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Sample records for haemorrhagic shock cardiopulmonary

  1. [Erythrocytes and microvascular tone during acute traumatic haemorrhagic shock].

    PubMed

    Morel, N; Biais, M; Delaunay, F; Dubuisson, V; Cassone, O; Siméon, F; Morel, O; Janvier, G

    2013-05-01

    Haemorrhagic shock remains a leading cause of death in trauma patients. The concept of haematologic damage control is gradually taking place in the management of traumatic haemorrhagic shock. It is based primarily on the early implementation of a quality blood transfusion involving erythrocytes, plasmas and platelets transfusion. Red blood cell transfusion is mainly supported by the oxygen carrier properties of erythrocytes. However, it appears that erythrocytes ability to modulate the bioavailability of nitric oxide (NO) plays a major role in capillary opening and perfusion. Erythrocytes are also actively involved in the processes of hemostasis and coagulation. In this context, it seems difficult to define a threshold of hemoglobin concentration to determine the implementation of a blood transfusion in traumatic haemorrhagic shock.

  2. Dengue haemorrhagic fever and the dengue shock syndrome in India.

    PubMed

    Lall, R; Dhanda, V

    1996-01-01

    The clinical spectrum of dengue fever ranges from asymptomatic infection through severe haemorrhage and sudden fatal shock. Increased capillary permeability is the diagnostic feature of dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF). The pathophysiology of DHF/dengue shock syndrome (DSS) is related to sequential infection with different serotypes of the virus, variations in virus virulence, interaction of the virus with environmental or host factors and a combination of various risk factors. Infection due to low virulence strains is assumed to be the reason for the infrequent incidence of serious dengue disease in India. Since all four serotypes of the dengue virus have been implicated in various outbreaks in this country and several outbreaks of DHF/DSS have been recorded since the first report in 1963, further epidemics of the disease are likely. The situation is aggravated by the recent emergence of DHF/DSS in Sri Lanka. In view of the potential of this disease to spread, effective preventive and control measures should be a priority.

  3. Successful use of Alteplase during cardiopulmonary resuscitation following massive PE in a patient presenting with ischaemic stroke and haemorrhagic transformation

    PubMed Central

    Middleton, Robert; Neumann, Juliane; Ward, Simon Michael

    2014-01-01

    The management of patients with acute stroke regarding treatment of thromboembolism is supported by a limited evidence base. We present the case of a 55-year-old female patient who initially presented with an ischaemic cerebral infarct with haemorrhagic transformation. Her clinical recovery was complicated by cardiac arrest secondary to massive pulmonary embolism. This was successfully treated with cardiopulmonary resuscitation and thrombolysis using Alteplase, which led to a full recovery to the pre-arrest state with no evidence of haemorrhagic complication. The patient was successfully discharged to a specialist centre for on-going stroke rehabilitation with no additional neurological impact. Despite the limited evidence base we believe this case highlights that thrombolysis can be used in select patients with haemorrhagic transformation of stroke and serious thromboembolic complications to achieve a positive outcome. PMID:25362185

  4. Survival without sequelae after prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation after electric shock.

    PubMed

    Motawea, Mohamad; Al-Kenany, Al-Sayed; Hosny, Mostafa; Aglan, Omar; Samy, Mohamad; Al-Abd, Mohamed

    2016-03-01

    "Electrical shock is the physiological reaction or injury caused by electric current passing through the human body. It occurs upon contact of a human body part with any source of electricity that causes a sufficient current through the skin, muscles, or hair causing undesirable effects ranging from simple burns to death." Ventricular fibrillation is believed to be the most common cause of death after electrical shock. "The ideal duration of cardiac resuscitation is unknown. Typically prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation is associated with poor neurologic outcomes and reduced long term survival. No consensus statement has been made and traditionally efforts are usually terminated after 15-30 minutes." The case under discussion seems worthy of the somewhat detailed description given. It is for a young man who survived after 65 minutes after electrical shock (ES) after prolonged high-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), multiple defibrillations, and artificial ventilation without any sequelae. Early start of adequate chest compressions and close adherence to advanced cardiac life support protocols played a vital role in successful CPR.

  5. Dengue haemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome. An unwelcome arrival in Trinidad.

    PubMed

    Teelucksingh, S; Mangray, A S; Barrow, S; Jankey, N; Prabhakar, P; Lewis, M

    1997-06-01

    This is the first report of dengue haemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome in Trinidad. Dengue infection was confirmed serologically or by viral isolation in five patients, aged 15 to 53 years, who presented with fever, thrombocytopenia and haemoconcentration. Three patients developed dengue shock syndrome, which was fatal; although there was no haemorrhagic tendency among these patients, bleeding occurred shortly before death in one of them. Two patients who had dengue haemorrhagic fever survived. The co-circulation of dengue virus serotypes 1, 2, and 4 in the Caribbean facilitates the development of dengue shock syndrome (DSS) or dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF). Clinicians should therefore be aware of their clinical features, laboratory diagnosis and clinical management. Appropriate public health interventions and improved surveillance should be implemented to reduce the risk of DHF/DSS associated mortality in Trinidad and Tobago.

  6. An epidemic of dengue haemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome in Delhi: a clinical study.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, V K; Suri, S; Bhasin, A; Srivastava, L; Bharadwaj, M

    1990-01-01

    Twenty-four cases of dengue haemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome were studied in Delhi in the months of September and October, 1988. The majority of these cases were boys aged 6-10 years. Classical symptoms of dengue (fever, headache, aesthesia, myalgia) occurred in all the patients. Digestive symptoms (nausea, vomiting, anorexia, abdominal pain and hepatomegaly) were also common. Haemorrhagic manifestations were present in 41.7% of the cases. Of these, 90% had gastrointestinal haemorrhages. Shock occurred in 17 cases (70.8%). Thrombocytopenia and prolongation of coagulation profile were found in 62.5% of cases. Three patients (12.5%) who presented with encephalopathy died. The other 21 patients recovered after an average period of 2-8 days.

  7. Haemorrhagic shock in mice--intracellular signalling and immunomodulation of peritoneal macrophages' LPS response.

    PubMed

    Rani, Meenakshi; Husain, Baher; Lendemans, Sven; Schade, Fritz U; Flohé, Sascha

    2006-01-01

    Haemorrhagic shock leads to decreased proinflammatory cytokine response which is associated with an increased susceptibility to bacterial infections. In the present study, the effect of GM-CSF on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced TNF-alpha release and MAPkinase activation was analysed on the background of a possible immunostimulating activity of this substance. Male BALB/c mice were bled to a mean arterial blood pressure of 50 mmHg for 45 min followed by resuscitation. Peritoneal macrophages were isolated 20 h after haemorrhage and incubated with 10 ng/ml GM-CSF for 6h before LPS stimulation. TNF-alpha synthesis was studied in the culture supernatants using ELISA. Phosphorylation of ERK, p38MAPK and IkappaBalpha was detected by Western blotting. LPS-induced TNF-alpha production of peritoneal macrophages was significantly decreased 20 h after haemorrhage in comparison to the corresponding cells of sham-operated mice. In parallel the phosphorylation of IkappaBalpha was less in LPS-stimulated peritoneal macrophages from haemorrhagic mice. LPS-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 was also decreased in peritoneal macrophages isolated after haemorrhagic shock. In contrast, p38MAPK was phosphorylated more intensely after LPS-stimulation in macrophages collected from shocked mice. GM-CSF incubation elevated LPS-induced TNF-alpha response of macrophages from both sham-operated and shocked mice which was accompanied by an elevated IkappaB and ERK phosphorylation. In general, GM-CSF treatment in vitro enhanced peritoneal macrophages LPS-response both in terms of TNF-alpha synthesis and IkappaB and MAPK signalling, but the levels always stayed lower than those of GM-CSF-treated cells from sham-operated animals. In conclusion, GM-CSF preincubation could partly reactivate the depressed functions of peritoneal macrophages and may therefore exert immunostimulating properties after shock or trauma.

  8. Dengue haemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome: lessons from the Cuban epidemic, 1981.

    PubMed Central

    Kouri, G. P.; Guzmán, M. G.; Bravo, J. R.; Triana, C.

    1989-01-01

    Dengue haemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS) is one of the principal causes of hospitalization and death among children in several south-east Asian countries. Also, in the Region of the Americas, there has been an increase in the frequency of dengue fever epidemics and in the number of cases of DHF/DSS. In 1981 an epidemic of dengue haemorrhagic fever occurred in Cuba and this suggests that there is a high risk that such epidemics could recur in the region. The article summarizes the main clinical, virological, and epidemiological data obtained during the outbreak, some of which are reported for the first time. PMID:2805215

  9. Dengue haemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome: lessons from the Cuban epidemic, 1981.

    PubMed

    Kouri, G P; Guzmán, M G; Bravo, J R; Triana, C

    1989-01-01

    Dengue haemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS) is one of the principal causes of hospitalization and death among children in several south-east Asian countries. Also, in the Region of the Americas, there has been an increase in the frequency of dengue fever epidemics and in the number of cases of DHF/DSS. In 1981 an epidemic of dengue haemorrhagic fever occurred in Cuba and this suggests that there is a high risk that such epidemics could recur in the region. The article summarizes the main clinical, virological, and epidemiological data obtained during the outbreak, some of which are reported for the first time.

  10. An epidemic of dengue haemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome in tropical India.

    PubMed

    Pushpa, V; Venkatadesikalu, M; Mohan, S; Cherian, T; John, T J; Ponnuraj, E M

    1998-12-01

    An epidemic of dengue haemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome occurred in Chennai, South India in 1989 during and following the rainy season. Sixty-nine infants and children admitted to the Institute of Child Health and Hospital for Children with a brief febrile illness associated with skin and mucous membrane bleeds and/or shock were studied. Forty-nine had antibodies to dengue viruses. The specific serotype of the virus responsible could not be identified owing to cross-reacting antibodies. Primary infection occurred in 11 cases, secondary infection in 17 cases, antibodily titres were indicative of 'probable' dengue infection in 16 and were uninterpretable in five. In 11 cases, serology could not be done. The pattern of disease in these 60 cases was similar, with a high mortality. Haemoconcentration was not a feature in the majority and the Hess test was negative in all those tested. Nine cases with a similar but milder illness tested negative for dengue.

  11. Involvement of the histaminergic system in the resuscitating effect of centrally acting leptin in haemorrhagic shock in rats.

    PubMed

    Jochem, J; Altinbas, B; Yalcin, M; Ottani, A; Giuliani, D; Savci, V; Kasperska-Zajac, A; Guarini, S

    2016-02-01

    Leptin, acting centrally as a neuromodulator, induces the activation of the sympathetic nervous system, which may lead to a pressor action in normotensive animals. In haemorrhagic shock, leptin administered intracerebroventricularly (icv.) evokes the resuscitating effect, with long-lasting rises in mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR), subsequent increase in peripheral blood flows, and a 100% survival at 2 h. Since leptin is able to activate histaminergic neurons, and centrally acting histamine also induces the resuscitating effect with the activation of the sympathetic nervous system, in the present study, we investigated an involvement of the histaminergic system in leptin-evoked cardiovascular effects in haemorrhagic shock. The model of irreversible haemorrhagic shock, with MAP decreased to and stabilised at 20 - 25 mmHg, has been used. Leptin (20 μg) given icv. at 5 min of critical hypotension evoked 181.5% increase in extracellular hypothalamic histamine concentration during the first 10 min after injection. Rises in MAP, HR and renal, mesenteric and hindquarters blood flows induced by leptin were inhibited by icv. pre-treatment with histamine H1 receptor antagonist chlorpheniramine (50 nmol). In contrast, there was no effect of H2, H3 and H4 receptor antagonists ranitidine (25 nmol), VUF 5681 (25 nmol) and JNJ 10191584 (25 nmol), respectively. In conclusion, the histaminergic system is involved in centrally-acting leptin-induced resuscitating effect in haemorrhagic shock in rats.

  12. Involvement of the histaminergic system in the resuscitating effect of centrally acting leptin in haemorrhagic shock in rats.

    PubMed

    Jochem, J; Altinbas, B; Yalcin, M; Ottani, A; Giuliani, D; Savci, V; Kasperska-Zajac, A; Guarini, S

    2016-02-01

    Leptin, acting centrally as a neuromodulator, induces the activation of the sympathetic nervous system, which may lead to a pressor action in normotensive animals. In haemorrhagic shock, leptin administered intracerebroventricularly (icv.) evokes the resuscitating effect, with long-lasting rises in mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR), subsequent increase in peripheral blood flows, and a 100% survival at 2 h. Since leptin is able to activate histaminergic neurons, and centrally acting histamine also induces the resuscitating effect with the activation of the sympathetic nervous system, in the present study, we investigated an involvement of the histaminergic system in leptin-evoked cardiovascular effects in haemorrhagic shock. The model of irreversible haemorrhagic shock, with MAP decreased to and stabilised at 20 - 25 mmHg, has been used. Leptin (20 μg) given icv. at 5 min of critical hypotension evoked 181.5% increase in extracellular hypothalamic histamine concentration during the first 10 min after injection. Rises in MAP, HR and renal, mesenteric and hindquarters blood flows induced by leptin were inhibited by icv. pre-treatment with histamine H1 receptor antagonist chlorpheniramine (50 nmol). In contrast, there was no effect of H2, H3 and H4 receptor antagonists ranitidine (25 nmol), VUF 5681 (25 nmol) and JNJ 10191584 (25 nmol), respectively. In conclusion, the histaminergic system is involved in centrally-acting leptin-induced resuscitating effect in haemorrhagic shock in rats. PMID:27010896

  13. Dengue haemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome: are they tumour necrosis factor-mediated disorders?

    PubMed

    Yadav, M; Kamath, K R; Iyngkaran, N; Sinniah, M

    1991-12-01

    A consecutive series of 24 patients with clinical features of primary dengue infection and 22 controls (14 patients with viral fever of unknown origin and 8 healthy subjects) were assayed for serum levels of tumour necrosis factor (TNF). The acute sera of the 24 patients with clinical dengue infection were positive for dengue virus-specific IgM antibody. Clinically, 8 had dengue fever (DF), 14 dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) and 2 dengue shock syndrome (DSS). All 16 patients with DHF/DSS had significantly elevated serum TNF levels but the 8 DF patients had TNF levels equivalent to that in the 22 controls. A case is made for augmented TNF production having a role for the pathophysiological changes observed in DHF/DSS and mediator modulation as a possible therapeutic approach to treatment.

  14. Comparative Evaluation of Crystalloid Resuscitation Rate in a Human Model of Compensated Haemorrhagic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Loretta; Lau, Lawrence; Churilov, Leonid; Riedel, Bernhard; McNicol, Larry; Hahn, Robert G.; Weinberg, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: The most effective rate of fluid resuscitation in haemorrhagic shock is unknown. Methods: We performed a randomized crossover pilot study in a healthy volunteer model of compensated haemorrhagic shock. Following venesection of 15 mL/kg of blood, participants were randomized to 20 mL/kg of crystalloid over 10 min (FAST treatment) or 30 min (SLOW treatment). The primary end point was oxygen delivery (DO2). Secondary end points included pressure and flow-based haemodynamic variables, blood volume expansion, and clinical biochemistry. Results: Nine normotensive healthy adult volunteers participated. No significant differences were observed in DO2 and biochemical variables between the SLOW and FAST groups. Blood volume was reduced by 16% following venesection, with a corresponding 5% reduction in cardiac index (CI) (P < 0.001). Immediately following resuscitation the increase in blood volume corresponded to 54% of the infused volume under FAST treatment and 69% of the infused volume under SLOW treatment (P = 0.03). This blood volume expansion attenuated with time to 24% and 25% of the infused volume 30 min postinfusion. During fluid resuscitation, blood pressure was higher under FAST treatment. However, CI paradoxically decreased in most participants during the resuscitation phase; a finding not observed under SLOW treatment. Conclusion: FAST or SLOW fluid resuscitation had no significant impact on DO2 between treatment groups. In both groups, changes in CI and blood pressure did not reflect the magnitude of intravascular blood volume deficit. Crystalloid resuscitation expanded intravascular blood volume by approximately 25%. PMID:26974423

  15. An epidemic of dengue haemorrhagic fever & dengue shock syndrome in & around Vellore.

    PubMed

    Cherian, T; Ponnuraj, E; Kuruvilla, T; Kirubakaran, C; John, T J; Raghupathy, P

    1994-08-01

    This report describes an epidemic of dengue haemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS) in the North Arcot Ambedkar district and the adjoining districts in Tamil Nadu and Andhra Pradesh. Nineteen children who fulfilled the clinical criteria for the diagnosis of DHF/DSS were admitted to the Christian Medical College Hospital, Vellore, during June through November, 1990. The clinical presentation was similar to that described in South-east Asian children and the case fatality rate was 26.3 per cent. Serology was confirmatory or suggestive of recent dengue virus infection in 16 children, uninterpretable in 2 and not consistent with recent dengue virus infection in 1 child. All children over 1 yr of age had very high antibody titres suggesting a secondary response whereas infants had lower titres consistent with primary response. The occurrence of recurrent epidemics in this region in the last few years with associated high case fatality emphasizes the urgent need for public health measures to curtail further epidemics.

  16. Why dengue haemorrhagic fever in Cuba? 1. Individual risk factors for dengue haemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS).

    PubMed

    Bravo, J R; Guzmán, M G; Kouri, G P

    1987-01-01

    During the dengue haemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS) epidemic in Cuba in 1981, we identified some individual risk factors for the development of the severe clinical picture or for the fatal outcome of the disease. The percentage of secondary infection in 3 groups of patients with DHF/DSS was between 95 and 98.3 and it is concluded that secondary infection is an important, but not the only, condition for the development of DHF/DSS. An analysis of these 3 groups of patients and a fourth group of fatal cases showed that chronic diseases such as bronchial asthma, diabetes mellitus and sickle cell anaemia were additional risk factors contributing significantly to the development of DHF/DSS. The study also revealed that race was an individual risk factor, since DHF/DSS was more prevalent in white than in black persons.

  17. Vasopressin during cardiopulmonary resuscitation and different shock states: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Krismer, Anette C; Dünser, Martin W; Lindner, Karl H; Stadlbauer, Karl H; Mayr, Viktoria D; Lienhart, Hannes G; Arntz, Richard H; Wenzel, Volker

    2006-01-01

    Vasopressin administration may be a promising therapy in the management of various shock states. In laboratory models of cardiac arrest, vasopressin improved vital organ blood flow, cerebral oxygen delivery, the rate of return of spontaneous circulation, and neurological recovery compared with epinephrine (adrenaline). In a study of 1219 adult patients with cardiac arrest, the effects of vasopressin were similar to those of epinephrine in the management of ventricular fibrillation and pulseless electrical activity; however, vasopressin was superior to epinephrine in patients with asystole. Furthermore, vasopressin followed by epinephrine resulted in significantly higher rates of survival to hospital admission and hospital discharge. The current cardiopulmonary resuscitation guidelines recommend intravenous vasopressin 40 IU or epinephrine 1mg in adult patients refractory to electrical countershock. Several investigations have demonstrated that vasopressin can successfully stabilize hemodynamic variables in advanced vasodilatory shock. Use of vasopressin in vasodilatory shock should be guided by strict hemodynamic indications, such as hypotension despite norepinephrine (noradrenaline) dosages >0.5 mug/kg/min. Vasopressin must never be used as the sole vasopressor agent. In our institutional routine, a fixed vasopressin dosage of 0.067 IU/min (i.e. 100 IU/50 mL at 2 mL/h) is administered and mean arterial pressure is regulated by adjusting norepinephrine infusion. When norepinephrine dosages decrease to 0.2 microg/kg/min, vasopressin is withdrawn in small steps according to the response in mean arterial pressure. Vasopressin also improved short- and long-term survival in various porcine models of uncontrolled hemorrhagic shock. In the clinical setting, we observed positive effects of vasopressin in some patients with life-threatening hemorrhagic shock, which had no longer responded to adrenergic catecholamines and fluid resuscitation. Clinical employment of

  18. Evaluation of circulating haematopoietic progenitor cells in patients with Trauma Haemorrhagic shock and its correlation with outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Manoj; Bhoi, Sanjeev; Subramanian, Arulselvi; Kamal, Vineet Kumar; Mohanty, Sujata; Rao, DN; Galwankar, Sagar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Haemorrhagic shock accounts up to 50% of early trauma deaths. Hematopoietic failure has been observed in experimental animals and human following shock and injury. One of the facets of bone marrow failure is multiple organ dysfunction syndrome and is commonly seen in patients recovering from severe trauma and hemorrhagic shock. Bone Marrow (BM) dysfunction is associated with mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) into peripheral blood. Present study explored the association of peripheral blood hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) with mortality in trauma haemorrhagic shock patients (T/HS). Materials and Methods: Prospective cohort studies of patients presenting within 8 hrs of injury with T/HS to the Department of Emergency Medicine, Jai Prakash Narayan Apex Trauma Center, All India Institute of Medical Sciences were recruited. Peripheral blood samples were collected in each patient for measurement of peripheral blood HPCs. Peripheral blood progenitor cell (PBPC) quantification was performed by measuring HPCs counts using the haematology analyzer (Sysmex XE-2100). Clinical and laboratory data were prospectively collected after consent. Ethical approval was taken and data was analysed by Stata 11.2. Results: 39 patients with trauma hemorrhagic shock and 30 normal healthy controls were recruited. HPCs were significantly higher (P < 0.001) in the T/HS as compared to control. Among study group, 14 patients died within 24 h. at the hospital admission, and found HPCs concentrations were highly significant (<0.001) in non-survivors (n = 14) when compared with survivors (n = 25) among T/HS patients. Conclusions: Our studies suggest the peripheral blood HPCs may be early prognostic marker for mortality among patients who presented with trauma hemorrhagic shock on admission. But the exact molecular mechanism and signalling pathway involved in the change of the behaviour of bone marrow microenvironment is still unclear. PMID:27308251

  19. Cardiopulmonary Arrest and Resuscitation in Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock: A Research Model.

    PubMed

    Chalkias, Athanasios; Spyropoulos, Vaios; Koutsovasilis, Anastasios; Papalois, Apostolos; Kouskouni, Evaggelia; Xanthos, Theodoros

    2015-03-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock is challenging and usually unsuccessful. The aim of the present study is to describe our swine model of cardiac arrest and resuscitation in severe sepsis and septic shock. In this prospective randomized animal study, 10 healthy female Landrace-Large White pigs with an average weight of 20 ± 1 kg (aged 19 - 21 weeks) were the study subjects. Septicemia was induced by an intravenous infusion of a bolus of 20-mL bacterial suspension in 2 min, followed by a continuous infusion during the rest of the experiment. After septic shock was confirmed, the animals were left untreated until cardiac arrest occurred. All animals developed pulseless electrical activity between the fifth and sixth hours of septicemia, whereas five (50%) of 10 animals were successfully resuscitated. Coronary perfusion pressure was statistically significantly different between surviving and nonsurviving animals. We found a statistically significant correlation between mean arterial pressure and unsuccessful resuscitation (P = 0.046), whereas there was no difference in end-tidal carbon dioxide (23.05 ± 1.73 vs. 23.56 ± 1.70; P = 0.735) between animals with return of spontaneous circulation and nonsurviving animals. During the 45-min postresuscitation monitoring, we noted a significant decrease in hemodynamic parameters, although oxygenation indices and lactate clearance were constantly increased (P = 0.001). This successful basic swine model was for the first time developed and may prove extremely useful in future studies on the periarrest period in severe sepsis and septic shock.

  20. Role of the massive transfusion protocol in the management of haemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Waters, J H

    2014-12-01

    The concept of rapid delivery of multiple blood products to the bedside of a massively haemorrhaging patient seems to be a logical approach to the management of the massively bleeding patient. However, controversy exists in the use of fixed blood component ratios. Assessing the extent of the coagulopathy through point-of-care testing might provide patients with product administration as needed, and avoid excessive transfusion and its associated complications.

  1. Glibenclamide dose response in patients with septic shock: effects on norepinephrine requirements, cardiopulmonary performance, and global oxygen transport.

    PubMed

    Morelli, Andrea; Lange, Matthias; Ertmer, Christian; Broeking, Katrin; Van Aken, Hugo; Orecchioni, Alessandra; Rocco, Monica; Bachetoni, Alessandra; Traber, Daniel L; Landoni, Giovanni; Pietropaoli, Paolo; Westphal, Martin

    2007-11-01

    Adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channels are important regulators of arterial vascular smooth muscle tone and are implicated in the pathophysiology of catecholamine tachyphylaxis in septic shock. The present study was designed as a prospective, randomized, double-blinded, clinical pilot study to determine whether different doses of glibenclamide have any effects on norepinephrine requirements, cardiopulmonary hemodynamics, and global oxygen transport in patients with septic shock. We enrolled 30 patients with septic shock requiring invasive hemodynamic monitoring and norepinephrine infusion of 0.5 microg.kg-1.min-1 or greater to maintain MAP between 65 and 75 mmHg. In addition to standard therapy, patients were randomized to receive either 10, 20, or 30 mg of enteral glibenclamide. Systemic hemodynamics, global oxygen transport including arterial lactate concentrations, gas exchange, plasma glucose concentrations, and electrolytes were determined at baseline and after 3, 6, and 12 h after administration of the study drug. Glibenclamide decreased plasma glucose concentrations in a dose-dependent manner but failed to reduce norepinephrine requirements. None of the doses had any effects on cardiopulmonary hemodynamics, global oxygen transport, gas exchange, or electrolytes. These data suggest that oral glibenclamide in doses from 10 to 30 mg fails to counteract arterial hypotension and thus to reduce norepinephrine requirements in catecholamine-dependent human septic shock.

  2. An unusual case of a patient who presented with haemorrhagic shock following massive subcutaneous haematomas of the lower back due to blunt trauma.

    PubMed

    Yumoto, Tetsuya; Sato, Keiji; Ugawa, Toyomu; Ujike, Yoshihito

    2015-10-14

    An 83-year-old woman with no significant medical history was transferred to our tertiary hospital after being hit by a car and presenting with haemorrhagic shock. Immediate fluid resuscitation was performed; physical, chest/pelvic X-ray and echographic examinations did not detect any major sources of bleeding. However, a contrast-enhanced CT scan revealed multiple regions of significant contrast extravasation in an extensive part of the subcutaneous tissue of the patient's lower back, which is an unusual source of bleeding. Transcatheter arterial embolisation of the lumbar and internal iliac arteries and their branches was carried out. In addition, haemostatic resuscitation was performed for damage control resuscitation, which successfully resolved the patient's haemorrhagic shock.

  3. Of cascades and perfect storms: the immunopathogenesis of dengue haemorrhagic fever-dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS).

    PubMed

    Pang, Tikki; Cardosa, Mary Jane; Guzman, Maria G

    2007-01-01

    The past four decades has witnessed a consolidation of the original observations made in the 1970s that dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS) have an immunological basis. Following reinfection with a dengue virus of different serotype, severe disease is linked to high levels of antibody-enhanced viral replication early in illness which is followed by a cascade of memory T-cell activation and a 'storm' of inflammatory cytokines and other chemical mediators. These compounds are released mainly from T cells, monocytes/macrophages and endothelial cells, and ultimately cause an increase in vascular permeability. The consolidation of the evidence has been largely due to several important prospective sero-epidemiological studies in areas endemic for DHF/DSS, which have shown that risk of severe disease is significantly higher in secondary dengue infections. These advances have underscored the fact that DHF/DSS pathogenesis is a complex, multifactorial process involving cocirculation of various dengue virus serotypes and the interplay of host and viral factors that influence disease severity. The continued search to define risk factors in susceptible populations must be combined with the new techniques of molecular virology and innovative approaches in vaccine design to achieve the ultimate objective of developing a safe and effective vaccine. PMID:17130899

  4. Comparison of thromboelastography parameters between different catheter lumen diameters in an uncontrolled haemorrhagic shock model in swine.

    PubMed

    Neate, Sean L; Boysen, Søren R; Wagg, Catherine R; Radics, Stacy L; Caulkett, Nigel A

    2013-09-01

    Sampling technique is a concern for standardization of thromboelastography (TEG), as it contributes towards preanalytical variation in TEG tracings. The objective of this study was to assess the influence of catheter lumen diameter on TEG parameters with kaolin-activated native blood in a swine haemorrhagic shock model, using standardized sampling techniques. We hypothesized that one or more TEG parameters will differ between venous samples collected from catheters with different diameter lumens. Ten male landrace swine were included in the study. Standard cut-down techniques on both femoral veins were performed and catheterized with a 14-gauge (14G) and a 20-gauge (20G) catheter of the same length. Blood withdrawal times were standardized to 3 s and TEG parameters (R, K, α, maximum amplitude, G and coagulation index) were measured or calculated. Significant differences were detected for R (14G < 20G; P = 0.002), K (14G < 20G; P = 0.026), maximum amplitude (14G > 20G; P = 0.02), G (14G > 20G; P = 0.001) and coagulation index (14G > 20G; P < 0.001). No significant differences were measured for α (P = 0.058). Bias values (method A: 20G; method B: 14G) for R, K, α, maximum amplitude, G and coagulation index were 1.00, 0.14, -1.88, -1.56, -1.39 and -1.07, respectively. Using TEG analysis, kaolin-activated native whole blood samples obtained from 14G catheters are hypercoagulable (clotted faster and stronger clot) compared with samples obtained from 20G catheters. Sampling methodology should be standardized and systematic when comparing TEG parameters.

  5. Development of an Animal Model for Burn-Blast Combined Injury and Cardiopulmonary System Changes in the Early Shock Stage.

    PubMed

    Hu, Quan; Chai, Jiake; Hu, Sen; Fan, Jun; Wang, Hong-Wei; Ma, Li; Duan, Hong-Jie; Liu, Lingying; Yang, Hongming; Li, Bai-Ling; Wang, Yi-He

    2015-12-01

    The purposes of this study were to establish an animal model for burn-blast combined injury research and elaborate cardiopulmonary system changes in the early shock stage. In this study, royal demolition explosive or RDX (hexagon, ring trimethylene nitramine) was used as an explosive source, and the injury conditions of the canine test subjects at various distances to the explosion (30, 50, and 70 cm) were observed by gross anatomy and pathology to determine a larger animal model of moderate blast injury. The canines were then subjected to a 35 % total body surface area (TBSA) full-thickness flame injury using napalm, which completed the development of a burn-blast combined injury model. Based on this model, the hemodynamic changes and arterial blood gas analysis after the burn-blast combined injury were measured to identify the cardiopulmonary system characteristics. In this research, RDX explosion and flame injury were used to develop a severe burn-blast injury animal model that was stable, close to reality, and easily controllable. The hemodynamic and arterial blood gas changes in the canine subjects after burn-blast injury changed distinctly from the burn and blast injuries. Blood pressure and cardiac output fluctuated, and the preload was significantly reduced, whereas the afterload significantly increased. Meanwhile, the oxygen saturation (SO2) decreased markedly with carbon dioxide partial pressure (PCO2), and lactic acid (Lac) rose, and oxygen partial pressure (PO2) reduced. These changes suggested that immediate clinical treatment is important during burn-blast injury both to stabilize cardiac function and supply blood volume and to reduce the vascular permeability, thereby preventing acute pneumonedema or other complications.

  6. Development of an Animal Model for Burn-Blast Combined Injury and Cardiopulmonary System Changes in the Early Shock Stage.

    PubMed

    Hu, Quan; Chai, Jiake; Hu, Sen; Fan, Jun; Wang, Hong-Wei; Ma, Li; Duan, Hong-Jie; Liu, Lingying; Yang, Hongming; Li, Bai-Ling; Wang, Yi-He

    2015-12-01

    The purposes of this study were to establish an animal model for burn-blast combined injury research and elaborate cardiopulmonary system changes in the early shock stage. In this study, royal demolition explosive or RDX (hexagon, ring trimethylene nitramine) was used as an explosive source, and the injury conditions of the canine test subjects at various distances to the explosion (30, 50, and 70 cm) were observed by gross anatomy and pathology to determine a larger animal model of moderate blast injury. The canines were then subjected to a 35 % total body surface area (TBSA) full-thickness flame injury using napalm, which completed the development of a burn-blast combined injury model. Based on this model, the hemodynamic changes and arterial blood gas analysis after the burn-blast combined injury were measured to identify the cardiopulmonary system characteristics. In this research, RDX explosion and flame injury were used to develop a severe burn-blast injury animal model that was stable, close to reality, and easily controllable. The hemodynamic and arterial blood gas changes in the canine subjects after burn-blast injury changed distinctly from the burn and blast injuries. Blood pressure and cardiac output fluctuated, and the preload was significantly reduced, whereas the afterload significantly increased. Meanwhile, the oxygen saturation (SO2) decreased markedly with carbon dioxide partial pressure (PCO2), and lactic acid (Lac) rose, and oxygen partial pressure (PO2) reduced. These changes suggested that immediate clinical treatment is important during burn-blast injury both to stabilize cardiac function and supply blood volume and to reduce the vascular permeability, thereby preventing acute pneumonedema or other complications. PMID:27011494

  7. The role of toll-like receptor-4 in the development of multi-organ failure following traumatic haemorrhagic shock and resuscitation.

    PubMed

    McGhan, Lee J; Jaroszewski, Dawn E

    2012-02-01

    Haemorrhagic shock and resuscitation (HS/R) following major trauma results in a global ischaemia and reperfusion injury that may lead to multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS). Systemic activation of the immune system is fundamental to the development of MODS in this context, and shares many features in common with the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) that complicates sepsis. An important advancement in the understanding of the innate response to infection involved the identification of mammalian toll-like receptors (TLRs) expressed on cells of the immune system. Ten TLR homologues have been identified in humans and toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) has been studied most intensively. Initially found to recognise bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), it has also recently been discovered that TLR4 is capable of activation by endogenous 'danger signal' molecules released following cellular injury; this has since implicated TLR4 in several non-infectious pathophysiologic processes, including HS/R. The exact events leading to multi-organ dysfunction following HS/R have not yet been clearly defined, although TLR4 is believed to play a central role as has been shown to be expressed at sites including the liver, lungs and myocardium following HS/R. Multi-organ dysfunction syndrome remains an important cause of morbidity and mortality in trauma patients, and current therapy is based on supportive care. Understanding the pathophysiology of HS/R will allow for the development of targeted therapeutic strategies aimed at minimising organ dysfunction and improving patient outcomes following traumatic haemorrhage. A review of the pathogenesis of haemorrhagic shock is presented, and the complex, yet critical role of TLR4 as both a key mediator and therapeutic target is discussed.

  8. [Upper gastrointestinal bleeding and haemorrhagic shock at the end of the holidays: pre-hospital and in-hospital management of a gastrointestinal emergency].

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Tat, M; Hoffman, A; Marquardt, J U; Buggenhagen, H; Münzel, T; Kneist, W; Galle, P R; Kiesslich, R; Rey, J W

    2014-05-01

    Upon returning from holidays, a 55-year-old patient presenting with melena and haemorrhagic shock was admitted to a University hospital after receiving first emergency medical care in a German InterCity train. In an interdisciplinary effort, haemodynamics were stabilised and the airway and respiratory function were secured. Under emergency care conditions the patient then underwent an emergency upper GI endoscopy where a spurting arterial upper gastrointestinal bleeding (Forrest 1a) was found. While the bleeding could not be controlled with endoscopic techniques, definitive haemostasis was achieved with a surgical laparotomy. While not commonly established for patients with severe GI bleeding, by spontaneous implementation of an interdisciplinary trauma room approach following established trauma algorithms the team was able to achieve stabilisation of vital functions and final control of bleeding in this highly unstable patient. Although the majority of upper gastrointestinal bleedings spontaneously cease, emergency care algorithms should be developed and implemented for patients with severe gastrointestinal bleedings in shock. Following the case vignette, we discuss a potential approach and develop an exemplary protocol for shock room management in this patient subgroup.

  9. Ebola haemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Feldmann, Heinz; Geisbert, Thomas W

    2011-03-01

    Ebola viruses are the causative agents of a severe form of viral haemorrhagic fever in man, designated Ebola haemorrhagic fever, and are endemic in regions of central Africa. The exception is the species Reston Ebola virus, which has not been associated with human disease and is found in the Philippines. Ebola virus constitutes an important local public health threat in Africa, with a worldwide effect through imported infections and through the fear of misuse for biological terrorism. Ebola virus is thought to also have a detrimental effect on the great ape population in Africa. Case-fatality rates of the African species in man are as high as 90%, with no prophylaxis or treatment available. Ebola virus infections are characterised by immune suppression and a systemic inflammatory response that causes impairment of the vascular, coagulation, and immune systems, leading to multiorgan failure and shock, and thus, in some ways, resembling septic shock.

  10. Dengue haemorrhagic fever in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Wong, H B

    1981-01-01

    The history of dengue haemorrhagic fever as distinct from dengue fever in South-East Asia is traced. The epidemiology of the disease in the various countries is contrasted with that in Singapore since DHF first appeared on the scene in South-East Asia. From this survey, it is concluded that the dengue haemorrhagic fever is a new disease presentation, and its fate in SE Asia depends on the immunological state of the community, attempts at vector control, and probably antigenic variation in the various types of dengue virus. The pathogenetic mechanisms are discussed in detail. Diagnosis is presented with a detailed discussion of diagnosis of the pre-shock stage. Finally, the management of dengue haemorrhagic fever is discussed.

  11. Spontaneous adrenal haemorrhage in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    A, Anagnostopoulos; S, Sharma

    2011-01-01

    The authors present a case of spontaneous adrenal haemorrhage, in a 28-year-old woman at 36 weeks of a twin pregnancy. Initial symptom was sudden onset chest pain which soon migrated to abdomen, accompanied by hypovolaemic shock and fetal bradycardia. Subsequent caesarean section for suspected placental abruption and resuscitation with nine units of blood, 10 of cryoprecipitate, four of fresh frozen plasma and two of platelets, in order to treat anaemia of Hgb of 3.6 g/dl and disseminated intravascular coagulation, failed to stabilise the woman. A CT scan of abdomen and pelvis then revealed a 15×17×17 cm retroperitoneal haematoma, secondary to right adrenal haemorrhage. Management was with laparotomy drainage and packing of the retroperitoneal haematoma along with the use of activated factor VII. Adrenal haemorrhage in pregnancy is an extremely rare, acute, life-threatening condition, presenting with non-specific symptoms. PMID:22679231

  12. [Cardiopulmonary Comorbidities].

    PubMed

    Seiler, Frederik; von Hardenberg, Albrecht; Böhm, Michael; Bals, Robert; Maack, Christoph

    2016-02-01

    Cardiac and pulmonary diseases are primary causes of global morbidity and mortality. Since the prevalence of both cardiac and pulmonary diseases increases with age, cardiopulmonary comorbidities inflict especially the elderly. Due to the tight physiological connection of the heart and the lung, diseases of both organs affect each other beyond a mere coincidence. At the same time, due to the similarity of their respective symptoms, their differentiation is challenging in clinical practice and therefore, comorbidities can be easily overlooked. This article provides an overview on the characteristics of cardiopulmonary comorbidities and their specific-, but also mutual pathophysiology. PMID:26886042

  13. Dengue and dengue haemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Rigau-Pérez, J G; Clark, G G; Gubler, D J; Reiter, P; Sanders, E J; Vorndam, A V

    1998-09-19

    The incidence and geographical distribution of dengue have greatly increased in recent years. Dengue is an acute mosquito-transmitted viral disease characterised by fever, headache, muscle and joint pains, rash, nausea, and vomiting. Some infections result in dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF), a syndrome that in its most severe form can threaten the patient's life, primarily through increased vascular permeability and shock. The case fatality rate in patients with dengue shock syndrome can be as high as 44%. For decades, two distinct hypotheses to explain the mechanism of DHF have been debated-secondary infection or viral virulence. However, a combination of both now seems to be the plausible explanation. The geographical expansion of DHF presents the need for well-documented clinical, epidemiological, and virological descriptions of the syndrome in the Americas. Biological and social research are essential to develop effective mosquito control, medications to reduce capillary leakage, and a safe tetravalent vaccine.

  14. Subsequent bilateral thalamic haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Jesus; Scherle, Claudio; Machado, Calixto

    2009-01-01

    Simultaneous or subsequent bilateral thalamic haemorrhage is rare, and most reported cases are from Asian countries. An 80-year-old white Cuban man, with a history of arterial hypertension, suffered sudden onset of right hemiparesis. Computed tomography (CT) scan showed a left posteromedial thalamic haemorrhage. Two days later his condition suddenly deteriorated: blood pressure was 220/105 mm Hg, he was stuporous and tetraplegic, respiration was ataxic, and his gaze was fixed and deviated downward and inward. CT scan showed haemorrhages in both thalami, extending to the ventricles. 32 h later the patient died. There are few previous publications of simultaneous or subsequent bilateral thalamic haemorrhages and this is the first report involving a Hispanic patient. Prognosis in patients with bilateral thalamic haemorrhage is poor, and the mechanism underlying the development of subsequent and symmetrical bleeding is not clear. PMID:21709830

  15. Shock

    MedlinePlus

    ... several kinds of shock. Hypovolemic shock happens when you lose a lot of blood or fluids. Causes include internal or external bleeding, dehydration, burns, and severe vomiting and/or diarrhea. Septic shock is caused by ...

  16. [Definition of shock types].

    PubMed

    Adams, H A; Baumann, G; Gänsslen, A; Janssens, U; Knoefel, W; Koch, T; Marx, G; Müller-Werdan, U; Pape, H C; Prange, W; Roesner, D; Standl, T; Teske, W; Werner, G; Zander, R

    2001-11-01

    Definitions of shock types. Hypovolaemic shock is a state of insufficient perfusion of vital organs with consecutive imbalance of oxygen supply and demand due to an intravascular volume deficiency with critically impaired cardiac preload. Subtypes are haemorrhagic shock, hypovolaemic shock in the narrow sense, traumatic-haemorrhagic shock and traumatic-hypovolaemic shock. Cardiac shock is caused by a primary critical cardiac pump failure with consecutive inadequate oxygen supply of the organism. Anaphylactic shock is an acute failure of blood volume distribution (distributive shock) and caused by IgE-dependent, type-I-allergic, classical hypersensibility, or a physically, chemically, or osmotically induced IgE-independent anaphylactoid hypersensibility. The septic shock is a sepsis-induced distribution failure of the circulating blood volume in the sense of a distributive shock. The neurogenic shock is a distributive shock induced by generalized and extensive vasodilatation with consecutive hypovolaemia due to an imbalance of sympathetic and parasympathetic regulation of vascular smooth muscles. PMID:11753724

  17. Managing Major Postpartum Haemorrhage following Acute Uterine Inversion with Rusch Balloon Catheter

    PubMed Central

    Keriakos, Remon; Chaudhuri, Smriti Ray

    2011-01-01

    Acute postpartum uterine inversion is a relatively rare complication. The uterus inverts and the uterine fundus prolapses to or through the dilated cervix. It is associated with major postpartum haemorrhage with or without shock. Shock is sometimes out of proportion to the haemorrhage. Minimal maternal morbidity and mortality can be achieved when uterine inversion is promptly and aggressively managed. We present this report of three cases of acute uterine inversion complicated with major postpartum haemorrhage and managed with Rusch balloon. The paper highlights the importance of early recognition and the safety of the use of intrauterine balloon to manage major postpartum haemorrhage in these cases. PMID:24826322

  18. The need to immobilise the cervical spine during cardiopulmonary resuscitation and electric shock administration in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Desroziers, Milene; Mole, Sophie; Jost, Daniel; Tourtier, Jean-Pierre

    2016-06-13

    In cases of out-of hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), falling to the ground can cause brain and neck trauma to the patient. We present a case of a man in his mid-60s who suffered from an OHCA resulting in a violent collapse. The patient received immediate cardiopulmonary resuscitation, but his spine was immobilised only after a large frontal haematoma was found. The resuscitation efforts resulted in return of spontaneous circulation and discharge from hospital. After this, doctors performed angioplasty, followed by a cardiopulmonary bypass. Later, CT scan examination reported a displaced and unstable fracture of the 6th vertebra without bone marrow involvement. The patient underwent a second operation. 40 days later, he was able to return home without sequela. This case shows the importance of analysing the circumstances of a fall, considering the possibility of two concomitant diagnoses and prioritising investigations and treatment.

  19. Haemorrhagic Fevers, Viral

    MedlinePlus

    ... fever, dengue, Omsk haemorrhagic fever, Kyasanur forest disease). Ebola virus disease outbreak in West Africa in 2014-2015 All information on Ebola virus disease Ebola features map Dashboard - Progress update ...

  20. Spontaneous Idiopathic Unilateral Adrenal Haemorrhage (SIAH).

    PubMed

    Naqvi, Syed Ali; Zaman, Shamas; Ahmed, Irfan

    2015-04-01

    Spontaneous Idiopathic Adrenal Haemorrhage (SIAH) is an unusual surgical emergency which can present with life threatening massive retroperitoneal bleeding. Most of the cases reported in the literature are associated with use of anticoagulation or underlying adrenal pathology such as tumors or cysts. Since this clinical entity is uncommon and clinical presentation is very indistinct, the diagnosis can be easily missed and can be challenging for the treating physicians. Nevertheless a raised clinical suspicion coupled with advances in radiological imaging have considerably improved the detection of SIAH in recent times. We report an unusual case of a 20 years old healthy female student who presented to our hospital with sudden onset of abdominal pain and shock. She was diagnosed as a case of massive spontaneous idiopathic unilateral adrenal haemorrhage, unaccompanied by any hematologic disorder, trauma or underlying pathology. Although patient was hemodynamically unstable at presentation, she was resuscitated promptly, investigated appropriately, hence recovered uneventfully with conservative management alone.

  1. Dengue haemorrhagic fever in Cuba. II. Clinical investigations.

    PubMed

    Guzman, M G; Kouri, G P; Bravo, J; Soler, M; Vazquez, S; Santos, M; Villaescusa, R; Basanta, P; Indan, G; Ballester, J M

    1984-01-01

    Clinical and serological studies were carried out on 114 patients admitted to hospital in Havana, Cuba with Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever and Dengue Shock Syndrome (DHF/DSS). Serological confirmation of dengue was obtained in 90% of cases, with 5% of cases primary and 95% secondary. Fever, haemorrhagic manifestations, vomiting and headache were the most frequent signs and symptoms. Among haemorrhagic manifestations, petechiae and vaginal bleeding were reported in a larger number of patients. 21 patients presented shock and, of these, 20 were secondary infections. The disease appeared more frequently in white persons and in women. The aetiopathogenicity of the syndromes is discussed. 95% of the cases could be explained on the basis of the secondary infection hypothesis.

  2. Management of postpartum haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Bonnet, Marie Pierre; Benhamou, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Postpartum Haemorrhage (PPH) is a major cause of maternal morbidity and mortality. Treatment of acquired coagulopathy observed in severe PPH is an important part of PPH management, but is mainly based on literature in trauma patients, and data thus should be interpreted with caution. This review describes recent advances in transfusion strategy and in the use of tranexamic acid and fibrinogen concentrates in women with PPH. PMID:27408694

  3. Management of postpartum haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, Marie Pierre; Benhamou, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Postpartum Haemorrhage (PPH) is a major cause of maternal morbidity and mortality. Treatment of acquired coagulopathy observed in severe PPH is an important part of PPH management, but is mainly based on literature in trauma patients, and data thus should be interpreted with caution. This review describes recent advances in transfusion strategy and in the use of tranexamic acid and fibrinogen concentrates in women with PPH. PMID:27408694

  4. Dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) outbreak in Calcutta--1990.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, N; Mukherjee, K K; Chakravarti, S K; Mukherjee, M K; De, P N; Sengupta, M; Banik, G B; Bhowmick, P; Sinha, S K; Chakraborty, M S

    1993-03-01

    An outbreak of Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever (DHF) occurred in Calcutta between September and December, 1990. Children and young adults were the major victims. Haemorrhagic manifestations and shocks were the main features in most of the hospitalised cases. Five mouse pathogenic agents were isolated from 105 acute cases and all were identified as DEN-3. HI and CF test with 55 paired sera revealed evidence of dengue infection in 33 (60 per cent) and flavivirus group reaction including dengue in 17 (30.9 per cent). It was for the first time, that DEN-3 was considered to be the etiologic agent for DHF in Calcutta.

  5. Delayed traumatic intracerebral haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Baratham, Gopal; Dennyson, William G.

    1972-01-01

    Twenty-one out of 7,866 head injuries were complicated by the development of delayed intracerebral haematomata. The age distribution of patients with this condition closely resembled that of patients with subdural haematomata and differed sharply from patients with extradural haemorrhage. This finding, combined with the fact that the two conditions often coexisted, suggests the possibility of similar aetiological factors operating in their production. The injury producing the lesion was often minor and the larger haematomata appeared to be associated with longer `asymptomatic' intervals. The neurological deterioration was in most instances clearly the result of an increase in intracranial pressure. When possible, angiography followed by definitive craniotomy was the most satisfactory method of management and multiple burr holes even when combined with needling of the hemisphere yielded unsatisfactory results. The distribution of lesions tended to confirm their traumatic origin. On no occasion was there a vascular abnormality to account for the haemorrhage and, despite the fact that the ages of most patients were in the seventh and eighth decades, the incidence of degenerative vascular disease was small. Contusional injury causes a local failure of the mechanisms that regulate cerebral blood flow. Hypoxia, hypercapnia, and venous congestion produce cerebral hyperaemia which encourages gradual haematoma formation particularly at the sites of injury. This explains not only the situation of the lesions but also the latency between the trauma and their development. PMID:5084138

  6. Methamphetamine-related brainstem haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Zelia K; Bennett, Iwan E; Chan, Patrick; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey V

    2016-10-01

    We report the case of an otherwise healthy 29-year-old woman who presented with a brainstem haemorrhage following intravenous methamphetamine use. Extensive investigation did not reveal an underlying pathology, and the development of symptoms was temporally related to methamphetamine injection. Although intracerebral haemorrhage secondary to methamphetamine use is well documented, this report describes a haemorrhage within the brainstem which is a rare location. While animal studies have demonstrated the potential of methamphetamines to produce brainstem haemorrhages, there has only been one previous report describing a haemorrhage in this location due to amphetamine use in humans. We conclude with a brief discussion of the clinical features and aetiology of methamphetamine-related stroke. PMID:27345417

  7. Methamphetamine-related brainstem haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Zelia K; Bennett, Iwan E; Chan, Patrick; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey V

    2016-10-01

    We report the case of an otherwise healthy 29-year-old woman who presented with a brainstem haemorrhage following intravenous methamphetamine use. Extensive investigation did not reveal an underlying pathology, and the development of symptoms was temporally related to methamphetamine injection. Although intracerebral haemorrhage secondary to methamphetamine use is well documented, this report describes a haemorrhage within the brainstem which is a rare location. While animal studies have demonstrated the potential of methamphetamines to produce brainstem haemorrhages, there has only been one previous report describing a haemorrhage in this location due to amphetamine use in humans. We conclude with a brief discussion of the clinical features and aetiology of methamphetamine-related stroke.

  8. Hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome successfully treated with high-volume hemofiltration.

    PubMed

    Bugedo, Guillermo; Florez, Jorge; Ferres, Marcela; Roessler, Eric; Bruhn, Alejandro

    2016-06-01

    Hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome has a high mortality rate, and early connection to extracorporeal membrane oxygenation has been suggested to improve outcomes. We report the case of a patient with demonstrated Hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome and refractory shock who fulfilled the criteria for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and responded successfully to high volume continuous hemofiltration. The implementation of high volume continuous hemofiltration along with protective ventilation reversed the shock within a few hours and may have prompted recovery. In patients with Hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome, a short course of high volume continuous hemofiltration may help differentiate patients who can be treated with conventional intensive care unit management from those who will require more complex therapies, such as extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. PMID:27410413

  9. Hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome successfully treated with high-volume hemofiltration

    PubMed Central

    Bugedo, Guillermo; Florez, Jorge; Ferres, Marcela; Roessler, Eric; Bruhn, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome has a high mortality rate, and early connection to extracorporeal membrane oxygenation has been suggested to improve outcomes. We report the case of a patient with demonstrated Hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome and refractory shock who fulfilled the criteria for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and responded successfully to high volume continuous hemofiltration. The implementation of high volume continuous hemofiltration along with protective ventilation reversed the shock within a few hours and may have prompted recovery. In patients with Hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome, a short course of high volume continuous hemofiltration may help differentiate patients who can be treated with conventional intensive care unit management from those who will require more complex therapies, such as extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. PMID:27410413

  10. Dengue haemorrhagic fever in children in Delhi.

    PubMed

    Kabra, S K; Verma, I C; Arora, N K; Jain, Y; Kalra, V

    1992-01-01

    An epidemic of dengue haemorrhagic fever occurred in Delhi during 1988. A total of 21 paediatric patients with dengue haemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome were evaluated from September to November 1988. All the patients had fever, restlessness, ecchymotic spots and ascites. Pleural effusion occurred in 19 patients (90%), and 18 (86%) exhibited each of the following: vomiting, thrombocytopenia, and haemoconcentration. Hepatomegaly was observed in 15 patients (71%) and splenomegaly in three (14%). Titres of haemagglutination inhibition (HI) antibodies against dengue virus type 2 were raised in all the 15 cases from whom sera were collected during the acute stage. Convalescent sera from five patients had increased titres of HI antibodies to dengue virus type 2. The remaining 10 cases exhibited raised IgM antibody levels against dengue virus type 2. The fatality rate for serologically proven cases was 13% (2 of 15 patients), while for all patients (including those diagnosed clinically (6) and serologically (15)) it was 33.3% (7 of 21). Patients who survived had no sequelae, except one who had transient hypertension that lasted for two weeks.

  11. Dengue and dengue haemorrhagic fever: Indian perspective.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, U C; Nagar, Rachna

    2008-11-01

    The relationship of this country with dengue has been long and intense. The ?rst recorded epidemic of clinically dengue-like illness occurred at Madras in 1780 and the dengue virus was isolated for the ?rst time almost simultaneously in Japan and Calcutta in 1943-1944. After the ?rst virologically proved epidemic of dengue fever along the East Coast of India in 1963-1964, it spread to allover the country.The ?rst full-blown epidemic of the severe form of the illness,the dengue haemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome occurred in North India in 1996. Aedes aegypti is the vector for transmission of the disease. Vaccines or antiviral drugs are not available for dengue viruses; the only effective way to prevent epidemic degure fever/dengue haemorrhagic fever (DF/DHF) is to control the mosquito vector, Aedes aegypti and prevent its bite. This country has few virus laboratories and some of them have done excellent work in the area of molecular epidemiology,immunopathology and vaccine development. Selected work done in this country on the problems of dengue is presented here.

  12. Epizootic haemorrhagic disease.

    PubMed

    Maclachlan, N J; Zientara, S; Savini, G; Daniels, P W

    2015-08-01

    Summary Epizootic haemorrhagic disease (EHD) is an arthropod-transmitted viral disease of certain wild ungulates, notably North American white-tailed deer and, more rarely, cattle. The disease in white-tailed deer results from vascular injury analogous to that caused by bluetongue virus (BTV), to which EHD virus (EHDV) is closely related. There are seven serotypes of EHDV recognised, and Ibaraki virus, which is the cause of sporadic disease outbreaks in cattle in Asia, is included in EHDV serotype 2. The global distribution and epidemiology of BTV and EHDV infections are also similar, as both viruses occur throughout temperate and tropical regions of the world where they are transmitted by biting Culicoides midges and infect a wide variety of domestic and wild ungulates. However, the global distribution and epidemiology of EHDV infection are less well characterised than they are for BTV. Whereas most natural and experimental EHDV infections (other than Ibaraki virus infection) of livestock are subclinical or asymptomatic, outbreaks of EHD have recently been reported among cattle in the Mediterranean Basin, Reunion Island, South Africa, and the United States. Accurate and convenient laboratory tests are increasingly available for the sensitive and specific serological and virological diagnosis of EHDV infection and confirmation of EHD in animals, but commercial vaccines are available only for prevention of Ibaraki disease and not for protection against other strains and serotypes of EHDV. PMID:26601439

  13. Massive obstetric haemorrhage with disseminated intravascular coagulopathy.

    PubMed

    Su, Lin Lin; Chong, Yap Seng

    2012-02-01

    Massive obstetric haemorrhage is a major contributor towards maternal morbidity and mortality. The main causes are abruptio placentae, placenta praevia and postpartum haemorrhage. Clinicians managing pregnant women should be equipped with the knowledge and skills for managing massive obstetric haemorrhage to institute timely and appropriate life-saving treatment. Prompt resuscitation and reversal of coagulopathy are critical while definitive measures are carried out to arrest the bleeding. Massive antepartum haemorrhage necessitates deliveries whereas interventions for postpartum haemorrhage range from medical to surgical measures. Algorithms such as haemostasis are useful aids to the systematic and stepwise management of postpartum haemorrhage. Surgical measures used to avoid peripartum haemorrhage include uterine compression sutures, uterine balloon tamponade, uterine artery, and internal iliac artery ligation. Tranexamic acid and recombinant factor VII are more recent medical interventions in massive postpartum haemorrhage. Education, regular drills and adherence to guidelines and protocols are important to reduce haemorrhage-related maternal deaths. PMID:22101177

  14. Cardiopulmonary discipline science plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Life sciences research in the cardiopulmonary discipline must identify possible consequences of space flight on the cardiopulmonary system, understand the mechanisms of these effects, and develop effective and operationally practical countermeasures to protect crewmembers inflight and upon return to a gravitational environment. The long-range goal of the NASA Cardiopulmonary Discipline Research Program is to foster research to better understand the acute and long-term cardiovascular and pulmonary adaptation to space and to develop physiological countermeasures to ensure crew health in space and on return to Earth. The purpose of this Discipline Plan is to provide a conceptual strategy for NASA's Life Sciences Division research and development activities in the comprehensive area of cardiopulmonary sciences. It covers the significant research areas critical to NASA's programmatic requirements for the Extended-Duration Orbiter, Space Station Freedom, and exploration mission science activities. These science activities include ground-based and flight; basic, applied, and operational; and animal and human research and development. This document summarizes the current status of the program, outlines available knowledge, establishes goals and objectives, identifies science priorities, and defines critical questions in the subdiscipline areas of both cardiovascular and pulmonary function. It contains a general plan that will be used by both NASA Headquarters Program Offices and the field centers to review and plan basic, applied, and operational (intramural and extramural) research and development activities in this area.

  15. Hypoxaemia during cardiopulmonary bypass

    PubMed Central

    Muir, A. L.; Davidson, I. A.

    1971-01-01

    Blood oxygenation was studied in patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass using the Rygg-Kyvsgaard bubble oxygenator. Oxygenation was satisfactory in perfusions carried out at normothermia and during hypothermia. During the rewarming phase of hypothermic perfusions hypoxaemia occurred. This could be prevented by a ganglion blocking agent (trimetaphan) given during the cooling phase. PMID:5565791

  16. The role of the vascular endothelium in arenavirus haemorrhagic fevers.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Stefan

    2009-12-01

    Viral haemorrhagic fevers (VHF) caused by arenaviruses are among the most devastating emerging human diseases. The most important pathogen among the arenaviruses is Lassa virus (LASV), the causative agent of Lassa fever that is endemic to West Africa. On the South American continent, the New World arenavirus Junin virus (JUNV), Machupo (MACV), Guanarito (GTOV), and Sabia virus (SABV) have emerged as causative agents of severe VHFs. Clinical and experimental studies on arenavirus VHF have revealed a crucial role of the endothelium in their pathogenesis. However, in contrast to other VHFs, haemorrhages are not a salient feature of Lassa fever and fatal cases do not show overt destruction of vascular tissue. The functional alteration of the vascular endothelium that precede shock and death in fatal Lassa fever may be due to more subtle direct or indirect effects of the virus on endothelial cells. Haemorrhagic disease manifestations and vascular involvement are more pronounced in the VHF caused by the South American haemorrhagic fever viruses. Recent studies on JUNV revealed perturbation of specific endothelial cell function, including expression of cell adhesion molecules, coagulation factors, and vasoactive mediators as a consequence of productive viral infection. These studies provided first possible links to some of the vascular abnormalities observed in patients, however, their relevance in vivo remains to be investigated.

  17. Dengue haemorrhagic fever in Malaysia: a review.

    PubMed

    George, R

    1987-09-01

    The historical background, epidemiology and changing pattern of clinical disease as seen in Malaysia is reviewed. The preliminary results of the longitudinal study of epidemiology of dengue in Malaysia is also presented. Studies led by Rudnick et al. over some 18 years have established that the disease is endemically transmitted by both Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus causing illnesses ranging from mild febrile episodes through classical dengue fever, dengue haemorrhagic fever and the dengue shock syndrome. The first epidemic occurred in 1962 in Penang, and the second major epidemic in 1974 in Selangor. From then on epidemics seem to occur every 4 years, i.e. 1978, and then in 1982. With increasing number of cases being seen from the end of 1985 and in 1986, and with the increasing numbers of positive virus isolates, another epidemic may occur this year. Though in the early years, mainly children were affected, recently more cases are being seen in 16-30 years age group. There is also a changing pattern in the clinical presentation of the cases. The clinician has to be aware of the various modes of presentation of this sinister disease. A high index of suspicion is needed for early diagnosis, as management is mainly symptomatic and there is no specific drug as yet to combat the shock and bleeding manifestations.

  18. Massive large-bowel haemorrhage.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, P.; Thomas, P. A.

    1981-01-01

    Operative intervention for massive colonic haemorrhage is fortunately rarely necessary, but planned, low-risk segmental resections can only be performed if the bleeding site is known. This information can most frequently be obtained by using a combination of sigmoidoscopy, barium enema examination, and selective mesenteric angiography. PMID:6972724

  19. [Dengue as haemorrhagic fever].

    PubMed

    Olszyńska-Krowicka, Maria

    2011-01-01

    Dengue virus is distributed in tropical and subtropical regions and transmitted by mosquitoes of the genus Aedes. In September 2010 two cases of indigenous dengue fever were diagnosed in metropolitan France for the first time and next DENV infection was diagnosed in a German traveler returning from a trip to Croatia. The Aedes albopictus mosquitoes were found in several European countries (for example in greenhouses in Netherlands). The indigenous DENV infections in Europe are rare diseases, probably acquired after bites of infected mosquitoes imported by airplanes from endemic areas. Nonspecific symptoms including: fever (up to 39 degrees C), chills, arthralagia, headache, myalgia and abnormalities in laboratory tests such as: thrombocytopaenia, leukopaenia and liver tests cause problems with differential diagnosis ofhematologic and hepatologic syndromes. The most serious complications are associated with dengue shock syndrome with mortality rate of 50%.

  20. Bilateral adrenal haemorrhagic infarction in a patient with antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Godfrey, Rebecca Louise; Clark, James; Field, Benjamin

    2014-11-19

    A 68-year-old woman with antiphospholipid syndrome presented with a 3-day history of bilateral loin pain, vomiting, fever and confusion. On examination she was febrile, hypotensive and tachycardic. Investigations revealed raised inflammatory markers, renal impairment and hyponatraemia. Abdominal ultrasound revealed two well-defined heterogeneous areas bilaterally in the region of the adrenal glands. This prompted serum cortisol measurement and a CT of the abdomen. Cortisol was low in the context of sepsis at 48 nmol/L, and CT confirmed bilateral heterogeneous adrenal pathology. The patient was managed for septic shock and adrenal insufficiency. She was recognised to have several risk factors for haemorrhagic infarction of the adrenals: antiphospholipid syndrome, sepsis, postoperative state and anticoagulant therapy. She was discharged well on glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid therapy and a repeat CT at 4 weeks confirmed the diagnosis of bilateral adrenal infarct and haemorrhage.

  1. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation: current guidelines.

    PubMed

    Green, Bart N; Clark, Tammi

    2005-01-01

    It is critical for health care providers to have the skills and composure required to administer cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) when necessary. Unfortunately, it is easy to postpone updating one's CPR certification when confronted with the demands of leading a practice. New guidelines for CPR have been in effect since 2000. This clinical update provides a brief overview of the new guidelines, some suggestions for incorporating CPR training into the clinician's practice, and clarification for some common legal misconceptions that doctors may have pertaining to administering CPR. PMID:19674653

  2. Thrombin during cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Edmunds, L Henry; Colman, Robert W

    2006-12-01

    Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) ignites a massive defense reaction that stimulates all blood cells and five plasma protein systems to produce a myriad of vasoactive and cytotoxic substances, cell-signaling molecules, and upregulated cellular receptors. Thrombin is the key enzyme in the thrombotic portion of the defense reaction and is only partially suppressed by heparin. During CPB, thrombin is produced by both extrinsic and intrinsic coagulation pathways and activated platelets. The routine use of a cell saver and the eventual introduction of direct thrombin inhibitors now offer the possibility of completely suppressing thrombin production and fibrinolysis during cardiac surgery with CPB. PMID:17126170

  3. [Dengue haemorrhagic fever in children: ten years of clinical experience].

    PubMed

    Méndez, Angela; González, Gerardo

    2003-06-01

    In Bucaramanga, Colombia, dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) has become endemo-epidemic since 1992. A cross-sectional study covering a period of 10 years (February, 1992 to February, 2002) was undertaken in children under 13 years of age hospitalized at the University Hospital. Observations were recorded on the clinical features, laboratory tests and the natural development of the disease. A total of 763 patients were examined, of whom 617 were classified as having DHF according to the WHO criteria (9.1% Grade I, 61.5% Grade II, 21.7% Grade III and 7.5% Grade IV). One hundred forty six patients could not be classified. The highest incidence took place in 1997, 1998 and 2001. Seventy four per cent of patients came from the metropolitan area of Bucaramanga; 48% were males; 0.3%, newborns; 11.8%, infants; 23%, pre-school children, and 64.9%, school children. The most important clinical features were fever and haemorrhagic manifestations (100%); vomiting (60%); abdominal pain (57%); headache (50%); osteomyalgia (40.8%); hepatomegaly (33%), and macular rash (29%). Among the haemorrhagic manifestations we found petechiae (56%); positive tourniquet test (35%); gastrointestinal bleeding (34%), and epistaxis (32%). Serous effusion was found in 17.7% of cases. Alarm signs of shock were found in 29%. Fifty two per cent had leucopenia and 37.3% atypic lymphocytes. Among other unusual manifestations were hepatitis, encephalopathy, alithiasic cholecystitis, acute renal failure, haemophagocytic syndrome and coinfections. Of the 617 cases, 12 died (1.5%).

  4. Cardiopulmonary arrest due to early hyperkalemia after liver injury.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Junna; Shimizu, Tetsunosuke; Kittaka, Tadahiro; Fukuda, Makiko; Akimoto, Hiroshi

    2014-11-01

    Hyperkalemia due to crush syndrome after trauma is a well known fatal clinical condition, but early hyperkalemia with hemorrhage after trauma is a rare phenomenon. We report on a 5-year-old boy who bruised from the lumbers, had cardiopulmonary arrest caused by hyperkalemia, and underwent perihepatic packing twice before being discharged without any neurologic deficits. Clinicians should be vigilant for signs of hyperkalemia accompanying hemorrhagic shock, even in the early phase of trauma. PMID:24928410

  5. Cardiopulmonary arrest due to early hyperkalemia after liver injury.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Junna; Shimizu, Tetsunosuke; Kittaka, Tadahiro; Fukuda, Makiko; Akimoto, Hiroshi

    2014-11-01

    Hyperkalemia due to crush syndrome after trauma is a well known fatal clinical condition, but early hyperkalemia with hemorrhage after trauma is a rare phenomenon. We report on a 5-year-old boy who bruised from the lumbers, had cardiopulmonary arrest caused by hyperkalemia, and underwent perihepatic packing twice before being discharged without any neurologic deficits. Clinicians should be vigilant for signs of hyperkalemia accompanying hemorrhagic shock, even in the early phase of trauma.

  6. Mouse model of intracerebellar haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Tijjani Salihu, Abubakar; Muthuraju, Sangu; Aziz Mohamed Yusoff, Abdul; Ahmad, Farizan; Zulkifli Mustafa, Mohd; Jaafar, Hasnan; Idris, Zamzuri; Rahman Izaini Ghani, Abdul; Malin Abdullah, Jafri

    2016-10-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the behavior and neuronal morphological changes in the perihaemorrhagic tissue of the mouse intracerebellar haemorrhage experimental model. Adult male Swiss albino mice were stereotactically infused with collagenase type VII (0.4U/μl of saline) unilaterally in to the cerebellum, following anaesthesia. Motor deficits were assessed using open field and composite score for evaluating the mouse model of cerebellar ataxia at 1, 3, 7, 14 and 21 days after collagenase infusion. The animals were sacrificed at the same time interval for evaluation of perihaematomal neuronal degeneration using haematoxylin and eosin staining and Annexin V-FITC/Propidium iodide assay. At the end of the study, it was found that infusion of 0.4U collagenase produces significant locomotor and ataxic deficit in the mice especially within the first week post surgery, and that this gradually improved within three weeks. Neuronal degeneration evident by cytoplasmic shrinkage and nuclear pyknosis was observed at the perihaematomal area after one day; especially at 3 and 7 days post haemorrhage. By 21 days, both the haematoma and degenerating neurons in the perihaematomal area were phagocytosed and the remaining neuronal cells around the scar tissue appeared normal. Moreover, Annexin-V/propidium iodide-positive cells were observed at the perihaematomal area at 3 and 7 days implying that the neurons likely die via apoptosis. It was concluded that a population of potentially salvageable neurons exist in the perihaematomal area after cerebellar haemorrhage throughout a wide time window that could be amenable to treatment. PMID:27327104

  7. Automated cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a case study.

    PubMed

    Spiro, Jon; Theodosiou, Maria; Doshi, Sagar

    2014-02-01

    Rates of survival after cardiac arrest are low and correlate with the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Devices that deliver automated CPR (A-CPR) can provide sustained and effective chest compressions, which are especially useful during patient transfer and while simultaneous invasive procedures are being performed. The use of such devices can also release members of resuscitation teams for other work. This article presents a case study involving a man with acute myocardial infarction complicated by cardiogenic shock and pulmonary oedema. It describes how ED nursing and medical teams worked together to deliver A-CPR, discusses the use of A-CPR devices in a tertiary cardiac centre, and highlights the advantages of using such devices.

  8. Dengue haemorrhagic fever in Burma.

    PubMed

    Thaung, U; Ming, C K; Thein, M

    1975-12-01

    Although sporadic from 1965 to 1969, a major outbreak of dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) occurred for the first time in Rangoon in 1970. Since then the disease has occurred every year in Rangoon and is now observed to be expanding to other urban areas in the country. The clinical diagnosis of DHF was confused by concurrent outbreaks of influenza A in 1971 and influenza A and B in 1972. A laboratory study of 3,447 clinically diagnosed haemorrhagic fever cases showed that 1643 cases (47.8%) were due to dengue and chikungunya, 296 (8.6%) to influenza A, 85(2.5%) to influenza B, 12(0.3%) to measles and 1411(40.8%) were of unknown aetiology during the 5 year period 1970-1974. Ae. aegypti mosquitoes are widely distributed in the country up to and including 900 meters above sea level but breeding is not found above that altitude. The absolute larval population which is highest in July as well as landing rate correlated with the peak incidence of DHF cases.

  9. Dengue type 1 epidemic with haemorrhagic manifestations in Fiji, 1989-90.

    PubMed

    Fagbami, A H; Mataika, J U; Shrestha, M; Gubler, D J

    1995-01-01

    A dengue type 1 epidemic occurred in Fiji between July 1989 and July 1990. Virus isolation in C6/36 cell cultures and Toxorhynchites mosquitos yielded 36 strains. Of the 3686 cases recorded by the Ministry of Health, 60% involved indigenous Fijians and 37%, Indians. A house-to-house survey revealed that a large majority of patients had classical dengue symptoms and 8% reported haemorrhagic manifestations. Among the children and adults hospitalized for dengue, 43% had haemorrhagic manifestations, including epistaxis, gingival bleeding, haematemesis, melaena and haematuria. A total of 15 patients with haemorrhagic manifestations and/or shock died, 10 of whom were aged 0-15 years; the diagnoses were confirmed in four cases by virus isolation or serology.

  10. Cardiopulmonary adaptation to weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prisk, G. K.; Guy, H. J.; Elliott, A. R.; West, J. B.

    1994-01-01

    The lung is profoundly affected by gravity. The absence of gravity (microgravity) removes the mechanical stresses acting on the lung paranchyma itself, resulting in a reduction in the deformation of the lung due to its own weight, and consequently altering the distribution of fresh gas ventilation within the lung. There are also changes in the mechanical forces acting on the rib cage and abdomen, which alters the manner in which the lung expands. The other way in which microgravity affects the lung is through the removal of the gravitationally induced hydrostatic gradients in vascular pressures, both within the lung itself, and within the entire body. The abolition of a pressure gradient within the pulmonary circulation would be expected to result in a greater degree of uniformity of blood flow within the lung, while the removal of the hydrostatic gradient within the body should result in an increase in venous return and intra-thoracic blood volume, with attendant changes in cardiac output, stroke volume, and pulmonary diffusing capacity. During the 9 day flight of Spacelab Life Sciences-1 (SLS-1) we collected pulmonary function test data on the crew of the mission. We compared the results obtained in microgravity with those obtained on the ground in both the standing and supine positions, preflight and in the week immediately following the mission. A number of the tests in the package were aimed at studying the anticipated changes in cardiopulmonary function, and we report those in this communication.

  11. [Fatal haemorrhagic rift valley fever: a case at Madagascar].

    PubMed

    Raveloson, N E; Ramorasata, J C; Rasolofohanitrininosy, R; Rakotoarivony, S T; Andrianjatovo, J J; Sztark, F

    2010-04-01

    Rift valley fever (RVF) is a viral zoonosis that can also infect humans. Haemorrhagic RVF is a severe potentially fatal form of the disease. Although haemorrhagic RVF accounts for only 1% of all infections, death occurs in up to 5% of cases. The purpose of this report is describe a severe case of haemorrhagic RVF observed in a 22-year-old cattle breeder admitted to the intensive care units of the Joseph Raseta Befelatanana University Hospitals in Antananarivo. The disease presented as an infectious syndrome but hemorrhagic manifestations developed early (day 2). They consisted of diffuse haemorrhage events (haemorrhagic vomit, gingival haemorrhage, skin haemorrhage, urinary haemorrhage, and haemorrhage on the venous puncture site). In spite of intensive care, haemorrhagic complications lead to death on day 4 of clinical evolution. Laboratory findings demonstrated alteration in liver function and coagulation disturbances. Multiple organ failure was also observed.

  12. Hyperamylasemia following cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Chang, H; Chung, Y T; Wu, G J; Hwang, F Y; Chen, K T; Peng, W L; Hung, C R

    1992-01-01

    In order to study the occurrence of postbypass hyperamylasemia, 75 patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) were studied from March 1989 to January 1990. There were 49 males and 26 females. Among them, 27 had congenital heart disease, 30 had valvular disease, and 18 had coronary artery disease. There were 27 patients with at least one elevated serum amylase sample after operation. Thus, the overall incidence of hyperamylasemia was 36%. As compared with the preoperative data (1.3%), there was a statistically significant difference in the occurrence of hyperamylasemia (p less than 0.05). Three patients had overt clinical pancreatitis postoperatively. There was no positive correlation between the serum amylase level and the occurrence of pancreatitis (p greater than 0.05). Forty-two cases had a significant elevation of the amylase creatinine clearance ratio (ACCR) after CPB. However, there was no significant difference between the groups with pulsatile and nonpulsatile CPB (p greater than 0.05). Three patients (4%) died in our series. The causes of death were heart failure in two and fulminant pancreatitis associated with low cardiac output in one. Although our experience in dealing with pancreatitis improved survival, mortality was still high (33.3%) in our series. Nevertheless, there was no apparent correlation between mortality and postbypass hyperamylasemia (p greater than 0.05). Logistic regression analysis was used to analyze the risk factors of the occurrence of hyperamylasemia, and the analysis revealed that patients with coronary artery disease were susceptible to postbypass hyperamylasemia. Our studies indicate that the use of total serum amylase or ACCR to monitor for the occurrence of pancreatitis in postbypass patients is inadequate.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1377742

  13. [Haemorrhagic fever viruses, possible bioterrorist use].

    PubMed

    Rigaudeau, Sophie; Bricaire, François; Bossi, Philippe

    2005-01-29

    The majority of haemorrhagic fever viruses are responsible for various clinical manifestations, the mutual characteristics of which are fever and haemorrhage in 5 to 70% of cases. All degrees of severity can be observed, ranging from isolated fever to multi-organ failure and death. These viruses belong to one of the following families: filoviridae, arenaviridae, bunyaviridae, and flaviviridae. They must be considered as dangerous biological weapons that could potentially be used. Most of the viruses responsible for haemorrhagic fever can be transmitted to humans through the air in spray form, except the dengue virus and the agents of haemorrhagic fever from the Congo Crimea and the haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome that are difficult to handle in cell culture. In the event of a bioterrorist act, the management of persons infected or suspected of being so will be made by the referent departments of infectious diseases, defined by the French Biotox plan. Management includes isolation, confirmation or invalidation of the diagnosis and rapid initiation of treatment with ribavirin. Ribavirin is recommended for the treatment and prophylaxis of arenavirus and bunyavirus infections; it is not effective for the other families of virus. Except for yellow fever, there is no vaccination for the other forms of viral haemorrhagic fever. PMID:15687968

  14. [Haemorrhagic fever viruses, possible bioterrorist use].

    PubMed

    Rigaudeau, Sophie; Bricaire, François; Bossi, Philippe

    2005-01-29

    The majority of haemorrhagic fever viruses are responsible for various clinical manifestations, the mutual characteristics of which are fever and haemorrhage in 5 to 70% of cases. All degrees of severity can be observed, ranging from isolated fever to multi-organ failure and death. These viruses belong to one of the following families: filoviridae, arenaviridae, bunyaviridae, and flaviviridae. They must be considered as dangerous biological weapons that could potentially be used. Most of the viruses responsible for haemorrhagic fever can be transmitted to humans through the air in spray form, except the dengue virus and the agents of haemorrhagic fever from the Congo Crimea and the haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome that are difficult to handle in cell culture. In the event of a bioterrorist act, the management of persons infected or suspected of being so will be made by the referent departments of infectious diseases, defined by the French Biotox plan. Management includes isolation, confirmation or invalidation of the diagnosis and rapid initiation of treatment with ribavirin. Ribavirin is recommended for the treatment and prophylaxis of arenavirus and bunyavirus infections; it is not effective for the other families of virus. Except for yellow fever, there is no vaccination for the other forms of viral haemorrhagic fever.

  15. Haemoglobin scavenging after subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Durnford, A; Dunbar, J; Galea, J; Bulters, D; Nicoll, J A R; Boche, D; Galea, I

    2015-01-01

    Rapid and effective clearance of cell-free haemoglobin after subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) is important to prevent vasospasm and neurotoxicity and improve long-term outcome. Haemoglobin is avidly bound by haptoglobin, and the complex is cleared by CD163 expressed on the membrane surface of macrophages. We studied the kinetics of haemoglobin and haptoglobin in cerebrospinal fluid after SAH. We show that haemoglobin levels rise gradually after SAH. Haptoglobin levels rise acutely with aneurysmal rupture as a result of injection of blood into the subarachnoid space. Although levels decline as haemoglobin scavenging occurs, complete depletion of haptoglobin does not occur and levels start rising again, indicating saturation of CD163 sites available for haptoglobin-haemoglobin clearance. In a preliminary neuropathological study we demonstrate that meningeal CD163 expression is upregulated after SAH, in keeping with a proinflammatory state. However, loss of CD163 occurs in meningeal areas with overlying blood compared with areas without overlying blood. Becauses ADAM17 is the enzyme responsible for shedding membrane-bound CD163, its inhibition may be a potential therapeutic strategy after SAH.

  16. Ebola and Marburg haemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Rougeron, V; Feldmann, H; Grard, G; Becker, S; Leroy, E M

    2015-03-01

    Ebolaviruses and Marburgviruses (family Filoviridae) are among the most virulent pathogens for humans and great apes causing severe haemorrhagic fever and death within a matter of days. This group of viruses is characterized by a linear, non-segmented, single-stranded RNA genome of negative polarity. The overall burden of filovirus infections is minimal and negligible compared to the devastation caused by malnutrition and other infectious diseases prevalent in Africa such as malaria, dengue or tuberculosis. In this paper, we review the knowledge gained on the eco/epidemiology, the pathogenesis and the disease control measures for Marburg and Ebola viruses developed over the last 15 years. The overall progress is promising given the little attention that these pathogen have achieved in the past; however, more is to come over the next decade given the more recent interest in these pathogens as potential public and animal health concerns. Licensing of therapeutic and prophylactic options may be achievable over the next 5-10 years.

  17. [Thanatological problems in cardiopulmonary surgery].

    PubMed

    Klochkov, N D; Timofeev, I V

    1992-01-01

    The pattern of immediate causes of death and types of terminal states (mechanisms of death) has been examined on the basis of thanatological analysis of 190 deaths occurred after operations on the heart (valve prosthesis) and lung (pneumonectomy). The differences in the thanatological profile of the respective surgical units are shown. Ways for reducing postoperative death in cardiopulmonary surgery are discussed.

  18. Prolactin inhibits the increased cytokine gene expression in Kupffer cells following haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Zhu, X H; Zellweger, R; Ayala, A; Chaudry, I H

    1996-02-01

    Kupffer cells are an important source of proinflammatory cytokines and contribute to the systemic inflammatory response observed following haemorrhagic shock. The systemic release of cytokines, such as TNF-alpha, IL-1 beta, IL-6, etc., has been associated with the decreased host immune and organ dysfunction following hypotension. Studies indicate that anterior pituitary hormone prolactin (PRL) plays an important role in the regulation of lymphocyte proliferation and macrophage function in vivo, as well as in vitro. However, it is not known what effects PRL administration has on Kupffer cells proinflammatory mediator release following haemorrhage. Therefore, it was the aim of this study to determine the effect of in vivo PRL administration on cytokine gene expression in Kupffer cells after haemorrhage. To study this, C3H/HeN male mice were bled to and maintained at a mean arterial pressure of 35 mmHg for 60 minutes, then resuscitated with shed blood, and segregated into two groups: one group was treated with PRL (100 micrograms/25 g body weight subcutaneously) while the other group received saline-vehicles. This was followed with lactated Ringer's solution (2 x the volume of shed blood). Two hours thereafter, the animals were sacrificed, Kupffer cells were isolated and stimulated with or without 10 micrograms/ml LPS for 1 hour. Total RNA was extracted and cytokine mRNA was detected by semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The results demonstrated that haemorrhage markedly increased the level of mRNA for IL-1 beta, IL-6, TGF-beta and TNF-beta in Kupffer cells. However, in vivo PRL treatment significantly decreased the cytokine gene expression in Kupffer cells following haemorrhage. This indicates that PRL may be useful in blunting the systemic inflammatory response associated with cell and organ depression following shock.

  19. Why dengue haemorrhagic fever in Cuba? 2. An integral analysis.

    PubMed

    Kouri, G P; Guzmán, M G; Bravo, J R

    1987-01-01

    The epidemiological factors present in Cuba in 1981, when the dengue haemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS) epidemic occurred, were exceptional when compared to those of other countries in the region. Evidence is presented which demonstrates that virulence of the circulating strain is an important element in the analysis of an epidemic. Although the two current hypotheses to explain the occurrence of DHF/DSS epidemics are valid in well defined but different epidemiological situations, neither Halstead's hypothesis of secondary-type infection or Rosen's hypothesis of the role played by the virulence of the circulating strain can explain all cases. An integrated, multifactorial and unifying hypothesis is presented, which could be applied in different epidemiological situations. It is based mainly on an in-depth analysis of the literature and of the Cuban experience.

  20. Dengue haemorrhagic fever in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Sumarmo

    1987-09-01

    Dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) was first recognized in Indonesia in the cities of Jakarta and Surabaya in 1968, 15 years after its recognition in the Philippines. During the 1968 outbreak, a total of 58 clinical cases with 24 deaths were reported. The number of reported cases since then has increased sharply, with the highest number of cases recorded in the years 1973 (10, 189 cases), 1983 (13,668 cases), and 1985 (13,588 cases). Outbreaks of the disease have spread to involve most of the major urban areas, as well as some of the rural areas. In 1985, the disease had spread to 26 of 27 Provinces and 160 of 300 regencies or municipalities. At present, the disease is endemic in many large cities and small towns. Interestingly, DHF has not been reported in some cities, even though dengue virus transmission rates in those cities are high. The epidemic pattern of DHF for the country as a whole has become irregular. Since 1982, the intensity and spread of DHF has created an increasing public health problem in Indonesia, particularly in Java where 60% of the total population of the country resides. Java contributed about 71% of all cases occurring in the country in 1982, 84% in 1983, and 91% in 1984. The peak monthly incidence of DHF was frequently reported during October through April, months which coincide with the rainy season. The morbidity rate for Indonesia, estimated from reported cases over five years (1981-1985), ranged between 3.39 to 8.65 per 100,000 population.

  1. Subdural haemorrhages in infants: population based study

    PubMed Central

    Jayawant, S; Rawlinson, A; Gibbon, F; Price, J; Schulte, J; Sharples, P; Sibert, J R; Kemp, A M

    1998-01-01

    Objectives To identify the incidence, clinical outcome, and associated factors of subdural haemorrhage in children under 2 years of age, and to determine how such cases were investigated and how many were due to child abuse. Design Population based case series. Setting South Wales and south west England. Subjects Children under 2 years of age who had a subdural haemorrhage. We excluded neonates who developed subdural haemorrhage during their stay on a neonatal unit and infants who developed a subdural haemorrhage after infection or neurosurgical intervention. Main outcome measures Incidence and clinical outcome of subdural haemorrhage in infants, the number of cases caused by child abuse, the investigations such children received, and associated risk factors. Results Thirty three children (23 boys and 10 girls) were identified with subdural haemorrhage. The incidence was 12.8/100 000 children/year (95% confidence interval 5.4 to 20.2). Twenty eight cases (85%) were under 1 year of age. The incidence of subdural haemorrhage in children under 1 year of age was 21.0/100 000 children/year and was therefore higher than in the older children. The clinical outcome was poor: nine infants died and 15 had profound disability. Only 22 infants had the basic investigations of a full blood count, coagulation screen, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging, skeletal survey or bone scan, and ophthalmological examination. In retrospect, 27 cases (82%) were highly suggestive of abuse. Conclusion Subdural haemorrhage is common in infancy and carries a poor prognosis; three quarters of such infants die or have profound disability. Most cases are due to child abuse, but in a few the cause is unknown. Some children with subdural haemorrhage do not undergo appropriate investigations. We believe the clinical investigation of such children should include a full multidisciplinary social assessment, an ophthalmic examination, a skeletal survey supplemented with a bone scan or a

  2. Quality management in cardiopulmonary imaging.

    PubMed

    Kanne, Jeffrey P

    2011-02-01

    Increased scrutiny of the practice of medicine by government, insurance providers, and individual patients has led to a rapid growth of quality management programs in health care. Radiology is no exception to this trend, and quality management has become an important issue for individual radiologists as well as their respective practices. Quality control has been a mainstay of the practice of radiology for many years, with quality assurance and quality improvement both relative newcomers. This article provides an overview of quality management in the context of cardiopulmonary imaging and describes specific areas of cardiopulmonary radiology in which the components of a quality management program can be integrated. Specific quality components are discussed, and examples of quality initiatives are provided.

  3. Ultrasound findings in dengue haemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Pramuljo, H S; Harun, S R

    1991-01-01

    The ultrasound examination of 29 children, aged between 2 to 13 years with clinical and serological proven dengue haemorrhagic fever were reviewed and correlated with the findings in the literature. Ultrasound findings consisted of: (1) ascites, (2) pleural effusion, (3) abnormal gallbladder wall and (4) abnormal liver parenchyma. Ascites is common in DHF. Pleural effusion was found on the right and on bilateral pleural spaces. There was no isolated left pleural effusions. The abnormal gallbladder wall has never been mentioned before in the literature and the abnormal liver parenchyma might be due to intraparenchymal and subcapsular haemorrhages.

  4. Hantaviruses and cardiopulmonary syndrome in South America.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Luiz Tadeu Moraes; Souza, William Marciel de; Ferrés, Marcela; Enria, Delia Alcira

    2014-07-17

    Hantavirus (Bunyaviridae) cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS) is an emerging health problem in South America due to urban growth and to the expansion of agriculture and cattle-raising areas into ecosystems containing most of the species of Sigmodontinae rodents that act as hantavirus reservoirs. About 4000 HCPS cases have been reported in South America up to 2013, associated with the following hantaviruses: Andes, Anajatuba, Araraquara (ARQV), Paranoá, Bermejo, Castelo dos Sonhos, Juquitiba, Araucária, Laguna Negra, Lechiguanas, Maripa, Oran, Rio Mamore and Tunari. The transmission of hantavirus to man occurs by contact with or through aerosols of excreta and secretions of infected rodents. Person-to-person transmission of hantavirus has also been reported in Argentina and Chile. HCPS courses with a capillary leaking syndrome produced by the hantavirus infecting lung endothelial cells and mostly with a severe inflammatory process associated with a cytokine storm. HCPS starts as a dengue-like acute febrile illness but after about 3 days progresses to respiratory failure and cardiogenic shock, leading to a high fatality rate that reaches 50% for patients infected with ARQV.

  5. 21 CFR 870.4230 - Cardiopulmonary bypass defoamer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Surgical Devices § 870.4230 Cardiopulmonary... with an oxygenator during cardiopulmonary bypass surgery to remove gas bubbles from the blood....

  6. 21 CFR 870.4230 - Cardiopulmonary bypass defoamer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Surgical Devices § 870.4230 Cardiopulmonary... with an oxygenator during cardiopulmonary bypass surgery to remove gas bubbles from the blood....

  7. 21 CFR 870.4230 - Cardiopulmonary bypass defoamer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Surgical Devices § 870.4230 Cardiopulmonary... with an oxygenator during cardiopulmonary bypass surgery to remove gas bubbles from the blood....

  8. Spontaneous retroperitoneal haemorrhage in a young adult

    PubMed Central

    Baksi, Aditya; Gupta, Shahana; Ray, Udipta; Ghosh, Shibajyoti

    2014-01-01

    We report a rare case of a primary adrenal cortical malignancy presenting with spontaneous retroperitoneal haemorrhage in a young adult. To the best of our knowledge, this is the thirteenth such case to be reported in the English literature. PMID:24658522

  9. The role of the histaminergic system in the central cardiovascular regulation in haemorrhagic hypotension.

    PubMed

    Jochem, Jerzy; Kasperska-Zajac, Alicja

    2012-01-01

    The histaminergic system consists of neurons located in tuberomammillary nucleus of the posterior hypothalamus. It affects many functions of the central nervous system, including regulation of the brainstem cardiovascular center. In this paper, we present current review of the literature concerning the role of the histaminergic system in the cardiovascular regulation in haemorrhagic hypotension. Experimental studies demonstrate that in both, normotension and critical hemorrhagic hypotension, histamine, acting as a central neurotransmitter, evokes the pressor effect. Interestingly, increases in mean arterial pressure are significantly higher in hypovolaemic than in normovolaemic animals. Many lines of evidence support the hypothesis that in haemorrhagic shock, the histaminergic system is able to activate neural and humoral compensatory mechanisms involving the sympathetic nervous and renin-angiotensin systems, arginine vasopressin and proopiomelanocortin-derived peptides. We suggest that the histaminergic system could be a new target for treatment of hemorrhagic hypotension.

  10. Dengue haemorrhagic fever in adults: a prospective study of 110 cases.

    PubMed

    Wali, J P; Biswas, A; Handa, R; Aggarwal, P; Wig, N; Dwivedi, S N

    1999-01-01

    One hundred and ten adult patients hospitalized with dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) during the recent outbreak in North India were prospectively studied. Of these, 48 (43.6%) were grade I, 40 (36.4%) grade II, 10 (9.1%) grade III and 12 (10.9%) grade IV DHF. Dengue shock syndrome (DSS) was seen in 22 (20%) patients. Fever, headache, myalgias and arthralgias were the common symptoms seen in 100%, 80.9%, 76.2% and 52.3% patients, respectively. Spontaneous bleeding was seen in 62 patients (56.4%) with mucocutaneous bleeding being the most common (46 patients). Gastrointestinal bleeding was seen in 38 (34.5%) patients. In as many as 40 patients, the haemorrhagic manifestations occurred after the fever had come down. Fifty-five patients (50%) required platelet transfusions. Twelve patients died, giving a mortality rate of 10.9% in the present study. Prompt recognition and supportive treatment can be lifesaving.

  11. [Viral haemorrhagic fevers--evolution of the epidemic potential].

    PubMed

    Markin, V A; Markov, V I

    2002-01-01

    In this review modern data on dangerous and particularly dangerous viral haemorrhagic fevers caused by a group of viruses belonging to the families of phylo-, arena-, flavi-, bunya- and togaviruses are presented. Morbidity rates and epidemics caused by Marburg virus, Ebola fever virus, Lassa fever virus, Argentinian and Bolivian haemorrhagic fever viruses, dengue haemorrhagic fever virus, Crimean haemorrhagic fever virus, Hantaviruses are analyzed. Mechanisms of the evolution of the epidemic manifestation of these infections are considered. The importance of the development of tools and methods of diagnosis, rapid prevention and treatment of exotic haemorrhagic fevers is emphasized.

  12. Nurses' accounts of cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Page, S; Meerabeau, L

    1996-08-01

    The relationship between theory and practice has received considerable attention within the nursing literature. This paper uses qualitative data from debriefing interviews with nurses following episodes of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to illustrate the complexities of translating sanitized theory into the messiness of practice. The interplay of affect and cognition on both learning from experience and on professional practice are explored. The feelings engendered by the CPR event and the labour required for their management form the second and major part of the paper. These are explored by examining the realities of a CPR event with its accompanying threat of death; success and failure, dignity versus indignity and the place of appropriate emotions throughout.

  13. History of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB).

    PubMed

    Hessel, Eugene A

    2015-06-01

    The development of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), thereby permitting open-heart surgery, is one of the most important advances in medicine in the 20th century. Many currently practicing cardiac anesthesiologists, cardiac surgeons, and perfusionists are unaware of how recently it came into use (60 years) and how much the practice of CPB has changed during its short existence. In this paper, the development of CPB and the many changes and progress that has taken place over this brief period of time, making it a remarkably safe endeavor, are reviewed. The many as yet unresolved questions are also identified, which sets the stage for the other papers in this issue of this journal.

  14. 21 CFR 870.4310 - Cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure gauge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure gauge... Cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure gauge. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure gauge is a device used in cardiopulmonary bypass surgery to measure the pressure of the blood...

  15. 21 CFR 870.4310 - Cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure gauge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure gauge... Cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure gauge. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure gauge is a device used in cardiopulmonary bypass surgery to measure the pressure of the blood...

  16. 21 CFR 870.4420 - Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy return sucker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy return sucker... Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy return sucker. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy return... from the chest or heart during cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. (b) Classification. Class...

  17. 21 CFR 870.4310 - Cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure gauge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure gauge... Cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure gauge. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure gauge is a device used in cardiopulmonary bypass surgery to measure the pressure of the blood...

  18. Severe intracranial haemorrhage in neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Francisco; Morais, Sofia; Sevivas, Teresa; Veiga, Ricardo; Salvado, Ramon; Taborda, Adelaide

    2011-01-01

    Neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia is a rare (1/1000–5000 births) life-threatening disorder, caused by fetomaternal incompatibility for a fetal human platelet alloantigen inherited from the father, with production of maternal alloantibodies against fetal platelets, leading to severe thrombocytopenia and potential bleeding. Intracranial haemorrhage is the most feared complication. This report presents the case of a term newborn infant, born from caesarean section after a normal pregnancy, presenting signs of skin bleeding with different ages. Obstetric history included a previous spontaneous abortion after amniocentesis. Severe thrombocytopenia (4×109/l platelets) was found and brain ultrasound showed multiple intracranial haemorrhages. Human platelet antigen (HPA) phenotyping showed maternal negative HPA-1a and paternal positive HPA-1a platelets. Strongly positive anti-HPA-1a and weakly positive anti-human leukocyte antigen class I alloantibodies were found in the mother. Multiple platelet transfusions, intravenous immunoglobulin and corticosteroid were given but favourable response was accomplished only after a compatible platelet transfusion. Brain MRI showed multiple subacute and chronic haemorrhages. PMID:22679192

  19. Cardiopulmonary consequences of obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Caples, Sean M; Kara, Tomas; Somers, Virend K

    2005-02-01

    Ongoing research in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) suggests strong associations with cardiopulmonary disorders. There is an abundance of studies describing physiological pathways in OSA that acutely impact the cardiovascular system. These mechanisms, if proven to carry over into the daytime hours, could form the basis for clinical disease. The challenge remains in disentangling these mechanistic processes from the many comorbid conditions often present in patients with OSA. Examples include male gender, obesity, and diabetes mellitus, all of which exert their own influence on the development of cardiopulmonary disease. This review discusses some of the physiological mechanisms associated with disordered breathing during sleep and explores putative cardiopulmonary disease associations.

  20. Evaluation of pulse oximetry during cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Spittal, M J

    1993-08-01

    This study evaluates whether the pulse oximeter is useful during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The instrument was of undoubted benefit in the management of primary respiratory arrest, but of equivocable value in cardiac arrest. Data were displayed during external chest compressions, but were generally unreliable. The ear probe was not able to produce a consistently good signal during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Nevertheless, the provision of an oximeter amongst the first-line resuscitation equipment available at a cardiopulmonary arrest significantly altered the management of seven out of 20 patients, five of whom survived.

  1. The Physiology of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Lurie, Keith G; Nemergut, Edward C; Yannopoulos, Demetris; Sweeney, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Outcomes after cardiac arrest remain poor more than a half a century after closed chest cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was first described. This review article is focused on recent insights into the physiology of blood flow to the heart and brain during CPR. Over the past 20 years, a greater understanding of heart-brain-lung interactions has resulted in novel resuscitation methods and technologies that significantly improve outcomes from cardiac arrest. This article highlights the importance of attention to CPR quality, recent approaches to regulate intrathoracic pressure to improve cerebral and systemic perfusion, and ongoing research related to the ways to mitigate reperfusion injury during CPR. Taken together, these new approaches in adult and pediatric patients provide an innovative, physiologically based road map to increase survival and quality of life after cardiac arrest.

  2. Cardiopulmonary function and laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Wahba, R W; Béïque, F; Kleiman, S J

    1995-01-01

    This review analyzes the literature dealing with cardiopulmonary function during and pulmonary function following laparoscopic cholecystectomy in order to describe the patterns of changes in these functions and the mechanisms involved as well as to identify areas of concern and lacunae in our knowledge. Information was obtained from a Medline literature search and the annual meeting supplements of Anesthesiology, Anesth Analg, Br J Anaesth, and Can J Anaesth. The principal findings were that changes in cardiovascular function due to the insufflation are characterized by an immediate decrease in cardiac index and an increase in mean arterial blood pressure and systemic vascular resistance. In the next few minutes there is partial restoration of cardiac index and resistance but blood pressure and heart rate do not change. The pattern is the result of the interaction between increased abdominal pressure, neurohumoral responses and absorbed CO2. Pulmonary function changes are characterized by reduced compliance without large alterations in PaO2, but tissue oxygenation can be adversely affected due to reduced O2 delivery. A major difficulty in maintaining normocarbia is due to the abdominal distention reducing pulmonary compliance and to CO2 absorption. End tidal CO2 tension is not a reliable index of PaCO2, particularly in ASA III-IV patients. The pattern of lung function following LC is characterized by a transient reduction in lung volumes and capacities with a restrictive breathing pattern and the loss of the abdominal contribution to breathing. Atelectasis also occurs. These changes are qualitatively similar to but of a lesser magnitude than those following "open" abdominal operations. It is concluded that the changes in cardiopulmonary function during laparoscopic upper abdominal surgery lead us to suggest judicious invasive monitoring and careful interpretation in ASA III-IV patients. Lung function following extensive procedures in sick patients has not been

  3. Bleeding manifestations of dengue haemorrhagic fever in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    George, R; Duraisamy, G

    1981-03-01

    Analysis of the bleeding manifestations of 130 cases of dengue haemorrhagic fever admitted into the Children's ward of the General Hospital, Kuala Lumpur from May 1973 to September 1978 has been done. Petechial skin rash, epistaxis and gum bleeding were seen most commonly in mild and moderately severe cases. However, blood stained gastric aspirates, and severe haematemesis were seen in severe or very severe cases. Though with better vector control and preventive measures, a marked reduction in the incidence of the cases has been noted, severe cases were seen with symptoms of shock and gastrointestinal bleeding. These symptoms carried a bad prognosis. Among 15 children that died 10 had gastrointestinal bleeding and 2 had a disseminated intravascular coagulation defect. Lymphocytosis with atypical lymphocytes, low platelet count, low reticulocyte count and raised packed cell volume were the main haematological features seen in all these cases. All these features reverted to normal within a week. Mild evidence of disseminated intravascular coagulation was seen in a number of cases, but severe features were seen only in four. Two cases improved as a result of heparin therapy. PMID:6111919

  4. Bleeding manifestations of dengue haemorrhagic fever in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    George, R; Duraisamy, G

    1981-03-01

    Analysis of the bleeding manifestations of 130 cases of dengue haemorrhagic fever admitted into the Children's ward of the General Hospital, Kuala Lumpur from May 1973 to September 1978 has been done. Petechial skin rash, epistaxis and gum bleeding were seen most commonly in mild and moderately severe cases. However, blood stained gastric aspirates, and severe haematemesis were seen in severe or very severe cases. Though with better vector control and preventive measures, a marked reduction in the incidence of the cases has been noted, severe cases were seen with symptoms of shock and gastrointestinal bleeding. These symptoms carried a bad prognosis. Among 15 children that died 10 had gastrointestinal bleeding and 2 had a disseminated intravascular coagulation defect. Lymphocytosis with atypical lymphocytes, low platelet count, low reticulocyte count and raised packed cell volume were the main haematological features seen in all these cases. All these features reverted to normal within a week. Mild evidence of disseminated intravascular coagulation was seen in a number of cases, but severe features were seen only in four. Two cases improved as a result of heparin therapy.

  5. Cardiopulmonary Syndromes (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Cancer.gov

    Expert-reviewed information summary about common conditions that produce chest symptoms. The cardiopulmonary syndromes addressed in this summary are cancer-related dyspnea, malignant pleural effusion, pericardial effusion, and superior vena cava syndrome.

  6. Alkhurma haemorrhagic fever--a viral haemorrhagic disease unique to the Arabian Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Memish, Ziad A; Charrel, Remi N; Zaki, Ali M; Fagbo, Shamsudeen F

    2010-11-01

    The emergence and re-emergence of human and animal pathogens on a global scale continues unabated. One such pathogen is the arbovirus that causes Alkhurma haemorrhagic fever, which emerged in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia in the mid 1990s. It has since re-emerged in other regions of the country and threatens to widen its area of endemicity beyond the peninsula. Human and animal movements, especially those associated with the annual mass gathering event of Hajj (pilgrimage) may facilitate introduction into other continental masses, where it must be differentiated from dengue and other similar arboviral haemorrhagic fevers. In addition to dengue and Kadam viruses, which are known to be endemic in Saudi Arabia, it is thought that other flaviviruses exist in the region, though undetected. Collectively, these viruses present diagnostic challenges that may confound the recognition of clinical cases of Alkhurma haemorrhagic fever. The Saudi Ministry of Health is making concerted efforts to expand the evidence base in order to enhance the diagnostic and preventive protocols used to address the challenge of Alkhurma haemorrhagic fever.

  7. Involvement of the histaminergic system in cytidine 5'-diphosphocholine-induced reversal of critical haemorrhagic hypotension in rats.

    PubMed

    Jochem, J; Savci, V; Filiz, N; Rybus-Kalinowska, B; Fogel, W A; Yalcin, M

    2010-02-01

    Cytidine 5'-diphosphocholine (CDP-choline) is an endogenously synthesized mononucleotide which exerts a variety of physiological effects by altering central cholinergic transmission. Administered intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) or intravenously, it reverses haemorrhagic hypotension in rats, apparently by the activation of central cholinergic receptors. The study was undertaken to investigate the involvement of the central histaminergic system in CDP-choline-mediated reversal of haemorrhagic hypotension. Experiments were carried out in male ketamine/xylazine-anaesthetised Wistar rats subjected to haemorrhagic hypotension of 20-26 mmHg. CDP-choline (2 micromol; i.c.v.) administered at 5 min of critical hypotension produced a long-lasting pressor effect with increases in mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), and renal, hindquarters and mesenteric blood flows, resulting in a 100% survival at 2 h. The action was accompanied by approximately a 26% increase in extracellular histamine concentration at the posterior hypothalamus, as measured by microdialysis. Cardiovascular effects mediated by CDP-choline were almost completely blocked by pretreatment with H(1) receptor antagonist chlorpheniramine (50 nmol; i.c.v.), but not with H(2) receptor blocker ranitidine (25 nmol; icv) or H(3)/H(4) receptor antagonist thioperamide (50 nmol; i.c.v.). In conclusion, the present results show that he central histaminergic system, through the activation of H(1) histaminergic receptors, is involved in CDP-choline-induced resuscitating effect in haemorrhage-shocked rats.

  8. Acute myocardial infarction complicating subarachnoid haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    van der Velden, L.B.J.; Otterspoor, L.C.; Schultze Kool, L.J.; Biessels, G.J.; Verheugt, F.W.A.

    2009-01-01

    An acute myocardial infarction is a rare complication of a subarachnoid haemorrhage. The combination of these two conditions imposes important treatment dilemmas. We describe two patients with this combination of life-threatening conditions. Patient 1 was treated with emergency percutaneous coronary intervention followed by clipping of the anterior communicating artery aneurysm. Six months after discharge the patient's memory and orientation had almost completely recovered. Patient 2 was treated with aspirin until coiling of the aneurysm could be performed. After successful coiling low-molecular-weight heparin was added. One week later the patient died due to a free wall rupture. (Neth Heart J 2009;17:284-7.19789696) PMID:19789696

  9. Cardiovascular effects of histamine administered intracerebroventricularly in critical haemorrhagic hypotension in rats.

    PubMed

    Jochem, J

    2000-06-01

    The study was designed to determine the cardiovascular effects of histamine administered intracerebroventricularly (icv) in a rat model of volume-controlled haemorrhagic shock. The withdrawal of approximately 50% of total blood volume resulted in the death of all control saline icv treated animals within 30 min. Icv injection of histamine produced a prompt dose-dependent (0.1-100 nmol) and long-lasting (10-100 nmol) increase in mean arterial pressure (MAP), pulse pressure (PP) and heart rate (HR), with a 100% survival of 2h after treatment (100 nmol). The increase in MAP and HR after histamine administration in bled rats in comparison to the normovolaemic animals was 2.7-3.3- and 1.3-3.6-fold higher, respectively. Pretreatment with chlorpheniramine (50 nmol icv), H1 receptor antagonist, inhibited the increase in MAP, PP, HR and survival rate produced by histamine, while chlorpheniramine given alone had no effect. Neither ranitidine (50 nmol icv), H2 histamine receptor antagonist, nor thioperamide (50 nmol icv), H3 receptor blocker, influenced the histamine action, however, when given alone, both evoked the pressor effect with elongation of survival time. It can be concluded that histamine administered icv reverses the haemorrhagic shock conditions, and histamine H1 receptors are involved.

  10. Open and closed chest extrathoracic cannulation for cardiopulmonary bypass and extracorporeal life support: methods, indications, and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Field, M L; Al‐Alao, B; Mediratta, N; Sosnowski, A

    2006-01-01

    Extrathoracic cannulation to establish cardiopulmonary bypass has been widely applied in recent years and includes: (a) repeat surgery, (b) minimally invasive surgery, and (c) cases with diseased vessels such as porcelain, aneurysmal, and dissecting aorta. In addition, the success and relative ease of peripheral cannulation, among other technological advances, has permitted the development of closed chest extracorporeal life support, in the form of cardiopulmonary support and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. With this development have come applications for cardiopulmonary bypass based support outside the traditional cardiac theatre setting, including emergency circulatory support for patients in cardiogenic shock and respiratory support for patients with severely impaired gas exchange. This review summarises the approach to extrathoracic cannulation for the generalist. PMID:16679471

  11. Hypertrophic olivary degeneration secondary to pontine haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Wein, Sara; Yan, Bernard; Gaillard, Frank

    2015-07-01

    We report a 58-year-old man who developed hyptertrophic olivary degeneration (HOD) after haemorrhage of a cavernous malformation in the pons. Lesions of the triangle of Guillain and Mollaret (the dentatorubro-olivary pathway) may lead to HOD, a secondary transsynaptic degeneration of the inferior olivary nucleus. HOD is considered unique because the degenerating olive initially becomes hypertrophic rather than atrophic. The primary lesion causing pathway interruption is often haemorrhage, either due to hypertension, trauma, surgery or, as in our patient, a vascular malformation such as a cavernoma. Ischaemia and demyelination can also occasionally be the inciting events. The classic clinical presentation of HOD is palatal myoclonus, although not all patients with HOD develop this symptom. The imaging features of HOD evolve through characteristic phases. The clue to the diagnosis of HOD is recognition of the distinct imaging stages and identification of a remote primary lesion in the triangle of Guillain and Mollaret. Familiarity with the classic imaging findings of this rare phenomenon is necessary in order to avoid misdiagnosis and prevent unnecessary intervention.

  12. Sufentanil disposition during cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Flezzani, P; Alvis, M J; Jacobs, J R; Schilling, M M; Bai, S; Reves, J G

    1987-11-01

    In order to investigate the ability of a computer-assisted continuous infusion (CACI) system to maintain constant plasma levels of sufentanil during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) using pharmacokinetic data derived from healthy surgical patients to determine the infusion rate, ten patients were anaesthetized with diazepam, enflurane and oxygen until ten minutes prior to the expected time of initiation of CPB. At that point, an infusion of sufentanil, aimed to reach a central compartment concentration of 5 ng.ml-1, was started via CACI. Plasma concentrations of sufentanil, haematocrit, total protein and albumin concentrations, and nasopharyngeal and CPB inflow temperatures were obtained at predetermined intervals before and up to 90 min after the initiation of CPB. Plasma concentrations of sufentanil reached 3.8 +/- 0.4 ng.ml-1 before CPB and approached the 5.0 ng.ml-1 set point (4.7 +/- 0.4 ng.ml-1) over the 90 min of CPB. In conclusion, our results show that it is possible to obtain stable plasma levels of sufentanil on CPB using a pharmacokinetically driven infusion scheme; however, our data suggest that use of such a system may lead to accumulation of drug during CPB. PMID:2960465

  13. Cardiopulmonary loading in motocross riding.

    PubMed

    Konttinen, Tomi; Häkkinen, Keijo; Kyröläinen, Heikki

    2007-07-01

    The present study was designed to examine physiological responses during motocross riding. Nine Finnish A-level motocross riders performed a 15-min ride at a motocross track and a test of maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) in the laboratory. Cardiopulmonary strain was measured continuously during the ride as well as in the VO2max test. During the ride, mean VO2 was 32 ml x kg(-1) x min(-1) (s = 4), which was 71% (s = 12) of maximum, while ventilation (V(E)) was 73% (s = 15) of its maximum. The relative VO2 and V(E) values during the riding correlated with successful riding performance (r = 0.80, P < 0.01 and r = 0.79, P < 0.01, respectively). Mean heart rate was maintained at 95% (s = 7) of its maximum. Mean blood lactate concentration was 5.0 mmol x l(-1) (s = 2.0) after the ride. A reduction of 16% (P < 0.001) in maximal isometric handgrip force was observed. In conclusion, motocross causes riders great physical stress. Both aerobic and anaerobic metabolism is required for the isometric and dynamic muscle actions experienced during a ride. PMID:17497401

  14. [Hospital organization of cardiopulmonary resuscitation].

    PubMed

    Gómez-Arnau, J; Lacoma, F; García del Valle, S; Núñez, A; González, A; Burgos, E

    1999-05-01

    That hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) should be supported by an organized plan rather than on the skills of individual health care personnel is a universally agreed-upon principle. Such a plan should guarantee that needed materials are available and in working order in all departments and that the team assigned to carry out CPR arrives promptly. Personnel other than the specialized team should also receive CPR training appropriate to their posts. The main features of a CPR plan are related to the five steps in the chain of survival: a) identification of a patient to be resuscitated, a matter that has important ethical ramifications; b) early recognition of cardiac arrest; c) early defibrillation; d) basic CPR, and e) advanced CPR. The CPR plan should incorporate the automatic recording of system, population, event and outcome variables. Task forces responsible for establishing and maintaining the plan and its quality control will periodically review the data with the aim of detecting errors, correcting them or introducing improvements. Various international societies and CPR committees have recently suggested a uniform way (the Utstein style) of recording and presenting data to allow comparisons either from hospital to hospital or over time within a single center.

  15. Bichat guidelines for the clinical management of haemorrhagic fever viruses and bioterrorism-related haemorrhagic fever viruses.

    PubMed

    Bossi, Philippe; Tegnell, Anders; Baka, Agoritsa; Van Loock, Frank; Hendriks, Jan; Werner, Albrecht; Maidhof, Heinrich; Gouvras, Georgios

    2004-12-15

    Haemorrhagic fever viruses (HFVs) are a diverse group of viruses that cause a clinical disease associated with fever and bleeding disorder. HFVs that are associated with a potential biological threat are Ebola and Marburg viruses (Filoviridae), Lassa fever and New World arenaviruses (Machupo, Junin, Guanarito and Sabia viruses) (Arenaviridae), Rift Valley fever (Bunyaviridae) and yellow fever, Omsk haemorrhagic fever, and Kyanasur Forest disease (Flaviviridae). In terms of biological warfare concerning dengue, Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever and Hantaviruses, there is not sufficient knowledge to include them as a major biological threat. Dengue virus is the only one of these that cannot be transmitted via aerosol. Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever and the agents of haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome appear difficult to weaponise. Ribavirin is recommended for the treatment and the prophylaxis of the arenaviruses and the bunyaviruses, but is not effective for the other families. All patients must be isolated and receive intensive supportive therapy.

  16. 21 CFR 870.4430 - Cardiopulmonary bypass intracardiac suction control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass intracardiac suction control. 870.4430 Section 870.4430 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND....4430 Cardiopulmonary bypass intracardiac suction control. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary...

  17. 21 CFR 870.4250 - Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller. 870.4250 Section 870.4250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass temperature...

  18. 21 CFR 870.4390 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing. 870.4390... bypass pump tubing. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing is polymeric tubing which is... through the cardiopulmonary bypass circuit. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  19. 21 CFR 870.4350 - Cardiopulmonary bypass oxygenator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass oxygenator. 870.4350... bypass oxygenator. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass oxygenator is a device used to exchange... the FDA guidance document entitled “Guidance for Cardiopulmonary Bypass Oxygenators 510(k) Submissions.”...

  20. 21 CFR 870.4230 - Cardiopulmonary bypass defoamer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass defoamer. 870.4230 Section... bypass defoamer. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass defoamer is a device used in conjunction with an oxygenator during cardiopulmonary bypass surgery to remove gas bubbles from the blood....

  1. 21 CFR 870.4250 - Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller. 870... Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller is a device used to control the temperature of the fluid entering and leaving a heat exchanger....

  2. 21 CFR 870.4250 - Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller. 870... Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller is a device used to control the temperature of the fluid entering and leaving a heat exchanger....

  3. 21 CFR 870.4250 - Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller. 870... Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller is a device used to control the temperature of the fluid entering and leaving a heat exchanger....

  4. 21 CFR 870.4250 - Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller. 870... Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller is a device used to control the temperature of the fluid entering and leaving a heat exchanger....

  5. 21 CFR 870.4205 - Cardiopulmonary bypass bubble detector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass bubble detector. 870.4205... bypass bubble detector. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass bubble detector is a device used to detect bubbles in the arterial return line of the cardiopulmonary bypass circuit. (b)...

  6. 21 CFR 870.4205 - Cardiopulmonary bypass bubble detector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass bubble detector. 870.4205... bypass bubble detector. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass bubble detector is a device used to detect bubbles in the arterial return line of the cardiopulmonary bypass circuit. (b)...

  7. 21 CFR 870.4205 - Cardiopulmonary bypass bubble detector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass bubble detector. 870.4205... bypass bubble detector. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass bubble detector is a device used to detect bubbles in the arterial return line of the cardiopulmonary bypass circuit. (b)...

  8. 21 CFR 870.4205 - Cardiopulmonary bypass bubble detector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass bubble detector. 870.4205... bypass bubble detector. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass bubble detector is a device used to detect bubbles in the arterial return line of the cardiopulmonary bypass circuit. (b)...

  9. 21 CFR 870.4205 - Cardiopulmonary bypass bubble detector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass bubble detector. 870.4205... bypass bubble detector. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass bubble detector is a device used to detect bubbles in the arterial return line of the cardiopulmonary bypass circuit. (b)...

  10. 21 CFR 870.4320 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator... Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator is an electrically and pneumatically operated device used to create pulsatile blood flow....

  11. 21 CFR 870.4320 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator... Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator is an electrically and pneumatically operated device used to create pulsatile blood flow....

  12. 21 CFR 870.4320 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator... Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator is an electrically and pneumatically operated device used to create pulsatile blood flow....

  13. 21 CFR 870.4320 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator... Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator is an electrically and pneumatically operated device used to create pulsatile blood flow....

  14. 21 CFR 870.4320 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator... Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator is an electrically and pneumatically operated device used to create pulsatile blood flow....

  15. Successful Resolution of Preretinal Haemorrhage with Intravitreal Ranibizumab

    PubMed Central

    Noorlaila, Baharuddin; Raja-Azmi, Mohd-Noor

    2016-01-01

    We would like to report two cases of preretinal haemorrhage from two different aetiology courses of bleeding being treated with intravitreal ranibizumab and its outcome. Our first case was a 39-year-old man with a diagnosis of severe aplastic anaemia that presented with bilateral premacular haemorrhages in both eyes. His right eye vision was 6/45 and it was counting finger in the left eye. He was treated with intravitreal ranibizumab once to the right eye and twice to the left eye. Right eye showed complete resolution of premacular haemorrhage and minimal residual premacular haemorrhage in the left eye at 3 months after initial presentation. Our second case was a 32-year-old healthy teacher that presented with preretinal haemorrhage at superotemporal region extending to macular area in left eye secondary to valsalva retinopathy. Her left vision was counting finger. She was treated with single intravitreal ranibizumab to the left eye. There was significant reduction of premacular haemorrhage and her left eye vision improved to 6/6 at 10 weeks after injection. Both cases had favourable outcome with intravitreal ranibizumab and can be considered as nonsurgical treatment option in treating premacular haemorrhage. PMID:27800200

  16. Bilateral adrenal gland haemorrhage: an unusual cause

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy, Vasant; Malabu, Usman; Cameron, Donald; Sangla, Kunwarjit

    2014-01-01

    Summary Our patient had drainage of a large amoebic liver abscess. This got complicated by a severe degree of hypotension, which required aggressive fluid resuscitation and hydrocortisone support. Computerised tomography (CT) of the abdomen revealed bilateral adrenal gland haemorrhage (BAH) resulting in primary adrenal gland failure, which was the cause for hypotension. Patient was on long-term warfarin for provoked deep vein thrombosis of lower limb, which was discontinued before the procedure. Thrombophilia profile indicated the presence of lupus anticoagulant factor with prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT). Patient was discharged on lifelong warfarin. This case emphasises the need for strong clinical suspicion for diagnosing BAH, rare but life-threatening condition, and its association with amoebic liver abscess and anti-phospholipid antibody syndrome (APLS). Learning points Recognition of BAH as a rare complication of sepsis.APLS can rarely cause BAH. PMID:25276353

  17. Experimental subarachnoid haemorrhage results in multifocal axonal injury.

    PubMed

    Kummer, Terrance T; Magnoni, Sandra; MacDonald, Christine L; Dikranian, Krikor; Milner, Eric; Sorrell, James; Conte, Valeria; Benetatos, Joey J; Zipfel, Gregory J; Brody, David L

    2015-09-01

    The great majority of acute brain injury results from trauma or from disorders of the cerebrovasculature, i.e. ischaemic stroke or haemorrhage. These injuries are characterized by an initial insult that triggers a cascade of injurious cellular processes. The nature of these processes in spontaneous intracranial haemorrhage is poorly understood. Subarachnoid haemorrhage, a particularly deadly form of intracranial haemorrhage, shares key pathophysiological features with traumatic brain injury including exposure to a sudden pressure pulse. Here we provide evidence that axonal injury, a signature characteristic of traumatic brain injury, is also a prominent feature of experimental subarachnoid haemorrhage. Using histological markers of membrane disruption and cytoskeletal injury validated in analyses of traumatic brain injury, we show that axonal injury also occurs following subarachnoid haemorrhage in an animal model. Consistent with the higher prevalence of global as opposed to focal deficits after subarachnoid haemorrhage and traumatic brain injury in humans, axonal injury in this model is observed in a multifocal pattern not limited to the immediate vicinity of the ruptured artery. Ultrastructural analysis further reveals characteristic axonal membrane and cytoskeletal changes similar to those associated with traumatic axonal injury. Diffusion tensor imaging, a translational imaging technique previously validated in traumatic axonal injury, from these same specimens demonstrates decrements in anisotropy that correlate with histological axonal injury and functional outcomes. These radiological indicators identify a fibre orientation-dependent gradient of axonal injury consistent with a barotraumatic mechanism. Although traumatic and haemorrhagic acute brain injury are generally considered separately, these data suggest that a signature pathology of traumatic brain injury-axonal injury-is also a functionally significant feature of subarachnoid haemorrhage, raising

  18. Experimental subarachnoid haemorrhage results in multifocal axonal injury

    PubMed Central

    Magnoni, Sandra; MacDonald, Christine L.; Dikranian, Krikor; Milner, Eric; Sorrell, James; Conte, Valeria; Benetatos, Joey J.; Zipfel, Gregory J.; Brody, David L.

    2015-01-01

    The great majority of acute brain injury results from trauma or from disorders of the cerebrovasculature, i.e. ischaemic stroke or haemorrhage. These injuries are characterized by an initial insult that triggers a cascade of injurious cellular processes. The nature of these processes in spontaneous intracranial haemorrhage is poorly understood. Subarachnoid haemorrhage, a particularly deadly form of intracranial haemorrhage, shares key pathophysiological features with traumatic brain injury including exposure to a sudden pressure pulse. Here we provide evidence that axonal injury, a signature characteristic of traumatic brain injury, is also a prominent feature of experimental subarachnoid haemorrhage. Using histological markers of membrane disruption and cytoskeletal injury validated in analyses of traumatic brain injury, we show that axonal injury also occurs following subarachnoid haemorrhage in an animal model. Consistent with the higher prevalence of global as opposed to focal deficits after subarachnoid haemorrhage and traumatic brain injury in humans, axonal injury in this model is observed in a multifocal pattern not limited to the immediate vicinity of the ruptured artery. Ultrastructural analysis further reveals characteristic axonal membrane and cytoskeletal changes similar to those associated with traumatic axonal injury. Diffusion tensor imaging, a translational imaging technique previously validated in traumatic axonal injury, from these same specimens demonstrates decrements in anisotropy that correlate with histological axonal injury and functional outcomes. These radiological indicators identify a fibre orientation-dependent gradient of axonal injury consistent with a barotraumatic mechanism. Although traumatic and haemorrhagic acute brain injury are generally considered separately, these data suggest that a signature pathology of traumatic brain injury—axonal injury—is also a functionally significant feature of subarachnoid haemorrhage

  19. Impact of Obesity on Cardiopulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Chandler, Marjorie L

    2016-09-01

    Although there are known detrimental effects of obesity on the heart and lungs, few data exist showing obesity as risk factor for cardiopulmonary disorders in dogs and cats. It is probable that increased abdominal fat is detrimental as it is in humans, and there is evidence of negative effects of increased intrathoracic fat. As well as physical effects of fat, increased inflammatory mediators and neurohormonal effects of obesity likely contribute to cardiopulmonary disorders. Weight loss in overweight individuals improves cardiac parameters and exercise tolerance. Obesity in patients with obstructive airway disorders is recognized to increase disease severity. PMID:27264052

  20. Dengue haemorrhagic fever in children in the 1996 Delhi epidemic.

    PubMed

    Kabra, S K; Jain, Y; Pandey, R M; Madhulika; Singhal, T; Tripathi, P; Broor, S; Seth, P; Seth, V

    1999-01-01

    An epidemic of dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) occurred in Delhi in 1996. A total of 240 children between the age of 4 months to 13 years of either sex, admitted in one hospital, were evaluated. Two hundred and sixteen (90%) children were from Delhi. A clinical diagnosis of dengue fever (DF) was made in 25 (10%), dengue fever with unusual bleeding (DFB) in 22 (9%), DHF in 80 (33%) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS) in 113 (47%) of the children strictly according to the WHO classification. The age peaked at 8 years. There was no association between various grades of severity of illness and age-groups though girls suffered from more severe illness. No association between severity of malnutrition and severity of illness was observed. Tourniquet test was positive in 40% with DF, 18% with DFB, 62% with DHF and 64% with DSS. In DSS haematemesis was present in 55 (49%), epistaxis in 39 (35%), melaena in 27 (24%) and ecchymosis in 34 (30%) patients. Children diagnosed as DFB had haematemesis and epistaxis in 12 (55%) and 10 (45%) respectively. Intravenous fluid requirement was clearly less in DFB patients than in DHF/DSS patients. Unusual clinical features in the form of jaundice were present in 7 (6%), hepatic encephalopathy in 6 (5%) and dengue encephalopathy in 6 (5%) patients. Dengue 2 virus was isolated from 10 of the 50 patients for whom viral culture was done on C6/36 clone of Aedes albopictus cell line. Eighteen patients suffering from DSS died giving an overall case fatality of 7.5%. The mortality rate in DHF/DSS was 9.3%. It is further suggested that DFB is a distinct entity. Most patients could be classified by the WHO classification if a retrospective packed cell volume was used to assess haemoconcentration. We suggest that development of area-specific criteria for diagnosis and management is desirable.

  1. Corticosteroid therapy of experimental hydrocephalus after intraventricular-subarachnoid haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, H. A.; Wilson, Rene B.; Patel, P. P.; Esmaili, M.

    1974-01-01

    Symptomatic hydrocephalus after subarachnoid haemorrhage seems to result both from mechanical obstruction of arachnoid villi and basilar cisterns and from an inflammatory cellular reaction in the villi. Subarachnoid haemorrhage was induced in rabbits using whole blood injected through an implanted intraventricular needle. Control rabbits receiving intraventricular methyl prednisolone acetate but no blood, developed ventricular dilation significantly more often than untreated controls. Eighty-three per cent of rabbits with untreated experimental subarachnoid haemorrhage developed moderate to severe hydrocephalus. Intramuscular steroid therapy significantly reduced the incidence of hydrocephalus. Images PMID:4406223

  2. Recent advances in vaccines against viral haemorrhagic fevers.

    PubMed

    Baize, S; Marianneau, P; Georges-Courbot, M C; Deubel, V

    2001-10-01

    Development of vaccines against viral haemorrhagic fevers is a public health priority. Recent advances in our knowledge of pathogenesis and of the immune responses elicited by these viruses emphasize the crucial role of the immune system in the control of infection, but also its probable involvement in pathogenesis. Several vaccine candidates against viral haemorrhagic fevers have been evaluated in animals during the past year. Together, these data suggest that a vaccine approach against viral haemorrhagic fevers is feasible, should induce well-balanced immune responses with cellular and humoral components, and should avoid the potential deleterious effects that are associated with such immune responses. PMID:11964870

  3. Recent advances in vaccines against viral haemorrhagic fevers.

    PubMed

    Baize, S; Marianneau, P; Georges-Courbot, M C; Deubel, V

    2001-10-01

    Development of vaccines against viral haemorrhagic fevers is a public health priority. Recent advances in our knowledge of pathogenesis and of the immune responses elicited by these viruses emphasize the crucial role of the immune system in the control of infection, but also its probable involvement in pathogenesis. Several vaccine candidates against viral haemorrhagic fevers have been evaluated in animals during the past year. Together, these data suggest that a vaccine approach against viral haemorrhagic fevers is feasible, should induce well-balanced immune responses with cellular and humoral components, and should avoid the potential deleterious effects that are associated with such immune responses.

  4. Disseminated fungal infection complicated with pulmonary haemorrhage in a case of acute myeloid leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Thulkar, S; Sharma, S; Das, P; Kumar, L

    2000-01-01

    Pulmonary haemorrhage is a common necropsy finding in acute leukaemia, however, it is rarely diagnosed during life. A man with acute myeloid leukaemia is reported who presented with disseminated fungal infection, anaemia, thrombocytopenia, and subconjuctival and petechial haemorrhages. During the course of the patient's illness, the chest infection was complicated with bilateral pulmonary haemorrhage. The diagnosis of pulmonary haemorrhage was based on characteristic clinical and radiological findings. The patient improved on treatment.


Keywords: leukaemia; pulmonary infiltrate; haemorrhage PMID:11060145

  5. Cardiogenic shock

    MedlinePlus

    Shock - cardiogenic ... electrical system of the heart (heart block) Cardiogenic shock occurs when the heart is unable to pump ... orthostatic hypotension) Weak (thready) pulse To diagnose cardiogenic shock, a catheter (tube) may be placed in the ...

  6. Clindamycin-induced anaphylactic shock during general anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Chiuan-Shiou; Lin, Su-Man; Lin, Shih-Pin; Chang, Wen-Guei; Chan, Kwok-Hon; Ting, Chien-Kun

    2006-11-01

    Clindamycin-related anaphylactic reaction is rarely reported. We report a male patient with buccal cancer who was undergoing radical neck dissection when life-threatening anaphylactic shock developed soon after intravenous infusion of clindamycin. Immediate cardiopulmonary resuscitation was performed, and the patient recovered uneventfully. Perioperative anaphylactic shock is a serious problem due to the difficulty of judgment and potentially disastrous outcome. Immediate diagnosis and halting of drug infusion should be the first actions taken.

  7. The Sunflower Cardiopulmonary Research Project of Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Leon

    A three year project designed to determine the value of a health program incorporating a cardiopulmonary fitness program is described. The instructional programs were in heart health, pulmonary health, nutrition, and physical fitness. A noncompetitive exercise and fitness period was employed in addition to the normal physical education time.…

  8. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Older Adults' Expectations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godkin, M. Dianne; Toth, Ellen L.

    1994-01-01

    Examined knowledge, attitudes, and opinions of 60 older adults about cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Most had little or no accurate knowledge of CPR. Knowledge deficits and misconceptions of older adults should be addressed so that they may become informed and active participants in CPR decision-making process. (BF)

  9. Haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome involving the liver.

    PubMed

    Chan, Y C; Wong, T W; Yap, E H; Tan, H C; Lee, H W; Chu, Y K; Lee, P W

    1987-09-01

    A case of haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome that originated in Malaysia is reported. The patient presented with clinical symptoms which were not typical of the disease as seen in endemic regions. Renal involvement, which is characteristic of haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome, was mild, and the predominant symptom was a persistently marked elevation of serum transaminase levels that was suggestive of hepatitis. Liver involvement has not been described in the Asian form of haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome. The patient developed a petechial skin rash and had severe thrombocytopenia. Serological confirmation of the diagnosis of haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome was obtained by the demonstration of significant antibody rises to hantaviruses in the patient's acute- and convalescent-phase sera.

  10. Isolated spinal artery aneurysm: a rare culprit of subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Sung, Tony H T; Leung, Warren K W; Lai, Bill M H; Khoo, Jennifer L S

    2015-04-01

    Isolated spinal artery aneurysm is a rare lesion which could be accountable for spontaneous spinal subarachnoid haemorrhage. We describe the case of a 74-year-old man presenting with sudden onset of chest pain radiating to the neck and back, with subsequent headache and confusion. Initial computed tomography aortogram revealed incidental finding of subtle acute spinal subarachnoid haemorrhage. A set of computed tomography scans of the brain showed further acute intracranial subarachnoid haemorrhage with posterior predominance, small amount of intraventricular haemorrhage, and absence of intracranial vascular lesions. Subsequent magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a thrombosed intradural spinal aneurysm with surrounding sentinel clot, which was trapped and excised during surgical exploration. High level of clinical alertness is required in order not to miss this rare but detrimental entity. Its relevant aetiopathological features and implications for clinical management are discussed.

  11. [Retinal haemorrhages in non-accidental head injury in childhood].

    PubMed

    Oberacher-Velten, I M; Helbig, H

    2014-09-01

    Retinal haemorrhages are one of the three cardinal manifestations of the "shaken baby syndrome" or "non-accidental head injury" in childhood. The role of an ophthalmologist in suspected non-accidental head injury has not only medical but also legal aspects and has been discussed controversially in the literature. The differential diagnosis and the specificity of retinal haemorrhages in childhood for an abusive head trauma will be pointed out in this paper.

  12. Visual restoration after suprachoroidal haemorrhage in glaucoma surgery.

    PubMed

    Rao, Aparna

    2014-03-04

    Suprachoroidal haemorrhage is the most dreaded complication feared by any surgeon during glaucoma surgery. Rapid explosive expulsion of intraocular contents can occur, which makes vision loss almost inevitable in most cases. Yet, adequate preparedness, prompt recognition of the earliest signs and quick closure of the wound can salvage the eye or even prevent loss of vision. This case highlights the successful visual rehabilitation and outcome in a patient with advanced glaucoma who experienced delayed expulsive haemorrhage intraoperatively.

  13. Brain microvascular function during cardiopulmonary bypass

    SciTech Connect

    Sorensen, H.R.; Husum, B.; Waaben, J.; Andersen, K.; Andersen, L.I.; Gefke, K.; Kaarsen, A.L.; Gjedde, A.

    1987-11-01

    Emboli in the brain microvasculature may inhibit brain activity during cardiopulmonary bypass. Such hypothetical blockade, if confirmed, may be responsible for the reduction of cerebral metabolic rate for glucose observed in animals subjected to cardiopulmonary bypass. In previous studies of cerebral blood flow during bypass, brain microcirculation was not evaluated. In the present study in animals (pigs), reduction of the number of perfused capillaries was estimated by measurements of the capillary diffusion capacity for hydrophilic tracers of low permeability. Capillary diffusion capacity, cerebral blood flow, and cerebral metabolic rate for glucose were measured simultaneously by the integral method, different tracers being used with different circulation times. In eight animals subjected to normothermic cardiopulmonary bypass, and seven subjected to hypothermic bypass, cerebral blood flow, cerebral metabolic rate for glucose, and capillary diffusion capacity decreased significantly: cerebral blood flow from 63 to 43 ml/100 gm/min in normothermia and to 34 ml/100 gm/min in hypothermia and cerebral metabolic rate for glucose from 43.0 to 23.0 mumol/100 gm/min in normothermia and to 14.1 mumol/100 gm/min in hypothermia. The capillary diffusion capacity declined markedly from 0.15 to 0.03 ml/100 gm/min in normothermia but only to 0.08 ml/100 gm/min in hypothermia. We conclude that the decrease of cerebral metabolic rate for glucose during normothermic cardiopulmonary bypass is caused by interruption of blood flow through a part of the capillary bed, possibly by microemboli, and that cerebral blood flow is an inadequate indicator of capillary blood flow. Further studies must clarify why normal microvascular function appears to be preserved during hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass.

  14. Dengue fever and dengue haemorrhagic fever: challenges of controlling an enemy still at large.

    PubMed

    Kurane, I; Takasaki, T

    2001-01-01

    Dengue virus infections are a serious cause of morbidity and mortality in most tropical and subtropical areas of the world: mainly Southeast and South Asia, Central and South America, and the Caribbean. Understanding the pathogenesis of dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF), the severe form of dengue illness, is a very important and challenging research subject. Viral virulence and immune responses have been considered as two major factors responsible for the pathogenesis. Virological studies are attempting to define the molecular basis of viral virulence. The immunopathological mechanisms appear to include a complex series of immune responses. A rapid increase in the levels of cytokines and chemical mediators apparently plays a key role in inducing plasma leakage, shock and haemorrhagic manifestations. It is likely that the entire process is initiated by infection with a so-called virulent dengue virus, often with the help of enhancing antibodies in secondary infection, and then triggered by rapidly elevated cytokines and chemical mediators produced by intense immune activation. However, understanding of the DHF pathogenesis is not complete. We still have a long way to go.

  15. Rabbit haemorrhagic disease (RHD) and rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV): a review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) is a calicivirus of the genus Lagovirus that causes rabbit haemorrhagic disease (RHD) in adult European rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus). First described in China in 1984, the virus rapidly spread worldwide and is nowadays considered as endemic in several countries. In Australia and New Zealand where rabbits are pests, RHDV was purposely introduced for rabbit biocontrol. Factors that may have precipitated RHD emergence remain unclear, but non-pathogenic strains seem to pre-date the appearance of the pathogenic strains suggesting a key role for the comprehension of the virus origins. All pathogenic strains are classified within one single serotype, but two subtypes are recognised, RHDV and RHDVa. RHD causes high mortality in both domestic and wild adult animals, with individuals succumbing between 48-72 h post-infection. No other species has been reported to be fatally susceptible to RHD. The disease is characterised by acute necrotising hepatitis, but haemorrhages may also be found in other organs, in particular the lungs, heart, and kidneys due to disseminated intravascular coagulation. Resistance to the disease might be explained in part by genetically determined absence or weak expression of attachment factors, but humoral immunity is also important. Disease control in rabbitries relies mainly on vaccination and biosecurity measures. Such measures are difficult to be implemented in wild populations. More recent research has indicated that RHDV might be used as a molecular tool for therapeutic applications. Although the study of RHDV and RHD has been hampered by the lack of an appropriate cell culture system for the virus, several aspects of the replication, epizootology, epidemiology and evolution have been disclosed. This review provides a broad coverage and description of the current knowledge on the disease and the virus. PMID:22325049

  16. Adult dengue haemorrhagic fever at Kuala Lumpur Hospital: retrospective study of 102 cases.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, N M; Cheong, I

    1995-01-01

    A retrospective study involving 102 adults with dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) was conducted to investigate the demographic aspect, clinical presenting features, laboratory investigations, complications, and mortality associated with the disease. The clinical diagnosis of DHF was in accordance with WHO recommendations. Epistaxis, gingivitis, haematemesis and gastritis were among the common complications. Platelet levels tended to decline from a higher value on admission (mean 67,000/mm3) to lower levels on subsequent days, with the lowest (mean 61,000/mm3) being on day 6 of the fever. Hyponatraemia (46.8%) was commonly observed. Morbidity of DHF was significant (29.4%) but the case fatality rate remained low (2.0%) in our adults, suggesting that adults are less likely than children to suffer from shock syndrome.

  17. Elevated tumour necrosis factor in dengue fever and dengue haemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Vitarana, T; de Silva, H; Withana, N; Gunasekera, C

    1991-06-01

    Acute and convalescent phase blood samples from five dengue fever (DF) patients and four dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) patients were tested for the presence of tumour necrosis factor (TNF). While all blood samples showed elevated levels, the acute phase blood sample levels were much higher. The mean TNF level in the acute samples of the five DF cases was 862 while in the DHF cases the level was 1722 pg/ml. Though the sample size is small, the difference appears to be statistically significant. Unlike in DF the distinctive features in DHF are the occurrence of shock, thrombocytopaenic purpura and sometimes disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). Increased TNF levels have not been reported in the literature in association with DHF, although it has been shown to contribute to these features which appear in some other diseases.

  18. Clinical manifestations of dengue haemorrhagic fever in children in Bandung, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Chairulfatah, A; Setiabudi, D; Ridad, A; Colebunders, R

    1995-12-01

    To describe the clinical manifestations of dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) all children with a clinical diagnosis of DHF admitted to the paediatric ward of the Dr. Hassan Sadikin General Hospital (Bandung, Indonesia) between April 1st 1991 and September 30th 1993 were enrolled in a prospective study. Of the 306 children with a clinical diagnosis of DHF on admission in only 128 (41.8%) the diagnosis of DHF was confirmed by HI test. Of the confirmed cases, 24 (19%) developed shock and 1 (0.7%) died. Of the 174 cases with a negative HI test, 33 (19%) developed shock and 4 (2%) died. Four of the children died of shock before an hemagglutination inhibitor (HI) test was performed. The overall case mortality rate was 2.9%. The symptoms and signs of the 128 children with serologically confirmed DHF included fever or a history of fever (100%), petechiae (29.7%), epistaxis (39.1%), other forms of bleeding (5.5%), a positive Tourniquet test (78.1%), hepatomegaly (46.9%), epigastric pain (61.7%), vomiting (55.5%), thrombocytopenia < 100,000/mm3 (3.2% on admission and 15.3% during hospitalisation). Four (3%) children developed encephalopathy and 1 child an acute liver failure. In order to decrease the mortality associated with DHF early diagnosis and adequate case management are essential.

  19. The metabolic effects of moderately severe upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage in man.

    PubMed Central

    Foster, K. J.; Alberti, K. G.; Binder, C.; Holdstock, G.; Karran, S. J.; Smith, C. L.; Talbot, S.; Turnell, D. C.

    1982-01-01

    The metabolic effects of moderately severe gastrointestinal haemorrhage were investigated in man. Before resuscitation, patients had raised circulating concentrations of glucose, lactate, alanine, glycerol and cortisol. After urgent operation for haemorrhage, metabolite concentrations were similar to those of control patients having elective abdominal surgery, but insulin concentrations were higher and cortisol lower in haemorrhage patients. There were no significant differences in nitrogen excretion between haemorrhage patients and their controls, but urinary 3-methyl-histidine excretion by haemorrhage patients was lower indicating decreased muscle protein breakdown. Decreased amino acid release from muscle might account for previously reported imparied wound healing after haemorrhage. PMID:7045838

  20. The effects of nitroglycerin during cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Stefaniotou, Antonia; Varvarousi, Giolanda; Varvarousis, Dimitrios P; Xanthos, Theodoros

    2014-07-01

    The outcome for both in-hospital and out-of hospital cardiac arrest remains dismal. Vasopressors are used to increase coronary perfusion pressure and thus facilitate return of spontaneous circulation during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. However, they are associated with a number of potential adverse effects and may decrease endocardial and cerebral organ blood flow. Nitroglycerin has a favourable haemodynamic profile which promotes forward blood flow. Several studies suggest that combined use of nitroglycerin with vasopressors during resuscitation, is associated with increased rates of resuscitation and improved post-resuscitation outcome. This article reviews the effects of nitroglycerin during cardiopulmonary resuscitation and postresuscitation period, as well as the beneficial outcomes of a combination regimen consisting of a vasopressor and a vasodilator, such as nitroglycerin.

  1. Practical aspects of advanced paediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Tibballs, J

    1988-08-01

    Successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the paediatric age group necessitates the acquisition of technical skills for rapid tracheal intubation, external cardiac compression and access to the circulation. Skills and equipment must be adapted to each age group. For optimal mechanical ventilation and the avoidance of complications, correct selection of endotracheal tube diameter and length is necessary. New techniques in resuscitation incorporate an understanding of the mechanism of blood flow during cardiac compression, the use of the intratracheal route for drug administration, and a revision of the use of catecholamines, sodium bicarbonate and calcium solutions in the treatment of asystole-bradycardia, electromechanical dissociation, ventricular fibrillation and tachycardia. Early intubation, adequate ventilation with oxygen, well performed external cardiac compression, prompt defibrillation and administration of adrenaline remain the cornerstones of advanced cardiopulmonary resuscitation. PMID:3064747

  2. Ebola haemorrhagic fever in Zaire, 1976

    PubMed Central

    1978-01-01

    Between 1 September and 24 October 1976, 318 cases of acute viral haemorrhagic fever occurred in northern Zaire. The outbreak was centred in the Bumba Zone of the Equateur Region and most of the cases were recorded within a radius of 70 km of Yambuku, although a few patients sought medical attention in Bumba, Abumombazi, and the capital city of Kinshasa, where individual secondary and tertiary cases occurred. There were 280 deaths, and only 38 serologically confirmed survivors. The index case in this outbreak had onset of symptoms on 1 September 1976, five days after receiving an injection of chloroquine for presumptive malaria at the outpatient clinic at Yambuku Mission Hospital (YMH). He had a clinical remission of his malaria symptoms. Within one week several other persons who had received injections at YMH also suffered from Ebola haemorrhagic fever, and almost all subsequent cases had either received injections at the hospital or had had close contact with another case. Most of these occurred during the first four weeks of the epidemic, after which time the hospital was closed, 11 of the 17 staff members having died of the disease. All ages and both sexes were affected, but women 15-29 years of age had the highest incidence of disease, a phenomenon strongly related to attendance at prenatal and outpatient clinics at the hospital where they received injections. The overall secondary attack rate was about 5%, although it ranged to 20% among close relatives such as spouses, parent or child, and brother or sister. Active surveillance disclosed that cases occurred in 55 of some 550 villages which were examined house-by-house. The disease was hitherto unknown to the people of the affected region. Intensive search for cases in the area of north-eastern Zaire between the Bumba Zone and the Sudan frontier near Nzara and Maridi failed to detect definite evidence of a link between an epidemic of the disease in that country and the outbreak near Bumba. Nevertheless it was

  3. Artificial neural network cardiopulmonary modeling and diagnosis

    DOEpatents

    Kangas, L.J.; Keller, P.E.

    1997-10-28

    The present invention is a method of diagnosing a cardiopulmonary condition in an individual by comparing data from a progressive multi-stage test for the individual to a non-linear multi-variate model, preferably a recurrent artificial neural network having sensor fusion. The present invention relies on a cardiovascular model developed from physiological measurements of an individual. Any differences between the modeled parameters and the parameters of an individual at a given time are used for diagnosis. 12 figs.

  4. [Clinical relevance of cardiopulmonary reflexes in anesthesiology].

    PubMed

    Guerri-Guttenberg, R A; Siaba-Serrate, F; Cacheiro, F J

    2013-10-01

    The baroreflex, chemoreflex, pulmonary reflexes, Bezold-Jarisch and Bainbridge reflexes and their interaction with local mechanisms, are a demonstration of the richness of cardiovascular responses that occur in human beings. As well as these, the anesthesiologist must contend with other variables that interact by attenuating or accentuating cardiopulmonary reflexes such as, anesthetic drugs, surgical manipulation, and patient positioning. In the present article we review these reflexes and their clinical relevance in anesthesiology.

  5. Artificial neural network cardiopulmonary modeling and diagnosis

    DOEpatents

    Kangas, Lars J.; Keller, Paul E.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention is a method of diagnosing a cardiopulmonary condition in an individual by comparing data from a progressive multi-stage test for the individual to a non-linear multi-variate model, preferably a recurrent artificial neural network having sensor fusion. The present invention relies on a cardiovascular model developed from physiological measurements of an individual. Any differences between the modeled parameters and the parameters of an individual at a given time are used for diagnosis.

  6. Chronic haemorrhagic radiation proctitis: A review.

    PubMed

    Nelamangala Ramakrishnaiah, Vishnu Prasad; Krishnamachari, Srinivasan

    2016-07-27

    Chronic haemorrhagic radiation proctitis (CHRP) is a difficult problem faced by the patients following radiation for pelvic malignancy. There is no standard treatment for this condition, but many methods of treatment are available. The aim of this study was to review the literature to see whether there is an improvement in the available evidence in comparison with previously published systematic reviews in treating patients with CHRP. The PubMed/Medline database and Google Scholar search was selectively searched. Studies, which treated patients with rectal bleeding due to chronic radiation proctitis or CHRP, were included. Seventy studies were finally selected out of which 14 were randomized controlled clinical trials. Though these studies could not be compared, it could be seen that there was an improvement in the methodology of the studies. There was an objective assessment of symptoms, signs and an objective assessment of outcomes. But, still, there were only a few studies that looked into the quality of life following treatment of CHRP. To increase recruitment to trials, a national registry of cases with established late radiation toxicity would facilitate the further improvement of such studies. Some of the conclusions that could be reached based on the available evidence are 4% formalin should be the first line treatment for patients with CHRP. Formalin and argon plasma coagulation (APC) are equally effective, but formalin is better for severe disease. Refractory patients, not responding to formalin or APC, need to be referred for hyperbaric oxygen therapy or surgery. Radio-frequency ablation is a promising modality that needs to be studied further in randomized trials. PMID:27462390

  7. Chronic haemorrhagic radiation proctitis: A review

    PubMed Central

    Nelamangala Ramakrishnaiah, Vishnu Prasad; Krishnamachari, Srinivasan

    2016-01-01

    Chronic haemorrhagic radiation proctitis (CHRP) is a difficult problem faced by the patients following radiation for pelvic malignancy. There is no standard treatment for this condition, but many methods of treatment are available. The aim of this study was to review the literature to see whether there is an improvement in the available evidence in comparison with previously published systematic reviews in treating patients with CHRP. The PubMed/Medline database and Google Scholar search was selectively searched. Studies, which treated patients with rectal bleeding due to chronic radiation proctitis or CHRP, were included. Seventy studies were finally selected out of which 14 were randomized controlled clinical trials. Though these studies could not be compared, it could be seen that there was an improvement in the methodology of the studies. There was an objective assessment of symptoms, signs and an objective assessment of outcomes. But, still, there were only a few studies that looked into the quality of life following treatment of CHRP. To increase recruitment to trials, a national registry of cases with established late radiation toxicity would facilitate the further improvement of such studies. Some of the conclusions that could be reached based on the available evidence are 4% formalin should be the first line treatment for patients with CHRP. Formalin and argon plasma coagulation (APC) are equally effective, but formalin is better for severe disease. Refractory patients, not responding to formalin or APC, need to be referred for hyperbaric oxygen therapy or surgery. Radio-frequency ablation is a promising modality that needs to be studied further in randomized trials. PMID:27462390

  8. Postpartum haemorrhage: a cause of maternal morbidity.

    PubMed

    Shirazee, Hasibul Hasan; Saha, Sudip Kr; Das, Indrani; Mondal, Tanmoy; Samanta, Sandip; Sarkar, Moloy

    2010-10-01

    To identify and analyse the risk factors associated with postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) and assess their impact on the maternal morbidity, a prospective observational study was carried out over a period of one year in a tertiary level referral institute in Kolkata, West Bengal, India. All the cases of PPH were identified and studied. Data analyses were done using Chi-square test. Out of 210 cases of maternal morbidity, 79 (37.6%) were found to have PPH as the causative factor. Uterine atonicity was found to be the main cause leading to 45 cases (56.9%) of PPH. With respect to the mode of delivery severe PPH was found in 34.3% of vaginally and 60% of operatively delivered patients which had statistical significance. More number of severe PPH cases, 17/31 (54.8%), had delivered outside the medical college. Here comes the role of 24-hour quality emergency obstetric care (EMOC), active management of 3rd stage of labour and early referral to the higher centre. The case fatality rate of PPH during the study period was 7.5%. This finding is quite close to the observation made in a North Indian tertiary hospital based study. In order to reduce maternal morbidity and thereby indirectly maternal mortality and to improve the overall maternal health, prevention and control of PPH can play a significant role. An integrated approach at all levels of healthcare delivery system, active management of labour and efficient emergency obstetric care will help in controlling the PPH. PMID:21510550

  9. 21 CFR 870.4420 - Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy return sucker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Surgical Devices § 870.4420... from the chest or heart during cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. (b) Classification. Class...

  10. 21 CFR 870.4350 - Cardiopulmonary bypass oxygenator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Surgical Devices § 870.4350 Cardiopulmonary...-heart surgery. (b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The special control for this device...

  11. Neurosurgical management of L-asparaginase induced haemorrhagic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Ogbodo, Elisha; Kaliaperumal, Chandrasekaran; O’Sullivan, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The authors describe a case of L-asparaginase induced intracranial thrombosis and subsequent haemorrhage in a newly diagnosed 30-year-old man with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia who was successfully managed by surgical intervention. At presentation, he had a Glasgow Coma Score of 7/15, was aphasic and had dense right hemiplegia. Neuroimaging revealed an acute anterior left middle cerebral artery infarct with parenchymal haemorrhagic conversion, mass effect and subfalcine herniation. He subsequently underwent left frontal craniotomy and evacuation of large frontal haematoma and decompressive craniectomy for cerebral oedema. Six months postoperatively he underwent titanium cranioplasty. He had made good clinical recovery and is currently mobilising independently with mild occasional episodes of expressive dysphasia, difficulty with fine motor movement on the right side, and has remained seizure free. This is the first documented case of L-asparaginase induced haemorrhagic stroke managed by neurosurgical intervention. The authors emphasise the possible role of surgery in managing chemotherapy induced intracranial complications. PMID:22605598

  12. [Meteorological observations concerning haemorrhages after tonsillectomy (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Dubs, R; Primault, B

    1975-09-01

    Based on the observation of 929 patients who had to be subjected to tonsillectomy within a period of twelve months, the authors concluded that the vast majority of post operative haemorrhages occurred during the beginning of a good weather period (clearing from the west), not quite so often during a "Föhn"-period (warm winds from the south). This contrasts somewhat with the observations of other authors who found a connection between haemorrhages and the beginning of a period of bad weather (close and stuffy, increasing humidity, high clouds). The dependence of postoperative haemorrhages on meteorological influences would perhaps give a reason for the hitherto medically unexplainable 40 per cent bleedings. Based on these observations it would be desirable for the meteorologic stations (or the media) to inform the doctors and hospitals about the weather phases.

  13. Haemorrhagic complications of pancreatitis: presentation, diagnosis and management.

    PubMed Central

    Ammori, B. J.; Madan, M.; Alexander, D. J.

    1998-01-01

    Massive haemorrhage is an uncommon complication in pancreatitis. Most affected patients suffer from chronic disease with associated pseudocyst. We present five patients (four male) with a mean age of 41 years (range 34-48 years). All patients had alcohol-induced pancreatitis complicated either by haematemesis (3), intraperitoneal haemorrhage (1) or both haematemesis and intraperitoneal haemorrhage (1). Source of bleeding was pseudocyst wall (2), splenic artery pseudoaneurysm (2) and splenic artery rupture (1). Distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy was performed in two patients, intracystic ligation and drainage in two, and packing with subsequent external drainage in one. Rebleeding occurred in two patients and required subsequent distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy in one; the other patient died of splenic rupture. No rebleeding and no mortality occurred after resection. Primary pancreatic resection is recommended whenever possible. Other management options include embolisation and ligation. Images Figure 1 PMID:9849330

  14. Nososcomial transmission of viral haemorrhagic fever in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Richards, Guy A

    2015-09-01

    Recent events in West Africa have highlighted the potential for the viral haemorrhagic fevers (VHFs) to cause considerable mortality and morbidity among heathcare workers. However, this is not a new threat as, although the risk is currently increased, it has always been present. In South Africa (SA) the only endemic haemorrhagic fever is Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever, transmitted by the Hyalomma tick, which is ubiquitous in cattle farming areas. Johannesburg, the commercial and transport hub of SA, is unusual in that all cases of VHF seen there are imported, either from rural areas in SA or from countries to the north. Johannesburg functions as the gateway to and from the rest of Africa, and as a destination for more affluent residents of neighbouring countries seeking medical attention. Numerous outbreaks of nosocomial infection have occurred in SA, and these are described in the form of brief case reports. PMID:26428962

  15. Fatal cerebral haemorrhage in a hypertensive seven-year-old boy.

    PubMed

    Brandtner, Herwig; Monticelli, Fabio C; Meyer, Harald J; Biebl, Ariane; Budka, Herbert

    2016-09-01

    A seven-year-old boy died from autopsy-proven brain haemorrhage due to hypertensive vasculopathy. This emphasizes the importance of early diagnosis and therapy of hypertension in children. Brain haemorrhage is a potentially fatal complication of paediatric hypertension.

  16. The collagen-binding protein of Streptococcus mutans is involved in haemorrhagic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Kazuhiko; Hokamura, Kazuya; Taniguchi, Naho; Wada, Koichiro; Kudo, Chiho; Nomura, Ryota; Kojima, Ayuchi; Naka, Shuhei; Muranaka, Yoshinori; Thura, Min; Nakajima, Atsushi; Masuda, Katsuhiko; Nakagawa, Ichiro; Speziale, Pietro; Shimada, Nobumitsu; Amano, Atsuo; Kamisaki, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Tokutaro; Umemura, Kazuo; Ooshima, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Although several risk factors for stroke have been identified, one-third remain unexplained. Here we show that infection with Streptococcus mutans expressing collagen-binding protein (CBP) is a potential risk factor for haemorrhagic stroke. Infection with serotype k S. mutans, but not a standard strain, aggravates cerebral haemorrhage in mice. Serotype k S. mutans accumulates in the damaged, but not the contralateral hemisphere, indicating an interaction of bacteria with injured blood vessels. The most important factor for high-virulence is expression of CBP, which is a common property of most serotype k strains. The detection frequency of CBP-expressing S. mutans in haemorrhagic stroke patients is significantly higher than in control subjects. Strains isolated from haemorrhagic stroke patients aggravate haemorrhage in a mouse model, indicating that they are haemorrhagic stroke-associated. Administration of recombinant CBP causes aggravation of haemorrhage. Our data suggest that CBP of S. mutans is directly involved in haemorrhagic stroke. PMID:21952219

  17. Fatal cerebral haemorrhage in a hypertensive seven-year-old boy

    PubMed Central

    Brandtner, Herwig; Monticelli, Fabio C; Meyer, Harald J; Biebl, Ariane

    2016-01-01

    A seven-year-old boy died from autopsy-proven brain haemorrhage due to hypertensive vasculopathy. This emphasizes the importance of early diagnosis and therapy of hypertension in children. Brain haemorrhage is a potentially fatal complication of paediatric hypertension.

  18. Periventricular intraparenchymal cerebral haemorrhage in preterm infants: the role of venous infarction.

    PubMed

    Gould, S J; Howard, S; Hope, P L; Reynolds, E O

    1987-03-01

    Haemorrhage into cerebral parenchymal tissue supero-lateral to the angles of the lateral ventricles is a major cause of death and disability in preterm infants. It is frequently associated with germinal layer and intraventricular haemorrhage but the mechanism by which parenchymal haemorrhage occurs is uncertain. Recent studies have suggested that it is due to bleeding into tissue previously damaged by ischaemia following cerebral hypoperfusion. We have studied 68 preterm infant brains, of which four contained early intraparenchymal haemorrhage supero-lateral to the angles of the lateral ventricles which were associated with large germinal layer and intraventricular haemorrhages. The anatomical distribution and histological features of these haemorrhages suggested that they resulted from venous infarction and that the venous drainage of the periventricular tissues had been obstructed by the germinal layer haemorrhages. In these four infants, bleeding into parenchymal tissues could be regarded as a complication of germinal layer and intraventricular haemorrhage rather than of cerebral hypoperfusion.

  19. 21 CFR 870.4210 - Cardiopulmonary bypass vascular catheter, cannula, or tubing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Surgical... cardiopulmonary bypass vascular catheter, cannula, or tubing is a device used in cardiopulmonary surgery...

  20. 21 CFR 870.4210 - Cardiopulmonary bypass vascular catheter, cannula, or tubing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Surgical... cardiopulmonary bypass vascular catheter, cannula, or tubing is a device used in cardiopulmonary surgery...

  1. 21 CFR 870.4210 - Cardiopulmonary bypass vascular catheter, cannula, or tubing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Surgical... cardiopulmonary bypass vascular catheter, cannula, or tubing is a device used in cardiopulmonary surgery...

  2. 21 CFR 870.4210 - Cardiopulmonary bypass vascular catheter, cannula, or tubing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Surgical... cardiopulmonary bypass vascular catheter, cannula, or tubing is a device used in cardiopulmonary surgery...

  3. A new NOTCH3 mutation presenting as primary intracerebral haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Pradotto, Luca; Orsi, Laura; Daniele, Dino; Caroppo, Paola; Lauro, Danilo; Milesi, Alessandra; Sellitti, Luigi; Mauro, Alessandro

    2012-04-15

    Primary intracerebral haemorrhages (PICH) are defined as haemorrhages within the brain parenchyma in the absence of readily identifiable causes. CADASIL (Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy) is a hereditary vascular disease and its mainly clinical manifestations are early-onset infarcts. Spontaneous lobar haematomas are a rare occurrence. We report a very unusual presentation of CADASIL in a 65 year-old man carrying a new NOTCH3 mutation. The clinical onset of the disease was related to an intracerebral haematoma following colon surgery and causing a delirium. In brief, our report suggests that CADASIL must be considered in patient with PICH. PMID:22206696

  4. Haemorrhagic Lumbar Juxtafacet Cyst with Ligamentum Flavum Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Ghent, Finn; Davidson, Trent; Mobbs, Ralph Jasper

    2014-01-01

    Juxtafacet cysts are an uncommon cause of radiculopathy. They occur most frequently in the lumbar region, and their distribution across the spine correlates with mobility. Haemorrhagic complications are rare and may occur in the absence of any provocation, although there is some association with anticoagulation and trauma. We present a case of acute radiculopathy due to an L5/S1 juxtafacet cyst with unprovoked haemorrhage which was found to extend into ligamentum flavum. The patient underwent uncomplicated microscope assisted decompression with excellent results. The demographics, presentation, aetiology, and management of juxtafacet cysts are discussed. PMID:25580330

  5. 21 CFR 870.4400 - Cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir. 870.4400... bypass blood reservoir. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir is a device used in conjunction with short-term extracorporeal circulation devices to hold a reserve supply of blood in the...

  6. 21 CFR 870.4300 - Cardiopulmonary bypass gas control unit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass gas control unit. 870.4300 Section 870.4300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... bypass gas control unit. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass gas control unit is a device...

  7. 21 CFR 870.4400 - Cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir. 870.4400... bypass blood reservoir. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir is a device used in conjunction with short-term extracorporeal circulation devices to hold a reserve supply of blood in the...

  8. 21 CFR 870.4400 - Cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir. 870.4400... bypass blood reservoir. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir is a device used in conjunction with short-term extracorporeal circulation devices to hold a reserve supply of blood in the...

  9. 21 CFR 870.4400 - Cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir. 870.4400... bypass blood reservoir. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir is a device used in conjunction with short-term extracorporeal circulation devices to hold a reserve supply of blood in the...

  10. 21 CFR 870.4400 - Cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir. 870.4400... bypass blood reservoir. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir is a device used in conjunction with short-term extracorporeal circulation devices to hold a reserve supply of blood in the...

  11. 21 CFR 870.4280 - Cardiopulmonary prebypass filter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary prebypass filter. 870.4280 Section... prebypass filter. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary prebypass filter is a device used during priming of... bypass. The device is not used to filter blood. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  12. 21 CFR 870.4420 - Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy return sucker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy return sucker. 870.4420 Section 870.4420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... from the chest or heart during cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. (b) Classification. Class...

  13. 21 CFR 870.4420 - Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy return sucker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy return sucker. 870.4420 Section 870.4420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... from the chest or heart during cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. (b) Classification. Class...

  14. 21 CFR 870.4420 - Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy return sucker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy return sucker. 870.4420 Section 870.4420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... from the chest or heart during cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. (b) Classification. Class...

  15. 21 CFR 870.4300 - Cardiopulmonary bypass gas control unit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... gas. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards). ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass gas control unit. 870.4300... bypass gas control unit. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass gas control unit is a device...

  16. 21 CFR 870.4390 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing. 870.4390... bypass pump tubing. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing is polymeric tubing which is used in the blood pump head and which is cyclically compressed by the pump to cause the blood to...

  17. 21 CFR 870.4390 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing. 870.4390... bypass pump tubing. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing is polymeric tubing which is used in the blood pump head and which is cyclically compressed by the pump to cause the blood to...

  18. 21 CFR 870.4390 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing. 870.4390... bypass pump tubing. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing is polymeric tubing which is used in the blood pump head and which is cyclically compressed by the pump to cause the blood to...

  19. 21 CFR 870.4390 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing. 870.4390... bypass pump tubing. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing is polymeric tubing which is used in the blood pump head and which is cyclically compressed by the pump to cause the blood to...

  20. Drug therapy of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in children.

    PubMed

    Zaritsky, A

    1989-03-01

    In contrast to adults, cardiopulmonary arrest in infants and children is rarely an acute, primary cardiac event. Instead, it is often the terminal event in a progressive deterioration of respiratory or circulatory function. Successful resuscitation from cardiac arrest therefore is unusual in the paediatric patient and most survivors have persistent neurological impairment. Rapid vascular access and recall of drug dosages are major obstacles in treating paediatric emergencies. This paper reviews vascular access and alternative drug delivery methods. The endotracheal and intraosseous routes provide alternative sites for drug delivery, but the optimal doses and methods of drug administration via these routes are unknown. Indeed, although great progress in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) research has been made over the past 10 years, there are only limited data on paediatric arrest mechanisms and drug treatment. In this paper, recommended dosages and mechanisms of action of drugs useful during cardiopulmonary resuscitation are reviewed, highlighting recent data which suggest that changes in current drug recommendations may be needed. To avoid delays in management, precalculated tables of drugs should be readily available in emergency departments and other care areas where paediatric cases are likely to be seen. Adrenaline (epinephrine) remains the drug of choice in a cardiac arrest, but the most effective dose may be higher than currently used. Treatment of acidosis during the arrest concentrates on restoration of ventilation and blood flow and not on bicarbonate administration. In the post-arrest setting increasing data suggest bicarbonate may not be beneficial and may actually be detrimental. Calcium and atropine also have relatively minor roles in resuscitation pharmacology. Calcium is only indicated to treat hypocalcaemia, counteract the effects of hyperkalaemia or hypermagnesaemia, or reverse calcium channel blocker toxicity. Finally, the role of isoprenaline

  1. Cardiopulmonary bypass: development of John Gibbon's heart-lung machine

    PubMed Central

    Passaroni, Andréia Cristina; Silva, Marcos Augusto de Moraes; Yoshida, Winston Bonetti

    2015-01-01

    Objective To provide a brief review of the development of cardiopulmonary bypass. Methods A review of the literature on the development of extracorporeal circulation techniques, their essential role in cardiovascular surgery, and the complications associated with their use, including hemolysis and inflammation. Results The advancement of extracorporeal circulation techniques has played an essential role in minimizing the complications of cardiopulmonary bypass, which can range from various degrees of tissue injury to multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. Investigators have long researched the ways in which cardiopulmonary bypass may insult the human body. Potential solutions arose and laid the groundwork for development of safer postoperative care strategies. Conclusion Steady progress has been made in cardiopulmonary bypass in the decades since it was first conceived of by Gibbon. Despite the constant evolution of cardiopulmonary bypass techniques and attempts to minimize their complications, it is still essential that clinicians respect the particularities of each patient's physiological function. PMID:26107456

  2. Clinical profile of dengue during 2005 outbreak in Kolkata and predictive markers of dengue haemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sanat Kumar; De, Saumyen; Sarkar, Uttam; Ghosh, Mausumi; Chatterjee, Mrinal Kanti; Samanta, Sandip

    2011-11-01

    Epidemics of dengue outbreak are frequent in south-east Asian countries. Dengue is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in this region. This prospective observational study was done at Dr BC Roy Memorial for Children during the outbreak in 2005 in Kolkata to know the clinical pattern of dengue cases and to find the possible markers of development of dengue hemorrhagic fever. Two hundred and eighty seropositive cases of dengue were included in the study. Among paediatric population, 5 to 10 years age group was most commonly affected. One-sixth of the cases were from villages indicating the extension of the epidemic in rural areas. Abrupt onset of high fever, non-purulent conjunctival injection, erythematous lips, flushed appearance, myalgia, arthralgia, headache and thrombocytopenia were the predominant features. Rhinitis and pharyngitis were rarely found. Prolonged fever more than 7 days, flushed appearance, pharyngeal congestion, shock evidence, serous effusion, bleeding manifestations, thrombocytopenia, elevated liver enzymes and elevated PCV were associated with development of dengue haemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome.

  3. Electron and immunoelectron microscopy of rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV).

    PubMed

    Valícek, L; Smíd, B; Rodák, L; Kudrna, J

    1990-01-01

    Rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) had a calicivirus-like structure and a diameter of 31.5-33.0 nm. Antigenic relationship between the investigated RHDV strain and the causal agent of RHD in China was demonstrated by immunoelectron microscopy.

  4. Immunoelectron microscopy of rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus using monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Valícek, L; Smíd, B; Rodák, L

    1992-12-01

    Five monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) to rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV), prepared and tested in ELISA, immunoperoxidase (IP) and immunofluorescence (IF) test previously, reacted specifically in immunoelectron microscopy (IEM), too. No differences in binding of individual MoAbs with full or empty RHDV particles were found by IEM.

  5. Intestinal haemorrhage in Antarctica. A multinational rescue operation.

    PubMed

    Podkolinski, M T; Semmens, K

    1979-09-22

    Three nations cooperated in the aerial evacuation from an Australian Antarctic station of a patient with gastrointestinal haemorrhage, after conservative treatment. The combined operation is described, and reference is made to the difficulties in medical management arising from polar isolation. Attention is drawn to logistic improvements which would alleviate this situation.

  6. Delayed haemorrhage in conservative surgery for ectopic pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Rachagan, S P; Neoh, H S

    1990-03-01

    A case of delayed haemorrhage after conservative surgery for ectopic pregnancy is presented. Brief pathophysiology of the condition is presented. The importance of beta-subunit human chorionic gonadotrophin monitoring of the serum in this patient is highlighted. Surgical procedures to prevent this complication are also discussed.

  7. Breathing-Impaired Speech after Brain Haemorrhage: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heselwood, Barry

    2007-01-01

    Results are presented from an auditory and acoustic analysis of the speech of an adult male with impaired prosody and articulation due to brain haemorrhage. They show marked effects on phonation, speech rate and articulator velocity, and a speech rhythm disrupted by "intrusive" stresses. These effects are discussed in relation to the speaker's…

  8. A clinical and epidemiological study of an epidemic of febrile illness with haemorrhagic manifestations which occurred at Kanpur, India, in 1968.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, U C; Kapoor, A K; Mathur, A; Chandra, D; Khan, A M; Mehrotra, R M

    1970-01-01

    An epidemic of febrile illness associated with haemorrhagic manifestations and shock occurred at Kanpur, India, during 1968. The epidemic was widespread in the city, involving about one-tenth of the population; cases were more frequent in thickly populated localities with poor sanitary conditions. Those affected were mainly adolescents and adults of both sexes and multiple cases occurred in families. The disease was characterized by the sudden onset of fever, associated with severe headache and low backache. A number of patients had bradycardia, vomiting and diarrhoea and macular skin rashes associated with itching. A small percentage of the patients had haemorrhagic manifestations in the form of haematemesis, haemoptysis, melaena, haematuria and bleeding per vaginum. The mortality was very low. Dengue type 4 virus has been implicated in the epidemic.

  9. Adrenal crisis secondary to bilateral adrenal haemorrhage after hemicolectomy

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, Venessa H M; Kabir, Shahrir; Ip, Julian C Y

    2016-01-01

    Summary Adrenal haemorrhage is a rare cause of adrenal crisis, which requires rapid diagnosis, prompt initiation of parenteral hydrocortisone and haemodynamic monitoring to avoid hypotensive crises. We herein describe a case of bilateral adrenal haemorrhage after hemicolectomy in a 93-year-old female with high-grade colonic adenocarcinoma. This patient’s post-operative recovery was complicated by an acute hypotensive episode, hypoglycaemia and syncope, and subsequent computed tomography (CT) scan of the abdomen revealed bilateral adrenal haemorrhage. Given her labile blood pressure, intravenous hydrocortisone was commenced with rapid improvement of blood pressure, which had incompletely responded with fluids. A provisional diagnosis of hypocortisolism was made. Initial heparin-induced thrombocytopenic screen (HITTS) was positive, but platelet count and coagulation profile were both normal. The patient suffered a concurrent transient ischaemic attack with no neurological deficits. She was discharged on a reducing dose of oral steroids with normal serum cortisol levels at the time of discharge. She and her family were educated about lifelong steroids and the use of parenteral steroids should a hypoadrenal crisis eventuate. Learning points: Adrenal haemorrhage is a rare cause of hypoadrenalism, and thus requires prompt diagnosis and management to prevent death from primary adrenocortical insufficiency. Mechanisms of adrenal haemorrhage include reduced adrenal vascular bed capillary resistance, adrenal vein thrombosis, catecholamine-related increased adrenal blood flow and adrenal vein spasm. Standard diagnostic assessment is a non-contrast CT abdomen. Intravenous hydrocortisone and intravenous substitution of fluids are the initial management. A formal diagnosis of primary adrenal insufficiency should never delay treatment, but should be made afterwards.

  10. Childhood dengue shock syndrome in Trinidad.

    PubMed

    Teelucksingh, S; Lutchman, G; Udit, A; Pooransingh, S

    1999-09-01

    Dengue haemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS) is a major cause of hospitalisation and mortality among children in South East Asia. We now report, for the first time, the occurrence of DHF/DSS in Trinidadian children. The presence of vomiting, abdominal pain and hepatomegaly in the setting of a dengue epidemic should alert clinicians to the possibility of DHF/DSS. Timely diagnosis and aggressive supportive treatment are essential for a successful outcome. Source reduction, vector control and community participation are also necessary to avert the South East Asian scenario from emerging in the Caribbean.

  11. Advances in the diagnosis of shock, its assessment and resuscitation during the Great War.

    PubMed

    Bullingham, A G P

    2016-07-01

    The Great War of 1914-1918 ushered in a new era of technology on the battlefield resulting in casualties on an unprecedented scale. There had been progress in many related areas of medicine before the outbreak of hostilities but these had not been applied or fully developed in clinical practice. This is particularly true for the management of haemorrhagic shock and resuscitation. This article discusses the history and development of medical treatment of shock and trauma patients during the conflict. PMID:27456289

  12. 21 CFR 870.4260 - Cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter... Cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line... entitled “Guidance for Cardiopulmonary Bypass Arterial Line Blood Filter 510(k) Submissions.”...

  13. 21 CFR 870.4210 - Cardiopulmonary bypass vascular catheter, cannula, or tubing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass vascular catheter, cannula... Devices § 870.4210 Cardiopulmonary bypass vascular catheter, cannula, or tubing. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass vascular catheter, cannula, or tubing is a device used in cardiopulmonary surgery...

  14. 21 CFR 870.4370 - Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. 870... Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass... cardiopulmonary bypass circuit during bypass surgery. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  15. [Cardiogenic shock].

    PubMed

    Houegnifioh, Komlanvi Kafui; Gfeller, Etienne; Garcia, Wenceslao; Ribordy, Vincent

    2014-08-13

    Cardiogenic shock, especially when it complicates a myocardial infarction, is still associated with high mortality rate. Emergency department or first care physicians are often the first providers to assess the cardiogenic shock patient, and plays thereby a key role in achieving a timely diagnosis and treatment. This review will detail the actual physiopathology understanding of the cardiogenic shock, its diagnosis and management focusing on the care within the emergency department.

  16. USE OF A PROGRAMMABLE CALCULATOR IN CARDIOPULMONARY PERFUSION

    PubMed Central

    Mills, J. David; Tallent, Jerome H.

    1978-01-01

    This study describes a hand-held, battery-powered, programmable instrument (Calculator Model SR-52) that can be taken directly into the operating room by cardiopulmonary perfusionists. Three programs are described in detail: 1) Cardiopulmonary perfusion parameters and estimated blood volume; 2) blood gas parameters and saturations, with temperature corrections; and 3) cardiopulmonary oxygen transfer and oxygenator efficiency. This inexpensive calculator allows perfusion personnel to manipulate easily-derived data into values which heretofore have required elaborate nomograms or special slide rules—or were not available within a reasonable computational time. PMID:15216068

  17. Factor V Leiden and Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Uppal, Victor; Rosin, Mark; Marcoux, Jo-Anne; Olson, Marnie; Bezaire, Jennifer; Dalshaug, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: We present a case of a patient with factor V Leiden with an antithrombin III activity of 67% who received a successful aortic valve replacement supported by cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). A safe level of anticoagulation was achieved by monitoring activated clotting time (ACT) and heparin concentration ensuring adequate anticoagulation throughout the procedure. Results from ACT, heparin dose response, heparin protamine titration, and thrombelastography are given. Factor V Leiden patients can be safely anti-coagulated using heparin for CPB procedures when monitored with ACT, heparin protamine titration, and thrombelastography. Postoperative chest tube losses were 360 mL, less than half our institutional average. Anticoagulation for the pre-and post-operative phase is also discussed. PMID:26834284

  18. The role of Levosimendan in cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Varvarousi, Giolanda; Stefaniotou, Antonia; Varvaroussis, Dimitrios; Aroni, Filippia; Xanthos, Theodoros

    2014-10-01

    Although initial resuscitation from cardiac arrest (CA) has increased over the past years, long term survival rates remain dismal. Epinephrine is the vasopressor of choice in the treatment of CA. However, its efficacy has been questioned, as it has no apparent benefits for long-term survival or favorable neurologic outcome. Levosimendan is an inodilator with cardioprotective and neuroprotective effects. Several studies suggest that it is associated with increased rates of return of spontaneous circulation as well as improved post-resuscitation myocardial function and neurological outcome. The purpose of this article is to review the properties of Levosimendan during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and also to summarize existing evidence regarding the use of Levosimendan in the treatment of CA.

  19. Transient Diabetes Insipidus Following Cardiopulmonary Bypass.

    PubMed

    Ekim, Meral; Ekim, Hasan; Yilmaz, Yunus Keser; Bolat, Ali

    2015-04-01

    Diabetes insipidus (DI) results from inadequate output of Antidiuretic Hormone (ADH) from the pituitary gland (central DI) or the inability of the kidney tubules to respond to ADH (nephrogenic DI). ADH is an octapeptide produced in the supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus and stored in the posterior lobe of the pituitary gland. Cardiopulmonary Bypass (CPB) has been shown to cause a six-fold increased circulating ADH levels 12 hours after surgery. However, in some cases, ADH release may be transiently suppressed due to cardioplegia (cardiac standstill) or CPB leading to DI. We present the postoperative course of a 60-year-old man who developed transient DI after CPB. He was successfully treated by applying nasal desmopressin therapy. Relevant biochemical parameters should be monitored closely in patients who produce excessive urine after open heart surgery.

  20. Increased post-operative haemorrhage seen in adult coblation tonsillectomy.

    PubMed

    Noon, A P; Hargreaves, S

    2003-09-01

    Coblation is a new soft tissue surgical technique that is being used for tonsillectomy. Published results show a significant decrease in the amount of post-operative pain experienced by patients undergoing coblation tonsillectomy. There has been no published work to date on the incidence of post-operative haemorrhage. From August 2001 to November 2002 one surgeon performed 36 coblation tonsillectomies on adults. On another list he performed 29 by his standard method of dissection and bipolar coagulation. Retrospective analysis found a significant increase in the secondary haemorrhage rate in adult patients undergoing coblation tonsillectomy (22.2 vs. 3.4 per cent). At our department coblation tonsillectomy has been abandoned until further work into its safety has been published.

  1. Resuscitation in massive obstetric haemorrhage using an intraosseous needle.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, D J; Bukunola, B; Samuels, T L; Induruwage, L; Uncles, D R

    2011-04-01

    A 38-year-old woman experienced a massive postpartum haemorrhage 30 minutes after emergency caesarean delivery. The patient became severely haemodynamically compromised with an unrecordable blood pressure. Rapid fluid resuscitation was limited by the capacity of the intravenous cannula in place at the time and inability to establish additional vascular access using conventional routes in a timely manner. An intraosseous needle was inserted in the proximal humerus at the first attempt and administration of resuscitation fluid by this route subsequently enabled successful placement of further intravenous lines. Blood and blood products were deployed in conjunction with intra-operative cell salvage and transoesophageal Doppler cardiac output monitoring was used to assess adequacy of volume replacement. Haemorrhage control was finally achieved with the use of recombinant factor VIIa and hysterectomy. PMID:21401545

  2. Dengue haemorrhagic fever integral hypothesis: confirming observations, 1987-2007.

    PubMed

    Guzman, Maria G; Kouri, Gustavo

    2008-06-01

    In 1987, Kouri et al. published in Transactions their integral hypothesis to explain the development of dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) epidemics (Kouri, G.P., Guzmán, M.G., Bravo, J.R., 1987. Why dengue haemorrhagic fever in Cuba? 2. An integral analysis. Trans. R. Soc. Trop. Med. Hyg. 81, 821-823). Based on observations carried out during the 1981 Cuban DHF epidemic, the authors integrated in one model the most advanced knowledge at that time. Observations in the last 20 years confirm the importance of this multifactorial and unifying view of the problem, where the interaction between the host, the virus and the vector in an epidemiological and ecosystem setting might determine DHF as a final outcome. Investigations on the interaction among host, virus and mosquito with an ecosystemic view are needed.

  3. Detection and localization of internal haemorrhaging using electrical bioimpedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, J.; Fenech, M.

    2013-04-01

    Electrical bioimpedance is an effective measuring tool to provide quick, non-invasive, real-time results which will be applied to the detection of internal haemorrhaging. Experiments were performed on female Fancy Rats weighing 333±44g, and 10mL of porcine blood was injected abdominally over 3 minutes. Data was collected using an 8×8 needle electrode array at 5 kHz, and 95 kHz and sent to the BioParHom Z-Flow. A strong correlation was found between the electrode paths crossing directly through the blood injection site, showing a decrease of about -0.17±0.1Ω/mL for the 5 kHz frequency. This correlation allows us to quickly detect internal haemorrhaging and also localize it with the current path set-up in the electrode array.

  4. Blood products and their use in traumatic major haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Deveau, Simon Ross

    2016-02-01

    Blood loss due to trauma is a leading cause of death in young people and is the result of the 'lethal triad' of hypothermia, acidosis and coagulopathy, which collectively reduce haemostasis. Emergency department nurses can help to reverse the triad through the timely and efficient use of blood products and fluids. This article briefly examines different blood groups, describes the elements of the lethal triad, and discusses the blood products used to transfuse patients with major haemorrhage. PMID:26853674

  5. Spontaneous subdural haemorrhage in a patient with scleroderma renal crisis

    PubMed Central

    Bhangoo, Munveer Singh; Hein, Paul; Nicholson, Laura; Carter, Caitlin

    2014-01-01

    A 52-year-old woman with a history of systemic sclerosis presented with new onset seizures and renal failure. The patient's history, laboratory data and pathology supported the diagnosis of scleroderma renal crisis. The patient was also noted to have a subdural haemorrhage (SDH) in the absence of trauma. This is the first report of scleroderma renal crisis associated with a spontaneous SDH. PMID:25193814

  6. Surgical Trial in Lobar Intracerebral Haemorrhage (STICH II) Protocol

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Within the spectrum of spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage there are some patients with large or space occupying haemorrhage who require surgery for neurological deterioration and others with small haematomas who should be managed conservatively. There is equipoise about the management of patients between these two extremes. In particular there is some evidence that patients with lobar haematomas and no intraventricular haemorrhage might benefit from haematoma evacuation. The STICH II study will establish whether a policy of earlier surgical evacuation of the haematoma in selected patients will improve outcome compared to a policy of initial conservative treatment. Methods/Design an international multicentre randomised parallel group trial. Only patients for whom the treating neurosurgeon is in equipoise about the benefits of early craniotomy compared to initial conservative treatment are eligible. All patients must have a CT scan confirming spontaneous lobar intracerebral haemorrhage (≤1 cm from the cortex surface of the brain and 10-100 ml in volume). Any clotting or coagulation problems must be corrected and randomisation must take place within 48 hours of ictus. With 600 patients, the study will be able to demonstrate a 12% benefit from surgery (2p < 0.05) with 80% power. Stratified randomisation is undertaken using a central 24 hour randomisation service accessed by telephone or web. Patients randomised to early surgery should have the operation within 12 hours. Information about the status (Glasgow Coma Score and focal signs) of all patients through the first five days of their trial progress is also collected in addition to another CT scan at about five days (+/- 2 days). Outcome is measured at six months via a postal questionnaire to the patient. Primary outcome is death or severe disability defined using a prognosis based 8 point Glasgow Outcome Scale. Secondary outcomes include: Mortality, Rankin, Barthel, EuroQol, and Survival. Trial

  7. Pathology of goose haemorrhagic polyomavirus infection in goose embryos.

    PubMed

    Bernáth, Sándor; Farsang, Attila; Kovács, Andrea; Nagy, Edith; Dobos-Kovács, Mihály

    2006-02-01

    Goose embryos were infected with goose haemorrhagic polyomavirus (GHPV) onto the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) in order to examine the effect of GHPV on the embryos and to obtain data on whether embryos could develop into infected, virus-shedding goslings, as well as to present an accurate biological method for virus titration. The reported method of infection could offer a possibility to express the virus titre as the median embryo infective dose (EID(50)). As a special pathological feature of the disease, extensive cerebral haemorrhages were observed, which protruded the skullcap in many cases. Some embryos infected with 10(1.25) or 10(0.25) EID(50)/0.2 ml were able to hatch; however, they were in poor physical condition and died by post-hatching day 4 showing haemorrhagic nephritis and enteritis of geese. Virus shedding was revealed by polymerase chain reaction. The ability of some of the infected goose embryos to hatch may indicate the potency of GHPV to spread vertically, although this needs further study for confirmation.

  8. Superselective coil embolization in gastrointestinal haemorrhage: early experience.

    PubMed

    Nawawi, O; Young, N; So, S

    2006-02-01

    This is a retrospective study to evaluate our early experience of using selective microcoil embolization in patients who had gastrointestinal (GI) haemorrhage. From December 2002 to December 2003, six patients with GI haemorrhage (upper GI, n = 1; lower GI, n = 5) underwent superselective microcoil embolization. Microcatheters were used to carry out embolizations in branches of the superior mesenteric artery. Microcoils were used in five patients and a combination of microcoils and embolospheres was used in one patient. Technical success (bleeding target devascularization) was achieved in all patients who showed active bleeding at the time of angiography. Two patients had recurrent bleeding within 24 h of embolization, of which one (16.7%) died. The other patient did not require active intervention as bleeding was minimal and resolved with conservative management. Satisfactory clinical success (no rebleeding after 30 days) was achieved in five patients. No clinical signs and symptoms of bowel ischaemia occurred in these patients. Follow-up colonoscopy carried out in two patients did not show any signs of ischaemia in the affected bowel segments. Superselective microcoil embolization is an effective and safe method of controlling and arresting bleeding in GI haemorrhage.

  9. Cardiopulmonary Syndromes (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Cancer.gov

    Expert-reviewed information summary about common conditions that produce chest symptoms. The cardiopulmonary syndromes addressed in this summary are cancer-related dyspnea, malignant pleural effusion, pericardial effusion, and superior vena cava syndrome.

  10. 21 CFR 870.4240 - Cardiopulmonary bypass heat exchanger.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Surgical Devices § 870.4240 Cardiopulmonary..., consisting of a heat exchange system used in extracorporeal circulation to warm or cool the blood...

  11. 21 CFR 870.4240 - Cardiopulmonary bypass heat exchanger.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Surgical Devices § 870.4240 Cardiopulmonary..., consisting of a heat exchange system used in extracorporeal circulation to warm or cool the blood...

  12. 21 CFR 870.4240 - Cardiopulmonary bypass heat exchanger.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Surgical Devices § 870.4240 Cardiopulmonary..., consisting of a heat exchange system used in extracorporeal circulation to warm or cool the blood...

  13. 21 CFR 870.4240 - Cardiopulmonary bypass heat exchanger.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Surgical Devices § 870.4240 Cardiopulmonary..., consisting of a heat exchange system used in extracorporeal circulation to warm or cool the blood...

  14. 21 CFR 870.4240 - Cardiopulmonary bypass heat exchanger.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Surgical Devices § 870.4240 Cardiopulmonary..., consisting of a heat exchange system used in extracorporeal circulation to warm or cool the blood...

  15. 21 CFR 870.4230 - Cardiopulmonary bypass defoamer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... with an oxygenator during cardiopulmonary bypass surgery to remove gas bubbles from the blood. (b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The special control for this device is the FDA guidance...

  16. 21 CFR 870.4310 - Cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure gauge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Surgical Devices § 870.4310... gauge is a device used in cardiopulmonary bypass surgery to measure the pressure of the blood...

  17. 21 CFR 870.4310 - Cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure gauge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Surgical Devices § 870.4310... gauge is a device used in cardiopulmonary bypass surgery to measure the pressure of the blood...

  18. Effect of Saral meditation on intelligence, performance and cardiopulmonary functions.

    PubMed

    Shah, A H; Joshi, S V; Mehrotra, P P; Potdar, N; Dhar, H L

    2001-11-01

    Meditation is a mental exercise to improve mental faculty. Present attempt was to evaluate effect of Saral Meditation on development of intelligence, academic performance & cardiopulmonary functions. Results show significant improvement in development of intelligence and academic performance. There was apparent improvement in confidence and they were free from anxiety. There were also considerable changes in psychomotor ability and cardiopulmonary functions however, result was not significant.

  19. Electrical failure during cardiopulmonary bypass: a critical moment.

    PubMed

    Durukan, Ahmet Baris; Gurbuz, Hasan Alper; Ozcelik, Gokhan; Yorgancioglu, Cem

    2016-06-01

    Electrical failure during cardiopulmonary bypass is a crisis situation for the cardiac surgical team. Fortunately, it has a low incidence with low morbidity and mortality rates. Notwithstanding, institutional preventative and management measures should be taken. Here, we report a case of electrical failure during cardiopulmonary bypass, which was successfully managed during the surgery, allowing the patient to recover uneventfully. These unwanted complications can only be managed by promoting awareness and putting in place strategies against them. PMID:27516788

  20. Electrical failure during cardiopulmonary bypass: a critical moment

    PubMed Central

    Gurbuz, Hasan Alper; Ozcelik, Gokhan; Yorgancioglu, Cem

    2016-01-01

    Electrical failure during cardiopulmonary bypass is a crisis situation for the cardiac surgical team. Fortunately, it has a low incidence with low morbidity and mortality rates. Notwithstanding, institutional preventative and management measures should be taken. Here, we report a case of electrical failure during cardiopulmonary bypass, which was successfully managed during the surgery, allowing the patient to recover uneventfully. These unwanted complications can only be managed by promoting awareness and putting in place strategies against them. PMID:27516788

  1. Characteristics and Mechanisms of Cardiopulmonary Injury Caused by Mine Blasts in Shoals: A Randomized Controlled Study in a Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Han, Gengfen; Wang, Ziming; Wang, Jianmin; Yang, Weixiao; Chen, Jing; Kang, Jianyi; Zhang, Sen; Wang, Aimin; Lai, Xinan

    2013-01-01

    Background Because the characteristics of blast waves in water are different from those in air and because kinetic energy is liberated by a pressure wave at the water-air interface, thoracic injuries from mine blasts in shoals may be serious. The aim of the present study was to investigate the characteristics and mechanisms of cardiopulmonary injury caused by mine blasts in shoals. Methods To study the characteristics of cardiopulmonary injury, 56 animals were divided randomly into three experimental groups (12 animals in the sham group, 22 animals in the land group and 22 animals in the shoal group). To examine the biomechanics of injury, 20 animals were divided randomly into the land group and the shoal group. In the experimental model, the water surface was at the level of the rabbit's xiphoid process, and paper electric detonators (600 mg RDX) were used to simulate mines. Electrocardiography and echocardiography were conducted, and arterial blood gases, serum levels of cardiac troponin I and creatine kinase-MB and other physiologic parameters were measured over a 12-hour period after detonation. Pressures in the thorax and abdomen and the acceleration of the thorax were measured. Conclusion The results indicate that severe cardiopulmonary injury and dysfunction occur following exposure to mine blasts in shoals. Therefore, the mechanisms of cardiopulmonary injury may result from shear waves that produce strain at the water-air interface. Another mechanism of injury includes the propagation of the shock wave from the planta to the thorax, which causes a much higher peak overpressure in the abdomen than in the thorax; as a result, the abdominal organs and diaphragm are thrust into the thorax, damaging the lungs and heart. PMID:24358110

  2. Cardiogenic shock.

    PubMed

    Shah, Palak; Cowger, Jennifer A

    2014-07-01

    Cardiogenic shock is the most common cause of in-hospital mortality for patients who have suffered a myocardial infarction. Mortality exceeds 50% and management is focused on a rapid diagnosis of cardiogenic shock, restoration of coronary blood flow through early revascularization, complication management, and maintenance of end-organ homeostasis. Besides revascularization, inotropes and vasodilators are potent medical therapies to assist the failing heart. Pulmonary arterial catheters are an important adjunctive tool to assess patient hemodynamics, but their use should be limited to select patients in cardiogenic shock.

  3. High incidence of post-tonsillectomy secondary haemorrhage following coblation tonsillectomy.

    PubMed

    Praveen, C V; Parthiban, Subashini; Terry, R M

    2013-01-01

    To examine the incidence of haemorrhage following tonsillectomy, to explore the usefulness of antibiotic in preventing postoperative haemorrhage and to examine if the haemorrhage depended on the level of expertise of the surgeon. A retrospective review analysing tonsillectomy method, the rate secondary haemorrhage, the grade of operating surgeon. A χ(2) analysis was used to determine the statistical difference between the haemorrhage rates of different tonsillectomy methods. One thousand three hundred and thirty-six tonsillectomies were performed during this period by four different methods: 615 by cold steel dissection, 582 by Coblation, 32 by bipolar dissection and 107 by Helica thermal coagulation. 621 tonsillectomies were performed by Consultant grade and middle grades performed 693 operations. 124 patients (9.3 %) were readmitted with haemorrhage. The secondary haemorrhage requiring surgery for controlling bleeding for cold steel dissection method was 1.5 % compared to 6.7 % for coblation method (P < 0.01 %), 6.3 % for bipolar dissection and 1.9 % for Helica thermal coagulation method. Overall consultants had a post tonsillectomy haemorrhage rate of 5.5 % and middle grades had a rate of 3.7 %. 86.5 % of the patients were already on routine prophylactic oral antibiotics at the time of presentation with haemorrhage needing surgical arrest and 13.5 % were not on antibiotics (P < 0.05 %). There was statistically significant difference in secondary haemorrhage rate between coblation and cold steel dissection methods. Coblation tonsillectomies had an increased need for operative intervention to control secondary haemorrhage. Routine use of antibiotic and expertise of operating surgeon had no bearing on secondary haemorrhage rate.

  4. Pure sensory stroke from compression of putaminal haemorrhage: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The literature rarely describes putaminal haemorrhage producing pure spinothalamic sensory deficit. Here reports a case of putaminal haemorrhage in which selective impairment of the spinothalamic sensory modality was due to the compression of the hematoma. Case presentation A 57 year old hypertensive man presented with a pure sensory stroke(PSS), and CT scan showed a putaminal haemorrhage. The clinical course was characterized by rapid resolution of the deficits. Conclusion This case illustrates this rarely of PSS from compression of putaminal haemorrhage of good functional and vital prognosis, and stresses the value of CT scanning for diagnosis and prognosis. PMID:19133162

  5. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing in the MRI environment.

    PubMed

    Lafountain, Richard A; da Silveira, Juliana Serafim; Varghese, Juliet; Mihai, Georgeta; Scandling, Debbie; Craft, Jason; Swain, Carmen B; Franco, Veronica; Raman, Subha V; Devor, Steven T; Simonetti, Orlando P

    2016-04-01

    Maximal oxygen consumption ([Formula: see text]max) measured by cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPX) is the gold standard for assessment of cardiorespiratory fitness. Likewise, cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is the gold standard for quantification of cardiac function. The combination of CPX and CMR may offer unique insights into cardiopulmonary pathophysiology; however, the MRI-compatible equipment needed to combine these tests has not been available to date. We sought to determine whether CPX testing in the MRI environment, using equipment modified for MRI yields results equivalent to those obtained in standard exercise physiology (EP) lab. Ten recreationally trained subjects completed [Formula: see text]max tests in different locations; an EP laboratory and an MRI laboratory, using site specific equipment. CMR cine images of the heart were acquired before and immediately after maximal exercise to measure cardiac function. Subjects in all tests met criteria indicating that peak exercise was achieved. Despite equipment modifications for the MRI environment, [Formula: see text]max was nearly identical between tests run in the different labs (95% lower confidence limit (LCL)  =  0.8182). The mean difference in [Formula: see text]max was less than 3.40 ml (kg/min)(-1), within the variability expected for tests performed on different days, in different locations, using different metabolic carts. MRI performed at rest and following peak exercise stress indicated cardiac output increased from 5.1  ±  1.0 l min(-1) to 16.4  ±  5.6 l min(-1), LVEF increased from 65.2  ±  3.3% to 78.4  ±  4.8%, while RVEF increased from 52.8  ±  5.3% to 63.4  ±  5.3%. Regression analysis revealed a significant positive correlation between [Formula: see text]max and stroke volume (R  =  0.788, P  =  0.006), while the correlation with cardiac output did not reach statistical significance (R

  6. Hospital based clinical surveillance for dengue haemorrhagic fever in Bandung, Indonesia 1994-1995.

    PubMed

    Chairulfatah, A; Setiabudi, D; Agoes, R; van Sprundel, M; Colebunders, R

    2001-10-22

    In Indonesia, by law dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) cases must be reported within 24 h to the district health authority. The objective of this study was to evaluate the adequacy, accuracy and reporting delay of this reporting system. In four major hospitals of the city of Bandung, medical records of hospitalised DHF cases admitted between April 1994 and March 1995 were reviewed. This list of DHF cases was compared with the list of reported cases to the Bandung Municipality Health Office. During the study period, 569 DHF cases and 81 dengue shock syndrome (DSS) cases were diagnosed. Only 199 (31%) of the 650 hospitalised cases with suspected DHF/DSS were reported to the Bandung Municipality Health Office. The percentage of fatal cases was significantly lower among all hospitalised cases 11/650 (1.7%) than among reported cases 5/199 (2.5%). In only 443 of the 583 hospitalised cases (76%) in which a dengue serological test was performed, was this test positive. Of the 199 reported DHF/DSS cases 151 (76%) had a positive haemagglutination inhibition test. This study shows that the surveillance system for DHF/DSS in Bandung should be strengthened. DHF/DSS cases should be reported on the basis of a diagnosis made during hospitalisation preferably after a serological confirmation is obtained.

  7. Cardiopulmonary monitoring in intra-abdominal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Malbrain, Manu L N G; Ameloot, Koen; Gillebert, Carl; Cheatham, Michael L

    2011-07-01

    Cardiopulmonary dysfunction and failure are commonly encountered in the patient with intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) or abdominal compartment syndrome. Accurate assessment and optimization of preload, contractility, and afterload in conjunction with appropriate goal-directed resuscitation and assessment of fluid responsiveness are essential to restore end-organ perfusion. In patients with IAH, the traditional "barometric" preload indicators such as pulmonary artery occlusion pressure and central venous pressure are erroneously increased. Volumetric monitoring techniques have been proven to be superior in directing the appropriate resuscitation together with targeted abdominal perfusion pressure. If such limitations are not recognized, misinterpretation of the patient's cardiac status is likely, resulting in inappropriate and potentially detrimental therapy. IAH also markedly affects the mechanical properties of the chest wall and consequently also the respiratory function. Altered mechanical properties of the chest wall may limit ventilation, influence the work of breathing, affect the interaction between the respiratory muscles, hasten the development of respiratory failure, and interfere with gas exchange. Pulmonary monitoring is important to understand the relationships between intra-abdominal pressure and chest wall mechanics and the impact of IAH on ventilator-induced lung injury, lung distention, recruitment, and lung edema. PMID:21944448

  8. [Ethics of the cardiopulmonary resuscitation decisions].

    PubMed

    Monzón, J L; Saralegui, I; Molina, R; Abizanda, R; Cruz Martín, M; Cabré, L; Martínez, K; Arias, J J; López, V; Gràcia, R M; Rodríguez, A; Masnou, N

    2010-11-01

    Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) must be attempted if indicated, not done if it is not indicated or if the patient does not accept or has previously rejected it and withdrawn it if it is ineffective. If CPR is considered futile, a Do-Not-Resuscitate Order (DNR) will be recorded. This should be made known to all physicians and nurses involved in patient care. It may be appropriate to limit life-sustaining-treatments for patients with severe anoxic encephalopathy, if the possibility of clinical evolution to brain death is ruled out. After CPR it is necessary to inform and support families and then review the process in order to make future improvements. After limitation of vital support, certain type of non-heart-beating-organ donation can be proposed. In order to acquire CPR skills, it is necessary to practice with simulators and, sometimes, with recently deceased, always with the consent of the family. Research on CPR is essential and must be conducted according to ethical rules and legal frameworks.

  9. Evaluation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation techniques in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billica, Roger; Gosbee, John; Krupa, Debra T.

    1991-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) techniques were investigated in microgravity with specific application to planned medical capabilities for Space Station Freedom (SSF). A KC-135 parabolic flight test was performed with the goal of evaluating and quantifying the efficacy of different types of microgravity CPR techniques. The flight followed the standard 40 parabola profile with 20 to 25 seconds of near-zero gravity in each parabola. Three experiments were involved chosen for their clinical background, certification, and practical experience in prior KC-135 parabolic flight. The CPR evaluation was performed using a standard training mannequin (recording resusci-Annie) which was used in practice prior to the actual flight. Aboard the KC-135, the prototype medical restraint system (MRS) for the SSF Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) was used for part of the study. Standard patient and crew restraints were used for interface with the MRS. During the portion of study where CPR was performed without MRS, a set of straps for crew restraint similar to those currently employed for the Space Shuttle program were used. The entire study was recorded via still camera and video.

  10. [Pediatric trauma life support and cardiopulmonary resuscitation].

    PubMed

    Domínguez Sampedro, P; de Lucas García, N; Balcells Ramírez, J; Martínez Ibáñez, V

    2002-06-01

    Accidents are the most frequent cause of mortality among children older than one year. Thus, the need to proceed to cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) during the early phases of trauma life support (TLS) is always a possibility. Trauma is a special situation in CPR: expected problems (i.e., hemorrhage, pneumo-hemothorax, hypothermia, and difficult intubation and vascular access), specific therapeutic actions (i.e., helmet retrieval and cervical spine immobilization), and exceptions to standard CPR guidelines (i.e., contraindication for the head tilt-chin lift manoeuvre) can arise. Therefore, TLS and CPR interventions must be appropriately integrated. TLS is considered a method (much like CPR). It combines organization and leadership with competent, structured and timely actions. Appropriate intervention within the first few moments ("platinum half-hour" and " golden hour") and first day ("silver day") is essential. As in CPR, two modalities can be distinguished: basic TLS (on the scene, without technical resources) and advanced TLS (with resources). The acronym PAA summarizes basic TLS: Protect-Alert-Aid. The advanced TLS sequence includes the following: primary survey and initial stabilization, secondary survey, triage, transport, and definitive care. The main objective of the primary survey and initial stabilization phase is the identification and treatment of injuries with immediate potential to cause death. CPR in the context of TLS should be adapted to the special features of trauma. Particular attention should be paid to the cervical spine. While not specific for trauma care, the early and generous administration of oxygen should be emphasized.

  11. A Case of Haemorrhagic Constrictive Pericarditis with Bilateral Pleural Effusions

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Julie; Talebi, Soheila; Cativo, Eder; Mushiyev, Savi; Pekler, Gerald; Visco, Ferdinand

    2016-01-01

    Presentation of pericardial disease is diverse, with the viral aetiology being the most common cause; however, when haemorrhagic pericardial effusion is present, these causes are narrowed to few aetiologies. We present a case of a young female of African descent who presented with diffuse abdominal pain and vomiting. Initial work-up showed pericardial effusion with impending echocardiographic findings of cardiac tamponade and bilateral pleural effusions. Procedures included a left video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) with pericardial window. We consider that it is important for all physicians to be aware of not only typical presentation but also atypical and unusual clinical picture of pericardial disease. PMID:27807484

  12. Acute adrenal haemorrhage: diagnosis, treatment and follow-up.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, J G; Borri, M L; Menasce, S; Ajzen, S; Kater, C E; Faiçal, S

    1996-01-01

    Acute adrenal haemorrhage (AAH) is a rare disorder with different aetiologies. Aiming to discuss this condition, this report deals with four different cases that will be analysed and examined below, each one of them confirmed by biopsy or surgery and followed clinically and radiologically. In these cases it was found that the patients suffered from localized abdominal pain (4/4) and fever (2/4); one patient had adrenal insufficiency due to bilateral massive AAH. Therefore we concluded that AAH is an uncommon condition with variable clinical manifestations. PMID:9089038

  13. [Leptospirosis with necro-haemorrhagic cholecystitis in a Boxer puppy].

    PubMed

    Steil, D; Quandt, A; Mayer-Scholl, A; Sie, J M; Löhr, C V; Teifke, J P

    2014-01-01

    A Boxer puppy from the island of Rügen, which was properly vaccinated according to its age, was presented with acute gastrointestinal symptoms. The presumptive diagnosis of leptospirosis with acute renal failure, hepatic damage, and jaundice was confirmed by seroconversion (increased titre to 1 : 800 in a non-vaccine serogroup 4 weeks after disease onset). Cholecystitis was diagnosed based on clinical symptoms and sonographic results. After an initial improvement, the puppy's condition deteriorated and cholecystectomy was performed. Histopathological diagnosis indicated a haemorrhagic necrotizing cholecystitis.

  14. [Leptospirosis with necro-haemorrhagic cholecystitis in a Boxer puppy].

    PubMed

    Steil, D; Quandt, A; Mayer-Scholl, A; Sie, J M; Löhr, C V; Teifke, J P

    2014-01-01

    A Boxer puppy from the island of Rügen, which was properly vaccinated according to its age, was presented with acute gastrointestinal symptoms. The presumptive diagnosis of leptospirosis with acute renal failure, hepatic damage, and jaundice was confirmed by seroconversion (increased titre to 1 : 800 in a non-vaccine serogroup 4 weeks after disease onset). Cholecystitis was diagnosed based on clinical symptoms and sonographic results. After an initial improvement, the puppy's condition deteriorated and cholecystectomy was performed. Histopathological diagnosis indicated a haemorrhagic necrotizing cholecystitis. PMID:25423604

  15. Acute retrobulbar haemorrhage: An ophthalmologic emergency for the emergency physician.

    PubMed

    Pamukcu, Can; Odabaşı, Mahmut

    2015-07-01

    Acute retrobulbar haemorrhage (ARBH) is a rare ophthalmic emergency observed following blunt eye trauma. Multiple trauma and loss of consciousness can hide symptoms of ARBH. Rapid diagnosis and immediate lateral canthotomy and cantholysis must be performed to prevent permanent visual loss in patients. Medical treatment can be added to surgical therapy. Lateral canthotomy and cantholysis are simple procedures that can be performed by emergency physicians. In this report, it was aimed to present a case with post-traumatic ARBH and provide general knowledge about the diagnosis, follow-up and treatment of ARBH.

  16. [Seizures caused by subarachnoid haemorrhage in a pregnant woman].

    PubMed

    Shim, Susy; Christiansen, Ulla Birgitte; Sørensen, Anne Nødgaard

    2016-07-25

    This case report describes a pregnant woman of gestational week 37 + 2 days who was admitted to the hospital with first-time seizures. The patient was stabilized, and an acute caesarian section was performed due to the possible aetiology of eclampsia and the advanced gestational age. Because of the atypical clinical history and normal maternal blood samples a computed tomography of the cerebrum was performed demonstrating a subarachnoid haemorrhage. A computed tomography-angiography revealed an aneurism at the anterior communicating artery. The aneurism was coiled the following day to reduce the risk of rebleeding. PMID:27460576

  17. A rare case of a giant haemorrhagic adrenal cyst.

    PubMed

    Kaderabek, D; McLeod, N; Tigges, T

    2012-01-01

    Giant adrenal cysts are an infrequent encounter in surgical practice. In this article we discuss a case of a 66 year old woman who presented with increasing abdominal girth and was subsequently found to have a large retroperitoneal mass on computed tomography (CT) scan. After a thorough endocrine work up was completed, the patient underwent an exploratory laparotomy with resection of a giant adrenal mass. This was ultimately found to be a haemorrhagic cyst. This case highlights the clinical features and management of this relatively rare finding.

  18. [Obstructive shock].

    PubMed

    Pich, H; Heller, A R

    2015-05-01

    An acute obstruction of blood flow in central vessels of the systemic or pulmonary circulation causes the clinical symptoms of shock accompanied by disturbances of consciousness, centralization, oliguria, hypotension and tachycardia. In the case of an acute pulmonary embolism an intravascular occlusion results in an acute increase of the right ventricular afterload. In the case of a tension pneumothorax, an obstruction of the blood vessels supplying the heart is caused by an increase in extravascular pressure. From a hemodynamic viewpoint circulatory shock caused by obstruction is closely followed by cardiac deterioration; however, etiological and therapeutic options necessitate demarcation of cardiac from non-cardiac obstructive causes. The high dynamics of this potentially life-threatening condition is a hallmark of all types of obstructive shock. This requires an expeditious and purposeful diagnosis and a rapid and well-aimed therapy. PMID:25994928

  19. Management of a delayed post-pancreatoduodenectomy haemorrhage using endovascular techniques

    PubMed Central

    Asai, Kengo; Zaydfudim, Victor; Truty, Mark; Reid-Lombardo, KMarie; Kendrick, Michael; Que, Florencia; Nagorney, David; Andrews, James; Farnell, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background A delayed post-pancreatoduodenectomy haemorrhage is associated with a significant increase in peri-operative mortality. Endovascular techniques are frequently used for a delayed haemorrhage. However, limited data exists on the short- and long-term outcomes of this approach. A retrospective review over a 10-year period at a quaternary-referral pancreatic centre was performed. Methods Between 2002–2012, 1430 pancreatoduodenectomies were performed, and 32 patients had a delayed haemorrhage (occurring >24 h post-operatively) managed by endovascular techniques. The clinicopathological variables related to a haemorrhage were investigated. Results A total of 42 endovascular procedures were performed at a median of 25 days, with the majority of delayed haemorrhages occurring after 7 days. There were four deaths (13%) with three occurring in patients with a grade C haemorrhage. Seven patients (22%) experienced rebleeding, and two patients developed hepatic abscesses. Conclusion A delayed haemorrhage post-pancreaticoduodenectomy can be managed by endovascular techniques with acceptable morbidity and mortality. Rebleeding and hepatic abscesses may occur and can be managed non-operatively in most cases. The association of a delayed haemorrhage with a pancreatic fistula makes this a challenging clinical problem. PMID:26235930

  20. Fatal cerebral haemorrhage in a hypertensive seven-year-old boy

    PubMed Central

    Brandtner, Herwig; Monticelli, Fabio C; Meyer, Harald J; Biebl, Ariane

    2016-01-01

    A seven-year-old boy died from autopsy-proven brain haemorrhage due to hypertensive vasculopathy. This emphasizes the importance of early diagnosis and therapy of hypertension in children. Brain haemorrhage is a potentially fatal complication of paediatric hypertension. PMID:27688895

  1. Fatal cerebral haemorrhage in a hypertensive seven-year-old boy.

    PubMed

    Brandtner, Herwig; Monticelli, Fabio C; Meyer, Harald J; Biebl, Ariane; Budka, Herbert

    2016-09-01

    A seven-year-old boy died from autopsy-proven brain haemorrhage due to hypertensive vasculopathy. This emphasizes the importance of early diagnosis and therapy of hypertension in children. Brain haemorrhage is a potentially fatal complication of paediatric hypertension. PMID:27688895

  2. A Snapshot of Coagulopathy After Cardiopulmonary Bypass.

    PubMed

    Höfer, Judith; Fries, Dietmar; Solomon, Cristina; Velik-Salchner, Corinna; Ausserer, Julia

    2016-09-01

    Cardiac surgery involving cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) is often associated with important blood loss, allogeneic blood product usage, morbidity, and mortality. Coagulopathy during CPB is complex, and the current lack of uniformity for triggers and hemostatic agents has led to a wide variability in bleeding treatment. The aim of this review is to provide a simplified picture of the data available on patients' coagulation status at the end of CPB in order to provide relevant information for the development of tailored transfusion algorithms. A nonsystematic literature review was carried out to identify changes in coagulation parameters during CPB. Both prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time increased during CPB, by a median of 33.3% and 17.9%, respectively. However, there was marked variability across the published studies, indicating these tests may be unreliable for guiding hemostatic therapy. Some thrombin generation (TG) parameters were affected, as indicated by a median increase in TG lag time of 55.0%, a decrease in TG peak of 17.5%, and only a slight decrease in endogenous thrombin potential of 7%. The most affected parameters were fibrinogen levels and platelet count/function. Both plasma fibrinogen concentration and FIBTEM maximum clot firmness decreased during CPB (median change of 36.4% and 33.3%, respectively) as did platelet count (44.5%) and platelet component (34.2%). This review provides initial information regarding changes in coagulation parameters during CPB but highlights the variability in the reported results. Further studies are warranted to guide physicians on the parameters most appropriate to guide hemostatic therapy.

  3. Teamwork and leadership in cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Hunziker, Sabina; Johansson, Anna C; Tschan, Franziska; Semmer, Norbert K; Rock, Laura; Howell, Michael D; Marsch, Stephan

    2011-06-14

    Despite substantial efforts to make cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) algorithms known to healthcare workers, the outcome of CPR has remained poor during the past decades. Resuscitation teams often deviate from algorithms of CPR. Emerging evidence suggests that in addition to technical skills of individual rescuers, human factors such as teamwork and leadership affect adherence to algorithms and hence the outcome of CPR. This review describes the state of the science linking team interactions to the performance of CPR. Because logistical barriers make controlled measurement of team interaction in the earliest moments of real-life resuscitations challenging, our review focuses mainly on high-fidelity human simulator studies. This technique allows in-depth investigation of complex human interactions using precise and reproducible methods. It also removes variability in the clinical parameters of resuscitation, thus letting researchers study human factors and team interactions without confounding by clinical variability from resuscitation to resuscitation. Research has shown that a prolonged process of team building and poor leadership behavior are associated with significant shortcomings in CPR. Teamwork and leadership training have been shown to improve subsequent team performance during resuscitation and have recently been included in guidelines for advanced life support courses. We propose that further studies on the effects of team interactions on performance of complex medical emergency interventions such as resuscitation are needed. Future efforts to better understand the influence of team factors (e.g., team member status, team hierarchy, handling of human errors), individual factors (e.g., sex differences, perceived stress), and external factors (e.g., equipment, algorithms, institutional characteristics) on team performance in resuscitation situations are critical to improve CPR performance and medical outcomes of patients. PMID:21658557

  4. A Snapshot of Coagulopathy After Cardiopulmonary Bypass.

    PubMed

    Höfer, Judith; Fries, Dietmar; Solomon, Cristina; Velik-Salchner, Corinna; Ausserer, Julia

    2016-09-01

    Cardiac surgery involving cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) is often associated with important blood loss, allogeneic blood product usage, morbidity, and mortality. Coagulopathy during CPB is complex, and the current lack of uniformity for triggers and hemostatic agents has led to a wide variability in bleeding treatment. The aim of this review is to provide a simplified picture of the data available on patients' coagulation status at the end of CPB in order to provide relevant information for the development of tailored transfusion algorithms. A nonsystematic literature review was carried out to identify changes in coagulation parameters during CPB. Both prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time increased during CPB, by a median of 33.3% and 17.9%, respectively. However, there was marked variability across the published studies, indicating these tests may be unreliable for guiding hemostatic therapy. Some thrombin generation (TG) parameters were affected, as indicated by a median increase in TG lag time of 55.0%, a decrease in TG peak of 17.5%, and only a slight decrease in endogenous thrombin potential of 7%. The most affected parameters were fibrinogen levels and platelet count/function. Both plasma fibrinogen concentration and FIBTEM maximum clot firmness decreased during CPB (median change of 36.4% and 33.3%, respectively) as did platelet count (44.5%) and platelet component (34.2%). This review provides initial information regarding changes in coagulation parameters during CPB but highlights the variability in the reported results. Further studies are warranted to guide physicians on the parameters most appropriate to guide hemostatic therapy. PMID:27268940

  5. Hypogammaglobulinemia After Cardiopulmonary Bypass in Infants

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, Leslie A; Robert, Stephen M; Atkinson, T. Prescott; Dabal, Robert J; Mahdi, Alla M.; Alten, Jeffrey A

    2014-01-01

    Background Hypogammaglobulinemia has been reported after cardiac surgery and may be associated with adverse outcomes. We sought to define baseline immunoglobulin (Ig) concentration in neonates and infants with congenital heart disease, determine its course following cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), and determine if post-CPB hypogammaglobulinemia was associated with increased morbidity. Methods Single center, retrospective analysis of infants who underwent cardiac surgery with CPB between June 2010 and December 2011. Ig concentration obtained from banked plasma of 47 patients from a prior study (pre-CPB, immediately post-CPB, and 24- and 48-hours post-CPB). Additionally, any Ig levels drawn for clinical purposes after CPB were included. Ig levels were excluded if drawn after chylothorax diagnosis or intravenous immunoglobulin G administration. Results Median age was 7 days. Preoperative Ig concentration was similar to that described in healthy children. IgG level fell to less than 50% of preoperative concentration by 24-hr post-CPB and failed to recover by 7 days. 25/47 (53%) patients had low IgG after CPB (<248 mg/dl). Despite no difference in demographics or risk factors between patients with low and normal IgG, low IgG patients had more positive fluid balance at 24-hours, increased pro-inflammatory plasma cytokine levels, duration of mechanical ventilation, and CICU length of stay. Additionally, low IgG patients had increased incidence of post-operative infections (40% vs. 14%, p=0.056). Conclusions Hypogammaglobulinemia occurs in half of infants after CPB. Its association with fluid overload and increased inflammatory cytokines suggests it may result from capillary leak. Postoperative hypogammaglobulinemia is associated with increased morbidity, including more secondary infections. PMID:24035378

  6. Extracorporeal Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: Predictors of Survival

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Joon Bum; Jung, Sung-Ho; Choo, Suk Jung; Chung, Cheol Hyun; Lee, Jae Won

    2016-01-01

    Background The use of extracorporeal life support (ECLS) in the setting of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) has shown improved outcomes compared with conventional CPR. The aim of this study was to determine factors predictive of survival in extracorporeal CPR (E-CPR). Methods Consecutive 85 adult patients (median age, 59 years; range, 18 to 85 years; 56 males) who underwent E-CPR from May 2005 to December 2012 were evaluated. Results Causes of arrest were cardiogenic in 62 patients (72.9%), septic in 18 patients (21.2%), and hypovolemic in 3 patients (3.5%), while the etiology was not specified in 2 patients (2.4%). The survival rate in patients with septic etiology was significantly poorer compared with those with another etiology (0% vs. 24.6%, p=0.008). Septic etiology (hazard ratio [HR], 2.84; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.49 to 5.44; p=0.002) and the interval between arrest and ECLS initiation (HR, 1.05 by 10 minutes increment; 95% CI, 1.02 to 1.09; p=0.005) were independent risk factors for mortality. When the predictive value of the E-CPR timing for in-hospital mortality was assessed using the receiver operating characteristic curve method, the greatest accuracy was obtained at a cutoff of 60.5 minutes (area under the curve, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.54 to 0.80; p=0.032) with 47.8% sensitivity and 88.9% specificity. The survival rate was significantly different according to the cutoff of 60.5 minutes (p=0.001). Conclusion These results indicate that efforts should be made to minimize the time between arrest and ECLS application, optimally within 60 minutes. In addition, E-CPR in patients with septic etiology showed grave outcomes, suggesting it to be of questionable benefit in these patients. PMID:27525236

  7. Teamwork and leadership in cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Hunziker, Sabina; Johansson, Anna C; Tschan, Franziska; Semmer, Norbert K; Rock, Laura; Howell, Michael D; Marsch, Stephan

    2011-06-14

    Despite substantial efforts to make cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) algorithms known to healthcare workers, the outcome of CPR has remained poor during the past decades. Resuscitation teams often deviate from algorithms of CPR. Emerging evidence suggests that in addition to technical skills of individual rescuers, human factors such as teamwork and leadership affect adherence to algorithms and hence the outcome of CPR. This review describes the state of the science linking team interactions to the performance of CPR. Because logistical barriers make controlled measurement of team interaction in the earliest moments of real-life resuscitations challenging, our review focuses mainly on high-fidelity human simulator studies. This technique allows in-depth investigation of complex human interactions using precise and reproducible methods. It also removes variability in the clinical parameters of resuscitation, thus letting researchers study human factors and team interactions without confounding by clinical variability from resuscitation to resuscitation. Research has shown that a prolonged process of team building and poor leadership behavior are associated with significant shortcomings in CPR. Teamwork and leadership training have been shown to improve subsequent team performance during resuscitation and have recently been included in guidelines for advanced life support courses. We propose that further studies on the effects of team interactions on performance of complex medical emergency interventions such as resuscitation are needed. Future efforts to better understand the influence of team factors (e.g., team member status, team hierarchy, handling of human errors), individual factors (e.g., sex differences, perceived stress), and external factors (e.g., equipment, algorithms, institutional characteristics) on team performance in resuscitation situations are critical to improve CPR performance and medical outcomes of patients.

  8. Gravity and Development of Cardiopulmonary Reflex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaoka, Shunji; Eno, Yuko; Ohira, Yoshinobu

    Cardio-pulmonary reflex, which our cardiac activity is synchronized to the respiration by autonomic nervous system regulation, is called as "respiratory sinus arrhythmia" and commonly found in adult. The physiological function of the espiratory sinus arrhythmia is considered to maximize the gas exchange during respiration cycle. This respiration induced heart rate variability (RHRV) is only found in mammals and avian showing a remarkable postnatal development, whereas no RHRV in aquatic species such as fish or amphibian. To elucidate our hypothesis that gravity exposure may plays a key role in the postnatal development of RHRV as well as its evolutional origin in these ground animals, we have studied effects of hypergravity (2G) on the postnatal development of RHRV using rat. Pregnant Wister rats were kept in centrifugal cages system for 38 days from 6th days of pregnant mother to have neonates until 23 days old. Electrocardiograph was recorded from the neonates in 2 to 23 days old in 2G group with simultaneous control (1G) group. The RHRV analysis was performed by calculating a component of Fourier power spectral coincide with the respiration frequency. In both groups, averaged resting heart rate gradually increase from 2 to 23 days old. When comparing the heart rate between the two groups, the 2G group indicated significantly lower (240± 8 bpm) than 1G control (326±21 bpm, p¡0.001) in 2 days old, where as no significance in 23 days old. The RHRV of 2 days old neonates in both groups indicated very small magnitude but significantly lower in 2G group than 1G control (p¡0.01). The RHRV gradually increase during the first 2 weeks and then rapid increased to reached 45 fold of magnitude in 1G control, whereas 69 fold in 2G group. The results strongly suggested that the postnatal innervation from respiration to cardiovascular centers was gravity dependent.

  9. Recombinant activated factor VII in post partum haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Magon, Navneet; Babu, K. M.; Kapur, Krishan; Chopra, Sanjiv; Joneja, Gurdarshan Singh

    2013-01-01

    Post-partum haemorrhage (PPH) is a life-threatening obstetric complication and the leading cause of maternal death. Any bleeding that results in or could result in haemodynamic instability, if untreated, must be considered as PPH. There is no controversy about the need for prevention and treatment of PPH. The keystone of management of PPH entails first, non-invasive and nonsurgical methods and then invasive and surgical methods. However, mortality remains high. Therefore, new advancements in the treatment are most crucial. One such advancement has been the use of recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) in PPH. First used 12 years back in PPH, this universal haemostatic agent has been effectively used in controlling PPH. The best available indicator of rFVIIa efficacy is the arrest of haemorrhage, which is judged by visual evidence and haemodynamic stabilization. It also reduces costs of therapy and the use of blood components in massive PPH. In cases of intractable PPH with no other obvious indications for hysterectomy, administration of rFVIIa should be considered before surgery. We share our experience in a series of cases of PPH, successfully managed using rFVIIa. PMID:24403703

  10. Intracerebral haemorrhage in Down syndrome: protected or predisposed?

    PubMed

    Buss, Lewis; Fisher, Elizabeth; Hardy, John; Nizetic, Dean; Groet, Jurgen; Pulford, Laura; Strydom, André

    2016-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS), which arises from trisomy of chromosome 21, is associated with deposition of large amounts of amyloid within the central nervous system. Amyloid accumulates in two compartments: as plaques within the brain parenchyma and in vessel walls of the cerebral microvasculature. The parenchymal plaque amyloid is thought to result in an early onset Alzheimer's disease (AD) dementia, a phenomenon so common amongst people with DS that it could be considered a defining feature of the condition. The amyloid precursor protein ( APP) gene lies on chromosome 21 and its presence in three copies in DS is thought to largely drive the early onset AD. In contrast, intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH), the main clinical consequence of vascular amyloidosis, is a more poorly defined feature of DS. We review recent epidemiological data on stroke (including haemorrhagic stroke) in order to make comparisons with a rare form of familial AD due to duplication (i.e. having three copies) of the APP region on chromosome 21, here called 'dup-APP', which is associated with more frequent and severe ICH. We conclude that although people with DS are at increased risk of ICH, this is less common than in dup-APP, suggesting the presence of mechanisms that act protectively. We review these mechanisms and consider comparative research into DS and dup-APP that may yield further pathophysiological insight. PMID:27239286

  11. Comparative studies for serodiagnosis of haemorrhagic septicaemia in cattle sera.

    PubMed

    El-Jakee, Jakeen K; Ali, Samah Said; El-Shafii, Soumaya Ahmed; Hessain, Ashgan M; Al-Arfaj, Abdullah A; Mohamed, Moussa I

    2016-01-01

    Haemorrhagic septicaemia caused by Pasteurella multocida is a major epizootic disease in cattle and buffaloes in developing countries with high morbidity and mortality rate. In the present study, a total of 88 P. multocida isolates were isolated from 256 nasopharyngeal swabs and lung tissues samples (34.4%) during the period from January, 2013 to March, 2014 from different governorates located in Egypt. Dead calves showed the highest percentage of P. multocida isolation followed by the emergency slaughtered calves, diseased calves then apparently healthy ones. These isolates were confirmed as P. multocida microscopically, biochemically by traditional tests and by API 20E commercial kit then by PCR. The percentages of positive serum samples using somatic antigen and micro-agglutination test at 1/1280 diluted serum were 10%, 54.49% and 0% in apparently healthy, diseased and emergency slaughtered samples, respectively whereas, the percentages using capsular antigen and indirect haemagglutination test were 40%, 60.89% and 60% in apparently healthy, diseased and emergency slaughtered samples, respectively. The ELISA showed the highest sensitivity for diagnosing P. multocida in apparently healthy, diseased and emergency slaughtered animals with percentages of 42%; 92.9% and 80%, respectively. The obtained results revealed that the ELISA using capsular antigen of P. multocida is a more sensitive and specific serological test for diagnosis of haemorrhagic septicaemia. PMID:26858538

  12. Acute haemorrhagic diarrhoea syndrome in dogs: 108 cases.

    PubMed

    Mortier, F; Strohmeyer, K; Hartmann, K; Unterer, S

    2015-06-13

    No prospective studies including large numbers of dogs with acute haemorrhagic diarrhoea syndrome (AHDS) are published so far. The aim of this case-control study was to describe signalment, history, clinical signs, laboratory values and course of disease in dogs with AHDS. Dogs (108) with idiopathic acute haemorrhagic diarrhoea (<3 days) were prospectively enrolled. Clinical assessment was performed by calculation of the 'AHDS index' (0-18). The hospital population and 21 healthy dogs served as control groups. Dogs with AHDS had a significantly lower body weight (median 9.8 kg) and age (median five years) than other dogs of the hospital population (20 kg; 10 years) (P<0.001). Predisposed breeds were Yorkshire terrier, miniature pinscher, miniature schnauzer and Maltese. The syndrome was more likely to occur during winter. Vomiting preceded the onset of bloody diarrhoea in 80 per cent of dogs and haematemesis was observed in half of those cases. Median AHDS index at presentation was 12 (range 3-17). Haematocrit was generally high (median 57.1 per cent; range 33-76 per cent), but exceeded 60 per cent only in 31.4 per cent of dogs. Haematocrit of 48.1 per cent of dogs was above reference range, as was monocyte (50.0 per cent), segmented (59.6 per cent) and band neutrophil count (45.2 per cent). A rapid clinical improvement occurred during the first 48 hours.

  13. An outbreak of acute haemorrhagic conjunctivitis in Kaduna, Nigeria.

    PubMed Central

    Babalola, O E; Amoni, S S; Samaila, E; Thaker, U; Darougar, S

    1990-01-01

    Clinical studies were carried out on two groups of patients with acute haemorrhagic conjunctivitis (AHC) during an epidemic in 1985 in Northern Nigeria. Group 1 consisted of 99 students attending a girls' boarding school, group 2 of 200 patients selected randomly from 1000 examined at the local clinic. Moderate to severe hyperaemia and papillary responses were present in the palpebral conjunctiva of all patients, and 234 (66%) had subconjunctival haemorrhages. Transient superficial punctate keratitis was noted in over 60% of patients. A transient flare suggestive of a low grade iritis was seen in five patients. No neurological disorders were noted. Serological studies were carried out on patients from group 2. Fifteen paired and 20 single serum samples were titrated against adenovirus type 4 (Ad-4) and enterovirus type 70 (EV-70). Two pairs of sera showed a 4-fold rise in antibody levels to EV-70, whereas the antibody titres to EV-70 in the rest of the sera ranged from 1:20 (no antibody) to 1:160. None of the paired serum samples showed a 4-fold rise in antibody levels to adenovirus. The results of clinical studies and serological findings support EV-70 as a probable cause of AHC in Nigeria. PMID:2155654

  14. Purification and characterization of an organ specific haemorrhagic toxin from Vipera russelli russelli (Russell's viper) venom.

    PubMed

    Kole, L; Chakrabarty, D; Datta, K; Bhattacharyya, D

    2000-04-01

    A haemorrhagic toxin (VRR-12) from Vipera russelli russelli (Russell's viper) venom has been purified by ion-exchange chromatography on CM-Sephadex C-50 followed by size-exclusion HPLC to electrophoretically homogeneous state. It is a 12 kDa single polypeptide having 1 mole of Zn+2 ion. This toxin induces intense intestinal haemorrhage and to a lesser extent skeletal muscle haemorrhage in mice. It does not show detectable proteolytic and esterolytic activity with selected substrates under specified conditions, haemolytic and phospholipase activity. When VRR-12, preincubated with bivalent antiserum against Saw-scaled and Russell's viper venom or EDTA was injected, haemorrhagic activity was not reduced, on the other hand preincubation with phenylmethyl sulphonyl fluoride reduced the activity markedly. Biodistribution studies with 125I VRR-12 show that haemorrhagic manifestation by this toxin is not a direct function of the fraction of the totally administered toxin distributed to that tissue. PMID:10983422

  15. Condom Tamponade in the Management of Primary Postpartum Haemorrhage: A Report of three cases in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Maya, Ernest T; Buntugu, Kennedy A; Aki, Lovelace; Srofenyoh, Emmanuel K

    2015-09-01

    Postpartum haemorrhage is one of the major causes of maternal mortality worldwide. The leading cause of primary postpartum haemorrhage is uterine atony and active management of the third stage of labour with oxytocin is recommended for preventing primary postpartum haemorrhage. Parenteral oxytocin is also the drug of choice for medical management of postpartum haemorrhage secondary to uterine atony. Condom uterine balloon tamponade is .a low cost technique that can be used as a second-line option for treatment. We report retrospectively three cases of primary PPH secondary to uterine atony which were managed successfully with condom tamponade. Condom tamponade is effective in managing post partum haemorrhage secondary to uterine atony and we advocate for the training of all skilled attendants on how to insert the condom tamponade.

  16. A Review of Carbon Dioxide Monitoring During Adult Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Pantazopoulos, Charalampos; Xanthos, Theodoros; Pantazopoulos, Ioannis; Papalois, Apostolos; Kouskouni, Evangelia; Iacovidou, Nicoletta

    2015-11-01

    Although high quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation is one of the most significant factors related to favourable outcome, its quality depends on many components, such as airway management, compression depth and chest recoil, hands-off time, and early defibrillation. The most common way of controlling the resuscitation efforts is monitoring of end-tidal carbon dioxide. The International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation suggests this method both for in-hospital and out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. However, despite the abundant human and animal studies supporting the usefulness of end-tidal carbon dioxide, its optimal values during cardiopulmonary resuscitation remain controversial. In this review, the advantages and effectiveness of end-tidal carbon dioxide during cardiopulmonary resuscitation are discussed and specific target values are suggested based on the available literature.

  17. Arterial ketone body ratio during and after cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Nomoto, S; Shimahara, Y; Kumada, K; Ogino, H; Okamoto, Y; Ban, T

    1992-06-01

    This study is the first to investigate the alteration in hepatic function during and after cardiopulmonary bypass in 30 patients by measuring the arterial ketone body ratio, an index of mitochondrial redox potential (oxidized nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide/reduced nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide). Although the preoperative arterial ketone body ratio was within normal limits (1.24 +/- 0.63), it decreased markedly 5 minutes after the start of cardiopulmonary bypass to 0.35 +/- 0.12 and remained at this low level throughout bypass. After bypass it continued to rise in a time-dependent fashion, returning to its preoperative level by the morning of the second postoperative day in normal convalescent patients. However, the ratio recovered more slowly in patients who required prolonged circulatory or respiratory support than in other patients. Thus we suggest that cardiopulmonary bypass had deleterious effects on the hepatic mitochondrial redox potential, which may contribute to homeostatic derangements and metabolic abnormalities.

  18. 21 CFR 870.4290 - Cardiopulmonary bypass adaptor, stopcock, manifold, or fitting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass adaptor, stopcock, manifold... Devices § 870.4290 Cardiopulmonary bypass adaptor, stopcock, manifold, or fitting. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass adaptor, stopcock, manifold, or fitting is a device used in cardiovascular...

  19. 21 CFR 870.4360 - Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump... Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a method other than revolving rollers to pump the blood...

  20. 21 CFR 870.4330 - Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor. 870.4330 Section 870.4330 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood...

  1. 21 CFR 870.4340 - Cardiopulmonary bypass level sensing monitor and/or control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass level sensing monitor and... Devices § 870.4340 Cardiopulmonary bypass level sensing monitor and/or control. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass level sensing monitor and/or control is a device used to monitor and/or control the...

  2. 21 CFR 870.4370 - Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. 870... Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a revolving roller mechanism to pump the blood through...

  3. 21 CFR 870.4370 - Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. 870... Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a revolving roller mechanism to pump the blood through...

  4. 21 CFR 870.4260 - Cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter... Cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter is a device used as part of a gas exchange (oxygenator) system to filter...

  5. 21 CFR 870.4260 - Cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter... Cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter is a device used as part of a gas exchange (oxygenator) system to filter...

  6. 21 CFR 870.4360 - Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump... Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a method other than revolving rollers to pump the blood...

  7. 21 CFR 870.4330 - Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor... Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor is a device used in conjunction with a blood gas sensor to measure the level of gases in the...

  8. 21 CFR 870.4330 - Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor... Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor is a device used in conjunction with a blood gas sensor to measure the level of gases in the...

  9. 21 CFR 870.4370 - Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. 870... Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a revolving roller mechanism to pump the blood through...

  10. 21 CFR 870.4260 - Cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter... Cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter is a device used as part of a gas exchange (oxygenator) system to filter...

  11. 21 CFR 870.4260 - Cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter... Cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter is a device used as part of a gas exchange (oxygenator) system to filter...

  12. 21 CFR 870.4360 - Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump... Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a method other than revolving rollers to pump the blood...

  13. 21 CFR 870.4360 - Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump... Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a method other than revolving rollers to pump the blood...

  14. 21 CFR 870.4330 - Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor... Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor is a device used in conjunction with a blood gas sensor to measure the level of gases in the...

  15. 21 CFR 870.4370 - Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. 870... Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a revolving roller mechanism to pump the blood through...

  16. 21 CFR 870.4330 - Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor... Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor is a device used in conjunction with a blood gas sensor to measure the level of gases in the...

  17. 21 CFR 870.4360 - Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump... Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a method other than revolving rollers to pump the blood...

  18. 21 CFR 870.4220 - Cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine console.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine console... Cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine console. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine... heart-lung machine. The console is designed to interface with the basic units used in a gas...

  19. 21 CFR 870.4220 - Cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine console.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine console... Cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine console. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine... heart-lung machine. The console is designed to interface with the basic units used in a gas...

  20. 21 CFR 870.4220 - Cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine console.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine console... Cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine console. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine... heart-lung machine. The console is designed to interface with the basic units used in a gas...

  1. 21 CFR 870.4220 - Cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine console.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine console... Cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine console. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine... heart-lung machine. The console is designed to interface with the basic units used in a gas...

  2. 21 CFR 870.4220 - Cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine console.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine console... Cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine console. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine... heart-lung machine. The console is designed to interface with the basic units used in a gas...

  3. 21 CFR 870.4410 - Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor... Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor is a transducer that measures the level of gases in the blood. (b) Classification. Class...

  4. 21 CFR 870.4410 - Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor... Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor is a transducer that measures the level of gases in the blood. (b) Classification. Class...

  5. 21 CFR 870.4410 - Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor... Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor is a transducer that measures the level of gases in the blood. (b) Classification. Class...

  6. 21 CFR 870.4410 - Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor... Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor is a transducer that measures the level of gases in the blood. (b) Classification. Class...

  7. 21 CFR 870.4410 - Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor... Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor is a transducer that measures the level of gases in the blood. (b) Classification. Class...

  8. 21 CFR 870.4340 - Cardiopulmonary bypass level sensing monitor and/or control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass level sensing monitor and... Devices § 870.4340 Cardiopulmonary bypass level sensing monitor and/or control. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass level sensing monitor and/or control is a device used to monitor and/or control the...

  9. Detection of ventricular fibrillation in the presence of cardiopulmonary resuscitation artefacts.

    PubMed

    Aramendi, Elisabete; de Gauna, Sofia Ruiz; Irusta, Unai; Ruiz, Jesus; Arcocha, M Fe; Ormaetxe, Jose Miguel

    2007-01-01

    Providing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to a patient in cardiac arrest introduces artefacts into the electrocardiogram (ECG), corrupting the diagnosis of the underlying heart rhythm. CPR must therefore be discontinued for reliable shock advice analysis by an automated external defibrillator (AED). Detection of ventricular fibrillation (VF) during CPR would enable CPR to continue during AED rhythm analysis, thereby increasing the likelihood of resuscitation success. This study presents a new adaptive filtering method to clean the ECG. The approach consists of a filter that adapts its characteristics to the spectral content of the signal exclusively using the surface ECG that commercial AEDs capture through standard patches. A set of 200 VF and 25 CPR artefact samples collected from real out-of-hospital interventions were used to test the method. The performance of a shock advice algorithm was evaluated before and after artefact removal. CPR artefacts were added to the ECG signals and four degrees of corruption were tested. Mean sensitivities of 97.83%, 98.27%, 98.32% and 98.02% were achieved, producing sensitivity increases of 28.44%, 49.75%, 59.10% and 64.25%, respectively, sufficient for ECG analysis during CPR. Although satisfactory and encouraging sensitivity values have been obtained, further clinical and experimental investigation is required in order to integrate this type of artefact suppressing algorithm in current AEDs.

  10. Cardiogenic Shock.

    PubMed

    Moskovitz, Joshua B; Levy, Zachary D; Slesinger, Todd L

    2015-08-01

    Cardiogenic shock is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in patients presenting with acute coronary syndrome. Although early reperfusion strategies are essential to the management of these critically ill patients, additional treatment plans are often needed to stabilize and treat the patient before reperfusion may be possible. This article discusses pharmacologic and surgical interventions, their indications and contraindications, management strategies, and treatment algorithms.

  11. CULTURE SHOCK.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    WEINSTEIN, GERALD; AND OTHERS

    IN A PANEL, GEORGE BRAGLE AND NATHAN GOULD STRESS TEACHER PREPARATION TO COPE WITH THE THREATENING IMPACT OF CULTURE OR REALITY SHOCK. THEY RECOMMEND MODIFYING THE ATTITUDES OF TEACHERS BY ALTERING THEIR PERCEPTIONS, PROVIDING THEM WITH DIRECT EXPERIENCE WITH THE SOCIOCULTURAL MILIEU OF GHETTO SCHOOLS, AND REQUIRING THEM TO TAKE COURSES IN THE…

  12. DC information preservation for cardiopulmonary monitor utilizing CW Doppler radar.

    PubMed

    Vergara, Alexander M; Boric-Lubecke, Olga; Lubecke, Victor M

    2008-01-01

    Direct conversion RF receivers introduce large DC offsets, reducing the dynamic range of the baseband signal. Coupled with the relatively small time varying signals in human vital sign monitoring using CW Doppler radar, extraction of cardio-pulmonary information becomes difficult. Previous DC offset compensation techniques utilizing AC coupling have proven detrimental to the performance of the system and the integrity of the low-frequency cardiopulmonary signals. A proposed system utilizing digitally controlled voltage feedback and center finding preserves the important DC information for optimal extraction of phase information in the quadrature system.

  13. Intracerebral haemorrhage profiles are changing: results from the Dijon population-based study.

    PubMed

    Béjot, Yannick; Cordonnier, Charlotte; Durier, Jérôme; Aboa-Eboulé, Corine; Rouaud, Olivier; Giroud, Maurice

    2013-02-01

    Incidence of intracerebral haemorrhage over the past three decades is reported as stable. This disappointing finding is questionable and suggests that any reduction in intracerebral haemorrhage incidence associated with improvements in primary prevention, namely, better control of blood pressure, might have been offset by an increase in cases of intracerebral haemorrhage owing to other factors, including the use of antithrombotic drugs in the ageing population. Therefore, we aimed to analyse trends in intracerebral haemorrhage incidence from 1985 to 2008 in the population-based registry of Dijon, France, taking into consideration the intracerebral haemorrhage location, the effect of age and the changes in the distribution of risk factors and premorbid treatments. Incidence rates were calculated and temporal trends were analysed by age groups (<60, 60-74 and ≥75 years) and intracerebral haemorrhage location (lobar or deep) according to study periods 1985-92, 1993-2000 and 2001-08. Over the 24 years of the study, 3948 patients with first-ever stroke were recorded. Among these, 441 had intracerebral haemorrhage (48.3% male), including 49% lobar, 37% deep, 9% infratentorial and 5% of undetermined location. Mean age at onset increased from 67.3 ± 15.9 years to 74.7 ± 16.7 years over the study period (P < 0.001). Overall crude incidence was 12.4/100,000/year (95% confidence interval: 11.2-13.6) and remained stable over time. However, an ∼80% increase in intracerebral haemorrhage incidence among people aged ≥75 years was observed between the first and both second and third study periods, contrasting with a 50% decrease in that in individuals aged <60 years, and stable incidence in those aged 60-74 years. This result was attributed to a 2-fold increase in lobar intracerebral haemorrhage in the elderly, concomitantly with an observed rise in the premorbid use of antithrombotics at this age, whatever the intracerebral haemorrhage location considered. In conclusion

  14. Life-threatening haemorrhage after 750 Le Fort I osteotomies and 376 SARPE procedures.

    PubMed

    Politis, C

    2012-06-01

    This study assessed the incidence, presenting symptoms, diagnosis, and management of patients with life-threatening postoperative haemorrhage after total Le Fort I osteotomy and surgically assisted rapid palatal expansion (SARPE). The medical records of 750 consecutive Le Fort I osteotomies and 376 consecutive SARPEs, both of which involved pterygomaxillary separation with a curved osteotome and a mallet, were analysed prospectively. Two cases of life-threatening haemorrhage were observed in the Le Fort I osteotomy group, both initiated on postoperative day 7. Anterior and posterior nasal packing were successful in one patient; the other required two embolizations for bleeding control (incidence of life-threatening postoperative haemorrhage: 2/750; confidence interval: 0.03-0.96%). In the SARPE group, one brisk epistaxis on the first postoperative day was controlled with anterior and posterior nasal packing under general anaesthesia. This haemorrhage was not considered life threatening (incidence of life-threatening postoperative haemorrhage: 0/376; confidence interval: 0-0.98%). In no case could the source of bleeding be established during re-explorative surgery or during diagnostic arteriography. The authors conclude that life-threatening haemorrhage is an exceptional finding after Le Fort I osteotomy; the observed incidence was 2/750, and life-threatening haemorrhage was not observed after SARPE in this series, despite the use of identical pterygomaxillary separation.

  15. Diagnostic laboratory for bleeding disorders ensures efficient management of haemorrhagic disorders.

    PubMed

    Riddell, A; Chuansumrit, A; El-Ekiaby, M; Nair, S C

    2016-07-01

    Haemorrhagic disorders like Postpartum haemorrhage and Dengue haemorrhagic fever are life threatening and requires an active and efficient transfusion service that could provide the most appropriate blood product which could be effective in managing them. This would essentially require prompt identification of the coagulopathy so that the best available product can be given to the bleeding patient to correct the identified haemostatic defect which will help control the bleeding. This would only be possible if the transfusion service has a laboratory to correctly detect the haemostatic defect and that too with an accuracy and precision which is ensured by a good laboratory quality assurance practices. These same processes are necessary for the transfusion services to ensure the quality of the blood products manufactured by them and that it contains adequate amounts of haemostasis factors which will be good to be effective in the management of haemorrhagic disorders. These issues are discussed in detail individually in the management of postpartum haemorrhage and Dengue haemorrhagic fever including when these can help in the use of rFVIIa in Dengue haemorrhagic fever. The requirements to ensure good-quality blood products are made available for the management of these disorders and the same have also been described. PMID:27405683

  16. Threat of Marburg and Ebola viral haemorrhagic fevers in Africa.

    PubMed

    Tukei, P M

    1996-01-01

    Marburg and Ebola viruses are members of the filovirus family that can be regarded as recently emerged. These viruses have caused sporadic outbreaks of fatal haemorrhagic disease in Africa, Europe and recently in the USA. The case fatality rates rank among the highest ranging from 33-80%. The mode of transmission of these viruses are clearly through close contact with blood and body fluids. Disease outbreaks have been amplified in hospital situations with poor blood precautions. In villages disease has been amplified through contamination with blood and fluids during nursing the sick and burial rituals. The source of the viruses has eluded discovery and new theories regarding the nature of these viruses are being entertained. The threat of new outbreaks in Africa is real since serological evidence of the presence of the virus has been documented in Kenya, Sudan, Zaire, Zimbabwe, Gabon, Cote-d'Ivoire and Gabon.

  17. [Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever in southern Russia].

    PubMed

    Onishchenko, G G; Efremenko, V I

    2004-01-01

    At the end of the 20th--the beginning of the 21st century activation of a natural focus of Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever (CCHF) in southern Russia was noted. As a consequence, in 2002 outbreaks and sporadic cases of this disease were registered on the territory of 6 out of 13 administrative units of the Southern Federal District. To minimize the epidemiological consequences of the aggravating epidemiological situation considerable efforts and means were required from health care organs and institutions of the state sanitary and epidemiological service, including essential financial expenditures. The results of natural foci of CCHF survey, obtained by 2002, as well as main trends of prophylactic and antiepidemic interventions are presented. Scientific research and practical observations made it possible to work out a number of methodological regulations concerning the diagnostics, treatment and prophylaxis of CCHF.

  18. Acute haemorrhage associated with pancreatic pseudocyst and chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Kiviluoto, T; Schröder, T; Kivilaakso, E; Lempinen, M

    1984-01-01

    The present study reports 18 patients operated on for chronic pancreatitis complicated by bleeding in the upper gastrointestinal tract, the peritoneal cavity or the retroperitoneal space. Damage to the splenic artery by a pancreatic pseudocyst was the most common reason for the bleeding (10 patients, 56%) and the most common site was the duodenum (10 patients, 56%). Eleven patients were treated by transcystic multiple suture ligations combined with external drainage of the pseudocyst, and seven by pancreatic resection or total pancreatectomy. Hospital mortality was 33% (6 patients); two patients had undergone transcystic suture ligation, and four pancreatic resection. Five patients needed a reoperation because of further bleeding, four of them having been treated initially by transcystic suture ligation. Our results suggest that haemostasis by suture ligation is a method to be recommended if the patient's condition has been exacerbated by severe haemorrhage.

  19. Rodent control programmes in areas affected by Bolivian haemorrhagic fever

    PubMed Central

    Mercado R., Rodolfo

    1975-01-01

    Bolivian haemorrhagic fever (BHF) caused by Machupo virus is acquired by contact with the excretions and secretions of Calomys callosus, an indigenous cricetine rodent which is preadapted to peridomestic habitats. It competes successfully with Mus musculus, but not with Rattus rattus. A successful disease control programme has functioned in Beni Department since 1964. It is based on trapping surveys and the detection of splenomegaly in Calomys rodents as an index of chronic virus infection. Mass trapping and poisoning are used initially, and regular trapping is employed to control Calomys populations in towns where disease has occurred. More than 1000 cases of BHF were recorded from 1960-1964, but less than 200 in the past 10 years. The cost of this programme is approximately $30 000 annually. PMID:182405

  20. Haemorrhage, hyponatraemia and more than just a hack.

    PubMed

    Shah, Mitsu; Kandil, Hala

    2014-06-18

    A 43-year-old previously healthy solicitor presented with a 9-day history of cough productive of yellow sputum with a prodrome of sore throat and myalgia. The cough was paroxysmal in nature and severe enough to cause extensive bilateral subconjunctival haemorrhages and cough syncopes multiple times a day, with one bout of associated haematemesis on the day of admission. He was isolated, treated for a presumed atypical chest infection with tazocin and clarithromycin, and monitored carefully until the hyponatraemia on presentation was resolved. Atypical screen and blood cultures were sent off, though unexciting at first, eventually confirmed the unlikely; Bordetella pertussis, much to the surprise of many who had Legionella as the top differential.

  1. Severe hypoxaemia after weaning from cardiopulmonary bypass: a case report.

    PubMed

    Simon, Caterina; Cavarretta, Elena; Capuano, Fabio; Bianchini, Roberto; Roscitano, Antonio; Tonelli, Euclide; Sinatra, Riccardo

    2007-11-01

    Persistence of patent foramen ovale is frequent in adults and usually asymptomatic. We report the case of a patient in whom a patent foramen ovale was diagnosed after weaning from cardiopulmonary bypass and was not recognised preoperatively. Intraoperative transoesophageal echocardiography is pivotal for surgical decision-making and should be performed in all patients undergoing cardiac surgery. PMID:17906486

  2. Cardiopulmonary Fitness and Endurance in Children with Developmental Coordination Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Sheng K.; Lin, Hsiao-Hui; Li, Yao-Chuen; Tsai, Chia-Liang; Cairney, John

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare cardiopulmonary fitness and endurance in 9-11-year-old children with DCD against a group of typically developing children in Taiwan. The Movement ABC test was used to evaluate the motor abilities of children. Forty-one participants (20 children with DCD and 21 children without DCD) were recruited for this…

  3. Retention of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Skills in Nigerian Secondary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onyeaso, Adedamola Olutoyin

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objective: For effective bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), retention of CPR skills after the training is central. The objective of this study was to find out how much of the CPR skills a group of Nigerian secondary school students would retain six weeks after their first exposure to the conventional CPR training. Materials…

  4. 21 CFR 870.4350 - Cardiopulmonary bypass oxygenator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass oxygenator. 870.4350 Section 870.4350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...-heart surgery. (b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The special control for this device...

  5. 21 CFR 870.4350 - Cardiopulmonary bypass oxygenator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass oxygenator. 870.4350 Section 870.4350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...-heart surgery. (b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The special control for this device...

  6. Efficacy of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in the Microgravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Smith L.; Campbell, Mark R.; Billica, Roger D.; Gilmore, Stevan M.

    2001-01-01

    End tidal carbon dioxide (EtCO 2) has been previously shown to be an effective non-invasive tool for estimating cardiac output during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Animal models have shown that this diagnostic adjunct can be used as a predictor of survival when EtCO 2 values are maintained above 25% of prearrest values.

  7. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation interface adapted for postextubation continuous noninvasive ventilatory support.

    PubMed

    Bach, John R; Saporito, Louis Ralph

    2015-09-01

    The authors report that a new oral interface designed for cardiopulmonary resuscitation and use during anesthesia permitted the successful extubation of an "unweanable" 27-yr-old woman with nemaline rod myopathy to continuous noninvasive ventilatory support. She had failed two previous extubation attempts. Tracheotomy and institutional care were avoided as a result. PMID:26135377

  8. 21 CFR 868.6175 - Cardiopulmonary emergency cart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary emergency cart. 868.6175 Section 868.6175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... resuscitation supplies for emergency treatment. The device does not include any equipment used...

  9. Retention of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Skills by Medical Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fossel, Michael; And Others

    1983-01-01

    A study of preclinical medical students' cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) skills showed students had a very recent CPR course had a significantly lower failure rate than those with courses one or two years previously. The most frequent errors were in chest compression rate and inability to adhere to the single-rescuer compression-to-ventilation…

  10. Family presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation and invasive procedures in children

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Cristiana Araújo G.; Balbino, Flávia Simphronio; Balieiro, Maria Magda F. G.; Mandetta, Myriam Aparecida

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To identify literature evidences related to actions to promote family's presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation and invasive procedures in children hospitalized in pediatric and neonatal critical care units. Data sources : Integrative literature review in PubMed, SciELO and Lilacs databases, from 2002 to 2012, with the following inclusion criteria: research article in Medicine, or Nursing, published in Portuguese, English or Spanish, using the keywords "family", "invasive procedures", "cardiopulmonary resuscitation", "health staff", and "Pediatrics". Articles that did not refer to the presence of the family in cardiopulmonary resuscitation and invasive procedures were excluded. Therefore, 15 articles were analyzed. Data synthesis : Most articles were published in the United States (80%), in Medicine and Nursing (46%), and were surveys (72%) with healthcare team members (67%) as participants. From the critical analysis, four themes related to the actions to promote family's presence in invasive procedures and cardiopulmonary resuscitation were obtained: a) to develop a sensitizing program for healthcare team; b) to educate the healthcare team to include the family in these circumstances; c) to develop a written institutional policy; d) to ensure the attendance of family's needs. Conclusions: Researches on these issues must be encouraged in order to help healthcare team to modify their practice, implementing the principles of the Patient and Family Centered Care model, especially during critical episodes. PMID:24676198

  11. The influence of biomaterials on inflammatory responses to cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Courtney, J M; Matata, B M; Yin, H Q; Esposito, A; Mahiout, A; Taggart, D P; Lowe, G D

    1996-05-01

    The nature of cardiopulmonary bypass and the complexity of the inflammatory response make the detection and interpretation of a biomaterial influence difficult. However, if mediation of the inflammatory response is considered to be an appropriate clinical goal, alteration to the biomaterial influence merits further investigation.

  12. Biological effects of shock waves: in vivo effect of high energy pulses on rabbit bone.

    PubMed

    Delius, M; Draenert, K; Al Diek, Y; Draenert, Y

    1995-01-01

    Extracorporeal shock waves have recently been introduced to treat pseudarthrosis and aseptic bone necrosis. Only little information exists up to now about the morphological effects of shock waves on normal bone. To study both their acute effect on bone and their long-term effect on its remodelling, 1500 shock waves generated with a Dornier XL1 experimental electrohydraulic lithotripter were applied at 27.5 kV to 19 rabbits divided into five groups. Changes were evaluated after 6, 11, 41, 59 and 85 days. The discharges were focused to the right femur 1 cm above the knee joint. Bone remodelling was assessed in four groups by four-colour fluorescent labelling with labels administered sequentially over 8-day periods during the first month after shock-wave application. Radiographs were taken at dissection to detect fractures. As a result, shock waves were found to induce periosteal detachment with subperiosteal haemorrhages and to press marrow contents out of the medullary cavity. In the medullary cavity, diffuse haemorrhages, haematomas and foci of fractured and displaced bony trabeculae were found. The bone cortex and the knee joint were normal. Radiographs showed lucencies in the marrow but no fractures. During the weeks following shock-wave application, there was intense apposition of new cortical bone resulting in considerable cortical thickening while trabecular remodelling in the medullary cavity was only minor. The displacement of bony trabeculae and marrow contents point to the action of cavitation as the major mechanism of shockwave damage to bone.

  13. Return to theatre in secondary post-tonsillectomy haemorrhage: a comparison of coblation and dissection techniques.

    PubMed

    Amir, Ida; Belloso, Antonio; Broomfield, Stephen J; Morar, Pradeep

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the incidence of return to theatre (RTT) for post-operative haemorrhage following coblation and dissection tonsillectomy and to investigate those that required RTT more than 10 days post-surgery. Retrospective review of post-tonsillectomy haemorrhages requiring RTT from April 2005 to March 2009 was conducted. Of 2,541 tonsillectomies performed, 81% were by coblation and 19% by dissection methods. The overall RTT rate was 1.7%. No difference was found in the overall RTT rates for primary and secondary haemorrhage between the two techniques. However, the overall RTT rates for primary and secondary haemorrhage were higher in adults than children (P = 0.0456 and P = 0.0215, respectively). RTT for secondary haemorrhage during the first ten post-operative days occurred in both coblation and dissection tonsillectomy with no significant difference. After the first post-operative week, late secondary bleeding requiring RTT occurred only in the coblation group (P = 0.0676). Four patients required blood transfusion; all were in the coblation group, three of which were required during RTT in the late secondary haemorrhage (after 10 days). The post-operative RTT rates for coblation tonsillectomy did not reveal a change of trend over the 4-year study period. Our RTT rate for secondary haemorrhage is higher than earlier published results. A learning curve could not be identified in RTT for coblation tonsillectomy haemorrhage. Late secondary haemorrhages requiring surgical intervention have only been identified in cases performed by coblation and could potentially be life threatening as 33% (3/9) required blood transfusion. This phenomenon may be explained by a particular physiological healing process associated with coblation.

  14. Consent for Brain Tissue Donation after Intracerebral Haemorrhage: A Community-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Samarasekera, Neshika; Lerpiniere, Christine; Farrall, Andrew J.; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; White, Philip M.; Torgersen, Antonia; Ironside, James W.; Smith, Colin; Al-Shahi Salman, Rustam

    2015-01-01

    Background Spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage is a devastating form of stroke and its incidence increases with age. Obtaining brain tissue following intracerebral haemorrhage helps to understand its cause. Given declining autopsy rates worldwide, the feasibility of establishing an autopsy-based collection and its generalisability are uncertain. Methods We used multiple overlapping sources of case ascertainment to identify every adult diagnosed with intracerebral haemorrhage between 1st June 2010-31st May 2012, whilst resident in the Lothian region of Scotland. We sought consent from patients with intracerebral haemorrhage (or their nearest relative if the patient lacked mental capacity) to conduct a research autopsy. Results Of 295 adults with acute intracerebral haemorrhage, 110 (37%) could not be approached to consider donation. Of 185 adults/relatives approached, 91 (49%) consented to research autopsy. There were no differences in baseline demographic variables or markers of intracerebral haemorrhage severity between consenters and non-consenters. Adults who died and became donors (n = 46) differed from the rest of the cohort (n = 249) by being older (median age 80, IQR 76–86 vs. 75, IQR 65–83, p = 0.002) and having larger haemorrhages (median volume 23ml, IQR 13–50 vs. 13ml, IQR 4–40; p = 0.002). Conclusions Nearly half of those approached consent to brain tissue donation after acute intracerebral haemorrhage. The characteristics of adults who gave consent were comparable to those in an entire community, although those who donate early are older and have larger haemorrhage volumes. PMID:26302447

  15. A risk scoring system for prediction of haemorrhagic stroke.

    PubMed

    Zodpey, S P; Tiwari, R R

    2005-01-01

    The present pair-matched case control study was carried out at Government Medical College Hospital, Nagpur, India, a tertiary care hospital with the objective to devise and validate a risk scoring system for prediction of hemorrhagic stroke. The study consisted of 166 hospitalized CT scan proved cases of hemorrhagic stroke (ICD 9, 431-432), and a age and sex matched control per case. The controls were selected from patients who attended the study hospital for conditions other than stroke. On conditional multiple logistic regression five risk factors- hypertension (OR = 1.9. 95% Cl = 1.5-2.5). raised scrum total cholesterol (OR = 2.3, 95% Cl = 1.1-4.9). use of anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents (OR = 3.4, 95% Cl =1.1-10.4). past history of transient ischaemic attack (OR = 8.4, 95% Cl = 2.1- 33.6) and alcohol intake (OR = 2.1, 95% Cl = 1.3-3.6) were significant. These factors were ascribed statistical weights (based on regression coefficients) of 6, 8, 12, 21 and 8 respectively. The nonsignificant factors (diabetes mellitus, physical inactivity, obesity, smoking, type A personality, history of claudication, family history of stroke, history of cardiac diseases and oral contraceptive use in females) were not included in the development of scoring system. ROC curve suggested a total score of 21 to be the best cut-off for predicting haemorrhag stroke. At this cut-off the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictivity and Cohen's kappa were 0.74, 0.74, 0.74 and 0.48 respectively. The overall predictive accuracy of this additive risk scoring system (area under ROC curve by Wilcoxon statistic) was 0.79 (95% Cl = 0.73-0.84). Thus to conclude, if substantiated by further validation, this scorincy system can be used to predict haemorrhagic stroke, thereby helping to devise effective risk factor intervention strategy. PMID:16479901

  16. The Socioeconomic Impacts of Clinically Diagnosed Haemorrhagic Septicaemia on Smallholder Large Ruminant Farmers in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, M; Young, J R; Suon, S; Bush, R D; Windsor, P A

    2015-10-01

    Haemorrhagic septicaemia (HS) is an acute fatal infectious disease of mainly cattle and buffalo and outbreaks occur commonly in Cambodia. Disease outbreak reports were examined to select five villages from three provinces for a retrospective investigation of HS epidemiology and socioeconomic impact on smallholders, with an aim of identifying potential benefits from improving disease prevention through biosecurity and vaccination. The Village Animal Health Worker (VAHW) or Chief in each village and 66 affected smallholders were surveyed. At the village level, 24% of all households were affected with an estimated mean village herd morbidity of 10.1% and mortality of 28.8%. Affected farmers reported HS disease morbidity and mortality at 42.7% and 63.6% respectively. Buffalo had a higher morbidity (OR = 2.3; P = 0.003) and mortality (OR = 6.9; P < 0.001) compared with cattle, and unvaccinated large ruminants a higher morbidity (OR = 2.9; P = 0.001). The financial impact varied depending on whether the animal survived, provision of treatment, draught replacement and lost secondary income. The mean cost per affected household was USD 952.50 based on ownership of five large ruminants. The impact per affected animal was USD 375.00, reducing the pre-disease value by 66.1%. A partial budget revealed an overwhelming incentive for farmers to practice biannual vaccination, with a net benefit of USD 951.58 per household based on an annual disease incidence rate of 1. Sensitivity analysis showed that a net benefit of USD 32.42 remained based on an outbreak every 20 years. This study indicates HS can cause a catastrophic financial shock to smallholders and remains a critical constraint to improving large ruminant productivity and profitability. Addressing HS disease control requires a focus on improving smallholder farmer knowledge of biosecurity and vaccination and should be priority to stakeholders interested in addressing regional food insecurity and poverty reduction.

  17. Dengue haemorrhagic fever — a public health problem and a field for research*

    PubMed Central

    Halstead, S. B.

    1980-01-01

    Dengue haemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS) is an enigmatic and growing public health problem which is confined at present to countries of South-East Asia. Since 1956, over 350 000 patients have been hospitalized and nearly 12 000 deaths have been reported. Dengue viruses, a group of four flaviviruses, are transmitted to man by Aedes aegypti. Currently, dengue viruses are actively transmitted in 61 countries which circle the globe in the tropical zone and have a combined population of 1500 million. Because the precise antecedents to DHF/DSS are unknown, the public health hazard posed by this syndrome is potentially worldwide. Epidemiological studies in South-East Asia clearly link DHF/DSS to individuals who have had a previous dengue infection or who have acquired maternal dengue antibody. Such antibody may serve as an opsonin, enhancing dengue virus infection of mononuclear phagocytes—the type of cell in man to which dengue infection may be confined. Antibody-mediated infection of these cells is the central concept in the hypothesis of immune infection enhancement. This hypothesis provides a conceptual framework for design of future research. There is an urgent need for a comprehensive identification of ”risk factors” in DHF/DSS. This research could be approached by undertaking comparative prospective epidemiological studies in dengue-endemic areas with and without DHF/DSS. Although important progress is being made in the development of attenuated dengue vaccines for each dengue type, a clearer understanding of the pathogenesis of DHF/DSS may be required to provide guidelines for safe and lasting immunoprophylaxis in man. PMID:6966540

  18. Dengue haemorrhagic fever--a public health problem and a field for research.

    PubMed

    Halstead, S B

    1980-01-01

    Dengue haemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS) is an enigmatic and growing public health problem which is confined at present to countries of South-East Asia. Since 1956, over 350 000 patients have been hospitalized and nearly 12 000 deaths have been reported. Dengue viruses, a group of four flaviviruses, are transmitted to man by Aedes aegypti. Currently, dengue viruses are actively transmitted in 61 countries which circle the globe in the tropical zone and have a combined population of 1500 million. Because the precise antecedents to DHF/DSS are unknown, the public health hazard posed by this syndrome is potentially worldwide. Epidemiological studies in South-East Asia clearly link DHF/DSS to individuals who have had a previous dengue infection or who have acquired maternal dengue antibody. Such antibody may serve as an opsonin, enhancing dengue virus infection of mononuclear phagocytes-the type of cell in man to which dengue infection may be confined. Antibody-mediated infection of these cells is the central concept in the hypothesis of immune infection enhancement. This hypothesis provides a conceptual framework for design of future research. There is an urgent need for a comprehensive identification of "risk factors" in DHF/DSS. This research could be approached by undertaking comparative prospective epidemiological studies in dengue-endemic areas with and without DHF/DSS. Although important progress is being made in the development of attenuated dengue vaccines for each dengue type, a clearer understanding of the pathogenesis of DHF/DSS may be required to provide guidelines for safe and lasting immunoprophylaxis in man.

  19. Atrial Fibrillation, Neurocognitive Decline and Gene Expression After Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Dalal, Rahul S.; Sabe, Ashraf A.; Elmadhun, Nassrene Y.; Ramlawi, Basel; Sellke, Frank W.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Atrial fibrillation and neurocognitive decline are common complications after cardiopulmonary bypass. By utilizing genomic microarrays we investigate whether gene expression is associated with postoperative atrial fibrillation and neurocognitive decline. METHODS Twenty one cardiac surgery patients were prospectively matched and underwent neurocognitive assessments pre-operatively and four days postoperatively. The whole blood collected in the pre-cardiopulmonary bypass, 6 hours after-cardiopulmonary bypass, and on the 4th postoperative day was hybridized to Affymetrix Gene Chip U133 Plus 2.0 Microarrays. Gene expression in patients who developed postoperative atrial fibrillation and neurocognitive decline (n=6; POAF+NCD) was compared with gene expression in patients with postoperative atrial fibrillation and normal cognitive function (n=5; POAF+NORM) and patients with sinus rhythm and normal cognitive function (n=10; SR+NORM). Regulated genes were identified using JMP Genomics 4.0 with a false discovery rate of 0.05 and fold change of >1.5 or <-1.5. RESULTS Eleven patients developed postoperative atrial fibrillation. Six of these also developed neurocognitive decline. Of the 12 patients with sinus rhythm, only 2 developed neurocognitive decline. POAF+NCD patients had unique regulation of 17 named genes preoperatively, 60 named genes six hours after cardiopulmonary bypass, and 34 named genes four days postoperatively (P<0.05) compared with normal patients. Pathway analysis demonstrated that these genes are involved in cell death, inflammation, cardiac remodeling and nervous system function. CONCLUSION Patients who developed postoperative atrial fibrillation and neurocognitive decline after cardiopulmonary bypass may have differential genomic responses compared to normal patients and patients with only postoperative atrial fibrillation, suggesting common pathophysiology for these conditions. Further exploration of these genes may provide insight into the

  20. Earlier application of percutaneous cardiopulmonary support rescues patients from severe cardiopulmonary failure using the APACHE III scoring system.

    PubMed

    Song, Suk-Won; Yang, Hong-Suk; Lee, Sak; Youn, Young-Nam; Yoo, Kyung-Jong

    2009-12-01

    Percutaneous cardiopulmonary support (PCPS) is a widely accepted treatment for severe cardiopulmonary failure. This system, which uses a percutaneous approach and autopriming devices, can be rapidly applied in emergency situations. We sought to identify the risk factors that could help predict in-hospital mortality, and to assess its outcomes in survivors. During a 2-yr period, 50 patients underwent PCPS for the treatment of severe cardiopulmonary failure, and of those, 22 (44%) were classified as survivors and 28 (56%) as non-survivors. We compared the 2 groups for risk factors of in-hospital mortality and to establish proper PCPS timing. Twenty patients underwent PCPS for acute myocardial infarction, 20 for severe cardiopulmonary failure after cardiac surgery, 7 for acute respiratory distress syndrome, and 3 for acute myocarditis. Multivariate analysis showed that an acute physiology, age, and chronic health evaluation (APACHE) III score >or=50 prior to PCPS was the only significant predictor of in-hospital mortality (P=0.001). Overall 18-month survival was 42.2%. Cox analysis showed patients with APACHE III scores >or=50 had a poor prognosis (P=0.001). Earlier application of PCPS, and other preemptive strategies designed to optimize high-risk patients, may improve patient outcomes. Identifying patients with high APACHE scores at the beginning of PCPS may predict in-hospital mortality. Survivors, particularly those with higher APACHE scores, may require more frequent follow-up to improve overall survival.

  1. Curved shock theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mölder, S.

    2016-07-01

    Curved shock theory (CST) is introduced, developed and applied to relate pressure gradients, streamline curvatures, vorticity and shock curvatures in flows with planar or axial symmetry. Explicit expressions are given, in an influence coefficient format, that relate post-shock pressure gradient, streamline curvature and vorticity to pre-shock gradients and shock curvature in steady flow. The effect of pre-shock flow divergence/convergence, on vorticity generation, is related to the transverse shock curvature. A novel derivation for the post-shock vorticity is presented that includes the effects of pre-shock flow non-uniformities. CST applicability to unsteady flows is discussed.

  2. Localized shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Daniel A.; Stanford, Douglas; Susskind, Leonard

    2015-03-01

    We study products of precursors of spatially local operators, , where W x ( t) = e - iHt W x e iHt . Using chaotic spin-chain numerics and gauge/gravity duality, we show that a single precursor fills a spatial region that grows linearly in t. In a lattice system, products of such operators can be represented using tensor networks. In gauge/gravity duality, they are related to Einstein-Rosen bridges supported by localized shock waves. We find a geometrical correspondence between these two descriptions, generalizing earlier work in the spatially homogeneous case.

  3. Recurrent hypertensive intracerebral haemorrhages: what should we do when a new hemispheric ischaemic event strikes?

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Osama S M

    2012-01-01

    Hypertensive intracerebral haemorrhage is usually a once in a lifetime event and recurrences are rare. Most recurrences usually develop within 2 years of the first event and the majority usually target the basal ganglia and thalami. Failure of blood pressure control is the most important, potentially preventable, culprit behind the development of primary intracerebral haemorrhages. However, the occurrence of a recurrent bleed in patients with optimally controlled hypertension should always prompt the physician to think of a new co-operating factor. We report on a 60-year-old hypertensive woman who developed right-sided thalamic haemorrhage 5 days after sustaining a lacunar infarct of the left thalamus for which she had been prescribed a dual antiplatelet therapy: aspirin and clopidrogrel. She had a history of two bilateral sequential hypertensive deep cerebellar haemorrhages which were developed 2 years ago. PMID:23264163

  4. Recurrent hypertensive intracerebral haemorrhages: what should we do when a new hemispheric ischaemic event strikes?

    PubMed

    Amin, Osama S M

    2012-01-01

    Hypertensive intracerebral haemorrhage is usually a once in a lifetime event and recurrences are rare. Most recurrences usually develop within 2 years of the first event and the majority usually target the basal ganglia and thalami. Failure of blood pressure control is the most important, potentially preventable, culprit behind the development of primary intracerebral haemorrhages. However, the occurrence of a recurrent bleed in patients with optimally controlled hypertension should always prompt the physician to think of a new co-operating factor. We report on a 60-year-old hypertensive woman who developed right-sided thalamic haemorrhage 5 days after sustaining a lacunar infarct of the left thalamus for which she had been prescribed a dual antiplatelet therapy: aspirin and clopidrogrel. She had a history of two bilateral sequential hypertensive deep cerebellar haemorrhages which were developed 2 years ago. PMID:23264163

  5. Contralateral haemorrhagic pulmonary metastases (“choriocarcinoma syndrome”) after pneumonectomy for primary pulmonary choriocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Durieu, I; Berger, N; Loire, R; Gamondes, J P; Guillaud, P H; Cordier, J F

    1994-01-01

    The case history is presented of a patient which illustrates both the diagnostic difficulties of an extremely rare tumour (choriocarcinoma of the lung) and its associated haemorrhagic metastases (“choriocarcinoma syndrome”). Images PMID:7517072

  6. Subarachnoid haemorrhage and cerebral vasculopathy in a child with sickle cell anaemia

    PubMed Central

    Inusa, Baba; Casale, Maddalena; Booth, Caroline; Lucas, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    Stroke in sickle cell anaemia (SCA) is either infarctive or haemorrhagic in nature. In childhood, over 75% of strokes in SCA are infarctive. We present an adolescent with SCA who developed hypertension at the age of 13, and was treated with lisinopril. Sixteen months later she was found in cardiorespiratory arrest and died on arrival in hospital. The last transcranial Doppler scan performed 6 months before her death and a brain MRI were reported normal. The autopsy discovered massive subarachnoid haemorrhage in association with vascular damage in the circle of Willis arteries. The case highlights a cause of haemorrhagic stroke, the first reported association between hypertension, SCA and a histopathologically proven cerebral vasculopathy. The difficulties in the management of haemorrhagic stroke and the poor outcome in SCA are discussed. PMID:25336550

  7. Management of postpartum haemorrhage with uterine balloon tamponade: The way forward.

    PubMed

    Marasinghe, Jeevan P; Du Plessis, Jacobus; Epitawela, Dinesh; Umstad, Mark P

    2015-08-01

    Uterine balloon tamponade has rapidly gained popularity in the management of postpartum haemorrhage. It is a conservative method often utilised before embarking on advanced surgical interventions. The mechanism of action, complications and long-term outcomes are discussed. PMID:26130087

  8. Acute ischaemic brain lesions in intracerebral haemorrhage: multicentre cross-sectional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Gregoire, Simone M; Charidimou, Andreas; Gadapa, Naveen; Dolan, Eamon; Antoun, Nagui; Peeters, Andre; Vandermeeren, Yves; Laloux, Patrice; Baron, Jean-Claude; Jäger, Hans R; Werring, David J

    2011-08-01

    Subclinical acute ischaemic lesions on brain magnetic resonance imaging have recently been described in spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage, and may be important to understand pathophysiology and guide treatment. The underlying mechanisms are uncertain. We tested the hypothesis that ischaemic lesions are related to magnetic resonance imaging markers of the severity and type of small-vessel disease (hypertensive arteriopathy or cerebral amyloid angiopathy) in a multicentre, cross-sectional study. We studied consecutive patients with intracerebral haemorrhage from four specialist stroke centres, and age-matched stroke service referrals without intracerebral haemorrhage. Acute ischaemic lesions were assessed on magnetic resonance imaging (<3 months after intracerebral haemorrhage) using diffusion-weighted imaging. White matter changes and cerebral microbleeds were rated with validated scales. We investigated associations between diffusion-weighted imaging lesions, clinical and radiological characteristics. We included 114 patients with intracerebral haemorrhage (39 with clinically probable cerebral amyloid angiopathy) and 47 age-matched controls. The prevalence of diffusion-weighted imaging lesions was 9/39 (23%) in probable cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related intracerebral haemorrhage versus 6/75 (8%) in the remaining patients with intracerebral haemorrhage (P = 0.024); no diffusion-weighted imaging lesions were found in controls. Diffusion-weighted imaging lesions were mainly cortical and were associated with mean white matter change score (odds ratio 1.14 per unit increase, 95% confidence interval 1.02-1.28, P = 0.024) and the presence of strictly lobar cerebral microbleeds (odds ratio 3.85, 95% confidence interval 1.15-12.93, P = 0.029). Acute, subclinical ischaemic brain lesions are frequent but previously underestimated after intracerebral haemorrhage, and are three times more common in cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related intracerebral haemorrhage than in

  9. Determinants and Time Trends for Ischaemic and Haemorrhagic Stroke in a Large Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yutao; Wang, Hao; Tao, Tao; Tian, Yingchun; Wang, Yutang; Chen, Yundai; Lip, Gregory Y. H.

    2016-01-01

    Background The clinical epidemiology of stroke has been widely investigated in Caucasian populations, but the changes over time in the proportion of ischaemic to haemorrhagic strokes is less clear, especially in the Chinese population. Aims Our objective was to study the determinants and time trends for ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke, in relation to age, in a large Chinese population cohort. Methods Using a medical insurance database in the southwest of China from 2001 to 2012, time trends in age-adjusted ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke incidence and the contributing risk factors associated with age were investigated. Results Among 425,901 individuals without prior stroke (52.4% male, median age 54), the rate of ischaemic stroke (per 1000 patient-years) decreased between 2002–2007, then remained broadly similar between 2008–2012. The rate of haemorrhagic stroke showed a similar trend, being approximately 1.3–1.9 from 2008–2012. Compared to patients age<65, ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke incidences (rate, 95% confidential interval, CI) were higher in the elderly population (age <65 versus age ≥65: ischaemic: 3.64, 3.33–4.00, vs 14.33, 14.01–14.60; haemorrhagic: 1.09, 1.00–1.10 vs 2.52,2.40–2.70, respectively, both p<0.001). There were no significant differences in haemorrhagic stroke rates between the elderly and the very elderly population. Ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke shared similar risk factors (age, hypertension, coronary artery disease (CAD), vascular disease, and diabetes mellitus) (all p<0.05). In subjects age<75 years, CAD (7.17, 4.14–12.37) and diabetes mellitus (3.27, 2.42–4.42) contributed most to the developing of haemorrhagic stroke (all p<0.001). Amongst the very elderly, vascular disease (2.24, 1.49–3.37) was an additional major risk factor for haemorrhagic stroke, together with CAD and diabetes mellitus (all p<0.001). Conclusion In this large Chinese cohort, there was an increased risk of ischaemic stroke compared

  10. [Oedema and haemorrhagic diathesis in a 50-year-old woman with thyrotoxicosis].

    PubMed

    Kozlov, A; Joeres, R; Braun, U

    2014-11-01

    We describe the case of a 50-year-old woman who presented with tachyarrhythmia, mild fever, peripheral oedema, ascites, epistaxis and gastrointestinal haemorrhage. Blood analysis revealed hyperthyroxinaemia. Analysis of thyroid-stimulating antibodies highlighted Graves' disease being the cause of the prevailing thyrotoxic crisis. Remarkable in this case of thyrotoxicosis is a liver affection without elevated transaminases but disturbed serum protein synthesis leading to hypalbuminaemic oedema and haemorrhagic complications. Thyrostatic treatment led to clinical response.

  11. Retroperitoneal Haematom due to Spontaneous Rupture and Haemorrhage of Adrenal Cyst Presenting with Grey Turner's Sign.

    PubMed

    Sonmez, Bedriye Muge; Yilmaz, Fevzi; Özkan, Fevzi Bircan; Ongar, Murat; Özturk, Derya; Cesur, Fatma

    2015-07-01

    Spontaneous retroperitoneal haemorrhage is a rare entity and a potentially life-threatening condition. A 41-year-old woman presented to our emergency department with left flank pain and dysuria. Her physical examination disclosed left abdominal and costovertebral angle tenderness, left flank ecchymosis (Grey Turner sign). Abdominal computerised tomography revealed spontaneous retroperitoneal haemorrhage. She was discharged after 10 days with recommendation of urology follow-up.

  12. Perimetric demonstration of spontaneous visual field recovery following occipital lobe haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Lin, Siying; George, Badie Z; Wilson-Holt, Nicholas J

    2013-08-29

    A 45-year-old patient on lifelong warfarin therapy after a metal aortic valve replacement developed a homonymous visual field defect following an occipital lobe haemorrhage. The patient received only conservative management and yet described continued improvement in her visual field defect for up to 20 months following the initial cerebral insult. We present the first conclusive illustrative documentation of visual recovery in a patient with an occipital lobe haemorrhage with sequential automated perimetric assessments over an extended period of time.

  13. Ischaemic stroke in a 21-year-old with hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    PubMed

    Kane, Ingrid; Pitt Ford, Alexandra; Lawton, Kirsty; Poitelea, Marius; Gainsborough, Nicola

    2016-10-01

    A 21-year-old man presented with an acute ischaemic stroke. He had a history of epistaxis and a family history of hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia. We gave thrombolysis after some deliberation, and he made a good neurological recovery. This case highlights the link between hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia and ischaemic stroke, the potential risks of thrombolysis in such patients and the need to consider pulmonary arteriovenous malformations in patients with stroke.

  14. Shock Prevention

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The electrician pictured is installing a General Electric Ground Fault Interrupter (GFI), a device which provides protection against electrical shock in the home or in industrial facilities. Shocks due to defective wiring in home appliances or other electrical equipment can cause severe burns, even death. As a result, the National Electrical Code now requires GFIs in all new homes constructed. This particular type of GFI employs a sensing element which derives from technology acquired in space projects by SCI Systems, Inc., Huntsville, Alabama, producer of sensors for GE and other manufacturers of GFI equipment. The sensor is based on the company's experience in developing miniaturized circuitry for space telemetry and other spacecraft electrical systems; this experience enabled SCI to package interruptor circuitry in the extremely limited space available and to produce sensory devices at practicable cost. The tiny sensor measures the strength of the electrical current and detects current differentials that indicate a fault in the functioning of an electrical system. The sensing element then triggers a signal to a disconnect mechanism in the GFI, which cuts off the current in the faulty circuit.

  15. UK guidelines on the management of variceal haemorrhage in cirrhotic patients

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Dhiraj; Stanley, Adrian J; Hayes, Peter C; Patch, David; Millson, Charles; Mehrzad, Homoyon; Austin, Andrew; Ferguson, James W; Olliff, Simon P; Hudson, Mark; Christie, John M

    2015-01-01

    These updated guidelines on the management of variceal haemorrhage have been commissioned by the Clinical Services and Standards Committee (CSSC) of the British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG) under the auspices of the liver section of the BSG. The original guidelines which this document supersedes were written in 2000 and have undergone extensive revision by 13 members of the Guidelines Development Group (GDG). The GDG comprises elected members of the BSG liver section, representation from British Association for the Study of the Liver (BASL) and Liver QuEST, a nursing representative and a patient representative. The quality of evidence and grading of recommendations was appraised using the AGREE II tool. The nature of variceal haemorrhage in cirrhotic patients with its complex range of complications makes rigid guidelines inappropriate. These guidelines deal specifically with the management of varices in patients with cirrhosis under the following subheadings: (1) primary prophylaxis; (2) acute variceal haemorrhage; (3) secondary prophylaxis of variceal haemorrhage; and (4) gastric varices. They are not designed to deal with (1) the management of the underlying liver disease; (2) the management of variceal haemorrhage in children; or (3) variceal haemorrhage from other aetiological conditions. PMID:25887380

  16. Corotating shock structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogilvie, K. W.

    1972-01-01

    Consideration of observed interplanetary shocks leads to the conclusion that a corotating forward shock has not been unambiguously identified at 1 AU. A reverse shock identified in September 1967 is a likely candidate for a corotating structure.

  17. What Is Cardiogenic Shock?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Cardiogenic Shock? Cardiogenic (kar-dee-oh-JE-nik) shock is ... treated right away. The most common cause of cardiogenic shock is damage to the heart muscle from a ...

  18. Climate Change. A Global Threat to Cardiopulmonary Health

    PubMed Central

    Thurston, George D.; Balmes, John R.; Pinkerton, Kent E.

    2014-01-01

    Recent changes in the global climate system have resulted in excess mortality and morbidity, particularly among susceptible individuals with preexisting cardiopulmonary disease. These weather patterns are projected to continue and intensify as a result of rising CO2 levels, according to the most recent projections by climate scientists. In this Pulmonary Perspective, motivated by the American Thoracic Society Committees on Environmental Health Policy and International Health, we review the global human health consequences of projected changes in climate for which there is a high level of confidence and scientific evidence of health effects, with a focus on cardiopulmonary health. We discuss how many of the climate-related health effects will disproportionally affect people from economically disadvantaged parts of the world, who contribute relatively little to CO2 emissions. Last, we discuss the financial implications of climate change solutions from a public health perspective and argue for a harmonized approach to clean air and climate change policies. PMID:24400619

  19. Climate change. A global threat to cardiopulmonary health.

    PubMed

    Rice, Mary B; Thurston, George D; Balmes, John R; Pinkerton, Kent E

    2014-03-01

    Recent changes in the global climate system have resulted in excess mortality and morbidity, particularly among susceptible individuals with preexisting cardiopulmonary disease. These weather patterns are projected to continue and intensify as a result of rising CO2 levels, according to the most recent projections by climate scientists. In this Pulmonary Perspective, motivated by the American Thoracic Society Committees on Environmental Health Policy and International Health, we review the global human health consequences of projected changes in climate for which there is a high level of confidence and scientific evidence of health effects, with a focus on cardiopulmonary health. We discuss how many of the climate-related health effects will disproportionally affect people from economically disadvantaged parts of the world, who contribute relatively little to CO2 emissions. Last, we discuss the financial implications of climate change solutions from a public health perspective and argue for a harmonized approach to clean air and climate change policies.

  20. Role of cardiopulmonary mechanoreceptors in the postural regulation of renin.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, R A; Marco, E J; Oliveri, C; Otero, F J; Degrossi, O; Moledo, L I; Julius, S

    1987-04-01

    To change the stretch on cardiopulmonary mechanoreceptors, large shifts of blood in the capacity space were elicited by tilting and by exerting positive lower body pressure in the tilted position. Twelve volunteers underwent invasive hemodynamic studies and in 10 other subjects cardiac size was determined by radionuclide cardiography. In all 22 subjects tilting caused the expected increase of renin, which was abolished by lower body compression. Decompression caused renin to increase again. Right atrial pressure in invasive studies and end-systolic and end-diastolic counts in noninvasive studies showed a significant and strong negative correlation with renin and norepinephrine levels. Thus, the degree of stretch of the cardiopulmonary mechanoreceptors is a major determinant of reflex regulation of renin release in humans.

  1. Glycemic control and outcome related to cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Thiessen, Steven; Vanhorebeek, Ilse; Van den Berghe, Greet

    2015-06-01

    Perioperative hyperglycemia, aggravated by cardiopulmonary bypass, is associated with adverse outcome in adult and pediatric patients. Whereas hyperglycemia was originally perceived as an adaptive response to surgical stress, it is now clear that glycemic control is a strategy to reduce adverse outcomes after cardiac surgery and cardiopulmonary bypass. The optimal blood glucose target, whether or not glycemic control should be initiated already intraoperatively, and whether or not perioperative glucose administration affects the impact of glycemic control on ischemia-reperfusion damage remain open questions. Hypoglycemia, the risk of which is increased with glycemic control, is also associated with adverse outcomes. However, it remains controversial whether brief episodes of hypoglycemia, rapidly corrected during glycemic control, have adverse effects on outcome. This review gives an overview of the currently available literature on glycemic control during and after cardiac surgery and focuses on the indicated open questions about this intervention for this specific patient population. PMID:26060029

  2. [Virtual educational proposal in cardiopulmonary resuscitation for the neonate care].

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Gilciane Ribeiro; Peres, Heloisa Helena Ciqueto; Rodrigues, Rita de Cássia; Tronchin, Daisy Maria Rizatto; Pereira, Irene Mari

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an educational proposal using virtual multimedia resources, to innovate, stimulate and diversify areas of communication and interaction, facilitating nurses' autonomous and reflexive process of teaching and learning. This is an applied research, following the cyclical and interactive phases of designing, planning, developing and implementing. The educational proposal was developed on the TelEduc platform, using specific tools for content organization and communication between students and administrator. The teaching modules were on the following themes: Module 1--Fundamentals of the heart anatomy and physiology in newborns; Module 2--Risk factors for the occurrence of cardiorespiratory arrest in newborns; Module 3--Planning nursing care; Module 4--Medications used in cardiopulmonary arrests in newborns; and Module 5--Cardiorespiratory arrest care in newborns. This study may contribute to innovating teaching in nursing from a virtual educational proposal on the important issue of newborn cardiopulmonary resuscitation care.

  3. [Virtual educational proposal in cardiopulmonary resuscitation for the neonate care].

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Gilciane Ribeiro; Peres, Heloisa Helena Ciqueto; Rodrigues, Rita de Cássia; Tronchin, Daisy Maria Rizatto; Pereira, Irene Mari

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an educational proposal using virtual multimedia resources, to innovate, stimulate and diversify areas of communication and interaction, facilitating nurses' autonomous and reflexive process of teaching and learning. This is an applied research, following the cyclical and interactive phases of designing, planning, developing and implementing. The educational proposal was developed on the TelEduc platform, using specific tools for content organization and communication between students and administrator. The teaching modules were on the following themes: Module 1--Fundamentals of the heart anatomy and physiology in newborns; Module 2--Risk factors for the occurrence of cardiorespiratory arrest in newborns; Module 3--Planning nursing care; Module 4--Medications used in cardiopulmonary arrests in newborns; and Module 5--Cardiorespiratory arrest care in newborns. This study may contribute to innovating teaching in nursing from a virtual educational proposal on the important issue of newborn cardiopulmonary resuscitation care. PMID:20642055

  4. Technique of Automated Control Over Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bureev, A. Sh; Kiseleva, E. Yu; Kutsov, M. S.; Zhdanov, D. S.

    2016-01-01

    The article describes a technique of automated control over cardiopulmonary resuscitation procedures on the basis of acoustic data. The research findings have allowed determining the primary important characteristics of acoustic signals (sounds of blood circulation in the carotid artery and respiratory sounds) and proposing a method to control the performance of resuscitation procedures. This method can be implemented as a part of specialized hardware systems.

  5. Warming during cardiopulmonary bypass is associated with jugular bulb desaturation.

    PubMed

    Croughwell, N D; Frasco, P; Blumenthal, J A; Leone, B J; White, W D; Reves, J G

    1992-05-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize cerebral venous effluent during normothermic nonpulsatile cardiopulmonary bypass. Thirty-one (23%) of 133 patients met desaturation criteria (defined as jugular bulb venous oxygen saturation less than or equal to 50% or jugular bulb venous oxygen tension less than or equal to 25 mm Hg) during normothermic cardiopulmonary bypass (after hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass at 27 degrees to 28 degrees C). Cerebral blood flow, calculated using xenon 133 clearance methodology, was significantly (p less than 0.005) higher in the saturated group (33.7 +/- 10.3 mL.100 g-1.min-1) than in the desaturated group (26.2 +/- 6.9 mL.100 g-1.min-1), whereas the cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen was significantly lower (p less than 0.005) in the saturated group (1.28 +/- 0.39 mL.100 g-.min-1) than in the desaturated group (1.52 +/- 0.36 mL.100 g-1.min-1) at normothermia. The arteriovenous oxygen difference at normothermia was lower in the saturated group (3.92 +/- 1.12 mL/dL) than in the desaturated group (5.97 +/- 1.05 mL/dL). Neuropsychological testing was performed in 74 of the 133 patients preoperatively and on day 7 postoperatively. There was a general decline in mean scores of all tests postoperatively in both groups with no significant difference between the groups. We conclude that cerebral venous desaturation represents a global imbalance in cerebral oxygen supply-demand that occurs during normothermic cardiopulmonary bypass and may represent transient cerebral ischemia. These episodes, however, are not associated with impared neuropsychological test performance as compared with the performance of patients with no evidence of desaturation.

  6. Strategy analysis of cardiopulmonary resuscitation training in the community.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin; Ma, Li; Lu, Yuan-Qiang

    2015-07-01

    Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a crucial therapy for sudden cardiac arrest. This appreciation produced immense efforts by professional organizations to train laypeople for CPR skills. However, the rate of CPR training is low and varies widely across communities. Several strategies are used in order to improve the rate of CPR training and are performed in some advanced countries. The Chinese CPR training in communities could gain enlightenment from them. PMID:26380744

  7. The effects of space flight on the cardiopulmonary system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicogossian, Arnauld E.; Gaffney, F. Andrew; Garshnek, Victoria

    1989-01-01

    Alterations of the human cardiopulmonary system in space flight are examined, including fluid shifts, orthostatic intolerance, changes in cardiac dynamics and electromechanics, and changes in pulmonary function and exercise capacity. Consideration is given to lower body negative pressure data from Skylab experiments and studies on the Space Shuttle. Also, echocardiography, cardiac dysrhythmias during spaceflight, and the role of neural mechanisms in circulatory control after spaceflight are discussed.

  8. Electrocardiographic changes in patients with haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Puljiz, Ivan; Kuzman, Ilija; Markotić, Alemka; Turcinov, Drago; Matić, Mladen; Makek, Nikola

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the incidence, type and dynamics of electrocardiography (ECG) alterations in patients with haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) according to different stages of the disease. 79 patients hospitalized at the University Hospital for Infectious Diseases in Zagreb during the large HFRS outbreak in Croatia in 2002 were retrospectively analysed. HFRS diagnosis was confirmed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. A 12-lead resting ECG was obtained. 30 (38%) patients had abnormal ECG findings, most frequently in the oliguric stage. Increased levels of urea and creatinine were observed in all patients with abnormal ECG, along with abnormal chest X-ray in nearly 50% of cases. Sinus tachycardia was the most frequent ECG disorder in the febrile stage, and bradycardia in the oliguric stage. During the course of disease, some other ECG disorders were recorded: bundle branch conduction defects, non-specific ventricular repolarization disturbances, supraventricular and ventricular extrasystoles, prolonged QT interval, low voltage of the QRS complexes in standard limb leads, atrioventricular block first-degree, and atrial fibrillation. Myocarditis was present in 3 patients. In conclusion, abnormal ECG was found in more than one-third of HFRS patients with the most common findings during the oliguric stage. All ECG changes were transient. PMID:16138429

  9. Viral haemorrhagic disease of rabbits and human health.

    PubMed Central

    Carman, J. A.; Garner, M. G.; Catton, M. G.; Thomas, S.; Westbury, H. A.; Cannon, R. M.; Collins, B. J.; Tribe, I. G.

    1998-01-01

    Viral haemorrhagic disease of rabbits (VHD), a potential biological control for wild rabbits in Australia and New Zealand, escaped from quarantined field trials on Wardang Island and spread to the mainland of Australia in October 1995. This study looked for any evidence of infection or illness in people occupationally exposed to the virus. Two hundred and sixty-nine people were interviewed and 259 blood samples were collected. Exposures to VHD-infected rabbits ranged from nil to very high. No VHD antibodies were detected in any of the 259 sera when tested by VHD competitive enzyme immunoassay, which had been validated with 1013 VHDV-specific antibody negative sera. A questionnaire designed to elicit symptoms of disease in a range of organ systems found no significant differences between illness in those exposed and those not exposed to VHD, nor could an association be found between exposure and subsequent episodes of illness. The findings are consistent with the view that exposure to VHD is not associated with infection or disease in humans. PMID:9825794

  10. Survival of rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) in the environment.

    PubMed Central

    Henning, J.; Meers, J.; Davies, P. R.; Morris, R. S.

    2005-01-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the persistence of rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) in the environment. Virus was impregnated onto two carrier materials (cotton tape and bovine liver) and exposed to environmental conditions on pasture during autumn in New Zealand. Samples were collected after 1, 10, 44 and 91 days and the viability of the virus was determined by oral inoculation of susceptible 11- to 14-week-old New Zealand White rabbits. Evidence of RHDV infection was based on clinical and pathological signs and/or seroconversion to RHDV. Virus impregnated on cotton tape was viable at 10 days of exposure but not at 44 days, while in bovine liver it was still viable at 91 days. The results of this study suggest that RHDV in animal tissues such as rabbit carcasses can survive for at least 3 months in the field, while virus exposed directly to environmental conditions, such as dried excreted virus, is viable for a period of less than 1 month. Survival of RHDV in the tissues of dead animals could, therefore, provide a persistent reservoir of virus, which could initiate new outbreaks of disease after extended delays. PMID:16050519

  11. Dengue fever and dengue haemorrhagic fever in adolescents and adults.

    PubMed

    Tantawichien, Terapong

    2012-05-01

    Dengue fever (DF) is endemic in tropical and subtropical zones and the prevalence is increasing across South-east Asia, Africa, the Western Pacific and the Americas. In recent years, the spread of unplanned urbanisation, with associated substandard housing, overcrowding and deterioration in water, sewage and waste management systems, has created ideal conditions for increased transmission of the dengue virus in tropical urban centres. While dengue infection has traditionally been considered a paediatric disease, the age distribution of dengue has been rising and more cases have been observed in adolescents and adults. Furthermore, the development of tourism in the tropics has led to an increase in the number of tourists who become infected, most of whom are adults. Symptoms and risk factors for dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) and severe dengue differ between children and adults, with co-morbidities and incidence in more elderly patients associated with greater risk of mortality. Treatment options for DF and DHF in adults, as for children, centre round fluid replacement (either orally or intravenously, depending on severity) and antipyretics. Further data are needed on the optimal treatment of adult patients.

  12. [Ebola and Marburg fever--outbreaks of viral haemorrhagic fever].

    PubMed

    Chlíbek, R; Smetana, J; Vacková, M

    2006-12-01

    With an increasing frequency of traveling and tourism to exotic countries, a new threat-import of rare, very dangerous infections-emerges in humane medicine. Ebola fever and Marburg fever, whose agents come from the same group of Filoviridae family, belong among these diseases. The natural reservoir of these viruses has not yet been precisely determined. The pathogenesis of the diseases is not absolutely clear, there is neither a possibility of vaccination, nor an effective treatment. Fever and haemorrhagic diathesis belong to the basic symptoms of the diseases. Most of the infected persons die, the death rate is 70-88 %. The history of Ebola fever is relatively short-30 years, Marburg fever is known almost 40 years. Hundreds of people have died of these diseases so far. The study involves epidemics recorded in the world and their epidemiological relations. Not a single case has been recorded in the Czech Republic, nevertheless a sick traveler or infected animals are the highest risk of import these diseases. In our conditions, the medical staff belong to a highly endangered group of people because of stringent isolation of patients, strict rules of barrier treatment regime and high infectivity of the diseases. For this reason, the public should be prepared for possible contact with these highly virulent infections.

  13. Traumatic subarachnoid haemorrhage: a clinicoradiological and TCD correlation.

    PubMed

    Chhabra, R; Sharma, B S; Gupta, S K; Khandelwal, N; Tiwari, M K; Khosla, V K

    2001-06-01

    Twenty five consecutive patients with CT proven pure traumatic subarachnoid haemorrhage (tSAH) were studied, prospectively over a 6 month period. They constituted 2% of all head injuries. Most of the patients (88%) had a mild or moderate head injury at the time of admission, with a mean glasgow comma scale (GCS) of 10.68. The CT scan findings were divided into 3 grades. Grade 1 - blood in hemispheric region only (n=4), grade 2 - blood in basal region only (n=11), grade 3 - blood in both hemispheric as well as basal region (n=10). Transcranial doppler ultrasound (TCD) velocities were recorded in all patients by insonating the middle cerebral artery, internal carotid artery and anterior cerebral artery on both sides. All patients were also subjected to digital substraction angiography (DSA). All patients with mild head injury had normal TCD velocity (<100 cm/sec), while TCD velocities of more than 150 cm/sec were seen only in one patient with severe head injury. Patients with severe head injury were found to have grade 3 tSAH on CT. No statistically significant correlation was found between the CT grade and TCD velocities. Angiographic vasospasm was found in 2 patients with severe head injury only. 90.2% of patients had good outcome at discharge. PMID:11447432

  14. Surgical management of postpartum haemorrhage: survey of French obstetricians

    PubMed Central

    Bouet, Pierre-Emmanuel; Brun, Stéphanie; Madar, Hugo; Schinkel, Elsa; Merlot, Benjamin; Sentilhes, Loïc

    2016-01-01

    The aim of our study was to assess the theoretical and practical knowledge of French obstetricians about the surgical management of postpartum haemorrhage (PPH). Our study is a national anonymous self-administered survey. A total of 363 obstetricians responded to this questionnaire between December 2013 and April 2014. Questionnaire sent through email to all French obstetricians who are members of either of two federations of hospital-based obstetricians. Answers were collected until the end of June 2014. The main outcome measure was obstetricians’ level of mastery of each surgical technique. The results were analysed descriptively (proportions). Only the 286 questionnaires fully completed were analysed; the complete response rate was 23% (286/1246). In all, 33% (95/286) of the responding obstetricians reported that they had not mastered sufficiently or even at all the technique for bilateral ligation of the uterine arteries, 37% (105/286) for uterine compression suture, 62% (178/286) for ligation of the internal iliac arteries, and 47% (134/286) for emergency peripartum hysterectomy. In all, 18% (52/286) of respondents stated that they had not mastered any of these techniques. Our study shows that a worrisome number of French obstetricians reported insufficient mastery of the surgical techniques for PPH management. PMID:27460158

  15. Surgical management of postpartum haemorrhage: survey of French obstetricians.

    PubMed

    Bouet, Pierre-Emmanuel; Brun, Stéphanie; Madar, Hugo; Schinkel, Elsa; Merlot, Benjamin; Sentilhes, Loïc

    2016-01-01

    The aim of our study was to assess the theoretical and practical knowledge of French obstetricians about the surgical management of postpartum haemorrhage (PPH). Our study is a national anonymous self-administered survey. A total of 363 obstetricians responded to this questionnaire between December 2013 and April 2014. Questionnaire sent through email to all French obstetricians who are members of either of two federations of hospital-based obstetricians. Answers were collected until the end of June 2014. The main outcome measure was obstetricians' level of mastery of each surgical technique. The results were analysed descriptively (proportions). Only the 286 questionnaires fully completed were analysed; the complete response rate was 23% (286/1246). In all, 33% (95/286) of the responding obstetricians reported that they had not mastered sufficiently or even at all the technique for bilateral ligation of the uterine arteries, 37% (105/286) for uterine compression suture, 62% (178/286) for ligation of the internal iliac arteries, and 47% (134/286) for emergency peripartum hysterectomy. In all, 18% (52/286) of respondents stated that they had not mastered any of these techniques. Our study shows that a worrisome number of French obstetricians reported insufficient mastery of the surgical techniques for PPH management. PMID:27460158

  16. Operative interventions in the management of major postpartum haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Keriakos, R; Chaudhuri, S

    2012-01-01

    In many recent studies in the developed world, the incidence of postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) has been rising, though the mortality has come down, suggesting improvement in the management of this condition. Since the publication of the RCOG guidelines in 2009 for management of PPH and the Sheffield guidelines for the use of Rusch balloon along with the initial small case series (Keriakos and Mukhopadhyay 2006), many units have introduced the guidelines into clinical practice. This has led to the reduction of surgical intervention in our unit. Major PPH accounted for 1.6% of the total deliveries in our hospital. Surgical interventions accounted for 7.8% of these cases and only 0.1% of the total deliveries. Risk factors for PPH were identified in 83%. In this paper, we reviewed the management of all patients who had major PPH and failed medical management over a period of about 4 years. All surgical interventions including Rusch balloon, B-Lynch suture, radiological interventions and hysterectomy were described. An update to Rusch balloon guidelines and Sheffield guidelines for management of major PPH are appended. PMID:22185528

  17. Quality of life and cognitive deficits after subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Hütter, B O; Gilsbach, J M; Kreitschmann, I

    1995-01-01

    In a retrospective study of 58 patients after subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) with a late result either good (GOS = I) or fair (GOS = II), patients were examined 1-5 years after the acute event for their quality of life including a neuropsychological examination. Cognitive deficits were found in visual short-term memory (46%) and in the three parameters of a reaction-time task ranging from 31 to 65%. Further deficits were found in verbal long-term memory (28%), concentration (5-13%) and language (11%). The quality of life was reduced in the SAH patients according to a self-rating scale in motivation (50%), interests (47%), mental capacity (47%), free-time activities (52%), social relationships (39%), concentration (70%), fine motor co-ordination (25%) and sleep (47%). A further 77% of the patients reported more frequent headaches since their SAH. Depression was found in 30% of the SAH patients. Life-satisfaction was significantly reduced in 37%, whereas 48% of the SAH patients suffered from increased emotional lability and in 41% motivation was significantly reduced. Negative job consequences like loss of job or demotion were reported by 16% of the patients investigated and an additional 15% had been retired. PMID:7576273

  18. Clinical and epidemiological patterns of Argentine haemorrhagic fever

    PubMed Central

    Maiztegui, J. I.

    1975-01-01

    The epidemiology of Argentine haemorrhagic fever (AHF) is closely related to cricetine rodents acting as natural hosts of Junin virus. The endemo-epidemic area, which has increased 5 times since the disease was first recognized 15-20 years ago, is located in a densely populated region of Argentina. It has been shown that the virus of LCM is active in humans and rodents of the AHF endemic area; this demonstrates the simultaneous presence of two arenaviruses pathogenic for man in a given geographic location. The disease is characterized by haematological, renal, neurological and cardiovascular changes. Electron microscopy and immunohistochemical studies have shown cytopathic changes, characteristic intracellular virus-like particles, and antigenic determinants of Junin virus in different organs from 9 cases of AHF. No deposits of immunoglobulins or C3 were found in the kidneys; in addition, an absence of fibrinogen and C3 in the hepatocytes and of immunoglobulins in the spleen was observed. These findings suggest a direct viral pathogenic action in the human disease. Ultrastructural and immunofluorescence studies in tissues of guinea-pigs inoculated with two strains of Junin virus revealed the presence of the same types of virus-like particles and antigenic determinants of Junin virus as were encountered in the human subjects with AHF. ImagesFig. 2Fig. 3 PMID:1085212

  19. Risk factors for primary postpartum haemorrhage. A case control study.

    PubMed

    Selo-Ojeme, D O; Okonofua, F E

    1997-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine which background factors predispose women to primary postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) at the Obafemi Awolowo University Hospital. The study consisted of 101 women who developed PPH after a normal vaginal delivery and 107 women with normal unassisted vaginal delivery without PPH Both cases and controls were investigated for sociodemographic risk factors, medical and obstetric histories, antenatal events and labour and delivery outcomes. Data were abstracted from the medical and delivery records and risks were estimated by multivariate logistic regression. The results of the univariate analysis revealed a number of potential risk factors for PPH but after adjustment by logistic regression three factors remained significant. These were prolonged second and third stages of labour and non-use of oxytocics after vaginal delivery. Previously hypothesised risk factors for PPH such as grand multiparity, primigravidity and previous episodes of PPH were not significantly associated with PPH. We conclude that primary PPH in this population is mostly associated with prolonged second and third stages of labour and non use of oxytocics. Efforts to reduce the incidence of PPH should not only be directed at proper management of labour but also training and retraining of primary health care workers and alternative health care providers in the early referral of patients with prolonged labour.

  20. Ultrastructural changes in the human lung following cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Anyanwu, E; Dittrich, H; Gieseking, R; Enders, H J

    1982-01-01

    In order to assess the degree of the pathological changes presenting in the lungs of patients after elective cardiac operations in cardiopulmonary bypass and to determine their prognosis, lung biopsies were taken from the right lower lobe of 36 patients after extracorporeal circulation and studied ultrastructurally. Prepump biopsies from the same presenting anterior portion of the lower lobe of the lung served as controls. Perivascular and interstitial edema featured prominently. Intraalveolar edema and extravasated corpuscular blood elements were observed, too. Damages to the mitochondria and to the lamellar bodies and swelling of the endothelial and alveolar cells were major observations following cardiopulmonary bypass lasting more than 60 minutes. These changes were also prominent in those lungs presenting with severe edema and fibrosis. Many intact type-II pneumocytes presented with enhanced metabolic and secretory activities. Merocrine and apocrine secretions were observed after extracorporeal circulation. The alveoli of the postpump lungs contained numerous detached normal appearing type-II pneumocytes, in contrast to the paucity of such cells in the alveoli of the control biopsies. The prognosis for the patients depends on any one or combination of any of the following factors: the pathological changes present in the lungs prior to the extracorporeal circulation, the duration of the cardiopulmonary bypass, the rate of the elimination of the surfactant and finally the ability of the undamaged type-II pneumocytes to step up the synthesis and secretion of the surface acting agent.

  1. Perfusion pressure control by adenosine triphosphate given during cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, K; Kurosawa, H; Horikoshi, S; Miyamoto, H; Suzuki, K

    1993-01-01

    Administration of exogenous adenosine triphosphate (ATP) as a vasodilator during cardiopulmonary bypass was assessed in consecutive adult patients (n = 24) who demonstrated a high arterial perfusion pressure (mean, > 90 mm Hg). The action of ATP was characterized by rapid induction and stabilization of the blood pressure level. The dose of ATP ranged from 0.68 to 2.68 mg/min. Within 1 minute after the administration, there was a significant reduction in the perfusion pressure from 102 +/- 18 mm Hg (mean +/- standard deviation) to 72 +/- 19 mm Hg. The ATP was then able to maintain the desired pressure of 69 +/- 12 mm Hg at 5 minutes, 67 +/- 12 mm Hg at 10 minutes, and consistent values thereafter. After the ATP administration was discontinued, there was a prompt recovery of pressure without bradyarrhythmia. The frequency and amount of inotropes used were consistent with the control group (n = 26). Although the administration of ATP reduced the increase in serum catecholamine concentration, there were no significant changes in other vasoactive mediators (eicosanoid, angiotensin II, endothelin) between the two groups during cardiopulmonary bypass. There was neither an accumulation of metabolic products (uric acid, phosphate) nor a decrease in the level of divalent cation (Ca2+), which is observed when the cations combine with phosphates or adenosine nucleotides. This study confirmed the efficacy and safety of ATP infusion during cardiopulmonary bypass. PMID:8417658

  2. Management of Anesthesia under Extracorporeal Cardiopulmonary Support in an Infant with Severe Subglottic Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Soeda, Rie; Taniguchi, Fumika; Sawada, Maiko; Hamaoka, Saeko; Shibasaki, Masayuki; Nakajima, Yasufumi; Hashimoto, Satoru; Sawa, Teiji; Nakayama, Yoshinobu

    2016-01-01

    A 4-month-old female infant who weighed 3.57 kg with severe subglottic stenosis underwent tracheostomy under extracorporeal cardiopulmonary support. First, we set up extracorporeal cardiopulmonary support to the infant and then successfully intubated an endotracheal tube with a 2.5 mm inner diameter before tracheostomy by otolaryngologists. Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary support is an alternative for maintenance of oxygenation in difficult airway management in infants. PMID:26989518

  3. Management of Anesthesia under Extracorporeal Cardiopulmonary Support in an Infant with Severe Subglottic Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Soeda, Rie; Taniguchi, Fumika; Sawada, Maiko; Hamaoka, Saeko; Shibasaki, Masayuki; Nakajima, Yasufumi; Hashimoto, Satoru; Sawa, Teiji; Nakayama, Yoshinobu

    2016-01-01

    A 4-month-old female infant who weighed 3.57 kg with severe subglottic stenosis underwent tracheostomy under extracorporeal cardiopulmonary support. First, we set up extracorporeal cardiopulmonary support to the infant and then successfully intubated an endotracheal tube with a 2.5 mm inner diameter before tracheostomy by otolaryngologists. Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary support is an alternative for maintenance of oxygenation in difficult airway management in infants.

  4. Pox-like lesions and haemorrhagic fever in two concurrent cases in the Central African Republic: case investigation and management in difficult circumstances

    PubMed Central

    Froeschl, Guenter; Kayembe, Pitchou Kasongo

    2015-01-01

    Cases of monkeypox in humans are frequently reported from the Democratic Republic of Congo. The few reports from the Central African Republic have been limited to cases in the far South closely bordering the Congos. Team members of an international medical organisation have suspected clinically two human cases of MPX, associated with clinical signs of coagulopathy and haemorrhage in the North of the country. Key findings were history of a squirrel, fever and vesicular dermal eruptions. Subsequently patients developed profuse epistaxis and hematemesis, associated with clinical signs of shock. Both patients were isolated and treated symptomatically. Samples were sent to a regional reference laboratory, who initially issued a confirmation of the suspected diagnosis of MPX in both cases. The result was later revised, and additional analyses of samples could not confirm the diagnosis. PMID:26664524

  5. Intra-alveolar haemorrhage in sudden infant death syndrome: a cause for concern?

    PubMed Central

    Yukawa, N; Carter, N; Rutty, G; Green, M A

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The "Back to Sleep" campaign in 1991 resulted in a dramatic decrease in the incidence of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). The proportion of presumed SIDS deaths being actually suspicious deaths from airway obstruction is likely to have become relatively greater. There is usually little pathological evidence to suggest smothering, but intra-alveolar haemorrhage appears to be more prominent in cases where interference with the airway is suspected. AIM: To attempt to quantify intra-alveolar haemorrhage to see whether it could be used as a marker to distinguish between smothering/overlaying and SIDS. METHODS: Intra-alveolar haemorrhage was quantified using digital image analysis on haematoxylin/eosin stained sections taken from the lungs of 62 consecutive infants who had died suddenly and unexpectedly. Cases were initially classified according to the original cause of death. After quantitation, the case histories were critically reviewed. Three pathologists independently made microscopic assessments of the degree of intra-alveolar haemorrhage in the first 24 cases to see whether these accurately reflected the quantitative results. RESULTS: 73% of those infants with a history suggesting possible involuntary overlaying and 45% of those with a history suspicious of smothering had significant intra-alveolar haemorrhage (> 5% of total lung surface area assessed). From the history, the cause of death in 11 cases initially classified as SIDS would better have been given as "Unascertained." Simple microscopic assessments underestimated the true extent of the haemorrhage in 33% (8/24). CONCLUSIONS: If a moderate degree (at least 5%) of pulmonary parenchymal haemorrhage is observed, this may be an indicator of airway obstruction for a significant period, either from overlaying or possibly smothering. The diagnosis of SIDS may be being used inappropriately in such cases. Images PMID:10645227

  6. Postpartum Pyomyoma, a Rare Complication of Sepsis Associated with Chorioamnionitis and Massive Postpartum Haemorrhage Treated with an Intrauterine Balloon

    PubMed Central

    Kaler, Mandeep; Gailer, Ruth; Iskaros, Joseph; David, Anna L.

    2015-01-01

    We report the successful treatment of a postpartum pyomyoma, a rare but serious complication of uterine leiomyomata in a 28-year-old primigravida. The patient was treated for an Escherichia Coli (E. Coli) urinary tract infection (UTI) at 16 weeks of gestation. She had asymptomatic short cervical length on ultrasound scan at 20 weeks that was managed conservatively due to the presence of further UTI and received antibiotics. She was known to have a left sided intramural leiomyoma. She presented with abdominal pain and vaginal bleeding at 23+1 weeks of gestation and the next day she had spontaneous vaginal delivery and collapsed with E. Coli septic shock, massive postpartum haemorrhage, and disseminated intravascular coagulation and was successfully treated with oxytocic drugs, a Rusch intrauterine balloon, and intravenous antibiotics. Eleven days postnatally she re-presented with systemic sepsis and was treated for retained products of conception. Sepsis persisted and investigations showed a postpartum pyomyoma that was initially managed with intravenous antibiotics to avoid surgery. Ultimately she required laparotomy, drainage of pyomyoma, and myomectomy. Postoperative recovery was good and the patient had a successful pregnancy two years later. PMID:26199774

  7. Particle Acceleration in Shock-Shock Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanotani, Masaru; Matsukiyo, Shuichi; Hada, Tohru

    2015-04-01

    Collisionless shock waves play a crucial role in producing high energy particles. One of the most plausible acceleration mechanisms is the first order Fermi acceleration in which non-thermal particles statistically gain energy while scattered by MHD turbulence both upstream and downstream of a shock. Indeed, X-ray emission from energetic particles accelerated at supernova remnant shocks is often observed [e.g., Uchiyama et al., 2007]. Most of the previous studies on shock acceleration assume the presence of a single shock. In space, however, two shocks frequently come close to or even collide with each other. For instance, it is observed that a CME (coronal mass ejection) driven shock collides with the earth's bow shock [Hietala et al., 2011], or interplanetary shocks pass through the heliospheric termination shock [Lu et al., 1999]. Colliding shocks are observed also in high power laser experiments [Morita et al., 2013]. It is expected that shock-shock interactions efficiently produce high energy particles. A previous work using hybrid simulation [Cargill et al., 1986] reports efficient ion acceleration when supercritical two shocks collide. In the hybrid simulation, however, the electron dynamics cannot be resolved so that electron acceleration cannot be discussed in principle. Here, we perform one-dimensional full Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulations to examine colliding two symmetric oblique shocks and the associated electron acceleration. In particular, the following three points are discussed in detail. 1. Energetic electrons are observed upstream of the two shocks before their collision. These energetic electrons are efficiently accelerated through multiple reflections at the two shocks (Fermi acceleration). 2. The reflected electrons excite large amplitude upstream waves. Electron beam cyclotron instability [Hasegawa, 1975] and electron fire hose instability [Li et al., 2000] appear to occur. 3. The large amplitude waves can scatters energetic electrons in

  8. Massive haemorrhage in liver transplantation: Consequences, prediction and management.

    PubMed

    Cleland, Stuart; Corredor, Carlos; Ye, Jia Jia; Srinivas, Coimbatore; McCluskey, Stuart A

    2016-06-24

    From its inception the success of liver transplantation has been associated with massive blood loss. Massive transfusion is classically defined as > 10 units of red blood cells within 24 h, but describing transfusion rates over a shorter period of time may reduce the potential for survival bias. Both massive haemorrhage and transfusion are associated with increased risk of mortality and morbidity (need for dialysis/surgical site infection) following liver transplantation although causality is difficult to prove due to the observational design of most trials. The blood loss associated with liver transplantation is multifactorial. Portal hypertension secondary to cirrhosis results in extensive collateral circulation, which can bleed during hepatectomy particular if portal pressures are increased. Avoiding volume loading and maintenance of a low central venous pressure together with the use of vasopressors have been shown to reduce blood loss and transfusion during liver transplantation, but may increase the risk of renal impairment post-operatively. Coagulation defects may be present pre-transplant, but haemostasis is often re-balanced due to a deficit in both pro- and anti-coagulation factors. Further derangement of haemostasis may develop in the anhepatic and neohepatic phases due to absent hepatic metabolic function, hyperfibrinolysis and platelet sequestration in the donor liver. Point-of-care tests of coagulation such as the viscoelastic tests rotation thromboelastometry/thromboelastometry allow and more accurate and rapid assessment of these derangements in coagulation and guide the use of factor replacement and antifibrinolytics. Transfusion protocols guided by these tests have been shown to reduce transfusion rates compared with conventional coagulation tests, but have not shown improvements in mortality or morbidity. Pre-operative factors associated with massive transfusion include previous surgery, re-do transplantation, the aetiology and severity of liver

  9. Massive haemorrhage in liver transplantation: Consequences, prediction and management

    PubMed Central

    Cleland, Stuart; Corredor, Carlos; Ye, Jia Jia; Srinivas, Coimbatore; McCluskey, Stuart A

    2016-01-01

    From its inception the success of liver transplantation has been associated with massive blood loss. Massive transfusion is classically defined as > 10 units of red blood cells within 24 h, but describing transfusion rates over a shorter period of time may reduce the potential for survival bias. Both massive haemorrhage and transfusion are associated with increased risk of mortality and morbidity (need for dialysis/surgical site infection) following liver transplantation although causality is difficult to prove due to the observational design of most trials. The blood loss associated with liver transplantation is multifactorial. Portal hypertension secondary to cirrhosis results in extensive collateral circulation, which can bleed during hepatectomy particular if portal pressures are increased. Avoiding volume loading and maintenance of a low central venous pressure together with the use of vasopressors have been shown to reduce blood loss and transfusion during liver transplantation, but may increase the risk of renal impairment post-operatively. Coagulation defects may be present pre-transplant, but haemostasis is often re-balanced due to a deficit in both pro- and anti-coagulation factors. Further derangement of haemostasis may develop in the anhepatic and neohepatic phases due to absent hepatic metabolic function, hyperfibrinolysis and platelet sequestration in the donor liver. Point-of-care tests of coagulation such as the viscoelastic tests rotation thromboelastometry/thromboelastometry allow and more accurate and rapid assessment of these derangements in coagulation and guide the use of factor replacement and antifibrinolytics. Transfusion protocols guided by these tests have been shown to reduce transfusion rates compared with conventional coagulation tests, but have not shown improvements in mortality or morbidity. Pre-operative factors associated with massive transfusion include previous surgery, re-do transplantation, the aetiology and severity of liver

  10. Intracranial haemorrhage among a population of haemophilic patients in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Antunes, S V; Vicari, P; Cavalheiro, S; Bordin, J O

    2003-09-01

    Intracranial haemorrhage (ICH) is a common cause of morbidity and mortality in haemophilic patients. The overall incidence of ICH has been reported to range from 2.2% to 7.5% in patients with haemophilia. From 1987 to 2001, 401 haemophilic patients from the Serviço de Hemofilia, Disciplina de Hematologia e Hemoterapia, Universidade Federal de São Paulo were evaluated. The episodes of ICH were documented by CT scan and the anatomic location, clinical presentation, relationship to trauma and clinical factors, including the presence of HIV infection and the presence of inhibitor, were reviewed. Among 401 haemophilic patients, 45 ICH episodes in 35 (8.7%) patients with age ranging from 4 days to 49 years (mean 10.6 years) were observed. A history of recent trauma was documented in 24 (53.3%) cases. Seventeen (37.8%) episodes occurred in more than one site of bleeding, 12 (26.7%) were subdural, seven (15.5%) subarachnoid, four (8.9%) epidural, two (4.4%) intracerebral and one (2.2%) intraventricular. The most frequent symptoms were headache and drowsiness. All patients were submitted to replacement therapy and neurosurgical intervention was performed in eight (17.8%) patients. Despite the treatment, three (8.6%) haemophilia A patients died due to the ICH event and three presented late sequelae. The most important aspect of ICH management is the early replacement therapy in haemophilic patients. This prompt treatment will increase the chances of a better prognosis. Another impact measure consists in the administration of the deficient coagulation factor after every head trauma, even when considered minor.

  11. Acute intracerebral haemorrhage: grounds for optimism in management.

    PubMed

    Delcourt, Candice; Anderson, Craig

    2012-12-01

    Spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) is one of the most devastating types of stroke, which has considerable disease burden in "non-white" ethnic groups where the population-attributable risks of elevated blood pressure are very high. Since the treatment of ICH remains largely supportive and expectant, nihilism and the early withdrawal of active therapy influence management decisions in clinical practice. However, approaches to management are now better defined on the basis of evidence that both survival and speed (and degree) of recovery are critically dependent on the location, size, and degree of expansion and extension into the intraventricular system of the haematoma of the ICH. Although no medical treatment has been shown to improve outcome in ICH, several promising avenues have emerged that include haemostatic therapy and intensive control of elevated blood pressure. Conversely, there is continued controversy over the role of evacuation of the haematoma of ICH via open craniotomy. Despite being an established practice for several decades, and having undergone evaluation in multiple randomised trials, there is uncertainty over which patients have the most to gain from an intervention with clear procedural risk. Minimally invasive surgery via local anaesthetic applied drill-puncture of the cranium and infusion of a thrombolytic agent is an attractive option for patients requiring critical management of the haematoma, not just in low resource settings but arguably also in specialist centres of western countries. With several ongoing clinical trials nearing completion, these treatments could enter routine practice within the next few years, further justifying the urgency of "time is brain" and that active management within well-organized, comprehensive acute stroke care units includes patients with ICH. PMID:23088860

  12. Dengue haemorrhagic fever and Japanese B encephalitis in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Nathin, M A; Harun, S R; Sumarmo

    1988-09-01

    Dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) was first recognized in Indonesia in the cities of Jakarta and Surabaya in 1968, 15 years after its recognition in the Philippines. During the 1968 outbreak, a total of 58 clinical cases with 24 deaths were reported. The number of reported cases since then has increased sharply, with the highest number of cases recorded in the years 1973 (10,189 cases), 1983 (13,668 cases), and 1985 (13,588 cases). Outbreaks of the disease have spread to involve most of the major urban areas, as well as some of the rural areas. In 1985, the disease had spread to 26 of 27 Provinces and 160 of 300 regencies of municipalities. At present, the disease is endemic in many large cities and small towns. Interestingly, DHF has not been reported in some cities, even though dengue virus transmission rates in those cities are high. The epidemic pattern of DHF for the country as a whole has become irregular. Since 1982, the intensity and spread of DHF has created an increasing public health problem in Indonesia, particularly in Java where 60% of the total population of the country resides. Java contributed about 71% of all cases occurring in the country in 1982, 84% in 1983, and 91% in 1984. The peak monthly incidence of DHF was frequently reported during October through April, months which coincide with the rainy season. The morbidity rate for Indonesia, estimated from reported cases over five years (1981-1985), ranged between 3.39 to 8.65 per 100,000 population. The overall case fatality rate has steadily declined from 41.3% in 1968 to 3% in 1984.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Dengue/dengue haemorrhagic fever: history and current status.

    PubMed

    Gubler, Duane J

    2006-01-01

    Dengue fever (DF) is an old disease; the first record of a clinically compatible disease being recorded in a Chinese medical encyclopaedia in 992. As the global shipping industry expanded in the 18th and 19th centuries, port cities grew and became more urbanized, creating ideal conditions for the principal mosquito vector, Aedes aegypti. Both the mosquitoes and the viruses were thus spread to new geographic areas causing major epidemics. Because dispersal was by sailing ship, however, there were long intervals (10-40 years) between epidemics. In the aftermath of World War II, rapid urbanization in Southeast Asia led to increased transmission and hyperendemicity. The first major epidemics of the severe and fatal form of disease, dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF), occurred in Southeast Asia as a direct result of this changing ecology. In the last 25 years of the 20th century, a dramatic global geographic expansion of epidemic DF/DHF occurred, facilitated by unplanned urbanization in tropical developing countries, modern transportation, lack of effective mosquito control and globalization. As we go into the 21st century, epidemic DF/DHF is one of the most important infectious diseases affecting tropical urban areas. Each year there are an estimated 50-100 million dengue infections, 500000 cases of DHF that must be hospitalized and 20000-25 000 deaths, mainly in children. Epidemic DF/DHF has an economic impact on the community of the same order of magnitude as malaria and other important infectious diseases. There are currently no vaccines nor antiviral drugs available for dengue viruses; the only effective way to prevent epidemic DF/DHF is to control the mosquito vector, Aedes aegypti.

  14. Cardiovascular devices; reclassification of nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pumps for cardiopulmonary and circulatory bypass; effective date of requirement for premarket approval for nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pumps for temporary ventricular support. Final order.

    PubMed

    2015-06-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing a final order to reclassify nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump (NRP) devices for cardiopulmonary and circulatory bypass, a preamendments class III device, into class II (special controls), and to require the filing of a premarket approval application (PMA) for NRP devices for temporary ventricular support. FDA is also revising the title and identification of the regulation for NRP devices in this order. PMID:26054096

  15. Haemorrhagic disease of the newborn in the British Isles: two year prospective study.

    PubMed Central

    McNinch, A W; Tripp, J H

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine the incidence of haemorrhagic disease of the newborn in the British Isles, study risk factors, and examine the effect of vitamin K prophylaxis. DESIGN--Prospective survey of all possible cases of haemorrhagic disease of the newborn as reported by consultant paediatricians using the monthly notification cards of the British Paediatric Surveillance Unit and a follow up questionnaire for each case to validate the diagnosis and accrue further data. SETTING--Britain (England, Scotland, and Wales) and Ireland (Northern Ireland and the Irish Republic) during December 1987 to March 1990. PATIENTS--27 infants classified as having confirmed (n = 25) or probable (n = 2) haemorrhagic disease of the newborn. RESULTS--24 of the 27 infants were solely breast fed. 10 suffered intracranial haemorrhage; two of these died and there was clinical concern about the remainder. 20 infants had received no vitamin K prophylaxis, and seven had received oral prophylaxis. Relative risk ratios for these groups compared with babies who had received intramuscular vitamin K were 81:1 and 13:1 respectively. Six infants had hepatitis (alpha 1 antitrypsin deficiency in four), unsuspected until presentation with haemorrhagic disease of the newborn, of whom four had received oral prophylaxis. One other baby had prolonged jaundice. One mother had taken phenytoin during pregnancy. CONCLUSIONS--All newborn infants should receive vitamin K prophylaxis. Intramuscular vitamin K is more effective than oral prophylactic regimens currently used in the British Isles. PMID:1747578

  16. 21 CFR 870.4270 - Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy suction line blood filter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... blood filter. 870.4270 Section 870.4270 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Devices § 870.4270 Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy suction line blood filter. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy suction line blood filter is a device used as part of a gas exchange...

  17. Does Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Cause Rib Fractures in Children? A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maguire, Sabine; Mann, Mala; John, Nia; Ellaway, Bev; Sibert, Jo R.; Kemp, Alison M.

    2006-01-01

    Background: There is a diagnostic dilemma when a child presents with rib fractures after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) where child abuse is suspected as the cause of collapse. We have performed a systematic review to establish the evidence base for the following questions: (i) Does cardiopulmonary resuscitation cause rib fractures in…

  18. Dysregulated Arginine Metabolism and Cardiopulmonary Dysfunction in Patients with Thalassaemia

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Claudia R.; Kim, Hae-Young; Klings, Elizabeth S.; Wood, John; Porter, John B.; Trachtenberg, Felicia; Sweeters, Nancy; Olivieri, Nancy F; Kwiatkowski, Janet L; Virzi, Lisa; Hassell, Kathryn; Taher, Ali; Neufeld, Ellis J; Thompson, Alexis A.; Larkin, Sandra; Suh, Jung H.; Vichinsky, Elliott P; Kuypers, Frans A.

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) commonly develops in thalassaemia syndromes, but is poorly characterized. The goal of this study was to provide a comprehensive description of the cardiopulmonary and biological profile of patients with thalassaemia at risk for PH. A case-control study of thalassaemia patients at high versus low PH-risk was performed. A single cross-sectional measurement for variables reflecting cardiopulmonary status and biological pathophysiology were obtained, including Doppler-echocardiography, 6-minute-walk-test, Borg Dyspnea Score, New York Heart Association functional class, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), chest-computerized tomography, pulmonary function testing and laboratory analyses targeting mechanism of coagulation, inflammation, haemolysis, adhesion and the arginine-nitric oxide pathway. Twenty-seven thalassaemia patients were evaluated, 14 with an elevated tricuspid-regurgitant-jet-velocity (TRV) ≥2.5m/s. Patients with increased TRV had a higher frequency of splenectomy, and significantly larger right atrial size, left atrial volume and left septal-wall thickness on echocardiography and/or MRI, with elevated biomarkers of abnormal coagulation, lactate dehydrogenase levels and arginase concentration, and lower arginine-bioavailability compared to low-risk patients. Arginase concentration correlated significantly to several echocardiography/MRI parameters of cardiovascular function in addition to global-arginine-bioavailability and biomarkers of haemolytic rate, including lactate dehydrogenase, haemoglobin and bilirubin. Thalassaemia patients with a TRV ≥2.5m/s have additional echocardiography and cardiac-MRI parameters suggestive of right and left-sided cardiac dysfunction. In addition, low arginine bioavailability may contribute to cardiopulmonary dysfunction in β-thalassaemia. PMID:25907665

  19. Subclinical cardiopulmonary dysfunction in stage 3 chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Alexander; Otto, James; Whittle, John; Stephens, Robert C M; Martin, Daniel S; Prowle, John R

    2016-01-01

    Objective Reduced exercise capacity is well documented in end-stage chronic kidney disease (CKD), preceded by changes in cardiac morphology in CKD stage 3. However, it is unknown whether subclinical cardiopulmonary dysfunction occurs in CKD stage 3 independently of heart failure. Methods Prospective observational cross-sectional study of exercise capacity assessed by cardiopulmonary exercise testing in 993 preoperative patients. Primary outcome was peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak). Anaerobic threshold (AT), oxygen pulse and exercise-evoked measures of autonomic function were analysed, controlling for CKD stage 3, age, gender, diabetes mellitus and hypertension. Results CKD stage 3 was present in 93/993 (9.97%) patients. Diabetes mellitus (RR 2.49 (95% CI 1.59 to 3.89); p<0.001), and hypertension (RR 3.20 (95% CI 2.04 to 5.03); p<0.001)) were more common in CKD stage 3. Cardiac failure (RR 0.83 (95% CI 0.30 to 2.24); p=0.70) and ischaemic heart disease (RR 1.40 (95% CI 0.97 to 2.02); p=0.09) were not more common in CKD stage 3. Patients with CKD stage 3 had lower predicted VO2peak (mean difference: 6% (95% CI 1% to 11%); p=0.02), lower peak heart rate (mean difference:9 bpm (95% CI 3 to 14); p=0.03)), lower AT (mean difference: 1.1 mL/min/kg (95% CI 0.4 to 1.7); p<0.001) and impaired heart rate recovery (mean difference: 4 bpm (95% CI 1 to 7); p<0.001)). Conclusions Subclinical cardiopulmonary dysfunction in CKD stage 3 is common. This study suggests that maladaptive cardiovascular/autonomic dysfunction may be established in CKD stage 3, preceding pathophysiology reported in end-stage CKD. PMID:27127638

  20. ECMO Rescue Therapy in Diffuse Alveolar Haemorrhage: A Case Report with Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Rawal, Gautam; Kumar, Raj; Yadav, Sankalp

    2016-06-01

    Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO) has evolved as a treatment option for patients having potentially reversible severe respiratory failure who are deteriorating on conventional ventilation. During ECMO, systemic anticoagulation is needed to maintain patency of the circuit. Therefore, ongoing haemorrhage remains a relative contra-indication to ECMO as it can further increase the bleeding. There is only limited evidence available for the use of ECMO in patients with alveolar haemorrhage. Most of these patients did not receive any anticoagulation during ECMO. We describe our experience with a patient who received intravenous anticoagulation during ECMO for refractory hypoxemic respiratory failure due to Diffuse Alveolar Haemorrhage (DAH) associated with Granulomatosis polyangitis (Wegner's GPA). ECMO sustained life by maintaining gas exchange support and provided the time for the immunotherapy to be effective. We report the successful use of anticoagulation during ECMO in a patient with DAH. PMID:27504336

  1. Dating of Acute and Subacute Subdural Haemorrhage: A Histo-Pathological Study

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Murali G; Vashista, Rakesh Kumar; Sharma, Suresh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Microscopic study of the organization of the Subdural Haemorrhage (SDH) verified against the time period can help us in the determination of its age which has serious medico-legal implications. Very few studies concerning the dating of SDH are present in the literature. Aim This study was conducted for dating the early subdural haemorrhage by routine histopathological stains. Materials and Methods A prospective analytical study was conducted during July 2009 to December 2010. A total of 100 cases (50 males and 50 females) fulfilling the inclusion and exclusion criteria were included in this study. Routine histopathological staining of the subdural haematoma was done. Results Correlation between the frequency of a given histomorphological phenomenon and the length of the Post-Traumatic Interval (PTI) was evidential. All the histomorphological features, when correlated with PTI groups, were found to be statistically significant, except for Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes (PMN). Conclusion We concluded that routine histopathology was reliable in the dating of early subdural haemorrhages.

  2. ECMO Rescue Therapy in Diffuse Alveolar Haemorrhage: A Case Report with Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Raj; Yadav, Sankalp

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO) has evolved as a treatment option for patients having potentially reversible severe respiratory failure who are deteriorating on conventional ventilation. During ECMO, systemic anticoagulation is needed to maintain patency of the circuit. Therefore, ongoing haemorrhage remains a relative contra-indication to ECMO as it can further increase the bleeding. There is only limited evidence available for the use of ECMO in patients with alveolar haemorrhage. Most of these patients did not receive any anticoagulation during ECMO. We describe our experience with a patient who received intravenous anticoagulation during ECMO for refractory hypoxemic respiratory failure due to Diffuse Alveolar Haemorrhage (DAH) associated with Granulomatosis polyangitis (Wegner’s GPA). ECMO sustained life by maintaining gas exchange support and provided the time for the immunotherapy to be effective. We report the successful use of anticoagulation during ECMO in a patient with DAH. PMID:27504336

  3. Acute Kidney Injury is More Common in Acute Haemorrhagic Stroke in Mymensingh Medical College Hospital.

    PubMed

    Ray, N C; Chowdhury, M A; Sarkar, S R

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication after acute stroke and is an independent predictor of both early and long-term mortality after acute stroke. Acute kidney injury is associated with increased mortality in haemorrhagic stroke patients. This cross sectional observational study was conducted in Nephrology, Neuromedicine and Medicine department of Mymensingh Medical College & Hospital, Mymensingh from July 2012 to June 2014. A total of 240 patients with newly detected acute stroke confirmed by CT scan of brain were included in this study. According to this study, 15.42% of acute stroke patients developed AKI. Among the patients with haemorrhagic stroke 21.87% developed AKI while only 13.07% patients with ischaemic stroke developed AKI. So, early diagnosis and management of AKI in patients with acute stroke especially in haemorrhagic stroke is very important to reduce the morbidity and mortality of these patients. PMID:26931240

  4. Adrenal haemorrhage with cholestasis and adrenal crisis in a newborn of a diabetic mother.

    PubMed

    Koklu, Esad; Kurtoglu, Selim; Akcakus, Mustafa; Koklu, Selmin

    2007-03-01

    The large hyperaemic foetal adrenal gland is vulnerable to vascular damage. This may occur in the neonatal period as a consequence of difficult labour, or its aetiology may not be apparent. The spectrum of presentation is considerable, ranging from asymptomatic to severe life-threatening intra-abdominal haemorrhage. The presentation of adrenal insufficiency may be delayed but the regenerative capacity of the adrenal is great, and most adrenal haemorrhage is not associated with significantly impaired function. Some reports showed that cholestatic hepatopathy with congenital hypopituitarism reversed by hydrocortisone treatment is considered in the context of the endocrine syndrome, probably as a consequence of the adrenal failure. We describe a case of bilateral adrenal haemorrhage with hepatitis syndrome and persistent hypoglycaemia in a newborn male with striking features of neonatal cholestasis and adrenal crisis.

  5. Dengue haemorrhagic fever outbreak in October-November 1996 in Ludhiana, Punjab, India.

    PubMed

    Kaur, H; Prabhakar, H; Mathew, P; Marshalla, R; Arya, M

    1997-07-01

    An epidemic of haemorrhagic fever broke out in Ludhiana in October and November 1996. Persons of all age groups were affected with preponderance of young adults. Haemorrhagic manifestations like rashes, epistaxis, bleeding from the gums and haematemesis were observed. The cause of fever was investigated. Serum samples collected at random from 71 patients were tested by ELISA for dengue types 1-4 IgM antibodies. These were positive in 96.7 per cent of cases. Immunoblot testing for IgM and IgG for all serotypes of dengue virus were positive in 90.2 and 73.2 per cent of the serum samples respectively. The haemorrhagic fever was serologically proven to be due to dengue virus.

  6. Arbovirus infections and viral haemorrhagic fevers in Uganda: a serological survey in Karamoja district, 1984.

    PubMed

    Rodhain, F; Gonzalez, J P; Mercier, E; Helynck, B; Larouze, B; Hannoun, C

    1989-01-01

    Sera collected in May 1984 from 132 adult residents of Karamoja district, Uganda, were examined by haemagglutination inhibition tests for antibodies against selected arboviruses, namely Chikungunya and Semliki Forest alphaviruses (Togaviridae); dengue type 2, Wesselsbron, West Nile, yellow fever and Zika flaviviruses (Flaviviridae); Bunyamwera, Ilesha and Tahyna bunyaviruses (Bunyaviridae); and Sicilian sandfly fever phlebovirus (Bunyaviridae); and by immunofluorescence tests against certain haemorrhagic fever viruses, Lassa fever arenavirus (Arenaviridae), Ebola-Sudan, Ebola-Zaïre and Marburg filoviruses (Filoviridae), Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever nairovirus and Rift Valley fever phlebovirus (Bunyaviridae). Antibodies against Chikungunya virus were the most prevalent (47%), followed by flavivirus antibodies (16%), which were probably due mainly to West Nile virus. No evidence of yellow fever or dengue virus circulation was observed. A few individuals had antibodies against Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever, Lassa, Ebola and Marburg viruses, suggesting that these viruses all circulate in the area.

  7. Mosquito-borne haemorrhagic fevers of South and South-East Asia.

    PubMed

    Halstead, S B

    1966-01-01

    During the past decade outbreaks of a severe haemorrhagic disease caused by dengue viruses of multiple types have been reported in the Philippines, Thailand, Malaysia, Viet-Nam and eastern India. In many of these outbreaks chikungunya virus, a group A arbovirus, was simultaneously the cause of similar but probably milder disease. Both these viruses appear to be able to be able to produce classical dengue fever in some individuals and disease with haemorrhagic manifestations in others. Because of the growing public health importance and the progressive spread of this disease a unified review of its clinical and epidemiological features has been needed. This paper presents the history and salient clinical features of mosquito-borne haemorrhagic fever and summarizes recent epidemiological studies and current diagnostic and control methods.

  8. Radiative Shock Waves In Emerging Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, R. Paul; Doss, F.; Visco, A.

    2011-05-01

    In laboratory experiments we produce radiative shock waves having dense, thin shells. These shocks are similar to shocks emerging from optically thick environments in astrophysics in that they are strongly radiative with optically thick shocked layers and optically thin or intermediate downstream layers through which radiation readily escapes. Examples include shocks breaking out of a Type II supernova (SN) and the radiative reverse shock during the early phases of the SN remnant produced by a red supergiant star. We produce these shocks by driving a low-Z plasma piston (Be) at > 100 km/s into Xe gas at 1.1 atm. pressure. The shocked Xe collapses to > 20 times its initial density. Measurements of structure by radiography and temperature by several methods confirm that the shock wave is strongly radiative. We observe small-scale perturbations in the post-shock layer, modulating the shock and material interfaces. We describe a variation of the Vishniac instability theory of decelerating shocks and an analysis of associated scaling relations to account for the growth of these perturbations, identify how they scale to astrophysical systems such as SN 1993J, and consider possible future experiments. Collaborators in this work have included H.F. Robey, J.P. Hughes, C.C. Kuranz, C.M. Huntington, S.H. Glenzer, T. Doeppner, D.H. Froula, M.J. Grosskopf, and D.C. Marion ________________________________ * Supported by the US DOE NNSA under the Predictive Sci. Academic Alliance Program by grant DE-FC52-08NA28616, the Stewardship Sci. Academic Alliances program by grant DE-FG52-04NA00064, and the Nat. Laser User Facility by grant DE-FG03-00SF22021.

  9. Challenges encountered with argatroban anticoagulation during cardiopulmonary bypass

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Shvetank; Ullom, Beth; Al-Baghdadi, Yasser; Okumura, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Use of argatroban as an alternative to heparin during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) in patients with heparin-induced thrombocytopenia has gained some attention in the past two decades. Dosing of argatroban during CPB is complex due to lack of complete understanding of its pharmacokinetic profile and the various elements during CPB that may alter its plasma levels. We report a case where the challenges in dosing argatroban led to failure to provide adequate anticoagulation during CPB, as evidenced by clot formation in the oxygenator, and extensive bleeding in the postoperative period. PMID:22345956

  10. Fetal monitoring during maternal cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed Central

    Koh, K. S.; Friesen, R. M.; Livingstone, R. A.; Peddle, L. J.

    1975-01-01

    Fetal cardiac activity was monitored with an external ultrasound transducer in two patients with clinical class III heart disease due to severe mitral stenosis complicated by pulmonary hypertension, undergoing open heart surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass in the 2nd trimester of pregnancy. Fetal distress was detected in one patient, who had mitral valvuloplasty, and was corrected by increasing the rate of blood flow, and the other patient had a mitral valve replacement but no fetal distress was noted. The postoperative course of both mothers and fetuses was uneventful. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 FIG. 6 FIG. 7 PMID:1125921

  11. A method of automatic control procedures cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bureev, A. Sh.; Zhdanov, D. S.; Kiseleva, E. Yu.; Kutsov, M. S.; Trifonov, A. Yu.

    2015-11-01

    The study is to present the results of works on creation of methods of automatic control procedures of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). A method of automatic control procedure of CPR by evaluating the acoustic data of the dynamics of blood flow in the bifurcation of carotid arteries and the dynamics of air flow in a trachea according to the current guidelines for CPR is presented. Evaluation of the patient is carried out by analyzing the respiratory noise and blood flow in the interspaces between the chest compressions and artificial pulmonary ventilation. The device operation algorithm of automatic control procedures of CPR and its block diagram has been developed.

  12. Comparative distribution of petechial haemorrhages as a function of aircraft cockpit geometry.

    PubMed

    Whinnery, J E

    1987-07-01

    One of the stresses to which aircrew are subjected in a modern highly manoeuvrable military aircraft is produced by high-speed turns; the resultant elevated G forces may cause petechial haemorrhages, particularly in the lower limbs. Since an aeroplane is an inconvenient laboratory, the mechanisms responsible for these haemorrhages are best investigated by elevated G forces produced in a human centrifuge on the ground, where a similar stress produces the same kind of haemorrhage. Such physical stimuli are in effect a modification of the normal terrestrial gravitational force (a force which under normal conditions is assumed to be +1 G) acting in a + Gz (head to foot) direction. The distribution of petechial haemorrhages is determined by a number of factors, including cockpit configuration. Differences in the distribution of petechial haemorrhages in the F-15 and F-16 aircraft (12 degrees tilt-back seat and 30 degrees tilt-back seat with elevation of the heel, respectively) lend an insight into those body areas where there is inadequate protection. The phenomenon usually begins to develop in healthy individuals at approximately +5 Gz (head to foot), with virtually everyone having petechial haemorrhages at +9 Gz. The kinetics of +Gz -induced petechiasis is interesting, because individuals develop an acclimatized resistance to these formations, whose exact aetiology is unknown; whether or not the petechiae are due to rupture of susceptible capillaries or to diapedesis is also unknown. Stasis and pooling of blood in the lower limbs play a specific role in the petechial formation; it is not only the +Gz stress, but also the protective equipment and techniques which determine the extent and magnitude of the petechiasis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Physical activity and subarachnoid haemorrhage: a population based case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Fann, J; Kukull, W; Katon, W; Longstreth, W

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To evaluate physical activity as a risk factor for subarachnoid haemorrhage.
METHODS—A population based case-control study in King County, Washington. A standardised, personal interview was used to determine physical activity during the past year and at the onset of the bleed for case patients and a similar reference time for control subjects. Conditional logistic regression and a case cross over analysis were performed in which each case patient served as his or her own control. Subjects were 149 men and women with incident, spontaneous subarachnoid haemorrhage and two control subjects per case patient. Control subjects were identified through random digit dialing and matched on age, sex, and respondent type.
RESULTS—Four of the 149 (2.7%) case patients were engaged in vigorous physical activity at the time of their subarachnoid haemorrhage. With those who were engaged in non-vigorous or no physical activity serving as the reference group, the relative risk of sustaining a subarachnoid haemorrhage for those engaged in vigorous physical activity was 11.6 (95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.2-113.2). In the case cross over analysis, the relative risk was 15.0 (95% CI 4.3-52.2). Higher levels of long term regular physical activity over the past year were associated with a lower, but not statistically significant, risk of subarachnoid haemorrhage (test for trend, p=0.3).
CONCLUSION—The risk of subarachnoid haemorrhage is increased during vigorous physical activity, although only a few result from this mechanism.

 PMID:11080229

  14. Feto - maternal haemorrhage in parturients: Incidence and its determinants.

    PubMed

    Adeniji, A O; Mabayoje, V O; Raji, A A; Muhibi, M A; Tijani, A A; Adeyemi, A S

    2008-01-01

    This prospective study of parturients at a tertiary health institution in south-western Nigeria aims to identify the incidence, severity and obstetric factors predisposing to feto - maternal haemorrhage (FMH) in our population. The exclusion criteria were haemoglobinopathy and patient's refusal of consent to participate in the study. The prepared slide was processed as in the acid elution test described by Kleihauer - Betke. The FMH was calculated using Mollison formula (Mollison 1972). Baseline data included maternal biodata, blood group, RhD and haemoglobin electrophoresis, route/mode of delivery, duration of labour, obstetric interventions, fetal blood group and birth weight. Data generated were analysed with Statistical Package for Social Scientists (SPSS) version 11 software. Frequency tables, cross-tabulations and correlations were performed. Pearson's correlation was applied to continuous variables, while Spearman's correlation was utilised for discrete variables. Level of statistical significance was set at p < 0.05. A total of 163 parturients were studied, of which eight were multifetal gestations. There were no significant differences in maternal age, parity, estimated gestational age at delivery and birth weight, in both groups of parturients with and without FMH. A total of 17 parturients (10.43%), four of which were multifetal gestations (2.45%), had demonstrable FMH. Large FMH (>15 ml fetal cells) were noted in 10 (6.14%) parturients, of which, four were RhD-negative mothers. A total of 9.8% and 11.5% parturients in the vaginal and caesarean delivery groups, respectively, had significant FMH (p = 0.736). Incidence of large FMH was similar with each of the routes of delivery. Antepartum complications of pregnancy, delivery manoeuvres and episiotomy were not significant determinants of FMH. Multiple gestations, fetal birth weight and complications in labour were significantly associated with risk of FMH. Risk-based approach to management, in Rh

  15. [Haemorrhagic colitis in a young male after the use of amoxicillin].

    PubMed

    van Hensbroek, P Boele; Hack, W W M; Labadie, J

    2005-12-31

    A 16-year-old boy had rectal blood loss due to haemorrhagic colitis probably resulting from oral and intravenous administration of amoxicillin. He also had haemolytic anaemia and thrombocytopenia, both also most likely resulting from the use of amoxicillin and/or ibuprofen. In the week following the discontinuation of amoxicillin and ibuprofen, the symptoms of bloody diarrhoea disappeared spontaneously and the blood picture became normal. Haemorrhagic colitis is a known side effect of amoxicillin that is rarely seen. Discontinuation of treatment typically results in a quick and uneventful recovery.

  16. Mycoplasma pneumoniae: an aetiological agent of acute haemorrhagic oedema of infancy.

    PubMed

    Di Lernia, Vito

    2014-11-01

    Acute haemorrhagic oedema of infancy (AHEI) is considered a separate clinical entity among cutaneous small vessel vasculitis of childhood. It usually occurs in children younger than 2 years of age, with spontaneous recovery occurring within a few weeks. A history of recent upper respiratory or urinary tract infections or immunisation is found in most patients. Although Mycoplasma pneumoniae has been linked to a wide array of skin eruptions or diseases, it is not recognised as a possible cause of acute haemorrhagic oedema of infancy. The authors report a child with AHEI and a concurrent M. pneumoniae infection.

  17. Technetium labelled red blood cell scintigraphy in the diagnosis of intestinal haemorrhage.

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, M. H.; Neoptolemos, J. P.; Watkin, E. M.; Cosgriff, P.; Barrie, W. W.

    1985-01-01

    99m-Technetium labelled red blood cell scintigraphy was used in the investigation of 15 adult patients with suspected small or large bowel bleeding requiring at least five units of blood (mean 14.3 units) and one neonate with rectal bleeding. Scintigraphy was found to be an accurate method of detecting the site of haemorrhage and was superior to angiography. This technique may be of particular value in patients with profuse colonic haemorrhage when the view at colonoscopy is poor. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:3872094

  18. The global pandemic of dengue/dengue haemorrhagic fever: current status and prospects for the future.

    PubMed

    Gubler, D J

    1998-03-01

    Dengue/dengue haemorrhagic fever has been one of the most important resurgent tropical diseases in the past 17 years, with expanding geographic distribution of both the viruses and the mosquito vectors, increased frequency of epidemics, the development of hyperendemicity (co-circulation of multiple virus serotypes) and the emergence of dengue haemorrhagic fever in new areas. This paper briefly reviews the changing epidemiology of dengue, discusses some of the factors responsible for the recent resurgence, and reviews the current options for reversing the trend of emergent disease.

  19. Meningeal haemorrhage and congestion associated with the perinatal mortality of beef calves.

    PubMed

    Haughey, K G

    1975-01-01

    Thirty Angus, Hereford and Shorthorn term calves dying before, during or within 7 days of birth in a large beef herd were autopsied. Selected specimens were examined histologically. Two carcasses were classified in the category of ante-parturient death, 24 as parturient, and 4 were classified in the post-parturient death category. Three of the latter showed evidence of starvation. Eight of the calves in the parturient death category were assisted during delivery, and 16 were not assisted. The incidence of nulliparous dams among assisted parturient deaths was significantly higher than among the unassisted group. A high incidence of meningeal haemorrhages and congestion were observed at single or multiple sites, within and around the cranial and spinal meninges. The lesions comprised subdural and epidural haemorrhages, bloodstained cerebrospinal fluid and leptomeningeal haemorrhage and congestion. They were seen in calves in both parturient and post-parturient death categories but not in the ante-parturient group. All calves classified in the parturient death category which were assisted during delivery showed haemorrhages involving the cranial and/or spinal meninges. Additional birth injuries, including separation of the costo-chondral junctions, fractured ribs, haemorrhage into the hip joints, inter-vertebral fibrocartilages and axillae, and rupture of the liver, were frequently present. Ten of the calves in the parturient death category which were unassisted during delivery showed meningeal haemorrhage and congestion. Two of the 4 calves in the post-parturient death category showed similar lesions and both showed evidence of starvation. The meningeal haemorrhages and congestion were similar to those observed in perinatal lamb mortality. They are considered manifestations of injury to the CNS arising from trauma and/or hypoxia during birth. Gross or microscopic evidence of infection was present in 2 calves in the post-parturient death category. Calves which had

  20. Gravity and the Evolution of Cardiopulmonary Morphology in Snakes

    PubMed Central

    Lillywhite, Harvey B.; Albert, James S.; Sheehy, Coleman M.; Seymour, Roger S.

    2011-01-01

    Physiological investigations of snakes have established the importance of heart position and pulmonary structure in contexts of gravity effects on blood circulation. Here we investigate morphological correlates of cardiopulmonary physiology in contexts related to ecology, behavior and evolution. We analyze data for heart position and length of vascular lung in 154 species of snakes that exhibit a broad range of characteristic behaviors and habitat associations. We construct a composite phylogeny for these species, and we codify gravitational stress according to species habitat and behavior. We use conventional regression and phylogenetically independent contrasts to evaluate whether trait diversity is correlated with gravitational habitat related to evolutionary transitions within the composite tree topology. We demonstrate that snake species living in arboreal habitats, or which express strongly climbing behaviors, possess relatively short blood columns between the heart and the head, as well as relatively short vascular lungs, compared to terrestrial species. Aquatic species, which experience little or no gravity stress in water, show the reverse – significantly longer heart–head distance and longer vascular lungs. These phylogenetic differences complement the results of physiological studies and are reflected in multiple habitat transitions during the evolutionary histories of these snake lineages, providing strong evidence that heart–to–head distance and length of vascular lung are co–adaptive cardiopulmonary features of snakes. PMID:22079804

  1. Cardiopulmonary laboratory biomarkers in the evaluation of acute dyspnea

    PubMed Central

    Stokes, Natalie R; Dietz, Brett W; Liang, Jackson J

    2016-01-01

    Dyspnea is a common chief complaint in the emergency department, with over 4 million visits annually in the US. Establishing the correct diagnosis can be challenging, because the subjective sensation of dyspnea can result from a wide array of underlying pathology, including pulmonary, cardiac, neurologic, psychiatric, toxic, and metabolic disorders. Further, the presence of dyspnea is linked with increased mortality in a variety of conditions, and misdiagnosis of the cause of dyspnea leads to poor patient-level outcomes. In combination with the history and physical, efficient, and focused use of laboratory studies, the various cardiopulmonary biomarkers can be useful in establishing the correct diagnosis and guiding treatment decisions in a timely manner. Use and interpretation of such tests must be guided by the clinical context, as well as an understanding of the current evidence supporting their use. This review discusses current standards and research regarding the use of established and emerging cardiopulmonary laboratory markers in the evaluation of acute dyspnea, focusing on recent evidence assessing the diagnostic and prognostic utility of various tests. These markers include brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and N-terminal prohormone (NT-proBNP), mid-regional peptides proatrial NP and proadrenomedullin, cardiac troponins, D-dimer, soluble ST2, and galectin 3, and included is a discussion on the use of arterial and venous blood gases. PMID:27307771

  2. Gravity and the evolution of cardiopulmonary morphology in snakes.

    PubMed

    Lillywhite, Harvey B; Albert, James S; Sheehy, Coleman M; Seymour, Roger S

    2012-02-01

    Physiological investigations of snakes have established the importance of heart position and pulmonary structure in contexts of gravity effects on blood circulation. Here we investigate morphological correlates of cardiopulmonary physiology in contexts related to ecology, behavior and evolution. We analyze data for heart position and length of vascular lung in 154 species of snakes that exhibit a broad range of characteristic behaviors and habitat associations. We construct a composite phylogeny for these species, and we codify gravitational stress according to species habitat and behavior. We use conventional regression and phylogenetically independent contrasts to evaluate whether trait diversity is correlated with gravitational habitat related to evolutionary transitions within the composite tree topology. We demonstrate that snake species living in arboreal habitats, or which express strongly climbing behaviors, possess relatively short blood columns between the heart and the head, as well as relatively short vascular lungs, compared to terrestrial species. Aquatic species, which experience little or no gravity stress in water, show the reverse - significantly longer heart-head distance and longer vascular lungs. These phylogenetic differences complement the results of physiological studies and are reflected in multiple habitat transitions during the evolutionary histories of these snake lineages, providing strong evidence that heart-to-head distance and length of vascular lung are co-adaptive cardiopulmonary features of snakes.

  3. Retinal hemorrhage after cardiopulmonary resuscitation with chest compressions.

    PubMed

    Pham, Hang; Enzenauer, Robert W; Elder, James E; Levin, Alex V

    2013-06-01

    Retinal hemorrhages in children in the absence of risk factors are regarded to be pathognomonic of shaken baby syndrome or other nonaccidental injuries. The physician must decide whether the retinal hemorrhages in children without risk factors are due to abuse or cardiopulmonary resuscitation with chest compression (CPR-CC). The objective of this study was to determine if CPR-CC can lead to retinal hemorrhages in children. Twenty-two patients who received in-hospital CPR-CC between February 15, 1990, and June 15, 1990, were enrolled. Pediatric ophthalmology fellows carried a code beeper and responded to calls for cardiopulmonary arrest situations. At the scene of CPR-CC, an indirect funduscopic examination was conducted for presence of retinal hemorrhages in the posterior pole. Follow-up examinations were performed at 24 and 72 hours. Of the 22 patients, 6 (27%) had retinal hemorrhages at the time of CPR-CC. Of these 6 patients, 5 had risk factors for retinal hemorrhages. The sixth patient had no risk factors and may have represented the only true case of retinal hemorrhages due to CPR-CC. Retinal hemorrhages are uncommon findings after CPR-CC. Retinal hemorrhages that are found after CPR-CC usually occur in the presence of other risk factors for hemorrhage with a mild hemorrhagic retinopathy in the posterior pole.

  4. Early Fluid Resuscitation and High Volume Hemofiltration Decrease Septic Shock Progression in Swine

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ping; Zheng, Ruiqiang; Xue, Lu; Zhang, Min; Wu, Xiaoyan

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the effects of early fluid resuscitation (EFR) combined with high volume hemofiltration (HVHF) on the cardiopulmonary function and removal of inflammatory mediators in a septic shock swine model. Eighteen swine were randomized into three groups: control (n = 6) (extracorporeal circulating blood only), continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) (n = 6; ultrafiltration volume = 25 mL/Kg/h), and HVHF (n = 6; ultrafiltration volume = 85 mL/Kg/h). The septic shock model was established by intravenous infusion of lipopolysaccharides (50 µg/kg/h). Hemodynamic parameters (arterial pressure, heart rate, cardiac output, stroke volume variability, left ventricular contractility, systemic vascular resistance, and central venous pressure), vasoactive drug parameters (dose and time of norepinephrine and hourly fluid intake), pulmonary function (partial oxygen pressure and vascular permeability), and cytokines (interleukin-6 and interleukin-10) were observed. Treatment resulted in significant changes at 4–6 h. HVHF was beneficial, as shown by the dose of vasoactive drugs, fluid intake volume, left ventricular contractility index, and partial oxygen pressure. Both CRRT and HVHF groups showed improved removal of inflammatory mediators compared with controls. In conclusion, EFR combined with HVHF improved septic shock in this swine model. The combination decreased shock progression, reduced the need for vasoactive drugs, and alleviated the damage to cardiopulmonary functions. PMID:26543849

  5. Early Fluid Resuscitation and High Volume Hemofiltration Decrease Septic Shock Progression in Swine.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ping; Zheng, Ruiqiang; Xue, Lu; Zhang, Min; Wu, Xiaoyan

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the effects of early fluid resuscitation (EFR) combined with high volume hemofiltration (HVHF) on the cardiopulmonary function and removal of inflammatory mediators in a septic shock swine model. Eighteen swine were randomized into three groups: control (n = 6) (extracorporeal circulating blood only), continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) (n = 6; ultrafiltration volume = 25 mL/Kg/h), and HVHF (n = 6; ultrafiltration volume = 85 mL/Kg/h). The septic shock model was established by intravenous infusion of lipopolysaccharides (50 µg/kg/h). Hemodynamic parameters (arterial pressure, heart rate, cardiac output, stroke volume variability, left ventricular contractility, systemic vascular resistance, and central venous pressure), vasoactive drug parameters (dose and time of norepinephrine and hourly fluid intake), pulmonary function (partial oxygen pressure and vascular permeability), and cytokines (interleukin-6 and interleukin-10) were observed. Treatment resulted in significant changes at 4-6 h. HVHF was beneficial, as shown by the dose of vasoactive drugs, fluid intake volume, left ventricular contractility index, and partial oxygen pressure. Both CRRT and HVHF groups showed improved removal of inflammatory mediators compared with controls. In conclusion, EFR combined with HVHF improved septic shock in this swine model. The combination decreased shock progression, reduced the need for vasoactive drugs, and alleviated the damage to cardiopulmonary functions.

  6. Miniature shock tube for laser driven shocks.

    PubMed

    Busquet, Michel; Barroso, Patrice; Melse, Thierry; Bauduin, Daniel

    2010-02-01

    We describe in this paper the design of a miniature shock tube (smaller than 1 cm(3)) that can be placed in a vacuum vessel and allows transverse optical probing and longitudinal backside extreme ultraviolet emission spectroscopy in the 100-500 A range. Typical application is the study of laser launched radiative shocks, in the framework of what is called "laboratory astrophysics."

  7. Shock & Anaphylactic Shock. Learning Activity Package.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hime, Kirsten

    This learning activity package on shock and anaphylactic shock is one of a series of 12 titles developed for use in health occupations education programs. Materials in the package include objectives, a list of materials needed, information sheets, reviews (self evaluations) of portions of the content, and answers to reviews. These topics are…

  8. Understanding the Shock in "Culture Shock."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schnell, Jim

    "Culture shock" is the expression generally associated with the frustrations that occur when persons have difficulty functioning in a different culture or when persons are exposed to individuals from another culture. Culture shock typically occurs in a 4-stage process that can unfold over varying lengths of time: the honeymoon, crisis, resolution,…

  9. Neptune inbound bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szabo, Adam; Lepping, Ronald P.

    1995-01-01

    Voyager 2 crossed the inbound or upstream Neptunian bow shock at 1430 spacecraft event time on August 24 in 1989 (Belcher et al., 1989). The plasma and magnetic field measurements allow us to study the solar wind interaction with the outermost gas giant. To fully utilize all of the spacecraft observations, an improved nonlinear least squares, 'Rankine-Hugoniot' magnetohydrodynamic shock-fitting technique has been developed (Szabo, 1994). This technique is applied to the Neptunian data set. We find that the upstream bow shock normal points nearly exactly toward the Sun consistent with any reasonable large-scale model of the bow shock for a near subsolar crossing. The shock was moving outward with a speed of 14 +/- 12 km/s. The shock can be characterized as a low beta, high Mach number, strong quasi-perpendicular shock. Finally, the shock microstructure features are resolved and found to scale well with theoretical expectations.

  10. Toxic shock syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... of toxic shock syndrome involved women who used tampons during their periods (menstruation). However, today less than half of cases are linked to tampon use. Toxic shock syndrome can also occur with ...

  11. Comparison of two technics of cardiopulmonary bypass (conventional and mini CPB) in the trans-and postoperative periods of cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Sergio Nunes; Zumba, Izabelle Balta; Batista, Micheline Sulzbacher; Pieve, Daniela Da; dos Santos, Elisandra; Stuermer, Ralf; de Oliveira, Gerson Pereira; Senger, Roberta

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to compare the effects of two different perfusion techniques: conventional cardiopulmonary bypass and miniature cardiopulmonary bypass in patients undergoing cardiac surgery at the University Hospital of Santa Maria - RS. Methods We perform a retrospective, cross-sectional study, based on data collected from the patients operated between 2010 and 2013. We analyzed the records of 242 patients divided into two groups: Group I: 149 patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass and Group II - 93 patients undergoing the miniature cardiopulmonary bypass. Results The clinical profile of patients in the preoperative period was similar in the cardiopulmonary bypass and miniature cardiopulmonary bypass groups without significant differences, except in age, which was greater in the miniature cardiopulmonary bypass group. The perioperative data were significant of blood collected for autotransfusion, which were higher in the group with miniature cardiopulmonary bypass than the cardiopulmonary bypass and in transfusion of packed red blood cells, which was higher in cardiopulmonary bypass than in miniature cardiopulmonary bypass. In the immediate, first and second postoperative period the values of hematocrit and hemoglobin were higher and significant in miniature cardiopulmonary bypass than in the cardiopulmonary bypass, although the bleeding in the first and second postoperative days was higher and significant in miniature cardiopulmonary bypass than in the cardiopulmonary bypass. Conclusion The present results suggest that the miniature cardiopulmonary bypass was beneficial in reducing the red blood cell transfusion during surgery and showed slight but significant increase in hematocrit and hemoglobin in the postoperative period. PMID:27163417

  12. Biomass shock pretreatment

    DOEpatents

    Holtzapple, Mark T.; Madison, Maxine Jones; Ramirez, Rocio Sierra; Deimund, Mark A.; Falls, Matthew; Dunkelman, John J.

    2014-07-01

    Methods and apparatus for treating biomass that may include introducing a biomass to a chamber; exposing the biomass in the chamber to a shock event to produce a shocked biomass; and transferring the shocked biomass from the chamber. In some aspects, the method may include pretreating the biomass with a chemical before introducing the biomass to the chamber and/or after transferring shocked biomass from the chamber.

  13. What Causes Cardiogenic Shock?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Cardiogenic Shock? Immediate Causes Cardiogenic shock occurs if the heart suddenly can't pump ... to the body. The most common cause of cardiogenic shock is damage to the heart muscle from a ...

  14. Feasibility of electrical impedance tomography in haemorrhagic stroke treatment using adaptive mesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasehi Tehrani, J.; Anderson, C.; Jin, C.; van Schaik, A.; Holder, D.; McEwan, A.

    2010-04-01

    EIT has been proposed for acute stroke differentiation, specifically to determine the type of stroke, either ischaemia (clot) or haemorrhage (bleed) to allow the rapid use of clot-busting drugs in the former (Romsauerova et al 2006) . This addresses an important medical need, although there is little treatment offered in the case of haemorrhage. Also the demands on EIT are high with usually no availability to take a 'before' measurement, ruling out time difference imaging. Recently a new treatment option for haemorrhage has been proposed and is being studied in international randomised controlled trial: the early reduction of elevated blood pressure to attenuate the haematoma. This has been shown via CT to reduce bleeds by up to 1mL by Anderson et al 2008. The use of EIT as a continuous measure is desirable here to monitor the effect of blood pressure reduction. A 1mL increase of haemorrhagic lesion located near scalp on the right side of head caused a boundary voltage change of less than 0.05% at 50 kHz. This could be visually observed in a time difference 3D reconstruction with no change in electrode positions, mesh, background conductivity or drift when baseline noise was less than 0.005% but not when noise was increased to 0.01%. This useful result informs us that the EIT system must have noise of less than 0.005% at 50 kHz including instrumentation, physiological and other biases.

  15. Pneumoencephalo-roulette tomography of operated primary pontine haemorrhage with long survival: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Kowada, M; Yamaguchi, K; Ito, Z; Matsuoka, S

    1972-04-01

    Pre- and postoperative pneumoencephalo-roulette tomography has been carried out in two cases of primary pontine haemorrhage with long survival. A pontine or cerebellar atrophy was revealed in case 1, in whom an intrapontine haematoma was removed. A markedly hollowed pons on the affected side has been demonstrated nearly five months after ventriculoatrial shunting in case 2.

  16. Trends in maternal mortality due to haemorrhage: two decades of Indian rural observations.

    PubMed

    Chhabra, S; Sirohi, Ritu

    2004-01-01

    Obstetric haemorrhage continues to be a major cause of maternal mortality. Our analysis of records of over a period of 20 years from April 1982 to March 2002 reveals that it was a contributory cause of maternal mortality in 19.9% of cases. The majority of deaths, (65%) had occurred within 24 hours of admission and in 47.5% of cases there was severe anaemia on admission; 17.5% had died due to an atonic PPH, which was the largest category, followed by ruptured uterus (15%), abruptio placenta (15%) and retained placenta (12.5%). Deaths due to obstetric haemorrhage because of a ruptured uterus, retained placenta and abortion have decreased from 22.22% between 1982 and 1987 to zero in the last 5 years and an increase was seen in deaths due to haemorrhage because of gestational trophoblastic neoplasia and ectopic pregnancy, from 1.69% to 4.87%, unclassified haemorrhage 1.96% to 7.31% and placenta praevia from zero between 1982 and 1987 to 4.87% between 1997 and 2002. PMID:14675979

  17. Visual outcome of 25-gauge microincision vitrectomy surgery in diabetic vitreous haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Burhan Abdul Majid; Rizvi, Syed Fawad; Mahmood, Syed Asaad; Mal, Washoo; Zafar, Shakir

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the visual outcome and complications of 25-gauge micro incision vitrectomy surgery (MIVS) in diabetic vitreous haemorrhage. Methods: This Quasi Experimental study was conducted at LRBT, Tertiary eye care hospital Karachi, from February 2012 to January 2013. Sixty eyes of sixty patients with uncontrolled type II diabetes mellitus (DM) were included. There were 43 (71.7%) males and 17 (28.3%) females. Age range was 40 – 60 years. All randomly selected patients underwent 25-gauge sutureless micro incision vitrectomy surgery for diabetic vitreous haemorrhage. Main outcomes measured were best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) assessed with logMAR and post-operative complications. Follow ups were at one day, one week, one month, three months and six months post-operatively. Result: Best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) gradually improved in majority of subjects in each subsequent follow up visit. Preoperative visual acuity was 1.023 ±0.226 logMAR, which was improved after final follow up to 0.457±0.256 and P-value was < 0.001. Five patients developed recurrent vitreous haemorrhage during study period, one patient developed cataract (1.7%), one (1.7%) had ocular hypotony defined as intraocular pressure < 5 mmHg and one (1.7%) developed endophthalmitis. Conclusion: 25-gauge micro incision vitrectomy surgery (MIVS) is an effective sutureless parsplana vitrectomy surgery which has good visual outcome in diabetic vitreous haemorrhage with minimum manageable complications. PMID:26649013

  18. Experimental respiratory Marburg virus haemorrhagic fever infection in the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus)

    PubMed Central

    Smither, Sophie J; Nelson, Michelle; Eastaugh, Lin; Laws, Thomas R; Taylor, Christopher; Smith, Simon A; Salguero, Francisco J; Lever, Mark S

    2013-01-01

    Marburg virus causes a highly infectious and lethal haemorrhagic fever in primates and may be exploited as a potential biothreat pathogen. To combat the infection and threat of Marburg haemorrhagic fever, there is a need to develop and license appropriate medical countermeasures. To determine whether the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) would be an appropriate model to assess therapies against Marburg haemorrhagic fever, initial susceptibility, lethality and pathogenesis studies were performed. Low doses of virus, between 4 and 28 TCID50, were sufficient to cause a lethal, reproducible infection. Animals became febrile between days 5 and 6, maintaining a high fever before succumbing to disease between 8 and 11 days postchallenge. Typical signs of Marburg virus infection were observed including haemorrhaging and a transient rash. In pathogenesis studies, virus was isolated from the animals’ lungs from day 3 postchallenge and from the liver, spleen and blood from day 5 postchallenge. Early signs of histopathology were apparent in the kidney and liver from day 3. The most striking features were observed in animals exhibiting severe clinical signs, which included high viral titres in all organs, with the highest levels in the blood, increased levels in liver function enzymes and blood clotting times, decreased levels in platelets, multifocal moderate-to-severe hepatitis and perivascular oedema. PMID:23441639

  19. Incidence and outcome of subarachnoid haemorrhage: a retrospective population based study

    PubMed Central

    Pobereskin, L

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—The purpose was to define the incidence and case fatality rates of subarachnoid haemorrhage in the population of Devon and Cornwall.
METHODS—A retrospective population based design was employed with multiple overlapping methods of case ascertainment. A strict definition of subarachnoid haemorrhage was used. Age and sex specific incidence rates and relative risks for death at different time intervals are calculated.
RESULTS—Eight hundred cases of first ever subarachnoid haemorrhage were identified; 77% of cases were verified by CT, 22% by necropsy, and 1% by lumbar puncture. The incidence rates are higher than those previously reported in the United Kingdom. The age standardised incidence rate (/100 000 person-years) for females was 11.9 (95% confidence interval (95% CI) 9.5-15.0), for males 7.4 (5.4-10.0), and the total rate was 9.7 (7.5-12.6). The case fatality rates at 24 hours, 1 week, and 30 days were 21 (18-24)%, 37 (33-41)%, and 44 (40-49)% respectively. The relative risk for death at 30days for those over 60 years:under 60 years was 2.95 (2.18-3.97).
CONCLUSION—The incidence of subarachnoid haemorrhage in the United Kingdom is higher than previously reported. Three quarters of the mortality occurs within 3days.

 PMID:11181855

  20. Computational Intelligence Method for Early Diagnosis Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever Using Fuzzy on Mobile Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salman, Afan; Lina, Yen; Simon, Christian

    2014-03-01

    Mortality from Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever (DHF) is still increasing in Indonesia particularly in Jakarta. Diagnosis of the dengue shall be made as early as possible so that first aid can be given in expectation of decreasing death risk. The Study will be conducted by developing expert system based on Computational Intelligence Method. On the first year, study will use the Fuzzy Inference System (FIS) Method to diagnose Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever particularly in Mobile Device consist of smart phone. Expert system application which particularly using fuzzy system can be applied in mobile device and it is useful to make early diagnosis of Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever that produce outcome faster than laboratory test. The evaluation of this application is conducted by performing accuracy test before and after validation using data of patient who has the Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever. This expert system application is easy, convenient, and practical to use, also capable of making the early diagnosis of Dengue Haemorraghic to avoid mortality in the first stage.

  1. Cardiopulmonary malformations in the inv/inv mouse.

    PubMed

    McQuinn, T C; Miga, D E; Mjaatvedt, C H; Phelps, A L; Wessels, A

    2001-05-01

    The inv/inv mouse carries an insertional mutation in the inversin gene, (inv, for inversion of embryonic turning). Previously it had been reported that almost 100% of the homozygous offspring (inv/inv) were characterized by situs inversus totalis. In this report we identify the spectrum of cardiopulmonary anatomical abnormalities in inv/inv mice surviving to birth to determine whether the abnormalities seen are of the categories classically associated with human situs abnormalities. Stillborn mice, offspring that died unexpectedly (within 48 hr after birth), and neonates with phenotypic characteristics of situs inversus (right-sided stomachs, growth failure or jaundice) were processed for standard histological examination. Of 173 offspring, 34 (20%) neonates (11 stillborn, 9 unexpected deaths, and 14 mice with situs inversus phenotype) were examined, 27 of which were genotyped to be inv/inv. Interestingly, three inv/inv mice (11%) were found to have situs solitus. Twenty-four had situs inversus with normal, mirror-image cardiac anatomy (dextrocardia with atrioventricular concordance, ventriculoarterial concordance and a right aortic arch). The overall incidence of cardiovascular anomalies observed was 10 out of 27 (37%). The most frequent severe malformation, identified in 3 out of 27 animals, was a complex consisting of pulmonary infundibular stenosis/atresia with absence of pulmonary valve tissue and a ventricular septal defect. The pulmonary phenotype in inv/inv mice was situs inversus with occasional minor lobar abnormalities. We conclude that 1) cardiopulmonary malformations in inv/inv mice are not rare (37%), 2) the cardiopulmonary malformations observed in inv/inv specimens are not of the spectrum typically associated with human heterotaxia. In particular, inv/inv mice have a propensity for defects in the development of the right ventricular outflow tract and the interventricular septum, and 3) approximately one out of ten inv/inv mice is born with situs

  2. Comparison of Methods for the Determination of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Chest Compression Fraction

    PubMed Central

    Iyanaga, Masayuki; Gray, Randal; Stephens, Shannon W.; Akinsanya, Olajide; Rodgers, Joel; Smyrski, Kathleen; Wang, Henry E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective While cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) chest compression fraction (CCF) is associated with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) outcomes, there is no standard method for the determination of CCF. We compared nine methods for calculating CCF. Methods We studied consecutive adult OHCA patients treated by Alabama Emergency Medical Services (EMS) agencies of the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium (ROC) during Jan. 1, 2010 - Oct. 28, 2010. Paramedics used portable cardiac monitors with real-time chest compression detection technology (LifePak 12, Physio-Control, Redmond, Washington). We performed both automated CCF calculation for the entire care episode as well as manual review of CPR data in 1-minute epochs, defining CCF as the proportion of each treatment interval with active chest compressions. We compared the CCF values resulting from 9 calculation methods: 1) mean CCF for the entire patient care episode (automated calculation by manufacturer software), 2) mean CCF for first 3 minutes of patient care, 3) mean CCF for first 5 minutes, 4) mean CCF for first 10 minutes, 5) mean CCF for the entire episode except first 5 minutes, 6) mean CCF for last 5 minutes, 7) mean CCF from start to first shock, 8) mean CCF for the first half of resuscitation, 9) mean CCF for the second half of resuscitation. We compared CCF for Methods 2-9 with Method 1 using paired t-tests with a Bonferroni-adjusted p-value of 0.006 (99.5% confidence intervals). Results Among 102 adult OHCA, patient demographics were: mean age 60.3 years (SD 20.8 years), African American 56.9%, male 63.7%, and shockable ECG rhythm 23.5%. Mean CPR duration was 728 seconds (95% CI: 647-809 seconds). Mean CCF for the 9 CCF calculation methods were: 1) 0.587; 2) 0.526; 3) 0.541; 4) 0.566; 5) 0.562; 6) 0.597; 7) 0.530; 8) 0.550; 9) 0.590%. Compared with Method 1, Method 7 CCF (start to first shock) was slightly lower (−0.057; 99.5% CI: −0.100 – (−0.014)). There were no other statistically

  3. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing in a patient with a permanent tracheostomy.

    PubMed

    Tran, Steven; Krige, Anton

    2016-11-01

    The benefits of cardiopulmonary exercise testing have been well established. Certain patient groups present challenges for conducting such a test. We were presented with a patient with a permanent tracheostomy at the preoperative assessment clinic. We describe our technique in overcoming the problem of connecting him to the testing machine, as this is normally done with the aid of a tight-fitting face mask. We used a cuffed tracheostomy tube together with some widely available tubing from theaters to connect the patient to the gas analyzer. The test was only stopped because of excessive secretions from the patient, and we had already established enough data to tell us that the patient was fit enough to proceed to surgery. As more patients present with tracheostomies, we feel that this case would be a useful reference in managing and assessing such patients. PMID:27687390

  4. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing after laryngectomy: A connection conundrum.

    PubMed

    Overstreet, Shana; Parekh, Kalpaj R; Gross, Thomas J

    2015-01-01

    A patient presents with a new bronchogenic carcinoma 5 years after laryngectomy for recurrent laryngeal tumor and 13 years after chemoradiation for concurrent lung cancer with synchronous base-of-tongue tumor. Due to his complex history and perceived limited respiratory reserve, he was felt high risk for the completion pneumonectomy needed for resection of this new tumor. The attending surgeon requested a full cardiopulmonary exercise test for risk assessment prior to surgery. We found that there was no commercially available connector that would allow our CPET equipment to reliably collect respiratory gases from a patient with tracheostomy stoma or tube. We report here a simple coupling devised "in house" that allowed for the performance of an interpretable test leading to a significant change in medical care. PMID:26744642

  5. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing: arm crank vs cycle ergometry.

    PubMed

    Orr, J L; Williamson, P; Anderson, W; Ross, R; McCafferty, S; Fettes, P

    2013-05-01

    This pilot study compared oxygen consumption during arm crank and cycle ergometer tests in 15 women. The mean (SD) peak oxygen consumption was less with arm cranking (25 (5) ml.kg(-1) .min(-1)) than with cycling (40 (7) ml.kg(-1) .min(-1)), p < 0.0001. The mean (SD) anaerobic threshold was less with arm cranking (13 (2) ml.kg(-1) .min(-1)) than with cycling (20 (4) ml.kg(-1) .min(-1)), p < 0.0001. There was moderate correlation, r(2) = 0.60, between the anaerobic thresholds determined by arm and leg exercise, p = 0.0007. This study suggests that arm crank cardiopulmonary exercise testing could be used for pre-operative assessment in those unable to cycle.

  6. Extensive injury after use of a mechanical cardiopulmonary resuscitation device.

    PubMed

    Wind, J; Bekkers, S C A M; van Hooren, L J H; van Heurn, L W E

    2009-10-01

    We report a case of a 49-year-old woman with a ruptured liver and spleen found at autopsy, which may have been related to the use of a mechanical cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) device (AutoPulse, ZOLL Medical Corporation, Chelmsford, Mass). She was admitted because of an out-of-hospital resuscitation, and under the suspicion of a pulmonary embolism, a thrombolytic agent was administered. Despite prolonged continuation of mechanical CPR, she died of persistent asystole. The evidence for improved outcomes after the use of a mechanical CPR device during resuscitation is still scarce. To prevent the unique complications reported here, regular checking of proper position of the chest band during resuscitation is advised.

  7. [Emphysematous Pyelonephritis with Cardio-Pulmonary Arrest : A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Yamamichi, Gaku; Tsutahara, Koichi; Kuribayashi, Sohei; Kawamura, Masataka; Nakano, Kosuke; Kishimoto, Nozomu; Tanigawa, Go; Matsushima, Asako; Fujimi, Satoshi; Takao, Tetsuya; Yamaguchi, Seiji

    2016-08-01

    A 40-year-old woman withuntreated type II diabetes mellitus was discovered withcardiopulmonary arrest in her room. On admission, she had ventricular fibrillation. After cardiopulmonary resuscitation, her own pulse restarted. The plasma glucose was 722 mg/dl and venous PH was 6.704. Abdominal computed tomography revealed gas within the parenchyma of the left kidney. We diagnosed her with emphysematous pyelonephritis and conducted emergency nephrectomy. Urinary and blood cultures were positive for Escherichia coli. Antibiotic therapy was initiated with doripenem and she was restrictively treated with intravenous insulin to control her plasma glucose. On the 8th day of hospital stay, she underwent resection of the small intestine because of necrosis. After multidisciplinary therapy, she was discharged with complete resolution of the infection. PMID:27624108

  8. Hypothermic cardiac arrest rescued with cardiopulmonary bypass and decompressive laparotomy.

    PubMed

    Talbot, Simon G; Davidson, Michael J; Javid, Sara; Patel, Amy N; Fitzgerald, Daniel; Patel, Vihas

    2010-12-01

    Hypothermic cardiac arrest is a relatively uncommon presentation to United States Emergency Departments. During 1979-2002, the Centers for Disease Control reported that an average of 689 deaths per year in the US were attributed to exposure to excessive natural cold. Severe hypothermia (<30°C) confers marked depression of critical metabolic and biochemical functions, but may also provide protection to the brain and other organs while resuscitation is undertaken. For all hypothermic patients, measures designed to prevent further heat loss and begin rewarming should be instituted, but should not delay routine Advanced Cardiac and Trauma Life Support procedures. Rewarming methods include passive rewarming (insulation, removal from environment), active external rewarming (heating blankets, radiant heat, warm water immersion), and active core rewarming (warm inhalation, warmed intravenous fluids, gastrointestinal irrigation, bladder irrigation, dialysis, thoracostomy lavage, and cardiopulmonary bypass). PMID:21036798

  9. Interdisciplinary Simulation Using the Cardiopulmonary Bypass Simulator (CPBS)?

    PubMed

    Mendel, Shaun

    2014-12-01

    Interdisciplinary education offerings between students of cardiovascular science and nurse anesthesia are uncommon despite the collaborative nature of these disciplines. The dual purpose of this article is to describe a method for interdisciplinary simulation and to report survey responses provided by participants. An interdisciplinary simulation session using concurrent use of the cardiopulmonary bypass simulator and the emergency care simulator is described. Interdisciplinary perceptions before and after the event were surveyed using the revised Interdisciplinary Education Perception Scale. Statistically significant differences between baseline and final survey responses were observed in the total score and within the areas of competency and perception of cooperation. Emerging simulation technologies and novel combinations of existing devices can facilitate meaningful interdisciplinary educational opportunities for health science students.

  10. Lack of Efficacy of Ulinastatin Therapy During Cardiopulmonary Bypass Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Yan; Lin, Jing; Yang, Yang; Zhou, Jing; Gong, Li-Na; Qin, Zhen; Du, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Background: It was believed that inflammatory response induced by cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) was blamed for complications after cardiac surgery. To improve the outcome, many pharmacological interventions have been applied to attenuate inflammatory response during CPB. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of ulinastatin (urinary trypsin inhibitor [UTI]) on outcome after CPB surgery. Methods: Totally, 208 patients undergoing elective valves replacement between November 2013 and September 2014 were divided into Group U (n = 70) and Group C (n = 138) based on they received UTI or not. Categorical variables were compared between groups using Fisher's exact test, and continuous variables using unpaired Student's t-test or Mann–Whitney U-test. One-way analysis of variance and Dunnett's or Tukey's tests were used to compare values at different time points within the same group. The risk of outcomes was estimated and adjusted by multivariable logistic regression, propensity scoring, and mixed-effect models for all measured variables. Results: Both the serious complications in total, including death, acute lung injury, acute respiratory distress syndrome and acute kidney injury, and the other complications, including hemodialysis, infection, re-incubation, and tracheotomy were similar between the two groups (P > 0.05). After adjusted by multivariable logistic regression and the propensity score, UTI still cannot be found any benefit to improve any outcomes after cardiac surgery. Also, no statistical differences with regard to duration of postoperative mechanical ventilation, the length of Intensive Care Unit and hospital stays (P > 0.05). Conclusion: UTI did not improve postoperative outcomes in our patients after cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. PMID:26612285

  11. Electroencephalography during surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass and hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Bashein, G; Nessly, M L; Bledsoe, S W; Townes, B D; Davis, K B; Coppel, D B; Hornbein, T F

    1992-06-01

    After more than 30 yr of use, electroencephalographic (EEG) monitoring during cardiopulmonary bypass has not gained wide clinical acceptance. To assess its utility to predict central nervous system injury, two-channel recordings were made from 78 patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass and anesthetized with fentanyl/diazepam/enflurane. The perfusion regimen included the use of high pump flow, a bubble oxygenator, and no arterial tubing filter. Target values were 28-32 degrees C for the minimum rectal temperature, 60-80 mmHg for mean arterial pressure, and 20-25% for hematocrit. Eight descriptors of the Fourier power spectra of the EEG were calculated off-line, and outcome comparisons were made with the results from neuropsychological tests. Among 58 patients yielding complete data of acceptable quality, a statistically significant reduction in total power was observed from prebypass to postbypass, accompanied by an increase in the fractional power in the theta and beta frequency bands and in the spectral edge frequency. The shifts in total and theta power were weakly associated with short-term but not with long-term changes in neuropsychological scores. Nearly 40% of the patients' EEGs were corrupted with electrical noise at some time during bypass. In 15 patients selected for having high-quality recordings and no neuropsychological deficit, an extensive statistical analysis failed to reveal any consistent variation in the EEG descriptors with hypothermia. Under the conditions studied, it appears that for other than gross signal dropout, the strong background variability in the EEG makes it have little value for detecting harbingers of brain injury.

  12. Finite Time Shock Acceleration at Interplanetary Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Channok, C.; Ruffolo, D.; Desai, M. I.; Mason, G. M.

    2004-05-01

    Observations of energetic ion acceleration at interplanetary shocks sometimes indicate a spectral rollover at ˜ 0.1 to 1 MeV nucl-1. This rollover is not well explained by finite shock width or thickness effects. At the same time, a typical timescale of diffusive shock acceleration is several days, implying that the process of shock acceleration at an interplanetary shock near Earth usually gives only a mild increase in energy to an existing seed particle population. This is consistent with a recent analysis of ACE observations that argues for a seed population at substantially higher energies than the solar wind. Therefore an explanation of typical spectra of interplanetary shock-accelerated ions requires a theory of finite-time shock acceleration, which for long times (or an unusually fast acceleration timescale) tends to the steady-state result of a power-law spectrum. We present analytic and numerical models of finite-time shock acceleration. For a given injection momentum p0, after a very short time there is only a small boost in momentum, at intermediate times the spectrum is a power law with a hump and steep cutoff at a critical momentum, and at longer times the critical momentum increases and the spectrum approaches the steady-state power law. The composition dependence of the critical momentum is different from that obtained for other cutoff mechanisms. The results are compared with observed spectra. Work in Thailand was supported by the Commission for Higher Education, the Rachadapisek Sompoj Fund of Chulalongkorn University, and the Thailand Research Fund. Work at the University of Maryland was supported by NASA contract NAS5-30927 and NASA grant PC 251428.

  13. Structure in Radiating Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doss, Forrest

    2010-11-01

    The basic radiative shock experiment is a shock launched into a gas of high-atomic-number material at high velocities, which fulfills the conditions for radiative losses to collapse the post-shock material to over 20 times the initial gas density. This has been accomplished using the OMEGA Laser Facility by illuminating a Be ablator for 1 ns with a total of 4 kJ, launching the requisite shock, faster than 100 km/sec, into a polyimide shock tube filled with Xe. The experiments have lateral dimensions of 600 μm and axial dimensions of 2-3 mm, and are diagnosed by x-ray backlighting. Repeatable structure beyond the one-dimensional picture of a shock as a planar discontinuity was discovered in the experimental data. One form this took was that of radial boundary effects near the tube walls, extended approximately seventy microns into the system. The cause of this effect - low density wall material which is heated by radiation transport ahead of the shock, launching a new converging shock ahead of the main shock - is apparently unique to high-energy-density experiments. Another form of structure is the appearance of small-scale perturbations in the post-shock layer, modulating the shock and material interfaces and creating regions of enhanced and diminished aerial density within the layer. The authors have applied an instability theory, a variation of the Vishniac instability of decelerating shocks, to describe the growth of these perturbations. We have also applied Bayesian statistical methods to better understand the uncertainties associated with measuring shocked layer thickness in the presence of tilt. Collaborators: R. P. Drake, H. F. Robey, C. C. Kuranz, C. M. Huntington, M. J. Grosskopf, D. C. Marion.

  14. Genetics of β2-Adrenergic Receptors and the Cardiopulmonary Response to Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Eric M.; Johnson, Bruce D.; Joyner, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Exercise elicits a number of physiologic responses to increase oxygen delivery to working muscles. The β2-adrenergic receptors (ADRB2) play a role in the cardiopulmonary response to exercise. This review is focused on how the gene that encodes the ADRB2 influences the cardiopulmonary response to exercise. In addition, we discuss possible interactions between ADRB2 and other genes important in exercise performance. PMID:18362692

  15. Reversibility of cardiopulmonary impairment after laparoscopic repair of large hiatal hernia

    PubMed Central

    Asti, Emanuele; Bonavina, Luigi; Lombardi, Massimo; Bandera, Francesco; Secchi, Francesco; Guazzi, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Giant hiatus hernia with or without intrathoracic gastric volvulus often presents with symptoms suggestive of both cardiac and pulmonary compression. Cardiopulmonary impairment may be reversible in these patients by laparoscopic crural repair and fundoplication as shown in this case report. Cardiac magnetic resonance and the cardiopulmonary exercise test may help selecting patients for surgery. These preliminary findings led us to start a prospective study using this multimodality diagnostic approach. PMID:26210719

  16. Reversibility of cardiopulmonary impairment after laparoscopic repair of large hiatal hernia.

    PubMed

    Asti, Emanuele; Bonavina, Luigi; Lombardi, Massimo; Bandera, Francesco; Secchi, Francesco; Guazzi, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Giant hiatus hernia with or without intrathoracic gastric volvulus often presents with symptoms suggestive of both cardiac and pulmonary compression. Cardiopulmonary impairment may be reversible in these patients by laparoscopic crural repair and fundoplication as shown in this case report. Cardiac magnetic resonance and the cardiopulmonary exercise test may help selecting patients for surgery. These preliminary findings led us to start a prospective study using this multimodality diagnostic approach. PMID:26210719

  17. Transesophageal echocardiography-guided thrombectomy of intracardiac renal cell carcinoma without cardiopulmonary bypass

    PubMed Central

    Souki, Fouad Ghazi; Demos, Michael; Fermin, Lilibeth; Ciancio, Gaetano

    2016-01-01

    Advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) resection has important anesthetic management implications, particularly when tumor extends, suprahepatic, into the right atrium. Use of transesophageal echocardiogram (TEE) is essential in identifying tumor extension and guiding resection. Latest surgical approach avoids venovenous and cardiopulmonary bypass yet requires special precautions and interventions on the anesthesiologist's part. We present a case of Level IV RCC resected without cardiopulmonary bypass and salvaged by TEE guidance and detection of residual intracardiac tumor. PMID:27716710

  18. 72 hours standby time of wet-primed cardiopulmonary bypass circuits: a microbiological quality assurance study.

    PubMed

    Schulz-Stübner, Sebastian; Schorer, Cornelia; Ennker, Jürgen; Bauer, Stefan; Schaumann, Reiner

    2014-10-01

    In a microbiological sample study of 15 wet-primed cardiopulmonary bypass circuits in standby mode for 72 hours under regular clinical conditions, no contamination of the priming fluid or the connectors could be detected. Hand contact surfaces of the machines demonstrated environmental microorganisms. These findings indicate the safe use of primed cardiopulmonary bypass circuits in standby mode for 72 hours. A surface disinfection of hand contact surfaces immediately before use is recommended. PMID:24788708

  19. Epidemiology of Intracranial Haemorrhages Associated with Vitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants in Spain: TAC Registry

    PubMed Central

    Zapata-Wainberg, Gustavo; Ximénez-Carrillo Rico, Álvaro; Benavente Fernández, Lorena; Masjuan Vallejo, Jaime; Gállego Culleré, Jaime; Freijó Guerrero, María del Mar; Egido, José; Gómez Sánchez, José Carlos; Martínez Domeño, Alejandro; Purroy García, Francisco; Vives Pastor, Bárbara; Blanco González, Miguel; Vivancos, José

    2015-01-01

    Background Vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (VKA-OACs) are effective for primary and secondary prevention of embolic events. The rate of haemorrhagic neurological complications in patients admitted to neurology departments in Spain is not yet known. Aims We aimed to determine the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of patients with intracranial haemorrhage secondary to VKA-OACs as well as the incidence of this severe complication. Methods We conducted a retrospective, descriptive, multi-centre study using information from the medical records of all patients admitted to neurology departments, diagnosed with spontaneous intracranial haemorrhage, and treated with VKA-OACs within a 1-year period. We collected demographic and care data from centres, patients' medical records [demographic data, medical history, haemorrhage origin, vascular risk factors, concomitant treatment, and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores], and patients' outcome at 3 months [independence (modified Rankin Scale score <3) and mortality rate]. Results Twenty-one hospitals serving a population of 8,155,628 inhabitants participated in the study. The total number of cases was 235, the mean age was 78.2 (SD 9.4) years, and the baseline NIHSS score was 11.6 (SD 9.5; median 9; interquartile range 14). The VKA-OACs used were acenocoumarol in 95.3% (224 patients) and warfarin in 4.7% (11 patients). The haemorrhage origin was deep in 29.8%, lobar in 25.5%, intraventricular in 11.5%, extensive in 17.4% (>100 ml), cerebellar in 12.3%, and in the brainstem in 3.4%. The international normalised ratio was within therapeutic ranges at admission (according to indication) in 29.4% (69 patients). The global incidence (cases per 100,000 inhabitants per year) is 2.88. The in-hospital mortality rate was 40%, and 24.3% of the patients were independent at 3 months, while the mortality at 3 months was 42.6%. Conclusion VKA-OAC treatment is associated with a large percentage of all

  20. New radiative shocks experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leygnac, S.; Bouquet, S.; Stehlé, C.; Benuzzi, A.; Boireau, J.-P.; Chièze, J.-P.; Grandjouan, N.; Huser, G.; Koenig, M.; Malka, V.; Merdji, H.; Michaut, C.; Thais, F.; Vinci, T.

    2002-06-01

    An experimental study of shocks with astrophysical relevance is performed with the high energy density laser of the LULI, at the Ecole Polytechnique. The peculiarity of these shocks is the strong coupling between radiation and hydrodynamics which leads to a structure governed by a radiative precursor. A new experiment has been performed this year where we have observed shocks identified as radiative shocks. We study them in various experimental configurations (several speeds and geometries of the medium where the shock propagates, allowing a quasi-planar or a quasi-spherical expansion). From the measurements it is possible to infer several features of the shock such as the speed, the electronic density, the geometrical shape and spectroscopic informations. The results will be studied with numerical simulations.

  1. Weak shock reflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, John K.; Brio, Moysey

    2000-05-01

    We present numerical solutions of a two-dimensional inviscid Burgers equation which provides an asymptotic description of the Mach reflection of weak shocks. In our numerical solutions, the incident, reflected, and Mach shocks meet at a triple point, and there is a supersonic patch behind the triple point, as proposed by Guderley for steady weak-shock reflection. A theoretical analysis indicates that there is an expansion fan at the triple point, in addition to the three shocks. The supersonic patch is extremely small, and this work is the first time it has been resolved.

  2. Anti-Shock Garment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Ames Research Center developed a prototype pressure suit for hemophiliac children, based on research of astronauts' physiological responses in microgravity. Zoex Corporation picked up the design and patents and developed an anti-shock garment for paramedic use. Marketed by Dyna Med, the suit reverses the effect of shock on the body's blood distribution by applying counterpressure to the legs and abdomen, returning blood to vital organs and stabilizing body pressure until the patient reaches a hospital. The DMAST (Dyna Med Anti-Shock Trousers) employ lower pressure than other shock garments, and are non-inflatable.

  3. When shock waves collide

    DOE PAGES

    Martinez, D.; Hartigan, P.; Frank, A.; Hansen, E.; Yirak, K.; Liao, A. S.; Graham, P.; Foster, J.; Wilde, B.; Blue, B.; et al

    2016-06-01

    Supersonic outflows from objects as varied as stellar jets, massive stars, and novae often exhibit multiple shock waves that overlap one another. When the intersection angle between two shock waves exceeds a critical value, the system reconfigures its geometry to create a normal shock known as a Mach stem where the shocks meet. Mach stems are important for interpreting emission-line images of shocked gas because a normal shock produces higher postshock temperatures, and therefore a higher-excitation spectrum than does an oblique shock. In this paper, we summarize the results of a series of numerical simulations and laboratory experiments designed tomore » quantify how Mach stems behave in supersonic plasmas that are the norm in astrophysical flows. The experiments test analytical predictions for critical angles where Mach stems should form, and quantify how Mach stems grow and decay as intersection angles between the incident shock and a surface change. While small Mach stems are destroyed by surface irregularities and subcritical angles, larger ones persist in these situations and can regrow if the intersection angle changes to become more favorable. Furthermore, the experimental and numerical results show that although Mach stems occur only over a limited range of intersection angles and size scales, within these ranges they are relatively robust, and hence are a viable explanation for variable bright knots observed in Hubble Space Telescope images at the intersections of some bow shocks in stellar jets.« less

  4. When Shock Waves Collide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartigan, P.; Foster, J.; Frank, A.; Hansen, E.; Yirak, K.; Liao, A. S.; Graham, P.; Wilde, B.; Blue, B.; Martinez, D.; Rosen, P.; Farley, D.; Paguio, R.

    2016-06-01

    Supersonic outflows from objects as varied as stellar jets, massive stars, and novae often exhibit multiple shock waves that overlap one another. When the intersection angle between two shock waves exceeds a critical value, the system reconfigures its geometry to create a normal shock known as a Mach stem where the shocks meet. Mach stems are important for interpreting emission-line images of shocked gas because a normal shock produces higher postshock temperatures, and therefore a higher-excitation spectrum than does an oblique shock. In this paper, we summarize the results of a series of numerical simulations and laboratory experiments designed to quantify how Mach stems behave in supersonic plasmas that are the norm in astrophysical flows. The experiments test analytical predictions for critical angles where Mach stems should form, and quantify how Mach stems grow and decay as intersection angles between the incident shock and a surface change. While small Mach stems are destroyed by surface irregularities and subcritical angles, larger ones persist in these situations and can regrow if the intersection angle changes to become more favorable. The experimental and numerical results show that although Mach stems occur only over a limited range of intersection angles and size scales, within these ranges they are relatively robust, and hence are a viable explanation for variable bright knots observed in Hubble Space Telescope images at the intersections of some bow shocks in stellar jets.

  5. Menses, fertility and pregnancy following the use of balloon tamponade technology in the management of postpartum haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Georgiou, Christos

    2014-06-01

    This manuscript describes five cases of pregnancies and births in women that have previously required the uterine-specific Bakri™ balloon in the management of postpartum haemorrhage. In addition, this manuscript reviews the impact on menses, fertility and subsequent pregnancies as potential surrogate effects on the myometrium and endometrium, when balloon tamponade technology is used as a 'uterine-sparing' second-line approach in the management of postpartum haemorrhage.

  6. Complications and pregnancy outcome following uterine compression suture for postpartum haemorrhage: a single centre experience.

    PubMed

    Liu, S; Mathur, M; Tagore, S

    2014-07-01

    In the treatment of postpartum haemorrhage from uterine atony, uterine compression sutures, such as the B-Lynch suture and its modifications have a role with the advantage of preservation of the uterus for fertility. There is however, a risk that apposition of the anterior and posterior walls of the uterus will impede drainage of lochia, resulting in undesirable complications. We undertook a five-year retrospective study of all women who underwent uterine compression sutures at the KK Women's and Children's Hospital, between 2008 and 2012. In total, 23 women had uterine compression sutures during the study period, of which, nineteen women managed to conserve their uterus. Our complication rate was 25%, which included persistent vaginal discharge, pyometra and endometritis. There were three conceptions, with two successful pregnancies. Our study shows uterine compression suture to be a safe and effective alternative to avoid hysterectomy with preservation of fertility at the time of major postpartum haemorrhage. The outcome of subsequent pregnancies is reassuring.

  7. Bilateral adrenal haemorrhage associated with heparin-induced thrombocytopaenia during treatment of Fournier gangrene.

    PubMed

    Tattersall, Timothy Lee; Thangasamy, Isaac A; Reynolds, Jamie

    2014-10-14

    We present a case of bilateral adrenal haemorrhage (BAH) associated with heparin-induced thrombocytopaenia (HIT) in a 61-year-old man admitted to hospital for the treatment of Fournier's gangrene. He presented to hospital with scrotal swelling and fever, and developed spreading erythaema and a gangrenous scrotum. His scrotum was surgically debrided and intravenous broad-spectrum antibiotics were administered. Unfractionated heparin was given postoperatively for venous thromboembolism prophylaxis. The patient deteriorated clinically 8-11 days postoperatively with delirium, chest pain and severe hypertension followed by hypotension and thrombocytopaenia. Abdominal CT scan revealed bilateral adrenal haemorrhage. Antibodies to the heparin-platelet factor 4 complex were present. HIT-associated BAH was diagnosed and heparin was discontinued. Intravenous bivalirudin and hydrocortisone were started, with rapid improvement in clinical status. BAH is a rare complication of HIT and should be considered in the postoperative patient with unexplained clinical deterioration.

  8. Pancreatico-enteric fistula post pancreatic duct ligation for delayed haemorrhage complicating pancreaticoduodenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Vijay, Adarsh; Noaman, Islam; Mahfouz, Ahmed; Khawar, Mahwish; Khalaf, Hatem; Elaffandi, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Pancreatic fistula remains the main cause for postoperative morbidity following pancreaticoduodenectomy. The coincidence of sentinel bleed prior to post pancreatectomy haemorrhage (PPH) and pancreatic fistula is associated with very high mortality. Presentation of case We report a case of pancreaticoduodenectomy complicated by postoperative leak and hematemesis. Severe delayed haemorrhage from the pancreatico-jejunostomy necessitated re-laparotomy and complete disconnection of the pancreatic anastomosis. Hemodynamic instability precluded a pancreatectomy or creation of a new anastomosis. A follow up MRI done 3 weeks after the patient’s discharge demonstrated a fistulous tract causing a communication between both the pancreatic and biliary systems and the enteric loop. Discussion Spontaneous development a pancreatico-enteric fistula despite ligation of the pancreatic duct and complete disconnection of the pancreatic anastomosis has never been reported in literature to date. Conclusion Pancreatic duct occlusion may be considered over a completion pancreatectomy or revisional pancreatic anastomosis in hemodynamically unstable and challenging cases. PMID:26921533

  9. [Multidisciplinary consensus document on the management of massive haemorrhage (HEMOMAS document)].

    PubMed

    Llau, J V; Acosta, F J; Escolar, G; Fernández-Mondéjar, E; Guasch, E; Marco, P; Paniagua, P; Páramo, J A; Quintana, M; Torrabadella, P

    2016-01-01

    Massive haemorrhage is common and often associated with high morbidity and mortality. We perform a systematic review of the literature, with extraction of the recommendations from the existing evidences because of the need for its improvement and the management standardization. From the results we found, we wrote a multidisciplinary consensus document. We begin with the agreement in the definitions of massive haemorrhage and massive transfusion, and we do structured recommendations on their general management (clinical assessment of bleeding, hypothermia management, fluid therapy, hypotensive resuscitation and damage control surgery), blood volume monitoring, blood products transfusion (red blood cells, fresh frozen plasma, platelets and their best transfusion ratio), and administration of hemostatic components (prothrombin complex, fibrinogen, factor VIIa, antifibrinolytic agents).

  10. Multidisciplinary consensus document on the management of massive haemorrhage (HEMOMAS document).

    PubMed

    Llau, J V; Acosta, F J; Escolar, G; Fernández-Mondéjar, E; Guasch, E; Marco, P; Paniagua, P; Páramo, J A; Quintana, M; Torrabadella, P

    2015-11-01

    Massive haemorrhage is common and often associated with high morbidity and mortality. We perform a systematic review of the literature, with extraction of the recommendations from the existing evidences because of the need for its improvement and the management standardization. From the results we found, we wrote a multidisciplinary consensus document. We begin with the agreement in the definitions of massive haemorrhage and massive transfusion, and we do structured recommendations on their general management (clinical assessment of bleeding, hypothermia management, fluid therapy, hypotensive resuscitation and damage control surgery), blood volume monitoring, blood products transfusion (red blood cells, fresh frozen plasma, platelets and their best transfusion ratio), and administration of hemostatic components (prothrombin complex, fibrinogen, factor VIIa, antifibrinolytic agents).

  11. [Multidisciplinary consensus document on the management of massive haemorrhage (HEMOMAS document)].

    PubMed

    Llau, J V; Acosta, F J; Escolar, G; Fernández-Mondéjar, E; Guasch, E; Marco, P; Paniagua, P; Páramo, J A; Quintana, M; Torrabadella, P

    2016-01-01

    Massive haemorrhage is common and often associated with high morbidity and mortality. We perform a systematic review of the literature, with extraction of the recommendations from the existing evidences because of the need for its improvement and the management standardization. From the results we found, we wrote a multidisciplinary consensus document. We begin with the agreement in the definitions of massive haemorrhage and massive transfusion, and we do structured recommendations on their general management (clinical assessment of bleeding, hypothermia management, fluid therapy, hypotensive resuscitation and damage control surgery), blood volume monitoring, blood products transfusion (red blood cells, fresh frozen plasma, platelets and their best transfusion ratio), and administration of hemostatic components (prothrombin complex, fibrinogen, factor VIIa, antifibrinolytic agents). PMID:26688462

  12. Multidisciplinary consensus document on the management of massive haemorrhage (HEMOMAS document).

    PubMed

    Llau, J V; Acosta, F J; Escolar, G; Fernández-Mondéjar, E; Guasch, E; Marco, P; Paniagua, P; Páramo, J A; Quintana, M; Torrabadella, P

    2015-11-01

    Massive haemorrhage is common and often associated with high morbidity and mortality. We perform a systematic review of the literature, with extraction of the recommendations from the existing evidences because of the need for its improvement and the management standardization. From the results we found, we wrote a multidisciplinary consensus document. We begin with the agreement in the definitions of massive haemorrhage and massive transfusion, and we do structured recommendations on their general management (clinical assessment of bleeding, hypothermia management, fluid therapy, hypotensive resuscitation and damage control surgery), blood volume monitoring, blood products transfusion (red blood cells, fresh frozen plasma, platelets and their best transfusion ratio), and administration of hemostatic components (prothrombin complex, fibrinogen, factor VIIa, antifibrinolytic agents). PMID:26233588

  13. [The use of carboprost tromethamole for prevention and treatment of postpartal haemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Milchev, N; Amaliev, G; Amaliev, I; Apiosian, Zh; Mladenova, M

    2011-01-01

    All around the world as well as in Bulgaria postpartal haemorrhage is a main reason of maternal death. The treatment of postpartal haemorrhage of which approximately 70% is caused by hypotony of the uterus is still a challenge for physician-obstetrician. In the following study we have used prostaglandin-Carboprost tromethamole (Prostin 15M) for treatment of this important obstetric pathology. One year investigation which includes 82 patients with hypotony during vaginal delivery or cesarian section. Results showed that the use of Carboprost tromethamole (Prostin 15M) in treatment of hypotony leads to fast and extended contraction of the uterus as well as significantly decreases blood loss and the necessity of haemotrasfusion.

  14. Spinal Intradural Schwannoma with Acute Intratumoural Haemorrhage: Case Report and Review

    PubMed Central

    Kongwad, Lakshman I.; Valiathan, Manna G.

    2016-01-01

    Schwannomas account for around half of all intradural spinal tumours, with chronic progressive symptoms as the most common presenting features. Intratumoural haemorrhage as a presenting feature of spinal schwannoma is very rare and only 11 cases have been reported till date. Authors here report a previously asymptomatic 40-year-old male who presented with acute onset paraplegia 12 hours after a minor trauma. MR imaging revealed a C7-D3 intradural-extramedullary lesion with features of acute blood and showing no enhancement. Emergency laminectomy and complete removal of the mass was performed and histopathology revealed features of schwannoma with haemorrhage. Patient had modest improvement of his neurological deficits at a follow-up of 6 months. Pertinent literature is reviewed in brief. PMID:26894121

  15. Spontaneous intra-hepatic haemorrhage in a patient with fever of unknown origin.

    PubMed

    Leung, Vincent K S; Lam, Clement Y W; Chan, C C; Ng, W L; Loke, Tony K L; Luk, I Sc; Chau, T N; Wu, Arthur H W; Fong, W N; Lam, S H

    2007-08-01

    Polyarteritis nodosa is a systemic necrotising vasculitis that affects the small- and medium-sized arteries. Multifocal aneurysmal formation in the renal, hepatic, and mesenteric vasculature is a hallmark of this condition, and spontaneous aneurysmal rupture may occur, resulting in life-threatening haemorrhage. We describe a 42-year-old man who initially presented with fever of unknown origin. A diagnosis could not be reached at that time despite extensive investigations. The fever subsided spontaneously after 8 weeks, and the patient remained well for 6 years until he was admitted again for evaluation of fever. During his hospital stay, he developed a spontaneous massive intra-hepatic haemorrhage resulting in hepatic rupture and a haemoperitoneum. The bleeding was controlled at emergency laparotomy. An abdominal angiography demonstrated multiple microaneurysms in the hepatic and mesenteric arterial vasculature. The clinical findings suggested polyarteritis nodosa, and the source of bleeding was probably a ruptured intra-hepatic artery aneurysm.

  16. Successful treatment of active haemorrhage from a duodenal diverticulum using surgicel (absorbable haemostat): a case report.

    PubMed

    Muguti, Gi; Gandhi, H; Ridgeway, D

    2007-01-01

    Haemorrhage is one of the rare but serious complications of duodenal diverticula. Current methods of treatment include: endoscopy with injection therapy or hemoclip application and diverticulectomy. In this paper we present the case of a 61 year old man with life threatening haemorrhage who was managed successfully with gentle packing of a bleeding duodenal diverticulum using SURGICEL (Absorbable Haemostat). This appears to be a simple and effective way of dealing with the problem especially in situations where other methods are ineffective or inapplicable. Early surgical intervention before the development of any coagulopathy increases the chances of a successful outcome. It has not been possible to find a similar report from a thorough literature search. PMID:20353131

  17. Christmas disease: diagnosis and management of a haemorrhagic diathesis following dentofacial trauma.

    PubMed

    Tamagond, Sridevi B; Hugar, Santosh I; Patil, Anil; Huddar, SandhyaRani

    2015-01-01

    Haemorrhagic diathesis has been of much concern to health professionals including dentists. It is not infrequent that a dentist becomes the first person to diagnose a bleeding disorder while performing dental treatment. Haemophilia is an X linked disorder with a frequency of about 1:10,000 births. Haemophilia B is much less common than haemophilia A, and affects only 1:300,000 males born alive. The clinical features of haemophilia B are very similar to those of haemophilia A with a prolongation of activated partial thromboplastin time. This case report describes the dental management of a patient with an uncommon haematological disorder, namely, factor IX deficiency, which remained undiagnosed until the patient had to undergo dentofacial trauma with unexpected severe haemorrhage. Preventive dentistry remains vital to young haemophiliacs. Surgical dental procedures may be performed for haemophiliacs but they must be judiciously coordinated by dental and medical health professionals.

  18. [Recurrent intraparenchimal haemorrhages in a patient with cerebral amyloidotic angiopathy: description of one autopsy case].

    PubMed

    Gallo, C; Orlassino, R; Vineis, C

    2006-02-01

    Cerebral amyloidotic angiopathy represents the most frequent cause of lobar haematoma in young patients and represents 5-10% of the non-traumatic cerebral haemorrhages. In the present work, we describe one autoptic case of recurrent cerebral haemorrhages in a 58-year-old woman. Macroscopically in the brain multiple haemorragic areas were present in the right frontal pole, right frontal and temporo-parietal lobes with homolateral ventricular inundation. The histological, histochemical, immunohistochemical, ultrastructural and biomolecular investigations confirmed the presence of amyloid deposits in the middle-size and little-size cerebral arteries. We report, moreover, a novel mutation (Leu705Val) within the Abeta sequence of a AbetaPP in a family with autosomal dominant, recurrent intracerebral hemorrhages beginning in the sixth decade of life.

  19. Bilateral adrenal haemorrhage associated with heparin-induced thrombocytopaenia during treatment of Fournier gangrene

    PubMed Central

    Tattersall, Timothy Lee; Thangasamy, Isaac A; Reynolds, Jamie

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of bilateral adrenal haemorrhage (BAH) associated with heparin-induced thrombocytopaenia (HIT) in a 61-year-old man admitted to hospital for the treatment of Fournier's gangrene. He presented to hospital with scrotal swelling and fever, and developed spreading erythaema and a gangrenous scrotum. His scrotum was surgically debrided and intravenous broad-spectrum antibiotics were administered. Unfractionated heparin was given postoperatively for venous thromboembolism prophylaxis. The patient deteriorated clinically 8–11 days postoperatively with delirium, chest pain and severe hypertension followed by hypotension and thrombocytopaenia. Abdominal CT scan revealed bilateral adrenal haemorrhage. Antibodies to the heparin-platelet factor 4 complex were present. HIT-associated BAH was diagnosed and heparin was discontinued. Intravenous bivalirudin and hydrocortisone were started, with rapid improvement in clinical status. BAH is a rare complication of HIT and should be considered in the postoperative patient with unexplained clinical deterioration. PMID:25315802

  20. Safety and efficacy of an inactivated Carbopol-adjuvanted goose haemorrhagic polyomavirus vaccine for domestic geese.

    PubMed

    Gelfi, Jacqueline; Pappalardo, Michael; Claverys, Carine; Peralta, Brigitte; Guerin, Jean-Luc

    2010-04-01

    Haemorrhagic nephritis enteritis of the goose (HNEG) is an epizootic viral disease in domestic geese. The causal agent is a polyomavirus, namely goose haemorrhagic polyomavirus. To help control the disease, an inactivated vaccine was developed, based on viral particles produced in goose kidney cells. Viral material was quantified using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, inactivated with beta-propiolactone and adjuvanted with Carbopol, an acrylic acid polymer. Carbopol proved to be more immunogenic than aluminium hydroxide and was totally safe when administered to young goslings and breeders alike. Carbopol-adjuvanted vaccine induced a high serological response. Moreover, goslings hatched from vaccinated breeders were protected against viral challenge, indicating that maternally-derived neutralizing antibodies (MDA) were efficiently transferred. MDA were still detectable 15 days post-hatch. Clinical trials will be necessary to accurately evaluate a vaccine-based HNEG control strategy under field conditions.

  1. 2005 American Heart Association (AHA) guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and emergency cardiovascular care (ECC) of pediatric and neonatal patients: pediatric basic life support.

    PubMed

    2006-05-01

    This publication presents the 2005 American Heart Association (AHA) guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and emergency cardiovascular care (ECC) of the pediatric patient and the 2005 American Academy of Pediatrics/AHA guidelines for CPR and ECC of the neonate. The guidelines are based on the evidence evaluation from the 2005 International Consensus Conference on Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care Science With Treatment Recommendations, hosted by the American Heart Association in Dallas, Texas, January 23-30, 2005. The "2005 AHA Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care" contain recommendations designed to improve survival from sudden cardiac arrest and acute life-threatening cardiopulmonary problems. The evidence evaluation process that was the basis for these guidelines was accomplished in collaboration with the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR). The ILCOR process is described in more detail in the "International Consensus on Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care Science With Treatment Recommendations." The recommendations in the "2005 AHA Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care" confirm the safety and effectiveness of many approaches, acknowledge that other approaches may not be optimal, and recommend new treatments that have undergone evidence evaluation. These new recommendations do not imply that care involving the use of earlier guidelines is unsafe. In addition, it is important to note that these guidelines will not apply to all rescuers and all victims in all situations. The leader of a resuscitation attempt may need to adapt application of the guidelines to unique circumstances. The following are the major pediatric advanced life support changes in the 2005 guidelines: There is further caution about the use of endotracheal tubes. Laryngeal mask airways are acceptable when used by experienced

  2. Haemorrhagic papular rash associated to Flavimonas oryzihabitans bacteraemia in a child.

    PubMed

    Kansouzidou, A; Charitidou, C; Poubrou, E; Daniilidis, V D; Tsagaropoulou, H

    2000-03-01

    Flavimonas oryzihabitans is a gram-negative rod that has rarely been implicated in human infections. The involvement of this organism has been documented in serious infections, the majority of which were cases of bacteraemia or peritonitis. We report the first isolation of the organism in Greece, from a case of bacteraemia, associated with haemorrhagic papular rash, in a paediatric patient and describe the phenotypic characteristics of the strain.

  3. Internal iliac artery embolisation for intractable bladder haemorrhage in the peri-operative phase

    PubMed Central

    Gujral, S.; Bell, R.; Kabala, J.; Persad, R.

    1999-01-01

    Intractable haemorrhage from the bladder wall during transurethral resection of bladder tumour is uncommon but potentially catastrophic. Internal iliac artery embolisation is a minimally invasive technique, which is now widely practised to stop bleeding from branches of these arteries in situations including pelvic malignancy, obstetric and gynaecological emergencies and trauma. We report its successful use peri-operatively, in an unfit, elderly patient with uncontrolled bleeding.


Keywords: embolisation; internal iliac artery; transurethral resection of bladder tumour PMID:10448498

  4. Internal iliac artery embolisation for intractable bladder haemorrhage in the peri-operative phase.

    PubMed

    Gujral, S; Bell, R; Kabala, J; Persad, R

    1999-03-01

    Intractable haemorrhage from the bladder wall during transurethral resection of bladder tumour is uncommon but potentially catastrophic. Internal iliac artery embolisation is a minimally invasive technique, which is now widely practised to stop bleeding from branches of these arteries is situations including pelvic malignancy, obstetric and gynaecological emergencies and trauma. We report its successful use peri-operatively, in an unfit, elderly patient with uncontrolled bleeding.

  5. Spontaneous liver haemorrhage and haemobilia as initial presentation of undiagnosed polyarteritis nodosa.

    PubMed

    Battula, N; Tsapralis, D; Morgan, M; Mirza, D

    2012-05-01

    Polyarteritis nodosa (PAN) is a systemic necrotising vasculitis that could result in multifocal aneurysms of visceral arteries. Isolated multiple aneurysms of the hepatic arteries in the setting of PAN is extremely rare. Patients are typically asymptomatic and, very rarely, spontaneous rupture with life threatening haemorrhage could be the initial presentation of an undiagnosed PAN. Accurate diagnosis, effective haemostasis and prompt initiation of immunosuppressive treatment with the help of a multidisciplinary team will improve the clinical outcomes.

  6. Dengue haemorrhagic fever in Cuba. I. Serological confirmation of clinical diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Guzman, M G; Kouri, G P; Bravo, J; Calunga, M; Soler, M; Vazquez, S; Venereo, C

    1984-01-01

    Serological studies by the haemagglutinin inhibition test to confirm a clinical diagnosis of dengue were done on 406 patients during the dengue 2 epidemic in Cuba in 1981. 49% of the cases were serologically positive; of these 64% was classified as primary and 36% as secondary. The frequency of symptoms is described: the most frequent were fever, headache, malaise and vomiting. Haemorrhagic manifestations predominated significantly in the secondary cases. The white race and female sex were found to predominate in the positive cases.

  7. Deaths associated with dengue haemorrhagic fever: the first in Australia in over a century.

    PubMed

    McBride, William J H

    2005-07-01

    A dengue fever epidemic was recognised in the Torres Strait Islands of Queensland in late 2003. Two fatal cases of dengue haemorrhagic fever occurred in early 2004. This severe manifestation is more common when a patient is infected a second time, with a different virus serotype to the first infection. These are the first fatalities related to dengue fever in Australia in over a century.

  8. Absorption of intubation-related lidocaine from the trachea during prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Moriya, F; Hashimoto, Y

    1998-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether lidocaine is absorbed from the trachea during the artificial circulation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The tissue distribution of lidocaine was investigated in eight individuals (Cases 1-8) who underwent cardiopulmonary resuscitation before being pronounced dead. In Cases 1-4, there was no restoration of heart beat during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Heart massage had been continued for 5 min in Cases 1 and 2, and for 60 min in Cases 3 and 4. Relatively high concentrations of lidocaine (more than 0.1 mg/L) were detected in the blood left in the heart and/or in the large thoracic vessels in the four cases. In Cases 1-3, a large proportion of the lidocaine detected in these blood samples may have diffused from the trachea after cessation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation since no lidocaine was detected in the cerebrospinal fluid, cerebrum, liver, right kidney, and/or right femoral muscle. In Case 4, however, tracheal lidocaine was thought to have been absorbed during cardiopulmonary resuscitation because 0.167-0.340 mg/L or mg/kg lidocaine was detected in the cerebrospinal fluid, liver, right kidney, and right femoral muscle. This was substantiated in experiments performed in rabbit carcasses given 50 microL/kg Xylocaine jelly (a 2% lidocaine hydrochloride preparation) intratracheally, followed by rhythmical thoracic compressions (100-150 times per minute) for 60 min. A possible reason for lack of absorption of lidocaine from the trachea of Case 3 during a 60-min cardiopulmonary resuscitation procedure may have been that effective blood circulation was not obtained during cardiopulmonary resuscitation because of bleeding and pulmonary collapse. Cases 5-8 survived for 3 h to 10 days after successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation; it was obvious that lidocaine was distributed to the tissues under the influence of the natural circulation. The kidney to liver lidocaine ratio in Case 4 (0.8) was much lower than that

  9. Diabetic patients have abnormal cerebral autoregulation during cardiopulmonary bypass

    SciTech Connect

    Croughwell, N.; Lyth, M.; Quill, T.J.; Newman, M.; Greeley, W.J.; Smith, L.R.; Reves, J.G. )

    1990-11-01

    We tested the hypothesis that insulin-dependent diabetic patients with coronary artery bypass graft surgery experience altered coupling of cerebral blood flow and oxygen consumption. In a study of 23 patients (11 diabetics and 12 age-matched controls), cerebral blood flow was measured using 133Xe clearance during nonpulsatile, alpha-stat blood gas managed cardiopulmonary bypass at the conditions of hypothermia and normothermia. In diabetic patients, the cerebral blood flow at 26.6 +/- 2.42 degrees C was 25.3 +/- 14.34 ml/100 g/min and at 36.9 +/- 0.58 degrees C it was 27.3 +/- 7.40 ml/100 g/min (p = NS). The control patients increased cerebral blood flow from 20.7 +/- 6.78 ml/100 g/min at 28.4 +/- 2.81 degrees C to 37.6 +/- 8.81 ml/100 g/min at 36.5 +/- 0.45 degrees C (p less than or equal to 0.005). The oxygen consumption was calculated from jugular bulb effluent and increased from hypothermic values of 0.52 +/- 0.20 ml/100 g/min in diabetics to 1.26 +/- 0.28 ml/100 g/min (p = 0.001) at normothermia and rose from 0.60 +/- 0.27 to 1.49 +/- 0.35 ml/100 g/min (p = 0.0005) in the controls. Thus, despite temperature-mediated changes in oxygen consumption, diabetic patients did not increase cerebral blood flow as metabolism increased. Arteriovenous oxygen saturation gradients and oxygen extraction across the brain were calculated from arterial and jugular bulb blood samples. The increase in arteriovenous oxygen difference between temperature conditions in diabetic patients and controls was significantly different (p = 0.01). These data reveal that diabetic patients lose cerebral autoregulation during cardiopulmonary bypass and compensate for an imbalance in adequate oxygen delivery by increasing oxygen extraction.

  10. Dating of Acute and Subacute Subdural Haemorrhage: A Histo-Pathological Study

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Murali G; Vashista, Rakesh Kumar; Sharma, Suresh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Microscopic study of the organization of the Subdural Haemorrhage (SDH) verified against the time period can help us in the determination of its age which has serious medico-legal implications. Very few studies concerning the dating of SDH are present in the literature. Aim This study was conducted for dating the early subdural haemorrhage by routine histopathological stains. Materials and Methods A prospective analytical study was conducted during July 2009 to December 2010. A total of 100 cases (50 males and 50 females) fulfilling the inclusion and exclusion criteria were included in this study. Routine histopathological staining of the subdural haematoma was done. Results Correlation between the frequency of a given histomorphological phenomenon and the length of the Post-Traumatic Interval (PTI) was evidential. All the histomorphological features, when correlated with PTI groups, were found to be statistically significant, except for Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes (PMN). Conclusion We concluded that routine histopathology was reliable in the dating of early subdural haemorrhages. PMID:27630864

  11. In vitro contractile effects of agents used in the clinical management of postpartum haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Morrison, John J; Crosby, David A; Crankshaw, Denis J

    2016-10-15

    Uterine atony is a major cause of postpartum haemorrhage and maternal mortality. However, the comparative pharmacology of agents used to treat this condition is poorly understood. This study evaluates, using human pregnant myometrium in vitro, a range of contractile parameters for agents used in the clinical treatment of atonic postpartum haemorrhage. The effects of oxytocin, carbetocin, ergometrine, carboprost, syntometrine and misoprostol were investigated in 146 myometrial strips from 19 donors. The potency and maximal response values were obtained, and compared, using both maximal amplitude and mean contractile force as indices of contraction. Single, EC50 concentrations of the agents were administered and both force and contraction peak parameters were compared during a 15-min exposure. Differences were considered significant when P<0.05. There were no significant differences in the peak amplitude of response between agents, except for misoprostol, which was inactive. There was a wide difference in potencies using both measures of contractility, with oxytocin and carbetocin being the most potent. The most important difference between the agents was in their ability to increase the mean contractile force, with oxytocin superior to all agents except syntometrine. In single dose experiments, mean contractile force was the parameter that separated the agents. In this respect, oxytocin was not statistically different from carboprost or syntometrine, but was superior to all other agents. These findings support a clear role for oxytocin as the first line agent for treatment of postpartum haemorrhage and raise doubts about the potential clinical usefulness of misoprostol. PMID:27423315

  12. Acute headache at emergency department: reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome complicated by subarachnoid haemorrhage and cerebral infarction.

    PubMed

    Yger, M; Zavanone, C; Abdennour, L; Koubaa, W; Clarençon, F; Dupont, S; Samson, Y

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome is becoming widely accepted as a rare cause of both ischemic and haemorrhagic stroke and should be evocated in case of thunderclap headaches associated with stroke. We present the case of a patient with ischemic stroke associated with cortical subarachnoid haemorrhage (cSAH) and reversible diffuse arteries narrowing, leading to the diagnosis of reversible vasoconstriction syndrome. Case Report. A 48-year-old woman came to the emergency department because of an unusual thunderclap headache. The computed tomography of the brain completed by CT-angiography was unremarkable. Eleven days later, she was readmitted because of a left hemianopsia. One day after her admission, she developed a sudden left hemiparesis. The brain MRI showed ischemic lesions in the right frontal and occipital lobe and diffuse cSAH. The angiography showed vasoconstriction of the right anterior cerebral artery and stenosis of both middle cerebral arteries. Nimodipine treatment was initiated and vasoconstriction completely regressed on day 16 after the first headache. Conclusion. Our case shows a severe reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome where both haemorrhagic and ischemic complications were present at the same time. The history we reported shows that reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome is still underrecognized, in particular in general emergency departments.

  13. Major haemorrhage associated with a pseudocyst in chronic pancreatitis: a gastro-surgical challenge.

    PubMed

    Rantala, A; Ovaska, J

    1996-01-01

    During the fifteen years between 1979 and 1994, ten patients with alcohol-associated chronic pancreatitis were treated for acute haemorrhage from pancreatic pseudocyst. Five of the cases took place in the last two years of the period. All patients were men with a median age of 39.5 years and with a mean of six years of alcohol misuse. Seven patients presented with massive gastrointestinal bleeding, two with intraperitoneal and one with retroperitoneal bleeding. In six patients the pseudocyst had perforated into the stomach or duodenum. Pancreatic resection resulted in permanent haemostasis in those patients it was attempted to perform, whereas ligation of the bleeding site failed in three out of four patients. One angiographic embolisation resulted in a good primary result but after 77 days the patient was operated on for recurrent bleeding. There was no hospital mortality, but altogether five patients were reoperated on for recurrent haemorrhage and six patients had other postoperative complications. Haemorrhage from pancreatic pseudocyst must be suspected in patients with anamnestic alcohol misuse and major gastrointestinal bleeding. Aggressive diagnostic evaluation, experience in pancreatic surgery, and operative strategies consisting of either resection or extracystic ligation are mandatory in the treatment of this acute condition.

  14. Update on the Surgical Trial in Lobar Intracerebral Haemorrhage (STICH II): statistical analysis plan

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Previous studies had suggested that the outcome for patients with spontaneous lobar intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) and no intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH) might be improved with early evacuation of the haematoma. The Surgical Trial in Lobar Intracerebral Haemorrhage (STICH II) set out to establish whether a policy of earlier surgical evacuation of the haematoma in selected patients with spontaneous lobar ICH would improve outcome compared to a policy of initial conservative treatment. It is an international, multi-centre, prospective randomised parallel group trial of early surgery in patients with spontaneous lobar ICH. Outcome is measured at six months via a postal questionnaire. Results Recruitment to the study began on 27 November 2006 and closed on 15 August 2012 by which time 601 patients had been recruited. The protocol was published in Trials (http://www.trialsjournal.com/content/12/1/124/). This update presents the analysis plan for the study without reference to the unblinded data. The trial data will not be unblinded until after follow-up is completed in early 2013. The main trial results will be presented in spring 2013 with the aim to publish in a peer-reviewed journal at the same time. Conclusion The data from the trial will provide evidence on the benefits and risks of early surgery in patients with lobar ICH. Trial registration ISRCTN: ISRCTN22153967 PMID:23171588

  15. Whole genome sequence of a goose haemorrhagic polyomavirus detected in Hungary.

    PubMed

    Fehér, Enikő; Lengyel, György; Dán, Adám; Farkas, Szilvia L; Bányai, Krisztián

    2014-06-01

    Goose haemorrhagic polyomavirus (GHPV) provoke haemorrhagic nephritis and enteritis of domestic geese. Outbreaks were detected in European countries and caused economic losses for goose keepers. Domestic ducks may be infected with GHPV without any signs typical for geese. The genomic organisation of some isolates was described but the gene functions and the pathomechanisms of the virus was not precisely defined. Here we describe the genome sequence and structure of GHPV of a goose from a Hungarian goose flock showing characteristics of the haemorrhagic nephritis and enteritis. The GHPV genome investigated in this study was 5252 bp long and was very similar (99% nucleotide identity) to sequences deposited in the GenBank. All the whole GHPV genomes possess the same ORFs in length, including the VP1, VP2, VP3, ORF-X, t and T tumour antigens. Amino acid changes are detected mainly in the putative ORF-X region. Data about the GHPV genome imply a conserved genomic structure among isolates from different countries. Genomic and epidemiological studies may help vaccine development efforts and identify potential heterologous reservoirs of GHPV.

  16. Transferrin receptor 1 is a cellular receptor for New World haemorrhagic fever arenaviruses.

    PubMed

    Radoshitzky, Sheli R; Abraham, Jonathan; Spiropoulou, Christina F; Kuhn, Jens H; Nguyen, Dan; Li, Wenhui; Nagel, Jane; Schmidt, Paul J; Nunberg, Jack H; Andrews, Nancy C; Farzan, Michael; Choe, Hyeryun

    2007-03-01

    At least five arenaviruses cause viral haemorrhagic fevers in humans. Lassa virus, an Old World arenavirus, uses the cellular receptor alpha-dystroglycan to infect cells. Machupo, Guanarito, Junin and Sabia viruses are New World haemorrhagic fever viruses that do not use alpha-dystroglycan. Here we show a specific, high-affinity association between transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1) and the entry glycoprotein (GP) of Machupo virus. Expression of human TfR1, but not human transferrin receptor 2, in hamster cell lines markedly enhanced the infection of viruses pseudotyped with the GP of Machupo, Guanarito and Junin viruses, but not with those of Lassa or lymphocytic choriomeningitis viruses. An anti-TfR1 antibody efficiently inhibited the replication of Machupo, Guanarito, Junin and Sabia viruses, but not that of Lassa virus. Iron depletion of culture medium enhanced, and iron supplementation decreased, the efficiency of infection by Junin and Machupo but not Lassa pseudoviruses. These data indicate that TfR1 is a cellular receptor for New World haemorrhagic fever arenaviruses.

  17. How Is Cardiogenic Shock Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Cardiogenic Shock Treated? Cardiogenic shock is life threatening and requires emergency medical treatment. ... arrive. The first goal of emergency treatment for cardiogenic shock is to improve the flow of blood and ...

  18. Shock Demagnetization of Pyrrhotite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Louzada, K. L.; Stewart, S. T.; Weiss, b. P.

    2005-01-01

    Maps of the remanent magnetic field of Mars show demagnetized zones within and around giant impact basins. It is likely that vast regions of the Martian crust were demagnetized due to a shock-induced phase change or magnetic transition of magnetic minerals in the crust. This hypothesis is supported by the fact that around the Hellas and Argyre basins, the edges of the unmagnetized zones roughly correspond with peak shock pressure contour lines of a few GPa. Although pyrrhotite is not a major carrier of magnetization in the Earth s crust, it is a common phase in Martian meteorites and may be an important carrier in the Martian crust. Understanding the effects of shock waves on magnetic minerals is critical for determining the origin of the demagnetized zones in impact basins and possibly for identifying the major magnetic carrier phases. Here we present the results of the first controlled shock demagnetization measurements on pyrrhotite. Previous experiments: Shock demagnetization

  19. Fatal cardiopulmonary complications in children treated with ventriculoatrial shunts.

    PubMed

    Lundar, T; Langmoen, I A; Hovind, K H

    1991-08-01

    During the years from 1965 to 1986, 716 children underwent a total of 2065 shunt procedures in our department. Of these, 1298 were ventriculoatrial (VA). Until 1979, Pudenz VA shunts were almost exclusively used as the primary procedure as well as in revisions. Since 1980, mini-Holter VA shunts have been implanted as a second choice, usually in cases with repeated distal failure in ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunts. Observation time for children with VA shunts is therefore from 10 to 23 years for the great majority. The cumulative death rate for all patients is 24% (175/716), 9% (64/716) being tumor patients who eventually died as a result of their neoplasm. Most of the other deaths were caused by shunt infection or occurred in a group of children where shunts had been implanted for palliative reasons and where follow-up was only sporadic. Among the 450 children with VA shunts, 15 fatal complications occurred that were directly related to the atrial catheter, resulting in an accumulated incidence of 3% of such serious side effects from VA shunting. Three of these 15 fatal cases presented with nonspecific signs of cardiopulmonary failure following 10-21 years' shunting, and they died from irreversible pulmonary hypertension within a few months. A fourth case of late cor pulmonale has done unexpectedly well and has improved considerably while receiving anticoagulant therapy for over a period of 3 years.

  20. A baboon model for hematologic studies of cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Hiramatsu, Y; Gikakis, N; Gorman, J H; Khan, M M; Hack, C E; Velthuis, H T; Sun, L; Marcinkiewicz, C; Rao, A K; Niewiarowski, S; Colman, R W; Edmunds, L H; Anderson, H L

    1997-10-01

    Objective investigation of new inhibitors of blood protein or cellular systems that are activated during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) is impeded by the absence of a satisfactory animal model. Because most baboon hematologic proteins immunologically cross-react with those used for human assays, we developed a robust, reusable baboon model of CPB. Blood samples were obtained from adult baboons at six time intervals before, during, and after 60 minutes of partial CPB at 37 degrees C with peripheral cannulas. Both membrane (n = 7) and bubble oxygenators (n = 7) were investigated. We measured platelet and white blood cell counts; platelet response to adenosine diphosphate and release of beta-thromboglobulin; fibrinopeptide A, prothrombin fragment F1.2, thrombin-antithrombin complex, D-dimer, and plasmin-antiplasmin complex; activated complement (C3b/c and C4b/c); elastase-alpha1 proteinase inhibitor complex; and bleeding times. Adherent glycoprotein IIIa antigen in Triton X-100 washes of the perfusion circuit was also measured. Markers of baboon platelet, complement, and neutrophil activation and thrombosis significantly increased during CPB with bubble oxygenator systems but did not change appreciably in membrane oxygenator circuits. Markers of fibrinolysis, D-dimer, and plasmin-antiplasmin complex did not change with either oxygenator. The baboon model of CPB, when a bubble oxygenator is used, is a robust, reusable animal model for evaluating inhibitors of platelet, complement, and neutrophil activation and thrombosis during and after CPB.