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Sample records for hakukansho ipomoea batatas

  1. [Chemical constituents from the tubers of Ipomoea batata].

    PubMed

    Yin, Yong-Qin; Shen, Zhi-Bin; Kong, Ling-Yi

    2012-06-01

    To investigate the chemical constituents from the tubers of Ipomoea batata. The chemical constituents were isolated and purified by solvent extraction together with various chromatographic techniques. The structures were elucidated on the basis of physiochemical property and spectral data. 6 compounds were identified from the CHCl3 extract as Batatinoside I (1), citrusin C(2), octadecyl caffeate (3), beta-amyrin acetate (4), caffeic acid (5), scopoletin (6). Compound 1 is isolated from Ipomoea batata for the first time.

  2. Ipomoea batatas and Agarics blazei ameliorate diabetic disorders with therapeutic antioxidant potential in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Niwa, Atsuko; Tajiri, Takashi; Higashino, Hideaki

    2011-01-01

    Ipomoea batatas, Agaricus blazei and Smallanthus sonchifolius are known to favorably influence diabetes mellitus. To clarify their antidiabetic efficacy and hypoglycemic mechanisms, we treated streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats with daily oral feeding of powdered Ipomoea batatas (5 g kg−1 d−1), Agaricus blazei (1 g kg−1 d−1) or Smallanthus sonchifolius (4 g kg−1 d−1) for 2 months. Treatments with Ipomoea batatas or Agaricus blazei, but not Smallanthus sonchifolius, significantly suppressed the increases of fasting plasma glucose and hemoglobin A1c levels, and restored body weight loss during diabetes. Serum insulin levels after oral glucose administration tests increased along the treatments of Ipomoea batatas or Agaricus blazei. Moreover, Ipomoea batatas and Agaricus blazei reduced superoxide production from leukocytes and vascular homogenates, serum 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine, and vascular nitrotyrosine formation of diabetic rats to comparable levels of normal control animals. Stress- and inflammation-related p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activity and tumor necrosis factor-α production of diabetic rats were significantly depressed by Ipomoea batatas administration. Histological examination also exhibited improvement of pancreatic β-cells mass after treatments with Ipomoea batatas or Agaricus blazei. These results suggest that hypoglycemic effects of Ipomoea batatas or Agaricus blazei result from their suppression of oxidative stress and proinflammatory cytokine production followed by improvement of pancreatic β-cells mass. PMID:21562638

  3. Ipomoea batatas and Agarics blazei ameliorate diabetic disorders with therapeutic antioxidant potential in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Niwa, Atsuko; Tajiri, Takashi; Higashino, Hideaki

    2011-05-01

    Ipomoea batatas, Agaricus blazei and Smallanthus sonchifolius are known to favorably influence diabetes mellitus. To clarify their antidiabetic efficacy and hypoglycemic mechanisms, we treated streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats with daily oral feeding of powdered Ipomoea batatas (5 g kg(-1) d(-1)), Agaricus blazei (1 g kg(-1) d(-1)) or Smallanthus sonchifolius (4 g kg(-1) d(-1)) for 2 months. Treatments with Ipomoea batatas or Agaricus blazei, but not Smallanthus sonchifolius, significantly suppressed the increases of fasting plasma glucose and hemoglobin A1c levels, and restored body weight loss during diabetes. Serum insulin levels after oral glucose administration tests increased along the treatments of Ipomoea batatas or Agaricus blazei. Moreover, Ipomoea batatas and Agaricus blazei reduced superoxide production from leukocytes and vascular homogenates, serum 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine, and vascular nitrotyrosine formation of diabetic rats to comparable levels of normal control animals. Stress- and inflammation-related p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activity and tumor necrosis factor-α production of diabetic rats were significantly depressed by Ipomoea batatas administration. Histological examination also exhibited improvement of pancreatic β-cells mass after treatments with Ipomoea batatas or Agaricus blazei. These results suggest that hypoglycemic effects of Ipomoea batatas or Agaricus blazei result from their suppression of oxidative stress and proinflammatory cytokine production followed by improvement of pancreatic β-cells mass.

  4. Uptake of iodine-131 in tropical crops. [Ipomoea batatas; Ipomoea reptans; Lycopersicon

    SciTech Connect

    Asprer, G.A.; Lansangan, L.M.

    1986-01-01

    Vegetable crops which include sweet potato tops (Ipomoea batatas), kangkong (Ipomoea repitans) and tomato plants were grown in dark-painted jars containing Hoagland-Arnon modified nutrient solution, utilizing the technique of hydroponics. The experiments for sweet potato tops and kangkong plants were duplicated for replicate studies and steady-state conditions were simulated throughout. Tomato plants were grown in the same manner but growth was observed to be hampered when starting from mature plants. Radioiodine was added to the nutrient medium containing 0.5% non-radioactive NaI solution. The solution in the jar was adjusted daily so as to maintain a constant concentration which would simulate routine releases that are essentially continuous. After incorporating the radioiodine to the solution, 10 ml aliquot was taken and counted for radioactivity by means of a 5'' x 5'' NaI(T1) detector connected to the multichannel gamma analyzer. Both plants and solution were counted for radioactivity at different time intervals using the same geometry. Results indicate that the activity in the plants were relatively higher than that of the solution. The activity tends to level off or decrease after a few days. The concentration factor which is the ratio of the activity in the plant (uCi/gm) over the activity in the medium (uCi/ml) varied for each time interval. 12 references, 2 figures, 3 tables.

  5. Distributions, ex situ conservation priorities, and genetic resources potential of crop wild relatives of sweeetpotato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam. I. series Batatas)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Crop wild relatives (CWR) of sweetpotato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam., I. series Batatas] have the potential to contribute to breeding objectives for this important root crop. Uncertainty in regard to species boundaries and their phylogenetic relationships, and the limited availability of germplasm wi...

  6. Gamma irradiation effect on the chemical composition and the antioxidant activity of Ipomoea batatas L.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, D.; Halide, H.; Wahab, A. W.; Kurniawan, D.

    2014-09-01

    The chemical composition and antioxidant activity of Ipomoea batatas L. (sweet potato) were studied by x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and by the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging capacity. The irradiation treatment was performed by using Cs-137 as a gamma sources in experimental equipment. Treatment by irradiation emerges as a possible conservation technique that has been tested successfully in several food products. The amount of chemical composition was changed and resulting new chemical for absorbed dose 40 mSv. Interestingly, it was found that gamma irradiation significantly increased the antioxidant activity, as measured by DPPH radical scavenging capacity. The antioxidant activity of Ipomoea batatas L. extract was dramatically increased in the non-irradiated sample to the sample irradiated at 40 mSv. These results indicate that gamma irradiation of Ipomoea batatas L. extract can enhance its antioxidant activity through the formation of a new chemical compound. Based on these results, increased antioxidant activity of Ipomoea batatas L. extracts by gamma rays can be applied to various industries, especially cosmetics, foodstuffs, and pharmaceuticals.

  7. Chemical optimization of protein extraction from sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) peel

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Proteins isolated from sweet potatoes (Ipomoea batatas) have been shown to possess antidiabetic, antioxidant, and antiproliferative properties. The objective of this study was to chemically optimize a process for extracting proteins from sweet potato peel. The extraction procedure involved mixing pe...

  8. Gamma irradiation effect on the chemical composition and the antioxidant activity of Ipomoea batatas L

    SciTech Connect

    Tahir, D. Halide, H. Kurniawan, D.; Wahab, A. W.

    2014-09-25

    The chemical composition and antioxidant activity of Ipomoea batatas L. (sweet potato) were studied by x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and by the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging capacity. The irradiation treatment was performed by using Cs-137 as a gamma sources in experimental equipment. Treatment by irradiation emerges as a possible conservation technique that has been tested successfully in several food products. The amount of chemical composition was changed and resulting new chemical for absorbed dose 40 mSv. Interestingly, it was found that gamma irradiation significantly increased the antioxidant activity, as measured by DPPH radical scavenging capacity. The antioxidant activity of Ipomoea batatas L. extract was dramatically increased in the non-irradiated sample to the sample irradiated at 40 mSv. These results indicate that gamma irradiation of Ipomoea batatas L. extract can enhance its antioxidant activity through the formation of a new chemical compound. Based on these results, increased antioxidant activity of Ipomoea batatas L. extracts by gamma rays can be applied to various industries, especially cosmetics, foodstuffs, and pharmaceuticals.

  9. Disentangling the origins of cultivated sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.).

    PubMed

    Roullier, Caroline; Duputié, Anne; Wennekes, Paul; Benoit, Laure; Fernández Bringas, Víctor Manuel; Rossel, Genoveva; Tay, David; McKey, Doyle; Lebot, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam., Convolvulaceae) counts among the most widely cultivated staple crops worldwide, yet the origins of its domestication remain unclear. This hexaploid species could have had either an autopolyploid origin, from the diploid I. trifida, or an allopolyploid origin, involving genomes of I. trifida and I. triloba. We generated molecular genetic data for a broad sample of cultivated sweet potatoes and its diploid and polyploid wild relatives, for noncoding chloroplast and nuclear ITS sequences, and nuclear SSRs. Our data did not support an allopolyploid origin for I. batatas, nor any contribution of I. triloba in the genome of domesticated sweet potato. I. trifida and I. batatas are closely related although they do not share haplotypes. Our data support an autopolyploid origin of sweet potato from the ancestor it shares with I. trifida, which might be similar to currently observed tetraploid wild Ipomoea accessions. Two I. batatas chloroplast lineages were identified. They show more divergence with each other than either does with I. trifida. We thus propose that cultivated I. batatas have multiple origins, and evolved from at least two distinct autopolyploidization events in polymorphic wild populations of a single progenitor species. Secondary contact between sweet potatoes domesticated in Central America and in South America, from differentiated wild I. batatas populations, would have led to the introgression of chloroplast haplotypes of each lineage into nuclear backgrounds of the other, and to a reduced divergence between nuclear gene pools as compared with chloroplast haplotypes.

  10. Disentangling the Origins of Cultivated Sweet Potato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.)

    PubMed Central

    Roullier, Caroline; Duputié, Anne; Wennekes, Paul; Benoit, Laure; Fernández Bringas, Víctor Manuel; Rossel, Genoveva; Tay, David; McKey, Doyle; Lebot, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam., Convolvulaceae) counts among the most widely cultivated staple crops worldwide, yet the origins of its domestication remain unclear. This hexaploid species could have had either an autopolyploid origin, from the diploid I. trifida, or an allopolyploid origin, involving genomes of I. trifida and I. triloba. We generated molecular genetic data for a broad sample of cultivated sweet potatoes and its diploid and polyploid wild relatives, for noncoding chloroplast and nuclear ITS sequences, and nuclear SSRs. Our data did not support an allopolyploid origin for I. batatas, nor any contribution of I. triloba in the genome of domesticated sweet potato. I. trifida and I. batatas are closely related although they do not share haplotypes. Our data support an autopolyploid origin of sweet potato from the ancestor it shares with I. trifida, which might be similar to currently observed tetraploid wild Ipomoea accessions. Two I. batatas chloroplast lineages were identified. They show more divergence with each other than either does with I. trifida. We thus propose that cultivated I. batatas have multiple origins, and evolved from at least two distinct autopolyploidization events in polymorphic wild populations of a single progenitor species. Secondary contact between sweet potatoes domesticated in Central America and in South America, from differentiated wild I. batatas populations, would have led to the introgression of chloroplast haplotypes of each lineage into nuclear backgrounds of the other, and to a reduced divergence between nuclear gene pools as compared with chloroplast haplotypes. PMID:23723970

  11. Anthocyanins in callus induced from purple storage root of Ipomoea batatas L.

    PubMed

    Terahara, N; Konczak-Islam, I; Nakatani, M; Yamakawa, O; Goda, Y; Honda, T

    2000-08-01

    Two anthocyanins were isolated from the highly pigmented callus derived from the storage root of purple sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L.) cultivar 'Ayamurasaki'. One was identified as cyanidin 3-O-sophoroside-5-O-glucoside, and the other as cyanidin 3-O-(2-O-(6-O-(E)-p-coumaroyl-beta-D-glucopyranosyl)-beta-D-glucop yranoside)-5-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside, by chemical and spectroscopic analysis.

  12. Phyotoxicity of diesel soil contamination on the germination of Lactuca sativa and Ipomoea batatas.

    PubMed

    Fatokun, Kayode; Lewu, Francis Bayo; Zharare, Godfrey Elijah

    2015-11-01

    Phytotoxic effect of diesel contaminated soil on germination rate of Lactuca sativa and Ipomoea batatas, at two concentrations ranges (0-6ml and 0-30ml), were investigated and compared. Diesel soil contamination was simulated and soil samples were taken from contaminated soil at 1, 5,10, 15, 25, 50, 75 and 100 days should be after planting. The result showed that in both plant species, diesel inhibited germination in a concentration dependent manner, Also, the influence of diesel contamination diminished with increased time duration; suggesting possible reduction in diesel toxicity over time. However, germination of lettuce was significant and negatively correlated (r2 = -0.941) with diesel contamination as compared to sweet potato (r2 = -0.638).Critical concentration of diesel in relation to seed germination of L. sativa was lower than vegetative germination of I. batatas, indicating that germination of I. batatas was less sensitive to diesel contamination as compared to L. sativa.

  13. IbMADS1 (Ipomoea batatas MADS-box 1 gene) is Involved in Tuberous Root Initiation in Sweet Potato (Ipomoea batatas)

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Amy Tsu; Huang, Yi-Shiuan; Wang, Yu-Shu; Ma, Daifu; Yeh, Kai-Wun

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims The tuberization mechanism of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) has long been studied using various approaches. Morphological data have revealed that the tuberizing events result from the activation of the cambium, followed by cell proliferation. However, uncertainties still remain regarding the regulators participating in this signal-transduction pathway. An attempt was made to characterize the role of one MADS-box transcription factor, which was preferentially expressed in sweet potato roots at the early tuberization stage. Methods A differential expression level of IbMADS1 (Ipomoea batatas MADS-box 1) was detected temporally and spatially in sweet potato tissues. IbMADS1 responses to tuberization-related hormones were assessed. In order to identify the evolutionary significance, the expression pattern of IbMADS1 was surveyed in two tuber-deficient Ipomoea relatives, I. leucantha and I. trifida, and compared with sweet potato. In functional analyses, potato (Solanum tuberosum) was employed as a heterologous model. The resulting tuber morphogenesis was examined anatomically in order to address the physiological function of IbMADS1, which should act similarly in sweet potato. Key Results IbMADS1 was preferentially expressed as tuberous root development proceeded. Its expression was inducible by tuberization-related hormones, such as jasmonic acid and cytokinins. In situ hybridization data showed that IbMADS1 transcripts were specifically distributed around immature meristematic cells within the stele and lateral root primordia. Inter-species examination indicated that IbMADS1 expression was relatively active in sweet potato roots, but undetectable in tuber-deficient Ipomoea species. IbMADS1-transformed potatoes exhibited tuber morphogenesis in the fibrous roots. The partial swellings along fibrous roots were mainly due to anomalous proliferation and differentiation in the xylem. Conclusions Based on this study, it is proposed that IbMADS1 is an

  14. IbMADS1 (Ipomoea batatas MADS-box 1 gene) is involved in tuberous root initiation in sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas).

    PubMed

    Ku, Amy Tsu; Huang, Yi-Shiuan; Wang, Yu-Shu; Ma, Daifu; Yeh, Kai-Wun

    2008-07-01

    The tuberization mechanism of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) has long been studied using various approaches. Morphological data have revealed that the tuberizing events result from the activation of the cambium, followed by cell proliferation. However, uncertainties still remain regarding the regulators participating in this signal-transduction pathway. An attempt was made to characterize the role of one MADS-box transcription factor, which was preferentially expressed in sweet potato roots at the early tuberization stage. A differential expression level of IbMADS1 (Ipomoea batatas MADS-box 1) was detected temporally and spatially in sweet potato tissues. IbMADS1 responses to tuberization-related hormones were assessed. In order to identify the evolutionary significance, the expression pattern of IbMADS1 was surveyed in two tuber-deficient Ipomoea relatives, I. leucantha and I. trifida, and compared with sweet potato. In functional analyses, potato (Solanum tuberosum) was employed as a heterologous model. The resulting tuber morphogenesis was examined anatomically in order to address the physiological function of IbMADS1, which should act similarly in sweet potato. IbMADS1 was preferentially expressed as tuberous root development proceeded. Its expression was inducible by tuberization-related hormones, such as jasmonic acid and cytokinins. In situ hybridization data showed that IbMADS1 transcripts were specifically distributed around immature meristematic cells within the stele and lateral root primordia. Inter-species examination indicated that IbMADS1 expression was relatively active in sweet potato roots, but undetectable in tuber-deficient Ipomoea species. IbMADS1-transformed potatoes exhibited tuber morphogenesis in the fibrous roots. The partial swellings along fibrous roots were mainly due to anomalous proliferation and differentiation in the xylem. Based on this study, it is proposed that IbMADS1 is an important integrator at the initiation of tuberization

  15. Advances in functional use of sweet potato, [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam].

    PubMed

    Barnes, Sandra L; Sanders, Sheila A

    2012-08-01

    This article reviews the patents that have been presented over the past two decades related to alternative functional use of the Sweet potato, Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam. The major categories of available patents include alternative food products such as Sweet potato chips and fries, Sweet potato ornamental products, and fuel ethanol production from Sweet potato. The majority of recent patents fall under the category of ornamental products and alternative food products, with only a few fuel ethanol products. Figure 1 shows the major categories of patented alternative products from Sweet potato.

  16. A Functional mathematical index for predicting effects of food processing on eight sweet potato(Ipomoea batatas)cultivars

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In this paper we apply an improved functional mathematical index (FMI), modified from those presented in previous publications, to define the influence of different cooking processes of eight sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) cultivars on composition of six bioactive phenolic compounds (flavonoids). Th...

  17. Demographic comparison of sweetpotato weevil reared on a major host, Ipomoea batatas, and an alternative host, I. triloba

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Gadi V. P.; Chi, Hisn

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we collected life table data for the sweetpotato weevil, Cylas formicarius, grown on Ipomoea batatas and Ipomoea triloba, and analyzed them using an age-stage, two-sex life table. We also demonstrated the growth potential of C. formicarius on these two host plants by using population projection. These data will be useful to the growers to the selection or eradication of host plants in an integrated control strategy for C. formicarius for the entire area of the targeted areas. We found that C. formicarius developed faster on I. batatas than on I. triloba. The developmental times of the larval and pupal stages on I. batatas than on I. triloba were 37.01 and 8.3 days. The adult females emerged before and began to produce eggs at 42 days earlier when reared on I. batatas. The fecundity of females was 90.0 eggs on I. batatas significantly higher than the mean fecundity of 68.5 eggs on I. triloba. Although this insect has a higher intrinsic rate of increase on I. batatas, the study indicated that C. formicarius can successfully survive and reproduce on both host plants. PMID:26156566

  18. Rapid and reliable method of extracting DNA and RNA from sweetpotato, Ipomoea batatas (L). Lam.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun-Hyung; Hamada, Tatsuro

    2005-12-01

    A quick, simple and reliable method of extracting DNA from sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.) has been developed. The method was applied successfully for extraction of total DNA from leaves and total RNA from leaves and various tissues. The yield of DNA extracted by this procedure was high (about 1 mg/g leaf tissue). The extracted DNA was completely digested by restriction endonucleases indicating the absence of common contaminating compounds. The absorbancy ratios of A260/A230 and A260/A280 of isolated RNA were approx. 2 and the yield was about 0.2 mg/g fresh wt. CIPK and tublin genes were successfully amplified by RT-PCR, suggesting the integrity of isolated RNA. The total DNA and RNA isolated by this method was of sufficient quality for subsequent molecular analysis.

  19. Calf thymus DNA-binding ability study of anthocyanins from purple sweet potatoes ( Ipomoea batatas L.).

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; Wang, Xirui; Zhang, Chao; Ma, Yue; Zhao, Xiaoyan

    2011-07-13

    A total of 10 anthocyanin compounds were identified from five purple sweet potato ( Ipomoea batatas L.) varieties, Qunzi, Zishu038, Ji18, Jingshu6, and Ziluolan, by high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) to assess their calf thymus DNA-binding ability in vitro. The interaction between anthocyanins and calf thymus DNA in Tris-HCl buffer solution (pH 6.9) was evaluated by fluorescence spectroscopy. Using ethidium bromide (EB) as a fluorescence probe, fluorescence quenching of the emission peak was seen in the DNA-EB system when anthocyanins were added, indicating that the anthocyanins bound with DNA. The acylated groups influenced the ability of the interaction with DNA. Anthocyanins from purple sweet potato with more acylated groups in sorphorose have a stronger binding ability with DNA.

  20. New polyphenol derivative in Ipomoea batatas tubers and its antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Dini, Irene; Tenore, Gian Carlo; Dini, Antonio

    2006-11-15

    Four different polyphenolic compounds were isolated by chromatographic methods from methanolic and hydromethanolic extracts of Ipomoea batatas tuber flour. On the basis of UV, mass, and NMR analysis procedures, the structure of the isolated compounds were determined as 4,5-di-O-caffeoyldaucic acid (1), 4-O-caffeoylquinic acid (2), 3,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid (3), and 1,3-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid (4). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of isolation and characterization of compound 1. Then, we evaluated the antioxidant activity of daucic acid derivative by using DPPH and FRAP methods together with authentic antioxidant standards, l-ascorbic acid, tert-butyl-4-hydroxy toluene (BHT), and gallic acid. The activity of compound 1 in both methods was higher than that of all standards used at the same molar concentration.

  1. Sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas [L.] Lam)--a valuable medicinal food: a review.

    PubMed

    Mohanraj, Remya; Sivasankar, Subha

    2014-07-01

    Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam, also known as sweet potato, is an extremely versatile and delicious vegetable that possesses high nutritional value. It is also a valuable medicinal plant having anti-cancer, antidiabetic, and anti-inflammatory activities. Sweet potato is now considered a valuable source of unique natural products, including some that can be used in the development of medicines against various diseases and in making industrial products. The overall objective of this review is to give a bird's-eye view of the nutritional value, health benefits, phytochemical composition, and medicinal properties of sweet potato. Specifically, this review outlines the biological activities of some of the sweet potato compounds that have been isolated, the pharmacological action of the sweet potato extract, clinical studies, and plausible medicinal applications of sweet potato (along with a safety evaluation), and demonstrates the potential of sweet potato as a medicinal food.

  2. Analyses of the complete genome and gene expression of chloroplast of sweet potato [Ipomoea batata].

    PubMed

    Yan, Lang; Lai, Xianjun; Li, Xuedan; Wei, Changhe; Tan, Xuemei; Zhang, Yizheng

    2015-01-01

    Sweet potato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam] ranks among the top seven most important food crops cultivated worldwide and is hexaploid plant (2n=6x=90) in the Convolvulaceae family with a genome size between 2,200 to 3,000 Mb. The genomic resources for this crop are deficient due to its complicated genetic structure. Here, we report the complete nucleotide sequence of the chloroplast (cp) genome of sweet potato, which is a circular molecule of 161,303 bp in the typical quadripartite structure with large (LSC) and small (SSC) single-copy regions separated by a pair of inverted repeats (IRs). The chloroplast DNA contains a total of 145 genes, including 94 protein-encoding genes of which there are 72 single-copy and 11 double-copy genes. The organization and structure of the chloroplast genome (gene content and order, IR expansion/contraction, random repeating sequences, structural rearrangement) of sweet potato were compared with those of Ipomoea (L.) species and some basal important angiosperms, respectively. Some boundary gene-flow and gene gain-and-loss events were identified at intra- and inter-species levels. In addition, by comparing with the transcriptome sequences of sweet potato, the RNA editing events and differential expressions of the chloroplast functional-genes were detected. Moreover, phylogenetic analysis was conducted based on 77 protein-coding genes from 33 taxa and the result may contribute to a better understanding of the evolution progress of the genus Ipomoea (L.), including phylogenetic relationships, intraspecific differentiation and interspecific introgression.

  3. Analyses of the Complete Genome and Gene Expression of Chloroplast of Sweet Potato [Ipomoea batata

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Lang; Lai, Xianjun; Li, Xuedan; Wei, Changhe; Tan, Xuemei; Zhang, Yizheng

    2015-01-01

    Sweet potato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam] ranks among the top seven most important food crops cultivated worldwide and is hexaploid plant (2n=6x=90) in the Convolvulaceae family with a genome size between 2,200 to 3,000 Mb. The genomic resources for this crop are deficient due to its complicated genetic structure. Here, we report the complete nucleotide sequence of the chloroplast (cp) genome of sweet potato, which is a circular molecule of 161,303 bp in the typical quadripartite structure with large (LSC) and small (SSC) single-copy regions separated by a pair of inverted repeats (IRs). The chloroplast DNA contains a total of 145 genes, including 94 protein-encoding genes of which there are 72 single-copy and 11 double-copy genes. The organization and structure of the chloroplast genome (gene content and order, IR expansion/contraction, random repeating sequences, structural rearrangement) of sweet potato were compared with those of Ipomoea (L.) species and some basal important angiosperms, respectively. Some boundary gene-flow and gene gain-and-loss events were identified at intra- and inter-species levels. In addition, by comparing with the transcriptome sequences of sweet potato, the RNA editing events and differential expressions of the chloroplast functional-genes were detected. Moreover, phylogenetic analysis was conducted based on 77 protein-coding genes from 33 taxa and the result may contribute to a better understanding of the evolution progress of the genus Ipomoea (L.), including phylogenetic relationships, intraspecific differentiation and interspecific introgression. PMID:25874767

  4. Carotenoids gene markers for sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas L. Lam): applications in genetic mapping, diversity evaluation and cross-species transference.

    PubMed

    Arizio, C M; Costa Tártara, S M; Manifesto, M M

    2014-04-01

    Carotenoids play essential biological roles in plants, and genes involved in the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway are evolutionarily conserved. Orange sweetpotato is an important source of β-carotene, a precursor of vitamin A. In spite of this, only a few research studies have focussed on the molecular aspects of carotenoid genes regarding their specific sequence and structure. In this study, we used published carotenoid gene sequences from Ipomoea and other species for "exon-primed intron-crossing" approaches. Fifteen pairs of primers representing six carotenoid genes were designed for different introns, eleven of which amplified scorable and reproducible alleles. The sequence of PCR products showed high homology to the original ones. Moreover, the structure and sequence of the introns and exons from five carotenoid structural genes were partially defined. Intron length polymorphism and intron single nucleotide polymorphisms were detected in amplified sequences. Marker dosages and allelic segregations were analysed in a mapping population. The developed markers were evaluated in a set of Ipomoeas batatas accessions so as to analyse genetic diversity and conservation applicability. Using CG strategy combined with EPIC-PCR technique, we developed carotenoid gene markers in sweetpotato. We reported the first set of polymorphic Candidate Gene markers for I. batatas, and demonstrated transferability in seven wild Ipomoea species. We described the sequence and structure of carotenoid genes and introduced new information about genomic constitution and allele dosage.

  5. A proteomic analysis of storage stress responses in Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam. tuberous root.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yusong; Chen, Cheng; Tao, Xiang; Wang, Jianxi; Zhang, Yizheng

    2012-08-01

    During post-harvest storage, tuberous roots of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L. Lam.) usually undergo a biotic and abiotic stress influencing protein expression pattern and substance contents. This research compared the change of total proteins and carbohydrate content in tuberous roots of sweet potato during the storage period. The result of the two-dimensional electrophoresis analysis demonstrated that there were 25 differentially expressed proteins between day 0 and day 75 during the storage. Among these proteins, 11 proteins were down-regulated and the other 14 were up-regulated. The results from MALDI-TOF-TOF/MS analyses and mascot database searching showed that 11 of the 25 differentially expressed proteins were identified as store-stress regulated proteins. It was also found that the proteins involved in the energy metabolism and the stress-response were drastically up-regulated, whereas those in biomacromolecule synthesis were markedly down-regulated. Meanwhile, under the experimental conditions, the content of the starch and the cellulose was decreased by more than a quarter and the amylase activity was increased moderately.

  6. [Characterization of Ipomoea batatas extract to be used as nutrient basis for culture media].

    PubMed

    Lobaina Rodríguez, Tamara; Rodríguez Martínez, Claudio; Zhurbenko, Raisa

    2007-01-01

    An Ipomoea batatas extract obtained by enzymatic hydrolysis with alpha amylase was characterized to be used as nutrient basis. Among its quality indicators, it had a content of over 50% whole carbohydrates with respect to the nominal mass, estimated by phenol-sulphur method. The same content of aminonitrogen detected and quantified by potentiometric titration using formaldehyde and of total nitrogen (0,23%) by Kjeldahl method were detected. The content of necessary mineral elements for microbial culture was determined by the atom absorption method. The study of biological reactivity of the vegetal extract showed the existence of essential aminoacids such as triptophane, cystine and cysteine for microorganisms. It was proved that the vegetal extract, when used as the only source of nutrients at various concentration levels (2, 4 and 10%), is capable of stimulating the growth of bacteriae and yeasts. The increase of two Candida albicans biomass, determined in a specially designed medium (SIGMA, USA), was significantly higher to that of other nutrient bases like soy peptone, yeast extract, triptone and micological peptone. It was evinced that the vegetal extract as a culture medium component did not have antimicrobial effect compounds since at 15-30 g/L concentrations, this extract did stimulate the microbial growth up to values (UFC/mL) similar to those of the reference media called agar triptone soy.

  7. Fractionation, enzyme inhibitory and cellular antioxidant activity of bioactives from purple sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas).

    PubMed

    Esatbeyoglu, Tuba; Rodríguez-Werner, Miriam; Schlösser, Anke; Winterhalter, Peter; Rimbach, Gerald

    2017-04-15

    Sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L.) is mainly cultivated in Asia. The deep purple color of purple sweet potato (PSP) is due to the high content of acylated anthocyanins. In the present study, PSP-derived polyphenols were identified using HPLC-PDA and HPLC-ESI-MS(n) analyses. After concentration of the polyphenols from PSP, preparative separation into two fractions, designated anthocyanins (AF) and copigments (CF), was carried out using adsorptive membrane chromatography. In enzyme inhibitory assays, all PSP samples inhibited the enzymes α-amylase, α-glucosidase and xanthine oxidase. Additionally, the cell signaling cellular antioxidant properties of the PSP extracts were investigated in cultured cells. PSP induced the transcription factor Nrf2, which regulates the expression of genes encoding heme oxygenase 1 (Hmox1), glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic subunit (Gclc) and paraoxonase 1 (PON1). Furthermore, PSP enhanced cellular glutathione concentrations and decreased lipid peroxidation in cultured hepatocytes. Overall, these results suggest that PSP extracts exhibit enzyme inhibitory and cellular antioxidant properties, especially PSP CF.

  8. Phytochemical screening, antioxidant, and antimicrobial activities of the crude leaves’ extract from Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam

    PubMed Central

    Pochapski, Márcia Thaís; Fosquiera, Eliana Cristina; Esmerino, Luís Antônio; dos Santos, Elizabete Brasil; Farago, Paulo Vitor; Santos, Fábio André; Groppo, Francisco Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Background: Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam., popularly known as sweet potato (SP), has played an important role as an energy and a phytochemical source in human nutrition and animal feeding. Ethnopharmacological data show that SP leaves have been effectively used in herbal medicine to treat inflammatory and/or infectious oral diseases in Brazil. The aim of this research was to evaluate the phytochemical, antioxidant, and antimicrobial activities of the crude leaves’ extract of SP leaves. Materials and Methods: The screening was performed for triterpenes/steroids, alkaloids, anthraquinones, coumarins, flavonoids, saponins, tannins, and phenolic acids. The color intensity or the precipitate formation was used as analytical responses to these tests. The total antioxidant capacity was evaluated by the phosphomolybdenum complex method. Antimicrobial activity was made by agar disk and agar well diffusion tests. Results: The phytochemical screening showed positive results for triterpenes/steroids, alkaloids, anthraquinones, coumarins, flavonoids, saponins, tannins, and phenolic acids. Total contents of 345.65, 328.44, and 662.02 mg were respectively obtained for alkaloids, anthraquinones, and phenolic compounds in 100 g of the dry sample. The total antioxidant capacity was 42.94% as compared to ascorbic acid. For antimicrobial studies, no concentration of the SP freeze dried extract was able to inhibit the growth of Streptococcus mutans, S. mitis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Candida albicans in both agar disk and agar well diffusion tests. Conclusions: SP leaves demonstrated the presence of secondary metabolites with potential biological activities. No antimicrobial activity was observed. PMID:21716926

  9. Chemical optimization of protein extraction from sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) peel.

    PubMed

    Maloney, Katherine P; Truong, Van-Den; Allen, Jonathan C

    2012-11-01

    Proteins isolated from sweet potatoes (Ipomoea batatas) have been shown to possess antidiabetic, antioxidant, and antiproliferative properties. The objective of this study was to chemically optimize a process for extracting proteins from sweet potato peel. The extraction procedure involved mixing peel with saline solvent to dissolve proteins and then precipitating with CaCl(2). Quadratic and segmented models were used to determine the optimum NaCl concentration and peel to solvent ratio to maximize protein solubility while minimizing solvent usage. A segmented model was also used to optimize the concentration of CaCl(2) used for precipitation. The highest yield was obtained by mixing blanched peelings with 59.7 mL of 0.025 mM NaCl per g peel and then precipitating with 6.8 mM CaCl(2). The results of this study show that potentially valuable proteins can be extracted from peel generated during processing of sweet potatoes and industrial costs can be minimized by using these optimum conditions. Potentially valuable proteins can be extracted from sweet potato peel, a waste product of sweet potato processing. © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists®

  10. Cryopreservation of sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas) and its pathogen eradication by cryotherapy.

    PubMed

    Feng, Chaohong; Yin, Zhenfang; Ma, Yanli; Zhang, Zhibo; Chen, Long; Wang, Biao; Li, Baiquan; Huang, Yushen; Wang, Qiaochun

    2011-01-01

    Sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas) ranks as the seventh most important staple crop in the world and the fifth in developing countries after rice, wheat, maize and cassava. Sweetpotato is mainly grown in developing countries, which account for more than 95% of total production of the whole world. Genetic resources, including cultivated varieties and wild species, are a prerequisite for novel sweetpotato breeding in both conventional and genetic engineering programs. Various cryopreservation protocols have been developed for shoot tips and embryogenic tissues. The former explants are preferred for long-term conservation of sweetpotato genetic resources, while the latter are valuable for sweetpotato genetic improvement. This review provides update comprehensive information on cryopreservation of sweetpotato shoot tips and embryogenic tissues. Plant pathogens such as viruses and phytoplasma severely hamper high yield and high quality production of sweetpotato. Thus, usage of pathogen-free planting materials is pivotal for sustainable sweetpotato production. Cryotherapy of shoot tips can efficiently eradicate sweetpotato pathogens such as viruses and phytoplasma. The mechanism behind pathogen eradication by cryotherapy of shoot tips has been elucidated. Pathogen eradication by cryotherapy provides an alternative, efficient strategy for production of pathogen-free plants. In addition, cryopreserved tissues may also be considered to be safer for exchange of germplasm between countries and regions.

  11. Characterization and development of EST-derived SSR markers in cultivated sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Currently there exists a limited availability of genetic marker resources in sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas), which is hindering genetic research in this species. It is necessary to develop more molecular markers for potential use in sweetpotato genetic research. With the newly developed next generation sequencing technology, large amount of transcribed sequences of sweetpotato have been generated and are available for identifying SSR markers by data mining. Results In this study, we investigated 181,615 ESTs for the identification and development of SSR markers. In total, 8,294 SSRs were identified from 7,163 SSR-containing unique ESTs. On an average, one SSR was found per 7.1 kb of EST sequence with tri-nucleotide motifs (42.9%) being the most abundant followed by di- (41.2%), tetra- (9.2%), penta- (3.7%) and hexa-nucleotide (3.1%) repeat types. The top five motifs included AG/CT (26.9%), AAG/CTT (13.5%), AT/TA (10.6%), CCG/CGG (5.8%) and AAT/ATT (4.5%). After removing possible duplicate of published EST-SSRs of sweetpotato, a total of non-repeat 7,958 SSR motifs were identified. Based on these SSR-containing sequences, 1,060 pairs of high-quality SSR primers were designed and used for validation of the amplification and assessment of the polymorphism between two parents of one mapping population (E Shu 3 Hao and Guang 2k-30) and eight accessions of cultivated sweetpotatoes. The results showed that 816 primer pairs could yield reproducible and strong amplification products, of which 195 (23.9%) and 342 (41.9%) primer pairs exhibited polymorphism between E Shu 3 Hao and Guang 2k-30 and among the 8 cultivated sweetpotatoes, respectively. Conclusion This study gives an insight into the frequency, type and distribution of sweetpotato EST-SSRs and demonstrates successful development of EST-SSR markers in cultivated sweetpotato. These EST-SSR markers could enrich the current resource of molecular markers for the sweetpotato community and would be useful for

  12. Plant-growth regulators alter phytochemical constituents and pharmaceutical quality in Sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L.).

    PubMed

    Ghasemzadeh, Ali; Talei, Daryush; Jaafar, Hawa Z E; Juraimi, Abdul Shukor; Mohamed, Mahmud Tengku Muda; Puteh, Adam; Halim, Mohd Ridzwan A

    2016-05-28

    Sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L.) is one of the most important consumed crops in many parts of the world because of its economic importance and content of health-promoting phytochemicals. With the sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L.) as our model, we investigated the exogenous effects of three plant-growth regulators methyl jasmonate (MeJA), salicylic acid (SA), and abscisic acid (ABA) on major phytochemicals in relation to phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) activity. Specifically, we investigated the total phenolic content (TPC), total flavonoid content (TFC), total anthocyanin content (TAC), and total β-carotene content (TCC). Individual phenolic and flavonoid compounds were identified using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC). Antioxidant activities of treated plants were evaluated using a 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay and a β-carotene bleaching assay. Anticancer activity of extracts was evaluated against breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231) using MTT assay. TPC, TFC, TAC, and TCC and antioxidant activities were substantially increased in MeJA-, SA-, and ABA-treated plants. Among the secondary metabolites identified in this study, MeJA application significantly induced production of quercetin, kaempferol, myricetin, gallic acid, chlorogenic acid, 3,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid, and 4,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid. Luteolin synthesis was significantly induced by SA application. Compared with control plants, MeJA-treated sweet potato exhibited the highest PAL activity, followed by SA and ABA treatment. The high DPPH activity was observed in MeJA followed by SA and ABA, with half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of 2.40, 3.0, and 3.40 mg/mL compared with α-tocopherol (1.1 mg/mL). Additionally, MeJA-treated sweet potato showed the highest β-carotene bleaching activity, with an IC50 value of 2.90 mg/mL, followed by SA (3.30 mg/mL), ABA (3.70 mg/mL), and control plants (4.5 mg/mL). Extracts of sweet potato root treated

  13. Purification and characterization of p-coumaroyl-D-glucose hydroxylase of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) roots.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, M; Kojima, M

    1991-01-01

    p-Coumaroyl-D-glucose hydroxylase in sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas Lam.) has been purified to apparent electrophoretic homogeneity using a combination of anion-and cation-exchange, hydrophobic and gel filtration chromatography. The purified enzyme was a monomer with a molecular weight of 33,000 and pI of 8.3. The purified enzyme showed not only hydroxylase activity but also polyphenol oxidase activity. L-Ascorbic acid was the best electron donor for the hydroxylation reaction, which had an optimum pH of 7.0. The enzyme hydroxylated p-coumaroyl-D-glucose, p-coumaric acid, and p-cresol but did not act on o-coumaric acid, m-coumaric acid, 4-hydroxy-3-methoxycinnamic acid, p-hydroxybenzoic acid or L-tyrosine. While the enzyme utilized p-coumaroyl-D-glucose and p-coumaric acid equally at pH 7.0, it hydroxylated only p-coumaroyl-D-glucose at pH 5.5. The enzyme oxidized diphenols such as D,L-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl) alanine and caffeic acid, but exhibited no clear pH optimum in this reaction characteristic of polyphenol oxidase. Both the hydroxylase and the polyphenol oxidase activities were strongly inhibited by beta-mercaptoethanol, diethyldithiocarbamate, KCN, and p-coumaric acid (in concentrations higher than 5 mM). Ammonium sulfate and sodium chloride activated the hydroxylase activity but not the polyphenol oxidase activity of the enzyme. The enzyme activity and L-ascorbic acid contents changed in a manner suggesting their involvements in chlorogenic acid biosynthesis during incubation of sliced sweet potato root tissues.

  14. Quality improvement of sweet-potato (Ipomoea batatas L. Lam.) roots as feed by ensilage.

    PubMed

    Lin, Y H; Huang, T C; Huang, C

    1988-07-01

    1. Sweet-potato (Ipomoea batatas L. Lam.) strips (SPS) mixed with maize powder (CP) in proportions 10:0, 9:1, 8:2, and 7:3 were ensiled for 1, 2 or 3 months. 2. Trypsin inhibitor activity (TIA) decreased during ensilage in samples of all treatments while the SPS-CP mixture (7:3, w/w) ensiled for 3 months contained the lowest TIA. 3. SPS-CP (8:2, w/w) dried or ensiled for 2 months, or ensiled for 2 months and dried, were each mixed with twice the amount of control diet (1:2, w/w) to make three diets. These three diets together with the control diet were used for a feeding experiment with rats to evaluate the nutritive value. 4. General composition analysis (including metabolizable energy), fatty acid composition and amino acid analysis (including percentage of essential amino acids) of the samples did not change during ensilage to an extent which could explain the improved performance of rats fed on ensiled diets. 5. Rats fed on diets containing dried SPS-CP (8:2, w/w) showed significantly lower (P less than 0.05) body-weight gain than rats fed on the control diet or ensiled SPS diets, at the end of the 8th week. They also showed enlargement of the pancreas. The adverse effect of SPS was associated with TIA which seemed to be prevented to some extent by ensilage. 6. The possibility that the starch of SPS may also contribute to the adverse effect cannot be excluded at present.

  15. Starch-branching enzyme I gene (IbSBEI) from sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas); molecular cloning and expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Tatsuro; Kim, Sun-Hyung; Shimada, Takiko

    2006-08-01

    The cDNA of the starch-branching enzyme I gene (IbSBEI) in the sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) has been cloned and sequenced. The IbSBEI amino acid sequence was 81% identical to that of potato StSBEI. DNA gel-blot analyses demonstrated that at least two copies of IbSBEI are present in the sweet potato genome. IbSBEI was strongly expressed in tuberous roots. Transcript levels in the roots of single leaf cuttings were extremely low during the first 15-40 d after planting and continuously increased up to 50 d, by which time the tuberous roots had almost completely developed. This indicates that IbSBEI may work in concert with the AGPase large subunit during the primary phase of starch granule formation.

  16. Biochemical and spectroscopic characterization of catechol oxidase from sweet potatoes (Ipomoea batatas) containing a type-3 dicopper center.

    PubMed

    Eicken, C; Zippel, F; Büldt-Karentzopoulos, K; Krebs, B

    1998-10-02

    Two catechol oxidases have been isolated from sweet potatoes (Ipomoea batatas) and purified to homogeneity. The two isozymes have been characterized by EXAFS, EPR-, UV/Vis-spectroscopy, isoelectric focusing, and MALDI-MS and have been shown to contain a dinuclear copper center. Both are monomers with a molecular mass of 39 kDa and 40 kDa, respectively. Substrate specificity and NH2-terminal sequences have been determined. EXAFS data for the 39 kDa enzyme reveal a coordination number of four for each Cu in the resting form and suggest a Cu(II)-Cu(II) distance of 2.9 A for the native met form and 3.8 A for the oxy form.

  17. Expressed nifH Genes of Endophytic Bacteria Detected in Field-Grown Sweet Potatoes (Ipomoea batatas L.).

    PubMed

    Terakado-Tonooka, Junko; Ohwaki, Yoshinari; Yamakawa, Hiromoto; Tanaka, Fukuyo; Yoneyama, Tadakatsu; Fujihara, Shinsuke

    2008-01-01

    We examined the nitrogenase reductase (nifH) genes of endophytic diazotrophic bacteria expressed in field-grown sweet potatoes (Ipomoea batatas L.) by reverse transcription (RT)-PCR. Gene fragments corresponding to nifH were amplified from mRNA obtained from the stems and storage roots of field-grown sweet potatoes several months after planting. Sequence analysis revealed that these clones were homologous to the nifH sequences of Bradyrhizobium, Pelomonas, and Bacillus sp. in the DNA database. Investigation of the nifH genes amplified from the genomic DNA extracted from these sweet potatoes also showed high similarity to various α-proteobacteria including Bradyrhizobium, β-proteobacteria, and cyanobacteria. These results suggest that bradyrhizobia colonize and express nifH genes not only in the root nodules of leguminous plants but also in sweet potatoes as diazotrophic endophytes.

  18. In vivo anti-fatigue activity of total flavonoids from sweetpotato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.] leaf in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunguang; Zhang, Lianying

    2013-08-01

    The in vivo anti-fatigue activity of the total flavonoids from sweet potato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.] leaf was investigated in male Kunming mice. The total flavonoids from sweet potato leaf (TFSL) were orally administered at doses of 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg for 4 weeks and the anti-fatigue effect was studied using a weight-loaded swimming test, along with the determination of serum urea nitrogen (SUN), blood lactic acid (BLA) and hepatic and muscle glycogen contents. The results showed that TFSL had significant anti-fatigue effects. TFSL extended the exhaustive swimming time, effectively inhibited the increase of BLA, decreased the level of SUN and increased the hepatic and muscle glycogen content of mice. Thus, TFSL may have potential as an anti-fatigue agent.

  19. Distributions, ex situ conservation priorities, and genetic resource potential of crop wild relatives of sweetpotato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam., I. series Batatas

    PubMed Central

    Khoury, Colin K.; Heider, Bettina; Castañeda-Álvarez, Nora P.; Achicanoy, Harold A.; Sosa, Chrystian C.; Miller, Richard E.; Scotland, Robert W.; Wood, John R. I.; Rossel, Genoveva; Eserman, Lauren A.; Jarret, Robert L.; Yencho, G. C.; Bernau, Vivian; Juarez, Henry; Sotelo, Steven; de Haan, Stef; Struik, Paul C.

    2015-01-01

    Crop wild relatives of sweetpotato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam., I. series Batatas] have the potential to contribute to breeding objectives for this important root crop. Uncertainty in regard to species boundaries and their phylogenetic relationships, the limited availability of germplasm with which to perform crosses, and the difficulty of introgression of genes from wild species has constrained their utilization. Here, we compile geographic occurrence data on relevant sweetpotato wild relatives and produce potential distribution models for the species. We then assess the comprehensiveness of ex situ germplasm collections, contextualize these results with research and breeding priorities, and use ecogeographic information to identify species with the potential to contribute desirable agronomic traits. The fourteen species that are considered the closest wild relatives of sweetpotato generally occur from the central United States to Argentina, with richness concentrated in Mesoamerica and in the extreme Southeastern United States. Currently designated species differ among themselves and in comparison to the crop in their adaptations to temperature, precipitation, and edaphic characteristics and most species also show considerable intraspecific variation. With 79% of species identified as high priority for further collecting, we find that these crop genetic resources are highly under-represented in ex situ conservation systems and thus their availability to breeders and researchers is inadequate. We prioritize taxa and specific geographic locations for further collecting in order to improve the completeness of germplasm collections. In concert with enhanced conservation of sweetpotato wild relatives, further taxonomic research, characterization and evaluation of germplasm, and improving the techniques to overcome barriers to introgression with wild species are needed in order to mobilize these genetic resources for crop breeding. PMID:25954286

  20. Distributions, ex situ conservation priorities, and genetic resource potential of crop wild relatives of sweetpotato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam., I. series Batatas].

    PubMed

    Khoury, Colin K; Heider, Bettina; Castañeda-Álvarez, Nora P; Achicanoy, Harold A; Sosa, Chrystian C; Miller, Richard E; Scotland, Robert W; Wood, John R I; Rossel, Genoveva; Eserman, Lauren A; Jarret, Robert L; Yencho, G C; Bernau, Vivian; Juarez, Henry; Sotelo, Steven; de Haan, Stef; Struik, Paul C

    2015-01-01

    Crop wild relatives of sweetpotato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam., I. series Batatas] have the potential to contribute to breeding objectives for this important root crop. Uncertainty in regard to species boundaries and their phylogenetic relationships, the limited availability of germplasm with which to perform crosses, and the difficulty of introgression of genes from wild species has constrained their utilization. Here, we compile geographic occurrence data on relevant sweetpotato wild relatives and produce potential distribution models for the species. We then assess the comprehensiveness of ex situ germplasm collections, contextualize these results with research and breeding priorities, and use ecogeographic information to identify species with the potential to contribute desirable agronomic traits. The fourteen species that are considered the closest wild relatives of sweetpotato generally occur from the central United States to Argentina, with richness concentrated in Mesoamerica and in the extreme Southeastern United States. Currently designated species differ among themselves and in comparison to the crop in their adaptations to temperature, precipitation, and edaphic characteristics and most species also show considerable intraspecific variation. With 79% of species identified as high priority for further collecting, we find that these crop genetic resources are highly under-represented in ex situ conservation systems and thus their availability to breeders and researchers is inadequate. We prioritize taxa and specific geographic locations for further collecting in order to improve the completeness of germplasm collections. In concert with enhanced conservation of sweetpotato wild relatives, further taxonomic research, characterization and evaluation of germplasm, and improving the techniques to overcome barriers to introgression with wild species are needed in order to mobilize these genetic resources for crop breeding.

  1. Phylogenetic relationships of the sweetpotato in Ipomoea series Batatas (Convolvulaceae) based on nuclear beta-amylase gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Rajapakse, Sriyani; Nilmalgoda, Sasanda D; Molnar, Matthew; Ballard, Robert E; Austin, Daniel F; Bohac, Janice R

    2004-03-01

    Phylogenetic relationships of 13 accessions and a cultivar representing the sweetpotato, Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam., and its wild progenitors, were investigated using the nucleotide sequence variation of a nuclear-encoded beta-amylase gene. A 1.1-1.3 kb fragment of the gene spanning two exons separated by a long intron was PCR-amplified, cloned, and sequenced. Exon sequences proved highly conservative, while intron sequences yielded large differences. Intron analyses grouped species in a phylogenetic context according to the presence of two genome types: A and B. These groups are consistent with results of previous analyses, save for the novel placement of I. tiliacea, among the A-genome species. Sequences specific to both A and B genome species have been identified. Exon sequences indicate that I. ramosissima and I. umbraticola are quite different from other A-genome species. Placement of I. littoralis is questionable; its intron is similar to other B-genome species, but its exons are quite different. Exon evolution indicates that the B-genome has evolved faster than the A-genome. Interspecific intron and exon variation indicates I. trifida, I. tabascana, and I. batatas form a monophyletic group.

  2. On the origin of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.) genetic diversity in New Guinea, a secondary centre of diversity

    PubMed Central

    Roullier, C; Kambouo, R; Paofa, J; McKey, D; Lebot, V

    2013-01-01

    New Guinea is considered the most important secondary centre of diversity for sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas). We analysed nuclear and chloroplast genetic diversity of 417 New Guinea sweet potato landraces, representing agro-morphological diversity collected throughout the island, and compared this diversity with that in tropical America. The molecular data reveal moderate diversity across all accessions analysed, lower than that found in tropical America. Nuclear data confirm previous results, suggesting that New Guinea landraces are principally derived from the Northern neotropical genepool (Camote and Batata lines, from the Caribbean and Central America). However, chloroplast data suggest that South American clones (early Kumara line clones or, more probably, later reintroductions) were also introduced into New Guinea and then recombined with existing genotypes. The frequency distribution of pairwise distances between New Guinea landraces suggests that sexual reproduction, rather than somaclonal variation, has played a predominant role in the diversification of sweet potato. The frequent incorporation of plants issued from true seed by farmers, and the geographical and cultural barriers constraining crop diffusion in this topographically and linguistically heterogeneous island, has led to the accumulation of an impressive number of variants. As the diversification of sweet potato in New Guinea is primarily the result of farmers' management of the reproductive biology of their crop, we argue that on-farm conservation programmes that implement distribution of core samples (clones representing the useful diversity of the species) and promote on-farm selection of locally adapted variants may allow local communities to fashion relatively autonomous strategies for coping with ongoing global change. PMID:23531982

  3. On the origin of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.) genetic diversity in New Guinea, a secondary centre of diversity.

    PubMed

    Roullier, C; Kambouo, R; Paofa, J; McKey, D; Lebot, V

    2013-06-01

    New Guinea is considered the most important secondary centre of diversity for sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas). We analysed nuclear and chloroplast genetic diversity of 417 New Guinea sweet potato landraces, representing agro-morphological diversity collected throughout the island, and compared this diversity with that in tropical America. The molecular data reveal moderate diversity across all accessions analysed, lower than that found in tropical America. Nuclear data confirm previous results, suggesting that New Guinea landraces are principally derived from the Northern neotropical genepool (Camote and Batata lines, from the Caribbean and Central America). However, chloroplast data suggest that South American clones (early Kumara line clones or, more probably, later reintroductions) were also introduced into New Guinea and then recombined with existing genotypes. The frequency distribution of pairwise distances between New Guinea landraces suggests that sexual reproduction, rather than somaclonal variation, has played a predominant role in the diversification of sweet potato. The frequent incorporation of plants issued from true seed by farmers, and the geographical and cultural barriers constraining crop diffusion in this topographically and linguistically heterogeneous island, has led to the accumulation of an impressive number of variants. As the diversification of sweet potato in New Guinea is primarily the result of farmers' management of the reproductive biology of their crop, we argue that on-farm conservation programmes that implement distribution of core samples (clones representing the useful diversity of the species) and promote on-farm selection of locally adapted variants may allow local communities to fashion relatively autonomous strategies for coping with ongoing global change.

  4. Improvement of cryopreservation technique for long-term storage of shoot tips of Ipomoea batatas

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Roots of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatis) are an important food crop in sub-tropical and tropical regions. Being a vegetatively propagated crop, its genetic resources are predominantly preserved as field plantings and/or as tissue cultures. Cryopreservation is the most economic and reliable preservati...

  5. Anti-Inflammatory and Anticancer Activities of Taiwanese Purple-Fleshed Sweet Potatoes (Ipomoea batatas L. Lam) Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Sugata, Marcelia; Lin, Chien-Yih; Shih, Yang-Chia

    2015-01-01

    Purple-fleshed sweet potato (PFSP) (Ipomoea batatas L. Lam) has been known to possess high amount of anthocyanins which contribute to its antioxidant activity. However, a few reports are available concerning its anti-inflammatory and anticancer properties. In this study, PFSP “Tainung 73,” which is locally grown in Taiwan, was steamed and extracted using acidified ethanol pH 3.5 under 80°C. Two kinds of crude anthocyanins extracts were obtained, namely, SP (Steamed, Peeled) and SNP (Steamed, No Peeled). Then, anti-inflammatory and anticancer activities of these extracts were investigated. Cell viability assay (MTT) showed that SP and SNP extracts were not toxic to RAW 264.7 cells. They even exhibited anti-inflammatory activities by suppressing the production of NO and proinflammatory cytokines, such as NF-κβ, TNF-α, and IL-6, in LPS-induced macrophage cells. Anticancer activities of these extracts were displayed through their ability to inhibit the growth of cancer cell lines, such as MCF-7 (breast cancer), SNU-1 (gastric cancer), and WiDr (colon adenocarcinoma), in concentration- and time-dependent manner. Further studies also revealed that SP extracts could induce apoptosis in MCF-7 and SNU-1 cancer cells through extrinsic and intrinsic pathway. In the future, PSFP extracts may have potential to be applied in nutraceutical, pharmaceutical, and food industries. PMID:26509161

  6. The influence of deep frying using various vegetable oils on acrylamide formation in sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L. Lam) chips.

    PubMed

    Lim, P K; Jinap, S; Sanny, M; Tan, C P; Khatib, A

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the precursors of acrylamide formation in sweet potato (SP) (Ipomoea batatas L. Lam) chips and to determine the effect of different types of vegetable oils (VOs), that is, palm olein, coconut oil, canola oil, and soya bean oil, on acrylamide formation. The reducing sugars and amino acids in the SP slices were analyzed, and the acrylamide concentrations of SP chips were measured. SP chips that were fried in a lower degree of unsaturation oils contained a lower acrylamide concentration (1443 μg/kg), whereas those fried with higher degree of unsaturated oils contained a higher acrylamide concentration (2019 μg/kg). SP roots were found to contain acrylamide precursors, that is, 4.17 mg/g glucose and 5.05 mg/g fructose, and 1.63 mg/g free asparagine. The type of VO and condition used for frying, significantly influenced acrylamide formation. This study clearly indicates that the contribution of lipids in the formation of acrylamide should not be neglected.

  7. Characterization and immunostimulatory activity of an (1-->6)-a-D-glucan from the root of Ipomoea batatas.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guohua; Kan, Jianquan; Li, Zhixiao; Chen, Zongdao

    2005-08-01

    The polysaccharide PSPP (purified sweet potato polysaccharide), isolated and purified from the roots of Ipomoea batatas, was found to be a glucan with a molecular weight of 53.2 kDa and specific rotation of +115.0 degrees (ca. 0.80, H(2)O). On the basis of methylation analysis, periodate oxidation, Smith degradation, infra-red spectroscopy, and (13)C NMR, the polysaccharide was confirmed as a (1-->6)-alpha-D-glucan. We evaluated the effects of polysaccharide PSPP on the in vivo immune function of mouse. Mice were treated with the polysaccharide PSPP (50, 150, and 250 mg/kg body weight) for 7 days. Phagocytic function, proliferation of lymphocytes, natural killer cell activity, hemolytic activity, and serum IgG concentration of the mice were studied. At the dose of 50 mg/kg, significant increments in proliferation of lymphocytes (P<0.05) and serum IgG concentration (P<0.05) were observed. At the dose of 150 and 250 mg/kg, significant increments (P<0.01 or P<0.05) were observed in all tested immunological indexes. A dose-dependent manner was demonstrated in phagocytic function, hemolytic activity, and serum IgG concentration, but not in proliferation of lymphocytes and natural killer cell activity. This suggests that PSPP improve the immune system and could be regarded as a biological response modifier.

  8. Effect of high pressure on the saccharification of starch in the tuberous root of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas).

    PubMed

    Shigematsu, Toru; Furukawa, Naho; Takaoka, Ryo; Hayashi, Mayumi; Sasao, Shoji; Ueno, Shigeaki; Nakajima, Kanako; Kido, Miyuki; Nomura, Kazuki; Iguchi, Akinori

    2017-05-01

    We analyzed the effect of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) treatment on reducing sugar production in the tuberous root of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas), based on pressure-gelatinization of starch and subsequent saccharification by internal amylases. HHP treatment at up to 600MPa at ambient temperature for 10min did not apparently affect the reducing sugar concentration in tuberous root. However, HHP treatment at 100 to 500MPa and 60°C or 70°C for 10min increased reducing sugar concentration as both the pressure and temperature increased. The reducing sugar concentration after HHP treatment at 500MPa and 70°C for 10min was roughly comparable to that of the thermal treatment control (80°C for 10min under atmospheric pressure). HHP treatment enabled the gelatinization and enzymatic saccharification of starch in the tuberous root of sweet potato, at a lower temperature than required by thermal treatment at atmospheric pressure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Anti-Inflammatory and Anticancer Activities of Taiwanese Purple-Fleshed Sweet Potatoes (Ipomoea batatas L. Lam) Extracts.

    PubMed

    Sugata, Marcelia; Lin, Chien-Yih; Shih, Yang-Chia

    2015-01-01

    Purple-fleshed sweet potato (PFSP) (Ipomoea batatas L. Lam) has been known to possess high amount of anthocyanins which contribute to its antioxidant activity. However, a few reports are available concerning its anti-inflammatory and anticancer properties. In this study, PFSP "Tainung 73," which is locally grown in Taiwan, was steamed and extracted using acidified ethanol pH 3.5 under 80°C. Two kinds of crude anthocyanins extracts were obtained, namely, SP (Steamed, Peeled) and SNP (Steamed, No Peeled). Then, anti-inflammatory and anticancer activities of these extracts were investigated. Cell viability assay (MTT) showed that SP and SNP extracts were not toxic to RAW 264.7 cells. They even exhibited anti-inflammatory activities by suppressing the production of NO and proinflammatory cytokines, such as NF-κβ, TNF-α, and IL-6, in LPS-induced macrophage cells. Anticancer activities of these extracts were displayed through their ability to inhibit the growth of cancer cell lines, such as MCF-7 (breast cancer), SNU-1 (gastric cancer), and WiDr (colon adenocarcinoma), in concentration- and time-dependent manner. Further studies also revealed that SP extracts could induce apoptosis in MCF-7 and SNU-1 cancer cells through extrinsic and intrinsic pathway. In the future, PSFP extracts may have potential to be applied in nutraceutical, pharmaceutical, and food industries.

  10. Preparative isolation of anthocyanins from Japanese purple sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L.) varieties by high-speed countercurrent chromatography.

    PubMed

    Montilla, Elyana Cuevas; Hillebrand, Silke; Butschbach, Daniela; Baldermann, Susanne; Watanabe, Naoharu; Winterhalter, Peter

    2010-09-22

    Purple-fleshed sweet potatoes (Ipomoea batatas L.) contain a very complex anthocyanin profile due to the presence of several non-, mono-, and diacylated glucosides of cyanidin and peonidin. In this study, the anthocyanin composition of four Japanese purple sweet potato cultivars (Chiran Murasaki, Tanegashima Murasaki, Naka Murasaki, and Purple Sweet) were investigated by HPLC-DAD and ESI-MSn analyses. The HPLC chromatograms of the different cultivars show a remarkable variation of the two major pigments, cyanidin-3-(6''-caffeoylsophoroside)-5-glucoside and peonidin-3-(6''-caffeoylsophoroside)-5-glucoside, respectively. According to this, they can be categorized into two groups on the basis of the peonidin/cyanidin ratio: the cultivars Chiran Murasaki and Purple Sweet showed a high content of peonidin derivatives (peonidin type), whereas the varieties Tanegashima Murasaki and Naka Murasaki were classified as cyanidin types. By means of high-speed countercurrent chromatography (HSCCC) the nonacylated 3-sophoroside-5-glucoside of cyanidin was isolated on a preparative scale. Furthermore, it was possible to isolate the monoacylated cyanidin-3-(6''-caffeoylsophoroside)-5-glucoside as well as three diacylated major pigments, cyanidin-3-(6'',6'''-dicaffeoylsophoroside)-5-glucoside, cyanidin-3-(6''-caffeoyl-6'''-p-hydroxy-benzoylsophoroside)-5-glucoside, and peonidin-3-(6''-caffeoyl-6'''-p-hydroxybenzoyl-sophoroside)-5-glucoside. The purity and identity of the so-obtained pigments were confirmed by NMR measurements.

  11. Relationship between Processing Method and the Glycemic Indices of Ten Sweet Potato (Ipomoea batatas) Cultivars Commonly Consumed in Jamaica.

    PubMed

    Bahado-Singh, Perceval S; Riley, Cliff K; Wheatley, Andrew O; Lowe, Henry I C

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of different traditional cooking methods on glycemic index (GI) and glycemic response of ten Sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) cultivars commonly eaten in Jamaica. Matured tubers were cooked by roasting, baking, frying, or boiling then immediately consumed by the ten nondiabetic test subjects (5 males and 5 females; mean age of 27 ± 2 years). The GI varied between 41 ± 5-93 ± 5 for the tubers studied. Samples prepared by boiling had the lowest GI (41 ± 5-50 ± 3), while those processed by baking (82 ± 3-94 ± 3) and roasting (79 ± 4-93 ± 2) had the highest GI values. The study indicates that the glycemic index of Jamaican sweet potatoes varies significantly with the method of preparation and to a lesser extent on intravarietal differences. Consumption of boiled sweet potatoes could minimize postprandial blood glucose spikes and therefore, may prove to be more efficacious in the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  12. A high-density SNP genetic map consisting of a complete set of homologous groups in autohexaploid sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas)

    PubMed Central

    Shirasawa, Kenta; Tanaka, Masaru; Takahata, Yasuhiro; Ma, Daifu; Cao, Qinghe; Liu, Qingchang; Zhai, Hong; Kwak, Sang-Soo; Cheol Jeong, Jae; Yoon, Ung-Han; Lee, Hyeong-Un; Hirakawa, Hideki; Isobe, Sachiko

    2017-01-01

    Sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas) is an autohexaploid species with 90 chromosomes (2n = 6x = 90) and a basic chromosome number of 15, and is therefore regarded as one of the most challenging species for high-density genetic map construction. Here, we used single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified by double-digest restriction site-associated DNA sequencing based on next-generation sequencing technology to construct a map for sweetpotato. We then aligned the sequence reads onto the reference genome sequence of I. trifida, a likely diploid ancestor of sweetpotato, to detect SNPs. In addition, to simplify analysis of the complex genetic mode of autohexaploidy, we used an S1 mapping population derived from self-pollination of a single parent. As a result, 28,087 double-simplex SNPs showing a Mendelian segregation ratio in the S1 progeny could be mapped onto 96 linkage groups (LGs), covering a total distance of 33,020.4 cM. Based on the positions of the SNPs on the I. trifida genome, the LGs were classified into 15 groups, each with roughly six LGs and six small extra groups. The molecular genetic techniques used in this study are applicable to high-density mapping of other polyploid plant species, including important crops. PMID:28281636

  13. The physicochemical properties of microwave-assisted encapsulated anthocyanins from Ipomoea batatas as affected by different wall materials

    PubMed Central

    Mohd Nawi, Norazlina; Muhamad, Ida Idayu; Mohd Marsin, Aishah

    2015-01-01

    This study focuses on the impact of different wall materials on the physicochemical properties of microwave-assisted encapsulated anthocyanins from Ipomoea batatas. Using the powder characterization technique, purple sweet potato anthocyanin (PSPAs) powders were analysed for moisture content, water activity, dissolution time, hygroscopicity, color and morphology. PSPAs were produced using different wall materials: maltodextrin (MD), gum arabic (GA) and a combination of gum arabic and maltodextrin (GA + MD) at a 1:1 ratio. Each of the wall materials was homogenized to the core material at a core/wall material ratio of 5 and were microencapsulated by microwave-assisted drying at 1100 W. Results indicated that encapsulated powder with the GA and MD combination presented better quality of powder with the lowest value of moisture content and water activity. With respect to morphology, the microcapsule encapsulated with GA + MD showed several dents in coating surrounding its core material, whereas other encapsulated powders showed small or slight dents entrapped onto the bioactive compound. Colorimetric analysis showed changes in values of L, a*, b*, hue and chroma in the reconstituted powder compared to the initial powder. PMID:25838887

  14. Improved Tolerance to Various Abiotic Stresses in Transgenic Sweet Potato (Ipomoea batatas) Expressing Spinach Betaine Aldehyde Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Weijuan; Zhang, Min; Zhang, Hongxia; Zhang, Peng

    2012-01-01

    Abiotic stresses are critical delimiters for the increased productivity and cultivation expansion of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas), a root crop with worldwide importance. The increased production of glycine betaine (GB) improves plant tolerance to various abiotic stresses without strong phenotypic changes, providing a feasible approach to improve stable yield production under unfavorable conditions. The gene encoding betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH) is involved in the biosynthesis of GB in plants, and the accumulation of GB by the heterologous overexpression of BADH improves abiotic stress tolerance in plants. This study is to improve sweet potato, a GB accumulator, resistant to multiple abiotic stresses by promoted GB biosynthesis. A chloroplastic BADH gene from Spinacia oleracea (SoBADH) was introduced into the sweet potato cultivar Sushu-2 via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The overexpression of SoBADH in the transgenic sweet potato improved tolerance to various abiotic stresses, including salt, oxidative stress, and low temperature. The increased BADH activity and GB accumulation in the transgenic plant lines under normal and multiple environmental stresses resulted in increased protection against cell damage through the maintenance of cell membrane integrity, stronger photosynthetic activity, reduced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and induction or activation of ROS scavenging by the increased activity of free radical-scavenging enzymes. The increased proline accumulation and systemic upregulation of many ROS-scavenging genes in stress-treated transgenic plants also indicated that GB accumulation might stimulate the ROS-scavenging system and proline biosynthesis via an integrative mechanism. This study demonstrates that the enhancement of GB biosynthesis in sweet potato is an effective and feasible approach to improve its tolerance to multiple abiotic stresses without causing phenotypic defects. This strategy for trait improvement in

  15. Utilization of ensiled sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.) leaves as a protein supplement in diets for growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Van An, L; Hong, T T T; Ogle, B; Lindberg, J E

    2005-01-01

    Four diets were formulated with protein from fishmeal (FM), groundnut cake (GC), ensiled sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L. (Lam.)) leaves (SP) or ensiled sweet potato leaves with lysine (SPL). In experiment 1, 24 crossbred (Large White x Mong Cai) growing pigs were allocated randomly by sex into four groups of six pigs and given one of four diets. Experiment 2 was conducted using 16 crossbred pigs (Large White x Mong Cai) at four farms. On each farm, pigs were allocated to two experimental groups. One group was fed the FM diet and the other group the SPL diet. In experiment 1, the daily live weight gains (DLWG) were significantly higher (p < 0.05) for the FM and SPL treatments (542 and 536 g/day, respectively) than for the GC and SP treatments (464 and 482 g/day, respectively). Feed intake was highest (2.0 kg/day) for the SPL and lowest (1.7 kg/day) for the GC treatment (p < 0.05) and feed conversion ratio (FCR) was highest (3.8 kg/kg gain) for SP and lowest (3.5 kg/kg gain) for FM (p < 0.05). There were no significant differences for carcase measurements among diets (p > 0.05). The feed cost per kg live weight gain was lowest for the SP and SPL diets compared to the FM and GC diets. The results of experiment 2 show that there were no significant differences in feed intake, DLWG and FCR between the two diets (p > 0.05). In conclusion, sweet potato leaves can replace fishmeal and groundnut cake in traditional Vietnamese diets for growing pigs.

  16. Influence of diesel contamination in soil on growth and dry matter partitioning of Lactuca sativa and Ipomoea batatas.

    PubMed

    Fatokun, Kayode; Zharare, Godfrey Elijah

    2015-09-01

    Phytotoxic effect of diesel contaminated soil was investigated on growth and dry matter partitioning in Lactuca sativa and Ipomoea batatas in greenhouse pot experiment at two concentration range (0-30 ml and 0-6 ml diesel kg(-1) soil) for 14 weeks. The results indicated thatwhole plant biomass, stem length, root length, number of leaves and leaf chlorophyll in two plants were negatively correlated with increasing diesel concentrations. The critical concentration of diesel associated with 10% decrease in plant growth was 0.33 ml for lettuce and 1.50 ml for sweet potato. Thus, growth of lettuce in diesel contaminated soil was more sensitive than sweet potato. The pattern of dry matter partitioning between root and shoot in both plants were similar. In 0-6 ml diesel contamination range, allocation of dry matter to shoot system was favoured resulting in high shoot: root ratio of 4.54 and 12.91 for lettuce and sweet potato respectively. However, in 0-30 ml diesel contamination range, allocation of dry matter to root was favoured, which may have been an adaptive mechanism in which the root system was used for storage in addition to increasing the capacity for foraging for mineral nutrients and water. Although lettuce accumulated more metals in its tissue than sweet potato, the tissue mineral nutrients in both species did not vary to great extent. The critical diesel concentration for toxicity suggested that the cause of mortality and poor growth of sweet potato and lettuce grown in diesel contaminated soil was due to presence of hydrocarbons in diesel.

  17. Digital gene expression analysis based on integrated de novo transcriptome assembly of sweet potato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam].

    PubMed

    Tao, Xiang; Gu, Ying-Hong; Wang, Hai-Yan; Zheng, Wen; Li, Xiao; Zhao, Chuan-Wu; Zhang, Yi-Zheng

    2012-01-01

    Sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L. [Lam.]) ranks among the top six most important food crops in the world. It is widely grown throughout the world with high and stable yield, strong adaptability, rich nutrient content, and multiple uses. However, little is known about the molecular biology of this important non-model organism due to lack of genomic resources. Hence, studies based on high-throughput sequencing technologies are needed to get a comprehensive and integrated genomic resource and better understanding of gene expression patterns in different tissues and at various developmental stages. Illumina paired-end (PE) RNA-Sequencing was performed, and generated 48.7 million of 75 bp PE reads. These reads were de novo assembled into 128,052 transcripts (≥ 100 bp), which correspond to 41.1 million base pairs, by using a combined assembly strategy. Transcripts were annotated by Blast2GO and 51,763 transcripts got BLASTX hits, in which 39,677 transcripts have GO terms and 14,117 have ECs that are associated with 147 KEGG pathways. Furthermore, transcriptome differences of seven tissues were analyzed by using Illumina digital gene expression (DGE) tag profiling and numerous differentially and specifically expressed transcripts were identified. Moreover, the expression characteristics of genes involved in viral genomes, starch metabolism and potential stress tolerance and insect resistance were also identified. The combined de novo transcriptome assembly strategy can be applied to other organisms whose reference genomes are not available. The data provided here represent the most comprehensive and integrated genomic resources for cloning and identifying genes of interest in sweet potato. Characterization of sweet potato transcriptome provides an effective tool for better understanding the molecular mechanisms of cellular processes including development of leaves and storage roots, tissue-specific gene expression, potential biotic and abiotic stress response in sweet

  18. H(+) -pyrophosphatase IbVP1 promotes efficient iron use in sweet potato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.].

    PubMed

    Fan, Weijuan; Wang, Hongxia; Wu, Yinliang; Yang, Nan; Yang, Jun; Zhang, Peng

    2017-06-01

    Iron (Fe) deficiency is one of the most common micronutrient deficiencies limiting crop production globally, especially in arid regions because of decreased availability of iron in alkaline soils. Sweet potato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.] grows well in arid regions and is tolerant to Fe deficiency. Here, we report that the transcription of type I H(+) -pyrophosphatase (H(+) -PPase) gene IbVP1 in sweet potato plants was strongly induced by Fe deficiency and auxin in hydroponics, improving Fe acquisition via increased rhizosphere acidification and auxin regulation. When overexpressed, transgenic plants show higher pyrophosphate hydrolysis and plasma membrane H(+) -ATPase activity compared with the wild type, leading to increased rhizosphere acidification. The IbVP1-overexpressing plants showed better growth, including enlarged root systems, under Fe-sufficient or Fe-deficient conditions. Increased ferric precipitation and ferric chelate reductase activity in the roots of transgenic lines indicate improved iron uptake, which is also confirmed by increased Fe content and up-regulation of Fe uptake genes, e.g. FRO2, IRT1 and FIT. Carbohydrate metabolism is significantly affected in the transgenic lines, showing increased sugar and starch content associated with the increased expression of AGPase and SUT1 genes and the decrease in β-amylase gene expression. Improved antioxidant capacities were also detected in the transgenic plants, which showed reduced H2 O2 accumulation associated with up-regulated ROS-scavenging activity. Therefore, H(+) -PPase plays a key role in the response to Fe deficiency by sweet potato and effectively improves the Fe acquisition by overexpressing IbVP1 in crops cultivated in micronutrient-deficient soils. © 2016 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Efficient embryogenic suspension culturing and rapid transformation of a range of elite genotypes of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas [L.] Lam.).

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Bi, Hui-Ping; Fan, Wei-Juan; Zhang, Min; Wang, Hong-Xia; Zhang, Peng

    2011-12-01

    Efficient Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation was developed using embryogenic suspension cell cultures of elite sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas [L.] Lam.) cultivars, including Ayamurasaki, Sushu2, Sushu9, Sushu11, Wanshu1, Xushu18 and Xushu22. Embryogenic suspension cultures were established in LCP medium using embryogenic calli induced from apical or axillary buds on an induction medium containing 2 mg l(-1) 2,4-D. Suspension cultures were co-cultivated with A. tumefaciens strain LBA4404 harboring the binary plasmid pCAMBIA1301 with the hpt gene as a selectable marker and an intron-interrupted uidA gene as a visible marker. Several key steps of the sweet potato transformation system have been investigated and optimized, including the appropriate antibiotics and their concentrations for suppressing Agrobacterium growth and the optimal doses of hygromycin for transformant selection. A total of 485 putative transgenic plant lines were produced from the transformed calli via somatic embryogenesis and germination to plants under 10 mg l(-1) hygromycin and 200 mg l(-1) cefotaxime. PCR, GUS and Southern blot analyses of the regenerated plants showed that 92.35% of them were transgenic. The number of T-DNA insertions varied from one to three in most transgenic plant lines. Plants showed 100% survival when 308 transgenics were transferred to soil in the greenhouse and then to the field. Most of them were morphologically normal, with the production of storage roots after 3 months of cultivation in the greenhouse or fields. The development of such a robust transformation method suitable to a range of sweet potato genotypes not only provides a routine tool for genetic improvement via transgenesis but also allows us to conduct a functional verification of endogenous genes in sweet potato.

  20. An Ipomoea batatas Iron-Sulfur Cluster Scaffold Protein Gene, IbNFU1, Is Involved in Salt Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xuejin; He, Shaozhen; Zhai, Hong; Liu, Qingchang

    2014-01-01

    Iron-sulfur cluster biosynthesis involving the nitrogen fixation (Nif) proteins has been proposed as a general mechanism acting in various organisms. NifU-like protein may play an important role in protecting plants against abiotic and biotic stresses. An iron-sulfur cluster scaffold protein gene, IbNFU1, was isolated from a salt-tolerant sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.) line LM79 in our previous study, but its role in sweetpotato stress tolerance was not investigated. In the present study, the IbNFU1 gene was introduced into a salt-sensitive sweetpotato cv. Lizixiang to characterize its function in salt tolerance. The IbNFU1-overexpressing sweetpotato plants exhibited significantly higher salt tolerance compared with the wild-type. Proline and reduced ascorbate content were significantly increased, whereas malonaldehyde (MDA) content was significantly decreased in the transgenic plants. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and photosynthesis were significantly enhanced in the transgenic plants. H2O2 was also found to be significantly less accumulated in the transgenic plants than in the wild-type. Overexpression of IbNFU1 up-regulated pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthase (P5CS) and pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase (P5CR) genes under salt stress. The systemic up-regulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging genes was found in the transgenic plants under salt stress. These findings suggest that IbNFU1gene is involved in sweetpotato salt tolerance and enhances salt tolerance of the transgenic sweetpotato plants by regulating osmotic balance, protecting membrane integrity and photosynthesis and activating ROS scavenging system. PMID:24695556

  1. An Ipomoea batatas iron-sulfur cluster scaffold protein gene, IbNFU1, is involved in salt tolerance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Degao; Wang, Lianjun; Liu, Chenglong; Song, Xuejin; He, Shaozhen; Zhai, Hong; Liu, Qingchang

    2014-01-01

    Iron-sulfur cluster biosynthesis involving the nitrogen fixation (Nif) proteins has been proposed as a general mechanism acting in various organisms. NifU-like protein may play an important role in protecting plants against abiotic and biotic stresses. An iron-sulfur cluster scaffold protein gene, IbNFU1, was isolated from a salt-tolerant sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.) line LM79 in our previous study, but its role in sweetpotato stress tolerance was not investigated. In the present study, the IbNFU1 gene was introduced into a salt-sensitive sweetpotato cv. Lizixiang to characterize its function in salt tolerance. The IbNFU1-overexpressing sweetpotato plants exhibited significantly higher salt tolerance compared with the wild-type. Proline and reduced ascorbate content were significantly increased, whereas malonaldehyde (MDA) content was significantly decreased in the transgenic plants. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and photosynthesis were significantly enhanced in the transgenic plants. H2O2 was also found to be significantly less accumulated in the transgenic plants than in the wild-type. Overexpression of IbNFU1 up-regulated pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthase (P5CS) and pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase (P5CR) genes under salt stress. The systemic up-regulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging genes was found in the transgenic plants under salt stress. These findings suggest that IbNFU1gene is involved in sweetpotato salt tolerance and enhances salt tolerance of the transgenic sweetpotato plants by regulating osmotic balance, protecting membrane integrity and photosynthesis and activating ROS scavenging system.

  2. A comparative study of proteomic differences between pencil and storage roots of sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.).

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeung Joo; Kim, Yun-Hee; Kwak, Youn-Sig; An, Jae Young; Kim, Pil Joo; Lee, Byung Hyun; Kumar, Vikranth; Park, Kee Woong; Chang, Eun Sil; Jeong, Jae Cheol; Lee, Haeng-Soon; Kwak, Sang-Soo

    2015-02-01

    Fibrous roots of sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.) usually develop into both pencil and storage roots. To understand protein function in root development, a proteomic analysis was conducted on the pencil and storage roots of the light orange-fleshed sweetpotato cultivar, Yulmi. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis showed that expression of 30 protein spots differed between pencil and storage roots: 15 proteins were up-regulated or expressed in pencil roots and 15 in storage roots. Differentially expressed proteins spots were investigated using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry, and 10 proteins from pencil roots were identified as binding protein isoform A, catechol oxidase, peroxidases, ascorbate peroxidase, endochitinase, flavanone 3-hydroxylase and unknown proteins. Of the proteins up-regulated in, or restricted to, storage roots, 13 proteins were identified as protein disulfide isomerase, anionic peroxidase, putative ripening protein, sporamin B, sporamin A and sporamin A precursor. An analysis of enzyme activity revealed that catechol oxidase and peroxidase as the first and last enzymes of the lignin biosynthesis pathway, and ascorbate peroxidase had higher activities in pencil than in storage roots. The total concentration of phenolic compounds was also far higher in pencil than in storage roots, and lignin accumulated only in pencil roots. These results provide important insight into sweetpotato proteomics, and imply that lignin biosynthesis and stress-related proteins are up-regulated or uniquely expressed in pencil roots. The results indicate that the reduction of carbon flow toward phenylpropanoid biosynthesis and its delivery to carbohydrate metabolism is a major event in storage root formation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. A genome-wide BAC-end sequence survey provides first insights into sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.) genome composition.

    PubMed

    Si, Zengzhi; Du, Bing; Huo, Jinxi; He, Shaozhen; Liu, Qingchang; Zhai, Hong

    2016-11-21

    Sweetpotato, Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam., is an important food crop widely grown in the world. However, little is known about the genome of this species because it is a highly heterozygous hexaploid. Gaining a more in-depth knowledge of sweetpotato genome is therefore necessary and imperative. In this study, the first bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library of sweetpotato was constructed. Clones from the BAC library were end-sequenced and analyzed to provide genome-wide information about this species. The BAC library contained 240,384 clones with an average insert size of 101 kb and had a 7.93-10.82 × coverage of the genome, and the probability of isolating any single-copy DNA sequence from the library was more than 99%. Both ends of 8310 BAC clones randomly selected from the library were sequenced to generate 11,542 high-quality BAC-end sequences (BESs), with an accumulative length of 7,595,261 bp and an average length of 658 bp. Analysis of the BESs revealed that 12.17% of the sweetpotato genome were known repetitive DNA, including 7.37% long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons, 1.15% Non-LTR retrotransposons and 1.42% Class II DNA transposons etc., 18.31% of the genome were identified as sweetpotato-unique repetitive DNA and 10.00% of the genome were predicted to be coding regions. In total, 3,846 simple sequences repeats (SSRs) were identified, with a density of one SSR per 1.93 kb, from which 288 SSRs primers were designed and tested for length polymorphism using 20 sweetpotato accessions, 173 (60.07%) of them produced polymorphic bands. Sweetpotato BESs had significant hits to the genome sequences of I. trifida and more matches to the whole-genome sequences of Solanum lycopersicum than those of Vitis vinifera, Theobroma cacao and Arabidopsis thaliana. The first BAC library for sweetpotato has been successfully constructed. The high quality BESs provide first insights into sweetpotato genome composition, and have significant hits to the genome

  4. Ipomoea batatas (Convolvulaceae)-mediated synthesis of silver nanoparticles for controlling mosquito vectors of Aedes albopictus, Anopheles stephensi, and Culex quinquefasciatus (Diptera:Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Pavithra Bharathi, V; Ragavendran, C; Murugan, N; Natarajan, D

    2016-12-08

    We proposed an effective and eco-friendly control of dengue, malaria, and filariasis-causing vectors. We tested Ipomoea batatas leaves-mediated silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) against first to fourth instar larvae and adults of Aedes albopictus, Anopheles stephensi, and Culex quinquefasciatus at different concentrations. The synthesized AgNPs showed broad spectrum of larvicidal and adulticidal effects after 48 h of exposure. The characterization of synthesized AgNPs was done using various spectral and microscopy analyses. The maximum efficacy was observed in synthesized AgNPs against the adult of Ae. albopictus with the LC50 and LC90 values were 10.069 and 15.657 μg/mL, respectively, followed by others.

  5. Plastidial α-glucan phosphorylase 1 complexes with disproportionating enzyme 1 in Ipomoea batatas storage roots for elevating malto-oligosaccharide metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yi-Chen; Chang, Shih-Chung; Juang, Rong-Huay

    2017-01-01

    It has been proposed that malto-oligosaccharides (MOSs) are possibly recycled back into amylopectin biosynthesis via the sequential reactions catalyzed by plastidial α-glucan phosphorylase 1 (Pho1) and disproportionating enzyme 1 (Dpe1). In the present study, the reciprocal co-immunoprecipitation experiments using specific antibodies against Pho1 and Dpe1 demonstrated that these two enzymes can form a complex (the PD complex) in Ipomoea batatas storage roots. The immunohistochemistry analyses also revealed the co-localization of Pho1 and Dpe1 in the amyloplasts, and the protein levels of Pho1 and Dpe1 increased gradually throughout sweet potato storage root development. A high molecular weight PD complex was co-purified from sweet potato storage root lysates by size exclusion chromatography. Enzyme kinetic analyses showed that the PD complex can catalyze maltotriose and maltotetraose to generate glucose-1-phosphate in the presence of inorganic phosphate, and it also performs greater Dpe1 activity toward MOSs than does free form Dpe1. These data suggest that Pho1 and Dpe1 may form a metabolon complex, which provides elevated metabolic fluxes for MOS metabolism via a direct transfer of sugar intermediates, resulting in recycling of glucosyl units back into amylopectin biosynthesis more efficiently. PMID:28472155

  6. Development and Identification of SSR Markers Associated with Starch Properties and β-Carotene Content in the Storage Root of Sweet Potato (Ipomoea batatas L.)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kai; Wu, Zhengdan; Tang, Daobin; Lv, Changwen; Luo, Kai; Zhao, Yong; Liu, Xun; Huang, Yuanxin; Wang, Jichun

    2016-01-01

    Sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L.) is a nutritious food crop and, based on the high starch content of its storage root, a potential bioethanol feedstock. Enhancing the nutritional value and starch quantity of storage roots are important goals of sweet potato breeding programs aimed at developing improved varieties for direct consumption, processing, and industrial uses. However, developing improved lines of sweet potato is challenging due to the genetic complexity of this plant and the lack of genome information. Short sequence repeat (SSR) markers are powerful molecular tools for tracking important loci in crops and for molecular-based breeding strategies; however, few SSR markers and marker-trait associations have hitherto been identified in sweet potato. In this study, we identified 1824 SSRs by using a de novo assembly of publicly available ESTs and mRNAs in sweet potato, and designed 1476 primer pairs based on SSR-containing sequences. We mapped 214 pairs of primers in a natural population comprised of 239 germplasms, and identified 1278 alleles with an average of 5.972 alleles per locus and a major allele frequency of 0.7702. Population structure analysis revealed two subpopulations in this panel of germplasms, and phenotypic characterization demonstrated that this panel is suitable for association mapping of starch-related traits. We identified 32, 16, and 17 SSR markers associated with starch content, β-carotene content, and starch composition in the storage root, respectively, using association analysis and further evaluation of a subset of sweet potato genotypes with various characteristics. The SSR markers identified here can be used to select varieties with desired traits and to investigate the genetic mechanism underlying starch and carotenoid formation in the starchy roots of sweet potato. PMID:26973669

  7. Flow injection spectrophotometric determination of L-Dopa and carbidopa in pharmaceutical formulations using a crude extract of sweet potato root [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.] as enzymatic source.

    PubMed

    Fatibello-Filho, O; da Cruz Vieira, I

    1997-04-01

    A flow injection (FI) spectrophotometric method is proposed for the determination of L-dopa and carbidopa in pharmaceutical formulations. After selection of the extraction medium (e.g., buffer-to-tissue ratio, pH, buffer concentration, protective agents and/or stabilizers) and storage conditions, crude extract of sweet potato root [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.] was used as an enzymatic source of polyphenol oxidase (Tyrosinase; catechol oxidase; EC.1.14.18.1) directly in the carrier. This enzyme catalyses the oxidation of these catecholamines to the corresponding dopaquinone. Further, dopaquinone undergoes a rapid spontaneous auto-oxidation to leucodopachrome, which is in turn oxidized to dopachrome; this last compound has a strong absorption at 480 and 360 nm for L-dopa and carbidopa, respectively. For the optimum extraction conditions found the enzyme activity of the crude extract did not vary for at least 5 months when stored at 4 degrees C and decreased by only 4-5% during an 8 h working period at 25 degrees C. The results obtained for L-dopa and carbidopa by the proposed enzymatic FI method were in close agreement with the label values (r1 = 0.9699 and r2 = 0.9999) and also with those obtained using a pharmacopeial method (r3 = 0.9675). The throughput was 26 samples h-1, and 2.30 ml of crude extract were consumed in each determination, corresponding to only 72 mg of the original sweet potato root. The detection limit (three times the signal blank/slope) was 1.5 x 10(-5) and 2.0 x 10(-5) mol l-1 for L-dopa and carbidopa, respectively; the recovery of L-dopa and carbidopa from three samples ranged from 98.6 to 106.3% of the added amount.

  8. Probing anthocyanin profiles in purple sweet potato cell line (Ipomoea batatas L. Cv. Ayamurasaki) by high-performance liquid chromatography and electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tian, Qingguo; Konczak, Izabela; Schwartz, Steven J

    2005-08-10

    A purple line cell line (PL) generated from the storage root of purple-fleshed sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L.) cv. Ayamurasaki produces a complex mixture of anthocyanins, and seven major anthocyanins have been isolated and identified to date. All these anthocyanins are exclusively cyanidin or peonidin 3-sophoroside-5-glucosides and their acylated derivatives. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled to photodiode array (PDA) detection and electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS) on a triple quadrupole instrument was employed to further investigate the anthocyanin composition of the PL extract. Precursor-ion analysis, product-ion analysis, and selected reaction monitoring (SRM) MS/MS experiments were conducted sequentially to screen and characterize anthocyanins in the aqueous extract of the PL cell line. Precursor-ion analysis specifically detected the molecular cations of each category of anthocyanins by scanning the precursors of anthocyanidins (cyanidin, peonidin, and pelargonidin). The detected molecular cation of each anthocyanin was fragmented using product-ion analysis by collisionally activated dissociation (CAD). MS/MS using SRM detection was conducted to further confirm the fragmentation observed during product-ion analysis. In comparison to the commonly used product-ion analysis technique, the combined use of precursor-ion analysis, product-ion analysis, and SRM is particularly useful for positive identification of anthocyanins in complex matrixes and provides important information to confirm the proposed structures. Twenty-six anthocyanins were detected and characterized in the aqueous extract of the PL cell line. Several anthocyanins, including two pelargonidin derivatives, were tentatively identified for the first time in these cells.

  9. Development and Identification of SSR Markers Associated with Starch Properties and β-Carotene Content in the Storage Root of Sweet Potato (Ipomoea batatas L.).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kai; Wu, Zhengdan; Tang, Daobin; Lv, Changwen; Luo, Kai; Zhao, Yong; Liu, Xun; Huang, Yuanxin; Wang, Jichun

    2016-01-01

    Sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L.) is a nutritious food crop and, based on the high starch content of its storage root, a potential bioethanol feedstock. Enhancing the nutritional value and starch quantity of storage roots are important goals of sweet potato breeding programs aimed at developing improved varieties for direct consumption, processing, and industrial uses. However, developing improved lines of sweet potato is challenging due to the genetic complexity of this plant and the lack of genome information. Short sequence repeat (SSR) markers are powerful molecular tools for tracking important loci in crops and for molecular-based breeding strategies; however, few SSR markers and marker-trait associations have hitherto been identified in sweet potato. In this study, we identified 1824 SSRs by using a de novo assembly of publicly available ESTs and mRNAs in sweet potato, and designed 1476 primer pairs based on SSR-containing sequences. We mapped 214 pairs of primers in a natural population comprised of 239 germplasms, and identified 1278 alleles with an average of 5.972 alleles per locus and a major allele frequency of 0.7702. Population structure analysis revealed two subpopulations in this panel of germplasms, and phenotypic characterization demonstrated that this panel is suitable for association mapping of starch-related traits. We identified 32, 16, and 17 SSR markers associated with starch content, β-carotene content, and starch composition in the storage root, respectively, using association analysis and further evaluation of a subset of sweet potato genotypes with various characteristics. The SSR markers identified here can be used to select varieties with desired traits and to investigate the genetic mechanism underlying starch and carotenoid formation in the starchy roots of sweet potato.

  10. Bone and faecal minerals and scanning electron microscopic assessments of femur in rats fed phytic acid extract from sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas).

    PubMed

    Dilworth, Lowell; Omoruyi, Felix O; Reid, Walton; Asemota, Helen N

    2008-04-01

    Phytic acid was extracted from sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) and fed to Wistar rats with or without zinc for 3 weeks. Animals were then sacrificed and bone and faecal minerals were assessed. The ultra-structure of the bones was examined via scanning electron microscopy. Phytic acid extract or commercial phytic acid supplemented diets (D + Zn + PE or D + PE) displayed reduced bone calcium levels (101.27 +/- 59.11 and 119.27 +/- 45.36 g/kg) compared to the other test groups. Similarly, reduced calcium were observed in the control groups (D + Zn and D) fed formulated diets with or without zinc supplementation (213.14 +/- 15.31 and 210 +/- 6.88 g/kg) compared to the other test groups. The group fed supplemented commercial phytic acid diet (D + CP) demonstrated the lowest femur magnesium (3.72 +/- 0.13 g/kg) while the group fed phytic acid extract supplementation (D + PE) recorded the highest level (4.84 +/- 0.26 g/kg) amongst the groups. Femur iron was highest in the group fed commercial phytic acid supplemented diet (D + CP -115.74 +/- 2.41 g/kg) compared to the other groups. Faecal magnesium levels were significantly higher in the two test groups fed phytic acid extract with or without zinc (D + Zn + PE or D + PE) compared to all other groups. All the groups which had phytic acid supplemented diets had significantly thinner bone in the trabecular region, compared to the groups fed formulated diet or zinc supplemented formulated diet (D or D + Zn). These observations suggest that the consumption of foods high in phytic acid may contribute to a reduction in the minerals available for essential metabolic processes in rats.

  11. A new MADS-box gene (IbMADS10) from sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam) is involved in the accumulation of anthocyanin.

    PubMed

    Lalusin, Antonio G; Nishita, Koichi; Kim, Sung-Hyung; Ohta, Masaru; Fujimura, Tatsuhito

    2006-01-01

    A new MADS-box gene designated as IbMADS10 was cloned and its expression was characterized from sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.) cv. Beniazuma. The deduced amino acid sequence of the gene indicated high homology with members of the MADS-box family of transcription factors. IbMADS10 shares high amino acid sequence similarity with the DEFH28 of Antirrhinum majus (64%) and with BpMADS4 of Betula pendula (61%) of the SQUA subfamily. Southern blot analysis revealed that the IbMADS10 is present in one or low copy number in the sweet potato genome. The gene is specifically expressed in the pigmented tissues such as in the flower bud, in the pink and in red roots, and hence, it was speculated that the IbMADS10 gene might be correlated with anthocyanin biosynthesis in sweet potato. RNA blot expression of the anthocyanin biosynthesis genes encoding for CHS, CHI, F3H, DFR, ANS and UFTG carried out in the tissues where the IbMADS10 gene was expressed revealed similar transcript levels in all tissues where the IbMADS10 gene is highly expressed, indicating that the IbMADS10 gene is highly correlated with the anthocyanin biosynthesis genes. Another important aspect is the pigmented phenotypes of transgenic calli that ectopically express the IbMADS10 gene, thereby supporting its involvement in the developmental regulation of pigment formation. Tissue printing result further strengthens the hypothesis that the IbMADS10 gene is indeed involved in anthocyanin pigmentation in sweet potato. As the purpose of the IbMADS10 gene is pigmentation, its function, therefore, resembles that of the transparent testa (tt) genes of Arabidopsis.

  12. Analysis of sphingolipids in potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.) and sweet potatoes (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.) by reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS).

    PubMed

    Bartke, Nana; Fischbeck, Anne; Humpf, Hans-Ulrich

    2006-12-01

    Ceramides and glucocerebrosides of potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.) and sweet potatoes (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.) were analyzed using RP-HPLC-ESI-MS/MS. Ceramides and glucocerebrosides containing the three different long-chain bases 4,8-sphingadienine (d18:2(delta4,delta8)), 4-hydroxy-8-sphingenine (t18:1(delta8)), and 8-sphingenine (d18:1(delta8)) acylated to saturated and unsaturated hydroxy- and nonhydroxy fatty acids with 16-26 carbon atoms were detected. For ceramides and glucocerebrosides 4,8-sphingadienine (d18:2(delta4,delta8)) was found as the major long-chain base, with lesser amounts of 4-hydroxy-8-sphingenine (t18:1(delta8)) and 8-sphingenine (d18:1(delta8)). 2-(Alpha-)hydroxypalmitic acid (C16:0h) was the major fatty acid, which was found to be acylated to the long-chain bases. For quantification of these compounds, an RP-HPLC-ESI-MS/MS method with an "echo-peak"-technique simulating internal standard injection was developed. The analyzed samples of potatoes and sweet potatoes showed amounts of approximately 0.1-8 microg/kg single ceramides and amounts up to 500 microg/kg glucocerebrosides, with C16:0h-glucosyl-4,8-sphingadienine as the major component.

  13. Molecular cloning and functional analysis of the ortho-hydroxylases of p-coumaroyl coenzyme A/feruloyl coenzyme A involved in formation of umbelliferone and scopoletin in sweet potato, Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Seitaro; Mizutani, Masaharu; Sakata, Kanzo; Shimizu, Bun-Ichi

    2012-02-01

    Ortho-hydroxylation of cinnamates is a key step in coumarin biosynthesis in plants. Ortho-hydroxylated cinnamates undergo trans/cis isomerization of the side-chain and then lactonization to form coumarins. Sweet potato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.] accumulates umbelliferone and scopoletin after biotic and abiotic stresses. To elucidate molecular aspects of ortho-hydroxylation involved in umbelliferone formation in sweet potato, isolation and characterization of cDNAs encoding 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases (2OGD) was performed from sweet potato tubers treated with a chitosan elicitor. Five cDNAs (designated as Ib) encoding a protein of 358 amino acid residues were cloned, and these were categorized into two groups, Ib1 and Ib2, based on their amino acid sequences. Whether the recombinant Ib proteins had any enzymatic activity toward cinnamates was examined. Ib1 proteins exhibited ortho-hydroxylation activity toward feruloyl coenzyme A (CoA) to form scopoletin (K(m)=~10 μM, k(cat)=~2.7s(-1)). By contrast, Ib2 proteins catalyzed ortho-hydroxylation of feruloyl-CoA (K(m)=7.3-14.0 μM, k(cat)=0.28-0.55 s(-1)) and also of p-coumaroyl-CoA (K(m)=6.1-15.2 μM, k(cat)=0.28-0.64 s(-1)) to form scopoletin and umbelliferone, respectively. Fungal and chitosan treatments increased levels of umbelliferone and its glucoside (skimmin) in the tubers, and expression of the Ib2 gene was induced concomitantly. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Suppression of the invasive plant mile-a-minute (Mikania micrantha) by local crop sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) by means of higher growth rate and competition for soil nutrients.

    PubMed

    Shen, Shicai; Xu, Gaofeng; Clements, David Roy; Jin, Guimei; Chen, Aidong; Zhang, Fudou; Kato-Noguchi, Hisashi

    2015-01-28

    There are a variety of ways of increasing crop diversity to increase agricultural sustainability and in turn having a positive influence on nearby natural ecosystems. Competitive crops may provide potent management tools against invasive plants. To elucidate the competitive mechanisms between a sweet potato crop (Ipomoea batatas) and an invasive plant, mile-a-minute (Mikania micrantha), field experiments were carried out in Longchuan County of Yunnan Province, Southwest China, utilizing a de Wit replacement series. The trial incorporated seven ratios of sweet potato and mile-a-minute plants in 25 m(2) plots. In monoculture, the total biomass, biomass of adventitious root, leafstalk length, and leaf area of sweet potato were all higher than those of mile-a-minute, and in mixed culture the plant height, branch, leaf, stem node, adventitious root, flowering and biomass of mile-a-minute were suppressed significantly (P < 0.05). The relative yield (RY) of mile-a-minute and sweet potato was less than 1.0 in mixed culture, indicating that intraspecific competition was less than interspecific competition. The competitive balance index of sweet potato demonstrated a higher competitive ability than mile-a-minute. Except pH, other soil nutrient contents of initial soil (CK) were significantly higher than those of seven treatments. The concentrations of soil organic matter, total N, total K, available N, available P, available K, exchange Ca, exchange Mg, available Mn, and available B were significantly greater (P < 0.05) in mile-a-minute monoculture soil than in sweet potato monoculture soil, and were reduced by the competition of sweet potato in the mixture. Evidently sweet potato has a competitive advantage in terms of plant growth characteristics and greater absorption of soil nutrients. Thus, planting sweet potato is a promising technique for reducing infestations of mile-a-minute, providing weed management benefits and economic returns from harvest of sweet

  15. Effects of feeding sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) vines as a supplement on feed intake, growth performance, digestibility and carcass characteristics of Sidama goats fed a basal diet of natural grass hay.

    PubMed

    Megersa, Tadesse; Urge, Mengistu; Nurfeta, Ajebu

    2013-02-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of substituting sweet potato [Ipomoea batatas (L) Lam] vines for concentrate on growth performance, digestibility, and carcass characteristics. Thirty yearling bucks (15.3 ± 1.64 kg) were assigned into six treatments in a randomized complete block design: natural grass hay alone (T1) or supplemented with 100 % sweet potato vines (SPV) (T2), 65 % SPV + 35 % concentrate (T3), 35 % SPV + 65 % concentrate (T4), and 100 % concentrate (T5) on dry matter (DM) basis. Supplemented goats (T2, T3, T4, and T5) consumed higher (p < 0.001) total DM (553, 567, 505, and 515 g/day), respectively, when compared to the nonsupplemented (T1) goats (349 g/day). The crude protein (CP) intake (32.0, 48.6, 54.7, and 69.2 g/day) increased with increasing levels of the concentrate in the diet for T2, T3, T4, and T5, respectively. The DM digestibility in T2, T3, T4, and T5, respectively, was higher (P < 0.01) (0.69, 0.72, 0.72, and 0.74) than in T1 (0.56). Apparent digestibility of CP was observed to be higher (P < 0.001) in T3, T4, T5 (0.78, 0.83, and 0.88) when compared to the bucks in T2 (0.60). Higher (P < 0.001) daily weight gain (31.2, 46.4, 48.6, and 47.6 g/day) were recorded for T2, T3, T4, and T5, respectively, whereas the nonsupplemented goats lost weight (-19.5 g/day). Slaughter weight, empty body weight, hot carcass weight, dressing percentage, rib-eye muscle area, and total edible offals were higher (P < 0.05) in supplemented goats compared with nonsupplemented ones. Therefore, it could be concluded that sweet potato vine can replace the conventional concentrate and could be fed with poor quality hay to prevent body weight loss of animal in the absence of other feed supplements.

  16. Infrared drying of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L.) slices.

    PubMed

    Doymaz, Ibrahim

    2012-12-01

    The effect of different infrared power levels (104, 125, 146 and 167 W) on drying kinetics and rehydration ratio of sweet potato slices was investigated. It was observed that the power levels affected the drying time and rehydration ratio. The increase in infrared power level decreased the drying time. The experimental data obtained from drying study were fitted with Newton, Henderson and Pabis and Logarithmic models to evaluate the drying kinetics of the sweet potato slices. The fit quality of the proposed models was evaluated by using the determination of coefficient (R (2) ), mean relative percent error (P), reduced chi-square (χ (2) ) and root means square error (RMSE). Among the three drying models, the Logarithmic model gave a better fit over the other two models. Effective diffusivity varied from 1.31 × 10(-10) to 3.66 × 10(-10) m(2)/s and was significantly influenced by infrared power.

  17. Susceptibility of sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas) peel proteins to digestive enzymes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sweet potato proteins have been shown to possess antioxidant and antidiabetic properties in vivo. The ability of a protein to exhibit systemic effects is somewhat unusual as proteins are typically susceptible to digestive enzymes. This study was undertaken to better understand how digestive enzymes ...

  18. Identification of indole diterpenes in Ipomoea asarifolia and Ipomoea muelleri, plants tremorgenic to livestock

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ipomoea asarifolia has been associated with a tremorgenic syndrome in livestock in Brazil and was recently reported to contain tremorgenic indole diterpenes. Ipomoea muelleri has been reported to cause a similar tremorgenic syndrome in livestock in Australia. Ipomoea asarifolia and I. muelleri were ...

  19. Scanning of Transposable Elements and Analyzing Expression of Transposase Genes of Sweet Potato [Ipomoea batatas

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Xiang; Lai, Xian-Jun; Zhang, Yi-Zheng; Tan, Xue-Mei; Wang, Haiyan

    2014-01-01

    Background Transposable elements (TEs) are the most abundant genomic components in eukaryotes and affect the genome by their replications and movements to generate genetic plasticity. Sweet potato performs asexual reproduction generally and the TEs may be an important genetic factor for genome reorganization. Complete identification of TEs is essential for the study of genome evolution. However, the TEs of sweet potato are still poorly understood because of its complex hexaploid genome and difficulty in genome sequencing. The recent availability of the sweet potato transcriptome databases provides an opportunity for discovering and characterizing the expressed TEs. Methodology/Principal Findings We first established the integrated-transcriptome database by de novo assembling four published sweet potato transcriptome databases from three cultivars in China. Using sequence-similarity search and analysis, a total of 1,405 TEs including 883 retrotransposons and 522 DNA transposons were predicted and categorized. Depending on mapping sets of RNA-Seq raw short reads to the predicted TEs, we compared the quantities, classifications and expression activities of TEs inter- and intra-cultivars. Moreover, the differential expressions of TEs in seven tissues of Xushu 18 cultivar were analyzed by using Illumina digital gene expression (DGE) tag profiling. It was found that 417 TEs were expressed in one or more tissues and 107 in all seven tissues. Furthermore, the copy number of 11 transposase genes was determined to be 1–3 copies in the genome of sweet potato by Real-time PCR-based absolute quantification. Conclusions/Significance Our result provides a new method for TE searching on species with transcriptome sequences while lacking genome information. The searching, identification and expression analysis of TEs will provide useful TE information in sweet potato, which are valuable for the further studies of TE-mediated gene mutation and optimization in asexual reproduction. It contributes to elucidating the roles of TEs in genome evolution. PMID:24608103

  20. Studies of sugar composition and starch morphology of baked sweet potatoes (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam).

    PubMed

    Lai, Yung-Chang; Huang, Che-Lun; Chan, Chin-Feng; Lien, Ching-Yi; Liao, Wayne C

    2013-12-01

    Sugar composition of seven sweet potato cultivars was successfully analyzed. Fresh CYY95-26 sweet potatoes had the highest (8.41%) total sugar content while TNG73 had the lowest (4.5%). For these fresh sweet potatoes, maltose content was very low (0 ~ 0.39%). Because 49.92 ~ 92.43% of total sugars were sucrose, sucrose was the major sugar composition of fresh sweet potatoes. After the baking treatment, the total sugar content of baked sweet potatoes was dramatically increased due to the formation of maltose. The maltose content significantly increased from 0 ~ 0.39% to 8.81 ~ 13.97% on dry weight basis. Therefore, maltose should be included in calculating the total sugar content. Electronic micrographs of fresh sweet potato samples showed that the size of starch granules was generally less than 20 μm. After the baking treatment, starch granules completely gelatinized.

  1. Cloning and comparative protein modeling of two purple acid phosphatase isozymes from sweet potatoes (Ipomoea batatas).

    PubMed

    Durmus, A; Eicken, C; Spener, F; Krebs, B

    1999-09-14

    The sequence of cDNA fragments of two isozymes of the purple acid phosphatase from sweet potato (spPAP1 and spPAP2) has been determined by 5' and 3' rapid amplification of cDNA ends protocols using oligonucleotide primers based on amino acid information. The encoded amino acid sequences of these two isozymes show an equidistance of 72-77% not only to each other, but also to the primary structure of the purple acid phosphatase from red kidney bean (kbPAP). A three-dimensional model of the active site has been constructed for spPAP2 on the basis of the kbPAP crystallographic structure that helps to explain the reported differences in the visible and EPR spectra of spPAP2 and kbPAP.

  2. The effect of gamma radiation on the ultrastructure of sweet potatoes (Ipomoea batatas)

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, A.

    1986-12-01

    Radiation is being used to increase the storage life of fresh foods. Various doses of gamma radiation were administered to Jewel cultivar sweet potatoes and the effects were monitored by direct observation and by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Potatoes were divided into two groups: those irradiated immediately after harvest (doses = 0 kGy - 0.4 KGy) and those irradiated one week after harvest (doses = 0 kGy - 0.4 kGy). Potatoes were examined and viewed each month for 7 months. Gross observations included weight, color and texture of the sweet potatoes. Those potatoes irradiated immediately after harvest spoiled faster than those irradiated one week after harvest. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated several cellular modifications accompanying spoilage. Cell collapse was greatest at the higher radiation doses during the periods of 1 to 5 months post-irradiation. The shape and size of starch granules varied with storage time and radiation levels. The mitochondria, cell walls and plasma membranes appeared normal as seen by transmission electron microscopy until 6 months post-irradiation for potatoes irradiated both immediately after harvest and one week after harvest. Thereafter, degradative changes were observed.

  3. Evaluation of metals in several varieties of sweet potatoes (Ipomoea batatas L.): comparative study.

    PubMed

    Luis, Gara; Rubio, Carmen; Gutiérrez, Angel J; González-Weller, Dailos; Revert, Consuelo; Hardisson, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    Sweet potatoes are a staple in the diet of some people and an excellent source of minerals. Metal monitoring in food, like sweet potatoes, provides basic information on safety aspects in regulatory processes as well as nutritional values. One hundred five samples of three varieties of sweet potatoes were randomly obtained from supermarkets, farmers markets, and farmers' plots in Tenerife (Canary Islands, Spain). The edible portion (pulp) was the only part considered for analysis. Flame atomic absorption spectrometry was used to determine the contents of sodium (Na), potassium (K), calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), and zinc (Zn), while the levels of chromium (Cr), nickel (Ni), cadmium (Cd), and lead (Pb) were determined using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. The mean concentrations were 500 Na, 4409 K, 564 Ca, 609 Mg, 1.291 Cu, 6.554 Fe, 2.324 Mn, 2.348 Zn, 0.028 Cr, 0.048 Ni, 0.001 Cd, and 0.003 Pb mg/kg, respectively. Potassium presented the highest contents in all varieties of sweet potatoes. Iron was the most abundant microelement. The orange fleshed sweet potato variety offered greater nutritional contributions to the recommended intakes than the rest of the varieties studied. The estimated mean daily intake of Ni (0.72 mg/day) detected in our samples was highly consistent with other studies. Average daily intakes of Cd (0.015 μg/day) and Pb (0.045 μg/day) were below toxicological reference values. In conclusion, the levels of Cd and Pb detected in the sweet potatoes analyzed do not represent any toxicological risk to consumers.

  4. Susceptibility of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) peel proteins to digestive enzymes.

    PubMed

    Maloney, Katherine P; Truong, Van-Den; Allen, Jonathan C

    2014-07-01

    Sweet potato proteins have been shown to possess antioxidant and antidiabetic properties in vivo. The ability of a protein to exhibit systemic effects is somewhat unusual as proteins are typically susceptible to digestive enzymes. This study was undertaken to better understand how digestive enzymes affect sweet potato proteins. Two fractions of industrially processed sweet potato peel, containing 6.8% and 8.5% protein and 80.5% and 83.3% carbohydrate, were used as a source of protein. Sweet potato proteins were incubated with pepsin, trypsin, and chymotrypsin and protein breakdown was visualized with SDS-PAGE. After pepsin digestion, samples were assayed for amylase inhibitory activity. Sporamin, the major storage protein in sweet potatoes, which functions as a trypsin inhibitor as well, exhibited resistance to pepsin, trypsin, and chymotrypsin. Sporamin from blanched peel of orange sweet potatoes was less resistant to pepsin digestion than sporamin from outer peel and from extract of the white-skinned Caiapo sweet potato. Trypsin inhibitory activity remained after simulated gastric digestion, with the Caiapo potato protein and peel samples exhibiting higher inhibitory activity compared to the blanched peel sample. Amylase and chymotrypsin inhibitory activity was not present in any of the samples after digestion.

  5. Efficacy of Ipomoea batatas (Caiapo) on diabetes control in type 2 diabetic subjects treated with diet.

    PubMed

    Ludvik, Bernhard; Neuffer, Beatrice; Pacini, Giovanni

    2004-02-01

    To investigate the tolerability, efficacy, and mode of action of Caiapo, an extract of white sweet potatoes, on metabolic control in type 2 diabetic patients. A total of 61 type 2 diabetic patients treated by diet were given 4 g Caiapo (n = 30; mean age 55.2 +/- 2.1 years; BMI 28.0 +/- 0.4 kg/m(2)) or placebo (n = 31; mean age 55.6 +/- 1.5 years; BMI 27.6 +/- 0.3 kg/m(2)) once daily for 12 weeks. Each subject underwent a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) at baseline and after 1, 2, and 3 months to assess 2-h glucose levels. Additionally, fasting blood glucose, HbA(1c), total cholesterol, and triglyceride levels were measured. After treatment with Caiapo, HbA(1c) decreased significantly (P < 0.001) from 7.21 +/- 0.15 to 6.68 +/- 0.14%, whereas it remained unchanged (P = 0.23) in subjects given placebo (7.04 +/- 0.17 vs. 7.10 +/- 0.19%). Fasting blood glucose levels decreased (P < 0.001) in the Caiapo group (143.7 +/- 1.9 vs. 128.5 +/- 1.7 mg/dl) and did not change in the placebo group (144.3 +/- 1.9 vs. 138.2 +/- 2.1 mg/dl; P = 0.052). A decrease in body weight was observed in both the placebo group (P = 0.0027) and in the Caiapo group (P < 0.0001), probably due to a better- controlled lifestyle. In the Caiapo group, body weight was related to the improvement in glucose control (r = 0.618; P < 0.0002). Two-hour glucose levels were significantly (P < 0.001) decreased in the Caiapo group (193.3 +/- 10.4 vs. 162.8 +/- 8.2 mg/dl) compared with the placebo group (191.7 +/- 9.2 vs. 181.0 +/- 7.1 mg/dl). Mean cholesterol at the end of the treatment was significantly lower in the Caiapo group (214.6 +/- 11.2 mg/dl) than in the placebo group (248.7 +/- 11.2 mg/dl; P < 0.05). No significant changes in triglyceride levels or blood pressure were observed, and Caiapo was well tolerated without significant adverse effects. This study confirms the beneficial effects of Caiapo on plasma glucose as well as cholesterol levels in patients with type 2 diabetes. For the first time, the long-term efficacy of Caiapo on glucose control was demonstrated by the observed decrease in HbA(1c). Thus, the neutraceutical Caiapo seems to be a useful agent in the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  6. Susceptibility of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) peel proteins to digestive enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Maloney, Katherine P; Truong, Van-Den; Allen, Jonathan C

    2014-01-01

    Sweet potato proteins have been shown to possess antioxidant and antidiabetic properties in vivo. The ability of a protein to exhibit systemic effects is somewhat unusual as proteins are typically susceptible to digestive enzymes. This study was undertaken to better understand how digestive enzymes affect sweet potato proteins. Two fractions of industrially processed sweet potato peel, containing 6.8% and 8.5% protein and 80.5% and 83.3% carbohydrate, were used as a source of protein. Sweet potato proteins were incubated with pepsin, trypsin, and chymotrypsin and protein breakdown was visualized with SDS-PAGE. After pepsin digestion, samples were assayed for amylase inhibitory activity. Sporamin, the major storage protein in sweet potatoes, which functions as a trypsin inhibitor as well, exhibited resistance to pepsin, trypsin, and chymotrypsin. Sporamin from blanched peel of orange sweet potatoes was less resistant to pepsin digestion than sporamin from outer peel and from extract of the white-skinned Caiapo sweet potato. Trypsin inhibitory activity remained after simulated gastric digestion, with the Caiapo potato protein and peel samples exhibiting higher inhibitory activity compared to the blanched peel sample. Amylase and chymotrypsin inhibitory activity was not present in any of the samples after digestion. PMID:25473492

  7. Preparative purification of polyphenols from sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L.) leaves by AB-8 macroporous resins.

    PubMed

    Xi, Lisha; Mu, Taihua; Sun, Hongnan

    2015-04-01

    In this study, the adsorption properties of AB-8 macroporous resin for sweet potato leaf polyphenols was investigated. The adsorption mechanism was elaborated by the Langmuir and Freundlich equations, and the purification parameters were optimised by adsorption and desorption tests. The constituents and their contents of the purified products were analysed, and the antioxidant activities were determined. The results showed that the optimal processing parameters were as follows: an initial polyphenol concentration of 2.0mg chlorogenic acid equivalent (CAE)/ml, pH 3.0, an ethanol desorption solution concentration of 70% (v/v) and a flow rate for feeding and elution of 1BV/h. The purified products mainly contained eight phenolic constituents and the contents of three di-caffeoylquinic acids were relatively higher than the other constituents. The purified products possessed strong antioxidant activities. In conclusion, purification by AB-8 macroporous resin was highly efficient, economic and environmentally friendly and has a great industrial production potential. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Characterization and development of EST-SSR markers in sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam).

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Hee; Kim, Jun-Hoi; Jo, Won-Sam; Ham, Jeong-Gwan; Chung, Il Kyung; Kim, Kyung-Min

    2016-12-01

    In this study, a cDNA library was constructed from the total RNA of sweet potato leaves. A total of 789 copies of the cDNA were cloned in Escherichia coli by employing the pGEM-T Easy vector. Sequencing was carried out by Solgent Co. (Korea). As many as 579 expressed sequence tag-simple sequence repeat (EST-SSR) markers were designed (73.38%) from the known cDNA nucleotide base sequences. The lengths of the developed EST-SSR markers ranged from 100 to 499 bp (average length 238 bp). Their motif sequence types were varied, with most being dinucleotides and pentanucleotides, and the most commonly found motifs were CAGAAT (29.0%) and TCT (2.8%). Based on these SSR-containing sequences, 619 pairs of high-quality SSR primers were designed using WebSat and Primer3web. The total number of primers designed was 144. Polymorphism was evident in 82 EST-SSR markers among 20 Korean sweet potato cultivars tested and in 90 EST-SSR markers in the two parents of a mapping population, Yeseumi and Annobeny. In this study, the hexaploid sweet potato (2n = 6x = 90) EST-SSR markers were developed in the absence of full-sequence data. Moreover, by acting as a molecular tag for particular traits, the EST-SSR marker can also simultaneously identify information about the corresponding gene. These EST-SSR markers will allow the molecular analysis of sweet potato to be done more efficiently. Thus, we can develop high-quality sweet potato while overcoming the challenges from climate change and other unfavorable conditions.

  9. Sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) attenuates diet-induced aortic stiffening independent of changes in body composition.

    PubMed

    Garner, Tyler; Ouyang, An; Berrones, Adam J; Campbell, Marilyn S; Du, Bing; Fleenor, Bradley S

    2017-08-01

    We hypothesized a sweet potato intervention would prevent high-fat (HF) diet-induced aortic stiffness, which would be associated with decreased arterial oxidative stress and increased mitochondrial uncoupling. Young (8-week old) C57BL/6J mice were randomly divided into 4 groups: low fat (LF; 10% fat), HF (60% fat), low-fat sweet potato (LFSP; 10% fat containing 260.3 μg/kcal sweet potato), or high-fat sweet potato diet (HFSP; 60% fat containing 260.3 μg/kcal sweet potato) for 16 weeks. Compared with LF and LFSP, HF- and HFSP-fed mice had increased body mass and percent fat mass with lower percent lean mass (all, P < 0.05). Sweet potato intervention did not influence body composition (all, P > 0.05). Arterial stiffness, assessed by aortic pulse wave velocity and ex vivo mechanical testing of the elastin region elastic modulus (EEM) was greater in HF compared with LF and HFSP animals (all, P < 0.05). Advanced glycation end products and nitrotyrosine abundance were greater in aortic segments from HF mice compared with LF and HFSP animals (all, P < 0.05). Aortic elastin and uncoupling protein 2 expressions, however, were reduced in HF compared with LF and HFSP mice (all, P < 0.05). Aortic segments cultured with 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP), a mitochondrial uncoupler, for 72 h reduced the EEM of HF arteries compared with nontreated HF segments (P < 0.05). DNP had no effect on the EEM of aortic segments from HFSP mice. In conclusion, sweet potato attenuates diet-induced aortic stiffness independent of body mass and composition, which is associated with a normalization of arterial oxidative stress possibly due to mitochondrial uncoupling.

  10. Experimental swainsonine poisoning in goats ingesting Ipomoea sericophylla and Ipomoea riedelii (Convolvulaceae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ipomoea sericophylla and Ipomoea riedelii cause a glycoprotein storage disease in goats. This paper reports the experimental poisoning in goats by dried I. sericophylla and I. riedelii containing 0.05% and 0.01% swainsonine, respectively. Three groups with four animals each were used. Group 1 recei...

  11. Sweepoviruses Cause Disease in Sweet Potato and Related Ipomoea spp.: Fulfilling Koch's Postulates for a Divergent Group in the Genus Begomovirus

    PubMed Central

    Márquez-Martín, Belén; Moriones, Enrique; Navas-Castillo, Jesús

    2011-01-01

    Sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) and related Ipomoea species are frequently infected by monopartite begomoviruses (genus Begomovirus, family Geminiviridae), known as sweepoviruses. Unlike other geminiviruses, the genomes of sweepoviruses have been recalcitrant to rendering infectious clones to date. Thus, Koch's postulates have not been fullfilled for any of the viruses in this group. Three novel species of sweepoviruses have recently been described in Spain: Sweet potato leaf curl Lanzarote virus (SPLCLaV), Sweet potato leaf curl Spain virus (SPLCSV) and Sweet potato leaf curl Canary virus (SPLCCaV). Here we describe the generation of the first infectious clone of an isolate (ES:MAL:BG30:06) of SPLCLaV. The clone consisted of a complete tandem dimeric viral genome in a binary vector. Successful infection by agroinoculation of several species of Ipomoea (including sweet potato) and Nicotiana benthamiana was confirmed by PCR, dot blot and Southern blot hybridization. Symptoms observed in infected plants consisted of leaf curl, yellowing, growth reduction and vein yellowing. Two varieties of sweet potato, ‘Beauregard’ and ‘Promesa’, were infected by agroinoculation, and symptoms of leaf curl and interveinal loss of purple colouration were observed, respectively. The virus present in agroinfected plants was readily transmitted by the whitefly Bemisia tabaci to I. setosa plants. The progeny virus population present in agroinfected I. setosa and sweet potato plants was isolated and identity to the original isolate was confirmed by sequencing. Therefore, Koch's postulates were fulfilled for the first time for a sweepovirus. PMID:22073314

  12. Horizontal Transmission of "Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum" by Bactericera cockerelli (Hemiptera: Triozidae) on Convolvulus and Ipomoea (Solanales: Convolvulaceae).

    PubMed

    Torres, Glenda L; Cooper, W Rodney; Horton, David R; Swisher, Kylie D; Garczynski, Stephen F; Munyaneza, Joseph E; Barcenas, Nina M

    2015-01-01

    "Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum" (Proteobacteria) is an important pathogen of solanaceous crops (Solanales: Solanaceae) in North America and New Zealand, and is the putative causal agent of zebra chip disease of potato. This phloem-limited pathogen is transmitted to potato and other solanaceous plants by the potato psyllid, Bactericera cockerelli (Hemiptera: Triozidae). While some plants in the Convolvulaceae (Solanales) are also known hosts for B. cockerelli, previous efforts to detect Liberibacter in Convolvulaceae have been unsuccessful. Moreover, studies to determine whether Liberibacter can be acquired from these plants by B. cockerelli are lacking. The goal of this study was to determine whether horizontal transmission of Liberibacter occurs among potato psyllids on two species of Convolvulaceae, sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) and field bindweed (Convolvulus arvensis), which grows abundantly in potato growing regions of the United States. Results indicated that uninfected psyllids acquired Liberibacter from both I. batatas and C. arvensis if infected psyllids were present on plants concurrently with the uninfected psyllids. Uninfected psyllids did not acquire Liberibacter from plants if the infected psyllids were removed from the plants before the uninfected psyllids were allowed access. In contrast with previous reports, PCR did detect the presence of Liberibacter DNA in some plants. However, visible amplicons were faint and did not correspond with acquisition of the pathogen by uninfected psyllids. None of the plants exhibited disease symptoms. Results indicate that horizontal transmission of Liberibacter among potato psyllids can occur on Convolvulaceae, and that the association between Liberibacter and Convolvulaceae merits additional attention.

  13. Horizontal Transmission of "Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum" by Bactericera cockerelli (Hemiptera: Triozidae) on Convolvulus and Ipomoea (Solanales: Convolvulaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Glenda L.; Cooper, W. Rodney; Horton, David R.; Swisher, Kylie D.; Garczynski, Stephen F.; Munyaneza, Joseph E.; Barcenas, Nina M.

    2015-01-01

    “Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum” (Proteobacteria) is an important pathogen of solanaceous crops (Solanales: Solanaceae) in North America and New Zealand, and is the putative causal agent of zebra chip disease of potato. This phloem-limited pathogen is transmitted to potato and other solanaceous plants by the potato psyllid, Bactericera cockerelli (Hemiptera: Triozidae). While some plants in the Convolvulaceae (Solanales) are also known hosts for B. cockerelli, previous efforts to detect Liberibacter in Convolvulaceae have been unsuccessful. Moreover, studies to determine whether Liberibacter can be acquired from these plants by B. cockerelli are lacking. The goal of this study was to determine whether horizontal transmission of Liberibacter occurs among potato psyllids on two species of Convolvulaceae, sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) and field bindweed (Convolvulus arvensis), which grows abundantly in potato growing regions of the United States. Results indicated that uninfected psyllids acquired Liberibacter from both I. batatas and C. arvensis if infected psyllids were present on plants concurrently with the uninfected psyllids. Uninfected psyllids did not acquire Liberibacter from plants if the infected psyllids were removed from the plants before the uninfected psyllids were allowed access. In contrast with previous reports, PCR did detect the presence of Liberibacter DNA in some plants. However, visible amplicons were faint and did not correspond with acquisition of the pathogen by uninfected psyllids. None of the plants exhibited disease symptoms. Results indicate that horizontal transmission of Liberibacter among potato psyllids can occur on Convolvulaceae, and that the association between Liberibacter and Convolvulaceae merits additional attention. PMID:26555359

  14. Survey of genome sequences in a wild sweet potato, Ipomoea trifida (H. B. K.) G. Don

    PubMed Central

    Hirakawa, Hideki; Okada, Yoshihiro; Tabuchi, Hiroaki; Shirasawa, Kenta; Watanabe, Akiko; Tsuruoka, Hisano; Minami, Chiharu; Nakayama, Shinobu; Sasamoto, Shigemi; Kohara, Mitsuyo; Kishida, Yoshie; Fujishiro, Tsunakazu; Kato, Midori; Nanri, Keiko; Komaki, Akiko; Yoshinaga, Masaru; Takahata, Yasuhiro; Tanaka, Masaru; Tabata, Satoshi; Isobe, Sachiko N.

    2015-01-01

    Ipomoea trifida (H. B. K.) G. Don. is the most likely diploid ancestor of the hexaploid sweet potato, I. batatas (L.) Lam. To assist in analysis of the sweet potato genome, de novo whole-genome sequencing was performed with two lines of I. trifida, namely the selfed line Mx23Hm and the highly heterozygous line 0431-1, using the Illumina HiSeq platform. We classified the sequences thus obtained as either ‘core candidates’ (common to the two lines) or ‘line specific’. The total lengths of the assembled sequences of Mx23Hm (ITR_r1.0) was 513 Mb, while that of 0431-1 (ITRk_r1.0) was 712 Mb. Of the assembled sequences, 240 Mb (Mx23Hm) and 353 Mb (0431-1) were classified into core candidate sequences. A total of 62,407 (62.4 Mb) and 109,449 (87.2 Mb) putative genes were identified, respectively, in the genomes of Mx23Hm and 0431-1, of which 11,823 were derived from core sequences of Mx23Hm, while 28,831 were from the core candidate sequence of 0431-1. There were a total of 1,464,173 single-nucleotide polymorphisms and 16,682 copy number variations (CNVs) in the two assembled genomic sequences (under the condition of log2 ratio of >1 and CNV size >1,000 bases). The results presented here are expected to contribute to the progress of genomic and genetic studies of I. trifida, as well as studies of the sweet potato and the genus Ipomoea in general. PMID:25805887

  15. Occurrence of white rust (Albugo ipomoeae-panduratae) on Ipomoea acuminate In the brazilian mid-west

    PubMed Central

    Pagani, A.P.S.; Dianese, A.C.; Inácio, C.A.; Café-Filho, A.C

    2012-01-01

    Spontaneous plants of Ipomoea acuminata (“morning glory”) exhibiting white rust pustules were found in a field crop area of Planaltina, DF, in the fall season of 2010 and the disease causal agent was identified as Albugo ipomoea-panduratae (Oomycota). No reports of the association between A. ipomoea-panduratae and I. acuminata were known in Brazil previously to 2010. A reference specimen was deposited at the University of Brasilia Mycological Reference Collection. PMID:24031833

  16. Antinociceptive effect from Ipomoea cairica extract.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, A A; Amaral, F A; Duarte, I D G; Oliveira, P M; Alves, R B; Silveira, D; Azevedo, A O; Raslan, D S; Castro, M S A

    2006-04-21

    Ipomoea cairica L. Sweet (Convolvulaceae) is used in Brazilian folk medicine for the treatment of rheumatism and inflammations. Ipomoea cairica ethanolic extract (100, 300, 1000 and 3000 mg/kg; per os) induced dose-dependent reduction of response in the formalin test inflammatory phase in mice. The same dose range did not modify neurogenic pain in formalin test, tail-flick reflex latency, carrageenan-induced paw edema, and Rota-Rod test motor performance. From the bio-active fraction 3,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid and 4,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid were obtained. These compounds have been previously reported to have analgesic and antioxidative effects. A possible explanation for the antinociception is that somehow the compounds present in the extract reduced the release of pro-nociceptive mediators unrelated to carrageenan-induced edema, such as histamine. Interestingly, caffeoylquinic acid derivatives have been reported to inhibit histamine release on in vitro models. The isolated caffeoylquinic acids could explain, at least in part, the antinociceptive effect of Ipomoea cairica polar extract.

  17. Evolution of the selfing syndrome in Ipomoea.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Tanya M; Rausher, Mark D

    2013-01-01

    Plants that are highly selfing typically exhibit a suite of morphological traits termed a "selfing syndrome," including reduced corollas and reproductive structures, loss of corolla pigmentation, little anther-stigma separation, and a lower pollen/ovule (P/O) ratio. While it is typically assumed that these changes are adaptive, few attempts have been made to determine whether they result from the operation of natural selection or genetic drift. In the southeastern United States, Ipomoea lacunosa has evolved a typical selfing syndrome compared to its close relative, Ipomoea cordatotriloba. Microsatellite markers confirmed that selfing rates are substantially higher in I. lacunosa. Furthermore, using a standard QST - FST comparison, we evaluated the relative importance of selection and drift in the evolution of selfing syndrome traits in I. lacunosa. The analysis demonstrated that natural selection is responsible for the evolution of reduced corolla size, anther-stigma distance, and style length in this species. By contrast, leaf characteristics unrelated to selfing were found to have diverged largely by genetic drift. Our study provides one of the first confirmations that natural selection drives the evolution of selfing-syndrome traits.

  18. Effect of processing techniques on color and active components amount of sweet potato (Ipomoea Batatas l) flakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmawati, Y.; Mahmudatussa'adah, A.; Yogha, S.

    2016-04-01

    Sweet potato processing is limited, such as flour, snacks, cystic, or chips. Flakes as pre-cooked meals are made through the stages of making pasta and drying. The purpose of this study was to optimize the production of sweet potato flakes at the stage of making pasta and drying. Making the pasta is done through techniques steamed or baked. Pasta drying using tools a drum dryer or cabinet dryer. As an indicator of optimization is the total of monomeric anthocyanins, β-carotene and color the resulting flakes. The results showed that the amount of anthocyanin monomeric flakes by using steam, and drum dryer (3.83 ± 0.03 mg CYE/g db), flakes by the technique of steam, and cabinet dryer (3.03 ± 0.02 mg CYE/g db), flakes with techniques bake, drum dryer (2.49 ± 0.05 CYE mg/g db), flakes with bake technique, cabinet dryer (1.98 ± 0.03 mg CYE/g db). The Color of purple sweet potato flakes produced through steamed techniques bright purple, while the color purple sweet potato flakes produced through techniques roast give a brownish purple color. The amount of β-carotene yellow flakes sweet potato with stages of cooking steamed, drum dryer (152±0.5 mg/Kg db), grilled drum dryer (136±0.4 mg/Kg db), flakes of yellow sweet potato with stages of roasted and cabinet dryer (140±0.8 mg/Kg db), and grilled stage with cabinet dryer (122±0.3 mg/Kg db). In conclusion sweet potato flakes production techniques through the stages of steam process, and used drum dryers have a number of anthocyanins or β-carotene bigger and brighter colors than the baked flakes techniques and used cabinet dryer.

  19. An arsenate reductase homologue possessing phosphatase activity from sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas [L.] Lam): kinetic studies and characterization.

    PubMed

    Chan, Ya-Hui; Lin, Chao-Yi; Pai, Shou-Hsiung; Huang, Jenq-Kuen; Lin, Chi-Tsai

    2011-04-13

    A cDNA encoding a putative arsenate reductase homologue (IbArsR) was cloned from sweet potato (Ib). The deduced protein showed a high level of sequence homology (16-66%) with ArsRs from other organisms. A 3-D homology structure was created based on AtArsR (PDB code 1T3K ) from Arabidopsis thaliana. The putative active site of protein tyrosine phosphatase (HC(X)(5)R) is conserved in all reported ArsRs. IbArsR was overexpressed and purified. The monomeric nature of the enzyme was confirmed by 15% SDS-PAGE and molecular mass determination of the native enzyme via ESI Q-TOF. The IbArsR lacks arsenate reductase activity but possesses phosphatase activity. The Michaelis constant (K(M)) value for p-nitrophenyl phosphate (pNPP) was 11.11 mM. The phosphatase activity was inhibited by 0.5 mM sodium arsenate [As(V)]. The protein's half-life of deactivation at 25 °C was 6.1 min, and its inactivation rate constant K(d) was 1.1 × 10(-1) min(-1). The enzyme was active in a broad pH range from 4.0 to 11.0 with optimum activity at pH 10.0. Phosphatase would remove phosphate group from nucleic acid or dephosphorylation of other enzymes as regulation signaling.

  20. Lactic acid fermentation of beta-carotene rich sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L.) into lacto-juice.

    PubMed

    Panda, Smita H; Ray, Ramesh C

    2007-06-01

    Lacto-juices processed by lactic acid fermentation bring about a change in the beverage assortment for their high nutritive value, vitamins and minerals which are beneficial to human health when consumed. Sweet potato roots (non-boiled/ fully-boiled) were fermented with Lactobacillus plantarum MTCC 1407 at 28 +/- 2 degrees C for 48 h to make lacto- juice. During fermentation both analytical [pH, titratable acidity, lactic acid, starch, total sugar, reducing sugar (g/kg roots), total phenol and beta-carotene (mg/kg roots)] and sensory (texture, taste, aroma, flavour and after taste) analyses of sweet potato lacto-juice were evaluated. The fermented juice was subjected to panelist evaluation for acceptability. There were no significant variations in biochemical constituents (pH, 2.2-3.3; lactic acid, 1.19-1.27 g/kg root; titratable acidity, 1.23-1.46 g/kg root, etc.) of lacto-juices prepared from non-boiled and fully-boiled sweet potato roots except beta-carotene concentration [130 +/- 7.5 mg/kg (fully-boiled roots) and 165 +/- 8.1 mg/kg (non-boiled roots)]. The panelist evaluation scores ranged from 3-4.8 (in a hedonic scale of 1-5) from moderate liking to very much liking of sweet potato lacto-juice. Principal component analyses reduced the eight original analytical variables to three independent components (factors), which accounted for 99.9% of the total variations. Similarly, five original sensory variables were reduced to two independent components, which accounted for 83.1% of the total variations.

  1. Altered Phenylpropanoid Metabolism in the Maize Lc-Expressed Sweet Potato (Ipomoea batatas) Affects Storage Root Development.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongxia; Yang, Jun; Zhang, Min; Fan, Weijuan; Firon, Nurit; Pattanaik, Sitakanta; Yuan, Ling; Zhang, Peng

    2016-01-04

    There is no direct evidence of the effect of lignin metabolism on early storage root development in sweet potato. In this study, we found that heterologous expression of the maize leaf color (Lc) gene in sweet potato increased anthocyanin pigment accumulation in the whole plant and resulted in reduced size with an increased length/width ratio, low yield and less starch content in the early storage roots. RT-PCR analysis revealed dramatic up-regulation of the genes involved in the lignin biosynthesis pathway in developing storage roots, leading to greater lignin content in the Lc transgenic lines, compared to the wild type. This was also evidenced by the enhanced lignification of vascular cells in the early storage roots. Furthermore, increased expression of the β-amylase gene in leaves and storage roots also accelerated starch degradation and increased the sugar use efficiency, providing more energy and carbohydrate sources for lignin biosynthesis in the Lc transgenic sweet potato. Lesser starch accumulation was observed in the developing storage roots at the initiation stage in the Lc plants. Our study provides experimental evidence of the basic carbohydrate metabolism underlying the development of storage roots, which is the transformation of lignin biosynthesis to starch biosynthesis.

  2. Sweet potato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.] cultivated as tuber or leafy vegetable supplier as affected by elevated tropospheric ozone.

    PubMed

    Keutgen, Norbert; Keutgen, Anna J; Janssens, Marc J J

    2008-08-13

    Sweet potato cultivars respond differently to elevated tropospheric ozone concentrations of ca. 130 mug m (-3), 8 h a day for 4 weeks, which affects their selection for cultivation. In the first cultivar presented here, an adequate leafy vegetable supplier, the ozone load resulted in a shift of biomass to maintain the canopy at the expense of tuber development. Starch content of leaves was reduced, indicating an impairment of quality, but carotenoid content remained stable. The second cultivar may be grown for tuber production. Although the ratio tuber/plant remained stable under ozone, tuber yield and its starch content were significantly reduced. The lower starch content indicated a worse quality for certain industrial processing, but it is desirable for chip production. Elevated tropospheric ozone concentrations also influenced free amino acids and macronutrient contents of tubers, but these modifications were of minor significance for tuber quality in the second cultivar.

  3. Altered Phenylpropanoid Metabolism in the Maize Lc-Expressed Sweet Potato (Ipomoea batatas) Affects Storage Root Development

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongxia; Yang, Jun; Zhang, Min; Fan, Weijuan; Firon, Nurit; Pattanaik, Sitakanta; Yuan, Ling; Zhang, Peng

    2016-01-01

    There is no direct evidence of the effect of lignin metabolism on early storage root development in sweet potato. In this study, we found that heterologous expression of the maize leaf color (Lc) gene in sweet potato increased anthocyanin pigment accumulation in the whole plant and resulted in reduced size with an increased length/width ratio, low yield and less starch content in the early storage roots. RT-PCR analysis revealed dramatic up-regulation of the genes involved in the lignin biosynthesis pathway in developing storage roots, leading to greater lignin content in the Lc transgenic lines, compared to the wild type. This was also evidenced by the enhanced lignification of vascular cells in the early storage roots. Furthermore, increased expression of the β-amylase gene in leaves and storage roots also accelerated starch degradation and increased the sugar use efficiency, providing more energy and carbohydrate sources for lignin biosynthesis in the Lc transgenic sweet potato. Lesser starch accumulation was observed in the developing storage roots at the initiation stage in the Lc plants. Our study provides experimental evidence of the basic carbohydrate metabolism underlying the development of storage roots, which is the transformation of lignin biosynthesis to starch biosynthesis. PMID:26727353

  4. Comparative analysis of phytochemicals and nutrient availability in two contrasting cultivars of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L.).

    PubMed

    Shekhar, Shubhendu; Mishra, Divya; Buragohain, Alak Kumar; Chakraborty, Subhra; Chakraborty, Niranjan

    2015-04-15

    Sweet potato ranks as the world's seventh most important food crop, and has major contribution to energy and phytochemical source of nutrition. To unravel the molecular basis for differential nutrient availability, and to exploit the natural genetic variation(s) of sweet potato, a series of physiochemical and proteomics experiment was conducted using two contrasting cultivars, an orange-fleshed sweet potato (OFSP) and a white-fleshed sweet potato (WFSP). Phytochemical screening revealed high percentage of carbohydrate, reducing sugar and phenolics in WFSP, whereas OFSP showed increased levels of total protein, flavonoids, anthocyanins, and carotenoids. The rate of starch and cellulose degradation was found to be less in OFSP during storage, indicating tight regulation of gene(s) responsible for starch-degradation. Comparative proteomics displayed a cultivar-dependent expression of proteins along with evolutionarily conserved proteins. These results suggest that cultivar-specific expression of proteins and/or their interacting partners might play a crucial role for nutrient acquisition in sweet potato. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Toxic Ipomeamarone Accumulation in Healthy Parts of Sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas L. Lam) Storage Roots upon Infection by Rhizopus stolonifer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Furanoterpenoid accumulation in response to microbial attack in rotting sweetpotatoes has long been linked to deaths and lung edema of cattle in the world. However, it is not known whether furanoterpenoid ipomeamarone accumulates in the healthy-looking parts of infected sweetpotato storage roots. This is critical for effective utilization as animal feed and assessment of the potential negative impact on human health. Therefore, we first identified the fungus from infected sweetpotatoes as a Rhizopus stolonifer strain and then used it to infect healthy sweetpotato storage roots for characterization of furanoterpenoid content. Ipomeamarone and its precursor, dehydroipomeamarone, were identified through spectroscopic analyses, and detected in all samples and controls at varying concentrations. Ipomeamarone concentration was at toxic levels in healthy-looking parts of some samples. Our study provides fundamental information on furanoterpenoids in relation to high levels reported that could subsequently affect cattle on consumption and high ipomeamarone levels in healthy-looking parts. PMID:25418792

  6. Variability of sugars in staple-type sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas) cultivars: The effects of harvest time and storage

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Total soluble sugar content and composition was studied by high performance liquid chromatography in four high dry-matter sweet potato cultivars at 3, 4, and 5 months maturity. Total soluble sugar consisted of sucrose, glucose, and fructose, ranging from 4.10–10.82 g/100 g (dry-weight basis). At har...

  7. Immunomodulatory effects of Alliums and Ipomoea batata extracts on lymphocytes and macrophages functions in White Leghorn chickens: in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Hanieh, Hamza; Narabara, Kiyoaki; Tanaka, Yuji; Gu, Zhigang; Abe, Asaki; Kondo, Yasuhiro

    2012-01-01

    We previously described that supplementary garlic, onion and purple sweet potato (PSP) enhance humoral immune response in White Leghorn chickens. In the present in vitro study, we investigated the effects of garlic (GE), onion (OE) and PSP (PSPE) extracts on proliferation, interleukin (IL)-2 and interferon (INF)-γ gene expression of stimulated lymphocytes. The effects on microbicidal activity, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) productions of stimulated peritoneal macrophages were studied as well. The results showed that GE augmented Concanavalin A (ConA)-induced splenocytes (4, 8 and 16µg/mL) and thymocytes (2, 4 and 8µg/mL) proliferations, and gene expression of IL-2 (8 and 16µg/mL) and INF-γ (16µg/mL). None of the examined extracts had mitogenic effect nor stimulated bursacytes response to phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). Macrophages exhibited superior microbicidal activity and ROS production with GE at 4 and 8µg/mL and with OE at 25.6µg/mL. None of the extracts showed stimulatory effects on NO production. The extracts showed concentration-dependent inhibitory effects on all measured parameters at higher concentrations. Taken together, it is likely that garlic has direct stimulatory effects on immune cell functions, whereas the in vitro inhibitory effects of onion and PSP were likely attributed to high flavonoid contents.

  8. Field studies of sweet potatoes and cowpeas in response to elevated carbon dioxide. Progress report. [Ipomoea batatas; Vigna unguiculata

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, P.K.

    1985-01-01

    The physiological and biochemical effects of enriched CO/sub 2/ on sweet potatoes and cowpeas were studied in open top chambers. The main task was to assemble equipment to generate test atmospheres of CO/sub 2/ in the field, using open top chambers as the basic exposure unit for studying the response of sweet potatoes and cowpeas to enriched CO/sub 2/. Plant responses to CO/sub 2/ in open top chambers have been demonstrated by several investigators in a variety of crops. This study focused on growth and development of both sweet potatoes and cowpeas at levels of CO/sub 2/ ranging from the ambient level of 354 ppM to 659 ppM. The effects of CO/sub 2/ on leaf and stem weights, stem length, leaf area, and stomatal number and conductance were studied on both species. Additional studies on sweet potatoes included the effects of CO/sub 2/ on the weight, chemical content and quality of tubers. Additional studies on cowpeas included the effects of CO/sub 2/ on the weight of seeds and rate of nitrogen fixation. 27 figs., 35 tabs. (ACR)

  9. Bovine atypical interstitial pneumonia associated with the ingestion of damaged sweet potatoes (Ipomoea batatas) in Northeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, R M; Simões, S V; Tabosa, I M; Nóbrega, W D; Riet-Correa, F

    2001-08-01

    Atypical interstitial pneumonia in cattle associated with the ingestion of damaged sweet potatoes is reported in the State of Paraíba, Northeastern Brazil. The sweet potatoes were severely damaged by Myzus tersicae, and had an obvious fungal infection. Eighteen milking cows, 1 bull and 1 steer were fed approximately 400 kg of the sweet potatoes. Six days after consumption 13 cows were affected with labored abdominal breathing, extended and lowered head, coughing, expiratory grunt, salivation and protruded tongue. Six animals died and the others recovered in 4-7 d. At necropsy lungs were distended and did not collapse when the thorax was opened. Bullous emphysema and gelatinous exudates were observed in the interlobular, peribronchial and subpleural tissues. Microscopically, the lungs had severe edema and emphysema, congestion, and alveolar epithelial cell hyperplasia. The sweet potatoes were cultured but Fusarium spp was not isolated, probably because a zigomycete fungus covered the plates in 48 h of incubation.

  10. Nutritional and physical properties of organic Beauregard sweet potato [Ipomoea batatas (L.)] as influenced by broiler litter application rate.

    PubMed

    Gichuhi, Peter N; Kpomblekou-A, Kokoasse; Bovell-Benjamin, Adelia C

    2014-07-01

    Organic farming has been on an upward trend in recent years. However, the manures used like broiler litter have variable nutrient content, making it important to establish optimal application rate, for maximum crop yield and quality. Additionally, some states like Alabama restricts the amount of broiler litter to control excessive nutrients accumulation which can lead to surface and ground water contamination. The current study evaluated the effect of broiler litter at rates 0, 0.5, 1, 2, and 3 t ha(-1) (treatments T0, T0.5, T1, T2, and T3), on the nutritional and physical properties of Beauregard sweet potato. Analyses were performed to determine moisture, ash, fiber, vitamin C, and β-carotene contents using oven, muffler furnace, dye, and spectrophotometric methods; texture; and color using compressive strength and L, a, b system, respectively. Ash content of the samples ranged from 0.9% to 1.4% with a very strong positive linear correlation (r = 0.9) to the broiler litter rate. However, vitamin C had a quadratic relationship with the broiler litter rate with a peaking at T0.5 (15.5 mg/100 g). The yellow color (b-value) also had a strong linear relationship with the broiler litter rate (r = 0.86). However, the other measures showed moderate, weak, or negligible correlations to the broiler litter level. T0.5 had the highest β-carotene (262.0 μg/g), dry matter contents and had the most firm (0.040 kN) sweet potatoes with the deepest orange color (L = 60.7). Based on the study's findings, 0.5 t ha(-1) appeared to be appropriate level of broiler litter, which is consistent with Alabama's law and is also advantageous in terms of low cost of farming practices and water pollution reduction.

  11. De novo sequencing and comprehensive analysis of the mutant transcriptome from purple sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L.).

    PubMed

    Ma, Peiyong; Bian, Xiaofeng; Jia, Zhaodong; Guo, Xiaoding; Xie, Yizhi

    2016-01-10

    Purple sweet potatoes, rich in anthocyanin, have been widely favored in light of increasing awareness of health and food safety. In this study, a mutant of purple sweet potato (white peel and flesh) was used to study anthocyanin metabolism by high-throughput RNA sequencing and comparative analysis of the mutant and wild type transcriptomes. A total of 88,509 unigenes ranging from 200nt to 14,986nt with an average length of 849nt were obtained. Unigenes were assigned to Gene Ontology (GO), Clusters of Orthologous Group (COG) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG). Functional enrichment using GO and KEGG annotations showed that 3828 of the differently expressed genes probably influenced many important biological and metabolic pathways, including anthocyanin biosynthesis. Most importantly, the structural and transcription factor genes that contribute to anthocyanin biosynthesis were downregulated in the mutant. The unigene dataset that was used to discover the anthocyanin candidate genes can serve as a comprehensive resource for molecular research in sweet potato. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of baking and boiling on the nutritional and antioxidant properties of sweet potato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.] cultivars.

    PubMed

    Dincer, Cuneyt; Karaoglan, Mert; Erden, Fidan; Tetik, Nedim; Topuz, Ayhan; Ozdemir, Feramuz

    2011-11-01

    The effects of baking and boiling on the nutritional and antioxidant properties of three sweet potato cultivars (Beniazuma, Koganesengan, Kotobuki) cultivated in Turkey were investigated. The samples were analyzed for proximate composition, total phenolic content, ascorbic acid, β-carotene, antiradical activity, and free sugars. The dry matter, protein, and starch contents of the sweet potatoes were significantly changed by the treatments while the ash and crude fiber contents did not differ as significantly. The β-carotene contents of baked and boiled sweet potatoes were lower than those of fresh sweet potatoes; however, the total phenolic and ascorbic acid contents of the baked and boiled sweet potatoes were higher than those of the fresh samples. Generally, the antiradical activity of the sweet potatoes increased with the treatments. Sucrose, glucose, and fructose were quantified as free sugars in all fresh sweet potatoes; however, maltose was determined in the treated samples. In terms of the analyzed parameters, there were no explicit differences among the sweet potato cultivars.

  13. Rapid quantitative determination of maltose and total sugars in sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L. [Lam.]) varieties using HPTLC.

    PubMed

    Lebot, Vincent

    2017-03-01

    When a raw sweet potato root is analysed, only sucrose, glucose and fructose are present but during cooking, starch is hydrolysed into maltose giving the sweet flavour to cooked roots. This study aimed at developing an HPTLC protocol for the rapid quantitative determination of maltose and total sugars in four commercial varieties and to compare them to 243 hybrids grouped by flesh colour (white, orange, purple). In commercial varieties, mean maltose content varied from 10.26 to 15.60% and total sugars from 17.83 to 27.77% on fresh weight basis. Hybrids showed significant variation in maltose content within each group, with means ranging from 7.65% for white-fleshed, to 8.53% in orange- and 11.98% in purple-fleshed. Total mean sugars content was 20.24, 22.11 and 26.84% respectively for white, orange and purple flesh hybrids. No significant correlations were detected between individual sugars but maltose and total sugars content were highly correlated. Compared to the best commercial variety (Baby), 25 hybrids (10.3%) presented a higher maltose content and 40 (16.5%) showed a higher total sugars content. HPTLC was observed as an attractive, cost efficient, high-throughput technique for quantitating maltose and total sugars in sweet potatoes. Perspectives for improving sweet potato quality for consumers' requirements are also discussed.

  14. Nutritional and physical properties of organic Beauregard sweet potato [Ipomoea batatas (L.)] as influenced by broiler litter application rate

    PubMed Central

    Gichuhi, Peter N; Kpomblekou-A, Kokoasse; Bovell-Benjamin, Adelia C

    2014-01-01

    Organic farming has been on an upward trend in recent years. However, the manures used like broiler litter have variable nutrient content, making it important to establish optimal application rate, for maximum crop yield and quality. Additionally, some states like Alabama restricts the amount of broiler litter to control excessive nutrients accumulation which can lead to surface and ground water contamination. The current study evaluated the effect of broiler litter at rates 0, 0.5, 1, 2, and 3 t ha−1 (treatments T0, T0.5, T1, T2, and T3), on the nutritional and physical properties of Beauregard sweet potato. Analyses were performed to determine moisture, ash, fiber, vitamin C, and β-carotene contents using oven, muffler furnace, dye, and spectrophotometric methods; texture; and color using compressive strength and L, a, b system, respectively. Ash content of the samples ranged from 0.9% to 1.4% with a very strong positive linear correlation (r = 0.9) to the broiler litter rate. However, vitamin C had a quadratic relationship with the broiler litter rate with a peaking at T0.5 (15.5 mg/100 g). The yellow color (b-value) also had a strong linear relationship with the broiler litter rate (r = 0.86). However, the other measures showed moderate, weak, or negligible correlations to the broiler litter level. T0.5 had the highest β-carotene (262.0 μg/g), dry matter contents and had the most firm (0.040 kN) sweet potatoes with the deepest orange color (L = 60.7). Based on the study's findings, 0.5 t ha−1 appeared to be appropriate level of broiler litter, which is consistent with Alabama's law and is also advantageous in terms of low cost of farming practices and water pollution reduction. PMID:25473490

  15. Activity staining on polyacrylamide gels of trypsin inhibitors from leaves of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L. Lam) varieties.

    PubMed

    Hou, W C; Lin, Y H

    1998-02-01

    The failure of activity staining of trypsin inhibitors in crude leaf extracts of sweet potato varieties including Tainong 27, Tainong 34, and Tainong 57 on a 15% sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) gel was prevented by dipping the gels in solutions containing 10-40 mM hydrogen peroxide, 10 mM Tris buffer (pH 7.9) for 30 min before staining.

  16. Elimination of the tremorgenic toxin of Ipomoea asarifolia by milk

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    With the aim to determine if the tremorgenic toxin of Ipomoea asarifolia is eliminated in milk, three groups of Swiss female mice received, immediately after giving birth until weaning, a ration containing 20% or 30% of dry I. asarifolia. All the offspring of the females that received 20% or 30% I. ...

  17. Characterization of pentasaccharide glycosides from the roots of Ipomoea arborescens.

    PubMed

    León, Ismael; Mirón, Gumersindo; Alonso, Daniel

    2006-06-01

    Ten new pentasaccharide glycosides, arboresins 1-6 (1-6) and murucins 6-9 (8-11), along with five known glycolipids, were isolated from the roots of Ipomoea arborescens, and their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic and chemical methods. Compounds 1-6 and 8-11 were evaluated for cytotoxicity against a small panel of cancer cell lines.

  18. Conditioning food aversions to Ipomoea carnea var. Fistulosa in sheep

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ipomoea carnea is a toxic plant in Brazil that often poisons sheep. Conditioned food aversion may be a tool to reduce intoxication problems in grazing sheep. Fifteen sheep were adapted to consume I. carnea for 36 days. Subsequently sheep were randomly divided into three groups of five sheep each. ...

  19. Possible glyphosate tolerance mechanism in pitted morningglory (Ipomoea lacunosa L.)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Glyphosate is the most historic herbicide ever developed. Aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) is the most frequently detected metabolite of glyphosate in higher plants. The natural tolerance of Ipomoea lacunosa to glyphosate has made these plants among the most common and troublesome weeds in the sou...

  20. Effects of Myrothecium verrucaria on morning-glory (Ipomoea) species

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    During field testing of a bioherbicidal strain of the fungus Myrothecium verrucaria (MV) for control of spurges and purslanes in tomato plots in 2005, we noted extensive damage to volunteer morning-glory (Ipomoea spp.) seedlings. This observation prompted investigations on the biological control ef...

  1. Recovery of methane-rich gas from solid-feed anaerobic digestion of ipomoea (Ipomoea carnea).

    PubMed

    Sankar Ganesh, P; Sanjeevi, R; Gajalakshmi, S; Ramasamy, E V; Abbasi, S A

    2008-03-01

    Studies are presented on new types of anaerobic digesters in which chopped or dry crushed Ipomoea carnea was fed without any other pretreatment, in an attempt to develop commercially viable means of utilizing the otherwise very harmful plant. Two types of solid-feed anaerobic digesters (SFADs) were studied. The first type had a single vessel in which the bottom 35% portion was separated from the top portion by a perforated PVC disk. The weed was charged from the top and inoculated with anaerobically digested cowdung-water slurry. The fermentation of the weed in the reactor led to the formation of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) plus some biogas. The leachate, rich in the VFAs, was passed through the perforated PVC sheet and collected in the lower portion of the vessel. The other type of reactors had two vessels, the first one was fully charged with the weed and the second received the VFA leachate. With both types were attached upflow anaerobic filters (UAFs) which converted the leachate into combustible biogas consisting of approximately 70% methane. All SFADs developed very consistent performance in terms of biogas yield within 17 weeks of start. The two-compartment reactors yielded significantly more biogas than the single-compartment reactors of corresponding total volume, and the reactors with which anaerobic filters (AF) were attached yielded more biogas than the ones without AF. The best performing units generated 2.41m(3) of biogas per m(3) of digester volume, as compared to 0.1-0.2m(3) of biogas, m(-3)d(-1), obtainable with conventional digesters. This indicates the viability of this technology. The spent weed can be vermicomposted directly to obtain good soil-conditioner cum fertilizer; earthworm Eudrilus eugeniae produced 540mg vermicast per animal every day, achieving near total conversion of feed to vermicast in 20 days. The proposed systems, thus, makes it possible to accomplish total utilization of ipomoea.

  2. Classical taxonomy studies of medicinally important Ipomoea leari

    PubMed Central

    Porwal, Omji; Gupta, Saurabh; Nanjan, Moola Joghee; Singh, Amit

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ipomoea leari which belongs to the family Convolvulaceae is an unexplored medicinal plant in the Indian medicinal system. According to ethnobotanical information, the whole plant is used for various disorders such as anti-inflammatory, psychotomimetic and anticancer activities. The current study seeks to standardize the parameters for this herb. Materials and Methods: The identification of the pharmacognostical, morphoanatomical characters of Ipomoea leari (leaf, stem and root) were carried out in terms of organoleptic, macroscopic, microscopic, physicochemical, florescence and phytochemical analyses. Physicochemical parameters such as total ash, moisture content and extractive values were determined by World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines. The plant material was fixed in formalin-5 mL + acetic acid-5 mL + 70% ethyl alcohol-9 mL (FAA) and dehydrated with graded series of tertiary-butyl alcohol. Toluidine blue, a polychromatic stain was used for staining the sections and then whole components were observed with Nikon lab photo device with microscopic units. Results: Microscopically, leaf consists of prominent midrib and the lamina, both having dorsiventral symmetry. The stomata are actinocytic. The stem consists of an epidermal layer of one cell thickness, wide cortex, vascular cylinder and wide pith. The root measuring 1.6 mm thick was studied. It consists of uniformly thick and continuous periderm, wide cortex and thick vascular cylinder. Qualitative analysis revealed the presence of carbohydrates, flavonoids, glycosides, steroids and phenols. The pharmacognostic studies were carried out in terms of macroscopic, phytoconstituent and chromatographic analyses of Ipomoea leari. Various standard methods were adopted to carry out the investigation. Conclusion: The results of the present study provide valuable pharmacognostic information of Ipomoea leari for its identification. Our result's suggest that Ipomoea leari is a promising candidate as an

  3. Control of amphibious weed ipomoea (Ipomoea carnea) by utilizing it for the extraction of volatile fatty acids as energy precursors

    PubMed Central

    Rafiq Kumar, M.; Tauseef, S.M.; Abbasi, Tasneem; Abbasi, S.A.

    2014-01-01

    Volatile fatty acids (VFAs), comprising mainly of acetic acid and lesser quantities of propionic and butyric acids, are generated when zoomass or phytomass is acted upon by acidogenic and acetogenic microorganisms. VFAs can be utilized by methanogens under anaerobic conditions to generate flammable methane–carbon dioxide mixtures known as ‘biogas’. Acting on the premise that this manner of VFA utilization for generating relatively clean energy can be easily accomplished in a controlled fashion in conventional biogas plants as well as higher-rate anaerobic digesters, we have carried out studies aimed to generate VFAs from the pernicious weed ipomoea (Ipomoea carnea). The VFA extraction was accomplished by a simple yet effective technology, appropriate for use even by laypersons. For this acid-phase reactors were set, to which measured quantities of ipomoea leaves were charged along with water inoculated with cow dung. The reactors were stirred intermittently. It was found that VFA production started within hours of the mixing of the reactants and peaked by the 10th or 11th day in all the reactors, effecting a conversion of over 10% of the biomass into VFAs. The reactor performance had good reproducibility and the process appeared easily controllable, frugal and robust. PMID:25685545

  4. Recreational use of D-lysergamide from the seeds of Argyreia nervosa, Ipomoea tricolor, Ipomoea violacea, and Ipomoea purpurea in Poland.

    PubMed

    Juszczak, Grzegorz R; Swiergiel, Artur H

    2013-01-01

    Recently, there are important changes in recreational drug use. The aim of the present study was to analyse reports published on a recreational web site by drug users who ingested seeds of plants belonging to the Convolvulaceae family and to compare them with available medical case reports. We have also included reports describing the effects induced by "druids fantasy," which is a new drug allegedly containing the same alkaloid as the seeds of A. nervosa. Our search reveals the reoccurrence of recreational use of I. tricolor and violacea (morning glory), which had not been reported in medical literature since 1968. We have also found that drug users are experimenting with other species, such as I. purpurea, whose psychoactive properties are unknown. Symptoms and doses reported by drug users were comparable with the few available medical case reports. The most worrying symptom was suicidal ideation reported by two subjects who ingested A. nervosa and Ipomoea seeds. Effects induced by druids fantasy were comparable with the effects induced by A. nervosa and various Ipomoea species. The ingestion of seeds was frequently associated with taking drugs such as cannabis and hashish, although other combinations, for example with dextromethorphan, were also reported.

  5. Ipomoea asarifolia neutralizes inflammation induced by Tityus serrulatus scorpion venom.

    PubMed

    Lima, Maira Conceição Jerônimo de Souza; Bitencourt, Mariana Angélica Oliveira; Furtado, Allanny Alves; Oliveira Rocha, Hugo Alexandre; Oliveira, Ruth Medeiros; da Silva-Júnior, Arnóbio Antônio; Tabosa do Egito, Eryvaldo Sócrates; Tambourgi, Denise Vilarinho; Zucolotto, Silvana Maria; Fernandes-Pedrosa, Matheus de Freitas

    2014-05-14

    Envenoming caused by scorpion sting is a serious public health problem. In Brazil, 13,038 accidents caused by venomous animals have been reported. Of this total, 53% of the cases and 14 deaths were caused by scorpions. Furthermore, Tityus serrulatus (Buthidae) is the most dangerous scorpion due to the high toxicity of its venom. The treatment is the common supportive therapy and the serum therapy, but some people do not have access to both therapies and seek healing through the use of medical plants. This study evaluated the ability of the crude extract and fractions from the leaves of Ipomoea asarifolia in neutralizing the main biological effects caused by Tityus serrulatus envenoming in mice. BALB/c mice were pretreated (i.v.) with 100 μλ of aqueous extracts and fractions dichloromethane, ethyl acetate, and n-butanol (CH₂Cl₂, EtOAc, and n-BuOH, respectively) of Ipomoea asarifolia, rutin or saline. Then, the animals received 100 μλ (i.p.) of venom of Tityus serrulatus (0.8 mg/kg). After six hours, the peritoneal lavage was performed with PBS and the number cells were determined using a Neubauer chamber. The supernatants were collected for determination of cytokines, such as IL-6, IL-12, and IL-1β. The aqueous extract, fractions and rutin, at all doses, significantly reduced cell migration, which was endorsed by the reduction of the levels of certain cytokines. This is the first study that demonstrated the potential effect of Ipomoea asarifolia against inflammation caused by Tityus serrulatus venom, suggesting that these extracts and/or their bioactive molecules, especially the flavonoid rutin, have potential use in the therapy of this envenomation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Phytoremediation of lead using Ipomoea aquatica Forsk. in hydroponic solution.

    PubMed

    Bedabati Chanu, Laitonjam; Gupta, Abhik

    2016-08-01

    Ipomoea aquatica Forsk., an aquatic macrophyte, was assessed for its ability to accumulate lead (Pb) by exposing it to graded concentrations of this metal. Accumulation of Pb was the highest in root followed by that in stem and leaf with translocation factor (TF) values of less than unity. On the other hand, all bioconcentration factor (BCF) values in root, stem and leaf were greater than unity. Furthermore, exposure to Pb concentrations over about 20 mg L(-1) induced colour changes in the basal portion of stem which had significantly higher Pb accumulation than that in the unaffected apical part. This resulted in sequestration of excess metal in affected stem tissue, which could take up Pb by the process of caulofiltration or shoot filtration, and served as a secondary reservoir of Pb in addition to the root. The apical parts contained less lead and could regrow roots from nodes and survive when kept in Pb-free medium. The ability of the plant to store Pb in its root and lower part of stem coupled with its ability to propagate by fragmentation through production of adventitious roots and lateral branches from nodes raises the possibility of utilizing Ipomoea aquatica for Pb phytoremediation from liquid effluent. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Poly(acrylonitrile) grafted Ipomoea seed-gums: a renewable reservoir to industrial gums.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vandana; Tiwari, Ashutosh; Tripathi, Devendra Narayan; Sanghi, Rashmi

    2005-01-01

    Plants of Ipomoea genus are widely distributed in India as wild vegetation and are reported source for the seed gums. Seed gums from Ipomoea dasysperma, Ipomoea hederacea, and Ipomoea palmata plants were grafted with polyacrylonitrile (PAN) using potassium persulfate/ascorbic acid redox initiator for modifying their properties for potential industrial applications. Under identical grafting conditions, the extent of the grafting was observed to be dependent on the galactose-to-mannose ratio and the degree of the branching in the galactomannans. Viscosity, gel formation, film formation, and the shelf life of the grafted gum solutions and water and saline retention capacity of the grafted seed gums were determined and compared with the parent gums. Water retention of the alkalie hydrolyzed grafted seed gums were also studied. Grafted gums were characterized using FTIR, NMR, and XRD analysis.

  8. A novel role of ethephon in controlling the noxious weed Ipomoea cairica (Linn.) Sweet

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhong-Yu; Zhang, Tai-Jie; Su, Jin-Quan; Soon Chow, Wah; Liu, Jia-Qin; Chen, Li-Ling; Li, Wei-Hua; Peng, Shao-Lin; Peng, Chang-Lian

    2015-01-01

    Several auxin herbicides, such as 2, 4-D and dicamba, have been used to eradicate an exotic invasive weed Ipomoea cairica in subtropical China, but restraining the re-explosion of this weed is still a challenge. Since ethylene is one of the major intermediate functioning products during the eradication process, we explored the possibility, mechanism and efficiency of using ethephon which can release ethylene to control Ipomoea cairica. The results of the pot experiment showed that 7.2 g /L ethephon could totally kill Ipomoea cairica including the stems and roots. The water culture experiment indicated that ethephon released an abundance of ethylene directly in leaves and caused increases in electrolyte leakage, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC), abscisic acid (ABA) and H2O2 and decreases in chlorophyll content and photosynthetic activity, finally leading to the death of Ipomoea cairica. The field experiment showed that the theoretical effective concentration of ethephon for controlling Ipomoea cairica (weed control efficacy, WCE = 98%) was 4.06 g/L and the half inhibitory concentration (I50) was 0.56 g/L. More than 50% of the accompanying species were insensitive to the phytotoxicity of ethephon. Therefore, ethephon is an excellent alternative herbicide for controlling Ipomoea cairica. PMID:26087386

  9. A novel role of ethephon in controlling the noxious weed Ipomoea cairica (Linn.) Sweet.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhong-Yu; Zhang, Tai-Jie; Su, Jin-Quan; Chow, Wah Soon; Liu, Jia-Qin; Chen, Li-Ling; Li, Wei-Hua; Peng, Shao-Lin; Peng, Chang-Lian

    2015-06-18

    Several auxin herbicides, such as 2, 4-D and dicamba, have been used to eradicate an exotic invasive weed Ipomoea cairica in subtropical China, but restraining the re-explosion of this weed is still a challenge. Since ethylene is one of the major intermediate functioning products during the eradication process, we explored the possibility, mechanism and efficiency of using ethephon which can release ethylene to control Ipomoea cairica. The results of the pot experiment showed that 7.2 g /L ethephon could totally kill Ipomoea cairica including the stems and roots. The water culture experiment indicated that ethephon released an abundance of ethylene directly in leaves and caused increases in electrolyte leakage, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC), abscisic acid (ABA) and H2O2 and decreases in chlorophyll content and photosynthetic activity, finally leading to the death of Ipomoea cairica. The field experiment showed that the theoretical effective concentration of ethephon for controlling Ipomoea cairica (weed control efficacy, WCE = 98%) was 4.06 g/L and the half inhibitory concentration (I50) was 0.56 g/L. More than 50% of the accompanying species were insensitive to the phytotoxicity of ethephon. Therefore, ethephon is an excellent alternative herbicide for controlling Ipomoea cairica.

  10. Antioxidant activities of two metallothionein-like proteins from sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas [L.] Lam. `Tainong 57') storage roots and their synthesized peptides.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shyh-Shyun; Deng, Jeng-Shyan; Chen, Hsien-Jung; Lin, Yaw-Huei; Huang, Guan-Jhong

    2014-12-01

    Metallothionein (MT) characterized by their low molecular weight and high cysteine content. Two recombinant proteins of MT-I and MT-II overproduced in E. coli (M15) was purified by Ni(2+)-chelated affinity chromatography. The molecular mass of MT-I and MT-II are ca. 6,600 and 8,000 Da as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Total antioxidant status, DPPH radical scavenging activity, reducing power method, Fe(2+)-chelating ability, ferric thiocyanate (FTC) method, and protecting calf thymus DNA against hydroxyl radical-induced damage were studied. The MT-I and MT-II proteins with a concentration of 100 μg/mL exhibited the highest activity (expressed respectively as 61.72 ± 0.13 and 74.28 ± 1.15 μM Trolox equivalent antioxidative capacity, TEAC) in total antioxidant status test. Like total antioxidant status, DPPH radical scavenging activity, reducing power, Fe(2+)-chelating ability, FTC activity, and protecting calf thymus DNA against hydroxyl radical-induced damage all showed that MT-1 and MT-II proteins have antioxidant activities. In this study, we also found that antioxidant activities of MT-I and MT-II increased from 17% and 16% (0 h) to about 26% and 28% (24 h) after 24 h hydrolysis by trypsin. Smaller peptides increased the antioxidant activities. Four and three peptides, respectively, from MT-I and MT-II protein sequences for testing antioxidative activity were synthesized according to tryptic hydrolysis simulation. The obtained MSSGCK, CGSDCK, LTLEGSSEK, ATEGGHACK, CGNGCGGCK, and CDPCNCK showed IC50 values of 309.87, 1423.37, 3925.54, 561.32, 300.76, and 610.12 μM, respectively, when scavenging activity of DPPH radicals (%) was measured. These findings mean that a cysteine residue is most important in antiradical activities. It was suggested that MT-I and MT-II might contribute their antioxidant activities against hydroxyl and peroxyl radicals.

  11. Accumulation of lead and arsenic in Malabar spinach (Basella alba L.) and sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L.) leaves grown on urban and orchard soils.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Migration of people of different ethnic backgrounds to U.S. urban areas has resulted in different ethnic vegetable crops being grown in urban gardens. There are concerns that some ethnic vegetable crops may accumulate heavy metals when grown on urban soils. The objective of this study was to evalua...

  12. The potential of computer vision, optical backscattering parameters and artificial neural network modelling in monitoring the shrinkage of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L.) during drying.

    PubMed

    Onwude, Daniel I; Hashim, Norhashila; Abdan, Khalina; Janius, Rimfiel; Chen, Guangnan

    2017-07-30

    Drying is a method used to preserve agricultural crops. During the drying of products with high moisture content, structural changes in shape, volume, area, density and porosity occur. These changes could affect the final quality of dried product and also the effective design of drying equipment. Therefore, this study investigated a novel approach in monitoring and predicting the shrinkage of sweet potato during drying. Drying experiments were conducted at temperatures of 50-70 °C and samples thicknesses of 2-6 mm. The volume and surface area obtained from camera vision, and the perimeter and illuminated area from backscattered optical images were analysed and used to evaluate the shrinkage of sweet potato during drying. The relationship between dimensionless moisture content and shrinkage of sweet potato in terms of volume, surface area, perimeter and illuminated area was found to be linearly correlated. The results also demonstrated that the shrinkage of sweet potato based on computer vision and backscattered optical parameters is affected by the product thickness, drying temperature and drying time. A multilayer perceptron (MLP) artificial neural network with input layer containing three cells, two hidden layers (18 neurons), and five cells for output layer, was used to develop a model that can monitor, control and predict the shrinkage parameters and moisture content of sweet potato slices under different drying conditions. The developed ANN model satisfactorily predicted the shrinkage and dimensionless moisture content of sweet potato with correlation coefficient greater than 0.95. Combined computer vision, laser light backscattering imaging and artificial neural network can be used as a non-destructive, rapid and easily adaptable technique for in-line monitoring, predicting and controlling the shrinkage and moisture changes of food and agricultural crops during drying. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. Effect of including sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas Lam) meal in finishing pig diets on growth performance, carcass traits and pork quality.

    PubMed

    Pietrosemoli, Silvana; Moron-Fuenmayor, Oneida Elizabeth; Paez, Angel; Villamide, Maria Jesús

    2016-10-01

    The partial replacement of a commercial concentrate at 10-20% and 15-30% (the first percentage of each dietary treatment corresponded to weeks 1-3 and the second to weeks 4-7 of the experiment, respectively) by sweet potato meal (SPM; 70% foliage: 30% roots) was evaluated for growth performance, carcass yield, instrumental and sensory pork quality using 36 commercial crossbred pigs (56.8 ± 1.3 kg initial body weight). Three dietary treatments were compared in a randomized complete block design. Most growth, carcass traits and pork quality variables were not affected by the SPM inclusion. Growth performance averaged 868 g/day and feed efficiency 0.24 kg/kg. However, feed intake increased 2.2% (P = 0.04) in pigs fed the 10-20% SPM diets, in a similar order of magnitude as the decrease in dietary energy. Despite an increase in gastrointestinal tract as a percent of hot carcass weight (+14.7%) (P = 0.03) with SPM inclusion, carcass yield averaged 69.4%. Conversely, decreases in loin yield (-4.2%) (P = 0.05), backfat thickness (-6.0%) (P < 0.01) and pork tenderness (-13%) (P = 0.02) were observed with 15-30% SPM inclusion. Results suggest that up to 20% SPM inclusion is a viable feed strategy for finishing pigs, easily replicable in small farm settings. © 2016 Japanese Society of Animal Science. © 2016 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  14. Heterogeneity of poly(A) sites in the granule-bound starch synthase I gene in sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.).

    PubMed

    Kimura, Takashi; Saito, Akira

    2010-01-01

    Analysis of the cDNAs of granule-bound starch synthase I (GBSSI) in sweet potato indicated that six types of GBSSI were expressed in the tuberous root, and that the poly(A) sites in GBSSI were highly heterogeneous. Several poly(A) sites were located within or downstream of the polymorphic TA repeat. The GBSSI gene has a 23-nucleotide A-rich sequence in the 3' untranslated region, and we believe that the main near-upstream elements of the poly(A) signal are included in this sequence.

  15. Chemical composition, nitrogen degradability and in vitro ruminal biological activity of tannins in vines harvested from four tropical sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L.) varieties.

    PubMed

    Ali, R; Mlambo, V; Mangwe, M C; Dlamini, B J

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated the potential of vines from four sweet potato varieties (Tia Nong 57, Tia Nong 66, Ligwalagwala and Kenya) as alternative feed resources for ruminant livestock. The chemical composition [neutral detergent fibre (NDF), acid detergent fibre (ADF), crude protein (CP) and acid detergent insoluble nitrogen (ADIN)], in vitro ruminal nitrogen (N) degradability and in vitro ruminal biological activity of tannins in the vines, harvested at 70 and 110 days after planting (DAP), were determined. Variety and harvesting stage did not (p > 0.05) influence CP and NDF content of the vines. Concentration of CP ranged from 104.9 to 212.2 g/kg DM, while NDF ranged from 439.4 to 529.2 g/kg DM across harvesting stages and varieties. Nitrogen degradability (ND) at 70 and 110 DAP was highest (p < 0.05) in Ligwalagwala (743.1 and 985.0 g/kg DM, respectively). Treatment of vines with tannin-binding polyethylene glycol (PEG) increased (p < 0.05) in vitro ruminal cumulative gas production parameters (a, b and c). The in vitro ruminal biological activity of tannins, as measured by increment in gas production parameters upon PEG inclusion, had a maximum value of 18.2%, suggesting low to moderate antinutritional tannin activity. Ligwalagwala vines, with highly degradable N, would be the best protein supplement to use during the dry season when ruminant animals consume low N basal diets and maintenance is an acceptable production objective. Tia Nong 66 and Kenya varieties, with less degradable N, may be more suitable for use as supplements for high-producing animals such as dairy goats.

  16. Distribution of Phenolic Compounds and Antioxidative Activities in Parts of Sweet Potato (Ipomoea batata L.) plants and in home processed roots

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We measured six phenolic compounds by HPLC, the total phenolic content by Folin-Ciocalteu, and antioxidative activities by three methods in the sweet potato plant and in home processed roots. Total phenolic content was highest in the leaves. Eight root varieties were partitioned and analyzed for p...

  17. De novo assembly and characterization of root transcriptome using Illumina paired-end sequencing and development of cSSR markers in sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The tuberous root of sweetpotato is an important agricultural and biological organ. There are not sufficient transcriptomic and genomic data in public databases for understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying the tuberous root formation and development. Thus, high throughput transcriptome sequencing is needed to generate enormous transcript sequences from sweetpotato root for gene discovery and molecular marker development. Results In this study, more than 59 million sequencing reads were generated using Illumina paired-end sequencing technology. De novo assembly yielded 56,516 unigenes with an average length of 581 bp. Based on sequence similarity search with known proteins, a total of 35,051 (62.02%) genes were identified. Out of these annotated unigenes, 5,046 and 11,983 unigenes were assigned to gene ontology and clusters of orthologous group, respectively. Searching against the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes Pathway database (KEGG) indicated that 17,598 (31.14%) unigenes were mapped to 124 KEGG pathways, and 11,056 were assigned to metabolic pathways, which were well represented by carbohydrate metabolism and biosynthesis of secondary metabolite. In addition, 4,114 cDNA SSRs (cSSRs) were identified as potential molecular markers in our unigenes. One hundred pairs of PCR primers were designed and used for validation of the amplification and assessment of the polymorphism in genomic DNA pools. The result revealed that 92 primer pairs were successfully amplified in initial screening tests. Conclusion This study generated a substantial fraction of sweetpotato transcript sequences, which can be used to discover novel genes associated with tuberous root formation and development and will also make it possible to construct high density microarrays for further characterization of gene expression profiles during these processes. Thousands of cSSR markers identified in the present study can enrich molecular markers and will facilitate marker-assisted selection in sweetpotato breeding. Overall, these sequences and markers will provide valuable resources for the sweetpotato community. Additionally, these results also suggested that transcriptome analysis based on Illumina paired-end sequencing is a powerful tool for gene discovery and molecular marker development for non-model species, especially those with large and complex genome. PMID:21182800

  18. Physical Characteristics of White Sweet Potato (Ipomoea batatas L.), Rice (Oryza sativa L.), and Tapioca (Manihot esculenta) Flours - Based Seasoning Composite Flour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfani, NNA; Ishartani, D.; Anam, C.; Praseptiangga, D.; Manuhara, G. J.

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the physical characteristics of seasoning composite flour that made from white sweet potato, rice, and tapioca flours, and determined the best formula of seasoning composite flour. A completely randomized design (CRD) with formula as the single factor was used. The data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA method and followed by Duncan Multiple Range Test (DMRT) at significance 5% if there was a significant difference. The best formula of seasoning composite flour was 30% tapioca flour, 30% rice flour, and 40% white sweet potato flour. The physical characteristics of the best formula were 5.689 ml/g of swelling power, 2.681 g/g of water absorption capacity, 0.887 ml/g of oil absorption capacity, and 22.03% cooking loss. Physical characteristics of the best seasoning composite flour were significantly different from the commercial seasoning flour and showed a better cooking loss, oil absorption capacity, and swelling power than commercial seasoning flour.

  19. The effect of coloured light on Ipomoea purpurea growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surducan, Vasile; Lung, Ildiko; Surducan, Emanoil

    2009-08-01

    Ipomoea purpurea is a climbing ornamental plant native to Mexico. The paper is describing the experimental setup and results for indoor growing plants exposed to white LED light (inside a reference chamber) and four different wavelength LED lights (inside a measure chamber). Four growing experiments of 12-15 days, took place in identical environmental conditions (identical temperature and relative humidity inside the reference and measure chambers, similar lighting conditions and soil moisture). At the end of the experiments, the plant chlorophyll and xanthophylls content have been measured and the plant aspect (vegetal mass, leaves colour and robustness) has been observed. The smallest content in chlorophyll (a and b) was developed by the plants growth in blue light (480 nm), however those plants where 10% taller than plants growth in white light, but less robust. The higher content in carotenoids and xanthophylls was observed in plants which growth in white and red light.

  20. Pentasaccharide resin glycosides from Ipomoea cairica and their cytotoxic activities.

    PubMed

    Yu, Bangwei; Luo, Jianguang; Wang, Junsong; Zhang, Dongming; Yu, Shishan; Kong, Lingyi

    2013-11-01

    Six partially acylated pentasaccharide resin glycosides, cairicosides A-F, were isolated from the aerial parts of Ipomoea cairica. These compounds were characterized as a group of macrolactones of simonic acid A, partially acylated with different organic acids. The lactonization site of 11S-hydroxyhexadecanoic acid (jalapinolic acid) was bound to the second saccharide moiety at C-3 in cairicosides A-E, while at C-2 in cairicoside F. Structures were established by spectroscopic and chemical methods. Compounds cairicosides A-E exhibited moderate cytotoxicity against a small panel of human tumor cell lines with IC50 values in the range of 4.28-14.31μM. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Ipomoea hederifolia rooted soil bed and Ipomoea aquatica rhizofiltration coupled phytoreactors for efficient treatment of textile wastewater.

    PubMed

    Rane, Niraj R; Patil, Swapnil M; Chandanshive, Vishal V; Kadam, Suhas K; Khandare, Rahul V; Jadhav, Jyoti P; Govindwar, Sanjay P

    2016-06-01

    Ipomoea aquatica, a macrophyte was found to degrade a highly sulfonated and diazo textile dye Brown 5R up to 94% within 72 h at a concentration of 200 mg L(-1). Induction in the activities of enzymes such as azoreductase, lignin peroxidase, laccase, DCIP reductase, tyrosinase, veratryl alcohol oxidase, catalase and superoxide dismutase was observed in leaf and root tissue in response to Brown 5R exposure. There was significant reduction in contents of chlorophyll a (25%), chlorophyll b (17%) and carotenoids (30%) in the leaves of plants. HPLC, FTIR, UV-vis spectrophotometric and HPTLC analyses confirmed the biotransformation and removal of parent dye from solution. Enzymes activities and GC-MS analysis of degradation products lead to the proposal of a possible pathway of phytotransformation of dye. The proposed pathway of dye metabolism revealed the formation of Napthalene-1,2-diamine and methylbenzene. Toxicity study on HepG2 cell lines showed a 3 fold decrease in toxicity of Brown 5R after phytoremediation by I. aquatica. Hydrophytic nature of I. aquatica leads to its exploration in a combinatorial phytoreactor with Ipomoea hederifolia soil bed system. Rhizofiltration with I. aquatica and soil bed treatment by I. hederifolia treated 510 L of effluent effectively within 72 h. I. aquatica along with I. hederifolia could decolorize textile industry effluent within 72 h of treatment as evident from the significant reductions in the values of COD, BOD, solids and ADMI. Further on field trials of treatment of textile wastewater was successfully carried out in a constructed lagoon. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The role of stamens in ethylene production in Ipomoea nil

    SciTech Connect

    Kiss, H.G.

    1989-01-01

    Ethylene production inhibits filament and corolla growth during young stages in flower development, and it promotes corolla unfolding and senescence in Ipomoea nil. Initial studies with the in vitro application of gibberellic acid (GA{sub 3}), demonstrated that decreased filament growth occurred when the anthers remained attached to the filaments during the young stages in development. The removal of the anthers from intact plants did not enhance filament growth until the synthesis of wound ethylene was inhibited by applied aminoethoxyvinylglycine (AVG) or cobalt chloride. It was hypothesized that the anthers were source tissues and that the filaments were transport vectors for the ethylene precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) to regulate growth events in the various floral organs. To test this hypothesis, endogenous IAA and ACC and ethylene production were measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) or gas chromatography. The transport of {sup 14}C-IAA and {sup 14}C-ACC through filament segments and filaments within intact flower buds also was examined during flower development.

  3. Is Allelopathic Activity of Ipomoea murucoides Induced by Xylophage Damage?

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Palacios, Alejandro; Corona-López, Angélica María; Rios, María Yolanda; Aguilar-Guadarrama, Berenice; Toledo-Hernández, Víctor Hugo; Rodríguez-López, Verónica; Valencia-Díaz, Susana

    2015-01-01

    Herbivory activates the synthesis of allelochemicals that can mediate plant-plant interactions. There is an inverse relationship between the activity of xylophages and the abundance of epiphytes on Ipomoea murucoides. Xylophagy may modify the branch chemical constitution, which also affects the liberation of allelochemicals with defense and allelopathic properties. We evaluated the bark chemical content and the effect of extracts from branches subjected to treatments of exclusion, mechanical damage and the presence/absence of epiphytes, on the seed germination of the epiphyte Tillandsia recurvata. Principal component analysis showed that branches without any treatment separate from branches subjected to treatments; damaged and excluded branches had similar chemical content but we found no evidence to relate intentional damage with allelopathy; however 1-hexadecanol, a defense volatile compound correlated positively with principal component (PC) 1. The chemical constitution of branches subject to exclusion plus damage or plus epiphytes was similar among them. PC2 indicated that palmitic acid (allelopathic compound) and squalene, a triterpene that attracts herbivore enemies, correlated positively with the inhibition of seed germination of T. recurvata. Inhibition of seed germination of T. recurvata was mainly correlated with the increment of palmitic acid and this compound reached higher concentrations in excluded branches treatments. Then, it is likely that the allelopathic response of I. murucoides would increase to the damage (shade, load) that may be caused by a high load of epiphytes than to damage caused by the xylophages. PMID:26625350

  4. Is Allelopathic Activity of Ipomoea murucoides Induced by Xylophage Damage?

    PubMed

    Flores-Palacios, Alejandro; Corona-López, Angélica María; Rios, María Yolanda; Aguilar-Guadarrama, Berenice; Toledo-Hernández, Víctor Hugo; Rodríguez-López, Verónica; Valencia-Díaz, Susana

    2015-01-01

    Herbivory activates the synthesis of allelochemicals that can mediate plant-plant interactions. There is an inverse relationship between the activity of xylophages and the abundance of epiphytes on Ipomoea murucoides. Xylophagy may modify the branch chemical constitution, which also affects the liberation of allelochemicals with defense and allelopathic properties. We evaluated the bark chemical content and the effect of extracts from branches subjected to treatments of exclusion, mechanical damage and the presence/absence of epiphytes, on the seed germination of the epiphyte Tillandsia recurvata. Principal component analysis showed that branches without any treatment separate from branches subjected to treatments; damaged and excluded branches had similar chemical content but we found no evidence to relate intentional damage with allelopathy; however 1-hexadecanol, a defense volatile compound correlated positively with principal component (PC) 1. The chemical constitution of branches subject to exclusion plus damage or plus epiphytes was similar among them. PC2 indicated that palmitic acid (allelopathic compound) and squalene, a triterpene that attracts herbivore enemies, correlated positively with the inhibition of seed germination of T. recurvata. Inhibition of seed germination of T. recurvata was mainly correlated with the increment of palmitic acid and this compound reached higher concentrations in excluded branches treatments. Then, it is likely that the allelopathic response of I. murucoides would increase to the damage (shade, load) that may be caused by a high load of epiphytes than to damage caused by the xylophages.

  5. Alkaloidal components in the poisonous plant, Ipomoea carnea (Convolvulaceae).

    PubMed

    Haraguchi, Mitsue; Gorniak, Silvana L; Ikeda, Kyoko; Minami, Yasuhiro; Kato, Atsushi; Watson, Alison A; Nash, Robert J; Molyneux, Russell J; Asano, Naoki

    2003-08-13

    Natural intoxication of livestock by the ingestion of Ipomoea carnea (Convolvulaceae) sometimes occurs in tropical regions of the world. Polyhydroxylated alkaloids were isolated from the leaves, flowers, and seeds of the poisonous plant and characterized. Chromatographic separation of the leaf extract resulted in the isolation of swainsonine (1), 2-epi-lentiginosine (2), calystegines B(1) (3), B(2) (4), B(3) (5), and C(1) (6), and N-methyl-trans-4-hydroxy-l-proline (7). The contents of 1 in the fresh leaves and flowers were 0.0029 and 0.0028%, respectively, whereas the contents of 1, 3, and 4 in the seeds were approximately 10 times higher than those in the leaves and flowers. Alkaloids 3, 4, and 6 showed a potent inhibitory activity toward rat lysosomal beta-glucosidase, with IC(50) values of 2.1, 0.75, and 0.84 microM, respectively, and alkaloid 5 was a moderate inhibitor of alpha- and beta-mannosidases. Although alkaloid 1 is known as a powerful inhibitor of lysosomal alpha-mannosidase (IC(50) = 0.02 microM), alkaloid 2, which has been thought to be an intermediate in the biosynthesis of 1, was also a potent inhibitor of alpha-mannosidase with an IC(50) value of 4.6 microM.

  6. Possible glyphosate tolerance mechanism in pitted morningglory (Ipomoea lacunosa L.).

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Daniela N; Nandula, Vijay K; Dayan, Franck E; Rimando, Agnes M; Duke, Stephen O; Reddy, Krishna N; Shaw, David R

    2015-02-18

    Natural tolerance of Ipomoea lacunosa to glyphosate has made it problematic in the southeastern U.S. since the adoption of glyphosate-resistant crops. Experiments were conducted to determine (i) the variability in tolerance to glyphosate among accessions, (ii) if there is any correlation between metabolism of glyphosate to aminomethylphosponic acid (AMPA) or sarcosine and the level of tolerance, and (iii) the involvement of differential translocation in tolerance to glyphosate. Fourteen I. lacunosa accessions had GR50 values ranging from 58 to 151 grams of acid equivalent per hectare (ae/ha) glyphosate, a 2.6-fold variability in tolerance to glyphosate. There was no evidence of the most tolerant (MT) accession metabolizing glyphosate to AMPA more rapidly than the least tolerant (LT) accession. Metabolism to sarcosine was not found. (14)C-glyphosate absorption was similar in the two accessions. LT accession translocated more (14)C-glyphosate than MT accession at 24 and 48 h after treatment. Differential translocation partly explains glyphosate tolerance in MT accession.

  7. Elimination of ergoline alkaloids following treatment of Ipomoea asarifolia (Convolvulaceae) with fungicides.

    PubMed

    Kucht, Sabine; Gross, Julia; Hussein, Yasser; Grothe, Torsten; Keller, Ullrich; Basar, Simla; König, Wilfried A; Steiner, Ulrike; Leistner, Eckhard

    2004-08-01

    Ergoline alkaloids are constituents of Clavicipitaceous fungi living on Poaceae plants. Ergoline alkaloids as well as volatile oil are also present in Ipomoea asarifolia Roem. & Schult (Convolvulaceae). Treatment of this plant with two fungicides (Folicur, Pronto Plus) eliminates the ergoline alkaloids but not the volatile oil. Elimination of ergoline alkaloids occurs concomitantly with loss of fungal hyphae associated with secretory glands on the upper leaf surface of the Ipomoea plant. Our observations suggest that accumulation of ergoline alkaloids in the Convolvulaceae may depend on the presence of a plant-associated fungus.

  8. Conditioned food aversion for control of poisoning by Ipomoea carnea subsp. fistulosa

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Conditioned food aversion is a technique that can be used to train livestock to avoid ingestion of poisonous plants. This study tested the efficacy and durability of conditioned food aversion to eliminate goat’s consumption of Ipomoea carnea subsp. fistulosa. We used 14 young Moxotó goats, which wer...

  9. Effects of prepartum ingestion of Ipomoea carnea on postpartum maternal and neonate behavior in goats

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ipomoea carnea (I. carnea) is a toxic plant that grows in tropical areas, and is readily consumed by grazing goats. The plant contains the alkaloids swainsonine and calystegines, which inhibit cellular enzymes and cause systematic cell death. This study evaluated the behavioral effects on dams and k...

  10. Conditioned food aversion to control outbreaks of intoxication by Ipomoea carnea and Turbina cordata in goats

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Conditioned food aversion is used to train livestock to avoid the ingestion of toxic plants. This technique was used to control Turbina cordata poisoning in goats in one farm, and to control Ipomoea carnea subsp. istulosa poisoning in another farm. The goats were penned at night and the next mornin...

  11. The use of ultrasonography to study teratogenicity in ruminants: Evaluation of Ipomoea carnea in goats

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ipomoea carnea (I. carnea) is a poisonous plant found in Brazil and other tropical countries that often poison livestock. The plant contains calystegines and swainsonine, which inhibit cellular enzymes and cause systematic cell death. The objective of this study was to evaluate the perinatal effects...

  12. Conditioned food aversion to Ipomoea carnea var. fistulosa induced by Baccharis coridifolia in goats

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Baccharis coridifolia is a plant that induces strong conditioned food aversion in ruminants. This research aimed to induce a conditioned food aversion to Ipomoea carnea var. fistulosa in goats, using B. coridifolia as an aversive agent, and to compare the aversion induced by this plant with the aver...

  13. Maternal ingestion of Ipomoea carnea: Effects on goat-kid bonding and behavior

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ipomoea carnea is a toxic plant found in Brazil and other tropical and subtropical countries and often causes poisoning of livestock. The plant contains the alkaloids swainsonine and calystegines, which inhibit key cellular enzymes and cause systematic cell death. This study evaluated the behavioral...

  14. Changes in swainsonine, calystegine, and nitrogen concentrations on an annual basis in Ipomoea carnea

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ipomoea carnea, a swainsonine containing plant, is known to cause a neurologic disease in grazing livestock in Brazil and other parts of the world. To better understand the relative toxicity and nutritional content of I. carnea, we investigated swainsonine, calystegines, and crude protein concentra...

  15. Neonate behavior in goats is affected by maternal ingestion of Ipomoea carnea

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ipomoea carnea is a toxic plant that grows in tropical areas, and is readily consumed by grazing goats. The plant contains the alkaloids swainsonine and calystegines, which inhibit cellular enzymes and cause systematic cell death. This study evaluated the behavioral effects on dams and kids of prena...

  16. Alpha-mannosidosis in goats caused by the swainsonine-containing plant Ipomoea verbascoidea

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A disease of the nervous system is reported in goats in the semiarid region of northeastern Brazil. Histological examination showed diffuse vacuolation of neurons and epithelial cells of the pancreas, thyroid, renal tubules, and liver. The swainsonine-containing plant Ipomoea verbascoidea was found ...

  17. Conditioned food aversion to control poisoning by Ipomoea carnea subsp. fistulosa in goats

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ipomoea carnea is a toxic plant often ingested by livestock in Brazil. Three experiments were conducted to determine if conditioned food aversion was effective in reducing goats’ consumption of I. carnea. In the fi rst experiment, 10 mildly intoxicated goats that had been eating I. carnea were avert...

  18. Production of the alkaloid swainsonine by a fungal endosymbiont of the ascomycete order Chaetothyriales in the host Ipomoea carnea.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Some plant species within the Convolvulaceae (morning glory family) from South America, Africa, and Australia cause a neurologic disease in grazing livestock caused by swainsonine. These convolvulaceous species including Ipomoea carnea contain the indolizidine alkaloid swainsonine, an inhibitor of ...

  19. Rhizobium ipomoeae sp. nov., isolated from a water convolvulus field.

    PubMed

    Sheu, Shih-Yi; Chen, Zih-Han; Young, Chiu-Chung; Chen, Wen-Ming

    2016-04-01

    A bacterial strain, designated shin9-1T, was isolated from a water sample taken from a water convolvulus field in Taiwan and characterized using a polyphasic taxonomical approach. Cells of strain shin9-1T were aerobic, Gram-stain-negative, rod-shaped and surrounded by a thick capsule and formed cream-coloured colonies. Growth occurred at 10-45 °C (optimum, 30 °C), with 0-3.0% NaCl (optimum, 0.5%) and at pH 7.0-9.0 (optimum, pH 7.0). Strain shin9-1T did not form nodules on a legume plant, Macroptilium atropurpureum, and the nodulation genes nodA, nodC and the nitrogenase reductase gene nifH were not detected by PCR. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA and three housekeeping gene sequences (recA, atpD and rpoB) showed that strain shin9-1T belonged to the genus Rhizobium. Strain shin9-1T had the highest level of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with respect to Rhizobium daejeonense L61T (97.6 %). The major fatty acid of strain shin9-1T was C18:1ω7c. The polar lipid profile consisted of phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine, diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylmonomethylethanolamine and several uncharacterized lipids. The DNA G+C content was 58.3 mol%. The DNA-DNA relatedness of strain shin9-1T with respect to recognized species of the genus Rhizobium was less than 70%. Phenotypic characteristics of the novel strain also differed from those of the most closely related species of the genus Rhizobium. On the basis of the phylogenetic inference and phenotypic data, strain shin9-1T should be classified as a representative of a novel species, for which the name Rhizobium ipomoeae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is shin9-1T (=LMG 27163T=KCTC 32148T).

  20. Somatic embryogenesis and plant regeneration in tissue cultures of sweet potato (Ipomea batatas Poir.).

    PubMed

    Liu, J R; Cantliffe, D J

    1984-06-01

    Leaf, shoot-tip, stem, and root explants of sweet potato (Ipomea batatas Poir.) gave rise to two kinds of callus on nutrient agar medium containing 0.5 to 2.0 mg/l 2,4-D. One callus, bright- to pale-yellow, was compact and organized, while the other was dull-yellow and friable. The former callus gave rise to numerous globular and heart-shaped embryoids. When transferred onto hormone-free medium, the embryoids readily developed into a torpedo-shape before germination. The plantlets were transplanted to soil where they flowered and formed storage roots at maturity.

  1. Reconstruction of muon tracks in a buried plastic scintillator muon telescope (BATATA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riggi, S.; Insolia, A.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Trovato, E.

    2012-10-01

    The BATATA muon counter was designed as one of the foreseen detector upgrades of the Pierre Auger Observatory with the main goal of quantifying the electromagnetic contamination of the muon signal as a function of the depth for cosmic ray shower energies above 10 PeV. Nevertheless BATATA offers also the possibility of measuring the incoming direction of secondary muons from both GeV and PeV primary cosmic rays. Large efforts have been already done to quantify from simulations the amount of the electromagnetic contamination and the expected muon identification performances. The present work is focused on the evaluation of the detector performances for muon track reconstruction. To this aim and in view of the detector installation in the field, expected to be completed by the first half of current year, we performed a GEANT4 end-to-end simulation of such device and set up a track reconstruction procedure. Typical results concerning achieved acceptance and angular resolution for muons are presented.

  2. DNA relatedness among strains of the sweet potato pathogen Streptomyces ipomoea (Person and Martin 1940) Waksman and Henrici 1948.

    PubMed Central

    Labeda, D P; Lyons, A J

    1992-01-01

    DNA relatedness among 28 putative strains of Streptomyces ipomoea from geographically diverse locations and the type strain, NRRL B-12321, was determined spectrophotometrically. The data confirm that these 28 strains are not closely related genetically to the plant-pathogenic species Streptomyces scabies (39% DNA relatedness) or Streptomyces acidiscabies (17% DNA relatedness) or any other major blue-spored Streptomyces species (less than 30% DNA relatedness). Of the 29 strains examined, 4 could be clearly distinguished from S. ipomoea on the basis of morphological criteria, i.e., they had gray rather than blue spores and produced melanin pigment, and their low DNA relatedness to authentic S. ipomoea strains confirmed their original misidentification. The remaining 25 S. ipomoea strains exhibited high DNA relatedness among themselves (76 to 100% homology), even though they had been isolated in different locations throughout the United States and Japan. The avirulent type strain, NRRL B-12321, exhibited slightly lower DNA relatedness with the virulent strains of S. ipomoea (85% average DNA relatedness) than was observed among the virulent strains (average of 96% DNA relatedness). PMID:1610178

  3. DNA relatedness among strains of the sweet potato pathogen Streptomyces ipomoea (Person and Martin 1940) Waksman and Henrici 1948.

    PubMed

    Labeda, D P; Lyons, A J

    1992-02-01

    DNA relatedness among 28 putative strains of Streptomyces ipomoea from geographically diverse locations and the type strain, NRRL B-12321, was determined spectrophotometrically. The data confirm that these 28 strains are not closely related genetically to the plant-pathogenic species Streptomyces scabies (39% DNA relatedness) or Streptomyces acidiscabies (17% DNA relatedness) or any other major blue-spored Streptomyces species (less than 30% DNA relatedness). Of the 29 strains examined, 4 could be clearly distinguished from S. ipomoea on the basis of morphological criteria, i.e., they had gray rather than blue spores and produced melanin pigment, and their low DNA relatedness to authentic S. ipomoea strains confirmed their original misidentification. The remaining 25 S. ipomoea strains exhibited high DNA relatedness among themselves (76 to 100% homology), even though they had been isolated in different locations throughout the United States and Japan. The avirulent type strain, NRRL B-12321, exhibited slightly lower DNA relatedness with the virulent strains of S. ipomoea (85% average DNA relatedness) than was observed among the virulent strains (average of 96% DNA relatedness).

  4. Transcriptome Profiling of Beach Morning Glory (Ipomoea imperati) under Salinity and Its Comparative Analysis with Sweetpotato

    PubMed Central

    Solis, Julio; Baisakh, Niranjan; Brandt, Steven R.; Villordon, Arthur; La Bonte, Don

    2016-01-01

    The response and adaption to salt remains poorly understood for beach morning glory [Ipomoea imperati (Vahl) Griseb], one of a few relatives of sweetpotato, known to thrive under salty and extreme drought conditions. In order to understand the genetic mechanisms underlying salt tolerance of a Convolvulaceae member, a genome-wide transcriptome study was carried out in beach morning glory by 454 pyrosequencing. A total of 286,584 filtered reads from both salt stressed and unstressed (control) root and shoot tissues were assembled into 95,790 unigenes with an average length of 667 base pairs (bp) and N50 of 706 bp. Putative differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified as transcripts overrepresented under salt stressed tissues compared to the control, and were placed into metabolic pathways. Most of these DEGs were involved in stress response, membrane transport, signal transduction, transcription activity and other cellular and molecular processes. We further analyzed the gene expression of 14 candidate genes of interest for salt tolerance through quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) and confirmed their differential expression under salt stress in both beach morning glory and sweetpotato. The results comparing transcripts of I. imperati against the transcriptome of other Ipomoea species, including sweetpotato are also presented in this study. In addition, 6,233 SSR markers were identified, and an in silico analysis predicted that 434 primer pairs out of 4,897 target an identifiable homologous sequence in other Ipomoea transcriptomes, including sweetpotato. The data generated in this study will help in understanding the basics of salt tolerance of beach morning glory and the SSR resources generated will be useful for comparative genomics studies and further enhance the path to the marker-assisted breeding of sweetpotato for salt tolerance. PMID:26848754

  5. Isolation and identification of compounds with antinociceptive action from Ipomoea pes-caprae (L.) R. Br.

    PubMed

    Krogh, R; Kroth, R; Berti, C; Madeira, A O; Souza, M M; Cechinel-Filho, V; Delle-Monache, F; Yunes, R A

    1999-06-01

    This study describes the isolation and identification of several constituents from Ipomoea pes-caprae (L.) R. Br., a medicinal plant frequently employed in folk medicine of many countries as a remedy against several diseases, including inflammation and pain. Our results demonstrate that some of these compounds, such as glochidone, betulinic acid, alpha- and beta-amyrin acetate, isoquercitrin, etc. showed pronounced antinociceptive properties in the writhing test and formalin test in mice. These data confirm our previous work concerning the antinociceptive action of the hydroalcoholic extract of I. pes-caprae and justify, at least in part, the popular use of this plant for the treatment of dolorous processes.

  6. Ipomoeassin F, a new cytotoxic macrocyclic glycoresin from the leaves of Ipomoea squamosa from the Suriname rainforest.

    PubMed

    Cao, Shugeng; Norris, Andrew; Wisse, Jan H; Miller, James S; Evans, Randy; Kingston, David G I

    2007-08-01

    A new cytotoxic macrocyclic glycoresin, ipomoeassin F (6), has been isolated from the leaves of Ipomoea squamosa. The structure was elucidated by the interpretation of spectral data. Compound 6 was strongly active in the A2780 (human ovarian cancer cell line) assay with an IC(50) value of 0.036 microM.

  7. Bioaccumulation of metals and metalloids in medicinal plant Ipomoea pes-caprae from areas impacted by tsunami.

    PubMed

    Kozak, Lidia; Kokociński, Mikołaj; Niedzielski, Przemysław; Lorenc, Stanisław

    2015-02-01

    Tsunami events may have an enormous impact on the functioning of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems by altering various relationships with biotic components. Concentrations of acid-leachable fractions of heavy metals and metalloids in soils and plant samples from areas affected by the December 2004 tsunami in Thailand were determined. Ipomoea pes-caprae, a common plant species growing along the seashore of this region, and frequently used in folk medicine, was selected to assess the presence of selected elements. Elevated amounts of Cd, Pb, Zn, and As in soil samples, and Pb, Zn, As, Se, Cr, and Ni in plant samples were determined from the tsunami-impacted regions for comparison with reference locations. The flowers of Ipomoea pes-caprae contained the highest amounts of these metals, followed by its leaves, and stems. In addition, its bioaccumulation factor (BAF) supports this capability of high metal uptake by Ipomoea pes-caprae from the areas affected by the tsunami in comparison with a reference site. This uptake was followed by the translocation of these elements to the various plant components. The presence of these toxic metals in Ipomoea pes-caprae growing in contaminated soils should be a concern of those who use this plant for medicinal purposes. Further studies on the content of heavy metals and metalloids in this plant in relation to human health concerns are recommended. © 2014 SETAC.

  8. Ipvelutine, 7β-Acetoxy-2α-(tigloyloxy)tropane, an Unusual Tropane Alkaloid from Ipomoea velutina R. Br. (Convolvulaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Ott, Sonja Christina; Jenett-Siems, Kristina; Siems, Karsten; Müller, Frank; Hilker, Monika; Eich, Eckart

    2013-01-01

    Convolvulaceae provide a rich source of tropane alkaloids, however, 2-substituted tropanes have been described for only few species of this taxon. In this note, 2,7-diesters such as ipvelutine [7β-acetoxy-2α-(tigloyloxy)tropane] isolated from the vegetative parts of the Australian Ipomoea velutina R. BR. are described as a new group of tropane diesters. PMID:23833719

  9. Fatty acid profiles of Garuga floribunda, Ipomoea pes-caprae, Melanolepis multiglandulosa and Premna odorata seed oils

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The fatty acid profiles of the seed oils of four species from four plant families for which no or only sparse information on the fatty acid profiles is available are reported. The five seed oils are Garuga floribunda of the Burseraceae family, Ipomoea pes-caprae of the Convolvulaceae family, Melanol...

  10. Ipvelutine, 7β-Acetoxy-2α-(tigloyloxy)tropane, an Unusual Tropane Alkaloid from Ipomoea velutina R. Br. (Convolvulaceae).

    PubMed

    Ott, Sonja Christina; Jenett-Siems, Kristina; Siems, Karsten; Müller, Frank; Hilker, Monika; Eich, Eckart

    2013-01-01

    Convolvulaceae provide a rich source of tropane alkaloids, however, 2-substituted tropanes have been described for only few species of this taxon. In this note, 2,7-diesters such as ipvelutine [7β-acetoxy-2α-(tigloyloxy)tropane] isolated from the vegetative parts of the Australian Ipomoea velutina R. BR. are described as a new group of tropane diesters.

  11. Feeding preferences of experienced and naïve goats and sheep for the toxic plant Ipomoea carnea subsp. fistulosa

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ipomoea carnea is a toxic plant that grazing goats and cattle may learn to ingest with repeated exposure. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feeding preferences of experienced and non-experienced (naïve) goats and sheep for I. carnea. The study used 3 groups of 5 goats (Group 1, experi...

  12. Allelopathic potential ofIpomoea tricolor (Convolvulaceae) in a greenhouse experiment.

    PubMed

    Anaya, A L; Sabourin, D J; Hernandez-Bautista, B E; Mendez, I

    1995-08-01

    The allelopathic potential ofIpomoea tricolor, a plant used in Mexican agriculture to control weeds, and tricolorin A, the major phytogrowth inhibitor present in the so-called "resin glycosides" of this plant, have been evaluated by testing leachates of the plant and the compound on the germination and radicle growth ofAmaranthus hypochondriacus, Echinochloa crusgalli, Senna uniflora, I. tricolor, andI. purpurea. The allelopathic potential ofI. tricolor was evaluated in a greenhouse experiment with dryI. tricolor mixed with sterile and nonsterile soil in pots.A. hypochondriacus was sown in pots containingI. tricolor, 2-chloro-4-(ethylamino)-6-(isopropylamino)-1,3,5 triazine (Gesaprim) or 1-glyphosphate, and the glyphosphate salt of isopropylamine (Faena), two different commercial herbicides used as a comparison toI. tricolor. Number and dry weights of different monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous weeds andA. hypochondriacus growing in the different treatments were measured.Ipomoea and Faena herbicide had a similar inhibitory effect on monocots.

  13. Genome sequence and analysis of the Japanese morning glory Ipomoea nil

    PubMed Central

    Hoshino, Atsushi; Jayakumar, Vasanthan; Nitasaka, Eiji; Toyoda, Atsushi; Noguchi, Hideki; Itoh, Takehiko; Shin-I, Tadasu; Minakuchi, Yohei; Koda, Yuki; Nagano, Atsushi J.; Yasugi, Masaki; Honjo, Mie N.; Kudoh, Hiroshi; Seki, Motoaki; Kamiya, Asako; Shiraki, Toshiyuki; Carninci, Piero; Asamizu, Erika; Nishide, Hiroyo; Tanaka, Sachiko; Park, Kyeung-Il; Morita, Yasumasa; Yokoyama, Kohei; Uchiyama, Ikuo; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Tabata, Satoshi; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Kohara, Yuji; Suzuki, Yutaka; Sugano, Sumio; Fujiyama, Asao; Iida, Shigeru; Sakakibara, Yasubumi

    2016-01-01

    Ipomoea is the largest genus in the family Convolvulaceae. Ipomoea nil (Japanese morning glory) has been utilized as a model plant to study the genetic basis of floricultural traits, with over 1,500 mutant lines. In the present study, we have utilized second- and third-generation-sequencing platforms, and have reported a draft genome of I. nil with a scaffold N50 of 2.88 Mb (contig N50 of 1.87 Mb), covering 98% of the 750 Mb genome. Scaffolds covering 91.42% of the assembly are anchored to 15 pseudo-chromosomes. The draft genome has enabled the identification and cataloguing of the Tpn1 family transposons, known as the major mutagen of I. nil, and analysing the dwarf gene, CONTRACTED, located on the genetic map published in 1956. Comparative genomics has suggested that a whole genome duplication in Convolvulaceae, distinct from the recent Solanaceae event, has occurred after the divergence of the two sister families. PMID:27824041

  14. Comparative studies on plant range size: Linking reproductive and regenerative traits in two Ipomoea species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astegiano, Julia; Funes, Guillermo; Galetto, Leonardo

    2010-09-01

    Reproductive and regenerative traits associated with colonization and persistence ability may determine plant range size. However, few comparative studies on plant distribution have assessed these traits simultaneously. Pollinator richness and frequency of visits, autonomous self-pollination ability, reproductive output (i.e., reproductive traits), seed bank strategy and seedling density (i.e., regenerative traits) were compared between the narrowly distributed Ipomoea rubriflora O'Donnell (Convolvulaceae) and its widespread congener Ipomoea purpurea (L.) Roth. The narrowly distributed species showed higher ecological specialization to pollinators and lower autonomous self-pollination ability. Frequency of visits, natural seed/ovule ratio and fruit set, and total fruit production did not differ between species. However, the number of seeds produced per fruit was lower in the narrowly distributed species, translating into lower total seed production per plant. Indeed, I. rubriflora formed smaller transient and persistent seed banks and showed lower seedling density than the widespread I. purpurea. These reproductive and regenerative trait results suggest that the narrowly distributed species may have lower colonization and persistence ability than its widespread congener. They further suggest that the negative effects of lower fecundity in the narrowly distributed species might persist in time through the long-lasting effects of total seed production on seed bank size, reducing the species' ability to buffered environmental stochasticity. However, other regenerative traits, such as seed size, and processes such as pre- and post-dispersal seed predation, might modulate the effects of plant fecundity on plant colonization and persistence ability and thus range size.

  15. Antimutagenic and Anticarcinogenic Effect of Methanol Extracts of Sweetpotato (Ipomea batata) Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hwan-Goo; Cho, Joon-Hyoung

    2010-01-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the antimutagenic potential of the methanolic extract from the leaves of sweet potato (Ipomea batatas, IB) with the SOS chromotest (umu test) and Salmonella typhimurium TA 98 and TA 100. The anticarcinogenic effects were also studied by calculation of the IC50 on human cancer cell lines and investigating the function of gap junction in rat liver epithelial cells. The IB extract inhibited dose-dependently the β-galactosidase activity induced spontaneously at concentration of more than 200 mg/ml in S. typhimurium TA 1535/pSK 1002, and decreased significantly (p < 0.01) the β-galactosidase activities induced by mutagen 6-chloro-9-[3- (2-chloroethylamino) proylamino]-2-methoxyacridine dihydrochloride (ICR) at dose of more than 0.4 mg/0.1 ml. The IB extract showed no effect on the spontaneous reversions of S. typhimurium TA 98 and 100 but benzo (α) pyrene (BaP) -stimulated reversions were decreased dose-dependently (p < 0.01) at the concentration of more than 100 mg/ml. The IC50 value of stomach cancer cells was lower than that of normal rat liver epithelial cells, but the values of colon and uterine cancer cell lines were similar to those of normal rat liver epithelial cells. The transfer of dye through gap junctions was not affected by treatment of the IB extracts at any concentration during treatment periods. The simultaneously treatment of IB extract and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) effectively prevented the inhibition of dye transfer induced by TPA 1 hour after treatment at all exposed concentrations. The number of gap junctions was significantly (p < 0.01) increased by the treatment with IB extract at concentrations of more than 40 μg/ml. The inhibition of the expression of gap junction proteins by TPA (0.01 μg/ml) was recovered dose dependently by the simultaneous treatment of IB extracts. Our data suggest that Ipomea batatas has antimutagenic and anticarcionogenic activity in vitro. PMID:24278503

  16. Antimutagenic and Anticarcinogenic Effect of Methanol Extracts of Sweetpotato (Ipomea batata) Leaves.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hwan-Goo; Jeong, Sang-Hee; Cho, Joon-Hyoung

    2010-03-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the antimutagenic potential of the methanolic extract from the leaves of sweet potato (Ipomea batatas, IB) with the SOS chromotest (umu test) and Salmonella typhimurium TA 98 and TA 100. The anticarcinogenic effects were also studied by calculation of the IC50 on human cancer cell lines and investigating the function of gap junction in rat liver epithelial cells. The IB extract inhibited dose-dependently the β-galactosidase activity induced spontaneously at concentration of more than 200 mg/ml in S. typhimurium TA 1535/pSK 1002, and decreased significantly (p < 0.01) the β-galactosidase activities induced by mutagen 6-chloro-9-[3- (2-chloroethylamino) proylamino]-2-methoxyacridine dihydrochloride (ICR) at dose of more than 0.4 mg/0.1 ml. The IB extract showed no effect on the spontaneous reversions of S. typhimurium TA 98 and 100 but benzo (α) pyrene (BaP) -stimulated reversions were decreased dose-dependently (p < 0.01) at the concentration of more than 100 mg/ml. The IC50 value of stomach cancer cells was lower than that of normal rat liver epithelial cells, but the values of colon and uterine cancer cell lines were similar to those of normal rat liver epithelial cells. The transfer of dye through gap junctions was not affected by treatment of the IB extracts at any concentration during treatment periods. The simultaneously treatment of IB extract and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) effectively prevented the inhibition of dye transfer induced by TPA 1 hour after treatment at all exposed concentrations. The number of gap junctions was significantly (p < 0.01) increased by the treatment with IB extract at concentrations of more than 40 μg/ml. The inhibition of the expression of gap junction proteins by TPA (0.01 μg/ml) was recovered dose dependently by the simultaneous treatment of IB extracts. Our data suggest that Ipomea batatas has antimutagenic and anticarcionogenic activity in vitro.

  17. Sweet potato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam. "Tainong 57"] starch improves insulin sensitivity in high-fructose diet-fed rats by ameliorating adipocytokine levels, pro-inflammatory status, and insulin signaling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ya-Yen; Lai, Ming-Hoang; Hung, Hsin-Yu; Liu, Jen-Fang

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of low-glycemic index (GI) sweet potato starch on adipocytokines, pro-inflammatory status, and insulin signaling in the high-fructose diet-induced insulin-resistant rat. We randomly divided 24 insulin-resistant rats and 16 normal rats into two groups fed a diet containing 575 g/kg of starch: a low-GI sweet potato starch (S) or a high-GI potato starch (P). The four experimental groups were labeled as follows: insulin-resistant P (IR-P), insulin-resistant S (IR-S), normal P (N-P) and normal S (N-S). After 4 wk on the experimental diets, an intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (IPGTT) was conducted, and the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA), adipocytokines, pro-inflammatory cytokines levels, and insulin signaling-related protein expression were measured. The homeostasis model assessment values were significantly lower in the IR-S than in the IR-P group, suggesting that insulin sensitivity was improved among sweet potato starch-fed rats. Levels of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, resistin, and retinol binding protein-4 were significantly lower in the IR-S versus the IR-P group, indicating an improvement of pro-inflammatory status in sweet potato starch-fed rats. The sweet potato starch diet also significantly enhanced the protein expression of phospho-Tyr-insulin receptor substrate-1 and improved the translocation of glucose transporter 4 in the skeletal muscle. Our results illustrated that sweet potato starch feeding for 4 wk can improve insulin sensitivity in insulin-resistant rats, possibly by improving the adipocytokine levels, pro-inflammatory status, and insulin signaling.

  18. Transcriptional profiling of sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas) roots indicates down-regulation of lignin biosynthesis and up-regulation of starch biosynthesis at an early stage of storage root formation.

    PubMed

    Firon, Nurit; LaBonte, Don; Villordon, Arthur; Kfir, Yanir; Solis, Julio; Lapis, Evgenia; Perlman, Temima Schnitzer; Doron-Faigenboim, Adi; Hetzroni, Amots; Althan, Leviah; Adani Nadir, Lahan

    2013-07-09

    The number of fibrous roots that develop into storage roots determines sweetpotato yield. The aim of the present study was to identify the molecular mechanisms involved in the initiation of storage root formation, by performing a detailed transcriptomic analysis of initiating storage roots using next-generation sequencing platforms. A two-step approach was undertaken: (1) generating a database for the sweetpotato root transcriptome using 454-Roche sequencing of a cDNA library created from pooled samples of two root types: fibrous and initiating storage roots; (2) comparing the expression profiles of initiating storage roots and fibrous roots, using the Illumina Genome Analyzer to sequence cDNA libraries of the two root types and map the data onto the root transcriptome database. Use of the 454-Roche platform generated a total of 524,607 reads, 85.6% of which were clustered into 55,296 contigs that matched 40,278 known genes. The reads, generated by the Illumina Genome Analyzer, were found to map to 31,284 contigs out of the 55,296 contigs serving as the database. A total of 8,353 contigs were found to exhibit differential expression between the two root types (at least 2.5-fold change). The Illumina-based differential expression results were validated for nine putative genes using quantitative real-time PCR. The differential expression profiles indicated down-regulation of classical root functions, such as transport, as well as down-regulation of lignin biosynthesis in initiating storage roots, and up-regulation of carbohydrate metabolism and starch biosynthesis. In addition, data indicated delicate control of regulators of meristematic tissue identity and maintenance, associated with the initiation of storage root formation. This study adds a valuable resource of sweetpotato root transcript sequences to available data, facilitating the identification of genes of interest. This resource enabled us to identify genes that are involved in the earliest stage of storage root formation, highlighting the reduction in carbon flow toward phenylpropanoid biosynthesis and its delivery into carbohydrate metabolism and starch biosynthesis, as major events involved in storage root initiation. The novel transcripts related to storage root initiation identified in this study provide a starting point for further investigation into the molecular mechanisms underlying this process.

  19. Transcriptional profiling of sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas) roots indicates down-regulation of lignin biosynthesis and up-regulation of starch biosynthesis at an early stage of storage root formation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The number of fibrous roots that develop into storage roots determines sweetpotato yield. The aim of the present study was to identify the molecular mechanisms involved in the initiation of storage root formation, by performing a detailed transcriptomic analysis of initiating storage roots using next-generation sequencing platforms. A two-step approach was undertaken: (1) generating a database for the sweetpotato root transcriptome using 454-Roche sequencing of a cDNA library created from pooled samples of two root types: fibrous and initiating storage roots; (2) comparing the expression profiles of initiating storage roots and fibrous roots, using the Illumina Genome Analyzer to sequence cDNA libraries of the two root types and map the data onto the root transcriptome database. Results Use of the 454-Roche platform generated a total of 524,607 reads, 85.6% of which were clustered into 55,296 contigs that matched 40,278 known genes. The reads, generated by the Illumina Genome Analyzer, were found to map to 31,284 contigs out of the 55,296 contigs serving as the database. A total of 8,353 contigs were found to exhibit differential expression between the two root types (at least 2.5-fold change). The Illumina-based differential expression results were validated for nine putative genes using quantitative real-time PCR. The differential expression profiles indicated down-regulation of classical root functions, such as transport, as well as down-regulation of lignin biosynthesis in initiating storage roots, and up-regulation of carbohydrate metabolism and starch biosynthesis. In addition, data indicated delicate control of regulators of meristematic tissue identity and maintenance, associated with the initiation of storage root formation. Conclusions This study adds a valuable resource of sweetpotato root transcript sequences to available data, facilitating the identification of genes of interest. This resource enabled us to identify genes that are involved in the earliest stage of storage root formation, highlighting the reduction in carbon flow toward phenylpropanoid biosynthesis and its delivery into carbohydrate metabolism and starch biosynthesis, as major events involved in storage root initiation. The novel transcripts related to storage root initiation identified in this study provide a starting point for further investigation into the molecular mechanisms underlying this process. PMID:23834507

  20. Antispasmodic activity of beta-damascenone and E-phytol isolated from Ipomoea pes-caprae.

    PubMed

    Pongprayoon, U; Baeckström, P; Jacobsson, U; Lindström, M; Bohlin, L

    1992-02-01

    The crude extract (IPA) of the plant Ipomoea pes-caprae (L.) R. Br. has previously been shown to antagonize smooth muscle contractions induced by several agonists via a non-specific mechanism. Bioassay-guided fractionation of IPA resulted in isolation of the antispasmodically acting isoprenoids beta-damascenone and E-phytol. Their antispasmodic potencies were found to be in the same range as that of papaverine, a general spasmolytic agent. This effect was suggested to play a role in the previously observed anti-inflammatory activity of IPA by interfering with the contraction of endothelial cells. Severe vascular contraction has been shown to be involved in the dermatitis caused by toxic jellyfishes. It is possible that beta-damascenone and E-phytol, by interfering with the contraction of vascular smooth muscle cells, are partly responsible for the previously reported effectiveness of IPA in the treatment of such dermatitis.

  1. Ipomoea dasysperma seed gum: an effective natural coagulant for the decolorization of textile dye solutions.

    PubMed

    Sanghi, Rashmi; Bhattacharya, Bani; Dixit, Awantika; Singh, Vandana

    2006-10-01

    An investigation of dye decolorization from synthetic dye solutions using the non-ionic, water-soluble, high molecular weight seed gums Ipomoea dasysperma and guar gum as coagulants was undertaken. The use of galactomannans derived from plants in this system presents a sustainable method of textile effluent treatment. These natural coagulants extracted from plants proved to be workable alternatives to conventional coagulants like polyaluminum chloride, as they are biodegradable, safe to human health, are cost effective when compared to imported chemicals and have a wider effective dosage range for flocculation of various colloidal suspensions. Coagulant dose and coagulation pH are important factors influencing the mechanism of coagulation. Also the type and chemical structure of the dye plays an important role in the coagulation process. The seed gums alone were found to be effective for decolorization of direct dye and in combination with PAC their coagulation efficiency was well extended even for reactive and acid dyes.

  2. Identification and characterization of an Ipomoea nil glucosyltransferase which metabolizes some phytohormones

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Hiroyuki Hayase, Hiroki; Nakayama, Akira; Yamaguchi, Isomaro; Asami, Tadao; Nakajima, Masatoshi

    2007-10-05

    A glucosyltransferase gene InGTase1 was identified from the immature seeds of morning glory (Ipomoea nil), whose product shows a broad substrate-preference, including that of some phytohormones. When 2-trans-abscisic acid, indole-3-acetic acid, salicylic acid (SA) or ({+-})-jasmonic acid was reacted with InGTase1 and UDP-[{sup 14}C]-glucose, each {sup 14}C-labeled compound with high polarity was detected after thin layer chromatography. SA metabolites were identified as SA glucosyl ester by using {sup 1}H NMR and GC/MS. Detailed substrate-preferences of InGTase1 were examined with some analogous compounds, which elucidated that the arm length and/or orientation of a carboxyl group of the compounds or its surrounding electron density severely affected the enzymatic activity. The broad substrate-preference will greatly contribute to the synthesis of various glucoconjugates.

  3. Development of Randomly Amplified Polymorphic DNA Based SCAR Marker for Identification of Ipomoea mauritiana Jacq (Convolvulaceae).

    PubMed

    Devaiah, Kambiranda; Balasubramani, Subramani Paranthaman; Venkatasubramanian, Padma

    2011-01-01

    Vidari is an Ayurvedic herbal drug used as aphrodisiac, galactagogue and is also used in the preparation of Chyavanaprash. Tubers of Ipomoea mauritiana Jacq. (Convolvulaceae), Pueraria tuberosa (Roxb. ex Willd.) DC (Fabaceae), Adenia hondala (Gaertn.) de Wilde (Passifloraceae) and pith of Cycas circinalis L. (Cycadaceae) are all traded in the name of Vidari, creating issues of botanical authenticity of the Ayurvedic raw drug. DNA-based markers have been developed to distinguish I. mauritiana from the other Vidari candidates. A putative 600-bp polymorphic sequence, specific to I. mauritiana was identified using randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique. Furthermore, sequence characterized amplified region (SCAR) primers (IM1F and IM1R) were designed from the unique RAPD amplicon. The SCAR primers produced a specific 323-bp amplicon in authentic I. mauritiana and not in the allied species.

  4. Development of Randomly Amplified Polymorphic DNA Based SCAR Marker for Identification of Ipomoea mauritiana Jacq (Convolvulaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Devaiah, Kambiranda; Balasubramani, Subramani Paranthaman; Venkatasubramanian, Padma

    2011-01-01

    Vidari is an Ayurvedic herbal drug used as aphrodisiac, galactagogue and is also used in the preparation of Chyavanaprash. Tubers of Ipomoea mauritiana Jacq. (Convolvulaceae), Pueraria tuberosa (Roxb. ex Willd.) DC (Fabaceae), Adenia hondala (Gaertn.) de Wilde (Passifloraceae) and pith of Cycas circinalis L. (Cycadaceae) are all traded in the name of Vidari, creating issues of botanical authenticity of the Ayurvedic raw drug. DNA-based markers have been developed to distinguish I. mauritiana from the other Vidari candidates. A putative 600-bp polymorphic sequence, specific to I. mauritiana was identified using randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique. Furthermore, sequence characterized amplified region (SCAR) primers (IM1F and IM1R) were designed from the unique RAPD amplicon. The SCAR primers produced a specific 323-bp amplicon in authentic I. mauritiana and not in the allied species. PMID:21738554

  5. Variation in floral morphology and plant reproductive success in four Ipomoea species (Convolvulaceae) with contrasting breeding systems.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Dávila, R; Martén-Rodríguez, S; Huerta-Ramos, G

    2016-11-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that self-compatibility would be associated with floral traits that facilitate autonomous self-pollination to ensure reproduction under low pollinator visitation. In a comparison of two pairs of Ipomoea species with contrasting breeding systems, we predicted that self-compatible (SC) species would have smaller, less variable flowers, reduced herkogamy, lower pollinator visitation and higher reproductive success than their self-incompatible (SI) congeners. We studied sympatric species pairs, I. hederacea (SC)- I. mitchellae (SI) and I. purpurea (SC)-I. indica (SI), in Mexico, over two years. We quantified variation in floral traits and nectar production, documented pollinator visitation, and determined natural fruit and seed set. Hand-pollination and bagging experiments were conducted to determine potential for autonomous self-pollination and apomixis. Self-compatible Ipomoea species had smaller flowers and lower nectar production than SI species; however, floral variation and integration did not vary according to breeding system. Bees were primary pollinators of all species, but visitation rates were seven times lower in SC than SI species. SC species had a high capacity for autonomous self-pollination due to reduced herkogamy at the highest anther levels. Self-compatible species had two to six times higher fruit set than SI species. Results generally support the hypothesis that self-compatibility and autonomous self-pollination ensure reproduction under low pollinator visitation. However, high variation in morphological traits of SC Ipomoea species suggests they maintain variation through outcrossing. Furthermore, reduced herkogamy was associated with high potential for autonomous self-pollination, providing a reproductive advantage that possibly underlies transitions to self-compatibility in Ipomoea.

  6. The effect of Ipomoea reptans poir ethanolic extract on the histopathological parameters of pancreas in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayati, Farida; Widyarini, Sitarina; Lanova, Lulung; Wijayanti, Marsih

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of ethanolic extract of Ipomoea reptans Poir in male Wistar rats on the histopathological parameters of the pancreas. The rats (N=30) were divided into six groups, each consisting of five rats. The treatment groups were divided into: group I as the normal group fed ad libitum during the research, group II as the positive control administered glibenclamide 0.09 mg/200g BW, group III as the negative control given aquadest, and group IV to VI given ethanolic extract of Ipomoea reptans Poir as much as 200 mg/KgBW, 400 mg/KgBW and 600 mg/KgBW respectively. The study of antidiabetic effect was undertaken by oral administration for 21 days. On the 21st day, all the rats were dissected to prepare histopathological preparates through Gomori's chrome alum hematoxylin-phloxine staining method. The histopathological study showed that the ethanol extract of Ipomoea reptans Poir at a dose of 200 mg/KgBW and 400mg/KgBW had an antidiabetic activity through protection of pancreatic β-cell from damage in male Wistar rats induced by streptozotocin.

  7. Likelihood analysis of the chalcone synthase genes suggests the role of positive selection in morning glories (Ipomoea).

    PubMed

    Yang, Ji; Gu, Hongya; Yang, Ziheng

    2004-01-01

    Chalcone synthase (CHS) is a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of flavonoides, which are important for the pigmentation of flowers and act as attractants to pollinators. Genes encoding CHS constitute a multigene family in which the copy number varies among plant species and functional divergence appears to have occurred repeatedly. In morning glories (Ipomoea), five functional CHS genes (A-E) have been described. Phylogenetic analysis of the Ipomoea CHS gene family revealed that CHS A, B, and C experienced accelerated rates of amino acid substitution relative to CHS D and E. To examine whether the CHS genes of the morning glories underwent adaptive evolution, maximum-likelihood models of codon substitution were used to analyze the functional sequences in the Ipomoea CHS gene family. These models used the nonsynonymous/synonymous rate ratio (omega = d(N)/ d(S)) as an indicator of selective pressure and allowed the ratio to vary among lineages or sites. Likelihood ratio test suggested significant variation in selection pressure among amino acid sites, with a small proportion of them detected to be under positive selection along the branches ancestral to CHS A, B, and C. Positive Darwinian selection appears to have promoted the divergence of subfamily ABC and subfamily DE and is at least partially responsible for a rate increase following gene duplication.

  8. Extract from Dioscorea batatas ameliorates insulin resistance in mice fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soyoung; Jwa, Hyejeong; Yanagawa, Yasuko; Park, Taesun

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether Dioscorea batatas (DB) extract attenuates high-fat diet (HFD)-induced insulin resistance in the visceral adipose tissues of mice, and by what mechanism(s). Mice were fed a HFD for 4 weeks to induce the early development of insulin resistance. The DB extract was administered to mice fed a HFD by oral gavage at a dose of 100 mg/kg body weight daily for 7 weeks. Biochemical parameters in blood were measured using enzymatic kits, and the expression levels of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4), phosphorylated (p-)S6K1, phosphorylated v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog (p-AKT), and phosphorylated extracellular regulated kinase (p-ERK) in epididymal fat tissue were determined by western blot analyses. The DB extract effectively reversed the HFD-induced elevations in plasma glucose and insulin levels, and the homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance and oral glucose tolerance test values. The level of p-AKT protein was up-regulated, whereas the levels of p-ERK and p-S6K1 proteins were down-regulated in the adipose tissues of DB mice compared with HFD mice. Furthermore, the DB extract significantly reversed the HFD-induced decrease in the plasma membrane GLUT4 level in the adipose tissue of mice. The DB extract improved glucose metabolism in HFD-fed mice through the up-regulation of plasma membrane GLUT4 content in the visceral adipose tissue. Activation of the insulin signaling cascade leading to GLUT4 translocation was the mechanism underlying the beneficial effects of the DB extract on early-stage obesity-induced insulin resistance.

  9. A lysosomal storage disease induced by Ipomoea carnea in goats in Mozambique.

    PubMed

    de Balogh, K K; Dimande, A P; van der Lugt, J J; Molyneux, R J; Naudé, T W; Welman, W G

    1999-05-01

    A novel plant-induced lysosomal storage disease was observed in goats from a village in Mozambique. Affected animals were ataxic, with head tremors and nystagmus. Because of a lack of suitable feed, the animals consumed an exotic hedge plant growing in the village that was identified as Ipomoea carnea (shrubby morning glory, Convolvulaceae). The toxicosis was reproduced by feeding I. carnea plant material to goats. In acute cases, histologic changes in the brain and spinal cord comprised widespread cytoplasmic vacuolation of neurons and glial cells in association with axonal spheroid formation. Ultrastructurally, cytoplasmic storage vacuoles in neurons were membrane bound and consistent with lysosomes. Cytoplasmic vacuolation was also found in neurons in the submucosal and mesenteric plexuses in the small intestine, in renal tubular epithelial cells, and in macrophage-phagocytic cells in the spleen and lymph nodes in acute cases. Residual alterations in the brain in chronic cases revealed predominantly cerebellar lesions characterized by loss of Purkinje neurons and gliosis of the Purkinje cell layer. Analysis of I. carnea plant material by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry established the presence of the mannosidase inhibitor swainsonine and 2 glycosidase inhibitors, calystegine B2 and calystegine C1, consistent with a plant-induced alpha-mannosidosis in the goats. The described storage disorder is analogous to the lysosomal storage diseases induced by ingestion of locoweeds (Astragalus and Oxytropis) and poison peas (Swainsona).

  10. Maternal Ingestion of Ipomoea carnea: Effects on Goat-Kid Bonding and Behavior.

    PubMed

    Gotardo, André T; Pfister, James A; Raspantini, Paulo C F; Górniak, Silvana L

    2016-03-16

    Ipomoea carnea is a toxic plant found in Brazil and other tropical and subtropical countries and often causes poisoning of livestock. The plant contains the alkaloids swainsonine and calystegines, which inhibit key cellular enzymes and cause systematic cell death. This study evaluated the behavioral effects of prenatal ingestion of this plant on dams and their kids. Twenty-four pregnant goats were randomly allocated into four treatment groups and received the following doses (g/kg BW) of fresh I. carnea: 0 (control group), 1.0 (IC1), 3.0 (IC3), and 5.0 (IC5) from day 27 of gestation until parturition. Dam and kid bonding and behavior were evaluated by several tests, immediately after birth until six weeks of age. Dams from IC3 and IC5 groups spent less time paying attention to the newborn. There was a lack of maternal-infant bonding due to I. carnea intoxication. Kids from treated dams had difficulty in standing, suckling, and in recognizing their mother hours after birth. I. carnea can also compromise the kids' ability to learn and to retain spatial memory. We suggest that kids from pregnant goats given I. carnea during gestation have significant behavioral alterations and developmental delays that may compromise their survival.

  11. EVALUATION OF SUBLETHAL EFFECTS OF Ipomoea cairica LINN. EXTRACT ON LIFE HISTORY TRAITS OF DENGUE VECTORS

    PubMed Central

    ZUHARAH, Wan Fatma; AHBIRAMI, Rattanam; DIENG, Hamady; THIAGALETCHUMI, Maniam; FADZLY, Nik

    2016-01-01

    Plant derived insecticides have considerable potential for mosquito control because these products are safer than conventional insecticides. This study aimed to investigate sublethal activities of Ipomoea carica or railway creeper crude acethonilic extract against life history trait of dengue vectors, Aedes albopictus and Aedes aegypti. The late third instar larvae of Ae. albopictus and Ae. aegypti were exposed to a sublethal dose at LC50 and larvae that survived were further cultured. Overall, Ipomea cairica crude extracts affected the whole life history of both Aedes species. The study demonstrated significantly lower egg production (fecundity) and eggs hatchability (fertility) in Ae. albopictus. The sublethal dose of crude extracts reduced significantly the width of larval head capsule and the wing length of both sexes in both Aedes species. The significance of sublethal effects of I. cairica against Aedes mosquitoes was an additional hallmark to demonstrate further activity of this plant despite its direct toxicity to the larvae. The reduced reproductive capacity as well as morphological and physiological anomalies are some of the effects that make I. cairica a potential candidate to be used as a new plant-based insecticide to control dengue vectors. PMID:27253746

  12. Distribution of metals in aquatic edible plants: Trapa natans (Roxb.) Makino and Ipomoea aquatica Forsk.

    PubMed

    Rai, U N; Sinha, S

    2001-09-01

    Most of the water bodies being used for the cultivation of edible aquatic plants (Trapa natans and Ipomoea aquatica) in Lucknow district, U.P., India, were found to be contaminated with a variety of toxic metals (Fe, Cu, Cr, Mn and Pb). The concentration of metals Cr, Pb and Fe in water was much higher than recommended permissible limits of WHO (1995). The edible parts of these plants bioconcentrated metals from their surrounding water significantly. Therefore, the present study was planned to assess the metal concentration in edible part of plants which was collected from various water bodies used for cultivation of these crops. Despite varying levels of metals found in various fruit parts of T. natans, the metal accumulation in kernel was alarming. However, metal content decreased significantly in various parts after boiling the fruit. Similarly, I. aquatica also accumulated significantly higher amounts of these metals in leaves, however the metal accumulating potential varied considerably depending upon level of metal contamination in the water body in which they were growing. The importance of these findings in the exploitation of these aquatic crops to meet the demand of food and health perspectives for human beings is highlighted.

  13. Maternal Ingestion of Ipomoea carnea: Effects on Goat-Kid Bonding and Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Gotardo, André T.; Pfister, James A.; Raspantini, Paulo C. F.; Górniak, Silvana L.

    2016-01-01

    Ipomoea carnea is a toxic plant found in Brazil and other tropical and subtropical countries and often causes poisoning of livestock. The plant contains the alkaloids swainsonine and calystegines, which inhibit key cellular enzymes and cause systematic cell death. This study evaluated the behavioral effects of prenatal ingestion of this plant on dams and their kids. Twenty-four pregnant goats were randomly allocated into four treatment groups and received the following doses (g/kg BW) of fresh I. carnea: 0 (control group), 1.0 (IC1), 3.0 (IC3), and 5.0 (IC5) from day 27 of gestation until parturition. Dam and kid bonding and behavior were evaluated by several tests, immediately after birth until six weeks of age. Dams from IC3 and IC5 groups spent less time paying attention to the newborn. There was a lack of maternal-infant bonding due to I. carnea intoxication. Kids from treated dams had difficulty in standing, suckling, and in recognizing their mother hours after birth. I. carnea can also compromise the kids’ ability to learn and to retain spatial memory. We suggest that kids from pregnant goats given I. carnea during gestation have significant behavioral alterations and developmental delays that may compromise their survival. PMID:26999204

  14. The costs and benefits of tolerance to competition in ipomoea purpurea, the common morning glory.

    PubMed

    Chaney, Lindsay; Baucom, Regina S

    2014-06-01

    Tolerance to competition has been hypothesized to reduce the negative impact of plant-plant competition on fitness. Although competitive interactions are a strong selective force, an analysis of net selection on tolerance to competition is absent in the literature. Using 55 full/half-sibling families from 18 maternal lines in the crop weed Ipomoea purpurea, we measured fitness and putative tolerance traits when grown with and without competition in an agricultural field. We tested for the presence of genetic variation for tolerance to competition and determined if there were costs and benefits of this trait. We also assessed correlations between tolerance and potential tolerance traits. We uncovered a fitness benefit of tolerance in the presence of competition and a cost in its absence. We failed to detect evidence of additive genetic variation underlying tolerance, but did uncover the presence of a significant maternal-line effect for tolerance, which suggests its evolutionary trajectory is not easily predicted. The cost of tolerance is likely due to later initiation of flowering of tolerant individuals in the absence of competition, whereas relative growth rate was found to positively covary with tolerance in the presence of competition, and can thus be considered a tolerance trait.

  15. Resin Glycosides from Ipomoea alba Seeds as Potential Chemosensitizers in Breast Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Morales, Sara; Castañeda-Gómez, Jhon; Rosas-Ramírez, Daniel; Fragoso-Serrano, Mabel; Figueroa-González, Gabriela; Lorence, Argelia; Pereda-Miranda, Rogelio

    2016-12-23

    Multidrug resistance is the expression of one or more efflux pumps, such as P-glycoprotein, and is a major obstacle in cancer therapy. The use of new potent and noncytotoxic efflux pump modulators, coadministered with antineoplastic agents, is an alternative approach for increasing the success rate of therapy regimes with different drug combinations. This report describes the isolation and structure elucidation of six new resin glycosides from moon vine seeds (Ipomoea alba) as potential mammalian multidrug-resistance-modifying agents. Albinosides IV-IX (1-6), along with the known albinosides I-III (7-9), were purified from the CHCl3-soluble extract. Degradative chemical reactions in combination with NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry were used for their structural elucidation. Four new glycosidic acids, albinosinic acids D-G (10-13), were released by saponification of natural products 3-6. They were characterized as tetrasaccharides of either convolvulinolic (11S-hydroxytetradecanoic) or jalapinolic (11S-hydroxyhexadecanoic) acids. The potentiation of vinblastine susceptibility in multidrug-resistant human breast carcinoma cells of albinosides 1-6 was evaluated by modulation assays. The noncytotoxic albinosides VII (4) and VIII (5), at a concentration of 25 μg/mL, exerted the strongest potentiation of vinblastine susceptibility, with a reversal factor (RFMCF-7/Vin(+)) of 201- and >2517-fold, respectively.

  16. Central nervous system depressant activity of an ethyl acetate extract from Ipomoea stans roots.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Ruiz, Maribel; Gutiérrez, Carmen; Enrique Jiménez-Ferrer, J; Tortoriello, Jaime; Mirón, Gumersindo; León, Ismael

    2007-06-13

    Ipomoea stans Cav., popularly known as "tumbavaqueros", is a plant widely used in Mexico for the treatment of epileptic seizures and nervous disorders. This work researched the action of the ethyl acetate extract from the root of I. stans (IS-EAE) on the central nervous system (CNS). The administration of IS-EAE (2.5 and 5.0 mg/kg, i.p.) produced an anxiolytic effect in mice. This extract (20.0 and 40.0 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly reduced spontaneous motor activity. 2.5, 5.0, 10.0, and 20.0 mg/kg of IS-EAE protected mice against pentylenetetrazole-induced convulsions and increased the hypnotic effect induced by pentobarbital. The administration of IS-EAE was able to increase the release of GABA in brain cortex of mice. These results suggest that IS-EAE possess anxiolytic and anticonvulsant effects, and could have potential sedative effect, probably through a GABAergic system. The extract did not show antidepressant effects on mice exposed to forced swimming test.

  17. Bioreactor with Ipomoea hederifolia adventitious roots and its endophyte Cladosporium cladosporioides for textile dye degradation.

    PubMed

    Patil, Swapnil M; Chandanshive, Vishal V; Rane, Niraj R; Khandare, Rahul V; Watharkar, Anuprita D; Govindwar, Sanjay P

    2016-04-01

    In vitro grown untransformed adventitious roots (AR) culture of Ipomoea hederifolia and its endophytic fungus (EF) Cladosporium cladosporioides decolorized Navy Blue HE2R (NB-HE2R) at a concentration of 20 ppm up to 83.3 and 65%, respectively within 96h. Whereas the AR-EF consortium decolorized the dye more efficiently and gave 97% removal within 36h. Significant inductions in the enzyme activities of lignin peroxidase, tyrosinase and laccase were observed in roots, while enzymes like tyrosinase, laccase and riboflavin reductase activities were induced in EF. Metabolites of dye were analyzed using UV-vis spectroscopy, FTIR and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Possible metabolic pathways of NB-HE2R were proposed with AR, EF and AR-EF systems independently. Looking at the superior efficacy of AR-EF system, a rhizoreactor was developed for the treatment of NB-HE2R at a concentration of 1000 ppm. Control reactor systems with independently grown AR and EF gave 94 and 85% NB-HE2R removal, respectively within 36h. The AR-EF rhizoreactor, however, gave 97% decolorization. The endophyte colonization additionally increased root and shoot lengths of candidate plants through mutualism. Combined bioreactor strategies can be effectively used for future eco-friendly remediation purposes.

  18. Natural history of the narrow endemics Ipomoea cavalcantei and I. marabaensis from Amazon Canga savannahs.

    PubMed

    Babiychuk, Elena; Kushnir, Sergei; Vasconcelos, Santelmo; Dias, Mariana Costa; Carvalho-Filho, Nelson; Nunes, Gisele Lopes; Dos Santos, Jorge Filipe; Tyski, Lourival; da Silva, Delmo Fonseca; Castilho, Alexandre; Fonseca, Vera Lucia Imperatriz; Oliveira, Guilherme

    2017-08-08

    Amazon comprises a vast variety of ecosystems, including savannah-like Canga barrens that evolved on iron-lateritic rock plateaus of the Carajás Mountain range. Individual Cangas are enclosed by the rain forest, indicating insular isolation that enables speciation and plant community differentiation. To establish a framework for the research on natural history and conservation management of endemic Canga species, seven chloroplast DNA loci and an ITS2 nuclear DNA locus were used to study natural molecular variation of the red flowered Ipomoea cavalcantei and the lilac flowered I. marabaensis. Partitioning of the nuclear and chloroplast gene alleles strongly suggested that the species share the most recent common ancestor, pointing a new independent event of the red flower origin in the genus. Chloroplast gene allele analysis showed strong genetic differentiation between Canga populations, implying a limited role of seed dispersal in exchange of individuals between Cangas. Closed haplotype network topology indicated a requirement for the paternal inheritance in generation of cytoplasmic genetic variation. Tenfold higher nucleotide diversity in the nuclear ITS2 sequences distinguished I. cavalcantei from I. marabaensis, implying a different pace of evolutionary changes. Thus, Canga ecosystems offer powerful venues for the study of speciation, multitrait adaptation and the origins of genetic variation.

  19. Gene expression in opening and senescing petals of morning glory (Ipomoea nil) flowers.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Tetsuya; Ichimura, Kazuo; Kanekatsu, Motoki; van Doorn, Wouter G

    2007-06-01

    We isolated several senescence-associated genes (SAGs) from the petals of morning glory (Ipomoea nil) flowers, with the aim of furthering our understanding of programmed cell death. Samples were taken from the closed bud stage to advanced visible senescence. Actinomycin D, an inhibitor of transcription, if given prior to 4 h after opening, suppressed the onset of visible senescence, which occurred at about 9 h after flower opening. The isolated genes all showed upregulation. Two cell-wall related genes were upregulated early, one encoding an extensin and one a caffeoyl-CoA-3-O-methyltransferase, involved in lignin production. A pectinacetylesterase was upregulated after flower opening and might be involved in cell-wall degradation. Some identified genes showed high homology with published SAGs possibly involved in remobilisation processes: an alcohol dehydrogenase and three cysteine proteases. One transcript encoded a leucine-rich repeat receptor protein kinase, putatively involved in signal transduction. Another transcript encoded a 14-3-3 protein, also a protein kinase. Two genes have apparently not been associated previously with senescence: the first encoded a putative SEC14, which is required for Golgi vesicle transport, the second was a putative ataxin-2, which has been related to RNA metabolism. Induction of the latter has been shown to result in cell death in yeast, due to defects in actin filament formation. The possible roles of these genes in programmed cell death are discussed.

  20. Resin glycosides from Ipomoea wolcottiana as modulators of the multidrug resistance phenotype in vitro.

    PubMed

    Corona-Castañeda, Berenice; Rosas-Ramírez, Daniel; Castañeda-Gómez, Jhon; Aparicio-Cuevas, Manuel Alejandro; Fragoso-Serrano, Mabel; Figueroa-González, Gabriela; Pereda-Miranda, Rogelio

    2016-03-01

    Recycling liquid chromatography was used for the isolation and purification of resin glycosides from the CHCl3-soluble extracts prepared using flowers of Ipomoea wolcottiana Rose var. wolcottiana. Bioassay-guided fractionation, using modulation of both antibiotic activity against multidrug-resistant strains of Gram-negative bacteria and vinblastine susceptibility in breast carcinoma cells, was used to isolate the active glycolipids as modulators of the multidrug resistance phenotype. An ester-type dimer, wolcottine I, one tetra- and three pentasaccharides, wolcottinosides I-IV, in addition to the known intrapilosin VII, were characterized by NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. In vitro assays established that none of these metabolites displayed antibacterial activity (MIC>512 μg/mL) against multidrug-resistant strains of Escherichia coli, and two nosocomial pathogens: Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi and Shigella flexneri; however, when tested (25 μg/mL) in combination with tetracycline, kanamycin or chloramphenicol, they exerted a potentiation effect of the antibiotic susceptibility up to eightfold (64 μg/mL from 512 μg/mL). It was also determined that these non-cytotoxic (CI50>8.68 μM) agents modulated vinblastine susceptibility at 25 μg/mL in MFC-7/Vin(+) cells with a reversal factor (RFMCF-7/Vin(+)) of 2-130 fold.

  1. Identification of phenolic antioxidants in Ipomoea mauritiana jacq. using spectrophotometric and mass spectroscopic studies

    PubMed Central

    Sulaiman, Cheruthazhakkat; Geetha, Sivadasan Pillai; Indira, Balachandran

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Ipomoea mauritiana is used in both Ayurveda and folk medicine systems. The tuberous roots are known to be diuretic, depurative, carminative, and anthelmintic. The objective of the current study was to identify phenolic antioxidants from I. mauritiana using spectrophotometric and LC-MS analysis. Materials and Methods: An activity-guided fractionation and purification process was used to identify the antioxidative components from I. mauritiana tuber. Dried mature tubers of I. mauritiana were extracted with 80% methanol and then partitioned by chloroform, ethyl acetate, acetone, and methanol. The acetone fraction showed the strongest 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity among four fractions and was subjected to separation and purification using preparative reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Results: Two compounds were separated from the acetone fraction using preparative LC fraction collector. The purified compounds were screened for their antioxidative potential using DPPH assay. The compounds were subjected to LC-MS analysis in ESI negative mode. One of the compounds was identified as Caffeoyl glucose based on the mass fragmentation. Conclusion: The acetone fraction showed highest radical scavenging activity and the phytoconstituents of the same were identified by LC-MS/MS analysis. PMID:25050305

  2. EVALUATION OF SUBLETHAL EFFECTS OF Ipomoea cairica LINN. EXTRACT ON LIFE HISTORY TRAITS OF DENGUE VECTORS.

    PubMed

    Zuharah, Wan Fatma; Ahbirami, Rattanam; Dieng, Hamady; Thiagaletchumi, Maniam; Fadzly, Nik

    2016-01-01

    Plant derived insecticides have considerable potential for mosquito control because these products are safer than conventional insecticides. This study aimed to investigate sublethal activities of Ipomoea carica or railway creeper crude acethonilic extract against life history trait of dengue vectors, Aedes albopictus and Aedes aegypti. The late third instar larvae of Ae. albopictus and Ae. aegypti were exposed to a sublethal dose at LC50 and larvae that survived were further cultured. Overall, Ipomea cairica crude extracts affected the whole life history of both Aedes species. The study demonstrated significantly lower egg production (fecundity) and eggs hatchability (fertility) in Ae. albopictus. The sublethal dose of crude extracts reduced significantly the width of larval head capsule and the wing length of both sexes in both Aedes species. The significance of sublethal effects of I. cairica against Aedes mosquitoes was an additional hallmark to demonstrate further activity of this plant despite its direct toxicity to the larvae. The reduced reproductive capacity as well as morphological and physiological anomalies are some of the effects that make I. cairica a potential candidate to be used as a new plant-based insecticide to control dengue vectors.

  3. Parallel evolution at multiple levels in the origin of hummingbird pollinated flowers in Ipomoea.

    PubMed

    Des Marais, David L; Rausher, Mark D

    2010-07-01

    A transition in flower color accompanying a shift in pollinator guilds is a prominent and repeated adaptation in angiosperms. In many cases, shifts to similar pollinators are associated with similar flower-color transitions. The extent to which this parallelism at the phenotypic level results from parallel changes at the biochemical, developmental, and genetic levels, however, remains an open question. There have been few attempts to determine whether parallelism at these lower levels results from mutation bias or fixation bias of different classes of mutation. We address these issues by examining the biochemical, developmental, and genetic changes that have occurred in red-flowering species of the Mina lineage of morning glories (Ipomoea) and compare these to the changes reported for I. horsfalliae, which has independently evolved red flowers. Using transgenic techniques, we demonstrate that the transition from blue to red flowers in Mina species is due primarily to down-regulation of the enzyme flavonol-3'-hydroxylase (F3'H) in flowers but not in vegetative tissues, and that this down-regulation is at least partly due to cis-regulatory change in the gene for F3'H. These changes are similar to those exhibited by I. horsfalliae, indicating parallelism at the biochemical and developmental levels, and possibly at the genetic level.

  4. A proposed mechanism for physical dormancy break in seeds of Ipomoea lacunosa (Convolvulaceae).

    PubMed

    Jayasuriya, K M G Gehan; Baskin, Jerry M; Geneve, Robert L; Baskin, Carol C

    2009-02-01

    The water-impermeable seeds of Ipomoea lacunosa undergo sensitivity cycling to dormancy breaking treatment, and slits are formed around bulges adjacent to the micropyle during dormancy break, i.e. the water gap opens. The primary aim of this research was to identify the mechanism of slit formation in seeds of this species. Sensitive seeds were incubated at various combinations of relative humidity (RH) and temperature after blocking the hilar area in different places. Increase in seed mass was measured before and after incubation. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and staining of insensitive and sensitive seeds were carried out to characterize these states morphologically and anatomically. Water absorption was monitored at 35 and 25 degrees C at 100 % RH. There was a significant relationship between incubation temperature and RH with percentage seed dormancy break. Sensitive seeds absorbed water vapour, but insensitive seeds did not. Different amounts of water were absorbed by seeds with different blocking treatments. There was a significant relationship between dormancy break and the amount of water absorbed during incubation. Water vapour seals openings that allow it to escape from seeds and causes pressure to develop below the bulge, thereby causing slits to form. A model for the mechanism of formation of slits (physical dormancy break) is proposed.

  5. The evolutionary potential of Baker's weediness traits in the common morning glory, Ipomoea purpurea (Convolvulaceae).

    PubMed

    Chaney, Lindsay; Baucom, Regina S

    2012-09-01

    Many reports have cited Baker's list of weediness traits, or those that exemplify the "ideal" weed, yet few have considered the evolutionary potential of such traits as a group. Thus, it is unknown whether constraints on the evolution of increased weediness, such as a lack of genetic variation or genetic correlations between the traits, are present. Ipomoea purpurea, the common morning glory, is a problematic weed that exhibits many of Baker's ideal weed traits. We used progeny from a half/full-sib breeding design in a series of three greenhouse experiments to assess the presence of genetic variation, narrow sense heritabilities, and genetic correlations in Baker's growth, competition, and fitness "weediness" traits in two populations of I. purpurea. We uncovered genetic variation underlying reproductive fitness traits and competitive ability in at least one population, but no evidence of genetic variation underlying growth rate in either population. Genetic correlations between many of the weediness characters differed significantly from zero; however, their direction and/or magnitude differed between populations. We found that increased weediness in the common morning glory is more likely to occur through selection on reproductive output and competitive ability rather than through selection on growth rate. Assessing Baker's traits in a quantitative genetics framework can provide a solid perspective on their evolutionary potential and a unique framework within which to determine how weeds will respond to different environmental stresses and/or scenarios of global climate change.

  6. Effect of aqueous extract of Ipomoea carnea leaf on isolated frog and mouse heart.

    PubMed

    Bachhav, K V; Burande, M D; Rangari, V D; Mehta, J K

    1999-11-01

    Ipomoea carnea fam. Convolvulaceae is a poisonous plant and its toxicity is supposed to be due to the cardiac and respiratory failure. The present paper describes the cardiac effect of aqueous extract of the fresh leaves of I. carnea using mouse and frog heart. The aqueous extract produced an initial blockade of isolated frog heart for 5-10 sec followed by dose dependent increase in both amplitude and rate that lasts up to 2 min. Atropine (1 microgram/ml) blocked the initial depressant phase and potentiated the stimulant effect of the aqueous extract. The dose dependent increase in cardiac contractility of aqueous extract was not altered by propranolol or calcium channel blockers like nifedipine or diltiazem. The decrease in sodium chloride concentration or increase in potassium chloride concentration or calcium chloride concentration in physiological salt solution inhibited the responses to aqueous extract while an increase in sodium chloride concentration or decrease in potassium chloride or calcium chloride concentration in physiological salt solution potentiated the responses to the aqueous extract of I. carnea. It may be suggested from the data that aqueous extract of I. carnea produces positive inotropic effect on isolate frog heart possibly by sodium extrusion or release of the intracellular calcium.

  7. A proposed mechanism for physical dormancy break in seeds of Ipomoea lacunosa (Convolvulaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Jayasuriya, K. M. G. Gehan; Baskin, Jerry M.; Geneve, Robert L.; Baskin, Carol C.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims The water-impermeable seeds of Ipomoea lacunosa undergo sensitivity cycling to dormancy breaking treatment, and slits are formed around bulges adjacent to the micropyle during dormancy break, i.e. the water gap opens. The primary aim of this research was to identify the mechanism of slit formation in seeds of this species. Methods Sensitive seeds were incubated at various combinations of relative humidity (RH) and temperature after blocking the hilar area in different places. Increase in seed mass was measured before and after incubation. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and staining of insensitive and sensitive seeds were carried out to characterize these states morphologically and anatomically. Water absorption was monitored at 35 and 25 °C at 100 % RH. Key Results There was a significant relationship between incubation temperature and RH with percentage seed dormancy break. Sensitive seeds absorbed water vapour, but insensitive seeds did not. Different amounts of water were absorbed by seeds with different blocking treatments. There was a significant relationship between dormancy break and the amount of water absorbed during incubation. Conclusions Water vapour seals openings that allow it to escape from seeds and causes pressure to develop below the bulge, thereby causing slits to form. A model for the mechanism of formation of slits (physical dormancy break) is proposed. PMID:19098068

  8. Towards a better understanding of Ipomoea asarifolia toxicity: evidence of the involvement of a leaf lectin.

    PubMed

    Salles, H O; Vasconcelos, I M; Santos, L F L; Oliveira, H D; Costa, P P C; Nascimento, N R F; Santos, C F; Sousa, D F; Jorge, A R C; Menezes, D B; Monteiro, H S A; Gondim, D M F; Oliveira, J T A

    2011-11-01

    Natural intoxication of livestock by ingestion of Ipomoea asarifolia leaves has been reported to occur widely in Brazil. Previous studies carried out by our research group provided strong evidence that a lectin could be involved with the toxic properties of I. asarifolia. To reinforce this hypothesis, a lectin-enriched fraction (LEF) was isolated from I. asarifolia leaves and its toxic effects were assessed. Leaves of I. asarifolia were excised from plants growing widely in the field, mechanically wounded and maintained in a chamber at 25 ± 3 °C for 72h in the dark, under near 100% relative humidity. The leaf proteins were extracted, ammonium sulfate precipitated, chromatographed on DEAE-cellulose and Phenyl-Sepharose to produce LEF that under SDS-PAGE showed a molecular mass of 44.0 kDa and after N-terminal amino acid analysis a primary sequence composed of AGYTPVLDIGAEVLAAGEPY. The in vivo toxicity of LEF assessed by intraorbital injection in mice showed induced severe uncoordinated movements without death. LEF reduced the muscular contraction in a dose depend way and at 29.8 μg/mL (CE(50)) it produces 50% inhibition of contraction, suggesting that LEF blunts autonomic neurotransmission. Isolated rat kidneys were perfused with LEF and no effects on the perfusion pressure or renal vascular resistance were observed, but urinary flow and glomerular filtration rate increased. Moreover, the percentage of tubular transport of Na(+), K(+) and Cl(-) decreased. Histological examination of the kidneys perfused with LEF exhibited little alterations. These toxic effects observed above were concomitant with the increase of LEF hemagglutination activity, which strongly suggest that one of the toxic principles of I. asarifolia is a lectin present in its leaves.

  9. Seed Development in Ipomoea lacunosa (Convolvulaceae), with Particular Reference to Anatomy of the Water Gap

    PubMed Central

    Gehan Jayasuriya, K. M. G.; Baskin, Jerry M.; Geneve, Robert L.; Baskin, Carol C.

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims Disruption of one or both of the bulges (water gap) in the seed coat adjacent to the micropyle is responsible for breaking physical dormancy (PY) in seeds of Ipomoea lacunosa and other taxa of Convolvulaceae. Hitherto, neither ontogeny of these bulges nor onset of PY together with anatomical development and maturation drying of the seed had been studied in this family. The aims of this study were to monitor physiological and anatomical changes that occur during seed development in I. lacunosa, with particular reference to ontogeny of the water gap. Methods Developmental anatomy (ontogeny) of seed coat and dry mass, length, moisture content, germinability and onset of seed coat impermeability to water were monitored from pollination to seed maturity. Blocking/drying and dye-tracking experiments were done to identify site of moisture loss during the final stages of seed drying. Key Results Physiological maturity of seeds occurred 22 d after pollination (DAP), and 100 % of seeds germinated 24 DAP. Impermeability of the seed coat developed 27–30 DAP, when seed moisture content was 13 %. The hilar fissure was identified as the site of moisture loss during the final stages of seed drying. The entire seed coat developed from the two outermost layers of the integument. A transition zone, i.e. a weak margin where seed coat ruptures during dormancy break, formed between the bulge and hilar ring and seed coat away from the bulge. Sclereid cells in the transition zone were square, whereas they were elongated under the bulge. Conclusions Although the bulge and other areas of the seed coat have the same origin, these two cell layers underwent a different series of periclinal and anticlinal divisions during bulge development (beginning a few hours after pollination) than they did during development of the seed coat away from the bulge. Further, the boundary between the square sclereids in the transition zone and the elongated ones of the bulge delineate the

  10. Experimental intoxication of guinea pigs with Ipomoea carnea: behavioural and neuropathological alterations.

    PubMed

    Cholich, Luciana A; Márquez, Mercedes; Pumarola i Batlle, Martí; Gimeno, Eduardo J; Teibler, Gladys P; Rios, Elvio E; Acosta, Ofelia C

    2013-12-15

    Ipomoea carnea is a toxic plant that affects goats, with symptoms being characterised by nervous disorders and death. Swainsonine and calystegines are the principal toxic components isolated from I. carnea, which also yields lysergic acid derivatives. The aim of this study was to improve the clinical characterisation of experimental intoxication by I. carnea in guinea pigs through the evaluation of behavioural changes and to perform a thorough histopathological analysis of the affected CNS. Leaves of I. carnea were administered to guinea pigs. Open-field gait analysis and monoamine levels were measured. The poisoned animals exhibited increased vocalisation, lethargy, and a reduction in the locomotion frequency after the fourth week of intoxication, as demonstrated in the open-field test. Significant differences were observed in hind-limb gait width by the last week of intoxication. After 65 days, the guinea pigs were euthanised, necropsied, and examined using light and electron microscopy. At the end of the experiment, plasma serotonin decreased. In contrast, dopamine decreased, and noradrenaline increased in urine. Brain sections were evaluated with conventional histological methods and immunohistochemistry (IHC), as well as by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Vacuoles were observed throughout the brain, but they were particularly prominent in the brainstem. In addition, there were PAS-negative regions, and the Nissl substance was dispersed or absent, which was confirmed with the Kluver-Barreda stain. Moderate microgliosis was observed by immunohistochemistry. In the medulla oblongata, numerous ubiquitin-positive spheroids together with neuronal degeneration were observed in the nucleus gracilis/cuneatus. Furthermore, vacuoles were observed in astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, and endothelial cells by TEM. Our results showed that the behavioural effects may have been caused by alterations in the brain in conjunction with changes in monoamine levels. This

  11. In vivo antitumor potential of Ipomoea pes-caprae on melanoma cancer

    PubMed Central

    Manigauha, Ashish; Kharya, M. D.; Ganesh, N.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The incidence of skin cancers is rising gradually. The treatment of melanoma is also necessary to prevent the spread of cancer to other body organs. Scientific literatures have not documented any evidence of the antitumor potential of Ipomoea pes-caprae on melanoma. Aim of the Study: Explore in vivo antitumor potential of I. pes-caprae on melanoma cancer. Materials and Methods: Petroleum ether (60°C–80°C), methanolic and aqueous extracts, and swaras prepared from the whole herb of I. pes-caprae were assessed for their antitumor activity. The extracts and swaras at doses of 25 and 50 mg/kg b. wt. were administered intraperitoneal along with chemo and radiotherapy for 40 days for exploring antitumor activity against melanoma cancer (B16F10) in male C57BL mice. The results obtained from tumor volume, and histopathological studies were compared with the control and dacarbazine used as a standard. Results: Antitumor effect of I. pes-caprae extracts and swaras on melanoma cancer was found to be significant (P < 0.01) compared to normal control. The tumor volume inhibition against tumor-bearing mice, although differed from each other, was concentration dependent. Administration of plant extracts and swaras from the day 1 since tumor inducted. The induction of tumor was found delayed by 10–15 days and the tumor volume on the day 40 was similar to the Dacarbazine treatment used as a standard. Conclusion: The results obtained from the tumor volume and histopathological studies clearly revealed the antitumor potential of I. pes-caprae on melanoma cancer. PMID:25829785

  12. In vivo antitumor potential of Ipomoea pes-caprae on melanoma cancer.

    PubMed

    Manigauha, Ashish; Kharya, M D; Ganesh, N

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of skin cancers is rising gradually. The treatment of melanoma is also necessary to prevent the spread of cancer to other body organs. Scientific literatures have not documented any evidence of the antitumor potential of Ipomoea pes-caprae on melanoma. Explore in vivo antitumor potential of I. pes-caprae on melanoma cancer. Petroleum ether (60°C-80°C), methanolic and aqueous extracts, and swaras prepared from the whole herb of I. pes-caprae were assessed for their antitumor activity. The extracts and swaras at doses of 25 and 50 mg/kg b. wt. were administered intraperitoneal along with chemo and radiotherapy for 40 days for exploring antitumor activity against melanoma cancer (B16F10) in male C57BL mice. The results obtained from tumor volume, and histopathological studies were compared with the control and dacarbazine used as a standard. Antitumor effect of I. pes-caprae extracts and swaras on melanoma cancer was found to be significant (P < 0.01) compared to normal control. The tumor volume inhibition against tumor-bearing mice, although differed from each other, was concentration dependent. Administration of plant extracts and swaras from the day 1 since tumor inducted. The induction of tumor was found delayed by 10-15 days and the tumor volume on the day 40 was similar to the Dacarbazine treatment used as a standard. The results obtained from the tumor volume and histopathological studies clearly revealed the antitumor potential of I. pes-caprae on melanoma cancer.

  13. Assessment of the perinatal effects of maternal ingestion of Ipomoea carnea in rats.

    PubMed

    Hueza, Isis M; Guerra, José L; Haraguchi, Mitsue; Gardner, Dale R; Asano, Naoki; Ikeda, Kyoko; Górniak, Silvana L

    2007-08-01

    It is believed that Ipomoea carnea toxicosis induces abnormal embryogenesis in livestock. Studies on rats treated with I. carnea aqueous fraction (AF) during gestation, revealed litters with decreased body weight, but the characteristic vacuolar lesions promoted by swainsonine, its main toxic principle, were observed only in young rats on postnatal day (PND) 7. However, these alterations could have resulted as consequence of swainsonine placental passage and/or damage or even ingestion of the contaminated milk by pups. Thus, this perinatal work was performed to verify the transplacental passage of swainsonine and its excretion into milk employing the cross-fostering (CF) procedure as a tool of study. Females were treated with AF or vehicle during gestation and after birth pups were fostered between treated and untreated dams. Pup body weight gain (BWG) and histopathology to observe vacuolar degeneration were performed on PND 3 and 7. In addition, swainsonine detection was performed in amniotic fluid and milk from rats treated with the AF during gestation or lactation. BWG was significantly lower only in pups from mothers treated with the plant and fostered to other treated mothers (AF-AF group of pups). The histopathology revealed that pups from treated mothers fostered to untreated ones showed the characteristic vacuolar lesions; however, the lesions from the AF-AF pups were more severe in both periods evaluated. Amniotic fluid and milk analysis revealed the presence of swainsonine excretion into these fluid compartments. Thus, the results from CF and the chemical analysis allowed concluding that swainsonine passes the placental barrier and affects fetal development and milk excretion participates in I. carnea perinatal toxicosis.

  14. Seed development in Ipomoea lacunosa (Convolvulaceae), with particular reference to anatomy of the water gap.

    PubMed

    Gehan Jayasuriya, K M G; Baskin, Jerry M; Geneve, Robert L; Baskin, Carol C

    2007-09-01

    Disruption of one or both of the bulges (water gap) in the seed coat adjacent to the micropyle is responsible for breaking physical dormancy (PY) in seeds of Ipomoea lacunosa and other taxa of Convolvulaceae. Hitherto, neither ontogeny of these bulges nor onset of PY together with anatomical development and maturation drying of the seed had been studied in this family. The aims of this study were to monitor physiological and anatomical changes that occur during seed development in I. lacunosa, with particular reference to ontogeny of the water gap. Developmental anatomy (ontogeny) of seed coat and dry mass, length, moisture content, germinability and onset of seed coat impermeability to water were monitored from pollination to seed maturity. Blocking/drying and dye-tracking experiments were done to identify site of moisture loss during the final stages of seed drying. Physiological maturity of seeds occurred 22 d after pollination (DAP), and 100 % of seeds germinated 24 DAP. Impermeability of the seed coat developed 27-30 DAP, when seed moisture content was 13 %. The hilar fissure was identified as the site of moisture loss during the final stages of seed drying. The entire seed coat developed from the two outermost layers of the integument. A transition zone, i.e. a weak margin where seed coat ruptures during dormancy break, formed between the bulge and hilar ring and seed coat away from the bulge. Sclereid cells in the transition zone were square, whereas they were elongated under the bulge. Although the bulge and other areas of the seed coat have the same origin, these two cell layers underwent a different series of periclinal and anticlinal divisions during bulge development (beginning a few hours after pollination) than they did during development of the seed coat away from the bulge. Further, the boundary between the square sclereids in the transition zone and the elongated ones of the bulge delineate the edge of the water gap.

  15. Spontaneous and experimental glycoprotein storage disease of goats induced by Ipomoea carnea subsp fistulosa (Convolvulaceae).

    PubMed

    Armién, A G; Tokarnia, C H; Peixoto, P Vargas; Frese, K

    2007-03-01

    Spontaneous and experimental poisoning with the swainsonine-containing and calystegine-containing plant Ipomoea carnea subsp fistulosa is described. Three of 8 goats presenting with emaciation, weakness, symmetrical ataxia, posterior paresis, proprioceptive deficits, abnormal posture, abnormal postural reaction, and muscle hypertonia were necropsied. I fistulosa was suspected to be the cause of the neurologic disease in all cases. An experiment was conducted to confirm the diagnosis using 12 goats and diets containing 3 different concentrations of the plant. All goats fed I fistulosa developed neurological signs that were similar to those observed in the spontaneous intoxication. Muscle atrophy and pallor were the only macroscopic changes observed in spontaneous and in experimental intoxication. Histological lesions of spontaneous and experimental animals were similar. The most prominent lesion was cytoplasmic vacuolation in neurons of the central and the autonomous nervous system, pancreatic acinar cells, hepatocytes, Kupffer cells, follicular epithelial cells of the thyroid gland, and macrophages of the lymphatic tissues. Neuronal necrosis, axonal spheroids formation, and astrogliosis were additionally observed in the brain. Ultrastructurally, the cytoplasmic vacuoles consisted of distended lysosomes surrounded by a single-layered membrane. Nonreduced end-rests or sequence of alpha-Man, alpha-Glc, beta(1-4)-GlcNAc, and NeuNAc on lysosomal membrane were revealed by lectin histochemistry. Samples of plants used in the experimental trial contained swainsonine and calystegine and their intermediary derivate. We conclude that I fistulosa induces a glycoprotein storage disease primarily based on the inhibition of the lysosomal alpha-mannosidase by the alkaloid swainsonine.

  16. Damage suffered by swamp morning glory (Ipomoea aquatica Forsk) exposed to vanadium (V).

    PubMed

    Chen, Ting; Li, Ting-Qiang; Yang, Jin-Yan

    2016-03-01

    To elucidate the physiological and morphological responses generated by vanadium (V) in plants, hydroponic culture experiments were performed with swamp morning glory (Ipomoea aquatica Forsk) exposed to 0 mg L(-1) to 2.50 mg L(-1) pentavalent V [V(V)] in Hoagland nutrient solutions. The concentration of chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b, and carotene peaked at a V(V) concentration of 0.05 mg L(-1) and gradually decreased at higher V(V) concentrations. Similarly, the plant biomass was stimulated at low levels of V(V) and was inhibited when V(V) concentrations exceeded 0.1 mg L(-1). Pentavalent V had negative effects on the uptake of phosphorus (P) by roots, shoots, and leaves. The biological absorption coefficients of V of the roots were higher than those of the aerial parts. Under low concentrations of V(V) exposure, the predominant species of V in the aerial parts was tetravalent V [V(IV)], whereas V(V) became more prevalent when concentrations of V(V) in the solution was higher than 0.50 mg L(-1). In the roots, however, the concentrations of V(V) were always higher than those of the V(IV), except in the control group. Organelles in the V(V)-treated leaves were distorted, and the periplasmic space became wider. These results indicate V(V) has concentration-dependent effects on the physiological properties of swamp morning glory, whereas the plant has the ability to develop self-protective function to adapt to the toxicity of V(V). © 2015 SETAC.

  17. Doença de depósito lisossomal induzida pelo consumo de Ipomoea verbascoidea (Convolvulaceae) em caprinos no semiárido de Pernambuco

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The aim of this paper was to reproduce the poisoning of Ipomoea verbascoidea in goats and describe the epidemiological, clinical and pathological aspects of spontaneous poisoning by this plant in Pernambuco. For this, we studied the epidemiology of the disease in seven mu¬nicipalities in the semiari...

  18. Natural association of two different betasatellites with Sweet potato leaf curl virus in wild morning glory (Ipomoea purpurea) in India.

    PubMed

    Swapna Geetanjali, A; Shilpi, S; Mandal, Bikash

    2013-08-01

    Wild morning glory (Ipomoea purpurea) was observed to be affected by leaf curl and yellow vein diseases during summer-rainy season of 2009 in New Delhi, India. The virus was experimentally transmitted through whitefly, Bemisia tabaci to I. purpurea that reproduced the two distinct symptoms. Sequence analysis of multiple full-length clones obtained through rolling circle amplification from the leaf curl and yellow vein samples showed 91.8-95.3% sequence identity with Sweet potato leaf curl virus (SPLCV) and the isolates were phylogenetically distinct from those reported from Brazil, China, Japan and USA. Interestingly, two different betasatellites, croton yellow vein mosaic betasatellite and papaya leaf curl betasatellite were found with SPLCV in leaf curl and yellow vein diseases of I. purpurea, respectively. This study is the first report of occurrence of SPLCV in wild morning glory in India. SPLCV was known to infect other species of morning glory; our study revealed that I. purpurea, a new species of morning glory was a natural host of SPLCV. To date, betasatellite associated with SPLCV in Ipomoea spp. is not known. Our study provides evidence of natural association of two different betasatellites with SPLCV in leaf curl and yellow vein diseases of I. purpurea.

  19. Anti-Inflammatory Activity of N-Butanol Extract from Ipomoea stolonifera In Vivo and In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Shuping; Ji, Bin; Wang, Jinzhi; Bai, Xueting; Shi, Ganggang

    2014-01-01

    Ipomoea stolonifera (I. stolonifera) has been used for the treatment of inflammatory diseases including rheumatism and rheumatoid arthritis in Chinese traditional medicine. However, the anti-inflammatory activity of I. stolonifera has not been elucidated. For this reason, the anti-inflammatory activity of n-butanol extract of I. stolonifera (BE-IS) was evaluated in vivo by using acute models (croton oil-induced mouse ear edema, carrageenan-induced rat paw edema, and carrageenan-induced rat pleurisy) and chronic models (cotton pellet-induced rat granuloma, and complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA)-induced rat arthritis). Results indicated that oral administration of BE-IS significantly attenuated croton oil-induced ear edema, decreased carrageenan-induced paw edema, reduced carrageenan-induced exudates and cellular migration, inhibited cotton pellet-induced granuloma formation and improved CFA-induced arthritis. Preliminary mechanism studies demonstrated that BE-IS decreased the levels of myeloperoxidase (MPO) and malondialdehyde (MDA), increased the activity of anti-oxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD) in vivo, and reduced the production of nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 in lipopolysaccharide-activated RAW264.7 macrophages in vitro. Results obtained in vivo and in vitro demonstrate that BE-IS has considerable anti-inflammatory potential, which provided experimental evidences for the traditional application of Ipomoea stolonifera in inflammatory diseases. PMID:24752203

  20. The effect of leaf shape on the thermoregulation and frost tolerance of an annual vine, Ipomoea hederacea (Convolvulaceae).

    PubMed

    Campitelli, Brandon E; Gorton, Amanda J; Ostevik, Katherine L; Stinchcombe, John R

    2013-11-01

    Leaf shape is predicted to have important ecophysiological consequences; for example, theory predicts that lobed leaves should track air temperature more closely than their entire-margined counterparts. Hence, leaf-lobing may be advantageous during cold nights (∼0°C) when there is the risk of damage by radiation frost (a phenomenon whereby leaves fall below air temperature because of an imbalance between radiational heat loss and convective heat gain). Here, we test whether radiation frost can lead to differential damage between leaf shapes by examining a leaf-shape polymorphism in Ipomoea hederacea, where leaves are either lobed or heart-shaped depending on a single Mendelian locus. We logged leaf temperature during midautumn, and measured chlorophyll fluorescence and survival as proxies of performance. Furthermore, we tested if the leaf-shape locus confers freezing tolerance using freezing assays on leaf tissue from different leaf shapes. We found that lobed leaves consistently remain warmer than heart-shaped leaves during the night, but that no pattern emerged during the day, and that temperature differences between leaf shapes were typically small. Furthermore, we found that leaf types did not differ in frost tolerance, but that a 1°C decrease leads to a transition from moderate to complete damage. Our results demonstrate that Ipomoea hederacea leaf shapes do experience different nighttime temperatures, and that only minor temperature differences can lead to disparate levels of freezing damage, suggesting that the differential thermoregulation could result in different levels of frost damage.

  1. Development of successive cambia, cambial activity, and their relationship to physiological traits in Ipomoea arborescens (Convolvulaceae) seedlings.

    PubMed

    Terrazas, Teresa; Aguilar-Rodríguez, Silvia; Ojanguren, Clara Tinoco

    2011-05-01

    The seedling stage is one of the most critical phases in the life history of plants; during this stage, plants must develop efficient conductive and storage systems before the end of the favorable season. Little is known about the origin of successive cambia in seedlings of tree species of Ipomoea or about how many cambia are produced in one growth season. We studied the anatomy of Ipomoea arborescens seedlings to defi ne when cambium is differentiated, to determine how many cambia differentiate in one year of growth, and to relate the development of successive cambia to physiological aspects of growth. Seedlings from 5 to 425 d of age were harvested, and their morphology as well as CO(2) and water exchange, were evaluated at 5 and 60 d after germination. Six stages of development were established to study origin of cambia. Cambium was differentiated 5 d after germination, at a time when seedlings had photosynthetic cotyledons with high specific area, assimilation rate, and stomatal conductance. Differentiation of the fi rst successive cambium occurred inparenchyma cells below the endodermis or starch sheath. Development of reverse cambium and intraxylary phloem cambiumdemonstrated that ontogenetic shifts may occur in different stem regions. In the 10-mo-old plants, all cambia reactivated, and earlywood wide vessels were differentiated. The origin of successive cambia, the occurrence of more than one type of cambium, and parenchyma proliferation are features shared by I. arborescens with its climbing ancestors as a strategy for survival in the harsh environment of tropical deciduous forests.

  2. De Novo Assembly and Annotation of the Transcriptome of the Agricultural Weed Ipomoea purpurea Uncovers Gene Expression Changes Associated with Herbicide Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Leslie, Trent; Baucom, Regina S.

    2014-01-01

    Human-mediated selection can lead to rapid evolution in very short time scales, and the evolution of herbicide resistance in agricultural weeds is an excellent example of this phenomenon. The common morning glory, Ipomoea purpurea, is resistant to the herbicide glyphosate, but genetic investigations of this trait have been hampered by the lack of genomic resources for this species. Here, we present the annotated transcriptome of the common morning glory, Ipomoea purpurea, along with an examination of whole genome expression profiling to assess potential gene expression differences between three artificially selected herbicide resistant lines and three susceptible lines. The assembled Ipomoea transcriptome reported in this work contains 65,459 assembled transcripts, ~28,000 of which were functionally annotated by assignment to Gene Ontology categories. Our RNA-seq survey using this reference transcriptome identified 19 differentially expressed genes associated with resistance—one of which, a cytochrome P450, belongs to a large plant family of genes involved in xenobiotic detoxification. The differentially expressed genes also broadly implicated receptor-like kinases, which were down-regulated in the resistant lines, and other growth and defense genes, which were up-regulated in resistant lines. Interestingly, the target of glyphosate—EPSP synthase—was not overexpressed in the resistant Ipomoea lines as in other glyphosate resistant weeds. Overall, this work identifies potential candidate resistance loci for future investigations and dramatically increases genomic resources for this species. The assembled transcriptome presented herein will also provide a valuable resource to the Ipomoea community, as well as to those interested in utilizing the close relationship between the Convolvulaceae and the Solanaceae for phylogenetic and comparative genomics examinations. PMID:25155274

  3. Accumulation of heavy metals in water spinach (Ipomoea aquatica) cultivated in the Bangkok region, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Göthberg, Agneta; Greger, Maria; Bengtsson, Bengt-Erik

    2002-09-01

    The aquatic plant water spinach (Ipomoea aquatica), either wild or cultivated, is found throughout Southeast Asia and is a widely consumed vegetable in the region. Many of the waters where I. aquatica grows serve as recipients for domestic and other types of wastewater. Because these waters contain not only nutrients, but often also a wide variety of pollutants such as heavy metals from various human activities, many people risk intoxication. To estimate the accumulation of lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), total mercury (total Hg), and methylmercury in I. aquatica and the potential hazard to human health via consumption, nine sites for cultivation of I. aquatica in the greater Bangkok region of Thailand were sampled. At seven of the sites, I. aquatica was cultivated for the local food market. The concentrations of methylmercury, total Hg, Pb, and Cd in I. aquatica were 0.8 to 221, 12 to 2,590, 40 to 530, and < or = 10 to 123 microg/kg dry weight, respectively. At all sites at least one element showed relatively high concentrations and no reference site could be established. From threshold values for highest tolerable intake of these metals by humans and information about consumption of I. aquatica among local people, Pb and Cd concentrations in I. aquatica do not seem to be a direct threat to human health. However, concentrations of Hg were very high at some sites, and were higher in leaves (highest mean value: 1,440 microg/kg dry wt) than in stems (highest mean value: 422 microg/kg dry wt). This might be a threat, especially to children and fetuses, because Hg in I. aquatica was composed of methylmercury, partly or totally, at most sites to 11% or less and at one site from 50 to 100%. At the latter site, I. aquatica was not cultivated for the food market. Because other food sources, such as fish, may have high concentrations of methylmercury, these results indicate a need for monitoring of Hg, especially methylmercury, in different foodstuffs in the region.

  4. Water Spinach, Ipomoea aquatica (Convolvulaceae), Ameliorates Lead Toxicity by Inhibiting Oxidative Stress and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Dewanjee, Saikat; Dua, Tarun K.; Khanra, Ritu; Das, Shilpa; Barma, Sujata; Joardar, Swarnalata; Bhattacharjee, Niloy; Zia-Ul-Haq, M.; Jaafar, Hawa Z. E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Ipomoea aquatica (Convolvulaceae), an aquatic edible plant, is traditionally used against heavy metal toxicity in India. The current study intended to explore the protective role of edible (aqueous) extract of I. aquatica (AEIA) against experimentally induced Pb-intoxication. Methods The cytoprotective role of AEIA was measured on mouse hepatocytes by cell viability assay followed by Hoechst staining and flow cytometric assay. The effect on ROS production, lipid peroxidation, protein carbonylation, intracellular redox status were measured after incubating the hepatocytes with Pb-acetate (6.8 μM) along with AEIA (400 μg/ml). The effects on the expressions of apoptotic signal proteins were estimated by western blotting. The protective role of AEIA was measured by in vivo assay in mice. Haematological, serum biochemical, tissue redox status, Pb bioaccumulation and histological parameters were evaluated to estimate the protective role of AEIA (100 mg/kg) against Pb-acetate (5 mg/kg) intoxication. Results Pb-acetate treated hepatocytes showed a gradual reduction of cell viability dose-dependently with an IC50 value of 6.8 μM. Pb-acetate treated hepatocytes exhibited significantly enhanced levels (p < 0.01) of ROS production, lipid peroxidation, protein carbonylation with concomitant depletion (p < 0.01) of antioxidant enzymes and GSH. However, AEIA treatment could significantly restore the aforementioned parameters in murine hepatocytes near to normalcy. Besides, AEIA significantly reversed (p < 0.05–0.01) the alterations of transcription levels of apoptotic proteins viz. Bcl 2, Bad, Cyt C, Apaf-1, cleaved caspases [caspase 3, caspase 8 and caspase 9], Fas and Bid. In in vivo bioassay, Pb-acetate treatment caused significantly high intracellular Pb burden and oxidative pressure in the kidney, liver, heart, brain and testes in mice. In addition, the haematological and serum biochemical factors were changed significantly in Pb-acetate-treated animals. AEIA

  5. Anti-inflammatory and antispasmodic activity of Ipomoea imperati (Vahl) Griseb (Convolvulaceae).

    PubMed

    Paula, A C B; Hayashi, L S S; Freitas, J C

    2003-01-01

    Ipomoea imperati (Convolvulaceae) lives on the sandy shores of the Brazilian coast and in other areas of the world. The anti-inflammatory activity of a methanol-water extract of the leaves of I. imperati was investigated in experimental models of acute and subchronic inflammation. Topical application of the extract (10 mg/ear) inhibited mouse ear edema induced by croton oil (89.0 +/- 1.3% by the lipid fraction with an IC50 of 3.97 mg/ear and 57.0 +/- 1.3% by the aqueous fraction with an IC50 of 3.5 mg/ear) and arachidonic acid (42.0 +/- 2.0% with an IC50 of 4.98 mg/ear and 31.0 +/- 2.0% with an IC50 of 4.72 mg/ear). Phospholipase A2, purified from Apis mellifera bee venom, was also inhibited by the extract (5.0 mg/ml lipid and aqueous fraction) in vitro in a dose-dependent manner (85% by the lipid fraction with an IC50 of 3.22 mg/ml and 25% by the aqueous fraction with an IC50 of 3.43 mg/ml). The methanol-water extract of I. imperati (1000 mg/kg) administered by the oral route also inhibited the formation of cotton pellet-induced granulomas (73.2 +/- 1.2% by the lipid fraction and 56.14 +/- 2.7% by the aqueous fraction) and did not cause gastric mucosal lesions. I. imperati extracts (10 mg/ml) also inhibited in a dose-dependent manner the muscle contractions of guinea pig ileum induced by acetylcholine and histamine (IC50 of 1.60 mg/ml for the lipid fraction and 4.12 mg/ml for the aqueous fraction). These results suggest the use of I. imperati as an anti-inflammatory and antispasmodic agent in traditional medicine.

  6. Water Spinach, Ipomoea aquatic (Convolvulaceae), Ameliorates Lead Toxicity by Inhibiting Oxidative Stress and Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Dewanjee, Saikat; Dua, Tarun K; Khanra, Ritu; Das, Shilpa; Barma, Sujata; Joardar, Swarnalata; Bhattacharjee, Niloy; Zia-Ul-Haq, M; Jaafar, Hawa Z E

    2015-01-01

    Ipomoea aquatica (Convolvulaceae), an aquatic edible plant, is traditionally used against heavy metal toxicity in India. The current study intended to explore the protective role of edible (aqueous) extract of I. aquatica (AEIA) against experimentally induced Pb-intoxication. The cytoprotective role of AEIA was measured on mouse hepatocytes by cell viability assay followed by Hoechst staining and flow cytometric assay. The effect on ROS production, lipid peroxidation, protein carbonylation, intracellular redox status were measured after incubating the hepatocytes with Pb-acetate (6.8 μM) along with AEIA (400 μg/ml). The effects on the expressions of apoptotic signal proteins were estimated by western blotting. The protective role of AEIA was measured by in vivo assay in mice. Haematological, serum biochemical, tissue redox status, Pb bioaccumulation and histological parameters were evaluated to estimate the protective role of AEIA (100 mg/kg) against Pb-acetate (5 mg/kg) intoxication. Pb-acetate treated hepatocytes showed a gradual reduction of cell viability dose-dependently with an IC50 value of 6.8 μM. Pb-acetate treated hepatocytes exhibited significantly enhanced levels (p < 0.01) of ROS production, lipid peroxidation, protein carbonylation with concomitant depletion (p < 0.01) of antioxidant enzymes and GSH. However, AEIA treatment could significantly restore the aforementioned parameters in murine hepatocytes near to normalcy. Besides, AEIA significantly reversed (p < 0.05-0.01) the alterations of transcription levels of apoptotic proteins viz. Bcl 2, Bad, Cyt C, Apaf-1, cleaved caspases [caspase 3, caspase 8 and caspase 9], Fas and Bid. In in vivo bioassay, Pb-acetate treatment caused significantly high intracellular Pb burden and oxidative pressure in the kidney, liver, heart, brain and testes in mice. In addition, the haematological and serum biochemical factors were changed significantly in Pb-acetate-treated animals. AEIA treatment restored

  7. Suspected natural lysosomal storage disease from ingestion of pink morning glory (Ipomoea carnea) in goats in northern Argentina.

    PubMed

    Ríos, Elvio E; Cholich, Luciana A; Chileski, Gabriela; García, Enrique N; Lértora, Javier; Gimeno, Eduardo J; Guidi, María G; Mussart, Norma; Teibler, Gladys P

    2015-07-01

    This study describes an occurrence of pink morning glory (Ipomoea carnea) intoxication in goats in northern Argentina. The clinical signs displayed by the affected animals were ataxia, lethargy, emaciation, hypertonia of the neck muscles, spastic paresis in the hind legs, abnormal postural reactions and death. The clinico-pathologic examination revealed that the affected animals were anemic and their serum level of aspartate aminotransferase was significantly increased. Cytoplasmic vacuolation in the Purkinje cells and pancreatic acinar cells was observed by histological examination. The neuronal lectin binding pattern showed a strong positive reaction to WGA (Triticum vulgaris), sWGA (succinylated T. vulgaris) and LCA (Lens culinaris). Although I. carnea is common in tropical regions, this is the first report of spontaneous poisoning in goats in Argentina.

  8. Neutralization of toxic effects of different crude jellyfish venoms by an extract of Ipomoea pes-caprae (L.) R. Br.

    PubMed

    Pongprayoon, U; Bohlin, L; Wasuwat, S

    1991-10-01

    An extract (IPA) of the plant Ipomoea pes-caprae (L.) R. Br., previously shown to be clinically effective toward dermatitis caused by venomous jellyfishes, was studied as to its ability to neutralize toxic activities of jellyfish venoms. Different venoms exhibited different degrees of activity. When IPA was incubated with active venoms, it inhibited the actions of all jellyfish venoms tested, with IC50 values in the range of 0.3-0.8 mgIPA/mg venom for proteolytic action, and with about 10 times lower IC50 values for the neutralization of haemolytic action. These activities of IPA support the previously reported effectiveness in the treatment of dermatitis caused by jellyfish sting.

  9. Analysis of Metabolites in Stem Parasitic Plant Interactions: Interaction of Cuscuta–Momordica versus Cassytha–Ipomoea

    PubMed Central

    Furuhashi, Takeshi; Nakamura, Takemichi; Iwase, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Cuscuta and Cassytha are two well-known stem parasitic plant genera with reduced leaves and roots, inducing haustoria in their stems. Their similar appearance in the field has been recognized, but few comparative studies on their respective plant interactions are available. To compare their interactions, we conducted a metabolite analysis of both the Cassytha–Ipomoea and the Cuscuta–Momordica interaction. We investigated the energy charge of the metabolites by UFLC (ultra-high performance liquid chromatography), and conducted GC-MS (gas chromatography-mass spectrometry) analysis for polar metabolites (e.g., saccharides, polyols) and steroids. The energy charge after parasitization changed considerably in Cassytha but not in Cusucta. Cuscuta changed its steroid pattern during the plant interaction, whereas Cassytha did not. In the polar metabolite analysis, the laminaribiose increase after parasitization was conspicuous in Cuscuta, but not in Cassytha. This metabolite profile difference points to different lifestyles and parasitic strategies. PMID:27941603

  10. Suspected natural lysosomal storage disease from ingestion of pink morning glory (Ipomoea carnea) in goats in northern Argentina

    PubMed Central

    RÍOS, Elvio E.; CHOLICH, Luciana A.; CHILESKI, Gabriela; GARCÍA, Enrique N.; LÉRTORA, Javier; GIMENO, Eduardo J.; GUIDI, María G.; MUSSART, Norma; TEIBLER, Gladys P.

    2015-01-01

    This study describes an occurrence of pink morning glory (Ipomoea carnea) intoxication in goats in northern Argentina. The clinical signs displayed by the affected animals were ataxia, lethargy, emaciation, hypertonia of the neck muscles, spastic paresis in the hind legs, abnormal postural reactions and death. The clinico-pathologic examination revealed that the affected animals were anemic and their serum level of aspartate aminotransferase was significantly increased. Cytoplasmic vacuolation in the Purkinje cells and pancreatic acinar cells was observed by histological examination. The neuronal lectin binding pattern showed a strong positive reaction to WGA (Triticum vulgaris), sWGA (succinylated T. vulgaris) and LCA (Lens culinaris). Although I. carnea is common in tropical regions, this is the first report of spontaneous poisoning in goats in Argentina. PMID:25728544

  11. High Tolerance to Salinity and Herbivory Stresses May Explain the Expansion of Ipomoea Cairica to Salt Marshes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Gang; Huang, Qiao-Qiao; Lin, Zhen-Guang; Huang, Fang-Fang; Liao, Hui-Xuan; Peng, Shao-Lin

    2012-01-01

    Background Invasive plants are often confronted with heterogeneous environments and various stress factors during their secondary phase of invasion into more stressful habitats. A high tolerance to stress factors may allow exotics to successfully invade stressful environments. Ipomoea cairica, a vigorous invader in South China, has recently been expanding into salt marshes. Methodology/Principal Findings To examine why this liana species is able to invade a stressful saline environment, we utilized I. cairica and 3 non-invasive species for a greenhouse experiment. The plants were subjected to three levels of salinity (i.e., watered with 0, 4 and 8 g L−1 NaCl solutions) and simulated herbivory (0, 25 and 50% of the leaf area excised) treatments. The relative growth rate (RGR) of I. cairica was significantly higher than the RGR of non-invasive species under both stress treatments. The growth performance of I. cairica was not significantly affected by either stress factor, while that of the non-invasive species was significantly inhibited. The leaf condensed tannin content was generally lower in I. cairica than in the non-invasive I. triloba and Paederia foetida. Ipomoea cairica exhibited a relatively low resistance to herbivory, however, its tolerance to stress factors was significantly higher than either of the non-invasive species. Conclusions/Significance This is the first study examining the expansion of I. cairica to salt marshes in its introduced range. Our results suggest that the high tolerance of I. cairica to key stress factors (e.g., salinity and herbivory) contributes to its invasion into salt marshes. For I. cairica, a trade-off in resource reallocation may allow increased resources to be allocated to tolerance and growth. This may contribute to a secondary invasion into stressful habitats. Finally, we suggest that I. cairica could spread further and successfully occupy salt marshes, and countermeasures based on herbivory could be ineffective for

  12. High tolerance to salinity and herbivory stresses may explain the expansion of Ipomoea cairica to salt marshes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gang; Huang, Qiao-Qiao; Lin, Zhen-Guang; Huang, Fang-Fang; Liao, Hui-Xuan; Peng, Shao-Lin

    2012-01-01

    Invasive plants are often confronted with heterogeneous environments and various stress factors during their secondary phase of invasion into more stressful habitats. A high tolerance to stress factors may allow exotics to successfully invade stressful environments. Ipomoea cairica, a vigorous invader in South China, has recently been expanding into salt marshes. To examine why this liana species is able to invade a stressful saline environment, we utilized I. cairica and 3 non-invasive species for a greenhouse experiment. The plants were subjected to three levels of salinity (i.e., watered with 0, 4 and 8 g L(-1) NaCl solutions) and simulated herbivory (0, 25 and 50% of the leaf area excised) treatments. The relative growth rate (RGR) of I. cairica was significantly higher than the RGR of non-invasive species under both stress treatments. The growth performance of I. cairica was not significantly affected by either stress factor, while that of the non-invasive species was significantly inhibited. The leaf condensed tannin content was generally lower in I. cairica than in the non-invasive I. triloba and Paederia foetida. Ipomoea cairica exhibited a relatively low resistance to herbivory, however, its tolerance to stress factors was significantly higher than either of the non-invasive species. This is the first study examining the expansion of I. cairica to salt marshes in its introduced range. Our results suggest that the high tolerance of I. cairica to key stress factors (e.g., salinity and herbivory) contributes to its invasion into salt marshes. For I. cairica, a trade-off in resource reallocation may allow increased resources to be allocated to tolerance and growth. This may contribute to a secondary invasion into stressful habitats. Finally, we suggest that I. cairica could spread further and successfully occupy salt marshes, and countermeasures based on herbivory could be ineffective for controlling this invasion.

  13. Floral nectaries, nectar production dynamics and chemical composition in six ipomoea species (convolvulaceae) in relation to pollinators.

    PubMed

    Galetto, Leonardo; Bernardello, Gabriel

    2004-08-01

    Floral nectaries and nectar features were compared between six Argentinian Ipomoea species with differences in their pollinator guilds: I. alba, I. rubriflora, I. cairica, I. hieronymi var. hieronymi, I. indica, and I. purpurea. Pollinators were recorded in natural populations. The morpho-anatomical study was carried out through scanning electron and light microscopy. Nectar sugars were identified via gas chromatography. Nectar production and the effect of its removal on total nectar sugar amount were determined by using sets of bagged flowers. Hymenopterans were visitors of most species, while hummingbirds visited I. rubriflora and sphingids I. alba. All the species had a vascularized discoidal nectary surrounding the ovary base with numerous open stomata with a species-specific distribution. All nectar samples contained amino acids and sugars. Most species had sucrose-dominant nectars. Flowers lasted a few hours. Mean nectar sugar concentration throughout the lifetime of the flower ranged from 34.28 to 39.42 %, except for I. cairica (49.25 %) and I. rubriflora (25.18 %). Ipomoea alba had the highest nectar volume secreted per flower (50.12 microL), while in the other taxa it ranged from 2.42 to 12.00 microL. Nectar secretion began as soon as the flowers opened and lasted for a few hours (in I. purpurea, I. rubriflora) or it was continuous during the lifetime of the flower (in the remaining species). There was an increase of total sugar production after removals in I. cairica, I. indica and I. purpurea, whereas in I. alba and I. rubriflora removals had no effect, and in I. hieronymi there was a decrease in total sugar production. The chemical composition, production dynamics and removal effects of nectar could not be related to the pollinator guild of these species. Flower length was correlated with nectary size and total volume of nectar secreted, suggesting that structural constraints may play a major role in the determination of nectar traits of these species.

  14. Interstrain Inhibition in the Sweet Potato Pathogen Streptomyces ipomoeae: Purification and Characterization of a Highly Specific Bacteriocin and Cloning of Its Structural Gene

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiujun; Clark, Christopher A.; Pettis, Gregg S.

    2003-01-01

    Strains of the sweet potato soil rot pathogen Streptomyces ipomoeae had previously been divided into three groups based on their ability to inhibit one another during pairwise cocultivation. While group I strains are not antagonistic to members of the other groups, group II and group III strains produce separate substances that are inhibitory to strains outside their respective cognate groups. Here, we purified the group III inhibitory substance from the culture supernatant of a representative strain and found that it consists of a single 10-kDa cationic protein which is bacteriolytic for S. ipomoeae group I and II strains but which showed no inhibitory function against other streptomycetes or other bacterial genera tested. The structural gene for the inhibitor was cloned from a chromosomal library of the producing strain, and while the gene sequence revealed that the inhibitor is initially made in a larger precursor form, the deduced mature protein showed no significant homology to other known proteins. Our results demonstrate that S. ipomoeae group III inhibitory activity is manifested in the form of a highly specific, potentially novel bacteriocin, which we have designated ipomicin. PMID:12676701

  15. Floral Nectaries, Nectar Production Dynamics and Chemical Composition in Six Ipomoea Species (Convolvulaceae) in Relation to Pollinators

    PubMed Central

    GALETTO, LEONARDO; BERNARDELLO, GABRIEL

    2004-01-01

    • Background and Aims Floral nectaries and nectar features were compared between six Argentinian Ipomoea species with differences in their pollinator guilds: I. alba, I. rubriflora, I. cairica, I. hieronymi var. hieronymi, I. indica, and I. purpurea. • Methods Pollinators were recorded in natural populations. The morpho-anatomical study was carried out through scanning electron and light microscopy. Nectar sugars were identified via gas chromatography. Nectar production and the effect of its removal on total nectar sugar amount were determined by using sets of bagged flowers. • Key Results Hymenopterans were visitors of most species, while hummingbirds visited I. rubriflora and sphingids I. alba. All the species had a vascularized discoidal nectary surrounding the ovary base with numerous open stomata with a species-specific distribution. All nectar samples contained amino acids and sugars. Most species had sucrose-dominant nectars. Flowers lasted a few hours. Mean nectar sugar concentration throughout the lifetime of the flower ranged from 34·28 to 39·42 %, except for I. cairica (49·25 %) and I. rubriflora (25·18 %). Ipomoea alba had the highest nectar volume secreted per flower (50·12 µL), while in the other taxa it ranged from 2·42 to 12·00 µL. Nectar secretion began as soon as the flowers opened and lasted for a few hours (in I. purpurea, I. rubriflora) or it was continuous during the lifetime of the flower (in the remaining species). There was an increase of total sugar production after removals in I. cairica, I. indica and I. purpurea, whereas in I. alba and I. rubriflora removals had no effect, and in I. hieronymi there was a decrease in total sugar production. • Conclusions The chemical composition, production dynamics and removal effects of nectar could not be related to the pollinator guild of these species. Flower length was correlated with nectary size and total volume of nectar secreted, suggesting that structural constraints may play

  16. Improvement of sperm density in neem-oil induced infertile male albino rats by Ipomoea digitata Linn

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Ghanashyam Keshav; Mahajan, Raghunath Totaram; Mahajan, Arun Y.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Investigation has been carried out to validate folkloric claim of the potential of Ipomoea digitata (ID) based on reproductive health status in experimentally induced male albino rats. Materials and Methods: Emulsified neem oil fed albino rats were orally administered root powder of ID suspended in water for the doses of 250 and 500 mg/kg body weight for 40 days. Change in organ weight, sperm density and motility, serum hormonal levels and histomorphological changes were evaluated. Results: Significant increase in the sperm density and the sperm motility (P < 0.01) along with increase in the testis, and epididymes weight in neem-oil induced infertile rats treated with ID at both dose levels. This effect is vis-à-vis to serum hormonal levels. Presence of β-sitosterol in the root of ID likely to enhance the process of spermatogenesis as it is evident from histomorphological studies. Conclusion: Results of the present investigation reveal that ID is a good candidate for the management of male infertility. PMID:26401398

  17. A resurrection experiment finds evidence of both reduced genetic diversity and potential adaptive evolution in the agricultural weed Ipomoea purpurea.

    PubMed

    Kuester, Adam; Wilson, Ariana; Chang, Shu-Mei; Baucom, Regina S

    2016-09-01

    Despite the negative economic and ecological impact of weeds, relatively little is known about the evolutionary mechanisms that influence their persistence in agricultural fields. Here, we use a resurrection approach to examine the potential for genotypic and phenotypic evolution in Ipomoea purpurea, an agricultural weed that is resistant to glyphosate, the most widely used herbicide in current-day agriculture. We found striking reductions in allelic diversity between cohorts sampled nine years apart (2003 vs. 2012), suggesting that populations of this species sampled from agricultural fields have experienced genetic bottleneck events that have led to lower neutral genetic diversity. Heterozygosity excess tests indicate that these bottlenecks may have occurred prior to 2003. A greenhouse assay of individuals sampled from the field as seed found that populations of this species, on average, exhibited modest increases in herbicide resistance over time. However, populations differed significantly between sampling years for resistance: some populations maintained high resistance between the sampling years whereas others exhibited increased or decreased resistance. Our results show that populations of this noxious weed, capable of adapting to strong selection imparted by herbicide application, may lose genetic variation as a result of this or other environmental factors. We probably uncovered only modest increases in resistance on average between sampling cohorts due to a strong and previously identified fitness cost of resistance in this species, along with the potential that nonresistant migrants germinate from the seed bank. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Biochar and Glomus caledonium Influence Cd Accumulation of Upland Kangkong (Ipomoea aquatica Forsk.) Intercropped with Alfred Stonecrop (Sedum alfredii Hance)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Junli; Wu, Fuyong; Wu, Shengchun; Lam, Cheung Lung; Lin, Xiangui; Wong, Ming Hung

    2014-04-01

    Both biochar application and mycorrhizal inoculation have been proposed to improve plant growth and alter bioaccumulation of toxic metals. A greenhouse pot trial was conducted to investigate growth and Cd accumulation of upland kangkong (Ipomoea aquatica Forsk.) intercropped with Alfred stonecrop (Sedum alfredii Hance) in a Cd-contaminated soil inoculated with Glomus caledonium and/or applied with biochar. Compared with the monocultural control, intercropping with stonecrop (IS) decreased kangkong Cd acquisition via rhizosphere competition, and also decreased kangkong yield. Gc inoculation (+M) accelerated growth and Cd acquisition of stonecrop, and hence resulted in further decreases in kangkong Cd acquisition. Regardless of IS and +M, biochar addition (+B) increased kangkong yield via elevating soil available P, and decreased soil Cd phytoavailability and kangkong Cd concentration via increasing soil pH. Compared with the control, the treatment of IS + M + B had a substantially higher kangkong yield (+25.5%) with a lower Cd concentration (-62.7%). Gc generated additive effects on soil alkalinization and Cd stabilization to biochar, causing lower DTPA-extractable (phytoavailable) Cd concentrations and post-harvest transfer risks.

  19. Biochar and Glomus caledonium influence Cd accumulation of upland kangkong (Ipomoea aquatica Forsk.) intercropped with Alfred stonecrop (Sedum alfredii Hance).

    PubMed

    Hu, Junli; Wu, Fuyong; Wu, Shengchun; Lam, Cheung Lung; Lin, Xiangui; Wong, Ming Hung

    2014-04-14

    Both biochar application and mycorrhizal inoculation have been proposed to improve plant growth and alter bioaccumulation of toxic metals. A greenhouse pot trial was conducted to investigate growth and Cd accumulation of upland kangkong (Ipomoea aquatica Forsk.) intercropped with Alfred stonecrop (Sedum alfredii Hance) in a Cd-contaminated soil inoculated with Glomus caledonium and/or applied with biochar. Compared with the monocultural control, intercropping with stonecrop (IS) decreased kangkong Cd acquisition via rhizosphere competition, and also decreased kangkong yield. Gc inoculation (+M) accelerated growth and Cd acquisition of stonecrop, and hence resulted in further decreases in kangkong Cd acquisition. Regardless of IS and +M, biochar addition (+B) increased kangkong yield via elevating soil available P, and decreased soil Cd phytoavailability and kangkong Cd concentration via increasing soil pH. Compared with the control, the treatment of IS + M + B had a substantially higher kangkong yield (+25.5%) with a lower Cd concentration (-62.7%). Gc generated additive effects on soil alkalinization and Cd stabilization to biochar, causing lower DTPA-extractable (phytoavailable) Cd concentrations and post-harvest transfer risks.

  20. Enhanced nitrogen and phosphorus removal from eutrophic lake water by Ipomoea aquatica with low-energy ion implantation.

    PubMed

    Li, Miao; Wu, Yue-Jin; Yu, Zeng-Liang; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Yu, Han-Qing

    2009-03-01

    Ipomoea aquatica with low-energy N+ ion implantation was used for the removal of both nitrogen and phosphorus from the eutrophic Chaohu Lake, China. The biomass growth, nitrate reductase and peroxidase activities of the implanted I. aquatica were found to be higher than those of I. aquatica without ion implantation. Higher NO3-N and PO4-P removal efficiencies were obtained for the I. aquatica irradiation at 25 keV, 3.9 x 10(16) N+ ions/cm(2) and 20 keV 5.2 x 10(16) N+ ions/cm(2), respectively (p < 0.05). Moreover, the nitrogen and phosphorus contents in the plant biomass with ion implantation were also greater than those of the controls. I. aquatica with ion implantation was directly responsible for 51-68% N removal and 54-71% P removal in the three experiments. The results further confirm that the ion implantation could enhance the growth potential of I. aquatica in real eutrophic water and increase its nutrient removal efficiency. Thus, the low-energy ion implantation for aquatic plants could be considered as an approach for in situ phytoremediation and bioremediation of eutrophic waters.

  1. Biosynthesis and accumulation of ergoline alkaloids in a mutualistic association between Ipomoea asarifolia (Convolvulaceae) and a clavicipitalean fungus.

    PubMed

    Markert, Anne; Steffan, Nicola; Ploss, Kerstin; Hellwig, Sabine; Steiner, Ulrike; Drewke, Christel; Li, Shu-Ming; Boland, Wilhelm; Leistner, Eckhard

    2008-05-01

    Ergoline alkaloids occur in taxonomically unrelated taxa, such as fungi, belonging to the phylum Ascomycetes and higher plants of the family Convolvulaceae. The disjointed occurrence can be explained by the observation that plant-associated epibiotic clavicipitalean fungi capable of synthesizing ergoline alkaloids colonize the adaxial leaf surface of certain Convolvulaceae plant species. The fungi are seed transmitted. Their capacity to synthesize ergoline alkaloids depends on the presence of an intact differentiated host plant (e.g. Ipomoea asarifolia or Turbina corymbosa [Convolvulaceae]). Here, we present independent proof that these fungi are equipped with genetic material responsible for ergoline alkaloid biosynthesis. The gene (dmaW) for the determinant step in ergoline alkaloid biosynthesis was shown to be part of a cluster involved in ergoline alkaloid formation. The dmaW gene was overexpressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the encoded DmaW protein purified to homogeneity, and characterized. Neither the gene nor the biosynthetic capacity, however, was detectable in the intact I. asarifolia or the taxonomically related T. corymbosa host plants. Both plants, however, contained the ergoline alkaloids almost exclusively, whereas alkaloids are not detectable in the associated epibiotic fungi. This indicates that a transport system may exist translocating the alkaloids from the epibiotic fungus into the plant. The association between the fungus and the plant very likely is a symbiotum in which ergoline alkaloids play an essential role.

  2. Colour Cues: Effects of Ipomoea Plant Extract on Culex quinquefasciatus Say Gravid Females in Choosing Oviposition Site.

    PubMed

    Zuharah, Wan Fatma; Thiagaletchumi, Maniam; Fadzly, Nik

    2016-08-01

    The interaction between plants and insects is dynamic, and may favour either the plant or the insect. Plant chemicals are deeply implicated in this relationship and influence insect behaviour. Here, we investigated the oviposition behaviour response of Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes based on the colour cues produced by Ipomoea cairica leaves extract. In this study, two sets of oviposition choice experiments were conducted: (1) single solution in a cage; and (2) multiple concentration solutions in a cage. In the single solution experiment, only 1 available oviposition site was offered to 5 gravid females and in the multiple concentration tests, 4 available oviposition sites were offered to 20 gravid females. The tested concentrations were set up at 100 mL of: (1) control (distilled water only); (2) 50 ppm; (3) 150 ppm; and (4) 300 ppm of I. cairica plant extracts. The highest concentration of 300 ppm appeared to show the highest intensity with the darkest colour followed by 150 ppm and 50 ppm concentrations. More gravid females were found drowned in the highest concentration, 300 ppm of acethonilic leaves extract, compared to 150 ppm and 50 ppm of the tested extract. No eggs were found in all tested solutions. The studied extract was found to effectively attract gravid Cx. quinquefasciatus females and subsequently cause mortality and inhibit egg deposition. The interference caused by the acethonilic extract of I. cairica on the oviposition activity of Cx. quinquefasciatus can result in better control of the vector insect.

  3. Biochar and Glomus caledonium Influence Cd Accumulation of Upland Kangkong (Ipomoea aquatica Forsk.) Intercropped with Alfred Stonecrop (Sedum alfredii Hance)

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Junli; Wu, Fuyong; Wu, Shengchun; Lam, Cheung Lung; Lin, Xiangui; Wong, Ming Hung

    2014-01-01

    Both biochar application and mycorrhizal inoculation have been proposed to improve plant growth and alter bioaccumulation of toxic metals. A greenhouse pot trial was conducted to investigate growth and Cd accumulation of upland kangkong (Ipomoea aquatica Forsk.) intercropped with Alfred stonecrop (Sedum alfredii Hance) in a Cd-contaminated soil inoculated with Glomus caledonium and/or applied with biochar. Compared with the monocultural control, intercropping with stonecrop (IS) decreased kangkong Cd acquisition via rhizosphere competition, and also decreased kangkong yield. Gc inoculation (+M) accelerated growth and Cd acquisition of stonecrop, and hence resulted in further decreases in kangkong Cd acquisition. Regardless of IS and +M, biochar addition (+B) increased kangkong yield via elevating soil available P, and decreased soil Cd phytoavailability and kangkong Cd concentration via increasing soil pH. Compared with the control, the treatment of IS + M + B had a substantially higher kangkong yield (+25.5%) with a lower Cd concentration (−62.7%). Gc generated additive effects on soil alkalinization and Cd stabilization to biochar, causing lower DTPA-extractable (phytoavailable) Cd concentrations and post-harvest transfer risks. PMID:24728157

  4. Leaf fluctuating asymmetry, soil disturbance and plant stress: A multiple year comparison using two herbs, Ipomoea pandurata and Cnidoscolus stimulosus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Freeman, D.C.; Brown, M.L.; Duda, J.J.; Graraham, J.H.; Emlen, J.M.; Krzysik, A.J.; Balbach, H.; Kovacic, D.A.; Zak, J.C.

    2005-01-01

    We studied Cnidoscolus stimulosus and Ipomoea pandurata, two common herbs of the Fall Line Sandhills to assess their potential as ecosystem level stress indicators. We focused on plants because they are among the most persistent organisms in terrestrial ecosystems. We used developmental instability as an indicator of plant population stress. Developmental instability is usually measured as deviations from symmetry, in traits that normally develop symmetrically. Thus, symmetry represents an idealized a priori phenotype. Stress presumably causes perturbations during development that may exceed the capacity of the organism to buffer or correct, resulting in developmental instability, and hence deviations from this ideal. Soil disturbance imposed by different land use patterns at Fort Benning, Georgia provided a gradient of soil disturbance. In 2000-2002 we collected plants from nine different sites representing three levels of disturbance. In addition, in 2002 we collected microhabitat data in 1 m quadrats surrounding each plant whose developmental stability we also assessed. The developmental instability of both species was influenced by land use patterns, whether or not the sites had been previously burned, and microhabitat variables. Developmental instability increased with soil disturbance, burning in the prior year, and as the percentage of bare ground increased around the target individual. To some extent, favorable microhabitat conditions reduced developmental instability in sites with medium and high soil disturbance, whereas unfavorable conditions at low soil disturbance sites increased developmental instability. As an indicator of community level stress, developmental instability is best used in conjunction with other indices of environmental quality. ?? Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. The degradation of two fluoroquinolone based antimicrobials by SilA, an alkaline laccase from Streptomyces ipomoeae.

    PubMed

    Blánquez, Alba; Guillén, Francisco; Rodríguez, Juana; Arias, M Enriqueta; Hernández, Manuel

    2016-03-01

    The presence of fluoroquinolone based antimicrobials in natural waters represents a significant emerging environmental problem. In this study the suitability of a novel alkaline bacterial laccase, SilA, from Streptomyces ipomoeae to degrade two key antimicrobials, Ciprofloxacin and Norfloxacin under alkaline conditions in the presence of natural mediators was assessed. Results showed that only the selected SilA-acetosyringone system was able to degrade more than 90% of both fluoroquinolones. HPLC analysis of the degradation products obtained after enzyme treatment confirmed the disappearance of the antimicrobials and the mediator after 24 h. The time course of the degradation showed that during the first 4 h a 75% of degradation of fluoroquinolones was detected while the mediator remained stable. A concomitant appearance of new chromatographic peaks derived from the fluoroquinolones and/or the mediator was detected. Moreover, toxicity assays demonstrated that the SilA-acetosyringone system was able to reduce the toxicity of Ciprofloxacin and Norfloxacin by 90 and 70%, respectively. In conclusion, these findings support the suitability of a low cost and environmentally friendly strategy based on the SilA-acetosyringone system for a primary treatment of contaminated alkaline wastewaters with this type of emerging pollutants.

  6. Homologs of genes associated with programmed cell death in animal cells are differentially expressed during senescence of Ipomoea nil petals.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Tetsuya; Ichimura, Kazuo; Kanekatsu, Motoki; van Doorn, Wouter G

    2009-03-01

    In senescent petals of Ipomoea nil, we investigated the expression of genes showing homology to genes involved in animal programmed cell death (PCD). Three encoded proteins were homologous to apoptotic proteins in animals: Bax inhibitor-1 (BI-1), a vacuolar processing enzyme (VPE; homologous to caspases) and a monodehydroascorbate reductase [MDAR; homologous to apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF)]. AIFs harbor an oxidoreductase domain and an apoptotic domain. MDARs exhibit homology to the AIF oxidoreductase domain, not to the apoptotic domain. The three other genes studied relate to autophagy. They encode homologs to vacuolar protein sorting 34 (VPS34) and to the Arabidopsis autophagy-related proteins 4b and 8a (ATG4b and ATG8a). The transcript abundance of MDAR decreased continuously, whereas that of the other genes studies exhibited a transient increase, except ATG4b whose abundance stayed high after an increase. Treatment with ethylene advanced the time to visible petal senescence, and hastened the changes in expression of each of the genes studied. In order to assess the role of VPS34 in petal senescence, we studied the effect of its inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA). 3-MA reduced the time to visible petal senescence, and also accelerated the time to DNA degradation. Remarkably, 3-MA increased the time to nuclear fragmentation, indicating that the time to visible petal senescence was independent of nuclear fragmentation. The data on 3-MA might suggest the idea that autophagy is not a cause of PCD, but part of the remobilization process.

  7. Biosynthesis and Accumulation of Ergoline Alkaloids in a Mutualistic Association between Ipomoea asarifolia (Convolvulaceae) and a Clavicipitalean Fungus1

    PubMed Central

    Markert, Anne; Steffan, Nicola; Ploss, Kerstin; Hellwig, Sabine; Steiner, Ulrike; Drewke, Christel; Li, Shu-Ming; Boland, Wilhelm; Leistner, Eckhard

    2008-01-01

    Ergoline alkaloids occur in taxonomically unrelated taxa, such as fungi, belonging to the phylum Ascomycetes and higher plants of the family Convolvulaceae. The disjointed occurrence can be explained by the observation that plant-associated epibiotic clavicipitalean fungi capable of synthesizing ergoline alkaloids colonize the adaxial leaf surface of certain Convolvulaceae plant species. The fungi are seed transmitted. Their capacity to synthesize ergoline alkaloids depends on the presence of an intact differentiated host plant (e.g. Ipomoea asarifolia or Turbina corymbosa [Convolvulaceae]). Here, we present independent proof that these fungi are equipped with genetic material responsible for ergoline alkaloid biosynthesis. The gene (dmaW) for the determinant step in ergoline alkaloid biosynthesis was shown to be part of a cluster involved in ergoline alkaloid formation. The dmaW gene was overexpressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the encoded DmaW protein purified to homogeneity, and characterized. Neither the gene nor the biosynthetic capacity, however, was detectable in the intact I. asarifolia or the taxonomically related T. corymbosa host plants. Both plants, however, contained the ergoline alkaloids almost exclusively, whereas alkaloids are not detectable in the associated epibiotic fungi. This indicates that a transport system may exist translocating the alkaloids from the epibiotic fungus into the plant. The association between the fungus and the plant very likely is a symbiotum in which ergoline alkaloids play an essential role. PMID:18344419

  8. Selection through male function favors smaller floral display size in the common morning glory Ipomoea purpurea (Convolvulaceae).

    PubMed

    Lau, Jennifer A; Miller, Richard E; Rausher, Mark D

    2008-07-01

    In self-compatible, hermaphroditic plants, display size-the number of flowers open on a plant at one time-is believed to be influenced by trade-offs between increasing geitonogamous selfing and decreasing per-flower pollen export as display size increases. Experimental results presented here indicate that selection through male function favors smaller display sizes in Ipomoea purpurea. In small arrays, plant display size was manipulated experimentally, and female selfing rate, male outcross success, and total male fitness were estimated using genetic markers and likelihood and regression analyses. As would be expected if larger displays experience greater geitonogamy, selfing rate increased with display size. However, the per-flower amount of pollen exported to other plants decreased with display size. The magnitude of this effect is more than sufficient to offset the increase in selfing rate, resulting in reduced per-flower total male fitness with increasing display size. The low values of inbreeding depression previously reported for this species would enhance this effect.

  9. Morphology and anatomy of physical dormancy in Ipomoea lacunosa: identification of the water gap in seeds of Convolvulaceae (Solanales).

    PubMed

    Jayasuriya, K M G Gehan; Baskin, Jerry M; Geneve, Robert L; Baskin, Carol C

    2007-07-01

    Convolvulaceae is the most advanced plant family (asterid clade) that produces seeds with physical dormancy (water-impermeable seed coat). There are several different opinions about the nature of the specialized structure ('water gap') in the seed coat through which water initially enters seeds of Convolvulaceae, but none of them has been documented clearly. The primary aim of the study was to identify the water gap in seeds of Ipomoea lacunosa (Convolvulaceae) and to describe its morphology, anatomy and function. Light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, tissue-sectioning, dye-tracking and blocking experiments were used to describe the morphology, anatomy and function of the water gap in seeds of I. lacunosa. Dormancy-breaking treatments caused slits to form around the two bulges on the seed coat adjacent to the hilum, and dye entered the seed only via the disrupted bulges. Bulge anatomy differs from that of the rest of the seed coat. Sclereid cells of the bulges are more compacted and elongated than those in the hilum pad and in the rest of the seed coat away from the bulges. The transition area between elongated and square-shaped sclereid cells is the place where the water gap opens. Morphology/anatomy of the water gap in Convolvulaceae differs from that of taxa in the other 11 angiosperm plant families that produce seeds with physical dormancy for which it has been described.

  10. Morphology and Anatomy of Physical Dormancy in Ipomoea lacunosa: Identification of the Water Gap in Seeds of Convolvulaceae (Solanales)

    PubMed Central

    Jayasuriya, K. M. G. Gehan; Baskin, Jerry M.; Geneve, Robert L.; Baskin, Carol C.

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims Convolvulaceae is the most advanced plant family (asterid clade) that produces seeds with physical dormancy (water-impermeable seed coat). There are several different opinions about the nature of the specialized structure (‘water gap’) in the seed coat through which water initially enters seeds of Convolvulaceae, but none of them has been documented clearly. The primary aim of the study was to identify the water gap in seeds of Ipomoea lacunosa (Convolvulaceae) and to describe its morphology, anatomy and function. Methods Light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, tissue-sectioning, dye-tracking and blocking experiments were used to describe the morphology, anatomy and function of the water gap in seeds of I. lacunosa. Key Results Dormancy-breaking treatments caused slits to form around the two bulges on the seed coat adjacent to the hilum, and dye entered the seed only via the disrupted bulges. Bulge anatomy differs from that of the rest of the seed coat. Sclereid cells of the bulges are more compacted and elongated than those in the hilum pad and in the rest of the seed coat away from the bulges. Conclusions The transition area between elongated and square-shaped sclereid cells is the place where the water gap opens. Morphology/anatomy of the water gap in Convolvulaceae differs from that of taxa in the other 11 angiosperm plant families that produce seeds with physical dormancy for which it has been described. PMID:17513869

  11. Selection on intra-individual variation in stigma-anther distance in the tropical tree Ipomoea wolcottiana (Convolvulaceae).

    PubMed

    Arceo-Gómez, G; Vargas, C F; Parra-Tabla, V

    2017-05-01

    It is well known that animals can exert strong selective pressures on plant traits. However, studies on the evolutionary consequences of plant-animal interactions have mainly focused on understanding how these interactions shape trait means, while overlooking its potential direct effect on the variability among structures within a plant (e.g. flowers and fruits). The degree of within-plant variability can have strong fitness effects but few studies have evaluated its role as a potential target of selection. Here we reanalysed data on Ipomoea wolcottiana stigma-anther distance to test alternate mechanisms driving selection on the mean as well as on intra-individual variance in 2 years. We found strong negative selection acting on intra-individual variation but not on mean stigma-anther distance, suggesting independent direct selection on the latter. Our result suggests that intra-individual variance has the potential to be an important target of selection in nature, and that ignoring it could lead to the wrong characterisation of the selection regime. We highlight the need for future studies to consider patterns of selection on the mean as well as on intra-individual variance if we want to understand the full extent of plant-animal interactions as an evolutionary force in nature. © 2017 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  12. Induction of systemic resistance in rice by leaf extracts of Zizyphus jujuba and Ipomoea carnea against Rhizoctonia solani

    PubMed Central

    Marimuthu, Thambiayya; Kagale, Jayashree; Thayumanavan, Balsamy; Samiyappan, Ramasamy

    2011-01-01

    Plants accumulate a great diversity of natural products, many of which confer protective effects against phytopathogenic attack. Earlier we had demonstrated that the leaf extracts of Zizyphus jujuba and Ipomoea carnea inhibit the in vitro mycelial growth of Rhizoctonia solani, and effectively reduce the incidence of sheath blight disease in rice.7 Here we demonstrate that foliar application of the aqueous leaf extracts of Z. jujuba and I. carnea followed by challenge inoculation with R. solani induces systemic resistance in rice as evident from significantly increased accumulation of pathogenesis-related proteins such as chitinase, β-1,3-glucanase and peroxidase, as well as defense-related compounds such as phenylalanine ammonia-lyase and phenolic substances. Thin layer chromatographic separation of secondary metabolites revealed presence of alkaloid and terpenoid compounds in the leaf extracts of Z. jujuba that exhibited toxicity against R. solani under in vitro condition. Thus, the enhanced sheath blight resistance in rice seedlings treated with leaf extracts of Z. jujuba or I. carnea can be attributed to the direct inhibitory effects of these leaf extracts as well as their ability to elicit systemic resistance against R. solani. PMID:21593600

  13. Colour Cues: Effects of Ipomoea Plant Extract on Culex quinquefasciatus Say Gravid Females in Choosing Oviposition Site

    PubMed Central

    Zuharah, Wan Fatma; Thiagaletchumi, Maniam; Fadzly, Nik

    2016-01-01

    The interaction between plants and insects is dynamic, and may favour either the plant or the insect. Plant chemicals are deeply implicated in this relationship and influence insect behaviour. Here, we investigated the oviposition behaviour response of Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes based on the colour cues produced by Ipomoea cairica leaves extract. In this study, two sets of oviposition choice experiments were conducted: (1) single solution in a cage; and (2) multiple concentration solutions in a cage. In the single solution experiment, only 1 available oviposition site was offered to 5 gravid females and in the multiple concentration tests, 4 available oviposition sites were offered to 20 gravid females. The tested concentrations were set up at 100 mL of: (1) control (distilled water only); (2) 50 ppm; (3) 150 ppm; and (4) 300 ppm of I. cairica plant extracts. The highest concentration of 300 ppm appeared to show the highest intensity with the darkest colour followed by 150 ppm and 50 ppm concentrations. More gravid females were found drowned in the highest concentration, 300 ppm of acethonilic leaves extract, compared to 150 ppm and 50 ppm of the tested extract. No eggs were found in all tested solutions. The studied extract was found to effectively attract gravid Cx. quinquefasciatus females and subsequently cause mortality and inhibit egg deposition. The interference caused by the acethonilic extract of I. cairica on the oviposition activity of Cx. quinquefasciatus can result in better control of the vector insect. PMID:27688853

  14. Immunostimulatory acivity of Calophyllum brasiliense, Ipomoea pes-caprae and Matayba elaeagnoides demonstrated by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells proliferation.

    PubMed

    Philippi, Marina Elisa; Duarte, Bruna Momm; Da Silva, Carolina Vieira; De Souza, Michel Thomaz; Niero, Rivaldo; Cechinel Filho, Valdir; Bueno, Edneia Casagranda

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluates the effect of methanol extracts of three Brazilian medicinal plants on in vitro proliferation of human mononuclear cells. Lymphoproliferation assay was carried out by incubating human peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy donors (1 x 10(6) cells/mL) with extracts of Calophyllum brasiliense (roots), Ipomoea pes-caprae (whole plant) and Matayba elaeagnoides (bark), both at 10, 50, 100 and 200 microg/mL, alone or with phytohemagglutinin (PHA, 5 microg/mL), in 96-well microplates at 37 degrees C with 5% CO2, for 72 h. The quantification of cell proliferation assay was performed by blue tetrazolium (MTT) reduction with reading at 540 nm. Cells incubated with only the culture medium were used as negative control for cell proliferation, while the positive control consisted of cells and PHA. The results suggest that the extracts of all three studied plants induce T lymphocyte proliferation. I. pes-caprae showed immunostimulatory activity three times higher than the C. brasiliense extract, while that of the M. elaeagnoides extract was 1.5 times higher. The results demonstrate immunostimulatory effects of these three plants, therefore the continuity of these studies is recommended, in order to determine the active principles.

  15. Antidiabetic Effects of Yam (Dioscorea batatas) and Its Active Constituent, Allantoin, in a Rat Model of Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Go, Hyeon-Kyu; Rahman, Md Mahbubur; Kim, Gi-Beum; Na, Chong-Sam; Song, Choon-Ho; Kim, Jin-Shang; Kim, Shang-Jin; Kang, Hyung-Sub

    2015-10-15

    The objective of this study was to investigate the therapeutic efficacies of crude yam (Dioscorea batatas) powder (PY), water extract of yam (EY), and allantoin (the active constituent of yam) in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats with respect to glucose, insulin, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), C-peptide, glycated hemoglobin (HbAlc), lipid metabolism, and oxidative stress. For this purpose, 50 rats were divided into five groups: normal control (NC), diabetic control (STZ), and STZ plus treatment groups (STZ + PY, STZ + EY, and STZ + allantoin). After treatment for one-month, there was a decrease in blood glucose: 385 ± 7 in STZ, 231 ± 3 in STZ + PY, 214 ± 11 in STZ + EY, and 243 ± 6 mg/dL in STZ + allantoin, respectively. There were significant statistical differences (p < 0.001) compared to STZ (100%): 60% in STZ + PY, 55% in STZ + EY, and 63% in STZ + allantoin. With groups in the same order, there were significant decreases (p < 0.001) in HbAlc (100% as 24.4 ± 0.6 ng/mL, 78%, 75%, and 77%), total cholesterol (100% as 122 ± 3 mg/dL, 70%, 67%, and 69%), and low-density lipoprotein (100% as 29 ± 1 mg/dL, 45%, 48%, and 38%). There were also significant increases (p < 0.001) in insulin (100% as 0.22 ± 0.00 ng/mL, 173%, 209%, and 177%), GLP-1 (100% as 18.4 ± 0.7 pmol/mL, 160%, 166%, and 162%), and C-peptide (100% as 2.56 ± 0.10 ng/mL, 129%, 132%, and 130%). The treatment effectively ameliorated antioxidant stress as shown by a significant decrease (p < 0.001) in malondialdehyde (100% as 7.25 ± 0.11 nmol/mL, 87%, 86%, and 85%) together with increases (p < 0.01) in superoxide dismutase (100% as 167 ± 6 IU/mL, 147%, 159%, and 145%) and reduced glutathione (100% as 167 ± 6 nmol/mL, 123%, 141%, and 140%). The results indicate that yam and allantoin have antidiabetic effects by modulating antioxidant activities, lipid profiles and by promoting the release of GLP-1, thereby improving the function of β-cells maintaining normal insulin and glucose

  16. Hepta-, hexa-, penta-, tetra-, and trisaccharide resin glycosides from three species of Ipomoea and their antiproliferative activity on two glioma cell lines.

    PubMed

    León-Rivera, Ismael; Del Río-Portilla, Federico; Enríquez, Raúl G; Rangel-López, Edgar; Villeda, Juana; Rios, María Yolanda; Navarrete-Vázquez, Gabriel; Hurtado-Días, Israel; Guzmán-Valdivieso, Ulises; Núñez-Urquiza, Verónica; Escobedo-Martínez, Carolina

    2017-03-01

    Six new partially acylated resin glycosides were isolated from convolvulin of Ipomoea purga, Ipomoea stans, and Ipomoea murucoides (Convolvulaceae). The structures of compounds 1-6 were elucidated by a combination of NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The structure of jalapinoside B (1) consists of a hexasaccharide core bonded to an 11-hydroxytetradecanoic (convolvulinic) acid forming a macrolactone acylated by a 2-methylbutanoyl, a 3-hydroxy-2-methylbutanoyl, and a quamoclinic acid B units. Purginoic acid A (2) contains a hexasaccharide core bonded to a convolvulinic acid acylated by a 3-hydroxy-2-methylbutanoyl unit. Stansin A (4) is an ester-type heterodimer, and consists of two stansoic acid A (3) units, acylated by 2-methylbutanoic and 3-hydroxy-2-methylbutanoic acids. The site of lactonization was located at C-3 of Rhamnose, and the position for the ester linkage of the monomeric unit B on the macrolactone unit A was established as C-4 of the terminal rhamnose. Compounds 5 and 6 are glycosidic acids. Murucinic acid II (5) is composed of a pentasaccharide core bonded to an 11-hydroxyhexadecanoic (jalapinolic) acid, acylated by an acetyl unit. Stansinic acid I (6) is a tetrasaccharide core bonded to a jalapinolic acid, acylated by 2-methylbutanoyl and 3-hydroxy-2-methylbutanoyl units. Preliminary testing showed the cytotoxicity of compounds 1-6 toward OVCAR and UISO-SQC-1 cancer cell lines. In addition, compound 1 showed an antiproliferative activity on glioma C6 and RG2 tumor cell lines. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Antiurolithiatic activity of ethanol leaf extract of Ipomoea eriocarpa against ethylene glycol-induced urolithiasis in male Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Das, Moonjit; Malipeddi, Himaja

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate the prophylactic and curative effect of the ethanol leaf extract of Ipomoea eriocarpa (Convolvulaceae) (IEE) in ethylene glycol-induced urolithiasis in rats. Materials and Methods: Thirty male Wistar rats were divided into five groups (n = 6). All the groups received stone-inducing treatment till 28th day, comprising 1% ethylene glycol (v/v) with 1% ammonium chloride (w/v) for 4 days, followed by 1% ethylene glycol alone in water, except Group I (Control). Group II received only stone-inducing treatment till 28th day. Group III (Standard) received cystone (500 mg/kg) from 15th day till 28th day. Group IV (Prophylactic) received IEE (200 mg/kg) from 1st day till 28th day and Group V (Curative) received IEE (200 mg/kg) from 15th day till 28th day. Various biochemical parameters such as phosphorus, calcium, magnesium, urea, and creatinine levels were evaluated using urine, serum, and kidney homogenate. The kidneys were also sectioned and examined histopathologically under light microscope to study the kidney architecture and calcium oxalate deposits. Results: The IEE treatment (prophylactic and curative) significantly (P < 0.001) restored the parameters in urine, serum, and kidney homogenate to near-normal level. The histopathological examinations revealed that calcium oxalate crystal deposits in the renal tubules and congestion and dilation of the parenchymal blood vessels were significantly reverted after IEE treatment. Conclusions: The leaf extract of I. eriocarpa reduces and inhibits the growth of urinary stones showing its effect as an antiurolithiatic agent. PMID:27298496

  18. Synergistic interactions of begomoviruses with Sweet potato chlorotic stunt virus (genus Crinivirus) in sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L.).

    PubMed

    Cuellar, Wilmer J; Galvez, Marco; Fuentes, Segundo; Tugume, Joab; Kreuze, Jan

    2015-06-01

    Three hundred and ninety-four sweet potato accessions from Latin America and East Africa were screened by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the presence of begomoviruses, and 46 were found to be positive. All were symptomless in sweet potato and generated leaf curling and/or chlorosis in Ipomoea setosa. The five most divergent isolates, based on complete genome sequences, were used to study interactions with Sweet potato chlorotic stunt virus (SPCSV), known to cause synergistic diseases with other viruses. Co-infections led to increased titres of begomoviruses and decreased titres of SPCSV in all cases, although the extent of the changes varied notably between begomovirus isolates. Symptoms of leaf curling only developed temporarily in combination with isolate StV1 and coincided with the presence of the highest begomovirus concentrations in the plant. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) sequence analysis revealed that co-infection of SPCSV with isolate StV1 led to relatively increased siRNA targeting of the central part of the SPCSV genome and a reduction in targeting of the genomic ends, but no changes to the targeting of StV1 relative to single infection of either virus. These changes were not observed in the interaction between SPCSV and the RNA virus Sweet potato feathery mottle virus (genus Potyvirus), implying specific effects of begomoviruses on RNA silencing of SPCSV in dually infected plants. Infection in RNase3-expressing transgenic plants showed that this protein was sufficient to mediate this synergistic interaction with DNA viruses, similar to RNA viruses, but exposed distinct effects on RNA silencing when RNase3 was expressed from its native virus, or constitutively from a transgene, despite a similar pathogenic outcome. © 2014 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  19. Toxicity of OTC to Ipomoea aquatica Forsk. and to microorganisms in a long-term sewage-irrigated farmland soil.

    PubMed

    Ma, Tingting; Chen, Li'ke; Wu, Longhua; Christie, Peter; Luo, Yongming

    2016-08-01

    Water spinach (Ipomoea aquatic Forsk.) was selected to investigate the effects of oxytetracycline (OTC) on the toxicity of soil contaminated by long-term sewage irrigation. After acute toxicity test in petri dish at nine different OTC-spiked levels for 48 h, the germination rate was found to be generally inhibited in all treatments treated with OTC but the root elongation and activities of several antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD) and catalase (CAT) were either forward or backward stimulated to varying extent. During a 60-day sub-chronic toxicity test by means of a pot experiment, activities of SOD, POD and CAT in both the leaf and root tissue at 25 mg OTC per kg soil (dry weight) and in root tissue at 1 mg OTC per kg soil (dry weight) were significantly different than those in other treatments, which also indicated the higher sensitivity of the root. The foliar photosynthetic rate, stomatal conductance and transpiration rate were all gradually inhibited in spite of elevated water use efficiency under the pressure of the different OTC concentrations, which were highly significant different at 10 mg OTC per kg soil (dry weight). Indices of soil microbial diversity at 4 mg OTC kg(-1) soil were significantly different from those of the control, indicating the potential adverse effects of OTC to soil microorganisms. The results suggest that the introduction of OTC could damage both plants and soil microorganisms, and during sub-chronic incubation, the sensitivity of different indices generally followed the order of root tissue antioxidant enzyme activities, soil microbial diversity indices, leaf photosynthesis-related index and leaf tissue enzyme antioxidant activities. In addition, the application of livestock and poultry manure containing pollutants like OTC in farmland soil, especially if the soil has been contaminated before, should be taken more seriously in the context of the current pursuit of increased agricultural

  20. Cycling of Sensitivity to Physical Dormancy-break in Seeds of Ipomoea lacunosa (Convolvulaceae) and Ecological Significance

    PubMed Central

    Jayasuriya, K. M. G. G.; Baskin, J. M.; Baskin, C. C.

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims Although a claim has been made that dormancy cycling occurs in seeds of Ipomoea lacunosa (Convolvulaceae) with physical dormancy, this would seem to be impossible since the water gap cannot be closed again after it opens (dormancy break). On the other hand, changes in sensitivity (sensitive ↔ non-sensitive) to dormancy-breaking factors have been reported in seeds of Fabaceae with physical dormancy. The primary aim of the present study was to determine if sensitivity cycling also occurs in physically dormant seeds of I. lacunosa. Methods Treatments simulating conditions in the natural habitat of I. lacunosa were used to break seed dormancy. Storage of seeds at temperatures simulating those in spring, summer, autumn and winter were tested for their effect on sensitivity change. Seeds made non-dormant were stored dry in different temperature regimes to test for dormancy cycling. In addition, seeds collected on different dates (i.e. matured under different climatic conditions) were used to test for maternal effects on sensitivity to dormancy-breaking factors. Key Results Sensitivity was induced by storing seeds under wet conditions and reversed by storing them under dry conditions at low (≤5 °C) or high (≥30 °C) temperatures, demonstrating that seeds of I. lacunosa can cycle between sensitive and insensitive states. Sensitive seeds required ≥2 h at 35 °C on moist sand for release of dormancy. However, there is no evidence to support dormancy cycling per se. Conceptual models are proposed for sensitivity cycling and germination phenology of I. lacunosa in the field. Conclusions Seasonal germination behaviour of physically dormant I. lacunosa seeds can be explained by sensitivity cycling but not by dormancy cycling per se. Convolvulaceae is only the second of 16 families known to contain species with physical dormancy for which sensitivity cycling has been demonstrated. PMID:18032427

  1. Cycling of sensitivity to physical dormancy-break in seeds of Ipomoea lacunosa (Convolvulaceae) and ecological significance.

    PubMed

    Jayasuriya, K M G G; Baskin, J M; Baskin, C C

    2008-02-01

    Although a claim has been made that dormancy cycling occurs in seeds of Ipomoea lacunosa (Convolvulaceae) with physical dormancy, this would seem to be impossible since the water gap cannot be closed again after it opens (dormancy break). On the other hand, changes in sensitivity (sensitive <--> non-sensitive) to dormancy-breaking factors have been reported in seeds of Fabaceae with physical dormancy. The primary aim of the present study was to determine if sensitivity cycling also occurs in physically dormant seeds of I. lacunosa. Treatments simulating conditions in the natural habitat of I. lacunosa were used to break seed dormancy. Storage of seeds at temperatures simulating those in spring, summer, autumn and winter were tested for their effect on sensitivity change. Seeds made non-dormant were stored dry in different temperature regimes to test for dormancy cycling. In addition, seeds collected on different dates (i.e. matured under different climatic conditions) were used to test for maternal effects on sensitivity to dormancy-breaking factors. Sensitivity was induced by storing seeds under wet conditions and reversed by storing them under dry conditions at low (< or = 5 degrees C) or high (> or = 30 degrees C) temperatures, demonstrating that seeds of I. lacunosa can cycle between sensitive and insensitive states. Sensitive seeds required > or = 2 h at 35 degrees C on moist sand for release of dormancy. However, there is no evidence to support dormancy cycling per se. Conceptual models are proposed for sensitivity cycling and germination phenology of I. lacunosa in the field. Seasonal germination behaviour of physically dormant I. lacunosa seeds can be explained by sensitivity cycling but not by dormancy cycling per se. Convolvulaceae is only the second of 16 families known to contain species with physical dormancy for which sensitivity cycling has been demonstrated.

  2. Structure of the receptacular nectary and circadian metabolism of starch in the ant-guarded plant Ipomoea cairica (Convolvulaceae).

    PubMed

    Paiva, E A S; Martins, L C

    2014-01-01

    Nectaries occur widely in Convolvulaceae. These structures remain little studied despite their possible importance in plant-animal interactions. In this paper, we sought to describe the structure and ultrastructure of the receptacular nectaries (RNs) of Ipomoea cairica, together with the dynamics of nectar secretion. Samples of floral buds, flowers at anthesis and immature fruits were collected, fixed and processed using routine methods for light, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Circadian starch dynamics were determined through starch measurements on nectary sections. The secretion samples were subjected to thin layer chromatography. RNs of I. cairica were cryptic, having patches of nectar-secreting trichomes, subglandular parenchyma cells and thick-walled cells delimiting the nectary aperture. The glandular trichomes were peltate type and had typical ultrastructural features related to nectar secretion. The nectar is composed of sucrose, fructose and glucose. Nectar secretion was observed in young floral buds and continued as the flower developed, lasting until the fruit matured. The starch content of the subglandular tissue showed circadian variation, increasing during the day and decreasing at night. The plastids were distinct in different portions of the nectary. The continuous day-night secretory pattern of the RNs of I. cairica is associated with pre-nectar source circadian changes in which the starch acts as a buffer, ensuring uninterrupted nectar secretion. This circadian variation may be present in other extrafloral nectaries and be responsible for full daytime secretion. We conclude that sampling time is relevant in ultrastructural studies of dynamic extranuptial nectaries that undergo various changes throughout the day. © 2013 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  3. De novo transcriptome assembly of Ipomoea nil using Illumina sequencing for gene discovery and SSR marker identification.

    PubMed

    Wei, Changhe; Tao, Xiang; Li, Ming; He, Bin; Yan, Lang; Tan, Xuemei; Zhang, Yizheng

    2015-10-01

    Ipomoea nil is widely used as an ornamental plant due to its abundance of flower color, but the limited transcriptome and genomic data hinder research on it. Using illumina platform, transcriptome profiling of I. nil was performed through high-throughput sequencing, which was proven to be a rapid and cost-effective means to characterize gene content. Our goal is to use the resulting information to facilitate the relevant research on flowering and flower color formation in I. nil. In total, 268 million unique illumina RNA-Seq reads were produced and used in the transcriptome assembly. These reads were assembled into 220,117 contigs, of which 137,307 contigs were annotated using the GO and KEGG database. Based on the result of functional annotations, a total of 89,781 contigs were assigned 455,335 GO term annotations. Meanwhile, 17,418 contigs were identified with pathway annotation and they were functionally assigned to 144 KEGG pathways. Our transcriptome revealed at least 55 contigs as probably flowering-related genes in I. nil, and we also identified 25 contigs that encode key enzymes in the phenylpropanoid biosynthesis pathway. Based on the analysis relating to gene expression profiles, in the phenylpropanoid biosynthesis pathway of I. nil, the repression of lignin biosynthesis might lead to the redirection of the metabolic flux into anthocyanin biosynthesis. This may be the most likely reason that I. nil has high anthocyanins content, especially in its flowers. Additionally, 15,537 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) were detected using the MISA software, and these SSRs will undoubtedly benefit future breeding work. Moreover, the information uncovered in this study will also serve as a valuable resource for understanding the flowering and flower color formation mechanisms in I. nil.

  4. Assessment of residual bio-efficacy and persistence of Ipomoea cairica plant extract against Culex quinquefasciatus Say mosquito.

    PubMed

    Thiagaletchumi, Maniam; Zuharah, Wan Fatma; Ahbi Rami, Rattanam; Fadzly, Nik; Dieng, Hamady; Ahmad, Abu Hassan; AbuBakar, Sazaly

    2014-09-01

    Specification on residual action of a possible alternative insecticide derived from plant materials is important to determine minimum interval time between applications and the environmental persistence of the biopesticides. The objective of this study is to evaluate crude acethonilic extract of Ipomoea cairica leaves for its residual and persistence effects against Culex quinquefasciatus larvae. Wild strain of Cx. quinquefasciatus larvae were used for the purpose of the study. Two test designs, replenishment of water and without replenishment of water were carried out. For the first design, a total of 10 ml of test solution containing Ip. cairica extracts was replenished daily and replaced with 10 ml of distilled water. For the second design, treatment water was maintained at 1500 ml and only evaporated water was refilled. Larval mortality was recorded at 24 hours post-treatment after each introduction period and trials were terminated when mortality rate falls below 50%. Adult emergences from survived larvae were observed and number of survivals was recorded. For the non-replenishment design, mortality rate significantly reduced to below 50% after 28 days, meanwhile for replenishment of water declined significantly after 21 days (P < 0.05). There was no adult emergence observed up to seven days for non-replenishment and first two days for replenishment of water design. The short period of residual effectiveness of crude acethonilic extract of Ip. cairica leaves with high percentage of larval mortality on the first few days, endorses fewer concerns of having excess residues in the environment which may carry the risk of insecticide resistance and environmental pollution.

  5. Reproductive allocation and output in herbaceous annuals of the genera Polygonum, Ipomoea, and Cassia in elevated CO[sub 2] environments

    SciTech Connect

    Farnsworth, E.J.; Bazzaz, F.A. )

    1994-06-01

    In assessing the capacity of plants to adapt to rapidly changing global climate, we must elucidate the impacts of elevated carbon dioxide on reproduction, fitness and evolution. We investigated how elevated CO[sub 2] influenced reproduction and growth of plants exhibiting a range of floral displays, the implications of shifts in allocation for fitness in these species, and whether related taxa would show similar patterns of response. Three herbaceous, annual species each of the genera Polygonum, Ipomoea, and Cassia were grown under 350 or 700 ppm CO[sub 2]. Vegetative growth and reproductive output were non-destructively measured throughout the full life span, and biomass calibrated with a subsample harvest at first flowering. Viability and germination studies of seed progeny were conducted to more precisely characterize fitness. Timecourse and numbers of floral buds, flowers, unripe and abscised fruits differed between CO[sub 2] treatments. Genera differed significantly in their phenological responses to elevated CO[sub 2], Polygonum and Cassia species (but not Ipomoea) showed accelerated, enhanced reproduction. Elevated CO[sub 2] ameliorated trade-offs between vegetative and floral production. However, seed [open quotes]quality[close quotes] and fitness were not always directly correlated with quantity produced. Species within general responded more consistently to CO[sub 2], indicating that phylogeny and life form may be general predictors of performance under global change.

  6. 90 Days toxicological assessment of hydroethanolic leaf extract of Ipomoea asarifolia (Desr.) Roem. and Schult. (Convolvulaceae) in rats.

    PubMed

    Akindele, Abidemi J; Unachukwu, Emeka G; Osiagwu, Daniel D

    2015-11-04

    Ipomoea asarifolia (Convolvulacae), commonly known as "morning glory" is found across West Africa. Preparations of the plant are used traditionally for the treatment of diverse ailments including diabetes, neuralgia, arthritic pain and stomach ache. This study was designed to assess the safety profile of the hydroethanolic leaf extract of I. asarifolia through a 90-day subchronic toxicity study in rats. I. asarifolia was administered p.o. at doses of 40, 200 and 1000mg/kg to separate groups of rats for 90 days. Distilled water was given p.o. to rats in the control group. Some set of rats in each group were left for additional 30 days without administration of the extract for reversibility study. Animals were weighed weekly and relevant parameters were assayed at the end of the main and reversibility study periods. There was no significant change (p>0.05) in the body weight of rats, and food and water intake in I. asarifolia treated groups compared with control. I. asarifolia (40-1000 mg/kg) significantly but reversibly reduced (p<0.05, 0.001) sperm motility and count. The extract did not generally cause significant change (p>0.05) in the weight of vital organs and haematological parameters except in the case of reversible reduction in the level of haemoglobin and red blood cell count (p<0.01; 40 mg/kg). The level of biochemical parameters and electrolytes were not significantly changed (p>0.05) except for the reversible reduction in the level of aspartate aminotransferase (AST; p<0.0001; 200 and 1000 mg/kg) and increase in the level of Na(+) (p<0.01; 200 mg/kg). The level of kidney reduced glutathione (GSH) was reversibly increased (p<0.01; 1000 mg/kg) while the level of enzymatic and non-enzymatic in vivo antioxidants was generally comparable and not significantly different (p>0.05) from control in respect of all other vital organs. Histological presentations were generally normal in respect of the liver, kidneys, brain, heart, lungs, pancreas, spleen and testes

  7. Morphological and Physiological Responses of Morning Glory (Ipomoea lacunosa L.) Grown in a Lead- and Chelate-Amended Soil

    PubMed Central

    Kambhampati, Murty S.; Begonia, Gregorio B.; Begonia, Maria F. T.; Bufford, Yolanda

    2005-01-01

    Lead (Pb) is one of the most toxic metals in the environment and may cause drastic morphological and physiological deformities in Ipomoea lacunosa. The goal of this research was to evaluate some morphological and physiological responses of morning glory grown on a Pb- and chelate-amended soil. Soil samples were analyzed, at Mississippi State University Soil Laboratory, for physico-chemical parameters, such as soil texture (73% sand, 23% silt, 4.4% clay), organic matter (6.24 ± 0.60%), and pH (7.95 ± 0.03), to establish soil conditions at the beginning of the experiments. Five EDTA (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid) concentrations (0, 0.1, 0.5, 1, 5mM) and four lead (0, 500, 1000, 2000mg/L) treatments were arranged in factorial in a Randomized Complete Block (RCB) design with five replications. Duncan’s multiple comparison range test showed that the mean difference values of stomatal density were significant between 500 and 1000mg/L Pb and between 1000 and 2000mg/L Pb. Two way ANOVA (at 1% level) indicated that interaction between Pb and EDTA had a significant effect on the stomatal density and photosynthetic rates, and at 5% level Pb had a significant effect on chlorophyll concentrations. Lowest concentrations of chlorophyll were recorded at 2000mg/L Pb and 5mM EDTA and exhibited a decreasing trend specifically in the ranges of 1000 and 2000mg/L Pb and 1.0 and 5.0mM EDTA. Duncan’s multiple comparison range test confirmed that mean differences between the control treatment vs. 2000mg/L Pb, and 500mg/L vs. 2000mg/L Pb were significantly different at p>0.05. There was a decrease in leaf net photosynthetic rate with increasing concentrations of Pb from 0 to 2000mg/L. In conclusion, I. lacunosa L. plants were grown to maturity in all treatments with no significant and/or apparent morphological disorders, which indicated that this species might be highly tolerant even at 2000mg/L Pb concentrations in the soil. PMID:16705831

  8. UV-B protective effect of a polyacylated anthocyanin, HBA, in flower petals of the blue morning glory, Ipomoea tricolor cv. Heavenly Blue.

    PubMed

    Mori, Mihoko; Yoshida, Kumi; Ishigaki, Yasuhito; Matsunaga, Tsukasa; Nikaido, Osamu; Kameda, Kiyoshi; Kondo, Tadao

    2005-03-15

    The protective effects of polyacylated anthocyanin, heavenly blue anthocyanin (HBA), in blue flower petals of morning glory (Ipomoea tricolor cv. Heavenly Blue) against UV-B induced DNA damage were examined. We first clarified the concentration of HBA in epidermal vacuoles to be 12mM, and then constructed a UV-B irradiating apparatus resembling flower petal tissue to assess the screening effect of HBA. Monochromatic (280 and 310nm) or broad UV-B induced DNA lesions were reduced completely by the HBA filter to the same molecular numbers as those in living petal epidermis. However, diluted HBA solution and trisdeacyl HBA did not have the same reduction effect. HBA was more tolerant to solar radiation than trisdeacyl HBA. These data strongly suggest that polyacylated anthocyanins in flower petals can screen harmful UV-B efficiently. This action might be largely due to aromatic acyl residues.

  9. "allometry" Deterministic Approaches in Cell Size, Cell Number and Crude Fiber Content Related to the Physical Quality of Kangkong (Ipomoea reptans) Grown Under Different Plant Density Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selamat, A.; Atiman, S. A.; Puteh, A.; Abdullah, N. A. P.; Mohamed, M. T. M.; Zulkeefli, A. A.; Othman, S.

    Kangkong, especially the upland type (Ipomoea reptans) is popularly consumed as a vegetable dish in the South East Asian countries for its quality related to Vitamins (A and C) and crude fiber contents. Higher fiber contents would prevent from the occurrence of colon cancer and diverticular disease. With young stem edible portion, its cell number and size contribute to the stem crude fiber content. The mathematical approach of allometry of cell size, number, and fiber content of stem could be used in determining the 'best' plant density pressure in producing the quality young stem to be consumed. Basically, allometry is the ratio of relative increment (growth or change) rates of two parameters, or the change rate associated to the log of measured variables relationship. Kangkog grown equal or lower than 55 plants m-2 produced bigger individual plant and good quality (physical) kangkong leafy vegetable, but with lower total yield per unit area as compared to those grown at higher densities.

  10. The geographic mosaic of herbicide resistance evolution in the common morning glory, Ipomoea purpurea: Evidence for resistance hotspots and low genetic differentiation across the landscape

    PubMed Central

    Kuester, Adam; Chang, Shu-Mei; Baucom, Regina S

    2015-01-01

    Strong human-mediated selection via herbicide application in agroecosystems has repeatedly led to the evolution of resistance in weedy plants. Although resistance can occur among separate populations of a species across the landscape, the spatial scale of resistance in many weeds is often left unexamined. We assessed the potential that resistance to the herbicide glyphosate in the agricultural weed Ipomoea purpurea has evolved independently multiple times across its North American range. We examined both adaptive and neutral genetic variations in 44 populations of I. purpurea by pairing a replicated dose–response greenhouse experiment with SSR genotyping of experimental individuals. We uncovered a mosaic pattern of resistance across the landscape, with some populations exhibiting high-survival postherbicide and other populations showing high death. SSR genotyping revealed little evidence of isolation by distance and very little neutral genetic structure associated with geography. An approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) analysis uncovered evidence for migration and admixture among populations before the widespread use of glyphosate rather than the very recent contemporary gene flow. The pattern of adaptive and neutral genetic variations indicates that resistance in this mixed-mating weed species appears to have evolved in independent hotspots rather than through transmission of resistance alleles across the landscape. PMID:26366199

  11. Synchrony between flower opening and petal-color change from red to blue in morning glory, Ipomoea tricolor cv. Heavenly Blue

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Kumi; Miki, Naoko; Momonoi, Kazumi; Kawachi, Miki; Katou, Kiyoshi; Okazaki, Yoshiji; Uozumi, Nobuyuki; Maeshima, Masayoshi; Kondo, Tadao

    2009-01-01

    Petal color change in morning glory Ipomoea tricolor cv. Heavenly Blue, from red to blue, during the flower-opening period is due to an unusual increase in vacuolar pH (pHv) from 6.6 to 7.7 in colored epidermal cells. We clarified that this pHv increase is involved in tonoplast-localized Na+/H+ exchanger (NHX). However, the mechanism of pHv increase and the physiological role of NHX1 in petal cells have remained obscure. In this study, synchrony of petal-color change from red to blue, pHv increase, K+ accumulation, and cell expansion growth during flower-opening period were examined with special reference to ItNHX1. We concluded that ItNHX1 exchanges K+, but not Na+, with H+ to accumulate an ionic osmoticum in the vacuole, which is then followed by cell expansion growth. This function may lead to full opening of petals with a characteristic blue color. PMID:19521056

  12. Field crops (Ipomoea aquatica Forsk. and Brassica chinensis L.) for phytoremediation of cadmium and nitrate co-contaminated soils via rotation with Sedum alfredii Hance.

    PubMed

    Tang, Lin; Luo, Weijun; Chen, Weikang; He, Zhenli; Gurajala, Hanumanth Kumar; Hamid, Yasir; Deng, Meihua; Yang, Xiaoe

    2017-07-01

    Phytoremediation coupled with crop rotation (PCC) is a feasible strategy for remediation of contaminated soil without interrupting crop production. The objective of this study was to develop a PCC technology system for greenhouse fields co-contaminated with Cd and nitrate using hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii. In this system, endophytic bacterium M002 inoculation, CO2 fertilization, and fermentation residue were continuously applied to improve the growth of S. alfredii, and low-accumulator Ipomoea aquatica and low-accumulator Brassica chinensis were rotated under reasonable water management. These comprehensive management practices were shown to increase S. alfredii biomass and Cd uptake and reduce Cd and nitrate concentration in I. aquatica and B. chinensis. This crop rotating system could remove 56.5% total Cd, 62.3% DTPA extractable Cd, and 65.4% nitrate, respectively, from the co-contaminated soil in 2 years of phytoremediation, and is an effective way of remediating moderately co-contaminated soil by Cd and nitrate.

  13. Synchrony between flower opening and petal-color change from red to blue in morning glory, Ipomoea tricolor cv. Heavenly Blue.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kumi; Miki, Naoko; Momonoi, Kazumi; Kawachi, Miki; Katou, Kiyoshi; Okazaki, Yoshiji; Uozumi, Nobuyuki; Maeshima, Masayoshi; Kondo, Tadao

    2009-01-01

    Petal color change in morning glory Ipomoea tricolor cv. Heavenly Blue, from red to blue, during the flower-opening period is due to an unusual increase in vacuolar pH (pHv) from 6.6 to 7.7 in colored epidermal cells. We clarified that this pHv increase is involved in tonoplast-localized Na+/H+ exchanger (NHX). However, the mechanism of pHv increase and the physiological role of NHX1 in petal cells have remained obscure. In this study, synchrony of petal-color change from red to blue, pHv increase, K+ accumulation, and cell expansion growth during flower-opening period were examined with special reference to ItNHX1. We concluded that ItNHX1 exchanges K+, but not Na+, with H+ to accumulate an ionic osmoticum in the vacuole, which is then followed by cell expansion growth. This function may lead to full opening of petals with a characteristic blue color.

  14. Leaf lifetime photosynthetic rate and leaf demography in whole plants of Ipomoea pes-caprae growing with a low supply of calcium, a 'non-mobile' nutrient.

    PubMed

    Suárez, N

    2010-03-01

    The adaptive significance of leaf longevity has been established in relation to restrictive nutrients that can be retranslocated within the plant. However, the effect of deficiencies in 'non-mobile' nutrients on leaf lifespan and photosynthetic carbon gain is uncertain. Calcium is frequently given as an example of an essential nutrient with low phloem mobility that may alter the leaf senescence process. This study has been designed to estimate leaf lifespan, leaf production (L(p)) and leaf death (L(d)) rates, the age structure of leaves, and the decline in maximum photosynthetic rate (A(max)) with age in plants of Ipomoea pes-caprae growing with a full supply of nutrients and with a low Ca supply. The Ca deficiency produced reductions in L(p) and leaf lifespan compared with control plants. In spite of the differences in the demographic parameters between treatments in control and low-Ca plants, the percentage of leaves of a given leaf age class is maintained in such a way that the number of leaves per plant continues to increase. No relationship was found between Ca supply and A(max). However, the decline in A(max) with leaf senescence was rather sudden in control plants compared with plants growing with a low Ca supply. The importance of simultaneously using the total leaf demographic census and the assimilation rate along with leaf lifespan data in order to understand the performance of whole plants under constrained conditions is discussed.

  15. Remediation of textile azo dye acid red 114 by hairy roots of Ipomoea carnea Jacq. and assessment of degraded dye toxicity with human keratinocyte cell line.

    PubMed

    Jha, Pamela; Jobby, Renitta; Desai, N S

    2016-07-05

    Bioremediation has proven to be the most desirable and cost effective method to counter textile dye pollution. Hairy roots (HRs) of Ipomoea carnea J. were tested for decolourization of 25 textile azo dyes, out of which >90% decolourization was observed in 15 dyes. A diazo dye, Acid Red 114 was decolourized to >98% and hence, was chosen as the model dye. A significant increase in the activities of oxidoreductive enzymes was observed during decolourization of AR114. The phytodegradation of AR114 was confirmed by HPLC, UV-vis and FTIR spectroscopy. The possible metabolites were identified by GCMS as 4- aminobenzene sulfonic acid 2-methylaniline and 4- aminophenyl 4-ethyl benzene sulfonate and a probable pathway for the biodegradation of AR114 has been proposed. The nontoxic nature of the metabolites and toxicity of AR114 was confirmed by cytotoxicity tests on human keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT). When HaCaT cells were treated separately with 150 μg mL(-1) of AR114 and metabolites, MTT assay showed 50% and ≈100% viability respectively. Furthermore, flow cytometry data showed that, as compared to control, the cells in G2-M and death phase increased by 2.4 and 3.6 folds respectively on treatment with AR114 but remained unaltered in cells treated with metabolites.

  16. Expression of an AtNAP gene homolog in senescing morning glory (Ipomoea nil) petals of two cultivars with a different flower life span.

    PubMed

    Shinozaki, Yoshihito; Tanaka, Toshimitsu; Ogiwara, Isao; Kanekatsu, Motoki; van Doorn, Wouter G; Yamada, Tetsuya

    2014-05-01

    AtNAP, a NAC family transcription factor, has been shown to promote leaf senescence in Arabidopsis. We isolated an AtNAP homolog in morning glory (Ipomoea nil), designated InNAP, and investigated its expression during petal senescence. We used two cultivars, one showing a normal short flower life span (cv. Peking Tendan) and another a longer life span (cv. Violet). InNAP was highly expressed in both cultivars. Expression was high before that of the senescence marker gene InSAG12. InNAP and InSAG12 expression was high in cv. Peking Tendan before cv. Violet. The expression of both genes was therefore temporally related to the onset of the visible senescence symptoms. An inhibitor of ethylene action (silver thiosulphate, STS) delayed petal senescence in cv. Peking Tendan but had no effect in cv. Violet. STS treatment had no clear effect on the InNAP expression in petals of both cultivars, suggesting that endogenous ethylene may not be necessary for its induction. These data suggest the hypothesis that InNAP plays a role in petal senescence, independent of the role of endogenous ethylene.

  17. Edible leaf extract of Ipomoea aquatica Forssk. (Convolvulaceae) attenuates doxorubicin-induced liver injury via inhibiting oxidative impairment, MAPK activation and intrinsic pathway of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Dewanjee, Saikat; Joardar, Swarnalata; Bhattacharjee, Niloy; Dua, Tarun K; Das, Subhadip; Kalita, Jatin; Manna, Prasenjit

    2017-07-01

    Ipomoea aquatica Forssk. (Convolvulaceae) is an aquatic vegetable traditionally employed against toxic effects of xenobiotics. The present study has been designed to investigate the molecular mechanism underlying the beneficial role of the edible (aqueous) leaf extract of I. aquatica (AEIA) against doxorubicin (Dox)-induced liver injury. AEIA exhibited a dose-dependent (∼400 μg/ml) increase in cell viability against Dox (1 μM) in isolated rodent hepatocytes. AEIA (400 μg/ml) prevented the Dox-induced increase in ROS, redox imbalance, and activation of mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK) and intrinsic pathway of apoptosis in hepatocytes. In the in vivo assay, administration of AEIA (100 mg/kg, p.o.) against Dox (3 mg/kg, i.p.) also reduced the oxidative impairment, DNA fragmentation, ATP formation, and up-regulated the mitochondrial co-enzymes Qs in the liver tissues of Wistar rats. Histological assessments were in agreement with the biochemical findings. Substantial quantities of phyto-antioxidants in AEIA may mediate its beneficial function against Dox-induced liver injury. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The Invasion of Coastal Areas in South China by Ipomoea cairica May Be Accelerated by the Ecotype Being More Locally Adapted to Salt Stress

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Gang; Gao, Yang; Huang, Fang-Fang; Yuan, Ming-Yue; Peng, Shao-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Local adaptation and phenotypic plasticity are two alternative mechanisms used by invasive plants for range expansion. We conducted a series of experiments to investigate the role of these mechanisms in the recent expansion of the invasive Ipomoea cairica from non-saline to salt-stressed coastal habitats. A comparison of the plant’s photosynthetic traits and construction costs across habitats was conducted through a field survey. Meanwhile, a full factorial greenhouse experiment was conducted with two ecotypes (non-saline and coastal) of I. cairica and two salinity gradients (water and 4 g L-1 NaCl solution) to evaluate the roles of the two strategies by comparing their main traits. The results revealed that the construction cost and Amax of I. cairica did not change with the habitat type. The ecotype and saline treatments, however, significantly influenced the plant growth. The non-saline ecotype (NE) generally showed higher or equal plasticity of biomass-allocation and functional traits compared to the coastal ecotype (CE). However, the fitness and biomass of the NE significantly decreased with salinity, whereas those aspects of the CE did not change. Our results indicate that the recent expansion of I. cairica into coastal areas may be accelerated by the local adaptation of the CE to salt stress. Additionally, in South China, the CE will most likely evolve adaptations to both saline and non-saline environments, which will further broaden the invasion range of I. cairica in the future. PMID:26867222

  19. Traditional Chinese medicine herbal extracts of Cibotium barometz, Gentiana scabra, Dioscorea batatas, Cassia tora, and Taxillus chinensis inhibit SARS-CoV replication.

    PubMed

    Wen, Chih-Chun; Shyur, Lie-Fen; Jan, Jia-Tsrong; Liang, Po-Huang; Kuo, Chih-Jung; Arulselvan, Palanisamy; Wu, Jin-Bin; Kuo, Sheng-Chu; Yang, Ning-Sun

    2011-10-01

    Development of anti-severe acute respiratory syndrome associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV) agents is pivotal to prevent the reemergence of the life-threatening disease, SARS. In this study, more than 200 extracts from Chinese medicinal herbs were evaluated for anti-SARS-CoV activities using a cell-based assay that measured SARS-CoV-induced cytopathogenic effect (CPE) in vitro on Vero E6 cells. Six herbal extracts, one each from Gentianae Radix ( lóng dǎn; the dried rhizome of Gentiana scabra), Dioscoreae Rhizoma ( shān yào; the tuber of Dioscorea batatas), Cassiae Semen ( jué míng zǐ; the dried seed of Cassia tora) and Loranthi Ramus ( sāng jì shēng; the dried stem, with leaf of Taxillus chinensis) (designated as GSH, DBM, CTH and TCH, respectively), and two from Rhizoma Cibotii ( gǒu jǐ; the dried rhizome of Cibotium barometz) (designated as CBE and CBM), were found to be potent inhibitors of SARS-CoV at concentrations between 25 and 200 μg/ml. The concentrations of the six extracts needed to inhibit 50% of Vero E6 cell proliferation (CC50) and 50% of viral replication (EC50) were determined. The resulting selective index values (SI = CC50/EC50) of the most effective extracts CBE, GSH, DBM, CTH and TCH were > 59.4, > 57.5, > 62.1, > 59.4, and > 92.9, respectively. Among these extracts, CBM and DBM also showed significant inhibition of SARS-CoV 3CL protease activity with IC50 values of 39 μg/ml and 44 μg/ml, respectively. Our findings suggest that these six herbal extracts may have potential as candidates for future development of anti-SARS therapeutics.AbbreviationsSARS,severe acute respiratory syndromeCoV,coronavirusCPE,cytopathogenic effectTCM,traditional Chinese medicine.

  20. Traditional Chinese medicine herbal extracts of Cibotium barometz, Gentiana scabra, Dioscorea batatas, Cassia tora, and Taxillus chinensis inhibit SARS-CoV replication

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Chih-Chun; Shyur, Lie-Fen; Jan, Jia-Tsrong; Liang, Po-Huang; Kuo, Chih-Jung; Arulselvan, Palanisamy; Wu, Jin-Bin; Kuo, Sheng-Chu; Yang, Ning-Sun

    2011-01-01

    Development of anti-severe acute respiratory syndrome associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV) agents is pivotal to prevent the reemergence of the life-threatening disease, SARS. In this study, more than 200 extracts from Chinese medicinal herbs were evaluated for anti-SARS-CoV activities using a cell-based assay that measured SARS-CoV-induced cytopathogenic effect (CPE) in vitro on Vero E6 cells. Six herbal extracts, one each from Gentianae Radix (龍膽 lóng dǎn; the dried rhizome of Gentiana scabra), Dioscoreae Rhizoma (山藥 shān yào; the tuber of Dioscorea batatas), Cassiae Semen (決明子 jué míng zǐ; the dried seed of Cassia tora) and Loranthi Ramus (桑寄生 sāng jì shēng; the dried stem, with leaf of Taxillus chinensis) (designated as GSH, DBM, CTH and TCH, respectively), and two from Rhizoma Cibotii (狗脊 gǒu jǐ; the dried rhizome of Cibotium barometz) (designated as CBE and CBM), were found to be potent inhibitors of SARS-CoV at concentrations between 25 and 200 μg/ml. The concentrations of the six extracts needed to inhibit 50% of Vero E6 cell proliferation (CC50) and 50% of viral replication (EC50) were determined. The resulting selective index values (SI = CC50/EC50) of the most effective extracts CBE, GSH, DBM, CTH and TCH were > 59.4, > 57.5, > 62.1, > 59.4, and > 92.9, respectively. Among these extracts, CBM and DBM also showed significant inhibition of SARS-CoV 3CL protease activity with IC50 values of 39 μg/ml and 44 μg/ml, respectively. Our findings suggest that these six herbal extracts may have potential as candidates for future development of anti-SARS therapeutics. Abbreviations SARS, severe acute respiratory syndrome CoV, coronavirus CPE, cytopathogenic effect TCM, traditional Chinese medicine PMID:24716104

  1. Variation of biometric parameters and C, N, and P concentrations of Oryza glumaepatula at different depths of an Amazonian lake impacted by bauxite tailings (Lake Batata, Pará, Brazil).

    PubMed

    Enrich-Prast, A; Esteves, F A; Breves, A R

    2002-02-01

    Lake Batata is a typical Amazonian clear water lake which has undergone anthropogenic impacts. Thirty percent of its total area has been covered with bauxite tailings. Thus, it is possible to distinguish two areas in this ecosystem: the impacted and the natural. The goal of this research was to study C, N, and P content variation and the values of biomass, length, density, and culm diameter of Oryza glumaepatula at different depths in the natural and impacted areas of Lake Batata. The results obtained in this research suggest that the availability of P and N, in both water and sediment, is lower at the shallow site when compared to the deeper sites. On the other hand, C concentrations decreased as P and N concentrations increased. This may be explained by the structural function of C in aquatic macrophytes. At shallower sites, due to the reduced water column, individuals invest in supporting structures that display high C concentrations. The higher density and biomass of O. glumaepatula at the intermediate site indicate that this area presents the best conditions for germination and establishment of individuals of this species. The chemical composition and biometric parameters of O. glumaepatula have shown that this population has higher spatial variation in the natural area. In the impacted area, the absence of significant variations in N and P concentrations in O. glumaepatula among the three sampled sites promotes higher homogeneity in the stands. The high C:P and N:P ratios indicate that, in the impacted area, P is more limiting to the development of O. glumaepatula than it is in the natural area. The reduced values of biomass and density of O. glumaepatula in the impacted area suggest that the bauxite tailings limit the development of this population.

  2. Long-Distance Dispersal by Sea-Drifted Seeds Has Maintained the Global Distribution of Ipomoea pes-caprae subsp. brasiliensis (Convolvulaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Miryeganeh, Matin; Takayama, Koji; Tateishi, Yoichi; Kajita, Tadashi

    2014-01-01

    Ipomoea pes-caprae (Convolvulaceae), a pantropical plant with sea-drifted seeds, is found globally in the littoral areas of tropical and subtropical regions. Unusual long-distance seed dispersal has been believed to be responsible for its extraordinarily wide distribution; however, the actual level of inter-population migration has never been studied. To clarify the level of migration among populations of I. pes-caprae across its range, we investigated nucleotide sequence variations by using seven low-copy nuclear markers and 272 samples collected from 34 populations that cover the range of the species. We applied coalescent-based approaches using Bayesian and maximum likelihood methods to assess migration rates, direction of migration, and genetic diversity among five regional populations. Our results showed a high number of migrants among the regional populations of I. pes-caprae subsp. brasiliensis, which suggests that migration among distant populations was maintained by long-distance seed dispersal across its global range. These results also provide strong evidence for recent trans-oceanic seed dispersal by ocean currents in all three oceanic regions. We also found migration crossing the American continents. Although this is an apparent land barrier for sea-dispersal, migration between populations of the East Pacific and West Atlantic regions was high, perhaps because of trans-isthmus migration via pollen dispersal. Therefore, the migration and gene flow among populations across the vast range of I. pes-caprae is maintained not only by seed dispersal by sea-drifted seeds, but also by pollen flow over the American continents. On the other hand, populations of subsp. pes-caprae that are restricted to only the northern part of the Indian Ocean region were highly differentiated from subsp. brasiliensis. Cryptic barriers that prevented migration by sea dispersal between the ranges of the two subspecies and/or historical differentiation that caused local adaptation

  3. Long-distance dispersal by sea-drifted seeds has maintained the global distribution of Ipomoea pes-caprae subsp. brasiliensis (Convolvulaceae).

    PubMed

    Miryeganeh, Matin; Takayama, Koji; Tateishi, Yoichi; Kajita, Tadashi

    2014-01-01

    Ipomoea pes-caprae (Convolvulaceae), a pantropical plant with sea-drifted seeds, is found globally in the littoral areas of tropical and subtropical regions. Unusual long-distance seed dispersal has been believed to be responsible for its extraordinarily wide distribution; however, the actual level of inter-population migration has never been studied. To clarify the level of migration among populations of I. pes-caprae across its range, we investigated nucleotide sequence variations by using seven low-copy nuclear markers and 272 samples collected from 34 populations that cover the range of the species. We applied coalescent-based approaches using Bayesian and maximum likelihood methods to assess migration rates, direction of migration, and genetic diversity among five regional populations. Our results showed a high number of migrants among the regional populations of I. pes-caprae subsp. brasiliensis, which suggests that migration among distant populations was maintained by long-distance seed dispersal across its global range. These results also provide strong evidence for recent trans-oceanic seed dispersal by ocean currents in all three oceanic regions. We also found migration crossing the American continents. Although this is an apparent land barrier for sea-dispersal, migration between populations of the East Pacific and West Atlantic regions was high, perhaps because of trans-isthmus migration via pollen dispersal. Therefore, the migration and gene flow among populations across the vast range of I. pes-caprae is maintained not only by seed dispersal by sea-drifted seeds, but also by pollen flow over the American continents. On the other hand, populations of subsp. pes-caprae that are restricted to only the northern part of the Indian Ocean region were highly differentiated from subsp. brasiliensis. Cryptic barriers that prevented migration by sea dispersal between the ranges of the two subspecies and/or historical differentiation that caused local adaptation

  4. Critical analysis of the potential of Ipomoea nil'Scarlet O'Hara' for ozone biomonitoring in the sub-tropics.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Maurício Lamano; Nobre Esposito, Jéssica Bordotti; de Souza, Silvia Ribeiro; Domingos, Marisa

    2012-07-01

    This study aimed to analyze critically the potential of Ipomoea nil'Scarlet O'Hara' for O(3) biomonitoring in the sub-tropics. Four field experiments (one in each season of 2006) were carried out in a location of the city of São Paulo mainly polluted by O(3). Each experiment started with 50 plants, and lasted 28 days. Sub-lots of five plants were taken at intervals between three or four days long. Groups of four plants were also exposed in closed chambers to filtered air or to 40, 50 or 80 ppb of O(3) for three consecutive hours a day for six days. The percentage of leaf injury (interveinal chloroses and necroses), the concentrations of ascorbic acid (AA) and the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and peroxidases (POD) were determined in the 5th, 6th and 7th oldest leaves on the main stem of the plants taken in all experiments. Visible injury occurred in the plants from all experiments. Seasonality in the antioxidant responses observed in plants grown under field conditions was associated with meteorological variables and ozone concentrations five days before leaf analyses. The highest levels of antioxidants occurred during the spring. The percentage of leaf injury was explained (R(2) = 0.97, p < 0.01) by the reduction in the levels of AA and activity of POD five days before the leaf analyses and by the reduction in the levels of particulate matter, and enhancement of temperature and global radiation 10 days before this same day. Although I. nil may be employed for qualitative O(3) biomonitoring, its efficiency for quantitative biomonitoring in the sub-tropics may be compromised, depending on how intense the oxidative power of the environment is.

  5. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi induced differential Cd and P phytoavailability via intercropping of upland kangkong (Ipomoea aquatica Forsk.) with Alfred stonecrop (Sedum alfredii Hance): post-harvest study.

    PubMed

    Hu, Junli; Li, Jintian; Wu, Fuyong; Wu, Shengchun; Ye, Zhihong; Lin, Xiangui; Wong, Ming Hung

    2013-12-01

    A post-harvest experiment was conducted further to our previous greenhouse pot study on upland kangkong (Ipomoea aquatica Forsk.) and Alfred stonecrop (Sedum alfredii Hance) intercropping system in Cd-contaminated soil inoculated with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. Previously, four treatments were established in the intercropping experiment, including monoculture of kangkong (control), intercropping with stonecrop (IS), and IS plus inoculation with Glomus caledonium (IS+Gc) or Glomus versiforme (IS+Gv). Both kangkong and stonecrop plants were harvested after growing for 8 weeks. Then, the tested soils were reclaimed for growing post-harvest kangkong for 6 weeks. In the post-harvest experiment, there were no significant differences between the IS and control treatments, except for a significantly decreased (p<0.05) soil available P concentration with IS treatment. Compared with IS, both IS+Gc and IS+Gv significantly decreased (p<0.05) soil DTPA-extractable (phytoavailable) Cd concentrations, but not total Cd, by elevating soil pH, causing significantly lower (p<0.05) Cd concentrations in both the root and shoot of kangkong. In addition, both Gc and Gv significantly increased (p<0.05) soil acid phosphatase activities and available P concentrations and hence resulted in significantly higher (p<0.05) plant P acquisitions. However, only Gv significantly increased (p<0.05) kangkong yield, while Gc only significantly elevated (p<0.05) the shoot P concentration. It suggested that AM fungi have played key roles in Cd stabilization and P mobilization in the intercropping system, and such positive responses seemed to be sustainable and valuable in post-harvest soils.

  6. Solenostemon monostachyus, Ipomoea involucrata and Carica papaya seed oil versus Glutathione, or Vernonia amygdalina: Methanolic extracts of novel plants for the management of sickle cell anemia disease

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a genetic disease caused by an individual inheriting an allele for sickle cell hemoglobin from both parents and is associated with unusually large numbers of immature blood cells, containing many long, thin, crescent-shaped erythrocytes. It is a disease prevalent throughout many populations. The use of medicinal plants and nutrition in managing SCD is gaining increasing attention. Methods The antisickling effects of Solenostemon monostachyus (SolMon), Carica papaya seed oil (Cari-oil) and Ipomoea involucrata (Ipocrata) in male (HbSSM) and female (HbSSF) human sickle cell blood was examined in vitro and compared with controls, or cells treated with glutathione or an antisickling plant (Vernonia amygdalina; VerMyg). Results Levels of sickle blood cells were significantly reduced (P < 0.05) in all the plant-extract treated SCD patients’ blood compared with that of untreated SCD patients. RBCs in SolMon, Ipocrata, and Cari-oil treated samples were significantly higher (P < 0.05) compared with VerMyg-treated samples. The Fe2+/Fe3+ ratio was significantly reduced (P < 0.05) in all plant extract-treated HbSSM samples compared with controls. Hemoglobin concentration was significantly increased (P < 0.05) by SolMon treatment in HbSSF compared with VerMyg. Sickle cell polymerization inhibition exhibited by SolMon was significantly higher (P < 0.05) compared with that of VerMyg in HbSSF blood. Sickle cell polymerization inhibition in SolMon and Ipocrata were significantly higher (P < 0.05) compared with VerMyg in HbSSM blood. All plant extracts significantly reduced (P < 0.05) lactate dehydrogenase activity in both HbSSM and HbSSF-treated blood. Catalase activity was significantly increased (P < 0.05) in HbSSF blood treated with Ipocrata compared with glutathione. Cari-oil treated HbSSM and HbSSF blood had significantly increased (P < 0.05) peroxidase activity compared with controls. Conclusions Methanolic extracts from S

  7. Larvicidal Efficacy of Different Plant Parts of Railway Creeper, Ipomoea cairica Extract Against Dengue Vector Mosquitoes, Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae) and Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae)

    PubMed Central

    AhbiRami, Rattanam; Zuharah, Wan Fatma; Thiagaletchumi, Maniam; Subramaniam, Sreeramanan; Sundarasekar, Jeevandran

    2014-01-01

    Natural insecticides from plant origin against mosquito vectors have been the main concern for research due to their high level of eco-safety. Control of mosquitoes in their larval stages are an ideal method since Aedes larvae are aquatic, thus it is easier to deal with them in this habitat. The present study was specifically conducted to explore the larvicidal efficacy of different plant parts of Ipomoea cairica (L.) or railway creeper crude extract obtained using two different solvents; methanol and acetone against late third-stage larvae of Aedes albopictus (Skuse) and Aedes aegypti (L.) (Diptera: Culicidae). Plant materials of I. cairica leaf, flower, and stem were segregated, airdried, powdered, and extracted using Soxhlet apparatus. Larvicidal bioassays were performed by using World Health Organization standard larval susceptibility test method for each species which were conducted separately for different concentration ranging from 10 to 450 ppm. Both acetone and methanol extracts showed 100% mortality at highest concentration tested (450 ppm) after 24 h of exposure. Results from factorial ANOVA indicated that there were significant differences in larvicidal effects between mosquito species, solvent used and plant parts (F = 5.71, df = 2, P < 0.05). The acetone extract of I. cairica leaf showed the most effective larvicidal action in Ae. aegypti with LC50 of 101.94 ppm followed by Ae. albopictus with LC50 of 105.59 ppm compared with other fractions of I. cairica extract obtained from flower, stem, and when methanol are used as solvent. The larvae of Ae. aegypti appeared to be more susceptible to I. cairica extract with lower LC50 value compared with Ae. albopictus (F = 8.83, df = 1, P < 0.05). Therefore, this study suggests that the acetone extract of I. cairica leaf can be considered as plant-derived insecticide for the control of Aedes mosquitoes. This study quantified the larvicidal property of I. cairica extract

  8. Larvicidal efficacy of different plant parts of railway creeper, Ipomoea cairica Extract Against Dengue Vector Mosquitoes, Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae) and Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    AhbiRami, Rattanam; Zuharah, Wan Fatma; Thiagaletchumi, Maniam; Subramaniam, Sreeramanan; Sundarasekar, Jeevandran

    2014-01-01

    Natural insecticides from plant origin against mosquito vectors have been the main concern for research due to their high level of eco-safety. Control of mosquitoes in their larval stages are an ideal method since Aedes larvae are aquatic, thus it is easier to deal with them in this habitat. The present study was specifically conducted to explore the larvicidal efficacy of different plant parts of Ipomoea cairica (L.) or railway creeper crude extract obtained using two different solvents; methanol and acetone against late third-stage larvae of Aedes albopictus (Skuse) and Aedes aegypti (L.) (Diptera: Culicidae). Plant materials of I. cairica leaf, flower, and stem were segregated, airdried, powdered, and extracted using Soxhlet apparatus. Larvicidal bioassays were performed by using World Health Organization standard larval susceptibility test method for each species which were conducted separately for different concentration ranging from 10 to 450 ppm. Both acetone and methanol extracts showed 100% mortality at highest concentration tested (450 ppm) after 24 h of exposure. Results from factorial ANOVA indicated that there were significant differences in larvicidal effects between mosquito species, solvent used and plant parts (F=5.71, df=2, P<0.05). The acetone extract of I. cairica leaf showed the most effective larvicidal action in Ae. aegypti with LC50 of 101.94 ppm followed by Ae. albopictus with LC50 of 105.59 ppm compared with other fractions of I. cairica extract obtained from flower, stem, and when methanol are used as solvent. The larvae of Ae. aegypti appeared to be more susceptible to I. cairica extract with lower LC50 value compared with Ae. albopictus (F=8.83, df=1, P<0.05). Therefore, this study suggests that the acetone extract of I. cairica leaf can be considered as plant-derived insecticide for the control of Aedes mosquitoes. This study quantified the larvicidal property of I. cairica extract, providing information on lethal concentration that

  9. Variation in cadmium accumulation among 30 cultivars and cadmium subcellular distribution in 2 selected cultivars of water spinach (Ipomoea aquatica Forsk.).

    PubMed

    Wang, Junli; Yuan, Jiangang; Yang, Zhongyi; Huang, Baifei; Zhou, Yihui; Xin, Junliang; Gong, Yulian; Yu, Hui

    2009-10-14

    To reduce the influx of cadmium (Cd), a toxic heavy metal, into the human food chain through vegetable intake, a pot experiment for the selection of a pollution-safe cultivar (PSC) of water spinach (Ipomoea aquatica Forsk.) was carried out. The experiment with 30 tested cultivars revealed that the maximum differences in Cd concentration between the cultivars containing the highest and the lowest Cd were 3.0-3.9-fold under low-Cd treatment (soil Cd = 0.593 mg kg(-1)), 2.7-3.5-fold under middle-Cd treatment (soil Cd = 1.091 mg kg(-1)), and 2.6-2.7-fold under high-Cd treatment (soil Cd = 1.824 mg kg(-1)), large enough to define the Cd-PSCs. Concentrations of Cd in edible parts of six cultivars, cv. Daxingbaigu, Huifengqing, Qiangkunbaigu, Qiangkunqinggu, Shenniuliuye, and Xingtianqinggu, were lower than 0.2 mg kg(-1), the maximum level (ML) of Cd allowed by the Codex Alimentarius Commission (CAC) standard, even under middle-Cd treatment. Accordingly, these cultivars were treated as typical Cd-PSCs. Four cultivars, cv. Jieyangbaigeng, Xianggangdaye, Sannongbaigeng, and Taiwan 308, contained Cd in edible parts exceeding the ML even under low-Cd treatment, and they were defined as typical non-Cd-PSCs. The correlations of the Cd concentrations among the tested cultivars between the three treatments were significant at the p < 0.05 level. A conspicuous difference in Cd subcellular distribution in hydroponic plant tissues between cv. Qiangkunqinggu (a typical Cd-PSC) and cv. Taiwan 308 (a typical non-Cd-PSC) were observed. Cd absorbed by cv. Qiangkunqinggu seemed to be well-compartmentalized in root and in cell wall fragment, which may be one of the mechanisms leading to its low Cd accumulating property. The results indicated that water spinach, a leafy vegetable, could be easily polluted by soils contaminated with Cd, as 80% of the tested cultivars had exceeded the ML of Cd according to the CAC standard even under the middle-Cd treatment. Much of the evidence obtained from

  10. The effects of two common edible herbs, Ipomoea aquatica and Enhydra fluctuans, on cadmium-induced pathophysiology: a focus on oxidative defence and anti-apoptotic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Dua, Tarun K; Dewanjee, Saikat; Khanra, Ritu; Bhattacharya, Niloy; Bhaskar, Bhuvan; Zia-Ul-Haq, Muhammad; De Feo, Vincenzo

    2015-07-28

    Ipomoea aquatica (Convolvulaceae) and Enhydra fluctuans (Asteraceae), two aquatic vegetables, are traditionally used against heavy metal toxicity in traditional medicines in India. The present study aimed to explore the protective role of edible (aqueous) extracts of I. aquatica (AEIA) and E. fluctuans (AEEF) against Cd-intoxication. The extracts were chemically standardized by spectroscopic and HPLC analysis. The cytoprotective roles of AEIA and AEEF were measured on mouse hepatocytes. The effect on redox status were measured after incubating the hepatocytes with CdCl2 (30 μM) along with AEIA or AEEF (400 μg/ml). The effects on the expressions of apoptotic signal proteins were estimated. The protective roles of AEIA or AEEF were measured by in vivo assay in mice. Haematological, serum biochemical, tissue redox status, Cd bioaccumulation and histological parameters were evaluated to estimate the protective role of AEIA or AEEF (100 mg/kg) against CdCl2 (4 mg/kg) intoxication. Phytochemical analysis revealed presence of substantial quantities of phenolics, flavonoids, saponins, carbohydrates and ascorbic acid in AEIA or AEEF. CdCl2 treated murine hepatocytes showed a gradual reduction of cell viability in a concentration dependent manner with an IC50 of ~30 μM. CdCl2 treated hepatocytes exhibited significantly enhanced levels (p < 0.01) of ROS production, lipid peroxidation, protein carbonylation and NADPH oxidase with concomitant depletion (p < 0.01) of antioxidant enzymes and GSH. However, AEIA or AEEF treatment along with CdCl2 significantly restored the aforementioned parameters in murine hepatocytes near to normalcy. Besides, AEIA or AEEF significantly counteracted (p < 0.05-0.01) with ROS mediated alteration of transcription levels of signal proteins viz. Bcl-2, BAD, Cyt-C, Caspases, Fas and Bid. In in vivo bioassay, CdCl2 treatment caused significantly high Cd bioaccumulation and oxidative stress in the liver, kidney, heart, brain and testes in mice. In

  11. Solenostemon monostachyus, Ipomoea involucrata and Carica papaya seed oil versus Glutathione, or Vernonia amygdalina: methanolic extracts of novel plants for the management of sickle cell anemia disease.

    PubMed

    Afolabi, Israel Sunmola; Osikoya, Iyanuoluwa Olubukola; Fajimi, Oluwabukunmi Dorcas; Usoro, Priscilla Ibanga; Ogunleye, Damilola Olufunlayo; Bisi-Adeniyi, Tolulope; Adeyemi, Alaba O; Adekeye, Bosede Temitope

    2012-12-22

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a genetic disease caused by an individual inheriting an allele for sickle cell hemoglobin from both parents and is associated with unusually large numbers of immature blood cells, containing many long, thin, crescent-shaped erythrocytes. It is a disease prevalent throughout many populations. The use of medicinal plants and nutrition in managing SCD is gaining increasing attention. The antisickling effects of Solenostemon monostachyus (SolMon), Carica papaya seed oil (Cari-oil) and Ipomoea involucrata (Ipocrata) in male (HbSSM) and female (HbSSF) human sickle cell blood was examined in vitro and compared with controls, or cells treated with glutathione or an antisickling plant (Vernonia amygdalina; VerMyg). Levels of sickle blood cells were significantly reduced (P < 0.05) in all the plant-extract treated SCD patients' blood compared with that of untreated SCD patients. RBCs in SolMon, Ipocrata, and Cari-oil treated samples were significantly higher (P < 0.05) compared with VerMyg-treated samples. The Fe(2+)/Fe(3+) ratio was significantly reduced (P < 0.05) in all plant extract-treated HbSSM samples compared with controls. Hemoglobin concentration was significantly increased (P < 0.05) by SolMon treatment in HbSSF compared with VerMyg. Sickle cell polymerization inhibition exhibited by SolMon was significantly higher (P < 0.05) compared with that of VerMyg in HbSSF blood. Sickle cell polymerization inhibition in SolMon and Ipocrata were significantly higher (P < 0.05) compared with VerMyg in HbSSM blood. All plant extracts significantly reduced (P < 0.05) lactate dehydrogenase activity in both HbSSM and HbSSF-treated blood. Catalase activity was significantly increased (P < 0.05) in HbSSF blood treated with Ipocrata compared with glutathione. Cari-oil treated HbSSM and HbSSF blood had significantly increased (P < 0.05) peroxidase activity compared with controls. Methanolic extracts from S. monostachyus, C. papaya seed oil and I

  12. BATATA: a buried muon hodoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, F.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Paic, G.; Salazar, M. E. Patiño; D'Olivo, J. C.; Molina, R. Alfaro

    2009-04-01

    Muon hodoscopes have several applications, ranging from astrophysics to fundamental particle physics. In this work, we present a detector dedicated to the study, at ground level, of the main signals of cosmic-ray induced showers above 6 PeV. The whole detector is composed by a set of three parallel dual-layer scintillator planes buried at fix depths ranging from 120 g/cm2 to 600 g/cm2 and by a triangular array of water cerenkov detectors located nearby on ground.

  13. Combining ability of sweetpotato germplasm for yield, dry matter content, and anthocyanin production

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Interest in the potential of sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas) for the production of industrial products is increasing. As part of an effort to evaluate the potential of sweetpotatoes for starch and anthocyanin production in the southeastern United States, a 5 x 5 North Carolina mating design II (NCII m...

  14. Insect Interactions in Sweetpotato Breeding Nurseries

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sweetpotato, Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam. (Convolvulaceae), is a vital staple food crop in much of the developing world, and it is an important specialty crop in the United States. American consumers prefer sweetpotatoes with sweet, moist orange flesh. After many years of decline beginning in the 195...

  15. Arsenic, Pb, Cu, Zn, and P accumulation by sweet potato grown on broiler litter ash amended Pb and As contaminated soils

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sweet potato [Ipomoea batatas (L) Lam] is an important food crop grown in tropical and subtropical areas of the world. It is generally grown for its carbohydrates rich tuber. Sweet potato leaves rich in vitamin B, ß-carotene, iron, calcium, zinc and protein have been used as leafy vegetables in diff...

  16. Weathering rate of male rubber septa impregnator sex pheromone of Sweetpotato Weevil, Cylas formicarius elegantulus (Coleoptera: Brentidae), in East Hawaii

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In recent years, sweet potato, Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lamarck, production in Hawaii has been increasing, reaching 190 harvested ha, with a total production of 3.78 million kg in 2009. Sweet potato production in Hawaii is hindered by three major quarantine pests, for which only one, the sweetpotato we...

  17. Current status and future direction of sweetpotato research at the U. S. Vegetable Laboratory

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas L.) is one of the world’s most important root crops that is grown in more than 100 countries worldwide. It is an important specialty crop in the U.S. Since 1939, there has been continuous research on sweetpotato at the USDA, and for over 40 years at the U.S. Vegetable ...

  18. Trapping sweetpotato weevil, Cylas formicarius elegantulus (Coleoptera: Brentidae), with high doses of sex pheromone: Catch enhancement and weathering rate in Hawaii

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sweetpotato, Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lamarck, one of the top ten staple crops produced worldwide, has increased in production in Hawaii in recent years. The sweetpotato weevil, Cylas formicarius elegantulus (Summers)(Coleoptera: Brentidae), is a major economic and quarantine pest of sweetpotato in Hawa...

  19. Assessment of genetic diversity of sweet potato in Puerto Rico

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L.) is the seventh most important food crop due to its distinct advantages, such as adaptability to different environmental conditions and high nutritional value. Assessing the genetic diversity of this important crop is necessary due to the constant increase of demand ...

  20. Green light synergistically enhances male sweetpotato weevil sex pheromone response

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sweetpotato, Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lamarck, commercially grown in over 100 countries, is the 7th most important staple crop in the world. Sweetpotato weevil is a major pest of sweetpotato in most areas of cultivation, the feeding of which induces production in the sweetpotato root of extremely bitter...

  1. Genetic diversity and population structure of begomoviruses infecting sweet potato

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Begomoviruses infecting sweet potatoes (Ipomoea batatas) exhibit high genetic diversity, and approximately eight species including Sweet potato leaf curl virus (SPLCV) have been described from different regions around the world. In this study, the complete genomic sequences of 17 geographically dist...

  2. Yield and consumer acceptability of ‘Evangeline’ sweetpotato for production in North Carolina

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Studies were conducted in 2012 and 2013 to compare Evangeline to various sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas) varieties (Bayou Belle, Beauregard, Bonita, Covington, NC05-198, and Orleans) for commercial production in North Carolina. In another study, microwaved and oven-baked ‘Evangeline’ and ‘Covington’ s...

  3. Effects of A Killed-Cover Crop Mulching System on Sweetpotato Production, Soil Pests, and Insect Predators in South Carolina

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sweetpotato, Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam., is typically grown bare soils where weeds and erosion can be problematic before plants become established. Conservation tillage systems for sweetpotato may help alleviate these problems. Therefore, one insect-resistant (‘Ruddy’) and two insect-susceptible (‘...

  4. ‘Covington’ sweetpotato

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    ‘Covington’ is an orange-fleshed, smooth-skinned, rose-colored, table-stock sweetpotato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.] developed by North Carolina State University (NCSU). ‘Covington’, named after the late Henry M. Covington an esteemed sweetpotato scientist at NC State, was evaluated as NC98-608 in mu...

  5. Efficient Regeneration and Selection of Virus-free Sweetpotato Plants from Sweet Potato Leaf Curl Virus Infected Materials and Their Effects on Yields in Field Trials

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sweet potato leaf curl virus (SPLCV) is an emerging virus disease in sweetpotato (Ipomoea batata) in the U.S. The incidence of SPLCV infection on sweetpotato increased dramatically in recent years due to the explosion of whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) populations. Among several sweetpotato v...

  6. Identification of quantitative trait Loci for dry-matter, starch, and ß-carotene content in Sweetpotato

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Development of orange-fleshed sweetpotatoes (OFSP) is essential for the improvement of the food supply and nutritional status of millions of people in developing countries, particularly in sub Saharan Africa. However, sweetpotato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam] breeding is challenging due to its genetic ...

  7. Transmission of Sweet Potato Leaf Curl Virus by Bemisia tabaci

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sweetpotato, Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam. (Solanales: Convolvulaceae), is an important world food crop, and Asia is the focal production region. Because it is vegetatively propagated, sweetpotato is especially prone to accumulate infections by several viruses. Sweet potato leaf curl virus (SPLCV) (ss...

  8. ‘Liberty’ Dry-Fleshed Sweetpotato

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The sweetpotato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.] cultivar, ‘Liberty’ was jointly developed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Agricultural Research Service (ARS), and Clemson University, South Carolina Agriculture and Forestry Research System. This cultivar is a dry-fleshed type with attracti...

  9. Whitefly transmission of Sweet potato leaf curl virus in sweetpotato germplasm

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sweetpotato, Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam., is among an extensive number of plant species attacked by Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius). Because this important world food crop is vegetatively propagated, it can conveniently accumulate infections by several viruses. Sweet potato leaf curl virus (SPLCV) (ssDNA...

  10. ‘Charleston Scarlet’ Sweetpotato

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The sweetpotato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.] cultivar, ‘Charleston Scarlet’ was developed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Charleston, SC. ‘Charleston Scarlet’ produces orange-fleshed, sweet storage roots with attractive scarlet-colored skin (periderm). Vine gro...

  11. Detection and classification of SPLCV isolates in the U.S. sweetpotato germplasm collection via a real-time PCR assay and phylogenetic analysis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The USDA/ARS sweetpotato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam] germplasm collection contains accessions that were initially collected from various countries worldwide. These materials have been maintained and distributed as in vitro plantlets since the 1980s. The status of viral infection by the emerging Swe...

  12. Management of sweet potato leaf curl virus in sweetpotatoes using insecticides

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sweetpotato leaf curl virus (SPLCV), which is transmitted by the sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae), can severely affect yields of commercial sweetpotatoes, Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam. (Convolvulaceae). This virus occurs every year at the U.S. Vegetable Laborato...

  13. Field evaluation of yield effects on the U.S.A. heirloom sweet potato cultivars infected by sweet potato leaf curl virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The incidence of Sweet potato leaf curl virus (SPLCV), a Begomovirus, infection of sweetpotato Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam. (Convolvulaceae) in South Carolina, USA has increased rapidly in recent years. This is likely due to the use of infected propagating materials and the increasing population of it...

  14. Sweet Potato Leaf Curl Virus: Virus Reservoir in Species of Wild Morning Glory

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Recent increases in populations of the Sweetpotato leaf curl virus (SPLCV) vector, the sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius), led to a dramatic increase in the disease in sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas). Knowledge of crop or weed species that occur in sweetpotato growing areas and can serv...

  15. Differential Clomazone, Herbicide Tolerance among Sweetpotato Genotypes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Clomazone (Command 3ME) is a broad spectrum preemergence herbicide that is registered for use in sweetpotato [Ipomoea batatas L. (Lam.)]. It controls several important annual weeds that are not controlled by the other sweetpotato herbicides. Following clomazone application for weed control in the ...

  16. Product evaluation for reniform nematode suppression in Mississippi Delta sweetpotato production, 2011

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The reniform nematode, Rotylenchulus reniformis, can cause significant losses in sweetpotato, Ipomoea batatas, production in the Mississippi Delta. Reniform nematode is a microscopic plant parasite that feeds on sweetpotato roots causing severe stunting of root growth. Reduction in yield due to the ...

  17. An evaluation of cassava, sweet potato and field corn as potential carbohydrate sources for bioethanol production in Alabama and Maryland

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The recent emphasis on corn production to meet the increasing demand for bioethanol has resulted in trepidation regarding the sustainability of the global food supply. To assess the potential of alternative crops as sources of bioethanol production, we grew sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) and cassav...

  18. Photosynthesis and fluctuating asymmetry as indicators of plant response to soil disturbance in the Fall-Line Sandhills of Georgia: a case study using Rhus copallinum and Ipomoea pandurata

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Freeman, D. Carl; Brown, Michelle L.; Duda, Jeffrey J.; Graham, John H.; Emlen, John M.; Krzysik, Anthony J.; Balbach, Harold E.; Kovacic, David A.; Zak, John C.

    2004-01-01

    We examined net photosynthesis, transpiration, stomatal conductance, and leaf fluctuating asymmetry on two species (Rhus copallinum and Ipomoea pandurata) as indicators of stress at nine sites across a gradient of soil disturbance at Fort Benning, Georgia. There were three sites for each of three disturbance levels. Physical habitat disturbance was caused by activities associated with infantry training, including mechanized elements (tanks and personnel carriers) and foot soldiers. In addition, we examined the influence of prescribed burns and microhabitat effects (within meter‐square quadrats centered about the plant) on these measures of plant stress. Net photosynthesis declined with increasing disturbance in the absence of burning for both species. However, when sites were burned the previous year, net photosynthesis increased with increasing disturbance. Developmental instability in Rhus, as measured by fluctuating asymmetry, also declined with increasing disturbance in the absence of burning but increased with disturbance if sites were burned the previous year. Developmental instability was much less sensitive to burning in Ipomoea and in general was lowest at intermediate disturbance sites. Microenvironmental and microhabitat effects were weakly correlated with measures of plant stress when all sites were combined. However, higher correlations were obtained within site categories, especially when the recent history of prescribed burning was used as a category. Finally, using all of the combined data in a discriminant function analysis allowed us to correctly predict the disturbance level of more than 80% of the plants. Plant stress is responsive to both large‐scale perturbations, such as burning, and microhabitat parameters. Because of this, it is important to include macro‐ and microhabitat parameters when assessing stress. Similarly, we found a combination of developmental and physiological indicators of stress was superior to using them

  19. Aqueous extract from Ipomoea asarifolia (Convolvulaceae) leaves and its phenolic compounds have anti-inflammatory activity in murine models of edema, peritonitis and air-pouch inflammation.

    PubMed

    Furtado, Allanny A; Torres-Rêgo, Manoela; Lima, Maíra C J S; Bitencourt, Mariana A O; Estrela, Andréia Bergamo; Souza da Silva, Nayara; da Silva Siqueira, Emerson Michell; Tomaz, José Carlos; Lopes, Norberto Peporine; Silva-Júnior, Arnóbio Antônio; Zucolotto, Silvana M; Fernandes-Pedrosa, Matheus F

    2016-11-04

    Ipomoea asarifolia (Desr.) Roem. and Schult.(Convolvulaceae), popularly known as salsa or salsa-brava, is a plant of which the decoction of leaves is used in folk medicine to treat various inflammatory disorders such of dermatitis, scabies, symptoms of syphilis, skin ulcers and external wounds. However, little is known about possible compounds and mechanisms of action of the plant to support the activities reported by popular use. The study aimed to identify bioactive molecules present in the crude extract of I. asarifolia leaves and investigate the anti-inflammatory potential of this extract in different experimental in vivo models to improve the understanding on that activity. Aqueous extract of I. asarifolia leaves was prepared by decoction (1:10 m/v) and its chromatographic profile was obtained by high performance liquid chromatography coupled with diode array detector (HPLC-DAD) and liquid chromatography diode array detector coupled with mass spectrometry (LC-DAD-MS). The potential anti-inflammatory activity of the extract was assessed using the following in vivo models: xylene-induced ear edema (20, 30 and 40mg/kg), evaluating the degree of edema formation; carrageenan-induced peritonitis (10, 20 and 30mg/kg), evaluating leukocyte migration and cytokine levels (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-12 and TNF-α) at 4h; zymosan-induced air pouch inflammation (20, 30 and 40mg/kg), evaluating the kinetics of leukocyte migration by total and differential counts at 6, 24 and 48h. The same tests were conducted using pure compounds identified in the aqueous extract from I. asarifolia leaves in different doses for each experimental model. The compounds identified in the aqueous extract of I. asarifolia leaves by HPLC-DAD and LC-DAD-MS were rutin, chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid. The extract significantly reduced ear edema induced by xylene (81%, 85% and 86% for doses of 20, 30 and 40mg/kg, respectively, p<0.001), as well as cell migration in experimental models of peritonitis (70%, 78

  20. Ipomoea pes-caprae (L.) R. Br (Convolvulaceae) relieved nociception and inflammation in mice - A topical herbal medicine against effects due to cnidarian venom-skin contact.

    PubMed

    da Silva Barth, Cristiane; Tolentino de Souza, Hugo Guilherme; Rocha, Lilian W; da Silva, Gislaine Francieli; Dos Anjos, Mariana Ferreira; Pastor, Veronica D'Avila; Belle Bresolin, Tania Mari; Garcia Couto, Angelica; Roberto Santin, José; Meira Quintão, Nara Lins

    2017-03-22

    Ipomoea pes-caprae is known as bayhops, beach morning glory or goat's foot, and in Brazil as salsa-de-praia. Its leaves are used in worldwide folk medicine for the relief of jellyfish-stings symptoms. The literature only reports the neutralizing effects of nonpolar plant derived over jellyfish venoms, without validating the popular use or exploring the mechanism of action. This study aimed to evaluate and validate the topical effects of a semisolid containing hydroethanolic extract obtained from the aerial parts of I. pes-caprae using different models of paw- and ear-oedema and spontaneous nociception in mice, attempting to better understand the mechanism involved in its effect. Leaf and stem of I. pes-caprae were extracted by ethanol 50% (v/v) and the soft-extract was incorporated in Hostacerin® cream base at 0.5%, 1.0% and 2% (w/w). The anti-hypersensitivity effects were evaluated by injecting the Physalia physalis venom into the right mice's hindpaw pre-treated either with the semisolid containing the I. pes-caprae extract or with the isolated majority compound 3,5-Di-O-caffeoylquinic acid (ISA). The topical anti-inflammatory activity was investigated using both preclinical models: paw oedema induced by trypsin, bradykinin (BK), histamine and carrageenan, and ear oedema induced by capsaicin. Additionally, the model of spontaneous nociception induced by trypsin and capsaicin were used to verify the topical antinociceptive activity. The animals pre-treated with the semisolid containing I. pes-caprae extract or with the intraplantar injection of the major component (ISA) had the mechanical hypersensitivity induced by P. physalis venom significantly reduced. Significant inhibition was also observed in paw-oedema induced by trypsin, histamine and BK, and in a less extent in carrageenan-induced paw oedema. Similar effect was observed in mice challenged to the capsaicin-induced ear-oedema. Besides the vascular effects, the extract interfered with leukocyte migration

  1. Efeito do Solo do Materias Organicos E do Adubo Formula 4N:14P:8K Para Producao DA Batata (Solanum tuberosum L.) Semente Pre-Basica no Casa de Vegetacao

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    László, Márton

    2010-05-01

    hard effect (57%). Our results are shown that it was possible developing of the seed potato production under tropical greenhouse conditions by optimalised soil-organic matter-fertilizer system. This datas should be as indicators to sustainable field potato advisory systems. Keywords: potato (Solanum tuberosum L.), greenhouse, latossolo vermelho soil, farmyard manure, burnt rice straw, 4N:14P:8K fertilizer, sustainability, yield RESUMO A batata é atualmente uma das hortaliças de maior importância no Brasíl. Nos conduzirémos os três experimentos para aumentár-se do produção e produtividade da batata (Solanum tuberosum L.) semente pré- básica no casa de vegetação da Brazília-DF, no Empresa Brasileira de Pesquisa Agropecuaria- Centro Nacional de Pesquisas de Hortaliças no 1990. Os três experimentos (latossolo vermelho novo x esterco de curral x palha de arroz queimado, latossolo vermelho novo x adubo 4:14:8 NPK, latossolo vermelho novo x esterco de curral x palha de arroz queimado x adubo 4:14:8 NPK) no casa de vegetação foram conduzidos com total 29 combinações, no 5-5-3 repetições com total parcelas de 116. Os resultados foram submetidos a analise de variáncia, ANOVA e MANOVA. Nossos principal resultados estam apresentándo abaixo. 1. A mistura de 80% latossolo vermelho novo, 10% palha de arroz queimado e 10% de esterco de curral, apresentou os maiores valores para numero de tuberculos com 0-20 mm, peso total de tuberculos com 0-20 mm e peso total de tuberculos por vaso. 2. Há um efeito grande crescente das doses de 4N:14P:8K nos caracteres observados. 3. Analise-se do latossolo vermelho novo x esterco de curral x palha de arroz queimado x adubo 4:14:8 NPK experimento os resultados apresentárám-se que entre nas misturas também foi melhor a 80% latossolo vermelho novo, 10% palha de arroz queimado, 10% esterco de curral. Examinando-se 15 fatores, entre 11 casos afirmou-se a mistura como para melhor que a outra mistura. Nossos resultados

  2. Identification of some Bioactive Metabolites in a Fractionated Methanol Extract from Ipomoea aquatica (Aerial Parts) through TLC, HPLC, UPLC-ESI-QTOF-MS and LC-SPE-NMR Fingerprints Analyses.

    PubMed

    Hefny Gad, Mahmoud; Tuenter, Emmy; El-Sawi, Nagwa; Younes, Sabry; El-Ghadban, El-Mewafy; Demeyer, Kristiaan; Pieters, Luc; Vander Heyden, Yvan; Mangelings, Debby

    2017-08-04

    The plant species Ipomoea aquatica contains various bioactive constituents, e.g. phenols and flavonoids, which have several medical uses. All previous studies were executed in Asia; however, no reports are available from Africa, and the secondary metabolites of this plant species from Africa are still unknown. The present study aims finding suitable conditions to identify the bioactive compounds from different fractions. Chromatographic fingerprint profiles of different fractions were developed using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and then these conditions were transferred to thin-layer chromatography (TLC). Subsequently, the chemical structure of some bioactive compounds was elucidated using ultra-performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole time of flight-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-QTOF-MS) and liquid chromatography-solid phase extraction-nuclear magnetic resonance (LC-SPE-NMR) spectroscopy. The HPLC fingerprints, developed on two coupled Chromolith RP-18e columns, using a gradient mobile phase (methanol/water/trifluoroacetic acid, 5:95:0.05, v/v/v), showed more peaks than the TLC profile. The TLC fingerprint allows the identification of the types of chemical constituents, e.g. flavonoids. Two flavonoids (nicotiflorin and ramnazin-3-O-rutinoside) and two phenolic compounds (dihydroxybenzoic acid pentoside and di-pentoside) were tentatively identified by QTOF-MS, while NMR confirmed the structure of rutin and nicotiflorin. The HPLC and TLC results showed that HPLC fingerprints give more and better separated peaks, but TLC helped in determining the class of the active compounds in some fractions. Bioactive constituents were identified as well using MS and NMR analyses. Two flavonoids and two phenolic compounds were tentatively identified in this species for the first time, to the best of our knowledge. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Multiple transcripts of a gene for a leucine-rich repeat receptor kinase from morning glory (Ipomoea nil) originate from different TATA boxes in a tissue-specific manner.

    PubMed

    Bassett, C L; Nickerson, M L; Farrell, R E; Harrison, M

    2004-07-01

    TATA boxes are the most common regulatory elements found in the promoters of eukaryotic genes because they are associated with basal transcription initiation by RNA polymerase II. Often only a single TATA element is found in a given promoter, and tissue-, stage- and/or stimulus-specific expression occurs because the TATA box is associated with other cis -acting elements that enhance or repress transcription. We used software tools for gene analysis to assist in locating potential TATA box(es) in an AT-rich region of the promoter of a gene, inrpk1, which codes for a leucine-rich receptor protein kinase in morning glory (Ipomoea nil). Through the use of RT-PCR and various combinations of forward primers bracketing most of the promoter region we were able to define the 5'-ends of transcripts in this region. The region was then targeted for analysis by RNA Ligase-Mediated-5' Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (RLM-5' RACE) to identify the transcript initiation site(s). Positioning of initiation sites with respect to TATA boxes identified by gene analysis tools allowed us to identify three operational TATA elements which regulate basal transcription from this gene. Two TATA boxes were responsible for all of the inrpk1 transcripts found in leaves and cotyledons, and about 25-30% of the transcripts in roots. A third TATA box was involved only in expression in roots and accounted for the remaining 50-70% of root transcripts. RNAs expressed from this element lack two potentially functional upstream AUG codons, and may be translated more efficiently than transcripts originating from the other TATA boxes.

  4. Plants for space plantations. [crops for closed life support systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikishanova, T. I.

    1978-01-01

    Criteria for selection of candidate crops for closed life support systems are presented and discussed, and desired characteristics of candidate higher plant crops are given. Carbohydrate crops, which are most suitable, grown worldwide are listed and discussed. The sweet potato, ipomoea batatas Poir., is shown to meet the criteria to the greatest degree, and the criteria are recommended as suitable for initial evaluation of candidate higher plant crops for such systems.

  5. Buried plastic scintillator muon telescope (BATATA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfaro, R.; de Donato, C.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Guzmán, A.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Moreno Barbosa, E.; Paic, G.; Patiño Salazar, E.; Salazar Ibarguen, H.; Sánchez, F. A.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Valdés-Galicia, J. F.; Vargas Treviño, A. D.; Vergara Limón, S.; Villaseñor, L. M.; Auger Collaboration

    2010-05-01

    Muon telescopes have multiple applications in the area of cosmic ray research. We are currently building such a detector with the objective of comparing the ground penetration of muon vs. electron-gamma signals originated in cosmic ray showers. The detector is composed by a set of three parallel dual-layer scintillator planes, buried at fixed depths ranging from 120 to 600g/cm2. Each layer is 4m2 and is composed by 49 rectangular strips of 4cm×2m, oriented at a 90∘ angle with respect to its companion layer, which gives an xy-coincidence pixel of 4×4cm2. The scintillators are MINOS extruded polystyrene strips, with an embedded Bicron BC92 wavelength shifting (WLS) fibers, of 1.5 mm in diameter. Light is collected by Hamamatsu H7546B multi-anode PMTs of 64 pixels. The front-end (FE) electronics works in counting mode and signals are transmitted to the surface DAQ stage using low-voltage differential signaling (LVDS). Any strip signal above threshold opens a GPS-tagged 2μs data collection window. Data, including signal and background, are acquired by a system of FPGA (Spartan 2E) boards and a single-board computer (TS7800).

  6. Bioregenerative life support system for a lunar base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H.; Wang, J.; Manukovsky, N. S.; Kovalev, V. S.; Gurevich, Yu. L.

    We have studied a modular approach to construction of bioregenerative life support system BLSS for a lunar base using soil-like substrate SLS for plant cultivation Calculations of massflow rates in BLSS were based mostly on a vegetarian diet and biological conversion of plant residues in SLS Plant candidate list for lunar BLSS includes the following basic species rice Oryza sativa soy Glycine max sweet potato Ipomoea batatas and wheat Triticum aestivum To reduce the time necessary for transition of the system to steady state we suggest that the first seeding and sprouting could be made on Earth

  7. Review of major sweetpotato pests in Japan, with information on resistance breeding programs.

    PubMed

    Okada, Yoshihiro; Kobayashi, Akira; Tabuchi, Hiroaki; Kuranouchi, Toshikazu

    2017-01-01

    Sweetpotato (Ipomoeae batatas (L.) Lam.) is an important food crop affected by several pests throughout the world, especially in tropical, subtropical, and temperate regions. Although Japan is relatively free from many serious sweetpotato pests, some pests, especially soil-borne pathogens, viruses, and insects such as plant-parasitic nematodes and weevils, cause severe damage in Japan. In this review, we describe the current status and management options for sweetpotato pests and diseases in Japan and review research related to sweetpotato breeding that can promote resistance to these problems. Furthermore, we describe methods to evaluate resistance to pests and disease used in sweetpotato breeding at the National Agriculture and Food Research Organization (NARO).

  8. Growth inhibitory activities of crude extracts obtained from herbal plants in the Ryukyu Islands on several human colon carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Kaneshiro, Tatsuya; Suzui, Masumi; Takamatsu, Reika; Murakami, Akira; Ohigashi, Hajime; Fujino, Tetsuya; Yoshimi, Naoki

    2005-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the use of herbs for the treatment of human diseases including cancer. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine whether crude extracts obtained from 44 herbal plants in the Ryukyu Islands might contain components capable of inhibiting the growth of a variety of human colon carcinoma cell lines. Leaves, roots and other parts of the plants were extracted with chloroform, and the crude extracts were dissolved in dimethylsulfoxide and used for the experiments. Extracts of Hemerocallis fulva, Ipomoea batatas, Curcuma longa, and Nasturium officinale caused marked dose-dependent growth inhibition, with IC(50) values in the range of 10-80 mug/ml. With the HCT116 cell line, the extracts of Hemerocallis fulva and Ipomoea batatas induced G1 cell cycle arrest after 48 h of treatment. In addition, we found that extracts of Curcuma longa, and Nasturium officinale induced apoptosis in these cells after 48 h of treatment. The present studies are the first systematic examination of the growth inhibitory effects of crude extracts obtained from herbal plants in the Ryukyu Islands. The findings provide evidence that several plants in the Ryukyu Islands contain components that may have anticancer activity.

  9. Novosphingobium ipomoeae sp. nov., isolated from a water convolvulus field.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Ming; Huang, Cheng-Wen; Chen, Jhen-Ci; Chen, Zih-Han; Sheu, Shih-Yi

    2017-09-04

    A bacterial strain designated Tese-5T was isolated from a water convolvulus field in Taiwan and characterized using the polyphasic taxonomic approach. Strain Tese-5T was an aerobic, Gram-stain-negative, non-motile, rod-shaped bacterium and formed bright yellow coloured colonies. Strain Tese-5T grew at 15-35 °C (optimum, 30 °C), with 0-1.0 % NaCl (optimum, 0-0.5 %) and at pH 5.5-7 (optimum, pH 6). The major fatty acids (>10 %) of strain Tese-5T were C18 : 1ω7c, summed feature 3 (C16 : 1ω7c and/or C16 : 1ω6c) and C16 : 0. The polar lipid profile comprised phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylmonomethylethanolamine, phosphatidyldimethylethanolamine and sphingoglycolipid. The major polyamine was spermidine. The major isoprenoid quinone was Q-10. The DNA G+C content was 65.7 mol%. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain Tese-5T belonged to the genus Novosphingobium and showed the highest levels of sequence similarity to Novosphingobium chloroacetimidivorans BUT-14T and Novosphingobium mathurense SM117T (96.3 %). Phenotypic characteristics of the novel strain also differed from those of the closest-related species of the genus Novosphingobium. On the basis of the genotypic, chemotaxonomic and phenotypic data, strain Tese-5T represents a novel species in the genus Novosphingobium, for which the name Novosphingobium ipomoeaesp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is Tese-5T (=BCRC 80904T=LMG 28838T=KCTC 42656T).

  10. Optimization of Polysaccharide Ultrasonic Extraction Conditions Using Purple Sweet Potato Tubers Based on Free Radical Scavenging and Glycosylation Inhibitory Bioactivities.

    PubMed

    Guo, Haihua; Kong, Fansheng; Yan, Chunyan

    2017-01-01

    The purple sweet potato, Ipomoea batatas, belongs to the family Convolvulaceae. It is one of the most widely consumed tubers in Asia and is found in many dishes. Many people with diabetes eat purple sweet potato tubers to help reduce blood glucose in China. To predict the ultrasonic conditions for getting the optimal in vitro antioxidant and antiglycated activity of ultrasonic extracted polysaccharides from purple sweet potato (I. batatas) tubers, the artificial neural network (ANN) regression models was used in this study. The antioxidant activity of polysaccharides was quantified by evaluating the hydroxyl radical scavenging effect after ultrasonic extraction, and the data were used in conjunction with optimized extraction conditions to train the predictive ANN models. The following conditions were predicted to yield optimal hydroxyl scavenging activity: 200 W, 22°C, and 40 min. In contrast, conditions of 230 W, 22°C, and 50 min yielded the greatest inhibitory effect on albumin nonenzymatic glycosylation. The accuracy and predictive ability of the models ranged from good to excellent, as indicated by R(2) values ranging from 0.953 to 0.998. The results of the present study showed that ANN predictive models are useful in ultrasonic processing, which can rapidly and accurately predict the optimum extraction conditions for polysaccharides based on their antioxidant and antiglycated activities. In addition, the results of the present study suggest that the consumption of sweet potatoes may help reduce free radicals in the body and prevent or treat diabetes. Ultrasonic extraction conditions were simulated and optimized using artificial neural networkBioactivities showed nonlinear relationship with ultrasonic conditionsThe optimal extraction conditions were 200 W, 22°C, and 40 min for the highest antioxidant capacityThe optimal extraction conditions were 230 W, 22°C, and 50 min for the highest antiglycated effect. Abbreviations used: IBP: Polysaccharide of Ipomoea

  11. An analytical pipeline to compare and characterise the anthocyanin antioxidant activities of purple sweet potato cultivars.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yijie; Deng, Liqing; Chen, Jinwu; Zhou, Siyu; Liu, Shuang; Fu, Yufan; Yang, Chunxian; Liao, Zhihua; Chen, Min

    2016-03-01

    Purple sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L.) is rich in anthocyanin pigments, which are valuable constituents of the human diet. Techniques to identify and quantify anthocyanins and their antioxidant potential are desirable for cultivar selection and breeding. In this study, we performed a quantitative and qualitative chemical analysis of 30 purple sweet potato (PSP) cultivars, using various assays to measure reducing power radical-scavenging activities, and linoleic acid autoxidation inhibition activity. Grey relational analysis (GRA) was applied to establish relationships between the antioxidant activities and the chemical fingerprints, in order to identify key bioactive compounds. The results indicated that four peonidin-based anthocyanins and three cyanidin-based anthocyanins make significant contributions to antioxidant activity. We conclude that the analytical pipeline described here represents an effective method to evaluate the antioxidant potential of, and the contributing compounds present in, PSP cultivars. This approach may be used to guide future breeding strategies. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Biodepollution of wastewater containing phenolic compounds from leather industry by plant peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Diao, Mamounata; Ouédraogo, Nafissétou; Baba-Moussa, Lamine; Savadogo, Paul W; N'Guessan, Amani G; Bassolé, Imael H N; Dicko, Mamoudou H

    2011-04-01

    This study deals with the use of peroxidases (POXs) from Allium sativum, Ipomoea batatas, Raphanus sativus and Sorghum bicolor to catalyze the degradation of free phenolic compounds as well as phenolic compounds contained in wastewater from leather industry. Secretory plant POXs were able to catalyze the oxidation of gallic acid, ferulic acid, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, pyrogallol and 1,4-tyrosol prepared in ethanol 2% (v:v). Efficiency of peroxidase catalysis depends strongly on the chemical nature of phenolic substrates and on the botanical source of the enzymes. It appeared that POX from Raphanus sativus had the highest efficiency. Results show that POXs can also remove phenolic compounds present in industrial wastewater such as leather industry. Removal of phenolic compounds in wastewater from leather industry by POX was significantly enhanced by polyethylene glycol.

  13. Caffeoylsophorose in a red vinegar produced through fermentation with purple sweetpotato.

    PubMed

    Terahara, Norihiko; Matsui, Toshiro; Fukui, Keiichi; Matsugano, Kazusato; Sugita, Koichi; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi

    2003-04-23

    Recently, a new red vinegar has been developed via fermentation with the storage root of purple-fleshed sweetpotato, Ipomoea batatas L. cv. Ayamurasaki. The red vinegar had a higher antioxidative activity than white or black vinegars. The red vinegar contained some new components possibly derived from the original purple sweetpotato. A major component was isolated using preparative HPLC, and the chemical structure was determined to be 6-O-(E)-caffeoyl-(2-O-beta-d-glucopyranosyl)-alpha-d-glucopyranose (caffeoylsophorose) by MS and NMR. Because the caffeoylsophorose showed a high antioxidative activity, it plays an important functional role in red vinegar as do anthocyanins and other components. Examination of the mechanism of formation is now in progress.

  14. Change in Invertase Activity of Sweet Potato in Response to Wounding and Purification and Properties of Its Invertases 1

    PubMed Central

    Matsushita, Kazunobu; Uritani, Ikuzo

    1974-01-01

    When root tissue of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas Lam.) was sliced, acid invertase activity, initially absent in freshly sliced tissue, appeared after a 3- to 6-hour lag phase, rapidly reached a maximum in 18 hours, and thereafter decreased. The increase in invertase activity was accompanied by a decrease in sucrose content of the root tissue. Alkaline invertase activity was present in fresh root tissue, but changed little after wounding. Acid invertase in wounded tissue and alkaline invertase in fresh tissue were purified and their properties were investigated. The acid invertase was a ß-fructofuranosidase and was unaffected by substrate or by any of the cations and several metabolites. The alkaline invertase was more specific for sucrose, was inhibited by glucose and glucose 6-phosphate, and displayed non-Michaelis-Menten kinetics. PMID:16658839

  15. Sensory characterization of a ready-to-eat sweetpotato breakfast cereal by descriptive analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dansby, M. A.; Bovell-Benjamin, A. C.

    2003-01-01

    The sweetpotato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam], an important industry in the United States, has been selected as a candidate crop to be grown on future long-duration space missions by NASA. Raw sweetpotato roots were processed into flour, which was used to formulate ready-to-eat breakfast cereal (RTEBC). Twelve trained panelists evaluated the sensory attributes of the extruded RTEBC using descriptive analysis. The samples were significantly different (P<0.05) for all attributes. Twelve perceived sensory attributes, which could be used to differentiate the appearance, texture, and flavor of sweetpotato RTEBC, were described. The data could be used to optimize the RTEBC and for designing studies to test its consumer acceptance.

  16. Inhibition of mitochondrial respiration by the flavone aglycone isovitexin causes aberrant petal and leaf morphology in Silene latifolia.

    PubMed

    Wagner, A M; van Brederode, J

    1996-05-01

    The morphological mutant "isovitexin" in Silene latifolia (the white campion) has small and up-curled petals and leaves. In this mutant the aglycone isovitexin is the only flavone present in the vacuole. In the present study it is shown that isovitexin has a strong toxic effect on mitochondria that is to a large extent abolished by glycosylation. This effect can be used to explain the aberrant morphology. Isovitexin acts at the level of the ubiquinone pool; cytochrome c - cytochrome aa3 oxidase activity was unaffected, and with either reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide or succinate as a respiratory substrate, effects on respiration were found in Silene leaves-, potato (Solanum tuberosum) tuber- and sweet potato (Ipomoea batata L.) tuber mitochondria. Since in sweet potato electron transport via the cyanide insensitive pathway was also inhibited, with the ubiquinone pool as the only component (besides the dehydrogenases) shared by these two pathways, the site of inhibition must be at this level.

  17. [Assessment of the impact of the biological rodenticide Biorat in populations of rodents settled in several crops of the Republic of Costa Rica].

    PubMed

    Villafaña Martín, F; Silva Pupo, M; Ruiz Blanco, J; Sánchez Rojas, L G; Campos Muñoz, A

    1999-01-01

    The impact of biological rodenticide Biorat on populations of rodents settled in some crops was determined; these crops are highly infested with Sigmodon hispidus, a very common vector in various Central American countries. The trapping technique and the appraisal of damages allowed to calculate the index of infestation which ranged from 75 to 90 percent in three crops. Twenty for to 36 kg of BIORAT were applied to 6 ha planted with Cucumis sativus (cucumber), Ipomoea batata (sweet potato) and Ananas comusus (pineapple). This action brought about that the rodent population in such crops reduced the potential damage and consequently, index of infestation was reduced by 94.6 to 98%; therefore, the residual population left amounted from 2 to 3.5%, meaning that damages were under the economic threshold. Generally speaking, the results were similar to those of other countries.

  18. Irradiation as a methyl bromide alternative for postharvest control of Omphisa anastomosalis (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) and Euscepes postfasciatus and Cylas formicarius elegantulus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in sweet potatoes.

    PubMed

    Follett, Peter A

    2006-02-01

    Irradiation studies were conducted with three sweet potato, Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam., pests to determine an effective dose for quarantine control. Dose-response tests indicated that the most radiotolerant stage occurring in roots was the pupa of sweetpotato vine borer, Omphisa anastomosalis (Guenee), and the adult of West Indian sweetpotato weevil, Euscepes postfasciatus (Fairmaire), and sweetpotato weevil, Cylas formicarius elegantulus (Summers). In large-scale confirmatory tests, irradiation of 60,000 C. formicarius elegantulus adults, 62,323 E. postfasciatus adults, and 30,282 O. anastomosalis pupae at a dose of 150 Gy resulted in no production of F1 adults, demonstrating that this dose is sufficient to provide quarantine security.

  19. Development of Plant Gene Vectors for Tissue-Specific Expression Using GFP as a Reporter Gene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Jacquelyn; Egnin, Marceline; Xue, Qi-Han; Prakash, C. S.

    1997-01-01

    Reporter genes are widely employed in plant molecular biology research to analyze gene expression and to identify promoters. Gus (UidA) is currently the most popular reporter gene but its detection requires a destructive assay. The use of jellyfish green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene from Aequorea Victoria holds promise for noninvasive detection of in vivo gene expression. To study how various plant promoters are expressed in sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas), we are transcriptionally fusing the intron-modified (mGFP) or synthetic (modified for codon-usage) GFP coding regions to these promoters: double cauliflower mosaic virus 35S (CaMV 35S) with AMV translational enhancer, ubiquitin7-intron-ubiquitin coding region (ubi7-intron-UQ) and sporaminA. A few of these vectors have been constructed and introduced into E. coli DH5a and Agrobacterium tumefaciens EHA105. Transient expression studies are underway using protoplast-electroporation and particle bombardment of leaf tissues.

  20. Determination of thiabendazole residues in white and sweet potatoes by liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Arenas, R V; Rahman, H; Johnson, N A

    1995-01-01

    A liquid chromatographic (LC) method was developed for determination of thiabendazole (TBZ) residues in or on whole, unwashed white potatoes (Solanum tuberosum) and sweet potatoes (Ipomoea batatas). TBZ is extracted from the potato homogenate with ethyl acetate and the extract purified and concentrated on a cation-exchange, solid-phase extraction column. The extract is analyzed for TBZ residues by column LC with a cation-exchange column and fluorescence detection. Recoveries of TBZ from whole white potatoes fortified with TBZ at 0.05-20 ppm and from whole sweet potatoes fortified with TBZ at 0.005-0.1 ppm averaged 100 and 94%, respectively. The method is also applicable for quantitation of TBZ residues in white potato waste (dried peel) used as an animal feed additive. The present method for monitoring TBZ residues in white and sweet potatoes and white potato waste (dried peel) is simple, rapid, and sensitive.

  1. Development of Plant Gene Vectors for Tissue-Specific Expression Using GFP as a Reporter Gene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Jacquelyn; Egnin, Marceline; Xue, Qi-Han; Prakash, C. S.

    1997-01-01

    Reporter genes are widely employed in plant molecular biology research to analyze gene expression and to identify promoters. Gus (UidA) is currently the most popular reporter gene but its detection requires a destructive assay. The use of jellyfish green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene from Aequorea Victoria holds promise for noninvasive detection of in vivo gene expression. To study how various plant promoters are expressed in sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas), we are transcriptionally fusing the intron-modified (mGFP) or synthetic (modified for codon-usage) GFP coding regions to these promoters: double cauliflower mosaic virus 35S (CaMV 35S) with AMV translational enhancer, ubiquitin7-intron-ubiquitin coding region (ubi7-intron-UQ) and sporaminA. A few of these vectors have been constructed and introduced into E. coli DH5a and Agrobacterium tumefaciens EHA105. Transient expression studies are underway using protoplast-electroporation and particle bombardment of leaf tissues.

  2. Sensory characterization of a ready-to-eat sweetpotato breakfast cereal by descriptive analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dansby, M. A.; Bovell-Benjamin, A. C.

    2003-01-01

    The sweetpotato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam], an important industry in the United States, has been selected as a candidate crop to be grown on future long-duration space missions by NASA. Raw sweetpotato roots were processed into flour, which was used to formulate ready-to-eat breakfast cereal (RTEBC). Twelve trained panelists evaluated the sensory attributes of the extruded RTEBC using descriptive analysis. The samples were significantly different (P<0.05) for all attributes. Twelve perceived sensory attributes, which could be used to differentiate the appearance, texture, and flavor of sweetpotato RTEBC, were described. The data could be used to optimize the RTEBC and for designing studies to test its consumer acceptance.

  3. Inheritance of low pasting temperature in sweetpotato starch and the dosage effect of wild-type alleles

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, Kenji; Tamiya, Seiji; Sakai, Tetsufumi; Kai, Yumi; Ohara-Takada, Akiko; Kuranouchi, Toshikazu; Yoshinaga, Masaru

    2015-01-01

    Sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.), which is an outcrossing hexaploid, is one of the most important starch-producing crops in the world. During the last decade, new sweetpotato cultivars, e.g. ‘Quick Sweet’, which have approximately 20°C lower pasting temperature, slower retrogradation and higher digestibility of raw starch than ordinary cultivars, have been developed in Japan. Genetic analysis of these variants with low pasting temperature starch was conducted in this study. Using 8 variants and 15 normal clones, 26 families were generated. The results from analyzing these progenies suggested that this trait is a qualitative character controlled by one recessive allele (designated spt), which is inherited in a hexasomic manner. A dosage effect of the wild-type Spt allele was found for starch pasting temperature, although the effect was not linear. These results will aid breeders to develop sweetpotato cultivars with a range of starch pasting temperatures. PMID:26366119

  4. Early dispersals of maize and other food plants into the Southern Caribbean and Northeastern South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagán-Jiménez, Jaime R.; Rodríguez-Ramos, Reniel; Reid, Basil A.; van den Bel, Martijn; Hofman, Corinne L.

    2015-09-01

    Grindstones from Eva 2 and St. John, two of the earliest sites in northeastern South America and the southern Caribbean respectively, were subjected to starch grain analysis. Results of this study revealed that these stone artifacts were utilized to process a variety of cultivars such as maize (Zea mays), sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas), chili pepper (Capsicum spp.), achira (Canna spp.), legumes (Fabaceae), and yams (Dioscoreaceae), coupled with wild resources, most notably marunguey (Zamia spp.). Radiocarbon dates indicate that the use of plants identified at these two sites were much older than previously considered, going back to at least 7790 cal. BP at St. John and 5990 cal. BP at Eva 2. This new evidence showcases the importance of the Caribbean basin as an arena for early phytocultural dispersals. It also focuses attention on the role of navigation as a mechanism for crop diffusion in the Neotropics.

  5. Production of oxalic acid by some fungi infected tubers.

    PubMed

    Faboya, O; Ikotun, T; Fatoki, O S

    1983-01-01

    Oxalic acid (as oxalate) was detected in four tubers commonly used for food in Nigeria-Dioscorea rotundata (White yam), Solanum tuberosum (Irish potato), Ipomoea batatas (Sweet potato), and Manihot esculenta (cassava). Whereas healthy I. batata had the highest oxalic acid content, healthy M. esculenta contained the lowest. When all tubers were artifically inoculated with four fungi-Penicillium oxalicum CURIE and THOM, Aspergillus niger VAN TIEGH, A. flavus and A. tamarii KITA, there was an increase in oxalate content/g of tuber tissue. The greatest amount of oxalate was produced by P. oxalicum in D. rotundata tuber. Consistently higher amounts of oxalate were produced by the four fungi in infected sweet potato tuber than in any other tuber and consistently lower amounts of oxalate were produced by the four fungi in Irish potato tuber. Differences in the carbohydrate type present in the tubers and in the biosynthesis pathway are thought to be responsible for variation in the production of oxalate in the different tubers by the four fungi used.

  6. Monascus fermentation of dioscorea for increasing the production of cholesterol-lowering agent--monacolin K and antiinflammation agent--monascin.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chun-Lin; Wang, Jyh-Jye; Kuo, Shing-Lin; Pan, Tzu-Ming

    2006-10-01

    Monacolin K, an inhibitor for cholesterol synthesis, is the secondary metabolite of Monascus species. The formation of the secondary metabolites of the Monascus species is affected by cultivation environment and method. This research uses sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas), potato (Solanum tuberosum), casava (Manihot esculenta), and dioscorea (Dioscorea batatas) as the substrates and discusses the best substrate to produce monacolin K. The results show that Monascus purpureus NTU 301, with dioscorea as the substrate, can produce monacolin K at 2,584 mg kg(-1), which is 5.37 times to that resulted when rice is used as the substrate. In addition, more amount of yellow pigment can be found in Monascus-fermented dioscorea than in Monascus-fermented rice. The certain composition of yellow pigment is identified as monascin, which has been shown as an antiinflammation agent exhibiting potent inhibitory effects on 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced inflammation in mice in previous studies. Therefore, dioscorea is concluded to be the best substrate for Monascus species to produce the cholesterol-lowering agent-monacolin K and antiinflammation agent-monascin.

  7. Characterization of Non-coding DNA Satellites Associated with Sweepoviruses (Genus Begomovirus, Geminiviridae) - Definition of a Distinct Class of Begomovirus-Associated Satellites.

    PubMed

    Lozano, Gloria; Trenado, Helena P; Fiallo-Olivé, Elvira; Chirinos, Dorys; Geraud-Pouey, Francis; Briddon, Rob W; Navas-Castillo, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    Begomoviruses (family Geminiviridae) are whitefly-transmitted, plant-infecting single-stranded DNA viruses that cause crop losses throughout the warmer parts of the World. Sweepoviruses are a phylogenetically distinct group of begomoviruses that infect plants of the family Convolvulaceae, including sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas). Two classes of subviral molecules are often associated with begomoviruses, particularly in the Old World; the betasatellites and the alphasatellites. An analysis of sweet potato and Ipomoea indica samples from Spain and Merremia dissecta samples from Venezuela identified small non-coding subviral molecules in association with several distinct sweepoviruses. The sequences of 18 clones were obtained and found to be structurally similar to tomato leaf curl virus-satellite (ToLCV-sat, the first DNA satellite identified in association with a begomovirus), with a region with significant sequence identity to the conserved region of betasatellites, an A-rich sequence, a predicted stem-loop structure containing the nonanucleotide TAATATTAC, and a second predicted stem-loop. These sweepovirus-associated satellites join an increasing number of ToLCV-sat-like non-coding satellites identified recently. Although sharing some features with betasatellites, evidence is provided to suggest that the ToLCV-sat-like satellites are distinct from betasatellites and should be considered a separate class of satellites, for which the collective name deltasatellites is proposed.

  8. Characterization of Non-coding DNA Satellites Associated with Sweepoviruses (Genus Begomovirus, Geminiviridae) – Definition of a Distinct Class of Begomovirus-Associated Satellites

    PubMed Central

    Lozano, Gloria; Trenado, Helena P.; Fiallo-Olivé, Elvira; Chirinos, Dorys; Geraud-Pouey, Francis; Briddon, Rob W.; Navas-Castillo, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    Begomoviruses (family Geminiviridae) are whitefly-transmitted, plant-infecting single-stranded DNA viruses that cause crop losses throughout the warmer parts of the World. Sweepoviruses are a phylogenetically distinct group of begomoviruses that infect plants of the family Convolvulaceae, including sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas). Two classes of subviral molecules are often associated with begomoviruses, particularly in the Old World; the betasatellites and the alphasatellites. An analysis of sweet potato and Ipomoea indica samples from Spain and Merremia dissecta samples from Venezuela identified small non-coding subviral molecules in association with several distinct sweepoviruses. The sequences of 18 clones were obtained and found to be structurally similar to tomato leaf curl virus-satellite (ToLCV-sat, the first DNA satellite identified in association with a begomovirus), with a region with significant sequence identity to the conserved region of betasatellites, an A-rich sequence, a predicted stem–loop structure containing the nonanucleotide TAATATTAC, and a second predicted stem–loop. These sweepovirus-associated satellites join an increasing number of ToLCV-sat-like non-coding satellites identified recently. Although sharing some features with betasatellites, evidence is provided to suggest that the ToLCV-sat-like satellites are distinct from betasatellites and should be considered a separate class of satellites, for which the collective name deltasatellites is proposed. PMID:26925037

  9. Optimization of Polysaccharide Ultrasonic Extraction Conditions Using Purple Sweet Potato Tubers Based on Free Radical Scavenging and Glycosylation Inhibitory Bioactivities

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Haihua; Kong, Fansheng; Yan, Chunyan

    2017-01-01

    Background: The purple sweet potato, Ipomoea batatas, belongs to the family Convolvulaceae. It is one of the most widely consumed tubers in Asia and is found in many dishes. Many people with diabetes eat purple sweet potato tubers to help reduce blood glucose in China. Objective: To predict the ultrasonic conditions for getting the optimal in vitro antioxidant and antiglycated activity of ultrasonic extracted polysaccharides from purple sweet potato (I. batatas) tubers, the artificial neural network (ANN) regression models was used in this study. Materials and Methods: The antioxidant activity of polysaccharides was quantified by evaluating the hydroxyl radical scavenging effect after ultrasonic extraction, and the data were used in conjunction with optimized extraction conditions to train the predictive ANN models. Results: The following conditions were predicted to yield optimal hydroxyl scavenging activity: 200 W, 22°C, and 40 min. In contrast, conditions of 230 W, 22°C, and 50 min yielded the greatest inhibitory effect on albumin nonenzymatic glycosylation. The accuracy and predictive ability of the models ranged from good to excellent, as indicated by R2 values ranging from 0.953 to 0.998. Conclusion: The results of the present study showed that ANN predictive models are useful in ultrasonic processing, which can rapidly and accurately predict the optimum extraction conditions for polysaccharides based on their antioxidant and antiglycated activities. In addition, the results of the present study suggest that the consumption of sweet potatoes may help reduce free radicals in the body and prevent or treat diabetes. SUMMARY Ultrasonic extraction conditions were simulated and optimized using artificial neural networkBioactivities showed nonlinear relationship with ultrasonic conditionsThe optimal extraction conditions were 200 W, 22°C, and 40 min for the highest antioxidant capacityThe optimal extraction conditions were 230 W, 22°C, and 50 min for the highest

  10. De novo sequencing and a comprehensive analysis of purple sweet potato (Impomoea batatas L.) transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Xie, Fuliang; Burklew, Caitlin E; Yang, Yanfang; Liu, Min; Xiao, Peng; Zhang, Baohong; Qiu, Deyou

    2012-07-01

    High-throughput RNA sequencing was performed for comprehensively analyzing the transcriptome of the purple sweet potato. A total of 58,800 unigenes were obtained and ranged from 200 nt to 10,380 nt with an average length of 476 nt. The average expression of one unigene was 34 reads per kb per million reads (RPKM) with a maximum expression of 1,935 RPKM. At least 40,280 (68.5%) unigenes were identified to be protein-coding genes, in which 11,978 and 5,184 genes were homologous to Arabidopsis and rice proteins, respectively. Gene ontology (GO) and Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes (KEGG) analysis showed that 19,707 (33.5%) unigenes were classified to 1,807 terms of GO including molecular functions, biological processes, and cellular components and 9,970 (17.0%) unigenes were enriched to 11,119 KEGG pathways. We found that at least 3,553 genes may be involved in the biosynthesis pathways of starch, alkaloids, anthocyanin pigments, and vitamins. Additionally, 851 potential simple sequence repeats (SSRs) were identified in all unigenes. Transcriptome sequencing on tuberous roots of the sweet potato yielded substantial transcriptional sequences and potentially useful SSR markers which provide an important data source for sweet potato research. Comparison of two RNA-sequence datasets from the purple and the yellow sweet potato showed that UDP-glucose-flavonoid 3-O-glucosyltransferase was one of the key enzymes in the pathway of anthocyanin biosynthesis and that anthocyanin-3-glucoside might be one of the major components for anthocyanin pigments in the purple sweet potato. This study contributes to the molecular mechanisms of sweet potato development and metabolism and therefore that increases the potential utilization of the sweet potato in food nutrition and pharmacy.

  11. Optimisation of ultrasound-assisted osmotic dehydration of sweet potato (Ipomea batatas) using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Oladejo, Ayobami Olayemi; Ma, Haile

    2016-08-01

    Sweet potato is a highly nutritious tuber crop that is rich in β-carotene. Osmotic dehydration is a pretreatment method for drying of fruit and vegetables. Recently, ultrasound technology has been applied in food processing because of its numerous advantages which include time saving, little damage to the quality of the food. Thus, there is need to investigate and optimise the process parameters [frequency (20-50 kHz), time (10-30 min) and sucrose concentration (20-60% w/v)] for ultrasound-assisted osmotic dehydration of sweet potato using response surface methodology. The optimised values obtained were frequency of 33.93 kHz, time of 30 min and sucrose concentration of 35.69% (w/v) to give predicted values of 21.62, 4.40 and 17.23% for water loss, solid gain and weight reduction, respectively. The water loss and weight reduction increased when the ultrasound frequency increased from 20 to 35 kHz and then decreased as the frequency increased from 35 to 50 kHz. The results from this work show that low ultrasound frequency favours the osmotic dehydration of sweet potato and also reduces the use of raw material (sucrose) needed for the osmotic dehydration of sweet potato. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  12. Protective effect of secondary plant metabolites from Ipomoea aquatica Forsk. against carbofuran induced damages.

    PubMed

    Datta, Sanjukta; Sinha, Mahuya; Das, Dipesh; Ghosh, Santinath; Dhar, Pubali

    2013-12-01

    Plausible interactions between food contaminants and natural constituents in vivo and protective effect of polyphenols present in I. aquatica against carbofuran toxicity in Charles Foster rats were evaluated. Determinations based on antioxidant enzyme activities showed significant alterations in glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and catalase in tissues (liver and brain) and plasma of pesticide treated group while polyphenolic extracts from I. aquatica (IAE) attenuated their activities when given alongwith carbofuran. IAE decreased enhanced lipid peroxidation levels in plasma and erythrocyte membrane and cholesterol levels in brain and plasma. IAE also minimized histopathological degenerative changes produced by carbofuran. While single cell gel electrophoresis showed that secondary metabolites in leafy vegetables produced a combinatorial effect with pesticide at cellular level, DNA fragmentation level in bone marrow cells showed a decline in the IAE treated rats. Food safety adversely affected by various chemical contaminants can be retained by plant polyphenols and secondary plant constituents that can be found together in bolus. Therefore, the present study gives an insight into the protective role of naturally found polyphenols against pesticide toxicity.

  13. Isolation of endosymbionts from Ipomoea carnea and Swainsona canescens that produce swainsonine

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fungi including Metarhizium anisopliae (Clavicipitaceae), Rhizoctonia leguminicola (Ceratobasidiaceae), and Undifilum (Pleosporaceae), an endophyte found in the plant genera Astragalus and Oxytropis (Fabaceae) have been reported to be responsible for the production of swainsonine. Based upon the ass...

  14. Assessment of the perinatal effects of maternal ingestion of Ipomoea carnea in rats

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    It is believed that I. carnea toxicosis induces abnormal embryogenesis in livestock. Studies with rats treated with I. carnea aqueous fraction (AF) during gestation, revealed litters with decreased body weight, but the characteristic vacuolar lesions promoted by swainsonine, its main toxic principle...

  15. Quantitative genetic variance and multivariate clines in the Ivyleaf morning glory, Ipomoea hederacea.

    PubMed

    Stock, Amanda J; Campitelli, Brandon E; Stinchcombe, John R

    2014-08-19

    Clinal variation is commonly interpreted as evidence of adaptive differentiation, although clines can also be produced by stochastic forces. Understanding whether clines are adaptive therefore requires comparing clinal variation to background patterns of genetic differentiation at presumably neutral markers. Although this approach has frequently been applied to single traits at a time, we have comparatively fewer examples of how multiple correlated traits vary clinally. Here, we characterize multivariate clines in the Ivyleaf morning glory, examining how suites of traits vary with latitude, with the goal of testing for divergence in trait means that would indicate past evolutionary responses. We couple this with analysis of genetic variance in clinally varying traits in 20 populations to test whether past evolutionary responses have depleted genetic variance, or whether genetic variance declines approaching the range margin. We find evidence of clinal differentiation in five quantitative traits, with little evidence of isolation by distance at neutral loci that would suggest non-adaptive or stochastic mechanisms. Within and across populations, the traits that contribute most to population differentiation and clinal trends in the multivariate phenotype are genetically variable as well, suggesting that a lack of genetic variance will not cause absolute evolutionary constraints. Our data are broadly consistent theoretical predictions of polygenic clines in response to shallow environmental gradients. Ecologically, our results are consistent with past findings of natural selection on flowering phenology, presumably due to season-length variation across the range.

  16. Promoter analysis of the sweet potato ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase gene IbAGP1 in Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xuelian; Li, Qian; Liu, Dongqing; Zang, Lili; Zhang, Kaiyue; Deng, Kejun; Yang, Shixin; Xie, Zhengyang; Tang, Xu; Qi, Yiping; Zhang, Yong

    2015-11-01

    The IbAGP1 gene of sweet potato ( Ipomoea batatas ) encodes the sucrose-inducible small subunit of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase. Through expression analysis of 5'-truncations and synthetic forms of the IbAGP1 promoter in transgenic tobacco, we show that SURE-Like elements and W-box elements of the promoter contribute to the sucrose inducibility of this gene. Sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) contains two genes (IbAGP1 and IbAGP2) encoding the catalytically active small subunits of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, an enzyme with an important role in regulating starch synthesis in higher plants. Previous studies have shown that IbAGP1 is expressed in the storage roots, leaves, and stem tissues of sweet potato, and its transcript is strongly induced by applying sucrose exogenously to detached leaves. To investigate the tissue-specific expression of the IbAGP1 promoter, a series of 5'-truncated promoters extending from bases -1913, -1598, -1298, -1053, -716, and -286 to base +75 were used to drive the expression of the β-glucuronidase reporter gene (GUS) in tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum). Histochemical and fluorometric GUS assays showed that (1) GUS expression driven by the longest fragment (1989 bp) of the IbAGP1 promoter was detected in vegetative tissues (roots, stems, leaves), (2) fragments extending to -1053 or beyond retained strong GUS expression in roots, stems, and leaves, whereas further 5'-deletions resulted in considerable reduction in GUS activity, and (3) the series of 5'-truncated promoters responded differently to exogenously applied sucrose. The 1989-bp IbAGP1 promoter contains five sequences (two AATAAAA, one AATAAAAAA, and two AATAAATAAA) that are similar to sucrose-responsive elements (SURE). These SURE-Like sequences are found at nucleotide positions -1273, -1239, -681, -610, and -189. Moreover, putative W-box elements are found at positions -1985, -1434, -750, and -578. Synthetic promoters containing tandem repeats of the 4X SURE-Like or 4X W

  17. Energy expenditure in relation to activity of lesser mouse deer (Tragulus javanicus).

    PubMed

    Darlis; Abdullah, N; Liang, J B; Purwanto, B; Ho, Y W

    2001-11-01

    Heat production (HP) of male and female mouse deer during eating, standing and sitting was determined using the open circuit respiration chamber (RC). The time taken for similar activities was also determined in an outdoor enclosure (OD). The animals were fed kangkong (Ipomoea aquatica), sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) and rabbit pellet ad libitum. Male mouse deer consumed more dry matter (DM), organic matter (OM) and gross energy (GE) than female. The time for each activity of male and female mouse deer kept in RC and OD was similar. The average time spent in RC and OD for both male and female, respectively, for sitting (956 and 896 min/day) was significantly (P<0.01) longer than standing (463 and 520 min/day) and eating (21 and 24 min/day). Heat production for male and female mouse deer, respectively, during eating was the highest (0.44 and 0.43 kJ/kg W(0.75)/min) followed by standing (0.37 and 0.33 kJ/kgW(0.75)/min) and sitting (0.26 and 0.26 kJ/kg W(0.75)/min). The difference in HP per min during standing between male and female was significant (P<0.05). The HP for 08.00-14.00 h and 14.00-20.00 h periods were higher than 20.00-02.00 h and 02.00-08.00 h periods. The overall HP for males during 08.00-14.00 h and 14.00-20.00 h periods were significantly (P<0.05) higher (114.8 and 119.2 kJ/kg W(0.75)) than female (107.5 and 110.4 kJ/kg W(0.75)), respectively.

  18. Molecular genetic analysis of virus isolates from wild and cultivated plants demonstrates that East Africa is a hotspot for the evolution and diversification of sweet potato feathery mottle virus.

    PubMed

    Tugume, Arthur K; Cuéllar, Wilmer J; Mukasa, Settumba B; Valkonen, Jari P T

    2010-08-01

    Sweet potato feathery mottle virus (SPFMV, genus Potyvirus) is globally the most common pathogen of cultivated sweet potatoes (Ipomoea batatas; Convolvulaceae). Although more than 150 SPFMV isolates have been sequence-characterized from cultivated sweet potatos across the world, little is known about SPFMV isolates from wild hosts and the evolutionary forces shaping SPFMV population structures. In this study, 46 SPFMV isolates from 14 wild species of genera Ipomoea, Hewittia and Lepistemon (barcoded for the matK gene in this study) and 13 isolates from cultivated sweet potatoes were partially sequenced. Wild plants were infected with the EA, C or O strain, or co-infected with the EA and C strains of SPFMV. In East Africa, SPFMV populations in wild species and sweet potato were genetically undifferentiated, suggesting inter-host transmission of SPFMV. Globally, spatial diversification of the 178 isolates analysed was observed, strain EA being largely geographically restricted to East Africa. Recombination was frequently detected in the 6K2-VPg-NIaPro region of the EA strain, demonstrating a recombination 'hotspot'. Recombination between strains EA and C was rare, despite their frequent co-infections in wild plants, suggesting purifying selection against strain EA/C recombinants. Positive selection was predicted on 17 amino acids distributed over the entire coat protein in the globally distributed strain C, as compared to only four amino acids in the coat protein N-terminus of the EA strain. This selection implies a more recent introduction of the C strain and a higher adaptation of the EA strain to the local ecosystem. Thus, East Africa appears as a hotspot for evolution and diversification of SPFMV.

  19. Biomolecular characterization, identification, enzyme activities of molds and physiological changes in sweet potatoes (Ipomea batatas) stored under controlled atmospheric conditions

    PubMed Central

    Oladoye, C. O.; Connerton, I. F.; Kayode, R. M. O.; Omojasola, P. F.; Kayode, I. B.

    2016-01-01

    Microbial attacks during storage are one of the primary causes of product deterioration, and can limit the process of prolonging the shelf-life of harvested food. In this study, sweet potatoes were stored at temperatures of 13, 21, and 29 °C for 4 weeks. Samples were collected during storage and plated on potato dextrose agar, from which axenic mold cultures were obtained and identified using 26S rRNA gene sequences. Physiological changes of potato tubers were assessed with respect to pathogenicity, enzyme activity, and atmospheric storage conditions. Six fungal species were identified, namely Penicillium chrysogenum (P. rubens), P. brevicompactum, Mucor circinelloides, Cladosporium cladosporiodes, P. expansum, and P. crustosum. The following fungal isolates, namely P. expansum, P. brevicompactum, and Rhizopus oryzae, were recovered from the re-infected samples and selected according to their levels of enzyme activity. This study revealed high levels of activity for cellulase and pectinase, which were most notable during the initial three days of testing, and were followed by a steady decrease (P<0.05). Polygalacturonase activity was prominent with values ranging from 12.64 to 56.79 U/mg (P. expansum) and 18.36 to 79.01 U/mg (P. brevicompactum). Spoilage was obvious in the control group, which had a 100% decay at the end of the experimental period compared with samples treated with iprodione and sodium hypochlorite, in which the decay rates were 5% and 55%, respectively. The data for the iprodione- and sodium hypochlorite-treated samples at the end of the 3-month storage period showed that they were significantly different (P=0.041), with the sodium hypochlorite-treated samples producing twice the rate of infection compared to the iprodione-treated samples. The comparative rate of the progression of decay in the treated samples can be expressed as iprodione

  20. [Nutritional evaluation of sweet potato cultivars Ipomea batata (L.) Lam used in bread as partial substitute of wheat flour].

    PubMed

    Cárdenas, H; Kalinowski, J; Huaman, Z; Scott, G

    1993-12-01

    Four hundred and forty entries of sweet potato tubers from the International Potato Center were evaluated for chemical characteristics related to nutritional value. Dry matter range in the group was 15 to 45g/100g. The native entries DLP 2393, DLP 1120, DLP 2312, DLP 1908 and the foreign RCB 361F were selected for use in bread manufacture. Their average dry matter and crude protein was 38.5 and 9.2% respectively. Sweet potato bread was made replacing 30% of wheat flour with grinded sweet potato tubers. This bread had 11.0% crude protein in dry matter basis which were the same for bread made of wheat flour. There were no differences in organoleptic characteristics or protein quality (Apparent biological value: 37 vs 42%; apparent digestibility: 81 vs 80%; net protein utilization: 33 vs 39%) between sweet potato or full wheat flour breads respectively.

  1. Comparative analysis of nutritional quality of five different cultivars of sweet potatoes (Ipomea batatas (L) Lam) in Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Senanayake, Suraji A; Ranaweera, K K D S; Gunaratne, Anil; Bamunuarachchi, Arthur

    2013-07-01

    Nutritional attributes of flours obtained from five different cultivars of sweet potato roots commonly available in Sri Lanka showed significant differences in the tested parameters. The starch level ranged between 33% and 64% on the dry basis and the extractability from fresh tubers was governed by the quantity of starch. The crude fiber level ranged between 2.1% and 13.6% on dry basis and the highest level was observed in swp7 (CARI 273) and resistant starch ranged from 14.2% to 17.2%. Higher percentage of resistant starch from total starch was found in Wariyapola red (swp1) cultivar resulting in lower digestion level while higher levels of digestion was evident in cultivars with lower levels of resistant starch with high level of total starch. Low levels of calcium and significant levels of iron were found in the five cultivars studied. Crude protein level was in the range of 1.2-3.3% on dry basis and trypsin inhibitor activity level (TIA) was significantly different (P > 0.05) in the cultivars studied while heating resulted in a significantly high reduction in the TIA level than in unheated condition. Polygonal or round shaped starch granules were in the range of 16.8-23.5 μm and low level of starch digestion was shown in cultivars containing larger granules. Total amylose content lies in the range 15.4-19.6% and cultivars having higher percentage of amylose showed higher level of in vitro pancreatic digestion (Pallepola [swp4] and swp7). The starch digestibility of sweet potato flour was in the range of 36-55% and the highest digestion was observed in swp7. Orange fleshed cultivars (swp4 and swp7) were comparatively rich in nutrients and digestibility than the other three studied cultivars.

  2. Effect of heat-moisture treatment on digestibility of different cultivars of sweet potato (Ipomea batatas (L.) Lam) starch.

    PubMed

    Senanayake, Suraji; Gunaratne, Anil; Ranaweera, K K D S; Bamunuarachchi, Arthur

    2014-07-01

    Different heat-moisture levels were applied to native starches from different cultivars of sweet potatoes available in Sri Lanka (Wariyapola red, Wariyapola white, Pallepola variety, Malaysian variety and CARI 273) to study the digestibility level. Samples were treated with 20, 25, and 30% moisture at 85°C and 120°C for 6 h and in vitro starch digestibility was tested with porcine pancreatin enzyme. A range of 19.3-23.5% digestibility was shown by the native starches with no significant difference (P < 0.05). Significant changes were observed in the digestibility level of the hydrothermally modified starches and the moisture content showed a positive impact on the digestibility. Heat-moisture treatment at 85°C brought an overall increase in digestibility and temperature beyond 85°C had a negative impact. No significant difference (P < 0.05) in the digestibility was observed with 20% and 25% moisture at 85°C and increased level were seen at 85°C and 30% moisture.

  3. Effect of heat–moisture treatment on digestibility of different cultivars of sweet potato (Ipomea batatas (L.) Lam) starch

    PubMed Central

    Senanayake, Suraji; Gunaratne, Anil; Ranaweera, K K D S; Bamunuarachchi, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    Different heat–moisture levels were applied to native starches from different cultivars of sweet potatoes available in Sri Lanka (Wariyapola red, Wariyapola white, Pallepola variety, Malaysian variety and CARI 273) to study the digestibility level. Samples were treated with 20, 25, and 30% moisture at 85°C and 120°C for 6 h and in vitro starch digestibility was tested with porcine pancreatin enzyme. A range of 19.3–23.5% digestibility was shown by the native starches with no significant difference (P < 0.05). Significant changes were observed in the digestibility level of the hydrothermally modified starches and the moisture content showed a positive impact on the digestibility. Heat–moisture treatment at 85°C brought an overall increase in digestibility and temperature beyond 85°C had a negative impact. No significant difference (P < 0.05) in the digestibility was observed with 20% and 25% moisture at 85°C and increased level were seen at 85°C and 30% moisture. PMID:25473497

  4. Metabolite profiling of Dioscorea (yam) species reveals underutilised biodiversity and renewable sources for high-value compounds.

    PubMed

    Price, Elliott J; Wilkin, Paul; Sarasan, Viswambharan; Fraser, Paul D

    2016-07-07

    Yams (Dioscorea spp.) are a multispecies crop with production in over 50 countries generating ~50 MT of edible tubers annually. The long-term storage potential of these tubers is vital for food security in developing countries. Furthermore, many species are important sources of pharmaceutical precursors. Despite these attributes as staple food crops and sources of high-value chemicals, Dioscorea spp. remain largely neglected in comparison to other staple tuber crops of tropical agricultural systems such as cassava (Manihot esculenta) and sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas). To date, studies have focussed on the tubers or rhizomes of Dioscorea, neglecting the foliage as waste. In the present study metabolite profiling procedures, using GC-MS approaches, have been established to assess biochemical diversity across species. The robustness of the procedures was shown using material from the phylogenetic clades. The resultant data allowed separation of the genotypes into clades, species and morphological traits with a putative geographical origin. Additionally, we show the potential of foliage material as a renewable source of high-value compounds.

  5. Genome-wide assessment of population structure and genetic diversity and development of a core germplasm set for sweet potato based on specific length amplified fragment (SLAF) sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lianjun; Lei, Jian; Chai, Shasha; Liu, Yi; Yang, Yuanyuan; Yang, Xinsun; Jiao, Chunhai

    2017-01-01

    Sweet potato, Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam., is an important food crop that is cultivated worldwide. However, no genome-wide assessment of the genetic diversity of sweet potato has been reported to date. In the present study, the population structure and genetic diversity of 197 sweet potato accessions most of which were from China were assessed using 62,363 SNPs. A model-based structure analysis divided the accessions into three groups: group 1, group 2 and group 3. The genetic relationships among the accessions were evaluated using a phylogenetic tree, which clustered all the accessions into three major groups. A principal component analysis (PCA) showed that the accessions were distributed according to their population structure. The mean genetic distance among accessions ranged from 0.290 for group 1 to 0.311 for group 3, and the mean polymorphic information content (PIC) ranged from 0.232 for group 1 to 0.251 for group 3. The mean minor allele frequency (MAF) ranged from 0.207 for group 1 to 0.222 for group 3. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) showed that the maximum diversity was within accessions (89.569%). Using CoreHunter software, a core set of 39 accessions was obtained, which accounted for approximately 19.8% of the total collection. The core germplasm set of sweet potato developed will be a valuable resource for future sweet potato improvement strategies. PMID:28187178

  6. Viral RNase3 Co-Localizes and Interacts with the Antiviral Defense Protein SGS3 in Plant Cells

    PubMed Central

    Weinheimer, Isabel; Haikonen, Tuuli; Ala-Poikela, Marjo; Moser, Mirko; Streng, Janne; Rajamäki, Minna-Liisa; Valkonen, Jari P. T.

    2016-01-01

    Sweet potato chlorotic stunt virus (SPCSV; family Closteroviridae) encodes a Class 1 RNase III endoribonuclease (RNase3) that suppresses post-transcriptional RNA interference (RNAi) and eliminates antiviral defense in sweetpotato plants (Ipomoea batatas). For RNAi suppression, RNase3 cleaves double-stranded small interfering RNAs (ds-siRNA) and long dsRNA to fragments that are too short to be utilized in RNAi. However, RNase3 can suppress only RNAi induced by sense RNA. Sense-mediated RNAi involves host suppressor of gene silencing 3 (SGS3) and RNA–dependent RNA polymerase 6 (RDR6). In this study, subcellular localization and host interactions of RNase3 were studied in plant cells. RNase3 was found to interact with SGS3 of sweetpotato and Arabidopsis thaliana when expressed in leaves, and it localized to SGS3/RDR6 bodies in the cytoplasm of leaf cells and protoplasts. RNase3 was also detected in the nucleus. Co-expression of RNase3 and SGS3 in leaf tissue enhanced the suppression of RNAi, as compared with expression of RNase3 alone. These results suggest additional mechanisms needed for efficient RNase3-mediated suppression of RNAi and provide new information about the subcellular context and phase of the RNAi pathway in which RNase3 realizes RNAi suppression. PMID:27391019

  7. Photosynthetic Response to Long- and Short-Term Changes in Carbon Dioxide in Sweetpotatoes Grown Hydroponically with Enhanced Mineral Nutrition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Casey; Terse, Anita; Hileman, Douglas R.; Mortley, Desmond G.; Hill, Jill

    1998-01-01

    Sweetpotato [Ipomoea batatas L.(Lam.)] has been selected by NASA as a potential food for long-term space missions. In previous experiments, sweetpotato plants grown hydroponically under elevated levels of CO2 depleted the nitrogen in the nutrient solution between the hi-weekly solution replacements. In this experiment, the effect of enhanced nutrient replenishment on photosynthetic rates of sweetpotato was determined. CO2 response curves were determined for "TU-82-155" and "Georgia-Jet" sweetpotatoes grown hydroponically in growth chambers at three different CO2 concentrations (400, 750, and 1000 micro-mol/mol CO2). Gas exchange measurements were made using infrared gas analysis, an open-flow gas exchange system, and a controlled-climate cuvette. Photosynthetic measurements were made at CO2 concentrations from 50-1000 micro-mol/mol CO2. Net photosynthetic rates showed an increase with increasing measurement CO2 in all nutrient regimes, but the response of photosynthetic rates to the growth CO2 conditions varied among the experiments and between the two varieties. Enhanced mineral nutrition led to increased net photosynthetic rates in "Georgia Jet" plants, but not in "TU-82-155" plants. The results of this study will help to determine the CO2 requirements for growth of sweetpotato on proposed space missions.

  8. Protective effect of supplemental anthocyanins on Arabidopsis leaves under high light.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xue-Qin; Chow, Wah Soon; Su, Li-Juan; Peng, Xin-Xiang; Peng, Chang-Lian

    2010-02-01

    Ten anthocyanin components have been detected in roots of purple sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas Lam.) by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to diode array detection and electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. All the anthocyanins were exclusively cyanidins or peonidin 3-sophoroside-5-glucosides and their acylated derivatives. The total anthocyanin content in purple sweet potato powder obtained by solid-phase extraction was 66 mg g(-1). A strong capacity of purple sweet potato anthocyanins (PSPA) to scavenge reactive oxygen species (superoxide, hydroxyl radical) and the stable 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl organic free radical was found in vitro using the electron spin resonance technique. To determine the functional roles of anthocyanins in leaves in vivo, for the first time, supplemental anthocyanins were infiltrated into leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana double mutant of the ecotype Landsberg erecta (tt3tt4) deficient in anthocyanin biosynthesis. Chlorophyll fluorescence imaging showed that anthocyanins significantly ameliorated the inactivation of photosystems II during prolonged high-light (1300 micromol m(-2) s(-1)) exposure. Comet assay of DNA revealed an obvious role of supplemental PSPA in alleviating DNA damage by high light in leaves. Our results suggest that anthocyanins could function in vitro and in vivo to alleviate the direct or indirect oxidative damage of the photosynthetic apparatus and DNA in plants caused by high-light stress.

  9. The potential of orange-fleshed sweet potato to prevent vitamin A deficiency in Africa.

    PubMed

    Gurmu, Fekadu; Hussein, Shimelis; Laing, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin A deficiency is among major health problems worldwide that leads to blindness, retarded growth and death, particularly in developing countries. In these countries, vitamin A deficiency largely affects pre-school children, pregnant and lactating mothers, and the rural poor. For instance, the predicted prevalence of vitamin A deficiency for 36 sub-Saharan African countries is 19.1%. Different strategies, including vitamin A supplementation, food fortification and dietary diversification, have been used to combat this problem. However, these strategies are not sustainable due to their high costs. Orange-fleshed sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L. Lam) is a low priced crop, which is part of staple foods in most of sub-Saharan Africa that can be a year-round source of vitamin A. Most of the orange-fleshed sweet potato varieties contain 3000-16000 μg 100 g(-1) of β-carotene and this contributes to 250 to 1300 μg 100 g(-1) Retinol Activity Equivalents (RAE). Therefore, by using orange-fleshed sweet potato, it is possible to improve vitamin A status, increase the bio-availability of different micro-nutrients such as Fe, Zn, Ca and Mg, reduce vitamin A deficiency and hence reduce child mortality rates by 23 to 30%. The article highlights the significance of vitamin A for human nutrition, the effect of vitamin A deficiency, the different prevention methods and the potential of orange- fleshed sweet potato as a food crop to prevent vitamin A deficiency.

  10. Invertase proteinaceous inhibitor of Cyphomandra betacea Sendt fruits.

    PubMed

    Ordóñez, R M; Isla, M I; Vattuone, M A; Sampietro, A R

    2000-01-01

    This work describes a new invertase proteinaceous inhibitor from Cyphomandra betacea Sendt. (tomate de arbol) fruits. The proteinaceous inhibitor was isolated and purified from a cell wall preparation. The pH stability, kinetics of the inhibition of the C. betacea invertase, inhibition of several higher plant invertases and lectin nature of the inhibitor were studied. The inhibitor structure involves a single polypeptide (Mr = 19000), as shown by gel filtration and SDS-PAGE determinations. N-terminal aminoacid sequence was determined. The properties and some structural features of the inhibitor are compared with the proteinaceous inhibitors from several plant species (Beta vulgaris L., Ipomoea batatas L. and Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.). All these inhibitors share lectinic properties, some common epitopes, some aminoacid sequences and a certain lack of specificity towards invertases of different species, genera and even plant family. In consequence, the inhibitors appear to belong to the same lectin family. It is now known that some lectins are part of the defence mechanism of higher plants against fungi and bacteria and this is a probable role of the proteinaceous inhibitors.

  11. Potential impacts of bioprocessing of sweet potato: Review.

    PubMed

    El Sheikha, Aly Farag; Ray, Ramesh C

    2017-02-11

    Sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L.) is among the major food crops in the world and is cultivated in all tropical and subtropical regions particularly in Asia, Africa, and the Pacific. Asia and Africa regions account for 95% of the world's production. Among the root and tuber crops grown in the world, sweet potato ranks second after cassava. In previous decades, sweet potato represented food and feed security, now it offers income generation possibilities, through bioprocessing products. Bioprocessing of sweet potato offers novel opportunities to commercialize this crop by developing a number of functional foods and beverages such as sour starch, lacto-pickle, lacto-juice, soy sauce, acidophilus milk, sweet potato curd and yogurt, and alcoholic drinks through either solid state or submerged fermentation. Sweet potato tops, especially leaves are preserved as hay or silage. Sweet potato flour and bagassae are used as substrates for production of microbial protein, enzymes, organic acids, monosodium glutamate, chitosan, etc. Additionally, sweet potato is a promising candidate for production of bioethanol. This review deals with the development of various products from sweet potato by application of bioprocessing technology. To the best of our knowledge, there is no review paper on the potential impacts of the sweet potato bioprocessing.

  12. Production of Vesicular-Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungus Inoculum in Aeroponic Culture †

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Ling-Ling L.; Sylvia, David M.

    1988-01-01

    Bahia grass (Paspalum notatum) and industrial sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) colonized by Glomus deserticola, G. etunicatum, and G. intraradices were grown in aeroponic cultures. After 12 to 14 weeks, all roots were colonized by the inoculated vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. Abundant vesicles and arbuscules formed in the roots, and profuse sporulation was detected intra-and extraradically. Within each fungal species, industrial sweet potato contained significantly more roots and spores per plant than bahia grass did, although the percent root colonization was similar for both hosts. Mean percent root colonization and sporulation per centimeter of colonized root generally increased with time, although with some treatments colonization declined by week 14. Spore production ranged from 4 spores per cm of colonized root for G. etunicatum to 51 spores per cm for G. intraradices. Infectivity trials with root inocula resulted in a mean of 38, 45, and 28% of bahia grass roots colonized by G. deserticola, G. etunicatum, and G. intraradices, respectively. The germination rate of G. etunicatum spores produced in soil was significantly higher than that produced in aeroponic cultures (64% versus 46%) after a 2-week incubation at 28°C. However, infectivity studies comparing G. etunicatum spores from soil and aeroponic culture indicated no biological differences between the spore sources. Aeroponically produced G. deserticola and G. etunicatum inocula retained their infectivity after cold storage (4°C) in either sterile water or moist vermiculite for at least 4 and 9 months, respectively. PMID:16347548

  13. Profiling of differentially expressed genes critical to storage root development in hydroponically and in-vitro grown sweetpotato for space farming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egnin, M.; Gao, H.; He, G.; Woullard, F.; Mortley, D.; Scoffield, J.; Bey, B.; Quain, M.; Prakash, C. S.; Bonsi, C.

    Environment is known to have significant effects on the nutrient content and quality of crop plants especially through its impact on the temporal and spatial expression of genes Little is known about the molecular changes and harvest index in plants in response to microgravity Sweetpotato underline Ipomoea underline batatas L Lam is one of the most important root crops and an excellent NASA crop for space farming to provide essential nutrients to sustain human life on long-term space missions The initiation and development of storage root formation is one of the most critical processes determining yield of sweetpotato The molecular mechanism of storage root initiation and development in sweetpotato is poorly understood To this end knowledge of gravity perception the genetic and molecular nature of the induction process of storage root will tremendously help improve on sweetpotato harvest index for space farming cDNA-AFLP techniques were employed to investigate temporal and spatial expressions to gain molecular insights and identify transcripts differentially expressed during early stages of sweetpotato storage root development Two hydroponically grown cultivars using Nutrient Film Technology NFT and microstorage roots were evaluated TU-82-155 an early maturing 90 DAP with orange flesh and tinge red skin and PI318846-3 a late maturing 135 DAP with white flesh and off-yellow skin were compared for differential genes expression during storage root development at 14 21 28 35 and 45 DAP Total RNA was isolated from

  14. Performance of growing indigenous goats fed diets based on urban market crop wastes.

    PubMed

    Katongole, C B; Sabiiti, E N; Bareeba, F B; Ledin, I

    2009-03-01

    The effect of feeding diets including market crop wastes (sweet potato vines (Ipomoea batatas) and scarlet eggplant (Solanum aethiopicum)) on growth and digestibility was studied using 32 indigenous intact growing male goats. Adding elephant grass (Pennisetum purpureum), maize bran and Leucaena leucocephala leaves, four isocaloric and isonitrogenous diets (Sweet potato vines, Solanum, Mixed and Control) were formulated. After the growth trial, 12 goats were randomly selected for a digestibility trial with the same diets, and 8 goats for a feed preference test comparing the market wastes and elephant grass. Crude protein (CP) intake was highest (P<0.05) for the Control (48 g/day) and lowest for the Sweet potato vines diet (23 g/day). Average daily gain was between 11.0 and 14.2 g/day, and similar between diets. The DM and CP digestibilities of the diets were 0.56 and 0.56 (Control), 0.62 and 0.56 (Mixed), 0.59 and 0.49 (Sweet potato vines), and 0.54 and 0.45 (Solanum), respectively. Faecal and urinary N excretions were highest in goats fed the Sweet potato vines and Solanum diets. Eggplant wastes were the least (P<0.05) preferred. On average the goats spent 5% of their 8-hour time eating eggplant wastes, 34% on sweet potato vines and 36% on elephant grass. Growth performance and N retention were low due to the low intake of feed, especially eggplant wastes.

  15. Integrating biological treatment of crop residue into a hydroponic sweetpotato culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trotman, A. A.; David, P. P.; Bonsi, C. K.; Hill, W. A.; Mortley, D. G.; Loretan, P. A.

    1997-01-01

    Residual biomass from hydroponic culture of sweetpotato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.] was degraded using natural bacterial soil isolates. Sweetpotato was grown for 120 days in hydroponic culture with a nutrient solution comprised of a ratio of 80% modified half Hoagland solution to 20% filtered effluent from an aerobic starch hydrolysis bioreactor. The phytotoxicity of the effluent was assayed with `Waldmann's Green' lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) and the ratio selected after a 60-day bioassay using sweetpotato plants propagated vegetatively from cuttings. Controlled environment chamber experiments were conducted to investigate the impact of filtrate from biological treatment of crop residue on growth and storage root production with plants grown in a modified half Hoagland solution. Incorporation of bioreactor effluent, reduced storage root yield of `Georgia Jet' sweetpotato but the decrease was not statistically significant when compared with yield for plants cultured in a modified half Hoagland solution without filtrate. However, yield of `TU-82-155' sweetpotato was significantly reduced when grown in a modified half Hoagland solution into which filtered effluent had been incorporated. Total biomass was significantly reduced for both sweetpotato cultivars when grown in bioreactor effluent. The leaf area and dry matter accumulation were significantly (P < 0.05) reduced for both cultivars when grown in solution culture containing 20% filtered effluent.

  16. Structure and characterization of a cDNA clone for phenylalanine ammonia-lyase from cut-injured roots of sweet potato

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Yoshiyuki; Matsuoka, Makoto; Yamanoto, Naoki; Ohashi, Yuko; Kano-Murakami, Yuriko; Ozeki, Yoshihiro Univ. of Tokyo )

    1989-08-01

    A cDNA clone for phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) induced in wounded sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas Lam.) root was obtained by immunoscreening a cDNA library. The protein produced in Escherichia coli cells containing the plasmid pPAL02 was indistinguishable from sweet potato PAL as judged by Ouchterlony double diffusion assays. The M{sub r} of its subunit was 77,000. The cells converted ({sup 14}C)-L-phenylalanine into ({sup 14}C)-t-cinnamic acid and PAL activity was detected in the homogenate of the cells. The activity was dependent on the presence of the pPAL02 plasmid DNA. The nucleotide sequence of the cDNA contained a 2,121-base pair (bp) open-reading frame capable of coding for a polypeptide with 707 amino acids (M{sub r} 77,137), a 22-bp 5{prime}-noncoding region and a 207-bp 3{prime}-noncoding region. The results suggest that the insert DNA fully encoded the amino acid sequence for sweet potato PAL that is induced by wounding. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence with that of a PAL cDNA fragment from Phaseolus vulgaris revealed 78.9% homology. The sequence from amino acid residues 258 to 494 was highly conserved, showing 90.7% homology.

  17. Intelligent pH indicator film composed of agar/potato starch and anthocyanin extracts from purple sweet potato.

    PubMed

    Choi, Inyoung; Lee, Jun Young; Lacroix, Monique; Han, Jaejoon

    2017-03-01

    A new colorimetric pH indicator film was developed using agar, potato starch, and natural dyes extracted from purple sweet potato, Ipomoea batatas. Both agar and potato starch are solid matrices used to immobilize natural dyes, anthocyanins. The ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectrum of anthocyanin extract solutions and agar/potato starch films with anthocyanins showed color variations to different pH values (pH 2.0-10.0). Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and UV-vis region spectra showed compatibility between agar, starch, and anthocyanin extracts. Color variations of pH indicator films were measured by a colorimeter after immersion in different pH buffers. An application test was conducted for potential use as a meat spoilage sensor. The pH indicator films showed pH changes and spoilage point of pork samples, changing from red to green. Therefore, the developed pH indicator films could be used as a diagnostic tool for the detection of food spoilage.

  18. Nitrogen recycling during phenylpropanoid metabolism in sweet potato tubers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, S.; Lewis, N. G.; Towers, G. H.

    1998-01-01

    In the first step of the phenylpropanoid metabolic pathway, L-phenylalanine (L-Phe) is deaminated to form E-cinnamate, in a conversion catalyzed by phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL; EC 4.3.1.5). The metabolic fate of the ammonium ion (NH4+) produced in this reaction was investigated in sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) tuber discs. [15N]-Labeled substrates including L-Phe, in the presence or absence of specific enzyme inhibitors, were administered to sweet potato discs in light under aseptic conditions. 15N-Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic analyses revealed that the 15NH4+ liberated during the PAL reaction is first incorporated into the amide nitrogen of L-glutamine (L-Gln) and then into L-glutamate (L-Glu). These results extend our previous observations in pine and potato that PAL-generated NH4+ is assimilated by the glutamine synthetase (GS; EC 6.3.1.2)/glutamate synthase (GOGAT; EC 1.4.1.13) pathway, with the NH4+ so formed ultimately being recycled back to L-Phe via L-Glu as aminoreceptor and donor.

  19. Metabolite profiling of Dioscorea (yam) species reveals underutilised biodiversity and renewable sources for high-value compounds

    PubMed Central

    Price, Elliott J.; Wilkin, Paul; Sarasan, Viswambharan; Fraser, Paul D.

    2016-01-01

    Yams (Dioscorea spp.) are a multispecies crop with production in over 50 countries generating ~50 MT of edible tubers annually. The long-term storage potential of these tubers is vital for food security in developing countries. Furthermore, many species are important sources of pharmaceutical precursors. Despite these attributes as staple food crops and sources of high-value chemicals, Dioscorea spp. remain largely neglected in comparison to other staple tuber crops of tropical agricultural systems such as cassava (Manihot esculenta) and sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas). To date, studies have focussed on the tubers or rhizomes of Dioscorea, neglecting the foliage as waste. In the present study metabolite profiling procedures, using GC-MS approaches, have been established to assess biochemical diversity across species. The robustness of the procedures was shown using material from the phylogenetic clades. The resultant data allowed separation of the genotypes into clades, species and morphological traits with a putative geographical origin. Additionally, we show the potential of foliage material as a renewable source of high-value compounds. PMID:27385275

  20. Symbiotic N2-Fixation Estimated by the 15N Tracer Technique and Growth of Pueraria phaseoloides (Roxb.) Benth. Inoculated with Bradyrhizobium Strain in Field Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Sarr, Papa Saliou; Okon, Judith Wase; Begoude, Didier Aime Boyogueno; Araki, Shigeru; Ambang, Zachée; Shibata, Makoto; Funakawa, Shinya

    2016-01-01

    This field experiment was established in Eastern Cameroon to examine the effect of selected rhizobial inoculation on N2-fixation and growth of Pueraria phaseoloides. Treatments consisted of noninoculated and Bradyrhizobium yuanmingense S3-4-inoculated Pueraria with three replications each. Ipomoea batatas as a non-N2-fixing reference was interspersed in each Pueraria plot. All the twelve plots received 2 gN/m2 of 15N ammonium sulfate 10% atom excess. At harvest, dry matter yields and the nitrogen derived from atmospheric N2-fixation (%Ndfa) of inoculated Pueraria were significantly (P < 0.05) higher (81% and 10.83%, resp.) than those of noninoculated Pueraria. The inoculation enhanced nodule dry weight 2.44-fold. Consequently, the harvested N significantly (P < 0.05) increased by 83% in inoculated Pueraria, resulting from the increase in N2-fixation and soil N uptake. A loss of 55 to 60% of the N fertilizer was reported, and 36 to 40% of it was immobilized in soil. Here, we demonstrated that both N2-fixing potential of P. phaseoloides and soil N uptake are improved through field inoculations using efficient bradyrhizobial species. In practice, the inoculation contributes to maximize N input in soils by the cover crop's biomass and represent a good strategy to improve soil fertility for subsequent cultivation. PMID:26904363

  1. Interaction of a potential vacuolar targeting receptor with amino- and carboxyl-terminal targeting determinants.

    PubMed

    Kirsch, T; Saalbach, G; Raikhel, N V; Beevers, L

    1996-06-01

    A protein of 80 kD from developing pea (Pisum sativum) cotyledons has previously been shown to exhibit characteristics of a vacuolar targeting receptor by means of its affinity for the amino-terminal vacuolar targeting sequence of proaleurain from barley (Hordeum vulgare). In this report we show that the same protein also binds to the amino-terminal targeting peptide of prosporamin from sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) and to the carboxyl-terminal targeting determinant of pro-2S albumin from Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa). The receptor protein does not bind to the carboxyl-terminal propeptide (representing the targeting sequence) of barley lectin. The binding of the 80-kD protein to the sporamin determinant involves a motif (NPIR) that has been shown to be crucial for vacuolar targeting in vivo. The binding to the carboxyl-terminal targeting determinant of pro-2S albumin appears to involve the carboxyl-terminal propeptide and the adjacent five amino acids of the mature protein. The 80-kD protein does not bind to peptide sequences that have been shown to be incompetent in directing vacuolar targeting.

  2. Genetic analysis and association of simple sequence repeat markers with storage root yield, dry matter, starch and β-carotene content in sweetpotato

    PubMed Central

    Yada, Benard; Brown-Guedira, Gina; Alajo, Agnes; Ssemakula, Gorrettie N.; Owusu-Mensah, Eric; Carey, Edward E.; Mwanga, Robert O.M.; Yencho, G. Craig

    2017-01-01

    Molecular markers are needed for enhancing the development of elite sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam) cultivars with a wide range of commercially important traits in sub-Saharan Africa. This study was conducted to estimate the heritability and determine trait correlations of storage root yield, dry matter, starch and β-carotene content in a cross between ‘New Kawogo’ × ‘Beauregard’. The study was also conducted to identify simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers associated with these traits. A total of 287 progeny and the parents were evaluated for two seasons at three sites in Uganda and genotyped with 250 SSR markers. Broad sense heritability (H2) for storage root yield, dry matter, starch and β-carotene content were 0.24, 0.68, 0.70 and 0.90, respectively. Storage root β-carotene content was negatively correlated with dry matter (r = −0.59, P < 0.001) and starch (r = −0.93, P < 0.001) content, while storage root yield was positively correlated with dry matter (r = 0.57, P = 0.029) and starch (r = 0.41, P = 0.008) content. Through logistic regression, a total of 12, 4, 6 and 8 SSR markers were associated with storage root yield, dry matter, starch and β-carotene content, respectively. The SSR markers used in this study may be useful for quantitative trait loci analysis and selection for these traits in future. PMID:28588391

  3. Genetic analysis and association of simple sequence repeat markers with storage root yield, dry matter, starch and β-carotene content in sweetpotato.

    PubMed

    Yada, Benard; Brown-Guedira, Gina; Alajo, Agnes; Ssemakula, Gorrettie N; Owusu-Mensah, Eric; Carey, Edward E; Mwanga, Robert O M; Yencho, G Craig

    2017-03-01

    Molecular markers are needed for enhancing the development of elite sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam) cultivars with a wide range of commercially important traits in sub-Saharan Africa. This study was conducted to estimate the heritability and determine trait correlations of storage root yield, dry matter, starch and β-carotene content in a cross between 'New Kawogo' × 'Beauregard'. The study was also conducted to identify simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers associated with these traits. A total of 287 progeny and the parents were evaluated for two seasons at three sites in Uganda and genotyped with 250 SSR markers. Broad sense heritability (H(2)) for storage root yield, dry matter, starch and β-carotene content were 0.24, 0.68, 0.70 and 0.90, respectively. Storage root β-carotene content was negatively correlated with dry matter (r = -0.59, P < 0.001) and starch (r = -0.93, P < 0.001) content, while storage root yield was positively correlated with dry matter (r = 0.57, P = 0.029) and starch (r = 0.41, P = 0.008) content. Through logistic regression, a total of 12, 4, 6 and 8 SSR markers were associated with storage root yield, dry matter, starch and β-carotene content, respectively. The SSR markers used in this study may be useful for quantitative trait loci analysis and selection for these traits in future.

  4. Fermentation by amylolytic lactic acid bacteria and consequences for starch digestibility of plantain, breadfruit, and sweet potato flours.

    PubMed

    Haydersah, Julien; Chevallier, Isabelle; Rochette, Isabelle; Mouquet-Rivier, Claire; Picq, Christian; Marianne-Pépin, Thérèse; Icard-Vernière, Christèle; Guyot, Jean-Pierre

    2012-08-01

    The potential of tropical starchy plants such as plantain (Musa paradisiaca), breadfruit (Artocarpus communis), and sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) for the development of new fermented foods was investigated by exploiting the capacity of some lactic acid bacteria to hydrolyze starch. The amylolytic lactic acid bacteria (ALAB) Lactobacillus plantarum A6 and Lactobacillus fermentum Ogi E1 were able to change the consistency of thick sticky gelatinized slurries of these starchy fruits and tubers into semiliquid to liquid products. Consequently, a decrease in apparent viscosity and an increase in Bostwick flow were observed. These changes and the production of maltooligosaccharides confirmed starch hydrolysis. Sucrose in sweet potato was not fermented by strain A6 and poorly fermented by strain Ogi E1, suggesting possible inhibition of sucrose fermentation. In all 3 starchy plants, rapidly digestible starch (RDS) was higher than slowly digestible starch (SDS) and resistant starch (RS) represented between 17% and 30% dry matter (DM). The digestibility of plantain was not affected by fermentation, whereas the RDS content of breadfruit and sweet potato decreased and the RS content increased after fermentation. The characteristics resulting from different combinations of gluten free starchy plants (plantain, breadfruit, sweet potato) and amylolytic lactic acid bacteria (ALAB) offer opportunities to develop new functional fermented beverages, mainly for breadfruit and sweet potato, after further investigation of their formulation, sensory attributes, nutritional, and prebiotic characteristics. Journal of Food Science © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists® No claim to original US government works.

  5. Monosaccharide composition of sweetpotato fiber and cell wall polysaccharides from sweetpotato, cassava, and potato analyzed by the high-performance anion exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection method.

    PubMed

    Salvador, L D; Suganuma, T; Kitahara, K; Tanoue, H; Ichiki, M

    2000-08-01

    The cell wall materials (CWMs) from sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas cv. Kokei 14), cassava (Manihot esculenta), and potato (Solanum tuberosum cv. Danshaku) and commercial sweetpotato fiber as well as their polysaccharide fractions were analyzed for sugar composition by the high-performance anion exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection (HPAEC-PAD) method. The separation of arabinose and rhamnose, and xylose and mannose, by this method has been improved using a CarboPac PA 10 column. Pretreatment of the CWMs and cellulose fractions with 12 M H(2)SO(4) was required for complete hydrolysis to occur. Commercial sweetpotato fiber was found to be mainly composed of glucose (88.4%), but small amounts of other sugars were also detected. Among the root crops, sweetpotato CWM had the highest amount of pectin and galacturonic acid. Fucose was detected only in cassava CWM and its hemicellulose fraction, while galactose was present in the highest amount in potato CWM. Among the polysaccharide fractions, it was only in the hemicellulose fraction where significant differences in the sugar composition, especially in the galactose content, were observed among the root crops.

  6. Recent progress in sweetpotato breeding and cultivars for diverse applications in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, Kenji; Kobayashi, Akira; Sakai, Tetsufumi; Kuranouchi, Toshikazu; Kai, Yumi

    2017-01-01

    Sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.) is an outcrossing hexaploid that is cultivated in the tropics and warm-temperate regions of the world. Sweetpotato has played an important role as a famine-relief crop during its long history and has recently been reevaluated as a health-promoting food. In Japan, sweetpotato is used for a wide range of applications, such as table use, processed foods, and alcohol and starch production, and two groups at National Agriculture Research Organization (NARO) undertake the breeding of cultivars for these applications. Sweetpotato breeders utilize breeding processes such as grafting for flower induction and the identification of incompatibility groups before crossing to conquer problems peculiar to sweetpotato. For table use, new cultivars with high sugar content were released recently and have become popular among Japanese consumers. New cultivars with high anthocyanin or β-carotene content were released for processed foods and use as colorants. As raw materials, new cultivars with high alcohol yield were released for the production of shochu spirits. In addition, new cultivars with high starch yield and a cultivar containing starch with excellent cold-storage ability were released for starch production. This review deals with recent progress in sweetpotato breeding and cultivars for diverse applications in Japan. PMID:28465663

  7. Carbon Dioxide Effects on Ethanol Production, Pyruvate Decarboxylase, and Alcohol Dehydrogenase Activities in Anaerobic Sweet Potato Roots 1

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ling A.; Hammett, Larry K.; Pharr, David M.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of varied anaerobic atmospheres on the metabolism of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas [L.] Lam.) roots was studied. The internal gas atmospheres of storage roots changed rapidly when the roots were submerged under water. O2 and N2 gases disappeared quickly and were replaced by CO2. There were no appreciable differences in gas composition among the four cultivars that were studied. Under different anaerobic conditions, ethanol concentration in the roots was highest in a CO2 environment, followed by submergence and a N2 environment in all the cultivars except one. A positive relationship was found between ethanol production and pyruvate decarboxylase activity from both 100% CO2-treated and 100% N2-treated roots. CO2 atmospheres also resulted in higher pyruvate decarboxylase activity than did N2 atmospheres. Concentrations of CO2 were higher within anaerobic roots than those in the ambient anaerobic atmosphere. The level of pyruvate decarboxylase and ethanol in anaerobic roots was proportional to the ambient CO2 concentration. The measurable activity of pyruvate decarboxylase that was present in the roots was about 100 times less than that of alcohol dehydrogenase. Considering these observations, it is suggested that the rate-limiting enzyme for ethanol biosynthesis in sweet potato storage roots under anoxia is likely to be pyruvate decarboxylase rather than alcohol dehydrogenase. PMID:16662798

  8. [Construction of a bivalent plant expression vector carrying VvSUC11 and VvSUC12 genes and its genetic transformation in sugar beet].

    PubMed

    Yin, Donglin; Zhu, Jianbo; Wang, Aiying; Xiang, Benchun

    2011-08-01

    We have recombined genes VvSUC11, VvSUC12 from Vitis vinifera L., and root-specific promoters of sweet potato storage protein gene from Ipomoea batatas L. Lam., named as SP1 and SP2. We have constructed a vector pCAMBIA2301-SP1- VvSUC11-SP2-VvSUC12 using pCAMBIA2301 as an original vector. VvSUC11 and VvSUC12 were under the control of root-specific promoters of sweet potato storage protein gene. We transformed the vector into KWS-9103 breeding line of Beta vulgaris L. with Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. We have established the optimal genetic transformation protocol of sugar beet as following: the explants pre-cultured for 4 days were immersed in Agrobacterium suspension of OD(600)=0.5, supplemented with 0.005% Silwet L-77, and followed by a 4-day culture on medium containing cefotaxime, then the buds were selected on medium containing kanamycin and cefotaxime. The percentage of kanamycin-resistant buds was as high as 42%. Results of PCR and RT-PCR proved that the target genes had integrated into sugar beet genome and expressed. It will lay a foundation for further studying their function in Beta vulgaris.

  9. Flow-batch technique for the simultaneous enzymatic determination of levodopa and carbidopa in pharmaceuticals using PLS and successive projections algorithm.

    PubMed

    Grünhut, Marcos; Centurión, María E; Fragoso, Wallace D; Almeida, Luciano F; de Araújo, Mário C U; Fernández Band, Beatriz S

    2008-05-30

    An enzymatic flow-batch system with spectrophotometric detection was developed for simultaneous determination of levodopa [(S)-2 amino-3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)propionic acid] and carbidopa [(S)-3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-2-hydrazino-2-methylpropionic acid] in pharmaceutical preparations. The data were analysed by univariate method, partial least squares (PLS) and a novel variable selection for multiple lineal regression (MLR), the successive projections algorithm (SPA). The enzyme polyphenol oxidase (PPO; EC 1.14.18.1) obtained from Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam. was used to oxidize both analytes to their respective dopaquinones, which presented a strong absorption between 295 and 540 nm. The statistical parameters (RMSE and correlation coefficient) calculated after the PLS in the spectral region between 295 and 540 nm and MLR-SPA application were appropriate for levodopa and carbidopa. A comparative study of univariate, PLS, in different ranges, and MLR-SPA chemometrics models, was carried out by applying the elliptical joint confidence region (EJCR) test. The results were satisfactory for PLS in the spectral region between 295 and 540 nm and for MLR-SPA. Tablets of commercial samples were analysed and the results obtained are in close agreement with both, spectrophotometric and HPLC pharmacopeia methods. The sample throughput was 18 h(-1).

  10. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Critical Function of Sucrose Metabolism Related-Enzymes in Starch Accumulation in the Storage Root of Sweet Potato

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kai; Wu, Zhengdan; Tang, Daobin; Luo, Kai; Lu, Huixiang; Liu, Yingying; Dong, Jie; Wang, Xin; Lv, Changwen; Wang, Jichun; Lu, Kun

    2017-01-01

    The starch properties of the storage root (SR) affect the quality of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.). Although numerous studies have analyzed the accumulation and properties of starch in sweet potato SRs, the transcriptomic variation associated with starch properties in SR has not been quantified. In this study, we measured the starch and sugar contents and analyzed the transcriptome profiles of SRs harvested from sweet potatoes with high, medium, and extremely low starch contents, at five developmental stages [65, 80, 95, 110, and 125 days after transplanting (DAP)]. We found that differences in both water content and starch accumulation in the dry matter affect the starch content of SRs in different sweet potato genotypes. Based on transcriptome sequencing data, we assembled 112336 unigenes, and identified several differentially expressed genes (DEGs) involved in starch and sucrose metabolism, and revealed the transcriptional regulatory network controlling starch and sucrose metabolism in sweet potato SRs. Correlation analysis between expression patterns and starch and sugar contents suggested that the sugar–starch conversion steps catalyzed by sucrose synthase (SuSy) and UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (UGPase) may be essential for starch accumulation in the dry matter of SRs, and IbβFRUCT2, a vacuolar acid invertase, might also be a key regulator of starch content in the SRs. Our results provide valuable resources for future investigations aimed at deciphering the molecular mechanisms determining the starch properties of sweet potato SRs. PMID:28690616

  11. Selenium Accumulating Leafy Vegetables Are a Potential Source of Functional Foods

    PubMed Central

    Mabeyo, Petro E.; Manoko, Mkabwa L. K.; Gruhonjic, Amra; Fitzpatrick, Paul A.; Landberg, Göran; Erdélyi, Máté; Nyandoro, Stephen S.

    2015-01-01

    Selenium deficiency in humans has been associated with various diseases, the risks of which can be reduced through dietary supplementation. Selenium accumulating plants may provide a beneficial nutrient for avoiding such illnesses. Thus, leafy vegetables such as Amaranthus hybridus, Amaranthus sp., Cucurbita maxima, Ipomoea batatas, Solanum villosum, Solanum scabrum, and Vigna unguiculata were explored for their capabilities to accumulate selenium when grown on selenium enriched soil and for use as a potential source of selenium enriched functional foods. Their selenium contents were determined by spectrophotometry using the complex of 3,3′-diaminobenzidine hydrochloride (DABH) as a chromogen. The mean concentrations in the leaves were found to range from 7.90 ± 0.40 to 1.95 ± 0.12 μg/g dry weight (DW), with C. maxima accumulating the most selenium. In stems, the accumulated selenium content ranged from 1.12 ± 0.10 μg/g in Amaranthus sp. to 5.35 ± 0.78 μg/g DW in C. maxima and was hence significantly different (P < 0.01). The cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 was used in cytotoxicity assays to determine the anticancer potential of these extracts. With exception of S. scabrum and S. villosum, no cytotoxicity was detected for the selenium enriched vegetable extracts up to 100 μg/mL concentration. Hence, following careful evaluation the studied vegetables may be considered as selenium enriched functional foods. PMID:26955635

  12. Screening, separating, and completely recovering polyphenol oxidases and other biochemicals from sweet potato wastewater in starch production.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shi; Zhang, Yi-Feng; Zeng, Zhao-Qin; Lin, Jia; Zhang, Ya-Wen; Ni, He; Li, Hai-Hang

    2015-02-01

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) has multiple functions, and the lack of commercially available enzyme sources limits its widespread application in various industries. An accurate PPO assay was developed by HPLC determination of the substrate oxidation. Resources screening indicated that sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L.) wastewater in starch production has high PPO activity. A procedure was developed for separately recovering PPO, β-amylase, sporamins, and small molecular nutrients (SMNs) from sweet potato wastewater. The wastewater was adjusted to pH 3.5 to precipitate PPO, and then adjusted to 50 % acetone to precipitate β-amylase and further to 80 % acetone to precipitate sporamins. The SMNs were obtained after acetone recovery. Purified powders of 4.3 × 10(5) units of PPO, 4.0 × 10(6) units of β-amylase, 8.70 g sporamins, and 20.2 g SMNs were obtained from the wastewater of 1 kg sweet potato. More than 50 million tons of sweet potato is used for starch production annually around the world. Through this simple procedure, huge amount of biochemical resources can be recovered from the wastewater, which greatly increases the economic value of the crop and saves the environment.

  13. Indirect determination of sulfite using a polyphenol oxidase biosensor based on a glassy carbon electrode modified with multi-walled carbon nanotubes and gold nanoparticles within a poly(allylamine hydrochloride) film.

    PubMed

    Sartori, Elen Romão; Vicentini, Fernando Campanhã; Fatibello-Filho, Orlando

    2011-12-15

    The modification of a glassy carbon electrode with multi-walled carbon nanotubes and gold nanoparticles within a poly(allylamine hydrochloride) film for the development of a biosensor is proposed. This approach provides an efficient method used to immobilize polyphenol oxidase (PPO) obtained from the crude extract of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.). The principle of the analytical method is based on the inhibitory effect of sulfite on the activity of PPO, in the reduction reaction of o-quinone to catechol and/or the reaction of o-quinone with sulfite. Under the optimum experimental conditions using the differential pulse voltammetry technique, the analytical curve obtained was linear in the concentration of sulfite in the range from 0.5 to 22 μmol L(-1) with a detection limit of 0.4 μmol L(-1). The biosensor was applied for the determination of sulfite in white and red wine samples with results in close agreement with those results obtained using a reference iodometric method (at a 95% confidence level).

  14. Gene expression activity and pathway selection for sucrose metabolism in developing storage root of sweet potato.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiu-Qing; Zhang, Dapeng

    2003-06-01

    Development of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) storage root coincides with starch accumulation made using cleaved products of imported photoassimilate sucrose. The genes and pathways are predominantly active for sucrose metabolism in developing storage root were unknown. In this study, we used both an expressed sequence tag (EST) approach and a reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) approach to answer this question. Sucrose synthase (SuSy) was found to be significantly more frequent in storage root ESTs than in fibrous root ESTs. SuSy was the most abundant carbohydrate-metabolism gene in the storage-root ESTs. RT-PCR results confirmed this by showing that invertase was active in fibrous roots but rapidly decreased to an undetectable level during storage root development while SuSy became predominant. Invertase expression was also detectable in young immature storage root and shoot tips, suggesting an involvement in cell formation. SuSy expression pattern showed considerable similarity to that of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, an essential enzyme for starch synthesis. The results indicated that (i). SuSy was the most actively expressed enzyme in sucrose metabolism in developing storage root and was correlated with sink strength, and (ii). whereas invertase was active at cell formation stages, SuSy pathway was predominant for sucrose cleavage related to starch-accumulation.

  15. Isolation and characterization of cDNAs and genomic DNAs encoding ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase large and small subunits from sweet potato.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yu-Xi; Chen, Yu-Xiang; Tao, Xiang; Cheng, Xiao-Jie; Wang, Hai-Yan

    2016-04-01

    Sweet potato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.], the world's seventh most important food crop, is also a major industrial raw material for starch and ethanol production. In the plant starch biosynthesis pathway, ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) catalyzes the first, rate-limiting step and plays a pivotal role in regulating this process. In spite of the importance of sweet potato as a starch source, only a few studies have focused on the molecular aspects of starch biosynthesis in sweet potato and almost no intensive research has been carried out on the AGPase gene family in this species. In this study, cDNAs encoding two small subunits (SSs) and four large subunits (LSs) of AGPase isoforms were cloned from sweet potato and the genomic organizations of the corresponding AGPase genes were elucidated. Expression pattern analysis revealed that the two SSs were constitutively expressed, whereas the four LSs displayed differential expression patterns in various tissues and at different developmental stages. Co-expression of SSs with different LSs in Escherichia coli yielded eight heterotetramers showing different catalytic activities. Interactions between different SSs and LSs were confirmed by a yeast two-hybrid experiment. Our findings provide comprehensive information about AGPase gene sequences, structures, expression profiles, and subunit interactions in sweet potato. The results can serve as a foundation for elucidation of molecular mechanisms of starch synthesis in tuberous roots, and should contribute to future regulation of starch biosynthesis to improve sweet potato starch yield.

  16. Stable Internal Reference Genes for the Normalization of Real-Time PCR in Different Sweetpotato Cultivars Subjected to Abiotic Stress Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Chang Yoon; Park, Seyeon; Jeong, Jae cheol; Lee, Haeng-Soon; Kwak, Sang-Soo

    2012-01-01

    Reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) has become one of the most widely used methods for gene expression analysis, but its successful application depends on the stability of suitable reference genes used for data normalization. In plant studies, the choice and optimal number of reference genes must be experimentally determined for the specific conditions, plant species, and cultivars. In this study, ten candidate reference genes of sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas) were isolated and the stability of their expression was analyzed using two algorithms, geNorm and NormFinder. The samples consisted of tissues from four sweetpotato cultivars subjected to four different environmental stress treatments, i.e., cold, drought, salt and oxidative stress. The results showed that, for sweetpotato, individual reference genes or combinations thereof should be selected for use in data normalization depending on the experimental conditions and the particular cultivar. In general, the genes ARF, UBI, COX, GAP and RPL were validated as the most suitable reference gene set for every cultivar across total tested samples. Interestingly, the genes ACT and TUB, although widely used, were not the most suitable reference genes in different sweetpotato sample sets. Taken together, these results provide guidelines for reference gene(s) selection under different experimental conditions. In addition, they serve as a foundation for the more accurate and widespread use of RT-qPCR in various sweetpotato cultivars. PMID:23251557

  17. Feed and fuel: the dual-purpose advantage of an industrial sweetpotato.

    PubMed

    Mussoline, Wendy A; Wilkie, Ann C

    2017-03-01

    Sustainable agricultural systems must support nutritional requirements, meet the energy demands of a growing population, preserve environmental resources and mitigate climate change. The sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas L.) is a high-yielding crop that requires minimal fertilization and irrigation, and the CX-1 industrial cultivar offers superior potential for feed and fuel. CX-1 had the highest agronomic fresh vine yield (51.5 t ha(-1) ), averaged over two cropping seasons, compared with Hernandez (33.7) and Beauregard (21.8) varieties. CX-1 vines were more nutritional than the table varieties, specifically in regard to relative feed value (205), water-soluble carbohydrates (171 g kg(-1) dry matter (DM)), total digestible nutrients (643 g kg(-1) DM), metabolizable energy (10.2 MJ kg(-1) DM) and organic matter digestibility. Their lower fiber and lignin concentrations contributed to their freshness and digestibility throughout maturity. Significantly higher iron concentrations make the CX-1 vines a valuable, low-fat iron supplement for animal feed. The CX-1 roots also showed the highest bioethanol potential (82.3 g ethanol kg(-1) fresh root) compared to Hernandez (64.5) and Beauregard (48.1). The CX-1 industrial sweetpotato is an ideal dual-purpose crop for tropical/subtropical climates that can be utilized as a non-grain-based feedstock for bioethanol production while contributing a valuable, high-yielding nutritional supplement for animal feed. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. Construction of a linkage map based on retrotransposon insertion polymorphisms in sweetpotato via high-throughput sequencing.

    PubMed

    Monden, Yuki; Hara, Takuya; Okada, Yoshihiro; Jahana, Osamu; Kobayashi, Akira; Tabuchi, Hiroaki; Onaga, Shoko; Tahara, Makoto

    2015-03-01

    Sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas L.) is an outcrossing hexaploid species with a large number of chromosomes (2n = 6x = 90). Although sweetpotato is one of the world's most important crops, genetic analysis of the species has been hindered by its genetic complexity combined with the lack of a whole genome sequence. In the present study, we constructed a genetic linkage map based on retrotransposon insertion polymorphisms using a mapping population derived from a cross between 'Purple Sweet Lord' (PSL) and '90IDN-47' cultivars. High-throughput sequencing and subsequent data analyses identified many Rtsp-1 retrotransposon insertion sites, and their allele dosages (simplex, duplex, triplex, or double-simplex) were determined based on segregation ratios in the mapping population. Using a pseudo-testcross strategy, 43 and 47 linkage groups were generated for PSL and 90IDN-47, respectively. Interestingly, most of these insertions (~90%) were present in a simplex manner, indicating their utility for linkage map construction in polyploid species. Additionally, our approach led to savings of time and labor for genotyping. Although the number of markers herein was insufficient for map-based cloning, our trial analysis exhibited the utility of retrotransposon-based markers for linkage map construction in sweetpotato.

  19. Composition of suberin-associated waxes from the subterranean storage organs of seven plants : Parsnip, carrot, rutabaga, turnip, red beet, sweet potato and potato.

    PubMed

    Espelie, K E; Sadek, N Z; Kolattukudy, P E

    1980-10-01

    The waxes associated with the suberin in the periderm of the underground storage organs of parsnip (Pastinaca sativa L.), carrot (Daucus carota L.), rutabaga (Brassica napobrassica Mill.), turnip (Brassica rapa L.), red beet (Beta vulgaris L.), sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L.) and potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) were isolated, fractionated into hydrocarbon, wax ester, free fatty alcohol and free fatty acid fractions, and analyzed by combined gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. The amount of wax extracted from the periderm of the storage organs ranged from 2 to 32 μg/cm(2). The hydrocarbons from the suberin layer have a broader chain-length distribution, a predominance of shorter carbon chains, and a higher proportion of even-numbered carbon chains than the leaf alkanes from the same plants. The major components of the free and esterified fatty alcohols and fatty acids have an even number of carbon atoms, and are similar in chain-length distribution to their counterparts found covalently attached to the suberin polymers; however, these suberin components are shorter in chain length than their cuticular analogues from the leaves. Also extracted from the storage organs were polar components which included fatty alcohols and fatty acids in a conjugated form, and ω-hydroxy acids and dicarboxylic acids. Evidence is presented that removal of the wax from the periderm of whole storage organs results in a decrease in diffusion resistance to moisture.

  20. Alpha-tocopherol content in 62 edible tropical plants.

    PubMed

    Ching, L S; Mohamed, S

    2001-06-01

    Vitamin E was determined by the high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method. All the plants tested showed differences in their alpha-tocopherol content and the differences were significant (p < 0.05). The highest alpha-tocopherol content was in Sauropus androgynus leaves (426.8 mg/kg edible portion), followed by Citrus hystrix leaves (398.3 mg/kg), Calamus scipronum (193.8 mg/kg), starfruit leaves Averrhoa belimbi (168.3 mg/kg), red pepper Capsicum annum (155.4 mg/kg), local celery Apium graveolens (136.4 mg/kg), sweet potato shoots Ipomoea batatas (130.1 mg/kg), Pandanus odorus (131.5 mg/kg), Oenanthe javanica (146.8 mg/kg), black tea Camelia chinensis (183.3 mg/kg),papaya Carica papaya shoots (111.3 mg/kg), wolfberry leaves Lycium chinense (94.4 mg/kg), bird chili Capsicum frutescens leaves (95.4 mg/kg), drumstick Moringa oleifera leaves (90.0 mg/kg), green chili Capsicum annum (87 mg/kg), Allium fistulosum leaves (74.6 mg/kg), and bell pepper Capsicum annum (71.0 mg/kg). alpha-Tocopherol was not detected in Brassica oleracea, Phaeomeria speciosa, Pachyrrhizus speciosa, Pleurotus sajor-caju, and Solanum melongena.

  1. Batatinosides II-VI, acylated lipooligosaccharides from the resin glycosides of sweet potato.

    PubMed

    Escalante-Sánchez, Edgar; Rosas-Ramírez, Daniel; Linares, Edelmira; Bye, Robert; Pereda-Miranda, Rogelio

    2008-10-22

    Sweet potato ( Ipomoea batatas) belongs to the Convolvulaceae (morning glory family) and is native to Mexico and Central America. Its edible tuberous roots have been much appreciated since pre-Hispanic times in Mesoamerica and now play an important role as a basic diet staple and a medicinal plant worldwide. The hexane-soluble extract from roots, through preparative-scale recycling HPLC, yielded five new lipophilic oligosaccharides of jalapinolic acid, batatinosides II-VI ( 1- 5), as well as the known pescapreins I ( 6) and VII ( 7) and murucoidin I ( 8), which are part of the purgative resin glycoside mixture. NMR spectroscopy and FAB mass spectrometry were used to characterize their structures. Compounds 1 and 2 are tetraglycosidic lactones of operculinic acid C. The pentasaccharide structures for compounds 3 and 4 were confirmed to be macrolactones of simonic acid B, and that characterized for 5 was derived from operculinic acid A. The lactonization site of the aglycone was placed at C-3 of the second saccharide unit in all compounds except 4, where it was placed at C-2. All compounds contain an esterifying residue that is composed of a long-chain fatty acid, n-decanoic acid (capric) or n-dodecanoic acid (lauric). In compound 3, an additional short-chain fatty acid, (2 S)-methylbutyric acid, was also identified.

  2. Glutathione S-transferase SlGSTE1 in Spodoptera litura may be associated with feeding adaptation of host plants.

    PubMed

    Zou, Xiaopeng; Xu, Zhibin; Zou, Haiwang; Liu, Jisheng; Chen, Shuna; Feng, Qili; Zheng, Sichun

    2016-03-01

    Spodoptera litura is polyphagous pest insect and feeds on plants of more than 90 families. In this study the role of glutathione S-transferase epilson 1 (slgste1) in S. litura in detoxification was examined. This gene was up-regulated in the midgut of S. litura at the transcriptional and protein levels when the insect fed on Brassica juncea or diet containing phytochemicals such as indole-3-carbinol and allyl-isothiocyanate that are metabolic products of sinigrin and glucobrassicin in B. juncea. The SlGSTE1 could catalyze the conjugation of reduced glutathione and indole-3-carbinol and allyl-isothiocyanate, as well as xanthotoxin, which is a furanocoumarin, under in vitro condition. When the expression of Slgste1 in the larvae was suppressed with RNAi, the larval growth and feeding rate were decreased. Furthermore, the up-regulated expression of the SlGSTE1 protein in the midgut of larvae that fed on different host plants was detected by 2-DE and ESI/MS analysis. The feeding adaptation from the most to the least of the larvae for the various host plants was Brassica alboglabra, Brassica linn. Pekinensis, Cucumis sativus, Ipomoea batatas, Arachis hypogaea and Capsicum frutescens. All the results together suggest that Slgste1 is a critical detoxifying enzyme that is induced by phytochmicals in the host plants and, inter alia, may be related to host plant adaptation of S. litura. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Inoculation of somatic embryos of sweet potato with an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus improves embryo survival and plantlet formation.

    PubMed

    Bressan, W; de Carvalho, C H; Sylvia, D M

    2000-08-01

    Responses of somatic embryos of sweet potato (Ipomoea batata (L.) Poir., cv. White Star) at different developmental stages to in vitro inoculation with Glomus etunicatum (Becker and Gerdemann) (isolate INVAM FL329) were evaluated. Somatic embryos were grown in glass tubes containing sterilized vermiculite and sand. A layer of natrosol plus White's medium was used as a carrier for arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungal spores. Survival of embryos inoculated with AM fungi was significantly (P < 0.05) greater than that of noninoculated embryos at the rooted-cotyledonary-torpedo and rooted-elongated-torpedo developmental stages. Mycorrhizae significantly (P < 0.05) increased plantlet formation only when inoculation occurred at the rooted-elongated-torpedo developmental stage. The growth stage at which the embryos were inserted into the glass tubes exerted a significant influence upon plantlet formation, and plantlet formation was further enhanced by inoculation with G. etunicatum. Plantlet formation was greatest at the rooted-elongated-torpedo stage. These results demonstrate that inoculation of somatic embryos with AM fungi improves embryo survival and plantlet formation, and could enhance use of somatic embryos as synthetic seeds.

  4. Potential of trap crops for integrated management of the tropical armyworm, Spodoptera litura in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhongshi; Chen, Zepeng; Xu, Zaifu

    2010-01-01

    The tropical armyworm, Spodoptera litura (F.) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), is an important pest of tobacco, Nicotiana tabacum L. (Solanales: Solanaceae), in South China that is becoming increasingly resistant to pesticides. Six potential trap crops were evaluated to control S. litura on tobacco. Castor bean, Ricinus communis L. (Malpighiales: Euphorbiaceae), and taro, Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott (Alismatales: Araceae), hosted significantly more S. litura than peanut, Arachis hypogaea L. (Fabales: Fabaceae), sweet potato, Ipomoea batata Lam. (Solanales: Convolvulaceae) or tobacoo in a greenhouse trial, and tobacco field plots with taro rows hosted significantly fewer S. litura than those with rows of other trap crops or without trap crops, provided the taro was in a fast-growing stage. When these crops were grown along with eggplant, Solanum melongena L. (Solanales: Solanaceae), and soybean, Glycines max L. (Fabales: Fabaceae), in separate plots in a randomized matrix, tobacco plots hosted more S. litura than the other crop plots early in the season, but late in the season, taro plots hosted significantly more S. litura than tobacco, soybean, sweet potato, peanut or eggplant plots. In addition, higher rates of S. litura parasitism by Microplitis prodeniae Rao and Chandry (Hymenoptera: Bracondidae) and Campoletis chlorideae Uchida (Ichnumonidae) were observed in taro plots compared to other crop plots. Although taro was an effective trap crop for managing S. litura on tobacco, it did not attract S. litura in the seedling stage, indicating that taro should either be planted 20-30 days before tobacco, or alternative control methods should be employed during the seedling stage.

  5. The effect of Piper aduncum invasion on soil in tropical ecosystems of Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukla, Jaroslav; Frouz, Jan

    2017-04-01

    Piper aduncum is successful Neotropical invasive species in Papua New Guinea. Despite its interaction with aboveground part of ecosystem has been extensively studied little is known about its effect on soil. Here we report two studies, in first we compare soil chemistry and soil biota in sites invaded and non-invaded by P. aduncum near Wanang village. In other study we use benefit of previous experiment when P. aduncum was experimentally removed near Ohu village. Here we compare soil chemistry and chemistry of plant leaves growing in garden originating by slashing and burning two adjacent patches with and without P. aduncum. Soil under P. aduncum had significantly less phosphorus in 0-5 cm soil layer and less nitrates, nitrogen and carbon in 5-10 cm soil layer than soil in old gardens uninvaded by P. aduncum. P. aduncum soil also harbors fewer microfloras than uninvaded soil as shown by PLFA analysis. No difference was found in fauna communities. Gardens created on patches where old P. aduncum was removed did not differ in soil chemistry from plots which were overgrown by P. aduncum, but leaves of sweet potatoes (Ipomoea batatas) in gardens where P. aduncum was previously removed contained more nitrogen. Results suggest that P. aduncum invasion may affect some chemical and microbial properties in invaded soil. P. aduncum has negative effect on traditional shifting agriculture.

  6. Studies on Somatic Embryogenesis in Sweetpotato

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, J. Rasheed; Prakash, C. S.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to improve the somatic embryo (SE) system for plant production of sweetpotato Ipomoea batatas L.(Lam)l. Explants isolated from SE-derived sweet potato plants were compared with control (non SE-derived) plants for their competency for SE production. Leaf explants were cultured on Murashige-Skoog (MS) medium with 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (0.2 mg/L) and 6-benzylaminopurine (2.5 mg/L) for 2 weeks in darkness and transferred to MS medium with abscisic acid (2.5 Explants isolated from those plants developed through somatic embryo-genesis produced new somatic embryos rapidly and in higher frequency than those isolated from control plants. They also appeared to grow faster in tissue culture than the control plants. Current studies in the laboratory are examining whether plants derived from a cyclical embryogenesis system (five cycles) would have any further positive impact on the rapidity and frequency of somatic embryo development. More detailed studies using electron microscopy are expected to show the point of origin of the embryos and to allow determination of their quality throughout the cyclical process. This study may facilitate improved plant micropropagation, gene transfer and germplasm conservation in sweet potato.

  7. Studies for Somatic Embryogenesis in Sweet Potato

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, J. Rasheed; Prakash, C. S.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to improve the somatic embryo (SE) system for plant production of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L(Lam)). Explants isolated from SE-derived sweet potato plants were compared with control (non SE-derived) plants for their competency for SE production. Leaf explants were cultured on Murashige-Skoog (MS) medium with 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (0.2 mg/L) and 6-benzylaminopurine (2.5 mg/L) for 2 weeks in darkness and transferred to MS medium with abscisic acid (2.5 mg/L). Explants isolated from those plants developed through somatic embryogenesis produced new somatic embryos rapidly and in higher frequency than those isolated from control plants They also appeared to grow faster in tissue culture than the control plants. Current studies in the laboratory are examining whether plants derived from a cyclical embryogenesis system (five cycles) would have any further positive impact on the rapidity and frequency of somatic embryo development. More detailed studies using electron microscopy are expected to show the point of origin of the embryos and to allow determination of their quality throughout the cyclical process. This study may facilitate improved plant micropropagation, gene transfer and germplasm conservation in sweet potato.

  8. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Critical Function of Sucrose Metabolism Related-Enzymes in Starch Accumulation in the Storage Root of Sweet Potato.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kai; Wu, Zhengdan; Tang, Daobin; Luo, Kai; Lu, Huixiang; Liu, Yingying; Dong, Jie; Wang, Xin; Lv, Changwen; Wang, Jichun; Lu, Kun

    2017-01-01

    The starch properties of the storage root (SR) affect the quality of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.). Although numerous studies have analyzed the accumulation and properties of starch in sweet potato SRs, the transcriptomic variation associated with starch properties in SR has not been quantified. In this study, we measured the starch and sugar contents and analyzed the transcriptome profiles of SRs harvested from sweet potatoes with high, medium, and extremely low starch contents, at five developmental stages [65, 80, 95, 110, and 125 days after transplanting (DAP)]. We found that differences in both water content and starch accumulation in the dry matter affect the starch content of SRs in different sweet potato genotypes. Based on transcriptome sequencing data, we assembled 112336 unigenes, and identified several differentially expressed genes (DEGs) involved in starch and sucrose metabolism, and revealed the transcriptional regulatory network controlling starch and sucrose metabolism in sweet potato SRs. Correlation analysis between expression patterns and starch and sugar contents suggested that the sugar-starch conversion steps catalyzed by sucrose synthase (SuSy) and UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (UGPase) may be essential for starch accumulation in the dry matter of SRs, and IbβFRUCT2, a vacuolar acid invertase, might also be a key regulator of starch content in the SRs. Our results provide valuable resources for future investigations aimed at deciphering the molecular mechanisms determining the starch properties of sweet potato SRs.

  9. Amperometric biosensor for the determination of phenols using a crude extract of sweet potato

    SciTech Connect

    Cruz Vieira, I. da; Fatibello-Filho, O.

    1997-03-01

    An amperometric biosensor for the determination of phenols is proposed using a crude extract of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.) as an enzymatic source of polyphenol oxidase (PPO; tyrosinase; catechol oxidase; EC 1.14.18.1). The biosensor is constructed by the immobilization of sweet potato crude extract with glutaraldehyde and bovine serum albumin onto an oxygen membrane. This biosensor provides a linear response for catechol, pyrogallol, phenol and p-cresol in the concentration ranges of 2.0 x 10{sup -5} -4.3 x 10{sup -4} mol L{sup -1}, 2.0 x 10{sup -5} -4.3 x 10{sup -4} mol L{sup -1}, 2.0 x 10{sup -5} -4.5 x 10{sup -4} mol L{sup -1} and 2.0 x 10{sup -5} -4.5 x 10{sup -4} mol L{sup -1}, respectively. The response time was about 3-5 min for the useful response range, and the lifetime of this electrode was excellent for fifteen days (over 220 determinations for each enzymatic membrane). Application of this biosensor for the determination of phenols in industrial wastewaters is presented.

  10. Food processing methods influence the glycaemic indices of some commonly eaten West Indian carbohydrate-rich foods.

    PubMed

    Bahado-Singh, P S; Wheatley, A O; Ahmad, M H; Morrison, E Y St A; Asemota, H N

    2006-09-01

    Glycaemic index (GI) values for fourteen commonly eaten carbohydrate-rich foods processed by various methods were determined using ten healthy subjects. The foods studied were round leaf yellow yam (Dioscorea cayenensis), negro and lucea yams (Dioscorea rotundata), white and sweet yams (Dioscorea alata), sweet potato (Solanum tuberosum), Irish potato (Ipomoea batatas), coco yam (Xanthosoma spp.), dasheen (Colocasia esculenta), pumpkin (Cucurbita moschata), breadfruit (Artocarpus altilis), green banana (Musa sapientum), and green and ripe plantain (Musa paradisiaca). The foods were processed by boiling, frying, baking and roasting where applicable. Pure glucose was used as the standard with a GI value of 100. The results revealed marked differences in GI among the different foods studied ranging from 35 (se 3) to 94 (se 8). The area under the glucose response curve and GI value of some of the roasted and baked foods were significantly higher than foods boiled or fried (P<0.05). The results indicate that foods processed by roasting or baking may result in higher GI. Conversely, boiling of foods may contribute to a lower GI diet.

  11. Signal transduction and regulation of IbpreproHypSys in sweet potato.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-Chi; Wan, Wei-Lin; Lin, Jeng-Shane; Kuo, Yun-Wei; King, Yu-Chi; Chen, Yu-Chi; Jeng, Shih-Tong

    2016-07-01

    Hydroxyproline-rich glycopeptides (HypSys) are small signalling peptides containing 18-20 amino acids. The expression of IbpreproHypSys, encoding the precursor of IbHypSys, was induced in sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas cv. Tainung 57) through wounding and IbHypSys treatments by using jasmonate and H2 O2 . Transgenic sweet potatoes overexpressing (OE) and silencing [RNA interference (RNAi)] IbpreproHypSys were created. The expression of the wound-inducible gene for ipomoelin (IPO) in the local and systemic leaves of OE plants was stronger than the expression in wild-type (WT) and RNAi plants after wounding. Furthermore, grafting experiments indicated that IPO expression was considerably higher in WT stocks receiving wounding signals from OE than from RNAi scions. However, wounding WT scions highly induced IPO expression in OE stocks. These results indicated that IbpreproHypSys expression contributed towards sending and receiving the systemic signals that induced IPO expression. Analysing the genes involved in the phenylpropanoid pathway demonstrated that lignin biosynthesis was activated after synthetic IbHypSys treatment. IbpreproHypSys expression in sweet potato suppressed Spodoptera litura growth. In conclusion, wounding induced the expression of IbpreproHypSys, whose protein product was processed into IbHypSys. IbHypSys stimulated IbpreproHypSys and IPO expression and enhanced lignin biosynthesis, thus protecting plants from insects. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Nitrogen recycling during phenylpropanoid metabolism in sweet potato tubers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, S.; Lewis, N. G.; Towers, G. H.

    1998-01-01

    In the first step of the phenylpropanoid metabolic pathway, L-phenylalanine (L-Phe) is deaminated to form E-cinnamate, in a conversion catalyzed by phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL; EC 4.3.1.5). The metabolic fate of the ammonium ion (NH4+) produced in this reaction was investigated in sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) tuber discs. [15N]-Labeled substrates including L-Phe, in the presence or absence of specific enzyme inhibitors, were administered to sweet potato discs in light under aseptic conditions. 15N-Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic analyses revealed that the 15NH4+ liberated during the PAL reaction is first incorporated into the amide nitrogen of L-glutamine (L-Gln) and then into L-glutamate (L-Glu). These results extend our previous observations in pine and potato that PAL-generated NH4+ is assimilated by the glutamine synthetase (GS; EC 6.3.1.2)/glutamate synthase (GOGAT; EC 1.4.1.13) pathway, with the NH4+ so formed ultimately being recycled back to L-Phe via L-Glu as aminoreceptor and donor.

  13. Inactivation of trypsin inhibitors in sweet potato and taro tubers during processing.

    PubMed

    Kiran, K Sasi; Padmaja, G

    2003-01-01

    In order to understand the extent of elimination of trypsin inhibitors during processing of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) and taro (Colocasia esculenta) tubers, a detailed study was conducted using tubers processed by oven drying, cooking, and microwave baking. Between 80 and 90% trypsin inhibitor (TI) activity was retained in sweet potato chips up to 2h at 70 degrees C. Among the four cultivars of sweet potatoes, RS-III-2 trypsin inhibitors were more heat labile. Heating at 100 degrees C led to rapid inactivation of TI of sweet potatoes. Varietal differences in thermal stability were more pronounced for the trypsin inhibitors of taro than sweet potatoes. Taro inhibitors were also more rapidly inactivated than sweet potato TI. Between 17 and 31% TI activity was retained in cooked tuber pieces of sweet potatoes, while only 3-10% were retained in taro cultivars. Very effective inactivation of trypsin inhibitors of sweet potatoes and taro could be obtained through microwave baking. Flour prepared from taro was devoid of TI activity, while 5-12% TI activity was retained in the flour prepared from sweet potatoes. The study clearly established that among the four techniques used, microwave baking and flour preparation were the best methods to eliminate TI from sweet potatoes and taro.

  14. In vitro availability of some essential minerals in commonly eaten processed and unprocessed Caribbean tuber crops.

    PubMed

    Dilworth, Lowell L; Omoruyi, Felix O; Asemota, Helen N

    2007-02-01

    The levels of three essential minerals Ca, Fe and Mg and the extent of their availability were assessed in four commonly eaten Caribbean tuber crops [dasheen (Xanthosoma spp.), Irish potato (Solanum tuberosum), sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) and yellow yam (Dioscorea cayenensis)] in their processed and unprocessed states. Calcium was highest in cooked dasheen (5150+/-50 mg/kg) while Magnesium was highest in uncooked Irish potato (3600+/-200 mg/kg). There was no significant loss of calcium from the food samples upon cooking. All the uncooked food samples displayed higher levels minerals assessed compared to the cooked samples except for cooked Irish potato that recorded the level of iron (182.25+/-8.75 mg/kg). Availability of these minerals in the cooked and uncooked tubers crops upon digestion also showed a similar pattern. In conclusion, the consumption of these tuber crops in the Caribbean may not be responsible for the reported cases of iron deficiency in the region. However, the availability of minerals from these tuber crops when consumed with other foods (the usual practice in the Caribbean) needs further investigation.

  15. Effects of CO[sub 2] enrichment and nitrogen fertilization on leaf gas exchange and yield of field-grown sweet potatoes

    SciTech Connect

    Hileman, D.R.; Strachan, R.; Alemayehu, M.; Huluka, G.; Moore, J.; Biswas, P.K. )

    1993-06-01

    Sweet potatoes (Ipomoea batatas L.) were grown in the field in open-top chambers at two levels of CO[sub 2] (ambient and 300 [mu]L L[sup [minus]1] above ambient) and two levels of nitrogen fertilization. Leaf gas exchange rates were determined during midday hours under sunny conditions. CO[sub 2] enrichment led to an increase of 48% in net photosynthetic rates and to decreases of 15% and 29% in leaf transpiration and stomatal conductance. The nitrogen treatment had no significant effects on leaf gas exchange, The number of storage roots and total storage root fresh weight increased 33% and 38%, respectively, at elevated CO[sub 2]. There was a non-significant trend towards larger storage roots at high nitrogen levels. The lack of significant effects due to the nitrogen treatment (except for a positive effect on leaf size) may indicate that nitrogen was not limiting, Elemental analysis of plant and soil samples, currently in progress, will help clarify this situation.

  16. Molecular characterization and an infectious clone construction of sweet potato leaf curl virus (SPLCV) isolated from Korea.

    PubMed

    Choi, E; Lee, G; Park, J; Lee, T K; Choi, H S; Lee, S

    2012-01-01

    Sweet potato leaf curl disease (SPLCD) was primarily identified in sweet potato fields in Korea in 2003, and the complete genomic sequence of sweet potato leaf curl virus (SPLCV) has been cloned. The genome of the Korean SPLCV isolate (SPLCV-KR) comprises 2,828 nucleotides with six open reading frames in DNA-A, similar to a monopartite begomovirus. Additionally, neither the genome B genomic component nor the DNA beta sequence was detected. The results of phylogenetic analysis using the maximum parsimony method showed that SPLCV-KR is more closely related to SPLCV-US (US) than SPLCV-CN (China) and SPLCV-JP (Japan). A tandem repeat dimer of SPLCV-KR was cloned and found to be infectious in sweet potatoes (Ipomoea batatas) via biolistic inoculation. The SPLCV-infected sweet potatoes exhibited mild leaf curl symptoms of SPLCD, and the newly-replicated viral DNA was detected via Southern blot analysis. Results of biotic, molecular, and phylogenetic characterization suggest that SPLCV-KR is a new strain of SPLCV and is importantly placed in the evolutionary progression from curtoviruses to begomoviruses. sweet potato leaf curl virus; sweet potato leaf curl disease; phylogenetic analysis; infectious clone; biolistic infection.

  17. Control of sweet potato virus diseases.

    PubMed

    Loebenstein, Gad

    2015-01-01

    Sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) is ranked seventh in global food crop production and is the third most important root crop after potato and cassava. Sweet potatoes are vegetative propagated from vines, root slips (sprouts), or tubers. Therefore, virus diseases can be a major constrain, reducing yields markedly, often more than 50%. The main viruses worldwide are Sweet potato feathery mottle virus (SPFMV) and Sweet potato chlorotic stunt virus (SPCSV). Effects on yields by SPFMV or SPCSV alone are minor, or but in complex infection by the two or other viruses yield losses of 50%. The orthodox way of controlling viruses in vegetative propagated crops is by supplying the growers with virus-tested planting material. High-yielding plants are tested for freedom of viruses by PCR, serology, and grafting to sweet potato virus indicator plants. After this, meristem tips are taken from those plants that reacted negative. The meristems were grown into plants which were kept under insect-proof conditions and away from other sweet potato material for distribution to farmers after another cycle of reproduction. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Feeding outside the forest: the importance of crop raiding and an invasive weed in the diet of gallery forest ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta) following a cyclone at the Beza Mahafaly special reserve, Madagascar.

    PubMed

    LaFleur, M; Gould, L

    2009-01-01

    In January 2005, a cyclone hit southern Madagascar, including the Beza Mahafaly Special Reserve, disrupting the flowering/fruiting cycle of Tamarindus indica, leaving Lemur catta without its major food resource during reproductive periods. We studied two adjacent groups of L. catta during the late gestation period, and both groups ventured outside the reserve to feed. The Red group (RG) fed daily on cultivated sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) leaves in a nearby field, and both groups consumed leaves and stems of the invasive terrestrial flowering herb Mexican prickly poppy (Argemone mexicana), growing outside the reserve. The Green group (GG) spent significantly more time feeding than did RG, and more time feeding inside the forest compared to outside. The members of RG spent half of their time feeding in the crops, and nearly half of their diet consisted of easy-to-process sweet potato leaves. Additionally, RG defended and restricted GG's access to the crop territory. Of the two non-forest foods, A. mexicana leaves were higher in protein and most minerals (P, Mg, K and Na, but not Ca) and lower in fiber than sweet potato leaves, but sweet potato leaves were preferred by RG. L. catta is a markedly flexible primate with respect to diet, and switches to fallback foods from outside the forest during periods of low food availability. In the highly seasonal and unpredictable climate of southern Madagascar, such behavioral adaptations are important to the survival of this species.

  19. Botanical origin of dietary supplements labeled as "Kwao Keur", a folk medicine from Thailand.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Takuro; Kawamura, Maiko; Kikura-Hanajiri, Ruri; Goda, Yukihiro

    2014-01-01

    In the course of our study on the quality of dietary supplements in Japan, both the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequence of nrDNA and the rps16 intron sequence of cpDNA of products labeled as "Kwao Keur" were investigated. As a result, the DNA sequence of Pueraria candollei var. mirifica, which is the source plant of Kwao Keur, was observed in only about half of the products. Inferred from the determined sequences, source plants in the other products included Medicago sativa, Glycyrrhiza uralensis, Pachyrhizus erosus, and Ipomoea batatas, etc. These inferior products are estimated to lack the efficacy implied by their labeling. In order to guarantee the quality of dietary supplements, it is important to identify the source materials exactly; in addition, an infrastructure that can exclude these inferior products from the market is needed for the protection of consumers from potential damage to their health and finances. The DNA analysis performed in this study is useful for this purpose.

  20. Selenium Accumulating Leafy Vegetables Are a Potential Source of Functional Foods.

    PubMed

    Mabeyo, Petro E; Manoko, Mkabwa L K; Gruhonjic, Amra; Fitzpatrick, Paul A; Landberg, Göran; Erdélyi, Máté; Nyandoro, Stephen S

    2015-01-01

    Selenium deficiency in humans has been associated with various diseases, the risks of which can be reduced through dietary supplementation. Selenium accumulating plants may provide a beneficial nutrient for avoiding such illnesses. Thus, leafy vegetables such as Amaranthus hybridus, Amaranthus sp., Cucurbita maxima, Ipomoea batatas, Solanum villosum, Solanum scabrum, and Vigna unguiculata were explored for their capabilities to accumulate selenium when grown on selenium enriched soil and for use as a potential source of selenium enriched functional foods. Their selenium contents were determined by spectrophotometry using the complex of 3,3'-diaminobenzidine hydrochloride (DABH) as a chromogen. The mean concentrations in the leaves were found to range from 7.90 ± 0.40 to 1.95 ± 0.12 μg/g dry weight (DW), with C. maxima accumulating the most selenium. In stems, the accumulated selenium content ranged from 1.12 ± 0.10 μg/g in Amaranthus sp. to 5.35 ± 0.78 μg/g DW in C. maxima and was hence significantly different (P < 0.01). The cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 was used in cytotoxicity assays to determine the anticancer potential of these extracts. With exception of S. scabrum and S. villosum, no cytotoxicity was detected for the selenium enriched vegetable extracts up to 100 μg/mL concentration. Hence, following careful evaluation the studied vegetables may be considered as selenium enriched functional foods.

  1. A novel α/β-hydrolase gene IbMas enhances salt tolerance in transgenic sweetpotato.

    PubMed

    Liu, Degao; Wang, Lianjun; Zhai, Hong; Song, Xuejin; He, Shaozhen; Liu, Qingchang

    2014-01-01

    Salt stress is one of the major environmental stresses in agriculture worldwide and affects crop productivity and quality. The development of crops with elevated levels of salt tolerance is therefore highly desirable. In the present study, a novel maspardin gene, named IbMas, was isolated from salt-tolerant sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.) line ND98. IbMas contains maspardin domain and belongs to α/β-hydrolase superfamily. Expression of IbMas was up-regulated in sweetpotato under salt stress and ABA treatment. The IbMas-overexpressing sweetpotato (cv. Shangshu 19) plants exhibited significantly higher salt tolerance compared with the wild-type. Proline content was significantly increased, whereas malonaldehyde content was significantly decreased in the transgenic plants. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and photosynthesis were significantly enhanced in the transgenic plants. H2O2 was also found to be significantly less accumulated in the transgenic plants than in the wild-type. Overexpression of IbMas up-regulated the salt stress responsive genes, including pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthase, pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase, SOD, psbA and phosphoribulokinase genes, under salt stress. These findings suggest that overexpression of IbMas enhances salt tolerance of the transgenic sweetpotato plants by regulating osmotic balance, protecting membrane integrity and photosynthesis and increasing reactive oxygen species scavenging capacity.

  2. Elimination of two viruses which interact synergistically from sweetpotato by shoot tip culture and cryotherapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Q C; Valkonen, J P T

    2008-12-01

    Sweet potato chlorotic stunt virus (SPCSV; Closteroviridae) and Sweet potato feathery mottle virus (SPFMV; Potyviridae) interact synergistically and cause severe diseases in co-infected sweetpotato plants (Ipomoea batatas). Sweetpotato is propagated vegetatively and virus-free planting materials are pivotal for sustainable production. Using cryotherapy, SPCSV and SPCSV were eliminated from all treated single-virus-infected and co-infected shoot tips irrespective of size (0.5-1.5mm including 2-4 leaf primordia). While shoot tip culture also eliminated SPCSV, elimination of SPFMV failed in 90-93% of the largest shoot tips (1.5mm) using this technique. Virus distribution to different leaf primordia and tissues within leaf primordia in the shoot apex and petioles was not altered by co-infection of the viruses in the fully virus-susceptible sweetpotato genotype used. SPFMV was immunolocalized to all types of tissues and up to the fourth-youngest leaf primordium. In contrast, SPCSV was detected only in the phloem and up to the fifth leaf primordium. Because only cells in the apical dome of the meristem and the two first leaf primordia survived cryotherapy, all data taken together could explain the results of virus elimination. The simple and efficient cryotherapy protocol developed for virus elimination can also be used for preparation of sweetpotato materials for long-term preservation.

  3. Orange protein has a role in phytoene synthase stabilization in sweetpotato

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seyeon; Kim, Ho Soo; Jung, Young Jun; Kim, Sun Ha; Ji, Chang Yoon; Wang, Zhi; Jeong, Jae Cheol; Lee, Haeng-Soon; Lee, Sang Yeol; Kwak, Sang-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids have essential roles in light-harvesting processes and protecting the photosynthetic machinery from photo-oxidative damage. Phytoene synthase (PSY) and Orange (Or) are key plant proteins for carotenoid biosynthesis and accumulation. We previously isolated the sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas) Or gene (IbOr), which is involved in carotenoid accumulation and salt stress tolerance. The molecular mechanism underlying IbOr regulation of carotenoid accumulation was unknown. Here, we show that IbOr has an essential role in regulating IbPSY stability via its holdase chaperone activity both in vitro and in vivo. This protection results in carotenoid accumulation and abiotic stress tolerance. IbOr transcript levels increase in sweetpotato stem, root, and calli after exposure to heat stress. IbOr is localized in the nucleus and chloroplasts, but interacts with IbPSY only in chloroplasts. After exposure to heat stress, IbOr predominantly localizes in chloroplasts. IbOr overexpression in transgenic sweetpotato and Arabidopsis conferred enhanced tolerance to heat and oxidative stress. These results indicate that IbOr holdase chaperone activity protects IbPSY stability, which leads to carotenoid accumulation, and confers enhanced heat and oxidative stress tolerance in plants. This study provides evidence that IbOr functions as a molecular chaperone, and suggests a novel mechanism regulating carotenoid accumulation and stress tolerance in plants. PMID:27633588

  4. Triterpene saponin hemi-biosynthesis of a leaf beetle's (Platyphora kollari) defensive secretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghostin, Jean; Habib-Jiwan, Jean-Louis; Rozenberg, Raoul; Daloze, Désiré; Pasteels, Jacques M.; Braekman, Jean-Claude

    2007-07-01

    The adults of the leaf beetle Platyphora kollari (Chrysomelidae) are able to metabolise the oleanane triterpene β-amyrin (1) into the glycoside 3-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-β-d-glucuronopyranosyl-hederagenin (2) that is stored in their defensive glands. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that oleanolic acid (3) is an intermediate in the conversion of 1 into 2 and to check whether the sequestration of pentacyclic triterpenes is selective in favour of β-amyrin (1). To this end, adults of P. kollari were fed with Ipomoea batatas leaf disks painted with a solution of [2,2,3-2H3]oleanolic acid or [2,2,3-2H3]α-amyrin and the secretion of their defensive glands analysed by HPLC ESIMS. The data presented in this work indicated that the first step of the transformation of β-amyrin (1) into the sequestered glycoside 2 is its oxidation into oleanolic acid (3) and that this conversion is selective but not specific in favour of β-amyrin (1).

  5. Sweet potato resistance to Euscepes postfasciatus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae): larval performance adversely effected by adult's preference to tuber for food and oviposition.

    PubMed

    Okada, Y; Yasuda, K; Sakai, T; Ichinose, K

    2014-08-01

    The preferences of the West Indian sweet potato weevil, Euscepes postfasciatus (Fairmaire), to tubers of sweet potato, Ipomoea batatas (L.), for food and for oviposition were evaluated, and correlated to sweet potato's resistance to immatures. Adults (parent) were released in a plastic box containing tubers of sweet potato cultivars and maintained for 5 d, after which the adults on each tuber were counted. All adults were then removed and each tuber was maintained separately. New adults that emerged from the tubers were counted. Cultivars were grouped by cluster analyses using the number of parent adults on the tubers and the number of new adults emerging from the tubers, adjusted for the weight of each tuber. Cultivars were divided into five groups: average level of preference, preferred, preferred for oviposition but not for food, preferred for food but not for oviposition, and not preferred. New adults from the first two groups took less time to eclose than those from the other groups, and their body size was smaller. In a second experiment, one to five cultivars were selected from each group and inoculated each tuber with 10 weevil eggs on each cultivar. Although the proportion of eclosed adults was not significantly different between cultivars, the time to eclosion was shorter and body size was smaller on preferred cultivars. The selection of tubers by parent adults was not linearly related with larval development, and did not reduce the survival of the immatures.

  6. A Novel α/β-Hydrolase Gene IbMas Enhances Salt Tolerance in Transgenic Sweetpotato

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xuejin; He, Shaozhen; Liu, Qingchang

    2014-01-01

    Salt stress is one of the major environmental stresses in agriculture worldwide and affects crop productivity and quality. The development of crops with elevated levels of salt tolerance is therefore highly desirable. In the present study, a novel maspardin gene, named IbMas, was isolated from salt-tolerant sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.) line ND98. IbMas contains maspardin domain and belongs to α/β-hydrolase superfamily. Expression of IbMas was up-regulated in sweetpotato under salt stress and ABA treatment. The IbMas-overexpressing sweetpotato (cv. Shangshu 19) plants exhibited significantly higher salt tolerance compared with the wild-type. Proline content was significantly increased, whereas malonaldehyde content was significantly decreased in the transgenic plants. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and photosynthesis were significantly enhanced in the transgenic plants. H2O2 was also found to be significantly less accumulated in the transgenic plants than in the wild-type. Overexpression of IbMas up-regulated the salt stress responsive genes, including pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthase, pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase, SOD, psbA and phosphoribulokinase genes, under salt stress. These findings suggest that overexpression of IbMas enhances salt tolerance of the transgenic sweetpotato plants by regulating osmotic balance, protecting membrane integrity and photosynthesis and increasing reactive oxygen species scavenging capacity. PMID:25501819

  7. Analytical optimization of a phenolic-rich herbal extract and supplementation in fermented milk containing sweet potato pulp.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Lorena Rodrigues; Santos, Jânio Sousa; Daguer, Heitor; Valese, Andressa Camargo; Cruz, Adriano Gomes; Granato, Daniel

    2017-04-15

    The aims of the present study were to optimize and characterize the phenolic composition of a herbal extract composed of green mate (Ilex paraguariensis), clove (Syzygium aromaticum), and lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus) and to propose the addition of this polyphenol-rich extract to fermented milks (FM) with/without sweet potato pulp (Ipomoea batatas). Proximate composition, pH, acidity, instrumental texture profile, total phenolic content (TPC), antioxidant activity (AA) of all formulations were measured, and sensory attributes were also investigated. The addition of a lyophilized extract (1g 100g(-1)) containing 87.5% clove and 12.5% green mate increased the AA and TPC, while FM with added sweet potato pulp had the best sensory acceptance. The TPC and total reducing capacity had a slight change during 21days of storage. The data showed that herbal extracts and sweet potato pulp may be used to develop new dairy foods with potential functional properties. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Species or Genotypes? Reassessment of Four Recently Described Species of the Ceratocystis Wilt Pathogen, Ceratocystis fimbriata, on Mangifera indica.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Leonardo S S; Harrington, Thomas C; Ferreira, Maria A; Damacena, Michelle B; Al-Sadi, Abdullah M; Al-Mahmooli, Issa H S; Alfenas, Acelino C

    2015-09-01

    Ceratocystis wilt is among the most important diseases on mango (Mangifera indica) in Brazil, Oman, and Pakistan. The causal agent was originally identified in Brazil as Ceratocystis fimbriata, which is considered by some as a complex of many cryptic species, and four new species on mango trees were distinguished from C. fimbriata based on variation in internal transcribed spacer sequences. In the present study, phylogenetic analyses using DNA sequences of mating type genes, TEF-1α, and β-tubulin failed to identify lineages corresponding to the four new species names. Further, mating experiments found that the mango isolates representing the new species were interfertile with each other and a tester strain from sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas), on which the name C. fimbriata is based, and there was little morphological variation among the mango isolates. Microsatellite markers found substantial differentiation among mango isolates at the regional and population levels, but certain microsatellite genotypes were commonly found in multiple populations, suggesting that these genotypes had been disseminated in infected nursery stock. The most common microsatellite genotypes corresponded to the four recently named species (C. manginecans, C. acaciivora, C. mangicola, and C. mangivora), which are considered synonyms of C. fimbriata. This study points to the potential problems of naming new species based on introduced genotypes of a pathogen, the value of an understanding of natural variation within and among populations, and the importance of phenotype in delimiting species.

  9. Luminol-hydrogen peroxide chemiluminescence produced by sweet potato peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Alpeeva, Inna S; Yu Sakharov, Ivan

    2007-01-01

    Anionic sweet potato peroxidase (SPP; Ipomoea batatas) was shown to efficiently catalyse luminol oxidation by hydrogen peroxide, forming a long-term chemiluminescence (CL) signal. Like other anionic plant peroxidases, SPP is able to catalyse this enzymatic reaction efficiently in the absence of any enhancer. Maximum intensity produced in SPP-catalysed oxidation of luminol was detected at pH 7.8-7.9 to be lower than that characteristic of other peroxidases (8.4-8.6). Varying the concentrations of luminol, hydrogen peroxide and Tris buffer in the reaction medium, we determined favourable conditions for SPP catalysis (100 mmol/L Tris-HCl buffer, pH 7.8, containing 5 mmol/L hydrogen peroxide and 8 mmol/L luminol). The SPP detection limit in luminol oxidation was 1.0 x 10(-14) mol/L. High sensitivity in combination with the long-term CL signal and high stability is indicative of good promise for the application of SPP in CL enzyme immunoassay.

  10. Development of a beverage benchtop prototype based on sweet potato peels: optimization of antioxidant activity by a mixture design.

    PubMed

    Anastácio, Ana; Carvalho, Isabel Saraiva de

    2015-08-01

    A beverage benchtop prototype related to oxidative stress protection was developed based on sweet potato peels phenolics. Formula components were sweet potato peel (Ipomoeas batatas L.) aqueous extract (SPPE), sweet potato leaves water extract (SPLE) and honey solution (HonS). According to linear squares regression (LSR) models, SPLE presented higher additive effect on total phenolic content (TPC), FRAP and DPPH than the other components. All antagonist interactions were not significant. The optimum formula obtained by artificial neural networks (ANN) analysis was 50.0% of SPPE, 21.5% of SPLE and 28.5% of HonS. Predicted responses of TPC, FRAP, DPPH and soluble solids were 309 mg GAE/L, 476 mg TE/L, 1098 mg TE/L and 12.3 °Brix, respectively. Optimization with LSR models was similar to ANN. Beverage prototype results positioned next to commercial vegetable and fruit beverages, thus it has an interesting potential to the market of health and wellness.

  11. Production of α-1,4-glucosidase from Bacillus licheniformis KIBGE-IB4 by utilizing sweet potato peel.

    PubMed

    Nawaz, Muhammad Asif; Bibi, Zainab; Karim, Asad; Rehman, Haneef Ur; Jamal, Muhsin; Jan, Tour; Aman, Afsheen; Qader, Shah Ali Ul

    2017-02-01

    In the current study, sweet potato peel (Ipomoea batatas) was observed as the most favorable substrate for the maximum synthesis of α-1,4-glucosidase among various agro-industrial residues. Bacillus licheniformis KIBGE-IB4 produced 6533.0 U ml(-1) of α-1,4-glucosidase when growth medium was supplemented with 1% dried and crushed sweet potato peel. It was evident from the results that bacterial isolate secreted 6539.0 U ml(-1) of α-1,4-glucosidase in the presence of 0.4% peptone and meat extract with 0.1% yeast extract. B. licheniformis KIBGE-IB4 released 6739.0 and 7190.0 U ml(-1) of enzyme at 40 °C and pH 7.0, respectively. An improved and cost-effective growth medium design resulted 8590.0 U ml(-1) of α-1,4-glucosidase with 1.3-fold increase as compared to initial amount from B. licheniformis KIBGE-IB4. This enzyme can be used to fulfill the accelerating demand of food and pharmaceutical industries. Further purification and immobilization of this enzyme can also enhance its utility for various commercial applications. Graphical abstract Pictorial representation of maltase production from sweet potato peel.

  12. Phenolic composition and radical scavenging activity of sweetpotato-derived shochu distillery by-products treated with koji.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Makoto; Kurata-Azuma, Rie; Fujii, Makoto; Hou, De-Xing; Ikeda, Kohji; Yoshidome, Tomohisa; Osako, Miho

    2004-12-01

    Phenolic composition and radical scavenging activity in the shochu distillery by-products of sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas L.) treated with koji (Aspergillus awamori mut.) and cellulase (Cellulosin T2) were investigated to develop new uses. Koji and Cellulosin T2 treatment of shochu distillery by-products from sweetpotatoes, rice, and barley increased phenolic content. Caffeic acid was identified as a dominant phenolic component in the shochu distillery by-products of the sweetpotato. Adding koji and/or Cellulosin T2 to the shochu distillery by-product indicated that koji was involved in caffeic acid production. Caffeic acid was not detected in raw or steamed roots of "Koganesengan", the material of sweetpotato for shochu production, suggesting that it is produced during shochu fermentation. The phenolic content and radical scavenging activity the shochu distillery by-product treated with koji and Cellulosin T2 were superior to those of commercial vinegar. These results suggest that koji treatment of sweetpotato-derived shochu distillery by-products has potential for food materials with physiological functions. Further koji treatment of sweetpotato shochu-distillery by-products may be applicable to mass production of caffeic acid.

  13. Cytokinin-dependent secondary growth determines root biomass in radish (Raphanus sativus L.)

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Geupil; Lee, Jung-Hun; Rastogi, Khushboo; Park, Suhyoung; Oh, Sang-Hun; Lee, Ji-Young

    2015-01-01

    The root serves as an essential organ in plant growth by taking up nutrients and water from the soil and supporting the rest of the plant body. Some plant species utilize roots as storage organs. Sweet potatoes (Ipomoea batatas), cassava (Manihot esculenta), and radish (Raphanus sativus), for example, are important root crops. However, how their root growth is regulated remains unknown. In this study, we characterized the relationship between cambium and radial root growth in radish. Through a comparative analysis with Arabidopsis root expression data, we identified putative cambium-enriched transcription factors in radish and analysed their expression in representative inbred lines featuring distinctive radial growth. We found that cell proliferation activities in the cambium positively correlated with radial growth and final yields of radish roots. Expression analysis of candidate transcription factor genes revealed that some genes are differentially expressed between inbred lines and that the difference is due to the distinct cytokinin response. Taken together, we have demonstrated for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, that cytokinin-dependent radial growth plays a key role in the yields of root crops. PMID:25979997

  14. Assessment of the potential health risks associated with the aluminium, arsenic, cadmium and lead content in selected fruits and vegetables grown in Jamaica.

    PubMed

    Antoine, Johann M R; Fung, Leslie A Hoo; Grant, Charles N

    2017-01-01

    Thirteen Jamaican-grown food crops - ackee (Blighia sapida), banana (Musa acuminate), cabbage (Brassica oleracea), carrot (Daucus carota), cassava (Manihot esculenta), coco (Xanthosoma sagittifolium), dasheen (Colocasia esculenta), Irish potato (Solanum tuberosum), pumpkin (Cucurbita pepo), sweet pepper (Capsicum annuum), sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas), tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) and turnip (Brassica rapa) - were analysed for aluminium, arsenic, cadmium and lead by atomic absorption spectrophotometry and instrumental neutron activation analysis. The fresh weight mean concentrations in these food crops (4.25-93.12 mg/kg for aluminium; 0.001-0.104 mg/kg for arsenic; 0.015-0.420 mg/kg for cadmium; 0.003-0.100 mg/kg for lead) were used to calculate the estimated daily intake (EDI), target hazard quotient (THQ), hazard index (HI) and target cancer risk (TCR) for arsenic, associated with dietary exposure to these potentially toxic elements. Each food type had a THQ and HI < 1 indicating no undue non-carcinogenic risk from exposure to a single or multiple potentially toxic elements from the same food. The TCR for arsenic in these foods were all below 1 × 10(-4), the upper limit used for acceptable cancer risk. There is no significant health risk to the consumer associated with the consumption of these Jamaican-grown food crops.

  15. Antioxidant Activity in Extracts of 27 Indigenous Taiwanese Vegetables

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Pi-Yu; Lin, Su-Yi; Lin, Kuan-Hung; Liu, Yu-Fen; Hsu, Ju-Ing; Yang, Chi-Ming; Lai, Jun-You

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to identify the antioxidants and antioxidant axtivity in 27 of Taiwan’s indigenous vegetables. Lycium chinense (Lc), Lactuca indica (Li), and Perilla ocymoides (Po) contained abundant quercetin (Que), while Artemisia lactiflora (Al) and Gynura bicolor (Gb) were rich in morin and kaempferol, respectively. Additionally, Nymphoides cristata (Nc) and Sechium edule (Se)-yellow had significantly higher levels of myricetin (Myr) than other tested samples. Cyanidin (Cyan) and malvidin (Mal) were abundant in Gb, Abelmoschus esculentus Moench (Abe), Po, Anisogonium esculentum (Retz.) Presl (Ane), Ipomoea batatas (Ib)-purple, and Hemerocallis fulva (Hf)-bright orange. Relatively high levels of Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC), oxygen radical absorption capacity (ORAC), and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenger were generated from extracts of Toona sinensis (Ts) and Po. Significant and positive correlations between antioxidant activity and polyphenols, anthocyanidins, Que, Myr, and morin were observed, indicating that these phytochemicals were some of the main components responsible for the antioxidant activity of tested plants. The much higher antioxidant activity of Po, Ts, and Ib (purple leaf) may be related to their higher Cyan, Que, and polyphenol content. PMID:24858497

  16. A spatial ecology study on the effects of field conditions and crop rotation on the incidence of Plectris aliena (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) grub damage to sweetpotato roots.

    PubMed

    Brill, Nancy L; Osborne, Jason; Abney, Mark R

    2013-10-01

    A farmscape study was conducted in commercial sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam) fields in Columbus County, NC, in 2010 and 2011 to investigate the effects of the following field conditions: soil drainage class, soil texture, field size, border habitat, land elevation, and the previous year's crop rotation on the incidence of damage caused by Plectris aliena Chapman (Coleoptera:Scarabaeidae) larval feeding. Soil drainage and crop rotation significantly affected the incidence of damage to roots, with well drained soils having a low estimated incidence of damaged roots (0.004) compared with all other drainage classes (0.009-0.011 incidence of damaged roots). Fields with soybeans [Glycine max (L.) Merr] planted the preceding year had the highest incidence of root damage (0.15) compared with all other crops. The effects of border habitats, which were adjacent to grower fields where roots were sampled, showed that as the location of the roots was closer to borders of soybean (planted the year before) or grass fields, the chance of damage to roots decreased. Results indicate that growers can use crop rotation as a management technique and avoid planting sweetpotatoes the year after soybeans to reduce the incidence of P. aliena larval feeding on sweetpotato roots. Environmental conditions such as fields with poor drainage and certain border habitats may be avoided, or selected, by growers to reduce risk of damage to roots by P. aliena.

  17. Construction of a linkage map based on retrotransposon insertion polymorphisms in sweetpotato via high-throughput sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Monden, Yuki; Hara, Takuya; Okada, Yoshihiro; Jahana, Osamu; Kobayashi, Akira; Tabuchi, Hiroaki; Onaga, Shoko; Tahara, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas L.) is an outcrossing hexaploid species with a large number of chromosomes (2n = 6x = 90). Although sweetpotato is one of the world’s most important crops, genetic analysis of the species has been hindered by its genetic complexity combined with the lack of a whole genome sequence. In the present study, we constructed a genetic linkage map based on retrotransposon insertion polymorphisms using a mapping population derived from a cross between ‘Purple Sweet Lord’ (PSL) and ‘90IDN-47’ cultivars. High-throughput sequencing and subsequent data analyses identified many Rtsp-1 retrotransposon insertion sites, and their allele dosages (simplex, duplex, triplex, or double-simplex) were determined based on segregation ratios in the mapping population. Using a pseudo-testcross strategy, 43 and 47 linkage groups were generated for PSL and 90IDN-47, respectively. Interestingly, most of these insertions (~90%) were present in a simplex manner, indicating their utility for linkage map construction in polyploid species. Additionally, our approach led to savings of time and labor for genotyping. Although the number of markers herein was insufficient for map-based cloning, our trial analysis exhibited the utility of retrotransposon-based markers for linkage map construction in sweetpotato. PMID:26069444

  18. Integrating biological treatment of crop residue into a hydroponic sweetpotato culture.

    PubMed

    Trotman, A A; David, P P; Bonsi, C K; Hill, W A; Mortley, D G; Loretan, P A

    1997-01-01

    Residual biomass from hydroponic culture of sweetpotato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.] was degraded using natural bacterial soil isolates. Sweetpotato was grown for 120 days in hydroponic culture with a nutrient solution comprised of a ratio of 80% modified half Hoagland solution to 20% filtered effluent from an aerobic starch hydrolysis bioreactor. The phytotoxicity of the effluent was assayed with Waldmann's Green' lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) and the ratio selected after a 60-day bioassay using sweetpotato plants propagated vegetatively from cuttings. Controlled environment chamber experiments were conducted to investigate the impact of filtrate from biological treatment of crop residue on growth and storage root production with plants grown in a modified half Hoagland solution. Incorporation of bioreactor effluent, reduced storage root yield of 'Georgia Jet' sweetpotato but the decrease was not statistically significant when compared with yield for plants cultured in a modified half Hoagland solution without filtrate. However, yield of 'TU-82-155' sweetpotato was significantly reduced when grown in a modified half Hoagland solution into which filtered effluent had been incorporated. Total biomass was significantly reduced for both sweetpotato cultivars when grown in bioreactor effluent. The leaf area and dry matter accumulation were significantly (P < 0.05) reduced for both cultivars when grown in solution culture containing 20% filtered effluent.

  19. Mycotoxicoses of ruminants and horses.

    PubMed

    Riet-Correa, Franklin; Rivero, Rodolfo; Odriozola, Ernesto; Adrien, Maria de Lourdes; Medeiros, Rosane M T; Schild, Ana Lucia

    2013-11-01

    In the current study, mycotoxicoses of ruminants and horses are reviewed, with an emphasis on the occurrence of these diseases in South America. The main mycotoxicoses observed in grazing cattle include intoxications by indole-diterpenoid mycotoxins (Paspalum spp. contaminated by Claviceps paspali, Lolium perenne infected by Neotyphodium lolii, Cynodon dactylon infected by Claviceps cynodontis, and Poa huecu), gangrenous ergotism and dysthermic syndrome (hyperthermia) caused by Festuca arundinacea (syn. Festuca elatior) infected by Neotyphodium coenophialum (syn. Acremonium coenophialum), and photosensitization in pastures contaminated by toxigenic Pithomyces chartarum. Other mycotoxicoses in grazing cattle include slaframine toxicity in clover pastures infected by Rhizoctonia leguminicola and diplodiosis in cattle grazing in corn stubbles. The mycotoxicoses caused by contaminated concentrated food or byproducts in cattle include poisoning by toxins of Aspergillus clavatus, which contaminate barley or sugar beetroot by-products, gangrenous ergotism or dysthermic syndrome caused by wheat bran or wheat screenings contaminated with Claviceps purpurea, and acute respiratory distress caused by damaged sweet potatoes (Ipomoea batatas). The main mycotoxicosis of horses is leukoencephalomalacia caused by the fumonisins B1 and B2 produced by Fusarium spp. Poisoning by C. purpurea and F. elatior infected by N. coenophialum has also been reported as a cause of agalactia and neonatal mortality in mares. Slaframine toxicosis caused by the ingestion of alfalfa hay contaminated by R. leguminicola has also been reported in horses.

  20. Colocalization of barley lectin and sporamin in vacuoles of transgenic tobacco plants

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, M.R.; Borkhsenious, O.N.; Raikhel, N.V. ); Matsuoka, K.; Nakamura, K. )

    1993-02-01

    Various targeting motifs have been identified for plant proteins delivered to the vacuole. For barley (Hordeum vulgare) lectin, a typical Gramineae lectin and defense-related protein, the vacuolar information is contained in a carboxyl-terminal propeptide. In contrast, the vacuolar targeting information of sporamin, a storage protein from the tuberous roots of the sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas), is encoded in an amino-terminal propeptide. Both proteins were expressed simultaneously in transgenic tobacco plants to enable analysis of their posttranslational processing and subcellular localization by pulse-chase labeling and electron-microscopic immunocytochemical methods. The pulse-chase experiments demonstrated that processing and delivery to the vacuole are not impaired by the simultaneous expression of barley lectin and sporamin. Both proteins were targeted quantitatively to the vacuole, indication that the carboxyl-terminal and amino-terminal propeptided are equally recognized by the vacuolar protein-sorting machinery. Double-labeling experiments showed that barley lectin and sporamin accumulate in the same vacuole of transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) leaf and root cells. 35 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Cytokinin-dependent secondary growth determines root biomass in radish (Raphanus sativus L.).

    PubMed

    Jang, Geupil; Lee, Jung-Hun; Rastogi, Khushboo; Park, Suhyoung; Oh, Sang-Hun; Lee, Ji-Young

    2015-08-01

    The root serves as an essential organ in plant growth by taking up nutrients and water from the soil and supporting the rest of the plant body. Some plant species utilize roots as storage organs. Sweet potatoes (Ipomoea batatas), cassava (Manihot esculenta), and radish (Raphanus sativus), for example, are important root crops. However, how their root growth is regulated remains unknown. In this study, we characterized the relationship between cambium and radial root growth in radish. Through a comparative analysis with Arabidopsis root expression data, we identified putative cambium-enriched transcription factors in radish and analysed their expression in representative inbred lines featuring distinctive radial growth. We found that cell proliferation activities in the cambium positively correlated with radial growth and final yields of radish roots. Expression analysis of candidate transcription factor genes revealed that some genes are differentially expressed between inbred lines and that the difference is due to the distinct cytokinin response. Taken together, we have demonstrated for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, that cytokinin-dependent radial growth plays a key role in the yields of root crops. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  2. High-throughput microarray mapping of cell wall polymers in roots and tubers during the viscosity-reducing process.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuhong; Willats, William G; Lange, Lene; Jin, Yanling; Fang, Yang; Salmeán, Armando A; Pedersen, Henriette L; Busk, Peter Kamp; Zhao, Hai

    2016-01-01

    Viscosity reduction has a great impact on the efficiency of ethanol production when using roots and tubers as feedstock. Plant cell wall-degrading enzymes have been successfully applied to overcome the challenges posed by high viscosity. However, the changes in cell wall polymers during the viscosity-reducing process are poorly characterized. Comprehensive microarray polymer profiling, which is a high-throughput microarray, was used for the first time to map changes in the cell wall polymers of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas), cassava (Manihot esculenta), and Canna edulis Ker. over the entire viscosity-reducing process. The results indicated that the composition of cell wall polymers among these three roots and tubers was markedly different. The gel-like matrix and glycoprotein network in the C. edulis Ker. cell wall caused difficulty in viscosity reduction. The obvious viscosity reduction of the sweet potato and the cassava was attributed to the degradation of homogalacturonan and the released 1,4-β-d-galactan and 1,5-α-l-arabinan.

  3. Analysis of genes developmentally regulated during storage root formation of sweet potato.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Masaru; Takahata, Yasuhiro; Nakatani, Makoto

    2005-01-01

    To identify the genes involved in storage root formation of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas), we performed a simplified differential display analysis on adventitious roots at different developmental stages of the storage root. The expression patterns were confirmed by semiquantitative RT-PCR analyses. As a result, 10 genes were identified as being developmentally regulated and were named SRF1-SRF10. The expression of SRF1, SRF2, SRF3, SRF5, SRF6, SRF7, and SRF9 increased during storage root formation, whereas the expression of SRF4, SRF8, and SRF10 decreased. For further characterization, a full-length cDNA of SRF6 was isolated from the cDNA library of the storage root. SRF6 encoded a receptor-like kinase (RLK), which was structurally similar to the leucine-rich repeat (LRR) II RLK family of Arabidopsis thaliana. RNA gel blot analysis showed that the mRNA of SRF6 was most abundantly expressed in the storage roots, although a certain amount of expression was also observed in other vegetative organs. Tissue print mRNA blot analysis of the storage root showed that the mRNA of SRF6 was localized around the primary cambium and meristems in the xylem, which consist of actively dividing cells and cause the thickening of the storage root.

  4. Analysis of a sugar response mutant of Arabidopsis identified a novel B3 domain protein that functions as an active transcriptional repressor.

    PubMed

    Tsukagoshi, Hironaka; Saijo, Takanori; Shibata, Daisuke; Morikami, Atsushi; Nakamura, Kenzo

    2005-06-01

    A recessive mutation hsi2 of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) expressing luciferase (LUC) under control of a short promoter derived from a sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) sporamin gene (Spo(min)LUC) caused enhanced LUC expression under both low- and high-sugar conditions, which was not due to increased level of abscisic acid. The hsi2 mutant contained a nonsense mutation in a gene encoding a protein with B3 DNA-binding domain. HSI2 and two other Arabidopsis proteins appear to constitute a novel subfamily of B3 domain proteins distinct from ABI3, FUS3, and LEC2, which are transcription activators involved in seed development. The C-terminal part of HSI2 subfamily proteins contained a sequence similar to the ERF-associated amphiphilic repression (EAR) motif. Deletion of the C-terminal portion of HSI2 lost in the hsi2 mutant caused reduced nuclear targeting of HSI2. Null allele of HSI2 showed even higher Spo(min)LUC expression than the hsi2 mutant, whereas overexpression of HSI2 reduced the LUC expression. Transient coexpression of 35SHSI2 with Spo(min)LUC in protoplasts repressed the expression of LUC activity, and deletion or mutation of the EAR motif significantly reduced the repression activity of HSI2. These results indicate that HSI2 and related proteins are B3 domain-EAR motif active transcription repressors.

  5. Establishment and molecular characterization of a sweet potato germplasm bank of the highlands of Paraná State, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Camargo, L K P; Mógor, A F; Resende, J T V; Da-Silva, P R

    2013-11-18

    The sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L.) is a crop of great importance in developing countries, as a food staple, for animal feed, and potentially for biofuel. Development of cultivars adapted to specific regions within these countries would be useful. To start a breeding program, the first step is the establishment of a germplasm bank. We initiated a sweet potato germplasm bank with accessions collected from the highlands of Paraná State, Brazil. To establish this germplasm bank, we carried out numerous sweet potato-collecting expeditions in regions with an altitude above 700 meters in this region; 116 genotypes currently comprise this collection. The genetic diversity of this germplasm bank was estimated using inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers. Polymorphic information content (PIC), marker index (MI), and resolving power (RP) were calculated to determine the viability of ISSR markers for use in sweet potato genetic studies. The correlation between PIC and MI (r(2) = 0.81) and between MI and RP (r(2) = 0.97) were positive and significant, indicating that ISSR markers are robust for sweet potato identification. Two ISSR primers, 807 and 808, gave the best results for all attributes, and thus could be used as representative ISSR primers for the genetic analysis of sweet potato. Cluster analysis and principal component analysis indicated high genetic variability (0.51 of similarity among all genotypes); genotypes collected from different counties grouped together.

  6. Horizontal transmission of "Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum" by Bactericera cockerelli (Hemiptera: Triozidae) on Convolvulus and Ipomoea (Solanales: Convolvulaceae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    “Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum” (Proteobacteria) is an important pathogen of solanaceous crops (Solanales: Solanaceae) in North America and New Zealand, and is the putative causal agent of zebra chip disease of potato. This phloem-limited pathogen is transmitted to potato and other Solanaceo...

  7. Mixed Infections of Four Viruses, the Incidence and Phylogenetic Relationships of Sweet Potato Chlorotic Fleck Virus (Betaflexiviridae) Isolates in Wild Species and Sweetpotatoes in Uganda and Evidence of Distinct Isolates in East Africa.

    PubMed

    Tugume, Arthur K; Mukasa, Settumba B; Valkonen, Jari P T

    2016-01-01

    Viruses infecting wild flora may have a significant negative impact on nearby crops, and vice-versa. Only limited information is available on wild species able to host economically important viruses that infect sweetpotatoes (Ipomoea batatas). In this study, Sweet potato chlorotic fleck virus (SPCFV; Carlavirus, Betaflexiviridae) and Sweet potato chlorotic stunt virus (SPCSV; Crinivirus, Closteroviridae) were surveyed in wild plants of family Convolvulaceae (genera Astripomoea, Ipomoea, Hewittia and Lepistemon) in Uganda. Plants belonging to 26 wild species, including annuals, biannuals and perennials from four agro-ecological zones, were observed for virus-like symptoms in 2004 and 2007 and sampled for virus testing. SPCFV was detected in 84 (2.9%) of 2864 plants tested from 17 species. SPCSV was detected in 66 (5.4%) of the 1224 plants from 12 species sampled in 2007. Some SPCSV-infected plants were also infected with Sweet potato feathery mottle virus (SPFMV; Potyvirus, Potyviridae; 1.3%), Sweet potato mild mottle virus (SPMMV; Ipomovirus, Potyviridae; 0.5%) or both (0.4%), but none of these three viruses were detected in SPCFV-infected plants. Co-infection of SPFMV with SPMMV was detected in 1.2% of plants sampled. Virus-like symptoms were observed in 367 wild plants (12.8%), of which 42 plants (11.4%) were negative for the viruses tested. Almost all (92.4%) the 419 sweetpotato plants sampled from fields close to the tested wild plants displayed virus-like symptoms, and 87.1% were infected with one or more of the four viruses. Phylogenetic and evolutionary analyses of the 3'-proximal genomic region of SPCFV, including the silencing suppressor (NaBP)- and coat protein (CP)-coding regions implicated strong purifying selection on the CP and NaBP, and that the SPCFV strains from East Africa are distinguishable from those from other continents. However, the strains from wild species and sweetpotato were indistinguishable, suggesting reciprocal movement of SPCFV

  8. Mixed Infections of Four Viruses, the Incidence and Phylogenetic Relationships of Sweet Potato Chlorotic Fleck Virus (Betaflexiviridae) Isolates in Wild Species and Sweetpotatoes in Uganda and Evidence of Distinct Isolates in East Africa

    PubMed Central

    Tugume, Arthur K.; Mukasa, Settumba B.; Valkonen, Jari P. T.

    2016-01-01

    Viruses infecting wild flora may have a significant negative impact on nearby crops, and vice-versa. Only limited information is available on wild species able to host economically important viruses that infect sweetpotatoes (Ipomoea batatas). In this study, Sweet potato chlorotic fleck virus (SPCFV; Carlavirus, Betaflexiviridae) and Sweet potato chlorotic stunt virus (SPCSV; Crinivirus, Closteroviridae) were surveyed in wild plants of family Convolvulaceae (genera Astripomoea, Ipomoea, Hewittia and Lepistemon) in Uganda. Plants belonging to 26 wild species, including annuals, biannuals and perennials from four agro-ecological zones, were observed for virus-like symptoms in 2004 and 2007 and sampled for virus testing. SPCFV was detected in 84 (2.9%) of 2864 plants tested from 17 species. SPCSV was detected in 66 (5.4%) of the 1224 plants from 12 species sampled in 2007. Some SPCSV-infected plants were also infected with Sweet potato feathery mottle virus (SPFMV; Potyvirus, Potyviridae; 1.3%), Sweet potato mild mottle virus (SPMMV; Ipomovirus, Potyviridae; 0.5%) or both (0.4%), but none of these three viruses were detected in SPCFV-infected plants. Co-infection of SPFMV with SPMMV was detected in 1.2% of plants sampled. Virus-like symptoms were observed in 367 wild plants (12.8%), of which 42 plants (11.4%) were negative for the viruses tested. Almost all (92.4%) the 419 sweetpotato plants sampled from fields close to the tested wild plants displayed virus-like symptoms, and 87.1% were infected with one or more of the four viruses. Phylogenetic and evolutionary analyses of the 3′-proximal genomic region of SPCFV, including the silencing suppressor (NaBP)- and coat protein (CP)-coding regions implicated strong purifying selection on the CP and NaBP, and that the SPCFV strains from East Africa are distinguishable from those from other continents. However, the strains from wild species and sweetpotato were indistinguishable, suggesting reciprocal movement of SPCFV

  9. Activation of Nitrogen-Fixing Endophytes Is Associated with the Tuber Growth of Sweet Potato

    PubMed Central

    Yonebayashi, Koyo; Katsumi, Naoya; Nishi, Tomoe; Okazaki, Masanori

    2014-01-01

    Endophytic nitrogen-fixing organisms have been isolated from the aerial parts of field-grown sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas). The 15N dilution method, which is based on the differences in stable nitrogen isotope ratios, is useful for measuring nitrogen fixation in the field. In this study, seedlings of two sweet potato cultivars, ‘Beniazuma’ and ‘Benikomachi,’ were transplanted into an alluvial soil that had been treated with organic improving material in advance. Whole plants were sampled every 2 or 3 weeks. After separating plants into tuberous roots and leaves, the fresh weights of the samples were measured, and the nitrogen content and natural 15N content of leaves were determined with an elemental analyzer and an isotope ratio mass spectrometer linked to an elemental analyzer, respectively. The contribution of nitrogen fixation derived from atmospheric N2 in sweet potato was calculated by assuming that leaves at 2 weeks after transplanting were in a non-nitrogen-fixing state. The contribution ratios of nitrogen fixation by nitrogen-fixing endophytes in leaves of both sweet potato cultivars increased rapidly from 35 to 61 days after transplanting and then increased gradually to 55–57% at 90 days after transplanting. Over the course of the sweet potato growing season, the activity of nitrogen-fixing endophytes in leaves began to increase at about 47 days after transplanting, the weight of leaves increased rapidly, and then growth of tuberous roots began a few weeks later. Our findings indicate that nitrogen-fixing endophytes will be activated under inorganic nitrogen-free sweet potato cultivation, allowing for growth of the tuberous roots. PMID:26819874

  10. Nitric oxide activates superoxide dismutase and ascorbate peroxidase to repress the cell death induced by wounding.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Ching; Jih, Pei-Ju; Lin, Hsin-Hung; Lin, Jeng-Shane; Chang, Ling-Lan; Shen, Yu-Hsing; Jeng, Shih-Tong

    2011-10-01

    Wounding caused by rain, wind, and pathogen may lead plants to onset defense response. Previous studies indicated that mechanical wounding stimulates plants to generate nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)). In this study, the functions of NO and H(2)O(2) after wounding in sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas cv. Tainung 57) was further analyzed. Mechanical wounding damaged cells and resulted in necrosis, but the presence of NO donors or NO scavenger might reduce or enhance the cell death caused by wounding, respectively. The amount of H(2)O(2) induced by wounding was also decreased or increased when plants were incubated with NO donors or NO scavenger, individually. These results indicate that NO may regulate H(2)O(2) generation to affect cell death. NO-induced proteins isolated from two-dimensional electrophoresis were identified to be Copper/Zinc superoxide dismutases (CuZnSODs). The activities of CuZnSODs and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) could be enhanced by NO. In addition, the expression of CuZnSOD and APX was induced by wounding via NO, and their expression was further stimulated by NO through the generation of cGMP. The influx of calcium ions and the activity of NADPH oxidase were also involved in the NO signal transduction pathway inducing APX expression. Collectively, the generation of H(2)O(2) in wounded plants might trigger cell death. Meanwhile, the production of NO induced by wounding stimulated signal transducers including cGMP, calcium ions, and H(2)O(2) to activate CuZnSOD and APX, which further decreased H(2)O(2) level and reduced the cell death caused by wounding.

  11. Ipomoelin, a Jacalin-Related Lectin with a Compact Tetrameric Association and Versatile Carbohydrate Binding Properties Regulated by Its N Terminus

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wei-Chieh; Liu, Kai-Lun; Hsu, Fang-Ciao; Jeng, Shih-Tong; Cheng, Yi-Sheng

    2012-01-01

    Many proteins are induced in the plant defense response to biotic stress or mechanical wounding. One group is lectins. Ipomoelin (IPO) is one of the wound-inducible proteins of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas cv. Tainung 57) and is a Jacalin-related lectin (JRL). In this study, we resolved the crystal structures of IPO in its apo form and in complex with carbohydrates such as methyl α-D-mannopyranoside (Me-Man), methyl α-D-glucopyranoside (Me-Glc), and methyl α-D-galactopyranoside (Me-Gal) in different space groups. The packing diagrams indicated that IPO might represent a compact tetrameric association in the JRL family. The protomer of IPO showed a canonical β-prism fold with 12 strands of β-sheets but with 2 additional short β-strands at the N terminus. A truncated IPO (ΔN10IPO) by removing the 2 short β-strands of the N terminus was used to reveal its role in a tetrameric association. Gel filtration chromatography confirmed IPO as a tetrameric form in solution. Isothermal titration calorimetry determined the binding constants (KA) of IPO and ΔN10IPO against various carbohydrates. IPO could bind to Me-Man, Me-Glc, and Me-Gal with similar binding constants. In contrast, ΔN10IPO showed high binding ability to Me-Man and Me-Glc but could not bind to Me-Gal. Our structural and functional analysis of IPO revealed that its compact tetrameric association and carbohydrate binding polyspecificity could be regulated by the 2 additional N-terminal β-strands. The versatile carbohydrate binding properties of IPO might play a role in plant defense. PMID:22808208

  12. TiO2 Nanostructure Synthesized by Sol-Gel for Dye Sensitized Solar Cells as Renewable Energy Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramelan, A. H.; Wahyuningsih, S.; Saputro, S.; Supriyanto, E.; Hanif, Q. A.

    2017-02-01

    The use of renewable materials as a constituent of a smart alternative energy such as the use of natural dyes for light harvesting needs to be developed. Synthesis of anatase titanium dioxide (TiO2) and fabrication Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell (DSSC) using dye-based of anthocyanin from purple sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L.) as a photosensitizer had been done. Synthesis TiO2 through sol-gel process with the addition of triblock copolymer Pluronic F127 template was controlled at pH 3 whereas calcination was carried out at a temperature of 500 °C, 550 °C and 600 °C. The obtained TiO2 were analyzed by XRD, SAA, and SEM. The conclusion is anatase TiO2 obtained until annealing up to 600 °C. Self-assembly Pluronic F127 triblock copolymer capable of restraining the growth of TiO2 crystals. Retention growth of TiO2 mesoporous produces material character that can be used as builders photoanode DSSC with natural sensitizer anthocyanin from purple sweet potatoes. Based on the analysis of X-ray diffraction patterns and surface area analyser, the higher the calcination temperature the greater the size of the anatase crystals is obtained, however, the smaller its surface area. Purple sweet potato anthocyanin’s dyed on to TiO2 was obtained a good enough performance for DSSC’s and gain the optimum performance from DSSC’s system built with mesoporous TiO2 annealed 550 °C using flavylium form anthocyanin.

  13. Isolation and Characterization of Hydroxyproline-Rich Glycopeptide Signals in Black Nightshade Leaves1[OA

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Gregory; Bhattacharya, Ramcharan; Chen, Yu-Chi; Barona, Guido; Yamaguchi, Yube; Ryan, Clarence A.

    2009-01-01

    A gene encoding a preprohydroxyproline-rich systemin, SnpreproHypSys, was identified from the leaves of black nightshade (Solanum nigrum), which is a member of a small gene family of at least three genes that have orthologs in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum; NtpreproHypSys), tomato (Solanum lycopersicum; SlpreproHypSys), petunia (Petunia hybrida; PhpreproHypSys), potato (Solanum tuberosum; PhpreproHypSys), and sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas; IbpreproHypSys). SnpreproHypSys was induced by wounding and by treatment with methyl jasmonate. The encoded precursor protein contained a signal sequence and was posttranslationally modified to produce three hydroxyproline-rich glycopeptide signals (HypSys peptides). The three HypSys peptides isolated from nightshade leaf extracts were called SnHypSys I (19 amino acids with six pentoses), SnHypSys II (20 amino acids with six pentoses), and SnHypSys III (20 amino acids with either six or nine pentoses) by their sequential appearance in SnpreproHypSys. The three SnHypSys peptides were synthesized and tested for their abilities to alkalinize suspension culture medium, with synthetic SnHypSys I demonstrating the highest activity. Synthetic SnHypSys I was capable of inducing alkalinization in other Solanaceae cell types (or species), indicating that structural conformations within the peptides are recognized by the different cells/species to initiate signal transduction pathways, apparently through recognition by homologous receptor(s). To further demonstrate the biological relevance of the SnHypSys peptides, the early defense gene lipoxygenase D was shown to be induced by all three synthetic peptides when supplied to excised nightshade plants. PMID:19403725

  14. Isolation and characterization of hydroxyproline-rich glycopeptide signals in black nightshade leaves.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Gregory; Bhattacharya, Ramcharan; Chen, Yu-Chi; Barona, Guido; Yamaguchi, Yube; Ryan, Clarence A

    2009-07-01

    A gene encoding a preprohydroxyproline-rich systemin, SnpreproHypSys, was identified from the leaves of black nightshade (Solanum nigrum), which is a member of a small gene family of at least three genes that have orthologs in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum; NtpreproHypSys), tomato (Solanum lycopersicum; SlpreproHypSys), petunia (Petunia hybrida; PhpreproHypSys), potato (Solanum tuberosum; PhpreproHypSys), and sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas; IbpreproHypSys). SnpreproHypSys was induced by wounding and by treatment with methyl jasmonate. The encoded precursor protein contained a signal sequence and was posttranslationally modified to produce three hydroxyproline-rich glycopeptide signals (HypSys peptides). The three HypSys peptides isolated from nightshade leaf extracts were called SnHypSys I (19 amino acids with six pentoses), SnHypSys II (20 amino acids with six pentoses), and SnHypSys III (20 amino acids with either six or nine pentoses) by their sequential appearance in SnpreproHypSys. The three SnHypSys peptides were synthesized and tested for their abilities to alkalinize suspension culture medium, with synthetic SnHypSys I demonstrating the highest activity. Synthetic SnHypSys I was capable of inducing alkalinization in other Solanaceae cell types (or species), indicating that structural conformations within the peptides are recognized by the different cells/species to initiate signal transduction pathways, apparently through recognition by homologous receptor(s). To further demonstrate the biological relevance of the SnHypSys peptides, the early defense gene lipoxygenase D was shown to be induced by all three synthetic peptides when supplied to excised nightshade plants.

  15. Effects of prolonged restriction in water supply on photosynthesis, shoot development and storage root yield in sweet potato.

    PubMed

    van Heerden, Philippus Daniel Riekert; Laurie, Robert

    2008-09-01

    Besides the paucity of information on the effects of drought stress on photosynthesis and yield in sweet potato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.], available reports are also contradictory. The aim of this study was to shed light on the effects of long-term restricted water supply on shoot development, photosynthesis and storage root yield in field-grown sweet potato. Experiments were conducted under a rainout shelter where effects of restricted water supply were assessed in two varieties (Resisto and A15). Large decreases in stomatal conductance occurred in both varieties after 5 weeks of treatment. However, continued measurements revealed a large varietal difference in persistence of this response and effects on CO(2) assimilation. Although restricted water supply decreased leaf relative water content similarly in both varieties, the negative effects on stomatal conductance disappeared with time in A15 (indicating high drought acclimation capacity) but not in Resisto, thus leading to inhibition of CO(2) assimilation in Resisto. Chlorophyll a fluorescence measurements, and the relationship between stomatal conductance, intercellular CO(2) concentration and CO(2) assimilation rate, indicated that drought stress inhibited photosynthesis primarily through stomatal closure. Although yield loss was considerably larger in Resisto, it was also reduced by up to 60% in A15, even though photosynthesis, expressed on a leaf area basis, was not inhibited in this variety. In A15 yield loss appears to be closely associated with decreased aboveground biomass accumulation, whereas in Resisto, combined effects on biomass accumulation and photosynthesis per unit leaf area are indicated, suggesting that research aimed at improving drought tolerance in sweet potato should consider both these factors.

  16. A new method to culture sweetpotato in space farming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuyuki, I.; Ishii, Y.; Oda, M.; Kitaya, Y.; Mori, G.

    Sweetpotato production in space has many advantages over that of other crops; the plant has a higher growth rate and a higher yield with less fertilizer and less water, and functions as an efficient CO_2/O_2 converter. In a limited space in space farming, however, it is not favorable that sweetpotato shoots develop vigorously while the roots have not enlarged yet, because the sweetpotato organ of interest is not the shoot but the tuberous root. Cuttings of sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas Lam. "Beniazuma") were used in this study. Each cutting was cut off from the 2nd - 10th nodes from the apices of mother branches and consisted of one expanded leaf, one node and five cm long stem. The cuttings were cultured suboptimally on a mixed soil (peat-moss:vermiculite=1:1 in volume) in a greenhouse under sunlight. Growth characteristics of the cuttings removed axillary buds were compared with cuttings with axillary buds in the first experiment. The cuttings without axillary buds started tuberous root bulking about 30 days after the onset of the experiment. The harvest index (tuberous root dry mass/total dry mass) was 0.5 after 70 days. Whereas, the control plant with an axillary bud developed a lateral shoot and formed no tuberous root during 70 days in the experiment. It was necessary to remove the axillary buds in order to form the tuberous roots in this method. To evaluate the effect of light intensity on tuberous root formation, cuttings without axillary buds were shaded with cheesecloth having 43% of light transmittance in the second experiment. The tuberous root formation was retarded 50 days in shaded cuttings compared with control cuttings. The tuberous roots were quickly formed and the large harvest index was ensured in this method with cuttings without axillary buds. Therefore the method is expected to be advantageous to culture sweetpotato at a high density with rapid turn over in a limited culture space in space farming.

  17. Sweet potato: a review of its past, present, and future role in human nutrition.

    PubMed

    Bovell-Benjamin, Adelia C

    2007-01-01

    The overall objective of this chapter is to review the past, present, and future role of the sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas [L.] Lam) in human nutrition. Specifically, the chapter describes the role of the sweet potato in human diets; outlines the biochemical and nutritional composition of the sweet potato with emphasis on its beta-carotene and anthocyanin contents; highlights sweet potato utilization, and its potential as value-added products in human food systems; and demonstrates the potential of the sweet potato in the African context. Early records have indicated that the sweet potato is a staple food source for many indigenous populations in Central and South Americas, Ryukyu Island, Africa, the Caribbean, the Maori people, Hawaiians, and Papua New Guineans. Protein contents of sweet potato leaves and roots range from 4.0% to 27.0% and 1.0% to 9.0%, respectively. The sweet potato could be considered as an excellent novel source of natural health-promoting compounds, such as beta-carotene and anthocyanins, for the functional food market. Also, the high concentration of anthocyanin and beta-carotene in sweet potato, combined with the high stability of the color extract make it a promising and healthier alternative to synthetic coloring agents in food systems. Starch and flour processing from sweet potato can create new economic and employment activities for farmers and rural households, and can add nutritional value to food systems. Repositioning sweet potato production and its potential for value-added products will contribute substantially to utilizing its benefits and many uses in human food systems. Multidisciplinary, integrated research and development activities aimed at improving production, storage, postharvest and processing technologies, and quality of the sweet potato and its potential value-added products are critical issues, which should be addressed globally.

  18. Enhanced accumulation of carotenoids in sweetpotato plants overexpressing IbOr-Ins gene in purple-fleshed sweetpotato cultivar.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung-Chul; Kim, Sun Ha; Park, Seyeon; Lee, Hyeong-Un; Lee, Joon Seol; Park, Woo Sung; Ahn, Mi-Jeong; Kim, Yun-Hee; Jeong, Jae Cheol; Lee, Haeng-Soon; Kwak, Sang-Soo

    2015-01-01

    Sweetpotato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam] is an important root crop that produces low molecular weight antioxidants such as carotenoids and anthocyanin. The sweetpotato orange (IbOr) protein is involved in the accumulation of carotenoids. To increase the levels of carotenoids in the storage roots of sweetpotato, we generated transgenic sweetpotato plants overexpressing IbOr-Ins under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter in an anthocyanin-rich purple-fleshed cultivar (referred to as IbOr plants). IbOr plants exhibited increased carotenoid levels (up to 7-fold) in their storage roots compared to wild type (WT) plants, as revealed by HPLC analysis. The carotenoid contents of IbOr plants were positively correlated with IbOr transcript levels. The levels of zeaxanthin were ∼ 12 times elevated in IbOr plants, whereas β-carotene increased ∼ 1.75 times higher than those of WT. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that most carotenoid biosynthetic pathway genes were up-regulated in the IbOr plants, including PDS, ZDS, LCY-β, CHY-β, ZEP and Pftf, whereas LCY-ɛ was down-regulated. Interestingly, CCD1, CCD4 and NCED, which are related to the degradation of carotenoids, were also up-regulated in the IbOr plants. Anthocyanin contents and transcription levels of associated biosynthetic genes seemed to be altered in the IbOr plants. The yields of storage roots and aerial parts of IbOr plants and WT plants were not significantly different under field cultivation. Taken together, these results indicate that overexpression of IbOr-Ins can increase the carotenoid contents of sweetpotato storage roots.

  19. Functional Characterization of Dihydroflavonol-4-Reductase in Anthocyanin Biosynthesis of Purple Sweet Potato Underlies the Direct Evidence of Anthocyanins Function against Abiotic Stresses

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongxia; Fan, Weijuan; Li, Hong; Yang, Jun; Huang, Jirong; Zhang, Peng

    2013-01-01

    Dihydroflavonol-4-reductase (DFR) is a key enzyme in the catalysis of the stereospecific reduction of dihydroflavonols to leucoanthocyanidins in anthocyanin biosynthesis. In the purple sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas Lam.) cv. Ayamurasaki, expression of the IbDFR gene was strongly associated with anthocyanin accumulation in leaves, stems and roots. Overexpression of the IbDFR in Arabidopsis tt3 mutants fully complemented the pigmentation phenotype of the seed coat, cotyledon and hypocotyl. Downregulation of IbDFR expression in transgenic sweet potato (DFRi) using an RNAi approach dramatically reduced anthocyanin accumulation in young leaves, stems and storage roots. In contrast, the increase of flavonols quercetin-3-O-hexose-hexoside and quercetin-3-O-glucoside in the leaves and roots of DFRi plants is significant. Therefore, the metabolic pathway channeled greater flavonol influx in the DFRi plants when their anthocyanin and proanthocyanidin accumulation were decreased. These plants also displayed reduced antioxidant capacity compared to the wild type. After 24 h of cold treatment and 2 h recovery, the wild-type plants were almost fully restored to the initial phenotype compared to the slower recovery of DFRi plants, in which the levels of electrolyte leakage and hydrogen peroxide accumulation were dramatically increased. These results provide direct evidence of anthocyanins function in the protection against oxidative stress in the sweet potato. The molecular characterization of the IbDFR gene in the sweet potato not only confirms its important roles in flavonoid metabolism but also supports the protective function of anthocyanins of enhanced scavenging of reactive oxygen radicals in plants under stressful conditions. PMID:24223813

  20. Overexpression of sweetpotato swpa4 peroxidase results in increased hydrogen peroxide production and enhances stress tolerance in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yun-Hee; Kim, Cha Young; Song, Wan-Keun; Park, Doo-Sang; Kwon, Suk-Yoon; Lee, Haeng-Soon; Bang, Jae-Wook; Kwak, Sang-Soo

    2008-03-01

    Plant peroxidases (POD) reduce hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) in the presence of an electron donor. Extracellular POD can also induce H(2)O(2) production and may perform a significant function in responses to environmental stresses via the regulation of H(2)O(2) in plants. We previously described the isolation of 10 POD cDNA clones from cell cultures of sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas). Among them, the expression of the swpa4 gene was profoundly induced by a variety of abiotic stresses and pathogenic infections (Park et al. in Mol Gen Genome 269:542-552 2003; Jang et al. in Plant Physiol Biochem 42:451-455 2004). In the present study, transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants overexpressing the swpa4 gene under the control of the CaMV 35S promoter were generated in order to assess the function of swpa4 in planta. The transgenic plants exhibited an approximately 50-fold higher POD specific activity than was observed in control plants. Both transient expression analysis with the swpa4-GFP fusion protein and POD activity assays in the apoplastic washing fluid revealed that the swpa4 protein is secreted into the apoplastic space. In addition, a significantly enhanced tolerance to a variety of abiotic and biotic stresses occurred in the transgenic plants. These plants harbored increased lignin and phenolic content, and H(2)O(2 )was also generated under normal conditions. Furthermore, they showed an increased expression level of a variety of apoplastic acidic pathogenesis-related (PR) genes following enhanced H(2)O(2) production. These results suggest that the expression of swpa4 in the apoplastic space may function as a positive defense signal in the H(2)O(2)-regulated stress response signaling pathway.

  1. Polyphenol-rich sweet potato greens extract inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in prostate cancer cells in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Karna, Prasanthi; Gundala, Sushma R.; Gupta, Meenakshi V.; Shamsi, Shahab A.; Pace, Ralphenia D.; Yates, Clayton; Narayan, Satya; Aneja, Ritu

    2011-01-01

    Sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) leaves or greens, extensively consumed as a vegetable in Africa and Asia, are an excellent source of dietary polyphenols such as anthocyanins and phenolic acids. Here, we show that sweet potato greens extract (SPGE) has the maximum polyphenol content compared with several commercial vegetables including spinach. The polyphenol-rich SPGE exerts significant antiproliferative activity in a panel of prostate cancer cell lines while sparing normal prostate epithelial cells. Mechanistically, SPGE perturbed cell cycle progression, reduced clonogenic survival, modulated cell cycle and apoptosis regulatory molecules and induced apoptosis in human prostate cancer PC-3 cells both in vitro and in vivo. SPGE-induced apoptosis has a mitochondrially mediated component, which was attenuated by pretreatment with cyclosporin A. We also observed alterations of apoptosis regulatory molecules such as inactivation of Bcl2, upregulation of BAX, cytochrome c release and activation of downstream apoptotic signaling. SPGE caused DNA degradation as evident by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-nick-end labeling (TUNEL) staining of increased concentration of 3′-DNA ends. Furthermore, apoptotic induction was caspase dependent as shown by cleavage of caspase substrate, poly (adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase. Oral administration of 400 mg/kg SPGE remarkably inhibited growth and progression of prostate tumor xenografts by ∼69% in nude mice, as shown by tumor volume measurements and non-invasive real-time bioluminescent imaging. Most importantly, SPGE did not cause any detectable toxicity to rapidly dividing normal tissues such as gut and bone marrow. This is the first report to demonstrate the in vitro and in vivo anticancer activity of sweet potato greens in prostate cancer. PMID:21948980

  2. Induction of Expression of Genes Coding for Sporamin and β-Amylase by Polygalacturonic Acid in Leaf-Petiole Cuttings of Sweet Potato 1

    PubMed Central

    Ohto, Masa-aki; Nakamura-Kito, Kyoko; Nakamura, Kenzo

    1992-01-01

    Sporamin and β-amylase are two major proteins of tuberous storage root of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) and their accumulation can be induced concomitantly with the accumulation of starch in leaves and petioles by sucrose (K Nakamura, M Ohto, N Yoshida, K Nakamura [1991] Plant Physiol 96: 902-909). Although mechanical wounding of leaves of sweet potato only occasionally induced the expression of sporamin and β-amylase genes, their expression could be reproducibly induced in leaf-petiole cuttings when these explants were dipped in a solution of polygalacturonic acid or chitosan at their cut edges. Polygalacturonic acid seemed to induce expression of the same genes coding for sporamin and β-amylase that are induced by sucrose. Because polygalacturonic acid and chitosan are known to mediate the induction of wound-inducible defense reactions, these results raise an interesting possibility that β-amylase, in addition to sporamin, may have some role in the defense reaction. Expression of sporamin and β-amylase genes could also be induced by abscisic acid, and this induction by abscisic acid, as well as induction by polygalacturonic acid or sucrose, was repressed by gibberellic acid. By contrast, methyl jasmonate did not cause the significant induction of either sporamin or β-amylase mRNAs. Induction of expression of sporamin and β-amylase genes by polygalacturonic acid or sucrose was inhibited by cycloheximide, suggesting that de novo synthesis of proteins is required for both of the induction processes. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:16668901

  3. Response Characteristics of Soil Fractal Features to Different Land Uses in Typical Purple Soil Watershed

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Bang-lin; Chen, Xiao-yan; Ding, Lin-qiao; Huang, Yu-han; Zhou, Ji; Yang, Tian-tian

    2015-01-01

    As a fundamental characteristic of soil physical properties, the soil Particle Size Distribution (PSD) is important in the research on soil moisture migration, solution transformation, and soil erosion. In this research, the PSD characteristics with distinct methods in different land uses are analyzed. The results show that the upper bound of the volume domain of the clay domain ranges from 5.743μm to 5.749μm for all land-use types. For the silt domain of purple soil, the value ranges among 286.852~286.966 μm. For all purple soil land-use types, the order of the volume domain fractal dimensions is DclayIpomoea batatas are all higher than the corresponding values in the Citrus reticulate Blanco and Setaria viridis. Moreover, in all the land-use types, all of the parameters in volume domain fractal dimension (Dvi) are higher than the corresponding parameter values from the United States Department of Agriculture (Dvi(U)). The correlation study between the volume domain fractal dimension and the soil properties shows that the intensity of correlation to the soil texture and soil organic matter has the order as: Dsilt>Dsilt(U)>Dsand (U)>Dsand and Dsilt>Dsilt(U)>Dsand>Dsand(U), respectively. As it is compared with all Dvi, the Dsilt has the most significant correlativity to the soil texture and organic matter in different land uses of the typical purple soil watersheds. Therefore, Dsilt will be a potential indictor for evaluating the proportion of fine particles in the PSD, as well as a key measurement in soil quality and productivity studies. PMID:25856376

  4. Cloning and characterization of an Orange gene that increases carotenoid accumulation and salt stress tolerance in transgenic sweetpotato cultures.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Ha; Ahn, Young Ock; Ahn, Mi-Jeong; Jeong, Jae Cheol; Lee, Haeng-Soon; Kwak, Sang-Soo

    2013-09-01

    The Orange (Or) gene is responsible for the accumulation of carotenoids in plants. We isolated the Or gene (IbOr) from storage roots of orange-fleshed sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas L. Lam. cv. Sinhwangmi), and analyzed its function in transgenic sweetpotato calli. The IbOr gene has an open reading frame in the 942 bp cDNA, which encodes a 313-amino acid protein containing a cysteine-rich zinc finger domain. IbOr was strongly expressed in storage roots of orange-fleshed sweetpotato cultivars; it also was expressed in leaves, stems, and roots of cultivars with alternatively colored storage roots. IbOr transcription increased in response to abiotic stress, with gene expression reaching maximum at 2 h after treatment. Two different overexpression vectors of IbOr (IbOr-Wt and IbOr-Ins, which contained seven extra amino acids) were transformed into calli of white-fleshed sweetpotato [cv. Yulmi (Ym)] using Agrobacterium. The transgenic calli were easily selected because they developed a fine orange color. The expression levels of the IbOr transgene and genes involved in carotenoid biosynthesis in IbOr-Wt and IbOr-Ins transgenic calli were similar, and both transformants displayed higher expression levels than those in Ym calli. The contents of β-carotene, lutein, and total carotenoids in IbOr-Ins transgenic lines were approximately 10, 6, and 14 times higher than those in Ym calli, respectively. The transgenic IbOr calli exhibited increased antioxidant activity and increased tolerance to salt stress. Our work shows that the IbOr gene may be useful for the biotechnological development of transgenic sweetpotato plants that accumulate increased carotenoid contents on marginal agricultural lands.

  5. Molecular characterization of tocopherol biosynthetic genes in sweetpotato that respond to stress and activate the tocopherol production in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Ji, Chang Yoon; Kim, Yun-Hee; Kim, Ho Soo; Ke, Qingbo; Kim, Gun-Woo; Park, Sung-Chul; Lee, Haeng-Soon; Jeong, Jae Cheol; Kwak, Sang-Soo

    2016-09-01

    Tocopherol (vitamin E) is a chloroplast lipid that is presumed to be involved in the plant response to oxidative stress. In this study, we isolated and characterized five tocopherol biosynthetic genes from sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas [L.] Lam) plants, including genes encoding 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (IbHPPD), homogentisate phytyltransferase (IbHPT), 2-methyl-6-phytylbenzoquinol methyltransferase (IbMPBQ MT), tocopherol cyclase (IbTC) and γ-tocopherol methyltransferase (IbTMT). Fluorescence microscope analysis indicated that four proteins localized into the chloroplast, whereas IbHPPD observed in the nuclear. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that the expression patterns of the five tocopherol biosynthetic genes varied in different plant tissues and under different stress conditions. All five genes were highly expressed in leaf tissues, whereas IbHPPD and IbHPT were highly expressed in the thick roots. The expression patterns of these five genes significantly differed in response to PEG, NaCl and H2O2-mediated oxidative stress. IbHPPD was strongly induced following PEG and H2O2 treatment and IbHPT was strongly induced following PEG treatment, whereas IbMPBQ MT and IbTC were highly expressed following NaCl treatment. Upon infection of the bacterial pathogen Pectobacterium chrysanthemi, the expression of IbHPPD increased sharply in sweetpotato leaves, whereas the expression of the other genes was reduced or unchanged. Additionally, transient expression of the five tocopherol biosynthetic genes in tobacco (Nicotiana bentamiana) leaves resulted in increased transcript levels of the transgenes expressions and tocopherol production. Therefore, our results suggested that the five tocopherol biosynthetic genes of sweetpotato play roles in the stress defense response as transcriptional regulators of the tocopherol production.

  6. Site-specific phosphorylation of L-form starch phosphorylase by the protein kinase activity from sweet potato roots.

    PubMed

    Young, Guang-Huar; Chen, Han-Min; Lin, Chi-Tsai; Tseng, Kuang-Ching; Wu, Jiann-Shing; Juang, Rong-Huay

    2006-02-01

    A 78-amino acid insertion (L78) is found in the low-affinity type (L-form) of starch phosphorylase (L-SP, EC 2.4.1.1). This insertion blocks the starch-binding site on the L-SP molecule, and it decreases the binding affinity of L-SP toward starch. The computational analysis of the amino acid sequence on L78 predicts several phosphorylation sites at its Ser residues. Indeed, from the immunoblotting results using antibodies against phosphoamino acids, we observed that the purified L-SP from mature sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) roots is phosphorylated. This observation led us to the detection of a protein kinase activity in the protein fraction of the crude extract from the sweet potato roots. The kinase was partially purified by liquid chromatography, and its native molecular mass was estimated as 338 kDa. An expressed peptide (L78P) containing the essential part of L78 was intensively phosphorylated by the kinase. However, H-SP (the high-affinity isomer of SP lacking the L78 insertion) and the proteolytic modified L-SP, which lost its L78 fragment, could not be phosphorylated. Furthermore, using L78P mutants by site-directed mutagenesis at Ser residues on L78, we demonstrate that only one Ser residue on L78 is phosphorylated by the kinase. These results imply that this kinase is specific to L-SP, or more precisely, to the L78 insertion. The in vitro phosphorylated L-SP shows higher sensitivity to proteolytic modification, but has no change in its kinetic parameters.

  7. Response characteristics of soil fractal features to different land uses in typical purple soil watershed.

    PubMed

    Luo, Bang-lin; Chen, Xiao-yan; Ding, Lin-qiao; Huang, Yu-han; Zhou, Ji; Yang, Tian-tian

    2015-01-01

    As a fundamental characteristic of soil physical properties, the soil Particle Size Distribution (PSD) is important in the research on soil moisture migration, solution transformation, and soil erosion. In this research, the PSD characteristics with distinct methods in different land uses are analyzed. The results show that the upper bound of the volume domain of the clay domain ranges from 5.743 μm to 5.749 μm for all land-use types. For the silt domain of purple soil, the value ranges among 286.852~286.966 μm. For all purple soil land-use types, the order of the volume domain fractal dimensions is D clayIpomoea batatas are all higher than the corresponding values in the Citrus reticulate Blanco and Setaria viridis. Moreover, in all the land-use types, all of the parameters in volume domain fractal dimension (Dvi) are higher than the corresponding parameter values from the United States Department of Agriculture (Dvi(U)). The correlation study between the volume domain fractal dimension and the soil properties shows that the intensity of correlation to the soil texture and soil organic matter has the order as: D silt>D silt(U)>D sand (U)>D sand and D silt>D silt(U)>D sand>D sand(U), respectively. As it is compared with all Dvi, the D silt has the most significant correlativity to the soil texture and organic matter in different land uses of the typical purple soil watersheds. Therefore, Dsilt will be a potential indictor for evaluating the proportion of fine particles in the PSD, as well as a key measurement in soil quality and productivity studies.

  8. The influences of purple sweet potato anthocyanin on the growth characteristics of human retinal pigment epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Min; Lu, Xiaoling; Hao, Lei; Wu, Tao; Zhao, Huanjiao; Wang, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Background Anthocyanins have been proven to be beneficial to the eyes. However, information is scarce about the effects of purple sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas, L.) anthocyanin (PSPA), a class of anthocyanins derived from purple sweet potato roots, on visual health. Objective The aim of this study was to investigate whether PSPA could have influences on the growth characteristics (cellular morphology, survival, and proliferation) of human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells, which perform essential functions for the visual process. Methods The RPE cell line D407 was used in the present study. The cytotoxicity of PSPA was assessed by MTT assay. Then, cellular morphology, viability, cell cycle, Ki67expression, and PI3K/MAPK activation of RPE cells treated with PSPA were determined. Results PSPA exhibited dose-dependent promotion of RPE cell proliferation at concentrations ranging from 10 to 1,000 µg/ml. RPE cells treated with PSPA demonstrated a predominantly polygonal morphology in a mosaic arrangement, and colony-like cells displayed numerous short apical microvilli and typical ultrastructure. PSPA treatment also resulted in a better platform growing status, statistically higher viability, an increase in the S-phase, and more Ki67+ cells. However, neither pAkt nor pERK were detected in either group. Conclusions We found that PSPA maintained high cell viability, boosted DNA synthesis, and preserved a high percentage of continuously cycling cells to promote cell survival and division without changing cell morphology. This paper lays the foundation for further research about the damage-protective activities of PSPA on RPE cells or human vision. PMID:26070791

  9. Assessment of Genetic Diversity of Sweet Potato in Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Bonilla, Lorraine; Cuevas, Hugo E.; Montero-Rojas, Milly; Bird-Pico, Fernando; Luciano-Rosario, Dianiris; Siritunga, Dimuth

    2014-01-01

    Sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L.) is the seventh most important food crop due to its distinct advantages, such as adaptability to different environmental conditions and high nutritional value. Assessing the genetic diversity of this important crop is necessary due to the constant increase of demand for food and the need for conservation of agricultural and genetic resources. In Puerto Rico (PR), the genetic diversity of sweet potato has been poorly understood, although it has been part of the diet since Pre-Columbus time. Thus, 137 landraces from different localities around PR were collected and subjected to a genetic diversity analysis using 23 SSR-markers. In addition, 8 accessions from a collection grown in Gurabo, PR at the Agricultural Experimental Station (GAES), 10 US commercial cultivars and 12 Puerto Rican accessions from the USDA repository collection were included in this assessment. The results of the analysis of the 23 loci showed 255 alleles in the 167 samples. Observed heterozygosity was high across populations (0.71) while measurements of total heterozygosity revealed a large genetic diversity throughout the population and within populations. UPGMA clustering method revealed two main clusters. Cluster 1 contained 12 PR accessions from the USDA repository collection, while cluster 2 consisted of PR landraces, US commercial cultivars and the PR accessions from GAES. Population structure analysis grouped PR landraces in five groups including four US commercial cultivars. Our study shows the presence of a high level of genetic diversity of sweet potato across PR which can be related to the genetic makeup of sweet potato, human intervention and out-crossing nature of the plant. The history of domestication and dispersal of sweet potato in the Caribbean and the high levels of genetic diversity found through this study makes sweet potato an invaluable resource that needs to be protected and further studied. PMID:25551388

  10. Effects of anthocyanin-rich purple potato flakes on antioxidant status in F344 rats fed a cholesterol-rich diet.

    PubMed

    Han, Kyu-Ho; Matsumoto, Asami; Shimada, Ken-ichiro; Sekikawa, Mitsuo; Fukushima, Michihiro

    2007-11-01

    We examined the antioxidant effects of polyphenol/anthocyanin-rich potato (Solanum tuberosum cv. Shadow-Queen) flakes in male rats fed a high-cholesterol diet. The rats were served either a high-cholesterol (0.5% cholesterol plus 0.125% sodium cholate) diet, or a high-cholesterol diet containing a mixture of 243 g alpha-maize starch/kg supplemented with one of the following (per kg diet): 300 g medium purple potato (Shadow-Queen), 300 g white potato (Solanum tuberosum cv. Toyoshiro) or 300 g dark purple sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas cv. Ayamurasaki) flakes for 28 d. We analysed thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) levels in the serum and liver, and antioxidant enzyme activities in the liver. At this dosage, TBARS levels in the serum and liver of the Shadow-Queen and Ayamurasaki groups were significantly lower than those in the control and Toyoshiro groups. The serum urate levels in all the flake groups were significantly lower than that in the control group. The hepatic glutathione levels in the Shadow-Queen and Ayamurasaki groups were significantly higher than in the control and Toyoshiro groups. The activities of hepatic glutathione reductase and glutathione S-transferase in the Shadow-Queen and Ayamurasaki groups were significantly greater than those in the control group. These results show that modulation of antioxidant enzymes and oxidative status in the serum and liver by the purple potato flake diet (Shadow-Queen) containing polyphenols/anthocyanins may play an important role in the protection against adverse effects related to oxidative damage in rats fed a high-cholesterol diet.

  11. The genome of cultivated sweet potato contains Agrobacterium T-DNAs with expressed genes: An example of a naturally transgenic food crop

    PubMed Central

    Kyndt, Tina; Quispe, Dora; Zhai, Hong; Jarret, Robert; Ghislain, Marc; Liu, Qingchang; Gheysen, Godelieve

    2015-01-01

    Agrobacterium rhizogenes and Agrobacterium tumefaciens are plant pathogenic bacteria capable of transferring DNA fragments [transfer DNA (T-DNA)] bearing functional genes into the host plant genome. This naturally occurring mechanism has been adapted by plant biotechnologists to develop genetically modified crops that today are grown on more than 10% of the world’s arable land, although their use can result in considerable controversy. While assembling small interfering RNAs, or siRNAs, of sweet potato plants for metagenomic analysis, sequences homologous to T-DNA sequences from Agrobacterium spp. were discovered. Simple and quantitative PCR, Southern blotting, genome walking, and bacterial artificial chromosome library screening and sequencing unambiguously demonstrated that two different T-DNA regions (IbT-DNA1 and IbT-DNA2) are present in the cultivated sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas [L.] Lam.) genome and that these foreign genes are expressed at detectable levels in different tissues of the sweet potato plant. IbT-DNA1 was found to contain four open reading frames (ORFs) homologous to the tryptophan-2-monooxygenase (iaaM), indole-3-acetamide hydrolase (iaaH), C-protein (C-prot), and agrocinopine synthase (Acs) genes of Agrobacterium spp. IbT-DNA1 was detected in all 291 cultigens examined, but not in close wild relatives. IbT-DNA2 contained at least five ORFs with significant homology to the ORF14, ORF17n, rooting locus (Rol)B/RolC, ORF13, and ORF18/ORF17n genes of A. rhizogenes. IbT-DNA2 was detected in 45 of 217 genotypes that included both cultivated and wild species. Our finding, that sweet potato is naturally transgenic while being a widely and traditionally consumed food crop, could affect the current consumer distrust of the safety of transgenic food crops. PMID:25902487

  12. The genome of cultivated sweet potato contains Agrobacterium T-DNAs with expressed genes: An example of a naturally transgenic food crop.

    PubMed

    Kyndt, Tina; Quispe, Dora; Zhai, Hong; Jarret, Robert; Ghislain, Marc; Liu, Qingchang; Gheysen, Godelieve; Kreuze, Jan F

    2015-05-05

    Agrobacterium rhizogenes and Agrobacterium tumefaciens are plant pathogenic bacteria capable of transferring DNA fragments [transfer DNA (T-DNA)] bearing functional genes into the host plant genome. This naturally occurring mechanism has been adapted by plant biotechnologists to develop genetically modified crops that today are grown on more than 10% of the world's arable land, although their use can result in considerable controversy. While assembling small interfering RNAs, or siRNAs, of sweet potato plants for metagenomic analysis, sequences homologous to T-DNA sequences from Agrobacterium spp. were discovered. Simple and quantitative PCR, Southern blotting, genome walking, and bacterial artificial chromosome library screening and sequencing unambiguously demonstrated that two different T-DNA regions (IbT-DNA1 and IbT-DNA2) are present in the cultivated sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas [L.] Lam.) genome and that these foreign genes are expressed at detectable levels in different tissues of the sweet potato plant. IbT-DNA1 was found to contain four open reading frames (ORFs) homologous to the tryptophan-2-monooxygenase (iaaM), indole-3-acetamide hydrolase (iaaH), C-protein (C-prot), and agrocinopine synthase (Acs) genes of Agrobacterium spp. IbT-DNA1 was detected in all 291 cultigens examined, but not in close wild relatives. IbT-DNA2 contained at least five ORFs with significant homology to the ORF14, ORF17n, rooting locus (Rol)B/RolC, ORF13, and ORF18/ORF17n genes of A. rhizogenes. IbT-DNA2 was detected in 45 of 217 genotypes that included both cultivated and wild species. Our finding, that sweet potato is naturally transgenic while being a widely and traditionally consumed food crop, could affect the current consumer distrust of the safety of transgenic food crops.

  13. Assessment of genetic diversity of sweet potato in Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Bonilla, Lorraine; Cuevas, Hugo E; Montero-Rojas, Milly; Bird-Pico, Fernando; Luciano-Rosario, Dianiris; Siritunga, Dimuth

    2014-01-01

    Sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L.) is the seventh most important food crop due to its distinct advantages, such as adaptability to different environmental conditions and high nutritional value. Assessing the genetic diversity of this important crop is necessary due to the constant increase of demand for food and the need for conservation of agricultural and genetic resources. In Puerto Rico (PR), the genetic diversity of sweet potato has been poorly understood, although it has been part of the diet since Pre-Columbus time. Thus, 137 landraces from different localities around PR were collected and subjected to a genetic diversity analysis using 23 SSR-markers. In addition, 8 accessions from a collection grown in Gurabo, PR at the Agricultural Experimental Station (GAES), 10 US commercial cultivars and 12 Puerto Rican accessions from the USDA repository collection were included in this assessment. The results of the analysis of the 23 loci showed 255 alleles in the 167 samples. Observed heterozygosity was high across populations (0.71) while measurements of total heterozygosity revealed a large genetic diversity throughout the population and within populations. UPGMA clustering method revealed two main clusters. Cluster 1 contained 12 PR accessions from the USDA repository collection, while cluster 2 consisted of PR landraces, US commercial cultivars and the PR accessions from GAES. Population structure analysis grouped PR landraces in five groups including four US commercial cultivars. Our study shows the presence of a high level of genetic diversity of sweet potato across PR which can be related to the genetic makeup of sweet potato, human intervention and out-crossing nature of the plant. The history of domestication and dispersal of sweet potato in the Caribbean and the high levels of genetic diversity found through this study makes sweet potato an invaluable resource that needs to be protected and further studied.

  14. Effects of land use changes on kinetics of potassium release in sweetpotato garden soils of the highlands, Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajashekhar Rao, B. K.

    2014-09-01

    The present study attempts to employ K release parameters to identify soil quality degradation due to changed land use pattern in sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam) gardens of Highlands of Papua New Guinea. Soils with widely differing exchangeable and non-exchangeable K contents were successively extracted 569 h in 0.01 M CaCl2 and K release data was fitted to four mathematical models: first order, power, parabolic diffusion and Elovich equations. Results showed two distinct parts in the K release curves and 58-80% of total K were released to solution phase within 76 h (first 5 extractions) with 20-42% K released in the later parts (after 76 h). Soils from older gardens which were subjected to intensive and prolonged land use showed significantly (P < 0.05) lower cumulative K release potential than the gardens which are recently brought to cultivation (new gardens). Among four equations, first order and power equations best described the K release pattern and the constant b, an index of K+ release rates, ranged from 0.005-0.008 mg kg-1h-1 in first order model, and was between 0.14 and 0.83 mg kg-1h-1 in power model for the soils. In the non-volcanic soils, model constant b values were significantly (P < 0.05) higher than the volcanic soils thus indicative of vulnerability of volcanic soils to K deficiency. The food garden soils need management interventions either through improved fallow management or through mineral fertilizers plus animal manures to sustain productivity.

  15. Insect pests of sweetpotato in Uganda: farmers' perceptions of their importance and control practices.

    PubMed

    Okonya, Joshua Sikhu; Mwanga, Robert Om; Syndikus, Katja; Kroschel, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Insect pests are among the most important constraints limiting sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas) production in Africa. However, there is inadequate information about farmers' knowledge, perceptions and practices in the management of key insect pests. This has hindered development of effective pest management approaches for smallholder farmers. A standard questionnaire was used to interview individual sweetpotato farmers (n = 192) about their perception and management practices regarding insect pests in six major sweetpotato producing districts of Uganda. The majority (93%) of farmers perceived insect pests to be a very serious problem. With the exception of Masindi and Wakiso districts where the sweetpotato butterfly (Acraea acerata) was the number one constraint, sweetpotato weevils (Cylas puncticollis and C. brunneus) were ranked as the most important insect pests. Insecticide use in sweetpotato fields was very low being highest (28-38% of households) in districts where A. acerata infestation is the biggest problem. On average, 65% and 87% of the farmers took no action to control A. acerata and Cylas spp., respectively. Farmers were more conversant with the presence of and damage by A. acerata than of Cylas spp. as they thought that Cylas spp. root damage was brought about by a prolonged dry season. Different levels of field resistance (ability of a variety to tolerate damage) of sweetpotato landraces to A. acerata (eight landraces) and Cylas spp. (six landraces) were reported by farmers in all the six districts. This perceived level of resistance to insect damage by landraces needs to be investigated. To improve farmers' capabilities for sweetpotato insect pest management, it is crucial to train them in the basic knowledge of insect pest biology and control.

  16. Zinc, copper, or cerium accumulation from metal oxide nanoparticles or ions in sweet potato: Yield effects and projected dietary intake from consumption.

    PubMed

    Bradfield, Scott J; Kumar, Pawan; White, Jason C; Ebbs, Stephen D

    2017-01-01

    The potential release of metal oxide engineered nanoparticles (ENP) into agricultural systems has created the need to evaluate the impact of these materials on crop yield and food safety. The study here grew sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) to maturity in field microcosms using substrate amended with three concentrations (100, 500 or 1000 mg kg DW(-1)) of either nZnO, nCuO, or nCeO2 or equivalent amounts of Zn(2+), Cu(2+), or Ce(4+). Adverse effects on tuber biomass were observed only for the highest concentration of Zn or Cu applied. Exposure to both forms of Ce had no adverse effect on yield and a slight positive benefit at higher concentrations on tuber diameter. The three metals accumulated in both the peel and flesh of the sweet potato tubers, with concentrations higher in the peel than the flesh for each element. For Zn, >70% of the metal was in the flesh and for Cu >50%. The peels retained 75-95% of Ce in the tubers. The projected dietary intake of each metal by seven age-mass classes from child to adult only exceeded the oral reference dose for chronic toxicity in a scenario where children consumed tubers grown at the highest metal concentration. The results throughout were generally not different between the ENP- and ionic-treatments, suggesting that the added ENPs underwent dissolution to release their component ions prior to accumulation. The results offer insight into the fate and impact of these ENPs in soils. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Sweet Potato Peels and Cancer Prevention.

    PubMed

    Oluyori, Abimbola Peter; Shaw, Arun Kumar; Olatunji, Gabriel Ademola; Rastogi, Preeti; Meena, Sanjeev; Datta, Dipak; Arora, Ashish; Reddy, Sammajay; Puli, Saidha

    2016-01-01

    A bioassay-guided fractionation of an alcoholic extract from the peels of Ipomoea batatas Lam has been carried out. Sulforhodamine B and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assays were used to evaluate the anticancer and antioxidant potential, respectively, while silica gel column chromatography (CC) was used to isolate compounds that were characterized using 1D- and 2D-NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) and mass spectrometry. The alcoholic extract was fractionated into n-hexane, ethyl acetate, n-butanol, and water. The n-hexane fraction which showed the most promising anticancer activity was further fractionated via silica gel CC into IB-F002A, IB-F002B, and IB-F002C. Of these, IB-F002C was the most active with IC50 values 24.75, 47.91, 52.37, 34.17, 46.07, and 25.89 μg/ml against breast, colon-1, colon-2, ovary, lung, and head/neck cancer cell lines, respectively. The bioassay-guided isolation from IB-F002C afforded a glucocerebroside, which showed 10.51%, 12.19%, 16.14%, and 34.05% inhibition of head and neck, breast-1, colon-1, and ovarian cancer cell lines, respectively. Octadecyl coumarate, 7-hydroxycoumarin, and 6-methoxy-7-hydroxycoumarin that showed different antioxidant potentials were also identified in this study. Sweet potato peel, which is usually discarded as waste, contains constituents that can serve as dietary components to prevent the development of different types of cancer.

  18. [Variations of flavanoid contents in vine tips among different varieties, parts and time of topping of sweetpotato for vegetable-use].

    PubMed

    Fu, Yufan; Zeng, Lingjiang; Yang, Chunxian; Liao, Zhihua; Zhang, Qitang

    2010-05-01

    To study the variations of flavonoids contents in vine tips of sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas) among different varieties, parts and the time of topping. The flavonoid contents in leaf, petiole and stem of vine tips at 6 different topping time of 3 varieties for vegetable-use Pushu 53, Guangcaishu No. 2 and Fushu 7-6, which were collected from Chongqing were determined by UV spectrophotometry with rutin as a standard substance. The results showed that the flavonoid content of Guangcaishu No. 2 was higher than that of Pusu 53, so was that of Pusu 53 than that of Fushu 7-6. The average flavonoid contents in leaf of 3 varieties were between 3.66 mg x L(-1) and 11.09 mg x L(-1) during 6 topping time, and those in petiole, stem were between 2.20-5.26 mg x L(-1) and 4.03-7.79 mg x L(-1), respectively. The rations of average flavonoid contents in leaf, petiole and stem to the total contents of vine tips among 3 varieties during their whole topping periods were 46.71%, 20.65% and 32.63%, respectively. The contents during earlier topping time were higher than those of later periods. The variance analysis of flavonoid contents revealed that there was significant difference between different varieties, parts and time of topping and significant interactions among varieties, parts and time of topping. The results of the study indicate that the contents of flavonoid should be considered for the breeding, cultivation and industrialization of sweetpotato for vegetable-use.

  19. Effects of a killed-cover crop mulching system on sweetpotato production, soil pests, and insect predators in South Carolina.

    PubMed

    Jackson, D Michael; Harrison, Howard F

    2008-12-01

    Sweetpotatoes, Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam. (Convolvulaceae), are typically grown on bare soil where weeds and erosion can be serious problems. Conservation tillage systems using cover crop residues as mulch can help reduce these problems, but little is known about how conservation tillage affects yield and quality of sweetpotato or how these systems impact populations of beneficial and pest insects. Therefore, field experiments were conducted at the U.S. Vegetable Laboratory, Charleston, SC, in 2002-2004 to evaluate production of sweetpotatoes in conventional tillage versus a conservation tillage system by using an oat (Avena sativa L. (Poaceae)-crimson clover (Trifolium incarnatum L.) (Fabaceae) killed-cover crop (KCC) mulch. The four main treatments were 1) conventional tillage, hand-weeded; 2) KCC, hand-weeded; 3) conventional tillage, weedy; and 4) KCC, weedy. Each main plot was divided into three subplots, whose treatments were sweetpotato genotypes: 'Ruddy', which is resistant to soil insect pests; and 'SC1149-19' and 'Beauregard', which are susceptible to soil insect pests. For both the KCC and conventional tillage systems, sweetpotato yields were higher in plots that received hand weeding than in weedy plots. Orthogonal contrasts revealed a significant effect of tillage treatment (conventional tillage versus KCC) on yield in two of the 3 yr. Ruddy remained resistant to injury by soil insect pests in both cropping systems; and it consistently had significantly higher percentages of clean roots and less damage by wireworm-Diabrotica-Systena complex, sweetpotato flea beetles, grubs, and sweetpotato weevils than the two susceptible genotypes. In general, injury to sweetpotato roots by soil insect pests was not significantly higher in the KCC plots than in the conventionally tilled plots. Also, more fire ants, rove beetles, and carabid beetle were captured by pitfall traps in the KCC plots than in the conventional tillage plots during at least 1 yr of the study

  20. Potential of Trap Crops for Integrated Management of the Tropical Armyworm, Spodoptera litura in Tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhongshi; Chen, Zepeng; Xu, Zaifu

    2010-01-01

    The tropical armyworm, Spodoptera litura (F.) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), is an important pest of tobacco, Nicotiana tabacum L. (Solanales: Solanaceae), in South China that is becoming increasingly resistant to pesticides. Six potential trap crops were evaluated to control S. litura on tobacco. Castor bean, Ricinus communis L. (Malpighiales: Euphorbiaceae), and taro, Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott (Alismatales: Araceae), hosted significantly more S. litura than peanut, Arachis hypogaea L. (Fabales: Fabaceae), sweet potato, Ipomoea batata Lam. (Solanales: Convolvulaceae) or tobacoo in a greenhouse trial, and tobacco field plots with taro rows hosted significantly fewer S. litura than those with rows of other trap crops or without trap crops, provided the taro was in a fast-growing stage. When these crops were grown along with eggplant, Solanum melongena L. (Solanales: Solanaceae), and soybean, Glycines max L. (Fabales: Fabaceae), in separate plots in a randomized matrix, tobacco plots hosted more S. litura than the other crop plots early in the season, but late in the season, taro plots hosted significantly more S. litura than tobacco, soybean, sweet potato, peanut or eggplant plots. In addition, higher rates of S. litura parasitism by Microplitis prodeniae Rao and Chandry (Hymenoptera: Bracondidae) and Campoletis chlorideae Uchida (Ichnumonidae) were observed in taro plots compared to other crop plots. Although taro was an effective trap crop for managing S. litura on tobacco, it did not attract S. litura in the seedling stage, indicating that taro should either be planted 20–30 days before tobacco, or alternative control methods should be employed during the seedling stage. PMID:20874598

  1. Mitochondrial DNA Fragmentation as a Molecular Tool to Monitor Thermal Processing of Plant-Derived, Low-Acid Foods, and Biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Jane M; Pérez-Díaz, Ilenys M; Sandeep, K P; Simunovic, Josip; Harris, Keith; Osborne, Jason A; Hassan, Hosni M

    2015-08-01

    Cycle threshold (Ct) increase, quantifying plant-derived DNA fragmentation, was evaluated for its utility as a time-temperature integrator. This novel approach to monitoring thermal processing of fresh, plant-based foods represents a paradigm shift. Instead of using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) to detect pathogens, identify adulterants, or authenticate ingredients, this rapid technique was used to quantify the fragmentation of an intrinsic plant mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) gene over time-temperature treatments. Universal primers were developed which amplified a mitochondrial gene common to plants (atp1). These consensus primers produced a robust qPCR signal in 10 vegetables, 6 fruits, 3 types of nuts, and a biofuel precursor. Using sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) puree as a model low-acid product and simple linear regression, Ct value was highly correlated to time-temperature treatment (R(2) = 0.87); the logarithmic reduction (log CFU/mL) of the spore-forming Clostridium botulinum surrogate, Geobacillus stearothermophilus (R(2) = 0.87); and cumulative F-value (min) in a canned retort process (R(2) = 0.88), all comparisons conducted at 121 °C. D121 and z-values were determined for G. stearothermophilus ATCC 7953 and were 2.71 min and 11.0 °C, respectively. D121 and z-values for a 174-bp universal plant amplicon were 11.3 min and 9.17 °C, respectively, for mtDNA from sweet potato puree. We present these data as proof-of-concept for a molecular tool that can be used as a rapid, presumptive method for monitoring thermal processing in low-acid plant products. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  2. Effects of Purple-fleshed Sweet Potato (Ipomoera batatas Cultivar Ayamurasaki) Powder Addition on Color and Texture Properties and Sensory Characteristics of Cooked Pork Sausages during Storage

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Sang-Keun; Kim, Yeong-Jung; Park, Jae Hong; Hur, In-Chul; Nam, Sang-Hae; Shin, Daekeun

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of adding purple-fleshed sweet potato (PFP) powder on the texture properties and sensory characteristics of cooked pork sausage. Sodium nitrite alone and sodium nitrite in combination with PFP were added to five different treatments sausages (CON (control) = 0.01% sodium nitrite, SP25 = 0.005% sodium nitrite and 0.25% purple-fleshed sweet potato powder combination, SP50 = 0.005% sodium nitrite and 0.5% purple-fleshed sweet potato powder combination, PP25 = 0.25% purple-fleshed sweet potato powder, PP50 = 0.5% purple-fleshed sweet potato powder). The sausages were cooked to 74°C, stored at 4°C for 6 wks, and used for chemical analysis, textural properties, and a sensory evaluation on 0, 2, 4 and 6 wks of storage, respectively. Similar CIE a* and b* values were determined in sausages from CON, SP25 and SP50 at the end of storage, and they were higher in CIE a* but lower in CIE b* than that of the PP25 and PP50 sausages. Significant differences were observed for brittleness and hardness when PFP was added to the sausages but were not confirmed after 4 wks of storage. The objective color score was influenced by adding PFP; however, the effect was not dose dependent. In overall acceptability, panelists favored the CON, SP25, SP50, and PP50 sausages but did not prefer PP25 sausages at the end of storage. Therefore, adding PFP to cooked pork sausages improved color and texture properties and sensory characteristics, but further study is needed to determine the proper ratio of sodium nitrite and PFP. PMID:25049698

  3. [Study of the possibility of utilizing the transpired mositure condensate from sweet potato for growing plants in biological life support systems].

    PubMed

    Derendiaeva, T A

    1976-01-01

    The effect of nonpurified condensate obtained during prolonged cultivation of batata in a sealed chamber upon batata cuttings and seedlings of garden cress, radish and Chinese cabbage was studied. It was shown that nonpurified condensate produced an inhibitory effect on the formation of roots in batata cuttings and on the growth of previously developed roots of batata cuttings and seedlings. The studies which used a chemical model of 3,4-dihydroxy phenylalanine indicated that the condensate contained biologically active substance of organic origin. However, only experiments with the real continuous culture of batata, using real dilutions of the condensate that depend on the size of the greenhouse and the amount of the nutrient solution would clarify wheather condensate of transpiration water of batata plants can be repeatedly utilized in life support systems.

  4. Kinetics of potassium release in sweet potato cropped soils: a case study in the highlands of Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajashekhar Rao, B. K.

    2015-02-01

    The present study attempts to employ potassium (K) release parameters to identify soil-quality degradation due to changed land use patterns in sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam) farms of the highlands of Papua New Guinea. Rapid population increase in the region increased pressure on the land to intensify subsistence production mainly by reducing fallow periods. Such continuous cropping practice coupled with lack of K fertilization practices could lead to a rapid loss of soil fertility and soil-resource degradation. The study aims to evaluate the effects of crop intensification on the K-release pattern and identify soil groups vulnerable to K depletion. Soils with widely differing exchangeable and non-exchangeable K contents were sequentially extracted for periods between 1 and 569 h in 0.01 M CaCl2, and K-release data were fitted to four mathematical models: first order, power, parabolic diffusion and Elovich equations. Results showed two distinct parts in the K-release curves, and 58-80% of total K was released to solution phase within 76 h (first five extractions) with 20-42% K released in the later parts (after 76 h). Soils from older farms that were subjected to intensive and prolonged land use showed significantly (P < 0.05) lower cumulative K-release potential than the farms recently brought to cultivation (new farms). Among the four equations, first-order and power equations best described the K-release pattern; the constant b, an index of K-release rates, ranged from 0.005 to 0.008 mg kg-1 h-1 in the first-order model and was between 0.14 and 0.83 mg kg-1 h-1 in the power model for the soils. In the non-volcanic soils, model constant b values were significantly (P < 0.05) higher than the volcanic soils, thus indicating the vulnerability of volcanic soils to K deficiency. The volcanic soils cropped for several crop cycles need immediate management interventions either through improved fallow management or through mineral fertilizers plus animal manures

  5. Biocompatibility of sweetpotato and peanut in a hydroponic system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mortley, D. G.; Loretan, P. A.; Hill, W. A.; Bonsi, C. K.; Morris, C. E.; Hall, R.; Sullen, D.

    1998-01-01

    'Georgia Red' peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) and TU-82-155 sweetpotato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam] were grown in monocultured or intercropped recirculating hydroponic systems in a greenhouse using the nutrient film technique (NFT). The objective was to determine whether growth and subsequent yield would be affected by intercropping. Treatments were sweetpotato monoculture (SP), peanut monoculture (PN), and sweetpotato and peanut grown in separate NFT channels but sharing a common nutrient solution (SP-PN). Greenhouse conditions ranged from 24 to 33 degrees C, 60% to 90% relative humidity (RH), and photosynthetic photon flux (PPF) of 200 to 1700 micromoles m-2 s-1. Sweetpotato cuttings (15 cm long) and 14-day-old seedlings of peanuts were planted into growth channels (0.15 x 0.15 x 1.2 m). Plants were spaced 25 cm apart within and 25 cm apart between growing channels. A modified half-Hoagland solution with a 1 N: 2.4 K ratio was used. Solution pH was maintained between 5.5 and 6.0 for treatments involving SP and 6.4 and 6.7 for PN. Electrical conductivity (EC) ranged between 1100 and 1200 microS cm-1. The number of storage roots per sweetpotato plant was similar for both SP and SP-PN. Storage root fresh and dry mass were 29% and 36% greater, respectively, for plants in the SP-PN treatment than for plants in the SP treatment. The percent dry mass of the storage roots, dry mass of fibrous and pencil roots, and the length-to-diameter ratio of storage roots were similar for SP and SP-PN sweetpotato plants. Likewise, foliage fresh and dry mass and harvest index were not significantly influenced by treatment. Total dry mass was 37% greater for PN than for SP-PN peanut plants, and pod dry mass was 82% higher. Mature and total seed dry mass and fibrous root dry mass were significantly greater for PN than for SP-PN plants. Harvest index (HI) was similar for both treatments. Root length tended to be lower for seedlings grown in the nutrient solution from the SP-PN treatment.