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Sample records for haemorrhagic shock cardiopulmonary

  1. Anti-shock garment in postpartum haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Miller, Suellen; Martin, Hilarie B; Morris, Jessica L

    2008-12-01

    The non-pneumatic anti-shock garment (NASG) is a first-aid device that reverses hypovolaemic shock and decreases obstetric haemorrhage. It consists of articulated neoprene segments that close tightly with Velcro, shunting blood from the lower body to the core organs, elevating blood pressure and increasing preload and cardiac output. This chapter describes the controversial history of the predecessors of NASG, pneumatic anti-shock garments (PASGs), relates case studies of PASG for obstetric haemorrhage, compares pneumatic and non-pneumatic devices and posits why the NASG is more appropriate for low-resource settings. This chapter discusses the only evidence available about NASGs for obstetric haemorrhage - two pre-post pilot trials and three case series - and describes recently initiated randomized cluster trials in Africa. Instructions and an algorithm for ASGs in haemorrhage and shock management are included. Much remains unknown about the NASG, a promising intervention for obstetric haemorrhage management.

  2. Electrical shock survival after prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Maqsood; Shabbir, Khawar

    2013-07-01

    Electrical shock is typically an untoward exposure of human body to any source of electricity that causes a sufficient current to pass through the skin, muscles or hair causing undesirable effects ranging from simple burns to death. Ventricular fibrillation is believed to be the most common cause of death following electrical shock. The case under discussion is of a young man who survived following electrical shock after prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), multiple defibrillations and artificial ventilation due to poor respiratory effort. Early start of chest compressions played a vital role in successful CPR.

  3. Dengue haemorrhagic fever or dengue shock syndrome in children

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Dengue haemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome are major causes of hospital admission and mortality in children. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of supportive treatments for dengue haemorrhagic fever or dengue shock syndrome in children? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to March 2014 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found nine studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: adding blood component transfusion to standard intravenous fluids; adding corticosteroids or intravenous immunoglobulin to standard intravenous fluids; and crystalloids versus colloids. PMID:25860404

  4. Management of bleeding disorders in traumatic-haemorrhagic shock states with deep frozen fresh plasma.

    PubMed

    Hehne, H J; Nyman, D; Burri, H; Wolff, G

    1976-01-01

    Coagulation disorders in traumatic-haemorrhagic shock need not represent a simple coagulation problem. They may also occur as a complex of local and disseminated intravascular consumption, dilution, extravascular loss and depressed synthesis of coagulation factors. In the severely bleeding patient with a haemorrhagic diathesis heparin is contrainedicated because it does not normalize coagulability immediately. Therefore, it fails to stop haemorrhage and the shock becomes untreatable. Fresh frozen plasma, however, has proved to be suitable as a simultaneous substitution therapy for the coagulation disorder and the hypovolaemic shock. 25 patients suffering from severe traumatic-hemorrhagic shock associated with coagulation disorders and haemorrhagic diathesis were successfully treated with fresh frozen plasma, after conventional shock therapy had failed over a period of 2 hours. The success was documented clinically and by numerous laboratory tests. Thrombocytopenia has only a secondary responsibility for the haemorrhagic state.

  5. Successful use of Alteplase during cardiopulmonary resuscitation following massive PE in a patient presenting with ischaemic stroke and haemorrhagic transformation

    PubMed Central

    Middleton, Robert; Neumann, Juliane; Ward, Simon Michael

    2014-01-01

    The management of patients with acute stroke regarding treatment of thromboembolism is supported by a limited evidence base. We present the case of a 55-year-old female patient who initially presented with an ischaemic cerebral infarct with haemorrhagic transformation. Her clinical recovery was complicated by cardiac arrest secondary to massive pulmonary embolism. This was successfully treated with cardiopulmonary resuscitation and thrombolysis using Alteplase, which led to a full recovery to the pre-arrest state with no evidence of haemorrhagic complication. The patient was successfully discharged to a specialist centre for on-going stroke rehabilitation with no additional neurological impact. Despite the limited evidence base we believe this case highlights that thrombolysis can be used in select patients with haemorrhagic transformation of stroke and serious thromboembolic complications to achieve a positive outcome. PMID:25362185

  6. Survival without sequelae after prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation after electric shock.

    PubMed

    Motawea, Mohamad; Al-Kenany, Al-Sayed; Hosny, Mostafa; Aglan, Omar; Samy, Mohamad; Al-Abd, Mohamed

    2016-03-01

    "Electrical shock is the physiological reaction or injury caused by electric current passing through the human body. It occurs upon contact of a human body part with any source of electricity that causes a sufficient current through the skin, muscles, or hair causing undesirable effects ranging from simple burns to death." Ventricular fibrillation is believed to be the most common cause of death after electrical shock. "The ideal duration of cardiac resuscitation is unknown. Typically prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation is associated with poor neurologic outcomes and reduced long term survival. No consensus statement has been made and traditionally efforts are usually terminated after 15-30 minutes." The case under discussion seems worthy of the somewhat detailed description given. It is for a young man who survived after 65 minutes after electrical shock (ES) after prolonged high-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), multiple defibrillations, and artificial ventilation without any sequelae. Early start of adequate chest compressions and close adherence to advanced cardiac life support protocols played a vital role in successful CPR.

  7. Brain damage complicating septic shock: acute haemorrhagic leucoencephalitis as a complication of the generalised Shwartzman reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Graham, D I; Behan, P O; More, I A

    1979-01-01

    The neuropathological findings in six patients who developed neurological signs after the onset of "septic shock" caused by Gram-negative septicaemia are described. The changes in the brains were characteristic of acute haemorrhagic leucoencephalitis, and there was evidence, particularly in the kidneys, of disseminated intravascular coagulation with tubular necrosis and, in some, appearances indistinguishable from membrano-proliferative glomerulonephritis. It is agreed that acute haemorrhagic leucoencephalitis is another manifestation of a generalised Shwartzman reaction, and it is suggested that activation of complement is the final common pathway that produces tissue damage in the brain and kidney. Images PMID:762582

  8. Comparative Evaluation of Crystalloid Resuscitation Rate in a Human Model of Compensated Haemorrhagic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Loretta; Lau, Lawrence; Churilov, Leonid; Riedel, Bernhard; McNicol, Larry; Hahn, Robert G.; Weinberg, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: The most effective rate of fluid resuscitation in haemorrhagic shock is unknown. Methods: We performed a randomized crossover pilot study in a healthy volunteer model of compensated haemorrhagic shock. Following venesection of 15 mL/kg of blood, participants were randomized to 20 mL/kg of crystalloid over 10 min (FAST treatment) or 30 min (SLOW treatment). The primary end point was oxygen delivery (DO2). Secondary end points included pressure and flow-based haemodynamic variables, blood volume expansion, and clinical biochemistry. Results: Nine normotensive healthy adult volunteers participated. No significant differences were observed in DO2 and biochemical variables between the SLOW and FAST groups. Blood volume was reduced by 16% following venesection, with a corresponding 5% reduction in cardiac index (CI) (P < 0.001). Immediately following resuscitation the increase in blood volume corresponded to 54% of the infused volume under FAST treatment and 69% of the infused volume under SLOW treatment (P = 0.03). This blood volume expansion attenuated with time to 24% and 25% of the infused volume 30 min postinfusion. During fluid resuscitation, blood pressure was higher under FAST treatment. However, CI paradoxically decreased in most participants during the resuscitation phase; a finding not observed under SLOW treatment. Conclusion: FAST or SLOW fluid resuscitation had no significant impact on DO2 between treatment groups. In both groups, changes in CI and blood pressure did not reflect the magnitude of intravascular blood volume deficit. Crystalloid resuscitation expanded intravascular blood volume by approximately 25%. PMID:26974423

  9. Role of neuronal and vascular Ca(2+)-channels in the ACTH-induced reversal of haemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed Central

    Guarini, S.; Bazzani, C.; Bertolini, A.

    1993-01-01

    1. In a rat model of volume-controlled haemorrhagic shock causing the death of all control (saline-treated) animals within 30 min, the intravenous (i.v.) bolus injection of ACTH-(1-24) at a dose of 160 micrograms kg-1 produced an impressive and sustained restoration of arterial pressure, pulse pressure and respiratory function, with 100% survival at the end of the observation period (2 h). 2. Both intracerebroventricular (i.c.v., 0.015-0.06 microgram kg-1) and i.v. (5 micrograms kg-1) pretreatment with the N-calcium channel blocker, omega-conotoxin GVIA, and i.v. (but not i.c.v.) pretreatment with the L-calcium channel blocker, nicardipine (125-500 micrograms kg-1) dose-dependently prevented the ACTH-induced shock reversal. 3. These results further indicate that the effect of ACTH in haemorrhagic shock may involve a neuronal link and the eventual restoration of vascular tone mediated by N- and L-type calcium channels, respectively. PMID:8395293

  10. Cardiopulmonary Arrest and Resuscitation in Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock: A Research Model.

    PubMed

    Chalkias, Athanasios; Spyropoulos, Vaios; Koutsovasilis, Anastasios; Papalois, Apostolos; Kouskouni, Evaggelia; Xanthos, Theodoros

    2015-03-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock is challenging and usually unsuccessful. The aim of the present study is to describe our swine model of cardiac arrest and resuscitation in severe sepsis and septic shock. In this prospective randomized animal study, 10 healthy female Landrace-Large White pigs with an average weight of 20 ± 1 kg (aged 19 - 21 weeks) were the study subjects. Septicemia was induced by an intravenous infusion of a bolus of 20-mL bacterial suspension in 2 min, followed by a continuous infusion during the rest of the experiment. After septic shock was confirmed, the animals were left untreated until cardiac arrest occurred. All animals developed pulseless electrical activity between the fifth and sixth hours of septicemia, whereas five (50%) of 10 animals were successfully resuscitated. Coronary perfusion pressure was statistically significantly different between surviving and nonsurviving animals. We found a statistically significant correlation between mean arterial pressure and unsuccessful resuscitation (P = 0.046), whereas there was no difference in end-tidal carbon dioxide (23.05 ± 1.73 vs. 23.56 ± 1.70; P = 0.735) between animals with return of spontaneous circulation and nonsurviving animals. During the 45-min postresuscitation monitoring, we noted a significant decrease in hemodynamic parameters, although oxygenation indices and lactate clearance were constantly increased (P = 0.001). This successful basic swine model was for the first time developed and may prove extremely useful in future studies on the periarrest period in severe sepsis and septic shock.

  11. Development of an Animal Model for Burn-Blast Combined Injury and Cardiopulmonary System Changes in the Early Shock Stage.

    PubMed

    Hu, Quan; Chai, Jiake; Hu, Sen; Fan, Jun; Wang, Hong-Wei; Ma, Li; Duan, Hong-Jie; Liu, Lingying; Yang, Hongming; Li, Bai-Ling; Wang, Yi-He

    2015-12-01

    The purposes of this study were to establish an animal model for burn-blast combined injury research and elaborate cardiopulmonary system changes in the early shock stage. In this study, royal demolition explosive or RDX (hexagon, ring trimethylene nitramine) was used as an explosive source, and the injury conditions of the canine test subjects at various distances to the explosion (30, 50, and 70 cm) were observed by gross anatomy and pathology to determine a larger animal model of moderate blast injury. The canines were then subjected to a 35 % total body surface area (TBSA) full-thickness flame injury using napalm, which completed the development of a burn-blast combined injury model. Based on this model, the hemodynamic changes and arterial blood gas analysis after the burn-blast combined injury were measured to identify the cardiopulmonary system characteristics. In this research, RDX explosion and flame injury were used to develop a severe burn-blast injury animal model that was stable, close to reality, and easily controllable. The hemodynamic and arterial blood gas changes in the canine subjects after burn-blast injury changed distinctly from the burn and blast injuries. Blood pressure and cardiac output fluctuated, and the preload was significantly reduced, whereas the afterload significantly increased. Meanwhile, the oxygen saturation (SO2) decreased markedly with carbon dioxide partial pressure (PCO2), and lactic acid (Lac) rose, and oxygen partial pressure (PO2) reduced. These changes suggested that immediate clinical treatment is important during burn-blast injury both to stabilize cardiac function and supply blood volume and to reduce the vascular permeability, thereby preventing acute pneumonedema or other complications.

  12. Haemorrhagic smallpox

    PubMed Central

    McKenzie, P. J.; Githens, J. H.; Harwood, M. E.; Roberts, J. F.; Rao, A. R.; Kempe, C. H.

    1965-01-01

    A total of 60 patients in Madras with haemorrhagic and non-haemorrhagic clinical forms of smallpox were investigated by a variety of bleeding and coagulation studies in an attempt to reveal specific haematological defects that might account for the haemorrhagic diathesis in certain cases of smallpox. The non-haemorrhagic smallpox patients had no coagulation abnormalities, although some had thrombocytopenia. The early haemorrhagic patients showed a deficiency of platelets, prothrombin and accelerator globulin, and increased circulating antithrombin. Patients with the late form of haemorrhagic smallpox showed significant thrombocytopenia and less severe deficiencies of the same coagulation factors; a few also had increased antithrombin. The authors suggest that therapy with fresh, frozen or lyophilized plasma should be tried; fresh, platelet-rich plasma should offer the greatest benefit. PMID:5295401

  13. Safety and feasibility of sublingual microcirculation assessment in the emergency department for civilian and military patients with traumatic haemorrhagic shock: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Naumann, David N; Mellis, Clare; Smith, Iain M; Mamuza, Jasna; Skene, Imogen; Harris, Tim; Midwinter, Mark J; Hutchings, Sam D

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Sublingual microcirculatory monitoring for traumatic haemorrhagic shock (THS) may predict clinical outcomes better than traditional blood pressure and cardiac output, but is not usually performed until the patient reaches the intensive care unit (ICU), missing earlier data of potential importance. This pilot study assessed for the first time the feasibility and safety of sublingual video-microscopy for THS in the emergency department (ED), and whether it yields useable data for analysis. Setting A safety and feasibility assessment was undertaken as part of the prospective observational MICROSHOCK study; sublingual video-microscopy was performed at the UK-led Role 3 medical facility at Camp Bastion, Afghanistan, and in the ED in 3 UK Major Trauma Centres. Participants There were 15 casualties (2 military, 13 civilian) who presented with traumatic haemorrhagic shock with a median injury severity score of 26. The median age was 41; the majority (n=12) were male. The most common injury mechanism was road traffic accident. Primary and secondary outcome measures Safety and feasibility were the primary outcomes, as measured by lack of adverse events or clinical interruptions, and successful acquisition and storage of data. The secondary outcome was the quality of acquired video clips according to validated criteria, in order to determine whether useful data could be obtained in this emergency context. Results Video-microscopy was successfully performed and stored for analysis for all patients, yielding 161 video clips. There were no adverse events or episodes where clinical management was affected or interrupted. There were 104 (64.6%) video clips from 14 patients of sufficient quality for analysis. Conclusions Early sublingual microcirculatory monitoring in the ED for patients with THS is safe and feasible, even in a deployed military setting, and yields videos of satisfactory quality in a high proportion of cases. Further investigations of early

  14. Ebola haemorrhagic fever

    PubMed Central

    Feldmann, Heinz; Geisbert, Thomas W

    2012-01-01

    Ebola viruses are the causative agents of a severe form of viral haemorrhagic fever in man, designated Ebola haemorrhagic fever, and are endemic in regions of central Africa. The exception is the species Reston Ebola virus, which has not been associated with human disease and is found in the Philippines. Ebola virus constitutes an important local public health threat in Africa, with a worldwide effect through imported infections and through the fear of misuse for biological terrorism. Ebola virus is thought to also have a detrimental effect on the great ape population in Africa. Case-fatality rates of the African species in man are as high as 90%, with no prophylaxis or treatment available. Ebola virus infections are characterised by immune suppression and a systemic inflammatory response that causes impairment of the vascular, coagulation, and immune systems, leading to multiorgan failure and shock, and thus, in some ways, resembling septic shock. PMID:21084112

  15. Gastroduodenal haemorrhage.

    PubMed Central

    Grime, R. T.

    1979-01-01

    Before the First World War the treatment of gastroduodenal haemorrhage was predominantly medical, though the results, especially with recurrent haemorrhage, were far less satisfactory than was claimed by some physicians. It was not until Finsterer, in 1939, demonstrated the virtues of early operation that surgery began to take its place in the treatment of this condition, mainly by gastric resection. Results remained poor, however, until 1958 with the introduction of conservative treatment by vagotomy, pyloroplasty, and under-running of the bleeding point. Personal experience, both with partial gastrectomy in the 1950s and 1960s and with mainly conservative treatment between 1967 and 1970, is described and the results presented. PMID:373573

  16. Observational study of the effects of traumatic injury, haemorrhagic shock and resuscitation on the microcirculation: a protocol for the MICROSHOCK study

    PubMed Central

    Hutchings, Sam; Naumann, David N; Harris, Tim; Wendon, Julia; Midwinter, Mark J

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The microcirculation is the physiological site of oxygen and substrate exchange. Its effectiveness during circulatory shock is vital for the perfusion of tissues, and has a bearing on subsequent organ function and prognosis. Microcirculatory dysfunction following traumatic haemorrhagic shock (THS) has been understudied compared with other pathologies such as sepsis. The aim of the MICROSHOCK study is to investigate changes seen in the microcirculation of patients following THS, and to assess its response to resuscitation. A greater understanding of the behaviour and mechanisms of microcirculatory dysfunction in this context may direct future avenues of goal-directed resuscitation for these patients. Methods and analysis This multicentre prospective longitudinal observational study includes patients who present as an emergency with THS. Microcirculatory parameters are recorded using sublingual incident dark field microscopy alongside measurements of global flow (oesophageal Doppler and transthoracic echocardiography). Patients are enrolled into the study as soon as feasible after they arrive in hospital, and then at subsequent daily time points. Blood samples are taken for investigation into the mechanisms of microcirculatory dysfunction. Sequential Organ Failure Assessment scores will be analysed with microcirculatory parameters to determine whether they correlate with greater fidelity than more conventional, global circulatory parameters. Ethics and dissemination Research Ethics Committee approval has been granted for this study (Reference: 14/YH/0078). Owing to the nature of THS, capacity for informed consent will be absent on patient enrolment. This will be addressed according to the Mental Health Capacity Act 2005. The physician in charge of the patient's care (nominated consultee) may consent on behalf of the patient. Consent will also be sought from a personal consultee (close relative or friend). After capacity is regained, the participant will

  17. Antepartum Haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, Rosalba; Cacciatore, Alessandra; Cignini, Pietro; Vigna, Roberto; Romano, Mattea

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Antepartum haemorrhage (APH) defined as bleeding from the genital tract in the second half of pregnancy, remains a major cause of perinatal mortality and maternal morbidity in the developed world. Results: In approximately half of all women presenting with APH, a diagnosis of placental abruption or placenta praevia will be made; no firm diagnosis will be made in the other half even after investigations. Conclusion: In cases presenting with APH, the evaluation consists of history, clinical signs and symptoms and once the mother is stabilized, a speculum examination and an ultrasound scan. A revision of the literature was mode only larger prospective tials or case-control study were taken into account. PMID:22439054

  18. Striatocapsular haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Chung, C S; Caplan, L R; Yamamoto, Y; Chang, H M; Lee, S J; Song, H J; Lee, H S; Shin, H K; Yoo, K M

    2000-09-01

    Haemorrhages in the striatocapsular area, or striatocapsular haemorrhages (SCHs), have been regarded as a single entity, although the area is composed of several functionally discrete structures that receive blood supply from different arteries. We analysed the morphological and clinical presentations of 215 cases of SCHs according to a new classification method we have designed on the basis of arterial territories. SCHs were divided into six types: (i) anterior type (Heubner's artery); (ii) middle type (medial lenticulostriate artery); (iii) posteromedial type (anterior choroidal artery); (iv) posterolateral type (posteromedial branches of lateral lenticulostriate artery); (v) lateral type (most lateral branches of lateral lenticulostriate artery); and (vi) massive type. The anterior type (11%) formed small caudate haematomas, always ruptured into the lateral ventricle, causing severe headache, and mild contralateral hemiparesis developed occasionally. The outcome was excellent. The middle type (7%) involved the globus pallidus and medial putamen, frequently causing contralateral hemiparesis and transient conjugate eye deviation to the lesion side. About 50% of the patients recovered to normal. The posteromedial type (4%) formed very small haematomas in the posterior limb of the internal capsule and presented with mild dysarthria, contralateral hemiparesis and sensory deficit, with excellent outcome in general. The posterolateral type (33%) affected the posterior half of the putamen and posterior limb of the internal capsule and presented with impaired consciousness and contralateral hemiparesis with either language dysfunction or contralateral neglect. The outcome was fair to poor but there were no deaths. The lateral type (21%) formed large elliptical haematomas between the putamen and insular cortex. Contralateral hemiparesis with language dysfunction or contralateral neglect developed frequently but resolved over several weeks. The clinical outcome was

  19. Preventing deaths due to haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Hofmeyr, G Justus; Qureshi, Zahida

    2016-10-01

    Prevention of deaths from obstetric haemorrhage requires effective health systems including family planning, commodities, personnel, infrastructure and ultimately universal access to comprehensive obstetric care for women giving birth. The main causes of death associated with antepartum haemorrhage are placental abruption, placenta praevia and uterine rupture. Preventive measures include preconceptual folate supplementation, management of hypertensive disorders, early diagnosis of placenta praevia and use of uterine stimulants cautiously, particularly misoprostol. Preventive measures for post-partum haemorrhage include routine active management of the third stage of labour. Treatment involves a cascade of increasingly invasive interventions in rapid sequence until the bleeding is stopped. These interventions include fluid resuscitation, removal of the placenta, bimanual uterine compression, uterotonics, tranexamic acid, suturing of lower genital tract injury, blood product replacement, balloon tamponade, laparotomy, stepwise uterine devascularization, uterine compression sutures and hysterectomy. Emergency temporizing measures include application of the non-pneumatic anti-shock garment, and at laparotomy, aortic compression and uterine tourniquet application. The effectiveness of treatment methods and the optimal dosage of misoprostol are research priorities. Interesting new approaches include transvaginal uterine artery clamping and suction uterine tamponade.

  20. Ebolavirus and Haemorrhagic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Matua, Gerald A.; Van der Wal, Dirk M.; Locsin, Rozzano C.

    2015-01-01

    The Ebola virus is a highly virulent, single-stranded ribonucleic acid virus which affects both humans and apes and has fast become one of the world’s most feared pathogens. The virus induces acute fever and death, with haemorrhagic syndrome occurring in up to 90% of patients. The known species within the genus Ebolavirus are Bundibugyo, Sudan, Zaïre, Reston and Taï Forest. Although endemic in Africa, Ebola has caused worldwide anxiety due to media hype and concerns about its international spread, including through bioterrorism. The high fatality rate is attributed to unavailability of a standard treatment regimen or vaccine. The disease is frightening since it is characterised by rapid immune suppression and systemic inflammatory response, causing multi-organ and system failure, shock and often death. Currently, disease management is largely supportive, with containment efforts geared towards mitigating the spread of the virus. This review describes the classification, morphology, infective process, natural ecology, transmission, epidemic patterns, diagnosis, clinical features and immunology of Ebola, including management and epidemic containment strategies. PMID:26052448

  1. Acute cardiac injury after subarachnoid haemorrhage: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Marcì, Marcello; Savatteri, Paolino; Pizzuto, Antonino; Giammona, Giuseppe; Renda, Baldassare; Lojacono, Francesca; Sanfilippo, Nicola

    2009-12-09

    It is well known that cardiopulmonary complications are often associated to subarachnoid haemorrhage. For appropriate therapeutic managing it is very important to distinguish acute coronary syndrome from neurogenic myocardial injury, which is a reversible condition. Furthermore, because the hearts of brain dead patients may be utilized for therapeutic purpose, it has became of importance to rule out erroneous diagnosis of cardiac ischemia in order to avoid rejection of hearts potential suitable for transplantation.We present a report of two female patients affected by cardiac complications caused by aneurismal subarachnoid haemorrhage admitted to our neurosurgical intensive care department.

  2. [Volume replenishment in haemorrhage: caution advised].

    PubMed

    Kooter, Albertus J; Zweegman, Sonja; Smulders, Yvo M

    2011-01-01

    Acute haemorrhage is a frequent problem in medicine. Patients with acute bleeding may present with signs of hypotension and reduced organ perfusion. The physician's reflex action is often to treat such patients with intravenous volume replenishment using colloid or cristalloid liquids. Intravenous volume replenishment has, however, a downside: it increases the tendency to bleed and therefore can increase blood loss. Previous clinical observations and experimental animal and human studies addressing volume replenishment in haemorrhagic shock have repeatedly shown that accepting hypotension favourably affects prognosis. However, relevant practice guidelines, such as for gastrointestinal bleeding, usually advise liberal intravenous volume replenishment if hypotension is present. In this article we advocate caution when considering intravenous blood volume adjustment in haemorrhage.

  3. Subsequent bilateral thalamic haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Jesus; Scherle, Claudio; Machado, Calixto

    2009-01-01

    Simultaneous or subsequent bilateral thalamic haemorrhage is rare, and most reported cases are from Asian countries. An 80-year-old white Cuban man, with a history of arterial hypertension, suffered sudden onset of right hemiparesis. Computed tomography (CT) scan showed a left posteromedial thalamic haemorrhage. Two days later his condition suddenly deteriorated: blood pressure was 220/105 mm Hg, he was stuporous and tetraplegic, respiration was ataxic, and his gaze was fixed and deviated downward and inward. CT scan showed haemorrhages in both thalami, extending to the ventricles. 32 h later the patient died. There are few previous publications of simultaneous or subsequent bilateral thalamic haemorrhages and this is the first report involving a Hispanic patient. Prognosis in patients with bilateral thalamic haemorrhage is poor, and the mechanism underlying the development of subsequent and symmetrical bleeding is not clear. PMID:21709830

  4. Venezuelan haemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Salas, R; de Manzione, N; Tesh, R B; Rico-Hesse, R; Shope, R E; Betancourt, A; Godoy, O; Bruzual, R; Pacheco, M E; Ramos, B

    1991-10-26

    An outbreak of severe haemorrhagic illness began in the municipality of Guanarito, Portuguesa State, Venezuela, in September, 1989. Subsequent detailed study of 15 cases confirmed the presence of a new viral disease, designated Venezuelan haemorrhagic fever. Characteristic features are fever, toxicity, headache, arthralgia, diarrhoea, conjunctivitis, pharyngitis, leucopenia, thrombocytopenia, and haemorrhagic manifestations. Other features include facial oedema, cervical lymphadenopathy, nausea/vomiting, cough, chest or abdominal pain, and convulsions. The patients ranged in age from 6 to 54 years; all were residents of rural areas in central Venezuela, and 9 died. Infection with Guanarito virus, a newly recognised arenavirus, was shown by direct culture or by serological confirmation in all cases. Epidemiological studies suggest that the disease is endemic in some rural areas of central Venezuela and that it is rodent-borne. Venezuelan haemorrhagic fever has many similarities to Lassa fever and to the arenavirus haemorrhagic fevers that occur in Argentina and Bolivia.

  5. Haemorrhagic Fevers, Viral

    MedlinePlus

    ... fever, dengue, Omsk haemorrhagic fever, Kyasanur forest disease). Ebola virus disease outbreak in West Africa in 2014-2015 All information on Ebola virus disease Ebola features map Dashboard - Progress update ...

  6. The need to immobilise the cervical spine during cardiopulmonary resuscitation and electric shock administration in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Desroziers, Milene; Mole, Sophie; Jost, Daniel; Tourtier, Jean-Pierre

    2016-06-13

    In cases of out-of hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), falling to the ground can cause brain and neck trauma to the patient. We present a case of a man in his mid-60s who suffered from an OHCA resulting in a violent collapse. The patient received immediate cardiopulmonary resuscitation, but his spine was immobilised only after a large frontal haematoma was found. The resuscitation efforts resulted in return of spontaneous circulation and discharge from hospital. After this, doctors performed angioplasty, followed by a cardiopulmonary bypass. Later, CT scan examination reported a displaced and unstable fracture of the 6th vertebra without bone marrow involvement. The patient underwent a second operation. 40 days later, he was able to return home without sequela. This case shows the importance of analysing the circumstances of a fall, considering the possibility of two concomitant diagnoses and prioritising investigations and treatment.

  7. Tonsillectomy: haemorrhaging ideas.

    PubMed

    McClelland, L; Jones, N S

    2005-10-01

    Tonsil surgery has been described for over 3000 years. Haemorrhage following tonsillectomy remains the most serious complication of surgery. Over recent years several audits have been gathering data on current trends in tonsil surgery and clinical outcomes throughout England, Scotland and Northern Ireland. The results support a return to traditional dissection with ties to reduce the risk of post-operative haemorrhage. We describe the changes that have occurred to improve efficacy and safety during the evolution of the modern tonsillectomy.

  8. Shock

    MedlinePlus

    ... Many organs can be damaged as a result. Shock requires immediate treatment and can get worse very rapidly. As many 1 in 5 people who suffer shock will die from it. Considerations The main types ...

  9. Haemorrhagic necrosis of small intestine and acute pancreatitis following open-heart surgery

    PubMed Central

    Horton, E. H.; Murthy, S. K.; Seal, R. M. E.

    1968-01-01

    Five cases of haemorrhagic necrosis of the small intestine occurring after valve replacement under cardiopulmonary bypass are described. In one case, in addition to the above, there was an unusual complication, namely acute pancreatitis. The possible causes are discussed. The importance of hypotension before, during, or after bypass, or in the post-operative phase, is stressed. Images PMID:5664708

  10. Pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Orlowski, J P

    1983-04-01

    Pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation refers to those measures used to restore ventilation and circulation in children. This article defines how cardiopulmonary resuscitation in infants, children, and adolescents differs from cardiopulmonary resuscitation in adults and delineates the drugs and dosages to be used in the resuscitation of pediatric patients.

  11. Management of postpartum haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Bonnet, Marie Pierre; Benhamou, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Postpartum Haemorrhage (PPH) is a major cause of maternal morbidity and mortality. Treatment of acquired coagulopathy observed in severe PPH is an important part of PPH management, but is mainly based on literature in trauma patients, and data thus should be interpreted with caution. This review describes recent advances in transfusion strategy and in the use of tranexamic acid and fibrinogen concentrates in women with PPH. PMID:27408694

  12. Delta- and kappa-opioid receptors in the caudal midline medulla mediate haemorrhage-evoked hypotension.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Luke A; Keay, Kevin A; Bandler, Richard

    2002-04-16

    In mammals blood loss can trigger, shock, an abrupt, life-threatening hypotension and bradycardia. In the halothane-anaesthetised rat this response is blocked by inactivation of a discrete, vasodepressor area in the caudal midline medulla (CMM). Haemorrhagic shock is blocked also by systemic or ventricular injections of the opioid antagonist, naloxone. This study investigated, in the halothane anaesthetised rat, the contribution of delta-, kappa- and mu-opioid receptors in the CMM vasodepressor region to haemorrhage-evoked shock (i.e. hypotension and bradycardia) and its recovery. It was found that microinjections into the CMM of the delta-opioid receptor antagonist, naltrindole delayed and attenuated the hypotension and bradycardia evoked by haemorrhage, but did not promote recompensation. In contrast, CMM microinjections of the kappa-opioid receptor antagonist, nor-binaltorphamine, although it did not alter haemorrhage-evoked hypotension and bradycardia, did lead to a rapid restoration of AP, but not HR. CMM microinjections of the mu-opioid receptor antagonist, CTAP had no effect on haemorrhage-evoked shock or recompensation. These data indicate that delta- and kappa- (but not mu-) opioid receptor-mediated events within the CMM contribute to the hypotension and bradycardia evoked by haemorrhage and the effectiveness of naloxone in reversing shock.

  13. Shock.

    PubMed

    Wacker, David A; Winters, Michael E

    2014-11-01

    Critically ill patients with undifferentiated shock are complex and challenging cases in the ED. A systematic approach to assessment and management is essential to prevent unnecessary morbidity and mortality. The simplified, systematic approach described in this article focuses on determining the presence of problems with cardiac function (the pump), intravascular volume (the tank), or systemic vascular resistance (the pipes). With this approach, the emergency physician can detect life-threatening conditions and implement time-sensitive therapy.

  14. Methamphetamine-related brainstem haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Zelia K; Bennett, Iwan E; Chan, Patrick; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey V

    2016-10-01

    We report the case of an otherwise healthy 29-year-old woman who presented with a brainstem haemorrhage following intravenous methamphetamine use. Extensive investigation did not reveal an underlying pathology, and the development of symptoms was temporally related to methamphetamine injection. Although intracerebral haemorrhage secondary to methamphetamine use is well documented, this report describes a haemorrhage within the brainstem which is a rare location. While animal studies have demonstrated the potential of methamphetamines to produce brainstem haemorrhages, there has only been one previous report describing a haemorrhage in this location due to amphetamine use in humans. We conclude with a brief discussion of the clinical features and aetiology of methamphetamine-related stroke.

  15. Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Yam, Nicholson; McMullan, David Michael

    2017-02-01

    Extracorporeal life support (ECLS) is used for patients in isolated or combined cardiopulmonary failures. The use of ECLS to rescue patients with cardiac arrest that is refractory to conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation has been shown to improve survival in many patient populations. Increasing recognition of the survival benefit associated with extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR) has led to increased use of ECPR during the past decade. This review provides an overview of ECPR utilization; population-based clinical outcomes, resource utilization and costs associated this advanced form of life support therapy.

  16. Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Yam, Nicholson

    2017-01-01

    Extracorporeal life support (ECLS) is used for patients in isolated or combined cardiopulmonary failures. The use of ECLS to rescue patients with cardiac arrest that is refractory to conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation has been shown to improve survival in many patient populations. Increasing recognition of the survival benefit associated with extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR) has led to increased use of ECPR during the past decade. This review provides an overview of ECPR utilization; population-based clinical outcomes, resource utilization and costs associated this advanced form of life support therapy. PMID:28275617

  17. Seizures Following Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Brouwer, Monique E.; McMeniman, William J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Seizures following cardiopulmonary bypass are an immediate and alarming indication that a neurologic event has occurred. A case report of a 67-year-old man undergoing aortic valve surgery who unexpectedly experiences seizures following cardiopulmonary bypass is outlined. Possible contributing factors including atheromatous disease in the aorta, low cerebral perfusion pressures, an open-chamber procedure, and the use of tranexamic acid are identified. PMID:27729707

  18. Haematology in dengue and dengue haemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Srichaikul, T; Nimmannitya, S

    2000-06-01

    Dengue fever (DF) and dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) are caused by the dengue virus. The major pathophysiological hallmark that distinguishes DHF from DF is plasma leakage as a result of increased vascular permeability. Following this leakage, hypovolaemic shock occurs as a consequence of a critical plasma volume loss. Constant haematological abnormalities occurring in DHF and frequently include bone marrow suppression, leucopenia and thrombocytopenia. An enhanced immune response of the host to a secondary DV infection is a feature of DHF and leads to many consequences. These are immune complex formation, complement activation, increased histamine release and a massive release of many cytokines into the circulation, leading to shock, vasculopathy, thrombopathy and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). The mechanisms underlying the bleeding in DHF are multiple. These are vasculopathy, thrombopathy and DIC. Thrombopathy consists of thrombocytopenia and platelet dysfunction. DIC is prominent in patients with shock. The most severe DIC and massive bleeding are the result of prolonged shock and cause a fatal outcome. The mechanisms of thrombopathy and DIC and the proper management of DHF are reviewed and discussed.

  19. Crimean-Congo Haemorrhagic Fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... vector. The Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus in animals and ticks The hosts of the CCHF virus ... be effective. Prevention and control Controlling CCHF in animals and ticks Ticks of the genus Hyalomma are ...

  20. Hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome successfully treated with high-volume hemofiltration

    PubMed Central

    Bugedo, Guillermo; Florez, Jorge; Ferres, Marcela; Roessler, Eric; Bruhn, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome has a high mortality rate, and early connection to extracorporeal membrane oxygenation has been suggested to improve outcomes. We report the case of a patient with demonstrated Hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome and refractory shock who fulfilled the criteria for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and responded successfully to high volume continuous hemofiltration. The implementation of high volume continuous hemofiltration along with protective ventilation reversed the shock within a few hours and may have prompted recovery. In patients with Hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome, a short course of high volume continuous hemofiltration may help differentiate patients who can be treated with conventional intensive care unit management from those who will require more complex therapies, such as extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. PMID:27410413

  1. Blood transfusion and the anaesthetist: management of massive haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, D; Wee, M; Clyburn, P; Walker, I; Brohi, K; Collins, P; Doughty, H; Isaac, J; Mahoney, PF; Shewry, L

    2010-01-01

    Hospitals must have a major haemorrhage protocol in place and this should include clinical, laboratory and logistic responses. Immediate control of obvious bleeding is of paramount importance (pressure, tourniquet, haemostatic dressings). The major haemorrhage protocol must be mobilised immediately when a massive haemorrhage situation is declared. A fibrinogen < 1 g.l−1 or a prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) of > 1.5 times normal represents established haemostatic failure and is predictive of microvascular bleeding. Early infusion of fresh frozen plasma (FFP; 15 ml.kg−1) should be used to prevent this occurring if a senior clinician anticipates a massive haemorrhage. Established coagulopathy will require more than 15 ml.kg−1 of FFP to correct. The most effective way to achieve fibrinogen replacement rapidly is by giving fibrinogen concentrate or cryoprecipitate if fibrinogen is unavailable. 1:1:1 red cell:FFP:platelet regimens, as used by the military, are reserved for the most severely traumatised patients. A minimum target platelet count of 75 × 109.l−1 is appropriate in this clinical situation. Group-specific blood can be issued without performing an antibody screen because patients will have minimal circulating antibodies. O negative blood should only be used if blood is needed immediately. In hospitals where the need to treat massive haemorrhage is frequent, the use of locally developed shock packs may be helpful. Standard venous thromboprophylaxis should be commenced as soon as possible after haemostasis has been secured as patients develop a prothrombotic state following massive haemorrhage. PMID:20963925

  2. Hypotensive but not normotensive haemorrhage increases tryptophan hydroxylase-2 mRNA in caudal midline medulla.

    PubMed

    Brown, Heidi J; Henderson, Luke A; Keay, Kevin A

    2006-05-08

    Severe blood loss triggers shock, a precipitous hypotension and bradycardia. The integrity of (i) neurons in the vasodepressor region of the caudal midline medulla and (ii) central 5-HT neurotransmission are critical for the expression of haemorrhagic shock. This study investigated whether progressive blood loss triggers altered synthesis of 5-HT in the vasodepressor region of the caudal midline medulla by measuring changes in relative expression levels of tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (TpH 2) mRNA, the rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of neuronal 5-HT. Hypotensive but not normotensive haemorrhage triggered a significant increase in TpH 2 mRNA in the vasodepressor region of the caudal midline medulla, identifying an important role for 5-HT-containing caudal midline medullary neurons in haemorrhagic shock.

  3. The role of the vascular endothelium in arenavirus haemorrhagic fevers.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Stefan

    2009-12-01

    Viral haemorrhagic fevers (VHF) caused by arenaviruses are among the most devastating emerging human diseases. The most important pathogen among the arenaviruses is Lassa virus (LASV), the causative agent of Lassa fever that is endemic to West Africa. On the South American continent, the New World arenavirus Junin virus (JUNV), Machupo (MACV), Guanarito (GTOV), and Sabia virus (SABV) have emerged as causative agents of severe VHFs. Clinical and experimental studies on arenavirus VHF have revealed a crucial role of the endothelium in their pathogenesis. However, in contrast to other VHFs, haemorrhages are not a salient feature of Lassa fever and fatal cases do not show overt destruction of vascular tissue. The functional alteration of the vascular endothelium that precede shock and death in fatal Lassa fever may be due to more subtle direct or indirect effects of the virus on endothelial cells. Haemorrhagic disease manifestations and vascular involvement are more pronounced in the VHF caused by the South American haemorrhagic fever viruses. Recent studies on JUNV revealed perturbation of specific endothelial cell function, including expression of cell adhesion molecules, coagulation factors, and vasoactive mediators as a consequence of productive viral infection. These studies provided first possible links to some of the vascular abnormalities observed in patients, however, their relevance in vivo remains to be investigated.

  4. Cardiopulmonary discipline science plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Life sciences research in the cardiopulmonary discipline must identify possible consequences of space flight on the cardiopulmonary system, understand the mechanisms of these effects, and develop effective and operationally practical countermeasures to protect crewmembers inflight and upon return to a gravitational environment. The long-range goal of the NASA Cardiopulmonary Discipline Research Program is to foster research to better understand the acute and long-term cardiovascular and pulmonary adaptation to space and to develop physiological countermeasures to ensure crew health in space and on return to Earth. The purpose of this Discipline Plan is to provide a conceptual strategy for NASA's Life Sciences Division research and development activities in the comprehensive area of cardiopulmonary sciences. It covers the significant research areas critical to NASA's programmatic requirements for the Extended-Duration Orbiter, Space Station Freedom, and exploration mission science activities. These science activities include ground-based and flight; basic, applied, and operational; and animal and human research and development. This document summarizes the current status of the program, outlines available knowledge, establishes goals and objectives, identifies science priorities, and defines critical questions in the subdiscipline areas of both cardiovascular and pulmonary function. It contains a general plan that will be used by both NASA Headquarters Program Offices and the field centers to review and plan basic, applied, and operational (intramural and extramural) research and development activities in this area.

  5. Cardio-Pulmonary Response to Shock.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-02-01

    and differences may exist even within a given vessel. For example, microvessel endothelial Km and Ki values ( imipramine ) for 5-HT are 4.7 * 10- 7M and...fluoxetine and imipramine ), 40C and selected metabolic inhibitors and ana- logues. Analysis of transport kinetics at higher concentrations of S-HT...iodoacetate, 2-4 dinitrophenol and sodium azide), 40C, tryptamine (10"’M) and the 5-HT antagonists, fluoxetine and imipramine (10 5M and 10 4M

  6. San Antonio Vasopressin in Shock Symposium Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Keywords: Conference report Vasopressin Shock Cardiac arrest Traumatic brain injury Septic shock Haemorrhagic shock a b s t r a c t The...potential benefits of vasopressin use in shock. 2. Vasopressin deficiency states and shock While a vasopressin infusion has little vasopressor effect in...100pg/ml and restores arterial blood pressure by a direct vasopres- sor effect and by increasing sensitivity to pressor catecholamines. At low doses (1

  7. Amphetamine abuse and intracranial haemorrhage.

    PubMed Central

    Buxton, N; McConachie, N S

    2000-01-01

    Amphetamines taken by any route can cause cerebral vasculitis and intracranial haemorrhage. 8 cases were seen in a neurosurgical unit over 3.5 years. The published work indicates that those who experience these complications, mainly young adults, have poor outcomes. PMID:11089483

  8. Haemorrhagic Colitis Caused by Dasatinib

    PubMed Central

    Patodi, Nishant; Sagar, Nidhi; Rudzki, Zbigniew; Langman, Gerald; Sharma, Naveen

    2012-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding appears to be a common adverse event associated with dasatinib therapy. Here we present a case of a 59-year-old man with chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) developing the rarest complication of haemorrhagic colitis with dasatinib therapy which resolved rapidly after treatment withdrawal. PMID:23316400

  9. Stress preconditioning attenuates oxidative injury to the alveolar epithelium of the lung following haemorrhage in rats

    PubMed Central

    Pittet, J F; Lu, L N; Geiser, T; Lee, H; Matthay, M A; Welch, W J

    2002-01-01

    Inhibition of cAMP-dependent stimulation of vectorial fluid transport across the alveolar epithelium following haemorrhagic shock is mediated by reactive nitrogen species released within the airspaces of the lung. We tested here the hypothesis that the prior activation of the cellular heat shock or stress response, via exposure to either heat or geldanamycin, would attenuate the release of airspace nitric oxide (NO) responsible for the shock-mediated failure of the alveolar epithelium to respond to catecholamines in rats. Rats were haemorrhaged to a mean arterial pressure of 30–35 mmHg for 60 min, and then resuscitated with a 4 % albumin solution. Alveolar fluid clearance was measured by change in concentration of a protein solution instilled into the airspaces 5 h after the onset of haemorrhage. Stress preconditioning restored the cAMP-mediated upregulation of alveolar liquid clearance after haemorrhage. The protective effect of stress preconditioning was mediated in part by a decrease in the expression of iNOS in the lung. Specifically, stress preconditioning decreased the production of nitrite by endotoxin-stimulated alveolar macrophages removed from haemorrhaged rats or by A549 and rat alveolar epithelial type II cell monolayers stimulated with cytomix (a mixture of TNF-α, IL-1β and IFN-γ) for 24 h. In summary, these results provide the first in vivo evidence that stress preconditioning restores a normal fluid transport capacity of the alveolar epithelium in the early phase following haemorrhagic shock by attenuating NO-mediated oxidative stress to the lung epithelium. PMID:11790821

  10. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy following subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Maekawa, Hidetsugu; Hadeishi, Hiromu

    2014-08-01

    A 67-year-old woman was admitted with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage and a 12-lead ECG showed ST segment elevation. Transthoracic echocardiography confirmed akinesis of the left ventricular mid-apical segment, with an ejection fraction of 26%, features characteristic of takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Five days later, we identified thrombus in the apex of the left ventricle. Sixteen days after onset, the thrombus had disappeared and wall motion improved (ejection fraction 58%) without evidence of cardioembolism. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is a cause of cardiac dysfunction after stroke, including SAH. It is characterised by transiently depressed contractile function of the left mid and apical ventricle, without obstructive coronary artery disease. Clinicians should suspect takotsubo cardiomyopathy in patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage who have an ECG abnormality. Echocardiography is needed to detect the distinctive regional wall motion abnormality. Despite its severity in the acute phase, takotsubo cardiomyopathy is self-limiting and its management is conservative.

  11. Teaching schoolchildren cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Lester, C; Donnelly, P; Weston, C; Morgan, M

    1996-02-01

    Forty-one children aged 11-12 years received tuition in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and subsequently completed questionnaires to assess their theoretical knowledge and attitudes their likelihood of performing CPR. Although most children scored well on theoretical knowledge, this did not correlate with an assessment of practical ability using training manikins. In particular only one child correctly called for help after the casualty was found to be unresponsive, and none telephoned for an ambulance before starting resuscitation. These omissions have important implications for the teaching of CPR and the resulting effectiveness of community CPR programmes.

  12. Cardiopulmonary Bypass Without Heparin.

    PubMed

    Rehfeldt, Kent H; Barbara, David W

    2016-03-01

    Due to familiarity, short half-life, ease of monitoring, and the availability of a reversal agent, heparin remains the anticoagulant of choice for cardiac operations requiring cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). However, occasionally patients require CPB but should not receive heparin, most often because of acute or subacute heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT). In these cases, if it is not feasible to wait for the disappearance of HIT antibodies, an alternative anticoagulant must be selected. A number of non-heparin anticoagulant options have been explored. However, current recommendations suggest the use of a direct thrombin inhibitor such as bivalirudin. This review describes the use of heparin alternatives for the conduct of CPB with a focus on the direct thrombin inhibitors.

  13. Fatal haemorrhage following male ritual circumcision.

    PubMed

    Hiss, J; Horowitz, A; Kahana, T

    2000-03-01

    Lethal complications following ritual circumcision are extremely rare, the most common being sepsis. We present here a case of fatal haemorrhage from a tiny incision of the glans, following a 'home' circumcision of a 6-week-old baby. The post-mortem examination disclosed idiopathic neonatal hepatitis. It is suggested that the previously undiagnosed hepatic condition was responsible for the fatal haemorrhage.

  14. Viral haemorrhagic fevers in healthcare settings.

    PubMed

    Ftika, L; Maltezou, H C

    2013-03-01

    Viral haemorrhagic fevers (VHFs) typically manifest as rapidly progressing acute febrile syndromes with profound haemorrhagic manifestations and very high fatality rates. VHFs that have the potential for human-to-human transmission and onset of large nosocomial outbreaks include Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever, Ebola haemorrhagic fever, Marburg haemorrhagic fever and Lassa fever. Nosocomial outbreaks of VHFs are increasingly reported nowadays, which likely reflects the dynamics of emergence of VHFs. Such outbreaks are associated with an enormous impact in terms of human lives and costs for the management of cases, contact tracing and containment. Surveillance, diagnostic capacity, infection control and the overall preparedness level for management of a hospital-based VHF event are very limited in most endemic countries. Diagnostic capacities for VHFs should increase in the field and become affordable. Availability of appropriate protective equipment and education of healthcare workers about safe clinical practices and infection control is the mainstay for the prevention of nosocomial spread of VHFs.

  15. Cardiopulmonary adaptation to weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prisk, G. K.; Guy, H. J.; Elliott, A. R.; West, J. B.

    1994-01-01

    The lung is profoundly affected by gravity. The absence of gravity (microgravity) removes the mechanical stresses acting on the lung paranchyma itself, resulting in a reduction in the deformation of the lung due to its own weight, and consequently altering the distribution of fresh gas ventilation within the lung. There are also changes in the mechanical forces acting on the rib cage and abdomen, which alters the manner in which the lung expands. The other way in which microgravity affects the lung is through the removal of the gravitationally induced hydrostatic gradients in vascular pressures, both within the lung itself, and within the entire body. The abolition of a pressure gradient within the pulmonary circulation would be expected to result in a greater degree of uniformity of blood flow within the lung, while the removal of the hydrostatic gradient within the body should result in an increase in venous return and intra-thoracic blood volume, with attendant changes in cardiac output, stroke volume, and pulmonary diffusing capacity. During the 9 day flight of Spacelab Life Sciences-1 (SLS-1) we collected pulmonary function test data on the crew of the mission. We compared the results obtained in microgravity with those obtained on the ground in both the standing and supine positions, preflight and in the week immediately following the mission. A number of the tests in the package were aimed at studying the anticipated changes in cardiopulmonary function, and we report those in this communication.

  16. [Cardiopulmonary resuscitation through centuries].

    PubMed

    Gajić, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    THE ANCIENT TIMES: Many early civilisations left testimonies about ancient times and resuscitation, as well. Some of them did it successfully and some of them did it less successfully; however, all of them wished to help a dying person and to bring him back to life. The first trustworthy note can be found in the Bible--Old Testament as a very realistic description of resuscitation of a child. THE MIDDLE AGES: The medieval scientists, Paracelsus and Vesalius, described first successful resuscitation attempts in the 15th and 16th century. These two men successfully applied ventilation methods by air inflation with blacksmith bellows. THE MODERN ERA: The first defibrillation was recorded in the 18th century in England, which was conducted by one of the volunteer society members. With the development of mechanics and techniques, the first precursors of modern respirators were introduced in the 19th century. The age of modern cardiopulmonary resuscitation began in the middle of 20th century, when Dr Peter Safar brought in the combination of artificial ventilation and chest compressions as the standard for implementing resuscitation. Adrenalin and defibrillation were introduced into the resuscitation techniques by Dr Redding and Dr Kouwenhaven, respectively; thus beginning the advance life support administration, which has been applied, with minor changes, until today.

  17. T cell responses and dengue haemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Screaton, Gavin; Mongkolsapaya, Juthathip

    2006-01-01

    The enhancement of severe disease upon secondary infection makes dengue almost unique among infectious pathogens and presents a serious challenge to vaccine design. Several key observations have been made which shed light onto this phenomenon particularly that antibodies can enhance Fc receptor-dependent uptake of virus into macrophages thereby increasing virus replication. Furthermore there seems to be a relationship between the peak virus load and disease severity. However, a second key feature of dengue is that the life-threatening symptoms do not correlate with the period of high viraemia; instead they occur at a time when the virus load is in steep decline. The coincidence of severe disease manifestations with defervescence and virus control suggests that the symptoms may be a consequence of the immune response to the virus rather than virus induced cytopathology. One of the key elements in the immune response to viruses are T cells which can both secrete a host of inflammatory cytokines and also be directly cytotoxic to infected cells. There are a number of experimental models of T cell-induced immunopathology including in responses to viruses. Particularly interesting in this respect are models of RSV-induced immunopathology, which have direct relevance to vaccine design as a formalin-inactivated vaccine to RSV actually enhanced disease in children when they became naturally infected with RSV, an echo of the disease enhancement seen in dengue. We will present an analysis of CD8+ T cell responses to a number of novel T cell epitopes during dengue infection and also analyse the function and cytokine secretion of these cells. We suggest that an exaggerated and partially misdirected T cell response seen in secondary dengue infection may be part of the complex series of events leading to dengue haemorrhagic fever and shock.

  18. Haemostatic management of obstetric haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Collis, R E; Collins, P W

    2015-01-01

    The haemostatic management of major obstetric haemorrhage remains challenging, and current published guidance relies heavily on experience from the non-pregnant population and expert opinion. In recent years, an interest in the implications of relative hypofibrinogenaemia, point-of-care monitoring of coagulation abnormalities, and the potential to give goal-directed therapy to correct coagulopathies, have created the possibility of significantly challenging and changing guidance. There is evidence that the haemostatic impairment in the pregnant population is different from trauma-induced bleeding, and the type and rate of onset of coagulopathies differ depending on the underlying cause. This review examines areas such as possible intervention points, describes evidence for over-transfusion of fresh frozen plasma in some situations and challenges conventional thinking on formulaic management. It also examines the rationale for other therapeutic options, including fibrinogen concentrate and tranexamic acid.

  19. Viral haemorrhagic fever in children.

    PubMed

    MacDermott, Nathalie E; De, Surjo; Herberg, Jethro A

    2016-05-01

    Viral haemorrhagic fevers (VHFs) are currently at the forefront of the world's attention due to the recent Zaire ebola virus epidemic in West Africa. This epidemic has highlighted the frailty of the world's public health response mechanisms and demonstrated the potential risks to nations around the world of imported cases of epidemic diseases. While imported cases in children are less likely, the potential for such a scenario remains. It is therefore essential that paediatricians are aware of and prepared for potential imported cases of tropical diseases, VHFs being of particular importance due to their propensity to cause nosocomial spread. Examining the four families of viruses--Filoviridae, Arenaviridae, Bunyaviridae and Flaviviridae--we describe the different types of VHFs, with emphasis on differentiation from other diseases through detailed history-taking, their presentation and management from a paediatric perspective.

  20. [Fatal haemorrhagic rift valley fever: a case at Madagascar].

    PubMed

    Raveloson, N E; Ramorasata, J C; Rasolofohanitrininosy, R; Rakotoarivony, S T; Andrianjatovo, J J; Sztark, F

    2010-04-01

    Rift valley fever (RVF) is a viral zoonosis that can also infect humans. Haemorrhagic RVF is a severe potentially fatal form of the disease. Although haemorrhagic RVF accounts for only 1% of all infections, death occurs in up to 5% of cases. The purpose of this report is describe a severe case of haemorrhagic RVF observed in a 22-year-old cattle breeder admitted to the intensive care units of the Joseph Raseta Befelatanana University Hospitals in Antananarivo. The disease presented as an infectious syndrome but hemorrhagic manifestations developed early (day 2). They consisted of diffuse haemorrhage events (haemorrhagic vomit, gingival haemorrhage, skin haemorrhage, urinary haemorrhage, and haemorrhage on the venous puncture site). In spite of intensive care, haemorrhagic complications lead to death on day 4 of clinical evolution. Laboratory findings demonstrated alteration in liver function and coagulation disturbances. Multiple organ failure was also observed.

  1. Anticoagulation-related intracranial extracerebral haemorrhage.

    PubMed Central

    Mattle, H; Kohler, S; Huber, P; Rohner, M; Steinsiepe, K F

    1989-01-01

    From January 1981 to June 1986 116 patients with anticoagulation-related intracranial haemorrhage were referred to hospital. Seventy six of these haemorrhages were extracerebral, 69 were in the subdural and seven in the subarachnoid space. No epidural haemorrhages were identified. Compared with non-anticoagulation-related haematomas, the risk of haemorrhage was calculated to be increased fourfold in men and thirteenfold in women. An acute subdural haematoma, mostly due to contusion, was more frequently accompanied by an additional intracerebral haematoma than a chronic subdural haematoma. Trauma was a more important factor in acute subdural haematomas than in chronic. Almost half of the patients (48%) had a history of hypertension, more than a third (35%) had heart disease and about one fifth (18%) were diabetic. Headache was the most frequent initial symptom. Later decreased level of consciousness and focal neurological signs exceeded the frequency of headache. Three patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage and nine patients with acute subdural haematomas died, while those with chronic subdural haematomas all survived and had at the most mild, non-disabling sequelae. Myocardial infarction (22%), pulmonary embolism (20%), and arterial disease (20%) were the most frequent reasons for anticoagulant treatment. Critical review based on established criteria for anticoagulation treatment suggests there was no medical reason to treat a third of these patients. The single most useful measure that could be taken to reduce the risk of anticoagulation-induced intracranial haemorrhage would be to identify patients who are being unnecessarily treated and to discontinue anticoagulants. PMID:2769275

  2. Ebola and Marburg haemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Rougeron, V; Feldmann, H; Grard, G; Becker, S; Leroy, E M

    2015-03-01

    Ebolaviruses and Marburgviruses (family Filoviridae) are among the most virulent pathogens for humans and great apes causing severe haemorrhagic fever and death within a matter of days. This group of viruses is characterized by a linear, non-segmented, single-stranded RNA genome of negative polarity. The overall burden of filovirus infections is minimal and negligible compared to the devastation caused by malnutrition and other infectious diseases prevalent in Africa such as malaria, dengue or tuberculosis. In this paper, we review the knowledge gained on the eco/epidemiology, the pathogenesis and the disease control measures for Marburg and Ebola viruses developed over the last 15 years. The overall progress is promising given the little attention that these pathogen have achieved in the past; however, more is to come over the next decade given the more recent interest in these pathogens as potential public and animal health concerns. Licensing of therapeutic and prophylactic options may be achievable over the next 5-10 years.

  3. Haemoglobin scavenging after subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Durnford, A; Dunbar, J; Galea, J; Bulters, D; Nicoll, J A R; Boche, D; Galea, I

    2015-01-01

    Rapid and effective clearance of cell-free haemoglobin after subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) is important to prevent vasospasm and neurotoxicity and improve long-term outcome. Haemoglobin is avidly bound by haptoglobin, and the complex is cleared by CD163 expressed on the membrane surface of macrophages. We studied the kinetics of haemoglobin and haptoglobin in cerebrospinal fluid after SAH. We show that haemoglobin levels rise gradually after SAH. Haptoglobin levels rise acutely with aneurysmal rupture as a result of injection of blood into the subarachnoid space. Although levels decline as haemoglobin scavenging occurs, complete depletion of haptoglobin does not occur and levels start rising again, indicating saturation of CD163 sites available for haptoglobin-haemoglobin clearance. In a preliminary neuropathological study we demonstrate that meningeal CD163 expression is upregulated after SAH, in keeping with a proinflammatory state. However, loss of CD163 occurs in meningeal areas with overlying blood compared with areas without overlying blood. Becauses ADAM17 is the enzyme responsible for shedding membrane-bound CD163, its inhibition may be a potential therapeutic strategy after SAH.

  4. Subdural haemorrhages in infants: population based study

    PubMed Central

    Jayawant, S; Rawlinson, A; Gibbon, F; Price, J; Schulte, J; Sharples, P; Sibert, J R; Kemp, A M

    1998-01-01

    Objectives To identify the incidence, clinical outcome, and associated factors of subdural haemorrhage in children under 2 years of age, and to determine how such cases were investigated and how many were due to child abuse. Design Population based case series. Setting South Wales and south west England. Subjects Children under 2 years of age who had a subdural haemorrhage. We excluded neonates who developed subdural haemorrhage during their stay on a neonatal unit and infants who developed a subdural haemorrhage after infection or neurosurgical intervention. Main outcome measures Incidence and clinical outcome of subdural haemorrhage in infants, the number of cases caused by child abuse, the investigations such children received, and associated risk factors. Results Thirty three children (23 boys and 10 girls) were identified with subdural haemorrhage. The incidence was 12.8/100 000 children/year (95% confidence interval 5.4 to 20.2). Twenty eight cases (85%) were under 1 year of age. The incidence of subdural haemorrhage in children under 1 year of age was 21.0/100 000 children/year and was therefore higher than in the older children. The clinical outcome was poor: nine infants died and 15 had profound disability. Only 22 infants had the basic investigations of a full blood count, coagulation screen, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging, skeletal survey or bone scan, and ophthalmological examination. In retrospect, 27 cases (82%) were highly suggestive of abuse. Conclusion Subdural haemorrhage is common in infancy and carries a poor prognosis; three quarters of such infants die or have profound disability. Most cases are due to child abuse, but in a few the cause is unknown. Some children with subdural haemorrhage do not undergo appropriate investigations. We believe the clinical investigation of such children should include a full multidisciplinary social assessment, an ophthalmic examination, a skeletal survey supplemented with a bone scan or a

  5. Hantaviruses and cardiopulmonary syndrome in South America.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Luiz Tadeu Moraes; Souza, William Marciel de; Ferrés, Marcela; Enria, Delia Alcira

    2014-07-17

    Hantavirus (Bunyaviridae) cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS) is an emerging health problem in South America due to urban growth and to the expansion of agriculture and cattle-raising areas into ecosystems containing most of the species of Sigmodontinae rodents that act as hantavirus reservoirs. About 4000 HCPS cases have been reported in South America up to 2013, associated with the following hantaviruses: Andes, Anajatuba, Araraquara (ARQV), Paranoá, Bermejo, Castelo dos Sonhos, Juquitiba, Araucária, Laguna Negra, Lechiguanas, Maripa, Oran, Rio Mamore and Tunari. The transmission of hantavirus to man occurs by contact with or through aerosols of excreta and secretions of infected rodents. Person-to-person transmission of hantavirus has also been reported in Argentina and Chile. HCPS courses with a capillary leaking syndrome produced by the hantavirus infecting lung endothelial cells and mostly with a severe inflammatory process associated with a cytokine storm. HCPS starts as a dengue-like acute febrile illness but after about 3 days progresses to respiratory failure and cardiogenic shock, leading to a high fatality rate that reaches 50% for patients infected with ARQV.

  6. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation with vasopressin in a dog.

    PubMed

    Schmittinger, Christian A; Astner, Sandra; Astner, Leonhard; Kössler, Josef; Wenzel, Volker

    2005-03-01

    That endogenous vasopressin levels in successfully resuscitated human patients were significantly higher than in patients who died pointed to the possible benefit of administering vasopressin during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Several CPR studies in pigs showed that vasopressin improved blood flow to vital organs, cerebral oxygen delivery, resuscitability and neurological outcome when compared with epinephrine. In a small clinical study, vasopressin significantly improved short-term survival when compared with epinephrine indicating its potential as an alternative pressor to epinephrine during CPR in human beings. As there was little clinical data available at that time, its recommended use was limited to adult human beings with shock-refractory ventricular fibrillation. In this report, we present the case of a dog in which the successful management of intraoperative asystolic cardiac arrest involved vasopressin. Unexpected cardiac arrest occurred during anaesthesia for the surgical removal of multiple mammary adenocarcinomata in a 11-year-old Yorkshire terrier. Despite an ASA physical status assignation of III, the dog was successfully resuscitated with external chest compressions, intermittent positive pressure ventilation and vasopressin (2 doses of 0.8 IU kg(-1)) and was discharged 3 days later without signs of neurological injury. We believe vasopressin contributed to restoring spontaneous circulation. It may prove increasingly useful in perioperative resuscitation in dogs.

  7. Simulated Cardiopulmonary Arrests in a Hospital Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mishkin, Barbara H.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes a simulated interdisciplinary role rehearsal for cardiopulmonary arrest to prepare nurses to function effectively. Includes needs analysis, program components, and responses of program participants. (Author)

  8. Transient global amnesia and left frontal haemorrhage.

    PubMed Central

    Jacome, D. E.; Yanez, G. F.

    1988-01-01

    A patient developed spontaneous, acute, dominant frontal lobe haemorrhage neighbouring on a zone of pre-existing post-traumatic encephalomalacia manifesting clinically as transient global amnesia. Amnesia can be secondary to disease of the frontal lobe, affecting pathways interconnecting the basal forebrain and hippocampus of the temporal lobe. Images Figure 1 PMID:3174526

  9. Subarachnoid haemorrhage: difficulties in diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, S. D.; Robinson, T. J.

    1998-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage is associated with a uniquely severe headache of acute onset. Classical cases are readily identified as such, although this is not always the case. Four cases who were admitted to a district general hospital within a 3-month period are presented, because they demonstrate a variety of presentations, management options, and outcomes. PMID:10320890

  10. [Viral haemorrhagic fevers--evolution of the epidemic potential].

    PubMed

    Markin, V A; Markov, V I

    2002-01-01

    In this review modern data on dangerous and particularly dangerous viral haemorrhagic fevers caused by a group of viruses belonging to the families of phylo-, arena-, flavi-, bunya- and togaviruses are presented. Morbidity rates and epidemics caused by Marburg virus, Ebola fever virus, Lassa fever virus, Argentinian and Bolivian haemorrhagic fever viruses, dengue haemorrhagic fever virus, Crimean haemorrhagic fever virus, Hantaviruses are analyzed. Mechanisms of the evolution of the epidemic manifestation of these infections are considered. The importance of the development of tools and methods of diagnosis, rapid prevention and treatment of exotic haemorrhagic fevers is emphasized.

  11. Upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage: predictive factors of in-hospital mortality in patients treated in the medical intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Skok, P; Sinkovič, A

    2011-01-01

    This prospective, cohort study assessed the independent predictors of in-hospital mortality in patients with acute upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage admitted to the medical intensive care unit (MICU) at the University Clinical Centre Maribor, Slovenia. Using univariate, multivariate and logistic regression methods the predictors of mortality in 54 upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage patients (47 men, mean ± SD age 61.6 ± 14.2 years) were investigated. The mean ± SD duration of treatment in the MICU was 2.8 ± 2.9 days and the mortality rate was 31.5%. Significant differences between nonsurvivors and survivors were observed in haemorrhagic shock, heart failure, infection, diastolic blood pressure at admission, haemoglobin and red blood cell count at admission, and lowest haemoglobin and red blood cell count during treatment. Heart failure (odds ratio 59.13) was the most significant independent predictor of in-hospital mortality. Haemorrhagic shock and the lowest red blood cell count during treatment were also important independent predictive factors of in-hospital mortality.

  12. A Systematic Review of Intensive Cardiopulmonary Management after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Christie, Sean

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Intensive cardiopulmonary management is frequently undertaken in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI), particularly due to the occurrence of neurogenic shock and ventilatory insufficiency and in an attempt to reduce secondary injury. We undertook a systematic review of the literature to examine the evidence that intensive care management improves outcome after SCI and to attempt to define key parameters for cardiopulmonary support/resuscitation. We review the literature in five areas: management of SCI patients in specialized centers, risk in SCI patients of cardiopulmonary complications, parameters for blood pressure and oxygenation/ventilation support following SCI, risk factors for cardiopulmonary insufficiency requiring ICU care after SCI, and preventative strategies to reduce the risks of cardiopulmonary complications in SCI patients. The literature supports that, in light of the significant incidence of cardiorespiratory complications, SCI patients should be managed in a monitored special care unit. There is weak evidence supporting the maintenance of MAP >85 mmHg for a period extending up to 1 week following SCI. PMID:20030558

  13. Mixed venous-arterial CO2 tension gradient after cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Takami, Yoshiyuki; Masumoto, Hiroshi

    2005-09-01

    Significant venous hypercarbia has been reported in septic shock and circulatory failure. Cardiopulmonary bypass also impairs systemic and pulmonary blood perfusion. The objective of this study was to determine the clinical significance of the increased venous-arterial CO2 tension gradient resulting from venous hypercarbia after cardiopulmonary bypass. On arrival in the intensive care unit, venous and arterial CO2 tensions were measured in the radial and pulmonary arteries in 140 consecutive patients who had undergone coronary (n = 79), valve (n = 34), aortic (n = 20), and other (n = 7) surgery under cardiopulmonary bypass. The mean venous-arterial CO2 tension gradient was 5.0 +/- 3.3 mm Hg (range, 7.7 to 15.7 mm Hg). By linear regression analysis, the factors that significantly correlated with venous-arterial CO2 tension gradient were bypass duration, aortic crossclamp time, initial arterial lactate level, transpulmonary arteriovenous lactate difference, arterial bicarbonate level, base excess, cardiac index, mixed venous O2 saturation, O2 delivery, O2 consumption, and the peak value of creatine kinase. The venous-arterial CO2 tension gradient may reflect impaired perfusion and anaerobic metabolism induced by cardiopulmonary bypass and could be a simple and useful indicator for patient management after surgery under cardiopulmonary bypass.

  14. History of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB).

    PubMed

    Hessel, Eugene A

    2015-06-01

    The development of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), thereby permitting open-heart surgery, is one of the most important advances in medicine in the 20th century. Many currently practicing cardiac anesthesiologists, cardiac surgeons, and perfusionists are unaware of how recently it came into use (60 years) and how much the practice of CPB has changed during its short existence. In this paper, the development of CPB and the many changes and progress that has taken place over this brief period of time, making it a remarkably safe endeavor, are reviewed. The many as yet unresolved questions are also identified, which sets the stage for the other papers in this issue of this journal.

  15. Dengue haemorrhagic fever with unusual prolonged thrombocytopaenia.

    PubMed

    Kamil, S M; Mohamad, N H; Narazah, M Y; Khan, F A

    2006-04-01

    We describe a case of dengue haemorrhagic fever with prolonged thrombocytopaenia. A 22-year-old Malay man with no prior illness presented with a history of fever and generalised macular rash of four days duration. Initial work-up suggested the diagnosis of dengue haemorrhagic fever based on thrombocytopaenia and positive dengue serology. Patient recovered from acute illness by day ten, and was discharged from the hospital with improving platelet count. He was then noted to have declining platelet count on follow-up and required another hospital admission on day 19 of his illness because of declining platelet count. The patient remained hospitalised till day 44 of his illness and managed with repeated platelet transfusion and supportive care till he recovered spontaneously.

  16. Lessons from nosocomial viral haemorrhagic fever outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Fisher-Hoch, Susan P

    2005-01-01

    The outbreak of Marburg haemorrhagic fever in Angola in 2004-2005 shows once again the devastating and rapid spread of viral haemorrhagic fevers in medical settings where hygiene practices are poorly applied or ignored. The legacy of years of war and poverty in Angola has resulted in very poor medical education and services. The initial high rate of infection among infants in Angola may have been related to poor hospital practices, possibly administration of vaccines. Though the outbreak in Angola was in a part of Africa not previously known to have filovirus infection, prior ecological modelling had predicted this location and many others. Prevention of future outbreaks will not be easy. The urgent need is dissemination of knowledge and the training, discipline and resources for good clinical practice. Educating the public to demand higher standards could be a powerful tool. Good practices are difficult to establish and maintain on the scale needed.

  17. European research priorities for intracerebral haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Thorsten; Petersson, Jesper; Al-Shahi Salman, Rustam; Christensen, Hanne; Cordonnier, Charlotte; Csiba, Laszlo; Harnof, Sagi; Krieger, Derk; Mendelow, David; Molina, Carlos; Montaner, Joan; Overgaard, Karsten; Roine, Risto O; Schmutzhard, Erich; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Toni, Danilo; Stapf, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Over 2 million people are affected by intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) worldwide every year, one third of them dying within 1 month, and many survivors being left with permanent disability. Unlike most other stroke types, the incidence, morbidity and mortality of ICH have not declined over time. No standardised diagnostic workup for the detection of the various underlying causes of ICH currently exists, and the evidence for medical or surgical therapeutic interventions remains limited. A dedicated European research programme for ICH is needed to identify ways to reduce the burden of ICH-related death and disability. The European Research Network on Intracerebral Haemorrhage EURONICH is a multidisciplinary academic research collaboration that has been established to define current research priorities and to conduct large clinical studies on all aspects of ICH.

  18. [Alveolar haemorrhage following a cannabis water pipe].

    PubMed

    Moatemri, Z; Zaibi, H; Dabboussi, S; Mhamedi, S; Aichaouia, C; Khadhraoui, M; Cheikh, R

    2016-10-01

    Respiratory toxicity of cannabis is well-known today particularly with the new consumption patterns. We report the case of a 25-year-old man admitted for haemoptysis, with unfavourable outcome and acute respiratory failure. Various explorations concluded to acute respiratory distress syndrome secondary to diffuse alveolar haemorrhage. Etiological assessment was initially negative. Outcome was favourable during hospitalization, authorizing the discharge of our patient. Two days later, alveolar haemorrhage recur, with positive toxicological tests for cannabis and the patient admits smoking cannabis by plastic "bang". We illustrate, through this case, the severity of respiratory complications caused by new methods of using cannabis, particularly with plastic 'bang', hence the need to insist of the importance of supported withdrawal and to inform young people how these techniques are serious.ssss.

  19. Viral haemorrhagic fevers: current status, future threats.

    PubMed

    Speed, B R; Gerrard, M P; Kennett, M L; Catton, M G; Harvey, B M

    1996-01-15

    In developing countries, the major outbreaks of viral haemorrhagic fevers such as Marburg, Ebola and Lassa fever viruses have been nosocomially spread. The high mortality and absence of specific treatment have had a devastating effect. Epidemics of this highly contagious disease remain a constant threat to Australia and, as a result, carefully planned laboratory and public health strategies and clinical infection control measures have been instituted for the management of suspected cases.

  20. 21 CFR 870.4380 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control. 870... Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control is a... control the speed of blood pumps used in cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. (b) Classification. Class...

  1. 21 CFR 870.4380 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control. 870... Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control is a... control the speed of blood pumps used in cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. (b) Classification. Class...

  2. 21 CFR 870.4380 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control. 870... Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control is a... control the speed of blood pumps used in cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. (b) Classification. Class...

  3. 21 CFR 870.4380 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control. 870... Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control is a... control the speed of blood pumps used in cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. (b) Classification. Class...

  4. 21 CFR 870.4310 - Cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure gauge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure gauge... Cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure gauge. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure gauge is a device used in cardiopulmonary bypass surgery to measure the pressure of the blood...

  5. 21 CFR 870.4380 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control. 870... Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control is a... control the speed of blood pumps used in cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. (b) Classification. Class...

  6. Spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhages-warfarin as a risk factor.

    PubMed

    Lawrentschuk, Nathan; Kariappa, Sonia; Kaye, Andrew H

    2003-09-01

    The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the incidence of warfarin use in 156 consecutive patients presenting to a single tertiary referral centre with spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage. Our study found that 11% of patients (16/159) presenting with spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage were on warfarin for prophylactic anticoagulation at time of presentation. Comparison was made to other published Australian data with regard to the incidence of warfarin use in patients presenting with spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage. Patient outcomes were also examined.

  7. Cardiopulmonary readjustments in passive tilt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matalon, S. V.; Farhi, L. E.

    1979-01-01

    The readjustment of cardiopulmonary variables in human volunteers at various tilt angles on a tilt board is studied. Five healthy subjects (18-31 yr) with thorough knowledge of the experimental protocol are tested, passively tilted from the supine to the upright position in 15-deg increments in random sequence. The parameters measured are cardiac output (Q), heart rate (HR), stroke volume (SV), minute and alveolar ventilation /V(E) and V(A)/, functional residual capacity (FRC), and arterial-end-tidal P(CO2) pressure difference. It is found that changes in Q and FRC are linearly related to the sine of the tilt angle, indicating that either reflexes are absent or their net effect is proportional to the effects of gravity. This is clearly not the case for other variables /HR, SV, V(E), V(A)/, where it is possible to demonstrate threshold values for the appearance of secondary changes.

  8. Mini cardiopulmonary bypass: Anesthetic considerations

    PubMed Central

    Alsatli, Raed A.

    2012-01-01

    This review article is going to elaborate on the description, components, and advantages of mini-cardiopulmonary bypass (mini-CPB), with special reference to the anesthetic management and fast track anesthesia with mini-CPB. There are several clinical advantages of mini-CPB like, reduced inflammatory reaction to the pump, reduced need for allogenic blood transfusion and lower incidence of postoperative neurological complications. There are certainly important points that have to be considered by anesthesiologists to avoid sever perturbation in the cardiac output and blood pressure during mini-CPB. Fast-track anesthesia provides advantages regarding fast postoperative recovery from anesthesia, and reduction of postoperative ventilation time. Mini bypass offers a sound alternative to conventional CPB, and has definite advantages. It has its limitations, but even with that it has a definite place in the current practice of cardiac surgery. PMID:25885494

  9. Simultaneous hypertensive intracerebral haemorrhages: what are the odds?

    PubMed

    Amin, Osama S M

    2013-01-22

    The simultaneous development of two (or more) spontaneous, hypertensive, non-traumatic intraparenchymal cerebral haemorrhages is rare and constitutes less than 5.6% of all hypertensive cerebral haemorrhages. In addition to having a high early mortality, these haemorrhages carry a considerable morbidity figure in patients who survive the event. We report a 68-year-old hypertensive and diabetic woman who presented with a sudden onset of headache, vomiting, and dense right-sided weakness. In less than an hour, she became obtunded. An urgent non-contrast CT brain scan revealed two left-sided supratentorial hemispheric haemorrhages; putamenal and thalamic.

  10. Bilateral eyelid ecchymosis and subconjunctival haemorrhage manifesting as presenting feature in a case of dengue haemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Jain, Sparshi; Goswami, Anup; Singh, Nidhi; Kaur, Savleen

    2015-10-01

    We report a case of bilateral eyelid ecchymosis and subconjunctival haemorrhage, a rare presenting feature of dengue haemorrhagic fever. A 17-year-old boy presented to the emergency department with complaints of redness in both eyes and vomiting. He had bilateral eyelid ecchymosis with subconjunctival haemorrhage. Complete blood count revealed a significantly reduced platelet count of 11000/µL suggestive of dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF). Ocular manifestations were followed by other systemic haemorrhagic manifestations of dengue later on which violates the usual sequence of events of dengue fever. Bilateral eyelid ecchymosis is a rare clinical manifestation and a rare presenting feature of dengue fever and one has to keep high index of suspicion for presence of dengue whenever a case of fever presents with lid ecchymosis/haemorrhage.

  11. Cardiopulmonary helminths in foxes from the Pyrenees.

    PubMed

    Garrido-Castañé, Ignasi; Ortuño, Anna; Marco, Ignasi; Castellà, Joaquim

    2015-12-01

    The present survey was carried out to investigate the prevalence of cardiopulmonary helminths in red foxes in Pyrenees area and to evaluate the role of foxes in the eco-epidemiology of these nematodes. Hearts and entire respiratory tracts were obtained from 87 foxes from Vall d'Aran region, Pyrenees, Catalonia, north-eastern Spain. The cardiopulmonary tracts were dissected, flushed and examined for nematodes using sedimented flushing water. Of the 87 examined foxes, 53 (61%) were positive for cardiopulmonary helminths. The identified nematodes were Crenosoma vulpis (44.8%), Eucoleus aerophilus (29.9%) and Angiostrongylus vasorum (3.4%). Statistical differences were observed only on comparing age and C.vulpis prevalence, with young foxes being more infected than adults. The high prevalence of cardiopulmonary nematodes suggested that red foxes may play an important role in their transmission and maintenance in the studied area.

  12. Teaching Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in the Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carveth, Stephen W.

    1979-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation is a key part of emergency cardiac care. It is a basic life support procedure that can be taught in the schools with the assistance of the American Heart Association. (JMF)

  13. Cardiopulmonary Syndromes (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Cancer.gov

    Expert-reviewed information summary about common conditions that produce chest symptoms. The cardiopulmonary syndromes addressed in this summary are cancer-related dyspnea, malignant pleural effusion, pericardial effusion, and superior vena cava syndrome.

  14. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support in post-traumatic cardiopulmonary failure

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chun-Yu; Tsai, Feng-Chun; Lee, Hsiu-An; Tseng, Yuan-His

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Patients with multiple traumas associated with cardiopulmonary failure have a high mortality rate; however, such patients can be temporarily stabilized using extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), providing a bridge to rescue therapy. Using a retrospective study design, we aimed to clarify the prognostic factors of post-traumatic ECMO support. From March 2006 to July 2016, 43 adult patients (mean age, 37.3 ± 15.2 years; 7 females [16.3%]) underwent ECMO because of post-traumatic cardiopulmonary failure. Pre-ECMO demographics, peri-ECMO events, and post-ECMO recoveries were compared between survivors and nonsurvivors. The most common traumatic insult was traffic collision (n = 30, 69.8%), and involved injury areas included the chest (n = 33, 76.7%), head (n = 14, 32.6%), abdomen (n = 21, 48.8%), and fractures (n = 21, 48.8%). Fifteen patients (34.9%) underwent cardiopulmonary resuscitation and 22 (51.2%) received rescue interventions before ECMO deployment. The mean time interval between trauma and ECMO was 90.6 ± 130.1 hours, and the mode of support was venovenous in 26 patients (60.5%). A total of 26 patients (60.5%) were weaned off of ECMO and 22 (51.6%) survived to discharge, with an overall mean support time of 162.9 ± 182.7 hours. A multivariate regression analysis identified 2 significant predictors for in-hospital mortality: an injury severity score (ISS) >30 (odds ratio [OR], 9.48; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.04–18.47; P = 0.042), and the requirement of renal replacement therapy (RRT) during ECMO (OR, 8.64; 95% CI, 1.73–26.09; P = 0.020). These two factors were also significant for the 1-year survival (ISS >30: 12.5%; ISS ≤30, 48.1%, P = 0.001) (RRT required, 15.0%; RRT not required, 52.2%, P = 0.006). Using ECMO in selected traumatized patients with cardiopulmonary failure can be a salvage therapy. Prompt intervention before shock-impaired systemic organ perfusion and acute

  15. Ebola haemorrhagic fever in Sudan, 1976

    PubMed Central

    1978-01-01

    A large outbreak of haemorrhagic fever (subsequently named Ebola haemorrhagic fever) occurred in southern Sudan between June and November 1976. There was a total of 284 cases; 67 in the source town of Nzara, 213 in Maridi, 3 in Tembura, and 1 in Juba. The outbreak in Nzara appears to have originated in the workers of a cotton factory. The disease in Maridi was amplified by transmission in a large, active hospital. Transmission of the disease required close contact with an acute case and was usually associated with the act of nursing a patient. The incubation period was between 7 and 14 days. Although the link was not well established, it appears that Nzara could have been the source of infection for a similar outbreak in the Bumba Zone of Zaire. In this outbreak Ebola haemorrhagic fever was a unique clinical disease with a high mortality rate (53% overall) and a prolonged recovery period in those who survived. Beginning with an influenza-like syndrome, including fever, headache, and joint and muscle pains, the disease soon caused diarrhoea (81%), vomiting (59%), chest pain (83%), pain and dryness of the throat (63%), and rash (52%). Haemorrhagic manifestations were common (71%), being present in half of the recovered cases and in almost all the fatal cases. Two post mortems were carried out on patients in November 1976. The histopathological findings resembled those of an acute viral infection and although the features were characteristic they were not exclusively diagnostic. They closely resembled the features described in Marburg virus infection, with focal eosinophilic necrosis in the liver and destruction of lymphocytes and their replacement by plasma cells. One case had evidence of renal tubular necrosis. Two strains of Ebola virus were isolated from acute phase sera collected from acutely ill patients in Maridi hospital during the investigation in November 1976. Antibodies to Ebola virus were detected by immunofluorescence in 42 of 48 patients in Maridi who

  16. Outcome following subdural haemorrhages in infancy

    PubMed Central

    Jayawant, Sandeep; Parr, Jeremy

    2007-01-01

    Subdural haemorrhages (SDH) are associated with significant neurodisability in affected individuals. The incidence of SDH in infants is between 12 and 25 cases per 100 000 children and most detected SDH are due to physical abuse. In the infant brain, SDH are caused by tearing of the bridging veins in the subdural space and may result in significant brain injury. The challenge of assessing outcome in infants with SDH is evaluating whether SDH or other accompanying brain insults are instrumental in the neurodevelopmental outcome. PMID:17376941

  17. Epidemic acute haemorrhagic conjunctivitis in Lagos, Nigeria.

    PubMed Central

    McMoli, T. E.; Bordoh, A. N.; Munube, G. M.; Bell, E. J.

    1984-01-01

    Enterovirus 70 has recently emerged as a causative agent of epidemic acute haemorrhagic conjunctivitis ( AHC ). This paper is a report of the first association of enterovirus 70 with epidemic AHC in Nigeria. Despite numerous symptoms, including reduction in visual acuity, eventual recovery in 2 to 3 weeks with no functional loss was the rule except in 11 patients. Five of these patients ended up with superficial corneal scarring. Two had evisceration for unresolving panophthalmitis, while 4 went blind from ruptured corneal abscesses or ulcers. All the 11 patients had treated themselves or used traditional medications. None of the patients had signs of involvement of the central nervous system. PMID:6326796

  18. Thalamic haemorrhage vs internal capsule-basal ganglia haemorrhage: clinical profile and predictors of in-hospital mortality

    PubMed Central

    Arboix, Adrià; Rodríguez-Aguilar, Raquel; Oliveres, Montserrat; Comes, Emili; García-Eroles, Luis; Massons, Joan

    2007-01-01

    Background There is a paucity of clinical studies focused specifically on intracerebral haemorrhages of subcortical topography, a subject matter of interest to clinicians involved in stroke management. This single centre, retrospective study was conducted with the following objectives: a) to describe the aetiological, clinical and prognostic characteristics of patients with thalamic haemorrhage as compared with that of patients with internal capsule-basal ganglia haemorrhage, and b) to identify predictors of in-hospital mortality in patients with thalamic haemorrhage. Methods Forty-seven patients with thalamic haemorrhage were included in the "Sagrat Cor Hospital of Barcelona Stroke Registry" during a period of 17 years. Data from stroke patients are entered in the stroke registry following a standardized protocol with 161 items regarding demographics, risk factors, clinical features, laboratory and neuroimaging data, complications and outcome. The region of the intracranial haemorrhage was identified on computerized tomographic (CT) scans and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain. Results Thalamic haemorrhage accounted for 1.4% of all cases of stroke (n = 3420) and 13% of intracerebral haemorrhage (n = 364). Hypertension (53.2%), vascular malformations (6.4%), haematological conditions (4.3%) and anticoagulation (2.1%) were the main causes of thalamic haemorrhage. In-hospital mortality was 19% (n = 9). Sensory deficit, speech disturbances and lacunar syndrome were significantly associated with thalamic haemorrhage, whereas altered consciousness (odds ratio [OR] = 39.56), intraventricular involvement (OR = 24.74) and age (OR = 1.23), were independent predictors of in-hospital mortality. Conclusion One in 8 patients with acute intracerebral haemorrhage had a thalamic hematoma. Altered consciousness, intraventricular extension of the hematoma and advanced age were determinants of a poor early outcome. PMID:17919332

  19. Thrombus formation in a dilated torcula following aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Haynes, H R; Visca, A; Renowden, S; Malcolm, G

    2013-08-01

    A case of thrombus formation occurring within a dilation of the dural venous sinuses following aneurysmal sub-arachnoid haemorrhage is presented. Acute neurological deterioration accompanied propagation of the thrombus. The patient was anticoagulated on day 5 post-SAH with no haemorrhagic complications and made a full recovery. The optimum time to commence anticoagulation is not clear and is discussed.

  20. Open and closed chest extrathoracic cannulation for cardiopulmonary bypass and extracorporeal life support: methods, indications, and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Field, M L; Al‐Alao, B; Mediratta, N; Sosnowski, A

    2006-01-01

    Extrathoracic cannulation to establish cardiopulmonary bypass has been widely applied in recent years and includes: (a) repeat surgery, (b) minimally invasive surgery, and (c) cases with diseased vessels such as porcelain, aneurysmal, and dissecting aorta. In addition, the success and relative ease of peripheral cannulation, among other technological advances, has permitted the development of closed chest extracorporeal life support, in the form of cardiopulmonary support and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. With this development have come applications for cardiopulmonary bypass based support outside the traditional cardiac theatre setting, including emergency circulatory support for patients in cardiogenic shock and respiratory support for patients with severely impaired gas exchange. This review summarises the approach to extrathoracic cannulation for the generalist. PMID:16679471

  1. Hypertrophic olivary degeneration secondary to pontine haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Wein, Sara; Yan, Bernard; Gaillard, Frank

    2015-07-01

    We report a 58-year-old man who developed hyptertrophic olivary degeneration (HOD) after haemorrhage of a cavernous malformation in the pons. Lesions of the triangle of Guillain and Mollaret (the dentatorubro-olivary pathway) may lead to HOD, a secondary transsynaptic degeneration of the inferior olivary nucleus. HOD is considered unique because the degenerating olive initially becomes hypertrophic rather than atrophic. The primary lesion causing pathway interruption is often haemorrhage, either due to hypertension, trauma, surgery or, as in our patient, a vascular malformation such as a cavernoma. Ischaemia and demyelination can also occasionally be the inciting events. The classic clinical presentation of HOD is palatal myoclonus, although not all patients with HOD develop this symptom. The imaging features of HOD evolve through characteristic phases. The clue to the diagnosis of HOD is recognition of the distinct imaging stages and identification of a remote primary lesion in the triangle of Guillain and Mollaret. Familiarity with the classic imaging findings of this rare phenomenon is necessary in order to avoid misdiagnosis and prevent unnecessary intervention.

  2. Bichat guidelines for the clinical management of haemorrhagic fever viruses and bioterrorism-related haemorrhagic fever viruses.

    PubMed

    Bossi, Philippe; Tegnell, Anders; Baka, Agoritsa; Van Loock, Frank; Hendriks, Jan; Werner, Albrecht; Maidhof, Heinrich; Gouvras, Georgios

    2004-12-15

    Haemorrhagic fever viruses (HFVs) are a diverse group of viruses that cause a clinical disease associated with fever and bleeding disorder. HFVs that are associated with a potential biological threat are Ebola and Marburg viruses (Filoviridae), Lassa fever and New World arenaviruses (Machupo, Junin, Guanarito and Sabia viruses) (Arenaviridae), Rift Valley fever (Bunyaviridae) and yellow fever, Omsk haemorrhagic fever, and Kyanasur Forest disease (Flaviviridae). In terms of biological warfare concerning dengue, Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever and Hantaviruses, there is not sufficient knowledge to include them as a major biological threat. Dengue virus is the only one of these that cannot be transmitted via aerosol. Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever and the agents of haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome appear difficult to weaponise. Ribavirin is recommended for the treatment and the prophylaxis of the arenaviruses and the bunyaviruses, but is not effective for the other families. All patients must be isolated and receive intensive supportive therapy.

  3. Postnatal cardiopulmonary adaptations to high altitude.

    PubMed

    Huicho, Luis

    2007-09-30

    Postnatal cardiopulmonary adaptations to high altitude constitute a key component of any set of responses developed to face high altitude hypoxia. Such responses are required ultimately to meet the energy demands necessary for adequate functioning at cell and organism level. After a brief insight on general and cardiopulmonary comparative studies in growing and adult organisms, differences and possible explanations for varying cardiopulmonary pathology, pulmonary artery hypertension, persistent right ventricular predominance and subacute high altitude pulmonary hypertension in different populations of children living at high altitude are discussed. Potential long-term implications of early chronic hypoxic exposure on later diseases are also presented. It is hoped that this review will help the practicing physician working at high altitude to make informed decisions concerning individual pediatric patients, specifically with regard to diagnosis and management of altitude-related cardiopulmonary pathology. Finally, plausibility and the knowledge-base of public health interventions to reduce the risks posed by suboptimal or inadequate postnatal cardiopulmonary responses to high altitude are discussed.

  4. Mechanical advances in cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Lurie, K; Plaisance, P; Sukhum, P; Soleil, C

    2001-06-01

    Challenged by the continued high mortality rates for patients in cardiac arrest, the American Heart Association and the European Resuscitation Council developed a new set of guidelines in 2000 to help advance several new and promising cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) techniques and devices. This is the first time these organizations have taken such a bold move, in part because of the poor results with standard closed-chest cardiac massage. The new techniques, interposed abdominal counterpulsation and active compression decompression CPR, each provide greater blood flow to the vital organs in animal models of CPR and lead to higher blood pressures in patients in cardiac arrest. In some clinical studies, both techniques have resulted in a significant increase in survival after cardiac arrest in comparison with standard CPR. Three of the four new CPR devices that were recommended in the new guidelines also provide superior vital organ blood flow and increased blood pressures in comparison with standard CPR. The three devices that improve the efficiency of CPR are the circumferential vest, an active compression decompression CPR device, and an inspiratory impedance valve used in combination with the active compression decompression CPR device. The fourth device type, one that compresses the thorax using an automated mechanical piston compression mechanism, was recommended to reduce the number of personnel required to perform CPR. However, no studies on the automated mechanical compression devices have showed an improvement in hemodynamic variables or survival in comparison with standard CPR. Taken together, these new technologies represent an important step forward in the evolution of CPR from a pair of hands to devices designed to enhance CPR efficiency. Each of these advances is described, and the recent literature about each of them is reviewed.

  5. Successful Resolution of Preretinal Haemorrhage with Intravitreal Ranibizumab

    PubMed Central

    Noorlaila, Baharuddin; Raja-Azmi, Mohd-Noor

    2016-01-01

    We would like to report two cases of preretinal haemorrhage from two different aetiology courses of bleeding being treated with intravitreal ranibizumab and its outcome. Our first case was a 39-year-old man with a diagnosis of severe aplastic anaemia that presented with bilateral premacular haemorrhages in both eyes. His right eye vision was 6/45 and it was counting finger in the left eye. He was treated with intravitreal ranibizumab once to the right eye and twice to the left eye. Right eye showed complete resolution of premacular haemorrhage and minimal residual premacular haemorrhage in the left eye at 3 months after initial presentation. Our second case was a 32-year-old healthy teacher that presented with preretinal haemorrhage at superotemporal region extending to macular area in left eye secondary to valsalva retinopathy. Her left vision was counting finger. She was treated with single intravitreal ranibizumab to the left eye. There was significant reduction of premacular haemorrhage and her left eye vision improved to 6/6 at 10 weeks after injection. Both cases had favourable outcome with intravitreal ranibizumab and can be considered as nonsurgical treatment option in treating premacular haemorrhage. PMID:27800200

  6. Concurrent arterial aneurysms in brain arteriovenous malformations with haemorrhagic presentation

    PubMed Central

    Stapf, C; Mohr, J; Pile-Spellman, J; Sciacca, R; Hartmann, A; Schumacher, H; Mast, H

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To assess the effect of concurrent arterial aneurysms on the risk of incident haemorrhage from brain arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Methods: In a cross sectional study, 463 consecutive, prospectively enrolled patients from the Columbia AVM Databank were analysed. Concurrent arterial aneurysms on brain angiography were classified as feeding artery aneurysms, intranidal aneurysms, and aneurysms unrelated to blood flow to the AVM. Clinical presentation (diagnostic event) was categorised as intracranial haemorrhage proved by imaging or non-haemorrhagic presentation. Univariate and multivariate statistical models were applied to test the effect of age, sex, AVM size, venous drainage pattern, and the three types of aneurysms on the risk of AVM haemorrhage at initial presentation. Results: Arterial aneurysms were found in 117 (25%) patients with AVM (54 had feeding artery aneurysms, 21 had intranidal aneurysms, 18 had unrelated aneurysms, and 24 had more than one aneurysm type). Intracranial haemorrhage was the presenting symptom in 204 (44%) patients with AVM. In the univariate model, the relative risk for haemorrhagic AVM presentation was 2.28 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.12 to 4.64) for patients with intranidal aneurysms and 1.88 (95% CI 1.14 to 3.08) for those with feeding artery aneurysms. In the multivariate model an independent effect of feeding artery aneurysms (odds ratio 2.11, 95% CI 1.18 to 3.78) on haemorrhagic AVM presentation was found. No significant effect was seen for intranidal and unrelated aneurysms. The attributable risk of feeding artery aneurysms for incident haemorrhage in patients with AVM was 6% (95% CI 1% to 11%). Conclusions: The findings suggest that feeding artery aneurysms are an independent determinant for increased risk of incident AVM haemorrhage. PMID:12185161

  7. 21 CFR 870.4250 - Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller. 870... Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller is a device used to control the temperature of the fluid entering and leaving a heat exchanger....

  8. 21 CFR 870.4250 - Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller. 870... Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller is a device used to control the temperature of the fluid entering and leaving a heat exchanger....

  9. 21 CFR 870.4250 - Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller. 870... Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller is a device used to control the temperature of the fluid entering and leaving a heat exchanger....

  10. 21 CFR 870.4250 - Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller. 870... Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller is a device used to control the temperature of the fluid entering and leaving a heat exchanger....

  11. 21 CFR 870.4250 - Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller. 870... Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller is a device used to control the temperature of the fluid entering and leaving a heat exchanger....

  12. 21 CFR 870.4320 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator... Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator is an electrically and pneumatically operated device used to create pulsatile blood flow....

  13. 21 CFR 870.4320 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator... Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator is an electrically and pneumatically operated device used to create pulsatile blood flow....

  14. 21 CFR 870.4320 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator... Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator is an electrically and pneumatically operated device used to create pulsatile blood flow....

  15. A Suspected Case of an Alveolar Haemorrhage Caused by Dasatinib

    PubMed Central

    Sakoda, Yoritake; Arimori, Yojiro; Ueno, Masakatsu; Matsumoto, Takafumi

    2017-01-01

    A 39-year-old man treated with dasatinib for chronic myelogenous leukaemia presented to our hospital with haemoptysis, coughing, and dyspnoea. Chest radiography and computed tomography revealed ground-glass opacities and a crazy-paving pattern. Bronchoalveolar lavage was not performed due to serious hypoxemia and bleeding. Significant bleeding from the peripheral bronchi led to a diagnosis of an alveolar haemorrhage. Dasatinib-induced alveolar haemorrhaging was suspected based on the clinical findings. His condition improved immediately after dasatinib withdrawal and initiation of steroid therapy. Reports of alveolar haemorrhaging induced by dasatinib are rare. As such, this is considered an important case. PMID:28090053

  16. Impact of Obesity on Cardiopulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Chandler, Marjorie L

    2016-09-01

    Although there are known detrimental effects of obesity on the heart and lungs, few data exist showing obesity as risk factor for cardiopulmonary disorders in dogs and cats. It is probable that increased abdominal fat is detrimental as it is in humans, and there is evidence of negative effects of increased intrathoracic fat. As well as physical effects of fat, increased inflammatory mediators and neurohormonal effects of obesity likely contribute to cardiopulmonary disorders. Weight loss in overweight individuals improves cardiac parameters and exercise tolerance. Obesity in patients with obstructive airway disorders is recognized to increase disease severity.

  17. Haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome involving the liver.

    PubMed

    Chan, Y C; Wong, T W; Yap, E H; Tan, H C; Lee, H W; Chu, Y K; Lee, P W

    1987-09-07

    A case of haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome that originated in Malaysia is reported. The patient presented with clinical symptoms which were not typical of the disease as seen in endemic regions. Renal involvement, which is characteristic of haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome, was mild, and the predominant symptom was a persistently marked elevation of serum transaminase levels that was suggestive of hepatitis. Liver involvement has not been described in the Asian form of haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome. The patient developed a petechial skin rash and had severe thrombocytopenia. Serological confirmation of the diagnosis of haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome was obtained by the demonstration of significant antibody rises to hantaviruses in the patient's acute- and convalescent-phase sera.

  18. Corticosteroid-responsive prolonged thrombocytopenia following dengue haemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Leong, K W; Srinivas, P

    1993-09-01

    A case of prolonged thrombocytopenia following dengue haemorrhagic fever in a 15 year old boy is reported. The mechanism was presumed to be immunological and he responded dramatically to oral prednisolone.

  19. Recovery of cochlear and vestibular function after labyrinthine haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Araújo-Martins, José; Melo, Patrícia; Ribeiro, Cristóvão; Barros, Ezequiel

    2014-01-01

    Inner ear haemorrhage is a rare disorder with disabling symptoms. Prognosis is generally considered to be poor with essentially no chance of functional recovery. The most common aetiologies are related to blood dyscrasias, anticoagulant therapy or local trauma. The association with autoimmune diseases is exceptional. The authors report a case of sudden deafness with vertigo in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis, caused by labyrinthine haemorrhage. Clinical picture and progress of audiovestibular function are described along with imagiological features from magnetic resonance imaging. Inner ear haemorrhage is a rare disorder with disabling symptoms and poor prognosis. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first case described with documented vestibular function recovery following labyrinthine haemorrhage.

  20. Aspirin-induced post-gingivectomy haemorrhage: a timely reminder.

    PubMed

    Thomason, J M; Seymour, R A; Murphy, P; Brigham, K M; Jones, P

    1997-02-01

    A case report is described of significant aspirin-induced haemorrhage following a gingivectory procedure in an organ transplant patient. Aspirin-induced platelet impairment secondary to low-dose aspirin was implicated as the cause of the haemorrhage. Haemostasis was eventually achieved after platelet transfusion. The case illustrates the problems that can arise when carrying out gingival surgery on patients medicated with low-dose aspirin.

  1. The Sunflower Cardiopulmonary Research Project of Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Leon

    A three year project designed to determine the value of a health program incorporating a cardiopulmonary fitness program is described. The instructional programs were in heart health, pulmonary health, nutrition, and physical fitness. A noncompetitive exercise and fitness period was employed in addition to the normal physical education time.…

  2. Acute gastrointestinal haemorrhage on board a cruise ship in the Antarctic Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Carron, Mathieu; Globokar, Peter; Sicard, Bruno A

    2016-01-01

    Antarctic tourism on board cruise ships has expanded since the 1990s, essentially in the Antarctic Peninsula. Due to remoteness, medical cases may evolve into life threatening conditions as emergency medical evacuations are challenging. We discuss the case of a young crew member who suddenly fainted with an epigastric pain and abundant rectal bleeding while on board a cruise ship heading to the Deception Island (62°57.6 South, 60°29.5 West), 44 h away from Ushuaia by sea. A medical evacuation was necessary to save the patient whose haemoglobin level rapidly decreased from 11 g/dL to 8.7 g/dL over an 8 h period due to uncontrolled gastrointestinal bleeding. Following discussions between the French, Chilean and Argentinean Medical Top Side Support and Maritime Rescue Authorities and despite poor weather conditions, an emergency medical evacuation by air to Chile was made possible. The evacuation, which was 2 days shorter compared to an evacuation by sea, allowed the patient to reach a hospital facility in time to save his life whereas he decompensated in haemorrhagic shock. As passengers on cruise ships are typically elderly and often following anticoagulant therapies, the risk of bleeding is most important. Facing a gastric haemorrhage, a transfusion is often required. In remote areas, transfusion of fresh whole blood to stabilize a critical patient until he reaches a hospital must be considered.

  3. Decreased plasma isoleucine concentrations after upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Dejong, C H; Meijerink, W J; van Berlo, C L; Deutz, N E; Soeters, P B

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A decrease in arterial isoleucine values after intragastric blood administration in pigs has been observed. This contrasted with increased values of most other amino acids, ammonia, and urea. After an isonitrogenous control meal in these pigs all amino acids including isoleucine increased, and urea increased to a lesser extent, suggesting a relation between the arterial isoleucine decrease and uraemia after gastrointestinal haemorrhage. METHODS: To extend these findings to humans, plasma amino acids were determined after gastrointestinal haemorrhage in patients with peptic ulcers (n = 9) or oesophageal varices induced by liver cirrhosis (n = 4) and compared with preoperative patients (n = 106). RESULTS: After gastrointestinal haemorrhage, isoleucine decreased in all patients by more than 60% and normalised within 48 hours. Most other amino acids increased and also normalised within 48 hours. Uraemia occurred in both groups, hyperammonaemia was seen in patients with liver cirrhosis. CONCLUSIONS: These results confirm previous findings in animals and healthy volunteers that plasma isoleucine decreases after simulated upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage. This supports the hypothesis that the absence of isoleucine in blood protein causes decreased plasma isoleucine values after gastrointestinal haemorrhage, and may be a contributory factor to uraemia and hyperammonaemia in patients with normal and impaired liver function, respectively. Intravenous isoleucine administration after gastrointestinal haemorrhage could be beneficial and will be the subject of further research. PMID:8881800

  4. Aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage: guidance in making the correct diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Liebenberg, W; Worth, R; Firth, G; Olney, J; Norris, J

    2005-01-01

    Background: The natural history of untreated aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage carries a dismal prognosis. Case fatalities range between 32% and 67%. Treatment with either surgical clipping or endovascular coiling is highly successful at preventing re-bleeding and yet the diagnosis is still missed. Methods: Based on the national guidelines for analysis of cerebrospinal fluid for bilirubin in suspected subarachnoid haemorrhage and a review of other available literature this study has compiled guidance in making the diagnosis. Conclusion: In patients presenting with a suspected non-traumatic subarachnoid haemorrhage, computed tomography within 12 hours will reliably show 98% of subarachnoid haemorrhage. In patients who present after 12 hours with a negative computed tomogram, formal cerebrospinal fluid spectophotometry will detect subarachnoid haemorrhage for the next two weeks with a reliability of 96%. Between the early diagnosis with the aid of computed tomography and the later diagnosis with the added benefit of spectophotometry in the period where computed tomograms become less reliable, it should be possible to diagnose most cases of subarachnoid haemorrhage correctly. PMID:15998826

  5. Brain microvascular function during cardiopulmonary bypass

    SciTech Connect

    Sorensen, H.R.; Husum, B.; Waaben, J.; Andersen, K.; Andersen, L.I.; Gefke, K.; Kaarsen, A.L.; Gjedde, A.

    1987-11-01

    Emboli in the brain microvasculature may inhibit brain activity during cardiopulmonary bypass. Such hypothetical blockade, if confirmed, may be responsible for the reduction of cerebral metabolic rate for glucose observed in animals subjected to cardiopulmonary bypass. In previous studies of cerebral blood flow during bypass, brain microcirculation was not evaluated. In the present study in animals (pigs), reduction of the number of perfused capillaries was estimated by measurements of the capillary diffusion capacity for hydrophilic tracers of low permeability. Capillary diffusion capacity, cerebral blood flow, and cerebral metabolic rate for glucose were measured simultaneously by the integral method, different tracers being used with different circulation times. In eight animals subjected to normothermic cardiopulmonary bypass, and seven subjected to hypothermic bypass, cerebral blood flow, cerebral metabolic rate for glucose, and capillary diffusion capacity decreased significantly: cerebral blood flow from 63 to 43 ml/100 gm/min in normothermia and to 34 ml/100 gm/min in hypothermia and cerebral metabolic rate for glucose from 43.0 to 23.0 mumol/100 gm/min in normothermia and to 14.1 mumol/100 gm/min in hypothermia. The capillary diffusion capacity declined markedly from 0.15 to 0.03 ml/100 gm/min in normothermia but only to 0.08 ml/100 gm/min in hypothermia. We conclude that the decrease of cerebral metabolic rate for glucose during normothermic cardiopulmonary bypass is caused by interruption of blood flow through a part of the capillary bed, possibly by microemboli, and that cerebral blood flow is an inadequate indicator of capillary blood flow. Further studies must clarify why normal microvascular function appears to be preserved during hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass.

  6. Anti-TNF monoclonal antibodies prevent haemorrhage-induced suppression of Kupffer cell antigen presentation and MHC class II antigen expression.

    PubMed Central

    Ertel, W; Morrison, M H; Ayala, A; Perrin, M M; Chaudry, I H

    1991-01-01

    Kupffer cells (KC), by virtue of their ability to present antigen (AP) and express major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II antigen (Ia), play a pivotal role in the host defence system against invading micro-organisms. Although haemorrhagic shock depresses the above KC functions, it is not known whether increased KC tumour necrosis factor (TNF) production and elevated TNF plasma levels following haemorrhage are responsible for it. To study this, C3H/HeN mice were pretreated intraperitoneally with either anti-murine TNF antibody (anti-TNF Ab) or saline. Twenty hours later mice were bled and maintained at a mean blood pressure of 35 mmHg for 60 min followed by adequate fluid resuscitation. Two and 24 hr later, plasma was collected and KC were isolated. AP was measured by co-culturing KC with the D10.G4.1 Th cell clone. Ia expression was determined by direct immunofluorescence. Interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6 and TNF levels in KC supernatants and plasma were measured with bioassays or ELISA. Haemorrhage increased circulating TNF levels by 215% at 2 hr and by 76% at 24 hr (P less than 0.05), which was prevented by pretreatment with anti-TNF Ab. Haemorrhage-induced increase of circulating IL-6 was abolished (P less than 0.05) at 2 hr but not at 24 hr in the anti-TNF Ab group. The suppression of KC AP (P less than 0.05) and Ia expression (P less than 0.05) due to haemorrhage was attenuated (P less than 0.05) in anti-TNF Ab-treated mice at 2 and 24 hr and KC IL-1 and TNF synthesis was further (P less than 0.01) increased. These results indicate that TNF plays a critical role in the initiation and regulation of KC AP, Ia expression, and cytokine production following haemorrhage. PMID:1748476

  7. Emergency management of heat exchanger leak on cardiopulmonary bypass with hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Gukop, P; Tiezzi, A; Mattam, K; Sarsam, M

    2015-11-01

    Heat exchanger leak on cardiopulmonary bypass is very rare, but serious. The exact incidence is not known. It is an emergency associated with the potential risk of blood contamination, air embolism and haemolysis, difficulty with re-warming, acidosis, subsequent septic shock, multi-organ failure and death. We present a prompt, highly co-ordinated algorithm for the successful management of this important rare complication. There is need for further research to look for safety devices that detect leaks and techniques to reduce bacterial load. It is essential that teams practice oxygenator change-out routines and have a well-established change-out protocol.

  8. Rabbit haemorrhagic disease (RHD) and rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV): a review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) is a calicivirus of the genus Lagovirus that causes rabbit haemorrhagic disease (RHD) in adult European rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus). First described in China in 1984, the virus rapidly spread worldwide and is nowadays considered as endemic in several countries. In Australia and New Zealand where rabbits are pests, RHDV was purposely introduced for rabbit biocontrol. Factors that may have precipitated RHD emergence remain unclear, but non-pathogenic strains seem to pre-date the appearance of the pathogenic strains suggesting a key role for the comprehension of the virus origins. All pathogenic strains are classified within one single serotype, but two subtypes are recognised, RHDV and RHDVa. RHD causes high mortality in both domestic and wild adult animals, with individuals succumbing between 48-72 h post-infection. No other species has been reported to be fatally susceptible to RHD. The disease is characterised by acute necrotising hepatitis, but haemorrhages may also be found in other organs, in particular the lungs, heart, and kidneys due to disseminated intravascular coagulation. Resistance to the disease might be explained in part by genetically determined absence or weak expression of attachment factors, but humoral immunity is also important. Disease control in rabbitries relies mainly on vaccination and biosecurity measures. Such measures are difficult to be implemented in wild populations. More recent research has indicated that RHDV might be used as a molecular tool for therapeutic applications. Although the study of RHDV and RHD has been hampered by the lack of an appropriate cell culture system for the virus, several aspects of the replication, epizootology, epidemiology and evolution have been disclosed. This review provides a broad coverage and description of the current knowledge on the disease and the virus. PMID:22325049

  9. Adult dengue haemorrhagic fever at Kuala Lumpur Hospital: retrospective study of 102 cases.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, N M; Cheong, I

    1995-01-01

    A retrospective study involving 102 adults with dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) was conducted to investigate the demographic aspect, clinical presenting features, laboratory investigations, complications, and mortality associated with the disease. The clinical diagnosis of DHF was in accordance with WHO recommendations. Epistaxis, gingivitis, haematemesis and gastritis were among the common complications. Platelet levels tended to decline from a higher value on admission (mean 67,000/mm3) to lower levels on subsequent days, with the lowest (mean 61,000/mm3) being on day 6 of the fever. Hyponatraemia (46.8%) was commonly observed. Morbidity of DHF was significant (29.4%) but the case fatality rate remained low (2.0%) in our adults, suggesting that adults are less likely than children to suffer from shock syndrome.

  10. Haemorrhage control in severely injured patients.

    PubMed

    Gruen, Russell L; Brohi, Karim; Schreiber, Martin; Balogh, Zsolt J; Pitt, Veronica; Narayan, Mayur; Maier, Ronald V

    2012-09-22

    Most surgeons have adopted damage control surgery for severely injured patients, in which the initial operation is abbreviated after control of bleeding and contamination to allow ongoing resuscitation in the intensive-care unit. Developments in early resuscitation that emphasise rapid control of bleeding, restrictive volume replacement, and prevention or early management of coagulopathy are making definitive surgery during the first operation possible for many patients. Improved topical haemostatic agents and interventional radiology are becoming increasingly useful adjuncts to surgical control of bleeding. Better understanding of trauma-induced coagulopathy is paving the way for the replacement of blind, unguided protocols for blood component therapy with systemic treatments targeting specific deficiencies in coagulation. Similarly, treatments targeting dysregulated inflammatory responses to severe injury are under investigation. As point-of-care diagnostics become more suited to emergency environments, timely targeted intervention for haemorrhage control will result in better patient outcomes and reduced demand for blood products. Our Series paper describes how our understanding of the roles of the microcirculation, inflammation, and coagulation has shaped new and emerging treatment strategies.

  11. Dabigatran ameliorates post-haemorrhagic hydrocephalus development after germinal matrix haemorrhage in neonatal rat pups.

    PubMed

    Klebe, Damon; Flores, Jerry J; McBride, Devin W; Krafft, Paul R; Rolland, William B; Lekic, Tim; Zhang, John H

    2016-01-01

    We aim to determine if direct thrombin inhibition by dabigatran will improve long-term brain morphological and neurofunctional outcomes and if potential therapeutic effects are dependent upon reduced PAR-1 stimulation and consequent mTOR activation. Germinal matrix haemorrhage was induced by stereotaxically injecting 0.3 U type VII-S collagenase into the germinal matrix of P7 rat pups. Animals were divided into five groups: sham, vehicle (5% DMSO), dabigatran intraperitoneal, dabigatran intraperitoneal + TFLLR-NH2 (PAR-1 agonist) intranasal, SCH79797 (PAR-1 antagonist) intraperitoneal, and dabigatran intranasal. Neurofunctional outcomes were determined by Morris water maze, rotarod, and foot fault evaluations at three weeks. Brain morphological outcomes were determined by histological Nissl staining at four weeks. Expression levels of p-mTOR/p-p70s6k at three days and vitronectin/fibronectin at 28 days were quantified. Intranasal and intraperitoneal dabigatran promoted long-term neurofunctional recovery, improved brain morphological outcomes, and reduced intracranial pressure at four weeks after GMH. PAR-1 stimulation tended to reverse dabigatran's effects on post-haemorrhagic hydrocephalus development. Dabigatran also reduced expression of short-term p-mTOR and long-term extracellular matrix proteins, which tended to be reversed by PAR-1 agonist co-administration. PAR-1 inhibition alone, however, did not achieve the same therapeutic effects as dabigatran administration.

  12. [Cardiopulmonary resuscitation: risks and benefits of ventilation].

    PubMed

    Cordioli, Ricardo Luiz; Garelli, Valentina; Lyazidi, Aissam; Suppan, Laurent; Savary, Dominique; Brochard, Laurent; Richard, Jean-Christophe M

    2013-12-11

    Knowledge of the physiological mechanisms that govern cardiopulmonary interactions during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) allows to better assess risks and benefits of ventilation. Ventilation is required to maintain gas exchange, particularly when CPR is prolonged. Nevertheless, conventional ventilation (bag mask or mechanical ventilation) may be harmful when excessive or when chest compressions are interrupted. In fact large tidal volume and/or rapid respiratory rate may adversely compromise hemodynamic effects of chest compressions. In this regard, international recommendations that give the priority to chest compressions, are meaningful. Continuous flow insufflation with oxygen that generates a moderate positive airway pressure avoids any interruption of chest compressions and prevents the risk of lung injury associated with prolonged resuscitation.

  13. Ebola haemorrhagic fever in Zaire, 1976

    PubMed Central

    1978-01-01

    Between 1 September and 24 October 1976, 318 cases of acute viral haemorrhagic fever occurred in northern Zaire. The outbreak was centred in the Bumba Zone of the Equateur Region and most of the cases were recorded within a radius of 70 km of Yambuku, although a few patients sought medical attention in Bumba, Abumombazi, and the capital city of Kinshasa, where individual secondary and tertiary cases occurred. There were 280 deaths, and only 38 serologically confirmed survivors. The index case in this outbreak had onset of symptoms on 1 September 1976, five days after receiving an injection of chloroquine for presumptive malaria at the outpatient clinic at Yambuku Mission Hospital (YMH). He had a clinical remission of his malaria symptoms. Within one week several other persons who had received injections at YMH also suffered from Ebola haemorrhagic fever, and almost all subsequent cases had either received injections at the hospital or had had close contact with another case. Most of these occurred during the first four weeks of the epidemic, after which time the hospital was closed, 11 of the 17 staff members having died of the disease. All ages and both sexes were affected, but women 15-29 years of age had the highest incidence of disease, a phenomenon strongly related to attendance at prenatal and outpatient clinics at the hospital where they received injections. The overall secondary attack rate was about 5%, although it ranged to 20% among close relatives such as spouses, parent or child, and brother or sister. Active surveillance disclosed that cases occurred in 55 of some 550 villages which were examined house-by-house. The disease was hitherto unknown to the people of the affected region. Intensive search for cases in the area of north-eastern Zaire between the Bumba Zone and the Sudan frontier near Nzara and Maridi failed to detect definite evidence of a link between an epidemic of the disease in that country and the outbreak near Bumba. Nevertheless it was

  14. Effects of Cardiopulmonary Bypass on Hemostasis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    agents as possible alternatives to heparin anticoagulation during CPB. Some of the agents mat have been found to be promising in these studies...67-76. 22Q. Terrell MR, Walenga JM, Koza MJ, et al. Efficacy of aprotinin with various anticoagulant agents in cardiopulmonary bypass. AnnThorac Surg...procedures, systemic anticoagulation with 3mg/kg of heparin prior to the institution of CPB elicits a modest but significant prolongation of the

  15. [Clinical relevance of cardiopulmonary reflexes in anesthesiology].

    PubMed

    Guerri-Guttenberg, R A; Siaba-Serrate, F; Cacheiro, F J

    2013-10-01

    The baroreflex, chemoreflex, pulmonary reflexes, Bezold-Jarisch and Bainbridge reflexes and their interaction with local mechanisms, are a demonstration of the richness of cardiovascular responses that occur in human beings. As well as these, the anesthesiologist must contend with other variables that interact by attenuating or accentuating cardiopulmonary reflexes such as, anesthetic drugs, surgical manipulation, and patient positioning. In the present article we review these reflexes and their clinical relevance in anesthesiology.

  16. Artificial neural network cardiopulmonary modeling and diagnosis

    DOEpatents

    Kangas, L.J.; Keller, P.E.

    1997-10-28

    The present invention is a method of diagnosing a cardiopulmonary condition in an individual by comparing data from a progressive multi-stage test for the individual to a non-linear multi-variate model, preferably a recurrent artificial neural network having sensor fusion. The present invention relies on a cardiovascular model developed from physiological measurements of an individual. Any differences between the modeled parameters and the parameters of an individual at a given time are used for diagnosis. 12 figs.

  17. Artificial neural network cardiopulmonary modeling and diagnosis

    DOEpatents

    Kangas, Lars J.; Keller, Paul E.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention is a method of diagnosing a cardiopulmonary condition in an individual by comparing data from a progressive multi-stage test for the individual to a non-linear multi-variate model, preferably a recurrent artificial neural network having sensor fusion. The present invention relies on a cardiovascular model developed from physiological measurements of an individual. Any differences between the modeled parameters and the parameters of an individual at a given time are used for diagnosis.

  18. [Fatal alveolar haemorrhage following a "bang" of cannabis].

    PubMed

    Grassin, F; André, M; Rallec, B; Combes, E; Vinsonneau, U; Paleiron, N

    2011-09-01

    The new methods of cannabis consumption (home made water pipe or "bang") may be responsible for fatal respiratory complications. We present a case, with fatal outcome, of a man of 19 years with no previous history other than an addiction to cannabis using "bang". He was admitted to intensive care with acute dyspnoea. A CT scan showed bilateral, diffuse alveolar shadowing. He was anaemic with an Hb of 9.3g/l. Bronchoalveolar lavage revealed massive alveolar haemorrhage. Investigations for infection and immunological disorder were negative and toxicology was negative except for cannabis. Antibiotic treatment was given and favourable progress allowed early discharge. Death occurred 15 days later due to alveolar haemorrhage following a further "bang" of cannabis. Autopsy showed toxic alveolar haemorrhage. The probable mechanism is pulmonary damage due to acid anhydrides released by the incomplete combustion of cannabis in contact with plastic. These acids have a double effect on the lungs: a direct toxicity with severe inflammation of the mucosa leading to alveolar haemorrhage and subsequently the acid anhydrides may lead to the syndrome of intra-alveolar haemorrhage and anaemia described in occupational lung diseases by Herbert in Oxford in 1979. It manifests itself by haemoptysis and intravascular haemolysis. We draw attention to the extremely serious potential consequences of new methods of using cannabis, particularly the use of "bang" in homemade plastic materials.

  19. 21 CFR 870.4240 - Cardiopulmonary bypass heat exchanger.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Surgical Devices § 870.4240 Cardiopulmonary... perfusion fluid flowing through the device. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  20. 21 CFR 870.4240 - Cardiopulmonary bypass heat exchanger.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Surgical Devices § 870.4240 Cardiopulmonary... perfusion fluid flowing through the device. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  1. 21 CFR 870.4240 - Cardiopulmonary bypass heat exchanger.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Surgical Devices § 870.4240 Cardiopulmonary... perfusion fluid flowing through the device. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  2. Haemorrhagic complications of pancreatitis: presentation, diagnosis and management.

    PubMed Central

    Ammori, B. J.; Madan, M.; Alexander, D. J.

    1998-01-01

    Massive haemorrhage is an uncommon complication in pancreatitis. Most affected patients suffer from chronic disease with associated pseudocyst. We present five patients (four male) with a mean age of 41 years (range 34-48 years). All patients had alcohol-induced pancreatitis complicated either by haematemesis (3), intraperitoneal haemorrhage (1) or both haematemesis and intraperitoneal haemorrhage (1). Source of bleeding was pseudocyst wall (2), splenic artery pseudoaneurysm (2) and splenic artery rupture (1). Distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy was performed in two patients, intracystic ligation and drainage in two, and packing with subsequent external drainage in one. Rebleeding occurred in two patients and required subsequent distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy in one; the other patient died of splenic rupture. No rebleeding and no mortality occurred after resection. Primary pancreatic resection is recommended whenever possible. Other management options include embolisation and ligation. Images Figure 1 PMID:9849330

  3. Haemorrhagic cholecystitis: an unusual cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Natalie

    2014-01-17

    Haemorrhagic cholecystitis is a rare cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding and is a difficult diagnosis to make. This case report describes an orthopaedic patient, who developed deranged liver function tests and anaemia after a hemiarthroplasty of the hip. The patient had upper abdominal pain and black stools which clinically appeared to be melaena. An ultrasound scan of the abdomen was inconclusive, and therefore a CT was performed and the potential diagnosis of haemorrhagic cholecystitis was raised. An endoscopic evaluation of the upper gastrointestinal tract showed no evidence of other causes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Following an emergency laparotomy and cholecystectomy, she recovered well. This report aims to increase awareness about the uncommon condition of haemorrhagic cholecystitis, and to educate regarding clinical and radiological signs which lead to this diagnosis.

  4. An outbreak of acute haemorrhagic conjunctivitis in Melaka, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Ghazali, O; Chua, K B; Ng, K P; Hooi, P S; Pallansch, M A; Oberste, M S; Chua, K H; Mak, J W

    2003-10-01

    This paper reports a second outbreak of acute haemorrhagic conjunctivitis due to coxsackievirus A24 in peninsular Malaysia. Between June 2002 and early October 2003, 10,327 patients, comprising 3,261 children and 7,066 adults, were treated for acute conjunctivitis in 11 government health clinics in the Melaka Tengah district of the state of Melaka. The figure grossly underestimates the size of the outbreak; as no patients treated in private clinics in the same district were included. Institution and household surveillance showed that the commonest presenting clinical feature of the illness was eye-discharge (91.2%), followed by foreign body sensation (81.8%), pain (78.3%) and subconjunctival haemorrhage (74.4%). The mean duration of illness was 6.5 and five days for patients with and without subconjunctival haemorrhage respectively.

  5. Can Drug Effects Explain the Recent Temporal Increase in Atonic Postpartum Haemorrhage?

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, K. S.; Sheehy, Odile; Mehrabadi, Azar; Urquia, Marcelo L.; Hutcheon, Jennifer A.; Kramer, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background Rates of postpartum haemorrhage and atonic postpartum haemorrhage have increased in several high‐income countries. We carried out a study to examine if drug use in pregnancy, or drug and other interactions, explained this increase in postpartum haemorrhage. Methods The linked administrative and hospital databases of the Québec Pregnancy Cohort were used to define a cohort of pregnant women in Québec, Canada, from 1998 to 2009 (n = 138 704). Case–control studies on any postpartum haemorrhage and atonic postpartum haemorrhage were carried out within this population, with up to five controls randomly selected for each case after matching on index date and hospital of delivery (incidence density sampling). Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate the effects of drug use on postpartum haemorrhage and atonic postpartum haemorrhage. Results There was an unexpected non‐linear, declining temporal pattern in postpartum haemorrhage and atonic postpartum haemorrhage between 1998 and 2009. Use of antidepressants (mainly selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors) was associated with higher rates of postpartum haemorrhage [adjusted rate ratio (aRR) 1.48, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.23, 1.77] and atonic postpartum haemorrhage [aRR 1.40, 95% CI 1.13, 1.74]. Thrombocytopenia was also associated with higher rates of postpartum haemorrhage [aRR 1.52, 95% CI 1.16, 2.00]. There were no statistically significant drug interactions. Adjustment for maternal factors and drug use had little effect on temporal trends in postpartum haemorrhage and atonic postpartum haemorrhage. Conclusions Although antidepressant use and thrombocytopenia were associated with higher rates of atonic postpartum haemorrhage, antidepressant and other drug use did not explain temporal trends in postpartum haemorrhage. PMID:25847112

  6. Ependymoma of conus medullaris presenting as subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, C T; Beck, J; Seifert, V; Marquardt, G

    2008-02-01

    Subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) due to spinal ependymoma is very rare. We report a 37 year old man who presented with typical clinical signs of SAH. Lumbar puncture confirmed SAH but cerebral angiography was negative, and further diagnostic work-up revealed an ependymoma of the conus medullaris as the source of the haemorrhage. A comprehensive review of the literature was conducted. Only 17 patients with spontaneous SAH due to a spinal ependymoma have been reported since 1958. However, in cases of SAH and negative diagnostic findings for cerebral aneurysms or malformations, this aetiology should be considered and work-up of the spinal axis completed.

  7. Dissociated unilateral convergence paralysis in a patient with thalamotectal haemorrhage.

    PubMed Central

    Lindner, K; Hitzenberger, P; Drlicek, M; Grisold, W

    1992-01-01

    A 47 year old male was admitted in a comatose state. CT scan showed a haemorrhage in the right pulvinar thalamus descending into the right part of the lamina quadrigemina. He presented with anisocoria, prompt bilateral pupillary light reaction, and unilateral convergence paralysis contralateral to the lesion in combination with upward gaze palsy. During an observation period of two months, the convergence reaction returned to normal. MRI showed a lacunar lesion ventral to superior right colliculus. Angiography revealed an arteriovenous malformation (right posterior cerebral artery--sinus rectus) as the possible cause of the haemorrhage. Images PMID:1527550

  8. Retroperitoneal Haematoma in a Patient with Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jasminder; Singh, Harpreet; Jagota, Ruchi; Bala, Saroj

    2016-01-01

    Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever (DHF) has diverse manifestations ranging from asymptomatic petechial skin haemorrhages to life threatening cerebral, pulmonary, gastrointestinal and genitourinary haemorrhages. However, the association of spontaneous retroperitoneal haematomas with DHF is not well documented in literature. We report a rare case of spontaneous retroperitoneal haematoma complicating DHF. PMID:28050423

  9. [Emergency medicine at the limit: shock-, analgesic therapy and airway management in difficult terrain].

    PubMed

    Rauch, Simon; Schenk, Kai; Rainer, Bernhard; Strapazzon, Giacomo; Paal, Peter; Brugger, Hermann

    2016-01-01

    Rescue operations in mountain and remote areas pose special challenges for the rescue team and often differ substantially from rescue missions in the urban environment. Given the growing sports and leisure activities in mountains, incidence of alpine emergencies is expected to rise further. The following article describes the treatment of haemorrhagic shock, analgesic therapy and airway management in mountain rescue.

  10. 21 CFR 870.4390 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing. 870.4390... bypass pump tubing. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing is polymeric tubing which is used in the blood pump head and which is cyclically compressed by the pump to cause the blood to...

  11. 21 CFR 870.4390 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing. 870.4390... bypass pump tubing. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing is polymeric tubing which is used in the blood pump head and which is cyclically compressed by the pump to cause the blood to...

  12. 21 CFR 870.4390 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing. 870.4390... bypass pump tubing. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing is polymeric tubing which is used in the blood pump head and which is cyclically compressed by the pump to cause the blood to...

  13. 21 CFR 870.4390 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing. 870.4390... bypass pump tubing. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing is polymeric tubing which is used in the blood pump head and which is cyclically compressed by the pump to cause the blood to...

  14. 21 CFR 870.4400 - Cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir. 870.4400... bypass blood reservoir. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir is a device used in conjunction with short-term extracorporeal circulation devices to hold a reserve supply of blood in the...

  15. 21 CFR 870.4240 - Cardiopulmonary bypass heat exchanger.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass heat exchanger. 870.4240... bypass heat exchanger. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass heat exchanger is a device, consisting of a heat exchange system used in extracorporeal circulation to warm or cool the blood...

  16. 21 CFR 870.4240 - Cardiopulmonary bypass heat exchanger.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass heat exchanger. 870.4240... bypass heat exchanger. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass heat exchanger is a device, consisting of a heat exchange system used in extracorporeal circulation to warm or cool the blood...

  17. 21 CFR 870.4420 - Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy return sucker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy return sucker. 870.4420 Section 870.4420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... from the chest or heart during cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. (b) Classification. Class...

  18. 21 CFR 870.4420 - Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy return sucker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy return sucker. 870.4420 Section 870.4420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... from the chest or heart during cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. (b) Classification. Class...

  19. 21 CFR 870.4420 - Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy return sucker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy return sucker. 870.4420 Section 870.4420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... from the chest or heart during cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. (b) Classification. Class...

  20. 21 CFR 870.4420 - Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy return sucker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy return sucker. 870.4420 Section 870.4420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... from the chest or heart during cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. (b) Classification. Class...

  1. 21 CFR 870.4400 - Cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir. 870.4400... bypass blood reservoir. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir is a device used in... circulation. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards), except that a reservoir that contains...

  2. 21 CFR 870.4400 - Cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir. 870.4400... bypass blood reservoir. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir is a device used in... circulation. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards), except that a reservoir that contains...

  3. 21 CFR 870.4400 - Cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir. 870.4400... bypass blood reservoir. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir is a device used in... circulation. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards), except that a reservoir that contains...

  4. 21 CFR 870.4400 - Cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir. 870.4400... bypass blood reservoir. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir is a device used in... circulation. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards), except that a reservoir that contains...

  5. 21 CFR 870.4390 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing. 870.4390... bypass pump tubing. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing is polymeric tubing which is used in the blood pump head and which is cyclically compressed by the pump to cause the blood to...

  6. Sarcoidosis of the cardio-pulmonary systems.

    PubMed

    Dubrey, Simon; Sharma, Rakesh; Underwood, Richard; Mittal, Tarun; Wells, Athol

    2016-02-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multi-system disease with a wide range of phenotypes. Pulmonary involvement is the most frequently identified target for sarcoidosis and is responsible for the majority of deaths. Cardiac sarcoid is less commonly identified, may be occult, is significantly influenced by race, and can portend an unpredictable and sometimes fatal outcome. Sarcoidosis remains an enigmatic disease spectrum of unknown aetiology, frequently difficult to diagnose and with a variable disease course. This article summarises current views on the diagnosis and management of cardiopulmonary involvement.

  7. Advances in the diagnosis of shock, its assessment and resuscitation during the Great War.

    PubMed

    Bullingham, A G P

    2016-07-01

    The Great War of 1914-1918 ushered in a new era of technology on the battlefield resulting in casualties on an unprecedented scale. There had been progress in many related areas of medicine before the outbreak of hostilities but these had not been applied or fully developed in clinical practice. This is particularly true for the management of haemorrhagic shock and resuscitation. This article discusses the history and development of medical treatment of shock and trauma patients during the conflict.

  8. Spontaneous hepatic haemorrhage: a review of pathogenesis, aetiology and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasa, Sanket; Lee, Wai G; Aldameh, Ali; Koea, Jonathan B

    2015-01-01

    Background A spontaneous hepatic haemorrhage (SHH) is a rare condition that presents acutely to both hepatobiliary and general surgeons. Management of the condition is challenging because of the emergent presentation requiring immediate intervention, the presence of underlying chronic liver disease and the multiple potential underlying aetiological conditions. Methods A literature search on a spontaneous hepatic haemorrhage was instituted on Medline (1966–2014), Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials, EMBASE (1947–2014), PubMed, Web of Science and Google Scholar. The specific topics of interest were causes – including rare causes, pathophysiological mechanisms and management options. A narrative review was planned from the outset. Results After 1546 abstracts were reviewed, 74 studies were chosen for inclusion. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the commonest cause of a spontaneous haemorrhage with 10% of HCC presenting with bleeding. Other causes are benign hepatic lesions (hemangioma, adenoma, focal nodular hyperplasia, nodular regenerative hyperplasia, biliary cystadenoma and angiomyelolipoma), malignant hepatic tumours (angiosarcoma, haemangioendothelioma, hepatoblastoma and rhabdoid sarcoma), peliosis hepatis, amyloid, systemic lupus erythematosis, polyarteritis nodosa, HELLP syndrome and acute fatty liver of pregnancy. Treatment practice emphasizes arterial embolization to obtain haemostasis with a hepatectomy reserved for tumour-bearing patients after staging and assessment of liver function. Conclusion A spontaneous hepatic haemorrhage is an acute presentation of a spectrum of conditions that requires early diagnosis and multidisciplinary management. PMID:26252245

  9. Intestinal haemorrhage in Antarctica. A multinational rescue operation.

    PubMed

    Podkolinski, M T; Semmens, K

    1979-09-22

    Three nations cooperated in the aerial evacuation from an Australian Antarctic station of a patient with gastrointestinal haemorrhage, after conservative treatment. The combined operation is described, and reference is made to the difficulties in medical management arising from polar isolation. Attention is drawn to logistic improvements which would alleviate this situation.

  10. Diffuse alveolar haemorrhage secondary to propylthiouracil-induced vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Catarina; Costa, Teresa; Marques, Ana Vieira

    2015-01-01

    Propylthiouracil is a drug used to treat hyperthyroidism. It can cause several side effects including pulmonary disorders that, although rare, can be severe. The authors describe the case of a woman treated with propylthiouracil who developed diffuse alveolar haemorrhage with severe respiratory failure and anaemia, which improved with discontinuation of the antithyroid drug and on starting systemic corticosteroid therapy. PMID:25661751

  11. Breathing-Impaired Speech after Brain Haemorrhage: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heselwood, Barry

    2007-01-01

    Results are presented from an auditory and acoustic analysis of the speech of an adult male with impaired prosody and articulation due to brain haemorrhage. They show marked effects on phonation, speech rate and articulator velocity, and a speech rhythm disrupted by "intrusive" stresses. These effects are discussed in relation to the speaker's…

  12. Intracranial haemorrhage and use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    de Abajo, Francisco J; Jick, Hershel; Derby, Laura; Jick, Susan; Schmitz, Stephen

    2000-01-01

    Aims In the past few years an increasing number of bleeding disorders have been reported in association with the use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), including serious cases of intracranial haemorrhage, raising concerns about the safety of this class of drugs. The present study was performed to test the hypothesis of an increased risk of intracranial haemorrhage associated with the use of SSRIs. Methods We carried out a case-control study nested in a cohort of antidepressants users with the UK-based General Practice Research Database (GPRD) as the primary source of information. The study cohort encompassed subjects aged between 18 and 79 years who received a first-time prescription for any antidepressant from January, 1990 to October, 1997. Patients with presenting conditions or treatments that could be associated with an increased risk of intracranial haemorrhage were excluded from the cohort. Patients were followed-up until the occurrence of an idiopathic intracranial haemorrhage. Up to four controls per case, matched on age, sex, calendar time and practice were randomly selected from the study cohort. We estimated adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals of intracranial haemorrhage with current use of SSRIs and other antidepressants as compared with nonuse using conditional logistic regression. Results We identified 65 cases of idiopathic intracranial haemorrhage and 254 matched controls. Current exposure to SSRIs was ascertained in 7 cases (10.8%) and 24 controls (9.7%) resulting in an adjusted OR (95%CI) of 0.8 (0.3,2.3). The estimate for ‘other antidepressants’ was 0.7 (0.3,1.6). The effect measures were not modified by gender or age. No effect related to dose or treatment duration was detected. The risk estimates did not change according to the location of bleeding (intracerebral or subarachnoid). Conclusions Our results are not compatible with a major increased risk of intracranial haemorrhage among users of SSRIs or other

  13. Cardiopulmonary bypass: development of John Gibbon's heart-lung machine

    PubMed Central

    Passaroni, Andréia Cristina; Silva, Marcos Augusto de Moraes; Yoshida, Winston Bonetti

    2015-01-01

    Objective To provide a brief review of the development of cardiopulmonary bypass. Methods A review of the literature on the development of extracorporeal circulation techniques, their essential role in cardiovascular surgery, and the complications associated with their use, including hemolysis and inflammation. Results The advancement of extracorporeal circulation techniques has played an essential role in minimizing the complications of cardiopulmonary bypass, which can range from various degrees of tissue injury to multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. Investigators have long researched the ways in which cardiopulmonary bypass may insult the human body. Potential solutions arose and laid the groundwork for development of safer postoperative care strategies. Conclusion Steady progress has been made in cardiopulmonary bypass in the decades since it was first conceived of by Gibbon. Despite the constant evolution of cardiopulmonary bypass techniques and attempts to minimize their complications, it is still essential that clinicians respect the particularities of each patient's physiological function. PMID:26107456

  14. Adrenal crisis secondary to bilateral adrenal haemorrhage after hemicolectomy

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, Venessa H M; Kabir, Shahrir; Ip, Julian C Y

    2016-01-01

    Summary Adrenal haemorrhage is a rare cause of adrenal crisis, which requires rapid diagnosis, prompt initiation of parenteral hydrocortisone and haemodynamic monitoring to avoid hypotensive crises. We herein describe a case of bilateral adrenal haemorrhage after hemicolectomy in a 93-year-old female with high-grade colonic adenocarcinoma. This patient’s post-operative recovery was complicated by an acute hypotensive episode, hypoglycaemia and syncope, and subsequent computed tomography (CT) scan of the abdomen revealed bilateral adrenal haemorrhage. Given her labile blood pressure, intravenous hydrocortisone was commenced with rapid improvement of blood pressure, which had incompletely responded with fluids. A provisional diagnosis of hypocortisolism was made. Initial heparin-induced thrombocytopenic screen (HITTS) was positive, but platelet count and coagulation profile were both normal. The patient suffered a concurrent transient ischaemic attack with no neurological deficits. She was discharged on a reducing dose of oral steroids with normal serum cortisol levels at the time of discharge. She and her family were educated about lifelong steroids and the use of parenteral steroids should a hypoadrenal crisis eventuate. Learning points: Adrenal haemorrhage is a rare cause of hypoadrenalism, and thus requires prompt diagnosis and management to prevent death from primary adrenocortical insufficiency. Mechanisms of adrenal haemorrhage include reduced adrenal vascular bed capillary resistance, adrenal vein thrombosis, catecholamine-related increased adrenal blood flow and adrenal vein spasm. Standard diagnostic assessment is a non-contrast CT abdomen. Intravenous hydrocortisone and intravenous substitution of fluids are the initial management. A formal diagnosis of primary adrenal insufficiency should never delay treatment, but should be made afterwards. PMID:27855238

  15. Assessing Exercise Limitation Using Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing

    PubMed Central

    Stickland, Michael K.; Butcher, Scott J.; Marciniuk, Darcy D.; Bhutani, Mohit

    2012-01-01

    The cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET) is an important physiological investigation that can aid clinicians in their evaluation of exercise intolerance and dyspnea. Maximal oxygen consumption (V˙O2max) is the gold-standard measure of aerobic fitness and is determined by the variables that define oxygen delivery in the Fick equation (V˙O2 = cardiac output × arterial-venous O2 content difference). In healthy subjects, of the variables involved in oxygen delivery, it is the limitations of the cardiovascular system that are most responsible for limiting exercise, as ventilation and gas exchange are sufficient to maintain arterial O2 content up to peak exercise. Patients with lung disease can develop a pulmonary limitation to exercise which can contribute to exercise intolerance and dyspnea. In these patients, ventilation may be insufficient for metabolic demand, as demonstrated by an inadequate breathing reserve, expiratory flow limitation, dynamic hyperinflation, and/or retention of arterial CO2. Lung disease patients can also develop gas exchange impairments with exercise as demonstrated by an increased alveolar-to-arterial O2 pressure difference. CPET testing data, when combined with other clinical/investigation studies, can provide the clinician with an objective method to evaluate cardiopulmonary physiology and determination of exercise intolerance. PMID:23213518

  16. USE OF A PROGRAMMABLE CALCULATOR IN CARDIOPULMONARY PERFUSION.

    PubMed

    Mills, J David; Tallent, Jerome H.

    1978-06-01

    This study describes a hand-held, battery-powered, programmable instrument (Calculator Model SR-52) that can be taken directly into the operating room by cardiopulmonary perfusionists. Three programs are described in detail: 1) Cardiopulmonary perfusion parameters and estimated blood volume; 2) blood gas parameters and saturations, with temperature corrections; and 3) cardiopulmonary oxygen transfer and oxygenator efficiency. This inexpensive calculator allows perfusion personnel to manipulate easily-derived data into values which heretofore have required elaborate nomograms or special slide rules-or were not available within a reasonable computational time.

  17. Haematological, blood gas and acid-base effects of central histamine-induced reversal of critical haemorrhagic hypotension in rats.

    PubMed

    Jochem, J

    2001-09-01

    In a rat model of volume-controlled irreversible haemorrhagic shock, which results in a severe metabolic acidosis and the death of all control animals within 30 min., intracerebroventricular injection of histamine (100 nmol) produces a prompt and long-lasting increase in mean arterial pressure and heart rate, with a 100% survival of 2 h after treatment. Histamine action is accompanied by a decrease in haematocrit value, haemoglobin concentration, erythrocyte and platelet count, and an increase in residual blood volume at the end of the experiment (2 h). Cardiovascular effects are also associated with a long-lasting rise in respiratory rate and biphasic blood acid-base changes - initial increase of metabolic acidosis with the decrease in arterial and venous pH, bicarbonate concentration and base excess, followed by almost a complete recovery of blood gas and acid-base parameters to the pre-bleeding values, with normalisation of arterial and venous pH, Pco2 bicarbonate concentration and base excess at the end of experiment. It can be concluded that in the late phase of central histamine-induced reversal of haemorrhagic hypotension there is almost a complete restoration of blood gas and acid-base status due to circulatory and respiratory compensations, while accompanying haematological changes are the result of the haemodilution and the increase in residual blood volume.

  18. Transient Diabetes Insipidus Following Cardiopulmonary Bypass.

    PubMed

    Ekim, Meral; Ekim, Hasan; Yilmaz, Yunus Keser; Bolat, Ali

    2015-04-01

    Diabetes insipidus (DI) results from inadequate output of Antidiuretic Hormone (ADH) from the pituitary gland (central DI) or the inability of the kidney tubules to respond to ADH (nephrogenic DI). ADH is an octapeptide produced in the supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus and stored in the posterior lobe of the pituitary gland. Cardiopulmonary Bypass (CPB) has been shown to cause a six-fold increased circulating ADH levels 12 hours after surgery. However, in some cases, ADH release may be transiently suppressed due to cardioplegia (cardiac standstill) or CPB leading to DI. We present the postoperative course of a 60-year-old man who developed transient DI after CPB. He was successfully treated by applying nasal desmopressin therapy. Relevant biochemical parameters should be monitored closely in patients who produce excessive urine after open heart surgery.

  19. Cardiopulmonary Exercise Test in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Magri, Damiano; Santolamazza, Caterina

    2017-04-04

    Understanding the functional limitation in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, the most common inherited heart disease, is challenging. Beside the occurrence of disease-related complications, several factors are potential determinants of exercise limitation, including left ventricular hypertrophy, myocardial fiber disarray, left ventricular outflow tract obstruction, microvascular ischemia, and interstitial fibrosis. Furthermore, drugs commonly used in the daily management of these patients may interfere with exercise capacity, especially those with a negative chronotropic effect. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing can safely and objectively evaluate the functional capacity of these patients and help the physician in understanding the mechanisms that underlie this limitation. Features that reduce exercise capacity may predict progression to heart failure in these patients and even the risk of sudden cardiac death.

  20. Intracerebral haemorrhage: mechanisms of injury and therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Keep, Richard F.; Hua, Ya; Xi, Guohua

    2013-01-01

    Intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) accounts for about 10–15% of all strokes. ICH is associated with high mortality and morbidity and there has been no successful Phase III clinical trial for this condition. The last six years has seen a great increase in the number of pre-clinical and clinical studies focused on ICH. There have been significant advances in the animal models available to study ICH and in our understanding of the mechanisms underlying brain injury following haemorrhage. This has led to the identification of several therapeutic targets that are now being pursued into clinical trials. These advances are described in this review in addition to information on past and current clinical trials. Many of the former were based on very limited pre-clinical data and possible guidelines on the nature of pre-clinical results that justify proceeding to the clinic are discussed. PMID:22698888

  1. Spontaneous Subdural Haemorrhage: A Rare Association with Plasmodium Vivax Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Hariprasad, Shetty; Koya, Rohini; Acharya, Vasudev; Krishna, Shastry Barkur Anantha

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is an endemic disease in tropical countries and disease of universal importance. Central Nervous System (CNS) complications of malaria are severe and associated with significant mortality. Thrombocytopaenia in malaria causing haemorrhagic CNS complications is rare. We report a case of 35-year-old male patient presented with headache, vomiting and was diagnosed to have subdural haemorrhage (SDH). On examination patient was found to be febrile with peripheral smear showing evidence of Plasmodium vivax (P.vivax) infection with severe thrombocytopaenia. In endemic regions with malaria, SDH being rare presentation of malaria should be considered as a differential diagnosis in febrile patients with neurological manifestations. Rarity of spontaneous SDH in malaria and raising awareness amongst treating physicians about the same is the driving factor for reporting this case. PMID:26894111

  2. Miniaturized cardiopulmonary bypass: the Hammersmith technique

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Conventional Cardiopulmonary Bypass (cCPB) is a trigger of systemic inflammatory reactions, hemodilution, coagulopathy, and organ failure. Miniaturised Cardiopulmonary Bypass (mCPB) has the potential to reduce these deleterious effects. Here, we describe our standardised ‘Hammersmith’ mCPB technique, used in all types of adult cardiac operations including major aortic surgery. Methods The use of mCPB remains limited by the diversity of technologies which range from extremely complex, micro systems to ones very similar to cCPB. Our approach is designed around the principle of balancing the benefits of miniaturisation; reducing foreign surface area while maintaining patient safety. Results From January 2010 to March 2011, a single surgeon performed 184 consecutive operations (Euro score Logistic 8.4+/-9.9): 61 aortic valve replacements, 78 CABGs, 25 aortic valve replacement and CABG and 17 other procedures (major aortic surgery, re-do operations or double/triple valve replacements). Our clinical experience suggests that: i. Venous drainage is optimally maintained using kinetic energy. ii. Venous collapse pressure depends on the patient’s anatomy and cannula size, but most importantly on the negative pressure generated by venous drainage. iii. The patient-prime interaction is optimised with antegrade and retrograde autologous priming, which mixes the blood and prime away from the tissues and results in a reduced oncotic destabilization. iv. mCPB is a safe and reproducible technique Conclusion The Hammersmith mCPB is a “next generation” system which uses standard commercially available components. It aims to maintain safety margin and the benefit of miniaturised system whilst reducing the human factor demands. PMID:23731623

  3. Necrotising haemorrhagic encephalomyelopathy in an adult: Leigh's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Delgado, G; Gállego, J; Tuñón, T; Zarranz, J J; Villanueva, J A

    1987-01-01

    A 21 year old male, well-nourished and non-alcoholic, died after five weeks illness. He had suffered epileptic fits, bilateral internuclear ophthalmoplegia, bulbar and pontine paralysis, tetraparesia, ataxia and dystonia. A CT brain scan showed low density lesions of the striatum bilaterally. Post-mortem studies revealed pathological anomalies compatible with Leigh's disease, although the presence of haemorrhages and involvement of the mamillary bodies could also suggest Wernicke's encephalopathy. Images PMID:3572437

  4. Intracranial tumoural haemorrhage--a report of 58 cases.

    PubMed

    Yuguang, Liu; Meng, Liu; Shugan, Zhu; Yuquan, Jiang; Gang, Li; Xingang, Li; Chengyuan, Wu

    2002-11-01

    In order to study the computerized tomographic (CT) appearances and clinical characteristics of intracranial tumoural haemorrhage (ITH), we analyzed retrospectively fifty-eight patients with ITH and reviewed the literature. As a result, 91% patients had acute or subacute onset and 26% manifested haemorrhage as their first symptoms. CT scanning indicated that intratumoural bleeding occurred in 23 cases, bleeding into parenchyma 18 cases, subarachnoid space 6 cases, ventricle 3 cases and subdural space 8 cases. Thirty-eight patients had emergency operations and the others had selective operations. Both tumours and haematomas were removed all together in all patients. Fifty-five patients were cured or improved and three died during the perioperative stage in our series. Among the patients with ITH, there were 21 metastatic tumours, 19 gliomas, 10 meningiomas, 6 pituitary adenomas, 1 melanoma and 1 acoustic neurilemoma. The onset of most ITH resembled that of cerebrovascular diseases. The location of ITH and the CT appearances of ITH varied in different cerebral tumours. Radical removal of brain tumours with haemorrhage is an effective treatment for ITH, which can greatly decrease the perioperative mortality rate and improve the prognoses of patients.

  5. Cardiopulmonary Syndromes (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Cancer.gov

    Expert-reviewed information summary about common conditions that produce chest symptoms. The cardiopulmonary syndromes addressed in this summary are cancer-related dyspnea, malignant pleural effusion, pericardial effusion, and superior vena cava syndrome.

  6. [Preliminary study of colloid osmotic pressure for cardiopulmonary bypass].

    PubMed

    Wang, D; Xiang, L; Luo, J

    1996-12-01

    The ideal colloid osmotic pressure is beneficial to decrease the fluid accumulated in the pulmonary and other tissue during cardiopulmonary bypass. Schupbach reported the proper colloidosmotic pressure for cardiopulmonary bypass was 2.1 kPa (16 mmHg). Colloid osmotic pressures of blood and priming fluid during cardiopulmonary bypass were measured in 28 patients with heart disease by using colloid osmotic pressure detection apparatus. The value of colloid osmotic pressure suitable for the designed standard was apparently different among the Gelofusine group and other groups. P value was 0.005. Priming fluid for cardiopulmonary bypass needs to satisfy the quality and the quantity of colloid osmotic pressure. Using Albumin isn't economical. Whole blood and plazma are not suitable for increasing colloid osmotic pressure. Hydroxyethyl starch or Gelofusine is best choice in priming to get designed standard of colloid osmotic pressure. The ratio of hydroxyethyl starch or Gelofusine in priming fluid should beyond 1/2.

  7. Cytoprotection by inhaled carbon monoxide before cardiopulmonary bypass in preclinical models.

    PubMed

    Loop, Torsten; Schlensak, Christian; Goebel, Ulrich

    2012-05-01

    Although a potentially toxic gaseous molecule, carbon monoxide recently gains rising scientifically and clinical interest as its beneficial effects and mechanisms of action are defined substantially in various in vitro and in vivo experiments. Its anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic and anti-proliferative properties but its increasing impact concerning numerous disease models in means of protection, well describe this gas as a new and challenging therapeutic alternative. In this review, we focus on the extensively analyzed advantageous value of pre- and postconditioning with inhaled carbon monoxide in the context of lung and kidney injury, induced by the low perfusion during and after cardiopulmonary bypass. Mechanisms like the heat shock response as well as an expanded view regarding toxicity and side effects are described broadly.

  8. Some aspects of the mitochondrial oxidative metabolism in human atrial tissue during cardiopulmonary by-pass.

    PubMed

    Corbucci, G G; Gasparetto, A; Antonelli, M; Bufi, M; De Blasi, R A

    1987-01-01

    Following previous research on the hypoxic cell in human circulatory shock, the present work has investigated some mitochondrial oxidative aspects in atrial biopsies taken during cardiopulmonary by-pass. Cardioplegic solution and hypothermia were administered to 10 patients and the atrial samples were collected before and after aortic clamping. The results show a cellular protective effect of cardioplegia and hypothermia on the electron-transport chain, even if the enzymes with high KmO2 appear to be more sensitive to ischaemia. The results suggest a metabolic injury rather than an oxidative damage due to the induced ischaemia, alterations to fatty-acid beta-oxidation being especially notable. Because of the unchanged oxidative capacities, the oxyradical generation and the peroxidative damage appear to be irrelevant in the ischaemic period and during the course of reperfusion. Further studies are needed to elucidate the metabolic damage and the therapeutic implications due to the induced ischaemia in the myocardial cell during the aortic clamping.

  9. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support in post-traumatic cardiopulmonary failure: A 10-year single institutional experience.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chun-Yu; Tsai, Feng-Chun; Lee, Hsiu-An; Tseng, Yuan-His

    2017-02-01

    Patients with multiple traumas associated with cardiopulmonary failure have a high mortality rate; however, such patients can be temporarily stabilized using extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), providing a bridge to rescue therapy. Using a retrospective study design, we aimed to clarify the prognostic factors of post-traumatic ECMO support.From March 2006 to July 2016, 43 adult patients (mean age, 37.3 ± 15.2 years; 7 females [16.3%]) underwent ECMO because of post-traumatic cardiopulmonary failure. Pre-ECMO demographics, peri-ECMO events, and post-ECMO recoveries were compared between survivors and nonsurvivors.The most common traumatic insult was traffic collision (n = 30, 69.8%), and involved injury areas included the chest (n = 33, 76.7%), head (n = 14, 32.6%), abdomen (n = 21, 48.8%), and fractures (n = 21, 48.8%). Fifteen patients (34.9%) underwent cardiopulmonary resuscitation and 22 (51.2%) received rescue interventions before ECMO deployment. The mean time interval between trauma and ECMO was 90.6 ± 130.1 hours, and the mode of support was venovenous in 26 patients (60.5%). A total of 26 patients (60.5%) were weaned off of ECMO and 22 (51.6%) survived to discharge, with an overall mean support time of 162.9 ± 182.7 hours. A multivariate regression analysis identified 2 significant predictors for in-hospital mortality: an injury severity score (ISS) >30 (odds ratio [OR], 9.48; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.04-18.47; P = 0.042), and the requirement of renal replacement therapy (RRT) during ECMO (OR, 8.64; 95% CI, 1.73-26.09; P = 0.020). These two factors were also significant for the 1-year survival (ISS >30: 12.5%; ISS ≤30, 48.1%, P = 0.001) (RRT required, 15.0%; RRT not required, 52.2%, P = 0.006).Using ECMO in selected traumatized patients with cardiopulmonary failure can be a salvage therapy. Prompt intervention before shock-impaired systemic organ perfusion and acute renal failure

  10. Pre-Eclampsia Increases the Risk of Postpartum Haemorrhage: A Nationwide Cohort Study in The Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    von Schmidt auf Altenstadt, Joost F.; Hukkelhoven, Chantal W. P. M.; van Roosmalen, Jos; Bloemenkamp, Kitty W. M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Postpartum haemorrhage is a leading cause of maternal morbidity and mortality worldwide. Identifying risk indicators for postpartum haemorrhage is crucial to predict this life threatening condition. Another major contributor to maternal morbidity and mortality is pre-eclampsia. Previous studies show conflicting results in the association between pre-eclampsia and postpartum haemorrhage. The primary objective of this study was to investigate the association between pre-eclampsia and postpartum haemorrhage. Our secondary objective was to identify other risk indicators for postpartum haemorrhage in the Netherlands. Methods A nationwide cohort was used, containing prospectively collected data of women giving birth after 19 completed weeks of gestation from January 2000 until January 2008 (n =  1 457 576). Data were extracted from the Netherlands Perinatal Registry, covering 96% of all deliveries in the Netherlands. The main outcome measure, postpartum haemorrhage, was defined as blood loss of ≥1000 ml in the 24 hours following delivery. The association between pre-eclampsia and postpartum haemorrhage was investigated with uni- and multivariable logistic regression analyses. Results Overall prevalence of postpartum haemorrhage was 4.3% and of pre-eclampsia 2.2%. From the 31 560 women with pre-eclampsia 2 347 (7.4%) developed postpartum haemorrhage, compared to 60 517 (4.2%) from the 1 426 016 women without pre-eclampsia (odds ratio 1.81; 95% CI 1.74 to 1.89). Risk of postpartum haemorrhage in women with pre-eclampsia remained increased after adjusting for confounders (adjusted odds ratio 1.53; 95% CI 1.46 to 1.60). Conclusion Women with pre-eclampsia have a 1.53 fold increased risk for postpartum haemorrhage. Clinicians should be aware of this and use this knowledge in the management of pre-eclampsia and the third stage of labour in order to reach the fifth Millenium Developmental Goal of reducing maternal mortality ratios with 75% by 2015. PMID

  11. Assessing practical skills in cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    González, Baltasar Sánchez; Martínez, Laura; Cerdà, Manel; Piacentini, Enrique; Trenado, Josep; Quintana, Salvador

    2017-01-01

    Abstract This paper aims to analyze agreement in the assessment of external chest compressions (ECC) by 3 human raters and dedicated feedback software. While 54 volunteer health workers (medical transport technicians), trained and experienced in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), performed a complete sequence of basic CPR maneuvers on a manikin incorporating feedback software (Laerdal PC v 4.2.1 Skill Reporting Software) (L), 3 expert CPR instructors (A, B, and C) visually assessed ECC, evaluating hand placement, compression depth, chest decompression, and rate. We analyzed the concordance among the raters (A, B, and C) and between the raters and L with Cohen's kappa coefficient (K), intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC), Bland–Altman plots, and survival–agreement plots. The agreement (expressed as Cohen's K and ICC) was ≥0.54 in only 3 instances and was ≤0.45 in more than half. Bland–Altman plots showed significant dispersion of the data. The survival–agreement plot showed a high degree of discordance between pairs of raters (A–L, B–L, and C–L) when the level of tolerance was set low. In visual assessment of ECC, there is a significant lack of agreement among accredited raters and significant dispersion and inconsistency in data, bringing into question the reliability and validity of this method of measurement. PMID:28353609

  12. Cardiopulmonary Exercise Test: Background, Applicability and Interpretation

    PubMed Central

    Herdy, Artur Haddad; Ritt, Luiz Eduardo Fonteles; Stein, Ricardo; de Araújo, Claudio Gil Soares; Milani, Mauricio; Meneghelo, Romeu Sérgio; Ferraz, Almir Sérgio; Hossri, Carlos; de Almeida, Antonio Eduardo Monteiro; Fernandes-Silva, Miguel Morita; Serra, Salvador Manoel

    2016-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET) has been gaining importance as a method of functional assessment in Brazil and worldwide. In its most frequent applications, CPET consists in applying a gradually increasing intensity exercise until exhaustion or until the appearance of limiting symptoms and/or signs. The following parameters are measured: ventilation; oxygen consumption (VO2); carbon dioxide production (VCO2); and the other variables of conventional exercise testing. In addition, in specific situations, pulse oximetry and flow-volume loops during and after exertion are measured. The CPET provides joint data analysis that allows complete assessment of the cardiovascular, respiratory, muscular and metabolic systems during exertion, being considered gold standard for cardiorespiratory functional assessment.1-6 The CPET allows defining mechanisms related to low functional capacity that can cause symptoms, such as dyspnea, and correlate them with changes in the cardiovascular, pulmonary and skeletal muscle systems. Furthermore, it can be used to provide the prognostic assessment of patients with heart or lung diseases, and in the preoperative period, in addition to aiding in a more careful exercise prescription to healthy subjects, athletes and patients with heart or lung diseases. Similarly to CPET clinical use, its research also increases, with the publication of several scientific contributions from Brazilian researchers in high-impact journals. Therefore, this study aimed at providing a comprehensive review on the applicability of CPET to different clinical situations, in addition to serving as a practical guide for the interpretation of that test. PMID:27982272

  13. [Ethics of the cardiopulmonary resuscitation decisions].

    PubMed

    Monzón, J L; Saralegui, I; Molina, R; Abizanda, R; Cruz Martín, M; Cabré, L; Martínez, K; Arias, J J; López, V; Gràcia, R M; Rodríguez, A; Masnou, N

    2010-11-01

    Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) must be attempted if indicated, not done if it is not indicated or if the patient does not accept or has previously rejected it and withdrawn it if it is ineffective. If CPR is considered futile, a Do-Not-Resuscitate Order (DNR) will be recorded. This should be made known to all physicians and nurses involved in patient care. It may be appropriate to limit life-sustaining-treatments for patients with severe anoxic encephalopathy, if the possibility of clinical evolution to brain death is ruled out. After CPR it is necessary to inform and support families and then review the process in order to make future improvements. After limitation of vital support, certain type of non-heart-beating-organ donation can be proposed. In order to acquire CPR skills, it is necessary to practice with simulators and, sometimes, with recently deceased, always with the consent of the family. Research on CPR is essential and must be conducted according to ethical rules and legal frameworks.

  14. Evaluation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation techniques in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billica, Roger; Gosbee, John; Krupa, Debra T.

    1991-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) techniques were investigated in microgravity with specific application to planned medical capabilities for Space Station Freedom (SSF). A KC-135 parabolic flight test was performed with the goal of evaluating and quantifying the efficacy of different types of microgravity CPR techniques. The flight followed the standard 40 parabola profile with 20 to 25 seconds of near-zero gravity in each parabola. Three experiments were involved chosen for their clinical background, certification, and practical experience in prior KC-135 parabolic flight. The CPR evaluation was performed using a standard training mannequin (recording resusci-Annie) which was used in practice prior to the actual flight. Aboard the KC-135, the prototype medical restraint system (MRS) for the SSF Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) was used for part of the study. Standard patient and crew restraints were used for interface with the MRS. During the portion of study where CPR was performed without MRS, a set of straps for crew restraint similar to those currently employed for the Space Shuttle program were used. The entire study was recorded via still camera and video.

  15. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) in pulmonary emphysema.

    PubMed

    Paoletti, Patrizia; De Filippis, Francesca; Fraioli, Francesco; Cinquanta, Alessandra; Valli, Gabriele; Laveneziana, Pierantonio; Vaccaro, Francesco; Martolini, Dario; Palange, Paolo

    2011-12-15

    In patients affected by chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), cardiopulmonary response to exercise was never related to the severity of emphysema (E) measured by high resolution computed tomography (HRCT). Sixteen patients (age=65±8 yrs; FEV(1)=54±18%pred; RV=160±28%pred) with moderate to severe E (quantified by lung HRCT as % voxels <-910 HU) were exercised on a cycle-ergometer to exhaustion. Oxygen uptake (V˙(O2)), carbon dioxide output (V˙(CO2)), ventilation (V˙(E)), tidal volume (V(T)), and end-tidal P(CO2) (PET(CO2)) derived variables were measured breath-by-breath. The % of E correlated with: (1) the ratio V(Tpeak) (r=0.74; p=0.001); (2) the V˙(E)/V˙(CO2) slope (r=-0.77; p=0.0004); (3) PET(CO2) values at peak exercise (r=0.80; p=0.0001). Also, the %E was strongly predicted by the following exercise equation: %E(EST) = 58.1 + 11.9 × ΔV˙(E)/V˙(CO2) (r=0.94; p<0.0001). A V(Tpeak)/FEV1 ratio>1 is typically observed in severe E patients; furthermore, the V˙(E)/V˙(CO2) slope and the PET(CO2peak) values decrease and increase respectively as more as the emphysema is severe.

  16. Review and Outcome of Prolonged Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Youness, Houssein; Al Halabi, Tarek; Hussein, Hussein; Awab, Ahmed; Jones, Kellie; Keddissi, Jean

    2016-01-01

    The maximal duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is unknown. We report a case of prolonged CPR. We have then reviewed all published cases with CPR duration equal to or more than 20 minutes. The objective was to determine the survival rate, the neurological outcome, and the characteristics of the survivors. Measurements and Main Results. The CPR data for 82 patients was reviewed. The median duration of CPR was 75 minutes. Patients mean age was 43 ± 21 years with no significant comorbidities. The main causes of the cardiac arrests were myocardial infarction (29%), hypothermia (21%), and pulmonary emboli (12%). 74% of the arrests were witnessed, with a mean latency to CPR of 2 ± 6 minutes and good quality chest compression provided in 96% of the cases. Adjunct therapy included extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (18%), thrombolysis (15.8%), and rewarming for hypothermia (19.5%). 83% were alive at 1 year, with full neurological recovery reported in 63 patients. Conclusion. Patients undergoing prolonged CPR can survive with good outcome. Young age, myocardial infarction, and potentially reversible causes of cardiac arrest such as hypothermia and pulmonary emboli predict a favorable result, especially when the arrest is witnessed and followed by prompt and good resuscitative efforts. PMID:26885387

  17. A community training scheme in cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, R; Martin, B; Williams, G; Quinn, E; Robertson, G; Chamberlain, D A

    1984-01-01

    Community instruction in basic life support and resuscitation techniques has been offered in Brighton Health District since 1978. Classes are held frequently for the general public and businesses, schools, and other organisations. First aid care for unconscious patients, the treatment of respiratory obstruction or failure, and the recognition and management of cardiac arrest is taught in a single two hour session. Over 20 000 people have been taught, up to 40 at a time in multiple groups of six to eight, by lay instructors usually supervised by ambulancemen trained to "paramedic" standards. Fifty four incidents have been reported to us in which techniques learnt in the classes have been implemented. Five patients recovered after first aid support but subsequently did not seek medical treatment. Of the 34 patients reviewed in hospital, at least 20 survived to be discharged. We believe that intervention may have been life saving in 16 instances. The benefit of cardiopulmonary resuscitation for victims who may have been asystolic is, however, difficult to quantify because the outcome without intervention cannot be predicted accurately. Community training in basic life support should be considered in association with ambulances equipped for resuscitation and hospital intensive care and cardiac care units as an integrated service for the victims of sudden circulatory or respiratory emergencies. The results achieved so far in Brighton and in other more advanced schemes, particularly in the United States of America, may encourage other health authorities to adopt similar programmes. PMID:6421403

  18. [Cardiopulmonary resuscitation in pregnant women: peculiarities].

    PubMed

    Grau Gandía, S; Martínez Ramón, M A

    1998-01-01

    This review main purpose is to show nursing the present knowledge about cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in pregnant women because of the scarce information published by Spanish Nursing Publications. The bibliographical research was made using both the Medline (from January 1982 to March 1998) and Index de Enfermería databases. There, we can find 32 references from which only 23 were selected (all of them belong to the Medline database) in spite of 3 chapters that had already been selected from other different books. Although maternal cardiac arrest rarely happens during pregnancy, it is very important for sanitary staff to be familiarized with the specifics thecnics and equipment (ultrasound and cardiotocograph monitoring). This review describes the physiological changes that take place during pregnancy and have an incidence into CPR. The article also includes the conclusions about the checked papers and the peculiarities that have to be taken into account in each CPR, such as the fetal viability evaluation, right CPR position, airway and breathing, desfibrillation, external cardiac compression and use of pharmacologic therapy and intravenous fluids. Moreover, there is a special mention of the perimortem cesarean delivery features: antecedents, foetus-maternals consequences and managements, due to the fact that this surgical operation should be included inside the CPR protocols of the pregnant.

  19. An unusual cause for an optic disc haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, Julia; Kailasanathan, Anusha; Chen, Hean

    2011-01-01

    A 51-year-old male on chemotherapy for myeloma presented initially with a unilateral optic disc haemorrhage and signs of optic neuropathy. This rapidly progressed to affect both eyes and within a few days he developed retinal features suggestive of progressive outer retinal necrosis. He was treated with intravenous acyclovir that was subsequently changed to ganciclovir when serological tests for cytomegalovirus were found to be positive for immunoglobulin M antibodies. His visual loss continued to deteriorate despite treatment, and he subsequently developed a retinal detachment in one eye. The causes of optic neuropathy in immunocompromised patients and the importance of eliminating an infective cause are discussed. PMID:22707367

  20. Diagnostic Accuracy of Early Radiology in Acute Gastrointestinal Haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Allan, R. N.; Dykes, P. W.; Toye, D. K. M.

    1972-01-01

    The accuracy of early radiology in patients with acute gastrointestinal haemorrhage has been studied by a comparison of the radiological opinion with the established diagnosis. A full examination has proved safe and uncomplicated with a high degree of accuracy and no false-positive results. Analysis of the errors shows that the presence of residue discourages the radiologist from making the correct diagnosis, and modification of the standard bariummeal technique may be needed to overcome this difficulty. ImagesFIG. 2FIG. 3FIG. 4FIG. 5FIG. 6 PMID:4538882

  1. Glomerular haematuria, renal interstitial haemorrhage and acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Martín Cleary, Catalina; Moreno, Juan Antonio; Fernández, Beatriz; Ortiz, Alberto; Parra, Emilio G; Gracia, Carolina; Blanco-Colio, Luis M; Barat, Antonio; Egido, Jesús

    2010-12-01

    Macroscopic haematuria of glomerular origin has been associated with acute kidney injury. We report a patient with IgA nephropathy, macroscopic haematuria and acute kidney injury. Systemic anticoagulation may have aggravated haematuria. There was extensive interstitial and intratubular red blood cell extravasation, and interstitial haemosiderin deposits. The abundant presence of macrophages expressing the haemoglobin scavenger receptor CD163 and of cells stained for oxidative stress markers (NADPH-p22 phox and heme-oxigenase-1) in areas of interstitial haemorrhage and red blood cell cast-containing tubules provided evidence for a role for free haemoglobin in tubulointerstitial renal injury in human glomerular disease.

  2. Subarachnoid haemorrhage mimicking transient ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Lai, C-H; Juan, Y-H; Chang, S-L; Lee, W-L; How, C-K; Hsu, T-F

    2015-08-01

    Patients often present to the emergency department with loss of consciousness. The differential diagnosis of such condition may be difficult because of limited clinical information. The authors present a case of subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) with initial electrocardiographic (ECG) finding mimicking ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), which was confirmed to resolve in a follow-up study. Accurate and timely diagnosis of SAH-related ST-segment elevation was important, as the therapeutic strategy for SAH is completely different from that for STEMI. If the clinicians do not have other tools for diagnosis, the follow-up ECG may help us make a most possible diagnosis.

  3. A Case of Haemorrhagic Constrictive Pericarditis with Bilateral Pleural Effusions

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Julie; Talebi, Soheila; Cativo, Eder; Mushiyev, Savi; Pekler, Gerald; Visco, Ferdinand

    2016-01-01

    Presentation of pericardial disease is diverse, with the viral aetiology being the most common cause; however, when haemorrhagic pericardial effusion is present, these causes are narrowed to few aetiologies. We present a case of a young female of African descent who presented with diffuse abdominal pain and vomiting. Initial work-up showed pericardial effusion with impending echocardiographic findings of cardiac tamponade and bilateral pleural effusions. Procedures included a left video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) with pericardial window. We consider that it is important for all physicians to be aware of not only typical presentation but also atypical and unusual clinical picture of pericardial disease. PMID:27807484

  4. Intraparenchymal haemorrhage and uncal herniation resulting from dobutamine stress echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Bennin, Charles-Lwanga Kobina; Ramoutar, Virin; Velarde, Gladys

    2014-01-01

    Intracranial haemorrhage (ICH) resulting from dobutamine stress echocardiography (DSE) is a rare complication in an otherwise relatively safe procedure. There has been one previously reported case of ICH associated with DSE in a patient who was fully anticoagulated. The authors report a second case of ICH associated with DSE leading to a poor outcome. Unlike the previous report, this patient was not fully anticoagulated and bleeding resulted from uncontrolled hypertension. Clinicians should be attentive to the risk of ICH associated with DSE in the setting of uncontrolled hypertension. PMID:24642173

  5. A composite neurobehavioral test to evaluate acute functional deficits after cerebellar haemorrhage in rats.

    PubMed

    McBride, Devin W; Nowrangi, Derek; Kaur, Harpreet; Wu, Guangyong; Huang, Lei; Lekic, Tim; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H

    2017-01-01

    Cerebellar haemorrhage accounts for 5-10% of all intracerebral haemorrhages and leads to severe, long-lasting functional deficits. Currently, there is limited research on this stroke subtype, which may be due to the lack of a suitable composite neuroscoring system specific for cerebellar injury in rodents. The purpose of this study is to develop a comprehensive composite neuroscore test for cerebellar injury using a rat model of cerebellar haemorrhage. Sixty male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to either sham surgery or cerebellar haemorrhage. Twenty-four hours post-injury, neurological behaviour was evaluated using 17 cost-effective and easy-to-perform tests, and a composite neuroscore was developed. The composite neuroscore was then used to assess functional recovery over seven days after cerebellar haemorrhage. Differences in the composite neuroscore deficits for the mild and moderate cerebellar haemorrhage models were observed for up to five days post-ictus. Until now, a composite neuroscore for cerebellar injury was not available for rodent studies. Herein, using mild and moderate cerebellar haemorrhage rat models a composite neuroscore for cerebellar injury was developed and used to assess functional deficits after cerebellar haemorrhage. This composite neuroscore may also be useful for other cerebellar injury models.

  6. Fatal cerebral haemorrhage in a hypertensive seven-year-old boy

    PubMed Central

    Brandtner, Herwig; Monticelli, Fabio C; Meyer, Harald J; Biebl, Ariane

    2016-01-01

    A seven-year-old boy died from autopsy-proven brain haemorrhage due to hypertensive vasculopathy. This emphasizes the importance of early diagnosis and therapy of hypertension in children. Brain haemorrhage is a potentially fatal complication of paediatric hypertension. PMID:27688895

  7. Three-dimensional reconstruction and volumetry of intracranial haemorrhage and its mass effect.

    PubMed

    Strik, H M; Borchert, H; Fels, C; Knauth, M; Rienhoff, O; Bähr, M; Verhey, J F

    2005-06-01

    Intracerebral haemorrhage still causes considerable disability and mortality. The studies on conservative and operative management are inconclusive, probably due to inexact volumetry of the haemorrhage. We investigated whether three-dimensional (3-D), voxel-based volumetry of the haemorrhage and its mass effect is feasible with routine computed tomography (CT) scans. The volumes of the haemorrhage, ventricles, midline shift, the intracranial volume and ventricular compression in CT scans of 12 patients with basal ganglia haemorrhage were determined with the 3-D slicer software. Indices of haemorrhage and intracranial or ventricular volume were calculated and correlated with the clinical data. The intended measures could be determined with an acceptable intra-individual variability. The 3-D volumetric data tended to correlate better with the clinical course than the conventionally assessed distance of midline shift and volume of haemorrhage. 3-D volumetry of intracranial haemorrhage and its mass effect is feasible with routine CT examination. Prospective studies should assess its value for clinical studies on intracranial space-occupying diseases.

  8. Pediatric Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: Advances in Science, Techniques, and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Topjian, Alexis A.; Berg, Robert A.; Nadkarni, Vinay M.

    2009-01-01

    More than 25% of children survive to hospital discharge after in-hospital cardiac arrests, and 5% to 10% survive after out-of-hospital cardiac arrests. This review of pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation addresses the epidemiology of pediatric cardiac arrests, mechanisms of coronary blood flow during cardiopulmonary resuscitation, the 4 phases of cardiac arrest resuscitation, appropriate interventions during each phase, special resuscitation circumstances, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The key elements of pathophysiology that impact and match the timing, intensity, duration, and variability of the hypoxic-ischemic insult to evidence-based interventions are reviewed. Exciting discoveries in basic and applied-science laboratories are now relevant for specific subpopulations of pediatric cardiac arrest victims and circumstances (eg, ventricular fibrillation, neonates, congenital heart disease, extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation). Improving the quality of interventions is increasingly recognized as a key factor for improving outcomes. Evolving training strategies include simulation training, just-in-time and just-in-place training, and crisis-team training. The difficult issue of when to discontinue resuscitative efforts is addressed. Outcomes from pediatric cardiac arrests are improving. Advances in resuscitation science and state-of-the-art implementation techniques provide the opportunity for further improvement in outcomes among children after cardiac arrest. PMID:18977991

  9. Mining Discriminative Patterns to Predict Health Status for Cardiopulmonary Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Qian; Shang, Jingbo; Juen, Joshua; Han, Jiawei; Schatz, Bruce

    2017-01-01

    Smartphones are ubiquitous now, but it is still unclear what physiological functions they can monitor at clinical quality. Pulmonary function is a standard measure of health status for cardiopulmonary patients. We have shown that predictive models can accurately classify cardiopulmonary conditions from healthy status, as well as different severity levels within cardiopulmonary disease, the GOLD stages. Here we propose several universal models to monitor cardiopulmonary conditions, including DPClass, a novel learning approach we designed. We carefully prepare motion dataset covering status from GOLD 0 (healthy), GOLD 1 (mild), GOLD 2 (moderate), all the way to GOLD 3 (severe). Sixty-six subjects participate in this study. After de-identification, their walking data are applied to train the predictive models. The RBF-SVM model yields the highest accuracy while the DPClass model provides better interpretation of the model mechanisms. We not only provide promising solutions to monitor health status by simply carrying a smartphone, but also demonstrate how demographics influences predictive models of cardiopulmonary disease. PMID:28174760

  10. Human investigations into the arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreflexes during exercise.

    PubMed

    Fadel, Paul J; Raven, Peter B

    2012-01-01

    After considerable debate and key experimental evidence, the importance of the arterial baroreflex in contributing to and maintaining the appropriate neural cardiovascular adjustments to exercise is now well accepted. Indeed, the arterial baroreflex resets during exercise in an intensity-dependent manner to continue to regulate blood pressure as effectively as at rest. Studies have indicated that the exercise resetting of the arterial baroreflex is mediated by both the feedforward mechanism of central command and the feedback mechanism associated with skeletal muscle afferents (the exercise pressor reflex). Another perhaps less appreciated neural mechanism involved in evoking and maintaining neural cardiovascular responses to exercise is the cardiopulmonary baroreflex. The limited information available regarding the cardiopulmonary baroreflex during exercise provides evidence for a role in mediating sympathetic nerve activity and blood pressure responses. In addition, recent investigations have demonstrated an interaction between cardiopulmonary baroreceptors and the arterial baroreflex during dynamic exercise, which contributes to the magnitude of exercise-induced increases in blood pressure as well as the resetting of the arterial baroreflex. Furthermore, neural inputs from the cardiopulmonary baroreceptors appear to play an important role in establishing the operating point of the arterial baroreflex. This symposium review highlights recent studies in these important areas indicating that the interactions of four neural mechanisms (central command, the exercise pressor reflex, the arterial baroreflex and cardiopulmonary baroreflex) are integral in mediating the neural cardiovascular adjustments to exercise.

  11. Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Lansing, Allan M.

    1963-01-01

    Septic shock may be defined as hypotension caused by bacteremia and accompanied by decreased peripheral blood flow, evidenced by oliguria. Clinically, a shaking chill is the warning signal. The immediate cause of hypotension is pooling of blood in the periphery, leading to decreased venous return: later, peripheral resistance falls and cardiac failure may occur. Irreversible shock is comparable to massive reactive hyperemia. Reticuloendothelial failure, histamine release, and toxic hypersensitivity may be factors in the pathogenesis of septic shock. Adrenal failure does not usually occur, but large doses of corticosteroid are employed therapeutically to counteract the effect of histamine release or hypersensitivity to endotoxin. The keys to successful therapy are time, antibiotics, vasopressors, cortisone and correction of acidosis. PMID:14063936

  12. Condom Tamponade in the Management of Primary Postpartum Haemorrhage: A Report of three cases in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Maya, Ernest T; Buntugu, Kennedy A; Aki, Lovelace; Srofenyoh, Emmanuel K

    2015-09-01

    Postpartum haemorrhage is one of the major causes of maternal mortality worldwide. The leading cause of primary postpartum haemorrhage is uterine atony and active management of the third stage of labour with oxytocin is recommended for preventing primary postpartum haemorrhage. Parenteral oxytocin is also the drug of choice for medical management of postpartum haemorrhage secondary to uterine atony. Condom uterine balloon tamponade is .a low cost technique that can be used as a second-line option for treatment. We report retrospectively three cases of primary PPH secondary to uterine atony which were managed successfully with condom tamponade. Condom tamponade is effective in managing post partum haemorrhage secondary to uterine atony and we advocate for the training of all skilled attendants on how to insert the condom tamponade.

  13. Embolic Activity During In Vivo Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    PubMed Central

    DeFoe, Gordon R.; Dame, Norman A.; Farrell, Mark S.; Ross, Cathy S.; Langner, Craig W.; Likosky, Donald S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: Neurologic injury after cardiac surgery is principally associated with emboli. Although much work has focused on surgical sources of emboli, less attention has been focused on emboli associated with the heart–lung machine. We tested whether emboli are associated with discrete processes during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). One hundred patients undergoing cardiothoracic surgery were enrolled between April 2008 and May 2011 at a single medical center. During each surgical procedure, emboli were counted in three CPB locations: the venous side (Channel 1), before the arterial line filter (Channel 2), and after the arterial line filter (Channel 3). We used prespecified event markers to identify perfusionist interventions. Identical circuits were used on all patients. Of the 100 patients enrolled, 62 underwent isolated coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), 17 underwent isolated valve operations, and 21 underwent CABG plus valve. Median counts across Channels 1, 2, and 3 were 69,853, 3,017, and 1,251, respectively. The greatest contributor to emboli in Channels 1, 2, and 3, respectively, were achieving the calculated CPB flow, opening of the electronic arterial line clamp, and introducing a hemofilter. The circuit technology was efficient in reducing total emboli counts from Channels 1–2 irrespective of the size of the emboli. Nearly 71% of all emboli 30–100 mm in size were removed from the circuit between Channels 2 and 3. No significant association was found between emboli counts and S100B release. Emboli occur frequently during CPB and are predominantly associated with the initiation of bypass, operation of the electronic arterial line clamp, and the initiation of a hemofilter. Continued work to reduce the occurrence of emboli is warranted. PMID:25208432

  14. Gravity and Development of Cardiopulmonary Reflex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaoka, Shunji; Eno, Yuko; Ohira, Yoshinobu

    Cardio-pulmonary reflex, which our cardiac activity is synchronized to the respiration by autonomic nervous system regulation, is called as "respiratory sinus arrhythmia" and commonly found in adult. The physiological function of the espiratory sinus arrhythmia is considered to maximize the gas exchange during respiration cycle. This respiration induced heart rate variability (RHRV) is only found in mammals and avian showing a remarkable postnatal development, whereas no RHRV in aquatic species such as fish or amphibian. To elucidate our hypothesis that gravity exposure may plays a key role in the postnatal development of RHRV as well as its evolutional origin in these ground animals, we have studied effects of hypergravity (2G) on the postnatal development of RHRV using rat. Pregnant Wister rats were kept in centrifugal cages system for 38 days from 6th days of pregnant mother to have neonates until 23 days old. Electrocardiograph was recorded from the neonates in 2 to 23 days old in 2G group with simultaneous control (1G) group. The RHRV analysis was performed by calculating a component of Fourier power spectral coincide with the respiration frequency. In both groups, averaged resting heart rate gradually increase from 2 to 23 days old. When comparing the heart rate between the two groups, the 2G group indicated significantly lower (240± 8 bpm) than 1G control (326±21 bpm, p¡0.001) in 2 days old, where as no significance in 23 days old. The RHRV of 2 days old neonates in both groups indicated very small magnitude but significantly lower in 2G group than 1G control (p¡0.01). The RHRV gradually increase during the first 2 weeks and then rapid increased to reached 45 fold of magnitude in 1G control, whereas 69 fold in 2G group. The results strongly suggested that the postnatal innervation from respiration to cardiovascular centers was gravity dependent.

  15. Acute haemorrhagic diarrhoea syndrome in dogs: 108 cases.

    PubMed

    Mortier, F; Strohmeyer, K; Hartmann, K; Unterer, S

    2015-06-13

    No prospective studies including large numbers of dogs with acute haemorrhagic diarrhoea syndrome (AHDS) are published so far. The aim of this case-control study was to describe signalment, history, clinical signs, laboratory values and course of disease in dogs with AHDS. Dogs (108) with idiopathic acute haemorrhagic diarrhoea (<3 days) were prospectively enrolled. Clinical assessment was performed by calculation of the 'AHDS index' (0-18). The hospital population and 21 healthy dogs served as control groups. Dogs with AHDS had a significantly lower body weight (median 9.8 kg) and age (median five years) than other dogs of the hospital population (20 kg; 10 years) (P<0.001). Predisposed breeds were Yorkshire terrier, miniature pinscher, miniature schnauzer and Maltese. The syndrome was more likely to occur during winter. Vomiting preceded the onset of bloody diarrhoea in 80 per cent of dogs and haematemesis was observed in half of those cases. Median AHDS index at presentation was 12 (range 3-17). Haematocrit was generally high (median 57.1 per cent; range 33-76 per cent), but exceeded 60 per cent only in 31.4 per cent of dogs. Haematocrit of 48.1 per cent of dogs was above reference range, as was monocyte (50.0 per cent), segmented (59.6 per cent) and band neutrophil count (45.2 per cent). A rapid clinical improvement occurred during the first 48 hours.

  16. Comparative studies for serodiagnosis of haemorrhagic septicaemia in cattle sera

    PubMed Central

    El-Jakee, Jakeen K.; Ali, Samah Said; El-Shafii, Soumaya Ahmed; Hessain, Ashgan M.; Al-Arfaj, Abdullah A.; Mohamed, Moussa I.

    2015-01-01

    Haemorrhagic septicaemia caused by Pasteurella multocida is a major epizootic disease in cattle and buffaloes in developing countries with high morbidity and mortality rate. In the present study, a total of 88 P. multocida isolates were isolated from 256 nasopharyngeal swabs and lung tissues samples (34.4%) during the period from January, 2013 to March, 2014 from different governorates located in Egypt. Dead calves showed the highest percentage of P. multocida isolation followed by the emergency slaughtered calves, diseased calves then apparently healthy ones. These isolates were confirmed as P. multocida microscopically, biochemically by traditional tests and by API 20E commercial kit then by PCR. The percentages of positive serum samples using somatic antigen and micro-agglutination test at 1/1280 diluted serum were 10%, 54.49% and 0% in apparently healthy, diseased and emergency slaughtered samples, respectively whereas, the percentages using capsular antigen and indirect haemagglutination test were 40%, 60.89% and 60% in apparently healthy, diseased and emergency slaughtered samples, respectively. The ELISA showed the highest sensitivity for diagnosing P. multocida in apparently healthy, diseased and emergency slaughtered animals with percentages of 42%; 92.9% and 80%, respectively. The obtained results revealed that the ELISA using capsular antigen of P. multocida is a more sensitive and specific serological test for diagnosis of haemorrhagic septicaemia. PMID:26858538

  17. Role of canine circovirus in dogs with acute haemorrhagic diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Anderson, A; Hartmann, K; Leutenegger, C M; Proksch, A L; Mueller, R S; Unterer, S

    2017-02-27

    Canine circovirus (CanineCV) has been detected in some dogs with severe haemorrhagic diarrhoea, but its pathogenic role is unclear. This study evaluated a suspected association between the presence of CanineCV and acute haemorrhagic diarrhoea syndrome (AHDS) in dogs. The prevalence of CanineCV in dogs with AHDS was compared with that in healthy dogs and those infected with canine parvovirus (CPV). Additionally, time to recovery and mortality rate were compared between CanineCV-positive and CanineCV-negative dogs. Faecal samples of dogs with AHDS (n=55), healthy dogs (n=66) and dogs infected with CPV (n=54) were examined by two real-time TaqMan PCR assays targeting the replicase and capsid genes of CanineCV. CanineCV was detected in faecal samples of two dogs with AHDS, three healthy controls and seven dogs infected with CPV. Among the three groups, there was no significant difference in prevalence of CanineCV. CPV-infected animals that were coinfected with CanineCV had a significantly higher mortality rate compared with those negative for CanineCV. CanineCV does not appear to be the primary causative agent of AHDS in dogs, but might play a role as a negative co-factor in disease outcome in dogs with CPV infection.

  18. An outbreak of acute haemorrhagic conjunctivitis in Kaduna, Nigeria.

    PubMed Central

    Babalola, O E; Amoni, S S; Samaila, E; Thaker, U; Darougar, S

    1990-01-01

    Clinical studies were carried out on two groups of patients with acute haemorrhagic conjunctivitis (AHC) during an epidemic in 1985 in Northern Nigeria. Group 1 consisted of 99 students attending a girls' boarding school, group 2 of 200 patients selected randomly from 1000 examined at the local clinic. Moderate to severe hyperaemia and papillary responses were present in the palpebral conjunctiva of all patients, and 234 (66%) had subconjunctival haemorrhages. Transient superficial punctate keratitis was noted in over 60% of patients. A transient flare suggestive of a low grade iritis was seen in five patients. No neurological disorders were noted. Serological studies were carried out on patients from group 2. Fifteen paired and 20 single serum samples were titrated against adenovirus type 4 (Ad-4) and enterovirus type 70 (EV-70). Two pairs of sera showed a 4-fold rise in antibody levels to EV-70, whereas the antibody titres to EV-70 in the rest of the sera ranged from 1:20 (no antibody) to 1:160. None of the paired serum samples showed a 4-fold rise in antibody levels to adenovirus. The results of clinical studies and serological findings support EV-70 as a probable cause of AHC in Nigeria. PMID:2155654

  19. [Massive haemorrhage after bivalirudin anticoagulation in two heart transplant patients].

    PubMed

    Tauron, M; Paniagua, P; Muñoz-Guijosa, C; Mirabet, S; Padró, J M

    2013-01-01

    Heparin-induced thrombopenia is a common autoimmune complication. It is a prothrombotic state due to the formation of antibodies against heparin/platelet factor 4 complexes. In this situation drugs other than heparin must be used for anticoagulation during extracorporeal circulation (bypass) surgery. Two cases of heart transplantation are presented in whom bivalirudin was used as an anticoagulant during the cardiopulmonary bypass. Severe bleeding complications were observed in both patients. The diagnosis of heparin-induced thrombopenia needs to be improved, as well as the development of protocols for using new drugs other than heparin. For this reason, we have reviewed current protocols and alternative therapies to heparin.

  20. A Review of Carbon Dioxide Monitoring During Adult Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Pantazopoulos, Charalampos; Xanthos, Theodoros; Pantazopoulos, Ioannis; Papalois, Apostolos; Kouskouni, Evangelia; Iacovidou, Nicoletta

    2015-11-01

    Although high quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation is one of the most significant factors related to favourable outcome, its quality depends on many components, such as airway management, compression depth and chest recoil, hands-off time, and early defibrillation. The most common way of controlling the resuscitation efforts is monitoring of end-tidal carbon dioxide. The International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation suggests this method both for in-hospital and out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. However, despite the abundant human and animal studies supporting the usefulness of end-tidal carbon dioxide, its optimal values during cardiopulmonary resuscitation remain controversial. In this review, the advantages and effectiveness of end-tidal carbon dioxide during cardiopulmonary resuscitation are discussed and specific target values are suggested based on the available literature.

  1. 21 CFR 870.4370 - Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. 870... Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a revolving roller mechanism to pump the blood through...

  2. 21 CFR 870.4360 - Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump... Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a method other than revolving rollers to pump the blood...

  3. 21 CFR 870.4360 - Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump... Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a method other than revolving rollers to pump the blood...

  4. 21 CFR 870.4370 - Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. 870... Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a revolving roller mechanism to pump the blood through...

  5. 21 CFR 870.4370 - Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. 870... Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a revolving roller mechanism to pump the blood through...

  6. 21 CFR 870.4360 - Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump... Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a method other than revolving rollers to pump the blood...

  7. 21 CFR 870.4370 - Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. 870... Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a revolving roller mechanism to pump the blood through...

  8. 21 CFR 870.4360 - Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump... Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a method other than revolving rollers to pump the blood...

  9. 21 CFR 870.4220 - Cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine console.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine console... Cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine console. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine... heart-lung machine. The console is designed to interface with the basic units used in a gas...

  10. 21 CFR 870.4220 - Cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine console.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine console... Cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine console. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine... heart-lung machine. The console is designed to interface with the basic units used in a gas...

  11. 21 CFR 870.4220 - Cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine console.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine console... Cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine console. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine... heart-lung machine. The console is designed to interface with the basic units used in a gas...

  12. 21 CFR 870.4220 - Cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine console.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine console... Cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine console. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine... heart-lung machine. The console is designed to interface with the basic units used in a gas...

  13. 21 CFR 870.4220 - Cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine console.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine console... Cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine console. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine... heart-lung machine. The console is designed to interface with the basic units used in a gas...

  14. 21 CFR 870.4410 - Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor... Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor is a transducer that measures the level of gases in the blood. (b) Classification. Class...

  15. 21 CFR 870.4330 - Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor... Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor is a device used in conjunction with a blood gas sensor to measure the level of gases in the...

  16. 21 CFR 870.4260 - Cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter... Cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter is a device used as part of a gas exchange (oxygenator) system to filter...

  17. 21 CFR 870.4330 - Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor... Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor is a device used in conjunction with a blood gas sensor to measure the level of gases in the...

  18. 21 CFR 870.4410 - Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor... Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor is a transducer that measures the level of gases in the blood. (b) Classification. Class...

  19. 21 CFR 870.4260 - Cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter... Cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter is a device used as part of a gas exchange (oxygenator) system to filter...

  20. 21 CFR 870.4330 - Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor... Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor is a device used in conjunction with a blood gas sensor to measure the level of gases in the...

  1. 21 CFR 870.4330 - Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor... Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor is a device used in conjunction with a blood gas sensor to measure the level of gases in the...

  2. 21 CFR 870.4410 - Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor... Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor is a transducer that measures the level of gases in the blood. (b) Classification. Class...

  3. 21 CFR 870.4260 - Cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter... Cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter is a device used as part of a gas exchange (oxygenator) system to filter...

  4. 21 CFR 870.4410 - Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor... Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor is a transducer that measures the level of gases in the blood. (b) Classification. Class...

  5. 21 CFR 870.4260 - Cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter... Cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter is a device used as part of a gas exchange (oxygenator) system to filter...

  6. 21 CFR 870.4360 - Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump... Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a method other than revolving rollers to pump the blood...

  7. 21 CFR 870.4260 - Cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter... Cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter is a device used as part of a gas exchange (oxygenator) system to filter...

  8. 21 CFR 870.4370 - Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. 870... Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a revolving roller mechanism to pump the blood through...

  9. 21 CFR 870.4330 - Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor... Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor is a device used in conjunction with a blood gas sensor to measure the level of gases in the...

  10. 21 CFR 870.4410 - Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor... Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor is a transducer that measures the level of gases in the blood. (b) Classification. Class...

  11. Management of a malignant hyperthermia patient during cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Byrick, R J; Rose, D K; Ranganathan, N

    1982-01-01

    The anaesthetic management of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) for a patient with biopsy-proven malignant hyperthermia is reported. Specific changes in the technique used, such as venting the oxygenator before use, monitoring mixed venous PO2 and PCO2, as well as the safety of cold hyperkalaemic cardioplegia are described. Controversial aspects of malignant hyperthermia management such as the safety of calcium and catechol inotropes are discussed in relationship to the successful use of cardio-pulmonary bypass in our patient. We chose to treat left ventricular dysfunction by aggressive vasodilator (nitroglycerine) therapy. We detected no myocardial or respiratory depression secondary to dantrolene therapy either before or after operation.

  12. DC information preservation for cardiopulmonary monitor utilizing CW Doppler radar.

    PubMed

    Vergara, Alexander M; Boric-Lubecke, Olga; Lubecke, Victor M

    2008-01-01

    Direct conversion RF receivers introduce large DC offsets, reducing the dynamic range of the baseband signal. Coupled with the relatively small time varying signals in human vital sign monitoring using CW Doppler radar, extraction of cardio-pulmonary information becomes difficult. Previous DC offset compensation techniques utilizing AC coupling have proven detrimental to the performance of the system and the integrity of the low-frequency cardiopulmonary signals. A proposed system utilizing digitally controlled voltage feedback and center finding preserves the important DC information for optimal extraction of phase information in the quadrature system.

  13. Synchronization and Cardio-pulmonary feedback in Sleep Apnea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Limei; Ivanov, Plamen Ch.; Chen, Zhi; Hu, Kun; Paydarfar, David; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2004-03-01

    Findings indicate a dynamical coupling between respiratory and cardiac function. However, the nature of this nonlinear interaction remains not well understood. We investigate transient patterns in the cardio-pulmonary interaction under healthy conditions by means of cross-correlation and nonlinear synchronization techniques, and we compare how these patterns change under pathologic conditions such as obstructive sleep apnea --- a periodic cessation of breathing during sleep. We find that during apnea episodes the nonlinear features of cardio-pulmonary interaction change intermittently, and can exhibit variations characterized by different time delays in the phase synchronization between breathing and heartbeat dynamics.

  14. Complications of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation for unconscious patients without cardiopulmonary arrest

    PubMed Central

    Moriwaki, Yoshihiro; Sugiyama, Mitsugi; Tahara, Yoshio; Iwashita, Masayuki; Kosuge, Takayuki; Harunari, Nobuyuki; Arata, Shinju; Suzuki, Noriyuki

    2012-01-01

    Background: Insufficient knowledge of the risks and complications of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) may be an obstructive factor for CPR, however, particularly for patients who are not clearly suffering out of hospital cardiopulmonary arrest (OH-CPA). The object of this study was to clarify the potential complication, the safety of bystander CPR in such cases. Materials and Methods: This study was a population-based observational case series. To be enrolled, patients had to have undergone CPR with chest compressions performed by lay persons, had to be confirmed not to have suffered OHCPA. Complications of bystander CPR were identified from the patients’ medical records and included rib fracture, lung injury, abdominal organ injury, and chest and/or abdominal pain requiring analgesics. In our emergency department, one doctor gathered information while others performed X-ray and blood examinations, electrocardiograms, and chest and abdominal ultrasonography. Results: A total of 26 cases were the subjects. The mean duration of bystander CPR was 6.5 minutes (ranging from 1 to 26). Nine patients died of a causative pathological condition and pneumonia, and the remaining 17 survived to discharge. Three patients suffered from complications (tracheal bleeding, minor gastric mucosal laceration, and chest pain), all of which were minimal and easily treated. No case required special examination or treatment for the complication itself. Conclusion: The risk and frequency of complications due to bystander CPR is thought to be very low. It is reasonable to perform immediate CPR for unconscious victims with inadequate respiration, and to help bystanders perform CPR using the T-CPR system. PMID:22416146

  15. Platelet count and transfusion requirements during moderate or severe postpartum haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Jones, R M; de Lloyd, L; Kealaher, E J; Lilley, G J; Precious, E; Burckett St Laurent, D; Hamlyn, V; Collis, R E; Collins, P W

    2016-06-01

    Limited data exist on platelet transfusion during postpartum haemorrhage. We retrospectively analysed a consecutive cohort from a single centre of 347 women with moderate or severe postpartum haemorrhage, transfused according to national guidelines. Twelve (3%) women required a platelet transfusion. There were no differences between women who did and did not receive platelets with respect to age, mode of initiation of labour or mode of delivery. Women receiving a platelet transfusion had a lower median (IQR [range]) platelet count at study entry than women who did not receive platelets before haemorrhage (135 (97-175 [26-259])×10(9) .l(-1) vs 224 (186-274 [91-1006])×10(9) .l(-1) ), respectively), and at diagnosis of postpartum haemorrhage (median 114 (78-153 [58-238])×10(9) .l(-1) vs 193 (155-243 [78-762])×10(9) .l(-1) respectively). Six women were thrombocytopenic pre-delivery. The cause of haemorrhage that was associated with the highest rate of platelet transfusion was placental abruption, with three of 14 women being transfused. If antenatal thrombocytopenia or consumptive coagulopathy were not present, platelets were only required for haemorrhage > 5000 ml. Early formulaic platelet transfusion would have resulted in many women receiving platelets unnecessarily. Using current guidelines, the need for platelet transfusion is uncommon without antenatal thrombocytopenia, consumptive coagulopathy or haemorrhage > 5000 ml. We found no evidence to support early fixed-ratio platelet transfusion.

  16. Diagnostic laboratory for bleeding disorders ensures efficient management of haemorrhagic disorders.

    PubMed

    Riddell, A; Chuansumrit, A; El-Ekiaby, M; Nair, S C

    2016-07-01

    Haemorrhagic disorders like Postpartum haemorrhage and Dengue haemorrhagic fever are life threatening and requires an active and efficient transfusion service that could provide the most appropriate blood product which could be effective in managing them. This would essentially require prompt identification of the coagulopathy so that the best available product can be given to the bleeding patient to correct the identified haemostatic defect which will help control the bleeding. This would only be possible if the transfusion service has a laboratory to correctly detect the haemostatic defect and that too with an accuracy and precision which is ensured by a good laboratory quality assurance practices. These same processes are necessary for the transfusion services to ensure the quality of the blood products manufactured by them and that it contains adequate amounts of haemostasis factors which will be good to be effective in the management of haemorrhagic disorders. These issues are discussed in detail individually in the management of postpartum haemorrhage and Dengue haemorrhagic fever including when these can help in the use of rFVIIa in Dengue haemorrhagic fever. The requirements to ensure good-quality blood products are made available for the management of these disorders and the same have also been described.

  17. Combined assessment of thrombotic and haemorrhagic risk in acute medical patients.

    PubMed

    La Regina, Micaela; Orlandini, Francesco; Marchini, Francesca; Marinaro, Alessia; Bonacci, Rosanna; Bonanni, Paola; Corsini, Francesca; Ceraudo, Anna Maria; Pacetti, Edoarda; Scuotri, Lucia; Costabile, Davide; Dentali, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Acute medical patients have a high risk of venous thromboembolic events (VTE). Unfortunately, the fear of bleeding complications limits the use of antithrombotic prophylaxis in this setting. To stratify the VTE and haemorrhagic risk, two clinical scores (PADUA, IMPROVE) have recently been developed. However, it is not clear how many patients have a concomitant high VTE and haemorrhagic risk and what is the use of prophylaxis in this situation. To clarify these issues we performed a prospective cohort study enrolling consecutive patients admitted to internal medicine. Patients admitted to internal medicine (January to December 2013) were included. VTE and haemorrhagic risk were evaluated in all the included patients. Use and type of anti-thrombotic prophylaxis was recorded. A total of 1761 patients (mean age 77.6 years) were enrolled; 76.8% (95% CI 74.7-78.7) were at high VTE risk and 11.9% (95% CI 10.4-13.5) were at high haemorrhagic risk. Anti-thrombotic prophylaxis was used in 80.5% of patients at high VTE risk and in 6.5% at low VTE risk (p<0.001), and in 16.6% at high haemorrhagic risk and in 72.5% at low haemorrhagic risk (p<0.001). Prophylaxis was used in 20.4% at both high VTE and haemorrhagic risk and in 88.9% at high VTE risk but low haemorrhagic risk. At multivariate-analysis, use of prophylaxis appeared highly influenced by the VTE risk (OR 68.2, 95% CI 43.1 - 108.0). In conclusion, many patients admitted to internal medicine were at high risk of VTE. Since almost 90% of them were at low haemorrhagic risk, pharmacological prophylaxis may be safely prescribed in most of these patients.

  18. Consent for Brain Tissue Donation after Intracerebral Haemorrhage: A Community-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Samarasekera, Neshika; Lerpiniere, Christine; Farrall, Andrew J.; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; White, Philip M.; Torgersen, Antonia; Ironside, James W.; Smith, Colin; Al-Shahi Salman, Rustam

    2015-01-01

    Background Spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage is a devastating form of stroke and its incidence increases with age. Obtaining brain tissue following intracerebral haemorrhage helps to understand its cause. Given declining autopsy rates worldwide, the feasibility of establishing an autopsy-based collection and its generalisability are uncertain. Methods We used multiple overlapping sources of case ascertainment to identify every adult diagnosed with intracerebral haemorrhage between 1st June 2010-31st May 2012, whilst resident in the Lothian region of Scotland. We sought consent from patients with intracerebral haemorrhage (or their nearest relative if the patient lacked mental capacity) to conduct a research autopsy. Results Of 295 adults with acute intracerebral haemorrhage, 110 (37%) could not be approached to consider donation. Of 185 adults/relatives approached, 91 (49%) consented to research autopsy. There were no differences in baseline demographic variables or markers of intracerebral haemorrhage severity between consenters and non-consenters. Adults who died and became donors (n = 46) differed from the rest of the cohort (n = 249) by being older (median age 80, IQR 76–86 vs. 75, IQR 65–83, p = 0.002) and having larger haemorrhages (median volume 23ml, IQR 13–50 vs. 13ml, IQR 4–40; p = 0.002). Conclusions Nearly half of those approached consent to brain tissue donation after acute intracerebral haemorrhage. The characteristics of adults who gave consent were comparable to those in an entire community, although those who donate early are older and have larger haemorrhage volumes. PMID:26302447

  19. [Cardiogenic shock in acute myocardial infarct. Its coronary angioplasty treatment].

    PubMed

    Fernández Valadez, E; García y Otero, J M; Escobar, G P; Frutos Rangel, E; Zúñiga Sedano, J; García García, R; Verduzco Bazavilvazo, S; López Aranda, J; López Ruiz, J

    1993-01-01

    Ventricular dysfunction is the most common cause of in-hospital death in patients with acute myocardial infarction. When cardiogenic shock is manifested the mortality is very high. Seven patients with cardiogenic shock complicating acute myocardial infarction were treated with emergency coronary angioplasty. Four patients required cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), 2 intraaortic balloon pump support and one femoro-femoral bypass pump support during the coronary angioplasty. The angiography success rate was 86%. Two patients died, one in the catheterization laboratory and the other one 24 hours later. The hospital mortality was 29%. Of the patients who survived 4 are in functional class I and one in functional class II (NYHA). Coronary angioplasty therapy in patients with cardiogenic shock complicating acute myocardial infarction plays a decisive role in the reduction of mortality.

  20. A risk scoring system for prediction of haemorrhagic stroke.

    PubMed

    Zodpey, S P; Tiwari, R R

    2005-01-01

    The present pair-matched case control study was carried out at Government Medical College Hospital, Nagpur, India, a tertiary care hospital with the objective to devise and validate a risk scoring system for prediction of hemorrhagic stroke. The study consisted of 166 hospitalized CT scan proved cases of hemorrhagic stroke (ICD 9, 431-432), and a age and sex matched control per case. The controls were selected from patients who attended the study hospital for conditions other than stroke. On conditional multiple logistic regression five risk factors- hypertension (OR = 1.9. 95% Cl = 1.5-2.5). raised scrum total cholesterol (OR = 2.3, 95% Cl = 1.1-4.9). use of anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents (OR = 3.4, 95% Cl =1.1-10.4). past history of transient ischaemic attack (OR = 8.4, 95% Cl = 2.1- 33.6) and alcohol intake (OR = 2.1, 95% Cl = 1.3-3.6) were significant. These factors were ascribed statistical weights (based on regression coefficients) of 6, 8, 12, 21 and 8 respectively. The nonsignificant factors (diabetes mellitus, physical inactivity, obesity, smoking, type A personality, history of claudication, family history of stroke, history of cardiac diseases and oral contraceptive use in females) were not included in the development of scoring system. ROC curve suggested a total score of 21 to be the best cut-off for predicting haemorrhag stroke. At this cut-off the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictivity and Cohen's kappa were 0.74, 0.74, 0.74 and 0.48 respectively. The overall predictive accuracy of this additive risk scoring system (area under ROC curve by Wilcoxon statistic) was 0.79 (95% Cl = 0.73-0.84). Thus to conclude, if substantiated by further validation, this scorincy system can be used to predict haemorrhagic stroke, thereby helping to devise effective risk factor intervention strategy.

  1. Prevention and treatment of variceal haemorrhage in 2017.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Felix; Berzigotti, Annalisa; Bosch, Jaime

    2017-01-01

    Variceal haemorrhage is a major complication of portal hypertension that still causes high mortality in patients with cirrhosis. Improved knowledge of the pathophysiology of portal hypertension has recently led to a more comprehensive approach to prevent all the complications of this condition. Thus, optimal treatment of portal hypertension requires a strategy that takes into account the clinical stage of the disease and all the major variables that affect the risk of progression to the next stage and death. In patients with compensated liver disease, the correction of factors influencing the progression of fibrosis, in particular aetiologic factors, is now feasible in many cases and should be achieved to prevent the development or progression of gastroesophageal varices and hepatic decompensation. Once gastroesophageal varices have developed, non-selective beta-blockers remain the cornerstone of therapy. Carvedilol provides a greater decrease in portal pressure and is currently indicated as a first-choice therapy for primary prophylaxis. The treatment of acute variceal haemorrhage includes a combination of vasoactive drugs, antibiotics and endoscopic variceal band ligation. In high-risk patients, the early use of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) lowers the risk of re-bleeding and improves survival. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt is the choice for uncontrolled variceal bleeding; a self-expandable metal stent or balloon tamponade can be used as a bridging measure. The combination of non-selective beta-blockers and endoscopic variceal band ligation reduces the risk of recurrent variceal bleeding and improves survival. In these cases, statins seem to further improve survival. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt is indicated in patients who rebleed during secondary prophylaxis.

  2. The oestrogenised chick as an experimental model for fatty liver-haemorrhagic syndrome in the fowl.

    PubMed

    Pearson, A W; Butler, E J

    1978-01-01

    A syndrome resembling fatty liver-haemorrhagic syndrome in laying hens was reproduced in six- to seven-week-old chickens by injecting oestradiol-17beta-dipropionate intramuscularly (total dose 20-50 mg/kg). The degree of hepatic steatosis and the severity and extent of haemorrhage from the liver varied with the dose and the results suggested a pathogenic relationship between the two conditions. There was no evidence of reticulolysis in the liver. When food was withdrawn for 24 h after the last injection there was a dramatic fall in the haemorrhage score and a reduction in the lipid content of the liver.

  3. Cigarette smoking and subarachnoid haemorrhage: a population-based case-control study.

    PubMed Central

    Fogelholm, R; Murros, K

    1987-01-01

    Smoking habits were analysed in 114 patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage, less than 70 years old, obtained from an epidemiological study. One control, matched for age, sex, and domicile, was selected for each patient. Current cigarette smokers were significantly more prevalent among cases than controls, and the relative risk of subarachnoid haemorrhage compared with non-smokers was 2.7 in men and 3.0 in women. The so called metastatic emphysema theory with increased elastolytic activity in the serum of smokers is proposed as biochemical basis for the increased risk of subarachnoid haemorrhage. PMID:3819759

  4. Family presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation and invasive procedures in children

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Cristiana Araújo G.; Balbino, Flávia Simphronio; Balieiro, Maria Magda F. G.; Mandetta, Myriam Aparecida

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To identify literature evidences related to actions to promote family's presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation and invasive procedures in children hospitalized in pediatric and neonatal critical care units. Data sources : Integrative literature review in PubMed, SciELO and Lilacs databases, from 2002 to 2012, with the following inclusion criteria: research article in Medicine, or Nursing, published in Portuguese, English or Spanish, using the keywords "family", "invasive procedures", "cardiopulmonary resuscitation", "health staff", and "Pediatrics". Articles that did not refer to the presence of the family in cardiopulmonary resuscitation and invasive procedures were excluded. Therefore, 15 articles were analyzed. Data synthesis : Most articles were published in the United States (80%), in Medicine and Nursing (46%), and were surveys (72%) with healthcare team members (67%) as participants. From the critical analysis, four themes related to the actions to promote family's presence in invasive procedures and cardiopulmonary resuscitation were obtained: a) to develop a sensitizing program for healthcare team; b) to educate the healthcare team to include the family in these circumstances; c) to develop a written institutional policy; d) to ensure the attendance of family's needs. Conclusions: Researches on these issues must be encouraged in order to help healthcare team to modify their practice, implementing the principles of the Patient and Family Centered Care model, especially during critical episodes. PMID:24676198

  5. 21 CFR 870.4430 - Cardiopulmonary bypass intracardiac suction control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass intracardiac suction control. 870.4430 Section 870.4430 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... intracardiac suction control is a device which provides the vacuum and control for a cardiotomy return...

  6. 21 CFR 870.4430 - Cardiopulmonary bypass intracardiac suction control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass intracardiac suction control. 870.4430 Section 870.4430 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... intracardiac suction control is a device which provides the vacuum and control for a cardiotomy return...

  7. Cardiopulmonary rehabilitation in a patient with Noonan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Callahan, M P; Pham, T; Rashbaum, I; Pineda, H; Greenspan, N

    2000-02-01

    Noonan syndrome, an autosomal dominant disease occurring with an incidence of 1 in 1,000 to 1 in 2,500 live births, is characterized by its particular cardiovascular abnormalities, including pulmonic valve stenosis, pulmonary artery stenosis, and, more rarely, septal defects and coarctation of the aorta. The case of a 20-year-old man admitted for inpatient cardiopulmonary rehabilitation after pulmonic valve repair, left pulmonary artery angioplasty, and pectus excavatum repair is presented. His endurance was markedly decreased, thus limiting his ability to perform activities of daily living and reducing his exercise tolerance. With participation in a comprehensive cardiopulmonary rehabilitation program, he experienced marked improvement with independence in his activities of daily living and an increase in his metabolic equivalent levels from to 2.8 to 5.4. After inpatient rehabilitation, he underwent left pulmonary stent placement before being discharged home. Subsequent outpatient cardiopulmonary rehabilitation has continued to improve significantly his overall exercise tolerance. Given that Noonan syndrome is viewed as the most common syndrome associated with congenital heart disease after Down syndrome, physiatrists must be familiar with its presentation, its associated abnormalities, and the treatment approach to optimize the patient's cardiopulmonary, musculoskeletal, and psychological status.

  8. A National Survey of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Training for the Deaf.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Kenneth H.; Tomasetti, James A.

    1983-01-01

    Responses to a national survey by regional directors of the American Heart Association, American National Red Cross, and continuing education programs for the deaf indicated that little is done to train the deaf in cardiopulmonary resuscitation and that communication barriers and inadequate training resources are major reasons. (Author)

  9. Efficacy of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in the Microgravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Smith L.; Campbell, Mark R.; Billica, Roger D.; Gilmore, Stevan M.

    2001-01-01

    End tidal carbon dioxide (EtCO 2) has been previously shown to be an effective non-invasive tool for estimating cardiac output during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Animal models have shown that this diagnostic adjunct can be used as a predictor of survival when EtCO 2 values are maintained above 25% of prearrest values.

  10. Family presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation: grief therapy or prolonged futility?

    PubMed

    Sherman, David A

    2008-01-01

    Nursing leaders are responsible in part for implementing procedures supporting family presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Family presence has received broad support in nursing literature and from professional organizations. A case study suggests that, when a patient's spokesperson is struggling with the question of whether to set limits to treatments, allowing family presence may inappropriately prolong futile care.

  11. 21 CFR 880.6080 - Cardiopulmonary resuscitation board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary resuscitation board. 880.6080 Section 880.6080 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL HOSPITAL AND PERSONAL USE DEVICES General Hospital and Personal...

  12. 21 CFR 870.4320 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator. 870.4320 Section 870.4320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... of completion of a PDP is required to be filed with the Food and Drug Administration on or...

  13. 21 CFR 870.4320 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator. 870.4320 Section 870.4320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... of completion of a PDP is required to be filed with the Food and Drug Administration on or...

  14. 21 CFR 870.4350 - Cardiopulmonary bypass oxygenator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass oxygenator. 870.4350 Section 870.4350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...-heart surgery. (b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The special control for this device...

  15. 21 CFR 870.4350 - Cardiopulmonary bypass oxygenator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass oxygenator. 870.4350 Section 870.4350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...-heart surgery. (b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The special control for this device...

  16. 21 CFR 870.4350 - Cardiopulmonary bypass oxygenator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass oxygenator. 870.4350 Section 870.4350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...-heart surgery. (b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The special control for this device...

  17. 21 CFR 870.4350 - Cardiopulmonary bypass oxygenator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass oxygenator. 870.4350 Section 870.4350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...-heart surgery. (b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The special control for this device...

  18. Retention of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Skills in Nigerian Secondary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onyeaso, Adedamola Olutoyin

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objective: For effective bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), retention of CPR skills after the training is central. The objective of this study was to find out how much of the CPR skills a group of Nigerian secondary school students would retain six weeks after their first exposure to the conventional CPR training. Materials…

  19. 21 CFR 870.4200 - Cardiopulmonary bypass accessory equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass accessory equipment. 870.4200 Section 870.4200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN..., and (ii) The guidance document entitled “Guidance on the Performance Standard for Electrode Lead...

  20. 21 CFR 870.4200 - Cardiopulmonary bypass accessory equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass accessory equipment. 870.4200 Section 870.4200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN..., and (ii) The guidance document entitled “Guidance on the Performance Standard for Electrode Lead...

  1. Cardiopulmonary Fitness and Endurance in Children with Developmental Coordination Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Sheng K.; Lin, Hsiao-Hui; Li, Yao-Chuen; Tsai, Chia-Liang; Cairney, John

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare cardiopulmonary fitness and endurance in 9-11-year-old children with DCD against a group of typically developing children in Taiwan. The Movement ABC test was used to evaluate the motor abilities of children. Forty-one participants (20 children with DCD and 21 children without DCD) were recruited for this…

  2. [Increased fibrinolytic activity during cardiopulmonary bypass is caused by activated protein C system].

    PubMed

    Gando, S; Tedo, I; Masio, H; Goda, Y; Kawahigashi, H

    1994-06-01

    To examine the hypothesis that activated protein C system during cardiopulmonary bypass surgery may increase fibrinolytic activity during cardiopulmonary bypass, protein C activity, protein C antigen and thrombomodulin of sixteen patients undergoing elective cardiopulmonary bypass surgery were investigated after induction of anesthesia, before and after cardiopulmonary bypass, and at the end of operation. Protein C activity decreased and thrombomodulin increased significantly after the cardiopulmonary bypass. There were no significant correlations of thrombomodulin with protein C activity and protein C antigen. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that protein C system is activated and circulating thrombomodulin appears in the systemic circulation during cardiopulmonary bypass surgery and this enhanced activation of protein C system is possibly related to the reported increase of fibrinolytic activity during cardiopulmonary bypass.

  3. ACE2 and Microbiota: Emerging Targets for Cardiopulmonary Disease Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Cole-Jeffrey, Colleen T; Liu, Meng; Katovich, Michael J; Raizada, Mohan K; Shenoy, Vinayak

    2015-01-01

    The health of the cardiovascular and pulmonary systems is inextricably linked to the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Physiologically speaking, a balance between the vasodeleterious (ACE/Ang II/AT1R) and vasoprotective (ACE2/Ang-(1–7)/MasR) components of the RAS is critical for cardiopulmonary homeostasis. Upregulation of the ACE/Ang II/AT1R axis shifts the system toward vasoconstriction, proliferation, hypertrophy, inflammation, and fibrosis, all factors that contribute to the development and progression of cardiopulmonary diseases. Conversely, stimulation of the vasoprotective ACE2/Ang-(1–7)/MasR axis produces a counter-regulatory response that promotes cardiovascular health. Current research is investigating novel strategies to augment actions of the vasoprotective RAS components, particularly ACE2, in order to treat various pathologies. While multiple approaches to increase the activity of ACE2 have displayed beneficial effects against experimental disease models, the mechanisms behind its protective actions remain incompletely understood. Recent work demonstrating a non-catalytic role for ACE2 in amino acid transport in the gut has led us to speculate that the therapeutic effects of ACE2 can be mediated, in part, by its actions on the gastrointestinal tract and/or gut microbiome. This is consistent with emerging data which suggests that dysbiosis of the gut and lung microbiomes is associated with cardiopulmonary disease. This review highlights new developments in the protective actions of ACE2 against cardiopulmonary disorders, discusses innovative approaches to targeting ACE2 for therapy, and explores an evolving role for gut and lung microbiota in cardiopulmonary health. PMID:26322922

  4. ACE2 and Microbiota: Emerging Targets for Cardiopulmonary Disease Therapy.

    PubMed

    Cole-Jeffrey, Colleen T; Liu, Meng; Katovich, Michael J; Raizada, Mohan K; Shenoy, Vinayak

    2015-12-01

    The health of the cardiovascular and pulmonary systems is inextricably linked to the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Physiologically speaking, a balance between the vasodeleterious (Angiotensin-converting enzyme [ACE]/Angiotensin II [Ang II]/Ang II type 1 receptor [AT1R]) and vasoprotective (Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 [ACE2]/Angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)]/Mas receptor [MasR]) components of the RAS is critical for cardiopulmonary homeostasis. Upregulation of the ACE/Ang II/AT1R axis shifts the system toward vasoconstriction, proliferation, hypertrophy, inflammation, and fibrosis, all factors that contribute to the development and progression of cardiopulmonary diseases. Conversely, stimulation of the vasoprotective ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/MasR axis produces a counter-regulatory response that promotes cardiovascular health. Current research is investigating novel strategies to augment actions of the vasoprotective RAS components, particularly ACE2, in order to treat various pathologies. Although multiple approaches to increase the activity of ACE2 have displayed beneficial effects against experimental disease models, the mechanisms behind its protective actions remain incompletely understood. Recent work demonstrating a non-catalytic role for ACE2 in amino acid transport in the gut has led us to speculate that the therapeutic effects of ACE2 can be mediated, in part, by its actions on the gastrointestinal tract and/or gut microbiome. This is consistent with emerging data which suggest that dysbiosis of the gut and lung microbiomes is associated with cardiopulmonary disease. This review highlights new developments in the protective actions of ACE2 against cardiopulmonary disorders, discusses innovative approaches to targeting ACE2 for therapy, and explores an evolving role for gut and lung microbiota in cardiopulmonary health.

  5. Atrial Fibrillation, Neurocognitive Decline and Gene Expression After Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Dalal, Rahul S.; Sabe, Ashraf A.; Elmadhun, Nassrene Y.; Ramlawi, Basel; Sellke, Frank W.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Atrial fibrillation and neurocognitive decline are common complications after cardiopulmonary bypass. By utilizing genomic microarrays we investigate whether gene expression is associated with postoperative atrial fibrillation and neurocognitive decline. METHODS Twenty one cardiac surgery patients were prospectively matched and underwent neurocognitive assessments pre-operatively and four days postoperatively. The whole blood collected in the pre-cardiopulmonary bypass, 6 hours after-cardiopulmonary bypass, and on the 4th postoperative day was hybridized to Affymetrix Gene Chip U133 Plus 2.0 Microarrays. Gene expression in patients who developed postoperative atrial fibrillation and neurocognitive decline (n=6; POAF+NCD) was compared with gene expression in patients with postoperative atrial fibrillation and normal cognitive function (n=5; POAF+NORM) and patients with sinus rhythm and normal cognitive function (n=10; SR+NORM). Regulated genes were identified using JMP Genomics 4.0 with a false discovery rate of 0.05 and fold change of >1.5 or <-1.5. RESULTS Eleven patients developed postoperative atrial fibrillation. Six of these also developed neurocognitive decline. Of the 12 patients with sinus rhythm, only 2 developed neurocognitive decline. POAF+NCD patients had unique regulation of 17 named genes preoperatively, 60 named genes six hours after cardiopulmonary bypass, and 34 named genes four days postoperatively (P<0.05) compared with normal patients. Pathway analysis demonstrated that these genes are involved in cell death, inflammation, cardiac remodeling and nervous system function. CONCLUSION Patients who developed postoperative atrial fibrillation and neurocognitive decline after cardiopulmonary bypass may have differential genomic responses compared to normal patients and patients with only postoperative atrial fibrillation, suggesting common pathophysiology for these conditions. Further exploration of these genes may provide insight into the

  6. Management of postpartum haemorrhage with uterine balloon tamponade: The way forward.

    PubMed

    Marasinghe, Jeevan P; Du Plessis, Jacobus; Epitawela, Dinesh; Umstad, Mark P

    2015-08-01

    Uterine balloon tamponade has rapidly gained popularity in the management of postpartum haemorrhage. It is a conservative method often utilised before embarking on advanced surgical interventions. The mechanism of action, complications and long-term outcomes are discussed.

  7. Successfull management of a life threatening cerebellar haemorrhage following spine surgery - a case report -.

    PubMed

    Pallud, Johan; Belaïd, Hayat; Aldea, Sorin

    2009-06-01

    Cerebellar haemorrhages are rare life-threatening complications following spine surgery that present challenges for their diagnostic and their therapeutic management. Their patho-physiology remains unclear.We report a case of a life-threatening cerebellar haemorrhage secondary to an occult dural tear following a planned L5-S1 laminectomy. The patient was treated with emergent external ventriculostomy following by a posterior fossa decompressive craniectomy. Cerebellar haemorrhages have to be suspected systematically when unexpected neurological signs occur after spine surgery since their rapid management lead to favourable outcomes. The present imaging findings allow us proposing that cerebellar haemorrhages result primarily from superior cerebellar venous stretching and tearing, and that cerebellar infarction and swelling occur secondarily.

  8. Fatty haemorrhagic liver syndrome in laying hens on diets supplemented with rapeseed products.

    PubMed

    Yamashiro, S; Bhatnagar, M K; Scott, J R; Slinger, S J

    1975-11-01

    Livers of laying hens of Hy-Line No 934E on low erucic acid rapeseed meals and rapeseed oil were studied. Gross lesions in the livers of hens on experimental diets were moderate to severe fatty degeneration, focal necrosis and moderate to severe haemorrhage. Histological examination revealed oedematous foci and lysis of hepatocytes along with large amounts of lipid droplets in the necrotic lesions. Necrotic lesions were not always associated with large haemorrhages. Connective tissue infiltration of older degenerative and haemorrhagic lesions was not extensive. Abdominal haemorrhage from livers occurred when extensive necrosis in the form of hepatocyte lysis and some vascular changes were present, suggesting hepatocytic degeneration caused by toxic products or their metabolites present in rapeseed by-products.

  9. Recurrent hypertensive intracerebral haemorrhages: what should we do when a new hemispheric ischaemic event strikes?

    PubMed

    Amin, Osama S M

    2012-12-20

    Hypertensive intracerebral haemorrhage is usually a once in a lifetime event and recurrences are rare. Most recurrences usually develop within 2 years of the first event and the majority usually target the basal ganglia and thalami. Failure of blood pressure control is the most important, potentially preventable, culprit behind the development of primary intracerebral haemorrhages. However, the occurrence of a recurrent bleed in patients with optimally controlled hypertension should always prompt the physician to think of a new co-operating factor. We report on a 60-year-old hypertensive woman who developed right-sided thalamic haemorrhage 5 days after sustaining a lacunar infarct of the left thalamus for which she had been prescribed a dual antiplatelet therapy: aspirin and clopidrogrel. She had a history of two bilateral sequential hypertensive deep cerebellar haemorrhages which were developed 2 years ago.

  10. Bilateral adrenal haemorrhage: a cause of haemodynamic collapse in heparin-induced thrombocytopaenia.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Nasir; Khan, Mahjabeen; Parveen, Sanober; Balavenkatraman, Arvind

    2016-03-10

    Heparin-induced thrombocytopaenia (HIT) is a life-threatening complication of exposure to heparin. It is mediated by autoantibodies to platelet factor-4 causing platelet activation, destruction and thrombosis. Given their rich arterial supply and a single central vein, the adrenal glands are particularly susceptible to congestive haemorrhage following venous thrombosis. We report a case of bilateral adrenal haemorrhage (BAH) associated with HIT following prophylactic use of unfractionated heparin for venous thromboembolism causing adrenal insufficiency. BAH is a life-threatening paradoxical complication associated with HIT, a prothrombotic state. The resulting adrenal insufficiency can lead to haemodynamic collapse if unrecognised. Early diagnosis, in the wake of vague symptoms, and prompt treatment primarily aimed at repletion of glucocorticoids and close monitoring of enlarging haemorrhage is of utmost importance. Likewise, early identification of HIT is important to prevent potential complications including adrenal haemorrhage.

  11. Determinants and Time Trends for Ischaemic and Haemorrhagic Stroke in a Large Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yutao; Wang, Hao; Tao, Tao; Tian, Yingchun; Wang, Yutang; Chen, Yundai; Lip, Gregory Y. H.

    2016-01-01

    Background The clinical epidemiology of stroke has been widely investigated in Caucasian populations, but the changes over time in the proportion of ischaemic to haemorrhagic strokes is less clear, especially in the Chinese population. Aims Our objective was to study the determinants and time trends for ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke, in relation to age, in a large Chinese population cohort. Methods Using a medical insurance database in the southwest of China from 2001 to 2012, time trends in age-adjusted ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke incidence and the contributing risk factors associated with age were investigated. Results Among 425,901 individuals without prior stroke (52.4% male, median age 54), the rate of ischaemic stroke (per 1000 patient-years) decreased between 2002–2007, then remained broadly similar between 2008–2012. The rate of haemorrhagic stroke showed a similar trend, being approximately 1.3–1.9 from 2008–2012. Compared to patients age<65, ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke incidences (rate, 95% confidential interval, CI) were higher in the elderly population (age <65 versus age ≥65: ischaemic: 3.64, 3.33–4.00, vs 14.33, 14.01–14.60; haemorrhagic: 1.09, 1.00–1.10 vs 2.52,2.40–2.70, respectively, both p<0.001). There were no significant differences in haemorrhagic stroke rates between the elderly and the very elderly population. Ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke shared similar risk factors (age, hypertension, coronary artery disease (CAD), vascular disease, and diabetes mellitus) (all p<0.05). In subjects age<75 years, CAD (7.17, 4.14–12.37) and diabetes mellitus (3.27, 2.42–4.42) contributed most to the developing of haemorrhagic stroke (all p<0.001). Amongst the very elderly, vascular disease (2.24, 1.49–3.37) was an additional major risk factor for haemorrhagic stroke, together with CAD and diabetes mellitus (all p<0.001). Conclusion In this large Chinese cohort, there was an increased risk of ischaemic stroke compared

  12. Dieulafoy’s lesion with intra-abdominal haemorrhage: a novel association

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Cuiping; Zou, Yantai; Wang, Li; Han, Xiqun; Bai, Lan

    2010-01-01

    Dieulafoy’s lesion is an uncommon but important cause of gastrointestinal bleeding, especially with respect to the upper gastrointestinal tract wherein massive, life-threatening haemorrhage occurs from a calibre-persistent submucosal artery. This report describes a case of a 60-year-old man with gastric Dieulafoy’s lesion presenting with exogastric haemorrhage, which was diagnosed following a pathological examination. PMID:22751207

  13. [Oedema and haemorrhagic diathesis in a 50-year-old woman with thyrotoxicosis].

    PubMed

    Kozlov, A; Joeres, R; Braun, U

    2014-11-01

    We describe the case of a 50-year-old woman who presented with tachyarrhythmia, mild fever, peripheral oedema, ascites, epistaxis and gastrointestinal haemorrhage. Blood analysis revealed hyperthyroxinaemia. Analysis of thyroid-stimulating antibodies highlighted Graves' disease being the cause of the prevailing thyrotoxic crisis. Remarkable in this case of thyrotoxicosis is a liver affection without elevated transaminases but disturbed serum protein synthesis leading to hypalbuminaemic oedema and haemorrhagic complications. Thyrostatic treatment led to clinical response.

  14. Multiple shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenker, Stephen H.; Stanford, Douglas

    2014-12-01

    Using gauge/gravity duality, we explore a class of states of two CFTs with a large degree of entanglement, but with very weak local two-sided correlation. These states are constructed by perturbing the thermofield double state with thermal-scale operators that are local at different times. Acting on the dual black hole geometry, these perturbations create an intersecting network of shock waves, supporting a very long wormhole. Chaotic CFT dynamics and the associated fast scrambling time play an essential role in determining the qualitative features of the resulting geometries.

  15. Historical overview and review of current day treatment in the management of acute variceal haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Rajoriya, Neil; Tripathi, Dhiraj

    2014-01-01

    Variceal haemorrhage is one of the most devastating consequences of portal hypertension, with a 1-year mortality of 40%. With the passage of time, acute management strategies have developed with improved survival. The major historical treatment landmarks in the management of variceal haemorrhage can be divided into surgical, medical, endoscopic and radiological breakthroughs. We sought to provide a historical overview of the management of variceal haemorrhage and how treatment modalities over time have impacted on clinical outcomes. A PubMed search of the following terms: portal hypertension, variceal haemorrhage, gastric varices, oesophageal varices, transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt was performed. To complement this, Google™ was searched with the aforementioned terms. Other relevant references were identified after review of the reference lists of articles. The review of therapeutic advances was conducted divided into pre-1970s, 1970/80s, 1990s, 2000-2010 and post-2010. Also, a summary and review on the pathophysiology of portal hypertension and clinical outcomes in variceal haemorrhage was performed. Aided by the development of endoscopic therapies, medication and improved radiological interventions; the management of variceal haemorrhage has changed over recent decades with improved survival from an often-terminating event in recent past. PMID:24914369

  16. UK guidelines on the management of variceal haemorrhage in cirrhotic patients

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Dhiraj; Stanley, Adrian J; Hayes, Peter C; Patch, David; Millson, Charles; Mehrzad, Homoyon; Austin, Andrew; Ferguson, James W; Olliff, Simon P; Hudson, Mark; Christie, John M

    2015-01-01

    These updated guidelines on the management of variceal haemorrhage have been commissioned by the Clinical Services and Standards Committee (CSSC) of the British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG) under the auspices of the liver section of the BSG. The original guidelines which this document supersedes were written in 2000 and have undergone extensive revision by 13 members of the Guidelines Development Group (GDG). The GDG comprises elected members of the BSG liver section, representation from British Association for the Study of the Liver (BASL) and Liver QuEST, a nursing representative and a patient representative. The quality of evidence and grading of recommendations was appraised using the AGREE II tool. The nature of variceal haemorrhage in cirrhotic patients with its complex range of complications makes rigid guidelines inappropriate. These guidelines deal specifically with the management of varices in patients with cirrhosis under the following subheadings: (1) primary prophylaxis; (2) acute variceal haemorrhage; (3) secondary prophylaxis of variceal haemorrhage; and (4) gastric varices. They are not designed to deal with (1) the management of the underlying liver disease; (2) the management of variceal haemorrhage in children; or (3) variceal haemorrhage from other aetiological conditions. PMID:25887380

  17. Two Cases of Refractory Cardiogenic Shock Secondary to Bupropion Successfully Treated with Veno-Arterial Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Heise, C William; Skolnik, Aaron B; Raschke, Robert A; Owen-Reece, Huw; Graeme, Kimberlie A

    2016-09-01

    Bupropion inhibits the uptake of dopamine and norepinephrine. Clinical effects in overdose include seizure, status epilepticus, tachycardia, arrhythmias, and cardiogenic shock. We report two cases of severe bupropion toxicity resulting in refractory cardiogenic shock, cardiac arrest, and repeated seizures treated successfully. Patients with cardiovascular failure related to poisoning may particularly benefit from extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). These are the first cases of bupropion toxicity treated with veno-arterial EMCO (VA-ECMO) in which bupropion toxicity is supported by confirmatory testing. Both cases demonstrate the effectiveness of VA-ECMO in poisoned patients with severe cardiogenic shock or cardiopulmonary failure.

  18. Cardiopulmonary Exercise Test: Background, Applicability and Interpretation.

    PubMed

    Herdy, Artur Haddad; Ritt, Luiz Eduardo Fonteles; Stein, Ricardo; Araújo, Claudio Gil Soares de; Milani, Mauricio; Meneghelo, Romeu Sérgio; Ferraz, Almir Sérgio; Hossri, Carlos; Almeida, Antonio Eduardo Monteiro de; Fernandes-Silva, Miguel Morita; Serra, Salvador Manoel

    2016-11-01

    Cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET) has been gaining importance as a method of functional assessment in Brazil and worldwide. In its most frequent applications, CPET consists in applying a gradually increasing intensity exercise until exhaustion or until the appearance of limiting symptoms and/or signs. The following parameters are measured: ventilation; oxygen consumption (VO2); carbon dioxide production (VCO2); and the other variables of conventional exercise testing. In addition, in specific situations, pulse oximetry and flow-volume loops during and after exertion are measured. The CPET provides joint data analysis that allows complete assessment of the cardiovascular, respiratory, muscular and metabolic systems during exertion, being considered gold standard for cardiorespiratory functional assessment.1-6 The CPET allows defining mechanisms related to low functional capacity that can cause symptoms, such as dyspnea, and correlate them with changes in the cardiovascular, pulmonary and skeletal muscle systems. Furthermore, it can be used to provide the prognostic assessment of patients with heart or lung diseases, and in the preoperative period, in addition to aiding in a more careful exercise prescription to healthy subjects, athletes and patients with heart or lung diseases. Similarly to CPET clinical use, its research also increases, with the publication of several scientific contributions from Brazilian researchers in high-impact journals. Therefore, this study aimed at providing a comprehensive review on the applicability of CPET to different clinical situations, in addition to serving as a practical guide for the interpretation of that test. Resumo O teste cardiopulmonar de exercício (TCPE) vem ganhando importância crescente como método de avaliação funcional tanto no Brasil quanto no Mundo. Nas suas aplicações mais frequentes, o teste consiste em submeter o indivíduo a um exercício de intensidade gradativamente crescente até a exaustão ou o

  19. Shock Prevention

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The electrician pictured is installing a General Electric Ground Fault Interrupter (GFI), a device which provides protection against electrical shock in the home or in industrial facilities. Shocks due to defective wiring in home appliances or other electrical equipment can cause severe burns, even death. As a result, the National Electrical Code now requires GFIs in all new homes constructed. This particular type of GFI employs a sensing element which derives from technology acquired in space projects by SCI Systems, Inc., Huntsville, Alabama, producer of sensors for GE and other manufacturers of GFI equipment. The sensor is based on the company's experience in developing miniaturized circuitry for space telemetry and other spacecraft electrical systems; this experience enabled SCI to package interruptor circuitry in the extremely limited space available and to produce sensory devices at practicable cost. The tiny sensor measures the strength of the electrical current and detects current differentials that indicate a fault in the functioning of an electrical system. The sensing element then triggers a signal to a disconnect mechanism in the GFI, which cuts off the current in the faulty circuit.

  20. The Significance of Splenectomy in Experimental Swine Models of Controlled Hemorrhagic Shock

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-01

    of animals to modulate the cardiopulmonary parameters, which resulted in a peak of MAP at 49 mm Hg and 54 mmHg, SBP of 60 mmHg and 68 mmHg, and HR of...Antonio, TX REFERENCES 1. Lehman E, Amole C. The function of the spleen in the retardation of shock from hemorrhage. Surgery. 1938;4:44 50. 2. Horton

  1. Geometrical shock dynamics of fast magnetohydrodynamic shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostert, Wouter; Pullin, Dale I.; Samtaney, Ravi; Wheatley, Vincent

    2016-11-01

    We extend the theory of geometrical shock dynamics (GSD, Whitham 1958), to two-dimensional fast magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) shocks moving in the presence of nonuniform magnetic fields of general orientation and strength. The resulting generalized area-Mach number rule is adapted to MHD shocks moving in two spatial dimensions. A partially-spectral numerical scheme developed from that of Schwendeman (1993) is described. This is applied to the stability of plane MHD fast shocks moving into a quiescent medium containing a uniform magnetic field whose field lines are inclined to the plane-shock normal. In particular, we consider the time taken for an initially planar shock subject to an initial perturbed magnetosonic Mach number distribution, to first form shock-shocks. Supported by KAUST OCRF Award No. URF/1/2162-01.

  2. Climate change. A global threat to cardiopulmonary health.

    PubMed

    Rice, Mary B; Thurston, George D; Balmes, John R; Pinkerton, Kent E

    2014-03-01

    Recent changes in the global climate system have resulted in excess mortality and morbidity, particularly among susceptible individuals with preexisting cardiopulmonary disease. These weather patterns are projected to continue and intensify as a result of rising CO2 levels, according to the most recent projections by climate scientists. In this Pulmonary Perspective, motivated by the American Thoracic Society Committees on Environmental Health Policy and International Health, we review the global human health consequences of projected changes in climate for which there is a high level of confidence and scientific evidence of health effects, with a focus on cardiopulmonary health. We discuss how many of the climate-related health effects will disproportionally affect people from economically disadvantaged parts of the world, who contribute relatively little to CO2 emissions. Last, we discuss the financial implications of climate change solutions from a public health perspective and argue for a harmonized approach to clean air and climate change policies.

  3. Neuroprotective Strategies during Cardiac Surgery with Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Salameh, Aida; Dhein, Stefan; Dähnert, Ingo; Klein, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    Aortocoronary bypass or valve surgery usually require cardiac arrest using cardioplegic solutions. Although, in principle, in a number of cases beating heart surgery (so-called off-pump technique) is possible, aortic or valve surgery or correction of congenital heart diseases mostly require cardiopulmonary arrest. During this condition, the heart-lung machine also named cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) has to take over the circulation. It is noteworthy that the invention of a machine bypassing the heart and lungs enabled complex cardiac operations, but possible negative effects of the CPB on other organs, especially the brain, cannot be neglected. Thus, neuroprotection during CPB is still a matter of great interest. In this review, we will describe the impact of CPB on the brain and focus on pharmacological and non-pharmacological strategies to protect the brain. PMID:27879647

  4. Glycemic control and outcome related to cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Thiessen, Steven; Vanhorebeek, Ilse; Van den Berghe, Greet

    2015-06-01

    Perioperative hyperglycemia, aggravated by cardiopulmonary bypass, is associated with adverse outcome in adult and pediatric patients. Whereas hyperglycemia was originally perceived as an adaptive response to surgical stress, it is now clear that glycemic control is a strategy to reduce adverse outcomes after cardiac surgery and cardiopulmonary bypass. The optimal blood glucose target, whether or not glycemic control should be initiated already intraoperatively, and whether or not perioperative glucose administration affects the impact of glycemic control on ischemia-reperfusion damage remain open questions. Hypoglycemia, the risk of which is increased with glycemic control, is also associated with adverse outcomes. However, it remains controversial whether brief episodes of hypoglycemia, rapidly corrected during glycemic control, have adverse effects on outcome. This review gives an overview of the currently available literature on glycemic control during and after cardiac surgery and focuses on the indicated open questions about this intervention for this specific patient population.

  5. Climate Change. A Global Threat to Cardiopulmonary Health

    PubMed Central

    Thurston, George D.; Balmes, John R.; Pinkerton, Kent E.

    2014-01-01

    Recent changes in the global climate system have resulted in excess mortality and morbidity, particularly among susceptible individuals with preexisting cardiopulmonary disease. These weather patterns are projected to continue and intensify as a result of rising CO2 levels, according to the most recent projections by climate scientists. In this Pulmonary Perspective, motivated by the American Thoracic Society Committees on Environmental Health Policy and International Health, we review the global human health consequences of projected changes in climate for which there is a high level of confidence and scientific evidence of health effects, with a focus on cardiopulmonary health. We discuss how many of the climate-related health effects will disproportionally affect people from economically disadvantaged parts of the world, who contribute relatively little to CO2 emissions. Last, we discuss the financial implications of climate change solutions from a public health perspective and argue for a harmonized approach to clean air and climate change policies. PMID:24400619

  6. Pox-like lesions and haemorrhagic fever in two concurrent cases in the Central African Republic: case investigation and management in difficult circumstances

    PubMed Central

    Froeschl, Guenter; Kayembe, Pitchou Kasongo

    2015-01-01

    Cases of monkeypox in humans are frequently reported from the Democratic Republic of Congo. The few reports from the Central African Republic have been limited to cases in the far South closely bordering the Congos. Team members of an international medical organisation have suspected clinically two human cases of MPX, associated with clinical signs of coagulopathy and haemorrhage in the North of the country. Key findings were history of a squirrel, fever and vesicular dermal eruptions. Subsequently patients developed profuse epistaxis and hematemesis, associated with clinical signs of shock. Both patients were isolated and treated symptomatically. Samples were sent to a regional reference laboratory, who initially issued a confirmation of the suspected diagnosis of MPX in both cases. The result was later revised, and additional analyses of samples could not confirm the diagnosis. PMID:26664524

  7. Cardiopulmonary stress during exercise training in patients with COPD.

    PubMed

    Probst, V S; Troosters, T; Pitta, F; Decramer, M; Gosselink, R

    2006-06-01

    Exercise training is an essential component of pulmonary rehabilitation. However, the cardiopulmonary stress imposed during different modalities of exercise training is not yet known. In the present study, the cardiopulmonary stress of a 12-week exercise training programme in 11 chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients (forced expiratory volume in one second 42+/-12%pred, age 69+/-6 yrs) was measured. Pulmonary gas exchange and cardiac frequency (f(C)) of three training sessions were measured with a portable metabolic system at the beginning, mid-term and end of the programme. Symptoms were assessed with Borg scores. The exercise intensity was compared with the recommendations for exercise training by the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM). Training effects were significant (maximum change in work: 14+/-11 Watts, 6-min walk test: 44+/-36 m). Whole body exercises (cycling, walking and stair climbing) consistently resulted in higher cardiopulmonary stress (oxygen uptake (V'(O(2))), minute ventilation and f(C)) than arm cranking and resistance training. Dyspnoea was higher during cycling than resistance training. Patients exercised for >70% (>20 min) of the total exercise time at >40% of the V'(O(2)) reserve and f(C) reserve ("moderate" intensity according to the ACSM) throughout the programme. The cardiopulmonary stress resistance training is lower than during whole-body exercise and results in fewer symptoms. In addition, exercise testing based on guidelines using a fixed percentage of baseline peak performance and symptom scores achieves and sustains training intensities recommended according to the American College of Sports Medicine.

  8. The effects of space flight on the cardiopulmonary system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicogossian, Arnauld E.; Gaffney, F. Andrew; Garshnek, Victoria

    1989-01-01

    Alterations of the human cardiopulmonary system in space flight are examined, including fluid shifts, orthostatic intolerance, changes in cardiac dynamics and electromechanics, and changes in pulmonary function and exercise capacity. Consideration is given to lower body negative pressure data from Skylab experiments and studies on the Space Shuttle. Also, echocardiography, cardiac dysrhythmias during spaceflight, and the role of neural mechanisms in circulatory control after spaceflight are discussed.

  9. Strategy analysis of cardiopulmonary resuscitation training in the community

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jin; Ma, Li

    2015-01-01

    Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a crucial therapy for sudden cardiac arrest. This appreciation produced immense efforts by professional organizations to train laypeople for CPR skills. However, the rate of CPR training is low and varies widely across communities. Several strategies are used in order to improve the rate of CPR training and are performed in some advanced countries. The Chinese CPR training in communities could gain enlightenment from them. PMID:26380744

  10. Haemostatic monitoring during postpartum haemorrhage and implications for management.

    PubMed

    Solomon, C; Collis, R E; Collins, P W

    2012-12-01

    Postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) is a major risk factor for maternal morbidity and mortality. PPH has numerous causative factors, which makes its occurrence and severity difficult to predict. Underlying haemostatic imbalances such as consumptive and dilutional coagulopathies may develop during PPH, and can exacerbate bleeding and lead to progression to severe PPH. Monitoring coagulation status in patients with PPH may be crucial for effective haemostatic management, goal-directed therapy, and improved outcomes. However, current PPH management guidelines do not account for the altered baseline coagulation status observed in pregnant patients, and the appropriate transfusion triggers to use in PPH are unknown, due to a lack of high-quality studies specific to this area. In this review, we consider the evidence for the use of standard laboratory-based coagulation tests and point-of-care viscoelastic coagulation monitoring in PPH. Many laboratory-based tests are unsuitable for emergency use due to their long turnaround times, so have limited value for the management of PPH. Emerging evidence suggests that viscoelastic monitoring, using thrombelastography- or thromboelastometry-based tests, may be useful for rapid assessment and for guiding haemostatic therapy during PPH. However, further studies are needed to define the ranges of reference values that should be considered 'normal' in this setting. Improving awareness of the correct application and interpretation of viscoelastic coagulation monitoring techniques may be critical in realizing their emergency diagnostic potential.

  11. Haemostatic monitoring during postpartum haemorrhage and implications for management

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, C.; Collis, R. E.; Collins, P. W.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) is a major risk factor for maternal morbidity and mortality. PPH has numerous causative factors, which makes its occurrence and severity difficult to predict. Underlying haemostatic imbalances such as consumptive and dilutional coagulopathies may develop during PPH, and can exacerbate bleeding and lead to progression to severe PPH. Monitoring coagulation status in patients with PPH may be crucial for effective haemostatic management, goal-directed therapy, and improved outcomes. However, current PPH management guidelines do not account for the altered baseline coagulation status observed in pregnant patients, and the appropriate transfusion triggers to use in PPH are unknown, due to a lack of high-quality studies specific to this area. In this review, we consider the evidence for the use of standard laboratory-based coagulation tests and point-of-care viscoelastic coagulation monitoring in PPH. Many laboratory-based tests are unsuitable for emergency use due to their long turnaround times, so have limited value for the management of PPH. Emerging evidence suggests that viscoelastic monitoring, using thrombelastography- or thromboelastometry-based tests, may be useful for rapid assessment and for guiding haemostatic therapy during PPH. However, further studies are needed to define the ranges of reference values that should be considered ‘normal’ in this setting. Improving awareness of the correct application and interpretation of viscoelastic coagulation monitoring techniques may be critical in realizing their emergency diagnostic potential. PMID:23075633

  12. Haemorrhagic disease of lagomorphs: evidence for a calicivirus.

    PubMed

    Moussa, A; Chasey, D; Lavazza, A; Capucci, L; Smíd, B; Meyers, G; Rossi, C; Thiel, H J; Vlásak, R; Rønsholt, L

    1992-11-01

    Studies on the aetiological agents of rabbit haemorrhagic disease (RHD) and European brown hare syndrome show that the viruses responsible for these infections can be placed in the family Caliciviridae. Established members of this group are vesicular exanthema virus (prototype), San Miguel sea lion virus and feline calcivirus. The human hepatitis E virus and the Norwalk agent may soon be included. The RHD virus genome consists of a positive stranded RNA molecule composed of 7437 nucleotides. A major subgenomic RNA of 2.2 kb, colinear with the 3' end of the genomic RNA, can also be recovered from infected liver tissue, and both RNAs are enclosed within viral capsids formed by a single major protein of approximately 60 kDa. Electron microscopic examination of organ suspensions from diseased animals shows two types of particle; 35-40 nm complete virions have the regularly arranged cup-shaped depressions typical of calcivirus morphology, and 23-25 nm smooth particles resulting from degradation of the outer surface structures of the complete virions.

  13. Delineating the Association between Heavy Postpartum Haemorrhage and Postpartum Depression

    PubMed Central

    Eckerdal, Patricia; Kollia, Natasa; Löfblad, Johanna; Hellgren, Charlotte; Karlsson, Linnea; Högberg, Ulf; Wikström, Anna-Karin; Skalkidou, Alkistis

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To explore the association between postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) and postpartum depression (PPD), taking into account the role of postpartum anaemia, delivery experience and psychiatric history. Methods A nested cohort study (n = 446), based on two population-based cohorts in Uppsala, Sweden. Exposed individuals were defined as having a bleeding of ≥1000ml (n = 196) at delivery, and non-exposed individuals as having bleeding of <650ml (n = 250). Logistic regression models with PPD symptoms (Edinburgh Postnatal Depression scale (EPDS) score ≥ 12) as the outcome variable and PPH, anaemia, experience of delivery, mood during pregnancy and other confounders as exposure variables were undertaken. Path analysis using Structural Equation Modeling was also conducted. Results There was no association between PPH and PPD symptoms. A positive association was shown between anaemia at discharge from the maternity ward and the development of PPD symptoms, even after controlling for plausible confounders (OR = 2.29, 95%CI = 1.15–4.58). Path analysis revealed significant roles for anaemia at discharge, negative self-reported delivery experience, depressed mood during pregnancy and postpartum stressors in increasing the risk for PPD. Conclusion This study proposes important roles for postpartum anaemia, negative experience of delivery and mood during pregnancy in explaining the development of depressive symptoms after PPH. PMID:26807799

  14. Vasospasmogenic substance produced following subarachnoid haemorrhage, and its fate.

    PubMed

    Sonobe, M; Suzuki, J

    1978-01-01

    Fresh blood and supernatants of blood-CSF mixtures incubated for 1 to 15 days were applied to the basilar artery of adult cats, and the degree of constriction was measured with a surgical microscope. The constriction due to fresh blood was weak and transient. It seems possible to assume that serotonin isolated from platelets participates greatly in the transient vasoconstriction induced by fresh blood. Supernatants of blood-CSF mixtures incubated for three days had weak activity in comparison with the powerful and long-lasting activity of those incubated for seven days. Furthermore, mixtures incubated for 15 days had little or no activity. This change in the vasoconstrictive activity was similar to, and coincides chronologically with clinical late spasm following subarachnoid haemorrhage 34. We investigated the vasospasmogenic substance in the seventh day mixture. Heat coagulation, ultrafiltration, sephadex G-100 gel-chromatography, disc-electrophoresis, and Spectrophotography show that extracellular oxyHb has a strong spasmogenic activity. In the 15th day mixture, oxyHb is spontaneously converted to metHb. Experimentally, oxyHb has a strong vasoconstrictive activity, and metHb has no vasoconstrictive activity. We have had success in oxidizing oxyHb into metHb with sodium nitrite, thus preventing experimental vasospasm.

  15. Disordered cerebro-vascular physiology in aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Symon, L

    1978-01-01

    The technical problems of surgery for anterior circle aneurysm have in large measure been solved. The problem of reduced perfusion to the brain which characterises the patient with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage in a poor clinical condition demands more subtle physiological handling. It appears likely that maintenance of an intact cell membrane and blood brain barrier may be aided by the exhibition of pre and post-operative steriods, and that concentration on regional perfusion should be the main aim in post-operative management of such cases. This demands maintenance of adequate blood volume, avoidance of platelet stickiness, and utilisation of the pathological paralysis of autoregulation to improve flow to ischaemic zones by hypertensive agents if necessary. The possibility that early operation with evacuation of blood from the basal cisterns may in the end prevent the vascular damage and disordered vaso-reactivity which encourages the development of transient ischaemic deficits, is a concept which has to be actively pursued. The problem is a continuing one which has bedevilled aneurysm surgery for 25 years, but the omens suggest that a solution is appreciably nearer at hand.

  16. Clinical and epidemiological patterns of Argentine haemorrhagic fever

    PubMed Central

    Maiztegui, J. I.

    1975-01-01

    The epidemiology of Argentine haemorrhagic fever (AHF) is closely related to cricetine rodents acting as natural hosts of Junin virus. The endemo-epidemic area, which has increased 5 times since the disease was first recognized 15-20 years ago, is located in a densely populated region of Argentina. It has been shown that the virus of LCM is active in humans and rodents of the AHF endemic area; this demonstrates the simultaneous presence of two arenaviruses pathogenic for man in a given geographic location. The disease is characterized by haematological, renal, neurological and cardiovascular changes. Electron microscopy and immunohistochemical studies have shown cytopathic changes, characteristic intracellular virus-like particles, and antigenic determinants of Junin virus in different organs from 9 cases of AHF. No deposits of immunoglobulins or C3 were found in the kidneys; in addition, an absence of fibrinogen and C3 in the hepatocytes and of immunoglobulins in the spleen was observed. These findings suggest a direct viral pathogenic action in the human disease. Ultrastructural and immunofluorescence studies in tissues of guinea-pigs inoculated with two strains of Junin virus revealed the presence of the same types of virus-like particles and antigenic determinants of Junin virus as were encountered in the human subjects with AHF. ImagesFig. 2Fig. 3 PMID:1085212

  17. Imaging cerebral haemorrhage with magnetic induction tomography: numerical modelling.

    PubMed

    Zolgharni, M; Ledger, P D; Armitage, D W; Holder, D S; Griffiths, H

    2009-06-01

    Magnetic induction tomography (MIT) is a new electromagnetic imaging modality which has the potential to image changes in the electrical conductivity of the brain due to different pathologies. In this study the feasibility of detecting haemorrhagic cerebral stroke with a 16-channel MIT system operating at 10 MHz was investigated. The finite-element method combined with a realistic, multi-layer, head model comprising 12 different tissues, was used for the simulations in the commercial FE package, Comsol Multiphysics. The eddy-current problem was solved and the MIT signals computed for strokes of different volumes occurring at different locations in the brain. The results revealed that a large, peripheral stroke (volume 49 cm(3)) produced phase changes that would be detectable with our currently achievable instrumentation phase noise level (17 m degrees ) in 70 (27%) of the 256 exciter/sensor channel combinations. However, reconstructed images showed that a lower noise level than this, of 1 m degrees , was necessary to obtain good visualization of the strokes. The simulated MIT measurements were compared with those from an independent transmission-line-matrix model in order to give confidence in the results.

  18. Surgical management of postpartum haemorrhage: survey of French obstetricians

    PubMed Central

    Bouet, Pierre-Emmanuel; Brun, Stéphanie; Madar, Hugo; Schinkel, Elsa; Merlot, Benjamin; Sentilhes, Loïc

    2016-01-01

    The aim of our study was to assess the theoretical and practical knowledge of French obstetricians about the surgical management of postpartum haemorrhage (PPH). Our study is a national anonymous self-administered survey. A total of 363 obstetricians responded to this questionnaire between December 2013 and April 2014. Questionnaire sent through email to all French obstetricians who are members of either of two federations of hospital-based obstetricians. Answers were collected until the end of June 2014. The main outcome measure was obstetricians’ level of mastery of each surgical technique. The results were analysed descriptively (proportions). Only the 286 questionnaires fully completed were analysed; the complete response rate was 23% (286/1246). In all, 33% (95/286) of the responding obstetricians reported that they had not mastered sufficiently or even at all the technique for bilateral ligation of the uterine arteries, 37% (105/286) for uterine compression suture, 62% (178/286) for ligation of the internal iliac arteries, and 47% (134/286) for emergency peripartum hysterectomy. In all, 18% (52/286) of respondents stated that they had not mastered any of these techniques. Our study shows that a worrisome number of French obstetricians reported insufficient mastery of the surgical techniques for PPH management. PMID:27460158

  19. Dengue and dengue haemorrhagic fever: implications of host genetics.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Umeshc; Nagar, Rachna; Shrivastava, Richa

    2006-07-01

    Little is known of the role of human leucocyte antigen (HLA) alleles or non-HLA alleles in determining resistance, susceptibility or the severity of acute viral infections. Dengue fever (DF) and dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) are suitable models for immunogenetic studies, yet only superficial efforts have been made to study dengue disease to date. DF and DHF can be caused by both primary and secondary infection by any of the four serotypes of the dengue virus. Differences in host susceptibility to infectious disease and disease severity cannot be attributed solely to the virus virulence. Variations in immune response, often associated with polymorphism in the human genome, can now be detected. Data on the influence of human genes in DF and DHF are discussed here in relation to (1) associations between HLA polymorphism and dengue disease susceptibility or resistance, (2) protective alleles influencing progression to severe disease, (3) alleles restricting CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes, and (4) non-HLA genetic factors that may contribute to DHF evolution. Recent discoveries regarding genetic associations in other viral infections may provide clues to understanding the development of end-stage complications in dengue disease. The scanty positive data presented here indicate a need for detailed genetic studies in different ethnic groups in different countries during the acute phase of DF and DHF on a larger number of patients.

  20. Dengue fever and dengue haemorrhagic fever in adolescents and adults.

    PubMed

    Tantawichien, Terapong

    2012-05-01

    Dengue fever (DF) is endemic in tropical and subtropical zones and the prevalence is increasing across South-east Asia, Africa, the Western Pacific and the Americas. In recent years, the spread of unplanned urbanisation, with associated substandard housing, overcrowding and deterioration in water, sewage and waste management systems, has created ideal conditions for increased transmission of the dengue virus in tropical urban centres. While dengue infection has traditionally been considered a paediatric disease, the age distribution of dengue has been rising and more cases have been observed in adolescents and adults. Furthermore, the development of tourism in the tropics has led to an increase in the number of tourists who become infected, most of whom are adults. Symptoms and risk factors for dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) and severe dengue differ between children and adults, with co-morbidities and incidence in more elderly patients associated with greater risk of mortality. Treatment options for DF and DHF in adults, as for children, centre round fluid replacement (either orally or intravenously, depending on severity) and antipyretics. Further data are needed on the optimal treatment of adult patients.

  1. Medication Errors in Cardiopulmonary Arrest and Code-Related Situations.

    PubMed

    Flannery, Alexander H; Parli, Sara E

    2016-01-01

    PubMed/MEDLINE (1966-November 2014) was searched to identify relevant published studies on the overall frequency, types, and examples of medication errors during medical emergencies involving cardiopulmonary resuscitation and related situations, and the breakdown by type of error. The overall frequency of medication errors during medical emergencies, specifically situations related to resuscitation, is highly variable. Medication errors during such emergencies, particularly cardiopulmonary resuscitation and surrounding events, are not well characterized in the literature but may be more frequent than previously thought. Depending on whether research methods included database mining, simulation, or prospective observation of clinical practice, reported occurrence of medication errors during cardiopulmonary resuscitation and surrounding events has ranged from less than 1% to 50%. Because of the chaos of the resuscitation environment, errors in prescribing, dosing, preparing, labeling, and administering drugs are prone to occur. System-based strategies, such as infusion pump policies and code cart management, as well as personal strategies exist to minimize medication errors during emergency situations.

  2. Cardiopulmonary signal sensing from subject wearing body armor.

    PubMed

    Park, Byung-Kwon; Lubecke, Victor; Boric-Lubecke, Olga; Host-Madsen, Anders

    2007-01-01

    Continuous wave (CW) Doppler motion sensing radar can detect human physiological signal such as respiration or heart signals at a distance and through barriers. It has been shown that heart rate can be extracted with good accuracy for normally clothed subjects. Such technique could potentially be used to search for survivors in battlefield triage applications. To assess the feasibility of such applications, we investigated Doppler radar of cardiopulmonary signal sensing from subjects wearing body armor vests. This paper presents measurement results of heart signals obtained using CW Doppler radar from a subject wearing body armor vest. Since armor plate reflects most of the RF signal, received signal after reflected from a subject is phase modulated with motion of an armor plate induced by chest motion, rather than directly with chest motion due to cardiopulmonary motion. Two different cases, including supine and seated positions, are chosen for this study, and good sensitivity was obtained in both cases. To the best of author's knowledge, this is the first published result of cardiopulmonary signal detection from a subject wearing a body armor vest.

  3. Novel blood sampling method of an artificial endocrine pancreas via the cardiopulmonary bypass circuit.

    PubMed

    Kawahito, Shinji; Higuchi, Seiichi; Mita, Naoji; Kitagawa, Tetsuya; Kitahata, Hiroshi

    2013-12-01

    We tried to perform continuous blood glucose monitoring during cardiovascular surgery involving cardiopulmonary bypass using an artificial endocrine pancreas (STG-22 or -55; Nikkiso, Tokyo, Japan); however, we often encountered problems during these procedures because insufficient blood was obtained for monitoring. Thus, we started performing the blood sampling via the venous side of the cardiopulmonary bypass circuit. As a result, continuous blood glucose monitoring using an artificial endocrine pancreas was proven to be stable and reliable during cardiovascular surgery involving cardiopulmonary bypass.

  4. Management of Anesthesia under Extracorporeal Cardiopulmonary Support in an Infant with Severe Subglottic Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Soeda, Rie; Taniguchi, Fumika; Sawada, Maiko; Hamaoka, Saeko; Shibasaki, Masayuki; Nakajima, Yasufumi; Hashimoto, Satoru; Sawa, Teiji; Nakayama, Yoshinobu

    2016-01-01

    A 4-month-old female infant who weighed 3.57 kg with severe subglottic stenosis underwent tracheostomy under extracorporeal cardiopulmonary support. First, we set up extracorporeal cardiopulmonary support to the infant and then successfully intubated an endotracheal tube with a 2.5 mm inner diameter before tracheostomy by otolaryngologists. Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary support is an alternative for maintenance of oxygenation in difficult airway management in infants. PMID:26989518

  5. Postpartum Pyomyoma, a Rare Complication of Sepsis Associated with Chorioamnionitis and Massive Postpartum Haemorrhage Treated with an Intrauterine Balloon

    PubMed Central

    Kaler, Mandeep; Gailer, Ruth; Iskaros, Joseph; David, Anna L.

    2015-01-01

    We report the successful treatment of a postpartum pyomyoma, a rare but serious complication of uterine leiomyomata in a 28-year-old primigravida. The patient was treated for an Escherichia Coli (E. Coli) urinary tract infection (UTI) at 16 weeks of gestation. She had asymptomatic short cervical length on ultrasound scan at 20 weeks that was managed conservatively due to the presence of further UTI and received antibiotics. She was known to have a left sided intramural leiomyoma. She presented with abdominal pain and vaginal bleeding at 23+1 weeks of gestation and the next day she had spontaneous vaginal delivery and collapsed with E. Coli septic shock, massive postpartum haemorrhage, and disseminated intravascular coagulation and was successfully treated with oxytocic drugs, a Rusch intrauterine balloon, and intravenous antibiotics. Eleven days postnatally she re-presented with systemic sepsis and was treated for retained products of conception. Sepsis persisted and investigations showed a postpartum pyomyoma that was initially managed with intravenous antibiotics to avoid surgery. Ultimately she required laparotomy, drainage of pyomyoma, and myomectomy. Postoperative recovery was good and the patient had a successful pregnancy two years later. PMID:26199774

  6. Ultrafiltration of priming blood before cardiopulmonary bypass attenuates inflammatory response and maintains cardiopulmonary function in neonatal piglets.

    PubMed

    Ugaki, Shinya; Honjo, Osami; Kotani, Yasuhiro; Nakakura, Mahito; Douguchi, Takuma; Oshima, Yu; Yoshizumi, Ko; Kasahara, Shingo; Sano, Shunji

    2009-01-01

    Blood priming is necessary for cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) in neonates to avoid excessive hemodilution; however, transfusion-related inflammation affects postCPB outcomes in neonatal open-heart surgery. We hypothesized that ultrafiltration of priming blood before CPB may reduce inflammatory mediators in priming blood and postCPB inflammatory responses, thereby improving cardiopulmonary function. Twelve 1-week-old piglets (3.5 +/- 0.2 kg) were divided into two groups. Group U (n = 6) employed the priming blood ultrafiltrated before CPB, but group N (n = 6) used the nonultrafiltrated blood. Cardiopulmonary bypass was performed for 2 hours and then modified ultrafiltration (MUF) was conducted. Data were acquired before CPB and after MUF. The values of K+, serotonin, and IL-8 in priming blood was significantly decreased after ultrafiltration (8.2 +/- 2.6 vs. 4.2 +/- 0.8 mEq/L, p < 0.01, 234 +/- 96 vs. 74 +/- 42 ng/ml, p < 0.01, 78.4 +/- 5.1 vs. 64.5 +/- 59.1 pg/ml, p < 0.05). Group U after MUF had lower thrombin-antithrombin complex levels (23.9 +/- 5.1 vs. 33.7 +/- 4.6 ng/ml, p < 0.01) and lower IL-8 levels in airway fluid (925 +/- 710 vs. 2495 +/- 1207 pg/ml, p < 0.05) than group N. Cardiac output and arterial PO2 after MUF in group U were also higher (1.13 +/- 0.21 vs. 0.69 +/- 0.22, p < 0.01, 340 +/- 190 vs. 149 +/- 84 mm Hg, p < 0.05). The ultrafiltration of blood priming before CPB attenuated activation of the coagulation pathway and inflammatory responses and preserved cardiopulmonary function in neonatal piglets.

  7. Toxic Shock Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... burn to avoid getting a staph infection. Toxic shock syndrome treatment Because toxic shock syndrome gets worse quickly, you may be seriously ... toxic shock syndrome in a wound? Resources Toxic Shock Syndrome ... treatment, women's health Family Health, Women January 2017 Copyright © ...

  8. Intracranial haemorrhage among a population of haemophilic patients in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Antunes, S V; Vicari, P; Cavalheiro, S; Bordin, J O

    2003-09-01

    Intracranial haemorrhage (ICH) is a common cause of morbidity and mortality in haemophilic patients. The overall incidence of ICH has been reported to range from 2.2% to 7.5% in patients with haemophilia. From 1987 to 2001, 401 haemophilic patients from the Serviço de Hemofilia, Disciplina de Hematologia e Hemoterapia, Universidade Federal de São Paulo were evaluated. The episodes of ICH were documented by CT scan and the anatomic location, clinical presentation, relationship to trauma and clinical factors, including the presence of HIV infection and the presence of inhibitor, were reviewed. Among 401 haemophilic patients, 45 ICH episodes in 35 (8.7%) patients with age ranging from 4 days to 49 years (mean 10.6 years) were observed. A history of recent trauma was documented in 24 (53.3%) cases. Seventeen (37.8%) episodes occurred in more than one site of bleeding, 12 (26.7%) were subdural, seven (15.5%) subarachnoid, four (8.9%) epidural, two (4.4%) intracerebral and one (2.2%) intraventricular. The most frequent symptoms were headache and drowsiness. All patients were submitted to replacement therapy and neurosurgical intervention was performed in eight (17.8%) patients. Despite the treatment, three (8.6%) haemophilia A patients died due to the ICH event and three presented late sequelae. The most important aspect of ICH management is the early replacement therapy in haemophilic patients. This prompt treatment will increase the chances of a better prognosis. Another impact measure consists in the administration of the deficient coagulation factor after every head trauma, even when considered minor.

  9. Pattern of elevation of urine catecholamines in intracerebral haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Hamann, G F; Strittmatter, M; Hoffmann, K H; Holzer, G; Stoll, M; Keshevar, T; Moili, R; Wein, K; Schimrigk, K

    1995-01-01

    Autonomic nervous system dysfunction is a common complication of severe intracranial disease. The aim of this study was to reveal the autonomic changes in patients suffering from acute intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH). 25 patients with spontaneous ICH within 24 hours of onset of symptoms were included. All patients were treated with standardised medical management and the meta- and normetanephrines were detected by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) in 24-hour urine every day. The mean level of normetanephrine (709 +/- 579 micrograms/day) and metanephrine (244 +/- 161 mg/day) were significantly elevated in comparison with a control group, p < or = 0.01. The norepinephrine elevation was of greater diagnostic and prognostic importance. Maximum urinary catecholamine metabolite levels occurred between day 3 to 10 after the bleeding. Normetanephrines correlated with the prognosis and the complications of ICH: intraventricular involvement resulted in significantly elevated normetanephrine levels (896 +/- 520 micrograms/day versus 311 +/- 78 micrograms/day) p < or = 0.01. Patients with a great volume of haematoma developed severe autonomic dysregulation (normetanephrines 1114 +/- 493 micrograms/day), whereas patients with smaller haematoma did not (339 +/- 125 micrograms/day) p < or = 0.0001; patients with bad outcome (1014 +/- 620 mg/day) had higher levels of normetanephrines than those with a good prognosis (322 +/- 110 micrograms/day) p < or = 0.001. A close relationship to elevated intracranial pressure was established. This study demonstrated the feasibility of detecting autonomic nervous system dysfunction in neurological intensive care patients by means of examination of the metabolites of the catecholamines in the urine.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Efficient muscle regeneration after highly haemorrhagic Bothrops alternatus venom injection.

    PubMed

    Garcia Denegri, María Emilia; Teibler, Gladys P; Maruñak, Silvana L; Hernández, David R; Acosta, Ofelia C; Leiva, Laura C

    2016-11-01

    Bothrops alternatus snake venom is particularly characterized for inducing a prominent haemorrhage and affecting hemostasis as a consequence of 43.1% of metallo-proteinases and less than 10% of PLA2 (almost all non-myotoxic phospholipases) in its venomics. In addition, myonecrosis is the major local effect in viper envenoming which might lead to permanent sequela. Then, the rebuilding of the microvasculature at the local injured site acquires significance since represents one of the pivotal stages for subsequent skeletal muscle regeneration either at morphological or functional aspects. Due to the significance played by vasculature in this process, it is important to study by histology and immunohistochemical techniques, the muscular damage and the sequence of skeletal muscle reconstruction (degree of damage, reconstitution of muscle fibres and capillaries). In this work, we injected intramuscularly 50 or 100 μg per mouse of B. alternatus venom in gastrocnemius muscles. We provided a complete description and characterization of the different stages of myogenesis after mild (50 µg) and severe (100 µg) local injury induced by B. alternatus venom toxins. The regeneration was evaluated 24 h, 3, 7, 14 and 28 days after receiving venom injection. Finally, both doses induced an extended necrosis at the site of injection where, when critical steps in the regenerative process are taking place, an efficient tissue rebuilding is achieved. B. alternatus venom is characterized by the high percentage of exclusively class P-III metalloproteinases, and by the lack of class P-I metalloproteinases in its venom composition. This could explain the effectiveness of muscle regeneration after venom injection despite the severity of the initial phase of envenoming.

  11. Interleukin-6 and development of vasospasm after subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Osuka, K; Suzuki, Y; Tanazawa, T; Hattori, K; Yamamoto, N; Takayasu, M; Shibuya, M; Yoshida, J

    1998-01-01

    The authors characterized the role of interleukins in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the development of vasospasm after subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH), particularly interleukin-6 (IL-6). Concentrations of interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta), IL-6, and interleukin-8 (IL-8) were measured serially in CSF of 24 patients and in serum of 9 patients with SAH and correlated clinically. Additionally, the effects of the same cytokines on the cerebral arteries of dogs were analyzed on angiograms after intracisternal injection. Changes in levels of eicosanoids, angiogenic factors, and soluble cell adhesion molecules were investigated in the CSF of injected dogs. CSF concentrations of IL-6 and IL-8 were elevated significantly above control levels from the acute stage of SAH until the chronic stage. Patients with symptomatic vasospasm had significantly higher levels of IL-6 as well as IL-8 in CSF on days 5 and 7. Intracisternal injection of IL-6 induced long-lasting vasoconstriction in five out of eight dogs, while IL-8 did not. The diameter of canine basilar artery after IL-6 was reduced 29 +/- 5% from pretreatment diameter at 8 hours. Prostaglandins E2 and I2 were elevated in CSF for the first 4.5 hour of this IL-6-induced vasospasm. Neither angiogenic factors such as platelet-derived growth factor-AB and vascular endothelial growth factor nor soluble cell adhesion molecules were significantly elevated in CSF. IL-6, which increases to very high concentrations in CSF after SAH, may be important in inducing vasospasm, as IL-6 produced long-lasting vasoconstriction in the canine cerebral artery, which may be partly related to activation of the prostaglandin cascade.

  12. Cardiovascular devices; reclassification of nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pumps for cardiopulmonary and circulatory bypass; effective date of requirement for premarket approval for nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pumps for temporary ventricular support. Final order.

    PubMed

    2015-06-08

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing a final order to reclassify nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump (NRP) devices for cardiopulmonary and circulatory bypass, a preamendments class III device, into class II (special controls), and to require the filing of a premarket approval application (PMA) for NRP devices for temporary ventricular support. FDA is also revising the title and identification of the regulation for NRP devices in this order.

  13. ECMO Rescue Therapy in Diffuse Alveolar Haemorrhage: A Case Report with Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Raj; Yadav, Sankalp

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO) has evolved as a treatment option for patients having potentially reversible severe respiratory failure who are deteriorating on conventional ventilation. During ECMO, systemic anticoagulation is needed to maintain patency of the circuit. Therefore, ongoing haemorrhage remains a relative contra-indication to ECMO as it can further increase the bleeding. There is only limited evidence available for the use of ECMO in patients with alveolar haemorrhage. Most of these patients did not receive any anticoagulation during ECMO. We describe our experience with a patient who received intravenous anticoagulation during ECMO for refractory hypoxemic respiratory failure due to Diffuse Alveolar Haemorrhage (DAH) associated with Granulomatosis polyangitis (Wegner’s GPA). ECMO sustained life by maintaining gas exchange support and provided the time for the immunotherapy to be effective. We report the successful use of anticoagulation during ECMO in a patient with DAH. PMID:27504336

  14. Pathological and biochemical observations on subclinical cases of fatty liver-haemorrhagic syndrome in the fowl.

    PubMed

    Pearson, A W; Butler, E J

    1978-01-01

    A high incidence of subclinical fatty liver-haemorrhagic syndrome (FLHS) was found in three flocks of laying hens in which deaths from FLHS had occurred. There was so significant difference between the affected hens and the remainder of the block in egg production or quality, but the former were more obese and had higher concentrations of lipids in their livers, suggesting a pathogenic relationship between hepatic steatosis and haemorrhage. Soluble protein tended to accumulate with the fat in the livers. Reticulolysis had occurred in over half the haemorrhagic livers examined. Histological examination and DNA estimations provided no evidence of generalised hyperplasia. From the composition of the liver lipids it was concluded that the steatosis resulted mainly from an increase in lipogenesis from dietary carbohydrate. Lipid levels in the plasma were weakly correlated with those in the liver. No change was detected in the plasma protein pattern.

  15. Toll-like receptor-4 agonist in post-haemorrhage pneumonia: role of dendritic and natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Roquilly, Antoine; Broquet, Alexis; Jacqueline, Cedric; Gautreau, Laetitia; Segain, Jean Pierre; de Coppet, Pierre; Caillon, Jocelyne; Altare, Frédéric; Josien, Regis; Asehnoune, Karim

    2013-11-01

    Haemorrhage-induced immunosuppression has been linked to nosocomial infections. We assessed the impact of monophosphoryl lipid A, a Toll/interleukin-1 receptor-domain-containing adaptor protein inducing interferon-biased Toll-like receptor-4 agonist currently used as a vaccine adjuvant in humans, on post-haemorrhage susceptibility to infection. We used a mouse model of post-haemorrhage pneumonia induced by methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus. Monophosphoryl lipid A was administered intravenously after haemorrhage and before pneumonia onset. Haemorrhage altered survival rate, increased lung damage (neutrophil accumulation, oedema and cytokine release) and altered the functions of dendritic and natural killer cells. Here, we show that monophosphoryl lipid A decreased systemic dissemination of S. aureus and dampened inflammatory lung lesions. Monophosphoryl lipid A partially restored the capacity for antigen presentation and the transcriptional activity in dendritic cells. Monophosphoryl lipid A did not restore the interferon-γ mRNA but prevented interleukin-10 mRNA overexpression in natural killer cells compared with untreated mice. Ex vivo monophosphoryl lipid A-stimulated dendritic cells or natural killer cells harvested from haemorrhaged animals were adoptively transferred into mice undergoing post-haemorrhage pneumonia. Stimulated dendritic cells (but not stimulated natural killer cells) improved the survival rate compared with mice left untreated. In vivo depletion of natural killer cells decreased survival rate of monophosphoryl lipid A-treated mice. Dendritic and natural killer cells are critically involved in the beneficial effects of monophosphoryl lipid A within post-haemorrhage pneumonia.

  16. Dysregulated arginine metabolism and cardiopulmonary dysfunction in patients with thalassaemia.

    PubMed

    Morris, Claudia R; Kim, Hae-Young; Klings, Elizabeth S; Wood, John; Porter, John B; Trachtenberg, Felicia; Sweeters, Nancy; Olivieri, Nancy F; Kwiatkowski, Janet L; Virzi, Lisa; Hassell, Kathryn; Taher, Ali; Neufeld, Ellis J; Thompson, Alexis A; Larkin, Sandra; Suh, Jung H; Vichinsky, Elliott P; Kuypers, Frans A

    2015-06-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) commonly develops in thalassaemia syndromes, but is poorly characterized. The goal of this study was to provide a comprehensive description of the cardiopulmonary and biological profile of patients with thalassaemia at risk for PH. A case-control study of thalassaemia patients at high versus low PH-risk was performed. A single cross-sectional measurement for variables reflecting cardiopulmonary status and biological pathophysiology were obtained, including Doppler-echocardiography, 6-min-walk-test, Borg Dyspnoea Score, New York Heart Association functional class, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), chest-computerized tomography, pulmonary function testing and laboratory analyses targeting mechanisms of coagulation, inflammation, haemolysis, adhesion and the arginine-nitric oxide pathway. Twenty-seven thalassaemia patients were evaluated, 14 with an elevated tricuspid-regurgitant-jet-velocity (TRV) ≥ 2·5 m/s. Patients with increased TRV had a higher frequency of splenectomy, and significantly larger right atrial size, left atrial volume and left septal-wall thickness on echocardiography and/or MRI, with elevated biomarkers of abnormal coagulation, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels and arginase concentration, and lower arginine-bioavailability compared to low-risk patients. Arginase concentration correlated significantly to several echocardiography/MRI parameters of cardiovascular function in addition to global-arginine-bioavailability and biomarkers of haemolytic rate, including LDH, haemoglobin and bilirubin. Thalassaemia patients with a TRV ≥ 2·5 m/s have additional echocardiography and cardiac-MRI parameters suggestive of right and left-sided cardiac dysfunction. In addition, low arginine bioavailability may contribute to cardiopulmonary dysfunction in β-thalassaemia.

  17. Subclinical cardiopulmonary dysfunction in stage 3 chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Alexander; Otto, James; Whittle, John; Stephens, Robert C M; Martin, Daniel S; Prowle, John R

    2016-01-01

    Objective Reduced exercise capacity is well documented in end-stage chronic kidney disease (CKD), preceded by changes in cardiac morphology in CKD stage 3. However, it is unknown whether subclinical cardiopulmonary dysfunction occurs in CKD stage 3 independently of heart failure. Methods Prospective observational cross-sectional study of exercise capacity assessed by cardiopulmonary exercise testing in 993 preoperative patients. Primary outcome was peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak). Anaerobic threshold (AT), oxygen pulse and exercise-evoked measures of autonomic function were analysed, controlling for CKD stage 3, age, gender, diabetes mellitus and hypertension. Results CKD stage 3 was present in 93/993 (9.97%) patients. Diabetes mellitus (RR 2.49 (95% CI 1.59 to 3.89); p<0.001), and hypertension (RR 3.20 (95% CI 2.04 to 5.03); p<0.001)) were more common in CKD stage 3. Cardiac failure (RR 0.83 (95% CI 0.30 to 2.24); p=0.70) and ischaemic heart disease (RR 1.40 (95% CI 0.97 to 2.02); p=0.09) were not more common in CKD stage 3. Patients with CKD stage 3 had lower predicted VO2peak (mean difference: 6% (95% CI 1% to 11%); p=0.02), lower peak heart rate (mean difference:9 bpm (95% CI 3 to 14); p=0.03)), lower AT (mean difference: 1.1 mL/min/kg (95% CI 0.4 to 1.7); p<0.001) and impaired heart rate recovery (mean difference: 4 bpm (95% CI 1 to 7); p<0.001)). Conclusions Subclinical cardiopulmonary dysfunction in CKD stage 3 is common. This study suggests that maladaptive cardiovascular/autonomic dysfunction may be established in CKD stage 3, preceding pathophysiology reported in end-stage CKD. PMID:27127638

  18. The response of cerebral cortex to haemorrhagic damage: experimental evidence from a penetrating injury model.

    PubMed

    Purushothuman, Sivaraman; Marotte, Lauren; Stowe, Sally; Johnstone, Daniel M; Stone, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the response of the brain to haemorrhagic damage is important in haemorrhagic stroke and increasingly in the understanding the cerebral degeneration and dementia that follow head trauma and head-impact sports. In addition, there is growing evidence that haemorrhage from small cerebral vessels is important in the pathogenesis of age-related dementia (Alzheimer's disease). In a penetration injury model of rat cerebral cortex, we have examined the neuropathology induced by a needlestick injury, with emphasis on features prominent in the ageing and dementing human brain, particularly plaque-like depositions and the expression of related proteins. Needlestick lesions were made in neo- and hippocampal cortex in Sprague Dawley rats aged 3-5 months. Brains were examined after 1-30 d survival, for haemorrhage, for the expression of hyperphosphorylated tau, Aβ, amyloid precursor protein (APP), for gliosis and for neuronal death. Temporal cortex from humans diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease was examined with the same techniques. Needlestick injury induced long-lasting changes-haem deposition, cell death, plaque-like deposits and glial invasion-along the needle track. Around the track, the lesion induced more transient changes, particularly upregulation of Aβ, APP and hyperphosporylated tau in neurons and astrocytes. Reactions were similar in hippocampus and neocortex, except that neuronal death was more widespread in the hippocampus. In summary, experimental haemorrhagic injury to rat cerebral cortex induced both permanent and transient changes. The more permanent changes reproduced features of human senile plaques, including the formation of extracellular deposits in which haem and Aβ-related proteins co-localised, neuronal loss and gliosis. The transient changes, observed in tissue around the direct lesion, included the upregulation of Aβ, APP and hyperphosphorylated tau, not associated with cell death. The findings support the possibility that

  19. Symptomatologic versus neuroimaging predictors of in-hospital survival after intracerebral haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Savadi-Oskouei, D; Sadeghi-Bazargani, H; Hashemilar, M; DeAngelis, T

    2010-05-01

    Symptomatological prediction of Intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) mortality is a simple and effective method compared to pathological predictors. In this study we considered consciousness level as an easily measurable predictor and compared it to haemorrhage location, intraventricular penetration and haemorrhage size derived from Computerized Tomography (CT) to predict mortality using a parametric survival analysis model. Two hundred and thirty eight ICH patients from a neurology hospital ward were enrolled into this comparative study. Patient history was documented with respect to mortality and a questionnaire outlining background variables and medical history was completed for them. Consciousness level was clinically evaluated by a physician while haemorrhage size and location were determined via computerized tomographic scanning reports. Data were entered into the computer and analyzed according to the Weibull parametric survival analysis model using STATA 8 statistical software. Males constituted 47.1% of the 238 patients, 52.9% were females. The age range of the patients varied from 13 to 88 years, with a mean age of 62.4 +/- 13.6 (Mean +/- SD). Half of the patients survived more than 20 days. Using the Weibull regression model, the only significant independent symptomatological predictor of mortality was found to be the level of consciousness. Cumulative hazard during the 90 days was compared for different levels of consciousness. Application of Weibull to pathological predictors of ICH mortality showed that the two independent predictors were haemorrhage size and intraventricular penetration. Results of statistical modelling didn't provide evidence of priority for pathological predictors of survival compared to easily measurable levels of consciousness as a symptomatological predictor. Easily measurable symptoms of level of consciousness can be used as a survival predictor of stroke due to intra-cerebral haemorrhage when compared to pathological indicators.

  20. Radiative Shock Waves In Emerging Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, R. Paul; Doss, F.; Visco, A.

    2011-05-01

    In laboratory experiments we produce radiative shock waves having dense, thin shells. These shocks are similar to shocks emerging from optically thick environments in astrophysics in that they are strongly radiative with optically thick shocked layers and optically thin or intermediate downstream layers through which radiation readily escapes. Examples include shocks breaking out of a Type II supernova (SN) and the radiative reverse shock during the early phases of the SN remnant produced by a red supergiant star. We produce these shocks by driving a low-Z plasma piston (Be) at > 100 km/s into Xe gas at 1.1 atm. pressure. The shocked Xe collapses to > 20 times its initial density. Measurements of structure by radiography and temperature by several methods confirm that the shock wave is strongly radiative. We observe small-scale perturbations in the post-shock layer, modulating the shock and material interfaces. We describe a variation of the Vishniac instability theory of decelerating shocks and an analysis of associated scaling relations to account for the growth of these perturbations, identify how they scale to astrophysical systems such as SN 1993J, and consider possible future experiments. Collaborators in this work have included H.F. Robey, J.P. Hughes, C.C. Kuranz, C.M. Huntington, S.H. Glenzer, T. Doeppner, D.H. Froula, M.J. Grosskopf, and D.C. Marion ________________________________ * Supported by the US DOE NNSA under the Predictive Sci. Academic Alliance Program by grant DE-FC52-08NA28616, the Stewardship Sci. Academic Alliances program by grant DE-FG52-04NA00064, and the Nat. Laser User Facility by grant DE-FG03-00SF22021.

  1. Contrast MR of the brain after high-perfusion cardiopulmonary bypass

    SciTech Connect

    Simonson, T.M.; Yuh, W.T.C.; Hindman, B.J.; Embrey, R.P.; Halloran, J.I.; Behrendt, D.M. )

    1994-01-01

    To study the efficacy of contrast MR imaging in the evaluation of central nervous system complications in the cardiopulmonary bypass patient and attempt to explain their pathophysiology based on the MR appearance and the cardiopulmonary bypass protocol. Nineteen patients were prospectively studied with contrast MR examinations the day before and 3 to 7 days after cardiopulmonary bypass, to determine the nature, extent, and number of new postoperative MR abnormalities. Cardiopulmonary bypass parameters used in our institution included: membrane oxygenation, arterial filtration with a pore size of 25 [mu]m, and a relatively high perfusion rate to produce a cardiac index of 2.0 to 2.5 L min per m[sup 2]. The preoperative noncontrast MR examination showed age-related changes and/or signs of ischemia in 60% of patients on the day before surgery. However, there was no abnormal enhancement or new T2 abnormalities on any postoperative MR examination to suggest hypoperfusion or emboli. None of the 19 patients developed overt neurologic deficits postoperatively. Review of the cardiopulmonary bypass protocol used indicated significant variations in technique at different institutions. Contrast MR imaging demonstrated no new abnormalities in patients after cardiopulmonary bypass performed with strict in-line arterial filtration and relatively high perfusion. MR imaging is feasible in the early postoperative period after cardiopulmonary bypass and may offer a convenient method for evaluation of the neurologic impact of technical factors associated with cardiopulmonary bypass. 17 refs.

  2. 21 CFR 870.4270 - Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy suction line blood filter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... blood filter. 870.4270 Section 870.4270 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Devices § 870.4270 Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy suction line blood filter. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy suction line blood filter is a device used as part of a gas exchange...

  3. 21 CFR 870.4270 - Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy suction line blood filter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... blood filter. 870.4270 Section 870.4270 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Devices § 870.4270 Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy suction line blood filter. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy suction line blood filter is a device used as part of a gas exchange...

  4. 21 CFR 870.4270 - Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy suction line blood filter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... blood filter. 870.4270 Section 870.4270 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Devices § 870.4270 Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy suction line blood filter. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy suction line blood filter is a device used as part of a gas exchange...

  5. 21 CFR 870.4270 - Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy suction line blood filter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... blood filter. 870.4270 Section 870.4270 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Devices § 870.4270 Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy suction line blood filter. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy suction line blood filter is a device used as part of a gas exchange...

  6. 21 CFR 870.4290 - Cardiopulmonary bypass adaptor, stopcock, manifold, or fitting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., or fitting. 870.4290 Section 870.4290 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Devices § 870.4290 Cardiopulmonary bypass adaptor, stopcock, manifold, or fitting. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass adaptor, stopcock, manifold, or fitting is a device used in cardiovascular...

  7. 21 CFR 870.4270 - Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy suction line blood filter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... blood filter. 870.4270 Section 870.4270 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Devices § 870.4270 Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy suction line blood filter. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy suction line blood filter is a device used as part of a gas exchange...

  8. Does Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Cause Rib Fractures in Children? A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maguire, Sabine; Mann, Mala; John, Nia; Ellaway, Bev; Sibert, Jo R.; Kemp, Alison M.

    2006-01-01

    Background: There is a diagnostic dilemma when a child presents with rib fractures after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) where child abuse is suspected as the cause of collapse. We have performed a systematic review to establish the evidence base for the following questions: (i) Does cardiopulmonary resuscitation cause rib fractures in…

  9. [Serum immune complexes and cardiopulmonary bypass. A review of thirty-four cases (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Herreman, G; Poisson-Lespassailles, C; Puech, H; Vanetti, A; Delaunay, L; Yvart, J; Fermé, I

    1982-05-20

    The immunologic status of patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass as investigated. Rheumatoid factor, cryoglobulinemia and serum immune complexes were looked for. Studies were performed before the operation and eight or fifteen days later. From the results, it is concluded that the immunologic changes that occur in the immediate postoperative period cannot be interpreted because of the profound modifications resulting from cardiopulmonary bypass.

  10. Popular Hybrid Congenital Heart Procedures without Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Aamisha; Amin, Zahid

    2017-01-01

    As surgical and catheter interventions advance, patients with congenital heart disease are now offered alternative treatment options that cater to their individual needs. Furthermore, collaboration between interventional cardiologists and cardiac surgeons have led to the development of hybrid procedures, using the best techniques of each respective field to treat these complex cardiac entities from initial treatment in the pediatric patient to repeat intervention in the adult. We present a review of the increased popularity and trend in hybrid procedures in congenital heart disease without the use of cardiopulmonary bypass. PMID:28321396

  11. Sternal force-displacement relationship during cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Gruben, K G; Guerci, A D; Halperin, H R; Popel, A S; Tsitlik, J E

    1993-05-01

    A viscoelastic model is presented to describe the dynamic response of the human chest to cyclic loading during manual cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Sternal force and displacement were measured during 16 clinical resuscitation attempts and during compressions on five CPR training manikins. The model was developed to describe the clinical data and consists of the parallel combination of a spring and dashpot. The human chests' elastic and damping properties were both augmented with increasing displacement. The manikins' elastic properties were stiffer and both elastic and damping properties were less dependent on displacement than the humans'.

  12. Induced mild hypothermia in post-cardiopulmonary bypass vasoplegia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Mukesh; Singh, Prabhat Kumar; Kumar, Naresh; Pant, Kailash Chandra

    2009-01-01

    The state of vasoplegia in immediate post-cardiopulmonary bypass period is characterized by severe hypotension, supranormal cardiac output, low systemic vascular resistance (SVR), and resistance to vasoconstrictors. We could successfully use induced mild hypothermia to increase SVR, and could avoid very high doses of nor-epinephrine (>0.3 mcg/kg/min) in the background of severe pulmonary hypertension (systolic pulmonary pressure> 90 mmHg). Its effects such as decreased oxygen demand, positive inotropy and better right ventricle performance probably helped to improve oxygenation in presence of pulmonary oedema.

  13. Mycoplasma pneumoniae: an aetiological agent of acute haemorrhagic oedema of infancy.

    PubMed

    Di Lernia, Vito

    2014-11-01

    Acute haemorrhagic oedema of infancy (AHEI) is considered a separate clinical entity among cutaneous small vessel vasculitis of childhood. It usually occurs in children younger than 2 years of age, with spontaneous recovery occurring within a few weeks. A history of recent upper respiratory or urinary tract infections or immunisation is found in most patients. Although Mycoplasma pneumoniae has been linked to a wide array of skin eruptions or diseases, it is not recognised as a possible cause of acute haemorrhagic oedema of infancy. The authors report a child with AHEI and a concurrent M. pneumoniae infection.

  14. Adult supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumour presenting as intracranial haemorrhage: Case report.

    PubMed

    Black-Tiong, Sean P; Sandler, Simon J I; Otto, Sophia; Wells, Adam J

    2017-03-01

    Primitive neuroectodermal tumours (PNET) are highly malignant tumours with an aggressive clinical behaviour. Commonly seen in children, they are uncommon in the adult population, and rare in the supratentorial location. Adult supratentorial PNETs (ST-PNET) typically present with symptoms relating to raised intracranial pressure, seizures, or focal neurological deficits. Presentation with intracranial haemorrhage has been reported only twice before in the literature, one of which was fatal. We report the case of intracranial haemorrhage secondary to ST-PNET in a young adult and her immediate management.

  15. Should the norepinephrine maximal dosage rate be greatly increased in late shock?

    PubMed

    Stefanou, Christos; Palazis, Lakis; Loizou, Areti; Timiliotou, Chrystalla

    2016-03-04

    Any advanced shock eventually degenerates into vasoplegia, which responds weakly to vasopressors. The highest reported norepinephrine flow rate is 3 μg/kg/min. We present the case of a young explosion victim, who was transferred in late haemorrhagic shock. Apart from usual treatment (hydration, mass transfusion protocol), single-agent norepinephrine was used to maintain a mean arterial pressure (MAP) of >60-65 mm Hg. For several hours, norepinephrine flow was 7-10 times the aforementioned (highest reported) in order to achieve our goal; during which, further hydration or transfusion would not contribute to MAP elevation. Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) severity score was 18 (expected mortality >99%). The patient survived without underperfusion-related damage. We conclude that norepinephrine dosages could potentially be greatly increased in late shock. We must resist giving up flow escalation based on its numerical value.

  16. Cardiopulmonary Circuit Models for Predicting Injury to the Heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Richard; Wing, Sarah; Bassingthwaighte, James; Neal, Maxwell

    2004-11-01

    Circuit models have been used extensively in physiology to describe cardiopulmonary function. Such models are being used in the DARPA Virtual Soldier (VS) Project* to predict the response to injury or physiological stress. The most complex model consists of systemic circulation, pulmonary circulation, and a four-chamber heart sub-model. This model also includes baroreceptor feedback, airway mechanics, gas exchange, and pleural pressure influence on the circulation. As part of the VS Project, Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been evaluating various cardiopulmonary circuit models for predicting the effects of injury to the heart. We describe, from a physicist's perspective, the concept of building circuit models, discuss both unstressed and stressed models, and show how the stressed models are used to predict effects of specific wounds. *This work was supported by a grant from the DARPA, executed by the U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command/TATRC Cooperative Agreement, Contract # W81XWH-04-2-0012. The submitted manuscript has been authored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, managed for the U.S. DOE by UT-Battelle, LLC, under contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725. Accordingly, the U.S. Government retains a non-exclusive, royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for U.S. Government purpose.

  17. Gravity and the evolution of cardiopulmonary morphology in snakes.

    PubMed

    Lillywhite, Harvey B; Albert, James S; Sheehy, Coleman M; Seymour, Roger S

    2012-02-01

    Physiological investigations of snakes have established the importance of heart position and pulmonary structure in contexts of gravity effects on blood circulation. Here we investigate morphological correlates of cardiopulmonary physiology in contexts related to ecology, behavior and evolution. We analyze data for heart position and length of vascular lung in 154 species of snakes that exhibit a broad range of characteristic behaviors and habitat associations. We construct a composite phylogeny for these species, and we codify gravitational stress according to species habitat and behavior. We use conventional regression and phylogenetically independent contrasts to evaluate whether trait diversity is correlated with gravitational habitat related to evolutionary transitions within the composite tree topology. We demonstrate that snake species living in arboreal habitats, or which express strongly climbing behaviors, possess relatively short blood columns between the heart and the head, as well as relatively short vascular lungs, compared to terrestrial species. Aquatic species, which experience little or no gravity stress in water, show the reverse - significantly longer heart-head distance and longer vascular lungs. These phylogenetic differences complement the results of physiological studies and are reflected in multiple habitat transitions during the evolutionary histories of these snake lineages, providing strong evidence that heart-to-head distance and length of vascular lung are co-adaptive cardiopulmonary features of snakes.

  18. How Is Cardiogenic Shock Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Cardiogenic Shock Diagnosed? The first step in diagnosing cardiogenic shock ... is cardiogenic shock. Tests and Procedures To Diagnose Shock and Its Underlying Causes Blood Pressure Test Medical ...

  19. Toxic Shock Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... toxic shock syndrome results from toxins produced by Staphylococcus aureus (staph) bacteria, but the condition may also ... a skin or wound infection. Bacteria, most commonly Staphylococcus aureus (staph), causes toxic shock syndrome. It can ...

  20. Neptune inbound bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szabo, Adam; Lepping, Ronald P.

    1995-01-01

    Voyager 2 crossed the inbound or upstream Neptunian bow shock at 1430 spacecraft event time on August 24 in 1989 (Belcher et al., 1989). The plasma and magnetic field measurements allow us to study the solar wind interaction with the outermost gas giant. To fully utilize all of the spacecraft observations, an improved nonlinear least squares, 'Rankine-Hugoniot' magnetohydrodynamic shock-fitting technique has been developed (Szabo, 1994). This technique is applied to the Neptunian data set. We find that the upstream bow shock normal points nearly exactly toward the Sun consistent with any reasonable large-scale model of the bow shock for a near subsolar crossing. The shock was moving outward with a speed of 14 +/- 12 km/s. The shock can be characterized as a low beta, high Mach number, strong quasi-perpendicular shock. Finally, the shock microstructure features are resolved and found to scale well with theoretical expectations.

  1. Shock & Anaphylactic Shock. Learning Activity Package.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hime, Kirsten

    This learning activity package on shock and anaphylactic shock is one of a series of 12 titles developed for use in health occupations education programs. Materials in the package include objectives, a list of materials needed, information sheets, reviews (self evaluations) of portions of the content, and answers to reviews. These topics are…

  2. Biomass shock pretreatment

    SciTech Connect

    Holtzapple, Mark T.; Madison, Maxine Jones; Ramirez, Rocio Sierra; Deimund, Mark A.; Falls, Matthew; Dunkelman, John J.

    2014-07-01

    Methods and apparatus for treating biomass that may include introducing a biomass to a chamber; exposing the biomass in the chamber to a shock event to produce a shocked biomass; and transferring the shocked biomass from the chamber. In some aspects, the method may include pretreating the biomass with a chemical before introducing the biomass to the chamber and/or after transferring shocked biomass from the chamber.

  3. Physiopathology of shock

    PubMed Central

    Bonanno, Fabrizio Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    Shock syndromes are of three types: cardiogenic, hemorrhagic and inflammatory. Hemorrhagic shock has its initial deranged macro-hemodynamic variables in the blood volume and venous return. In cardiogenic shock there is a primary pump failure that has cardiac output/mean arterial pressure as initial deranged variables. In Inflammatory Shock it is the microcirculation that is mainly affected, while the initial deranged macrocirculation variable is the total peripheral resistance hit by systemic inflammatory response. PMID:21769210

  4. Computational Intelligence Method for Early Diagnosis Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever Using Fuzzy on Mobile Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salman, Afan; Lina, Yen; Simon, Christian

    2014-03-01

    Mortality from Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever (DHF) is still increasing in Indonesia particularly in Jakarta. Diagnosis of the dengue shall be made as early as possible so that first aid can be given in expectation of decreasing death risk. The Study will be conducted by developing expert system based on Computational Intelligence Method. On the first year, study will use the Fuzzy Inference System (FIS) Method to diagnose Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever particularly in Mobile Device consist of smart phone. Expert system application which particularly using fuzzy system can be applied in mobile device and it is useful to make early diagnosis of Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever that produce outcome faster than laboratory test. The evaluation of this application is conducted by performing accuracy test before and after validation using data of patient who has the Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever. This expert system application is easy, convenient, and practical to use, also capable of making the early diagnosis of Dengue Haemorraghic to avoid mortality in the first stage.

  5. Experimental respiratory Marburg virus haemorrhagic fever infection in the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus).

    PubMed

    Smither, Sophie J; Nelson, Michelle; Eastaugh, Lin; Laws, Thomas R; Taylor, Christopher; Smith, Simon A; Salguero, Francisco J; Lever, Mark S

    2013-04-01

    Marburg virus causes a highly infectious and lethal haemorrhagic fever in primates and may be exploited as a potential biothreat pathogen. To combat the infection and threat of Marburg haemorrhagic fever, there is a need to develop and license appropriate medical countermeasures. To determine whether the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) would be an appropriate model to assess therapies against Marburg haemorrhagic fever, initial susceptibility, lethality and pathogenesis studies were performed. Low doses of virus, between 4 and 28 TCID50 , were sufficient to cause a lethal, reproducible infection. Animals became febrile between days 5 and 6, maintaining a high fever before succumbing to disease between 8 and 11 days postchallenge. Typical signs of Marburg virus infection were observed including haemorrhaging and a transient rash. In pathogenesis studies, virus was isolated from the animals' lungs from day 3 postchallenge and from the liver, spleen and blood from day 5 postchallenge. Early signs of histopathology were apparent in the kidney and liver from day 3. The most striking features were observed in animals exhibiting severe clinical signs, which included high viral titres in all organs, with the highest levels in the blood, increased levels in liver function enzymes and blood clotting times, decreased levels in platelets, multifocal moderate-to-severe hepatitis and perivascular oedema.

  6. [Morphological characteristics of haemorrhagic enteritis in dogs caused by parvo-like viruses (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    v d Gaag, I; van den Ingh, T S; van Dijk, J E

    1980-03-15

    Various outbreaks of parvo-like virus infection in dogs are reported. A form of haemorrhagic enteritis was observed, which was microscopically characterized by a hypo-regenerative villous atrophy of the small intestine, which bears a close resemblance to the typical lesion of feline panleucopenia. This pathomorphological feature may be regarded as typical of canine enteritis due to a parvo-like virus.

  7. Marburg haemorrhagic fever in returning travellers: an overview aimed at clinicians.

    PubMed

    Bauer, M P; Timen, A; Vossen, A C T M; van Dissel, J T

    2015-06-22

    Marburg virus haemorrhagic fever (MARV HF) is a dramatic disease that can occur in a traveller returning from an area where the virus is endemic. In this article, we provide an overview of MARV HF as an imported infection with an emphasis on clinical aspects. Although late features such as rash, signs of haemorrhagic diathesis and liver necrosis may point to the diagnosis, the initial clinical picture is non-specific. If in this early phase the patient's epidemiological exposure history is compatible with MARV HF, the patient should be isolated and managed according to viral haemorrhagic fever protocol and RT-PCR should be performed on the patient's blood as soon as possible to rule out MARV HF (or other possible viral haemorrhagic fevers). In severe cases, direct electron microscopy of blood in specialized centres (e.g. Bernhard-Nocht Institute in Hamburg, Germany) may be considered if the result of the RT-PCR is not readily available. Adequate diagnostics and empirical treatment for other acute life-threatening illnesses should not be withheld while test results are awaited, but all management and diagnostics should be weighed against the risks of nosocomial transmission.

  8. Experimental respiratory Marburg virus haemorrhagic fever infection in the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus)

    PubMed Central

    Smither, Sophie J; Nelson, Michelle; Eastaugh, Lin; Laws, Thomas R; Taylor, Christopher; Smith, Simon A; Salguero, Francisco J; Lever, Mark S

    2013-01-01

    Marburg virus causes a highly infectious and lethal haemorrhagic fever in primates and may be exploited as a potential biothreat pathogen. To combat the infection and threat of Marburg haemorrhagic fever, there is a need to develop and license appropriate medical countermeasures. To determine whether the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) would be an appropriate model to assess therapies against Marburg haemorrhagic fever, initial susceptibility, lethality and pathogenesis studies were performed. Low doses of virus, between 4 and 28 TCID50, were sufficient to cause a lethal, reproducible infection. Animals became febrile between days 5 and 6, maintaining a high fever before succumbing to disease between 8 and 11 days postchallenge. Typical signs of Marburg virus infection were observed including haemorrhaging and a transient rash. In pathogenesis studies, virus was isolated from the animals’ lungs from day 3 postchallenge and from the liver, spleen and blood from day 5 postchallenge. Early signs of histopathology were apparent in the kidney and liver from day 3. The most striking features were observed in animals exhibiting severe clinical signs, which included high viral titres in all organs, with the highest levels in the blood, increased levels in liver function enzymes and blood clotting times, decreased levels in platelets, multifocal moderate-to-severe hepatitis and perivascular oedema. PMID:23441639

  9. Provision for major obstetric haemorrhage: an Australian and New Zealand survey and review.

    PubMed

    Fowler, S J

    2005-12-01

    Obstetric haemorrhage is a leading cause of maternal death and the most common contributor to serious obstetric morbidity. Maternal mortality audit data suggest that appropriate preparation and good emergency management leads to improved outcome. The aim of this study was to assess facilities relevant to major obstetric haemorrhage management in all units in Australia and New Zealand that offer operative obstetric services. The questionnaire was divided into ten sections: demographics, facilities, staffing, policies and guidelines, drugs, procedures, equipment, point of care testing, availability of O negative blood and free comments. Responses were received from 240 (76.4%) of the 314 hospitals surveyed (187 public and 53 private). One hundred and nine units (45%) had fewer than 500 deliveries per year Distances to referral facilities were frequently very large. Of the 90 hospitals (38.1%) without an onsite blood bank, 12 did not have a supply of blood for emergencies. Half of all units (n=121) had on-site intensive care or high dependency facilities and 72.9% (n=175) had an on-site cardiac arrest team. Only 58.8% of units (n=141) had a written haemorrhage protocol. Findings are presented in the context of other literature, including evidence-based guidelines. Haemorrhage responds well to appropriate treatment, although careful preparation and anticipation of problems is required. In our region geographical factors and different systems of healthcare complicate provision of obstetric services. Where facilities are limited, women should be offered antenatal transfer to a larger centre.

  10. Use of thermography to monitor sole haemorrhages and temperature distribution over the claws of dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, K; Wilhelm, J; Fürll, M

    2015-02-07

    Subclinical laminitis, an early pathological event in the development of many claw diseases, is an important factor in the welfare and economics of high-producing dairy cows. However, the aetiology and pathogenesis of this complex claw disease are not well understood. The present study investigated to what extent thermographic examination of claws is able to give information about corium inflammation, and whether the technique may be used as a diagnostic tool for early detection of subclinical laminitis. Moreover, the temperature distribution over the individual main claws was investigated to obtain further knowledge about pressure distribution on the claws. For this purpose the claws of 123 cows were evaluated in the first week after calving as well as after the second month of lactation for presence of sole haemorrhages (a sign of subclinical laminitis). Furthermore, the ground contact area was analysed by thermography. Sole haemorrhages were significantly increased by the second month of lactation. Thermography showed clear differences between the claws of the front limbs and hindlimbs, as well as between lateral and medial claws. Although the distribution of sole haemorrhages was consistent with the pattern of the temperature distribution over the main claws, no clear correlation was found between the claw temperature after calving and the visible laminitis-like changes (sole haemorrhages) eight weeks later.

  11. Incidence and outcome of subarachnoid haemorrhage: a retrospective population based study

    PubMed Central

    Pobereskin, L

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—The purpose was to define the incidence and case fatality rates of subarachnoid haemorrhage in the population of Devon and Cornwall.
METHODS—A retrospective population based design was employed with multiple overlapping methods of case ascertainment. A strict definition of subarachnoid haemorrhage was used. Age and sex specific incidence rates and relative risks for death at different time intervals are calculated.
RESULTS—Eight hundred cases of first ever subarachnoid haemorrhage were identified; 77% of cases were verified by CT, 22% by necropsy, and 1% by lumbar puncture. The incidence rates are higher than those previously reported in the United Kingdom. The age standardised incidence rate (/100 000 person-years) for females was 11.9 (95% confidence interval (95% CI) 9.5-15.0), for males 7.4 (5.4-10.0), and the total rate was 9.7 (7.5-12.6). The case fatality rates at 24 hours, 1 week, and 30 days were 21 (18-24)%, 37 (33-41)%, and 44 (40-49)% respectively. The relative risk for death at 30days for those over 60 years:under 60 years was 2.95 (2.18-3.97).
CONCLUSION—The incidence of subarachnoid haemorrhage in the United Kingdom is higher than previously reported. Three quarters of the mortality occurs within 3days.

 PMID:11181855

  12. Survey of arrangements for anaesthesia for interventional neuroradiology for aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Webb, S T; Farling, P A

    2005-06-01

    The management of patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage following rupture of an intracranial aneurysm is changing. The recent introduction of endovascular occlusion of the aneurysm using detachable coils offers an alternative to craniotomy and clipping of the aneurysm for the prevention of recurrent aneurysmal haemorrhage. The aim of this survey was to evaluate the current provision of peri-operative care for patients with an aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage in the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland. A survey was conducted of the 34 neuroscience centres which provide an adult neurosurgery service in the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland. Most centres reported an increasing role for coiling, and a decreasing role for clipping in the management of aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage. The provision of peri-operative care for patients undergoing interventional neuroradiology procedures varied greatly between centres. Neurovascular services in the UK are being reorganised and adequate staff and facilities should be available for the peri-operative care of patients undergoing interventional neuroradiology procedures.

  13. A Prospective Study of Survival After In-Hospital Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and its Related Factors

    PubMed Central

    Miranzadeh, Sedigheh; Adib-Hajbaghery, Mohsen; Hosseinpour, Nadimeh

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite several studies, there is no agreement on factors that affect survival after in-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Objectives This study aimed to evaluate the survival rate of in-hospital CPR and its related factors at Shahid Beheshti hospital in Kashan, Iran, in 2014. Patients and Methods A descriptive study was conducted on all cases of CPR performed in Kashan Shahid Beheshti hospital during a 6-month period in 2014. Through a consecutive sampling method, 250 cases of CPR were studied. A three-part researcher-made instrument was used. The outcome of CPR was documented as either survival to hospital discharge or unsuccessful (death of the patient). Chi-square test, t test, and logistic regression analysis were used to analyze the data. Results Of all CPR cases, 238 (95.2%) were unsuccessful and 12 (4.8%) survived to hospital discharge. Only 2.6% of patients who were resuscitated in medical units survived to hospital discharge, whereas this rate was 11.4% in the emergency department. Only 45 (18%) patients were defibrillated during resuscitation; in 11 patients, defibrillation was performed between 15 to 45 minutes after the initiation of CPR. The mean time from initiation of CPR to the first DC shock was 13.93 ± 8.88 minutes. Moreover, the mean duration of CPR was 35.11 ± 11.42 minutes. The survival rate was higher in the morning shift and lower during the time of shift change (9.4% vs. 0). The duration of CPR and speed of arrival of the CPR team were identified as factors that predicted the outcome of CPR. Conclusions The survival rate after in-hospital CPR was very low. The duration of CPR and the time of initiating CPR effects patients’ outcomes. These findings highlight the crucial role of an organized, skilled, well-established and timely CPR team. PMID:27218061

  14. Comparison of Methods for the Determination of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Chest Compression Fraction

    PubMed Central

    Iyanaga, Masayuki; Gray, Randal; Stephens, Shannon W.; Akinsanya, Olajide; Rodgers, Joel; Smyrski, Kathleen; Wang, Henry E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective While cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) chest compression fraction (CCF) is associated with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) outcomes, there is no standard method for the determination of CCF. We compared nine methods for calculating CCF. Methods We studied consecutive adult OHCA patients treated by Alabama Emergency Medical Services (EMS) agencies of the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium (ROC) during Jan. 1, 2010 - Oct. 28, 2010. Paramedics used portable cardiac monitors with real-time chest compression detection technology (LifePak 12, Physio-Control, Redmond, Washington). We performed both automated CCF calculation for the entire care episode as well as manual review of CPR data in 1-minute epochs, defining CCF as the proportion of each treatment interval with active chest compressions. We compared the CCF values resulting from 9 calculation methods: 1) mean CCF for the entire patient care episode (automated calculation by manufacturer software), 2) mean CCF for first 3 minutes of patient care, 3) mean CCF for first 5 minutes, 4) mean CCF for first 10 minutes, 5) mean CCF for the entire episode except first 5 minutes, 6) mean CCF for last 5 minutes, 7) mean CCF from start to first shock, 8) mean CCF for the first half of resuscitation, 9) mean CCF for the second half of resuscitation. We compared CCF for Methods 2-9 with Method 1 using paired t-tests with a Bonferroni-adjusted p-value of 0.006 (99.5% confidence intervals). Results Among 102 adult OHCA, patient demographics were: mean age 60.3 years (SD 20.8 years), African American 56.9%, male 63.7%, and shockable ECG rhythm 23.5%. Mean CPR duration was 728 seconds (95% CI: 647-809 seconds). Mean CCF for the 9 CCF calculation methods were: 1) 0.587; 2) 0.526; 3) 0.541; 4) 0.566; 5) 0.562; 6) 0.597; 7) 0.530; 8) 0.550; 9) 0.590%. Compared with Method 1, Method 7 CCF (start to first shock) was slightly lower (−0.057; 99.5% CI: −0.100 – (−0.014)). There were no other statistically

  15. Cardiopulmonary exercise test in chronic heart failure: beyond peak oxygen consumption.

    PubMed

    Franco, Veronica

    2011-03-01

    Patients with cardiovascular diseases commonly present with exercise intolerance, clinically manifest as shortness of breath and fatigue, and these symptoms have important prognostic implications. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing is a well-established method for evaluation of cardiopulmonary diseases. It provides an objective assessment of maximal aerobic capacity (peak VO(2)), estimates prognosis, and allows the physician to discriminate among many subtle and often overlapping etiologies. This review focuses on the evaluation of important exercise parameters, in addition to the peak VO(2), during cardiopulmonary exercise testing.

  16. [Acute traumatic myocardial infarction with cardiogenic shock in severe polytrauma--a case report].

    PubMed

    Rohe, G; Feyerherd, F; Möx, B; Hachenberg, T

    2000-04-01

    A 41-year-old man suffered severe polytrauma and developed a traumatic myocardial infarction with cardiogenic shock. Thrombolysis as well as coronary bypass grafting was contraindicated due to accompanying injuries. An attempted early coronary revascularization by percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) failed due to dissection of the left interventricular coronary artery. Treatment of cardiac insufficiency was complicated by intraabdominal haemorrhage enforcing emergency laparotomy. Intraaortic balloon counterpulsation proved to be efficient in supporting circulation in these circumstances. The case report documents the practicability and importance of treating both myocardial ischaemia and attending injuries in an equivalent and coordinated manner in traumatic myocardial infarction.

  17. Vacuum-assisted drainage in cardiopulmonary bypass: advantages and disadvantages

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho Filho, Élio Barreto; Marson, Fernando Augusto de Lima; da Costa, Loredana Nilkenes Gomes; Antunes, Nilson

    2014-01-01

    Systematic review of vacuum assisted drainage in cardiopulmonary bypass, demonstrating its advantages and disadvantages, by case reports and evidence about its effects on microcirculation. We conducted a systematic search on the period 1997-2012, in the databases PubMed, Medline, Lilacs and SciELO. Of the 70 selected articles, 26 were included in the review. Although the vacuum assisted drainage has significant potential for complications and requires appropriate technology and professionalism, prevailed in literature reviewed the concept that vacuum assisted drainage contributed in reducing the rate of transfusions, hemodilutions, better operative field, no significant increase in hemolysis, reduced complications surgical, use of lower prime and of smaller diameter cannulas. PMID:25140478

  18. Interdisciplinary Simulation Using the Cardiopulmonary Bypass Simulator (CPBS)©

    PubMed Central

    Mendel, Shaun

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: Interdisciplinary education offerings between students of cardiovascular science and nurse anesthesia are uncommon despite the collaborative nature of these disciplines. The dual purpose of this article is to describe a method for interdisciplinary simulation and to report survey responses provided by participants. An interdisciplinary simulation session using concurrent use of the cardiopulmonary bypass simulator and the emergency care simulator is described. Interdisciplinary perceptions before and after the event were surveyed using the revised Interdisciplinary Education Perception Scale. Statistically significant differences between baseline and final survey responses were observed in the total score and within the areas of competency and perception of cooperation. Emerging simulation technologies and novel combinations of existing devices can facilitate meaningful interdisciplinary educational opportunities for health science students. PMID:26357799

  19. Subcapsular liver haematoma after cardiopulmonary resuscitation by untrained personnel.

    PubMed

    Monsuez, Jean-Jacques; Charniot, Jean-Christophe; Veilhan, Luc Antoine; Mougué, Ferdinand; Bellin, Marie-France; Boissonnas, Alain

    2007-05-01

    Although early cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is associated with increased survival of sudden cardiac arrest victims, it may also result in miscellaneous injuries. A 25-year-old inebriated man rescued from drowning in a swimming pool was apnoeic and pulseless after being pulled out of the water. Successful CPR was provided by untrained bystanders, including abdominal thrusts thought to remove water from the airways and chest compressions to provide haemodynamic support. As the patient progressively improved during his subsequent hospital stay, he complained of right upper abdominal and thoracic pain. A computed tomographic scan showed a 11 cm subcapsular haematoma contiguous to the right hepatic lobe. A favourable outcome was obtained after conservative, non-operative treatment. Subcapsular haematoma of the liver is a potentially life threatening complication that warrants consideration in survivors of cardiac arrest who have received closed chest compression and/or abdominal thrusts.

  20. Myhre syndrome: Clinical features and restrictive cardiopulmonary complications.

    PubMed

    Starr, Lois J; Grange, Dorothy K; Delaney, Jeffrey W; Yetman, Anji T; Hammel, James M; Sanmann, Jennifer N; Perry, Deborah A; Schaefer, G Bradley; Olney, Ann Haskins

    2015-12-01

    Myhre syndrome, a connective tissue disorder characterized by deafness, restricted joint movement, compact body habitus, and distinctive craniofacial and skeletal features, is caused by heterozygous mutations in SMAD4. Cardiac manifestations reported to date have included patent ductus arteriosus, septal defects, aortic coarctation and pericarditis. We present five previously unreported patients with Myhre syndrome. Despite varied clinical phenotypes all had significant cardiac and/or pulmonary pathology and abnormal wound healing. Included herein is the first report of cardiac transplantation in patients with Myhre syndrome. A progressive and markedly abnormal fibroproliferative response to surgical intervention is a newly delineated complication that occurred in all patients and contributes to our understanding of the natural history of this disorder. We recommend routine cardiopulmonary surveillance for patients with Myhre syndrome. Surgical intervention should be approached with extreme caution and with as little invasion as possible as the propensity to develop fibrosis/scar tissue is dramatic and can cause significant morbidity and mortality.

  1. [Basic cardiopulmonary resuscitation courses for parents of newborns and infants].

    PubMed

    Enríquez, Diego; Castro, Adriana; Rabasa, Cecilia; Capelli, Carola; Cores Ponte, Florencia; Gutiérrez, Susana; Mariani, Gonzalo; Pacchioni, Sergio; Pardo, Amorina; Pérez, Gastón; Sorgetti, Mariana; Szyld, Edgardo

    2014-04-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) courses meet all the definitions of an educational activity for prevention of cardiac arrest death by risk patients' parents and/or the general population. The aim is to improve patients' home care and turn parents confident before their children are discharged from hospital, mainly from intensive care units. Currently these courses are part of discharge protocols in many neonatologist services although there are offers that exceed this target, and extend to other areas such as education and caregivers. Locally the experience of neonatal CPR at the Sociedad Argentina de Pediatría stands out in connection with delivering courses to high risk patients' parents as well as designing and spreading learning material.

  2. Pyruvate enhances neurological recovery following cardiopulmonary arrest and resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Arti B.; Barlow, Matthew A.; Yang, Shao-Hua; Simpkins, James W.; Mallet, Robert T.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Cerebral oxidative stress and metabolic dysfunction impede neurological recovery from cardiac arrest-resuscitation. Pyruvate, a potent antioxidant and energy-yielding fuel, has been shown to protect against oxidant- and ischemia-induced neuronal damage. This study tested whether acute pyruvate treatment during cardiopulmonary resuscitation can prevent neurological dysfunction and cerebral injury following cardiac arrest. Methods Anesthetized, open-chest mongrel dogs underwent 5 min cardiac arrest, 5 min open chest cardiac compression (OCCC), defibrillation and 3 day recovery. Pyruvate (n = 9) or NaCl volume control (n = 8) were administered (0.125 mmol/kg/min iv) throughout OCCC and the first 55 min recovery. Sham dogs (n = 6) underwent surgery and recovery without cardiac arrest-resuscitation. Results Neurological deficit score (NDS), evaluated at 2 day recovery, was sharply increased in NaCl-treated dogs (10.3 ± 3.5) vs. shams (1.2 ± 0.4), but pyruvate treatment mitigated neurological deficit (NDS = 3.3 ± 1.2; P < 0.05 vs. NaCl). Brain samples were taken for histological examination and evaluation of inflammation and cell death at 3 d recovery. Loss of pyramidal neurons in the hippocampal CA1 subregion was greater in the NaCl controls than in pyruvate treated dogs (11.7 ± 2.3% vs. 4.3 ± 1.2%; P < 0.05). Cardiac arrest increased caspase 3 activity, matrix metalloproteinase activity, and DNA fragmentation in the CA1 subregion; pyruvate prevented caspase-3 activation and DNA fragmentation, and suppressed matrix metalloproteinase activity. Conclusion Intravenous pyruvate therapy during cardiopulmonary resuscitation prevents initial oxidative stress and neuronal injury and enhances neurological recovery from cardiac arrest. PMID:17618729

  3. Thrombolytic-Enhanced Extracorporeal Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation After Prolonged Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Spinelli, Elena; Davis, Ryan P.; Ren, Xiaodan; Sheth, Parth S.; Tooley, Trevor R.; Iyengar, Amit; Sowell, Brandon; Owens, Gabe E.; Bocks, Martin L.; Jacobs, Teresa L.; Yang, Lynda J.; Stacey, William C.; Bartlett, Robert H.; Rojas-Peña, Alvaro; Neumar, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of the combination of extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR) and thrombolytic therapy on the recovery of vital organ function after prolonged cardiac arrest. Design Laboratory investigation Setting University Laboratory Subjects Pigs Interventions Animals underwent 30-minute untreated ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest followed by extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR) for 6 hours. Animals were allocated into two experimental groups: t-ECPR, which received Streptokinase 1 MU and c-ECPR which did not receive Streptokinase. In both groups the resuscitation protocol included the following physiologic targets: mean arterial pressure (MAP) > 70 mmHg, Cerebral perfusion pressure (CerPP) > 50 mmHg, PaO2 150 ± 50 mmHg, PaCO2 40 ± 5 mmHg and core temperature 33 ± 1 °C. Defibrillation was attempted after 30 minutes of ECPR. Measurements and Main Results A cardiac resuscitability score was assessed on the basis of: success of defibrillation; return of spontaneous heart beat; weanability form ECPR; and left ventricular systolic function after weaning. The addition of thrombolytic to ECPR significantly improved cardiac resuscitability (3.7 ± 1.6 in t-ECPR vs 1.0 ± 1.5 in c-ECPR). Arterial lactate clearance was higher in t-ECPR than in c-ECPR (40 ± 15% VS 18 ± 21 %). At the end of the experiment, the intracranial pressure was significantly higher in c-ECPR than in t-ECPR. Recovery of brain electrical activity, as assessed by quantitative analysis of EEG signal, and ischemic neuronal injury on histopathologic examination did not differ between groups. Animals in t-ECPR group did not have increased bleeding complications, including intracerebral hemorrhages. Conclusions In a porcine model of prolonged cardiac arrest, thrombolytic-enhanced ECPR improved cardiac resuscitability and reduced brain edema, without increasing bleeding complications. However, early EEG recovery and ischemic neuronal injury were

  4. Gastroenterology case report of mesalazine-induced cardiopulmonary hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Ferrusquía, José; Pérez-Martínez, Isabel; Gómez de la Torre, Ricardo; Fernández-Almira, María Luisa; de Francisco, Ruth; Rodrigo, Luis; Riestra, Sabino

    2015-04-07

    Mesalazine is a 5-aminosalicylic acid derivative that has been widely used to treat patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Accumulating evidence indicates that mesalazine has a very low rate of adverse drug reactions and is well tolerated by patients. However, a few cases of pulmonary and cardiac disease related to mesalazine have been reported in the past, though infrequently, preventing clinicians from diagnosing the conditions early. We describe the case of a 32-year-old man with ulcerative colitis who was admitted with a two-month history of persistent fever following mesalazine treatment initiated 14 mo earlier. At the time of admission, mesalazine dose was increased from 1.5 to 3.0 g/d, and antibiotic therapy was started with no improvement. Three weeks after admission, the patient developed dyspnea, non-productive cough, and chest pain. Severe eosinophilia was detected in laboratory tests, and a computed tomography scan revealed interstitial infiltrates in both lungs, as well as a large pericardial effusion. The bronchoalveolar lavage reported a CD4/CD8 ratio of 0.5, and an increased eosinophil count. Transbronchial biopsy examination showed a severe eosinophilic infiltrate of the lung tissue. Mesalazine-induced cardiopulmonary hypersensitivity was suspected after excluding other possible etiologies. Consequently, mesalazine treatment was suspended, and corticosteroid therapy was initiated, resulting in resolution of symptoms and radiologic abnormalities. We conclude that mesalazine-induced pulmonary and cardiac hypersensitivity should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of unexplained cardiopulmonary symptoms and radiographic abnormalities in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

  5. Gastroenterology case report of mesalazine-induced cardiopulmonary hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Ferrusquía, José; Pérez-Martínez, Isabel; Gómez de la Torre, Ricardo; Fernández-Almira, María Luisa; de Francisco, Ruth; Rodrigo, Luis; Riestra, Sabino

    2015-01-01

    Mesalazine is a 5-aminosalicylic acid derivative that has been widely used to treat patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Accumulating evidence indicates that mesalazine has a very low rate of adverse drug reactions and is well tolerated by patients. However, a few cases of pulmonary and cardiac disease related to mesalazine have been reported in the past, though infrequently, preventing clinicians from diagnosing the conditions early. We describe the case of a 32-year-old man with ulcerative colitis who was admitted with a two-month history of persistent fever following mesalazine treatment initiated 14 mo earlier. At the time of admission, mesalazine dose was increased from 1.5 to 3.0 g/d, and antibiotic therapy was started with no improvement. Three weeks after admission, the patient developed dyspnea, non-productive cough, and chest pain. Severe eosinophilia was detected in laboratory tests, and a computed tomography scan revealed interstitial infiltrates in both lungs, as well as a large pericardial effusion. The bronchoalveolar lavage reported a CD4/CD8 ratio of 0.5, and an increased eosinophil count. Transbronchial biopsy examination showed a severe eosinophilic infiltrate of the lung tissue. Mesalazine-induced cardiopulmonary hypersensitivity was suspected after excluding other possible etiologies. Consequently, mesalazine treatment was suspended, and corticosteroid therapy was initiated, resulting in resolution of symptoms and radiologic abnormalities. We conclude that mesalazine-induced pulmonary and cardiac hypersensitivity should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of unexplained cardiopulmonary symptoms and radiographic abnormalities in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:25852295

  6. Revolving back to the basics in cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Roppolo, L P; Wigginton, J G; Pepe, P E

    2009-05-01

    Since the 1970s, most of the research and debate regarding interventions for cardiopulmonary arrest have focused on advanced life support (ALS) therapies and early defibrillation strategies. During the past decade, however, international guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) have not only emphasized the concept of uninterrupted chest compressions, but also improvements in the timing, rate and quality of those compressions. In essence, it has been a ''revolution'' in resuscitation medicine in terms of ''coming full circle'' to the 1960s when basic CPR was first developed. Recent data have indicated the need for minimally-interrupted chest compressions with an accompanying emphasis toward removing rescue ventilation altogether in sudden cardiac arrest, at least in the few minutes after a sudden unheralded collapse. In other studies, transient delays in defibrillation attempts and ALS interventions are even recommended so that basic CPR can be prioritized to first restore and maintain better coronary artery perfusion. New devices have now been developed to modify, in real-time, the performance of basic CPR, during both training and an actual resuscitative effort. Several new adjuncts have been created to augment chest compressions or enhance venous return and evolving technology may now be able to identify ventricular fibrillation (VF) without interrupting chest compressions. A renewed focus on widespread CPR training for the average person has also returned to center stage with ground-breaking training initiatives including validated video-based adult learning courses that can reliably teach and enable long term retention of basic CPR skills and automated external defibrillator (AED) use.

  7. Shock front nonstationarity of supercritical perpendicular shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hada, Tohru; Oonishi, Makiko; LembèGe, Bertrand; Savoini, Philippe

    2003-06-01

    The shock front nonstationarity of perpendicular shocks in super-critical regime is analyzed by examining the coupling between "incoming" and "reflected" ion populations. For a given set of parameters including the upstream Mach number (MA) and the fraction α of reflected to incoming ions, a self-consistent, time-stationary solution of the coupling between ion streams and the electromagnetic field is sought for. If such a solution is found, the shock is stationary; otherwise, the shock is nonstationary, leading to a self-reforming shock front often observed in full particle simulations of quasi-perpendicular shocks. A parametric study of this numerical model allows us to define a critical αcrit between stationary and nonstationary regimes. The shock can be nonstationary even for relatively low MA(2-5). For a moderate MA(5-10), the critical value αcrit is about 15 to 20%. For very high MA (>10), αcrit saturates around 20%. Moreover, present full simulations show that self-reformation of the shock front occurs for relatively low βi and disappears for high βi, where βi is the ratio of upstream ion plasma to magnetic field pressures. Results issued from the present theoretical model are found to be in good agreement with full particle simulations for low βi case; this agreement holds as long as the motion of reflected ions is coherent enough (narrow ion ring) to be described by a single population in the model. The present model reveals to be "at variance" with full particle simulations results for the high βi case. Present results are also compared with previous hybrid simulations.

  8. Structure in Radiating Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doss, Forrest

    2010-11-01

    The basic radiative shock experiment is a shock launched into a gas of high-atomic-number material at high velocities, which fulfills the conditions for radiative losses to collapse the post-shock material to over 20 times the initial gas density. This has been accomplished using the OMEGA Laser Facility by illuminating a Be ablator for 1 ns with a total of 4 kJ, launching the requisite shock, faster than 100 km/sec, into a polyimide shock tube filled with Xe. The experiments have lateral dimensions of 600 μm and axial dimensions of 2-3 mm, and are diagnosed by x-ray backlighting. Repeatable structure beyond the one-dimensional picture of a shock as a planar discontinuity was discovered in the experimental data. One form this took was that of radial boundary effects near the tube walls, extended approximately seventy microns into the system. The cause of this effect - low density wall material which is heated by radiation transport ahead of the shock, launching a new converging shock ahead of the main shock - is apparently unique to high-energy-density experiments. Another form of structure is the appearance of small-scale perturbations in the post-shock layer, modulating the shock and material interfaces and creating regions of enhanced and diminished aerial density within the layer. The authors have applied an instability theory, a variation of the Vishniac instability of decelerating shocks, to describe the growth of these perturbations. We have also applied Bayesian statistical methods to better understand the uncertainties associated with measuring shocked layer thickness in the presence of tilt. Collaborators: R. P. Drake, H. F. Robey, C. C. Kuranz, C. M. Huntington, M. J. Grosskopf, D. C. Marion.

  9. Epidemiology of Intracranial Haemorrhages Associated with Vitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants in Spain: TAC Registry

    PubMed Central

    Zapata-Wainberg, Gustavo; Ximénez-Carrillo Rico, Álvaro; Benavente Fernández, Lorena; Masjuan Vallejo, Jaime; Gállego Culleré, Jaime; Freijó Guerrero, María del Mar; Egido, José; Gómez Sánchez, José Carlos; Martínez Domeño, Alejandro; Purroy García, Francisco; Vives Pastor, Bárbara; Blanco González, Miguel; Vivancos, José

    2015-01-01

    Background Vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (VKA-OACs) are effective for primary and secondary prevention of embolic events. The rate of haemorrhagic neurological complications in patients admitted to neurology departments in Spain is not yet known. Aims We aimed to determine the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of patients with intracranial haemorrhage secondary to VKA-OACs as well as the incidence of this severe complication. Methods We conducted a retrospective, descriptive, multi-centre study using information from the medical records of all patients admitted to neurology departments, diagnosed with spontaneous intracranial haemorrhage, and treated with VKA-OACs within a 1-year period. We collected demographic and care data from centres, patients' medical records [demographic data, medical history, haemorrhage origin, vascular risk factors, concomitant treatment, and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores], and patients' outcome at 3 months [independence (modified Rankin Scale score <3) and mortality rate]. Results Twenty-one hospitals serving a population of 8,155,628 inhabitants participated in the study. The total number of cases was 235, the mean age was 78.2 (SD 9.4) years, and the baseline NIHSS score was 11.6 (SD 9.5; median 9; interquartile range 14). The VKA-OACs used were acenocoumarol in 95.3% (224 patients) and warfarin in 4.7% (11 patients). The haemorrhage origin was deep in 29.8%, lobar in 25.5%, intraventricular in 11.5%, extensive in 17.4% (>100 ml), cerebellar in 12.3%, and in the brainstem in 3.4%. The international normalised ratio was within therapeutic ranges at admission (according to indication) in 29.4% (69 patients). The global incidence (cases per 100,000 inhabitants per year) is 2.88. The in-hospital mortality rate was 40%, and 24.3% of the patients were independent at 3 months, while the mortality at 3 months was 42.6%. Conclusion VKA-OAC treatment is associated with a large percentage of all

  10. Mass cardiopulmonary resuscitation 99--survey results of a multi-organisational effort in public education in cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Fong, Y T; Anantharaman, V; Lim, S H; Leong, K F; Pokkan, G

    2001-05-01

    Mass cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) 99 in Singapore was a large-scale multi-organisational effort to increase awareness and impart basic cardiac life support skills to the lay public. Mass CPR demonstrations followed by small group manikin practice with instructor guidance was conducted simultaneously in three centres, four times a day. The exercise enlisted 15 community organisations and received the support of 19 other organisations. Three hundred and ninety-eight manikins and 500 instructors ('I's) were mobilised to teach an audience of 6000 participants ('P's). Two surveys, for 'I's and 'P's were conducted with respondent rates of 65.8% and 50%, respectively. 73.6% of the P-respondents ('P-R's) indicated that they attended the event to increase their knowledge. 66.9% were willing to attend a more comprehensive CPR course. Concerns and perceptions in performing bystander CPR were assessed.

  11. An unusual manifestation of brain tumor: development of delayed hemiplegia after cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Kurisu, Kazuhiro; Hisahara, Manabu; Ando, Yusuke; Tominaga, Ryuji

    2007-01-01

    Cerebral swelling after cardiopulmonary bypass might trigger a critical cerebral consequence resulting from intracranial space-occupying lesion. We experienced a 75-year-old woman who suffered from a delayed left hemiplegia after mitral valve replacement. Urgent diagnostic imaging revealed the presence of a brain tumor with perifocal cerebral edema. Fluid shifts occurring within a few days after the cardiopulmonary bypass, manifesting the focal cerebral edema, played a key role in this unique clinical course.

  12. Therapeutic hypothermia and reliability of somatosensory evoked potentials in predicting outcome after cardiopulmonary arrest.

    PubMed

    Rothstein, Ted Laurence

    2012-08-01

    The loss of the N20 component on testing median somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEP) has been established as the most reliable indicator of unfavorable prognosis in post-cardiopulmonary arrest patients. With the intervention of therapeutic hypothermia in the management of patients who remain comatose following cardiopulmonary arrest that association is now in dispute. Abandoning SSEP as a key prognostic indicator of neurologic outcome would be a serious loss and cannot be justified.

  13. Transesophageal echocardiography-guided thrombectomy of intracardiac renal cell carcinoma without cardiopulmonary bypass

    PubMed Central

    Souki, Fouad Ghazi; Demos, Michael; Fermin, Lilibeth; Ciancio, Gaetano

    2016-01-01

    Advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) resection has important anesthetic management implications, particularly when tumor extends, suprahepatic, into the right atrium. Use of transesophageal echocardiogram (TEE) is essential in identifying tumor extension and guiding resection. Latest surgical approach avoids venovenous and cardiopulmonary bypass yet requires special precautions and interventions on the anesthesiologist's part. We present a case of Level IV RCC resected without cardiopulmonary bypass and salvaged by TEE guidance and detection of residual intracardiac tumor. PMID:27716710

  14. Shock absorber control system

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, Y.; Ohira, M.; Ushida, M.; Miyagawa, T.; Shimodaira, T.

    1987-01-13

    A shock absorber control system is described for controlling a dampening force of a shock absorber of a vehicle comprising: setting means for setting a desired dampening force changeable within a predetermined range; drive means for driving the shock absorber to change the dampening force of the shock absorber linearly; control means for controlling the drive means in accordance with the desired dampening force when the setting of the desired dampening force has been changed; detecting means for detecting an actual dampening force of the shock absorber; and correcting means for correcting the dampening force of the shock absorber by controlling the drive means in accordance with a difference between the desired dampening force and the detected actual dampening force.

  15. Haemorrhagic bowel syndrome in dairy cattle: possible role of Clostridium perfringens type A in the disease complex.

    PubMed

    Ceci, L; Paradies, P; Sasanelli, M; de Caprariis, D; Guarda, F; Capucchio, M T; Carelli, G

    2006-12-01

    A survey based on clinical, pathological and microbiological investigations was performed on 11 Brown Swiss cattle affected with depression, anorexia, agalaxia, ruminal hypomotility, abdominal pain and melaena. In eight animals, macroscopical lesions consisted in haemorrhagic enteritis in the small intestine. Seven of eight isolates from tissue samples were identified as Clostridum perfringens type A, and four were identified as C. perfringens type A with the beta2 toxin gene. Based on these observations, animals were considered affected with haemorrhagic bowel syndrome.

  16. When shock waves collide

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, D.; Hartigan, P.; Frank, A.; Hansen, E.; Yirak, K.; Liao, A. S.; Graham, P.; Foster, J.; Wilde, B.; Blue, B.; Rosen, P.; Farley, D.; Paguio, R.

    2016-06-01

    Supersonic outflows from objects as varied as stellar jets, massive stars, and novae often exhibit multiple shock waves that overlap one another. When the intersection angle between two shock waves exceeds a critical value, the system reconfigures its geometry to create a normal shock known as a Mach stem where the shocks meet. Mach stems are important for interpreting emission-line images of shocked gas because a normal shock produces higher postshock temperatures, and therefore a higher-excitation spectrum than does an oblique shock. In this paper, we summarize the results of a series of numerical simulations and laboratory experiments designed to quantify how Mach stems behave in supersonic plasmas that are the norm in astrophysical flows. The experiments test analytical predictions for critical angles where Mach stems should form, and quantify how Mach stems grow and decay as intersection angles between the incident shock and a surface change. While small Mach stems are destroyed by surface irregularities and subcritical angles, larger ones persist in these situations and can regrow if the intersection angle changes to become more favorable. Furthermore, the experimental and numerical results show that although Mach stems occur only over a limited range of intersection angles and size scales, within these ranges they are relatively robust, and hence are a viable explanation for variable bright knots observed in Hubble Space Telescope images at the intersections of some bow shocks in stellar jets.

  17. When shock waves collide

    DOE PAGES

    Martinez, D.; Hartigan, P.; Frank, A.; ...

    2016-06-01

    Supersonic outflows from objects as varied as stellar jets, massive stars, and novae often exhibit multiple shock waves that overlap one another. When the intersection angle between two shock waves exceeds a critical value, the system reconfigures its geometry to create a normal shock known as a Mach stem where the shocks meet. Mach stems are important for interpreting emission-line images of shocked gas because a normal shock produces higher postshock temperatures, and therefore a higher-excitation spectrum than does an oblique shock. In this paper, we summarize the results of a series of numerical simulations and laboratory experiments designed tomore » quantify how Mach stems behave in supersonic plasmas that are the norm in astrophysical flows. The experiments test analytical predictions for critical angles where Mach stems should form, and quantify how Mach stems grow and decay as intersection angles between the incident shock and a surface change. While small Mach stems are destroyed by surface irregularities and subcritical angles, larger ones persist in these situations and can regrow if the intersection angle changes to become more favorable. Furthermore, the experimental and numerical results show that although Mach stems occur only over a limited range of intersection angles and size scales, within these ranges they are relatively robust, and hence are a viable explanation for variable bright knots observed in Hubble Space Telescope images at the intersections of some bow shocks in stellar jets.« less

  18. Shock initiation of nitromethane

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, C.S.; Holmes, N.C.

    1993-12-31

    The shock initiation processes of nitromethane have been examined by using a fast time-resolved emission spectroscopy at a two-stage gas gun. a broad, but strong emission has been observed in a spectral range between 350 and 700 nm from shocked nitromethane above 9 GPa. The temporal profile suggests that shocked nitromethane detonates through three characteristic periods, namely an induction period, a hock initiation period, and a thermal explosion period. This paper discusses temporal and chemical characteristics of these periods and present the temperature of the shock-detonating nitromethane at pressures between 9 and 15 GPa.

  19. Anti-Shock Garment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Ames Research Center developed a prototype pressure suit for hemophiliac children, based on research of astronauts' physiological responses in microgravity. Zoex Corporation picked up the design and patents and developed an anti-shock garment for paramedic use. Marketed by Dyna Med, the suit reverses the effect of shock on the body's blood distribution by applying counterpressure to the legs and abdomen, returning blood to vital organs and stabilizing body pressure until the patient reaches a hospital. The DMAST (Dyna Med Anti-Shock Trousers) employ lower pressure than other shock garments, and are non-inflatable.

  20. [Two cases of Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever (CCHF) in two tourists in Senegal in 2004].

    PubMed

    Tall, A; Sall, A A; Faye, O; Diatta, B; Sylla, R; Faye, J; Faye, P C; Faye, O; Ly, A B; Sarr, F D; Diab, H; Diallo, M

    2009-08-01

    Two cases of Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever (CCHF) occurred in two French tourists during their visit in Senegal in November 2004. Febrile and hemorrhagic syndrome with ulorrhagia, petechiae, haematemesis, haematomas associated with biological signs of disseminated intramuscular coagulation were observed. For the first case who had a medical evacuation to France before diagnosis, Crimean-Congo virus infection was revealed by laboratory tests performed by the National Reference Center for Hemorrhagic Fevers (NRCHF, Institut Pasteur, Lyon) and secondly by the Centre de Référence OMS sur la Recherche des Arbovirus et des virus des Fièvres Hémorragiques (CRORA) in the Dakar Pasteur Institute (DPI). The second case diagnosed by the CRORA died after clinical deterioration with liver failure and severe haemorrhages. Healthcare workers and family members who had contact with tissue or blood from patients were followed up after the putative exposure either in France or in Senegal.

  1. Osteogenesis imperfecta presenting as aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage in a 53-year-old man

    PubMed Central

    Kaliaperumal, Chandrasekaran; Walsh, Tom; Balasubramanian, Chandramouli; Wyse, Gerry; Fanning, Noel; Kaar, George

    2011-01-01

    The authors describe a case of aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage in a 53-year-old man with background of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). CT brain revealed diffuse subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) and cerebral angiogram subsequently confirmed vertebral artery aneurysm rupture leading to SAH. To the authors knowledge this is the first case of vertebral artery aneurysmal SAH described in OI. A previously undiagnosed OI was confirmed by genetic analysis (COL1A1 gene mutation). This aneurysm was successfully treated by endovascular route. Post interventional treatment patient developed stroke secondary to vasospasm. Communicating hydrocephalus, which developed in the process of management, was successfully treated with ventriculo-peritoneal shunt. The aetio-pathogenesis and management of this condition is described. The authors have reviewed the literature and genetic basis of this disease. PMID:22674700

  2. Christmas disease: diagnosis and management of a haemorrhagic diathesis following dentofacial trauma

    PubMed Central

    Tamagond, Sridevi B; Hugar, Santosh I; Patil, Anil; Huddar, SandhyaRani

    2015-01-01

    Haemorrhagic diathesis has been of much concern to health professionals including dentists. It is not infrequent that a dentist becomes the first person to diagnose a bleeding disorder while performing dental treatment. Haemophilia is an X linked disorder with a frequency of about 1:10 000 births. Haemophilia B is much less common than haemophilia A, and affects only 1:300 000 males born alive. The clinical features of haemophilia B are very similar to those of haemophilia A with a prolongation of activated partial thromboplastin time. This case report describes the dental management of a patient with an uncommon haematological disorder, namely, factor IX deficiency, which remained undiagnosed until the patient had to undergo dentofacial trauma with unexpected severe haemorrhage. Preventive dentistry remains vital to young haemophiliacs. Surgical dental procedures may be performed for haemophiliacs but they must be judiciously coordinated by dental and medical health professionals. PMID:25568261

  3. Effect of dengue-1 antibodies on American dengue-2 viral infection and dengue haemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Kochel, Tadeusz J; Watts, Douglas M; Halstead, Scott B; Hayes, Curtis G; Espinoza, Angelica; Felices, Vidal; Caceda, Roxana; Bautista, Christian T; Montoya, Ysabel; Douglas, Susan; Russell, Kevin L

    2002-07-27

    In Iquitos, Peru, no cases of dengue haemorrhagic fever have been recorded in individuals infected with dengue-1 virus followed by American genotype dengue-2 (American dengue-2) virus. We assayed serum samples collected in Iquitos that tested positive for antibodies of monotype dengue-1 and monotype dengue-2 using a plaque reduction neutralisation test to determine their ability to neutralise the infectivity of two dengue-1 viruses, two American dengue-2 viruses, and two Asian dengue-2 viruses. Sera positive for the dengue-1 antibody neutralised dengue-1 viruses and American dengue-2 viruses much more effectively than Asian dengue-2 viruses. Neutralisation of American dengue-2 virus by sera positive for dengue-1 antibodies may account for the absence of dengue haemorrhagic fever in individuals infected with dengue-1 in 1990-91 followed by American dengue-2 virus in 1995 in Iquitos, Peru.

  4. Safety and efficacy of an inactivated Carbopol-adjuvanted goose haemorrhagic polyomavirus vaccine for domestic geese.

    PubMed

    Gelfi, Jacqueline; Pappalardo, Michael; Claverys, Carine; Peralta, Brigitte; Guerin, Jean-Luc

    2010-04-01

    Haemorrhagic nephritis enteritis of the goose (HNEG) is an epizootic viral disease in domestic geese. The causal agent is a polyomavirus, namely goose haemorrhagic polyomavirus. To help control the disease, an inactivated vaccine was developed, based on viral particles produced in goose kidney cells. Viral material was quantified using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, inactivated with beta-propiolactone and adjuvanted with Carbopol, an acrylic acid polymer. Carbopol proved to be more immunogenic than aluminium hydroxide and was totally safe when administered to young goslings and breeders alike. Carbopol-adjuvanted vaccine induced a high serological response. Moreover, goslings hatched from vaccinated breeders were protected against viral challenge, indicating that maternally-derived neutralizing antibodies (MDA) were efficiently transferred. MDA were still detectable 15 days post-hatch. Clinical trials will be necessary to accurately evaluate a vaccine-based HNEG control strategy under field conditions.

  5. A patient with a prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time and a deep intracerebral haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Schindhelm, Roger K; Wondergem, Mariëlle J; Admiraal, Joke; Nap, Gert; Boekel, Edwin Ten; Hani, Lahcen

    2012-05-01

    We report on a 57-year-old woman with a pontine haemorrhage and an extremely prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) of more than 240 s, suggestive of a coagulation disorder. Given the location of the haemorrhage, which is associated with a high mortality rate, recombinant factor VIIa was administered, although not all necessary laboratory analyses could be performed at that time. In our case, a deficiency of factor XII was found, which is not associated with an increased bleeding risk. In an acute setting, evaluation of a prolonged aPTT may cause diagnostic and therapeutic challenges, in particular in situations where additional laboratory investigations may not be readily available.

  6. Acute primary haemorrhagic omental torsion mimicking perforated appendicitis: an unorthodox surgical paradox.

    PubMed

    Rehman, Abdul

    2014-08-01

    Acute primary haemorrhagic omental torsion is an atypical and deceptive cause of acute abdomen that could closely mimic a myriad of intra-abdominal catastrophes, especially perforated appendicitis. The author reports a 30 years man who had presented with gradually worsening right-sided abdominal pain of 2 days duration. Laboratory work-up and abdominal radiographs were inconclusive. Abdominal sonography detected presence of free fluid in the pelvic cul-de-sac. Based on clinical and sonographic findings, presumptive diagnosis of perforated appendicitis was made and the patient was explored through extended Rockey-Davis incision. About 500 - 700 ml of dark-coloured blood (haemoperitoneum) was present in the peritoneal cavity and the pelvis secondary to acute haemorrhagic omental torsion. The appendix was grossly normal. Omentectomy and prophylactic appendicectomy resulted in uneventful recovery of the patient. Acute primary omental torsion is an uncommon pathology that must be kept in mind during differential diagnosis of acute abdomen, especially acute or perforated appendicitis.

  7. Spontaneous gall bladder haemorrhage in a renal dialysis patient following haemodialysis with tinzaparin.

    PubMed

    Borman, Natalie; Graetz, Keith

    2010-08-01

    Spontaneous gall bladder haemorrhage is a rare and serious occurrence with a few cases reported in the literature in haemodialysis patients. This report describes this complication following dialysis with a low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) tinzaparin. This patient presented with acute right upper quadrant pain and intermittent haematemesis following 4 hours of haemodialysis. Despite being well established on dialysis, LMWH had only been used once previously. There was no history of trauma or pre-existing gall bladder pathology and no clinical or biochemical evidence of inflammation or infection. Computed tomography (CT) scan revealed an extensive gall bladder haemorrhage. The patient was treated conservatively with analgesia, and blood transfusion and symptoms settled without intervention. This case report highlights a rare site of bleeding following LMWH use in a haemodialysis patient.

  8. Failure of oestradiol administration to induce fatty liver haemorrhagic syndrome in the laying hen.

    PubMed

    Pearce, J; Johnson, A H

    1986-03-01

    Studies were carried out to investigate whether the administration of oestradiol to laying hens induced fatty liver-haemorrhagic syndrome (FLHS). Short term oestradiol administration (up to 6 d) significantly increased liver size and plasma lipid concentration but had no effect on liver lipid concentration or hepatic lipogenic enzyme activities. Longer-term hormone treatment (up to 28 d) again significantly increased liver size and plasma lipid concentration. Liver lipid concentration was substantially reduced and lipogenic enzyme activity significantly reduced in oestradiol-treated birds. These effects had some similarities to those seen in oestrogenised immature birds and were additive to the effects of endogenous oestrogen in the laying bird. There were no deaths from FLHS and oestradiol treatment did not cause liver haemorrhages or affect egg production.

  9. Visual development in infants with prenatal post‐haemorrhagic ventricular dilatation

    PubMed Central

    Ricci, Daniela; Luciano, Rita; Baranello, Giovanni; Veredice, Chiara; Cesarini, Laura; Bianco, Flaviana; Pane, Marika; Gallini, Francesca; Vasco, Gessica; Savarese, Immacolata; Zuppa, Antonio A; Masini, Lucia; Rocco, Concezio Di; Romagnoli, Costantino; Guzzetta, Francesco; Mercuri, Eugenio

    2007-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to assess visual function in 13 infants with evidence of prenatal post haemorrhagic ventricular dilatation. Design Infants were assessed at 5, 12 and 24 months using a battery of tests specifically designed to assess various aspects of visual function in infancy. Visual findings were correlated with several variables, including extent of the lesion and presence of epilepsy. Results and conclusions Abnormalities of visual function were frequent (over 60%) in our cohort at age 2 years, ranging from isolated abnormal ocular movements to severe abnormalities of all the aspects of visual function assessed. The most severe and persistent abnormalities of visual function were found in infants with grade IV intraventricular haemorrhage and shunted hydrocephalus who also had epilepsy in the first year. PMID:17142298

  10. [Multidisciplinary consensus document on the management of massive haemorrhage (HEMOMAS document)].

    PubMed

    Llau, J V; Acosta, F J; Escolar, G; Fernández-Mondéjar, E; Guasch, E; Marco, P; Paniagua, P; Páramo, J A; Quintana, M; Torrabadella, P

    2016-01-01

    Massive haemorrhage is common and often associated with high morbidity and mortality. We perform a systematic review of the literature, with extraction of the recommendations from the existing evidences because of the need for its improvement and the management standardization. From the results we found, we wrote a multidisciplinary consensus document. We begin with the agreement in the definitions of massive haemorrhage and massive transfusion, and we do structured recommendations on their general management (clinical assessment of bleeding, hypothermia management, fluid therapy, hypotensive resuscitation and damage control surgery), blood volume monitoring, blood products transfusion (red blood cells, fresh frozen plasma, platelets and their best transfusion ratio), and administration of hemostatic components (prothrombin complex, fibrinogen, factor VIIa, antifibrinolytic agents).

  11. Multidisciplinary consensus document on the management of massive haemorrhage (HEMOMAS document).

    PubMed

    Llau, J V; Acosta, F J; Escolar, G; Fernández-Mondéjar, E; Guasch, E; Marco, P; Paniagua, P; Páramo, J A; Quintana, M; Torrabadella, P

    2015-11-01

    Massive haemorrhage is common and often associated with high morbidity and mortality. We perform a systematic review of the literature, with extraction of the recommendations from the existing evidences because of the need for its improvement and the management standardization. From the results we found, we wrote a multidisciplinary consensus document. We begin with the agreement in the definitions of massive haemorrhage and massive transfusion, and we do structured recommendations on their general management (clinical assessment of bleeding, hypothermia management, fluid therapy, hypotensive resuscitation and damage control surgery), blood volume monitoring, blood products transfusion (red blood cells, fresh frozen plasma, platelets and their best transfusion ratio), and administration of hemostatic components (prothrombin complex, fibrinogen, factor VIIa, antifibrinolytic agents).

  12. Chemical gastro-oesophagitis, upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage and gastroscopic findings following Dettol poisoning.

    PubMed

    Chan, T Y; Sung, J J; Critchley, J A

    1995-01-01

    1. Dettol liquid (chloroxylenol 4.8%, pine oil, isopropyl alcohol), a household disinfectant, has a corrosive action on the gastrointestinal mucosa when swallowed. The incidence of upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage and gastroscopic findings following Dettol poisoning was studied in 89 patients. 2. Five patients (5.6%) developed minor haematemesis, in the form of coffee-coloured or blood-stained vomitus. One patient had a gastroscopy performed on the day after admission, showing signs of chemical burns in the oesophagus and stomach. Gastroscopy was performed in one other patient on day 11 to rule out oesophageal stricture; the patient was normal. All patients completely recovered. 3. The data from this study suggest that upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage following Dettol poisoning tends to be mild and self-limiting. Gastroscopy, which may increase the risk of aspiration in patients with impaired consciousness, is not required unless other causes of gastrointestinal bleeding are suspected.

  13. Bilateral adrenal haemorrhage associated with heparin-induced thrombocytopaenia during treatment of Fournier gangrene.

    PubMed

    Tattersall, Timothy Lee; Thangasamy, Isaac A; Reynolds, Jamie

    2014-10-14

    We present a case of bilateral adrenal haemorrhage (BAH) associated with heparin-induced thrombocytopaenia (HIT) in a 61-year-old man admitted to hospital for the treatment of Fournier's gangrene. He presented to hospital with scrotal swelling and fever, and developed spreading erythaema and a gangrenous scrotum. His scrotum was surgically debrided and intravenous broad-spectrum antibiotics were administered. Unfractionated heparin was given postoperatively for venous thromboembolism prophylaxis. The patient deteriorated clinically 8-11 days postoperatively with delirium, chest pain and severe hypertension followed by hypotension and thrombocytopaenia. Abdominal CT scan revealed bilateral adrenal haemorrhage. Antibodies to the heparin-platelet factor 4 complex were present. HIT-associated BAH was diagnosed and heparin was discontinued. Intravenous bivalirudin and hydrocortisone were started, with rapid improvement in clinical status. BAH is a rare complication of HIT and should be considered in the postoperative patient with unexplained clinical deterioration.

  14. Use of Recombinant Factor VIIA for Control of Combat-Related Haemorrhage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-25

    partial thromboplastin time , international normalised ratio) were not available from the clinical records to assess patients’ haemostatic response to...Public reporting burden for the collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions...haemorrhage Susan I Woodruff,1 Amber L Dougherty,2 Judy L Dye,2 Charlene R Mohrle,2 Michael R Galarneau3 ABSTRACT Background Recombinant activated human

  15. Haemorrhage from the bovine penis during erection and ejaculation: a possible explanation of some cases.

    PubMed

    Ashdown, R R; Majeed, Z Z

    1978-07-01

    Leakage of polyester resin from the cavernous spaces of the corpus spongiosum penis (csp) into the terminal part of the urethral lumen was demonstrated in one post mortem specimen. No information was available on service performance or semen characteristics immediately before slaughter. It is suggested that haemorrhage from the csp into the urethral lumen may cause spurting of blood from the apex of the penis at service.

  16. Rediscovering the wound haematoma as a site of haemostasis during major arterial haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    White, N.J.; Mehic, E.; Wang, X.; Chien, D.; Lim, E.; St. John, A.E.; Stern, S.A.; Mourad, P.D.; Rieger, M.; Fries, D.; Martinowitz, U.

    2015-01-01

    Background Treatments for major internal bleeding after injury include permissive hypotension to decrease the rate of blood loss, intravenous infusion of plasma or clotting factors to improve clot formation, and rapid surgical haemostasis or arterial embolization to control bleeding vessels. Yet, little is known regarding major internal arterial haemostasis, or how these commonly-used treatments might influence haemostasis. Objectives (1) Use a swine model of femoral artery bleeding to understand the perivascular haemostatic response to contained arterial haemorrhage. (2) Directly confirm the association between hemodynamics and bleeding velocity. (3) Observe the feasibility of delivering an activated clotting factor directly to internal sites of bleeding using a simplified angiographic approach. Methods Ultrasound was used to measure bleeding velocity and in vivo clot formation by elastography in a swine model of contained femoral artery bleeding with fluid resuscitation. A swine model of internal pelvic and axillary artery haemorrhage was also used to demonstrate feasibility of local delivery of an activated clotting factor. Results In this model, clots formed slowly within the peri-wound hematoma , but eventually containing the bleeding. Central hemodynamics correlated positively with bleeding velocity. Infusion of recombinant human activated Factor VII into the injured artery nearby the site of major internal haemorrhage in the pelvis and axillae was feasible. Conclusions We rediscover that clot formation within the peri-wound haematoma is an integral component of haemostasis and a feasible target for treatment of major internal bleeding using activated clotting factors delivered using a simplified angiographic approach. PMID:26414624

  17. Dating of Acute and Subacute Subdural Haemorrhage: A Histo-Pathological Study

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Murali G; Vashista, Rakesh Kumar; Sharma, Suresh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Microscopic study of the organization of the Subdural Haemorrhage (SDH) verified against the time period can help us in the determination of its age which has serious medico-legal implications. Very few studies concerning the dating of SDH are present in the literature. Aim This study was conducted for dating the early subdural haemorrhage by routine histopathological stains. Materials and Methods A prospective analytical study was conducted during July 2009 to December 2010. A total of 100 cases (50 males and 50 females) fulfilling the inclusion and exclusion criteria were included in this study. Routine histopathological staining of the subdural haematoma was done. Results Correlation between the frequency of a given histomorphological phenomenon and the length of the Post-Traumatic Interval (PTI) was evidential. All the histomorphological features, when correlated with PTI groups, were found to be statistically significant, except for Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes (PMN). Conclusion We concluded that routine histopathology was reliable in the dating of early subdural haemorrhages. PMID:27630864

  18. Whole genome sequence of a goose haemorrhagic polyomavirus detected in Hungary.

    PubMed

    Fehér, Enikő; Lengyel, György; Dán, Adám; Farkas, Szilvia L; Bányai, Krisztián

    2014-06-01

    Goose haemorrhagic polyomavirus (GHPV) provoke haemorrhagic nephritis and enteritis of domestic geese. Outbreaks were detected in European countries and caused economic losses for goose keepers. Domestic ducks may be infected with GHPV without any signs typical for geese. The genomic organisation of some isolates was described but the gene functions and the pathomechanisms of the virus was not precisely defined. Here we describe the genome sequence and structure of GHPV of a goose from a Hungarian goose flock showing characteristics of the haemorrhagic nephritis and enteritis. The GHPV genome investigated in this study was 5252 bp long and was very similar (99% nucleotide identity) to sequences deposited in the GenBank. All the whole GHPV genomes possess the same ORFs in length, including the VP1, VP2, VP3, ORF-X, t and T tumour antigens. Amino acid changes are detected mainly in the putative ORF-X region. Data about the GHPV genome imply a conserved genomic structure among isolates from different countries. Genomic and epidemiological studies may help vaccine development efforts and identify potential heterologous reservoirs of GHPV.

  19. Update on the Surgical Trial in Lobar Intracerebral Haemorrhage (STICH II): statistical analysis plan

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Previous studies had suggested that the outcome for patients with spontaneous lobar intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) and no intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH) might be improved with early evacuation of the haematoma. The Surgical Trial in Lobar Intracerebral Haemorrhage (STICH II) set out to establish whether a policy of earlier surgical evacuation of the haematoma in selected patients with spontaneous lobar ICH would improve outcome compared to a policy of initial conservative treatment. It is an international, multi-centre, prospective randomised parallel group trial of early surgery in patients with spontaneous lobar ICH. Outcome is measured at six months via a postal questionnaire. Results Recruitment to the study began on 27 November 2006 and closed on 15 August 2012 by which time 601 patients had been recruited. The protocol was published in Trials (http://www.trialsjournal.com/content/12/1/124/). This update presents the analysis plan for the study without reference to the unblinded data. The trial data will not be unblinded until after follow-up is completed in early 2013. The main trial results will be presented in spring 2013 with the aim to publish in a peer-reviewed journal at the same time. Conclusion The data from the trial will provide evidence on the benefits and risks of early surgery in patients with lobar ICH. Trial registration ISRCTN: ISRCTN22153967 PMID:23171588

  20. Recent Advances in the Management of Major Postpartum Haemorrhage - A Review

    PubMed Central

    Rani, P Reddi

    2017-01-01

    Postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) is a leading cause of maternal mortality and morbidity worldwide and 75-90% of these haemorrhage results from uterine atony. Delayed and substandard obstetrics care can kill a woman within hours of Major Obstetric Haemorrhage (MOH). Prenatal identification of at risk women, prompt assessment of blood loss, effective management and involvement of multidisciplinary teams is of utmost importance to save the lives of these women. However, even with the best prenatal care, PPH occurs, it can occur without any risk factors. The first step in management is achieving haemodynamic stability, second being arrest of bleeding, both are done simultaneously. Cases of refractory PPH is managed by postpartum hysterectomy which results in complete inability in hosting a future pregnancy, a psychological impact and risk of intra operative surgical morbidities. This review discusses the current evidence based management of PPH, existing controversies in transfusion of blood and blood products and newer advances in this field. It was conducted by searching the English language medical literature using Medline (1994-2015). The current scenario in developing countries mandates research on newer and practicable strategies to tackle PPH which can be implemented effectively and have an upper edge over the existing practices in the management of PPH. PMID:28384942

  1. Pathological and epidemiological significance of goose haemorrhagic polyomavirus infection in ducks.

    PubMed

    Corrand, Léni; Gelfi, Jacqueline; Albaric, Olivier; Etievant, Mélanie; Pingret, Jean-Luc; Guerin, Jean-Luc

    2011-08-01

    Goose haemorrhagic polyomavirus (GHPV) is the viral agent of haemorrhagic nephritis enteritis of geese, a lethal disease of goslings. It was recently shown that GHPV can also be detected in Muscovy and mule ducks. The goal of the present study was to investigate the pathobiology of GHPV in ducks. In the first experiment, field isolates of GHPV from Muscovy or mule ducks were fully sequenced and compared with goose GHPV. These duck isolates were then used to inoculate 1-day-old goslings. Typical clinical signs and lesions of haemorrhagic nephritis enteritis of geese were reproduced, indicating that "duck-GHPV" isolates are virulent in geese. In the second experiment, 1-day-old and 21-day-old Muscovy ducklings were infected by a reference GHPV strain. In both cases, neither clinical signs nor histopathological lesions were observed. However, the virus was detected in cloacal bursae and sera, and serological responses were detected at 12 days post infection. These findings suggest firstly that one common genotype of GHPV circulates among ducks and geese, and secondly that ducks may be infected by GHPV but show no pathologic evidence of infection, whereas geese express clinical signs. GHPV infection should therefore be considered as being carried in ducks and of epidemiological relevance in cases of contact with goose flocks.

  2. Protective effect of berberine on cyclophosphamide-induced haemorrhagic cystitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Xu, X; Malavé, A

    2001-05-01

    The urotoxicity of cyclophosphamide and the protective effect of the herb berberine were investigated in this study. Administration of 150 mg/kg cyclophosphamide intraperitoneally caused a serious haemorrhagic cystitis in rats after 12 hr, including bladder oedema, haemorrhage, and dramatic elevation of nitric oxide metabolites (nitrite+nitrate) in urine and in plasma. To explore whether cyclophosphamide-induced cystitis could be prevented by berberine, rats were pretreated with a single dose or two doses of berberine at 50, 100, or 200 mg/kg intraperitoneally then challenged with cyclophosphamide (150 mg/kg, intraperitoneally). The results indicated that pretreatment of rats with berberine could reduce cyclophosphamide-induced cystitis in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, we found that two doses of berberine showed greater protection against cyclophosphamide urotoxicity than when given a single dose. In addition, our data shows that a single dose of 200 mg/kg berberine, or two doses of 100, and 200 mg/kg berberine could completely block cyclophosphamide-induced bladder oedema and haemorrhage, as well as nitric oxide metabolites increase in rat urine and plasma. In conclusion, our findings suggest that berberine could be a potential effective drug in the treatment of cyclophosphamide-induced cystitis, and provides us with the bright hope in the prevention and treatment of cyclophosphamide urotoxicity.

  3. Diabetic patients have abnormal cerebral autoregulation during cardiopulmonary bypass

    SciTech Connect

    Croughwell, N.; Lyth, M.; Quill, T.J.; Newman, M.; Greeley, W.J.; Smith, L.R.; Reves, J.G. )

    1990-11-01

    We tested the hypothesis that insulin-dependent diabetic patients with coronary artery bypass graft surgery experience altered coupling of cerebral blood flow and oxygen consumption. In a study of 23 patients (11 diabetics and 12 age-matched controls), cerebral blood flow was measured using 133Xe clearance during nonpulsatile, alpha-stat blood gas managed cardiopulmonary bypass at the conditions of hypothermia and normothermia. In diabetic patients, the cerebral blood flow at 26.6 +/- 2.42 degrees C was 25.3 +/- 14.34 ml/100 g/min and at 36.9 +/- 0.58 degrees C it was 27.3 +/- 7.40 ml/100 g/min (p = NS). The control patients increased cerebral blood flow from 20.7 +/- 6.78 ml/100 g/min at 28.4 +/- 2.81 degrees C to 37.6 +/- 8.81 ml/100 g/min at 36.5 +/- 0.45 degrees C (p less than or equal to 0.005). The oxygen consumption was calculated from jugular bulb effluent and increased from hypothermic values of 0.52 +/- 0.20 ml/100 g/min in diabetics to 1.26 +/- 0.28 ml/100 g/min (p = 0.001) at normothermia and rose from 0.60 +/- 0.27 to 1.49 +/- 0.35 ml/100 g/min (p = 0.0005) in the controls. Thus, despite temperature-mediated changes in oxygen consumption, diabetic patients did not increase cerebral blood flow as metabolism increased. Arteriovenous oxygen saturation gradients and oxygen extraction across the brain were calculated from arterial and jugular bulb blood samples. The increase in arteriovenous oxygen difference between temperature conditions in diabetic patients and controls was significantly different (p = 0.01). These data reveal that diabetic patients lose cerebral autoregulation during cardiopulmonary bypass and compensate for an imbalance in adequate oxygen delivery by increasing oxygen extraction.

  4. The AED in resuscitation: it's not just about the shock.

    PubMed

    Page, Richard L

    2011-01-01

    The automated external defibrillator (AED), in combination with effective cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), is a critical part of the American Heart Association's "Chain of survival." Newer guidelines have simplified resuscitation and emphasized the importance of CPR in providing rapid and deep compressions with minimal interruptions; in fact, CPR should resume immediately after the shock given by the AED, without the delay entailed in checking for pulse or rhythm conversion. Our experience with the AED aboard aircraft, showing 40% long-term survival with the AED in ventricular fibrillation, demonstrated the safety and efficacy of the device. Despite this and other reports of successful AED deployment, AEDs are not yet available at all public locations. Prospective research, as undertaken by the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium, will be the key to future refinements of the guidelines and enhanced survival with use of the AED in sudden cardiac arrest.

  5. Blueberry shock virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Blueberry shock disease first observed in Washington state in 1987 and initially confused with blueberry scorch caused by Blueberry scorch virus (BlScV). However, shock affected plants produced a second flush of leaves after flowering and the plants appeared normal by late summer except for the lac...

  6. What Is Cardiogenic Shock?

    MedlinePlus

    ... think that you or someone else is in shock, call 9–1–1 right away for emergency treatment. Prompt medical care can save your life and ... half of the people who go into cardiogenic shock survive. This is because of ... improved treatments, such as medicines and devices. These treatments can ...

  7. [Historical vision of shock].

    PubMed

    Dosne Pasqualini, C

    1998-01-01

    The concept of shock and its close relationship with that of stress dates back to the experiments of Hans Selye initiated in 1936 at McGill University in Montreal, with whom I collaborated between 1939 and 1942. It was demonstrated that the General Adaptation Syndrome begins with an Alarm Reaction, which consists of a Stage of Shock and one of Counter-Shock, followed by a Stage of Adaptation and finally a Stage of Exhaustion. My Ph.D. thesis concluded that shock was due to an adrenal insufficiency postulating that active metabolic processes drain the body of certain essential compounds the lack of which causes shock. My interest in the role of the glucose metabolism in shock led me to work with Bernardo Houssay in 1942 at the Institute of Physiology of the University of Buenos Aires and in 1944 with C.N.H. Long at Yale University. There I developed a method for the induction of hemorrhagic shock in the guinea pig with 94% lethality; curiously, the administration of 200 mg of ascorbic acid prevented death. Upon my return to Buenos Aires, these results were confirmed and moreover, it was demonstrated that the administration of cortisone led to 40% survival of the animals while desoxycorticosterone had no effect. At the time, no explanation was available but to-day, half a century later, this Symposium should be able to explain the mechanisms leading to death by hemorrhagic shock.

  8. Normal Shock Vortex Interaction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-03-01

    Figure 9: Breakdown map for normal-shock vortex-interaction. References [1] O. Thomer, W. Schroder and M. Meinke , Numerical Simulation of Normal...and Oblique-Shock Vortex Interaction, ZAMM Band 80, Sub. 1, pp. 181-184, 2000. [2] O. Thomer, E. Krause, W. Schroder and M. Meinke , Computational

  9. Pathophysiology of shock.

    PubMed

    Houston, M C

    1990-06-01

    Shock is an acute widespread reduction in effective tissue perfusion that invokes an imbalance of oxygen supply and demand, anaerobic metabolism, lactic acidosis, cellular and organ dysfunction, metabolic abnormalities, and, if prolonged, irreversible damage and death. The pathophysiologic events in the various types of shock are different and complex with hemodynamic and oxygenation changes, alterations in the composition of the fluid compartments, and various mediators. Shock results from a change in one or a combination of the following: intravascular volume, myocardial function, systemic vascular resistance, or distribution of blood flow. The clinical types of shock include hypovolemic, cardiogenic, distributive (septic), and obstructive. An understanding of the pathophysiologic changes, rapid diagnosis, appropriate monitoring, and appropriate therapy can reduce the high morbidity and mortality in shock states.

  10. Reflection of curved shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mölder, S.

    2017-03-01

    Shock curvatures are related to pressure gradients, streamline curvatures and vorticity in flows with planar and axial symmetry. Explicit expressions, in an influence coefficient format, are used to relate post-shock pressure gradient, streamline curvature and vorticity to pre-shock gradients and shock curvature in steady flow. Using higher order, von Neumann-type, compatibility conditions, curved shock theory is applied to calculate the flow near singly and doubly curved shocks on curved surfaces, in regular shock reflection and in Mach reflection. Theoretical curved shock shapes are in good agreement with computational fluid dynamics calculations and experiment.

  11. Survival from profound metabolic acidosis due to hypovolaemic shock. A world record?

    PubMed

    Di Rollo, Nicola; Caesar, David; Ferenbach, David A; Dunn, Mark J G

    2013-01-30

    This case describes the unexpected survival of an adult man who presented to the emergency department with hypovolaemic shock secondary to a splenic haemorrhage. Before surgery he had a pH 6.527, base excess (BE) -34.2 mmol/l and lactate 15.6 mmol/l. He underwent a splenectomy after which his condition stabilised. He was managed in the intensive care unit postoperatively where he required organ support including renal replacement therapy but was subsequently discharged home with no neurological or renal deficit. Although there are case reports of patients surviving such profound metabolic acidosis these have mainly been cases of near drowning or toxic alcohol ingestion. To the best of our knowledge this is the first reported case of survival after a pH of 6.5 secondary to hypovolaemic shock.

  12. Air filtering capacity of an integrated cardiopulmonary bypass unit.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Xavier M; Tevaearai, Hendrik T; Jegger, David; von Segesser, Ludwig K

    2003-01-01

    To limit the morbidity of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), a new concept of integrating pumping, oxygenation, and air removal into a single unit has been developed (CardioVention Inc., Santa Clara, CA). The air filtration capacity of this system was tested. Three calves (73.2 +/- 2 kg) were connected to the integrated system by jugular and carotid cannulation. The integrated unit was challenged with injections of boluses of air of 5, 10, and 20 ml, three times each, and for a blood flow of 3 L/min and 5 L/min, respectively. The bubble count and size were recorded downstream of the unit with a Doppler ultrasound. At 3 L/min, bubbles were detected after injections of 20 ml only (n = 7 for the nine boluses). At 5 L/min, 1 bubble was detected with the nine injections of 5 ml, 14 bubbles were detected with nine injections of 10 ml, and 25 bubbles were detected with nine injections of 20 ml. No bubble exceeded 40 microm in diameter as determined by the Doppler ultrasound. The air filtering capacity of the CardioVention system is excellent both in terms of bubble count and of size after injection of large boluses of air. Its integrated concept offers a simplification of the circuit with fewer devices and connections, which further reduces the risk of accidental air introduction.

  13. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation knowledge and attitude among general dentists in Kuwait

    PubMed Central

    Alkandari, Sarah A.; Alyahya, Lolwa; Abdulwahab, Mohammed

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dentists as health care providers should maintain a competence in resuscitation. This cannot be overemphasized by the fact that the population in our country is living longer with an increasing proportion of medically compromised persons in the general population. This preliminary study aimed to assess the knowledge and attitude of general dentists towards cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). METHODS: A cross-sectional study was carried out among 250 licensed general dental practitioners working in ministry of health. Data were obtained through electronic self-administered questionnaire consisting of demographic data of general dentists, and their experience, attitude and knowledge about CPR based on the 2010 American Heart Association guidelines update for CPR. RESULTS: Totally 208 general dentists took part in the present study giving a response rate of 83.2%. Only 36% of the participants demonstrated high knowledge on CPR, while 64% demonstrated low knowledge. Participants’ age, gender, nationality, years of experience, career hierarchy, and formal CPR training were associated significantly with CPR knowledge. Almost all the participants (99%) felt that dentists needed to be competent in basic resuscitation skills and showed a positive attitude towards attending continuing dental educational programs on CPR. CONCLUSION: This study showed that majority of general dental practitioners in Kuwait had inadequate knowledge on CPR. It was also found that CPR training significantly influenced the CPR knowledge of the participants. Therefore, training courses on CPR should be regularly provided to general dentists in the country. PMID:28123615

  14. Trainers' Attitudes towards Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation, Current Care Guidelines, and Training.

    PubMed

    Mäkinen, M; Castrén, M; Nurmi, J; Niemi-Murola, L

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Studies have shown that healthcare personnel hesitate to perform defibrillation due to individual or organisational attitudes. We aimed to assess trainers' attitudes towards cardiopulmonary resuscitation and defibrillation (CPR-D), Current Care Guidelines, and associated training. Methods. A questionnaire was distributed to CPR trainers attending seminars in Finland (N = 185) focusing on the updated national Current Care Guidelines 2011. The questions were answered using Likert scale (1 = totally disagree, 7 = totally agree). Factor loading of the questionnaire was made using maximum likelihood analysis and varimax rotation. Seven scales were constructed (Hesitation, Nurse's Role, Nontechnical Skill, Usefulness, Restrictions, Personal, and Organisation). Cronbach's alphas were 0.92-0.51. Statistics were Student's t-test, ANOVA, stepwise regression analysis, and Pearson Correlation. Results. The questionnaire was returned by 124/185, 67% CPR trainers, of whom two-thirds felt that their undergraduate training in CPR-D had not been adequate. Satisfaction with undergraduate defibrillation training correlated with the Nontechnical Skills scale (p < 0.01). Participants scoring high on Hesitation scale (p < 0.01) were less confident about their Nurse's Role (p < 0.01) and Nontechnical Skills (p < 0.01). Conclusion. Quality of undergraduate education affects the work of CPR trainers and some feel uncertain of defibrillation. The train-the-trainers courses and undergraduate medical education should focus more on practical scenarios with defibrillators and nontechnical skills.

  15. [Cardiopulmonary resuscitation already in Egypt 5,000 years ago?].

    PubMed

    Ocklitz, A

    1997-06-06

    In light of the medically relevant features of the ancient Egyptian mouth-opening ceremony, the question of the effectiveness of medical practices in Egypt thousands of years ago is examined, whereby the religious and cultural framework also plays a significant role. In the Land on the Nile myth and reality clearly generated special conditions which favoured the systematic treatment of questions of resuscitation. Numerous examples show that this had practical consequences in the area of everyday medicine. In addition, rebirth and resurrection were central elements of the cult of the dead which had exact medical equivalents. These equivalents may demonstrate the advanced state of resuscitation practices in Egypt at that time. In this context, a reconstruction of an ancient Egyptian mouth-opening instrument is presented. In the cult of the dead, this instrument played a role which can be compared to the function of a modern laryngoscope. It appears possible that at the time of the pyramids the Egyptians already had an understanding of the technology required to perform instrument-aided artificial respiration. Whether or not they actually possessed a fundamental knowledge of the principles of cardio-pulmonary resuscitation remains unclear. Nevertheless, the astonishingly functional characteristics of the reconstructed mouth-opening instrument suggest that it was developed for more than purely symbolic purposes.

  16. A Novel Rotary Pulsatile Flow Pump for Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Teman, Nicholas R.; Mazur, Daniel E.; Toomasian, John; Jahangir, Emilia; Alghanem, Fares; Goudie, Marcus; Rojas-Peña, Alvaro; Haft, Jonathan W.

    2014-01-01

    It has been suggested that pulsatile blood flow is superior to continuous flow in cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). However, adoption of pulsatile flow (PF) technology has been limited due to practically and complexity of creating a consistent physiologic pulse. A pediatric pulsatile rotary ventricular pump (PRVP) was designed to address this problem. We evaluated the PRVP in an animal model, and determined its ability to generate PF during CPB. The PRVP (modified peristaltic pump, with tapering of the outlet of the pump chamber) was tested in 4 piglets (10-12kg). Cannulation was performed with right atrial and aortic cannulae, and pressure sensors were inserted into the femoral arteries. Pressure curves were obtained at different levels of flow and compared with both the animal's baseline physiologic function and a continuous flow (CF) roller pump. Pressure and flow waveforms demonstrated significant pulsatility in the PRVP setup compared to CF at all tested conditions. Measurement of hemodynamic energy data, including the percent pulsatile energy and the surplus hydraulic energy, also revealed a significant increase in pulsatility with the PRVP (p <0.001). PRVP creates physiologically significant PF, similar to the pulsatility of a native heart, and has the potential to be easily implemented in pediatric CPB. PMID:24625536

  17. Hypoplastic left heart syndrome: palliation without cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Tucker, W Y; McKone, R C; Weesner, K M; Kon, N D

    1990-05-01

    Our 100% mortality rate with first-stage palliation of hypoplastic left heart syndrome performed with cardiopulmonary bypass led us to a procedure not necessitating bypass. In nine neonates with this congenital heart defect, a woven Dacron graft was placed from the main pulmonary artery to the descending thoracic aorta. The patent ductus arteriosus was ligated and the main pulmonary artery banded distal to the graft and proximal to the bifurcation. Five patients were extubated within 4 days. Only low-dose inotropic support was required in eight of the nine. There were no bleeding problems. Four patients died in the hospital: one of Candida sepsis at 81 days, one of low cardiac output at 2 days, and two of restrictive atrial septal defect at 3 and 5 days. The five living patients were discharged 11 to 80 days postoperatively (mean 38 days). We now perform balloon septostomies preoperatively in all patients and believe that this will improve the survival rate. We believe this simpler approach to the treatment of hypoplastic left heart syndrome may allow survival for a cardiac transplant or a staged Fontan procedure at a later date for more definitive treatment.

  18. Cardiopulmonary phenotype associated with human PHD2 mutation.

    PubMed

    Talbot, Nick P; Smith, Thomas G; Balanos, George M; Dorrington, Keith L; Maxwell, Patrick H; Robbins, Peter A

    2017-04-01

    Oxygen-dependent regulation of the erythropoietin gene is mediated by the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) family of transcription factors. When oxygen is plentiful, HIF undergoes hydroxylation by a family of oxygen-dependent prolyl hydroxylase domain (PHD) proteins, promoting its association with the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) ubiquitin E3 ligase and subsequent proteosomal degradation. When oxygen is scarce, the PHD enzymes are inactivated, leading to HIF accumulation and upregulation not only of erythropoietin expression, but also the expression of hundreds of other genes, including those coordinating cardiovascular and ventilatory adaptation to hypoxia. Nevertheless, despite the identification of over 50 mutations in the PHD-HIF-VHL pathway in patients with previously unexplained congenital erythrocytosis, there are very few reports of associated cardiopulmonary abnormalities. We now report exaggerated pulmonary vascular and ventilatory responses to acute hypoxia in a 35-year-old man with erythrocytosis secondary to heterozygous mutation in PHD2, the most abundant of the PHD isoforms. We compare this phenotype with that reported in patients with the archetypal disorder of cellular oxygen sensing, Chuvash polycythemia, and discuss the possible clinical implications of our findings, particularly in the light of the emerging role for small molecule PHD inhibitors in clinical practice.

  19. Accuracy of temperature measurement in the cardiopulmonary bypass circuit.

    PubMed

    Newland, Richard F; Sanderson, Andrew J; Baker, Robert A

    2005-03-01

    Oxygenator arterial outlet blood temperature is routinely measured in the cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) circuit as a surrogate for the temperature of the arterial blood delivered to sensitive organs such as the brain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of the temperature thermistors used in the Terumo Capiox SX25 oxygenator and to compare the temperature measured at the outlet of the oxygenator using the Capiox CX*TL Luer Thermistor with temperatures measured at distal sites. Five experimental stages were performed in vitro to achieve this aim. Under our experimental conditions, the luer thermistors accurately measured the temperature as referenced by a precision thermometer. In the CPB circuit, the difference between arterial outlet and reference thermometer temperature varied with outlet temperature over-reading at low temperatures and under reading at high temperatures. There was negligible heat loss (-0.4+/-0.1degrees C) measured at 4.5 m from the arterial outlet. The Terumo Capiox CX*TL Luer Thermistor is an accurate and reliable instrument for measuring temperature when incorporated into the Capiox Oxygenator. The accuracy in the measurement of temperature using these thermistors is affected by the thermistor immersion depth. Under reading of the arterial blood temperature by approximately 0.5 degrees C should be considered at normothermic temperatures, to avoid exceeding the maximum arterial blood temperature as described by institutional protocols. The accuracy of blood temperature measurements should be considered for all oxygenator arterial outlet temperature probes.

  20. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation of adults with in-hospital cardiac arrest using the Utstein style

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Rose Mary Ferreira Lisboa; Silva, Bruna Adriene Gomes de Lima e; Silva, Fábio Junior Modesto e; Amaral, Carlos Faria Santos

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to analyze the clinical profile of patients with in-hospital cardiac arrest using the Utstein style. Methods This study is an observational, prospective, longitudinal study of patients with cardiac arrest treated in intensive care units over a period of 1 year. Results The study included 89 patients who underwent cardiopulmonary resuscitation maneuvers. The cohort was 51.6% male with a mean age 59.0 years. The episodes occurred during the daytime in 64.6% of cases. Asystole/bradyarrhythmia was the most frequent initial rhythm (42.7%). Most patients who exhibited a spontaneous return of circulation experienced recurrent cardiac arrest, especially within the first 24 hours (61.4%). The mean time elapsed between hospital admission and the occurrence of cardiac arrest was 10.3 days, the mean time between cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation was 0.68 min, the mean time between cardiac arrest and defibrillation was 7.1 min, and the mean duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation was 16.3 min. Associations between gender and the duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (19.2 min in women versus 13.5 min in men, p = 0.02), the duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation and the return of spontaneous circulation (10.8 min versus 30.7 min, p < 0.001) and heart disease and age (60.6 years versus 53.6, p < 0.001) were identified. The immediate survival rates after cardiac arrest, until hospital discharge and 6 months after discharge were 71%, 9% and 6%, respectively. Conclusions The main initial rhythm detected was asystole/bradyarrhythmia; the interval between cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation was short, but defibrillation was delayed. Women received cardiopulmonary resuscitation for longer periods than men. The in-hospital survival rate was low. PMID:28099640

  1. Cost-utility analysis of an adjunctive recombinant activated factor VIIa for on-demand treatment of bleeding episodes in dengue haemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Naing, Cho; Poovorawan, Yong; Mak, Joon Wah; Aung, Kyan; Kamolratankul, Pirom

    2015-06-01

    The present study aimed to assess the cost-utility analysis of using an adjunctive recombinant activated factor VIIa (rFVIIa) in children for controlling life-threatening bleeding in dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF)/dengue shock syndrome (DSS). We constructed a decision-tree model, comparing a standard care and the use of an additional adjuvant rFVIIa for controlling life-threatening bleeding in children with DHF/DSS. Cost and utility benefit were estimated from the societal perspective. The outcome measure was cost per quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). Overall, treatment with adjuvant rFVIIa gained QALYs, but the total cost was higher. The incremental cost-utility ratio for the introduction of adjuvant rFVIIa was $4241.27 per additional QALY. Sensitivity analyses showed the utility value assigned for calculation of QALY was the most sensitive parameter. We concluded that despite high cost, there is a role for rFVIIa in the treatment of life-threatening bleeding in patients with DHF/DSS.

  2. Comparison of shock severity measures

    SciTech Connect

    Baca, T.J.

    1989-01-01

    In an effort to clarify the issues associated with quantifying shock severity, this paper compares the merits of two measures of shock severity. The first measure is the widely used absolute acceleration shock response spectrum (SAA). The second measure of shock severity is relatively new and is known as the shock intensity spectrum (SIS). Overall information content of SAA and SIS spectra are compared and discussed in the context of two shock excitations having known amplitude, duration, and frequency content. The first is a burst of band-limited white noise and the second is a classical haversine pulse. After describing both the SAA and SIS shock measures, numerous examples are described which emphasize the strengths and limitations of each shock characterization method. This discussion reveals how the use of different shock measures may alter an engineer's conclusions about relative shock severity between two shock environments. 8 refs., 15 figs.

  3. Shock Bench Enhancements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charvet, B.; Dilhan, D.; Palladino, M.

    2014-06-01

    In 2008 a contract placed by CNES in partnership with ESA has led MECANO ID to develop a shock bench to qualify spacecraft equipment. A spacecraft shall withstand several shocks without degradation: launcher fairing or stages separation, spacecraft separation, the release of appendage (solar arrays, antenna reflectors, booms) and shocks generated when the pyrovalves of the propulsion system are fired.The Shock Response Spectrum (SRS) requirement, to be applied to the equipment, depends on its mass, its size and its location in the satellite. CNES has performed a survey of the pyroshock qualification requirements on CNES and ESA satellites. The outcome of the activity was the input for the bench development (Fig. 1). The design and sizing of the pyroshock bench started with non linear shock analysis with the help of the Dytran software.A lot of solutions have been compared: mono-plate, bi- plate, Hopkinson bar. The bi-plate was chosen thanks to its very rich frequency content. Also, the shock can be generated on one plate with the equipment mounted on the other, to avoid the direct transmission of the shock to the equipment basis.This study led to a 1000 mm x 650 mm steel bi-plate with a 300 mm aluminum cube fitted on one side. The equipment to test is mounted on the cube (Fig. 2 & 3).

  4. Echocardiography in shock management.

    PubMed

    McLean, Anthony S

    2016-08-20

    Echocardiography is pivotal in the diagnosis and management of the shocked patient. Important characteristics in the setting of shock are that it is non-invasive and can be rapidly applied.In the acute situation a basic study often yields immediate results allowing for the initiation of therapy, while a follow-up advanced study brings the advantage of further refining the diagnosis and providing an in-depth hemodynamic assessment. Competency in basic critical care echocardiography is now regarded as a mandatory part of critical care training with clear guidelines available. The majority of pathologies found in shocked patients are readily identified using basic level 2D and M-mode echocardiography. A more comprehensive diagnosis can be achieved with advanced levels of competency, for which practice guidelines are also now available. Hemodynamic evaluation and ongoing monitoring are possible with advanced levels of competency, which includes the use of colour Doppler, spectral Doppler, and tissue Doppler imaging and occasionally the use of more recent technological advances such as 3D or speckled tracking.The four core types of shock-cardiogenic, hypovolemic, obstructive, and vasoplegic-can readily be identified by echocardiography. Even within each of the main headings contained in the shock classification, a variety of pathologies may be the cause and echocardiography will differentiate which of these is responsible. Increasingly, as a result of more complex and elderly patients, the shock may be multifactorial, such as a combination of cardiogenic and septic shock or hypovolemia and ventricular outflow obstruction.The diagnostic benefit of echocardiography in the shocked patient is obvious. The increasing prevalence of critical care physicians experienced in advanced techniques means echocardiography often supplants the need for more invasive hemodynamic assessment and monitoring in shock.

  5. Rodent models of cardiopulmonary disease: their potential applicability in studies of air pollutant susceptibility.

    PubMed Central

    Kodavanti, U P; Costa, D L; Bromberg, P A

    1998-01-01

    The mechanisms by which increased mortality and morbidity occur in individuals with preexistent cardiopulmonary disease following acute episodes of air pollution are unknown. Studies involving air pollution effects on animal models of human cardiopulmonary diseases are both infrequent and difficult to interpret. Such models are, however, extensively used in studies of disease pathogenesis. Primarily they comprise those developed by genetic, pharmacologic, or surgical manipulations of the cardiopulmonary system. This review attempts a comprehensive description of rodent cardiopulmonary disease models in the context of their potential application to susceptibility studies of air pollutants regardless of whether the models have been previously used for such studies. The pulmonary disease models include bronchitis, emphysema, asthma/allergy, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, interstitial fibrosis, and infection. The models of systemic hypertension and congestive heart failure include: those derived by genetics (spontaneously hypertensive, Dahl S. renin transgenic, and other rodent models); congestive heart failure models derived by surgical manipulations; viral myocarditis; and cardiomyopathy induced by adriamycin. The characteristic pathogenic features critical to understanding the susceptibility to inhaled toxicants are described. It is anticipated that this review will provide a ready reference for the selection of appropriate rodent models of cardiopulmonary diseases and identify not only their pathobiologic similarities and/or differences to humans but also their potential usefulness in susceptibility studies. Images Figure 2 PMID:9539009

  6. [Hiatal hernia incarceration during cardiopulmonary bypass in patient with acute aortic dissection--a case report].

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Y; Saito, T; Horimi, H; Kato, M; Kawashima, T; Fuse, K

    1995-09-01

    A 67-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital under diagnosis of Stanford type A acute aortic dissection. Chest CT showed aortic dissection from the ascending to descending aorta, and large hiatal hernia. Operation was undergone under cardiopulmonary bypass and circulatory arrest with retrograde cerebral perfusion. A graft replacement was carried out from the ascending to transverse arch aorta. After the release of the cross-clamping of aorta, the heart was gradually oppressed anteriorly by extrapericardial mass, so that the patient could not be weaned from the cardiopulmonary bypass. The mass was revealed incarcerated hiatal hernia by ultrasonography. After laparotomy, diaphragm and hiatus were incised, the incarceration was relieved and the diaphgragm was repaired with a Goretex sheet. Then the patient could be weaned from cardiopulmonary bypass. Her postoperative course was uneventful except for acute renal failure, and she was discharged 60 days after the operation. The incarceration of hiatal hernia was thought to be caused by tissue edema and small bleeding during cardiopulmonary bypass. This is the first reported case with the incarceration of hiatal hernia which occurred during cardiopulmonary bypass.

  7. Shock formation of HCO/+/

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elitzur, M.

    1983-04-01

    It is shown that shocks propagating in dense molecular regions will lead to a decrease in HCO(+) relative abundance, in agreement with previous results by Iglesias and Silk (1978). The shock enhancement of HCO(+) detected in the supernova remnant IC 443 by Dickinson et al. (1980) is due to enhanced ionization in the shocked material. This is the result of the material penetrating the remnant cavity where it becomes exposed to the trapped cosmic rays. A similar enhancement appears to have been detected by Wootten in W28 and is explained by the same model.

  8. Sepsis and septic shock.

    PubMed

    Maloney, Patrick J

    2013-08-01

    Early recognition of sepsis and septic shock in children relies on obtaining an attentive clinical history, accurate vital signs, and a physical examination focused on mental status, work of breathing, and circulatory status. Laboratory tests may support the diagnosis but are not reliable in isolation. The goal of septic shock management is reversal of tissue hypoperfusion. The therapeutic end point is shock reversal. Mortality is significantly better among children when managed appropriately. Every physician who cares for children must strive to have a high level of suspicion and keen clinical acumen for recognizing the rare but potentially seriously ill child.

  9. Shock effects in meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoeffler, D.; Bischoff, A.; Buchwald, V.; Rubin, A. E.

    1988-01-01

    The impacts that can occur between objects on intersecting solar system orbits can generate shock-induced deformations and transformations, creating new mineral phases or melting old ones. These shock-metamorphic effects affect not only the petrography but the chemical and isotopic properties and the ages of primordial meteoritic materials. A fuller understanding of shock metamorphism and breccia formation in meteorites will be essential not only in the study of early accretion, differentiation, and regolith-evolution processes, but in the characterization of the primordial composition of the accreted material itself.

  10. Shocks near Jamming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, Leopoldo R.; Turner, Ari M.; van Hecke, Martin; Vitelli, Vincenzo

    2012-02-01

    Nonlinear sound is an extreme phenomenon typically observed in solids after violent explosions. But granular media are different. Right when they jam, these fragile and disordered solids exhibit a vanishing rigidity and sound speed, so that even tiny mechanical perturbations form supersonic shocks. Here, we perform simulations in which two-dimensional jammed granular packings are dynamically compressed and demonstrate that the elementary excitations are strongly nonlinear shocks, rather than ordinary phonons. We capture the full dependence of the shock speed on pressure and impact intensity by a surprisingly simple analytical model.

  11. Does repair of pectus excavatum improve cardiopulmonary function?

    PubMed

    Jayaramakrishnan, Kumara; Wotton, Robin; Bradley, Amy; Naidu, Babu

    2013-06-01

    A best evidence topic was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was 'Does repair of pectus excavatum (PE) improve cardiopulmonary function?' One hundred and sixty-eight papers were found using the reported search, 19 level III evidence papers and three meta-analyses were relevant. Studies were divided into four groups based on the surgical technique applied and pulmonary and cardiac functions in these groups were analysed. The meta-analyses show conflicting results for improvements in pulmonary and cardiac functions when comparing surgical techniques, while four more recent studies show improved long-term results using the Nuss technique. The best evidence of papers studying the PE repair using the minimally invasive Nuss technique demonstrates a decrease in pulmonary function during the early postoperative period, however, there is a small but significant improvement during the late postoperative period and after bar removal. The best evidence for cardiac function in this group suggests an early improvement that is sustained during further follow-up. The best evidence of papers studying the PE repair using the Ravitch technique shows that pulmonary function decreased during the early postoperative period, however, there is a small but significant improvement during the late postoperative period. The best evidence for cardiac function in this group suggests an early improvement that is sustained during further follow-up. The best evidence of papers studying the PE repair using other techniques (modified Daniel's technique, modified Baronofsky's technique, sterno-costal turn-over technique and sterno-costal elevation technique) or where surgical techniques used were not described (preceding year 1985) suggests that there is no improvement in pulmonary function after surgery. There is some evidence that certain aspects of cardiac function improved after surgery in this group.

  12. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Lunar and Martian Gravity Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarkar, Subhajit

    2004-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation is required training for all astronauts. No studies thus far have investigated how chest compressions may be affected in lunar and Martian gravities. Therefore a theoretical quantitative study was performed. The maximum downward force an unrestrained person can apply is mg N (g(sub Earth) = 9.78 ms(sup -2), g(sub moon) = 1.63 ms(sup -2), g(sub Mars) = 3.69 ms(sup -2). Tsitlik et a1 (Critical Care Medicine, 1983) described the human sternal elastic force-displacement relationship (compliance) by: F = betaD(sub s) + gammaD(sub s)(sup 2) (beta = 54.9 plus or minus 29.4 Ncm(sup -1) and gamma = 10.8 plus or minus 4.1 Ncm(sup -2)). Maximum forces in the 3 gravitational fields produced by 76 kg (US population mean), 41 kg and 93 kg (masses derived from the limits for astronaut height), produced solutions for compression depth using Tsitlik equations for chests of: mean compliance (beta = 54.9, gamma = 10.8), low compliance (beta = 84.3, gamma = 14.9) and high compliance (beta = 25.5, gamma = 6.7). The mass for minimum adequate adult compression, 3.8 cm (AHA guidelines), was also calculated. 76 kg compresses the mean compliance chest by: Earth, 6.1 cm, Mars, 3.2 cm, Moon, 1.7 cm. In lunar gravity, the high compliance chest is compressed only 3.2 cm by 93 kg, 120 kg being required for 3.8 cm. In Martian gravity, on the mean chest, 93 kg compresses 3.6 cm; 99 kg is required for 3.8 cm. On Mars, the high compliance chest is compressed 4.8 cm with 76 kg, 5.5 cm with 93 kg, with 52 kg required for 3.8 cm.

  13. Cardiopulmonary Responses to Supine Cycling during Short-Arm Centrifugation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vener, J. M.; Simonson, S. R.; Stocks, J.; Evettes, S.; Bailey, K.; Biagini, H.; Jackson, C. G. R.; Greenleaf, J. E.; Dalton, Bonnie P. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate cardiopulmonary responses to supine cycling with concomitant +G(sub z) acceleration using the NASA/Ames Human Powered Short-Arm Centrifuge (HPC). Subjects were eight consenting males (32+/-5 yrs, 178+/-5 cm, 86.1+/- 6.2 kg). All subjects completed two maximal exercise tests on the HPC (with and without acceleration) within a three-day period. A two tailed t-test with statistical significance set at p less than or equal to 0.05 was used to compare treatments. Peak acceleration was 3.4+/-0.1 G(sub z), (head to foot acceleration). Peak oxygen uptake (VO2(sub peak) was not different between treatment groups (3.1+/-0.1 Lmin(exp -1) vs. 3.2+/-0.1 Lmin(exp -1) for stationary and acceleration trials, respectively). Peak HR and pulmonary minute ventilation (V(sub E(sub BTPS))) were significantly elevated (p less than or equal to 0.05) for the acceleration trial (182+/-3 BPM (Beats per Minute); 132.0+/-9.0 Lmin(exp -1)) when compared to the stationary trial (175+/-3 BPM; 115.5+/-8.5 Lmin(exp -1)). Ventilatory threshold expressed as a percent of VO2(sub peak) was not different for acceleration and stationary trials (72+/-2% vs. 68+/-2% respectively). Results suggest that 3.4 G(sub z) acceleration does not alter VO2(sub peak) response to supine cycling. However, peak HR and V(sub E(sub BTPS)) response may be increased while ventilatory threshold response expressed as a function of percent VO2(sub peak) is relatively unaffected. Thus, traditional exercise prescription based on VO2 response would be appropriate for this mode of exercise. Prescriptions based on HR response may require modification.

  14. Delivery of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the microgravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barratt, M. R.; Billica, R. D.

    1992-01-01

    The microgravity environment presents several challenges for delivering effective cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Chest compressions must be driven by muscular force rather than by the weight of the rescuer's upper torso. Airway stabilization is influenced by the neutral body posture. Rescuers will consist of crew members of varying sizes and degrees of physical deconditioning from space flight. Several methods of CPR designed to accommodate these factors were tested in the one G environment, in parabolic flight, and on a recent shuttle flight. Methods: Utilizing study participants of varying sizes, different techniques of CPR delivery were evaluated using a recording CPR manikin to assess adequacy of compressive force and frequency. Under conditions of parabolic flight, methods tested included conventional positioning of rescuer and victim, free floating 'Heimlich type' compressions, straddling the patient with active and passive restraints, and utilizing a mechanical cardiac compression assist device (CCAD). Multiple restrain systems and ventilation methods were also assessed. Results: Delivery of effective CPR was possible in all configurations tested. Reliance on muscular force alone was quickly fatiguing to the rescuer. Effectiveness of CPR was dependent on technique, adequate restraint of the rescuer and patient, and rescuer size and preference. Free floating CPR was adequate but rapidly fatiguing. The CCAD was able to provide adequate compressive force but positioning was problematic. Conclusions: Delivery of effective CPR in microgravity will be dependent on adequate resuer and patient restraint, technique, and rescuer size and preference. Free floating CPR may be employed as a stop gap method until patient restraint is available. Development of an adequate CCAD would be desirable to compensate for the effects of deconditioning.

  15. Hydrogen sulfide improves neural function in rats following cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ji-Yan; Zhang, Min-Wei; Wang, Jin-Gao; Li, Hui; Wei, Hong-Yan; Liu, Rong; Dai, Gang; Liao, Xiao-Xing

    2016-02-01

    The alleviation of brain injury is a key issue following cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is hypothesized to be involved in the pathophysiological process of ischemia-reperfusion injury, and exerts a protective effect on neurons. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of H2S on neural functions following cardiac arrest (CA) in rats. A total of 60 rats were allocated at random into three groups. CA was induced to establish the model and CPR was performed after 6 min. Subsequently, sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), hydroxylamine or saline was administered to the rats. Serum levels of H2S, neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and S100β were determined following CPR. In addition, neurological deficit scoring (NDS), the beam walking test (BWT), prehensile traction test and Morris water maze experiment were conducted. Neuronal apoptosis rates were detected in the hippocampal region following sacrifice. After CPR, as the H2S levels increased or decreased, the serum NSE and S100β concentrations decreased or increased, respectively (P<0.0w. The NDS results of the NaHS group were improved compared with those of the hydroxylamine group at 24 h after CPR (P<0.05). In the Morris water maze experiment, BWT and prehensile traction test the animals in the NaHS group performed best and rats in the hydroxylamine group performed worst. At day 7, the apoptotic index and the expression of caspase-3 were reduced in the hippocampal CA1 region, while the expression of Bcl-2 increased in the NaHS group; and results of the hydroxylamine group were in contrast. Therefore, the results of the present study indicate that H2S is able to improve neural function in rats following CPR.

  16. VentSim: a simulation model of cardiopulmonary physiology.

    PubMed

    Rutledge, G W

    1994-01-01

    VentSim is a quantitative model that predicts the effects of alternative ventilator settings on the cardiopulmonary physiology of critically ill patients. VentSim is an expanded version of the physiologic model in VentPlan, an application that provides ventilator-setting recommendations for patients in the intensive care unit. VentSim includes a ventilator component, an airway component, and a circulation component. The ventilator component predicts the pressures and airflows that are generated by a volume-cycled, constant-flow ventilator. The airway component has anatomic and physiologic deadspace compartments, and two alveolar compartments that participate in gas exchange with two pulmonary blood-flow compartments in the circulatory component. The circulatory component also has a shunt compartment that allows a fraction of blood flow to bypass gas exchange in the lungs, and a tissue compartment that consumes oxygen and generates carbon dioxide. The VentSim model is a set of linked first-order difference equations, with control variables that correspond to the ventilator settings, dependent variables that correspond to the physiologic state, and one independent variable, time. Because the model has no steady state solution, VentSim solves the equations by numeric integration, which is computation intensive. Simulation results demonstrate that VentSim predicts the effects of a variety of physiologic abnormalities that cannot be represented in less complex models such as the VentPlan model. For a ventilator-management application, the time-critical nature of ventilator-setting decisions limits the use of complex models. Advanced ventilator-management applications may include a mechanism to select patient-specific models that balance the trade-off of benefit of model detail and cost of computation delay.

  17. Oxygen transport and consumption during experimental cardiopulmonary bypass using oxyfluor.

    PubMed

    Briceño, J C; Rincón, I E; Vélez, J F; Castro, I; Arcos, M I; Velásquez, C E

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate a perfluorocarbon based oxygen carrier (Oxyfluor), a porcine model of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) was implemented. Swine (30 kg) were subjected to 2 h of normothermic CPB using Oxyfluor (OF group, n = 8) or Ringer's lactate (RL group, n = 13) as the prime. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) was kept at 50 mm Hg, flow rate at 80 ml x min(-1) x kg(-1), and PaCO2 at 35 mm Hg. Hemodynamic, hematologic, fluid balance, and blood gasimetry variables were measured. Total body oxygen delivery (DO2), consumption (VO2), and the fractional contribution to delivery (FCD) and to consumption (FCC) of the red blood cells (RBC), PFC, and plasma phases were calculated. Mixed venous PO2 (PvO2) was significantly higher at 30 min and 1 h on CPB in the OF group than in the RL group. FCCRBC was significantly lower at 30 min, 1 h, and 90 min on CPB in the OF group than in the RL group. PvjO2, Ca-vO2, Ca-vj O2, and VO2 were slightly higher in the OF group than in the RL group. Tissue fluid accumulation was not alleviated with Oxyfluor, and tissue and brain acidosis were significantly increased in the OF group. This study presented evidence that Oxyfluor improved tissue oxygenation and total body oxygen consumption during experimental CPB. In addition, Oxyfluor reduced FCCRBC, increasing oxygen transport reserve of the RBC phase, which can be useful to reduce hypoxic events during CPB. Further research should be conducted to optimize PFC-OCs for use in CPB and to reduce secondary effects.

  18. Extended effects of air pollution on cardiopulmonary mortality in Vienna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuberger, Manfred; Rabczenko, Daniel; Moshammer, Hanns

    BackgroundCurrent standards for fine particulates and nitrogen dioxide are under revision. Patients with cardiovascular disease have been identified as the largest group which need to be protected from effects of urban air pollution. MethodsWe sought to estimate associations between indicators of urban air pollution and daily mortality using time series of daily TSP, PM 10, PM 2.5, NO 2, SO 2, O 3 and nontrauma deaths in Vienna (Austria) 2000-2004. We used polynomial distributed lag analysis adjusted for seasonality, daily temperature, relative humidity, atmospheric pressure and incidence of influenza as registered by sentinels. ResultsAll three particulate measures and NO 2 were associated with mortality from all causes and from ischemic heart disease and COPD at all ages and in the elderly. The magnitude of the effect was largest for PM 2.5 and NO 2. Best predictor of mortality increase lagged 0-7 days was PM 2.5 (for ischemic heart disease and COPD) and NO 2 (for other heart disease and all causes). Total mortality increase, lagged 0-14 days, per 10 μg m -3 was 2.6% for PM 2.5 and 2.9% for NO 2, mainly due to cardiopulmonary and cerebrovascular causes. ConclusionAcute and subacute lethal effects of urban air pollution are predicted by PM 2.5 and NO 2 increase even at relatively low levels of these pollutants. This is consistent with results on hospital admissions and the lack of a threshold. While harvesting (reduction of mortality after short increase due to premature deaths of most sensitive persons) seems to be of minor importance, deaths accumulate during 14 days after an increase of air pollutants. The limit values for PM 2.5 and NO 2 proposed for 2010 in the European Union are unable to prevent serious health effects.

  19. Elimination of Gaseous Microemboli from Cardiopulmonary Bypass using Hypobaric Oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Gipson, Keith E.; Rosinski, David J.; Schonberger, Robert B.; Kubera, Cathryn; Mathew, Eapen S.; Nichols, Frank; Dyckman, William; Courtin, Francois; Sherburne, Bradford; Bordey, Angelique F; Gross, Jeffrey B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Numerous gaseous microemboli (GME) are delivered into the arterial circulation during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). These emboli damage end organs through multiple mechanisms that are thought to contribute to neurocognitive deficits following cardiac surgery. Here, we use hypobaric oxygenation to reduce dissolved gases in blood and greatly reduce GME delivery during CPB. Methods Variable subatmospheric pressures were applied to 100% oxygen sweep gas in standard hollow fiber microporous membrane oxygenators to oxygenate and denitrogenate blood. GME were quantified using ultrasound while air embolism from the surgical field was simulated experimentally. We assessed end organ tissues in swine postoperatively using light microscopy. Results Variable sweep gas pressures allowed reliable oxygenation independent of CO2 removal while denitrogenating arterial blood. Hypobaric oxygenation produced dose-dependent reductions of Doppler signals produced by bolus and continuous GME loads in vitro. Swine were maintained using hypobaric oxygenation for four hours on CPB with no apparent adverse events. Compared with current practice standards of O2/air sweep gas, hypobaric oxygenation reduced GME volumes exiting the oxygenator (by 80%), exiting the arterial filter (95%), and arriving at the aortic cannula (∼100%), indicating progressive reabsorption of emboli throughout the CPB circuit in vivo. Analysis of brain tissue suggested decreased microvascular injury under hypobaric conditions. Conclusions Hypobaric oxygenation is an effective, low-cost, common sense approach that capitalizes on the simple physical makeup of GME to achieve their near-total elimination during CPB. This technique holds great potential for limiting end-organ damage and improving outcomes in a variety of patients undergoing extracorporeal circulation. PMID:24206970

  20. Cardiopulmonary function in dogs with serious chronic heartworm disease.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, H; Kubota, A; Yasuda, K; Hirano, Y; Sasaki, Y

    1992-08-01

    Cardiopulmonary function was examined in 18 dogs with serious chronic heartworm disease showing ascites, subcutaneous edema, prostration, weakness, jaundice and so on. After surgical heartworm removal from the pulmonary arteries, 10 dogs recovered (surviving group), and 8 dogs died or were euthanatized because of poor prognosis (nonsurviving group). The number of live heartworms residing in the pulmonary arteries of the surviving group tended to be larger than that in the nonsurviving group. At necropsy, severe pulmonary arterial lesions such as thromboembolism including dead heartworms, proliferative and villous lesions and intimal hyperplasia were noticed in all dogs examined, and tended to be severer in the nonsurviving group. Heartworm-coiling around the tricuspid valve chord was found in 1 dog of the surviving group and 4 dogs of the nonsurviving group. Before heartworm removal, there was no significant difference in the mean pulmonary arterial pressure (MPAP) between the surviving and nonsurviving group. Right atrial pressure (v-wave) was higher, and the cardiac index (CI) was lower in the nonsurviving group. Arterial oxygen tension was lower in the surviving group than in the heartworm-free group, and it was lower in the nonsurviving group than in the surviving group. Carbon dioxide tension was lower in the surviving group than in the heartworm-free group. Bicarbonate concentration (HCO3-) was lower both in the surviving and nonsurviving groups than in the heartworm-free group. One week after heartworm removal, MPAP decreased (P less than 0.05), and CI and HCO3- tended to increase in the surviving group.

  1. Effect of dyad training on medical students’ cardiopulmonary resuscitation performance

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Candice; Huang, Chin-Chou; Lin, Shing-Jong; Chen, Jaw-Wen

    2017-01-01

    Abstract We investigated the effects of dyadic training on medical students’ resuscitation performance during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training. We provided students with a 2-hour training session on CPR for simulated cardiac arrest. Student teams were split into double groups (Dyad training groups: Groups A and B) or Single Groups. All groups received 2 CPR simulation rounds. CPR simulation training began with peer demonstration for Group A, and peer observation for Group B. Then the 2 groups switched roles. Single Groups completed CPR simulation without peer observation or demonstration. Teams were then evaluated based on leadership, teamwork, and team member skills. Group B had the highest first simulation round scores overall (P = 0.004) and in teamwork (P = 0.001) and team member skills (P = 0.031). Group B also had the highest second simulation round scores overall (P < 0.001) and in leadership (P = 0.033), teamwork (P < 0.001), and team member skills (P < 0.001). In the first simulation, there were no differences between Dyad training groups with those of Single Groups in overall scores, leadership scores, teamwork scores, and team member scores. In the second simulation, Dyad training groups scored higher in overall scores (P = 0.002), leadership scores (P = 0.044), teamwork scores (P = 0.005), and team member scores (P = 0.008). Dyad training groups also displayed higher improvement in overall scores (P = 0.010) and team member scores (P = 0.022). Dyad training was effective for CPR training. Both peer observation and demonstration for peers in dyad training can improve student resuscitation performance. PMID:28353555

  2. Acetaminophen Attenuates Lipid Peroxidation in Children Undergoing Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Scott A.; Zaccagni, Hayden; Bichell, David P.; Christian, Karla G.; Mettler, Bret A.; Donahue, Brian S.; Roberts, L. Jackson; Pretorius, Mias

    2014-01-01

    Objective Hemolysis, occurring during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), is associated with lipid peroxidation and postoperative acute kidney injury (AKI). Acetaminophen (ApAP) inhibits lipid peroxidation catalyzed by hemeproteins and in an animal model attenuated rhabdomyolysis-induced AKI. This pilot study tests the hypothesis that ApAP attenuates lipid peroxidation in children undergoing CPB. Design Single center prospective randomized double blinded study. Setting University-affiliated pediatric hospital. Patients Thirty children undergoing elective surgical correction of a congenital heart defect. Interventions Patients were randomized to ApAP (OFIRMEV® (acetaminophen) injection, Cadence Pharmaceuticals, San Diego, CA) or placebo every 6 hours for 4 doses starting before the onset of CPB. Measurement and Main Results Markers of hemolysis, lipid peroxidation (isofurans and F2-isoprostanes) and AKI were measured throughout the perioperative period. CPB was associated with a significant increase in free hemoglobin (from a pre-bypass level of 9.8±6.2 mg/dl to a peak of 201.5±42.6 mg/dl post-bypass). Plasma and urine isofuran and F2-isoprostane concentrations increased significantly during surgery. The magnitude of increase in plasma isofurans was greater than the magnitude in increase in plasma F2-isoprostanes. ApAP attenuated the increase in plasma isofurans compared to placebo (P=0.02 for effect of study drug). There was no significant effect of ApAP on plasma F2-isoprostanes or urinary makers of lipid peroxidation. ApAP did not affect postoperative creatinine, urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin or prevalence of AKI. Conclusion CPB in children is associated with hemolysis and lipid peroxidation. ApAP attenuated the increase in plasma isofuran concentrations. Future studies are needed to establish whether other therapies that attenuate or prevent the effects of free hemoglobin result in more effective inhibition of lipid peroxidation in patients

  3. Chest Compression With Personal Protective Equipment During Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jie; Lu, Kai-Zhi; Yi, Bin; Chen, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Following a chemical, biological, radiation, and nuclear incident, prompt cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) procedure is essential for patients who suffer cardiac arrest. But CPR when wearing personal protection equipment (PPE) before decontamination becomes a challenge for healthcare workers (HCW). Although previous studies have assessed the impact of PPE on airway management, there is little research available regarding the quality of chest compression (CC) when wearing PPE. A present randomized cross-over simulation study was designed to evaluate the effect of PPE on CC performance using mannequins. The study was set in one university medical center in the China. Forty anesthesia residents participated in this randomized cross-over study. Each participant performed 2 min of CC on a manikin with and without PPE, respectively. Participants were randomized into 2 groups that either performed CC with PPE first, followed by a trial without PPE after a 180-min rest, or vice versa. CPR recording technology was used to objectively quantify the quality of CC. Additionally, participants’ physiological parameters and subjective fatigue score values were recorded. With the use of PPE, a significant decrease of the percentage of effective compressions (41.3 ± 17.1% with PPE vs 67.5 ± 15.6% without PPE, P < 0.001) and the percentage of adequate compressions (67.7 ± 18.9% with PPE vs 80.7 ± 15.5% without PPE, P < 0.001) were observed. Furthermore, the increases in heart rate, mean arterial pressure, and subjective fatigue score values were more obvious with the use of PPE (all P < 0.01). We found significant deterioration of CC performance in HCW with the use of a level-C PPE, which may be a disadvantage for enhancing survival of cardiac arrest. PMID:27057878

  4. Medical Students Teaching Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation to Middle School Brazilian Students

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Lucas Gaspar; Germano, Rafael; Menezes, Pedro Lugarinho; Schmidt, André; Pazin-Filho, Antônio

    2013-01-01

    Background Diseases of the circulatory system are the most common cause of death in Brazil. Because the general population is often the first to identify problems related to the circulatory system, it is important that they are trained. However, training is challenging owing to the number of persons to be trained and the maintenance of training. Objectives To assess the delivery of a medical-student led cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training program and to assess prior knowledge of CPR as well as immediate and delayed retention of CPR training among middle school students. Methods Two public and two private schools were selected. CPR training consisted of a video class followed by practice on manikins that was supervised by medical students. Multiple choice questionnaires were provided before, immediately after, and at 6 months after CPR training. The questions were related to general knowledge, the sequence of procedures, and the method to administer each component (ventilation, chest compression, and automated external defibrillation). The instructors met in a focus group after the sessions to identify the potential problems faced. Results In total, 147 students completed the 6-month follow-up. The public school students had a lower prior knowledge, but this difference disappeared immediately after training. After the 6-month follow-up period, these public school students demonstrated lower retention. The main problem faced was teaching mouth-to-mouth resuscitation. Conclusions The method used by medical students to teach middle school students was based on the watch-and-practice technique. This method was effective in achieving both immediate and late retention of acquired knowledge. The greater retention of knowledge among private school students may reflect cultural factors. (Arq Bras Cardiol. 2013;101(4):328-335) PMID:23949324

  5. Toxic shock syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... by a toxin produced by some types of staphylococcus bacteria. A similar problem, called toxic shock-like ... men. Risk factors include: Recent childbirth Infection with Staphylococcus aureus ( S aureus ), commonly called a Staph infection Foreign ...

  6. Separation of craniopagus Siamese twins using cardiopulmonary bypass and hypothermic circulatory arrest.

    PubMed

    Cameron, D E; Reitz, B A; Carson, B S; Long, D M; Dufresne, C R; Vander Kolk, C A; Maxwell, L G; Tilghman, D M; Nichols, D G; Wetzel, R C

    1989-11-01

    Occipitally joined craniopagus Siamese twins were separated with the use of cardiopulmonary bypass and hypothermic circulatory arrest. The 7-month-old infants shared a large sagittal venous sinus that precluded conventional neurosurgical approach because of risk of exsanguination and air embolism. After craniotomy and preliminary exposure of the sinus, each twin underwent sternotomy and total cardiopulmonary bypass with deep hypothermia. Hypothermic circulatory arrest allowed safe division and subsequent reconstruction of the sinus remnants. Several unusual problems were encountered, including transfusion of a large blood volume from one extracorporeal circuit to the other through the common venous sinus, deleterious warming of the exposed brain during circulatory arrest, and thrombosis of both pump oxygenators. Both infants survived, although recovery was complicated in each by neurologic injury, cranial wound infection, and hydrocephalus. This case demonstrates the valuable supportive role of cardiopulmonary bypass and hypothermic circulatory arrest in the management of complex surgical problems of otherwise inoperable patients.

  7. Pilot Canine Investigation of the Cardiopulmonary Baroreflex Control of Ventricular Contractility

    PubMed Central

    Sala-Mercado, Javier A.; Chen, Xiaoxiao; Hammond, Robert L.; Kim, Jong-Kyung; McDonald, Phillip J.; Stephenson, Larry W.; O’Leary, Donal S.; Mukkamala, Ramakrishna

    2010-01-01

    We performed a pilot investigation of the cardiopulmonary baroreflex control of ventricular contractility in two conscious dogs. We specifically measured spontaneous beat-to-beat hemodynamic variability before and after the administration of propranolol. We then identified the transfer function relating beat-to-beat fluctuations in central venous pressure (CVP) to maximal ventricular elastance (Emax) to characterize the cardiopulmonary baroreflex control of ventricular contractility, while accounting for the influences of arterial blood pressure fluctuations on Emax via the arterial baroreflex and heart rate fluctuations on Emax via the force-frequency relation. Our major finding is that the cardiopulmonary baroreflex responds to an increase (decrease) in CVP by increasing (decreasing) Emax via the β-sympathetic nervous system. PMID:19963523

  8. Early Treatment in Shock

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    jasminoides Ellis). It is com- monly sold in the United States as an herbal supplement . In terms of crocetin’s fundamental mode of action in host... supplementation 15 can be beneficial in ameliorating the tissue damage produced following experimental 16 hemorrhagic shock. In the present investigation...experimental rat model of hemorrhagic shock. Our studies were designed to test two 19 hypotheses. First, L-arginine supplementation during resuscitation will

  9. Shock Properties of Kimberlite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willmott, G. R.; Proud, W. G.; Field, J. E.

    2004-07-01

    Plate impact experiments have been performed on the igneous diamond-bearing matrix kimberlite. Longitudinal and lateral stresses were measured in the uniaxial strain regime using manganin stress gauges. The shock Hugoniot of the kimberlite has been characterized at axial stresses between 1 and 9 GPa. The kimberlite has a low impedance response when compared with similar data for other geological materials. The data indicate that the rock behaves inelastically above shock stresses of 1 GPa.

  10. Fluid therapy in shock.

    PubMed

    Mandell, D C; King, L G

    1998-05-01

    The goal of treatment for all types of shock is the improvement of tissue perfusion and oxygenation. The mainstay of therapy for hypovolemic and septic shock is the expansion of the intravascular volume by fluid administration, including crystalloids, colloids, and blood products. Frequent physical examinations and monitoring enable the clinician to determine the adequacy of tissue oxygenation and thus the success of the fluid therapy.

  11. "Smart" Electromechanical Shock Absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stokes, Lebarian; Glenn, Dean C.; Carroll, Monty B.

    1989-01-01

    Shock-absorbing apparatus includes electromechanical actuator and digital feedback control circuitry rather than springs and hydraulic damping as in conventional shock absorbers. Device not subject to leakage and requires little or no maintenance. Attenuator parameters adjusted in response to sensory feedback and predictive algorithms to obtain desired damping characteristic. Device programmed to decelerate slowly approaching vehicle or other large object according to prescribed damping characteristic.

  12. Early Treatment in Shock

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    1471–2210/2/7. Accessed April 15, 2005. 20. Wang CJ, Lee MJ, Chang MC, Lin JK. Inhibition of tumor promotion in benzo [ a ] pyrene -initiated CD-1 mouse...model. Deliverable: A panel of genes that are reproducibly altered in white blood cells and in liver and muscle by shock and resuscitation. 1. To...Deliverable: Coordinated with objective #1, A panel of genes that are reproducibly altered in white blood cells and in liver and muscle by shock and

  13. Catecholamines in shock.

    PubMed

    Alho, A; Jäättelä, A; Lahdensuu, M; Rokkanen, P; Avikainen, V; Karaharju, E; Tervo, T; Lepistö, P

    1977-06-01

    The role of endogenous catecholamines in various clinical shock and stress states is reviewed; the effects, especially on the peripheral circulation, of catecholamine secretion are the same independent of the cause. Risks of using sympathomimetic agents in the treatment of shock are evaluated. A prolonged noradrenaline activity is to be expected in surgical stress states, e.g. multiple injuries, fat embolism syndrome, burns and infections; therapeutic approaches to minimize the sympathoadrenal activity are outlined.

  14. Visual detection of goose haemorrhagic polyomavirus in geese and ducks by loop-mediated isothermal amplification.

    PubMed

    Woźniakowski, Grzegorz; Tarasiuk, Karolina

    2015-01-01

    Goose haemorrhagic polyomavirus (GHPV) is an aetiological agent of haemorrhagic nephritis and enteritis of geese occurring in geese (Anser anser). GHPV may also infect Muscovy ducks (Carina mochata) and mule ducks. Early detection of GHPV is important to isolate the infected birds from the rest of the flock thus limiting infection transmission. The current diagnosis of haemorrhagic nephritis and enteritis of geese is based on virus isolation, histopathological examination, haemagglutination inhibition assay, ELISA and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Recently, real-time PCR assay was developed which considerably improved detection of GHPV. In spite of many advantages, these methods are still time-consuming and inaccessible for laboratories with limited access to ELISA plate readers or PCR thermocyclers. The aim of our study was to develop loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) that may be conducted in a water bath. Two pairs of specific primers complementary to VP1 gene of GHPV were designed. The results of GHPV LAMP were recorded under ultraviolet light. Our study showed LAMP was able to specifically amplify VP1 fragment of a GHPV without cross-reactivity with other pathogens of geese and ducks. LAMP detected as little as 1.5 pg of DNA extracted from a GHPV standard strain (150 pg/µl). The optimized LAMP was used to examine 18 field specimens collected from dead and clinically diseased geese and ducks aged from 1 to 12 weeks. The positive signal for GHPV was detected in three out of 18 (16.6%) specimens. These results were reproducible and consistent with those of four real-time PCR. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report on LAMP application for the GHPV detection.

  15. Emerging rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus 2 (RHDV2) at the gates of the African continent.

    PubMed

    Martin-Alonso, Aarón; Martin-Carrillo, Natalia; Garcia-Livia, Katherine; Valladares, Basilio; Foronda, Pilar

    2016-10-01

    Until the beginning of this decade, the genetic characterization of rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) from Iberian Peninsula had revealed the existence of two genogroups, G1 and sporadically G6. In 2010, the new emerging rabbit haemorrhagic disease variant, RHDV2 or RHDVb, was described in France, from where it has rapidly spread throughout Europe, including Iberian Peninsula countries. Nevertheless, although cases of rabbit haemorrhagic disease (RHD) have been reported in the Canary Islands, a Spanish archipelago located 100km off the coast of Morocco, no genetic characterization of RHDV had been carried out. Consequently, in order to identify the circulating RHDV strains in this archipelago, liver samples of six farm rabbits and fifteen wild rabbits were collected from several areas of the largest island, Tenerife, and analyzed for the presence of RHDV by antigen capture double antibody sandwich ELISA. In case of positive ELISA result, we amplified and sequenced two fragments of the vp60 gene, which were concatenated for phylogenetic purposes. The sequences analysis revealed the presence of RHDV2 in both farm and wild rabbits from several areas of Tenerife. This result constitutes the first finding of RHDV2 in the Canary Islands. These RHDV2 strains found in Tenerife shared two exclusive SNPs that have not been observed in the rest of RHDV2 strains. The identification of RHDV2 and the absence of classic RHDV strains in this study suggest that RHDV2 may be replacing classic strains in Tenerife, as has been also proposed in Iberian Peninsula, France and Azores. Given the proximity of the Canary Islands to the African continent, this result should raise awareness about a possible dispersal of RHDV2 from the Canary Islands to the North of Africa.

  16. Electron Acceleration in Shock-Shock Interaction: Simulations and Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanotani, M.; Matsukiyo, S.; Mazelle, C. X.; Hada, T.

    2015-12-01

    Collisionless shock waves play a crucial role in producing high energy particles (cosmic rays) in space. While most of the past studies about particle acceleration assume the presence of a single shock, in space two shocks frequently come close to or even collide with each other. Hietala et al. [2011] observed the collision of an interplanetary shock and the earth's bow shock and the associated acceleration of energetic ions. The kinetic natures of a shock-shock collision has not been well understood. Only the work done by using hybrid simulation was reported by Cargill et al. [1986], in which they focus on a collision of two supercritical shocks and the resultant ion acceleration. We expect similarly that electron acceleration can also occur in shock-shock collision. To investigate the electron acceleration process in a shock-shock collision, we perform one-dimensional full particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. In the simulation energetic electrons are observed between the two approaching shocks before colliding. These energetic electrons are efficiently accelerated through multiple reflections at the two shocks (Fermi acceleration). The reflected electrons create a temperature anisotropy and excite large amplitude waves upstream via the electron fire hose instability. The large amplitude waves can scatter the energetic electrons in pitch angle so that some of them gain large pitch angles and are easily reflected when they encounter the shocks subsequently. The reflected electrons can sustain, or probably even strengthen, them. We further discuss observational results of an interaction of interplanetary shocks and the earth's bow shock by examining mainly Cluster data. We focus on whether or not electrons are accelerated in the shock-shock interaction.

  17. AOTV bow shock location

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desautel, D.

    1985-01-01

    Hypersonic bow-shock location and geometry are of central importance to the aerodynamics and aerothermodynamics of aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicles (AOTVs), but they are difficult to predict for a given vehicle configuration. This paper reports experimental measurements of shock standoff distance for the 70 deg cone AOTV configuration in shock-tunnel-test flows at Mach numbers of 3.8 to 7.9 and for angles of attack from 0 deg to 20 deg. The controlling parameter for hypersonic bow-shock standoff distance (for a given forebody shape) is the mean normal-shock density ratio. Values for this parameter in the tests reported are in the same range as those of the drag-brake AOTV perigee regime. Results for standoff distance are compared with those previously reported in the literature for this AOTV configuration. It is concluded that the AOTV shock standoff distance for the conical configuration, based on frustrum (base) radius, is equivalent to that of a sphere with a radius about 35 percent greater than that of the cone; the distance is, therefore, much less than reported in previous studies. Some reasons for the discrepancies between the present and previous are advanced. The smaller standoff distance determined here implies there will be less radiative heat transfer than was previously expected.

  18. A global compendium of human Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus occurrence

    PubMed Central

    Messina, Jane P; Pigott, David M; Duda, Kirsten A; Brownstein, John S; Myers, Monica F; George, Dylan B; Hay, Simon I

    2015-01-01

    In order to map global disease risk, a geographic database of human Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) occurrence was produced by surveying peer-reviewed literature and case reports, as well as informal online sources. Here we present this database, comprising occurrence data linked to geographic point or polygon locations dating from 1953 to 2013. We fully describe all data collection, geo-positioning, database management and quality-control procedures. This is the most comprehensive database of confirmed CCHF occurrence in humans to-date, containing 1,721 geo-positioned occurrences in total. PMID:25977820

  19. A global compendium of human Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus occurrence.

    PubMed

    Messina, Jane P; Pigott, David M; Duda, Kirsten A; Brownstein, John S; Myers, Monica F; George, Dylan B; Hay, Simon I

    2015-01-01

    In order to map global disease risk, a geographic database of human Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) occurrence was produced by surveying peer-reviewed literature and case reports, as well as informal online sources. Here we present this database, comprising occurrence data linked to geographic point or polygon locations dating from 1953 to 2013. We fully describe all data collection, geo-positioning, database management and quality-control procedures. This is the most comprehensive database of confirmed CCHF occurrence in humans to-date, containing 1,721 geo-positioned occurrences in total.

  20. Intracerebral haemorrhage and hemiplegia with heterotopic ossification of the affected hip.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, M M C; Murray, T; Keeling, F; Williams, D

    2015-08-04

    We present the case of a 72-year-old woman who developed right hemiparesis following a left frontal intraparenchymal haemorrhage. Three months following initial presentation, the patient noted poorly localised right lower quadrant pain. Following extensive investigations, a diagnosis of heterotopic ossification of the hip was made. We discuss the aetiology and pathogenesis of this uncommon entity, and discuss its relationship to ipsilateral neurological injury. The link with neurological injury can result in a delayed and atypical presentation. Early recognition and treatment are important for those caring for patients with acquired neurological deficits, and permit improved patient outcomes.

  1. Simultaneous occurrence of internal capsule infarct and cerebellar haemorrhage in a patient with hemiplegia.

    PubMed

    Pande, Nikhil; Vivek, Ganapathiraman; Hande, Manjunath; Acharya, Vasudeva

    2014-01-09

    A 68-year-old woman with hypertension with no history of cerebrovascular events presented with a left-sided hemiplegia which had developed acutely 2 days ago. She was not on maintenance therapy with antiplatelets or anticoagulants. A CT scan showed acute ischaemic infarction of the right internal capsule and cerebellar haemorrhage. Cardiac evaluation was normal. Doppler ultrasonography of the extracranial carotid and vertebral arteries showed diffuse arteriosclerotic changes, but did not reveal any haemodynamic occlusion. The simultaneous development of dual strokes was considered to be an extension of the same arteriosclerotic process to the intracranial carotid and basilar arteries.

  2. A clinical guide to viral haemorrhagic fevers: Ebola, Marburg and Lassa.

    PubMed

    Jeffs, Benjamin

    2006-01-01

    The viral haemorrhagic fevers are a group of diseases that share many clinical features. Ebola, Marburg and Lassa are diseases that cause a relatively small number of deaths globally, but pose special risks to medical staff due to the ease of transmission, and can have a profound impact to the communities they affect. This article gives a brief overview of diseases caused by the Ebola, Marburg and Lassa viruses. It gives some practical advice to the clinician on the diagnosis and management of these diseases.

  3. Isolation and immunisation studies of a canine parco-like virus from dogs with haemorrhagic enteritis.

    PubMed

    Appel, M J; Scott, F W; Carmichael, L E

    1979-08-25

    A newly recognised canine parvo like virus was isolated from faeces of dogs with haemorrhagic enteritis. Cell cultures from several species were susceptible to it. Virus infected cells could be demonstrated by staining with fluorescent antibody reagents (prepared against canine virus or feline panleucopenia virus) or by haemagglutination with pig or rhesus monkey red blood cells. Inhibition of haemagglutination by specific antiserum prepared in specific-pathogen-free beagles provided a convenient method for viral identification. Experimental inoculation of specific-pathogen-free beagles resulted in elevated body temperatures and caused lymphopenia lasting one to three days. Feline panleucopenia virus vaccines protected dogs against challenge with virulent canine parvo-like virus.

  4. Incidence of delayed cerebral ischaemia following subarachnoid haemorrhage of unknown cause.

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, P

    1985-01-01

    A retrospective study was made of 50 consecutive patients with spontaneous subarachnoid haemorrhage for which no cause was found, looking for evidence of delayed cerebral ischaemia particularly during the first 2 weeks after the bleed. Twenty-three patients had blood visible on the CT scan but only 4-6% developed delayed ischaemia, all of whom made a good recovery. The low incidence of this complication in this group of patients suggests that subarachnoid blood is not a sufficient cause for delayed ischaemia. PMID:3981169

  5. [Screening for systemic manifestations of vascular malformations in patients with hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (Osler disease)].

    PubMed

    Cerra Pohl, Ana; Werner, Jochen Alfred; Folz, Benedikt Josef

    2008-11-01

    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (Rendu-Osler- Weber syndrome) is a disease characterized by systemic vascular malformations. Typical clinical manifestations are recurrent epistaxis and telangiectases of the skin and the mucous membranes. The syndrome is furthermore characterized by its hereditary aspect. The disease seems to be much more complicated than previously thought, mainly because of the accompanying vascular malformations in vital organs, like the liver, the kidney, the lung, the brain, and the eyes. The diagnosis and treatment of systemic vascular malformations requires interdisciplinary management.

  6. Early and rapid diagnosis of acute haemorrhagic conjunctivitis with tear specimens

    PubMed Central

    Yin-Murphy, M.; Rahim, N. Abdul; Phoon, M. C.; Baharuddin-Ishak; Howe, J.

    1985-01-01

    Picornavirus particles and serotype-specific neutralizing antibody were demonstrated in tears collected during early onset of acute haemorrhagic conjunctivitis. Virus particles deposited from tears by airfuge ultracentrifugation and stained with potassium phosphotungstate were easily recognized by electron microscopy. Tear neutralizing antibody in the ultracentrifuged supernatant was detected by the neutralization test in monolayer HeLa cells grown in microtitration plates. The presence of virus particles and specific neutralizing antibody in tear specimens correlated with the serological findings. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:3878740

  7. Quality of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation When Directing the Area of maximal Compression by Transesophageal Echocardiography During Cardiac Arrest in Swine (Sus scrofa)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-30

    E7(/(3+21(180%(5 ,QFOXGHDUHDFRGH 18-02-2014 Final Mar 2012 - Jan 2014 Quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation when directing the area of...1. Protocol Number: FWH20110158A 2. Type of Research: Animal Research 3. Title: Quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation when directing...Compressions over the Left Ventricle During Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Increases Coronary Perfusion Pressure and Return of Spontaneous Circulation

  8. Basic life support knowledge of secondary school students in cardiopulmonary resuscitation training using a song

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca del Pozo, Francisco Javier; Canales Velis, Nancy Beatriz; Andrade Barahona, Mario Miguel; Siggers, Aidan; Lopera, Elisa

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To examine the effectiveness of a “cardiopulmonary resuscitation song” in improving the basic life support skills of secondary school students. Methods This pre-test/post-test control design study enrolled secondary school students from two middle schools randomly chosen in Córdoba, Andalucia, Spain. The study included 608 teenagers. A random sample of 87 students in the intervention group and 35 in the control group, aged 12-14 years were selected. The intervention included a cardiopulmonary resuscitation song and video. A questionnaire was conducted at three-time points: pre-intervention, one month and eight months post-intervention. Results On global knowledge of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, there were no significant differences between the intervention group and the control group in the trial pre-intervention and at the month post-intervention. However, at 8 months there were significant differences with a p-value = 0.000 (intervention group, 95% CI: 6.39 to 7.13 vs. control group, 95% CI: 4.75 to 5.92), (F (1,120)=16.644, p= 0.000). In addition, significant differences about students’ basic life support knowledge about chest compressions at eight months post-intervention (F(1,120)=15.561, p=0.000) were found. Conclusions Our study showed that incorporating the song component in the cardiopulmonary resuscitation teaching increased its effectiveness and the ability to remember the cardiopulmonary resuscitation algorithm. Our study highlights the need for different methods in the cardiopulmonary resuscitation teaching to facilitate knowledge retention and increase the number of positive outcomes after sudden cardiac arrest. PMID:27442599

  9. [The effects of antioxidants on the reflex from an eye-ground and electric activity of retina during intravitreal haemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Guliyeva, U

    2008-10-01

    The object of investigation was to study the reflex from an eye-ground, the character of the disorder of electric activity of retina during the experimental vitreous haemorrhage and the possibility of correction of these alterations by the antioxidants. The research was conducted on 5 month 300 chinchilla rabbits of male sex, weight 2.8-3.2 kg. The phenosan kali, superoxidedismutase (SOD), catalasa, "Hemaza", ditikarbomat natrium (DTKN), mannitol, tocopherol acetate, deferooxamin were used. The rabbits treated with the antioxidants complex and "Hemasa" showed the best dynamic of the restoration of the ophthalmological conditions. It was found that, vitreous haemorrhage considerably damaged the formation of ERG. Separate application of antioxidants: phenosan kali, SOD and mannitol restore the amplitude of ERG retina during intravitreal haemorrhage, not influencing the temporal parameters. The application of antioxidants complex considerably restores the amplitude characteristics, becoming close to the norm, not influencing the time of ERG parameters development.

  10. Bilateral macular haemorrhages secondary to hepatitis-associated aplastic anaemia, treated with Nd:YAG laser posterior hyaloidotomy.

    PubMed

    Ranganath, Akshatha; Mariatos, George; Thakur, Shakti

    2011-12-01

    Hepatitis-associated aplastic anaemia (HAAA) is an uncommon but distinct variant of aplastic anaemia in which pancytopenia and bone marrow failure appears 2-3 months after an acute attack of hepatitis. Although bilateral vision loss may rarely be the initial presentation of aplastic anaemia, no such report is known in HAAA. Here the authors report such a case presenting with large premacular subhyaloid haemorrhages secondary to severe anaemia and thrombocytopenia. Anaemic hypoxic damage to the vessel wall together with increased cardiac output and low platelet counts are interacting causal factors in the development of bleeding. Though these haemorrhages are benign and usually improve spontaneously, the presence of blood may cause permanent macular changes before it resolves. Posterior hyaloidotomy enabled rapid resolution of premacular subhyaloid haemorrhage thereby restoring vision and preventing need for vitreo-retinal surgery. These patients should be advised to refrain from valsalva manoeuvres, ocular rubbing and vigorous exercise to prevent ocular morbidity.

  11. Carbon dioxide production during cardiopulmonary bypass: pathophysiology, measure and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Ranucci, Marco; Carboni, Giovanni; Cotza, Mauro; de Somer, Filip

    2017-01-01

    Carbon dioxide production during cardiopulmonary bypass derives from both the aerobic metabolism and the buffering of lactic acid produced by tissues under anaerobic conditions. Therefore, carbon dioxide removal monitoring is an important measure of the adequacy of perfusion and oxygen delivery. However, routine monitoring of carbon dioxide removal is not widely applied. The present article reviews the main physiological and pathophysiological sources of carbon dioxide, the available techniques to assess carbon dioxide production and removal and the clinically relevant applications of carbon dioxide-related variables as markers of the adequacy of perfusion during cardiopulmonary bypass.

  12. Methylene Blue for Vasoplegia When on Cardiopulmonary Bypass During Double-Lung Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Carley, Michelle; Schaff, Jacob; Lai, Terrance; Poppers, Jeremy

    2015-10-15

    Vasoplegia syndrome, characterized by hypotension refractory to fluid resuscitation or high-dose vasopressors, low systemic vascular resistance, and normal-to-increased cardiac index, is associated with increased morbidity and mortality after cardiothoracic surgery. Methylene blue inhibits inducible nitric oxide synthase and guanylyl cyclase, and has been used to treat vasoplegia during cardiopulmonary bypass. However, because methylene blue is associated with increased pulmonary vascular resistance, its use in patients undergoing lung transplantion has been limited. Herein, we report the use of methylene blue to treat refractory vasoplegia during cardiopulmonary bypass in a patient undergoing double-lung transplantation.

  13. Factors influencing neurologic outcome after neonatal cardiopulmonary bypass: what we can and cannot control.

    PubMed

    Hsia, Tain-Yen; Gruber, Peter J

    2006-06-01

    Advances in cardiopulmonary bypass and surgical techniques have led to progress in the early repair of congenital heart defects in children. However, as increasing numbers survive their initial cardiac operation, an awareness is emerging that significant early and late neurologic morbidities continue to complicate otherwise successful operative repairs. Adverse neurologic outcomes after neonatal cardiac surgery are multifactorial and relate to both fixed and modifiable mechanisms. The purpose of this review is to (1) review mechanisms of brain injury after neonatal cardiopulmonary bypass, (2) examine risk factors, and (3) speculate on how investigations may improve our understanding of neurologic injury.

  14. Cardiopulmonary bypass with bivalirudin in type II heparin-induced thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Stephanie B; Acsell, Jeffrey R; Crumbley, Arthur J; Uber, Walter E

    2004-12-01

    Cardiopulmonary bypass in patients with type II heparin induced-thrombocytopenia poses significant challenges. Inadequate pharmacokinetic profiles, monitoring, reversibility, and availability often limit alternative anticoagulation strategies. Bivalirudin, a semisynthetic direct thrombin inhibitor, was recently approved for use in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary interventions. Its unique properties, including a relatively short half-life, an anticoagulation effect that closely correlates with activated clotting time, and an alternate metabolic pathway for elimination, make bivalirudin an attractive agent for cardiopulmonary bypass in patients with type II heparin induced-thrombocytopenia. We report our experience using bivalirudin in 2 patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting.

  15. Development of the roller pump for use in the cardiopulmonary bypass circuit.

    PubMed

    Cooley, D A

    1987-06-01

    In 1937, John Gibbon proposed his concept of extracorporeal circulation as an aid to cardiac surgery. Subsequently, a number of different types of pumps were tried in the extracorporeal circuit. Today, the pump used most often is a positive displacement twin roller pump, originally patented by Porter and Bradley in 1855. The rotary pump has undergone some minor modifications prior to its use in clinical cardiopulmonary bypass. Cardiovascular surgeons owe much to Porter and Bradley for an invention that has proved both efficient and effective for cardiopulmonary bypass and has allowed operations on an open heart in a relatively dry, bloodless field.

  16. Case report. Successful use of tenecteplase in massive pulmonary embolism with cardiopulmonary resuscitation immediately following tracheostomy.

    PubMed

    Abdulla, W; Netter, U

    2005-01-01

    The use of thrombolytics for the treatment of massive pulmonary embolism with cardiopulmonary resuscitation is being controversially discussed. This is one of the first reports on the successful use of tenecteplase in a 59-year-old man who survived a massive pulmonary embolism after tracheostomy followed by a 30-minute cardiopulmonary resuscitation without cerebral damage. In such a dramatic clinical event, the immediate and simple use of this modern thrombolytic appears to be a justifiable last-resort treatment option until controlled studies in sufficiently sized patient populations will have proven or refuted its efficacy and safety.

  17. Shock/shock interference on a transpiration cooled hemispherical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nowak, Robert J.; Wieting, Allan R.; Holden, Michael S.

    1990-01-01

    Experimental results are presented which show the effectiveness of transpiration cooling in reducing the peak heat flux caused by an impinging shock on a bow shock of a hemispherical model. The 12-inch diameter hemispherical transpiration model with helium coolant was tested in the Calspan 48-inch Hypersonic Shock Tunnel at nominal Mach 12.1 and freestream unit Reynolds number of 0.33 x 10 to the 6th/ft. An incident shock wave, generated by a blunt flat-plate shock generator inclined at 10 deg to the freestream, intersected the bow shock of the model to produce shock/shock interference. The stagnation heat flux without coolant or shock/shock interference was about 1.6 times a smooth surface laminar prediction due to effective roughness of the coolant ejection slots. A coolant mass flux 31 percent of the freestream mass flux reduced the stagnation heat flux to zero without shock/shock interference. However, for the same coolant mass flux and with shock/shock interference the peak heat flux was only reduced 8.3 percent, even though the total integrated heat load was reduced.

  18. Immunohistochemical detection of IgM and IgG in lung tissue of dogs with leptospiral pulmonary haemorrhage syndrome (LPHS)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leptospiral pulmonary haemorrhage syndrome (LPHS) is a severe form of leptospirosis. Pathogenic mechanisms are poorly understood. Lung tissues from 26 dogs with LPHS, 5 dogs with pulmonary haemorrhage due to other causes and 6 healthy lungs were labelled for IgG, IgM and leptospiral antigens. Three ...

  19. Design and Experimental Evaluation of a Non-Invasive Microwave Head Imaging System for Intracranial Haemorrhage Detection.

    PubMed

    Mobashsher, A T; Bialkowski, K S; Abbosh, A M; Crozier, S

    2016-01-01

    An intracranial haemorrhage is a life threatening medical emergency, yet only a fraction of the patients receive treatment in time, primarily due to the transport delay in accessing diagnostic equipment in hospitals such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging or Computed Tomography. A mono-static microwave head imaging system that can be carried in an ambulance for the detection and localization of intracranial haemorrhage is presented. The system employs a single ultra-wideband antenna as sensing element to transmit signals in low microwave frequencies towards the head and capture backscattered signals. The compact and low-profile antenna provides stable directional radiation patterns over the operating bandwidth in both near and far-fields. Numerical analysis of the head imaging system with a realistic head model in various situations is performed to realize the scattering mechanism of haemorrhage. A modified delay-and-summation back-projection algorithm, which includes effects of surface waves and a distance-dependent effective permittivity model, is proposed for signal and image post-processing. The efficacy of the automated head imaging system is evaluated using a 3D-printed human head phantom with frequency dispersive dielectric properties including emulated haemorrhages with different sizes located at different depths. Scattered signals are acquired with a compact transceiver in a mono-static circular scanning profile. The reconstructed images demonstrate that the system is capable of detecting haemorrhages as small as 1 cm3. While quantitative analyses reveal that the quality of images gradually degrades with the increase of the haemorrhage's depth due to the reduction of signal penetration inside the head; rigorous statistical analysis suggests that substantial improvement in image quality can be obtained by increasing the data samples collected around the head. The proposed head imaging prototype along with the processing algorithm demonstrates its feasibility for

  20. Anti-fibrinolytic treatment in the pre-operative management of subarachnoid haemorrhage caused by ruptured intracranial aneurysm.

    PubMed Central

    Ameen, A A; Illingworth, R

    1981-01-01

    One hundred consecutive patients treated with epsilon aminocaproic acid 24 grams daily prior to surgery for ruptured intracranial aneurysms have been compared with the previous 100 patients managed similarly but without anti-fibrinolytic drugs. No other alterations in management were made and the two series are closely comparable in all other respects. Fewer episodes of recurrent haemorrhage and deaths from this cause occurred in the treated patients, but more cases of cerebral ischaemia occurred. Neither difference is statistically significant and overall more deaths occurred in the patients treated with antifibrinolytic drugs. The value of this method of treatment in the management of aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage is questioned. PMID:7229645