Science.gov

Sample records for halo high velocity

  1. Mixing between high velocity clouds and the galactic halo

    SciTech Connect

    Gritton, Jeffrey A.; Shelton, Robin L.; Kwak, Kyujin E-mail: rls@physast.uga.edu

    2014-11-01

    In the Galactic halo, metal-bearing Galactic halo material mixes into high velocity clouds (HVCs) as they hydrodynamically interact. This interaction begins long before the clouds completely dissipate and long before they slow to the velocity of the Galactic material. In order to make quantitative estimates of the mixing efficiency and resulting metal enrichment of HVCs, we made detailed two- and three-dimensional simulations of cloud-interstellar medium interactions. Our simulations track the hydrodynamics and time-dependent ionization levels. They assume that the cloud originally has a warm temperature and extremely low metallicity while the surrounding medium has a high temperature, low density, and substantial metallicity, but our simulations can be generalized to other choices of initial metallicities. In our simulations, mixing between cloud and halo gas noticeably raises the metallicity of the high velocity material. We present plots of the mixing efficiency and metal enrichment as a function of time.

  2. High-velocity pulsars in the galactic halo.

    PubMed

    Eichler, D; Silk, J

    1992-08-14

    It is proposed that high-velocity pulsars are produced in extended galactic halos, and possibly in extragalactic space, from primordial (population III) stars. Such a population of neutron stars could provide an explanation for the gamma-ray bursters and would then accommodate the possibility that most bursters are not in the visible parts of galaxies.

  3. Trigonometric parallaxes of high velocity halo white dwarf candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducourant, C.; Teixeira, R.; Hambly, N. C.; Oppenheimer, B. R.; Hawkins, M. R. S.; Rapaport, M.; Modolo, J.; Lecampion, J. F.

    2007-07-01

    Context: The status of 38 halo white dwarf candidates identified by Oppenheimer et al. (2001, Science, 292, 698) has been intensively discussed by various authors. In analyses undertaken to date, trigonometric parallaxes are crucial missing data. Distance measurements are mandatory to kinematically segregate halo object from disk objects and hence enable a more reliable estimate of the local density of halo dark matter residing in such objects. Aims: We present trigonometric parallax measurements for 15 candidate halo white dwarfs (WDs) selected from the Oppenheimer et al. (2001) list. Methods: We observed the stars using the ESO 1.56-m Danish Telescope and ESO 2.2-m telescope from August 2001 to July 2004. Results: Parallaxes with accuracies of 1-2 mas were determined yielding relative errors on distances of ~5% for 6 objects, ~12% for 3 objects, and ~20% for two more objects. Four stars appear to be too distant (probably farther than 100 pc) to have measurable parallaxes in our observations. Conclusions: Distances, absolute magnitudes and revised space velocities were derived for the 15 halo WDs from the Oppenheimer et al. (2001) list. Halo membership is confirmed unambiguously for 6 objects while 5 objects may be thick disk members and 4 objects are too distant to draw any conclusion based solely on kinematics. Comparing our trigonometric parallaxes with photometric parallaxes used in previous work reveals an overestimation of distance as derived from photometric techniques. This new data set can be used to revise the halo white dwarf space density, and that analysis will be presented in a subsequent publication. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile (067.D-0107, 069.D-0054, 070.D-0028, 071.D-0005, 072.D-0153, 073.D-0028).

  4. A Gravitational Double-scattering Mechanism for Generating High-velocity Objects during Halo Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samsing, Johan

    2015-02-01

    We present a dynamical model that describes how halo particles can receive a significant energy kick from the merger between their own host halo and a target halo. This could provide a possible explanation for some high-velocity objects, including extended systems like globular clusters (GCs). In the model we especially introduce a double-scattering mechanism, where a halo particle receives a significant part of its total energy kick by first undergoing a gravitational deflection by the target halo and subsequently by its original host halo. This generates an energy kick that is due to the relative velocity between the halos during the deflections. We derive analytically the total kick energy of the particle, which is composed of energy from the double-scattering mechanism and tidal fields, as a function of its position in its original host halo just before merger. In the case of a 1:10 merger, we find that the presented mechanisms can easily generate particles with a velocity approximately two times the virial velocity of the target halo. This motivates us to suggest that the high velocity of the recently discovered GC HVGC-1 can be explained by a head-on halo merger. Finally, we illustrate the orbital evolution of high-velocity particles outside the virial sphere of the target halo by solving the equation of motion in an expanding universe. We find a sweet spot around a scale factor of 0.3-0.5 for ejecting particles into large orbits, which can easily reach beyond approximately five virial radii.

  5. A GRAVITATIONAL DOUBLE-SCATTERING MECHANISM FOR GENERATING HIGH-VELOCITY OBJECTS DURING HALO MERGERS

    SciTech Connect

    Samsing, Johan

    2015-02-01

    We present a dynamical model that describes how halo particles can receive a significant energy kick from the merger between their own host halo and a target halo. This could provide a possible explanation for some high-velocity objects, including extended systems like globular clusters (GCs). In the model we especially introduce a double-scattering mechanism, where a halo particle receives a significant part of its total energy kick by first undergoing a gravitational deflection by the target halo and subsequently by its original host halo. This generates an energy kick that is due to the relative velocity between the halos during the deflections. We derive analytically the total kick energy of the particle, which is composed of energy from the double-scattering mechanism and tidal fields, as a function of its position in its original host halo just before merger. In the case of a 1:10 merger, we find that the presented mechanisms can easily generate particles with a velocity approximately two times the virial velocity of the target halo. This motivates us to suggest that the high velocity of the recently discovered GC HVGC-1 can be explained by a head-on halo merger. Finally, we illustrate the orbital evolution of high-velocity particles outside the virial sphere of the target halo by solving the equation of motion in an expanding universe. We find a sweet spot around a scale factor of 0.3-0.5 for ejecting particles into large orbits, which can easily reach beyond approximately five virial radii.

  6. High-velocity gas toward the LMC resides in the Milky Way halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, P.; de Boer, K. S.; Werner, K.; Rauch, T.

    2015-12-01

    Aims: To explore the origin of high-velocity gas in the direction of the Large Magellanic Cloud, (LMC) we analyze absorption lines in the ultraviolet spectrum of a Galactic halo star that is located in front of the LMC at d = 9.2+4.1-7.2 kpc distance. Methods: We study the velocity-component structure of low and intermediate metal ions (C ii, Si ii, Si iii) in the spectrum of RX J0439.8-6809, as obtained with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) onboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), and measure equivalent widths and column densities for these ions. We supplement our COS data with a Far-Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) spectrum of the nearby LMC star Sk -69 59 and with H i 21 cm data from the Leiden-Argentina-Bonn (LAB) survey. Results: Metal absorption toward RX J0439.8-6809 is unambiguously detected in three different velocity components near vLSR = 0, + 60, and + 150 km s-1. The presence of absorption proves that all three gas components are situated in front of the star, thus located in the disk and inner halo of the Milky Way. For the high-velocity cloud (HVC) at vLSR = + 150 km s-1, we derive an oxygen abundance of [O/H] =-0.63 (~0.2 solar) from the neighboring Sk -69 59 sight line, in accordance with previous abundance measurements for this HVC. From the observed kinematics we infer that the HVC hardly participates in the Galactic rotation. Conclusions: Our study shows that the HVC toward the LMC represents a Milky Way halo cloud that traces low column density gas with relatively low metallicity. We rule out scenarios in which the HVC represents material close to the LMC that stems from a LMC outflow.

  7. Formation of a Giant Galactic Gaseous Halo: Metal-Absorption Lines and High-Velocity Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fan

    1992-04-01

    A Galactic gaseous halo formed through the interstellar disk-halo connection is simulated by means of a two-dimensional axisymmetric hydrodynamic code based upon the chimney model of the interstellar medium, a new version of the galactic fountain. Galactic rotation, heating processes by diffuse UV flux, and radiative cooling processes are taken into account. The resulting gaseous halo can be divided into three categories, i.e., wind-type halo, bound-type halo, and cooled-type halo. In this way, we try to reproduce the column densities of C IV, N V, O VI, and Si IV in the observed absorption lines of halo stars. Assuming that the radiatively cooled halo gas condenses into clouds due to thermal instabilities, we can calculate their distribution and ballistic motions in the Galactic gravitational field. These correspond to the high- and intermediate-velocity clouds observed at high Galactic latitudes. We find that a cooled-type halo with a gas temperature between 5 X 10^5 and 10^6 K and a density between 10^-3 and 10^-2 cm^-3 at the disk-halo interface can reproduce the observational facts about our Galaxy. Supposing that the metal-absorption-line systems of QSOs arise from the halos of intervening galaxies formed by similar processes, we calculate features of the Ca II, Mg II, C IV, and Si IV absorption lines in various stages of galactic evolution. We conclude that C IV systems which are greater than 50 kpc in size correspond to the wind-type halo. On the other hand, Mg II and Ca II systems can only be detected in a very restricted region ( Metaxa, SMALL FAINT CLUSTERS IN THE LMC This is a short review of the main results of my Ph.D. thesis concerning some important problems on the dynamical properties of the LMC star clusters. The topic of this thesis was to find and study the dynamical paramters (tidal radius r_t core radius r_c concentration parameters log (r_t/r_c), and total mass M) for a large sample of small LMC clusters and to define their location in the

  8. A HIGH-VELOCITY BULGE RR LYRAE VARIABLE ON A HALO-LIKE ORBIT

    SciTech Connect

    Kunder, Andrea; Storm, J.; Rich, R. M.; Hawkins, K.; Poleski, R.; Johnson, C. I.; Shen, J.; Li, Z.-Y.; Cordero, M. J.; Nataf, D. M.; Bono, G.; Walker, A. R.; Koch, A.; De Propris, R.; Udalski, A.; Szymanski, M. K.; Soszynski, I.; Pietrzynski, G.; Ulaczyk, K.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; and others

    2015-07-20

    We report on the RR Lyrae variable star, MACHO 176.18833.411, located toward the Galactic bulge and observed within the data from the ongoing Bulge RR Lyrae Radial Velocity Assay, which has the unusual radial velocity of −372 ± 8 km s{sup −1} and true space velocity of −482 ± 22 km s{sup −1} relative to the Galactic rest frame. Located less than 1 kpc from the Galactic center and toward a field at (l, b) = (3, −2.5), this pulsating star has properties suggesting it belongs to the bulge RR Lyrae star population, yet a velocity indicating it is abnormal, at least with respect to bulge giants and red clump stars. We show that this star is most likely a halo interloper and therefore suggest that halo contamination is not insignificant when studying metal-poor stars found within the bulge area, even for stars within 1 kpc of the Galactic center. We discuss the possibility that MACHO 176.18833.411 is on the extreme edge of the bulge RR Lyrae radial velocity distribution, and also consider a more exotic scenario in which it is a runaway star moving through the Galaxy.

  9. The velocity shear tensor: tracer of halo alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Libeskind, Noam I.; Hoffman, Yehuda; Forero-Romero, Jaime; Gottlöber, Stefan; Knebe, Alexander; Steinmetz, Matthias; Klypin, Anatoly

    2013-01-01

    The alignment of dark matter (DM) haloes and the surrounding large-scale structure (LSS) is examined in the context of the cosmic web. Halo spin, shape and the orbital angular momentum of subhaloes are investigated relative to the LSS using the eigenvectors of the velocity shear tensor evaluated on a grid with a scale of 1 Mpc h-1, deep within the non-linear regime. Knots, filaments, sheets and voids are associated with regions that are collapsing along 3, 2, 1 or 0 principal directions simultaneously. Each halo is tagged with a web classification (i.e. knot halo, filament halo, etc.) according to the nature of the collapse at the halo position. The full distribution of shear eigenvalues is found to be substantially different from that tagged to haloes, indicating that the observed velocity shear is significantly biased. We find that larger mass haloes live in regions where the shear is more isotropic, namely the expansion or collapse is more spherical. A correlation is found between the halo shape and the eigenvectors of the shear tensor, with the longest (shortest) axis of the halo shape being aligned with the slowest (fastest) collapsing eigenvector. This correlation is web independent, suggesting that the velocity shear is a fundamental tracer of the halo alignment. A similar result is found for the alignment of halo spin with the cosmic web. It has been shown that high-mass haloes exhibit a spin flip with respect to the LSS: we find that the mass at which this spin flip occurs is web dependent and not universal as suggested previously. Although weaker than haloes, subhalo orbits too exhibit an alignment with the LSS, providing a possible insight into the highly correlated corotation of the Milky Way's satellite system. The present study suggests that the velocity shear tensor constitutes the natural framework for studying the directional properties of the non-linear LSS and those of haloes and galaxies.

  10. Gas motions within high-velocity cloud Complex A reveal that it is dissolving into the Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huey-You, Cannan; Barger, Kathleen; Nidever, David L.; Rueff, Katherine Meredith

    2017-01-01

    A massive gas cloud, known as Complex A, is headed towards our Galaxy. This high-velocity cloud is made up of 2 million solar masses of neutral and ionized hydrogen. This cloud is traveling through the Galactic halo, which causes a headwind that damages the cloud. Light escaping the Milky Way’s disk also hits the cloud and ionizes it. Using 21-cm radio observations from the Green Bank Telescope, we studied the motions of the gas. We found that diffuse gas is lagging behind the denser parts of the cloud. These motions suggest that gas is being stripped off the cloud and that it is dissolving into the Galactic halo. This disruptive process means that less gas will safely reach the disk of Milky Way and therefore the cloud will provide less gas for making future stars.

  11. Terminal Velocity Infall in QSO Absorption Line Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benjamin, Robert A.

    We explore the hypothesis that clouds detected in quasar absorption line systems are falling at a terminal velocity toward the center of high redshift gaseous galactic halos. Since both the ionization level and terminal velocity of halo clouds increase with increasing distance from the central galaxy, velocity resolved profiles of highly ionized gas are predicted to have a greater width than low ionization gas. A line of sight passing through the center of gaseous halo (an idealized damped Ly alpha system), yields low ionization absorption at the velocity of the galaxy, flanked by high ionization on either side. Reasonable halo parameters yield total velocity extents for C IV of Delta v_{C IV}=100-200 km s^{-1}, in agreement with many systems observed by Lu et al (1997). The remaining systems may better described by the rotating disk model of Prochaska & Wolfe (1998). Finally, observational tests are suggested for verifying or falsifying the terminal velocity hypothesis for these systems.

  12. RADIAL VELOCITIES OF GALACTIC HALO STARS IN VIRGO

    SciTech Connect

    Brink, Thomas G.; Mateo, Mario; Martinez-Delgado, David E-mail: mmateo@umich.ed

    2010-11-15

    We present multi-slit radial velocity measurements for 111 stars in the direction of the Virgo Stellar Stream (VSS). The stars were photometrically selected to be probable main-sequence stars in the Galactic halo. When compared with the radial velocity distribution expected for the halo of the Milky Way, as well as the distribution seen in a control field, we observe a significant excess of negative velocity stars in the field, which can likely be attributed to the presence of a stellar stream. This kinematic excess peaks at a Galactic standard of rest radial velocity of -75 km s{sup -1}. A rough distance estimate suggests that this feature extends from {approx}15 kpc out to, and possibly beyond, the {approx}30 kpc limit of the study. The mean velocity of these stars is incompatible with those of the VSS itself (V{sub gsr} {approx} 130 km s{sup -1}), which we weakly detect, but it is consistent with radial velocity measurements of nearby 2MASS M-giants and SDSS+SEGUE K/M-giants and blue horizontal branch stars that constitute the leading tidal tail of the Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal galaxy. Some oblate models for the shape of the Milky Way's dark matter halo predict that the leading arm of the Sagittarius Stream should pass through this volume, and have highly negative (V{sub gsr} {approx}< -200 km s{sup -1}) radial velocities, as it descends down from the northern Galactic hemisphere toward the Galactic plane. The kinematic feature observed in this study, if it is in fact Sagittarius debris, is not consistent with these predictions, and instead, like other leading stream radial velocity measurements, is consistent with a recently published triaxial halo model, or, if axisymmetry is imposed, favors a prolate shape for the Galactic halo potential. However, a rough distance estimate to the observed kinematic feature places it somewhat closer (D {approx} 15-30 kpc) than the Sagittarius models predict (D {approx} 35-45 kpc).

  13. HALO VELOCITY GROUPS IN THE PISCES OVERDENSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Sesar, Branimir; Ivezic, Zeljko; Vivas, A. Katherina; Duffau, Sonia E-mail: zi@u.washington.ed E-mail: sonia.duffau@gmail.co

    2010-07-01

    We report spectroscopic observations of five faint (V {approx} 20) RR Lyrae stars associated with the Pisces overdensity conducted with the Gemini South Telescope. At a heliocentric and galactocentric distance of {approx}80 kpc, this is the most distant substructure in the Galactic halo known to date. We combined our observations with literature data and confirmed that the substructure is composed of two different kinematic groups. The main group contains eight stars and has (V{sub gsr}) = 50 km s{sup -1}, while the second group contains four stars at a velocity of (V{sub gsr}) = -52 km s{sup -1}, where V{sub gsr} is the radial velocity in the galactocentric standard of rest. The metallicity distribution of RR Lyrae stars in the Pisces overdensity is centered on [Fe/H] = -1.5 dex and has a width of 0.3 dex. The new data allowed us to establish that both groups are spatially extended making it very unlikely that they are bound systems, and are more likely to be debris of a tidally disrupted galaxy or galaxies. Due to small sky coverage, it is still unclear whether these groups have the same or different progenitors.

  14. FERMI-LAT OBSERVATIONS OF HIGH- AND INTERMEDIATE-VELOCITY CLOUDS: TRACING COSMIC RAYS IN THE HALO OF THE MILKY WAY

    SciTech Connect

    Tibaldo, L.; Digel, S. W.; Franckowiak, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Negro, M.; Orlando, E.; Porter, T. A.; Reimer, O.; Casandjian, J. M.; Grenier, I. A.; Marshall, D. J.; Strong, A. W. E-mail: digel@stanford.edu

    2015-07-10

    It is widely accepted that cosmic rays (CRs) up to at least PeV energies are Galactic in origin. Accelerated particles are injected into the interstellar medium where they propagate to the farthest reaches of the Milky Way, including a surrounding halo. The composition of CRs coming to the solar system can be measured directly and has been used to infer the details of CR propagation that are extrapolated to the whole Galaxy. In contrast, indirect methods, such as observations of γ-ray emission from CR interactions with interstellar gas, have been employed to directly probe the CR densities in distant locations throughout the Galactic plane. In this article we use 73 months of data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope in the energy range between 300 MeV and 10 GeV to search for γ-ray emission produced by CR interactions in several high- and intermediate-velocity clouds (IVCs) located at up to ∼7 kpc above the Galactic plane. We achieve the first detection of IVCs in γ rays and set upper limits on the emission from the remaining targets, thereby tracing the distribution of CR nuclei in the halo for the first time. We find that the γ-ray emissivity per H atom decreases with increasing distance from the plane at 97.5% confidence level. This corroborates the notion that CRs at the relevant energies originate in the Galactic disk. The emissivity of the upper intermediate-velocity Arch hints at a 50% decline of CR densities within 2 kpc from the plane. We compare our results to predictions of CR propagation models.

  15. VELOCITY DISPERSION PROFILE OF THE MILKY WAY HALO

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Warren R.; Geller, Margaret J.; Kenyon, Scott J.; Diaferio, Antonaldo E-mail: mgeller@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: diaferio@ph.unito.it

    2010-01-15

    We present a spectroscopic sample of 910 distant halo stars from the Hypervelocity Star survey from which we derive the velocity dispersion profile of the Milky Way halo. The sample is a mix of 74% evolved horizontal branch stars and 26% blue stragglers. We estimate distances to the stars using observed colors, metallicities, and stellar evolution tracks. Our sample contains twice as many objects with R > 50 kpc as previous surveys. We compute the velocity dispersion profile in two ways: with a parametric method based on a Milky Way potential model and with a non-parametric method based on the caustic technique originally developed to measure galaxy cluster mass profiles. The resulting velocity dispersion profiles are remarkably consistent with those found by two independent surveys based on other stellar populations: the Milky Way halo exhibits a mean decline in radial velocity dispersion of -0.38 {+-} 0.12 km s{sup -1} kpc{sup -1} over 15 < R < 75 kpc. This measurement is a useful basis for calculating the total mass and mass distribution of the Milky Way halo.

  16. The ROCKSTAR Phase-space Temporal Halo Finder and the Velocity Offsets of Cluster Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behroozi, Peter S.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Wu, Hao-Yi

    2013-01-01

    We present a new algorithm for identifying dark matter halos, substructure, and tidal features. The approach is based on adaptive hierarchical refinement of friends-of-friends groups in six phase-space dimensions and one time dimension, which allows for robust (grid-independent, shape-independent, and noise-resilient) tracking of substructure; as such, it is named ROCKSTAR (Robust Overdensity Calculation using K-Space Topologically Adaptive Refinement). Our method is massively parallel (up to 105 CPUs) and runs on the largest current simulations (>1010 particles) with high efficiency (10 CPU hours and 60 gigabytes of memory required per billion particles analyzed). A previous paper has shown ROCKSTAR to have excellent recovery of halo properties; we expand on these comparisons with more tests and higher-resolution simulations. We show a significant improvement in substructure recovery compared to several other halo finders and discuss the theoretical and practical limits of simulations in this regard. Finally, we present results that demonstrate conclusively that dark matter halo cores are not at rest relative to the halo bulk or substructure average velocities and have coherent velocity offsets across a wide range of halo masses and redshifts. For massive clusters, these offsets can be up to 350 km s-1 at z = 0 and even higher at high redshifts. Our implementation is publicly available at http://code.google.com/p/rockstar.

  17. Measuring the Stellar Halo Velocity Anisotropy With 3D Kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Emily C.; Deason, Alis J.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Rockosi, Constance M.; van der Marel, Roeland P.; Sohn, S. Tony

    2016-08-01

    We present the first measurement of the anisotropy parameter β using 3D kinematic information outside of the solar neighborhood. Our sample consists of 13 Milky Way halo stars with measured proper motions and radial velocities in the line of sight of M31. Proper motions were measured using deep, multi-epoch HST imaging, and radial velocities were measured from Keck II/DEIMOS spectra. We measure β = -0.3-0.9 +0.4, which is consistent with isotropy, and inconsistent with measurements in the solar neighborhood. We suggest that this may be the kinematic signature of a relatively early, massive accretion event, or perhaps several such events.

  18. Velocity Structure and Plasma Properties in Halo CMEs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, William (Technical Monitor); Raymond, John C.

    2003-01-01

    We have identified a set of 23 Halo CMEs through July 2002 and 21 Partial Halo CMEs from the LASCO Halo CME Mail Archive for which Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) spectra exist. For each event we have collected basic information such as the event speed, whether or not UVCS caught the bright front, lines detected, Doppler shift and associated flare class. We have also obtained excellent observations of some of the spectacular events in November 2003, and we have made theoretical calculations pertaining to CME expansion at the heights observed by UVCS. We first analyzed the halo CMEs on 21 April and 24 August 2002 and the partial halo on 23 July 2002, because the X-class flares associated with these CMEs were extensively observed by RHESSI and other instruments as part of the MAX MILLENIUM campaign. These very fast CMEs showed extremely violent disruption of the pre-CME streamers, little or no cool prominence material, and the unusual (for UVCS heights) hot emission line [Fe XVIII]. Results, including a discussion of the current sheet interpretation for the [Fe XVIII] emission, are published in Raymond et al. and presented at the Fall 2002 AGU meeting and the solar physics summer school in L'Aquila, Italy. We are currently preparing two papers on the Dec. 28, 2000 partial halo event. This event was chosen to take advantage of the SEP event measured by WIND and ACE, and because a Type II radio burst coincides with the time that broad, blue-shifted O VI emission appeared in the UVCS spectra. One paper deals with a new density and velocity diagnostic for very fast CMEs; pumping of O VI lambda 1032 by Ly beta and pumping of O VI lambda 1038 by O VI lambda 1032. The other discusses physics of the shock wave and association with the SEP event. In the coming year we plan to expand the list of Halo and Partial Halo events observed by UVCS through the end of 2003. We will look at those events as a class to search for correlation between UV spectral characteristics

  19. High Velocity Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfire, M. G.; McKee, C. F.; Hollenbach, D. J.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Morrison, David (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    We calculate the thermal equilibrium gas temperature of high velocity clouds (HVCs) in the Galactic Halo. Our method accounts for the photoelectric heating from small grains and PAHs, and includes a detailed treatment of the ionization rates and heating due to the soft X-ray background and due to cosmic rays. Phase diagrams (thermal pressure P versus gas density n) are presented for gas with a range of dust/gas ratios (D/G) and a range of metallicities (Z). Variations in D/G affect mainly the photoelectric heating rate, while variations in Z affect both the photoelectric heating and gas cooling. Curves are shown for D/G = 1 (local value) to D/G less than approx. equal to 0.005 and for Z=1 (local value) to Z= 0.005. We find that a two phase medium (CNM + WNM) can be in pressure equilibrium with a hot (T approximately 1-2 x 10(exp 6) K) halo within a range of permitted pressures, P(sup min) to P(sup max). We take halo parameters consistent with observed properties of the soft X-ray background. In general, both P(sup min) and P(sup max) decrease with lower D/G due to a drop in photoelectric heating from grains, while. P(sup min) and P(sup max) increase with lower Z due to a drop in gas coolants. We demonstrate that successful two phase models can be constructed with pressure in the range 10(exp 3) less than approximately equal to P/k less than approximately equal to 10(exp 4) K cm(exp -3) consistent with the thermal pressure in the Galactic disk. In addition, using the observed relation between CNM density and distance in HVCs, (n = 75/fDkpc cm(exp -3); Wakker & Schwarz 1991, AA, 250, 484) we show that our pressure curves constrain the allowed range of HVC heights to be between 0.3 - 16 kpc.

  20. Cosmic web alignments with the shape, angular momentum and peculiar velocities of dark matter haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forero-Romero, Jaime E.; Contreras, Sergio; Padilla, Nelson

    2014-09-01

    We study the alignment of dark matter haloes with the cosmic web characterized by the tidal and velocity shear fields. We focus on the alignment of their shape, angular momentum and peculiar velocities. We use a cosmological N-body simulation that allows us to study dark matter haloes spanning almost five orders of magnitude in mass (109-1014) h-1 M⊙ and spatial scales of (0.5-1.0) h-1 Mpc to define the cosmic web. The strongest alignment is measured for halo shape along the smallest tidal eigenvector, e.g. along filaments and walls, with a signal that gets stronger as the halo mass increases. In the case of the velocity shear field only massive haloes >1012 h-1 M⊙ tend to have their shapes aligned along the largest tidal eigenvector, i.e. perpendicular to filaments and walls. For the angular momentum we find alignment signals only for haloes more massive than 1012 h-1 M⊙ both in the tidal and velocity shear fields where the preferences is to be parallel to the middle eigenvector; perpendicular to filaments and parallel to walls. Finally, the peculiar velocities show a strong alignment along the smallest tidal eigenvector for all halo masses; haloes move along filaments and walls. The same alignment is present with the velocity shear, albeit weaker and only for haloes less massive than 1012 h-1 M⊙. Our results show that the two different algorithms used to define the cosmic web describe different physical aspects of non-linear collapse and should be used in a complementary way to understand the cosmic web influence on galaxy evolution.

  1. High Resolution Numerical Studies of the Milky Way Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashkov, Valery

    2013-01-01

    The halo of the MilkyWay (MW) contains residual evidence of its hierarchical accretion history, such as stellar streams, dwarf satellite galaxies and possibly even intermediate-mass black holes the latter carried as they fell into the larger Galaxy. The discovery and study of these objects have the potential to answer elusive questions about our Galaxy, such as the accurate determination of its total mass, a fundamental quantity that determines the properties and fate of galaxies in the Universe. I use a particle tagging technique to dynamically populate the N-body Via Lactea II high-resolution simulation with stars. The method is calibrated using the observed luminosity function of Milky Way satellites and the concentration of their stellar populations, and self-consistently follows the accretion and disruption of progenitor dwarfs and the build-up of the stellar halo in a cosmological "live host". Simple prescriptions for assigning stellar populations to collisionless particles are able to reproduce many properties of the observed Milky Way halo and its surviving dwarf satellites, like velocity dispersions, sizes, brightness profiles, metallicities, and spatial distribution. I apply a standard mass estimation algorithm based on Jeans modelling of the line-of-sight velocity dispersion profiles to the simulated dwarf spheroidals, and test the accuracy of this technique. The inner mass-luminosity relation for currently detectable satellites is nearly flat in this mode! l, in qualitative agreement with the "common mass scale" found in Milky Way dwarfs. I extend the tagging approach to the study of intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs), and assess the size, properties, and detectability of the leftover accreted halo population. The method assigns a black hole to the most tightly bound central particle of each subhalo at infall according to an extrapolation of the MBH-sigma star relation, and self-consistently follows the accretion and disruption of Milky Way

  2. Cosmology with velocity dispersion counts: an alternative to measuring cluster halo masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldwell, C. E.; McCarthy, I. G.; Baldry, I. K.; Collins, C. A.; Schaye, J.; Bird, S.

    2016-11-01

    The evolution of galaxy cluster counts is a powerful probe of several fundamental cosmological parameters. A number of recent studies using this probe have claimed tension with the cosmology preferred by the analysis of the Planck primary cosmic microwave background (CMB) data, in the sense that there are fewer clusters observed than predicted based on the primary CMB cosmology. One possible resolution to this problem is systematic errors in the absolute halo mass calibration in cluster studies, which is required to convert the standard theoretical prediction (the halo mass function) into counts as a function of the observable (e.g. X-ray luminosity, Sunyaev-Zel'dovich flux, and optical richness). Here we propose an alternative strategy, which is to directly compare predicted and observed cluster counts as a function of the one-dimensional velocity dispersion of the cluster galaxies. We argue that the velocity dispersion of groups/clusters can be theoretically predicted as robustly as mass but, unlike mass, it can also be directly observed, thus circumventing the main systematic bias in traditional cluster counts studies. With the aid of the BAHAMAS suite of cosmological hydrodynamical simulations, we demonstrate the potential of the velocity dispersion counts for discriminating even similar Λ cold dark matter models. These predictions can be compared with the results from existing redshift surveys such as the highly complete Galaxy And Mass Assembly survey, and upcoming wide-field spectroscopic surveys such as the Wide Area Vista Extragalactic Survey and the Dark Energy Survey Instrument.

  3. Velocity Structure and Plasma Properties in Halo CMES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raymond, John C.

    2004-01-01

    We have identified a set of 23 Halo CMEs and 21 Partial Halo CMEs from the LASCO Halo CME Archive for which UVCS spectra exist through July 2002. For each event we have collected basic information such as the event speed, whether or not UVCS caught the bright front, lines detected, Doppler shift and associated flare class. We are currently analyzing the subset for which UVCS caught the CME front. We also obtained excellent observations of some of the spectacular events in November 2003, and we have made theoretical calculations pertaining to CME expansion at the heights observed by UVCS. In one event we were able to analyze the properties of the current sheet in detail.

  4. Determination of the large scale volume weighted halo velocity bias in simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yi; Zhang, Pengjie; Jing, Yipeng

    2015-06-01

    A profound assumption in peculiar velocity cosmology is bv=1 at sufficiently large scales, where bv is the volume-weighted halo(galaxy) velocity bias with respect to the matter velocity field. However, this fundamental assumption has not been robustly verified in numerical simulations. Furthermore, it is challenged by structure formation theory (Bardeen, Bond, Kaiser and Szalay, Astrophys. J. 304, 15 (1986); Desjacques and Sheth, Phys. Rev D 81, 023526 (2010), which predicts the existence of velocity bias (at least for proto-halos) due to the fact that halos reside in special regions (local density peaks). The major obstacle to measuring the volume-weighted velocity from N-body simulations is an unphysical sampling artifact. It is entangled in the measured velocity statistics and becomes significant for sparse populations. With recently improved understanding of the sampling artifact (Zhang, Zheng and Jing, 2015, PRD; Zheng, Zhang and Jing, 2015, PRD), for the first time we are able to appropriately correct this sampling artifact and then robustly measure the volume-weighted halo velocity bias. (1) We verify bv=1 within 2% model uncertainty at k ≲0.1 h /Mpc and z =0 - 2 for halos of mass ˜1012- 1013h-1M⊙ and, therefore, consolidate a foundation for the peculiar velocity cosmology. (2) We also find statistically significant signs of bv≠1 at k ≳0.1 h /Mpc . Unfortunately, whether this is real or caused by a residual sampling artifact requires further investigation. Nevertheless, cosmology based on the k ≳0.1 h /Mpc velocity data should be careful with this potential velocity bias.

  5. Elliptical galaxies with rapidly decreasing velocity dispersion profiles: NMAGIC models and dark halo parameter estimates for NGC 4494

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morganti, Lucia; Gerhard, Ortwin; Coccato, Lodovico; Martinez-Valpuesta, Inma; Arnaboldi, Magda

    2013-06-01

    NGC 4494 is one of several intermediate-luminosity elliptical galaxies inferred to have an unusually diffuse dark matter halo. We use the χ2-made-to-measure particle code NMAGIC to construct axisymmetric models of NGC 4494 from photometric and various kinematic data. The extended kinematics include light spectra in multiple slitlets out to 3.5Re, and hundreds of planetary nebula velocities out to ≃7Re, thus allowing us to probe the dark matter content and orbital structure in the halo. We use Monte Carlo simulations to estimate confidence boundaries for the halo parameters, given our data and modelling set-up. We find that the true potential of the dark matter halo is recovered within ΔG (merit function) ≲ 26 (Δχ2 ≲ 59) at the 70 per cent confidence level (CL), and within ΔG ≲ 32 (Δχ2 ≲ 70) at the 90 per cent CL. These numbers are much larger than the usually assumed Δχ2 = 2.3 (4.6) for the 70 per cent (90 per cent) CL for two free parameters, perhaps case dependent, but calling into question the general validity of the standard assumptions used for halo and black hole mass determinations. The best-fitting models for NGC 4494 have a dark matter fraction of about 0.6 ± 0.1 at 5Re (70 per cent CL) and are embedded in a dark matter halo with circular velocity ˜200 km s-1. The total circular velocity curve (CVC) is approximately flat at vc = 220 km s-1 outside ˜0.5Re. The orbital anisotropy of the stars is moderately radial. These results are independent of the assumed inclination of the galaxy, and edge-on models are preferred. Comparing with the haloes of NGC 3379 and NGC 4697, whose velocity dispersion profiles also decrease rapidly from the centre outwards, the outer CVCs and dark matter haloes are quite similar. NGC 4494 shows a particularly high dark matter fraction inside ˜ 3Re, and a strong concentration of baryons in the centre.

  6. The disk-halo interface of the Milky Way as observed with the Radial Velocity Experiment (RAVE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinmetz, Matthias

    2015-08-01

    The Radial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) is the largest wide-field spectroscopic stellar survey of the Milky Way in the pre-Gaia era. Over the period of 2003-2013, 574,630 spectra for 483,330 stars have been amassed in the Ca triplet region at 8410-8795 Å with resolving power R ~ 7500. Spectral range and resolution are comparable to the RVS unit of the Gaia Satellite. Radial velocities at 2km/s accuracy have been derived as well as stellar parameters and chemical abundances for Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Fe, and Ni. Furthermore, distances have been derived by combining RAVE data with 2MASS and APASS photometry.RAVE data have been applied to a multitude of questions regarding the dynamical and chemical evolution of the Milky Way. In this presentation I will focus on the interface between the thin and thick disk(s) and the Galactic halo, respectively, presenting data on systematic changes in abundence and alpha enrichment of the respectice stellar population with their kinematical properties (rotation velocity, velocity dispersion) out to distances of several kpc from the Sun. Furthermore, systematic changes in the chemical gradients will be presented. An analysis of high velocity stars reveals that while most have abundance properties typical for halo stars, a few stars have more disk-like chemical abundance pattern indicative of that these stars were formed in the disk but later on ejected into the stellar halo.

  7. The Velocity Anisotropy of Distant Milky Way Halo Stars from Hubble Space Telescope Proper Motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deason, A. J.; Van der Marel, R. P.; Guhathakurta, P.; Sohn, S. T.; Brown, T. M.

    2013-03-01

    Based on long baseline (5-7 years) multi-epoch HST/ACS photometry, used previously to measure the proper motion of M31, we present the proper motions (PMs) of 13 main-sequence Milky Way halo stars. The sample lies at an average distance of r ~= 24 kpc from the Galactic center, with a root-mean-square spread of 6 kpc. At this distance, the median PM accuracy is 5 km s-1. We devise a maximum likelihood routine to determine the tangential velocity ellipsoid of the stellar halo. The velocity second moments in the directions of the Galactic (l, b) system are < v^2_l > ^{1/2} = 123^{+29}_{-23} km s-1, and < v^2_b > ^{1/2} = 83^{+24}_{-16} km s-1. We combine these results with the known line-of-sight second moment, < v^2_los > ^{1/2} = 105 +/- 5 km s-1, at this langrrang to study the velocity anisotropy of the halo. We find approximate isotropy between the radial and tangential velocity distributions, with anisotropy parameter β = 0.0^{+0.2}_{-0.4}. Our results suggest that the stellar halo velocity anisotropy out to r ~ 30 kpc is less radially biased than solar neighborhood measurements. This is opposite to what is expected from violent relaxation, and may indicate the presence of a shell-type structure at r ~ 24 kpc. With additional multi-epoch HST data, the method presented here has the ability to measure the transverse kinematics of the halo for more stars, and to larger distances. This can yield new improved constraints on the stellar halo formation mechanism, and the mass of the Milky Way.

  8. High Velocity Gas Gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    A video tape related to orbital debris research is presented. The video tape covers the process of loading a High Velocity Gas Gun and firing it into a mounted metal plate. The process is then repeated in slow motion.

  9. Pairwise velocities of dark matter haloes: a test for the Λ cold dark matter model using the bullet cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Robert; Nagamine, Kentaro

    2012-02-01

    The existence of a bullet cluster (such as 1E 0657-56) poses a challenge to the concordance Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) model. Here we investigate the velocity distribution of dark matter (DM) halo pairs in large N-body simulations with differing box sizes (250 h-1 Mpc? Gpc) and resolutions. We examine various basic statistics such as the halo masses, pairwise halo velocities (v12), collisional angles and pair separation distances. We then compare our results to the initial conditions required to reproduce the observational properties of 1E 0657-56 in non-cosmological hydrodynamical simulations. We find that the high-velocity tail of the v12 distribution extends to greater velocities as we increase the simulation box size. We also find that the number of high v12 pairs increases as we increase the particle count and resolution with a fixed box size; however, this increase is mostly due to lower mass haloes which do not match the observed masses of 1E 0657-56. We find that the redshift evolution effect is not very strong for the v12 distribution function between z= 0.0 and z˜ 0.5. We identify some pairs whose v12 resemble the required initial conditions, however, even the best candidates have either wrong halo mass ratios or too large separations. Our simulations suggest that it is very difficult to produce such initial conditions at z= 0.0, 0.296 and 0.489 in comoving volumes as large as (2 h-1 Gpc)3. Based on the extrapolation of our cumulative v12 function, we find that one needs a simulation with a comoving box size of (4.48 h-1 Gpc)3 and 22403 DM particles in order to produce at least one pair of haloes that resembles the required v12 and observed masses of 1E 0657-56. From our simulated v12 probability distribution function, we find that the probability of finding a halo pair with v12≥ 3000 km s-1 and masses ? to be 2.76 × 10-8 at z= 0.489. We conclude that either 1E 0657-56 is incompatible with the concordance ΛCDM universe or the initial conditions

  10. Correlation Analysis between Spin, Velocity Shear, and Vorticity of Baryonic and Dark Matter Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L. L.

    2016-05-01

    Using cosmological hydrodynamic simulations, we investigate the alignments between velocity shear, vorticity, and the spin of dark matter halos, and study the correlation between baryonic and dark matter. We find that (1) mis-alignment between vorticity of baryonic and dark matter would develop on scales < 0.2h-1 Mpc; (2) the vorticity of baryonic matter exhibits stronger alignment/anti-alignment with the eigenvectors of velocity shear than that of dark matter; (3) small/massive halos spinning parallel/perpendicular to the host filaments are sensitive to the identification of cosmic web, simulation box size, and resolution. These factors might complicate the connection between the spins of dark matter halos and galaxies, and affect the correlation signal of the alignments of galaxy spin with nearby large-scale structures.

  11. The pairwise velocity difference of over 2000 BHB stars in the Milky Way halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Xiang-Xiang; Rix, Hans-Walter; Zhao, Gang

    2009-11-01

    Models of hierarchical galaxy formation predict that the extended stellar halos of galaxies like our Milky Way show a great deal of sub-structure, arising from disrupted satellites. Spatial sub-structure is directly observed, and has been quantified, in the Milky Way's stellar halo. Phase-space conservation implies that there should be sub-structure in position-velocity space. Here, we aim to quantify such position-velocity sub-structure, using a state-of-the art data set having over 2000 blue horizontal branch (BHB) stars with photometry and spectroscopy from SDSS. For stars in dynamically cold streams (“young" streams), we expect that pairs of objects that are physically close also have similar velocities. Therefore, we apply the well-established “pairwise velocity difference" (PVD) statistic <|ΔVlos|> (Δr), where we expect <|ΔVlod|> to drop for small separations Δr. We calculate the PVD for the SDSS BHB sample and find <|ΔVlos|> (Δr) approx const., i.e. no such signal. By making mock-observations of the simulations by Bullock & Johnston and applying the same statistic, we show that for individual, dynamically young streams, or assemblages of such streams, <|ΔVlod|> drops for small distance separations Δr, as qualitatively expected. However, for a realistic complete set of halo streams, the pair-wise velocity difference shows no signal, as the simulated halos are dominated by “dynamically old" phase-mixed streams. Our findings imply that the sparse sampling and the sample sizes in SDSS DR6 are still insufficient to use the position-velocity sub-structure for a stringent quantitative data-model comparison. Therefore, alternate statistics must be explored and much more densely sampled surveys, dedicated to the structure of the Milky Way, such as LAMOST, are needed.

  12. Large-scale structure after COBE: Peculiar velocities and correlations of cold dark matter halos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zurek, Wojciech H.; Quinn, Peter J.; Salmon, John K.; Warren, Michael S.

    1994-01-01

    Large N-body simulations on parallel supercomputers allow one to simultaneously investigate large-scale structure and the formation of galactic halos with unprecedented resolution. Our study shows that the masses as well as the spatial distribution of halos on scales of tens of megaparsecs in a cold dark matter (CDM) universe with the spectrum normalized to the anisotropies detected by Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) is compatible with the observations. We also show that the average value of the relative pairwise velocity dispersion sigma(sub v) - used as a principal argument against COBE-normalized CDM models-is significantly lower for halos than for individual particles. When the observational methods of extracting sigma(sub v) are applied to the redshift catalogs obtained from the numerical experiments, estimates differ significantly between different observation-sized samples and overlap observational estimates obtained following the same procedure.

  13. Stellar Mass Versus Stellar Velocity Dispersion: Which is Better for Linking Galaxies to Their Dark Matter Halos?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cheng; Wang, Lixin; Jing, Y. P.

    2013-01-01

    It was recently suggested that compared to its stellar mass (M *), the central stellar velocity dispersion (σ*) of a galaxy might be a better indicator for its host dark matter halo mass. Here we test this hypothesis by estimating the dark matter halo mass for central galaxies in groups as a function of M * and σ*. For this we have estimated the redshift-space cross-correlation function (CCF) between the central galaxies at given M * and σ* and a reference galaxy sample, from which we determine both the projected CCF, wp (rp ), and the velocity dispersion profile. A halo mass is then obtained from the average velocity dispersion within the virial radius. At fixed M *, we find very weak or no correlation between halo mass and σ*. In contrast, strong mass dependence is clearly seen even when σ* is limited to a narrow range. Our results thus firmly demonstrate that the stellar mass of central galaxies is still a good (if not the best) indicator for dark matter halo mass, better than the stellar velocity dispersion. The dependence of galaxy clustering on σ* at fixed M *, as recently discovered by Wake et al., may be attributed to satellite galaxies, for which the tidal stripping occurring within halos has stronger effect on stellar mass than on central stellar velocity dispersion.

  14. Highly-Ionized Gas in the Galactic Halo: A FUSE Survey of O 6 Absorption toward 22 Halo Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zsargo, J.; Sembach, K. R.; Howk, J. C.; Savage, B. D.

    2002-12-01

    Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) spectra of 22 Galactic halo stars are studied to determine the amount of O 6 in the Galactic halo between ~0.3 and ~10 kpc from the Galactic mid-plane. Strong O 6 λ 1031.93 absorption was detected toward 21 stars, and a reliable 3 σ upper limit was obtained toward HD 97991. The weaker member of the O 6 doublet at 1037.62 Å could be studied toward only six stars. The observed columns are reasonably consistent with a patchy exponential O 6 distribution with a mid-plane density of 1.7x10-8 cm-3 and scale height between 2.3 and 4 kpc. We do not see clear signs of strong high-velocity components in O 6 absorption along the Galactic sight lines, which indicates the general absence of high velocity O 6 within 2-5 kpc of the Galactic mid-plane. The correlation between the H 1 and O 6 intermediate velocity absorption is also poor. The O 6 velocity dispersions are much larger than the value of ~18 km/s expected from thermal broadening for gas at T ~ 3x105 K, the temperature at which O 6 is expected to reach its peak abundance in collisional ionization equilibrium. Turbulence, inflow, and outflow must have an effect on the shape of the O 6 profiles. Kinematical comparisons of O 6 with Ar 1 reveal that 9 of 21 sight lines are closely aligned in LSR velocity (|Δ VLSR| <=5 km/s ), while 8 of 21 exhibit significant velocity differences (|Δ VLSR| >= 15 km/s ). This dual behavior may indicate the presence of two different types of O 6-bearing environments toward the Galactic sight lines. Comparison of O 6 with other highly-ionized species suggests that the high ions are produced primarily by cooling hot gas in the Galactic fountain flow, and that turbulent mixing also has a significant contribution. The role of turbulent mixing is most important toward sight lines that sample supernova remnants like Loop I and IV. We are also able to show that the O 6 enhancement toward the Galactic center region that was observed in the FUSE

  15. Galaxy halo occupation at high redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullock, James S.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Somerville, Rachel S.

    2002-01-01

    We discuss how current and future data on the clustering and number density of z~3 Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs) can be used to constrain their relationship to dark matter haloes. We explore a three-parameter model in which the number of LBGs per dark halo scales like a power law in the halo mass: N(M)=(M/M1)S for M>Mmin. Here, Mmin is the minimum mass halo that can host an LBG, M1 is a normalization parameter, associated with the mass above which haloes host more than one observed LBG, and S determines the strength of the mass-dependence. We show how these three parameters are constrained by three observable properties of LBGs: the number density, the large-scale bias and the fraction of objects in close pairs. Given these three quantities, the three unknown model parameters may be estimated analytically, allowing a full exploration of parameter space. As an example, we assume a ΛCDM cosmology and consider the observed properties of a recent sample of spectroscopically confirmed LBGs. We find that the favoured range for our model parameters is Mmin~=(0.4-8)×1010h- 1Msolar, M1~=(6-10)×1012h- 1Msolar, and 0.9<~S<~1.1. The preferred region in Mmin expands by an order of magnitude, and slightly shallower slopes are acceptable if the allowed range of bg is permitted to span all recent observational estimates. We also discuss how the observed clustering of LBGs as a function of luminosity can be used to constrain halo occupation, although because of current observational uncertainties we are unable to reach any strong conclusions. Our methods and results can be used to constrain more realistic models that aim to derive the occupation function N(M) from first principles, and offer insight into how basic physical properties affect the observed properties of LBGs.

  16. Dwarf Dark Matter Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colín, P.; Klypin, A.; Valenzuela, O.; Gottlöber, Stefan

    2004-09-01

    We study properties of dark matter halos at high redshifts z=2-10 for a vast range of masses with the emphasis on dwarf halos with masses of 107-109 h-1 Msolar. We find that the density profiles of relaxed dwarf halos are well fitted by the Navarro, Frenk, & White (NFW) profile and do not have cores. We compute the halo mass function and the halo spin parameter distribution and find that the former is very well reproduced by the Sheth & Tormen model, while the latter is well fitted by a lognormal distribution with λ0=0.042 and σλ=0.63. We estimate the distribution of concentrations for halos in a mass range that covers 6 orders of magnitude, from 107 to 1013 h-1 Msolar, and find that the data are well reproduced by the model of Bullock et al. The extrapolation of our results to z=0 predicts that present-day isolated dwarf halos should have a very large median concentration of ~35. We measure the subhalo circular velocity functions for halos with masses that range from 4.6×109 to 1013 h-1 Msolar and find that they are similar when normalized to the circular velocity of the parent halo. Dwarf halos studied in this paper are many orders of magnitude smaller than well-studied cluster- and Milky Way-sized halos. Yet, in all respects the dwarfs are just downscaled versions of the large halos. They are cuspy and, as expected, more concentrated. They have the same spin parameter distribution and follow the same mass function that was measured for large halos.

  17. TWO DISTANT HALO VELOCITY GROUPS DISCOVERED BY THE PALOMAR TRANSIENT FACTORY

    SciTech Connect

    Sesar, Branimir; Cohen, Judith G.; Levitan, David; Kirby, Evan N.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Prince, Thomas A.; Grillmair, Carl J.; Laher, Russ R.; Surace, Jason A.; Juric, Mario; Ofek, Eran O.

    2012-08-20

    We report the discovery of two new halo velocity groups (Cancer groups A and B) traced by eight distant RR Lyrae stars and observed by the Palomar Transient Factory survey at R.A. {approx} 129 Degree-Sign , decl. {approx} 20 Degree-Sign (l {approx} 205 Degree-Sign , b {approx} 32 Degree-Sign ). Located at 92 kpc from the Galactic center (86 kpc from the Sun), these are some of the most distant substructures in the Galactic halo known to date. Follow-up spectroscopic observations with the Palomar Observatory 5.1 m Hale telescope and W. M. Keck Observatory 10 m Keck I telescope indicate that the two groups are moving away from the Galaxy at v-bar{sub gsr}{sup A} = 78.0{+-}5.6 km s{sup -1} (Cancer group A) and v-bar{sub gsr}{sup B} = 16.3{+-}7.1 km s{sup -1} (Cancer group B). The groups have velocity dispersions of {sigma}{sub v{sub g{sub s{sub r}{sup A}}}} = 12.4{+-}5.0 km s{sup -1} and {sigma}B{sub v{sub g{sub s{sub r}{sup B}}}} =14.9{+-}6.2 km s{sup -1} and are spatially extended (about several kpc), making it very unlikely that they are bound systems, and more likely to be debris of tidally disrupted dwarf galaxies or globular clusters. Both groups are metal-poor (median metallicities of [Fe/H]{sup A} = -1.6 dex and [Fe/H]{sup B} = -2.1 dex) and have a somewhat uncertain (due to small sample size) metallicity dispersion of {approx}0.4 dex, suggesting dwarf galaxies as progenitors. Two additional RR Lyrae stars with velocities consistent with those of the Cancer groups have been observed {approx}25 Degree-Sign east, suggesting possible extension of the groups in that direction.

  18. The Milky Way's halo in 6D: Gaia's Radial Velocity Spectrometer performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seabroke, George; Cropper, Mark; Katz, David; Sartoretti, Paola; Panuzzo, Pasquale; Marchal, Olivier; Gueguen, Alain; Benson, Kevin; Dolding, Chris; Huckle, Howard; Smith, Mike; Baker, Steve

    2016-08-01

    Gaia's Radial Velocity Spectrometer (RVS) has been operating in routine phase for over one year since initial commissioning. RVS continues to work well but the higher than expected levels of straylight reduce the limiting magnitude. The end-of-mission radial-velocity (RV) performance requirement for G2V stars was 15 km s-1 at V = 16.5 mag. Instead, 15 km s-1 precision is achieved at 15 < V < 16 mag, consistent with simulations that predict a loss of 1.4 mag. Simulations also suggest that changes to Gaia's onboard software could recover ~0.14 mag of this loss. Consequently Gaia's onboard software was upgraded in April 2015. The status of this new commissioning period is presented, as well as the latest scientific performance of the on-ground processing of RVS spectra. We illustrate the implications of the RVS limiting magnitude on Gaia's view of the Milky Way's halo in 6D using the Gaia Universe Model Snapshot (GUMS).

  19. Highly ionized gas in the Galactic halo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shull, J. Michael; Slavin, Jonathan D.

    1994-01-01

    We reexamine the values of electron density n(sub e) and gas pressure P/k in the interstellar medium (ISM) of the Galactic halo, as inferred from C IV emission and absorption lines and using current C IV atomic data. In a homogeneous model with 4.7 less than or equal to log T less than or equal to 5.3, the data are consistent with 0.01 less than or equal to n(sub e) less than or equal to 0.02/cu cm and 2200 less than or equal to P/k less than or equal to 3700/cu cm K, a factor of 2-3 higher than advocated by Martin & Bowyer (1990) and comparable to the thermal pressure in the disk. If some of the C IV absorption arises from nonemitting, photoionized gas, then the inferred density and pressure will increase accordingly. The volume filling factor for homogeneous models ranges from 0.5% to 5%. Because of the constraints arising from filling factor and radiated power, most of the C IV must arise from gas near the peak of the cooling curve, at log t less than or equal to 5.6. We relate both emission-line and absorption-line observations to recent models in which turbulent mixing layers and isobarically cooling supernova remnants (SNRs) provide significant amounts of halo gas at approximately 10(exp 5.3) K and process 20-40 solar mass/yr with a power of approximately 10(exp 41) ergs/sec. Since the observed C IV and N V absorption scale heights have been reported to differ, at 4.9 kpc and 1.6 kpc, respectively, we examine inhomogeneous models with different exponential scale heights of T, P, and SN energy input. The ISM may change its character with distance above the Galactic plane, as superbubbles and mixing layers dominate over isolated SNRs as the source of the C IV. For appropiate scale heights, the midplane pressure is twice the homogeneous values quoted above. The O IV lambda 1034 diffuse emission line, which can be used as a temperature diagnostic of the hot gas, is predicted to be comparable in strength to that of C IV lambda 1549 (approximately 6000 photons

  20. HALO384: a halo-based potency prediction algorithm for high-throughput detection of antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Woehrmann, Marcos H; Gassner, Nadine C; Bray, Walter M; Stuart, Joshua M; Lokey, Scott

    2010-02-01

    A high-throughput (HT) agar-based halo assay is described, which allows for rapid screening of chemical libraries for bioactivity in microorganisms such as yeast and bacteria. A pattern recognition algorithm was developed to identify halo-like shapes in plate reader optical density (OD) measurements. The authors find that the total growth inhibition within a detected halo provides an accurate estimate of a compound's potency measured in terms of its EC(50). The new halo recognition method performs significantly better than an earlier method based on single-point OD readings. An assay based on the halo algorithm was used to screen a 21,120-member library of drug-like compounds in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, leading to the identification of novel bioactive scaffolds containing derivatives of varying potencies. The authors also show that the HT halo assay can be performed with the pathogenic bacterium Vibrio cholerae and that liquid culture EC(50) values and halo scores show a good correlation in this organism. These results suggest that the HT halo assay provides a rapid and inexpensive way to screen for bioactivity in multiple microorganisms.

  1. High S/N Observations of Low-Ionization Gas Through the Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, D. M.; Roth, K. C.; Savage, B. D.; Lu, L.

    1993-12-01

    Optical absorption-line studies of extragalactic objects can now provide a sensitive probe of low-ionization gas over the full extent of the Galactic halo. Such work is particularly pertinent to a better understanding of the distances, metallicities, and sky coverage of the high-velocity clouds (HVCs) primarily observed in H I 21 cm emission. We have recently obtained high S/N, high resolution (20 km s(-1) ) KPNO 4-m echelle observations of the Ca II absorption toward the QSO 1821+643, the Seyfert galaxy Mkn 231, and SN 1993J in the galaxy M81. We detect a weak (W_lambda ~30 m Angstroms) Ca II component at an LSR velocity of -140 km s(-1) toward 1821+643 that corresponds to the Outer Arm H I HVC Complex. In the case of Mkn 231, we find no evidence of high-velocity Ca II absorption despite the location of this sightline near H I HVC Complex C. Our Ca II observations toward SN 1993J are especially exceptional in quality (S/N~500) and reveal absorption due to the Galactic halo, the disk of M81, and intergalactic material in the M81 group. Although the M81 disk gas dominates the absorption in the velocity region encompassing HVC Complex C, we do find a high-velocity component at +228 km s(-1) in Ca II that has also been seen in Mg II absorption with HST (Bowen et al. 1994, Ap. J. (Letters), in press). Our echelle spectra of SN 1993J also reveal detections of other interstellar atoms and molecules such as Ti II, Ca I, and CH(+) \\@. The Ti II measurement is particularly interesting in that it represents the first detection of Ti II toward an extragalactic object and indicates a Ti II scale height of about 1200 pc which is somewhat less than expected from observations of Ti II toward halo stars.

  2. The distance to the high velocity clouds of neutral hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bregman, Joel N.

    1992-01-01

    The goal of this project was to determine the distance to high velocity gas clouds. These clouds are believed to lie in the halo of the galaxy, but this is a matter of controversy. The technique was used to look for the effect of absorption by these clouds against the light of stars at various distances along the line of sight to these clouds. This was done in the ultraviolet using the International Ultraviolet Explorer. Absorption at the velocity of the clouds was not found in any of the stars, which have kiloparsec distances. It was concluded that the vertical distance to these clouds is at least 1.5 kpc, putting them firmly in the halo of the galaxy.

  3. Connecting massive galaxies to dark matter haloes in BOSS - I. Is galaxy colour a stochastic process in high-mass haloes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Shun; Leauthaud, Alexie; Hearin, Andrew P.; Bundy, Kevin; Zentner, Andrew R.; Behroozi, Peter S.; Reid, Beth A.; Sinha, Manodeep; Coupon, Jean; Tinker, Jeremy L.; White, Martin; Schneider, Donald P.

    2016-08-01

    We use subhalo abundance matching (SHAM) to model the stellar mass function (SMF) and clustering of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) `CMASS' sample at z ˜ 0.5. We introduce a novel method which accounts for the stellar mass incompleteness of CMASS as a function of redshift, and produce CMASS mock catalogues which include selection effects, reproduce the overall SMF, the projected two-point correlation function wp, the CMASS dn/dz, and are made publicly available. We study the effects of assembly bias above collapse mass in the context of `age matching' and show that these effects are markedly different compared to the ones explored by Hearin et al. at lower stellar masses. We construct two models, one in which galaxy colour is stochastic (`AbM' model) as well as a model which contains assembly bias effects (`AgM' model). By confronting the redshift dependent clustering of CMASS with the predictions from our model, we argue that that galaxy colours are not a stochastic process in high-mass haloes. Our results suggest that the colours of galaxies in high-mass haloes are determined by other halo properties besides halo peak velocity and that assembly bias effects play an important role in determining the clustering properties of this sample.

  4. A High-Throughput Yeast Halo Assay for Bioactive Compounds.

    PubMed

    Bray, Walter; Lokey, R Scott

    2016-09-01

    When a disk of filter paper is impregnated with a cytotoxic or cytostatic drug and added to solid medium seeded with yeast, a visible clear zone forms around the disk whose size depends on the concentration and potency of the drug. This is the traditional "halo" assay and provides a convenient, if low-throughput, read-out of biological activity that has been the mainstay of antifungal and antibiotic testing for decades. Here, we describe a protocol for a high-throughput version of the halo assay, which uses an array of 384 pins to deliver ∼200 nL of stock solutions from compound plates onto single-well plates seeded with yeast. Using a plate reader in the absorbance mode, the resulting halos can be quantified and the data archived in the form of flat files that can be connected to compound databases with standard software. This assay has the convenience associated with the visual readout of the traditional halo assay but uses far less material and can be automated to screen thousands of compounds per day.

  5. Full halo coronal mass ejections: Do we need to correct the projection effect in terms of velocity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Chenglong; Wang, Yuming; Pan, Zonghao; Zhang, Min; Ye, Pinzhong; Wang, S.

    2013-11-01

    The projection effect is one of the biggest obstacles in learning the real properties of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and forecasting their geoeffectiveness. To evaluate the projection effect, 86 full halo CMEs (FHCMEs) listed in the Coordinated Data Analysis Workshop CME catalog from 1 March 2007 to 31 May 2012 are investigated. By applying the Graduated Cylindrical Shell model, we obtain the deprojected values of the propagation velocity, direction, and angular width of these FHCMEs and compare them with the projected values measured in the plane-of-sky. Although these CMEs look full halo in the view angle of SOHO, it is found that their propagation directions and angular widths could vary in a large range, implying projection effect is a major reason causing a CME being halo, but not the only one. Furthermore, the comparison of the deprojected and projected velocities reveals that most FHCMEs originating within 45° of the Sun-Earth line with a projected speed slower than 900 km s-1 suffer from large projection effect, while the FHCMEs originating far from the vicinity of solar disk center or moving faster than 900 km s-1have small projection effect. Thus, for the latter class of FHCMEs, it is not necessary to correct the measured velocities.

  6. PROBING THE HALO FROM THE SOLAR VICINITY TO THE OUTER GALAXY: CONNECTING STARS IN LOCAL VELOCITY STRUCTURES TO LARGE-SCALE CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, Kathryn V.; Sheffield, Allyson A.; Majewski, Steven R.; Sharma, Sanjib; Rocha-Pinto, Helio J.

    2012-11-20

    This paper presents the first potential connections made between two local features in velocity space found in a survey of M giant stars and stellar spatial inhomogeneities on global scales. Comparison to cosmological, chemodynamical stellar halo models confirms that the M giant population is particularly sensitive to rare, recent and massive accretion events. These events can give rise to locally observed velocity sequences-each made from a small fraction of debris from a massive progenitor, passing at high velocity through the survey volume, near the pericenter of the eccentric orbit of the system. The majority of the debris is found in much larger structures, whose morphologies are more cloud-like than stream-like and which lie at the orbital apocenters. Adopting this interpretation, the full-space motions represented by the observed M giant velocity features are derived under the assumption that the members within each sequence share a common space velocity. Orbit integrations are then used to trace the past and future trajectories of these stars across the sky revealing plausible associations with large, previously discovered, cloud-like structures. The connections made between nearby velocity structures and these distant clouds represent preliminary steps toward developing coherent maps of such giant debris systems. These maps promise to provide new insights into the origin of debris clouds, new probes of Galactic history and structure, and new constraints on the high-velocity tails of the local dark matter distribution that are essential for interpreting direct dark matter particle detection experiments.

  7. High velocity collisions of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Donald F.; Mattson, William D.

    2017-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are a unique class of material with highly functionalizable surfaces and exciting applications. With a large surface-to-volume ratio and potentially high surface tension, shocked nanoparticles might display unique materials behavior. Using density functional theory, we have simulated high-velocity NP collisions under a variety of conditions. NPs composed of diamond-C, cubic-BN, and diamond-Si were considered with particle sizes up to 3.5 nm diameter. Additional simulations involved NPs that were destabilized by incorporating internal strain. The initial spherical NP structures were carved out of bulk crystals while the NPs with internal strain were constructed as a dense core (compressive strain) encompassed by a thin shell (tensile strain). Both on-axis and off-axis collisions were simulated at 10 km/s relative velocity. The amount of internal strain was artificially increased by creating a dense inner core with bond lengths compressed up to 8%. Collision dynamics, shock propagation, and fragmentation will be analyzed, but the simulation are ongoing and results are not finalized. The effect of material properties, internal strain, and collision velocity will be discussed.

  8. Halo columns: new generation technology for high speed liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Ali, Imran; Gaitonde, Vinay D; Grahn, Anders

    2010-01-01

    Fast speed and high sample loading and the pressing demands of industries and researchers are compelling scientists and manufacturers to explore the new horizons in column technology. Recently, superficially porous silica particle columns are manufactured with some salient features such as super fast speed, sharp peaks, good sample loading, and low backpressure. The commercially available columns are Halo (Advanced Material Technology, Wilmington, DE), Express (Supelco, Bellefonte, PA), and Proshell 120 (Agilent, Santa Clara, CA). Halo columns are of C(8), C(18), RP Amide, and HILIC types with 2.7 microm over all diameters, 0.5 microm porous thick layers containing 90 A as pore diameter, and 150 m(2)/g surface area. These columns have been used for fast separation of low molecular weight compounds with some exception for large molecules such as protein, peptides, and DNA. The present article describes the importance of these state-of-the-art superficially porous silica particles based columns with special emphasis on Halo columns. The different aspects of these columns such as structures, mechanism of separations, applications, and comparison, with conventional columns have been discussed.

  9. On the stability of satellite planes - I. Effects of mass, velocity, halo shape and alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernando, Nuwanthika; Arias, Veronica; Guglielmo, Magda; Lewis, Geraint F.; Ibata, Rodrigo A.; Power, Chris

    2017-02-01

    The recently discovered vast thin plane of dwarf satellites orbiting the Andromeda Galaxy (M31) adds to the mystery of the small-scale distribution of the Local Group's galaxy population. Such well-defined planar structures are apparently rare occurrences in cold dark matter cosmological simulations, and we lack a coherent explanation of their formation and existence. In this paper, we explore the long-term survivability of thin planes of dwarfs in galactic haloes, focusing, in particular, on systems mimicking the observed Andromeda distribution. The key results show that, in general, planes of dwarf galaxies are fragile, sensitive to the shape of the dark matter halo and other perturbing effects. In fact, long-lived planes of satellites only exist in polar orbits in spherical dark matter haloes, presenting a challenge to the observed Andromeda plane that is significantly tilted with respect to the optical disc. Our conclusion is that, in the standard cosmological models, planes of satellites are generally short lived, and hence we must be located at a relatively special time in the evolution of the Andromeda Plane, lucky enough to see its coherent pattern.

  10. High velocity impact experiment (HVIE)

    SciTech Connect

    Toor, A.; Donich, T.; Carter, P.

    1998-02-01

    The HVIE space project was conceived as a way to measure the absolute EOS for approximately 10 materials at pressures up to {approximately}30 Mb with order-of-magnitude higher accuracy than obtainable in any comparable experiment conducted on earth. The experiment configuration is such that each of the 10 materials interacts with all of the others thereby producing one-hundred independent, simultaneous EOS experiments The materials will be selected to provide critical information to weapons designers, National Ignition Facility target designers and planetary and geophysical scientists. In addition, HVIE will provide important scientific information to other communities, including the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization and the lethality and vulnerability community. The basic HVIE concept is to place two probes in counter rotating, highly elliptical orbits and collide them at high velocity (20 km/s) at 100 km altitude above the earth. The low altitude of the experiment will provide quick debris strip-out of orbit due to atmospheric drag. The preliminary conceptual evaluation of the HVIE has found no show stoppers. The design has been very easy to keep within the lift capabilities of commonly available rides to low earth orbit including the space shuttle. The cost of approximately 69 million dollars for 100 EOS experiment that will yield the much needed high accuracy, absolute measurement data is a bargain!

  11. Orbital anisotropy in cosmological haloes revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojtak, Radosław; Gottlöber, Stefan; Klypin, Anatoly

    2013-09-01

    The velocity anisotropy of particles inside dark matter (DM) haloes is an important physical quantity, which is required for the accurate modelling of mass profiles of galaxies and clusters of galaxies. It is typically measured using the ratio of the radial to tangential velocity dispersions at a given distance from the halo centre. However, this measure is insufficient to describe the dynamics of realistic haloes, which are not spherical and are typically quite elongated. Studying the velocity distribution in massive DM haloes in cosmological simulations, we find that in the inner parts of the haloes, the local velocity ellipsoids are strongly aligned with the major axis of the halo, the alignment being stronger for more relaxed haloes. In the outer regions of the haloes, the alignment becomes gradually weaker and the orientation is more random. These two distinct regions of different degree of the alignment coincide with two characteristic regimes of the DM density profile: a shallow inner cusp and a steep outer profile that are separated by a characteristic radius at which the density declines as ρ ∝ r-2. This alignment of the local velocity ellipsoids requires reinterpretation of features found in measurements based on the spherically averaged ratio of the radial to tangential velocity dispersions. In particular, we show that the velocity distribution in the central halo regions is highly anisotropic. For cluster-size haloes with mass 1014-1015 h-1 M⊙, the velocity anisotropy along the major axis is nearly independent of radius and is equal to β = 1 - σ ^2_perp/σ ^2_radial≈ 0.4, which is significantly larger than the previously estimated spherically averaged velocity anisotropy. The alignment of density and velocity anisotropies and the radial trends may also have some implications for the mass modelling based on kinematical data of objects such as galaxy clusters or dwarf spheroidals, where the orbital anisotropy is a key element in an unbiased mass

  12. What Happens to a High Velocity Cloud When it Hits the Milky Way's Disk: Is Dark Matter Necessary for Survival?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelton, Robin L.; Galyardt, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Dark matter halos enshroud some of the most massive high velocity clouds. Their gravitational pull confines the clouds as they pass through the intergalactic medium. Given the ability of dark matter halos to stabilize their embedded baryonic clouds against hydrodynamic interactions that would otherwise disrupt them, it has further been suggested that dark matter halos could enable high velocity clouds to survive impacts with the Milky Way's disk. The survival of high velocity clouds, such as the Smith Cloud, during a passage through the disk has been cited as evidence for the presence of dark matter. However, a second actor, the magnetic field, may also be at play. In order to characterize, measure, and disentangle their effects, we have performed magnetohydrodynamic simulations of massive high velocity clouds as they impact a galactic disk. Here, we present the rate at which material dissipates in a variety of situations that include or exclude dark matter and magnetic fields.

  13. IUE observations of blue halo high luminosity stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hack, M.; Franco, M. L.; Stalio, R.

    1981-01-01

    Two high luminosity population II blue stars of high galactic latitude, BD+33 deg 2642 and HD 137569 were observed at high resolution. The stellar spectra show the effect of mass loss in BD+33 deg 2642 and abnormally weak metallic lines in HD 137569. The interstellar lines in the direction of BD+33 deg 2642, which lies at a height z greater than or equal to 6.2 kpc from the galactic plane, are split into two components. No high ionization stages are found at the low velocity component; nor can they be detected in the higher velocity clouds because of mixing with the corresponding stellar/circumstellar lines.

  14. Solar Wind Halo Formation by the Scattering of the Strahl via Direct Cluster/PEACE Observations of the 3D Velocity Distribution Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueroa-Vinas, Adolfo; Gurgiolo, Chris A.; Nieves-Chinchilla, Teresa; Goldstein, Melvyn L.

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested by a number of authors that the solar wind electron halo can be formed by the scattering of the strahl. On frequent occasions we have observed in electron angular skymaps (Phi/Theta-plots) of the electron 3D velocity distribution functions) a bursty-filament of particles connecting the strahl to the solar wind core-halo. These are seen over a very limited energy range. When the magnetic field is well off the nominal solar wind flow direction such filaments are inconsistent with any local forces and are probably the result of strong scattering. Furthermore, observations indicates that the strahl component is frequently and significantly anisotropic (Tper/Tpal approx.2). This provides a possible free energy source for the excitation of whistler waves as a possible scattering mechanism. The empirical observational evidence between the halo and the strahl suggests that the strahl population may be, at least in part, the source of the halo component.

  15. Intermediate-metallicity, high-velocity stars and Galactic chemical evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, S. G.; Smith, I. M.

    2003-05-01

    High signal-to-noise ratio spectra were obtained of 10 high-proper-motion stars having -1 <~[Fe/H] < 0, and a comparable number of disc stars. All but two of the high-proper-motion stars were confirmed to have [Fe/H] > -1.0, some approaching solar metallicity, but, even so, earlier measurements overestimated the metallicities and velocities of some of these stars. Models of stellar populations were used to assign membership probabilities to the Galactic components to which the high-velocity stars might belong. Many were found to be more probably thick-disc than halo objects, despite their large space motions, and two might be associated with the inner Galaxy. It may be necessary to reassess contamination of previous halo samples, such as those used to define the metallicity distribution, to account for contamination by high-velocity thick-disc stars, and to consider possible subcomponents of the halo. The change in [α/Fe] ratios at [Fe/H]~=-1.0 is often used to constrain the degree and timing of Type Ia supernova nucleosynthesis in Galactic chemical-evolution models. [Ti/Fe] values were measured for eight of the high-velocity stars. Both high- and low-[Ti/Fe] halo stars exist; likewise high- and low-[Ti/Fe] thick-disc stars exist. We conclude that the [Ti/Fe]`break' is not well defined for a given population; nor is there a simple, continuous evolutionary sequence through the break. Implications for the interpretation of the [α/Fe] break in terms of SN Ia time-scales and progenitors are discussed. The range of [Ti/Fe] found for high-velocity (low rotation) thick-disc stars contrasts with that for the low-velocity (high rotation) thick-disc sample studied by Prochaska et al.

  16. Transverse Beam Halo Measurements at High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) using Vibrating Wire Monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, M.; Hanna, B.; Scarpine, V.; Shiltsev, V.; Steimel, J.; Artinian, S.; Arutunian, S.

    2015-02-26

    The measurement and control of beam halos will be critical for the applications of future high-intensity hadron linacs. In particular, beam profile monitors require a very high dynamic range when used for the transverse beam halo measurements. In this study, the Vibrating Wire Monitor (VWM) with aperture 60 mm was installed at the High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) front-end to measure the transverse beam halo. A vibrating wire is excited at its resonance frequency with the help of a magnetic feedback loop, and the vibrating and sensitive wires are connected through a balanced arm. The sensitive wire is moved into the beam halo region by a stepper motor controlled translational stage. We study the feasibility of the vibrating wire for the transverse beam halo measurements in the low-energy front-end of the proton linac.

  17. Detection of ultraviolet halos around highly inclined galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Hodges-Kluck, Edmund; Bregman, Joel N.

    2014-07-10

    We report the discovery of diffuse ultraviolet light around late-type galaxies out to 5-20 kpc from the midplane using Swift and GALEX images. The emission is consistent with the stellar outskirts in the early-type galaxies but not in the late-type galaxies, where the emission is quite blue and consistent with a reflection nebula powered by light escaping from the galaxy and scattering off dust in the halo. Our results agree with expectations from halo dust discovered in extinction by Ménard et al. to within a few kpc of the disk and imply a comparable amount of hot and cold gas in galaxy halos (a few× 10{sup 8} M{sub ☉} within 20 kpc) if the dust resides primarily in Mg II absorbers. The results also highlight the potential of UV photometry to study individual galaxy halos.

  18. Solar Wind Halo Formation by the Scattering of the Strahl: Direct Cluster/PEACE Observations of the 3D Velocity Distribution Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinas, A. F.; Gurgiolo, C. A.; Nieves-Chinchilla, T.; Wendel, D. E.; Goldstein, M. L.; Fazakerley, A. N.

    2010-12-01

    The current hypothesis of the formation of the solar wind halo electrons is that they are produced from scattering of the strahl. This hypothesis is strengthened by direct observations of the strahl electrons being scattered into the halo in an isolated event. On frequent occasions we have observed in electron angular skymaps (Phi/Theta-plots) of the electron 3D velocity distribution functions, a bursty-filament of particles connecting the strahl to the solar wind core-halo. These are seen over a limited energy range. The observation implies that the formation of the halo is not a continuous process but occurs in bursts in regions where conditions for wave growth providing the scattering are optimum. Sometimes, observations indicates that the strahl component is anisotropic (Tper/Tpal ~ 2). This provides a possible free energy source for the excitation of whistler waves as a possible scattering mechanism, however this condition is not always observed. The empirical observational evidence between the halo and the strahl suggests that the strahl population may be, at least in part, the source of the halo component.

  19. High velocity pulsed wire-arc spray

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witherspoon, F. Douglas (Inventor); Massey, Dennis W. (Inventor); Kincaid, Russell W. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Wire arc spraying using repetitively pulsed, high temperature gas jets, usually referred to as plasma jets, and generated by capillary discharges, substantially increases the velocity of atomized and entrained molten droplets. The quality of coatings produced is improved by increasing the velocity with which coating particles impact the coated surface. The effectiveness of wire-arc spraying is improved by replacing the usual atomizing air stream with a rapidly pulsed high velocity plasma jet. Pulsed power provides higher coating particle velocities leading to improved coatings. 50 micron aluminum droplets with velocities of 1500 m/s are produced. Pulsed plasma jet spraying provides the means to coat the insides of pipes, tubes, and engine block cylinders with very high velocity droplet impact.

  20. The COS-Halos Survey: Origins of the Highly Ionized Circumgalactic Medium of Star-Forming Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werk, Jessica K.; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Cantalupo, Sebastiano; Fox, Andrew J.; Oppenheimer, Benjamin; Tumlinson, Jason; Tripp, Todd M.; Lehner, Nicolas; McQuinn, Matthew

    2016-12-01

    The total contribution of diffuse halo gas to the galaxy baryon budget strongly depends on its dominant ionization state. In this paper, we address the physical conditions in the highly ionized circumgalactic medium (CGM) traced by {{O}} {{VI}} absorption lines observed in COS-Halos spectra. We analyze the observed ionic column densities, absorption-line widths and relative velocities, along with the ratios of {{N}} {{V}}/{{O}} {{VI}} for 39 fitted Voigt profile components of O vi. We compare these quantities with the predictions given by a wide range of ionization models. Photoionization models that include only extragalactic UV background radiation are ruled out; conservatively, the upper limits to {{N}} {{V}}/{{O}} {{VI}} and measurements of {N}{{O}{{VI}}} imply unphysically large path lengths ≳100 kpc. Furthermore, very broad {{O}} {{VI}} absorption (b > 40 km s-1) is a defining characteristic of the CGM of star-forming L* galaxies. We highlight two possible origins for the bulk of the observed {{O}} {{VI}}: (1) highly structured gas clouds photoionized primarily by local high-energy sources or (2) gas radiatively cooling on large scales behind a supersonic wind. Approximately 20% of circumgalactic O vi does not align with any low-ionization state gas within ±50 km s-1 and is found only in halos with {M}{halo} < 1012 {M}⊙ . We suggest that this type of unmatched O vi absorption traces the hot corona itself at a characteristic temperature of {10}5.5 K. We discuss the implications of these very distinct physical origins for the dynamical state, gas cooling rates, and total baryonic content of L* gaseous halos.

  1. The rotation of the halo of NGC 6822 from the radial velocities of carbon stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Graham P.; Ryan, Sean G.; Sibbons, Lisette F.

    2016-11-01

    Using spectra taken with the AAOmega spectrograph, we measure the radial velocities of over 100 stars, many of which are intermediate age carbon stars, in the direction of the dwarf irregular galaxy NGC 6822. Kinematic analysis suggests that the carbon stars in the sample are associated with NGC 6822, and estimates of its radial velocity and galactic rotation are made from a star-by-star analysis of its carbon star population. We calculate a heliocentric radial velocity for NGC 6822 of -51 ± 3 km s-1 and show that the population rotates with a mean rotation speed of 11.2 ± 2.1 km s-1 at a mean distance of 1.1 kpc from the galactic centre, about a rotation axis with a position angle of 26° ± 13°, as projected on the sky. This is close to the rotation axis of the H I gas disc and suggests that NGC 6822 is not a polar ring galaxy, but is dynamically closer to a late-type galaxy. However, the rotation axis is not aligned with the minor axis of the AGB isodensity profiles and this remains a mystery.

  2. Wide Binaries among High-Velocity and Metal-Poor Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, C.; Herrera, M. A.; Poveda, A.

    The properties of old disk and halo binaries are of interest for the understanding of the processes of formation and early dynamical evolution of the Galaxy. The luminosity function of the components of wide binaries and multiples, their mass function, the fraction of halo or old disk stars that are members of wide binaries, and the distribution of its separations are some of the basic properties that are poorly understood, mainly because of the paucity of known wide binaries among halo and old disk stars. The present work is an attempt to ameliorate this situation. We have elaborated a list of 130 halo and old disk wide binaries by searching for common proper motion companions to the high-velocity and metal-poor stars studied by Schuster and Nissen (1988, 1993). Based on Stromgren photometry, these authors have derived distances, metallicities and ages for their stars. Since each star has a large and well determined proper motion it was possible to compare this value with that of NLTT stars of its vicinity. In this way we were able to identify 130 high-velocity and metal-poor common proper motion binary systems. Each system was carefully checked to avoid misidentifications, and when possible, distances were updated using the Hipparcos trigonometric parallaxes. We have determined the distribution of angular separations for our wide binaries. Reliable distances are available for all of our systems, so this distribution can be converted into a separation distribution in AU. We find that 12 systems have separations in excess of 10000 AU, and their existence poses interesting dynamical problems. Since many systems also have known radial velocities, space velocities for them can be determined, and galactic orbits have been computed and characterized. The secondaries of these wide binaries are interesting in themselves, since they represent a sampling of the faint end of the main sequence of old disk and halo stars.

  3. Study of plasma meniscus and beam halo in negative ion sources using three dimension in real space and three dimension in velocity space particle in cell model

    SciTech Connect

    Nishioka, S. Goto, I.; Hatayama, A.; Miyamoto, K.; Okuda, S.; Fukano, A.

    2014-02-15

    Our previous study by two dimension in real space and three dimension in velocity space-particle in cell model shows that the curvature of the plasma meniscus causes the beam halo in the negative ion sources. The negative ions extracted from the periphery of the meniscus are over-focused in the extractor due to the electrostatic lens effect, and consequently become the beam halo. The purpose of this study is to verify this mechanism with the full 3D model. It is shown that the above mechanism is essentially unchanged even in the 3D model, while the fraction of the beam halo is significantly reduced to 6%. This value reasonably agrees with the experimental result.

  4. Core-halo limit and internal dynamics of high intensity beams

    SciTech Connect

    Nghiem, P. A. P.; Valette, M.; Chauvin, N.; Pichoff, N.; Uriot, D.

    2015-08-15

    The dynamics of high-intensity beams largely depends on their internal space charge forces. These forces are responsible of non-linear coupling, emittance growth, and halo generation. They contribute to shape the beam density profile. As a consequence, an analysis of this profile can be a precious indicator capable of revealing the internal dynamics of the beam. This paper recalls the precise core-halo limit determination proposed earlier, then studies its behavior through a wide range of beam profiles, and finally shows its relevance as an indicator of the limit separating the two space charge field regimes of the core and the halo.

  5. Haloes gone MAD: The Halo-Finder Comparison Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knebe, Alexander; Knollmann, Steffen R.; Muldrew, Stuart I.; Pearce, Frazer R.; Aragon-Calvo, Miguel Angel; Ascasibar, Yago; Behroozi, Peter S.; Ceverino, Daniel; Colombi, Stephane; Diemand, Juerg; Dolag, Klaus; Falck, Bridget L.; Fasel, Patricia; Gardner, Jeff; Gottlöber, Stefan; Hsu, Chung-Hsing; Iannuzzi, Francesca; Klypin, Anatoly; Lukić, Zarija; Maciejewski, Michal; McBride, Cameron; Neyrinck, Mark C.; Planelles, Susana; Potter, Doug; Quilis, Vicent; Rasera, Yann; Read, Justin I.; Ricker, Paul M.; Roy, Fabrice; Springel, Volker; Stadel, Joachim; Stinson, Greg; Sutter, P. M.; Turchaninov, Victor; Tweed, Dylan; Yepes, Gustavo; Zemp, Marcel

    2011-08-01

    We present a detailed comparison of fundamental dark matter halo properties retrieved by a substantial number of different halo finders. These codes span a wide range of techniques including friends-of-friends, spherical-overdensity and phase-space-based algorithms. We further introduce a robust (and publicly available) suite of test scenarios that allow halo finder developers to compare the performance of their codes against those presented here. This set includes mock haloes containing various levels and distributions of substructure at a range of resolutions as well as a cosmological simulation of the large-scale structure of the universe. All the halo-finding codes tested could successfully recover the spatial location of our mock haloes. They further returned lists of particles (potentially) belonging to the object that led to coinciding values for the maximum of the circular velocity profile and the radius where it is reached. All the finders based in configuration space struggled to recover substructure that was located close to the centre of the host halo, and the radial dependence of the mass recovered varies from finder to finder. Those finders based in phase space could resolve central substructure although they found difficulties in accurately recovering its properties. Through a resolution study we found that most of the finders could not reliably recover substructure containing fewer than 30-40 particles. However, also here the phase-space finders excelled by resolving substructure down to 10-20 particles. By comparing the halo finders using a high-resolution cosmological volume, we found that they agree remarkably well on fundamental properties of astrophysical significance (e.g. mass, position, velocity and peak of the rotation curve). We further suggest to utilize the peak of the rotation curve, vmax, as a proxy for mass, given the arbitrariness in defining a proper halo edge. Airport code for Madrid, Spain

  6. High Velocity Implanting of Anchors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    pi’ech us~inq cold high pressure gas to s’jppl y -the, energy, instead of propllant gs. This turned .ne. "* "UNCLASSIFIED *SECJQ" : SSI FICA’ION O.TH.IS... pressure gun propulsor now used. These alternate ýropulsion systems all have the capability to propel the PEA’s and to eliminate the recoil problems that...EXIT AND AT GAS-WATER INTERFACE AS A FUNCTION OF TIME ..... ......... 34 11 REQUIRED INSIDE DIAMETER OF LAUNCH, TUBE AS A FUNCTION OF DRIVE PRESSURE

  7. Comparison of high group velocity accelerating structures

    SciTech Connect

    Farkas, Z.D.; Wilson, P.B.

    1987-02-01

    It is well known that waveguides with no perturbations have phase velocities greater than the velocity of light c. If the waveguide dimensions are chosen so that the phase velocity is only moderately greater than c, only small perturbations are required to reduce the phase velocity to be synchronous with a high energy particle bunch. Such a lightly loaded accelerator structure will have smaller longitudinal and transverse wake potentials and hence will lead to lower emittance growth in an accelerated beam. Since these structures are lightly loaded, their group velocities are only slightly less than c and not in the order of 0.01c, as is the case for the standard disk-loaded structures. To ascertain that the peak and average power requirements for these structures are not prohibitive, we examine the elastance and the Q for several traveling wave structures: phase slip structures, bellows-like structures, and lightly loaded disk-loaded structures.

  8. Profiles of dark matter haloes at high redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Popolo, A.

    2001-08-01

    I study the evolution of halo density profiles as a function of time in the SCDM and ΛCDM cosmologies. Following Del PopoloQ1, I calculate the concentration parameter c=rv /a and study its time evolution. For a given halo mass, I find that c(z)~1/(1+z) in both the ΛCDM and SCDM cosmology, in agreement with the analytic model of Bullock et al.Q1 and N-body simulations. In both models, a(z) is roughly constant. The present model predicts a stronger evolution of c(z) with respect to the Navarro, Frenk & WhiteQ1 model. Finally I show some consequences of the results on galaxy modelling.

  9. Discovery of High Proper-Motion Ancient White Dwarfs: Nearby Massive Compact Halo Objects?

    PubMed

    Ibata; Irwin; Bienaymé; Scholz; Guibert

    2000-03-20

    We present the discovery and spectroscopic identification of two very high proper-motion ancient white dwarf stars, found in a systematic proper-motion survey. Their kinematics and apparent magnitude clearly indicate that they are halo members, while their optical spectra are almost identical to the recently identified cool halo white dwarf WD 0346+246. Canonical stellar halo models predict a white dwarf volume density that is 2 orders of magnitude less than the rho approximately 7x10-4 M middle dot in circle pc-3 inferred from this survey. With the caveat that the sample size is very small, it appears that a significant fraction, approximately 10%, of the local dark matter halo is in the form of very old, cool, white dwarfs.

  10. Stellar population of the Small Magellanic Cloud near NGC 121. I - The mean metallicity, metallicity spread, and radial velocity of SMC halo giants

    SciTech Connect

    Suntzeff, N.B.; Friel, E.; Klemola, A.; Kraft, R.P.; Graham, J.A.

    1986-02-01

    Technological advances make it now possible to conduct CCD photometry studies of stars in the halo of the Magellanic Clouds, taking into account the age and chemical composition of the oldest stars, the star-formation rate, and the age-metallicity relations. Recent reserch demonstrates that these relationships are different in the Clouds and in the Galaxy. The present paper is concerned with an examination of the giant stars of the SMC halo in the vicinity of the SMC cluster NGC 121, giving attention to the chemical composition and radial velocity of these objects. Astrometry and photometry based on direct photographs are considered along with spectroscopic observations, taking into account reduction techniques, sample spectra, radial velocities, and spectrophotometric indices and metallicity spread of giants. 69 references.

  11. Instrumented impact testing at high velocities

    SciTech Connect

    Delfosse, D.; Pageau, G.; Bennett, R.; Poursartip, A. Defence Research Establishment Valcartier, Courcelette )

    1993-01-01

    Impact loading of carbon fiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP) aircraft parts is a major concern. Birds or hailstones striking an aircraft generally have a low mass and a high velocity, whereas typically instrumented impact experiments are performed with a high mass and a low velocity. Our aim has been to build an instrumented impact facility with a low-mass projectile capable of simulating these impact events, since there is evidence that a low-velocity impact will not always result in the same amount or even type of damage as a high-velocity impact. This paper provides a detailed description of the instrumented low-mass impact facility at The University of British Columbia (UBC). A gas gun is used to accelerate the instrumented projectile to impact velocities as high as 50 m/s, corresponding to an energy level of 350 J. The contact force during the impact event is measured by an incorporated load cell. The necessary mathematical operations to determine the real load-displacement curves are outlined, and the results of some impact events at different velocities are shown. 23 refs.

  12. High velocity formability and factors affecting it

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehra, Mala Seth

    High velocity forming methods successfully address problems faced in conventional forming techniques. They can be effectively used for forming metals with low formability like aluminum alloys and high strength steel. They can be instrumental is manufacturing of lighter vehicles with higher fuel efficiency. Electromagnetic forming (EMF) is an HVF method that is gaining wide acceptance due to its advantages and scope for commercialization. A number of experimental studies were carried out with EMF with the main goal of exploring fundamentals about material formability at high velocities, which can be used to establish practical design guidelines and to make models of high velocity formability. Thus the main factors that influence high velocity formability-inertia/size effects; changes in constitutive behavior; impact; and dynamic failure modes, were studied mainly with experiments. The role of changes in constitutive behavior in improving formability was studied from existing studies and new theoretical studies involving High velocity Forming Limit Diagram (FLD) and through solving an inverse problem of ring expansion. Tube free-expansion experiments were carried out to demonstrate enhanced metal formability even in the absence of die impact. To further establish the significance of inertia, electromagnetic ring free-expansion experiments with rings of different aspect ratios were carried out. A higher aspect ratio sample had better formability in terms of uniform and total elongation and also had fewer necks than a low aspect ratio (more slender) ring at the same velocity. The results clearly demonstrated the influence of sample aspect ratio (dimensions) and hence inertia on high velocity formability. Die impact experiments were carried out with tubes and rings to show the beneficial influence of die arrest of a moving sample. It was revealed that die impact in an appropriate range of velocities can significantly suppress failure and reduce the number of tears and

  13. Internal Detonation Velocity Measurements Inside High Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Benterou, J; Bennett, C V; Cole, G; Hare, D E; May, C; Udd, E

    2009-01-16

    In order to fully calibrate hydrocodes and dynamic chemistry burn models, initiation models and detonation models of high explosives, the ability to continuously measure the detonation velocity within an explosive is required. Progress on an embedded velocity diagnostic using a 125 micron diameter optical fiber containing a chirped fiber Bragg grating is reported. As the chirped fiber Bragg grating is consumed by the moving detonation wave, the physical length of the unconsumed Bragg grating is monitored with a fast InGaAs photodiode. Experimental details of the associated equipment and data in the form of continuous detonation velocity records within PBX-9502 are presented. This small diameter fiber sensor has the potential to measure internal detonation velocities on the order of 10 mm/{micro}sec along path lengths tens of millimeters long.

  14. Properties of the highly ionized disk and halo gas toward two distant high-latitude stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, Blair D.; Sembach, K. R.

    1994-01-01

    Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS) intermediate -resolution observations of S III, Si III, Al III, Si IV, C IV, and N V absorption along the sight lines to HD 18100 (l = 217.9 deg, b = -62.7, d = 3.1 kpc, z = -2.8 kpc) and HD 100340 (l = 258.9 deg, b = +61.2 deg, d = 5.3 kpc, z = 4.6 kpc) are presented. These small science aperture spectra have resolutions ranging from 11 to 20 km/s full width at half maximum (FWHM) and S/N from 30 to 65 per diode substep. Strong absorption by moderately and highly ionized gas is seen in each direction. The absorption in the direction of the south Galactic polar region (HD 18100) is kinematically simple, while the absorption in the direction of north Galactic polar region (HD 100304) is kinematically complex. In each case the absorption by the highly ionized gas lies within the velocity range of absorption by neutral and weakly ionized gas. Along each sight line, the velocity dispersion determined from the unsaturated absorption lines increases with the energy required to create each ion. The logarithmic column densities for Al III, Si IV, C IV, and N V are log N(atoms/sq cm = 12.71, 13.10, 13.58, and 12.75 toward HD 18100 and log N = 12.88, 13.31, 13.83, and 13.04 toward HD 100340. Average ionic ratios among these species are very similar along the two sight lines. Differences in profile shape between the absorption for AL II, Si IV, C IV, and N V provide additional support for the claim of Savage, Sembach, & Cardelli (1994) that there exists two types of highly ionized gas in the interstellar medium. One type of highly ionized gas is responsible for the structured Si IV absorption and part of the C IV absorption. In this gas N(C IV)/N(Si IV) approximately 3.0 and N(C IV)/N(N V) greater than 6. The absorption by this gas seems to be associated with some type of self-regulating interface or mixing layer between the warm and hot interstellar medium. The other type of highly ionized gas is responsible for most of the N V

  15. A High-Velocity Collision With Our Galaxy's Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-08-01

    University).Using the Arecibo radio telescope in Puerto Rico, Park and collaborators have observed a supershell in the outskirts of the Milky Way and it has a high-velocity cloud at its center! Could this pair of objects be the evidence needed?A Revealing PairThe supershell, GS040.2+00.670, is roughly 3,000 light-years across, and its in the process of expanding outwards. The interior of the shell is filled with a complex structure that looks almost like spokes extending from a central hub. CHVC040, a compact high-velocity cloud, is located right at the central hub; the authors calculate a probability of less than a thousandth of a percent that this alignment is random.An integrated intensity map (click for a better look!) of neutral hydrogen showing the overall picture of the supershell (left), with the hub-and-spoke complex structure indicated within the shell. Contours in a close-up view (right) shows the location of the high-velocity cloud directly at the central hub. [Park et al. 2016]Park and collaborators examine the morphology and the velocity data for the shell and the cloud. Based on the authors calculations, if CHVC040 were traveling at a typical velocity for high-velocity clouds (several hundred kilometers per second), it would have enough energy to have created the supershell when it slammed into the disk. The parameters of the shell allow the authors estimate when the collision happened: roughly five million years ago.If this scenario is correct, Park and collaborators observations demonstrate that some compact high-velocity clouds can survive their trip through the galactic halo to smash into the galactic disk, forming a supershell on impact. A systematic study of the ~300 known compact high-velocity clouds in the Milky Way may reveal other, similar systems of compact high-velocity clouds coincident with supershells.CitationGeumsook Park et al 2016 ApJ 827 L27. doi:10.3847/2041-8205/827/2/L27

  16. High Resolution Velocity Structure in Eastern Turkey

    SciTech Connect

    Pasyanos, M; Gok, R; Zor, E; Walter, W

    2004-09-03

    We investigate the crustal and upper mantle structure of eastern Turkey where the Anatolian, Arabian and Eurasian Plates meet and form a complex tectonic structure. The Bitlis suture is a continental collision zone between the Anatolian plateau and the Arabian plate. Broadband data available through the Eastern Turkey Seismic Experiment (ETSE) provided a unique opportunity for studying the high resolution velocity structure. Zor et al. found an average 46 km thick crust in Anatolian plateau using six-layered grid search inversion of the ETSE receiver functions. Receiver functions are sensitive to the velocity contrast of interfaces and the relative travel time of converted and reverberated waves between those interfaces. The interpretation of receiver function alone with many-layered parameterization may result in an apparent depth-velocity tradeoff. In order to improve previous velocity model, we employed the joint inversion method with many layered parameterization of Julia et al. (2000) to the ETSE receiver functions. In this technique, the receiver function and surface-wave observations are combined into a single algebraic equation and each data set is weighted by an estimate of the uncertainty in the observations. We consider azimuthal changes of receiver functions and have stacked them into different groups. We calculated the receiver functions using iterative time-domain deconvolution technique and surface wave group velocity dispersion curves between 10-100 sec. We are making surface wave dispersion measurements at the ETSE stations and have incorporated them into a regional group velocity model. Preliminary results indicate a strong trend in the long period group velocity in the northeast. This indicates slow upper mantle velocities in the region consistent with Pn, Sn and receiver function results. We started with both the 1-D model that is obtained with the 12 tones dam explosion shot data recorded by ETSE network and the existing receiver function

  17. Wide Binaries among High-Velocity and Metal-Poor Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, C.; Herrera, M. A.; Poveda, A.

    1998-11-01

    The properties of old disk and halo binaries are of interest for the understanding of the processes of formation and early dynamical evolution of the Galaxy. The luminosity function of the components of wide binaries and multiples, their mass function, the fraction of halo or old disk stars that are members of wide binaries, and the distribution of their separations are some of the basic properties that are poorly understood, mainly because of the paucity of known wide binaries among halo and old disk stars. The present work is an attempt to ameliorate this situation. We have elaborated a list of 133 wide binaries mostly belonging to the halo or high-velocity disk, by searching for common proper motion companions to the high-velocity and metal-poor stars studied by Schuster and collaborators (1988, 1993). Based on Stromgren photometry, these authors have derived distances, metallicities and ages for their stars. Since each star has a large and well determined proper motion, it was possible to compare this value with that of NLTT stars of its vicinity. In this way we were able to identify over 100 high-velocity and metal-poor common proper motion binary systems. Each system was carefully checked to avoid misidentifications; in most of the cases, distances were improved using the Hipparcos trigonometric parallaxes. We have determined the distribution of angular separations for our wide binaries. Reliable distances are available for all of our systems, so this distribution can be converted into a separation distribution in AU. We find 11 systems that have projected semiaxes in excess of 10000 AU, or 16 systems with expected semiaxes larger than 10000 AU, their existence poses interesting dynamical problems. Since many systems also have known radial velocities, space velocities for them can be determined, and galactic orbits have been computed and characterized. The secondaries of these wide binaries are interesting by themselves, since they represent a sampling of the

  18. Higher order mode beams mitigate halos in high intensity proton linacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Abhishek; Krishnagopal, Srinivas

    2017-01-01

    High intensity proton linacs (HIPLs) for applications such as Accelerator Driven Reactor Systems (ADRS) have serious beam dynamics issues related to beam halo formation. This can lead to particle loss and radioactivation of the surroundings which consequently limit the beam current. Beam halos are largely driven by the nonlinear space-charge force of the beam, which depends strongly on the beam distribution and also on the initial beam mismatch. We propose here the use of a higher order mode beam (HOMB), that has a weaker nonlinear force, to mitigate beam halos. We first show how the nonlinear space-charge force can itself be exploited in the presence of nonlinear solenoid fields, to produce a HOMB in the low energy beam transport (LEBT) line. We then study the transport of such a beam through a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ), and show that the HOMB has a significant advantage in terms of emittance blow-up, halo formation and beam loss, over a Gaussian beam, even with a finite initial mismatch. For example, for the transport of a 30 mA beam through the RFQ, with an initial beam mismatch of 45%, the Gaussian beam sees an emittance blow-up of 125%, while the HOMB sees a blow-up of only 35% (relative to the initial emittance of 0.2 π mm -mrad ). Similarly, the beam halo parameter and beam loss are 0.95 and 25% respectively for a Gaussian beam, but only 0.35 and 15% for a HOMB. The beam dynamics of the HOMB agrees quite well with the particle-core model, because of the more linear space-charge force, while for the Gaussian beam there are additional particle loss mechanisms arising from nonlinear resonances. Therefore, the HOMB suppresses emittance blow-up and halo formation, and can make high current ADRS systems more viable.

  19. Consideration of wear rates at high velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hale, Chad S.

    The development of the research presented here is one in which high velocity relative sliding motion between two bodies in contact has been considered. Overall, the wear environment is truly three-dimensional. The attempt to characterize three-dimensional wear was not economically feasible because it must be analyzed at the micro-mechanical level to get results. Thus, an engineering approximation was carried out. This approximation was based on a metallographic study identifying the need to include viscoplasticity constitutive material models, coefficient of friction, relationships between the normal load and velocity, and the need to understand wave propagation. A sled test run at the Holloman High Speed Test Track (HHSTT) was considered for the determination of high velocity wear rates. In order to adequately characterize high velocity wear, it was necessary to formulate a numerical model that contained all of the physical events present. The experimental results of a VascoMax 300 maraging steel slipper sliding on an AISI 1080 steel rail during a January 2008 sled test mission were analyzed. During this rocket sled test, the slipper traveled 5,816 meters in 8.14 seconds and reached a maximum velocity of 1,530 m/s. This type of environment was never considered previously in terms of wear evaluation. Each of the features of the metallography were obtained through micro-mechanical experimental techniques. The byproduct of this analysis is that it is now possible to formulate a model that contains viscoplasticity, asperity collisions, temperature and frictional features. Based on the observations of the metallographic analysis, these necessary features have been included in the numerical model, which makes use of a time-dynamic program which follows the movement of a slipper during its experimental test run. The resulting velocity and pressure functions of time have been implemented in the explicit finite element code, ABAQUS. Two-dimensional, plane strain models

  20. High Resolution Velocity Structure in Eastern Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasyanos, M. E.; Gok, R.; Zor, E.; Walter, W. R.

    2004-12-01

    We investigate the crust and upper mantle structure of eastern Turkey where the Anatolian, Arabian and Eurasian Plates meet, forming a complex tectonic regime. The Bitlis suture is a continental collision zone between the Anatolian plateau and the Arabian plate. Broadband data available through the Eastern Turkey Seismic Experiment (ETSE) provide a unique opportunity for studying the high resolution velocity structure of the region. Zor et al. (2003) found an average 46 km thick crust in the Anatolian plateau using a six-layered grid search inversion of the ETSE receiver functions. Receiver functions are sensitive to the velocity contrast of interfaces and the relative travel time of converted and reverberated waves between those interfaces. The interpretation of receiver functions alone, however, may result in an apparent depth-velocity trade-off [Ammon et al., 1990]. In order to improve upon this velocity model, we have combined the receiver functions with surface wave data using the joint inversion method of Julia et al. (2000). In this technique, the two sets of observations are combined into a single algebraic equation and each data set is weighted by an estimate of the uncertainty in the observations. The receiver functions are calculated using an iterative time-domain deconvolution technique. We also consider azimuthal changes in the receiver functions and have stacked them into different groups accordingly. We are improving our surface wave model by making Love and Rayleigh dispersion measurements at the ETSE stations and incorporating them into a regional group velocity model for periods between 10 and 100 seconds. Preliminary results indicate a strong trend in the long period group velocities toward the northeast, indicating slow upper mantle velocities in the area consistent with Pn, Sn and receiver function results. Starting models used for the joint inversions include both a 1-D model from a 12-ton dam shot recorded by ETSE [Gurbuz et al., 2004] and

  1. Inflow velocities of cold flows streaming into massive galaxies at high redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goerdt, Tobias; Ceverino, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    We study the velocities of the accretion along streams from the cosmic web into massive galaxies at high redshift with the help of three different suites of AMR hydrodynamical cosmological simulations. The results are compared to free-fall velocities and to the sound speeds of the hot ambient medium. The sound speed of the hot ambient medium is calculated using two different methods to determine the medium's temperature. We find that the simulated cold stream velocities are in violent disagreement with the corresponding free-fall profiles. The sound speed is a better albeit not always correct description of the cold flows' velocity. Using these calculations as a first order approximation for the gas inflow velocities vinflow = 0.9 vvir is given. We conclude from the hydrodynamical simulations as our main result that the velocity profiles for the cold streams are constant with radius. These constant inflow velocities seem to have a `parabola-like' dependency on the host halo mass in units of the virial velocity that peaks at Mvir = 1012 M⊙ and we also propose that the best-fitting functional form for the dependency of the inflow velocity on the redshift is a square root power-law relation: v_inflow ∝ √{z + 1} v_vir.

  2. Ongoing Search for Metal Line Emission in Intermediate and High Velocity Clouds with WHAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barger, K. A.; Haffner, L. M.; Madsen, G. J.; Hill, A. S.; Wakker, B. P.

    2010-01-01

    We present new observations of the ionized gas in Complexes A, K, and L obtained with the Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper (WHAM). To date, there have been only a limited number of studies of the ionized components of intermediate and high velocity clouds. Investigating their emission provides a rare probe of the physical conditions of the clouds and the halo they are embedded within. These types of measurements will help guide discussion of the origin and evolution of these neutral halo structures. Here we follow up on the H-alpha maps we have presented elsewhere with deeper observations in H-alpha, [S II], [N II], and [O I]. Distance constraints from absorption studies place this gas in the mid to lower Galactic halo. Complex A has been constrained to a distance of 8-10 kpc (Wakker et al. 2008); Complex K has an upper limit of 6.8 kpc; and Complex L at a distance of 8-15 kpc (Wakker 2000). Some halo gas structures have clear metal line emission (e.g., Smith Cloud; Hill et al. 2009 and this meeting); however, the lack of [S II] emission toward Complex C combined with absorption-line observations demonstrates that it has very low metallically (Wakker, et al. 1999). Such discoveries reveal ongoing gas replenishment of the evolving Milky Way. Here, we find a similar lack of emission toward the high-velocity Complex A. In particular, the cores of its cloud components designated III and IV show no evidence for metal line emission in our new observations, which places new constraints on the metallically of this complex. These observations were taken with WHAM at Kitt Peak, and we thank the excellent, decade-long support from its staff. WHAM operations are supported through NSF award AST-0607512.

  3. High-Velocity Collisions of Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Donald; Mattson, William

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are interesting materials with exciting applications due to their large surface-to-volume ratio and functionalizable surfaces. The large surface area and potentially high surface tension might result in unique materials behavior when subject to shock loading. Using density functional theory, we have simulated high-velocity NP collisions producing high-pressure, high-temperature, and extreme shock conditions. NPs composed of diamond-C, cubic-BN, and diamond-Si were considered with particle sizes up to 3.5 nm diameter. Some simulations involved NPs that were destabilized by incorporating internal strain. Normal, spherical NPs were carved out of bulk crystals and structurally optimized while the NPs with internal strain were constructed as a dense core (compressive strain) encompassed by a thin shell (tensile strain). Both on-axis and off-axis collisions were simulated at various speeds. Collision dynamics, shock propagation, and fragmentation will be presented and analyzed. The effect of material properties, internal strain, and collision velocity on the final temperature of the fragments will be discussed.

  4. NGC 1275, High Velocity Filamentary System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caulet, Adeline

    The extensive filamentary system surrounding NGC 1275 is known to exhibit two velocity components, one at 5200 km/s which is the same as the velocity of NGC 1275 itself, and one at 8300 km/s. The low velocity (LV) system has been studied extensively with a view to elucidating the nature of a putative cooling flow of intracluster (A426) gas into NGC1275. A plausible hypothesis based on optical and radio data describes the high velocity (HV) system as a late-type galaxy caught in the gravitational potential well of NGC 1275 and falling into it with a velocity of about 3000 km/s. In this picture the HV filaments are composed of giant HII regions which have been imaged in H-alpha and observed spectroscopically in other optical lines. Our lack of certainty about the morphology of the HV system, the dynamical relationship between the HV and LV systems, and the optical spectral characteristics of the HV filaments coupled with the fact that spiral galaxies are rare in the inner regions of A426 make this hypothesis tentative. Yet it is important to understand the nature of the HV system in order to properly interpret observations of the LV system in terms of a cooling flow. We propose to obtain vacuum ultraviolet spectra with the IUE of several emission regions of the HV system. The objectives are: a) to use any observed vacuum ultraviolet emission lines together with existing optical emission line data to infer the physical processes by which the emission lines are produced, b) to use any vacuum ultraviolet emission line data to help determine abundances, particularly that of carbon, with a view to finding evidence bearing on the origin of the HV system, and c) and to search for an ultraviolet continuum characteristic of an OB stellar population. The proposed work is part of a larger effort to obtain groundbased Fabry-Perot imagery and sounding rocket vacuum ultraviolet imagery of the HV and LV systems.

  5. A Discovery of a Compact High Velocity Cloud-Galactic Supershell System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Geumsook; Koo, Bon-Chul; Kang, Ji-hyun; Gibson, Steven J.; Peek, Joshua Eli Goldston; Douglas, Kevin A.; Korpela, Eric J.; Heiles, Carl E.

    2017-01-01

    High velocity clouds (HVCs) are neutral hydrogen (HI) gas clouds having very different radial velocities from those of the Galactic disk material. While some large HVC complexes are known to be gas streams tidally stripped from satellite galaxies of the Milky Way, there are relatively isolated and small angular-sized HVCs, so called “compact HVCs (CHVCs)”, the origin of which remains controversial. There are about 300 known CHVCs in the Milky Way, and many of them show a head-tail structure, implying a ram pressure interaction with the diffuse Galactic halo gas. It is, however, not clear whether CHVCs are completely dissipated in the Galactic halo to feed the multi-phase circumgalactic medium or they can survive their trip through the halo and collide with the Galactic disk. The colliding CHVCs may leave a gigantic trail in the disk, and it had been suggested that some of HI supershells that require ≧ 3 x 1052 erg may be produced by the collision of such HVCs.Here we report the detection of a kiloparsec (kpc)-size supershell in the outskirts of the Milky Way with the compact HVC 040+01-282 (hereafter, CHVC040) at its geometrical center using the “Inner-Galaxy Arecibo L-band Feed Array” HI 21 cm survey data. The morphological and physical properties of both objects suggest that CHVC040, which is either a fragment of a nearby disrupted galaxy or a cloud that originated from an intergalactic accreting flow, collided with the disk ˜5 Myr ago to form the supershell. Our results show that some compact HVCs can survive their trip through the Galactic halo and inject energy and momentum into the Milky Way disk.

  6. The Geographic Distribution of Boulder Halo Craters at Mid-to-High Latitudes on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rader, L. X.; Fassett, C. I.; Levy, J. S.; King, I. R.; Chaffey, P. M.; Wagoner, C. M.; Hanlon, A. E.; Watters, J. L.; Kreslavsky, M. A.; Holt, J. W.; Dyar, M. D.

    2017-01-01

    Extensive evidence exists for ground ice at mid-to-high latitudes on Mars, including results from neutron spectroscopy [1-3], thermal properties [4-5], geomorphology [e.g., 6-9], and the in situ observations of Mars Phoenix [10]. This ground ice has been hypothesized to be emplaced diffusively and fill pores [11], or to have accumulated by ice and dust deposition that draped or mantled the terrain [7, 12]. These two processes are not mutually exclusive; both potentially have occurred on Mars [5]. One of the landforms found in areas where ground ice is common on Mars are boulder halo craters [e.g., 13-15] (Figure 1), which are topographically muted impact craters that are filled by ice-rich regolith. They are outlined by boulders that trace a circular outline of the original crater rim. Boulder halos generally have distinctly higher boulder densities than the surrounding background plains and have few boulders in their interiors. The mechanism of boulder halo crater formation is somewhat uncertain. Our working model is that an impact event occurs with sufficient size to excavate to a depth greater than the boulder-poor, ice-rich soils. Excavated boulders are deposited around the crater's rim and in its proximal ejecta. Quite rapidly [14], the crater becomes infilled by icy soil. Rather than being buried, boulders in the halo remain at the surface, perhaps be-cause they 'float' relative to finer-grained materials [14, 16]. Regardless of the details of this process, the life-time of boulders at the surface is much greater than the timescale needed to remove most of the craters' topography. Physical weathering of rocks must be greatly out-paced by crater infilling (the opposite of what is typical, e.g., on the Moon [17]). The rapidity of this infilling is easiest to understand if icy mantling material is deposited and accumulates, rather than simply being added by pore filling of soils. If this model is correct, boulder halos only form when they excavate rock

  7. High precision radial velocities with GIANO spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carleo, I.; Sanna, N.; Gratton, R.; Benatti, S.; Bonavita, M.; Oliva, E.; Origlia, L.; Desidera, S.; Claudi, R.; Sissa, E.

    2016-06-01

    Radial velocities (RV) measured from near-infrared (NIR) spectra are a potentially excellent tool to search for extrasolar planets around cool or active stars. High resolution infrared (IR) spectrographs now available are reaching the high precision of visible instruments, with a constant improvement over time. GIANO is an infrared echelle spectrograph at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG) and it is a powerful tool to provide high resolution spectra for accurate RV measurements of exoplanets and for chemical and dynamical studies of stellar or extragalactic objects. No other high spectral resolution IR instrument has GIANO's capability to cover the entire NIR wavelength range (0.95-2.45 μm) in a single exposure. In this paper we describe the ensemble of procedures that we have developed to measure high precision RVs on GIANO spectra acquired during the Science Verification (SV) run, using the telluric lines as wavelength reference. We used the Cross Correlation Function (CCF) method to determine the velocity for both the star and the telluric lines. For this purpose, we constructed two suitable digital masks that include about 2000 stellar lines, and a similar number of telluric lines. The method is applied to various targets with different spectral type, from K2V to M8 stars. We reached different precisions mainly depending on the H-magnitudes: for H ˜ 5 we obtain an rms scatter of ˜ 10 m s-1, while for H ˜ 9 the standard deviation increases to ˜ 50 ÷ 80 m s-1. The corresponding theoretical error expectations are ˜ 4 m s-1 and 30 m s-1, respectively. Finally we provide the RVs measured with our procedure for the targets observed during GIANO Science Verification.

  8. Identifying Remote Halo Giants in High-Latitude Fields with Kepler 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Ruth

    2015-08-01

    This talk describes halo-field K2 proposals submitted for C6, and planned for C8, C10, and C12, to identify red giants at distances from the Galactic plane between 10 and 100 kpc. This complements KASC WG8 Galactic Archaeology proposals by identifying and characterizing very remote halo red giants, and also in contributing to MAST a grid of high-resolution spectral calculations for giants useful for determining temperatures, gravities, and abundances from optical spectroscopy. Unlike previous surveys, our targets are unbiased in metallicity, consisting of all EPIC stars with SDSS ugriz photometry, g-r from 0.6 to 1.1, proximity > 12" (if present) to minimize contamination, and proper motion < 11 mas to remove most foreground stars. Kepler magnitudes Kp are between 16 and 18.5, where we establish that K2 can detect p-mode oscillations of red giants and measure the frequency of maximum power νmax. We also show that for these minimally-reddened stars, the g-r color alone yields the effective temperature Teff to 100K for giants with metallicity [Fe/H] below -1. We then illustrate how [Fe/H] will be estimated from νmax from the dependence of red-giant luminosity on metallicity at a given g-r.Only about 3% of these targets will be halo giants. The remainder will be intervening dwarfs, which at these magnitudes will be more than 1 kpc from the Galactic plane and thus members of the old halo population. This sample is valuable in its own right, for problems as diverse as the nature of the thick disk - halo transition and the occurrence of flaring on cool dwarfs so old that any original global magnetic dynamo has died away.

  9. Identifying galaxy candidates in WSRT H i imaging of ultra-compact high velocity clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Elizabeth A. K.; Oosterloo, Tom A.; Cannon, John M.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P.

    2016-12-01

    Ultra-compact high velocity clouds (UCHVCs) were identified in the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) H i survey as potential gas-bearing dark matter halos. Here we present higher resolution neutral hydrogen (H i) observations of twelve UCHVCS with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT). The UCHVCs were selected based on a combination of size, isolation, large recessional velocity and high column density as the best candidate dark matter halos. The WSRT data were tapered to image the UCHVCs at 210'' (comparable to the Arecibo resolution) and 105'' angular resolution. In a comparison of the single-dish to interferometer data, we find that the integrated line flux recovered in the WSRT observations is generally comparable to that from the single-dish ALFALFA data. In addition, any structure seen in the ALFALFA data is reproduced in the WSRT maps at the same angular resolution. At 210'' resolution all the sources are generally compact with a smooth H i morphology, as expected from their identification as UCHVCs. At the higher angular resolution, a majority of the sources break into small clumps contained in a diffuse envelope. These UCHVCs also have no ordered velocity motion and are most likely Galactic halo clouds. We identify two UCHVCs, AGC 198606 and AGC 249525, as excellent galaxy candidates based on maintaining a smooth H i morphology at higher angular resolution and showing ordered velocity motion consistent with rotation. A third source, AGC 249565, lies between these two populations in properties and is a possible galaxy candidate. If interpreted as gas-bearing dark matter halos, the three candidate galaxies have rotation velocities of 8-15 km s-1, H i masses of 0.6-50 × 105M⊙, H i radii of 0.3-2 kpc, and dynamical masses of 2-20 × 107M⊙ for a range of plausible distances. These are the UCHVCs with the highest column density values in the ALFALFA H i data and we suggest this is the best way to identify further candidates.

  10. High-resolution ultraviolet spectroscopy of gas in galaxy halos and large-scale structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Limin

    This dissertation presents spectroscopic studies of gas in galaxy halos and large-scale structures through high-resolution quasar absorption lines. The broad goal of this effort is to learn how galaxies acquire their gas and how they return it to the intergalactic medium, or more generally, how galaxies interact with their environment. The study of the absorption lines due to the extraplanar 21cm "Outer Arm" (OA) of the Milky Way toward two quasars, H1821+643 and HS0624+6907, provides valuable insight into the gas accretion processes. It yields the following results. (1) The OA is a multiphase cloud and high ions show small but significant offsets in velocity and are unlikely to be cospatial with the low ions. (2) The overall metallicity of the OA is Z=0.3-0.5 Z⊙, but nitrogen is underabundant. (3) The abundance of N, O, and S derived are roughly consistent with outer-galaxy emission-line abundances and the metallicity gradient derived from H II regions. The similarity of the OA kinematics to several nearby high velocity clouds (HVCs, e.g. Complexes C, G, and H) suggests that these clouds could be detritus from a merging satellite galaxy. To test this hypothesis, we build up a simple model including tidal tripping, ram-pressure stripping, and dynamical friction to consider whether the OA could be debris affiliated with the Monoceros Ring. Our model can roughly reproduce the spatial and velocity characteristics of the OA. Moreover, the metallicity of the OA is similar to the higher metallicities measured in the younger stellar components of the Monoceros Ring and the progenitor candidate, the CMa overdensity. However, both our model and the Galactic warp scenario can not explain other HVCs that are likely to be related to the OA. Instead of acquiring gas, some galaxies have their gas removed through various physical processes. Ram-pressure stripping and tidal interaction are important mechanisms for galaxies to loose their gas. The high-resolution spectrum of Mrk

  11. Experimental high-velocity missile head injury.

    PubMed

    Allen, I V; Scott, R; Tanner, J A

    1982-09-01

    A standardized experimental high-velocity penetrating head-injury model has been produced in which pathological lesions were observed, not only in the wound track but at sites more remote from the track in the hypothalamus, brain stem and cerebellum. Diffuse subarachnoid haemorrhage was common and intraventricular haemorrhage was a constant feature. Other constant histological abnormalities were:L 1. Perivascular "ring' haemorrhages. 2. Perivascular haemorrhage with a surrounding zone of decreased staining intensity. 3. Perivascular increased staining intensity. 4. Areas of decreased staining intensity apparently dissociated from areas of haemorrhage. The pathogenesis of the perivascular lesions is discussed and preliminary studies suggest that these may be the site of early oedema. The implications of this experiment for military surgery and for ballistic protection of the head are discussed.

  12. Disk or halo white dwarfs?. Kinematic analysis of high proper motion surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spagna, A.; Carollo, D.; Lattanzi, M. G.; Bucciarelli, B.

    2004-12-01

    We present an alternative method for the kinematic analysis of high proper motion surveys and discuss its application to the survey of Oppenheimer et al. (2001) for the selection of reliable halo white dwarfs (WDs). The local WD space density we estimate is ρWD ≃ 1/2 × 10-5 M⊙ pc-3, which is about an order of magnitude smaller than the value derived in Oppenheimer et al. (2001), and is consistent with the values obtained from recent reanalyses of the same data. Our result, which corresponds to a fraction of 0.1% / 0.2% of the local dark matter, does not support the scenario suggested by microlensing experiments that ancient cool WDs could contribute significantly to the dark halo of the Milky Way.

  13. A study of two high-velocity red horizontal branch stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, C. B.; Jilinski, E. G.; Drake, N. A.; Ortega, V. G.; Roig, F.

    2013-11-01

    Context. High-velocity halo stars provide important information about the properties of the extreme Galactic halo. The study of Population II unbound and bound stars enables us better estimate the mass of the halo. Aims: We carried out a detailed spectroscopic and kinematic study of two red horizontal branch stars, CD-41°15048 and HD 214362. Methods: The atmospheric parameters, chemical abundances, and kinematical properties were determined using high-resolution optical spectroscopy and employing the local thermodynamic equilibrium model atmospheres of Kurucz and the spectral analysis code moog. Results: We found that CD-41°15048 and HD 214362 are metal-poor red horizontal branch stars. Their abundance patterns are similar to other metal-poor halo stars already investigated. Our kinematic analysis of the 3D space motions shows that HD 214362 has a highly eccentric (e = 0.95) orbit and passes at 2 kpc from the Galactic center. CD-41°15048, for an adopted distance of 1.3 kpc, has an extreme retrograde motion and travels with very high velocity relative to the Galactocentric reference frame (VGRF = 583 km s-1). Conclusions: CD-41°15048 is a bound or an unbound star, depending on the adopted Galactic potential. We also show that the red horizontal branch star BD+09°3223 is another example of a hypervelocity star. Whether it is bound or unbound to the Galaxy depends on the assumed mass and adopted Galactic potential. Possible origins of these two high-velocity stars are briefly discussed. CD-41°15048 and BD+09°3223 are further examples of evolved stars to join the restricted group of hypervelocity stars. Finally, our results seem to contradict the idea that a passage of a star very close to the Galactic center is the only possible origin of hypervelocity stars. Based on observations made with the 2.2 m telescope at the European Southern Observatory (La Silla, Chile) under the agreement between ESO and Observatório Nacional (2007-2010).Figures 3-5, 8, 10

  14. THE MASSIVE-BLACK-HOLE-VELOCITY-DISPERSION RELATION AND THE HALO BARYON FRACTION: A CASE FOR POSITIVE ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS FEEDBACK

    SciTech Connect

    Silk, Joseph; Nusser, Adi E-mail: adi@physics.technion.ac.i

    2010-12-10

    Force balance considerations put a limit on the rate of active galactic nucleus radiation momentum output, L/c, capable of driving galactic superwinds and reproducing the observed M{sub BH}-{sigma} relation between black hole mass and spheroid velocity dispersion. We show that black holes cannot supply enough momentum in radiation to drive the gas out by pressure alone. Energy-driven winds give a M{sub BH}-{sigma} scaling favored by a recent analysis but also fall short energetically once cooling is incorporated. We propose that outflow triggering of star formation by enhancing the intercloud medium turbulent pressure and squeezing clouds can supply the necessary boost and suggest possible tests of this hypothesis. Our hypothesis simultaneously can account for the observed halo baryon fraction.

  15. Current halo structures in high-current plasma experiments: {theta}-pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Matveev, Yu. V.

    2007-03-15

    Experimental data elucidating mechanisms for halo formation in {theta}-pinch discharges are presented and discussed. The experiments were performed with different gases (H{sub 2}, D{sub 2}, He, and Ar) in a theta-pinch device with a porcelain vacuum chamber and an excitation coil 15 cm in diameter and 30 cm in length. The stored energy, the current in the excitation coil, and the current half-period were W = 10 kJ, I = 400 kA, and T/2 = 14 {mu}s, respectively. It is found that the plasma rings (halos) surrounding the pinch core arise as a result of coaxial pinch stratification due to both the excitation of closed currents (inductons) inside the pinch and the radial convergence of the plasma current sheaths produced after the explosion of T-layers formed near the wall in the initial stage of the discharge. It is concluded that halo structures observed in pinches, tokamaks, and other high-current devices used in controlled fusion research have the same nature.

  16. Quench propagation velocity for highly stabilized conductors

    SciTech Connect

    Mints, R.G. |; Ogitsu, T. |; Devred, A.

    1995-05-01

    Quench propagation velocity in conductors having a large amount of stabilizer outside the multifilamentary area is considered. It is shown that the current redistribution process between the multifilamentary area and the stabilizer can strongly effect the quench propagation. A criterion is derived determining the conditions under which the current redistribution process becomes significant, and a model of effective stabilizer area is suggested to describe its influence on the quench propagation velocity. As an illustration, the model is applied to calculate the adiabatic quench propagation velocity for a conductor geometry with a multifilamentary area embedded inside the stabilizer.

  17. On optical studies of high-velocity clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    York, D. G.; Burks, G. S.; Gibney, T. B.

    1986-01-01

    Lists of distant objects that can be used to study physical conditions in, and distances of, 21 cm (Oort) high-velocity clouds are presented. Recent published observations are used to compile positions, velocities, and distances of the clouds.

  18. Consideration of Wear Rates at High Velocity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    Mild wear “involves the relatively slow removal of the tops of the highest contacting asperities with little substrate distortion”. They indicated...introduced pressure velocity, the product of bearing pressure and slid- ing velocity, Pv, as a parameter for presenting results. Units for Pv are (Pa)(m...the pin. Length loss was measured for each test. However, the soft copper pins had a tendency to “ mushroom ” during sliding under the applied load

  19. Simple Motor Control Concept Results High Efficiency at High Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starin, Scott; Engel, Chris

    2013-09-01

    The need for high velocity motors in space applications for reaction wheels and detectors has stressed the limits of Brushless Permanent Magnet Motors (BPMM). Due to inherent hysteresis core losses, conventional BPMMs try to balance the need for torque verses hysteresis losses. Cong-less motors have significantly less hysteresis losses but suffer from lower efficiencies. Additionally, the inherent low inductance in cog-less motors result in high ripple currents or high switching frequencies, which lowers overall efficiency and increases performance demands on the control electronics.However, using a somewhat forgotten but fully qualified technology of Isotropic Magnet Motors (IMM), extremely high velocities may be achieved at low power input using conventional drive electronics. This paper will discuss the trade study efforts and empirical test data on a 34,000 RPM IMM.

  20. Auditory velocity discrimination in the horizontal plane at very high velocities.

    PubMed

    Frissen, Ilja; Féron, François-Xavier; Guastavino, Catherine

    2014-10-01

    We determined velocity discrimination thresholds and Weber fractions for sounds revolving around the listener at very high velocities. Sounds used were a broadband white noise and two harmonic sounds with fundamental frequencies of 330 Hz and 1760 Hz. Experiment 1 used velocities ranging between 288°/s and 720°/s in an acoustically treated room and Experiment 2 used velocities between 288°/s and 576°/s in a highly reverberant hall. A third experiment addressed potential confounds in the first two experiments. The results show that people can reliably discriminate velocity at very high velocities and that both thresholds and Weber fractions decrease as velocity increases. These results violate Weber's law but are consistent with the empirical trend observed in the literature. While thresholds for the noise and 330 Hz harmonic stimulus were similar, those for the 1760 Hz harmonic stimulus were substantially higher. There were no reliable differences in velocity discrimination between the two acoustical environments, suggesting that auditory motion perception at high velocities is robust against the effects of reverberation.

  1. The Unusually High Halo Concentration of the Fossil Group NGC 6482: Evidence for Weak Adiabatic Contraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buote, David A.

    2017-01-01

    Although fossil galaxy systems are thought to be very old, and thus should possess above-average halo concentrations, typically fossils have unexceptional concentrations of their masses. We revisit the massive isolated elliptical galaxy/fossil group NGC 6482 for which previous X-ray studies of a modest Chandra observation obtained a very uncertain, but also possibly very high, halo concentration. We present new measurements of the hot gas surface brightness, temperature, and iron abundance using the modest Chandra observation and a previously unpublished Suzaku observation, the latter of which allows the measurements of the gas properties to be extended out to ∼ {r}2500. By constructing hydrostatic equilibrium models of the gas with separate components for the gas, the stellar mass of the large central galaxy (BCG), and the dark matter (DM), we measure {c}200=32.2+/- 7.1 and {M}200=(4.5+/- 0.6)× {10}12 {M}ȯ using a Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) DM profile. For a halo of this mass, the measured concentration c200 exceeds the mean value (7.1) expected for relaxed ΛCDM halos by 3.5σ in terms of the observational error, and by 6σ considering the intrinsic scatter in the ΛCDM c–M relation, which situates NGC 6482 as the most extreme outlier known for a fossil system. We explored several variants of adiabatic contraction (AC) models and, while the AC models provide fits of the same quality as the uncontracted models, they do have the following advantages: (1) lower c200 that is less of an outlier in the ΛCDM c–M relation, and (2) baryon fractions ({f}{{b},200}) that agree better with the mean cosmic value. While the standard AC prescriptions yield a BCG stellar mass that is uncomfortably low compared to results from stellar population synthesis (SPS) models, a weaker AC variant that artificially shuts off cooling and star formation at z = 2 yields the same stellar mass as the uncontracted models. These are probably the reasons why our X-ray analysis prefers this

  2. VLA Observations of the Magnetic Field of the Smith High Velocity Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betti, Sarah; Hill, Alex S.; Mao, Sui Ann; McClure-Griffiths, Naomi M.; Lockman, Felix J.; Benjamin, Robert A.; Gaensler, Bryan M.

    2017-01-01

    High velocity clouds (HVCs) are hydrogen gas clouds around galaxies with velocities inconsistent with Galactic rotation. HVCs may fuel future star formation and drive galaxy evolution. The Smith Cloud is an HVC with an orbit suggesting it has made at least one passage through the disk. A measured magnetic field suggests how it survived passage through the Galactic halo. The Faraday rotation measure (RM) provides information about the strength and direction of the magnetic field. We use the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) to obtain reliable RMs towards ~950 background point sources to measure the geometry of the magnetic field of the Smith Cloud. These RMs constrain the strength of the magnetic field at the head, tail, and body of the Smith Cloud while RMs directly behind the Smith Cloud suggest there is ionized gas associated with the cloud that has not previously been detected. The confirmation of the magnetic field of the Smith Cloud along with a detailed morphology of the magnetic field structure will constrain how HVCs pass through the Galactic halo without losing their gas and survive the passage through the intergalactic and interstellar media.

  3. H ii REGIONS WITHIN A COMPACT HIGH VELOCITY CLOUD. A NEARLY STARLESS DWARF GALAXY?

    SciTech Connect

    Bellazzini, M.; Magrini, L.; Mucciarelli, A.; Fraternali, F.; Ibata, R.; Martin, N.; Battaglia, G.; Testa, V.; Fumana, M.; Marchetti, A.; Correnti, M.

    2015-02-10

    Within the SECCO survey we identified a candidate stellar counterpart to the Ultra Compact High Velocity Cloud (UCHVC) HVC274.68+74.70-123 that was suggested by Adams et al. to be a possible mini halo within the Local Group of galaxies. The spectroscopic follow-up of the brightest sources within the candidate reveals the presence of two H ii regions whose radial velocity is compatible with a physical association with the UVHVC. The available data do not allow us to give a definite answer on the nature of the newly identified system. A few alternative hypotheses are discussed. However, the most likely possibility is that we have found a new faint dwarf galaxy residing in the Virgo cluster of galaxies, which we name SECCO 1. Independently of its actual distance, SECCO 1 displays a ratio of neutral hydrogen mass to V luminosity of M{sub H} {sub I}/L{sub V}≳20, by far the largest among local dwarfs. Hence, it appears to be a nearly starless galaxy and it may be an example of the missing links between normal dwarfs and the dark mini halos that are predicted to exist in large numbers according to the currently accepted cosmological model.

  4. Spatial and Kinematic Alignments between Central and Satellite Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faltenbacher, A.; Jing, Y. P.; Li, Cheng; Mao, Shude; Mo, H. J.; Pasquali, Anna; van den Bosch, Frank C.

    2008-03-01

    Based on a cosmological N-body simulation, we analyze spatial and kinematic alignments of satellite halos within 6 times the virial radius of group-sized host halos (rvir). We measure three different types of spatial alignment: halo alignment between the orientation of the group central substructure (GCS) and the distribution of its satellites, radial alignment between the orientation of a satellite and the direction toward its GCS, and direct alignment between the orientation of the GCS and that of its satellites. Analogously, we use the directions of satellite velocities and probe three further types of alignment: the radial velocity alignment between the satellite velocity and the connecting line between the satellite and GCS, the halo velocity alignment between the orientation of the GCS and satellite velocities, and the autovelocity alignment between the satellite orientations and their velocities. We find that satellites are preferentially located along the major axis of the GCS within at least 6rvir (the range probed here). Furthermore, satellites preferentially point toward the GCS. The most pronounced signal is detected on small scales, but a detectable signal extends out to ~6rvir. The direct alignment signal is weaker; however, a systematic trend is visible at distances lesssim2rvir. All velocity alignments are highly significant on small scales. The halo velocity alignment is constant within 2rvir and declines rapidly beyond. The halo and the autovelocity alignments are maximal at small scales and disappear beyond 1rvir and 1.5rvir, respectively. Our results suggest that the halo alignment reflects the filamentary large-scale structure that extends far beyond the virial radii of the groups. In contrast, the main contribution to the radial alignment arises from the adjustment of the satellite orientations in the group tidal field. The projected data reveal good agreement with recent results derived from large galaxy surveys.

  5. THE COSMIC HISTORY OF THE SPIN OF DARK MATTER HALOS WITHIN THE LARGE-SCALE STRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect

    Trowland, Holly E.; Lewis, Geraint F.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss

    2013-01-10

    We use N-body simulations to investigate the evolution of the orientation and magnitude of dark matter halo angular momentum within the large-scale structure since z = 3. We look at the evolution of the alignment of halo spins with filaments and with each other, as well as the spin parameter, which is a measure of the magnitude of angular momentum. It was found that the angular momentum vectors of dark matter halos at high redshift have a weak tendency to be orthogonal to filaments and high-mass halos have a stronger orthogonal alignment than low-mass halos. Since z = 1, the spins of low-mass halos have become weakly aligned parallel to filaments, whereas high-mass halos kept their orthogonal alignment. This recent parallel alignment of low-mass halos casts doubt on tidal torque theory as the sole mechanism for the buildup of angular momentum. We see evidence for bulk flows and the broadening of filaments over time in the alignments of halo spin and velocities. We find a significant alignment of the spin of neighboring dark matter halos only at very small separations, r < 0.3 Mpc h {sup -1}, which is driven by substructure. A correlation of the spin parameter with halo mass is confirmed at high redshift.

  6. Mapping the dynamics of a giant Ly α halo at z = 4.1 with MUSE: the energetics of a large-scale AGN-driven outflow around a massive, high-redshift galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swinbank, A. M.; Vernet, J. D. R.; Smail, Ian; De Breuck, C.; Bacon, R.; Contini, T.; Richard, J.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Urrutia, T.; Venemans, B.

    2015-05-01

    We present Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) integral field unit spectroscopic observations of the ˜150 kpc Lyα halo around the z = 4.1 radio galaxy TN J1338-1942. This 9-h observation maps the full two-dimensional kinematics of the Lyα emission across the halo, which shows a velocity gradient of Δv ˜ 700 km s-1 across 150 kpc in projection, and also identified two absorption systems associated with the Lyα emission from the radio galaxy. Both absorbers have high covering fractions (˜1) spanning the full ˜150 × 80 kpc2 extent of the halo. The stronger and more blueshifted absorber (Δv ˜ -1200 km s-1 from the systemic) has dynamics that mirror that of the underlying halo emission and we suggest that this high column material (n(H I) ˜ 1019.4 cm-2), which is also seen in C IV absorption, represents an outflowing shell that has been driven by the active galactic nuclei (AGN) or the star formation within the galaxy. The weaker (n(H I) ˜ 1014 cm-2) and less blueshifted (Δv ˜ -500 km s-1) absorber most likely represents material in the cavity between the outflowing shell and the Lyα halo. We estimate that the mass in the shell must be ˜1010 M⊙ - a significant fraction of the interstellar medium from a galaxy at z = 4. The large scales of these coherent structures illustrate the potentially powerful influence of AGN feedback on the distribution and energetics of material in their surroundings. Indeed, the discovery of high-velocity (˜1000 km s-1), group-halo-scale (i.e. >150 kpc) and mass-loaded winds in the vicinity of the central radio source is in agreement with the requirements of models that invoke AGN-driven outflows to regulate star formation and black hole growth in massive galaxies.

  7. Accretion in the galactic halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, Alex Courtney

    2000-10-01

    The Milky Way disk is enveloped in a diffuse, dynamically-hot collection of stars and star clusters collectively known as the ``stellar halo''. Photometric and chemical analyses suggest that these stars are ancient fossils of the galaxy formation epoch. Yet, little is known about the origin of this trace population. Is this system merely a vestige of the initial burst of star formation within the decoupled proto-Galaxy, or is it the detritus of cannibalized satellite galaxies? In an attempt to unravel the history of the Milky Way's stellar halo, I performed a detailed spectroscopic analysis of 55 metal-poor stars possessing ``extreme'' kinematic properties. It is thought that stars on orbits that either penetrate the remote halo or exhibit large retrograde velocities could have been associated with assimilated (or ``accreted'') dwarf galaxies. The hallmark of an accreted halo star is presumed to be a deficiency (compared with normal stars) of the α-elements (O, Mg, Si, Ca, Ti) with respect to iron, a consequence of sporadic bursts of star formation within the diminutive galaxies. Abundances for a select group of light metals (Li, Na, Mg, Si, Ca, Ti), iron-peak nuclides (Cr, Fe, Ni), and neutron-capture elements (Y, Ba) were calculated using line-strengths measured from high-resolution, high signal-to-noise spectral observations collected with the Keck I 10-m and KPNO 4-m telescopes. The abundances extracted from the spectra reveal: (1)The vast majority of outer halo stars possess supersolar [α/Fe] > 0.0) ratios. (2)The [α/Fe] ratio appears to decrease with increasing metallicity. (3)The outer halo stars have lower ratios of [α/Fe] than inner halo stars at a given metallicity. (4)At the largest metallicities, there is a large spread in the observed [α/Fe] ratios. (5)[α/Fe] anti-correlates with RAPO. (6)Only one star (BD+80° 245) exhibits the peculiar abundances expected of an assimilated star. The general conclusion extracted from these data is that the

  8. Comparative Analysis of Gas Halos in High Redshift Galaxies: Observations vs Λ-CDM Simluations with Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churchill, Christopher W.; Klypin, A.; Ceverino, D.; Kacprzak, G. G.

    2007-12-01

    Analysis of mock quasar spectra of metal absorption lines in the proximity of formed galaxies in cosmological simulation is a highly promising approach for interpreting the efficiency with which gas is converted into stars in galaxies, the mechanisms of gas inflow in the context of the cosmic web, and the star-gas feedback processes in galaxies. We are undertaking a wholesale approach to use powerful Λ-CDM simulations to interpret high-quality absorption line data (HIRES/UVES) and high-quality galaxy imaging data (HST) for inferring the interplay between galaxies and metal enriched gas in the vicinity of galaxies (few hundred kpc). The simulations are performed using the Eulerian Gasdynamics plus N-body Adaptive Refinement Tree (ART) code, which has gas cell resolutions of 20-50 pc. Physical processes implemented in the code include radiative cooling, star formation, metal enrichment and thermal feedback due to type II and type Ia supernovae. We quantitatively compare the observed and simulated spatial and kinematic distribution of HI, MgII, CIV, and OVI absorption lines over a range of impact parameters as a function of redshift, and discuss key insights for interpreting the underlying temperature, density, and ionization structure of the halo/cosmic-web interface, and the influence of galaxies on its chemical enrichment. Disparities between the simulations and the statistical cross sections and velocity spreads of the absorption line data in turn provide powerful constraints on the galaxy feedback recipes, which we quantitatively examine.

  9. Consideration of Wear Rates at High Velocities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    evaluations were performed for different velocity ranges depending on the interest of the individual researcher. As a result, an inconsistency 4 W L...together will produce heat. The slipper-rail interaction being studied is no different . The amount of heat generated is a function of the frictional...the one which provides the highest wear rate. To correlate specimens from different sources and of varying sizes and shapes, the wear rate, normal

  10. Fluctuations in the high-redshift Lyman-Werner background: close halo pairs as the origin of supermassive black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dijkstra, Mark; Haiman, Zoltán; Mesinger, Andrei; Wyithe, J. Stuart B.

    2008-12-01

    The earliest generation of stars and black holes must have established an early `Lyman-Werner' background (LWB) at high redshift, prior to the epoch of reionization. Because of the long mean free path of photons with energies hν < 13.6eV, the LWB was nearly uniform. However, some variation in the LWB is expected due to the discrete nature of the sources, and their highly clustered spatial distribution. In this paper, we compute the probability distribution function (PDF) of the LW flux that irradiates dark matter (DM) haloes collapsing at high redshift (z ~ 10). Our model accounts for (i) the clustering of DM haloes, (ii) Poisson fluctuations in the number of corresponding star-forming galaxies and (iii) scatter in the LW luminosity produced by haloes of a given mass (calibrated using local observations). We find that >99 per cent of the DM haloes are illuminated by an LW flux within a factor of 2 of the global mean value. However, a small fraction, ~10-8 to 10-6, of DM haloes with virial temperatures Tvir >~ 104 K have a close luminous neighbour within <~10 kpc, and are exposed to an LW flux exceeding the global mean by a factor of >20, or to J21,LW > 103 (in units of 10-21 erg s-1 Hz-1 sr-1 cm-2). This large LW flux can photodissociate H2 molecules in the gas collapsing due to atomic cooling in these haloes, and prevent its further cooling and fragmentation. Such close halo pairs therefore provide possible sites in which primordial gas clouds collapse directly into massive black holes (MBH ~ 104-6Msolar), and subsequently grow into supermassive (MBH >~ 109Msolar) black holes by z ~ 6.

  11. 46 CFR 153.353 - High velocity vents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false High velocity vents. 153.353 Section 153.353 Shipping... Systems § 153.353 High velocity vents. The discharge point of a B/3 or 4m venting system must be located..., unimpeded jet; (b) The jet has a minimum exit velocity of 30 m/sec (approx. 98.4 ft/sec); and (c) The...

  12. 46 CFR 153.353 - High velocity vents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false High velocity vents. 153.353 Section 153.353 Shipping... Systems § 153.353 High velocity vents. The discharge point of a B/3 or 4m venting system must be located..., unimpeded jet; (b) The jet has a minimum exit velocity of 30 m/sec (approx. 98.4 ft/sec); and (c) The...

  13. Cryogenic Testing of High-Velocity Spoke Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Hopper, Christopher S.; Delayen, Jean R.; Park, HyeKyoung

    2014-12-01

    Spoke-loaded cavities are being investigated for the high-velocity regime. The relative compactness at low-frequency makes them attractive for applications requiring, or benefiting from, 4 K operation. Additionally, the large velocity acceptance makes them good candidates for the acceleration of high-velocity protons and ions. Here we present the results of cryogenic testing of a 325 MHz, β0= 0.82 single-spoke cavity and a 500 MHz, β0 = 1 double-spoke cavity.

  14. 46 CFR 153.353 - High velocity vents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false High velocity vents. 153.353 Section 153.353 Shipping... Systems § 153.353 High velocity vents. The discharge point of a B/3 or 4m venting system must be located..., unimpeded jet; (b) The jet has a minimum exit velocity of 30 m/sec (approx. 98.4 ft/sec); and (c) The...

  15. 46 CFR 153.353 - High velocity vents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false High velocity vents. 153.353 Section 153.353 Shipping... Systems § 153.353 High velocity vents. The discharge point of a B/3 or 4m venting system must be located..., unimpeded jet; (b) The jet has a minimum exit velocity of 30 m/sec (approx. 98.4 ft/sec); and (c) The...

  16. 46 CFR 153.353 - High velocity vents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false High velocity vents. 153.353 Section 153.353 Shipping... Systems § 153.353 High velocity vents. The discharge point of a B/3 or 4m venting system must be located..., unimpeded jet; (b) The jet has a minimum exit velocity of 30 m/sec (approx. 98.4 ft/sec); and (c) The...

  17. The Outer Halo -- Halo Origins and Mass of the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Heather; Arabadjis, John; Dohm-Palmer, Robbie; Freeman, Ken; Harding, Paul; Mateo, Mario; Norris, John; Olszewski, Ed; Sneden, Chris

    2000-02-01

    Through our detection of distant halo stars, we are now well placed to map the regions of the Galactic halo where previously only satellite galaxies and a few globular clusters were known. Mapping this region is crucial for answering questions like: How and over what timescales was the Milky Way's stellar halo assembled? What is the total mass and shape of its dark halo? The Sagittarius dwarf has demonstrated that at least some of the stellar halo was accreted. But, HOW MUCH of the halo was accreted? Our previous efforts have proven that the Washington photometric system, in conjuction with spectroscopy, is capable of efficiently and unambiguously identifying halo stars out to 100 kpc or more. We require followup spectroscopy to map velocity substructure, which is more likely visible in the outer halo because of the long dynamical timescales, and to identify the rare objects in the extreme outer halo which will constrain the shape and size of its dark halo. We are applying for 4m/RCSP time at both CTIO and KPNO to observe faint outer-halo giant and BHB candidates.

  18. Punch valve development testing: Low and high velocity test results

    SciTech Connect

    Replogle, W.C.; Brandon, S.L.

    1996-09-01

    This is a report on the use of quasi-static tests to predict fundamental parameters for punch valve development. This report summarizes the results from low and high velocity tests performed with 0.63 and 0.38 cm diameter plungers, 5 cm long penetrating aluminium and composite targets. The low velocity tests, 0.025 m/s, were performed to understand the effects and interactions of plunger diameter plunger tip shape, target material, and target support on penetration energy and plunger functionality. High velocity tests, 75 m/s, were compared to low velocity results.

  19. The combined effects of halo and linear doping effects on the high-frequency and switching performance in ballistic CNTFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wang; Lu, Zhang; Xueying, Wang; Zhubing, Wang; Ting, Zhang; Na, Li; Xiao, Yang; Gongshu, Yue

    2014-11-01

    To overcome short-channel effects (SCEs) in high-performance device applications, a novel structure of CNTFET with a combination of halo and linear doping structure (HL-CNTFET) has been proposed. It has been theoretically investigated by a quantum kinetic model, which is based on two-dimensional non-equilibrium Green's functions solved self-consistently with Poisson's equations. We have studied the effect of halo doping and linear doping structure on static and dynamical performances of HL-CNTFET. It is demonstrated that a halo doping structure can decrease the drain leakage current and improve the on/off current ratio, and that linear doping can improve high-frequency and switching performance.

  20. Halo occupation numbers and galaxy bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peacock, J. A.; Smith, R. E.

    2000-11-01

    We propose a heuristic model that displays the main features of realistic theories for galaxy bias. We first show that the low-order clustering statistics of the dark-matter distribution depend almost entirely on the locations and density profiles of dark-matter haloes. The quasi-linear mass correlations are in fact reproduced well by a model of independent randomly-placed haloes. The distribution of galaxies within the halo density field depends on: (i) the efficiency of galaxy formation, as manifested by the halo occupation number - the number of galaxies brighter than some sample limit contained in a halo of a given mass; (ii) the location of these galaxies within their halo. The first factor is constrained by the empirical luminosity function of groups. For the second factor, we assume that one galaxy marks the halo centre, with any remaining galaxies acting as satellites that trace the halo mass. This second assumption is essential if small-scale galaxy correlations are to remain close to a single power law, rather than flattening in the same way as the correlations of the overall density field. These simple assumptions amount to a recipe for non-local bias, in which the probability of finding a galaxy is not a simple function of its local mass density. We have applied this prescription to some CDM models of current interest, and find that the predictions are close to the observed galaxy correlations for a flat Ω=0.3 model (ΛCDM), but not for an Ω=1 model with the same power spectrum (τCDM). This is an inevitable consequence of cluster normalization for the power spectra: cluster-scale haloes of given mass have smaller core radii for high Ω, and hence display enhanced small-scale clustering. Finally, the pairwise velocity dispersion of galaxies in the ΛCDM model is lower than that of the mass, allowing cluster-normalized models to yield a realistic Mach number for the peculiar velocity field. This is largely due to the strong variation of galaxy

  1. Milky Way halo gas kinematics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danly, L.

    1986-01-01

    Measurements of high resolution, short wavelength absorption data taken by IUE toward high latitude O and B stars are presented in a discussion of the large scale kinematic properties of Milky Way Halo gas. An analysis of these data demonstrates that: (1) the obsrved absorption widths (FWHM) of Si II are very large, ranging up to 150 Km/s for the most distant halo star; this is much larger than is generally appreciated from optical data; (2) the absorption is observed to be systematically negative in radial velocity, indicating that cool material is, on the whole, flowing toward the disk of the galaxy; (3) there is some evidence for asymmetry between the northern and southern galactic hemispheres, in accordance with the HI 21 cm data toward the galactic poles; (4) low column density gas with highly negative radial LSR velocity (V less than -70 km/s) can be found toward stars beyond 1-3 kpc in the northern galactic hemisphere in all four quadrants of galactic longitude; and (5) only the profiles toward stars in the direction of known high velocity HI features show a clear two component structure.

  2. Optical Emission from High Velocity Clouds and the Nature of HVCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiner, B. J.; Vogel, S. N.; Williams, T. B.

    1999-12-01

    The nature and origin of the high-velocity clouds of neutral hydrogen remain controversial, and the distances of most HVCs are poorly constrained. Only the large northern HVC complexes M and A have upper distance limits, of <5 and 4--10 kpc, from absorption against halo stars (Danly et al 1993, van Woerden et al 1999). These HVCs have diffuse H-alpha emission of 80--200 milli-Rayleighs (mR) (Tufte, Reynolds & Haffner 1998). We report results from a search of 20 high velocity clouds for faint diffuse optical emission lines in H-alpha and [N II], using a Fabry-Perot at the Las Campanas 2.5-m telescope. A few small complexes are ``bright,'' with H-alpha emission from 100--400 mR and high [N II]/H-alpha. Many HVCs are very faint in H-alpha: HVCs from the Anticenter, Galactic Center Negative, and Extreme Positive complexes have H-alpha from <15 to 30 mR. We construct a simple model for the ionizing flux emergent from the galaxy, normalized by the northern ``bright'' HVCs with known distances and H-alpha fluxes. If the H-alpha from HVCs is produced by ionizing flux escaping from the Galaxy, the H-alpha flux can be used to infer distances for HVCs. The model places the very faint HVCs at distances of 20--60 kpc, in the outer Galactic halo. If H-alpha can be produced by other mechanisms, than these distances could be lower limits. Independent of the model or mechanism, the HVCs that are very faint in H-alpha should be much farther away than the nearby ``bright'' HVCs. The faint HVCs are too far away to be produced by a Galactic fountain, and represent a significant amount of gas accreting onto the Galaxy. This work has been supported by a Carnegie Barbara McClintock Fellowship.

  3. High-resolution HI and CO observations of high-latitude intermediate-velocity clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röhser, T.; Kerp, J.; Ben Bekhti, N.; Winkel, B.

    2016-08-01

    Context. Intermediate-velocity clouds (IVCs) are HI halo clouds that are likely related to a Galactic fountain process. In-falling IVCs are candidates for the re-accretion of matter onto the Milky Way. Aims: We study the evolution of IVCs at the disk-halo interface, focussing on the transition from atomic to molecular IVCs. We compare an atomic IVC to a molecular IVC and characterise their structural differences in order to investigate how molecular IVCs form high above the Galactic plane. Methods: With high-resolution HI observations of the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope and 12CO(1 → 0) and 13CO(1 → 0) observations with the IRAM 30 m telescope, we analyse the small-scale structures within the two clouds. By correlating HI and far-infrared (FIR) dust continuum emission from the Planck satellite, the distribution of molecular hydrogen (H2) is estimated. We conduct a detailed comparison of the HI, FIR, and CO data and study variations of the XCO conversion factor. Results: The atomic IVC does not disclose detectable CO emission. The atomic small-scale structure, as revealed by the high-resolution HI data, shows low peak HI column densities and low HI fluxes as compared to the molecular IVC. The molecular IVC exhibits a rich molecular structure and most of the CO emission is observed at the eastern edge of the cloud. There is observational evidence that the molecular IVC is in a transient and, thus, non-equilibrium phase. The average XCO factor is close to the canonical value of the Milky Way disk. Conclusions: We propose that the two IVCs represent different states in a gradual transition from atomic to molecular clouds. The molecular IVC appears to be more condensed allowing the formation of H2 and CO in shielded regions all over the cloud. Ram pressure may accumulate gas and thus facilitate the formation of H2. We show evidence that the atomic IVC will evolve also into a molecular IVC in a few Myr. The reduced datacubes are only available at the CDS via

  4. High Velocity White Dwarfs from Type Ia Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, B.

    2002-12-01

    The single degenerate scenario for Type Ia supernovae predicts the post-supernova release of the donor star with a space velocity determined by the original binary orbital velocity. The mass transfer criteria for successful supernova ignition also place constraints on the mass of the donor. The combination of these two factors means that the great majority of high velocity donor remnants will be white dwarfs. We present models of the Type Ia supernova progenitors and antecedents in the Galaxy, and examine the donor remnant white dwarf population in the light of the current interest in high velocity white dwarfs. One potential discriminant between donor remnants and normal high velocity white dwarfs (from a thick disk or spheroid stellar population) is a determination of the binary fraction. White dwarfs which have their origin in disrupted close binaries will always be single.

  5. Dynamic Strengthening During High Velocity Shear Experiments with Siliceous Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Z.; Chang, J. C.; Boneh, Y.; Chen, X.; Reches, Z.

    2011-12-01

    It is generally accepted that dynamic-weakening is essential for earthquake instability, and many experimental works have documented this weakening. Recent observations revealed also opposite trends of dynamic-strengthening in experiments (Reches & Lockner, 2010). We present here our experimental results of this dynamic-strengthening and discuss possible implications to earthquake behavior. We ran hundreds of experiments on experimental faults made of siliceous rock including granite, syenite, diorite, and quartzite. The experimental fault is comprised of two solid cylindrical blocks with a raised-ring contact of 7 cm diameter and 1 cm width. We recognized general, three regimes of strength-velocity relations: (I) Dynamic weakening (drop of 20-60% of static strength) as slip velocity increased from ~0.0003 m/s (lowest experimental velocity) to a critical velocity, Vc=0.008-0.16 m/s; (II) Abrupt transition to dynamic strengthening regime during which the fault strength almost regains its static strength; and (III) Quasi-constant strength with further possible drops as velocity approaches ~1 m/s. The critical velocity depends on the sample lithology: Vc is ~0.06 m/s for granite, ~0.008 m/s for syenite, ~0.01 m/s for diorite, and ~0.16 m/s for quartzite. The strengthening stage is associated with temperature increase, wear-rate increase, and the occurrence of intense, high frequency stick-slip events (Reches & Lockner, 2010). Sammis et al., (this meeting) attributed this strengthening to dehydration of the thin water layer that covers the gouge particles as the temperature increases. On the other hand, we note that tens of experiments with dolomite samples (non-siliceous), which were deformed under similar conditions, did not exhibit the velocity strengthening (unpublished). Based on the analyses by Andrews (2004, 2005), we speculate that velocity strengthening may bound the slip velocity. The numerical models of Andrews show that the slip velocity along a slip

  6. Acceleration of objects to high velocity by electromagnetic forces

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard F

    2017-02-28

    Two exemplary approaches to the acceleration of projectiles are provided. Both approaches can utilize concepts associated with the Inductrack maglev system. Either of them provides an effective means of accelerating multi-kilogram projectiles to velocities of several kilometers per second, using launchers of order 10 meters in length, thus enabling the acceleration of projectiles to high velocities by electromagnetic forces.

  7. High Velocity Absorption during Eta Car B's Periastron Passage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Krister E.; Groh, J. H.; Hillier, J.; Gull, Theodore R.; Owocki, S. P.; Okazaki, A. T.; Damineli, A.; Teodoro, M.; Weigelt, G.; Hartman, H.

    2010-01-01

    Eta Car is one of the most luminous massive stars in the Galaxy, with repeated eruptions with a 5.5 year periodicity. These events are caused by the periastron passage of a massive companion in an eccentric orbit. We report the VLT/CRIRES detection of a strong high-velocity, (<1900 km/s) , broad absorption wing in He I at 10833 A during the 2009.0 periastron passage. Previous observations during the 2003.5 event have shown evidence of such high-velocity absorption in the He I 10833 transition, allowing us to conclude that the high-velocity gas is crossing the line-of-sight toward Eta Car over a time period of approximately 2 months. Our analysis of HST/STlS archival data with observations of high velocity absorption in the ultraviolet Si IV and C IV resonance lines, confirm the presence of a high-velocity material during the spectroscopic low state. The observations provide direct detection of high-velocity material flowing from the wind-wind collision zone around the binary system, and we discuss the implications of the presence of high-velocity gas in Eta Car during periastron

  8. Halo-Formation at an Early Stage of Injection into High-Intensity Hadron Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Shimosaki, Yoshito

    2005-06-08

    Halo formation under a non-equilibrium state for a 2D Gaussian beam has been examined in terms of a transition of time-varying nonlinear resonances induced by the space-charge effect. Analytic approaches using an isolated resonance Hamiltonian are presented for estimating the location of the halo and the strength of the diffusion.

  9. Superconducting spoke cavities for high-velocity applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hopper, Christopher S.; Delayen, Jean R.

    2013-10-01

    To date, superconducting spoke cavities have been designed, developed, and tested for particle velocities up to {beta}{sub 0}~0.6, but there is a growing interest in possible applications of multispoke cavities for high-velocity applications. We have explored the design parameter space for low-frequency, high-velocity, double-spoke superconducting cavities in order to determine how each design parameter affects the electromagnetic properties, in particular the surface electromagnetic fields and the shunt impedance. We present detailed design for cavities operating at 325 and 352 MHz and optimized for {beta}{sub 0}~=0.82 and 1.

  10. Clouds Dominate the Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-01-01

    yet," he said. Earlier this year, data taken with the newly commissioned GBT demonstrated that rather than a diffuse mist or other ill-defined feature - as many astronomers had speculated - the halo was in fact made up of well-defined clouds. "The discovery of these clouds, each containing 50-to-100 solar masses of hydrogen and averaging about 100 light-years in diameter, challenged many of the prevailing theories about the structure and dynamics of the halo," said Lockman. The clouds were discovered about 25,000 light-years from Earth toward the center of our Galaxy. The latest findings show the clouds extend at least 5,000 light-years above and below the Galactic plane. Though the initial studies by Lockman revealed the presence of these clouds, the data were insufficient to conclusively show that they were present throughout the entire halo. These latest results provide valuable evidence that the earlier results were truly representative of the entire halo. "The richness and variety of this phenomenon continues to astound me," remarked Lockman. Lockman's new studies also confirm that these clouds travel along with the rest of the Galaxy, rotating about its center. These studies clearly rule out the possibility that so-called "high-velocity clouds" were responsible for what was detected initially. High-velocity clouds are vagabond clumps of intergalactic gas, possibly left over from the formation of the Milky Way and other nearby galaxies. "One thing that is for certain is that these are not high-velocity clouds, this is an entirely separate phenomenon," said Lockman. According to the researcher, the ubiquitous nature and dynamics of these newly discovered clouds support the theory that they are condensing out of the hot gas that is lifted into the halo through supernova explosions. When a massive star dies, it produces a burst of cosmic rays and an enormous expanding bubble of gas at a temperature of several million degrees Celsius. Over time, this hot gas will

  11. High Resolution Simulations for Hierarchical Formation of Dark Matter Halos Hosting Galaxies and AGNs at High Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiyama, Tomoaki

    2015-08-01

    We present the evolution of dark matter halos in six large cosmological N-body simulations, called the ν2GC (New Numerical Galaxy Catalog) simulations on the basis of the LCDM cosmology consistent with observational results obtained by the Planck satellite. The largest simulation consists of 81923 (550 billion) dark matter particles in a box of 1.12h-1Gpc (a mass resolution of 2.20×108 h-1M⊙). Among simulations utilizing boxes larger than 1h-1Gpc, our simulation yields the highest resolution simulation that has ever been achieved. Compared with the Millennium simulation (Springel et al. 2005), our simulation offers the advantages of a mass resolution that is four times better and a spatial volume that is 11 times larger. A ν2GC simulation with the smallest box consists of eight billions particles in a box of 70h-1Mpc (a mass resolution of 3.44×106 -1M⊙). These simulations can follow the evolution of halos over masses of eight orders of magnitude, from small dwarf galaxies to massive clusters. Using the unprecedentedly high resolution and powerful statistics of the ν2GC simulations, we provide statistical results of the halo mass function, mass accretion rate, formation redshift, and merger statistics, and present accurate fitting functions for the Planck cosmology, from redshift 10 to 0. By combining the ν2GC simulations with our new semi-analytic galaxy formation model, we are able to prepare mock catalogs of galaxies and active galactic nuclei, which will be made publicly available in the near future.

  12. Sc and neutron-capture abundances in Galactic low- and high-α field halo stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishlock, C. K.; Yong, D.; Karakas, A. I.; Alves-Brito, A.; Meléndez, J.; Nissen, P. E.; Kobayashi, C.; Casey, A. R.

    2017-01-01

    We determine relative abundance ratios for the neutron-capture elements Zr, La, Ce, Nd, and Eu for a sample of 27 Galactic dwarf stars with -1.5 < [Fe/H] <-0.8. We also measure the iron-peak element Sc. These stars separate into three populations (low- and highhalo and thick-disc stars) based on the [α/Fe] abundance ratio and their kinematics as discovered by Nissen & Schuster. We find differences between the low- and high-α groups in the abundance ratios of [Sc/Fe], [Zr/Fe], [La/Zr], [Y/Eu], and [Ba/Eu] when including Y and Ba from Nissen & Schuster. For all ratios except [La/Zr], the low-α stars have a lower abundance compared to the high-α stars. The low-α stars display the same abundance patterns of high [Ba/Y] and low [Y/Eu] as observed in present-day dwarf spheroidal galaxies, although with smaller abundance differences, when compared to the high-α stars. These distinct chemical patterns have been attributed to differences in the star formation rate between the two populations and the contribution of low-metallicity, low-mass asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars to the low-α population. By comparing the low-α population with AGB stellar models, we place constraints on the mass range of the AGB stars.

  13. Halo Shape and its Relation to Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottlöber, S.; Turchaninov, V.

    Using high resolution DM simulations we study the shape of dark matter halos. Halos become more spherical with decreasing mass. This trend is even more pronounced for the inner part of the halo. Angular momentum and shape are correlated. The angular momenta of neighboring halos are correlated.

  14. Response of polymer composites to high and low velocity impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsieh, C. Y.; Mount, A.; Jang, B. Z.; Zee, R. H.

    1990-01-01

    The present investigation of fiber-reinforced polymer matrix composites' impact characteristics employed a drop tower for the low-velocity impact case and a novel, projectile instantaneous velocity-measuring sensor for high-velocity impact. Attention was given to the energy loss of projectiles in composites reinforced with polyethylene, kevlar, and graphite. Two distinct energy-loss mechanisms are noted, the first of which is due to the actual fracture process while the other is due to the generation of friction heat. The drop-tower impact-test results furnish the strain-rate dependence of the energy loss.

  15. Fluid shielding of high-velocity jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodykoontz, J. H.

    1984-01-01

    Experimental noise data for a nozzle exhaust system incorporating a thermal acoustic shield (TAS) are presented to show the effect of changes in geometric and flow parameters on attenuation of high-velocity jet exhaust noise in the flyover plane. The results are presented for a 10.00-cm-diameter primary conical nozzle with a TAS configuration consisting of a 2.59- or 5.07-cm-wide annular gap. Shield-stream exhaust velocity was varied from 157 to 248 m/sec to investigate the effect of velocity ratio. The results showed that increasing the annular gap width increases attenuation of high-frequency noise when comparisons are made on the same ideal thrust basis. Varying the velocity ratio had a minor effect on the noise characteristics of the nozzles investigated.

  16. An Unusual Lunar Halo

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardon, Bartley L.

    1977-01-01

    Discusses a photograph of an unusual combination of lunar halos: the 22-degree refraction halo, the circumscribed halo, and a reflection halo. Deduces the form and orientations of the ice crystals responsible for the observed halo features. (MLH)

  17. Stellar mass to halo mass relation from galaxy clustering in VUDS: a high star formation efficiency at z ≃ 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durkalec, A.; Le Fèvre, O.; de la Torre, S.; Pollo, A.; Cassata, P.; Garilli, B.; Le Brun, V.; Lemaux, B. C.; Maccagni, D.; Pentericci, L.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Thomas, R.; Vanzella, E.; Zamorani, G.; Zucca, E.; Amorín, R.; Bardelli, S.; Cassarà, L. P.; Castellano, M.; Cimatti, A.; Cucciati, O.; Fontana, A.; Giavalisco, M.; Grazian, A.; Hathi, N. P.; Ilbert, O.; Paltani, S.; Ribeiro, B.; Schaerer, D.; Scodeggio, M.; Sommariva, V.; Talia, M.; Tresse, L.; Vergani, D.; Capak, P.; Charlot, S.; Contini, T.; Cuby, J. G.; Dunlop, J.; Fotopoulou, S.; Koekemoer, A.; López-Sanjuan, C.; Mellier, Y.; Pforr, J.; Salvato, M.; Scoville, N.; Taniguchi, Y.; Wang, P. W.

    2015-04-01

    The relation between the galaxy stellar mass M⋆ and the dark matter halo mass Mh gives important information on the efficiency in forming stars and assembling stellar mass in galaxies. We present measurements of the ratio of stellar mass to halo mass (SMHR) at redshifts 2 < z < 5, obtained from the VIMOS Ultra Deep Survey. We use halo occupation distribution (HOD) modelling of clustering measurements on ~3000 galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts to derive the dark matter halo mass Mh, and spectral energy density fitting over a large set of multi-wavelength data to derive the stellar mass M⋆ and compute the SMHR = M⋆/Mh. We find that the SMHR ranges from 1% to 2.5% for galaxies with M⋆ = 1.3 × 109 M⊙ to M⋆ = 7.4 × 109 M⊙ in DM halos with Mh = 1.3 × 1011 M⊙ to Mh = 3 × 1011 M⊙. We derive the integrated star formation efficiency (ISFE) of these galaxies and find that the star formation efficiency is a moderate 6-9% for lower mass galaxies, while it is relatively high at 16% for galaxies with the median stellar mass of the sample ~ 7 × 109 M⊙. The lower ISFE at lower masses may indicate that some efficient means of suppressing star formation is at work (like SNe feedback), while the high ISFE for the average galaxy at z ~ 3 indicates that these galaxies efficiently build up their stellar mass at a key epoch in the mass assembly process. Based on our results, we propose a possible scenario in which the average massive galaxy at z ~ 3 begins to experience truncation of its star formation within a few million years. Based on data obtained with the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope, Paranal, Chile, under Large Program 185.A-0791.

  18. Effective Dark Matter Halo Catalog in f (R ) Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jian-hua; Hawken, Adam J.; Li, Baojiu; Guzzo, Luigi

    2015-08-01

    We introduce the idea of an effective dark matter halo catalog in f (R ) gravity, which is built using the effective density field. Using a suite of high resolution N -body simulations, we find that the dynamical properties of halos, such as the distribution of density, velocity dispersion, specific angular momentum and spin, in the effective catalog of f (R ) gravity closely mimic those in the cold dark matter model with a cosmological constant (Λ CDM ). Thus, when using effective halos, an f (R ) model can be viewed as a Λ CDM model. This effective catalog therefore provides a convenient way for studying the baryonic physics, the galaxy halo occupation distribution and even semianalytical galaxy formation in f (R ) cosmologies.

  19. Renormalized halo bias

    SciTech Connect

    Assassi, Valentin; Baumann, Daniel; Green, Daniel; Zaldarriaga, Matias E-mail: dbaumann@damtp.cam.ac.uk E-mail: matiasz@ias.edu

    2014-08-01

    This paper provides a systematic study of renormalization in models of halo biasing. Building on work of McDonald, we show that Eulerian biasing is only consistent with renormalization if non-local terms and higher-derivative contributions are included in the biasing model. We explicitly determine the complete list of required bias parameters for Gaussian initial conditions, up to quartic order in the dark matter density contrast and at leading order in derivatives. At quadratic order, this means including the gravitational tidal tensor, while at cubic order the velocity potential appears as an independent degree of freedom. Our study naturally leads to an effective theory of biasing in which the halo density is written as a double expansion in fluctuations and spatial derivatives. We show that the bias expansion can be organized in terms of Galileon operators which aren't renormalized at leading order in derivatives. Finally, we discuss how the renormalized bias parameters impact the statistics of halos.

  20. A Speeding Binary in the Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-04-01

    The recent discovery of a hyper-velocity binary star system in the halo of the Milky Way poses a mystery: how was this system accelerated to its high speed?Accelerating StarsUnlike the uniform motion in the Galactic disk, stars in the Milky Ways halo exhibit a huge diversity of orbits that are usually tilted relative to the disk and have a variety of speeds. One type of halo star, so-called hyper-velocity stars, travel with speeds that can approach the escape velocity of the Galaxy.How do these hyper-velocity stars come about? Assuming they form in the Galactic disk, there are multiple proposed scenarios through which they could be accelerated and injected into the halo, such as:Ejection after a close encounter with the supermassive black hole at the Galactic centerEjection due to a nearby supernova explosionEjection as the result of a dynamical interaction in a dense stellar population.Further observations of hyper-velocity stars are necessary to identify the mechanism responsible for their acceleration.J1211s SurpriseModels of J1211s orbit show it did not originate from the Galactic center (black dot). The solar symbol shows the position of the Sun and the star shows the current position of J1211. The bottom two panels show two depictions(x-y plane and r-z plane) of estimated orbits of J1211 over the past 10 Gyr. [Nmeth et al. 2016]To this end, a team of scientists led by Pter Nmeth (Friedrich Alexander University, Erlangen-Nrnberg) recently studied the candidate halo hyper-velocity star SDSS J121150.27+143716.2. The scientists obtained spectroscopy of J1211 using spectrographs at the Keck Telescope in Hawaii and ESOs Very Large Telescope in Chile. To their surprise, they discovered the signature of a companion in the spectra: J1211 is actually a binary!Nmeth and collaborators found that J1211, located roughly 18,000 light-years away, is moving at a rapid ~570 km/s relative to the galactic rest frame. The binary system consists of a hot (30,600 K) subdwarf and a

  1. Orbital Transfer Vehicle Engine Technology High Velocity Ratio Diffusing Crossover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lariviere, Brian W.

    1992-01-01

    High speed, high efficiency head rise multistage pumps require continuous passage diffusing crossovers to effectively convey the pumped fluid from the exit of one impeller to the inlet of the next impeller. On Rocketdyne's Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV), the MK49-F, a three stage high pressure liquid hydrogen turbopump, utilizes a 6.23 velocity ratio diffusing crossover. This velocity ratio approaches the diffusion limits for stable and efficient flow over the operating conditions required by the OTV system. The design of the high velocity ratio diffusing crossover was based on advanced analytical techniques anchored by previous tests of stationary two-dimensional diffusers with steady flow. To secure the design and the analytical techniques, tests were required with the unsteady whirling characteristics produced by an impeller. A tester was designed and fabricated using a 2.85 times scale model of the MK49-F turbopumps first stage, including the inducer, impeller, and the diffusing crossover. Water and air tests were completed to evaluate the large scale turbulence, non-uniform velocity, and non-steady velocity on the pump and crossover head and efficiency. Suction performance tests from 80 percent to 124 percent of design flow were completed in water to assess these pump characteristics. Pump and diffuser performance from the water and air tests were compared with the actual MK49-F test data in liquid hydrogen.

  2. Orbital transfer vehicle engine technology high velocity ratio diffusing crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lariviere, Brian W.

    1992-12-01

    High speed, high efficiency head rise multistage pumps require continuous passage diffusing crossovers to effectively convey the pumped fluid from the exit of one impeller to the inlet of the next impeller. On Rocketdyne's Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV), the MK49-F, a three stage high pressure liquid hydrogen turbopump, utilizes a 6.23 velocity ratio diffusing crossover. This velocity ratio approaches the diffusion limits for stable and efficient flow over the operating conditions required by the OTV system. The design of the high velocity ratio diffusing crossover was based on advanced analytical techniques anchored by previous tests of stationary two-dimensional diffusers with steady flow. To secure the design and the analytical techniques, tests were required with the unsteady whirling characteristics produced by an impeller. A tester was designed and fabricated using a 2.85 times scale model of the MK49-F turbopumps first stage, including the inducer, impeller, and the diffusing crossover. Water and air tests were completed to evaluate the large scale turbulence, non-uniform velocity, and non-steady velocity on the pump and crossover head and efficiency. Suction performance tests from 80 percent to 124 percent of design flow were completed in water to assess these pump characteristics. Pump and diffuser performance from the water and air tests were compared with the actual MK49-F test data in liquid hydrogen.

  3. The highly ionized, high-velocity gas in NGC 6231

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massa, Derck

    2017-02-01

    It is well known that clusters of massive stars are influenced by the presence of strong winds, that they are sources of diffuse X-rays from shocked gas, and that this gas can be vented into the surrounding region or the halo through the champagne effect. However, the details of how these different environments interact and evolve are far from complete. This paper attributes the broad C IVλλ1500 absorption features (extending to -1900 km s-1) that are seen in the spectra of main sequence B stars in NGC 6231 to gas in the cluster environment and not the B stars themselves. It is shown that the presence of a WC star, WR 79, in the cluster makes this gas detectable because its wind enriches the cluster gas with carbon. Given the available data, it is not clear whether the absorbing gas is simply the far wind of WR 79 or a collective cluster wind enriched by carbon from the wind of WR 79. If it is simply due to the wind, then this wind must flow, unimpeded for more than 2 pc, suggesting that the inner region of the cluster is nearly devoid of obstructing material. If it is actually a collective wind from the cluster, then we could be witnessing an important stage of galactic feedback. In either case, the observations provide a unique and significant piece to the puzzle of how massive, open clusters evolve.

  4. 3D finite element simulations of high velocity projectile impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ožbolt, Joško; İrhan, Barış; Ruta, Daniela

    2015-09-01

    An explicit three-dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) code is developed for the simulation of high velocity impact and fragmentation events. The rate sensitive microplane material model, which accounts for large deformations and rate effects, is used as a constitutive law. In the code large deformation frictional contact is treated by forward incremental Lagrange multiplier method. To handle highly distorted and damaged elements the approach based on the element deletion is employed. The code is then used in 3D FE simulations of high velocity projectile impact. The results of the numerical simulations are evaluated and compared with experimental results. It is shown that it realistically predicts failure mode and exit velocities for different geometries of plain concrete slab. Moreover, the importance of some relevant parameters, such as contact friction, rate sensitivity, bulk viscosity and deletion criteria are addressed.

  5. High-Velocity Clouds Merging with the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockman, Felix J.

    HI observations with the Green Bank Telescope have now given us two clear examples of high-velocity HI clouds which are encountering the Milky Way disk and losing matter to it: Complex H, passing through the plane of the Milky Way in the far outer Galaxy, and Smith's Cloud, just entering the disk in the inner Galaxy. These clouds may give unique insights into the ongoing formation of the Milky Way, its chemical history, and the nature of the high-velocity cloud phenomenon.

  6. AHF: AMIGA'S HALO FINDER

    SciTech Connect

    Knollmann, Steffen R.; Knebe, Alexander

    2009-06-15

    Cosmological simulations are the key tool for investigating the different processes involved in the formation of the universe from small initial density perturbations to galaxies and clusters of galaxies observed today. The identification and analysis of bound objects, halos, is one of the most important steps in drawing useful physical information from simulations. In the advent of larger and larger simulations, a reliable and parallel halo finder, able to cope with the ever-increasing data files, is a must. In this work we present the freely available MPI parallel halo finder AHF. We provide a description of the algorithm and the strategy followed to handle large simulation data. We also describe the parameters a user may choose in order to influence the process of halo finding, as well as pointing out which parameters are crucial to ensure untainted results from the parallel approach. Furthermore, we demonstrate the ability of AHF to scale to high-resolution simulations.

  7. A mechanism for high wall-rock velocities in rockbursts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGarr, A.

    1997-01-01

    Considerable evidence has been reported for wall-rock velocities during rockbursts in deep gold mines that are substantially greater than ground velocities associated with the primary seismic events. Whereas varied evidence suggests that slip across a fault at the source of an event generates nearby particle velocities of, at most, several m/s, numerous observations, in nearby damaged tunnels, for instance, imply wall-rock velocities of the order of 10 m/s and greater. The common observation of slab buckling or breakouts in the sidewalls of damaged excavations suggests that slab flexure may be the mechanism for causing high rock ejection velocities. Following its formation, a sidewall slab buckles, causing the flexure to increase until the stress generated by flexure reaches the limit 5 that can be supported by the sidewall rock. I assume here that S is the uniaxial compressive strength. Once the flexural stress exceeds S, presumably due to the additional load imposed by a nearby seismic event, the slab fractures and unflexes violently. The peak wall-rock velocity v thereby generated is given by v=(3 + 1-??2/2)1 2 S/?????E for rock of density ??, Young's modulus E, and Poisson's ratio ??. Typical values of these rock properties for the deep gold mines of South Africa yield v= 26 m/s and for especially strong quartzites encountered in these same mines, v> 50m/s. Even though this slab buckling process leads to remarkably high ejection velocities and violent damage in excavations, the energy released during this failure is only a tiny fraction of that released in the primary seismic event, typically of magnitude 2 or greater.

  8. High-temperature polyimides prepared from 2,2-bis-[(2-halo-4-aminophenoxy)-phenyl]hexafluoropropane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Robert J. (Inventor); Chang, Glenn E. C. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    There are provided the aromatic diamines 2,2-bis-[(2-halo-4-aminophenoxy)-phenyl]hexafluoropropane, where the attached ortho halogen is preferably chlorine, and 4,4'-bis(4-aminophenoxy)biphenyl, as novel monomers for polyimide polymerizations. The former, when reacted with 2,2-bis(3,4-dicarboxyphenyl)hexafluoropropane dianhydride, provides a polyimide having exceptional high-temperature performance. The latter diamine is a low-cost monomer for polyimide production.

  9. HD 69686: A MYSTERIOUS HIGH VELOCITY B STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Wenjin; Gies, D. R.; McSwain, M. V. E-mail: gies@chara.gsu.ed

    2009-09-20

    We report on the discovery of a high velocity B star, HD 69686. We estimate its space velocity, distance, surface temperature, gravity, and age. With these data, we are able to reconstruct the trajectory of the star and to trace it back to its birthplace. We use evolutionary tracks for single stars to estimate that HD 69686 was born 73 Myr ago in the outer part of our Galaxy (r {approx} 12 kpc) at a position well below the Galactic plane (z {approx} -1.8 kpc), a very unusual birthplace for a B star. Along the star's projected path in the sky, we also find about 12 other stars having similar proper motions, and their photometry data suggest that they are located at the same distance as HD 69686 and probably have the same age. We speculate on the origin of this group by star formation in a high velocity cloud or as a Galactic merger fragment.

  10. THE SMITH CLOUD: HIGH-VELOCITY ACCRETION AND DARK MATTER CONFINEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, M.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.

    2009-12-20

    The Smith Cloud is a massive system of metal-poor neutral and ionized gas (M{sub gas} approx> 2 x 10{sup 6} M{sub sun}) that is presently moving at high velocity (V{sub GSR}approx 300 km s{sup -1}) with respect to the Galaxy at a distance of 12 kpc from the Sun. The kinematics of the cloud's cometary tail indicates that the gas is in the process of accretion onto the Galaxy, as first discussed by Lockman et al. Here, we re-investigate the cloud's orbit by considering the possibility that the cloud is confined by a dark matter halo. This is required for the cloud to survive its passage through the Galactic corona. We consider three possible models for the dark matter halo (Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW), Einasto, and Burkert) including the effects of tidal disruption and ram pressure stripping during the cloud's infall onto and passage through the Galactic disk. For the NFW and Einasto dark matter models, we are able to determine reasonable initial conditions for the Smith Cloud, although this is only marginally possible with the Burkert model. For all three models, the progenitor had an initial (gas+dark matter) mass that was an order-of-magnitude higher than inferred today. In agreement with Lockman et al., the cloud appears to have punched through the disk approx70 Myr ago. For our most successful models, the baryon-to-dark matter ratio is fairly constant during an orbital period but drops by a factor of 2-5 after transiting the disk. The cloud appears to have only marginally survived its transit and is unlikely to retain its integrity during the next transit approx 30 Myr from now.

  11. High precision radial velocities: the case for NIR.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carleo, I.; Gratton, R.

    In the context of the preparation for the high resolution spectrograph HIRES for E-ELT, we are studying the possibility to derive high-precision radial velocities (RV) on a prototype:GIANO, the near-infrared (NIR) echelle spectrograph now available at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo. Radial velocities measured from near-infrared spectra are a potential tool to search for extrasolar planets around cool stars. High resolution infrared spectrographs now available are reaching the high precision of visible instruments, with a constant improvement over time. In particular, no other IR instruments have GIANO's capability to cover the entire NIR wavelength range. We have developed an ensemble of IDL procedures to measure high precision radial velocities on GIANO spectra. Taking into account the achieved precisions with GIANO, we constrain the sample of targets for which GIANO is better than HARPS-N, but with the advent of GIARPS (GIANO+HARPS-N), GIANO will improve its performances and include a much larger sample of stars. The NIR range is the future of RV measurements, especially because the jitter due to the star surface activities is reduced in the NIR. As a consequence, HIRES working in NIR range might be very useful, and for a wide range of cases, it will be more efficient than HIRES working in the visible range, for detection and characterization of planets using radial velocity technique.

  12. Effect of halo on high power laser pulse wake in underdense plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Naveen; Zhidkov, Alexei; Masuda, Shinichi; Hosokai, Tomonao; Kodama, Ryosuke

    2016-11-01

    Strong disturbance in the wake of the laser pulses propagating in underdense plasma and consequent unstable electron acceleration by the wakefield can be provoked by pulse's halo, which always exists as a result of an imperfect optical focusing. When the power in the halo part exceeds a critical level for the self-focusing, it evolves in the plasma as an independent mode, which later gets coupled with the propagation of the central Gaussian spot of the pulse resulting in a novel instability. Here, this instability is investigated numerically via fully relativistic 3D particle-in-cell simulations and is shown to be partially suppressed by using plasma channels for pulse guiding.

  13. Chemical abundances in a high-velocity RR Lyrae star near the bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, C. J.; Rich, R. M.; Koch, A.; Xu, S.; Kunder, A.; Ludwig, H.-G.

    2016-05-01

    Low-mass variable high-velocity stars are interesting study cases for many aspects of Galactic structure and evolution. Until recently, the only known high- or hyper-velocity stars were young stars thought to originate from the Galactic center. Wide-area surveys such as APOGEE and BRAVA have found several low-mass stars in the bulge with Galactic rest-frame velocities higher than 350 km s-1. In this study we present the first abundance analysis of a low-mass RR Lyrae star that is located close to the Galactic bulge, with a space motion of ~-400 km s-1. Using medium-resolution spectra, we derived abundances (including upper limits) of 11 elements. These allowed us to chemically tag the star and discuss its origin, although our derived abundances and metallicity, at [Fe/H] =-0.9 dex, do not point toward one unambiguous answer. Based on the chemical tagging, we cannot exclude that it originated in the bulge. However, its retrograde orbit and the derived abundances combined suggest that the star was accelerated from the outskirts of the inner (or even outer) halo during many-body interactions. Other possible origins include the bulge itself, or the star might have been stripped from a stellar cluster or the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy when it merged with the Milky Way. The data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  14. Searching for New Highly r-Process-Enhanced Stars in the Halo of the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beers, Timothy C.; Placco, Vinicius; Holmbeck, Erika M.; Hansen, Terese T.; Simon, Joshua D.; Thompson, Ian; Frebel, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Great progress has been made in recent years concerning understanding and constraining the nature of the astrophysical r-process, and on obtaining evidence for the likely astrophysical site(s) of its production. One of the keys to this progress was the identification, over 20 years ago, of a rare class of VMP stars ([Fe/H] < -2.0), which in spite of their very low metallicity, exhibit r-process-element enhancements relative to iron from 10 to over 100 times the Solar ratio (the r-II stars). These stars provide us with the best probes of the production of the r-process elements in the early Universe. Furthermore, knowledge of their metallicity distribution and frequency in the halo field provides potentially tight constraints on the origin of the r-process. However, due to their rarity (~3% of VMP stars), only a total of ~25 r-II stars have been found to date.We provide an update on our new survey effort to quadruple the numbers of recognized r-II stars over the next few years, based on "snapshot" high-resolution spectroscopy of a sample of some 2500 bright (V < 13.5) VMP stars, using the Echelle spectrograph on the du Pont 2.5m telescope. To date, some 1000 targets have been identified, based on medium-resolution follow-up of stars from the RAVE survey, the Best & Brightest survey, and a variety of other sources. Over 100 of these targets have been observed at high resolution in the first run with the du Pont telscope; we expect this number to grow rapidly, as observations continue.This work received partial support from PHY 14-30152; Physics Frontier Center/JINA Center for the Evolution of the Elements (JINA-CEE), awarded by the US National Science Foundation.

  15. Exploring the liminality: properties of haloes and subhaloes in borderline f(R) gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Difu; Li, Baojiu; Han, Jiaxin; Gao, Liang; Hellwing, Wojciech A.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the properties of dark matter haloes and subhaloes in an f(R) gravity model with |fR0| = 10-6, using a very-high-resolution N-body simulation. The model is a borderline between being cosmologically interesting and yet still consistent with current data. We find that the halo mass function in this model has a maximum 20 per cent enhancement compared with the Λ-cold-dark-matter (ΛCDM) predictions between z = 1 and 0. Because of the chameleon mechanism which screens the deviation from standard gravity in dense environments, haloes more massive than 1013 h-1 M⊙ in this f(R) model have very similar properties to haloes of similar mass in ΛCDM, while less massive haloes, such as that of the Milky Way, can have steeper inner density profiles and higher velocity dispersions due to their weaker screening. The halo concentration is remarkably enhanced for low-mass haloes in this model due to a deepening of the total gravitational potential. Contrary to the naive expectation, the halo formation time zf is later for low-mass haloes in this model, a consequence of these haloes growing faster than their counterparts in ΛCDM at late times and the definition of zf. Subhaloes, especially those less massive than 1011 h-1 M⊙, are substantially more abundant in this f(R) model for host haloes less massive than 1013 h-1 M⊙. We discuss the implications of these results for the Milky Way satellite abundance problem. Although the overall halo and subhalo properties in this borderline f(R) model are close to their ΛCDM predictions, our results suggest that studies of the Local Group and astrophysical systems, aided by high-resolution simulations, can be valuable for further tests of it.

  16. Electric rail gun projectile acceleration to high velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, D. P.; Mccormick, T. J.; Barber, J. P.

    1982-01-01

    Electric rail accelerators are being investigated for application in electric propulsion systems. Several electric propulsion applications require that the rail accelerator be capable of launching projectiles at velocities above 10 km/s. An experimental program was conducted to develop rail accelerator technology for high velocity projectile launch. Several 6 mm bore, 3 m long rail accelerators were fabricated. Projectiles with a mass of 0.2 g were accelerated by plasmas, carrying currents up to 150 kA. Experimental design and results are described. Results indicate that the accelerator performed as predicted for a fraction of the total projectile acceleration. The disparity between predicted and measured results are discussed.

  17. High-Velocity Star Formation in the Large Magellanic Cloud.

    PubMed

    Graff; Gould

    2000-05-01

    Light-echo measurements show that SN 1987A is 425 pc behind the LMC disk. It is continuing to move away from the disk at 18 km s-1. Thus, it has been suggested that SN 1987A was ejected from the LMC disk. However, SN 1987A is a member of a star cluster, so this entire cluster would have to have been ejected from the disk. We show that the cluster was formed in the LMC disk, with a velocity perpendicular to the disk of about 50 km s-1. Such high-velocity formation of a star cluster is unusual, having no known counterpart in the Milky Way.

  18. A simple model to link the properties of quasars to the properties of dark matter haloes out to high redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croton, Darren J.

    2009-04-01

    We present a simple model of how quasars occupy dark matter haloes from z = 0 to 5 using the observed mBH-σ relation and quasar luminosity functions. This provides a way for observers to statistically infer host halo masses for quasar observations using luminosity and redshift alone. Our model is deliberately simple and sidesteps any need to explicitly describe the physics. In spite of its simplicity, the model reproduces many key observations and has predictive power: (i) model quasars have the correct luminosity function (by construction) and spatial clustering (by consequence); (ii) we predict high-redshift quasars of a given luminosity live in less massive dark matter haloes than the same luminosity quasars at low redshifts; (iii) we predict a factor of ~5 more 108.5Msolar black holes at z ~ 2 than is currently observed; (iv) we predict a factor of ~20 evolution in the amplitude of the mBH-Mhalo relation between z = 5 and the present day; (v) we expect luminosity-dependent quasar lifetimes of between tQ ~ 107 and 108yr, but which may become as short as 105-6yr for quasars brighter than L* and (vi) while little luminosity-dependent clustering evolution is expected at z <~ 1, increasingly strong evolution is predicted for L > L* quasars at higher redshifts. These last two results arise from the narrowing distribution of halo masses that quasars occupy as the Universe ages. We also deconstruct both `downsizing' and `upsizing' trends predicted by the model at different redshifts and space densities. Importantly, this work illustrates how current observations cannot distinguish between more complicated physically motivated quasar models and our simple phenomenological approach. It highlights the opportunities such methodologies provide.

  19. High-speed velocity measurements on an EFI-system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prinse, W. C.; van't Hof, P. G.; Cheng, L. K.; Scholtes, J. H. G.

    2007-01-01

    For the development of an Exploding Foil Initiator for Insensitive Munitions applications the following topics are of interest: the electrical circuit, the exploding foil, the velocity of the flyer, the driver explosive, the secondary flyer and the acceptor explosive. Several parameters of the EFI have influences on the velocity of the flyer. To investigate these parameters a Fabry-Perot Velocity Interferometer System (F-PVIS) has been used. The light to and from the flyer is transported by a multimode fibre terminated with a GRIN-lens. By this method the velocity of very tiny objects (0.1 mm), can be measured. The velocity of flyer can be recorded with nanosecond resolution, depending on the Fabry-Perot etalon and the streak camera. With this equipment the influence of the dimensions of the exploding foil and the flyer on the velocity and the acceleration of the flyer are investigated. Also the integrity of the flyer during flight can be analyzed. To characterize the explosive material, to be used as driver explosive in EFI's, the initiation behaviour of the explosive has been investigated by taking pictures of the explosion with a high speed framing and streak camera. From these pictures the initiation distance and the detonation behaviour of the explosive has been analyzed. Normally, the driver explosive initiates the acceptor explosive (booster) by direct contact. This booster explosive is embedded in the main charge of the munitions. The combination of initiator, booster explosive and main charge explosive is called the detonation train. In this research the possibility of initiation of the booster by an intermediate flyer is investigated. This secondary flyer can be made of different materials, like aluminium, steel and polyester with different sizes. With the aid of the F-PVIS the acceleration of the secondary flyer is investigated. This reveals the influence of the thickness and density of the flyer on the acceleration and final velocity. Under certain

  20. Phase velocity limit of high-frequency photon density waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haskell, Richard C.; Svaasand, Lars O.; Madsen, Sten; Rojas, Fabio E.; Feng, T.-C.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    1995-05-01

    In frequency-domain photon migration (FDPM), two factors make high modulation frequencies desirable. First, with frequencies as high as a few GHz, the phase lag versus frequency plot has sufficient curvature to yield both the scattering and absorption coefficients of the tissue under examination. Second, because of increased attenuation, high frequency photon density waves probe smaller volumes, an asset in small volume in vivo or in vitro studies. This trend toward higher modulation frequencies has led us to re-examine the derivation of the standard diffusion equation (SDE) from the Boltzman transport equation. We find that a second-order time-derivative term, ordinarily neglected in the derivation, can be significant above 1 GHz for some biological tissue. The revised diffusion equation, including the second-order time-derivative, is often termed the P1 equation. We compare the dispersion relation of the P1 equation with that of the SDE. The P1 phase velocity is slower than that predicted by the SDE; in fact, the SDE phase velocity is unbounded with increasing modulation frequency, while the P1 phase velocity approaches c/sqrt(3) is attained only at modulation frequencies with periods shorter than the mean time between scatterings of a photon, a frequency regime that probes the medium beyond the applicability of diffusion theory. Finally we caution that values for optical properties deduced from FDPM data at high frequencies using the SDE can be in error by 30% or more.

  1. Molecular gas in the halo fuels the growth of a massive cluster galaxy at high redshift.

    PubMed

    Emonts, B H C; Lehnert, M D; Villar-Martín, M; Norris, R P; Ekers, R D; van Moorsel, G A; Dannerbauer, H; Pentericci, L; Miley, G K; Allison, J R; Sadler, E M; Guillard, P; Carilli, C L; Mao, M Y; Röttgering, H J A; De Breuck, C; Seymour, N; Gullberg, B; Ceverino, D; Jagannathan, P; Vernet, J; Indermuehle, B T

    2016-12-02

    The largest galaxies in the universe reside in galaxy clusters. Using sensitive observations of carbon monoxide, we show that the Spiderweb galaxy-a massive galaxy in a distant protocluster-is forming from a large reservoir of molecular gas. Most of this molecular gas lies between the protocluster galaxies and has low velocity dispersion, indicating that it is part of an enriched intergalactic medium. This may constitute the reservoir of gas that fuels the widespread star formation seen in earlier ultraviolet observations of the Spiderweb galaxy. Our results support the notion that giant galaxies in clusters formed from extended regions of recycled gas at high redshift.

  2. Molecular gas in the halo fuels the growth of a massive cluster galaxy at high redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emonts, B. H. C.; Lehnert, M. D.; Villar-Martín, M.; Norris, R. P.; Ekers, R. D.; van Moorsel, G. A.; Dannerbauer, H.; Pentericci, L.; Miley, G. K.; Allison, J. R.; Sadler, E. M.; Guillard, P.; Carilli, C. L.; Mao, M. Y.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; De Breuck, C.; Seymour, N.; Gullberg, B.; Ceverino, D.; Jagannathan, P.; Vernet, J.; Indermuehle, B. T.

    2016-12-01

    The largest galaxies in the universe reside in galaxy clusters. Using sensitive observations of carbon monoxide, we show that the Spiderweb galaxy—a massive galaxy in a distant protocluster—is forming from a large reservoir of molecular gas. Most of this molecular gas lies between the protocluster galaxies and has low velocity dispersion, indicating that it is part of an enriched intergalactic medium. This may constitute the reservoir of gas that fuels the widespread star formation seen in earlier ultraviolet observations of the Spiderweb galaxy. Our results support the notion that giant galaxies in clusters formed from extended regions of recycled gas at high redshift.

  3. New cluster members and halo stars of the Galactic globular cluster NGC 1851

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navin, Colin A.; Martell, Sarah L.; Zucker, Daniel B.

    2015-10-01

    NGC 1851 is an intriguing Galactic globular cluster, with multiple stellar evolutionary sequences, light and heavy element abundance variations and indications of a surrounding stellar halo. We present the first results of a spectroscopic study of red giant stars within and outside of the tidal radius of this cluster. Our results identify nine probable new cluster members (inside the tidal radius) with heliocentric radial velocities consistent with that of NGC 1851. We also identify, based on their radial velocities, four probable extratidal cluster halo stars at distances up to ˜3.1 times the tidal radius, which are supportive of previous findings that NGC 1851 is surrounded by an extended stellar halo. Proper motions were available for 12 of these 13 stars and all are consistent with that of NGC 1851. Apart from the cluster members and cluster halo stars, our observed radial velocity distribution agrees with the expected distribution from a Besançon disc/N-body stellar halo Milky Way model generated by the GALAXIA code, suggesting that no other structures at different radial velocities are present in our field. The metallicities of these stars are estimated using equivalent width measurements of the near-infrared calcium triplet absorption lines and are found, within the limitations of this method, to be consistent with that of NGC 1851. In addition we recover 110 red giant cluster members from previous studies based on their radial velocities and identify three stars with unusually high radial velocities.

  4. High Velocity Forming of Magnesium and Titanium Sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Revuelta, A.; Larkiola, J.; Korhonen, A. S.; Kanervo, K.

    2007-04-07

    Cold forming of magnesium and titanium is difficult due to their hexagonal crystal structure and limited number of available slip systems. However, high velocity deformation can be quite effective in increasing the forming limits. In this study, electromagnetic forming (EMF) of thin AZ31B-O magnesium and CP grade 1 titanium sheets were compared with normal deep drawing. Same dies were used in both forming processes. Finite element (FE) simulations were carried out to improve the EMF process parameters. Constitutive data was determined using Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar tests (SHPB). To study formability, sample sheets were electromagnetically launched to the female die, using a flat spiral electromagnetic coil and aluminum driver sheets. Deep drawing tests were made by a laboratory press-machine.Results show that high velocity forming processes increase the formability of Magnesium and Titanium sheets although process parameters have to be carefully tuned to obtain good results.

  5. Gouge initiation in high-velocity rocket sled testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachau, R. D. M.; Trucano, T. G.; Yew, C. H.

    1994-07-01

    A model is presented which describes the formation of surface damage 'gouging' on the rails that guide rocket sleds. An unbalanced sled can randomly cause a very shallow-angle, oblique impact between the sled shoe and the rail. This damage phenomenon has also been observed in high-velocity guns where the projectile is analogous to the moving sled shoe and the gun barrel is analogous to the stationary rail. At sufficiently high velocity, the oblique impact will produce a thin hot layer of soft material on the contact surfaces. Under the action of a normal moving load, the soft layer lends itself to an anti-symmetric deformation and the formation of a 'hump' in front of the moving load. A gouge is formed when this hump is overrun by the sled shoe. The phenomenon is simulated numerically using the CTH strong shock physics code, and the results are in good agreement with experimental observation.

  6. Gouge initiation in high-velocity rocket sled testing

    SciTech Connect

    Tachau, R.D.M.; Trucano, T.G.; Yew, C.H.

    1994-07-01

    A model is presented which describes the formation of surface damage ``gouging`` on the rails that guide rocket sleds. An unbalanced sled can randomly cause a very shallow-angle, oblique impact between the sled shoe and the rail. This damage phenomenon has also been observed in high-velocity guns where the projectile is analogous to the moving sled shoe and the gun barrel is analogous to the stationary rail. At sufficiently high velocity, the oblique impact will produce a thin hot layer of soft material on the contact surfaces. Under the action of a normal moving load, the soft layer lends itself to an anti-symmetric deformation and the formation of a ``hump`` in front of the moving load. A gouge is formed when this hump is overrun by the sled shoe. The phenomenon is simulated numerically using the CTH strong shock physics code, and the results are in good agreement with experimental observation.

  7. Exploring the Hot Galactic Halo Using Shadows of High Latitude Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juda, M.; Petre, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this proposal was to measure variations in the 1/4 keV emission from the galactic halo, using ROSAT (x-ray astronomy satellite) Position Sensitive Proportional Counters (PSPC) observations toward known enhancements in the absorbing column density along the line-of-sight out of the Galaxy. Target directions were selected to have a low total hydrogen column density but to also show significant gradients in the amount of absorbing material, as traced by Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) 100 micron emission, on angular scales that would be contained within the PSPC field of view. In addition, we restricted the galactic latitude of the target directions to be greater than 60 degrees or less than -60 degrees in order to enable a cleaner separation of Galactic halo emission from that of the Galactic disk. The observations would also provide a measurement of the brightness of the emission from the Local Bubble.

  8. Gentle protein ionization assisted by high-velocity gas flow.

    PubMed

    Yang, Pengxiang; Cooks, R Graham; Ouyang, Zheng; Hawkridge, Adam M; Muddiman, David C

    2005-10-01

    Gentle protein electrospray ionization is achieved using the high-velocity gas flow of an air amplifier to improve desolvation in conventional ESI and generate intact folded protein ions in the gas phase. Comparisons are made between the ESI spectra of a number of model proteins, including ubiquitin, cytochrome c, lysozyme, and myoglobin, over a range of pH values under optimized conditions, with and without using an air amplifier to achieve high-velocity gas flow. Previously reported increased ion signals are confirmed. In addition, the peaks recorded using the air amplifier are shown to be narrower, corresponding to more complete desolvation. Significant changes in the charge-state distribution also are observed, with a shift to lower charge state at high-velocity flow. The relationship between the observed charge-state distribution and protein conformation was explored by comparing the charge-state shifts and the distributions of charge states for proteins that are or are not stable in their native conformations in low pH solutions. The data suggest retention of native or nativelike protein conformations using the air amplifier in all cases examined. This is explained by a mechanism in which the air amplifier rapidly creates small droplets from the original large ESI droplets and these microdroplets then desolvate without a significant decrease in pH, resulting in retention of the folded protein conformations. Furthermore, the holoform of ionized myoglobin is visible at pH 3.5, a much lower value than the minimum needed to see this form in conventional ESI. These results provide evidence for the importance of the conditions used in the desolvation process for the preservation of the protein conformation and suggest that the conditions achieved when using high-velocity gas flows to assist droplet evaporation and ion desolvation are much gentler than those in conventional ESI experiments.

  9. Dark Matter annihilations in halos and high-redshift sources of reionization of the universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulin, Vivian; Serpico, Pasquale D.; Lesgourgues, Julien

    2015-12-01

    It is well known that annihilations in the homogeneous fluid of dark matter (DM) can leave imprints in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy power spectrum. However, the relevance of DM annihilations in halos for cosmological observables is still subject to debate, with previous works reaching different conclusions on this point. Also, all previous studies used a single type of parameterization for the astrophysical reionization, and included no astrophysical source for the heating of the intergalactic medium. In this work, we revisit these problems. When standard approaches are adopted, we find that the ionization fraction does exhibit a very particular (and potentially constraining) pattern, but the currently measurable τreio is left almost unchanged: in agreement with most of the previous literature, for plausible halo models we find that the modification of the signal with respect to the one coming from annihilations in the smooth background is tiny, below cosmic variance within currently allowed parameter space. However, if different and probably more realistic treatments of the astrophysical sources of reionization and heating are adopted, a more pronounced effect of the DM annihilation in halos is possible. We thus conclude that within currently adopted baseline models the impact of the virialised DM structures cannot be uncovered by CMB power spectra measurements, but a larger impact is possible if peculiar models are invoked for the redshift evolution of the DM annihilation signal or different assumptions are made for the astrophysical contributions. A better understanding (both theoretical and observational) of the reionization and temperature history of the universe, notably via the 21 cm signal, seems the most promising way for using halo formation as a tool in DM searches, improving over the sensitivity of current cosmological probes.

  10. Dark Matter annihilations in halos and high-redshift sources of reionization of the universe

    SciTech Connect

    Poulin, Vivian; Serpico, Pasquale D.; Lesgourgues, Julien E-mail: Pasquale.Serpico@lapth.cnrs.fr

    2015-12-01

    It is well known that annihilations in the homogeneous fluid of dark matter (DM) can leave imprints in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy power spectrum. However, the relevance of DM annihilations in halos for cosmological observables is still subject to debate, with previous works reaching different conclusions on this point. Also, all previous studies used a single type of parameterization for the astrophysical reionization, and included no astrophysical source for the heating of the intergalactic medium. In this work, we revisit these problems. When standard approaches are adopted, we find that the ionization fraction does exhibit a very particular (and potentially constraining) pattern, but the currently measurable τ{sub reio} is left almost unchanged: in agreement with most of the previous literature, for plausible halo models we find that the modification of the signal with respect to the one coming from annihilations in the smooth background is tiny, below cosmic variance within currently allowed parameter space. However, if different and probably more realistic treatments of the astrophysical sources of reionization and heating are adopted, a more pronounced effect of the DM annihilation in halos is possible. We thus conclude that within currently adopted baseline models the impact of the virialised DM structures cannot be uncovered by CMB power spectra measurements, but a larger impact is possible if peculiar models are invoked for the redshift evolution of the DM annihilation signal or different assumptions are made for the astrophysical contributions. A better understanding (both theoretical and observational) of the reionization and temperature history of the universe, notably via the 21 cm signal, seems the most promising way for using halo formation as a tool in DM searches, improving over the sensitivity of current cosmological probes.

  11. Modelling galaxy clustering: halo occupation distribution versus subhalo matching.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hong; Zheng, Zheng; Behroozi, Peter S; Zehavi, Idit; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Comparat, Johan; Favole, Ginevra; Gottloeber, Stefan; Klypin, Anatoly; Prada, Francisco; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio A; Weinberg, David H; Yepes, Gustavo

    2016-07-01

    We model the luminosity-dependent projected and redshift-space two-point correlation functions (2PCFs) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 Main galaxy sample, using the halo occupation distribution (HOD) model and the subhalo abundance matching (SHAM) model and its extension. All the models are built on the same high-resolution N-body simulations. We find that the HOD model generally provides the best performance in reproducing the clustering measurements in both projected and redshift spaces. The SHAM model with the same halo-galaxy relation for central and satellite galaxies (or distinct haloes and subhaloes), when including scatters, has a best-fitting χ(2)/dof around 2-3. We therefore extend the SHAM model to the subhalo clustering and abundance matching (SCAM) by allowing the central and satellite galaxies to have different galaxy-halo relations. We infer the corresponding halo/subhalo parameters by jointly fitting the galaxy 2PCFs and abundances and consider subhaloes selected based on three properties, the mass Macc at the time of accretion, the maximum circular velocity Vacc at the time of accretion, and the peak maximum circular velocity Vpeak over the history of the subhaloes. The three subhalo models work well for luminous galaxy samples (with luminosity above L*). For low-luminosity samples, the Vacc model stands out in reproducing the data, with the Vpeak model slightly worse, while the Macc model fails to fit the data. We discuss the implications of the modelling results.

  12. Two high-velocity encounters of elliptical galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balcells, Marc; Borne, Kirk D.; Hoessel, John G.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes results obtained on a simulation of two high-velocity encounters of NGC 4782/4783 and NGC 2672/2673 binary elliptical galaxies which differ substantially in mass ratio (about 1 for the first pair, and about 10 for the second). CCD images and velocities obtained from digital spectra were used to constrain simulations of the galaxy collisions. The binary orbital elements, the orientation of the orbit in the sky, the time since pericenter, and the dynamical mass of the pair were derived. Results suggested that the dumb-bell galaxy NGC 4782/4783 is not a supermassive galaxy, as was claimed earlier on the basis of the high relative velocity and high central dispersion, but has a moderate mass to luminosity ratio M/L(B) of about 10. It was concluded that its trajectory changed from hyperbolic to elliptical as a result of energy lost during the collision. It was found that the NGC 2672/2673 also has a moderate M/L(B) of about 7.

  13. High velocity compact clouds in the sagittarius C region

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Kunihiko; Oka, Tomoharu; Matsumura, Shinji; Nagai, Makoto; Kamegai, Kazuhisa

    2014-03-01

    We report the detection of extremely broad emission toward two molecular clumps in the Galactic central molecular zone. We have mapped the Sagittarius C complex (–0.°61 < l < –0.°27, –0.°29 < b < 0.°04) in the HCN J = 4-3, {sup 13}CO J = 3-2, and H{sup 13}CN J = 1-0 lines with the ASTE 10 m and NRO 45 m telescopes, detecting bright emission with 80-120 km s{sup –1} velocity width (in full-width at zero intensity) toward CO–0.30–0.07 and CO–0.40–0.22, which are high velocity compact clouds (HVCCs) identified with our previous CO J = 3-2 survey. Our data reveal an interesting internal structure of CO–0.30–0.07 comprising a pair of high velocity lobes. The spatial-velocity structure of CO–0.40–0.22 can be also understood as a multiple velocity component, or a velocity gradient across the cloud. They are both located on the rims of two molecular shells of about 10 pc in radius. Kinetic energies of CO–0.30–0.07 and CO–0.40–0.22 are (0.8-2) × 10{sup 49} erg and (1-4) × 10{sup 49} erg, respectively. We propose several interpretations of their broad emission: collision between clouds associated with the shells, bipolar outflow, expansion driven by supernovae (SNe), and rotation around a dark massive object. These scenarios cannot be discriminated because of the insufficient angular resolution of our data, though the absence of a visible energy source associated with the HVCCs seems to favor the cloud-cloud collision scenario. Kinetic energies of the two molecular shells are 1 × 10{sup 51} erg and 0.7 × 10{sup 51} erg, which can be furnished by multiple SN or hypernova explosions in 2 × 10{sup 5} yr. These shells are candidates of molecular superbubbles created after past active star formation.

  14. High velocity electromagnetic particle launcher for aerosol production studies

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, D.A.; Rader, D.J.

    1986-05-01

    This report describes the development of a new device for study of metal combustion, breakup and production of aerosols in a high velocity environment. Metal wires are heated and electromagnetically launched with this device to produce molten metal droplets moving at velocities ranging up to about Mach 1. Such tests are presently intended to simulate the behavior of metal streamers ejected from a high-explosive detonation. A numerical model of the launcher performance in terms of sample properties, sample geometry and pulser electrical parameters is presented which can be used as a tool for design of specific test conditions. Results from several tests showing the range of sample velocities accessible with this device are described and compared with the model. Photographic measurements showing the behavior of tungsten and zirconium metal droplets are presented. Estimates of the Weber breakup and drag on the droplets, as well as calculations of the droplet trajectories, are described. Such studies may ultimately be useful in assessing environmental hazards in the handling and storage of devices containing metallic plutonium.

  15. Ultrasonic Velocity and Texture of High RRR Niobium

    SciTech Connect

    S. R. Agnew; F. Zeng; G.R. Myneni

    2003-06-01

    Conventional assessments of the mechanical properties of rolled high RRR niobium plate material via tensile testing have revealed an unusually low apparent Young's moduli and yield strength in some annealed samples. These observations motivated a series of measurements of ultrasonic velocity, a dynamic assessment of the elastic moduli. In fact, the dynamic modulus is within the range of normal for all samples tested. However, there is a trend of increasing shear velocities for shear waves propagating through the sheet thickness and polarized in the sheet transverse direction. Careful analyses of the crystallographic texture using SEM-based electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) have revealed a subtle, but systematic change in the texture, which can explain the trend. It is further important to note that the change in texture is not observable from surface measurements using x-ray diffraction, but requires sectioning of the samples. Thus, measurements of ultrasonic velocity represent a non-destructive evaluation tool which is extremely sensitive to subtle changes in the texture of high RRR niobium. Finally, there are material lot variations, which are currently attributed to the effects of impurities, such as Ta and H.

  16. High resolved velocity measurements using Laser Cantilever Anemometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puczylowski, Jaroslaw; Hölling, Michael; Peinke, Joachim

    2016-11-01

    We have developed a new anemometer, namely the 2d-LCA (2d-Laser-Cantilever-Anemometer), that is capable of performing high resolved velocity measurements in fluids. The anemometer uses a micostructured cantilever made of silicon as a sensing element. The specific shape and the small dimensions (about 150µm) of the cantilever allow for precise measurements of two velocity component at a temporal resolution of about 150kHz. The angular acceptance range is 180° in total. The 2d-LCA is a simple to use alternative to x-wires and can be used in many areas of operation including measurements in liquids or in particle-laden flows. Unlike hot-wires, the resolution power of the 2d-LCA does not decrease with increasing flow velocity, making it particularly suitable for measurements in high-speed flows. In the recent past new cantilever designs were implemented with the goal to further improve the angular resolution and increase the stability. In addition, we have designed more robust cantilevers for measurements in rough environments such as offshore areas. Successful comparative measurements with hot-wires have been carried out in order to assess the performance of the 2d-LCA.

  17. Searching for Dark Matter Annihilation in the Smith High-Velocity Cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drlica-Wagner, Alex; Gomez-Vargas, German A.; Hewitt, John W.; Linden, Tim; Tibaldo, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Recent observations suggest that some high-velocity clouds may be confined by massive dark matter halos. In particular, the proximity and proposed dark matter content of the Smith Cloud make it a tempting target for the indirect detection of dark matter annihilation. We argue that the Smith Cloud may be a better target than some Milky Way dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies and use gamma-ray observations from the Fermi Large Area Telescope to search for a dark matter annihilation signal. No significant gamma-ray excess is found coincident with the Smith Cloud, and we set strong limits on the dark matter annihilation cross section assuming a spatially extended dark matter profile consistent with dynamical modeling of the Smith Cloud. Notably, these limits exclude the canonical thermal relic cross section (approximately 3 x 10 (sup -26) cubic centimeters per second) for dark matter masses less than or approximately 30 gigaelectronvolts annihilating via the B/B- bar oscillation or tau/antitau channels for certain assumptions of the dark matter density profile; however, uncertainties in the dark matter content of the Smith Cloud may significantly weaken these constraints.

  18. Searching for dark matter annihilation in the Smith high-velocity cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Drlica-Wagner, Alex; Gómez-Vargas, Germán A.; Hewitt, John W.; Linden, Tim; Tibaldo, Luigi

    2014-07-20

    Recent observations suggest that some high-velocity clouds may be confined by massive dark matter halos. In particular, the proximity and proposed dark matter content of the Smith Cloud make it a tempting target for the indirect detection of dark matter annihilation. We argue that the Smith Cloud may be a better target than some Milky Way dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies and use γ-ray observations from the Fermi Large Area Telescope to search for a dark matter annihilation signal. No significant γ-ray excess is found coincident with the Smith Cloud, and we set strong limits on the dark matter annihilation cross section assuming a spatially extended dark matter profile consistent with dynamical modeling of the Smith Cloud. Notably, these limits exclude the canonical thermal relic cross section (∼ 3 × 10{sup –26} cm{sup 3} s{sup –1}) for dark matter masses ≲ 30 GeV annihilating via the b b-bar or τ{sup +}τ{sup –} channels for certain assumptions of the dark matter density profile; however, uncertainties in the dark matter content of the Smith Cloud may significantly weaken these constraints.

  19. The SEGUE K Giant Survey. III. Quantifying Galactic Halo Substructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janesh, William; Morrison, Heather L.; Ma, Zhibo; Rockosi, Constance; Starkenburg, Else; Xue, Xiang Xiang; Rix, Hans-Walter; Harding, Paul; Beers, Timothy C.; Johnson, Jennifer; Lee, Young Sun; Schneider, Donald P.

    2016-01-01

    We statistically quantify the amount of substructure in the Milky Way stellar halo using a sample of 4568 halo K giant stars at Galactocentric distances ranging over 5-125 kpc. These stars have been selected photometrically and confirmed spectroscopically as K giants from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey’s Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration project. Using a position-velocity clustering estimator (the 4distance) and a model of a smooth stellar halo, we quantify the amount of substructure in the halo, divided by distance and metallicity. Overall, we find that the halo as a whole is highly structured. We also confirm earlier work using blue horizontal branch (BHB) stars which showed that there is an increasing amount of substructure with increasing Galactocentric radius, and additionally find that the amount of substructure in the halo increases with increasing metallicity. Comparing to resampled BHB stars, we find that K giants and BHBs have similar amounts of substructure over equivalent ranges of Galactocentric radius. Using a friends-of-friends algorithm to identify members of individual groups, we find that a large fraction (˜33%) of grouped stars are associated with Sgr, and identify stars belonging to other halo star streams: the Orphan Stream, the Cetus Polar Stream, and others, including previously unknown substructures. A large fraction of sample K giants (more than 50%) are not grouped into any substructure. We find also that the Sgr stream strongly dominates groups in the outer halo for all except the most metal-poor stars, and suggest that this is the source of the increase of substructure with Galactocentric radius and metallicity.

  20. THE SEGUE K GIANT SURVEY. III. QUANTIFYING GALACTIC HALO SUBSTRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect

    Janesh, William; Morrison, Heather L.; Ma, Zhibo; Harding, Paul; Rockosi, Constance; Xue, Xiang Xiang; Rix, Hans-Walter; Beers, Timothy C.; Johnson, Jennifer; Lee, Young Sun; Schneider, Donald P.

    2016-01-10

    We statistically quantify the amount of substructure in the Milky Way stellar halo using a sample of 4568 halo K giant stars at Galactocentric distances ranging over 5–125 kpc. These stars have been selected photometrically and confirmed spectroscopically as K giants from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey’s Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration project. Using a position–velocity clustering estimator (the 4distance) and a model of a smooth stellar halo, we quantify the amount of substructure in the halo, divided by distance and metallicity. Overall, we find that the halo as a whole is highly structured. We also confirm earlier work using blue horizontal branch (BHB) stars which showed that there is an increasing amount of substructure with increasing Galactocentric radius, and additionally find that the amount of substructure in the halo increases with increasing metallicity. Comparing to resampled BHB stars, we find that K giants and BHBs have similar amounts of substructure over equivalent ranges of Galactocentric radius. Using a friends-of-friends algorithm to identify members of individual groups, we find that a large fraction (∼33%) of grouped stars are associated with Sgr, and identify stars belonging to other halo star streams: the Orphan Stream, the Cetus Polar Stream, and others, including previously unknown substructures. A large fraction of sample K giants (more than 50%) are not grouped into any substructure. We find also that the Sgr stream strongly dominates groups in the outer halo for all except the most metal-poor stars, and suggest that this is the source of the increase of substructure with Galactocentric radius and metallicity.

  1. Measuring the Spin Period of a High-Velocity Pulsar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomsick, John

    2012-10-01

    X-ray observations of IGR J11014-6103 show that it has a complex morphology with a point source and two components of extended emission. Its properties indicate that it is very likely to be a pulsar wind nebula (PWN). Chandra and radio observations strongly suggest that the compact object is moving away from SNR MSH 11-61A. Based on the evolution of this supernova remnant, an association would indicate that IGR J11014-6103 has a transverse velocity of 2,400 to 2,900 km/s. The possibility of such a high kick velocity makes the proposed timing study important for proving that the compact object is a pulsar, determining its period (P), and measuring dP/dt to determine if the characteristic age is consistent with the pulsar originating in MSH 11-61A.

  2. Low and high velocity impact response of thick hybrid composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hiel, Clement; Ishai, Ori

    1993-01-01

    The effects of low and high velocity impact on thick hybrid composites (THC's) were experimentally compared. Test Beams consisted of CFRP skins which were bonded onto an interleaved syntactic foam core and cured at 177 C (350 F). The impactor tip for both cases was a 16 mm (0.625 inch) steel hemisphere. In spite of the order of magnitude difference in velocity ranges and impactor weights, similar relationships between impact energy, damage size, and residual strength were found. The dependence of the skin compressive strength on damage size agree well with analytical open hole models for composite laminates and may enable the prediction of ultimate performance for the damaged composite, based on visual inspection.

  3. Response of Cable Harnesses Subjected to High-velocity Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitta, Kumi; Kawakita, Shirou; Takeba, Atsushi; Katayama, Masahide

    We compared numerical simulation results obtained using AUTODYN-3D, which is used for impact analysis of complex physical systems including fluid and solid materials, with experimental results obtained using a two-stage light gas gun. The response of electric power supply cable harnesses subjected to high-velocity impact at 4.01 km/s is shown and discussed. In addition, AUTODYN-3D was applied to the numerical simulation of the hypervelocity impact of micrometeoroids and space debris (M/OD) at 15 km/s and 20 km/s, respectively. Material models used in the numerical simulation are also discussed and investigated in order to cover a wide range of impact velocities, including shock-induced vaporization.

  4. Analysis of high velocity impact on hybrid composite fan blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sinclair, J. H.

    1979-01-01

    Recent developments in the analysis of high velocity impact of composite blades are described, using a computerized capability which consists of coupling a composites mechanics code with the direct-time integration features of NASTRAN. The application of the capability to determine the linear dynamic response of an interply hybrid composite aircraft engine fan blade is described in detail. The results also show that the impact stresses reach sufficiently high magnitudes to cause failures in the impact region at early times of the impact event.

  5. Analysis of high velocity impact on hybrid composite fan blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sinclair, J. H.

    1979-01-01

    This paper describes recent developments in the analysis of high velocity impact of composite blades using a computerized capability which consists of coupling a composites mechanics code with the direct-time integration features of NASTRAN. The application of the capability to determine the linear dynamic response of an intraply hybrid composite aircraft engine fan blade is described in detail. The predicted results agree with measured data. The results also show that the impact stresses reach sufficiently high magnitudes to cause failures in the impact region at early times of the impact event.

  6. Velocity alignment leads to high persistence in confined cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camley, Brian A.; Rappel, Wouter-Jan

    2014-06-01

    Many cell types display random motility on two-dimensional substrates but crawl persistently in a single direction when confined in a microchannel or on an adhesive micropattern. Does this imply that the motility mechanism of confined cells is fundamentally different from that of unconfined cells? We argue that both free- and confined-cell migration may be described by a generic model of cells as "velocity-aligning" active Brownian particles previously proposed to solve a completely separate problem in collective cell migration. Our model can be mapped to a diffusive escape over a barrier and analytically solved to determine the cell's orientation distribution and repolarization rate. In quasi-one-dimensional confinement, velocity-aligning cells maintain their direction for times that can be exponentially larger than their persistence time in the absence of confinement. Our results suggest an important connection between single- and collective-cell migration: high persistence in confined cells corresponds with fast alignment of velocity to cell-cell forces.

  7. Identifying Remote Halo Giants in High-Latitude Fields with Kepler 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Ruth C.

    2016-08-01

    This work sketches how SDSS ugr colors and Kepler 2 in halo fields can identify red giants 50 - 100 kpc distant with minimal metallicity bias. For these mildly-reddened, metal-poor giants, (g-r)o yields the effective temperature T eff to 100 K. K2 can detect the p-mode oscillations of red giants and measure their frequency of maximum power νmax. This sets the luminosity L bol and thus the distance, plus an estimate of metallicity [Fe/H].

  8. Modelling the H I halo of the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marasco, A.; Fraternali, F.

    2011-01-01

    Aims: We studied the global distribution and kinematics of the extra-planar neutral gas in the Milky Way. Methods: We built 3D models for a series of Galactic H I layers, projected them for an inside view, and compared them with the Leiden-Argentina-Bonn 21-cm observations. Results: We show that the Milky Way disk is surrounded by an extended halo of neutral gas with a vertical scale-height of 1.6+0.6-0.4 kpc and an H I mass of 3.2+1.0-0.9 × 108 M⊙, which is ~5-10% of the total Galactic H I. This H I halo rotates more slowly than the disk with a vertical velocity gradient of -15 ± 4 km s-1 kpc-1. We found evidence for a global infall motion in the halo, both vertical (20+5-7 km s-1) and radial (30+7-5 km s-1). Conclusions: The Milky Way H I extra-planar layer shows properties similar to the halos of external galaxies, which is compatible with it being predominantly produced by supernova explosions in the disk. It is most likely composed of distinct gas complexes with masses of ~104-5 M⊙, of which the intermediate velocity clouds are the local manifestations. The classical high-velocity clouds appear to be a separate population.

  9. High-velocity features in Type Ia supernova spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childress, Michael J.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Ganeshalingam, Mohan; Schmidt, Brian P.

    2014-01-01

    We use a sample of 58 low-redshift (z ≤ 0.03) Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) having well-sampled light curves and spectra near maximum light to examine the behaviour of high-velocity features (HVFs) in SN Ia spectra. We take advantage of the fact that Si II λ6355 is free of HVFs at maximum light in all SNe Ia, while HVFs are still strong in the Ca II near-infrared feature in many SNe, allowing us to quantify the strength of HVFs by comparing the structure of these two lines. We find that the average HVF strength increases with decreasing light-curve decline rate, and rapidly declining SNe Ia (Δm15(B) ≥ 1.4 mag) show no HVFs in their maximum-light spectra. Comparison of HVF strength to the light-curve colour of the SNe Ia in our sample shows no evidence of correlation. We find a correlation of HVF strength with the velocity of Si II λ6355 at maximum light (vSi), such that SNe Ia with lower vSi have stronger HVFs, while those SNe Ia firmly in the `high-velocity' (i.e. vSi ≥ 12 000 km s-1) subclass exhibit no HVFs in their maximum-light spectra. While vSi and Δm15(B) show no correlation in the full sample of SNe Ia, we find a significant correlation between these quantities in the subset of SNe Ia having weak HVFs. In general, we find that slowly declining (low Δm15(B)) SNe Ia, which are more luminous and more energetic than average SNe Ia, tend to produce either high photospheric ejecta velocities (i.e. high vSi) or strong HVFs at maximum light, but not both. Finally, we examine the evolution of HVF strength for a sample of SNe Ia having extensive pre-maximum spectroscopic coverage and find significant diversity of the pre-maximum HVF behaviour.

  10. GRAVITATIONALLY CONSISTENT HALO CATALOGS AND MERGER TREES FOR PRECISION COSMOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Behroozi, Peter S.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Wu, Hao-Yi; Busha, Michael T.; Klypin, Anatoly A.; Primack, Joel R. E-mail: rwechsler@stanford.edu

    2013-01-20

    We present a new algorithm for generating merger trees and halo catalogs which explicitly ensures consistency of halo properties (mass, position, and velocity) across time steps. Our algorithm has demonstrated the ability to improve both the completeness (through detecting and inserting otherwise missing halos) and purity (through detecting and removing spurious objects) of both merger trees and halo catalogs. In addition, our method is able to robustly measure the self-consistency of halo finders; it is the first to directly measure the uncertainties in halo positions, halo velocities, and the halo mass function for a given halo finder based on consistency between snapshots in cosmological simulations. We use this algorithm to generate merger trees for two large simulations (Bolshoi and Consuelo) and evaluate two halo finders (ROCKSTAR and BDM). We find that both the ROCKSTAR and BDM halo finders track halos extremely well; in both, the number of halos which do not have physically consistent progenitors is at the 1%-2% level across all halo masses. Our code is publicly available at http://code.google.com/p/consistent-trees. Our trees and catalogs are publicly available at http://hipacc.ucsc.edu/Bolshoi/.

  11. Experimental investigation of high velocity impacts on brittle materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nathenson, David Isaac

    Experiments were conducted on soda lime glass and AS800 grade silicon nitride. Soda lime glass is often used in windows of military vehicles and aircraft where integrity in the event of shrapnel impacts is of vital concern. AS800 grade silicon nitride is considered one of the leading material candidates for the next generation of aircraft engine turbine blades because of its superior high temperature properties when compared with nickel based super-alloys. The suitability of these materials for their applications depends upon their response to point and planar dynamic impact loading. An experimental apparatus was constructed to fire one-sixteenth inch diameter hardened chrome steel ball bearings at 50 mm square soda lime glass blocks of thicknesses between 3 mm and 25.4 mm. Inelasticity due to the crushed zone effects the coefficients of restitution and the surface strains. The change in severity of cracking with velocity and specimen thickness is observed. Shock compression and pressure-shear experiments were conducted by means of a single stage gas gun capable of attaining impact velocities of 600 m/s. High velocity planar shock compression experiments on soda lime glass reveal a lack of spall strength, and a decrease of shear impedance and shear strength in the presence of a failure wave. The longitudinal impedance remains nearly constant. The spall strength of glass is 3.49 GPa and is sensitive to the presence of shear. Shock compression studies on silicon nitride using normal shock compression show that the material has a Hugoniot Elastic Limit of 12 GPa and that the spall strength decreases with increasing impact velocity due to damage below the HEL. The presence of inelastic deformation stops this trend, while the presence of shear increases the rate of spall strength drop by five times because of more severe microscopic damage. Experiments involving multiple shocks on silicon nitride show that material loading and unloading follows the shock Hugoniot

  12. Resonant Orbits and the High Velocity Peaks toward the Bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molloy, Matthew; Smith, Martin C.; Evans, N. Wyn; Shen, Juntai

    2015-10-01

    We extract the resonant orbits from an N-body bar that is a good representation of the Milky Way, using the method recently introduced by Molloy et al. By decomposing the bar into its constituent orbit families, we show that they are intimately connected to the boxy-peanut shape of the density. We highlight the imprint due solely to resonant orbits on the kinematic landscape toward the Galactic center. The resonant orbits are shown to have distinct kinematic features and may be used to explain the cold velocity peak seen in the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment commissioning data. We show that high velocity peaks are a natural consequence of the motions of stars in the 2:1 orbit family and that stars on other higher order resonances can contribute to the peaks. The locations of the peaks vary with bar angle and, with the tacit assumption that the observed peaks are due to the 2:1 family, we find that the locations of the high velocity peaks correspond to bar angles in the range {10}\\circ ≲ {θ }{bar}≲ 25^\\circ . However, some important questions about the nature of the peaks remain, such as their apparent absence in other surveys of the Bulge and the deviations from symmetry between equivalent fields in the north and south. We show that the absence of a peak in surveys at higher latitudes is likely due to the combination of a less prominent peak and a lower number density of bar supporting orbits at these latitudes.

  13. Globular clusters in the halo of M31

    SciTech Connect

    Racine, R. Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Corp., Kamuela, HI )

    1991-03-01

    The CFHT was used to obtain high-resolution CCD images of 82 cluster candidates in the halo of M31. These data, combined with radial velocities which cover an additional 27 candidates, are used to compile a catalog of 51 bona fide M31 halo globulars. The other candidates are found to be background galaxies (54) and field stars (4). The cluster sample appears to be incomplete for V greater than 18. The projected distribution of globulars follows an 1/r-squared law for r(kpc) between values of 6 and 22 and then drops faster, suggesting a cutoff at about 40 kpc. These trends are similar to those for globular clusters in the Milky Way halo. The total populaton of globulars in M31 is estimated to be larger than in the Milky Way by a factor of 1.8 + or - 0.3. 30 refs.

  14. Paradoxes of high and low velocities in modern geodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, P. V.

    2016-11-01

    An analysis of the data on the vertical and horizontal movements of the Earth's crust obtained within recent 40 years has revealed paradoxical deviations of its deformations from the movements inherited from the past geological times. Currently, high local deformation velocities are observed both in the aseismic and seismically active regions. There are no clues to this phenomenon within the conventional concepts of geodynamics and mechanics of deformed solids. It is shown in this work that the paradoxes of high and low velocities could be solved if deformation processes taking place in the Earths' crust would be treated as the evolution of the stress-strain state of the loaded medium as a typical non-linear dynamic system. In this case, fracture develops in two stages—a comparatively slow quasi-stationary stage and a superfast catastrophic one, wherein the spatial localization of parameters is followed by the localization of the deformation process in time. This property is a fundamental characteristic of any non-linear dynamic systems.

  15. High-velocity streams of dust originating from Saturn.

    PubMed

    Kempf, Sascha; Srama, Ralf; Horányi, Mihaly; Burton, Marcia; Helfert, Stefan; Moragas-Klostermeyer, Georg; Roy, Mou; Grün, Eberhard

    2005-01-20

    High-velocity submicrometre-sized dust particles expelled from the jovian system have been identified by dust detectors on board several spacecraft. On the basis of periodicities in the dust impact rate, Jupiter's moon Io was found to be the dominant source of the streams. The grains become positively charged within the plasma environment of Jupiter's magnetosphere, and gain energy from its co-rotational electric field. Outside the magnetosphere, the dynamics of the grains are governed by the interaction with the interplanetary magnetic field that eventually forms the streams. A similar process was suggested for Saturn. Here we report the discovery by the Cassini spacecraft of bursts of high-velocity dust particles (> or = 100 km s(-1)) within approximately 70 million kilometres of Saturn. Most of the particles detected at large distances appear to originate from the outskirts of Saturn's outermost main ring. All bursts of dust impacts detected within 150 Saturn radii are characterized by impact directions markedly different from those measured between the bursts, and they clearly coincide with the spacecraft's traversals through streams of compressed solar wind.

  16. High-Velocity H I Gas in Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Bon-Chul

    1993-05-01

    Using the Hat Creek 85 foot telescope, we had carried out a survey of H I 21 cm emission lines toward all 103 known northern supernova remnants (SNRs) in order to find rapidly expanding SNR shells (Koo & Heiles 1991). We detected 15 SNRs that have associated high-velocity (HV) H I gas, most of which are quite likely the gas accelerated by the SN blast wave. Although the large beam-size (FWHM~ 30') of the 85 foot telescope prevented us to see the structure of the HV H I gas, the H I mass distribution in line-of-sight velocity suggested clumpy shell structures in several SNRs. In order to resolve the structure of the HV H I gas, we have been carrying out high-resolution H I 21 cm line observations using the Arecibo telescope and the VLA. We report preliminary results on two SNRs, CTB 80 and W51. In CTB 80, the VLA observations revealed fast moving H I clumps, which have a dense (n_H ~ 100 cm(-3) ) core surrounded by a relatively diffuse envelope. The clumps are small, 3 pc to 5 pc, and have velocities between +40 km s(-1) and +80 km s(-1) with respect to the systematic velocity of CTB 80. The clumps have relatively large momentum per unit volume, which implies that they have been swept-up at an early stage of the SNR evolution. By analyzing the Arecibo data, we found that the interstellar medium around CTB 80 is far from being uniform and homogeneous, which explains the peculiar morphology of CTB 80 in infrared and radio continuum. In W51, HV H I gas moving up to v_LSR>+150 km s(-1) has been detected. The H I distribution is elongated along the northwest-southeast direction, and the peak is very close to an X-ray bright region. We discuss the implications of our results in relation to the X-ray and the radio continuum morphology of W51. This work was supported in part by NON DIRECTED RESEARCH FUND, Korea Research Foundation, 1992.

  17. Lyman-Alpha Observations of High Radial Velocity Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bookbinder, Jay

    1990-12-01

    H I LYMAN -ALPHA (LY-A) IS ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT LINES EMITTED BY PLASMA IN THE TEMPERATURE RANGE OF 7000 TO 10 TO THE FIFTH POWER K IN LATE-TYPE STARS. IT IS A MAJOR COMPONENT OF THE TOTAL RADIATIVE LOSS RATE, AND IT PLAYS A CRUCIAL ROLE IN DETERMINING THE ATMOSPHERIC STRUCTURE AND IN FLUORESCING OTHER UV LINES. YET IT IS ALSO THE LEAST STUDIED MAJOR LINE IN THE FAR UV, BECAUSE MOST OF THE LINE FLUX IS ABSORBED BY THE ISM ALONG THE LINE OF SIGHT AND BECAUSE IT IS STRONGLY COMTAMINATED BY THE GEOCORONAL BACKGROUND. A KNOWLEDGE OF THE Ly-A PROFILE IS ALSO IMPORTANT FOR STUDIES OF DEUTERIUM IN THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM. BY OBSERVING HIGH RADIAL VELOCITY STARS WE WILL OBTAIN FOR THE FIRST TIME HIGH RESOLUTION SPECTRA OF THE CORE OF A STELLAR H I LYMAN-A EMISSION LINE PROFILE.

  18. The FUSE Survey of 0 VI in the Galactic Halo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonneborn, George; Savage, B. D.; Wakker, B. P.; Sembach, K. R.; Jenkins, E. B.; Moos, H. W.; Shull, J. M.

    2003-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of the Far-Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) program to study 0 VI in the Milky Way halo. Spectra of 100 extragalactic objects and two distant halo stars are analyzed to obtain measures of O VI absorption along paths through the Milky Way thick disk/halo. Strong O VI absorption over the velocity range from -100 to 100 km/s reveals a widespread but highly irregular distribution of O VI, implying the existence of substantial amounts of hot gas with T approx. 3 x 10(exp 5) K in the Milky Way thick disk/halo. The overall distribution of O VI is not well described by a symmetrical plane-parallel layer of patchy O VI absorption. The simplest departure from such a model that provides a reasonable fit to the observations is a plane-parallel patchy absorbing layer with an average O VI mid-plane density of n(sub 0)(O VI) = 1.7 x 10(exp -2)/cu cm, a scale height of approx. 2.3 kpc, and a approx. 0.25 dex excess of O VI in the northern Galactic polar region. The distribution of O VI over the sky is poorly correlated with other tracers of gas in the halo, including low and intermediate velocity H I, Ha emission from the warm ionized gas at approx. l0(exp 4) K, and hot X-ray emitting gas at approx. l0(exp 6) K . The O VI has an average velocity dispersion, b approx. 60 km/s and standard deviation of 15 km/s. Thermal broadening alone cannot explain the large observed profile widths. A combination of models involving the radiative cooling of hot fountain gas, the cooling of supernova bubbles in the halo, and the turbulent mixing of warm and hot halo gases is required to explain the presence of O VI and other highly ionized atoms found in the halo. The preferential venting of hot gas from local bubbles and superbubbles into the northern Galactic polar region may explain the enhancement of O VI in the North.

  19. Observations of Complex H, a High Velocity Cloud Close to the Galactic Plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buenrostro, V.; Lockman, J.; Beckman, J. E.

    2008-06-01

    Using 21 cm observations of Complex H with the Green Bank Radio Telescope, we have derived its LSR velocity of ˜ 200 km s-1 and an H I mass of 7.5× 107 M⊙. This gives useful support to the scenario in which the Galactic disk is being built up by the continual accretion of clouds of this type from the intracluster medium of the Local Group. Complex H is detected as shedding a gas tail, and has a shock front at its leading surface, both phenomena attributable to its interaction with the halo gas of the Milky Way.

  20. Asymmetric velocity anisotropies in remnants of collisionless mergers

    SciTech Connect

    Sparre, Martin; Hansen, Steen H. E-mail: hansen@dark-cosmology.dk

    2012-07-01

    Dark matter haloes in cosmological N-body simulations are affected by processes such as mergers, accretion and the gravitational interaction with baryonic matter. Typically the analysis of dark matter haloes is performed in spherical or elliptical bins and the velocity distributions are often assumed to be constant within those bins. However, the velocity anisotropy, which describes differences between the radial and tangential velocity dispersion, has recently been show to have a strong dependence on direction in the triaxial halos formed in cosmological simulations. In this study we derive properties of particles in cones parallel or perpendicular to the collision axis of merger remnants. We find that the velocity anisotropy has a strong dependence on direction. The finding that the direction-dependence of the velocity anisotropy of a halo depends on the merger history, explains the existence of such trends in cosmological simulations. It also explains why a large diversity is seen in the velocity anisotropy profiles in the outer parts of high-resolution simulations of cosmological haloes.

  1. Compressional velocity measurements for a highly fractured lunar anorthosite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sondergeld, C. H.; Granryd, L. A.; Spetzler, H. A.

    1979-01-01

    The compressional wave (V sub p) velocities in three mutually perpendicular directions have been measured in lunar sample 60025,174, lunar anorthosite. V sub p measurements were made at ambient temperature and pressure and a new technique was developed to measure the velocities because of the tremendous acoustic wave attenuation of the lunar sample. The measured velocities were all less than 1 km/sec and displayed up to a 21% departure from the mean value of the three directions. The velocities agree with seismic wave velocities determined for the lunar surface at the collection site.

  2. The Case for the Dual Halo of the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beers, Timothy C.; Carollo, Daniela; Ivezić, Željko; An, Deokkeun; Chiba, Masashi; Norris, John E.; Freeman, Ken C.; Lee, Young Sun; Munn, Jeffrey A.; Re Fiorentin, Paola; Sivarani, Thirupathi; Wilhelm, Ronald; Yanny, Brian; York, Donald G.

    2012-02-01

    Carollo et al. have recently resolved the stellar population of the Milky Way halo into at least two distinct components, an inner halo and an outer halo. This result has been criticized by Schönrich et al., who claim that the retrograde signature associated with the outer halo is due to the adoption of faulty distances. We refute this claim, and demonstrate that the Schönrich et al. photometric distances are themselves flawed because they adopted an incorrect main-sequence absolute magnitude relationship from the work of Ivezić et al. When compared to the recommended relation from Ivezić et al., which is tied to a Milky Way globular cluster distance scale and accounts for age and metallicity effects, the relation adopted by Schönrich et al. yields up to 18% shorter distances for stars near the main-sequence turnoff (TO). Use of the correct relationship yields agreement between the distances assigned by Carollo et al. and Ivezić et al. for low-metallicity dwarfs to within 6%-10%. Schönrich et al. also point out that intermediate-gravity stars (3.5 <=log g < 4.0) with colors redder than the TO region are likely misclassified, with which we concur. We implement a new procedure to reassign luminosity classifications for the TO stars that require it. New derivations of the rotational behavior demonstrate that the retrograde signature and high velocity dispersion of the outer-halo population remain. We summarize additional lines of evidence for a dual halo, including a test of the retrograde signature based on proper motions alone, and conclude that the preponderance of evidence strongly rejects the single-halo interpretation.

  3. Sensitivities of phase-velocity dispersion curves of surface waves due to high-velocity-layer and low-velocity-layer models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Chao; Xu, Yixian; Pan, Yudi; Wang, Ao; Gao, Lingli

    2016-12-01

    High-velocity-layer (HVL) and low-velocity-layer (LVL) models are two kinds of the most common irregular layered models in near-surface geophysical applications. When calculating dispersion curves of some extreme irregular models, current algorithms (e.g., Knopoff transfer matrix algorithm) should be modified. We computed the correct dispersion curves and analyzed their sensitivities due to several synthetic HVL and LVL models. The results show that phase-velocity dispersion curves of both Rayleigh and Love waves are sensitive to variations in S-wave velocity of an LVL, but insensitive to that of an HVL. In addition, they are both insensitive to those of layers beneath the HVL or LVL. With an increase in velocity contrast between the irregular layer and its neighboring layers, the sensitivity effects (high sensitivity for the LVL and low sensitivity for the HVL) will amplify. These characteristics may significantly influence the inversion stability, leading to an inverted result with a low level of confidence. To invert surface-wave phase velocities for a more accurate S-wave model with an HVL or LVL, priori knowledge may be required and an inversion algorithm should be treated with extra caution.

  4. Monolithic interferometer for high precision radial velocity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Xiaoke; Ge, Jian; Wang, Ji; Lee, Brian

    2009-08-01

    In high precision radial velocity (RV) measurements for extrasolar planets searching and studies, a stable wide field Michelson interferometer is very critical in Exoplanet Tracker (ET) instruments. Adopting a new design, monolithic interferometers are homogenous and continuous in thermal expansion, and field compensation and thermal compensation are both satisfied. Interferometer design and fabrication are decrypted in details. In performance evaluations, field angle is typically 22° and thermal sensitivity is typically -1.7 x 10-6/°C, which corresponds to ~500 m/s /°C in RV scale. In interferometer stability monitoring using a wavelength stabilized laser source, phase shift data was continuously recorded for nearly seven days. Appling a frequent calibration every 30 minutes as in typical star observations, the interferometer instability contributes less than 1.4 m/s in RV error, in a conservative estimation.

  5. Heterogeneous fragmentation of metallic liquid microsheet with high velocity gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An-Min, He; Pei, Wang; Jian-Li, Shao

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale molecular dynamics simulations are performed to study the fragmentation of metallic liquid sheets with high velocity gradient. Dynamic fragmentation of the system involves the formation of a network of fragments due to the growth and coalescence of holes, decomposition of the network into filaments, and further breakup of the filaments into spherical clusters. The final size distribution of the fragmented clusters in the large volume limit is found to obey a bilinear exponential form, which is resulted from the heterogeneous breakup of quasi-cylindrical filaments. The main factors contributing to fragmentation heterogeneity are introduced, including strain rate inhomogeneity and matter distribution nonuniformity of fragments produced during decomposition of the network structure. Project supported by the Science and Technology Development Foundation of China Academy of Engineering Physics (Grant Nos. 2013A0201010 and 2015B0201039) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11402032).

  6. Deployable Emergency Shutoff Device Blocks High-Velocity Fluid Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nabors, Sammy A.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has developed a device and method for blocking the flow of fluid from an open pipe. Motivated by the sea-bed oil-drilling catastrophe in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010, NASA innovators designed the device to plug, control, and meter the flow of gases and liquids. Anchored with friction fittings, spikes, or explosively activated fasteners, the device is well-suited for harsh environments and high fluid velocities and pressures. With the addition of instrumentation, it can also be used as a variable area flow metering valve that can be set based upon flow conditions. With robotic additions, this patent-pending innovation can be configured to crawl into a pipe then anchor and activate itself to block or control fluid flow.

  7. Collisional Disruption of Ice by High-Velocity Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakawa, Masahiko

    1999-11-01

    High-velocity impact among icy planetesimals is a physical phenomenon important to the planetary evolution process in the outer Solar System. In order to study this phenomenon, impact experiments on water ice were made by using a two-stage light gas gun installed in a cold room (-10°C) to clarify the elementary processes of collisional disruption and to study the reaccumulation and the escape conditions of the impact fragments. Cubic ice targets ranging in size from 15 to 100 mm were impacted by a nylon projectile of 7 mg with an impact velocity ( vi) from 2.3 to 4.7 km/s. The corresponding mass ratio of the projectile to the target ( mp/ Mt) ranged from 10 -3 to 10 -6, which is two orders of magnitude lower than that used in previous studies (Arakawa et al. 1995, Icarus118, 341-354). As a result, we obtained data on elementary processes such as attenuation of the shock wave and fragmentation dynamics. We found that the shock pressure attenuates in the ice target according to the relation of P∝( Lp/ r2, irrespective of the mass ratio between 10 -3 and 10 -5, where Lp is the projectile size and r is a propagation distance. The largest fragment mass ( ml) normalized by the original target mass has a good relationship to a nondimensional impact stress ( PI, NDIS) defined as the ratio of the antipodal pressure to the material strength. This relationship is described as ml/ Mt ∝ PI-1.7 for a wide range of impact conditions (50 m/s< vi<4 km/s and 10 -1< ml/ Mt<10 -6), and shows the utility of NDIS. Using a measured shock wave decay constant of 2, the reaccumulation and the escape conditions of icy bodies in high-velocity collisions were estimated. As a result, it was clarified that a rubble pile could be formed when large icy bodies (radius>20 km) reaccumulated. On the other hand, when smaller icy bodies (radius<2 km) disrupted catastrophically, all fragments escaped and a rubble pile was never formed.

  8. High velocity vortex channeling in vicinal YBCO thin films.

    PubMed

    Puica, I; Lang, W; Durrell, J H

    2012-09-01

    We report on electrical transport measurements at high current densities on optimally doped YBa2Cu3O7-δ thin films grown on vicinal SrTiO3 substrates. Data were collected by using a pulsed-current technique in a four-probe arrangement, allowing to extend the current-voltage characteristics to high supercritical current densities (up to 24 MA cm(-2)) and high electric fields (more than 20 V/cm), in the superconducting state at temperatures between 30 and 80 K. The electric measurements were performed on tracks perpendicular to the vicinal step direction, such that the current crossed between ab planes, under magnetic field rotated in the plane defined by the crystallographic c axis and the current density. At magnetic field orientation parallel to the cuprate layers, evidence for the sliding motion along the ab planes (vortex channeling) was found. The signature of vortex channeling appeared to get enhanced with increasing electric field, due to the peculiar depinning features in the kinked vortex range. They give rise to a current-voltage characteristics steeper than in the more off-plane rectilinear vortex orientations, in the electric field range below approximately 1 V/cm. Roughly above this value, the high vortex channeling velocities (up to 8.6 km/s) could be ascribed to the flux flow, although the signature of ohmic transport appeared to be altered by unavoidable macroscopic self-heating and hot-electron-like effects.

  9. Probability density distribution of velocity differences at high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Praskovsky, Alexander A.

    1993-01-01

    Recent understanding of fine-scale turbulence structure in high Reynolds number flows is mostly based on Kolmogorov's original and revised models. The main finding of these models is that intrinsic characteristics of fine-scale fluctuations are universal ones at high Reynolds numbers, i.e., the functional behavior of any small-scale parameter is the same in all flows if the Reynolds number is high enough. The only large-scale quantity that directly affects small-scale fluctuations is the energy flux through a cascade. In dynamical equilibrium between large- and small-scale motions, this flux is equal to the mean rate of energy dissipation epsilon. The pdd of velocity difference is a very important characteristic for both the basic understanding of fully developed turbulence and engineering problems. Hence, it is important to test the findings: (1) the functional behavior of the tails of the probability density distribution (pdd) represented by P(delta(u)) is proportional to exp(-b(r) absolute value of delta(u)/sigma(sub delta(u))) and (2) the logarithmic decrement b(r) scales as b(r) is proportional to r(sup 0.15) when separation r lies in the inertial subrange in high Reynolds number laboratory shear flows.

  10. Formation of the Galactic Stellar Halo. I. Structure and Kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekki, Kenji; Chiba, Masashi

    2001-09-01

    We perform numerical simulations for the formation of the Galactic stellar halo, based on the currently favored cold dark matter theory of galaxy formation. Our numerical models, taking into account both dynamical and chemical evolution processes in a consistent manner, are aimed at explaining the observed structure and kinematics of the stellar halo in the context of hierarchical galaxy formation. The main results of the present simulations are summarized as follows: (1) Basic physical processes involved in the formation of the stellar halo, composed of metal-deficient stars with [Fe/H]<=-1.0, are described by both dissipative and dissipationless merging of subgalactic clumps and their resultant tidal disruption in the course of gravitational contraction of the Galaxy at high redshift (z>1). (2) The simulated halo has a density profile similar to the observed power-law form of ρ(r)~r-3.5 and also has a metallicity distribution similar to the observations. The halo shows virtually no radial gradient for stellar ages and only a small gradient for metallicities. (3) The dual nature of the halo, i.e., its inner flattened and outer spherical density distribution, is reproduced, at least qualitatively, by the present model. The outer spherical halo is formed via essentially dissipationless merging of small subgalactic clumps, whereas the inner flattened one is formed via three different mechanisms, i.e., dissipative merging between larger, more massive clumps, adiabatic contraction due to the growing Galactic disk, and gaseous accretion onto the equatorial plane. (4) For the simulated metal-poor stars with [Fe/H]<=-1.0, there is no strong correlation between metal abundances and orbital eccentricities, in good agreement with the recent observations. Moreover, the observed fraction of the low-eccentricity stars is reproduced correctly for [Fe/H]<=-1.6 and approximately for the intermediate-abundance range of -1.6<[Fe/H]<=-1.0. (5) The mean rotational velocity of the

  11. Halo and subhalo demographics with Planck cosmological parameters: Bolshoi-Planck and MultiDark-Planck simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Puebla, Aldo; Behroozi, Peter; Primack, Joel; Klypin, Anatoly; Lee, Christoph; Hellinger, Doug

    2016-10-01

    We report and provide fitting functions for the abundance of dark matter haloes and subhaloes as a function of mass, circular velocity, and redshift from the new Bolshoi-Planck and MultiDark-Planck ΛCDM cosmological simulations, based on the Planck parameters. We also report halo mass accretion rates and concentrations. We show that the higher cosmological matter density of the Planck parameters compared with the WMAP parameters leads to higher abundance of massive haloes at high redshifts. We find that the median halo spin parameter {λ _B}= J(√{2}M_virR_virV_vir)^{-1} is nearly independent of redshift, leading to predicted evolution of galaxy sizes that is consistent with observations, while the significant decrease with redshift in median {λ _P}= J|E|^{-1/2}G^{-1}M^{-5/2} predicts more decrease in galaxy sizes than is observed. Using the Tully-Fisher and Faber-Jackson relations between galaxy velocity and mass, we show that a simple model of how galaxy velocity is related to halo maximum circular velocity leads to increasing overprediction of cosmic stellar mass density as redshift increases beyond z ˜ 1, implying that such velocity-mass relations must change at z ≳ 1. By making a realistic model of how observed galaxy velocities are related to halo circular velocity, we show that recent optical and radio observations of the abundance of galaxies are in good agreement with our ΛCDM simulations. Our halo demographics are based on updated versions of the ROCKSTAR and CONSISTENT TREES codes, and this paper includes appendices explaining all of their outputs. This paper is an introduction to a series of related papers presenting other analyses of the Bolshoi-Planck and MultiDark-Planck simulations.

  12. OXYGEN ABUNDANCES IN LOW- AND HIGH-{alpha} FIELD HALO STARS AND THE DISCOVERY OF TWO FIELD STARS BORN IN GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, I.; Melendez, J.

    2012-10-01

    Oxygen abundances of 67 dwarf stars in the metallicity range -1.6 < [Fe/H] < -0.4 are derived from a non-LTE analysis of the 777 nm O I triplet lines. These stars have precise atmospheric parameters measured by Nissen and Schuster, who find that they separate into three groups based on their kinematics and {alpha}-element (Mg, Si, Ca, Ti) abundances: thick disk, high-{alpha} halo, and low-{alpha} halo. We find the oxygen abundance trends of thick-disk and high-{alpha} halo stars very similar. The low-{alpha} stars show a larger star-to-star scatter in [O/Fe] at a given [Fe/H] and have systematically lower oxygen abundances compared to the other two groups. Thus, we find the behavior of oxygen abundances in these groups of stars similar to that of the {alpha} elements. We use previously published oxygen abundance data of disk and very metal-poor halo stars to present an overall view (-2.3 < [Fe/H] < +0.3) of oxygen abundance trends of stars in the solar neighborhood. Two field halo dwarf stars stand out in their O and Na abundances. Both G53-41 and G150-40 have very low oxygen and very high sodium abundances, which are key signatures of the abundance anomalies observed in globular cluster (GC) stars. Therefore, they are likely field halo stars born in GCs. If true, we estimate that at least 3% {+-} 2% of the local field metal-poor star population was born in GCs.

  13. Fault gouge rheology under confined, high-velocity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reches, Z.; Madden, A. S.; Chen, X.

    2012-12-01

    We recently developed the experimental capability to investigate the shear properties of fine-grain gouge under confined conditions and high-velocity. The experimental system includes a rotary apparatus that can apply large displacements of tens of meters, slip velocity of 0.001- 2.0 m/s, and normal stress of 35 MPa (Reches and Lockner, 2010). The key new component is a Confined ROtary Cell (CROC) that can shear a gouge layer either dry or under pore-pressure. The pore pressure is controlled by two syringe pumps. CROC includes a ring-shape gouge chamber of 62.5 mm inner diameter, 81.25 mm outer diameter, and up to 3 mm thick gouge sample. The lower, rotating part of CROC contains the sample chamber, and the upper, stationary part includes the loading, hollow cylinder and setting for temperature, and dilation measurements, and pore-pressure control. Each side of the gouge chamber has two pairs of industrial, spring-energized, self-lubricating, teflon-graphite seals, built for particle media and can work at temperature up to 250 ded C. The space between each of the two sets of seals is pressurized by nitrogen. This design generates 'zero-differential pressure' on the inner seal (which is in contact with the gouge powder), and prevents gouge leaks. For the preliminary dry experiments, we used ~2.0 mm thick layers of room-dry kaolinite powder. Total displacements were on the order of meters and normal stress up to 4 MPa. The initial shear was accommodated by multiple internal slip surfaces within the kaolinite layer accommodated as oriented Riedel shear structures. Later, the shear was localized within a thin, plate-parallel Y-surface. The kaolinite layer was compacted at a quasi-asymptotic rate, and displayed a steady-state friction coefficient of ~ 0.5 with no clear dependence on slip velocity up to 0.15 m/s. Further experiments with loose quartz sand (grain size ~ 125 micron) included both dry runs and pore-pressure (distilled water) controlled runs. The sand was

  14. COLLISIONS BETWEEN DARK MATTER CONFINED HIGH VELOCITY CLOUDS AND MAGNETIZED GALACTIC DISKS: THE SMITH CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Galyardt, Jason; Shelton, Robin L. E-mail: rls@physast.uga.edu

    2016-01-01

    The Galaxy’s population of High Velocity Clouds (HVCs) may include a subpopulation that is confined by dark matter minihalos and falling toward the Galactic disk. We present the first magnetohydrodynamic simulational study of dark-matter-dominated HVCs colliding with a weakly magnetized galactic disk. Our HVCs have baryonic masses of 5 × 10{sup 6}M{sub ⊙} and dark matter minihalo masses of 0, 3 × 10{sup 8}, or 1 × 10{sup 9} M{sub ⊙}. They are modeled on the Smith Cloud, which is said to have collided with the disk 70 Myr ago. We find that, in all cases, the cloud’s collision with the galactic disk creates a hole in the disk, completely disperses the cloud, and forms a bubble-shaped structure on the far side of the disk. In contrast, when present, the dark matter minihalo continues unimpeded along its trajectory. Later, as the minihalo passes through the bubble structure and galactic halo, it accretes up to 6.0 × 10{sup 5} M{sub ⊙} in baryonic material, depending on the strengths of the magnetic field and minihalo gravity. These simulations suggest that if the Smith Cloud is associated with a dark matter minihalo and collided with the Galactic disk, the minihalo has accreted the observed gas. However, if the Smith Cloud is dark-matter-free, it is on its first approach toward the disk. These simulations also suggest that the dark matter is most concentrated either at the head of the cloud or near the cloud, depending upon the strength of the magnetic field, a point that could inform indirect dark matter searches.

  15. Numerical Investigation of High Velocity Suspension Flame Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taleby, M.; Hossainpour, S.

    2012-12-01

    High-velocity suspension flame spraying (HVSFS) has recently developed as a possible alternative to conventional HVOF-spraying employing liquid suspensions instead of dry powder feedstock enables the use of nanoparticles. From the fluid dynamics point of view, the HVSFS system is complex and involves three-phase (gas, liquid and solid particles) turbulent flow, heat transfer, evaporation of the suspension solvent, chemical reactions of main fuel (propane) and suspension solvent (ethanol) and supersonic/subsonic flow transitions. Computational fluid dynamic techniques were carried out to solve the mass, momentum, and energy conservation equations. The realizable k-ɛ turbulence model was used to account for the effect of turbulence. The HVSFS process involves two combustion reactions. A primary combustion process is the premixed oxygen-propane reaction and secondary process is the non-premixed oxygen-gaseous ethanol reaction. For each reaction, one step global reaction, which takes dissociations and intermediate reactions into account, was derived from the equilibrium chemistry code developed by Gordon and McBride and eddy dissipation model was used to calculate the rate of reactions based on the transport equations for all species (10 species) mass fractions. Droplets were tracked in the continuum in a Lagrangian approach. In this paper, flow field inside and outside the gun simulated to provide clear and complete insight about the HVSFS processes. Moreover, the effect of some operative parameters (oxy-fuel flow rate, ethanol flow rate, droplets injection velocity and droplets size) on the gas flow field along the centerline and droplets evaporation behavior was discussed.

  16. The StEllar Counterparts of COmpact high velocity clouds (SECCO) survey. I. Photos of ghosts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellazzini, M.; Beccari, G.; Battaglia, G.; Martin, N.; Testa, V.; Ibata, R.; Correnti, M.; Cusano, F.; Sani, E.

    2015-03-01

    We present an imaging survey that searches for the stellar counterparts of recently discovered ultra-compact high-velocity H i clouds (UCHVC). It has been proposed that these clouds are candidate mini-haloes in the Local Group and its surroundings within a distance range of 0.25-2.0 Mpc. Using the Large Binocular Telescope we obtained wide-field (≃ 23' × 23') g- and r-band images of the twenty-five most promising and most compact clouds amongst the fifty-nine that have been identified. Careful visual inspection of all the images does not reveal any stellar counterpart that even slightly resembles Leo P, the only local dwarf galaxy that was found as a counterpart to a previously detected high-velocity cloud. Only a possible distant (D> 3.0 Mpc) counterpart to HVC274.68+74.70-123 has been identified in our images. The point source photometry in the central 17.3' × 7.7' chips reaches r ≤ 26.5 and is expected to contain most of the stellar counterparts to the UCHVCs. However, no obvious stellar over-density is detected in any of our fields, in marked contrast to our comparison Leo P field, in which the dwarf galaxy is detected at a >30σ-significance level. Only HVC352.45+59.06+263 may be associated with a weak over-density, whose nature cannot be ascertained with our data. Sensitivity tests show that our survey would have detected any dwarf galaxy dominated by an old stellar population, with an integrated absolute magnitude of MV ≤ - 8.0 and a half-light radius of rh ≤ 300 pc that lies within 1.5 Mpc of us, thereby confirming that it is unlikely that the observed UCHVCs are associated with the stellar counterparts typical of known Local Group dwarf galaxies. Based on data acquired using the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT). The LBT is an international collaboration amongst institutions in the United States, Italy, and Germany. LBT Corporation partners are The University of Arizona on behalf of the Arizona university system; Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica

  17. All-sky census of Galactic high-latitude molecular intermediate-velocity clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röhser, T.; Kerp, J.; Lenz, D.; Winkel, B.

    2016-12-01

    Context. The H i halo clouds of the Milky Way, and in particular the intermediate-velocity clouds (IVCs), are thought to be connected to Galactic fountain processes. Observations of fountain clouds are important for understanding the role of matter recycling and accretion onto the Galactic disk and subsequent star formation. Aims: Here, we quantify the amount of molecular gas in the Galactic halo. We focus on the rare class of molecular IVCs (MIVCs) and search for new objects. Methods: The H i-FIR correlation was studied across the entire northern and southern Galactic hemispheres at Galactic latitudes | b | > 20° to determine the amount and distribution of molecular gas in IVCs. We used the most recent large-scale H i and FIR data, the Effelsberg Bonn-H i Survey, the Parkes Galactic All-Sky Survey, and the Planck FIR surveys. Results: We present a catalogue of 239 MIVC candidates on the northern and southern Galactic hemispheres. Among these candidates, all previously known MIVCs are recovered except for one single source. The frequency of candidates differs significantly between the northern and southern Galactic hemispheres and between negative and positive LSR velocities as well. Conclusions: In our approach we analyse the local Galactic environment. Extrapolating our results to the entire Galaxy, the global inflow of atomic and molecular IVC gas onto the Milky Way may account for the major fraction of the gaseous mass that is required to sustain the current Galactic star formation rate.

  18. Ultraviolet Halos around Spiral Galaxies. I. Morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodges-Kluck, Edmund; Cafmeyer, Julian; Bregman, Joel N.

    2016-12-01

    We examine ultraviolet halos around a sample of highly inclined galaxies within 25 Mpc to measure their morphology and luminosity. Despite contamination from galactic light scattered into the wings of the point-spread function, we find that ultraviolet (UV) halos occur around each galaxy in our sample. Around most galaxies the halos form a thick, diffuse disk-like structure, but starburst galaxies with galactic superwinds have qualitatively different halos that are more extensive and have filamentary structure. The spatial coincidence of the UV halos above star-forming regions, the lack of consistent association with outflows or extraplanar ionized gas, and the strong correlation between the halo and galaxy UV luminosity suggest that the UV light is an extragalactic reflection nebula. UV halos may thus represent 106-107 M ⊙ of dust within 2-10 kpc of the disk, whose properties may change with height in starburst galaxies.

  19. High velocity properties of the dynamic frictional force between ductile metals

    SciTech Connect

    Hammerberg, James Edward; Hollan, Brad L; Germann, Timothy C; Ravelo, Ramon J

    2010-01-01

    The high velocity properties of the tangential frictional force between ductile metal interfaces seen in large-scale NonEquilibrium Molecular Dynamics (NEMD) simulations are characterized by interesting scaling behavior. In many cases a power law decrease in the frictional force with increasing velocity is observed at high velocities. We discuss the velocity dependence of the high velocity branch of the tangential force in terms of structural transformation and ultimate transition, at the highest velocities, to confined fluid behavior characterized by a critical strain rate. The particular case of an Al/Al interface is discussed.

  20. Dynamic weakening by nanoscale smoothing during high velocity fault slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Madden, A. S.; Bickmore, B. R.; Reches, Z.

    2012-12-01

    Rock friction is commonly determined through measurements on rock samples with areas from a few cm^2 to 1 m^2. On the other hand, theoretical models suggest that frictional processes are scale-dependent, and active at scales of a few microns or less. We used Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) to determine the frictional strength and roughness of experimental fault surfaces that slipped under high velocity (< 0.9 m/s) and moderate normal stress (< 7.0 MPa). The high velocity tests (Reches and Lockner, 2010) were conducted on experimental faults made of Sierra White granite (SWG) and Kasota dolomite (KD), and the sheared surfaces were sampled for the nanoscale measurements by the AFM. The friction coefficient (FC) at the sub-micron scale was measured by using the AFM to press & shear a tiny silica glass bead against the rock surface (Stiernstedt et al., 2005). The 3D morphology of the fault surfaces at the nano- to microscale was measured with the standard AFM intermittent contact mode with sharp tip probe. In the AFM friction measurements, a total of 43 sites have been measured and each site was repeated hundreds of times; 33 of these sites were measured under air and 10 sites were measured under deionized water. The SWG and KD samples display FC values that vary systematically with orientation and conditions. Room-dry, un-sheared surfaces have FC = 0.64 ± 0.05 for both rock types. KD normal to striations has FC = 0.60 ± 0.15. SWG rough, sheared surface display FC = 0.71 ± 0.02. Significant friction drop was observed under dry, parallel to striations, with FC = 0.34 ± 0.08 (KD) and FC = 0.52 ± 0.03 (SWG). Under wet (water covered) conditions parallel to slickensides, the friction dropped even further to FC = 0.15 ± 0.05 (dolomite) and FC = 0.31 ± 0.05 (granite). The nanoscale FC (room dry, parallel to striations) is comparable to the macroscopic FC for the host experiments. Roughness calculations are based on AFM topographic images, and analyzed by both Power

  1. High velocity vortex channeling in vicinal YBCO thin films

    PubMed Central

    Puica, I.; Lang, W.; Durrell, J.H.

    2012-01-01

    We report on electrical transport measurements at high current densities on optimally doped YBa2Cu3O7−δ thin films grown on vicinal SrTiO3 substrates. Data were collected by using a pulsed-current technique in a four-probe arrangement, allowing to extend the current–voltage characteristics to high supercritical current densities (up to 24 MA cm−2) and high electric fields (more than 20 V/cm), in the superconducting state at temperatures between 30 and 80 K. The electric measurements were performed on tracks perpendicular to the vicinal step direction, such that the current crossed between ab planes, under magnetic field rotated in the plane defined by the crystallographic c axis and the current density. At magnetic field orientation parallel to the cuprate layers, evidence for the sliding motion along the ab planes (vortex channeling) was found. The signature of vortex channeling appeared to get enhanced with increasing electric field, due to the peculiar depinning features in the kinked vortex range. They give rise to a current–voltage characteristics steeper than in the more off-plane rectilinear vortex orientations, in the electric field range below approximately 1 V/cm. Roughly above this value, the high vortex channeling velocities (up to 8.6 km/s) could be ascribed to the flux flow, although the signature of ohmic transport appeared to be altered by unavoidable macroscopic self-heating and hot-electron-like effects. PMID:23482832

  2. A High Stellar Velocity Dispersion and ~100 Globular Clusters for the Ultra-diffuse Galaxy Dragonfly 44

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dokkum, Pieter; Abraham, Roberto; Brodie, Jean; Conroy, Charlie; Danieli, Shany; Merritt, Allison; Mowla, Lamiya; Romanowsky, Aaron; Zhang, Jielai

    2016-09-01

    Recently a population of large, very low surface brightness, spheroidal galaxies was identified in the Coma cluster. The apparent survival of these ultra-diffuse galaxies (UDGs) in a rich cluster suggests that they have very high masses. Here, we present the stellar kinematics of Dragonfly 44, one of the largest Coma UDGs, using a 33.5 hr integration with DEIMOS on the Keck II telescope. We find a velocity dispersion of σ ={47}-6+8 {km} {{{s}}}-1, which implies a dynamical mass of {M}{dyn}(\\lt {r}1/2)={0.7}-0.2+0.3× {10}10 {M}⊙ within its deprojected half-light radius of {r}1/2=4.6+/- 0.2 {kpc}. The mass-to-light ratio is M/{L}I(\\lt {r}1/2)={48}-14+21 {M}⊙ /{L}⊙ , and the dark matter fraction is 98% within {r}1/2. The high mass of Dragonfly 44 is accompanied by a large globular cluster population. From deep Gemini imaging taken in 0\\buildrel{\\prime\\prime}\\over{.} 4 seeing we infer that Dragonfly 44 has {94}-20+25 globular clusters, similar to the counts for other galaxies in this mass range. Our results add to other recent evidence that many UDGs are “failed” galaxies, with the sizes, dark matter content, and globular cluster systems of much more luminous objects. We estimate the total dark halo mass of Dragonfly 44 by comparing the amount of dark matter within r=4.6 {kpc} to enclosed mass profiles of NFW halos. The enclosed mass suggests a total mass of ˜ {10}12 {M}⊙ , similar to the mass of the Milky Way. The existence of nearly dark objects with this mass is unexpected, as galaxy formation is thought to be maximally efficient in this regime.

  3. Hydrodynamic lubrication in nanoscale bearings under high shear velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yunfei; Li, Deyu; Jiang, Kai; Yang, Juekuan; Wang, Xiaohui; Wang, Yujuan

    2006-08-01

    The setting up process in a nanoscale bearing has been modeled by molecular dynamics simulation. Contrary to the prediction from the classical Reynolds' theory, simulation results show that the load capacity of the nanoscale bearing does not increase monotonically with the operation speed. This is attributed to the change of the local shear rate, which will decrease with the shear velocity of the bearing as the shear velocity exceeds a critical value, i.e., the local shear rate has an upper limit. A simple nonlinear dynamic model indicates that the momentum exchange between the liquid and the solid wall is reduced with the shear velocity when the shear velocity is above a critical value. The weak momentum exchange results in a decrease of the local shear rate, which in turn causes a sharp increase of the slip length.

  4. High-velocity Bipolar Molecular Emission from an AGN Torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallimore, Jack F.; Elitzur, Moshe; Maiolino, Roberto; Marconi, Alessandro; O'Dea, Christopher P.; Lutz, Dieter; Baum, Stefi A.; Nikutta, Robert; Impellizzeri, C. M. V.; Davies, Richard; Kimball, Amy E.; Sani, Eleonora

    2016-09-01

    We have detected in ALMA observations CO J=6\\to 5 emission from the nucleus of the Seyfert galaxy NGC 1068. The low-velocity (up to ±70 km s-1 relative to systemic) CO emission resolves into a 12 × 7 pc structure, roughly aligned with the nuclear radio source. Higher-velocity emission (up to ±400 km s-1) is consistent with a bipolar outflow in a direction nearly perpendicular (≃80°) to the nuclear disk. The position-velocity diagram shows that in addition to the outflow, the velocity field may also contain rotation about the disk axis. These observations provide compelling evidence in support of the disk-wind scenario for the active galactic nucleus obscuring torus.

  5. Velocity-metallicity correlation for high-z DLA galaxies: evidence of a mass-metallicity relation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledoux, C.; Petitjean, P.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Møller, P.; Srianand, R.

    2006-10-01

    We used our database of VLT-UVES quasar spectra to build up a sample of 70 Damped Lyman-α (DLA) or strong sub-DLA systems with total neutral hydrogen column densities of log N(H i)⪆ 20 and redshifts in the range 1.7velocity widths of low-ionization line profiles, Δ V. For the first time, we provide evidence for a correlation between DLA metallicity and line profile velocity width, which is detected at the 6.1σ significance level. This confirms the trend previously observed in a much smaller sample by Wolfe & Prochaska (1998). The best-fit linear relation is [X/H]=1.55(± 0.12)logΔ V -4.33(± 0.23), with Δ V expressed in km s-1. The slope of the DLA velocity-metallicity relation is the same within uncertainties between the higher (z_abs>2.43) and the lower (z_abs≤ 2.43) redshift halves of our sample. However, the two populations of systems are statistically different. There is a strong redshift evolution in the sense that the median metallicity and median velocity width increase with decreasing redshift. We argue that the existence of a DLA velocity-metallicity correlation, over more than a factor of 100 spread in metallicity, is probably the consequence of an underlying mass-metallicity relation for the galaxies responsible for DLA absorption lines. Assuming a simple linear scaling of the galaxy luminosity with the mass of the dark-matter halo, we find that the slope of the DLA velocity-metallicity relation is consistent with that of the luminosity-metallicity relation derived for local galaxies. If the galaxy dynamical mass is indeed the dominant factor setting up the observed DLA velocity-metallicity correlation, then the DLA systems exhibiting the lowest metallicities among the DLA population should, on average, be associated with galaxies of lower masses (e.g., gas-rich dwarf galaxies). In turn

  6. Borromean halo, Tango halo, and halo isomers in atomic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izosimov, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Structure of the ground and excited states in halo-like nuclei is discussed. Both the Borromean and tango halo types can be observed for n-p configurations of atomic nuclei.Structure of the halo may be different for the different levels and resonances in atomic nuclei. Isobar analog, double isobar analog, configuration, and double configuration states can simultaneously have n-n, n-p, and p-p halo components in their wave functions. When the halo structure of the excited state differs from that of the ground state, or the ground state has non-halo structure, the γ-transition from the excited state to the ground state can be essentially hindered, i.e. the formation of a specific type of isomers (halo isomers) becomes possible. B(Mγ) and B(Eγ) values for γ-transitions in 6,7,8Li, 8,9,10Be, 8,10,11B, 10,11,12,13,14C, 13,14,15,16,17N, 15,16,17,19O, and 17F are analyzed. Special attention is given to nuclei which ground state does not exhibit halo structure but the excited state (halo isomer) may have one.

  7. Contrast Between 1992 and 1997 High Latitude Spring Haloe Observations of Lower Stratospheric HCl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglass, A. R.; Kawa, S. R.

    1998-01-01

    HCl measurements from HALOE in the northern hemisphere during mid-May 1997 revealed vortex fragments in which the chlorine reservoir partitioning was strongly pushed toward HCl (approx. 90% HCl, approx. 10% ClONO2), similar to partitioning previously observed in the Antarctic vortex region. In contrast, observations of ClONO2 and HCl in the northern polar spring, 1992, and in other years, show these species established the balance typical for gas phase photochemical reactions in this region (approx. 60% HCl, approx. 40% ClONO2). Annually, chlorine reservoirs in the winter lower stratosphere polar vortex are converted to chlorine radicals via heterogeneous reactions on particle surfaces at very cold temperatures (less than about 200 K). As temperatures warm in spring, the heterogeneous processes become insignificant compared with gas phase reactions, and the chlorine reservoirs are reformed. Measurements through the northern winter/spring in 1992 show rapid formation of ClONO2, followed by steady loss of ClONO2 and increasing HCl. Although ClONO2 measurements are not available for 1997, the HCl increase in 1997 is observed to be much more rapid and the eventual HCl mixing ratio is about 50% greater than that of 1992. The observations are examined through comparison with the Goddard three-dimensional chemistry and transport model. This model utilizes winds and temperatures from the Goddard Earth Observing System Data Assimilation System and a complete integration scheme for stratospheric photochemistry. Analysis of the evolution of HCl and ClONO2 shows that the observed difference in the overall rate of HCl formation is explained by the sensitivity of the gas-phase chemistry to the ozone mixing ratio and the temperature. The results show that the model accurately simulates HCl and ClONO2 evolution during these two winters. Model validity is further supported by comparisons with O3 and reactive nitrogen species NO and NO2. This analysis provides a sensitive test of

  8. COSMIC VORTICITY AND THE ORIGIN HALO SPINS

    SciTech Connect

    Libeskind, Noam I.; Steinmetz, Matthias; Gottloeber, Stefan; Hess, Steffen; Hoffman, Yehuda; Knebe, Alexander

    2013-04-01

    In the standard model of cosmology, structure emerges out of a non-rotational flow and the angular momentum of collapsing halos is induced by tidal torques. The growth of angular momentum in the linear and quasi-linear phases is associated with a shear, curl-free, flow and it is well described within the linear framework of tidal torque theory (TTT). However, TTT ceases to be applicable as halos approach turnaround when their ambient flow field becomes rotational. Subsequently, halos become embedded in a vortical flow field and the growth of their angular momentum is affected by the vorticity of their ambient velocity field. Using a cosmological simulation, we have examined the importance of the curl of the velocity field in determining halo spin, finding a significant alignment between the two: the vorticity tends to be perpendicular to the axis of the fastest collapse of the velocity shear tensor (e{sub 1}). This is independent of halo masses and cosmic web environment. Our results agree with previous findings on the tendency of halo spin to be perpendicular to e{sub 1}, and of the spin of (simulated) halos and (observed) galaxies to be aligned with the large-scale structure. It follows that angular momentum growth proceeds in two distinct phases. First, the angular momentum emerges out of a shear, curl-free, potential flow, as described by TTT. In the second phase, in which halos approach virialization, the angular momentum emerges out of a vortical flow and halo spin becomes partially aligned with the vorticity of the ambient flow field.

  9. High-speed non-intrusive measurements of fuel velocity fields at high-pressure injectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gürtler, Johannes; Schlüßler, Raimund; Fischer, Andreas; Czarske, Jürgen

    2017-03-01

    Using a single high-speed camera and a frequency modulated laser, a novel approach is presented for fast velocity field measurements in unsteady spray flows. The velocity range is from zero up to several 100 m/s, which requires a high measurement rate and a large dynamic. Typically, flow measurements require to seed tracer particles to the fluid. A paradigm shift to seeding-free measurements is presented. The light scattered at the phase boundaries of the fluid droplets is evaluated. In order to validate the high-speed measurement system, a detailed uncertainty analysis is performed by means of measurements as well as simulations. Thereby, variations of the scattered light intensity, which are based on the high temporal velocity gradients, are found to be the main contribution to the uncertainty. The eventually measurement results, obtained at a measurement rate of 500 kHz, exhibit spray velocities ranging from 0 m/s up to 400 m/s in less than 1 ms, and the detection of unsteady and irregular flow phenomena with a characteristic time of several μs is achieved. This demonstrates the high measurement rate, the high temporal resolution and the large measurement range of the proposed high-speed measurement system.

  10. A box full of chocolates: The rich structure of the nearby stellar halo revealed by Gaia and RAVE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmi, Amina; Veljanoski, Jovan; Breddels, Maarten A.; Tian, Hao; Sales, Laura V.

    2017-01-01

    Context. The hierarchical structure formation model predicts that stellar halos should form, at least partly, via mergers. If this was a predominant formation channel for the Milky Way's halo, imprints of this merger history in the form of moving groups or streams should also exist in the vicinity of the Sun. Aims: We study the kinematics of halo stars in the Solar neighbourhood using the very recent first data release from the Gaia mission, and in particular the TGAS dataset, in combination with data from the RAVE survey. Our aim is to determine the amount of substructure present in the phase-space distribution of halo stars that could be linked to merger debris. Methods: To characterise kinematic substructure, we measured the velocity correlation function in our sample of halo (low-metallicity) stars. We also studied the distribution of these stars in the space of energy and two components of the angular momentum, in what we call "integrals of motion" space. Results: The velocity correlation function reveals substructure in the form of an excess of pairs of stars with similar velocities, well above that expected for a smooth distribution. Comparison to cosmological simulations of the formation of stellar halos indicates that the levels found are consistent with the Galactic halo having been built solely via accretion. Similarly, the distribution of stars in the space of integrals of motion is highly complex. A strikingly high fraction (from 58% up to more than 73%) of the stars that are somewhat less bound than the Sun are on (highly) retrograde orbits. A simple comparison to Milky Way-mass galaxies in cosmological hydrodynamical simulations suggests that less than 1% have such prominently retrograde outer halos. We also identify several other statistically significant structures in integrals of motion space that could potentially be related to merger events.

  11. Probing the Truncation of Galaxy Dark Matter Halos in High-Density Environments from Hydrodynamical N-Body Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limousin, Marceau; Sommer-Larsen, Jesper; Natarajan, Priyamvada; Milvang-Jensen, Bo

    2009-05-01

    We analyze high-resolution, N-body hydrodynamical simulations of fiducial galaxy clusters to probe tidal stripping of the dark matter subhalos. These simulations include a prescription for star formation allowing us to track the fate of the stellar component as well. We investigate the effect of tidal stripping on cluster galaxies hosted in these dark matter subhalos as a function of projected cluster-centric radius. To quantify the extent of the dark matter halos of cluster galaxies, we introduce the half-mass radius r 1/2 as a diagnostic, and study its evolution with projected cluster-centric distance R as a function of redshift. We find a well-defined trend for (r 1/2, R): the closer the galaxies are to the center of the cluster, the smaller the half-mass radius. Interestingly, this trend is inferred in all redshift frames examined in this work ranging from z = 0 to z = 0.7. At z = 0, galaxy halos in the central regions of clusters are found to be highly truncated, with the most compact half-mass radius of 10 kpc. We also find that r 1/2 depends on luminosity and we present scaling relations of r 1/2 with galaxy luminosity. The corresponding total mass of the cluster galaxies is also found to increase with projected cluster-centric distance and luminosity, but with more scatter than the (r 1/2, R) trend. Comparing the distribution of stellar mass to total mass for cluster galaxies, we find that the dark matter component is preferentially stripped, whereas the stellar component is much less affected by tidal forces. We compare these results with galaxy-galaxy lensing probes of r 1/2 and find qualitative agreement. Future surveys with space-based telescopes such as DUNE and SNAP, that combine wide-field and high-resolution imaging, will be able to probe the predicted (r 1/2, R) relation observationally.

  12. Self-Interacting Dark Matter Halos and the Gravothermal Catastrophe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balberg, Shmuel; Shapiro, Stuart L.; Inagaki, Shogo

    2002-04-01

    We study the evolution of an isolated spherical halo of self-interacting dark matter (SIDM) in the gravothermal fluid formalism. We show that the thermal relaxation time tr of an SIDM halo with the central density and velocity dispersion of a typical dwarf galaxy is significantly shorter than its age. We find a self-similar solution for the evolution of an SIDM halo in the limit where the mean free path between collisions, λ, is longer than the gravitational scale height H everywhere. Typical halos formed in this long mean free path regime relax to a quasi-stationary gravothermal density profile characterized by a nearly homogeneous core and a power-law halo where ρ~r-2.19. We solve the more general time-dependent problem and show that the contracting core evolves to sufficiently high density that λ inevitably becomes smaller than H in the innermost region. The core undergoes secular collapse to a singular state (the ``gravothermal catastrophe'') in a time tcoll~290tr, which is longer than the Hubble time for a typical dark matter-dominated galaxy core at the present epoch. Our model calculations are consistent with previous more detailed N-body simulations for SIDM, providing a simple physical interpretation of their results and extending them to higher spatial resolution and longer evolution times. At late times, mass loss from the contracting dense inner core to the ambient halo is significantly moderated, so that the final mass of the inner core may be appreciable when it becomes relativistic and radially unstable to dynamical collapse to a black hole.

  13. Predicting High Explosive Detonation Velocities from Their Composition and Structure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-09-01

    for a gamut of ideal explosives. The explosives ranged from nitroaromatics, cyclic and linear nitramines, nitrate esters and nitro-nitrato...structure is postulated for a gamut of explosives. Since detonation velocity, DQ, is density dependent, the linear regression plot. Figure 1, of the

  14. Results on fibre scrambling for high accuracy radial velocity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avila, Gerardo; Singh, Paul; Chazelas, Bruno

    2010-07-01

    We present in this paper experimental data on fibres and scramblers to increase the photometrical stability of the spectrograph PSF. We have used round, square, octagonal fibres and beam homogenizers. This study is aimed to enhance the accuracy measurements of the radial velocities for ESO ESPRESSO (VLT) and CODEX (E-ELT) instruments.

  15. Low inlet gas velocity high throughput biomass gasifier

    DOEpatents

    Feldmann, Herman F.; Paisley, Mark A.

    1989-01-01

    The present invention discloses a novel method of operating a gasifier for production of fuel gas from carbonaceous fuels. The process disclosed enables operating in an entrained mode using inlet gas velocities of less than 7 feet per second, feedstock throughputs exceeding 4000 lbs/ft.sup.2 -hr, and pressures below 100 psia.

  16. Treatment Protocol for High Velocity/High Energy Gunshot Injuries to the Face

    PubMed Central

    Peled, Micha; Leiser, Yoav; Emodi, Omri; Krausz, Amir

    2011-01-01

    Major causes of facial combat injuries include blasts, high-velocity/high-energy missiles, and low-velocity missiles. High-velocity bullets fired from assault rifles encompass special ballistic properties, creating a transient cavitation space with a small entrance wound and a much larger exit wound. There is no dispute regarding the fact that primary emergency treatment of ballistic injuries to the face commences in accordance with the current advanced trauma life support (ATLS) recommendations; the main areas in which disputes do exist concern the question of the timing, sequence, and modes of surgical treatment. The aim of the present study is to present the treatment outcome of high-velocity/high-energy gunshot injuries to the face, using a protocol based on the experience of a single level I trauma center. A group of 23 injured combat soldiers who sustained bullet and shrapnel injuries to the maxillofacial region during a 3-week regional military conflict were evaluated in this study. Nine patients met the inclusion criteria (high-velocity/high-energy injuries) and were included in the study. According to our protocol, upon arrival patients underwent endotracheal intubation and were hemodynamically stabilized in the shock-trauma unit and underwent total-body computed tomography with 3-D reconstruction of the head and neck and computed tomography angiography. All patients underwent maxillofacial surgery upon the day of arrival according to the protocol we present. In view of our treatment outcomes, results, and low complication rates, we conclude that strict adherence to a well-founded and structured treatment protocol based on clinical experience is mandatory in providing efficient, appropriate, and successful treatment to a relatively large group of patients who sustain various degrees of maxillofacial injuries during a short period of time. PMID:23449809

  17. MRK 1216 and NGC 1277 - an orbit-based dynamical analysis of compact, high-velocity dispersion galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yıldırım, Akın; van den Bosch, Remco C. E.; van de Ven, Glenn; Husemann, Bernd; Lyubenova, Mariya; Walsh, Jonelle L.; Gebhardt, Karl; Gültekin, Kayhan

    2015-09-01

    We present a dynamical analysis to infer the structural parameters and properties of the two nearby, compact, high-velocity dispersion galaxies MRK 1216 and NGC 1277. Combining deep Hubble Space Telescope imaging, wide-field integral field unit stellar kinematics, and complementary long-slit spectroscopic data out to three effective radii, we construct orbit-based models to constrain their black hole masses, dark matter content and stellar mass-to-light ratios. We obtain a black hole mass of log(M•/M⊙) = 10.1_{-0.2}^{+0.1} for NGC 1277 and an upper limit of log(M•/M⊙) = 10.0 for MRK 1216, within 99.7 per cent (3σ) confidence. The stellar mass-to-light ratios span a range of ΥV = 6.5_{-1.5}^{+1.5} in NGC 1277 and ΥH = 1.8_{-0.8}^{+0.5} in MRK 1216 and are in good agreement with single stellar population models of a single power-law Salpeter initial mass function. Even though our models do not place strong constraints on the dark halo parameters, they suggest that dark matter is a necessary ingredient in MRK 1216, with a dark matter contribution of 22^{+30}_{-20} per cent to the total mass budget within one effective radius. NGC 1277, on the other hand, can be reproduced without the need for a dark halo, and a maximal dark matter fraction of 13 per cent within the same radial extent. In addition, we investigate the orbital structures of both galaxies, which are rotationally supported and consistent with photometric multi-Sérsic decompositions, indicating that these compact objects do not host classical, non-rotating bulges formed during recent (z ≤ 2) dissipative events or through violent relaxation. Finally, both MRK 1216 and NGC 1277 are anisotropic, with a global anisotropy parameter δ of 0.33 and 0.58, respectively. While MRK 1216 follows the trend of fast-rotating, oblate galaxies with a flattened velocity dispersion tensor in the meridional plane of the order of βz ˜ δ, NGC 1277 is highly tangentially anisotropic and seems to belong

  18. High-resolution OH LIF velocity measurement technique for high-speed reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klavuhn, K. G.; Gauba, G.; Mcdaniel, J. C.

    1992-01-01

    A nonintrusive optical technique was developed for the quantitative study of velocity fields in steady, high-speed, reacting flows. A narrow-linewidth laser source was tuned through an isolated OH absorption line to measure the Doppler-shifted linecenter frequency relative to an iodine reference line. A counterpropagating beam approach was used to eliminate collisional impact shift effects. Pointwise measurements of velocity were made in a unique reacting underexpanded jet facility as an extensive calibration of the technique over a wide range of flow conditions. The extension of the technique to planar measurements is also discussed.

  19. Constraining the Cosmic Ray Electron Distribution and the Halo Dark Matter from the High Energy Gamma-Ray Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chary, R.; Wright, E. L.

    2000-10-01

    We present an independent estimate of the high latitude (|b|>20 deg) contribution to the E>30 MeV gamma-ray background from Galactic nucleon-nucleon, electron bremsstrahlung and inverse Compton processes. In particular, the inverse Compton contribution has been estimated for different cosmic ray electron distributions and after factoring in the anisotropy in the interstellar radiation field and the anisotropic Klein-Nishina scattering cross section. We find that the emission from the inverse Compton process when the anisotropy in the radiation field is included can be higher by up to 50% when compared to estimates that adopt an isotropic radiation field. Simulated inverse Compton maps with a cosmic ray electron distribution represented by a ``pill box'' extending up to a distance of 5 kpc above the Galactic plane provide better fits to the EGRET intensity maps suggesting that the cosmic ray halo may be larger than previously thought. Fitting for the Galactic components of gamma-ray emission confirms the existence of an isotropic component with an intensity that can be represented by the form 27.7*(E/MeV)-2.16 ph m-2 s-1 sr-1 MeV-1, in excellent agreement with previous estimates. The spectrum of the isotropic component further argues strongly in favor of unresolved gamma-ray blazars being the source of this emission. Introduction of an anisotropic component improves the quality of the fits. However, this component, which could potentially arise from the dark matter in the Galactic halo, is not well characterized by a single power law which might be associated with any single dark matter candidate. It has an intensity of about a third of the isotropic background above E > 100 MeV at the level of 3*10-2 ph m-2 s-1 sr-1. The best fit power law spectrum to this component has a photon index of -1.7. Based on the intensity and spectrum of the anisotropic component we derive upper limits of 109Msun for the mass of cold, baryonic gas within the solar circle and a primordial

  20. Present-day Galactic Evolution: Low-metallicity, Warm, Ionized Gas Inflow Associated with High-velocity Cloud Complex A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barger, K. A.; Haffner, L. M.; Wakker, B. P.; Hill, Alex. S.; Madsen, G. J.; Duncan, A. K.

    2012-12-01

    The high-velocity cloud Complex A is a probe of the physical conditions in the Galactic halo. The kinematics, morphology, distance, and metallicity of Complex A indicate that it represents new material that is accreting onto the Galaxy. We present Wisconsin Hα Mapper kinematically resolved observations of Complex A over the velocity range of -250 to -50 km s-1 in the local standard of rest reference frame. These observations include the first full Hα intensity map of Complex A across (\\mathit {l, b}) = (124{^\\circ }, 18{^\\circ }) to (171°, 53°) and deep targeted observations in Hα, [S II] λ6716, [N II] λ6584, and [O I] λ6300 toward regions with high H I column densities, background quasars, and stars. The Hα data imply that the masses of neutral and ionized material in the cloud are similar, both being greater than 106 M ⊙. We find that the Bland-Hawthorn & Maloney model for the intensity of the ionizing radiation near the Milky Way is consistent with the known distance of the high-latitude part of Complex A and an assumed cloud geometry that puts the lower-latitude parts of the cloud at a distance of 7-8 kpc. This compatibility implies a 5% ionizing photon escape fraction from the Galactic disk. We also provide the nitrogen and sulfur upper abundance solutions for a series of temperatures, metallicities, and cloud configurations for purely photoionized gas; these solutions are consistent with the sub-solar abundances found by previous studies, especially for temperatures above 104 K or for gas with a high fraction of singly ionized nitrogen and sulfur.

  1. Optical Doppler tomographic imaging of fluid flow velocity in highly scattering media

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Z.; Milner, T.E.; Dave, D.; Nelson, J.S.

    1997-01-01

    An optical Doppler tomography (ODT) system that permits imaging of fluid flow velocity in highly scattering media is described. ODT combines Doppler velocimetry with the high spatial resolution of low-coherence optical interferometry to measure fluid flow velocity at discrete spatial locations. Tomographic imaging of particle flow velocity within a circular conduit submerged 1mm below the surface in a highly scattering phantom of Intralipid is demonstrated. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital Optical Society of America}

  2. Vortex shedding flow meter performance at high flow velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegwarth, J. D.

    1986-01-01

    In some of the ducts of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME), the maximum liquid oxygen flow velocities approach 10 times those at which liquid flow measurements are normally made. The hydrogen gas flow velocities in other ducts exceed the maximum for gas flow measurement by more than a factor of 3. The results presented here show from water flow tests that vortex shedding flow meters of the appropriate design can measure water flow to velocities in excess of 55 m/s, which is a Reynolds number of about 2 million. Air flow tests have shown that the same meter can measure flow to a Reynolds number of at least 22 million. Vortex shedding meters were installed in two of the SSME ducts and tested with water flow. Narrow spectrum lines were obtained and the meter output frequencies were proportional to flow to + or - 0.5% or better over the test range with no flow conditioning, even though the ducts had multiple bends preceeding the meter location. Meters with the shedding elements only partially spanning the pipe and some meters with ring shaped shedding elements were also tested.

  3. Preliminary results for an aeromagnetic survey flown over Italy using the HALO (High Altitude and LOng range) research aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesur, V.; Gebler, A.; Schachtschneider, R.

    2012-12-01

    In June 2012 the GEOHALO mission was flown over Italy using the high altitude and long-range German research aircraft HALO (Gulfstream jet - G550). One goal of the mission was to demonstrate the feasibility of using geodetic and geophysical instrumentation on such fast flying aircraft. Several types of data were acquired including gravity, GNSS signals (reflectometry, spectrometry and occultation), laser altimetry and magnetic data. The magnetic data were collected through two independent acquisition chains placed inside under-wing containers. Each chain included a total intensity cesium magnetometer, a three-component fluxgate magnetometer, several temperature censors and a digitizer. Magnetic and temperature data were collected at a 10 Hz sampling rate. Seven parallel profiles, each around 1000 km long, were flown over the Apennine peninsula from north-west to south-east. The flight altitude was about 3500 m and the survey line spacing around 40 km. These long profiles were complemented by four crossing profiles, and a repeated flight line at a higher altitude (approx. 10500 m). The ground speed during the flight was generally around 125 m/s (450 km/h). The output from the first steps of the magnetic data processing will be shown. The measured magnetic data appear to be consistent with the expected signal.

  4. ULTRA-COMPACT HIGH VELOCITY CLOUDS AS MINIHALOS AND DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Faerman, Yakov; Sternberg, Amiel; McKee, Christopher F.

    2013-11-10

    We present dark matter minihalo models for the Ultra-Compact, High-Velocity H I Clouds (UCHVCs) recently discovered in the 21 cm ALFALFA survey. We assume gravitational confinement of 10{sup 4} K H I gas by flat-cored dark-matter subhalos within the Local Group. We show that for flat cores, typical (median) tidally stripped cosmological subhalos at redshift z = 0 have dark-matter masses of ∼10{sup 7} M{sub ☉} within the central 300 pc (independent of total halo mass), consistent with the 'Strigari mass scale' observed in low-luminosity dwarf galaxies. Flat-cored subhalos also resolve the mass discrepancy between simulated and observed satellites around the Milky Way. For the UCHVCs, we calculate the photoionization-limited hydrostatic gas profiles for any distance-dependent total observed H I mass and predict the associated (projected) H I half-mass radii, assuming the clouds are embedded in distant (d ∼> 300 kpc) and unstripped subhalos. For a typical UCHVC (0.9 Jy km s{sup –1}), we predict physical H I half-mass radii of 0.18 to 0.35 kpc (or angular sizes of 0.'6 to 2.'1) for distances ranging from 300 kpc to 2 Mpc. As a consistency check, we model the gas-rich dwarf galaxy Leo T, for which there is a well-resolved H I column density profile and a known distance (420 kpc). For Leo T, we find that a subhalo with M{sub 300} = 8 (± 0.2) × 10{sup 6} M{sub ☉} best fits the observed H I profile. We derive an upper limit of P{sub HIM} ∼< 150 cm{sup –3} K for the pressure of any enveloping hot intergalactic medium gas at the distance of Leo T. Our analysis suggests that some of the UCHVCs may in fact constitute a population of 21 cm-selected but optically faint dwarf galaxies in the Local Group.

  5. The prodigious halo of the other Huygens.

    PubMed

    Können, Gunther P

    2015-02-01

    At the height of the ceremony in the Principality of Orange of the restoration of the sovereignty of the House of Nassau in 1665, a ceremony led by Christiaan's father, Constantijn Huygens, a "solar crown" appeared in the sky, apparently a divine sign of approval. A nearly forgotten contemporary color engraving of this miraculous event has survived. Constantijn seized the opportunity by using to his advantage the general euphoria among the citizens caused by the appearance. We argue that Constantijn knew exactly what was going on in the sky because of his son's work on halo theory. Given its brightness and its time of appearance, it seems plausible that the most prominent halo in the Orange halo display was a circumscribed halo rather than the more familiar but bleaker circular 22° halo. The same probably holds for most of the other high-sun halos that caused general consternation, dating from the Octavian halo of 44 BC, to the Chernobyl halo of 1986, and indeed up to bright high-sun halos of the present.

  6. Halo Star Lithium Depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Pinsonneault, M. H.; Walker, T. P.; Steigman, G.; Narayanan, Vijay K.

    1999-12-10

    stars. A maximum of 0.4 dex depletion is set by the observed dispersion and 6Li/7Li depletion ratio, and a minimum of 0.2 dex depletion is required by both the presence of highly overdepleted halo stars and consistency with the solar and open cluster 7Li data. The cosmological implications of these bounds on the primordial abundance of 7Li are discussed. (c) (c) 1999. The American Astronomical Society.

  7. Halo modelling in chameleon theories

    SciTech Connect

    Lombriser, Lucas; Koyama, Kazuya; Li, Baojiu E-mail: kazuya.koyama@port.ac.uk

    2014-03-01

    We analyse modelling techniques for the large-scale structure formed in scalar-tensor theories of constant Brans-Dicke parameter which match the concordance model background expansion history and produce a chameleon suppression of the gravitational modification in high-density regions. Thereby, we use a mass and environment dependent chameleon spherical collapse model, the Sheth-Tormen halo mass function and linear halo bias, the Navarro-Frenk-White halo density profile, and the halo model. Furthermore, using the spherical collapse model, we extrapolate a chameleon mass-concentration scaling relation from a ΛCDM prescription calibrated to N-body simulations. We also provide constraints on the model parameters to ensure viability on local scales. We test our description of the halo mass function and nonlinear matter power spectrum against the respective observables extracted from large-volume and high-resolution N-body simulations in the limiting case of f(R) gravity, corresponding to a vanishing Brans-Dicke parameter. We find good agreement between the two; the halo model provides a good qualitative description of the shape of the relative enhancement of the f(R) matter power spectrum with respect to ΛCDM caused by the extra attractive gravitational force but fails to recover the correct amplitude. Introducing an effective linear power spectrum in the computation of the two-halo term to account for an underestimation of the chameleon suppression at intermediate scales in our approach, we accurately reproduce the measurements from the N-body simulations.

  8. "Invisible" Galactic Halos.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lugt, Karel Vander

    1993-01-01

    Develops a simple core-halo model of a galaxy that exhibits the main features of observed rotation curves and quantitatively illustrates the need to postulate halos of dark matter. Uses only elementary mechanics. (Author/MVL)

  9. Cold dark matter. 2: Spatial and velocity statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelb, James M.; Bertschinger, Edmund

    1994-01-01

    We examine high-resolution gravitational N-body simulations of the omega = 1 cold dark matter (CDM) model in order to determine whether there is any normalization of the initial density fluctuation spectrum that yields acceptable results for galaxy clustering and velocities. Dense dark matter halos in the evolved mass distribution are identified with luminous galaxies; the most massive halos are also considered as sites for galaxy groups, with a range of possibilities explored for the group mass-to-light ratios. We verify the earlier conclusions of White et al. (1987) for the low-amplitude (high-bias) CDM model-the galaxy correlation function is marginally acceptable but that there are too many galaxies. We also show that the peak biasing method does not accurately reproduce the results obtained using dense halos identified in the simulations themselves. The Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) anisotropy implies a higher normalization, resulting in problems with excessive pairwise galaxy velocity dispersion unless a strong velocity bias is present. Although we confirm the strong velocity bias of halos reported by Couchman & Carlberg (1992), we show that the galaxy motions are still too large on small scales. We find no amplitude for which the CDM model can reconcile simultaneously and galaxy correlation function, the low pairwise velocity dispersion, and the richness distribution of groups and clusters. With the normalization implied by COBE, the CDM spectrum has too much power on small scales if omega = 1.

  10. Cold dark matter. 2: Spatial and velocity statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelb, James M.; Bertschinger, Edmund

    1994-12-01

    We examine high-resolution gravitational N-body simulations of the omega = 1 cold dark matter (CDM) model in order to determine whether there is any normalization of the initial density fluctuation spectrum that yields acceptable results for galaxy clustering and velocities. Dense dark matter halos in the evolved mass distribution are identified with luminous galaxies; the most massive halos are also considered as sites for galaxy groups, with a range of possibilities explored for the group mass-to-light ratios. We verify the earlier conclusions of White et al. (1987) for the low-amplitude (high-bias) CDM model-the galaxy correlation function is marginally acceptable but that there are too many galaxies. We also show that the peak biasing method does not accurately reproduce the results obtained using dense halos identified in the simulations themselves. The Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) anisotropy implies a higher normalization, resulting in problems with excessive pairwise galaxy velocity dispersion unless a strong velocity bias is present. Although we confirm the strong velocity bias of halos reported by Couchman & Carlberg (1992), we show that the galaxy motions are still too large on small scales. We find no amplitude for which the CDM model can reconcile simultaneously and galaxy correlation function, the low pairwise velocity dispersion, and the richness distribution of groups and clusters. With the normalization implied by COBE, the CDM spectrum has too much power on small scales if omega = 1.

  11. The kinematics of globular clusters systems in the outer halos of the Aquarius simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veljanoski, J.; Helmi, A.

    2016-07-01

    Stellar halos and globular cluster (GC) systems contain valuable information regarding the assembly history of their host galaxies. Motivated by the detection of a significant rotation signal in the outer halo GC system of M 31, we investigate the likelihood of detecting such a rotation signal in projection, using cosmological simulations. To this end we select subsets of tagged particles in the halos of the Aquarius simulations to represent mock GC systems, and analyse their kinematics. We find that GC systems can exhibit a non-negligible rotation signal provided the associated stellar halo also has a net angular momentum. The ability to detect this rotation signal is highly dependent on the viewing perspective, and the probability of seeing a signal larger than that measured in M 31 ranges from 10% to 90% for the different halos in the Aquarius suite. High values are found from a perspective such that the projected angular momentum of the GC system is within ≲40 deg of the rotation axis determined via the projected positions and line-of-sight velocities of the GCs. Furthermore, the true 3D angular momentum of the outer stellar halo is relatively well aligned, within 35 deg, with that of the mock GC systems. We argue that the net angular momentum in the mock GC systems arises naturally when the majority of the material is accreted from a preferred direction, namely along the dominant dark matter filament of the large-scale structure that the halos are embedded in. This, together with the favourable edge-on view of M 31's disk suggests that it is not a coincidence that a large rotation signal has been measured for its outer halo GC system.

  12. Evolution of Dwarf Spheroidal Satellites in the Common Surface-density Dark Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okayasu, Yusuke; Chiba, Masashi

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the growth histories of dark matter halos associated with dwarf satellites in Local Group galaxies and the resultant evolution of the baryonic component. Our model is based on the recently proposed property that the mean surface density of a dark halo inside a radius at maximum circular velocity {V}{{\\max }} is universal over a large range of {V}{{\\max }}. Given that a surface density of 20 M ⊙ pc-2 well explains dwarf satellites in the Milky Way and Andromeda, we find that the evolution of the dark halo in this common surface-density scale is characterized by the rapid increase of the halo mass assembled by the redshift {z}{{TT}} of the tidal truncation by its host halo, at early epochs of {z}{{TT}}≳ 6 or {V}{{\\max }}≲ 22 km s-1. This mass growth of the halo is slow at lower {z}{{TT}} or larger {V}{{\\max }}. Taking into account the baryon content in this dark halo evolution, under the influence of the ionizing background radiation, we find that the dwarf satellites are divided into roughly two families: those with {V}{{\\max }}≲ 22 km s-1 having high star formation efficiency and those with larger {V}{{\\max }} having less efficient star formation. This semianalytical model is in agreement with the high-resolution numerical simulation for galaxy formation and with the observed star formation histories for Fornax and Leo II. This suggests that the evolution of a dark halo may play a key role in understanding star formation histories in dwarf satellites.

  13. High- and low-temperature-stable thermite composition for producing high-pressure, high-velocity gases

    DOEpatents

    Halcomb, Danny L.; Mohler, Jonathan H.

    1990-10-16

    A high- and low-temperature-stable thermite composition for producing high-pressure and high-velocity gases comprises an oxidizable metal, an oxidizing reagent, and a high-temperature-stable gas-producing additive selected from the group consisting of metal carbides and metal nitrides.

  14. Scaling rule for target ionization by highly charged ions at low-to-intermediate velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, W.; Deveney, E. F.; Datz, S.; Desai, D. D.; Krause, H. F.; Sanders, J. M.; Vane, C. R.; Cocke, C. L.; Giese, J. P.

    1996-04-01

    Cross sections for ionization of He by highly charged Clq+, Cuq+, and Iq+ (q=6-10) impact at velocities from 1.6 to 3.1 a.u. were measured. These results are compared with other experimental and theoretical results available over a wide velocity range. A universal scaling rule for target ionization by nearly bare, highly charged ions at low to intermediate velocities (0.2-3.5 a.u.) is reported.

  15. Space-time and Spectral Structures of Sprite Halos Obtained from High-speed Photometric and Imaging Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyasato, R.; Fukunishi, H.; Taylor, M. J.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.

    2001-12-01

    We carried out optical observations of lightning-induced luminous events at Yucca Ridge Field Station, Colorado, USA, from 1996 to 2000, using two multi-anode array photometers (MAP), an image intensified CCD cameras and other optical instruments. The MAP has 16 channels aligned vertically and each channel has a field-of-view of 0.67x10.75 degrees. Consequently, the total size of field-of-view is 10.75x10.75 degrees. The time resolution of MAP is 50 microseconds so that we can detect temporal and spatial structures of sprite halo emissions. The two MAPs are equipped with different color filters, red (380-500 nm) for mesurement of N2 1st positive band and N2+ Meinel band, and blue (560-800 nm) for mesurement of N2 2nd positive band and N2+ 1st negative band, respectively. Using data obtained from these instruments, we estimated the altitude range and the horizontal extent of sprite halos. Sprite halos move downward as focusing into the center of diffuse glows. It is found that the starting and ending altitudes are about 83 and 67 km, respectively, on average, and that the mean speed of downward motion is about 1/6 of the light speed. On the other hand, the estimated horizontal extent of sprite halos are about 40 - 110 km with a mean value of 78 km. A mean duration of sprite halos is found to be about 1 ms. Using the ratios of blue to red siganls obtained from two MAPs during the SPRITES'99 campaign, we estimated the energies of electrons inducing sprite halo emissions by assuming a more realistic non-Mawellian energy distribution as well as a standard Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution. Futhermore, we calculated the charge moments of causative CGs using NLDN data and investigated the relationship between the charge moments of causative CGs and the time delays from VLF sferics to the onset of sprite halos. By comparing the observational results with the model calculation presented by Barrington-Leigh et al. [2000], we will discuss the generation mechanism of sprite halos.

  16. The influence of slip velocity and temperature on permeability during and after high-velocity fault slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanikawa, W.; Mukoyoshi, H.; Tadai, O.; Hirose, T.; Lin, W.

    2011-12-01

    Fluid transport properties in fault zones play an important role in dynamic processes during large earthquakes. If the permeability in a fault zone is low, high pore-fluid pressures caused by thermal pressurization (Sibson, 1973) or shear-induced compaction (Blanpied et al., 1992) can lead to an apparent reduction of fault strength. Changes in porosity and permeability of fault rocks within a fault zone during earthquakes and the subsequent progressive recovery of these properties may have a large influence on earthquake recurrence (Sleep and Blanpied, 1992). A rotary shear apparatus was used to investigate changes of fluid transport properties in a fault zone by real-time measurement of gas flow rates during and after shearing of hollow sandstone and granite cylinders at various slip rates. Our apparatus measures permeability parallel to the slip plane in both the slip zone and wall rocks. In all cases, permeability decreased rapidly with an increase of friction, but recovered soon after slip, reaching a steady state within several tens of minutes. The rate of reduction of permeability increased with increasing slip velocity. Permeability did not recover to pre-slip levels after low-velocity tests but recovered to exceed them after high-velocity tests. Frictional heating of gases at the slip surface increased gas viscosity, which increased gas flow rate to produce an apparent permeability increase. The irreversible permeability changes of the low-velocity tests were caused by gouge formation due to wearing and smoothing of the slip surface. The increase of permeability after high-velocity tests was caused by mesoscale fracturing in response to rapid temperature rise. Changes of pore fluid viscosity contributed more to changes of flow rate than did permeability changes caused by shear deformation, although test results from different rocks and pore fluids might be different. References Blanpied, M.L., Lockner, D.A., Byerlee, J.D., 1992. An earthquake mechanism

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The SEGUE K giant survey. III. Galactic halo (Janesh+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janesh, W.; Morrison, H. L.; Ma, Z.; Rockosi, C.; Starkenburg, E.; Xue, X. X.; Rix, H.-W.; Harding, P.; Beers, T. C.; Johnson, J.; Lee, Y. S.; Schneider, D. P.

    2016-03-01

    We statistically quantify the amount of substructure in the Milky Way stellar halo using a sample of 4568 halo K giant stars at Galactocentric distances ranging over 5-125kpc. These stars have been selected photometrically and confirmed spectroscopically as K giants from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey's Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration (SEGUE) project. Using a position-velocity clustering estimator (the 4distance) and a model of a smooth stellar halo, we quantify the amount of substructure in the halo, divided by distance and metallicity. Overall, we find that the halo as a whole is highly structured. We also confirm earlier work using blue horizontal branch (BHB) stars which showed that there is an increasing amount of substructure with increasing Galactocentric radius, and additionally find that the amount of substructure in the halo increases with increasing metallicity. Comparing to resampled BHB stars, we find that K giants and BHBs have similar amounts of substructure over equivalent ranges of Galactocentric radius. Using a friends-of-friends algorithm to identify members of individual groups, we find that a large fraction (~33%) of grouped stars are associated with Sgr, and identify stars belonging to other halo star streams: the Orphan Stream, the Cetus Polar Stream, and others, including previously unknown substructures. A large fraction of sample K giants (more than 50%) are not grouped into any substructure. We find also that the Sgr stream strongly dominates groups in the outer halo for all except the most metal-poor stars, and suggest that this is the source of the increase of substructure with Galactocentric radius and metallicity. (2 data files).

  18. THE BLACK HOLE–DARK MATTER HALO CONNECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Sabra, Bassem M.; Saliba, Charbel; Akl, Maya Abi; Chahine, Gilbert

    2015-04-10

    We explore the connection between the central supermassive black holes (SMBH) in galaxies and the dark matter halo through the relation between the masses of the SMBHs and the maximum circular velocities of the host galaxies, as well as the relationship between stellar velocity dispersion of the spheroidal component and the circular velocity. Our assumption here is that the circular velocity is a proxy for the mass of the dark matter halo. We rely on a heterogeneous sample containing galaxies of all types. The only requirement is that the galaxy has a direct measurement of the mass of its SMBH and a direct measurement of its circular velocity and its velocity dispersion. Previous studies have analyzed the connection between the SMBH and dark matter halo through the relationship between the circular velocity and the bulge velocity dispersion, with the assumption that the bulge velocity dispersion stands in for the mass of the SMBH, via the well-established SMBH mass–bulge velocity dispersion relation. Using intermediate relations may be misleading when one is studying them to decipher the active ingredients of galaxy formation and evolution. We believe that our approach will provide a more direct probe of the SMBH and the dark matter halo connection. We find that the correlation between the mass of SMBHs and the circular velocities of the host galaxies is extremely weak, leading us to state the dark matter halo may not play a major role in regulating the black hole growth in the present Universe.

  19. Mechanical factors associated with the development of high ball velocity during an instep soccer kick.

    PubMed

    De Witt, John K; Hinrichs, Richard N

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether joint velocities and segmental angular velocities are significantly correlated with ball velocity during an instep soccer kick. We developed a deterministic model that related ball velocity to kicking leg and pelvis motion from the initiation of downswing until impact. Three-dimensional videography was used to collect data from 16 experienced male soccer players (age = 24.8 +/- 5.5 years; height = 1.80 +/- 0.07m; mass = 76.73 +/- 8.31 kg) while kicking a stationary soccer ball into a goal 12 m away with their right foot with maximal effort. We found that impact velocities of the foot center of mass (CM), the impact velocity of the foot CM relative to the knee, peak velocity of the knee relative to the hip, and the peak angular thigh velocity were significantly correlated with ball velocity. These data suggest that linear and angular velocities at and prior to impact are critical to developing high ball velocity. Since events prior to impact are critical for kick success, coordination and summation of speeds throughout the kicking motion are important factors. Segmental coordination that occurs during a maximal effort kick is critical for completing a successful kick.

  20. Turbulence velocity profiling for high sensitivity and vertical-resolution atmospheric characterization with Stereo-SCIDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborn, J.; Butterley, T.; Townson, M. J.; Reeves, A. P.; Morris, T. J.; Wilson, R. W.

    2017-02-01

    As telescopes become larger, into the era of ˜40 m Extremely Large Telescopes, the high-resolution vertical profile of the optical turbulence strength is critical for the validation, optimization and operation of optical systems. The velocity of atmospheric optical turbulence is an important parameter for several applications including astronomical adaptive optics systems. Here, we compare the vertical profile of the velocity of the atmospheric wind above La Palma by means of a comparison of Stereo-SCIntillation Detection And Ranging (Stereo-SCIDAR) with the Global Forecast System models and nearby balloon-borne radiosondes. We use these data to validate the automated optical turbulence velocity identification from the Stereo-SCIDAR instrument mounted on the 2.5 m Isaac Newton Telescope, La Palma. By comparing these data we infer that the turbulence velocity and the wind velocity are consistent and that the automated turbulence velocity identification of the Stereo-SCIDAR is precise. The turbulence velocities can be used to increase the sensitivity of the turbulence strength profiles, as weaker turbulence that may be misinterpreted as noise can be detected with a velocity vector. The turbulence velocities can also be used to increase the altitude resolution of a detected layer, as the altitude of the velocity vectors can be identified to a greater precision than the native resolution of the system. We also show examples of complex velocity structure within a turbulent layer caused by wind shear at the interface of atmospheric zones.

  1. Are High Velocity Peaks in the Milky Way Bulge due to the Bar?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhao-Yu; Shen, Juntai; Rich, R. Michael; Kunder, Andrea; Mao, Shude

    2014-04-01

    Recently the commissioning APOGEE observations of the Galactic bulge reported that a significant fraction of stars (~10%) are in a cold (σV ≈ 30 km s-1) high velocity peak (Galactocentric radial velocity ≈200 km s-1). These stars are speculated to reflect the stellar orbits in the Galactic bar. In this study, we use two N-body models of a Milky Way-like disk galaxy with different bar strengths to critically examine this possibility. The general trends of the Galactocentric radial velocity distribution in observations and simulations are similar, but neither our models nor the BRAVA data reveal a statistically significant cold high velocity peak. A Monte Carlo test further suggests that it is possible for a spurious high velocity peak to appear if there are only a limited number of stars observed. Thus, the reported cold high velocity peak, even if it is real, is unlikely due to stars on the bar-supporting orbits. Our models do predict an excess of stars with high radial velocity, but not in a distinct peak. In the distance-velocity diagram, the high velocity particles in different fields exist at a similar distance ~8.5 ± 1 kpc away from the Sun. This result may be explained by geometric intersections between the line-of-sight and the particle orbits; high velocity stars naturally exist approximately at the tangent point, without constituting a distinct peak. We further demonstrate that even without the presence of a bar structure, particle motions in an axisymmetric disk can also exhibit an excess of high velocity stars.

  2. ARE HIGH VELOCITY PEAKS IN THE MILKY WAY BULGE DUE TO THE BAR?

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhao-Yu; Shen, Juntai; Rich, R. Michael; Kunder, Andrea; Mao, Shude

    2014-04-10

    Recently the commissioning APOGEE observations of the Galactic bulge reported that a significant fraction of stars (∼10%) are in a cold (σ{sub V} ≈ 30 km s{sup –1}) high velocity peak (Galactocentric radial velocity ≈200 km s{sup –1}). These stars are speculated to reflect the stellar orbits in the Galactic bar. In this study, we use two N-body models of a Milky Way-like disk galaxy with different bar strengths to critically examine this possibility. The general trends of the Galactocentric radial velocity distribution in observations and simulations are similar, but neither our models nor the BRAVA data reveal a statistically significant cold high velocity peak. A Monte Carlo test further suggests that it is possible for a spurious high velocity peak to appear if there are only a limited number of stars observed. Thus, the reported cold high velocity peak, even if it is real, is unlikely due to stars on the bar-supporting orbits. Our models do predict an excess of stars with high radial velocity, but not in a distinct peak. In the distance-velocity diagram, the high velocity particles in different fields exist at a similar distance ∼8.5 ± 1 kpc away from the Sun. This result may be explained by geometric intersections between the line-of-sight and the particle orbits; high velocity stars naturally exist approximately at the tangent point, without constituting a distinct peak. We further demonstrate that even without the presence of a bar structure, particle motions in an axisymmetric disk can also exhibit an excess of high velocity stars.

  3. Concentrations of Simulated Dark Matter Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Child, Hillary

    2017-01-01

    We present the concentration-mass (c-M) relation of dark matter halos in two new high-volume high-resolution cosmological N-body simulations, Q Continuum and Outer Rim. Concentration describes the density of the central regions of halos; it is highest for low-mass halos at low redshift, decreasing at high mass and redshift. The shape of the c-M relation is an important probe of cosmology. We discuss the redshift dependence of the c-M relation, several different methods to determine concentrations of simulated halos, and potential sources of bias in concentration measurements. To connect to lensing observations, we stack halos, which also allows us to assess the suitability of the Navarro-Frenk-White profile and other profiles, such as Einasto, with an additional shape parameter. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. DGE-1144082.

  4. Building Halos by Digesting Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-05-01

    We think galactic halos are built through the addition of material from the smaller subhalos of satellites digested by their hosts. Though most of the stars in Milky-Way-mass halos were probably formed in situ, many were instead accumulated over time, as orbiting dwarf galaxies were torn apart and their stars flung throughout the host galaxy. A recent set of simulations has examined this brutal formation process.In the authors simulations, a subhalo first falls into the host halo. At this point, it can either survive to present day as a satellite galaxy, or it can be destroyed, its stars scattering throughout the host halo. [Deason et al. 2016]Subhalo FateThere are many open questions about the growth of Milky-Way-mass halos from the accretion of subhalos. Which subhalos are torn apart and accreted, and which ones survive intact? Are more small or large subhalos accreted? Does subhalo accretion affect the host galaxys metallicity? And what can we learn from all of this about the Milky Ways formation history?In a recently published study, a team of scientists from Stanford University and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory set out to answer these questions using a suite of 45 zoom-in simulations of Milky-Way-mass halos. Led by Alis Deason, the team tracked the accretion history of these 45 test galaxies to determine how their halos were built.Piecing Together HistoryDeason and collaborators reach several new and interesting conclusions based on the outcomes of their simulations.Average accreted stellar mass from destroyed dwarfs for each host halo, as a function of the time of the last major accretion event. More stellar mass is accreted in more recent accretion events. [Deason et al. 2016]Most of the stellar mass accreted by the Milky-Way-mass halos typically comes from only one or two destroyed dwarfs. The accreted dwarfs are usually low-mass if they were accreted early on in the simulation (i.e., in the early universe), and high-mass if they were accreted

  5. High S/N Spectroscopy and Radial Velocities of Field BHB Tip Stars Similar to KIC 1718290

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, E.; O'Connell, C.; Fontaine, G.

    2014-04-01

    In a followup to Östensen et al.'s (2012) discovery of the first g-mode pulsator found on the classical blue horizontal branch (BHB), we present atmospheric parameters for ten blue field stars known to have similar effective temperatures and gravities, plus radial velocities for seven of them, as a first step towards investigating the overall properties of these stars. All of the field BHB tip stars have temperatures and gravities that place them in a narrow region below the main sequence and above the gap separating them from the hotter and more compact sdB stars. Interestingly, half of the ten BHB tip stars exhibit higher metallicities and greater than solar He abundances similar to, although not quite as high as, the BHB pulsator KIC 1718290, while the other half have much lower metallicities and He abundances, more typical of those observed in sdB stars. RV's determined from five or more MMT spectra each for KIC 1718290 and seven of the other BHB tip stars show that none exhibit significant RV variations at the 2 to 3 km s-1 level on time scales shorter than a day or two; the variations were no larger for two stars reobserved after an interval of two months nor for one star that was observed over two years. Such velocity variations are comparable to those we have measured previously for sdB stars with MS companions, several of which are now known to have orbital periods of the order of a couple of years. The magnitudes and galactic latitudes of the stars in our BHB tip sample are consistent with membership in the galactic disk, rather than the halo.

  6. Why are halo coronal mass ejections faster?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qing-Min; Guo, Yang; Chen, Peng-Fei; Ding, Ming-De; Fang, Cheng

    2010-05-01

    Halo coronal mass ejections (CMEs) have been to be significantly faster than normal CMEs, which is a long-standing puzzle. In order to solve the puzzle, we first investigate the observed properties of 31 limb CMEs that clearly display loop-shaped frontal loops. The observational results show a strong tendency that slower CMEs are weaker in white-light intensity. Then, we perform a Monte Carlo simulation of 20000 artificial limb CMEs that have an average velocity of ~523 km s-1. The Thomson scattering of these events is calculated when they are assumed to be observed as limb and halo events, respectively. It is found that the white-light intensity of many slow CMEs becomes remarkably reduced when they turn from being viewed as a limb event to being viewed as a halo event. When the intensity is below the background solar wind fluctuation, it is assumed that they would be missed by coronagraphs. The average velocity of “detectable" halo CMEs is ~922 km s-1 very close to the observed value. This also indicates that wider events are more likely to be recorded. The results soundly suggest that the higher average velocity of halo CMEs is due to that a majority of slow events and some of narrow fast events carrying less material are so faint that they are blended with the solar wind fluctuations, and therefore are not observed.

  7. The Dual Origin Of Stellar Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolotov, Adi

    In the dominant Lambda+Cold Dark Matter cosmological paradigm, galaxy stellar halos are thought to form hierarchically from multiple accretion events, starting from the first structures to collapse in the Universe. This dissertation aims to make the first detailed theoretical predictions for the origin of galactic stellar halos. We focus on understanding the physical processes involved in halo formation using high-resolution, N-body + Smooth Particle Hydrodynamic simulations of disk galaxies in a cosmological context. These self-consistent simulations are used to study the competing importance of dissipative processes and dissipationless mergers in the formation of stellar halos. The relative contribution of each mechanism, and its specific role in assembling the inner and outer regions of halos is explored, as a function of galaxy mass and merging history. We show that the presence of both accreted and in situ stars in halos is a generic feature of galaxy formation. For L* galaxies, the relative contribution of each stellar population to a halo is shown to be a function of a galaxy's accretion history. Galaxies with recent mergers, like M31, will host relatively few in situ stars, while galaxies with more quiescent recent histories, like the Milky Way, will likely have a larger relative contribution from an in situ population. We show that in situ halo stars are more [alpha/Fe]-rich than accreted stars at the high [Fe/H] end of a halo's metallicity distribution function. In lower mass galaxies, M ˜ 1010 M, in situ stars dominate the stellarmass of halos. In these galaxies, in situ halo stars are, on average, younger and more metal-rich than accreted halo stars. Because in situ stars are dominant, these trends result in halos that are more metal-rich than simple accretion models predict. The halos of low mass galaxies do not extend out to the virial radii of the primary, as they do in more massive galaxies. We find that the ratio of luminous-halo mass to total

  8. STEALTH GALAXIES IN THE HALO OF THE MILKY WAY

    SciTech Connect

    Bullock, James S.; Stewart, Kyle R.; Kaplinghat, Manoj; Tollerud, Erik J.; Wolf, Joe

    2010-07-10

    We predict that there is a population of low-luminosity dwarf galaxies orbiting within the halo of the Milky Way (MW) that have surface brightnesses low enough to have escaped detection in star-count surveys. The overall count of stealth galaxies is sensitive to the presence (or lack) of a low-mass threshold in galaxy formation. These systems have luminosities and stellar velocity dispersions that are similar to those of known ultrafaint dwarf galaxies but they have more extended stellar distributions (half-light radii greater than about 100 pc) because they inhabit dark subhalos that are slightly less massive than their higher surface brightness counterparts. As a result, the typical peak surface brightness is fainter than 30 mag arcsec{sup -2}. One implication is that the inferred common mass scale for MW dwarfs may be an artifact of selection bias. If there is no sharp threshold in galaxy formation at low halo mass, then ultrafaint galaxies like Segue 1 represent the high-mass, early-forming tail of a much larger population of objects that could number in the hundreds and have typical peak circular velocities of about 8 km s{sup -1} and masses within 300 pc of about 5 million solar masses. Alternatively, if we impose a low-mass threshold in galaxy formation in order to explain the unexpectedly high densities of the ultrafaint dwarfs, then we expect only a handful of stealth galaxies in the halo of the MW. A complete census of these objects will require deeper sky surveys, 30 m class follow-up telescopes, and more refined methods to identify extended, self-bound groupings of stars in the halo.

  9. Hohlraum Designs for High Velocity Implosions on NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Meezan, N B; Hicks, D G; Callahan, D A; Olson, R E; Schneider, M S; Thomas, C A; Robey, H F; Celliers, P M; Kline, J K; Dixit, S N; Michel, P A; Jones, O S; Clark, D S; Ralph, J E; Doeppner, T; MacKinnon, A J; Haan, S W; Landen, O L; Glenzer, S H; Suter, L J; Edwards, M J; Macgowan, B J; Lindl, J D; Atherton, L J

    2011-10-19

    In this paper, we compare experimental shock and capsule trajectories to design calculations using the radiation-hydrodynamics code HYDRA. The measured trajectories from surrogate ignition targets are consistent with reducing the x-ray flux on the capsule by about 85%. A new method of extracting the radiation temperature as seen by the capsule from x-ray intensity and image data shows that about half of the apparent 15% flux deficit in the data with respect to the simulations can be explained by HYDRA overestimating the x-ray flux on the capsule. The National Ignition Campaign (NIC) point-design target is designed to reach a peak fuel-layer velocity of 370 km/s by ablating 90% of its plastic (CH) ablator. The 192-beam National Ignition Facility laser drives a gold hohlraum to a radiation temperature (T{sub RAD}) of 300 eV with a 20 ns-long, 420 TW, 1.3 MJ laser pulse. The hohlraum x-rays couple to the CH ablator in order to apply the required pressure to the outside of the capsule. In this paper, we compare experimental measurements of the hohlraum T{sub RAD} and the implosion trajectory with design calculations using the code hydra. The measured radial positions of the leading shock wave and the unablated shell are consistent with simulations in which the x-ray flux on the capsule is artificially reduced by 85%. We describe a new method of inferring the T{sub RAD} seen by the capsule from time-dependent x-ray intensity data and static x-ray images. This analysis shows that hydra overestimates the x-ray flux incident on the capsule by {approx}8%.

  10. Jupiter's Ring Halo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A mosaic of four images taken through the clear filter (610 nanometers) of the solid state imaging (CCD) system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft on November 8, 1996, at a resolution of approximately 46 kilometers (km) per picture element (pixel) along the rings; however, because the spacecraft was only about 0.5 degrees above the ring plane, the image is highly foreshortened in the vertical direction. The images were obtained when Galileo was in Jupiter's shadow peering back toward the Sun; the ring was approximately 2,300,000 kilometers (km) away. The arc on the far right of the image is produced by sunlight scattered by small particles comprising Jupiter's upper atmospheric haze. The ring also efficiently scatters light, indicating that much of its brightness is due to particles that are microns or less in diameter. Such small particles are believed to have human-scale lifetimes, i.e., very brief compared to the solar system's age.

    Jupiter's ring system is composed of three parts -- a flat main ring, a lenticular halo interior to the main ring, and the gossamer ring, which lies exterior to the main ring. The near and far arms of Jupiter's main ring extend horizontally across the mosaic, joining together at the ring's ansa, on the far left side of the figure. The near arm of the ring appears to be abruptly truncated close to the planet, at the point where it passes into Jupiter's shadow.

    A faint mist of particles can be seen above and below the main rings; this vertically extended, toroidal 'halo' is unusual in planetary rings, and is probably caused by electromagnetic forces which can push small grains out of the ring plane. Halo material is present across this entire image, implying that it reaches more than 27,000 km above the ring plane. Because of shadowing, the halo is not visible close to Jupiter in the lower right part of the mosaic. In order to accentuate faint features in the image, different brightnesses are shown through color, with the brightest

  11. Globular Cluster Orbits from HST Proper Motions: Constraining the Formation and Mass of the Milky Way Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, S. Tony; Van Der Marel, Roeland P.; Deason, Alis J.; Bellini, Andrea; Besla, Gurtina; Watkins, Laura

    2016-06-01

    The globular cluster (GC) system of the Milky Way (MW) provides important information on the MW's present structure and past evolution. GCs in the halo are particularly useful tracers; because of their long dynamical timescales, their orbits retain imprints of their origin or accretion history. Full 3D motions are required to calculate past orbits. While most GCs have known line of sight velocities, accurate proper motion (PM) measurements are currently available for only a few halo GCs. Our goal is to create the first high-quality PM database for halo GCs. We have identified suitable 1st-epoch data in the HST Archive for 20 halo GCs at 10-100 kpc from the Galactic Center. We are in the process of obtaining the necessary 2nd-epoch data to determine absolute PMs of the target GCs through our HST program GO-14235. We will use the same advanced astrometric techniques that allowed us to measure the PMs of M31 and Leo I. Previous studies of the halo GC system based on e.g., stellar populations, metallicities, RR Lyrae properties, and structural properties have revealed a dichotomy between old and young halo GCs. This may reflect distinct formation scenarios (in situ vs. accreted). Orbit calculations based on our PMs will directly test this. The PMs will also yield the best handle yet on the velocity anisotropy profile of any tracer population in the halo. This will resolve the mass-anisotropy degeneracy to provide an improved estimate of the MW mass, which is at present poorly known. In summary, our project will deliver the first accurate PMs for halo GCs, and will significantly increase our understanding of the formation, evolution, and mass of the MW.

  12. Metallicity and Kinematics of M31's Outer Stellar Halo from a Keck Spectroscopic Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitzel, David B.; Guhathakurta, Puragra

    2002-07-01

    We present first results from a spectroscopic survey designed to examine the metallicity and kinematics of individual red giant branch stars in the outer halo of the Andromeda spiral galaxy (M31). This study is based on multislit spectroscopy with the Keck II 10 m telescope and Low Resolution Imaging Spectrograph of the Ca II near-infrared triplet in 99 M31 halo candidates in a field at R=19 kpc on the southeast minor axis with brightnesses from 20halo red giants from foreground Milky Way dwarf stars, faint compact background galaxies, and M31 disk giants. The observed distribution of radial velocities is well fitted by an equal mix of foreground Milky Way dwarf stars, drawn from a standard Galactic model and with velocities v<~0 km s-1, and M31 halo giants represented by a Gaussian of width σM31v~150 km s-1 centered on its systemic velocity of vM31sys~-300 km s-1. A secure sample of 29 M31 red giant stars is identified on the basis of radial velocity (v<-220 km s-1) and, in the case of four intermediate-velocity stars (-160halo giants has an rms spread of at least 0.6 dex and spans the >~2 dex range over which the abundance measurement methods are calibrated. The mean/median metallicity of the M31 halo is about <[Fe/H]>=-1.9 to -1.1 dex (depending on the details of metallicity calibration and sample selection) and possibly higher: the high-metallicity end of the distribution is poorly constrained by our data since the selection function for the secure M31 sample excludes over 80% of the giants in solar/supersolar metallicity range. Possible reasons are

  13. Role of group and phase velocity in high-energy neutrino observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, P. B.; Woschnagg, K.

    2001-03-01

    Kuzmichev recently showed that use of phase velocity rather than group velocity for Cherenkov light signals and pulses from calibration lasers in high-energy neutrino telescopes leads to errors in track reconstruction and distance measurement. We amplify on his remarks and show that errors for four cases of interest to AMANDA, IceCube, and radio Cherenkov detector are negligibly small.

  14. Inverse Compton X-Ray Halos Around High-z Radio Galaxies: A Feedback Mechanism Powered by Far-Infrared Starbursts or the Cosmic Microwave Background?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Small, Ian; Blundell, Katherine M.; Lehmer, B. D.; Alexander, D. M.

    2012-01-01

    We report the detection of extended X-ray emission around two powerful radio galaxies at z approx. 3.6 (4C 03.24 and 4C 19.71) and use these to investigate the origin of extended, inverse Compton (IC) powered X-ray halos at high redshifts. The halos have X-ray luminosities of L(sub X) approx. 3 x 10(exp 44) erg/s and sizes of approx.60 kpc. Their morphologies are broadly similar to the approx.60 kpc long radio lobes around these galaxies suggesting they are formed from IC scattering by relativistic electrons in the radio lobes, of either cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons or far-infrared photons from the dust-obscured starbursts in these galaxies. These observations double the number of z > 3 radio galaxies with X-ray-detected IC halos. We compare the IC X-ray-to-radio luminosity ratios for the two new detections to the two previously detected z approx. 3.8 radio galaxies. Given the similar redshifts, we would expect comparable X-ray IC luminosities if millimeter photons from the CMB are the dominant seed field for the IC emission (assuming all four galaxies have similar ages and jet powers). Instead we see that the two z approx. 3.6 radio galaxies, which are 4 fainter in the far-infrared than those at z 3.8, also have approx.4x fainter X-ray IC emission. Including data for a further six z > or approx. 2 radio sources with detected IC X-ray halos from the literature, we suggest that in the more compact, majority of radio sources, those with lobe sizes < or approx.100-200 kpc, the bulk of the IC emission may be driven by scattering of locally produced far-infrared photons from luminous, dust-obscured starbursts within these galaxies, rather than millimeter photons from the CMB. The resulting X-ray emission appears sufficient to ionize the gas on approx.100-200 kpc scales around these systems and thus helps form the extended, kinematically quiescent Ly(alpha) emission line halos found around some of these systems. The starburst and active galactic nucleus

  15. The diagnostic value of halo and reversed halo signs for invasive mold infections in compromised hosts.

    PubMed

    Georgiadou, Sarah P; Sipsas, Nikolaos V; Marom, Edith M; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P

    2011-05-01

    The halo sign is a CT finding of ground-glass opacity surrounding a pulmonary nodule or mass. The reversed halo sign is a focal rounded area of ground-glass opacity surrounded by a crescent or complete ring of consolidation. In severely immunocompromised patients, these signs are highly suggestive of early infection by an angioinvasive fungus. The halo sign and reversed halo sign are most commonly associated with invasive pulmonary aspergillosis and pulmonary mucormycosis, respectively. Many other infections and noninfectious conditions, such as neoplastic and inflammatory processes, may also manifest with pulmonary nodules associated with either sign. Although nonspecific, both signs can be useful for preemptive initiation of antifungal therapy in the appropriate clinical setting. This review aims to evaluate the diagnostic value of the halo sign and reversed halo sign in immunocompromised hosts and describes the wide spectrum of diseases associated with them.

  16. The Diagnostic Value of Halo and Reversed Halo Signs for Invasive Mold Infections in Compromised Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Georgiadou, Sarah P.; Sipsas, Nikolaos V.; Marom, Edith M.

    2011-01-01

    The halo sign is a CT finding of ground-glass opacity surrounding a pulmonary nodule or mass. The reversed halo sign is a focal rounded area of ground-glass opacity surrounded by a crescent or complete ring of consolidation. In severely immunocompromised patients, these signs are highly suggestive of early infection by an angioinvasive fungus. The halo sign and reversed halo sign are most commonly associated with invasive pulmonary aspergillosis and pulmonary mucormycosis, respectively. Many other infections and noninfectious conditions, such as neoplastic and inflammatory processes, may also manifest with pulmonary nodules associated with either sign. Although nonspecific, both signs can be useful for preemptive initiation of antifungal therapy in the appropriate clinical setting. This review aims to evaluate the diagnostic value of the halo sign and reversed halo sign in immunocompromised hosts and describes the wide spectrum of diseases associated with them. PMID:21467021

  17. High-velocity, high-excitation neutral carbon in a cloud in the Vela supernova remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Edward B.; Wallerstein, George

    1995-01-01

    HD 72089 is situated behind the Vela supernova remnant, and the interstellar absorption lines in the spectrum of this star are remarkable for two reasons. First, there are six distinct velocity components that span the (heliocentric) velocity range -60 to +121 km/s in the lines of Na I and Ca II. Second, two of the components at high velocity, one at +85 km/s and another at +121.5 km/s, have densities that are large enough to produce observable lines from neutral carbon. The gas moving at +121.5 km/s has such a large pressure that the excited fine-structure levels of the ground electronic state of C I are collisionally populated nearly in proportion to their level degeneracies. This high-velocity gas exhibits unusually low column densities of Mg I and Na I, compared to that of C I. We propose that the +121.5 km/s component represents gas that has cooled and recombined in a zone that follows a shock driven into a cloud by the very recent passage of a supernova blast wave. A representative preshock density of n(sub H) approximately = 13/cc and velocity v(sub s) = 100 km/s is indicated by the strength of diffuse (O III) emission lines seen in directions very near HD 72089. The strong collisional population of excited C I and apparent absence of excited levels of O I give a most favorable fit to the conditions 1000 less than n(sub H) less than 2900/cc over a temperature range 300 less than T less than 1000 K. The fact that the compression is not substantially more than this indicates that the preshock gas may have had an embedded, transverse magnetic field with a strength B greater than or approximately = 1 micro-G. The large dynamical pressure of the supernova blast wave that would be needed to create the cloud shock that we describe implies that the energy of the supernova was 8 x 10(exp 51) ergs, if the Vela remnant is 500 pc away. We can bring this value much closer to typical supernova energies E less than or approximately = 10(exp 51) ergs if the distance to the

  18. High spatial range velocity measurements in a high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Silva, C. M.; Gnanamanickam, E. P.; Atkinson, C.; Buchmann, N. A.; Hutchins, N.; Soria, J.; Marusic, I.

    2014-02-01

    Here, we detail and analyse a multi-resolution particle image velocity measurement that resolves the wide range of scales prevalent in a zero pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer at high Reynolds numbers (up to Reτ ≈ 20 000). A unique configuration is utilised, where an array of eight high resolution cameras at two magnification levels are used simultaneously to obtain a large field of view, while still resolving the smaller scales prevalent in the flow. Additionally, a highly magnified field of view targeted at the near wall region is employed to capture the viscous sublayer and logarithmic region, with a spatial resolution of a few viscous length scales. Flow statistics from these measurements show good agreement with prior, well resolved hot-wire anemometry measurements. Analysis shows that the instantaneous wall shear stress can be reliably computed, which is historically known to be challenging in boundary layers. A statistical assessment of the wall shear stress shows good agreement with existing correlations, prior experimental and direct numerical simulation data, extending this view to much higher Reynolds numbers. Furthermore, conditional analysis using multiple magnification levels is detailed, to study near-wall events associated with high skin friction fluctuations and their associated overlaying structures in the log region. Results definitively show that the passage of very large-scale positive (or negative) velocity fluctuations are associated with increased (or reduced) small-scale variance in wall shear stress fluctuations.

  19. Halo Orbit Mission Correction Maneuvers Using Optimal Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, M.; Serban, R.; Petzold, L.; Koon, W.; Ross, S.; Marsden, J.; Wilson, R.

    2000-01-01

    This paper addresses the computation of the required trajectory correction maneuvers (TCM) for a halo orbit space mission to compensate for the launch velocity errors introduced by inaccuracies of the launch vehicle.

  20. The Dependence of the Occupation of Galaxies on the Halo Formation Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Guangtun; Zheng, Zheng; Lin, W. P.; Jing, Y. P.; Kang, Xi; Gao, Liang

    2006-03-01

    We study the dependence of the galaxy contents within halos on the halo formation time using two galaxy formation models, one being a semianalytic model utilizing the halo assembly history from a high-resolution N-body simulation and the other being a smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulation including radiative cooling, star formation, and energy feedback from galactic winds. We confirm the finding by Gao et al. that at fixed mass, the clustering of halos depends on the halo formation time, especially for low-mass halos. This age dependence of halo clustering makes it desirable to study the correlation between the occupation of galaxies within halos and the halo age. We find that, in halos of fixed mass, the number of satellite galaxies has a strong dependence on halo age, with fewer satellites in older halos. The youngest one-third of the halos can have an order of magnitude more satellites than the oldest one-third. For central galaxies, in halos that form earlier, they tend to have more stars and thus appear to be more luminous, and the dependence of their luminosity on halo age is not as strong as that of stellar mass. The results can be understood through the star formation history in halos and the merging of satellites onto central galaxies. The age dependence of the galaxy contents within halos would constitute an important ingredient in a more accurate halo-based model of galaxy clustering.

  1. ASSEMBLY OF THE OUTER GALACTIC STELLAR HALO IN THE HIERARCHICAL MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Murante, Giuseppe; Curir, Anna; Poglio, Eva; Villalobos, Alvaro E-mail: curir@oato.inaf.i E-mail: villalobos@oats.inaf.i

    2010-06-20

    We provide a set of numerical N-body simulations for studying the formation of the outer Milky Ways' stellar halo through accretion events. After simulating minor mergers of prograde and retrograde orbiting satellite halos with a dark matter main halo, we analyze the signal left by satellite stars in the rotation velocity distribution. The aim is to explore the orbital conditions where a retrograde signal in the outer part of the halo can be obtained, in order to give a possible explanation of the observed rotational properties of the Milky Way stellar halo. Our results show that, for satellites more massive than {approx}1/40 of the main halo, the dynamical friction has a fundamental role in assembling the final velocity distributions resulting from different orbits and that retrograde satellites moving on low-inclination orbits deposit more stars in the outer halo regions and therefore can produce the counter-rotating behavior observed in the outer Milky Way halo.

  2. Acoustic and streaming velocity components in a resonant waveguide at high acoustic levels.

    PubMed

    Daru, Virginie; Reyt, Ida; Bailliet, Hélène; Weisman, Catherine; Baltean-Carlès, Diana

    2017-01-01

    Rayleigh streaming is a steady flow generated by the interaction between an acoustic wave and a solid wall, generally assumed to be second order in a Mach number expansion. Acoustic streaming is well known in the case of a stationary plane wave at low amplitude: it has a half-wavelength spatial periodicity and the maximum axial streaming velocity is a quadratic function of the acoustic velocity amplitude at antinode. For higher acoustic levels, additional streaming cells have been observed. Results of laser Doppler velocimetry measurements are here compared to direct numerical simulations. The evolution of axial and radial velocity components for both acoustic and streaming velocities is studied from low to high acoustic amplitudes. Two streaming flow regimes are pointed out, the axial streaming dependency on acoustics going from quadratic to linear. The evolution of streaming flow is different for outer cells and for inner cells. Also, the hypothesis of radial streaming velocity being of second order in a Mach number expansion, is not valid at high amplitudes. The change of regime occurs when the radial streaming velocity amplitude becomes larger than the radial acoustic velocity amplitude, high levels being therefore characterized by nonlinear interaction of the different velocity components.

  3. X Persei: The X-Ray Halo and Spectrum of a High-Latitude X-Ray Binary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, Richard (Technical Monitor); Smith, Randall

    2004-01-01

    The observations were completed on February 25,2003. Although the source was in the FOV for 31.4 ksec, only 18.2 ksec of data were usable due to a strong flare in the first part of the observations. We have extracted the X-ray halo from the good portion of the data, and were then faced with the problem of calibrating the far-off-axis point spread function, which is needed only for X-ray halo analysis; the same problem affected Chandra halo observations. We used data from 3C273, MCG 6-30-15, LMC X-1, and Her X-1 to measure the PSF, and found that it is reasonably well fit with a power law of the form PSF(theta) = A theta^-G, where A = 0.0034 arcmin^-2, and G = 3.05 for energies between 1-4 keV. This suggests there are fewer large dust grains along the When fitting the spectrum of X Persei, we found NH = 3e21 cm^-2, as expected. However, the X-ray halo (using a Mathis, Rumpl, Nordsieck 1977 dust model) required at most a column density of 1.4+/-0.1 e21 cm^-2; other models required sightline to X Per than would have been expected. In addition, a smoothly distributed dust model fit the observations better than a single cloud model, also against our expectations. We are in the process of writing a paper to be submitted to ApJ with these results, and will also present them at the 2004 HEAD meeting in New Orleans.

  4. WEIGHING THE GALACTIC DARK MATTER HALO: A LOWER MASS LIMIT FROM THE FASTEST HALO STAR KNOWN

    SciTech Connect

    Przybilla, Norbert; Tillich, Alfred; Heber, Ulrich; Scholz, Ralf-Dieter

    2010-07-20

    The mass of the Galactic dark matter halo is under vivid discussion. A recent study by Xue et al. revised the Galactic halo mass downward by a factor of {approx}2 relative to previous work, based on the line-of-sight velocity distribution of {approx}2400 blue horizontal-branch (BHB) halo stars. The observations were interpreted with a statistical approach using cosmological galaxy formation simulations, as only four of the six-dimensional phase-space coordinates were determined. Here we concentrate on a close investigation of the stars with the highest negative radial velocity from that sample. For one star, SDSSJ153935.67+023909.8 (J1539+0239 for short), we succeed in measuring a significant proper motion, i.e., full phase-space information is obtained. We confirm the star to be a Population II BHB star from an independent quantitative analysis of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectrum-providing the first non-LTE (NLTE) study of any halo BHB star-and reconstruct its three-dimensional trajectory in the Galactic potential. J1539+0239 turns out to be the fastest halo star known to date, with a Galactic rest-frame velocity of 694{sup +300}{sub -221} km s{sup -1} (full uncertainty range from Monte Carlo error propagation) at its current position. The extreme kinematics of the star allows a significant lower limit to be put on the halo mass in order to keep it bound, of M {sub halo} {>=} 1.7{sup +2.3}{sub -1.1} x 10{sup 12} M{sub sun}. We conclude that the Xue et al. results tend to underestimate the true halo mass as their most likely mass value is consistent with our analysis only at a level of 4%. However, our result confirms other studies that make use of the full phase-space information.

  5. APPARATUS FOR PRODUCING HIGH VELOCITY SHOCK WAVES IN GASES

    DOEpatents

    Scott, F.R.; Josephson, V.

    1960-02-01

    >A device for producing a high-energy ionized gas region comprises an evacuated tapered insulating vessel and a substantially hemispherical insulating cap hermetically affixed to the large end of the vessel, an annular electrode having a diameter equal to and supported in the interior wall of the vessel at the large end and having a conductive portion inside the vessel, a second electrode supported at the small end of the vessel, means connected to the vessel for introducing a selected gas therein, a source of high potential having two poles. means for connecting one pole of the high potential source to the annular electrode, and means for connecting the other pole of the potential source to the second electrode.

  6. Rheology of serpentinite in high-temperature and low-slip-velocity regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, M.; Uehara, S.; Mizoguchi, K.; Takeda, N.; Masuda, K.

    2009-12-01

    This study was designed to clarify the rheology of serpentinite experimentally, related both the sliding velocity and the temperature. The frictional behavior of serpentinite is of particular interest in the study of earthquake generation processes along subducting plates and transform faults. Previous studies [Reinen et al., 1991-93] revealed that the serpentinites indicated two-mechanical behaviors at velocity-step test: ‘state-variable dominated behavior’ at relatively higher velocity (0.1-10 μm/sec) and ‘flow-dominated behavior’ at lower velocity (less than 0.1 μm/sec). Such complexity on the frictional behavior could make it complicated to forecast on the slip acceleration process from the plate motion velocity to the earthquake. Even under the room-temperature condition, those multiple behavior could be observed, thus, serpentinite can be a model substance to present a new constitutive law at the brittle-ductile transition regime. We, therefore, focus to discuss the transient behaviors of serpentinite at the velocity-step test. We used a gas-medium, high-pressure, and high-temperature triaxial testing machine belonging to the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Japan. Sliding deformation was applied on the thin zone of the serpentinite gouge (1.0 g of almost pure antigorite powder) sandwiched between two alumina blocks with oblique surfaces at 30° to the axis. All experiments were carried out under a set of constant conditions, 100 MPa of the confining pressure (Ar-gas) and 30 MPa of the pore pressure (distilled water). The temperature conditions were varied from the room-temperature to 500° C, and three sliding velocity-regimes were adopted: low (0.0115 - 0.115 μm/sec), middle (0.115 - 1.15 μm/sec) and high (1.15 - 11.5 μm/sec) velocity regimes. In each velocity regime, the sliding velocity was increased or decreased in a stepwise fashion, and then we observed the transient behaviors until it reached the

  7. High-Velocity Estimates for the Scattering Operator and Aharonov-Bohm Effect in Three Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballesteros, Miguel; Weder, Ricardo

    2009-01-01

    We obtain high-velocity estimates with error bounds for the scattering operator of the Schrödinger equation in three dimensions with electromagnetic potentials in the exterior of bounded obstacles that are handlebodies. A particular case is a finite number of tori. We prove our results with time-dependent methods. We consider high-velocity estimates where the direction of the velocity of the incoming electrons is kept fixed as its absolute value goes to infinity. In the case of one torus our results give a rigorous proof that quantum mechanics predicts the interference patterns observed in the fundamental experiments of Tonomura et al. that gave conclusive evidence of the existence of the Aharonov-Bohm effect using a toroidal magnet. We give a method for the reconstruction of the flux of the magnetic field over a cross-section of the torus modulo 2π. Equivalently, we determine modulo 2π the difference in phase for two electrons that travel to infinity, when one goes inside the hole and the other outside it. For this purpose we only need the high-velocity limit of the scattering operator for one direction of the velocity of the incoming electrons. When there are several tori-or more generally handlebodies-the information that we obtain in the fluxes, and on the difference of phases, depends on the relative position of the tori and on the direction of the velocities when we take the high-velocity limit of the incoming electrons. For some locations of the tori we can determine all the fluxes modulo 2π by taking the high-velocity limit in only one direction. We also give a method for the unique reconstruction of the electric potential and the magnetic field outside the handlebodies from the high-velocity limit of the scattering operator.

  8. Temperature Dependence of Sound Velocity in High-Strength Fiber-Reinforced Plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Ryuji; Yoneyama, Keiichi; Ogasawara, Futoshi; Ueno, Masashi; Okuda, Yuichi; Yamanaka, Atsuhiko

    2003-08-01

    Longitudinal sound velocity in unidirectional hybrid composites or high-strength fiber-reinforced plastics (FRPs) was measured along the fiber axis over a wide temperature range (from 77 K to 420 K). We investigated two kinds of high-strength crystalline polymer fibers, polyethylene (Dyneema) and polybenzobisoxazole (Zylon), which are known to have negative thermal expansion coefficients and high thermal conductivities along the fiber axis. Both FRPs had very high sound velocities of about 9000 m/s at low temperatures and their temperature dependences were very strong. Sound velocity monotonically decreased with increasing temperature. The temperature dependence of sound velocity was much stronger in Dyneema-FRP than in Zylon-FRP.

  9. A "Light," Centrally Concentrated Milky Way Halo?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashkov, Valery; Pillepich, Annalisa; Deason, Alis J.; Madau, Piero; Rockosi, Constance M.; Guedes, Javiera; Mayer, Lucio

    2013-08-01

    We discuss a novel approach to "weighing" the Milky Way (MW) dark matter halo, one that combines the latest samples of halo stars selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) with state of the art numerical simulations of MW analogs. The fully cosmological runs employed in the present study include "Eris," one of the highest resolution hydrodynamical simulations of the formation of a M vir = 8 × 1011 M ⊙ late-type spiral, and the dark-matter-only M vir = 1.7 × 1012 M ⊙ "Via Lactea II" (VLII) simulation. Eris provides an excellent laboratory for creating mock SDSS samples of tracer halo stars, and we successfully compare their density, velocity anisotropy, and radial velocity dispersion profiles with the observational data. Most mock SDSS realizations show the same "cold veil" recently observed in the distant stellar halo of the MW, with tracers as cold as σlos ≈ 50 km s-1 between 100 and 150 kpc. Controlled experiments based on the integration of the spherical Jeans equation as well as a particle tagging technique applied to VLII show that a "heavy" M vir ≈ 2 × 1012 M ⊙ realistic host produces a poor fit to the kinematic SDSS data. We argue that these results offer added evidence for a "light," centrally concentrated MW halo.

  10. A ''LIGHT'', CENTRALLY CONCENTRATED MILKY WAY HALO?

    SciTech Connect

    Rashkov, Valery; Pillepich, Annalisa; Deason, Alis J.; Madau, Piero; Rockosi, Constance M.; Mayer, Lucio

    2013-08-20

    We discuss a novel approach to ''weighing'' the Milky Way (MW) dark matter halo, one that combines the latest samples of halo stars selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) with state of the art numerical simulations of MW analogs. The fully cosmological runs employed in the present study include ''Eris'', one of the highest resolution hydrodynamical simulations of the formation of a M{sub vir} = 8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} M{sub Sun} late-type spiral, and the dark-matter-only M{sub vir} = 1.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} M{sub Sun} ''Via Lactea II'' (VLII) simulation. Eris provides an excellent laboratory for creating mock SDSS samples of tracer halo stars, and we successfully compare their density, velocity anisotropy, and radial velocity dispersion profiles with the observational data. Most mock SDSS realizations show the same ''cold veil'' recently observed in the distant stellar halo of the MW, with tracers as cold as {sigma}{sub los} Almost-Equal-To 50 km s{sup -1} between 100 and 150 kpc. Controlled experiments based on the integration of the spherical Jeans equation as well as a particle tagging technique applied to VLII show that a ''heavy'' M{sub vir} Almost-Equal-To 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} M{sub Sun} realistic host produces a poor fit to the kinematic SDSS data. We argue that these results offer added evidence for a ''light'', centrally concentrated MW halo.

  11. MAGNETIC METHOD FOR PRODUCING HIGH VELOCITY SHOCK WAVES IN GASES

    DOEpatents

    Josephson, V.

    1960-01-26

    A device is described for producing high-energy plasmas comprising a tapered shock tube of dielectric material and having a closed small end, an exceedingly low-inductance coll supported about and axially aligned with the small end of the tapered tube. an elongated multiturn coil supported upon the remninder of the exterior wall of the shock tube. a potential source and switch connected in series with the low-inductance coil, a potential source and switch connected in series with the elongated coil, means for hermetically sealing the large end of the tube, means for purging the tube of gases, and means for admitting a selected gas into the shock tube.

  12. Search for auroral belt E-parallel fields with high-velocity barium ion injections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heppner, J. P.; Ledley, B. G.; Miller, M. L.; Marionni, P. A.; Pongratz, M. B.

    1989-01-01

    In April 1984, four high-velocity shaped-charge Ba(+) injections were conducted from two sounding rockets at 770-975 km over northern Alaska under conditions of active auroral and magnetic disturbance. Spatial ionization (brightness) profiles of high-velocity Ba(+) clouds from photometric scans following each release were found to be consistent with the 28-sec theoretical time constant for Ba photoionization determined by Carlsten (1975). These observations therefore revealed no evidence of anomalous fast ionization predicted by the Alfven critical velocity hypothesis.

  13. Variables Affecting Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics Simulation of High-Velocity Flyer Plate Impact Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Somasundaram, Deepak S; Trabia, Mohamed; O'Toole, Brendan; Hixson, Robert S

    2014-01-23

    This paper describes our work to characterize the variables affecting the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method in the LS-DYNA package for simulating high-velocity flyer plate impact experiments. LS-DYNA simulations are compared with one-dimensional experimental data of an oxygen-free high-conductivity (OFHC) copper flyer plate impacting another plate of the same material. The comparison is made by measuring the velocity of a point on the back surface of the impact plate using the velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR) technique.

  14. An Approach for Measuring and Modeling of Plastic Deformation of Metallic Plates during High Velocity Impacts

    SciTech Connect

    O'Toole, Brendan J.; Trabia, Mohamed B.; Roy, Shawoon K.; Somasundarum, Deepak; Jennings, Richard; Matthes, Melissa; Hixson, Robert S.; Becker, Steven; Daykin, Edward P.; Pena, Michael T.; Machorro, Eric A.

    2014-05-29

    During high velocity impact experiments, projectile impact creates extreme pressure waves that results in a significant localized deformation within a short period of time. Experiments under these conditions require sophisticated data acquisition technique to better understand the materials deformation mechanisms. Since these experiments are expensive, it is also beneficial to develop accurate computational models that can predict this kind of deformation in high velocity impact events.

  15. CELFE/NASTRAN Code for the Analysis of Structures Subjected to High Velocity Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1978-01-01

    CELFE (Coupled Eulerian Lagrangian Finite Element)/NASTRAN Code three-dimensional finite element code has the capability for analyzing of structures subjected to high velocity impact. The local response is predicted by CELFE and, for large problems, the far-field impact response is predicted by NASTRAN. The coupling of the CELFE code with NASTRAN (CELFE/NASTRAN code) and the application of the code to selected three-dimensional high velocity impact problems are described.

  16. High Velocity Videoculography to Determination of the Pupil Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Villamar, Luis A.; Suaste, E.

    2008-08-11

    The characterization and determination of the dynamics pupillary in normal subjects, we can help to more accurately determine the behavior of the pupil; the videoculography is a tool that allows us to study the eye and especially the pupil to 30 frames per second in traditional form with the videoculography at high speed allows us to discuss our case in the pupil at 928 frames per second, this speed can determine with greater accuracy and precision dynamics eye, analyzing the movement pupillary each 1 ms approximately. This work shows the results of the capture and escape pupillary through this methodology, the results more accurately taking the capture of images between 5 and 7 ms about using a pulse with duration of 200 ms stimulation.

  17. Moderate Velocity Ball Impact of a Mock High-Explosive

    SciTech Connect

    Furmanski, Jevan; Rae, Philip; Clements, Bradford E.

    2012-06-05

    Modeling of thermal and mechanical events in high-explosive materials is complicated by the composite nature of the material, which experiences viscoelastic and plastic deformations and sustains damage in the form of microcracks that can dominate its overall behavior. A mechanical event of interest is projectile interaction with the material, which leads to extreme local deformation and adiabatic heating, which can potentially lead to adverse outcomes in an energetic material. Simulations of such an event predicted large local temperature rises near the path of a spherical projectile, but these were experimentally unconfirmed and hence potentially non-physical. This work concerns the experimental verification of local temperatures both at the surface and in the wake of a spherical projectile penetrating a mock (unreactive) high-explosive at {approx}700 m/s. Fast response thermocouples were embedded radially in a mid-plane of a cylindrical target, which was bonded around the thermocouples with epoxy and recorded by an oscilloscope through a low-pass filter with a bandwidth of 500 Hz. A peak temperature rise of 70 K was measured both at the equator of the projectile and in its wake, in good agreement with the temperature predicted in the minimally distorted elements at those locations by a finite element model in ABAQUS employing the ViscoSCRAM constitutive model. Further work is needed to elucidate the extreme temperature rises in material undergoing crushing or fragmentation, which is difficult to predict with meshed finite element methods due to element distortion, and also challenging to quantify experimentally.

  18. Disorder-induced domain wall velocity shift at high fields in perpendicularly magnetized thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voto, Michele; Lopez-Diaz, Luis; Torres, Luis; Moretti, Simone

    2016-11-01

    Domain wall dynamics in a perpendicularly magnetized system is studied by means of micromagnetic simulations in which disorder is introduced as a dispersion of both the easy-axis orientation and the anisotropy constant over regions reproducing a granular structure of the material. High field dynamics show a linear velocity-field relationship and an additional grain size dependent velocity shift, weakly dependent on both applied field and intrinsic Gilbert's damping parameter. We find the origin of this velocity shift in the nonhomogeneous in-plane effective field generated by the tilting of anisotropy easy axis introduced by disorder. We show that a one-dimensional analytical approach cannot predict the observed velocities and we augment it with the additional dissipation of energy arising from internal domain wall dynamics triggered by disorder. This way we prove that the main cause of higher velocity is the ability of the domain wall to irradiate energy into the domains, acquired with a precise feature of disorder.

  19. Airflow energy harvesting with high wind velocities for industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chew, Z. J.; Tuddenham, S. B.; Zhu, M.

    2016-11-01

    An airflow energy harvester capable of harvesting energy from vortices at high speed is presented in this paper. The airflow energy harvester is implemented using a modified helical Savonius turbine and an electromagnetic generator. A power management module with maximum power point finding capability is used to manage the harvested energy and convert the low voltage magnitude from the generator to a usable level for wireless sensors. The airflow energy harvester is characterized using vortex generated by air hitting a plate in a wind tunnel. By using an aircraft environment with wind speed of 17 m/s as case study, the output power of the airflow energy harvester is measured to be 126 mW. The overall efficiency of the power management module is 45.76 to 61.2%, with maximum power point tracking efficiency of 94.21 to 99.72% for wind speed of 10 to 18 m/s, and has a quiescent current of 790 nA for the maximum power point tracking circuit.

  20. Ignition process evolution at high supersonic velocities in channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldfeld, M. A.; Starov, A. V.; Timofeev, K. Yu.; Vinogradov, V. A.

    2009-06-01

    The results of experimental research of multi-injector combustors in the regime of the attached pipe are presented. As a source of high-enthalpy working gas (air), hot shot wind tunnel IT-302M of ITAM, the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences was used. Tests have been carried out at Mach numbers 3, 4 and 5, in a range of change of total temperature from 2000K up to 3000K and static pressure from 0.08MPa up to 0.23MPa. Injector section has been manufactured in two versions with a various relative height of wedge-shaped injectors with parallel fuel injection. Influence of conditions on the entrance of the combustion chamber on ignition and a stable combustion of hydrogen was investigated. Intensive combustion of hydrogen has been received only at Mach numbers 3 and 4. Advantage of injector section with the greater relative height of injectors is revealed. The mechanism of fuel ignition in the combustion chamber of the given configuration was investigated: two-step ignition process including “kindling” and intensive combustion over all channel volume.

  1. High velocity HI in the inner 5 KPC of M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinks, E.

    New radio frequency position-velocity maps of HI whithin 5 kpc of the M31 galactic center are reported. The maps were generated from 21 cm line studies performed with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope directed at regions +6 arcmin, 0 arcmin, and -6 arcmin distance from the nucleus. High velocity neutral hydrogen displayed the same signature at high velocities previously observed in the visible range (Rubin and Ford, 1970), but no HI was detected within the inner 500 pc. The data indicate that rotation produces the high velocities rather than an infall to or an ejection from the nucleus. The region around the M31 nucleus is suggested to be similar to that of the Galaxy.

  2. 3D SIMULATIONS OF REALISTIC POWER HALOS IN MAGNETOHYDROSTATIC SUNSPOT ATMOSPHERES: LINKING THEORY AND OBSERVATION

    SciTech Connect

    Rijs, Carlos; Przybylski, Damien; Moradi, Hamed; Cally, Paul S.; Shelyag, Sergiy; Rajaguru, S. P.

    2016-01-20

    The well-observed acoustic halo is an enhancement in time-averaged Doppler velocity and intensity power with respect to quiet-Sun values that is prominent for the weak and highly inclined field around the penumbra of sunspots and active regions. We perform 3D linear wave modeling with realistic distributed acoustic sources in a magnetohydrostatic sunspot atmosphere and compare the resultant simulation enhancements with multiheight SDO observations of the phenomenon. We find that simulated halos are in good qualitative agreement with observations. We also provide further proof that the underlying process responsible for the halo is the refraction and return of fast magnetic waves that have undergone mode conversion at the critical a = c atmospheric layer. In addition, we also find strong evidence that fast Alfvén mode conversion plays a significant role in the structure of the halo, taking energy away from photospheric and chromospheric heights in the form of field-aligned Alfvén waves. This conversion process may explain the observed “dual-ring” halo structure at higher (>8 mHz) frequencies.

  3. Liquid mercury sound velocity measurements under high pressure and high temperature by picosecond acoustics in a diamond anvils cell.

    PubMed

    Decremps, F; Belliard, L; Couzinet, B; Vincent, S; Munsch, P; Le Marchand, G; Perrin, B

    2009-07-01

    Recent improvements to measure ultrasonic sound velocities of liquids under extreme conditions are described. Principle and feasibility of picosecond acoustics in liquids embedded in a diamond anvils cell are given. To illustrate the capability of these advances in the sound velocity measurement technique, original high pressure and high temperature results on the sound velocity of liquid mercury up to 5 GPa and 575 K are given. This high pressure technique will certainly be useful in several fundamental and applied problems in physics and many other fields such as geophysics, nonlinear acoustics, underwater sound, petrology or physical acoustics.

  4. The outer regions of the giant Virgo galaxy M 87 Kinematic separation of stellar halo and intracluster light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longobardi, Alessia; Arnaboldi, Magda; Gerhard, Ortwin; Hanuschik, Reinhard

    2015-07-01

    Aims: We present a spectroscopic study of a sample of 287 planetary nebulas (PNs) around the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) M 87 in Virgo A, of which 211 are located between 40 kpc and 150 kpc from the galaxy centre. With these data we can distinguish the stellar halo from the co-spatial intracluster light (ICL) and study both components separately. Methods: We obtained PN velocities with a high resolution FLAMES/VLT survey targeting eight fields in a total area of ~0.4 deg2. We identified PNs from their narrow and symmetric redshifted λ5007 Å [OIII] emission line, the presence of the second λ4959 Å [OIII] emission line, and the absence of significant continuum. We implement a robust technique to measure the halo velocity dispersion from the projected phase-space to identify PNs associated with the M 87 halo and ICL. Using photometric magnitudes, we construct PN luminosity functions (PNLFs), which are complete down to m5007 = 28.8. Results: The velocity distribution of the spectroscopically confirmed PNs is bimodal, containing a narrow component centred on the systemic velocity of the BCG and an off-centred broader component, which we identify as halo and ICL, respectively. We find that 243 PNs are part of the velocity distribution of the M 87 halo, while the remaining subsample of 44 PNs are intracluster PNs (ICPNs). Halo and ICPNs have different spatial distributions: the number density of halo PNs follow the galaxy's surface brightness profile, whereas the ICPNs are characterised by a shallower power-law profile, IICL ∝ Rγ with γ in the range [-0.34, -0.04 ]. No evidence is found for an asymmetry in the halo and ICPN density distributions when the NW and SE fields are studied separately. A study of the composite PN number density profile confirms the superposition of different PN populations associated with the M 87 halo and the ICL, characterised by different PN specific numbers α. We derive αhalo = 1.06 × 10-8NPN L⊙,bol-1 and αICL = 2.72 × 10

  5. Elastic wave velocities of lunar samples at high pressures and their geophysical implications.

    PubMed

    Kanamori, H; Nur, A; Chung, D; Wones, D; Simmons, G

    1970-01-30

    Ultrasonic measurement of P and S velocities of Apollo 11 lunar samples 10020, 10057, and 10065 to 5 kilobars pressure at room temperature shows a pronounced increase of velocity (as much as twofold) for the first 2 kilobars. The travel times predicted from the velocity-depth curve of sample 10057 are consistent with the results of the Apollo 12 seismic experiments. At pressures below 200 bars, the samples are highly attenuating; for both P and S waves, the value of Q is about 10.

  6. Warm spraying—a novel coating process based on high-velocity impact of solid particles

    PubMed Central

    Kuroda, Seiji; Kawakita, Jin; Watanabe, Makoto; Katanoda, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, coating processes based on the impact of high-velocity solid particles such as cold spraying and aerosol deposition have been developed and attracting much industrial attention. A novel coating process called ‘warm spraying’ has been developed, in which coatings are formed by the high-velocity impact of solid powder particles heated to appropriate temperatures below the melting point of the powder material. The advantages of such process are as follows: (1) the critical velocity needed to form a coating can be significantly lowered by heating, (2) the degradation of feedstock powder such as oxidation can be significantly controlled compared with conventional thermal spraying where powder is molten, and (3) various coating structures can be realized from porous to dense ones by controlling the temperature and velocity of the particles. The principles and characteristics of this new process are discussed in light of other existing spray processes such as high-velocity oxy-fuel spraying and cold spraying. The gas dynamics of particle heating and acceleration by the spraying apparatus as well as the high-velocity impact phenomena of powder particles are discussed in detail. Several examples of depositing heat sensitive materials such as titanium, metallic glass, WC–Co cermet and polymers are described with potential industrial applications. PMID:27877996

  7. High Velocity Impact Interaction of Metal Particles with Porous Heterogeneous Materials with an Inorganic Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glazunov, A. A.; Ishchenko, A. N.; Afanasyeva, S. A.; Belov, N. N.; Burkin, V. V.; Rogaev, K. S.; Tabachenko, A. N.; Khabibulin, M. V.; Yugov, N. T.

    2016-03-01

    A computational-experimental investigation of stress-strain state and fracture of a porous heterogeneous material with an inorganic matrix, used as a thermal barrier coating of flying vehicles, under conditions of a high-velocity impact by a spherical steel projectile imitating a meteorite particle is discussed. Ballistic tests are performed at the velocities about 2.5 km/s. Numerical modeling of the high-velocity impact is described within the framework of a porous elastoplastic model including fracture and different phase states of the materials. The calculations are performed using the Euler and Lagrange numerical techniques for the velocities up to 10 km/s in a complete-space problem statement.

  8. Heat Transfer and Hydraulic Flow Resistance for Streams of High Velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lelchuk, V. L.

    1943-01-01

    Problems of hydraulic flow resistance and heat transfer for streams with velocities comparable with acoustic have present great importance for various fields of technical science. Especially, they have great importance for the field of heat transfer in designing and constructing boilers.of the "Velox" type. In this article a description of experiments and their results as regards definition of the laws of heat transfer in differential form for high velocity air streams inside smooth tubes are given.

  9. Group velocity matching in high-order harmonic generation driven by mid-infrared lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-García, C.; Popmintchev, T.; Murnane, M. M.; Kapteyn, H. C.; Plaja, L.; Becker, A.; Jaron-Becker, A.

    2016-07-01

    We analyze the role of group-velocity matching (GVM) in the macroscopic build up of the high-harmonic signal generated in gas targets at high pressures. A definition of the walk-off length, associated with GVM, in the non-perturbative intensity regime of high-harmonic generation is given. Semiclassical predictions based on this definition are in excellent agreement with full quantum simulations. We demonstrate that group velocity matching is a relevant factor in high harmonic generation and the isolation of attosecond pulses driven by long wavelength lasers and preferentially selects contributions from the short quantum trajectories.

  10. New halo white dwarf candidates in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dame, Kyra; Gianninas, A.; Kilic, Mukremin; Munn, Jeffrey A.; Brown, Warren R.; Williams, Kurtis A.; von Hippel, Ted; Harris, Hugh C.

    2016-12-01

    We present optical spectroscopy and near-infrared photometry of 57 faint (g = 19-22) high proper motion white dwarfs identified through repeat imaging of ≈3100 deg2 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey footprint by Munn et al. We use ugriz and JH photometry to perform a model atmosphere analysis, and identify 10 ultracool white dwarfs with Teff < 4000 K, including the coolest pure H atmosphere white dwarf currently known, J1657+2638, with Teff = 3550 ± 100 K. The majority of the objects with cooling ages larger than 9 Gyr display thick disc kinematics and constrain the age of the thick disc to ≥11 Gyr. There are four white dwarfs in our sample with large tangential velocities (vtan > 120 km s-1) and UVW velocities that are more consistent with the halo than the Galactic disc. For typical 0.6 M⊙ white dwarfs, the cooling ages for these halo candidates range from 2.3 to 8.5 Gyr. However, the total main-sequence+white dwarf cooling ages of these stars would be consistent with the Galactic halo if they are slightly undermassive. Given the magnitude limits of the current large-scale surveys, many of the coolest and oldest white dwarfs remain undiscovered in the solar neighbourhood, but upcoming surveys such as Gaia and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope should find many of these elusive thick disc and halo white dwarfs.

  11. THE DUAL ORIGIN OF STELLAR HALOS

    SciTech Connect

    Zolotov, Adi; Hogg, David W.; Willman, Beth; Brooks, Alyson M.; Brook, Chris B.; Stinson, Greg E-mail: bwillman@haverford.edu

    2009-09-10

    We investigate the formation of the stellar halos of four simulated disk galaxies using high-resolution, cosmological SPH + N-body simulations. These simulations include a self-consistent treatment of all the major physical processes involved in galaxy formation. The simulated galaxies presented here each have a total mass of {approx}10{sup 12} M{sub sun}, but span a range of merger histories. These simulations allow us to study the competing importance of in situ star formation (stars formed in the primary galaxy) and accretion of stars from subhalos in the building of stellar halos in a {lambda}CDM universe. All four simulated galaxies are surrounded by a stellar halo, whose inner regions (r < 20 kpc) contain both accreted stars, and an in situ stellar population. The outer regions of the galaxies' halos were assembled through pure accretion and disruption of satellites. Most of the in situ halo stars formed at high redshift out of smoothly accreted cold gas in the inner 1 kpc of the galaxies' potential wells, possibly as part of their primordial disks. These stars were displaced from their central locations into the halos through a succession of major mergers. We find that the two galaxies with recently quiescent merger histories have a higher fraction of in situ stars ({approx}20%-50%) in their inner halos than the two galaxies with many recent mergers ({approx}5%-10% in situ fraction). Observational studies concentrating on stellar populations in the inner halo of the Milky Way will be the most affected by the presence of in situ stars with halo kinematics, as we find that their existence in the inner few tens of kpc is a generic feature of galaxy formation.

  12. Development of a high-velocity free-flight launcher : the Ames light-gas gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charters, A C; Denardo, B Pat; Rossow, Vernon J

    1955-01-01

    Recent interest in long-range missiles has stimulated a search for new experimental techniques which can reproduce in the laboratory the high temperatures and Mach numbers associated with the missiles' flight. One promising possibility lies in free-flight testing of laboratory models which are flown at the full velocity of the missile. In this type of test, temperatures are approximated and aerodynamic heating of the model is representative of that experienced by the missile in high-velocity flight. A prime requirement of the free-flight test technique is a device which had the capacity for launching models at the velocities desired. In response to thie need, a gun firing light models at velocities up to 15,000 feet per second has been developed at the Ames Aeronautical Laboratory. The design of this gun, the analysis of its performance, and the results of the initial firing trials are described in this paper. The firing trials showed that the measured velocities and pressures agreed well with the predicted values. Also, the erosion of the launch tube was very small for the eleven rounds fired. The performance of the gun suggests that it will prove to be a satisfactory launcher for high-velocity free-flight tests. However, it should be mentioned that only the gross performance has been evaluated so far, and, consequently, the operation of the gun must be investigated in further detail before its performance can be reliably predicted over its full operating range.

  13. Population Gradients in Stellar Halos from GHOSTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailin, Jeremy; Monachesi, Antonela; Bell, Eric F.; de Jong, Roelof S.; Ghosts Survey

    2015-01-01

    We report on recent results from the Galaxy Halos, Outer disks, Substructure, Thick disks, and Star clusters (GHOSTS) survey, an HST ACS+WFC3 imaging survey to study stellar populations in and around 16 nearby spiral galaxies. By using HST resolution to resolve the stellar halos into individual red giant branch (RGB) stars, we are able to detect distinct stellar populations at several points throughout the halo of the half dozen massive highly-inclined galaxies in the sample. In approximately half of these galaxies, we detect a gradient in the color of the RGB; which we interpret as a metallicity gradient. Stellar halo formation models predict a wide variety of metallicity gradients: those in which the halos are dominated by stars formed in situ predict stronger gradients than we observe, while accretion-dominated halo models predict weaker or nonexistent gradients. Our measurements therefore provide a useful discriminator between stellar halo models, and at first look appear most consistent with the accretion-based model of Cooper et al. (2010).

  14. High precision UTDR measurements by sonic velocity compensation with reference transducer.

    PubMed

    Stade, Sam; Kallioinen, Mari; Mänttäri, Mika; Tuuva, Tuure

    2014-07-02

    An ultrasonic sensor design with sonic velocity compensation is developed to improve the accuracy of distance measurement in membrane modules. High accuracy real-time distance measurements are needed in membrane fouling and compaction studies. The benefits of the sonic velocity compensation with a reference transducer are compared to the sonic velocity calculated with the measured temperature and pressure using the model by Belogol'skii, Sekoyan et al. In the experiments the temperature was changed from 25 to 60 °C at pressures of 0.1, 0.3 and 0.5 MPa. The set measurement distance was 17.8 mm. Distance measurements with sonic velocity compensation were over ten times more accurate than the ones calculated based on the model. Using the reference transducer measured sonic velocity, the standard deviations for the distance measurements varied from 0.6 to 2.0 µm, while using the calculated sonic velocity the standard deviations were 21-39 µm. In industrial liquors, not only the temperature and the pressure, which were studied in this paper, but also the properties of the filtered solution, such as solute concentration, density, viscosity, etc., may vary greatly, leading to inaccuracy in the use of the Belogol'skii, Sekoyan et al. model. Therefore, calibration of the sonic velocity with reference transducers is needed for accurate distance measurements.

  15. Improving estimation of microseismic focal mechanisms using a high-resolution velocity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, T.; Chen, Y.; Lin, Y.; Huang, L.

    2015-12-01

    Injection and migration of CO2 during the geological carbon sequestration change the pore pressure and stress distribution in the reservoir. The change in stress may induce brittle failure on fractures, causing microseismic events. Focal mechanisms of induced microseismic events are useful for understanding stress evolution in the reservoir. An accurate estimation of microseismic focal mechanism depends on the accuracy of velocity models. In this work, we study the improvement on estimation of microseismic focal mechanisms using a high-resolution velocity model. We obtain the velocity model using a velocity inversion algorithm with a modified total-variation scheme rather than the commonly used Tikhonov regularization technique. We demonstrate with synthetic microseismic data that the velocity inversion method with a modified total-variation regularization scheme improves velocity inversion, and the improved velocity models enhance the accuracy of estimated focal mechanisms of microseismic events. We apply the new methodology to microseismic data acquired at a CO2-EOR (enhanced oil recovery) site at Aneth, Utah.

  16. A simple approach for determining detonation velocity of high explosive at any loading density.

    PubMed

    Keshavarz, Mohammad Hossein

    2005-05-20

    A simple empirical relationship is introduced between detonation velocity at any loading density and chemical composition of high explosive as well as its gas phase heat of formation, which is calculated by group additivity rules. The present work may be applied to any explosive that contains the elements of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and oxygen with no difficulties. The new correlation can easily be applied for determining detonation velocity of explosives with loading densities less than 1g/cm3 as well as greater than 1g/cm3. Calculated detonation velocities by this procedure for both pure and explosive formulations show good agreement with respect to measured detonation velocity over a wide range of loading density.

  17. The kinematics of the high velocity bipolar nebulae NGC 6537 and HB 5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corradi, Romano L. M.; Schwarz, Hugo E.

    1993-03-01

    The velocity structure of the bipolar planetary nebulae (PNe) NGC 6537 and Hb 5 has been investigated by means of medium dispersion long slit spectra. We have derived kinematical parameters and the deprojected shapes of the two nebulae by applying the kinematical model introduced by Solf and Ulrich (1985). In the direction of the polar axis of the nebulae, the deprojected expansion velocity is computed to be 300 km/s for NGC 6537 and about 250 km/s for Hb 5. These are very high velocities, but not unusual in the class of bipolar nebulae. The observed shapes and the velocity fields, in particular the one of Hb 5, are nicely reproduced by the interacting winds models by Icke et al. (1989). These imply a strongly aspherical initial mass distribution, i.e. equatorial to polar density contrasts larger than five. We espouse the idea that these initial conditions are created in interacting binary systems.

  18. Sound velocity of high-strength polymer with negative thermal expansion coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, R.; Ueno, M.; Okuda, Y.; Burmistrov, S.; Yamanaka, A.

    2003-05-01

    Sound velocities of fiber reinforced plastics (FRPs) were measured along the fiber axis at temperatures between 360 and 77 K. We used two kinds of the high-strength crystalline polymer fibers, polyethylene (Dyneema) and polybenzobisoxazole (Zylon), which have negative thermal expansion coefficients. They also have high thermal conductivities and high resistances for flash over voltage, and are expected as new materials for coil bobbins or spacers at cryogenic temperatures. They have very large sound velocities of about 9000 (m/s) at 77 K, which are 4.5 times larger than that of the ordinary polyethylene fiber.

  19. SHORT-DURATION LENSING EVENTS. I. WIDE-ORBIT PLANETS? FREE-FLOATING LOW-MASS OBJECTS? OR HIGH-VELOCITY STARS?

    SciTech Connect

    Di Stefano, Rosanne

    2012-08-01

    Short-duration lensing events tend to be generated by low-mass lenses or by lenses with high transverse velocities. Furthermore, for any given lens mass and speed, events of short duration are preferentially caused by nearby lenses (mesolenses) that can be studied in detail, or else by lenses so close to the source star that finite-source-size effects may be detected, yielding information about both the Einstein ring radius and the surface of the lensed star. Planets causing short-duration events may be in orbits with any orientation, and may have semimajor axes smaller than 1 AU, or they may reach the outer limits of their planetary systems, in the region corresponding to the solar system's Oort Cloud. They can have masses larger than Jupiter's or smaller than Pluto's. Lensing therefore has a unique potential to expand our understanding of planetary systems. A particular advantage of lensing is that it can provide precision measurements of system parameters, including the masses of and projected separation between star and planet. We demonstrate how the parameters can be extracted and show that a great deal can be learned. For example, it is remarkable that the gravitational mass of nearby free-floating planet-mass lenses can be measured by complementing observations of a photometric event with deep images that detect the planet itself. A fraction of short events may be caused by high-velocity stars located within a kiloparsec. Many high-velocity lenses are likely to be neutron stars that received large natal kicks. Other high-speed stars may be members of the halo population. Still others may be hypervelocity stars that have been ejected from the Galactic center, or runaway stars escaped from close binaries, possibly including the progenitor binaries of Type Ia supernovae.

  20. Short-duration Lensing Events. I. Wide-orbit Planets? Free-floating Low-mass Objects? Or High-velocity Stars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Stefano, Rosanne

    2012-08-01

    Short-duration lensing events tend to be generated by low-mass lenses or by lenses with high transverse velocities. Furthermore, for any given lens mass and speed, events of short duration are preferentially caused by nearby lenses (mesolenses) that can be studied in detail, or else by lenses so close to the source star that finite-source-size effects may be detected, yielding information about both the Einstein ring radius and the surface of the lensed star. Planets causing short-duration events may be in orbits with any orientation, and may have semimajor axes smaller than 1 AU, or they may reach the outer limits of their planetary systems, in the region corresponding to the solar system's Oort Cloud. They can have masses larger than Jupiter's or smaller than Pluto's. Lensing therefore has a unique potential to expand our understanding of planetary systems. A particular advantage of lensing is that it can provide precision measurements of system parameters, including the masses of and projected separation between star and planet. We demonstrate how the parameters can be extracted and show that a great deal can be learned. For example, it is remarkable that the gravitational mass of nearby free-floating planet-mass lenses can be measured by complementing observations of a photometric event with deep images that detect the planet itself. A fraction of short events may be caused by high-velocity stars located within a kiloparsec. Many high-velocity lenses are likely to be neutron stars that received large natal kicks. Other high-speed stars may be members of the halo population. Still others may be hypervelocity stars that have been ejected from the Galactic center, or runaway stars escaped from close binaries, possibly including the progenitor binaries of Type Ia supernovae.

  1. THE STELLAR HALOS OF MASSIVE ELLIPTICAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, Jenny E.; Murphy, Jeremy D.; Comerford, Julia M.; Gebhardt, Karl; Adams, Joshua J.

    2012-05-01

    We use the Mitchell Spectrograph (formerly VIRUS-P) on the McDonald Observatory 2.7 m Harlan J. Smith Telescope to search for the chemical signatures of massive elliptical galaxy assembly. The Mitchell Spectrograph is an integral-field spectrograph with a uniquely wide field of view (107'' Multiplication-Sign 107''), allowing us to achieve remarkably high signal-to-noise ratios of {approx}20-70 pixel{sup -1} in radial bins of 2-2.5 times the effective radii of the eight galaxies in our sample. Focusing on a sample of massive elliptical galaxies with stellar velocity dispersions {sigma}{sub *} > 150 km s{sup -1}, we study the radial dependence in the equivalent widths (EW) of key metal absorption lines. By twice the effective radius, the Mgb EWs have dropped by {approx}50%, and only a weak correlation between {sigma}{sub *} and Mgb EW remains. The Mgb EWs at large radii are comparable to those seen in the centers of elliptical galaxies that are {approx} an order of magnitude less massive. We find that the well-known metallicity gradients often observed within an effective radius continue smoothly to 2.5 R{sub e} , while the abundance ratio gradients remain flat. Much like the halo of the Milky Way, the stellar halos of our galaxies have low metallicities and high {alpha}-abundance ratios, as expected for very old stars formed in small stellar systems. Our observations support a picture in which the outer parts of massive elliptical galaxies are built by the accretion of much smaller systems whose star formation history was truncated at early times.

  2. The Stellar Halos of Massive Elliptical Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, Jenny E.; Murphy, Jeremy D.; Comerford, Julia M.; Gebhardt, Karl; Adams, Joshua J.

    2012-05-01

    We use the Mitchell Spectrograph (formerly VIRUS-P) on the McDonald Observatory 2.7 m Harlan J. Smith Telescope to search for the chemical signatures of massive elliptical galaxy assembly. The Mitchell Spectrograph is an integral-field spectrograph with a uniquely wide field of view (107'' × 107''), allowing us to achieve remarkably high signal-to-noise ratios of ~20-70 pixel-1 in radial bins of 2-2.5 times the effective radii of the eight galaxies in our sample. Focusing on a sample of massive elliptical galaxies with stellar velocity dispersions σ* > 150 km s-1, we study the radial dependence in the equivalent widths (EW) of key metal absorption lines. By twice the effective radius, the Mgb EWs have dropped by ~50%, and only a weak correlation between σ* and Mgb EW remains. The Mgb EWs at large radii are comparable to those seen in the centers of elliptical galaxies that are ~ an order of magnitude less massive. We find that the well-known metallicity gradients often observed within an effective radius continue smoothly to 2.5 Re , while the abundance ratio gradients remain flat. Much like the halo of the Milky Way, the stellar halos of our galaxies have low metallicities and high α-abundance ratios, as expected for very old stars formed in small stellar systems. Our observations support a picture in which the outer parts of massive elliptical galaxies are built by the accretion of much smaller systems whose star formation history was truncated at early times.

  3. System For Determining The Velocities Of Individual Fragments From An Exploding Warhead Using High Speed Photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollingworth, Donald; van der Merwe, Hendrik J.

    1983-03-01

    When a fragmentation warhead explodes, fragments are hurled outwards in all directions and in effect become projectiles with a capacity for inflicting damage on nearby objects. For kinetic energy calculations it is necessary to know both the mass and velocity of the fragments. These velocities can most easily be ascertained by the use of high speed photography. Owing to the considerable difference in speed between the fastest and slowest fragments emanating from an exploding warhead, a high speed motion picture camera, framing at the rate of 10 000 pictures per second, has been found to be a good medium for measuring their velocities. For instance velocity measurement tests have shown that over a distance of five metres from the centre of the warhead to the edges of the velocity plates, the difference in speed between the fastest and slowest fragments from an exploding 460 kg warhead covers a time span of at least 1 millisecond. This would represent 10 frames on a film running at the rate of 10 000 pictures per second. This paper will set forth the operating principles of the high speed photographic measuring techniques and the degree of accuracy which can be expected from it. Throughout the text the term warhead has been used to describe any fragmenting high explosive shell, bomb, rocket warhead, grenade or other explosive munitions.

  4. A high velocity impact experiment of micro-scale ice particles using laser-driven system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hyeonju; Kim, Jungwook; Yoh, Jack J.

    2014-11-01

    A jet engine for high speed air breathing propulsion is subject to continuous wear as a result of impacts of micro-scale ice particles during a flight in the atmosphere. The inlet duct and compressor blades are exposed to on-coming frozen moisture particles that may result in the surface damage and significantly shorten the designed lifetime of the aircraft. Under such prolonged high-speed impact loading, the performance parameters such as flight instability and power loss of a jet engine can be significantly degraded. In this work, a laser-driven system was designed to accelerate micro-scale ice particles to the velocity up to Mach 2 using a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser beam at 100-600 mJ with 1064 nm wavelength and 9 ns pulse duration. The high speed images (Phantom v711) and double exposure shadowgraphs were used to calculate the average velocity of ice particles and their deceleration. Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector measurements were also utilized for the analysis of free surface velocity of a metal foil in order to understand the interfacial dynamics between the impacting particles and accepting metal target. The velocity of our ice particles is sufficiently fast for studying the effect of moisture particle collision on an air-breathing duct of high speed aircraft, and thus the results can provide insight into how minute space debris or micrometeorites cause damage to the orbiting spacecraft at large.

  5. Experimental verification of vapor deposition rate theory in high velocity burner rigs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.; Santoro, Gilbert J.

    1985-01-01

    The main objective has been the experimental verification of the corrosive vapor deposition theory in high-temperature, high-velocity environments. Towards this end a Mach 0.3 burner-rig appartus was built to measure deposition rates from salt-seeded (mostly Na salts) combustion gases on the internally cooled cylindrical collector. Deposition experiments are underway.

  6. Temporary Network Development Capability in High Velocity Environments: A Dynamic Capability Study of Disaster Relief Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, William Ross

    2010-01-01

    Organizations involved in crisis relief after a natural disaster face the multifaceted challenge of significantly changing needs of their various stakeholders, limited, ambiguous and even incorrect information, and highly compressed time limitations. Yet the performance of these organization in these high velocity environments is critical for the…

  7. Highly ionized gas absorption in the disk and halo toward HD 167756 at 3.5 kilometers per second resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, Blair D.; Sembach, Kenneth R.; Cardelli, Jason A.

    1994-01-01

    High-resolution spectra of interstellar Si IV, C IV, and N V absorption lines along the 4 kpc path to the inner Galaxy star HD 167756 at z = -0.85 kpc are presented. The spectra were obtained with the echelle mode of Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS) aboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and have signal-to-noise ratios ranging from 23 to 38. The high resolution of the measurements full width at half maximum (FWHM = 3.5 km/s) results in fully resolved line profiles for the highly ionized gas absorption. The measurements provide information on the column density per unit velocity, N(v), as a function of velocity for Si IV, C IV, and N V. The C IV and N V profiles extend from -70 to +70 km/s, while the Si IV profiles extend from -40 to +70 km/s. The integrated logarithmic column densities are long N(Si IV) = 13.09 +/- 0.02, log N(C IV) = 13.83 +/- 0.02, and log N(N V) = 13.56 +/- 0.03. The N V profile is broad, asymmetric, and featureless, while the Si IV profile contains narrow absorption components near V(sub LSR) = -19, 0, +20, and +52 km/s with Doppler spread parameters, b about = 10-12 km/s. The C IV profile contains both broad and narrow structure. The high ion feature near +52 km/s is also detected in the low-ionization lines of Ca II, O I, Si II, and Fe II. The other narrow Si IV and C IV components occur within several km/s of components seen in low-ionization species. The sight line contains at least two types of highly ionized gas. One type gives rise to a broad N V profile, and the other results in the more structured Si IV profile. The C IV profile contains contributions from both types of highly ionized gas. The broad but asymmetric N V profile is well represented by a large Galactic scale height gas which is participating in Galactic rotation and has a combination of thermal and turbulent broadening with b(sub tot) about = 42 km/s. The C IV to N V abundance ratio of 1.0 +/- 0.3 for the gas implies T about 1.6 x 10(exp 5) K or about 8 x 10

  8. Velocity Fields in H II Regions Using High Resolution Imaging Fabry-Perot Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seema, P.

    1996-05-01

    The thesis comprises of two parts: I. Instrumentation II. Observations, results and discussion. An imaging Fabry-Perot spectrometer (IFPS) is designed and constructed for the studies on kinematics of extended astronomical objects (Seema et al., 1992). IFPS comprises of a field aperture, collimating lens and a two dimensional imaging sensor called Imaging Photon Detector (IPD). It is the first time that IPD which uses a resistive anode for position determination is being used in the spectroscopic studies of astronomical objects. Observations were made on Orion and Trifid nebula covering a wide field of view using a 35cm Celestron-14 telescope (f/11 cassegrain) at Gurushikhar, Mt.Abu, India. Orion Nebula: Observations were made in [OIII] 5007A, line with a spectral resolution of 6 km/sec and spatial resolution of 4" covering a field of view of 10.5', to study (i) general velocity flow (ii) high velocity flow and (iii)random motions. Line profiles generated for about 2000 positions showed an asymmetric shape with (a)a narrow component 20 +- 3 km/sec and (b) a broad component 50 +- 3 km/sec. The two components could be interpreted in terms of the interaction of the ionized gas (from the trapezium stars) with the condensations present in the nebula, resulting in the secondary flows. The iso-velocity contour map generated for both the components showed velocity flow in agreement with the champagne flow model (Tenorio-Tagle 1982). A model emission line profile constructed assuming a champagne flow in [OIII] 5007A, line for a position 2' away from theta-1 C Ori showed a reasonably good agreement with the narrow component of the observed profile. Certain high velocity flow (~50 km/s) regions are observed to be superimposed on the main flow of the narrow component. These flows are either radiation pressure driven stellar winds or jets generated during the formation phase of Young stellar objects. The radial velocity was found to be low with no high velocity flow regions in

  9. Relationship between structures of sprite streamers and inhomogeneity of preceding halos captured by high-speed camera during a combined aircraft and ground-based campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Y.; Sato, M.; Kudo, T.; Shima, Y.; Kobayashi, N.; Inoue, T.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; McHarg, M. G.; Haaland, R. K.; Kammae, T.; Yair, Y.; Lyons, W. A.; Cummer, S. A.; Ahrns, J.; Yukman, P.; Warner, T. A.; Sonnenfeld, R. G.; Li, J.; Lu, G.

    2011-12-01

    The relationship between diffuse glows such as elves and sprite halos and subsequent discrete structure of sprite streamers is considered to be one of the keys to solve the mechanism causing a large variation of sprite structures. However, it's not easy to image at high frame rate both the diffuse and discrete structures simultaneously, since it requires high sensitivity, high spatial resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio. To capture the real spatial structure of TLEs without influence of atmospheric absorption, spacecraft would be the best solution. However, since the imaging observation from space is mostly made for TLEs appeared near the horizon, the range from spacecraft to TLEs becomes large, such as few thousand km, resulting in low spatial resolution. The aircraft can approach thunderstorm up to a few hundred km or less and can carry heavy high-speed cameras with huge size data memories. In the period of June 27 - July 10, 2011, a combined aircraft and ground-based campaign, in support of NHK Cosmic Shore project, was carried with two jet airplanes under collaboration between NHK (Japan Broadcasting Corporation) and universities. On 8 nights out of 16 standing-by, the jets took off from the airport near Denver, Colorado, and an airborne high speed camera captured over 40 TLE events at a frame rate of 8300 /sec. Here we introduce the time development of sprite streamers and the both large and fine structures of preceding halos showing inhomogeneity, suggesting a mechanism to cause the large variation of sprite types, such as crown like sprites.

  10. The Scaling of Stellar Mass and Central Stellar Velocity Dispersion for Quiescent Galaxies at z<0.7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahid, H. Jabran; Geller, Margaret J.; Fabricant, Daniel G.; Hwang, Ho Seong

    2016-12-01

    We examine the relation between stellar mass and central stellar velocity dispersion—the M * σ relation—for massive quiescent galaxies at z < 0.7. We measure the local relation from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the intermediate redshift relation from the Smithsonian Hectospec Lensing Survey. Both samples are highly complete (>85%) and we consistently measure the stellar mass and velocity dispersion for the two samples. The M * σ relation and its scatter are independent of redshift with σ \\propto {M}* 0.3 for M * ≳ 1010.3 M ⊙. The measured slope of the M * σ relation is the same as the scaling between the total halo mass and the dark matter halo velocity dispersion obtained by N-body simulations. This consistency suggests that massive quiescent galaxies are virialized systems, where the central dark matter concentration is either a constant or negligible fraction of the stellar mass. The relation between the total galaxy mass (stellar + dark matter) and the central stellar velocity dispersion is consistent with the observed relation between the total mass of a galaxy cluster and the velocity dispersion of the cluster members. This result suggests that the central stellar velocity dispersion is directly proportional to the velocity dispersion of the dark matter halo. Thus, the central stellar velocity dispersion is a fundamental, directly observable property of galaxies, which may robustly connect galaxies to dark matter halos in N-body simulations. To interpret the results further in the context of ΛCDM, it would be useful to analyze the relationship between the velocity dispersion of stellar particles and the velocity dispersion characterizing their dark matter halos in high-resolution cosmological hydrodynamic simulations.

  11. Smith's Cloud: A High Velocity HI Cloud Entering The Galactic Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockman, Felix J.; Benjamin, R. A.; Heroux, A.; Langston, G. I.

    2007-12-01

    HI observations using the Green Bank Telescope at 21cm of the high-velocity cloud known as Smith's Cloud show that it has a large, cometary morphology pointing toward the Galactic disk, and shows clear signs of interaction with the Milky Way. From the velocity range of the interaction we can estimate the rest velocity of the ambient medium into which Smith's Cloud moves. This gives a kinematic distance to the interaction site of 12 kpc, a value which is essentially identical to other distance estimates for the cloud. The main portion of Smith's Cloud is located about 3 kpc below the Galactic plane and only 7.6 kpc from the Galactic center. Its total extent is more than 3 kpc. It is bring more than a million solar masses of gas to the star-forming regions of the inner Galaxy. From the projected differential velocity of the cloud we can estimate its trajectory: its total space velocity appears to be at least 275 km/s and it has a peculiar velocity with respect to its environment of at least 95 km/s.

  12. Isolated Bacterial Spores at High-velocity Survive Surface Impacts in Vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, Daniel; Barney, Brandon

    We present experiments in which bacterial spores were found to survive being accelerated in vacuum to velocities in the range 30-120 m/s and impacted on a dense target. In these experiments, spores of Bacillus subtilis spores were charged using electrospray at atmospheric pressure, dried, and then introduced into high vacuum. Through choice of skimmers and beam tubes, different velocity ranges were achieved. An image-charge detector observed the charged spores, providing total charge and velocity. The spores then impacted a glass target within a collection vessel. After the experiment, the collection vessel contents were extracted and cultured. Several positive and negative controls were used, including the use of antibiotic-resistant spores and antibiotic-containing (rifampicin) agar for culturing. These impact velocities are of particular interest for possible transport of bacterial spores from Mars to Phobos, and may have implications for planetary protection in a Phobos sample return mission. In addition, bacteria may reach similar velocities during a spacecraft crash (e.g., within components, or from spacecraft to surface materials during impact, etc.), raising concerns about forward contamination. The velocities of interest to transport of life between planets (panspermia) are somewhat higher, but these results complement shock-based experiments and contribute to the general discussion of impact survivability of organisms.

  13. Jet Velocity Profile Effects on Spray Characteristics of Impinging Jets at High Reynolds and Weber Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Neil S.; Kulkarni, Varun; Sojka, Paul E.

    2014-11-01

    While like-on-like doublet impinging jet atomization has been extensively studied in the literature, there is poor agreement between experimentally observed spray characteristics and theoretical predictions (Ryan et al. 1995, Anderson et al. 2006). Recent works (Bremond and Villermaux 2006, Choo and Kang 2007) have introduced a non-uniform jet velocity profile, which lead to a deviation from the standard assumptions for the sheet velocity and the sheet thickness parameter. These works have assumed a parabolic profile to serve as another limit to the traditional uniform jet velocity profile assumption. Incorporating a non-uniform jet velocity profile results in the sheet velocity and the sheet thickness parameter depending on the sheet azimuthal angle. In this work, the 1/7th power-law turbulent velocity profile is assumed to provide a closer match to the flow behavior of jets at high Reynolds and Weber numbers, which correspond to the impact wave regime. Predictions for the maximum wavelength, sheet breakup length, ligament diameter, and drop diameter are compared with experimental observations. The results demonstrate better agreement between experimentally measured values and predictions, compared to previous models. U.S. Army Research Office under the Multi-University Research Initiative Grant Number W911NF-08-1-0171.

  14. Critical velocities for deflagration and detonation triggered by voids in a REBO high explosive

    SciTech Connect

    Herring, Stuart Davis; Germann, Timothy C; Jensen, Niels G

    2010-01-01

    The effects of circular voids on the shock sensitivity of a two-dimensional model high explosive crystal are considered. We simulate a piston impact using molecular dynamics simulations with a Reactive Empirical Bond Order (REBO) model potential for a sub-micron, sub-ns exothermic reaction in a diatomic molecular solid. The probability of initiating chemical reactions is found to rise more suddenly with increasing piston velocity for larger voids that collapse more deterministically. A void with radius as small as 10 nm reduces the minimum initiating velocity by a factor of 4. The transition at larger velocities to detonation is studied in a micron-long sample with a single void (and its periodic images). The reaction yield during the shock traversal increases rapidly with velocity, then becomes a prompt, reliable detonation. A void of radius 2.5 nm reduces the critical velocity by 10% from the perfect crystal. A Pop plot of the time-to-detonation at higher velocities shows a characteristic pressure dependence.

  15. HIGH-VELOCITY CLOUDS IN THE GALACTIC ALL SKY SURVEY. I. CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, V. A.; Kummerfeld, J. K.; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.; Murphy, T.; Pisano, D. J.; Curran, J. R.

    2013-11-01

    We present a catalog of high-velocity clouds (HVCs) from the Galactic All Sky Survey (GASS) of southern sky neutral hydrogen, which has 57 mK sensitivity and 1 km s{sup –1} velocity resolution and was obtained with the Parkes Telescope. Our catalog has been derived from the stray-radiation-corrected second release of GASS. We describe the data and our method of identifying HVCs and analyze the overall properties of the GASS population. We catalog a total of 1693 HVCs at declinations <0°, including 1111 positive velocity HVCs and 582 negative velocity HVCs. Our catalog also includes 295 anomalous velocity clouds (AVCs). The cloud line-widths of our HVC population have a median FWHM of ∼19 km s{sup –1}, which is lower than that found in previous surveys. The completeness of our catalog is above 95% based on comparison with the HIPASS catalog of HVCs upon which we improve by an order of magnitude in spectral resolution. We find 758 new HVCs and AVCs with no HIPASS counterpart. The GASS catalog will shed unprecedented light on the distribution and kinematic structure of southern sky HVCs, as well as delve further into the cloud populations that make up the anomalous velocity gas of the Milky Way.

  16. Observations of diffusion in the electron halo and strahl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurgiolo, Chris; Goldstein, Melvyn L.

    2016-12-01

    Observations of the three-dimensional solar wind electron velocity distribution functions (VDF) using ϕ-θ plots often show a tongue of electrons that begins at the strahl and stretches toward a new population of electrons, termed the proto-halo, that exists near the projection of the magnetic field opposite that associated with the strahl. The energy range in which the tongue and proto-halo are observed forms a "diffusion zone". The tongue first appears in energy generally near the lower-energy range of the strahl and in the absence of any clear core/halo signature. While the ϕ-θ plots give the appearance that the tongue and proto-halo are derived from the strahl, a close examination of their density suggests that their source is probably the upper-energy core/halo electrons which have been scattered by one or more processes into these populations.

  17. A Investigation of Gouge Initiation in High-Velocity Sliding Contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachau, Robert David Mazur

    1991-02-01

    Surface damage has been observed on the rails of rocket sled tracks and on the barrels of high-velocity guns. The phenomenon is generally referred to as "gouging". Damage to a stationary surface (guider) is created from the oblique impact of a high-velocity object (slider) moving over its surface. The surface damage (gouge) is typically a shallow crater in the shape of a teardrop with the leading edge characterized by the wider end and a slightly raised lip. For rocket sleds, rail gouging occurs when the sled velocity is greater than 1.5 km/sec; while in guns, barrel gouging occurs when the velocity exceeds 4 km/sec. A model is developed to describe the phenomenon of gouging. An unbalanced slider randomly causes a shallow -angle, oblique impact between the slider and the guider. At sufficiently high velocity, the impact produces a thin, but very hot, layer of soft material at the contact surface. Under the action of a moving load, the soft layer lends itself to an antisymmetric deformation and a gouge is formed when this soft material is over-run by the slider. The model is simulated numerically with a hydrodynamic (CTH) code. The results of the simulations are in good agreement with the observed phenomena. Based on the simulated temperature and pressure profiles at the contact surface, design criteria for gouge mitigation are developed in this study.

  18. Experimental verification of corrosive vapor deposition rate theory in high velocity burner rigs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, S. A.; Santoro, G. J.

    1986-01-01

    The ability to predict deposition rates is required to facilitate modelling of high temperature corrosion by fused salt condensates in turbine engines. A corrosive salt vapor deposition theory based on multicomponent chemically frozen boundary layers (CFBL) has been successfully verified by high velocity burner rig experiments. The experiments involved internally air-impingement cooled, both rotating full and stationary segmented cylindrical collectors located in the crossflow of sodium-seeded combustion gases. Excellent agreement is found between the CFBL theory an the experimental measurements for both the absolute amounts of Na2SO4 deposition rates and the behavior of deposition rate with respect to collector temperature, mass flowrate (velocity) and Na concentration.

  19. Determination of minority-carrier lifetime and surface recombination velocity with high spacial resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watanabe, M.; Actor, G.; Gatos, H. C.

    1977-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of the electron beam induced current in conjunction with high-resolution scanning makes it possible to evaluate the minority-carrier lifetime three dimensionally in the bulk and the surface recombination velocity two dimensionally, with a high spacial resolution. The analysis is based on the concept of the effective excitation strength of the carriers which takes into consideration all possible recombination sources. Two-dimensional mapping of the surface recombination velocity of phosphorus-diffused silicon diodes is presented as well as a three-dimensional mapping of the changes in the minority-carrier lifetime in ion-implanted silicon.

  20. Field-effect transistor having a superlattice channel and high carrier velocities at high applied fields

    DOEpatents

    Chaffin, R.J.; Dawson, L.R.; Fritz, I.J.; Osbourn, G.C.; Zipperian, T.E.

    1984-04-19

    In a field-effect transistor comprising a semiconductor having therein a source, a drain, a channel and a gate in operational relationship, there is provided an improvement wherein said semiconductor is a superlattice comprising alternating quantum well and barrier layers, the quantum well layers comprising a first direct gap semiconductor material which in bulk form has a certain bandgap and a curve of electron velocity versus applied electric field which has a maximum electron velocity at a certain electric field, the barrier layers comprising a second semiconductor material having a bandgap wider than that of said first semiconductor material, wherein the layer thicknesses of said quantum well and barrier layers are sufficiently thin that the alternating layers constitute a superlattice having a curve of electron velocity versus applied electric field which has a maximum electron velocity at a certain electric field, and wherein the thicknesses of said quantum well layers are selected to provide a superlattice curve of electron velocity versus applied electric field whereby, at applied electric fields higher than that at which the maximum electron velocity occurs in said first material when in bulk form, the electron velocities are higher in said superlattice than they are in said first semiconductor material in bulk form.

  1. Frictional strength of wet- and dry- talc gouge in high-velocity shear experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Reches, Z.; Elwood Madden, A. S.

    2015-12-01

    The strength of the creeping segment of the San Andres fault may be controlled by the distinct weakness and stability of talc (Moore & Rymer, 2007). We analyze talc frictional strength at high slip-velocity of 0.002 - 0.66 m/s, long slip-distances of 0.01 m to 33 m, and normal stresses up to 4.1 MPa. This analysis bridges the gap between nucleation stage of low velocity/distance, and the frictional behavior during large earthquakes. We tested wet and dry samples of pure talc gouge in a confined rotary cell, and continuously monitored the slip-velocity, stresses, dilation and temperature. We run 29 experiments of single and stepped velocities to obtain 243 values of quasi-static frictional coefficients. Dry talc gouge showed distinct slip-strengthening: friction coefficient of µ ~0.4 at short slip-distances of D < 0.1 m, and it increased systematically to µ ~0.8 at slip-distances of D = 0.1- 1 m; at D > 1 m, the frictional strength saturated at µ= 0.8 - 1 level. Wet talc gouge (16-20% water) displayed low frictional strength of µ= 0.1-0.3, in agreement with published triaxial tests. The stepped-velocity runs revealed a consistent velocity-strengthening trend. For a velocity jump from V1 to V2, we used VD = (µ2 -µ1)/ln (V2/V1), and found that on average VD = 0.06 and 0.03 for dry and wet talc, respectively, and for slip distances shorter than 1 m. Microstructural analysis of post-shearing wet talc gouge revealed extreme slip localization to a principal-slip-zone of a few microns, and significant shear compaction of 10-30%. In contrast, dry talc gouge exhibited distributed shear in a wide zone and systematic shear dilation (10-50%). We propose slip along weak interlayer talc plates and thermal-pressurization as the possible weakening mechanisms for wet talc. The development of distributed secondary fault network along with substantial grain crushing is responsible for slip-strengthening in dry condition. Fig. 1. Friction maps of talc gouge as function of slip

  2. Characterization and evaluation of silicon carbide for high-velocity impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmquist, Timothy J.; Johnson, Gordon R.

    2005-05-01

    This article presents a characterization and evaluation of silicon carbide for high-velocity impact. This includes a wide range of loading conditions that produce large strains, high strain rates, and high pressures. Experimental data from the literature are used to determine constants for the Johnson-Holmquist-Beissel (JHB) constitutive model for brittle materials. A previous article by the authors presented a characterization of silicon carbide for high-velocity impact using an earlier version of the model (JH-1). The previous work provided good agreement with a broad range of experimental data with the exception of high-velocity penetration data. The current work uses the more recently developed JHB constitutive model, a target geometry that more closely matches the experimental design, and a computational technique that allows for target prestress. These recent developments (primarily the prestress) produce computed results that agree with all the experimental data, including the high-velocity penetration data. The computed results also provide a detailed analysis of the penetration process into a prestressed target and show why it is necessary to include the target prestress. A specific result is the ability to reproduce the nonsteady penetration rate that occurs in the prestressed target.

  3. The halo fixator.

    PubMed

    Bono, Christopher M

    2007-12-01

    The halo fixator may be used for the definitive treatment of cervical spine trauma, preoperative reduction in the patient with spinal deformity, and adjunctive postoperative stabilization following cervical spine surgery. Halo fixation decreases cervical motion by 30% to 96%. Absolute contraindications include cranial fracture, infection, and severe soft-tissue injury at the proposed pin sites. Relative contraindications include severe chest trauma, obesity, advanced age, and a barrel-shaped chest. In children, a computed tomography scan of the head should be obtained before pin placement to determine cranial bone thickness. Complications of halo fixation include pin loosening, pin site infection, and skin breakdown. A concerning rate of life-threatening complications, such as respiratory distress, has been reported in elderly patients. Despite a paucity of contemporary data, recent retrospective studies have demonstrated acceptable results for halo fixation in managing some upper and lower cervical spine injuries.

  4. Analysis of group-velocity dispersion of high-frequency Rayleigh waves for near-surface applications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luo, Y.; Xia, J.; Xu, Y.; Zeng, C.

    2011-01-01

    The Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) method is an efficient tool to obtain the vertical shear (S)-wave velocity profile using the dispersive characteristic of Rayleigh waves. Most MASW researchers mainly apply Rayleigh-wave phase-velocity dispersion for S-wave velocity estimation with a few exceptions applying Rayleigh-wave group-velocity dispersion. Herein, we first compare sensitivities of fundamental surface-wave phase velocities with group velocities with three four-layer models including a low-velocity layer or a high-velocity layer. Then synthetic data are simulated by a finite difference method. Images of group-velocity dispersive energy of the synthetic data are generated using the Multiple Filter Analysis (MFA) method. Finally we invert a high-frequency surface-wave group-velocity dispersion curve of a real-world example. Results demonstrate that (1) the sensitivities of group velocities are higher than those of phase velocities and usable frequency ranges are wider than that of phase velocities, which is very helpful in improving inversion stability because for a stable inversion system, small changes in phase velocities do not result in a large fluctuation in inverted S-wave velocities; (2) group-velocity dispersive energy can be measured using single-trace data if Rayleigh-wave fundamental-mode energy is dominant, which suggests that the number of shots required in data acquisition can be dramatically reduced and the horizontal resolution can be greatly improved using analysis of group-velocity dispersion; and (3) the suspension logging results of the real-world example demonstrate that inversion of group velocities generated by the MFA method can successfully estimate near-surface S-wave velocities. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  5. How pyroclastic flows attain high velocities- new insights from large-scale experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breard, E.; Lube, G.; Jones, J.; Valentine, G. A.

    2015-12-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions are most deadly when highly mobile pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) sweep down mountain flanks after eruption columns or lava domes collapse. An important goal in volcanic hazard assessment is to predict the velocity of PDCs in numerical hazard models. To date, this has only been partially successful for dilute PDCs, and major uncertainties remain with regard to the dynamics of PDCs that have coupled dense underflow and dilute ash-cloud regions. Interrogating these complex multiphase processes is only practical in the laboratory, but this introduces the problem of scale where it is difficult to minimise the boundary layer effects which, in small flows, can dominate behaviour. To bridge the gap, we synthesized large-scale PDCs by gravitational collapse of 1300 kg of a natural pyroclastic mixture and examined flow front velocity fields on inclined slopes. We show that, proximally, PDCs experience rapid expulsion of gas that entrains particles and yields a fast-moving turbulent and dilute cloud that becomes the flow head and moves at 200-250% of the impact velocity. Downstream, the turbulent cloud moves ahead of the underflow. We show that the velocity-dependent friction coefficient (which represents the major dissipative form of energy) directly relates to the kinematics of the underflow front. In experimental situations where the dilute flow front velocity exceeds at all times the underflow velocity, we propose a new analytical model to quantify the asymptotic waning of the flow front velocity with distance. Using measurements of the flow head geometry and density, we show that our model successfully predicts the flow front kinematics including a long-lasting period of deceleration. Importantly, the interplay between the turbulent flow front and the presence of an underflow leads to the formation of a wedge-shaped head characterized by unexpectedly high coefficients of entrainment of ambient air.

  6. IUE observations of high velocity gas towards the M16 nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, B. Y.

    1984-03-01

    The star HD 168183, which is part of the giant H II region-molecular cloud complex of M16 (NGC 6611), has been observed at high resolution using the IUE satellite. High velocity interstellar absorption components have been detected at velocities of -83, -38 and +40 km s-1 and it is proposed that a stellar wind-driven shock-front, interacting with the ambient neutral interstellar gas, is responsible for such complex velocity structure. Strong absorption from five of the 12C16O UV molecular lines has also been detected and the present UV absorption line data seem consistent with radio observations of M16 in which the Tenorio-Tagle 'champagne' model has been invoked to explain the ionized and neutral gas outflows from the nebula.

  7. Palomar 13: An Unusual Stellar System in the Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Côté, Patrick; Djorgovski, S. G.; Meylan, G.; Castro, Sandra; McCarthy, J. K.

    2002-08-01

    We report the first results of a program to study the internal kinematics of globular clusters in the outer halo of the Milky Way. Using the Keck telescope and High Resolution Echelle Spectrometer, we have measured precise radial velocities for 30 candidate red giants in the direction of Palomar 13, an object traditionally cataloged as a compact, low-luminosity globular cluster. We have combined these radial velocities with published proper motion membership probabilities and new CCD photometry from the Keck and Canada-France-Hawaii telescopes to isolate a sample of 21 probable members. We find a systemic velocity of s=24.1+/-0.5 km s-1 and a projected, intrinsic velocity dispersion of σp=2.2+/-0.4 km s-1. Although modest, this dispersion is nevertheless several times larger than that expected for a globular cluster of this luminosity and central concentration. Taken at face value, it implies a mass-to-light ratio of ΥV=40+24-17 based on the best-fit King-Michie model. The surface density profile of Palomar 13 also appears unusual compared to most Galactic globular clusters; depending upon the details of background subtraction and model-fitting, Palomar 13 either contains a substantial population of ``extratidal'' stars, or is considerably more spatially extended than previously suspected. The full surface density profile is equally well fitted by a King-Michie model having a high concentration and large tidal radius, or by a Navarro-Frenk-White model. We examine-and tentatively reject-a number of possible origins for the observed characteristics of Palomar 13 (e.g., velocity ``jitter'' among the red giant branch stars, spectroscopic binary stars, nonstandard mass functions, modified Newtonian dynamics) and conclude that the two leading explanations are either catastrophic heating during a recent perigalacticon passage or the presence of a dark matter halo. The available evidence therefore suggests that Palomar 13 is either a globular cluster that is now in

  8. Measurement of a velocity field in microvessels using a high resolution PIV technique.

    PubMed

    Sugii, Yasuhiko; Nishio, Shigeru; Okamoto, Koji

    2002-10-01

    Because endothelial cells are subject to flow shear stress, it is important to determine the velocity distribution in microvessels during studies of the mechanical interactions between the blood and the endothelium. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) is a quantitative method for measuring velocity fields instantaneously in experimental fluid mechanics. The authors have developed a high-resolution PIV technique that improves the dynamic flow range, spatial resolution, and measurement accuracy. The proposed method was applied to images of the arteriole in the rat mesentery, using an intravital microscope and high-speed digital video system. Taking the mesentery motion into account, the PIV technique was improved to measure red blood cell (RBC) velocity. Velocity distributions with spatial resolutions of 0.8 3 0.8 mm were obtained even near the wall in the center plane of the arteriole. The arteriole velocity profile was blunt in the center region of the vessel cross-section and sharp in the near-wall region. Typical flow features for non-Newtonian fluid are shown.

  9. Velocity measurements of laser driven flyers backed by high impedance windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheffield, S. A.; Rogers, J. W., Jr.; Castaneda, J. N.

    The response of free-standing foils to laser intensity levels of 1,000 to 1,000000 Gw/sq cm was characterized. The response of free-standing and backed foils at much lower intensities, i.e., in the region of 1 to 20 GW/sq cm, was characterized and these flyers are used to initiate insensitive secondary high explosives. The output of a 3.5-J Nd:glass laser with a 16 ns pulse was used to drive 1.5-mm-diameter aluminum flyers. The velocities of both free-standing flyers and flyers backed on the driven side by windows of water, fused silica, or sapphire were measured using optically recording velocity interferometer system (ORVIS). Intensities were on the order of 10 GW/sq cm and velocities as high as 5 km/s were measured for 13-micron/thick, Al flyers. Velocity and acceleration varied only slightly with the shock impedance of the window. Preliminary measurements indicate that pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) at a density of 1.4 grams/cu cm, and HNS-FP (hexanitrostilbene-fine particle) at a density of 1.6 grams/cu cm, can be promptly detonated by 66-micron m-thick, Al flyers impacting at a velocity of near 2.5 km/s.

  10. Velocity measurements of laser driven flyers backed by high impedance windows

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, S.A.; Rogers, J.W. Jr.; Castaneda, J.N.

    1985-01-01

    Because of possible applications to inertial confinement fusion, the response of free-standing foils to laser intensity levels of 10/sup 3/ to 10/sup 6/ GW/cm/sup 2/ has been well characterized. Our interest is in characterizing the response of free-standing and backed foils at much lower intensities, i.e., in the region of 1 to 20 GW/cm/sup 2/, and using these flyers to initiate insensitive secondary high explosives. The output of a 3.5-J Nd:glass laser with a 16 ns pulse was used to drive 1.5-mm-diameter aluminum (Al) flyers. The velocities of both free-standing flyers and flyers backed on the driven side by windows of water, fused silica, or sapphire were measured using ORVIS (Optically Recording Velocity Interferometer System). Intensities were on the order of 10 GW/cm/sup 2/ and velocities as high as 5 km/s were measured for 13-..mu..m/thick, Al flyers. Velocity and acceleration were observed to vary only slightly with the shock impedance of the window. Preliminary measurements indicate that PETN (pentaerythritol tetranitrate) at a density of 1.4 grams/cm/sup 3/, and HNS-FP (hexanitrostilbene-fine particle) at a density of 1.6 grams/cm/sup 3/, can be promptly detonated by 66-..mu..m-thick, Al flyers impacting at a velocity of near 2.5 km/s.

  11. The HALO / HALO-2 Supernova Neutrino Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, Stanley; HALO Collaboration; HALO-2 Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The Helium and Lead Observatory (HALO) is a dedicated supernova neutrino detector in SNOLAB, which is built from 79 tons of surplus lead and the helium-3 neutron detectors from the SNO experiment. It is sensitive primarily to electron neutrinos, and is thus complementary to water Cerenkov and organic scintillation detectors which are primarily sensitive to electron anti-neutrinos. A comparison of the rates in these complementary detectors will enable a flavor decomposition of the neutrino flux from the next galactic core-collapse supernova. We have tentative ideas to build a 1000-ton HALO-2 detector in the Gran Sasso laboratory by using the lead from the decommissioned OPERA detector. We are exploring several neutron detector technologies to supplement the existing helium-3 detectors. We welcome new collaborators to join us. This research is supported by the NRC and NSERC (Canada), the US DOE and NSF, and the German RISE program.

  12. Halo vest instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huston, Dryver R.; Krag, Martin

    1996-05-01

    The halo vest is a head and neck immobilization system that is often used on patients that are recovering from cervical trauma or surgery. The halo vest system consists of a rigid halo that is firmly attached to the skull, an upright support structure for stabilization and immobilization, and a torso-enveloping vest. The main purpose of this study was to measure the forces that are carried by the halo-vest structure as the subject undergoes various activities of daily living and external loading for different vest designs. A tethered strain gage load cell based instrumentation system was used to take these load measurements on ten different subjects. Three different halo-vest systems were evaluated. The primary difference between the vests was the amount of torso coverage and the use of shoulder straps. The loads were measured, analyzed and used to compare the vests and to create a model of halo-vest-neck mechanics. Future applications of this technology to standalone data logging, pin-load measuring and biofeedback applications are discussed.

  13. EFFECT OF DARK MATTER HALO SUBSTRUCTURES ON GALAXY ROTATION CURVES

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Nirupam

    2010-11-01

    In this paper, the effect of halo substructures on galaxy rotation curves is investigated using a simple model of dark matter clustering. A dark matter halo density profile is developed based only on the scale-free nature of clustering that leads to a statistically self-similar distribution of the substructures at the galactic scale. A semi-analytical method is used to derive rotation curves for such a clumpy dark matter density profile. It is found that the halo substructures significantly affect the galaxy velocity field. Based on the fractal geometry of the halo, this self-consistent model predicts a Navarro-Frenk-White-like rotation curve and a scale-free power spectrum of the rotation velocity fluctuations.

  14. MULTIPLE HIGH-VELOCITY SiO MASER FEATURES FROM THE HIGH-MASS PROTOSTAR W51 NORTH

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Se-Hyung; Kim, Jaeheon; Byun, Do-Young E-mail: jhkim@kasi.re.kr

    2011-02-01

    We present the detection of multiple high-velocity silicon monoxide (SiO v = 1, 2, J = 1-0) maser features in the high-mass protostar W51 North which are distributed over an exceedingly large velocity range from 105 to 230 km s{sup -1}. The SiO v = 1, J = 1-0 maser emission shows 3-5 narrow components which span a velocity range from 154 to 230 km s{sup -1} according to observational epochs. The SiO v = 2, J = 1-0 maser also shows 3-5 narrow components that do not correspond to the SiO v = 1 maser and span a velocity range from 105 to 154 km s{sup -1}. The multiple maser components show significant changes on very short timescales (<1 month) from epoch to epoch. We suggest that the high-velocity SiO masers may be emanated from massive star-forming activity of the W51 North protostar as SiO maser jets and will be a good probe of the earliest evolutionary stages of high-mass star formation via an accretion model. Further high angular resolution observations will be required for confirmation.

  15. Preservation of Cognitive Performance with Age during Exertional Heat Stress under Low and High Air Velocity

    PubMed Central

    Wright Beatty, Heather E.; Keillor, Jocelyn M.; Hardcastle, Stephen G.; Boulay, Pierre; Kenny, Glen P.

    2015-01-01

    Older adults may be at greater risk for occupational injuries given their reduced capacity to dissipate heat, leading to greater thermal strain and potentially cognitive decrements. Purpose. To examine the effects of age and increased air velocity, during exercise in humid heat, on information processing and attention. Methods. Nine young (24 ± 1 years) and 9 older (59 ± 1 years) males cycled 4 × 15 min (separated by 15 min rest) at a fixed rate of heat production (400 W) in humid heat (35°C, 60% relative humidity) under 0.5 (low) and 3.0 (high) m·s−1 air velocity wearing coveralls. At rest, immediately following exercise (end exercise), and after the final recovery, participants performed an abbreviated paced auditory serial addition task (PASAT, 2 sec pace). Results. PASAT numbers of correct responses at end exercise were similar for young (low = 49 ± 3; high = 51 ± 3) and older (low = 46 ± 5; high = 47 ± 4) males and across air velocity conditions, and when scored relative to age norms. Psychological sweating, or an increased sweat rate with the administration of the PASAT, was observed in both age groups in the high condition. Conclusion. No significant decrements in attention and speeded information processing were observed, with age or altered air velocity, following intermittent exercise in humid heat. PMID:25874223

  16. Ultraviolet Molecular Rayleigh Scattering Used to Measure Velocity in High-Speed Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seasholtz, Richard G.

    1997-01-01

    Molecular Rayleigh scattering offers a means to measure gas flow parameters including density, temperature, and velocity. No seeding of the flow is necessary. The Rayleigh scattered power is proportional to the gas density, the spectral width is related to the gas temperature, and the shift in the frequency of the spectral peak is proportional to one component of the fluid velocity. Velocity measurements based on Rayleigh scattering are more suitable for high-speed flow, where the bulk fluid velocity is on the order of, or larger than, the molecular thermal velocities. Use of ultraviolet wavelengths for Rayleigh scattering diagnostics is attractive for two reasons. First, the Rayleigh scattering cross section is proportional to the inverse 4th power of the wavelength. And second, the reflectivity of metallic surfaces is generally less than it is at longer wavelengths. This is of particular interest in confined flow situations, such as in small wind tunnels and aircraft engine components, where the stray laser light scattered from the windows and internal surfaces in the test facility limits the application of Rayleigh scattering diagnostics. In this work at the NASA Lewis Research Center, molecular Rayleigh scattering of the 266-nm fourth harmonic of a pulsed, injection seeded Nd:YAG (neodymium:yttriumaluminum- garnet) laser was used to measure velocity in a supersonic free air jet with a 9.3- mm exit diameter. The frequency of the Rayleigh scattered light was analyzed with a planar mirror Fabry-Perot interferometer used in a static imaging mode, with the images recorded on a cooled, high-quantum-efficiency charge-coupled discharge (CCD) camera. In addition, some unshifted light from the same laser pulse was imaged through the interferometer to generate a reference. Data were obtained with single laser pulses at velocities up to Mach 1.3. The measured velocities were in good agreement with velocities calculated from isentropic flow relations. Our conclusion from

  17. Sound Velocity Measurement of Stishovite at High Pressures up to 19 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, C.; Jin, Z.; Wang, Y.; Zhang, Y.; WANG, C.

    2015-12-01

    An experimental system for measurement of the elastic wave velocities of solid polycrystalline samples at high pressures has been installed at the State Key Laboratory of Geological Processes and Mineral Resources, China University of Geosciences (Wuhan). The ultrasonic system with LiNbO3 transducer can both generate and receive high frequency (MHz) signal. Combination with a Walker-type multianvil, the travel time through the polycrystalline sample at high pressures can be obtained. We carried out sound velocity measurements on polycrystalline stishovite up to 19 GPa at room temperature. And the experimental result shows an acoustic softening at high pressures. The experimental technique provides the offline experimental measurement of various materials to the high pressures corresponding to the Earth's mantle transition zone.

  18. Role of the leader in the rail gun channel at high launching velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagorskii, A. V.; Katsnel'Son, S. S.; Pravdin, S. S.; Fomichev, V. P.

    1992-08-01

    An analysis of the performance of a number of rail guns indicates that one of the factors limiting the launching velocity is the formation of a leader. In experiments, the leader is usually formed as a result of a plasma breakdown between the dielectric projectile and the channel walls. This can be prevented by various technical means. However, at high launching velocities (5 km/s and greater) a leader may form as a result of a breakdown in the ionized gas in the wake of a strong shock wave ahead of the projectile. Further research is needed to find ways of preventing the formation of a leader in the latter case.

  19. Evidence for a Very Low-column Density Hole in the Galactic Halo in the Direction of the High Latitude Molecular Cloud MBM 16

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W.; Galeazzi, M.; Ursino, E.

    2016-01-01

    Shadow observations are the only way to observe emission from the galactic halo (GH) and/or the circumgalactic medium (CGM) free of any foreground contamination from local hot bubble (LHB) and solar wind charge exchange (SWCX). We analyzed data from a shadow observation in the direction of the high latitude, neutral hydrogen cloud MBM 16 with Suzaku. We found that all emission can be accounted for by foreground emission from LHB and SWCX, plus power-law emission associated with unresolved point sources. The GH/CGM in the direction of MBM 16 is negligible or inexistent in our observation, with upper limits on the emission measure of 9× {10}-4 pc cm-6 (90% C.L.-solar metallicity), at the lowest end of current estimates.

  20. Fabry-Perot images of NGC 1275 and its puzzling high-velocity system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caulet, Adeline; Woodgate, Bruce E.; Brown, Larry W.; Gull, Theodore R.; Hintzen, Paul; Lowenthal, James D.; Oliversen, Ronald J.; Ziegler, Michael M.

    1992-01-01

    The Fabry-Perot imager is used to obtain a velocity sequence of calibrated narrow-band CCD images to cover 3000 km/s velocity space between the redshifted H-alpha emission lines of NGC 1275, its extended associated system of low-velocity (LV) filaments, and the high-velocity (HV) system of knots, projected on the same line of sight in the sky. The lack of intermediate-velocity emission-line gas between the two systems leads to an upper limit of 1.5 x 10 exp -16 ergs/sq cm s sq arcsec (3 sigma) on stripped ionized gas due to the dynamical interaction between NGC 1275 and its HV companion galaxy. It also confirms previous reports that the level of continuum light arising from stellar and nonstellar sources must be very low in otherwise bright, strongly concentrated emission-line knots with unresolved diameters of 425/h pc. The H-alpha luminosities of the emission-line regions of the two systems were measured and star formation rates derived in order to investigate quantitatively the physical relation between the HV galaxy, NGC 1275, and the surrounding cooling flow filaments.

  1. Portable conduction velocity experiments using earthworms for the college and high school neuroscience teaching laboratory.

    PubMed

    Shannon, Kyle M; Gage, Gregory J; Jankovic, Aleksandra; Wilson, W Jeffrey; Marzullo, Timothy C

    2014-03-01

    The earthworm is ideal for studying action potential conduction velocity in a classroom setting, as its simple linear anatomy allows easy axon length measurements and the worm's sparse coding allows single action potentials to be easily identified. The earthworm has two giant fiber systems (lateral and medial) with different conduction velocities that can be easily measured by manipulating electrode placement and the tactile stimulus. Here, we present a portable and robust experimental setup that allows students to perform conduction velocity measurements within a 30-min to 1-h laboratory session. Our improvement over this well-known preparation is the combination of behaviorally relevant tactile stimuli (avoiding electrical stimulation) with the invention of minimal, low-cost, and portable equipment. We tested these experiments during workshops in both a high school and college classroom environment and found positive learning outcomes when we compared pre- and posttests taken by the students.

  2. Rayleigh Scattering Diagnostic for Dynamic Measurement of Velocity Fluctuations in High Speed Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seasholtz, Richard G.; Panda, Jayanta; Elam, Kristie A.

    2001-01-01

    A flow diagnostic technique based on the molecular Rayleigh scattering of laser light is used to obtain dynamic density and velocity data in a high speed flow. The technique is based on analyzing the Rayleigh scattered light with a Fabry-Perot interferometer used in the static, imaging mode. An analysis is presented that established a lower bound for measurement uncertainty of about 20 m/sec for individual velocity measurements obtained in a 100 microsecond time interval. Software and hardware interfaces were developed to allow computer control of all aspects of the experiment and data acquisition. The signals from three photomultiplier tubes were simultaneously recorded using photon counting at a 10 kHz sampling rate and 10 second recording periods. Density and velocity data, including distribution functions and power spectra, taken in a Mach 0.8 free jet, are presented.

  3. Velocity analysis using high-resolution semblance based on sparse hyperbolic Radon transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Xiangbo; Wang, Shengchao; Zhang, Tianze

    2016-11-01

    Semblance measures the lateral coherency of the seismic events in a common mid-point gather, and it has been widely used for the normal-moveout-based velocity estimation. In this paper, we propose a new velocity analysis method by using high-resolution semblance based on sparse hyperbolic Radon transform (SHRT). Conventional semblance can be defined as the ratio of signal energy to total energy in the time gate. We replace the signal energy with the square of the sparse Radon panel and replace the total energy with the sparse Radon panel of the square data. Because of the sparsity-constrained inversion of SHRT, the new approach can produce higher resolution semblance spectra than the conventional semblance. We test this new semblance on synthetic and field data to demonstrate the improvements in velocity analysis.

  4. MODIFIED GRAVITY SPINS UP GALACTIC HALOS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jounghun; Zhao, Gong-Bo; Li, Baojiu; Koyama, Kazuya

    2013-01-20

    We investigate the effect of modified gravity on the specific angular momentum of galactic halos by analyzing the halo catalogs at z = 0 from high-resolution N-body simulations for a f(R) gravity model that meets the solar-system constraint. It is shown that the galactic halos in the f(R) gravity model tend to acquire significantly higher specific angular momentum than those in the standard {Lambda}CDM model. The largest difference in the specific angular momentum distribution between these two models occurs for the case of isolated galactic halos with mass less than 10{sup 11} h {sup -1} M {sub Sun }, which are likely least shielded by the chameleon screening mechanism. As the specific angular momentum of galactic halos is rather insensitive to other cosmological parameters, it can in principle be an independent discriminator of modified gravity. We speculate a possibility of using the relative abundance of low surface brightness galaxies (LSBGs) as a test of general relativity given that the formation of the LSBGs occurs in fast spinning dark halos.

  5. Study of olivine-rich dark halo crater - Beaumont L in Mare Nectaris using high resolution remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Prabhjot; Chauhan, Prakash; Rajawat, A. S.; Kumar, A. S. Kiran

    2015-05-01

    Study of dark-haloed craters (DHCs) can provide important information about the geology, mineralogy and evolution of certain hidden mare deposits known as cryptomare. Some DHCs have been identified in the Mare Nectaris region of the near side of the Moon. Beaumont L represents one such DHC situated on the western flank of the Nectaris basin. Moon Mineralogical Mapper (M3) images were used to investigate the composition of DHCs. Morphological investigations have been carried out using Terrain Mapping Camera (TMC) and Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) Narrow Angle Camera images. The morphological details captured by TMC and LROC Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) images provide evidence that Beaumont-L is of impact origin and do not show evidence of a volcanic origin. The compositional analysis using M3 data indicates the presence of an olivine rich cryptomare unit excavated due to the Beaumont L impact. Our study also confirms that the band I feature in the reflectance spectra of Beaumont L is completely attributable to olivine deposits without contribution from any type of glass/melt deposits. The presence of olivine in Beaumont L suggests either excavation of olivine-rich cryptomare or a subsurface mafic pluton.

  6. The Vertical Structure of the Halo Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinman, T. D.; Bragaglia, A.; Cacciari, C.; Buzzoni, A.; Spagna, A.

    New GSC-II proper motions and radial velocities of RR Lyrae and Blue Horizontal Branch stars near the North Galactic Pole are used to show that the Galactic Halo 5 kpc above the Plane has a significantly retrograde galactic rotation. Streaming motions cannot be excluded. Based on observations collected at the Kitt Peak and TNG Observatories. Funded by MIUR-Cofin 2001 (PI: Gratton).

  7. A Joint Inversion for Velocity and Anisotropy Structure Beneath a Highly Extended Continental Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eilon, Z.; Abers, G. A.; Gaherty, J. B.; Jin, G.

    2014-12-01

    We jointly invert body wave travel times for anisotropy and velocity variations within the Woodlark Rift, Papua New Guinea, one of the youngest (≤6Ma) and most highly-extended (≤190km) continental rifts known. We use data from the CDPapua passive seismic array deployed around the D'Entrecasteaux Islands; these islands lie within the maximally-thinned continental crust at the centre of the rift and host the world's youngest (5 - 7 Ma) UHP rocks. We have previously used SK(K)S splitting to identify strong anisotropy within this rift, with fast axis orientated parallel to extension, roughly N-S. Consistency of splitting direction across station, back azimuth and method of analysis indicates a simple anisotropic fabric beneath much of this region. Consequently, we simplify the anisotropic inversion by solving for perturbations to N-S and E-W shear velocities at each node. This work builds on our previous isotropic tomographic study by resolving tradeoffs between anisotropy and velocity heterogeneities. We cross-correlate shear wave arrivals separately on N-S and E-W components, using the Christoffel equations to show that the travel times of these orthogonal quasi-shear pulses distinctly record the fast and slow velocities within our model. We invert these data for velocities on an irregular mesh, using a finite frequency approach with a first fresnel zone approximation. Preliminary results identify the locus of the rift beneath the D'Entrecasteaux Islands, and demonstrate that substantial anisotropy is present beneath the region of major extension. This anisotropy is co-located with low seismic velocities that indicate almost total removal of lithosphere, consistent with gravity fitting. Therefore, we ascribe the anisotropy within the rift to LPO of highly sheared asthenospheric mantle as a result of the large magnitude of extension.

  8. Method and apparatus for optical Doppler tomographic imaging of fluid flow velocity in highly scattering media

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, John Stuart; Milner, Thomas Edward; Chen, Zhongping

    1999-01-01

    Optical Doppler tomography permits imaging of fluid flow velocity in highly scattering media. The tomography system combines Doppler velocimetry with high spatial resolution of partially coherent optical interferometry to measure fluid flow velocity at discrete spatial locations. Noninvasive in vivo imaging of blood flow dynamics and tissue structures with high spatial resolutions of the order of 2 to 10 microns is achieved in biological systems. The backscattered interference signals derived from the interferometer may be analyzed either through power spectrum determination to obtain the position and velocity of each particle in the fluid flow sample at each pixel, or the interference spectral density may be analyzed at each frequency in the spectrum to obtain the positions and velocities of the particles in a cross-section to which the interference spectral density corresponds. The realized resolutions of optical Doppler tomography allows noninvasive in vivo imaging of both blood microcirculation and tissue structure surrounding the vessel which has significance for biomedical research and clinical applications.

  9. The frequency and distribution of high-velocity gas in the Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, Joy S.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the frequency and distribution of high-velocity gas in the Galaxy using UV absorption line measurements from archival high-dispersion IUE spectra and to identify particularly interesting regions for future study. Approximately 500 spectra have been examined. The study began with the creation of a database of all 0 and B stars with b less than or = to 30 deg observed with IUE at high dispersion over its 18-year lifetime. The original database of 2500 unique objects was reduced to 1200 objects which had optimal exposures available. The next task was to determine the distances of these stars so the high-velocity structures could be mapped in the Galaxy. Spectroscopic distances were calculated for each star for which photometry was available. The photometry was acquired for each star using the SIMBAD database. Preference was given to the ubvy system where available; otherwise the UBV system was used.

  10. Design and test of a superconducting structure for high-velocity ions

    SciTech Connect

    Delayen, J.R.; Kennedy, W.L.; Roche, C.T.

    1992-10-01

    Following the successful development of a niobium coaxial half-wave structure we have designed, built and tested a new half-wave geometry: the spoke resonator. This geometry is better suited for high frequency resonators and for the acceleration of high velocity ions. The prototype cavity is a 2-gap structure resonating at 855 MHz, and optimized for particle velocity of 0.30 c. It is easier to manufacture than the coaxial half-wave resonator and the geometry can be straightforwardly extended to multigap designs. Rf-tests have been performed on this cavity both prior to and after high temperature annealing. An accelerating gradient of 7.2 MV/m (cw) and 7.8 MV/m (pulsed) was observed at 4.2 K. After annealing, a low power Q{sub 0} of 1.2 {times}10{sup 8} was observed with small Q degradation due to field emission at high accelerating fields.

  11. Design and test of a superconducting structure for high-velocity ions

    SciTech Connect

    Delayen, J.R.; Kennedy, W.L.; Roche, C.T.

    1992-01-01

    Following the successful development of a niobium coaxial half-wave structure we have designed, built and tested a new half-wave geometry: the spoke resonator. This geometry is better suited for high frequency resonators and for the acceleration of high velocity ions. The prototype cavity is a 2-gap structure resonating at 855 MHz, and optimized for particle velocity of 0.30 c. It is easier to manufacture than the coaxial half-wave resonator and the geometry can be straightforwardly extended to multigap designs. Rf-tests have been performed on this cavity both prior to and after high temperature annealing. An accelerating gradient of 7.2 MV/m (cw) and 7.8 MV/m (pulsed) was observed at 4.2 K. After annealing, a low power Q{sub 0} of 1.2 {times}10{sup 8} was observed with small Q degradation due to field emission at high accelerating fields.

  12. High-Velocity Absorption Features in FUSE Spectra of Eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonneborn, G.; Iping, R. C.; Gull, T. R.; Vieira, G.

    2003-01-01

    Numerous broad (200 to 1000 km/sec) features in the FUSE spectrum (905-1187 A) of eta Carinae are identified as absorption by a forest of high-velocity narrow lines formed in the expanding circumstellar envelope. These features were previously thought to be P-Cygni lines arising in the wind of the central star. The features span a heliocentric velocity range of -140 to -580 km/sec and are seen prominently in low-ionization ground-state transitions (e.g. N I 1134-35, Fe II 1145-42, 1133, 1127- 22, P II 1153, C I 1158) in addition to C III] 1176 A. The high-velocity components of the FUSE transitions have depths about 50% below the continuum. The identifications are consistent with the complex velocity structures seen in ground- and excited-state transitions of Mg I, Mg 11, Fe II, V II, etc observed in STIS/E230H spectra. The origin of other broad features of similar width and depth in the FUSE spectrum, but without low-velocity ISM absorption, are unidentified. However, they are suspected of being absorption of singly-ionized iron-peak elements (e.g. Fe II, V II, Cr II) out of excited levels 1,000 to 20,000 cmE-l above the ground state. The high-velocity features seen in Fe II 1145 are also present in Fe II 1608 (STIS/E140M), but are highly saturated in the latter. Since these transitions have nearly identical log (flambda) (1.998 vs. 2.080), the differences in the profiles are attributable to the different aperture sizes used (30 x 30 arcsec for FUSE, 0.2 x 0.2 arcsec for STIS/E140M). The high-velocity gas appears to be very patchy or has a small covering factor near the central star. Eta Carinae has been observed several times by FUSE over the past three years. The FUSE flux levels and spectral features in eta Car are essentially unchanged over the 2000 March to June 2002 period, establishing a baseline far-UV spectrum in advance of the predicted spectroscopic minimum in 2003.

  13. The high-velocity outflow in the proto-planetary nebula Hen 3-1475

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riera, A.; García-Lario, P.; Manchado, A.; Bobrowsky, M.; Estalella, R.

    2003-04-01

    The proto-planetary nebula Hen 3-1475 shows a remarkable highly collimated optical jet with an S-shaped string of three pairs of knots and extremely high velocities. We present here a detailed analysis of the overall morphology, kinematic structure and the excitation conditions of these knots based on deep ground-based high dispersion spectroscopy complemented with high spatial resolution spectroscopy obtained with STIS onboard HST, and WFPC2 [N II] images. The spectra obtained show double-peaked, extremely wide emission line profiles, and a decrease of the radial velocities with distance to the source in a step-like fashion. We find that the emission line ratios observed in the intermediate knots are consistent with a spectrum arising from the recombination region of a shock wave with shock velocities ranging from 100 to 150 km s-1. We propose that the ejection velocity is varying as a function of time with a quasi-periodic variability (with timescale of the order of 100 years) and the direction of ejection is also varying with a precession period of the order of 1500 years. Some slowing down with distance along the axis of the Hen 3-1475 jet may be due to the entrainment process and/or to the enviromental drag. This scenario is supported by geometric and kinematic evidence: firstly, the decrease of the radial velocities along the Hen 3-1475 jet in a step like fashion; secondly, the kinematic structure observed in the knots; thirdly, the point-symmetric morphology together with the high proper motions shown by several knots; and finally the fact that the shock velocity predicted from the observed spectra of the shocked knots is much slower than the velocities at which these knots move outwards with respect to the central source. Based on observations made during service time with the 2.5 m Isaac Newton Telescope operated on La Palma by the Isaac Newton Group of Telescopes in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de

  14. Friction properties and deformation mechanisms of halite(-mica) gouges from low to high sliding velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buijze, Loes; Niemeijer, André R.; Han, Raehee; Shimamoto, Toshihiko; Spiers, Christopher J.

    2017-01-01

    The evolution of friction as a function of slip rate is important in understanding earthquake nucleation and propagation. Many laboratory experiments investigating friction of fault rocks are either conducted in the low velocity regime (10-8-10-4 ms-1) or in the high velocity regime (0.01-1 m s-1). Here, we report on the evolution of friction and corresponding operating deformation mechanisms in analog gouges deformed from low to high slip rates, bridging the gap between these low and high velocity regimes. We used halite and halite-muscovite gouges to simulate processes, governing friction, active in upper crustal quartzitic fault rocks, at conditions accessible in the laboratory. The gouges were deformed over a 7 orders of magnitude range of slip rate (10-7-1 m s-1) using a low-to-high velocity rotary shear apparatus, using a normal stress of 5 MPa and room-dry humidity. Microstructural analysis was conducted to study the deformation mechanisms. Four frictional regimes as a function of slip rate could be recognized from the mechanical data, showing a transitional regime and stable sliding (10-7-10-6 m s-1), unstable sliding and weakening (10-6-10-3 m s-1), hardening (10-2-10-1 m s-1) and strong weakening (10-1-1 m s-1). Each of the four regimes can be associated with a distinct microstructure, reflecting a transition from mainly brittle deformation accompanied by pressure solution healing to temperature activated deformation mechanisms. Additionally, the frictional response of a sliding gouge to a sudden acceleration of slip rate to seismic velocities was investigated. These showed an initial strengthening, the amount of which depended on the friction level at which the step was made, followed by strong slip weakening.

  15. Development of tunable high pressure CO2 laser for lidar measurements of pollutants and wind velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, J. S.; Guerra, M.; Javan, A.

    1980-01-01

    The problem of laser energy extraction at a tunable monochromatic frequency from an energetic high pressure CO2 pulsed laser plasma, for application to remote sensing of atmospheric pollutants by Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) and of wind velocities by Doppler Lidar, was investigated. The energy extraction principle analyzed is based on transient injection locking (TIL) at a tunable frequency. Several critical experiments for high gain power amplification by TIL are presented.

  16. High Resolution Velocity Map Imaging Photoelectron Spectroscopy of the Beryllium Oxide Anion, BeO-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dermer, Amanda Reed; Mascaritolo, Kyle; Heaven, Michael

    2016-06-01

    The photodetachment spectrum of BeO- has been studied using high resolution velocity map imaging photoelectron spectroscopy. The vibrational contours were imaged and compared with Franck-Condon simulations for the ground and excited states of the neutral. The electron affinity of BeO was measured for the first time, and anisotropies of several transitions were determined. Experimental findings are compared to high level ab initio calculations.

  17. High-Resolution Seismic Velocity and Attenuation Models of Eastern Tibet and Adjacent Regions (Post Print)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-04

    Basin. QLg and QPg models have been determined using a Reverse Two- station/event Method, which shows a high seismic attenuation zone along the...been determined using a Reverse Two-station/event Method, which shows a high seismic attenuation zone along the Kunlun belt. We have also observed...Like Pn and body wave results, low velocity anomalies occur across and within major strike-slip fault zones in the Qiangtang and Songpan-Ganzi

  18. Dramatic High-Speed Velocity Dependence of Quartz Friction Without Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Toro, G.; Di Toro, G.; Goldsby, D. L.; Tullis, T. E.

    2001-12-01

    A series of large displacement, ambient pressure friction experiments on a monominerallic quartz rock has been conducted to supplement our previous experiments at high confining pressure. Ambient pressure tests are conducted at higher sliding velocities, up to 100 mm/s, than presently can be obtained at high pressure, ~3 mm/s. The 1-atm. rotary shear apparatus allows only ~40 mm of unidirectional sliding displacement; large displacements of many meters are accumulated by repeatedly reversing the sliding direction. Time-dependent finite-element heat-flow analyses were performed to estimate temperatures generated by sliding. These FEM results were verified with temperature measurements made below the slip surface. Results obtained at ambient pressure are consistent with those obtained at high pressure at 3 mm/s. Both tests reveal an extraordinary reduction in friction coefficient with increasing sliding displacement and velocity, from initial values of 0.6 to 0.8 down to a relatively steady-state value of 0.2 to 0.4. Once the friction coefficient has decreased to a relatively steady-state low level, a pause in sliding or an interval of slow sliding results in an increase in the friction coefficient to values of 0.6 to 0.8. A return to high velocity causes a decrease in friction over ~0.5 m of slip back to the quasi-steady-state level. The velocity dependence of friction revealed by these experiments is striking. On a plot of friction coefficient versus log slip velocity, friction decreases only slightly with increasing slip velocity below 1 mm/s, as for typical rate and state friction data. Between ~3 and 100 mm/s, however, the linear trend of friction versus log velocity extrapolates to zero at 300 mm/s. The observed frictional weakening cannot be caused by melting; average fault surface temperatures are < 150° C, and flash temperatures at asperity contacts are < 900° C. Weakening may be due to a lubricating layer of hydrated amorphous silica produced on the

  19. HIGH-RESOLUTION SEISMIC VELOCITY AND ATTENUATION MODELS OF THE CAUCASUS-CASPIAN REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Mellors, R; Gok, R; Sandvol, E

    2007-07-10

    The southwest edge of Eurasia is a tectonically and structurally complex region that includes the Caspian and Black Sea basins, the Caucasus Mountains, and the high plateaus south of the Caucasus. Crustal and upper mantle velocities show great heterogeneity in this region and regional phases display variations in both amplitudes and travel time. Furthermore, due to a lack of quality data, the region has largely been unexplored in terms of the detailed lithospheric seismic structure. A unified high-resolution 3D velocity and attenuation model of the crust and upper mantle will be developed and calibrated. This model will use new data from 23 new broadband stations in the region analyzed with a comprehensive set of techniques. Velocity models of the crust and upper mantle will be developed using a joint inversion of receiver functions and surface waves. The surface wave modeling will use both event-based methods and ambient noise tomography. Regional phase (Pg, Pn, Sn, and Lg) Q model(s) will be constructed using the new data in combination with existing data sets. The results of the analysis (both attenuation and velocity modeling) will be validated using modeling of regional phases, calibration with selected events, and comparison with previous work. Preliminary analyses of receiver functions show considerable variability across the region. All results will be integrated into the KnowledgeBase.

  20. Velocity-pressure integrated versus penalty finite element methods for high Reynolds number flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Sang-Wook

    1988-01-01

    Velocity-pressure integrated and consistent penalty finite element computations of high Reynolds number, laminar flows are presented. In both of the methods, the pressure has been interpolated using linear shape functions for a triangular element. The triangular element is contained inside the bi-quadratic isoparametric element. It has been reported previously that the pressure interpolation method, when used in the velocity-pressure integrated method, yielded accurate computational results for high Reynolds number flows. It is shown that use of the same pressure interpolation method in the consistent penalty finite element method yielded accurate velocity and pressure fields which were comparable to those obtained using the velocity-pressure integrated method. Accuracy of the two finite element methods has been demonstrated by comparing the computational results with available experimental data and/or fine-grid finite difference computational results. Advantages and disadvantages of the two methods are discussed on the basis of accuracy and convergence nature. Example problems considered include a lid-driven cavity flow for Reynolds number of 10,000, a laminar backward-facing step flow, a laminar flow through a nest of cylinders, and a channel flow with an internal blockage. A finite element computer program (NSFLOW/P) for the 2-D, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations is also presented.

  1. On projectile fragmentation at high-velocity perforation of a thin bumper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myagkov, N. N.; Stepanov, V. V.

    2014-09-01

    By means of 3D numerical simulations, we study the statistical properties of the fragments cloud formed during high-velocity impact of a spherical projectile on a mesh bumper. We present a quantitative description of the projectile fragmentation, and study the nature of the transition from the damage to the fragmentation of the projectile when the impact velocity varies. A distinctive feature of the present work is that the calculations are carried out by smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method applied to the equations of mechanics of deformable solids (MDS). We describe the materials behavior by the Mie-Grüneisen equation of state and the Johnson-Cook model for the yield strength. The maximum principal stress spall model is used as the fracture model. It is shown that the simulation results of fragmentation based on the MDS equations by the SPH method are qualitatively consistent with the results obtained earlier on the basis of the molecular dynamics and discrete element models. It is found that the power-law distribution exponent does not depend on energy imparted to the projectile during the high-velocity impact. At the same time, our calculations show that the critical impact velocity, the power-law exponent and other critical exponents depend on the fracture criterion.

  2. Single ionization in highly charged ion-atom collisions at low to intermediate velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdallah, Mohammad Abdallah

    1998-11-01

    Single electron ejection from neutral targets (He and Ne) by the impact of low to highly charged ions (p, He+,/ Ne+,/ He2+,/ C6+,/ O8+, and Ne10+) at low to intermediate impact velocities is studied. A novel technique of electron momentum imaging is implemented. In this technique two-dimensional electron momentum distributions are produced in coincidence with recoil ions and projectile ions. In first generation experiments we studied the ejected electron momentum distributions without analyzing recoil ions momentum. This series of experiments revealed a charge-state dependence and velocity dependence that are contradictory to a dominant saddle point ionization mechanism at intermediate velocities. It showed a possibility of an agreement with a saddle centered distributions for low charge states at low collision velocities. To pursue the problem in more detail, we developed a second generation spectrometer which allowed us to fully determine the recoil ions momentum. This allowed us to determine the collision plane, energy loss (Q-value), and impact parameter for every collision that resulted in a single (target) electron ejection. This series of experiments revealed for the first time very marked structure in electron spectra that were impossible to observe in other experiments. These structures indicate the quasi-molecular nature of the collision process even at velocities comparable to the electron 'classical' orbital velocity. For the collisions of p, He+, and He2+ with He, a π-orbital shape of the electron momentum distribution is observed. This indicates the importance of the rotational coupling 2p/sigma/to2p/pi in the initial promotion of the ground state electron. This is followed by further promotions to the continuum. This agrees with the 'classical' description implied by the saddle-point ionization mechanism picture.

  3. The Relationship Between Convection Velocities in Simultaneous High-Latitude Ionospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, S. G.; Murr, D. L.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.

    2007-12-01

    Depending on the dipole tilt angle of the Earth's magnetosphere, the northern and southern hemispheres can have dramatically different average conductances. Because the ionosphere provides a path through which magnetospheric field-aligned currents coupling the two regions close, it is expected that the electric field and current density would also exhibit asymmetric behavior between hemispheres that depend on the dipole tilt angle. Some magnetohydrodynamic models of the magnetosphere show that the ratio of the global hemispheric electric potential can be a factor of 2-4 for large dipole tilt angles. Statistical studies of ionospheric electric fields using ground-based radars and spacecraft also show that there is a seasonal dependence of the global ionospheric potential but that the difference is at most ~20%. Here we use merged line-of-sight velocity vectors obtained simultaneously in both hemispheres from the SuperDARN network of HF radars to investigate the relationship of the convection velocity for conditions of varying hemispheric conductance. We find a marked difference in the hemispheric relationship of the simultaneous convection velocities between the dayside and the nightside ionospheres. Using a dataset consisting of seven years of SuperDARN merged velocities centered roughly on the most recent solar maximum, we show statistically that the ratio of velocities restricted to the dayside in the Summer hemisphere to those in the dayside Winter hemisphere depends only marginally on the dipole tilt angle and is at most a factor of ~1.2 for extreme tilt angles. The ratio of merged velocities restricted to the nightside, however, show a strong dependence on dipole tilt angle and can be as high as 2 for extreme tilt angles. The results are consistent with the notion that the dayside magnetosphere-ionosphere circuit behaves as if driven by a constant voltage source, whereas the nightside acts more like a circuit with a constant current source.

  4. Chemical reactions induced by high-velocity molecular impacts: challenges for closed-source mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    Analysis of upper atmosphere composition using closed-source neutral mass spectrometers (e.g., Cassini INMS, MAVEN NGIMS) is subject to error due to chemical reactions caused by the high-velocity impacts of neutral molecules on the source surfaces. In addition to species traditionally considered "surface reactive" (e.g., O, N) it is likely that many or all impacting molecules are vibrationally excited to the point that chemical changes can occur. Dissociation, fragmentation, formation of radicals and ions, and other reactions likely obscure analysis of the native atmospheric composition, particularly of organic compounds. Existing techniques are not capable of recreating the relevant impact chemistry in the lab. We report on the development of a new capability allowing reactions of high-velocity neutrals impacting surfaces to be characterized directly. Molecules introduced into a vacuum chamber are impacted at several km/s by the surface of a high-speed rotor. These molecules subsequently impact multiple times on other surfaces within the vacuum chamber until they are thermalized, after which they are cryogenically collected and analyzed. Reaction pathways and thermodynamics for volatile compounds are then determined. We will present current results on this project, including data from low- and mid-range velocity experiments. This type of information is critical to clarify prior flight results and plan for future missions. Finally, we present a new type of inlet intended to significantly reduce fragmentation for impact velocities typical of a fly-by mission. Theoretical analysis indicates that this new inlet may reduce fragmentation by more than an order of magnitude for any encounter velocity.

  5. Thin Shell, High Velocity Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions on the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, T.; Hurricane, O. A.; Callahan, D. A.; Barrios, M. A.; Casey, D. T.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Döppner, T.; Haan, S. W.; Hinkel, D. E.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Le Pape, S.; MacPhee, A. G.; Pak, A.; Park, H.-S.; Patel, P. K.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H. F.; Salmonson, J. D.; Springer, P. T.; Tommasini, R.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bionta, R.; Bond, E.; Bradley, D. K.; Caggiano, J.; Celliers, P.; Cerjan, C. J.; Church, J. A.; Dixit, S.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Edgell, D.; Edwards, M. J.; Field, J.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Grim, G.; Guler, N.; Hatarik, R.; Herrmann, H. W.; Hsing, W. W.; Izumi, N.; Jones, O. S.; Khan, S. F.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Knauer, J.; Kohut, T.; Kozioziemski, B.; Kritcher, A.; Kyrala, G.; Landen, O. L.; MacGowan, B. J.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Meezan, N. B.; Merrill, F. E.; Moody, J. D.; Nagel, S. R.; Nikroo, A.; Parham, T.; Ralph, J. E.; Rosen, M. D.; Rygg, J. R.; Sater, J.; Sayre, D.; Schneider, M. B.; Shaughnessy, D.; Spears, B. K.; Town, R. P. J.; Volegov, P. L.; Wan, A.; Widmann, K.; Wilde, C. H.; Yeamans, C.

    2015-04-01

    Experiments have recently been conducted at the National Ignition Facility utilizing inertial confinement fusion capsule ablators that are 175 and 165 μ m in thickness, 10% and 15% thinner, respectively, than the nominal thickness capsule used throughout the high foot and most of the National Ignition Campaign. These three-shock, high-adiabat, high-foot implosions have demonstrated good performance, with higher velocity and better symmetry control at lower laser powers and energies than their nominal thickness ablator counterparts. Little to no hydrodynamic mix into the DT hot spot has been observed despite the higher velocities and reduced depth for possible instability feedthrough. Early results have shown good repeatability, with up to 1 /2 the neutron yield coming from α -particle self-heating.

  6. Thin Shell, High Velocity Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, T.; Hurricane, O. A.; Callahan, D. A.; Barrios, M. A.; Casey, D. T.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Doppner, T.; Haan, S. W.; Hinkel, D. E.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Le Pape, S.; MacPhee, A. G.; Pak, A.; Park, H. S.; Patel, P. K.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H. F.; Salmonson, J. D.; Springer, P. T.; Tommasini, R.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bionta, R.; Bond, E.; Bradley, D. K.; Caggiano, J.; Celliers, P.; Cerjan, C. J.; Church, J. A.; Dixit, S.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Edgell, D.; Edwards, M. J.; Field, J.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Grim, G.; Guler, N.; Hatarik, R.; Herrmann, H. W.; Hsing, W. W.; Izumi, N.; Jones, O. S.; Khan, S. F.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Knauer, J.; Kohut, T.; Kozioziemski, B.; Kritcher, A.; Kyrala, G.; Landen, O. L.; MacGowan, B. J.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Meezan, N. B.; Merrill, F. E.; Moody, J. D.; Nagel, S. R.; Nikroo, A.; Parham, T.; Ralph, J. E.; Rosen, M. D.; Rygg, J. R.; Sater, J.; Sayre, D.; Schneider, M. B.; Shaughnessy, D.; Spears, B. K.; Town, R.P. J.; Volegov, P. L.; Wan, A.; Widmann, K.; Wilde, C. H.; Yeamans, C.

    2015-04-06

    Experiments have recently been conducted at the National Ignition Facility utilizing inertial confinement fusion capsule ablators that are 175 and 165 μm in thickness, 10% and 15% thinner, respectively, than the nominal thickness capsule used throughout the high foot and most of the National Ignition Campaign. These three-shock, high-adiabat, high-foot implosions have demonstrated good performance, with higher velocity and better symmetry control at lower laser powers and energies than their nominal thickness ablator counterparts. Little to no hydrodynamic mix into the DT hot spot has been observed despite the higher velocities and reduced depth for possible instability feedthrough. Earlier results have shown good repeatability, with up to 1/2 the neutron yield coming from α-particle self-heating.

  7. Measuring densities of high-velocity metallic sprays using piezoelectric sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, C. E.; Proud, W. G.

    2007-12-12

    Recent research efforts in large-scale hydrodynamic experiments have concentrated on the possibility of using piezoelectric sensors to study the evolution of ejecta. Ejecta are small (<100 m diameter) particulates that are ejected at high velocity (>1 km s{sup -1}) from a shocked surface. This paper investigates whether Dynasen PZT piezoelectric sensors are reliable and robust enough to measure accurate time-resolved stresses and densities in high-velocity metallic sprays. The sprays are assumed to have similar characteristics to ejecta sprays, and are generated by a gas gun and in a safe and reproducible manner. A complimentary diagnostic technique, utilising high-speed photography and fast x-radiography, measures the densities of the sprays independently, allowing the accuracy of the sensors to be assessed. The Dynasen sensors have been shown to perform relatively well in spray environments. Their accuracy can be improved by taking their mechanical impedance characteristics into account.

  8. Spectroscopic Observations of SN 2012fr: A Luminous, Normal Type Ia Supernova with Early High-velocity Features and a Late Velocity Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childress, M. J.; Scalzo, R. A.; Sim, S. A.; Tucker, B. E.; Yuan, F.; Schmidt, B. P.; Cenko, S. B.; Silverman, J. M.; Contreras, C.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Phillips, M.; Morrell, N.; Jha, S. W.; McCully, C.; Filippenko, A. V.; Anderson, J. P.; Benetti, S.; Bufano, F.; de Jaeger, T.; Forster, F.; Gal-Yam, A.; Le Guillou, L.; Maguire, K.; Maund, J.; Mazzali, P. A.; Pignata, G.; Smartt, S.; Spyromilio, J.; Sullivan, M.; Taddia, F.; Valenti, S.; Bayliss, D. D. R.; Bessell, M.; Blanc, G. A.; Carson, D. J.; Clubb, K. I.; de Burgh-Day, C.; Desjardins, T. D.; Fang, J. J.; Fox, O. D.; Gates, E. L.; Ho, I.-T.; Keller, S.; Kelly, P. L.; Lidman, C.; Loaring, N. S.; Mould, J. R.; Owers, M.; Ozbilgen, S.; Pei, L.; Pickering, T.; Pracy, M. B.; Rich, J. A.; Schaefer, B. E.; Scott, N.; Stritzinger, M.; Vogt, F. P. A.; Zhou, G.

    2013-06-01

    We present 65 optical spectra of the Type Ia SN 2012fr, 33 of which were obtained before maximum light. At early times, SN 2012fr shows clear evidence of a high-velocity feature (HVF) in the Si II λ6355 line that can be cleanly decoupled from the lower velocity "photospheric" component. This Si II λ6355 HVF fades by phase -5 subsequently, the photospheric component exhibits a very narrow velocity width and remains at a nearly constant velocity of ~12,000 km s-1 until at least five weeks after maximum brightness. The Ca II infrared triplet exhibits similar evidence for both a photospheric component at v ≈ 12,000 km s-1 with narrow line width and long velocity plateau, as well as an HVF beginning at v ≈ 31,000 km s-1 two weeks before maximum. SN 2012fr resides on the border between the "shallow silicon" and "core-normal" subclasses in the Branch et al. classification scheme, and on the border between normal and high-velocity Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) in the Wang et al. system. Though it is a clear member of the "low velocity gradient" group of SNe Ia and exhibits a very slow light-curve decline, it shows key dissimilarities with the overluminous SN 1991T or SN 1999aa subclasses of SNe Ia. SN 2012fr represents a well-observed SN Ia at the luminous end of the normal SN Ia distribution and a key transitional event between nominal spectroscopic subclasses of SNe Ia.

  9. Baryon acoustic oscillations in 2D. II. Redshift-space halo clustering in N-body simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimichi, Takahiro; Taruya, Atsushi

    2011-08-01

    We measure the halo power spectrum in redshift space from cosmological N-body simulations, and test the analytical models of redshift distortions particularly focusing on the scales of baryon acoustic oscillations. Remarkably, the measured halo power spectrum in redshift space exhibits a large-scale enhancement in amplitude relative to the real-space clustering, and the effect becomes significant for the massive or highly biased halo samples. These findings cannot be simply explained by the so-called streaming model frequently used in the literature. By contrast, a physically motivated perturbation theory model developed in the previous paper reproduces the halo power spectrum very well, and the model combining a simple linear scale-dependent bias can accurately characterize the clustering anisotropies of halos in two dimensions, i.e., line-of-sight and its perpendicular directions. The results highlight the significance of nonlinear coupling between density and velocity fields associated with two competing effects of redshift distortions, i.e., Kaiser and Finger-of-God effects, and a proper account of this effect would be important in accurately characterizing the baryon acoustic oscillations in two dimensions.

  10. HALO7D: Disentangling the Milky Way Accretion History with Observations in 7 Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Emily C.; Deason, Alis; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Rockosi, Constance M.; Van Der Marel, Roeland P.; Sohn, S. Tony; HSTPROMO, HALO7D

    2016-01-01

    The Milky Way (MW) is shrouded in a faint metal-poor stellar halo. Its structure and kinematics provide a unique archaeological record of the MW's formation, past evolution, and accretion history. These data also help us constrain the dark matter mass out to large radii (50 to 100 kpc). However, studies of the MW stellar halo are hindered by observational constraints. Beyond D~10 kpc, our knowledge of the MW halo is limited to line of sight velocities and rare tracer populations (blue horizontal branch and red giant branch stars). We aim to address these limitations using highly accurate HST-measured proper motions and very deep (8-24 hour integrations) Keck DEIMOS spectroscopy of MW main sequence turn-off stars in the CANDELS fields. By combining these two datasets, we can obtain 6D phase-space information plus chemical abundances (7 "Dimensions") for our halo stars. This survey, which will be unique even in the era of Gaia, will vastly improve our understanding of the Milky Way structure, evolution and mass in a way that neither the HST proper motions nor Keck spectroscopy can do on their own.

  11. Simulating Halos with the Caterpillar Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-04-01

    The Caterpillar Project is a beautiful series of high-resolution cosmological simulations. The goal of this project is to examine the evolution of dark-matter halos like the Milky Ways, to learn about how galaxies like ours formed. This immense computational project is still in progress, but the Caterpillar team is already providing a look at some of its first results.Lessons from Dark-Matter HalosWhy simulate the dark-matter halos of galaxies? Observationally, the formation history of our galaxy is encoded in galactic fossil record clues, like the tidal debris from disrupted satellite galaxies in the outer reaches of our galaxy, or chemical abundance patterns throughout our galactic disk and stellar halo.But to interpret this information in a way that lets us learn about our galaxys history, we need to first test galaxy formation and evolution scenarios via cosmological simulations. Then we can compare the end result of these simulations to what we observe today.This figure illustrates the difference that mass resolution makes. In the left panel, the mass resolution is 1.5*10^7 solar masses per particle. In the right panel, the mass resolution is 3*10^4 solar masses per particle [Griffen et al. 2016]A Computational ChallengeDue to how computationally expensive such simulations are, previous N-body simulations of the growth of Milky-Way-like halos have consisted of only one or a few halos each. But in order to establish a statistical understanding of how galaxy halos form and find out whether the Milky Ways halo is typical or unusual! it is necessary to simulate a larger number of halos.In addition, in order to accurately follow the formation and evolution of substructure within the dark-matter halos, these simulations must be able to resolve the smallest dwarf galaxies, which are around a million solar masses. This requires an extremely high mass resolution, which adds to the computational expense of the simulation.First OutcomesThese are the challenges faced by

  12. Origins of Stellar Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Kathryn V.

    2016-08-01

    This contribution reviews ideas about the origins of stellar halos. It includes discussion of the theoretical understanding of and observational evidence for stellar populations formed ``in situ'' (meaning formed in orbits close to their current ones), ``kicked-out'' (meaning formed in the inner galaxy in orbits unlike their current ones) and ``accreted'' (meaning formed in a dark matter halo other than the one they currently occupy). At this point there is general agreement that a significant fraction of any stellar halo population is likely ``accreted''. There is modest evidence for the presence of a ``kicked-out'' population around both the Milky Way and M31. Our theoretical understanding of and the observational evidence for an ``in situ'' population are less clear.

  13. Halo-independent direct detection analyses without mass assumptions

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Adam J.; Fox, Patrick J.; Kahn, Yonatan; McCullough, Matthew

    2015-10-06

    Results from direct detection experiments are typically interpreted by employing an assumption about the dark matter velocity distribution, with results presented in the m{sub χ}−σ{sub n} plane. Recently methods which are independent of the DM halo velocity distribution have been developed which present results in the v{sub min}−g-tilde plane, but these in turn require an assumption on the dark matter mass. Here we present an extension of these halo-independent methods for dark matter direct detection which does not require a fiducial choice of the dark matter mass. With a change of variables from v{sub min} to nuclear recoil momentum (p{sub R}), the full halo-independent content of an experimental result for any dark matter mass can be condensed into a single plot as a function of a new halo integral variable, which we call h-til-tilde(p{sub R}). The entire family of conventional halo-independent g-tilde(v{sub min}) plots for all DM masses are directly found from the single h-tilde(p{sub R}) plot through a simple rescaling of axes. By considering results in h-tilde(p{sub R}) space, one can determine if two experiments are inconsistent for all masses and all physically possible halos, or for what range of dark matter masses the results are inconsistent for all halos, without the necessity of multiple g-tilde(v{sub min}) plots for different DM masses. We conduct a sample analysis comparing the CDMS II Si events to the null results from LUX, XENON10, and SuperCDMS using our method and discuss how the results can be strengthened by imposing the physically reasonable requirement of a finite halo escape velocity.

  14. Halo-independent direct detection analyses without mass assumptions

    DOE PAGES

    Anderson, Adam J.; Fox, Patrick J.; Kahn, Yonatan; ...

    2015-10-06

    Results from direct detection experiments are typically interpreted by employing an assumption about the dark matter velocity distribution, with results presented in the mχ – σn plane. Recently methods which are independent of the DM halo velocity distribution have been developed which present results in the vmin – g~ plane, but these in turn require an assumption on the dark matter mass. Here we present an extension of these halo-independent methods for dark matter direct detection which does not require a fiducial choice of the dark matter mass. With a change of variables from vmin to nuclear recoil momentum (pR),more » the full halo-independent content of an experimental result for any dark matter mass can be condensed into a single plot as a function of a new halo integral variable, which we call tilde h(pR). The entire family of conventional halo-independent tilde g~(vmin) plots for all DM masses are directly found from the single tilde h~(pR) plot through a simple rescaling of axes. By considering results in tildeh~(pR) space, one can determine if two experiments are inconsistent for all masses and all physically possible halos, or for what range of dark matter masses the results are inconsistent for all halos, without the necessity of multiple tilde g~(vmin) plots for different DM masses. As a result, we conduct a sample analysis comparing the CDMS II Si events to the null results from LUX, XENON10, and SuperCDMS using our method and discuss how the results can be strengthened by imposing the physically reasonable requirement of a finite halo escape velocity.« less

  15. Halo-independent direct detection analyses without mass assumptions

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Adam J.; Fox, Patrick J.; Kahn, Yonatan; McCullough, Matthew

    2015-10-06

    Results from direct detection experiments are typically interpreted by employing an assumption about the dark matter velocity distribution, with results presented in the mχ – σn plane. Recently methods which are independent of the DM halo velocity distribution have been developed which present results in the vmin – g~ plane, but these in turn require an assumption on the dark matter mass. Here we present an extension of these halo-independent methods for dark matter direct detection which does not require a fiducial choice of the dark matter mass. With a change of variables from vmin to nuclear recoil momentum (pR), the full halo-independent content of an experimental result for any dark matter mass can be condensed into a single plot as a function of a new halo integral variable, which we call tilde h(pR). The entire family of conventional halo-independent tilde g~(vmin) plots for all DM masses are directly found from the single tilde h~(pR) plot through a simple rescaling of axes. By considering results in tildeh~(pR) space, one can determine if two experiments are inconsistent for all masses and all physically possible halos, or for what range of dark matter masses the results are inconsistent for all halos, without the necessity of multiple tilde g~(vmin) plots for different DM masses. As a result, we conduct a sample analysis comparing the CDMS II Si events to the null results from LUX, XENON10, and SuperCDMS using our method and discuss how the results can be strengthened by imposing the physically reasonable requirement of a finite halo escape velocity.

  16. Halo-independent direct detection analyses without mass assumptions

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Adam J.; Fox, Patrick J.; Kahn, Yonatan; McCullough, Matthew E-mail: pjfox@fnal.gov E-mail: matthew.mccullough@cern.ch

    2015-10-01

    Results from direct detection experiments are typically interpreted by employing an assumption about the dark matter velocity distribution, with results presented in the m{sub χ}−σ{sub n} plane. Recently methods which are independent of the DM halo velocity distribution have been developed which present results in the v{sub min}− g-tilde plane, but these in turn require an assumption on the dark matter mass. Here we present an extension of these halo-independent methods for dark matter direct detection which does not require a fiducial choice of the dark matter mass. With a change of variables from v{sub min} to nuclear recoil momentum (p{sub R}), the full halo-independent content of an experimental result for any dark matter mass can be condensed into a single plot as a function of a new halo integral variable, which we call h-tilde (p{sub R}). The entire family of conventional halo-independent g-tilde (v{sub min}) plots for all DM masses are directly found from the single h-tilde (p{sub R}) plot through a simple rescaling of axes. By considering results in h-tilde (p{sub R}) space, one can determine if two experiments are inconsistent for all masses and all physically possible halos, or for what range of dark matter masses the results are inconsistent for all halos, without the necessity of multiple g-tilde (v{sub min}) plots for different DM masses. We conduct a sample analysis comparing the CDMS II Si events to the null results from LUX, XENON10, and SuperCDMS using our method and discuss how the results can be strengthened by imposing the physically reasonable requirement of a finite halo escape velocity.

  17. Halo-independent direct detection analyses without mass assumptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Adam J.; Fox, Patrick J.; Kahn, Yonatan; McCullough, Matthew

    2015-10-01

    Results from direct detection experiments are typically interpreted by employing an assumption about the dark matter velocity distribution, with results presented in the mχ-σn plane. Recently methods which are independent of the DM halo velocity distribution have been developed which present results in the vmin-tilde g plane, but these in turn require an assumption on the dark matter mass. Here we present an extension of these halo-independent methods for dark matter direct detection which does not require a fiducial choice of the dark matter mass. With a change of variables from vmin to nuclear recoil momentum (pR), the full halo-independent content of an experimental result for any dark matter mass can be condensed into a single plot as a function of a new halo integral variable, which we call tilde h(pR). The entire family of conventional halo-independent tilde g(vmin) plots for all DM masses are directly found from the single tilde h(pR) plot through a simple rescaling of axes. By considering results in tilde h(pR) space, one can determine if two experiments are inconsistent for all masses and all physically possible halos, or for what range of dark matter masses the results are inconsistent for all halos, without the necessity of multiple tilde g(vmin) plots for different DM masses. We conduct a sample analysis comparing the CDMS II Si events to the null results from LUX, XENON10, and SuperCDMS using our method and discuss how the results can be strengthened by imposing the physically reasonable requirement of a finite halo escape velocity.

  18. Quasi-static and multi-site high velocity impact response of composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deka, Lakshya

    Understanding of low and high velocity transverse impact of laminated fiber reinforced composites is of interest in military, aerospace, marine and civilian structures. Recent advances in the field of numerical simulation provide a means of predicting the performance characteristics of layered materials for impact protection. The overall objective of this work is to investigate the behavior of laminated composites which include both thermoplastic and thermoset systems subjected to quasi-static, low and high velocity impact; both from an experimental and numerical modeling view point. To analyze this problem, a series of quasi-static, low and high velocity impact tests have been performed on laminated composite plates namely E-glass/polypropylene, S2-glass/epoxy and carbon/polyphenylene sulphide. To analyze the perforation mechanism, ballistic limit and damage evolution, an explicit three-dimensional finite element code LS-DYNA is used. Selecting proper material models and contact definition is one of the major criteria for obtaining accurate numerical simulation. Material model 162 (MAT 162), a progressive failure model based on modified Hashin's criteria and continuum damage mechanics (CDM) has been assigned to predict failure of the laminate. This approach is used because during transverse impact, a composite laminate undergoes progressive damage. The laminate and the projectile are meshed using brick elements with single integration points. The impact velocity ranges from 180 to 400 m s -1. This work focuses on three main aspects; (i) To obtain static and dynamic material properties to incorporate into the finite element model and predict the ballistic limit of a composite laminate based on the information from quasi-static punch shear test; (ii) To understand penetration, material erosion, ballistic limit and delamination mechanisms for single and multi-site high velocity (or ballistic) impact of composite laminates; (iii) To investigate the different failure

  19. The Angular Momentum Distribution within Dark Matter Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, D.; Jing, Y.

    We study the angular momentum profile of dark matter halos for a statistical sample drawn from a set of high-resolution cosmological simulations of 2563 particles. Two typical Cold Dark Matter (CDM) models have been analyzed, and the halos are selected to have at least 3× 104 particles in order to reliably measure the angular momentum profile. In contrast with the recent claims of Bullock et al. (2001), we find that the degree of misalignment of angular momentum within a halo is very high. About 50 percent of halos have more than 10 percent of halo mass in the mass of negative angular momentum j. After the mass of negative j is excluded, the cumulative mass function M(halos (˜ 50%) which exhibit systematic deviations from the universal function. Our results, however, are broadly in good agreement with the recent work of van den Bosch et al. (2002). We also study the angular momentum profile of halos in a Warm Dark Matter (WDM) model and a Self-Interacting Dark Matter (SIDM) model. We find that the angular momentum profile of halos in the WDM is statistically indistinguishable from that in the CDM model, but the angular momentum of halos in the SIDM is reduced by the self-interaction of dark matter.

  20. Development for sound velocity and density measurements of liquid metal at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terasaki, H.; Nishida, K.; Urakawa, S.; Uesugi, K.; Takubo, Y.; Kuwabara, S.; Nakatsuka, A.; Hoshino, M.; Kono, Y.; Higo, Y.; Kondo, T.

    2012-12-01

    Sound velocity and density of liquid Fe-alloys under high pressure is quite important physical property to estimate the amount of light elements in the terrestrial core from the seismic data. Here, we have developed the system for simultaneous measurement of sound velocity and density combined with X-ray tomography technique at high pressure and temperature. High pressure experiments were performed using 80-ton uni-axial press (Urakawa et al. 2010) installed at X-ray computed micro-tomography (CT) beamline (BL20B2), SPring-8 synchrotron radiation facility. High pressure was generated using opposed-type cupped anvils. We measured the sound velocity and density of solid FeSi at room temperature and those of solid and liquid Ni-S at high temperature. Experimental pressure was obtained from the volume of h-BN. CT measurement was carried out by rotating the press from 0 to 180o with 0.2-0.3o steps. Monochromatized X-ray of 51 keV was used. Density was determined by using X-ray absorption method based on the X-ray radiograph image. The sample thickness for the X-ray path can be directly obtained from the CT data. This is a big advantage for CT measurement. Sound velocity was measured using pulse-echo overlapping ultrasonic method. P-wave signals were generated and detected by LiNbO3 transducer attached backside of the anvil. We have successfully observed both P-wave and S-wave signals up to 1.5 GPa and 1673 K. We detected change of signal intensity and shape corresponding to melting of Ni-S sample.

  1. Kinematic imprint of clumpy disk formation on halo objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Shigeki

    2013-02-01

    Context. Clumpy disk galaxies in the distant universe, at redshift of z ≳ 1, have been observed to host several giant clumps in their disks. They are thought to correspond to early formative stages of disk galaxies. On the other hand, halo objects, such as old globular clusters and halo stars, are likely to consist of the oldest stars in a galaxy (age ≳ 10 Gyr), clumpy disk formation can thus be presumed to take place in a pre-existing halo system. Aims: Giant clumps orbit in the same direction in a premature disk and are so massive that they may be expected to interact gravitationally with halo objects and exercise influence on the kinematic state of the halo. Accordingly, I scrutinize the possibility that the clumps leave a kinematic imprint of the clumpy disk formation on a halo system. Methods: I perform a restricted N-body calculation with a toy model to study the kinematic influence on a halo by orbital motions of clumps and the dependence of the results on masses (mass loss), number, and orbital radii of the clumps. Results: I show that halo objects can catch clump motions and acquire disky rotation in a dynamical friction time scale of the clumps, ~0.5 Gyr. The influence of clumps is limited within a region around the disk, while the halo system shows vertical gradients of net rotation velocity and orbital eccentricity. The significance of the kinematic influence strongly depends on the clump masses; the lower limit of postulated clump mass would be ~5 × 108 M⊙. The result also depends on whether the clumps are subjected to rapid mass loss or not, which is an open question under debate in recent studies. The existence of such massive clumps is not unrealistic. I therefore suggest that the imprints of past clumpy disk formation could remain in current galactic halos.

  2. IDENTIFYING CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE STELLAR HALO FROM ACCRETED, KICKED-OUT, AND IN SITU POPULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, Allyson A.; Johnston, Kathryn V.; Majewski, Steven R. E-mail: kvj@astro.columbia.edu; and others

    2012-12-20

    We present a medium-resolution spectroscopic survey of late-type giant stars at mid-Galactic latitudes of (30 Degree-Sign < |b| < 60 Degree-Sign ), designed to probe the properties of this population to distances of {approx}9 kpc. Because M giants are generally metal-rich and we have limited contamination from thin disk stars by the latitude selection, most of the stars in the survey are expected to be members of the thick disk (([Fe/H]) {approx} -0.6) with some contribution from the metal-rich component of the nearby halo. Here we report first results for 1799 stars. The distribution of radial velocity (RV) as a function of l for these stars shows (1) the expected thick disk population and (2) local metal-rich halo stars moving at high speeds relative to the disk, which in some cases form distinct sequences in RV-l space. High-resolution echelle spectra taken for 34 of these ''RV outliers'' reveal the following patterns across the [Ti/Fe]-[Fe/H] plane: 17 of the stars have abundances reminiscent of the populations present in dwarf satellites of the Milky Way, 8 have abundances coincident with those of the Galactic disk and a more metal-rich halo, and 9 of the stars fall on the locus defined by the majority of stars in the halo. The chemical abundance trends of the RV outliers suggest that this sample consists predominantly of stars accreted from infalling dwarf galaxies. A smaller fraction of stars in the RV outlier sample may have been formed in the inner Galaxy and subsequently kicked to higher eccentricity orbits, but the sample is not large enough to distinguish conclusively between this interpretation and the alternative that these stars represent the tail of the velocity distribution of the thick disk. Our data do not rule out the possibility that a minority of the sample could have formed from gas in situ on their current orbits. These results are consistent with scenarios where the stellar halo, at least as probed by M giants, arises from multiple

  3. Real-time dynamics of high-velocity micro-particle impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veysset, David; Hsieh, Alex; Kooi, Steve; Maznev, Alex A.; Tang, Shengchang; Olsen, Bradley D.; Nelson, Keith A.

    High-velocity micro-particle impact is important for many areas of science and technology, from space exploration to the development of novel drug delivery platforms. We present real-time observations of supersonic micro-particle impacts using multi-frame imaging. In an all optical laser-induced projectile impact test, a monolayer of micro-particles is placed on a transparent substrate coated with a laser absorbing polymer layer. Ablation of a laser-irradiated polymer region accelerates the micro-particles into free space with speeds up to 1.0 km/s. The particles are monitored during the impact on the target with an ultrahigh-speed multi-frame camera that can record up to 16 images with time resolution as short as 3 ns. In particular, we investigated the high-velocity impact deformation response of poly(urethane urea) (PUU) elastomers to further the fundamental understanding of the molecular influence on dynamical behaviors of PUUs. We show the dynamic-stiffening response of the PUUs and demonstrate the significance of segmental dynamics in the response. We also present movies capturing individual particle impact and penetration in gels, and discuss the observed dynamics. The results will provide an impetus for modeling high-velocity microscale impact responses and high strain rate deformation in polymers, gels, and other materials.

  4. Higher velocity, high-foot implosions on the National Ignition Facility laser

    DOE PAGES

    Callahan, D. A.; Hurricane, O. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; ...

    2015-05-15

    By increasing the velocity in “high foot” implosions [Dittrich et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 055002 (2014); Park et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 055001 (2014); Hurricane et al., Nature 506, 343 (2014); Hurricane et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056314 (2014)] on the National Ignition Facility laser, we have nearly doubled the neutron yield and the hotspot pressure as compared to the implosions reported upon last year. The implosion velocity has been increased using a combination of the laser (higher power and energy), the hohlraum (depleted uranium wall material with higher opacity and lower specific heat than gold hohlraums), andmore » the capsule (thinner capsules with less mass). We find that the neutron yield from these experiments scales systematically with a velocity-like parameter of the square root of the laser energy divided by the ablator mass. By connecting this parameter with the inferred implosion velocity (v), we find that for shots with primary yield >1e15 neutrons, the total yield ~ v⁹˙⁴. This increase is considerably faster than the expected dependence for implosions without alpha heating ( ~v⁵˙⁹) and is additional evidence that these experiments have significant alpha heating.« less

  5. Higher velocity, high-foot implosions on the National Ignition Facility laser

    SciTech Connect

    Callahan, D. A.; Hurricane, O. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Döppner, T.; Ma, T.; Park, H. -S.; Barrios Garcia, M. A.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Casey, D. T.; Cerjan, C. J.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Edwards, M. J.; Haan, S. W.; Hamza, A. V.; Kline, J. L.; Knauer, J. P.; Kritcher, A. L.; Landen, O. L.; LePape, S.; MacPhee, A. G.; Milovich, J. L.; Nikroo, A.; Pak, A. E.; Patel, P. K.; Rygg, J. R.; Ralph, J. E.; Salmonson, J. D.; Spears, B. K.; Springer, P. T.; Tommasini, R.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bionta, R. M.; Bond, E. J.; Bradley, D. K.; Caggiano, J. A.; Field, J. E.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Frenje, J.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Grim, G. P.; Hatarik, R.; Merrill, F. E.; Nagel, S. R.; Izumi, N.; Khan, S. F.; Town, R. P. J.; Sayre, D. B.; Volegov, P.; Wilde, C. H.

    2015-05-15

    By increasing the velocity in “high foot” implosions [Dittrich et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 055002 (2014); Park et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 055001 (2014); Hurricane et al., Nature 506, 343 (2014); Hurricane et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056314 (2014)] on the National Ignition Facility laser, we have nearly doubled the neutron yield and the hotspot pressure as compared to the implosions reported upon last year. The implosion velocity has been increased using a combination of the laser (higher power and energy), the hohlraum (depleted uranium wall material with higher opacity and lower specific heat than gold hohlraums), and the capsule (thinner capsules with less mass). We find that the neutron yield from these experiments scales systematically with a velocity-like parameter of the square root of the laser energy divided by the ablator mass. By connecting this parameter with the inferred implosion velocity (v), we find that for shots with primary yield >1e15 neutrons, the total yield ~ v⁹˙⁴. This increase is considerably faster than the expected dependence for implosions without alpha heating ( ~v⁵˙⁹) and is additional evidence that these experiments have significant alpha heating.

  6. Higher velocity, high-foot implosions on the National Ignition Facility laser

    SciTech Connect

    Callahan, D. A.; Hurricane, O. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Döppner, T.; Ma, T.; Park, H.-S.; Barrios Garcia, M. A.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Casey, D. T.; Cerjan, C. J.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Edwards, M. J.; Haan, S. W.; Hamza, A. V.; Kritcher, A. L.; Landen, O. L.; LePape, S.; MacPhee, A. G.; Milovich, J. L.; and others

    2015-05-15

    By increasing the velocity in “high foot” implosions [Dittrich et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 055002 (2014); Park et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 055001 (2014); Hurricane et al., Nature 506, 343 (2014); Hurricane et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056314 (2014)] on the National Ignition Facility laser, we have nearly doubled the neutron yield and the hotspot pressure as compared to the implosions reported upon last year. The implosion velocity has been increased using a combination of the laser (higher power and energy), the hohlraum (depleted uranium wall material with higher opacity and lower specific heat than gold hohlraums), and the capsule (thinner capsules with less mass). We find that the neutron yield from these experiments scales systematically with a velocity-like parameter of the square root of the laser energy divided by the ablator mass. By connecting this parameter with the inferred implosion velocity (v), we find that for shots with primary yield >1 × 10{sup 15} neutrons, the total yield ∼ v{sup 9.4}. This increase is considerably faster than the expected dependence for implosions without alpha heating (∼v{sup 5.9}) and is additional evidence that these experiments have significant alpha heating.

  7. The Smith Cloud: A High-Velocity Cloud Colliding with the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockman, Felix J.; Benjamin, Robert A.; Heroux, A. J.; Langston, Glen I.

    2008-05-01

    New 21 cm H I observations made with the Green Bank Telescope show that the high-velocity cloud known as the Smith Cloud has a striking cometary appearance and many indications of interaction with the Galactic interstellar medium. The velocities of interaction give a kinematic distance of 12.4 +/- 1.3 kpc, consistent with the distance derived from other methods. The Cloud is >3 × 1 kpc in size, and its tip at (l, b) ≈ 39°, -13° is 7.6 kpc from the Galactic center and 2.9 kpc below the Galactic plane. It has >106 M⊙ in H I. Its leading section has a total space velocity near 300 km s-1, is moving toward the Galactic plane with a velocity of 73 +/- 26 km s-1, and is shedding material to the Galaxy. In the absence of drag, the Cloud will cross the plane in about 27 Myr. The Smith Cloud may be an example of the accretion of gas by the Milky Way that is needed to explain certain persistant anomalies in Galactic chemical evolution.

  8. Residual stresses in high-velocity oxy-fuel metallic coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Totemeier, T. C.; Wright, R. N.; Swank, W. D.

    2004-06-01

    X-ray based residual stress measurements were made on type 316 stainless steel and Fe3Al coatings that were high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) sprayed onto low-carbon and stainless steel substrates. Nominal coating thicknesses varied from 250 to 1500 µm. The effect of HVOF spray particle velocity on residual stress and deposition efficiency was assessed by preparing coatings at three different torch chamber pressures. The effect of substrate thickness on residual stress was determined by spraying coatings onto thick (6.4 mm) and thin (1.4 mm) substrates. Residual stresses were compressive for both coating materials and increased in magnitude with spray velocity. For coatings applied to thick substrates, near-surface residual stresses were essentially constant with increasing coating thickness. Differences in thermal expansion coefficient between low-carbon and stainless steels led to a 180 MPa difference in residual stress for Fe3Al coatings. Deposition efficiency for both materials is maximized at an intermediate (˜600 m/s) velocity. Considerations for X-ray measurement of residual stresses in HVOF coatings are also presented.

  9. Nonlinear free vibrations of centrifugally stiffened uniform beams at high angular velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekhoucha, F.; Rechak, S.; Duigou, L.; Cadou, J. M.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we study the bending nonlinear free vibrations of a centrifugally stiffened beam with uniform cross-section and constant angular velocity. The nonlinear intrinsic equations of motion used here are geometrically exact and specific to beams exhibiting large amplitude displacements and rotations associated with small strains. Based on the Timoshenko beam model, these equations are derived from Hamilton's principle, in which the warping is considered. All coupling terms are considered including Coriolis terms. The studied beams are isotropic with clamped-free boundary conditions. By combining the Galerkin method with the harmonic balance method, the equations of motion are converted into a quadratic function treated with a continuation method: the Asymptotic Numerical Method, where the generalized displacement vector is presented as a series expansion. While analysing the effect of the angular velocity, we determine the amplitude versus frequency variations which are plotted as backbone curves. Considering the first lagging and flapping modes, the changes in beam behaviour from hardening to softening are investigated and identified as a function of the angular velocity and the effect of shear. Particular attention is paid to high angular velocities for both Euler-Bernoulli and Timoshenko beams and the natural frequencies so obtained are compared with the results available in the literature.

  10. Experimental and analytical study of high velocity impact on Kevlar/Epoxy composite plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikarwar, Rahul; Velmurugan, Raman; Madhu, Velmuri

    2012-12-01

    In the present study, impact behavior of Kevlar/Epoxy composite plates has been carried out experimentally by considering different thicknesses and lay-up sequences and compared with analytical results. The effect of thickness, lay-up sequence on energy absorbing capacity has been studied for high velocity impact. Four lay-up sequences and four thickness values have been considered. Initial velocities and residual velocities are measured experimentally to calculate the energy absorbing capacity of laminates. Residual velocity of projectile and energy absorbed by laminates are calculated analytically. The results obtained from analytical study are found to be in good agreement with experimental results. It is observed from the study that 0/90 lay-up sequence is most effective for impact resistance. Delamination area is maximum on the back side of the plate for all thickness values and lay-up sequences. The delamination area on the back is maximum for 0/90/45/-45 laminates compared to other lay-up sequences.

  11. High Velocity Tensile Test for Thin Plate Specimen with One Bar Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itabashi, Masaaki

    In order to design thin-walled impact-resistant structure, for example, an automotive body, dynamic behavior of thin plate is essential. So far, except for laminated composite materials, high velocity tensile test of thin plate specimen did not attract impact researchers' and engineers' attention very much. In this paper, the previous thin plate specimen assembly for the one bar method was improved. The one bar method has been utilized for cylindrical specimens of various solid materials and is known as an effective high velocity tensile testing technique. Unfortunately, the previous assembly introduced a tremendous initial peak on stress-strain curves, even for aluminum alloys. With a new specimen assembly, stress-strain curves for IF (Interstitial-atom Free) steel and 7075-T6 aluminum alloy obtained by the one bar method were almost equivalent to those obtained by the tensile version of the split Hopkinson pressure bar method.

  12. The detection of high-velocity outflows from M8E-IR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, George F.; Allen, Mark; Beer, Reinhard; Dekany, Richard; Huntress, Wesley

    1988-01-01

    A high-resolution (0.059/cm) M band (4.6 micron) spectrum of the embedded young stellar object M8E-IR is presented and discussed. The spectrum shows strong absorption to large blueshifts in the rotational lines of the fundamental vibrational band, v = 1-0, of CO. The absorption is interpreted as being due to gas near to, and flowing from, the central object. The outflowing gas is warm (95-330 K) and consists of discrete velocity components with the very high velocities of 90, 130, 150, and 160 km/s. On the basis of a simple model, it is estimated that the observed outflows are less than 100 yr old.

  13. Electrical method and apparatus for impelling the extruded ejection of high-velocity material jets

    DOEpatents

    Weingart, Richard C.

    1989-01-01

    A method and apparatus (10, 40) for producing high-velocity material jets provided. An electric current pulse generator (14, 42) is attached to an end of a coaxial two-conductor transmission line (16, 44) having an outer cylindrical conductor (18), an inner cylindrical conductor (20), and a solid plastic or ceramic insulator (21) therebetween. A coxial, thin-walled metal structure (22, 30) is conductively joined to the two conductors (18, 20) of the transmission line (16, 44). An electrical current pulse applies magnetic pressure to and possibly explosively vaporizes metal structure (22), thereby collapsing it and impelling the extruded ejection of a high-velocity material jet therefrom. The jet is comprised of the metal of the structure (22), together with the material that comprises any covering layers (32, 34) disposed on the structure. An electric current pulse generator of the explosively driven magnetic flux compression type or variety (42) may be advantageously used in the practice of this invention.

  14. The Guitar nebula - A bow shock from a slow-spin, high-velocity neutron star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cordes, James M.; Romani, Roger W.; Lundgren, Scott C.

    1993-01-01

    The discovery is reported of a prominent nebula produced by the motion of a high-velocity pulsar, PSR 2224 + 65, through partially neutral gas. The pulsar's transverse speed of over about 800 km/s makes it arguably the fastest known star in the Galaxy and guarantees that it will ultimately escape the Galactic potential well. A deep H-alpha image reveals a bright head and a giant limb-brightened 'body' whose variable width suggests that the ambient interstellar gas has density variations on length scales less than 0.1 pc. Thermalization of shock energy occurs at a rate of about 0.01 times the pulsar's spindown loss rate. These observations provide some insights into the likelihood of finding shocks around other pulsars and the use of nebulae to find high-velocity neutron stars either not acting as pulsars or with their radiation beamed away from the earth.

  15. The Guitar nebula - A bow shock from a slow-spin, high-velocity neutron star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordes, James M.; Romani, Roger W.; Lundgren, Scott C.

    1993-03-01

    The discovery is reported of a prominent nebula produced by the motion of a high-velocity pulsar, PSR 2224 + 65, through partially neutral gas. The pulsar's transverse speed of over about 800 km/s makes it arguably the fastest known star in the Galaxy and guarantees that it will ultimately escape the Galactic potential well. A deep H-alpha image reveals a bright head and a giant limb-brightened 'body' whose variable width suggests that the ambient interstellar gas has density variations on length scales less than 0.1 pc. Thermalization of shock energy occurs at a rate of about 0.01 times the pulsar's spindown loss rate. These observations provide some insights into the likelihood of finding shocks around other pulsars and the use of nebulae to find high-velocity neutron stars either not acting as pulsars or with their radiation beamed away from the earth.

  16. Joint constraints on the Galactic dark matter halo and GC from hypervelocity stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Elena M.; Marchetti, T.; Cacciato, M.; Kuiack, M.; Sari, R.

    2017-01-01

    The mass assembly history of the Milky Way can inform both theory of galaxy formation and the underlying cosmological model. Thus, observational constraints on the properties of both its baryonic and dark matter contents are sought. Here we show that hypervelocity stars (HVSs) can in principle provide such constraints. We model the observed velocity distribution of HVSs, produced by tidal break-up of stellar binaries caused by Sgr A*. Considering a Galactic Centre (GC) binary population consistent with that inferred in more observationally accessible regions, a fit to current HVS data with significance level >5% can only be obtained if the escape velocity from the GC to 50 kpc is V_G ≲ 850 km s-1, regardless of the enclosed mass distribution. When a NFW matter density profile for the dark matter halo is assumed, haloes with V_G ≲ 850 km s-1are in agreement with predictions in the ΛCDM model and that a subset of models around M200 ˜ 0.5 - 1.5 × 1012M⊙ and r_s ≲ 35 kpc can also reproduce Galactic circular velocity data. HVS data alone cannot currently exclude potentials with VG > 850 km s-1. Finally, specific constraints on the halo mass from HVS data are highly dependent on the assumed baryonic mass potentials. This first attempt to simultaneously constrain GC and dark halo properties is primarily hampered by the paucity and quality of data. It nevertheless demonstrates the potential of our method, that may be fully realised with the ESA Gaia mission.

  17. Chronic symptoms after vestibular neuritis and the high velocity vestibulo-ocular reflex

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Mitesh; Arshad, Qadeer; Roberts, R Edward; Ahmad, Hena; Bronstein, Adolfo M.

    2015-01-01

    Hypothesis As the anterior and posterior semicircular canals are vital to the regulation of gaze stability, particularly during locomotion or vehicular travel, we tested whether the high velocity vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) of the three ipsilesional semicircular canals elicited by the modified Head Impulse Test would correlate with subjective dizziness or vertigo scores after vestibular neuritis (VN). Background Recovery following acute VN varies with around half reporting persistent symptoms long after the acute episode. However, an unanswered question is whether chronic symptoms are associated with impairment of the high velocity VOR of the anterior or posterior canals. Methods Twenty patients who had experienced an acute episode of VN at least three months earlier were included in this study. Participants were assessed with the video head impulse test (vHIT) of all six canals, bithermal caloric irrigation, the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI) and the Vertigo Symptoms Scale short-form (VSS). Results Of these 20 patients, 12 felt that they had recovered from the initial episode whereas 8 did not and reported elevated DHI and VSS scores. However, we found no correlation between DHI or VSS scores and the ipsilesional single or combined vHIT gain, vHIT gain asymmetry or caloric paresis. The high velocity VOR was not different between patients who felt they had recovered and patients who felt they had not. Conclusions Our findings suggest that chronic symptoms of dizziness following VN are not associated with the high velocity VOR of the single or combined ipsilesional horizontal, anterior or posterior semicircular canals. PMID:26719963

  18. High-definition velocity-space tomography of fast-ion dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salewski, M.; Geiger, B.; Jacobsen, A. S.; Hansen, P. C.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Korsholm, S. B.; Leipold, F.; Madsen, J.; Moseev, D.; Nielsen, S. K.; Nocente, M.; Odstrčil, T.; Rasmussen, J.; Stagner, L.; Stejner, M.; Weiland, M.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2016-10-01

    Velocity-space tomography of the fast-ion distribution function in a fusion plasma is usually a photon-starved tomography method due to limited optical access and signal-to-noise ratio of fast-ion D α (FIDA) spectroscopy as well as the strive for high-resolution images. In high-definition tomography, prior information makes up for this lack of data. We restrict the target velocity space through the measured absence of FIDA light, impose phase-space densities to be non-negative, and encode the known geometry of neutral beam injection (NBI) sources. We further use a numerical simulation as prior information to reconstruct where in velocity space the measurements and the simulation disagree. This alternative approach is demonstrated for four-view as well as for two-view FIDA measurements. The high-definition tomography tools allow us to study fast ions in sawtoothing plasmas and the formation of NBI peaks at full, half and one-third energy by time-resolved tomographic movies.

  19. High-velocity frictional strength across the Tohoku-Oki megathrust determined from surface drilling torque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ujiie, Kohtaro; Inoue, Tomoya; Ishiwata, Junya

    2016-03-01

    High-velocity frictional strength is one of the primary factors controlling earthquake faulting. The Japan Trench Fast Drilling Project drilled through the shallow plate boundary fault, where displacement was ~50 m during the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake. To determine downhole frictional strength, we analyzed the surface drilling torque data acquired at rotation rates equivalent to seismic slip rates (0.8-1.3 m/s). The results show a clear contrast in high-velocity frictional strength across the plate boundary fault: the apparent friction coefficient of frontal prism sediments (hemipelagic mudstones) in the hanging wall is 0.1-0.3, while that of the underthrust sediments (mudstone, laminar pelagic claystone, and chert) in the footwall increases to 0.2-0.4. The apparent friction coefficient of the smectite-rich pelagic clay in the plate boundary fault is 0.08-0.19, which is consistent with that determined from high-velocity (1.1-1.3 m/s) friction experiments. This suggests that surface drilling torque is useful in obtaining downhole frictional strength.

  20. Ultrafine particle generation by high-velocity impact of metal projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stabile, L.; Iannitti, G.; Vigo, P.; Ruggiero, A.; Russi, A.; Buonanno, G.

    2014-05-01

    Ultrafine particle generation through mechanical processes was not carefully deepened so far, even if it could be related to the human health-based researches. In particular, the evaluation of ultrafine particles produced in battlefield scenarios can be useful to quantify the exposure of soldiers to particles carrying toxic heavy metals. In the present work ultrafine particle generation during high-velocity impact of metal projectiles was deepened performing symmetrical high velocity Taylor impacts of copper cylinder tests (Rod-on-Rod tests) by means of a gas-gun facility. Particle number distributions and total concentrations were measured through one-second-time resolution instruments in a chamber where impact events at different velocities were performed. Particle number generation per impact was also evaluated. Particle concentrations in the 106 part. cm-3 range were measured corresponding to particle generations higher than 1012 particles per impact, then comparable to those typical of combustion sources. Particle number distribution showed a unimodal distribution with a 10 nm mode. Summarizing, the performed experimental campaign revealed an extremely high generation of ultrafine particles from mechanical processes.

  1. A comprehensive statistical investigation of schlieren image velocimetry (SIV) using high-velocity helium jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Sayan; Qiao, Li

    2017-03-01

    A detailed statistical assessment of seedless velocity measurement using Schlieren Image Velocimetry (SIV) was explored using open source Robust Phase Correlation (RPC) algorithm. A well-known flow field, an axisymmetric turbulent helium jet, was analyzed near and intermediate region (0≤ x/d≤ 20) for two different Reynolds numbers, Re d = 11,000 and Re d = 22,000 using schlieren with horizontal knife-edge, schlieren with vertical knife-edge and shadowgraph technique, and the resulted velocity fields from SIV techniques were compared to traditional Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements. A novel, inexpensive, easy to setup two-camera SIV technique had been demonstrated to measure high-velocity turbulent jet, with jet exit velocities 304 m/s (Mach = 0.3) and 611 m/s (Mach = 0.6), respectively. Several image restoration and enhancement techniques were tested to improve signal to noise ratio (SNR) in schlieren and shadowgraph images. Processing and post-processing parameters for SIV techniques were examined in detail. A quantitative comparison between self-seeded SIV techniques and traditional PIV had been made using correlation statistics. While the resulted flow field from schlieren with horizontal knife-edge and shadowgraph showed excellent agreement with PIV measurements, schlieren with vertical knife-edge performed poorly. The performance of spatial cross-correlations at different jet locations using SIV techniques and PIV was evaluated. Turbulence quantities like turbulence intensity, mean velocity fields, Reynolds shear stress influenced spatial correlations and correlation plane SNR heavily. Several performance metrics such as primary peak ratio (PPR), peak to correlation energy (PCE), the probability distribution of signal and noise were used to compare capability and potential of different SIV techniques.

  2. The Gas Dynamics of High-Velocity Oxy-Fuel Thermal Sprays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackett, Charles Marcou

    An experimental study of the gas dynamics of the High-Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) thermal spray process has been performed. With this process, a hot, combustion-driven, supersonic jet is used to propel particles onto a surface, thus forming metal coatings that provide wear, temperature, and corrosion resistance. The fundamental physics of the spray process were studied and several key areas of interest were identified for in-depth study. Optical diagnostic techniques, including microsecond -exposure schlieren and shadowgraph imaging, were used to visualize the hot supersonic jet produced during the spray process. Energetic turbulent mixing of the jet with the surrounding atmosphere was observed. Measurements of oxide levels in aluminum and mild steel coatings sprayed for a range of conditions indicated that the turbulent mixing influences coating oxidation. However, experiments conducted with a low-speed coaxial shroud of inert gas demonstrated that coating oxide formation can be effectively controlled during the spray process. A simple numerical model was developed to predict the behavior of a spray particle in the HVOF jet. The results of computations indicated that independent control of spray particle velocity and temperature was possible through systematic variations in combustion chamber pressure and particle injection location within the nozzle. This hypothesis was confirmed through a series of experiments in which stainless steel particle velocity and temperature were measured using trace velocimetry and two-color radiative pyrometry, respectively. Combustion chamber pressure had a strong effect on particle velocity. Injection location was used to control the residence time of a particle within the flow, thus allowing manipulation of particle temperature without a measurable effect on velocity. Thus, the results of these experiments revealed that the gas dynamics--the behavior of the compressible gas flow--of the HVOF spray process strongly influenced spray

  3. Predicting the Maximum Dynamic Strength in Bench Press: The High Precision of the Bar Velocity Approach.

    PubMed

    Loturco, Irineu; Kobal, Ronaldo; Moraes, José E; Kitamura, Katia; Cal Abad, César C; Pereira, Lucas A; Nakamura, Fábio Y

    2017-04-01

    Loturco, I, Kobal, R, Moraes, JE, Kitamura, K, Cal Abad, CC, Pereira, LA, and Nakamura, FY. Predicting the maximum dynamic strength in bench press: the high precision of the bar velocity approach. J Strength Cond Res 31(4): 1127-1131, 2017-The aim of this study was to determine the force-velocity relationship and test the possibility of determining the 1 repetition maximum (1RM) in "free weight" and Smith machine bench presses. Thirty-six male top-level athletes from 3 different sports were submitted to a standardized 1RM bench press assessment (free weight or Smith machine, in randomized order), following standard procedures encompassing lifts performed at 40-100% of 1RM. The mean propulsive velocity (MPV) was measured in all attempts. A linear regression was performed to establish the relationships between bar velocities and 1RM percentages. The actual and predicted 1RM for each exercise were compared using a paired t-test. Although the Smith machine 1RM was higher (10% difference) than the free weight 1RM, in both cases the actual and predicted values did not differ. In addition, the linear relationship between MPV and percentage of 1RM (coefficient of determination ≥95%) allow determination of training intensity based on the bar velocity. The linear relationships between the MPVs and the relative percentages of 1RM throughout the entire range of loads enable coaches to use the MPV to accurately monitor their athletes on a daily basis and accurately determine their actual 1RM without the need to perform standard maximum dynamic strength assessments.

  4. High-velocity stimulation evokes "dense" population response in layer 2/3 vibrissal cortex.

    PubMed

    Ranjbar-Slamloo, Yadollah; Arabzadeh, Ehsan

    2017-03-01

    Supragranular layers of sensory cortex are known to exhibit sparse firing. In rodent vibrissal cortex, a small fraction of neurons in layer 2 and 3 (L2/3) respond to whisker stimulation. In this study, we combined whole cell recording and two-photon imaging in anesthetized mice and quantified the synaptic response and spiking profile of L2/3 neurons. Previous literature has shown that neurons across layers of vibrissal cortex are tuned to the velocity of whisker movement. We therefore used a broad range of stimuli that included the standard range of velocities (0-1.2 deg/ms) and extended to a "sharp" high-velocity deflection (3.8 deg/ms). Consistent with previous literature, whole cell recording revealed a sparse response to the standard range of velocities: although all recorded cells showed tuning to velocity in their postsynaptic potentials, only a small fraction produced stimulus-evoked spikes. In contrast, the sharp stimulus evoked reliable spiking in the majority of neurons. The action potential threshold of spikes evoked by the sharp stimulus was significantly lower than that of the spontaneous spikes. Juxtacellular recordings confirmed that application of sharp stimulus to single or multiple whiskers produced temporally precise spiking with minimal trial-to-trial spike count variability (Fano factors equal or close to the theoretical minimum). Two-photon imaging further confirmed that most neurons that were not responsive to the standard deflections responded to the sharp stimulus. Altogether, our results indicate that sparseness in L2/3 cortex depends on the choice of stimulus: strong single- or multiwhisker stimulation can induce the transition from sparse to "dense" population response.NEW & NOTEWORTHY In superficial layers of sensory cortex, only a small fraction of neurons fire most of the spontaneous and sensory evoked spikes. However, the functional relevance of such "sparse" activity remains unknown. We found that a "dense" population response is

  5. Velocity and pressure characteristics of a model SSME high pressure fuel turbopump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tse, D. G-N.; Sabnis, J. S.; Mcdonald, H.

    1991-01-01

    Under the present effort an experiment rig has been constructed, an instrumentation package developed and a series of mean and rms velocity and pressure measurements made in a turbopump which modelled the first stage of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) High Pressure Fuel Turbopump. The rig was designed so as to allow initial experiments with a single configuration consisting of a bell-mouth inlet, a flight impeller, a vaneless diffuser and a volute. Allowance was made for components such as inlet guide vanes, exit guide vanes, downstream pumps, etc. to be added in future experiments. This flexibility will provide a clear baseline set of experiments and allow evaluation in later experiments of the effect of adding specific components upon the pump performance properties. The rotational speed of the impeller was varied between 4260 and 7680 rpm which covered the range of scaled SSME rotation speeds when due allowance is made for the differing stagnation temperature, model to full scale. The results at the inlet obtained with rotational speeds of 4260, 6084 and 7680 rpm showed that the axial velocity at the bell-mouth inlet remained roughly constant at 2.2 of the bulk velocity at the exit of the turbopump near the center of the inlet, but it decreased rapidly with increasing radius at all three speeds. Reverse flow occurred at a radius greater than 0.9 R for all three speeds and the maximum negative velocity reduced from 1.3 of the bulk velocity at the exit of the turbopump at 4260 rpm to 0.35 at 7680 rpm, suggesting that operating at a speed closer to the design condition of 8700 rpm improved the inlet characteristics. The reverse flow caused positive prerotation at the impeller inlet which was negligibly small near the center but reached 0.7 of the impeller speed at the outer annulus. The results in the diffuser and the volute obtained at 7680 rpm show that the hub and shroud walls of the diffuser were characterized by regions of transient reverse flow with

  6. Angular Momentum Profiles of Warm Dark Matter Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullock, James S.; Kravtsov, and Andrey V.; Colín, Pedro

    2002-01-01

    We compare the specific angular momentum profiles of virialized dark halos in cold dark matter (CDM) and warm dark matter (WDM) models, using high-resolution dissipationless simulations. The simulations were initialized using the same set of modes, except on small scales, where the power was suppressed in WDM below the filtering length. Remarkably, WDM as well as CDM halos are well described by the two-parameter angular momentum profile of Bullock and coworkers, even though the halo masses are below the filtering scale of the WDM. Although the best-fit shape parameters change quantitatively for individual halos in the two simulations, we find no systematic variation in profile shapes as a function of the dark matter type. The scatter in shape parameters is significantly smaller for the WDM halos, suggesting that substructure and/or merging history plays a role in producing scatter about the mean angular momentum distribution, but that the average angular momentum profiles of halos originate from larger scale phenomena or a mechanism associated with the virialization process. The known mismatch between the angular momentum distributions of dark halos and disk galaxies is, therefore, present in WDM as well as CDM models. Our WDM halos tend to have a less coherent (more misaligned) angular momentum structure and smaller spin parameters than do their CDM counterparts, although we caution that this result is based on a small number of halos.

  7. Two-step simulation of velocity and passive scalar mixing at high Schmidt number in turbulent jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rah, K. Jeff; Blanquart, Guillaume

    2016-11-01

    Simulation of passive scalar in the high Schmidt number turbulent mixing process requires higher computational cost than that of velocity fields, because the scalar is associated with smaller length scales than velocity. Thus, full simulation of both velocity and passive scalar with high Sc for a practical configuration is difficult to perform. In this work, a new approach to simulate velocity and passive scalar mixing at high Sc is suggested to reduce the computational cost. First, the velocity fields are resolved by Large Eddy Simulation (LES). Then, by extracting the velocity information from LES, the scalar inside a moving fluid blob is simulated by Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS). This two-step simulation method is applied to a turbulent jet and provides a new way to examine a scalar mixing process in a practical application with smaller computational cost. NSF, Samsung Scholarship.

  8. Globular Cluster Contributions to the Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martell, Sarah; Grebel, Eva; Lai, David

    2010-08-01

    The goal of this project is to confirm chemically that globular clusters are the source of as much as half the population of the Galactic halo. Using moderate-resolution spectroscopy from the SEGUE survey, we have identified a previously unknown population of halo field giants with distinctly strong CN features. CN variations are typically only observed in globular clusters, so these stars are interpreted as immigrants to the halo that originally formed in globular clusters. In one night of Keck/HIRES time, we will obtain high-quality, high- resolution spectra for five such stars, and determine abundances of O, Na, Mg, Al, alpha, iron-peak and neutron-capture elements. With this information we can state clearly whether these unusual CN-strong halo stars carry the full abundance pattern seen in CN-strong globular cluster stars, with depleted C, O, and Mg and enhanced N, Na, and Al. This type of coarse ``chemical tagging'' will allow a clearer division of the Galactic halo into contributions from globular clusters and from dwarf galaxies, and will place constraints on theoretical models of globular cluster formation and evolution.

  9. Concentration, ellipsoidal collapse, and the densest dark matter haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okoli, Chiamaka; Afshordi, Niayesh

    2016-03-01

    The smallest dark matter haloes are the first objects to form in the hierarchical structure formation of cold dark matter (CDM) cosmology and are expected to be the densest and most fundamental building blocks of CDM structures in our Universe. Nevertheless, the physical characteristics of these haloes have stayed illusive, as they remain well beyond the current resolution of N-body simulations (at redshift zero). However, they dominate the predictions (and uncertainty) in expected dark matter annihilation signal, amongst other astrophysical observables. Using the conservation of total energy and the ellipsoidal collapse framework, we can analytically find the mean and scatter of concentration c and 1D velocity dispersion σ1d for haloes of different virial mass M200. Both c and σ _1d/M_{200}^{1/3} are in good agreement with numerical results within the regime probed by simulations - slowly decreasing functions of mass that approach constant values at large masses. In particular, the predictions for the 1D velocity dispersion of cluster mass haloes are surprisingly robust as the inverse heat capacity of cosmological haloes crosses zero at M200 ˜ 1014 M⊙. However, we find that current extrapolations from simulations to smallest CDM haloes dramatically depend on the assumed profile (e.g. NFW versus Einasto) and fitting function, which is why theoretical considerations, such as the one presented here, can significantly constrain the range of feasible predictions.

  10. What's a Halo?

    MedlinePlus

    ... to school, doing schoolwork, and participating in extracurricular clubs, as long as they're feeling up to it and the doctor says it's OK. Your child's doctor will tell you what activities your child should avoid while in a halo brace. Sports will have to be put on hold for ...

  11. Ultrasound Velocity Measurements in High-Chromium Steel Under Plastic Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunev, Aleksey; Bochkareva, Anna; Barannikova, Svetlana; Zuev, Lev

    2016-04-01

    In the present study, the variation of the propagation velocity of ultrasound in the plastic deformation of corrosion-resistant high-chromium steel 40X13 with ferrite-carbide (delivery status), martensitic (quenched) and sorbitol (after high-temperature tempering) structures have beem studied/ It is found that each state shows its view of the loading curve. In the delivery state diagram loading is substantially parabolic throughout, while in the martensitic state contains only linear strain hardening step and in the sorbitol state the plastic flow curve is three-step. The velocity of ultrasonic surface waves (Rayleigh waves) was measured simultaneously with the registration of the loading curve in the investigated steel in tension. It is shown that the dependence of the velocity of ultrasound in active loading is determined by the law of plastic flow, that is, the staging of the corresponding diagram of loading. Structural state of the investigated steel is not only changing the type of the deformation curve under uniaxial tension, but also changes the nature of ultrasound speed of deformation.

  12. PTF 12gzk—A rapidly declining, high-velocity type Ic radio supernova

    SciTech Connect

    Horesh, Assaf; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Corsi, Alessandra; Frail, Dale A.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Ben-Ami, Sagi; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Yaron, Ofer; Arcavi, Iair; Ofek, Eran O.; Kasliwal, Mansi M.

    2013-11-20

    Only a few cases of Type Ic supernovae (SNe) with high-velocity ejecta (≥0.2 c) have been discovered and studied. Here, we present our analysis of radio and X-ray observations of the Type Ic SN PTF 12gzk. The radio emission declined less than 10 days after explosion, suggesting SN ejecta expanding at high velocity (∼0.3 c). The radio data also indicate that the density of the circumstellar material (CSM) around the supernova is lower by a factor of ∼10 than the CSM around normal Type Ic SNe. PTF 12gzk may therefore be an intermediate event between a 'normal' SN Ic and a gamma-ray-burst-SN-like event. Our observations of this rapidly declining radio SN at a distance of 58 Mpc demonstrates the potential to detect many additional radio SNe, given the new capabilities of the Very Large Array (improved sensitivity and dynamic scheduling), which are currently missed, leading to a biased view of radio SNe Ic. Early optical discovery followed by rapid radio observations would provide a full description of the ejecta velocity distribution and CSM densities around stripped massive star explosions as well as strong clues about the nature of their progenitor stars.

  13. Episodic High-velocity Outflows from V899 Mon: A Constraint On The Outflow Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ninan, J. P.; Ojha, D. K.; Philip, N. S.

    2016-07-01

    We report the detection of large variations in the outflow wind velocity from a young eruptive star, V899 Mon, during its ongoing high accretion outburst phase. Such large variations in the outflow velocity (from -722 to -425 km s-1) have never been reported previously in this family of objects. Our continuous monitoring of this source shows that the multi-component, clumpy, and episodic high velocity outflows are stable in the timescale of a few days, and vary over the timescale of a few weeks to months. We detect significant decoupling in the instantaneous outflow strength to accretion rate. From the comparison of various possible outflow mechanisms in magnetospheric accretion of young stellar objects, we conclude magnetically driven polar winds to be the most consistent mechanism for the outflows seen in V899 Mon. The large scale fluctuations in outflow over the short period makes V899 Mon the most ideal source to constrain various magnetohydrodynamics simulations of magnetospheric accretion. Based on observations made with the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT).

  14. High-Resolution Hα Velocity Fields of Nearby Spiral Galaxies with the Southern African Large Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Carl; Williams, Ted; Spekkens, Kristine; Lee-Waddell, Karen; Kuzio de Naray, Rachel; Sellwood, Jerry

    2016-01-01

    In an effort to test ΛCDM predictions of galaxy mass distributions, we have obtained spectrophotometric observations of several nearby spiral galaxies with the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) Fabry-Pérot (FP) interferometer as part of the RSS Imaging spectroscopy Nearby Galaxy Survey. Utilizing the SALT FP's 8 arcmin field of view and 2 arcsec angular resolution, we have derived 2D velocity fields of the Hα emission line to high spatial resolution at large radii. We have modeled these velocity fields with the DiskFit software package and found them to be in good agreement with lower-resolution velocity fields of the HI 21 cm line for the same galaxies. Here we present our Hα kinematic map of the barred spiral galaxy NGC 578. At the distance to this galaxy (22 Mpc), our kinematic data has a spatial resolution of 185 pc and extends to galactocentric radii of 13 kpc. The high spatial resolution of this data allows us to resolve the inner rising part of the rotation curves, which is compromised by beam smearing in lower-resolution observations. We are using these Hα kinematic data, combined with HI 21 cm kinematics and broadband photometric observations, to place constraints on NGC 578's mass distribution.

  15. Target responses to the impact of high-velocity, non-abrasive water jets

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, S.W.; Reitter, T.; Carlson, G.; Crutchmer, J.; Garrett, D.; Kramer, P.; Do, B.

    1993-04-01

    Theoretical and experimental investigations have been performed on the effects of a non-abrasive water jet impinging on a solid surface. The theoretical analysis treats the time-dependent, twodimensional case of an axisymmetric jet impacting on a rigid or non-rigid surface at various velocities, up to 1500 m/s. The numerical results obtained include time-dependent pressure distributions and jet geometry near the surface. The maximum calculated pressures agree well with the ``water-hammer`` values when modified for high-velocity jets. Impact and machining experiments were conducted with various materials with water jet reservoir pressures up to 276 MPa (40,000 psi). Test results show that maximum mass removal rate takes place when the standoff distance is several hundred nozzle diameters from the nozzle, suggesting that at this long distance the jet has disintegrated into a series of ligaments and drops impinging on the surface. Analytical and experimental efforts are continuing on determining the dominant mechanisms for the target response to high-velocity jets.

  16. Target responses to the impact of high-velocity, non-abrasive water jets

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, S.W.; Reitter, T.; Carlson, G. ); Crutchmer, J.; Garrett, D.; Kramer, P.; Do, B. )

    1993-04-01

    Theoretical and experimental investigations have been performed on the effects of a non-abrasive water jet impinging on a solid surface. The theoretical analysis treats the time-dependent, twodimensional case of an axisymmetric jet impacting on a rigid or non-rigid surface at various velocities, up to 1500 m/s. The numerical results obtained include time-dependent pressure distributions and jet geometry near the surface. The maximum calculated pressures agree well with the water-hammer'' values when modified for high-velocity jets. Impact and machining experiments were conducted with various materials with water jet reservoir pressures up to 276 MPa (40,000 psi). Test results show that maximum mass removal rate takes place when the standoff distance is several hundred nozzle diameters from the nozzle, suggesting that at this long distance the jet has disintegrated into a series of ligaments and drops impinging on the surface. Analytical and experimental efforts are continuing on determining the dominant mechanisms for the target response to high-velocity jets.

  17. Prescribed Velocity Gradients for Highly Viscous SPH Fluids with Vorticity Diffusion.

    PubMed

    Peer, Andreas; Teschner, Matthias

    2016-12-06

    Working with prescribed velocity gradients is a promising approach to efficiently and robustly simulate highly viscous SPH fluids. Such approaches allow to explicitly and independently process shear rate, spin, and expansion rate. This can be used to, e.g., avoid interferences between pressure and viscosity solvers. Another interesting aspect is the possibility to explicitly process the vorticity, e.g. to preserve the vorticity. In this context, this paper proposes a novel variant of the prescribed-gradient idea that handles vorticity in a physically motivated way. In contrast to a less appropriate vorticity preservation that has been used in a previous approach, vorticity is diffused. The paper illustrates the utility of the vorticity diffusion. Therefore, comparisons of the proposed vorticity diffusion with vorticity preservation and additionally with vorticity damping are presented. The paper further discusses the relation between prescribed velocity gradients and prescribed velocity Laplacians which improves the intuition behind the prescribed-gradient method for highly viscous SPH fluids. Finally, the paper discusses the relation of the proposed method to a physically correct implicit viscosity formulation.

  18. Diverse stellar haloes in nearby Milky Way mass disc galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmsen, Benjamin; Monachesi, Antonela; Bell, Eric F.; de Jong, Roelof S.; Bailin, Jeremy; Radburn-Smith, David J.; Holwerda, Benne W.

    2017-04-01

    We have examined the resolved stellar populations at large galactocentric distances along the minor axis (from 10 kpc up to between 40 and 75 kpc), with limited major axis coverage, of six nearby highly inclined Milky Way (MW) mass disc galaxies using Hubble Space Telescope data from the Galaxy haloes, Outer discs, Substructure, Thick discs, and Star clusters (GHOSTS) survey. We select red giant branch stars to derive stellar halo density profiles. The projected minor axis density profiles can be approximated by power laws with projected slopes of -2 to -3.7 and a diversity of stellar halo masses of 1-6 × 109 M⊙, or 2-14 per cent of the total galaxy stellar masses. The typical intrinsic scatter around a smooth power-law fit is 0.05-0.1 dex owing to substructure. By comparing the minor and major axis profiles, we infer projected axis ratios c/a at ∼25 kpc between 0.4and0.75. The GHOSTS stellar haloes are diverse, lying between the extremes charted out by the (rather atypical) haloes of the MW and M31. We find a strong correlation between the stellar halo metallicities and the stellar halo masses. We compare our results with cosmological models, finding good agreement between our observations and accretion-only models where the stellar haloes are formed by the disruption of dwarf satellites. In particular, the strong observed correlation between stellar halo metallicity and mass is naturally reproduced. Low-resolution hydrodynamical models have unrealistically high stellar halo masses. Current high-resolution hydrodynamical models appear to predict stellar halo masses somewhat higher than observed but with reasonable metallicities, metallicity gradients, and density profiles.

  19. Erosive wear of ductile metals by a particle-laden high velocity liquid jet

    SciTech Connect

    Ka-Keung Li, Simon; Humphrey, Joseph A. C.; Levy, Alan V.

    1981-11-30

    In this paper, a liquid-solid particle jet impingement flow apparatus is described and experimental measurements are reported for the accelerated erosion of copper, aluminum and mild steel sheet metal by coal suspensions in kerosene and Al2O3 and SiC suspensions in water. Slurry velocities of up to 130 ft s-1 (40 m s-1) and impingement angles of 15°–90° were investigated. The maximum particle concentration used was 40 wt.%. For high velocity the results of this work show two erosion maxima; these are found at impingement angles of 90° and 40°. However, in corresponding gas-solid particle investigations maximum erosion occurs at approximately 20°. In this work both particle concentration and composition were varied. Finally, a polynomial regression technique was used to calculate empirical and semitheoretical correlation constants.

  20. LP 400-22, A Very Low Mass and High-Velocity White Dwarf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawka, Adela; Vennes, Stephane; Oswalt, Terry D.; Smith, J. Allyn; Silvestri, Nicole M.

    2006-01-01

    We report the identification of LP 400-22 (WD 2234+222) as a very low mass and high-velocity white dwarf. The ultraviolet GALEX and optical photometric colors and a spectral line analysis of LP 400-22 show this star to have an effective temperature of 11,080+/-140 K and a surface gravity of log g = 6.32 +/-0.08. Therefore, this is a helium-core white dwarf with a mass of 0.17 M,. The tangential velocity of this white dwarf is 414+/-43 km/s, making it one of the fastest moving white dwarfs known. We discuss probable evolutionary scenarios for this remarkable object.

  1. The quest for TPa Hugoniot data: using the DEMG in high velocity pulsed power experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Jeff H; Rousculp, Christopher L; Holtkamp, David B; Oro, David M; Griego, Jeffrey R; Atchison, Walter L; Reinovsky, Robert E

    2010-12-20

    ALT-3 is an experiment being designed in collaboration between Russian VNIIEF scientists and LANL that aims to conduct high velocity material experiments to measure shock velocities at pressures near 1 TPa. The DEMG (Disk Explosive Magnetic Generator) is used to drive >60MA currents to accelerate an aluminum liner to speeds in excess of 20 km/s. The 1-D model of the DEMG has been refined from a given current profile to a time-varying inductance. Various techniques are used to model the FOS (Foil Opening Switch) on the DEMG and a refined DEMG model is then used to drive a liner into various targets to determine the optimum design for the experiment and analyze the possible conditions and complications.

  2. A High Speed Calibration Method for Laser Positioner by Constant Velocity Scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Hiroyuki

    This paper describes a high speed calibration method for laser positioner by scanning work area under constant velocity. Laser positioner consists of sinusoidal laser encoder, DC motor and the controller. The encoder has diffraction grating scale and laser optics. It generates sine and cosine outputs according to the travel distance. Qualities of the scale and the optics contribute to the fluctuation of output signal amplitude, DC offset and relative phase. First, the controller collects the output data under constant velocity of 4 samples per 1 sine wave length. The parameter can be estimated by simplified discrete Fourier transform method. Calibration data are collected every quarter sine wave length over all positioner work area. The result is stored in the table then referred by the controller in real time operation. Experiment results are also reported for HDD servo track writer application.

  3. Galaxy power spectrum in redshift space: Combining perturbation theory with the halo model

    SciTech Connect

    Okumura, Teppei; Hand, Nick; Seljak, Uros; Vlah, Zvonimir; Desjacques, Vincent

    2015-11-19

    Theoretical modeling of the redshift-space power spectrum of galaxies is crucially important to correctly extract cosmological information from galaxy redshift surveys. The task is complicated by the nonlinear biasing and redshift space distortion (RSD) effects, which change with halo mass, and by the wide distribution of halo masses and their occupations by galaxies. One of the main modeling challenges is the existence of satellite galaxies that have both radial distribution inside the halos and large virial velocities inside halos, a phenomenon known as the Finger-of-God (FoG) effect. We present a model for the redshift-space power spectrum of galaxies in which we decompose a given galaxy sample into central and satellite galaxies and relate different contributions to the power spectrum to 1-halo and 2-halo terms in a halo model. Our primary goal is to ensure that any parameters that we introduce have physically meaningful values, and are not just fitting parameters. For the lowest order 2-halo terms we use the previously developed RSD modeling of halos in the context of distribution function and perturbation theory approach. This term needs to be multiplied by the effect of radial distances and velocities of satellites inside the halo. To this one needs to add the 1-halo terms, which are nonperturbative. We show that the real space 1-halo terms can be modeled as almost constant, with the finite extent of the satellites inside the halo inducing a small k2R2 term over the range of scales of interest, where R is related to the size of the halo given by its halo mass. Furthermore, we adopt a similar model for FoG in redshift space, ensuring that FoG velocity dispersion is related to the halo mass. For FoG k2 type expansions do not work over the range of scales of interest and FoG resummation must be used instead. We test several simple damping functions to model the velocity dispersion FoG effect. Applying the formalism to mock

  4. Galaxy power spectrum in redshift space: Combining perturbation theory with the halo model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okumura, Teppei; Hand, Nick; Seljak, Uroš; Vlah, Zvonimir; Desjacques, Vincent

    2015-11-01

    Theoretical modeling of the redshift-space power spectrum of galaxies is crucially important to correctly extract cosmological information from galaxy redshift surveys. The task is complicated by the nonlinear biasing and redshift space distortion (RSD) effects, which change with halo mass, and by the wide distribution of halo masses and their occupations by galaxies. One of the main modeling challenges is the existence of satellite galaxies that have both radial distribution inside the halos and large virial velocities inside halos, a phenomenon known as the Finger-of-God (FoG) effect. We present a model for the redshift-space power spectrum of galaxies in which we decompose a given galaxy sample into central and satellite galaxies and relate different contributions to the power spectrum to 1-halo and 2-halo terms in a halo model. Our primary goal is to ensure that any parameters that we introduce have physically meaningful values, and are not just fitting parameters. For the lowest order 2-halo terms we use the previously developed RSD modeling of halos in the context of distribution function and perturbation theory approach. This term needs to be multiplied by the effect of radial distances and velocities of satellites inside the halo. To this one needs to add the 1-halo terms, which are nonperturbative. We show that the real space 1-halo terms can be modeled as almost constant, with the finite extent of the satellites inside the halo inducing a small k2R2 term over the range of scales of interest, where R is related to the size of the halo given by its halo mass. We adopt a similar model for FoG in redshift space, ensuring that FoG velocity dispersion is related to the halo mass. For FoG k2 type expansions do not work over the range of scales of interest and FoG resummation must be used instead. We test several simple damping functions to model the velocity dispersion FoG effect. Applying the formalism to mock galaxies modeled after the "CMASS" sample of the

  5. Galaxy power spectrum in redshift space: Combining perturbation theory with the halo model

    DOE PAGES

    Okumura, Teppei; Hand, Nick; Seljak, Uros; ...

    2015-11-19

    Theoretical modeling of the redshift-space power spectrum of galaxies is crucially important to correctly extract cosmological information from galaxy redshift surveys. The task is complicated by the nonlinear biasing and redshift space distortion (RSD) effects, which change with halo mass, and by the wide distribution of halo masses and their occupations by galaxies. One of the main modeling challenges is the existence of satellite galaxies that have both radial distribution inside the halos and large virial velocities inside halos, a phenomenon known as the Finger-of-God (FoG) effect. We present a model for the redshift-space power spectrum of galaxies in whichmore » we decompose a given galaxy sample into central and satellite galaxies and relate different contributions to the power spectrum to 1-halo and 2-halo terms in a halo model. Our primary goal is to ensure that any parameters that we introduce have physically meaningful values, and are not just fitting parameters. For the lowest order 2-halo terms we use the previously developed RSD modeling of halos in the context of distribution function and perturbation theory approach. This term needs to be multiplied by the effect of radial distances and velocities of satellites inside the halo. To this one needs to add the 1-halo terms, which are nonperturbative. We show that the real space 1-halo terms can be modeled as almost constant, with the finite extent of the satellites inside the halo inducing a small k2R2 term over the range of scales of interest, where R is related to the size of the halo given by its halo mass. Furthermore, we adopt a similar model for FoG in redshift space, ensuring that FoG velocity dispersion is related to the halo mass. For FoG k2 type expansions do not work over the range of scales of interest and FoG resummation must be used instead. We test several simple damping functions to model the velocity dispersion FoG effect. Applying the formalism to mock galaxies modeled after the

  6. A Ly{alpha} HALO AROUND A QUASAR AT REDSHIFT z = 6.4

    SciTech Connect

    Willott, Chris J.; Chet, Savironi; Hutchings, John B.; Bergeron, Jacqueline

    2011-12-15

    We present long-slit spectroscopic data that reveal extended Ly{alpha} emission around the z = 6.417 radio-quiet quasar CFHQS J2329-0301. The Ly{alpha} emission is extended over 15 kpc and has a luminosity of >8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 36} W, comparable to the most luminous Ly{alpha} halos known. The emission has complex kinematics, in part due to foreground absorption, which only partly covers the extended nebula. The velocity ranges from -500 km s{sup -1} to +500 km s{sup -1}, with a peak remarkably close to the systemic velocity identified by broad Mg II emission of the quasar. There is no evidence for infall or outflow of the halo gas. We speculate that the Ly{alpha} emission mechanism is recombination after quasar photoionization of gas sitting within a high-mass dark matter halo. The immense Ly{alpha} luminosity indicates a higher covering factor of cold gas compared with typical radio-quiet quasars at lower redshift.

  7. Effects of light illumination on electron velocity of AlGaN/GaN heterostructures under high electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Lei; Yang, Xuelin Cheng, Jianpeng; Sang, Ling; Xu, Fujun; Tang, Ning; Feng, Zhihong; Lv, Yuanjie; Wang, Xinqiang; Shen, B.; Ge, Weikun

    2014-12-15

    We have investigated the variation of electron velocity in AlGaN/GaN heterostructures depending on illuminating light intensity and wavelength. It is shown that the electron velocity at high electric field increases under above-band light illumination. This electron velocity enhancement is found to be related to the photo-generated cold holes which interact with hot electrons and thus accelerate the energy relaxation at high electric field. The results suggest an alternative way to improve the electron energy relaxation rate and hence the electron velocity in GaN based heterostructures.

  8. Investigation of high velocity separator for particle removal in coal gasification plants. Phase II report

    SciTech Connect

    Linhardt, H.D.

    1980-01-15

    This report summarizes the results of Phase II of the High Velocity Particle Separator Program performed under Contract EF-77-C-01-2709. This high velocity wedge separator has the potential to reduce equipment size and cost of high temperature and pressurized particulate removal equipment for coal derived gases. Phase II has been directed toward testing and detailed conceptual design of an element suitable for a commercial scale high temperature, high pressure particle separator (HTPS). Concurrently, Phase IA has been conducted, which utilized the ambient analog method (AAM) for aerodynamic and collection performance investigation of each HTPS configuration prior and during hot testing. This report summarizes the results of Phase IA and II. The AAM effort established correlation of theoretical analysis and experiment for HTPS pressure drop, purge flow ratio and collection efficiency potential. Task I defined the initial test conditions to be the contract design point of 1800/sup 0/F and 350 psia. The 1800/sup 0/F, 350 psia testing represents the main high temperature testing with coal-derived particulates in the 2 to 10 micron range. Phase IA and Phase II have demonstrated efficient particle collection with acceptable pressure drop. In view of these encouraging results, it is reasonable to apply the developed technology toward future hot gas particulate cleanup requirements.

  9. HIGH-PRECISION TIMING OF FIVE MILLISECOND PULSARS: SPACE VELOCITIES, BINARY EVOLUTION, AND EQUIVALENCE PRINCIPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, M. E.; Stairs, I. H.; Ferdman, R. D.; Lyne, A. G.; Freire, P. C. C.; Kramer, M.; Nice, D. J.; Demorest, P. B.; Ransom, S. M.; Camilo, F.; Hobbs, G.; Manchester, R. N.

    2011-12-20

    We present high-precision timing of five millisecond pulsars (MSPs) carried out for more than seven years; four pulsars are in binary systems and one is isolated. We are able to measure the pulsars' proper motions and derive an estimate for their space velocities. The measured two-dimensional velocities are in the range 70-210 km s{sup -1}, consistent with those measured for other MSPs. We also use all the available proper motion information for isolated and binary MSPs to update the known velocity distribution for these populations. As found by earlier works, we find that the velocity distribution of binary and isolated MSPs are indistinguishable with the current data. Four of the pulsars in our observing program are highly recycled with low-mass white dwarf companions and we are able to derive accurate binary parameters for these systems. For three of these binary systems, we are able to place initial constraints on the pulsar masses with best-fit values in the range 1.0-1.6 M{sub Sun }. The implications of the results presented here to our understanding of binary pulsar evolution are discussed. The updated parameters for the binary systems studied here, together with recently discovered similar systems, allowed us to update previous limits on the violation of the strong equivalence principle through the parameter |{Delta}| to 4.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} (95% confidence) and the violation of Lorentz invariance/momentum conservation through the parameter |{alpha}-hat3| to 5.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -20} (95% confidence).

  10. Simulation of compact circumstellar shells around Type Ia supernovae and the resulting high-velocity features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulligan, Brian W.; Wheeler, J. Craig

    2017-01-01

    For Type Ia supernovae that are observed prior to B-band maximum (approximately 18-20 days after the explosion) Ca absorption features are observed at velocities of order 10,000 km/s faster than the typical photospheric features. These high velocity features weaken in the first couple of weeks, disappearing entirely by a week after B-band maximum. The source of this high velocity material is uncertain: it may be the result of interaction between the supernova and circumstellar material or may be the result of plumes or bullets of material ejected during the course of the explosion. We simulate interaction between a supernova and several compact circumstellar shells, located within 0.03 solar radii of the progenitor white dwarf and having masses of 0.02 solar masses or less. We use FLASH to perform hydrodynamic simulations of the system to determine the structure of the ejecta and shell components after the interaction, then use these results to generate synthetic spectra with 1 day cadence for the first 25 days after the explosion. We compare the evolution of the velocity and pseudo-equivalent width of the Ca near-infrared triplet features in the synthetic spectra to observed values, demonstrating that these models are consistent with observations. Additionally, we fit the observed spectra of SN 2011fe (Parrent 2012, Pereira 2013) prior to B-band maximum using these models and synthetic spectra and provide an estimate for Ca abundance within the circumstellar material with implications for the mechanism by which the white dwarf explodes.

  11. Far-infrared excess emission as a tracer of disk-halo interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz, D.; Kerp, J.; Flöer, L.; Winkel, B.; Boulanger, F.; Lagache, G.

    2015-01-01

    Context. Given the current and past star-formation in the Milky Way in combination with the limited gas supply, the re-fuelling of the reservoir of cool gas is an important aspect of Galactic astrophysics. The infall of H i halo clouds can, among other mechanisms, contribute to solving this problem. Aims: We study the intermediate-velocity cloud IVC135+54 and its spatially associated high-velocity counterpart to look for signs of a past or ongoing interaction. Methods: Using the Effelsberg-Bonn H i Survey data, we investigated the interplay of gas at different velocities. In combination with far-infrared Planck and IRIS data, we extended this study to interstellar dust and used the correlation of the data sets to infer information on the dark gas. Results: The velocity structure indicates a strong compression and deceleration of the infalling high-velocity cloud (HVC), associated with far-infrared excess emission in the intermediate-velocity cloud. This excess emission traces molecular hydrogen, confirming that IVC135+54 is one of the very few molecular halo clouds. The high dust emissivity of IVC135+54 with respect to the local gas implies that it consists of disk material and does not, unlike the HVC, have an extragalactic origin. Conclusions: Based on the velocity structure of the HVC and the dust content of the IVC, a physical connection between them appears to be the logical conclusion. Since this is not compatible with the distance difference between the two objects, we conclude that this particular HVC might be much closer to us than complex C. Alternatively, the indicators for an interaction are misleading and have another origin.

  12. A UNIVERSAL MODEL FOR HALO CONCENTRATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Diemer, Benedikt; Kravtsov, Andrey V.

    2015-01-20

    We present a numerical study of dark matter halo concentrations in ΛCDM and self-similar cosmologies. We show that the relation between concentration, c, and peak height, ν, exhibits the smallest deviations from universality if halo masses are defined with respect to the critical density of the universe. These deviations can be explained by the residual dependence of concentration on the local slope of the matter power spectrum, n, which affects both the normalization and shape of the c-ν relation. In particular, there is no well-defined floor in the concentration values. Instead, the minimum concentration depends on redshift: at fixed ν, halos at higher z experience steeper slopes n, and thus have lower minimum concentrations. We show that the concentrations in our simulations can be accurately described by a universal seven-parameter function of only ν and n. This model matches our ΛCDM results to ≲ 5% accuracy up to z = 6, and matches scale-free Ω{sub m} = 1 models to ≲ 15%. The model also reproduces the low concentration values of Earth-mass halos at z ≈ 30, and thus correctly extrapolates over 16 orders of magnitude in halo mass. The predictions of our model differ significantly from all models previously proposed in the literature at high masses and redshifts. Our model is in excellent agreement with recent lensing measurements of cluster concentrations.

  13. Density and sound velocity of Fe-S liquids at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Z.; Sakamaki, T.; Yu, T.; Kono, Y.; Wang, Y.; Park, C.; Shen, G.

    2011-12-01

    Liquid iron is the dominant component in the Earth's outer core and possibly the cores (or outer cores) of other terrestrial planets like Moon, Mars, and Mercury. Seismological and geochemical observations suggest that light elements such as S, C, O, Si, H, etc may be present in the liquid cores. In order to constrain the abundances of light elements and understand their effects on the structure, dynamics, and evolution of planetary cores, it is crucial to determine the equation of state for Fe-light element alloying liquids under core conditions. However, density data on liquid Fe-light element alloys at core pressures are very limited and no sound velocity or bulk modulus data are available for these liquids at high pressures. This makes it difficult to extrapolate the equation of state to core pressures. As a result, density data on solid Fe alloys are often used in the literature to compare with seismological observations by making corrections for the volume of melting. In this study, we extend the density dataset for Fe-S liquids by measuring the density of liquid iron with 19wt% sulfur and 27wt% sulfur using the X-ray absorption technique in a DIA-type multianvil apparatus up to 7 GPa and 2173 K. Ion chambers and 2D X-ray radiographic images were used to measure intensities of the incident and transmitted monochromatic X-rays, with the photon energy optimized at 40 keV. The density was then determined from the Beer-Lambert law using the mass absorption coefficients. We have also developed techniques to directly measure the ultrasonic sound velocities in these liquids up to 5 GPa and 1773 K using a Paris-Edinburgh cell. The sound velocity was determined by measuring the travel time difference between the sample echo and the buffer rod echo using a waveform generator and a digital oscilloscope and by measuring the sample thickness using X-ray radiographic images. The combination of density and sound velocity data can provide tight constraints on the equation of

  14. An Improved Catalog of Halo Wide Binary Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Christine; Monroy-Rodríguez, Miguel A.

    2014-08-01

    We present an improved catalog of halo wide binaries compiled from an extensive literature search. Most of our binaries stem from the common proper motion binary catalogs by Allen et al. and Chanamé & Gould, but we have also included binaries from the lists of Ryan and Zapatero-Osorio & Martín. All binaries were carefully checked and their distances and systemic radial velocities are included when available. Probable membership to the halo population was tested by means of reduced proper motion diagrams for 251 candidate halo binaries. After eliminating obvious disk binaries, we ended up with 211 probable halo binaries, 150 of which have radial velocities available. We compute galactic orbits for these 150 binaries and calculate the time they spend within the galactic disk. Considering the full sample of 251 candidate halo binaries as well as several subsamples, we find that the distribution of angular separations (or expected major semiaxes) follows a power law f(a) ~ a -1 (Oepik's relation) up to different limits. For the 50 most disk-like binaries, those that spend their entire lives within z = ±500 pc, this limit is found to be 19,000 AU (0.09 pc), while for the 50 most halo-like binaries, those that spend on average only 18% of their lives within z = ±500 pc, the limit is 63,000 AU (0.31 pc). In a companion paper, we employ this catalog to establish limits on the masses of the halo massive perturbers (massive compact halo objects).

  15. An improved catalog of halo wide binary candidates

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Christine; Monroy-Rodríguez, Miguel A.

    2014-08-01

    We present an improved catalog of halo wide binaries compiled from an extensive literature search. Most of our binaries stem from the common proper motion binary catalogs by Allen et al. and Chanamé and Gould, but we have also included binaries from the lists of Ryan and Zapatero-Osorio and Martín. All binaries were carefully checked and their distances and systemic radial velocities are included when available. Probable membership to the halo population was tested by means of reduced proper motion diagrams for 251 candidate halo binaries. After eliminating obvious disk binaries, we ended up with 211 probable halo binaries, 150 of which have radial velocities available. We compute galactic orbits for these 150 binaries and calculate the time they spend within the galactic disk. Considering the full sample of 251 candidate halo binaries as well as several subsamples, we find that the distribution of angular separations (or expected major semiaxes) follows a power law f(a) ∼ a {sup –1} (Oepik's relation) up to different limits. For the 50 most disk-like binaries, those that spend their entire lives within z = ±500 pc, this limit is found to be 19,000 AU (0.09 pc), while for the 50 most halo-like binaries, those that spend on average only 18% of their lives within z = ±500 pc, the limit is 63,000 AU (0.31 pc). In a companion paper, we employ this catalog to establish limits on the masses of the halo massive perturbers (massive compact halo objects).

  16. [Estimates of velocity of the travelling wave in the high-range cochlea of the dolphin].

    PubMed

    Popov, V V; Supin, A Ia

    2014-07-01

    Auditory brainstem responses (ABR) to sound pulses of precisely defined spectrum band of 0.5 oct (from 11.2-16 to 90-128 kHz) were recorded in bottlenose dolphins Tursiops truncatus. At equal stimulus levels, ABR amplitude depended on the stimulus spectrum band: the higher the frequency, the higher the amplitude. ABR waveform little depended on the stimulus spectrum band, however ABR latency did depend: the higher the frequency, the shorter the latency. The latency difference between responses to the lowest-frequency (11.2-16 kHz) and the highest-frequency (90-129 kHz) stimuli was up to 0.3 ms. This latency difference was attributed to the time of the wave travelling along the basilar membrane. Therefore, the data were used to compute the travelling-wave velocity. The obtained estimates were: 38.2 oct/ms at the proximal (high-frequ- ency) end of the basilar membrane to 2.8 oct/ms at the distal (low-frequency) end. Comparison of the travelling-wave velocities in humans and dolphins shows that the travelling-wave velocity is linked to the characteristic frequency, not to the place in the cochlea.

  17. Velocity gap mode of capillary electrophoresis developed for high-resolution chiral separations.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue; Li, Youxin; Zhao, Lumeng; Shen, Jianguo; Zhang, Yong; Bao, James J

    2014-10-01

    A new CE method based on velocity gap (VG) theory has been developed for high-resolution chiral separations. In VG, two consecutive electric fields are adopted to drive analytes passing through two capillaries, which are linked together through a joint. The joint is immersed inside another buffer vial which has conductivity communication with the buffer inside the capillary. By adjusting the field strengths onto the two capillaries, it is possible to observe different velocities of an analyte when it passes through those two capillaries and there would be a net velocity change (NVC) for the same analyte. Different analytes may have different NVC which may be specifically meaningful for enantioseparations because enantiomers are usually hard to resolve. By taking advantage of this NVC, it is possible to enhance the resolution of a chiral separation if a proper voltage program is applied. The feasibility of using NVC to enhance chiral separation was demonstrated in the separations of three pairs of enantiomers: terbutaline, chlorpheniramine, and promethazine. All separations started with partial separation in a conventional CE and were significantly improved under the same experimental conditions. The results indicated that VG has the potential to be used to improve the resolving power of CE in chiral separations.

  18. High velocity features in Type Ia supernovae via interaction with circumstellar shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulligan, Brian W.; Wheeler, J. Craig

    2015-01-01

    Observations of Type Ia supernovae (SN Ia) in the weeks before B-band maximum (Bmax) have shown the presence of Ca, Si, and Fe features with velocities of 8,000-14,000 km/s faster than that associated with the photospheric features (PSF). Suggestions for the source of the high velocity features include interaction of the ejecta with a circumstellar material. We perform hydrodynamic simulation of a supernova interacting with a shell consisting of 5×10-3 M⊙ of material and an outer radius of 0.028 R⊙ as well as a supernova in a low density circumstellar medium (LDCSM) without a shell. We present the synthetic spectra of the Ca II near-IR feature generated from both models fit to the observed features in SN 2011fe in the epoch before Bmax. The shell interaction model consistently fits the observed spectra better than the LDCSM model at all times before Bmax, and satisfies the observed velocity evolution of both the HVF and PSF.

  19. A high stellar velocity dispersion for a compact massive galaxy at redshift z = 2.186.

    PubMed

    van Dokkum, Pieter G; Kriek, Mariska; Franx, Marijn

    2009-08-06

    Recent studies have found that the oldest and most luminous galaxies in the early Universe are surprisingly compact, having stellar masses similar to present-day elliptical galaxies but much smaller sizes. This finding has attracted considerable attention, as it suggests that massive galaxies have grown in size by a factor of about five over the past ten billion years (10 Gyr). A key test of these results is a determination of the stellar kinematics of one of the compact galaxies: if the sizes of these objects are as extreme as has been claimed, their stars are expected to have much higher velocities than those in present-day galaxies of the same mass. Here we report a measurement of the stellar velocity dispersion of a massive compact galaxy at redshift z = 2.186, corresponding to a look-back time of 10.7 Gyr. The velocity dispersion is very high at km s(-1), consistent with the mass and compactness of the galaxy inferred from photometric data. This would indicate significant recent structural and dynamical evolution of massive galaxies over the past 10 Gyr. The uncertainty in the dispersion was determined from simulations that include the effects of noise and template mismatch. However, we cannot exclude the possibility that some subtle systematic effect may have influenced the analysis, given the low signal-to-noise ratio of our spectrum.

  20. Mapping Dark Matter Halos with Stellar Kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Jeremy; Gebhardt, K.; Greene, J. E.; Graves, G.

    2013-07-01

    Galaxies of all sizes form and evolve in the centers of dark matter halos. As these halos constitute the large majority of the total mass of a galaxy, dark matter certainly plays a central role in the galaxy's formation and evolution. Yet despite our understanding of the importance of dark matter, observations of the extent and shape of dark matter halos have been slow in coming. The paucity of data is particularly acute in elliptical galaxies. Happily, concerted effort over the past several years by a number of groups has been shedding light on the dark matter halos around galaxies over a wide range in mass. The development of new instrumentation and large surveys, coupled with the tantalizing evidence for a direct detection of dark matter from the AMS experiment, has brought on a golden age in the study of galactic scale dark matter halos. I report on results using extended stellar kinematics from integrated light to dynamically model massive elliptical galaxies in the local universe. I use the integral field power of the Mitchell Spectrograph to explore the kinematics of stars to large radii (R > 2.5 r_e). Once the line-of-sight stellar kinematics are measured, I employ orbit-based, axisymmetric dynamical modeling to explore a range of dark matter halo parameterizations. Globular cluster kinematics at even larger radii are used to further constrain the dynamical models. The dynamical models also return information on the anisotropy of the stars which help to further illuminate the primary formation mechanisms of the galaxy. Specifically, I will show dynamical modeling results for the first and second rank galaxies in the Virgo Cluster, M49 and M87. Although similar in total luminosity and ellipticity, these two galaxies show evidence for different dark matter halo shapes, baryon to dark matter fractions, and stellar anisotropy profiles. Moreover, the stellar velocity dispersion at large radii in M87 is significantly higher than the globular clusters at the same

  1. Stellar discs in Aquarius dark matter haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeBuhr, Jackson; Ma, Chung-Pei; White, Simon D. M.

    2012-10-01

    We investigate the gravitational interactions between live stellar discs and their dark matter haloes, using Λ cold dark matter haloes similar in mass to that of the Milky Way taken from the Aquarius Project. We introduce the stellar discs by first allowing the haloes to respond to the influence of a growing rigid disc potential from z = 1.3 to 1.0. The rigid potential is then replaced with star particles which evolve self-consistently with the dark matter particles until z = 0.0. Regardless of the initial orientation of the disc, the inner parts of the haloes contract and change from prolate to oblate as the disc grows to its full size. When the disc's normal is initially aligned with the major axis of the halo at z = 1.3, the length of the major axis contracts and becomes the minor axis by z = 1.0. Six out of the eight discs in our main set of simulations form bars, and five of the six bars experience a buckling instability that results in a sudden jump in the vertical stellar velocity dispersion and an accompanying drop in the m = 2 Fourier amplitude of the disc surface density. The bars are not destroyed by the buckling but continue to grow until the present day. Bars are largely absent when the disc mass is reduced by a factor of 2 or more; the relative disc-to-halo mass is therefore a primary factor in bar formation and evolution. A subset of the discs is warped at the outskirts and contains prominent non-coplanar material with a ring-like structure. Many discs reorient by large angles between z = 1 and 0, following a coherent reorientation of their inner haloes. Larger reorientations produce more strongly warped discs, suggesting a tight link between the two phenomena. The origins of bars and warps appear independent: some discs with strong bars show little disturbances at the outskirts, while the discs with the weakest bars show severe warps.

  2. HIGH-RESOLUTION SEISMIC VELOCITY AND ATTENUATION MODELS OF THE CAUCASUS-CASPIAN REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Mellors, R; Gok, R; Pasyanos, M; Skobeltsyn, G; Teoman, U; Godoladze, T; Sandvol, E

    2008-07-01

    The southwest edge of Eurasia is a tectonically and structurally complex region that includes the Caspian and Black Sea basins, the Caucasus Mountains, and the high plateaus south of the Caucasus. Using data from 25 broadband stations located in the region, new estimates of crustal and upper mantle thickness, velocity structure, and attenuation are being developed. Receiver functions have been determined for all stations. Depth to Moho is estimated using slant stacking of the receiver functions, forward modeling, and inversion. Moho depths along the Caspian and in the Kura Depression are in general poorly constrained using only receiver functions due to thick sedimentary basin sediments. The best fitting models suggest a low velocity upper crust with Moho depths ranging from 30 to 40 km. Crustal thicknesses increase in the Greater Caucasus with Moho depths of 40 to 50 km. Pronounced variations with azimuth of source are observed indicating 3D structural complexity and upper crustal velocities are higher than in the Kura Depression to the south. In the Lesser Caucasus, south and west of the Kura Depression, the crust is thicker (40 to 50 km) and upper crustal velocities are higher. Work is underway to refine these models with the event based surface wave dispersion and ambient noise correlation measurements from continuous data. Regional phase (Lg and Pg) attenuation models as well as blockage maps for Pn and Sn are being developed. Two methods are used to estimate Q: the two-station method to estimate inter-station Q and the reversed, two-station, two event method. The results are then inverted to create Lg and Pg Q maps. Initial results suggest substantial variations in both Pg and Lg Q in the region. A zone of higher Pg Q extends west from the Caspian between the Lesser and Greater Caucasus and a narrow area of higher Lg Q is observed.

  3. Wire melting and droplet atomization in a high velocity oxy-fuel jet

    SciTech Connect

    Neiser, R.A.; Brockmann, J.E.; O`Hern, T.J.

    1995-07-01

    Coatings produced by feeding a steel wire into a high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) torch are being intensively studied by the automotive industry as a cost-effective alternative to the more expensive cast iron sleeves currently used in aluminum engine blocks. The microstructure and properties of the sprayed coatings and the overall economics of the process depend critically on the melting and atomization occurring at the wire tip. This paper presents results characterizing several aspects of wire melting and droplet breakup in an HVOF device. Fluctuations in the incandescent emission of the plume one centimeter downstream from the wire tip were recorded using a fast photodiode. A Fourier transform of the light traces provided a measure of the stripping rate of molten material from the wire tip. Simultaneous in-flight measurement of atomized particle size and velocity distributions were made using a Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer (PDPA). The recorded size distributions approximate a log-normal distribution. Small particles traveled faster than large particles, but the difference was considerably smaller than simple aerodynamic drag arguments would suggest. A set of experiments was carried out to determine the effect that variations in torch gas flow rates have on wire melt rate, average particle size, and average particle velocity. The observed variation of particle size with spray condition is qualitatively consistent with a Weber breakup of the droplets coming off the wire. The measurements also showed that it was possible to significantly alter atomized particle size and velocity without appreciably changing the wire melt rate.

  4. A novel platform to study magnetized high-velocity collisionless shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Higginson, D. P.; Korneev, Ph; Béard, J.; Chen, S. N.; d'Humières, E.; Pépin, H.; Pikuz, S.; Pollock, B.; Riquier, R.; Tikhonchuk, V.; Fuchs, J.

    2014-12-13

    An experimental platform to study the interaction of two colliding high-velocity (0.01–0.2c; 0.05–20 MeV) proton plasmas in a high strength (20 T) magnetic field is introduced. This platform aims to study the collision of magnetized plasmas accelerated via the Target-Normal-Sheath-Acceleration mechanism and initially separated by distances of a few hundred microns. The plasmas are accelerated from solid targets positioned inside a few cubic millimeter cavity located within a Helmholtz coil that provides up to 20 T magnetic fields. Various parameters of the plasmas at their interaction location are estimated. These show an interaction that is highly non-collisional, and that becomes more and more dominated by the magnetic fields as time progresses (from 5 to 60 ps). Particle-in-cell simulations are used to reproduce the initial acceleration of the plasma both via simulations including the laser interaction and via simulations that start with preheated electrons (to save dramatically on computational expense). The benchmarking of such simulations with the experiment and with each other will be used to understand the physical interaction when a magnetic field is applied. In conclusion, the experimental density profile of the interacting plasmas is shown in the case without an applied magnetic magnetic field, so to show that without an applied field that the development of high-velocity shocks, as a result of particle-to-particle collisions, is not achievable in the configuration considered.

  5. Revisit of the relationship between the elastic properties and sound velocities at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chenju; Xiang, Shikai; Gu, Jianbing; Kuang, Xiaoyu; Yu, Yin; Yan, Xiaozhen; Chen, Haiyan

    2014-09-01

    The second-order elastic constants and stress-strain coefficients are defined, respectively, as the second derivatives of the total energy and the first derivative of the stress with respect to strain. Since the Lagrangian and infinitesimal strain are commonly used in the two definitions above, the second-order elastic constants and stress-strain coefficients are separated into two categories, respectively. In general, any of the four physical quantities is employed to characterize the elastic properties of materials without differentiation. Nevertheless, differences may exist among them at non-zero pressures, especially high pressures. Having explored the confusing issue systemically in the present work, we find that the four quantities are indeed different from each other at high pressures and these differences depend on the initial stress applied on materials. Moreover, the various relations between the four quantities depicting elastic properties of materials and high-pressure sound velocities are also derived from the elastic wave equations. As examples, we calculated the high-pressure sound velocities of cubic tantalum and hexagonal rhenium using these nexus. The excellent agreement of our results with available experimental data suggests the general applicability of the relations.

  6. Characterization of High-Velocity Single Particle Impacts on Plasma-Sprayed Ceramic Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiilakoski, Jarkko; Lindroos, Matti; Apostol, Marian; Koivuluoto, Heli; Kuokkala, Veli-Tapani; Vuoristo, Petri

    2016-08-01

    High-velocity impact wear can have a significant effect on the lifetime of thermally sprayed coatings in multiple applications, e.g., in the process and paper industries. Plasma-sprayed oxide coatings, such as Cr2O3- and TiO2-based coatings, are often used in these industries in wear and corrosion applications. An experimental impact study was performed on thermally sprayed ceramic coatings using the High-Velocity Particle Impactor (HVPI) at oblique angles to investigate the damage, failure, and deformation of the coated structures. The impact site was characterized by profilometry, optical microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Furthermore, the connection between the microstructural details and impact behavior was studied in order to reveal the damage and failure characteristics at a more comprehensive level. Differences in the fracture behavior were found between the thermally sprayed Cr2O3 and TiO2 coatings, and a concept of critical impact energy is presented here. The superior cohesion of the TiO2 coating inhibited interlamellar cracking while the Cr2O3 coating suffered greater damage at high impact energies. The HVPI experiment has proven to be able to produce valuable information about the deformation behavior of coatings under high strain rates and could be utilized further in the development of wear-resistant coatings.

  7. DETECTION OF HIGH VELOCITY OUTFLOWS IN THE SEYFERT 1 GALAXY Mrk 590

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, A.; Mathur, S.; Krongold, Y.

    2015-01-01

    We report on the detection of ultra-fast outflows in the Seyfert 1 galaxy Mrk 590. These outflows are identified through highly blueshifted absorption lines of O VIII and Ne IX in the medium energy grating spectrum and Si XIV and Mg XII in the high energy grating spectrum on board the Chandra X-ray observatory. Our best-fit photoionization model requires two absorber components at outflow velocities of 0.176c and 0.0738c and a third tentative component at 0.0867c. The components at 0.0738c and 0.0867c have high ionization parameters and high column densities, similar to other ultra-fast outflows detected at low resolution by Tombesi et al. We also found suggestive evidence for super-solar silicon in these components. These outflows carry sufficient mass and energy to provide effective feedback proposed by theoretical models. The component at 0.176c, on the other hand, has a low ionization parameter and low column density, similar to those detected by Gupta et al. in Ark 564. These absorbers occupy a different locus on the velocity versus ionization parameter plane and have opened up a new parameter space of active galactic nucleus (AGN) outflows. The presence of ultra-fast outflows in moderate luminosity AGNs poses a challenge to models of AGN outflows.

  8. Revisit of the relationship between the elastic properties and sound velocities at high pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chenju; Yan, Xiaozhen; Xiang, Shikai Chen, Haiyan; Gu, Jianbing; Yu, Yin; Kuang, Xiaoyu

    2014-09-14

    The second-order elastic constants and stress-strain coefficients are defined, respectively, as the second derivatives of the total energy and the first derivative of the stress with respect to strain. Since the Lagrangian and infinitesimal strain are commonly used in the two definitions above, the second-order elastic constants and stress-strain coefficients are separated into two categories, respectively. In general, any of the four physical quantities is employed to characterize the elastic properties of materials without differentiation. Nevertheless, differences may exist among them at non-zero pressures, especially high pressures. Having explored the confusing issue systemically in the present work, we find that the four quantities are indeed different from each other at high pressures and these differences depend on the initial stress applied on materials. Moreover, the various relations between the four quantities depicting elastic properties of materials and high-pressure sound velocities are also derived from the elastic wave equations. As examples, we calculated the high-pressure sound velocities of cubic tantalum and hexagonal rhenium using these nexus. The excellent agreement of our results with available experimental data suggests the general applicability of the relations.

  9. Low Sound Velocity Contributing to the High Thermoelectric Performance of Ag8SnSe6.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen; Lin, Siqi; Ge, Binghui; Yang, Jiong; Zhang, Wenqing; Pei, Yanzhong

    2016-11-01

    Conventional strategies for advancing thermoelectrics by minimizing the lattice thermal conductivity focus on phonon scattering for a short mean free path. Here, a design of slow phonon propagation as an effective approach for high-performance thermoelectrics is shown. Taking Ag8SnSe6 as an example, which shows one of the lowest sound velocities among known thermoelectric semiconductors, the lattice thermal conductivity is found to be as low as 0.2 W m(-1) K(-1) in the entire temperature range. As a result, a peak thermoelectric figure of merit zT > 1.2 and an average zT as high as ≈0.8 are achieved in Nb-doped materials, without relying on a high thermoelectric power factor. This work demonstrates not only a guiding principle of low sound velocity for minimal lattice thermal conductivity and therefore high zT, but also argyrodite compounds as promising thermoelectric materials with weak chemical bonds and heavy constituent elements.

  10. MAPPING THE GALACTIC HALO WITH BLUE HORIZONTAL BRANCH STARS FROM THE TWO-DEGREE FIELD QUASAR REDSHIFT SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    De Propris, Roberto; Harrison, Craig D.; Mares, Peter J.

    2010-08-20

    We use 666 blue horizontal branch stars from the 2Qz Redshift Survey to map the Galactic halo in four dimensions (position, distance, and velocity). We find that the halo extends to at least 100 kpc in Galactocentric distance, and obeys a single power-law density profile of index {approx}-2.5 in two different directions separated by about 150{sup 0} on the sky. This suggests that the halo is spherical. Our map shows no large kinematically coherent structures (streams, clouds, or plumes) and appears homogeneous. However, we find that at least 20% of the stars in the halo reside in substructures and that these substructures are dynamically young. The velocity dispersion profile of the halo appears to increase toward large radii while the stellar velocity distribution is non-Gaussian b