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Sample records for hair cells auditory

  1. Apical phosphatidylserine externalization in auditory hair cells.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiaorui; Gillespie, Peter G; Nuttall, Alfred L

    2007-01-01

    In hair cells of the inner ear, phosphatidylserine (PS), detected with fluorescent annexin V labeling, was rapidly exposed on the external leaflet of apical plasma membranes upon dissection of the organ of Corti. PS externalization was unchanged by caspase inhibition, suggesting that externalization did not portend apoptosis or necrosis. Consistent with that conclusion, mitochondrial membrane potential and hair-cell nuclear structure remained normal during externalization. PS externalization was triggered by forskolin, which raises cAMP, and blocked by inhibitors of adenylyl cyclase. Blocking Na(+) influx by inhibiting the mechanoelectrical transduction channels and P2X ATP channels also inhibited external PS externalization. Diminished PS externalization was also seen in cells exposed to LY 294002, which blocks membrane recycling in hair cells by inhibiting phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. These results indicate that PS exposure on the external leaflet, presumably requiring vesicular transport, results from elevation of intracellular cAMP, which can be triggered by Na(+) entry into hair cells.

  2. A prestin motor in chicken auditory hair cells

    PubMed Central

    Beurg, Maryline; Tan, Xiaodong; Fettiplace, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Active force generation by outer hair cells (OHCs) underlies amplification and frequency tuning in the mammalian cochlea but whether such a process exists in non-mammals is unclear. Here we demonstrate that hair cells of the chicken auditory papilla possess an electromechanical force generator in addition to active hair bundle motion due to mechanotransducer channel gating. The properties of the force generator, its voltage-dependence and susceptibility to salicylate, as well as an associated chloride-sensitive non-linear capacitance, suggest involvement of the chicken homolog of prestin, the OHC motor protein. The presence of chicken prestin in the hair cell lateral membrane was confirmed by immunolabeling studies. The hair bundle and prestin motors together create sufficient force to produce fast lateral displacements of the tectorial membrane. Our results imply that the first use of prestin as a motor protein occurred early in amniote evolution and was not a mammalian invention as is usually supposed. PMID:23746629

  3. My oh my(osin): Insights into how auditory hair cells count, measure, and shape

    PubMed Central

    Pollock, Lana M.; Chou, Shih-Wei

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying mechanosensory hair bundle formation in auditory sensory cells are largely mysterious. In this issue, Lelli et al. (2016. J. Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201509017) reveal that a pair of molecular motors, myosin IIIa and myosin IIIb, is involved in the hair bundle’s morphology and hearing. PMID:26754648

  4. Supporting cell division is not required for regeneration of auditory hair cells after ototoxic injury in vitro.

    PubMed

    Shang, Jialin; Cafaro, Jon; Nehmer, Rachel; Stone, Jennifer

    2010-06-01

    In chickens, nonsensory supporting cells divide and regenerate auditory hair cells after injury. Anatomical evidence suggests that supporting cells can also transdifferentiate into hair cells without dividing. In this study, we characterized an organ culture model to study auditory hair cell regeneration, and we used these cultures to test if direct transdifferentiation alone can lead to significant hair cell regeneration. Control cultures (organs from posthatch chickens maintained without streptomycin) showed complete hair cell loss in the proximal (high-frequency) region by 5 days. In contrast, a 2-day treatment with streptomycin induced loss of hair cells from all regions by 3 days. Hair cell regeneration proceeded in culture, with the time course of supporting cell division and hair cell differentiation generally resembling in vivo patterns. The degree of supporting cell division depended upon the presence of streptomycin, the epithelial region, the type of culture media, and serum concentration. On average, 87% of the regenerated hair cells lacked the cell division marker BrdU despite its continuous presence, suggesting that most hair cells were regenerated via direct transdifferentiation. Addition of the DNA polymerase inhibitor aphidicolin to culture media prevented supporting cell division, but numerous hair cells were regenerated nonetheless. These hair cells showed signs of functional maturation, including stereociliary bundles and rapid uptake of FM1-43. These observations demonstrate that direct transdifferentiation is a significant mechanism of hair cell regeneration in the chicken auditory after streptomycin damage in vitro.

  5. Potassium currents in auditory hair cells of the frog basilar papilla.

    PubMed

    Smotherman, M S; Narins, P M

    1999-06-01

    The whole-cell patch-clamp technique was used to identify and characterize ionic currents in isolated hair cells of the leopard frog basilar papilla (BP). This end organ is responsible for encoding the upper limits of a frog's spectral sensitivity (1.25-2.0 kHz in the leopard frog). Isolated BP hair cells are the smallest hair cells in the frog auditory system, with spherical cell bodies typically less than 20 microm in diameter and exhibiting whole-cell capacitances of 4-7 pF. Hair cell zero-current resting potentials (Vz) varied around a mean of -65 mV. All hair cells possessed a non-inactivating, voltage-dependent calcium current (I(Ca)) that activates above a threshold of -55 mV. Similarly all hair cells possessed a rapidly activating, outward, calcium-dependent potassium current (I(K)(Ca)). Most hair cells also possessed a slowly activating, outward, voltage-dependent potassium current (I(K)), which is approximately 80% inactive at the hair cell Vz, and a fast-activating, inward-rectifying potassium current (I(K1)) which actively contributes to setting Vz. In a small subset of cells I(K) was replaced by a fast-inactivating, voltage-dependent potassium current (I(A)), which strongly resembled the A-current observed in hair cells of the frog sacculus and amphibian papilla. Most cells have very similar ionic currents, suggesting that the BP consists largely of one homogeneous population of hair cells. The kinetic properties of the ionic currents present (in particular the very slow I(K)) argue against electrical tuning, a specialized spectral filtering mechanism reported in the hair cells of birds, reptiles, and amphibians, as a contributor to frequency selectivity of this organ. Instead BP hair cells reflect a generalized strategy for the encoding of high-frequency auditory information in a primitive, mechanically tuned, terrestrial vertebrate auditory organ.

  6. Adaptation of mammalian auditory hair cell mechanotransduction is independent of calcium entry.

    PubMed

    Peng, Anthony W; Effertz, Thomas; Ricci, Anthony J

    2013-11-20

    Adaptation is a hallmark of hair cell mechanotransduction, extending the sensory hair bundle dynamic range while providing mechanical filtering of incoming sound. In hair cells responsive to low frequencies, two distinct adaptation mechanisms exist, a fast component of debatable origin and a slow myosin-based component. It is generally believed that Ca(2+) entry through mechano-electric transducer channels is required for both forms of adaptation. This study investigates the calcium dependence of adaptation in the mammalian auditory system. Recordings from rat cochlear hair cells demonstrate that altering Ca(2+) entry or internal Ca(2+) buffering has little effect on either adaptation kinetics or steady-state adaptation responses. Two additional findings include a voltage-dependent process and an extracellular Ca(2+) binding site, both modulating the resting open probability independent of adaptation. These data suggest that slow motor adaptation is negligible in mammalian auditory cells and that the remaining adaptation process is independent of calcium entry.

  7. Therapeutics for Regeneration of Fully Functional Auditory Outer Hair Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-27

    induced hearing loss ( NIHL ) affects millions of navy servicemen even when the best protective devices are used. To address the Naval Global War on...in naval servicemen who are suffering from NIHL . NIHL is primarily caused by damage to sensory outer hair cells (OHCs) of the inner ear. Thanks to...members suffering from NIHL . We proposed to utilize a new mouse model (Prestin-YFP knockin) we have recently created to sen -: en G u- cjl ncl i cl C! t

  8. Cooperative functions of Hes/Hey genes in auditory hair cell and supporting cell development.

    PubMed

    Tateya, Tomoko; Imayoshi, Itaru; Tateya, Ichiro; Ito, Juichi; Kageyama, Ryoichiro

    2011-04-15

    Notch-mediated lateral inhibition has been reported to regulate auditory hair cell and supporting cell development from common precursors. While the Notch effector genes Hes1, Hes5 and Hey1 are expressed in the developing cochlea, inactivation of either of them causes only mild abnormality, suggesting their functional redundancy. To explore the roles of Hes/Hey genes in cochlear development, we examined compound heterozygous or homozygous mutant mice that lacked Hes1, Hes5 and Hey1 alleles. We found that a reduction in Hes/Hey gene dosage led to graded increase of hair cell formation. However, if at least one allele of Hes1, Hes5 or Hey1 was intact, excessive hair cells were accompanied by overproduction of supporting cells, suggesting that the hair cell increase does not occur at the expense of supporting cells, and that each Hes/Hey gene functions to induce supporting cells. By contrast, when all alleles of Hes1, Hes5 and Hey1 were inactivated, the number of hair cells increased more drastically, whereas that of supporting cells was unchanged compared with control, suggesting that supporting cell formation was balanced by their overproduction and fate conversion into hair cells. The increase of the cell numbers seemed to occur after the prosensory domain formation in the mutants because the proliferation state and the size of the prosensory domain were not affected. Thus, Hes1, Hes5 and Hey1 cooperatively inhibit hair cell formation, and one allele of Hes1, Hes5 or Hey1 is sufficient for supporting cell production probably by lateral inhibition in the sensory epithelium. Strikingly, Hes/Hey mutations lead to disorganized cell alignment and polarity and to hearing loss despite hair cell overproduction. These results suggest that Hes/Hey gene dosage is essential not only for generation of appropriate numbers of hair cells and supporting cells by controlling cell proliferation and lateral inhibition but also for the hearing ability by regulating the cell alignment

  9. Calcium-induced calcium release supports recruitment of synaptic vesicles in auditory hair cells

    PubMed Central

    Schnee, Michael E.; Ricci, Anthony J.

    2015-01-01

    Hair cells from auditory and vestibular systems transmit continuous sound and balance information to the central nervous system through the release of synaptic vesicles at ribbon synapses. The high activity experienced by hair cells requires a unique mechanism to sustain recruitment and replenishment of synaptic vesicles for continuous release. Using pre- and postsynaptic electrophysiological recordings, we explored the potential contribution of calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) in modulating the recruitment of vesicles to auditory hair cell ribbon synapses. Pharmacological manipulation of CICR with agents targeting endoplasmic reticulum calcium stores reduced both spontaneous postsynaptic multiunit activity and the frequency of excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs). Pharmacological treatments had no effect on hair cell resting potential or activation curves for calcium and potassium channels. However, these drugs exerted a reduction in vesicle release measured by dual-sine capacitance methods. In addition, calcium substitution by barium reduced release efficacy by delaying release onset and diminishing vesicle recruitment. Together these results demonstrate a role for calcium stores in hair cell ribbon synaptic transmission and suggest a novel contribution of CICR in hair cell vesicle recruitment. We hypothesize that calcium entry via calcium channels is tightly regulated to control timing of vesicle fusion at the synapse, whereas CICR is used to maintain a tonic calcium signal to modulate vesicle trafficking. PMID:26510758

  10. Physical Limits to Auditory Transduction of Hair-Cell Bundles probed by a Biomimetic System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Taegeun; Lee, Woo Seok; Ahn, Kang-Hun

    2015-06-01

    Inspired by auditory hair cells of lower vertebrates, we design and fabricate an opto-electro-mechanical sensor at the border of its spontaneous activity, called Hopf bifurcation critical point. As proposed for biological hair cells, we observe that, as the system approaches the critical point, the frequency selectivity and the force sensitivity are enhanced. However, we find that the enhancement has limits because of its intrinsic nonlinearity, even at the critical point. We also find that the minimally detectable force is not influenced by the active feedback force despite its enhanced sensitivity. This is due to the inevitable heating of the hair bundle, which implies that the active amplification of the hair cell bundle might not lower the threshold level of detectable sound.

  11. Physical Limits to Auditory Transduction of Hair-Cell Bundles probed by a Biomimetic System

    PubMed Central

    Song, Taegeun; Lee, Woo Seok; Ahn, Kang-Hun

    2015-01-01

    Inspired by auditory hair cells of lower vertebrates, we design and fabricate an opto-electro-mechanical sensor at the border of its spontaneous activity, called Hopf bifurcation critical point. As proposed for biological hair cells, we observe that, as the system approaches the critical point, the frequency selectivity and the force sensitivity are enhanced. However, we find that the enhancement has limits because of its intrinsic nonlinearity, even at the critical point. We also find that the minimally detectable force is not influenced by the active feedback force despite its enhanced sensitivity. This is due to the inevitable heating of the hair bundle, which implies that the active amplification of the hair cell bundle might not lower the threshold level of detectable sound. PMID:26074375

  12. Progenitor cell cycling during hair cell regeneration in the vestibular and auditory epithelia of the chick.

    PubMed

    Stone, J S; Choi, Y S; Woolley, S M; Yamashita, H; Rubel, E W

    1999-01-01

    We investigated nucleotide-labeling patterns during ongoing hair cell regeneration in the avian vestibular epithelium and during drug-induced regeneration in the avian auditory epithelium. For utricle experiments, post-hatch chicks received an injection of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) and were allowed to survive from 2 hours to 110 days after the injection. Utricles were fixed and immunoreacted to detect BrdU. The number of BrdU-labeled nuclei in the hair cell and support cell layers of the utricular sensory epithelium changes significantly between 2 hours and 110 days post-BrdU. At 2 hours, most labeled cells are isolated, while by 5-10 days, the majority of labeled cells are organized in pairs that are most frequently composed of a hair cell and a support cell. Pairs of labeled cells are seen as late as 110 days. Clusters of more than 3 labeled cells are uncommon at all time-points. The total number of labeled cells increases approximately 1.5-fold between 5 and 60 days post-BrdU. This increase is due primarily to a rise in the number of labeled support cells, and it is likely that it represents additional rounds of division by a subset of cells that were labeled at the time of the BrdU injection. There is a significant decrease in labeled nuclei in the hair cell layer between 60 and 110 days post-BrdU, suggesting that hair cells die during this period. To investigate support cell recycling in the drug-damaged auditory epithelium, we examined nucleotide double labeling after separate injections of BrdU and tritiated thymidine. A small number of support cells that incorporate BrdU administered at 3 days post-gentamicin treatment also label with tritiated thymidine administered between 17 and 38 hours later. We conclude that a small population of support cells recycles during regeneration in both the normal utricle and the drug-damaged basilar papilla.

  13. Bcl-2 gene therapy prevents aminoglycoside-induced degeneration of auditory and vestibular hair cells.

    PubMed

    Pfannenstiel, Susanna C; Praetorius, Mark; Plinkert, Peter K; Brough, Douglas E; Staecker, Hinrich

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the protective effects of bcl-2, we have developed an in vivo model of gentamicin ototoxicity in C57BL/6 mice using intratympanic delivery of gentamicin. Hair cell survival was evaluated using myosin VIIa immunohistochemistry, cytocochleogram and auditory brainstem response (ABR) testing. At 10 days after gentamicin application, a consistent loss of outer hair cells was seen. Mice were pretreated with an adenovector expressing human bcl-2 (Ad.11D.bcl-2) or a control vector (Ad.11D). Seventy-two hours after vector delivery mice were treated with intratympanic gentamicin and evaluated at 10 days after ototoxin delivery. Pretreatment with Ad.11D.bcl-2 resulted in morphologic protection of hair cells and preservation of hearing thresholds measured by ABR.

  14. Hydrogen protects auditory hair cells from cisplatin-induced free radicals.

    PubMed

    Kikkawa, Yayoi S; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Taniguchi, Mirei; Ito, Juichi

    2014-09-05

    Cisplatin is a widely used chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of various malignancies. However, its maximum dose is often limited by severe ototoxicity. Cisplatin ototoxicity may require the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the inner ear by activating enzymes specific to the cochlea. Molecular hydrogen was recently established as an antioxidant that selectively reduces ROS, and has been reported to protect the central nervous system, liver, kidney and cochlea from oxidative stress. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential of molecular hydrogen to protect cochleae against cisplatin. We cultured mouse cochlear explants in medium containing various concentrations of cisplatin and examined the effects of hydrogen gas dissolved directly into the media. Following 48-h incubation, the presence of intact auditory hair cells was assayed by phalloidin staining. Cisplatin caused hair cell loss in a dose-dependent manner, whereas the addition of hydrogen gas significantly increased the numbers of remaining auditory hair cells. Additionally, hydroxyphenyl fluorescein (HPF) staining of the spiral ganglion showed that formation of hydroxyl radicals was successfully reduced in hydrogen-treated cochleae. These data suggest that molecular hydrogen can protect auditory tissues against cisplatin toxicity, thus providing an additional strategy to protect against drug-induced inner ear damage.

  15. Postnatal Refinement of Auditory Hair Cell Planar Polarity Deficits Occurs in the Absence of Vangl2

    PubMed Central

    Copley, Catherine O.; Duncan, Jeremy S.; Liu, Chang; Cheng, Haixia

    2013-01-01

    The distinctive planar polarity of auditory hair cells is evident in the polarized organization of the stereociliary bundle. Mutations in the core planar cell polarity gene Van Gogh-like 2 (Vangl2) result in hair cells that fail to properly orient their stereociliary bundles along the mediolateral axis of the cochlea. The severity of this phenotype is graded along the length of the cochlea, similar to the hair cell differentiation gradient, suggesting that an active refinement process corrects planar polarity phenotypes in Vangl2 knock-out (KO) mice. Because Vangl2 gene deletions are lethal, Vangl2 conditional knock-outs (CKOs) were generated to test this hypothesis. When crossed with Pax2–Cre, Vangl2 is deleted from the inner ear, yielding planar polarity phenotypes similar to Vangl2 KOs at late embryonic stages except that Vangl2 CKO mice are viable and do not have craniorachischisis like Vangl2 KOs. Quantification of planar polarity deficits through postnatal development demonstrates the activity of a Vangl2-independent refinement process that rescues the planar polarity phenotype within 10 d of birth. In contrast, the Pax2–Cre;Vangl2 CKO has profound changes in the shape and distribution of outer pillar cell and Deiters' cell phalangeal processes that are not corrected during the period of planar polarity refinement. Auditory brainstem response analyses of adult mice show a 10–15 dB shift in auditory threshold, and distortion product otoacoustic emission measurements indicate that this mild hearing deficit is of cochlear origin. Together, these data demonstrate a Vangl2-independent refinement mechanism that actively reorients auditory stereociliary bundles and reveals an unexpected role of Vangl2 during supporting cell morphogenesis. PMID:23986237

  16. Postnatal refinement of auditory hair cell planar polarity deficits occurs in the absence of Vangl2.

    PubMed

    Copley, Catherine O; Duncan, Jeremy S; Liu, Chang; Cheng, Haixia; Deans, Michael R

    2013-08-28

    The distinctive planar polarity of auditory hair cells is evident in the polarized organization of the stereociliary bundle. Mutations in the core planar cell polarity gene Van Gogh-like 2 (Vangl2) result in hair cells that fail to properly orient their stereociliary bundles along the mediolateral axis of the cochlea. The severity of this phenotype is graded along the length of the cochlea, similar to the hair cell differentiation gradient, suggesting that an active refinement process corrects planar polarity phenotypes in Vangl2 knock-out (KO) mice. Because Vangl2 gene deletions are lethal, Vangl2 conditional knock-outs (CKOs) were generated to test this hypothesis. When crossed with Pax2-Cre, Vangl2 is deleted from the inner ear, yielding planar polarity phenotypes similar to Vangl2 KOs at late embryonic stages except that Vangl2 CKO mice are viable and do not have craniorachischisis like Vangl2 KOs. Quantification of planar polarity deficits through postnatal development demonstrates the activity of a Vangl2-independent refinement process that rescues the planar polarity phenotype within 10 d of birth. In contrast, the Pax2-Cre;Vangl2 CKO has profound changes in the shape and distribution of outer pillar cell and Deiters' cell phalangeal processes that are not corrected during the period of planar polarity refinement. Auditory brainstem response analyses of adult mice show a 10-15 dB shift in auditory threshold, and distortion product otoacoustic emission measurements indicate that this mild hearing deficit is of cochlear origin. Together, these data demonstrate a Vangl2-independent refinement mechanism that actively reorients auditory stereociliary bundles and reveals an unexpected role of Vangl2 during supporting cell morphogenesis.

  17. 17-DMAG induces Hsp70 and protects the auditory hair cells from kanamycin ototoxicity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yun; Yu, Yang; Chu, Hanqi; Bing, Dan; Wang, Shaoli; Zhou, Liangqiang; Chen, Jin; Chen, Qingguo; Pan, Chunchen; Sun, Yanbo; Cui, Yonghua

    2015-02-19

    Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) has been known to be able to play a protective role in the cochlea. The aim of this study was to investigate whether geldanamycin hydrosoluble derivative 17-(dimethylaminoethylamino)-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-DMAG) has the ability to induce Hsp70 up-regulation to protect hair cells from kanamycin-induced ototoxicity in vitro. The organ of Corti (OC) explants were isolated from mice at postnatal day 3-5. Then, the explants were exposed to kanamycin with or without pre-incubation with 17-DMAG. The expression of Hsp70 was assessed by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, ELISA, and immunofluorescent staining. The surviving hair cells were examined by phalloidin labeling and were counted. We found that Hsp70 expression in the explants after pre-incubation with 17-DMAG was significantly increased at both mRNA and protein levels. Immunofluorescent staining showed that Hsp70 was mainly located in the auditory hair cells. Compared with kanamycin group, the loss of hair cells was inhibited significantly in 17-DMAG+kanamycin group. Our study demonstrated that 17-DMAG induces Hsp70 in the hair cells, and has a significant protective effect against kanamycin ototoxicity in vitro. 17-DMAG has the possibility to be a safe and effective anti-ototoxic drug.

  18. Manipulation of BK channel expression is sufficient to alter auditory hair cell thresholds in larval zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Rohmann, Kevin N.; Tripp, Joel A.; Genova, Rachel M.; Bass, Andrew H.

    2014-01-01

    Non-mammalian vertebrates rely on electrical resonance for frequency tuning in auditory hair cells. A key component of the resonance exhibited by these cells is an outward calcium-activated potassium current that flows through large-conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels. Previous work in midshipman fish (Porichthys notatus) has shown that BK expression correlates with seasonal changes in hearing sensitivity and that pharmacologically blocking these channels replicates the natural decreases in sensitivity during the winter non-reproductive season. To test the hypothesis that reducing BK channel function is sufficient to change auditory thresholds in fish, morpholino oligonucleotides (MOs) were used in larval zebrafish (Danio rerio) to alter expression of slo1a and slo1b, duplicate genes coding for the pore-forming α-subunits of BK channels. Following MO injection, microphonic potentials were recorded from the inner ear of larvae. Quantitative real-time PCR was then used to determine the MO effect on slo1a and slo1b expression in these same fish. Knockdown of either slo1a or slo1b resulted in disrupted gene expression and increased auditory thresholds across the same range of frequencies of natural auditory plasticity observed in midshipman. We conclude that interference with the normal expression of individual slo1 genes is sufficient to increase auditory thresholds in zebrafish larvae and that changes in BK channel expression are a direct mechanism for regulation of peripheral hearing sensitivity among fishes. PMID:24803460

  19. Seasonal plasticity of auditory hair cell frequency sensitivity correlates with plasma steroid levels in vocal fish

    PubMed Central

    Rohmann, Kevin N.; Bass, Andrew H.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Vertebrates displaying seasonal shifts in reproductive behavior provide the opportunity to investigate bidirectional plasticity in sensory function. The midshipman teleost fish exhibits steroid-dependent plasticity in frequency encoding by eighth nerve auditory afferents. In this study, evoked potentials were recorded in vivo from the saccule, the main auditory division of the inner ear of most teleosts, to test the hypothesis that males and females exhibit seasonal changes in hair cell physiology in relation to seasonal changes in plasma levels of steroids. Thresholds across the predominant frequency range of natural vocalizations were significantly less in both sexes in reproductive compared with non-reproductive conditions, with differences greatest at frequencies corresponding to call upper harmonics. A subset of non-reproductive males exhibiting an intermediate saccular phenotype had elevated testosterone levels, supporting the hypothesis that rising steroid levels induce non-reproductive to reproductive transitions in saccular physiology. We propose that elevated levels of steroids act via long-term (days to weeks) signaling pathways to upregulate ion channel expression generating higher resonant frequencies characteristic of non-mammalian auditory hair cells, thereby lowering acoustic thresholds. PMID:21562181

  20. Electrical tuning and transduction in short hair cells of the chicken auditory papilla

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Xiaodong; Beurg, Maryline; Hackney, Carole; Mahendrasingam, Shanthini

    2013-01-01

    The avian auditory papilla contains two classes of sensory receptor, tall hair cells (THCs) and short hair cells (SHCs), the latter analogous to mammalian outer hair cells with large efferent but sparse afferent innervation. Little is known about the tuning, transduction, or electrical properties of SHCs. To address this problem, we made patch-clamp recordings from hair cells in an isolated chicken basilar papilla preparation at 33°C. We found that SHCs are electrically tuned by a Ca2+-activated K+ current, their resonant frequency varying along the papilla in tandem with that of the THCs, which also exhibit electrical tuning. The tonotopic map for THCs was similar to maps previously described from auditory nerve fiber measurements. SHCs also possess an A-type K+ current, but electrical tuning was observed only at resting potentials positive to −45 mV, where the A current is inactivated. We predict that the resting potential in vivo is approximately −40 mV, depolarized by a standing inward current through mechanotransducer (MT) channels having a resting open probability of ∼0.26. The resting open probability stems from a low endolymphatic Ca2+ concentration (0.24 mM) and a high intracellular mobile Ca2+ buffer concentration, estimated from perforated-patch recordings as equivalent to 0.5 mM BAPTA. The high buffer concentration was confirmed by quantifying parvalbumin-3 and calbindin D-28K with calibrated postembedding immunogold labeling, demonstrating >1 mM calcium-binding sites. Both proteins displayed an apex-to-base gradient matching that in the MT current amplitude, which increased exponentially along the papilla. Stereociliary bundles also labeled heavily with antibodies against the Ca2+ pump isoform PMCA2a. PMID:23365177

  1. Phase-locking precision is enhanced by multiquantal release at an auditory hair cell ribbon synapse

    PubMed Central

    Li, Geng-Lin; Cho, Soyoun; von Gersdorff, Henrique

    2014-01-01

    Sound-evoked spikes in the auditory nerve can phase-lock with submillisecond precision for prolonged periods of time. However, the synaptic mechanisms that enable this accurate spike firing remain poorly understood. Using paired recordings from adult frog hair cells and their afferent fibers we show here that during sinewave stimuli EPSC failures occur even during strong stimuli. However, exclusion of EPSC failures leads to mean EPSC amplitudes that are independent of Ca2+ current. Given the intrinsic jitter in spike triggering, evoked EPSPs and spikes had surprisingly similar degrees of synchronization to a sinewave stimulus. This similarity was explained by an unexpected finding: large-amplitude multiquantal EPSCs have a significantly larger synchronization index than smaller evoked EPSCs. Large EPSPs therefore enhance the precision of spike timing. The hair cells’ unique capacity for continuous, large-amplitude, and highly synchronous multiquantal release thus underlies its ability to trigger phase-locked spikes in afferent fibers. PMID:25199707

  2. Electrically evoked auditory nerve responses in the cochlea with normal outer hair cells

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Tianying.; Guo, Menghe; He, Wenxuan; Miller, Josef M; Nuttall, Alfred L

    2010-01-01

    As hybrid cochlear implant devices are increasingly used for restoring hearing in patients with residual hearing it is important to understand electrically evoked responses in cochleae having functional hair cells. To test the hypothesis that extracochlear electrical stimulation (EES) from sinusoidal current can provoke an auditory nerve response with normal frequency selectivity, the EES-evoked compound action potential (ECAP) was investigated in this study. Brief sinusoidal electrical currents, delivered via a round window electrode, were used to evoke ECAP. The ECAP waveform was observed to be the same as the acoustically evoked CAP (ACAP), except for a shorter latency. The input/output and intensity/latency functions of ACAPs and ECAPs were also similar. The maximum acoustic masking for both ACAP and ECAP occurred near probe frequencies. Since the masked tuning curve of a CAP reflects the frequency selectivity of neural excitation, these data demonstrate a highly specific activation of the auditory nerve, which would result in high degree of frequency selectivity. This frequency selectivity likely results from the cochlear traveling wave caused by electrically stimulated outer hair cells. PMID:22034583

  3. Electrically evoked auditory nerve responses in the cochlea with normal outer hair cells.

    PubMed

    Ren, Tianying; Guo, Menghe; He, Wenxuan; Miller, Josef M; Nuttall, Alfred L

    2009-12-01

    As hybrid cochlear implant devices are increasingly used for restoring hearing in patients with residual hearing it is important to understand electrically evoked responses in cochleae having functional hair cells. To test the hypothesis that extracochlear electrical stimulation (EES) from sinusoidal current can provoke an auditory nerve response with normal frequency selectivity, the EES-evoked compound action potential (ECAP) was investigated in this study. Brief sinusoidal electrical currents, delivered via a round window electrode, were used to evoke ECAP. The ECAP waveform was observed to be the same as the acoustically evoked CAP (ACAP), except for a shorter latency. The input/output and intensity/latency functions of ACAPs and ECAPs were also similar. The maximum acoustic masking for both ACAP and ECAP occurred near probe frequencies. Since the masked tuning curve of a CAP reflects the frequency selectivity of neural excitation, these data demonstrate a highly specific activation of the auditory nerve, which would result in high degree of frequency selectivity. This frequency selectivity likely results from the cochlear traveling wave caused by electrically stimulated outer hair cells.

  4. Phylogenetic differences in calcium permeability of the auditory hair cell cholinergic nicotinic receptor

    PubMed Central

    Lipovsek, Marcela; Im, Gi Jung; Franchini, Lucía F.; Pisciottano, Francisco; Katz, Eleonora; Fuchs, Paul Albert; Elgoyhen, Ana Belén

    2012-01-01

    The α9 and α10 cholinergic nicotinic receptor subunits assemble to form the receptor that mediates efferent inhibition of hair cell function within the auditory sensory organ, a mechanism thought to modulate the dynamic range of hearing. In contrast to all nicotinic receptors, which serve excitatory neurotransmission, the activation of α9α10 produces hyperpolarization of hair cells. An evolutionary analysis has shown that the α10 subunit exhibits signatures of positive selection only along the mammalian lineage, strongly suggesting the acquisition of a unique function. To establish whether mammalian α9α10 receptors have acquired distinct functional properties as a consequence of this evolutionary pressure, we compared the properties of rat and chicken recombinant and native α9α10 receptors. Our main finding in the present work is that, in contrast to the high (pCa2+/pMonovalents ∼10) Ca2+ permeability reported for rat α9α10 receptors, recombinant and native chicken α9α10 receptors have a much lower permeability (∼2) to this cation, comparable to that of neuronal α4β2 receptors. Moreover, we show that, in contrast to α10, α7 as well as α4 and β2 nicotinic subunits are under purifying selection in vertebrates, consistent with the conserved Ca2+ permeability reported across species. These results have important consequences for the activation of signaling cascades that lead to hyperpolarization of hair cells after α9α10 gating at the cholinergic–hair cell synapse. In addition, they suggest that high Ca2+ permeability of the α9α10 cholinergic nicotinic receptor might have evolved together with other features that have given the mammalian ear an expanded high-frequency sensitivity. PMID:22371598

  5. Auditory Brainstem Response Altered in Humans With Noise Exposure Despite Normal Outer Hair Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Bramhall, Naomi F.; Konrad-Martin, Dawn; McMillan, Garnett P.; Griest, Susan E.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Recent animal studies demonstrated that cochlear synaptopathy, a partial loss of inner hair cell-auditory nerve fiber synapses, can occur in response to noise exposure without any permanent auditory threshold shift. In animal models, this synaptopathy is associated with a reduction in the amplitude of wave I of the auditory brainstem response (ABR). The goal of this study was to determine whether higher lifetime noise exposure histories in young people with clinically normal pure-tone thresholds are associated with lower ABR wave I amplitudes. Design Twenty-nine young military Veterans and 35 non Veterans (19 to 35 years of age) with normal pure-tone thresholds were assigned to 1 of 4 groups based on their self-reported lifetime noise exposure history and Veteran status. Suprathreshold ABR measurements in response to alternating polarity tone bursts were obtained at 1, 3, 4, and 6 kHz with gold foil tiptrode electrodes placed in the ear canal. Wave I amplitude was calculated from the difference in voltage at the positive peak and the voltage at the following negative trough. Distortion product otoacoustic emission input/output functions were collected in each participant at the same four frequencies to assess outer hair cell function. Results After controlling for individual differences in sex and distortion product otoacoustic emission amplitude, the groups containing participants with higher reported histories of noise exposure had smaller ABR wave I amplitudes at suprathreshold levels across all four frequencies compared with the groups with less history of noise exposure. Conclusions Suprathreshold ABR wave I amplitudes were reduced in Veterans reporting high levels of military noise exposure and in non Veterans reporting any history of firearm use as compared with Veterans and non Veterans with lower levels of reported noise exposure history. The reduction in ABR wave I amplitude in the groups with higher levels of noise exposure cannot be accounted

  6. Regulated vesicular trafficking of specific PCDH15 and VLGR1 variants in auditory hair cells.

    PubMed

    Zallocchi, Marisa; Delimont, Duane; Meehan, Daniel T; Cosgrove, Dominic

    2012-10-03

    Usher syndrome is a genetically heterogeneous disorder characterized by hearing and balance dysfunction and progressive retinitis pigmentosa. Mouse models carrying mutations for the nine Usher-associated genes have splayed stereocilia, and some show delayed maturation of ribbon synapses suggesting these proteins may play different roles in terminal differentiation of auditory hair cells. The presence of the Usher proteins at the basal and apical aspects of the neurosensory epithelia suggests the existence of regulated trafficking through specific transport proteins and routes. Immature mouse cochleae and UB/OC-1 cells were used in this work to address whether specific variants of PCDH15 and VLGR1 are being selectively transported to opposite poles of the hair cells. Confocal colocalization studies between apical and basal vesicular markers and the different PCDH15 and VLGR1 variants along with sucrose density gradients and the use of vesicle trafficking inhibitors show the existence of Usher protein complexes in at least two vesicular subpools. The apically trafficked pool colocalized with the early endosomal vesicle marker, rab5, while the basally trafficked pool associated with membrane microdomains and SNAP25. Moreover, coimmunoprecipitation experiments between SNAP25 and VLGR1 show a physical interaction of these two proteins in organ of Corti and brain. Collectively, these findings establish the existence of a differential vesicular trafficking mechanism for specific Usher protein variants in mouse cochlear hair cells, with the apical variants playing a potential role in endosomal recycling and stereocilia development/maintenance, and the basolateral variants involved in vesicle docking and/or fusion through SNAP25-mediated interactions.

  7. Short term synaptic plasticity regulates the level of olivocochlear inhibition to auditory hair cells

    PubMed Central

    Ballestero, Jimena; de San Martín, Javier Zorrilla; Goutman, Juan; Elgoyhen, Ana Belén; Fuchs, Paul A.; Katz, Eleonora

    2011-01-01

    In the mammalian inner ear, the gain control of auditory inputs is exerted by medial olivocochlear (MOC) neurons that innervate cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs). OHCs mechanically amplify the incoming sound waves by virtue of their electromotile properties while the MOC system reduces the gain of auditory inputs by inhibiting OHCs function. How this process is orchestrated at the synaptic level remains unknown. In the present study, MOC firing was evoked by electrical stimulation in an isolated mouse cochlear preparation, while OHCs postsynaptic responses were monitored by whole-cell recordings. These recordings confirmed that electrically evoked inhibitory postsynaptic currents (eIPSCs) are mediated solely by α9α10 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) functionally coupled to calcium-activated SK2 channels. Synaptic release occurred with low probability when MOC-OHC synapses were stimulated at 1Hz. However, as the stimulation frequency was raised, the reliability of release increased due to presynaptic facilitation. In addition, the relatively slow decay of eIPSCs gave rise to temporal summation at stimulation frequencies above 10 Hz. The combined effect of facilitation and summation resulted in a frequency-dependent increase in the average amplitude of inhibitory currents in OHCs. Thus, we have demonstrated that short-term plasticity is responsible for shaping MOC inhibition and, therefore, encodes the transfer function from efferent firing frequency to the gain of the cochlear amplifier. PMID:21994392

  8. Mechanical properties of the lateral cortex of mammalian auditory outer hair cells.

    PubMed Central

    Tolomeo, J A; Steele, C R; Holley, M C

    1996-01-01

    Mammalian auditory outer hair cells generate high-frequency mechanical forces that enhance sound-induced displacements of the basilar membrane within the inner ear. It has been proposed that the resulting cell deformation is directed along the longitudinal axis of the cell by the cortical cytoskeleton. We have tested this proposal by making direct mechanical measurements on outer hair cells. The resultant stiffness modulus along the axis of whole dissociated cells was 3 x 10(-3) N/m, consistent with previously published values. The resultant axial and circumferential stiffness moduli for the cortical lattice were 5 x 10(-4) N/m and 3 x 10(-3) N/m, respectively. Thus the cortical lattice is a highly orthotropic structure. Its axial stiffness is small compared with that of the intact cell, but its circumferential stiffness is within the same order of magnitude. These measurements support the theory that the cortical cytoskeleton directs electrically driven length changes along the longitudinal axis of the cell. The Young's modulus of the circumferential filamentous components of the lattice were calculated to be 1 x 10(7) N/m2. The axial cross-links, believed to be a form of spectrin, were calculated to have a Young's modulus of 3 x 10(6) N/m2. Based on the measured values for the lattice and intact cell cortex, an estimate for the resultant stiffness modulus of the plasma membrane was estimated to be on the order of 10(-3) N/m. Thus, the plasma membrane appears to be relatively stiff and may be the dominant contributor to the axial stiffness of the intact cell. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 PMID:8804625

  9. A revised model of the inner-hair cell and auditory-nerve complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumner, Christian J.; Lopez-Poveda, Enrique A.; O'Mard, Lowel P.; Meddis, Ray

    2002-05-01

    A revised computational model of the inner-hair cell (IHC) and auditory-nerve (AN) complex is presented and evaluated. Building on previous models, the algorithm is intended as a component for use in more comprehensive models of the auditory periphery. It combines smaller components that aim to be faithful to physiology in so far as is practicable and known. Transduction between cochlear mechanical motion and IHC receptor potential (RP) is simulated using a modification of an existing biophysical IHC model. Changes in RP control the opening of calcium ion channels near the synapse, and local calcium levels determine the probability of the release of neurotransmitter. AN adaptation results from transmitter depletion. The exact timing of AN action potentials is determined by the quantal and stochastic release of neurotransmitter into the cleft. The model reproduces a wide range of animal RP and AN observations. When the input to the model is taken from a suitably nonlinear simulation of the motion of the cochlear partition, the new algorithm is able to simulate the rate-intensity functions of low-, medium-, and high-spontaneous rate AN fibers in response to stimulation both at best frequency and at other frequencies. The variation in fiber type arises in large part from the manipulation of a single parameter in the model: maximum calcium conductance. The model also reproduces quantitatively phase-locking characteristics, relative refractory effects, mean-to-variance ratio, and first- and second-order discharge history effects.

  10. Frequency locking in auditory hair cells: Distinguishing between additive and parametric forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edri, Yuval; Bozovic, Dolores; Yochelis, Arik

    2016-10-01

    The auditory system displays remarkable sensitivity and frequency discrimination, attributes shown to rely on an amplification process that involves a mechanical as well as a biochemical response. Models that display proximity to an oscillatory onset (also known as Hopf bifurcation) exhibit a resonant response to distinct frequencies of incoming sound, and can explain many features of the amplification phenomenology. To understand the dynamics of this resonance, frequency locking is examined in a system near the Hopf bifurcation and subject to two types of driving forces: additive and parametric. Derivation of a universal amplitude equation that contains both forcing terms enables a study of their relative impact on the hair cell response. In the parametric case, although the resonant solutions are 1 : 1 frequency locked, they show the coexistence of solutions obeying a phase shift of π, a feature typical of the 2 : 1 resonance. Different characteristics are predicted for the transition from unlocked to locked solutions, leading to smooth or abrupt dynamics in response to different types of forcing. The theoretical framework provides a more realistic model of the auditory system, which incorporates a direct modulation of the internal control parameter by an applied drive. The results presented here can be generalized to many other media, including Faraday waves, chemical reactions, and elastically driven cardiomyocytes, which are known to exhibit resonant behavior.

  11. Changes in size and shape of auditory hair cells in vivo during noise-induced temporary threshold shift.

    PubMed

    Dew, L A; Owen, R G; Mulroy, M J

    1993-03-01

    In this study we describe changes in the size and shape of auditory hair cells of the alligator lizard in vivo during noise-induced temporary threshold shift. These changes consist of a decrease in cell volume, a decrease in cell length and an increase in cell width. We speculate that these changes are due to relaxation of cytoskeletal contractile elements and osmotic loss of intracellular water. We also describe a decrease in the surface area of the hair cell plasmalemma, and speculate that it is related to the endocytosis and intracellular accumulation of cell membrane during synaptic vesicle recycling. Finally we describe an increase in the endolymphatic surface area of the hair cell, and speculate that this could alter the micromechanics of the stereociliary tuft to attenuate the effective stimulus.

  12. ROR1 is essential for proper innervation of auditory hair cells and hearing in humans and mice

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Horta, Oscar; Abad, Clemer; Sennaroglu, Levent; Foster, Joseph; DeSmidt, Alexandra; Bademci, Guney; Tokgoz-Yilmaz, Suna; Cengiz, F. Basak; Grati, M’hamed; Fitoz, Suat; Liu, Xue Z.; Farooq, Amjad; Imtiaz, Faiqa; Currall, Benjamin B.; Morton, Cynthia Casson; Nishita, Michiru; Minami, Yasuhiro; Lu, Zhongmin; Walz, Katherina; Tekin, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Hair cells of the inner ear, the mechanosensory receptors, convert sound waves into neural signals that are passed to the brain via the auditory nerve. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms that govern the development of hair cell–neuronal connections. We ascertained a family with autosomal recessive deafness associated with a common cavity inner ear malformation and auditory neuropathy. Via whole-exome sequencing, we identified a variant (c.2207G>C, p.R736T) in ROR1 (receptor tyrosine kinase-like orphan receptor 1), cosegregating with deafness in the family and absent in ethnicity-matched controls. ROR1 is a tyrosine kinase-like receptor localized at the plasma membrane. At the cellular level, the mutation prevents the protein from reaching the cellular membrane. In the presence of WNT5A, a known ROR1 ligand, the mutated ROR1 fails to activate NF-κB. Ror1 is expressed in the inner ear during development at embryonic and postnatal stages. We demonstrate that Ror1 mutant mice are severely deaf, with preserved otoacoustic emissions. Anatomically, mutant mice display malformed cochleae. Axons of spiral ganglion neurons show fasciculation defects. Type I neurons show impaired synapses with inner hair cells, and type II neurons display aberrant projections through the cochlear sensory epithelium. We conclude that Ror1 is crucial for spiral ganglion neurons to innervate auditory hair cells. Impairment of ROR1 function largely affects development of the inner ear and hearing in humans and mice. PMID:27162350

  13. Auditory Hair Cell-Specific Deletion of p27Kip1 in Postnatal Mice Promotes Cell-Autonomous Generation of New Hair Cells and Normal Hearing

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Bradley J.; Liu, Zhiyong; Crabtree, Mark; Coak, Emily; Cox, Brandon C.

    2014-01-01

    Hearing in mammals relies upon the transduction of sound by hair cells (HCs) in the organ of Corti within the cochlea of the inner ear. Sensorineural hearing loss is a widespread and permanent disability due largely to a lack of HC regeneration in mammals. Recent studies suggest that targeting the retinoblastoma (Rb)/E2F pathway can elicit proliferation of auditory HCs. However, previous attempts to induce HC proliferation in this manner have resulted in abnormal cochlear morphology, HC death, and hearing loss. Here we show that cochlear HCs readily proliferate and survive following neonatal, HC-specific, conditional knock-out of p27Kip1 (p27CKO), a tumor suppressor upstream of Rb. Indeed, HC-specific p27CKO results in proliferation of these cells without the upregulation of the supporting cell or progenitor cell proteins, Prox1 or Sox2, suggesting that they remain HCs. Furthermore, p27CKO leads to a significant addition of postnatally derived HCs that express characteristic synaptic and stereociliary markers and survive to adulthood, although a portion of the newly derived inner HCs exhibit cytocauds and lack VGlut3 expression. Despite this, p27CKO mice exhibit normal hearing as measured by evoked auditory brainstem responses, which suggests that the newly generated HCs may contribute to, or at least do not greatly detract from, function. These results show that p27Kip1 actively maintains HC quiescence in postnatal mice, and suggest that inhibition of p27Kip1 in residual HCs represents a potential strategy for cell-autonomous auditory HC regeneration. PMID:25411503

  14. Auditory hair cell-specific deletion of p27Kip1 in postnatal mice promotes cell-autonomous generation of new hair cells and normal hearing.

    PubMed

    Walters, Bradley J; Liu, Zhiyong; Crabtree, Mark; Coak, Emily; Cox, Brandon C; Zuo, Jian

    2014-11-19

    Hearing in mammals relies upon the transduction of sound by hair cells (HCs) in the organ of Corti within the cochlea of the inner ear. Sensorineural hearing loss is a widespread and permanent disability due largely to a lack of HC regeneration in mammals. Recent studies suggest that targeting the retinoblastoma (Rb)/E2F pathway can elicit proliferation of auditory HCs. However, previous attempts to induce HC proliferation in this manner have resulted in abnormal cochlear morphology, HC death, and hearing loss. Here we show that cochlear HCs readily proliferate and survive following neonatal, HC-specific, conditional knock-out of p27(Kip1) (p27CKO), a tumor suppressor upstream of Rb. Indeed, HC-specific p27CKO results in proliferation of these cells without the upregulation of the supporting cell or progenitor cell proteins, Prox1 or Sox2, suggesting that they remain HCs. Furthermore, p27CKO leads to a significant addition of postnatally derived HCs that express characteristic synaptic and stereociliary markers and survive to adulthood, although a portion of the newly derived inner HCs exhibit cytocauds and lack VGlut3 expression. Despite this, p27CKO mice exhibit normal hearing as measured by evoked auditory brainstem responses, which suggests that the newly generated HCs may contribute to, or at least do not greatly detract from, function. These results show that p27(Kip1) actively maintains HC quiescence in postnatal mice, and suggest that inhibition of p27(Kip1) in residual HCs represents a potential strategy for cell-autonomous auditory HC regeneration.

  15. Saccular-specific hair cell addition correlates with reproductive state-dependent changes in the auditory saccular sensitivity of a vocal fish

    PubMed Central

    Coffin, Allison B.; Mohr, Robert A.; Sisneros, Joseph A.

    2012-01-01

    The plainfin midshipman fish, Porichthys notatus, is a seasonal breeding teleost fish for which vocal-acoustic communication is essential for its reproductive success. Female midshipman use the saccule as the primary end organ for hearing to detect and locate “singing” males that produce multiharmonic advertisement calls during the summer breeding season. Previous work showed that female auditory sensitivity changes seasonally with reproductive state; summer reproductive females become better suited than winter nonreproductive females to detect and encode the dominant higher harmonic components in the male’s advertisement call, which are potentially critical for mate selection and localization. Here, we test the hypothesis that these seasonal changes in female auditory sensitivity are concurrent with seasonal increases in saccular hair cell receptors. We show that there is increased hair cell density in reproductive females and that this increase is not dependent on body size since similar changes in hair cell density were not found in the other inner ear end organs. We also observed an increase in the number of small, potentially immature saccular hair bundles in reproductive females. The seasonal increase in saccular hair cell density and smaller hair bundles in reproductive females was paralleled by a dramatic increase in the magnitude of the evoked saccular potentials and a corresponding decrease in the auditory thresholds recorded from the saccule. This demonstration of correlated seasonal plasticity of hair cell addition and auditory sensitivity may in part facilitate the adaptive auditory plasticity of this species to enhance mate detection and localization during breeding. PMID:22279221

  16. Hair cell ribbon synapses

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Andreas; Lysakowski, Anna

    2010-01-01

    Hearing and balance rely on the faithful synaptic coding of mechanical input by the auditory and vestibular hair cells of the inner ear. Mechanical deflection of their stereocilia causes the opening of mechanosensitive channels, resulting in hair cell depolarization, which controls the release of glutamate at ribbon-type synapses. Hair cells have a compact shape with strong polarity. Mechanoelectrical transduction and active membrane turnover associated with stereociliar renewal dominate the apical compartment. Transmitter release occurs at several active zones along the basolateral membrane. The astonishing capability of the hair cell ribbon synapse for temporally precise and reliable sensory coding has been the subject of intense investigation over the past few years. This research has been facilitated by the excellent experimental accessibility of the hair cell. For the same reason, the hair cell serves as an important model for studying presynaptic Ca2+ signaling and stimulus-secretion coupling. In addition to common principles, hair cell synapses differ in their anatomical and functional properties among species, among the auditory and vestibular organs, and among hair cell positions within the organ. Here, we briefly review synaptic morphology and connectivity and then focus on stimulus-secretion coupling at hair cell synapses. PMID:16944206

  17. Adaptation Independent Modulation of Auditory Hair Cell Mechanotransduction Channel Open Probability Implicates a Role for the Lipid Bilayer.

    PubMed

    Peng, Anthony W; Gnanasambandam, Radhakrishnan; Sachs, Frederick; Ricci, Anthony J

    2016-03-09

    The auditory system is able to detect movement down to atomic dimensions. This sensitivity comes in part from mechanisms associated with gating of hair cell mechanoelectric transduction (MET) channels. MET channels, located at the tops of stereocilia, are poised to detect tension induced by hair bundle deflection. Hair bundle deflection generates a force by pulling on tip-link proteins connecting adjacent stereocilia. The resting open probability (P(open)) of MET channels determines the linearity and sensitivity to mechanical stimulation. Classically, P(open) is regulated by a calcium-sensitive adaptation mechanism in which lowering extracellular calcium or depolarization increases P(open). Recent data demonstrated that the fast component of adaptation is independent of both calcium and voltage, thus requiring an alternative explanation for the sensitivity of P(open) to calcium and voltage. Using rat auditory hair cells, we characterize a mechanism, separate from fast adaptation, whereby divalent ions interacting with the local lipid environment modulate resting P(open). The specificity of this effect for different divalent ions suggests binding sites that are not an EF-hand or calmodulin model. GsMTx4, a lipid-mediated modifier of cationic stretch-activated channels, eliminated the voltage and divalent sensitivity with minimal effects on adaptation. We hypothesize that the dual mechanisms (lipid modulation and adaptation) extend the dynamic range of the system while maintaining adaptation kinetics at their maximal rates.

  18. An unusually powerful mode of low-frequency sound interference due to defective hair bundles of the auditory outer hair cells.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Kazusaku; Michel, Vincent; Giraudet, Fabrice; Riederer, Brigitte; Foucher, Isabelle; Papal, Samantha; Perfettini, Isabelle; Le Gal, Sébastien; Verpy, Elisabeth; Xia, Weiliang; Seidler, Ursula; Georgescu, Maria-Magdalena; Avan, Paul; El-Amraoui, Aziz; Petit, Christine

    2014-06-24

    A detrimental perceptive consequence of damaged auditory sensory hair cells consists in a pronounced masking effect exerted by low-frequency sounds, thought to occur when auditory threshold elevation substantially exceeds 40 dB. Here, we identified the submembrane scaffold protein Nherf1 as a hair-bundle component of the differentiating outer hair cells (OHCs). Nherf1(-/-) mice displayed OHC hair-bundle shape anomalies in the mid and basal cochlea, normally tuned to mid- and high-frequency tones, and mild (22-35 dB) hearing-threshold elevations restricted to midhigh sound frequencies. This mild decrease in hearing sensitivity was, however, discordant with almost nonresponding OHCs at the cochlear base as assessed by distortion-product otoacoustic emissions and cochlear microphonic potentials. Moreover, unlike wild-type mice, responses of Nherf1(-/-) mice to high-frequency (20-40 kHz) test tones were not masked by tones of neighboring frequencies. Instead, efficient maskers were characterized by their frequencies up to two octaves below the probe-tone frequency, unusually low intensities up to 25 dB below probe-tone level, and growth-of-masker slope (2.2 dB/dB) reflecting their compressive amplification. Together, these properties do not fit the current acknowledged features of a hypersensitivity of the basal cochlea to lower frequencies, but rather suggest a previously unidentified mechanism. Low-frequency maskers, we propose, may interact within the unaffected cochlear apical region with midhigh frequency sounds propagated there via a mode possibly using the persistent contact of misshaped OHC hair bundles with the tectorial membrane. Our findings thus reveal a source of misleading interpretations of hearing thresholds and of hypervulnerability to low-frequency sound interference.

  19. Probing the pore of the auditory hair cell mechanotransducer channel in turtle

    PubMed Central

    Farris, H E; LeBlanc, C L; Goswami, J; Ricci, A J

    2004-01-01

    Hair cell mechano-electric transducer (MET) channels play a pivotal role in auditory and vestibular signal detection, yet few data exist regarding their molecular nature. Present work characterizes the MET channel pore, a region whose properties are thought to be intrinsically determined. Two approaches were used. First, the channel was probed with antagonists of candidate channel subtypes including: cyclic nucleotide-gated channels, transient receptor potential channels and gap-junctional channels. Eight new antagonists were identified. Most of the effective antagonists had a partially charged amine group predicted to penetrate the channel pore, antagonizing current flow, while the remainder of the molecule prevented further permeation of the compound through the pore. This blocking mechanism was tested using curare to demonstrate the open channel nature of the block and by identifying methylene blue as a permeant channel blocker. The second approach estimated dimensions of the channel pore with simple amine compounds. The narrowest diameter of the pore was calculated as 12.5 ± 0.8 Å and the location of a binding site ∼45% of the way through the membrane electric field was calculated. Channel length was estimated as ∼31 Å and the width of the pore mouth at < 17 Å. Each effective antagonist had a minimal diameter, measured about the penetrating amine, of less than the pore diameter, with a direct correlation between IC50 and minimal diameter. The IC50 was also directly related to the length of the amine side chains, further validating the proposed pore blocking mechanism. Data provided by these two approaches support a hypothesis regarding channel permeation and block that incorporates molecular dimensions and ion interactions within the pore. PMID:15181168

  20. Modes and regulation of endocytic membrane retrieval in mouse auditory hair cells.

    PubMed

    Neef, Jakob; Jung, Sangyong; Wong, Aaron B; Reuter, Kirsten; Pangrsic, Tina; Chakrabarti, Rituparna; Kügler, Sebastian; Lenz, Christine; Nouvian, Régis; Boumil, Rebecca M; Frankel, Wayne N; Wichmann, Carolin; Moser, Tobias

    2014-01-15

    Synaptic vesicle recycling sustains high rates of neurotransmission at the ribbon-type active zones (AZs) of mouse auditory inner hair cells (IHCs), but its modes and molecular regulation are poorly understood. Electron microscopy indicated the presence of clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) and bulk endocytosis. The endocytic proteins dynamin, clathrin, and amphiphysin are expressed and broadly distributed in IHCs. We used confocal vglut1-pHluorin imaging and membrane capacitance (Cm) measurements to study the spatial organization and dynamics of IHC exocytosis and endocytosis. Viral gene transfer expressed vglut1-pHluorin in IHCs and targeted it to synaptic vesicles. The intravesicular pH was ∼6.5, supporting only a modest increase of vglut1-pHluorin fluorescence during exocytosis and pH neutralization. Ca(2+) influx triggered an exocytic increase of vglut1-pHluorin fluorescence at the AZs, around which it remained for several seconds. The endocytic Cm decline proceeded with constant rate (linear component) after exocytosis of the readily releasable pool (RRP). When exocytosis exceeded three to four RRP equivalents, IHCs additionally recruited a faster Cm decline (exponential component) that increased with the amount of preceding exocytosis and likely reflects bulk endocytosis. The dynamin inhibitor Dyngo-4a and the clathrin blocker pitstop 2 selectively impaired the linear component of endocytic Cm decline. A missense mutation of dynamin 1 (fitful) inhibited endocytosis to a similar extent as Dyngo-4a. We propose that IHCs use dynamin-dependent endocytosis via CME to support vesicle cycling during mild stimulation but recruit bulk endocytosis to balance massive exocytosis.

  1. Canonical transient receptor potential channel subtype 3-mediated hair cell Ca(2+) entry regulates sound transduction and auditory neurotransmission.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ann Chi Yan; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Housley, Gary D

    2013-05-01

    The physiological significance of canonical transient receptor potential (TRPC) ion channels in sensory systems is rapidly emerging. Heterologous expression studies show that TRPC3 is a significant Ca(2+) entry pathway, with dual activation via G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-phospholipase C-diacylglycerol second messenger signaling, and through negative feedback, whereby a fall in cytosolic Ca(2+) releases Ca(2+) -calmodulin channel block. We hypothesised that the latter process contributes to cochlear hair cell cytosolic Ca(2+) homeostasis. Confocal microfluorimetry with the Ca(2+) indicator Fluo-4 acetoxymethylester showed that, when cytosolic Ca(2+) was depleted, Ca(2+) re-entry was significantly impaired in mature TRPC3(-/-) inner and outer hair cells. The impact of this disrupted Ca(2+) homeostasis on sound transduction was assessed with the use of distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs), which constitute a direct measure of the outer hair cell transduction that underlies hearing sensitivity and frequency selectivity. TRPC3(-/-) mice showed significantly stronger DPOAE (2f1  - f2 ) growth functions than wild-type (WT) littermates within the frequency range of best hearing acuity. This translated to hyperacusis (decreased threshold) measured by the auditory brainstem response (ABR). TRPC3(-/-) and WT mice did not differ in the levels of temporary and permanent threshold shift arising from noise exposure, indicating that potential GPCR signaling via TRPC3 is not pronounced. Overall, these data suggest that the Ca(2+) set-point in the hair cell, and hence membrane conductance, is modulated by TRPC3s through their function as a negative feedback-regulated Ca(2+) entry pathway. This TPRC3-regulated Ca(2+) homeostasis shapes the sound transduction input-output function and auditory neurotransmission.

  2. The acquisition of mechano‐electrical transducer current adaptation in auditory hair cells requires myosin VI

    PubMed Central

    Marcotti, Walter; Corns, Laura F.; Goodyear, Richard J.; Rzadzinska, Agnieszka K.; Avraham, Karen B.; Steel, Karen P.; Richardson, Guy P.

    2016-01-01

    Key points The transduction of sound into electrical signals occurs at the hair bundles atop sensory hair cells in the cochlea, by means of mechanosensitive ion channels, the mechano‐electrical transducer (MET) channels.The MET currents decline during steady stimuli; this is termed adaptation and ensures they always work within the most sensitive part of their operating range, responding best to rapidly changing (sound) stimuli.In this study we used a mouse model (Snell's waltzer) for hereditary deafness in humans that has a mutation in the gene encoding an unconventional myosin, myosin VI, which is present in the hair bundles.We found that in the absence of myosin VI the MET current fails to acquire its characteristic adaptation as the hair bundles develop.We propose that myosin VI supports the acquisition of adaptation by removing key molecules from the hair bundle that serve a temporary, developmental role. Abstract Mutations in Myo6, the gene encoding the (F‐actin) minus end‐directed unconventional myosin, myosin VI, cause hereditary deafness in mice (Snell's waltzer) and humans. In the sensory hair cells of the cochlea, myosin VI is expressed in the cell bodies and along the stereocilia that project from the cells’ apical surface. It is required for maintaining the structural integrity of the mechanosensitive hair bundles formed by the stereocilia. In this study we investigate whether myosin VI contributes to mechano‐electrical transduction. We report that Ca2+‐dependent adaptation of the mechano‐electrical transducer (MET) current, which serves to keep the transduction apparatus operating within its most sensitive range, is absent in outer and inner hair cells from homozygous Snell's waltzer mutant mice, which fail to express myosin VI. The operating range of the MET channels is also abnormal in the mutants, resulting in the absence of a resting MET current. We found that cadherin 23, a component of the hair bundle's transient lateral links

  3. Inner Hair Cell Loss Disrupts Hearing and Cochlear Function Leading to Sensory Deprivation and Enhanced Central Auditory Gain.

    PubMed

    Salvi, Richard; Sun, Wei; Ding, Dalian; Chen, Guang-Di; Lobarinas, Edward; Wang, Jian; Radziwon, Kelly; Auerbach, Benjamin D

    2016-01-01

    There are three times as many outer hair cells (OHC) as inner hair cells (IHC), yet IHC transmit virtually all acoustic information to the brain as they synapse with 90-95% of type I auditory nerve fibers. Here we review a comprehensive series of experiments aimed at determining how loss of the IHC/type I system affects hearing by selectively destroying these cells in chinchillas using the ototoxic anti-cancer agent carboplatin. Eliminating IHC/type I neurons has no effect on distortion product otoacoustic emission or the cochlear microphonic potential generated by OHC; however, it greatly reduces the summating potential produced by IHC and the compound action potential (CAP) generated by type I neurons. Remarkably, responses from remaining auditory nerve fibers maintain sharp tuning and low thresholds despite innervating regions of the cochlea with ~80% IHC loss. Moreover, chinchillas with large IHC lesions have surprisingly normal thresholds in quiet until IHC losses exceeded 80%, suggesting that only a few IHC are needed to detect sounds in quiet. However, behavioral thresholds in broadband noise are elevated significantly and tone-in-narrow band noise masking patterns exhibit greater remote masking. These results suggest the auditory system is able to compensate for considerable loss of IHC/type I neurons in quiet but not in difficult listening conditions. How does the auditory brain deal with the drastic loss of cochlear input? Recordings from the inferior colliculus found a relatively small decline in sound-evoked activity despite a large decrease in CAP amplitude after IHC lesion. Paradoxically, sound-evoked responses are generally larger than normal in the auditory cortex, indicative of increased central gain. This gain enhancement in the auditory cortex is associated with decreased GABA-mediated inhibition. These results suggest that when the neural output of the cochlea is reduced, the central auditory system compensates by turning up its gain so that

  4. Inner Hair Cell Loss Disrupts Hearing and Cochlear Function Leading to Sensory Deprivation and Enhanced Central Auditory Gain

    PubMed Central

    Salvi, Richard; Sun, Wei; Ding, Dalian; Chen, Guang-Di; Lobarinas, Edward; Wang, Jian; Radziwon, Kelly; Auerbach, Benjamin D.

    2017-01-01

    There are three times as many outer hair cells (OHC) as inner hair cells (IHC), yet IHC transmit virtually all acoustic information to the brain as they synapse with 90–95% of type I auditory nerve fibers. Here we review a comprehensive series of experiments aimed at determining how loss of the IHC/type I system affects hearing by selectively destroying these cells in chinchillas using the ototoxic anti-cancer agent carboplatin. Eliminating IHC/type I neurons has no effect on distortion product otoacoustic emission or the cochlear microphonic potential generated by OHC; however, it greatly reduces the summating potential produced by IHC and the compound action potential (CAP) generated by type I neurons. Remarkably, responses from remaining auditory nerve fibers maintain sharp tuning and low thresholds despite innervating regions of the cochlea with ~80% IHC loss. Moreover, chinchillas with large IHC lesions have surprisingly normal thresholds in quiet until IHC losses exceeded 80%, suggesting that only a few IHC are needed to detect sounds in quiet. However, behavioral thresholds in broadband noise are elevated significantly and tone-in-narrow band noise masking patterns exhibit greater remote masking. These results suggest the auditory system is able to compensate for considerable loss of IHC/type I neurons in quiet but not in difficult listening conditions. How does the auditory brain deal with the drastic loss of cochlear input? Recordings from the inferior colliculus found a relatively small decline in sound-evoked activity despite a large decrease in CAP amplitude after IHC lesion. Paradoxically, sound-evoked responses are generally larger than normal in the auditory cortex, indicative of increased central gain. This gain enhancement in the auditory cortex is associated with decreased GABA-mediated inhibition. These results suggest that when the neural output of the cochlea is reduced, the central auditory system compensates by turning up its gain so that

  5. Adaptation Independent Modulation of Auditory Hair Cell Mechanotransduction Channel Open Probability Implicates a Role for the Lipid Bilayer

    PubMed Central

    Gnanasambandam, Radhakrishnan; Sachs, Frederick

    2016-01-01

    The auditory system is able to detect movement down to atomic dimensions. This sensitivity comes in part from mechanisms associated with gating of hair cell mechanoelectric transduction (MET) channels. MET channels, located at the tops of stereocilia, are poised to detect tension induced by hair bundle deflection. Hair bundle deflection generates a force by pulling on tip-link proteins connecting adjacent stereocilia. The resting open probability (Popen) of MET channels determines the linearity and sensitivity to mechanical stimulation. Classically, Popen is regulated by a calcium-sensitive adaptation mechanism in which lowering extracellular calcium or depolarization increases Popen. Recent data demonstrated that the fast component of adaptation is independent of both calcium and voltage, thus requiring an alternative explanation for the sensitivity of Popen to calcium and voltage. Using rat auditory hair cells, we characterize a mechanism, separate from fast adaptation, whereby divalent ions interacting with the local lipid environment modulate resting Popen. The specificity of this effect for different divalent ions suggests binding sites that are not an EF-hand or calmodulin model. GsMTx4, a lipid-mediated modifier of cationic stretch-activated channels, eliminated the voltage and divalent sensitivity with minimal effects on adaptation. We hypothesize that the dual mechanisms (lipid modulation and adaptation) extend the dynamic range of the system while maintaining adaptation kinetics at their maximal rates. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Classically, changes in extracellular calcium and voltage affect open probability (Popen) through mechanoelectric transduction adaptation, and this mechanism is the only means of controlling the set point of the channel. Here, we further characterize the effects of extracellular calcium and voltage on the channel and for the first time determine that these manipulations occur through a mechanism that is independent of fast adaptation

  6. Remodeling of the Inner Hair Cell Microtubule Meshwork in a Mouse Model of Auditory Neuropathy AUNA1

    PubMed Central

    Surel, Clément; Guillet, Marie; Lenoir, Marc; Bourien, Jérôme; Sendin, Gaston; Joly, Willy; Delprat, Benjamin; Lesperance, Marci M.; Puel, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Auditory neuropathy 1 (AUNA1) is a form of human deafness resulting from a point mutation in the 5′ untranslated region of the Diaphanous homolog 3 (DIAPH3) gene. Notably, the DIAPH3 mutation leads to the overexpression of the DIAPH3 protein, a formin family member involved in cytoskeleton dynamics. Through study of diap3-overexpressing transgenic (Tg) mice, we examine in further detail the anatomical, functional, and molecular mechanisms underlying AUNA1. We identify diap3 as a component of the hair cells apical pole in wild-type mice. In the diap3-overexpressing Tg mice, which show a progressive threshold shift associated with a defect in inner hair cells (IHCs), the neurotransmitter release and potassium conductances are not affected. Strikingly, the overexpression of diap3 results in a selective and early-onset alteration of the IHC cuticular plate. Molecular dissection of the apical components revealed that the microtubule meshwork first undergoes aberrant targeting into the cuticular plate of Tg IHCs, followed by collapse of the stereociliary bundle, with eventual loss of the IHC capacity to transmit incoming auditory stimuli. PMID:28058271

  7. Developmental regulation of planar cell polarity and hair-bundle morphogenesis in auditory hair cells: lessons from human and mouse genetics.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaowei; Sipe, Conor W

    2016-01-01

    Hearing loss is the most common and costly sensory defect in humans and genetic causes underlie a significant proportion of affected individuals. In mammals, sound is detected by hair cells (HCs) housed in the cochlea of the inner ear, whose function depends on a highly specialized mechanotransduction organelle, the hair bundle. Understanding the factors that regulate the development and functional maturation of the hair bundle is crucial for understanding the pathophysiology of human deafness. Genetic analysis of deafness genes in animal models, together with complementary forward genetic screens and conditional knock-out mutations in essential genes, have provided great insights into the molecular machinery underpinning hair-bundle development and function. In this review, we highlight recent advances in our understanding of hair-bundle morphogenesis, with an emphasis on the molecular pathways governing hair-bundle polarity and orientation. We next discuss the proteins and structural elements important for hair-cell mechanotransduction as well as hair-bundle cohesion and maintenance. In addition, developmental signals thought to regulate tonotopic features of HCs are introduced. Finally, novel approaches that complement classic genetics for studying the molecular etiology of human deafness are presented. WIREs Dev Biol 2016, 5:85-101. doi: 10.1002/wdev.202 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  8. Elementary properties of Ca2+ channels and their influence on multivesicular release and phase-locking at auditory hair cell ribbon synapses

    PubMed Central

    Magistretti, Jacopo; Spaiardi, Paolo; Johnson, Stuart L.; Masetto, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium (Cav1.3) channels in mammalian inner hair cells (IHCs) open in response to sound and the resulting Ca2+ entry triggers the release of the neurotransmitter glutamate onto afferent terminals. At low to mid sound frequencies cell depolarization follows the sound sinusoid and pulses of transmitter release from the hair cell generate excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) in the afferent fiber that translate into a phase-locked pattern of action potential activity. The present article summarizes our current understanding on the elementary properties of single IHC Ca2+ channels, and how these could have functional implications for certain, poorly understood, features of synaptic transmission at auditory hair cell ribbon synapses. PMID:25904847

  9. Steady-State Adaptation of Mechanotransduction Modulates the Resting Potential of Auditory Hair Cells, Providing an Assay for Endolymph [Ca2+

    PubMed Central

    Farris, Hamilton E.; Wells, Gregg B.; Ricci, Anthony J.

    2007-01-01

    The auditory hair cell resting potential is critical for proper translation of acoustic signals to the CNS, because it determines their filtering properties, their ability to respond to stimuli of both polarities, and, because the hair cell drives afferent firing rates, the resting potential dictates spontaneous transmitter release. In turtle auditory hair cells, the filtering properties are established by the interactions between BK calcium-activated potassium channels and an L-type calcium channel (electrical resonance). However, both theoretical and in vitro recordings indicate that a third conductance is required to set the resting potential to a point on the ICa and IBK activation curves in which filtering is optimized like that found in vivo. Present data elucidate a novel mechanism, likely universal among hair cells, in which mechanoelectric transduction (MET) and its calcium-dependent adaptation provide the depolarizing current to establish the hair cell resting potential. First, mechanical block of the MET current hyperpolarized the membrane potential, resulting in broadband asymmetrical resonance. Second, altering steady-state adaptation by altering the [Ca2+] bathing the hair bundle changed the MET current at rest, the magnitude of which resulted in membrane potential changes that encompassed the best resonant voltage. The Ca2+ sensitivity of adaptation allowed for the first physiological estimate of endolymphatic Ca2+ near the MET channel (56 ±11μM), a value similar to bulk endolymph levels. These effects of MET current on resting potential were independently confirmed using a theoretical model of electrical resonance that included the steady-state MET conductance. PMID:17135414

  10. The glutamate receptor subunit delta1 is highly expressed in hair cells of the auditory and vestibular systems.

    PubMed

    Safieddine, S; Wenthold, R J

    1997-10-01

    In the inner ear, fast excitatory synaptic transmission is mediated by ionotropic glutamate receptors, including AMPA, kainate, and NMDA receptors. The recently identified delta1 and delta2 glutamate receptors share low homology with the other three types, and no clear response or ligand binding has been obtained from cells transfected with delta alone or in combination with other ionotropic receptors. Studies of mice lacking expression of delta2 show that this subunit plays a crucial role in plasticity of cerebellar glutamatergic synapses. In addition, these mice show a deficit in vestibular compensation. These findings and the nature of glutamatergic synapses between vestibulocochlear hair cells and primary afferent dendrites suggest that delta receptors may be functionally important in the inner ear and prompted us to investigate the expression of delta receptors in the cochlea and peripheral vestibular system. Reverse transcription and DNA amplification by PCR combined with immunocytochemistry and in situ hybridization were used. Our results show that the expression of delta1 in the organ of Corti is intense and restricted to the inner hair cells, whereas delta1 is expressed in all spiral ganglion neurons as well as in their satellite glial cells. In the vestibular end organ, delta1 was highly expressed in both hair cell types and also was expressed in the vestibular ganglion neurons. The prominent expression of delta1 in inner hair cells and in type I and type II vestibular hair cells suggests a functional role in hair cell neurotransmission.

  11. Expression of amyloid-β in mouse cochlear hair cells causes an early-onset auditory defect in high-frequency sound perception.

    PubMed

    Omata, Yasuhiro; Tharasegaran, Suganya; Lim, Young-Mi; Yamasaki, Yasutoyo; Ishigaki, Yasuhito; Tatsuno, Takanori; Maruyama, Mitsuo; Tsuda, Leo

    2016-03-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that defects in the sensory system are highly correlated with age-related neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). This raises the possibility that sensory cells possess some commonalities with neurons and may provide a tool for studying AD. The sensory system, especially the auditory system, has the advantage that depression in function over time can easily be measured with electrophysiological methods. To establish a new mouse AD model that takes advantage of this benefit, we produced transgenic mice expressing amyloid-β (Aβ), a causative element for AD, in their auditory hair cells. Electrophysiological assessment indicated that these mice had hearing impairment, specifically in high-frequency sound perception (>32 kHz), at 4 months after birth. Furthermore, loss of hair cells in the basal region of the cochlea, which is known to be associated with age-related hearing loss, appeared to be involved in this hearing defect. Interestingly, overexpression of human microtubule-associated protein tau, another factor in AD development, synergistically enhanced the Aβ-induced hearing defects. These results suggest that our new system reflects some, if not all, aspects of AD progression and, therefore, could complement the traditional AD mouse model to monitor Aβ-induced neuronal dysfunction quantitatively over time.

  12. Deletion of SLC19A2, the high affinity thiamine transporter, causes selective inner hair cell loss and an auditory neuropathy phenotype.

    PubMed

    Liberman, M C; Tartaglini, E; Fleming, J C; Neufeld, E J

    2006-09-01

    Mutations in the gene coding for the high-affinity thiamine transporter Slc19a2 underlie the clinical syndrome known as thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia (TRMA) characterized by anemia, diabetes, and sensorineural hearing loss. To create a mouse model of this disease, a mutant line was created with targeted disruption of the gene. Cochlear function is normal in these mutants when maintained on a high-thiamine diet. When challenged with a low-thiamine diet, Slc19a2-null mice showed 40-60 dB threshold elevations by auditory brainstem response (ABR), but only 10-20 dB elevation by otoacoustic emission (OAE) measures. Wild-type mice retain normal hearing on either diet. Cochlear histological analysis showed a pattern uncommon for sensorineural hearing loss: selective loss of inner hair cells after 1-2 weeks on low thiamine and significantly greater inner than outer hair cell loss after longer low-thiamine challenges. Such a pattern is consistent with the observed discrepancy between ABR and OAE threshold shifts. The possible role of thiamine transport in other reported cases of selective inner hair cell loss is considered.

  13. Response properties from turtle auditory hair cell afferent fibers suggest spike generation is driven by synchronized release both between and within synapses

    PubMed Central

    Schnee, M. E.; Castellano-Muñoz, M.

    2013-01-01

    Inner ear hair cell afferent fiber synapses are capable of transferring information at high rates for long periods of time with extraordinary fidelity. As at other sensory synapses, hair cells rely on graded receptor potentials and unique vesicle trafficking and release properties of ribbon synapses to relay intensity information. Postsynaptic recordings from afferent fibers of the turtle auditory papilla identified excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) that were fast AMPA receptor-based responses with rapid onset and decay times. EPSCs varied in amplitude by ∼15× per fiber, with kinetics that showed a tendency to slow at larger amplitudes. Complex EPSCs were produced by temporal summation of single events, likely across synapses. Complex EPSCs were more efficient at generating action potentials than single EPSCs. Potassium-evoked release increased the frequency of EPSCs, in particular complex events, but did not increase EPSC amplitudes. Temporal summation of EPSCs across synapses may underlie action potential generation at these synapses. Broad amplitude histograms were probed for mechanisms of multivesicular release with reduced external Ca2+ or the introduction of Cd2+ or Sr2+ to uncouple release. The results are consistent with broad amplitude histograms being generated by a combination of the variability in synaptic vesicle size and coordinated release of these vesicles. It is posited that multivesicular release plays less of a role in multisynaptic ribbon synapses than in single synaptic afferent fibers. PMID:23596330

  14. Response properties from turtle auditory hair cell afferent fibers suggest spike generation is driven by synchronized release both between and within synapses.

    PubMed

    Schnee, M E; Castellano-Muñoz, M; Ricci, A J

    2013-07-01

    Inner ear hair cell afferent fiber synapses are capable of transferring information at high rates for long periods of time with extraordinary fidelity. As at other sensory synapses, hair cells rely on graded receptor potentials and unique vesicle trafficking and release properties of ribbon synapses to relay intensity information. Postsynaptic recordings from afferent fibers of the turtle auditory papilla identified excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) that were fast AMPA receptor-based responses with rapid onset and decay times. EPSCs varied in amplitude by ≈ 15× per fiber, with kinetics that showed a tendency to slow at larger amplitudes. Complex EPSCs were produced by temporal summation of single events, likely across synapses. Complex EPSCs were more efficient at generating action potentials than single EPSCs. Potassium-evoked release increased the frequency of EPSCs, in particular complex events, but did not increase EPSC amplitudes. Temporal summation of EPSCs across synapses may underlie action potential generation at these synapses. Broad amplitude histograms were probed for mechanisms of multivesicular release with reduced external Ca(2+) or the introduction of Cd(2+) or Sr(2+) to uncouple release. The results are consistent with broad amplitude histograms being generated by a combination of the variability in synaptic vesicle size and coordinated release of these vesicles. It is posited that multivesicular release plays less of a role in multisynaptic ribbon synapses than in single synaptic afferent fibers.

  15. Noise exposure modulates cochlear inner hair cell ribbon volumes, correlating with changes in auditory measures in the FVB/nJ mouse

    PubMed Central

    Paquette, Stephen T.; Gilels, Felicia; White, Patricia M.

    2016-01-01

    Cochlear neuropathy resulting from unsafe noise exposure is a life altering condition that affects many people. This hearing dysfunction follows a conserved mechanism where inner hair cell synapses are lost, termed cochlear synaptopathy. Here we investigate cochlear synaptopathy in the FVB/nJ mouse strain as a prelude for the investigation of candidate genetic mutations for noise damage susceptibility. We used measurements of auditory brainstem response (ABR) and distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE) to assess hearing recovery in FVB/nJ mice exposed to two different noise levels. We also utilized confocal fluorescence microscopy in mapped whole mount cochlear tissue, in conjunction with deconvolution and three-dimensional modeling, to analyze numbers, volumes and positions of paired synaptic components. We find evidence for significant synapse reorganization in response to both synaptopathic and sub-synaptopathic noise exposures in FVB/nJ. Specifically, we find that the modulation in volume of very small synaptic ribbons correlates with the presence of reduced ABR peak one amplitudes in both levels of noise exposures. These experiments define the use of FVB/nJ mice for further genetic investigations into the mechanisms of noise damage. They further suggest that in the cochlea, neuronal-inner hair cell connections may dynamically reshape as part of the noise response. PMID:27162161

  16. Noise exposure modulates cochlear inner hair cell ribbon volumes, correlating with changes in auditory measures in the FVB/nJ mouse.

    PubMed

    Paquette, Stephen T; Gilels, Felicia; White, Patricia M

    2016-05-10

    Cochlear neuropathy resulting from unsafe noise exposure is a life altering condition that affects many people. This hearing dysfunction follows a conserved mechanism where inner hair cell synapses are lost, termed cochlear synaptopathy. Here we investigate cochlear synaptopathy in the FVB/nJ mouse strain as a prelude for the investigation of candidate genetic mutations for noise damage susceptibility. We used measurements of auditory brainstem response (ABR) and distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE) to assess hearing recovery in FVB/nJ mice exposed to two different noise levels. We also utilized confocal fluorescence microscopy in mapped whole mount cochlear tissue, in conjunction with deconvolution and three-dimensional modeling, to analyze numbers, volumes and positions of paired synaptic components. We find evidence for significant synapse reorganization in response to both synaptopathic and sub-synaptopathic noise exposures in FVB/nJ. Specifically, we find that the modulation in volume of very small synaptic ribbons correlates with the presence of reduced ABR peak one amplitudes in both levels of noise exposures. These experiments define the use of FVB/nJ mice for further genetic investigations into the mechanisms of noise damage. They further suggest that in the cochlea, neuronal-inner hair cell connections may dynamically reshape as part of the noise response.

  17. Effects of rates of spontaneous synaptic vesicle secretions in inner hair cells on information transmission in an auditory nerve fiber model.

    PubMed

    Kumsa, Parichat; Mino, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we investigate how the rates of spontaneous synaptic vesicle secretions affect information transmission of the spike trains in response to the inner hair cell (IHC) synaptic currents in an auditory nerve fiber (ANF) model through computer simulations. The IHC synaptic currents were modeled by a filtered inhomogeneous Poisson process modulated with sinusoidal functions, while the stochastic ion channel model was incorporated into each node of Ranvier in the ANF model with spiral ganglion. The information rates were estimated from the entropies of the inter-spike intervals of the spike trains to evaluate information transmission in the ANF model. The results show that the information rates increased, reached a maximum, and then decreased as the rate of spontaneous secretion increased, implying a resonance phenomenon dependent on the rate of spontaneous IHC synaptic secretions. In conclusion, this phenomenon similar to the regular stochastic resonance may be observed due to that spontaneous IHC synaptic secretions may act as an origin of fluctuation or noise, and these findings may play a key role in the design of better auditory prostheses.

  18. Comparative transduction mechanisms of hair cells in the bullfrog uticulus. 2: Sensitivity and response dynamics to hair bundle displacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, Richard A.

    1994-01-01

    The present study was motivated by an interest in seeing whether hair cell types in the bullfrog utriculus might differ in their voltage responses to hair bundle displacement. Particular interest was in assessing the contributions of two factors to the responses of utricular hair cells. First, interest in examining the effect of hair bundle morphology on the sensitivity of hair cells to natural stimulation was motivated by the observation that vestibular hair cells, unlike many auditory hair cells, are not free-standing but rather linked to an accessory cupular or otolithic membrane via the tip of their kinocilium. Interest also laid in examining the contribution, if any, of adaptation to the response properties of utricular hair cells. Hair cells in auditory and vibratory inner ear endorgans adapt to maintained displacements of their hair bundles, sharply limiting their low frequency sensitivity. This adaptation is mediated by a shift in the displacement-response curve (DRC) of the hair cell along the displacement axis. Observations suggest that the adaptation process occurs within the hair bundle and precedes mechanoelectric transduction. Recent observations of time-dependent changes in hair bundle stiffness are consistent with this conclusion. Adaptation would be expected to be most useful in inner ear endorgans in which hair cells are subject to large static displacements that could potentially saturate their instantaneous response and compromise their sensitivity to high frequency stimulation. The adaptation process also permits hair cells to maintain their sensory hair bundle in the most sensitive portion of their DRC. In vestibular otolith organs in which static sensitivity is desirable, any adaptation process in the hair cells may be undesirable. The rate and extent of the decline of the voltage responses was measured of utricular hair cells to step and sinusoidal hair bundle displacements. Then for similar resting potentials and response amplitudes, the

  19. ILDR1 null mice, a model of human deafness DFNB42, show structural aberrations of tricellular tight junctions and degeneration of auditory hair cells.

    PubMed

    Morozko, Eva L; Nishio, Ayako; Ingham, Neil J; Chandra, Rashmi; Fitzgerald, Tracy; Martelletti, Elisa; Borck, Guntram; Wilson, Elizabeth; Riordan, Gavin P; Wangemann, Philine; Forge, Andrew; Steel, Karen P; Liddle, Rodger A; Friedman, Thomas B; Belyantseva, Inna A

    2015-02-01

    In the mammalian inner ear, bicellular and tricellular tight junctions (tTJs) seal the paracellular space between epithelial cells. Tricellulin and immunoglobulin-like (Ig-like) domain containing receptor 1 (ILDR1, also referred to as angulin-2) localize to tTJs of the sensory and non-sensory epithelia in the organ of Corti and vestibular end organs. Recessive mutations of TRIC (DFNB49) encoding tricellulin and ILDR1 (DFNB42) cause human nonsyndromic deafness. However, the pathophysiology of DFNB42 deafness remains unknown. ILDR1 was recently reported to be a lipoprotein receptor mediating the secretion of the fat-stimulated cholecystokinin (CCK) hormone in the small intestine, while ILDR1 in EpH4 mouse mammary epithelial cells in vitro was shown to recruit tricellulin to tTJs. Here we show that two different mouse Ildr1 mutant alleles have early-onset severe deafness associated with a rapid degeneration of cochlear hair cells (HCs) but have a normal endocochlear potential. ILDR1 is not required for recruitment of tricellulin to tTJs in the cochlea in vivo; however, tricellulin becomes mislocalized in the inner ear sensory epithelia of ILDR1 null mice after the first postnatal week. As revealed by freeze-fracture electron microscopy, ILDR1 contributes to the ultrastructure of inner ear tTJs. Taken together, our data provide insight into the pathophysiology of human DFNB42 deafness and demonstrate that ILDR1 is crucial for normal hearing by maintaining the structural and functional integrity of tTJs, which are critical for the survival of auditory neurosensory HCs.

  20. Auditory system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ades, H. W.

    1973-01-01

    The physical correlations of hearing, i.e. the acoustic stimuli, are reported. The auditory system, consisting of external ear, middle ear, inner ear, organ of Corti, basilar membrane, hair cells, inner hair cells, outer hair cells, innervation of hair cells, and transducer mechanisms, is discussed. Both conductive and sensorineural hearing losses are also examined.

  1. All Akt Isoforms (Akt1, Akt2, Akt3) Are Involved in Normal Hearing, but Only Akt2 and Akt3 Are Involved in Auditory Hair Cell Survival in the Mammalian Inner Ear

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Yves; Levano, Soledad; Radojevic, Vesna; Naldi, Arianne Monge; Setz, Cristian; Ryan, Allen F.; Pak, Kwang; Hemmings, Brian A.; Bodmer, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The kinase Akt is a key downstream mediator of the phosphoinositide-3-kinase signaling pathway and participates in a variety of cellular processes. Akt comprises three isoforms each encoded by a separate gene. There is evidence to indicate that Akt is involved in the survival and protection of auditory hair cells in vitro. However, little is known about the physiological role of Akt in the inner ear—especially in the intact animal. To elucidate this issue, we first analyzed the mRNA expression of the three Akt isoforms in the inner ear of C57/BL6 mice by real-time PCR. Next, we tested the susceptibility to gentamicin-induced auditory hair cell loss in isoform-specific Akt knockout mice compared to wild-types (C57/BL6) in vitro. To analyze the effect of gene deletion in vivo, hearing and cochlear microanatomy were evaluated in Akt isoform knockout animals. In this study, we found that all three Akt isoforms are expressed in the cochlea. Our results further indicate that Akt2 and Akt3 enhance hair cell resistance to ototoxicity, while Akt1 does not. Finally, we determined that untreated Akt1 and Akt2/Akt3 double knockout mice display significant hearing loss, indicating a role for these isoforms in normal hearing. Taken together, our results indicate that each of the Akt isoforms plays a distinct role in the mammalian inner ear. PMID:25811375

  2. Sensory transduction: the 'swarm intelligence' of auditory hair bundles.

    PubMed

    Albert, Jörg

    2011-08-23

    In vertebrate hair cells, the hair bundle is responsible for the conversion of mechanical vibrations into electrical signals. In a combined experimental and computational tour de force, a group of researchers now presents a quantitative model that explains how the bundle's specific microarchitecture gives rise to its exquisite mechanosensory properties.

  3. Relationship Between Hair Cell Loss and Hearing Loss in Fishes.

    PubMed

    Smith, Michael E

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to intense sound or ototoxic chemicals can damage the auditory hair cells of vertebrates, resulting in hearing loss. Although the relationship between such hair cell damage and auditory function is fairly established for terrestrial vertebrates, there are limited data available to understand this relationship in fishes. Although investigators have measured either the morphological damage of the inner ear or the functional deficits in the hearing of fishes, very few have directly measured both in an attempt to find a relationship between the two. Those studies that have examined both auditory hair cell damage in the inner ear and the resulting hearing loss in fishes are reviewed here. In general, there is a significant linear relationship between the number of hair cells lost and the severity of hearing threshold shifts, although this varies between species and different hair cell-damaging stimuli. After trauma to the fish ear, auditory hair cells are able to regenerate to control level densities. With this regeneration also comes a restoration of hearing. Thus there is also a significant relationship between hair cell recovery and hearing recovery in fishes.

  4. Notch Signaling Limits Supporting Cell Plasticity in the Hair Cell-Damaged Early Postnatal Murine Cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Korrapati, Soumya; Roux, Isabelle; Glowatzki, Elisabeth; Doetzlhofer, Angelika

    2013-01-01

    In mammals, auditory hair cells are generated only during embryonic development and loss or damage to hair cells is permanent. However, in non-mammalian vertebrate species, such as birds, neighboring glia-like supporting cells regenerate auditory hair cells by both mitotic and non-mitotic mechanisms. Based on work in intact cochlear tissue, it is thought that Notch signaling might restrict supporting cell plasticity in the mammalian cochlea. However, it is unresolved how Notch signaling functions in the hair cell-damaged cochlea and the molecular and cellular changes induced in supporting cells in response to hair cell trauma are poorly understood. Here we show that gentamicin-induced hair cell loss in early postnatal mouse cochlear tissue induces rapid morphological changes in supporting cells, which facilitate the sealing of gaps left by dying hair cells. Moreover, we provide evidence that Notch signaling is active in the hair cell damaged cochlea and identify Hes1, Hey1, Hey2, HeyL, and Sox2 as targets and potential Notch effectors of this hair cell-independent mechanism of Notch signaling. Using Cre/loxP based labeling system we demonstrate that inhibition of Notch signaling with a γ- secretase inhibitor (GSI) results in the trans-differentiation of supporting cells into hair cell-like cells. Moreover, we show that these hair cell-like cells, generated by supporting cells have molecular, cellular, and basic electrophysiological properties similar to immature hair cells rather than supporting cells. Lastly, we show that the vast majority of these newly generated hair cell-like cells express the outer hair cell specific motor protein prestin. PMID:24023676

  5. Class III myosins shape the auditory hair bundles by limiting microvilli and stereocilia growth

    PubMed Central

    Lelli, Andrea; Michel, Vincent; Boutet de Monvel, Jacques; Cortese, Matteo; Bosch-Grau, Montserrat; Aghaie, Asadollah; Perfettini, Isabelle; Dupont, Typhaine; Avan, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The precise architecture of hair bundles, the arrays of mechanosensitive microvilli-like stereocilia crowning the auditory hair cells, is essential to hearing. Myosin IIIa, defective in the late-onset deafness form DFNB30, has been proposed to transport espin-1 to the tips of stereocilia, thereby promoting their elongation. We show that Myo3a−/−Myo3b−/− mice lacking myosin IIIa and myosin IIIb are profoundly deaf, whereas Myo3a-cKO Myo3b−/− mice lacking myosin IIIb and losing myosin IIIa postnatally have normal hearing. Myo3a−/−Myo3b−/− cochlear hair bundles display robust mechanoelectrical transduction currents with normal kinetics but show severe embryonic abnormalities whose features rapidly change. These include abnormally tall and numerous microvilli or stereocilia, ungraded stereocilia bundles, and bundle rounding and closure. Surprisingly, espin-1 is properly targeted to Myo3a−/−Myo3b−/− stereocilia tips. Our results uncover the critical role that class III myosins play redundantly in hair-bundle morphogenesis; they unexpectedly limit the elongation of stereocilia and of subsequently regressing microvilli, thus contributing to the early hair bundle shaping. PMID:26754646

  6. Cell transplantation to the auditory nerve and cochlear duct.

    PubMed

    Sekiya, Tetsuji; Kojima, Ken; Matsumoto, Masahiro; Kim, Tae-Soo; Tamura, Tetsuya; Ito, Juichi

    2006-03-01

    We have developed a technique to deliver cells to the inner ear without injuring the membranes that seal the endolymphatic and perilymphatic chambers. The integrity of these membranes is essential for normal hearing, and the technique should significantly reduce surgical trauma during cell transplantation. Embryonic stem cells transplanted at the internal auditory meatal portion of an atrophic auditory nerve migrated extensively along it. Four-five weeks after transplantation, the cells were found not only throughout the auditory nerve, but also in Rosenthal's canal and the scala media, the most distal portion of the auditory nervous system where the hair cells reside. Migration of the transplanted cells was more extensive following damage to the auditory nerve. In the undamaged nerve, migration was more limited, but the cells showed more signs of neuronal differentiation. This highlights an important balance between tissue damage and the potential for repair.

  7. Hair cell regeneration: Look to the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubel, Edwin W.

    2005-04-01

    Less than 2 decades ago it was discovered that birds can regenerate hair cells in the auditory and vestibular parts of the inner ear after the native hair cells are destroyed by exposure to excessive noise or by mechanical trauma of aminoglycoside antibiotics. This discovery issued in a new era of hearing research-it suggested that some day it may be possible to actually restore hearing in people with congenital or acquired hearing loss due to the degeneration of sensory cells or supporting cells in the inner ear. Fifteen years is a very short time in the history of science. Consider the fact that we have actively sought chemical treatments to prevent or cure cancers for well over a half century and the ``war on Cancer,'' resulted in enormous public and private support. Progress has been great, and some forms of cancer can be treated with great success, but the overall 5-year survival rates have only risen from about 50% to 63%. Progress will continue and many more forms of cancer will be cured and prevented during the next half century. Similarly, during the first 15 years of hair cell regeneration research enormous progress has been made, and we now know that postnatal mammalian ears have the capacity to produce new hair cells. We are indeed a long way from restoring hearing through hair cell regeneration, but the future is pretty clear. I will review the progress of this field with an eye toward the future and what it means for treatments of today. In particular, I will address the potential cost versus benefits of bilateral implantation when applied to babies and young children.

  8. Transfer characteristics of the hair cell's afferent synapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keen, Erica C.; Hudspeth, A. J.

    2006-04-01

    The sense of hearing depends on fast, finely graded neurotransmission at the ribbon synapses connecting hair cells to afferent nerve fibers. The processing that occurs at this first chemical synapse in the auditory pathway determines the quality and extent of the information conveyed to the central nervous system. Knowledge of the synapse's input-output function is therefore essential for understanding how auditory stimuli are encoded. To investigate the transfer function at the hair cell's synapse, we developed a preparation of the bullfrog's amphibian papilla. In the portion of this receptor organ representing stimuli of 400-800 Hz, each afferent nerve fiber forms several synaptic terminals onto one to three hair cells. By performing simultaneous voltage-clamp recordings from presynaptic hair cells and postsynaptic afferent fibers, we established that the rate of evoked vesicle release, as determined from the average postsynaptic current, depends linearly on the amplitude of the presynaptic Ca2+ current. This result implies that, for receptor potentials in the physiological range, the hair cell's synapse transmits information with high fidelity. auditory system | exocytosis | glutamate | ribbon synapse | synaptic vesicle

  9. A Bio-Inspired Electromechanical System: Artificial Hair Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Kang-Hun

    Inspired by recent biophysical study on the auditory sensory organs, we study electromechanical system which functions similar to the hair cell of the ear. One of the important mechanisms of hair cells, adaptation, is mimicked by an electromechanical feedback loop. The proposed artificial hair cell functions similar to a living sensory organ in the sense that it senses input force signal in spite of the relatively strong noise. Numerical simulation of the proposed system shows otoacoustic sound emission, which was observed in the experiments on the hair cells of the bullfrog. This spontaneous motion is noise-induced periodic motion which is controlled by the time scale of adaptation process and the mechanical damping.

  10. Pejvakin, a Candidate Stereociliary Rootlet Protein, Regulates Hair Cell Function in a Cell-Autonomous Manner.

    PubMed

    Kazmierczak, Marcin; Kazmierczak, Piotr; Peng, Anthony W; Harris, Suzan L; Shah, Prahar; Puel, Jean-Luc; Lenoir, Marc; Franco, Santos J; Schwander, Martin

    2017-03-29

    Mutations in the Pejvakin (PJVK) gene are thought to cause auditory neuropathy and hearing loss of cochlear origin by affecting noise-induced peroxisome proliferation in auditory hair cells and neurons. Here we demonstrate that loss of pejvakin in hair cells, but not in neurons, causes profound hearing loss and outer hair cell degeneration in mice. Pejvakin binds to and colocalizes with the rootlet component TRIOBP at the base of stereocilia in injectoporated hair cells, a pattern that is disrupted by deafness-associated PJVK mutations. Hair cells of pejvakin-deficient mice develop normal rootlets, but hair bundle morphology and mechanotransduction are affected before the onset of hearing. Some mechanotransducing shorter row stereocilia are missing, whereas the remaining ones exhibit overextended tips and a greater variability in height and width. Unlike previous studies of Pjvk alleles with neuronal dysfunction, our findings reveal a cell-autonomous role of pejvakin in maintaining stereocilia architecture that is critical for hair cell function.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Two missense mutations in the Pejvakin (PJVK or DFNB59) gene were first identified in patients with audiological hallmarks of auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder, whereas all other PJVK alleles cause hearing loss of cochlear origin. These findings suggest that complex pathogenetic mechanisms underlie human deafness DFNB59. In contrast to recent studies, we demonstrate that pejvakin in auditory neurons is not essential for normal hearing in mice. Moreover, pejvakin localizes to stereociliary rootlets in hair cells and is required for stereocilia maintenance and mechanosensory function of the hair bundle. Delineating the site of the lesion and the mechanisms underlying DFNB59 will allow clinicians to predict the efficacy of different therapeutic approaches, such as determining compatibility for cochlear implants.

  11. Imaging hair cell transduction at the speed of sound: dynamic behavior of mammalian stereocilia.

    PubMed

    Fridberger, Anders; Tomo, Igor; Ulfendahl, Mats; Boutet de Monvel, Jacques

    2006-02-07

    The cochlea contains two types of sensory cells, the inner and outer hair cells. Sound-evoked deflection of outer hair cell stereocilia leads to fast force production that will enhance auditory sensitivity up to 1,000-fold. In contrast, inner hair cells are thought to have a purely receptive function. Deflection of their stereocilia produces receptor potentials, transmitter release, and action potentials in the auditory nerve. Here, we describe a method for rapid confocal imaging. The method was used to image stereocilia during simultaneous sound stimulation in an in vitro preparation of the guinea pig cochlea. We show that inner hair cell stereocilia move because they interact with the fluid surrounding the hair bundles, but stereocilia deflection occurs at a different phase of the stimulus than is generally expected. In outer hair cells, stereocilia deflections were approximately 1/3 of the reticular lamina displacement. Smaller deflections were found in inner hair cells. The ratio between stereocilia deflection and reticular lamina displacement is important for auditory function, because it determines the stimulus applied to transduction channels. The low ratio measured here suggests that amplification of hair-bundle movements may be necessary in vivo to preserve transduction fidelity at low stimulus levels. In the case of the inner hair cells, this finding would represent a departure from traditional views on their function.

  12. Imaging hair cell transduction at the speed of sound: Dynamic behavior of mammalian stereocilia

    PubMed Central

    Fridberger, Anders; Tomo, Igor; Ulfendahl, Mats; Boutet de Monvel, Jacques

    2006-01-01

    The cochlea contains two types of sensory cells, the inner and outer hair cells. Sound-evoked deflection of outer hair cell stereocilia leads to fast force production that will enhance auditory sensitivity up to 1, 000-fold. In contrast, inner hair cells are thought to have a purely receptive function. Deflection of their stereocilia produces receptor potentials, transmitter release, and action potentials in the auditory nerve. Here, we describe a method for rapid confocal imaging. The method was used to image stereocilia during simultaneous sound stimulation in an in vitro preparation of the guinea pig cochlea. We show that inner hair cell stereocilia move because they interact with the fluid surrounding the hair bundles, but stereocilia deflection occurs at a different phase of the stimulus than is generally expected. In outer hair cells, stereocilia deflections were ≈1/3 of the reticular lamina displacement. Smaller deflections were found in inner hair cells. The ratio between stereocilia deflection and reticular lamina displacement is important for auditory function, because it determines the stimulus applied to transduction channels. The low ratio measured here suggests that amplification of hair-bundle movements may be necessary in vivo to preserve transduction fidelity at low stimulus levels. In the case of the inner hair cells, this finding would represent a departure from traditional views on their function. PMID:16446441

  13. Synchronization of Spontaneous Active Motility of Hair Cell Bundles

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tracy-Ying; Ji, Seung; Bozovic, Dolores

    2015-01-01

    Hair cells of the inner ear exhibit an active process, believed to be crucial for achieving the sensitivity of auditory and vestibular detection. One of the manifestations of the active process is the occurrence of spontaneous hair bundle oscillations in vitro. Hair bundles are coupled by overlying membranes in vivo; hence, explaining the potential role of innate bundle motility in the generation of otoacoustic emissions requires an understanding of the effects of coupling on the active bundle dynamics. We used microbeads to connect small groups of hair cell bundles, using in vitro preparations that maintain their innate oscillations. Our experiments demonstrate robust synchronization of spontaneous oscillations, with either 1:1 or multi-mode phase-locking. The frequency of synchronized oscillation was found to be near the mean of the innate frequencies of individual bundles. Coupling also led to an improved regularity of entrained oscillations, demonstrated by an increase in the quality factor. PMID:26540409

  14. Stimulus Processing in Vestibular Hair Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-03

    Preliminary results reveal that in some cells, the currents elicited by voltage steps are qualitatively similar to those previously described in frog ...rather than in the artificial perilymph used for the frog saccules. In some experiments individual hair cells were stimulated by moving their hair bundles...postsynaptic potentials alone. (2) Whole-cell current recording from isolated vestibular hair cells Hair cells were isolated from frog saccules and from rat

  15. Sensing sound: molecules that orchestrate mechanotransduction by hair cells.

    PubMed

    Kazmierczak, Piotr; Müller, Ulrich

    2012-04-01

    Animals use acoustic signals to communicate and to obtain information about their environment. The processing of acoustic signals is initiated at auditory sense organs, where mechanosensory hair cells convert sound-induced vibrations into electrical signals. Although the biophysical principles underlying the mechanotransduction process in hair cells have been characterized in much detail over the past 30 years, the molecular building-blocks of the mechanotransduction machinery have proved to be difficult to determine. We review here recent studies that have both identified some of these molecules and established the mechanisms by which they regulate the activity of the still-elusive mechanotransduction channel.

  16. Epidermal growth factor upregulates production of supernumerary hair cells in neonatal rat organ of corti explants.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, P P; Malgrange, B; Thiry, M; Van De Water, T R; Moonen, G

    2000-03-01

    The organ of Corti is highly ordered, with a single row of inner hair cells and three rows of outer hair cells. The number of hair cells produced was thought to be limited by the time of their terminal mitosis (i.e. E14 in the mouse). However, exogenous application of retinoic acid has been shown to stimulate the formation of supernumerary hair cells in organ of Corti explants from E13 to E16 mouse embryos. Using late embryonic and neonatal rat organ of Corti explants, we investigated the potential for production of supernumerary hair cells in more mature auditory sensory epithelia. When newborn rat organ of Corti explants were cultured under control conditions, an area of supernumerary hair cells was observed in a segment of organ of Corti that was at the junction between the basal and middle turns. In these areas of supernumerary hair cells the number of hair cells increased per unit of length, but remained constant per surface unit, further demonstrating the supernumerary character of this phenomenon. Organ of Corti explants treated with epidermal growth factor (EGF) showed a 50% increase in the length of the organ of Corti segment containing supernumerary hair cells. Upregulation of supernumerary hair cell formation by EGF was found to start and be maximal at birth (P0) and to disappear by 2 days after birth (P2). Treatment of EGF stimulated P0 explants with an antimitotic drug, cytosine arabinoside (ARAc), demonstrated that the production of supernumerary hair cells occurred independently of cell division.

  17. Coupling a sensory hair-cell bundle to cyber clones enhances nonlinear amplification.

    PubMed

    Barral, Jérémie; Dierkes, Kai; Lindner, Benjamin; Jülicher, Frank; Martin, Pascal

    2010-05-04

    The vertebrate ear benefits from nonlinear mechanical amplification to operate over a vast range of sound intensities. The amplificatory process is thought to emerge from active force production by sensory hair cells. The mechano-sensory hair bundle that protrudes from the apical surface of each hair cell can oscillate spontaneously and function as a frequency-selective, nonlinear amplifier. Intrinsic fluctuations, however, jostle the response of a single hair bundle to weak stimuli and seriously limit amplification. Most hair bundles are mechanically coupled by overlying gelatinous structures. Here, we assayed the effects of mechanical coupling on the hair-bundle amplifier by combining dynamic force clamp of a hair bundle from the bullfrog's saccule with real-time stochastic simulations of hair-bundle mechanics. This setup couples the hair bundle to two virtual hair bundles, called cyber clones, and mimics a situation in which the hair bundle is elastically linked to two neighbors with similar characteristics. We found that coupling increased the coherence of spontaneous hair-bundle oscillations. By effectively reducing noise, the synergic interplay between the hair bundle and its cyber clones also enhanced amplification of sinusoidal stimuli. All observed effects of coupling were in quantitative agreement with simulations. We argue that the auditory amplifier relies on hair-bundle cooperation to overcome intrinsic noise limitations and achieve high sensitivity and sharp frequency selectivity.

  18. Physiological Maturation of Regenerating Hair Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, Richard A.

    2003-01-01

    The bullfrog saccule, a sensor of gravity and substrate-borne vibration, is a model system for hair cell transduction. Saccular hair cells also increase in number throughout adult life and rapidly recover after hair cell damage, making this organ an ideal system for studying hair cell development, repair, and regeneration. We have used of hair cell and supporting cell immunocytochemical markers to identify damaged hair cells and hair cell precursors in organotypic cultures of the bullfrog saccule. We then used an innovative combination of confocal, electron, and time-lapse microscopy to study the fate of damaged hair cells and the origin of new hair cells after gentamicin ototoxicity in normal and mitotically blocked saccular cultures. These studies have shown that gentamicin ototoxicity produces both lethal and sublethal hair cell damage. They have also shown that hair cell recovery in this organ takes place by both the repair of sublethally damaged hair cells and by the replacement of lost hair cells by mitotic regeneration. In parallel studies, we have used biophysical and molecular biological techniques to study the differentiation and innervation of developing, repairing, and regenerating hair cells. More specifically, we have used RT-PCR to obtain the bullfrog homologues of L-type voltage- gated calcium (L-VGCC) and large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated potassium (BK) channel genes. We have then obtained probes for these genes and, using in situ hybridization, begun to examine their expression in the bullfrog saccule and amphibian papilla. We have also used fluorescent-labeled channel toxins and channel toxin derivatives to determine the time of appearance of L-type voltage-gated calcium (L-VGCC) and Ca(2+)-activated potassium (BK) channels and to study dynamic changes in the number, distribution, and co-localization of these proteins in developing, repairing, and regenerating hair cells. Using time-lapse microscopy, we are also studying the dynamic relationship

  19. Formation, encapsulation, and validation of membrane-based artificial hair cell sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrison, Kevin L.; Sarles, Stephen A.; Leo, Donald J.

    2012-04-01

    Hair cell structures are one of the most common forms of sensing elements found in nature. In nearly all vertebrates hair cells are used for auditory and vestibular sensing. In humans, approximately 16,000 auditory hair cells can be found in the cochlea of the ear. Each hair cell contains a stereocilia, which is the primary structure for sound transduction. This study looks to develop and characterize an artificial hair cell that resembles the stereocilia of the human ear. Recently our research group has shown that a single artificial hair cell can be formed in an open substrate using a single aqueous droplet and a hydrogel. In this study, air was blown across the hair and analyzed using spectral analysis. The results of this study provided the foundation for our current work toward an artificial hair cell that uses two aqueous droplets. In the current study a test fixture was created in order to consistently measure various properties of the encapsulated hair cell. The response of the hair cell was measured with an impulse input at various locations on the test fixture. A frequency response function was then created using the impulse input and the output of the sensor. It was found that the vibration of the hair was only detectable if the test fixture was struck at the correct location. By changing the physical parameters of the hair sensor, such as hair length, we were able to alter the response of the sensor. It was also found that the sensitivity of the sensor was reliant on the size of the lipid bilayer.

  20. The Effects of Urethane on Rat Outer Hair Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Mingyu; Chen, Mengzi; Yang, Xueying

    2016-01-01

    The cochlea converts sound vibration into electrical impulses and amplifies the low-level sound signal. Urethane, a widely used anesthetic in animal research, has been shown to reduce the neural responses to auditory stimuli. However, the effects of urethane on cochlea, especially on the function of outer hair cells, remain largely unknown. In the present study, we compared the cochlear microphonic responses between awake and urethane-anesthetized rats. The results revealed that the amplitude of the cochlear microphonic was decreased by urethane, resulting in an increase in the threshold at all of the sound frequencies examined. To deduce the possible mechanism underlying the urethane-induced decrease in cochlear sensitivity, we examined the electrical response properties of isolated outer hair cells using whole-cell patch-clamp recording. We found that urethane hyperpolarizes the outer hair cell membrane potential in a dose-dependent manner and elicits larger outward current. This urethane-induced outward current was blocked by strychnine, an antagonist of the α9 subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Meanwhile, the function of the outer hair cell motor protein, prestin, was not affected. These results suggest that urethane anesthesia is expected to decrease the responses of outer hair cells, whereas the frequency selectivity of cochlea remains unchanged. PMID:28050287

  1. Glass Probe Stimulation of Hair Cell Stereocilia.

    PubMed

    Peng, Anthony W; Ricci, Anthony J

    2016-01-01

    Hair cells are designed to sense mechanical stimuli of sound using their apical stereocilia hair bundles. Mechanical deflection of this hair bundle is converted into an electrical signal through gating of mechano-electric transduction channels. Stiff probe stimulation of hair bundles is an invaluable tool for studying the transduction channel and its associated processes because of the speed and ability to precisely control hair bundle position. Proper construction of these devices is critical to their ultimate performance as is appropriate placement of the probe onto the hair bundle. Here we describe the construction and use of a glass probe coupled to a piezo-electric actuator for stimulating hair bundles, including the basic technique for positioning of the stimulating probe onto the hair bundle. These piezo-electric stimulators can be adapted to other mechanically sensitive systems.

  2. Magnetic actuation of hair cells

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, David; Roongthumskul, Yuttana; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Cheon, Jinwoo; Bozovic, Dolores

    2011-01-01

    The bullfrog sacculus contains mechanically sensitive hair cells whose stereociliary bundles oscillate spontaneously when decoupled from the overlying membrane. Steady-state offsets on the resting position of a hair bundle can suppress or modulate this native motility. To probe the dynamics of spontaneous oscillation in the proximity of the critical point, we describe here a method for mechanical actuation that avoids loading the bundles or contributing to the viscous drag. Magnetite beads were attached to the tips of the stereocilia, and a magnetic probe was used to impose deflections. This technique allowed us to observe the transition from multi-mode to single-mode state in freely oscillating bundles, as well as the crossover from the oscillatory to the quiescent state. PMID:22163368

  3. Insensitivity of the audiogram to carboplatin induced inner hair cell loss in chinchillas.

    PubMed

    Lobarinas, Edward; Salvi, Richard; Ding, Dalian

    2013-08-01

    Noise trauma, aging, and ototoxicity preferentially damage the outer hair cells of the inner ear, leading to increased hearing thresholds and poorer frequency resolution. Whereas outer hair cells make synaptic connections with less than 10% of afferent auditory nerve fibers (type-II), inner hair cells make connections with over 90% of afferents (type-I). Despite these extensive connections, little is known about how selective inner hair cell loss impacts hearing. In chinchillas, moderate to high doses of the anticancer compound carboplatin produce selective inner hair cell and type-I afferent loss with little to no effect on outer hair cells. To determine the effects of carboplatin-induced inner hair cell loss on the most widely used clinical measure of hearing, the audiogram, pure-tone thresholds were determined behaviorally before and after 75 mg/kg carboplatin. Following carboplatin treatment, small effects on audiometric thresholds were observed even with extensive inner hair cell losses that exceed 80%. These results suggest that conventional audiometry is insensitive to inner hair cell loss and that only small populations of inner hair cells appear to be necessary for detecting tonal stimuli in a quiet background.

  4. Aminoglycoside ototoxicity and hair cell ablation in the adult gerbil: A simple model to study hair cell loss and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Leila; Rivolta, Marcelo N.

    2015-01-01

    The Mongolian gerbil, Meriones unguiculatus, has been widely employed as a model for studies of the inner ear. In spite of its established use for auditory research, no robust protocols to induce ototoxic hair cell damage have been developed for this species. In this paper, we demonstrate the development of an aminoglycoside-induced model of hair cell loss, using kanamycin potentiated by the loop diuretic furosemide. Interestingly, we show that the gerbil is relatively insensitive to gentamicin compared to kanamycin, and that bumetanide is ineffective in potentiating the ototoxicity of the drug. We also examine the pathology of the spiral ganglion after chronic, long-term hair cell damage. Remarkably, there is little or no neuronal loss following the ototoxic insult, even at 8 months post-damage. This is similar to the situation often seen in the human, where functioning neurons can persist even decades after hair cell loss, contrasting with the rapid, secondary degeneration found in rats, mice and other small mammals. We propose that the combination of these factors makes the gerbil a good model for ototoxic damage by induced hair cell loss. PMID:25783988

  5. Solitary Hair Cells Are Distributed Throughout the Extramacular Epithelium in the Bullfrog's Saccule

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, Jason R.; Corwin, Jeffrey T.

    2000-01-01

    The frog inner ear contains eight sensory organs that provide sensitivities to auditory, vestibular, and ground-borne vibrational stimuli. The saccule in bullfrogs is responsible for detecting ground- and air-borne vibrations and is used for studies of hair cell physiology, development, and regeneration. Based on hair bundle morphology, a number of hair cell types have been defined in this organ. Using immunocytochemistry, vital labeling, and electron microscopy, we have characterized a new hair cell type in the bullfrog saccule. A monoclonal antibody that is specific to hair cells revealed that a population of solitary hair cells exists outside the sensory macula in what was previously thought to be nonsensory epithelium. We call these extramacular hair cells. There are 80–100 extramacular hair cells in both tadpole and adult saccules, which extend up to 1 mm from the edge of the sensory macula. The extramacular hair cells have spherical cell bodies and small apical surfaces. Even in adults, the hair bundles of the extramacular cells appear immature, with a long kinocilium (6–9 μm) and short stereocilia (0.5–2 μm). At least 90% of extramacular hair cells are likely to be innervated as demonstrated by labeling of nerve fibers with an antineurofilament antibody. The extramacular hair cells may differentiate in regions just beyond the edge of the macula at an early stage in development and then be pushed out via the interstitial growth of the epithelium that surrounds the macula. It is also possible that they may be produced from cell divisions in the extramacular epithelium that has not been considered capable of giving rise to hair cells. PMID:11545144

  6. Outer Hair Cells Provide Active Tuning in the Organ of Corti.

    PubMed

    Ulfendahl, Mats; Flock Å, Åke

    1998-06-01

    The detection of sound by the mammalian hearing organ, the organ of Corti, is far from a passive process with the sensory cells acting as mere receptors. The high sensitivity and sharp tuning of the auditory apparatus are very much dependant on the active mechanical behavior of the outer hair cells, acting as effector cells.

  7. Immunohistochemical study of hair follicle stem cells in regenerated hair follicles induced by Wnt10b

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yiming; Xing, Yizhan; Guo, Haiying; Ma, Xiaogen; Li, Yuhong

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of the periodic regeneration of hair follicles is complicated. Although Wnt10b has been reported to induce hair follicle regeneration, the characteristics of induced hair follicles, especially the target cells of Wnt10b, have not yet been clearly elucidated. Thus, we systematically evaluated the expression and proliferation patterns of Wnt10b-induced hair follicles. We found that Wnt10b promoted the proliferation of hair follicle stem cells from 24 hours after AdWnt10b injection. Seventy-two hours after AdWnt10b injection, cells outside of bulge area began to proliferate. When the induced hair follicle entered full anagen, although the hair follicle stem cells were normal, canonical Wnt signaling was maintained in the hair precortex cells. Our results reveal that the target cells that overexpressed Wnt10b included hair follicle stem cells, hair precortex cells, and matrix cells. PMID:27766026

  8. Defective calmodulin-dependent rapid apical endocytosis in zebrafish sensory hair cell mutants.

    PubMed

    Seiler, C; Nicolson, T

    1999-11-15

    Vertebrate mechanosensory hair cells contain a narrow "pericuticular" zone which is densely populated with small vesicles between the cuticular plate and cellular junctions near the apical surface. The presence of many cytoplasmic vesicles suggests that the apical surface of hair cells has a high turnover rate. The significance of intense membrane trafficking at the apical surface is not known. Using a marker of endocytosis, the styryl dye FM1-43, this report shows that rapid apical endocytosis in zebrafish lateral line sensory hair cells is calcium and calmodulin dependent and is partially blocked by the presence of amiloride and dihydrostreptomycin, known inhibitors of mechanotransduction channels. As seen in lateral line hair cells, sensory hair cells within the larval otic capsule also exhibit rapid apical endocytosis. Defects in internalization of the dye in both lateral line and inner ear hair cells were found in five zebrafish auditory/vestibular mutants: sputnik, mariner, orbiter, mercury, and skylab. In addition, lateral line hair cells in these mutants were not sensitive to prolonged exposure to streptomycin, which is toxic to hair cells. The presence of endocytic defects in the majority of zebrafish mechanosensory mutants points to a important role of apical endocytosis in hair cell function.

  9. Hair-Cell Mechanotransduction Persists in TRP Channel Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Niksch, Paul D.; Webber, Roxanna M.; Garcia-Gonzalez, Miguel; Watnick, Terry; Zhou, Jing; Vollrath, Melissa A.; Corey, David P.

    2016-01-01

    Members of the TRP superfamily of ion channels mediate mechanosensation in some organisms, and have been suggested as candidates for the mechanotransduction channel in vertebrate hair cells. Some TRP channels can be ruled out based on lack of an inner ear phenotype in knockout animals or pore properties not similar to the hair-cell channel. Such studies have excluded Trpv4, Trpa1, Trpml3, Trpm1, Trpm3, Trpc1, Trpc3, Trpc5, and Trpc6. However, others remain reasonable candidates. We used data from an RNA-seq analysis of gene expression in hair cells as well as data on TRP channel conductance to narrow the candidate group. We then characterized mice lacking functional Trpm2, Pkd2, Pkd2l1, Pkd2l2 and Pkd1l3, using scanning electron microscopy, auditory brainstem response, permeant dye accumulation, and single-cell electrophysiology. In all of these TRP-deficient mice, and in double and triple knockouts, mechanotransduction persisted. Together with published studies, these results argue against the participation of any of the 33 mouse TRP channels in hair cell transduction. PMID:27196058

  10. Hair cell force generation does not amplify or tune vibrations within the chicken basilar papilla

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Anping; Liu, Xiaofang; Raphael, Patrick D.; Applegate, Brian E.; Oghalai, John S.

    2016-01-01

    Frequency tuning within the auditory papilla of most non-mammalian species is electrical, deriving from ion-channel resonance within their sensory hair cells. In contrast, tuning within the mammalian cochlea is mechanical, stemming from active mechanisms within outer hair cells that amplify the basilar membrane travelling wave. Interestingly, hair cells in the avian basilar papilla demonstrate both electrical resonance and force-generation, making it unclear which mechanism creates sharp frequency tuning. Here, we measured sound-induced vibrations within the apical half of the chicken basilar papilla in vivo and found broadly-tuned travelling waves that were not amplified. However, distortion products were found in live but not dead chickens. These findings support the idea that avian hair cells do produce force, but that their effects on vibration are small and do not sharpen tuning. Therefore, frequency tuning within the apical avian basilar papilla is not mechanical, and likely derives from hair cell electrical resonance. PMID:27796310

  11. Hair cell force generation does not amplify or tune vibrations within the chicken basilar papilla.

    PubMed

    Xia, Anping; Liu, Xiaofang; Raphael, Patrick D; Applegate, Brian E; Oghalai, John S

    2016-10-31

    Frequency tuning within the auditory papilla of most non-mammalian species is electrical, deriving from ion-channel resonance within their sensory hair cells. In contrast, tuning within the mammalian cochlea is mechanical, stemming from active mechanisms within outer hair cells that amplify the basilar membrane travelling wave. Interestingly, hair cells in the avian basilar papilla demonstrate both electrical resonance and force-generation, making it unclear which mechanism creates sharp frequency tuning. Here, we measured sound-induced vibrations within the apical half of the chicken basilar papilla in vivo and found broadly-tuned travelling waves that were not amplified. However, distortion products were found in live but not dead chickens. These findings support the idea that avian hair cells do produce force, but that their effects on vibration are small and do not sharpen tuning. Therefore, frequency tuning within the apical avian basilar papilla is not mechanical, and likely derives from hair cell electrical resonance.

  12. Evaluation of the Hair Cell Regeneration in Zebrafish Larvae by Measuring and Quantifying the Startle Responses

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Changquan; Zhong, Zhenmin; Sun, Peng

    2017-01-01

    The zebrafish has become an established model organism for the study of hearing and balance systems in the past two decades. The classical approach to examine hair cells is to use dye to conduct selective staining, which shows the number and morphology of hair cells but does not reveal their function. Startle response is a behavior closely related to the auditory function of hair cells; therefore it can be used to measure the function of hair cells. In this study, we developed a device to measure the startle response of zebrafish larvae. By applying various levels of stimulus, it showed that the system can discern a 10 dB difference. The hair cell in zebrafish can regenerate after damage due to noise exposure or drug treatment. With this device, we measured the startle response of zebrafish larvae during and after drug treatment. The results show a similar trend to the classical hair cell staining method. The startle response was reduced with drug treatment and recovered after removal of the drug. Together it demonstrated the capability of this behavioral assay in evaluating the hair cell functions of fish larvae and its potential as a high-throughput screening tool for auditory-related gene and drug discovery. PMID:28250994

  13. Cell proliferation and hair cell addition in the ear of the goldfish, Carassius auratus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanford, P. J.; Presson, J. C.; Popper, A. N.

    1996-01-01

    Cell proliferation and hair cell addition have not been studied in the ears of otophysan fish, a group of species who have specialized hearing capabilities. In this study we used the mitotic S-phase marker bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) to identify proliferating cells in the ear of one otophysan species, Carassius auratus (the goldfish). Animals were sacrificed at 3 h or 5 days postinjection with BrdU and processed for immunocytochemistry. The results of the study show that cell proliferation occurs in all of the otic endorgans and results in the addition of new hair cells. BrdU-labeled cells were distributed throughout all epithelia, including the primary auditory endorgan (saccule), where hair cell phenotypes vary considerably along the rostrocaudal axis. This study lays the groundwork for our transmission electron microscopy study of proliferative cells in the goldfish ear (Presson et al., Hearing Research 100 (1996) 10-20) as well as future studies of hair cell development in this species. The ability to predict, based on epithelial location, the future phenotype of developing hair cells in the saccule of the goldfish make that endorgan a particularly powerful model system for the investigation of early hair cell differentiation.

  14. Innervation of Cochlear Hair Cells by Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Neurons In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Gunewardene, Niliksha; Crombie, Duncan; Dottori, Mirella; Nayagam, Bryony A

    2016-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) may serve as an autologous source of replacement neurons in the injured cochlea, if they can be successfully differentiated and reconnected with residual elements in the damaged auditory system. Here, we explored the potential of hiPSC-derived neurons to innervate early postnatal hair cells, using established in vitro assays. We compared two hiPSC lines against a well-characterized hESC line. After ten days' coculture in vitro, hiPSC-derived neural processes contacted inner and outer hair cells in whole cochlear explant cultures. Neural processes from hiPSC-derived neurons also made contact with hair cells in denervated sensory epithelia explants and expressed synapsin at these points of contact. Interestingly, hiPSC-derived neurons cocultured with hair cells at an early stage of differentiation formed synapses with a higher number of hair cells, compared to hiPSC-derived neurons cocultured at a later stage of differentiation. Notable differences in the innervation potentials of the hiPSC-derived neurons were also observed and variations existed between the hiPSC lines in their innervation efficiencies. Collectively, these data illustrate the promise of hiPSCs for auditory neuron replacement and highlight the need to develop methods to mitigate variabilities observed amongst hiPSC lines, in order to achieve reliable clinical improvements for patients.

  15. Innervation of Cochlear Hair Cells by Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Neurons In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Gunewardene, Niliksha; Crombie, Duncan; Dottori, Mirella; Nayagam, Bryony A.

    2016-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) may serve as an autologous source of replacement neurons in the injured cochlea, if they can be successfully differentiated and reconnected with residual elements in the damaged auditory system. Here, we explored the potential of hiPSC-derived neurons to innervate early postnatal hair cells, using established in vitro assays. We compared two hiPSC lines against a well-characterized hESC line. After ten days' coculture in vitro, hiPSC-derived neural processes contacted inner and outer hair cells in whole cochlear explant cultures. Neural processes from hiPSC-derived neurons also made contact with hair cells in denervated sensory epithelia explants and expressed synapsin at these points of contact. Interestingly, hiPSC-derived neurons cocultured with hair cells at an early stage of differentiation formed synapses with a higher number of hair cells, compared to hiPSC-derived neurons cocultured at a later stage of differentiation. Notable differences in the innervation potentials of the hiPSC-derived neurons were also observed and variations existed between the hiPSC lines in their innervation efficiencies. Collectively, these data illustrate the promise of hiPSCs for auditory neuron replacement and highlight the need to develop methods to mitigate variabilities observed amongst hiPSC lines, in order to achieve reliable clinical improvements for patients. PMID:26966437

  16. Manganese is Toxic to Spiral Ganglion Neurons and Hair Cells in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Dalian; Roth, Jerome; Salvi, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Occupational exposure to high atmospheric levels of Mn produces a severe and debilitating disorder known as manganism characterized by extrapyramidal disturbances similar to that seen in Parkinson’s disease. Epidemiological and case studies suggest that persistent exposures to Mn may have deleterious effects on other organs including the auditory system and hearing. Mn accumulates in the inner ear following acute exposure raising the possibility that it can damage the sensory hair cells that convert sound into neural activity or spiral ganglion neurons (SGN) that transmit acoustic information from the hair cells to the brain via the auditory nerve. In this paper we demonstrate for first time that Mn causes significant damage to the sensory hair cells, peripheral auditory nerve fibers (ANF) and SGN in cochlear organotypic cultures isolated from postnatal day three rats. The peripheral ANF that make synaptic contact with the sensory hair cells were particularly vulnerable to Mn toxicity; damage occurred at concentrations as low 0.01 mM and increased with dose and duration of Mn exposure. Sensory hair cells, in contrast, were slightly more resistant to Mn toxicity than the ANF. Mn induced an atypical pattern of sensory cell damage; Mn was more toxic to inner hair cells (IHC) than outer hair cells (OHC) and in addition, IHC loss was relatively uniform along the length of the cochlea. Mn also caused significant loss and shrinkage of SGN soma. These findings are the first to demonstrate that Mn can produce severe lesions to both neurons and hair cells in the postnatal inner ear. PMID:21182863

  17. Manganese is toxic to spiral ganglion neurons and hair cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ding, Dalian; Roth, Jerome; Salvi, Richard

    2011-03-01

    Occupational exposure to high atmospheric levels of Mn produces a severe and debilitating disorder known as manganism characterized by extrapyramidal disturbances similar to that seen in Parkinson's disease. Epidemiological and case studies suggest that persistent exposures to Mn may have deleterious effects on other organs including the auditory system and hearing. Mn accumulates in the inner ear following acute exposure raising the possibility that it can damage the sensory hair cells that convert sound into neural activity or spiral ganglion neurons (SGN) that transmit acoustic information from the hair cells to the brain via the auditory nerve. In this paper we demonstrate for first time that Mn causes significant damage to the sensory hair cells, peripheral auditory nerve fibers (ANF) and SGN in cochlear organotypic cultures isolated from postnatal day three rats. The peripheral ANF that make synaptic contact with the sensory hair cells were particularly vulnerable to Mn toxicity; damage occurred at concentrations as low 0.01 mM and increased with dose and duration of Mn exposure. Sensory hair cells, in contrast, were slightly more resistant to Mn toxicity than the ANF. Mn induced an atypical pattern of sensory cell damage; Mn was more toxic to inner hair cells (IHC) than outer hair cells (OHC) and in addition, IHC loss was relatively uniform along the length of the cochlea. Mn also caused significant loss and shrinkage of SGN soma. These findings are the first to demonstrate that Mn can produce severe lesions to both neurons and hair cells in the postnatal inner ear.

  18. Observing Cells in Plucked Hair Follicles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, John

    1991-01-01

    A simple technique is described by which the cells attached to plucked hair can be observed and used to demonstrate dividing and differentiating cell populations. The necessary equipment and the procedure are listed. (Author/KR)

  19. Calcium entry into stereocilia drives adaptation of the mechanoelectrical transducer current of mammalian cochlear hair cells.

    PubMed

    Corns, Laura F; Johnson, Stuart L; Kros, Corné J; Marcotti, Walter

    2014-10-14

    Mechanotransduction in the auditory and vestibular systems depends on mechanosensitive ion channels in the stereociliary bundles that project from the apical surface of the sensory hair cells. In lower vertebrates, when the mechanoelectrical transducer (MET) channels are opened by movement of the bundle in the excitatory direction, Ca(2+) entry through the open MET channels causes adaptation, rapidly reducing their open probability and resetting their operating range. It remains uncertain whether such Ca(2+)-dependent adaptation is also present in mammalian hair cells. Hair bundles of both outer and inner hair cells from mice were deflected by using sinewave or step mechanical stimuli applied using a piezo-driven fluid jet. We found that when cochlear hair cells were depolarized near the Ca(2+) reversal potential or their hair bundles were exposed to the in vivo endolymphatic Ca(2+) concentration (40 µM), all manifestations of adaptation, including the rapid decline of the MET current and the reduction of the available resting MET current, were abolished. MET channel adaptation was also reduced or removed when the intracellular Ca(2+) buffer 1,2-Bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA) was increased from a concentration of 0.1 to 10 mM. The findings show that MET current adaptation in mouse auditory hair cells is modulated similarly by extracellular Ca(2+), intracellular Ca(2+) buffering, and membrane potential, by their common effect on intracellular free Ca(2+).

  20. Dopamine Modulates the Activity of Sensory Hair Cells

    PubMed Central

    Toro, Cecilia; Trapani, Josef G.; Pacentine, Itallia; Maeda, Reo; Sheets, Lavinia; Mo, Weike

    2015-01-01

    The senses of hearing and balance are subject to modulation by efferent signaling, including the release of dopamine (DA). How DA influences the activity of the auditory and vestibular systems and its site of action are not well understood. Here we show that dopaminergic efferent fibers innervate the acousticolateralis epithelium of the zebrafish during development but do not directly form synapses with hair cells. However, a member of the D1-like receptor family, D1b, tightly localizes to ribbon synapses in inner ear and lateral-line hair cells. To assess modulation of hair-cell activity, we reversibly activated or inhibited D1-like receptors (D1Rs) in lateral-line hair cells. In extracellular recordings from hair cells, we observed that D1R agonist SKF-38393 increased microphonic potentials, whereas D1R antagonist SCH-23390 decreased microphonic potentials. Using ratiometric calcium imaging, we found that increased D1R activity resulted in larger calcium transients in hair cells. The increase of intracellular calcium requires Cav1.3a channels, as a Cav1 calcium channel antagonist, isradipine, blocked the increase in calcium transients elicited by the agonist SKF-38393. Collectively, our results suggest that DA is released in a paracrine fashion and acts at ribbon synapses, likely enhancing the activity of presynaptic Cav1.3a channels and thereby increasing neurotransmission. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The neurotransmitter dopamine acts in a paracrine fashion (diffusion over a short distance) in several tissues and bodily organs, influencing and regulating their activity. The cellular target and mechanism of the action of dopamine in mechanosensory organs, such as the inner ear and lateral-line organ, is not clearly understood. Here we demonstrate that dopamine receptors are present in sensory hair cells at synaptic sites that are required for signaling to the brain. When nearby neurons release dopamine, activation of the dopamine receptors increases the activity of

  1. Horseradish peroxidase dye tracing and embryonic statoacoustic ganglion cell transplantation in the rat auditory nerve trunk.

    PubMed

    Palmgren, Björn; Jin, Zhe; Jiao, Yu; Kostyszyn, Beata; Olivius, Petri

    2011-03-04

    At present severe damage to hair cells and sensory neurons in the inner ear results in non-treatable auditory disorders. Cell implantation is a potential treatment for various neurological disorders and has already been used in clinical practice. In the inner ear, delivery of therapeutic substances including neurotrophic factors and stem cells provide strategies that in the future may ameliorate or restore hearing impairment. In order to describe a surgical auditory nerve trunk approach, in the present paper we injected the neuronal tracer horseradish peroxidase (HRP) into the central part of the nerve by an intra cranial approach. We further evaluated the applicability of the present approach by implanting statoacoustic ganglion (SAG) cells into the same location of the auditory nerve in normal hearing rats or animals deafened by application of β-bungarotoxin to the round window niche. The HRP results illustrate labeling in the cochlear nucleus in the brain stem as well as peripherally in the spiral ganglion neurons in the cochlea. The transplanted SAGs were observed within the auditory nerve trunk but no more peripheral than the CNS-PNS transitional zone. Interestingly, the auditory nerve injection did not impair auditory function, as evidenced by the auditory brainstem response. The present findings illustrate that an auditory nerve trunk approach may well access the entire auditory nerve and does not compromise auditory function. We suggest that such an approach might compose a suitable route for cell transplantation into this sensory cranial nerve.

  2. Hair Cell Heterogeneity in the Goldfish Saccule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saidel, William M.; Lanford, Pamela J.; Yan, Hong Y.; Popper, Arthur N.

    1995-01-01

    A set of cytological studies performed in the utricle and saccule of Astronotus ocellatus (Teleostei, Percomorphi, Cichlidae) identified two basic types of hair cells and others with some intermediate characteristics. This paper reports on applying the same techniques to the saccule of Carassius auratus (Teleostei, Otophysi, Cyprinidae) and demonstrates similar types of hair cells to those found in Astronotus. Since Carassius and Astronous are species of extreme taxonomic distance within the Euteteostei, two classes of mechanoreceptive hair cells are likely to represent the primitive condition for sensory receptors in the euteleost inner ear and perhaps in all bony fish ears.

  3. Comparative Transduction Mechanisms of Vestibular Otolith Hair Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, Richard A.

    1994-01-01

    Hair cells in the bullfrog vestibular otolith organs regenerate following aminoglycoside ototoxicity. Hair cells in these organs are differentially sensitive to gentamicin, with saccular hair cells and hair cells in the utricular striola being damaged at lower gentamicin concentrations than hair cells in the utricular extrastriola. Regenerating hair cells in these organs have short hair bundles and can be classified into a number of phenotypes using the same morphological criteria used to identify their mature counterparts. Our studies suggest that some supporting cells can convert, or transdifferentiate,into hair cells without an intervening cell division. By stimulating these processes in humans, clinicians may be able to alleviate human deafness and peripheral vestibular disorders by regenerating and replacing lost hair cells. In vivo and in vitro studies were done on cell proliferation and hair cell regeneration.

  4. Mechanisms underlying the temporal precision of sound coding at the inner hair cell ribbon synapse

    PubMed Central

    Moser, Tobias; Neef, Andreas; Khimich, Darina

    2006-01-01

    Our auditory system is capable of perceiving the azimuthal location of a low frequency sound source with a precision of a few degrees. This requires the auditory system to detect time differences in sound arrival between the two ears down to tens of microseconds. The detection of these interaural time differences relies on network computation by auditory brainstem neurons sharpening the temporal precision of the afferent signals. Nevertheless, the system requires the hair cell synapse to encode sound with the highest possible temporal acuity. In mammals, each auditory nerve fibre receives input from only one inner hair cell (IHC) synapse. Hence, this single synapse determines the temporal precision of the fibre. As if this was not enough of a challenge, the auditory system is also capable of maintaining such high temporal fidelity with acoustic signals that vary greatly in their intensity. Recent research has started to uncover the cellular basis of sound coding. Functional and structural descriptions of synaptic vesicle pools and estimates for the number of Ca2+ channels at the ribbon synapse have been obtained, as have insights into how the receptor potential couples to the release of synaptic vesicles. Here, we review current concepts about the mechanisms that control the timing of transmitter release in inner hair cells of the cochlea. PMID:16901948

  5. Optogenetic Control of Mouse Outer Hair Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tao; Ramamoorthy, Sripriya; Wilson, Teresa; Chen, Fangyi; Porsov, Edward; Subhash, Hrebesh; Foster, Sarah; Zhang, Yuan; Omelchenko, Irina; Bateschell, Michael; Wang, Lingyan; Brigande, John V.; Jiang, Zhi-Gen; Mao, Tianyi; Nuttall, Alfred L.

    2016-01-01

    Normal hearing in mammals depends on sound amplification by outer hair cells (OHCs) presumably by their somatic motility and force production. However, the role of OHC force production in cochlear amplification and frequency tuning are not yet fully understood. Currently, available OHC manipulation techniques for physiological or clinical studies are limited by their invasive nature, lack of precision, and poor temporal-spatial resolution. To overcome these limitations, we explored an optogenetic approach based on channelrhodopsin 2 (ChR-2), a direct light-activated nonselective cation channel originally discovered in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Three approaches were compared: 1) adeno-associated virus-mediated in utero transfer of the ChR-2 gene into the developing murine otocyst, 2) expression of ChR-2(H134R) in an auditory cell line (HEI-OC1), and 3) expression of ChR-2 in the OHCs of a mouse line carrying a ChR-2 conditional allele. Whole cell recording showed that blue light (470 nm) elicited the typical nonselective cation current of ChR-2 with reversal potential around zero in both mouse OHCs and HEI-OC1 cells and generated depolarization in both cell types. In addition, pulsed light stimulation (10 Hz) elicited a 1:1 repetitive depolarization and ChR-2 currents in mouse OHCs and HEI-OC1 cells, respectively. The time constant of depolarization in OHCs, 1.45 ms, is 10 times faster than HEI-OC1 cells, which allowed light stimulation up to rates of 10/s to elicit corresponding membrane potential changes. Our study demonstrates that ChR-2 can successfully be expressed in mouse OHCs and HEI-OC1 cells and that these present a typical light-sensitive current and depolarization. However, the amount of ChR-2 current induced in our in vivo experiments was insufficient to result in measurable cochlear effects. PMID:26789771

  6. Role of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor on Efferent Inhibition in Cochlear Hair Cell

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The α9α10 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) mediates efferent inhibition of hair cell function within the auditory sensory organ. Gating of the nAChRs leads to activation of calcium-dependent potassium channels to hyperpolarize the hair cell. In efferent system, main calcium providers to SK channel are nAChR and synaptic cistern, which contribution to efferent inhibition is different between avian and mammalian species. Calcium permeation is more effective in nAChRs of mammalian cochlea than avian cochlea, and mammalian calcium permeability of nAChRs is about 3 times more than avian hair cell. Thus, mammalian nAChRs is a main component of efferent inhibition in cochlear hair cell system. PMID:24653883

  7. Characterization of the Transcriptome of Nascent Hair Cells and Identification of Direct Targets of the Atoh1 Transcription Factor

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Tiantian; Jen, Hsin-I; Kang, Hyojin; Klisch, Tiemo J.; Zoghbi, Huda Y.

    2015-01-01

    Hair cells are sensory receptors for the auditory and vestibular system in vertebrates. The transcription factor Atoh1 is both necessary and sufficient for the differentiation of hair cells, and is strongly upregulated during hair-cell regeneration in nonmammalian vertebrates. To identify genes involved in hair cell development and function, we performed RNA-seq profiling of purified Atoh1-expressing hair cells from the neonatal mouse cochlea. We identified >600 enriched transcripts in cochlear hair cells, of which 90% have not been previously shown to be expressed in hair cells. We identified 233 of these hair cell genes as candidates to be directly regulated by Atoh1 based on the presence of Atoh1 binding sites in their regulatory regions and by analyzing Atoh1 ChIP-seq datasets from the cerebellum and small intestine. We confirmed 10 of these genes as being direct Atoh1 targets in the cochlea by ChIP-PCR. The identification of candidate Atoh1 target genes is a first step in identifying gene regulatory networks for hair-cell development and may inform future studies on the potential role of Atoh1 in mammalian hair cell regeneration. PMID:25855195

  8. Dimethyl Sulfoxide (DMSO) Exacerbates Cisplatin-induced Sensory Hair Cell Death in Zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    PubMed Central

    Gleichman, Julia S.; Kramer, Matthew D.; Wang, Qi; Sibrian-Vazquez, Martha; Strongin, Robert M.; Steyger, Peter S.; Cotanche, Douglas A.; Matsui, Jonathan I.

    2013-01-01

    Inner ear sensory hair cells die following exposure to aminoglycoside antibiotics or chemotherapeutics like cisplatin, leading to permanent auditory and/or balance deficits in humans. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) are used to study drug-induced sensory hair cell death since their hair cells are similar in structure and function to those found in humans. We developed a cisplatin dose-response curve using a transgenic line of zebrafish that expresses membrane-targeted green fluorescent protein under the control of the Brn3c promoter/enhancer. Recently, several small molecule screens have been conducted using zebrafish to identify potential pharmacological agents that could be used to protect sensory hair cells in the presence of ototoxic drugs. Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is typically used as a solvent for many pharmacological agents in sensory hair cell cytotoxicity assays. Serendipitously, we found that DMSO potentiated the effects of cisplatin and killed more sensory hair cells than treatment with cisplatin alone. Yet, DMSO alone did not kill hair cells. We did not observe the synergistic effects of DMSO with the ototoxic aminoglycoside antibiotic neomycin. Cisplatin treatment with other commonly used organic solvents (i.e. ethanol, methanol, and polyethylene glycol 400) also did not result in increased cell death compared to cisplatin treatment alone. Thus, caution should be exercised when interpreting data generated from small molecule screens since many compounds are dissolved in DMSO. PMID:23383324

  9. Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) exacerbates cisplatin-induced sensory hair cell death in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Uribe, Phillip M; Mueller, Melissa A; Gleichman, Julia S; Kramer, Matthew D; Wang, Qi; Sibrian-Vazquez, Martha; Strongin, Robert M; Steyger, Peter S; Cotanche, Douglas A; Matsui, Jonathan I

    2013-01-01

    Inner ear sensory hair cells die following exposure to aminoglycoside antibiotics or chemotherapeutics like cisplatin, leading to permanent auditory and/or balance deficits in humans. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) are used to study drug-induced sensory hair cell death since their hair cells are similar in structure and function to those found in humans. We developed a cisplatin dose-response curve using a transgenic line of zebrafish that expresses membrane-targeted green fluorescent protein under the control of the Brn3c promoter/enhancer. Recently, several small molecule screens have been conducted using zebrafish to identify potential pharmacological agents that could be used to protect sensory hair cells in the presence of ototoxic drugs. Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is typically used as a solvent for many pharmacological agents in sensory hair cell cytotoxicity assays. Serendipitously, we found that DMSO potentiated the effects of cisplatin and killed more sensory hair cells than treatment with cisplatin alone. Yet, DMSO alone did not kill hair cells. We did not observe the synergistic effects of DMSO with the ototoxic aminoglycoside antibiotic neomycin. Cisplatin treatment with other commonly used organic solvents (i.e. ethanol, methanol, and polyethylene glycol 400) also did not result in increased cell death compared to cisplatin treatment alone. Thus, caution should be exercised when interpreting data generated from small molecule screens since many compounds are dissolved in DMSO.

  10. Inhibition of caspases prevents ototoxic and ongoing hair cell death

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsui, Jonathan I.; Ogilvie, Judith M.; Warchol, Mark E.

    2002-01-01

    Sensory hair cells die after acoustic trauma or ototoxic insults, but the signal transduction pathways that mediate hair cell death are not known. Here we identify several important signaling events that regulate the death of vestibular hair cells. Chick utricles were cultured in media supplemented with the ototoxic antibiotic neomycin and selected pharmacological agents that influence signaling molecules in cell death pathways. Hair cells that were treated with neomycin exhibited classically defined apoptotic morphologies such as condensed nuclei and fragmented DNA. Inhibition of protein synthesis (via treatment with cycloheximide) increased hair cell survival after treatment with neomycin, suggesting that hair cell death requires de novo protein synthesis. Finally, the inhibition of caspases promoted hair cell survival after neomycin treatment. Sensory hair cells in avian vestibular organs also undergo continual cell death and replacement throughout mature life. It is unclear whether the loss of hair cells stimulates the proliferation of supporting cells or whether the production of new cells triggers the death of hair cells. We examined the effects of caspase inhibition on spontaneous hair cell death in the chick utricle. Caspase inhibitors reduced the amount of ongoing hair cell death and ongoing supporting cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. In isolated sensory epithelia, however, caspase inhibitors did not affect supporting cell proliferation directly. Our data indicate that ongoing hair cell death stimulates supporting cell proliferation in the mature utricle.

  11. Phoenix is required for mechanosensory hair cell regeneration in the zebrafish lateral line.

    PubMed

    Behra, Martine; Bradsher, John; Sougrat, Rachid; Gallardo, Viviana; Allende, Miguel L; Burgess, Shawn M

    2009-04-01

    In humans, the absence or irreversible loss of hair cells, the sensory mechanoreceptors in the cochlea, accounts for a large majority of acquired and congenital hearing disorders. In the auditory and vestibular neuroepithelia of the inner ear, hair cells are accompanied by another cell type called supporting cells. This second cell population has been described as having stem cell-like properties, allowing efficient hair cell replacement during embryonic and larval/fetal development of all vertebrates. However, mammals lose their regenerative capacity in most inner ear neuroepithelia in postnatal life. Remarkably, reptiles, birds, amphibians, and fish are different in that they can regenerate hair cells throughout their lifespan. The lateral line in amphibians and in fish is an additional sensory organ, which is used to detect water movements and is comprised of neuroepithelial patches, called neuromasts. These are similar in ultra-structure to the inner ear's neuroepithelia and they share the expression of various molecular markers. We examined the regeneration process in hair cells of the lateral line of zebrafish larvae carrying a retroviral integration in a previously uncharacterized gene, phoenix (pho). Phoenix mutant larvae develop normally and display a morphologically intact lateral line. However, after ablation of hair cells with copper or neomycin, their regeneration in pho mutants is severely impaired. We show that proliferation in the supporting cells is strongly decreased after damage to hair cells and correlates with the reduction of newly formed hair cells in the regenerating phoenix mutant neuromasts. The retroviral integration linked to the phenotype is in a novel gene with no known homologs showing high expression in neuromast supporting cells. Whereas its role during early development of the lateral line remains to be addressed, in later larval stages phoenix defines a new class of proteins implicated in hair cell regeneration.

  12. Caspase inhibitors promote vestibular hair cell survival and function after aminoglycoside treatment in vivo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsui, Jonathan I.; Haque, Asim; Huss, David; Messana, Elizabeth P.; Alosi, Julie A.; Roberson, David W.; Cotanche, Douglas A.; Dickman, J. David; Warchol, Mark E.

    2003-01-01

    The sensory hair cells of the inner ear undergo apoptosis after acoustic trauma or aminoglycoside antibiotic treatment, causing permanent auditory and vestibular deficits in humans. Previous studies have demonstrated a role for caspase activation in hair cell death and ototoxic injury that can be reduced by concurrent treatment with caspase inhibitors in vitro. In this study, we examined the protective effects of caspase inhibition on hair cell death in vivo after systemic injections of aminoglycosides. In one series of experiments, chickens were implanted with osmotic pumps that administrated the pan-caspase inhibitor z-Val-Ala-Asp(Ome)-fluoromethylketone (zVAD) into inner ear fluids. One day after the surgery, the animals received a 5 d course of treatment with streptomycin, a vestibulotoxic aminoglycoside. Direct infusion of zVAD into the vestibule significantly increased hair cell survival after streptomycin treatment. A second series of experiments determined whether rescued hair cells could function as sensory receptors. Animals treated with streptomycin displayed vestibular system impairment as measured by a greatly reduced vestibulo-ocular response (VOR). In contrast, animals that received concurrent systemic administration of zVAD with streptomycin had both significantly greater hair cell survival and significantly increased VOR responses, as compared with animals treated with streptomycin alone. These findings suggest that inhibiting the activation of caspases promotes the survival of hair cells and protects against vestibular function deficits after aminoglycoside treatment.

  13. Functional development of mechanosensitive hair cells in stem cell-derived organoids parallels native vestibular hair cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao-Ping; Koehler, Karl R.; Mikosz, Andrew M.; Hashino, Eri; Holt, Jeffrey R.

    2016-01-01

    Inner ear sensory epithelia contain mechanosensitive hair cells that transmit information to the brain through innervation with bipolar neurons. Mammalian hair cells do not regenerate and are limited in number. Here we investigate the potential to generate mechanosensitive hair cells from mouse embryonic stem cells in a three-dimensional (3D) culture system. The system faithfully recapitulates mouse inner ear induction followed by self-guided development into organoids that morphologically resemble inner ear vestibular organs. We find that organoid hair cells acquire mechanosensitivity equivalent to functionally mature hair cells in postnatal mice. The organoid hair cells also progress through a similar dynamic developmental pattern of ion channel expression, reminiscent of two subtypes of native vestibular hair cells. We conclude that our 3D culture system can generate large numbers of fully functional sensory cells which could be used to investigate mechanisms of inner ear development and disease as well as regenerative mechanisms for inner ear repair. PMID:27215798

  14. Spontaneous activity of cochlear hair cells triggered by fluid secretion mechanism in adjacent support cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Han Chin; Lin, Chun-Chieh; Cheung, Rocky; Zhang-Hooks, YingXin; Agarwal, Amit; Ellis-Davies, Graham; Rock, Jason; Bergles, Dwight E.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Spontaneous electrical activity of neurons in developing sensory systems promotes their maturation and proper connectivity. In the auditory system, spontaneous activity of cochlear inner hair cells (IHCs) is initiated by the release of ATP from glia-like inner supporting cells (ISCs), facilitating maturation of central pathways before hearing onset. Here, we find that ATP stimulates purinergic autoreceptors in ISCs, triggering Cl− efflux and osmotic cell shrinkage by opening TMEM16A Ca2+-activated Cl− channels. Release of Cl− from ISCs also forces K+ efflux, causing transient depolarization of IHCs near ATP release sites. Genetic deletion of TMEM16A markedly reduces the spontaneous activity of IHCs and spiral ganglion neurons in the developing cochlea, and prevents ATP-dependent shrinkage of supporting cells. These results indicate that support cells in the developing cochlea have adapted a pathway used for fluid secretion in other organs to induce periodic excitation of hair cells. PMID:26627734

  15. Gene Expression by Mouse Inner Ear Hair Cells during Development

    PubMed Central

    Scheffer, Déborah I.; Shen, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Hair cells of the inner ear are essential for hearing and balance. As a consequence, pathogenic variants in genes specifically expressed in hair cells often cause hereditary deafness. Hair cells are few in number and not easily isolated from the adjacent supporting cells, so the biochemistry and molecular biology of hair cells can be difficult to study. To study gene expression in hair cells, we developed a protocol for hair cell isolation by FACS. With nearly pure hair cells and surrounding cells, from cochlea and utricle and from E16 to P7, we performed a comprehensive cell type-specific RNA-Seq study of gene expression during mouse inner ear development. Expression profiling revealed new hair cell genes with distinct expression patterns: some are specific for vestibular hair cells, others for cochlear hair cells, and some are expressed just before or after maturation of mechanosensitivity. We found that many of the known hereditary deafness genes are much more highly expressed in hair cells than surrounding cells, suggesting that genes preferentially expressed in hair cells are good candidates for unknown deafness genes. PMID:25904789

  16. Neuroplastin Isoform Np55 Is Expressed in the Stereocilia of Outer Hair Cells and Required for Normal Outer Hair Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Wei-Zheng; Grillet, Nicolas; Dewey, James B.; Trouillet, Alix; Krey, Jocelyn F.; Barr-Gillespie, Peter G.; Oghalai, John S.

    2016-01-01

    Neuroplastin (Nptn) is a member of the Ig superfamily and is expressed in two isoforms, Np55 and Np65. Np65 regulates synaptic transmission but the function of Np55 is unknown. In an N-ethyl-N-nitrosaurea mutagenesis screen, we have now generated a mouse line with an Nptn mutation that causes deafness. We show that Np55 is expressed in stereocilia of outer hair cells (OHCs) but not inner hair cells and affects interactions of stereocilia with the tectorial membrane. In vivo vibrometry demonstrates that cochlear amplification is absent in Nptn mutant mice, which is consistent with the failure of OHC stereocilia to maintain stable interactions with the tectorial membrane. Hair bundles show morphological defects as the mutant mice age and while mechanotransduction currents can be evoked in early postnatal hair cells, cochlea microphonics recordings indicate that mechanontransduction is affected as the mutant mice age. We thus conclude that differential splicing leads to functional diversification of Nptn, where Np55 is essential for OHC function, while Np65 is implicated in the regulation of synaptic function. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Amplification of input sound signals, which is needed for the auditory sense organ to detect sounds over a wide intensity range, depends on mechanical coupling of outer hair cells to the tectorial membrane. The current study shows that neuroplastin, a member of the Ig superfamily, which has previously been linked to the regulation of synaptic plasticity, is critical to maintain a stable mechanical link of outer hair cells with the tectorial membrane. In vivo recordings demonstrate that neuroplastin is essential for sound amplification and that mutation in neuroplastin leads to auditory impairment in mice. PMID:27581460

  17. synaptojanin1 Is Required for Temporal Fidelity of Synaptic Transmission in Hair Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Weike; Brockerhoff, Susan E.; Nicolson, Teresa

    2009-01-01

    To faithfully encode mechanosensory information, auditory/vestibular hair cells utilize graded synaptic vesicle (SV) release at specialized ribbon synapses. The molecular basis of SV release and consequent recycling of membrane in hair cells has not been fully explored. Here, we report that comet, a gene identified in an ENU mutagenesis screen for zebrafish larvae with vestibular defects, encodes the lipid phosphatase Synaptojanin 1 (Synj1). Examination of mutant synj1 hair cells revealed basal blebbing near ribbons that was dependent on Cav1.3 calcium channel activity but not mechanotransduction. Synaptojanin has been previously implicated in SV recycling; therefore, we tested synaptic transmission at hair-cell synapses. Recordings of post-synaptic activity in synj1 mutants showed relatively normal spike rates when hair cells were mechanically stimulated for a short period of time at 20 Hz. In contrast, a sharp decline in the rate of firing occurred during prolonged stimulation at 20 Hz or stimulation at a higher frequency of 60 Hz. The decline in spike rate suggested that fewer vesicles were available for release. Consistent with this result, we observed that stimulated mutant hair cells had decreased numbers of tethered and reserve-pool vesicles in comparison to wild-type hair cells. Furthermore, stimulation at 60 Hz impaired phase locking of the postsynaptic activity to the mechanical stimulus. Following prolonged stimulation at 60 Hz, we also found that mutant synj1 hair cells displayed a striking delay in the recovery of spontaneous activity. Collectively, the data suggest that Synj1 is critical for retrieval of membrane in order to maintain the quantity, timing of fusion, and spontaneous release properties of SVs at hair-cell ribbon synapses. PMID:19424431

  18. Synaptojanin1 is required for temporal fidelity of synaptic transmission in hair cells.

    PubMed

    Trapani, Josef G; Obholzer, Nikolaus; Mo, Weike; Brockerhoff, Susan E; Nicolson, Teresa

    2009-05-01

    To faithfully encode mechanosensory information, auditory/vestibular hair cells utilize graded synaptic vesicle (SV) release at specialized ribbon synapses. The molecular basis of SV release and consequent recycling of membrane in hair cells has not been fully explored. Here, we report that comet, a gene identified in an ENU mutagenesis screen for zebrafish larvae with vestibular defects, encodes the lipid phosphatase Synaptojanin 1 (Synj1). Examination of mutant synj1 hair cells revealed basal blebbing near ribbons that was dependent on Cav1.3 calcium channel activity but not mechanotransduction. Synaptojanin has been previously implicated in SV recycling; therefore, we tested synaptic transmission at hair-cell synapses. Recordings of post-synaptic activity in synj1 mutants showed relatively normal spike rates when hair cells were mechanically stimulated for a short period of time at 20 Hz. In contrast, a sharp decline in the rate of firing occurred during prolonged stimulation at 20 Hz or stimulation at a higher frequency of 60 Hz. The decline in spike rate suggested that fewer vesicles were available for release. Consistent with this result, we observed that stimulated mutant hair cells had decreased numbers of tethered and reserve-pool vesicles in comparison to wild-type hair cells. Furthermore, stimulation at 60 Hz impaired phase locking of the postsynaptic activity to the mechanical stimulus. Following prolonged stimulation at 60 Hz, we also found that mutant synj1 hair cells displayed a striking delay in the recovery of spontaneous activity. Collectively, the data suggest that Synj1 is critical for retrieval of membrane in order to maintain the quantity, timing of fusion, and spontaneous release properties of SVs at hair-cell ribbon synapses.

  19. Whole-Cell Patch-Clamp Recording of Mouse and Rat Inner Hair Cells in the Intact Organ of Corti.

    PubMed

    Goutman, Juan D; Pyott, Sonja J

    2016-01-01

    Whole-cell patch clamping is a widely applied method to record currents across the entire membrane of a cell. This protocol describes application of this method to record currents from the sensory inner hair cells in the intact auditory sensory epithelium, the organ of Corti, isolated from rats or mice. This protocol particularly outlines the basic equipment required, provides instructions for the preparation of solutions and small equipment items, and methodology for recording voltage-activated and evoked synaptic currents from the inner hair cells.

  20. Calcium Balance and Mechanotransduction in Rat Cochlear Hair Cells

    PubMed Central

    Beurg, Maryline; Nam, Jong-Hoon; Chen, Qingguo

    2010-01-01

    Auditory transduction occurs by opening of Ca2+-permeable mechanotransducer (MT) channels in hair cell stereociliary bundles. Ca2+ clearance from bundles was followed in rat outer hair cells (OHCs) using fast imaging of fluorescent indicators. Bundle deflection caused a rapid rise in Ca2+ that decayed after the stimulus, with a time constant of about 50 ms. The time constant was increased by blocking Ca2+ uptake into the subcuticular plate mitochondria or by inhibiting the hair bundle plasma membrane Ca2+ ATPase (PMCA) pump. Such manipulations raised intracellular Ca2+ and desensitized the MT channels. Measurement of the electrogenic PMCA pump current, which saturated at 18 pA with increasing Ca2+ loads, indicated a maximum Ca2+ extrusion rate of 3.7 fmol·s−1. The amplitude of the Ca2+ transient decreased in proportion to the Ca2+ concentration bathing the bundle and in artificial endolymph (160 mM K+, 20 μM Ca2+), Ca2+ carried 0.2% of the MT current. Nevertheless, MT currents in endolymph displayed fast adaptation with a submillisecond time constant. In endolymph, roughly 40% of the MT current was activated at rest when using 1 mM intracellular BAPTA compared with 12% with 1 mM EGTA, which enabled estimation of the in vivo Ca2+ load as 3 pA at rest. The results were reproduced by a model of hair bundle Ca2+ diffusion, showing that the measured PMCA pump density could handle Ca2+ loads incurred from resting and maximal MT currents in endolymph. The model also indicated the endogenous mobile buffer was equivalent to 1 mM BAPTA. PMID:20427623

  1. Ephrin-A5/EphA4 signalling controls specific afferent targeting to cochlear hair cells.

    PubMed

    Defourny, Jean; Poirrier, Anne-Lise; Lallemend, François; Mateo Sánchez, Susana; Neef, Jakob; Vanderhaeghen, Pierre; Soriano, Eduardo; Peuckert, Christiane; Kullander, Klas; Fritzsch, Bernd; Nguyen, Laurent; Moonen, Gustave; Moser, Tobias; Malgrange, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    Hearing requires an optimal afferent innervation of sensory hair cells by spiral ganglion neurons in the cochlea. Here we report that complementary expression of ephrin-A5 in hair cells and EphA4 receptor among spiral ganglion neuron populations controls the targeting of type I and type II afferent fibres to inner and outer hair cells, respectively. In the absence of ephrin-A5 or EphA4 forward signalling, a subset of type I projections aberrantly overshoot the inner hair cell layer and invade the outer hair cell area. Lack of type I afferent synapses impairs neurotransmission from inner hair cells to the auditory nerve. By contrast, radial shift of type I projections coincides with a gain of presynaptic ribbons that could enhance the afferent signalling from outer hair cells. Ephexin-1, cofilin and myosin light chain kinase act downstream of EphA4 to induce type I spiral ganglion neuron growth cone collapse. Our findings constitute the first identification of an Eph/ephrin-mediated mutual repulsion mechanism responsible for specific sorting of auditory projections in the cochlea.

  2. High-order synchronization of hair cell bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Michael; Molzon, Adrian; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Kim, Ji-Wook; Cheon, Jinwoo; Bozovic, Dolores

    2016-12-01

    Auditory and vestibular hair cell bundles exhibit active mechanical oscillations at natural frequencies that are typically lower than the detection range of the corresponding end organs. We explore how these noisy nonlinear oscillators mode-lock to frequencies higher than their internal clocks. A nanomagnetic technique is used to stimulate the bundles without an imposed mechanical load. The evoked response shows regimes of high-order mode-locking. Exploring a broad range of stimulus frequencies and intensities, we observe regions of high-order synchronization, analogous to Arnold Tongues in dynamical systems literature. Significant areas of overlap occur between synchronization regimes, with the bundle intermittently flickering between different winding numbers. We demonstrate how an ensemble of these noisy spontaneous oscillators could be entrained to efficiently detect signals significantly above the characteristic frequencies of the individual cells.

  3. High-order synchronization of hair cell bundles

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Michael; Molzon, Adrian; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Kim, Ji-wook; Cheon, Jinwoo; Bozovic, Dolores

    2016-01-01

    Auditory and vestibular hair cell bundles exhibit active mechanical oscillations at natural frequencies that are typically lower than the detection range of the corresponding end organs. We explore how these noisy nonlinear oscillators mode-lock to frequencies higher than their internal clocks. A nanomagnetic technique is used to stimulate the bundles without an imposed mechanical load. The evoked response shows regimes of high-order mode-locking. Exploring a broad range of stimulus frequencies and intensities, we observe regions of high-order synchronization, analogous to Arnold Tongues in dynamical systems literature. Significant areas of overlap occur between synchronization regimes, with the bundle intermittently flickering between different winding numbers. We demonstrate how an ensemble of these noisy spontaneous oscillators could be entrained to efficiently detect signals significantly above the characteristic frequencies of the individual cells. PMID:27974743

  4. Glial Cell Contributions to Auditory Brainstem Development

    PubMed Central

    Cramer, Karina S.; Rubel, Edwin W

    2016-01-01

    Glial cells, previously thought to have generally supporting roles in the central nervous system, are emerging as essential contributors to multiple aspects of neuronal circuit function and development. This review focuses on the contributions of glial cells to the development of auditory pathways in the brainstem. These pathways display specialized synapses and an unusually high degree of precision in circuitry that enables sound source localization. The development of these pathways thus requires highly coordinated molecular and cellular mechanisms. Several classes of glial cells, including astrocytes, oligodendrocytes and microglia, have now been explored in these circuits in both avian and mammalian brainstems. Distinct populations of astrocytes are found over the course of auditory brainstem maturation. Early appearing astrocytes are associated with spatial compartments in the avian auditory brainstem. Factors from late appearing astrocytes promote synaptogenesis and dendritic maturation, and astrocytes remain integral parts of specialized auditory synapses. Oligodendrocytes play a unique role in both birds and mammals in highly regulated myelination essential for proper timing to decipher interaural cues. Microglia arise early in brainstem development and may contribute to maturation of auditory pathways. Together these studies demonstrate the importance of non-neuronal cells in the assembly of specialized auditory brainstem circuits. PMID:27818624

  5. Power Efficiency of Outer Hair Cell Somatic Electromotility

    PubMed Central

    Rabbitt, Richard D.; Clifford, Sarah; Breneman, Kathryn D.; Farrell, Brenda; Brownell, William E.

    2009-01-01

    Cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs) are fast biological motors that serve to enhance the vibration of the organ of Corti and increase the sensitivity of the inner ear to sound. Exactly how OHCs produce useful mechanical power at auditory frequencies, given their intrinsic biophysical properties, has been a subject of considerable debate. To address this we formulated a mathematical model of the OHC based on first principles and analyzed the power conversion efficiency in the frequency domain. The model includes a mixture-composite constitutive model of the active lateral wall and spatially distributed electro-mechanical fields. The analysis predicts that: 1) the peak power efficiency is likely to be tuned to a specific frequency, dependent upon OHC length, and this tuning may contribute to the place principle and frequency selectivity in the cochlea; 2) the OHC power output can be detuned and attenuated by increasing the basal conductance of the cell, a parameter likely controlled by the brain via the efferent system; and 3) power output efficiency is limited by mechanical properties of the load, thus suggesting that impedance of the organ of Corti may be matched regionally to the OHC. The high power efficiency, tuning, and efferent control of outer hair cells are the direct result of biophysical properties of the cells, thus providing the physical basis for the remarkable sensitivity and selectivity of hearing. PMID:19629162

  6. Global Analysis of Protein Expression of Inner Ear Hair Cells.

    PubMed

    Hickox, Ann E; Wong, Ann C Y; Pak, Kwang; Strojny, Chelsee; Ramirez, Miguel; Yates, John R; Ryan, Allen F; Savas, Jeffrey N

    2017-02-01

    The mammalian inner ear (IE) subserves auditory and vestibular sensations via highly specialized cells and proteins. Sensory receptor hair cells (HCs) are necessary for transducing mechanical inputs and stimulating sensory neurons by using a host of known and as yet unknown protein machinery. To understand the protein composition of these unique postmitotic cells, in which irreversible protein degradation or damage can lead to impaired hearing and balance, we analyzed IE samples by tandem mass spectrometry to generate an unbiased, shotgun-proteomics view of protein identities and abundances. By using Pou4f3/eGFP-transgenic mice in which HCs express GFP driven by Pou4f3, we FACS purified a population of HCs to analyze and compare the HC proteome with other IE subproteomes from sensory epithelia and whole IE. We show that the mammalian HC proteome comprises hundreds of uniquely or highly expressed proteins. Our global proteomic analysis of purified HCs extends the existing HC transcriptome, revealing previously undetected gene products and isoform-specific protein expression. Comparison of our proteomic data with mouse and human databases of genetic auditory/vestibular impairments confirms the critical role of the HC proteome for normal IE function, providing a cell-specific pool of candidates for novel, important HC genes. Several proteins identified exclusively in HCs by proteomics and verified by immunohistochemistry map to human genetic deafness loci, potentially representing new deafness genes.

  7. Developmental expression of BK channels in chick cochlear hair cells

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Cochlear hair cells are high-frequency sensory receptors. At the onset of hearing, hair cells acquire fast, calcium-activated potassium (BK) currents, turning immature spiking cells into functional receptors. In non-mammalian vertebrates, the number and kinetics of BK channels are varied systematically along the frequency-axis of the cochlea giving rise to an intrinsic electrical tuning mechanism. The processes that control the appearance and heterogeneity of hair cell BK currents remain unclear. Results Quantitative PCR results showed a non-monotonic increase in BK α subunit expression throughout embryonic development of the chick auditory organ (i.e. basilar papilla). Expression peaked near embryonic day (E) 19 with six times the transcript level of E11 sensory epithelia. The steady increase in gene expression from E11 to E19 could not explain the sudden acquisition of currents at E18-19, implicating post-transcriptional mechanisms. Protein expression also preceded function but progressed in a sequence from diffuse cytoplasmic staining at early ages to punctate membrane-bound clusters at E18. Electrophysiology data confirmed a continued refinement of BK trafficking from E18 to E20, indicating a translocation of BK clusters from supranuclear to subnuclear domains over this critical developmental age. Conclusions Gene products encoding BK α subunits are detected up to 8 days before the acquisition of anti-BK clusters and functional BK currents. Therefore, post-transcriptional mechanisms seem to play a key role in the delayed emergence of calcium-sensitive currents. We suggest that regulation of translation and trafficking of functional α subunits, near voltage-gated calcium channels, leads to functional BK currents at the onset of hearing. PMID:20003519

  8. Significance of the resting angles of hair-cell bundles for Hopf bifurcation criticality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyung-Joong; Ahn, Kang-Hun

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the significance of the inclined angle of a hair bundle at equilibrium. We find that, while the angle gives a geometrical conversion factor between the bundle deflection and the ion channel displacement, it also controls the dynamics of the bundle. We show that a Hopf bifurcation, which enhances sensitivity, can be driven by the geometrical factor. However, existing experimental data indicate that mammalian auditory hair-cell bundles are located far away from the Hopf bifurcation point, suggesting that the high sensitivity of mammalian hearing might come from other mechanisms.

  9. Directional sensitivity of hair cell afferents in the Octopus statocyst.

    PubMed

    Budelmann, B U; Williamson, R

    1994-02-01

    Changes in threshold sensitivity of hair cell afferents of the macula and crista of the Octopus statocyst were analyzed when the hair cells were stimulated with sinusoidal water movements from different directions. The experiments indicate that cephalopod statocyst hair cells are directionally sensitive in a way that is similar to the responses of the hair cells of the vertebrate vestibular and lateral line systems, with the amplitude of the response changing according to the cosine of the angle by which the direction of the stimulus (the deflection of the ciliary bundle) deviates from the direction of the hair cell's morphological polarization.

  10. Hair follicle stem cell marker nestin expression in regenerating hair follicles of patients with alopecia areata.

    PubMed

    Amoh, Yasuyuki; Maejima, Hideki; Niiyama, Shiro; Mii, Sumiyuki; Hamada, Yuko; Saito, Norimitsu; Katsuoka, Kensei

    2011-01-01

    Cells that are nestin positive and keratin 15 (K15) negative are located in the hair follicle pluripotent stem cell (hfPS) area (hfPSA). The hfPSA is located within the root of the sebaceous glands, in a region just above the hair follicle bulge area. In the current study, we investigated the expression pattern of the stem cell marker nestin in the hair follicle cycling of patients with alopecia areata. In the normal human scalp, the majority of hair follicles are in the anagen phase of development. While it is often difficult to identify nestin expression in late anagen phases, nestin-expressing cells are easily identified in proliferating cells located in the hfPSA of the growing early and middle anagen phase hair follicles. In patients exhibiting alopecia areata, the middle anagen hair follicles with growing cells were found to be nestin positive and K15 negative. In contrast, the hair follicles undergoing degradation in alopecia areata patients demonstrated lymphocytic infiltration within the nestin- and K15-negative dermal papilla cells. Both the nestin-positive hfPSA and K15-positive hair follicle bulge areas were not damaged in all phases. In addition, the regenerating early anagen hair follicles demonstrated nestin-positive and K15-negative cells within the dermal papilla and in the area surrounding the hair bulb. These results suggest that the nestin-positive cells play an important role not only in the hfPSA, but also in the dermal papilla in the regenerating hair follicle.

  11. Treatment with Piribedil and Memantine Reduces Noise-Induced Loss of Inner Hair Cell Synaptic Ribbons

    PubMed Central

    Altschuler, Richard A.; Wys, Noel; Prieskorn, Diane; Martin, Cathy; DeRemer, Susan; Bledsoe, Sanford; Miller, Josef M.

    2016-01-01

    Noise overstimulation can induce loss of synaptic ribbons associated with loss of Inner Hair CellAuditory Nerve synaptic connections. This study examined if systemic administration of Piribedil, a dopamine agonist that reduces the sound evoked auditory nerve compound action potential and/or Memantine, an NMDA receptor open channel blocker, would reduce noise-induced loss of Inner Hair Cell ribbons. Rats received systemic Memantine and/or Piribedil for 3 days before and 3 days after a 3 hour 4 kHz octave band noise at 117 dB (SPL). At 21 days following the noise there was a 26% and 38% loss of synaptic ribbons in regions 5.5 and 6.5 mm from apex, respectively, elevations in 4-, 8- and 20 kHz tonal ABR thresholds and reduced dynamic output at higher intensities of stimulation. Combined treatment with Piribedil and Memantine produced a significant reduction in the noise-induced loss of ribbons in both regions and changes in ABR sensitivity and dynamic responsiveness. Piribedil alone gave significant reduction in only the 5.5 mm region and Memantine alone did not reach significance in either region. Results identify treatments that could prevent the hearing loss and hearing disorders that result from noise-induced loss of Inner Hair CellAuditory Nerve synaptic connections. PMID:27686418

  12. Improved ROS measurement in root hair cells.

    PubMed

    Juárez, Silvina Paola Denita; Mangano, Silvina; Estevez, José M

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are recognized as important signaling components in various processes in plants. ROS are produced for NADPH oxidase in different subcellular compartments and they are involved for a wide range of stimuli, such as cell cycle, growth, plant defenses, abiotic stress responses, and abscisic acid signaling in guard cells. In Arabidopsis, root hairs ROS also play a key role in root hair growth and they control the activity of calcium channels required for polar growth (Takeda et al. Science 319:1241-1244, 2008). The production of reactive oxygen species is under a specific molecular control in order to avoid detrimental side effects. Here we describe a protocol to detect ROS by oxidation of a derivative of fluorescein: 2',7-dihidro dicloro fluorescein (H2DCFDA).

  13. Regional differences in lectin binding patterns of vestibular hair cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, R. A.; Schuff, N. R.; Bancroft, J.

    1993-01-01

    Surface glycoconjugates of hair cells and supporting cells in the vestibular endorgans of the bullfrog were identified using biotinylated lectins with different carbohydrate specificities. Lectin binding in hair cells was consistent with the presence of glucose and mannose (CON A), galactose (RCA-I), N-acetylglucosamine (WGA), N-acetylgalactosamine (VVA), but not fucose (UEA-I) residues. Hair cells in the bullfrog sacculus, unlike those in the utriculus and semicircular canals, did not strain for N-acetylglucosamine (WGA) or N-acetylgalactosamine (VVA). By contrast, WGA and, to a lesser extent, VVA, differentially stained utricular and semicircular canal hair cells, labeling hair cells located in peripheral, but not central, regions. In mammals, WGA uniformly labeled Type I hair cells while labeling, as in the bullfrog, Type II hair cells only in peripheral regions. These regional variations were retained after enzymatic digestion. We conclude that vestibular hair cells differ in their surface glycoconjugates and that differences in lectin binding patterns can be used to identify hair cell types and to infer the epithelial origin of isolated vestibular hair cells.

  14. Regional differences in lectin binding patterns of vestibular hair cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, Richard A.; Schuff, N. R.; Bancroft, J.

    1994-01-01

    Surface glycoconjugates of hair cells and supporting cells in the vestibular endorgans of the bullfrog were identified using biotinylated lectins with different carbohydrate specificities. Lectin binding in hair cells was consistent with the presence of glucose and mannose (CON A), galactose (RCA-I), N-acetylgalactosamine (VVA), but not fucose (UEA-I) residues. Hair cells in the bullfrog sacculus, unlike those in the utriculus and semicircular canals, did not stain for N-acetylglucosamine (WGA) or N-acetylgalactosamine (VVA). By contrast, WGA and, to a lesser extent, VVA, differentially stained utricular and semicircular canal hair cells, labeling hair cells located in peripheral, but not central, regions. In mammals, WGA uniformly labeled Type 1 hair cells while labeling, as in the bullfrog, Type 2 hair cells only in peripheral regions. These regional variations were retained after enzymatic digestion. We conclude that vestibular hair cells differ in their surface glycoconjugates and that differences in lectin binding patterns can be used to identify hair cell types and to infer the epithelial origin of isolated vestibular hair cells.

  15. Kinocilia mediate mechanosensitivity in developing zebrafish hair cells

    PubMed Central

    Kindt, Katie S.; Finch, Gabriel; Nicolson, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Mechanosensitive cilia are vital to signaling and development across many species. In sensory hair cells, sound and movement are transduced by apical hair bundles. Each bundle is comprised of a single primary cilium (kinocilium) flanked by multiple rows of actin-filled projections (stereocilia). Extracellular tip links that interconnect stereocilia are thought to gate mechanosensitive channels. In contrast to stereocilia, kinocilia are not critical for hair-cell mechanotransduction. However, by sequentially imaging the structure of hair bundles and mechanosensitivity of individual lateral-line hair cells in vivo, we uncovered a central role for kinocilia in mechanosensation during development. Our data demonstrate that nascent hair cells require kinocilia and kinocilial links for mechanosensitivity. Although nascent hair bundles have correct planar polarity, the polarity of their responses to mechanical stimuli is initially reversed. Later in development, a switch to correctly polarized mechanosensitivity coincides with the formation of tip links and the onset of tip link-dependent mechanotransduction. PMID:22898777

  16. Innervation regulates synaptic ribbons in lateral line mechanosensory hair cells.

    PubMed

    Suli, Arminda; Pujol, Remy; Cunningham, Dale E; Hailey, Dale W; Prendergast, Andrew; Rubel, Edwin W; Raible, David W

    2016-06-01

    Failure to form proper synapses in mechanosensory hair cells, the sensory cells responsible for hearing and balance, leads to deafness and balance disorders. Ribbons are electron-dense structures that tether synaptic vesicles to the presynaptic zone of mechanosensory hair cells where they are juxtaposed with the post-synaptic endings of afferent fibers. They are initially formed throughout the cytoplasm, and, as cells mature, ribbons translocate to the basolateral membrane of hair cells to form functional synapses. We have examined the effect of post-synaptic elements on ribbon formation and maintenance in the zebrafish lateral line system by observing mutants that lack hair cell innervation, wild-type larvae whose nerves have been transected and ribbons in regenerating hair cells. Our results demonstrate that innervation is not required for initial ribbon formation but suggest that it is crucial for regulating the number, size and localization of ribbons in maturing hair cells, and for ribbon maintenance at the mature synapse.

  17. A novel stereocilia defect in sensory hair cells of the deaf mouse mutant Tasmanian devil.

    PubMed

    Erven, Alexandra; Skynner, Michael J; Okumura, Katsuzumi; Takebayashi, Shin-ichiro; Brown, Steve D M; Steel, Karen P; Allen, Nicholas D

    2002-10-01

    Stereocilia are specialized actin-filled, finger-like processes arrayed in rows of graded heights to form a crescent or W-shape on the apical surface of sensory hair cells. The stereocilia are deflected by the vibration of sound, which opens transduction channels and allows an influx of ions to depolarize the hair cell, in turn triggering synaptic activity. The specialized morphology and organization of the stereocilia bundle is crucial in the process of sensory transduction in the inner ear. However, we know little about the development of stereocilia in the mouse and few molecules that are involved in stereocilia maturation are known. We describe here a new mouse mutant with abnormal stereocilia development. The Tasmanian devil (tde) mouse mutation arose by insertional mutagenesis and has been mapped to the middle of chromosome 5. Homozygotes show head-tossing and circling and have raised thresholds for cochlear nerve responses to sound. The gross morphology of the inner ear was normal, but the stereocilia of cochlear and vestibular hair cells are abnormally thin, and they become progressively disorganized with increasing age. Ultimately, the hair cells die. This is the first report of a mutant showing thin stereocilia. The association of thin stereocilia with cochlear dysfunction emphasizes the critical role of stereocilia in auditory transduction, and the discovery of the Tasmanian devil mutant provides a resource for the identification of an essential molecule in hair cell function.

  18. Hair cell counts in a rat model of sound damage: Effects of tissue preparation & identification of regions of hair cell loss.

    PubMed

    Neal, Christopher; Kennon-McGill, Stefanie; Freemyer, Andrea; Shum, Axel; Staecker, Hinrich; Durham, Dianne

    2015-10-01

    Exposure to intense sound can damage or kill cochlear hair cells (HC). This loss of input typically manifests as noise induced hearing loss, but it can also be involved in the initiation of other auditory disorders such as tinnitus or hyperacusis. In this study we quantify changes in HC number following exposure to one of four sound damage paradigms. We exposed adult, anesthetized Long-Evans rats to a unilateral 16 kHz pure tone that varied in intensity (114 dB or 118 dB) and duration (1, 2, or 4 h) and sacrificed animals 2-4 weeks later. We compared two different methods of tissue preparation, plastic embedding/sectioning and whole mount dissection, for quantifying hair cell loss as a function of frequency. We found that the two methods of tissue preparation produced largely comparable cochleograms, with whole mount dissections allowing a more rapid evaluation of hair cell number. Both inner and outer hair cell loss was observed throughout the length of the cochlea irrespective of sound damage paradigm. Inner HC loss was either equal to or greater than outer HC loss. Increasing the duration of sound exposures resulted in more severe HC loss, which included all HC lesions observed in an analogous shorter duration exposure.

  19. Noise-Induced Loss of Hair Cells and Cochlear Synaptopathy Are Mediated by the Activation of AMPK

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Kayla; Yuan, Hu; Wang, Xianren

    2016-01-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is a major unresolved public health problem. Here, we investigate pathomechanisms of sensory hair cell death and suggest a novel target for protective intervention. Cellular survival depends upon maintenance of energy homeostasis, largely by AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). In response to a noise exposure in CBA/J mice, the levels of phosphorylated AMPKα increased in hair cells in a noise intensity-dependent manner. Inhibition of AMPK via siRNA or the pharmacological inhibitor compound C attenuated noise-induced loss of outer hair cells (OHCs) and synaptic ribbons, and preserved auditory function. Additionally, noise exposure increased the activity of the upstream AMPK kinase liver kinase B1 (LKB1) in cochlear tissues. The inhibition of LKB1 by siRNA attenuated the noise-increased phosphorylation of AMPKα in OHCs, reduced the loss of inner hair cell synaptic ribbons and OHCs, and protected against NIHL. These results indicate that noise exposure induces hair cell death and synaptopathy by activating AMPK via LKB1-mediated pathways. Targeting these pathways may provide a novel route to prevent NIHL. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Our results demonstrate for the first time that the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) α in sensory hair cells is noise intensity dependent and contributes to noise-induced hearing loss by mediating the loss of inner hair cell synaptic ribbons and outer hair cells. Noise induces the phosphorylation of AMPKα1 by liver kinase B1 (LKB1), triggered by changes in intracellular ATP levels. The inhibition of AMPK activation by silencing AMPK or LKB1, or with the pharmacological inhibitor compound C, reduced outer hair cell and synaptic ribbon loss as well as noise-induced hearing loss. This study provides new insights into mechanisms of noise-induced hearing loss and suggests novel interventions for the prevention of the loss of sensory hair cells and cochlear synaptopathy. PMID:27413159

  20. Nociceptor and hair cell transducer properties of TRPA1, a channel for pain and hearing.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Keiichi; Duggan, Anne; Kumar, Gagan; García-Añoveros, Jaime

    2005-04-20

    Mechanosensory channels of sensory cells mediate the sensations of hearing, touch, and some forms of pain. The TRPA1 (a member of the TRP family of ion channel proteins) channel is activated by pain-producing chemicals, and its inhibition impairs hair cell mechanotransduction. As shown here and previously, TRPA1 is expressed by hair cells as well as by most nociceptors (small neurons of dorsal root, trigeminal, and nodose ganglia) and localizes to their sensory terminals (mechanosensory stereocilia and peripheral free nerves, respectively). Thus, TRPA1 channels are proposed to mediate transduction in both hair cells and nociceptors. Accordingly, we find that heterologously expressed TRPA1 display channel behaviors expected for both auditory and nociceptive transducers. First, TRPA1 and the hair cell transducer share a unique set of pore properties not described for any other channel (block by gadolinium, amiloride, gentamicin, and ruthenium red, a ranging conductance of approximately 100 pS that is reduced to 54% by calcium, permeating calcium-induced potentiation followed by closure, and reopening by depolarization), supporting a direct role of TRPA1 as a pore-forming subunit of the hair cell transducer. Second, TRPA1 channels inactivate in hyperpolarized cells but remain open in depolarized cells. This property provides a mechanism for the lack of desensitization, coincidence detection, and allodynia that characterize pain by allowing a sensory neuron to respond constantly to sustained stimulation that is suprathreshold (i.e., noxious) and yet permitting the same cell to ignore sustained stimulation that is subthreshold (i.e., innocuous). Our results support a TRPA1 role in both nociceptor and hair cell transduction.

  1. Sensory hair cell death and regeneration in fishes

    PubMed Central

    Monroe, Jerry D.; Rajadinakaran, Gopinath; Smith, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Sensory hair cells are specialized mechanotransductive receptors required for hearing and vestibular function. Loss of hair cells in humans and other mammals is permanent and causes reduced hearing and balance. In the early 1980’s, it was shown that hair cells continue to be added to the inner ear sensory epithelia in cartilaginous and bony fishes. Soon thereafter, hair cell regeneration was documented in the chick cochlea following acoustic trauma. Since then, research using chick and other avian models has led to great insights into hair cell death and regeneration. However, with the rise of the zebrafish as a model organism for studying disease and developmental processes, there has been an increased interest in studying sensory hair cell death and regeneration in its lateral line and inner ears. Advances derived from studies in zebrafish and other fish species include understanding the effect of ototoxins on hair cells and finding otoprotectants to mitigate ototoxin damage, the role of cellular proliferation vs. direct transdifferentiation during hair cell regeneration, and elucidating cellular pathways involved in the regeneration process. This review will summarize research on hair cell death and regeneration using fish models, indicate the potential strengths and weaknesses of these models, and discuss several emerging areas of future studies. PMID:25954154

  2. Gene and stem cell therapy of the hair follicle.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Robert M

    2005-01-01

    The hair follicle is a highly complex appendage of the skin containing a multiplicity of cell types. The follicle undergoes constant cycling through the life of the organism including growth and resorption with growth dependent on specific stem cells. The targeting of the follicle by genes and stem cells to change its properties, in particular, the nature of the hair shaft is discussed. Hair follicle delivery systems are described such as liposomes and viral vectors for gene therapy. The nature of the hair follicle stem cells is discussed, in particular, its pluripotency.

  3. Cochlear hair cells: the sound-sensing machines

    PubMed Central

    Goutman, Juan D.; Elgoyhen, A. Belén; Gómez-Casati, María Eugenia

    2015-01-01

    Summary The sensory epithelium of the mammalian inner ear contains two types of mechanosensory cells: inner (IHC) and outer hair cells (OHC). They both transduce mechanical force generated by sound waves into electrical signals. In their apical end, these cells possess a set of stereocilia representing the mechanosensing organelles. IHC are responsible for detecting sounds and transmitting the acoustic information to the brain by converting graded depolarization into trains of action potentials in auditory nerve fibers. OHC are responsible for the active mechanical amplification process that leads to the fine tuning and high sensitivity of the mammalian inner ear. This active amplification is the consequence of the ability of OHC to alter their cell length in response to changes in membrane potential, and is controlled by an efferent inhibitory innervation. Medial olivocochlear efferent fibers, originating in the brainstem, synapse directly at the base of OHC and release acetylcholine. A very special type of nicotinic receptor, assembled by α9α10 subunits, participates in this synapse. Here we review recent knowledge and the role of both afferent and efferent synapse in the inner ear. PMID:26335749

  4. Cochlear hair cells: The sound-sensing machines.

    PubMed

    Goutman, Juan D; Elgoyhen, A Belén; Gómez-Casati, María Eugenia

    2015-11-14

    The sensory epithelium of the mammalian inner ear contains two types of mechanosensory cells: inner (IHC) and outer hair cells (OHC). They both transduce mechanical force generated by sound waves into electrical signals. In their apical end, these cells possess a set of stereocilia representing the mechanosensing organelles. IHC are responsible for detecting sounds and transmitting the acoustic information to the brain by converting graded depolarization into trains of action potentials in auditory nerve fibers. OHC are responsible for the active mechanical amplification process that leads to the fine tuning and high sensitivity of the mammalian inner ear. This active amplification is the consequence of the ability of OHC to alter their cell length in response to changes in membrane potential, and is controlled by an efferent inhibitory innervation. Medial olivocochlear efferent fibers, originating in the brainstem, synapse directly at the base of OHC and release acetylcholine. A very special type of nicotinic receptor, assembled by α9α10 subunits, participates in this synapse. Here we review recent knowledge and the role of both afferent and efferent synapse in the inner ear.

  5. The Nicotinic Receptor of Cochlear Hair Cells: A Possible Pharmacotherapeutic Target?

    PubMed Central

    Elgoyhen, Ana Belén; Katz, Eleonora; Fuchs, Paul A.

    2009-01-01

    Mechanosensory hair cells of the organ of Corti transmit information regarding sound to the central nervous system by way of peripheral afferent neurons. In return, the central nervous system provides feedback and modulates the afferent stream of information through efferent neurons. The medial olivocochlear efferent system makes direct synaptic contacts with outer hair cells and inhibits amplification brought about by the active mechanical process inherent to these cells. This feedback system offers the potential to improve the detection of signals in background noise, to selectively attend to particular signals, and to protect the periphery from damage caused by overly loud sounds. Acetylcholine released at the synapse between efferent terminals and outer hair cells activates a peculiar nicotinic cholinergic receptor subtype, the α9α10 receptor. At present no pharmacotherapeutic approaches have been designed that target this cholinergic receptor to treat pathologies of the auditory system. The potential use of α9α10 selective drugs in conditions such as noise-induced hearing loss, tinnitus and auditory processing disorders is discussed. PMID:19481062

  6. Artificial Hair Cells for Sensing Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Jack

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present additional information about the flow-velocity sensors described briefly in the immediately preceding article. As noted therein, these sensors can be characterized as artificial hair cells that implement an approximation of the sensory principle of flow-sensing cilia of fish: A cilium is bent by an amount proportional to the flow to which it is exposed. A nerve cell at the base of the cilium senses the flow by sensing the bending of the cilium. In an artificial hair cell, the artificial cilium is a microscopic cantilever beam, and the bending of an artificial cilium is measured by means of a strain gauge at its base (see Figure 1). Figure 2 presents cross sections of a representative sensor of this type at two different stages of its fabrication process. The process consists of relatively- low-temperature metallization, polymer-deposition, microfabrication, and surface-micromachining subprocesses, including plastic-deformation magnetic assembly (PDMA), which is described below. These subprocesses are suitable for a variety of substrate materials, including silicon, some glasses, and some polymers. Moreover, because it incorporates a polymeric supporting structure, this sensor is more robust, relative to its silicon-based counterparts.

  7. Transduction channels’ gating can control friction on vibrating hair-cell bundles in the ear

    PubMed Central

    Bormuth, Volker; Barral, Jérémie; Joanny, Jean-François; Jülicher, Frank; Martin, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    Hearing starts when sound-evoked mechanical vibrations of the hair-cell bundle activate mechanosensitive ion channels, giving birth to an electrical signal. As for any mechanical system, friction impedes movements of the hair bundle and thus constrains the sensitivity and frequency selectivity of auditory transduction. Friction is generally thought to result mainly from viscous drag by the surrounding fluid. We demonstrate here that the opening and closing of the transduction channels produce internal frictional forces that can dominate viscous drag on the micrometer-sized hair bundle. We characterized friction by analyzing hysteresis in the force–displacement relation of single hair-cell bundles in response to periodic triangular stimuli. For bundle velocities high enough to outrun adaptation, we found that frictional forces were maximal within the narrow region of deflections that elicited significant channel gating, plummeted upon application of a channel blocker, and displayed a sublinear growth for increasing bundle velocity. At low velocity, the slope of the relation between the frictional force and velocity was nearly fivefold larger than the hydrodynamic friction coefficient that was measured when the transduction machinery was decoupled from bundle motion by severing tip links. A theoretical analysis reveals that channel friction arises from coupling the dynamics of the conformational change associated with channel gating to tip-link tension. Varying channel properties affects friction, with faster channels producing smaller friction. We propose that this intrinsic source of friction may contribute to the process that sets the hair cell’s characteristic frequency of responsiveness. PMID:24799674

  8. Outer Hair Cell Electromotility in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramamoorthy, Sripriya; Nuttall, Alfred L.

    2011-11-01

    The effectiveness of outer hair cell (OHC) electro-motility in vivo has been challenged by the expected low-pass filtering of the transmembrane potential due to the cell's own capacitance. The OHC electromotility is characterized here by an electromechanical ratio defined as the ratio of the OHC contraction to the transmembrane potential. This ratio has been measured in isolated cells to be approximately 26 nm/mV. We estimate the OHC electromechanical ratio in vivo from the recently measured displacements of the reticular lamina and the basilar membrane near the 19 kHz characteristic frequency in the basal region of guinea pig cochlea. Our analysis strongly suggests OHC electromotility process is effective for cochlear amplification in vivo at least around the characteristic frequency of the basal location in spite of the low-pass filtering.

  9. Development and regeneration of vestibular hair cells in mammals.

    PubMed

    Burns, Joseph C; Stone, Jennifer S

    2016-11-15

    Vestibular sensation is essential for gaze stabilization, balance, and perception of gravity. The vestibular receptors in mammals, Type I and Type II hair cells, are located in five small organs in the inner ear. Damage to hair cells and their innervating neurons can cause crippling symptoms such as vertigo, visual field oscillation, and imbalance. In adult rodents, some Type II hair cells are regenerated and become re-innervated after damage, presenting opportunities for restoring vestibular function after hair cell damage. This article reviews features of vestibular sensory cells in mammals, including their basic properties, how they develop, and how they are replaced after damage. We discuss molecules that control vestibular hair cell regeneration and highlight areas in which our understanding of development and regeneration needs to be deepened.

  10. Using injectoporation to deliver genes to mechanosensory hair cells.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Wei; Wagner, Thomas; Yan, Linxuan; Grillet, Nicolas; Müller, Ulrich

    2014-10-01

    Mechanosensation, the transduction of mechanical force into electrochemical signals, allows organisms to detect touch and sound, to register movement and gravity, and to sense changes in cell volume and shape. The hair cells of the mammalian inner ear are the mechanosensors for the detection of sound and head movement. The analysis of gene function in hair cells has been hampered by the lack of an efficient gene transfer method. Here we describe a method termed injectoporation that combines tissue microinjection with electroporation to express cDNAs and shRNAs in mouse cochlear hair cells. Injectoporation allows for gene transfer into dozens of hair cells, and it is compatible with the analysis of hair cell function using imaging approaches and electrophysiology. Tissue dissection and injectoporation can be carried out within a few hours, and the tissue can be cultured for days for subsequent functional analyses.

  11. EphA7 regulates spiral ganglion innervation of cochlear hair cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young J; Ibrahim, Leena A; Wang, Sheng-Zhi; Yuan, Wei; Evgrafov, Oleg V; Knowles, James A; Wang, Kai; Tao, Huizhong W; Zhang, Li I

    2016-04-01

    During the development of periphery auditory circuitry, spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) form a spatially precise pattern of innervation of cochlear hair cells (HCs), which is an essential structural foundation for central auditory processing. However, molecular mechanisms underlying the developmental formation of this precise innervation pattern remain not well understood. Here, we specifically examined the involvement of Eph family members in cochlear development. By performing RNA-sequencing for different types of cochlear cell, in situ hybridization, and immunohistochemistry, we found that EphA7 was strongly expressed in a large subset of SGNs. In EphA7 deletion mice, there was a reduction in the number of inner radial bundles originating from SGNs and projecting to HCs as well as in the number of ribbon synapses on inner hair cells (IHCs), as compared with wild-type or heterozygous mutant mice, attributable to fewer type I afferent fibers. The overall activity of the auditory nerve in EphA7 deletion mice was also reduced, although there was no significant change in the hearing intensity threshold. In vitro analysis further suggested that the reduced innervation of HCs by SGNs could be attributed to a role of EphA7 in regulating outgrowth of SGN neurites as knocking down EphA7 in SGNs resulted in diminished SGN fibers. In addition, suppressing the activity of ERK1/2, a potential downstream target of EphA7 signaling, either with specific inhibitors in cultured explants or by knocking out Prkg1, also resulted in reduced SGN fibers. Together, our results suggest that EphA7 plays an important role in the developmental formation of cochlear innervation pattern through controlling SGN fiber ontogeny. Such regulation may contribute to the salience level of auditory signals presented to the central auditory system.

  12. Induction of Functional Hair-Cell-Like Cells from Mouse Cochlear Multipotent Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Quanwen; Shen, Yi; Chen, Jiarong; Ding, Jie; Tang, Zihua; Zhang, Cui; Chen, Jianling; Li, Liang; Chen, Ping; Wang, Jinfu

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we developed a two-step-induction method of generating functional hair cells from inner ear multipotent cells. Multipotent cells from the inner ear were established and induced initially into progenitor cells committed to the inner ear cell lineage on the poly-L-lysine substratum. Subsequently, the committed progenitor cells were cultured on the mitotically inactivated chicken utricle stromal cells and induced into hair-cell-like cells containing characteristic stereocilia bundles. The hair-cell-like cells exhibited rapid permeation of FM1-43FX. The whole-cell patch-clamp technique was used to measure the membrane currents of cells differentiated for 7 days on chicken utricle stromal cells and analyze the biophysical properties of the hair-cell-like cells by recording membrane properties of cells. The results suggested that the hair-cell-like cells derived from inner ear multipotent cells were functional following differentiation in an enabling environment. PMID:27057177

  13. Hair cell regeneration after ATOH1 gene therapy in the cochlea of profoundly deaf adult guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Patrick J; Wise, Andrew K; Flynn, Brianna O; Nayagam, Bryony A; Richardson, Rachael T

    2014-01-01

    The degeneration of hair cells in the mammalian cochlea results in permanent sensorineural hearing loss. This study aimed to promote the regeneration of sensory hair cells in the mature cochlea and their reconnection with auditory neurons through the introduction of ATOH1, a transcription factor known to be necessary for hair cell development, and the introduction of neurotrophic factors. Adenoviral vectors containing ATOH1 alone, or with neurotrophin-3 and brain derived neurotrophic factor were injected into the lower basal scala media of guinea pig cochleae four days post ototoxic deafening. Guinea pigs treated with ATOH1 gene therapy, alone, had a significantly greater number of cells expressing hair cell markers compared to the contralateral non-treated cochlea when examined 3 weeks post-treatment. This increase, however, did not result in a commensurate improvement in hearing thresholds, nor was there an increase in synaptic ribbons, as measured by CtBP2 puncta after ATOH1 treatment alone, or when combined with neurotrophins. However, hair cell formation and synaptogenesis after co-treatment with ATOH1 and neurotrophic factors remain inconclusive as viral transduction was reduced due to the halving of viral titres when the samples were combined. Collectively, these data suggest that, whilst ATOH1 alone can drive non-sensory cells towards an immature sensory hair cell phenotype in the mature cochlea, this does not result in functional improvements after aminoglycoside-induced deafness.

  14. Induced pluripotent stem cells from human hair follicle keratinocytes as a potential source for in vitro hair follicle cloning

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sheng Jye; Ho, Shu Cheow; Mok, Pooi Ling; Tan, Kian Lee; Ong, Alan H.K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Human hair follicles are important for the renewal of new hairs and their development. The generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from hair follicles is easy due to its accessibility and availability. The pluripotent cells derived from hair follicles not only have a higher tendency to re-differentiate into hair follicles, but are also more suited for growth in hair scalp tissue microenvironment. Methods In this study, human hair follicular keratinocytes were used to generate iPSCs, which were then further differentiated in vitro into keratinocytes. The derived iPSCs were characterised by using immunofluorescence staining, flow cytometry, and reverse-transcription PCR to check for its pluripotency markers expression. Results The iPSC clones expressed pluripotency markers such as TRA-1-60, TRA-1-81, SSEA4, OCT4, SOX2, NANOG, LEFTY, and GABRB. The well-formed three germ layers were observed during differentiation using iPSCs derived from hair follicles. The successful formation of keratioctyes from iPSCs was confirmed by the expression of cytokeratin 14 marker. Discussion Hair follicles represent a valuable keratinocytes source for in vitro hair cloning for use in treating hair balding or grafting in burn patients. Our significant findings in this report proved that hair follicles could be used to produce pluripotent stem cells and suggested that the genetic and micro-environmental elements of hair follicles might trigger higher and more efficient hair follicles re-differentiation. PMID:27867768

  15. Conditional Deletion of Atoh1 Reveals Distinct Critical Periods for Survival and Function of Hair Cells in the Organ of Corti

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Tiantian; Seymour, Michelle L.; Zhang, Hongyuan; Pereira, Fred A.

    2013-01-01

    Atonal homolog1 (Atoh1) encodes a basic helix–loop–helix protein that is the first transcription factor to be expressed in differentiating hair cells. Previous work suggests that expression of Atoh1 in prosensory precursors is necessary for the differentiation and survival of hair cells, but it is not clear whether Atoh1 is required exclusively for these processes, or whether it regulates other functions later during hair cell maturation. We used EGFP-tagged Atoh1 knock-in mice to demonstrate for the first time that Atoh1 protein is expressed in hair cell precursors several days before the appearance of differentiated markers, but not in the broad pattern expected of a proneural gene. We conditionally deleted Atoh1 at different points in hair cell development and observe a rapid onset of hair cell defects, suggesting that the Atoh1 protein is unstable in differentiating hair cells and is necessary through an extended phase of their differentiation. Conditional deletion of Atoh1 reveals multiple functions in hair cell survival, maturation of stereociliary bundles, and auditory function. We show the presence of distinct critical periods for Atoh1 in each of these functions, suggesting that Atoh1 may be directly regulating many aspects of hair cell function. Finally, we show that the supporting cell death that accompanies loss of Atoh1 in hair cells is likely caused by the abortive trans-differentiation of supporting cells into hair cells. Together our data suggest that Atoh1 regulates multiple aspects of hair cell development and function. PMID:23761906

  16. Atoh1 as a Coordinator of Sensory Hair Cell Development and Regeneration in the Cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sungsu; Jeong, Han-Seong

    2017-01-01

    Cochlear sensory hair cells (HCs) are crucial for hearing as mechanoreceptors of the auditory systems. Clarification of transcriptional regulation for the cochlear sensory HC development is crucial for the improvement of cell replacement therapies for hearing loss. Transcription factor Atoh1 is the key player during HC development and regeneration. In this review, we will focus on Atoh1 and its related signaling pathways (Notch, fibroblast growth factor, and Wnt/β-catenin signaling) involved in the development of cochlear sensory HCs. We will also discuss the potential applicability of these signals for the induction of HC regeneration. PMID:28184337

  17. Transient receptor potential melastatin 1: a hair cell transduction channel candidate.

    PubMed

    Gerka-Stuyt, John; Au, Adrian; Peachey, Neal S; Alagramam, Kumar N

    2013-01-01

    Sound and head movements are perceived through sensory hair cells in the inner ear. Mounting evidence indicates that this process is initiated by the opening of mechanically sensitive calcium-permeable channels, also referred to as the mechanoelectrical transducer (MET) channels, reported to be around the tips of all but the tallest stereocilia. However, the identity of MET channel remains elusive. Literature suggests that the MET channel is a non-selective cation channel with a high Ca(2+) permeability and ~100 picosiemens conductance. These characteristics make members of the transient receptor potential (TRP) superfamily likely candidates for this role. One of these candidates is the transient receptor potential melastatin 1 protein (TRPM1), which is expressed in various cells types within the cochlea of the mouse including the hair cells. Recent studies demonstrate that mutations in the TRPM1 gene underlie the inherited retinal disease complete congenital stationary night blindness in humans and depolarizing bipolar cell dysfunction in the mouse retina, but auditory function was not assessed. Here we investigate the role of Trpm1 in hearing and as a possible hair cell MET channel using mice homozygous for the null allele of Trpm1 (Trpm1(-/-)) or a missense mutation in the pore domain of TRPM1 (Trpm1(tvrm27/tvrm27)). Hearing thresholds were evaluated in adult (4-5 months old) mice with auditory-evoked brain stem responses. Our data shows no statistically significant difference in hearing thresholds in Trpm1(-/-) or Trpm1(tvrm27/tvrm27) mutants compared to littermate controls. Further, none of the mutant mice showed any sign of balance disorder, such as head bobbing or circling. These data suggest that TRPM1 is not essential for development of hearing or balance and it is unlikely that TRPM1 is a component of the hair cell MET channel.

  18. Distinguishing hair cell from neural potentials recorded at the round window.

    PubMed

    Forgues, Mathieu; Koehn, Heather A; Dunnon, Askia K; Pulver, Stephen H; Buchman, Craig A; Adunka, Oliver F; Fitzpatrick, Douglas C

    2014-02-01

    Almost all patients who receive cochlear implants have some acoustic hearing prior to surgery. Electrocochleography (ECoG), or electrophysiological measures of cochlear response to sound, can identify remaining auditory nerve activity that is the basis for this residual hearing and can record potentials from hair cells that are no longer functionally connected to nerve fibers. The ECoG signal is therefore complex, being composed of both hair cell and neural signals. To identify signatures of different sources in the recorded potentials, we collected ECoG data across frequency and intensity from the round window of gerbils before and after treatment with kainic acid, a neurotoxin. Distortions in the recorded waveforms were produced by different sources over different ranges of frequency and intensity. In response to tones at low frequencies and low-to-moderate intensities, the major source of distortion was from neural phase-locking that was sensitive to kainic acid. At high intensities at all frequencies, the distortion was not sensitive to kainic acid and was consistent with asymmetric saturation of the hair cell transducer current. In addition to loss of phase-locking, changes in the envelope after kainic acid treatment indicate that sustained neural firing combines with receptor potentials from hair cells to produce the envelope of the response to tones. These results provide baseline data to interpret comparable recordings from human cochlear implant recipients.

  19. Distinguishing hair cell from neural potentials recorded at the round window

    PubMed Central

    Forgues, Mathieu; Koehn, Heather A.; Dunnon, Askia K.; Pulver, Stephen H.; Buchman, Craig A.; Adunka, Oliver F.

    2013-01-01

    Almost all patients who receive cochlear implants have some acoustic hearing prior to surgery. Electrocochleography (ECoG), or electrophysiological measures of cochlear response to sound, can identify remaining auditory nerve activity that is the basis for this residual hearing and can record potentials from hair cells that are no longer functionally connected to nerve fibers. The ECoG signal is therefore complex, being composed of both hair cell and neural signals. To identify signatures of different sources in the recorded potentials, we collected ECoG data across frequency and intensity from the round window of gerbils before and after treatment with kainic acid, a neurotoxin. Distortions in the recorded waveforms were produced by different sources over different ranges of frequency and intensity. In response to tones at low frequencies and low-to-moderate intensities, the major source of distortion was from neural phase-locking that was sensitive to kainic acid. At high intensities at all frequencies, the distortion was not sensitive to kainic acid and was consistent with asymmetric saturation of the hair cell transducer current. In addition to loss of phase-locking, changes in the envelope after kainic acid treatment indicate that sustained neural firing combines with receptor potentials from hair cells to produce the envelope of the response to tones. These results provide baseline data to interpret comparable recordings from human cochlear implant recipients. PMID:24133227

  20. Photometric recording of transmembrane potential in outer hair cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Takashi; Oghalai, John S.; Saggau, Peter; Rabbitt, Richard D.; Brownell, William E.

    2006-06-01

    Cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs) are polarized epithelial cells that have mechanoelectrical transduction channels within their apical stereocilia and produce electromotile force along their lateral wall. Phase shifts, or time delays, in the transmembrane voltage occurring at different axial locations along the cell may contribute to our understanding of how these cells operate at auditory frequencies. We developed a method to optically measure the phase of the OHC transmembrane potential using the voltage-sensitive dye (VSD) di-8-ANEPPS. The exit aperture of a fibre-optic light source was driven in two dimensions so that a 24 µm spot of excitation light could be positioned along the length of the OHC. We used the whole-cell patch-clamp technique in the current-clamp mode to stimulate the OHC at the base. The photometric response and the voltage response were monitored with a photodetector and patch-clamp amplifier, respectively. The photometric response was used to measure the regional changes in the membrane potential in response to maintained (dc) and sinusoidal (ac) current stimuli applied at the base of the cell. We used a neutral density filter to lower the excitation light intensity and reduce phototoxicity. A sensitive detector and lock-in amplifier were used to measure the small ac VSD signal. This permitted measurements of the ac photometric response below the noise floor of the static fluorescence. The amplitude and phase components of the photometric response were recorded for stimuli up to 800 Hz. VSD data at 400-800 Hz show the presence of a small phase delay between the stimulus voltage at the base of the cell and the local membrane potential measured along the lateral wall. Results are consistent with the hypothesis that OHCs exhibit inhomogeneous membrane potentials that vary with position in analogy with the voltage in nerve axons.

  1. Shaping the mammalian auditory sensory organ by the planar cell polarity pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Michael; Chen, Ping

    2014-01-01

    The human ear is capable of processing sound with a remarkable resolution over a wide range of intensity and frequency. This ability depends largely on the extraordinary feats of the hearing organ, the organ of Corti and its sensory hair cells. The organ of Corti consists of precisely patterned rows of sensory hair cells and supporting cells along the length of the snail-shaped cochlear duct. On the apical surface of each hair cell, several rows of actin-containing protrusions, known as stereocilia, form a “V”-shaped staircase. The vertices of all the “V”-shaped stereocilia point away from the center of the cochlea. The uniform orientation of stereocilia in the organ of Corti manifests a distinctive form of polarity known as planar cell polarity (PCP). Functionally, the direction of stereociliary bundle deflection controls the mechanical channels located in the stereocilia for auditory transduction. In addition, hair cells are tonotopically organized along the length of the cochlea. Thus, the uniform orientation of stereociliary bundles along the length of the cochlea is critical for effective mechanotransduction and for frequency selection. Here we summarize the morphological and molecular events that bestow the structural characteristics of the mammalian hearing organ, the growth of the snail-shaped cochlear duct and the establishment of PCP in the organ of Corti. The PCP of the sensory organs in the vestibule of the inner ear will also be described briefly. PMID:17891715

  2. Rescue of Hearing by Gene Delivery to Inner-Ear Hair Cells Using Exosome-Associated AAV.

    PubMed

    György, Bence; Sage, Cyrille; Indzhykulian, Artur A; Scheffer, Deborah I; Brisson, Alain R; Tan, Sisareuth; Wu, Xudong; Volak, Adrienn; Mu, Dakai; Tamvakologos, Panos I; Li, Yaqiao; Fitzpatrick, Zachary; Ericsson, Maria; Breakefield, Xandra O; Corey, David P; Maguire, Casey A

    2017-02-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) is a safe and effective vector for gene therapy for retinal disorders. Gene therapy for hearing disorders is not as advanced, in part because gene delivery to sensory hair cells of the inner ear is inefficient. Although AAV transduces the inner hair cells of the mouse cochlea, outer hair cells remain refractory to transduction. Here, we demonstrate that a vector, exosome-associated AAV (exo-AAV), is a potent carrier of transgenes to all inner ear hair cells. Exo-AAV1-GFP is more efficient than conventional AAV1-GFP, both in mouse cochlear explants in vitro and with direct cochlear injection in vivo. Exo-AAV shows no toxicity in vivo, as assayed by tests of auditory and vestibular function. Finally, exo-AAV1 gene therapy partially rescues hearing in a mouse model of hereditary deafness (lipoma HMGIC fusion partner-like 5/tetraspan membrane protein of hair cell stereocilia [Lhfpl5/Tmhs(-/-)]). Exo-AAV is a powerful gene delivery system for hair cell research and may be useful for gene therapy for deafness.

  3. Hair cell recovery in mitotically blocked cultures of the bullfrog saccule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, R. A.; Burton, M. D.; Fashena, D. S.; Naeger, R. A.

    2000-01-01

    Hair cells in many nonmammalian vertebrates are regenerated by the mitotic division of supporting cell progenitors and the differentiation of the resulting progeny into new hair cells and supporting cells. Recent studies have shown that nonmitotic hair cell recovery after aminoglycoside-induced damage can also occur in the vestibular organs. Using hair cell and supporting cell immunocytochemical markers, we have used confocal and electron microscopy to examine the fate of damaged hair cells and the origin of immature hair cells after gentamicin treatment in mitotically blocked cultures of the bullfrog saccule. Extruding and fragmenting hair cells, which undergo apoptotic cell death, are replaced by scar formations. After losing their bundles, sublethally damaged hair cells remain in the sensory epithelium for prolonged periods, acquiring supporting cell-like morphology and immunoreactivity. These modes of damage appear to be mutually exclusive, implying that sublethally damaged hair cells repair their bundles. Transitional cells, coexpressing hair cell and supporting cell markers, are seen near scar formations created by the expansion of neighboring supporting cells. Most of these cells have morphology and immunoreactivity similar to that of sublethally damaged hair cells. Ultrastructural analysis also reveals that most immature hair cells had autophagic vacuoles, implying that they originated from damaged hair cells rather than supporting cells. Some transitional cells are supporting cells participating in scar formations. Supporting cells also decrease in number during hair cell recovery, supporting the conclusion that some supporting cells undergo phenotypic conversion into hair cells without an intervening mitotic event.

  4. Control of hair cell excitability by vestibular primary sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Brugeaud, Aurore; Travo, Cécile; Demêmes, Danielle; Lenoir, Marc; Llorens, Jordi; Puel, Jean-Luc; Chabbert, Christian

    2007-01-01

    In the rat utricle, synaptic contacts between hair cells and the nerve fibers arising from the vestibular primary neurons form during the first week after birth. During that period, the sodium-based excitability that characterizes neonate utricle sensory cells is switched off. To investigate whether the establishment of synaptic contacts was responsible for the modulation of the hair cell excitability, we used an organotypic culture of rat utricle in which the setting of synapses was prevented. Under this condition, the voltage-gated sodium current and the underlying action potentials persisted in a large proportion of non-afferented hair cells. We then studied whether impairment of nerve terminals in utricle of adult rats may also affect hair cell excitability. We induced selective and transient damages of afferent terminals using glutamate excitotoxicity in vivo. The efficiency of the excitotoxic injury was attested by selective swellings of the terminals and underlying altered vestibular behavior. Under this condition, the sodium-based excitability transiently recovered in hair cells. These results indicate that the modulation of hair cells excitability depends on the state of the afferent terminals. In adult utricle hair cells this property may be essential to set the conditions required for restoration of the sensory network after damage. This is achieved via re-expression of a biological process that occurs during synaptogenesis. PMID:17392466

  5. SENSORY HAIR CELL REGENERATION IN THE ZEBRAFISH LATERAL LINE

    PubMed Central

    Lush, Mark E.; Piotrowski, Tatjana

    2014-01-01

    Damage or destruction of sensory hair cells in the inner ear leads to hearing or balance deficits that can be debilitating, especially in older adults. Unfortunately, the damage is permanent, as regeneration of the inner ear sensory epithelia does not occur in mammals. Zebrafish and other non-mammalian vertebrates have the remarkable ability to regenerate sensory hair cells and understanding the molecular and cellular basis for this regenerative ability will hopefully aid us in designing therapies to induce regeneration in mammals. Zebrafish not only possess hair cells in the ear but also in the sensory lateral line system. Hair cells in both organs are functionally analogous to hair cells in the inner ear of mammals. The lateral line is a mechanosensory system found in most aquatic vertebrates that detects water motion and aids in predator avoidance, prey capture, schooling and mating. Although hair cell regeneration occurs in both the ear and lateral line, most research to date has focused on the lateral line due to its relatively simple structure and accessibility. Here we review the recent discoveries made during the characterization of hair cell regeneration in zebrafish. PMID:25045019

  6. Introduction to Hair-Follicle-Associated Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Robert M

    2016-01-01

    Nestin-expressing stem cells of the hair follicle, discovered by our laboratory, have been shown to be able to form outer-root sheaths of the follicle as well as neurons and many other non-follicle cell types. We have termed the nestin-expressing stem cells of the hair follicle as hair-follicle-associated pluripotent (HAP) stem cells. We have shown that the HAP stem cells from the hair follicle can effect the repair of peripheral nerve and spinal cord injury. The hair follicle stem cells differentiate into neuronal and glial cells after transplantation to the injured peripheral nerve and spinal cord, and enhance injury repair and locomotor recovery. When the excised hair follicle with its nerve stump was placed in Gelfoam(®) 3D histoculture, HAP stem cells grew and extended the hair follicle nerve which consisted of βIII-tubulin-positive fibers with F-actin expression at the tip. These findings indicate that βIII-tubulin-positive fibers elongating from the whisker follicle sensory nerve stump were growing axons. The growing whisker sensory nerve was highly enriched in HAP stem cells, which appeared to play a major role in its elongation and interaction with other nerves in 3D Gelfoam(®) histoculture, including the sciatic nerve, the trigeminal nerve, and the trigeminal nerve ganglion. These results suggest that a major function of the HAP stem cells in the hair follicle is for growth of the follicle sensory nerve. Recently, we have shown that HAP stem cells can differentiate into beating cardiac muscle cells. HAP stem cells have critical advantages for regenerative medicine over embryonic stem (ES) cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells in that they are highly accessible from each patient, thereby eliminating immunological issues since they are autologous, require no genetic manipulation, are non-tumorigenic, and do not present ethical issues.

  7. Time sequence of auditory nerve and spiral ganglion cell degeneration following chronic kanamycin-induced deafness in the guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Kong, W J; Yin, Z D; Fan, G R; Li, D; Huang, X

    2010-05-17

    We investigated the time sequence of morphological changes of the spiral ganglion cell (SGC) and auditory nerve (AN) following chronic kanamycin-induced deafness. Guinea pigs were treated with kanamycin by subcutaneous injection at 500 mg/kg per day for 7 days. Histological changes in hair cells, SGCs, Schwann cells and the area of the cross-sectional of the AN with vestibular ganglion (VG) in the internal acoustic meatus were quantified at 1, 7, 14, 28, 56 and 70 days after kanamycin treatment. Outer hair cells decreased at 7 and 14 days. Loss of inner hair cells occurred at 14 and 28 days. The cross-sectional area of the AN with VG increased at 1 day and decreased shortly following loss of SGCs and Schwann cells at 7, 14 and 28 days after deafening. There was a similar time course of morphological changes in the overall cochlea and the basal turn. Thus, the effects of kanamycin on hair cells, spiral ganglion and Schwann cells are progressive. Early degeneration of SGC and Schwann cell mainly results from the direct toxic effect of kanamycin. However, multiple factors such as loss of hair cell, degeneration of Schwann cell and the progressive damage of kanamycin, may participate in the late degeneration process of SGCs. The molecular mechanism of the degeneration of SGC and Schwann cell should be investigated in the future. Moreover, there is a different time sequence of cell degeneration between acute and chronic deafness by kanamycin.

  8. Aqueous extract of red deer antler promotes hair growth by regulating the hair cycle and cell proliferation in hair follicles.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing-jie; Li, Zheng; Gu, Li-juan; Wang, Yun-bo; Lee, Mi-ra; Sung, Chang-keun

    2014-01-01

    Deer antlers are the only mammalian appendage capable of regeneration. We aimed to investigate the effect of red deer antler extract in regulating hair growth, using a mouse model. The backs of male mice were shaved at eight weeks of age. Crude aqueous extracts of deer antler were prepared at either 4 °C or 100 °C and injected subcutaneously to two separate groups of mice (n = 9) at 1 mL/day for 10 consecutive days, with water as a vehicle control group. The mice skin quantitative hair growth parameters were measured and 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine was used to identify label-retaining cells. We found that, in both the 4 °C and the 100 °C deer antler aqueous extract-injection groups, the anagen phase was extended, while the number of BrdU-incorporated cells was dramatically increased. These results indicate that deer antler aqueous extract promotes hair growth by extending the anagen phase and regulating cell proliferation in the hair follicle region.

  9. Ribeye a-mCherry fusion protein: a novel tool for labeling synaptic ribbons of the hair cell.

    PubMed

    West, Megan C; McDermott, Brian M

    2011-04-30

    Synaptic ribbons are presynaptic cytomatrices that are required for efficient transfer of auditory information from hair cells to the central nervous system. In the hair cell, each electron-dense ribbon tethers numerous synaptic vesicles by fine filaments. The ribbon generally resides juxtaposed to the active zone plasma membrane. A dearth of appropriate tools to visualize the ribbon synapse has limited our knowledge of its development. Here we present the design and implementation of a method to visualize synaptic ribbons in hair cells. This scheme uses a tagged version of the protein Ribeye a, which is specific to ribbons. We generate the DNA construct Tg(pvalb3b:ribeye a-mCherry) to transgenically express the fusion protein Ribeye a-mCherry in zebrafish hair cells. The fusion protein localizes to the basolateral surface of the hair cell with a pattern similar to that of a hair cell labeled with an antiserum that recognizes ribeye proteins. Moreover, using this antiserum to label transgenics that express Ribeye a-mCherry, we demonstrate that the fusion protein and antibody-associated fluorescent signals overlap. In addition, ribbons labeled with the fusion protein are proximal to afferent nerve endings. Finally, the fusion protein labels hair-cell ribbons of zebrafish at different developmental time points. These findings indicate that the fusion protein is an effective tool to label ribbons in live and fixed hair cells, which will make it useful in the study of ribbon synapse development and to characterize zebrafish mutants with defects in synapse formation.

  10. Inner Ear Hair Cell-Like Cells from Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ronaghi, Mohammad; Nasr, Marjan; Ealy, Megan; Durruthy-Durruthy, Robert; Waldhaus, Joerg; Diaz, Giovanni H.; Joubert, Lydia-Marie; Oshima, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    In mammals, the permanence of many forms of hearing loss is the result of the inner ear's inability to replace lost sensory hair cells. Here, we apply a differentiation strategy to guide human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) into cells of the otic lineage using chemically defined attached-substrate conditions. The generation of human otic progenitor cells was dependent on fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling, and protracted culture led to the upregulation of markers indicative of differentiated inner ear sensory epithelia. Using a transgenic ESC reporter line based on a murine Atoh1 enhancer, we show that differentiated hair cell-like cells express multiple hair cell markers simultaneously. Hair cell-like cells displayed protrusions reminiscent of stereociliary bundles, but failed to fully mature into cells with typical hair cell cytoarchitecture. We conclude that optimized defined conditions can be used in vitro to attain otic progenitor specification and sensory cell differentiation. PMID:24512547

  11. Interrelated striated elements in vestibular hair cells of the rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, M. D.; Bourne, C.

    1983-01-01

    A series of interrelated striated organelles in types I and II vestibular hair cells of the rat which appear to be less developed in cochlear hair cells have been revealed by unusual fixation procedures, suggesting that contractile elements may play a role in sensory transduction in the inner ear, especially in the vestibular system. Included in the series of interrelated striated elements are the cuticular plate and its basal attachments to the hair cell margins, the connections of the strut array of the kinociliary basal body to the cuticular plate, and striated organelles associated with the plasma membrane and extending below the apical junctional complexes.

  12. Assembly of hair bundles, an amazing problem for cell biology.

    PubMed

    Barr-Gillespie, Peter-G

    2015-08-01

    The hair bundle--the sensory organelle of inner-ear hair cells of vertebrates--exemplifies the ability of a cell to assemble complex, elegant structures. Proper construction of the bundle is required for proper mechanotransduction in response to external forces and to transmit information about sound and movement. Bundles contain tightly controlled numbers of actin-filled stereocilia, which are arranged in defined rows of precise heights. Indeed, many deafness mutations that disable hair-cell cytoskeletal proteins also disrupt bundles. Bundle assembly is a tractable problem in molecular and cellular systems biology; the sequence of structural changes in stereocilia is known, and a modest number of proteins may be involved.

  13. Asymmetric Distribution of Cadherin 23 and Protocadherin 15 in the Kinocilial Links of Avian Sensory Hair Cells

    PubMed Central

    Goodyear, Richard J; Forge, Andy; Legan, P Kevin; Richardson, Guy P

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Cadherin 23 and protocadherin 15 are components of tip links, fine filaments that interlink the stereocilia of hair cells and are believed to gate the hair cell's mechanotransducer channels. Tip links are aligned along the hair bundle's axis of mechanosensitivity, stretching obliquely from the top of one stereocilium to the side of an adjacent, taller stereocilium. In guinea pig auditory hair cells, tip links are polarized with cadherin 23 at the upper end and protocadherin 15 at the lower end, where the transducer channel is located. Double immunogold labeling of avian hair cells was used to study the distribution of these two proteins in kinocilial links, a link type that attaches the tallest stereocilia of the hair bundle to the kinocilium. In the kinocilial links of vestibular hair bundles, cadherin 23 localizes to the stereocilium and protocadherin 15 to the kinocilium. The two cadherins are therefore asymmetrically distributed within the kinocilial links but of a polarity that is, within those links that are aligned along the hair bundle's axis of sensitivity, reversed relative to that of tip links. Conventional transmission electron microscopy of hair bundles fixed in the presence of tannic acid reveals a distinct density in the 120–130 nm long kinocilial links that is located 35–40 nm from the kinociliary membrane. The location of this density is consistent with it being the site at which interactions occur in an in trans configuration between the opposing N-termini of homodimeric forms of cadherin 23 and protocadherin 15. J. Comp. Neurol. 518:4288–4297, 2010. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:20853507

  14. Hair cell regeneration or the expression of related factors that regulate the fate specification of supporting cells in the cochlear ducts of embryonic and posthatch chickens.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lingling; Jin, Ran; Xu, Jincao; Ji, Yubin; Zhang, Meiguang; Zhang, Xuebo; Zhang, Xinwen; Han, Zhongming; Zeng, Shaoju

    2016-02-01

    Hair cells in posthatch chickens regenerate spontaneously through mitosis or the transdifferentiation of supporting cells in response to antibiotic injury. However, how embryonic chicken cochleae respond to antibiotic treatment remains unknown. This study is the first to indicate that unlike hair cells in posthatch chickens, the auditory epithelium was free from antibiotic injury (25-250 mg gentamicin/kg) in embryonic chickens, although FITC-conjugated gentamicin actually reached embryonic hair cells. Next, we examined and counted the cells and performed labeling for BrdU, Sox2, Atoh1/Math1, PV or p27(kip1) (triple or double labeling) in the injured cochlea ducts after gentamicin treatment at 2 h (h), 15 h, 24 h, 2 days (d), 3 d and 7 d after BrdU treatment in posthatch chickens. Our results indicated that following gentamicin administration, proliferating cells (BrdU+) were labeled for Atoh1/Math1 in the damaged areas 3d after gentamicin administration, whereas hair cells (PV+) renewed through mitosis (BrdU+) or direct transdifferentiation (BrdU-) were evident only after 5 d of gentamicin administration. In addition, Sox2 expression was up-regulated in triggered supporting cells at an early stage of regeneration, but stopped at the advent of mature hair cells. Our study also indicated that p27(kip1) was expressed in both hair cells and supporting cells but was down-regulated in a subgroup of the supporting cells that gave rise to hair cells. These data and the obtained dynamic changes of the cells labeled for BrdU, Sox2, Atoh1/Math1, PV or p27(kip1) are useful for understanding supporting cell behaviors and their fate specification during hair cell regeneration.

  15. Absence of Neuroplastin-65 Affects Synaptogenesis in Mouse Inner Hair Cells and Causes Profound Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Carrott, Leanne; Aguilar, Carlos; Johnson, Stuart L.; Chessum, Lauren; West, Melissa; Morse, Susan; Dorning, Joanne; Smart, Elizabeth; Hardisty-Hughes, Rachel; Ball, Greg; Parker, Andrew; Barnard, Alun R.; MacLaren, Robert E.; Wells, Sara; Marcotti, Walter

    2016-01-01

    The Neuroplastin gene encodes two synapse-enriched protein isoforms, Np55 and Np65, which are transmembrane glycoproteins that regulate several cellular processes, including the genesis, maintenance, and plasticity of synapses. We found that an absence of Np65 causes early-onset sensorineural hearing loss and prevented the normal synaptogenesis in inner hair cells (IHCs) in the newly identified mouse mutant pitch. In wild-type mice, Np65 is strongly upregulated in the cochlea from around postnatal day 12 (P12), which corresponds to the onset of hearing. Np65 was specifically localized at the presynaptic region of IHCs. We found that the colocalization of presynaptic IHC ribbons and postsynaptic afferent terminals is greatly reduced in pitch mutants. Moreover, IHC exocytosis is also reduced with mutant mice showing lower rates of vesicle release. Np65 appears to have a nonessential role in vision. We propose that Np65, by regulating IHC synaptogenesis, is critical for auditory function in mammals. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In the mammalian cochlea, the sensory inner hair cells (IHCs) encode auditory information. They do this by converting sound wave-induced mechanical motion of their hair bundles into an electrical current. This current generates a receptor potential that controls release of glutamate neurotransmitter from their ribbon synapses onto the auditory afferent fiber. We show that the synapse-enriched protein Np65, encoded by the Neuroplastin gene, is localized at the IHC presynaptic region. In mutant mice, absence of Np65 causes early-onset sensorineural hearing loss and prevents normal neurotransmitter release in IHCs and colocalization of presynaptic ribbons with postsynaptic afferents. We identified Neuroplastin as a novel deafness gene required for ribbon synapse formation and function, which is critical for sound perception in mammals. PMID:26740663

  16. The role of ear stone size in hair cell acoustic sensory transduction.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Maya; Tanimoto, Masashi; Oda, Yoichi

    2013-01-01

    Hearing and bodily balance are different sensations initiated by a common mechanism. Both sound- and head movement-dependent mechanical displacement are converted into electrical signals by the sensory hair cells. The saccule and utricle inner ear organs, in combination with their central projections to the hindbrain, are considered essential in fish for separating auditory and vestibular stimuli. Here, we established an in vivo method in larval zebrafish to manipulate otolith growth. We found that the saccule containing a large otolith is necessary to detect sound, whereas the utricle containing a small otolith is not sufficient. Otolith removal and relocation altered otolith growth such that utricles with experimentally enlarged otoliths acquired the sense of sound. These results show that otolith biomineralization occurs in a region-specific manner, and suggest that regulation of otolith size in the larval zebrafish ear is crucial to differentially sense auditory and vestibular information.

  17. Compartmentalized vesicular traffic around the hair cell cuticular plate.

    PubMed

    Kachar, B; Battaglia, A; Fex, J

    1997-05-01

    Through thin-section and freeze-fracture electron microscopy, we identify structural correlates of an intense vesicular traffic in a narrow band of cytoplasm around the cuticular plate of the bullfrog vestibular hair cells. Myriads of coated and uncoated vesicles associated with longitudinally oriented microtubules populate the narrow cytoplasmic region between the cuticular plate and the actin network of the apical junctional belt. If microtubules in the sensory hair cells, like those in axons, are pathways for organelle transport, then the characteristic distribution of microtubules around the cuticular plate represents transport pathways across the apical region of the hair cells. This compartmentalized membrane traffic system appears to support an intense vesicular release and uptake along a band of apical plasma membrane near the cell border. Functions of this transport system may include membrane recycling as well as exocytotic and endocytotic exchange between the hair cell cytoplasm and the endolymphatic compartment.

  18. Mefloquine damage vestibular hair cells in organotypic cultures.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dongzhen; Ding, Dalian; Jiang, Haiyan; Stolzberg, Daniel; Salvi, Richard

    2011-07-01

    Mefloquine is an effective and widely used anti-malarial drug; however, some clinical reports suggest that it can cause dizziness, balance, and vestibular disturbances. To determine if mefloquine might be toxic to the vestibular system, we applied mefloquine to organotypic cultures of the macula of the utricle from postnatal day 3 rats. The macula of the utricle was micro-dissected out as a flat surface preparation and cultured with 10, 50, 100, or 200 μM mefloquine for 24 h. Specimens were stained with TRITC-conjugated phalloidin to label the actin in hair cell stereocilia and TO-PRO-3 to visualize cell nuclei. Some utricles were also labeled with fluorogenic caspase-3, -8, or -9 indicators to evaluate the mechanism of programmed cell death. Mefloquine treatment caused a dose-dependent loss of utricular hair cells. Treatment with 10 μM caused a slight reduction, 50 μM caused a significant reduction, and 200 μM destroyed nearly all the hair cells. Hair cell nuclei in mefloquine-treated utricles were condensed and fragmented, morphological features of apoptosis. Mefloquine-treated utricles were positive for the extrinsic initiator caspase-8 and intrinsic initiator caspase-9 and downstream executioner caspase-3. These results indicate that mefloquine can induce significant hair cell degeneration in the postnatal rat utricle and that mefloquine-induced hair cell death is initiated by both caspase-8 and caspase-9.

  19. The Coupling between Ca2+ Channels and the Exocytotic Ca2+ Sensor at Hair Cell Ribbon Synapses Varies Tonotopically along the Mature Cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Soyoun

    2017-01-01

    The cochlea processes auditory signals over a wide range of frequencies and intensities. However, the transfer characteristics at hair cell ribbon synapses are still poorly understood at different frequency locations along the cochlea. Using recordings from mature gerbils, we report here a surprisingly strong block of exocytosis by the slow Ca2+ buffer EGTA (10 mM) in basal hair cells tuned to high frequencies (∼30 kHz). In addition, using recordings from gerbil, mouse, and bullfrog auditory organs, we find that the spatial coupling between Ca2+ influx and exocytosis changes from nanodomain in low-frequency tuned hair cells (∼<2 kHz) to progressively more microdomain in high-frequency cells (∼>2 kHz). Hair cell synapses have thus developed remarkable frequency-dependent tuning of exocytosis: accurate low-latency encoding of onset and offset of sound intensity in the cochlea's base and submillisecond encoding of membrane receptor potential fluctuations in the apex for precise phase-locking to sound signals. We also found that synaptic vesicle pool recovery from depletion was sensitive to high concentrations of EGTA, suggesting that intracellular Ca2+ buffers play an important role in vesicle recruitment in both low- and high-frequency hair cells. In conclusion, our results indicate that microdomain coupling is important for exocytosis in high-frequency hair cells, suggesting a novel hypothesis for why these cells are more susceptible to sound-induced damage than low-frequency cells; high-frequency inner hair cells must have a low Ca2+ buffer capacity to sustain exocytosis, thus making them more prone to Ca2+-induced cytotoxicity. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In the inner ear, sensory hair cells signal reception of sound. They do this by converting the sound-induced movement of their hair bundles present at the top of these cells, into an electrical current. This current depolarizes the hair cell and triggers the calcium-induced release of the neurotransmitter

  20. Decreasing Outer Hair Cell Membrane Cholesterol Increases Cochlear Electromechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brownell, William E.; Jacob, Stefan; Hakizimana, Pierre; Ulfendahl, Mats; Fridberger, Anders

    2011-11-01

    The effect of decreasing membrane cholesterol on the mechanical response of the cochlea to acoustic and/or electrical stimulation was monitored using laser interferometry. In contrast to pharmacological interventions that typically decrease cochlear electromechanics, reducing membrane cholesterol increased the response. The electromechanical response in untreated preparations was asymmetric with greater displacements in response to positive currents and cholesterol depletion increased the asymmetry. The results confirm that outer hair cell electromotility is enhanced by low membrane cholesterol. The asymmetry of the response indicates the outer hair cell resting membrane potential is hyperpolarized relative to the voltage of maximum gain for the outer hair cell voltage-displacement function. The magnitude of the response increase suggests a non-uniform distribution of cholesterol along the lateral wall of normal adult outer hair cells.

  1. Selective hair cell ablation and noise exposure lead to different patterns of changes in the cochlea and the cochlear nucleus.

    PubMed

    Kurioka, Takaomi; Lee, Min Young; Heeringa, Amarins N; Beyer, Lisa A; Swiderski, Donald L; Kanicki, Ariane C; Kabara, Lisa L; Dolan, David F; Shore, Susan E; Raphael, Yehoash

    2016-09-22

    In experimental animal models of auditory hair cell (HC) loss, insults such as noise or ototoxic drugs often lead to secondary changes or degeneration in non-sensory cells and neural components, including reduced density of spiral ganglion neurons, demyelination of auditory nerve fibers and altered cell numbers and innervation patterns in the cochlear nucleus (CN). However, it is not clear whether loss of HCs alone leads to secondary degeneration in these neural components of the auditory pathway. To elucidate this issue, we investigated changes of central components after cochlear insults specific to HCs using diphtheria toxin receptor (DTR) mice expressing DTR only in HCs and exhibiting complete HC loss when injected with diphtheria toxin (DT). We showed that DT-induced HC ablation has no significant impacts on the survival of auditory neurons, central synaptic terminals, and myelin, despite complete HC loss and profound deafness. In contrast, noise exposure induced significant changes in synapses, myelin and CN organization even without loss of inner HCs. We observed a decrease of neuronal size in the auditory pathway, including peripheral axons, spiral ganglion neurons, and CN neurons, likely due to loss of input from the cochlea. Taken together, selective HC ablation and noise exposure showed different patterns of pathology in the auditory pathway and the presence of HCs is not essential for the maintenance of central synaptic connectivity and myelination.

  2. Falsification of the ionic channel theory of hair cell transduction

    PubMed Central

    Rossetto, Michelangelo

    2013-01-01

    The hair cell provides the transduction of mechanical vibrations in the balance and acoustic sense of all vertebrates that swim, walk, or fly. The current theory places hair cell transduction in a mechanically controlled ion channel. Although the theory of a mechanical input modulating the flow of ions through an ion pore has been a useful tool, it is falsified by experimental data in the literature and can be definitively falsified by a proposed experiment. PMID:24563711

  3. Effect of low-level laser treatment on cochlea hair-cell recovery after ototoxic hearing loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhee, Chung-Ku; He, Peijie; Jung, Jae Yun; Ahn, Jin-Chul; Chung, Phil-Sang; Lee, Min Young; Suh, Myung-Whan

    2013-12-01

    The primary cause of hearing loss includes damage to cochlear hair cells. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has become a popular treatment for damaged nervous systems. Based on the idea that cochlea hair cells and neural cells are from same developmental origin, the effect of LLLT on hearing loss in animal models is evaluated. Hearing loss animal models were established, and the animals were irradiated by 830-nm diode laser once a day for 10 days. Power density of the laser treatment was 900 mW/cm2, and the fluence was 162 to 194 J. The tympanic membrane was evaluated after LLLT. Thresholds of auditory brainstem responses were evaluated before treatment, after gentamicin, and after 10 days of LLLT. Quantitative scanning electron microscopic (SEM) observations were done by counting remaining hair cells. Tympanic membranes were intact at the end of the experiment. No adverse tissue reaction was found. On SEM images, LLLT significantly increased the number of hair cells in middle and basal turns. Hearing was significantly improved by laser irradiation. After LLLT treatment, both the hearing threshold and hair-cell count significantly improved.

  4. Heat shock transcription factor HSF1 is required for survival of sensory hair cells against acoustic overexposure.

    PubMed

    Sugahara, Kazuma; Inouye, Sachiye; Izu, Hanae; Katoh, Yumiko; Katsuki, Kensaku; Takemoto, Tsuyoshi; Shimogori, Hiroaki; Yamashita, Hiroshi; Nakai, Akira

    2003-08-01

    To analyze the role of heat shock response in the cochleae, we induced major heat shock proteins, Hsp70, Hsp90, and Hsp27 by perfusion of hot saline into the middle ear cavity (called 'local heat shock') in guinea pigs. Hsps were induced in almost all of the cochlear cells including the sensory hair cells in the organ of Corti. We showed that loss of both the sensory hair cells and the auditory function induced by acoustic overexposure was inhibited by pretreatment of the inner ear with local heat shock. To examine the role of heat shock transcription factor 1(HSF), which activates heat shock genes in response to heat shock, in the protection of sensory hair cells, we analyzed acoustic injury in HSF1-null mice. We found that the loss of sensory hair cells was more significant in HSF1-null mice compared with that of wild-type mice when mice were subjected to acoustic overexposure. These results indicate that HSF1 is required for survival of the sensory hair cells against acoustic overexposure.

  5. Therapeutic strategy for hair regeneration: Hair cycle activation, niche environment modulation, wound-induced follicle neogenesis and stem cell engineering

    PubMed Central

    Chueh, Shan-Chang; Lin, Sung-Jan; Chen, Chih-Chiang; Lei, Mingxing; Wang, Ling Mei; Widelitz, Randall B.; Hughes, Michael W.; Jiang, Ting-Xing; Chuong, Cheng Ming

    2013-01-01

    Introduction There are major new advancements in the fields of stem cell biology, developmental biology, regenerative hair cycling, and tissue engineering. The time is ripe to integrate, translate and apply these findings to tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Readers will learn about new progress in cellular and molecular aspects of hair follicle development, regeneration and potential therapeutic opportunities these advances may offer. Areas covered Here we use hair follicle formation to illustrate this progress and to identify targets for potential strategies in therapeutics. Hair regeneration is discussed in four different categories. (1) Intra-follicle regeneration (or renewal) is the basic production of hair fibers from hair stem cells and dermal papillae in existing follicles. (2) Chimeric follicles via epithelial-mesenchymal recombination to identify stem cells and signaling centers. (3) Extra-follicular factors including local dermal and systemic factors can modulate the regenerative behavior of hair follicles, and may be relatively easy therapeutic targets. (4) Follicular neogenesis means the de novo formation of new follicles. In addition, scientists are working to engineer hair follicles, which require hair forming competent epidermal cells and hair inducing dermal cells. Expert opinion Ideally self-organizing processes similar to those occurring during embryonic development should be elicited with some help from biomaterials. PMID:23289545

  6. Loss of function of Ywhah in mice induces deafness and cochlear outer hair cells' degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Buret, L; Rebillard, G; Brun, E; Angebault, C; Pequignot, M; Lenoir, M; Do-cruzeiro, M; Tournier, E; Cornille, K; Saleur, A; Gueguen, N; Reynier, P; Amati-Bonneau, P; Barakat, A; Blanchet, C; Chinnery, P; Yu-Wai-Man, P; Kaplan, J; Roux, A-F; Van Camp, G; Wissinger, B; Boespflug-Tanguy, O; Giraudet, F; Puel, J-L; Lenaers, G; Hamel, C; Delprat, B; Delettre, C

    2016-01-01

    In vertebrates, 14-3-3 proteins form a family of seven highly conserved isoforms with chaperone activity, which bind phosphorylated substrates mostly involved in regulatory and checkpoint pathways. 14-3-3 proteins are the most abundant protein in the brain and are abundantly found in the cerebrospinal fluid in neurodegenerative diseases, suggesting a critical role in neuron physiology and death. Here we show that 14-3-3eta-deficient mice displayed auditory impairment accompanied by cochlear hair cells' degeneration. We show that 14-3-3eta is highly expressed in the outer and inner hair cells, spiral ganglion neurons of cochlea and retinal ganglion cells. Screening of YWHAH, the gene encoding the 14-3-3eta isoform, in non-syndromic and syndromic deafness, revealed seven non-synonymous variants never reported before. Among them, two were predicted to be damaging in families with syndromic deafness. In vitro, variants of YWHAH induce mild mitochondrial fragmentation and severe susceptibility to apoptosis, in agreement with a reduced capacity of mutated 14-3-3eta to bind the pro-apoptotic Bad protein. This study demonstrates that YWHAH variants can have a substantial effect on 14-3-3eta function and that 14-3-3eta could be a critical factor in the survival of outer hair cells. PMID:27275396

  7. Ocsyn, a novel syntaxin-interacting protein enriched in the subapical region of inner hair cells.

    PubMed

    Safieddine, S; Ly, C D; Wang, Y-X; Wang, C Y; Kachar, B; Petralia, R S; Wenthold, R J

    2002-06-01

    Sensory (hair) cells of the inner ear contain two specialized areas of membrane delivery. The first, located at the cell base, is the afferent synapse where rapid delivery of synaptic vesicles is required to convey information about auditory signals with exceedingly high temporal precision. The second area is at the apex. To accommodate the continuous movement of stereocilia and facilitate their repair, recycling of membrane components is required. Intense vesicular traffic is restricted to a narrow band of cytoplasm around the cuticular plate, which anchors stereocilia. Our previous analyses showed that SNARE proteins (syntaxin 1A/SNAP25/VAMP1) are concentrated at both poles of hair cells, consistent with their involvement in membrane delivery at both locations. To investigate further the molecules involved in membrane delivery at these two sites, we constructed a two-hybrid library of the organ of Corti and probed it with syntaxin 1A. Here we report the cloning of a novel syntaxin-binding protein that is concentrated in a previously uncharacterized organelle at the apex of inner hair cells.

  8. Proliferation of Functional Hair Cells in Vivo in the Absence of the Retinoblastoma Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sage, Cyrille; Huang, Mingqian; Karimi, Kambiz; Gutierrez, Gabriel; Vollrath, Melissa A.; Zhang, Duan-Sun; García-Añoveros, Jaime; Hinds, Philip W.; Corwin, Jeffrey T.; Corey, David P.; Chen, Zheng-Yi

    2005-02-01

    In mammals, hair cell loss causes irreversible hearing and balance impairment because hair cells are terminally differentiated and do not regenerate spontaneously. By profiling gene expression in developing mouse vestibular organs, we identified the retinoblastoma protein (pRb) as a candidate regulator of cell cycle exit in hair cells. Differentiated and functional mouse hair cells with a targeted deletion of Rb1 undergo mitosis, divide, and cycle, yet continue to become highly differentiated and functional. Moreover, acute loss of Rb1 in postnatal hair cells caused cell cycle reentry. Manipulation of the pRb pathway may ultimately lead to mammalian hair cell regeneration.

  9. Membrane properties specialize mammalian inner hair cells for frequency or intensity encoding

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Stuart L

    2015-01-01

    The auditory pathway faithfully encodes and relays auditory information to the brain with remarkable speed and precision. The inner hair cells (IHCs) are the primary sensory receptors adapted for rapid auditory signaling, but they are not thought to be intrinsically tuned to encode particular sound frequencies. Here I found that under experimental conditions mimicking those in vivo, mammalian IHCs are intrinsically specialized. Low-frequency gerbil IHCs (~0.3 kHz) have significantly more depolarized resting membrane potentials, faster kinetics, and shorter membrane time constants than high-frequency cells (~30 kHz). The faster kinetics of low-frequency IHCs allow them to follow the phasic component of sound (frequency-following), which is not required for high-frequency cells that are instead optimally configured to encode sustained, graded responses (intensity-following). The intrinsic membrane filtering of IHCs ensures accurate encoding of the phasic or sustained components of the cell’s in vivo receptor potential, crucial for sound localization and ultimately survival. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08177.001 PMID:26544545

  10. The advantages of hair follicle pluripotent stem cells over embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells for regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Amoh, Yasuyuki; Katsuoka, Kensei; Hoffman, Robert M

    2010-12-01

    Multipotent adult stem cells have many potential therapeutic applications. Our recent findings suggest that hair follicles are a promising source of easily accessible multipotent stem cells. Stem cells in the hair follicle area express the neural stem cell marker nestin, suggesting that hair-follicle stem cells and neural stem cells have common features. Nestin-expressing hair follicle stem cells can form neurons and other cell types, and thus adult hair follicle stem cells could have important therapeutic applications, particularly for neurologic diseases. Transplanted hair follicle stem cells promote the functional recovery of injured peripheral nerve and spinal cord. Recent findings suggest that direct transplantation of hair-follicle stem cells without culture can promote nerve repair, which makes them potentially clinically practical. Human hair follicle stem cells as well as mouse hair follicle stem cells promote nerve repair and can be applied to test the hypothesis that human hair follicle stem cells can provide a readily available source of neurologically therapeutic stem cells. The use of hair follicle stem cells for nerve regeneration overcomes critical problems of embryonic stem cells or induced pluripotent stem cells in that the hair follicle stem cells are multipotent, readily accessible, non-oncogenic, and are not associated with ethical issues.

  11. Coenzyme Q10 protects hair cells against aminoglycoside.

    PubMed

    Sugahara, Kazuma; Hirose, Yoshinobu; Mikuriya, Takefumi; Hashimoto, Makoto; Kanagawa, Eiju; Hara, Hirotaka; Shimogori, Hiroaki; Yamashita, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that the production of free radicals is associated with sensory cell death induced by an aminoglycoside. Many researchers have reported that antioxidant reagents protect sensory cells in the inner ear, and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is an antioxidant that is consumed as a health food in many countries. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of CoQ10 in mammalian vestibular hair cell death induced by aminoglycoside. Cultured utricles of CBA/CaN mice were divided into three groups (control group, neomycin group, and neomycin + CoQ10 group). In the neomycin group, utricles were cultured with neomycin (1 mM) to induce hair cell death. In the neomycin + CoQ10 group, utricles were cultured with neomycin and water-soluble CoQ10 (30-0.3 µM). Twenty-four hours after exposure to neomycin, the cultured tissues were fixed, and vestibular hair cells were labeled using an anti-calmodulin antibody. Significantly more hair cells survived in the neomycin + CoQ10 group than in the neomycin group. These data indicate that CoQ10 protects sensory hair cells against neomycin-induced death in the mammalian vestibular epithelium; therefore, CoQ10 may be useful as a protective drug in the inner ear.

  12. Fate of Mammalian Cochlear Hair Cells and Stereocilia after Loss of the Stereocilia

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Shuping; Yang, Shiming; Guo, Weiwei; He, David Z.Z.

    2009-01-01

    Cochlear hair cells transduce mechanical stimuli into electrical activity. The site of hair cell transduction is the hair bundle, an array of stereocilia with different height arranged in a staircase. Tip links connect the apex of each stereocilium to the side of its taller neighbor. The hair bundle and tip links of hair cells are susceptible to acoustic trauma and ototoxic drugs. It has been shown that hair cells in lower vertebrates and in the mammalian vestibular system may survive bundle loss and undergo self-repair of the stereocilia. Our goals were to determine whether cochlear hair cells could survive the trauma and whether the tip link and/or the hair bundle could be regenerated. We simulated the acoustic trauma-induced tip link damage or stereociliary loss by disrupting tip links or ablating the hair bundles in the cultured organ of Corti from neonatal gerbils. Hair-cell fate and stereociliary morphology and function were examined using confocal and scanning electron microscopies and electrophysiology. Most bundleless hair cells survived and developed for about 2 weeks. However, no spontaneous hair-bundle regeneration was observed. When tip links were ruptured, repair of tip links and restoration of mechanotransduction were observed in less than 24 hours. Our study suggests that the dynamic nature of the hair cell's transduction apparatus is retained despite the fact that regeneration of the hair bundle is lost in mammalian cochlear hair cells. PMID:19955380

  13. Mechanical amplification by hair cells in the semicircular canals.

    PubMed

    Rabbitt, Richard D; Boyle, Richard; Highstein, Stephen M

    2010-02-23

    Sensory hair cells are the essential mechanotransducers of the inner ear, responsible not only for the transduction of sound and motion stimuli but also, remarkably, for nanomechanical amplification of sensory stimuli. Here we show that semicircular canal hair cells generate a mechanical nonlinearity in vivo that increases sensitivity to angular motion by amplification at low stimulus strengths. Sensitivity at high stimulus strengths is linear and shows no evidence of amplification. Results suggest that the mechanical work done by hair cells contributes approximately 97 zJ/cell of amplification per stimulus cycle, improving sensitivity to angular velocity stimuli below approximately 5 degrees /s (0.3-Hz sinusoidal motion). We further show that mechanical amplification can be inhibited by the brain via activation of efferent synaptic contacts on hair cells. The experimental model was the oyster toadfish, Opsanus tau. Physiological manifestation of mechanical amplification and efferent control in a teleost vestibular organ suggests the active motor process in sensory hair cells is ancestral. The biophysical basis of the motor(s) remains hypothetical, but a key discriminating question may involve how changes in somatic electrical impedance evoked by efferent synaptic action alter function of the motor(s).

  14. Structure and Function of the Hair Cell Ribbon Synapse

    PubMed Central

    Nouvian, R.; Beutner, D.; Parsons, T.D.

    2006-01-01

    Faithful information transfer at the hair cell afferent synapse requires synaptic transmission to be both reliable and temporally precise. The release of neurotransmitter must exhibit both rapid on and off kinetics to accurately follow acoustic stimuli with a periodicity of 1 ms or less. To ensure such remarkable temporal fidelity, the cochlear hair cell afferent synapse undoubtedly relies on unique cellular and molecular specializations. While the electron microscopy hallmark of the hair cell afferent synapse — the electron-dense synaptic ribbon or synaptic body — has been recognized for decades, dissection of the synapse’s molecular make-up has only just begun. Recent cell physiology studies have added important insights into the synaptic mechanisms underlying fidelity and reliability of sound coding. The presence of the synaptic ribbon links afferent synapses of cochlear and vestibular hair cells to photoreceptors and bipolar neurons of the retina. This review focuses on major advances in understanding the hair cell afferent synapse molecular anatomy and function that have been achieved during the past years. PMID:16773499

  15. Mitochondrial aerobic respiration is activated during hair follicle stem cell differentiation, and its dysfunction retards hair regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yan; Luo, Binping; Deng, Zhili; Wang, Ben; Liu, Fangfen; Li, Jinmao; Shi, Wei; Xie, Hongfu; Hu, Xingwang

    2016-01-01

    Background. Emerging research revealed the essential role of mitochondria in regulating stem/progenitor cell differentiation of neural progenitor cells, mesenchymal stem cells and other stem cells through reactive oxygen species (ROS), Notch or other signaling pathway. Inhibition of mitochondrial protein synthesis results in hair loss upon injury. However, alteration of mitochondrial morphology and metabolic function during hair follicle stem cells (HFSCs) differentiation and how they affect hair regeneration has not been elaborated upon. Methods. We compared the difference in mitochondrial morphology and activity between telogen bulge cells and anagen matrix cells. Expression levels of mitochondrial ROS and superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) were measured to evaluate redox balance. In addition, the level of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) and pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) were estimated to present the change in energetic metabolism during differentiation. To explore the effect of the mitochondrial metabolism on regulating hair regeneration, hair growth was observed after application of a mitochondrial respiratory inhibitor upon hair plucking. Results. During HFSCs differentiation, mitochondria became elongated with more abundant organized cristae and showed higher activity in differentiated cells. SOD2 was enhanced for redox balance with relatively stable ROS levels in differentiated cells. PDK increased in HFSCs while differentiated cells showed enhanced PDH, indicating that respiration switched from glycolysis to oxidative phosphorylation during differentiation. Inhibiting mitochondrial respiration in differentiated hair follicle cells upon hair plucking repressed hair regeneration in vivo. Conclusions. Upon HFSCs differentiation, mitochondria are elongated with more abundant cristae and show higher activity, accompanying with activated aerobic respiration in differentiated cells for higher energy supply. Also, dysfunction of mitochondrial respiration delays hair

  16. Optimizing atoh1 induced vestibular hair cell regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Staecker, Hinrich; Schlecker, Christina; Kraft, Shannon; Praetorius, Mark; Hsu, Chi; Brough, Douglas E.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis Determine the optimal design characteristics of an adenoviral vector to deliver atoh1 and induce regeneration of vestibular hair cells. Study Design Evaluation of a mouse model of intra-labyrinthine gene delivery. Tissue culture of mouse and human macular organs. Methods Macular organs from adult C57Bl/6 mice were treated with binding modified and alternate adenovectors expressing green fluorescent protein (gfp) or luciferase (L). Expression of marker genes was determined over time to determine vector transfection efficiency. The inner ear of adult mice was then injected with modified vectors. Expression of gfp and distribution of vector DNA was followed. Hearing and balance function was evaluated in normal animals to ensure safety of the novel vector designs. An optimized vector was identified and tested for its ability to induce hair cell regeneration in a mouse vestibulopathy model. Finally this vector was tested for its ability to induce hair cell regeneration in human tissue. Results Ad5 serotype based vectors were identified as having a variety of different binding capacities for inner ear tissue. This makes it difficult to limit the dose of vector due to entry into non-targeted cells. Screening of rare adenovector serotypes demonstrated that Ad28 based vectors were ideally suited for delivery to supporting cells and therefore useful for hair cell regeneration studies. Utilization of an Ad28 based vector to deliver atoh1 to a mouse model of vestibular loss resulted significant functional recovery of balance. This vector was also capable of transfecting human macular organs and inducing regeneration of human vestibular hair cells in vitro. Conclusions Improvement in vector design can lead to more specific cell based delivery and reduction of non specific delivery of the trans gene leading to the development of optimized molecular therapeutics to induce hair cell regeneration. Level of Evidence N/A Controlled basic science study. PMID

  17. Ocsyn and mitochondrial-canalicular complexes in vestibular hair cells.

    PubMed

    Vautrin, Jean; Travo, Cécile; Boyer, Catherine; Ventéo, Stéphanie; Favre, Daniel; Dechesne, Claude J

    2006-12-01

    Ocsyn, a syntaxin-interacting protein characterized by Safieddine et al. [Safieddine, S., Ly, C.D., Wang, Y.-X., Kachar, B., Petralia, R.S., Wenthold, R.J., 2002. Ocsyn, a novel syntaxin-interacting protein enriched in the subapical region of inner hair cells. Mol. Cell. Neurosci., 20, 343-353] in the guinea pig organ of Corti was primarily identified in organelles located at the subapical region of inner hair cells. They proposed that in cochlear inner hair cells, ocsyn was involved in protein trafficking associated to recycling endosomes. Ocsyn happens to be highly homologous to syntabulin with an almost identical syntaxin-binding domain. Syntabulin is believed to attach syntaxin-containing vesicles to kinesin for their axonal transport along microtubules. The present study shows the distribution of ocsyn in guinea pig and rat vestibular hair cells using immunocytochemistry and confocal microscopy. Ocsyn was characterized by intense immunolabeled spots distributed exclusively in type I and II vestibular hair cells. The subcuticular region under the cuticular plate exhibited particularly densely packed spots. In the neck region of the sensory cells, where microtubules are abundant, there was no colocalization of ocsyn and alpha-tubulin. Ocsyn labeled spots were also present in the medial and basal hair cell regions, particularly in the supranuclear and infranuclear regions. Mitochondria are particularly numerous in these three regions (subcuticular, supranuclear and infranuclear). Double labeling of ocsyn and cytochrome c showed that ocsyn was present in the same zones that mitochondria. This, together with the great similarity of ocsyn and syntabulin, suggest that, akin to syntabulin, ocsyn is involved in addressing organelles. We propose that ocsyn is involved in the formation of the canalicular-mitochondrial complexes depicted by Spicer et al. [Spicer, S.S., Thomopoulos, G.N., Schulte, B.A., 1999. Novel membranous structures in apical and basal compartments of

  18. Pterins in human hair follicle cells and in the synchronized murine hair cycle.

    PubMed

    Schallreuter, K U; Beazley, W D; Hibberts, N A; Tobin, D J; Paus, R; Wood, J M

    1998-10-01

    Human dermal papilla cells (HDPC) express mRNA for the key enzymes for de novo synthesis/recycling and regulation of the pterin (6R)-L-erythro-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin (6BH4). HDPC had significantly higher enzyme activities and 6BH4 levels in a comparative study with dermal fibroblasts, epidermal melanocytes, and keratinocytes under in vitro conditions. In addition, a significantly more rapid uptake of 14C-L-phenylalanine was demonstrated in HDPC compared with fibroblasts, whereas the differences in turnover to L-tyrosine were insignificant, suggesting a pooling of L-phenylalanine in HDPC. These results suggested that HDPC driven 6BH4 synthesis could be of major functional importance in the hair cycle. In order to follow this hypothesis in vivo, expression of enzyme activities and levels of the produced cofactor during the synchronized hair cycle were determined employing the murine model C57BL/6. These data revealed a significantly increased de novo synthesis for 6BH4 via GTP-cyclohydrolase I concomitant with high levels of 6BH4, and the induction of phenylalanine hydroxylase activities during the telogen/early anagen stage (days 0-1). Pterin levels and enzyme activities fall on day 3 and plateau during the rest of the entire cycle. In addition, thioredoxin reductase and glutathione reductase activities were measured, where the latter enzyme remained constant but thioredoxin reductase activities showed a biphasic behavior. The first peak coincided with the induction of 6BH4 de novo synthesis at the beginning of the hair cycle. The second peak was observed at mid-anagen, when melanogenesis takes place. Taken together, our results show the presence of autocrine pterin synthesis/recycling in human hair follicle cells under in vitro conditions, and a possible role for 6BH4 in the synchronized murine hair cycle.

  19. Semicircular Canals Circumvent Brownian Motion Overload of Mechanoreceptor Hair Cells

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Mees; Heeck, Kier

    2016-01-01

    Vertebrate semicircular canals (SCC) first appeared in the vertebrates (i.e. ancestral fish) over 600 million years ago. In SCC the principal mechanoreceptors are hair cells, which as compared to cochlear hair cells are distinctly longer (70 vs. 7 μm), 10 times more compliant to bending (44 vs. 500 nN/m), and have a 100-fold higher tip displacement threshold (< 10 μm vs. <400 nm). We have developed biomechanical models of vertebrate hair cells where the bundle is approximated as a stiff, cylindrical elastic rod subject to friction and thermal agitation. Our models suggest that the above differences aid SCC hair cells in circumventing the masking effects of Brownian motion noise of about 70 nm, and thereby permit transduction of very low frequency (<10 Hz) signals. We observe that very low frequency mechanoreception requires increased stimulus amplitude, and argue that this is adaptive to circumvent Brownian motion overload at the hair bundles. We suggest that the selective advantage of detecting such low frequency stimuli may have favoured the evolution of large guiding structures such as semicircular canals and otoliths to overcome Brownian Motion noise at the level of the mechanoreceptors of the SCC. PMID:27448330

  20. Localized Cell and Drug Delivery for Auditory Prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Hendricks, Jeffrey L.; Chikar, Jennifer A.; Crumling, Mark A.; Raphael, Yehoash; Martin, David C.

    2011-01-01

    Localized cell and drug delivery to the cochlea and central auditory pathway can improve the safety and performance of implanted auditory prostheses (APs). While generally successful, these devices have a number of limitations and adverse effects including limited tonal and dynamic ranges, channel interactions, unwanted stimulation of non-auditory nerves, immune rejection, and infections including meningitis. Many of these limitations are associated with the tissue reactions to implanted auditory prosthetic devices and the gradual degeneration of the auditory system following deafness. Strategies to reduce the insertion trauma, degeneration of target neurons, fibrous and bony tissue encapsulation, and immune activation can improve the viability of tissue required for AP function as well as improve the resolution of stimulation for reduced channel interaction and improved place-pitch and level discrimination. Many pharmaceutical compounds have been identified that promote the viability of auditory tissue and prevent inflammation and infection. Cell delivery and gene therapy have provided promising results for treating hearing loss and reversing degeneration. Currently, many clinical and experimental methods can produce extremely localized and sustained drug delivery to address AP limitations. These methods provide better control over drug concentrations while eliminating the adverse effects of systemic delivery. Many of these drug delivery techniques can be integrated into modern auditory prosthetic devices to optimize the tissue response to the implanted device and reduce the risk of infection or rejection. Together, these methods and pharmaceutical agents can be used to optimize the tissue-device interface for improved AP safety and effectiveness. PMID:18573323

  1. Myc and Fgf Are Required for Zebrafish Neuromast Hair Cell Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Goo; Huang, Mingqian; Obholzer, Nikolaus D; Sun, Shan; Li, Wenyan; Petrillo, Marco; Dai, Pu; Zhou, Yi; Cotanche, Douglas A; Megason, Sean G; Li, Huawei; Chen, Zheng-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Unlike mammals, the non-mammalian vertebrate inner ear can regenerate the sensory cells, hair cells, either spontaneously or through induction after hair cell loss, leading to hearing recovery. The mechanisms underlying the regeneration are poorly understood. By microarray analysis on a chick model, we show that chick hair cell regeneration involves the activation of proliferation genes and downregulation of differentiation genes. Both MYC and FGF are activated in chick hair cell regeneration. Using a zebrafish lateral line neuromast hair cell regeneration model, we show that the specific inhibition of Myc or Fgf suppresses hair cell regeneration, demonstrating that both pathways are essential to the process. Rapid upregulation of Myc and delayed Fgf activation during regeneration suggest a role of Myc in proliferation and Fgf in differentiation. The dorsal-ventral pattern of fgfr1a in the neuromasts overlaps with the distribution of hair cell precursors. By laser ablation, we show that the fgfr1a-positive supporting cells are likely the hair cell precursors that directly give rise to new hair cells; whereas the anterior-posterior fgfr1a-negative supporting cells have heightened proliferation capacity, likely to serve as more primitive progenitor cells to replenish lost precursors after hair cell loss. Thus fgfr1a is likely to mark compartmentalized supporting cell subtypes with different capacities in renewal proliferation and hair cell regeneration. Manipulation of c-MYC and FGF pathways could be explored for mammalian hair cell regeneration.

  2. Magnetic Bead Actuation of Saccular Hair Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowland, David; Ramunno-Johnson, Damien; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Cheon, Jinwoo; Bozovic, Dolores

    2011-11-01

    When decoupled from the overlying membrane, hair bundles of the amphibian sacculus exhibit spontaneous oscillation. To explore the dynamics of this innate motility without an imposed external load, we recorded their oscillations with a high-speed CMOS camera, and applied mechanical manipulation that minimally alters the geometry of an individual hair bundle. We present a technique that utilizes micron-sized magnetic particles to actuate the stereociliary bundle with a magnetized probe. Quasi-steady-state displacements were imposed on freely oscillating bundles. Our data indicate that deflection of the bundle affects both the frequency and the amplitude of the oscillations, with a crossing of the bifurcation that is dependent on the direction and speed of the applied offset.

  3. A model for mammalian cochlear hair cell differentiation in vitro: effects of retinoic acid on cytoskeletal proteins and potassium conductances.

    PubMed

    Helyer, R; Cacciabue-Rivolta, D; Davies, D; Rivolta, M N; Kros, C J; Holley, M C

    2007-02-01

    We have established a model for the in-vitro differentiation of mouse cochlear hair cells and have used it to explore the influence of retinoic acid on proliferation, cytoskeletal proteins and voltage-gated potassium conductances. The model is based on the conditionally immortal cell line University of Sheffield/ventral otocyst-epithelial cell line clone 36 (US/VOT-E36), derived from ventral otic epithelial cells of the mouse at embryonic day 10.5 and transfected with a reporter for myosin VIIa. Retinoic acid did not increase cell proliferation but led to up-regulation of myosin VIIa and formation of prominent actin rings that gave rise to numerous large, linear actin bundles. Cells expressing myosin VIIa had larger potassium conductances and did not express the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27(kip1). US/VOT-E36 endogenously expressed the voltage-gated potassium channel alpha-subunits Kv1.3 and Kv2.1, which we subsequently identified in embryonic and neonatal hair cells in both auditory and vestibular sensory epithelia in vivo. These subunits could underlie the embryonic and neonatal delayed-rectifiers recorded in nascent hair cells in vivo. Kv2.1 was particularly prominent on the basolateral membrane of cochlear inner hair cells. Kv1.3 was distributed throughout all hair cells but tended to be localized to the cuticular plates. US/VOT-E36 recapitulates a coherent pattern of cell differentiation under the influence of retinoic acid and will provide a convenient model for screening the effects of other extrinsic factors on the differentiation of cochlear epithelial cell types in vitro.

  4. Supporting cells remove and replace sensory receptor hair cells in a balance organ of adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Bucks, Stephanie A; Cox, Brandon C; Vlosich, Brittany A; Manning, James P; Nguyen, Tot B; Stone, Jennifer S

    2017-01-01

    Vestibular hair cells in the inner ear encode head movements and mediate the sense of balance. These cells undergo cell death and replacement (turnover) throughout life in non-mammalian vertebrates. However, there is no definitive evidence that this process occurs in mammals. We used fate-mapping and other methods to demonstrate that utricular type II vestibular hair cells undergo turnover in adult mice under normal conditions. We found that supporting cells phagocytose both type I and II hair cells. Plp1-CreERT2-expressing supporting cells replace type II hair cells. Type I hair cells are not restored by Plp1-CreERT2-expressing supporting cells or by Atoh1-CreERTM-expressing type II hair cells. Destruction of hair cells causes supporting cells to generate 6 times as many type II hair cells compared to normal conditions. These findings expand our understanding of sensorineural plasticity in adult vestibular organs and further elucidate the roles that supporting cells serve during homeostasis and after injury. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18128.001 PMID:28263708

  5. Characterization of Transcriptomes of Cochlear Inner and Outer Hair Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huizhan; Pecka, Jason L.; Zhang, Qian; Soukup, Garrett A.; Beisel, Kirk W.

    2014-01-01

    Inner hair cells (IHCs) and outer hair cells (OHCs) are the two types of sensory receptor cells that are critical for hearing in the mammalian cochlea. IHCs and OHCs have different morphology and function. The genetic mechanisms that define their morphological and functional specializations are essentially unknown. The transcriptome reflects the genes that are being actively expressed in a cell and holds the key to understanding the molecular mechanisms of the biological properties of the cell. Using DNA microarray, we examined the transcriptome of 2000 individually collected IHCs and OHCs from adult mouse cochleae. We show that 16,647 and 17,711 transcripts are expressed in IHCs and OHCs, respectively. Of those genes, ∼73% are known genes, 22% are uncharacterized sequences, and 5.0% are noncoding RNAs in both populations. A total of 16,117 transcripts are expressed in both populations. Uniquely and differentially expressed genes account for <15% of all genes in either cell type. The top 10 differentially expressed genes include Slc17a8, Dnajc5b, Slc1a3, Atp2a3, Osbpl6, Slc7a14, Bcl2, Bin1, Prkd1, and Map4k4 in IHCs and Slc26a5, C1ql1, Strc, Dnm3, Plbd1, Lbh, Olfm1, Plce1, Tectb, and Ankrd22 in OHCs. We analyzed commonly and differentially expressed genes with the focus on genes related to hair cell specializations in the apical, basolateral, and synaptic membranes. Eighty-three percent of the known deafness-related genes are expressed in hair cells. We also analyzed genes involved in cell-cycle regulation. Our dataset holds an extraordinary trove of information about the molecular mechanisms underlying hair cell morphology, function, pathology, and cell-cycle control. PMID:25122905

  6. The Efferent Medial Olivocochlear-Hair Cell Synapse

    PubMed Central

    Elgoyhen, Ana Belén; Katz, Eleonora

    2011-01-01

    Amplification of incoming sounds in the inner ear is modulated by an efferent pathway which travels back from the brain all the way to the cochlea. The medial olivocochlear system makes synaptic contacts with hair cells, where the neurotransmitter acetylcholine is released. Synaptic transmission is mediated by a unique nicotinic cholinergic receptor composed of α9 and α10 subunits, which is highly Ca2+ permeable and is coupled to a Ca2+-activated SK potassium channel. Thus, hyperpolarization of hair cells follows efferent fiber activation. In this work we review the literature that has enlightened our knowledge concerning the intimacies of this synapse. PMID:21762779

  7. Interaural attention modulates outer hair cell function.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Sridhar; Keil, Andreas; Stratis, Kyle; Osborne, Aaron F; Cerwonka, Colin; Wong, Jennifer; Rieger, Brenda L; Polcz, Valerie; Smith, David W

    2014-12-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that auditory attention tasks may modulate the sensitivity of the cochlea by way of the corticofugal and the medial olivocochlear (MOC) efferent pathways. Here, we studied the extent to which a separate efferent tract, the 'uncrossed' MOC, which functionally connects the two ears, mediates inter-aural selective attention. We compared distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) in one ear with binaurally presented primaries, using an intermodal target detection task in which participants were instructed to report the occurrence of brief target events (visual changes, tones). Three tasks were compared under identical physical stimulation: (i) report brief tones in the ear in which DPOAE responses were recorded; (ii) report brief tones presented to the contralateral, non-recorded ear; and (iii) report brief phase shifts of a visual grating at fixation. Effects of attention were observed as parallel shifts in overall DPOAE contour level, with DPOAEs relatively higher in overall level when subjects ignored the auditory stimuli and attended to the visual stimulus, compared with both of the auditory-attending conditions. Importantly, DPOAE levels were statistically lowest when attention was directed to the ipsilateral ear in which the DPOAE recordings were made. These data corroborate notions that top-down mechanisms, via the corticofugal and medial efferent pathways, mediate cochlear responses during intermodal attention. New findings show attending to one ear can significantly alter the physiological response of the contralateral, unattended ear, probably through the uncrossed-medial olivocochlear efferent fibers connecting the two ears.

  8. Robust regeneration of adult zebrafish lateral line hair cells reflects continued precursor pool maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Ivan A.; Kappedal, Ryan; Mackenzie, Scott M.; Hailey, Dale W.; Hoffman, Trevor L.; Schilling, Thomas F.; Raible, David W.

    2015-01-01

    We have examined lateral line hair cell and support cell maintenance in adult zebrafish when growth is largely complete. We demonstrate that adult zebrafish not only replenish hair cells after a single instance of hair cell damage, but also maintain hair cells and support cells after multiple rounds of damage and regeneration. We find that hair cells undergo continuous turnover in adult zebrafish in the absence of damage. We identify mitotically-distinct support cell populations and show that hair cells regenerate from underlying support cells in a region-specific manner. Our results demonstrate that there are two distinct support cell populations in the lateral line, which may help explain why zebrafish hair cell regeneration is extremely robust, retained throughout life, and potentially unlimited in regenerative capacity. PMID:25869855

  9. Comparative transduction mechanisms of hair cells in the bullfrog utriculus. 1: Responses to intracellular current

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, Richard A.

    1994-01-01

    Hair cells in the bullfrog sacculus are specifically adapted to sense small-amplitude, high-frequency linear accelerations. These hair cells display many properties that are undesirable or inappropriate for hair cells that must provide static gravity sensitivity. This study resulted in part due to an interest in seeing how the transduction mechanisms of hair cells in a gravity-sensing otolith endorgan would differ from those in the bullfrog sacculus. The bullfrog utriculus is an appropriate model for these studies, because its structure is representative of higher vertebrates in general and its function as a sensor of static gravity and dynamic linear acceleration is well known. Hair cells in the bullfrog utriculus, classifiable as Type 2 by cell body and synapse morphology, differ markedly in hair bundle morphology from those in the bullfrog sacculus. Moreover, the hair bundle morphologies of utricular hair cells, unlike those in the sacculus, differ in different membrane regions.

  10. Predicting the location of missing outer hair cells using the electrical signal recorded at the round window

    PubMed Central

    Chertoff, Mark E.; Earl, Brian R.; Diaz, Francisco J.; Sorensen, Janna L.; Thomas, Megan L. A.; Kamerer, Aryn M.; Peppi, Marcello

    2014-01-01

    The electrical signal recorded at the round window was used to estimate the location of missing outer hair cells. The cochlear response was recorded to a low frequency tone embedded in high-pass filtered noise conditions. Cochlear damage was created by either overexposure to frequency-specific tones or laser light. In animals with continuous damage along the partition, the amplitude of the cochlear response increased as the high-pass cutoff frequency increased, eventually reaching a plateau. The cochlear distance at the onset of the plateau correlated with the anatomical onset of outer hair cell loss. A mathematical model replicated the physiologic data but was limited to cases with continuous hair cell loss in the middle and basal turns. The neural contribution to the cochlear response was determined by recording the response before and after application of Ouabain. Application of Ouabain eliminated or reduced auditory neural activity from approximately two turns of the cochlea. The amplitude of the cochlear response was reduced for moderate signal levels with a limited effect at higher levels, indicating that the cochlear response was dominated by outer hair cell currents at high signal levels and neural potentials at low to moderate signal levels. PMID:25190395

  11. Insulin resistance due to dietary iron overload disrupts inner hair cell ribbon synapse plasticity in male mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fei; Hao, Shuai; Yang, Bo; Zhao, Yue; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Wenyue; Yang, Jun; Chen, Jie

    2015-06-15

    To evaluate whether cochlear inner hair cells (IHCs) ribbon synapse plasticity would be interrupted by insulin resistance (IR) due to dietary iron overload, we established an IR model in C57Bl/6 male mice with an iron-enriched diet for 16 weeks. Glucose levels were measured at weeks 4, 8, 12, 16. Glucose tolerance test and insulin tolerance test were performed at week 16 after overnight fasting. Then, auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) measurements were performed for hearing threshold shifts. After ABR measurements, cochleae were harvested for assessment of the number of IHC ribbon synapses by immunostaining, the morphology of cochlear hair cells and spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) by transmission electron microscopy or immunostaining. Here, we show that IR due to dietary iron overload decreased the number of ribbon synapses, and induced moderate ABR threshold elevations. Besides, additional components including outer hair cells (OHCs), IHCs, and SGNs were unaffected. Moreover, IR did not disrupt the expression of vesicular glutamate transporter 3 (VGLUT3), myosin VIIa and prestin in hair cells. These results indicate that IHC ribbon synapses may be more susceptible to IR due to dietary iron overload.

  12. Direct effects of music in non-auditory cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Lestard, Nathalia Dos Reis; Valente, Raphael C; Lopes, Anibal G; Capella, Márcia A M

    2013-01-01

    The biological effects of electromagnetic waves are widely studied, especially due to their harmful effects, such as radiation-induced cancer and to their application in diagnosis and therapy. However, the biological effects of sound, another physical agent to which we are frequently exposed have been considerably disregarded by the scientific community. Although a number of studies suggest that emotions evoked by music may be useful in medical care, alleviating stress and nociception in patients undergoing surgical procedures as well as in cancer and burned patients, little is known about the mechanisms by which these effects occur. It is generally accepted that the mechanosensory hair cells in the ear transduce the sound-induced mechanical vibrations into neural impulses, which are interpreted by the brain and evoke the emotional effects. In the last decade; however, several studies suggest that the response to music is even more complex. Moreover, recent evidence comes out that cell types other than auditory hair cells could response to audible sound. However, what is actually sensed by the hair cells, and possible by other cells in our organism, are physical differences in fluid pressure induced by the sound waves. Therefore, there is no reasonable impediment for any cell type of our body to respond to a pure sound or to music. Hence, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the response of a human breast cancer cell line, MCF7, to music. The results' obtained suggest that music can alter cellular morpho-functional parameters, such as cell size and granularity in cultured cells. Moreover, our results suggest for the 1 st time that music can directly interfere with hormone binding to their targets, suggesting that music or audible sounds could modulate physiological and pathophysiological processes.

  13. Cockayne syndrome group B (Csb) and group a (Csa) deficiencies predispose to hearing loss and cochlear hair cell degeneration in mice.

    PubMed

    Nagtegaal, A Paul; Rainey, Robert N; van der Pluijm, Ingrid; Brandt, Renata M C; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T J; Borst, J Gerard G; Segil, Neil

    2015-03-11

    Sensory hair cells in the cochlea, like most neuronal populations that are postmitotic, terminally differentiated, and non-regenerating, depend on robust mechanisms of self-renewal for lifelong survival. We report that hair cell homeostasis requires a specific sub-branch of the DNA damage nucleotide excision repair pathway, termed transcription-coupled repair (TCR). Cockayne syndrome (CS), caused by defects in TCR, is a rare DNA repair disorder with a broad clinical spectrum that includes sensorineural hearing loss. We tested hearing and analyzed the cellular integrity of the organ of Corti in two mouse models of this disease with mutations in the Csb gene (CSB(m/m) mice) and Csa gene (Csa(-/-) mice), respectively. Csb(m/m) and Csa(-/-) mice manifested progressive hearing loss, as measured by an increase in auditory brainstem response thresholds. In contrast to wild-type mice, mutant mice showed reduced or absent otoacoustic emissions, suggesting cochlear outer hair cell impairment. Hearing loss in Csb(m/m) and Csa(-/-) mice correlated with progressive hair cell loss in the base of the organ of Corti, starting between 6 and 13 weeks of age, which increased by 16 weeks of age in a basal-to-apical gradient, with outer hair cells more severely affected than inner hair cells. Our data indicate that the hearing loss observed in CS patients is reproduced in mouse models of this disease. We hypothesize that accumulating DNA damage, secondary to the loss of TCR, contributes to susceptibility to hearing loss.

  14. The expression of NLRX1 in C57BL/6 mice cochlear hair cells: Possible relation to aging- and neomycin-induced deafness.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qianqian; Sun, Gaoying; Cao, Zhixin; Yin, Haiyan; Qi, Qi; Wang, Jinghan; Liu, Wenwen; Bai, Xiaohui; Wang, Haibo; Li, Jianfeng

    2016-03-11

    Nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich-repeat-containing family member X1 (NLRX1) is a cytoplasmic pattern recognition receptor that is predominantly located in mitochondria, which is tightly related to mitochondrial damage, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, inflammation and apoptosis. The present study was designed to explore whether NLRX1 expresses in C57BL/6 mice cochlear hair cells and, if so, to investigate the possible correlations between NLRX1 and hearing. The location and dynamic expression of NLRX1 were investigated by immunofluorescence, real-time PCR and Western blotting. Hearing thresholds of C57BL/6 mice were measured by auditory brainstem response (ABR). Moreover, the downstream inflammatory and apoptotic pathways regulated by NLRX1 were examined in age-related and neomycin-induced hair cell damage. Data showed that NLRX1 expressed in cytoplasm of C57BL/6 cochlear hair cells, especially in the cilia, which were essential for sound sensation. The expression of NLRX1 in hair cells increased as the mice grew up, and, decreased as they aged. Additionally, the activated apoptotic JNK pathway was detected in 9-month old mice with worse-hearing and 3-month old mice treated with neomycin. Overall, results indicate that NLRX1 may relate to hair cell maturity, hearing formation and maintenance, and promote hair cell apoptosis through JNK pathway induced by aging and neomycin.

  15. Mast cells as modulators of hair follicle cycling.

    PubMed

    Maurer, M; Paus, R; Czarnetzki, B M

    1995-08-01

    While the central role of mast cells (MC) in allergy and inflammation is well-appreciated, much less is known about their physiological functions. The impressive battery of potent growth modulatory MC products, and increasing evidence of MC involvement in hyperproliferative and fibrotic disorders suggest that tissue remodelling may be one of those, namely in the skin. Here, we delineate why this may best be studied by analysing the potential role of MC in hair growth regulation. On the background of numerous, yet widely under-appreciated hints from the older literature, we summarize and discuss our recent observations from the C57BL/6 mouse model for hair research which support the concept that MC are functionally important modulators of hair follicle cycling, specifically during anagen development. This invites to exploit the murine hair cycle as a model for dissecting the physiological growth modulatory functions of MC and encourages the exploration of MC-targeting pharmaceutical strategies for the treatment of hair growth disorders.

  16. Restorative effect of hair follicular dermal cells on injured human hair follicles in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Yamao, Mikaru; Inamatsu, Mutsumi; Okada, Taro; Ogawa, Yuko; Ishida, Yuji; Tateno, Chise; Yoshizato, Katsutoshi

    2015-03-01

    No model is available for examining whether in vivo-damaged human hair follicles (hu-HFs) are rescued by transplanting cultured hu-HF dermal cells (dermal papilla and dermal sheath cells). Such a model might be valuable for examining whether in vivo-damaged hu-HFs such as miniaturized hu-HFs in androgenic alopecia are improvable by auto-transplanting hu-HF dermal cells. In this study, we first developed mice with humanized skin composed of hu-keratinocytes and hu-dermal fibroblasts. Then, a 'humanized scalp model mouse' was generated by transplanting hu-scalp HFs into the humanized skin. To demonstrate the usability of the model, the lower halves of the hu-HFs in the model were amputated in situ, and cultured hu-HF dermal cells were injected around the amputated area. The results demonstrated that the transplanted cells contributed to the restoration of the damaged HFs. This model could be used to explore clinically effective technologies for hair restoration therapy by autologous cell transplantation.

  17. Diverse and Dynamic Expression Patterns of Voltage-Gated Ion Channel Genes in Rat Cochlear Hair Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beisel, K. W.; Fritzsch, B.

    2003-02-01

    Both qualitative and quantitative differences in ion-channel conductances are observed along the tonotopic axis of the mammalian cochlea. We have used a molecular approach to characterize these longitudinal expression patterns of voltage-gated ion-channel (VgCN) superfamily members in the peripheral auditory system. Initially RT-PCR and sequence analyses identified the VgCN α and accessory subunits of the cochlear hair cell (HC). Next, whole mount in situ hybridizations demonstrated at least seven common longitudinal expression patterns with the apex tip and basal hook region having the greatest in disparity. These data suggest potential topological variations in hair-cell electrophysiological signatures and these gradients may contribute to cochlear HC's ability to function as efficient frequency analyzers.

  18. Mechanisms of Aminoglycoside-Induced Hair Cell Death

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangiardi, Dominic A.; Cotanche, Douglas A.

    2005-01-01

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics are commonly used because of their ability to treat bacterial infections, yet they also are a major cause of deafness. Aminoglycosides selectively damage the cochlea's sensory hair cells, the receptors that respond to the fluid movement in the cochlea to produce neural signals that are relayed to the brain. Sensory hair…

  19. Hair-Cell Versus Afferent Adaptation in the Semicircular Canals

    PubMed Central

    Rabbitt, R. D.; Boyle, R.; Holstein, G. R.; Highstein, S. M.

    2010-01-01

    The time course and extent of adaptation in semicircular canal hair cells was compared to adaptation in primary afferent neurons for physiological stimuli in vivo to study the origins of the neural code transmitted to the brain. The oyster toadfish, Opsanus tau, was used as the experimental model. Afferent firing-rate adaptation followed a double-exponential time course in response to step cupula displacements. The dominant adaptation time constant varied considerably among afferent fibers and spanned six orders of magnitude for the population (~1 ms to >1,000 s). For sinusoidal stimuli (0.1–20 Hz), the rapidly adapting afferents exhibited a 90° phase lead and frequency-dependent gain, whereas slowly adapting afferents exhibited a flat gain and no phase lead. Hair-cell voltage and current modulations were similar to the slowly adapting afferents and exhibited a relatively flat gain with very little phase lead over the physiological bandwidth and dynamic range tested. Semicircular canal microphonics also showed responses consistent with the slowly adapting subset of afferents and with hair cells. The relatively broad diversity of afferent adaptation time constants and frequency-dependent discharge modulations relative to hair-cell voltage implicate a subsequent site of adaptation that plays a major role in further shaping the temporal characteristics of semicircular canal afferent neural signals. PMID:15306633

  20. Outer Hair Cells and Prestin—A Moderated Discussion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brownell, William E.; Gummer, Anthony W.

    2011-11-01

    A discussion moderated by the authors on the topic "Outer Hair Cells and Prestin" was held on 18 July 2011 at the 11th International Mechanics of Hearing Workshop in Williamstown, Massachusetts. The paper provides an edited transcript of the session.

  1. Hair Cells: Bundles, Tuning, Transduction—A Moderated Discussion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karavitaki, K. Domenica; Ricci, Anthony J.

    2011-11-01

    A discussion moderated by the authors on the topic "Hair Cells: Bundles, Tuning, Transduction" was held on 17 July 2011 at the 11th International Mechanics of Hearing Workshop in Williamstown, Massachusetts. The paper provides an edited transcript of the session.

  2. Coupling and elastic loading affect the active response by the inner ear hair cell bundles.

    PubMed

    Strimbu, Clark Elliott; Fredrickson-Hemsing, Lea; Bozovic, Dolores

    2012-01-01

    Active hair bundle motility has been proposed to underlie the amplification mechanism in the auditory endorgans of non-mammals and in the vestibular systems of all vertebrates, and to constitute a crucial component of cochlear amplification in mammals. We used semi-intact in vitro preparations of the bullfrog sacculus to study the effects of elastic mechanical loading on both natively coupled and freely oscillating hair bundles. For the latter, we attached glass fibers of different stiffness to the stereocilia and observed the induced changes in the spontaneous bundle movement. When driven with sinusoidal deflections, hair bundles displayed phase-locked response indicative of an Arnold Tongue, with the frequency selectivity highest at low amplitudes and decreasing under stronger stimulation. A striking broadening of the mode-locked response was seen with increasing stiffness of the load, until approximate impedance matching, where the phase-locked response remained flat over the physiological range of frequencies. When the otolithic membrane was left intact atop the preparation, the natural loading of the bundles likewise decreased their frequency selectivity with respect to that observed in freely oscillating bundles. To probe for signatures of the active process under natural loading and coupling conditions, we applied transient mechanical stimuli to the otolithic membrane. Following the pulses, the underlying bundles displayed active movement in the opposite direction, analogous to the twitches observed in individual cells. Tracking features in the otolithic membrane indicated that it moved in phase with the bundles. Hence, synchronous active motility evoked in the system of coupled hair bundles by external input is sufficient to displace large overlying structures.

  3. Hair cell regeneration in the bullfrog vestibular otolith organs following aminoglycoside toxicity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, Richard A.; Torres, M. A.; Schuff, N. R.

    1994-01-01

    Adult bullfrogs were given single intraotic injections of the aminoglycoside antibiotic gentamicin sulfate and sacrificed at postinjection times ranging from 0.5 to 9 days. The saccular and utricular maculae of normal and injected animals were examined in wholemount and cross-section. Intraotic 200 (mu) M gentamicin concentrations resulted in the uniform destruction of the hair bundles and, at later times, the cell bodies of saccular hair cells. In the utriculus, striolar hair cells were selectively damaged while extrastriolar hair cells were relatively unaffected. Regenerating hair cells, identified in sectioned material by their small cell bodies and short, well-formed hair bundles, were seen in the saccular and utricular maculae as early as 24-48 h postinjection. Immature versions of mature hair cell types in both otolith organs were recognized by the presence of absence of a bulbed kinocilia and the relative lengths of their kinocilia and longest sterocilia. Utricular hair cell types with kinocilia longer than their longest stereocilia were observed at earlier times than hair cell types with shorter kinocilia. In the same sacculus, the hair bundles of gentamicin-treated animals, even at 9 days postinjection, were significantly smaller than those of normal animals. The hair bundles of utricular hair cells, on the other hand, reached full maturity within the same time period.

  4. Hair cell regeneration in the bullfrog vestibular otolith organs following aminoglycoside toxicity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, R. A.; Torres, M. A.; Schuff, N. R.

    1993-01-01

    Adult bullfrog were given single intraotic injections of the aminoglycoside antibiotic gentamicin sulfate and sacrificed at postinjection times ranging from 0.5 to 9 days. The saccular and utricular maculae of normal and injected animals were examined in wholemount and cross-section. Intraotic 200 microM gentamicin concentrations resulted in the uniform destruction of the hair bundles and, at later times, the cell bodies of saccular hair cells. In the utriculus, striolar hair cells were selectively damaged while extrastriolar hair cells were relatively unaffected. Regenerating hair cells, identified in sectioned material by their small cell bodies and short, well-formed hair bundles, were seen in the saccular and utricular maculae as early as 24-48 h postinjection. Immature versions of mature hair cell types in both otolith organs were recognized by the presence or absence of a bulbed kinocilia and the relative lengths of their kinocilia and longest stereocilia. Utricular hair cell types with kinocilia longer than their longest stereocilia were observed at earlier than hair cell types with shorter kinocilia. In the sacculus, the hair bundles of gentamicin-treated animals, even at 9 days postinjection, were significantly smaller than those of normal animals. The hair bundles of utricular hair cells, on the other hand, reached full maturity within the same time period.

  5. Multiple Quantitative Trait Loci Modify Cochlear Hair Cell Degeneration in the Beethoven (Tmc1Bth) Mouse Model of Progressive Hearing Loss DFNA36

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi, Yoshihiro; Kurima, Kiyoto; Makishima, Tomoko; de Angelis, Martin Hrabé; Fuchs, Helmut; Frolenkov, Gregory; Kitamura, Ken; Griffith, Andrew J.

    2006-01-01

    Dominant mutations of transmembrane channel-like gene 1 (TMC1) cause progressive sensorineural hearing loss in humans and Beethoven (Tmc1Bth/+) mice. Here we show that Tmc1Bth/+ mice on a C3HeB/FeJ strain background have selective degeneration of inner hair cells while outer hair cells remain structurally and functionally intact. Inner hair cells primarily function as afferent sensory cells, whereas outer hair cells are electromotile amplifiers of auditory stimuli that can be functionally assessed by distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) analysis. When C3H-Tmc1Bth/Bth is crossed with either C57BL/6J or DBA/2J wild-type mice, F1 hybrid Tmc1Bth/+ progeny have increased hearing loss associated with increased degeneration of outer hair cells and diminution of DPOAE amplitudes but no difference in degeneration of inner hair cells. We mapped at least one quantitative trait locus (QTL), Tmc1m1, for DPOAE amplitude on chromosome 2 in [(C/B)F1 × C]N2-Tmc1Bth/+ backcross progeny, and three other QTL on chromosomes 11 (Tmc1m2), 12 (Tmc1m3), and 5 (Tmc1m4) in [(C/D)F1 × C]N2-Tmc1Bth/+ progeny. The polygenic basis of outer hair cell degeneration in Beethoven mice provides a model system for the dissection of common, complex hearing loss phenotypes, such as presbycusis, that involve outer hair cell degeneration in humans. PMID:16648588

  6. Multiple quantitative trait loci modify cochlear hair cell degeneration in the Beethoven (Tmc1Bth) mouse model of progressive hearing loss DFNA36.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Yoshihiro; Kurima, Kiyoto; Makishima, Tomoko; de Angelis, Martin Hrabé; Fuchs, Helmut; Frolenkov, Gregory; Kitamura, Ken; Griffith, Andrew J

    2006-08-01

    Dominant mutations of transmembrane channel-like gene 1 (TMC1) cause progressive sensorineural hearing loss in humans and Beethoven (Tmc1Bth/+) mice. Here we show that Tmc1Bth/+ mice on a C3HeB/FeJ strain background have selective degeneration of inner hair cells while outer hair cells remain structurally and functionally intact. Inner hair cells primarily function as afferent sensory cells, whereas outer hair cells are electromotile amplifiers of auditory stimuli that can be functionally assessed by distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) analysis. When C3H-Tmc1Bth/Bth is crossed with either C57BL/6J or DBA/2J wild-type mice, F1 hybrid Tmc1Bth/+ progeny have increased hearing loss associated with increased degeneration of outer hair cells and diminution of DPOAE amplitudes but no difference in degeneration of inner hair cells. We mapped at least one quantitative trait locus (QTL), Tmc1m1, for DPOAE amplitude on chromosome 2 in [(C/B)F1xC]N2-Tmc1Bth/+ backcross progeny, and three other QTL on chromosomes 11 (Tmc1m2), 12 (Tmc1m3), and 5 (Tmc1m4) in [(C/D)F1xC]N2-Tmc1Bth/+ progeny. The polygenic basis of outer hair cell degeneration in Beethoven mice provides a model system for the dissection of common, complex hearing loss phenotypes, such as presbycusis, that involve outer hair cell degeneration in humans.

  7. Hearing requires otoferlin-dependent efficient replenishment of synaptic vesicles in hair cells.

    PubMed

    Pangrsic, Tina; Lasarow, Livia; Reuter, Kirsten; Takago, Hideki; Schwander, Martin; Riedel, Dietmar; Frank, Thomas; Tarantino, Lisa M; Bailey, Janice S; Strenzke, Nicola; Brose, Nils; Müller, Ulrich; Reisinger, Ellen; Moser, Tobias

    2010-07-01

    Inner hair cell ribbon synapses indefatigably transmit acoustic information. The proteins mediating their fast vesicle replenishment (hundreds of vesicles per s) are unknown. We found that an aspartate to glycine substitution in the C(2)F domain of the synaptic vesicle protein otoferlin impaired hearing by reducing vesicle replenishment in the pachanga mouse model of human deafness DFNB9. In vitro estimates of vesicle docking, the readily releasable vesicle pool (RRP), Ca(2+) signaling and vesicle fusion were normal. Moreover, we observed postsynaptic excitatory currents of variable size and spike generation. However, mutant active zones replenished vesicles at lower rates than wild-type ones and sound-evoked spiking in auditory neurons was sparse and only partially improved during longer interstimulus intervals. We conclude that replenishment does not match the release of vesicles at mutant active zones in vivo and a sufficient standing RRP therefore cannot be maintained. We propose that otoferlin is involved in replenishing synaptic vesicles.

  8. Hair cell mechano-transduction: its influence on the gross mechanical characteristics of a hair cell sense organ.

    PubMed

    van Netten, S M

    1997-10-01

    The complex mechanical behaviour of a hair cell bundle appears to be a direct consequence of the gating forces on the individual transduction channels. The mechanical molecular interactions involved in transduction channel gating, therefore, also bear a reciprocal influence, via the hair bundles, on the mechanical properties of accessory structures driving them. This allows for the possibility to investigate, under in vivo conditions, the mechanical gating machinery of ion channels via the dynamics of accessory structures. We have performed such studies on the lateral line organ of fish and were thus able to relate the mechanics of elementary molecular events to the macroscopical dynamics of an intact organ.

  9. Foxi3 deficiency compromises hair follicle stem cell specification and activation

    PubMed Central

    Shirokova, Vera; Biggs, Leah C.; Jussila, Maria; Ohyama, Takahiro; Groves, Andrew K.; Mikkola, Marja L.

    2017-01-01

    The hair follicle is an ideal system to study stem cell specification and homeostasis due to its well characterized morphogenesis and stereotypic cycles of stem cell activation upon each hair cycle to produce a new hair shaft. The adult hair follicle stem cell niche consists of two distinct populations, the bulge and the more activation-prone secondary hair germ. Hair follicle stem cells are set aside during early stages of morphogenesis. This process is known to depend on the Sox9 transcription factor, but otherwise the establishment of the hair follicle stem cell niche is poorly understood. Here we show that that mutation of Foxi3, a Forkhead family transcription factor mutated in several hairless dog breeds, compromises stem cell specification. Further, loss of Foxi3 impedes hair follicle downgrowth and progression of the hair cycle. Genome-wide profiling revealed a number of downstream effectors of Foxi3 including transcription factors with a recognized function in hair follicle stem cells such as Lhx2, Runx1, and Nfatc1, suggesting that the Foxi3 mutant phenotype results from simultaneous downregulation of several stem cell signature genes. We show that Foxi3 displays a highly dynamic expression pattern during hair morphogenesis and cycling, and identify Foxi3 as a novel secondary hair germ marker. Absence of Foxi3 results in poor hair regeneration upon hair plucking, and a sparse fur phenotype in unperturbed mice that exacerbates with age, caused by impaired secondary hair germ activation leading to progressive depletion of stem cells. Thus, Foxi3 regulates multiple aspects of hair follicle development and homeostasis. PMID:26992132

  10. Rock `N' Rho in Outer Hair Cell Motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M.; Kalinec, G.; Kalinec, F.; Billadeau, D. D.; Urrutia, R.

    2003-02-01

    RhoA, Cdc42 and Rac1, small GTPases of the Rho family, are crucial regulators of the actin cytoskeleton and mediate different types of cell motility. They also help to maintain cellular homeostasis, actively regulating the structure and mechanical properties of the cells. We investigated the expression in the guinea-pig cochlea of the serine/threonine kinase ROCK, a well-known effector of RhoA, and measured electromotile amplitude in outer hair cells (OHCs) internally perfused with C3 and Y-27632, pharmacological inhibitors of RhoA and ROCK respectively, and dominant-negative mutants of Rac1 and Cdc42. We found that a RhoA/ROCK-mediated signaling pathway is important for mechanical homeostasis of cochlear OHCs, and identified ROCK as a potential target to selectively modulate outer hair cell electromotility.

  11. TMC1 and TMC2 are components of the mechanotransduction channel in hair cells of the mammalian inner ear

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Bifeng; Géléoc, Gwenaelle S.; Asai, Yukako; Horwitz, Geoffrey C.; Kurima, Kiyoto; Ishikawa, Kotaro; Kawashima, Yoshiyuki; Griffith, Andrew J.; Holt, Jeffrey R.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Sensory transduction in auditory and vestibular hair cells requires expression of transmembrane channel-like (Tmc) 1 and 2 genes, but the function of these genes is unknown. To investigate the hypothesis that TMC1 and TMC2 proteins are components of the mechanosensitive ion channels that convert mechanical information into electrical signals, we recorded whole-cell and single-channel currents from mouse hair cells that expressed Tmc1, Tmc2 or mutant Tmc1. Cells that expressed mutant Tmc1 had reduced calcium permeability and reduced single-channel currents, while Tmc2 cells had high calcium permeability and large single-channel currents. Cells that expressed both Tmc1 and Tmc2 had a broad range of single-channel currents, suggesting multiple heteromeric assemblies of TMC subunits. The data demonstrate TMC1 and TMC2 are components of hair cell transduction channels and contribute to permeation properties. Gradients in TMC channel composition may also contribute to variation in sensory transduction along the tonotopic axis of the mammalian cochlea. PMID:23871232

  12. ERK2 mediates inner hair cell survival and decreases susceptibility to noise-induced hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Kurioka, Takaomi; Matsunobu, Takeshi; Satoh, Yasushi; Niwa, Katsuki; Endo, Shogo; Fujioka, Masato; Shiotani, Akihiro

    2015-11-18

    Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) is a member of the family of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and coordinately regulates a multitude of cellular processes. In response to a variety of extracellular stimuli, phosphorylation of both threonine and tyrosine residues activates ERK. Recent evidence indicates that ERK is activated in response to cellular stress such as acoustic trauma. However, the specific role of ERK isoforms in auditory function is not fully understood. Here, we show that the isoform ERK2 plays an important role in regulating hair cell (HC) survival and noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) in mice (C57BL/6J). We found that conditional knockout mice deficient for Erk2 in the inner ear HCs had hearing comparable to control mice and exhibited no HC loss under normal conditions. However, we found that these knockout mice were more vulnerable to noise and had blunted recovery from NIHL compared to control mice. Furthermore, we observed a significantly lower survival rate of inner hair cells in these mice compared to control mice. Our results indicate that ERK2 plays important roles in the survival of HC in NIHL.

  13. Myosin VI is required for the proper maturation and function of inner hair cell ribbon synapses.

    PubMed

    Roux, Isabelle; Hosie, Suzanne; Johnson, Stuart L; Bahloul, Amel; Cayet, Nadège; Nouaille, Sylvie; Kros, Corné J; Petit, Christine; Safieddine, Saaid

    2009-12-01

    The ribbon synapses of auditory inner hair cells (IHCs) undergo morphological and electrophysiological transitions during cochlear development. Here we report that myosin VI (Myo6), an actin-based motor protein involved in genetic forms of deafness, is necessary for some of these changes to occur. By using post-embedding immunogold electron microscopy, we showed that Myo6 is present at the IHC synaptic active zone. In Snell's waltzer mutant mice, which lack Myo6, IHC ionic currents and ribbon synapse maturation proceeded normally until at least post-natal day 6. In adult mutant mice, however, the IHCs displayed immature potassium currents and still fired action potentials, as normally only observed in immature IHCs. In addition, the number of ribbons per IHC was reduced by 30%, and 30% of the remaining ribbons were morphologically immature. Ca2+-dependent exocytosis probed by capacitance measurement was markedly reduced despite normal Ca2+ currents and the large proportion of morphologically mature synapses, which suggests additional defects, such as loose Ca2+-exocytosis coupling or inefficient vesicular supply. Finally, we provide evidence that Myo6 and otoferlin, a putative Ca2+ sensor of synaptic exocytosis also involved in a genetic form of deafness, interact at the IHC ribbon synapse, and we suggest that this interaction is involved in the recycling of synaptic vesicles. Our findings thus uncover essential roles for Myo6 at the IHC ribbon synapse, in addition to that proposed in membrane turnover and anchoring at the apical surface of the hair cells.

  14. In vivo regulation of murine hair growth: insights from grafting defined cell populations onto nude mice.

    PubMed

    Lichti, U; Weinberg, W C; Goodman, L; Ledbetter, S; Dooley, T; Morgan, D; Yuspa, S H

    1993-07-01

    The nude mouse graft model for testing the hair-forming ability of selected cell populations has considerable potential for providing insights into factors that are important for hair follicle development and proper hair formation. We have developed a minimal component system consisting of immature hair follicle buds from newborn pigmented C57BL/6 mice and adenovirus E1A-immortalized rat vibrissa dermal papilla cells. Hair follicle buds contribute to formation of hairless skin when grafted alone or with Swiss 3T3 cells, but produce densely haired skin when grafted with a fresh dermal cell preparation. The fresh dermal cell preparation represents the single cell fraction after hair follicles have been removed from a collagenase digest of newborn mouse dermis. It provides dermal papilla cells, fibroblasts, and possibly other important growth factor-producing cell types. Rat vibrissa dermal papilla cells supported dense hair growth at early passage in culture but progressively lost this potential during repeated passage in culture. Of 19 E1A-immortalized, clonally derived rat vibrissa dermal papilla cell lines, the four most positive clones supported hair growth to the extent of approximately 200 to 300 hairs per 1-2 cm2 graft area. The remaining clones were moderately positive (five clones), weakly positive (three clones), or negative (seven clones). Swiss 3T3 cells prevented contraction of the graft area but did not appear to affect the number of hairs in the graft site produced by dermal papilla cells plus hair follicle buds alone. The relatively low hair density (estimated 1-5% of normal) resulting from grafts of hair follicle buds with the most positive of the immortalized dermal papilla cell clones compared to fresh dermal cells suggests that optimal reconstitution of hair growth requires some function of dermal papilla cells partially lost during the immortalization process and possibly the contribution of other cell types present in the fresh dermal cell

  15. Functional mechanotransduction is required for cisplatin-induced hair cell death in the zebrafish lateral line.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Andrew J; Hailey, Dale W; Stawicki, Tamara M; Wu, Patricia; Coffin, Allison B; Rubel, Edwin W; Raible, David W; Simon, Julian A; Ou, Henry C

    2013-03-06

    Cisplatin, one of the most commonly used anticancer drugs, is known to cause inner ear hair cell damage and hearing loss. Despite much investigation into mechanisms of cisplatin-induced hair cell death, little is known about the mechanism whereby cisplatin is selectively toxic to hair cells. Using hair cells of the zebrafish lateral line, we found that chemical inhibition of mechanotransduction with quinine and EGTA protected against cisplatin-induced hair cell death. Furthermore, we found that the zebrafish mutants mariner (myo7aa) and sputnik (cad23) that lack functional mechanotransduction were resistant to cisplatin-induced hair cell death. Using a fluorescent analog of cisplatin, we found that chemical or genetic inhibition of mechanotransduction prevented its uptake. These findings demonstrate that cisplatin-induced hair cell death is dependent on functional mechanotransduction in the zebrafish lateral line.

  16. Unconventional molecular regulation of synaptic vesicle replenishment in cochlear inner hair cells.

    PubMed

    Vogl, Christian; Cooper, Benjamin H; Neef, Jakob; Wojcik, Sonja M; Reim, Kerstin; Reisinger, Ellen; Brose, Nils; Rhee, Jeong-Seop; Moser, Tobias; Wichmann, Carolin

    2015-02-15

    Ribbon synapses of cochlear inner hair cells (IHCs) employ efficient vesicle replenishment to indefatigably encode sound. In neurons, neuroendocrine and immune cells, vesicle replenishment depends on proteins of the mammalian uncoordinated 13 (Munc13, also known as Unc13) and Ca(2+)-dependent activator proteins for secretion (CAPS) families, which prime vesicles for exocytosis. Here, we tested whether Munc13 and CAPS proteins also regulate exocytosis in mouse IHCs by combining immunohistochemistry with auditory systems physiology and IHC patch-clamp recordings of exocytosis in mice lacking Munc13 and CAPS isoforms. Surprisingly, we did not detect Munc13 or CAPS proteins at IHC presynaptic active zones and found normal IHC exocytosis as well as auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) in Munc13 and CAPS deletion mutants. Instead, we show that otoferlin, a C2-domain protein that is crucial for vesicular fusion and replenishment in IHCs, clusters at the plasma membrane of the presynaptic active zone. Electron tomography of otoferlin-deficient IHC synapses revealed a reduction of short tethers holding vesicles at the active zone, which might be a structural correlate of impaired vesicle priming in otoferlin-deficient IHCs. We conclude that IHCs use an unconventional priming machinery that involves otoferlin.

  17. A membrane bending model of outer hair cell electromotility.

    PubMed Central

    Raphael, R M; Popel, A S; Brownell, W E

    2000-01-01

    We propose a new mechanism for outer hair cell electromotility based on electrically induced localized changes in the curvature of the plasma membrane (flexoelectricity). Electromechanical coupling in the cell's lateral wall is modeled in terms of linear constitutive equations for a flexoelectric membrane and then extended to nonlinear coupling based on the Langevin function. The Langevin function, which describes the fraction of dipoles aligned with an applied electric field, is shown to be capable of predicting the electromotility voltage displacement function. We calculate the electrical and mechanical contributions to the force balance and show that the model is consistent with experimentally measured values for electromechanical properties. The model rationalizes several experimental observations associated with outer hair cell electromotility and provides for constant surface area of the plasma membrane. The model accounts for the isometric force generated by the cell and explains the observation that the disruption of spectrin by diamide reduces force generation in the cell. We discuss the relation of this mechanism to other proposed models of outer hair cell electromotility. Our analysis suggests that rotation of membrane dipoles and the accompanying mechanical deformation may be the molecular mechanism of electromotility. PMID:10827967

  18. Dynamic gene expression by putative hair-cell progenitors during regeneration in the zebrafish lateral line.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Aaron B; Kim, Taeryn; Cabot, Victoria; Hudspeth, A J

    2014-04-08

    Hearing loss is most commonly caused by the destruction of mechanosensory hair cells in the ear. This condition is usually permanent: Despite the presence of putative hair-cell progenitors in the cochlea, hair cells are not naturally replenished in adult mammals. Unlike those of the mammalian ear, the progenitor cells of nonmammalian vertebrates can regenerate hair cells throughout life. The basis of this difference remains largely unexplored but may lie in molecular dissimilarities that affect how progenitors respond to hair-cell death. To approach this issue, we analyzed gene expression in hair-cell progenitors of the lateral-line system. We developed a transgenic line of zebrafish that expresses a red fluorescent protein in the presumptive hair-cell progenitors known as mantle cells. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting from the skins of transgenic larvae, followed by microarray-based expression analysis, revealed a constellation of transcripts that are specifically enriched in these cells. Gene expression analysis after hair-cell ablation uncovered a cohort of genes that are differentially regulated early in regeneration, suggesting possible roles in the response of progenitors to hair-cell death. These results provide a resource for studying hair-cell regeneration and the biology of sensory progenitor cells.

  19. Dynamic gene expression by putative hair-cell progenitors during regeneration in the zebrafish lateral line

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Taeryn; Cabot, Victoria; Hudspeth, A. J.

    2014-01-01

    Hearing loss is most commonly caused by the destruction of mechanosensory hair cells in the ear. This condition is usually permanent: Despite the presence of putative hair-cell progenitors in the cochlea, hair cells are not naturally replenished in adult mammals. Unlike those of the mammalian ear, the progenitor cells of nonmammalian vertebrates can regenerate hair cells throughout life. The basis of this difference remains largely unexplored but may lie in molecular dissimilarities that affect how progenitors respond to hair-cell death. To approach this issue, we analyzed gene expression in hair-cell progenitors of the lateral-line system. We developed a transgenic line of zebrafish that expresses a red fluorescent protein in the presumptive hair-cell progenitors known as mantle cells. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting from the skins of transgenic larvae, followed by microarray-based expression analysis, revealed a constellation of transcripts that are specifically enriched in these cells. Gene expression analysis after hair-cell ablation uncovered a cohort of genes that are differentially regulated early in regeneration, suggesting possible roles in the response of progenitors to hair-cell death. These results provide a resource for studying hair-cell regeneration and the biology of sensory progenitor cells. PMID:24706895

  20. Cell Source and Mechanism of Hair Cell Regeneration in the Neonatal Mouse Cochlea

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    mechanism of hair cell regeneration in the neonatal mouse cochlea. Non-mammalian vertebrates such as birds , fish , and amphibians can regenerate hair...cells, and inner phalangeal cells (Figure 4). There are also cells medial to inner phalangeal cells called the greater epithelial ridge (GER) which...tetracycline-inducible mouse line ( called Atohl-rtTA) using the Atohl enhancer to drive expression of the reverse tetracycline transactivator (rtTA

  1. Comparative transduction mechanisms of hair cells in the bullfrog utriculus. II. Sensitivity and response dynamics to hair bundle displacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    1. Hair cells in whole-mount in vitro preparations of the utricular macula of the bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) were selected according to their macular location and hair bundle morphology. The sensitivity and response dynamics of selected hair cells to natural stimulation were examined by recording their voltage responses to step and sinusoidal hair bundle displacements applied to their longest stereocilia. 2. The voltage responses of 31 hair cells to sinusoidal hair bundle displacements were characterized by their gains and phases, taken with respect to peak hair bundle displacement. The gains of Type B and Type C cells at both 0.5 and 5.0 Hz were markedly lower than those of Type F and Type E cells. Phases, with the exception of Type C cells, lagged hair bundle displacement at 0.5 Hz. Type C cells had phase leads of 25-40 degrees. At 5.0 Hz, response phases in all cells were phase lagged with respect to those at 0.5 Hz. Type C cells had larger gains and smaller phase leads at 5.0 Hz than at 0.5 Hz, suggesting the presence of low-frequency adaptation. 3. Displacement-response curves, derived from the voltage responses to 5.0-Hz sinusoids, were sigmoidal in shape and asymmetrical, with the depolarizing response having a greater magnitude and saturating less abruptly than the hyperpolarizing response. When normalized to their largest displacement the linear ranges of these curves varied from < 0.5 to 1.25 microns and were largest in Type B and smallest in Type F and Type E cells. Sensitivity, defined as the slope of the normalized displacement-response curve, was inversely correlated with linear range. 4. The contribution of geometric factors associated with the hair bundle to linear range and sensitivity were predicted from realistic models of utricular hair bundles created using morphological data obtained from light and electron microscopy. Three factors, including 1) the inverse ratio of the lengths of the kinocilium and longest stereocilia, representing the

  2. Sound-induced length changes in outer hair cell stereocilia.

    PubMed

    Hakizimana, Pierre; Brownell, William E; Jacob, Stefan; Fridberger, Anders

    2012-01-01

    Hearing relies on mechanical stimulation of stereocilia bundles on the sensory cells of the inner ear. When sound hits the ear, each stereocilium pivots about a neck-like taper near their base. More than three decades of research have established that sideways deflection of stereocilia is essential for converting mechanical stimuli into electrical signals. Here we show that mammalian outer hair cell stereocilia not only move sideways but also change length during sound stimulation. Currents that enter stereocilia through mechanically sensitive ion channels control the magnitude of both length changes and bundle deflections in a reciprocal manner: the smaller the length change, the larger is the bundle deflection. Thus, the transduction current is important for maintaining the resting mechanical properties of stereocilia. Hair cell stimulation is most effective when bundles are in a state that ensures minimal length change.

  3. Local circadian clock gates cell cycle progression of transient amplifying cells during regenerative hair cycling

    PubMed Central

    Plikus, Maksim V.; Vollmers, Christopher; de la Cruz, Damon; Chaix, Amandine; Ramos, Raul; Panda, Satchidananda; Chuong, Cheng-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Regenerative cycling of hair follicles offers an unique opportunity to explore the role of circadian clock in physiological tissue regeneration. We focused on the role of circadian clock in actively proliferating transient amplifying cells, as opposed to quiescent stem cells. We identified two key sites of peripheral circadian clock activity specific to regenerating anagen hair follicles, namely epithelial matrix and mesenchymal dermal papilla. We showed that peripheral circadian clock in epithelial matrix cells generates prominent daily mitotic rhythm. As a consequence of this mitotic rhythmicity, hairs grow faster in the morning than in the evening. Because cells are the most susceptible to DNA damage during mitosis, this cycle leads to a remarkable time-of-day–dependent sensitivity of growing hair follicles to genotoxic stress. Same doses of γ-radiation caused dramatic hair loss in wild-type mice when administered in the morning, during mitotic peak, compared with the evening, when hair loss is minimal. This diurnal radioprotective effect becomes lost in circadian mutants, consistent with asynchronous mitoses in their hair follicles. Clock coordinates cell cycle progression with genotoxic stress responses by synchronizing Cdc2/Cyclin B-mediated G2/M checkpoint. Our results uncover diurnal mitotic gating as the essential protective mechanism in highly proliferative hair follicles and offer strategies for minimizing or maximizing cytotoxicity of radiation therapies. PMID:23690597

  4. Limited hair cell induction from human induced pluripotent stem cells using a simple stepwise method.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Hiroe; Skerleva, Desislava; Kitajiri, Shin-ichiro; Sakamoto, Tatsunori; Yamamoto, Norio; Ito, Juichi; Nakagawa, Takayuki

    2015-07-10

    Disease-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS) cells are expected to contribute to exploring useful tools for studying the pathophysiology of inner ear diseases and to drug discovery for treating inner ear diseases. For this purpose, stable induction methods for the differentiation of human iPS cells into inner ear hair cells are required. In the present study, we examined the efficacy of a simple induction method for inducing the differentiation of human iPS cells into hair cells. The induction of inner ear hair cell-like cells was performed using a stepwise method mimicking inner ear development. Human iPS cells were sequentially transformed into the preplacodal ectoderm, otic placode, and hair cell-like cells. As a first step, preplacodal ectoderm induction, human iPS cells were seeded on a Matrigel-coated plate and cultured in a serum free N2/B27 medium for 8 days according to a previous study that demonstrated spontaneous differentiation of human ES cells into the preplacodal ectoderm. As the second step, the cells after preplacodal ectoderm induction were treated with basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) for induction of differentiation into otic-placode-like cells for 15 days. As the final step, cultured cells were incubated in a serum free medium containing Matrigel for 48 days. After preplacodal ectoderm induction, over 90% of cultured cells expressed the genes that express in preplacodal ectoderm. By culture with bFGF, otic placode marker-positive cells were obtained, although their number was limited. Further 48-day culture in serum free media resulted in the induction of hair cell-like cells, which expressed a hair cell marker and had stereocilia bundle-like constructions on their apical surface. Our results indicate that hair cell-like cells are induced from human iPS cells using a simple stepwise method with only bFGF, without the use of xenogeneic cells.

  5. Tetrabromobisphenol-A induces apoptotic death of auditory cells and hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Park, Channy; Kim, Se-Jin; Lee, Won Kyo; Moon, Sung Kyun; Kwak, SeongAe; Choe, Seong-Kyu; Park, Raekil

    2016-09-30

    Phenolic tetrabromobisphenol-A (TBBPA) and its derivatives are commonly used flame-retardants, in spite of reported toxic effects including neurotoxicity, immunotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, and hepatotoxicity. However, the effects of TBBPA on ototoxicity have not yet been reported. In this study, we investigated the effect of TBBPA on hearing function in vivo and in vitro. Auditory Brainstem Response (ABR) threshold was markedly increased in mice after oral administration of TBBPA, indicating that TBBPA causes hearing loss. In addition, TBBPA induced the loss of both zebrafish neuromasts and hair cells in the rat cochlea in a dose-dependent manner. Mechanistically, hearing loss is largely attributed to apoptotic cell death, as TBBPA increased the expression of pro-apoptotic genes but decreased the expression of anti-apoptotic genes. We also found that TBBPA induced oxidative stress, and importantly, pretreatment with NAC, an anti-oxidant reagent, reduced TBBPA-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and partially prevented cell death. Our results show that TBBPA-mediated ROS generation induces ototoxicity and hearing loss. These findings implicate TBBPA as a potential environmental ototoxin by exerting its hazardous effects on the auditory system.

  6. Clonal Expansion of Lgr5-Positive Cells from Mammalian Cochlea and High-Purity Generation of Sensory Hair Cells.

    PubMed

    McLean, Will J; Yin, Xiaolei; Lu, Lin; Lenz, Danielle R; McLean, Dalton; Langer, Robert; Karp, Jeffrey M; Edge, Albert S B

    2017-02-21

    Death of cochlear hair cells, which do not regenerate, is a cause of hearing loss in a high percentage of the population. Currently, no approach exists to obtain large numbers of cochlear hair cells. Here, using a small-molecule approach, we show significant expansion (>2,000-fold) of cochlear supporting cells expressing and maintaining Lgr5, an epithelial stem cell marker, in response to stimulation of Wnt signaling by a GSK3β inhibitor and transcriptional activation by a histone deacetylase inhibitor. The Lgr5-expressing cells differentiate into hair cells in high yield. From a single mouse cochlea, we obtained over 11,500 hair cells, compared to less than 200 in the absence of induction. The newly generated hair cells have bundles and molecular machinery for transduction, synapse formation, and specialized hair cell activity. Targeting supporting cells capable of proliferation and cochlear hair cell replacement could lead to the discovery of hearing loss treatments.

  7. Age-Related Hearing Loss and Degeneration of Cochlear Hair Cells in Mice Lacking Thyroid Hormone Receptor β1

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Lily; Cordas, Emily; Wu, Xuefeng; Vella, Kristen R.; Hollenberg, Anthony N.

    2015-01-01

    A key function of the thyroid hormone receptor β (Thrb) gene is in the development of auditory function. However, the roles of the 2 receptor isoforms, TRβ1 and TRβ2, expressed by the Thrb gene are unclear, and it is unknown whether these isoforms promote the maintenance as well as development of hearing. We investigated the function of TRβ1 in mice with a Thrbb1 reporter allele that expresses β-galactosidase instead of TRβ1. In the immature cochlea, β-galactosidase was detected in the greater epithelial ridge, sensory hair cells, spiral ligament, and spiral ganglion and in adulthood, at low levels in the hair cells, support cells and root cells of the outer sulcus. Although deletion of all TRβ isoforms causes severe, early-onset deafness, deletion of TRβ1 or TRβ2 individually caused no obvious hearing loss in juvenile mice. However, over subsequent months, TRβ1 deficiency resulted in progressive loss of hearing and loss of hair cells. TRβ1-deficient mice had minimal changes in serum thyroid hormone and thyrotropin levels, indicating that hormonal imbalances were unlikely to cause hearing loss. The results suggest mutually shared roles for TRβ1 and TRβ2 in cochlear development and an unexpected requirement for TRβ1 in the maintenance of hearing in adulthood. PMID:26241124

  8. The hair follicle and its stem cells as drug delivery targets.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Robert M

    2006-05-01

    The hair follicle is a skin appendage with a complex structure containing many cell types that produce highly specialised proteins. The hair follicle is in a continuous cycle: anagen is the hair growth phase, catagen the involution phase and telogen is the resting phase. The follicle offers many potential therapeutic targets. Hoffman and colleagues have pioneered hair-follicle-specific targeting using liposomes to deliver small and large molecules, including genes. They have also pioneered ex vivo hair-follicle targeting with continued expression of the introduced gene following transplantation. Recently, it has been discovered that hair follicle stem cells are highly pluripotent and can form neurons, glial cells and other cell types, and this has suggested that hair follicle stem cells may serve as gene therapy targets for regenerative medicine.

  9. Conditional telomerase induction causes proliferation of hair follicle stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Sarin, Kavita Y.; Cheung, Peggie; Gilison, Daniel; Lee, Eunice; Tennen, Ruth I.; Wang, Estee; Artandi, Maja K.; Oro, Anthony E.; Artandi, Steven E.

    2005-01-01

    TERT, the protein component of telomerase1,2, serves to maintain telomere function through the de novo addition of telomere repeats to chromosome ends and is reactivated in 90% of human cancers. In normal tissues, TERT is expressed in stem cells and in progenitor cells3, but its role in these compartments is not fully understood. Here, we show that conditional transgenic induction of TERT in mouse skin epithelium causes a rapid transition from telogen, the resting phase of the hair follicle cycle, to anagen, the active phase, thereby facilitating robust hair growth. TERT overexpression promotes this developmental transition by causing proliferation of quiescent, multipotent stem cells in the hair follicle bulge region. This new function for TERT does not require the telomerase RNA component (TERC), which encodes the template for telomere addition, and therefore operates through a novel mechanism independent of its activity in synthesizing telomere repeats. These data indicate that, in addition to its established role in extending telomeres, TERT can promote proliferation of resting stem cells through a non-canonical pathway. PMID:16107853

  10. Developing an active artificial hair cell using nonlinear feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joyce, Bryan S.; Tarazaga, Pablo A.

    2015-09-01

    The hair cells in the mammalian cochlea convert sound-induced vibrations into electrical signals. These cells have inspired a variety of artificial hair cells (AHCs) to serve as biologically inspired sound, fluid flow, and acceleration sensors and could one day replace damaged hair cells in humans. Most of these AHCs rely on passive transduction of stimulus while it is known that the biological cochlea employs active processes to amplify sound-induced vibrations and improve sound detection. In this work, an active AHC mimics the active, nonlinear behavior of the cochlea. The AHC consists of a piezoelectric bimorph beam subjected to a base excitation. A feedback control law is used to reduce the linear damping of the beam and introduce a cubic damping term which gives the AHC the desired nonlinear behavior. Model and experimental results show the AHC amplifies the response due to small base accelerations, has a higher frequency sensitivity than the passive system, and exhibits a compressive nonlinearity like that of the mammalian cochlea. This bio-inspired accelerometer could lead to new sensors with lower thresholds of detection, improved frequency sensitivities, and wider dynamic ranges.

  11. Epigenetic DNA Demethylation Causes Inner Ear Stem Cell Differentiation into Hair Cell-Like Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yang; Hu, Zhengqing

    2016-01-01

    The DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) inhibitor 5-azacytidine (5-aza) causes genomic demethylation to regulate gene expression. However, it remains unclear whether 5-aza affects gene expression and cell fate determination of stem cells. In this study, 5-aza was applied to mouse utricle sensory epithelia-derived progenitor cells (MUCs) to investigate whether 5-aza stimulated MUCs to become sensory hair cells. After treatment, MUCs increased expression of hair cell genes and proteins. The DNA methylation level (indicated by percentage of 5-methylcytosine) showed a 28.57% decrease after treatment, which causes significantly repressed DNMT1 protein expression and DNMT activity. Additionally, FM1-43 permeation assays indicated that the permeability of 5-aza-treated MUCs was similar to that of sensory hair cells, which may result from mechanotransduction channels. This study not only demonstrates a possible epigenetic approach to induce tissue specific stem/progenitor cells to become sensory hair cell-like cells, but also provides a cell model to epigenetically modulate stem cell fate determination. PMID:27536218

  12. Recovery of vestibular function following hair cell destruction by streptomycin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, T. A.; Nelson, R. C.

    1992-01-01

    Can the vestibular periphery of warm-blooded vertebrates recover functionally from severe sensory hair cell loss? Recent findings in birds suggest a mechanism for recovery but in fact no direct functional evidence has been reported. We produced vestibular hair cell lesions using the ototoxic agent streptomycin sulfate (600 mg/kg/day, 8 days, chicks, Gallus domesticus). Compound action potentials of the vestibular nerve were used as a direct measure of peripheral vestibular function. Vestibular thresholds, neural activation latencies and amplitudes were documented. Eight days of drug treatment elevated thresholds significantly (P < 0.001) and eliminated all but remnants of vestibular activity. Virtually complete physiological recovery occurred in all animals studied over a period of 70 days following treatment. Thresholds recovered within two weeks of drug treatment whereas the return of response morphologies including activation latencies and amplitudes required an additional 6-8 weeks.

  13. Streptomycin ototoxicity and hair cell regeneration in the adult pigeon utricle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, T. C.; Dye, B. J.; Newlands, S. D.; Dickman, J. D.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to develop a technique to investigate the regeneration of utricular hair cells in the adult pigeon (Columba livia) following complete hair cell loss through administration of streptomycin. STUDY DESIGN: Experimental animal study. METHODS: Animals were divided into four groups. Group 1 received 10 to 15 days of systemic streptomycin injections. Animals in Groups 2 and 3 received a single direct placement of a 1-, 2-, 4-, or 8-mg streptomycin dose into the perilymphatic space. Animals in Groups 1 and 2 were analyzed within 1 week from injection to investigate hair cell destruction, whereas Group 3 was investigated at later dates to study hair cell recovery. Group 4 animals received a control injection of saline into the perilymphatic space. Damage and recovery were quantified by counting hair cells in isolated utricles using scanning electron microscopy. RESULTS: Although systemic injections failed to reliably achieve complete utricular hair cell destruction, a single direct placement of a 2-, 4-, or 8-mg streptomycin dose caused complete destruction within the first week. Incomplete hair cell loss was observed with the 1-mg dose. Over the long term, regeneration of the hair cells was seen with the 2-mg dose but not the 8-mg dose. Control injections of saline into the perilymphatic space caused no measurable hair cell loss. CONCLUSIONS: Direct placement of streptomycin into the perilymph is an effective, reliable method for complete destruction of utricular hair cells while preserving the regenerative potential of the neuroepithelium.

  14. Different uptake of gentamicin through TRPV1 and TRPV4 channels determines cochlear hair cell vulnerability.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong-Han; Park, Channy; Kim, Se-Jin; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Oh, Gi-Su; Shen, AiHua; So, Hong-Seob; Park, Raekil

    2013-03-08

    Hair cells at the base of the cochlea appear to be more susceptible to damage by the aminoglycoside gentamicin than those at the apex. However, the mechanism of base-to-apex gradient ototoxicity by gentamicin remains to be elucidated. We report here that gentamicin caused rodent cochlear hair cell damages in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Hair cells at the basal turn were more vulnerable to gentamicin than those at the apical turn. Gentamicin-conjugated Texas Red (GTTR) uptake was predominant in basal turn hair cells in neonatal rats. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and 4 (TRPV4) expression was confirmed in the cuticular plate, stereocilia and hair cell body of inner hair cells and outer hair cells. The involvement of TRPV1 and TRPV4 in gentamicin trafficking of hair cells was confirmed by exogenous calcium treatment and TRPV inhibitors, including gadolinium and ruthenium red, which resulted in markedly inhibited GTTR uptake and gentamicin-induced hair cell damage in rodent and zebrafish ototoxic model systems. These results indicate that the cytotoxic vulnerability of cochlear hair cells in the basal turn to gentamicin may depend on effective uptake of the drug, which was, in part, mediated by the TRPV1 and TRPV4 proteins.

  15. Observation of apical part and nerve terminals of human vestibular hair cells.

    PubMed

    Morita, I; Komatsuzaki, A; Kanda, T; Tatsuoka, H; Chiba, T

    1995-01-01

    The human vestibular sensory epithelia of macula utriculi in 3 cases of acoustic neurinoma were examined by conventional and intermediate voltage electron microscopes. The apical part and the nerve terminals of hair cells were studied by means of a computer-aided three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction technique. The sensory epithelia were fairly well preserved. Most type I and all type II hair cells appeared as those described in the other reports. However, some type I hair cells were incompletely surrounded by nerve calyces and received direct contacts from the efferent nerve endings. These type I hair cells were also innervated by a few neighbouring afferent nerve calyces. The stereocilia and the cuticular plate of type I hair cells differed from those of type II hair cells. The mean diameter of type I hair cell stereocilia was 488 +/- 59 nm and that of type II hair cells was 373 +/- 21 nm. The cuticular plate of type I hair cells resembled a cone and was about several times as thick as that of type II hair cells which was similar to a flat disc.

  16. Runx1 modulates developmental, but not injury-driven, hair follicle stem cell activation.

    PubMed

    Osorio, Karen M; Lee, Song Eun; McDermitt, David J; Waghmare, Sanjeev K; Zhang, Ying V; Woo, Hyun Nyun; Tumbar, Tudorita

    2008-03-01

    Aml1/Runx1 controls developmental aspects of several tissues, is a master regulator of blood stem cells, and plays a role in leukemia. However, it is unclear whether it functions in tissue stem cells other than blood. Here, we have investigated the role of Runx1 in mouse hair follicle stem cells by conditional ablation in epithelial cells. Runx1 disruption affects hair follicle stem cell activation, but not their maintenance, proliferation or differentiation potential. Adult mutant mice exhibit impaired de novo production of hair shafts and all temporary hair cell lineages, owing to a prolonged quiescent phase of the first hair cycle. The lag of stem cell activity is reversed by skin injury. Our work suggests a degree of functional overlap in Runx1 regulation of blood and hair follicle stem cells at an equivalent time point in the development of these two tissues.

  17. Methionine sulfoxide reductase B3 deficiency causes hearing loss due to stereocilia degeneration and apoptotic cell death in cochlear hair cells.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Tae-Jun; Cho, Hyun-Ju; Kim, Un-Kyung; Lee, Eujin; Oh, Se-Kyung; Bok, Jinwoong; Bae, Yong Chul; Yi, Jun-Koo; Lee, Jang Woo; Ryoo, Zae-Young; Lee, Sang Heun; Lee, Kyu-Yup; Kim, Hwa-Young

    2014-03-15

    Methionine sulfoxide reductase B3 (MsrB3) is a protein repair enzyme that specifically reduces methionine-R-sulfoxide to methionine. A recent genetic study showed that the MSRB3 gene is associated with autosomal recessive hearing loss in human deafness DFNB74. However, the precise role of MSRB3 in the auditory system and the pathogenesis of hearing loss have not yet been determined. This work is the first to generate MsrB3 knockout mice to elucidate the possible pathological mechanisms of hearing loss observed in DFNB74 patients. We found that homozygous MsrB3(-/-) mice were profoundly deaf and had largely unaffected vestibular function, whereas heterozygous MsrB3(+/-) mice exhibited normal hearing similar to that of wild-type mice. The MsrB3 protein is expressed in the sensory epithelia of the cochlear and vestibular tissues, beginning at E15.5 and E13.5, respectively. Interestingly, MsrB3 is densely localized at the base of stereocilia on the apical surface of auditory hair cells. MsrB3 deficiency led to progressive degeneration of stereociliary bundles starting at P8, followed by a loss of hair cells, resulting in profound deafness in MsrB3(-/-) mice. The hair cell loss appeared to be mediated by apoptotic cell death, which was measured using TUNEL and caspase 3 immunocytochemistry. Taken together, our data suggest that MsrB3 plays an essential role in maintaining the integrity of hair cells, possibly explaining the pathogenesis of DFNB74 deafness in humans caused by MSRB3 deficiency.

  18. Calcium-binding sites on sensory processes in vertebrate hair cells.

    PubMed Central

    Moran, D T; Rowley, J C; Asher, D L

    1981-01-01

    Vertebrate lateral line and vestibular systems center their function on highly mechanosensitive hair cells. Each hair cell is equipped with one kinocilium (which resembles a motile cilium) and 50-100 actin-containing stereocilia (which resemble microvilli) at the site of stimulus reception. This report describes electron-microscopic localization of calcium-binding sites on the sensory processes of vertebrate hair cells. Using the Oschman-Wall technique for calcium localization [Oschman, J. L. & Wall, B. J. (1972) J. Cell Biol. 55, 58-73] together with electron-probe x-ray microanalysis of thin sections, we observed: (i) calcium- and iron-containing deposits in the region of the ciliary necklace in goldfish lateral line hair cells, (ii) calcium deposits upon the surface of stereocilia of hair cells of the bullfrog inner ear, and (iii) calcium deposits upon stereocilia of hair cells of the guinea pig vestibular system. Images PMID:6973762

  19. Calbindin and parvalbumin are early markers of non-mitotically regenerating hair cells in the bullfrog vestibular otolith organs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steyger, P. S.; Burton, M.; Hawkins, J. R.; Schuff, N. R.; Baird, R. A.

    1997-01-01

    Earlier studies have demonstrated hair cell regeneration in the absence of cell proliferation, and suggested that supporting cells could phenotypically convert into hair cells following hair cell loss. Because calcium-binding proteins are involved in gene up-regulation, cell growth, and cell differentiation, we wished to determine if these proteins were up-regulated in scar formations and regenerating hair cells following gentamicin treatment. Calbindin and parvalbumin immunolabeling was examined in control or gentamicin-treated (GT) bullfrog saccular and utricular explants cultured for 3 days in amphibian culture medium or amphibian culture medium supplemented with aphidicolin, a blocker of nuclear DNA replication in eukaryotic cells. In control cultures, calbindin and parvalbumin immunolabeled the hair bundles and, less intensely, the cell bodies of mature hair cells. In GT or mitotically-blocked GT (MBGT) cultures, calbindin and parvalbumin immunolabeling was also seen in the hair bundles, cuticular plates, and cell bodies of hair cells with immature hair bundles. Thus, these antigens were useful markers for both normal and regenerating hair cells. Supporting cell immunolabeling was not seen in control cultures nor in the majority of supporting cells in GT cultures. In MBGT cultures, calbindin and parvalbumin immunolabeling was up-regulated in the cytosol of single supporting cells participating in scar formations and in supporting cells with hair cell-like characteristics. These data provide further evidence that non-mitotic hair cell regeneration in cultures can be accomplished by the conversion of supporting cells into hair cells.

  20. Selective Inner Hair Cell Dysfunction in Chinchillas Impairs Hearing-in-Noise in the Absence of Outer Hair Cell Loss.

    PubMed

    Lobarinas, Edward; Salvi, Richard; Ding, Dalian

    2016-04-01

    Poorer hearing in the presence of background noise is a significant problem for the hearing impaired. Ototoxic drugs, ageing, and noise exposure can damage the sensory hair cells of the inner ear that are essential for normal hearing sensitivity. The relationship between outer hair cell (OHC) loss and progressively poorer hearing sensitivity in quiet or in competing background noise is supported by a number of human and animal studies. In contrast, the effect of moderate inner hair cell (IHC) loss or dysfunction shows almost no impact on behavioral measures of hearing sensitivity in quiet, when OHCs remain intact, but the relationship between selective IHC loss and hearing in noise remains relatively unknown. Here, a moderately high dose of carboplatin (75 mg/kg) that produced IHC loss in chinchillas ranging from 40 to 80 % had little effect on thresholds in quiet. However, when tested in the presence of competing broadband (BBN) or narrowband noise (NBN), thresholds increased significantly. IHC loss >60 % increased signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) for tones (500-11,300 Hz) in competing BBN by 5-10 dB and broadened the masking function under NBN. These data suggest that IHC loss or dysfunction may play a significant role in listening in noise independent of OHC integrity and that these deficits may be present even when thresholds in quiet are within normal limits.

  1. Amplitude death of coupled hair bundles with stochastic channel noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyung-Joong; Ahn, Kang-Hun

    2014-04-01

    Hair cells conduct auditory transduction in vertebrates. In lower vertebrates such as frogs and turtles, due to the active mechanism in hair cells, hair bundles (stereocilia) can be spontaneously oscillating or quiescent. Recently an amplitude death phenomenon has been proposed [K.-H. Ahn, J. R. Soc. Interface, 10, 20130525 (2013)] as a mechanism for auditory transduction in frog hair-cell bundles, where sudden cessation of the oscillations arises due to the coupling between nonidentical hair bundles. The gating of the ion channel is intrinsically stochastic due to the stochastic nature of the configuration change of the channel. The strength of the noise due to the channel gating can be comparable to the thermal Brownian noise of hair bundles. Thus, we perform stochastic simulations of the elastically coupled hair bundles. In spite of stray noisy fluctuations due to its stochastic dynamics, our simulation shows the transition from collective oscillation to amplitude death as interbundle coupling strength increases. In its stochastic dynamics, the formation of the amplitude death state of coupled hair bundles can be seen as a sudden suppression of the displacement fluctuation of the hair bundles as the coupling strength increases. The enhancement of the signal-to-noise ratio through the amplitude death phenomenon is clearly seen in the stochastic dynamics. Our numerical results demonstrate that the multiple number of transduction channels per hair bundle is an important factor to the amplitude death phenomenon, because the phenomenon may disappear for a small number of transduction channels due to strong gating noise.

  2. High-Pass Filtering at Vestibular Frequencies by Transducer Adaptation in Mammalian Saccular Hair Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Songer, Jocelyn E.; Eatock, Ruth Anne

    2011-11-01

    The mammalian saccule detects head tilt and low-frequency head accelerations as well as higher-frequency bone vibrations and sounds. It has two different hair cell types, I and II, dispersed throughout two morphologically distinct regions, the striola and extrastriola. Afferents from the two zones have distinct response dynamics which may arise partly from zonal differences in hair cell properties. We find that type II hair cells in the rat saccular epithelium adapt with a time course appropriate for influencing afferent responses to head motions. Moreover, striolar type II hair cells adapted by a greater extent than extrastriolar type II hair cells and had greater phase leads in the mid-frequency range (5-50 Hz). These differences suggest that hair cell transduction may contribute to zonal differences in the adaptation of vestibular afferents to head motions.

  3. A review of adipocyte lineage cells and dermal papilla cells in hair follicle regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peipei; Kling, Russell E; Ravuri, Sudheer K; Kokai, Lauren E; Rubin, J Peter; Chai, Jia-ke

    2014-01-01

    Alopecia is an exceedingly prevalent problem effecting men and women of all ages. The standard of care for alopecia involves either transplanting existing hair follicles to bald areas or attempting to stimulate existing follicles with topical and/or oral medication. Yet, these treatment options are fraught with problems of cost, side effects, and, most importantly, inadequate long-term hair coverage. Innovative cell-based therapies have focused on the dermal papilla cell as a way to grow new hair in previously bald areas. However, despite this attention, many obstacles exist, including retention of dermal papilla inducing ability and maintenance of dermal papilla productivity after several passages of culture. The use of adipocyte lineage cells, including adipose-derived stem cells, has shown promise as a cell-based solution to regulate hair regeneration and may help in maintaining or increasing dermal papilla cells inducing hair ability. In this review, we highlight recent advances in the understanding of the cellular contribution and regulation of dermal papilla cells and summarize adipocyte lineage cells in hair regeneration. PMID:25383178

  4. Genetics of isolated auditory neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Del Castillo, Francisco J; Del Castillo, Ignacio

    2012-01-01

    Auditory neuropathies are disorders combining absent or abnormal auditory brainstem responses with preserved otoacoustic emissions and/or cochlear microphonics. These features indicate a normal function of cochlear outer hair cells. Thus, the primary lesion might be located in the inner hair cells, in the auditory nerve or in the intervening synapse. Auditory neuropathy is observed in up to 10 percent of deaf infants and children, either as part of some systemic neurodegenerative diseases or as an isolated entity. Research on the genetic causes of isolated auditory neuropathies has been remarkably successful in the last few years. Here we review the current knowledge on the structure, expression and function of the genes and proteins so far known to be involved in these disorders, as well as the clinical features that are associated with mutations in the different genes. This knowledge is permitting to classify isolated auditory neuropathies into etiologically homogeneous types, so providing clues for the better diagnosis, management and therapy of the affected subjects.

  5. Sonic hedgehog initiates cochlear hair cell regeneration through downregulation of retinoblastoma protein

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Na; Chen, Yan; Wang, Zhengmin; Chen, Guoling; Lin, Qin; Chen, Zheng-Yi; Li, Huawei

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Shh activation in neonatal cochleae enhances sensory cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proliferating supporting cells can transdifferentiate into hair cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Shh promotes proliferation by transiently modulating pRb activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Shh inhibits pRb by inhibiting transcription and increasing phosphorylation of pRb. -- Abstract: Cell cycle re-entry by cochlear supporting cells and/or hair cells is considered one of the best approaches for restoring hearing loss as a result of hair cell damage. To identify mechanisms that can be modulated to initiate cell cycle re-entry and hair cell regeneration, we studied the effect of activating the sonic hedgehog (Shh) pathway. We show that Shh signaling in postnatal rat cochleae damaged by neomycin leads to renewed proliferation of supporting cells and hair cells. Further, proliferating supporting cells are likely to transdifferentiate into hair cells. Shh treatment leads to inhibition of retinoblastoma protein (pRb) by increasing phosphorylated pRb and reducing retinoblastoma gene transcription. This results in upregulation of cyclins B1, D2, and D3, and CDK1. These results suggest that Shh signaling induces cell cycle re-entry in cochlear sensory epithelium and the production of new hair cells, in part by attenuating pRb function. This study provides an additional route to modulate pRb function with important implications in mammalian hair cell regeneration.

  6. Mammalian Cochlear Hair Cell Regeneration and Ribbon Synapse Reformation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Hair cells (HCs) are the sensory preceptor cells in the inner ear, which play an important role in hearing and balance. The HCs of organ of Corti are susceptible to noise, ototoxic drugs, and infections, thus resulting in permanent hearing loss. Recent approaches of HCs regeneration provide new directions for finding the treatment of sensor neural deafness. To have normal hearing function, the regenerated HCs must be reinnervated by nerve fibers and reform ribbon synapse with the dendrite of spiral ganglion neuron through nerve regeneration. In this review, we discuss the research progress in HC regeneration, the synaptic plasticity, and the reinnervation of new regenerated HCs in mammalian inner ear. PMID:28119785

  7. Expression and function of channelrhodopsin 2 in mouse outer hair cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fangyi; Wu, Tao; Wilson, Teresa; Subhash, Hrebesh; Omelchenko, Irina; Bateschell, Michael; Wang, Lingyan; Brigande, John; Jiang, Zhi-Gen; Nuttall, Alfred

    2013-03-01

    Outer hair cell (OHC) is widely accepted as the origin of cochlear amplification, a mechanism that accounts for the extreme sensitivity of the mammalian hearing. The key process of cochlear amplification is the reverse transduction, where the OHC changes its length under electrical stimulation. In this study, we developed a method to modulate electro-mechanical transduction with an optogenetic approach based on channelrhodopsin 2 (ChR2), a direct lightactivated non-selective cation channel (NSCC). We specifically expressed ChR2 in mouse cochlea OHCs through in uterus injection of adenovirus vector with ChR2 in fusion with the fluorescent marker tdTomato. We also transfected ChR2(H134R), a point mutant of ChR2, with plasmid to an auditory cell line (HEI-OC1). With whole cell recording, we found that blue light (470 nm) elicited a current with a reversal potential around zero in both mouse OHCs and HEI-OC1 cells and generated depolarization in both cell types.

  8. Inner ear hair cells deteriorate in mice engineered to have no or diminished innervation

    PubMed Central

    Kersigo, Jennifer; Fritzsch, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    The innervation of the inner ear critically depends on the two neurotrophins Ntf3 and Bdnf. In contrast to this molecularly well-established dependency, evidence regarding the need of innervation for long-term maintenance of inner ear hair cells is inconclusive, due to experimental variability. Mutant mice that lack both neurotrophins could shed light on the long-term consequences of innervation loss on hair cells without introducing experimental variability, but do not survive after birth. Mutant mice with conditional deletion of both neurotrophins lose almost all innervation by postnatal day 10 and show an initially normal development of hair cells by this stage. No innervation remains after 3 weeks and complete loss of all innervation results in near complete loss of outer and many inner hair cells of the organ of Corti within 4 months. Mutants that retain one allele of either neurotrophin have only partial loss of innervation of the organ of Corti and show a longer viability of cochlear hair cells with more profound loss of inner hair cells. By 10 months, hair cells disappear with a base to apex progression, proportional to the residual density of innervation and similar to carboplatin ototoxicity. Similar to reports of hair cell loss after aminoglycoside treatment, blobbing of stereocilia of apparently dying hair cells protrude into the cochlear duct. Denervation of vestibular sensory epithelia for several months also resulted in variable results, ranging from unusual hair cells resembling the aberrations found in the organ of Corti, to near normal hair cells in the canal cristae. Fusion and/or resorption of stereocilia and loss of hair cells follows a pattern reminiscent of Myo6 and Cdc42 null mice. Our data support a role of innervation for long-term maintenance but with a remarkable local variation that needs to be taken into account when attempting regeneration of the organ of Corti. PMID:25852547

  9. Kinetic analysis of barium currents in chick cochlear hair cells.

    PubMed Central

    Zidanic, M; Fuchs, P A

    1995-01-01

    Inward barium current (IBa) through voltage-gated calcium channels was recorded from chick cochlear hair cells using the whole-cell clamp technique. IBa was sensitive to dihydropyridines and insensitive to the peptide toxins omega-agatoxin IVa, omega-conotoxin GVIa, and omega-conotoxin MVIIC. Changing the holding potential over a -40 to -80 mV range had no effect on the time course or magnitude of IBa nor did it reveal any inactivating inward currents. The activation of IBa was modeled with Hodgkin-Huxley m2 kinetics. The time constant of activation, tau m, was 550 microseconds at -30 mV and gradually decreased to 100 microseconds at +50 mV. A Boltzmann fit to the activation curve, m infinity, yielded a half activation voltage of -15 mV and a steepness factor of 7.8 mV. Opening and closing rate constants, alpha m and beta m, were calculated from tau m and m infinity, then fit with modified exponential functions. The H-H model derived by evaluating the exponential functions for alpha m and beta m not only provided an excellent fit to the time course of IBa activation, but was predictive of the time course and magnitude of the IBa tail current. No differences in kinetics or voltage dependence of activation of IBa were found between tall and short hair cells. We conclude that both tall and short hair cells of the chick cochlea predominantly, if not exclusively, express noninactivating L-type calcium channels. These channels are therefore responsible for processes requiring voltage-dependent calcium entry through the basolateral cell membrane, such as transmitter release and activation of Ca(2+)-dependent K+ channels. PMID:7787021

  10. Evidence of a Hopf bifurcation in frog hair cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ospeck, M; Eguíluz, V M; Magnasco, M O

    2001-01-01

    The membrane potential of hair cells in the low-frequency hearing organ of the bullfrog, the amphibian papilla, sinusoidally oscillates at small amplitude in the absence of acoustical input. We stimulate the cell with a series of periodic currents close to this natural frequency and observe that its current-to-voltage transfer function is compressively nonlinear, having a large gain for small stimuli and a smaller gain for larger currents. Along with the spontaneous oscillation, this implies that the cell is poised close to a dynamical instability such as a Hopf bifurcation, because distant from the instability the transfer function becomes linear. The cell's frequency selectivity is enhanced for small stimuli. Simulations show that the cell's membrane capacitance is effectively reduced due to a current gain provided by this dynamical instability. We propose that the Hopf resonance is widely used by transducer cells on the sensory periphery to achieve small-signal amplification. PMID:11371437

  11. A study in motion sickness - Saccular hair cells in the adult bullfrog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, G. M.; Reschke, M.; Homick, J.

    1982-01-01

    The bullfrog's saccule were examined using light and scanning electron microscopy. No evidence of a striola was found. Type A hair cells were not only distributed peripherally, but also throughout the central macula, though far less frequently than the dominant type D. Two primary hair cell types were distinguished, which corresponded to the ciliary patterns: type A cilia are associated with short, conical hair cells, and type D cilia are associated with long, cylindrical hair cells. Each displays at least one subtype, which may represent developmental precursors. The otolithic membrane is crisscrossed with tunnels and topped with statoconia.

  12. Damage and Recovery of Hair Cells in Fish Canal (But Not Superficial) Neuromasts after Gentamicin Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Jiakun; Yan, Hong Young; Popper, Arthur N.

    1995-01-01

    Recent evidence demonstrating the presence of two types of sensory hair cells in the ear of a telcost fish (Astronotus ocellatus, the oscar) indicates that hair cell heterogeneity may exist not only in amniotic vertebrates but also in anamniotes. Here we report that a similar heterogeneity between hair cell types may also occur in the other mechanosensory organ of the oscar, the lateral line. We exposed oscars to the aminoglycoside (ototoxic) antibiotic gentamicin sulfate and found damaged sensory hair cells in one class of the lateral line receptors, the canal neuromasts, but not in the other class, the superficial neuromasts. This effect was not due to the canal environment. Moreover, new ciliary bundles on hair cells of the canal neuromasts were found after, and during, gentamicin exposure. The pattern of hair cell destruction and recovery in canal neuromasts is similar to that of type 1-like hair cells found in the striolar region of the utricle and lagena of the oscar after gentamicin treatment. These results suggest that the hair cells in the canal and superficial neuromasts may be similar to type 1-like and type 2 hair cells, respectively, in the fish ear.

  13. Signaling and Transcription Factors during Inner Ear Development: The Generation of Hair Cells and Otic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Gálvez, Héctor; Abelló, Gina; Giraldez, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Integration between cell signals and bHLH transcription factors plays a prominent role during the development of hair cells of the inner ear. Hair cells are the sensory receptors of the inner ear, responsible for the mechano-transduction of sound waves into electrical signals. They derive from multipotent progenitors that reside in the otic placode. Progenitor commitment is the result of cell signaling from the surrounding tissues that result in the restricted expression of SoxB1 transcription factors, Sox2 and Sox3. In turn, they induce the expression of Neurog1 and Atoh1, two bHLH factors that specify neuronal and hair cell fates, respectively. Neuronal and hair cell development, however, do not occur simultaneously. Hair cell development is prevented during neurogenesis and prosensory stages, resulting in the delay of hair cell development with respect to neuron production. Negative interactions between Neurog1 and Atoh1, and of Atoh1 with other bHLH factors driven by Notch signaling, like Hey1 and Hes5, account for this delay. In summary, the regulation of Atoh1 and hair cell development relies on interactions between cell signaling and bHLH transcription factors that dictate cell fate and timing decisions during development. Interestingly, these mechanisms operate as well during hair cell regeneration after damage and during stem cell directed differentiation, making developmental studies instrumental for improving therapies for hearing impairment. PMID:28393066

  14. Synaptic and Golgi membrane recycling in cochlear hair cells.

    PubMed

    Siegel, J H; Brownell, W E

    1986-06-01

    Membrane recycling in the mechanoreceptive sensory cells of the mammalian cochlea was studied by observing membrane-bound horseradish peroxidase (HRP) reaction product following brief in vivo exposure to the enzyme. In the inner hair cell (IHC), peroxidase was taken up into coated vesicles and became incorporated into synaptic vesicles surrounding presynaptic bodies, but much HRP was also transported to the apical zone where reaction product appeared in all components of the Golgi complex. Neither the subsurface cisternae nor a tubular network associated with clusters of mitochondria were labelled. Outer hair cells (OHCs) showed considerably less membrane-bound reaction product than IHCs, indicating less rapid plasmalemmal recycling. Most membrane-bound reaction product was contained in coated vesicles and small vacuoles in the synaptic zone, but was occasionally seen in multivesicular bodies in the most apical zone. No labelled organelles were detected in the large central region of the OHC. A diffuse staining of the cytoplasm, particularly pronounced in OHCs, often interfered with the evaluation of membrane-bound reaction product in OHCs. This staining pattern could be qualitatively reproduced in both IHCs and OHCs by incubating fixed segments of the organ of Corti in oxidized diaminobenzidine. The presence of labelled synaptic vesicles associated with presynaptic bodies of IHCs and OHCs suggests that they are formed from membrane retrieved from the plasmalemma. We found no evidence that the subsurface cisternae of IHCs or the laminated cisternae of OHCs are derived from the cell surface as they never contained reaction product.

  15. A theoretical study of calcium microdomains in turtle hair cells.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Y C; Tucker, T; Fettiplace, R

    1996-01-01

    Confocal imaging has revealed microdomains of intracellular free Ca2+ in turtle hair cells evoked by depolarizing pulses and has delineated factors affecting the growth and dissipation of such domains. However, imaging experiments have limited spatial and temporal resolution. To extend the range of the results we have developed a three-dimensional model of Ca2+ diffusion in a cylindrical hair cell, allowing part of the Ca2+ influx to occur over a small circular region (radius 0.125-1.0 micron) representing a high-density array of voltage-dependent channels. The model incorporated experimental information about the number of channels, the fixed and mobile Ca2+ buffers, and the Ca2+ extrusion mechanism. A feature of the calculations was the use of a variable grid size depending on the proximity to the Ca2+ channel cluster. The results agreed qualitatively with experimental data on the localization of the Ca2+ transients, although the experimental responses were smaller and slower, which is most likely due to temporal and spatial averaging in the imaging. The model made predictions about 1) the optimal Ca2+ channel number and density within a cluster, 2) the conditions to ensure independence of neighboring clusters, and 3) the influence of the Ca2+ buffers on the kinetics and localization of the microdomains. We suggest that an increase in the mobile Ca2+ buffer concentration in high-frequency hair cells (which possess a larger number of release sites) would allow lower amplitude and faster Ca2+ responses and promote functional independence of the sites. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 PMID:8913569

  16. A Stem Cell-Seeded Nanofibrous Scaffold for Auditory Nerve Replacement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0492 TITLE: A Stem Cell -Seeded Nanofibrous Scaffold for Auditory Nerve Replacement PRINCIPAL...COVERED 30 Sep 2014 - 29 Sep 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER A Stem Cell -Seeded Nanofibrous Scaffold for Auditory Nerve Replacement 5b...objectives aiming to push human stem cells toward an auditory neural fate, embed the cells on a functionalized scaffold, and implant the device in a deafened

  17. Epidermal stem cells and skin tissue engineering in hair follicle regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Balañá, María Eugenia; Charreau, Hernán Eduardo; Leirós, Gustavo José

    2015-01-01

    The reconstitution of a fully organized and functional hair follicle from dissociated cells propagated under defined tissue culture conditions is a challenge still pending in tissue engineering. The loss of hair follicles caused by injuries or pathologies such as alopecia not only affects the patients’ psychological well-being, but also endangers certain inherent functions of the skin. It is then of great interest to find different strategies aiming to regenerate or neogenerate the hair follicle under conditions proper of an adult individual. Based upon current knowledge on the epithelial and dermal cells and their interactions during the embryonic hair generation and adult hair cycling, many researchers have tried to obtain mature hair follicles using different strategies and approaches depending on the causes of hair loss. This review summarizes current advances in the different experimental strategies to regenerate or neogenerate hair follicles, with emphasis on those involving neogenesis of hair follicles in adult individuals using isolated cells and tissue engineering. Most of these experiments were performed using rodent cells, particularly from embryonic or newborn origin. However, no successful strategy to generate human hair follicles from adult cells has yet been reported. This review identifies several issues that should be considered to achieve this objective. Perhaps the most important challenge is to provide three-dimensional culture conditions mimicking the structure of living tissue. Improving culture conditions that allow the expansion of specific cells while protecting their inductive properties, as well as methods for selecting populations of epithelial stem cells, should give us the necessary tools to overcome the difficulties that constrain human hair follicle neogenesis. An analysis of patent trends shows that the number of patent applications aimed at hair follicle regeneration and neogenesis has been increasing during the last decade. This

  18. A simple method for purification of vestibular hair cells and non-sensory cells, and application for proteomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Herget, Meike; Scheibinger, Mirko; Guo, Zhaohua; Jan, Taha A; Adams, Christopher M; Cheng, Alan G; Heller, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Mechanosensitive hair cells and supporting cells comprise the sensory epithelia of the inner ear. The paucity of both cell types has hampered molecular and cell biological studies, which often require large quantities of purified cells. Here, we report a strategy allowing the enrichment of relatively pure populations of vestibular hair cells and non-sensory cells including supporting cells. We utilized specific uptake of fluorescent styryl dyes for labeling of hair cells. Enzymatic isolation and flow cytometry was used to generate pure populations of sensory hair cells and non-sensory cells. We applied mass spectrometry to perform a qualitative high-resolution analysis of the proteomic makeup of both the hair cell and non-sensory cell populations. Our conservative analysis identified more than 600 proteins with a false discovery rate of <3% at the protein level and <1% at the peptide level. Analysis of proteins exclusively detected in either population revealed 64 proteins that were specific to hair cells and 103 proteins that were only detectable in non-sensory cells. Statistical analyses extended these groups by 53 proteins that are strongly upregulated in hair cells versus non-sensory cells and vice versa by 68 proteins. Our results demonstrate that enzymatic dissociation of styryl dye-labeled sensory hair cells and non-sensory cells is a valid method to generate pure enough cell populations for flow cytometry and subsequent molecular analyses.

  19. Genetically induced cell death in bulge stem cells reveals their redundancy for hair and epidermal regeneration.

    PubMed

    Driskell, Iwona; Oeztuerk-Winder, Feride; Humphreys, Peter; Frye, Michaela

    2015-03-01

    Adult mammalian epidermis contains multiple stem cell populations in which quiescent and more proliferative stem and progenitor populations coexist. However, the precise interrelation of these populations in homeostasis remains unclear. Here, we blocked the contribution of quiescent keratin 19 (K19)-expressing bulge stem cells to hair follicle formation through genetic ablation of the essential histone methyltransferase Setd8 that is required for the maintenance of adult skin. Deletion of Setd8 eliminated the contribution of bulge cells to hair follicle regeneration through inhibition of cell division and induction of cell death, but the growth and morphology of hair follicles were unaffected. Furthermore, ablation of Setd8 in the hair follicle bulge blocked the contribution of K19-postive stem cells to wounded epidermis, but the wound healing process was unaltered. Our data indicate that quiescent bulge stem cells are dispensable for hair follicle regeneration and epidermal injury in the short term and support the hypothesis that quiescent and cycling stem cell populations are equipotent.

  20. Characterization of rat hair follicle stem cells selected by vario magnetic activated cell sorting system.

    PubMed

    Huang, Enyi; Lian, Xiaohua; Chen, Wei; Yang, Tian; Yang, Li

    2009-10-30

    Hair follicle stem cells (HfSCs) play crucial roles in hair follicle morphogenesis and hair cycling. These stem cells are self-renewable and have the multi-lineage potential to generate epidermis, sebaceous glands, and hair follicle. The separation and identification of hair follicle stem cells are important for further research in stem cell biology. In this study, we report on the successful enrichment of rat hair follicle stem cells through vario magnetic activated cell sorting (Vario MACS) and the biological characteristics of the stem cells. We chose the HfSCs positive surface markers CD34, alpha 6-integrin and the negative marker CD71 to design four isolation strategies: positive selection with single marker of CD34, positive selection with single marker of alpha 6-integrin, CD71 depletion followed by CD34 positive selection, and CD71 depletion followed by alpha 6-integrin positive selection. The results of flow cytometry analysis showed that all four strategies had ideal effects. Specifically, we conducted a series of researches on HfSCs characterized by their high level of CD34, termed CD34(bri) cells, and low to undetectable expression of CD34, termed CD34(dim) cells. CD34(bri) cells had greater proliferative potential and higher colony-forming ability than CD34(dim) cells. Furthermore, CD34(bri) cells had some typical characteristics as progenitor cells, such as large nucleus, obvious nucleolus, large nuclear:cytoplasmic ratio and few cytoplasmic organelles. Our findings clearly demonstrated that HfSCs with high purity and viability could be successfully enriched with Vario MACS.

  1. Root Hairs

    PubMed Central

    Grierson, Claire; Nielsen, Erik; Ketelaarc, Tijs; Schiefelbein, John

    2014-01-01

    Roots hairs are cylindrical extensions of root epidermal cells that are important for acquisition of nutrients, microbe interactions, and plant anchorage. The molecular mechanisms involved in the specification, differentiation, and physiology of root hairs in Arabidopsis are reviewed here. Root hair specification in Arabidopsis is determined by position-dependent signaling and molecular feedback loops causing differential accumulation of a WD-bHLH-Myb transcriptional complex. The initiation of root hairs is dependent on the RHD6 bHLH gene family and auxin to define the site of outgrowth. Root hair elongation relies on polarized cell expansion at the growing tip, which involves multiple integrated processes including cell secretion, endomembrane trafficking, cytoskeletal organization, and cell wall modifications. The study of root hair biology in Arabidopsis has provided a model cell type for insights into many aspects of plant development and cell biology. PMID:24982600

  2. Effect of JNK inhibitor SP600125 on hair cell regeneration in zebrafish (Danio rerio) larvae

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shaoyang; Wang, Xu; Li, Wenyan; Li, Huawei

    2016-01-01

    The c-Jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK) proteins are a subgroup of the mitogen-activated protein kinase family. They play a complex role in cell proliferation, survival, and apoptosis. Here, we report a novel role of JNK signalling in hair cell regeneration. We eliminated hair cells of 5-day post-fertilization zebrafish larvae using neomycin followed by JNK inhibition with SP600125. JNK inhibition strongly decreased the number of regenerated hair cells in response to neomycin damage. These changes were associated with reduced proliferation. JNK inhibition also increased cleaved caspase-3 activity and induced apoptosis in regenerating neuromasts. Finally, JNK inhibition with SP600125 decreased the expression of genes related to Wnt. Over-activation of the Wnt signalling pathway partly rescued the hair cell regeneration defects induced by JNK inhibition. Together, our findings provide novel insights into the function of JNK and show that JNK inhibition blocks hair cell regeneration by controlling the Wnt signalling pathway. PMID:27438150

  3. Cell wall-associated ROOT HAIR SPECIFIC 10, a proline-rich receptor-like kinase, is a negative modulator of Arabidopsis root hair growth

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Youra; Lee, Hyodong; Lee, Young-Sook; Cho, Hyung-Taeg

    2016-01-01

    Plant cell growth is restricted by the cell wall, and cell wall dynamics act as signals for the cytoplasmic and nuclear events of cell growth. Among various receptor kinases, ROOT HAIR SPECIFIC 10 (RHS10) belongs to a poorly known receptor kinase subfamily with a proline-rich extracellular domain. Here, we report that RHS10 defines the root hair length of Arabidopsis thaliana by negatively regulating hair growth. RHS10 modulates the duration of root hair growth rather than the growth rate. As poplar and rice RHS10 orthologs also showed a root hair-inhibitory function, this receptor kinase-mediated function appears to be conserved in angiosperms. RHS10 showed a strong association with the cell wall, most probably through its extracellular proline-rich domain (ECD). Deletion analysis of the ECD demonstrated that a minimal extracellular part, which includes a few proline residues, is required for RHS10-mediated root hair inhibition. RHS10 suppressed the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the root, which are necessary for root hair growth. A yeast two-hybrid screening identified an RNase (RNS2) as a putative downstream target of RHS10. Accordingly, RHS10 overexpression decreased and RHS10 loss increased RNA levels in the hair-growing root region. Our results suggest that RHS10 mediates cell wall-associated signals to maintain proper root hair length, at least in part by regulating RNA catabolism and ROS accumulation. PMID:26884603

  4. Biotechnology in the Treatment of Sensorineural Hearing Loss: Foundations and Future of Hair Cell Regeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To provide an overview of the methodologies involved in the field of hair cell regeneration. First, the author provides a tutorial on the biotechnological foundations of this field to assist the reader in the comprehension and interpretation of the research involved in hair cell regeneration. Next, the author presents a review of stem…

  5. Natural Bizbenzoquinoline Derivatives Protect Zebrafish Lateral Line Sensory Hair Cells from Aminoglycoside Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Kruger, Matthew; Boney, Robert; Ordoobadi, Alexander J.; Sommers, Thomas F.; Trapani, Josef G.; Coffin, Allison B.

    2016-01-01

    Moderate to severe hearing loss affects 360 million people worldwide and most often results from damage to sensory hair cells. Hair cell damage can result from aging, genetic mutations, excess noise exposure, and certain medications including aminoglycoside antibiotics. Aminoglycosides are effective at treating infections associated with cystic fibrosis and other life-threatening conditions such as sepsis, but cause hearing loss in 20–30% of patients. It is therefore imperative to develop new therapies to combat hearing loss and allow safe use of these potent antibiotics. We approach this drug discovery question using the larval zebrafish lateral line because zebrafish hair cells are structurally and functionally similar to mammalian inner ear hair cells and respond similarly to toxins. We screened a library of 502 natural compounds in order to identify novel hair cell protectants. Our screen identified four bisbenzylisoquinoline derivatives: berbamine, E6 berbamine, hernandezine, and isotetrandrine, each of which robustly protected hair cells from aminoglycoside-induced damage. Using fluorescence microscopy and electrophysiology, we demonstrated that the natural compounds confer protection by reducing antibiotic uptake into hair cells and showed that hair cells remain functional during and after incubation in E6 berbamine. We also determined that these natural compounds do not reduce antibiotic efficacy. Together, these natural compounds represent a novel source of possible otoprotective drugs that may offer therapeutic options for patients receiving aminoglycoside treatment. PMID:27065807

  6. Establishment of a Protein Reference Map for Soybean Root Hair Cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Root hairs are single tubular cells formed from the differentiation of epidermal cells on roots. They are involved in water and nutrient uptake, and represent the infection site on leguminous roots by rhizobia, soil bacteria that establish a nitrogen fixing symbiosis. Root hairs develop by polar cel...

  7. Changes in ribbon synapses and rough endoplasmic reticulum of rat utricular macular hair cells in weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, M. D.

    2000-01-01

    This study combined ultrastructural and statistical methods to learn the effects of weightlessness on rat utricular maculae. A principle aim was to determine whether weightlessness chiefly affects ribbon synapses of type II cells, since the cells communicate predominantly with branches of primary vestibular afferent endings. Maculae were microdissected from flight and ground control rat inner ears collected on day 13 of a 14-day spaceflight (F13), landing day (R0) and day 14 postflight (R14) and were prepared for ultrastructural study. Ribbon synapses were counted in hair cells examined in a Zeiss 902 transmission electron microscope. Significance of synaptic mean differences was determined for all hair cells contained within 100 section series, and for a subset of complete hair cells, using SuperANOVA software. The synaptic mean for all type II hair cells of F13 flight rats increased by 100%, and that for complete cells by 200%. Type I cells were less affected, with synaptic mean differences statistically insignificant in complete cells. Synapse deletion began within 8 h upon return to Earth. Additionally, hair cell laminated rough endoplasmic reticulum of flight rats was reversibly disorganized on R0. Results support the thesis that synapses in type II hair cells are uniquely affected by altered gravity. Type II hair cells may be chiefly sensors of gravitational and type I cells of translational linear accelerations.

  8. Gene Therapy Restores Hair Cell Stereocilia Morphology in Inner Ears of Deaf Whirler Mice.

    PubMed

    Chien, Wade W; Isgrig, Kevin; Roy, Soumen; Belyantseva, Inna A; Drummond, Meghan C; May, Lindsey A; Fitzgerald, Tracy S; Friedman, Thomas B; Cunningham, Lisa L

    2016-02-01

    Hereditary deafness is one of the most common disabilities affecting newborns. Many forms of hereditary deafness are caused by morphological defects of the stereocilia bundles on the apical surfaces of inner ear hair cells, which are responsible for sound detection. We explored the effectiveness of gene therapy in restoring the hair cell stereocilia architecture in the whirlin mouse model of human deafness, which is deaf due to dysmorphic, short stereocilia. Wild-type whirlin cDNA was delivered via adeno-associated virus (AAV8) by injection through the round window of the cochleas in neonatal whirler mice. Subsequently, whirlin expression was detected in infected hair cells (IHCs), and normal stereocilia length and bundle architecture were restored. Whirlin gene therapy also increased inner hair cell survival in the treated ears compared to the contralateral nontreated ears. These results indicate that a form of inherited deafness due to structural defects in cochlear hair cells is amenable to restoration through gene therapy.

  9. Spatial Distribution of Stem Cell-Like Keratinocytes in Dissected Compound Hair Follicles of the Dog

    PubMed Central

    Wiener, Dominique J.; Doherr, Marcus G.; Müller, Eliane J.; Welle, Monika M.

    2016-01-01

    Hair cycle disturbances are common in dogs and comparable to some alopecic disorders in humans. A normal hair cycle is maintained by follicular stem cells which are predominately found in an area known as the bulge. Due to similar morphological characteristics of the bulge area in humans and dogs, the shared particularity of compound hair follicles as well as similarities in follicular biomarker expression, the dog is a promising model to study human hair cycle and stem cell disorders. To gain insight into the spatial distribution of follicular keratinocytes with stem cell potential in canine compound follicles, we microdissected hair follicles in anagen and telogen from skin samples of freshly euthanized dogs. The keratinocytes isolated from different locations were investigated for their colony forming efficiency, growth and differentiation potential as well as clonal growth. Our results indicate that i) compound and single hair follicles exhibit a comparable spatial distribution pattern with respect to cells with high growth potential and stem cell-like characteristics, ii) the lower isthmus (comprising the bulge) harbors most cells with high growth potential in both, the anagen and the telogen hair cycle stage, iii) unlike in other species, colonies with highest growth potential are rather small with an irregular perimeter and iv) the keratinocytes derived from the bulbar region exhibit characteristics of actively dividing transit amplifying cells. Our results now provide the basis to conduct comparative studies of normal dogs and those with hair cycle disorders with the possibility to extend relevant findings to human patients. PMID:26788850

  10. Outer hair cell electromechanical properties in a nonlinear piezoelectric model

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yi-Wen; Neely, Stephen T.

    2009-01-01

    A nonlinear piezoelectric circuit is proposed to model electromechanical properties of the outer hair cell (OHC) in mammalian cochleae. The circuit model predicts (a) that the nonlinear capacitance decreases as the stiffness of the load increases, and (b) that the axial compliance of the cell reaches a maximum at the same membrane potential for peak capacitance. The model was also designed to be integrated into macro-mechanical models to simulate cochlear wave propagation. Analytic expressions of the cochlear-partition shunt admittance and the wave propagation function are derived in terms of OHC electro-mechanical parameters. Small-signal analyses indicate that, to achieve cochlear amplification, (1) nonlinear capacitance must be sufficiently high and (2) the OHC receptor current must be sensitive to the velocity of the reticular lamina. PMID:19640041

  11. TGF-beta is specifically expressed in human dermal papilla cells and modulates hair folliculogenesis.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Keita; Aoi, Noriyuki; Yamauchi, Yuji; Sato, Takahiro; Suga, Hirotaka; Eto, Hitomi; Kato, Harunosuke; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Yoshimura, Kotaro

    2009-01-01

    Dermal papilla cells (DPCs) in the mammalian hair follicle have been shown to develop hair follicles through epithelial-mesenchymal interactions. A cell therapy to regenerate human hair is theoretically possible by expanding autologous human DPCs (hDPCs) and transplanting them into bald skin, though much remains to be overcome before clinical success. In this study, we compared gene signatures of hDPCs at different passages and human dermal fibroblasts, and found transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta(2) to be highly expressed in cultured hDPCs. Keratinocyte conditioned medium, which is known to help preserve the hair-inducing capacity of hDPCs, up-regulated TGF-beta(2) expression of hDPCs and also enhanced their alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, a known index for hair-inductive capacity. Through screening of components secreted from keratinocytes, the vitamin D(3) analogue was found to promote TGF-beta(2) expression and ALP activity of hDPCs. In animal hair folliculogenesis models using rat epidermis and expanded hDPCs, inhibition of TGF-beta(2) signalling at the ligand or receptor level significantly impaired hair folliculogenesis and maturation. These results suggest an important role for TGF-beta(2) in hair follicle morphogenesis and provide insights into the establishment of future cell therapies for hair regrowth by transplanting expanded DPCs.

  12. Effect of bidirectional mechanoelectrical coupling on spontaneous oscillations and sensitivity in a model of hair cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amro, Rami M.; Neiman, Alexander B.

    2014-11-01

    Sensory hair cells of amphibians exhibit spontaneous activity in their hair bundles and membrane potentials, reflecting two distinct active amplification mechanisms employed in these peripheral mechanosensors. We use a two-compartment model of the bullfrog's saccular hair cell to study how the interaction between its mechanical and electrical compartments affects the emergence of distinct dynamical regimes, and the role of this interaction in shaping the response of the hair cell to weak mechanical stimuli. The model employs a Hodgkin-Huxley-type system for the basolateral electrical compartment and a nonlinear hair bundle oscillator for the mechanical compartment, which are coupled bidirectionally. In the model, forward coupling is provided by the mechanoelectrical transduction current, flowing from the hair bundle to the cell soma. Backward coupling is due to reverse electromechanical transduction, whereby variations of the membrane potential affect adaptation processes in the hair bundle. We isolate oscillation regions in the parameter space of the model and show that bidirectional coupling affects significantly the dynamics of the cell. In particular, self-sustained oscillations of the hair bundles and membrane potential can result from bidirectional coupling, and the coherence of spontaneous oscillations can be maximized by tuning the coupling strength. Consistent with previous experimental work, the model demonstrates that dynamical regimes of the hair bundle change in response to variations in the conductances of basolateral ion channels. We show that sensitivity of the hair cell to weak mechanical stimuli can be maximized by varying coupling strength, and that stochasticity of the hair bundle compartment is a limiting factor of the sensitivity.

  13. Foxp1 maintains hair follicle stem cell quiescence through regulation of Fgf18

    PubMed Central

    Leishman, Erin; Howard, Jeffrey M.; Garcia, Gloria E.; Miao, Qi; Ku, Amy T.; Dekker, Joseph D.; Tucker, Haley; Nguyen, Hoang

    2013-01-01

    Hair follicles cyclically degenerate and regenerate throughout adult life and require regular stem cell activation to drive the cycle. In the resting phase of the hair cycle, hair follicle stem cells are maintained in a quiescent state until they receive signals to proliferate. We found that the forkhead transcription factor Foxp1 is crucial for maintaining the quiescence of hair follicle stem cells. Loss of Foxp1 in skin epithelial cells leads to precocious stem cell activation, resulting in drastic shortening of the quiescent phase of the hair cycle. Conversely, overexpression of Foxp1 in keratinocytes prevents cell proliferation by promoting cell cycle arrest. Finally, through both gain- and loss-of-function studies, we identify fibroblast growth factor 18 (Fgf18) as the key downstream target of Foxp1. We show that exogenously supplied FGF18 can prevent the hair follicle stem cells of Foxp1 null mice from being prematurely activated. As Fgf18 controls the length of the quiescent phase and is a key downstream target of Foxp1, our data strongly suggest that Foxp1 regulates the quiescent stem cell state in the hair follicle stem cell niche by controlling Fgf18 expression. PMID:23946441

  14. Hair Regeneration Treatment Using Adipose-Derived Stem Cell Conditioned Medium: Follow-up With Trichograms

    PubMed Central

    Suga, Hirotaka

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Adipose-derived stem cells secrete various growth factors that promote hair growth. This study examined the effects of adipose-derived stem cell-conditioned medium on alopecia. Methods: Adipose-derived stem cell-conditioned medium was intradermally injected in 22 patients (11 men and 11 women) with alopecia. Patients received treatment every 3 to 5 weeks for a total of 6 sessions. Hair numbers were counted using trichograms before and after treatment. A half-side comparison study was also performed in 10 patients (8 men and 2 women). Results: Hair numbers were significantly increased after treatment in both male (including those without finasteride administration) and female patients. In the half-side comparison study, the increase in hair numbers was significantly higher on the treatment side than on the placebo side. Conclusion: Treatment using adipose-derived stem cell-conditioned medium appears highly effective for alopecia and may represent a new therapy for hair regeneration. PMID:25834689

  15. BDNF gene therapy induces auditory nerve survival and fiber sprouting in deaf Pou4f3 mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Fukui, H; Wong, H T; Beyer, L A; Case, B G; Swiderski, D L; Di Polo, A; Ryan, A F; Raphael, Y

    2012-01-01

    Current therapy for patients with hereditary absence of cochlear hair cells, who have severe or profound deafness, is restricted to cochlear implantation, a procedure that requires survival of the auditory nerve. Mouse mutations that serve as models for genetic deafness can be utilized for developing and enhancing therapies for hereditary deafness. A mouse with Pou4f3 loss of function has no hair cells and a subsequent, progressive degeneration of auditory neurons. Here we tested the influence of neurotrophin gene therapy on auditory nerve survival and peripheral sprouting in Pou4f3 mouse ears. BDNF gene transfer enhanced preservation of auditory neurons compared to control ears, in which nearly all neurons degenerated. Surviving neurons in treated ears exhibited pronounced sprouting of nerve fibers into the auditory epithelium, despite the absence of hair cells. This enhanced nerve survival and regenerative sprouting may improve the outcome of cochlear implant therapy in patients with hereditary deafness.

  16. Developmental regulation of nicotinic synapses on cochlear inner hair cells.

    PubMed

    Katz, Eleonora; Elgoyhen, Ana Belén; Gómez-Casati, María E; Knipper, Marlies; Vetter, Douglas E; Fuchs, Paul A; Glowatzki, Elisabeth

    2004-09-08

    In the mature cochlea, inner hair cells (IHCs) transduce acoustic signals into receptor potentials, communicating to the brain by synaptic contacts with afferent fibers. Before the onset of hearing, a transient efferent innervation is found on IHCs, mediated by a nicotinic cholinergic receptor that may contain both alpha9 and alpha10 subunits. Calcium influx through that receptor activates calcium-dependent (SK2-containing) potassium channels. This inhibitory synapse is thought to disappear after the onset of hearing [after postnatal day 12 (P12)]. We documented this developmental transition using whole-cell recordings from IHCs in apical turns of the rat organ of Corti. Acetylcholine elicited ionic currents in 88-100% of IHCs between P3 and P14, but in only 1 of 11 IHCs at P16-P22. Potassium depolarization of efferent terminals caused IPSCs in 67% of IHCs at P3, in 100% at P7-P9, in 93% at P10-P12, but in only 40% at P13-P14 and in none of the IHCs tested between P16 and P22. Earlier work had shown by in situ hybridization that alpha9 mRNA is expressed in adult IHCs but that alpha10 mRNA disappears after the onset of hearing. In the present study, antibodies to alpha10 and to the associated calcium-dependent (SK2) potassium channel showed a similar developmental loss. The correlated expression of these gene products with functional innervation suggests that Alpha10 and SK2, but not Alpha9, are regulated by synaptic activity. Furthermore, this developmental knock-out of alpha10, but not alpha9, supports the hypothesis that functional nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in hair cells are heteromers containing both these subunits.

  17. Hair cell stereociliary bundle regeneration by espin gene transduction after aminoglycoside damage and hair cell induction by Notch inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Taura, Akiko; Taura, Kojiro; Koyama, Yukinori; Yamamoto, Norio; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Ito, Juichi; Ryan, Allen F.

    2015-01-01

    Once inner ear hair cells (HCs) are damaged by drugs, noise or aging, their apical structures including the stereociliary arrays are frequently the first cellular feature to be lost. While this can be followed by progressive loss of HC somata, a significant number of HC bodies often remain even after stereociliary loss. However, in the absence of stereocilia they are nonfunctional. HCs can sometimes be regenerated by Atoh1 transduction or Notch inhibition, but they also may lack stereociliary bundles. It is therefore important to develop methods for the regeneration of stereocilia, in order to achieve HC functional recovery. Espin is an actin bundling protein known to participate in sterociliary elongation during development. We evaluated stereociliary array regeneration in damaged vestibular sensory epithelia in tissue culture, using viral vector transduction of two espin isoforms. Utricular HCs were damaged with aminoglycosides. The utricles were then treated with a γ-secretase inhibitor, followed by espin or control transduction and histochemistry. While γ-secretase inhibition increased the number of HCs, few had stereociliary arrays. In contrast, 46 hrs after espin1 transduction, a significant increase in hair-bundle-like structures was observed. These were confirmed to be immature stereociliary arrays by scanning electron microscopy. Increased uptake of FM1–43 uptake provided evidence of stereociliary function. Espin4 transduction had no effect. The results demonstrate that espin1 gene therapy can restore stereocilia on damaged or regenerated HCs. PMID:26886463

  18. Hair cell stereociliary bundle regeneration by espin gene transduction after aminoglycoside damage and hair cell induction by Notch inhibition.

    PubMed

    Taura, A; Taura, K; Koyama, Y; Yamamoto, N; Nakagawa, T; Ito, J; Ryan, A F

    2016-05-01

    Once inner ear hair cells (HCs) are damaged by drugs, noise or aging, their apical structures including the stereociliary arrays are frequently the first cellular feature to be lost. Although this can be followed by progressive loss of HC somata, a significant number of HC bodies often remain even after stereociliary loss. However, in the absence of stereocilia they are nonfunctional. HCs can sometimes be regenerated by Atoh1 transduction or Notch inhibition, but they also may lack stereociliary bundles. It is therefore important to develop methods for the regeneration of stereocilia, in order to achieve HC functional recovery. Espin is an actin-bundling protein known to participate in sterociliary elongation during development. We evaluated stereociliary array regeneration in damaged vestibular sensory epithelia in tissue culture, using viral vector transduction of two espin isoforms. Utricular HCs were damaged with aminoglycosides. The utricles were then treated with a γ-secretase inhibitor, followed by espin or control transduction and histochemistry. Although γ-secretase inhibition increased the number of HCs, few had stereociliary arrays. In contrast, 46 h after espin1 transduction, a significant increase in hair-bundle-like structures was observed. These were confirmed to be immature stereociliary arrays by scanning electron microscopy. Increased uptake of FM1-43 uptake provided evidence of stereociliary function. Espin4 transduction had no effect. The results demonstrate that espin1 gene therapy can restore stereocilia on damaged or regenerated HCs.

  19. All Three Rows of Outer Hair Cells Are Required for Cochlear Amplification.

    PubMed

    Murakoshi, Michio; Suzuki, Sho; Wada, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    In the mammalian auditory system, the three rows of outer hair cells (OHCs) located in the cochlea are thought to increase the displacement amplitude of the organ of Corti. This cochlear amplification is thought to contribute to the high sensitivity, wide dynamic range, and sharp frequency selectivity of the hearing system. Recent studies have shown that traumatic stimuli, such as noise exposure and ototoxic acid, cause functional loss of OHCs in one, two, or all three rows. However, the degree of decrease in cochlear amplification caused by such functional losses remains unclear. In the present study, a finite element model of a cross section of the gerbil cochlea was constructed. Then, to determine effects of the functional losses of OHCs on the cochlear amplification, changes in the displacement amplitude of the basilar membrane (BM) due to the functional losses of OHCs were calculated. Results showed that the displacement amplitude of the BM decreases significantly when a single row of OHCs lost its function, suggesting that all three rows of OHCs are required for cochlear amplification.

  20. Analysis of the Dynamic Behavior of the Inner Hair Cell Stereocilia by the Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, Toshihiro; Nakajima, Chihiro; Yamamoto, Yuichi; Andoh, Masayoshi; Iida, Koji; Murakoshi, Michio; Kumano, Shun; Wada, Hiroshi

    The motion of the inner hair cell (IHC) stereocilia, which results in tension in the tip links connected to mechanically gated ion channels, mediates the auditory transduction process. However, it is difficult to directly observe the motion of the stereocilia because of their minute dimensions and complex structure. In this study, to investigate such motion, a finite element method model of the tall, middle and short IHC stereocilia, including the tip and lateral links extending between the stereocilia, was constructed. By applying an analytically estimated fluid force caused by a stimulus of 60dB SPL at 500Hz to the model, the dynamic behavior of the stereocilia was analyzed. Numerical results showed that the stereocilia moved in phase and that the maximum tensions of 2.5fN and 2.1fN occurred in the tip link connecting the tall and middle stereocilia and in the tip link connecting the middle and short stereocilia, respectively. By contrast, under the condition in which the lateral links were removed, maximum tension in the former increased to 11.6fN, while that in the latter only increased to 2.3fN. It was therefore suggested that the lateral links protect the MET channels located at taller stereocilia against large stimuli and subject the channels located in the same IHC to forces of similar size.

  1. Otoferlin couples to clathrin-mediated endocytosis in mature cochlear inner hair cells

    PubMed Central

    Duncker, Susanne V.; Franz, Christoph; Kuhn, Stephanie; Schulte, Uwe; Campanelli, Dario; Brandt, Niels; Hirt, Bernhard; Fakler, Bernd; Blin, Nikolaus; Ruth, Peter; Engel, Jutta; Marcotti, Walter; Zimmermann, Ulrike; Knipper, Marlies

    2013-01-01

    The encoding of auditory information with indefatigable precision requires efficient re-supply of vesicles at inner hair cell (IHC) ribbon synapses. Otoferlin, a transmembrane protein responsible for deafness in DFNB9 families, has been postulated to act as a calcium sensor for exocytosis as well as to be involved in rapid vesicle replenishment of IHCs. However, the molecular basis of vesicle recycling in IHCs is largely unknown. In the present study, we used high-resolution liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry to co-purify otoferlin interaction partners in the mammalian cochlea. We identified multiple subunits of the adaptor protein complex AP-2 (CLAP), an essential component of clathrin-mediated endocytosis, as binding partners of otoferlin in rats and mice. The interaction between otoferlin and AP-2 was confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation. We also found that AP-2 interacts with myosin VI, another otoferlin binding partner important for clathrin-mediated endocytosis. The expression of AP-2 in IHCs was verified by RT-PCR. Confocal microscopy experiments revealed that the expression of AP-2 and its co-localization with otoferlin is confined to mature IHCs. When clathrin-mediated endocytosis was inhibited by blocking dynamin action, real-time changes in membrane capacitance showed impaired synaptic vesicle replenishment in mature but not immature IHCs. We suggest that an otoferlin–AP-2 interaction drives Ca2+- and stimulus-dependent compensating clathrin-mediated endocytosis in mature IHCs. PMID:23719817

  2. FM dye photo-oxidation as a tool for monitoring membrane recycling in inner hair cells.

    PubMed

    Kamin, Dirk; Revelo, Natalia H; Rizzoli, Silvio O

    2014-01-01

    Styryl (FM) dyes have been used for more than two decades to investigate exo- and endocytosis in conventional synapses. However, they are difficult to use in the inner hair cells of the auditory pathway (IHCs), as FM dyes appear to penetrate through mechanotransducer channels into the cytosol of IHCs, masking endocytotic uptake. To solve this problem we applied to IHCs the FM dye photo-oxidation technique, which renders the dyes into electron microscopy markers. Photo-oxidation allowed the unambiguous identification of labeled organelles, despite the presence of FM dye in the cytosol. This enabled us to describe the morphologies of several organelles that take up membrane in IHCs, both at rest and during stimulation. At rest, endosome-like organelles were detected in the region of the cuticular plate. Larger tubulo-cisternal organelles dominated the top and nuclear regions. Finally, the basal region, where the IHC active zones are located, contained few labeled organelles. Stimulation increased significantly membrane trafficking in the basal region, inducing the appearance of labeled vesicles and cistern-like organelles. The latter were replaced by small, synaptic-like vesicles during recovery after stimulation. In contrast, no changes in membrane trafficking were induced by stimulation in the cuticular plate region or in the top and nuclear regions. We conclude that synaptic vesicle recycling takes place mostly in the basal region of the IHCs. Other organelles participate in abundant constitutive membrane trafficking throughout the rest of the IHC volume.

  3. Otoferlin couples to clathrin-mediated endocytosis in mature cochlear inner hair cells.

    PubMed

    Duncker, Susanne V; Franz, Christoph; Kuhn, Stephanie; Schulte, Uwe; Campanelli, Dario; Brandt, Niels; Hirt, Bernhard; Fakler, Bernd; Blin, Nikolaus; Ruth, Peter; Engel, Jutta; Marcotti, Walter; Zimmermann, Ulrike; Knipper, Marlies

    2013-05-29

    The encoding of auditory information with indefatigable precision requires efficient resupply of vesicles at inner hair cell (IHC) ribbon synapses. Otoferlin, a transmembrane protein responsible for deafness in DFNB9 families, has been postulated to act as a calcium sensor for exocytosis as well as to be involved in rapid vesicle replenishment of IHCs. However, the molecular basis of vesicle recycling in IHCs is largely unknown. In the present study, we used high-resolution liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry to copurify otoferlin interaction partners in the mammalian cochlea. We identified multiple subunits of the adaptor protein complex AP-2 (CLAP), an essential component of clathrin-mediated endocytosis, as binding partners of otoferlin in rats and mice. The interaction between otoferlin and AP-2 was confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation. We also found that AP-2 interacts with myosin VI, another otoferlin binding partner important for clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME). The expression of AP-2 in IHCs was verified by reverse transcription PCR. Confocal microscopy experiments revealed that the expression of AP-2 and its colocalization with otoferlin is confined to mature IHCs. When CME was inhibited by blocking dynamin action, real-time changes in membrane capacitance showed impaired synaptic vesicle replenishment in mature but not immature IHCs. We suggest that an otoferlin-AP-2 interaction drives Ca(2+)- and stimulus-dependent compensating CME in mature IHCs.

  4. New findings in the mechanisms regulating polar growth in root hair cells.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas, Luis

    2009-01-01

    Root hairs cells are highly polarized cellular structures resulting from tip growth of specific root epidermal cells. Root-hair morphogenesis involves many aspects regulating tip growth such as exocytosis, ion flux, calcium homeostasis, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and cytoskeleton. These cells are excellent models for studying polar growth and can be challenged with many extracellular factors affecting the pattern of growth named Nod factors, elicitors, hormones, etc. The general scenery is that the well described tip-high intracellular Ca(2+) gradient plays a central role in regulating tip growth. On the other hand, ROS plays a key role in various processes, for example hypersensitive response, root hair development, hormone action, gravitropism and stress responses. However, ROS has recently emerged as a key player together with calcium in regulating polar growth, not only in root hair cells but also in pollen tubes, filamentous fungi and fucoid cells. Furthermore, Ca(2+)-permeable channel modulation by ROS has been demonstrated in Vicia faba guard cells and Arabidopsis root hairs. Recently, root hair cells were shown to experiment ROS, pH and calcium oscillations coupled to growth oscillation. These recent findings allow considering that root hair cells present a similar pattern of growth as described for pollen tubes.

  5. Calcium restriction prolongs metaphase in dividing Tradescantia stamen hair cells

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    Agents that lower extracellular calcium concentration (EGTA) or modulate calcium transport (lanthanum or D600) have been applied to dividing stamen hair cells of Tradescantia and analyzed for their ability to change the following: (a) the time required to progress from nuclear envelope breakdown to the onset of anaphase (metaphase transit time), (b) the time required to progress from anaphase to the initiation of the cell plate, and (c) the rate of chromosome motion in anaphase. Control cells complete metaphase in 32 min, initiate a cell plate in 19 min, and display a chromosome motion rate of 1.45 micron/min. If cells are treated with a calcium-EGTA buffer (pCa 8) for 4 h, the metaphase transit time is increased to 53 min without any change in the time of cell plate formation or the rate of chromosome motion. Lanthanum and D600, under conditions in which their access to the plasmalemma has been facilitated by pretreating the cells with cutinase, also markedly extend metaphase and in several instances permanently arrest cells. Lanthanum, however, produce little or no change in cell plate initiation or the rate of chromosome motion. Microscopic observations of the mitotic apparatus in calcium-stressed cells reveal normal chromatin condensation and metaphase progression. Chromosomes partly untwine but remain attached at their kinetochores. It is suggested that a flux of calcium, derived from the extracellular compartment, may cause the final splitting of sister chromosomes and trigger the onset of anaphase. However, once anaphase has begun, chromosome motion and cell plate initiation proceed normally even under conditions of extracellular calcium restriction. PMID:3921550

  6. Mild maternal iron deficiency anemia induces DPOAE suppression and cochlear hair cell apoptosis by caspase activation in young guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fei; Hao, Shuai; Zhao, Yue; Ren, Yahao; Yang, Jun; Sun, Xiance; Chen, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Iron deficiency (ID) anemia (IDA) alters auditory neural normal development in the mammalian cochlea. Previous results suggest that mild maternal IDA during pregnancy and lactation altered the hearing and nervous system development of the young offspring, but the mechanisms underlying the association are incompletely understood. The objective of this study was to evaluate the role of apoptosis in the development of sensory hair cells following mild maternal IDA during pregnancy and lactation. We established a maternal anemia model in female guinea pigs by using a mild iron deficient diet. The offspring were weaned on postnatal day (PND) 9 and then was given the iron sufficient diet. Maternal blood samples were collected on gestational day (GD) 21, GD 42, GD 63 and PND 9, serum level of iron (SI) or hemoglobin (Hb) was measured. Blood samples of pups were collected on PND 9 for SI measurement. On PND 24, pups were examined the distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) task, and then the cochleae were harvested for assessment of apoptosis by immunohistochemistry of cysteine-aspartic acid proteases 3/9 (caspase-3/9) and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay, and by double immunofluorescence for the colocalization of TUNEL and caspase-3. Blood samples of pups were collected on PND 24 for SI and Hb measurements. Here we show that mild maternal IDA during pregnancy and lactation resulted in hearing impairment, decreased hair cell number, caspase-3/9 activation and increased apoptotic cell number of young guinea pigs. These results indicate a key role for apoptosis in inhibition of hair cell development, caused by mild maternal IDA during pregnancy and lactation.

  7. Fenofibrate exerts protective effects against gentamicin-induced toxicity in cochlear hair cells by activating antioxidant enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Park, Channy; Ji, Hye-Min; Kim, Se-Jin; Kil, Sung-Hee; Lee, Joon No; Kwak, Seongae; Choe, Seong-Kyu; Park, Raekil

    2017-01-01

    Fenofibrate, an activator of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), has been shown to protect the kidneys and brain cells from oxidative stress; however, its role in preventing hearing loss has not been reported to date, at least to the best of our knowledge. In this study, we demonstrated the protective effects of fenofibrate against gentamicin (GM)-induced ototoxicity. We found that the auditory brainstem response threshold which was increased by GM was significantly reduced by pre-treatment with fenofibrate in rats. In cochlear explants, the disruption of hair cell layers by GM was also markedly attenuated by pre-treatment with fenofibrate. In addition, fenofibrate almost completely abolished GM-induced reactive oxygen species generation, which seemed to be mediated at least in part by the restoration of the expression of PPAR-α-dependent antioxidant enzymes, including catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD)-1. Of note, fenofibrate markedly increased the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) which was also induced to a certain degree by GM alone. The induced expression of HO-1 by fenofibrate appeared to be essential for mediating the protective effects of fenofibrate, as the inhibition of HO-1 activity significantly diminished the protective effects of fenofibrate against the GM-mediated death of sensory hair cells in cochlea explant culture, as well as in zebrafish neuromasts. These results suggest that fenofibrate protects sensory hair cells from GM-induced toxicity by upregulating PPAR-α-dependent antioxidant enzymes, including HO-1. Our results provide insight into the preventive therapy for hearing loss caused by aminoglycoside antibiotics. PMID:28290603

  8. Genomic expression differences between cutaneous cells from red hair color individuals and black hair color individuals based on bioinformatic analysis.

    PubMed

    Puig-Butille, Joan Anton; Gimenez-Xavier, Pol; Visconti, Alessia; Nsengimana, Jérémie; Garcia-García, Francisco; Tell-Marti, Gemma; Escamez, Maria José; Newton-Bishop, Julia; Bataille, Veronique; Del Río, Marcela; Dopazo, Joaquín; Falchi, Mario; Puig, Susana

    2016-12-24

    The MC1R gene plays a crucial role in pigmentation synthesis. Loss-of-function MC1R variants, which impair protein function, are associated with red hair color (RHC) phenotype and increased skin cancer risk. Cultured cutaneous cells bearing loss-of-function MC1R variants show a distinct gene expression profile compared to wild-type MC1R cultured cutaneous cells. We analysed the gene signature associated with RHC co-cultured melanocytes and keratinocytes by Protein-Protein interaction (PPI) network analysis to identify genes related with non-functional MC1R variants. From two detected networks, we selected 23 nodes as hub genes based on topological parameters. Differential expression of hub genes was then evaluated in healthy skin biopsies from RHC and black hair color (BHC) individuals. We also compared gene expression in melanoma tumors from individuals with RHC versus BHC. Gene expression in normal skin from RHC cutaneous cells showed dysregulation in 8 out of 23 hub genes (CLN3, ATG10, WIPI2, SNX2, GABARAPL2, YWHA, PCNA and GBAS). Hub genes did not differ between melanoma tumors in RHC versus BHC individuals. The study suggests that healthy skin cells from RHC individuals present a constitutive genomic deregulation associated with the red hair phenotype and identify novel genes involved in melanocyte biology.

  9. Induced pluripotent stem cells from human hair follicle mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yimei; Liu, Jinyu; Tan, Xiaohua; Li, Gaofeng; Gao, Yunhe; Liu, Xuejuan; Zhang, Lihong; Li, Yulin

    2013-08-01

    Reprogramming of somatic cells into inducible pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) provides an alternative to using embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Mesenchymal stem cells derived from human hair follicles (hHF-MSCs) are easily accessible, reproducible by direct plucking of human hairs. Whether these hHF-MSCs can be reprogrammed has not been previously reported. Here we report the generation of iPSCs from hHF-MSCs obtained by plucking several hairs. hHF-MSCs were isolated from hair follicle tissues and their mesenchymal nature confirmed by detecting cell surface antigens and multilineage differentiation potential towards adipocytes and osteoblasts. They were then reprogrammed into iPSCs by lentiviral transduction with Oct4, Sox2, c-Myc and Klf4. hHF-MSC-derived iPSCs appeared indistinguishable from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) in colony morphology, expression of alkaline phosphotase, and expression of specific hESCs surface markers, SSEA-3, SSEA-4, Tra-1-60, Tra-1-81, Nanog, Oct4, E-Cadherin and endogenous pluripotent genes. When injected into immunocompromised mice, hHF-MSC-derived iPSCs formed teratomas containing representatives of all three germ layers. This is the first study to report reprogramming of hHF-MSCs into iPSCs.

  10. Connexin-Mediated Signaling in Nonsensory Cells Is Crucial for the Development of Sensory Inner Hair Cells in the Mouse Cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Stuart L.; Ceriani, Federico; Houston, Oliver; Polishchuk, Roman; Polishchuk, Elena; Crispino, Giulia; Zorzi, Veronica

    2017-01-01

    Mutations in the genes encoding for gap junction proteins connexin 26 (Cx26) and connexin 30 (Cx30) have been linked to syndromic and nonsyndromic hearing loss in mice and humans. The release of ATP from connexin hemichannels in cochlear nonsensory cells has been proposed to be the main trigger for action potential activity in immature sensory inner hair cells (IHCs), which is crucial for the refinement of the developing auditory circuitry. Using connexin knock-out mice, we show that IHCs fire spontaneous action potentials even in the absence of ATP-dependent intercellular Ca2+ signaling in the nonsensory cells. However, this signaling from nonsensory cells was able to increase the intrinsic IHC firing frequency. We also found that connexin expression is key to IHC functional maturation. In Cx26 conditional knock-out mice (Cx26Sox10-Cre), the maturation of IHCs, which normally occurs at approximately postnatal day 12, was partially prevented. Although Cx30 has been shown not to be required for hearing in young adult mice, IHCs from Cx30 knock-out mice exhibited a comprehensive brake in their development, such that their basolateral membrane currents and synaptic machinery retain a prehearing phenotype. We propose that IHC functional differentiation into mature sensory receptors is initiated in the prehearing cochlea provided that the expression of either connexin reaches a threshold level. As such, connexins regulate one of the most crucial functional refinements in the mammalian cochlea, the disruption of which contributes to the deafness phenotype observed in mice and DFNB1 patients. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The correct development and function of the mammalian cochlea relies not only on the sensory hair cells, but also on the surrounding nonsensory cells. Although the nonsensory cells have been largely implicated in the general homeostasis in the mature cochlea, their involvement in the initial functional differentiation of the sensory inner hair cells is less

  11. Genetic analysis of vertebrate sensory hair cell mechanosensation: the zebrafish circler mutants.

    PubMed

    Nicolson, T; Rüsch, A; Friedrich, R W; Granato, M; Ruppersberg, J P; Nüsslein-Volhard, C

    1998-02-01

    The molecular basis of sensory hair cell mechanotransduction is largely unknown. In order to identify genes that are essential for mechanosensory hair cell function, we characterized a group of recently isolated zebrafish motility mutants. These mutants are defective in balance and swim in circles but have no obvious morphological defects. We examined the mutants using calcium imaging of acoustic-vibrational and tactile escape responses, high resolution microscopy of sensory neuroepithelia in live larvae, and recordings of extracellular hair cell potentials (microphonics). Based on the analyses, we have identified several classes of genes. Mutations in sputnik and mariner affect hair bundle integrity. Mutant astronaut and cosmonaut hair cells have relatively normal microphonics and thus appear to affect events downstream of mechanotransduction. Mutant orbiter, mercury, and gemini larvae have normal hair cell morphology and yet do not respond to acoustic-vibrational stimuli. The microphonics of lateral line hair cells of orbiter, mercury, and gemini larvae are absent or strongly reduced. Therefore, these genes may encode components of the transduction apparatus.

  12. Activin Potentiates Proliferation in Mature Avian Auditory Sensory Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    McCullar, Jennifer S.; Ty, Sidya; Campbell, Sean; Oesterle, Elizabeth C.

    2010-01-01

    Humans and other mammals are highly susceptible to permanent hearing and balance deficits due to an inability to regenerate sensory hair cells lost to inner ear trauma. In contrast, nonmammalian vertebrates, such as birds, robustly regenerate replacement hair cells and restore hearing and balance functions to near-normal levels. There is considerable interest in understanding the cellular mechanisms responsible for this difference in regenerative capacity. Here we report on involvement of the TGFβ superfamily type II activin receptors, Acvr2a and Acvr2b, in regulating proliferation in mature avian auditory sensory epithelium. Cultured, posthatch avian auditory sensory epithelium treated with Acvr2a and Acvr2b inhibitors shows decreased proliferation of support cells, the cell type that gives rise to new hair cells. Conversely, addition of activin A, an Acvr2a/b ligand, potentiates support cell proliferation. Neither treatment (inhibitor or ligand) affected hair cell survival, suggesting a specific effect of Acvr2a/b signaling on support cell mitogenicity. Using immunocytochemistry, Acvr2a, Acvr2b, and downstream Smad effector proteins were differentially localized in avian and mammalian auditory sensory epithelia. Collectively, these data suggest that signaling through Acvr2a/b promotes support cell proliferation in mature avian auditory sensory epithelium and that this signaling pathway may be incomplete, or actively blocked, in the adult mammalian ear. PMID:20071511

  13. Association between histone deacetylases and the loss of cochlear hair cells: Role of the former in noise-induced hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Wen, Li-Ting; Wang, Jie; Wang, Ye; Chen, Fu-Quan

    2015-08-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is one of the most frequent disabilities in industrialized countries. It has been demonstrated that hair cell loss in the auditory end organ may account for the majority of ear pathological conditions. Previous studies have indicated that histone deacetylases (HDACs) play an important role in neurodegenerative diseases, including hearing impairment, in older persons. Thus, we hypothesized that the inhibition of HDACs would prevent hair cell loss and, consequently, NIHL. In the present study, a CBA/J mouse model of NIHL was established. Following an injection with the HDAC inhibitor, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), the expression levels of HDAC1, HDAC4 and acetyl-histone H3 (Lys9) (H3-AcK9) were measured. The number of hair cells was quantified and their morphology was observed. The results revealed that 1 h following exposure to 110 dB SPL broadband noise, there was a significant increase in HDAC1 and HDAC4 expression, and a marked decrease in the H3-AcK9 protein levels, as shown by western blot analysis. Pre-treatment with SAHA significantly inhibited these effects. Two weeks following exposure to noise, the mice exhibited significant hearing impairment and an obvious loss in the number of outer hair cells. An abnormal cell morphology with cilia damage was also observed. Pre-treatment with SAHA markedly attenuated these noise-induced effects. Taken together, the findings of our study suggest that HDAC expression is associated with outer hair cell function and plays a significant role in NIHL. Our data indicate that SAHA may be a potential therapeutic agent for the prevention of NIHL.

  14. Epigenetic regulation of Atoh1 guides hair cell development in the mammalian cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Stojanova, Zlatka P.; Kwan, Tao; Segil, Neil

    2015-01-01

    In the developing cochlea, sensory hair cell differentiation depends on the regulated expression of the bHLH transcription factor Atoh1. In mammals, if hair cells die they do not regenerate, leading to permanent deafness. By contrast, in non-mammalian vertebrates robust regeneration occurs through upregulation of Atoh1 in the surviving supporting cells that surround hair cells, leading to functional recovery. Investigation of crucial transcriptional events in the developing organ of Corti, including those involving Atoh1, has been hampered by limited accessibility to purified populations of the small number of cells present in the inner ear. We used µChIP and qPCR assays of FACS-purified cells to track changes in the epigenetic status of the Atoh1 locus during sensory epithelia development in the mouse. Dynamic changes in the histone modifications H3K4me3/H3K27me3, H3K9ac and H3K9me3 reveal a progression from poised, to active, to repressive marks, correlating with the onset of Atoh1 expression and its subsequent silencing during the perinatal (P1 to P6) period. Inhibition of acetylation blocked the increase in Atoh1 mRNA in nascent hair cells, as well as ongoing hair cell differentiation during embryonic organ of Corti development ex vivo. These results reveal an epigenetic mechanism of Atoh1 regulation underlying hair cell differentiation and subsequent maturation. Interestingly, the H3K4me3/H3K27me3 bivalent chromatin structure observed in progenitors persists at the Atoh1 locus in perinatal supporting cells, suggesting an explanation for the latent capacity of these cells to transdifferentiate into hair cells, and highlighting their potential as therapeutic targets in hair cell regeneration. PMID:26487780

  15. Patterns of light interference produced by damaged cuticle cells in human hair.

    PubMed

    Gamez-Garcia, Manuel; Lu, Yuan

    2007-01-01

    Colorful patterns of light interference have been observed to occur in human hair cuticle cells. The light interference phenomenon has been analyzed by optical microscopy. The strong patterns of light interference appeared only in cuticle cells that had been damaged either mechanically or by thermal stresses. Cuticle cells that were not damaged did not produce this phenomenon. The zones of light interference on the hair surface were seen to extend to cuticle sheath areas whose damage was not apparent when analyzed under the Scanning Electron Microscope. The presence of oils and other hydrophobic materials in the hair had a strong effect in the appearance or disappearance of the interference patterns.

  16. Aminoglycoside-induced phosphatidylserine externalisation in sensory hair cells is regionally restricted, rapid and reversible

    PubMed Central

    Goodyear, R.J.; Gale, J.E.; Ranatunga, K.M.; Kros, C.J.; Richardson, G.P.

    2012-01-01

    The aminophospholipid phosphatidylserine (PS) is normally restricted to the inner leaflet of the plasmalemma. During certain cellular processes, including apoptosis, PS translocates to the outer leaflet and can be labelled with externally-applied annexin-V, a calcium-dependent PS-binding protein. In mouse cochlear cultures, annexin-V labelling reveals the aminoglycoside antibiotic neomycin induces rapid PS externalisation, specifically on the apical surface of hair cells. PS externalisation is observed within ~75 seconds of neomycin perfusion, first on the hair bundle and then on membrane blebs forming around the apical surface. Whole-cell capacitance also increases significantly within minutes of neomycin application indicating blebbing is accompanied by membrane addition to the hair-cell surface. PS-externalisation and membrane blebbing can, nonetheless, occur independently. Pre-treating hair cells with calcium chelators, a procedure that blocks mechanotransduction, or overexpressing a PIP2-binding pleckstrin-homology domain, can reduce neomycin-induced PS externalisation, suggesting neomycin enters hair cells via transduction channels, clusters PIP2, and thereby activates lipid scrambling. The effects of short-term neomycin treatment are reversible. Following neomycin washout, PS is no longer detected on the apical surface, apical membrane blebs disappear and surface-bound annexin-V is internalised, distributing throughout the supra-nuclear cytoplasm of the hair cell. Hair cells can therefore repair, and recover from, neomycin-induced surface damage. Hair cells lacking myosin VI, a minus-end directed actin-based motor implicated in endocytosis, can also recover from brief neomycin treatment. Internalised annexin-V, however, remains below the apical surface thereby pinpointing a critical role for myosin VI in the transport of endocytosed material away from the hair cell’s periphery. PMID:18829952

  17. Laser selective microablation of sensitized intracellular components within auditory receptor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, David M.; Evans, Burt N.; Santos-Sacchi, Joseph

    1995-05-01

    A laser system can be coupled to a light microscope for laser microbeam ablation and trapping of single cells in vitro. We have extended this technology by sensitization of target structures with vital dyes to provide selective ablation of specific subcellular components. Isolated auditory receptor cells (outer hair cells, OHCs) are known to elongate and contract in response to electrical, chemical and mechanical stimulation. Various intracellular structures are candidate components mediating motility of OHCs, but the exact mechanism(s) is currently unknown. In ongoing studies of OHC motility, we have used the microbeam for selective ablation of lateral wall components and of an axial cytoskeletal core that extends from the nucleus to the cell apex. Both the area beneath the subsurface cistemae of the lateral wall and the core are rich in mitochondria. OHCs isolated from guinea pig cochlea are suspended in L- 15 medium containing 2.0 (mu) M Rhodamine 123, a porphyrin with an affinity for mitochondria. A spark-pumped nitrogen laser pumping a dye cell (Coumarin 500) was aligned on the optical axis of a Nikon Optiphot-2 to produce a 3 ns, 0.5 - 10 micrometers spot (diameter above ablation threshold w/50X water immersion, N.A. 0.8), and energy at the target approximately equals 10 (mu) J/pulse. At short incubation times in Rh123 irradiation caused local blebbing or bulging of cytoplastic membrane and thus loss of the OHC's cylindrical shape. At longer Rh123 incubation times when the central axis of the cell was targeted we observed cytoplasmic clearing, immediate cell elongation (approximately equals 5%) and clumping of core material at nuclear and apical attachments. Experiments are underway to examine the significance of these preliminary observations.

  18. Paracrine crosstalk between human hair follicle dermal papilla cells and microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bassino, Eleonora; Gasparri, Franco; Giannini, Valentina; Munaron, Luca

    2015-05-01

    Human follicle dermal papilla cells (FDPC) are a specialized population of mesenchymal cells located in the skin. They regulate hair follicle (HF) development and growth, and represent a reservoir of multipotent stem cells. Growing evidence supports the hypothesis that HF cycling is associated with vascular remodeling. Follicular keratinocytes release vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) that sustains perifollicular angiogenesis leading to an increase of follicle and hair size. Furthermore, several human diseases characterized by hair loss, including Androgenetic Alopecia, exhibit alterations of skin vasculature. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying HF vascularization remain largely unknown. In vitro coculture approaches can be successfully employed to greatly improve our knowledge and shed more light on this issue. Here we used Transwell-based co-cultures to show that FDPC promote survival, proliferation and tubulogenesis of human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC) more efficiently than fibroblasts. Accordingly, FDPC enhance the endothelial release of VEGF and IGF-1, two well-known proangiogenic growth factors. Collectively, our data suggest a key role of papilla cells in vascular remodeling of the hair follicle.

  19. How hearing happens: mechanoelectrical transduction and amplification by hair cells of the internal ear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudspeth, A. J.

    2001-03-01

    Hearing and balance rely on the ability of hair cells in the inner ear to sense miniscule mechanical stimuli. In each cell, sound or acceleration deflects the mechanosensitive hair bundle, a tuft of rigid stereocilia protruding from the cell’s apical surface. By altering the tension in gating springs linked to mechanically sensitive transduction channels, this deflection changes the channels’ open probability and elicits an electrical response. To detect weak stimuli despite energy losses due to viscous dissipation, a hair cell can use active hair-bundle movement to amplify its mechanical inputs. This amplificatory process also yields spontaneous bundle oscillations. We stimulated hair bundles with a flexible glass probe and recorded their mechanical responses with a photometric system. When the stimulus frequency lay within a band enclosing a hair cell’s frequency of spontaneous oscillation, mechanical stimuli as small as 5 nm entrained the hair-bundle oscillations. For small stimuli, the bundle movement was larger than the stimulus. Because the energy dissipated by viscous drag exceeded the work provided by the stimulus probe, the hair bundles powered their motion and therefore amplified it. Using a displacement-clamp system to measure the mechanical properties of individual hair bundles from the bullfrog’s ear, we found that an oscillatory bundle displayed negative slope stiffness at the heart of its region of mechanosensitivity. Offsetting the hair bundle’s position activated an adaptation process that shifted the region of negative stiffness along the displacement axis. Modeling indicated that the interplay between negative bundle stiffness and the motor responsible for mechanical adaptation produced bundle oscillations similar to those observed. Just as the negative resistance of electrically excitable cells and of tunnel diodes can be embedded in a biasing circuit to amplify electrical signals, negative stiffness can be harnessed to amplify

  20. Over-expression of myosin7A in cochlear hair cells of circling mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yoo Yeon; Nam, Hajin; Jung, Harry; Kim, Boyoung

    2017-01-01

    Circling mouse (C57BL/6J-cir/cir) deleted the transmembrane inner ear (Tmie) gene is an animal model for human non-syndromic recessive deafness, DFNB6. In circling mouse, hair cells in the cochlea have degenerated and hair bundles have become irregularity as time goes on. Tmie protein carries out a function of the mechanoelectrical transduction channel in cochlear hair cells. Myosin7a (MYO7A) protein has key roles in development of the cochlear hair bundles as well as in the function of cochlear hair cells. To find whether Tmie protein interacts with MYO7A proteins in the cochlea postnatal developmental stage, we investigated expression of the MYO7A proteins in the cochlear hair cells of circling mice by western blot analysis and whole mount immunofluorescence at postnatal day 5 (P5). The expression of MYO7A showed statistically significant increase in the cochlea of C57BL/6J-+/cir and C57BL/6J-cir/cir mice than that of C57BL/6J-+/+ mice. The MYO7A intensity of the cochlear hair cells also increased in C57BL/6J-+/cir and C57BL/6J-cir/cir mice compared with those of C57BL/6J-+/+ mice. Taken together, the results indicate that Tmie protein may have an important role with MYO7A protein in the development and maintenance of the stereociliary bundles during postnatal developmental stage of the cochlea.

  1. Effects of human hair and nail proteins and their films on rat mast cells.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Toshihiro; Murai, Shinya; Ohkawa, Kousaku; Hirai, Toshihiro

    2008-06-01

    Human hair and nail are valuable materials for producing individual corresponding biocompatible materials. A rapid and convenient protein extraction method (Shindai method) and novel procedures for preparing their protein films from their extracts have been developed using human hair and nail. The effects of the human hair and nail proteins and their films on histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells were investigated. Both protein solutions and their films, mainly consisting of keratins and matrix proteins, did not induce histamine release from the mast cells. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) also showed that the mast cells were only slightly affected by adding the human hair and nail proteins or by incubating on their protein films. The IgE-dependent histamine release was inhibited by the hair and nail proteins and their films. Incubation of the mast cells with the hair and nail proteins prior to the addition of the IgE serum resulted in a high inhibition (50%) of the histamine release, while the inhibition was approximately 10% when the protein solutions were mixed with the mast cells after incubation with the IgE serum. These results suggest that the human hair and nail proteins and their films will be useful materials for antiallergic actions.

  2. Energy Output from a Single Outer Hair Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasa, Kuni H.

    2016-12-01

    Electromotility of outer hair cells (OHCs) has been extensively studied with in vitro experiments because of its physiological significance in the cochlear amplifier, which provides the exquisite sensitivity and frequency selectivity of the mammalian ear. However, these studies have been performed largely under load-free conditions or with static load, while these cells function in vivo in a dynamic environment, receiving electrical energy to enhance mechanical oscillation in the inner ear. This gap leaves uncertainties in addressing a key issue, how much mechanical energy an OHC provides. The present report is an attempt of bridging the gap by introducing a simple one-dimensional model for electromotility of OHC in a dynamic environment. This model incorporates a feedback loop involving the receptor potential and the mechanical load on OHC, and leads to an analytical expression for the membrane capacitance, which explicitly describes the dependence on the elastic load, viscous drag, and the mass. The derived equation of motion was examined in a mass-less model system with realistic parameter values for OHC. It was found that viscous drag is more effective than elastic load in enhancing the receptor potential that drives the cell. For this reason, it is expected that OHCs are more effective in counteracting viscous drag than providing elastic energy to the system.

  3. Acetylcholine-induced phosphorylation in isolated outer hair cells.

    PubMed

    Szõnyi, M; Csermely, P; Sziklai, I

    1999-03-01

    Two groups of isolated, surviving outer hair cells (OHCs) of guinea pig cochleas (n = 20, for each group) were treated with 10 microM acetylcholine or acetylcholine plus strichnine (an alpha9 nAChR antagonist), respectively, under short-term tissue culture conditions. The protein content of the cell homogenates was separated by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, Western blotted and labelled with an antibody against phosphoserine residues. Signals were detected using the ECL system. Acetylcholine challenge of the OHCs resulted in a difference in the pattern of phosphorylated proteins from those of strichnine pretreated cells. A 220 kDa and a 120 kDa protein expressed a more intense phosphorylated state in the ACh group compared with the ACh plus strichnine group. The 220 kDa phosphoprotein is in the range of the cytoskeletal protein beta-fodrin, whereas the 120 kDa fraction is similar to alpha-fodrin or an ankyrin isoform. Phosphorylation of proteins due to activation of the AChR by agonist can play a role in the signalling mechanism between receptor activation and increase in the electromotile capability of isolated OHCs.

  4. Glutamate Transporters EAAT4 and EAAT5 Are Expressed in Vestibular Hair Cells and Calyx Endings

    PubMed Central

    Gaboyard-Niay, Sophie; Calin-Jageman, Irina; Chidavaenzi, Robstein L.; Venteo, Stephanie; Desmadryl, Gilles; Goldberg, Jay M.; Lysakowski, Anna; Chabbert, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Glutamate is the neurotransmitter released from hair cells. Its clearance from the synaptic cleft can shape neurotransmission and prevent excitotoxicity. This may be particularly important in the inner ear and in other sensory organs where there is a continually high rate of neurotransmitter release. In the case of most cochlear and type II vestibular hair cells, clearance involves the diffusion of glutamate to supporting cells, where it is taken up by EAAT1 (GLAST), a glutamate transporter. A similar mechanism cannot work in vestibular type I hair cells as the presence of calyx endings separates supporting cells from hair-cell synapses. Because of this arrangement, it has been conjectured that a glutamate transporter must be present in the type I hair cell, the calyx ending, or both. Using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings, we demonstrate that a glutamate-activated anion current, attributable to a high-affinity glutamate transporter and blocked by DL-TBOA, is expressed in type I, but not in type II hair cells. Molecular investigations reveal that EAAT4 and EAAT5, two glutamate transporters that could underlie the anion current, are expressed in both type I and type II hair cells and in calyx endings. EAAT4 has been thought to be expressed almost exclusively in the cerebellum and EAAT5 in the retina. Our results show that these two transporters have a wider distribution in mice. This is the first demonstration of the presence of transporters in hair cells and provides one of the few examples of EAATs in presynaptic elements. PMID:23049999

  5. Developmental changes in two voltage-dependent sodium currents in utricular hair cells.

    PubMed

    Wooltorton, Julian R A; Gaboyard, Sophie; Hurley, Karen M; Price, Steven D; Garcia, Jasmine L; Zhong, Meng; Lysakowski, Anna; Eatock, Ruth Anne

    2007-02-01

    Two kinds of sodium current (I(Na)) have been separately reported in hair cells of the immature rodent utricle, a vestibular organ. We show that rat utricular hair cells express one or the other current depending on age (between postnatal days 0 and 22, P0-P22), hair cell type (I, II, or immature), and epithelial zone (striola vs. extrastriola). The properties of these two currents, or a mix, can account for descriptions of I(Na) in hair cells from other reports. The patterns of Na channel expression during development suggest a role in establishing the distinct synapses of vestibular hair cells of different type and epithelial zone. All type I hair cells expressed I(Na,1), a TTX-insensitive current with a very negative voltage range of inactivation (midpoint: -94 mV). I(Na,2) was TTX sensitive and had less negative voltage ranges of activation and inactivation (inactivation midpoint: -72 mV). I(Na,1) dominated in the striola at all ages, but current density fell by two-thirds after the first postnatal week. I(Na,2) was expressed by 60% of hair cells in the extrastriola in the first week, then disappeared. In the third week, all type I cells and about half of type II cells had I(Na,1); the remaining cells lacked sodium current. I(Na,1) is probably carried by Na(V)1.5 subunits based on biophysical and pharmacological properties, mRNA expression, and immunoreactivity. Na(V)1.5 was also localized to calyx endings on type I hair cells. Several TTX-sensitive subunits are candidates for I(Na,2).

  6. Postnatal development, maturation and aging in the mouse cochlea and their effects on hair cell regeneration.

    PubMed

    Walters, Bradley J; Zuo, Jian

    2013-03-01

    The organ of Corti in the mammalian inner ear is comprised of mechanosensory hair cells (HCs) and nonsensory supporting cells (SCs), both of which are believed to be terminally post-mitotic beyond late embryonic ages. Consequently, regeneration of HCs and SCs does not occur naturally in the adult mammalian cochlea, though recent evidence suggests that these cells may not be completely or irreversibly quiescent at earlier postnatal ages. Furthermore, regenerative processes can be induced by genetic and pharmacological manipulations, but, more and more reports suggest that regenerative potential declines as the organ of Corti continues to age. In numerous mammalian systems, such effects of aging on regenerative potential are well established. However, in the cochlea, the problem of regeneration has not been traditionally viewed as one of aging. This is an important consideration as current models are unable to elicit widespread regeneration or full recovery of function at adult ages yet regenerative therapies will need to be developed specifically for adult populations. Still, the advent of gene targeting and other genetic manipulations has established mice as critically important models for the study of cochlear development and HC regeneration and suggests that auditory HC regeneration in adult mammals may indeed be possible. Thus, this review will focus on the pursuit of regeneration in the postnatal and adult mouse cochlea and highlight processes that occur during postnatal development, maturation, and aging that could contribute to an age-related decline in regenerative potential. Second, we will draw upon the wealth of knowledge pertaining to age related senescence in tissues outside of the ear to synthesize new insights and potentially guide future research aimed at promoting HC regeneration in the adult cochlea.

  7. Distortion component analysis of outer hair cell motility-related gating charge.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, S; Santos-Sacchi, J

    1999-06-01

    The underlying Boltzmann characteristics of motility-related gating currents of the outer hair cell (OHC) are predicted to generate distortion components in response to sinusoidal transmembrane voltages. We studied this distortion since it reflects the mechanical activity of the cell that may contribute to peripheral auditory system distortion. Distortion components in the OHC electrical response were analyzed using the whole-cell voltage clamp technique, under conditions where ionic conductances were blocked. Single or double-sinusoidal transmembrane voltage stimulation was delivered at various holding voltages, and distortion components of the current responses were detected by Fourier analysis. Current response magnitude and phase of each distortion component as a function of membrane potential were compared with characteristics of the voltage-dependent capacitance, obtained by voltage stair-step transient analysis or dual-frequency admittance analysis. The sum distortion was most prominent among the distortion components at all holding voltages. Notches in the sum (f1+f2), difference (f2-f1) and second harmonic (2f) components occur at the voltage where peak voltage-dependent capacitance resides (VpkCm). Rapid phase reversals also occurred at VpkCm, but phase remained fairly stable at more depolarized and hyperpolarized potentials. Thus, it is possible to extract Boltzmann parameters of the motility-related charge movement from these distortion components. In fact, we have developed a technique to follow changes in the voltage dependence of OHC motility and charge movement by tracking the voltage at phase reversal of the f2-f1 product. When intracellular turgor pressure was changed, VpkCm and distortion notch voltages shifted in the same direction. These data have important implications for understanding cochlear nonlinearity, and more generally, indicate the usefulness of distortion analysis to study displacement currents.

  8. Factors modulating supernumerary hair cell production in the postnatal rat cochlea in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chardin, S; Romand, R

    1997-07-01

    It has been shown in the past that extra hair cells or supernumerary cells can be produced when neonatal cochleae are maintained in vitro. In this report, we investigated the effects of the culture methods, molecules and growth factors that are thought to be involved in cell proliferation. Quantitative studies of supernumerary hair cells were made by measuring the cell density over the entire spiral lamina at two postnatal stages: birth and 3 days after birth. With a standard feeding solution without serum, a difference in cell density was observed between the two methods of culture. Cochlear explants in a standard feeding solution supplemented with serum showed an increase of cell density only when the explantation is made at birth. Retinoic acid added to the standard feeding solution did not increase the hair cell density, while insulin induced an increase, especially at 5 micrograms/ml. Several growth factors were tested. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) presented a dose dependent effect with an increase of up to 30% of hair cell density that was observed in the basal region when the explantation was made at birth. Transforming growth factor-alpha did not induce an increase of cell density, whereas transforming growth factor-beta presented an effect on hair cell density, with a dose dependent effect reaching 37.4% for the basal inner hair cells. Interpretation of these results is limited because of the lack of data concerning the presence of specific membrane receptors. One possibility is that insulin stimulates hair cell differentiation from existing undifferentiated cells. Another hypothesis may be related to the EGF and transforming growth factor-beta, where these molecules might induce transdifferentiation of cells by acting on the transmembrane molecules and the extracellular matrix.

  9. Dendritic HCN channels shape excitatory postsynaptic potentials at the inner hair cell afferent synapse in the mammalian cochlea.

    PubMed

    Yi, Eunyoung; Roux, Isabelle; Glowatzki, Elisabeth

    2010-05-01

    Synaptic transmission at the inner hair cell (IHC) afferent synapse, the first synapse in the auditory pathway, is specialized for rapid and reliable signaling. Here we investigated the properties of a hyperpolarization-activated current (I(h)), expressed in the afferent dendrite of auditory nerve fibers, and its role in shaping postsynaptic activity. We used whole cell patch-clamp recordings from afferent dendrites directly where they contact the IHC in excised postnatal rat cochlear turns. Excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) of variable amplitude (1-35 mV) were found with 10-90% rise times of about 1 ms and time constants of decay of about 5 ms at room temperature. Current-voltage relations recorded in afferent dendrites revealed I(h). The pharmacological profile and reversal potential (-45 mV) indicated that I(h) is mediated by hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated cation (HCN) channels. The HCN channel subunits HCN1, HCN2, and HCN4 were found to be expressed in afferent dendrites using immunolabeling. Raising intracellular cAMP levels sped up the activation kinetics, increased the magnitude of I(h) and shifted the half activation voltage (V(half)) to more positive values (-104 +/- 3 to -91 +/- 2 mV). Blocking I(h) with 50 microM ZD7288 resulted in hyperpolarization of the resting membrane potential (approximately 4 mV) and slowing the decay of the EPSP by 47%, suggesting that I(h) is active at rest and shortens EPSPs, thereby potentially improving rapid and reliable signaling at this first synapse in the auditory pathway.

  10. Glutamatergic Signaling at the Vestibular Hair Cell Calyx Synapse

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Soroush G.; Pyott, Sonja J.; Yu, Zhou

    2014-01-01

    In the vestibular periphery a unique postsynaptic terminal, the calyx, completely covers the basolateral walls of type I hair cells and receives input from multiple ribbon synapses. To date, the functional role of this specialized synapse remains elusive. There is limited data supporting glutamatergic transmission, K+ or H+ accumulation in the synaptic cleft as mechanisms of transmission. Here the role of glutamatergic transmission at the calyx synapse is investigated. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from calyx endings were performed in an in vitro whole-tissue preparation of the rat vestibular crista, the sensory organ of the semicircular canals that sense head rotation. AMPA-mediated EPSCs showed an unusually wide range of decay time constants, from <5 to >500 ms. Decay time constants of EPSCs increased (or decreased) in the presence of a glutamate transporter blocker (or a competitive glutamate receptor blocker), suggesting a role for glutamate accumulation and spillover in synaptic transmission. Glutamate accumulation caused slow depolarizations of the postsynaptic membrane potentials, and thereby substantially increased calyx firing rates. Finally, antibody labelings showed that a high percentage of presynaptic ribbon release sites and postsynaptic glutamate receptors were not juxtaposed, favoring a role for spillover. These findings suggest a prominent role for glutamate spillover in integration of inputs and synaptic transmission in the vestibular periphery. We propose that similar to other brain areas, such as the cerebellum and hippocampus, glutamate spillover may play a role in gain control of calyx afferents and contribute to their high-pass properties. PMID:25355208

  11. Auditory and non-auditory effects of noise on health.

    PubMed

    Basner, Mathias; Babisch, Wolfgang; Davis, Adrian; Brink, Mark; Clark, Charlotte; Janssen, Sabine; Stansfeld, Stephen

    2014-04-12

    Noise is pervasive in everyday life and can cause both auditory and non-auditory health effects. Noise-induced hearing loss remains highly prevalent in occupational settings, and is increasingly caused by social noise exposure (eg, through personal music players). Our understanding of molecular mechanisms involved in noise-induced hair-cell and nerve damage has substantially increased, and preventive and therapeutic drugs will probably become available within 10 years. Evidence of the non-auditory effects of environmental noise exposure on public health is growing. Observational and experimental studies have shown that noise exposure leads to annoyance, disturbs sleep and causes daytime sleepiness, affects patient outcomes and staff performance in hospitals, increases the occurrence of hypertension and cardiovascular disease, and impairs cognitive performance in schoolchildren. In this Review, we stress the importance of adequate noise prevention and mitigation strategies for public health.

  12. Active Outer Hair Cells Affect the Sound-Evoked Vibration of the Reticular Lamina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, Stefan; Fridberger, Anders

    2011-11-01

    It is well established that the organ of Corti uses active mechanisms to enhance its sensitivity and frequency selectivity. Two possible mechanisms have been identified, both capable of producing mechanical forces, which can alter the sound-evoked vibration of the hearing organ. However, little is known about the effect of these forces on the sound-evoked vibration pattern of the reticular lamina. Current injections into scala media were used to alter the amplitude of the active mechanisms in the apex of the guinea pig temporal bone. We used time-resolved confocal imaging to access the vibration pattern of individual outer hair cells. During positive current injection the the sound-evoked vibration of outer hair cell row three increased while row one showed a small decrease. Negative currents reversed the observed effect. We conclude that the outer hair cell mediated modification of reticular lamina vibration patterns could contribute to the inner hair cell stimulation.

  13. Ion flow in cochlear hair cells and the regulation of hearing sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Patuzzi, Robert

    2011-10-01

    This paper discusses how ion transport proteins in the hair cells of the mammalian cochlea work to produce a sensitive but stable hearing organ. The transport proteins in the inner and outer hair cells are summarized (including their current voltage characteristics), and the roles of these proteins in determining intracellular Ca(2+), membrane potential, and ultimately cochlear sensitivity are discussed. The paper also discusses the role of the Ca(2+) sequestration sacs in outer hair cells in the autoregulation of hair cell membrane potential and cochlear gain, and how the underdamped control of Ca(2+) within these sacs may produce the observed slow oscillations in cochlear sensitivity and otoacoustic emissions after cochlear perturbations, including perilymphatic perfusions and prolonged low-frequency tones. The relative insensitivity of cochlear gain to short-term changes in the endocochlear potential is also discussed.

  14. Transient auditory nerve demyelination as a new mechanism for hidden hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Guoqiang; Corfas, Gabriel

    2017-01-01

    Hidden hearing loss (HHL) is a recently described auditory neuropathy believed to contribute to speech discrimination and intelligibility deficits in people with normal audiological tests. Animals and humans with HHL have normal auditory thresholds but defective cochlear neurotransmission, that is, reduced suprathreshold amplitude of the sound-evoked auditory nerve compound action potential. Currently, the only cellular mechanism known for HHL is loss of inner hair cell synapses (synaptopathy). Here we report that transient loss of cochlear Schwann cells results in permanent auditory deficits characteristic of HHL. This auditory neuropathy is not associated with synaptic loss, but rather with disruption of the first heminodes at the auditory nerve peripheral terminal. Thus, this study identifies a new mechanism for HHL, highlights the long-term consequences of transient Schwann cell loss on hearing and might provide insights into the causes of the auditory deficits reported in patients that recover from acute demyelinating diseases such as Guillain–Barré syndrome. PMID:28211470

  15. Ionic mechanisms subserving mechanosensory transduction and neural integration in statocyst hair cells of Hermissenda

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Joseph

    1988-01-01

    The neural processing of gravitational-produced sensory stimulation of statocyst hair cells in the nudibranch mollusk Hermissenda was studied. The goal in these studies was to understand how: gravireceptor neurons sense or transduce gravitational forces, gravitational stimulation is integrated so as to produce a graded receptor potential, and ultimately the generation of an action potential, and various neural adaptation phenomena which hair cells exhibit arise. The approach to these problems was primarily electrophysical.

  16. Natural Compounds as Occult Ototoxins? Ginkgo biloba Flavonoids Moderately Damage Lateral Line Hair Cells.

    PubMed

    Neveux, Sarah; Smith, Nicole K; Roche, Anna; Blough, Bruce E; Pathmasiri, Wimal; Coffin, Allison B

    2017-04-01

    Several drugs, including aminoglycosides and platinum-based chemotherapy agents, are well known for their ototoxic properties. However, FDA-approved drugs are not routinely tested for ototoxicity, so their potential to affect hearing often goes unrecognized. This issue is further compounded for natural products, where there is a lack of FDA oversight and the manufacturer is solely responsible for ensuring the safety of their products. Natural products such as herbal supplements are easily accessible and commonly used in the practice of traditional eastern and alternative medicine. Using the zebrafish lateral line, we screened a natural products library to identify potential ototoxins. We found that the flavonoids quercetin and kaempferol, both from the Gingko biloba plant, demonstrated significant ototoxicity, killing up to 30 % of lateral line hair cells. We then examined a third Ginkgo flavonoid, isorhamnetin, and found similar levels of ototoxicity. After flavonoid treatment, surviving hair cells demonstrated reduced uptake of the vital dye FM 1-43FX, suggesting that the health of the remaining hair cells was compromised. We then asked if these flavonoids enter hair cells through the mechanotransduction channel, which is the site of entry for many known ototoxins. High extracellular calcium or the quinoline derivative E6 berbamine significantly protected hair cells from flavonoid damage, implicating the transduction channel as a site of flavonoid uptake. Since known ototoxins activate cellular stress responses, we asked if reactive oxygen species were necessary for flavonoid ototoxicity. Co-treatment with the antioxidant D-methionine significantly protected hair cells from each flavonoid, suggesting that antioxidant therapy could prevent hair cell loss. How these products affect mammalian hair cells is still an open question and will be the target of future experiments. However, this research demonstrates the potential for ototoxic damage caused by unregulated

  17. Two classes of outer hair cells along the tonotopic axis of the cochlea.

    PubMed

    Engel, J; Braig, C; Rüttiger, L; Kuhn, S; Zimmermann, U; Blin, N; Sausbier, M; Kalbacher, H; Münkner, S; Rohbock, K; Ruth, P; Winter, H; Knipper, M

    2006-12-01

    The molecular basis of high versus low frequency hearing loss and the differences in the sensitivity of outer hair cells depending on their cochlear localization are currently not understood. Here we demonstrate the existence of two different outer hair cell phenotypes along the cochlear axis. Outer hair cells in low frequency regions exhibit early sensitivity for loss of Ca(v)1.3 (alpha1 subunit 1.3 forming the class D L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel), while high frequency regions display a progressive susceptibility for loss of the Ca(2+)-activated large conductance K(+) (BK) channel. Despite deafness, young Ca(v)1.3-deficient mice displayed distortion-product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs), indicating functional outer hair cells in the higher frequency range of the cochlea. Considering that DPOAEs are also found in the human deafness syndrome DFNB9 caused by mutations in the synaptic vesicle protein otoferlin, we tested the expression of otoferlin in outer hair cells. Surprisingly, otoferlin showed a distinct tonotopic expression pattern at both the mRNA and protein level. Otoferlin-expressing, Ca(v)1.3 deletion-sensitive outer hair cells in the low frequency range could be clearly separated from otoferlin-negative, BK deletion-sensitive outer hair cells in the high frequency range. In addition, BK deletion led to a higher noise vulnerability in low frequency regions, which are normally unaffected by the BK deletion alone, suggesting that BK currents are involved in survival mechanisms of outer hair cells under noise conditions. Our findings propose new mechanisms and candidate genes for explaining high and low frequency hearing loss.

  18. Isolation and culture of neural crest stem cells from human hair follicles.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ruifeng; Xu, Xiaowei

    2013-04-06

    Hair follicles undergo lifelong growth and hair cycle is a well-controlled process involving stem cell proliferation and quiescence. Hair bulge is a well-characterized niche for adult stem cells. This segment of the outer root sheath contains a number of different types of stem cells, including epithelial stem cells, melanocyte stem cells and neural crest like stem cells. Hair follicles represent an accessible and rich source for different types of human stem cells. We and others have isolated neural crest stem cells (NCSCs) from human fetal and adult hair follicles. These human stem cells are label-retaining cells and are capable of self-renewal through asymmetric cell division in vitro. They express immature neural crest cell markers but not differentiation markers. Our expression profiling study showed that they share a similar gene expression pattern with murine skin immature neural crest cells. They exhibit clonal multipotency that can give rise to myogenic, melanocytic, and neuronal cell lineages after in vitro clonal single cell culture. Differentiated cells not only acquire lineage-specific markers but also demonstrate appropriate functions in ex vivo conditions. In addition, these NCSCs show differentiation potential toward mesenchymal lineages. Differentiated neuronal cells can persist in mouse brain and retain neuronal differentiation markers. It has been shown that hair follicle derived NCSCs can help nerve regrowth, and they improve motor function in mice transplanted with these stem cells following transecting spinal cord injury. Furthermore, peripheral nerves have been repaired with stem cell grafts, and implantation of skin-derived precursor cells adjacent to crushed sciatic nerves has resulted in remyelination. Therefore, the hair follicle/skin derived NCSCs have already shown promising results for regenerative therapy in preclinical models. Somatic cell reprogramming to induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells has shown enormous potential for

  19. Wnt7b is an important intrinsic regulator of hair follicle stem cell homeostasis and hair follicle cycling.

    PubMed

    Kandyba, Eve; Kobielak, Krzysztof

    2014-04-01

    The hair follicle (HF) is an exceptional mini-organ to study the mechanisms which regulate HF morphogenesis, cycling, hair follicle stem cell (hfSCs) homeostasis, and progeny differentiation. During morphogenesis, Wnt signaling is well-characterized in the initiation of HF patterning but less is known about which particular Wnt ligands are required and whether individual Wnt ligands act in an indispensable or redundant manner during postnatal hfSCs anagen onset and HF cycle progression. Previously, we described the function of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling target gene WNT7a in intrinsic regulation of hfSCs homeostasis in vivo. Here, we investigated the role of Wnt7b, which was also intrinsically upregulated in hfSCs during physiological and precocious anagen after BMP inhibition in vivo. We demonstrated Wnt7b to be a direct target of canonical BMP signaling in hfSCs and using Wnt7b conditional gene targeting during HF morphogenesis revealed disrupted HF cycling including a shorter anagen, premature catagen onset with overall shorter hair production, and diminished HF differentiation marker expression. Additionally, we observed that postnatal ablation of Wnt7b resulted in delayed HF activation, affecting both the hair germ and bulge hfSCs but still maintaining a two-step sequence of HF stimulation. Interestingly, Wnt7b cKO hfSCs participated in reformation of the new HF bulge, but with slower self-renewal. These findings demonstrate the importance of intrinsic Wnt7b expression in hfSCs regulation and normal HF cycling and surprisingly reveal a nonredundant role for Wnt7b in the control of HF anagen length and catagen entry which was not compensated by other Wnt ligands.

  20. Functional specializations of primary auditory afferents on the Mauthner cells: Interactions between membrane and synaptic properties

    PubMed Central

    Curti, Sebastian; Pereda, Alberto E.

    2009-01-01

    Primary auditory afferents are usually perceived as passive, timing-preserving, lines of communication. Contrasting this view, a special class of auditory afferents to teleost Mauthner cells, a command neuron that organizes tail-flip escape responses, undergoes potentiation of their mixed (electrical and chemical) synapses in response to high frequency cellular activity. This property is likely to represent a mechanism of input sensitization as these neurons provide the Mauthner cell with essential information for the initiation of an escape response. We review here the anatomical and physiological specializations of these identifiable auditory afferents. In particular, we discuss how their membrane and synaptic properties act in concert to more efficaciously activate the Mauthner cells. The striking functional specializations of these neurons suggest that primary auditory afferents might be capable of more sophisticated contributions to auditory processing than has been generally recognized. PMID:19941953

  1. Channeling your inner ear potassium: K(+) channels in vestibular hair cells.

    PubMed

    Meredith, Frances L; Rennie, Katherine J

    2016-08-01

    During development of vestibular hair cells, K(+) conductances are acquired in a specific pattern. Functionally mature vestibular hair cells express different complements of K(+) channels which uniquely shape the hair cell receptor potential and filtering properties. In amniote species, type I hair cells (HCI) have a large input conductance due to a ubiquitous low-voltage-activated K(+) current that activates with slow sigmoidal kinetics at voltages negative to the membrane resting potential. In contrast type II hair cells (HCII) from mammalian and non-mammalian species have voltage-dependent outward K(+) currents that activate rapidly at or above the resting membrane potential and show significant inactivation. A-type, delayed rectifier and calcium-activated K(+) channels contribute to the outward K(+) conductance and are present in varying proportions in HCII. In many species, K(+) currents in HCII in peripheral locations of vestibular epithelia inactivate more than HCII in more central locations. Two types of inward rectifier currents have been described in both HCI and HCII. A rapidly activating K(+)-selective inward rectifier current (IK1, mediated by Kir2.1 channels) predominates in HCII in peripheral zones, whereas a slower mixed cation inward rectifier current (Ih), shows greater expression in HCII in central zones of vestibular epithelia. The implications for sensory coding of vestibular signals by different types of hair cells are discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled .

  2. tmie Is required for gentamicin uptake by the hair cells of mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Seojin; Lee, Jeong-Han; Cho, Hyun-Ju; Lee, Kyu-yup; Kim, Myoung Ok; Yun, Byung-Wook; Ryoo, ZaeYoung

    2013-04-01

    The circling (cir/cir) mouse is a spontaneous model of deafness due to deletion of a 40-kb genomic region that includes the transmembrane inner ear (tmie) gene. In addition to being deaf, cir/cir mice exhibit abnormal behaviors including circling and hyperactivity. Here we investigated differences between 3-d-old (that is, before hair-cell degeneration) cir/cir and phenotypically normal (+/cir) mice and the reason underlying the degeneration of the inner ear structure of cir/cir mice. To this end, we used gentamicin, gentamicin-Texas red conjugate, and FM1-43 to investigate mechanotransducer channel activity in the hair cells of cir/cir mice; these compounds are presumed to enter hair cells through the mechanotransducer channel. Although the structure of the inner ear of +/cir mice was equivalent to that of cir/cir mice, the hair cells of cir/cir mice (unlike +/cir) did not take up gentamicin, gentamicin-Texas red conjugate, or FM1-43. These findings suggest that hair cells in cir/cir mice demonstrate abnormal maturation and mechanotransduction. In addition, our current results indicate that tmie is required for maturation and maintenance of hair cells.

  3. Distribution and time course of hair cell regeneration in the pigeon utricle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dye, B. J.; Frank, T. C.; Newlands, S. D.; Dickman, J. D.

    1999-01-01

    Vestibular and cochlear regeneration following ototoxic insult from aminoglycoside antibiotics has been well documented, particularly in birds. In the present study, intraotic application of a 2 mg streptomycin paste was used to achieve complete vestibular hair cell destruction in pigeons (Columba livia) while preserving regenerative ability. Scanning electron microscopy was used to quantify hair cell density longitudinally during regeneration in three different utricular macula locations, including the striola, central and peripheral regions. The utricular epithelium was void of stereocilia (indicating hair cell loss) at 4 days after intraotic treatment with streptomycin. At 2 weeks the stereocilia began to appear randomly and mostly in an immature form. However, when present most kinocilia were polarized toward the developing striola. Initially, regeneration occurred more rapidly in the central and peripheral regions of the utricle as compared to the striola. As regeneration proceeded from 2 to 12 weeks, hair cell density in the striola region equaled the density noted in the central and peripheral regions. At 24 weeks, hair cell density of the central and peripheral regions was equal to normal values, however the striola region had a slightly greater hair cell density than that observed for normal animals.

  4. Gentamicin is ototoxic to all hair cells in the fish lateral line system.

    PubMed

    Van Trump, William J; Coombs, Sheryl; Duncan, Kyle; McHenry, Matthew J

    2010-03-01

    Hair cells of the lateral line system in fish may differ in their susceptibility to damage by aminoglycoside antibiotics. Gentamicin has been reported to damage hair cells within canal neuromasts, but not those within superficial neuromasts. This finding, based on SEM imaging, indicates a distinction in the physiology of hair cells between the two classes of neuromast. Studies concerned with the individual roles of canal and superficial neuromasts in behavior have taken advantage of this effect in an attempt to selectively disable canal neuromasts without affecting superficial neuromast function. Here we present an experimental test of the hypothesis that canal neuromasts are more vulnerable to gentamicin than superficial neuromasts. We measured the effect of gentamicin exposure on hair cells using vital stains (DASPEI and FM1-43) in the neuromasts of Mexican blind cave fish (Astyanaxfasciatus) and zebrafish (Daniorerio). Contrary to the findings of prior studies that used SEM, gentamicin significantly reduced dye uptake by hair cells of both canal and superficial neuromasts in both species. Therefore, lateral line hair cells of both neuromast types are vulnerable to gentamicin ototoxicity. These findings argue for a re-evaluation of the results of studies that have used gentamicin to differentiate the roles of the two classes of neuromast in fish behavior.

  5. Contributions of Mouse and Human Hematopoietic Cells to Remodeling of the Adult Auditory Nerve After Neuron Loss

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Hainan; Nishimoto, Eishi; Xing, Yazhi; Brown, LaShardai N; Noble, Kenyaria V; Barth, Jeremy L; LaRue, Amanda C; Ando, Kiyoshi; Schulte, Bradley A

    2016-01-01

    The peripheral auditory nerve (AN) carries sound information from sensory hair cells to the brain. The present study investigated the contribution of mouse and human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) to cellular diversity in the AN following the destruction of neuron cell bodies, also known as spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs). Exposure of the adult mouse cochlea to ouabain selectively killed type I SGNs and disrupted the blood-labyrinth barrier. This procedure also resulted in the upregulation of genes associated with hematopoietic cell homing and differentiation, and provided an environment conducive to the tissue engraftment of circulating stem/progenitor cells into the AN. Experiments were performed using both a mouse-mouse bone marrow transplantation model and a severely immune-incompetent mouse model transplanted with human CD34+ cord blood cells. Quantitative immunohistochemical analysis of recipient mice demonstrated that ouabain injury promoted an increase in the number of both HSC-derived macrophages and HSC-derived nonmacrophages in the AN. Although rare, a few HSC-derived cells in the injured AN exhibited glial-like qualities. These results suggest that human hematopoietic cells participate in remodeling of the AN after neuron cell body loss and that hematopoietic cells can be an important resource for promoting AN repair/regeneration in the adult inner ear. PMID:27600399

  6. Membrane tether formation from outer hair cells with optical tweezers.

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhiwei; Anvari, Bahman; Takashima, Masayoshi; Brecht, Peter; Torres, Jorge H; Brownell, William E

    2002-01-01

    Optical tweezers were used to characterize the mechanical properties of the outer hair cell (OHC) plasma membrane by pulling tethers with 4.5-microm polystyrene beads. Tether formation force and tether force were measured in static and dynamic conditions. A greater force was required for tether formations from OHC lateral wall (499 +/- 152 pN) than from OHC basal end (142 +/- 49 pN). The difference in the force required to pull tethers is consistent with an extensive cytoskeletal framework associated with the lateral wall known as the cortical lattice. The apparent plasma membrane stiffness, estimated under the static conditions by measuring tether force at different tether length, was 3.71 pN/microm for OHC lateral wall and 4.57 pN/microm for OHC basal end. The effective membrane viscosity was measured by pulling tethers at different rates while continuously recording the tether force, and estimated in the range of 2.39 to 5.25 pN x s/microm. The viscous force most likely results from the viscous interactions between plasma membrane lipids and the OHC cortical lattice and/or integral membrane proteins. The information these studies provide on the mechanical properties of the OHC lateral wall is important for understanding the mechanism of OHC electromotility. PMID:11867454

  7. Continuum Mechanical Model of the Outer Hair Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleischer, Mario; Harasztosi, Csaba; Nowotny, Manuela; Zahnert, Thomas; Gummer, Anthony W.

    2011-11-01

    Knowledge of the mechanical properties of the outer hair cell (OHC) is essential for understanding its electromechanical action. To provide insight into underlying mechanics, we developed a finite-element-model of the OHC. The model contains both an intracellular viscous fluid and a homogeneous shell-like structure for the basolateral wall, including anisotropic viscoelastic material properties. We found that the viscosity of the intracellular fluid could not yield the frequency dependent behaviour of the measured impedance. Shear viscosity needed to be included in the basolateral wall to obtain an adequate representation. The required value of the dynamic viscosity is on the order of 103 mPaṡs and, therefore, 1000 fold higher than for water. Furthermore, changing the compressibility of the basolateral wall from 106 to 109 Pa suggests that the impedance is not significantly affected by this parameter. Finally, our calculations indicate that up to at least 10 kHz the measured impedances result from passive mechanical properties of the OHC.

  8. High-resolution structure of hair-cell tip links

    PubMed Central

    Kachar, Bechara; Parakkal, Marianne; Kurc, Mauricio; Zhao, Yi-dong; Gillespie, Peter G.

    2000-01-01

    Transduction-channel gating by hair cells apparently requires a gating spring, an elastic element that transmits force to the channels. To determine whether the gating spring is the tip link, a filament interconnecting two stereocilia along the axis of mechanical sensitivity, we examined the tip link's structure at high resolution by using rapid-freeze, deep-etch electron microscopy. We found that the tip link is a right-handed, coiled double filament that usually forks into two branches before contacting a taller stereocilium; at the other end, several short filaments extend to the tip link from the shorter stereocilium. The structure of the tip link suggests that it is either a helical polymer or a braided pair of filamentous macromolecules and is thus likely to be relatively stiff and inextensible. Such behavior is incompatible with the measured elasticity of the gating spring, suggesting that the gating spring instead lies in series with the helical segment of the tip link. PMID:11087873

  9. Androgens and hair growth.

    PubMed

    Randall, Valerie Anne

    2008-01-01

    Hair's importance in human communication means that abnormalities like excess hair in hirsutism or hair loss in alopecia cause psychological distress. Androgens are the main regulator of human hair follicles, changing small vellus follicles producing tiny, virtually invisible hairs into larger intermediate and terminal follicles making bigger, pigmented hairs. The response to androgens varies with the body site as it is specific to the hair follicle itself. Normally around puberty, androgens stimulate axillary and pubic hair in both sexes, plus the beard, etc. in men, while later they may also inhibit scalp hair growth causing androgenetic alopecia. Androgens act within the follicle to alter the mesenchyme-epithelial cell interactions, changing the length of time the hair is growing, the dermal papilla size and dermal papilla cell, keratinocyte and melanocyte activity. Greater understanding of the mechanisms of androgen action in follicles should improve therapies for poorly controlled hair disorders like hirsutism and alopecia.

  10. Zebrafish Models for the Mechanosensory Hair Cell Dysfunction in Usher Syndrome 3 Reveal That Clarin-1 Is an Essential Hair Bundle Protein

    PubMed Central

    Gopal, Suhasini R.; Chen, Daniel H.-C.; Chou, Shih-Wei; Zang, Jingjing; Neuhauss, Stephan C.F.; Stepanyan, Ruben; McDermott, Brian M.

    2015-01-01

    Usher syndrome type III (USH3) is characterized by progressive loss of hearing and vision, and varying degrees of vestibular dysfunction. It is caused by mutations that affect the human clarin-1 protein (hCLRN1), a member of the tetraspanin protein family. The missense mutation CLRN1N48K, which affects a conserved N-glycosylation site in hCLRN1, is a common causative USH3 mutation among Ashkenazi Jews. The affected individuals hear at birth but lose that function over time. Here, we developed an animal model system using zebrafish transgenesis and gene targeting to provide an explanation for this phenotype. Immunolabeling demonstrated that Clrn1 localized to the hair cell bundles (hair bundles). The clrn1 mutants generated by zinc finger nucleases displayed aberrant hair bundle morphology with diminished function. Two transgenic zebrafish that express either hCLRN1 or hCLRN1N48K in hair cells were produced to examine the subcellular localization patterns of wild-type and mutant human proteins. hCLRN1 localized to the hair bundles similarly to zebrafish Clrn1; in contrast, hCLRN1N48K largely mislocalized to the cell body with a small amount reaching the hair bundle. We propose that this small amount of hCLRN1N48K in the hair bundle provides clarin-1-mediated function during the early stages of life; however, the presence of hCLRN1N48K in the hair bundle diminishes over time because of intracellular degradation of the mutant protein, leading to progressive loss of hair bundle integrity and hair cell function. These findings and genetic tools provide an understanding and path forward to identify therapies to mitigate hearing loss linked to the CLRN1 mutation. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Mutations in the clarin-1 gene affect eye and ear function in humans. Individuals with the CLRN1N48K mutation are born able to hear but lose that function over time. Here, we develop an animal model system using zebrafish transgenesis and gene targeting to provide an explanation for this

  11. MicroRNA-183 Family in Inner Ear: Hair Cell Development and Deafness.

    PubMed

    Mahmoodian Sani, Mohammad Reza; Hashemzadeh-Chaleshtori, Morteza; Saidijam, Massoud; Jami, Mohammad-Saeid; Ghasemi-Dehkordi, Payam

    2016-12-01

    miRNAs are essential factors of an extensively conserved post-transcriptional process controlling gene expression at mRNA level. Varoius biological processes such as growth and differentiation are regulated by miRNAs. Web of Science and PubMed databases were searched using the Endnote software for the publications about the role miRNA-183 family in inner ear: hair cell development and deafness published from 2000 to 2016. A triplet of these miRNAs particularly the miR-183 family is highly expressed in vertebrate hair cells, as with some of the peripheral neurosensory cells. Point mutations in one member of this family, miR-96, underlie DFNA50 autosomal deafness in humans and lead to abnormal hair cell development and survival in mice. In zebrafish, overexpression of the miR-183 family induces extra and ectopic hair cells, while knockdown decreases the number of hair cell. The miR-183 family (miR-183, miR-96 and miR-182) is expressed abundantly in some types of sensory cell in the eye, nose and inner ear. In the inner ear, mechanosensory hair cells have a robust expression level. Despite much similarity of these miRs sequences, small differences lead to distinct targeting of messenger RNAs targets. In the near future, miRNAs are likely to be explored as potential therapeutic agents to repair or regenerate hair cells, cell reprogramming and regenerative medicine applications in animal models because they can simultaneously down-regulate dozens or even hundreds of transcripts.

  12. MicroRNA-183 Family in Inner Ear: Hair Cell Development and Deafness

    PubMed Central

    Hashemzadeh-Chaleshtori, Morteza; Saidijam, Massoud; Jami, Mohammad-Saeid; Ghasemi-Dehkordi, Payam

    2016-01-01

    miRNAs are essential factors of an extensively conserved post-transcriptional process controlling gene expression at mRNA level. Varoius biological processes such as growth and differentiation are regulated by miRNAs. Web of Science and PubMed databases were searched using the Endnote software for the publications about the role miRNA-183 family in inner ear: hair cell development and deafness published from 2000 to 2016. A triplet of these miRNAs particularly the miR-183 family is highly expressed in vertebrate hair cells, as with some of the peripheral neurosensory cells. Point mutations in one member of this family, miR-96, underlie DFNA50 autosomal deafness in humans and lead to abnormal hair cell development and survival in mice. In zebrafish, overexpression of the miR-183 family induces extra and ectopic hair cells, while knockdown decreases the number of hair cell. The miR-183 family (miR-183, miR-96 and miR-182) is expressed abundantly in some types of sensory cell in the eye, nose and inner ear. In the inner ear, mechanosensory hair cells have a robust expression level. Despite much similarity of these miRs sequences, small differences lead to distinct targeting of messenger RNAs targets. In the near future, miRNAs are likely to be explored as potential therapeutic agents to repair or regenerate hair cells, cell reprogramming and regenerative medicine applications in animal models because they can simultaneously down-regulate dozens or even hundreds of transcripts. PMID:27942598

  13. New activators and inhibitors in the hair cycle clock: targeting stem cells' state of competence.

    PubMed

    Plikus, Maksim V

    2012-05-01

    The timing mechanism of the hair cycle remains poorly understood. However, it has become increasingly clear that the telogen-to-anagen transition is controlled jointly by at least the bone morphogenic protein (BMP), WNT, fibroblast growth factor (FGF), and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β signaling pathways. New research shows that Fgf18 signaling in hair follicle stem cells synergizes BMP-mediated refractivity, whereas Tgf-β2 signaling counterbalances it. Loss of Fgf18 signaling markedly accelerates anagen initiation, whereas loss of Tgf-β2 signaling significantly delays it, supporting key roles for these pathways in hair cycle timekeeping.

  14. N-acetyl-cysteine prevents age-related hearing loss and the progressive loss of inner hair cells in γ-glutamyl transferase 1 deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Dalian; Jiang, Haiyan; Chen, Guang-Di; Longo-Guess, Chantal; Muthaiah, Vijaya Prakash Krishnan; Tian, Cong; Sheppard, Adam; Salvi, Richard; Johnson, Kenneth R.

    2016-01-01

    Genetic factors combined with oxidative stress are major determinants of age-related hearing loss (ARHL), one of the most prevalent disorders of the elderly. Dwarf grey mice, Ggt1dwg/dwg, are homozygous for a loss of function mutation of the γ-glutamyl transferase 1 gene, which encodes an important antioxidant enzyme critical for the resynthesis of glutathione (GSH). Since GSH reduces oxidative damage, we hypothesized that Ggt1dwg/dwg mice would be susceptible to ARHL. Surprisingly, otoacoustic emissions and cochlear microphonic potentials, which reflect cochlear outer hair cell (OHC) function, were largely unaffected in mutant mice, whereas auditory brainstem responses and the compound action potential were grossly abnormal. These functional deficits were associated with an unusual and selective loss of inner hair cells (IHC), but retention of OHC and auditory nerve fibers. Remarkably, hearing deficits and IHC loss were completely prevented by N-acetyl-L-cysteine, which induces de novo synthesis of GSH; however, hearing deficits and IHC loss reappeared when treatment was discontinued. Ggt1dwg/dwgmice represent an important new model for investigating ARHL, therapeutic interventions, and understanding the perceptual and electrophysiological consequences of sensory deprivation caused by the loss of sensory input exclusively from IHC. PMID:26977590

  15. N-acetyl-cysteine prevents age-related hearing loss and the progressive loss of inner hair cells in γ-glutamyl transferase 1 deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Ding, Dalian; Jiang, Haiyan; Chen, Guang-Di; Longo-Guess, Chantal; Muthaiah, Vijaya Prakash Krishnan; Tian, Cong; Sheppard, Adam; Salvi, Richard; Johnson, Kenneth R

    2016-04-01

    Genetic factors combined with oxidative stress are major determinants of age-related hearing loss (ARHL), one of the most prevalent disorders of the elderly. Dwarf grey mice, Ggt1dwg/dwg, are homozygous for a loss of function mutation of the g-glutamyl transferase 1 gene, which encodes an important antioxidant enzyme critical for the resynthesis of glutathione (GSH). Since GSH reduces oxidative damage, we hypothesized that Ggt1dwg/dwg mice would be susceptible to ARHL. Surprisingly, otoacoustic emissions and cochlear microphonic potentials, which reflect cochlear outer hair cell (OHC) function, were largely unaffected in mutant mice, whereas auditory brainstem responses and the compound action potential were grossly abnormal. These functional deficits were associated with an unusual and selective loss of inner hair cells (IHC), but retention of OHC and auditory nerve fibers. Remarkably, hearing deficits and IHC loss were completely prevented by N-acetyl-L-cysteine, which induces de novo synthesis of GSH; however, hearing deficits and IHC loss reappeared when treatment was discontinued. Ggt1dwg/dwg mice represent an important new model for investigating ARHL, therapeutic interventions, and understanding the perceptual and electrophysiological consequences of sensory deprivation caused by the loss of sensory input exclusively from IHC.

  16. Molecular identification of an N-type Ca2+ channel in saccular hair cells.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, N A; Drescher, M J; Sheikhali, S A; Khan, K M; Hatfield, J S; Dickson, M J; Drescher, D G

    2006-01-01

    We report new molecular evidence for the presence of an N-type (Ca(v)2.2, alpha1B) voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel in hair cells of the saccular epithelium of the rainbow trout. The Ca(v)2.2 amino-acid sequence shows 68% and 63% identity compared with chick and human Ca(v)2.2, respectively. This channel reveals features that are characteristic of an N-type Ca(2+) channel: an omega-conotoxin GVIA binding domain, G(betagamma) binding regions, and a synaptic protein interaction site. Immunohistochemical studies with a custom antibody show that immunoreactivity for the Ca(v)2.2 is concentrated in the basolateral and apical regions of hair cells. Whereas trout brain and saccular macula express an 11-amino-acid insert in the second G(betagamma) binding domain of the Ca(v)2.2 I-II loop, isolated hair cells appear not to express this variant. We constructed fusion polypeptides representing portions of the I-II loop, beta1 and beta2a auxiliary subunits, the II-III loop, and syntaxin, and examined their intermolecular interactions via immunoprecipitation and surface plasmon resonance. The I-II loop polypeptides bound both beta1 and beta2a subunits with a preference for beta1, and the II-III loop exhibited Ca(2+)-dependent syntaxin binding. We demonstrated syntaxin immunoreactivity near afferent endings in hair cells, at hair-cell apices, and in efferent endings on hair cells, the former two sites consistent with binding of syntaxin to Ca(v)2.2. The present molecular characterization of the Ca(v)2.2 channel provides novel biochemical evidence for an N-type channel in hair cells, and details molecular interactions of this channel that reflect hair-cell function, such as spontaneous activity and vesicular trafficking. The current work, to our knowledge, represents the first demonstration of a putative N-type channel in hair cells as documented by tissue-specific antibody immunoreactivity and hair-cell-specific cDNA sequence.

  17. Hypotonic swelling of salicylate-treated cochlear outer hair cells.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Man; Ratnanather, J Tilak; Ceyhan, Elvan; Popel, Aleksander S; Brownell, William E

    2007-06-01

    The outer hair cell (OHC) is a hydrostat with a low hydraulic conductivity of Pf=3x10(-4) cm/s across the plasma membrane (PM) and subsurface cisterna that make up the OHC's lateral wall. The SSC is structurally and functionally a transport barrier in normal cells that is known to be disrupted by salicylate. The effect of sodium salicylate on Pf is determined from osmotic experiments in which isolated, control and salicylate-treated OHCs were exposed to hypotonic solutions in a constant flow chamber. The value of Pf=3.5+/-0.5x10(-4) cm/s (mean+/-s.e.m., n=34) for salicylate-treated OHCs was not significantly different from Pf=2.4+/-0.3x10(-4) cm/s (mean+/-s.e.m., n=31) for untreated OHCs (p=.3302). Thus Pf is determined by the PM and is unaffected by salicylate treatment. The ratio of longitudinal strain to radial strain epsilonz/epsilonc=-0.76 for salicylate-treated OHCs was significantly smaller (p=.0143) from -0.72 for untreated OHCs, and is also independent of the magnitude of the applied osmotic challenge. Salicylate-treated OHCs took longer to attain a steady-state volume which is larger than that for untreated OHCs and increased in volume by 8-15% prior to hypotonic perfusion unlike sodium alpha-ketoglutarate-treated OHCs. It is suggested that depolymerization of cytoskeletal proteins and/or glycogen may be responsible for the large volume increase in salicylate-treated OHCs as well as the different responses to different modes of application of the hypotonic solution.

  18. Mutations in CDC14A, Encoding a Protein Phosphatase Involved in Hair Cell Ciliogenesis, Cause Autosomal-Recessive Severe to Profound Deafness.

    PubMed

    Delmaghani, Sedigheh; Aghaie, Asadollah; Bouyacoub, Yosra; El Hachmi, Hala; Bonnet, Crystel; Riahi, Zied; Chardenoux, Sebastien; Perfettini, Isabelle; Hardelin, Jean-Pierre; Houmeida, Ahmed; Herbomel, Philippe; Petit, Christine

    2016-06-02

    By genetic linkage analysis in a large consanguineous Iranian family with eleven individuals affected by severe to profound congenital deafness, we were able to define a 2.8 Mb critical interval (at chromosome 1p21.2-1p21.1) for an autosomal-recessive nonsyndromic deafness locus (DFNB). Whole-exome sequencing allowed us to identify a CDC14A biallelic nonsense mutation, c.1126C>T (p.Arg376(∗)), which was present in the eight clinically affected individuals still alive. Subsequent screening of 115 unrelated individuals affected by severe or profound congenital deafness of unknown genetic cause led us to identify another CDC14A biallelic nonsense mutation, c.1015C>T (p.Arg339(∗)), in an individual originating from Mauritania. CDC14A encodes a protein tyrosine phosphatase. Immunofluorescence analysis of the protein distribution in the mouse inner ear showed a strong labeling of the hair cells' kinocilia. By using a morpholino strategy to knockdown cdc14a in zebrafish larvae, we found that the length of the kinocilia was reduced in inner-ear hair cells. Therefore, deafness caused by loss-of-function mutations in CDC14A probably arises from a morphogenetic defect of the auditory sensory cells' hair bundles, whose differentiation critically depends on the proper growth of their kinocilium.

  19. How do the medial olivocochlear efferents influence the biomechanics of the outer hair cells and thereby the cochlear amplifier? Simulation results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saremi, Amin; Stenfelt, Stefan; Verhulst, Sarah

    2015-12-01

    The bottom-up signal pathway, which starts from the outer ear and leads to the brain cortices, gives the classic image of the human sound perception. However, there have been growing evidences in the last six decades for existence of a functional descending network whereby the central auditory system can modulate the early auditory processing, in a top-down manner. The medial olivocochlear efferent fibers project from the superior olivary complex at the brainstem into the inner ear. They are linked to the basal poles of the hair cells by forming synaptic cisterns. This descending network can activate nicotinic cholinergic receptors (nAChR) that increase the membrane conductance of the outer hair cells and thereby modify the magnitude of the active force generated inside the cochlea. The aim of the presented work is to quantitatively investigate how the changes in the biomechanics of the outer hair cells, caused by the efferent activation, manipulate the cochlear responses. This is done by means of a frequency-domain biophysical model of the cochlea [12] where the parameters of the model convey physiological interpretations of the human cochlear structures. The simulations manifest that a doubling of the outer hair cell conductance, due to efferent activation, leads to a frequency-dependent gain reduction along the cochlear duct with its highest effect at frequencies between 1 kHz and 3.5 kHz and a maximum of approximately 10 dB gain reduction at 2 kHz. This amount of the gain inhibition and its frequency dependence reasonably agrees with the experimental data recorded from guinea pig, cat and human cochleae where the medial olivococlear efferents had been elicited by broad-band stimuli. The simulations also indicate that the efferent-induced increase of the outer hair cell conductance increases the best frequency of the cochlear responses, in the basal region. The presented simulations quantitatively confirm that activation of the medial olivocochlear efferents can

  20. T-cell reconstitution after thymus xenotransplantation induces hair depigmentation and loss.

    PubMed

    Furmanski, Anna L; O'Shaughnessy, Ryan F L; Saldana, Jose Ignacio; Blundell, Michael P; Thrasher, Adrian J; Sebire, Neil J; Davies, E Graham; Crompton, Tessa

    2013-05-01

    Here we present a mouse model for T-cell targeting of hair follicles, linking the pathogenesis of alopecia to that of depigmentation disorders. Clinically, thymus transplantation has been successfully used to treat T-cell immunodeficiency in congenital athymia, but is associated with autoimmunity. We established a mouse model of thymus transplantation by subcutaneously implanting human thymus tissue into athymic C57BL/6 nude mice. These xenografts supported mouse T-cell development. Surprisingly, we did not detect multiorgan autoimmune disease. However, in all transplanted mice, we noted a striking depigmentation and loss of hair follicles. Transfer of T cells from transplanted nudes to syngeneic black-coated RAG(-/-) recipients caused progressive, persistent coat-hair whitening, which preceded patchy hair loss in depigmented areas. Further transfer experiments revealed that these phenomena could be induced by CD4+ T cells alone. Immunofluorescent analysis suggested that Trp2+ melanocyte-lineage cells were decreased in depigmented hair follicles, and pathogenic T cells upregulated activation markers when exposed to C57BL/6 melanocytes in vitro, suggesting that these T cells are not tolerant to self-melanocyte antigens. Our data raise interesting questions about the mechanisms underlying tissue-specific tolerance to skin antigens.

  1. T-Cell Reconstitution after Thymus Xenotransplantation Induces Hair Depigmentation and Loss

    PubMed Central

    Furmanski, Anna L; O'Shaughnessy, Ryan F L; Saldana, Jose Ignacio; Blundell, Michael P; Thrasher, Adrian J; Sebire, Neil J; Davies, E Graham; Crompton, Tessa

    2013-01-01

    Here we present a mouse model for T-cell targeting of hair follicles, linking the pathogenesis of alopecia to that of depigmentation disorders. Clinically, thymus transplantation has been successfully used to treat T-cell immunodeficiency in congenital athymia, but is associated with autoimmunity. We established a mouse model of thymus transplantation by subcutaneously implanting human thymus tissue into athymic C57BL/6 nude mice. These xenografts supported mouse T-cell development. Surprisingly, we did not detect multiorgan autoimmune disease. However, in all transplanted mice, we noted a striking depigmentation and loss of hair follicles. Transfer of T cells from transplanted nudes to syngeneic black-coated RAG−/− recipients caused progressive, persistent coat-hair whitening, which preceded patchy hair loss in depigmented areas. Further transfer experiments revealed that these phenomena could be induced by CD4+ T cells alone. Immunofluorescent analysis suggested that Trp2+ melanocyte-lineage cells were decreased in depigmented hair follicles, and pathogenic T cells upregulated activation markers when exposed to C57BL/6 melanocytes in vitro, suggesting that these T cells are not tolerant to self-melanocyte antigens. Our data raise interesting questions about the mechanisms underlying tissue-specific tolerance to skin antigens. PMID:23303453

  2. Neuroglobin Expression in the Mammalian Auditory System.

    PubMed

    Reuss, Stefan; Banica, Ovidiu; Elgurt, Mirra; Mitz, Stephanie; Disque-Kaiser, Ursula; Riemann, Randolf; Hill, Marco; Jaquish, Dawn V; Koehrn, Fred J; Burmester, Thorsten; Hankeln, Thomas; Woolf, Nigel K

    2016-04-01

    The energy-yielding pathways that provide the large amounts of metabolic energy required by inner ear sensorineural cells are poorly understood. Neuroglobin (Ngb) is a neuron-specific hemoprotein of the globin family, which is suggested to be involved in oxidative energy metabolism. Here, we present quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR, in situ hybridization, immunohistochemical, and Western blot evidence that neuroglobin is highly expressed in the mouse and rat cochlea. For primary cochlea neurons, Ngb expression is limited to the subpopulation of type I spiral ganglion cells, those which innervate inner hair cells, while the subpopulation of type II spiral ganglion cells which innervate the outer hair cells do not express Ngb. We further investigated Ngb distribution in rat, mouse, and human auditory brainstem centers, and found that the cochlear nuclei and superior olivary complex (SOC) also express considerable amounts of Ngb. Notably, the majority of olivocochlear neurons, those which provide efferent innervation of outer hair cells as identified by neuronal tract tracing, were Ngb-immunoreactive. We also observed that neuroglobin in the SOC frequently co-localized with neuronal nitric oxide synthase, the enzyme responsible for nitric oxide production. Our findings suggest that neuroglobin is well positioned to play an important physiologic role in the oxygen homeostasis of the peripheral and central auditory nervous system, and provides the first evidence that Ngb signal differentiates the central projections of the inner and outer hair cells.

  3. Absence of both auditory evoked potentials and auditory percepts dependent on timing cues.

    PubMed

    Starr, A; McPherson, D; Patterson, J; Don, M; Luxford, W; Shannon, R; Sininger, Y; Tonakawa, L; Waring, M

    1991-06-01

    An 11-yr-old girl had an absence of sensory components of auditory evoked potentials (brainstem, middle and long-latency) to click and tone burst stimuli that she could clearly hear. Psychoacoustic tests revealed a marked impairment of those auditory perceptions dependent on temporal cues, that is, lateralization of binaural clicks, change of binaural masked threshold with changes in signal phase, binaural beats, detection of paired monaural clicks, monaural detection of a silent gap in a sound, and monaural threshold elevation for short duration tones. In contrast, auditory functions reflecting intensity or frequency discriminations (difference limens) were only minimally impaired. Pure tone audiometry showed a moderate (50 dB) bilateral hearing loss with a disproportionate severe loss of word intelligibility. Those auditory evoked potentials that were preserved included (1) cochlear microphonics reflecting hair cell activity; (2) cortical sustained potentials reflecting processing of slowly changing signals; and (3) long-latency cognitive components (P300, processing negativity) reflecting endogenous auditory cognitive processes. Both the evoked potential and perceptual deficits are attributed to changes in temporal encoding of acoustic signals perhaps occurring at the synapse between hair cell and eighth nerve dendrites. The results from this patient are discussed in relation to previously published cases with absent auditory evoked potentials and preserved hearing.

  4. Macrophages Contribute to the Cyclic Activation of Adult Hair Follicle Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Castellana, Donatello; Paus, Ralf; Perez-Moreno, Mirna

    2014-01-01

    Skin epithelial stem cells operate within a complex signaling milieu that orchestrates their lifetime regenerative properties. The question of whether and how immune cells impact on these stem cells within their niche is not well understood. Here we show that skin-resident macrophages decrease in number because of apoptosis before the onset of epithelial hair follicle stem cell activation during the murine hair cycle. This process is linked to distinct gene expression, including Wnt transcription. Interestingly, by mimicking this event through the selective induction of macrophage apoptosis in early telogen, we identify a novel involvement of macrophages in stem cell activation in vivo. Importantly, the macrophage-specific pharmacological inhibition of Wnt production delays hair follicle growth. Thus, perifollicular macrophages contribute to the activation of skin epithelial stem cells as a novel, additional cue that regulates their regenerative activity. This finding may have translational implications for skin repair, inflammatory skin diseases and cancer. PMID:25536657

  5. Acidic and basic hair/nail ("hard") keratins: their colocalization in upper cortical and cuticle cells of the human hair follicle and their relationship to "soft" keratins

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Although numerous hair proteins have been studied biochemically and many have been sequenced, relatively little is known about their in situ distribution and differential expression in the hair follicle. To study this problem, we have prepared several mouse monoclonal antibodies that recognize different classes of human hair proteins. Our AE14 antibody recognizes a group of 10-25K hair proteins which most likely corresponds to the high sulfur proteins, our AE12 and AE13 antibodies define a doublet of 44K/46K proteins which are relatively acidic and correspond to the type I low sulfur keratins, and our previously described AE3 antibody recognizes a triplet of 56K/59K/60K proteins which are relatively basic and correspond to the type II low sulfur keratins. Using these and other immunological probes, we demonstrate the following. The acidic 44K/46K and basic 56-60K hair keratins appear coordinately in upper corticle and cuticle cells. The 10-25K, AE14-reactive antigens are expressed only later in more matured corticle cells that are in the upper elongation zone, but these antigens are absent from cuticle cells. The 10-nm filaments of the inner root sheath cells fail to react with any of our monoclonal antibodies and are therefore immunologically distinguishable from the cortex and cuticle filaments. Nail plate contains 10-20% soft keratins in addition to large amounts of hair keratins; these soft keratins have been identified as the 50K/58K and 48K/56K keratin pairs. Taken together, these results suggest that the precursor cells of hair cortex and nail plate share a major pathway of epithelial differentiation, and that the acidic 44K/46K and basic 56-60K hard keratins represent a co- expressed keratin pair which can serve as a marker for hair/nail-type epithelial differentiation. PMID:2432071

  6. Mutations in cadherin 23 affect tip links in zebrafish sensory hair cells.

    PubMed

    Söllner, Christian; Rauch, Gerd-Jörg; Siemens, Jan; Geisler, Robert; Schuster, Stephan C; Müller, Ulrich; Nicolson, Teresa

    2004-04-29

    Hair cells have highly organized bundles of apical projections, or stereocilia, that are deflected by sound and movement. Displacement of stereocilia stretches linkages at the tips of stereocilia that are thought to gate mechanosensory channels. To identify the molecular machinery that mediates mechanotransduction in hair cells, zebrafish mutants were identified with defects in balance and hearing. In sputnik mutants, stereociliary bundles are splayed to various degrees, with individuals displaying reduced or absent mechanotransduction. Here we show that the defects in sputnik mutants are caused by mutations in cadherin 23 (cdh23). Mutations in Cdh23 also cause deafness and vestibular defects in mice and humans, and the protein is present in hair bundles. We show that zebrafish Cdh23 protein is concentrated near the tips of hair bundles, and that tip links are absent in homozygous sputnik(tc317e) larvae. Moreover, tip links are absent in larvae carrying weak alleles of cdh23 that affect mechanotransduction but not hair bundle integrity. We conclude that Cdh23 is an essential tip link component required for hair-cell mechanotransduction.

  7. Excessive activation of ionotropic glutamate receptors induces apoptotic hair-cell death independent of afferent and efferent innervation

    PubMed Central

    Sheets, Lavinia

    2017-01-01

    Accumulation of excess glutamate plays a central role in eliciting the pathological events that follow intensely loud noise exposures and ischemia-reperfusion injury. Glutamate excitotoxicity has been characterized in cochlear nerve terminals, but much less is known about whether excess glutamate signaling also contributes to pathological changes in sensory hair cells. I therefore examined whether glutamate excitotoxicity damages hair cells in zebrafish larvae exposed to drugs that mimic excitotoxic trauma. Exposure to ionotropic glutamate receptor (iGluR) agonists, kainic acid (KA) or N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), contributed to significant, progressive hair cell loss in zebrafish lateral-line organs. To examine whether hair-cell loss was a secondary effect of excitotoxic damage to innervating neurons, I exposed neurog1a morphants—fish whose hair-cell organs are devoid of afferent and efferent innervation—to KA or NMDA. Significant, dose-dependent hair-cell loss occurred in neurog1a morphants exposed to either agonist, and the loss was comparable to wild-type siblings. A survey of iGluR gene expression revealed AMPA-, Kainate-, and NMDA-type subunits are expressed in zebrafish hair cells. Finally, hair cells exposed to KA or NMDA appear to undergo apoptotic cell death. Cumulatively, these data reveal that excess glutamate signaling through iGluRs induces hair-cell death independent of damage to postsynaptic terminals. PMID:28112265

  8. Disruption of intracellular calcium regulation is integral to aminoglycoside-induced hair cell death.

    PubMed

    Esterberg, Robert; Hailey, Dale W; Coffin, Allison B; Raible, David W; Rubel, Edwin W

    2013-04-24

    Intracellular Ca(2+) is a key regulator of life or death decisions in cultured neurons and sensory cells. The role of Ca(2+) in these processes is less clear in vivo, as the location of these cells often impedes visualization of intracellular Ca(2+) dynamics. We generated transgenic zebrafish lines that express the genetically encoded Ca(2+) indicator GCaMP in mechanosensory hair cells of the lateral line. These lines allow us to monitor intracellular Ca(2+) dynamics in real time during aminoglycoside-induced hair cell death. After exposure of live larvae to aminoglycosides, dying hair cells undergo a transient increase in intracellular Ca(2+) that occurs shortly after mitochondrial membrane potential collapse. Inhibition of intracellular Ca(2+) elevation through either caged chelators or pharmacological inhibitors of Ca(2+) effectors mitigates toxic effects of aminoglycoside exposure. Conversely, artificial elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) by caged Ca(2+) release agents sensitizes hair cells to the toxic effects of aminoglycosides. These data suggest that alterations in intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis play an essential role in aminoglycoside-induced hair cell death, and indicate several potential therapeutic targets to stem ototoxicity.

  9. Assembling Composite Dermal Papilla Spheres with Adipose-derived Stem Cells to Enhance Hair Follicle Induction

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chin-Fu; Chang, Ya-Ju; Hsueh, Yuan-Yu; Huang, Chia-Wei; Wang, Duo-Hsiang; Huang, Tzu-Chieh; Wu, Yi-Ting; Su, Fong-Chin; Hughes, Michael; Chuong, Cheng-Ming; Wu, Chia-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Intradermal adipose tissue plays an essential role for hair follicles (HFs) regeneration by regulating hair cycles. However, the effect of reconstruction of HFs and the involvement of adipose-related cells are poorly understood. We investigated assembly strategies for the interactions of dermal papilla (DP) cells with adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) in promoting hair formation. DP cells lose DP traits during adherent culture, but preserved DP markers with a unified sphere diameter by seeding on chitosan-coated microenvironments. Next, ASCs isolated from rats were co-cultured with DP spheres by different assembling approaches to determine their interactions; a mixed sphere of ASCs with DP cells (MA-DPS), or a core-shell structure, outer ASCs shell and an inner DP core (CSA-DPS). CSA-DPS exhibited superior DP characteristics compared to MA-DPS. Conditional medium from ASCs, but not differentiated adipocytes, promoted DP markers and functional alkaline phosphatase activity from the DP cells. In vivo patch assay showed the core-shell assembling of CSA-DPS can reconstruct cellular arrangements and microenvironmental niches as dominated by PPARα signal in ASCs to induce the greater hair induction than MA-DPS or DP spheres alone. Therefore, the assembling of a core-shell sphere for DP with ASCs could reconstruct the HF cellular arrangement for hair formation. This paper set the groundwork for further evaluation of the input of other cell types. PMID:27210831

  10. Expression of mesenchymal stem cell marker CD90 on dermal sheath cells of the anagen hair follicle in canine species

    PubMed Central

    Mercati, F.; Pascucci, L.; Ceccarelli, P.; Dall’Aglio, C.; Pedini, V.; Gargiulo, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    The dermal sheath (DS) of the hair follicle is comprised by fibroblast-like cells and extends along the follicular epithelium, from the bulb up to the infundibulum. From this structure, cells with stem characteristics were isolated: they have a mesenchymal origin and express CD90 protein, a typical marker of mesenchymal stem cells. It is not yet really clear in which region of hair follicle these cells are located but some experimental evidence suggests that dermal stem cells are localized prevalently in the lower part of the anagen hair follicle. As there are no data available regarding DS stem cells in dog species, we carried out a morphological analysis of the hair follicle DS and performed both an immunohistochemical and an immunocytochemical investigation to identify CD90+ cells. We immunohistochemically evidenced a clear and abundant positivity to CD90 protein in the DS cells located in the lower part of anagen hair follicle. The positive cells showed a typical fibroblast-like morphology. They were flat and elongated and inserted among bundles of collagen fibres.The whole structure formed a close and continuous sleeve around the anagen hair follicle. Our immunocytochemical study allowed us to localize CD90 protein at the cytoplasmic membrane level.

  11. Expression of mesenchymal stem cell marker CD90 on dermal sheath cells of the anagen hair follicle in canine species.

    PubMed

    Mercati, F; Pascucci, L; Ceccarelli, P; Dall'Aglio, C; Pedini, V; Gargiulo, A M

    2009-09-23

    The dermal sheath (DS) of the hair follicle is comprised by fibroblast-like cells and extends along the follicular epithelium, from the bulb up to the infundibulum. From this structure, cells with stem characteristics were isolated: they have a mesenchymal origin and express CD90 protein, a typical marker of mesenchymal stem cells. It is not yet really clear in which region of hair follicle these cells are located but some experimental evidence suggests that dermal stem cells are localized prevalently in the lower part of the anagen hair follicle. As there are no data available regarding DS stem cells in dog species, we carried out a morphological analysis of the hair follicle DS and performed both an immunohistochemical and an immunocytochemical investigation to identify CD90+ cells. We immunohistochemically evidenced a clear and abundant positivity to CD90 protein in the DS cells located in the lower part of anagen hair follicle. The positive cells showed a typical fibroblast-like morphology. They were flat and elongated and inserted among bundles of collagen fibres. The whole structure formed a close and continuous sleeve around the anagen hair follicle. Our immunocytochemical study allowed us to localize CD90 protein at the cytoplasmic membrane level.

  12. The oral sensory structures of Thaliacea (Tunicata) and consideration of the evolution of hair cells in Chordata.

    PubMed

    Caicci, Federico; Gasparini, Fabio; Rigon, Francesca; Zaniolo, Giovanna; Burighel, Paolo; Manni, Lucia

    2013-08-15

    We analyzed the mouth of three species, representative of the three orders of the class Thaliacea (Tunicata)--Pyrosoma atlanticum (Pyrosomatida), Doliolum nationalis (Doliolida), and Thalia democratica (Salpida)--to verify the presence of mechanoreceptors, particularly hair cells. In vertebrates, hair cells are well-known mechanoreceptors of the inner ear and lateral line, typically exhibiting an apical hair bundle composed of a cilium and stereovilli but lacking an axon. For a long time, hair cells were thought to be exclusive to vertebrates. However, evidence of a mechanosensory organ (the coronal organ) employing hair cells in the mouth of tunicates, considered the sister group of vertebrates, suggests that tunicate and vertebrate hair cells may share a common origin. This study on thaliaceans, a tunicate group not yet investigated, shows that both P. atlanticum and D. nationalis possess a coronal organ, in addition to sensory structures containing peripheral neurons (i.e., cupular organs and triads of sensory cells). In contrast, in T. democratica, we did not recognize any oral multicellular sensory organ. We hypothesize that in T. democratica, hair cells were secondarily lost, concomitantly with the loss of branchial fissures, the acquisition of a feeding mechanism based on muscle activity, and a mechanosensory apparatus based on excitable epithelia. Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that hair cells were present in the common ancestor of tunicates and vertebrates, from which hair cells progressively evolved.

  13. Probing electrical tuning of hair cells with a Zap current method in the intact amphibian papilla of bullfrogs.

    PubMed

    Frolov, Daniil; Li, Geng-Lin

    2017-02-01

    Most, if not all, modern vertebrate species have evolved exquisite inner ears to discriminate acoustic signals of different frequencies, through a process called frequency tuning. For non-mammalian species, at least part of frequency tuning has been attributed to intrinsic electrical properties of hair cells, i.e. electrical tuning. Since it was first discovered, the traditional method to assess electrical tuning has been to inject step current into hair cells and examine dampened membrane voltage oscillation. However, this method is not applicable for hair cells that do not oscillate. In this study, we developed a Zap current method that can be unbiasedly applied to all hair cells regardless of their oscillating behavior. Similar to a chirp sound in acoustic stimulation, a Zap current is a sinusoidal current with the frequency increased linearly with time. We first validated this new method with the traditional step current method on hair cells with dampened membrane voltage oscillation, and then applied it to all hair cells in the intact amphibian papilla of bullfrogs. We found that while hair cells with dampened membrane voltage oscillation are sharply tuned, non-oscillating hair cells are broadly tuned. In addition, we found a third type of hair cells, which oscillate continuously and are extremely sharply tuned, with multiple peaks that are reminiscent of harmonics in the mammalian cochlea. In conclusion, the new Zap current method provides an unbiased way to assess electrical tuning, and it reveals an underappreciated heterogeneity of electrical tuning in the bullfrog amphibian papilla.

  14. Voltage- and Tension-Dependent Lipid Mobility in the Outer Hair Cell Plasma Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oghalai, John S.; Zhao, Hong-Bo; Kutz, J. Walter; Brownell, William E.

    2000-01-01

    The mechanism responsible for electromotility of outer hair cells in the ear is unknown but is thought to reside within the plasma membrane. Lipid lateral diffusion in the outer hair cell plasma membrane is a sigmoidal function of transmembrane potential and bathing media osmolality. Cell depolarization or hyposmotic challenge shorten the cell and reduce membrane fluidity by half. Changing the membrane tension with amphipathic drugs results in similar reductions. These dynamic changes in membrane fluidity represent the modulation of membrane tension by lipid-protein interactions. The voltage dependence may be associated with the force-generating motors that contribute to the exquisite sensitivity of mammalian hearing.

  15. Keratin 15 promoter targets putative epithelial stem cells in the hair follicle bulge.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yaping; Lyle, Stephen; Yang, Zaixin; Cotsarelis, George

    2003-11-01

    Putative epithelial stem cells in the hair follicle bulge are thought to play pivotal roles in the homeostasis, aging, and carcinogenesis of the cutaneous epithelium. Elucidating the role of bulge cells in these processes has been hampered by the lack of gene promoters that target this area with specificity. Here we describe the isolation of the mouse keratin 15 (K15) promoter and demonstrate its utility for preferentially targeting hair follicle bulge cells in adult K15/lacZ transgenic mice. We found that patterns of K15 expression and promoter activity changed with age and correlated with levels of differentiation within the cutaneous epithelium; less differentiated keratinocytes in the epidermis of the neonatal mouse and in the bulge area of the adult mouse preferentially expressed K15. These findings demonstrate the utility of the K15 promoter for targeting epithelial stem cells in the hair follicle bulge and set the stage for elucidating the role of bulge cells in skin biology.

  16. GMP-compliant culture of human hair follicle cells for encapsulation and transplantation.

    PubMed

    Marazzi, Mario; Crovato, Francesca; Bucco, Massimo; Sironi, Maria Chiara; Tosca, Marta Cecilia; Antonioli, Barbara; Chlapanidas, Theodora; Lucconi, Giulia; Rapisarda, Vincenzo; Scalise, Alessandro; Vigo, Daniele; Faustini, Massimo; Torre, Maria Luisa

    2012-01-01

    Human hair follicle cells, both bulge and dermal papilla cells, were isolated and cultured in a GMP cell factory, in order to obtain an in vitro hair follicle source for encapsulation end transplantation in alopecia regenerative cell therapy. An in vitro model, constituted by organotypic cultures of human skin sample, was set up to simulate the dermal-epidermal interaction between bulge cells and dermal papilla cells, evaluating the possible new follicles formation and the regenerative potentiality of these hair follicle cells. Both the bulge and dermal papilla cells show an excellent cellular proliferation as well as an abundant extracellular matrix production. The immunofluorescence investigation revealed the positivity of both cell lines to CK15 and CD200, whereas both cell lines were negative to CD71 and Oct-4. The pool of cultured bulge and dermal papilla cells was injected into the deep dermis; at day 28 of culture, some organized areas with a higher cell density can be observed: the cells self-organize into papilla-like lengthened aggregates. In samples in which the follicular cells have been seeded on the dermis surface, an epidermis-like homogeneous monolayer on the dermis surface can be seen, therefore showing a potentiality of these cells for epidermis regeneration. These data show the efficacy of a cellular isolation and amplification approach to obtain an in vitro human hair follicle regenerative source on industrial scale in a GMP cell factory. The results also proved an intrinsic potentiality of follicular cells to in vitro recreate the epidermis for tissue engineering purposes. Thus, it is feasible to produce bioengineered hair follicles in a GMP cell factory, for encapsulation and transplantation in alopecic patients.

  17. Imaging living hair cells within the cochlear epithelium of mice using two-photon microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Tao; Gao, Simon S.; Saggau, Peter; Oghalai, John S.

    2009-02-01

    Mice are an excellent model for studying mammalian hearing and transgenic mouse models of human hearing loss are commonly available for research. However, the mouse cochlea is substantially smaller than other animal models routinely used to study cochlear physiology. This makes the study of their hair cells difficult. We developed a novel methodology to optically image calcium within living hair cells left undisturbed within the excised mouse cochlea. Fresh cochleae were harvested, left intact within their otic capsule bone, and glued upright in a recording chamber. The bone overlying the region of the cochlear epithelium to be studied was opened and Reissner's membrane was incised. A fluorescent indicator was applied to the preparation to image intracellular calcium. A custom-built upright two-photon microscope was used to image the preparation using three dimensional scanning. We were able to image about 1/3 of a cochlear turn simultaneously, in either the apical or basal regions. Within one hour of animal sacrifice, we found that outer hair cells demonstrated increased fluorescence compared with surrounding supporting cells. Thus, this methodology can be used to visualize hair cell calcium changes and mechanotransduction over a region of the epithelium. Because the epithelium is left within the cochlea, dissection trauma is minimized and artifactual changes in hair cell physiology are reduced.

  18. Epidermal and hair follicle progenitor cells express melanoma-associated chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan core protein.

    PubMed

    Ghali, Lucy; Wong, Soon-Tee; Tidman, Nick; Quinn, Anthony; Philpott, Michael P; Leigh, Irene M

    2004-02-01

    Basal keratinocytes in the epidermis and hair follicle are biologically heterogeneous but must include a stable subpopulation of epidermal stem cells. In animal models these can be identified by their retention of radioactive label due to their slow cycle (label-retaining cells) but human studies largely depend on in vitro characterization of colony forming efficiency and clonogenicity. Differential integrin expression has been used to detect cells of increased proliferative potential but further stem cell markers are urgently required for in vivo and in vitro characterization. Using LHM2, a monoclonal antibody reacting with a high molecular weight melanoma-associated proteoglycan core protein, a subset of basal keratinocytes in both the interfollicular epidermis and the hair follicle has been identified. Coexpression of melanoma-associated chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan with keratins 15 and 19 as well as beta 1 and alpha 6 integrins has been examined in adult and fetal human skin from hair bearing, nonhair bearing, and palmoplantar regions. Although melanoma-associated chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan coexpression with a subset of beta 1 integrin bright basal keratinocytes within the epidermis suggests that melanoma-associated chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan colocalizes with epidermal stem cells, melanoma-associated chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan expression within the hair follicle was more complex and multiple subpopulations of basal outer root sheath keratinocytes are described. These data suggest that epithelial compartmentalization of the outer root sheath is more complex than interfollicular epidermis and further supports the hypothesis that more than one hair follicle stem cell compartment may exist.

  19. Cloning and characterization of SK2 channel from chicken short hair cells.

    PubMed

    Matthews, T M; Duncan, R K; Zidanic, M; Michael, T H; Fuchs, P A

    2005-06-01

    In the inner ear of birds, as in mammals, reptiles and amphibians, acetylcholine released from efferent neurons inhibits hair cells via activation of an apamin-sensitive, calcium-dependent potassium current. The particular potassium channel involved in avian hair cell inhibition is unknown. In this study, we cloned a small-conductance, calcium-sensitive potassium channel (gSK2) from a chicken cochlear library. Using RT-PCR, we demonstrated the presence of gSK2 mRNA in cochlear hair cells. Electrophysiological studies on transfected HEK293 cells showed that gSK2 channels have a conductance of approximately 16 pS and a half-maximal calcium activation concentration of 0.74+/-0.17 microM. The expressed channels were blocked by apamin (IC(50)=73.3+/-5.0 pM) and d-tubocurarine (IC(50)=7.6+/-1.0 microM), but were insensitive to charybdotoxin. These characteristics are consistent with those reported for acetylcholine-induced potassium currents of isolated chicken hair cells, suggesting that gSK2 is involved in efferent inhibition of chicken inner ear. These findings imply that the molecular mechanisms of inhibition are conserved in hair cells of all vertebrates.

  20. Sgk3 links growth factor signaling to maintenance of progenitor cells in the hair follicle.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Laura; Okada, Hitoshi; Pasolli, Hilda Amalia; Wakeham, Andrew; You-Ten, Annick Itie; Mak, Tak W; Fuchs, Elaine

    2005-08-15

    Tyrosine kinase growth factor receptor signaling influences proliferation, survival, and apoptosis. Hair follicles undergo cycles of proliferation and apoptotic regression, offering an excellent paradigm to study how this transition is governed. Several factors are known to affect the hair cycle, but it remains a mystery whether Akt kinases that are downstream of growth factor signaling impact this equilibrium. We now show that an Akt relative, Sgk (serum and glucocorticoid responsive kinase) 3, plays a critical role in this process. Hair follicles of mice lacking Sgk3 fail to mature normally. Proliferation is reduced, apoptosis is increased, and follicles prematurely regress. Maintenance of the pool of transiently amplifying matrix cells is impaired. Intriguingly, loss of Sgk3 resembles the gain of function of epidermal growth factor signaling. Using cultured primary keratinocytes, we find that Sgk3 functions by negatively regulating phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase signaling. Our results reveal a novel and important function for Sgk3 in controlling life and death in the hair follicle.

  1. Development and localization of reverse-polarity mechanotransducer channels in cochlear hair cells

    PubMed Central

    Beurg, Maryline; Goldring, Adam C.; Ricci, Anthony J.; Fettiplace, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Cochlear hair cells normally detect positive deflections of their hair bundles, rotating toward their tallest edge, which opens mechanotransducer (MT) channels by increased tension in interciliary tip links. After tip-link destruction, the normal polarity of MT current is replaced by a mechanically sensitive current evoked by negative bundle deflections. The “reverse-polarity” current was investigated in cochlear hair cells after tip-link destruction with BAPTA, in transmembrane channel-like protein isoforms 1/2 (Tmc1:Tmc2) double mutants, and during perinatal development. This current is a natural adjunct of embryonic development, present in all wild-type hair cells but declining after birth with emergence of the normal-polarity current. Evidence indicated the reverse-polarity current seen developmentally was a manifestation of the same ion channel as that evident under abnormal conditions in Tmc mutants or after tip-link destruction. In all cases, sinusoidal fluid-jet stimuli from different orientations suggested the underlying channels were opened not directly by deflections of the hair bundle but by deformation of the apical plasma membrane. Cell-attached patch recording on the hair-cell apical membrane revealed, after BAPTA treatment or during perinatal development, 90-pS stretch-activated cation channels that could be blocked by Ca2+ and by FM1-43. High-speed Ca2+ imaging, using swept-field confocal microscopy, showed the Ca2+ influx through the reverse-polarity channels was not localized to the hair bundle, but distributed across the apical plasma membrane. These reverse-polarity channels, which we propose to be renamed “unconventional” mechanically sensitive channels, have some properties similar to the normal MT channels, but the relationship between the two types is still not well defined. PMID:27162344

  2. 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 modulates the hair-inductive capacity of dermal papilla cells: therapeutic potential for hair regeneration.

    PubMed

    Aoi, Noriyuki; Inoue, Keita; Chikanishi, Toshihiro; Fujiki, Ryoji; Yamamoto, Hanako; Kato, Harunosuke; Eto, Hitomi; Doi, Kentaro; Itami, Satoshi; Kato, Shigeaki; Yoshimura, Kotaro

    2012-08-01

    Dermal papilla cells (DPCs) have the potential to induce differentiation of epithelial stem cells into hair, and Wnt signaling is deeply involved in the initiation process. The functional limitation of expanded adult DPCs has been a difficult challenge for cell-based hair regrowth therapy. We previously reported that 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) (VD(3)) upregulates expression of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β2 and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, both features of hair-inducing human DPCs (hDPCs). In this study, we further examined the effects and signaling pathways associated with VD(3) actions on DPCs. VD(3) suppressed hDPC proliferation in a dose-dependent, noncytotoxic manner. Among the Wnt-related genes investigated, Wnt10b expression was significantly upregulated by VD(3) in hDPCs. Wnt10b upregulation, as well as upregulation of ALPL (ALP, liver/bone/kidney) and TGF-β2, by VD(3) was specific in hDPCs and not detected in human dermal fibroblasts. Screening of paracrine or endocrine factors in the skin indicated that all-trans retinoic acid (atRA) upregulated Wnt10b gene expression, although synergistic upregulation (combined atRA and VD(3)) was not seen. RNA interference with vitamin D receptor (VDR) revealed that VD(3) upregulation of Wnt10b, ALPL, and TGF-β2 was mediated through the genomic VDR pathway. In a rat model of de novo hair regeneration by murine DPC transplantation, pretreatment with VD(3) significantly enhanced hair folliculogenesis. Specifically, a greater number of outgrowing hair shafts and higher maturation of regenerated follicles were observed. Together, these data suggest that VD(3) may promote functional differentiation of DPCs and be useful in preserving the hair follicle-inductive capacity of cultured DPCs for hair regeneration therapies.

  3. Identification of soybean proteins from a single cell type: The root hair

    SciTech Connect

    Brechenmacher, Laurent; Nguyen, Tran H.; Hixson, Kim K.; Libault, Marc; Aldrich, Joshua T.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Stacey, Gary

    2012-11-01

    Root hairs are a terminally differentiated single cell type, mainly involved in water and nutrient uptake from the soil. The soybean root hair cell represents an excellent model for the study of single cell systems biology. In this study, we identified 5702 proteins, with at least two peptides, from soybean root hairs using an accurate mass and time tag approach, establishing the most comprehensive proteome reference map of this single cell type. We also showed that trypsin is the most appropriate enzyme for soybean proteomic studies by performing an in silico digestion of the soybean proteome database using different proteases. Although the majority of proteins identified in this study are involved in basal metabolism, the function of others are more related to root hair formation/function and include proteins involved in nutrient uptake (transporters) or vesicular trafficking (cytoskeleton and RAB proteins). Interestingly, some of these proteins appear to be specifically expressed in root hairs and constitute very good candidates for further studies to elucidate unique features of this single cell model.

  4. Causes and Consequences of Sensory Hair Cell Damage and Recovery in Fishes.

    PubMed

    Smith, Michael E; Monroe, J David

    2016-01-01

    Sensory hair cells are the mechanotransductive receptors that detect gravity, sound, and vibration in all vertebrates. Damage to these sensitive receptors often results in deficits in vestibular function and hearing. There are currently two main reasons for studying the process of hair cell loss in fishes. First, fishes, like other non-mammalian vertebrates, have the ability to regenerate hair cells that have been damaged or lost via exposure to ototoxic chemicals or acoustic overstimulation. Thus, they are used as a biomedical model to understand the process of hair cell death and regeneration and find therapeutics that treat or prevent human hearing loss. Secondly, scientists and governmental natural resource managers are concerned about the potential effects of intense anthropogenic sounds on aquatic organisms, including fishes. Dr. Arthur N. Popper and his students, postdocs and research associates have performed pioneering experiments in both of these lines of fish hearing research. This review will discuss the current knowledge regarding the causes and consequences of both lateral line and inner ear hair cell damage in teleost fishes.

  5. Two-state approach to stochastic hair bundle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clausznitzer, Diana; Lindner, Benjamin; Jülicher, Frank; Martin, Pascal

    2008-04-01

    Hair cells perform the mechanoelectrical transduction of sound signals in the auditory and vestibular systems of vertebrates. The part of the hair cell essential for this transduction is the so-called hair bundle. In vitro experiments on hair cells from the sacculus of the American bullfrog have shown that the hair bundle comprises active elements capable of producing periodic deflections like a relaxation oscillator. Recently, a continuous nonlinear stochastic model of the hair bundle motion [Nadrowski , Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 101, 12195 (2004)] has been shown to reproduce the experimental data in stochastic simulations faithfully. Here, we demonstrate that a binary filtering of the hair bundle's deflection (experimental data and continuous hair bundle model) does not change significantly the spectral statistics of the spontaneous as well as the periodically driven hair bundle motion. We map the continuous hair bundle model to the FitzHugh-Nagumo model of neural excitability and discuss the bifurcations between different regimes of the system in terms of the latter model. Linearizing the nullclines and assuming perfect time-scale separation between the variables we can map the FitzHugh-Nagumo system to a simple two-state model in which each of the states corresponds to the two possible values of the binary-filtered hair bundle trajectory. For the two-state model, analytical expressions for the power spectrum and the susceptibility can be calculated [Lindner and Schimansky-Geier, Phys. Rev. E 61, 6103 (2000)] and show the same features as seen in the experimental data as well as in simulations of the continuous hair bundle model.

  6. Control of a hair bundle’s mechanosensory function by its mechanical load

    PubMed Central

    Salvi, Joshua D.; Ó Maoiléidigh, Dáibhid; Fabella, Brian A.; Tobin, Mélanie; Hudspeth, A. J.

    2015-01-01

    Hair cells, the sensory receptors of the internal ear, subserve different functions in various receptor organs: they detect oscillatory stimuli in the auditory system, but transduce constant and step stimuli in the vestibular and lateral-line systems. We show that a hair cell's function can be controlled experimentally by adjusting its mechanical load. By making bundles from a single organ operate as any of four distinct types of signal detector, we demonstrate that altering only a few key parameters can fundamentally change a sensory cell’s role. The motions of a single hair bundle can resemble those of a bundle from the amphibian vestibular system, the reptilian auditory system, or the mammalian auditory system, demonstrating an essential similarity of bundles across species and receptor organs. PMID:25691749

  7. Hair cell BK channels interact with RACK1, and PKC increases its expression on the cell surface by indirect phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Surguchev, Alexei; Bai, Jun-Ping; Joshi, Powrnima; Navaratnam, Dhasakumar

    2012-07-15

    Large conductance (BK) calcium activated potassium channels (Slo) are ubiquitous and implicated in a number of human diseases including hypertension and epilepsy. BK channels consist of a pore forming α-subunit (Slo) and a number of accessory subunits. In hair cells of nonmammalian vertebrates these channels play a critical role in electrical resonance, a mechanism of frequency selectivity. Hair cell BK channel clusters on the surface and currents increase along the tonotopic axis and contribute significantly to the responsiveness of these hair cells to sounds of high frequency. In contrast, messenger RNA levels encoding the Slo gene show an opposite decrease in high frequency hair cells. To understand the molecular events underlying this paradox, we used a yeast two-hybrid screen to isolate binding partners of Slo. We identified Rack1 as a Slo binding partner and demonstrate that PKC activation increases Slo surface expression. We also establish that increased Slo recycling of endocytosed Slo is at least partially responsible for the increased surface expression of Slo. Moreover, analysis of several PKC phosphorylation site mutants confirms that the effects of PKC on Slo surface expression are likely indirect. Finally, we show that Slo clusters on the surface of hair cells are also increased by increased PKC activity and may contribute to the increasing amounts of channel clusters on the surface of high-frequency hair cells.

  8. Beta-catenin can induce hair follicle stem cell differentiation into transit-amplifying cells through c-myc activation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qiong; Yu, Weirong; Fang, Yong; Yao, Min; Yang, Penggao

    2017-02-01

    Hair follicle stem cells play important roles in maintaining homeostasis and skin tissue self-renewal. Transit-amplifying cells represent the transition of cells from hair follicle stem cells into differentiated epidermal cells. Thus far, the signaling pathway and the molecular biological mechanism that regulate the proliferation and differentiation of hair follicle stem cells remain unclear. In this paper, we studied the relationship between β-catenin and c-myc during the process of the differentiation of hair follicle stem cells into transit-amplifying cells. Based on our results, the expression of β-catenin can activate the nuclear gene c-myc and regulate the expression of transit-amplifying cell markers K15, K19, a6-integrin and β1-integrin, indicating that β-catenin is involved in the transformation process from hair follicle stem cells to transit-amplifying cells and suggesting that β-catenin plays an important biological role in the induction of this differentiation process.

  9. Regenerated hair cells can originate from supporting cell progeny: Evidence from phototoxicity and laser ablation experiments in the lateral line system

    SciTech Connect

    Balak, K.J.; Corwin, J.T.; Jones, J.E. )

    1990-08-01

    The mechanisms that lead to the production of sensory hair cells during regeneration have been investigated by using 2 different procedures to ablate preexisting hair cells in individual neuromast sensory epithelia of the lateral line in the tails of salamanders, then monitoring the responses of surviving cells. In one series of experiments, fluorescent excitation was used to cause the phototoxic death of hair cells that selectively take up the pyridinium dye DASPEI. In the other experiments, the ultraviolet output of a pulsed neodymium-YAG laser was focused to a microbeam through a quartz objective lens in epi-illumination mode and used to selectively kill individual unlabeled hair cells while the cells were simultaneously imaged by transmitted light DIC microscopy. Through observation of the treated neuromasts in vivo, these experiments demonstrated that mature sensory epithelia that have been completely depleted of hair cells can still generate new hair cells. Preexisting hair cells are not necessary for regeneration. Immediately after the ablations the only resident cells in the sensory epithelia were supporting cells. These cells were observed to divide at rates that were increased over control values, and eventually those cell divisions gave rise to progeny that differentiated as hair cells, replacing those that had been killed. Macrophages were active in these epithelia, and their phagocytic activity had a significant influence on the standing population of cells. The first new hair cells appeared 3-5 d after the treatments, and additional hair cells usually appeared every 1-2 d for at least 2 weeks. We conclude that the fate of the progeny produced by supporting cell divisions is plastic to a degree, in that these progeny can differentiate either as supporting cells or as hair cells in epithelia where hair cells are missing or depleted.

  10. Dermal Papilla Cells Improve the Wound Healing Process and Generate Hair Bud-Like Structures in Grafted Skin Substitutes Using Hair Follicle Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Leirós, Gustavo José; Kusinsky, Ana Gabriela; Drago, Hugo; Bossi, Silvia; Sturla, Flavio; Castellanos, María Lía; Stella, Inés Yolanda

    2014-01-01

    Tissue-engineered skin represents a useful strategy for the treatment of deep skin injuries and might contribute to the understanding of skin regeneration. The use of dermal papilla cells (DPCs) as a dermal component in a permanent composite skin with human hair follicle stem cells (HFSCs) was evaluated by studying the tissue-engineered skin architecture, stem cell persistence, hair regeneration, and graft-take in nude mice. A porcine acellular dermal matrix was seeded with HFSCs alone and with HFSCs plus human DPCs or dermal fibroblasts (DFs). In vitro, the presence of DPCs induced a more regular and multilayered stratified epidermis with more basal p63-positive cells and invaginations. The DPC-containing constructs more accurately mimicked the skin architecture by properly stratifying the differentiating HFSCs and developing a well-ordered epithelia that contributed to more closely recapitulate an artificial human skin. This acellular dermal matrix previously repopulated in vitro with HFSCs and DFs or DPCs as the dermal component was grafted in nude mice. The presence of DPCs in the composite substitute not only favored early neovascularization, good assimilation and remodeling after grafting but also contributed to the neovascular network maturation, which might reduce the inflammation process, resulting in a better healing process, with less scarring and wound contraction. Interestingly, only DPC-containing constructs showed embryonic hair bud-like structures with cells of human origin, presence of precursor epithelial cells, and expression of a hair differentiation marker. Although preliminary, these findings have demonstrated the importance of the presence of DPCs for proper skin repair. PMID:25161315

  11. Noninvasive method for assessing the human circadian clock using hair follicle cells

    PubMed Central

    Akashi, Makoto; Soma, Haruhiko; Yamamoto, Takuro; Tsugitomi, Asuka; Yamashita, Shiko; Yamamoto, Takuya; Nishida, Eisuke; Yasuda, Akio; Liao, James K.; Node, Koichi

    2010-01-01

    A thorough understanding of the circadian clock requires qualitative evaluation of circadian clock gene expression. Thus far, no simple and effective method for detecting human clock gene expression has become available. This limitation has greatly hampered our understanding of human circadian rhythm. Here we report a convenient, reliable, and less invasive method for detecting human clock gene expression using biopsy samples of hair follicle cells from the head or chin. We show that the circadian phase of clock gene expression in hair follicle cells accurately reflects that of individual behavioral rhythms, demonstrating that this strategy is appropriate for evaluating the human peripheral circadian clock. Furthermore, using this method, we indicate that rotating shift workers suffer from a serious time lag between circadian gene expression rhythms and lifestyle. Qualitative evaluation of clock gene expression in hair follicle cells, therefore, may be an effective approach for studying the human circadian clock in the clinical setting. PMID:20798039

  12. Synchronous auditory nerve activity in the carboplatin-chinchilla model of auditory neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Cowper-Smith, C. D.; Dingle, R. N.; Guo, Y.; Burkard, R.; Phillips, D. P.

    2010-01-01

    Two hallmark features of auditory neuropathy (AN) are normal outer hair cell function in the presence of an absent∕abnormal auditory brainstem response (ABR). Studies of human AN patients are unable to determine whether disruption of the ABR is the result of a reduction of neural input, a loss of auditory nerve fiber (ANF) synchrony, or both. Neurophysiological data from the carboplatin model of AN reveal intact neural synchrony in the auditory nerve and inferior colliculus, despite significant reductions in neural input. These data suggest that (1), intact neural synchrony is available to support an ABR following carboplatin treatment and, (2), impaired spike timing intrinsic to neurons is required for the disruption of the ABR observed in human AN. PMID:20649190

  13. Coping with cancer -- hair loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000914.htm Coping with cancer - hair loss To use the sharing features on this ... lose your hair. Why Cancer Treatments can Cause Hair Loss Many chemotherapy drugs attack fast-growing cells. ...

  14. Basal cell carcinoma preferentially arises from stem cells within hair follicle and mechanosensory niches.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Shelby C; Eberl, Markus; Vagnozzi, Alicia N; Belkadi, Abdelmadjid; Veniaminova, Natalia A; Verhaegen, Monique E; Bichakjian, Christopher K; Ward, Nicole L; Dlugosz, Andrzej A; Wong, Sunny Y

    2015-04-02

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is characterized by frequent loss of PTCH1, leading to constitutive activation of the Hedgehog pathway. Although the requirement for Hedgehog in BCC is well established, the identity of disease-initiating cells and the compartments in which they reside remain controversial. By using several inducible Cre drivers to delete Ptch1 in different cell compartments in mice, we show here that multiple hair follicle stem cell populations readily develop BCC-like tumors. In contrast, stem cells within the interfollicular epidermis do not efficiently form tumors. Notably, we observed that innervated Gli1-expressing progenitors within mechanosensory touch dome epithelia are highly tumorigenic. Sensory nerves activate Hedgehog signaling in normal touch domes, while denervation attenuates touch dome-derived tumors. Together, our studies identify varying tumor susceptibilities among different stem cell populations in the skin, highlight touch dome epithelia as "hot spots" for tumor formation, and implicate cutaneous nerves as mediators of tumorigenesis.

  15. Spectrin βV adaptive mutations and changes in subcellular location correlate with emergence of hair cell electromotility in mammalians.

    PubMed

    Cortese, Matteo; Papal, Samantha; Pisciottano, Francisco; Elgoyhen, Ana Belén; Hardelin, Jean-Pierre; Petit, Christine; Franchini, Lucia Florencia; El-Amraoui, Aziz

    2017-02-21

    The remarkable hearing capacities of mammals arise from various evolutionary innovations. These include the cochlear outer hair cells and their singular feature, somatic electromotility, i.e., the ability of their cylindrical cell body to shorten and elongate upon cell depolarization and hyperpolarization, respectively. To shed light on the processes underlying the emergence of electromotility, we focused on the βV giant spectrin, a major component of the outer hair cells' cortical cytoskeleton. We identified strong signatures of adaptive evolution at multiple sites along the spectrin-βV amino acid sequence in the lineage leading to mammals, together with substantial differences in the subcellular location of this protein between the frog and the mouse inner ear hair cells. In frog hair cells, spectrin βV was invariably detected near the apical junctional complex and above the cuticular plate, a dense F-actin meshwork located underneath the apical plasma membrane. In the mouse, the protein had a broad punctate cytoplasmic distribution in the vestibular hair cells, whereas it was detected in the entire lateral wall of cochlear outer hair cells and had an intermediary distribution (both cytoplasmic and cortical, but restricted to the cell apical region) in cochlear inner hair cells. Our results support a scenario where the singular organization of the outer hair cells' cortical cytoskeleton may have emerged from molecular networks initially involved in membrane trafficking, which were present near the apical junctional complex in the hair cells of mammalian ancestors and would have subsequently expanded to the entire lateral wall in outer hair cells.

  16. Hair cells in non-vertebrate models: lower chordates and molluscs.

    PubMed

    Burighel, P; Caicci, F; Manni, L

    2011-03-01

    The study of hair cells in invertebrates is important, because it can shed light on the debated question about the evolutionary origin of vertebrate hair cells. Here, we review the morphology and significance of hair cells in two groups of invertebrates, the lower chordates (tunicates and cephalochordates) and the molluscs. These taxa possess complex mechanoreceptor organs based on both primary (sensory neurons) and/or secondary, axonless, sensory cells, bearing various apical specializations. Compared with vertebrates, these taxa show interesting examples of convergent evolution and possible homologies of sensory systems. For example, the "lateral line organ" of Octopoda and Decapoda, composed of primary sensory cells aligned on the arms and the head, is considered a classic example of convergent evolution to mechanoreception. Similarly, in ascidians, the cupular organ, formed of primary sensory cells embedded in a gelatinous cupula, is seen as an analog of neuromasts in vertebrates. However, the coronal organ of the oral siphon of ascidians, represented by a line of secondary sensory cells with a hair bundle also comprising graded stereovilli, is currently the best candidate for tracing the evolutionary origin of the vertebrate octavo-lateralis system. Several features, such as embryological origin, position, gene expression and morphology, support this hypothesis.

  17. Tissue-engineered skin preserving the potential of epithelial cells to differentiate into hair after grafting.

    PubMed

    Larouche, Danielle; Cuffley, Kristine; Paquet, Claudie; Germain, Lucie

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether tissue-engineered skin produced in vitro was able to sustain growth of hair follicles in vitro and after grafting. Different tissues were designed. Dissociated newborn mouse keratinocytes or newborn mouse hair buds (HBs) were added onto dermal constructs consisting of a tissue-engineered cell-derived matrix elaborated from either newborn mouse or adult human fibroblasts cultured with ascorbic acid. After 7-21 days of maturation at the air-liquid interface, no hair was noticed in vitro. Epidermal differentiation was observed in all tissue-engineered skin. However, human fibroblast-derived tissue-engineered dermis (hD) promoted a thicker epidermis than mouse fibroblast-derived tissue-engineered dermis (mD). In association with mD, HBs developed epithelial cyst-like inclusions presenting outer root sheath-like attributes. In contrast, epidermoid cyst-like inclusions lined by a stratified squamous epithelium were present in tissues composed of HBs and hD. After grafting, pilo-sebaceous units formed and hair grew in skin elaborated from HBs cultured 10-26 days submerged in culture medium in association with mD. However, the number of normal hair follicles decreased with longer culture time. This hair-forming capacity after grafting was not observed in tissues composed of hD overlaid with HBs. These results demonstrate that epithelial stem cells can be kept in vitro in a permissive tissue-engineered dermal environment without losing their potential to induce hair growth after grafting.

  18. Spectrin βV adaptive mutations and changes in subcellular location correlate with emergence of hair cell electromotility in mammalians

    PubMed Central

    Cortese, Matteo; Papal, Samantha; Pisciottano, Francisco; Elgoyhen, Ana Belén; Hardelin, Jean-Pierre; Petit, Christine; Franchini, Lucia Florencia; El-Amraoui, Aziz

    2017-01-01

    The remarkable hearing capacities of mammals arise from various evolutionary innovations. These include the cochlear outer hair cells and their singular feature, somatic electromotility, i.e., the ability of their cylindrical cell body to shorten and elongate upon cell depolarization and hyperpolarization, respectively. To shed light on the processes underlying the emergence of electromotility, we focused on the βV giant spectrin, a major component of the outer hair cells' cortical cytoskeleton. We identified strong signatures of adaptive evolution at multiple sites along the spectrin-βV amino acid sequence in the lineage leading to mammals, together with substantial differences in the subcellular location of this protein between the frog and the mouse inner ear hair cells. In frog hair cells, spectrin βV was invariably detected near the apical junctional complex and above the cuticular plate, a dense F-actin meshwork located underneath the apical plasma membrane. In the mouse, the protein had a broad punctate cytoplasmic distribution in the vestibular hair cells, whereas it was detected in the entire lateral wall of cochlear outer hair cells and had an intermediary distribution (both cytoplasmic and cortical, but restricted to the cell apical region) in cochlear inner hair cells. Our results support a scenario where the singular organization of the outer hair cells’ cortical cytoskeleton may have emerged from molecular networks initially involved in membrane trafficking, which were present near the apical junctional complex in the hair cells of mammalian ancestors and would have subsequently expanded to the entire lateral wall in outer hair cells. PMID:28179572

  19. Outer Hair Cell Somatic Electromotility In Vivo and Power Transfer to the Organ of Corti

    PubMed Central

    Ramamoorthy, Sripriya; Nuttall, Alfred L.

    2012-01-01

    The active amplification of sound-induced vibrations in the cochlea, known to be crucial for auditory sensitivity and frequency selectivity, is not well understood. The outer hair cell (OHC) somatic electromotility is a potential mechanism for such amplification. Its effectiveness in vivo is putatively limited by the electrical low-pass filtering of the cell's transmembrane potential. However, the transmembrane potential is an incomplete metric. We propose and estimate two metrics to evaluate the effectiveness of OHC electromotility in vivo. One metric is the OHC electromechanical ratio defined as the amplitude of the ratio of OHC displacement to the change in its transmembrane potential. The in vivo electromechanical ratio is derived from the recently measured in vivo displacements of the reticular lamina and the basilar membrane at the 19 kHz characteristic place in guinea pigs and using a model. The ratio, after accounting for the differences in OHC vibration in situ due to the impedances from the adjacent structures, is in agreement with the literature values of the in vitro electromechanical ratio measured by others. The second and more insightful metric is the OHC somatic power. Our analysis demonstrates that the organ of Corti is nearly optimized to receive maximum somatic power in vivo and that the estimated somatic power could account for the active amplification. PMID:22325260

  20. In Vivo Cochlear Hair Cell Generation and Survival by Coactivation of β-Catenin and Atoh1

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Bryan R.; Baldwin, Emily M.; Layman, Wanda S.; Taketo, Makoto Mark

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian cochlea exhibit minimal spontaneous regeneration, and loss of sensory hair cells (HCs) results in permanent hearing loss. In nonmammalian vertebrates, spontaneous HC regeneration occurs through both proliferation and differentiation of surrounding supporting cells (SCs). HC regeneration in postnatal mammalian cochleae in vivo remains limited by the small HC number and subsequent death of regenerated HCs. Here, we describe in vivo generation of 10-fold more new HCs in the mouse cochlea than previously reported, most of which survive to adulthood. We achieved this by combining the expression of a constitutively active form of β-catenin (a canonical Wnt activator) with ectopic expression of Atoh1 (a HC fate determination factor) in neonatal Lgr5+ cells (the presumed SC and HC progenitors of the postnatal mouse cochlea), and discovered synergistic increases in proliferation and differentiation. The new HCs were predominantly located near the endogenous inner HCs, expressed early HC differentiation markers, and were innervated despite incomplete alignment of presynaptic and postsynaptic markers. Surprisingly, genetic tracing revealed that only a subset of Lgr5+ cells that lie medial to the inner HCs respond to this combination, highlighting a previously unknown heterogeneity that exists among Lgr5+ cells. Together, our data indicate that β-catenin and Atoh1 mediate synergistic effects on both proliferation and differentiation of a subset of neonatal cochlear Lgr5+ cells, thus overcoming major limitations of HC regeneration in postnatal mouse cochleae in vivo. These results provide a basis for combinatorial therapeutics for hearing restoration. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Hearing loss in humans from aging, noise exposure, or ototoxic drugs (i.e., cisplatin or some antibiotics) is permanent and affects every segments of the population, worldwide. However, birds, frog, and fish have the ability to recover hearing, and recent studies have focused on understanding

  1. The delayed rectifier, IKI, is the major conductance in type I vestibular hair cells across vestibular end organs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricci, A. J.; Rennie, K. J.; Correia, M. J.

    1996-01-01

    Hair cells were dissociated from the semicircular canal, utricle, lagena and saccule of white king pigeons. Type I hair cells were identified morphologically based on the ratios of neck width to cuticular plate width (NPR < 0.72) as well as neck width to cell body width (NBR < 0.64). The perforated patch variant of the whole-cell recording technique was used to measure electrical properties from type I hair cells. In voltage-clamp, the membrane properties of all identified type I cells were dominated by a predominantly outward potassium current, previously characterized in semicircular canal as IKI. Zero-current potential, activation, deactivation, slope conductance, pharmacologic and steady-state properties of the complex currents were not statistically different between type I hair cells of different vestibular end organs. The voltage dependence causes a significant proportion of this conductance to be active about the cell's zero-current potential. The first report of the whole-cell activation kinetics of the conductance is presented, showing a voltage dependence that could be best fit by an equation for a single exponential. Results presented here are the first data from pigeon dissociated type I hair cells from utricle, saccule and lagena suggesting that the basolateral conductances of a morphologically identified population of type I hair cells are conserved between functionally different vestibular end organs; the major conductance being a delayed rectifier characterized previously in semicircular canal hair cells as IKI.

  2. Engineered deafness reveals that mouse courtship vocalizations do not require auditory experience.

    PubMed

    Mahrt, Elena J; Perkel, David J; Tong, Ling; Rubel, Edwin W; Portfors, Christine V

    2013-03-27

    Auditory experience during development is necessary for normal language acquisition in humans. Although songbirds, some cetaceans, and maybe bats may also be vocal learners, vocal learning has yet to be well established for a laboratory mammal. Mice are potentially an excellent model organism for studying mechanisms underlying vocal communication. Mice vocalize in different social contexts, yet whether they learn their vocalizations remains unresolved. To address this question, we compared ultrasonic courtship vocalizations emitted by chronically deaf and normal hearing adult male mice. We deafened CBA/CaJ male mice, engineered to express diphtheria toxin (DT) receptors in hair cells, by systemic injection of DT at postnatal day 2 (P2). By P9, almost all inner hair cells were absent and by P16 all inner and outer hair cells were absent in DTR mice. These mice did not show any auditory brainstem responses as adults. Wild-type littermates, also treated with DT at P2, had normal hair cells and normal auditory brainstem responses. We compared the temporal structure of vocalization bouts, the types of vocalizations, the patterns of syllables, and the acoustic features of each syllable type emitted by hearing and deaf males in the presence of a female. We found that almost all of the vocalization features we examined were similar in hearing and deaf animals. These findings indicate that mice do not need auditory experience during development to produce normal ultrasonic vocalizations in adulthood. We conclude that mouse courtship vocalizations are not acquired through auditory feedback-dependent learning.

  3. Photoactivation of ROS production in situ transiently activates cell proliferation in mouse skin and in the hair follicle stem cell niche promoting hair growth and wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco, Elisa; Calvo, María I.; Blázquez-Castro, Alfonso; Vecchio, Daniela; Zamarrón, Alicia; de Almeida, Irma Joyce Dias; Stockert, Juan C.; Hamblin, Michael R.; Juarranz, Ángeles; Espada, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    The role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the regulation of hair follicle cycle and skin homeostasis is poorly characterized. ROS have been traditionally linked to human disease and ageing, but recent findings suggest that can also have beneficial physiological functions in vivo in mammals. To test this hypothesis, we transiently switched on in situ ROS production in mouse skin. This process activated cell proliferation in the tissue and, interestingly, in the bulge region of the hair follicle, a major reservoir of epidermal stem cells, promoting hair growth as well as stimulating tissue repair after severe burn injury. We further show that these effects were associated with a transient Src kinase phosphorylation at Tyr416 and with a strong transcriptional activation of the prolactin family 2 subfamily c of growth factors. Our results point to potentially relevant modes of skin homeostasis regulation and demonstrate that a local and transient ROS production can regulate stem cell and tissue function in the whole organism. PMID:26134949

  4. The Rho GTPase Cdc42 regulates hair cell planar polarity and cellular patterning in the developing cochlea.

    PubMed

    Kirjavainen, Anna; Laos, Maarja; Anttonen, Tommi; Pirvola, Ulla

    2015-03-13

    Hair cells of the organ of Corti (OC) of the cochlea exhibit distinct planar polarity, both at the tissue and cellular level. Planar polarity at tissue level is manifested as uniform orientation of the hair cell stereociliary bundles. Hair cell intrinsic polarity is defined as structural hair bundle asymmetry; positioning of the kinocilium/basal body complex at the vertex of the V-shaped bundle. Consistent with strong apical polarity, the hair cell apex displays prominent actin and microtubule cytoskeletons. The Rho GTPase Cdc42 regulates cytoskeletal dynamics and polarization of various cell types, and, thus, serves as a candidate regulator of hair cell polarity. We have here induced Cdc42 inactivation in the late-embryonic OC. We show the role of Cdc42 in the establishment of planar polarity of hair cells and in cellular patterning. Abnormal planar polarity was displayed as disturbances in hair bundle orientation and morphology and in kinocilium/basal body positioning. These defects were accompanied by a disorganized cell-surface microtubule network. Atypical protein kinase C (aPKC), a putative Cdc42 effector, colocalized with Cdc42 at the hair cell apex, and aPKC expression was altered upon Cdc42 depletion. Our data suggest that Cdc42 together with aPKC is part of the machinery establishing hair cell planar polarity and that Cdc42 acts on polarity through the cell-surface microtubule network. The data also suggest that defects in apical polarization are influenced by disturbed cellular patterning in the OC. In addition, our data demonstrates that Cdc42 is required for stereociliogenesis in the immature cochlea.

  5. mGluR1 enhances efferent inhibition of inner hair cells in the developing rat cochlea.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhanlei; Goutman, Juan D; Pyott, Sonja J; Glowatzki, Elisabeth

    2017-02-17

    Just before the onset of hearing, the inner hair cells (IHCs) receive inhibitory efferent input from cholinergic medial olivocochlear (MOC) neurons originating in the brainstem. This input may serve a role in the maturation of the ascending (afferent) auditory system by inhibiting spontaneous activity of the IHCs. To investigate the molecular mechanisms regulating these IHC efferent synapses, we combined electrical stimulation of the efferent fibres with patch clamp recordings from the IHCs to measure efferent synaptic strength. By examining evoked responses, we show that activation of mGluRs by general and group I specific mGluR agonists enhances IHC efferent inhibition. This enhancement is blocked by application of a group I mGluR1-specific antagonist, indicating that enhancement of IHC efferent inhibition is mediated by group I mGluRs and specifically by mGluR1s. By comparing spontaneous and evoked responses, we show that group I mGluR agonists act presynaptically to increase neurotransmitter release without affecting postsynaptic responsiveness. Moreover, endogenous glutamate released from the IHCs also enhances IHC efferent inhibition via the activation of group I mGluRs. Finally, immunofluorescent analysis indicates that the efferent terminals are sufficiently close to IHC glutamate release sites to allow activation of mGluRs on the efferent terminals by glutamate spillover. Together, these results suggest that glutamate released from the IHCs activates group I mGluRs (mGluR1s), likely present on the efferent terminals, which, in turn, enhances release of acetylcholine and inhibition of the IHCs. Thus, mGluRs establish a local negative feedback loop positioned to regulate IHC activity and maturation of the ascending auditory system in the developing cochlea. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. Induction of osteoblastic differentiation of neural crest-derived stem cells from hair follicles.

    PubMed

    Urano-Morisawa, Eri; Takami, Masamichi; Suzawa, Tetsuo; Matsumoto, Akifumi; Osumi, Noriko; Baba, Kazuyoshi; Kamijo, Ryutaro

    2017-01-01

    The neural crest (NC) arises near the neural tube during embryo development. NC cells migrate throughout the embryo and have potential to differentiate into multiple cell types, such as peripheral nerves, glial, cardiac smooth muscle, endocrine, and pigment cells, and craniofacial bone. In the present study, we induced osteoblast-like cells using whisker follicles obtained from the NC of mice. Hair follicle cells derived from the NC labeled with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) were collected from protein zero-Cre/floxed-EGFP double transgenic mice and cultured, then treated and cultured in stem cell growth medium. After growth for 14 days, results of flow cytometry analysis showed that 95% of the EGFP-positive (EGFP+) hair follicle cells derived from the NC had proliferated and 76.2% of those expressed mesenchymal stem cells markers, such as platelet-derived growth factor α and stem cell antigen-1, and also showed constitutive expression of Runx2 mRNA. Cells stimulated with bone morphogenetic protein-2 expressed osteocalcin, osterix, and alkaline phosphatase mRNA, resulting in production of mineralized matrices, which were detected by von Kossa and alizarin red staining. Moreover, EGFP+ hair follicle cells consistently expressed macrophage colony-stimulating factor and osteoprotegerin (OPG). Addition of 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D3] (10-8 M) to the cultures suppressed OPG expression and induced RANKL production in the cells. Furthermore, multinucleated osteoclasts appeared within 6 days after starting co-cultures of bone marrow cells with EGFP+ cells in the presence of 1,25(OH)2D3 and PGE2. These results suggest that NC-derived hair follicle cells possess a capacity for osteoblastic differentiation and may be useful for developing new bone regenerative medicine therapies.

  7. Recovery of hair cell function after damage induced by gentamicin in organ culture of rat vestibular maculae.

    PubMed

    Taura, Akiko; Kojima, Ken; Ito, Juichi; Ohmori, Harunori

    2006-07-07

    Here, we report the functional and morphological evidence of hair cell recovery after damages induced by gentamicin (GM) in cultured explants of rat vestibular maculae. We evaluated mechano-electrical transduction (MET) function in hair cells, by measuring Ca(2+) responses in the explants with fura-2 when hair bundles were stimulated. After the MET testing, hair bundles were observed in high resolution by scanning electron microscopy, or by fluorescence microscopy after staining with phalloidin-FITC (fluorescent isothiocyanate). In the control culture, the number of hair bundles on the explants gradually decreased, and the percentage of explants showing Ca(2+) responses decreased and disappeared after 17 days in culture. Following GM (1-2 mM) treatment, most of the hair bundles were eliminated initially, but the hair bundles gradually increased in number during culture. Short hair bundle-like structures emerged in the areas where hair bundles had been completely lost. Consistent with the morphological observations, Ca(2+) responses disappeared after GM treatment, and they gradually recovered to a peak 13-17 days after treatment and were even induced at 17 days or more in culture. Furthermore, cells accumulated FM1-43, a dye permeable through the MET channel, when Ca(2+) responses recovered after GM treatment. Application of steroid hormone increased the percentage of explants showing MET activity, and enhanced the recovery of MET after GM treatment. We investigated Ki-67 immunoreactivity to detect cell proliferation and TUNEL staining to detect apoptotic cell death. Ki-67 immunoreactivity was negative after GM treatment, however TUNEL staining was positive and the positivity was GM dose dependent. Therefore, this functional recovery of transduction activity was not owing to the proliferation of hair cells but was likely the self-repair of the hair bundle.

  8. Active auditory mechanics in mosquitoes.

    PubMed Central

    Göpfert, M. C.; Robert, D.

    2001-01-01

    In humans and other vertebrates, hearing is improved by active contractile properties of hair cells. Comparable active auditory mechanics is now demonstrated in insects. In mosquitoes, Johnston's organ transduces sound-induced vibrations of the antennal flagellum. A non-muscular 'motor' activity enhances the sensitivity and tuning of the flagellar mechanical response in physiologically intact animals. This motor is capable of driving the flagellum autonomously, amplifying sound-induced vibrations at specific frequencies and intensities. Motor-related electrical activity of Johnston's organ strongly suggests that mosquito hearing is improved by mechanoreceptor motility. PMID:11270428

  9. Hair follicles' transit-amplifying cells govern concurrent dermal adipocyte production through Sonic Hedgehog.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bing; Tsai, Pai-Chi; Gonzalez-Celeiro, Meryem; Chung, Oliver; Boumard, Benjamin; Perdigoto, Carolina N; Ezhkova, Elena; Hsu, Ya-Chieh

    2016-10-15

    Growth and regeneration of one tissue within an organ compels accommodative changes in the surrounding tissues. However, the molecular nature and operating logic governing these concurrent changes remain poorly defined. The dermal adipose layer expands concomitantly with hair follicle downgrowth, providing a paradigm for studying coordinated changes of surrounding lineages with a regenerating tissue. Here, we discover that hair follicle transit-amplifying cells (HF-TACs) play an essential role in orchestrating dermal adipogenesis through secreting Sonic Hedgehog (SHH). Depletion of Shh from HF-TACs abrogates both dermal adipogenesis and hair follicle growth. Using cell type-specific deletion of Smo, a gene required in SHH-receiving cells, we found that SHH does not act on hair follicles, adipocytes, endothelial cells, and hematopoietic cells for adipogenesis. Instead, SHH acts directly on adipocyte precursors, promoting their proliferation and their expression of a key adipogenic gene, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (Pparg), to induce dermal adipogenesis. Our study therefore uncovers a critical role for TACs in orchestrating the generation of both their own progeny and a neighboring lineage to achieve concomitant tissue production across lineages.

  10. Skin, Hair, and Nails

    MedlinePlus

    ... thousands of cells and hundreds of sweat glands, oil glands, nerve endings, and blood vessels. Skin is ... empty into hair follicles and pores, produce the oil sebum that lubricates the skin and hair. Sebaceous ...

  11. Induction of Hair Growth by Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 in 1,763 MHz Radiofrequency-Irradiated Hair Follicle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Seong Jin; Cho, A-Ri; Jeon, Soon-Ik; Choi, Hyung-Do; Kim, Kyu Han; Park, Gun-Sik; Pack, Jeong-Ki; Kwon, Oh Sang; Park, Woong-Yang

    2011-01-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) radiation does not transfer high energy to break the covalent bonds of macromolecules, but these low energy stimuli might be sufficient to induce molecular responses in a specific manner. We monitored the effect of 1,763 MHz RF radiation on cultured human dermal papilla cells (hDPCs) by evaluating changes in the expression of cytokines related to hair growth. The expression of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) mRNA in hDPCs was significantly induced upon RF radiation at the specific absorption rate of 10 W/kg, which resulted in increased expression of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia/lymphoma 2 (BCL-2) and cyclin D1 (CCND1) proteins and increased phosphorylation of MAPK1 protein. Exposure to 10 W/kg RF radiation 1 h per day for 7 days significantly enhanced hair shaft elongation in ex vivo hair organ cultures. In RF-exposed follicular matrix keratinocytes in the hair bulb, the expression of Ki-67 was increased, while the signal for terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling was reduced. From these results, we suggest that 1,763 MHz RF exposure stimulates hair growth in vitro through the induction of IGF-1 in hDPCs. PMID:22164296

  12. Hair Follicle Bulge Stem Cells Appear Dispensable for the Acute Phase of Wound Re-epithelialization.

    PubMed

    Garcin, Clare L; Ansell, David M; Headon, Denis J; Paus, Ralf; Hardman, Matthew J

    2016-05-01

    The cutaneous healing response has evolved to occur rapidly, in order to minimize infection and to re-establish epithelial homeostasis. Rapid healing is achieved through complex coordination of multiple cell types, which importantly includes specific cell populations within the hair follicle (HF). Under physiological conditions, the epithelial compartments of HF and interfollicular epidermis remain discrete, with K15(+ve) bulge stem cells contributing progeny for HF reconstruction during the hair cycle and as a basis for hair shaft production during anagen. Only upon wounding do HF cells migrate from the follicle to contribute to the neo-epidermis. However, the identity of the first-responding cells, and in particular whether this process involves a direct contribution of K15(+ve) bulge cells to the early stage of epidermal wound repair remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that epidermal injury in murine skin does not induce bulge activation during early epidermal wound repair. Specifically, bulge cells of uninjured HFs neither proliferate nor appear to migrate out of the bulge niche upon epidermal wounding. In support of these observations, Diphtheria toxin-mediated partial ablation of K15(+ve) bulge cells fails to delay wound healing. Our data suggest that bulge cells only respond to epidermal wounding during later stages of repair. We discuss that this response may have evolved as a protective safeguarding mechanism against bulge stem cell exhaust and tumorigenesis. Stem Cells 2016;34:1377-1385.

  13. Hair Follicle Bulge Stem Cells Appear Dispensable for the Acute Phase of Wound Re‐epithelialization

    PubMed Central

    Garcin, Clare L.; Ansell, David M.; Headon, Denis J.; Paus, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The cutaneous healing response has evolved to occur rapidly, in order to minimize infection and to re‐establish epithelial homeostasis. Rapid healing is achieved through complex coordination of multiple cell types, which importantly includes specific cell populations within the hair follicle (HF). Under physiological conditions, the epithelial compartments of HF and interfollicular epidermis remain discrete, with K15+ve bulge stem cells contributing progeny for HF reconstruction during the hair cycle and as a basis for hair shaft production during anagen. Only upon wounding do HF cells migrate from the follicle to contribute to the neo‐epidermis. However, the identity of the first‐responding cells, and in particular whether this process involves a direct contribution of K15+ve bulge cells to the early stage of epidermal wound repair remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that epidermal injury in murine skin does not induce bulge activation during early epidermal wound repair. Specifically, bulge cells of uninjured HFs neither proliferate nor appear to migrate out of the bulge niche upon epidermal wounding. In support of these observations, Diphtheria toxin‐mediated partial ablation of K15+ve bulge cells fails to delay wound healing. Our data suggest that bulge cells only respond to epidermal wounding during later stages of repair. We discuss that this response may have evolved as a protective safeguarding mechanism against bulge stem cell exhaust and tumorigenesis. Stem Cells 2016;34:1377–1385 PMID:26756547

  14. Differentiating the stem cell pool of human hair follicle outer root sheath into functional melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Marie; Dieckmann, Christina; Rabe, Katrin; Simon, Jan-Christoph; Savkovic, Vuk

    2014-01-01

    Bench-to-Bedside concepts for regenerative therapy place significant weight on noninvasive approaches, with harvesting of the starting material as a header. This is particularly important in autologous treatments, which use one's bodily constituents for therapy. Precisely the stretch between obtaining therapeutic elements invasively and noninvasively places non-intrusive "sampling" rather than "biopsy" in the center of the road map of developing an autologous regenerative therapy. We focus on such a noninvasively available source of adult stem cells that we carry with us throughout our life, available at our fingertips-or shall we say hair roots, by a simple plucking of hair: the human hair follicle. This chapter describes an explant procedure for cultivating melanocytes differentiated from the stem cell pool of the hair follicle Outer Root Sheath (ORS). In vivo, the most abundant derivatives of the heterogeneous ORS stem cell pool are epidermal cells-melanocytes and keratinocytes which complete their differentiation-either spontaneously or upon picking up regenerative cues from damaged skin-and migrate from the ORS towards the adjacent regenerating area of the epidermis. We have taken advantage of the ORS developmental potential by optimizing explant primary culture, expansion and melanogenic differentiation of resident ORS stem cells towards end-stage melanocytes in order to obtain functional melanocytes noninvasively for the purposes of transplantation and use them for the treatment of depigmentation disorders. Our protocol specifies sampling of hair with their ORS, follicle medium-air interface primary culture, stimulation of cell outgrowth, adherent culture and differentiation of ORS stem cells and precursors towards fully functional melanocytes. Along with cultivation, we describe selection techniques for establishing and maintaining a pure melanocyte population and methods suitable for determining melanocyte identity.

  15. Prestin Regulation and Function in Residual Outer Hair Cells after Noise-Induced Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Anping; Song, Yohan; Wang, Rosalie; Gao, Simon S.; Clifton, Will; Raphael, Patrick; Chao, Sung-il; Pereira, Fred A.; Groves, Andrew K.; Oghalai, John S.

    2013-01-01

    The outer hair cell (OHC) motor protein prestin is necessary for electromotility, which drives cochlear amplification and produces exquisitely sharp frequency tuning. TectaC1509G transgenic mice have hearing loss, and surprisingly have increased OHC prestin levels. We hypothesized, therefore, that prestin up-regulation may represent a generalized response to compensate for a state of hearing loss. In the present study, we sought to determine the effects of noise-induced hearing loss on prestin expression. After noise exposure, we performed cytocochleograms and observed OHC loss only in the basal region of the cochlea. Next, we patch clamped OHCs from the apical turn (9–12 kHz region), where no OHCs were lost, in noise-exposed and age-matched control mice. The non-linear capacitance was significantly higher in noise-exposed mice, consistent with higher functional prestin levels. We then measured prestin protein and mRNA levels in whole-cochlea specimens. Both Western blot and qPCR studies demonstrated increased prestin expression after noise exposure. Finally, we examined the effect of the prestin increase in vivo following noise damage. Immediately after noise exposure, ABR and DPOAE thresholds were elevated by 30–40 dB. While most of the temporary threshold shifts recovered within 3 days, there were additional improvements over the next month. However, DPOAE magnitudes, basilar membrane vibration, and CAP tuning curve measurements from the 9–12 kHz cochlear region demonstrated no differences between noise-exposed mice and control mice. Taken together, these data indicate that prestin is up-regulated by 32–58% in residual OHCs after noise exposure and that the prestin is functional. These findings are consistent with the notion that prestin increases in an attempt to partially compensate for reduced force production because of missing OHCs. However, in regions where there is no OHC loss, the cochlea is able to compensate for the excess prestin in order to

  16. Prestin regulation and function in residual outer hair cells after noise-induced hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Xia, Anping; Song, Yohan; Wang, Rosalie; Gao, Simon S; Clifton, Will; Raphael, Patrick; Chao, Sung-il; Pereira, Fred A; Groves, Andrew K; Oghalai, John S

    2013-01-01

    The outer hair cell (OHC) motor protein prestin is necessary for electromotility, which drives cochlear amplification and produces exquisitely sharp frequency tuning. Tecta(C1509G) transgenic mice have hearing loss, and surprisingly have increased OHC prestin levels. We hypothesized, therefore, that prestin up-regulation may represent a generalized response to compensate for a state of hearing loss. In the present study, we sought to determine the effects of noise-induced hearing loss on prestin expression. After noise exposure, we performed cytocochleograms and observed OHC loss only in the basal region of the cochlea. Next, we patch clamped OHCs from the apical turn (9-12 kHz region), where no OHCs were lost, in noise-exposed and age-matched control mice. The non-linear capacitance was significantly higher in noise-exposed mice, consistent with higher functional prestin levels. We then measured prestin protein and mRNA levels in whole-cochlea specimens. Both Western blot and qPCR studies demonstrated increased prestin expression after noise exposure. Finally, we examined the effect of the prestin increase in vivo following noise damage. Immediately after noise exposure, ABR and DPOAE thresholds were elevated by 30-40 dB. While most of the temporary threshold shifts recovered within 3 days, there were additional improvements over the next month. However, DPOAE magnitudes, basilar membrane vibration, and CAP tuning curve measurements from the 9-12 kHz cochlear region demonstrated no differences between noise-exposed mice and control mice. Taken together, these data indicate that prestin is up-regulated by 32-58% in residual OHCs after noise exposure and that the prestin is functional. These findings are consistent with the notion that prestin increases in an attempt to partially compensate for reduced force production because of missing OHCs. However, in regions where there is no OHC loss, the cochlea is able to compensate for the excess prestin in order to

  17. Proteomic identification of hair cell repair proteins in the model sea anemone Nematostella vectensis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Pei-Ciao; Watson, Glen M

    2015-09-01

    Sea anemones have an extraordinary capability to repair damaged hair bundles, even after severe trauma. A group of secreted proteins, named repair proteins (RPs), found in mucus covering sea anemones significantly assists the repair of damaged hair bundle mechanoreceptors both in the sea anemone Haliplanella luciae and the blind cavefish Astyanax hubbsi. The polypeptide constituents of RPs must be identified in order to gain insight into the molecular mechanisms by which repair of hair bundles is accomplished. In this study, several polypeptides of RPs were isolated from mucus using blue native PAGE and then sequenced using LC-MS/MS. Thirty-seven known polypeptides were identified, including Hsp70s, as well as many polypeptide subunits of the 20S proteasome. Other identified polypeptides included those involved in cellular stress responses, protein folding, and protein degradation. Specific inhibitors of Hsp70s and the 20S proteasome were employed in experiments to test their involvement in hair bundle repair. The results of those experiments suggested that repair requires biologically active Hsp70s and 20S proteasomes. A model is proposed that considers the function of extracellular Hsp70s and 20S proteasomes in the repair of damaged hair cells.

  18. A hydrodynamic model of an outer hair cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, B. O.

    1982-01-01

    On the model it is possible to measure the force and the force direction for each individual hair as a function of the flow direction and velocity. Measurements were made at the man flow velocity .01 m/s, which is equivalent to a flow velocity in the real ear of about 1 micrometer/s. The kinematic viscosity of the liquid used in the model was 10,000 times higher than the viscosity of perilymph to attain hydrodynamic equality. Two different geometries for the sterocilia pattern were tested. First the force distribution for a W-shaped sterocilia pattern was recorded. This is the sterocilia pattern found in all real ears. It is found that the forces acting on the hairs are very regular and perpendicular to the legs of the W when the flow is directed from the outside of the W. When the flow is reversed, the forces are not reversed, but are much more irregular. This can eventually explain the half wave rectification of the nerve signals. As a second experiment, the force distribution for a V-shaped sterocilia pattern was recorded. Here the forces were irregular both when the flow was directed into the V and when it was directed against the edge of the V.

  19. Hair cell tufts and afferent innervation of the bullfrog crista ampullaris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Steven F.; Lewis, Edwin R.

    1990-01-01

    Within the bullfrog semicircular canal crista, hair cell tuft types were defined and mapped with the aid of scanning electron microscopy. Dye-filled planar afferent axons had mean distal axonal diameters of 1.6-4.9 microns, highly branched arbors, and contacted 11-24 hair cells. Dye-filled isthmus afferent axons had mean distal axonal diameters of 1.8-7.9 microns, with either small or large field arbors contacting 4-9 or 25-31 hair cells. The estimated mean number of contacts per innervated hair cell was 2.2 for planar and 1.3 for isthmus afferent neurons. Data on evoked afferent responses were available only for isthmus units that were observed to respond to our microrotational stimuli. Of 21 such afferent neurons, eight were successfully dye-filled. Within this sample, high-gain units had large field arbors and lower-gain units had small field arbors. The sensitivity of each afferent neuron was analyzed in terms of noise equivalent input (NEI), the stimulus amplitude for which the afferent response amplitude is just equivalent to the rms deviation of the instantaneous spike rate. NEI for isthmus units varied from 0.63 to 8.2 deg/s; the mean was 3.2 deg/s.

  20. Functional support of glutamate as a vestibular hair cell transmitter in an amniote

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, S. L.; Correia, M. J.

    1995-01-01

    Although hair cells in the cochlea and in the vestibular endorgans of anamniotes are thought to release glutamate or a similar compound as their transmitter, there is little evidence in amniotes (which, unlike anamniotes, possess both type I and II hair cells) as to the nature of the hair cell transmitters in the vestibular labyrinth. We have recorded extracellularly from single semicircular canal afferents in the turtle labyrinth maintained in vitro and have bath-applied a number of transmitter agonists and antagonists to relate the effects of these substances to the actions of the endogenous transmitter substances. Both glutamate and aspartate strongly excite the afferents while GABA and carbachol have negligible or weak effects. In contrast to its lack of effect on afferent activity in some anamniotes, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) was also found to excite these afferents. Kynurenic acid reversibly reduced the resting firing rates of the afferents and the increases in firing due to the application of glutamate and aspartate. These findings provide preliminary support for the hypothesis that glutamate (or a related compound) is also a vestibular hair cell transmitter in amniotes.

  1. Mitochondrial calcium uptake underlies ROS generation during aminoglycoside-induced hair cell death

    PubMed Central

    Esterberg, Robert; Linbo, Tor; Pickett, Sarah B.; Wu, Patricia; Ou, Henry C.; Rubel, Edwin W.; Raible, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to aminoglycoside antibiotics can lead to the generation of toxic levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) within mechanosensory hair