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Sample records for hamstring tendons graft

  1. ACL reconstruction: patellar tendon versus hamstring grafts--economical aspects.

    PubMed

    Forssblad, Magnus; Valentin, Anders; Engström, Björn; Werner, Suzanne

    2006-06-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to compare the costs for the use of patellar tendon versus hamstring tendons as grafts for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction including the different fixation methods. The background is that during recent years there has been a dramatic shift from patellar tendon to hamstring tendons in ACL reconstructions in Sweden. All our patients with ACL reconstructions performed during 1 year (2004) were included. Knee joints numbering 440 in 439 patients were primary ACL reconstructions. A hamstring graft was used in 345 knee joints (78.4%) and a patellar tendon graft in 95 (21.6%) of the patients (Table 2). On average 34 (SD 12.9; range 14-63) ACL reconstructions per surgeon were performed by a total of 14 surgeons. The average cost for patellar tendon procedure was 197 euros compared to 436 euros for the hamstring procedure. Mean time for surgery in primary reconstructions was 11.5 min shorter (P<0.001) for patellar tendon reconstructions (71.3+/-31 min) compared to hamstring reconstructions (83.2+/-27 min). This means a difference in cost of 90 euros. The total additional cost (fixation and surgery time) for the hamstring method compared to the patellar tendon method was on an average 329 euros. From a strict economic point of view we therefore recommend or at least consider the use of the patellar tendon as a graft in ACL reconstructions. PMID:16570193

  2. Arthroscopic posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using four-strand hamstring tendon graft and interference screws.

    PubMed

    Pinczewski, L A; Thuresson, P; Otto, D; Nyquist, F

    1997-10-01

    We describe an arthroscopic technique for reconstruction of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) using a four-strand hamstring tendon graft. The femoral tunnel is drilled via the anterolateral portal and the tibial tunnel through the skin incision from the graft harvest. The graft is pulled through the tunnels with pullout sutures and fastened with interference screws. The results to date are good and the procedure can often be performed as day surgery. PMID:9343661

  3. Interference screw fixation of hamstring vs patellar tendon grafts for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Aune, A K; Ekeland, A; Cawley, P W

    1998-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the fixation strength of a quadruple semitendinosus-gracilis graft compared with a middle-third bone-patellar tendon-bone graft using a new interference screw developed to fix hamstrings grafts for ACL reconstructions (RCL Smith & Nephew Donjoy). Five pairs of human cadaveric knees from donors with a mean age of 43 (range 33-52) years were used. One knee of each pair was randomly allocated to be reconstructed on the femoral side with a semitendinosus-gracilis graft from the same donor using RCL screw fixation. As the control, the contralateral knee was correspondingly reconstructed with a bone-patellar tendon-bone graft using the same interference screw. The grafts were pulled out at a velocity of 30 mm/s by an axially applied load using a MTS machine. The mean (SD) failure load for the bone-patellar tendon-bone graft fixations was 505 (25) N, 110% stronger than the mean failure load for the semitendinosus-gracilis graft fixations, which was 240 (47) N (P = 0.003). The stiffness for the patellar tendon-bone graft fixations was 46 (11) N/mm, 120% stiffer than the semitendinosus-gracilis graft fixations, which was 22 (11) N/mm (P = 0.01). This study shows that the interference screw principle used for ACL reconstructions with hamstrings tendons is inferior to that for bone-patellar tendon-bone reconstructions although the screw was developed especially for soft-tissue fixation in bone tunnels. PMID:9604194

  4. Knee extension and flexion muscle power after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with patellar tendon graft or hamstring tendons graft: a cross-sectional comparison 3 years post surgery.

    PubMed

    Ageberg, Eva; Roos, Harald P; Silbernagel, Karin Grävare; Thomeé, Roland; Roos, Ewa M

    2009-02-01

    Hamstring muscles play a major role in knee-joint stabilization after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. Weakness of the knee extensors after ACL reconstruction with patellar tendon (PT) graft, and in the knee flexors after reconstruction with hamstring tendons (HT) graft has been observed up to 2 years post surgery, but not later. In these studies, isokinetic muscle torque was used. However, muscle power has been suggested to be a more sensitive and sport-specific measures of strength. The aim was to study quadriceps and hamstring muscle power in patients with ACL injury treated with surgical reconstruction with PT or HT grafts at a mean of 3 years after surgery. Twenty subjects with PT and 16 subjects with HT grafts (mean age at follow up 30 years, range 20-39, 25% women), who were all included in a prospective study and followed the same goal-based rehabilitation protocol for at least 4 months, were assessed with reliable, valid, and responsive tests of quadriceps and hamstring muscle power at 3 years (SD 0.9, range 2-5) after surgery. The mean difference between legs (injured minus uninjured), the hamstring to quadriceps (H:Q, hamstring divided by quadriceps) ratio, and the limb symmetry index (LSI, injured leg divided by uninjured and multiplied by 100) value, were used for comparisons between the groups (analysis of variance). The mean difference between the injured and uninjured legs was greater in the HT than in the PT group for knee flexion power (-21.3 vs. 7.7 W, p = 0.001). Patients with HT graft had lower H:Q ratio in the injured leg than the patients with PT graft (0.63 vs. 0.77, p = 0.012). They also had lower LSI for knee flexion power than those in the PT group (88 vs. 106%, p < 0.001). No differences were found between the groups for knee extension power. The lower hamstring muscle power, and the lower hamstring to quadriceps ratio in the HT graft group than in the PT graft group 3 years (range 2-5) after ACL reconstruction, reflect imbalance

  5. Cyclic pull-out strength of hamstring tendon graft fixation with soft tissue interference screws. Influence of screw length.

    PubMed

    Stadelmaier, D M; Lowe, W R; Ilahi, O A; Noble, P C; Kohl, H W

    1999-01-01

    Blunt-threaded interference screws used for fixation of hamstring tendons in anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions provide aperture fixation and may provide a biomechanically more stable graft than a graft fixed further from the articular surface. It is unknown if soft tissue fixation strength using interference screws is affected by screw length. We compared the cyclic and time-zero pull-out forces of 7 x 25 mm and 7 x 40 mm blunt-threaded metal interference screws for hamstring graft tibial fixation in eight paired human cadaveric specimens. A four-stranded autologous hamstring tendon graft was secured by a blunt-threaded interference screw into a proximal tibial tunnel with a diameter corresponding to the graft width. Eight grafts were secured with a 25-mm length screw while the other eight paired grafts were secured with a 40-mm length screw. During cyclic testing, slippage of the graft occurred as the force of pull became greater with each cycle until the graft-screw complex ultimately failed. All grafts failed at the fixation site, with the tendon being pulled past the screw. There were no measurable differences in the mean cyclic failure strength, pull-out strength, or stiffness between the two sizes of screws. Although use of the longer screw would make removal technically easier should revision surgery be necessary, it did not provide stronger fixation strength than the shorter, standard screw as had been postulated. PMID:10569365

  6. Patellar tendon or hamstring graft anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions in patients aged above 50 years

    PubMed Central

    Bali, Tarun; Nagraj, Raghu; Kumar, Malhar N; Chandy, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background: The treatment of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury consists of arthroscopic ACL reconstruction with patellar tendon or hamstring graft. Satisfactory results have been reported so far in the younger age group. Dilemma arises regarding the suitability of ACL reconstruction in patients aged 50 years and above. This retrospective analyses the outcome of ACL reconstruction in patients aged 50 years and above. Materials and Methods: 55 patients aged 50 years and above presented to our institution with symptomatic ACL tear and were managed with arthroscopic reconstruction with patellar tendon/hamstring graft. 22 patients underwent ACL reconstruction with bone- patellar tendon-bone graft and the remaining 33 with a hamstring graft. Evaluation of functional outcome was performed using International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) and Lysholm scoring in the preoperative period, at the end of 1 year and at the final followup. Radiographic evaluation was performed using the Kellgren–Lawrence grading system. Results: The mean preoperative IKDC score was 39.7 ± 3.3. At the end of 1-year following the operation, the mean IKDC score was 73.6 ± 4.9 and at the final followup was 67.8 ± 7.7. The mean preoperative Lysholm score was 40.4 ± 10.3. At the end of 1-year following the intervention, the mean Lysholm score was 89.7 ± 2.1 and at final followup was 85.3 ± 2.5. Overall, 14 out of 42 patients who underwent radiographic assessment showed progression of osteoarthritis changes at the final followup after the intervention. Conclusion: In our study, there was a statistically significant improvement in the IKDC and Lysholm scores following the intervention. There was a slight deterioration in the scores at the final followup but the overall rate of satisfaction was still high and most of the patients were able to do their routine chores and light exercises suitable for their age group. Around one-third of patients show progression of radiographic changes

  7. Reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament: a comparison between bone-patellar tendon-bone grafts and fourstrand hamstring grafts

    PubMed Central

    Razi, Mohammad; Sarzaeem, Mohammad Mahdi; Kazemian, Gholam Hossein; Najafi, Farideh; Najafi, Mohammad Amin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Disruption of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a common ligamentous injury of the knee. The choice of graft for (ACL) reconstruction remains controversial. This prospective, randomized clinical trial aimed to compare clinical results of bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) grafts and four-strand semitendinosus-gracilis (ST) grafts for ACL reconstruction over a 3-year follow-up interval. Methods: Seventy-one patients with an average age of 29± 4.5yearswere treated for torn ACL between 2008 and 2009. Forty-sixpatients underwent reconstruction with BPTB autograft, and 41 were treated with ST autograft. At the time of final follow-up, 37 patients in patella group and 34 patients in hamstring group were evaluated in terms of return to pre-injury activity level, pain, knee stability, range of motion, IKDC (International Knee Documentation Committee) score and complications. Results: At 36thmonth of follow-up, 34 (92%) and 28 (82%) patients in BPTB and ST group, respectively had good-to-excellent IKDC score (p > 0.05). The activity levels were higher in BPTB group (p> 0.05). At 3rd yearof follow up, the Lachman test was graded normal, for 23 (62%) and 11 (32%) patients in BPTB and ST group, respectively (p=0.019). Regarding the pivot-shift test, 29 (79%) and 15 (44%) patients in patella and hamstring group, respectively had normal test at the latest follow-up (p=0.021).There were no significant differences in terms of thigh circumference difference, effusion, knee range of motion, pain and complications. Conclusion: The results indicate a trend toward increased graft laxity and pivot-shift grades in patients undergoing reconstruction with hamstring autograft compared with patella tendon. However, the two groups had comparable results in terms of activity level and knee function. PMID:25694992

  8. Fifteen Year Prospective Comparison of Patellar & Hamstring Tendon Grafts for ACL Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Roe, Justin; Salmon, Lucy; Kok, Alison; Linklater, James; Pinczewski, Leo

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This prospective longitudinal study compares isolated endoscopic ACL reconstruction utilizing 4-strand hamstring tendon (HT) or patellar tendon (PT) autograft over a 15-year period with respect to clinical outcomes and the development of osteoarthritis. Method: 90 consecutive patients with isolated ACL rupture were reconstructed with a PT autograft and 90 patients received HT autograft, with an identical surgical technique. Patients were assessed at 2, 5, 7, 10 and 15 years. Assessment included the IKDC Knee Ligament Evaluation including radiographic evaluation, KT1000, kneeling pain, and clinical outcomes. Results: Subjects who received the PT graft had significantly worse outcomes at 15 years for the variables of radiologically detectable osteoarthritis (p=0.001), motion loss (p=0.02), single leg hop test (p=0.002), participation in strenuous activity (p=0.03), knee related decrease in activity level (p=0.002) and kneeling pain (p=0.03). There was no significant difference between the HT and PT groups in overall IKDC grade (p=0.28). ACL graft rupture occurred in 16% of HT group and 8% of the PT group (p=0.10). Contralateral ACL rupture occurred in significantly more PT patients (24%) than HT patients (12%) (p=0.03). Conclusion: Significant differences have developed at 15 years after surgery which were not seen at earlier reviews. Compared to the HT Group, the PT group had significantly worse outcomes with respect to radiological osteoarthritis, range of motion and functional tests but no significant difference in laxity was identified. There was a high incidence of ACL injury after reconstruction, to both the reconstructed and the contralateral knee.

  9. The 5-Strand Hamstring Graft in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Rushyuan Jay; Ganley, Theodore J.

    2014-01-01

    The use of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in the pediatric and adolescent population has been increasing in recent years. Autograft hamstring graft is favored in this population, but these patients often have smaller hamstring tendons that yield smaller final graft constructs. These smaller grafts are associated with an increased need for revision surgery. We describe a technique for obtaining a larger-diameter anterior cruciate ligament graft construct from autologous hamstring graft without allograft supplementation. PMID:25473619

  10. Early versus late start of open kinetic chain quadriceps exercises after ACL reconstruction with patellar tendon or hamstring grafts: a prospective randomized outcome study.

    PubMed

    Heijne, Annette; Werner, Suzanne

    2007-04-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to evaluate physical outcome after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction with early versus late initiation of open kinetic chain (OKC) exercises for the quadriceps in patients operated on either patellar tendon or hamstring grafts. Sixty-eight patients, 36 males and 32 females, with either patellar tendon graft (34 patients) or hamstring graft (34 patients) were enrolled in this study. All patients were randomly allocated to either early (the 4th postoperative week) or late (the 12th postoperative week) start of OKC exercises for the quadriceps, resulting in four subgroups: patellar tendon reconstruction, early start (P4) or late start (P12) of OKC quadriceps exercises, hamstring tendon reconstruction, early start (H4) or late start (H12) of quadriceps OKC exercises. Prior to surgery and 3, 5 and 7 months later, assessments of range of motion (goniometer), anterior knee laxity (KT-1000), postural sway (KAT 2000), thigh muscle torques (Kin-Com dynamometer) and anterior knee pain (anterior knee pain score) were evaluated. No significant group differences were found in terms of range of motion 3, 5 and 7 months postoperatively. The H4 group showed a significantly higher mean difference of laxity over time of 1.0 mm (CI: 0.18-1.86) than the P4 group (P=0.04). Within the same type of surgery, the H4 against the H12, the mean difference over time was 1.2 mm (0.37-2.1) higher in the H4 group than in the H12 group (P=0.01). There were no significant group differences in terms of postural sway or anterior knee pain at the different test occasions. Significant differences in trends (changes over time) were found when comparing the four groups, for both quadriceps muscle torques (P<0.001) and hamstring muscle torques (P<0.001). All groups, except the P4 group, reached preoperative values of quadriceps muscle torques at the 7 months follow-up. In the H4 and the H12 groups, significantly lower hamstring muscle torques at

  11. Factors affecting return to sports after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with patellar tendon and hamstring graft: a prospective clinical investigation.

    PubMed

    Gobbi, Alberto; Francisco, Ramces

    2006-10-01

    In athletes, anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is recommended after injury to restore the normal knee function and allow subsequent return to sport. Successful ACL reconstruction with patellar tendon (PT) and hamstring tendon (HT) grafts combined with a well-structured rehabilitation program could bring athletes back to their previous level of sport activities. We prospectively followed-up 100 athletes who underwent ACL reconstruction with either PT (n=50) or HT grafts (n=50). Evaluation was done pre-operatively and post-operatively (3, 6, 12, and 24 months) using International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC), Lysholm, Noyes, and Tegner scales. Subjective assessment numeric evaluation (SANE), knee activity rating scale (Marx) and a psychological profile questionnaire (psychovitality) were also utilized. Objective evaluations included isokinetic tests and computerized knee motion analysis. Data gathered were statistically analyzed using the Mann-Whitney non-parametric U-test. Among the 100 patients who have undergone ACL reconstruction, 65% returned to the same level of sports, 24% changed sports and 11% ceased sport activities. No significant difference (P>0.05) in outcome between PT and HT grafts were observed. No significant differences (P>0.05) were noted between athletes who "returned" to their previous sport and those who "did not return" to sports at the same level when using the IKDC, Lysholm, Noyes, and Tegner knee evaluation scales. However, significant difference was observed with the knee scores obtained by those who returned and those who completely ceased participation in sport activities. Computerized laxity test revealed that 90% of these patients have less than 3 mm side-to-side difference with no significant difference between HT and PT groups. Patients who "returned to sports" obtained significantly better scores with the Marx scale (P=0.001) and the psychovitality questionnaire (P=0.001) than those who did not. Conventional knee

  12. Comparative pull-out and cyclic-loading strength tests of anchorage of hamstring tendon grafts in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Giurea, M; Zorilla, P; Amis, A A; Aichroth, P

    1999-01-01

    This study examined four devices for anchorage of hamstring tendons used as anterior cruciate ligament grafts: a stirrup, a clawed washer and screw, and "soft" and round-headed interference screws. Ultimate strength tests were performed using bovine tendons and bones. The stirrup was significantly stronger than the other anchorage devices, failing at 898 N. The clawed washer failed at 502 N, the soft screw at 691 N, and the round-headed screw at 445 N. Cyclic loading to 150 N (to simulate walking) caused elongation of 2.1 mm with the stirrup by 1100 cycles, and 6.7 mm with the clawed washer by 300 cycles. Different hole and soft screw diameters and placements (inside-out versus outside-in) allowed 1-to 3-mm slippage (no significant differences) by 1100 cycles. The round-headed screw allowed 6.8-mm slippage by 1100 cycles, and a sharp edge below the screw head caused tendon damage. Cyclic loads to 450 N (to simulate jogging) were then imposed until failure, and all specimens failed rapidly; only stirrup fixation kept all specimens intact after 300 load cycles. We concluded that anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions using hamstring tendons will slacken if rehabilitation is too aggressive, so forces on the reconstructed ligament should be minimized until tendon-to-bone healing occurs. PMID:10496580

  13. Accessory bands of the hamstring tendons: A clinical anatomical study.

    PubMed

    Yasin, M N; Charalambous, C P; Mills, S P; Phaltankar, P M

    2010-10-01

    Gracilis and semitendinosus tendons are commonly used as grafts in ligamentous reconstruction. Awareness of accessory bands of these tendons is essential in preventing inadvertent diversion of the tendon harvester into the main tendon resulting in premature tendon amputation and inadequate tendon graft. The aim of this study was to describe the characteristics of these accessory bands. Twenty five patients undergoing arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using hamstring tendons were included. The number of accessory bands and distance of the most proximal band from the distal periosteal insertion point on the tibial crest was recorded for both gracilis and semitendinosus. In most cases gracilis had two accessory bands; the average distance of the most proximal band from the tibial crest insertion being 5.1 cm. Semitendinosus had three bands in most cases, the average distance of the most proximal band from the tibial crest insertion being 8.1 cm. Five (20%) semitendinosus but no gracilis tendons had an accessory band originating greater than 10 cm from the tibial crest insertion. Semitendinosus had more accessory bands compared to gracilis. A significant proportion (20%) of semitendinosus and none of the gracilis tendons had bands originating greater than 10 cm proximal to the tibial crest insertion. This knowledge about the accessory bands of the hamstrings can guide toward safe harvesting of these tendons.

  14. Ultrastructural and morphological characteristics of human anterior cruciate ligament and hamstring tendons.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jingxian; Zhang, Xin; Ma, Yong; Zhou, Chunyan; Ao, Yingfang

    2012-09-01

    Hamstring tendons are a commonly used substitute for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Ligaments and tendons are similar in composition but the ACL is more complex than hamstring tendons in function and gross morphology, which are highly dependent on its structure and ultrastructure. The purpose of this study was to compare the morphology and ultrastructure of normal human ACL and hamstring tendons, including the cell type and arrangement, expression level of proteoglycans, diameter, and density of collagen fibrils. Twenty semitendinosus or gracilis tendons and 20 ACL specimens were harvested from patients with ACL rupture or osteoarthritis undergoing routine total knee arthroplasty. The specimens were examined histologically and the ultrastructure was observed using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Semitendinosus and gracilis tendons showed a homogeneous arrangement of collagen fibers and cell type. They had lower fibril density and more widely distributed fibril diameters. In the ACL, there was a more complex arrangement of collagen fibers, distribution of proteoglycans and different cell types. Electronic microscopy demonstrated a combination of parallel, helical and nonlinear networks of ACL fibrils, and fibril diameters were smaller and more nonuniform. This study compared the anatomy of normal human ACL and hamstring tendons, which may provide a standard for evaluating hamstring tendons grafts after ACL reconstruction and may facilitate the application of hamstring tendons in clinical applications.

  15. Autologous hamstring tendon used for revision of quadiceps tendon tears.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Frank; Nwachukwu, Benedict U; Kim, Jaehon; Martin, Scott D

    2013-04-01

    A paucity of literature exists on quadriceps tendon reruptures. Failed quadriceps tendon repair can cause significant morbidity and disability. Surgical management of quadriceps tendon rerupture can be challenging due to tissue degeneration, tendon retraction, muscle atrophy, and poor bone fixation. A lack of guidance in the literature exists on the appropriate surgical techniques for managing quadriceps tendon reruptures.This article describes the case of a male recreational athlete with a failed primary quadriceps tendon repair who presented 10 months after rerupture. Examination was significant for morbid obesity, assisted ambulation, and a significant defect at the superior pole of the patella on the affected side. Intraoperative findings were consistent with a 2.0- to 4.5-cm tendon defect across the extensor mechanism with complete retinaculi tears. The authors performed a novel surgical approach for revision of quadriceps tears using a bilateral hamstring autograft through a quadriceps tendon weave and a transosseous patellar repair. Tendon length was restored, and extensor mechanism tension was reapproximated. Postoperatively, the patient achieved a good outcome and had returned to full, painless, sport participation at 2-year follow-up.This surgical technique is suitable for revision quadriceps tendon repairs of large tendon gap defects, repairs desiring tendon-to-bone in-growth, and repairs requiring large-force transmission across the repair.

  16. Hamstring graft fixation in MPFL reconstruction at the patella using a transosseous suture technique.

    PubMed

    Siebold, Rainer; Chikale, Shivanand; Sartory, Nico; Hariri, Nawid; Feil, Sven; Pässler, Hans H

    2010-11-01

    Controversy still exists about fixation methods of a hamstring graft to the patella in case of medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction. This article presents a surgical technique of hamstring tendon graft fixation to the anatomical MPFL insertion on the patella using transosseous sutures. A superficial bony sulcus is created at the anatomical MPFL insertion site on the medial patellar rim with a bur. A looped hamstring tendon graft is fixed to this superficial sulcus by a pair of nonresorbable transosseous sutures passed across the patella. The retinaculum is sutured on top of the hamstring tendon graft at the level of the patella for additional fixation. The technique avoids bone tunnels as well as hardware at the patella. It reduces the risk of intraoperative or postoperative patella fracture or implant-related complications. The stable transosseous fixation technique allows for early rehabilitation.

  17. Hamstring pain and muscle strains following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a prospective, randomized trial comparing hamstring graft harvest techniques.

    PubMed

    D'Alessandro, Peter; Wake, Giulia; Annear, Peter

    2013-04-01

    There is limited information in the literature regarding hamstring pain and muscle strains in patients following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction using hamstring autograft. We sought to investigate whether dividing hamstring tendons distal to the musculotendinous junction rather than forcefully stripping tendons away from the muscle belly during graft harvest resulted in a lower incidence of hamstring pain, muscle strains, and leg flexion strength deficit following commencement of sport-specific training postoperatively. Patients were randomized to either the "Cut" or "Push" groups of hamstring tendon harvesting. All other operative techniques were uniform. A total of 34 (cut = 20, push = 14) patients had a mean follow-up of 30 months, and assessments were conducted by a blinded single practitioner. A customized hamstring strain questionnaire and visual analogue pain score provided information for the study's primary focus: evaluation of postoperative hamstring pain and muscle strains. Leg flexion strength was also measured and a full knee assessment was conducted. The Cincinnati sports activity rating scale (SARS) was used to account for varying degrees of sporting participation and intensity since reconstruction. The "Cut" group's mean visual analogue score was 10.05 mm, significantly lower than the "Push" group (24.66 mm, p = 0.0398). The Cut group also recorded a significant reduction in the incidence of hamstring strains following ACL reconstruction (5/20 patients 25%) compared with the Push group (7/14 patients 50%, p = 0.045). There was no difference in leg flexion strength between the groups. Of the patients who reported hamstring strains, there was no significant difference in the mean Cincinnati SARS between the groups, nor any difference in overall knee function. The incidence of hamstring pain and muscle strains was significantly reduced in patients receiving the "cut" technique of harvesting hamstring tendons in ACL reconstruction

  18. Graft Diameter matters in Hamstring ACL reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Clatworthy, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Recently techniques have been developed to increase graft diameter in hamstring ACL reconstruction with the hope to decrease graft failure. To date there is limited evidence to show that a smaller graft diameter results in a higher ACL failure rate. Method: The factors for failure in 1480 consecutive single surgeon hamstring ACL reconstructions were evaluated prospectively. Patients were followed for 2-15 years. A multivariate analysis was performed which looked at graft size, age, sex, time to surgery, meniscal integrity, meniscal repair and ACL graft placement to determine whether graft diameter matters in determining the failure of hamstring ACL reconstruction. Results: Graft diameters ranged from 6-10 mm. The mean graft diameter for all patients was 7.75 mm. 83 ACL reconstructions failed. The mean size of graft failures was 7.55 mm ACL reconstructions that failed had a significantly smaller hamstring graft diameter p=0.001. The Hazard Ratio for a smaller diameter graft is 0.517 p=<0.0001. For every 1 mm decrease in graft diameter there is a 48.3% higher chance of failure. The multivariate analysis showed a hazard ratio of 0.543 p=0.002. For every 1 mm decrease in graft diameter there is a 45.7% higher chance of failure. Conclusion: Smaller diameter hamstring grafts do have a higher failure rate. Grafts ≤ 7.5 mm had twice the failure rate of grafts ≥8 mm using a multivariate analysis for every 1 mm decrease in graft diameter there is a 45.7% higher chance of failure.

  19. Joint infection unique to hamstring tendon harvester used during anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction surgery.

    PubMed

    Tuman, Jeffrey; Diduch, David R; Baumfeld, Joshua A; Rubino, L Joseph; Hart, Joseph M

    2008-05-01

    Joint infection after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is a rare but important clinical issue that must be resolved quickly to prevent secondary joint damage and preserve the graft. After careful analysis, we observed 3 infection cases within a 12-month period after ACL reconstruction, which represented an abnormally elevated risk. All reconstructions were performed by the same surgeon and used hamstring tendon allograft. For each surgery, the Target Tendon Harvester (DePuy Mitek, Raynham, MA) was used to harvest hamstring tendons. Through our review, we learned that this instrument was sterilized while assembled. It is our belief that ineffective sterilization of this hamstring graft harvester served as the origin for these infections. We have determined that appropriate sterilization technique involves disassembly of this particular hamstring tendon harvester before sterilization because of the tube-within-a-tube configuration. We have since continued to use the Target Tendon Harvester, disassembling it before sterilization. There have been no infections in the ensuing 12 months during which the surgeon performed over 40 primary ACL reconstructions via hamstring autograft. The information from this report is intended to provide arthroscopists with information about potential sources of infection after ACL reconstruction surgery. PMID:18442698

  20. Joint infection unique to hamstring tendon harvester used during anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction surgery.

    PubMed

    Tuman, Jeffrey; Diduch, David R; Baumfeld, Joshua A; Rubino, L Joseph; Hart, Joseph M

    2008-05-01

    Joint infection after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is a rare but important clinical issue that must be resolved quickly to prevent secondary joint damage and preserve the graft. After careful analysis, we observed 3 infection cases within a 12-month period after ACL reconstruction, which represented an abnormally elevated risk. All reconstructions were performed by the same surgeon and used hamstring tendon allograft. For each surgery, the Target Tendon Harvester (DePuy Mitek, Raynham, MA) was used to harvest hamstring tendons. Through our review, we learned that this instrument was sterilized while assembled. It is our belief that ineffective sterilization of this hamstring graft harvester served as the origin for these infections. We have determined that appropriate sterilization technique involves disassembly of this particular hamstring tendon harvester before sterilization because of the tube-within-a-tube configuration. We have since continued to use the Target Tendon Harvester, disassembling it before sterilization. There have been no infections in the ensuing 12 months during which the surgeon performed over 40 primary ACL reconstructions via hamstring autograft. The information from this report is intended to provide arthroscopists with information about potential sources of infection after ACL reconstruction surgery.

  1. Isokinetic dynamometer evaluation of the effects of early thigh diameter difference on thigh muscle strength in patients undergoing anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with hamstring tendon graft.

    PubMed

    Kılınç, Bekir Eray; Kara, Adnan; Camur, Savas; Oc, Yunus; Celik, Haluk

    2015-04-01

    After anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, which muscle groups are more affected from frequently developing thigh muscle atrophy is a matter of debate. We evaluate the effect of thigh circumference difference between patients' knees who were administered the ACL reconstruction with hamstring tendon autograft and intact knees, on torque between the hamstring and quadriceps muscles. Fifty-five patients at least 6 months follow-up period available were included in our study. Power measurements of quadriceps and hamstring muscle groups in patients' extremities were done by using isokinetic dynamometer. The maximum torque values at 60°/sec, 240°/sec in frequency, positions of flexion and extension were determined. In accordance with our findings it is still possible to encounter the thigh atrophy in average 28 months after ACL reconstruction surgery even under physical rehabilitation programs and appropriate follow-up. It is inevitable for the clinician to consider these changes in diagnosis and rehabilitation stages. It can't be ignored that muscle weakness mechanisms developing in the thigh circumference vary according to the thigh muscle group and knee flexors play an important role in thigh atrophy when determining an appropriate rehabilitation program after reconstruction application.

  2. Isokinetic dynamometer evaluation of the effects of early thigh diameter difference on thigh muscle strength in patients undergoing anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with hamstring tendon graft

    PubMed Central

    Kılınç, Bekir Eray; Kara, Adnan; Camur, Savas; Oc, Yunus; Celik, Haluk

    2015-01-01

    After anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, which muscle groups are more affected from frequently developing thigh muscle atrophy is a matter of debate. We evaluate the effect of thigh circumference difference between patients’ knees who were administered the ACL reconstruction with hamstring tendon autograft and intact knees, on torque between the hamstring and quadriceps muscles. Fifty-five patients at least 6 months follow-up period available were included in our study. Power measurements of quadriceps and hamstring muscle groups in patients’ extremities were done by using isokinetic dynamometer. The maximum torque values at 60°/sec, 240°/sec in frequency, positions of flexion and extension were determined. In accordance with our findings it is still possible to encounter the thigh atrophy in average 28 months after ACL reconstruction surgery even under physical rehabilitation programs and appropriate follow-up. It is inevitable for the clinician to consider these changes in diagnosis and rehabilitation stages. It can’t be ignored that muscle weakness mechanisms developing in the thigh circumference vary according to the thigh muscle group and knee flexors play an important role in thigh atrophy when determining an appropriate rehabilitation program after reconstruction application. PMID:25960982

  3. Hamstring graft size and anthropometry in south Indian population

    PubMed Central

    Challa, Supradeeptha; Satyaprasad, Jonnalagedda

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aim The role of anthropometric measurements in the prediction of hamstring autograft size in Indian population remains unclear. Till now, no studies have been done on Indian population. Methods We evaluated 41 consecutive patients (34 males, 7 females) prospectively with anterior cruciate ligament deficiency scheduled for reconstruction using hamstring autograft at our institution between June 2011 and June 2013. Preoperatively we recorded age, gender, height, weight, body mass index, and activity level. Intraoperative measurements of semitendinosus tendon like absolute length, diameter before fashioning the graft and final diameter of the tripled graft using sizing tubes calibrated to 1 mm. Correlation coefficient (Pearson's r) analysis was used. Results As per study there is no correlation between graft diameter, age, sex, weight, activity, and body mass index, of patients. Height of patients correlated to graft diameter in both Indian men and women (p < 0.001). Conclusion Anthropometric measurements such as weight, gender, activity level cannot be used as definitive predictors for the hamstring graft diameter during harvest but height of the patients can be taken as good predictor in Indian population. PMID:26403553

  4. Comparison of viscoelastic, structural, and material properties of double-looped anterior cruciate ligament grafts made from bovine digital extensor and human hamstring tendons.

    PubMed

    Donahue, T L; Gregersen, C; Hull, M L; Howell, S M

    2001-04-01

    Due to ready availability, decreased cost, and freedom from transmissible diseases in humans such as hepatitis and AIDS, it would be advantageous to use tendon grafts from farm animals as a substitute for human tendon grafts in in vitro experiments aimed at improving the outcome of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructive surgery. Thus the objective of this study was to determine whether an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) graft composed of two loops of bovine common digital extensor tendon has the same viscoelastic, structural, and material properties as a graft composed of a double loop of semitendinosus and gracilis tendons from humans. To satisfy this objective, grafts were constructed from each tissue source. The cross-sectional area was measured using an area micrometer, and each graft was then pulled using a materials testing system while submerged in a saline bath. Using two groups of tendon grafts (n = 10), viscoelastic tests were conducted over a three-day period during which a constant displacement load relaxation test was followed by a constant amplitude, cyclic load creep test (first day), a constant load creep test (second day), and an incremental cyclic load creep test (third day). Load-to-failure tests were performed on two different groups of grafts (n = 8). When the viscoelastic behavior was compared, there were no significant differences in the rate of load decay or the final load (relaxation test) and rates of displacement increase or final displacements (creep tests) (p > 0.115). To compare both the structural and material properties in the toe region (i.e., < 250 N) of the load-elongation curve, the tangent stiffness and modulus functions were computed from parameters used in an exponential model fit to the load (stress)-elongation (strain) data. Although one of the two parameters in the functions was different statistically, this difference translated into a difference of only 0.03 mm in displacement at 250 N of load. In the linear

  5. Predicting Hamstring Graft Diameter Using MRI and Anthropometry

    PubMed Central

    Fritsch, Brett A; Mhaskar, Vikram A; An, Vincent Vinh Gia; Scholes, Corey

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Graft diameter is one variable that may affect outcome of ACL reconstruction. The ability to predict the size of a graft in a given patient pre-operatively may help guide graft selection and preparation technique. Various papers have correlated anthropometric data and MRI tendon measurements to intraoperative graft diameter, although no papers have investigated these together. The intra-operative diameter of a hamstring autograft will be influenced by graft preparation technique. Our study aimed to investigate the prediction of intraoperative graft diameter of 2 different graft construct techniques (4-strand semitendinosus versus quadrupled semitendinosus) using anthropometry and MRI measurements. Methods: Retrospective review of two groups of ACL reconstruction using different graft preparation techniques was performed. “Conventional” 4-strand gracilis + semitendinosus with fixed suspension at the femur and screw fixation at the tibia were compared with quadrupled semitendinosus grafts with adjustable suspensory fixation at each end (Graftlink). Cross-sectional areas (XSA) of the semitendinosus and gracilis tendons was measured in the axial slice of a T2 weighted MRI image using a region-of-interest tool. Stepwise linear regression using intraoperative graft diameter as the dependant variable was performed using MRI XSA of the semitendinosus and gracilis tendons, gender and height as predictors. Results: 129 ACL Reconstruction in 127 patients were done in the time period, 89 of which were done conventionally, and 40 which employed the Graftlink construct. The median graft diameter in the Graftlink group (8.5mm IQR8-9) was greater than that of the conventional group (8mm, IQR 7.5-8) (p < 0.001). MRI XSA of semitendinosus and height were statistically significant predictors of diameter in the Graftlink group (R2 = 51%), whilst MRI XSA of semitendinosus + gracilis and gender were predictors in the conventional group (R2 = 36%). Conclusion: Graftlink

  6. Hamstring tendon harvesting--Effect of harvester on tendon characteristics and soft tissue disruption; cadaver study.

    PubMed

    Charalambous, C P; Alvi, F; Phaltankar, P; Gagey, O

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the type of hamstring tendon harvester used can influence harvested tendon characteristics and soft tissue disruption. We compared two different types of tendon harvesters with regard to the length of tendon obtained and soft tissue disruption during hamstring tendon harvesting. Thirty six semitendinosus and gracilis tendons were harvested using either a closed stripper or a blade harvester in 18 paired knees from nine human fresh cadavers. Use of the blade harvester gave longer lengths of usable tendon whilst minimising the stripping of muscle and of any non-usable tendon. Our results suggest that the type of harvester per se can influence the length of tendon harvested as well as soft tissue disruption. Requesting such data from the industry prior to deciding which harvester to use seems desirable.

  7. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using Hamstring Tendon Autograft With Preserved Insertions.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ravi; Bahadur, Raj; Malhotra, Anubhav; Masih, Gladson David; Gupta, Parmanand

    2016-04-01

    We present a technique for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction using hamstring tendon autograft with preserved tibial insertions. The tendons, harvested with an open-ended tendon stripper while their tibial insertions are preserved, are looped around to prepare a quadrupled graft. The femoral tunnel is drilled independently through a transportal technique, whereas the tibial tunnel is drilled in a standard manner. The length of the quadrupled graft and loop of the RetroButton is adjusted so that it matches the calculated length of both tunnels and the intra-articular part of the proposed ACL graft. After the RetroButton is flipped, the graft is manually tensioned with maximal stretch on the free end, which is then sutured to the other end with preserved insertions. We propose that preserving the insertions is more biological and may provide better proprioception. The technique eliminates the need for a tibial-side fixation device, thus reducing the cost of surgery. Furthermore, tibial-side fixation of the free graft is the weakest link in the overall stiffness of the reconstructed ACL, and this technique circumvents this problem. Postoperative mechanical stability and functional outcome with this technique need to be explored and compared with those of ACL reconstruction using free hamstring autograft. PMID:27354946

  8. Interference screw position and hamstring graft location for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Simonian, P T; Sussmann, P S; Baldini, T H; Crockett, H C; Wickiewicz, T L

    1998-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with hamstring tendon graft and interference screw fixation has recently been considered. Concerns for the use of interference screws with soft tissue grafts include damage to the graft during screw insertion, decreased fixation strength, and a decrease in the bone-tendon contact area for healing within the tunnel when the screw is placed in an eccentric position. This last concern could be addressed by placing the interference screw centrally between the four limbs of the hamstring graft. The purpose of this study was to determine the mode of failure, the pullout force, and graft slippage before graft fixation failure of hamstring tendons fixed with an interference screw positioned eccentrically in relation to the hamstring tendons verses an interference screw positioned centrally between the four graft limbs. The semitendinosus and gracilis tendons were harvested from six, fresh cadaveric specimens. Each tendon was divided into two segments of equal length. Both the semitendinosus and gracilis tendon segments were looped to form four strands. The specimens were then fixed with a bioabsorbable interference screw in the two different positions and pulled from a standardized polyurethane foam. All tendons in both groups failed by pulling out from between the interference screw and tunnel, regardless of the screw position. No tendon was cut by the screw in either group. There was no significant difference between the forces required to produce specific amounts of graft slippage between the two fixation techniques tested. There was no significant difference between the average total slippage at maximum pullout, 11.8 mm for the screw placed in the eccentric position and 13.7 mm for the screw placed in the central position. The maximum pullout force averaged 265.3 N for the screw placed in the eccentric position, and 244.7 N for the screw placed in the central position; these values were not significantly different. Placement of

  9. Inducement of tissue regeneration of harvested hamstring tendons in a rabbit model

    PubMed Central

    Soejima, T.; Murakami, H.; Noguchi, K.; Shiba, N.; Nagata, K.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to determine if the use of fascia lata as a tendon regeneration guide (placed into the tendon canal following harvesting the semitendinosus tendon) would improve the incidence of tissue regeneration and prevent fatty degeneration of the semitendinosus muscle. Materials and Methods Bilateral semitendinosus tendons were harvested from rabbits using a tendon stripper. On the inducing graft (IG) side, the tendon canal and semitendinosus tibial attachment site were connected by the fascia lata, which was harvested at the same width as the semitendinosus tendon. On the control side, no special procedures were performed. Two groups of six rabbits were killed at post-operative weeks 4 and 8, respectively. In addition, three healthy rabbits were killed to obtain normal tissue. We evaluated the incidence of tendon tissue regeneration, cross-sectional area of the regenerated tendon tissue and proportion of fatty tissue in the semitendinosus muscle. Results At post-operative week 8, the distal end of the regenerated tissue reached the vicinity of the tibial insertion on the control side in two of six specimens. On the IG side, the regenerated tissue maintained continuity with the tibial insertion in all specimens. The cross-sectional area of the IG side was significantly greater than that of the control side. The proportion of fatty tissue in the semitendinosus muscle on the IG side was comparable with that of the control side, but was significantly greater than that of the normal muscle. Conclusions Tendon tissue regenerated with the fascia lata graft was thicker than naturally occurring regenerated tissue. However, the proportion of fatty tissue in the semitendinosus muscle was greater than that of normal muscle. Cite this article: K. Tabuchi, T. Soejima, H. Murakami, K. Noguchi, N. Shiba, K. Nagata. Inducement of tissue regeneration of harvested hamstring tendons in a rabbit model. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:247–252. DOI: 10

  10. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF ACL RECONSTRUCTION WITH ANATOMICAL POSITIONING OF THE TUNNELS USING THE PATELLAR TENDON VERSUS HAMSTRING TENDON

    PubMed Central

    de Pádua, Vitor Barion Castro; Maldonado, Hilário; Vilela, Júlio César Rodrigues; Provenza, Alexandre Ribeira; Monteiro, Cleverson; de Oliveira Neto, Heleno Cavalcante

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare ACL reconstruction with anatomical positioning of the tunnels using the hamstring or patellar tendons. Methods: We prospectively evaluated 52 patients who underwent ACL reconstruction using the Chambat's technique, with anatomical positioning of the tunnels drilled outside in. They were divided into group A, with 27 patients, using the patellar tendon as a graft, and group B, with 25 patients, using the hamstring. Results: In group A 26 patients were very satisfied or satisfied and 1 unhappy, in group B. 25 patients were very satisfied or satisfied with the procedure (p = 0.990). According to the Lysholm scale, group A had a mean score of 96.11 and group B, 95.32 (p=0.594). In relation to preoperative IKDC, 100% of the patients in group A and 92% of those in group B were IKDC C or D (p = 0.221); in the assessment with a minimum of two-year follow-up, 96% of group A and 92% of group B were IKDC A or B (p = 0.256). The Lachman test, pivot shift, return to sports activities, and the comparative difference in anterior translation (RolimeterTM) also showed no statistically significant difference. In group A, 5 patients (18.5%) were unable to kneel on a hard surface, whereas no patient in group B had this complaint. Conclusion: The anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction presents similar results using the hamstring or patellar tendon with anatomical positioning of the tunnels. Drilling the femoral tunnel outside in is a reproducible and accurate option in the correct placement the femoral tunnel. PMID:27027082

  11. Isokinetic quadriceps and hamstring muscle strength and knee function 5 years after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: comparison between bone-patellar tendon-bone and hamstring tendon autografts.

    PubMed

    Lautamies, Riitta; Harilainen, Arsi; Kettunen, Jyrki; Sandelin, Jerker; Kujala, Urho M

    2008-11-01

    Existing clinical studies have not proven which graft is to be preferred in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. In recent years, bone-patellar tendon-bone and hamstring tendons have been the most frequently used graft types. Muscle strength deficit is one of the consequences after ACL reconstruction. The aim of this study was to evaluate possible differences in hamstring and quadriceps muscle strength and knee function 5 years after ACL reconstruction between the BPTB and the STG groups. The study group consisted of 288 patients (132 women, 156 men) with a unilateral ACL rupture who had received a BPTB (175 patients) or STG (113 patients) ACL reconstruction. Lower extremity concentric isokinetic peak extension and flexion torques were assessed at the angular velocities of 60 degrees /s and 180 degrees /s. The International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC), the Tegner activity level, the Lysholm knee and the Kujala patellofemoral scores were also collected. Isokinetic quadriceps peak torque (percentage of the contralateral side) was 3.9% higher in the STG group than in the BPTB group at the velocity of 60 degrees /s and 3.2% higher at the velocity of 180 degrees /s and the isokinetic hamstring peak torque 2% higher in the BPTB group than in the STG group at the velocity of 60 degrees /s and 2.5% higher at the velocity of 180 degrees /s. In both groups the subjects had weaker quadriceps and hamstring muscle strength in the injured extremity compared with the uninjured one. In the single-leg hop test (according to the IKDC recommendations) there was a statistically significant difference (P = 0.040) between the groups. In the STG group, 68% of the patients had the single-leg hop ratio (injured vs. uninjured extremity) > or =90%, 31% of the patients 75-89% and 1% of the patients <75%, while in the BPTB group the corresponding percentages were 72, 21 and 7%. However, no statistically significant differences in clinical outcome were found between the

  12. Mechanical evaluation of a soft tissue interference screw in free tendon anterior cruciate ligament graft fixation.

    PubMed

    Nagarkatti, D G; McKeon, B P; Donahue, B S; Fulkerson, J P

    2001-01-01

    In this study of bioabsorbable screw fixation of free tendon grafts used in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, we performed load-to-failure and cyclic loading of tendon fixation in porcine bone. Bone density measurements from dual photon absorptometry scans were obtained to correlate bone density with fixation failure. The average density of porcine bone (1.42 g/cm2) was similar to that of young human bone (1.30 g/cm2) and significantly higher than that of elderly human cadaveric bone specimens (0.30 g/cm2). Cyclic loading was performed on free tendon grafts fixed with a bioabsorbable screw alone and on grafts fixed with a bioabsorbable screw and an anchor (polylactic acid ball or cortical bone disk). Stiffness of fixation increased substantially with the addition of a cortical bone disk anchor or polylactic acid ball compared with the interference screw alone. Tensile fixation strength of central quadriceps free tendon and hamstring tendon grafts were significantly superior in porcine bone of density similar to young human bone than in elderly human cadaveric bone. The bioabsorbable interference screw yielded loads at failure comparable with traditional bone-tendon-bone and hamstring tendon fixation when controlled for bone density. The addition of a cortical bone disk anchor provided the most optimal fixation of free tendon with the bioabsorbable screw and reduced slippage with cyclic loading to a very low level.

  13. The effect of screw length and position on fixation of four-stranded hamstring grafts for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Harvey, A R; Thomas, N P; Amis, A A

    2003-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine interference screw fixation of four strand hamstring grafts for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in vitro. Bovine tibiae and cannon tendons were used. Screws were introduced from 'outside-in'. The tendons were loaded cyclically to 150 N to simulate walking and 450 N to simulate jogging. Slippage of the tendon from the anchorage was recorded after 100, 300 and 1000 cycles. Cortico-cancellous and cancellous only fixations were compared using a 7-mm screw in an 8-mm tunnel with a 7-mm graft. The effect of screw length was studied by comparing 8 x 25 and 8 x 45 mm screws. Graft slippage with cancellous only fixation was significantly greater than with cortico-cancellous screw fixation (Pgrafts tended to slip more with a 25-mm screw than with a 45-mm screw but, while this difference was not significant (P>0.105), the longer screws gave more consistent behaviour. We concluded that the screw should be placed so that its head engages the cortex, while increasing screw length within cancellous bone did not significantly improve graft fixation. Cyclical load testing reflects the repetitive forces imposed in the early post-operative period following hamstring anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction and is important for the evaluation of graft fixations. PMID:12649035

  14. Tibial press-fit fixation of the hamstring tendons for ACL-reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Jagodzinski, M; Scheunemann, K; Knobloch, K; Albrecht, K; Krettek, C; Hurschler, C; Zeichen, J

    2006-12-01

    Press-fit fixation of patellar tendon bone anterior cruciate ligament autografts is an interesting technique because no hardware is necessary to achieve fixation. Up till the present point, there is no biomechanical data available for the tibial press-fit fixation of the hamstring tendons. Hamstring tendons of 21 human cadavers (age: 41.9 +/- 13.1 years) were used. A press-fit fixation with looped semitendinosus and gracilis tendons secured by a tape (T) over a bone bridge, or by a baseball-stitched suture (S), was compared with degradable interference screw fixation (I) in 21 porcine tibiae. The constructs were cyclically strained and subsequently loaded to failure. The maximum load to failure, stiffness, and elongation during cyclical loading were measured. The maximum load to failure was highest for the T-fixation at 970 +/- 83 N, followed by the I-fixation with 544 +/- 109 N, and the S-fixation with 402 +/- 78 N (P < 0.03). Stiffness of the constructs averaged 78 +/- 13 N/mm for T, 108 +/- 18 N/mm for S, and 162 +/- 27 N/mm for I (P < 0.03). Elongation during initial cyclical loading was 2.0 +/- 0.6 mm for T, 3.3 +/- 1.1 mm for S, and 1.4 +/- 0.5 mm for I (S inferior to I and T, P<0.05). Elongation between the 20th and 1,500th loading cycle was lower for T (2.2 +/- 0.7 mm) compared with I (4.1 +/- 2.7 mm) and S (4.8 +/- 0.7 mm; P < 0.001). The T-fixation technique exhibited a significantly higher failure load than the S-, and I- techniques. All techniques exhibited larger elongation during initial cyclical loading than is reported in the literature for grafts with bone blocks. Only one technique (T) showed satisfactory elongation behavior during long-term cyclic loading. Interference screw fixation demonstrated significantly higher stiffness. Only one of the investigated techniques (T) seemed to exhibit adequate mechanical properties necessary for early aggressive rehabilitation programs.

  15. Role of anthropometric data in the prediction of 4-stranded hamstring graft size in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Ho, Sean Wei Loong; Tan, Teong Jin Lester; Lee, Keng Thiam

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate whether pre-operative anthropometric data can predict the optimal diameter and length of hamstring tendon autograft for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. This was a cohort study that involved 169 patients who underwent single-bundle ACL reconstruction (single surgeon) with 4-stranded MM Gracilis and MM Semi-Tendinosus autografts. Height, weight, body mass index (BMI), gender, race, age and -smoking status were recorded pre-operatively. Intra-operatively, the diameter and functional length of the 4-stranded autograft was recorded. Multiple regression analysis was used to determine the relationship between the anthropometric measurements and the length and diameter of the implanted autografts. The strongest correlation between 4-stranded hamstring autograft diameter was height and weight. This correlation was stronger in females than males. BMI had a moderate correlation with the diameter of the graft in females. Females had a significantly smaller graft both in diameter and length when compared with males. Linear regression models did not show any significant correlation between hamstring autograft length with height and weight (p>0.05). Simple regression analysis demonstrated that height and weight can be used to predict hamstring graft diameter. The following regression equation was obtained for females: Graft diameter=0.012+0.034*Height+0.026*Weight (R2=0.358, p=0.004) The following regression equation was obtained for males: Graft diameter=5.130+0.012*Height+0.007*Weight (R2=0.086, p=0.002). Pre-operative anthropometric data has a positive correlation with the diameter of 4 stranded hamstring autografts but no significant correlation with the length. This data can be utilised to predict the autograft diameter and may be useful for pre-operative planning and patient counseling for graft selection.

  16. Human hamstring tenocytes survive when seeded into a decellularized porcine Achilles tendon extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Lohan, Anke; Stoll, Christiane; Albrecht, Marit; Denner, Andreas; John, Thilo; Krüger, Kay; Ertel, Wolfgang; Schulze-Tanzil, Gundula

    2013-01-01

    Tendon ruptures and defects remain major orthopaedic challenges. Tendon healing is a time-consuming process, which results in scar tissue with an altered biomechanical competence. Using a xenogeneic tendon extracellular matrix (ECM) as a natural scaffold, which can be reseeded with autologous human tenocytes, might be a promising approach to reconstruct damaged tendons. For this purpose, the porcine Achilles (AS) tendons serving as a scaffold were histologically characterized in comparison to human cell donor tendons. AS tendons were decellularized and then reseeded with primary human hamstring tenocytes using cell centrifuging, rotating culture and cell injection techniques. Vitality testing, histology and glycosaminoglycan/DNA quantifications were performed to document the success of tendon reseeding. Porcine AS tendons were characterized by a higher cell and sulfated glycosaminoglycan content than human cell donor tendons. Complete decellularization could be achieved, but led to a wash out of sulfated glycosaminoglycans. Nevertheless, porcine tendon could be recellularized with vital human tenocytes. The recellularization led to a slight increase in cell number compared to the native tendon and some glycosaminoglycan recovery. This study indicates that porcine tendon can be de- and recellularized using adult human tenocytes. Future work should optimize cell distribution within the recellularized tendon ECM and consider tendon- and donor species-dependent differences.

  17. Arthroscopy-assisted anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with patellar tendon or hamstring autografts.

    PubMed

    Doral, M N; Leblebicioglu, G; Atay, O A; Baydar, M L; Tetik, O; Atik, S

    2000-01-01

    Isolated ACL reconstructions were performed in 138 patients between 1994 and 1998. Patellar bone-patellar tendon-bone, and hamstring tendon autografts were used in 88 patients, and allografts were used in 50 patients. Eighty-eight knees of 88 patients with autograft reconstructions (17 female, 71 male) were included in this study and evaluation of the patients with allograft reconstruction reported separately. The mean age at the time of the operation was 32 years. All ACL reconstructions were performed arthroscopically. Twenty-seven bone-patellar tendon-bone, and 61 hamstring tendon autografts were used. The mean follow-up was 29 months. In the postoperative course the Lachman test was negative in 62 patients, 1+ in 22 patients, and 2+ in 4 patients. In 17 patients, anterior drawer sign were 1+ in comparison to the contralateral side. Pivot shift test was moderately positive only in 5 cases in the bone-patellar tendon-bone and hamstring tendon autograft groups postoperatively. There were 3 patients with subjective "giving way" symptoms. Second look arthroscopy revealed rupture of the neo-ligament. Arthroscopic washout and debridement were performed, and no revision ligamentoplasties were performed. Two of these patients improved with accelerated proprioceptive physical therapy, and one had to decrease his previous level of activity. There were no cases of arthrofibrosis, infection, or extension lag. Clinical results of patellar bone-tendon-bone and hamstring groups did not show any significant clinical difference. Avoiding the disturbance of the extensor mechanism of the knee is probably the most significant advantage of the hamstring autograft.

  18. Arthroscopy-assisted anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with patellar tendon or hamstring autografts.

    PubMed

    Doral, M N; Leblebicioglu, G; Atay, O A; Baydar, M L; Tetik, O; Atik, S

    2000-01-01

    Isolated ACL reconstructions were performed in 138 patients between 1994 and 1998. Patellar bone-patellar tendon-bone, and hamstring tendon autografts were used in 88 patients, and allografts were used in 50 patients. Eighty-eight knees of 88 patients with autograft reconstructions (17 female, 71 male) were included in this study and evaluation of the patients with allograft reconstruction reported separately. The mean age at the time of the operation was 32 years. All ACL reconstructions were performed arthroscopically. Twenty-seven bone-patellar tendon-bone, and 61 hamstring tendon autografts were used. The mean follow-up was 29 months. In the postoperative course the Lachman test was negative in 62 patients, 1+ in 22 patients, and 2+ in 4 patients. In 17 patients, anterior drawer sign were 1+ in comparison to the contralateral side. Pivot shift test was moderately positive only in 5 cases in the bone-patellar tendon-bone and hamstring tendon autograft groups postoperatively. There were 3 patients with subjective "giving way" symptoms. Second look arthroscopy revealed rupture of the neo-ligament. Arthroscopic washout and debridement were performed, and no revision ligamentoplasties were performed. Two of these patients improved with accelerated proprioceptive physical therapy, and one had to decrease his previous level of activity. There were no cases of arthrofibrosis, infection, or extension lag. Clinical results of patellar bone-tendon-bone and hamstring groups did not show any significant clinical difference. Avoiding the disturbance of the extensor mechanism of the knee is probably the most significant advantage of the hamstring autograft. PMID:10983256

  19. Ulnar Nerve Injury after Flexor Tendon Grafting.

    PubMed

    McCleave, Michael John

    2016-10-01

    A 43-year-old female is presented who underwent a two-stage tendon reconstruction and developed a low ulnar nerve palsy postoperatively. Exploration found that the tendon graft was passing through Guyon's canal and that the ulnar nerve was divided. This is a previously unreported complication. The reconstruction is discussed, the literature reviewed and a guide is given on how to identify the correct tissue plane when passing a tendon rod. PMID:27595967

  20. Autologous Hamstring Anterior Cruciate Ligament Graft Failure Using the Anteromedial Portal Technique With Suspensory Femoral Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Galdi, Balazs; Reyes, Allan; Brabston, Eugene W.; Levine, William N.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The anteromedial portal technique for drilling of the femoral tunnel during anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction has been advocated by many surgeons as allowing improved access to the anatomical footprint. Furthermore, suspensory fixation of soft tissue grafts has become popularized because of complications associated with cross-pin fixation. Concerns regarding the use of both have recently arisen. Purpose: To raise awareness of the increased risk of graft failure when using the anteromedial portal technique with suspensory femoral fixation during ACL reconstruction. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: From November 1998 to August 2012, a total of 465 primary ACL reconstructions were performed using quadrupled hamstring autograft tendons, with drilling of the femoral tunnel performed via the transtibial portal. Graft fixation on the femur was achieved with cross-pin fixation, while interference screw fixation was used on the tibia. From September 2012 to October 2013, there were 69 reconstructions performed through an anteromedial portal. While there was no change in graft choice, a change was made to using suspensory femoral fixation. No other surgical or postoperative rehabilitation changes were made. Results: During the 14-year period in which ACL reconstructions were performed via the transtibial portal and with cross-pin fixation, 2 graft failures (0.4% failure rate) were reported. After switching to the anteromedial portal with suspensory fixation, 7 graft failures (10.1% failure rate) were reported over a 13-month period. These were 5 male and 2 female patients, with a mean age of 18.8 years—all elite athletes. The same surgical technique was used in all patients, and all patients had at least an 8 mm–diameter graft. Patients were cleared to return to sport at an average of 8.4 months postoperatively, after completing functional performance tests. Of the 7 patients, 6 sustained a rerupture of the graft within

  1. The outcome at 15 years of endoscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using hamstring tendon autograft for 'isolated' anterior cruciate ligament rupture.

    PubMed

    Bourke, H E; Gordon, D J; Salmon, L J; Waller, A; Linklater, J; Pinczewski, L A

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to report the outcome of 'isolated' anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) ruptures treated with anatomical endoscopic reconstruction using hamstring tendon autograft at a mean of 15 years (14.25 to 16.9). A total of 100 consecutive men and 100 consecutive women with 'isolated' ACL rupture underwent four-strand hamstring tendon reconstruction with anteromedial portal femoral tunnel drilling and interference screw fixation by a single surgeon. Details were recorded pre-operatively and at one, two, seven and 15 years post-operatively. Outcomes included clinical examination, subjective and objective scoring systems, and radiological assessment. At 15 years only eight of 118 patients (7%) had moderate or severe osteo-arthritic changes (International Knee Documentation Committee Grades C and D), and 79 of 152 patients (52%) still performed very strenuous activities. Overall graft survival at 15 years was 83% (1.1% failure per year). Patients aged < 18 years at the time of surgery and patients with > 2 mm of laxity at one year had a threefold increase in the risk of suffering a rupture of the graft (p = 0.002 and p = 0.001, respectively). There was no increase in laxity of the graft over time. ACL reconstructive surgery in patients with an 'isolated' rupture using this technique shows good results 15 years post-operatively with respect to ligamentous stability, objective and subjective outcomes, and does not appear to cause osteoarthritis.

  2. Reconstruction of neglected patellar tendon ruptures using the quadriceps graft.

    PubMed

    Gomes, João Luiz Ellera; de Oliveira Alves, Jairo André; Zimmermann, José Mauro

    2014-08-01

    Several techniques using different grafts have been described for reconstruction of the patellar tendon after a neglected rupture. Retraction of the quadriceps tendon may compromise repair integrity due to progressive stretching of the graft. The authors present a surgical technique using the central one-third of the quadriceps tendon. This is supported by the fact that the resistance to traction of this segment of the quadriceps tendon equals that of a double-looped semitendinosus graft and that the harvesting of this specific graft promotes muscle inhibition, thus protecting the reconstruction during the recovery period.

  3. Prediction of quadruple hamstring graft diameter for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction by anthropometric measurements

    PubMed Central

    Asif, Naiyer; Ranjan, Rahul; Ahmed, Sohail; Sabir, Aamir B; Jilani, Latif Z; Qureshi, Owais A

    2016-01-01

    Background: The literature is scanty regarding the anthropometric predictors on the diameter of quadruple hamstring graft obtained in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in Indian population. Minimum diameter of the graft for ACL reconstruction should be >7 mm to preclude failure. The objective of this study was to assess the prediction of the hamstring graft diameter by several anthropometric parameters including age, thigh circumference, weight, height and body mass index (BMI). Materials and Methods: 46 consecutive patients who had undergone ACL reconstruction by the same surgeon using quadruple hamstring grafts were evaluated. The age, thigh circumference of the normal side, height, weight and BMI were recorded preoperatively and Pearson correlation was done using these parameters with graft diameter measured intraoperatively. Regression analysis in a stepwise manner was undertaken to assess the influence of individual anthropometric parameters on the graft diameter. Results: There were 44 males and 2 females. Mean age was 29.4 years, mean height was 172.6 cm, mean weight was 70.9 kg, mean BMI was 23.8 kg/m2, mean thigh circumference was 47.1 cm and mean graft diameter was 7.9 mm. There was a positive correlation individually between the thigh circumference and graft diameter obtained (r = 0.8, P < 0.01, n = 46), and between the height and graft diameter (r = 0.8, P < 0.01, n = 46). On the regression analysis thigh circumference and height were found to be significant predictors of graft diameter giving the following equation: Graft diameter (mm) = 0. 079 height (cm) +0.068 thigh circumference (cm) −9.031. Conclusion: Preoperatively using the above equation if graft diameter came out to be <7 mm then alternate options of graft material must be kept in mind in order to prevent failure. PMID:26955176

  4. Anatomic ACL reconstruction: rectangular tunnel/bone-patellar tendon-bone or triple-bundle/semitendinosus tendon grafting.

    PubMed

    Shino, Konsei; Mae, Tatsuo; Tachibana, Yuta

    2015-05-01

    Anatomic ACL reconstruction is the reasonable approach to restore stability without loss of motion after ACL tear. To mimic the normal ACL like a ribbon, our preferred procedures is the anatomic rectangular tunnel (ART) technique with a bone-patellar tendon-bone (BTB) graft or the anatomic triple bundle (ATB) procedure with a hamstring (HS) tendon graft. It is important to create tunnel apertures inside the attachment areas to lessen the tunnel widening. To identify the crescent-shaped ACL femoral attachment area, the upper cartilage margin, the posterior cartilage margin and the resident's ridge are used as landmarks. To delineate the C-shaped tibial insertion, medial intercondylar ridge, Parson's knob and anterior horn of the lateral meniscus are helpful. In ART-BTB procedure which is suitable for male patients engaged in contact sports, the parallelepiped tunnels with rectangular apertures are made within the femoral and tibial attachment areas. In ATB-HS technique which is mainly applied to female athletes engaged in non-contact sports including skiing or basketball, 2 femoral and 3 tibial round tunnels are created inside the attachment areas. These techniques make it possible for the grafts to run as the native ACL without impingement to the notch or PCL. After femoral fixation with an interference screw or cortical fixation devices including Endobutton, the graft is pretensioned in situ by repetitive manual pulls at 15-20° of flexion, monitoring the graft tension with tensioners on a tensioning boot installed on the calf. Tibial fixation with pullout sutures is achieved using Double Spike Plate and a screw at the pre-determined amount of tension of 10-20N. While better outcomes with less failure rate are being obtained compared to those in the past, higher graft tear rate remains a problem. Improved preventive training may be required to avoid secondary ACL injuries.

  5. Anatomic ACL reconstruction: rectangular tunnel/bone-patellar tendon-bone or triple-bundle/semitendinosus tendon grafting.

    PubMed

    Shino, Konsei; Mae, Tatsuo; Tachibana, Yuta

    2015-05-01

    Anatomic ACL reconstruction is the reasonable approach to restore stability without loss of motion after ACL tear. To mimic the normal ACL like a ribbon, our preferred procedures is the anatomic rectangular tunnel (ART) technique with a bone-patellar tendon-bone (BTB) graft or the anatomic triple bundle (ATB) procedure with a hamstring (HS) tendon graft. It is important to create tunnel apertures inside the attachment areas to lessen the tunnel widening. To identify the crescent-shaped ACL femoral attachment area, the upper cartilage margin, the posterior cartilage margin and the resident's ridge are used as landmarks. To delineate the C-shaped tibial insertion, medial intercondylar ridge, Parson's knob and anterior horn of the lateral meniscus are helpful. In ART-BTB procedure which is suitable for male patients engaged in contact sports, the parallelepiped tunnels with rectangular apertures are made within the femoral and tibial attachment areas. In ATB-HS technique which is mainly applied to female athletes engaged in non-contact sports including skiing or basketball, 2 femoral and 3 tibial round tunnels are created inside the attachment areas. These techniques make it possible for the grafts to run as the native ACL without impingement to the notch or PCL. After femoral fixation with an interference screw or cortical fixation devices including Endobutton, the graft is pretensioned in situ by repetitive manual pulls at 15-20° of flexion, monitoring the graft tension with tensioners on a tensioning boot installed on the calf. Tibial fixation with pullout sutures is achieved using Double Spike Plate and a screw at the pre-determined amount of tension of 10-20N. While better outcomes with less failure rate are being obtained compared to those in the past, higher graft tear rate remains a problem. Improved preventive training may be required to avoid secondary ACL injuries. PMID:25753837

  6. Single-Stage Flexor Tendon Grafting: Refining the Steps.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Derek R; McClinton, Michael A

    2015-07-01

    Single-stage tendon grafting for reconstruction of zone I and II flexor tendon injuries is a challenging procedure in hand surgery. Careful patient selection, strict indications, and adherence to sound surgical principles are mandatory for return of digital motion. PMID:26026357

  7. 'Serious thigh muscle strains': beware the intramuscular tendon which plays an important role in difficult hamstring and quadriceps muscle strains.

    PubMed

    Brukner, Peter; Connell, David

    2016-02-01

    Why do some hamstring and quadriceps strains take much longer to repair than others? Which injuries are more prone to recurrence? Intramuscular tendon injuries have received little attention as an element in 'muscle strain'. In thigh muscles, such as rectus femoris and biceps femoris, the attached tendon extends for a significant distance within the muscle belly. While the pathology of most muscle injures occurs at a musculotendinous junction, at first glance the athlete appears to report pain within a muscle belly. In addition to the musculotendinous injury being a site of pathology, the intramuscular tendon itself is occasionally injured. These injuries have a variety of appearances on MRIs. There is some evidence that these injuries require a prolonged rehabilitation time and may have higher recurrence rates. Therefore, it is important to recognise the tendon component of a thigh 'muscle strain'.

  8. Repair of severe muscle belly lacerations using a tendon graft.

    PubMed

    Botte, M J; Gelberman, R H; Smith, D G; Silver, M A; Gellman, H

    1987-05-01

    Fourteen patients with 58 severe forearm muscle belly lacerations had muscle repair using tendon grafts. At mean follow-up of 14 months, results of manual muscle testing (N = 58) were: grade 5, 42%, grade 4, 14%, grade 3, 9%, grade 2, 9%, grade 1, 12%, and grade 0, 15%. Mean grip strength of the injured extremity, in pounds per square inch, was 33.5 compared with 83.4 on the noninjured side. Tendon excursion and joint mobility were maintained, and there were no postoperative complications. Tendon grafting of severe muscle lacerations is an effective method to overcome extensive defects.

  9. Full-thickness quadriceps tendon: An easy cruciate reconstruction graft.

    PubMed

    Slullitel, D; Blasco, A; Periotti, G

    2001-09-01

    Full-thickness quadriceps tendon strength has been found to be similar or higher than that of the patellar tendon. Current techniques spare the deep vastus intermedius to avoid piercing the suprapatellar pouch, which might result in loss of visualization. This approach mainly results in loss of graft thickness and surgical problems related to the dissection made through the tendon. We describe a technique where a full-thickness graft can be used, making tendon stripping easier. We also describe how to preserve visualization during surgery. A double anchorage of the tendinous part of the graft on the femoral side is used together with fixation of the bone end on the tibial side, allowing early motion and thereby avoiding suprapatellar pouch adhesions.

  10. Staged tendon grafts and soft tissue coverage

    PubMed Central

    Elliot, David

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the two-staged flexor tendon method is to improve the predictability of final results in difficult problems dealing with tendon reconstruction. This article reviews the evolution and benefits of this procedure. It also considers the use of the technique to help deal with problems requiring pulley and skin reconstruction simultaneously with re-constituting the flexor tendon system. PMID:22022043

  11. Tendon grafts: their natural history, biology and future development.

    PubMed

    Wong, R; Alam, N; McGrouther, A D; Wong, J K F

    2015-09-01

    The use of tendon grafts has diminished as regimes of primary repairs and rehabilitation have improved, but they remain important in secondary reconstruction. Relatively little is known about the cellular biology of grafts, and the general perception is that they have little biological activity. The reality is that there is a wealth of cellular and molecular changes occurring with the process of engraftment that affect the quality of the repair. This review highlights the historical perspectives and modern concepts of graft take, reviews the different attachment techniques and revisits the biology of pseudosheath formation. In addition, we discuss some of the future directions in tendon reconstruction by grafting, which include surface modification, vascularized tendon transfer, allografts, biomaterials and cell-based therapies.

  12. Hamstring injuries.

    PubMed

    Ropiak, Christopher R; Bosco, Joseph A

    2012-01-01

    Hamstring injuries are a frequent injury in athletes. Proximal injuries are common, ranging from strain to complete tear. Strains are managed nonoperatively, with rest followed by progressive stretching and strengthening. Reinjury is a concern. High grade complete tears are better managed surgically, with reattachment to the injured tendon or ischial tuberosity. Distal hamstring injury is usually associated with other knee injuries, and isolated injury is rare.

  13. Outcome of Simultaneous Arthroscopic Anterior Cruciate Ligament and Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction With Hamstring Tendon Autograft: A Multicenter Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Panigrahi, Ranajit; Kumari Mahapatra, Amita; Priyadarshi, Ashok; Singha Das, Dibya; Palo, Nishit; Ranjan Biswal, Manas

    2016-01-01

    Background: Multiligamentous injuries of knee are a complex problem in orthopaedics. Combined ACL-PCL injuries are uncommon, usually associated with knee dislocations. Extremity vascular status is essential because of possible arterio-venous compromise. These complex injuries require a systematic evaluation and treatment. Single setting simultaneous arthroscopic ACL and PCL reconstruction or a staged approach can be adopted to treat these cases. Objectives: To evaluate functional outcome of simultaneous arthroscopic ACL and PCL reconstruction with hamstring tendon autograft in multiligamentous knee injuries. Patients and Methods: This prospective study was performed on 20 patients with combined ACL-PCL injuries who underwent simultaneous arthroscopic ACL-PCL reconstruction with hamstring tendon. Evaluation of functional outcome was by IKDC and Lysholm-Tegner scores. Results: In 20 patients, mean age 34 years, return to full-time work and to full sports was 8 weeks and 6.2 months respectively. All patients had full range of motion except 2 patients with < 5 degrees flexion loss; 90% had negative Lachmann test; 95% had negative pivot shift and 10% patients had mild posterior drawer at 90 degrees (1+) at final follow up. Mean IKDC score was 90 (range 81 - 94); mean Tegner activity score was 7 and mean Lysholm knee score was 89. 85% returned to preinjury activity level and a 90% satisfaction rate. Conclusions: Simultaneous arthroscopic ACL and PCL reconstructions using hamstring tendon for combined ACL and PCL injuries is a clinically effective, safe, time saving and cost-effective procedure with better patient compliance and reproducible for a timely return of motion, strength, and function with favorable outcome. PMID:27217932

  14. Acromioclavicular joint reconstruction using a tendon graft: a biomechanical study comparing a novel “sutured throughout” tendon graft to a standard tendon graft

    PubMed Central

    Naziri, Qais; Williams, Nadine; Hayes, Westley; Kapadia, Bhaveen H.; Chatterjee, Dipal; Urban, William P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: With a recurrence rate of over 30%, techniques that offer stronger acromioclavicular (AC) joint reconstruction through increased graft strength may provide longevity. The purpose of our study was to determine the biomechanical strength of a novel tendon graft sutured throughout compared to a native tendon graft in Grade 3 anatomical AC joint reconstruction. Methods: For this in vitro experiment, nine paired (n = 18) embalmed cadaveric AC joints of three males and six females (age 86 years, range 51–94 years) were harvested. Anatomic repair with fresh bovine Achilles tendon grafts without bone block was simulated. Specimens were divided into two groups; with group 1 using grafts with ultra-high molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) suture ran throughout the entire length. In group 2, reconstruction with only native allografts was performed. The distal scapula and humerus were casted in epoxy compound and mounted on the mechanical testing machine. Tensile tests were performed using a mechanical testing machine at the rate of 50 mm/min. Maximum load and displacement to failure were collected. Results: The average load to failure was significantly higher for group 1 compared to group 2, with mean values of 437.5 N ± 160.7 N and 94.4 N ± 43.6 N, (p = 0.001). The average displacement to failure was not significantly different, with 29.7 mm ± 10.6 mm in group 1 and 25 mm ± 9.1 mm in group 2 (p = 0.25). Conclusion: We conclude that a UHMWPE suture reinforced graft can provide a 3.6 times stronger AC joint reconstruction compared to a native graft. PMID:27163106

  15. Late quadriceps tendon rupture at the donor site following cruciate ligament reconstruction using central quadriceps tendon graft.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Vivek; Madi, Sandesh; Joseph, Amy; Acharya, Kiran

    2015-10-16

    Central quadriceps tendon (CQT) graft has been successfully used as a viable autograft option in cruciate ligament reconstruction of the knee. The prime emphasis in the majority of the literature is given to surgical details of quadriceps graft harvesting and outcome of cruciate ligament reconstruction. There is less discussion about donor site morbidity in CQT graft, and it is less frequent as compared to that in bone patellar tendon bone graft. We report an extremely unusual case of late quadriceps tendon rupture at the donor site following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using CQT graft.

  16. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction by using otogenous [correction of otogeneous] hamstring tendons with home-based rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Ugutmen, E; Ozkan, K; Kilincoglu, V; Ozkan, F U; Toker, S; Eceviz, E; Altintas, F

    2008-01-01

    We investigated patients undergoing arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction using otogenous hamstring tendons with a cross-pin technique to compare a post-operative home-based rehabilitation programme with a clinic-based programme. ACL reconstruction was performed on 104 patients (103 male) by the same surgeon. The mean age of the patients was 31.5 years (range 18 - 43 years) and the mean time interval between injury and operation was 34.3 months. Patients were randomly allocated to either a home-based (n = 52) or clinic-based rehabilitation programme (n = 52). Mean follow-up was 31.1 months (range 12 - 66 months). Patients underwent a series of examinations before and after surgery in order to evaluate functional recovery of their injured knee. The results demonstrated that using otogeneous hamstring tendons for ACL reconstruction was safe and produced satisfactory results. The study also demonstrated that a home-based rehabilitation programme was as effective as a clinic-based programme.

  17. Arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with the tibial-remnant preserving technique using a hamstring graft.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung-Ill; Min, Kyung-Dae; Choi, Hyung-Suk; Kim, Jun-Bum; Kim, Seong-Tae

    2006-03-01

    We propose that the tibial remnant of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is able to enhance the revascularization and cellular proliferation of the graft, to preserve proprioceptive function, and to be able to acquire anatomic placement of the graft without roof impingement. Therefore, it seems reasonable to assume that preserving the tibial remnant as much as possible as a source of reinnervation, if technically possible without causing impingement, would be of potential benefit to the patient. Our surgical technique was developed to maximize the preservation of the tibial remnant. The distally attached semitendinosus and gracilis tendons are harvested using the tendon stripper. After satisfactory placement of 2 guide pins convergently, a closed-end socket in the lateral femoral condyle is created using an adequately sized curved curette. For anatomic placement of the graft, the tibial tunnel should be positioned within the boundaries of the normal ACL tibial remnant. The reamer must be advanced very carefully to minimize injury to the residual remnant at the intra-articular margin of the tibial tunnel. Penetration should stop at the base of the stump. The folded grafts are then pulled intra-articularly through the tibial tunnel, the tibial remnant, and the femoral socket by pulling sutures under arthroscopic visualization. The ACL tibial remnant is compacted by the tendon passage. The graft is secured proximally by tying sutures in the lateral femoral condyle and distally at the tibia with double staples by a belt-buckle method. The advantages of our technique include maximal preservation of the tibial remnant, no roof impingement caused by intrasynovial anatomic placement of the graft, the simplicity of the procedure, the minimal need for hardware or special instruments, the economic benefit, and the potential prevention of tibial tunnel enlargement by preventing synovial fluid leakage. PMID:16517320

  18. Calcium phosphate-hybridized tendon graft to enhance tendon-bone healing two years after ACL reconstruction in goats

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background We developed a novel technique to improve tendon-bone attachment by hybridizing calcium phosphate (CaP) with a tendon graft using an alternate soaking process. However, the long-term result with regard to the interface between the tendon graft and the bone is unclear. Methods We analyzed bone tunnel enlargement by computed tomography and histological observation of the interface and the tendon graft with and without the CaP hybridization 2 years after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in goats using EndoButton and the postscrew technique (CaP, n = 4; control, n = 4). Results The tibial bone tunnel enlargement rates in the CaP group were lower than those in the control group (p < 0.05). In the CaP group, in the femoral and tibial bone tunnels at the anterior and posterior of the joint aperture site, direct insertion-like formation that contained a cartilage layer without tidemarks was more observed at the tendon-bone interface than in the control group (p < 0.05). Moreover, the gap area between the tendon graft and the bone was more observed at the femoral bone tunnel of the joint aperture site in the control group than in the CaP group (p < 0.05). The maturation of the tendon grafts determined using the ligament tissue maturation index was similar in both groups. Conclusions The CaP-hybridized tendon graft enhanced the tendon-bone healing 2 years after ACL reconstruction in goats. The use of CaP-hybridized tendon grafts can reduce the bone tunnel enlargement and gap area associated with the direct insertion-like formation in the interface near the joint. PMID:22166674

  19. The effect of tendon surface treatment on cell attachment for potential enhancement of tendon graft healing: an ex vivo model.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Takahiro; Sun, Yu-Long; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C; Zhao, Chunfeng

    2012-12-01

    For both tendon allografts and autografts, the surface, initially optimized for gliding, may not be ideal to facilitate tissue integration for graft healing to host tendon or bone. As a prelude to studying tendon-bone integration, we investigated the effect of surface treatments with trypsin or mechanical abrasion on cell attachment to the tendon surface in a canine ex vivo intrasynovial tendon tissue culture model. Intrasynovial tendon allograft surfaces were seeded with cells after the following treatments: (1) no treatment, (2) mechanical abrasion, (3) trypsin, and (4) abrasion and trypsin. The area covered by cells was determined using confocal laser microscopy at one and two weeks. Results were compared to untreated extrasynovial tendon. Additional tendons were characterized with scanning electron microscopy. Tendons with trypsin treatment had significantly more surface coverage with cells than the other groups, after both one and two weeks of culture. In terms of the cellular shape and size, cells on tendons with trypsin treatment spread more and were more polygonal in shape, whereas tendons with mechanical abrasion with/without trypsin treatment contained smaller, more spindle-like cells. Surface roughening can affect cell behavior with topographical stimulation. Trypsin surface digestion exposes a mesh-like structure on the tendon surface, which could enhance cell adherence and, possibly, tendon/bone healing.

  20. ‘Serious thigh muscle strains’: beware the intramuscular tendon which plays an important role in difficult hamstring and quadriceps muscle strains

    PubMed Central

    Brukner, Peter; Connell, David

    2016-01-01

    Why do some hamstring and quadriceps strains take much longer to repair than others? Which injuries are more prone to recurrence? Intramuscular tendon injuries have received little attention as an element in ‘muscle strain’. In thigh muscles, such as rectus femoris and biceps femoris, the attached tendon extends for a significant distance within the muscle belly. While the pathology of most muscle injures occurs at a musculotendinous junction, at first glance the athlete appears to report pain within a muscle belly. In addition to the musculotendinous injury being a site of pathology, the intramuscular tendon itself is occasionally injured. These injuries have a variety of appearances on MRIs. There is some evidence that these injuries require a prolonged rehabilitation time and may have higher recurrence rates. Therefore, it is important to recognise the tendon component of a thigh ‘muscle strain’. PMID:26519522

  1. Bone tunnel enlargement after ACL reconstruction using autologous hamstring tendons: a CT study

    PubMed Central

    Iorio, Raffaele; Vadalà, Antonio; Argento, Giuseppe; Di Sanzo, Vincenzo

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate prospectively the increase in the size of the tibial and femoral bone tunnel following arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction with quadrupled-hamstring autograft. Methods: Twenty-five consecutive patients underwent arthroscopic ACL reconstruction with quadrupled-hamstring autograft. Preoperative clinical evaluation was performed using the Lysholm knee score, Tegner activity level, and International Knee Documentation Committee forms and a KT-1000 arthrometer (side to side). Computed tomography (CT) of the femoral and tibial tunnel was performed on the day after operation in all cases and at mean follow-up of 10 months (range 9–11 months).Results: All of the clinical evaluation scales performed showed an overall improvement. The postoperative anterior laxity difference was <3 mm in 16 patients (70%) and 3–5 mm in seven patients (30%). The mean average femoral tunnel diameter increased significantly (3%) from 9.04±0.05 mm postoperatively to 9.3±0.8 mm at 10 months; tibial tunnel increased significantly (11%) from 9.03±0.04 mm to 10±0.8 mm. There were no statistically significant differences between tunnel enlargement, clinical results, and arthrometer evaluation. Conclusions: The rate of tunnel widening observed in this study seems to be lower than that reported in previous studies that used different techniques. We conclude that an anatomical surgical technique and a less aggressive rehabilitation process influenced the amount of tunnel enlargement after ACL reconstruction with doubled hamstrings. PMID:16683112

  2. Applying Cross-Pin System in Both Femoral and Tibial Fixation in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using Hamstring Tendons.

    PubMed

    Qi, Wei; Liu, Yujie; Xue, Jing; Li, Haifeng; Wang, Junliang; Qu, Feng

    2015-10-01

    Use of the RigidFix Cross Pin System (DePuy Mitek, Raynham, MA) is a popular technique for femoral fixation of grafts in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR). However, tibial fixation is still limited to the use of interference screws and post fixation, and few surgeons apply the femoral RigidFix system in tibial fixation. Meanwhile, tunnel enlargement is still a problem that affects the outcome of ACLR with hamstring grafts. We have used the femoral RigidFix system in femoral and tibial fixation. The rod top of the guide frame should be placed under the level of the subchondral bone at the proximal end of the tibial tunnel to ensure that the pins will not be inserted into the joint. The pins are inserted through the center of the lateral tibia. Using our technique, the fixation points of the femur and tibia are close to the anterior cruciate ligament insertions, and full contact of the graft with the tunnel wall can be accomplished. On the basis of our preliminary observations and investigation, we are optimistic about the prospect of performing ACLR using the RigidFix system in femoral and tibial fixation. PMID:26697293

  3. Tibial Fixation Properties of a Continuous-Loop ACL Hamstring Graft Construct with Suspensory Fixation in Porcine Bone.

    PubMed

    Smith, Patrick A; DeBerardino, Thomas M

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this article is to compare tibial fixation strength of suspensory fixation for a quadrupled semitendinosus continuous loop all-inside anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) construct versus a doubled semitendinosus and gracilis graft fixated with an interference screw. Biomechanical testing was conducted using human hamstring allografts and porcine tibias. Constructs were cycled from 50 to 250 N for 500 cycles followed by a pull to failure. The average load to failure of tibial suspensory fixation of the all-inside continuous loop construct (1,012 N) was statistically different compared with the tibial interference screw group (612 N) (p < 0.001). The cyclic displacement of the continuous loop construct (2.5 mm) was not statistically different from the interference screw construct (1.9 mm). For both the groups, approximately half the overall cyclic displacement occurred with the first cycle. Tibial side suspensory fixation of a novel all-inside continuous loop hamstring graft provided suitable strength for tibial fixation for ACL reconstruction. The continuous loop construct had a significantly higher load to failure compared with the use of an interference screw, and cyclic loading was comparable. Use of hamstring soft tissue grafts is very common for ACL reconstruction. An all-inside ACL reconstruction is based on a continuous loop construct utilizing a single semitendinosus graft that is quadrupled employing suspensory fixation on both the femoral and tibial side. Suspensory fixation on the femoral side been previously reported, but this is the first report of strength of this method of suspensory fixation on the tibia. PMID:25347056

  4. Does Choosing Autograft Hamstring vs. Patellar Tendon by Gender, Sport, Level of Competition or Laxity in High School and College Aged Athletes Improve KOOS, IKDC or Marx?

    PubMed Central

    Huston, Laura J.; Reinke, Emily; Kattan, Michael W.; Chagin, Kevin; Spindler, Kurt P.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Physicians’ and patients’ decision-making process between autograft hamstring (HG) vs. patellar tendon (BTB) for ACL reconstruction (ACLR) may be influenced by patient gender, laxity level, sport played, and/or competition level in the young, active athlete. ACLR specific to high school and college-aged athletes with these aforementioned factors in mind has not been evaluated. Therefore, our objectives were twofold: first, to develop a simple web-based risk calculator as a decision-making aid to provide the best estimate of expected 2-year KOOS, IKDC, and Marx outcomes by gender, sport, level of competition, and knee laxity. Second, to identify whether autograft HG or BTB is the optimal graft choice given any combination of the aforementioned variables. Methods: Our inclusion criteria in the MOON cohort were patients aged 11-22 who were injured in sport (football, soccer, basketball, other), who were due to have a unilateral primary ACLR with either an autograft HG or BTB, and who had a contralateral normal knee. Excluded were revisions, allografts, those with a contralateral ACLR and concomitant MCL/LCL/PCL surgery. Laxity was graded as increased (Lachman > 10 mm or a pivot lock) or normal based on the EUA. Our modeling controlled for BMI, ethnicity, and baseline measures of patient-reported outcomes. Our two year outcomes were the KOOS knee related quality of life subscale, KOOS sports and recreation subscale, IKDC, and Marx activity level. Our multivariable modeling for risk online calculator and nomograms was generated in two ways. The performances for our models were measured using R squared, calibration curves, and bootstrapping. Results: 937 patients were eligible, 809 (86%) had 2 year follow-up data. The average age was 17, with 50% females, and the distribution of HG to BTB was 301/508 respectively. First, in evaluating our models for ACLR autograft choice, neither KOOS subscale models performed better than chance. The IKDC and Marx models

  5. Does Gracilis Tendon Harvest During ACL Reconstruction with a Hamstring Autograft Affect Torque of Muscles Responsible for Shin Rotation?

    PubMed Central

    Królikowska, Aleksandra; Czamara, Andrzej; Kentel, Maciej

    2015-01-01

    Background A growing body of evidence indicates that in patients after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) with a combined semitendinosus and gracilis (STGR) graft there are large deficits in the internal rotation strength, which has led some authors to recommend harvest of only ST tendon whenever possible. The purpose of this study was to assess the isometric (IT) and peak torque (PT) of the muscles responsible for shin rotation in patients after ACLR with an ST or with an STGR graft. Material/Methods Twenty patients with an ST graft and 20 patients with a combined STGR graft underwent a 6-month postoperative rehabilitation program after ACLR. At the end of the rehabilitation program, the IT and PT of the muscles responsible for internal (IR) and external rotation (ER) of the shin were measured. The results were compared to the results of a control group. Additionally, to determine the reliability of the dynamometer for clinical research, a test-retest assessment was performed. Results There were no statistically significant differences between the 3 groups of participants. Nevertheless, in the STGR group there was a statistically significant difference between the IT of muscles internally rotating the shin in the involved knee and uninvolved knee at 25° of the internal shin rotation. Conclusions Comparison of IT and PT measurements performed after 24 weeks of postoperative rehabilitation generally showed no differences between patients after ACLR with the use of ST graft and patients who received a combination graft consisting of STGR. Nevertheless, there was an influence of GR harvest on internal shin rotation torque at a deep internal rotation angle. PMID:26190033

  6. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction With Autologous Hamstring

    PubMed Central

    Grawe, Brian M.; Williams, Phillip N.; Burge, Alissa; Voigt, Marcia; Altchek, David W.; Hannafin, Jo A.; Allen, Answorth A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Recent clinical investigations have identified inadequate autograft hamstring graft diameter (<8 mm) to be predictive of failure after reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). Purpose/Hypothesis: The objective of this study was to determine the utility of preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) variables of the hamstring tendons for the prediction of graft diameter at the time of surgery. The hypothesis was that cross-sectional area (CSA) of the hamstring tendon measured on MRI could accurately predict graft diameter, and threshold measurements could be established to predict graft diameter at the time of surgery. Study Design: Cohort study (diagnosis); Level of evidence, 2. Methods: A total of 84 consecutive skeletally mature patients prospectively enrolled in our ACL reconstruction patient registry were identified for study purposes. Patients were included if they underwent an MRI of the affected knee at our institution prior to ACL reconstruction with hamstring (HT) autograft. Graft preparation was performed via a standard quadrupled hamstring technique after harvesting both the gracilis and semitendinosus (4-GST). The smallest diameter end of the HT autograft was then utilized for measurement analysis. Total CSA was calculated for both hamstring tendons using the “region of interest tool” on the corresponding proton density–weighted axial image of the knee at the widest condylar dimension. Three independent reviewers measured the MRI scans so that intra- and interrater reliability of the measurements could be determined. A trend analysis was then undertaken to establish correlations between the MRI CSA and graft diameter. Predictive analysis was then performed to establish threshold MRI measurement values for specific graft diameters and determine whether any patient-specific factors would affect graft diameter (age, sex, and body mass index). Results: Mean patient age at the time of surgery was 36 years (range, 11

  7. IMPROVEMENT OF TENDON REPAIR USING MUSCLE GRAFTS TRANSDUCED WITH TGF-β1 cDNA

    PubMed Central

    Majewski, Martin; Porter, Ryan M.; Betz, Oliver B.; Betz, Volker M.; Clahsen, Harald; Flückiger, Rudolf; Evans, Christopher H.

    2015-01-01

    Tendon rupture is a common injury. Inadequate endogenous repair often leaves patients symptomatic, with tendons susceptible to re-rupture. Administration of certain growth factors improves tendon healing in animal models, but their delivery remains a challenge. Here we evaluated the delivery of TGF-β1 to tendon defects by the implantation of genetically modified muscle grafts. Rat muscle biopsies were transduced with recombinant adenovirus encoding TGF-β1 and grafted onto surgically transected Achilles tendons in recipient animals. Tissue regenerates were compared to those of controls by biomechanical testing as well as histochemical and immunohistochemical analyses. Healing was greatly accelerated when genetically modified grafts were implanted into tendon defects, with the resulting repair tissue gaining nearly normal histological appearance as early as 2 weeks postoperatively. This was associated with decreased deposition of type III collagen in favour of large fibre bundles indicative of type I collagen. These differences in tendon composition coincided with accelerated restoration of mechanical strength. Tendon thickness increased in gene-treated animals at weeks 1 and 2, but by week 8 became significantly lower than that of controls suggesting accelerated remodelling. Thus localised TGF-β1 delivery via adenovirus-modified muscle grafts improved tendon healing in this rat model and holds promise for clinical application. PMID:22354460

  8. The role of graft materials in suture augmentation for tendon repairs and reattachment.

    PubMed

    Kummer, Frederick J; Iesaka, Kazuho

    2005-08-01

    Various biomaterials have been used to augment sutures for the repair and reattachment of tendons. This study examined four different graft materials in a simple and reproducible model using chicken Achilles tendons to determine the strength and mechanism of suture reinforcement of tendon repairs. The graft materials tested were Gore-Tex(R) Soft Tissue Patch, Graftjacket, bovine pericardium, and an experimental graft material from Xylos Corporation. Testing was performed in shear to simulate forces on a torn tendon repair and pull-off to simulate those on a tendon reattachment to bone. Compared to unaugmented suture, grafts increased suture fixation strength from 10% to 60% in shear and from 0% to 36% in pull-off with the bovine pericardium graft, providing significant improvement in both tests. In no cases (even unaugmented) did the suture pull directly through the tendon, but instead sliced along it, demonstrating that the interface between the suture and the tendon determines fixation strength. Grafts function by increasing the area, friction, and nature of this interface, not by acting as a barrier for suture pull-through. PMID:15981174

  9. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Graft Choices: A Review of Current Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Dheerendra, Sujay K; Khan, Wasim S; Singhal, Rohit; Shivarathre, Deepak G; Pydisetty, Ravi; Johnstone, David

    2012-01-01

    The graft choice for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction continues to be controversial. There are several options available for the treating surgeon, including Bone Patellar Tendon Bone (BPTB) grafts, Hamstring tendon (HT) grafts, allografts and synthetic grafts. Within the last decade there have been several comparative trials and meta-analysis, which have failed to provide an answer with regards to the best graft available. The aim of this review is to understand the current concepts in graft choices for ACL reconstruction. PMID:22888379

  10. Reconstruction of chronic patellar tendon rupture using graft from contralateral patella graft together with reinforcement from flexor tendons. Case report.

    PubMed

    Frois Temponi, Eduardo; de Carvalho, Lúcio Honório; da Silva Bernardes, Cláudio Otávio; Presses Teixeira, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Chronic patellar tendon rupture is a rare disabling injury that is technically difficult to repair. The true prevalence of this injury is unknown. Delayed reconstruction of chronic patellar tendon rupture has yielded suboptimal clinical and functional results. Many different surgical methods for reconstruction of chronic patellar tendon injury have been reported. In this report, we present a case with chronic patellar tendon injury that was addressed using a technique that had not previously been described in the literature, through combining procedures that had been described separately. The reconstruction method presented in this article has the advantages of being easy and reproducible, without a requirement of allografts.

  11. Free Bone Plug Quadriceps Tendon Harvest and Suspensory Button Attachment for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Todor, Adrian; Caterev, Sergiu; Nistor, Dan Viorel; Khallouki, Youssef

    2016-06-01

    The most commonly used autografts for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction are the bone-patellar tendon-bone and hamstring tendons. Each has its advantages and limitations. The bone-patellar tendon-bone autograft can lead to more donor-site morbidity, and the hamstring autograft can be unpredictable in size. The quadriceps tendon, with or without a bone block, has been described as an alternative graft source and has been used especially in revision cases, but in recent years, it has attracted attention even for primary cases. We report a technique for harvesting a free bone quadriceps tendon graft and attaching an extracortical button for femoral fixation for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. PMID:27656375

  12. [Biomechanical properties of interference screw implantation in replacement of the anterior cruciate ligament with patellar and hamstring transplants. An experimental study using roentgen stereometry analysis (RSA)].

    PubMed

    Adam, F; Pape, D; Steimer, O; Kohn, D; Rupp, S

    2001-09-01

    This experimental roentgen stereometric analysis (RSA) study was performed to measure micromotions between the graft and tunnel under submaximal load in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The aim was to evaluate the maximum load at failure, linear stiffness, and slippage of bone-patellar-tendon-bone (BPTB) grafts fixed with interference screws compared to quadrupled hamstring grafts fixed with interference screws. We used 15 porcine tibia specimens for the study. In the BPTB group, the 10 x 25-mm bone plugs were fixed in a tunnel with 10 mm in diameter using a 7 x 25-mm titanium interference screw (n = 5) or a biodegradable screw (n = 5). The five hamstring transplants were folded to a four-stranded graft and armed with a baseball stitch suture. The sutured side was fixed with a 7 x 25-mm biodegradable polylactide screw in an 8-mm tunnel. The tibial bones, tendon grafts, and interference screws were marked with tantalum beads. The grafts were mounted to a custom made load frame and loaded parallel to the axis under RSA control increasing the force in steps of 50 N. Micromotions between bone plug, screw, and tibia were measured with RSA. Accuracy of RSA for the in vitro study was evaluated as 0.05 mm. Hamstring grafts failed at significantly lower maximum loads (492 +/- 30 N) than BPTB grafts (658 +/- 98 N). Linear stiffness of the hamstring graft fixations was eight times lower compared to the BPTB grafts (403 +/- 141 N/mm vs 3500 +/- 1300 N/mm). There was no significant difference between the biodegradable and titanium screws in the BPTB group. Slippage of the graft started at 82 +/- 35 N load in the hamstring group and at 428 +/- 135 N in the BPTB group. Slippage of the graft at 75% of the maximum pull-out strength was measured as 0.36 +/- 0.25 mm in the BPTB and 2.58 +/- 1.08 mm in the hamstring group. The interference screw fixation of a quadrupled hamstring graft showed a lower linear stiffness and an earlier slippage compared to a patellar

  13. A Comparative Animal Study of Tendon Grafts Healing After Remnant-Preserving Versus Conventional Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Jiang, Kan; Chai, Hao; Zhou, Mei; Bai, Jingping

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to determine if anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction by remnant preservation promotes cell proliferation, vascularization, proprioception recovery, and improved biomechanical properties of the tendon grafts. Material/Methods 75 New Zealand rabbits were randomly assigned into the control group (group A), conventional ACL reconstruction group (group B), ACL reconstruction using remnant preservation and graft through remnant sleeve technique group (group C), and ACL reconstruction using remnant preservation and remnant tensioning technique group (group D). The remnant and healing of tendon grafts in groups C and D were observed at 3, 6, and 12 weeks after surgery, and the mRNA expression levels of VEGF, NT-3 and GAP-43 in ACL (group A) or tendon graft samples (groups B, C, and D) were determined by real-time PCR. Tendon graft cell count, microvessel density (MVD), and proprioceptors were determined by H&E staining, CD34, and S-100 immunohistochemical staining. The biomechanical properties of the tendon graft at week 12 in groups B, C, and D were examined by using a tensile strength test. Results Remnant and tendon grafts were not healed at 3, 6, and 12 weeks after the operation in groups C and D. VEGF, NT-3, and GAP-43 mRNA expressions in groups B, C, and D were higher than those in group A (P<0.05), but no significant difference was observed between groups B, C, and D (P>0.05). Furthermore, tendon graft cell count, MVD, proprioception, and biomechanical properties showed no significant differences (P>0.05) among groups B, C, and D at various time points. Conclusions There was no significant difference in cell proliferation, vascularization, proprioception recovery, or biomechanical properties of the tendon grafts between remnant-preserving and conventional ACL reconstruction methods. PMID:27669454

  14. Combined Reconstruction of the Medial Collateral Ligament and Anterior Cruciate Ligament Using Ipsilateral Quadriceps Tendon-Bone and Bone-Patellar Tendon-Bone Autografts.

    PubMed

    Hetsroni, Iftach; Mann, Gideon

    2016-06-01

    The exclusive autograft choice for medial collateral ligament (MCL) reconstruction that has been described until today is the semitendinosus tendon. However, this has some potential disadvantages in a knee with combined MCL-anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, including weakening of the hamstring's anterior restraining action in an already ACL-injured knee and nonanatomic distal MCL graft insertion when leaving the semitendinosus insertion intact at the pes anserinus during reconstruction. Moreover, because some surgeons prefer to use the hamstring for autologous ACL reconstruction, the contralateral uninjured knee hamstring needs to be harvested as a graft source for the MCL reconstruction if autografts and not allografts are the surgeons' preference. We describe a technique for performing combined reconstruction of the MCL and ACL using ipsilateral quadriceps tendon-bone and bone-patellar tendon-bone autografts. This technique of MCL reconstruction spares the hamstring tendons and benefits from the advantage provided by bone-to-bone healing on the femur with distal and proximal MCL tibial fixation that closely reproduces the native MCL tibia insertion. PMID:27656381

  15. Combined Reconstruction of the Medial Collateral Ligament and Anterior Cruciate Ligament Using Ipsilateral Quadriceps Tendon-Bone and Bone-Patellar Tendon-Bone Autografts.

    PubMed

    Hetsroni, Iftach; Mann, Gideon

    2016-06-01

    The exclusive autograft choice for medial collateral ligament (MCL) reconstruction that has been described until today is the semitendinosus tendon. However, this has some potential disadvantages in a knee with combined MCL-anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, including weakening of the hamstring's anterior restraining action in an already ACL-injured knee and nonanatomic distal MCL graft insertion when leaving the semitendinosus insertion intact at the pes anserinus during reconstruction. Moreover, because some surgeons prefer to use the hamstring for autologous ACL reconstruction, the contralateral uninjured knee hamstring needs to be harvested as a graft source for the MCL reconstruction if autografts and not allografts are the surgeons' preference. We describe a technique for performing combined reconstruction of the MCL and ACL using ipsilateral quadriceps tendon-bone and bone-patellar tendon-bone autografts. This technique of MCL reconstruction spares the hamstring tendons and benefits from the advantage provided by bone-to-bone healing on the femur with distal and proximal MCL tibial fixation that closely reproduces the native MCL tibia insertion.

  16. The effect of graft choice on functional outcome in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Sajovic, Matjaz; Strahovnik, Andrej; Komadina, Radko; Dernovsek, Mojca Z

    2008-08-01

    A prospective, randomised, 5-year follow-up study was designed to compare the functional results between patellar tendon and hamstring tendon autografts after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Primary reconstruction was performed in 32 patients using the central third of the patellar ligament and in 32 patients using double-looped semitendinosus and gracilis tendons. All reconstructions were performed by a single surgeon, with identical surgical technique and rehabilitation protocol. Of the total 64 patients in the study, 54 (85%) were available for the 5-year follow-up. No statistically significant differences were seen with respect to Lysholm score, International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) classification, clinical and KT-2000 arthrometer laxity testing, single-legged hop test and anterior knee pain. Graft rupture occurred in two patients (8%) in the patellar tendon group and in two patients (7%) in the hamstring tendon group; 23 patients (88%) in the patellar tendon group and 23 patients (82%) in the hamstring tendon group returned to their pre-injury activity level. Good subjective outcome and stability can be obtained by using either graft; no statistically significant differences were found in functional outcome between the grafts.

  17. Reconstruction of Attritional Rupture of Flexor Tendons with Fascia Lata Graft Following Distal Radius Fracture Malunion.

    PubMed

    Bhat, A K; Acharya, A M; Soni, N

    2016-10-01

    Incidence of multiple flexor tendon rupture following distal radius fractures is rare with very few cases being reported in literature. We present an unusual case of a patient who had come to us with complaints of weakness and paresthesia of the right hand of one month prior and with a past history of dorsal plating for distal radius fracture nine years ago. Radiographs showed a distal radius fracture malunion with intact dorsal plate and protrusion of screws through the volar cortex. On exploration, attritional ruptures of all digital flexors were found with sparing of the Flexor Pollicis Longus tendon. The fibrous mass was excised and flexors reconstructed with a fascia lata graft. Attempt was made to correct the malunion with radial and ulnar osteotomies. At one year the patient had excellent restoration of digital flexion. PMID:27595963

  18. Synthesis, development, characterization and effectiveness of bovine pure platelet gel-collagen-polydioxanone bioactive graft on tendon healing

    PubMed Central

    Moshiri, Ali; Oryan, Ahmad; Meimandi-Parizi, Abdolhamid

    2015-01-01

    Bovine platelet gel (BPG) is an accessible and cost-effective source of growth factors which may have a value in tendon regenerative medicine. We produced a collagen implant (CI) as a tendon proper, covered it with polydioxanone (PDS) sheath to simulate paratenon and finally embedded the BPG as an active source of growth factor within the bioimplant to test whether BPG would be able to accelerate and enhance tendon regeneration and repair. After in vitro characterization of the bioactive grafts, the grafts were implanted in rabbit large tendon defect model. Untreated tendons and tendons treated with either CI or CI-PDS were served as controls for the CI-PDS-BPG. The animals were investigated clinically, ultrasonographically and haematologically for 120 days. After euthanasia, dry matter content, water uptake and delivery characteristics and also gross morphological, histopathological and scanning electron microscopic features of the healing tendons were assessed. In vitro, the activated platelets in the scaffold, released their growth factors significantly more than the controls. BPG also increased cell viability, and enhanced cellular differentiation, maturation and proliferation inside the CI-PDS compared with the controls. In vivo, the BPG modulated inflammation, increased quality and rate of fibroplasia and produced a remodelled tendon that had significantly higher collagen content and superior collagen fibril and fibre differentiation than controls. Treatment also significantly improved tendon water uptake and delivery characteristics, animals’ serum PDGF level, CI-PDS biocompatibility and biodegradability and reduced peritendinous adhesions, muscle fibrosis and atrophy. BPG was effective on tendon healing and CI-PDS-BPG may be a valuable bioscaffold in tendon reconstructive surgery. PMID:25702535

  19. Synthesis, development, characterization and effectiveness of bovine pure platelet gel-collagen-polydioxanone bioactive graft on tendon healing.

    PubMed

    Moshiri, Ali; Oryan, Ahmad; Meimandi-Parizi, Abdolhamid

    2015-06-01

    Bovine platelet gel (BPG) is an accessible and cost-effective source of growth factors which may have a value in tendon regenerative medicine. We produced a collagen implant (CI) as a tendon proper, covered it with polydioxanone (PDS) sheath to simulate paratenon and finally embedded the BPG as an active source of growth factor within the bioimplant to test whether BPG would be able to accelerate and enhance tendon regeneration and repair. After in vitro characterization of the bioactive grafts, the grafts were implanted in rabbit large tendon defect model. Untreated tendons and tendons treated with either CI or CI-PDS were served as controls for the CI-PDS-BPG. The animals were investigated clinically, ultrasonographically and haematologically for 120 days. After euthanasia, dry matter content, water uptake and delivery characteristics and also gross morphological, histopathological and scanning electron microscopic features of the healing tendons were assessed. In vitro, the activated platelets in the scaffold, released their growth factors significantly more than the controls. BPG also increased cell viability, and enhanced cellular differentiation, maturation and proliferation inside the CI-PDS compared with the controls. In vivo, the BPG modulated inflammation, increased quality and rate of fibroplasia and produced a remodelled tendon that had significantly higher collagen content and superior collagen fibril and fibre differentiation than controls. Treatment also significantly improved tendon water uptake and delivery characteristics, animals' serum PDGF level, CI-PDS biocompatibility and biodegradability and reduced peritendinous adhesions, muscle fibrosis and atrophy. BPG was effective on tendon healing and CI-PDS-BPG may be a valuable bioscaffold in tendon reconstructive surgery.

  20. Arthroscopically assisted anatomical coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction using tendon graft.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Yon-Sik; Seo, Young-Jin; Noh, Kyu-Cheol; Patro, Bishu Prasad; Kim, Do-Young

    2011-07-01

    We describe a method of arthroscopically assisted, mini-open, anatomical reconstruction of the coracoclavicular ligament. This method restores both components of the native ligament with the aim of achieving maximum stability with minimal disruption of the normal anatomy. Using the same principles of ligament reconstruction that are employed in other joints, transosseous tunnels are created following the native footprints of the conoid and trapezoid ligaments and an autologous graft is fixed using a PEEK screw. Adequate healing of the ligament occurs within the bone, to prevent stress risers with an appropriate working length. This procedure is unique, as it replaces the torn ligament with a natural substitute, in the appropriate location, through a minimally invasive procedure. This technique would be suitable for treatment of patients with either grade III or V acute acromioclavicular dislocations. Clinical outcomes for the first 13 consecutive patients treated with this procedure are reported, revealing excellent satisfaction rates with a Constant score of 96.6 at final follow-up.

  1. An endoscopic approach to longitudinal structures including muscle flaps and vein, tendon, and nerve grafts.

    PubMed

    Hallock, Geoffrey G; Rice, David C

    2008-02-01

    Anatomically favorable structures that have a longitudinal orientation are particularly amenable to endoscopic harvest. Typically, only a single portal is necessary for access, and an optical cavity can be maintained using a mechanical retraction device. As with all minimal invasive surgery, this can still allow rapid and often a safer tissue harvest with diminished morbidity, especially with respect to wound healing and non-aesthetic scar formation. Many plastic surgery applications have already been described facilitated by the endoscopic harvest of vein, tendon, and nerve grafts, as well as certain local or free muscle flaps.

  2. Effect of Calcium Phosphate–Hybridized Tendon Graft in Anatomic Single-Bundle ACL Reconstruction in Goats

    PubMed Central

    Mutsuzaki, Hirotaka; Fujie, Hiromichi; Nakajima, Hiromi; Fukagawa, Makoto; Nomura, Shunsuke; Sakane, Masataka

    2016-01-01

    Background: We previously developed a novel technique using an alternate soaking process that improves tendon-bone healing by hybridizing the tendon graft with calcium phosphate (CaP). However, the effects of the CaP-hybridized tendon graft on anatomic single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction remain unclear. Purpose: To determine the effects of CaP-hybridized tendon grafts compared with untreated tendon grafts 6 months after anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction using a goat model. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Animals were divided into a CaP group (n = 5 goats) and a control group (n = 5 goats), and we analyzed (1) knee kinematics and in situ forces under applied anterior tibial loads of 50 N and internal tibial torque of 2.0 N·m in the grafts at full extension and at 60° and 90° of knee flexion, (2) the mean percentage of bone tunnel enlargement using computed tomography (CT), and (3) the histology of the tendon-bone interface. Results: The in situ forces under applied anterior tibial loads of 50 N at 60° and 90° of knee flexion in the CaP group were greater than those in the control group (P < .05). The red safranin-O–stained area, indicating glycosaminoglycans in the cartilage layers at the joint aperture sites of the anterior femoral and posterior tibial bone tunnel, was greater in the CaP group than that in the control group (P < .05). The lengths of the nonbonding gap area between the anterior femoral and posterior tibial bone tunnels in the control group were greater than those in the CaP group (P < .05). No significant difference could be detected in the mean percentage of bone tunnel enlargement between the 2 groups. Conclusion: The CaP-hybridized tendon graft enhanced tendon-bone healing at the joint aperture site in both anterior femoral and posterior tibial tunnels 6 months after anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction in goats. The in situ forces under applied anterior tibial loads at greater

  3. Effect of Calcium Phosphate–Hybridized Tendon Graft in Anatomic Single-Bundle ACL Reconstruction in Goats

    PubMed Central

    Mutsuzaki, Hirotaka; Fujie, Hiromichi; Nakajima, Hiromi; Fukagawa, Makoto; Nomura, Shunsuke; Sakane, Masataka

    2016-01-01

    Background: We previously developed a novel technique using an alternate soaking process that improves tendon-bone healing by hybridizing the tendon graft with calcium phosphate (CaP). However, the effects of the CaP-hybridized tendon graft on anatomic single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction remain unclear. Purpose: To determine the effects of CaP-hybridized tendon grafts compared with untreated tendon grafts 6 months after anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction using a goat model. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Animals were divided into a CaP group (n = 5 goats) and a control group (n = 5 goats), and we analyzed (1) knee kinematics and in situ forces under applied anterior tibial loads of 50 N and internal tibial torque of 2.0 N·m in the grafts at full extension and at 60° and 90° of knee flexion, (2) the mean percentage of bone tunnel enlargement using computed tomography (CT), and (3) the histology of the tendon-bone interface. Results: The in situ forces under applied anterior tibial loads of 50 N at 60° and 90° of knee flexion in the CaP group were greater than those in the control group (P < .05). The red safranin-O–stained area, indicating glycosaminoglycans in the cartilage layers at the joint aperture sites of the anterior femoral and posterior tibial bone tunnel, was greater in the CaP group than that in the control group (P < .05). The lengths of the nonbonding gap area between the anterior femoral and posterior tibial bone tunnels in the control group were greater than those in the CaP group (P < .05). No significant difference could be detected in the mean percentage of bone tunnel enlargement between the 2 groups. Conclusion: The CaP-hybridized tendon graft enhanced tendon-bone healing at the joint aperture site in both anterior femoral and posterior tibial tunnels 6 months after anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction in goats. The in situ forces under applied anterior tibial loads at greater

  4. Hamstring injuries

    PubMed Central

    Guanche, Carlos A.

    2015-01-01

    There is a continuum of hamstring injuries that can range from musculotendinous strains to avulsion injuries. Although the proximal hamstring complex has a strong bony attachment on the ischial tuberosity, hamstring injuries are common in athletic population and can affect all levels of athletes. Nonoperative treatment is mostly recommended in the setting of low-grade partial tears and insertional tendinosis. However, failure of nonoperative treatment of partial tears may benefit from surgical debridement and repair. The technique presented on this article allows for the endoscopic management of proximal hamstring tears and chronic ischial bursitis, which until now has been managed exclusively with much larger open approaches. The procedure allows for complete exposure of the posterior aspect of the hip in a safe, minimally invasive fashion. PMID:27011828

  5. Synthetic grafts for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Rizzello, Giacomo; Berton, Alessandra; Fumo, Caterina; Maltese, Ludovica; Khan, Wasim S; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2013-11-01

    Several artificial biomaterials are available as ligament grafts. No ideal prosthesis mimicking natural human tissue have been found to date. The emerging field of tissue engineering holds the promise to use artificial ligaments as a viable alternative to the patellar or hamstring tendon autografts. Preliminary studies support the idea that these biomaterials have the ability to provide an alternative for autogenous grafts. However, no definitive conclusions have been found. Additionally, the incidence of postoperative complications varies within different studies. Prospective investigations are required to better understand the potential of artificial biomaterials as ligament grafts.

  6. Femoral interference screw placement through the tibial tunnel: a novel method without graft damage.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yi-Sheng; Wang, Ching-Jen

    2006-11-01

    A frequently encountered problem in endoscopic 1-incision anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is the difficulty involved in accurately inserting the femoral interference screw without significant and undesirable divergence between the screw and the graft when a femoral interference screw is fixed through the anteromedial portal. To minimize divergence, the authors demonstrated a modified, easy, and reproducible procedure that can be performed without causing graft injury or requiring special instrumentation. A ligament reconstruction route is created with the use of an ACL guide system. Lead graft sutures are pulled through the anteromedial portal by way of the femoral tunnel and out the anterolateral thigh first. The tendon graft is then inserted through the anteromedial portal and up into the femoral tunnel. A guidewire is introduced through the tibial tunnel into the femoral tunnel. An appropriately sized BioScrew (Linvatec, Largo, FL) is inserted, with the use of a guidewire inside the screw, through the tibial tunnel into the femoral tunnel. The graft is then retrieved through the anteromedial portal and is inserted through the tibial tunnel. Finally, the tendon graft in the tibial tunnel is similarly fixed with a BioScrew of the same size. Moreover, this novel approach is feasible for all tendon grafts (bone-patellar tendon-bone grafts, quadriceps tendon-patellar bone grafts, and hamstring tendon grafts). PMID:17084309

  7. Modified Weaver-Dunn Procedure Versus The Use of Semitendinosus Autogenous Tendon Graft for Acromioclavicular Joint Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Hegazy, Galal; Safwat, Hesham; Seddik, Mahmoud; Al-shal, Ehab A.; Al-Sebai, Ibrahim; Negm, Mohame

    2016-01-01

    Background: The optimal operative method for acromioclavicular joint reconstruction remains controversial. The modified Weaver-Dunn method is one of the most popular methods. Anatomic reconstruction of coracoclavicular ligaments with autogenous tendon grafts, widely used in treating chronic acromioclavicular joint instability, reportedly diminishes pain, eliminates sequelae, and improves function as well as strength. Objective: To compare clinical and radiologic outcomes between a modified Weaver-Dunn procedure and an anatomic coracoclavicular ligaments reconstruction technique using autogenous semitendinosus tendon graft. Methods: Twenty patients (mean age, 39 years) with painful, chronic Rockwood type III acromioclavicular joint dislocations were subjected to surgical reconstruction. In ten patients, a modified Weaver-Dunn procedure was performed, in the other ten patients; autogenous semitendinosus tendon graft was used. The mean time between injury and the index procedure was 18 month (range from 9 – 28). Clinical evaluation was performed using the Oxford Shoulder Score and Nottingham Clavicle Score after a mean follow-up time of 27.8 months. Preoperative and postoperative radiographs were compared. Results: In the Weaver-Dunn group the Oxford Shoulder Score improved from 25±4 to 40±2 points. While the Nottingham Clavicle Score increased from 48±7 to 84±11. In semitendinosus tendon graft group, the Oxford Shoulder Score improved from 25±3 points to 50±2 points and the Nottingham Clavicle Score from 48±8 points to 95±8, respectively. Conclusion: Acromioclavicular joint reconstruction using the semitendinosus tendon graft achieved better Oxford Shoulder Score and Nottingham Clavicle Score compared to the modified Weaver-Dunn procedure. PMID:27347245

  8. Bone Tunnel Diameter Measured with CT after Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using Double-Bundle Auto-Hamstring Tendons: Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Soo Jeong; Bae, So Young; Wang, Joon Ho

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the correlation between bone tunnel diameter after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction measured by computed tomography (CT) using multiplanar reconstruction (MPR) and stability or clinical scores. Materials and Methods Forty-seven patients (41 men and 6 women, mean age: 34 years) who had undergone ACL reconstruction with the double bundle technique using auto-hamstring graft and had subsequently received CT scans immediately after the surgery (T1: range, 1-4 days, mean, 2.5 days) and at a later time (T2: range, 297-644 days, mean, 410.4 days) were enrolled in this study. The diameter of each tunnel (two femoral and two tibial) at both T1 and T2 were independently measured using MPR technique by two radiologists. Stability and clinical scores were evaluated with a KT-2000 arthrometer, International Knee Documentation Committee objective scores, and the Lysholm score. Statistical analysis of the correlation between the diameter at T2 or the interval diameter change ratio ([T2 - T1] / T1) and clinical scores or stability was investigated. Results The tibial bone tunnels for the anteromedial bundles were significantly widened at T2 compared with T1 (observer 1, 0.578 mm to 0.698 mm, p value of < 0.001; observer 2, 0.581 mm to 0.707 mm, p value of < 0.001). There was no significant correlation between the diameter at T2 and stability or clinical scores and between the interval change ratio ([T2 - T1] / T1) and stability or clinical scores (corrected p values for all were 1.0). Intraobserver agreement for measurements was excellent (> 0.8) for both observers. Interobserver agreement for measurement was excellent (> 0.8) except for the most distal portion of the femoral bone tunnel for anterior medial bundle in immediate postoperative CT, which showed moderate agreement (concordance correlation coefficient = 0.6311). Conclusion Neither the diameter nor its change ratio during interval follow-up is correlated with stability or clinical

  9. Snapping Knee Syndrome of the Medial Hamstrings.

    PubMed

    Protzman, Nicole M; Conkle, Sean B; Busch, Michael F

    2015-10-01

    Snapping of the medial hamstrings is a rare condition, with few cases reported throughout the literature. The snapping sensation reportedly occurs when a hamstring tendon passes over the medial tibial condyle, a muscle belly, or another tendon. The semitendinosus tendon is frequently involved, but concomitant involvement of the semitendinosus and gracilis tendons has also been described. Although the exact etiology remains unclear, authors have theorized that the condition results from a congenital malformation or degradation of the accessory tendinous expansions of the semitendinosus. Whereas most cases resolve with conservative treatments, select cases require surgical intervention. Both the distal surgical release and tendon harvest have proved viable surgical procedures, achieving symptom alleviation with minimal patient morbidity. In this article, a case of medial snapping hamstring tendons involving both the semitendinosus and gracilis tendons is reviewed. A 17-year-old African American girl presented with extreme pain and snapping on the posteromedial aspect of her knee was appreciated. Radiographs were ordered and showed no acute fracture, no acute dislocation, normal medial joint space, normal lateral joint space, and normal patellofemoral space. Conservative and surgical options were reviewed, and the patient elected to undergo harvest of the tendons. Four weeks postoperatively, the patient reported complete resolution of symptoms. To date, there has been no recurrence of symptoms. The authors hope to increase awareness of this condition and add to the existing body of literature. PMID:26488792

  10. Influence of the crosshead rate on the mechanical properties of fixation systems of ACL tendon grafts.

    PubMed

    Martel, Oscar; Cárdenes, Juan F; Garcés, Gerardo; Carta, José A

    2009-11-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is one of the most important aspects of knee surgery. For this purpose, several fixation devices have been developed, although the interference screw is the most frequently used. The most typical biomechanical test of these devices consists of placing them in a testing machine and subjecting them to a pull-out test. However, insufficient attention has been paid to the influence of the displacement test rate on the mechanical properties of the fixation system. The aim of this study is to compare the influence of the crosshead rate in the biomechanical test of two different devices for the fixation of ACL tendon grafts. One hundred in vitro tests were performed using porcine tibiae and bovine tendons. The fixation devices used were (1) an interference screw and (2) a new expansion device. All ACL reconstructions were subjected to pull-out test to failure. Five crosshead rates were employed in a range from 30 mm/min to 4000 mm/min. Statistical analyses of the results show that, for the two devices, the rate has a significant effect on both maximum force and stiffness. Moreover, the new expansion device showed lesser dependency on the crosshead rate than the interference screw.

  11. Quadriceps tendon free graft augmentation for a midsubstance tear of the medial collateral ligament during total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kwang Am; Lee, Su Chan; Hwang, Seung Hyun; Jung, Soong Hyun

    2009-12-01

    Primary repair of a disrupted midsubstance MCL during TKA can provide satisfactory stability. However, in cases with poor soft tissue quality or a gap between the ligament ends, primary repair may not be feasible. In these cases, we have used an augmented repair. The purpose of this study is to describe the technique of augmented repair using a quadriceps tendon free graft and present our experience of five patients. A total of five patients underwent augmented repair of a transected MCL substance using a quadriceps tendon free graft. The patients were followed-up for a mean of 16 months. Augmented repair of the transected MCL substance was successful in all five patients, with a mean additional surgery time of 17 min, no coronal instability, a mean Knee Society Score of 87.0+/-2.7 (range, 85 to 90), and a mean function score of 85.0+/-3.5 (range, 80 to 90). There were no complications associated with the extensor mechanism. This data suggests that quadriceps tendon free graft augmentation might be a useful alternative for repairing midsubstance tears of the MCL in special situations, where the quality of the remaining tendon is poor, there is suspicion of stretching, and there is a small gap between both the repaired ligament ends resulting in late laxity.

  12. Synovial Mesenchymal Stem Cells Promote Meniscus Regeneration Augmented by an Autologous Achilles Tendon Graft in a Rat Partial Meniscus Defect Model

    PubMed Central

    Ozeki, Nobutake; Muneta, Takeshi; Matsuta, Seiya; Koga, Hideyuki; Nakagawa, Yusuke; Mizuno, Mitsuru; Tsuji, Kunikazu; Mabuchi, Yo; Akazawa, Chihiro; Kobayashi, Eiji; Saito, Tomoyuki; Sekiya, Ichiro

    2015-01-01

    Although meniscus defects and degeneration are strongly correlated with the later development of osteoarthritis, the promise of regenerative medicine strategies is to prevent and/or delay the disease's progression. Meniscal reconstruction has been shown in animal models with tendon grafting and transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs); however, these procedures have not shown the same efficacy in clinical studies. Here, our aim was to investigate the ability of tendon grafts pretreated with exogenous synovial-derived MSCs to prevent cartilage degeneration in a rat partial meniscus defect model. We removed the anterior half of the medial meniscus and grafted autologous Achilles tendons with or without a 10-minute pretreatment of the tendon with synovial MSCs. The meniscus and surrounding cartilage were evaluated at 2, 4, and 8 weeks (n = 5). Tendon grafts increased meniscus size irrespective of synovial MSCs. Histological scores for regenerated menisci were better in the tendon + MSC group than in the other two groups at 4 and 8 weeks. Both macroscopic and histological scores for articular cartilage were significantly better in the tendon + MSC group at 8 weeks. Implanted synovial MSCs survived around the grafted tendon and native meniscus integration site by cell tracking assays with luciferase+, LacZ+, DiI+, and/or GFP+ synovial MSCs and/or GFP+ tendons. Flow cytometric analysis showed that transplanted synovial MSCs retained their MSC properties at 7 days and host synovial tissue also contained cells with MSC characteristics. Synovial MSCs promoted meniscus regeneration augmented by autologous Achilles tendon grafts and prevented cartilage degeneration in rats. Stem Cells 2015;33:1927–1938 PMID:25993981

  13. Plantar Fat Grafting and Tendon Balancing for the Diabetic Foot Ulcer in Remission.

    PubMed

    Luu, Cynthia A; Larson, Ethan; Rankin, Timothy M; Pappalardo, Jennifer L; Slepian, Marvin J; Armstrong, David G

    2016-07-01

    We report on the use of free fat grafting as a means of redistributing normal and shear stress after healing of plantar diabetic foot wounds. Although fat augmentation (lipofilling) has been described previously as an approach to supplement defects and prevent atrophy, including use as an adjunct to wound healing and to mitigate pain in the foot, we are unaware of any reports in the medical literature that have described its use in the high-risk diabetic foot in remission. An active 37-year-old man with type 2 diabetes and neuropathy presented with gangrene of his fifth ray, which was amputated. He subsequently developed a chronic styloid process ulceration that progressed despite treatment. We performed a tibialis anterior tendon transfer and total contact casting. He went on to heal but with residual fat pad atrophy and recalcitrant preulcerative lesions. We then used autologous fat grafting for the plantar atrophy. The patient was able to successfully transition to normal shoe gear after 4 weeks with successful engraftment without complication or recurrence of the wound at 6 weeks. This therapy may provide a promising adjunct to increase ulcer-free days to the patient in diabetic foot remission. PMID:27536489

  14. Plantar Fat Grafting and Tendon Balancing for the Diabetic Foot Ulcer in Remission

    PubMed Central

    Luu, Cynthia A.; Larson, Ethan; Rankin, Timothy M.; Pappalardo, Jennifer L.; Slepian, Marvin J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: We report on the use of free fat grafting as a means of redistributing normal and shear stress after healing of plantar diabetic foot wounds. Although fat augmentation (lipofilling) has been described previously as an approach to supplement defects and prevent atrophy, including use as an adjunct to wound healing and to mitigate pain in the foot, we are unaware of any reports in the medical literature that have described its use in the high-risk diabetic foot in remission. An active 37-year-old man with type 2 diabetes and neuropathy presented with gangrene of his fifth ray, which was amputated. He subsequently developed a chronic styloid process ulceration that progressed despite treatment. We performed a tibialis anterior tendon transfer and total contact casting. He went on to heal but with residual fat pad atrophy and recalcitrant preulcerative lesions. We then used autologous fat grafting for the plantar atrophy. The patient was able to successfully transition to normal shoe gear after 4 weeks with successful engraftment without complication or recurrence of the wound at 6 weeks. This therapy may provide a promising adjunct to increase ulcer-free days to the patient in diabetic foot remission. PMID:27536489

  15. Nonoperative management of a partial patellar tendon rupture after bone-patellar tendon-bone graft harvest for ACL reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Benner, Rodney W; Shelbourne, K Donald; Freeman, Heather

    2013-12-01

    This is a case report of a young athlete who sustained a partial tear of the patellar tendon after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction with a bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) autograft. The injury, diagnostic workup, and decision-making process that lead to the choice of nonsurgical treatment are described. Furthermore, the rehabilitation process is described in detail. The patient returned to his previous level of sports activity and had a good clinical outcome as measured by range of motion, isokinetic quadriceps muscle strength testing, single leg hop testing, and the modified Noyes survey. In the absence of extensor mechanism incompetence or radiographic evidence of significant patella alta, partial ruptures of the patella tendon after ACL reconstruction using a BPTB autograft may be treated nonoperatively.

  16. COMPARISON BETWEEN THE RESULTS ACHIEVED IN ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION WITH TWO KINDS OF AUTOLOGOUS GRAFTS: PATELLAR TENDON VERSUS SEMITENDINOUS AND GRACILIS

    PubMed Central

    Abdalla, Rene Jorge; Monteiro, Diego Antico; Dias, Leonardo; Correia, Dárcio Maurício; Cohen, Moisés; Forgas, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Objective: this study aims to compare the arthrometric and isokinetic examination results from two types of autologous grafts: the central third of the patellar ligament and a graft formed by the tendons of the semitendinosus and gracilis muscles, within the same rehabilitation protocol, six months after the surgery. Methods: the results from examinations carried out on 63 patients were analyzed. These patients were divided in two groups: one group of 30 patients who received a patellar tendon graft and another group of 33 patients who received a graft from the tendons of the semitendinosus and gracilis muscles. Both the grafts were attached in the same way, with Endobutton™ for suspensory fixation to the femur and a bioabsorbable interference screw for fixation in the tibial tunnel. Results: arthrometry 30 did not present any statistical difference between the two study groups. On the other hand, the isokinetic evaluation showed that the patellar tendon group had a larger mean peak torque of flexion and greater extension deficit, while the semitendinosus/gracilis group had a better mean flexion/extension ratio and greater percentage of flexion deficit. There was no statistically significant difference between the groups when measuring peak torque extension. Conclusion: therefore, when the patellar tendon was used, there was greater extensor deficit and, when the semitendinosus/gracilis tendons were used, there was greater flexor deficit. PMID:27004173

  17. Biomechanical response to hamstring muscle strain injury.

    PubMed

    Schache, Anthony G; Wrigley, Tim V; Baker, Richard; Pandy, Marcus G

    2009-02-01

    Hamstring strains are common injuries, the majority of which occur whilst sprinting. An understanding of the biomechanical circumstances that cause the hamstrings to fail during sprinting is required to improve rehabilitation specificity. The aim of this study was to therefore investigate the biomechanics of an acute hamstring strain. Bilateral kinematic and ground reaction force data were captured from a sprinting athlete prior to and immediately following a right hamstring strain. Ten sprinting trials were collected: nine normal (pre-injury) trials and one injury trial. Joint angles, torques and powers as well as hamstring muscle-tendon unit lengths were computed using a three-dimensional biomechanical model. For the pre-injury trials, the right leg compared to the left displayed greater knee extension and hamstring muscle-tendon unit length during terminal swing, an increased vertical ground reaction force peak and loading rate, and an increased peak hip extensor torque and peak hip power generation during initial stance. For the injury trial, significant biomechanical reactions were evident in response to the right hamstring strain, most notably for the right leg during the proceeding swing phase after the onset of the injury. The earliest kinematic deviations in response to the injury were displayed by the trunk and pelvis during right mid-stance. Taking into account neuromuscular latencies and electromechanical delays, the stimulus for the injury must have occurred prior to right foot-strike during the swing phase of the sprinting cycle. It is concluded that hamstring strains during sprinting most likely occur during terminal swing as a consequence of an eccentric contraction.

  18. Structural mechanical properties of radiation-sterilized human Bone-Tendon-Bone grafts preserved by different methods.

    PubMed

    Gut, Grzegorz; Marowska, Joanna; Jastrzebska, Anna; Olender, Ewa; Kamiński, Artur

    2016-06-01

    To avoid the risk of infectious disease transmission from donor to recipient, allografts should be terminally sterilized. In the previous paper (Kaminski et al. in Cell Tissue Bank 10:215-219, 2009) we presented the effect of various methods of preservation (deep fresh freezing, glycerolization, lyophilization), followed by irradiation with different doses of electron beam (EB), on material (intrinsic) mechanical properties of human patellar tendons cut out as for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, obtained in failure tensile test. As structural mechanical properties are equally important to predict the behaviour of the graft as a whole functional unit, the purpose of the present paper was to show the results for failure load and elongation, obtained in the same experiment. Paired Bone-Tendon-Bone grafts (BTB) were prepared from cadaveric human patella tendons with both patellar and tibial attachments. They were preserved by deep freezing, glycerolization or lyophilization and subsequently EB-irradiated with the doses of 25, 35, 50 or 100 kGy (fresh-frozen grafts) or a single dose of 35 kGy (glycerolized and lyophilized grafts). Each experimental (irradiated) group was provided with control (non-irradiated), donor-matched group. The specimens from all groups were subjected to mechanical failure tensile test with the use of Instron system in order to measure their structural properties (failure load and elongation). All lyophilized grafts were rehydrated before mechanical testing. In our study we did not observe significant deterioration of structural mechanical properties of BTB grafts processed by fresh-freezing and then terminal sterilized with growing doses of EB up to 100 kGy. In contrast, BTB grafts processed by glycerolization or lyophilization and irradiated with 35 kGy showed significant decrease of failure load. Obtained results suggest that deep-frozen irradiated grafts retain their initial mechanical properties to an extent which does not

  19. Structural mechanical properties of radiation-sterilized human Bone-Tendon-Bone grafts preserved by different methods.

    PubMed

    Gut, Grzegorz; Marowska, Joanna; Jastrzebska, Anna; Olender, Ewa; Kamiński, Artur

    2016-06-01

    To avoid the risk of infectious disease transmission from donor to recipient, allografts should be terminally sterilized. In the previous paper (Kaminski et al. in Cell Tissue Bank 10:215-219, 2009) we presented the effect of various methods of preservation (deep fresh freezing, glycerolization, lyophilization), followed by irradiation with different doses of electron beam (EB), on material (intrinsic) mechanical properties of human patellar tendons cut out as for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, obtained in failure tensile test. As structural mechanical properties are equally important to predict the behaviour of the graft as a whole functional unit, the purpose of the present paper was to show the results for failure load and elongation, obtained in the same experiment. Paired Bone-Tendon-Bone grafts (BTB) were prepared from cadaveric human patella tendons with both patellar and tibial attachments. They were preserved by deep freezing, glycerolization or lyophilization and subsequently EB-irradiated with the doses of 25, 35, 50 or 100 kGy (fresh-frozen grafts) or a single dose of 35 kGy (glycerolized and lyophilized grafts). Each experimental (irradiated) group was provided with control (non-irradiated), donor-matched group. The specimens from all groups were subjected to mechanical failure tensile test with the use of Instron system in order to measure their structural properties (failure load and elongation). All lyophilized grafts were rehydrated before mechanical testing. In our study we did not observe significant deterioration of structural mechanical properties of BTB grafts processed by fresh-freezing and then terminal sterilized with growing doses of EB up to 100 kGy. In contrast, BTB grafts processed by glycerolization or lyophilization and irradiated with 35 kGy showed significant decrease of failure load. Obtained results suggest that deep-frozen irradiated grafts retain their initial mechanical properties to an extent which does not

  20. A modified arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament double-bundle reconstruction technique with autogenous quadriceps tendon graft: remnant-preserving technique.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Jae; Jo, Seung-Bae; Kim, Tai-Won; Chang, Ji-Hoon; Choi, Heon-Sik; Oh, Kyung-Soo

    2009-03-01

    Several techniques of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) double-bundle reconstruction have been introduced to improve the functional outcome and restore normal kinematics of the knee. Meanwhile, a remnant-preserving technique was developed to preserve the proprioception and to enhance the revascularization of the reconstructed ACL. We developed double-bundle ACL reconstruction technique using autogenous quadriceps tendon graft while preserving the remnant. With this technique, two femoral sockets and one tibial tunnel are made. To preserve the remnant of the ACL, the rotational direction of the reamer was set to counterclockwise just before perforation of the tibial tunnel. To pass the graft more easily without disturbance of the remnant, the graft passage was achieved through the tibial tunnel. We suggest that the remnant-preserving technique could be an effective alternative considering its mechanical stability as well as the proprioception and vascularization recovery in arthroscopic double-bundle ACL reconstruction.

  1. BIOMECHANICAL STUDY OF TRANSCORTICAL OR TRANSTRABECULAR BONE FIXATION OF PATELLAR TENDON GRAFT WITH BIOABSORBABLE PINS IN ACL RECONSTRUCTION IN SHEEP

    PubMed Central

    Albano, Mauro Batista; Borges, Paulo César; Namba, Mario Massatomo; da Silva, João Luiz Vieira; de Assis Pereira Filho, Francisco; Filho, Edmar Stieven; Matias, Jorge Eduardo Fouto

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the initial resistance of fixation using the Rigid Fix® system, and compare it with traditional fixation methods using metal interference screws; and to evaluate the resistance of the fixation with the rigid fix system when the rotational position of the bone block is altered in the interior of the femoral tunnel. Methods: forty ovine knee specimens (stifle joints) were submitted to anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACL) using a bone-tendon-bone graft. In twenty specimens, the Rigid Fix method was used; this group was subdivided into two groups: ten knees the pins transfixed only the spongious area of the bone block, and ten for fixation passing through the layer of cortical bone. In the twenty remaining specimens, the graft was fixed with 9mm metal interference screws. Results: comparison of the RIGIDFIX® method with the metal interference screw fixation method did not show any statistically significant differences in terms of maximum load and rigidity; also, there were no statistically significant differences when the rotational position of the bone block was altered inside the femoral tunnel. For these evaluations, a level of significance of p < 0.017 was considered. Conclusion: fixation of the bone-tendon-bone graft with 2 bioabsorbable pines, regardless of the rotational position inside the femoral tunnel, gave a comparable fixation in terms of initial resistance to the metal interference screw, in this experimental model. PMID:27027081

  2. Graft selection in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Miller, Suzanne L; Gladstone, James N

    2002-10-01

    Selecting the appropriate graft for ACL reconstruction depends on numerous factors including surgeon philosophy and experience, tissue availability (affected by anatomical anomalies or prior injury or surgery), and patient activity level and desires. Although the patella tendon autograft has the widest experience in the literature, and is probably the most commonly used graft source, this must be tempered with the higher reported incidences of potential morbidity and pitfalls associated with its use. The hamstring tendons are gaining increasing popularity, mostly due to reduced harvest morbidity and improved soft tissue fixation techniques, and many recent studies in the literature report equal results to BTB ACL reconstruction with respect to functional outcome and patient satisfaction. On the other hand, many of these studies report higher degrees of instrument (KT-100) tested laxity for hamstring reconstruction, and some have reported lower returns to preinjury levels of activity. One question that remains to be addressed is how closely objectively measured laxity tests correlate with subjectively assessed outcomes and ability to return to high levels of competitive sports. Allograft use, which decreased in popularity during the 1990s, appears to be undergoing a resurgence, with better sterilization processes and new graft sources (tibialis tendons), leading to increased availability and improved fixation techniques. The benefits of decreased surgical morbidity and easier rehabilitation must be weighed against the potential for greater failure of biologic incorporation, infection, and possibly slower return to activities. In our practice, for high-demand individuals (those playing cutting, pivoting, or jumping sports and skiing) BTB tends to be the graft of choice. For lower demand or older individuals, hamstring reconstructions will be performed. Allograft tissue will be used in older individuals (generally over 45 years old), those with signs of arthritis (and

  3. Graft selection in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Miller, Suzanne L; Gladstone, James N

    2002-10-01

    Selecting the appropriate graft for ACL reconstruction depends on numerous factors including surgeon philosophy and experience, tissue availability (affected by anatomical anomalies or prior injury or surgery), and patient activity level and desires. Although the patella tendon autograft has the widest experience in the literature, and is probably the most commonly used graft source, this must be tempered with the higher reported incidences of potential morbidity and pitfalls associated with its use. The hamstring tendons are gaining increasing popularity, mostly due to reduced harvest morbidity and improved soft tissue fixation techniques, and many recent studies in the literature report equal results to BTB ACL reconstruction with respect to functional outcome and patient satisfaction. On the other hand, many of these studies report higher degrees of instrument (KT-100) tested laxity for hamstring reconstruction, and some have reported lower returns to preinjury levels of activity. One question that remains to be addressed is how closely objectively measured laxity tests correlate with subjectively assessed outcomes and ability to return to high levels of competitive sports. Allograft use, which decreased in popularity during the 1990s, appears to be undergoing a resurgence, with better sterilization processes and new graft sources (tibialis tendons), leading to increased availability and improved fixation techniques. The benefits of decreased surgical morbidity and easier rehabilitation must be weighed against the potential for greater failure of biologic incorporation, infection, and possibly slower return to activities. In our practice, for high-demand individuals (those playing cutting, pivoting, or jumping sports and skiing) BTB tends to be the graft of choice. For lower demand or older individuals, hamstring reconstructions will be performed. Allograft tissue will be used in older individuals (generally over 45 years old), those with signs of arthritis (and

  4. Indian hedgehog signaling and the role of graft tension in tendon-to-bone healing: Evaluation in a rat ACL reconstruction model.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Andrew; Carballo, Camila; Ma, Richard; Wang, Hongsheng; Deng, Xianghua; Dahia, Chitra; Rodeo, Scott

    2016-04-01

    The structure and composition of the native enthesis is not recapitulated following tendon-to-bone repair. Indian Hedgehog (IHH) signaling has recently been shown to be important in enthesis development in a mouse model but no studies have evaluated IHH signaling in a healing model. Fourteen adult male rats underwent ACL reconstruction using a flexor tendon graft. Rats were assigned to two groups based on whether or not they received 0N or 10N of pre-tension of the graft. Specimens were evaluated at 3 and 6 weeks post-operatively using immunohistochemistry for three different protein markers of IHH signaling. Quantitative analysis of staining area and intensity using custom software demonstrated that IHH signaling was active in interface tissue formed at the healing tendon-bone interface. We also found increased staining area and intensity of IHH signaling proteins at 3 weeks in animals that received a pre-tensioned tendon graft. No significant differences were seen between the 3-week and 6-week time points. Our data suggests that the IHH signaling pathway is active during the tendon-bone healing process and appears to be mechanosensitive, as pre-tensioning of the graft at the time of surgery resulted in increased IHH signaling at three weeks. PMID:26447744

  5. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction best practice: A review of graft choice

    PubMed Central

    Shaerf, Daniel A; Pastides, Philip S; Sarraf, Khaled M; Willis-Owen, Charles A

    2014-01-01

    There is much literature about differing grafts used in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Much of this is of poor quality and of a low evidence base. We review and summarise the literature looking at the four main classes of grafts used in ACL reconstruction; bone-patella tendon-bone, hamstrings, allograft and synthetic grafts. Each graft has the evidence for its use reviewed and then compared, where possible, to the others. We conclude that although there is no clear “best” graft, there are clear differences between the differing graft choices. Surgeon’s need to be aware of the evidence behind these differences, in order to have appropriate discussions with their patients, so as to come to an informed choice of graft type to best suit each individual patient and their requirements. PMID:24649411

  6. Correlation between anthropometric data and length and thickness of the tendons of the semitendinosus and gracilis muscles used for grafts in reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament☆

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Rafael Noschang; Karam, Francisco Consoli; Schwanke, Roberto Luís; Millman, Rubens; Foletto, Zilmar Minetto; Schwanke, Carla Helena Augustin

    2016-01-01

    Objective Preoperative estimation of the length and diameter of the semitendinosus (ST) and gracilis (G) tendons can assist surgeons and allow them to have the opportunity to choose alternative grafts. The aim of this study was to investigate whether anthropometric measurements such as height, weight and body mass index (BMI) or the patient's age and sex have any correlation with the thickness and the length of ST and G tendons. Methods Data were gathered from 64 patients who underwent the surgical procedure of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using the tendons of the ST and G muscles as grafts, between June 2012 and August 2013. Variables such as age, sex, weight, height, body mass index (BMI) and length and diameter of the tendons of the ST and G muscles were analyzed. Results There was a positive correlation between the height and total diameter of the quadruple graft (r = 0.254; p = 0.043), total length of the ST tendon (r = 0.450; p < 0.01), diameter of the double ST (r = 0.270; p = 0.031), triple ST (r = 0.347; p = 0.005), length of G tendon (r = 0.249; p = 0.047) and diameter of the double-G (r = 0.258; p = 0.039). However, age (r = -0.015; p = 0.908), weight (r = 0.165; p = 0.193) and body mass index (r = 0.012; p = 0.926) showed no correlation. Conclusion Our results show that age, weight and BMI did not correlate with the diameter and length of the graft, while the height had a positive correlation with the total length of the flexor tendons and the diameter of the graft from the flexors (ST and G). PMID:27069886

  7. Anatomic All-Inside Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using Quadriceps Tendon Autograft.

    PubMed

    Crall, Timothy S; Gilmer, Brian B

    2015-12-01

    All-inside anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction has recently gained popularity, in part because of its bone-sparing socket preparation and reported lower pain levels after surgery. However, because this technique uses suture loops and cortical suspension buttons for graft fixation, it has mostly been limited to looped graft constructs (e.g., hamstring autograft, peroneus longus allograft). Quadriceps tendon autograft offers several advantages in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction but, until recently, has not been compatible with suture-loop and cortical suspensory fixation. We describe a technique that allows a relatively short (<75 mm) quadriceps tendon autograft (without bone block) to be used with established all-inside anatomic techniques. PMID:27284521

  8. Sports related hamstring strains--two cases with different etiologies and injury sites.

    PubMed

    Askling, C; Tengvar, M; Saartok, T; Thorstensson, A

    2000-10-01

    Hamstring strains are common injuries in sports. Knowledge about their etiology and localization is, however, limited. The two cases described here both had acute hamstring strains, but the etiologies were entirely different. The sprinter was injured when running at maximal speed, whereas the hamstring strain in the dancer occurred during slow stretching. Also the anatomical localizations of the injuries clearly differed. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed pathological changes in the distal semitendinosus muscle in the sprinter and the proximal tendon of the semimembranosus muscle in the dancer. Subjectively, both athletes severely underestimated the recovery time. These case observations suggest a possible link between etiology and localization of hamstring strains.

  9. Hydroxyapatite-doped polycaprolactone nanofiber membrane improves tendon-bone interface healing for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Han, Fei; Zhang, Peng; Sun, Yaying; Lin, Chao; Zhao, Peng; Chen, Jiwu

    2015-01-01

    Hamstring tendon autograft is a routine graft for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. However, ways of improving the healing between the tendon and bone is often overlooked in clinical practice. This issue can be addressed by using a biomimetic scaffold. Herein, a biomimetic nanofiber membrane of polycaprolactone/nanohydroxyapatite/collagen (PCL/nHAp/Col) is fabricated that mimics the composition of native bone tissue for promoting tendon-bone healing. This membrane has good cytocompatibility, allowing for osteoblast cell adhesion and growth and bone formation. As a result, MC3T3 cells reveal a higher mineralization level in PCL/nHAp/Col membrane compared with PCL membrane alone. Further in vivo studies in ACL reconstruction in a rabbit model shows that PCL/nHAp/Col-wrapped tendon may afford superior tissue integration to nonwrapped tendon in the interface between the tendon and host bone as well as improved mechanical strength. This study shows that PCL/nHAp/Col nanofiber membrane wrapping of autologous tendon is effective for improving tendon healing with host bone in ACL reconstruction.

  10. Hydroxyapatite-doped polycaprolactone nanofiber membrane improves tendon-bone interface healing for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Han, Fei; Zhang, Peng; Sun, Yaying; Lin, Chao; Zhao, Peng; Chen, Jiwu

    2015-01-01

    Hamstring tendon autograft is a routine graft for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. However, ways of improving the healing between the tendon and bone is often overlooked in clinical practice. This issue can be addressed by using a biomimetic scaffold. Herein, a biomimetic nanofiber membrane of polycaprolactone/nanohydroxyapatite/collagen (PCL/nHAp/Col) is fabricated that mimics the composition of native bone tissue for promoting tendon-bone healing. This membrane has good cytocompatibility, allowing for osteoblast cell adhesion and growth and bone formation. As a result, MC3T3 cells reveal a higher mineralization level in PCL/nHAp/Col membrane compared with PCL membrane alone. Further in vivo studies in ACL reconstruction in a rabbit model shows that PCL/nHAp/Col-wrapped tendon may afford superior tissue integration to nonwrapped tendon in the interface between the tendon and host bone as well as improved mechanical strength. This study shows that PCL/nHAp/Col nanofiber membrane wrapping of autologous tendon is effective for improving tendon healing with host bone in ACL reconstruction. PMID:26677323

  11. Minimally invasive reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament using quadriceps tendon.

    PubMed

    Fink, Christian; Veselko, Matjaz; Herbort, Mirco; Hoser, Christian

    2014-06-01

    Reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) for the treatment of patellar instability has received increased attention over the past few years. Most operative techniques use hamstring grafts fixed with bone tunnels and/or anchors on the patella. Despite good clinical results using these techniques, complications such as implant breakage, patellar fractures through bone tunnels, and loss of knee motion have occurred. We present a minimally invasive technique for MPFL reconstruction using a strip of quadriceps tendon. With the use of specially designed instruments, the graft is harvested through a 3-cm transverse incision at the proximal pole of the patella. The tendon strip is then dissected distally on the patella, left attached, and diverged 90° medially underneath the medial prepatellar tissue. The graft is fixed on the femur in 20° of knee flexion in a bone tunnel with a bioabsorbable interference screw (adults) or a bone anchor (children). We think that this technique presents a valuable alternative to common hamstring techniques for primary MPFL reconstruction in children and adults, as well as for MPFL revision surgery. PMID:25126496

  12. Reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament using autologous graft from quadriceps tendon to treat recurrent patellar dislocation☆

    PubMed Central

    Calapodopulos, Constantino Jorge; Nogueira, Marcelo Corvino; Eustáquio, José Martins Juliano; Calapodopulos Júnior, Constantino Jorge; Rodrigues, Oreston Alves

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of the surgical technique using the quadriceps tendon as a graft in static reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament. Methods This was a prospective case series study in which the participants were 22 patients with a diagnosis of recurrent patellar dislocation without any other anatomical alterations that required surgical treatment. The functional results from the technique were evaluated using clinical data and the Lysholm questionnaire, one year after the operation. Results It was observed that the patients were predominantly female (86%) and under 21 years of age (73%), just like in the literature. At the first annual return after the surgery, there was no significant pain on medium efforts, no loss of range of motion and a positive apprehension test. According to the questionnaire used, the results were graded as good. The patients who reported having severe pain on greater effort were involved in employment-related legal disputes. Conclusion This technique showed low morbidity and good functional results over the short term. PMID:27069888

  13. Treatment of Rockwood type III acromioclavicular joint dislocation using autogenous semitendinosus tendon graft and endobutton technique

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Gang; Peng, Chao-An; Sun, Hua-Bin; Xiao, Jing; Zhu, Kang

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic effect of autogenous semitendinosus graft and endobutton technique, and compare with hook plate in treatment of Rockwood type III acromioclavicular (AC) joint dislocation. Methods From April 2012 to April 2013, we treated 46 patients with Rockwood type III AC joint dislocation. Patients were randomly divided into two groups: Group A was treated using a hook plate and Group B with autogenous semitendinosus graft and endobutton technique. All participants were followed up for 12 months. Radiographic examinations were performed every 2 months postoperatively, and clinical evaluation was performed using the Constant–Murley score at the last follow-up. Results Results indicated that patients in Group B showed higher mean scores (90.3±5.4) than Group A (80.4±11.5) in terms of Constant–Murley score (P=0.001). Group B patients scored higher in terms of pain (P=0.002), activities (P=0.02), range of motion (P<0.001), and strength (P=0.004). In Group A, moderate pain was reported by 2 (8.7%) and mild pain by 8 (34.8%) patients. Mild pain was reported by 1 (4.3%) patient in Group B. All patients in Group B maintained complete reduction, while 2 (8.7%) patients in Group A experienced partial reduction loss. Two patients (8.7%) encountered acromial osteolysis on latest radiographs, with moderate shoulder pain and limited range of motion. Conclusion Autogenous semitendinosus graft and endobutton technique showed better results compared with the hook plate method and exhibited advantages of fewer complications such as permanent pain and acromial osteolysis. PMID:26811685

  14. Electromechanical delay of the knee extensor muscles is not altered after harvesting the patellar tendon as a graft for ACL reconstruction: implications for sports performance.

    PubMed

    Georgoulis, A D; Ristanis, S; Papadonikolakis, A; Tsepis, E; Moebius, U; Moraiti, C; Stergiou, N

    2005-09-01

    Although the scar tissue, which heals the donor site defect, has different elasticity from the neighbouring patellar tissue, it remains unclear if this scar tissue can lead to the changes of the electromechanical delay (EMD) of the knee extensor muscles. If such changes do exist, they can possibly affect both the utilization of the stored energy in the series elastic component, as well as the optimal performance of the knee joint movement. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of harvesting the patellar tendon during anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction and the associated patellar tendon scar tissue development on the EMD of the rectus femoris (RF) and vastus medialis (VM) muscles. Seventeen patients who underwent an ACL reconstruction using the medial third of the patellar tendon were divided in two groups based upon their post-operative time interval. Maximal voluntary contraction from the knee extensors, surface EMG activity, and ultrasonographic measurements of the patellar tendon cross-section area were obtained from both knees. Our results revealed that no significant changes for the maximal voluntary contraction of the knee extensors and for the EMD of the RF and the VM muscles due to patellar scar tissue development after harvesting the tendon for ACL reconstruction. The EMD, as a component of the stretch reflex, is important for the utilization of the stored energy in the series elastic component and thus, optimal sports performance. However, from our results, it can be implied that the ACL reconstruction using a patellar tendon graft would not impair sports performance as far as EMD is concerned.

  15. Hamstring injuries: prevention and treatment—an update

    PubMed Central

    Brukner, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Despite increased knowledge of hamstring muscle injuries, the incidence has not diminished. We now know that not all hamstring injuries are the same and that certain types of injuries require prolonged rehabilitation and return to play. The slow stretch type of injury and injuries involving the central tendon both require longer times to return to play. A number of factors have been proposed as being indicators of time taken to return to play, but the evidence for these is conflicting. Recurrence rates remain high and it is now thought that strength deficits may be an important factor. Strengthening exercise should be performed with the hamstrings in a lengthened position. There is conflicting evidence regarding the efficacy of platelet-rich plasma injection in the treatment of hamstring injuries so at this stage we cannot advise their use. Various tests have been proposed as predictors of hamstring injury and the use of the Nordboard is an interesting addition to the testing process. Prevention of these injuries is the ultimate aim and there is increasing evidence that Nordic hamstring exercises are effective in reducing the incidence. PMID:26105015

  16. Muscle and intensity based hamstring exercise classification in elite female track and field athletes: implications for exercise selection during rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Tsaklis, Panagiotis; Malliaropoulos, Nikos; Mendiguchia, Jurdan; Korakakis, Vasileios; Tsapralis, Kyriakos; Pyne, Debasish; Malliaras, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background Hamstring injuries are common in many sports, including track and field. Strains occur in different parts of the hamstring muscle but very little is known about whether common hamstring loading exercises specifically load different hamstring components. The purpose of this study was to investigate muscle activation of different components of the hamstring muscle during common hamstring loading exercises. Methods Twenty elite female track and field athletes were recruited into this study, which had a single-sample, repeated-measures design. Each athlete performed ten hamstring loading exercises, and an electromyogram (EMG) was recorded from the biceps femoris and semitendinosus components of the hamstring. Hamstring EMG during maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) was used to normalize the mean data across ten repetitions of each exercise. An electrogoniometer synchronized to the EMG was used to determine whether peak EMG activity occurred during muscle-tendon unit lengthening, shortening, or no change in length. Mean EMG values were compared between the two recording sites for each exercise using the Student’s t-test. Results The lunge, dead lift, and kettle swings were low intensity (<50% MVIC) and all showed higher EMG activity for semitendinosus than for biceps femoris. Bridge was low but approaching medium intensity, and the TRX, hamstring bridge, and hamstring curl were all medium intensity exercises (≥50% or <80% MVIC). The Nordic, fitball, and slide leg exercises were all high intensity exercises. Only the fitball exercise showed higher EMG activity in the biceps femoris compared with the semitendinosus. Only lunge and kettle swings showed peak EMG in the muscle-tendon unit lengthening phase and both these exercises involved faster speed. Conclusion Some exercises selectively activated the lateral and medial distal hamstrings. Low, medium, and high intensity exercises were demonstrated. This information enables the clinician, strength

  17. Preparation and characterization of antiadhesion barrier film from hyaluronic acid-grafted electrospun poly(caprolactone) nanofibrous membranes for prevention of flexor tendon postoperative peritendinous adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shih-Hsien; Chen, Chih-Hao; Shalumon, K T; Chen, Jyh-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Peritendinous adhesion is one of the common complications encountered after tendon injury and subsequent surgery, and it can be minimized by introducing a physical barrier between the injured site and the surrounding tissue. An electrospun hyaluronic acid-grafted poly(caprolactone) (PCL-g-HA) nanofibrous membrane (NFM) is proposed as an alternative to current antiadhesion barrier films. HA is covalently grafted to surface-aminolyzed PCL nanofibers, using carbodiimide as the coupling agent. Pristine PCL and PCL-g-HA NFMs were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and mechanical testing. In vitro cell culture with fibroblasts showed that PCL-g-HA NFMs reduced cellular adhesion on the membrane surface while maintaining cell proliferation. Animal experiments using a rabbit flexor digitorum profundus tendon model confirmed the efficacy of PCL-g-HA in reducing peritendinous adhesion, based on gross observation, histology, joint flexion-angle measurements, gliding tests, and biomechanical evaluation. PMID:25187711

  18. Effect of transosseous application of low-intensity ultrasound at the tendon graft-bone interface healing: gene expression and histological analysis in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Papatheodorou, Loukia K; Malizos, Konstantinos N; Poultsides, Lazaros A; Hantes, Michael E; Grafanaki, Katerina; Giannouli, Stamatina; Ioannou, Maria G; Koukoulis, Georgios K; Protopappas, Vasilios C; Fotiadis, Dimitrios I; Stathopoulos, Constantinos

    2009-04-01

    The present study investigates the effect of transosseous low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LiUS) on the healing at tendon graft-bone interface, in molecular and histological level. The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in both knees of 52 New Zealand White rabbits was excised and replaced with the long digital extensor. A custom-made ultrasound transducer was implanted onto the medial tibial condyle, adjacent to the surface of the bone tunnel at both knees of the rabbits. The LiUS-treated right knees received 200-mus bursts of 1 MHz sine waves at a pulse repetition rate of 1 kHz and with 30 mW/cm(2) spatial-average temporal-average intensity for 20 min daily (study group), while the left knee received no LiUS (control group). Thirty-six rabbits were used to perform semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis from both study and control groups for transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1), biglycan and collagen I. RT-PCR products showed statistically significant upregulation of biglycan and collagen I gene expression in the study group, while TGF-beta1 gene expression exhibited a bimodal profile. Histological examination performed in 16 rabbits from both groups supported the findings of the molecular analysis, indicating a faster healing rate and a more efficient ligamentization process after ultrasound treatment. These findings suggest that transosseous application of LiUS enhances the healing rate of the tendon graft-bone interface, possibly by affecting the expression levels of genes significant for the tendon to bone healing process.

  19. [The ACL tear from the pre-operative analysis to a 2-year follow-up, influence of the graft choice on the subjective and objective evaluation].

    PubMed

    Dejour, D; Potel, J-F; Gaudot, F; Panisset, J-C; Condouret, J

    2008-12-01

    This study is a synthesis of three series. The first study was prospective on 418 patients with an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear (group I). Two population of ACL ruptures were identified. One population with a postero-lateral bundle preserved in 16%, the mean medial anterior tibial translation side to side was 4.97 mm, the Lachman test was delayed in 40% with no or glide pivot shift in 73%. The second population with a complete ACL tear had a mean medial anterior tibial translation side to side of 7.93 mm, the Lachman test was soft in 98% with gross pivot shift in 80%. The second study was a retrospective study on 258 patients (group II) at 26 months follow-up, it correlated the impact of the type of graft on the clinical objective and subjective results. Twenty-eight percent had anterior knee pain, 33% for the patellar tendon and 25% for the hamstrings, the subjective IKDC was significantly lower for the painful knees, and 68% of the patellar tendon had a hypoesthesia and only 32% for the hamstrings. The ability to walk on the knee was 68% for the hamstrings and 35% for the patellar tendon. The third study was retrospective on 127 patients, 24 months after ACL reconstruction (group III), all were tested on a isokinetic machine for the extensor, the flexor and the internal rotator. In the total population, a 10% extensor and flexor deficit and a 5% rotator deficit was noted. A significant difference between patellar tendon and hamstrings in terms of muscular recovery was found. It pointed out that a more specific rehabilitation should be done on the hamstring group. The muscular recovery was correlated to the highest subjective score. This study allowed the surgeon to be more specific in the ACL tear definition, to adapt the graft choice to the type of sport activity but also to the type of work the patient does and finally to modify the rehabilitation protocol for the hamstring technique.

  20. Biceps femoris tendon injuries sustained while playing hockey

    PubMed Central

    Watura, Christopher; Harries, William

    2011-01-01

    A 42-year-old female nurse presented in March 2008 with a left proximal hamstring tendon injury sustained while playing hockey. At surgery, the proximal biceps femoris tendon and semitendonosus were found to be ruptured and were repaired. The patient made a good recovery but sustained a further hockey injury in January 2010 involving a complete tear and rupture of the biceps femoris tendon distally. This was managed conservatively and the patient was able to return to playing hockey 10 months later. Biceps femoris tendon injuries have been reported in sport but this is the first documented case of the injury occurring while playing hockey and is also the first reported case of a biceps tendon rupture proximally (hamstring tendon) followed by distal biceps femoris rupture at the knee in the same leg. PMID:22715185

  1. Tendon repair

    MedlinePlus

    Repair of tendon ... Tendon repair can be performed using: Local anesthesia (the immediate area of the surgery is pain-free) ... a cut on the skin over the injured tendon. The damaged or torn ends of the tendon ...

  2. [Quadriceps and patellar tendon ruptures].

    PubMed

    Grim, C; Lorbach, O; Engelhardt, M

    2010-12-01

    Ruptures of the quadriceps or patellar tendon are uncommon but extremely relevant injuries. Early diagnosis and surgical treatment with a stable suture construction are mandatory for a good postoperative clinical outcome. The standard methods of repair for quadriceps and patellar tendon injuries include the placement of suture loops through transpatellar tunnels. Reinforcement with either a wire cerclage or a PDS cord is used in patellar tendon repair. The PDS cord can also be applied as augmentation in quadriceps tendon repair. In secondary patellar tendon repair an autologous semitendinosus graft can be used. For chronic quadriceps tendon defects a V-shaped tendon flap with a distal footing is recommended. The different methods of repair should lead to early functional postoperative treatment. The clinical outcome after surgical treatment of patellar and quadriceps tendon ruptures is mainly good.

  3. PLA-grafting of collagen chains leading to a biomaterial with mechanical performances useful in tendon regeneration.

    PubMed

    Bellini, Davide; Cencetti, Claudia; Sacchetta, Anna Cristina; Battista, Angela Maria; Martinelli, Andrea; Mazzucco, Laura; Scotto D'Abusco, Anna; Matricardi, Pietro

    2016-12-01

    With the aim to obtain a scaffold with improved mechanical properties with respect to collagen for tendon augmentation and regeneration, a novel collagen-based material was prepared via heterogeneous phase derivatization of type I collagen sponges using polylactic acid. Compared to the untreated collagen, the functionalized sponge (Coll-PLA) was characterized by higher tensile properties and lower swelling capability; the degradation rate of Coll-PLA, in the presence of collagenase, was lower than that of the untreated collagen sponge. These results are related to an increased hydrophobic character of the collagen matrix due to the presence of PLA chains. In vitro tests, performed with human primary fibroblasts, showed that cell adhesion and proliferation rate on Coll-PLA were comparable to those obtained with the non-functionalized collagen. These findings suggest that the new biomaterial could be suitable as scaffold in tendon augmentation and regeneration. PMID:27498425

  4. Runx2-Modified Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Promote Tendon Graft Integration in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xin; Ma, Yong; Fu, Xin; Liu, Qiang; Shao, Zhenxing; Dai, Linghui; Pi, Yanbin; Hu, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Jiying; Duan, Xiaoning; Chen, Wenqing; Chen, Ping; Zhou, Chunyan; Ao, Yingfang

    2016-01-01

    Runx2 is a powerful osteo-inductive factor and adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) are multipotent. However, it is unknown whether Runx2-overexpressing ADSCs (Runx2-ADSCs) could promote anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. We evaluated the effect of Runx2-ADSCs on ACL reconstruction in vitro and in vivo. mRNA expressions of osteocalcin (OCN), bone sialoprotein (BSP) and collagen I (COLI) increased over time in Runx2-ADSCs. Runx2 overexpression inhibited LPL and PPARγ mRNA expressions. Runx2 induced alkaline phosphatase activity markedly. In nude mice injected with Runx2-ADSCs, promoted bone formation was detected by X-rays 8 weeks after injection. The healing of tendon-to-bone in a rabbit model of ACL reconstruction treated with Runx2-ADSCs, fibrin glue only and an RNAi targeting Runx2, was evaluated with CT 3D reconstruction, histological analysis and biomechanical methods. CT showed a greater degree of new bone formation around the bone tunnel in the group treated with Runx2-ADSCs compared with the fibrin glue group and RNAi Runx2 group. Histology showed that treatment with Runx2-ADSCs led to a rapid and significant increase at the tendon-to-bone compared with the control groups. Biomechanical tests demonstrated higher tendon pullout strength in the Runx2-ADSCs group at early time points. The healing of the attachment in ACL reconstruction was enhanced by Runx2-ADSCs. PMID:26743583

  5. Use of a strontium-enriched calcium phosphate cement in accelerating the healing of soft-tissue tendon graft within the bone tunnel in a rabbit model of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kuang, G M; Yau, W P; Lu, W W; Chiu, K Y

    2013-07-01

    We investigated whether strontium-enriched calcium phosphate cement (Sr-CPC)-treated soft-tissue tendon graft results in accelerated healing within the bone tunnel in reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). A total of 30 single-bundle ACL reconstructions using tendo Achillis allograft were performed in 15 rabbits. The graft on the tested limb was treated with Sr-CPC, whereas that on the contralateral limb was untreated and served as a control. At timepoints three, six, nine, 12 and 24 weeks after surgery, three animals were killed for histological examination. At six weeks, the graft-bone interface in the control group was filled in with fibrovascular tissue. However, the gap in the Sr-CPC group had already been completely filled in with new bone, and there was evidence of the early formation of Sharpey fibres. At 24 weeks, remodelling into a normal ACL-bone-like insertion was found in the Sr-CPC group. Coating of Sr-CPC on soft tissue tendon allograft leads to accelerated graft healing within the bone tunnel in a rabbit model of ACL reconstruction using Achilles tendon allograft.

  6. Comparison of arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction by bone-patellar tendon-bone graft with or without using interferential screw in general population.

    PubMed

    Arifeen, K N; Chowdhury, A Z; Sakeb, N; Joarder, A I; Salek, A K; Selimullah, A M

    2015-01-01

    Rupture of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) is common, resulting reduced quality of life, increasing the meniscal injury risk, knee instability and early degenerative joint disease. Bone-Patellar Tendon-Bone (BPTB) became the gold standard surgery where conservative management failed. Adding interferential screw provides rigid fixation which is important for early accelerated rehabilitation program in athletes but we have carried out this prospective interventional study in Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU) and our private settings from January 2007 to December 2011 to assess whether interferential screws provide any clinical and functional advantage in general population. Sixty six male patients of 21-40 years age, with ACL deficient knees were reconstructed with BPTB graft where 40 cases were augmented by interferential screws and 26 cases without and followed up for minimum 2 years. The clinical and functional outcome (by Lysholm Knee Scoring), post-operative knee stability (by clinical tests) and complications were assessed and recorded. There was significant (p<0.05, paired 't' test) improvement of knee function (limp, walking, stair climbing, squatting, thigh atrophy) in both groups but no significant difference between them (p>0.05, chi squared test) regarding clinical, functional outcome and knee stability. The complications were insignificant (p>0.05, chi squared test) in both groups but there were few cases of screw related complications with augmentation and pronounced anterior knee laxity without it. So, ACL reconstruction by BPTB grafts with or without augmentation results consistent and comparable outcome in general population. PMID:25725669

  7. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of semitendinosus tendon in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: Does this have an effect on graft choice?

    PubMed Central

    Cobanoglu, Mutlu; Ozgezmez, Ferit Tufan; Omurlu, Imran Kurt; Ozkan, Ilhan; Savk, Sevki Oner; Cullu, Emre

    2016-01-01

    Background: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction with ST autograft is sometimes unsuccessful because of harvested thin graft. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be a useful tool to evaluate the thickness of the graft. This study is performed to evaluate whether there is any correlation between diameters and cross-sectional area (CSA) of the semitendinosus tendon (ST) on the preoperative magnetic MRI and the diameter of the 4-stranded ST autograft in ACL reconstruction. Materials and Methods: Seventy patients who underwent single-bundle ACL reconstruction with 4-stranded ST for full-thickness ACL ruptures were included in this study. Anteroposterior (AP) and mediolateral (ML) diameters of ST at the levels of the joint line (JL) and femoral physeal line (PL), and also CSA at these levels were measured on T2-weighted fat-suppressed MRI examinations. The data obtained were compared with intraoperatively measured diameters of 4-stranded ST autograft. Correlations between variables were evaluated using Spearman's rho. Receiver operating characteristic and area under the curve statistics were used to evaluate the cut-off value for the correlation between 4-stranded ST graft diameter of 8 mm and CSA (mm2) on MRI. Results: On MRI measurements, no correlation was found between AP diameters at the level of the JL and 4-stranded ST diameter (P = 0.180). However, correlations were found between diameter of 4-stranded ST and ML diameter at the level of JL (P = 0.003) and PL (P = 0.002), AP diameter at the level of the PL (P = 0.009), CSA at the level of the JL (P < 0.001) and at the level of PL (P < 0.001). Correlation between the diameter of 4-stranded ST and CSA at both levels was more significant than that between AP-ML diameters of ST and diameter of autograft. The cut-off value for the 8 mm diameter CSA of 4-stranded ST was 5.9 mm2 at the JL and 8.99 mm2 at the PL. Conclusion: Preoperative MRI evaluation of CSA at the JL of the ST is a reliable parameter to

  8. Simultaneous reconstruction of quadriceps tendon rupture after TKA and neglected Achilles tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong Seuk; Min, Byoung-Hyun; Han, Kyeong-Jin; Cho, Jae Ho; Han, Seung Hwan; Lee, Doo-Hyung; Oh, Kyung Soo

    2010-05-12

    We report a case of simultaneous reconstruction of a quadriceps tendon rupture after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and neglected Achilles tendon rupture, which occurred before TKA with an ipsilateral hamstring autograft. A 64-year-old woman presented with persistent right knee pain. She also had right heel pain and had received multiple steroid injections at the knee joint and heel. On examination, she showed osteoarthritis in the medial and lateral compartments of the knee joint and an Achilles tendon rupture in the ipsilateral limb. There was skin dimpling and the proximal portion of tendon was migrated. We performed TKA, and the postoperative course was satisfactory. She returned 3 months postoperatively, however, with skin dimpling around the suprapatellar area and weakness of knee extension. Her ankle symptoms were also aggravated because she could not use the knee joint freely. We performed simultaneous reconstruction of the quadriceps tendon and the Achilles tendon using an ipsilateral hamstring autograft.Hamstring autograft offers a good alternative treatment option for rupture repair, particularly with concommitant ruptures of multiple sites when primary repair is not possible or the viability of repaired tissue is poor.

  9. Elastography Study of Hamstring Behaviors during Passive Stretching

    PubMed Central

    Le Sant, Guillaume; Ates, Filiz; Brasseur, Jean-Louis; Nordez, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The mechanical properties of hamstring muscles are usually inferred from global passive torque/angle relationships, in combination with adjoining tissues crossing the joint investigated. Shear modulus measurement provides an estimate of changes in muscle-tendon stiffness and passive tension. This study aimed to assess the passive individual behavior of each hamstring muscle in different stretching positions using shear wave elastography. Methods/Results The muscle shear modulus of each hamstring muscle was measured during a standardized slow passive knee extension (PKE, 80% of maximal range of motion) on eighteen healthy male volunteers. Firstly, we assessed the reliability of the measurements. Results were good for semitendinosus (ST, CV: 8.9%-13.4%), semimembranosus (SM, CV: 10.3%-11.2%) and biceps femoris long-head (BF-lh, CV: 8.6%-13.3%), but not for biceps femoris short-head (BF-sh, CV: 20.3%-44.9%). Secondly, we investigated each reliable muscle in three stretch positions: 70°, 90° and 110° of hip flexion. The results showed different values of shear modulus for the same amount of perceived stretch, with the highest measurements in the high-flexed hip situation. Moreover, individual muscles displayed different values, with values increasing or BF-lh, SM and ST, respectively. The inter-subject variability was 35.3% for ST, 27.4% for SM and 30.2% for BF-lh. Conclusion This study showed that the hip needs to be high-flexed to efficiently tension the hamstrings, and reports a higher muscle-tendon stress tolerance at 110° of hip angle. In addition muscles have different passive behaviors, and future works will clarify if it can be linked with rate of injury. PMID:26418862

  10. Effects of Prior Hamstring Strain Injury on Strength, Flexibility, and Running Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Silder, Amy; Thelen, Darryl G.; Heiderscheit, Bryan C.

    2010-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown evidence of residual scar tissue at the musculotendon junction following an acute hamstring strain injury, which could influence re-injury risk. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether bilateral differences in strength, neuromuscular patterns, and musculotendon kinematics during sprinting are present in individuals with a history of unilateral hamstring injury, and whether such differences are linked to the presence of scar tissue. Methods Eighteen subjects with a previous hamstring injury (>5 months prior) participated in a magnetic resonance (MR) imaging exam, isokinetic strength testing, and a biomechanical assessment of treadmill sprinting. Bilateral comparisons were made for peak knee flexion torque, angle of peak torque, and hamstrings:quadriceps strength ratio during strength testing, and muscle activations and peak hamstring stretch during sprinting. MR images were used to measure the volumes of the proximal tendon/aponeurois of the biceps femoris, with asymmetries considered indicative of residual scar tissue. Findings A significantly enlarged proximal biceps femoris tendon volume was measured on the side of prior injury. However, no significant differences between the previously injured and uninjured limbs were found in strength measures, peak hamstring stretch, or muscle activation patterns. Further, the degree of asymmetry in tendon volume was not correlated to any of the functional measures. Interpretation The results of this study indicate that injury-induced changes in morphology do not seem discernable from strength measures, running kinematics, or muscle activity patterns. Further research is warranted to ascertain whether residual scarring alters localized musculotendon tissue mechanics in a way that may contribute to the high rates of muscle re-injury that are observed clinically. PMID:20621753

  11. Tendonitis (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... tendon. It can occur as a result of injury, overuse, or with aging as the tendon loses elasticity. Any action that places prolonged repetitive strain on the forearm muscles can cause tendonitis. The ...

  12. Secure fixation of femoral bone plug with a suspensory button in anatomical anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with bone-patellar tendon-bone graft

    PubMed Central

    TAKETOMI, SHUJI; INUI, HIROSHI; NAKAMURA, KENSUKE; YAMAGAMI, RYOTA; TAHARA, KEITARO; SANADA, TAKAKI; MASUDA, HIRONARI; TANAKA, SAKAE; NAKAGAWA, TAKUMI

    2015-01-01

    Purpose the efficacy and safety of using a suspensory button for femoral fixation in anatomical anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction with bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) graft have not been established. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate bone plug integration onto the femoral socket and migration of the bone plug and the EndoButton (EB) (Smith & Nephew, Andover, MA, USA) after rectangular tunnel ACL reconstruction with BPTB autograft. Methods thirty-four patients who underwent anatomical rectangular ACL reconstruction with BPTB graft using EB for femoral fixation and in whom three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) was performed one week and one year after surgery were included in this study. Bone plug integration onto the femoral socket, bone plug migration, soft tissue interposition, EB migration and EB rotation were evaluated on 3D CT. The clinical outcome was also assessed and correlated with the imaging outcomes. Results the bone plug was integrated onto the femoral socket in all cases. The incidence of bone plug migration, soft tissue interposition, EB migration and EB rotation was 15, 15, 9 and 56%, respectively. No significant association was observed between the imaging outcomes. The postoperative mean Lysholm score was 97.1 ± 5.0 points. The postoperative side-to-side difference, evaluated using a KT-2000 arthrometer, averaged 0.5 ± 1.3 mm. There were no complications associated with EB use. Imaging outcomes did not affect the postoperative KT side-to-side difference. Conclusions the EB is considered a reliable device for femoral fixation in anatomical rectangular tunnel ACL reconstruction with BPTB autograft. Level of evidence Level IV, therapeutic case series. PMID:26889465

  13. Allogeneic Versus Autologous Derived Cell Sources for Use in Engineered Bone-Ligament-Bone Grafts in Sheep Anterior Cruciate Ligament Repair

    PubMed Central

    Mahalingam, Vasudevan D.; Behbahani-Nejad, Nilofar; Horine, Storm V.; Olsen, Tyler J.; Smietana, Michael J.; Wojtys, Edward M.; Wellik, Deneen M.; Arruda, Ellen M.

    2015-01-01

    The use of autografts versus allografts for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is controversial. The current popular options for ACL reconstruction are patellar tendon or hamstring autografts, yet advances in allograft technologies have made allogeneic grafts a favorable option for repair tissue. Despite this, the mismatched biomechanical properties and risk of osteoarthritis resulting from the current graft technologies have prompted the investigation of new tissue sources for ACL reconstruction. Previous work by our lab has demonstrated that tissue-engineered bone-ligament-bone (BLB) constructs generated from an allogeneic cell source develop structural and functional properties similar to those of native ACL and vascular and neural structures that exceed those of autologous patellar tendon grafts. In this study, we investigated the effectiveness of our tissue-engineered ligament constructs fabricated from autologous versus allogeneic cell sources. Our preliminary results demonstrate that 6 months postimplantation, our tissue-engineered auto- and allogeneic BLB grafts show similar histological and mechanical outcomes indicating that the autologous grafts are a viable option for ACL reconstruction. These data indicate that our tissue-engineered autologous ligament graft could be used in clinical situations where immune rejection and disease transmission may preclude allograft use. PMID:25397361

  14. Allogeneic versus autologous derived cell sources for use in engineered bone-ligament-bone grafts in sheep anterior cruciate ligament repair.

    PubMed

    Mahalingam, Vasudevan D; Behbahani-Nejad, Nilofar; Horine, Storm V; Olsen, Tyler J; Smietana, Michael J; Wojtys, Edward M; Wellik, Deneen M; Arruda, Ellen M; Larkin, Lisa M

    2015-03-01

    The use of autografts versus allografts for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is controversial. The current popular options for ACL reconstruction are patellar tendon or hamstring autografts, yet advances in allograft technologies have made allogeneic grafts a favorable option for repair tissue. Despite this, the mismatched biomechanical properties and risk of osteoarthritis resulting from the current graft technologies have prompted the investigation of new tissue sources for ACL reconstruction. Previous work by our lab has demonstrated that tissue-engineered bone-ligament-bone (BLB) constructs generated from an allogeneic cell source develop structural and functional properties similar to those of native ACL and vascular and neural structures that exceed those of autologous patellar tendon grafts. In this study, we investigated the effectiveness of our tissue-engineered ligament constructs fabricated from autologous versus allogeneic cell sources. Our preliminary results demonstrate that 6 months postimplantation, our tissue-engineered auto- and allogeneic BLB grafts show similar histological and mechanical outcomes indicating that the autologous grafts are a viable option for ACL reconstruction. These data indicate that our tissue-engineered autologous ligament graft could be used in clinical situations where immune rejection and disease transmission may preclude allograft use.

  15. MR OBSERVATIONS OF LONG-TERM MUSCULOTENDON REMODELING FOLLOWING A HAMSTRING STRAIN INJURY

    PubMed Central

    Silder, Amy; Heiderscheit, Bryan; Thelen, Darryl G.; Enright, Timothy; Tuite, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to use MR imaging to investigate long-term changes in muscle and tendon morphology following a hamstring strain injury. Materials and Methods MR images were obtained from 14 athletes who sustained a clinically diagnosed grade I/II hamstring strain injury between 5-23 months prior as well as five healthy controls. Qualitative bilateral comparisons were used to assess the presence of fatty infiltration and changes in morphology that may have arisen as a result of the previous injury. Hamstring muscle and tendon/scar volumes were quantified in both limbs for the biceps femoris long head (BFLH), biceps femoris short head (BFSH), the proximal semimembranosus tendon (PSMT) and the proximal conjoint biceps femoris and semitendinosus tendon (PBFT). Differences in muscle and tendon volume between limbs were statistically compared between the previously injured and healthy control subjects. Results Increased low-intensity signal was present along the musculotendon junction adjacent to the site of presumed prior injury for 11 of the 14 subjects, suggestive of persistent scar tissue. The thirteen subjects with biceps femoris injuries displayed a significant decrease in BFLH volume (p<0.01), often accompanied by an increase in BFSH volume. Two of these subjects also presented with fatty infiltration within the previously injured BFLH. Conclusion The results of this study provide evidence of long-term musculotendon remodeling following a hamstring strain injury. Additionally, many athletes are likely returning to sport with residual atrophy of the BFLH and/or hypertrophy of the BFSH. It is possible that long-term changes in musculotendon structure following injury alters contraction mechanics during functional movement, such as running, and may contribute to re-injury risk. PMID:18649077

  16. Arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament surgery: results of autogenous patellar tendon graft versus the Leeds-Keio synthetic graft five year follow-up of a prospective randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Ghalayini, S R A; Helm, A T; Bonshahi, A Y; Lavender, A; Johnson, D S; Smith, R B

    2010-10-01

    We conducted a prospective, randomised controlled trial comparing anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using middle third patellar tendon graft (PT) to synthetic Leeds-Keio (LK) ligament. The patients were randomised (26 PT, 24 LK). Subjective knee function was classified (Lysholm, Tegner activity, IKDC scores), laxity was measured (Lachman test, Stryker laxometer), and functional ability was assessed (one-hop test). There were no significant differences between Lysholm or IKDC scores at any stage by 5 years. Significant differences were found between the groups at 2 years for Tegner activity scores, laxity and one-hop testing. By 5 years there were no significant differences. Clinical equivalence was demonstrated between the two groups for the Lysholm score and one-hop test but not for the Tegner activity score at 5 years. The use of the LK ligament has been largely abandoned due to reports of its insufficiency. Our results demonstrate that it is not as inferior as one might expect. We conclude that the results of LK ligament ACL reconstruction are as acceptable as those using PT. It may provide an additional means of reconstruction where no suitable alternative is present.

  17. Expert opinion: diagnosis and treatment of proximal hamstring tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Lempainen, Lasse; Johansson, Kristian; Banke, Ingo J.; Ranne, Juha; Mäkelä, Keijo; Sarimo, Janne; Niemi, Pekka; Orava, Sakari

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background: proximal hamstring tendinopathy (PHT) is a disabilitating disease often causing underperformance in the athletically demanding patients. The main symptom of PHT is lower gluteal pain especially during running or while prolonged sitting. Mainly affecting athletically active individuals, PHT is a considerable challenge for treating health care professionals. Purpose: this paper aims to concisely present the literature on PHT to guide health care professionals treating these patients and doing research on the subject. Methods: we reviewed the literature on PHT through literature search of scientific journal databases. Conclusions: as a tendinopathic pathology, it is a rather recently discovered exertion injury. As with other chronic tendon overuse injuries, current treatment strategies are unspecific with uncertain outcomes due to the unknown etiology of the tendon degeneration. Diagnostic features as well as both operative and non-operative treatments are evaluated from a clinical perspective, providing up to date information for clinicians and sports medicine therapists dealing with hamstring problems. Level of evidence: V. PMID:25878983

  18. The clinical effect of tendon repair for tendon spontaneous rupture after corticosteroid injection in hands

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hui; Yang, Hu; Shen, Hui; Ye, Ganmin; Lin, Xiang-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Corticosteroid injections for hand tendinitis can lead to a rare significant complication of tendon spontaneous rupture. However, only sporadic cases were reported in the literature before. This study was designed to gauge the clinical effect of tendon repair in patients of tendon spontaneous rupture after corticosteroid injection and analyze our experience. This was a retrospective observational study of 13 patients (8 women and 5 men) operated between July 2011 and December 2015 for tendon spontaneous rupture after corticosteroid injection. Demographic data, clinical features, imaging data, and surgical treatments were carefully reviewed. The average age was 52.308 ± 15.381 years (range 29–71). The average injection times were 2.538 ± 1.664 times (range 1–6). The average rupture time (after last injection) was 10.923 ± 9.500 weeks (range 3–32). Nine patients were treated by tendon suture (69% of cases), and 4 patients were treated by tendon grafting (31% of cases). All patients received follow-up in our outpatient clinic. The sites of the tendon rupture (15 tendons of 13 patients had involved) include extensor pollicis longus (6 tendons, 40% of cases), extensor digiti quinti and extensor digiti minimi (4 tendons, 27% of cases), ring finger of extensor digitorum communis (3 tendons, 20% of cases), and middle finger of extensor digitorum communis (2 tendons, 13% of cases). Two patients who had tendon adhesion (15% of cases) were treated by tendon release. One patient who had tendon rerupture (8% of cases) was treated by tendon grafting. No patient had complications of infections, vascular, or nerve injury. Tendon spontaneous rupture is a serious complication after corticosteroid injection for tendinitis. Rigid standard of corticosteroid injection is very important. Magnetic resonance imaging was contributory to preoperative assess tendon defect and can be used to monitor healing quality of tendons during the follow-up. PMID:27741145

  19. Extensive Loss of Tibialis Anterior Tendon: Surgical Repair With Split Tendon Transfer of Tibialis Posterior Tendon: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Tsuyoshi; Uchida, Kenzo; Kokubo, Yasuo; Inukai, Tomoo; Sakamoto, Takumi; Yamagishi, Atsushi; Kitade, Makoto; Baba, Hisatoshi

    2016-01-01

    Extensive damage of the tibialis anterior tendon is rare and mainly caused by trauma. Surgical treatment of these injuries can become challenging owing to the limited availability of autogenous graft resources for reconstruction of the defect. In the present case report, we describe a large defect in the midfoot soft tissue after a traffic injury, which included complete loss of the tibialis anterior tendon. The tendon was reconstructed by split tendon transfer of the tibialis posterior tendon without sacrificing function, which was confirmed by the follow-up examination at 6 years after injury. We believe split tendon transfer of the tibialis posterior tendon can be one of the treatment options for patients with extensive disruption of the tibialis anterior tendon. PMID:26213163

  20. The effect of parecoxib and indometacin on tendon-to-bone healing in a bone tunnel: an experimental study in rats.

    PubMed

    Dimmen, S; Nordsletten, L; Engebretsen, L; Steen, H; Madsen, J E

    2009-02-01

    Conventional non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and newer specific cyclo-oxygenase-2 (cox-2) inhibitors are commonly used in musculoskeletal trauma and orthopaedic surgery to reduce the inflammatory response and pain. These drugs have been reported to impair bone metabolism. In reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament the hamstring tendons are mainly used as the graft of choice, and a prerequisite for good results is healing of the tendons in the bone tunnel. Many of these patients are routinely given NSAIDs or cox-2 inhibitors, although no studies have elucidated the effects of these drugs on tendon healing in the bone tunnel. In our study 60 female Wistar rats were randomly allocated into three groups of 20. One received parecoxib, one indometacin and one acted as a control. In all the rats the tendo-Achillis was released proximally from the calf muscles. It was then pulled through a drill hole in the distal tibia and sutured anteriorly. The rats were given parecoxib, indometacin or saline intraperitoneally twice daily for seven days. After 14 days the tendon/bone-tunnel interface was subjected to mechanical testing. Significantly lower maximum pull-out strength (p < 0.001), energy absorption (p < 0.001) and stiffness (p = 0.035) were found in rats given parecoxib and indometacin compared with the control group, most pronounced with parecoxib. PMID:19190065

  1. Tendon Innervation.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, Paul W; Salo, Paul; Hart, David A

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of tendon metabolism including the responses to loading is far from being well understood. During the last decade, however, accumulating data show that tendon innervation in addition to afferent functions, via efferent pathways has a regulatory role in tendon homeostasis via a wide range of neuromediators, which coordinate metabolic and neuro-inflammatory pathways.Innervation of intact healthy tendons is localized in the surrounding structures, i.e paratenon, endotenon and epitenon, whereas the tendon proper is practically devoid of neuronal supply. This anatomical finding reflects that the tendon metabolism is regulated from the tendon envelope, i.e. interfascicular matrix (see Chap. 1 ).Tendon innervation after injury and during repair, however, is found as extensive nerve ingrowth into the tendon proper, followed by a time-dependent emergence of different neuronal mediators, which amplify and fine-tune inflammatory and metabolic pathways in tendon regeneration. After healing nerve fibers retract to the tendon envelope.In tendinopathy innervation has been identified to consist of excessive and protracted nerve ingrowth in the tendon proper, suggesting pro-inflammatory, nociceptive and hypertrophic (degenerative) tissue responses.In metabolic disorders such as eg. diabetes impaired tendon healing has been established to be related to dysregulation of neuronal growth factors.Targeted approaches to the peripheral nervous system including neuronal mediators and their receptors may prove to be effective therapies for painful, degenerative and traumatic tendon disorders. PMID:27535247

  2. Immediate effect of stretching and ultrasound on hamstring flexibility and proprioception.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sung-Hak; Kim, Soo-Han

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] This research explored the positive effects of self-myofascial release on hamstring muscular flexibility and proprioception and investigated the effectiveness of the stretch combined with therapeutic ultrasound. [Subjects and Methods] This study included 30 healthy university students with no history of pain in the Achilles tendon or hamstring within the recent 6 months. Each participant completed two experiments. In the first experiment (MS), they completed self-myofascial stretching using a foam roller for 7 days. In the second experiment (MSU), the same participants performed the self-myofascial stretching after the 15-minute application of ultrasound. This study involved a pre- and post-test on hamstring muscle flexibility and hip joint proprioception. [Results] The use of self-myofascial stretching in the MS experiment had a significant effect on hamstring muscle flexibility and hip joint proprioception. However, the addition of ultrasound in the MSU experiment had no additive effect. [Conclusion] Self-myofascial stretching immediately increased hamstring muscle flexibility and improved hip joint proprioception, but the addition of pre-stretch ultra sound provided no further benefit.

  3. Immediate effect of stretching and ultrasound on hamstring flexibility and proprioception

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sung-Hak; Kim, Soo-Han

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This research explored the positive effects of self-myofascial release on hamstring muscular flexibility and proprioception and investigated the effectiveness of the stretch combined with therapeutic ultrasound. [Subjects and Methods] This study included 30 healthy university students with no history of pain in the Achilles tendon or hamstring within the recent 6 months. Each participant completed two experiments. In the first experiment (MS), they completed self-myofascial stretching using a foam roller for 7 days. In the second experiment (MSU), the same participants performed the self-myofascial stretching after the 15-minute application of ultrasound. This study involved a pre- and post-test on hamstring muscle flexibility and hip joint proprioception. [Results] The use of self-myofascial stretching in the MS experiment had a significant effect on hamstring muscle flexibility and hip joint proprioception. However, the addition of ultrasound in the MSU experiment had no additive effect. [Conclusion] Self-myofascial stretching immediately increased hamstring muscle flexibility and improved hip joint proprioception, but the addition of pre-stretch ultra sound provided no further benefit. PMID:27390420

  4. Immediate effect of stretching and ultrasound on hamstring flexibility and proprioception.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sung-Hak; Kim, Soo-Han

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] This research explored the positive effects of self-myofascial release on hamstring muscular flexibility and proprioception and investigated the effectiveness of the stretch combined with therapeutic ultrasound. [Subjects and Methods] This study included 30 healthy university students with no history of pain in the Achilles tendon or hamstring within the recent 6 months. Each participant completed two experiments. In the first experiment (MS), they completed self-myofascial stretching using a foam roller for 7 days. In the second experiment (MSU), the same participants performed the self-myofascial stretching after the 15-minute application of ultrasound. This study involved a pre- and post-test on hamstring muscle flexibility and hip joint proprioception. [Results] The use of self-myofascial stretching in the MS experiment had a significant effect on hamstring muscle flexibility and hip joint proprioception. However, the addition of ultrasound in the MSU experiment had no additive effect. [Conclusion] Self-myofascial stretching immediately increased hamstring muscle flexibility and improved hip joint proprioception, but the addition of pre-stretch ultra sound provided no further benefit. PMID:27390420

  5. Evaluation of hamstring muscle strength and morphology after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Y; Kuramochi, R; Fukubayashi, T

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to clarify the relationship between knee flexor strength and hamstring muscle morphology after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction using the semitendinosus (ST) tendon and to determine the causative factors of decreased knee flexor muscle strength. Fourteen male and ten female patients who resumed sports activities after surgery participated in the experiment. Isometric knee flexion torque was measured at 30°, 45°, 60°, 90°, and 105° of knee flexion. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to calculate ST muscle length and hamstring muscle volume, and to confirm the status of ST tendon regeneration. The correlation between the MRI findings and flexor strength was analyzed. Regenerated ST tendon was confirmed in 21 of the 24 patients, but muscle volume (87.6%) and muscle length (74.5%) of the ST in the operated limb were significantly smaller than those in the normal limb. The percentage of the knee flexion torque of the operated limb compared with that of the normal was apparently lower at 105° (69.1%) and 90° (68.6%) than at 60° (84.4%). Tendon regeneration, ST muscle shortening, and ST muscle atrophy correlated with decreased knee flexion torque. These results indicated that preserving the morphology of the ST muscle-tendon complex is important.

  6. Lower eccentric hamstring strength and single leg hop for distance predict hamstring injury in PETE students.

    PubMed

    Goossens, L; Witvrouw, E; Vanden Bossche, L; De Clercq, D

    2015-01-01

    Hamstring injuries have not been under research in physical education teacher education (PETE) students so far. Within the frame of the development of an injury prevention program, for this study we conducted an analysis of modifiable risk factors for hamstring injuries in PETE students. Hamstring injuries of 102 freshmen bachelor PETE students were registered prospectively during one academic year. Eighty-one students completed maximum muscle strength tests of hip extensors, hamstrings, quadriceps (isometric) and hamstrings (eccentric) at the start of the academic year. Sixty-nine of the latter completed a single leg hop for distance (SLHD). Risk factors for hamstring injuries were statistically detected using logistic regression. Sixteen hamstring injuries (0.16 injuries/student/academic year; 0.46 injuries/1000 h) occurred to 10 participants. Eight cases were included in the risk factor analysis. Lower eccentric hamstring strength (odds ratio (ODD) = 0.977; p = 0.043), higher isometric/eccentric hamstring strength ratio (ODD = 970.500; p = 0.019) and lower score on the SLHD (ODD = 0.884; p = 0.005) were significant risk factors for hamstring injury. A combination of eccentric hamstring strength test and SLHD could give a good risk analysis of hamstring injuries in PETE students. This might offer great perspectives for easily applicable screening in a clinical setting. PMID:25189278

  7. Lower eccentric hamstring strength and single leg hop for distance predict hamstring injury in PETE students.

    PubMed

    Goossens, L; Witvrouw, E; Vanden Bossche, L; De Clercq, D

    2015-01-01

    Hamstring injuries have not been under research in physical education teacher education (PETE) students so far. Within the frame of the development of an injury prevention program, for this study we conducted an analysis of modifiable risk factors for hamstring injuries in PETE students. Hamstring injuries of 102 freshmen bachelor PETE students were registered prospectively during one academic year. Eighty-one students completed maximum muscle strength tests of hip extensors, hamstrings, quadriceps (isometric) and hamstrings (eccentric) at the start of the academic year. Sixty-nine of the latter completed a single leg hop for distance (SLHD). Risk factors for hamstring injuries were statistically detected using logistic regression. Sixteen hamstring injuries (0.16 injuries/student/academic year; 0.46 injuries/1000 h) occurred to 10 participants. Eight cases were included in the risk factor analysis. Lower eccentric hamstring strength (odds ratio (ODD) = 0.977; p = 0.043), higher isometric/eccentric hamstring strength ratio (ODD = 970.500; p = 0.019) and lower score on the SLHD (ODD = 0.884; p = 0.005) were significant risk factors for hamstring injury. A combination of eccentric hamstring strength test and SLHD could give a good risk analysis of hamstring injuries in PETE students. This might offer great perspectives for easily applicable screening in a clinical setting.

  8. Closed rupture of the flexor tendons caused by carpal bone and joint disorders.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, H; Kato, H; Hata, Y; Nakatsuchi, Y; Tsuchikane, A

    2007-12-01

    We analysed 21 patients with closed rupture of the flexor tendons caused by carpal bone and joint disorders. The tendon that ruptured depended on the location of the bone perforation into the carpal tunnel. Radiocarpal arthrography was performed in 13 patients and capsular perforation was demonstrated by contrast medium leakage into the carpal canal in 11 patients. This proved a useful diagnostic test. The flexor tendon(s) were reconstructed with free tendon graft in 17 patients, cross-over transfer of flexor tendons from adjacent digits in two and buddying to an adjacent flexor tendon in one patient. Postoperative total active range of motion in the fingers after 13 free tendon graft reconstructions averaged 213 degrees (range 170-265 degrees ). The active range of motion of the thumb-interphalangeal joint after free tendon graft reconstruction in three cases improved from 0 degrees to 33 degrees on average (range 10 degrees -40 degrees ).

  9. An anatomical study of the proximal hamstring muscle complex to elucidate muscle strains in this region.

    PubMed

    Battermann, N; Appell, H-J; Dargel, J; Koebke, J

    2011-03-01

    Muscle strain injuries are common in sports, and a high incidence is reported for the hamstring muscles, especially in the proximal region, where the long head of the biceps femoris muscle is most frequently affected. To look for some architectural peculiarities, which would make this muscle vulnerable, 101 legs of embalmed human cadavers were dissected and descriptively examined, morphometric data were obtained in the proximal region, and slices of plastinated specimens were microscopically examined. The 3 muscles composing the proximal hamstring complex are partly twisted around each other and possess common fibrous adhesions. Biceps femoris (BF) and semitendinosus (ST) muscles form a common head, to which the ST contributes the majority of fascicles extending 9 cm down from the ischiac tuberosity, thereby attaching to the common tendon at a remarkable pennation angle. The first BF fascicles origin from the common tendon only at 6 cm distance from the ischiac tuberosity. It is concluded that the high incidence of proximal BF strains may be a misinterpretation due to insufficient imaging and the complex architecture. It is suggested that the pennation angle at which the ST inserts to the common tendon makes this muscle especially vulnerable for strains during forced eccentric contractions.

  10. Hamstring strains and tears in the athlete.

    PubMed

    Ali, Kashif; Leland, J Martin

    2012-04-01

    Hamstring injuries continue to be very common for both elite and amateur athletes. Given their high recurrence rate, the ability to treat these injuries effectively is critical to helping athletes return to their previous level of activity without putting them at risk for future injury. Most hamstring strains can be treated with initial pain control and a course of rehabilitation focused on a gradual return to activity. However, an exact, evidence-based rehabilitation protocol has yet to be studied. Although surgery is rare and reserved for complete hamstring ruptures, results show high patient satisfaction and ability to return to play.

  11. Hamstring Strength and Morphology Progression after Return to Sport from Injury

    PubMed Central

    Sanfilippo, Jennifer; Silder, Amy; Sherry, Marc A; Tuite, Michael J; Heiderscheit, Bryan C

    2012-01-01

    Hamstring strain re-injury rates can reach 30% within the initial two weeks following return to sport (RTS). Incomplete recovery of strength may be a contributing factor. However, relative strength of the injured and unaffected limbs at RTS is currently unknown. PURPOSE: Characterize hamstring strength and morphology at the time of RTS and six months later. METHODS: Twenty-five athletes that experienced an acute hamstring strain injury participated, following completion of a controlled rehabilitation program. Bilateral isokinetic strength testing and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed at RTS and 6-months later. Strength (knee flexion peak torque, work, angle of peak torque) and MRI (muscle and tendon volumes) measures were compared between limbs and over time using repeated measures ANOVA. RESULTS: The injured limb showed a peak torque deficit of 9.6% compared to the uninjured limb at RTS (60°/s, p<0.001), but not 6-months following. The knee flexion angle of peak torque decreased over time for both limbs (60°/s, p<0.001). MRI revealed that 20.4% of the muscle cross-sectional area showed signs of edema at RTS with full resolution by the 6-month follow-up. Tendon volume of the injured limb tended to increase over time (p=0.108), while muscle volume decreased 4–5% in both limbs (p<0.001). CONCLUSION: Residual edema and deficits in isokinetic knee flexion strength were present at RTS, but resolved during the subsequent six months. This occurred despite MRI evidence of scar tissue formation (increased tendon volume) and muscle atrophy, suggesting that neuromuscular factors may contribute to the return of strength. PMID:23059864

  12. Microstructural stress relaxation mechanics in functionally different tendons.

    PubMed

    Screen, H R C; Toorani, S; Shelton, J C

    2013-01-01

    Tendons experience widely varying loading conditions in vivo. They may be categorised by their function as either positional tendons, which are used for intricate movements and experience lower stress, or as energy storage tendons which act as highly stressed springs during locomotion. Structural and compositional differences between tendons are thought to enable an optimisation of their properties to suit their functional environment. However, little is known about structure-function relationships in tendon. This study adopts porcine flexor and extensor tendon fascicles as examples of high stress and low stress tendons, comparing their mechanical behaviour at the micro-level in order to understand their stress relaxation response. Stress-relaxation was shown to occur predominantly through sliding between collagen fibres. However, in the more highly stressed flexor tendon fascicles, more fibre reorganisation was evident when the tissue was exposed to low strains. By contrast, the low load extensor tendon fascicles appears to have less capacity for fibre reorganisation or shearing than the energy storage tendon, relying more heavily on fibril level relaxation. The extensor fascicles were also unable to sustain loads without rapid and complete stress relaxation. These findings highlight the need to optimise tendon repair solutions for specific tendons, and match tendon properties when using grafts in tendon repairs.

  13. Hamstring Muscle Injuries, a Rehabilitation Protocol Purpose

    PubMed Central

    Valle, Xavier; L.Tol, Johannes; Hamilton, Bruce; Rodas, Gil; Malliaras, Peter; Malliaropoulos, Nikos; Rizo, Vicenc; Moreno, Marcel; Jardi, Jaume

    2015-01-01

    Context: Hamstring acute muscle injuries are prevalent in several sports including AFL football (Australian Football League), sprinting and soccer, and are often associated with prolonged time away from sport. Evidence Acquisition: In response to this, research into prevention and management of hamstring injury has increased, but epidemiological data shows no decline in injury and re-injury rates, suggesting that rehabilitation programs and return to play (RTP) criteria have to be improved. There continues to be a lack of consensus regarding how to assess performance, recovery and readiness to RTP, following hamstring strain injury. Results: The aim of this paper was to propose rehabilitation protocol for hamstring muscle injuries based on current basic science and research knowledge regarding injury demographics and management options. Conclusions: Criteria-based (subjective and objective) progression through the rehabilitation program will be outlined along with exercises for each phase, from initial injury to RTP. PMID:26715969

  14. Computed tomography of hamstring muscle strains.

    PubMed

    Garrett, W E; Rich, F R; Nikolaou, P K; Vogler, J B

    1989-10-01

    Acute hamstring muscle strains occurring in ten college athletes were evaluated using computed tomography to identify the location and characteristics of these common injuries. Acute muscle strains appeared as areas of hypodensity within the muscle 1-2 d following injury. This suggests that inflammation and edema are the major component of injury, not bleeding as commonly assumed. Injuries were seen most commonly in the proximal and lateral portions of the hamstring muscle group, particularly in the biceps femoris.

  15. An ink surgical marker pen is damaging to tendon cells

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, S. L.; Jayadev, C.; Poulsen, R.; Hulley, P.; Price, A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Surgical marking during tendon surgery is often used for technical and teaching purposes. This study investigates the effect of a gentian violet ink marker pen, a common surgical marker, on the viability of the tissue and cells of tendon. Methods In vitro cell and tissue methods were used to test the viability of human hamstring explants and the migrating tenocytes in the presence of the gentian violet ink. Results The outcome of this study was that a constituent of the surgical marker pen causes cell and tissue death in culture, implying the same would occur in vivo. Conclusions This is a cause for concern when marking tendon during surgical procedures, as it may compromise healing and repair and potentially contribute to a poor outcome. The authors suggest that an alternative surgical marking procedure should be found, or that all marker pens should undergo testing on human tendon tissue in vitro prior to use. PMID:23610669

  16. Reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament and anterolateral ligament using interlinked hamstrings - technical note.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Marcio de Castro; Zidan, Flavio Ferreira; Miduati, Francini Belluci; Fortuna, Caio Cesar; Mizutani, Bruno Moreira; Abdalla, Rene Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Recent anatomical and biomechanical studies on the anterolateral ligament (ALL) of the knee have shown that this structure has an important function in relation to joint stability, especially when associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. However, the criteria for its reconstruction have not yet been fully established and the surgical techniques that have been described present variations regarding anatomical points and fixation materials. This study presents a reproducible technique for ALL and ACL reconstruction using hamstring tendons, in which three interference screws are used for fixation.

  17. Reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament and anterolateral ligament using interlinked hamstrings - technical note.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Marcio de Castro; Zidan, Flavio Ferreira; Miduati, Francini Belluci; Fortuna, Caio Cesar; Mizutani, Bruno Moreira; Abdalla, Rene Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Recent anatomical and biomechanical studies on the anterolateral ligament (ALL) of the knee have shown that this structure has an important function in relation to joint stability, especially when associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. However, the criteria for its reconstruction have not yet been fully established and the surgical techniques that have been described present variations regarding anatomical points and fixation materials. This study presents a reproducible technique for ALL and ACL reconstruction using hamstring tendons, in which three interference screws are used for fixation. PMID:27517028

  18. Sterilization with electron beam irradiation influences the biomechanical properties and the early remodeling of tendon allografts for reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL).

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Tanja; Hoburg, Arnd; Broziat, Christine; Smith, Mark D; Gohs, Uwe; Pruss, Axel; Scheffler, Sven

    2012-08-01

    Although allografts for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) replacement have shown advantages compared to autografts, their use is limited due to the risk of disease transmission and the limitations of available sterilization methods. Gamma sterilization has shown detrimental effects on graft properties at the high doses required for sufficient pathogen inactivation. In our previous in vitro study on human patellar tendon allografts, Electron beam (Ebeam) irradiation showed less detrimental effects compared to gamma sterilization (Hoburg et al. in Am J Sports Med 38(6):1134-1140, 2010). To investigate the biological healing and restoration of the mechanical properties of a 34 kGy Ebeam treated tendon allograft twenty-four sheep underwent ACL replacement with either a 34 kGy Ebeam treated allograft or a non-sterilized fresh frozen allograft. Biomechanical testing of stiffness, ultimate failure load and AP-laxity as well as histological analysis to investigate cell, vessel and myofibroblast-density were performed after 6 and 12 weeks. Native sheep ACL and hamstring tendons (HAT, each n = 9) served as controls. The results of a previous study analyzing the remodeling of fresh frozen allografts (n = 12) and autografts (Auto, n = 18) with the same study design were also included in the analysis. Statistics were performed using Mann-Whitney U test followed by Bonferroni-Holm correction. Results showed significantly decreased biomechanical properties during the early remodeling period in Ebeam treated grafts and this was accompanied with an increased remodeling activity. There was no recovery of biomechanical function from 6 to 12 weeks in this group in contrast to the results observed in fresh frozen allografts and autografts. Therefore, high dose Ebeam irradiation investigated in this paper cannot be recommended for soft tissue allograft sterilization.

  19. Tendon Differentiation on Decellularized Extracellular Matrix Under Cyclic Loading.

    PubMed

    Youngstrom, Daniel W; Barrett, Jennifer G

    2016-01-01

    Tendon bioreactors combine cells, scaffold, and mechanical stimulation to drive tissue neogenesis ex vivo. Faithful recapitulation of the native tendon microenvironment is essential for stimulating graft maturation or modeling tendon biology. As the mediator between cells and mechanical stimulation, the properties of a scaffold constitute perhaps the most essential elements in a bioreactor system. One method of achieving native scaffold properties is to process tendon allograft in a manner that removes cells without modifying structure and function: "decellularization." This chapter describes (1) production of tendon scaffolds derived from native extracellular matrix, (2) preparation of cell-laden scaffolds prior to bioreactor culture, and (3) tissue processing post-harvest for gene expression analysis. These methods may be applied for a variety of applications including graft production, cell priming prior to transplantation and basic investigations of tendon cell biology. PMID:27062597

  20. Tendon Differentiation on Decellularized Extracellular Matrix Under Cyclic Loading.

    PubMed

    Youngstrom, Daniel W; Barrett, Jennifer G

    2016-01-01

    Tendon bioreactors combine cells, scaffold, and mechanical stimulation to drive tissue neogenesis ex vivo. Faithful recapitulation of the native tendon microenvironment is essential for stimulating graft maturation or modeling tendon biology. As the mediator between cells and mechanical stimulation, the properties of a scaffold constitute perhaps the most essential elements in a bioreactor system. One method of achieving native scaffold properties is to process tendon allograft in a manner that removes cells without modifying structure and function: "decellularization." This chapter describes (1) production of tendon scaffolds derived from native extracellular matrix, (2) preparation of cell-laden scaffolds prior to bioreactor culture, and (3) tissue processing post-harvest for gene expression analysis. These methods may be applied for a variety of applications including graft production, cell priming prior to transplantation and basic investigations of tendon cell biology.

  1. Hybrid Graft Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: A Predictable Graft for Knee Stabilization.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Pinzon, Andres M; Barksdale, Leticia; Krill, Michael K; Leo, Brian M

    2015-06-01

    Trauma to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a season-ending injury and involves months of activity modification and rehabilitation. The annual incidence of ACL tears in the United States is approximately 200,000, which allows for a broad range of individualized treatment options. Various surgical techniques, including transtibial and independent tunnel drilling, allograft and autograft tissue, and various implants, have been described in the literature. This article describes the indications and technique for a hybrid soft tissue graft for ACL reconstruction. Autologous grafts eliminate the risk of disease transmission and have recently been shown to have a lower rerupture rate, particularly in younger, active patients; however, the harvesting of autologous hamstring grafts carries a risk of donor-site morbidity, iatrogenic injury of the graft, and inadequate graft size. In contrast to a traditional autologous soft tissue graft, the hybrid graft allows for graft size customization for a desired reconstruction, especially in cases where autograft hamstrings may be iatrogenically damaged or of inadequate size when harvested. The goal of a hybrid graft ACL reconstruction is to provide a favorable-sized graft with clinical outcomes comparable with autologous soft tissue grafts. In contrast to a traditional autologous soft tissue graft, this technique provides another option in the event of unforeseen deficiencies or complications associated with harvesting and preparation of the autologous gracilis and semitendinosis soft tissue graft. PMID:26091219

  2. Hybrid Graft Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: A Predictable Graft for Knee Stabilization.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Pinzon, Andres M; Barksdale, Leticia; Krill, Michael K; Leo, Brian M

    2015-06-01

    Trauma to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a season-ending injury and involves months of activity modification and rehabilitation. The annual incidence of ACL tears in the United States is approximately 200,000, which allows for a broad range of individualized treatment options. Various surgical techniques, including transtibial and independent tunnel drilling, allograft and autograft tissue, and various implants, have been described in the literature. This article describes the indications and technique for a hybrid soft tissue graft for ACL reconstruction. Autologous grafts eliminate the risk of disease transmission and have recently been shown to have a lower rerupture rate, particularly in younger, active patients; however, the harvesting of autologous hamstring grafts carries a risk of donor-site morbidity, iatrogenic injury of the graft, and inadequate graft size. In contrast to a traditional autologous soft tissue graft, the hybrid graft allows for graft size customization for a desired reconstruction, especially in cases where autograft hamstrings may be iatrogenically damaged or of inadequate size when harvested. The goal of a hybrid graft ACL reconstruction is to provide a favorable-sized graft with clinical outcomes comparable with autologous soft tissue grafts. In contrast to a traditional autologous soft tissue graft, this technique provides another option in the event of unforeseen deficiencies or complications associated with harvesting and preparation of the autologous gracilis and semitendinosis soft tissue graft.

  3. The role of neuromuscular inhibition in hamstring strain injury recurrence.

    PubMed

    Fyfe, Jackson J; Opar, David A; Williams, Morgan D; Shield, Anthony J

    2013-06-01

    Hamstring strain injuries are amongst the most common and problematic injuries in a wide range of sports that involve high speed running. The comparatively high rate of hamstring injury recurrence is arguably the most concerning aspect of these injuries. A number of modifiable and nonmodifiable risk factors are proposed to predispose athletes to hamstring strains. Potentially, the persistence of risk factors and the development of maladaptations following injury may explain injury recurrence. Here, the role of neuromuscular inhibition following injury is discussed as a potential mechanism for several maladaptations associated with hamstring re-injury. These maladaptations include eccentric hamstring weakness, selective hamstring atrophy and shifts in the knee flexor torque-joint angle relationship. Current evidence indicates that athletes return to competition after hamstring injury having developed maladaptations that predispose them to further injury. When rehabilitating athletes to return to competition following hamstring strain injury, the role of neuromuscular inhibition in re-injury should be considered.

  4. Hamstring muscle strain treated by mobilizing the sacroiliac joint.

    PubMed

    Cibulka, M T; Rose, S J; Delitto, A; Sinacore, D R

    1986-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of two types of treatment of hamstring muscle strains. Twenty patients with hamstring muscle strains were assigned randomly to an Experimental Group (n = 10) or a Control Group (n = 10). Peak torque production of the quadriceps femoris and hamstring muscles and hamstring muscle length were measured before and after treatment. The hamstring muscles of the Experimental and Control groups were treated with moist heat followed by passive stretching. The Experimental Group also received manipulation of the sacroiliac joint. The change in hamstring muscle peak torque was significantly greater for the Experimental Group than for the Control Group (p less than .005). No significant differences existed between the two groups in either quadriceps femoris muscle peak torque or hamstring muscle length. The results of this study suggest a relationship between sacroiliac joint dysfunction and hamstring muscle strain.

  5. A 3-Dimensional Anatomic Study of the Distal Biceps Tendon

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Christine; Li, Zhi; Pennings, Amanda; Agur, Anne; Elmaraghy, Amr

    2015-01-01

    Background Complete rupture of the distal biceps tendon from its osseous attachment is most often treated with operative intervention. Knowledge of the overall tendon morphology as well as the orientation of the collagenous fibers throughout the musculotendinous junction are key to intraoperative decision making and surgical technique in both the acute and chronic setting. Unfortunately, there is little information available in the literature. Purpose To comprehensively describe the morphology of the distal biceps tendon. Study Design Descriptive laboratory study. Methods The distal biceps terminal musculature, musculotendinous junction, and tendon were digitized in 10 cadaveric specimens and data reconstructed using 3-dimensional modeling. Results The average length, width, and thickness of the external distal biceps tendon were found to be 63.0, 6.0, and 3.0 mm, respectively. A unique expansion of the tendon fibers within the distal muscle was characterized, creating a thick collagenous network along the central component between the long and short heads. Conclusion This study documents the morphologic parameters of the native distal biceps tendon. Reconstruction may be necessary, especially in chronic distal biceps tendon ruptures, if the remaining tendon morphology is significantly compromised compared with the native distal biceps tendon. Knowledge of normal anatomical distal biceps tendon parameters may also guide the selection of a substitute graft with similar morphological characteristics. Clinical Relevance A thorough description of distal biceps tendon morphology is important to guide intraoperative decision making between primary repair and reconstruction and to better select the most appropriate graft. The detailed description of the tendinous expansion into the muscle may provide insight into better graft-weaving and suture-grasping techniques to maximize proximal graft incorporation. PMID:26665092

  6. Differentiation of hamstring short latency versus medium latency responses after tibia translation.

    PubMed

    Friemert, B; Bumann-Melnyk, M; Faist, M; Schwarz, W; Gerngross, H; Claes, L

    2005-01-01

    After injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) a functional instability is frequently observed which has been attributed to a disturbed sensorimotor function. In light of the clinical importance of ACL injuries and the resulting functional instability, it is of enormous clinical interest to elucidate the role of sensorimotor pathways that involve the ACL. In animals and humans a direct reflex pathway between the ACL and the hamstrings has been shown. The onset latencies of responses reported after ventral tibia translation were around 40-50 ms (range 17.9-65) and were regarded as medium latency responses (MLR). However, ventral tibia translation should also induce a stretch of the hamstring muscles and evoke a short latency response (SLR). Before any muscle response after ventral tibia translation can be ascribed to anatomical structures, it is crucial to analyze the obtained muscle responses carefully. The aim of the present study was the development of an algorithm to differentiate SLR and MLR responses after ventral tibia translation. In ten healthy subjects reflex responses of the hamstrings after anterior tibia translation and after tendon taps on the biceps femoris tendon were evaluated. To investigate the influence of skin afferents, control experiments were performed after lidocain injection of the dorsal calf. The mean onset latency of the tendon jerk reflex was 21.9 +/- 3.1 ms (range 17.3 - 28.7 ms). Both SLR responses (mean onset latency: 20.3 +/- 3.5 ms; range 15.4 - 25.8) and MLR responses (mean onset latency: 38.9 +/- 4.2 ms; range 32.9 - 46.7) were obtained in all subjects. Skin afferents from the calf do not play a major role. The development of an evaluation algorithm is presented that allows a safe differentiation between these partly superimposed SLR and MLR components. It is demonstrated that by measuring the first part of the SLR from the onset to the first peak the end of the SLR can be predicted and that the onset latency of the MLR

  7. Evaluation and management of hamstring injuries.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Christopher S; Redler, Lauren H; Ciccotti, Michael G; Maffulli, Nicola; Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Bradley, James

    2013-12-01

    Muscle injuries are the most common injuries in sports, with hamstring injuries accounting for 29% of all injuries in athletes. These injuries lead to prolonged impairment and have a reinjury risk of 12% to 31%. They range from mild muscle damage without loss of structural integrity to complete muscle tearing with fiber disruption. Novel MRI scores are increasingly being used and allow a more precise prediction of return to sport. In this article, the authors review the history, mechanisms of injury, and classification systems for hamstring injuries as well as present the latest evidence related to the management of hamstring injuries, including intramuscular and both proximal and distal insertional injuries. Indications for surgical treatment of certain proximal and distal avulsions, biological augmentation to the nonoperative treatment of midsubstance injuries, and advances in risk reduction and injury prevention are discussed.

  8. Abductor pollicis longus tendon division with swan neck thumb deformity.

    PubMed

    Zacharia, Balaji; Puthezhath, Kishore

    2012-08-01

    Swan neck thumb deformity can be caused by osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, tendon transfers and paralytic diseases. Abductor pollicis longus is one of the major stabilizing tendon of the carpometacarpal joint of thumb. To the best of our knowledge, swan neck thumb deformity owing to division of abductor pollicis longus tendon is rare. In this article, we describe a case of isolated division of abductor pollicis longus tendon presenting with swan-neck deformity of thumb and discuss the mechanism, management and outcome. The patient was treated by repair of the divided tendon using palmaris longus tendon graft. At approximately 107 weeks following treatment, the patient was having full range of thumb movement and the deformity completely disappeared. We also describe the unusual mechanism whereby an isolated division of abductor pollicis longus tendon results in swan neck thumb deformity. Level of clinical evidence IV. PMID:22825877

  9. Augmentation of tendon-to-bone healing.

    PubMed

    Atesok, Kivanc; Fu, Freddie H; Wolf, Megan R; Ochi, Mitsuo; Jazrawi, Laith M; Doral, M Nedim; Lubowitz, James H; Rodeo, Scott A

    2014-03-19

    Tendon-to-bone healing is vital to the ultimate success of the various surgical procedures performed to repair injured tendons. Achieving tendon-to-bone healing that is functionally and biologically similar to native anatomy can be challenging because of the limited regeneration capacity of the tendon-bone interface. Orthopaedic basic-science research strategies aiming to augment tendon-to-bone healing include the use of osteoinductive growth factors, platelet-rich plasma, gene therapy, enveloping the grafts with periosteum, osteoconductive materials, cell-based therapies, biodegradable scaffolds, and biomimetic patches. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound and extracorporeal shockwave treatment may affect tendon-to-bone healing by means of mechanical forces that stimulate biological cascades at the insertion site. Application of various loading methods and immobilization times influence the stress forces acting on the recently repaired tendon-to-bone attachment, which eventually may change the biological dynamics of the interface. Other approaches, such as the use of coated sutures and interference screws, aim to deliver biological factors while achieving mechanical stability by means of various fixators. Controlled Level-I human trials are required to confirm the promising results from in vitro or animal research studies elucidating the mechanisms underlying tendon-to-bone healing and to translate these results into clinical practice.

  10. Orientation of tendons in vivo with active and passive knee muscles.

    PubMed

    Aalbersberg, Sietske; Kingma, Idsart; Ronsky, Janet L; Frayne, Richard; van Dieën, Jaap H

    2005-09-01

    Tendon orientations in knee models are often taken from cadaver studies. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of muscle activation on tendon orientation in vivo. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) images of the knee were made during relaxation and isometric knee extensions and flexions with 0 degrees , 15 degrees and 30 degrees of knee joint flexion. For six tendons, the orientation angles in sagittal and frontal plane were calculated. In the sagittal plane, muscle activation pulled the patellar tendon to a more vertical orientation and the semitendinosus and sartorius tendons to a more posterior orientation. In the frontal plane, the semitendinosus had a less lateral orientation, the biceps femoris a more medial orientation and the patellar tendon less medial orientation in loaded compared to unloaded conditions. The knee joint angle also influenced the tendon orientations. In the sagittal plane, the patellar tendon had a more anterior orientation near full extension and the biceps femoris had an anterior orientation with 0 degrees and 15 degrees flexions and neutral with 30 degrees flexions. Within 0 degrees to 30 degrees of flexion, the biceps femoris cannot produce a posterior shear force and the anterior angle of the patellar tendon is always larger than the hamstring tendons. Therefore, co-contraction of the hamstring and quadriceps is unlikely to reduce anterior shear forces in knee angles up to 30 degrees . Finally, inter-individual variation in tendon angles was large. This suggests that the amount of shear force produced and the potential to counteract shear forces by co-contraction is subject-specific. PMID:16023464

  11. Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... when the posterior tibial tendon becomes inflamed or torn. As a result, the tendon may not be ... repetitive use. Once the tendon becomes inflamed or torn, the arch will slowly fall (collapse) over time. ...

  12. Achilles tendon repair

    MedlinePlus

    Achilles tendon rupture-surgery; Percutaneous Achilles tendon rupture repair ... To fix your torn Achilles tendon, the surgeon will: Make a cut down the back of your heel Make several small cuts rather than one large cut ...

  13. Achilles tendon rupture - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    Heel cord tear; Calcaneal tendon rupture ... MRI scan to see what type of Achilles tendon tear you have. An MRI is a type ... partial tear means at least some of the tendon is still OK. A full tear means your ...

  14. Tendon latch

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, B. J.

    1985-01-01

    A latch connects tendons run from a floating platform to a socket in a foundation on the sea floor. The latch includes a latch body having a plurality of dogs disposed within and urgible outward from the latch body. A piston is releasably disposed within the latch body above the dogs and moves downwardly when released to urge the dogs outwardly from the body into latching engagement with the socket. A trigger mechanism in the latch releases the piston when the latch body lands in the socket and contacts a trigger pin projecting upwardly from the bottom of the socket. A series of wedges are disposed exteriorally on the body and inhibit lateral movement of the body relative to the socket when the tendon is subjected to a cycle bending loads.

  15. Pitfalls during biomechanical testing - Evaluation of different fixation methods for measuring tendons endurance properties.

    PubMed

    Hangody, Gy; Pánics, G; Szebényi, G; Kiss, R; Hangody, L; Pap, K

    2016-03-01

    The goal of the study was to find a proper technique to fix tendon grafts into an INSTRON loading machine. From 8 human cadavers, 40 grafts were collected. We removed the bone-patella tendon-bone grafts, the semitendinosus and gracilis tendons, the quadriceps tendon-bone grafts, the Achilles tendons, and the peroneus longus tendons from each lower extremity. We tested the tendon grafts with five different types of fixation devices: surgical thread (Premicron 3), general mounting clamp, wire mesh, cement fixation, and a modified clamp for an INSTRON loading machine. The mean failure load in case of surgical thread fixation was (381N ± 26N). The results with the general clamp were (527N ± 45N). The wire meshes were more promising (750N ± 21N), but did not reach the outcomes we desired. Easy slippages of the ends of the tendons from the cement encasements were observed (253N ± 18N). We then began to use Shi's clamp that could produce 977N ± 416N peak force. We combined Shi's clamp with freezing of the graft and the rupture of the tendon itself demonstrated an average force of 2198 N ± 773N. We determined that our modified frozen clamp fixed the specimens against high tensile forces.

  16. Re-revision of a patellar tendon rupture in a young professional martial arts athlete.

    PubMed

    Vadalà, A; Iorio, R; Bonifazi, A M; Bolle, G; Ferretti, A

    2012-09-01

    A 27-year-old professional martial arts athlete experienced recurrent right knee patellar tendon rupture on three occasions. He underwent two operations for complete patellar tendon rupture: an end-to-end tenorrhaphy the first time, and revision with a bone-patellar-tendon (BPT) allograft. After the third episode, he was referred to our department, where we performed a surgical reconstruction with the use of hamstring pro-patellar tendon, in a figure-of-eight configuration, followed by a careful rehabilitation protocol. Clinical and radiological follow-ups were realized at 1, 3, and 6 months and 1 and 2 years postop, with an accurate physical examination, the use of recognized international outcome scores, and radiograph and MRI studies. As far as we know, this is the first paper to report a re-revision of a patellar tendon rupture.

  17. Informing Stem Cell-Based Tendon Tissue Engineering Approaches with Embryonic Tendon Development.

    PubMed

    Okech, William; Kuo, Catherine K

    2016-01-01

    Adult tendons fail to regenerate normal tissue after injury, and instead form dysfunctional scar tissue with abnormal mechanical properties. Surgical repair with grafts is the current standard to treat injuries, but faces significant limitations including pain and high rates of re-injury. To address this, we aim to regenerate new, normal tendons to replace dysfunctional tendons. A common approach to tendon tissue engineering is to design scaffolds and bioreactors based on adult tendon properties that can direct adult stem cell tenogenesis. Despite significant progress, advances have been limited due, in part, to a need for markers and potent induction cues. Our goal is to develop novel tendon tissue engineering approaches informed by embryonic tendon development. We are characterizing structure-property relationships of embryonic tendon to identify design parameters for three-dimensional scaffolds and bioreactor mechanical loading systems to direct adult stem cell tenogenesis. We will review studies in which we quantified changes in the mechanical and biochemical properties of tendon during embryonic development and elucidated specific mechanisms of functional property elaboration. We then examined the effects of these mechanical and biochemical factors on embryonic tendon cell behavior. Using custom-designed bioreactors, we also examined the effects of dynamic mechanical loading and growth factor treatment on embryonic tendon cells. Our findings have established cues to induce tenogenesis as well as metrics to evaluate differentiation. We finish by discussing how we have evaluated the tenogenic differentiation potential of adult stem cells by comparing their responses to that of embryonic tendon cells in these culture systems.

  18. Isokinetic Hamstrings: Quadriceps Ratios in Intercollegiate Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosene, John M.; Fogarty, Tracey D.; Mahaffey, Brian L.

    2001-01-01

    Compared the differences in the concentric hamstrings to quadriceps (H:Q) ratio among athletes in different sports at three velocities. Measurement of H:Q ratio of both knees among male and female college athletes indicated that the H:Q ratio increased as velocity increased. No differences existed for the H:Q ratio for sport or side of body. (SM)

  19. Anatomy and physiology of hamstring injury.

    PubMed

    Kumazaki, T; Ehara, Y; Sakai, T

    2012-12-01

    The hamstring muscles were analyzed anatomically and physiologically to clarify the specific reasons for the incidence of muscle strain of the hamstrings. For the anatomical study, hamstring muscles of 13 embalmed cadavers were dissected. For the physiological study, the knee flexor torque and surface electromyographic (EMG) signals were measured during isometric contraction of hamstring muscles in 10 healthy adults. The biceps femoris muscle long head (BF-L) and semimembranosus muscle (SM) had hemi-pennate architecture and their fiber length per total muscle length (FL/TML) was smaller than that of semtendinosus muscle (ST) and biceps femoris muscle short head (BF-S) with other architecture. The decrease of total muscle length per fiber length (ΔTML/FL) was larger in BF-L and SM than in ST and BF-S. The EMG activities at 0° of knee angle were at maximal compared with other knee angles and were of similar level in BF-L, in SM and in ST, whereas they were considerably smaller in BF-S. The EMG at 0° of knee angle activity per physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA) was about 1.6 times greater in BF-L than in SM. These results indicate the highest risk of muscle strain was in BF-L followed by SM.

  20. Rehabilitation of acute hamstring strain injuries.

    PubMed

    Sherry, Marc A; Johnston, Tyler S; Heiderscheit, Bryan C

    2015-04-01

    Acute hamstring injuries are responsible for significant time loss for athletes. As there are a multitude of injury mechanisms, thorough evaluation is imperative for determining the appropriate plan of care and adequate rehabilitation is required to reduce the risk of recurrent injuries.

  1. Adhesive bacterial colonization of exposed traumatized tendon.

    PubMed

    Webb, L X; Hobgood, C D; Meredith, J W; Gristina, A G

    1987-05-01

    Recent studies of compromised or damaged tissues, as well as biomaterials, have shown that they provide a particularly fertile substratum for bacterial colonization. Colonization in these environments is mediated by a process of microbial adhesion to surfaces of the substrata. In this report, we present electron microscopic studies of a portion of damaged and infected tendon. These studies demonstrate colonies of bacteria surrounded by a ruthenium red-staining exopolysaccharide biofilm and adhesion to the surface of the tendon by means of an exopolysaccharide polymer. We suggest that this adhesive form of bacterial colonization may partially explain the resistance of exposed tendon to effective debridement by simple mechanical measures and to coverage with granulation tissue, partial-thickness skin grafts, and vascularized tissue grafts.

  2. Biomimetic scaffold design for functional and integrative tendon repair.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinzhi; Bogdanowicz, Danielle; Erisken, Cevat; Lee, Nancy M; Lu, Helen H

    2012-02-01

    Rotator cuff tears represent the most common shoulder injuries in the United States. The debilitating effect of this degenerative condition coupled with the high incidence of failure associated with existing graft choices underscores the clinical need for alternative grafting solutions. The 2 critical design criteria for the ideal tendon graft would require the graft to not only exhibit physiologically relevant mechanical properties but also be able to facilitate functional graft integration by promoting the regeneration of the native tendon-to-bone interface. Centered on these design goals, this review will highlight current approaches to functional and integrative tendon repair. In particular, the application of biomimetic design principles through the use of nanofiber- and nanocomposite-based scaffolds for tendon tissue engineering will be discussed. This review will begin with nanofiber-based approaches to functional tendon repair, followed by a section highlighting the exciting research on tendon-to-bone interface regeneration, with an emphasis on implementation of strategic biomimicry in nanofiber scaffold design and the concomitant formation of graded multi-tissue systems for integrative soft-tissue repair. This review will conclude with a summary and discussion of future directions.

  3. Prevalence and influence of tibial tunnel widening after isolated anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using patella-bone-tendon-bone-graft: long-term follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Struewer, Johannes; Efe, Turgay; Frangen, Thomas Manfred; Schwarting, Tim; Buecking, Benjamin; Ruchholtz, Steffen; Schüttler, Karl Friedrich; Ziring, Ewgeni

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate incidence, degree and impact of tibial tunnel widening (TW) on patient-reported long-term clinical outcome, knee joint stability and prevalence of osteoarthritis (OA) after isolated anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. On average, 13.5 years after ACL reconstruction via patella-bone-tendon-bone autograft, 73 patients have been re-evaluated. Inclusion criteria consisted of an isolated anterior cruciate ligament rupture and reconstruction, a minimum of 10-year follow-up and no previous anterior cruciate ligament repair or associated intra-articular lesions. Clinical evaluation was performed via the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) score and the Tegner and Lysholm scores. Instrumental anterior laxity testing was carried out with the KT-1000™ arthrometer. The degree of degenerative changes and the prevalence of osteoarthritis were assessed with the Kellgren-Lawrence score. Tibial tunnel enlargement was radiographically evaluated on both antero-posterior and lateral views under establishment of 4 degrees of tibial tunnel widening by measuring the actual tunnel diameters in mm on the sclerotic margins of the inserted tunnels on 3 different points (T1–T3). Afterwards, a conversion of the absolute values in mm into a 4 staged ratio, based on the comparison to the results of the initial drill-width, should provide a better quantification and statistical analysis. Evaluation was performed postoperatively as well as on 2 year follow-up and 13 years after ACL reconstruction. Minimum follow-up was 10 years. 75% of patients were graded A or B according to IKDC score. The mean Lysholm score was 90.2±4.8 (25–100). Radiological assessment on long-term follow-up showed in 45% a grade I, in 24% a grade II, in 17% a grade III and in additional 12% a grade IV enlargement of the tibial tunnel. No evident progression of TW was found in comparison to the 2 year results. Radiological evaluation revealed

  4. THE ROLE OF MECHANOBIOLOGY IN TENDON HEALING

    PubMed Central

    Killian, Megan L.; Cavinatto, Leonardo; Galatz, Leesa M.; Thomopoulos, Stavros

    2011-01-01

    Mechanical cues affect tendon healing, homeostasis, and development in a variety of settings. Alterations in the mechanical environment are known to result in changes in the expression of extracellular matrix proteins, growth factors, transcription factors, and cytokines that can alter tendon structure and cell viability. Loss of muscle force in utero or in the immediate postnatal period delays tendon and enthesis development. The response of healing tendons to mechanical load varies depending on anatomic location. Flexor tendons require motion to prevent adhesion formation, yet excessive force results in gap formation and subsequent weakening of the repair. Excessive motion in the setting of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction causes accumulation of macrophages, which are detrimental to tendon graft healing. Complete removal of load is detrimental to rotator cuff healing, yet large forces are also harmful. Controlled loading can enhance healing in most settings; however, a fine balance must be reached between loads that are too low (leading to a catabolic state) and too high (leading to micro-damage). This review will summarize existing knowledge of the mechanobiology of tendon development, homeostasis, and healing. PMID:22244066

  5. Influence of autograft removal on rabbit patellar tendon length.

    PubMed

    Monllau, J C; Hinarejos, P; Alvarez, P; Alameda, F; Ballester, J

    2004-02-01

    Twelve adult New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into two groups. In group 1, 30% of the central mass of the right patellar tendon was removed. In group 2, 60% was removed. The left knees served as controls. The animals were killed 1 year later. The patella-patellar tendon-tibial tuberosity units of all knees were studied using histological and morphometric analysis. In both groups, the tendons had lengthened. Lengthening average was 2.50 mm in group 1 and 8.17 mm in group 2. In both groups, histology revealed poor alignment of the collagen fibres and high cellularity, although the findings in group 1 were nearer the normal histological pattern. The results suggest that removal of significant portions of the patellar tendon leads to lengthening of the resulting tendon. In clinical practice, it seems prudent to pay attention to the dimensions of the patellar tendon when harvesting a graft.

  6. Compressive properties of cd-HA-gelatin modified intrasynovial tendon allograft in canine model in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Jun; Zhao, Chunfeng; Chen, Qingshan; Thoreson, Andrew R; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C

    2011-06-01

    Although we sometimes use the intrasynovial tendon allograft as a donor, the gliding ability of allograft prepared by lyophilization is significantly decreased. The gliding ability of the grafted tendon after tendon reconstruction is very important because the high gliding resistance causes more adhesion and leads to poor clinical results. We recently revealed that tendon surface treatment with a carbodiimide derivatized HA (cd-HA)-gelatin mixture for intrasynovial tendon allograft significantly improved its gliding ability. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether this cd-HA-gelatin treatment affects the tendon mechanical property or not. A total of 40 flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) tendons from canines were evaluated for compressive property by using indentation test. Indentation stiffness was measured for normal tendon, rehydrated tendon after lyophilization, rehydrated tendon after lyophilization that was implanted 6 weeks in vivo, and cd-HA treated rehydrated tendon after lyophilization that was implanted 6 weeks in vivo. The results for all groups showed no significant difference in the tendon compressive properties. The findings of these results demonstrate that cd-HA treatment for intrasynovial tendon allograft is an excellent method to improve the tendon gliding ability after lyophilization without changing the compressive property of donor tendon. PMID:21549380

  7. Hamstrings stretch reflex in human spasticity

    PubMed Central

    Burke, David; Gillies, J. D.; Lance, James W.

    1971-01-01

    In 16 patients with spastic paralysis the hamstrings stretch reflex was found to increase as the velocity of stretch increased, and generally to subside after movement ceased. These effects are attributable to the dynamic property of the primary spindle ending. The stretch reflex commonly appeared in only the last third of the stretching movement and was maximal as the knee became fully extended. This is consistent with the static properties of the primary and secondary spindle endings, and accounts for the absence of the clasp-knife phenomenon in the spastic hamstrings. The difference in the nature of the stretch reflex in spastic flexor and extensor muscles is best explained by the differential reflex effects of group II afferent fibres which facilitate flexor motoneurones and inhibit extensor motoneurones. PMID:4255176

  8. Endoscopic proximal hamstring repair and ischial bursectomy.

    PubMed

    Dierckman, Brian D; Guanche, Carlos A

    2012-12-01

    With the significant increase in use of the arthroscope around the hip have come several less invasive techniques to manage pathologies around this joint. This technical note with a video details one such technique that allows for the endoscopic management of proximal hamstring tears and chronic ischial bursitis, which until now have been managed exclusively with much larger open approaches. This procedure allows for complete exposure of the posterior aspect of the hip in a safe, minimally invasive fashion. PMID:23766996

  9. Decellularized and Engineered Tendons as Biological Substitutes: A Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Lovati, Arianna B.; Bottagisio, Marta; Moretti, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    Tendon ruptures are a great burden in clinics. Finding a proper graft material as a substitute for tendon repair is one of the main challenges in orthopaedics, for which the requirement of a biological scaffold would be different for each clinical application. Among biological scaffolds, the use of decellularized tendon-derived matrix increasingly represents an interesting approach to treat tendon ruptures. We analyzed in vitro and in vivo studies focused on the development of efficient protocols for the decellularization and for the cell reseeding of the tendon matrix to obtain medical devices for tendon substitution. Our review considered also the proper tendon source and preclinical animal models with the aim of entering into clinical trials. The results highlight a wide panorama in terms of allogenic or xenogeneic tendon sources, specimen dimensions, physical or chemical decellularization techniques, and the cell type variety for reseeding from terminally differentiated to undifferentiated mesenchymal stem cells and their static or dynamic culture employed to generate implantable constructs tested in different animal models. We try to identify the most efficient approach to achieve an optimal biological scaffold for biomechanics and intrinsic properties, resembling the native tendon and being applicable in clinics in the near future, with particular attention to the Achilles tendon substitution. PMID:26880985

  10. Laminar Tendon Composites with Enhanced Mechanical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Alberti, Kyle A.; Sun, Jeong-Yun; Illeperuma, Widusha R.; Suo, Zhigang; Xu, Qiaobing

    2015-01-01

    Purpose A strong isotropic material that is both biocompatible and biodegradable is desired for many biomedical applications, including rotator cuff repair, tendon and ligament repair, vascular grafting, among others. Recently, we developed a technique, called “bioskiving” to create novel 2D and 3D constructs from decellularized tendon, using a combination of mechanical sectioning, and layered stacking and rolling. The unidirectionally aligned collagen nanofibers (derived from sections of decellularized tendon) offer good mechanical properties to the constructs compared with those fabricated from reconstituted collagen. Methods In this paper, we studied the effect that several variables have on the mechanical properties of structures fabricated from tendon slices, including crosslinking density and the orientation in which the fibers are stacked. Results We observed that following stacking and crosslinking, the strength of the constructs is significantly improved, with crosslinked sections having an ultimate tens ile strength over 20 times greater than non-crosslinked samples, and a modulus nearly 50 times higher. The mechanism of the mechanical failure mode of the tendon constructs with or without crosslinking was also investigated. Conclusions The strength and fiber organization, combined with the ability to introduce transversely isotropic mechanical properties makes the laminar tendon composites a biocompatiable material that may find future use in a number of biomedical and tissue engineering applications. PMID:25691802

  11. Low back pain, radiculopathy, and bilateral proximal hamstring ruptures: a case report.

    PubMed

    Deren, Matthew E; DeFroda, Steven F; Mukand, Nita H; Mukand, Jon A

    2015-12-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is a common complaint in the United States, with an incidence of 6.3%-15.4% and yearly recurrence in 54%-90% of patients.1 Trends show more frequent diagnostic testing, opioid use, and surgical intervention as the incidence of LBP increases.2 LBP is defined as pain at and near the lumbosacral region that can vary with physical activity and time. LBP is usually related to pathology of muscles, ligaments, spinal column joints, nerve roots, and the spinal cord. During the assessment of LBP, practitioners must also consider less common causes of pain in that region. For instance, patients with indolent or nighttime pain may have infectious or malignant processes. Referred pain from injuries to pelvic musculature or abdominal contents should be considered, especially following a traumatic event. One of these injuries, which can present as acute low back pain, is rupture of the proximal hamstring tendon. On rare occasion, concomitant LBP, radiculopathy, and hamstring injuries can occur;. This diagnostic challenge is described in the following case. PMID:26623451

  12. Traumatic simultaneous rupture of both flexor tendons in a finger of an athlete.

    PubMed

    Tan, Virak; Mundanthanam, George; Weiland, Andrew J

    2005-10-01

    We report a case of traumatic simultaneous disruption of both finger flexor tendons in a professional athlete. The novelties in this report are (1) the location of the rupture (FDS at midsubstance and FDP at insertion) and (2) the proposition that a normal but diminutive FDS tendon is a contributing factor in the rupture. We recommend that simultaneous rupture of the normal flexor tendons be treated in a similar manner as tendon lacerations. Primary repair, if possible, is the treatment of choice in these acute injuries. Tendon grafting should be reserved for subacute or chronic cases in which restoration of active finger flexion is needed.

  13. Hamstring Injuries--An Examination of Possible Causes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liemohn, Wendell

    On the basis of research, the following characteristics appear to be important factors relative to precluding hamstring strains in sprinters: bilaterality relative to hamstring and quadricep strength development, optimum strength ratios between ipsilateral antagonists throughout the range of movement, and above-normal hip-joint flexibility. (JD)

  14. Empirical Assessment of Dynamic Hamstring Function during Human Walking

    PubMed Central

    Thelen, Darryl G.; Lenz, Amy L.; Francis, Carrie; Lenhart, Rachel; Hernández, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    The hamstrings are often associated with the development of crouch gait, a fatiguing form of walking characterized by excessive hip flexion, knee flexion and ankle dorsiflexion during stance. However, recent studies have called into question whether abnormally active hamstrings induce the limb to move into a crouch posture. The purpose of this study was to directly measure the influence of the hamstrings on limb posture during stance. Nineteen healthy young adults walked on an instrumented treadmill at their preferred speed. A 90 ms long pulse train was used to stimulate the medial hamstrings during either terminal swing or loading response of random gait cycles. Induced motion was defined as the difference in joint angle trajectories between stimulated and non-stimulated strides. A dynamic musculoskeletal simulation of normal gait was generated and similarly perturbed by increasing hamstring excitation. The experiments show that hamstring stimulation induced a significant increase in posterior pelvic tilt, knee flexion and ankle dorsiflexion during stance, while having relatively less influence on the hip angular trajectory. The induced motion patterns were similar whether the hamstrings were stimulated during late swing or early stance, and were generally consistent with the direction of induced motion predicted by gait simulation models. Hence, we conclude that overactive hamstrings have the potential to induce the limb to move toward a crouch gait posture. PMID:23540723

  15. The modified bone-patellar tendon-bone allograft in single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kang, Huijun; Wang, Fei

    2011-06-01

    Bone-patellar tendon-bone graft has been an attractive option for single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in clinical practice. However, the graft-tunnel mismatch in the proximal part of the tibial tunnel and the ultimate strength after postoperative ligamentization process have been potential problems for the traditional 10-mm wide graft. We modified the traditional bone-patellar tendon-bone allograft to make it double-layer, as an ideal substitute graft for single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with better graft-tunnel match and higher initial graft strength.

  16. Transverse Compression of Tendons.

    PubMed

    Salisbury, S T Samuel; Buckley, C Paul; Zavatsky, Amy B

    2016-04-01

    A study was made of the deformation of tendons when compressed transverse to the fiber-aligned axis. Bovine digital extensor tendons were compression tested between flat rigid plates. The methods included: in situ image-based measurement of tendon cross-sectional shapes, after preconditioning but immediately prior to testing; multiple constant-load creep/recovery tests applied to each tendon at increasing loads; and measurements of the resulting tendon displacements in both transverse directions. In these tests, friction resisted axial stretch of the tendon during compression, giving approximately plane-strain conditions. This, together with the assumption of a form of anisotropic hyperelastic constitutive model proposed previously for tendon, justified modeling the isochronal response of tendon as that of an isotropic, slightly compressible, neo-Hookean solid. Inverse analysis, using finite-element (FE) simulations of the experiments and 10 s isochronal creep displacement data, gave values for Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio of this solid of 0.31 MPa and 0.49, respectively, for an idealized tendon shape and averaged data for all the tendons and E = 0.14 and 0.10 MPa for two specific tendons using their actual measured geometry. The compression load versus displacement curves, as measured and as simulated, showed varying degrees of stiffening with increasing load. This can be attributed mostly to geometrical changes in tendon cross section under load, varying according to the initial 3D shape of the tendon. PMID:26833218

  17. Transverse Compression of Tendons.

    PubMed

    Salisbury, S T Samuel; Buckley, C Paul; Zavatsky, Amy B

    2016-04-01

    A study was made of the deformation of tendons when compressed transverse to the fiber-aligned axis. Bovine digital extensor tendons were compression tested between flat rigid plates. The methods included: in situ image-based measurement of tendon cross-sectional shapes, after preconditioning but immediately prior to testing; multiple constant-load creep/recovery tests applied to each tendon at increasing loads; and measurements of the resulting tendon displacements in both transverse directions. In these tests, friction resisted axial stretch of the tendon during compression, giving approximately plane-strain conditions. This, together with the assumption of a form of anisotropic hyperelastic constitutive model proposed previously for tendon, justified modeling the isochronal response of tendon as that of an isotropic, slightly compressible, neo-Hookean solid. Inverse analysis, using finite-element (FE) simulations of the experiments and 10 s isochronal creep displacement data, gave values for Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio of this solid of 0.31 MPa and 0.49, respectively, for an idealized tendon shape and averaged data for all the tendons and E = 0.14 and 0.10 MPa for two specific tendons using their actual measured geometry. The compression load versus displacement curves, as measured and as simulated, showed varying degrees of stiffening with increasing load. This can be attributed mostly to geometrical changes in tendon cross section under load, varying according to the initial 3D shape of the tendon.

  18. Resurfacing with Chemically Modified Hyaluronic Acid and Lubricin for Flexor Tendon Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chunfeng; Hashimoto, Takahiro; Kirk, Ramona L.; Thoreson, Andrew R.; Jay, Gregory D.; Moran, Steven L.; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C.

    2013-01-01

    We assessed surface coating with carbodiimide derivatized hyaluronic acid combined with lubricin (cd-HA-Lubricin) as a way to improve extrasynovial tendon surface quality and, consequently, the functional results in flexor tendon reconstruction, using a canine in vivo model. The second and fifth flexor digitorum profundus tendons from 14 dogs were reconstructed with autologs peroneus longus (PL) tendons 6 weeks after a failed primary repair. One digit was treated with cd-HA-Lubricin, and the other was treated with saline as the control. Six weeks following grafting, the digits and graft tendons were functionally and histologically evaluated. Adhesion score, normalized work of flexion, graft friction in zone II, and adhesion breaking strength at the proximal repair site in zone III were all lower in the cd-HA-Lubricin treated group compared to the control group. The strength at the distal tendon/bone interface was decreased in the cd-HA-Lubricin treated grafts compared to the control grafts. Histology showed inferior healing in the cd-HA-Lubricin group at both proximal and distal repair sites. However, cd-HA-Lubricin treatment did not result in any gap or rupture at either the proximal or distal repair sites. These results demonstrate that cd-HA-Lubricin can eliminate graft adhesions and improve digit function, but that treatment may have an adverse effect on tendon healing. PMID:23335124

  19. Resurfacing with chemically modified hyaluronic acid and lubricin for flexor tendon reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chunfeng; Hashimoto, Takahiro; Kirk, Ramona L; Thoreson, Andrew R; Jay, Gregory D; Moran, Steven L; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C

    2013-06-01

    We assessed surface coating with carbodiimide derivatized hyaluronic acid combined with lubricin (cd-HA-Lubricin) as a way to improve extrasynovial tendon surface quality and, consequently, the functional results in flexor tendon reconstruction, using a canine in vivo model. The second and fifth flexor digitorum profundus tendons from 14 dogs were reconstructed with autologs peroneus longus (PL) tendons 6 weeks after a failed primary repair. One digit was treated with cd-HA-Lubricin, and the other was treated with saline as the control. Six weeks following grafting, the digits and graft tendons were functionally and histologically evaluated. Adhesion score, normalized work of flexion, graft friction in zone II, and adhesion breaking strength at the proximal repair site in zone III were all lower in the cd-HA-Lubricin treated group compared to the control group. The strength at the distal tendon/bone interface was decreased in the cd-HA-Lubricin treated grafts compared to the control grafts. Histology showed inferior healing in the cd-HA-Lubricin group at both proximal and distal repair sites. However, cd-HA-Lubricin treatment did not result in any gap or rupture at either the proximal or distal repair sites. These results demonstrate that cd-HA-Lubricin can eliminate graft adhesions and improve digit function, but that treatment may have an adverse effect on tendon healing.

  20. [The effect of platelet-rich plasma on graft healing in reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament of the knee joint: prospective study].

    PubMed

    Komzák, M; Hart, R; Šmíd, P; Puskeiler, M; Jajtner, P

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE OF THE STUDY Growth factors produced by platelets enhance tissue healing. The aim of this study was to confirm or disprove the hypothesis that, in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, the application of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) into the tibial and femoral tunnels and in the graft enhances graft maturation and graft-bone interface healing and thus improves knee function at 3 and 12 months post-operatively in comparison with the control group. MATERIAL AND METHODS A total of 40 patient had the surgery; 20 underwent single-bundle hamstring reconstruction with PRP application (PRP group) and 20 had the same surgery without PRP addition (control group). A 5 ml amount of PRP was obtained from the patient's peripheral blood. A graft inserted in the bone tunnels was fixed with interference screws and, after intra-articular fluid aspiration, 1 ml of PRP was injected into each tunnel and 3 ml were evenly applied to the intra-articular portion of the graft. The patients were examined by MRI at 3 and 12 months after surgery. The subsidence of swelling in the tunnelsurrounding tissues was taken as a sign of graft-bone interface healing, and increased signal intensity of the graft was considered as a result of its ligamentisation. The knee functional status was evaluated at 3 and 12 post-operative months, using the scoring systems (Cincinnati score, IKDC score). RESULTS Bone swelling was found at 3 post-operative months in 18 of 20 patients in both the PRP and the control group. Graft signal intensity was increased in most patients (19 of the PRP group; 18 control patients; p = 0.949). The Cincinnati score at 3 months had an average value of 72.7 (34-100; SO, 18.7) in the PRP group and 73.4 (42-99; SO, 16.3) in the control group (p = 0.793). The functional score after 12 months improved to 97.5 (75-100; SO, 12.8) in the PRP group and to 95.1 (66-100; SO, 13.1) in the control group; there was no significant difference between the groups (p = 0.885) at either

  1. Biology and augmentation of tendon-bone insertion repair

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Surgical reattachment of tendon and bone such as in rotator cuff repair, patellar-patella tendon repair and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction often fails due to the failure of regeneration of the specialized tissue ("enthesis") which connects tendon to bone. Tendon-to-bone healing taking place between inhomogenous tissues is a slow process compared to healing within homogenous tissue, such as tendon to tendon or bone to bone healing. Therefore special attention must be paid to augment tendon to bone insertion (TBI) healing. Apart from surgical fixation, biological and biophysical interventions have been studied aiming at regeneration of TBI healing complex, especially the regeneration of interpositioned fibrocartilage and new bone at the healing junction. This paper described the biology and the factors influencing TBI healing using patella-patellar tendon (PPT) healing and tendon graft to bone tunnel healing in ACL reconstruction as examples. Recent development in the improvement of TBI healing and directions for future studies were also reviewed and discussed. PMID:20727196

  2. Conservative Treatment of Subacute Proximal Hamstring Tendinopathy Using Eccentric Exercises Performed With a Treadmill: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    CUSHMAN, DANIEL; RHO, MONICA E.

    2015-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN Case report. BACKGROUND Proximal hamstring tendinopathy in runners is characterized by pain with passive hip flexion with the knee extended, active hip extension, and pain with sitting. Relatively little literature exists on the condition, and publications on nonsurgical treatment protocols are even more scarce. Surgical intervention, which comprises the majority of literature for treatment of this condition, is an option for cases that fail to respond to nonsurgical treatment. CASE DESCRIPTION The patient was a 34-year-old, otherwise healthy male triathlete with unilateral proximal hamstring tendinopathy diagnosed by ultrasound, who had pain only with running and prolonged sitting. After he failed to respond to 4 weeks of eccentric knee flexion and lumbopelvic musculature strengthening exercises, an eccentric hip extensor strengthening program using a treadmill was initiated. This treadmill exercise was performed on a daily basis, in addition to a lumbopelvic musculature strengthening program. OUTCOMES The patient noted a decrease in pain within 2 weeks of initiating the new exercise, and was able to return to gradual running after 4 weeks and to speed training after 12 weeks. He returned to competition shortly thereafter and had no recurrence for 12 months after the initiation of therapy. His score on the Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment-proximal hamstring tendons improved from 23 on initial presentation to 83 at 12 weeks after the initiation of therapy. DISCUSSION We described the management of a triathlete with subacute proximal hamstring tendinopathy, who responded well to nonsurgical treatment using eccentric hip extension strengthening using a treadmill. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE Therapy, level 4. PMID:25996362

  3. Achilles tendon: US examination

    SciTech Connect

    Fornage, B.D.

    1986-06-01

    Real-time ultrasonography (US) using linear-array probes and a stand-off pad as a ''waterpath'' was performed to evaluate the Achilles tendon in 67 patients (including 24 athletes) believed to have acute or chronic traumatic or inflammatory pathologic conditions. Tendons in 23 patients appeared normal on US scans. The 44 abnormal tendons comprised five complete and four partial ruptures, seven instances of postoperative change, and 28 cases of tendonitis. US depiction of the inner structure of the tendon resulted in the diagnosis of focal abnormalities, including partial ruptures, nodules, and calcifications. Tendonitis was characterized by enlargement and decreased echogenicity of the tendon. The normal US appearance of the Achilles tendon is described.

  4. Muscle activation during various hamstring exercises.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Matt J; Hammond, Kelley G; Schilling, Brian K; Ferreria, Lucas C; Reed, Jacob P; Weiss, Lawrence W

    2014-06-01

    The dorsal muscles of the lower torso and extremities have often been denoted the "posterior chain." These muscles are used to support the thoracic and lumbar spine and peripheral joints, including the hip, knee, and ankle on the dorsal aspect of the body. This study investigated the relative muscle activity of the hamstring group and selected surrounding musculature during the leg curl, good morning, glute-ham raise, and Romanian deadlift (RDL). Twelve healthy, weight-trained men performed duplicate trials of single repetitions at 85% 1-repetition maximum for each lift in random order, during which surface electromyography and joint angle data were obtained. Repeated measures analysis of variance across the 4 exercises was performed to compare the activity from the erector spinae (ES), gluteus medius (GMed), semitendinosus (ST), biceps femoris (BF), and medial gastrocnemius (MGas). Significant differences (p ≤ 0.05) were noted in eccentric muscle activity between exercise for the MGas (p < 0.027), ST (p < 0.001), BF (p < 0.001), and ES (p = 0.032), and in concentric muscle activity, for the ES (p < 0.001), BF (p = 0.010), ST (p = 0.009), MGas (p < 0.001), and the GMed (p = 0.018). Bonferroni post hoc analysis revealed significant pairwise differences during eccentric actions for the BF, ST, and MGas. Post hoc analysis also revealed significant pairwise differences during concentric actions for the ES, BF, ST, MGas, and GMed. Each of these showed effect sizes that are large or greater. The main findings of this investigation are that the ST is substantially more active than the BF among all exercises, and hamstring activity was maximized in the RDL and glute-ham raise. Therefore, athletes and coaches who seek to maximize the involvement of the hamstring musculature should consider focusing on the glute-ham raise and RDL. PMID:24149748

  5. Hamstring strains in athletes: diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Clanton, T O; Coupe, K J

    1998-01-01

    Hamstring strains are among the most common injuries (and reinjuries) in athletes. Studies combining electromyography with gait analysis have elucidated the timing of activity of the three muscles of the hamstring group; they function during the early-stance phase for knee support, during the late-stance phase for propulsion, and during midswing to control the momentum of the leg. Muscle injury, whether partial or complete, occurs at the myotendinous junction, where force is concentrated. The healing response begins with inflammation, associated edema, and localized hemorrhage. After an initial period of reduced tension, the healing muscle regains strength rapidly as long as reinjury does not occur. Although the use of anti-inflammatory medication is a keystone of treatment, a certain degree of inflammation is necessary for removing necrotic muscle fibers and rescaffolding to allow optimal recovery. The protocol of rest, ice, compression, and elevation is still the preferred first-aid approach. After a brief period of immobilization (usually less than 1 week for even the most severe strain), mobilization is begun to properly align the regenerating muscle fibers and limit the extent of connective tissue fibrosis. Concurrent pain-free stretching and strengthening exercises (beginning with isometrics and progressing to isotonics and isokinetics) are essential to regain flexibility and prevent further injury and inflammation. Readiness for return to competition can be assessed by isokinetic testing to confirm that muscle-strength imbalances have been corrected, the hamstring-quadriceps ratio is 50% to 60%, and the strength of the injured leg has been restored to within 10% of that of the unaffected leg. The only indication for surgery is a complete rupture at or near the origin from the ischial tuberosity or distally at its insertion (either soft-tissue avulsion with a large defect or bone avulsion with displacement by 2 cm).

  6. Biomechanics of Tendon Transfers.

    PubMed

    Livermore, Andrew; Tueting, Jonathan L

    2016-08-01

    The transfer of tendons in the upper extremity is a powerful technique to restore function to a partially paralyzed hand. The biomechanical principles of muscle tension and tendon excursion dictate motor function both in the native as well as transferred states. Appropriately tensioning transferred tendons to maximize the function of the associated muscle remains an area of focused research. Newer methods of tendon coaptation have proven similar in strength to the standard Pulvertaft weave, affording more options to the surgeon. PMID:27387073

  7. Musculoskeletal diseases—tendon

    PubMed Central

    Sakabe, Tomoya; Sakai, Takao

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Tendons establish specific connections between muscles and the skeleton by transferring contraction forces from skeletal muscle to bone thereby allowing body movement. Tendon physiology and pathology are heavily dependent on mechanical stimuli. Tendon injuries clinically represent a serious and still unresolved problem since damaged tendon tissues heal very slowly and no surgical treatment can restore a damaged tendon to its normal structural integrity and mechanical strength. Understanding how mechanical stimuli regulate tendon tissue homeostasis and regeneration will improve the treatment of adult tendon injuries that still pose a great challenge in today's medicine. Source of data This review summarizes the current status of tendon treatment and discusses new directions from the point of view of cell-based therapy and regenerative medicine approach. We searched the available literature using PubMed for relevant original articles and reviews. Growing points Identification of tendon cell markers has enabled us to study precisely tendon healing and homeostasis. Clinically, tissue engineering for tendon injuries is an emerging technology comprising elements from the fields of cellular source, scaffold materials, growth factors/cytokines and gene delivering systems. Areas timely for developing research The clinical settings to establish appropriate microenvironment for injured tendons with the combination of these novel cellular- and molecular-based scaffolds will be critical for the treatment. PMID:21729872

  8. Tendon development and diseases.

    PubMed

    Gaut, Ludovic; Duprez, Delphine

    2016-01-01

    Tendon is a uniaxial connective tissue component of the musculoskeletal system. Tendon is involved in force transmission between muscle and bone. Tendon injury is very common and debilitating but tendon repair remains a clinical challenge for orthopedic medicine. In vertebrates, tendon is mainly composed of type I collagen fibrils, displaying a parallel organization along the tendon axis. The tendon-specific spatial organization of type I collagen provides the mechanical properties for tendon function. In contrast to other components of the musculoskeletal system, tendon biology is poorly understood. An important goal in tendon biology is to understand the mechanisms involved in the production and assembly of type I collagen fibrils during development, postnatal formation, and healing processes in order to design new therapies for tendon repair. In this review we highlight the current understanding of the molecular and mechanical signals known to be involved in tenogenesis during development, and how development provides insights into tendon healing processes. WIREs Dev Biol 2016, 5:5-23. doi: 10.1002/wdev.201 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  9. Pressurized gas filled tendons

    SciTech Connect

    Silcox, W. H.

    1985-06-04

    Pressurized gas filled tubular tendons provide a means for detecting leaks therein. Filling the tendon with a gaseous fluid provides increased buoyancy and reduces the weight supported by the buoyant structure. The use of a corrosion inhibiting gaseous fluid reduces the corrosion of the interior tendon wall.

  10. Biologics for tendon repair☆

    PubMed Central

    Docheva, Denitsa; Müller, Sebastian A.; Majewski, Martin; Evans, Christopher H.

    2015-01-01

    Tendon injuries are common and present a clinical challenge to orthopedic surgery mainly because these injuries often respond poorly to treatment and require prolonged rehabilitation. Therapeutic options used to repair ruptured tendons have consisted of suture, autografts, allografts, and synthetic prostheses. To date, none of these alternatives has provided a successful long-term solution, and often the restored tendons do not recover their complete strength and functionality. Unfortunately, our understanding of tendon biology lags far behind that of other musculoskeletal tissues, thus impeding the development of new treatment options for tendon conditions. Hence, in this review, after introducing the clinical significance of tendon diseases and the present understanding of tendon biology, we describe and critically assess the current strategies for enhancing tendon repair by biological means. These consist mainly of applying growth factors, stem cells, natural biomaterials and genes, alone or in combination, to the site of tendon damage. A deeper understanding of how tendon tissue and cells operate, combined with practical applications of modern molecular and cellular tools could provide the long awaited breakthrough in designing effective tendon-specific therapeutics and overall improvement of tendon disease management. PMID:25446135

  11. A new strategy for the decellularisation of large equine tendons as biocompatible tendon substitutes.

    PubMed

    Bottagisio, M; Pellegata, A F; Boschetti, F; Ferroni, M; Moretti, M; Lovati, A B

    2016-07-08

    Tendon ruptures and/or large losses remain to be a great clinical challenge and often require full replacement of the damaged tissue. The use of auto- and allografts or engineered scaffolds is an established approach to restore severe tendon injuries. However, these grafts are commonly related to scarce biocompatibility, site morbidity, chronic inflammation and poor biomechanical properties. Recently, the decellularisation techniques of allo- or xenografts using specific detergents have been studied and have been found to generate biocompatible substitutes that resemble the native tissue. This study aims to identify a novel decellularisation protocol for large equine tendons that would produce an extracellular matrix scaffold suitable for the regeneration of injured tendons in humans. Specifically, equine tendons were treated either with tri (n-butyl) phosphate alone, or associated to multiple concentrations of peracetic acid (1, 3 and 5 %), which has never before been tested in vitro.Samples were then analysed by histology and with biochemical, biomechanical, and cytotoxicity tests. The best decellularisation protocol, resulting from these examinations, was selected and the chosen scaffold was re-seeded with murine fibroblasts. Resulting grafts were tested for cell viability, histologic analysis, DNA and collagen content. The results identified 1 % tri (n-butyl) phosphate combined with 3 % peracetic acid as the most suitable decellularised matrix in terms of biochemical and biomechanical properties. Moreover, the non-cytotoxic nature of the decellularised matrix allowed for good fibroblast reseeding, thus demonstrating a biocompatible matrix that will be suitable for tendon tissue engineering and hopefully as substitutes in severe tendon damages.

  12. A new strategy for the decellularisation of large equine tendons as biocompatible tendon substitutes.

    PubMed

    Bottagisio, M; Pellegata, A F; Boschetti, F; Ferroni, M; Moretti, M; Lovati, A B

    2016-01-01

    Tendon ruptures and/or large losses remain to be a great clinical challenge and often require full replacement of the damaged tissue. The use of auto- and allografts or engineered scaffolds is an established approach to restore severe tendon injuries. However, these grafts are commonly related to scarce biocompatibility, site morbidity, chronic inflammation and poor biomechanical properties. Recently, the decellularisation techniques of allo- or xenografts using specific detergents have been studied and have been found to generate biocompatible substitutes that resemble the native tissue. This study aims to identify a novel decellularisation protocol for large equine tendons that would produce an extracellular matrix scaffold suitable for the regeneration of injured tendons in humans. Specifically, equine tendons were treated either with tri (n-butyl) phosphate alone, or associated to multiple concentrations of peracetic acid (1, 3 and 5 %), which has never before been tested in vitro.Samples were then analysed by histology and with biochemical, biomechanical, and cytotoxicity tests. The best decellularisation protocol, resulting from these examinations, was selected and the chosen scaffold was re-seeded with murine fibroblasts. Resulting grafts were tested for cell viability, histologic analysis, DNA and collagen content. The results identified 1 % tri (n-butyl) phosphate combined with 3 % peracetic acid as the most suitable decellularised matrix in terms of biochemical and biomechanical properties. Moreover, the non-cytotoxic nature of the decellularised matrix allowed for good fibroblast reseeding, thus demonstrating a biocompatible matrix that will be suitable for tendon tissue engineering and hopefully as substitutes in severe tendon damages. PMID:27386840

  13. Hamstring injuries. Proposed aetiological factors, prevention, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Agre, J C

    1985-01-01

    Injuries to the hamstring muscles can be devastating to the athlete because these injuries frequently heal slowly and have a tendency to recur. It is thought that many of the recurrent injuries to the hamstring musculotendinous unit are the result of inadequate rehabilitation following the initial injury. The severity of hamstring injuries is usually of first or second degree, but occasionally third-degree injuries (complete rupture of the musculotendinous unit) do occur. Most hamstring strain injuries occur while running or sprinting. Several aetiological factors have been proposed as being related to injury of the hamstring musculotendinous unit. They include: poor flexibility, inadequate muscle strength and/or endurance, dyssynergic muscle contraction during running, insufficient warm-up and stretching prior to exercise, awkward running style, and a return to activity before complete rehabilitation following injury. Treatment for hamstring injuries includes rest and immobilisation immediately following injury and then a gradually increasing programme of mobilisation, strengthening, and activity. Permission to return to athletic competition should be withheld until full rehabilitation has been achieved (complete return of muscle strength, endurance, and flexibility in addition to a return of co-ordination and athletic agility). Failure to achieve full rehabilitation will only predispose the athlete to recurrent injury. The best treatment for hamstring injuries is prevention, which should include training to maintain and/or improve strength, flexibility, endurance, co-ordination, and agility.

  14. Radial Nerve Tendon Transfers.

    PubMed

    Cheah, Andre Eu-Jin; Etcheson, Jennifer; Yao, Jeffrey

    2016-08-01

    Radial nerve palsy typically occurs as a result of trauma or iatrogenic injury and leads to the loss of wrist extension, finger extension, thumb extension, and a reduction in grip strength. In the absence of nerve recovery, reconstruction of motor function involves tendon transfer surgery. The most common donor tendons include the pronator teres, wrist flexors, and finger flexors. The type of tendon transfer is classified based on the donor for the extensor digitorum communis. Good outcomes have been reported for most methods of radial nerve tendon transfers as is typical for positional tendon transfers not requiring significant power. PMID:27387076

  15. Attritional rupture of the extensor pollicis longus tendon by an osseous spur more than 30 years after wrist injury: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kuriyama, Kohji; Murase, Tsuyoshi; Moritomo, Hisao; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2014-12-01

    A 46-year-old woman sustained a rupture of the extensor pollicis longus tendon more than 30 years after wrist injury. She was successfully treated with palmaris longus tendon graft and excision of the osseous spur. Attrition of the extensor pollicis longus tendon by a newly formed osseous spur was the major mechanism.

  16. Effects of Trypsinization and Mineralization on Intrasynovial Tendon Allograft Healing to Bone

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Jin; van Alphen, Nick A.; Thoreson, Andrew R.; Chen, Qingshan; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C.; Schmid, Thomas M.; Zhao, Chunfeng

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to develop a novel technology to enhance tendon-to-bone interface healing by trypsinizing and mineralizing (TM) an intrasynovial tendon allograft in a rabbit bone tunnel model. Eight rabbit flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) tendons were used to optimize the trypsinization process. An additional 24 FDP tendons were stratified into control and TM groups; in each group, 4 tendons were used for in vitro evaluation of TM and 8 were transplanted into proximal tibial bone tunnels in rabbits. The samples were evaluated histologically and with mechanical testing at postoperative week 8. Maximum failure strength and linear stiffness were not significantly different between the control and TM tendons. A thin fibrous band of scar tissue formed at the graft-to-bone interface in the control group. However, only the TM group showed obvious new bone formation inside the tendon graft and a visible fibrocartilage layer at the bone tunnel entrance. This study is the first to explore effects of TM on the intrasynovial allograft healing to a bone tunnel. TM showed beneficial effects on chondrogenesis, osteogenesis, and integration of the intrasynovial tendon graft, but mechanical strength was the same as the control tendons in this short-term in vivo study. PMID:25611186

  17. Fibrillins in Tendon

    PubMed Central

    Giusti, Betti; Pepe, Guglielmina

    2016-01-01

    Tendons among connective tissue, mainly collagen, contain also elastic fibers (EF) made of fibrillin 1, fibrillin 2 and elastin that are broadly distributed in tendons and represent 1–2% of the dried mass of the tendon. Only in the last years, studies on structure and function of EF in tendons have been performed. Aim of this review is to revise data on the organization of EF in tendons, in particular fibrillin structure and function, and on the clinical manifestations associated to alterations of EF in tendons. Indeed, microfibrils may contribute to tendon mechanics; therefore, their alterations may cause joint hypermobility and contractures which have been found to be clinical features in patients with Marfan syndrome (MFS) and Beals syndrome. The two diseases are caused by mutations in genes FBN1 and FBN2 encoding fibrillin 1 and fibrillin 2, respectively. PMID:27812333

  18. Tendon Structure and Composition.

    PubMed

    Thorpe, Chavaunne T; Screen, Hazel R C

    2016-01-01

    Tendons are soft, fibrous tissues that connect muscle to bone. Their main function is to transfer muscle generated force to the bony skeleton, facilitating movement around a joint, and as such they are relatively passive, inelastic structures, able to resist high forces. Tendons are predominantly composed of collagen, which is arranged in a hierarchical manner parallel to the long axis of the tendon, resulting in high tensile strength. Tendon also contains a range of non-collagenous proteins, present in low amounts, which nevertheless have important functional roles. In this chapter, we describe general tendon composition and structure, and discuss how variations in composition and structure at different levels of the tendon hierarchy confer specific mechanical properties, which are related to tendon function. PMID:27535244

  19. Immediate Effects of Neurodynamic Sliding versus Muscle Stretching on Hamstring Flexibility in Subjects with Short Hamstring Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Castellote-Caballero, Yolanda; Valenza, Maríe C.; Puentedura, Emilio J.; Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César; Alburquerque-Sendín, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Background. Hamstring injuries continue to affect active individuals and although inadequate muscle extensibility remains a commonly accepted factor, little is known about the most effective method to improve flexibility. Purpose. To determine if an isolated neurodynamic sciatic sliding technique would improve hamstring flexibility to a greater degree than stretching or a placebo intervention in asymptomatic subjects with short hamstring syndrome (SHS). Study Design. Randomized double-blinded controlled trial. Methods. One hundred and twenty subjects with SHS were randomized to 1 of 3 groups: neurodynamic sliding, hamstring stretching, and placebo control. Each subject's dominant leg was measured for straight leg raise (SLR) range of motion (ROM) before and after interventions. Data were analyzed with a 3 × 2 mixed model ANOVA followed by simple main effects analyses. Results. At the end of the study, more ROM was observed in the Neurodynamic and Stretching groups compared to the Control group and more ROM in the Neurodynamic group compared to Stretching group. Conclusion. Findings suggest that a neurodynamic sliding technique will increase hamstring flexibility to a greater degree than static hamstring stretching in healthy subjects with SHS. Clinical Relevance. The use of neurodynamic sliding techniques to improve hamstring flexibility in sports may lead to a decreased incidence in injuries; however, this needs to be formally tested. PMID:26464889

  20. Immediate Effects of Neurodynamic Sliding versus Muscle Stretching on Hamstring Flexibility in Subjects with Short Hamstring Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Castellote-Caballero, Yolanda; Valenza, Maríe C; Puentedura, Emilio J; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Alburquerque-Sendín, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Background. Hamstring injuries continue to affect active individuals and although inadequate muscle extensibility remains a commonly accepted factor, little is known about the most effective method to improve flexibility. Purpose. To determine if an isolated neurodynamic sciatic sliding technique would improve hamstring flexibility to a greater degree than stretching or a placebo intervention in asymptomatic subjects with short hamstring syndrome (SHS). Study Design. Randomized double-blinded controlled trial. Methods. One hundred and twenty subjects with SHS were randomized to 1 of 3 groups: neurodynamic sliding, hamstring stretching, and placebo control. Each subject's dominant leg was measured for straight leg raise (SLR) range of motion (ROM) before and after interventions. Data were analyzed with a 3 × 2 mixed model ANOVA followed by simple main effects analyses. Results. At the end of the study, more ROM was observed in the Neurodynamic and Stretching groups compared to the Control group and more ROM in the Neurodynamic group compared to Stretching group. Conclusion. Findings suggest that a neurodynamic sliding technique will increase hamstring flexibility to a greater degree than static hamstring stretching in healthy subjects with SHS. Clinical Relevance. The use of neurodynamic sliding techniques to improve hamstring flexibility in sports may lead to a decreased incidence in injuries; however, this needs to be formally tested. PMID:26464889

  1. Effects of lubricant and autologous bone marrow stromal cell augmentation on immobilized flexor tendon repairs.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chunfeng; Ozasa, Yasuhiro; Shimura, Haruhiko; Reisdorf, Ramona L; Thoreson, Andrew R; Jay, Gregory; Moran, Steven L; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to test a novel treatment that carbodiimide-derivatized-hyaluronic acid-lubricin (cd-HA-lubricin) combined cell-based therapy in an immobilized flexor tendon repair in a canine model. Seventy-eight flexor tendons from 39 dogs were transected. One tendon was treated with cd-HA-lubricin plus an interpositional graft of 8 × 10(5) BMSCs and GDF-5. The other tendon was repaired without treatment. After 21 day of immobilization, 19 dogs were sacrificed; the remaining 20 dogs underwent a 21-day rehabilitation protocol before euthanasia. The work of flexion, tendon gliding resistance, and adhesion score in treated tendons were significantly less than the untreated tendons (p < 0.05). The failure strength of the untreated tendons was higher than the treated tendons at 21 and 42 days (p < 0.05). However, there is no significant difference in stiffness between two groups at day 42. Histologic analysis of treated tendons showed a smooth surface and viable transplanted cells 42 days after the repair, whereas untreated tendons showed severe adhesion formation around the repair site. The combination of lubricant and cell treatment resulted in significantly improved digit function, reduced adhesion formation. This novel treatment can address the unmet needs of patients who are unable to commence an early mobilization protocol after flexor tendon repair. PMID:26177854

  2. Factors associated with hamstring injuries. An approach to treatment and preventative measures.

    PubMed

    Worrell, T W

    1994-05-01

    Following hamstring strain, rehabilitation is often prolonged and frustrating for the athlete and for the sports medicine clinician. Though the initial treatment of rest, ice, compression and elevation is accepted for muscle strains, no consensus exists for rehabilitation of hamstring muscle strains. This lack of agreement concerning rehabilitation of hamstring injury represents our lack of understanding of the mechanism of injury and the factors that contribute to hamstring strain. A hamstring rehabilitation model is proposed that is based on our current understanding of the aetiological factors that contribute to hamstring muscle strain. The influence and interaction of hamstring strength, flexibility, warm-up and fatigue are aetiological factors that should be addressed in the rehabilitation and prevention of hamstring strains. The rehabilitation model is, however, not without limitations and speculations. Further research is needed to clarify the etiological factors of hamstring strain and the efficacy of different rehabilitation protocols.

  3. Prediction of hamstring injury in professional soccer players by isokinetic measurements

    PubMed Central

    Dauty, Marc; Menu, Pierre; Fouasson-Chailloux, Alban; Ferréol, Sophie; Dubois, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objectives previous studies investigating the ability of isokinetic strength ratios to predict hamstring injuries in soccer players have reported conflicting results. Hypothesis to determine if isokinetic ratios are able to predict hamstring injury occurring during the season in professional soccer players. Study Design case-control study; Level of evidence: 3. Methods from 2001 to 2011, 350 isokinetic tests were performed in 136 professional soccer players at the beginning of the soccer season. Fifty-seven players suffered hamstring injury during the season that followed the isokinetic tests. These players were compared with the 79 uninjured players. The bilateral concentric ratio (hamstring-to-hamstring), ipsilateral concentric ratio (hamstring-to-quadriceps), and mixed ratio (eccentric/concentric hamstring-to-quadriceps) were studied. The predictive ability of each ratio was established based on the likelihood ratio and post-test probability. Results the mixed ratio (30 eccentric/240 concentric hamstring-to-quadriceps) <0.8, ipsilateral ratio (180 concentric hamstring-to-quadriceps) <0.47, and bilateral ratio (60 concentric hamstring-to-hamstring) <0.85 were the most predictive of hamstring injury. The ipsilateral ratio <0.47 allowed prediction of the severity of the hamstring injury, and was also influenced by the length of time since administration of the isokinetic tests. Conclusion isokinetic ratios are useful for predicting the likelihood of hamstring injury in professional soccer players during the competitive season. PMID:27331039

  4. Anatomic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with quadriceps tendon autograft.

    PubMed

    Rabuck, Stephen J; Musahl, Volker; Fu, Freddie H; West, Robin V

    2013-01-01

    A multitude of graft options exist including both allograft and autograft sources for reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament. With recent concerns regarding the early graft failure and cost-effectiveness of allograft sources, more attention has been directed toward autograft options. However, autograft harvest has been associated with specific morbidity that can result in suboptimal outcomes. The quadriceps tendon is an excellent biomechanical and biologic option.

  5. Active tendon implants in flexor tendon reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Hunter, J M; Singer, D I; Jaeger, S H; Mackin, E J

    1988-11-01

    Forty-five active flexor tendon implants were evaluated after placement in scarred tendon beds of digits II through V. The implant is constructed of silicone rubber with a Dacron core, terminating in a loop proximally and a metal plate distally. Modification of the implant during the period of study has improved its reliability and longevity. The improvement in total active motion (TAM) averaged 72 degrees during implant functioning (stage I) in a group of digits that before operation were classified as 78% Boyes grade 5 (salvage). Complication rate during stage I was 11% (5 out of 45). Of the 27 digits evaluated after implant replacement by tendon autograft (stage II), there was an overall improvement in 62 degrees total active motion with 70% of digits being Boyes grade 5. Many of the complications were believed to be avoidable with experience. This study demonstrates the feasibility of an active tendon implant and the possibility of a permanent prosthesis. PMID:2976074

  6. Atraumatic quadriceps tendon tear associated with calcific tendonitis.

    PubMed

    Abram, Simon G F; Sharma, Akash D; Arvind, Chinnakonda

    2012-11-27

    Calcific tendonitis of the quadriceps tendon is an uncommon condition. We present the first case of a quadriceps tendon tear associated with calcific tendonitis. In this case, the patient presented with symptoms mimicking a rupture of the quadriceps tendon. This case illustrates that although calcific tendonitis of the quadriceps is a rare condition it is not benign and should be considered when investigating acute symptoms associated with the extensor mechanism of the knee.

  7. Regional differences in muscle activation during hamstrings exercise.

    PubMed

    Schoenfeld, Brad J; Contreras, Bret; Tiryaki-Sonmez, Gul; Wilson, Jacob M; Kolber, Morey J; Peterson, Mark D

    2015-01-01

    It is believed that regional activation within a muscle may lead to greater site-specific muscular adaptations in the activated portion of the muscle. Because the hamstrings are a biarticular muscle, it can be theorized that single-joint exercises where movement originates at the hip vs. the knee will result in differential activation of the muscle complex. The purpose of the present study was to assess electromyographic activity in the proximal and distal aspects of the medial and lateral hamstrings during performance of the stiff-legged deadlift (SLDL), a hip-dominant exercise, and the lying leg curl (LLC), a knee-dominant exercise. Ten young, resistance-trained men were recruited from a university population to participate in the study. Employing a within-subject design, participants performed the SLDL and LLC to muscular failure using a load equating to their 8 repetition maximum for each exercise. The order of performance of exercises was counterbalanced between participants so that approximately half of the subjects performed SLDL first and the other half performed LLC first. Surface electromyography was used to record mean normalized muscle activity of the upper lateral hamstrings, lower lateral hamstrings, upper medial hamstrings, and lower medial hamstrings. Results showed that the LLC elicited significantly greater normalized mean activation of the lower lateral and lower medial hamstrings compared with the SLDL (p ≤ 0.05). These findings support the notion that the hamstrings can be regionally targeted through exercise selection. Further investigations are required to determine whether differences in activation lead to greater muscular adaptations in the muscle complex. PMID:24978835

  8. Prevention of hamstring strains in elite soccer: an intervention study.

    PubMed

    Arnason, A; Andersen, T E; Holme, I; Engebretsen, L; Bahr, R

    2008-02-01

    The purpose was to test the effect of eccentric strength training and flexibility training on the incidence of hamstring strains in soccer. Hamstring strains and player exposure were registered prospectively during four consecutive soccer seasons (1999-2002) for 17-30 elite soccer teams from Iceland and Norway. The first two seasons were used as baseline, while intervention programs consisting of warm-up stretching, flexibility and/or eccentric strength training were introduced during the 2001 and 2002 seasons. During the intervention seasons, 48% of the teams selected to use the intervention programs. There was no difference in the incidence of hamstring strains between teams that used the flexibility training program and those who did not [relative risk (RR)=1.53, P=0.22], nor was there a difference compared with the baseline data (RR=0.89, P=0.75). The incidence of hamstring strains was lower in teams who used the eccentric training program compared with teams that did not use the program (RR=0.43, P=0.01), as well as compared with baseline data for the same intervention teams (RR=0.42, P=0.009). Eccentric strength training with Nordic hamstring lowers combined with warm-up stretching appears to reduce the risk of hamstring strains, while no effect was detected from flexibility training alone. These results should be verified in randomized clinical trials.

  9. Quadriceps tendon-patellar bone autograft for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a technical note.

    PubMed

    Franceschi, Francesco; Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Ruzzini, Laura; Papalia, Rocco; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2008-01-01

    The quadriceps tendon autograft can be used for primary and revision anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Despite several successful clinical reports, graft fixation issues remain, and the ideal technique for fixation continues to be controversial. We present a technique of ACL reconstruction with quadriceps tendon autograft (QTA) using a patellar bone block. The tendon end is fixed in the femoral tunnel and the bone plug in the tibial tunnel using reabsorbable interference screws. The advantages of this technique are related to the increase in stiffness of the graft, the achievement of a more anatomic fixation, and a reduction in synovial fluid leakage.

  10. Principles of Tendon Transfer.

    PubMed

    Wilbur, Danielle; Hammert, Warren C

    2016-08-01

    Tendon transfers provide a substitute, either temporary or permanent, when function is lost due to neurologic injury in stroke, cerebral palsy or central nervous system lesions, peripheral nerve injuries, or injuries to the musculotendinous unit itself. This article reviews the basic principles of tendon transfer, which are important when planning surgery and essential for an optimal outcome. In addition, concepts for coapting the tendons during surgery and general principles to be followed during the rehabilitation process are discussed. PMID:27387072

  11. Riser and tendon management system

    SciTech Connect

    Devlin, P.V.

    1992-02-18

    This patent describes a riser and tendon management system. It comprises means to set nominal conditions for the risers and tendons; means to measure actual riser and tendon conditions; means to compare the actual and nominal conditions of the risers and tendons; and means responsive to a differential between the actual and nominal riser and tendon conditions, which difference exceeds specified limits, and recommending corrective action to bring the risers and tendons back to within nominal conditions.

  12. Tendon and ligament imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hodgson, R J; O'Connor, P J; Grainger, A J

    2012-01-01

    MRI and ultrasound are now widely used for the assessment of tendon and ligament abnormalities. Healthy tendons and ligaments contain high levels of collagen with a structured orientation, which gives rise to their characteristic normal imaging appearances as well as causing particular imaging artefacts. Changes to ligaments and tendons as a result of disease and injury can be demonstrated using both ultrasound and MRI. These have been validated against surgical and histological findings. Novel imaging techniques are being developed that may improve the ability of MRI and ultrasound to assess tendon and ligament disease. PMID:22553301

  13. Tendon Homeostasis in Hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Soslowsky, Louis J; Fryhofer, George W

    2016-01-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is a serious health problem that is associated not only with heart disease, but also tendon pathology. In high cholesterol environments (e.g. familial hyperlipidemia), lipids accumulate within the tendon extracellular matrix and form deposits called xanthomas. Lipid-related changes are known to affect several tendon mechanical properties, including stiffness and modulus, in uninjured and injured tendons, alike. Mechanisms to explain these cholesterol-related changes are multiple, including alterations in tenocyte gene and protein expression, matrix turnover, tissue vascularity, and cytokine production. Clinically, rotator cuff tear and Achilles tendon rupture are clearly associated with metabolic derangements, and elevated total cholesterol is often among the specific metabolic parameters implicated. Treatment of hypercholesterolemia using statin medications has also been shown to affect tendon properties, resulting in normalization of tendon thickness and improved tendon healing. Despite current work, the pathophysiology of lipid-related tendon pathology remains incompletely understood, and additional hypothesis-generating studies, including those incorporating whole-genome and whole-transcriptome technologies, will help to point the field in new directions. PMID:27535257

  14. Inflammation in Tendon Disorders.

    PubMed

    Speed, Cathy

    2016-01-01

    The role of inflammation in tendon disorders has long been a subject of considerable debate. Developments in our understanding of the basic science of inflammation have provided further insight into its potential role in specific forms of tendon disease, and the circumstances that may potentiate this. Such circumstances include excessive mechanical stresses on tendon and the presence of systemic inflammation associated with chronic diseases. In this chapter a brief review of the basic science of inflammation is provided and the influence that it may play on tendons is discussed. PMID:27535263

  15. Acceleration of tendon-bone healing in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using an enamel matrix derivative in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Kadonishi, Y; Deie, M; Takata, T; Ochi, M

    2012-02-01

    We examined whether enamel matrix derivative (EMD) could improve healing of the tendon-bone interface following reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) using a hamstring tendon in a rat model. ACL reconstruction was performed in both knees of 30 Sprague-Dawley rats using the flexor digitorum tendon. The effect of commercially available EMD (EMDOGAIN), a preparation of matrix proteins from developing porcine teeth, was evaluated. In the left knee joint the space around the tendon-bone interface was filled with 40 µl of EMD mixed with propylene glycol alginate (PGA). In the right knee joint PGA alone was used. The ligament reconstructions were evaluated histologically and biomechanically at four, eight and 12 weeks (n = 5 at each time point). At eight weeks, EMD had induced a significant increase in collagen fibres connecting to bone at the tendon-bone interface (p = 0.047), whereas the control group had few fibres and the tendon-bone interface was composed of cellular and vascular fibrous tissues. At both eight and 12 weeks, the mean load to failure in the treated specimens was higher than in the controls (p = 0.009). EMD improved histological tendon-bone healing at eight weeks and biomechanical healing at both eight and 12 weeks. EMD might therefore have a human application to enhance tendon-bone repair in ACL reconstruction.

  16. Abnormal tenocyte morphology is more prevalent than collagen disruption in asymptomatic athletes' patellar tendons.

    PubMed

    Cook, J L; Feller, J A; Bonar, S F; Khan, K M

    2004-03-01

    This study investigated the prevalence of each of the four features of patellar tendinosis in asymptomatic athletic subjects undergoing patellar tendon anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Fifty subjects (39 males and 11 females) undergoing ACL reconstruction using a patellar tendon graft were screened for previous tendon symptoms, training and playing history and had their patellar tendons examined with ultrasound prior to surgery. During surgery, a small piece of proximal posterocentral tendon was harvested, fixed and examined under light microscopy. Histopathological changes were graded for severity. Results demonstrate that 18 tendons were abnormal on light microscopy and 32 were normal. There were no differences between subjects with and without pathology in respect of training, recovery after surgery and basic anthropometric measures. Three tendons were abnormal on ultrasound but only one had proximal and central changes. Tendons showed a consistent series of changes. Tenocyte changes were found in all but one of the abnormal tendons. In all but one of the tendons with increased ground substance there were tenocyte changes, and collagen separation was always associated with both tenocyte changes and increased ground substance. No tendons demonstrated neovascularization. It appears that cellular changes must be present if there is an increase in ground substance, or collagen and vascular changes. Further research is required to confirm these findings.

  17. Fatigue loading of tendon

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Jennifer H; Screen, Hazel R C

    2013-01-01

    Tendon injuries, often called tendinopathies, are debilitating and painful conditions, generally considered to develop as a result of tendon overuse. The aetiology of tendinopathy remains poorly understood, and whilst tendon biopsies have provided some information concerning tendon appearance in late-stage disease, there is still little information concerning the mechanical and cellular events associated with disease initiation and progression. Investigating this in situ is challenging, and numerous models have been developed to investigate how overuse may generate tendon fatigue damage and how this may relate to tendinopathy conditions. This article aims to review these models and our current understanding of tendon fatigue damage. We review the strengths and limitations of different methodologies for characterizing tendon fatigue, considering in vitro methods that adopt both viable and non-viable samples, as well as the range of different in vivo approaches. By comparing data across model systems, we review the current understanding of fatigue damage development. Additionally, we compare these findings with data from tendinopathic tissue biopsies to provide some insights into how these models may relate to the aetiology of tendinopathy. Fatigue-induced damage consistently highlights the same microstructural, biological and mechanical changes to the tendon across all model systems and also correlates well with the findings from tendinopathic biopsy tissue. The multiple testing routes support matrix damage as an important contributor to tendinopathic conditions, but cellular responses to fatigue appear complex and often contradictory. PMID:23837793

  18. Tendon Transfers for Tetraplegia.

    PubMed

    Bednar, Michael S

    2016-08-01

    It is estimated that 65% to 75% of patients with cervical spinal cord injuries could benefit from upper extremity tendon transfer surgery. The goals of surgery are to restore elbow extension, as well as hand pinch, grasp, and release. Patients who have defined goals, actively participate in therapy, and understand expected outcomes, appear to have the highest satisfaction following tendon transfer procedures. PMID:27387082

  19. The tibialis posterior tendon.

    PubMed

    Lhoste-Trouilloud, A

    2012-02-01

    The tibialis posterior tendon is the largest and anteriormost tendon in the medial ankle. It produces plantar flexion and supination of the ankle and stabilizes the plantar vault. Sonographic assessment of this tendon is done with high-frequency, linear-array transducers; an optimal examination requires transverse retromalleolar, longitudinal retromalleolar, and distal longitudinal scans, as well as dynamic studies. Disorders of the posterior tibial tendon include chronic tendinopathy with progressive rupture, tenosynovitis, acute rupture, dislocation and instability, enthesopathies. The most common lesion is a progressive "chewing gum" lesion that develops in a setting of chronic tendinopathy; it is usually seen in overweight women over 50 years of age with valgus flat feet. Medial ankle pain must also be carefully investigated, and the presence of instability assessed with dynamic maneuvers (forced inversion, or dorsiflexion) of the foot. Sonography plays an important role in the investigation of disorders involving the posterior tibial tendon.

  20. Hamstring Fatigue and Muscle Activation Changes During Six Sets of Nordic Hamstring Exercise in Amateur Soccer Players.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Paul W M; Lovell, Ric; Knox, Michael F; Brennan, Scott L; Siegler, Jason C

    2015-11-01

    The Nordic hamstring exercise (NHE) is a bodyweight movement commonly prescribed to increase eccentric hamstring strength and reduce the incidence of strain injury in sport. This study examined hamstring fatigue and muscle activation responses throughout 6 sets of 5 repetitions of the NHE. Ten amateur-level soccer players performed a single session of 6 sets of 5 repetitions of NHE. Maximal eccentric and concentric torque output (in newton meters) was measured after every set. Hamstrings electromyograms (EMG) were measured during all maximal contractions and exercise repetitions. Hamstring maximal eccentric torque was reduced throughout the range of motion after only a single set of NHE between 7.9 and 17.1% (p ≤ 0.05), with further reductions in subsequent sets. Similarly, maximal concentric torque reductions between 7.8 and 17.2% were observed throughout the range of motion after 1 set of NHE (p ≤ 0.05). During the descent phase of the NHE repetitions, hamstring muscle activity progressively increased as the number of sets performed increased. These increases were observed in the first half of the range of motion. During the ascent phase, biceps femoris muscle activity but not medial hamstrings was reduced from the start of exercise during latter sets of repetitions. These data provide unique insight into the extent of fatigue induced from a bodyweight only exercise after a single set of 5 repetitions. Strength and conditioning coaches need to be aware of the speed and extent of fatigue induced from NHE, particularly in practical settings in which this exercise is now prescribed before sport-specific training sessions (i.e., the FIFA-11 before soccer training). PMID:25886019

  1. The role of hamstring tightness in plantar fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Labovitz, Jonathan M; Yu, Jenny; Kim, Chul

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this prospective cohort study was to determine if hamstring tightness was an increased risk in plantar fasciitis. It was thought that there is an increased risk of plantar fasciitis when hamstring tightness is present. A total of 105 patients (68 women, 37 men) were included in the study, 79 of whom were diagnosed with plantar fasciitis. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated and the presence of plantar fasciitis, equinus, and calcaneal spurs were assessed. The popliteal angle was measured using standard diagnostic techniques. Without controlling for covariates, BMI, the presence of a calcaneal spur, tightness in the gastrocnemius, gastrocnemius-soleus, and hamstring all had statistically significant association with plantar fasciitis. After controlling for covariates, patients with hamstring tightness were about 8.7 times as likely to experience plantar fasciitis (P < .0001). Patients with BMI >35 were approximately 2.4 times as likely to experience plantar fasciitis compared with those with BMI <35 (P = .04). This study demonstrates that hamstring tightness plays a significant role in the presence of plantar fasciitis and should be addressed along with equinus and obesity when providing treatment to patients with this diagnosis.

  2. Conceptual framework for strengthening exercises to prevent hamstring strains.

    PubMed

    Guex, Kenny; Millet, Grégoire P

    2013-12-01

    High-speed running accounts for the majority of hamstring strains in many sports. The terminal swing phase is believed to be the most hazardous as the hamstrings are undergoing an active lengthening contraction in a long muscle length position. Prevention-based strength training mainly focuses on eccentric exercises. However, it appears crucial to integrate other parameters than the contraction type. Therefore, the aim of this study is to present a conceptual framework based on six key parameters (contraction type, load, range of motion, angular velocity, uni-/bilateral exercises, kinetic chain) for the hamstring's strength exercise for strain prevention. Based on the biomechanical parameters of sprinting, it is proposed to use high-load eccentric contractions. The movement should be performed at a slow to moderate angular velocity and focused at the knee joint, while the hip is kept in a large flexion position in order to reach a greater elongation stress of the hamstrings than in the terminal swing phase. In this way, we believe that, during sprinting, athletes would be better trained to brake the knee extension effectively in the whole range of motion without overstretch of the hamstrings. Finally, based on its functional application, unilateral open kinetic chain should be preferred. PMID:24062275

  3. Conceptual framework for strengthening exercises to prevent hamstring strains.

    PubMed

    Guex, Kenny; Millet, Grégoire P

    2013-12-01

    High-speed running accounts for the majority of hamstring strains in many sports. The terminal swing phase is believed to be the most hazardous as the hamstrings are undergoing an active lengthening contraction in a long muscle length position. Prevention-based strength training mainly focuses on eccentric exercises. However, it appears crucial to integrate other parameters than the contraction type. Therefore, the aim of this study is to present a conceptual framework based on six key parameters (contraction type, load, range of motion, angular velocity, uni-/bilateral exercises, kinetic chain) for the hamstring's strength exercise for strain prevention. Based on the biomechanical parameters of sprinting, it is proposed to use high-load eccentric contractions. The movement should be performed at a slow to moderate angular velocity and focused at the knee joint, while the hip is kept in a large flexion position in order to reach a greater elongation stress of the hamstrings than in the terminal swing phase. In this way, we believe that, during sprinting, athletes would be better trained to brake the knee extension effectively in the whole range of motion without overstretch of the hamstrings. Finally, based on its functional application, unilateral open kinetic chain should be preferred.

  4. Evidence based prevention of hamstring injuries in sport.

    PubMed

    Petersen, J; Hölmich, P

    2005-06-01

    A common soft tissue injury in sports involving sprinting and jumping is the hamstring strain. A major problem with hamstring strains is the high incidence of reinjury. Muscle injuries can be classified as direct or indirect and are typically grouped into three categories according to severity. A number of potential risk factors have been proposed for hamstring strains. Only a few are evidence based and some are mainly based on theoretical assumptions. There is a lack of clinical research on the effectiveness of rehabilitation programmes for hamstring strains. Although the initial treatment of rest, ice, compression, and elevation is accepted for muscle strains, no consensus exists for their rehabilitation. Not much evidence based research has been carried out on prevention of hamstring strain. To our knowledge only two prospective studies have so far been published. As the injuries are common in football and other sports involving sprinting and jumping, there is a need for further research preferably in the form of randomised controlled trials.

  5. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with allograft tendons.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Sabrina M; MacGillivray, John D; Warren, Russell F

    2003-01-01

    Allograft tissue allows reconstruction of the ACL without the donor site morbidity that can be caused by autograft harvesting. Patients who must kneel as a part of their occupation or chosen sport are particularly good candidates for allograft reconstruction. Patients over 45 years of age and those requiring revision ACL surgery can also benefit from the use and availability of allograft tendons. In some cases, patients or surgeons may opt for allograft tendons to maximize the result or morbidity ratio. Despite advances in cadaver screening and graft preparation, there remain risks of disease transmission and joint infection after allograft implantation. Detailed explanation and informed consent is vitally important in cases in which allograft tissue is used.

  6. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with allograft tendons.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Sabrina M; MacGillivray, John D; Warren, Russell F

    2003-01-01

    Allograft tissue allows reconstruction of the ACL without the donor site morbidity that can be caused by autograft harvesting. Patients who must kneel as a part of their occupation or chosen sport are particularly good candidates for allograft reconstruction. Patients over 45 years of age and those requiring revision ACL surgery can also benefit from the use and availability of allograft tendons. In some cases, patients or surgeons may opt for allograft tendons to maximize the result or morbidity ratio. Despite advances in cadaver screening and graft preparation, there remain risks of disease transmission and joint infection after allograft implantation. Detailed explanation and informed consent is vitally important in cases in which allograft tissue is used. PMID:12735200

  7. Bone Grafts

    MedlinePlus

    A bone graft transplants bone tissue. Surgeons use bone grafts to repair and rebuild diseased bones in your hips, knees, ... fractures or cancers. Once your body accepts the bone graft, it provides a framework for growth of new, ...

  8. Drug-Induced Tendon Disorders.

    PubMed

    Knobloch, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    Drug-induced tendon disorders are an often underestimated risk factor. The range from detrimental effects on the tendon include tendinopathy as well as potentially tendon rupture. As for today, four main drug classes have been reported to be associated with potentially deteriorated tendon properties: 1. Corticosteroids, 2. Chinolon antibiotics, 3. Aromatase inhbitors, 4. Statins as HMG-CoA-reductase inhibitors. Most often, the Achilles tendon is affected in terms of tendinopathy and/or subsequent tendon rupture. However, nearly every tendon of the entire body might be affected in a detrimental way by one or a combination of the aformentioned agents. PMID:27535265

  9. Tendon Gradient Mineralization for Tendon to Bone Interface Integration

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Jin; Thoreson, Andrew R.; Chen, Qingshan; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C.; Zhao, Chunfeng

    2014-01-01

    Tendon-to-bone integration is a great challenge for tendon or ligament reconstruction regardless of use of autograft or allograft tendons. We mineralized the tendon, thus transforming the tendon-to-bone into a “bone-to-bone” interface for healing. Sixty dog flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) tendons were divided randomly into 5 groups: 1) normal FDP tendon, 2) CaP (Non-extraction and mineralization without fetuin), 3) CaPEXT (Extraction by Na2HPO4 and mineralization without fetuin), 4) CaPFetuin (Non-extraction and mineralization with fetuin), and 5) CaPEXTFetuin (Extraction and mineralization with fetuin). The calcium and phosphate content significantly increased in tendons treated with combination of extraction and fetuin compared to the other treatments. Histology also revealed a dense mineral deposition throughout the tendon outer layers and penetrated into the tendon to a depth of 200 μm in a graded manner. Compressive moduli were significantly lower in the four mineralized groups compared with normal control group. No significant differences in maximum failure strength or stiffness were found in the suture pull-out test among all groups. Mineralization of tendon alters the interface from tendon to bone into mineralized tendon to bone, which may facilitate tendon-to-bone junction healing following tendon or ligament reconstruction. PMID:23939935

  10. Tendon gradient mineralization for tendon to bone interface integration.

    PubMed

    Qu, Jin; Thoreson, Andrew R; Chen, Qingshan; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C; Zhao, Chunfeng

    2013-11-01

    Tendon-to-bone integration is a great challenge for tendon or ligament reconstruction regardless of use of autograft or allograft tendons. We mineralized the tendon, thus transforming the tendon-to-bone into a "bone-to-bone" interface for healing. Sixty dog flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) tendons were divided randomly into five groups: (1) normal FDP tendon, (2) CaP (non-extraction and mineralization without fetuin), (3) CaPEXT (Extraction by Na2 HPO4 and mineralization without fetuin), (4) CaPFetuin (non-extraction and mineralization with fetuin), and (5) CaPEXTFetuin (extraction and mineralization with fetuin). The calcium and phosphate content significantly increased in tendons treated with combination of extraction and fetuin compared to the other treatments. Histology also revealed a dense mineral deposition throughout the tendon outer layers and penetrated into the tendon to a depth of 200 µm in a graded manner. Compressive moduli were significantly lower in the four mineralized groups compared with normal control group. No significant differences in maximum failure strength or stiffness were found in the suture pull-out test among all groups. Mineralization of tendon alters the interface from tendon to bone into mineralized tendon to bone, which may facilitate tendon-to-bone junction healing following tendon or ligament reconstruction.

  11. How Obesity Affects Tendons?

    PubMed

    Abate, Michele; Salini, Vincenzo; Andia, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Several epidemiological and clinical observations have definitely demonstrated that obesity has harmful effects on tendons. The pathogenesis of tendon damage is multi-factorial. In addition to overload, attributable to the increased body weight, which significantly affects load-bearing tendons, systemic factors play a relevant role. Several bioactive peptides (chemerin, leptin, adiponectin and others) are released by adipocytes, and influence tendon structure by means of negative activities on mesenchymal cells. The ensuing systemic state of chronic, sub-clinic, low-grade inflammation can damage tendon structure. Metabolic disorders (diabetes, impaired glucose tolerance, and dislipidemia), frequently associated with visceral adiposity, are concurrent pathogenetic factors. Indeed, high glucose levels increase the formation of Advanced Glycation End-products, which in turn form stable covalent cross-links within collagen fibers, modifying their structure and functionality.Sport activities, so useful for preventing important cardiovascular complications, may be detrimental for tendons if they are submitted to intense acute or chronic overload. Therefore, two caution rules are mandatory: first, to engage in personalized soft training program, and secondly to follow regular check-up for tendon pathology.

  12. How Obesity Affects Tendons?

    PubMed

    Abate, Michele; Salini, Vincenzo; Andia, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Several epidemiological and clinical observations have definitely demonstrated that obesity has harmful effects on tendons. The pathogenesis of tendon damage is multi-factorial. In addition to overload, attributable to the increased body weight, which significantly affects load-bearing tendons, systemic factors play a relevant role. Several bioactive peptides (chemerin, leptin, adiponectin and others) are released by adipocytes, and influence tendon structure by means of negative activities on mesenchymal cells. The ensuing systemic state of chronic, sub-clinic, low-grade inflammation can damage tendon structure. Metabolic disorders (diabetes, impaired glucose tolerance, and dislipidemia), frequently associated with visceral adiposity, are concurrent pathogenetic factors. Indeed, high glucose levels increase the formation of Advanced Glycation End-products, which in turn form stable covalent cross-links within collagen fibers, modifying their structure and functionality.Sport activities, so useful for preventing important cardiovascular complications, may be detrimental for tendons if they are submitted to intense acute or chronic overload. Therefore, two caution rules are mandatory: first, to engage in personalized soft training program, and secondly to follow regular check-up for tendon pathology. PMID:27535258

  13. Sex Hormones and Tendon.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Mette; Kjaer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The risk of overuse and traumatic tendon and ligament injuries differ between women and men. Part of this gender difference in injury risk is probably explained by sex hormonal differences which are specifically distinct during the sexual maturation in the teenage years and during young adulthood. The effects of the separate sex hormones are not fully elucidated. However, in women, the presence of estrogen in contrast to very low estrogen levels may be beneficial during regular loading of the tissue or during recovering after an injury, as estrogen can enhance tendon collagen synthesis rate. Yet, in active young female athletes, physiological high concentration of estrogen may enhance the risk of injuries due to reduced fibrillar crosslinking and enhanced joint laxity. In men, testosterone can enhance tendon stiffness due to an enhanced tendon collagen turnover and collagen content, but testosterone has also been linked to a reduced responsiveness to relaxin. The present chapter will focus on sex difference in tendon injury risk, tendon morphology and tendon collagen turnover, but also on the specific effects of estrogen and androgens. PMID:27535256

  14. Gastrocnemius myotendinous flap for patellar or quadriceps tendon repair, or both.

    PubMed

    Rhomberg, M; Schwabegger, A H; Ninkovic, M; Bauer, T; Ninkovic, M

    2000-08-01

    The authors' experience with simultaneous reconstruction of the quadriceps femoris or patellar tendon or both and soft tissue defect using a musculotendinous unit of the gastrocnemius muscle is presented. Five patients with a partial or complete defect of the quadriceps or patellar tendon or both and additional large soft tissue defects underwent reconstruction applying this technique as a one-stage surgical procedure in different variations. In cases with a partial defect of the tendon or loss of tendon thickness, the thick aponeurosis from the deeper aspect of the gastrocnemius was dissected and transferred as a pedicled tendon flap to reconstruct the tendon defect. In cases with a complete defect of the tendon, the superficial layer of the Achilles tendon together with the deep aponeurotic layer of the gastrocnemius muscle served to reconstruct the tendon. In both procedures the gastrocnemius muscle belly provided soft tissue coverage and was covered with a split thickness skin graft. One patient had a marginal deep necrosis develop that had to be covered with the other gastrocnemius muscle in a second operation. One patient with chronic polyarthritis and infection of his knee prosthesis declined additional reconstruction surgery and had the leg amputated. The average followup was 3.5 years. All patients achieved good results in active extension of the knee with an extension deficit of only 5 degrees to 15 degrees. The range of flexion was at least 90 degrees. The surgical technique described in this report provides functional tendon reconstruction and adequate soft tissue repair simultaneously.

  15. The Effect of Surface Treatment Using Hyaluronic Acid and Lubricin on the Gliding Resistance of Human Extrasynovial Tendons In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Taguchi, Manabu; Zhao, Chunfeng; Sun, Yu-Long; Jay, Gregory D.; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of the tendon surface treatment using hyaluronic acid (HA) and lubricin on the gliding resistance of human extrasynovial palmaris longus (PL) tendon in vitro. Methods Thirty two fresh-frozen human fingers and sixteen ipsilateral PL tendons were used. Each PL tendon was divided into two pieces which were randomly assigned into four experimental groups. After the gliding resistance of the normal PL tendon segments were measured, the tendons were treated with either saline, carbodiimide derivatized gelatin and hyaluronic acid (cd-HA-gelatin), carbodiimide derivatized gelatin with lubricin added (cd-gelatin+lubricin), or cd-HA-gelatin+lubricin. After treatment, tendon gliding resistance was measured up to 1000 cycles of simulated flexion/extension motion. Results The gliding resistance of the PL tendons in the cd-HA-gelatin, cd-gelatin+lubricin and cd-HA-gelatin+lubricin groups was significantly lower than that of the saline treated control after 1000 cycles (p<0.05). The gliding resistance in these treatment groups decreased within the first 50 cycles and then increased at a much more gradual rate over the 1000 cycles, with the cd-HA-gelatin+lubricin group being most stable. Conclusion The results suggest that tendon surface treatment using HA and lubricin can improve the gliding of human PL tendon in vitro. If validated in vivo, tendon surface treatment has the potential to improve the gliding ability of tendon grafts clinically. PMID:19556078

  16. Surgical Management of Recurrent Musculotendinous Hamstring Injury in Professional Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Sonnery-Cottet, Bertrand; Daggett, Matt; Gardon, Roland; Pupim, Barbara; Clechet, Julien; Thaunat, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hamstring injury is the most common muscular lesion in athletes. The conservative treatment is well described, and surgical management is often indicated for proximal tendinous avulsions. To our knowledge, no surgical treatment has been proposed for failure of conservative treatment in musculotendinous hamstring lesions. Purpose: To describe the surgical management of proximal and distal hamstring musculotendinous junction lesions in professional athletes after failure of conservative treatment. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: A consecutive series of 10 professional athletes, including 4 soccer players, 4 rugby players, and 2 handball players, underwent surgical intervention between October 2010 and June 2014 for the treatment of recurrent musculotendinous hamstring injuries. All athletes had failed at least 3 months of conservative treatment for a recurrent musculotendinous hamstring injury. Surgical resection of the musculotendinous scar tissue was performed using a longitudinal muscular suture. Lower Extremity Functional Scale (LEFS) and Marx scores were obtained at the 3-month follow-up, and a final phone interview was completed to determine recurrence of hamstring injury and return to previous level of play. Results: The mean age at surgery was 25.2 years (range, 19-35 years). The musculotendinous hamstring lesions involved 8 semitendinosus and 2 biceps femoris, with 6 injuries located proximally and 4 distally. Conservative treatment lasted a mean 5.1 months (range, 3-9 months) after last recurrence, and the patients had an average of 2.7 (range, 2-5) separate incidents of injury recurrence before surgical intervention was decided upon. At the 3-month follow-up, all patients had Marx activity scores of 16 and LEFS scores of 80. All 10 patients returned to the same level of play at a mean 3.4 months (range, 2-5 months). At a mean follow-up of 28.7 months, none of the athletes had suffered a recurrence. No surgical

  17. The influence of hamstring autograft size on patient reported outcomes and risk of revision following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: A MOON cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Mariscalco, Michael W.; Flanigan, David C.; Mitchell, Joshua; Pedroza, Angela D.; Jones, Morgan H.; Andrish, Jack T.; Parker, Richard D.; Kaeding, Christopher C.; Magnussen, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of graft size on patient-reported outcomes and revision risk following ACL reconstruction. Methods A retrospective chart review of prospectively collected cohort data, 263 of 320 consecutive patients (82.2%) undergoing primary ACL reconstruction with hamstring autograft were evaluated. Graft size, femoral tunnel drilling technique, patient age, sex, and BMI at the time of ACL reconstruction, pre-operative and 2-year post-operative KOOS and IKDC scores, and whether each patient underwent revision ACL reconstruction during the 2 year follow-up period were recorded. Revision was used as a marker for graft failure. The relationship between graft size and patient-reported outcomes was determined by multiple linear regression. The relationship between graft size and risk of revision was determined by dichotomizing graft size at 8mm and stratifying by age. Results After controlling for age, sex, operative side, surgeon, BMI, graft choice, and femoral tunnel drilling technique, a 1 mm increased in graft size was noted to correlate with 3.3-point increase in the KOOS-pain subscale (p = 0.003), a 2.0-point increased in the KOOS activities of daily living subscale (p = 0.034), a 5.2-point increase in the KOOS-sport/recreation function subscale (p = 0.004), and a 3.4-point increase in the subjective IKDC score (p = 0.026). Revision was required in 0 of 64 patients (0.0%) with grafts greater than 8mm in diameter and 14 of 199 patients (7.0%) with 8 mm or smaller grafts (p = 0.037). Among patients age 18 and under, revision was required in 0 of 14 patients (0.0%) with grafts greater than 8mm in diameter and 13 of 71 patients (18.3 %) with 8 mm or smaller grafts. Conclusions Smaller hamstring autograft size is a predictor of poorer KOOS Sport and Recreation function 2 years following primary ACL reconstruction. Larger sample size is required to confirm the relationship between graft size and risk of revision ACL

  18. Tendon Reattachment to Bone in an Ovine Tendon Defect Model of Retraction Using Allogenic and Xenogenic Demineralised Bone Matrix Incorporated with Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Tendon-bone healing following rotator cuff repairs is mainly impaired by poor tissue quality. Demineralised bone matrix promotes healing of the tendon-bone interface but its role in the treatment of tendon tears with retraction has not been investigated. We hypothesized that cortical demineralised bone matrix used with minimally manipulated mesenchymal stem cells will result in improved function and restoration of the tendon-bone interface with no difference between xenogenic and allogenic scaffolds. Materials and Methods In an ovine model, the patellar tendon was detached from the tibial tuberosity and a complete distal tendon transverse defect measuring 1 cm was created. Suture anchors were used to reattach the tendon and xenogenic demineralised bone matrix + minimally manipulated mesenchymal stem cells (n = 5), or allogenic demineralised bone matrix + minimally manipulated mesenchymal stem cells (n = 5) were used to bridge the defect. Graft incorporation into the tendon and its effect on regeneration of the enthesis was assessed using histomorphometry. Force plate analysis was used to assess functional recovery. Results Compared to the xenograft, the allograft was associated with significantly higher functional weight bearing at 6 (P = 0.047), 9 (P = 0.028), and 12 weeks (P = 0.009). In the allogenic group this was accompanied by greater remodeling of the demineralised bone matrix into tendon-like tissue in the region of the defect (p = 0.015), and a more direct type of enthesis characterized by significantly more fibrocartilage (p = 0.039). No failures of tendon-bone healing were noted in either group. Conclusion Demineralised bone matrix used with minimally manipulated mesenchymal stem cells promotes healing of the tendon-bone interface in an ovine model of acute tendon retraction, with superior mechanical and histological results associated with use of an allograft. PMID:27606597

  19. Tendon Reconstruction with Tissue Engineering Approach--A Review.

    PubMed

    Verdiyeva, Gunay; Koshy, Kiron; Glibbery, Natalia; Mann, Haroon; Seifalian, Alexander M

    2015-09-01

    Tendon injuries are a common and rising occurrence, associated with significant impairment to quality of life and financial burden to the healthcare system. Clinically, they represent an unresolved problem, due to poor natural tendon healing and the inability of current treatment strategies to restore the tendon to its native state. Tissue engineering offers a promising alternative, with the incorporation of scaffolds, cells and growth factors to support the complete regeneration of the tendon. The materials used in tendon engineering to date have provided significant advances in structural integrity and biological compatibility and in many cases the results obtained are superior to those observed in natural healing. However, grafts fail to reproduce the qualities of the pre-injured tendon and each has weaknesses subject to its constituent parts. Furthermore, many materials and cell types are being investigated concurrently, with seemingly little association or comparison between research results. In this review the properties of the most-investigated and effective components have been appraised in light of the surrounding literature, with research from early in-vitro experiments to clinical trials being discussed. Extensive comparisons have been made between scaffolds, cell types and growth factors used, listing strengths and weaknesses to provide a stable platform for future research. Promising future endeavours are also described in the field of nanocomposite material science, stem cell sources and growth factors, which may bypass weaknesses found in individual elements. The future of tendon engineering looks bright, with growing understanding in material technology, cell and growth factor application and encouraging recent advances bringing us ever closer to regenerating the native tendon. PMID:26485923

  20. Tendon Reconstruction with Tissue Engineering Approach--A Review.

    PubMed

    Verdiyeva, Gunay; Koshy, Kiron; Glibbery, Natalia; Mann, Haroon; Seifalian, Alexander M

    2015-09-01

    Tendon injuries are a common and rising occurrence, associated with significant impairment to quality of life and financial burden to the healthcare system. Clinically, they represent an unresolved problem, due to poor natural tendon healing and the inability of current treatment strategies to restore the tendon to its native state. Tissue engineering offers a promising alternative, with the incorporation of scaffolds, cells and growth factors to support the complete regeneration of the tendon. The materials used in tendon engineering to date have provided significant advances in structural integrity and biological compatibility and in many cases the results obtained are superior to those observed in natural healing. However, grafts fail to reproduce the qualities of the pre-injured tendon and each has weaknesses subject to its constituent parts. Furthermore, many materials and cell types are being investigated concurrently, with seemingly little association or comparison between research results. In this review the properties of the most-investigated and effective components have been appraised in light of the surrounding literature, with research from early in-vitro experiments to clinical trials being discussed. Extensive comparisons have been made between scaffolds, cell types and growth factors used, listing strengths and weaknesses to provide a stable platform for future research. Promising future endeavours are also described in the field of nanocomposite material science, stem cell sources and growth factors, which may bypass weaknesses found in individual elements. The future of tendon engineering looks bright, with growing understanding in material technology, cell and growth factor application and encouraging recent advances bringing us ever closer to regenerating the native tendon.

  1. [Simultaneous rupture of a patellar tendon and contralateral quadriceps tendon].

    PubMed

    Horas, U; Ernst, S; Meyer, C; Halbsguth, A; Herbst, U

    2006-09-01

    The simultaneous bilateral rupture of the quadriceps tendon is a rare injury; only occasional reports exist about the bilateral simultaneous rupture of the patellar tendon. Degenerative changes of the tendon due to drugs or diseases lead to the rupture. We describe two cases of simultaneous rupture of the patellar and contralateral quadriceps tendons; only one patient had special risks. We report the management of therapy and the functional results using the Lysholm score and Knee Rating Scale.

  2. Risk factors for hamstring injuries in male soccer players: a systematic review of prospective studies.

    PubMed

    van Beijsterveldt, A M C; van de Port, I G L; Vereijken, A J; Backx, F J G

    2013-06-01

    Hamstring injuries are common injuries in soccer players. In view of the high incidence and the serious consequences, identifying risk factors related to hamstring injuries is essential. The aim of this systematic review was therefore to identify risk factors for hamstring injuries in male adult soccer players. PubMed, Embase/Medline, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, and SPORTDiscus were systematically searched, and prospective studies investigating risk factors for hamstring injuries in adult male soccer players were included. The methodological quality of the included articles was assessed using a standardized set of predefined criteria. Seven of the 11 studies identified, involving a total of 1775 players and 344 hamstring injuries, met the inclusion criteria. All but one of the included studies met at least five of nine methodological criteria, causing them to be qualified as 'high quality'. The included studies used univariate as well as multivariate analyses to identify risk factors for hamstring injury. The results from the multivariate analyses suggest that previous hamstring injury is most strongly related to hamstring injury. Conflicting evidence is found for age and hamstring length or flexibility as risk factors for the occurrence of hamstring injuries.

  3. Hyperuricemia in Tendons.

    PubMed

    Andia, Isabel; Abate, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Hyperuricemia, particularly gout, and the immune inflammatory response are highly integrated. Both, long standing hyperuricemia and monosodium urate (MSU) crystal deposition can challenge tendon homeostasis because of their potential to cause inflammation to the host. Knowledge is emerging from clinical imaging research depicting where MSU crystals deposit, including patellar tendon, triceps and quadriceps tendons. Remarkably, subclinical tendon inflammation and damage are also present in asymptomatic hyperuricemia. Monosodium urate crystals act as danger activating molecular patterns (DAMPs), activating the inflammasome and inducing the secretion of IL-1beta, a key mediator of the inflammatory response. The crucial role of IL-1beta in driving the inflammatory events during gout attacks is supported by the clinical efficacy of IL-1beta blockade. Some data implicating IL-1beta as an initiator of tendinopathy exist, but the link between hyperuricemia and the development of tendinopathy remains to be validated. Further knowledge about the interactions of uric acid with both innate immune and tendon cells, and their consequences may help to determine if there is a subclass of hyperuricemic-tendinopathy. PMID:27535254

  4. Surgical Treatment of Neglected Traumatic Quadriceps Tendon Rupture with Knee Ankylosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Hun; Song, Eun-Kyoo; Seon, Jong-Keun; Woo, Seong-Hwan

    2016-06-01

    Quadriceps tendon rupture is an uncommon injury. This disabling condition is the result of direct or indirect trauma. It requires surgical repair to avoid poor outcomes in cases of neglected or chronic rupture. In most acute cases, simple tendon suture or reinsertion is suitable for an extensor mechanism reconstruction of the knee joint. However, chronic lesions often require a tendon graft or flap reconstruction. We report a case of a 15-year-old male who was diagnosed with a chronic quadriceps rupture with a patellar superior pole fracture. We performed quadriceps reconstruction using tibialis anterior allograft tendon and additional screw fixation to reconstruct the extensor mechanism and recover knee joint range of motion to prevent a high-level functional restriction. The treatment was difficult and limited due to neglect for 9-months that led to ankylosis accompanied with nonunion of tibial fracture. Our surgical treatment using allograft tendon resulted in a very good outcome after 30 months of follow-up.

  5. Tendon Driven Finger Actuation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Reich, David M. (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor); Linn, Douglas Martin (Inventor); Askew, Scott R. (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Platt, Robert (Inventor); Hargrave, Brian (Inventor); Valvo, Michael C. (Inventor); Abdallah, Muhammad E. (Inventor); Permenter, Frank Noble (Inventor); Mehling, Joshua S. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A humanoid robot includes a robotic hand having at least one finger. An actuation system for the robotic finger includes an actuator assembly which is supported by the robot and is spaced apart from the finger. A tendon extends from the actuator assembly to the at least one finger and ends in a tendon terminator. The actuator assembly is operable to actuate the tendon to move the tendon terminator and, thus, the finger.

  6. Neuronal regulation of tendon homoeostasis.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, Paul W

    2013-08-01

    The regulation of tendon homoeostasis, including adaptation to loading, is still not fully understood. Accumulating data, however, demonstrates that in addition to afferent (sensory) functions, the nervous system, via efferent pathways which are associated with through specific neuronal mediators plays an active role in regulating pain, inflammation and tendon homeostasis. This neuronal regulation of intact-, healing- and tendinopathic tendons has been shown to be mediated by three major groups of molecules including opioid, autonomic and excitatory glutamatergic neuroregulators. In intact healthy tendons the neuromediators are found in the surrounding structures: paratenon, endotenon and epitenon, whereas the proper tendon itself is practically devoid of neurovascular supply. This neuroanatomy reflects that normal tendon homoeostasis is regulated from the tendon surroundings. After injury and during tendon repair, however, there is extensive nerve ingrowth into the tendon proper, followed by a time-dependent emergence of sensory, autonomic and glutamatergic mediators, which amplify and fine-tune inflammation and regulate tendon regeneration. In tendinopathic condition, excessive and protracted presence of sensory and glutamatergic neuromediators has been identified, suggesting involvement in inflammatory, nociceptive and hypertrophic (degenerative) tissue responses. Under experimental and clinical conditions of impaired (e.g. diabetes) as well as excessive (e.g. tendinopathy) neuromediator release, dysfunctional tendon homoeostasis develops resulting in chronic pain and gradual degeneration. Thus there is a prospect that in the future pharmacotherapy and tissue engineering approaches targeting neuronal mediators and their receptors may prove to be effective therapies for painful, degenerative and traumatic tendon disorders.

  7. Neuronal regulation of tendon homoeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Ackermann, Paul W

    2013-01-01

    The regulation of tendon homoeostasis, including adaptation to loading, is still not fully understood. Accumulating data, however, demonstrates that in addition to afferent (sensory) functions, the nervous system, via efferent pathways which are associated with through specific neuronal mediators plays an active role in regulating pain, inflammation and tendon homeostasis. This neuronal regulation of intact-, healing- and tendinopathic tendons has been shown to be mediated by three major groups of molecules including opioid, autonomic and excitatory glutamatergic neuroregulators. In intact healthy tendons the neuromediators are found in the surrounding structures: paratenon, endotenon and epitenon, whereas the proper tendon itself is practically devoid of neurovascular supply. This neuroanatomy reflects that normal tendon homoeostasis is regulated from the tendon surroundings. After injury and during tendon repair, however, there is extensive nerve ingrowth into the tendon proper, followed by a time-dependent emergence of sensory, autonomic and glutamatergic mediators, which amplify and fine-tune inflammation and regulate tendon regeneration. In tendinopathic condition, excessive and protracted presence of sensory and glutamatergic neuromediators has been identified, suggesting involvement in inflammatory, nociceptive and hypertrophic (degenerative) tissue responses. Under experimental and clinical conditions of impaired (e.g. diabetes) as well as excessive (e.g. tendinopathy) neuromediator release, dysfunctional tendon homoeostasis develops resulting in chronic pain and gradual degeneration. Thus there is a prospect that in the future pharmacotherapy and tissue engineering approaches targeting neuronal mediators and their receptors may prove to be effective therapies for painful, degenerative and traumatic tendon disorders. PMID:23718724

  8. In vitro two-dimensional and three-dimensional tenocyte culture for tendon tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yiwei; Wang, Xiao; Zhang, Yaonan; Carr, Andrew J; Zhu, Liwei; Xia, Zhidao; Sabokbar, Afsie

    2016-03-01

    In order to examine the differentiation potential of the tenocytes expanded in our defined culture medium (reported previously) and the effect of sequential combination of the two culture conditions on human tenocytes, a two-dimensional and three-dimensional experimental approach was used. Human tenocytes were sequentially exposed to 1% fetal bovine serum (FBS) + 50 ng/ml platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGFBB ) + 50 ng/ml basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) for the first 14 days (expansion phase) followed by a further 14-day culture in the presence of 10 ng/ml transforming growth factor β-3 plus 50 ng/ml insulin-like growth factor 1, but in the absence of serum (differentiation phase). The results showed that by sequential treatment of human tenocytes maintaining a long-term two-dimensional tenocyte culture in vitro for up to 28 days was possible. These findings were further verified using a three-dimensional scaffold (Bombyx silk) whereby the tendon-like constructs formed resembled macroscopically and microscopically the constructs formed in 10% FBS supplemented culture media and the human hamstring tendon. These findings were further substantiated using haematoxylin and eosin staining, scanning electron microscopy and by immunohistochemical detection of type I collagen. In addition, the mechanical properties of the three-dimensional constructs were determined to be significantly superior to that of the natural human hamstring tendon. This is the first report to demonstrate a possible approach in expanding and differentiating human tenocytes for tendon tissue engineering.

  9. In vitro effects of glutamate and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonism on human tendon derived cells.

    PubMed

    Dean, Benjamin John Floyd; Snelling, Sarah J B; Dakin, Stephanie Georgina; Javaid, Muhammad Kassim; Carr, Andrew Jonathan

    2015-10-01

    It is known that extracellular glutamate concentrations are increased in tendinopathy but the effects of glutamate upon human tendon derived cells are unknown. The primary purpose was to investigate the effect of glutamate exposure on human tendon-derived cells in terms of viability, protein, and gene expression. The second purpose was to assess whether NMDAR antagonism would affect the response of tendon-derived cells to glutamate exposure. Human tendon-derived cells were obtained from supraspinatus tendon tissue obtained during rotator cuff repair (tendon tear derived cells) and from healthy hamstring tendon tissue (control cells). The in vitro impact of glutamate exposure and NMDAR antagonism (MK-801) was measured using the Alamar blue cell viability assay, immunocytochemistry, and quantitative real-time PCR. Glutamate reduced cell viability at 24 h in tendon tear derived cells but not in control cells at concentrations of 7.5 mM and above. Cell viability was significantly reduced after 72 h of 1.875 mM glutamate in both cell groups; this deleterious effect was attenuated by NMDAR antagonism with 10 µM MK-801. Both 24 and 72 h of 1.875 mM glutamate exposure reduced Type 1 alpha 1 collagen (COL1A1) and Type 3 alpha 1 collagen (COL3A1) gene expression, but increased Aggrecan gene expression. We propose that these effects of glutamate on tendon derived cells including reduced cell viability and altered matrix gene expression contribute to the pathogenesis of tendinopathy. PMID:26041147

  10. Tibialis Anterior Tendon Transfer.

    PubMed

    Mulhern, Jennifer L; Protzman, Nicole M; Brigido, Stephen A

    2016-01-01

    Tendon transfer procedures are used commonly for the correction of soft tissue imbalances and instabilities. The complete transfer and the split transfer of the tibialis anterior tendon are well-accepted methods for the treatment of idiopathic equinovarus deformity in children and adults. Throughout the literature, complete and split transfer have been shown to yield significant improvements in ankle and foot range of motion and muscle function. At present, there is insufficient evidence to recommend one procedure over the other, although the split procedure has been advocated for consistently achieving inversion to eversion muscle balance without overcorrection.

  11. Open Achilles tendon lacerations.

    PubMed

    Said, M Nader; Al Ateeq Al Dosari, Mohamed; Al Subaii, Nasser; Kawas, Alaa; Al Mas, Ali; Al Ser, Yaser; Abuodeh, Yousef; Shakil, Malik; Habash, Ali; Mukhter, Khalid

    2015-04-01

    In contrast to closed Achilles tendon ruptures, open injuries are rarely reported in the literature. This paper provides information about open Achilles tendon wounds that are eventually seen in the Middle East. The reporting unit, Hamad Medical Corporation, is one of the biggest trauma centers in the Gulf area and the major health provider in Qatar. This is a retrospective study including patients admitted and operated for open Achilles tendon injuries between January 2011 and December 2013. Two hundred and five cases of open Achilles tendon lacerations were operated in Hamad General Hospital in this period. Forty-eight cases showed partial injuries, and the remaining are complete tendons cut. In the same period, fifty-one closed ruptured Achilles tendons were operated in the same trauma unit. In the majority of cases, the open injury resulted from a slip in the floor-leveled traditional toilette seats. Local damage to the toilette seats resulted in sharp edges causing the laceration of the heel if the patient was slipping over the wet floor. This occurrence is the cause in the vast majority of the cases. Wounds were located 1-5 cm proximal to tendon insertion. Standard treatment principles were applied. This included thorough irrigation in the emergency room, intravenous antibiotics, surgical debridement and primary repair within 24 h. Patients were kept in the hospital 1-7 days for intravenous antibiotics and possible dressing changes. Postoperatively below knee slabs were applied in the majority of patients and were kept for about 4 weeks followed by gradual weight bearing and range of motion exercises. Outpatients follow up in 1-2 weeks. Further follow-up visits at around 2-, 4-, 8- and 12-week intervals until complete wound healing and satisfactory rehabilitation outcome. Sixteen cases needed a second procedure. A high incidence of Achilles tendon open injuries is reported. This seems to be related to partially damaged floor-level toilettes in the

  12. Posterior Tibial Tendon Transfer.

    PubMed

    Shane, Amber M; Reeves, Christopher L; Cameron, Jordan D; Vazales, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    When performed correctly with the right patient population, a tibialis posterior muscle/tendon transfer is an effective procedure. Many different methods have been established for fixating the tendon, each of which has its' own indications. Passing through the interosseous membrane is the preferred and recommended method and should be used unless this is not possible. Good surgical planning based on patient needs and expectations, along with excellent postoperative care including early range of motion and physical therapy minimizes risk of complications and allows for the optimal outcome to be achieved. PMID:26590722

  13. Distal Triceps Tendon Injuries.

    PubMed

    Keener, Jay D; Sethi, Paul M

    2015-11-01

    Acute triceps ruptures are an uncommon entity, occurring mainly in athletes, weight lifters (especially those taking anabolic steroids), and following elbow trauma. Accurate diagnosis is made clinically, although MRI may aid in confirmation and surgical planning. Acute ruptures are classified on an anatomic basis based on tear location and the degree of tendon involvement. Most complete tears are treated surgically in medically fit patients. Partial-thickness tears are managed according to the tear severity, functional demands, and response to conservative treatment. We favor an anatomic footprint repair of the triceps to provide optimal tendon to bone healing and, ultimately, functional outcome. PMID:26498552

  14. Magnesium inference screw supports early graft incorporation with inhibition of graft degradation in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Pengfei; Han, Pei; Zhao, Changli; Zhang, Shaoxiang; Zhang, Xiaonong; Chai, Yimin

    2016-01-01

    Patients after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction surgery commonly encounters graft failure in the initial phase of rehabilitation. The inhibition of graft degradation is crucial for the successful reconstruction of the ACL. Here, we used biodegradable high-purity magnesium (HP Mg) screws in the rabbit model of ACL reconstruction with titanium (Ti) screws as a control and analyzed the graft degradation and screw corrosion using direct pull-out tests, microCT scanning, and histological and immunohistochemical staining. The most noteworthy finding was that tendon graft fixed by HP Mg screws exhibited biomechanical properties substantially superior to that by Ti screws and the relative area of collagen fiber at the tendon-bone interface was much larger in the Mg group, when severe graft degradation was identified in the histological analysis at 3 weeks. Semi-quantitative immunohistochemical results further elucidated that the MMP-13 expression significantly decreased surrounding HP Mg screws with relatively higher Collagen II expression. And HP Mg screws exhibited uniform corrosion behavior without displacement or loosening in the femoral tunnel. Therefore, our results demonstrated that Mg screw inhibited graft degradation and improved biomechanical properties of tendon graft during the early phase of graft healing and highlighted its potential in ACL reconstruction. PMID:27210585

  15. Magnesium inference screw supports early graft incorporation with inhibition of graft degradation in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Pengfei; Han, Pei; Zhao, Changli; Zhang, Shaoxiang; Zhang, Xiaonong; Chai, Yimin

    2016-05-01

    Patients after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction surgery commonly encounters graft failure in the initial phase of rehabilitation. The inhibition of graft degradation is crucial for the successful reconstruction of the ACL. Here, we used biodegradable high-purity magnesium (HP Mg) screws in the rabbit model of ACL reconstruction with titanium (Ti) screws as a control and analyzed the graft degradation and screw corrosion using direct pull-out tests, microCT scanning, and histological and immunohistochemical staining. The most noteworthy finding was that tendon graft fixed by HP Mg screws exhibited biomechanical properties substantially superior to that by Ti screws and the relative area of collagen fiber at the tendon-bone interface was much larger in the Mg group, when severe graft degradation was identified in the histological analysis at 3 weeks. Semi-quantitative immunohistochemical results further elucidated that the MMP-13 expression significantly decreased surrounding HP Mg screws with relatively higher Collagen II expression. And HP Mg screws exhibited uniform corrosion behavior without displacement or loosening in the femoral tunnel. Therefore, our results demonstrated that Mg screw inhibited graft degradation and improved biomechanical properties of tendon graft during the early phase of graft healing and highlighted its potential in ACL reconstruction.

  16. Magnesium inference screw supports early graft incorporation with inhibition of graft degradation in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Pengfei; Han, Pei; Zhao, Changli; Zhang, Shaoxiang; Zhang, Xiaonong; Chai, Yimin

    2016-01-01

    Patients after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction surgery commonly encounters graft failure in the initial phase of rehabilitation. The inhibition of graft degradation is crucial for the successful reconstruction of the ACL. Here, we used biodegradable high-purity magnesium (HP Mg) screws in the rabbit model of ACL reconstruction with titanium (Ti) screws as a control and analyzed the graft degradation and screw corrosion using direct pull-out tests, microCT scanning, and histological and immunohistochemical staining. The most noteworthy finding was that tendon graft fixed by HP Mg screws exhibited biomechanical properties substantially superior to that by Ti screws and the relative area of collagen fiber at the tendon-bone interface was much larger in the Mg group, when severe graft degradation was identified in the histological analysis at 3 weeks. Semi-quantitative immunohistochemical results further elucidated that the MMP-13 expression significantly decreased surrounding HP Mg screws with relatively higher Collagen II expression. And HP Mg screws exhibited uniform corrosion behavior without displacement or loosening in the femoral tunnel. Therefore, our results demonstrated that Mg screw inhibited graft degradation and improved biomechanical properties of tendon graft during the early phase of graft healing and highlighted its potential in ACL reconstruction. PMID:27210585

  17. Mechanical properties of tendons: changes with sterilization and preservation.

    PubMed

    Smith, C W; Young, I S; Kearney, J N

    1996-02-01

    Tendon allografts are commonly used to replace damaged anterior cruciate ligaments (ACL). Some of the sterilization and preservation techniques used by tissue banks with tendon allografts are thought to impair the mechanical properties of graft tissues. The tensile mechanical properties of porcine toe extensor tendons were measured using a dynamic testing machine following either freezing, freeze-drying, freezing then irradiation at 25 kGy (2.5 MRad), freeze-drying then irradiation, or freeze-drying then ethylene oxide gas sterilization. There was a small but significant difference in Young's modulus between the frozen group (0.88 GPa + 0.09 SD) and both the fresh group (0.98 GPa 1 0.12 SD) and the frozen irradiated group (0.97 GPa 1 0.08 SD). No values of Young's modulus were obtained for the freeze-dried irradiated tendons. The ultimate tensile stress (UTS) of the freeze-dried irradiated group (4.7 MPa 1 4.8 SD) was significantly different from both the fresh and the frozen irradiated groups, being reduced by approximately 90 percent. There were no significant changes in UTS or Young's modulus between any of the other groups. If irradiation is to be used to sterilize a tendon replacement for an ACL it must take place after freeze-drying to maintain mechanical properties.

  18. Arthroscopic treatment of infrapatellar tendonitis.

    PubMed

    Romeo, A A; Larson, R V

    1999-04-01

    Infrapatellar tendonitis is a chronic overload lesion in the patellar ligament at the attachment to the lower pole of the patella. This lesion is found primarily in athletes who participate in jumping sports. Magnetic resonance imaging or ultrasound can show the extent of tendon pathology. Patellar tendonitis is treated with modification of activities, medications, and therapy. When conservative measures fail, operative debridement has been recommended. Previous reports have described a technique of open debridement of the patellar tendon, followed by an extended period of rehabilitation before returning to sports. Two athletes with persistent infrapatellar tendonitis were treated with an arthroscopic debridement. Both athletes returned to full activities without restrictions within 8 weeks of surgery. Arthroscopic treatment of infrapatellar tendonitis has not been previously described. This technical note describes the technique and two case reports of the arthroscopic treatment of infrapatellar tendonitis.

  19. Hamstring Injuries in Major and Minor League Baseball

    PubMed Central

    Zachazewski, James; Silvers, Holly J.; Li, Bernard; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn; Insler, Stephanie; Ahmad, Christopher S.; Mandelbaum, Bert R.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study is to test the efficacy of a hamstring injury prevention program designed to address the high incidence of acute and chronic hamstring injuries and re-injuries that occur in the sport of professional baseball. Methods: This was a prospective cluster cohort study assessing the efficacy of an injury prevention intervention designed to address hamstring injury in rookie and professional baseball players participating in Minor and Major League Baseball (N = 213). Each athlete was asked to participate and consented (Johns Hopkins Internal Review Board, Baltimore, Maryland). Those athletes who agreed to participate completed a questionnaire detailing their hamstring injury history. The hamstring injury prevention program was disseminated to each medical staff (team physician, certified athletic trainer and strength and conditioning coach) and they were instructed on how to implement the program. Weekly individual compliance with the program and injury data was collected. At the end of the season, the data were analyzed for program compliance and hamstring (HS) injury rates (both acute and reoccurrence) compared to the control data in the MLB HITS database. All data were stripped of individual and team identifiers prior to analysis. Results: For the major and minor league intervention study, one Major and Minor League organization served as the intervention (INT) team, which encompassed Rookie League, Fall Ball, Class A, AA, AAA and major league rosters (6 total teams). A total of 213 athletes consented to participate: Minor League: N = 173 players and Majors League: N = 40. Weekly compliance, injury incidence and time loss due to injury was compared to the HITS database (age, skill matched control group). The average weighted utilization of the injury prevention program was 25.30 utilizations for the uninjured group compared to 13.53 in the injured group (p=0.09). In the majors, there were 2 HS injuries in the INT vs. 79 in the CON

  20. Plant grafting.

    PubMed

    Melnyk, Charles W; Meyerowitz, Elliot M

    2015-03-01

    Since ancient times, people have cut and joined together plants of different varieties or species so they would grow as a single plant - a process known as grafting (Figures 1 and 2). References to grafting appear in the Bible, ancient Greek and ancient Chinese texts, indicating that grafting was practised in Europe, the Middle East and Asia by at least the 5(th) century BCE. It is unknown where or how grafting was first discovered, but it is likely that natural grafting, the process by which two plants touch and fuse limbs or roots in the absence of human interference (Figure 3), influenced people's thinking. Such natural grafts are generally uncommon, but are seen in certain species, including English ivy. Parasitic plants, such as mistletoe, that grow and feed on often unrelated species may have also contributed to the development of grafting as a technique, as people would have observed mistletoe growing on trees such as apples or poplars. PMID:25734263

  1. Successful management of hamstring injuries in Australian Rules footballers: two case reports

    PubMed Central

    Hoskins, Wayne T; Pollard, Henry P

    2005-01-01

    Hamstring injuries are the most prevalent injury in Australian Rules football. There is a lack of evidence based literature on the treatment, prevention and management of hamstring injuries, although it is agreed that the etiology is complicated and multi-factorial. We present two cases of hamstring injury that had full resolution after spinal manipulation and correction of lumbar-pelvic biomechanics. There was no recurrence through preventative treatment over a twelve and sixteen week period. The use of spinal manipulation for treatment or prevention of hamstring injury has not been documented in sports medicine literature and should be further investigated in prospective randomized controlled trials. PMID:15967047

  2. The Foam Roll as a Tool to Improve Hamstring Flexibility.

    PubMed

    Junker, Daniel H; Stöggl, Thomas L

    2015-12-01

    Although foam rolling is a common myofascial therapy used to increase range of motion (ROM), research is limited on the effectiveness of foam rolling on soft tissue extensibility. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of a 4-week training period of the foam roll method on hamstring flexibility. Furthermore, the study was designed to compare the effectiveness of the foam roll myofascial release with a conventional contract-relax proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) stretching method and a control group. Forty healthy males (age: 17-47 years) were randomly assigned to a foam roll group (FOAM, n = 13), a contract-relax PNF stretching group (CRPNF, n = 14), or a control group (CG, n = 13). The FOAM group massaged their hamstring muscles with the foam roll 3 times per week for 4 weeks (12 training sessions). The CRPNF group was assigned to 12 sessions of contract-relax PNF stretching. The CG underwent no intervention. Hamstring flexibility (ROM) was measured by a stand-and-reach test before and after the intervention period. Two-way repeated-measures analysis of variance showed a significant global time effect (p < 0.001) and an interaction effect for time × treatment (p = 0.004), demonstrating greater improvements in the FOAM and CRPNF compared with the CG, but no difference between the former. Delta changes from baseline to postintervention in ROM were not related to baseline ROM. The foam roll can be seen as an effective tool to increase hamstring flexibility within 4 weeks. The effects are comparable with the scientifically proven contract-relax PNF stretching method.

  3. The Foam Roll as a Tool to Improve Hamstring Flexibility.

    PubMed

    Junker, Daniel H; Stöggl, Thomas L

    2015-12-01

    Although foam rolling is a common myofascial therapy used to increase range of motion (ROM), research is limited on the effectiveness of foam rolling on soft tissue extensibility. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of a 4-week training period of the foam roll method on hamstring flexibility. Furthermore, the study was designed to compare the effectiveness of the foam roll myofascial release with a conventional contract-relax proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) stretching method and a control group. Forty healthy males (age: 17-47 years) were randomly assigned to a foam roll group (FOAM, n = 13), a contract-relax PNF stretching group (CRPNF, n = 14), or a control group (CG, n = 13). The FOAM group massaged their hamstring muscles with the foam roll 3 times per week for 4 weeks (12 training sessions). The CRPNF group was assigned to 12 sessions of contract-relax PNF stretching. The CG underwent no intervention. Hamstring flexibility (ROM) was measured by a stand-and-reach test before and after the intervention period. Two-way repeated-measures analysis of variance showed a significant global time effect (p < 0.001) and an interaction effect for time × treatment (p = 0.004), demonstrating greater improvements in the FOAM and CRPNF compared with the CG, but no difference between the former. Delta changes from baseline to postintervention in ROM were not related to baseline ROM. The foam roll can be seen as an effective tool to increase hamstring flexibility within 4 weeks. The effects are comparable with the scientifically proven contract-relax PNF stretching method. PMID:25992660

  4. Hamstring muscle strain recurrence and strength performance disorders.

    PubMed

    Croisier, Jean-Louis; Forthomme, Bénédicte; Namurois, Marie-Hélène; Vanderthommen, Marc; Crielaard, Jean-Michel

    2002-01-01

    We determined the frequency of strength disorders in 26 athletes with a history of hamstring muscle injury and recurrent strains and discomfort. We also assessed the effectiveness of rehabilitation to correct muscle performance. After concentric and eccentric isokinetic assessment, 18 athletes were found to have strength deficits, as determined by statistically selected cutoffs of peak torque, bilateral differences, and the flexors/quadriceps ratio. The discriminating character of the eccentric trial was demonstrated, combining a preferential eccentric peak torque deficit and a significant reduction of the mixed eccentric flexors/concentric quadriceps ratio. The athletes with muscle imbalances followed a rehabilitation program individually adapted from their strength profile. Treatment length was from 10 to 30 sessions and resulted in isokinetic parameter normalization in 17 of 18 subjects. Isokinetically corrected subjects were observed for 12 months after return to athletics. None sustained a clinically diagnosed hamstring muscle reinjury. Subjective intensity of pain and discomfort were significantly reduced, and they all returned to their prior level of competition. These results demonstrate that persistent muscle strength abnormalities may give rise to recurrent hamstring injuries and discomfort. An individualized rehabilitation program emphasizing eccentric training based on specific deficits contributes to a decrease in symptoms on return to sports.

  5. Engineering human neo-tendon tissue in vitro with human dermal fibroblasts under static mechanical strain.

    PubMed

    Deng, Dan; Liu, Wei; Xu, Feng; Yang, Yang; Zhou, Guangdong; Zhang, Wen Jie; Cui, Lei; Cao, Yilin

    2009-12-01

    Proper cell source is one of the key issues for tendon engineering. Our previous study showed that dermal fibroblasts could be used to successfully engineer tendon in vivo and tenocytes could engineer neo-tendon in vitro with static strain. This study further investigated the possibility of engineering human neo-tendon tissue in vitro using dermal fibroblasts. Human dermal fibroblasts were seeded on polyglycolic acid (PGA) fibers pre-fixed on a U-shape as a mechanical loading group, or simply cultured in a dish as a tension-free group. In addition, human tenocytes were also seeded on PGA fibers with tension as a comparison to human dermal fibroblasts. The results showed that human neo-tendon tissue could be generated using dermal fibroblasts during in vitro culture under static strain and the tissue structure became more mature with the increase of culture time. Longitudinally aligned collagen fibers and spindle shape cells were observed histologically and collagen fibril diameter and tensile strength increased with time and reached a peak at 14 weeks. In contrast, the dermal fibroblast-PGA constructs failed to form neo-tendon, but formed disorganized fibrous tissue in tension-free condition with significantly weaker strength and poor collagen fiber formation. Interestingly, neo-tendon tissues generated with human dermal fibroblasts were indistinguishable from the counterpart engineered with human tenocytes, which supports the viewpoint that human dermal fibroblasts is likely to replace tenocytes for future tendon graft development in vitro with dynamic mechanical loading in a bioreactor system.

  6. [Successive ruptures of patellar and Achilles tendons. Anabolic steroids in competitive sports].

    PubMed

    Isenberg, J; Prokop, A; Skouras, E

    2008-01-01

    Derivatives of testosterone or of 19-nor-testosterone are used as anabolics for the purpose of improving performance although the effect of anabolics is known still to be under discussion. The use of anabolic steroids continues among competitive athletes despite increased controls and increasingly frequent dramatic incidents connected with them. Whereas metabolic dysfunction during anabolic use is well documented, ruptures of the large tendons are rarely reported. Within 18 months, a 29-year-old professional footballer needed surgery for rupture of the patellar tendon and of both Achilles tendons. Carefully directed questioning elicited confirmation that he had taken different anabolic steroids regularly for 3 years with the intention of improving his strength. After each operation anabolic steroids were taken again at a high dosage during early convalescence and training. Minimally invasive surgery and open suturing techniques led to complete union of the Achilles tendons in good time. Training and anabolic use (metenolon 300 mg per week) started early after suturing of the patellar tendon including bone tunnels culminated in histologically confirmed rerupture after 8 weeks. After a ligament reconstruction with a semitendinosus tendon graft with subsequent infection, the tendon and reserve traction apparatus were lost. Repeated warnings of impaired healing if anabolic use was continued had been given without success. In view of the high number of unrecorded cases in competitive and athletic sports, we can assume that the use of anabolic steroids is also of quantitative relevance in the operative treatment of tendon ruptures.

  7. Repeated freeze-thaw cycles reduce the survival rate of osteocytes in bone-tendon constructs without affecting the mechanical properties of tendons.

    PubMed

    Suto, Kaori; Urabe, Ken; Naruse, Kouji; Uchida, Kentaro; Matsuura, Terumasa; Mikuni-Takagaki, Yuko; Suto, Mitsutoshi; Nemoto, Noriko; Kamiya, Kentaro; Itoman, Moritoshi

    2012-03-01

    Frozen bone-patellar tendon bone allografts are useful in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction as the freezing procedure kills tissue cells, thereby reducing immunogenicity of the grafts. However, a small portion of cells in human femoral heads treated by standard bone-bank freezing procedures survive, thus limiting the effectiveness of allografts. Here, we characterized the survival rates and mechanisms of cells isolated from rat bones and tendons that were subjected to freeze-thaw treatments, and evaluated the influence of these treatments on the mechanical properties of tendons. After a single freeze-thaw cycle, most cells isolated from frozen bone appeared morphologically as osteocytes and expressed both osteoblast- and osteocyte-related genes. Transmission electron microscopic observation of frozen cells using freeze-substitution revealed that a small number of osteocytes maintained large nuclei with intact double membranes, indicating that these osteocytes in bone matrix were resistant to ice crystal formation. We found that tendon cells were completely killed by a single freeze-thaw cycle, whereas bone cells exhibited a relatively high survival rate, although survival was significantly reduced after three freeze-thaw cycles. In patella tendons, the ultimate stress, Young's modulus, and strain at failure showed no significant differences between untreated tendons and those subjected to five freeze-thaw cycles. In conclusion, we identified that cells surviving after freeze-thaw treatment of rat bones were predominantly osteocytes. We propose that repeated freeze-thaw cycles could be applied for processing bone-tendon constructs prior to grafting as the treatment did not affect the mechanical property of tendons and drastically reduced surviving osteocytes, thereby potentially decreasing allograft immunogenecity.

  8. Acute Lower Extremity Running Kinematics After a Hamstring Stretch

    PubMed Central

    Davis Hammonds, Autumn L.; Laudner, Kevin G.; McCaw, Steve; McLoda, Todd A.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Limited passive hamstring flexibility might affect kinematics, performance, and injury risk during running. Pre-activity static straight-leg raise stretching often is used to gain passive hamstring flexibility. Objective: To investigate the acute effects of a single session of passive hamstring stretching on pelvic, hip, and knee kinematics during the swing phase of running. Design: Randomized controlled clinical trial. Setting: Biomechanics research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Thirty-four male (age = 21.2 ± 1.4 years) and female (age = 21.3±2.0 years) recreational athletes. Intervention(s): Participants performed treadmill running pretests and posttests at 70% of their age-predicted maximum heart rate. Pelvis, hip, and knee joint angles during the swing phase of 5 consecutive gait cycles were collected using a motion analysis system. Right and left hamstrings of the intervention group participants were passively stretched 3 times for 30 seconds in random order immediately after the pretest. Control group participants performed no stretching or movement between running sessions. Main Outcome Measure(s): Six 2-way analyses of variance to determine joint angle differences between groups at maximum hip flexion and maximum knee extension with an α level of .008. Results: Flexibility increased between pretest and post-test in all participants (F1,30 = 80.61, P<.001). Anterior pelvic tilt (F1,30 = 0.73, P=.40), hip flexion (F1,30 = 2.44, P=.13), and knee extension (F1,30 = 0.06, P=.80) at maximum hip flexion were similar between groups throughout testing. Anterior pelvic tilt (F1,30 = 0.69, P=.41), hip flexion (F1,30 = 0.23, P=.64), and knee extension (F1,30 = 3.38, P=.62) at maximum knee extension were similar between groups throughout testing. Men demonstrated greater anterior pelvic tilt than women at maximum knee extension (F1,30 = 13.62, P=.001). Conclusions: A single session of 3 straight-leg raise hamstring stretches did not change

  9. Strength Measurements in Acute Hamstring Injuries: Intertester Reliability and Prognostic Value of Handheld Dynamometry.

    PubMed

    Reurink, Gustaaf; Goudswaard, Gert Jan; Moen, Maarten H; Tol, Johannes L; Verhaar, Jan A N; Weir, Adam

    2016-08-01

    Study Design Cohort study, repeated measures. Background Although hamstring strength measurements are used for assessing prognosis and monitoring recovery after hamstring injury, their actual clinical relevance has not been established. Handheld dynamometry (HHD) is a commonly used method of measuring muscle strength. The reliability of HHD has not been determined in athletes with acute hamstring injuries. Objectives To determine the intertester reliability and the prognostic value of hamstring HHD strength measurement in acute hamstring injuries. Methods We measured knee flexion strength with HHD in 75 athletes at 2 visits, at baseline (within 5 days of hamstring injury) and follow-up (5 to 7 days after the baseline measurement). We assessed isometric hamstring strength in 15° and 90° of knee flexion. Reliability analysis testing was performed by 2 testers independently at the follow-up visit. We recorded the time needed to return to play (RTP) up to 6 months following baseline. Results The intraclass correlation coefficients of the strength measurements in injured hamstrings were between 0.75 and 0.83. There was a statistically significant but weak correlation between the time to RTP and the strength deficit at 15° of knee flexion measured at baseline (Spearman r = 0.25, P = .045) and at the follow-up visit (Spearman r = 0.26, P = .034). Up to 7% of the variance in time to RTP is explained by this strength deficit. None of the other strength variables were significantly correlated with time to RTP. Conclusion Hamstring strength can be reliably measured with HHD in athletes with acute hamstring injuries. The prognostic value of strength measurements is limited, as there is only a weak association between the time to RTP and hamstring strength deficit after acute injury. Level of Evidence Prognosis, level 4. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(8):689-696. Epub 12 May 2016. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.6363.

  10. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using a Combination of Autograft and Allograft Tendon

    PubMed Central

    Darnley, James E.; Léger-St-Jean, Benjamin; Pedroza, Angela D.; Flanigan, David C.; Kaeding, Christopher C.; Magnussen, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction with hamstring autografts less than 8.5 mm in diameter is associated with worse patient-reported outcome scores and increased risk of revision surgery compared with reconstructions performed with larger grafts. One proposed solution to small autograft harvest is to create a hybrid graft by augmenting autografts with allograft tissue to increase graft diameter. Purpose: To compare hybrid autograft/allograft ACL reconstruction to autograft ACL reconstruction, specifically analyzing the patient-reported outcome scores and the risk of revision surgery at 2 years postoperative. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: From the years 2002 to 2009, a total of 34 patients were identified from a prospectively collected database as having undergone hybrid ACL reconstruction. Twenty-seven of 34 (79.4%) patients had a 2-year follow-up. These 27 patients were matched by age (within 1 year) and sex to 27 patients who underwent hamstring autograft ACL reconstruction during the same period. At the 2-year mark, revision surgery risk and patient-reported outcome scores were compared between the 2 groups. Results: The mean age for the hybrid and matched groups (±SD) was 20.9 ± 7.0 years. Both the hybrid and control groups had 17 males and 10 females. There was no significant difference in preoperative patient-reported outcome scores, meniscus tears, or cartilage lesions between the 2 groups. Graft size was larger in the hybrid group (9.5 ± 0.6 mm) than in the autograft group (8.4 ± 0.9 mm) (P < .001). At 2 years postoperative, patient-reported outcome scores were similar between the hybrid and autograft groups. Revision surgery was required in 5 (18.5%) patients who underwent hybrid reconstruction compared with 2 (7.4%) of those who underwent autograft reconstruction (P = .26). Conclusion: Patients who undergo ACL reconstruction with hybrid hamstring grafts and hamstring autografts report similar

  11. [Damage to large tendons: Achilles, patellar and quadriceps tendons].

    PubMed

    Amlang, M H; Zwipp, H

    2006-07-01

    The etiology and mechanisms of Achilles, patellar and quadriceps tendon ruptures are very similar. Age dependent changes in tendon structure and disorders such gout, diabetes, rheumatic diseases and chronic renal failure are associated causes. The main mechanism of rupture is indirect trauma. Although clinical diagnosis is easy, ruptures are still frequently missed. Sonography is the main standard diagnostic tool. MRI is indicated only in special cases. Open operative repair is the most common treatment for quadriceps and patellar tendon ruptures. Treatment of Achilles tendon ruptures is moving towards an individualized choice of therapy. Percutaneous and other "minimally invasive" techniques will play an increasingly important role.

  12. Effects of cyclic loading on the tensile properties of human patellar tendon.

    PubMed

    Chandrashekar, Naveen; Slauterbeck, James; Hashemi, Javad

    2012-01-01

    Bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) graft is a popular choice for ACL reconstruction. These grafts are subjected to cyclic loading during the activities of daily living. Significant knee laxity is observed in reconstructed knee shortly after reconstruction. The source of this laxity is not clear. The change in the tensile properties of the graft due to cyclic loading can be one of the reasons for the change in knee laxity. Twenty patellar tendons from fresh frozen cadaver knees were cyclically loaded at a stress amplitude equivalent to 33% of the failure strength of the contralateral patellar tendon for 5000 cycles at 1.4Hz. They were then tested in tension to failure. Failure properties and the low load properties such as toe-region modulus were calculated. The results were compared with those of contralateral patellar tendons that were not subjected to cyclic loading before testing to failure. Fatigue loading did not alter the failure and low load properties with the exception of failure strain which decreased by about 10% (P<.05). Cyclically loaded patellar tendons with higher tissue mass density possess higher strength, modulus of elasticity, toughness, and transition stress (P<.05). The results indicate that there is no significant change in graft properties because of cyclic loading with the above load magnitude. The change in knee laxity observed after reconstruction, hence, is not because of change in graft properties due to moderate cyclic loading. Other factors, such as plastic deformation (yielding) of the graft, might play a role in increased knee laxity after reconstruction.

  13. Scaffolds in Tendon Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Lamberti, Alfredo; Petrillo, Stefano; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Tissue engineering techniques using novel scaffold materials offer potential alternatives for managing tendon disorders. Tissue engineering strategies to improve tendon repair healing include the use of scaffolds, growth factors, cell seeding, or a combination of these approaches. Scaffolds have been the most common strategy investigated to date. Available scaffolds for tendon repair include both biological scaffolds, obtained from mammalian tissues, and synthetic scaffolds, manufactured from chemical compounds. Preliminary studies support the idea that scaffolds can provide an alternative for tendon augmentation with an enormous therapeutic potential. However, available data are lacking to allow definitive conclusion on the use of scaffolds for tendon augmentation. We review the current basic science and clinical understanding in the field of scaffolds and tissue engineering for tendon repair. PMID:22190961

  14. Peroneal tendons subluxation.

    PubMed

    Oliva, Francesco; Del Frate, Dario; Ferran, Nicholas Antonio; Maffulli, Nicola

    2009-06-01

    Subluxation of the peroneal tendons is uncommon. It occurs especially in skiing, soccer, basketball, rugby, ice skating, judo, sprint, water-skiing, mountaineering, and gymnastics. We present an overview of the injury, with the classification commonly used. Many surgical techniques have been described to manage recurrent subluxation of the peroneal tendons, but only Level IV/Grade C evidence has been produced. Thus, randomized controlled trials are necessary to determinate the best surgical management method. It appears that high-demand individuals should be primarily managed surgically, and retinaculoplasty seems to be, when indicated, the best surgical option: it affords less complications and a high rate of return to sports without reducing their activity levels.

  15. Isolated vastus lateralis tendon avulsion.

    PubMed

    Frank, Jonathan M; Riedel, Matthew D; McCormick, Frank M; Nho, Shane J

    2013-10-01

    Isolated avulsion of the vastus lateralis tendon is a very rare injury. To our knowledge, only 1 case has been reported in the literature. This tendon is crucial to knee stability and proper patellofemoral tracking. As isolated avulsion of the tendon tends to occur in young, active males, early surgical repair is recommended to allow them to maintain a high level of functional ability. We present the case of a 49-year-old man who sustained an isolated vastus lateralis tendon avulsion injury. The injury was successfully treated with suture anchor repair.

  16. Tribological characteristics of healthy tendon.

    PubMed

    Theobald, Peter S; Dowson, Duncan; Khan, Ilyas M; Jones, Michael D

    2012-07-26

    Tendons transfer muscular forces efficiently and painlessly, facilitating joint motion. Whilst the tribology of articular cartilage is constantly explored, a poorer understanding remains of tendon lubrication and friction. This study reports experimental data describing the tribological characteristics of tendon and its surrounding tissue, before presenting an arithmetic solution to facilitate numerical modelling. The experimental characteristics of the tensile (i.e. mid-substance) and compressive (i.e. fibrocartilaginous) regions of bovine flexor tendon were investigated using a pin-on-plate tribometer, with immunofluroscence analysis describing the relative intensity and distribution of surface-bound lubricin. Arithmetic analysis considering the digital extensor tendon determined that, in physiological conditions, the tensile tendon region was able to generate elastohydrodynamic lubrication (EHL). The equivalent region of compressive tendon exhibited a higher intensity of surface-bound lubricin which, it is hypothesised, serves to minimise the increased frictional resistance due to generating only mixed or boundary lubrication regimes. Arithmetic analysis indicates that, given a more favourable biomechanical environment, this region can also generate EHL. Whilst acknowledging the limitations of transferring data from an animal model to a clinical environment, by providing the first data and equations detailing the film thicknesses and lubrication regime for these two tendon regions it is hoped that clinicians, engineers and scientists can consider improved clinical strategies to tackle both tendinopathy and tendon rupture.

  17. Effects of Sacrificing Tensor Tympani Muscle Tendon When Manubrium of Malleus Is Foreshortened in Type I Tympanoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Vadiya, Sohil

    2015-01-01

    The current study aims at observing effects of sacrificing the tensor tympani tendon when manubrium of malleus is foreshortened or retracted on graft uptake, hearing improvement, and occurrence of complications if any during type I tympanoplasty surgery for central perforations. 42 patients were included in group A where the tensor tendon was sectioned and 42 patients were included in group B where the tensor tympani tendon was retained and kept intact. Graft uptake rates are very good in both groups but hearing improvement was found significantly better in group A than group B. No unusual or undesired complications were seen in any of the cases. Sectioning of tensor tympani tendon is safe and effective procedure in cases where manubrium is foreshortened. PMID:26697069

  18. Comparison of the hamstring/quadriceps ratio in females during squat exercise using various foot wedges.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2016-08-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the hamstring/quadriceps ratio in females during squat exercise using various foot wedges. [Subjects and Methods] Nine females participated in this study. Surface electrodes measurements were taken over the hamstring and quadriceps under 3 squat exercise conditions, and the hamstring/quadriceps ratio was calculated. [Results] The hamstring/quadriceps ratio was significantly increased during squat exercise in inclined wedge condition (7.4 ± 1.8), compared to the declined wedge condition (5.3 ± 2.2) and no wedge condition (6.4 ± 3.2). [Conclusion] This study suggests that squat exercise in the inclined wedge condition may be effective for increasing the hamstring/quadriceps ratio in females. PMID:27630437

  19. Comparison of the hamstring/quadriceps ratio in females during squat exercise using various foot wedges

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Won-gyu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the hamstring/quadriceps ratio in females during squat exercise using various foot wedges. [Subjects and Methods] Nine females participated in this study. Surface electrodes measurements were taken over the hamstring and quadriceps under 3 squat exercise conditions, and the hamstring/quadriceps ratio was calculated. [Results] The hamstring/quadriceps ratio was significantly increased during squat exercise in inclined wedge condition (7.4 ± 1.8), compared to the declined wedge condition (5.3 ± 2.2) and no wedge condition (6.4 ± 3.2). [Conclusion] This study suggests that squat exercise in the inclined wedge condition may be effective for increasing the hamstring/quadriceps ratio in females.

  20. Comparison of the hamstring/quadriceps ratio in females during squat exercise using various foot wedges

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Won-gyu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the hamstring/quadriceps ratio in females during squat exercise using various foot wedges. [Subjects and Methods] Nine females participated in this study. Surface electrodes measurements were taken over the hamstring and quadriceps under 3 squat exercise conditions, and the hamstring/quadriceps ratio was calculated. [Results] The hamstring/quadriceps ratio was significantly increased during squat exercise in inclined wedge condition (7.4 ± 1.8), compared to the declined wedge condition (5.3 ± 2.2) and no wedge condition (6.4 ± 3.2). [Conclusion] This study suggests that squat exercise in the inclined wedge condition may be effective for increasing the hamstring/quadriceps ratio in females. PMID:27630437

  1. Assessment of stem cell carriers for tendon tissue engineering in pre-clinical models

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Tendon injuries are prevalent and problematic, especially among young and otherwise healthy individuals. The inherently slow innate healing process combined with the inevitable scar tissue formation compromise functional recovery, imposing the need for the development of therapeutic strategies. The limited number of low activity/reparative capacity tendon-resident cells has directed substantial research efforts towards the exploration of the therapeutic potential of various stem cells in tendon injuries and pathophysiologies. Severe injuries require the use of a stem cell carrier to enable cell localisation at the defect site. The present study describes advancements that injectable carriers, tissue grafts, anisotropically orientated biomaterials, and cell-sheets have achieved in preclinical models as stem cell carriers for tendon repair. PMID:25157898

  2. Physical principles demonstrate that the biceps femoris muscle relative to the other hamstring muscles exerts the most force: implications for hamstring muscle strain injuries

    PubMed Central

    Dolman, Bronwyn; Verrall, Geoffrey; Reid, Iain

    2014-01-01

    Summary Of the hamstring muscle group the biceps femoris muscle is the most commonly injured muscle in sports requiring interval sprinting. The reason for this observation is unknown. The objective of this study was to calculate the forces of all three hamstring muscles, relative to each other, during a lengthening contraction to assess for any differences that may help explain the biceps femoris predilection for injury during interval sprinting. To calculate the displacement of each individual hamstring muscle previously performed studies on cadaveric anatomical data and hamstring kinematics during sprinting were used. From these displacement calculations for each individual hamstring muscle physical principles were then used to deduce the proportion of force exerted by each individual hamstring muscle during a lengthening muscle contraction. These deductions demonstrate that the biceps femoris muscle is required to exert proportionally more force in a lengthening muscle contraction relative to the semimembranosus and semitendinosus muscles primarily as a consequence of having to lengthen over a greater distance within the same time frame. It is hypothesized that this property maybe a factor in the known observation of the increased susceptibility of the biceps femoris muscle to injury during repeated sprints where recurrent higher force is required. PMID:25506583

  3. Bilateral Spontaneous Midsubstance Patellar Tendon Rupture after Bilateral Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Rajani, Amyn; Dash, Kumar Kaushik; Mahajan, Neetin P; Kumar, Ritesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Patellar tendon rupture can occur due to multiple causes ranging from inflammatory pathologies to episodes of trauma. Extensor mechanism rupture is a rare complication of total knee arthroplasty (TKA). In most of these cases, the failure occurs as avulsion of patellar tendon from tibial tuberosity. We report a rare case with bilateral mid-substance patellar tendon rupture one month after bilateral total knee arthroplasty. Case Presentation: A 69-year-old male was operated for bilateral grade 4 osteoarthritis. On day 30 post-operative, he sustained bilateral patellar tendon rupture while getting up from toilet. He had a history of multiple steroid injections in the knee, which could have affected the tendon. The other etiologies could be inherent weakness of tendon due to diabetes and old age and micro-trauma/stretch associated with sudden correction of previous deformity by TKA. The management in our case was done by primary repair along with augmentation by autologous semitendinosus graft and suture anchor. Conclusion: The operating surgeon must be aware of the possibility of patellar tendon rupture following total knee arthroplasty. This will help the surgeon in early recognition and preparedness to handle such complications, should they arise. Surgeons may consider advising caution to both patient and rehabilitation team in cases with old age, chronic diabetes mellitus, and with a history of steroid injections. PMID:27703942

  4. Effects of freezing on the biomechanical and structural properties of human posterior tibial tendons

    PubMed Central

    Giannini, Sandro; Buda, Roberto; Agati, Patrizia; Bigi, Adriana; De Pasquale, Viviana; Ruggeri, Alessandro

    2007-01-01

    This work analyzes the effects of storage by fresh-freezing at −80°C on the histological, structural and biomechanical properties of the human posterior tibial tendon (PTT), used for ACL reconstruction. Twenty-two PTTs were harvested from eleven donors. For each donor one tendon was frozen at −80°C and thawed in physiological solution at 37°C, and the other was tested without freezing (control). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and biomechanical analysis were performed. We found the following mean changes in frozen-thawed tendons compared to controls: TEM showed an increase in the mean diameter of collagen fibrils and in fibril non-occupation mean ratio, while the mean number of fibrils decreased; DSC showed a decrease in mean denaturation temperature and denaturation enthalpy. Biomechanical analysis showed a decrease in ultimate load and ultimate stress, an increase in stiffness and a decrease in ultimate strain of tendons. In conclusion fresh-freezing brings about significant changes in the biomechanical and structural properties of the human PTT. A high variability exists in the biophysical properties of tendons among individuals and in the effects of storage on tendons. Therefore, when choosing an allograft tendon, particular care is needed to choose a biomechanically suitable graft. PMID:17216243

  5. One-incision endoscopic technique for posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with quadriceps tendon-patellar bone autograft.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Hwa; Chen, Wen-Jer; Shih, Chun-Hsiung

    2001-03-01

    Quadriceps tendon-patellar bone autograft is an alternative graft choice for posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction. A 2-incision technique with outside-in fixation at the femoral condyle is generally used. In this article, we describe a 1-incision endoscopic technique for PCL reconstruction with quadriceps tendon-patellar bone autograft. The graft consists of a proximal patellar bone plug and central quadriceps tendon. The bone plug is trapezoidal, 20 mm long, 10 mm wide, and 8 mm thick. The tendon portion is 80 mm long, 10 mm wide, and 6 mm thick, including the full-thickness of the rectus femoris and partial thickness of the vastus intermedius. Three arthroscopic portals, including anteromedial, anterolateral, and posteromedial, are used. All procedures are performed in an endoscopic manner with only 1 incision at the proximal tibia. At the femoral side, the bone plug is fixed by an interference screw. At the tibial side, the tendon portion is fixed by a suture to a screw on the anterior cortex and an interference bioscrew in the posterior tibial tunnel opening. Quadriceps tendon autograft has the advantages of being self-available, allowing for easier arthroscopic technique, and providing comparable graft size. The 1-incision technique provides a simple reconstruction method for PCL insufficiency without a second incision at the medial femoral condyle.

  6. Spontaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    Vigneswaran, N; Lee, K; Yegappan, M

    2007-11-01

    Spontaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon ruptures are uncommon. We present a 30-year-old man with end-stage renal failure, who sustained this injury, and subsequently had surgical repair of both tendons on separate occasions. He has since regained full range of movement of both knees.

  7. Principles of tendon transfers.

    PubMed

    Coulet, B

    2016-04-01

    Tendon transfers are carried out to restore functional deficits by rerouting the remaining intact muscles. Transfers are highly attractive in the context of hand surgery because of the possibility of restoring the patient's ability to grip. In palsy cases, tendon transfers are only used when a neurological procedure is contraindicated or has failed. The strategy used to restore function follows a common set of principles, no matter the nature of the deficit. The first step is to clearly distinguish between deficient muscles and muscles that could be transferred. Next, the type of palsy will dictate the scope of the program and the complexity of the gripping movements that can be restored. Based on this reasoning, a surgical strategy that matches the means (transferable muscles) with the objectives (functions to restore) will be established and clearly explained to the patient. Every paralyzed hand can be described using three parameters. 1) Deficient segments: wrist, thumb and long fingers; 2) mechanical performance of muscles groups being revived: high energy-wrist extension and finger flexion that require strong transfers with long excursion; low energy-wrist flexion and finger extension movements that are less demanding mechanically, because they can be accomplished through gravity alone in some cases; 3) condition of the two primary motors in the hand: extrinsics (flexors and extensors) and intrinsics (facilitator). No matter the type of palsy, the transfer surgery follows the same technical principles: exposure, release, fixation, tensioning and rehabilitation. By performing an in-depth analysis of each case and by following strict technical principles, tendon transfer surgery leads to reproducible results; this allows the surgeon to establish clear objectives for the patient preoperatively. PMID:27117119

  8. Potential mechanisms of a periosteum patch as an effective and favourable approach to enhance tendon-bone healing in the human body.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Jiang, Jia; Wu, Yang; Chen, Shiyi

    2012-03-01

    Tendon-bone healing is a progressive and complex pathophysiological process after tendon graft transplantation into a bone tunnel. A fibrous scar tissue layer forms at the graft-bone interface, which means a weak bonding of the graft in the bone tunnel. Periosteum, a favourable autologous tissue, was confirmed to be effective in promoting tendon-bone healing in the human body. The advantages of a periosteum patch for tendon-bone repair include the fact that this tissue meets the three primary requirements for tissue engineering: a source of progenitor cells, a scaffold for recruiting cells and growth factors, and a source of local growth factors. Furthermore, the periosteum can prevent graft micromotion, alleviate inflammation and deter bone resorption. In this review, we highlight the role of progenitor cells in the periosteum, which contribute to the regeneration of new bone and/or fibrocartilage at the tendon-bone interface. In summary, the periosteum has shown significant potential for use in the enhancement of graft-bone healing. Our investigations may provoke further studies on the management of allograft-bone healing and artificial ligament graft healing using a periosteum patch in future.

  9. Quadriceps and hamstrings prelanding myoelectric activity during landing from different heights among male and female athletes.

    PubMed

    de Britto, Morgana Alves; Carpes, Felipe P; Koutras, Georgios; Pappas, Evangelos

    2014-08-01

    ACL tear is a major concern among athletes, coaches and sports scientists. More than taking the athlete away from training and competition, ACL tear is a risk factor for early-onset of knee osteoarthritis, and, therefore addressing strategies to avoid such injury is pertinent not only for competitive athletes, but for all physically active subjects. Imbalances in the prelanding myoelectric activity of the hamstrings and quadriceps muscles have been linked to ACL injuries. We investigated the effect of landing from different heights on prelanding myoelectric activity of the hamstrings and quadriceps muscles in recreational athletes. Thirty recreational athletes (15 male and 15 female) performed three bilateral drop jumps from two different heights; 20cm and 40cm while myoelectric activity of the vastus medialis, rectus femoris, biceps femoris and medial hamstrings were collected. When increasing the height of drop landing tasks prelanding normalized myoelectric activity of the quadriceps was increased by 15-20% but no significant changes were found for the hamstrings. Female athletes exhibited higher activity of the medial hamstrings compared to their male counterparts. We concluded that increasing the height of drop landing tasks is associated with increased myoelectric activity of the quadriceps but not the hamstrings in recreational athletes. These differences in muscle activity may be related to increased risk for ACL injury when the height is increased. Female athletes demonstrated higher recruitment of the medial hamstrings.

  10. Magnitudes of muscle activation of spine stabilizers, gluteals, and hamstrings during supine bridge to neutral position.

    PubMed

    Youdas, James W; Hartman, James P; Murphy, Brooke A; Rundle, Ashley M; Ugorowski, Jenna M; Hollman, John H

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the magnitude of selective core muscle activation during supine bridging to neutral exercises (three on a stable and three on an unstable surface). Surface EMG analysis was performed on the lumbar multifidus, gluteus medius, gluteus maximus, and hamstrings from 13 male and 13 female subjects. Lumbar multifidus recruitment was not influenced by exercise or condition and ranged between 29.2 and 35.9% of maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC). Peak gluteus medius activation (42.0% MVIC) occurred in unstable single-leg bridge. Maximum recruitment of gluteus maximus (32.6% MVIC) appeared during stable single-leg bridge. Peak hamstring activation (59.6% MVIC) occurred during stable double-leg hamstring curl. Regardless of condition, hamstrings demonstrated high (51.9-59.6% MVIC) muscle recruitment during double-leg hamstring curls compared with the single-leg bridge or double-leg bridge. Various supine bridging to neutral exercises activated the hamstrings at levels conducive to strengthening, whereas recruitment of lumbar multifidus, gluteus medius, and gluteus maximus promoted endurance training. Clinically, we were unable to conclude the unstable support surface was preferable to the stable surface for boosting muscle recruitment of spine stabilizers, gluteals, and hamstring muscles during supine bridge to neutral position. PMID:25671354

  11. Anatomic study of the abductor pollicis longus: a source for grafting material of the hand.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Elena; Barco, Raul; Bullón, Adrian

    2010-05-01

    Interposition grafting material is used frequently to treat osteoarthritis of the base of the thumb or tendinous and ligamentous injuries of the hand. The observation of duplicated tendons in the first dorsal compartment of the hand prompted us to explore the possibility of using the accessory abductor pollicis longus (AAPL) tendon as grafting material. Based on dissections of 78 cadaveric upper limbs, we describe the number of tendons in the first dorsal compartment of the hand, the number of muscle bellies, their innervation, their insertion site, and the tendon dimensions to determine whether the AAPL can be considered a true tendon. The AAPL was present in 85% of the hands. Average length, width, and thickness (in millimeters) of the APL were of 69.3, 5.2, and 2.1, respectively. Average length, width, and thickness (in millimeters) of the AAPL were of 69.2, 3.3, and 1.6, respectively. No differences in dimension of the tendons were found between the APL and the AAPL. The dimensions of the tendinous portion of the AAPL are similar to those of the APL and can be considered a true tendon. When present, the AAPL is a suitable source of local grafting material.

  12. Anatomic Study of the Abductor Pollicis Longus: A Source for Grafting Material of the Hand

    PubMed Central

    Barco, Raul; Bullón, Adrian

    2009-01-01

    Interposition grafting material is used frequently to treat osteoarthritis of the base of the thumb or tendinous and ligamentous injuries of the hand. The observation of duplicated tendons in the first dorsal compartment of the hand prompted us to explore the possibility of using the accessory abductor pollicis longus (AAPL) tendon as grafting material. Based on dissections of 78 cadaveric upper limbs, we describe the number of tendons in the first dorsal compartment of the hand, the number of muscle bellies, their innervation, their insertion site, and the tendon dimensions to determine whether the AAPL can be considered a true tendon. The AAPL was present in 85% of the hands. Average length, width, and thickness (in millimeters) of the APL were of 69.3, 5.2, and 2.1, respectively. Average length, width, and thickness (in millimeters) of the AAPL were of 69.2, 3.3, and 1.6, respectively. No differences in dimension of the tendons were found between the APL and the AAPL. The dimensions of the tendinous portion of the AAPL are similar to those of the APL and can be considered a true tendon. When present, the AAPL is a suitable source of local grafting material. PMID:19760470

  13. Two cases of peroneus brevis tendon tear.

    PubMed

    Minoyama, O; Uchiyama, E; Iwaso, H; Hiranuma, K; Takeda, Y

    2002-02-01

    A longitudinal tear of the peroneal tendon is thought to be the result of repetitive peroneal subluxation. However, this report documents two cases of longitudinal split of the peroneus brevis tendon that had no peroneal tendon subluxation. Primary suture was performed. Subluxation of the peroneal tendons was not identified surgically in either case.

  14. Hamstring muscle forces prior to and immediately following an acute sprinting-related muscle strain injury.

    PubMed

    Schache, Anthony G; Kim, Hyung-Joo; Morgan, David L; Pandy, Marcus G

    2010-05-01

    A thorough understanding of the biomechanics of the hamstrings during sprinting is required to optimise injury rehabilitation and prevention strategies. The main aims of this study were to compare hamstrings load across different modes of locomotion as well as before and after an acute sprinting-related muscle strain injury. Bilateral kinematic and ground reaction force data were captured from a single subject whilst walking, jogging and sprinting prior to and immediately following a significant injury involving the right semitendinosis and biceps femoris long head muscles. Experimental data were input into a three-dimensional musculoskeletal model of the body and used, together with optimisation theory, to determine lower-limb muscle forces for each locomotor task. Hamstrings load was found to be greatest during terminal swing for sprinting. The hamstrings contributed the majority of the terminal swing hip extension and knee flexion torques, whilst gluteus maximus contributed most of the stance phase hip extension torque. Gastrocnemius contributed little to the terminal swing knee flexion torque. Peak hamstrings force was also substantially greater during terminal swing compared to stance for sprinting, but not for walking and jogging. Immediately following the muscle strain injury, the hamstrings demonstrated an intolerance to perform an eccentric-type contraction. Whilst peak hamstrings force during terminal swing did not decrease post-injury, both peak hamstrings length and negative work during terminal swing were considerably reduced. These results lend support to the paradigm that the hamstrings are most susceptible to muscle strain injury during the terminal swing phase of sprinting when they are contracting eccentrically.

  15. Achilles Tendon Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Wertz, Jess; Galli, Melissa; Borchers, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Achilles tendon (AT) rupture in athletes is increasing in incidence and accounts for one of the most devastating sports injuries because of the threat to alter or end a career. Despite the magnitude of this injury, reliable risk assessment has not been clearly defined, and prevention strategies have been limited. The purpose of this review is to identify potential intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors for AT rupture in aerial and ground athletes stated in the current literature. Evidence Acquisition: A MEDLINE search was conducted on AT rupture, or “injury” and “risk factors” and “athletes” from 1980 to 2011. Emphasis was placed on epidemiology, etiology, and review articles focusing on the risk for lower extremity injury in runners and gymnasts. Thirty articles were reviewed, and 22 were included in this assessment. Results: Aerial and ground athletes share many intrinsic risk factors for AT rupture, including overuse and degeneration of the tendon as well as anatomical variations that mechanically put an athlete at risk. Older athletes, athletes atypical in size for their sport, high tensile loads, leg dominance, and fatigue also may increase risk. Aerial athletes tend to have more extrinsic factors that play a role in this injury due to the varying landing surfaces from heights and technical maneuvers performed at various skill levels. Conclusion: Risk assessment for AT rupture in aerial and ground athletes is multivariable and difficult in terms of developing prevention strategies. Quantitative measures of individual risk factors may help identify major contributors to injury. PMID:24427410

  16. Implantation of a Novel Biologic and Hybridized Tissue Engineered Bioimplant in Large Tendon Defect: An In Vivo Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Oryan, Ahmad; Moshiri, Ali; Parizi, Abdolhamid Meimandi

    2014-01-01

    Surgical reconstruction of large Achilles tendon defects is technically demanding. There is no standard method, and tissue engineering may be a valuable option. We investigated the effects of 3D collagen and collagen-polydioxanone sheath (PDS) implants on a large tendon defect model in rabbits. Ninety rabbits were divided into three groups: control, collagen, and collagen-PDS. In all groups, 2 cm of the left Achilles tendon were excised and discarded. A modified Kessler suture was applied to all injured tendons to retain the gap length. The control group received no graft, the treated groups were repaired using the collagen only or the collagen-PDS prostheses. The bioelectrical characteristics of the injured areas were measured at weekly intervals. The animals were euthanized at 60 days after the procedure. Gross, histopathological and ultrastructural morphology and biophysical characteristics of the injured and intact tendons were investigated. Another 90 pilot animals were also used to investigate the inflammatory response and mechanism of graft incorporation during tendon healing. The control tendons showed severe hyperemia and peritendinous adhesion, and the gastrocnemius muscle of the control animals showed severe atrophy and fibrosis, with a loose areolar connective tissue filling the injured area. The tendons receiving either collagen or collagen-PDS implants showed lower amounts of peritendinous adhesion, hyperemia and muscle atrophy, and a dense tendon filled the defect area. Compared to the control tendons, application of collagen and collagen-PDS implants significantly improved water uptake, water delivery, direct transitional electrical current and tissue resistance to direct transitional electrical current. Compared to the control tendons, both prostheses showed significantly increased diameter, density and alignment of the collagen fibrils and maturity of the tenoblasts at ultrastructure level. Both prostheses influenced favorably tendon healing

  17. Implantation of a novel biologic and hybridized tissue engineered bioimplant in large tendon defect: an in vivo investigation.

    PubMed

    Oryan, Ahmad; Moshiri, Ali; Parizi, Abdolhamid Meimandi; Maffulli, Nicola

    2014-02-01

    Surgical reconstruction of large Achilles tendon defects is technically demanding. There is no standard method, and tissue engineering may be a valuable option. We investigated the effects of 3D collagen and collagen-polydioxanone sheath (PDS) implants on a large tendon defect model in rabbits. Ninety rabbits were divided into three groups: control, collagen, and collagen-PDS. In all groups, 2 cm of the left Achilles tendon were excised and discarded. A modified Kessler suture was applied to all injured tendons to retain the gap length. The control group received no graft, the treated groups were repaired using the collagen only or the collagen-PDS prostheses. The bioelectrical characteristics of the injured areas were measured at weekly intervals. The animals were euthanized at 60 days after the procedure. Gross, histopathological and ultrastructural morphology and biophysical characteristics of the injured and intact tendons were investigated. Another 90 pilot animals were also used to investigate the inflammatory response and mechanism of graft incorporation during tendon healing. The control tendons showed severe hyperemia and peritendinous adhesion, and the gastrocnemius muscle of the control animals showed severe atrophy and fibrosis, with a loose areolar connective tissue filling the injured area. The tendons receiving either collagen or collagen-PDS implants showed lower amounts of peritendinous adhesion, hyperemia and muscle atrophy, and a dense tendon filled the defect area. Compared to the control tendons, application of collagen and collagen-PDS implants significantly improved water uptake, water delivery, direct transitional electrical current and tissue resistance to direct transitional electrical current. Compared to the control tendons, both prostheses showed significantly increased diameter, density and alignment of the collagen fibrils and maturity of the tenoblasts at ultrastructure level. Both prostheses influenced favorably tendon healing

  18. The relationship between previous hamstring injury and the concentric isokinetic knee muscle strength of irish gaelic footballers

    PubMed Central

    O'Sullivan, Kieran; O'Ceallaigh, Brian; O'Connell, Kevin; Shafat, Amir

    2008-01-01

    Background Hamstring injury is one of the most common injuries affecting gaelic footballers, similar to other field sports. Research in other sports on whether residual hamstring weakness is present after hamstring injury is inconsistent, and no study has examined this factor in irish gaelic footballers. The aim of this study was to examine whether significant knee muscle weakness is present in male Irish gaelic footballers who have returned to full activity after hamstring injury. Methods The concentric isokinetic knee flexion and extension strength of 44 members of a university gaelic football team was assessed at 60, 180 and 300 degrees per second using a Contrex dynamometer. Results Fifteen players (34%) reported a history of hamstring strain, with 68% of injuries affecting the dominant (kicking) limb. The hamstrings were significantly stronger (p < 0.05) on the dominant limb in all uninjured subjects. The previously injured limbs had a significantly lower (p < 0.05) hamstrings to quadriceps (HQ) strength ratio than all other non-injured limbs, but neither their hamstrings nor quadriceps were significantly weaker (p > 0.05) using this comparison. The previously unilaterally injured hamstrings were significantly weaker (p < 0.05) than uninjured limbs however, when matched for dominance. The hamstring to opposite hamstring (H:oppH) strength ratio of the previously injured players was also found to be significantly lower (p < 0.05) than that of the uninjured players. Conclusion Hamstring muscle weakness was observed in male Irish gaelic footballers with a history of hamstring injury. This weakness is most evident when comparisons are made to multiple control populations, both within and between subjects. The increased strength of the dominant limb should be considered as a potential confounding variable in future trials. The study design does not allow interpretation of whether these changes in strength were present before or after injury. PMID:18325107

  19. Preventive Effects of Eccentric Training on Acute Hamstring Muscle Injury in Professional Baseball

    PubMed Central

    Seagrave, Richard A.; Perez, Luis; McQueeney, Sean; Toby, E. Bruce; Key, Vincent; Nelson, Joshua D.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hamstring injuries are the second most common injury causing missed days in professional baseball field players. Recent studies have shown the preventive benefit of eccentric conditioning on the hamstring muscle group in injury prevention. Specifically, Nordic-type exercises have been shown to decrease the incidence of acute hamstring injuries in professional athletes. Purpose: This was a prospective study performed in coordination with a single Major League Baseball (MLB) organization (major and minor league teams) that targeted the effects of Nordic exercises on the incidence of acute hamstring injuries in the professional-level baseball player. Study Design: Prospective cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. Methods: The daily workouts of 283 professional baseball players throughout all levels of a single MLB organization were prospectively recorded. The intervention group participated in the Nordic exercise program and was compared with a randomly selected control group of professional athletes within the organization not participating in the exercise program. The incidence of hamstring injuries in both groups was compared, and the total number of days missed due to injury was compared with the 2 previous seasons. Results: There were 10 hamstring injuries that occurred during the 2012 season among the 283 professional athletes that required removal from play. There were no injuries that occurred in the intervention group (n = 65, 0.00%; P = .0381). The number needed to treat (NNT) to prevent 1 hamstring injury was 11.3. The average repetitions per week of the injured group were assessed at multiple time points (2, 4, 6, and total weeks) prior to injury. There were significantly fewer repetitions per week performed in the injured group at all time points compared with overall average repetitions per week in the noninjured group (P = .0459, .0127, .0164, and .0299, respectively). After beginning the Nordic exercise program, there were 136 total days

  20. Effects of crushed ice and wetted ice on hamstring flexibility.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Chelsea C; Troiano, Jean M; Ramirez, Rebecca J; Miller, Michael G; Holcomb, William R

    2015-02-01

    Flexibility, which is the ability to move freely through a full range of motion (ROM), is desired to enhance the performance and decrease the likelihood of muscle injury. There are different techniques used to increase ROM and cryotherapy techniques to facilitation flexibility gains. However, the combination of stretching and type of cryotherapy agents are still confounding. The purpose was to determine which type of cryotherapy, crushed or wetted ice, would produce the greatest gains in hamstring ROM when followed by proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) stretching. Fifteen healthy subjects underwent 3 treatment conditions: crushed ice bag (crushed ice), wetted ice bag (wetted ice), and no ice bag (no ice). Subject's hamstring ROM was measured at baseline, then again after a 20-minute cryotherapy treatment session. Subjects were then stretched using a slow-reversal-hold-relax PNF technique followed by a final ROM measurement. A repeated measures analysis of variance showed significant differences between cryotherapy and measurement conditions. Post hoc testing indicated that no ice (75.49 ± 12.19° C) was significantly different from wetted ice (81.73 ± 10.34° C) and crushed ice (81.62 ± 13.19° C) at the end of the treatment session, and that no ice (85.27 ± 13.83° C) was significantly different than wetted ice (89.44 ± 11.31° C) and crushed ice (89.16 ± 13.78° C) after the stretching session. However, there were no differences between wetted ice and crushed ice. Results indicate that strength and conditioning specialists can increase ROM with both forms of ice in combination with PNF stretching more so than when using no ice at all. PMID:24378663

  1. Effects of crushed ice and wetted ice on hamstring flexibility.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Chelsea C; Troiano, Jean M; Ramirez, Rebecca J; Miller, Michael G; Holcomb, William R

    2015-02-01

    Flexibility, which is the ability to move freely through a full range of motion (ROM), is desired to enhance the performance and decrease the likelihood of muscle injury. There are different techniques used to increase ROM and cryotherapy techniques to facilitation flexibility gains. However, the combination of stretching and type of cryotherapy agents are still confounding. The purpose was to determine which type of cryotherapy, crushed or wetted ice, would produce the greatest gains in hamstring ROM when followed by proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) stretching. Fifteen healthy subjects underwent 3 treatment conditions: crushed ice bag (crushed ice), wetted ice bag (wetted ice), and no ice bag (no ice). Subject's hamstring ROM was measured at baseline, then again after a 20-minute cryotherapy treatment session. Subjects were then stretched using a slow-reversal-hold-relax PNF technique followed by a final ROM measurement. A repeated measures analysis of variance showed significant differences between cryotherapy and measurement conditions. Post hoc testing indicated that no ice (75.49 ± 12.19° C) was significantly different from wetted ice (81.73 ± 10.34° C) and crushed ice (81.62 ± 13.19° C) at the end of the treatment session, and that no ice (85.27 ± 13.83° C) was significantly different than wetted ice (89.44 ± 11.31° C) and crushed ice (89.16 ± 13.78° C) after the stretching session. However, there were no differences between wetted ice and crushed ice. Results indicate that strength and conditioning specialists can increase ROM with both forms of ice in combination with PNF stretching more so than when using no ice at all.

  2. Mechanical tensile properties of the quadriceps tendon and patellar ligament in young adults.

    PubMed

    Stäubli, H U; Schatzmann, L; Brunner, P; Rincón, L; Nolte, L P

    1999-01-01

    We analyzed mechanical tensile properties of 16 10-mm wide, full-thickness central parts of quadriceps tendons and patellar ligaments from paired knees of eight male donors (mean age, 24.9 years). Uniaxial tensile testing was performed in a servohydraulic materials testing machine at an extension rate of 1 mm/sec. Sixteen specimens were tested unconditioned and 16 specimens were tested after cyclic preconditioning (200 cycles between 50 N and 800 N at 0.5 Hz). Mean cross-sectional areas measured 64.6 +/- 8.4 mm2 for seven unconditioned and 61.9 +/- 9.0 mm2 for eight preconditioned quadriceps tendons and were significantly larger than those values of seven unconditioned and seven preconditioned patellar ligaments (36.8 +/- 5.7 mm2 and 34.5 +/- 4.4 mm2, respectively). Mean ultimate tensile stress values of unconditioned patellar ligaments were significantly larger than those values of unconditioned quadriceps tendons: 53.4 +/- 7.2 N/mm2 and 33.6 +/- 8.1 N/mm2, respectively. Strain at failure was 14.4% +/- 3.3% for preconditioned patellar ligaments and 11.2% +/- 2.2% for preconditioned quadriceps tendons (P = 0.0428). Preconditioned patellar ligaments exhibited significantly higher elastic modulus than preconditioned quadriceps tendons. Based on mechanical tensile properties analyses, the quadriceps tendon-bone construct may represent a versatile alternative graft in primary and revision anterior and posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

  3. Hyaluronic acid and tendon lesions

    PubMed Central

    Kaux, Jean-François; Samson, Antoine; Crielaard, Jean-Michel

    2015-01-01

    Summary Introduction recently, the viscoelastic properties of hyaluronic acid (HA) on liquid connective tissue have been proposed for the treatment of tendinopathies. Some fundamental studies show encouraging results on hyaluronic acid’s ability to promote tendon gliding and reduce adhesion as well as to improve tendon architectural organisation. Some observations also support its use in a clinical setting to improve pain and function. This literature review analyses studies relating to the use of hyaluronic acid in the treatment of tendinopathies. Methods this review was constructed using the Medline database via Pubmed, Scopus and Google Scholar. The key words hyaluronic acid, tendon and tendinopathy were used for the research. Results in total, 28 articles (in English and French) on the application of hyaluronic acid to tendons were selected for their relevance and scientific quality, including 13 for the in vitro part, 7 for the in vivo animal part and 8 for the human section. Conclusions preclinical studies demonstrate encouraging results: HA permits tendon gliding, reduces adhesions, creates better tendon architectural organisation and limits inflammation. These laboratory observations appear to be supported by limited but encouraging short-term clinical results on pain and function. However, controlled randomised studies are still needed. PMID:26958533

  4. Does a 'tight' hamstring predict low back pain reporting during prolonged standing?

    PubMed

    Raftry, Sean M; Marshall, Paul W M

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between hamstring passive stiffness and extensibility in asymptomatic individuals with the reporting of low back pain during 2-h prolonged standing. Twenty healthy participants with no history of low back pain (mean±SD, age 22.6±2.7 years, height 1.74±0.09 m, weight 76.2±14.8 kg). Low back pain (VAS score; mm) was continuously monitored during 2-h prolonged standing. Hamstring extensibility, passive stiffness, and stretch tolerance were measured before and after prolonged standing using an instrumented straight leg raise (iSLR). Ten participants reported a clinically relevant increase (Δ VAS>10mm) in low back pain during prolonged standing. Hamstring extensiblity (leg°(max)), passive stiffness (Nm.°(-1)), and stretch tolerance (VAS; mm) were no different between pain developers and non-pain developers. No changes in hamstring measures were observed following 2-h prolonged standing. No relationship was observed in this study between measures of hamstring extensibility and the reporting of low back pain during prolonged standing. There is no evidence to recommend hamstring extensibility interventions (i.e. passive stretching) as a means of reducing pain reporting in occupations requiring prolonged standing.

  5. Contributors to Fatigue Resistance of the Hamstrings and Quadriceps in Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, Noelle G; Li, Li; Geaghan, James P; Damiano, Diane L

    2009-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to elucidate relationships between quadriceps and hamstrings voluntary muscle fatigue and upper motor lesion impairments in cerebral palsy in order to gain a better understanding of their contribution to the observed fatigue resistance. Methods Seventeen ambulatory subjects with cerebral palsy (mean age: 17.0, SD = 4.8 years) were recruited. Quantitative measures of strength, spasticity, cocontraction, and stiffness for both muscle groups were collected on an isokinetic dynamometer and entered in a factor analysis. The resulting factors were used as independent variables in a multiple regression analysis with quadriceps and hamstrings fatigue as dependent variables. Findings Five independent factors explained 90% of the variance. In order of loadings, higher hamstring cocontraction and spasticity and lower hamstring strength were associated with lower levels of hamstring fatigue. Higher quadriceps cocontraction and lower quadriceps strength were the most predictive of lower levels of quadriceps fatigue. Interpretation Greater motor impairments of the agonist muscle, particularly cocontraction, spasticity, and weakness, were associated with lower rates of muscle fatigue of the same muscle during performance of a voluntary fatigue protocol for the hamstrings and quadriceps. Muscles are highly adaptable; therefore, the results of this study suggest that the observed fatigue resistance may be due to the effect of the primary neural insult on motor unit recruitment and rate modulation or the result of secondary adaptations to spasticity, weakness, or excessive cocontraction. PMID:19264384

  6. The management of hamstring injury--Part 1: Issues in diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Hoskins, Wayne; Pollard, Henry

    2005-05-01

    Hamstring injuries are the most prevalent muscle injury in sports involving rapid acceleration and maximum speed running. Injury typically occurs in an acute manner through an eccentric mechanism at the terminal stages of the swing phase of gait. Biceps femoris is most commonly injured. Re-injury rates are high and management is a challenge given the complex multi-factorial aetiology. The high rates of hamstring injury and re-injury may result from a lack of high-quality research into the aetiological factors underlying injury. Re-injury may also result from inaccuracy in diagnosis that results from the potential multi-factorial causes of these conditions. Inaccuracy in diagnosis could lead to multiple potential diagnoses that may result in the implementation of variable management protocols. Whilst potentially useful, such variability may also lead to the implementation of sub-optimal management strategies. Previous hamstring injury is the most recognized risk factor for injury, which indicates that future research should be directed at preventative measures. Much anecdotal and indirect evidence exists to suggest that several non-local factors contribute to injury, which may be addressed through the application of manual therapy. However, this connection has been neglected in previous research and literature. This paper will explore and speculate on this potential connection and offer some new contributive factors for hamstring injury management. This first paper of a two part series on hamstring injury will explore diagnostic issues relevant to hamstring injury and the second will investigate various established and speculative management approaches.

  7. Distal tears of the hamstring muscles: review of the literature and our results of surgical treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lempainen, Lasse; Sarimo, Janne; Mattila, Kimmo; Heikkilä, Jouni; Orava, Sakari

    2007-01-01

    Background Hamstring strains are among the most frequent injuries in sports, especially in events requiring sprinting and running. Distal tears of the hamstring muscles requiring surgical treatment are scarcely reported in the literature. Objective To evaluate the results of surgical treatment for distal hamstring tears. Design A case series of 18 operatively treated distal hamstring muscle tears combined with a review of previously published cases in the English literature. Retrospective study; level of evidence 4. Setting Mehiläinen Sports Trauma Research Center, Mehiläinen Hospital and Sports Clinic, Turku, Finland. Patients Between 1992 and 2005, a total of 18 athletes with a distal hamstring tear were operated at our centre. Main outcome measurements At follow‐up, the patients were asked about possible symptoms (pain, weakness, stiffness) and their return to the pre‐injury level of sport. Results The final results were rated excellent in 13 cases, good in 1 case, fair in 3 cases and poor in 1 case. 14 of the 18 patients were able to return to their former level of sport after an average of 4 months (range 2–6 months). Conclusions Surgical treatment seems to be beneficial in distal hamstring tears in selected cases. PMID:17138628

  8. Tendon Transfers for Combined Peripheral Nerve Injuries.

    PubMed

    Makarewich, Christopher A; Hutchinson, Douglas T

    2016-08-01

    Combined peripheral nerve injuries present a unique set of challenges to the hand surgeon when considering tendon transfers. They are often associated with severe soft tissue trauma, including lacerations to remaining innervated muscles and tendons, significant scar formation, and substantial sensory loss. In the case of combined nerve injuries, there are typically fewer options for tendon transfers due to fewer tendons of shared function that are expendable as well as associated injuries to tendon or muscle bellies. As such, careful preoperative planning must be performed to make the most of remaining muscle tendon units. PMID:27387081

  9. Bone Morphogenetic Protein 7 (BMP-7) Influences Tendon-Bone Integration In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Schwarting, Tim; Lechler, Philipp; Struewer, Johannes; Ambrock, Marius; Frangen, Thomas Manfred; Ruchholtz, Steffen; Ziring, Ewgeni; Frink, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Successful graft ingrowth following reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament is governed by complex biological processes at the tendon-bone interface. The aim of this study was to investigate in an in vitro study the effects of bone morphogenetic protein 7 (BMP-7) on tendon-bone integration. Materials and Methods To study the biological effects of BMP-7 on the process of tendon-bone-integration, two independent in vitro models were used. The first model involved the mono- and coculture of bovine tendon specimens and primary bovine osteoblasts with and without BMP-7 exposure. The second model comprised the mono- and coculture of primary bovine osteoblasts and fibroblasts. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), lactate and osteocalcin (OCN) were analyzed by ELISA. Histological analysis and electron microscopy of the tendon specimens were performed. Results In both models, positive effects of BMP-7 on ALP enzyme activity were observed (p<0.001). Additionally, similar results were noted for LDH activity and lactate concentration. BMP-7 stimulation led to a significant increase in OCN expression. Whereas the effects of BMP-7 on tendon monoculture peaked during an early phase of the experiment (p<0.001), the cocultures showed a maximal increase during the later stages (p<0.001). The histological analysis showed a stimulating effect of BMP-7 on extracellular matrix formation. Organized ossification zones and calcium carbonate-like structures were only observed in the BMP-stimulated cell cultures. Discussion This study showed the positive effects of BMP-7 on the biological process of tendon-bone integration in vitro. Histological signs of improved mineralization were paralleled by increased rates of osteoblast-specific protein levels in primary bovine osteoblasts and fibroblasts. Conclusion Our findings indicated a role for BMP-7 as an adjuvant therapeutic agent in the treatment of ligamentous injuries, and they emphasized the

  10. Tendon Tissue Engineering and Its Role on Healing of the Experimentally Induced Large Tendon Defect Model in Rabbits: A Comprehensive In Vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Meimandi-Parizi, Abdolhamid; Oryan, Ahmad; Moshiri, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Healing of large tendon defects is challenging. We studied the role of collagen implant with or without polydioxanone (PDS) sheath on the healing of a large Achilles tendon defect model, in rabbits. Sixty rabbits were divided into three groups. A 2 cm gap was created in the left Achilles tendon of all rabbits. In the control lesions, no implant was used. The other two groups were reconstructed by collagen and collagen-PDS implants respectively. The animals were clinically examined at weekly intervals and their lesions were observed by ultrasonography. Blood samples were obtained from the animals and were assessed for hematological analysis and determination of serum PDGF level, at 60 days post injury (DPI). The animals were then euthanized and their lesions were assessed for gross and histopathology, scanning electron microscopy, biomechanical testing, dry matter and hydroxyproline content. Another 65 pilot animals were also studied grossly and histopathologically to define the host implant interaction and graft incorporation at serial time points. The treated animals gained significantly better clinical scoring compared to the controls. Treatment with collagen and collagen-PDS implants significantly increased the biomechanical properties of the lesions compared to the control tendons at 60DPI (P<0.05). The tissue engineered implants also reduced peritendinous adhesion, muscle fibrosis and atrophy, and increased ultrasonographical echogenicity and homogenicity, maturation and differentiation of the collagen fibrils and fibers, tissue alignment and volume of the regenerated tissue compared to those of the control lesions (P<0.05). The implants were gradually absorbed and substituted by the new tendon. Implantation of the bioimplants had a significant role in initiating tendon healing and the implants were biocompatible, biodegradable and safe for application in tendon reconstructive surgery. The results of the present study may be valuable in clinical practice. PMID

  11. Negative pressure wound therapy in the management of late deep infections after open reconstruction of achilles tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    Mosser, Philipp; Kelm, Jens; Anagnostakos, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Infection is a major complication after open reconstruction of Achilles tendon ruptures. We report on the use of vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy in the treatment of late deep infections after open Achilles tendon reconstruction. Six patients (5 males [83.33%], 1 female [16.67%]; mean age, 52.8 [range 37 to 66] years) were been treated using an identical protocol. Surgical management consisted of debridement, lavage, and necrectomy of infected tendon parts. The VAC therapy was used for local wound preconditioning and infection management. A continuous negative pressure of 125 mm Hg was applied on each wound. For final wound closure, a split-thickness skin graft was performed. The skin graft healing process was also supported by VAC therapy during the first 5 days. The VAC dressings were changed a mean average of 3 (range 1 to 4) times until split-thickness skin grafting could be performed. The mean total duration of the VAC therapy was 13.6 ± 5.9 days. The mean hospital stay was 31.2 ± 15.9 days. No complications with regard to bleeding, seroma, or hematoma formation beneath the skin graft were observed. At a mean follow-up duration of 29.9 (range 4 to 65) months, no re-infection or infection persistence was observed. The VAC device seems to be a valuable tool in the treatment of infected tendons. The generalization of these conclusions should await the results of future studies with larger patient series.

  12. Elevated gastrocnemius forces compensate for decreased hamstrings forces during the weight-acceptance phase of single-leg jump landing: implications for anterior cruciate ligament injury risk.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Kristin D; Donnelly, Cyril J; Reinbolt, Jeffrey A

    2014-10-17

    Approximately 320,000 anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries in the United States each year are non-contact injuries, with many occurring during a single-leg jump landing. To reduce ACL injury risk, one option is to improve muscle strength and/or the activation of muscles crossing the knee under elevated external loading. This study's purpose was to characterize the relative force production of the muscles supporting the knee during the weight-acceptance (WA) phase of single-leg jump landing and investigate the gastrocnemii forces compared to the hamstrings forces. Amateur male Western Australian Rules Football players completed a single-leg jump landing protocol and six participants were randomly chosen for further modeling and simulation. A three-dimensional, 14-segment, 37 degree-of-freedom, 92 muscle-tendon actuated model was created for each participant in OpenSim. Computed muscle control was used to generate 12 muscle-driven simulations, 2 trials per participant, of the WA phase of single-leg jump landing. A one-way ANOVA and Tukey post-hoc analysis showed both the quadriceps and gastrocnemii muscle force estimates were significantly greater than the hamstrings (p<0.001). Elevated gastrocnemii forces corresponded with increased joint compression and lower ACL forces. The elevated quadriceps and gastrocnemii forces during landing may represent a generalized muscle strategy to increase knee joint stiffness, protecting the knee and ACL from external knee loading and injury risk. These results contribute to our understanding of how muscle's function during single-leg jump landing and should serve as the foundation for novel muscle-targeted training intervention programs aimed to reduce ACL injuries in sport. PMID:25218505

  13. Achilles tendon rupture rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Kearney, R. S.; Parsons, N.; Underwood, M.; Costa, M. L.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The evidence base to inform the management of Achilles tendon rupture is sparse. The objectives of this research were to establish what current practice is in the United Kingdom and explore clinicians’ views on proposed further research in this area. This study was registered with the ISRCTN (ISRCTN68273773) as part of a larger programme of research. Methods We report an online survey of current practice in the United Kingdom, approved by the British Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society and completed by 181 of its members. A total of ten of these respondents were invited for a subsequent one-to-one interview to explore clinician views on proposed further research in this area. Results The survey showed wide variations in practice, with patients being managed in plaster cast alone (13%), plaster cast followed by orthoses management (68%), and orthoses alone (19%). Within these categories, further variation existed regarding the individual rehabilitation facets, such as the length of time worn, the foot position within them and weight-bearing status. The subsequent interviews reflected this clinical uncertainty and the pressing need for definitive research. Conclusions The gap in evidence in this area has resulted in practice in the United Kingdom becoming varied and based on individual opinion. Future high-quality randomised trials on this subject are supported by the clinical community. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2015;4:65–9 PMID:25868938

  14. Adaptation of the tendon to mechanical usage.

    PubMed

    Reeves, N D

    2006-01-01

    Tendons primarily function as contractile force transmitters, but their mechanical properties may change dependent upon their level of mechanical usage. Using an ultrasound-based technique we have assessed tendon mechanical properties in vivo in a number of conditions representing different levels of mechanical usage. Ageing alters tendon mechanical properties; stiffness and modulus were lower in older adults by 10 and 14%, respectively, compared to young adults. Increased levels of exercise loading in old age can however partly reverse this process, as tendon stiffness and modulus were found to increase by 65 and 69%, respectively. Complete unloading due to bed rest or spinal cord injury both reduce tendon stiffness and modulus, however, only chronic unloading due to spinal cord injury seems to cause tendon atrophy. Alterations in tendon mechanical properties due to changes in the levels loading have implications for the speed of force transmission, the muscle's operating range and the likelihood of tendon strain injury.

  15. Quadriceps and patellar tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    Ramseier, L E; Werner, C M L; Heinzelmann, M

    2006-06-01

    Ruptures of the patellar and/or quadriceps tendon are rare injuries that require immediate repair to re-establish knee extensor continuity and to allow early motion. We evaluated 36 consecutive patients with quadriceps or patellar tendon rupture between 1993 and 2000. There were 37 primary ruptures, 3 reruptures, 21 quadriceps and 19 patellar tendon ruptures. Follow up examination (>24 months postoperatively) included the patient's history, assessment of risk factors, clinical examination of both knees, isometric muscle strength measurements and three specific knee scores, Hospital for Special Surgery Score, Knee Society Score and Turba Score, and a short form SF-36. We evaluated 29 patients (26 men) with 33 ruptures (16 patellar tendon, 17 quadriceps tendon). Seven patients were lost to follow up. We found no difference between the range of motion and muscle strength when the injured leg was compared to the non-injured leg. Risk factors did not influence the four scores, patient satisfaction, pain, muscle strength or range of motion. Multiple injured patients had a significant reduction in muscle strength and circumference, however patient satisfaction did not differ to the non-multiple injured patient group.

  16. The association between antagonist hamstring coactivation and episodes of knee joint shifting and buckling

    PubMed Central

    Segal, N.A.; Nevitt, M.C.; Welborn, R.D.; Nguyen, U.-S.D.T.; Niu, J.; Lewis, C.E.; Felson, D.T.; Frey-Law, L.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Objective Hamstring coactivation during quadriceps activation is necessary to counteract the quadriceps pull on the tibia, but coactivation can be elevated with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA). To guide rehabilitation to attenuate risk for mobility limitations and falls, this study evaluated whether higher antagonistic open kinetic chain hamstring coactivation is associated with knee joint buckling (sudden loss of support) and shifting (a sensation that the knee might give way). Design At baseline, median hamstring coactivation was assessed during maximal isokinetic knee extensor strength testing and at baseline and 24-month follow-up, knee buckling and shifting was self-reported. Associations between tertiles of co-activation and knee (1) buckling, (2) shifting and (3) either buckling or shifting were assessed using logistic regression, adjusted for age, sex, knee OA and pain. Results 1826 participants (1089 women) were included. Mean ± SD age was 61.7 ± 7.7 years, BMI was 30.3 ± 5.5 kg/m2 and 38.2% of knees had OA. There were no consistent statistically significant associations between hamstring coactivation and ipsilateral prevalent or incident buckling or the combination of buckling and shifting. The odds ratios for incident shifting in the highest in comparison with the lowest tertile of coactivation had similar magnitudes in the combined and medial hamstrings, but only reached statistical significance for lateral hamstring coactivation, OR(95%CI) 1.53 (0.99, 2.36). Conclusions Hamstring coactivation during an open kinetic chain quadriceps exercise was not consistently associated with prevalent or incident self-reported knee buckling or shifting in older adults with or at risk for knee OA. PMID:25765501

  17. Effects of hamstring-emphasized neuromuscular training on strength and sprinting mechanics in football players.

    PubMed

    Mendiguchia, J; Martinez-Ruiz, E; Morin, J B; Samozino, P; Edouard, P; Alcaraz, P E; Esparza-Ros, F; Mendez-Villanueva, A

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effects of a neuromuscular training program combining eccentric hamstring muscle strength, plyometrics, and free/resisted sprinting exercises on knee extensor/flexor muscle strength, sprinting performance, and horizontal mechanical properties of sprint running in football (soccer) players. Sixty footballers were randomly assigned to an experimental group (EG) or a control group (CG). Twenty-seven players completed the EG and 24 players the CG. Both groups performed regular football training while the EG performed also a neuromuscular training during a 7-week period. The EG showed a small increases in concentric quadriceps strength (ES = 0.38/0.58), a moderate to large increase in concentric (ES = 0.70/0.74) and eccentric (ES = 0.66/0.87) hamstring strength, and a small improvement in 5-m sprint performance (ES = 0.32). By contrast, the CG presented lower magnitude changes in quadriceps (ES = 0.04/0.29) and hamstring (ES = 0.27/0.34) concentric muscle strength and no changes in hamstring eccentric muscle strength (ES = -0.02/0.11). Thus, in contrast to the CG (ES = -0.27/0.14), the EG showed an almost certain increase in the hamstring/quadriceps strength functional ratio (ES = 0.32/0.75). Moreover, the CG showed small magnitude impairments in sprinting performance (ES = -0.35/-0.11). Horizontal mechanical properties of sprint running remained typically unchanged in both groups. These results indicate that a neuromuscular training program can induce positive hamstring strength and maintain sprinting performance, which might help in preventing hamstring strains in football players. PMID:25556888

  18. Triceps tendon rupture in weight lifters.

    PubMed

    Sollender, J L; Rayan, G M; Barden, G A

    1998-01-01

    Triceps tendon avulsion injuries are rare. We report four weight lifters with triceps tendon raptures, two of whom had received local steroid injections for pain in the triceps. All four patients had taken oral anabolic steroids before injury. All patients had closed avulsion of the triceps tendon from its insertion into the olecranon. Three patients were injured while bench pressing heavy weights, and one patient was injured while swinging a baseball bat. Satisfactory results were achieved after surgical reinsertion of the tendon.

  19. Anatomic Graft Passage in Remnant-Preserving Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Jin Hwan; Lee, Sang Hak

    2014-01-01

    Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction with preservation of the remnant PCL fibers has been performed under the assumption that preserving the fibers contributes to knee kinematics, grafted tendon healing, and recovery of proprioception. This technical note presents a single-bundle, transtibial PCL reconstruction with anatomic graft passage between the remnant PCL fibers. The operation is performed using the posterior trans-septal portal, which can provide excellent visualization while preserving a large amount of remnant PCL fibers. In addition, this technique allows for anatomic graft passage without soft-tissue impingement, and it minimizes the risk of nonanatomic positioning of the PCL grafts. PMID:25473610

  20. Influence on Strength and Flexibility of a Swing Phase-Specific Hamstring Eccentric Program in Sprinters' General Preparation.

    PubMed

    Guex, Kenny J; Lugrin, Véronique; Borloz, Stéphane; Millet, Grégoire P

    2016-02-01

    Hamstring injuries are common in sprinters and mainly occur during the terminal swing phase. Eccentric training has been shown to reduce hamstring injury rate by improving several risk factors. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that an additional swing phase-specific hamstring eccentric training in well-trained sprinters performed at the commencement of the winter preparation is more efficient to improve strength, ratio, optimum angle, and flexibility than a similar program without hamstring eccentric exercises. Twenty sprinters were randomly allocated to an eccentric (n = 10) or a control group (n = 10). Both groups performed their usual track and field training throughout the study period. Sprinters in the eccentric group performed an additional 6-week hamstring eccentric program, which was specific to the swing phase of the running cycle (eccentric high-load open-chain kinetic movements covering the whole hamstring length-tension relationship preformed at slow to moderate velocity). Isokinetic and flexibility measurements were performed before and after the intervention. The eccentric group increased hamstring peak torques in concentric at 60° · s(-1) by 16% (p < 0.001) and at 240° · s(-1) by 10% (p < 0.01), in eccentric at 30° · s(-1) by 20% (p < 0.001) and at 120° · s(-1) by 22% (p < 0.001), conventional and functional ratios by 12% (p < 0.001), and flexibility by 4° (p < 0.01), whereas the control group increased hamstring peak torques only in eccentric at 30° · s(-1) by 6% (p ≤ 0.05) and at 120° · s(-1) by 6% (p < 0.01). It was concluded that an additional swing phase-specific hamstring eccentric training in sprinters seems to be crucial to address different risk factors for hamstring strain injuries, such as eccentric and concentric strength, hamstring-to-quadriceps ratio ratio, and flexibility. PMID:26200198

  1. Influence on Strength and Flexibility of a Swing Phase-Specific Hamstring Eccentric Program in Sprinters' General Preparation.

    PubMed

    Guex, Kenny J; Lugrin, Véronique; Borloz, Stéphane; Millet, Grégoire P

    2016-02-01

    Hamstring injuries are common in sprinters and mainly occur during the terminal swing phase. Eccentric training has been shown to reduce hamstring injury rate by improving several risk factors. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that an additional swing phase-specific hamstring eccentric training in well-trained sprinters performed at the commencement of the winter preparation is more efficient to improve strength, ratio, optimum angle, and flexibility than a similar program without hamstring eccentric exercises. Twenty sprinters were randomly allocated to an eccentric (n = 10) or a control group (n = 10). Both groups performed their usual track and field training throughout the study period. Sprinters in the eccentric group performed an additional 6-week hamstring eccentric program, which was specific to the swing phase of the running cycle (eccentric high-load open-chain kinetic movements covering the whole hamstring length-tension relationship preformed at slow to moderate velocity). Isokinetic and flexibility measurements were performed before and after the intervention. The eccentric group increased hamstring peak torques in concentric at 60° · s(-1) by 16% (p < 0.001) and at 240° · s(-1) by 10% (p < 0.01), in eccentric at 30° · s(-1) by 20% (p < 0.001) and at 120° · s(-1) by 22% (p < 0.001), conventional and functional ratios by 12% (p < 0.001), and flexibility by 4° (p < 0.01), whereas the control group increased hamstring peak torques only in eccentric at 30° · s(-1) by 6% (p ≤ 0.05) and at 120° · s(-1) by 6% (p < 0.01). It was concluded that an additional swing phase-specific hamstring eccentric training in sprinters seems to be crucial to address different risk factors for hamstring strain injuries, such as eccentric and concentric strength, hamstring-to-quadriceps ratio ratio, and flexibility.

  2. Influence of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tear on Thigh Muscle Strength and Hamstring-to-Quadriceps Ratio: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Jung; Lee, Jin-Hyuck; Ahn, Sung-Eun; Park, Min-Ji; Lee, Dae-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Theoretical compensation after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear could cause quadriceps weakness and hamstring activation, preventing anterior tibial subluxation and affecting the expected hamstring-to-quadriceps ratio. Although quadriceps weakness often occurs after ACL tears, it remains unclear whether hamstring strength and hamstring-to-quadriceps ratio increase in ACL deficient knees. This meta-analysis compared the isokinetic muscle strength of quadriceps and hamstring muscles, and the hamstring-to-quadriceps ratio, of the injured and injured limbs of patients with ACL tears. This meta-analysis included all studies comparing isokinetic thigh muscle strengths and hamstring-to-quadriceps ratio in the injured and uninjured legs of patients with ACL tear, without or before surgery. Thirteen studies were included in the meta-analysis. Quadriceps and hamstring strengths were 22.3 N∙m (95% CI: 15.2 to 29.3 N∙m; P<0.001) and 7.4 N∙m (95% CI: 4.3 to 10.5 N∙m; P<0.001) lower, respectively, on the injured than on the uninjured side. The mean hamstring-to-quadriceps ratio was 4% greater in ACL deficient than in uninjured limbs (95% CI: 1.7% to 6.3%; P<0.001). Conclusively, Decreases were observed in both the quadriceps and hamstring muscles of patients with ACL tear, with the decrease in quadriceps strength being 3-fold greater. These uneven reductions slightly increase the hamstring-to-quadriceps ratio in ACL deficient knees.

  3. Influence of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tear on Thigh Muscle Strength and Hamstring-to-Quadriceps Ratio: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Sung-Eun; Park, Min-Ji; Lee, Dae-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Theoretical compensation after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear could cause quadriceps weakness and hamstring activation, preventing anterior tibial subluxation and affecting the expected hamstring-to-quadriceps ratio. Although quadriceps weakness often occurs after ACL tears, it remains unclear whether hamstring strength and hamstring-to-quadriceps ratio increase in ACL deficient knees. This meta-analysis compared the isokinetic muscle strength of quadriceps and hamstring muscles, and the hamstring-to-quadriceps ratio, of the injured and injured limbs of patients with ACL tears. This meta-analysis included all studies comparing isokinetic thigh muscle strengths and hamstring-to-quadriceps ratio in the injured and uninjured legs of patients with ACL tear, without or before surgery. Thirteen studies were included in the meta-analysis. Quadriceps and hamstring strengths were 22.3 N∙m (95% CI: 15.2 to 29.3 N∙m; P<0.001) and 7.4 N∙m (95% CI: 4.3 to 10.5 N∙m; P<0.001) lower, respectively, on the injured than on the uninjured side. The mean hamstring-to-quadriceps ratio was 4% greater in ACL deficient than in uninjured limbs (95% CI: 1.7% to 6.3%; P<0.001). Conclusively, Decreases were observed in both the quadriceps and hamstring muscles of patients with ACL tear, with the decrease in quadriceps strength being 3-fold greater. These uneven reductions slightly increase the hamstring-to-quadriceps ratio in ACL deficient knees. PMID:26745808

  4. Achilles tendon reflex measuring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szebeszczyk, Janina; Straszecka, Joanna

    1995-06-01

    The examination of Achilles tendon reflex is widely used as a simple, noninvasive clinical test in diagnosis and pharmacological therapy monitoring in such diseases as: hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, diabetic neuropathy, the lower limbs obstructive angiopathies and intermittent claudication. Presented Achilles tendon reflect measuring system is based on the piezoresistive sensor connected with the cylinder-piston system. To determinate the moment of Achilles tendon stimulation a detecting circuit was used. The outputs of the measuring system are connected to the PC-based data acquisition board. Experimental results showed that the measurement accuracy and repeatability is good enough for diagnostics and therapy monitoring purposes. A user friendly, easy-to-operate measurement system fulfills all the requirements related to recording, presentation and storing of the patients' reflexograms.

  5. Knee flexor strength and bicep femoris electromyographical activity is lower in previously strained hamstrings.

    PubMed

    Opar, David A; Williams, Morgan D; Timmins, Ryan G; Dear, Nuala M; Shield, Anthony J

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if athletes with a history of hamstring strain injury display lower levels of surface EMG (sEMG) activity and median power frequency in the previously injured hamstring muscle during maximal voluntary contractions. Recreational athletes were recruited, 13 with a history of unilateral hamstring strain injury and 15 without prior injury. All athletes undertook isokinetic dynamometry testing of the knee flexors and sEMG assessment of the biceps femoris long head (BF) and medial hamstrings (MHs) during concentric and eccentric contractions at ±180 and ±60°s(-1). The knee flexors on the previously injured limb were weaker at all contraction speeds compared to the uninjured limb (+180°s(-1)p=0.0036; +60°s(-1)p=0.0013; -60°s(-1)p=0.0007; -180°s(-1)p=0.0007) whilst sEMG activity was only lower in the BF during eccentric contractions (-60°s(-1)p=0.0025; -180°s(-1)p=0.0003). There were no between limb differences in MH sEMG activity or median power frequency from either BF or MH in the injured group. The uninjured group showed no between limb differences in any of the tested variables. Secondary analysis comparing the between limb difference in the injured and the uninjured groups, confirmed that previously injured hamstrings were mostly weaker (+180°s(-1)p=0.2208; +60°s(-1)p=0.0379; -60°(-1)p=0.0312; -180°s(-1)p=0.0110) and that deficits in sEMG were confined to the BF during eccentric contractions (-60°s(-1)p=0.0542; -180°s(-1)p=0.0473). Previously injured hamstrings were weaker and BF sEMG activity was lower than the contralateral uninjured hamstring. This has implications for hamstring strain injury prevention and rehabilitation which should consider altered neural function following hamstring strain injury.

  6. The effects of test environment and cyclic stretching on the failure properties of human patellar tendons

    SciTech Connect

    Haut, R.C.; Powlison, A.C. )

    1990-07-01

    There is a need to document the mechanical properties of patellar tendon allografts used for reconstructive surgery of the damaged anterior cruciate ligament, especially the effects of irradiation sterilization. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influences of in vitro test environment and low-level cyclic stretching prior to failure tests on nonirradiated and irradiated human graft tissues. Bilateral patellar tendons were split and each half processed accordingly. Some graft tissues were stretched cyclically at 2.5 mm deformation before failure. Experiments were performed in a 37 degrees C saline bath or with tissues moistened with a drip of the same. The irradiated grafts relaxed less and generated less slack length in the drip environment than the nonirradiated controls. Cyclic stretching did not alter failure characteristics of either graft tissue. While no significant differences in the tensile responses or failure characteristics were noted for irradiated and nonirradiated grafts in the drip, in the bath environment the nonirradiated tissues had greater strength and modulus. This resulted in there being a significant difference between irradiated and nonirradiated tissue responses in a heated saline bath environment. These experimental results exemplify the need to control in vitro test environments in the evaluation of various sterilization and preservation protocols for soft tissue allografts.

  7. Repair of patellar tendon injuries using a cell-collagen composite.

    PubMed

    Awad, Hani A; Boivin, Gregory P; Dressler, Matthew R; Smith, Frost N L; Young, Randell G; Butler, David L

    2003-05-01

    Collagen gels were seeded with rabbit bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and contracted onto sutures at initial cell densities of 1, 4, and 8 million cells/ml. These MSC-collagen composites were then implanted into full thickness, full length, central defects created in the patellar tendons of the animals providing the cells. These autologous repairs were compared to natural repair of identical defects on the contralateral side. Biomechanical, histological, and morphometric analyses were performed on both repair tissue types at 6, 12, and 26 weeks after surgery. Repair tissues containing the MSC-collagen composites showed significantly higher maximum stresses and moduli than natural repair tissues at 12 and 26 weeks postsurgery. However, no significant differences were observed in any dimensional or mechanical properties of the repair tissues across seeding densities at each evaluation time. By 26 weeks, the repairs grafted with MSC-collagen composites were one-fourth of the maximum stress of the normal central portion of the patellar tendon with bone ends. The modulus and maximum stress of the repair tissues grafted with MSC-collagen composites increased at significantly faster rates than did natural repairs over time. Unexpectedly, 28% of the MSC-collagen grafted tendons formed bone in the regenerating repair site. Except for increased repair tissue volume, no significant differences in cellular organization or histological appearance were observed between the natural repairs and MSC-collagen grafted repairs. Overall, these results show that surgically implanting tissue engineered MSC-collagen composites significantly improves the biomechanical properties of tendon repair tissues, although greater MSC concentrations produced no additional significant histological or biomechanical improvement.

  8. HAMSTRING INJURY REHABILITATION AND PREVENTION OF REINJURY USING LENGTHENED STATE ECCENTRIC TRAINING: A NEW CONCEPT

    PubMed Central

    Tim, Tyler; McHugh, Malachy

    2012-01-01

    Back ground and Purpose: Hamstring injury is a common occurrence in sport and there has been limited success in reducing this rate of recurrence to date. Description of Topic with Related Evidence: High speed running requires eccentric strength when the hamstring muscles are in a lengthened state. The lengthened state occurs when the hip is in flexion and the lower leg moves into extension, thus lengthening the two joint hamstring muscle over both articulations upon which they act. There is evidence to suggest that athletes who have sustained a hamstring strain lack strength when the muscle is utilized during performance in a lengthened state. Purpose: To examine the risk factors contributing to such a high recurrence rate and propose a unique rehabilitation strategy addressing these factors in order to decrease the rate of reinjury. Discussion/Relation to Clinical Practice: Failing to increase an athlete's eccentric strength in a lengthened position after a hamstring injury may predispose an athlete to subsequent reinjury. Incorporating lengthened state eccentric training may help reduce the rate of reinjury. Level of Evidence: Level 5 PMID:22666648

  9. Individual Muscle use in Hamstring Exercises by Soccer Players Assessed using Functional MRI.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Gonzalo, R; Tesch, P A; Linnehan, R M; Kreider, R B; Di Salvo, V; Suarez-Arrones, L; Alomar, X; Mendez-Villanueva, A; Rodas, G

    2016-06-01

    This study used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to compare individual muscle use in exercises aimed at preventing hamstring injuries. Thirty-six professional soccer players were randomized into 4 groups, each performing either Nordic hamstring, flywheel leg curl, Russian belt or conic-pulley exercise. MRIs were performed before and immediately after a bout of 4 sets of 8 repetitions. Pre-post exercise differences in contrast shift (T2) were analyzed for the long (BFLh) and short head (BFSh) of biceps femoris, semitendinosus (ST), semimembranosus (SM) and gracilis (GR) muscles. Flywheel leg curl increased (P<0.001) T2 of GR (95%), ST (65%), BFSh (51%) and BFLh (14%). After the Nordic hamstring, GR (39%), ST (16%) and BFSh (14%) showed increased T2 (P<0.001). Russian belt and conic-pulley exercise produced subtle (P<0.02) T2 increases of ST (9 and 6%, respectively) and BFLh (7 and 6%, respectively). Russian belt increased T2 of SM (7%). Among exercises examined, flywheel leg curl showed the most substantial hamstring and GR muscle use. However, no single exercise executed was able to increase T2 of all hamstring and synergist muscles analyzed. It is therefore suggested that multiple exercises must be carried out to bring in, and fully activate all knee flexors and hip extensors. PMID:27116347

  10. Asymmetry after hamstring injury in English Premier League: issue resolved, or perhaps not?

    PubMed

    Barreira, P; Drust, B; Robinson, M A; Vanrenterghem, J

    2015-06-01

    Hamstring injuries constitute one of the most concerning injuries in English Premier League football, due to its high primary incidence but also its recurrence. Functional methods assessing hamstring function during high-risk performance tasks such as sprinting are vital to identify potential risk factors. The purpose of this study was to assess horizontal force deficits during maximum sprint running on a non-motorized treadmill in football players with previous history of hamstring strains as a pre-season risk-assessment in a club setting. 17 male football players from one Premier League Club were divided into 2 groups, experimental (n=6, age=24.5±2.3 years) and control (n=11, age=21.3±1.2 years), according to history of previous hamstring injury. Participants performed a protocol including a 10-s maximum sprint on a non-motorized treadmill. Force deficits during acceleration phase and steady state phases of the sprint were assessed between limbs and between groups. The main outcome measures were horizontal and vertical peak forces during the acceleration phase or steady state. There were no significant differences in peak forces between previously injured and non-injured limbs, or between groups, challenging the ideas around functional force deficits in sprint running as a diagnostic measure of hamstring re-injury risk.

  11. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury: Compensation during Gait using Hamstring Muscle Activity

    PubMed Central

    Catalfamo, Paola Formento; Aguiar, Gerardo; Curi, Jorge; Braidot, Ariel

    2010-01-01

    Previous research has shown that an increase in hamstring activation may compensate for anterior tibial transalation (ATT) in patients with anterior cruciate ligament deficient knee (ACLd); however, the effects of this compensation still remain unclear. The goals of this study were to quantify the activation of the hamstring muscles needed to compensate the ATT in ACLd knee during the complete gait cycle and to evaluate the effect of this compensation on quadriceps activation and joint contact forces. A two dimensional model of the knee was used, which included the tibiofemoral and patellofemoral joints, knee ligaments, the medial capsule and two muscles units. Simulations were conducted to determine the ATT in healthy and ACLd knee and the hamstring activation needed to correct the abnormal ATT to normal levels (100% compensation) and to 50% compensation. Then, the quadriceps activation and the joint contact forces were calculated. Results showed that 100% compensation would require hamstring and quadriceps activations larger than their maximum isometric force, and would generate an increment in the peak contact force at the tibiofemoral (115%) and patellofemoral (48%) joint with respect to the healthy knee. On the other hand, 50% compensation would require less force generated by the muscles (less than 0.85 of maximum isometric force) and smaller contact forces (peak tibiofemoral contact force increased 23% and peak patellofemoral contact force decreased 7.5% with respect to the healthy knee). Total compensation of ATT by means of increased hamstring activity is possible; however, partial compensation represents a less deleterious strategy. PMID:20721326

  12. Tibialis Anterior Tendon Transfer for Posterior Tibial Tendon Insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Ramanujam, Crystal L; Stapleton, John J; Zgonis, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The Cobb procedure is useful for addressing stage 2 posterior tibial tendon dysfunction and is often accompanied by a medial displacement calcaneal osteotomy and/or lateral column lengthening. The Cobb procedure can also be combined with selected medial column arthrodesis and realignment osteotomies along with equinus correction when indicated. PMID:26590721

  13. The Relationship of the Sit and Reach Test to Criterion Measures of Hamstring and Back Flexibility in Young Females.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Allen W.; Baker, Alice A.

    1986-01-01

    This study tested 100 female adolescents to determine the relationships of the sit and reach test, a component of the Health Related Fitness Test, with back and hamstring flexibility. Findings indicate the sit and reach test is moderately related to hamstring flexibility but not to back and low back flexibility. (Author/MT)

  14. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound therapy: a potential strategy to stimulate tendon-bone junction healing.

    PubMed

    Ying, Zhi-min; Lin, Tiao; Yan, Shi-gui

    2012-12-01

    Incorporation of a tendon graft within the bone tunnel represents a challenging clinical problem. Successful anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction requires solid healing of the tendon graft in the bone tunnel. Enhancement of graft healing to bone is important to facilitate early aggressive rehabilitation and a rapid return to pre-injury activity levels. No convenient, effective or inexpensive procedures exist to enhance tendon-bone (T-B) healing after surgery. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) improves local blood perfusion and angiogenesis, stimulates cartilage maturation, enhances differentiation and proliferation of osteoblasts, and motivates osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), and therefore, appears to be a potential non-invasive tool for T-B healing in early stage of rehabilitation of ACL reconstruction. It is conceivable that LIPUS could be used to stimulate T-B tunnel healing in the home, with the aim of accelerating rehabilitation and an earlier return to normal activities in the near future. The purpose of this review is to demonstrate how LIPUS stimulates T-B healing at the cellular and molecular levels, describe studies in animal models, and provide a future direction for research.

  15. Effect of ACL Graft Type on Side-Step Cutting in Young Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Pace, James Lee; Mueske, Nicole; Padilla, Ricardo A.; Katzel, Mia; Healy, Bitte S.; Wren, Tishya

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Due to the slightly higher re-tear rate for ACL reconstruction (ACLR) with hamstring (HT) versus patellar tendon (PT), differences in movement strategies were assessed during side-step cutting in young athletes with recent ACLR to determine if graft type affected post-operative motion. Methods: Dominant limbs from 21 athletes without lower extremity injury or previous surgery (age 14.9 ± 2.0 years) and 26 limbs with recent (5.1-8.0 months post-operative) unilateral ACLR were included, 18 with HT grafts (age 16.6 ± 3.7 years) and 8 with PT (age 16.7 ± 1.2 years). Lower extremity 3-dimensional data was recorded during the deceleration phase (initial contact to maximum knee flexion) of a 45° cut. Group differences were assessed using analysis of variance with Bonferroni post-hoc tests. Results: The HT group had a slower approach velocity than controls (2.9 vs. 3.5 m/s; p=0.006) with intermediate velocity in the PT group (3.2 m/s). Both the HT and PT groups had lower peak ground reaction force (GRF) compared to controls (HT: 2.0 body weights, PT: 2.2 BW, Control: 2.8 BW; p≤0.02), along with lower peak knee flexion moments (HT: 1.4 Nm/kg, PT: 1.3 Nm/kg, Control: 2.2 Nm/kg; p=0.002). The PT group had less power absorption at the knee than controls (0.3 vs. 0.7 Nm/kg; p=0.07), while the HT group had more at the hip (0.4 vs. 0.1 Nm/kg; p=0.04). The HT group also had higher peak hip flexion (HT: 65.8°, PT: 53.9°, Control: 55.1°; p≤0.06) and hip sagittal plane excursion (HT: 9.4°, PT: 3.6°, Control: 2.8°; p≤0.05) than the PT and control groups. The HT group had lower peak knee valgus moments than controls (0.05 vs. 1.2 Nm/kg; p=0.01) as well as a greater range of frontal plane pelvic (8.2° vs. 3.4°; p=0.03) and hip (7.6° vs. 3.0°; p=0.05) motion. The PT group had intermediate values for valgus moment (0.8 Nm/kg) and pelvic (4.9°) and hip (3.3°) excursion. Conclusion: While both ACLR groups showed reduced GRFs and knee flexion moments

  16. Surgical Treatment of Neglected Traumatic Quadriceps Tendon Rupture with Knee Ankylosis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Hun; Seon, Jong-Keun; Woo, Seong-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Quadriceps tendon rupture is an uncommon injury. This disabling condition is the result of direct or indirect trauma. It requires surgical repair to avoid poor outcomes in cases of neglected or chronic rupture. In most acute cases, simple tendon suture or reinsertion is suitable for an extensor mechanism reconstruction of the knee joint. However, chronic lesions often require a tendon graft or flap reconstruction. We report a case of a 15-year-old male who was diagnosed with a chronic quadriceps rupture with a patellar superior pole fracture. We performed quadriceps reconstruction using tibialis anterior allograft tendon and additional screw fixation to reconstruct the extensor mechanism and recover knee joint range of motion to prevent a high-level functional restriction. The treatment was difficult and limited due to neglect for 9-months that led to ankylosis accompanied with nonunion of tibial fracture. Our surgical treatment using allograft tendon resulted in a very good outcome after 30 months of follow-up. PMID:27274474

  17. Multiple Fibromas of Tendon Sheath: Unusual Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Se Young; Jin, Seon Pil; Yeom, Bora; Kim, Shin Woo; Cho, So Yun

    2011-01-01

    Fibroma of the tendon sheath is an uncommon soft tissue tumor presenting as a solitary, slow-growing, firm, painless, small nodule, which shows strong attachment to the tendon or tendon sheath. It is usually localized on fingers and hand tendons in adults between the age of 20 and 40 years old. This case concerns a 61-year-old man presenting with a 5-year history of multiple cutaneous nodules on both palms and soles. Skin biopsy confirmed fibroma of the tendon sheath. Blood tests showed a high titer of rheumatoid factor and positivity to anti-nuclear antibody. No case of fibroma of the tendon sheath occurring multifocally on both palms and soles has been previously reported. Herein, we report on a very rare case of multiple fibromas of the tendon sheath arising from palms and soles, which supports the pathogenetic hypothesis that this tumor may be a reactive process rather than a true neoplasm. PMID:22028571

  18. Histologic analysis of ruptured quadriceps tendons.

    PubMed

    Trobisch, Per David; Bauman, Matthias; Weise, Kuno; Stuby, Fabian; Hak, David J

    2010-01-01

    Quadriceps tendon ruptures are uncommon injuries. Degenerative changes in the tendon are felt to be an important precondition for rupture. We retrospectively reviewed 45 quadriceps tendon ruptures in 42 patients. Quadriceps tendon ruptures occurred most often in the sixth and seventh decade of life. Men were affected six times as often as women. A tissue sample from the rupture-zone was obtained in 22 cases and histologic analysis was performed. Degenerative changes were present in only 14 (64%) of the 22 samples. We observed an increasing ratio of degenerative to nondegenerative tendons with increasing patient age. Our data suggests that quadriceps tendon rupture, especially in younger patients, can occur in the absence of pathologic tendon degeneration.

  19. Bioreactor Design for Tendon/Ligament Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Gardiner, Bruce S.; Lin, Zhen; Rubenson, Jonas; Kirk, Thomas B.; Wang, Allan; Xu, Jiake

    2013-01-01

    Tendon and ligament injury is a worldwide health problem, but the treatment options remain limited. Tendon and ligament engineering might provide an alternative tissue source for the surgical replacement of injured tendon. A bioreactor provides a controllable environment enabling the systematic study of specific biological, biochemical, and biomechanical requirements to design and manufacture engineered tendon/ligament tissue. Furthermore, the tendon/ligament bioreactor system can provide a suitable culture environment, which mimics the dynamics of the in vivo environment for tendon/ligament maturation. For clinical settings, bioreactors also have the advantages of less-contamination risk, high reproducibility of cell propagation by minimizing manual operation, and a consistent end product. In this review, we identify the key components, design preferences, and criteria that are required for the development of an ideal bioreactor for engineering tendons and ligaments. PMID:23072472

  20. The correlation between the imaging characteristics of hamstring injury and time required before returning to sports: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Kjell; Alricsson, Marie; Eckerman, Mattias; Magounakis, Theofilos; Werner, Suzanne

    2016-06-01

    Injuries to the hamstring muscles are common in athletes. Track and field, Australian football, American football and soccer are examples of sports where hamstring injuries are the most common. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether there is a correlation between a hamstring injury prognosis and its characteristics of imaging parameters. The literature search was performed in the databases PubMed and CINAHL, and eleven articles were included. Seven out of the 11 articles showed a correlation between the size of the hamstring injury and length of time required before returning to sports. Different authors have reported contrasting results about length of time required before returning to sports due to location of injury within specific muscle. Majority of the articles found hamstring strain correlated to an extended amount of time required before returning to sports. PMID:27419106

  1. Dry Endoscopic-Assisted Mini-Open Approach With Neuromonitoring for Chronic Hamstring Avulsions and Ischial Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Hoyos, Juan; Reddy, Manoj; Martin, Hal D.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic hamstring origin avulsions and ischial tunnel syndrome are common causes of posterior hip pain. Although physical therapy has shown benefits in some cases, recent evidence has reported better outcomes with surgical treatment in appropriately selected patients. The full-open approach has been the classic procedure to address this problem. However, the complications related to extensive tissue exposure and the proximity of the incision to the perianal zone have led to the description of full-endoscopic techniques. Achieving an accurate hamstring repair could be technically demanding with a full-endoscopic procedure. Accurate reattachment is crucial in hamstring repair because of the functional demand of the muscles crossing of 2 major joints (hip and knee). This surgical note describes a mixed technique including a mini-open approach, neuromonitoring, and dry endoscopic-assisted repair of the hamstring origin as an alternative for treating patients with chronic hamstring avulsions and ischial tunnel syndrome that remain symptomatic despite nonoperative treatment. PMID:26258031

  2. The correlation between the imaging characteristics of hamstring injury and time required before returning to sports: a literature review

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, Kjell; Alricsson, Marie; Eckerman, Mattias; Magounakis, Theofilos; Werner, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Injuries to the hamstring muscles are common in athletes. Track and field, Australian football, American football and soccer are examples of sports where hamstring injuries are the most common. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether there is a correlation between a hamstring injury prognosis and its characteristics of imaging parameters. The literature search was performed in the databases PubMed and CINAHL, and eleven articles were included. Seven out of the 11 articles showed a correlation between the size of the hamstring injury and length of time required before returning to sports. Different authors have reported contrasting results about length of time required before returning to sports due to location of injury within specific muscle. Majority of the articles found hamstring strain correlated to an extended amount of time required before returning to sports. PMID:27419106

  3. Comparison of hamstring-to-quadriceps ratio between accelerating and decelerating sections during squat exercise

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Won-gyu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to compare hamstring-to-quadriceps ratio between the accelerating and decelerating sections for anterior cruciate ligament protection during squat exercise. [Subjects and Methods] Nine asymptomatic males were enrolled in this study. The hamstring (medial part) and quadriceps (rectus femoris) muscle activities during squat exercise were measured, and the squat exercises were classified into two sections (accelerating and decelerating) by using an accelerometer. [Results] The hamstring-to-quadriceps ratio was significantly higher in the decelerating section than in the accelerating section during the squat exercise. [Conclusion] Application of an increasing decelerating section strategy during the squat exercise can prevent damage in patients with a weakened anterior cruciate ligament due to sports activities. PMID:27799671

  4. Relationship between muscle volume and muscle torque of the hamstrings after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Yu; Fukubayashi, Toru

    2010-01-01

    The muscle torque per unit volume of the hamstrings on the injured and uninjured sides in patients with ACL reconstruction were compared with participants with no history of knee injury to examine whether a similar mechanism leading to quadriceps weakness exists in the hamstrings of these patients. The study population consisted of 18 and 52 patients at hamstring volume was measured on MRI. To identify the muscle torque per unit volume, the peak torque of knee flexion was divided by the hamstring volume. Most muscle torque per unit volume indexes were not significantly different between the patients at hamstrings of the patients. The results of this study indicated that the mechanism of muscle weakness of the hamstrings after reconstruction was different from that of the quadriceps, although the precise mechanism remains to be determined.

  5. Using squat repetition maximum testing to determine hamstring resistance training exercise loads.

    PubMed

    Ebben, William P; Long, Nicholas J; Pawlowski, Zach D; Chmielewski, Lauren M; Clewien, Rustin W; Jensen, Randall L

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether there is a linear relationship between the squat and a variety of hamstring resistance training exercises, and whether this relationship differs on the basis of sex. This study also sought to create prediction equations for the determination of hamstring exercise load based on the squat load. Repetition maximums of the squat, as well as 4 common hamstring resistance training exercises including the seated leg curl, stiff leg dead lift, single leg dead lift, and good morning exercise, were determined for each subject. Subjects included 21 men and 13 women collegiate athletes. Data were evaluated using linear regression analysis to predict hamstring exercise loads from 6 repetition maximum squat data. Results of the analysis of all subjects indicated that squat load was a significant predictor of loads for each of the hamstring exercises. However, separate analysis of women revealed that squat load was not a significant predictor of loads for any of the hamstring exercises. Analysis of the men revealed that squat was a significant predictor of load for the seated leg curl (R = 0.58, p < 0.001), stiff leg dead lift (R = 0.82, p < 0.001), single leg stiff leg dead lift (R = 0.80, p < 0.001), and good morning (R = 0.79, p < 0.001) exercises. On the basis of the analysis of the men, the following prediction equations were devised for each exercise: (1) seated leg curl load = squat load (0.186) + 10.935 kg, (2) stiff leg deadlift load = squat load (1.133) - 86.331 kg, (3) single leg stiff leg deadlift load = squat load (0.443) - 3.425 kg, and (4) good morning load = squat load (0.961) - 105.505 kg. Thus, results from testing core exercises such as the squat can provide useful data for the assignment of loads for assistance exercises. PMID:20072071

  6. How Joint Torques Affect Hamstring Injury Risk in Sprinting Swing–Stance Transition

    PubMed Central

    SUN, YULIANG; WEI, SHUTAO; ZHONG, YUNJIAN; FU, WEIJIE; LI, LI; LIU, YU

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose The potential mechanisms of hamstring strain injuries in athletes are not well understood. The study, therefore, was aimed at understanding hamstring mechanics by studying loading conditions during maximum-effort overground sprinting. Methods Three-dimensional kinematics and ground reaction force data were collected from eight elite male sprinters sprinting at their maximum effort. Maximal isometric torques of the hip and knee were also collected. Data from the sprinting gait cycle were analyzed via an intersegmental dynamics approach, and the different joint torque components were calculated. Results During the initial stance phase, the ground reaction force passed anteriorly to the knee and hip, producing an extension torque at the knee and a flexion torque at the hip joint. Thus, the active muscle torque functioned to produce flexion torque at the knee and extension torque at the hip. The maximal muscle torque at the knee joint was 1.4 times the maximal isometric knee flexion torque. During the late swing phase, the muscle torque counterbalanced the motion-dependent torque and acted to flex the knee joint and extend the hip joint. The loading conditions on the hamstring muscles were similar to those of the initial stance phase. Conclusions During both the initial stance and late swing phases, the large passive torques at both the knee and hip joints acted to lengthen the hamstring muscles. The active muscle torques generated mainly by the hamstrings functioned to counteract those passive effects. As a result, during sprinting or high-speed locomotion, the hamstring muscles may be more susceptible to high risk of strain injury during these two phases. PMID:24911288

  7. Serial Changes of Quadriceps and Hamstring Muscle Strength Following Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Moon, Young-Wan; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Ahn, Hyeong-Sik; Lee, Dae-Hee

    2016-01-01

    This meta-analysis was performed to analyze serial changes in thigh muscles, including quadriceps and hamstring muscles, from before to one year after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). All studies sequentially comparing isokinetic quadriceps and hamstring muscle strengths between the TKA side and the contralateral uninjured limb were included in this meta-analysis. Five studies with 7 cohorts were included in this meta-analysis. The mean differences in the strengths of quadriceps and hamstring muscles between the TKA and uninjured sides were greatest three months after surgery (26.8 N∙m, 12.8 N∙m, P<0.001), but were similar to preoperative level at six months (18.4 N∙m, 7.4 N∙m P<0.001) and were maintained for up to one year (15.9 N∙m, 4.1 N∙m P<0.001). The pooled mean differences in changes in quadriceps and hamstring strengths relative to preoperative levels were 9.2 N∙m and 4.9 N∙m, respectively, three months postoperatively (P = 0.041), but were no longer significant after six months and one year. During the year after TKA, quadriceps and hamstring muscle strengths were lowest after 3 months, recovering to preoperative level after six months, but not reaching the muscle strength on the contralateral side. Relative to preoperative levels, the difference in muscle strength between the TKA and contralateral knees was only significant at three months. Because decrease of strength of the quadriceps was significantly greater than decrease in hamstring muscle strength at postoperative three months, early rehabilitation after TKA should focus on recovery of quadriceps muscle strength.

  8. Peak torque of quadriceps and hamstring muscles in basketball and soccer players of different divisions.

    PubMed

    Zakas, A; Mandroukas, K; Vamvakoudis, E; Christoulas, K; Aggelopoulou, N

    1995-09-01

    Basketball and soccer are two games with different training and playing procedures. The purpose of this study was to examine the maximal voluntary peak torques of the quadriceps and hamstring muscles, and the torque ratio between these muscle groups in basketball players (n = 61) and soccer players (n = 51) participating in teams of different divisions. Isokinetic peak torques were measured using the Cybex II isokinetic dynamometer at 60 and 180 degrees.s-1. Basketball players of the national team produced higher peak torque values of quadriceps muscles than the other basketball players of different divisions (p < 0.05 to p < 0.001). Hamstring peak torques of the national basketball team were significantly higher the only velocities measured compared with the players from division II and IV (p < 0.05). Peak torque values of quadriceps muscles relative to body weight were significantly higher in the national basketball team compared with basketball players from division I. No significant differences were found in peak torque values of quadriceps and hamstring muscles within the different basketball and soccer divisions. Peak torque expressed in absolute terms was significantly higher in basketball players than in soccer players (p < 0.05 to p < 0.001). However, these differences were not significant when the strength of quadriceps and hamstring muscles was expressed relative to body weight. The H/Q ratio did not differ either ditto among the different divisions of basketball and soccer players. Based on the data obtained in this study, we concluded that the subjects' body weight have a decisive effect on the production of peak torque values of quadriceps and hamstring muscles in basketball and soccer players. Furthermore that the playing in different divisions, as well as participating in different sports, i.e. basketball or soccer, have surprisingly small effects on the peak isokinetic torque production of the quadriceps and hamstring muscles.

  9. Enhancement of tendon-bone healing via the combination of biodegradable collagen-loaded nanofibrous membranes and a three-dimensional printed bone-anchoring bolt.

    PubMed

    Chou, Ying-Chao; Yeh, Wen-Lin; Chao, Chien-Lin; Hsu, Yung-Heng; Yu, Yi-Hsun; Chen, Jan-Kan; Liu, Shih-Jung

    2016-01-01

    A composite biodegradable polymeric model was developed to enhance tendon graft healing. This model included a biodegradable polylactide (PLA) bolt as the bone anchor and a poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanofibrous membrane embedded with collagen as a biomimic patch to promote tendon-bone interface integration. Degradation rate and compressive strength of the PLA bolt were measured after immersion in a buffer solution for 3 months. In vitro biochemical characteristics and the nanofibrous matrix were assessed using a water contact angle analyzer, pH meter, and tetrazolium reduction assay. In vivo efficacies of PLGA/collagen nanofibers and PLA bolts for tendon-bone healing were investigated on a rabbit bone tunnel model with histological and tendon pullout tests. The PLGA/collagen-blended nanofibrous membrane was a hydrophilic, stable, and biocompatible scaffold. The PLA bolt was durable for tendon-bone anchoring. Histology showed adequate biocompatibility of the PLA bolt on a medial cortex with progressive bone ingrowth and without tissue overreaction. PLGA nanofibers within the bone tunnel also decreased the tunnel enlargement phenomenon and enhanced tendon-bone integration. Composite polymers of the PLA bolt and PLGA/collagen nanofibrous membrane can effectively promote outcomes of tendon reconstruction in a rabbit model. The composite biodegradable polymeric system may be useful in humans for tendon reconstruction. PMID:27601901

  10. Hamstrings Stiffness and Landing Biomechanics Linked to Anterior Cruciate Ligament Loading

    PubMed Central

    Blackburn, J. Troy; Norcross, Marc F.; Cannon, Lindsey N.; Zinder, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Greater hamstrings stiffness is associated with less anterior tibial translation during controlled perturbations. However, it is unclear how hamstrings stiffness influences anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) loading mechanisms during dynamic tasks. Objective: To evaluate the influence of hamstrings stiffness on landing biomechanics related to ACL injury. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 36 healthy, physically active volunteers (18 men, 18 women; age = 23 ± 3 years, height = 1.8 ± 0.1 m, mass = 73.1 ± 16.6 kg). Intervention(s): Hamstrings stiffness was quantified via the damped oscillatory technique. Three-dimensional lower extremity kinematics and kinetics were captured during a double-legged jump-landing task via a 3-dimensional motion-capture system interfaced with a force plate. Landing biomechanics were compared between groups displaying high and low hamstrings stiffness via independent-samples t tests. Main Outcome Measure(s): Hamstrings stiffness was normalized to body mass (N/m·kg−1). Peak knee-flexion and -valgus angles, vertical and posterior ground reaction forces, anterior tibial shear force, internal knee-extension and -varus moments, and knee-flexion angles at the instants of each peak kinetic variable were identified during the landing task. Forces were normalized to body weight, whereas moments were normalized to the product of weight and height. Results: Internal knee-varus moment was 3.6 times smaller in the high-stiffness group (t22 = 2.221, P = .02). A trend in the data also indicated that peak anterior tibial shear force was 1.1 times smaller in the high-stiffness group (t22 = 1.537, P = .07). The high-stiffness group also demonstrated greater knee flexion at the instants of peak anterior tibial shear force and internal knee-extension and -varus moments (t22 range = 1.729–2.224, P < .05). Conclusions: Greater hamstrings stiffness was associated with landing

  11. Unstable Surface Improves Quadriceps:Hamstring Co-contraction for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury Prevention Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Shultz, Rebecca; Silder, Amy; Malone, Maria; Braun, Hillary Jane; Dragoo, Jason Logan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Increasing quadriceps:hamstring muscular co-contraction at the knee may reduce the risk of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. The purpose of this investigation was to examine muscle activation in the quadriceps and hamstrings and peak kinematics of the knee, hip, and trunk when performing a single-leg drop (SLD) on to a Bosu ball (unstable surface) compared with on to the floor (stable surface). Hypotheses: (1) The SLD on an unstable surface would lower the quadriceps to hamstrings electromyographic (EMG) activation ratio (Q:H EMG activation ratio) compared with being performed on the floor. (2) Lower Q:H EMG activation ratio would be caused by a relative increase in hamstring activation, with no significant change in quadriceps activation. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Thirty-nine Division I National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) female athletes performed 3 SLDs per leg onto a Bosu ball and onto the floor. Muscle activity of the vastus lateralis and lateral hamstrings were used to estimate peak quadriceps and hamstring activation, along with the Q:H EMG activation ratio. Kinematic measures at the knee, hip, and trunk were also estimated. Differences between landings were assessed using a 2-level analysis of variance (limb and surface). Results: The maximum Q:H EMG activation ratio was significantly reduced when athletes performed an SLD onto the Bosu ball (20%, P < 0.001) compared with the floor. Peak hamstring activity was higher when athletes landed on a Bosu ball (18% higher, P = 0.029) compared with when they landed on the floor. Conclusion: Compared with landing on the floor (a stable surface), landing on a Bosu ball (unstable surface) changed the athlete’s co-contraction at the knee and increased hamstring activity. However, landing on a Bosu ball also decreased the athlete’s knee flexion, which was an undesired effect. Clinical Relevance: These findings highlight the potential utility of unstable surfaces

  12. Fresh Versus Frozen Engineered Bone–Ligament–Bone Grafts for Sheep Anterior Cruciate Ligament Repair

    PubMed Central

    Mahalingam, Vasudevan D.; Behbahani-Nejad, Nilofar; Ronan, Elizabeth A.; Olsen, Tyler J.; Smietana, Michael J.; Wojtys, Edward M.; Wellik, Deneen M.; Arruda, Ellen M.

    2015-01-01

    Surgical intervention is often required to restore knee instability in patients with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. The most commonly used grafts for ACL reconstruction are tendon autografts or allografts. These current options, however, have shown failure rates requiring revision and continued instability in the long term. The mismatched biomechanical properties of the current tendon grafts compared with native ACL tissue are thought to contribute to these poor outcomes and potential risk of early onset osteoarthritis. As a possible solution to these issues, our laboratory has fabricated tissue-engineered ligament constructs that exhibit structural and functional properties similar to those of native ACL tissue after 6 months implantation. In addition, these tissue-engineered grafts achieve vascular and neural development that exceeds those of patellar tendon grafts. However, the utility of our tissue-engineered grafts is limited by the labor-intensive method required to produce the constructs and the need to use the constructs fresh, directly from the cell culturing system. Ideally, these constructs would be fabricated and stored until needed. Thus, in this study, we investigated the efficacy of freezing our tissue-engineered constructs as a method of preservation before use for ACL reconstruction. We hypothesized that frozen constructs would have similar histological and biomechanical outcomes compared with our fresh model. Our results showed that 6 months postimplantation as an ACL replacement graft, both our tissue-engineered fresh and frozen grafts demonstrated similar mechanical and histological outcomes, indicating that freezing is a suitable method for preserving and storing our graft before ACL reconstruction. The ability to use frozen constructs significantly increases the versatility of our graft technology expanding the clinical utility of our graft. PMID:25397990

  13. Pectoralis Major Tendon Repair

    PubMed Central

    Cordasco, Frank A.; Degen, Ryan; Mahony, Gregory Thomas; Tsouris, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Systematic reviews of the literature have identified 365 reported cases of Pectoralis Major Tendon (PMT) injuries. While surgical treatment has demonstrated improved outcomes compared to non-operative treatment, there is still relatively limited data on the functional outcome, return to sport and need for 2nd surgery in athletes following PMT repair. This study comprises the largest series of athletes following PMT repair reported to date. The Objective is to report on the functional outcomes, return to sport and need for 2nd surgery in a consecutive series of PMT tears. Methods: From 2009, 81 patients with PMT tears were enrolled in this prospective series. Baseline evaluation included patient demographics, mechanism of injury, physical examination and PMT specific MRI for confirmation of the diagnosis and analysis of the extent of injury. Each patient underwent surgical repair by the senior author utilizing a previously published surgical technique. Patients were then followed at 2 weeks, 6 weeks, 3 months and 6 months and further follow-up was conducted annually thereafter with functional outcome scores and adduction strength testing. The return to sport and incidence of 2nd surgery data were recorded. This study includes the first 40 athletes to reach the 2-year post-operative period. Results: All athletes were male, with an average age of 34.4 years (range 23-59). The patient cohort consisted of 4 professional NFL players and 36 recreational athletes. Average follow-up duration was 2.5 years (range 2 - 6.0 years). The most common mechanisms of injury occurred during the bench press (n=26) and contact sport participation (n=14). Sixteen injuries were complete avulsions involving both the clavicular and sternocostal heads, while 24 were isolated sternocostal head avulsions. Average pre-injury bench press of 396 lbs (range 170-500 lbs) was restored to 241 lbs post-operatively (range 140-550 lbs). Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation (SANE) scores

  14. A Technique of Improved Medial Meniscus Visualization by Anterior Cruciate Ligament Graft Placement in Chronic Anterior Cruciate Deficient Knees.

    PubMed

    Vertullo, Christopher J; Wijenayake, Lahann; Grayson, Jane E

    2016-04-01

    It is customary to perform medial meniscus repair before anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) graft placement when undertaken as a combined procedure. However, in chronic ACL-deficient knees, intraoperative anterior tibiofemoral translation can cause the medial meniscus repair to be more technically challenging. Intraoperative anterior tibiofemoral translation can both reduce the visualization of the medial meniscus and make its reduction unstable. An operative sequence alteration of ACL graft placement and tensioning before medial meniscal repair improves medial meniscus visualization in chronically ACL-deficient knees by using the ACL graft's ability to prevent anterior tibiofemoral translation. The technique sequence is as follows: (a) the medial meniscus is reduced, (b) ACL reconstruction is undertaken using a hamstring graft without final tibia fixation, PMID:27354950

  15. The Effects of Glucocorticoid on Tendon and Tendon Derived Cells.

    PubMed

    Dean, Benjamin John Floyd; Carr, Andrew Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are generally used to relieve pain and/or inflammation in a wide variety of musculoskeletal disorders including osteoarthritis, inflammatory arthritis, tendinopathy and degenerative spine disease. Glucocorticoids reduce tendon derived cell proliferation in vitro and reduce extracellular matrix synthesis both in vitro and in vivo, in particular type I collagen synthesis. Glucocorticoids also appear to result in acute deleterious changes in healthy in vivo tendon including collagen necrosis, collagen disorganisation and inflammatory cell infiltration; while the overall effect of glucocorticoid administration on the mechanical properties of healthy in vivo tendon are generally negative. Overall the existing in vitro and in vivo evidence suggests that glucocorticoids should be used with caution in treating painful tendinopathy. Certainly a real need exists to follow up the long term clinical effects of glucocorticoid in treating tendinopathy, as there is currently a paucity of evidence in this area. However in this context while the short term benefits are clear, glucocorticoids remain a useful treatment option provided they are used in the right patients in sensible moderation. PMID:27535266

  16. Stem cell therapy: a promising biological strategy for tendon-bone healing after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Hao, Zi-Chen; Wang, Shan-Zheng; Zhang, Xue-Jun; Lu, Jun

    2016-04-01

    Tendon-bone healing after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is a complex process, impacting significantly on patients' prognosis. Natural tendon-bone healing usually results in fibrous scar tissue, which is of inferior quality compared to native attachment. In addition, the early formed fibrous attachment after surgery is often not reliable to support functional rehabilitation, which may lead to graft failure or unsatisfied function of the knee joint. Thus, strategies to promote tendon-bone healing are crucial for prompt and satisfactory functional recovery. Recently, a variety of biological approaches, including active substances, gene transfer, tissue engineering and stem cells, have been proposed and applied to enhance tendon-bone healing. Among these, stem cell therapy has been shown to have promising prospects and draws increasing attention. From commonly investigated bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (bMSCs) to emerging ACL-derived CD34+ stem cells, multiple stem cell types have been proven to be effective in accelerating tendon-bone healing. This review describes the current understanding of tendon-bone healing and summarizes the current status of related stem cell therapy. Future limitations and perspectives are also discussed.

  17. Active Achilles tendon kinesitherapy accelerates Achilles tendon repair by promoting neurite regeneration☆

    PubMed Central

    Jielile, Jiasharete; Aibai, Minawa; Sabirhazi, Gulnur; Shawutali, Nuerai; Tangkejie, Wulanbai; Badelhan, Aynaz; Nuerduola, Yeermike; Satewalede, Turde; Buranbai, Darehan; Hunapia, Beicen; Jialihasi, Ayidaer; Bai, Jingping; Kizaibek, Murat

    2012-01-01

    Active Achilles tendon kinesitherapy facilitates the functional recovery of a ruptured Achilles tendon. However, protein expression during the healing process remains a controversial issue. New Zealand rabbits, aged 14 weeks, underwent tenotomy followed immediately by Achilles tendon microsurgery to repair the Achilles tendon rupture. The tendon was then immobilized or subjected to postoperative early motion treatment (kinesitherapy). Mass spectrography results showed that after 14 days of motion treatment, 18 protein spots were differentially expressed, among which, 12 were up-regulated, consisting of gelsolin isoform b and neurite growth-related protein collapsing response mediator protein 2. Western blot analysis showed that gelsolin isoform b was up-regulated at days 7–21 of motion treatment. These findings suggest that active Achilles tendon kinesitherapy promotes the neurite regeneration of a ruptured Achilles tendon and gelsolin isoform b can be used as a biomarker for Achilles tendon healing after kinesitherapy. PMID:25317130

  18. On the mechanical function of tendon.

    PubMed

    Kafka, V; Jírová, J; Smetana, V

    1995-01-01

    A mesoscopic approach is followed for mathematical modelling of the specific deformation properties of tendon. The approach starts from our general concept of modelling mechanical behaviour of heterogeneous media and assumes that the structure of tendon is optimized in such a way that it enables its adjacent muscle to work with a constant performance in the course of increasing loading (acting like a gearbox in a car). The model based on this assumption gives results that are in a very good accordance with observed properties of tendons. Clinical experience reveals that if this function of tendon is violated pathological changes appear in the respective muscle. RELEVANCE: Clarification and mathematical modelling of the mechanical function of tendon is of intellectual interest in its own right, but it is important also for cautioning surgeons against unnecessary violation of this function, and for tissue engineering aspects if tendon must be replaced.

  19. Common conditions of the achilles tendon.

    PubMed

    Mazzone, Michael F; McCue, Timothy

    2002-05-01

    The Achilles tendon, the largest tendon in the body, is vulnerable to injury because of its limited blood supply and the combination of forces to which it is subjected. Aging and increased activity (particularly velocity sports) increase the chance of injury to the Achilles tendon. Although conditions of the Achilles tendon are occurring with increasing frequency because the aging U.S. population is remaining active, the diagnosis is missed in about one fourth of cases. Injury onset can be gradual or sudden, and the course of healing is often lengthy. A thorough history and specific physical examination are essential to make the appropriate diagnosis and facilitate a specific treatment plan. The mainstay of treatment for tendonitis, peritendonitis, tendinosis, and retrocalcaneobursitis is ice, rest, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, but physical therapy, orthoties, and surgery may be necessary in recalcitrant cases. In patients with tendon rupture, casting or surgery is required. Appropriate treatment often leads to full recovery.

  20. Tensile mechanical properties of human forearm tendons.

    PubMed

    Weber, J F; Agur, A M R; Fattah, A Y; Gordon, K D; Oliver, M L

    2015-09-01

    Previous studies of the mechanical properties of tendons in the upper limb have used embalmed specimens or sub-optimal methods of measurement. The aim of this study was to determine the biomechanical properties of all tendons from five fresh frozen cadaveric forearms using updated methodology. The cross-sectional area of tendons was accurately measured using a laser reflectance system. Tensile testing was done in a precision servo-hydraulic device with cryo-clamp fixation. We determined that the cross-sectional area of some tendons is variable and directly influences the calculated material properties; visual estimation of this is unreliable. Data trends illustrate that digital extensor tendons possess the greatest tensile strength and a higher Young's modulus than other tendon types. PMID:25940499

  1. Mesenchymal stem cell applications to tendon healing

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhury, Salma

    2012-01-01

    Summary Tendons are often subject to age related degenerative changes that coincide with a diminished regenerative capacity. Torn tendons often heal by forming scar tissue that is structurally weaker than healthy native tendon tissue, predisposing to mechanical failure. There is increasing interest in providing biological stimuli to increase the tendon reparative response. Stem cells in particular are an exciting and promising prospect as they have the potential to provide appropriate cellular signals to encourage neotendon formation during repair rather than scar tissue. Currently, a number of issues need to be investigated further before it can be determined whether stem cells are an effective and safe therapeutic option for encouraging tendon repair. This review explores the in-vitro and invivo evidence assessing the effect of stem cells on tendon healing, as well as the potential clinical applications. PMID:23738300

  2. Tensile mechanical properties of human forearm tendons.

    PubMed

    Weber, J F; Agur, A M R; Fattah, A Y; Gordon, K D; Oliver, M L

    2015-09-01

    Previous studies of the mechanical properties of tendons in the upper limb have used embalmed specimens or sub-optimal methods of measurement. The aim of this study was to determine the biomechanical properties of all tendons from five fresh frozen cadaveric forearms using updated methodology. The cross-sectional area of tendons was accurately measured using a laser reflectance system. Tensile testing was done in a precision servo-hydraulic device with cryo-clamp fixation. We determined that the cross-sectional area of some tendons is variable and directly influences the calculated material properties; visual estimation of this is unreliable. Data trends illustrate that digital extensor tendons possess the greatest tensile strength and a higher Young's modulus than other tendon types.

  3. Nutrient pathways of flexor tendons in primates

    SciTech Connect

    Manske, P.R.; Lesker, P.A.

    1982-09-01

    The perfusion and diffusion pathways to the flexor profundus tendons of 40 monkeys were investigated by measuring the uptake of tritiated proline by various tendon segments. In the absence of all vascular connections, the process of diffusion provides nutrients to all areas of flexor tendon and in this study the process of diffusion was greater. The distal segment of tendon was observed to be profused most rapidly. The proximal tendon segment is perfused from both the muscular-tendinous junction and the vinculum longus; vincular segment perfusion is via the vinculum longus vessels alone; central segment perfusion is shared by the vinculum longus and vinculum brevis vasculature. The distal segment uptake is by both the process of diffusion or vinculum brevis perfusion. The osseous attachment at the distal phalanx contributes little to tendon nutrition.

  4. Dynamic behavior of tendons in random seas

    SciTech Connect

    Niedzwecki, J.M.; Rijken, O.R.; Soemantri, D.S.

    1995-12-31

    The dynamic behavior of large scale (1:55) undistorted models of TLP tendons were investigated. The tendons modeled were for a TLP designed to be deployed in a water depth of 914 m. The tendon motions were studied without the presence of the hull, In the study reported, the tendon models were subjected to three quite different design seas and the single and paired tendon configurations were compared under identical wave conditions. The main objective of this study was to examine the dynamic response of TLP tendons under controlled environmental conditions in order to better quantify the observed dynamic behavior. Underwater video tracking techniques were utilized in the experiments to obtain direct measurement of the inline and transverse displacements. Envelopes characterizing the extreme displacement behavior, spatial variations in response and collision behavior are presented and discussed.

  5. Agreement Between Face-to-Face and Free Software Video Analysis for Assessing Hamstring Flexibility in Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Moral-Muñoz, José A; Esteban-Moreno, Bernabé; Arroyo-Morales, Manuel; Cobo, Manuel J; Herrera-Viedma, Enrique

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the level of agreement between face-to-face hamstring flexibility measurements and free software video analysis in adolescents. Reduced hamstring flexibility is common in adolescents (75% of boys and 35% of girls aged 10). The length of the hamstring muscle has an important role in both the effectiveness and the efficiency of basic human movements, and reduced hamstring flexibility is related to various musculoskeletal conditions. There are various approaches to measuring hamstring flexibility with high reliability; the most commonly used approaches in the scientific literature are the sit-and-reach test, hip joint angle (HJA), and active knee extension. The assessment of hamstring flexibility using video analysis could help with adolescent flexibility follow-up. Fifty-four adolescents from a local school participated in a descriptive study of repeated measures using a crossover design. Active knee extension and HJA were measured with an inclinometer and were simultaneously recorded with a video camera. Each video was downloaded to a computer and subsequently analyzed using Kinovea 0.8.15, a free software application for movement analysis. All outcome measures showed reliability estimates with α > 0.90. The lowest reliability was obtained for HJA (α = 0.91). The preliminary findings support the use of a free software tool for assessing hamstring flexibility, offering health professionals a useful tool for adolescent flexibility follow-up.

  6. Agreement Between Face-to-Face and Free Software Video Analysis for Assessing Hamstring Flexibility in Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Moral-Muñoz, José A; Esteban-Moreno, Bernabé; Arroyo-Morales, Manuel; Cobo, Manuel J; Herrera-Viedma, Enrique

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the level of agreement between face-to-face hamstring flexibility measurements and free software video analysis in adolescents. Reduced hamstring flexibility is common in adolescents (75% of boys and 35% of girls aged 10). The length of the hamstring muscle has an important role in both the effectiveness and the efficiency of basic human movements, and reduced hamstring flexibility is related to various musculoskeletal conditions. There are various approaches to measuring hamstring flexibility with high reliability; the most commonly used approaches in the scientific literature are the sit-and-reach test, hip joint angle (HJA), and active knee extension. The assessment of hamstring flexibility using video analysis could help with adolescent flexibility follow-up. Fifty-four adolescents from a local school participated in a descriptive study of repeated measures using a crossover design. Active knee extension and HJA were measured with an inclinometer and were simultaneously recorded with a video camera. Each video was downloaded to a computer and subsequently analyzed using Kinovea 0.8.15, a free software application for movement analysis. All outcome measures showed reliability estimates with α > 0.90. The lowest reliability was obtained for HJA (α = 0.91). The preliminary findings support the use of a free software tool for assessing hamstring flexibility, offering health professionals a useful tool for adolescent flexibility follow-up. PMID:26313580

  7. Extensor tendon injuries in athletes.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Aakash; Jacobs, Bruce; Andoga, Alexandra; Baratz, Mark E

    2014-03-01

    Extensor tendon injuries of the hand and wrist in high-level athletes can cause a delay in return to play and permanently affect their performance. Given the inherent demand for a speedy and complete recovery, orthopedic surgeons must have an understanding of how to best direct an athlete's treatment for these injuries. The extensor anatomy is very intricate and a thorough understanding of the anatomy can help with both diagnosis and treatment. However, untreated or poorly managed injuries are at risk of leading to chronic deformities. We will discuss the diagnosis and management of the most common extensor tendon injuries and tendinopathies of the hand found in athletes: mallet fingers, swan-neck deformities, boutonniere deformities, central slip ruptures, sagittal band ruptures, intersection syndrome, extensor carpi ulnaris tendinitis, and extensor carpi ulnaris subluxation. PMID:24651290

  8. Tendon transfers for the drop foot.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, Karl M; Jones, Carroll P

    2014-03-01

    The paralytic drop foot represents a challenging problem for even the most experienced orthopedic surgeon. Careful patient selection, thorough preoperative examination and planning, and application of tendon transfer biomechanical and physiologic principles outlined in this article can lead to successful results, either through a posterior tibialis tendon transfer, Bridle transfer, or variations on these procedures. Achilles lengthening or gastrocnemius recession may also be needed at the time of tendon transfer. PMID:24548510

  9. Management of complications of extensor tendon injuries.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Kristina; Pipicelli, Joey; Grewal, Ruby

    2015-05-01

    Treatment goals for the management of extensor tendon injuries include restoration of function, minimizing disability, and decreasing the risk of complications. These goals can be achieved with an accurate understanding of the zone-specific concerns for extensor tendon injuries, early referral to hand therapy, and active communication between hand surgeons and therapists. This article reviews extensor tendon injuries by zone, outlines optimal management strategies that help prevent complications, and describes the treatment of these complications. PMID:25934204

  10. Lubricin Surface Modification Improves Tendon Gliding After Tendon Repair in a Canine Model in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Taguchi, Manabu; Sun, Yu-Long; Zhao, Chunfeng; Zobitz, Mark E.; Cha, Chung-Ja; Jay, Gregory D.; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of lubricin on the gliding of repaired flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) tendons in vitro. Canine FDP tendons were completely lacerated, repaired with a modified Pennington technique, and treated with one of the following solutions: saline, carbodiimide derivatized gelatin/hyaluronic acid (cd-HA-gelatin), carbodiimide derivatized gelatin to which lubricin was added in a second step (cd-gelatin + lubricin), or carbodiimide derivatized gelatin/HA + lubricin (cd-HA-gelatin + lubricin). After treatment, gliding resistance was measured up to 1,000 cycles of simulated flexion/extension motion. The increase in average and peak gliding resistance in cd-HA-gelatin, cd-gelatin + lubricin, and cd-HA-gelatin + lubricin tendons was less than the control tendons after 1,000 cycles (p < 0.05). The increase in average gliding resistance of cd-HA-gelatin + lubricin treated tendons was also less than that of the cd-HA-gelatin treated tendons (p < 0.05). The surfaces of the repaired tendons and associated pulleys were assessed qualitatively with scanning electron microscopy and appeared smooth after 1,000 cycles of tendon motion for the cd-HA-gelatin, cd-gelatin + lubricin, and cd-HA-gelatin + lubricin treated tendons, while that of the saline control appeared roughened. These results suggest that tendon surface modification can improve tendon gliding ability, with a trend suggesting that lubricin fixed on the repaired tendon may provide additional improvement over that provided by HA and gelatin alone. PMID:18683890

  11. Comparison of hamstring neuromechanical properties between healthy males and females and the influence of musculotendinous stiffness.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, J Troy; Bell, David R; Norcross, Marc F; Hudson, Jeff D; Engstrom, Lauren A

    2009-10-01

    The hamstrings limit anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) loading, and neuromuscular control of these muscles is crucial for dynamic knee joint stability. Sex differences in electromechanical delay (EMD) and rate of force production (RFP) have been reported previously, and attributed to differences in musculotendinous stiffness (MTS). These characteristics define the neuromechanical response to joint perturbation, and sex differences in these characteristics may contribute to the greater female ACL injury risk. However, it is unclear if these differences exist in the hamstrings, and the relationship between MTS and neuromechanical function has not been assessed directly. Hamstring MTS, EMD, the time required to produce 50% peak force (Time50%), and RFP were assessed in 20 males and 20 females with no history of ACL injury. EMD did not differ significantly across sex (p=0.788). However, MTS (p<0.001) and RFP (p=0.003) were greater in males, Time50% (p=0.013) was shorter in males, and Time50% was negatively correlated with MTS (r=-0.332, p=0.039). These results suggest that neuromechanical hamstring function in females may limit dynamic knee joint stability, potentially contributing to the greater female ACL injury risk. However, future research is necessary to determine the direct influences of MTS and neuromechanical function on dynamic knee joint stability and ACL injury risk.

  12. Effect of hamstring flexibility on isometric knee flexion angle-torque relationship.

    PubMed

    Alonso, J; McHugh, M P; Mullaney, M J; Tyler, T F

    2009-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between hamstring flexibility and knee flexion angle-torque relationship. Hamstring flexibility was assessed in 20 subjects (10 men, 10 women) using the straight leg raise (SLR) and active knee extension (AKE) tests. Isometric knee flexion strength was measured at five knee flexion angles while subjects were seated with the test thigh flexed 40 degrees and the trunk flexed 80 degrees . Lower extremities were classified as tight or normal based on the SLR and AKE tests. Peak knee flexion torque, angle of peak torque, and angle-torque relationship were compared between flexibility groups. Peak knee flexion torque was not different between tight and normal groups (SLR P=0.82; AKE P=0.68) but occurred in greater knee flexion (shorter muscle length) in the tight group compared with the normal group (SLR P<0.01; AKE P<0.05). The tight group had higher torque than the normal group at the shortest muscle length tested but lower torque at longer muscle lengths (SLR P<0.001; AKE P<0.001). In conclusion, the angle-torque relationship was shifted to the left in less flexible hamstrings such that knee flexion torque was increased at short muscle lengths and decreased at long muscle lengths when compared with more flexible hamstrings.

  13. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) treatment of sports-related severe acute hamstring injuries

    PubMed Central

    Guillodo, Yannick; Madouas, Gwénaelle; Simon, Thomas; Le Dauphin, Hermine; Saraux, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Summary Purpose hamstring injury is the most common musculoskeletal disorder and one of the main causes of missed sporting events. Shortening the time to return to play (TTRTP) is a priority for athletes and sports medicine practitioners. Hypothesis platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injection at the site of severe acute hamstring injury increases the healing rate and shortens the TTRTP. Study design Cohort study. Methods all patients with ultrasonography and MRI evidence of severe acute hamstring injury between January 2012 and March 2014 were offered PRP treatment. Those who accepted received a single intramuscular PRP injection within 8 days post-injury; the other patients served as controls. The same standardized rehabilitation program was used in both groups. A physical examination and ultrasonography were performed 10 and 30 days post-injury, then a phone interview 120 days post-injury, to determine the TTRTP at the pre-injury level. Results of 34 patients, 15 received PRP and 19 did not. Mean TTRTP at the pre-injury level was 50.9±10.7 days in the PRP group and 52.8±15.7 days in the control group. The difference was not statistically significant. Conclusion a single intramuscular PRP injection did not shorten the TTRTP in sports people with severe acute hamstring injuries. PMID:26958537

  14. Outcome of quadriceps tendon repair.

    PubMed

    Puranik, Gururaj S; Faraj, Adnan

    2006-04-01

    Complete rupture of the quadriceps tendon is a well-described injury. There is a scarcity of literature relating to the outcome of patients with this injury after surgery. We undertook a retrospective analysis of patients who had surgical repair of their quadriceps tendon at our institution over a 13-year period, totalling 21 patients. Males were more commonly affected, with a male/female ratio of 4:1. The peak incidence was in the sixth decade of life. Assessment consisted of the completion of a functional knee questionnaire and a clinical examination. Symptomatic outcome following surgical repair was good with a mean symptom score generated of 19.16 out of a maximum of 25 using the Rougraff et al scoring system. Most of the patients returned to their pre-injury level of activity. Five degrees deficit and extension lag was present in three patients; these patients had the quadriceps repaired using transosseous sutures. Patients who had direct repair of the tendon using the Bunnell technique had lower Rougraff scores than the rest.

  15. Quadriceps and patellar tendon ruptures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dennis; Stinner, Daniel; Mir, Hassan

    2013-10-01

    The diagnosis of quadriceps and patellar tendon ruptures requires a high index of suspicion and thorough history-taking to assess for medical comorbidities that may predispose patients to tendon degeneration. Radiographic assessment with plain films supplemented by ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging when the work-up is equivocal further aids diagnosis; however, advanced imaging is often unnecessary in patients with functional extensor mechanism deficits. Acute repair is preferred, and transpatellar bone tunnels serve as the primary form of fixation when the tendon rupture occurs at the patellar insertion, with or without augmentation depending on surgeon preference. Chronic tears and disruptions following total knee arthroplasty are special cases requiring reconstructions with allograft, synthetic mesh, or autograft. Rehabilitation protocols generally allow immediate weight-bearing with the knee locked in extension and crutch support. Limited arc motion is started early with active flexion and passive extension and then advanced progressively, followed by full active range of motion and strengthening. Complications are few but include quadriceps atrophy, knee stiffness, and rerupture. Outcomes are excellent if repair is done acutely, with poorer outcomes associated with delayed repair.

  16. High axial load termination for TLP tendons

    SciTech Connect

    Salama, M.M.

    1992-03-03

    This patent describes a hollow high axial load termination for a composite tubular tendon. It comprises: a curved hollow termination body open at one end wit a circular opening and connected at the opposite curved end with an elongated hollow member of lesser diameter than the diameter of the circular opening of the termination body, a composite tubular tendon containing axial fibers and helical fibers laid on an inner hollow liner; fibers of the composite tubular tendon extending over and covering the termination body from the abutment with the composite tubular tendon to the elongated member of lesser diameter than the termination body.

  17. Criterion-Related Validity of Sit-and-Reach Tests for Estimating Hamstring and Lumbar Extensibility: a Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mayorga-Vega, Daniel; Merino-Marban, Rafael; Viciana, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of the present meta-analysis was to examine the scientific literature on the criterion-related validity of sit-and-reach tests for estimating hamstring and lumbar extensibility. For this purpose relevant studies were searched from seven electronic databases dated up through December 2012. Primary outcomes of criterion-related validity were Pearson´s zero-order correlation coefficients (r) between sit-and-reach tests and hamstrings and/or lumbar extensibility criterion measures. Then, from the included studies, the Hunter- Schmidt´s psychometric meta-analysis approach was conducted to estimate population criterion- related validity of sit-and-reach tests. Firstly, the corrected correlation mean (rp), unaffected by statistical artefacts (i.e., sampling error and measurement error), was calculated separately for each sit-and-reach test. Subsequently, the three potential moderator variables (sex of participants, age of participants, and level of hamstring extensibility) were examined by a partially hierarchical analysis. Of the 34 studies included in the present meta-analysis, 99 correlations values across eight sit-and-reach tests and 51 across seven sit-and-reach tests were retrieved for hamstring and lumbar extensibility, respectively. The overall results showed that all sit-and-reach tests had a moderate mean criterion-related validity for estimating hamstring extensibility (rp = 0.46-0.67), but they had a low mean for estimating lumbar extensibility (rp = 0. 16-0.35). Generally, females, adults and participants with high levels of hamstring extensibility tended to have greater mean values of criterion-related validity for estimating hamstring extensibility. When the use of angular tests is limited such as in a school setting or in large scale studies, scientists and practitioners could use the sit-and-reach tests as a useful alternative for hamstring extensibility estimation, but not for estimating lumbar extensibility. Key Points Overall sit

  18. Hamstring exercises for track and field athletes: injury and exercise biomechanics, and possible implications for exercise selection and primary prevention.

    PubMed

    Malliaropoulos, Nikos; Mendiguchia, Jurdan; Pehlivanidis, Hercules; Papadopoulou, Sofia; Valle, Xavier; Malliaras, Peter; Maffulli, Nicola

    2012-09-01

    Hamstring strain injuries are the most prevalent muscle injuries in track and field (TF). These injuries often cause prolonged symptoms and a high risk of re-injury. Strengthening of the hamstring muscles has been recommended for injury prevention. The authors review the possible role of eccentric training in TF hamstring injury prevention and introduce exercise classification criteria to guide clinicians in designing strengthening programmes adapted to TF. The principles exposed may serve as a foundation for future development and application of new eccentric programmes to decrease the high incidence of this type of injury in other sports.

  19. Development of a nerve scaffold using a tendon chitosan tube.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Soichiro; Suzuki, Masumi; Yamaguchi, Isamu; Takakuda, Kazuo; Kobayashi, Hisatoshi; Shinomiya, Kenichi; Tanaka, Junzo

    2003-12-01

    Bridge grafting (15 mm) into the sciatic nerve of SD rats was carried out using tendon chitosan tubes having either a circular or triangular cross-section, as well as triangular tubes combined with laminin, CDPGYIGSR, or CSRARKQAASIKVAVSAD (n = 15 in each group). As a control, isografting (15 mm) was carried out in the SD rats (n = 7). Specimens were taken after 1, 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks for histology, and nerve regeneration was evaluated electro-physiologically and histologically after 12 weeks. The mechanical strength of triangular tubes was found to be higher than circular tubes, and the inner volume of a triangular tube tends to be larger than in circular tubes. Nerve tissue regeneration along the tube wall was found in both the laminin and laminin peptide groups. According to the result of percentage neural tissue in relation to evoked action potentials, the consecutive treatments of YIGSR and IKVAV was found to match the effectiveness of intact laminin.

  20. Tendon Transfers in the Rheumatoid Hand for Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Michael Brody; Singh, Hardeep; Wolf, Jennifer Moriatis

    2016-08-01

    Long-standing rheumatoid arthritis can result in spontaneous tendon rupture caused by attrition of the tendons. Ruptures of the ulnar-sided extensor tendons, flexor pollicis longus, and the flexor digitorum profundus can be seen. Primary repair of these tendon ruptures is frequently not possible because of delayed presentation and tendon damage by the disease process. Tendon transfers are the preferred method of treatment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. At surgery, it is critical to address the underlying cause of rupture to prevent future tendon ruptures. Rates of tendon rupture may decrease due to improved medications for rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:27387084

  1. MRI-Based Regional Muscle Use during Hamstring Strengthening Exercises in Elite Soccer Players.

    PubMed

    Mendez-Villanueva, Alberto; Suarez-Arrones, Luis; Rodas, Gil; Fernandez-Gonzalo, Rodrigo; Tesch, Per; Linnehan, Richard; Kreider, Richard; Di Salvo, Valter

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined site-specific hamstring muscles use with functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in elite soccer players during strength training. Thirty-six players were randomized into four groups, each performing either Nordic hamstring, flywheel leg-curl, Russian belt or the hip-extension conic-pulley exercise. The transverse relaxation time (T2) shift from pre- to post-MRI were calculated for the biceps femoris long (BFl) and short (BFs) heads, semitendinosus (ST) and semimembranosus (SM) muscles at proximal, middle and distal areas of the muscle length. T2 values increased substantially after flywheel leg-curl in all regions of the BFl (from 9±8 to 16±8%), BFs (41±6-71±11%), and ST (60±1-69±7%). Nordic hamstring induced a substantial T2 increase in all regions of the BFs (13±8-16±5%) and ST (15±7-17±5%). T2 values after the Russian belt deadlift substantially increased in all regions of the BFl (6±4-7±5%), ST (8±3-11±2%), SM (6±4-10±4%), and proximal and distal regions of BFs (6±6-8±5%). T2 values substantially increased after hip-extension conic-pulley only in proximal and middle regions of BFl (11±5-7±5%) and ST (7±3-12±4%). The relevance of such MRI-based inter- and intra-muscle use in designing more effective resistance training for improving hamstring function and preventing hamstring injuries in elite soccer players should be explored with more mechanistic studies. PMID:27583444

  2. MRI-Based Regional Muscle Use during Hamstring Strengthening Exercises in Elite Soccer Players.

    PubMed

    Mendez-Villanueva, Alberto; Suarez-Arrones, Luis; Rodas, Gil; Fernandez-Gonzalo, Rodrigo; Tesch, Per; Linnehan, Richard; Kreider, Richard; Di Salvo, Valter

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined site-specific hamstring muscles use with functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in elite soccer players during strength training. Thirty-six players were randomized into four groups, each performing either Nordic hamstring, flywheel leg-curl, Russian belt or the hip-extension conic-pulley exercise. The transverse relaxation time (T2) shift from pre- to post-MRI were calculated for the biceps femoris long (BFl) and short (BFs) heads, semitendinosus (ST) and semimembranosus (SM) muscles at proximal, middle and distal areas of the muscle length. T2 values increased substantially after flywheel leg-curl in all regions of the BFl (from 9±8 to 16±8%), BFs (41±6-71±11%), and ST (60±1-69±7%). Nordic hamstring induced a substantial T2 increase in all regions of the BFs (13±8-16±5%) and ST (15±7-17±5%). T2 values after the Russian belt deadlift substantially increased in all regions of the BFl (6±4-7±5%), ST (8±3-11±2%), SM (6±4-10±4%), and proximal and distal regions of BFs (6±6-8±5%). T2 values substantially increased after hip-extension conic-pulley only in proximal and middle regions of BFl (11±5-7±5%) and ST (7±3-12±4%). The relevance of such MRI-based inter- and intra-muscle use in designing more effective resistance training for improving hamstring function and preventing hamstring injuries in elite soccer players should be explored with more mechanistic studies.

  3. Fatigue affects peak joint torque angle in hamstrings but not in quadriceps.

    PubMed

    Coratella, Giuseppe; Bellin, Giuseppe; Beato, Marco; Schena, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Primary aim of this study was to investigate peak joint torque angle (i.e. the angle of peak torque) changes recorded during an isokinetic test before and after a fatiguing soccer match simulation. Secondarily we want to investigate functional Hecc:Qconc and conventional Hconc:Qconc ratio changes due to fatigue. Before and after a standardised soccer match simulation, twenty-two healthy male amateur soccer players performed maximal isokinetic strength tests both for hamstrings and for quadriceps muscles at 1.05 rad · s(‒1), 3.14 rad · s(‒1) and 5.24 rad · s(‒1). Peak joint torque angle, peak torque and both functional Hecc:Qconc and conventional Hconc:Qconc ratios were examined. Both dominant and non-dominant limbs were tested. Peak joint torque angle significantly increased only in knee flexors. Both eccentric and concentric contractions resulted in such increment, which occurred in both limbs. No changes were found in quadriceps peak joint torque angle. Participants experienced a significant decrease in torque both in hamstrings and in quadriceps. Functional Hecc:Qconc ratio was lower only in dominant limb at higher velocities, while Hconc:Qconc did not change. This study showed after specific fatiguing task changes in hamstrings only torque/angle relationship. Hamstrings injury risk could depend on altered torque when knee is close to extension, coupled with a greater peak torque decrement compared to quadriceps. These results suggest the use eccentric based training to prevent hamstrings shift towards shorter length.

  4. Days to Return to Participation After a Hamstrings Strain Among American Collegiate Soccer Players

    PubMed Central

    Cross, Kevin M.; Saliba, Susan A.; Conaway, Mark; Gurka, Kelly K.; Hertel, Jay

    2015-01-01

    Context Among US collegiate soccer players, the incidence rate and the event characteristics of hamstrings strains differ between sexes, but comparisons in the return-to-participation (RTP) time have not been reported. Objective To compare the RTP time between male and female collegiate soccer players and analyze the influence of event characteristics on the RTP time for each sex. Design Descriptive epidemiology study. Setting Data were collected from collegiate teams that voluntarily participated in the National Collegiate Athletic Association Injury Surveillance System. Patients or Other Participants Collegiate soccer athletes who sustained 507 hamstrings strains (306 men, 201 women) during the 2004 through 2009 fall seasons. Main Outcome Measure(s) Nonparametric statistics were used to evaluate RTP time differences between sexes and among categories of each event characteristic (ie, time of season, practice or competition, player position). Negative binomial regression was used to model the RTP time for each sex. All analyses were performed separately for first-time and recurrent strains. Results We found no differences in the RTP time between sexes for first-time (median: men = 7.0 days, women = 6.0 days; P = .07) or recurrent (median: men = 11 days, women = 5.5 days; P = .06) hamstrings strains. For male players with first-time strains, RTP time was increased when the strain occurred during competition or the in-season/postseason and varied depending on the division of play. Among female players with first-time strains, we found no differences in RTP time within characteristics. For male players with recurrent hamstrings strains, the RTP time was longer when the injury occurred during the in-season/postseason. Among female players with recurrent strains, RTP time was longer for forwards than for midfielders or defenders. Conclusions Although we found no differences in the RTP time after hamstrings strains in male and female collegiate soccer players, each sex

  5. MRI-Based Regional Muscle Use during Hamstring Strengthening Exercises in Elite Soccer Players

    PubMed Central

    Mendez-Villanueva, Alberto; Suarez-Arrones, Luis; Rodas, Gil; Fernandez-Gonzalo, Rodrigo; Tesch, Per; Linnehan, Richard; Kreider, Richard; Di Salvo, Valter

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined site-specific hamstring muscles use with functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in elite soccer players during strength training. Thirty-six players were randomized into four groups, each performing either Nordic hamstring, flywheel leg-curl, Russian belt or the hip-extension conic-pulley exercise. The transverse relaxation time (T2) shift from pre- to post-MRI were calculated for the biceps femoris long (BFl) and short (BFs) heads, semitendinosus (ST) and semimembranosus (SM) muscles at proximal, middle and distal areas of the muscle length. T2 values increased substantially after flywheel leg-curl in all regions of the BFl (from 9±8 to 16±8%), BFs (41±6–71±11%), and ST (60±1–69±7%). Nordic hamstring induced a substantial T2 increase in all regions of the BFs (13±8–16±5%) and ST (15±7–17±5%). T2 values after the Russian belt deadlift substantially increased in all regions of the BFl (6±4–7±5%), ST (8±3–11±2%), SM (6±4–10±4%), and proximal and distal regions of BFs (6±6–8±5%). T2 values substantially increased after hip-extension conic-pulley only in proximal and middle regions of BFl (11±5–7±5%) and ST (7±3–12±4%). The relevance of such MRI-based inter- and intra-muscle use in designing more effective resistance training for improving hamstring function and preventing hamstring injuries in elite soccer players should be explored with more mechanistic studies. PMID:27583444

  6. Post-operative use of knee brace in bone-tendon-bone patellar tendon anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: 5-year follow-up results of a randomized prospective study.

    PubMed

    Harilainen, A; Sandelin, J

    2006-02-01

    Sixty patients were prospectively randomized to brace and no-brace groups after bone-tendon-bone patellar tendon anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The brace group wore a rehabilitation knee brace for 12 weeks post-operatively, while the no-brace group was mobilized immediately, and crutches were discarded 2 weeks post-operatively. The groups were comparable with respect to age, gender, time from injury to surgery and concomitant injuries. There were no differences either pre-operatively or 5 years post-operatively (80% of patients reviewed) between the groups in terms of the knee score (Lysholm), activity level (Tegner), degree of laxity or isokinetic peak muscle torque. Thus it appears that knee braces are not needed in the post-operative rehabilitation after ACL reconstruction with the patellar tendon graft.

  7. Electrostrictive Graft Elastomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Ji (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor); St.Clair, Terry L. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    An electrostrictive graft elastomer has a backbone molecule which is a non-crystallizable, flexible macromolecular chain and a grafted polymer forming polar graft moieties with backbone molecules. The polar graft moieties have been rotated by an applied electric field, e.g., into substantial polar alignment. The rotation is sustained until the electric field is removed. In another embodiment, a process for producing strain in an elastomer includes: (a) providing a graft elastomer having a backbone molecule which is a non-crystallizable, flexible macromolecular chain and a grafted polymer forming polar graft moieties with backbone molecules; and (b) applying an electric field to the graft elastomer to rotate the polar graft moieties, e.g., into substantial polar alignment.

  8. Calcific tendonitis of the tibialis posterior tendon at the navicular attachment

    PubMed Central

    Harries, Luke; Kempson, Susan; Watura, Roland

    2011-01-01

    Calcific tendinosis (tendonosis/tendonitis) is a condition which results from the deposition of calcium hydroxyapatite crystals in any tendon of the body. Calcific tendonitis usually presents with pain, which can be exacerbated by prolonged use of the affected tendon. We report a case of calcific tendinosis in the posterior tibialis tendon at the navicular insertion. The pathology is rare in the foot, and extremely rare in the tibialis posterior tendon, indeed there are only 2 reported in the published literature. This case report highlights the need to consider calcific tendinosis in the foot despite its rarity. If this diagnosis is considered early, appropriate investigations can then be requested and unnecessary biopsies, use of antibiotics and surgery can be avoided. We also discuss possible causes of calcific tendinosis in the tibialis posterior tendon, the role of imaging modalities and review treatment methods. PMID:22470798

  9. Distribution of proteins within different compartments of tendon varies according to tendon type.

    PubMed

    Thorpe, Chavaunne T; Karunaseelan, Kabelan J; Ng Chieng Hin, Jade; Riley, Graham P; Birch, Helen L; Clegg, Peter D; Screen, Hazel R C

    2016-09-01

    Although the predominant function of all tendons is to transfer force from muscle to bone and position the limbs, some tendons additionally function as energy stores, reducing the energetic cost of locomotion. To maximise energy storage and return, energy-storing tendons need to be more extensible and elastic than tendons with a purely positional function. These properties are conferred in part by a specialisation of a specific compartment of the tendon, the interfascicular matrix, which enables sliding and recoil between adjacent fascicles. However, the composition of the interfascicular matrix is poorly characterised and we therefore tested the hypothesis that the distribution of elastin and proteoglycans differs between energy-storing and positional tendons, and that protein distribution varies between the fascicular matrix and the interfascicular matrix, with localisation of elastin and lubricin to the interfascicular matrix. Protein distribution in the energy-storing equine superficial digital flexor tendon and positional common digital extensor tendon was assessed using histology and immunohistochemistry. The results support the hypothesis, demonstrating enrichment of lubricin in the interfascicular matrix in both tendon types, where it is likely to facilitate interfascicular sliding. Elastin was also localised to the interfascicular matrix, specifically in the energy-storing superficial digital flexor tendon, which may account for the greater elasticity of the interfascicular matrix in this tendon. A differential distribution of proteoglycans was identified between tendon types and regions, which may indicate a distinct role for each of these proteins in tendon. These data provide important advances into fully characterising structure-function relationships within tendon. PMID:27113131

  10. Influence of Hamstring and Abdominal Muscle Activation on a Positive Ober's Test in People with Lumbopelvic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Tenney, H. Rich; DeBord, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To assess the immediate effect of hamstring and abdominal activation on pain levels as measured by the Numeric Pain Scale (NPS) and hip range of motion as measured by Ober's Test in people with lumbopelvic pain. Methods: Thirteen participants with lumbopelvic pain and positive Ober's Tests completed an exercise developed by the Postural Restoration Institute™ to recruit hamstrings and abdominal muscles. Results: There was a significant increase in passive hip-adduction angles (p<0.01) and decrease in pain (p<0.01) immediately after the intervention. Conclusion: Specific exercises that activate hamstrings and abdominal muscles appear to immediately improve Ober's Test measurements and reduce pain as measured by the NPS in people with lumbo-pelvic pain. Hamstring/abdominal activation, rather than iliotibial band stretching, may be an effective intervention for addressing lumbopelvic pain and a positive Ober's Test. PMID:24381375

  11. Tendons Involvement in Congenital Metabolic Disorders.

    PubMed

    Abate, Michele; Salini, Vincenzo; Andia, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Congenital metabolic disorders are consequence of defects involving single genes that code for enzymes. Blocking metabolic pathways, the defect leads to the shortage of essential compounds, and/or to the accumulation of huge quantities of precursors, which interfere with normal functions. Only few of these diseases are characterized by a clinically significant tendon involvement.Heterozygous Familial Hypercholesterolaemia results from the inheritance of a mutant low-density lipoprotein receptor gene; patients show high cholesterol levels, precocious coronary artery disease, and may develop tendon xanthomata (mainly in Achilles tendon). The detection of xanthomata is important, because it allows an early diagnosis and treatment of the disorder. Cerebrotendinous Xanthomatosis is a rare genetic metabolic disorder of cholesterol and bile acid metabolism, characterized by accumulation of cholestanol in brain and tendons. Tendon abnormalities are similar to those reported in Heterozygous Familial Hypercholesterolaemia. Alkaptonuria is caused by a deficiency of the enzyme homogentisic acid oxidase. Due to the accumulation of the homogentisic acid, tendons and ligaments are characterized by a typical ochre/yellow pigmentation (ochronosis), with ensuing inflammation, calcification and rupture. In Congenital Hypergalactosemia an increased tendon collagen cross-linking by non-enzymatic galactosylation can be observed. Finally, Congenital Hypophosphatasia may be associated to deposition of hydroxyapatite crystals in rotator cuff, elbow, and Achilles tendons. PMID:27535253

  12. Simultaneous and spontaneous bilateral quadriceps tendons rupture.

    PubMed

    Celik, Evrim Coşkun; Ozbaydar, Mehmet; Ofluoglu, Demet; Demircay, Emre

    2012-07-01

    Simultaneous and spontaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture is an uncommon injury that is usually seen in association with multiple medical conditions and some medications. We report a case of simultaneous and spontaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture that may be related to the long-term use of a statin.

  13. Measuring Regional Changes in Damaged Tendon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisch, Catherine Kayt Vincent

    Mechanical properties of tendon predict tendon health and function, but measuring these properties in vivo is difficult. An ultrasound-based (US) analysis technique called acoustoelastography (AE) uses load-dependent changes in the reflected US signal to estimate tissue stiffness non-invasively. This thesis explores whether AE can provide information about stiffness alteration resulting from tendon tears both ex vivo and in vivo. An ex vivo ovine infraspinatus tendon model suggests that the relative load transmitted by the different tendon layers transmit different fractions of the load and that ultrasound echo intensity change during cyclic loading decreases, becoming less consistent once the tendon is torn. An in vivo human tibialis anterior tendon model using electrically stimulated twitch contractions investigated the feasibility of measuring the effect in vivo. Four of the five subjects showed the expected change and that the muscle contraction times calculated using the average grayscale echo intensity change compared favorably with the times calculated based on the force data. Finally an AE pilot study with patients who had rotator cuff tendon tears found that controlling the applied load and the US view of the system will be crucial to a successful in vivo study.

  14. [Multiple calcifications and ossifications of tendons].

    PubMed

    Gaucher, A; Péré, P; Gillet, P

    1991-06-21

    Multiple calcifications and ossifications of tendons are, as a rule, associated with similar lesions of other articular and/or periarticular structures. The nature and multiplicity of these lesions gives them an unquestionable diagnostic and nosological value. Multiple calcifications are part of the apatite arthritis or of diffuse articular chondrocalcinosis. Multiple ossifications of tendons often suggest Forestier's disease and ankylosing spondylitis.

  15. Structure-mechanics relationships in mineralized tendons.

    PubMed

    Spiesz, Ewa M; Zysset, Philippe K

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we review the hierarchical structure and the resulting elastic properties of mineralized tendons as obtained by various multiscale experimental and computational methods spanning from nano- to macroscale. The mechanical properties of mineralized collagen fibres are important to understand the mechanics of hard tissues constituted by complex arrangements of these fibres, like in human lamellar bone. The uniaxial mineralized collagen fibre array naturally occurring in avian tendons is a well studied model tissue for investigating various stages of tissue mineralization and the corresponding elastic properties. Some avian tendons mineralize with maturation, which results in a graded structure containing two zones of distinct morphology, circumferential and interstitial. These zones exhibit different amounts of mineral, collagen, pores and a different mineral distribution between collagen fibrillar and extrafibrillar space that lead to distinct elastic properties. Mineralized tendon cells have two phenotypes: elongated tenocytes placed between fibres in the circumferential zone and cuboidal cells with lower aspect ratios in the interstitial zone. Interestingly some regions of avian tendons seem to be predestined to mineralization, which is exhibited as specific collagen cross-linking patterns as well as distribution of minor tendon constituents (like proteoglycans) and loss of collagen crimp. Results of investigations in naturally mineralizing avian tendons may be useful in understanding the pathological mineralization occurring in some human tendons.

  16. Is there a potential relationship between prior hamstring strain injury and increased risk for future anterior cruciate ligament injury?

    PubMed

    Opar, David A; Serpell, Benjamin G

    2014-02-01

    Hamstring strain injuries (HSIs) are the most prevalent injury in a number of sports, and while anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are less common, they are far more severe and have long-term implications, such as an increased risk of developing osteoarthritis later in life. Given the high incidence and severity of these injuries, they are key targets of injury preventive programs in elite sport. Evidence has shown that a previous severe knee injury (including ACL injury) increases the risk of HSI; however, whether the functional deficits that occur after HSI result in an increased risk of ACL injury has yet to be considered. In this clinical commentary, we present evidence that suggests that the link between previous HSI and increased risk of ACL injury requires further investigation by drawing parallels between deficits in hamstring function after HSI and in women athletes, who are more prone to ACL injury than men athletes. Comparisons between the neuromuscular function of the male and female hamstring has shown that women display lower hamstring-to-quadriceps strength ratios during isokinetic knee flexion and extension, increased activation of the quadriceps compared with the hamstrings during a stop-jump landing task, a greater time required to reach maximal isokinetic hamstring torque, and lower integrated myoelectrical hamstring activity during a sidestep cutting maneuver. Somewhat similarly, in athletes with a history of HSI, the previously injured limb, compared with the uninjured limb, displays lower eccentric knee flexor strength, a lower hamstrings-to-quadriceps strength ratio, lower voluntary myoelectrical activity during maximal knee flexor eccentric contraction, a lower knee flexor eccentric rate of torque development, and lower voluntary myoelectrical activity during the initial portion of eccentric contraction. Given that the medial and lateral hamstrings have different actions at the knee joint in the coronal plane, which hamstring head is

  17. Human flexor tendon tissue engineering: revitalization of biostatic allograft scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Woon, Colin Y L; Farnebo, Simon; Schmitt, Taliah; Kraus, Armin; Megerle, Kai; Pham, Hung; Yan, Xinrui; Gambhir, Sanjiv S; Chang, James

    2012-12-01

    Cadaveric tendon allografts form a readily available and underutilized source of graft material. Because of their material properties, allografts are biomechanically and biologically superior to synthetic scaffolds. However, before clinical use, allografts must undergo decellularization to reduce immunogenicity and oxidation to increase porosity, leaving a nonvital biostatic scaffold. Ex vivo seeding, or revitalization, is thought to hasten graft incorporation and stimulate intrinsic tendon healing, permitting early mobilization and return to function. In this study, we examined physical and biochemical augmentation methods, including scaffold surface scoring (physical) and rehydration of lyophilized scaffolds in serum (biochemical). Scaffolds were divided into four groups: (1) scored scaffolds, (2) lyophilized scaffolds rehydrated in fetal calf serum (FCS), (3) scaffolds both scored and rehydrated in FCS, and (4) control scaffolds. Scaffolds were reseeded with adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs). Reseeding efficacy was quantified by a live cell and total cell assays and qualified histologically with hematoxylin and eosin, live/dead and SYTO green nucleic acid stains, TUNEL apoptosis stains, procollagen stains, and transmission electron microscopy. Scaffold-seeded cell viability at up to 2 weeks in vitro and up to 4 weeks in vivo was demonstrated with bioluminescent imaging of scaffolds seeded with luciferase-positive ADSCs. The effect of seeding on scaffold biomechanical properties was demonstrated with evaluation of ultimate tensile stress (UTS) and an elastic modulus (EM). We found that scaffold surface scoring led to an increase in live and total cell attachment and penetration (MTS assay, p<0.001 and DNA assay, p=0.003, respectively). Histology confirmed greater total cell number in both construct core and surface in scored compared with unscored constructs. Cells reseeded on scored constructs displayed reduced apoptosis, persistent procollagen production, and

  18. Tendon Vasculature in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tempfer, Herbert; Traweger, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Tendons represent a bradytrophic tissue which is poorly vascularized and, compared to bone or skin, heal poorly. Usually, a vascularized connective scar tissue with inferior functional properties forms at the injury site. Whether the increased vascularization is the root cause of tissue impairments such as loss of collagen fiber orientation, ectopic formation of bone, fat or cartilage, or is a consequence of these pathological changes remains unclear. This review provides an overview of the role of tendon vasculature in healthy and chronically diseased tendon tissue as well as its relevance for tendon repair. Further, the nature and the role of perivascular tendon stem/progenitor cells residing in the vascular niche will be discussed and compared to multipotent stromal cells in other tissues. PMID:26635616

  19. Ultrasonic evaluation of flood gate tendons

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, G.; Brown, A.

    1997-10-01

    Our water resources infrastructure is susceptible to aging degradation just like the rest of this country`s infrastructure. A critical component of the water supply system is the flood gate that controls the outflow from dams.Long steel rods called tendons attach these radial gates to the concrete in the dam. The tendons are typically forty feet long and over one inch in diameter. Moisture may seep into the grout around the tendons and cause corrosion. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is working with the California Department of Water Resources to develop advanced ultrasonic techniques for nondestructively inspecting their tendons. A unique transducer was designed and fabricated to interrogate the entire tendon. A robust,portable unit was assembled that included a computer controlled data acquisition system and specialized data processing software to analyze the ultrasonic signals. This system was tested on laboratory specimens and is presently being fielded at two dam sites.

  20. Crossover Cutting During Hamstring Fatigue Produces Transverse Plane Knee Control Deficits

    PubMed Central

    Nyland, John A.; Caborn, David N.M.; Shapiro, Robert; Johnson, Darren L.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To assess the effects of eccentric work-induced hamstring fatigue on sagittal and transverse plane (axial) knee and ankle biodynamics and kinetics during a running crossover cut directional change (functional pivot shift). Design and Setting: A pretest-posttest, single-group intervention experimental design was employed. All data were collected in a biodynamics laboratory. Subjects: Twenty healthy athletic females were trained for 3 weeks in crossover cutting before testing. Measurements: Data were sampled during 3 unfatigued and 3 fatigued (20% eccentric isokinetic knee-flexor torque reduction) crossover cut trials. Three-dimensional kinematic and ground reaction-force data were sampled at 200 Hz and 1000 Hz, respectively, and joint moment estimates were calculated. Data were standardized to initial force-plate heelstrike for comparisons of mean differences between conditions using paired t tests with Bonferroni adjustments. Pearson product-moment correlations compared kinematic and eccentric hamstring-torque relationships. Results: During internal rotation phase 1, between heelstrike and impact absorption, mean internal rotation velocity increased by 21.2°/s ± 114°/s. During internal rotation phase II, mean peak transverse plane knee rotation during propulsion decreased by 3.1° ± 9°. During internal rotation phase II, mean peak ankle plantar flexor moment onsets occurred 12.7 ± 53 milliseconds earlier, and this activation demonstrated a moderately positive relationship with the onset of mean peak knee internal rotation during propulsion and a weak negative relationship with mean peak hamstring torque/lean body weight. Conclusions: The increased knee internal rotation velocity during phase I indicates transverse plane dynamic knee-control deficits during hamstring fatigue. Earlier peak ankle plantar-flexor moments and decreased internal rotation during phase II in the presence of hamstring fatigue may represent compensatory attempts at dynamic

  1. Knee and Hip Joint Kinematics Predict Quadriceps and Hamstrings Neuromuscular Activation Patterns in Drop Jump Landings

    PubMed Central

    Malfait, Bart; Dingenen, Bart; Smeets, Annemie; Staes, Filip; Pataky, Todd; Robinson, Mark A.; Vanrenterghem, Jos; Verschueren, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose was to assess if variation in sagittal plane landing kinematics is associated with variation in neuromuscular activation patterns of the quadriceps-hamstrings muscle groups during drop vertical jumps (DVJ). Methods Fifty female athletes performed three DVJ. The relationship between peak knee and hip flexion angles and the amplitude of four EMG vectors was investigated with trajectory-level canonical correlation analyses over the entire time period of the landing phase. EMG vectors consisted of the {vastus medialis(VM),vastus lateralis(VL)}, {vastus medialis(VM),hamstring medialis(HM)}, {hamstring medialis(HM),hamstring lateralis(HL)} and the {vastus lateralis(VL),hamstring lateralis(HL)}. To estimate the contribution of each individual muscle, linear regressions were also conducted using one-dimensional statistical parametric mapping. Results The peak knee flexion angle was significantly positively associated with the amplitudes of the {VM,HM} and {HM,HL} during the preparatory and initial contact phase and with the {VL,HL} vector during the peak loading phase (p<0.05). Small peak knee flexion angles were significantly associated with higher HM amplitudes during the preparatory and initial contact phase (p<0.001). The amplitudes of the {VM,VL} and {VL,HL} were significantly positively associated with the peak hip flexion angle during the peak loading phase (p<0.05). Small peak hip flexion angles were significantly associated with higher VL amplitudes during the peak loading phase (p = 0.001). Higher external knee abduction and flexion moments were found in participants landing with less flexed knee and hip joints (p<0.001). Conclusion This study demonstrated clear associations between neuromuscular activation patterns and landing kinematics in the sagittal plane during specific parts of the landing. These findings have indicated that an erect landing pattern, characterized by less hip and knee flexion, was significantly associated with an

  2. Gender-based analysis of hamstring and quadriceps muscle activation during jump landings and cutting.

    PubMed

    Ebben, William P; Fauth, McKenzie L; Petushek, Erich J; Garceau, Luke R; Hsu, Brittni E; Lutsch, Brittney N; Feldmann, Christina R

    2010-02-01

    This study evaluated gender differences in the magnitude and timing of hamstring and quadriceps activation during activities that are believed to cause anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries. Twelve men (age = 21.0 +/- 1.2 years; body mass = 81.61 +/- 13.3 kg; and jump height = 57.61 +/- 10.15 cm) and 12 women (age = 19.91 +/- 0.9 years; body mass = 64.36 +/- 6.14 kg; and jump height = 43.28 +/- 7.5) performed 3 repetitions each of the drop jump (jump) normalized to the subject's vertical jump height, and a sprint and cut at a 45-degree angle (cut). Electromyography (EMG) was used to quantify rectus femoris (RF), vastus lateralis (VL), vastus medialis (VM), lateral hamstring (LH), and medial hamstrings (MH) activation, timing, activation ratios, and timing ratios before and after foot contact for the jump and cut and normalized to each subject's hamstring and quadriceps maximum voluntary isometric contraction. Data were analyzed using an analysis of variance with results demonstrating that during the postcontact phase of the cut, men demonstrated greater LH and MH activation than women. In the precontact phase of the jump, men showed earlier activation of the VL and VM, than women. Women produced longer RF and VM muscle bursts during the postcontact phase of the cut. Additionally, men showed a trend toward higher hamstring to quadriceps activation ratio than women for the postcontact phase of the cut. This study provides evidence that men are LH dominant during the postcontact phase of the cut compared with women, whereas women sustain RF activation longer than men during this phase. Men activate quadriceps muscles earlier than women in the precontact phase of the jump. Training interventions may offer the potential for increasing the rate and magnitude of hamstring muscle activation. These outcomes should be evaluated using EMG during movements that are similar to those that cause ACL injuries to determine if gender differences in muscle activation can be

  3. The Role of Detraining in Tendon Mechanobiology

    PubMed Central

    Frizziero, Antonio; Salamanna, Francesca; Della Bella, Elena; Vittadini, Filippo; Gasparre, Giuseppe; Nicoli Aldini, Nicolò; Masiero, Stefano; Fini, Milena

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Several conditions such as training, aging, estrogen deficiency and drugs could affect the biological and anatomo-physiological characteristics of the tendon. Additionally, recent preclinical and clinical studies examined the effect of detraining on tendon, showing alterations in its structure and morphology and in tenocyte mechanobiology. However, few data evaluated the importance that cessation of training might have on tendon. Basically, we do not fully understand how tendons react to a phase of training followed by sudden detraining. Therefore, within this review, we summarize the studies where tendon detraining was examined. Materials and Methods: A descriptive systematic literature review was carried out by searching three databases (PubMed, Scopus and Web of Knowledge) on tendon detraining. Original articles in English from 2000 to 2015 were included. In addition, the search was extended to the reference lists of the selected articles. A public reference manager (www.mendeley.com) was adopted to remove duplicate articles. Results: An initial literature search yielded 134 references (www.pubmed.org: 53; www.scopus.com: 11; www.webofknowledge.com: 70). Fifteen publications were extracted based on the title for further analysis by two independent reviewers. Abstracts and complete articles were after that reviewed to evaluate if they met inclusion criteria. Conclusions: The revised literature comprised four clinical studies and an in vitro and three in vivo reports. Overall, the results showed that tendon structure and properties after detraining are compromised, with an alteration in the tissue structural organization and mechanical properties. Clinical studies usually showed a lesser extent of tendon alterations, probably because preclinical studies permit an in-depth evaluation of tendon modifications, which is hard to perform in human subjects. In conclusion, after a period of sudden detraining (e.g., after an injury), physical activity should

  4. Role of biomechanics in the understanding of normal, injured, and healing ligaments and tendons

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ho-Joong; Fisher, Matthew B; Woo, Savio L-Y

    2009-01-01

    Ligaments and tendons are soft connective tissues which serve essential roles for biomechanical function of the musculoskeletal system by stabilizing and guiding the motion of diarthrodial joints. Nevertheless, these tissues are frequently injured due to repetition and overuse as well as quick cutting motions that involve acceleration and deceleration. These injuries often upset this balance between mobility and stability of the joint which causes damage to other soft tissues manifested as pain and other morbidity, such as osteoarthritis. The healing of ligament and tendon injuries varies from tissue to tissue. Tendinopathies are ubiquitous and can take up to 12 months for the pain to subside before one could return to normal activity. A ruptured medial collateral ligament (MCL) can generally heal spontaneously; however, its remodeling process takes years and its biomechanical properties remain inferior when compared to the normal MCL. It is also known that a midsubstance anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear has limited healing capability, and reconstruction by soft tissue grafts has been regularly performed to regain knee function. However, long term follow-up studies have revealed that 20–25% of patients experience unsatisfactory results. Thus, a better understanding of the function of ligaments and tendons, together with knowledge on their healing potential, may help investigators to develop novel strategies to accelerate and improve the healing process of ligaments and tendons. With thousands of new papers published in the last ten years that involve biomechanics of ligaments and tendons, there is an increasing appreciation of this subject area. Such attention has positively impacted clinical practice. On the other hand, biomechanical data are complex in nature, and there is a danger of misinterpreting them. Thus, in these review, we will provide the readers with a brief overview of ligaments and tendons and refer them to appropriate methodologies used to

  5. Engineered scaffold-free tendon tissue produced by tendon-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ni, Ming; Rui, Yun Feng; Tan, Qi; Liu, Yang; Xu, Liang Liang; Chan, Kai Ming; Wang, Yan; Li, Gang

    2013-03-01

    Most of the exogenous biomaterials for tendon repair have limitations including lower capacity for inducing cell proliferation and differentiation, poorer biocompatibility and remodeling potentials. To avoid these shortcomings, we intend to construct an engineered tendon by stem cells and growth factors without exogenous scaffolds. In this study, we produced an engineered scaffold-free tendon tissue (ESFTT) in vitro and investigated its potentials for neo-tendon formation and promoting tendon healing in vivo. The ESFTT, produced via tendon-derived stem cells (TDSCs) by treatment of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and ascorbic acid in vitro, was characterized by histology, qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry methods. After ESFTT implanted into the nude mouse, the in vivo fluorescence imaging, histology and immunohistochemistry examinations showed neo-tendon formation. In a rat patellar tendon window injury model, the histology, immunohistochemistry and biomechanical testing data indicated ESFTT could significantly promote tendon healing. In conclusion, this is a proof-of-concept study demonstrating that ESFTT could be a potentially new approach for tendon repair and regeneration.

  6. Preparation and characterization of decellularized tendon slices for tendon tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Ning, Liang-Ju; Zhang, Yi; Chen, Xiao-He; Luo, Jing-Cong; Li, Xiu-Qun; Yang, Zhi-Ming; Qin, Ting-Wu

    2012-06-01

    To develop a naturally derived tendon tissue engineering scaffold with the preservation of the native ultrastructure, tensile strength, and biochemical composition of the tendon extracellular matrix (ECM), decellularized tendon slices (DTSs) were prepared using repetitive freeze/thaw of the intact Achilles tendons, frozen section, and nuclease treatment. The DTSs were characterized in the native ultrastructure, mechanical properties, biochemical composition, and cytocompatibility. Histological examination and DNA quantification analysis confirmed that cells were completely removed from tendon tissue by repetitive freeze/thaw in combination with nuclease treatment 12 h. The intrinsic ultrastructure of tendon tissue was well preserved based on scanning electron microscopy examination. The tensile strength of the DTSs was retained 85.62% of native tendon slice. More than 93% of proteoglycans (fibromodulin, biglycan) and growth factors (TGF-β1, IGF-1, VEGF, and CTGF) inherent in tendon ECM were preserved in the DTSs according to ELISA analysis. Furthermore, the DTSs facilitated attachment and repopulation of NIH-3T3 fibroblasts in vitro. Overall, the DTSs are sheet scaffolds with a combination of elemental mechanical strength and tendon ECM bioactive factors that may have many potential applications in tendon tissue engineering.

  7. Is higher serum cholesterol associated with altered tendon structure or tendon pain? A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Tilley, Benjamin J; Cook, Jill L; Docking, Sean I; Gaida, James E

    2015-01-01

    Background Tendon pain occurs in individuals with extreme cholesterol levels (familial hypercholesterolaemia). It is unclear whether the association with tendon pain is strong with less extreme elevations of cholesterol. Objective To determine whether lipid levels are associated with abnormal tendon structure or the presence of tendon pain. Methods We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis. Relevant articles were found through an electronic search of 6 medical databases—MEDLINE, Cochrane, AMED, EMBASE, Web of Science and Scopus. We included all case–control or cross-sectional studies with data describing (1) lipid levels or use of lipid-lowering drugs and (2) tendon structure or tendon pain. Results 17 studies (2612 participants) were eligible for inclusion in the review. People with altered tendon structure or tendon pain had significantly higher total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides, as well as lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol; with mean difference values of 0.66, 1.00, 0.33, and −0.19 mmol/L, respectively. Conclusions The results of this review indicate that a relationship exists between an individual’s lipid profile and tendon health. However, further longitudinal studies are required to determine whether a cause and effect relationship exists between tendon structure and lipid levels. This could lead to advancement in the understanding of the pathoaetiology and thus treatment of tendinopathy. PMID:26474596

  8. Repair of quadriceps tendon ruptures using suture anchors.

    PubMed

    Richards, David P; Barber, F Alan

    2002-01-01

    The repair of ruptured quadriceps tendon is commonly performed by weaving sutures through the ruptured tendon and then attaching the tendon to the bone by passing these sutures through tunnels in the superior patella. This technical note is the first report we are aware of in the English language literature of a technique that uses suture anchors to attach the tendon to bone.

  9. Bone grafts in dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Prasanna; Vinitha, Belliappa; Fathima, Ghousia

    2013-01-01

    Bone grafts are used as a filler and scaffold to facilitate bone formation and promote wound healing. These grafts are bioresorbable and have no antigen-antibody reaction. These bone grafts act as a mineral reservoir which induces new bone formation. PMID:23946565

  10. [Vascular graft prosthesis].

    PubMed

    Chakfé, N; Dieval, F; Thaveau, F; Rinckenbach, S; Hassani, O; Camelot, G; Durand, B; Kretz, J-G

    2004-06-01

    Performed since the 1950s, vascular grafting has opened modern era of vascular surgery. Autologous venous grafts are of first choice for revascularisation of small arteries. Synthetic grafts are mainly modelled using microporous polytetrafluoroethylene or terephtalate polyethylene. These prosthesis are mainly used for revascularization of medium and large size arteries. PMID:15220107

  11. Tendon Stem Cells: Mechanobiology and Development of Tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Wang, James H-C; Komatsu, Issei

    2016-01-01

    Millions of people suffer from tendon injuries in both occupational and athletic settings. However, the restoration of normal structure and function to injured tendons still remains as one of the greatest challenges in orthopaedics and sports medicine. In recent years, a remarkable advancement in tendon research field has been the discovery of tendon stem/progenitor cells (TSCs). Unlike tenocytes, the predominant resident cell in tendons, TSCs have the ability to self-renew and multi-differentiate. Because of these distinct properties, TSCs may play a critical role in tendon physiology as well as pathology such as tendinopathy, which is a prevalent chronic tendon injury. Additionally, because TSCs are tendon-specific stem cells, they could potentially be used in tendon tissue engineering in vitro, and serve as a promising cell source for cell-based therapy to effectively repair or even regenerate injured tendons in clinical settings. PMID:27535248

  12. The effects of the Bowen technique on hamstring flexibility over time: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Marr, Michelle; Baker, Julian; Lambon, Nicky; Perry, Jo

    2011-07-01

    The hamstring muscles are regularly implicated in recurrent injuries, movement dysfunction and low back pain. Links between limited flexibility and development of neuromusculoskeletal symptoms are frequently reported. The Bowen Technique is used to treat many conditions including lack of flexibility. The study set out to investigate the effect of the Bowen Technique on hamstring flexibility over time. An assessor-blind, prospective, randomised controlled trial was performed on 120 asymptomatic volunteers. Participants were randomly allocated into a control group or Bowen group. Three flexibility measurements occurred over one week, using an active knee extension test. The intervention group received a single Bowen treatment. A repeated measures univariate analysis of variance, across both groups for the three time periods, revealed significant within-subject and between-subject differences for the Bowen group. Continuing increases in flexibility levels were observed over one week. No significant change over time was noted for the control group.

  13. Viscoelasticity of Tendons Under Transverse Compression.

    PubMed

    Paul Buckley, C; Samuel Salisbury, S T; Zavatsky, Amy B

    2016-10-01

    Tendons are highly anisotropic and also viscoelastic. For understanding and modeling their 3D deformation, information is needed on their viscoelastic response under off-axis loading. A study was made, therefore, of creep and recovery of bovine digital extensor tendons when subjected to transverse compressive stress of up to ca. 100 kPa. Preconditioned tendons were compression tested between glass plates at increasing creep loads. The creep response was anomalous: the relative rate of creep reduced with the increasing stress. Over each ca. 100 s creep period, the transverse creep deformation of each tendon obeyed a power law dependence on time, with the power law exponent falling from ca. 0.18 to an asymptote of ca. 0.058 with the increasing stress. A possible explanation is stress-driven dehydration, as suggested previously for the similar anomalous behavior of ligaments. Recovery after removal of each creep load was also anomalous. Relative residual strain reduced with the increasing creep stress, but this is explicable in terms of the reducing relative rate of creep. When allowance was made for some adhesion occurring naturally between tendon and the glass plates, the results for a given load were consistent with creep and recovery being related through the Boltzmann superposition principle (BSP). The tendon tissue acted as a pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) in contact with the glass plates: explicable in terms of the low transverse shear modulus of the tendons. PMID:27496279

  14. Biological Augmentation of Rotator Cuff Tendon Repair

    PubMed Central

    Kovacevic, David

    2008-01-01

    A histologically normal insertion site does not regenerate following rotator cuff tendon-to-bone repair, which is likely due to abnormal or insufficient gene expression and/or cell differentiation at the repair site. Techniques to manipulate the biologic events following tendon repair may improve healing. We used a sheep infraspinatus repair model to evaluate the effect of osteoinductive growth factors and BMP-12 on tendon-to-bone healing. Magnetic resonance imaging and histology showed increased formation of new bone and fibrocartilage at the healing tendon attachment site in the treated animals, and biomechanical testing showed improved load-to-failure. Other techniques with potential to augment repair site biology include use of platelets isolated from autologous blood to deliver growth factors to a tendon repair site. Modalities that improve local vascularity, such as pulsed ultrasound, have the potential to augment rotator cuff healing. Important information about the biology of tendon healing can also be gained from studies of substances that inhibit healing, such as nicotine and antiinflammatory medications. Future approaches may include the use of stem cells and transcription factors to induce formation of the native tendon-bone insertion site after rotator cuff repair surgery. PMID:18264850

  15. Platelet-rich plasma treatment improves outcomes for chronic proximal hamstring injuries in an athletic population

    PubMed Central

    Fader, Ryan R.; Mitchell, Justin J.; Traub, Shaun; Nichols, Roger; Roper, Michelle; Mei Dan, Omer; McCarty, Eric C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background: chronic proximal hamstring tendinopathies is a disabling activity related condition. Currently, there is no well-accepted or extensively documented non-operative treatment option that provides consistently successful results. Purpose: to evaluate the efficacy of ultrasound guided platelet-rich plasma injections in treating chronic proximal hamstring tendinopathies. Methods: a total of 18 consecutive patients were retrospectively analyzed. All patients received a single injection of platelet rich plasma via ultra-sound guidance by a single radiologist. Outcome measures included a questionnaire evaluating previous treatments, visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, subjective improvement, history of injury, and return to activity. Results: the patient population included 12 females and 6 males. The average age at the time of the injection was 42.6 years (19–60). Provocative activities included running, biking, swimming. The average body mass index of patients was 22.9 (17.2–30.2). The average time of chronic pain prior to receiving the first injection was 32.6 months (6–120). All patients had attempted other forms of non-surgical treatment prior to entering the study. The average VAS pre-injection was 4.6 (0–8). Six months after the injection, 10/18 patients had 80% or greater improvement in their VAS. Overall, the average improvement was 63% (5–100). The only documented side effect was post-injection discomfort that resolved within seventy-two hours. Conclusion: chronic hamstring tendinopathy is a debilitating condition secondary to the pain, which limits an athlete’s ability to perform. For refractory cases of chronic insertional proximal hamstring injuries, platelet-rich plasma injections are safe and show benefit in the majority of patients in our study, allowing return to pre-injury activities. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. PMID:25767784

  16. Updates in biological therapies for knee injuries: tendons.

    PubMed

    Demange, Marco Kawamura; de Almeida, Adriano Marques; Rodeo, Scott A

    2014-09-01

    Tendons are subjected to tendinopathies caused by inflammation, degeneration, and weakening of the tendon, due to overuse and trauma, which may eventually lead to tendon rupture. Recently, there has been increasing interest in biological approaches to augment tissue healing. Tendon healing occurs through a dynamic process with inflammation, cellular proliferation, and tissue remodeling. In this review article, we discuss the more frequently proposed biological therapies for tendon injuries as platelet-rich plasma, mesenchymal stem cells, extracorporeal shockwave, and scaffolds.

  17. Percutaneous techniques for tendon transfers in the foot and ankle.

    PubMed

    Panchbhavi, Vinod Kumar

    2014-03-01

    Tendon transfer procedures are useful for replacing a dysfunctional or diseased tendon or for restoring muscle imbalance. The tendon to be transferred is harvested as distal as is necessary to provide adequate length for rerouting and attachment at the different site. The harvesting of tendon itself can be attained using an open surgical approach or minimally invasive percutaneous techniques that limit surgical exposure. This article describes percutaneous techniques for tendon transfer procedures used to address foot and ankle disorders. PMID:24548514

  18. Femoral Aperture Fixation Improves Anterior Cruciate Ligament Graft Function When Added to Cortical Suspensory Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Mark D.; Shadbolt, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Background: Recommendations for bone tunnel placement during anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction have become more precise. However, these recommendations differ neither with the choice of graft nor with the method of fixation used. The influence of the method of femoral fixation used on the biomechanical function of a soft tissue ACL graft remains unknown. Hypothesis: Our null hypothesis was that adding femoral aperture fixation to femoral cortical fixation, using the same bone tunnels, will not alter the control of anterior translation (AT) and internal rotation (IR) during ACL reconstruction using a hamstring graft. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: A total of 22 patients with an acute isolated ACL rupture underwent reconstruction using a single-bundle autologous hamstring graft. Computer navigation was used intraoperatively to plot the AT and IR during the pivot-shift test before reconstruction, after ACL reconstruction using cortical suspensory fixation, and after the addition of femoral aperture fixation. Statistical analysis (analysis of variance) was used to compare the AT and IR during the pivot shift at each stage in the procedure. Results: Before ACL reconstruction, the mean (±SD) AT was 14.2 ± 7.3 mm and mean IR was 17.2° ± 5.5°. After reconstruction using femoral cortical suspension, these figures were significantly reduced to 6.2 ± 3.5 mm and 12.5° ± 3.20°, respectively (P < .001). The addition of the aperture fixation was associated with a further significant reduction to 4.6 ± 3.2 mm and 10.4° ± 2.7°, respectively (P < .001). Conclusion: The addition of femoral aperture fixation to suspensory fixation results in a significant reduction in both the AT and IR that occurs during the pivot-shift assessment immediately after ACL reconstruction using autologous hamstring graft. Clinical Relevance: The most precise positioning of bone tunnels during soft tissue ACL reconstruction needs to take into consideration

  19. Femoral Aperture Fixation Improves Anterior Cruciate Ligament Graft Function When Added to Cortical Suspensory Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Mark D.; Shadbolt, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Background: Recommendations for bone tunnel placement during anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction have become more precise. However, these recommendations differ neither with the choice of graft nor with the method of fixation used. The influence of the method of femoral fixation used on the biomechanical function of a soft tissue ACL graft remains unknown. Hypothesis: Our null hypothesis was that adding femoral aperture fixation to femoral cortical fixation, using the same bone tunnels, will not alter the control of anterior translation (AT) and internal rotation (IR) during ACL reconstruction using a hamstring graft. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: A total of 22 patients with an acute isolated ACL rupture underwent reconstruction using a single-bundle autologous hamstring graft. Computer navigation was used intraoperatively to plot the AT and IR during the pivot-shift test before reconstruction, after ACL reconstruction using cortical suspensory fixation, and after the addition of femoral aperture fixation. Statistical analysis (analysis of variance) was used to compare the AT and IR during the pivot shift at each stage in the procedure. Results: Before ACL reconstruction, the mean (±SD) AT was 14.2 ± 7.3 mm and mean IR was 17.2° ± 5.5°. After reconstruction using femoral cortical suspension, these figures were significantly reduced to 6.2 ± 3.5 mm and 12.5° ± 3.20°, respectively (P < .001). The addition of the aperture fixation was associated with a further significant reduction to 4.6 ± 3.2 mm and 10.4° ± 2.7°, respectively (P < .001). Conclusion: The addition of femoral aperture fixation to suspensory fixation results in a significant reduction in both the AT and IR that occurs during the pivot-shift assessment immediately after ACL reconstruction using autologous hamstring graft. Clinical Relevance: The most precise positioning of bone tunnels during soft tissue ACL reconstruction needs to take into consideration

  20. Platelet-rich plasma in the treatment of acute hamstring injuries in professional football players

    PubMed Central

    ZANON, GIACOMO; COMBI, FRANCO; COMBI, ALBERTO; PERTICARINI, LORIS; SAMMARCHI, LUIGI; BENAZZO, FRANCESCO

    2016-01-01

    Purpose muscle injuries have a high incidence in professional football and are responsible for the largest number of days lost from competition. Several in vitro studies have confirmed the positive role of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) in accelerating recovery and in promoting muscle regeneration, and not fibrosis, in the healing process. This study examines the results of intralesional administration of PRP in the treatment of primary hamstring injuries sustained by players belonging to a major league football club. Methods twenty-five hamstring injuries (grade 2 according to MRI classification) sustained by professional football players during a 31-months observation period were treated with PRP and analyzed. Sport participation absence (SPA), in days, was considered to correspond to the healing time, and we also considered the re-injury rate, and tissue healing on MRI. The mean follow-up was 36.6 months (range 22–42). Results there were no adverse events. The mean SPA for the treated muscle injuries was 36.76±19.02 days. The re-injury rate was 12%. Tissue healing, evaluated on MRI, was characterized by the presence of excellent repair tissue and a small scar. Conclusions this study confirmed the safety of PRP in treating hamstring lesions in a large series of professional football players. PRP-treated lesions did not heal more quickly than untreated lesions described in the literature, but they showed a smaller scar and excellent repair tissue. Level of evidence Level IV, therapeutic case series. PMID:27386443

  1. Utilization and efficacy of computational gait analysis for hamstring lengthening surgery.

    PubMed

    MacWilliams, Bruce A; Stotts, Alan K; Carroll, Kristen L; D'Astous, Jacques L

    2016-09-01

    A retrospective analysis of computational gait studies performed in a single lab over a 12 year period was undertaken to characterize how recommendations to perform or not to perform hamstring lengthenings were utilized by physicians and the effect on outcomes. 131 Subjects were identified as either having hamstring lengthening considered by the referring surgeon, recommended by gait analysis data, or performed. A subset of this data meeting inclusion criteria for pre- and post-surgical timeframes, and bilateral diagnosis was further analyzed to assess the efficacy of the recommendations. There was initial agreement between planned procedures and recommended procedures in just 41% of the cases. Including the cases where there was agreement, gait analysis altered the initial procedure in 54%. In the cases where the initial plan was not supported by gait data, surgeons followed gait recommendations in 77%. In subjects who underwent hamstring lengthening, when surgeons followed or agreed with gait recommendations, patients were 3.6 times more likely to experience a positive outcome. PMID:27505142

  2. Effects of forward trunk lean on hamstring muscle kinematics during sprinting.

    PubMed

    Higashihara, Ayako; Nagano, Yasuharu; Takahashi, Kazumasa; Fukubayashi, Toru

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of forward trunk lean on hamstring muscle kinematics during sprinting. Eight male sprinters performed maximal-effort sprints in two trunk positions: forward lean and upright. A three-dimensional musculoskeletal model was used to compute the musculotendon lengths and velocity of the biceps femoris long head, semitendinosus, and semimembranosus muscles during the sprinting gait cycle. The musculotendon lengths of all the three hamstring muscles at foot strike and toe-off were significantly greater during the forward trunk lean sprint than during the upright trunk sprint. In addition, a positive peak musculotendon lengthening velocity was observed in the biceps femoris long head and semimembranosus muscles during the late stance phase, and musculotendon lengths at that instant were significantly greater during the forward trunk lean sprint than during the upright trunk sprint. The present study provides significant evidence that a potential for hamstring muscle strain injury involving forward trunk lean sprinting would exist during the stance phase. The results also indicate that the biceps femoris long head and semimembranosus muscles are stretched during forward trunk lean sprinting while contracting eccentrically in the late stance phase; thus, the elongation load on these muscles could be increased.

  3. Patellar tendon rupture: an ultrasound case report.

    PubMed

    Berg, Kenneth; Peck, Jeff; Boulger, Creagh; Bahner, David P

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses a case in which ultrasound was the primary modality for diagnosis of traumatic patellar tendon rupture. Traditionally, this diagnosis has been made using MRI. This case highlights the growing need for emergency medicine physicians to become facile with bedside ultrasound and its indications as a supplement to traditional musculoskeletal examination. Normal and pathological patellar tendon examinations with ultrasound are discussed in detail. Furthermore, the advantages of ultrasound over the more traditional imaging modalities of x-ray and MRI in cases where tendon rupture is suspected are discussed.

  4. Arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with quadriceps tendon autograft: clinical outcome in 4-7 years.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Hwa; Chuang, Tai-Yuan; Wang, Kun-Chuang; Chen, Wen-Jer; Shih, Chun-Hsiung

    2006-11-01

    Surgical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is indicated in the ACL-deficient knee with symptomatic instability and multiple ligaments injuries. In the present study, we describe the clinical results of quadriceps tendon-patellar bone autograft for ACL reconstruction. From 1996 to 1998, the graft has been used in 38 patients. Thirty-four patients with complete final follow-up for 4-7 years were analyzed. The average follow-up time was 62 (48-84) months. Thirty-two patients (94%) achieved good or excellent results by Lysholm knee rating. Twenty-six patients (76%) could return to moderate or strenuous activity after reconstruction. Twenty-eight patients (82%) had ligament laxity of less than 2 mm. Finally; 31 patients (91%) were assessed as normal or nearly normal rating by IKDC guideline. Twenty-five patients (73%) had less than 10 mm difference in thigh girth between their reconstructed and normal limbs. Thirty-two (94%) and 31 (91%) patients could achieve recovery of the extensor and flexor muscle strength in the reconstructed knee to 80% or more of normal knee strength, respectively. A statistically significant difference exists in thigh girth difference, extensor strength ratio, and flexor strength ratio before and after reconstruction. Tunnel expansion with more than 1 mm was identified in 2 (6%) tibial tunnels. Our study revealed satisfactory clinical subjective and objective results at 4-7 years follow-up. Quadriceps tendon autograft has the advantage of being self-available, relatively easier arthroscopic technique, and having a suitable size, making it an acceptable graft choice for ACL reconstruction. There is little quadriceps muscle strength loss after quadriceps harvest. A quadriceps tendon-patellar autograft is an adequate graft choice to ACL reconstruction.

  5. Les plaies du tendon patellaire

    PubMed Central

    Mechchat, Atif; Elidrissi, Mohammed; Mardy, Abdelhak; Elayoubi, Abdelghni; Shimi, Mohammed; Elibrahimi, Abdelhalim; Elmrini, Abdelmajid

    2014-01-01

    Les plaies du tendon patellaire sont peu fréquentes et sont peu rapportés dans la littérature, contrairement aux ruptures sous cutanées. Les sections du tendon patellaire nécessitent une réparation immédiate afin de rétablir l'appareil extenseur et de permettre une récupération fonctionnelle précoce. A travers ce travail rétrospectif sur 13 cas, nous analysons les aspects épidémiologiques, thérapeutiques et pronostiques de ce type de pathologie en comparant différents scores. L’âge moyen est de 25 ans avec une prédominance masculine. Les étiologies sont dominées par les accidents de la voie publique (68%) et les agressions par agent tranchant (26%) et contendant (6 %). Tous nos patients ont bénéficié d'un parage chirurgical avec suture tendineuse direct protégée par un laçage au fils d'aciers en légère flexion. La rééducation est débutée après sédation des phénomènes inflammatoires. Au dernier recul les résultats sont excellents et bon à 92%. Nous n'avons pas noté de différence de force musculaire et d'amplitude articulaire entre le genou sain et le genou lésé. Les lésions ouvertes du tendon patellaire est relativement rare. La prise en charge chirurgicale rapide donne des résultats assez satisfaisants. La réparation est généralement renforcée par un semi-tendineux, synthétique ou métallique en forme de cadre de renfort pour faciliter la réadaptation et réduire le risque de récidive après la fin de l'immobilisation. PMID:25170379

  6. Multi-Layer Electrospun Membrane Mimicking Tendon Sheath for Prevention of Tendon Adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shichao; Yan, Hede; Fan, Dapeng; Song, Jialin; Fan, Cunyi

    2015-01-01

    Defect of the tendon sheath after tendon injury is a main reason for tendon adhesions, but it is a daunting challenge for the biomimetic substitute of the tendon sheath after injury due to its multi-layer membrane-like structure and complex biologic functions. In this study, a multi-layer membrane with celecoxib-loaded poly(l-lactic acid)-polyethylene glycol (PELA) electrospun fibrous membrane as the outer layer, hyaluronic acid (HA) gel as middle layer, and PELA electrospun fibrous membrane as the inner layer was designed. The anti-adhesion efficacy of this multi-layer membrane was compared with a single-layer use in rabbit flexor digitorum profundus tendon model. The surface morphology showed that both PELA fibers and celecoxib-loaded PELA fibers in multi-layer membrane were uniform in size, randomly arrayed, very porous, and smooth without beads. Multi-layer membrane group had fewer peritendinous adhesions and better gliding than the PELA membrane group and control group in gross and histological observation. The similar mechanical characteristic and collagen expression of tendon repair site in the three groups indicated that the multi-layer membrane did not impair tendon healing. Taken together, our results demonstrated that such a biomimetic multi-layer sheath could be used as a potential strategy in clinics for promoting tendon gliding and preventing adhesion without poor tendon healing. PMID:25822877

  7. Canine tendon studies. II. Biomechanical evaluation of normal and regrown canine tendons.

    PubMed

    Walker, P; Amstutz, H C; Rubinfeld, M

    1976-01-01

    Some of the mechanical properties of regrown canine tendons are compared to those of normal tendons of young and mature animals. Patellar and Achilles tendons from 12 beagle dogs were removed and studied with their bone origin and insertions. Mechanical tests were performed within 24 hr and test conditions simulated the physiological function of the tendon in vivo at room temperature. Specimens were soaked in Ringers solution and mounted in an Instron testing machine with load deflection curves plotted automatically. The parameters used for analysis were load extension, stress relaxation, elastic limit, and strain rate dependence. The regrown tendons in young animals appeared to quickly adjust in dimension and structure so that their properties were not significantly different from those of normal tendons on a load extension basis. The normal tendons were stiffer than regrown ones but the modulus of elasticity increased with age. The Achilles were stiffer than patellar tendons. Cyclic loading with 25 kg did not affect reconstructed tendon models, although some increase in stiffness was noted. The elastic modulus decreased with an increase in ambient temperature and increasing strain rate.

  8. Famotidine suppresses osteogenic differentiation of tendon cells in vitro and pathological calcification of tendon in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kenichi; Hojo, Hironori; Koshima, Isao; Chung, Ung-il; Ohba, Shinsuke

    2012-12-01

    Heterotopic ossification or calcification follows any type of musculoskeletal trauma and is known to occur after arthroplasties of hip, knee, shoulder, or elbow; fractures; joint dislocations; or tendon ruptures. Histamine receptor H2 (Hrh2) has been shown to be effective for reducing pain and decreasing calcification in patients with calcifying tendinitis, which suggested that H2 blockers were effective for the treatment of tendon ossification or calcification. However, the detailed mechanisms of its action on tendon remain to be clarified. We investigated the mechanisms underlying H2 blocker-mediated suppression of tendon calcification, with a focus on the direct action of the drug on tendon cells. Famotidine treatment suppressed the mRNA expressions of Col10a1 and osteocalcin, ossification markers, in a tendon-derived cell line TT-D6, as well as a preosteoblastic one MC3T3-E1. Both of the cell lines expressed Hrh2; histamine treatment induced osteocalcin expression in these cells. Famotidine administration suppressed calcification in the Achilles tendon of ttw mice, a mouse model of ectopic ossification. These data suggest that famotidine inhibits osteogenic differentiation of tendon cells in vitro, and this inhibition may underlie the anti-calcification effects of the drug in vivo. This study points to the use of H2 blockers as a promising strategy for treating heterotopic ossification or calcification in tendon, and provides evidence in support of the clinical use of famotidine.

  9. IFSSH Flexor Tendon Committee report 2014: from the IFSSH Flexor Tendon Committee (Chairman: Jin Bo Tang).

    PubMed

    Tang, Jin Bo; Chang, James; Elliot, David; Lalonde, Donald H; Sandow, Michael; Vögelin, Esther

    2014-01-01

    Hand surgeons continue to search for the best surgical flexor tendon repair and treatment of the tendon sheaths and pulleys, and they are attempting to establish postoperative regimens that fit diverse clinical needs. It is the purpose of this report to present the current views, methods, and suggestions of six senior hand surgeons from six different countries - all experienced in tendon repair and reconstruction. Although certainly there is common ground, the report presents provocative views and approaches. The report reflects an update in the views of the committee. We hope that it is helpful to surgeons and therapists in treating flexor tendon injuries. PMID:23962872

  10. Biomechanical Comparison Between Bashti Bone Plug Technique and Biodegradable Screw for Fixation of Grafts in Ligament surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bashti, Kaveh; Tahmasebi, Mohammad N; Kaseb, Hasan; Farahmand, Farzam; Akbar, Mohammad; Mobini, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ligament reconstruction is a common procedure in orthopedic surgery. Although several popular techniques are currently in use, new methods are proposed for secure fixation of the tendon graft into the bone tunnel. Purposes: We sought to introduce our new technique of Bashti bone plug for fixation of soft tissue graft in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction and to compare its biomechanical features with conventional absorbable interference screw technique in a bovine model. Methods: Twenty pairs of bovine knees were harvested after death. Soft tissue was removed and the Achilles tendon was harvested to be used as an ACL graft. It was secured into the bone tunnel on the tibial side via two different methods: Bashti Bone Plug technique and conventional screw method. Biomechanical strength was measured using 200 N and 300 N cyclic loading on the graft. Pull out strength was also tested until the graft fails. Results: No graft failure was observed after 200 N and 300 N cyclic loading in either fixation methods. When testing for pull out failure, 21 tendons (53%) were torn and 19 tendons (48%) slipped out. No fixation failure occurred, which did not reveal a significant difference between the bone plug or interference screw group (P=0.11). The mean pull out force until failure of the graft was 496±66 N in the screw group and 503±67 N in the bone plug group (P=0.76). Conclusions: Our suggested fixation technique of Bashti bone plug is a native, cheap, and feasible method that provides comparable biomechanical strength with interference screw when soft tissue fixation was attempted in bovine model. PMID:25692166

  11. Composite coating of 58S bioglass and hydroxyapatite on a poly (ethylene terepthalate) artificial ligament graft for the graft osseointegration in a bone tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hong; Wu, Yang; Ge, Yunsheng; Jiang, Jia; Gao, Kai; Zhang, Pengyun; Wu, Lingxiang; Chen, Shiyi

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of the combination of hydroxyapatite (HA) and bioglass (BG) on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) artificial ligament graft osseointegration within the bone tunnel. The results of in vitro culturing of MC3T3-E1 mouse osteoblastic cells proved that this HA/BG composite coating can promote the cell compatibility of grafts. A rabbit extraarticular tendon-to-bone healing model was used to evaluate the effect of this composite coating on PET artificial ligaments in vivo. The final results demonstrated that HA/BG coating improved new bone formation at the graft-bone interface and increased the load-to-failure property of graft in bone tunnel compared to the control group at early time. The study has shown that HA/BG composite coating on the PET artificial ligament surface has a positive effect in the induction of artificial ligament osseointegration within the bone tunnel.

  12. Patterns of Hamstring Muscle Tears in the General Population: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Kuske, Barbara; Hamilton, David F.; Pattle, Sam B.; Simpson, A. Hamish R. W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Hamstring tears are well recognised in the sporting population. Little is known about these injuries in the general population. Purpose Evaluating the rates, patterns and risk factors of non-sporting hamstring tears, compared to sporting related hamstring tears. Data Sources MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (1989–2015). Study Selection Studies reporting patients with a grade 2 or 3 hamstring muscle tear, identified clinically, confirmed by MRI imaging or direct visualisation during surgical exploration. Data Synthesis 144 sets of linked data were extracted for analysis. Most injuries were in males (81.3%), where mean age at injury was lower (30.2, 95% CI 29.1–31.3) than in females (35.4, 95% CI 32.4–38.4) p = 0.06. Key differences were found in the proportion of non-sporting injuries in patients under and over the age 40 (p = 0.001). The proportion of non-sporting injuries was significantly higher in females compared to males (25.9% female non-sporting injuries, versus 8.5% male; p = 0.02). Avulsions were more frequently reported in non-sporting activities (70.5%). The proportion of such injuries was notably higher in females, though this failed to meet significance (p = 0.124). Grouped by age category a bimodal distribution was noted, with the proportion of avulsions greater in younger (age <15) and older patients (age > 40) (p = 0.008). 86.8% of patients returned to pre-injury activity levels with a similar frequency across all study variables; age, activity (sporting vs non-sporting) and injury type (avulsion vs tear). Conclusion This review highlights a proportion of adults suffering grade 2 or 3 hamstring injuries from activities other than the classic sports trauma. The majority of these non-sporting injuries were avulsion injuries that clustered in older female and skeletally immature patients suggesting a potential link to bone mineral density. PMID:27144648

  13. Hamstring strain injuries: factors that lead to injury and re-injury.

    PubMed

    Opar, David A; Williams, Morgan D; Shield, Anthony J

    2012-03-01

    Hamstring strain injuries (HSIs) are common in a number of sports and incidence rates have not declined in recent times. Additionally, the high rate of recurrent injuries suggests that our current understanding of HSI and re-injury risk is incomplete. Whilst the multifactoral nature of HSIs is agreed upon by many, often individual risk factors and/or causes of injury are examined in isolation. This review aims to bring together the causes, risk factors and interventions associated with HSIs to better understand why HSIs are so prevalent. Running is often identified as the primary activity type for HSIs and given the high eccentric forces and moderate muscle strain placed on the hamstrings during running these factors are considered to be part of the aetiology of HSIs. However, the exact causes of HSIs remain unknown and whilst eccentric contraction and muscle strain purportedly play a role, accumulated muscle damage and/or a single injurious event may also contribute. Potentially, all of these factors interact to varying degrees depending on the injurious activity type (i.e. running, kicking). Furthermore, anatomical factors, such as the biarticular organization, the dual innervations of biceps femoris (BF), fibre type distribution, muscle architecture and the degree of anterior pelvic tilt, have all been implicated. Each of these variables impact upon HSI risk via a number of different mechanisms that include increasing hamstring muscle strain and altering the susceptibility of the hamstrings to muscle damage. Reported risk factors for HSIs include age, previous injury, ethnicity, strength imbalances, flexibility and fatigue. Of these, little is known, definitively, about why previous injury increases the risk of future HSIs. Nevertheless, interventions put in place to reduce the incidence of HSIs by addressing modifiable risk factors have focused primarily on increasing eccentric strength, correcting strength imbalances and improving flexibility. The response to

  14. Hamstring strain injuries: factors that lead to injury and re-injury.

    PubMed

    Opar, David A; Williams, Morgan D; Shield, Anthony J

    2012-03-01

    Hamstring strain injuries (HSIs) are common in a number of sports and incidence rates have not declined in recent times. Additionally, the high rate of recurrent injuries suggests that our current understanding of HSI and re-injury risk is incomplete. Whilst the multifactoral nature of HSIs is agreed upon by many, often individual risk factors and/or causes of injury are examined in isolation. This review aims to bring together the causes, risk factors and interventions associated with HSIs to better understand why HSIs are so prevalent. Running is often identified as the primary activity type for HSIs and given the high eccentric forces and moderate muscle strain placed on the hamstrings during running these factors are considered to be part of the aetiology of HSIs. However, the exact causes of HSIs remain unknown and whilst eccentric contraction and muscle strain purportedly play a role, accumulated muscle damage and/or a single injurious event may also contribute. Potentially, all of these factors interact to varying degrees depending on the injurious activity type (i.e. running, kicking). Furthermore, anatomical factors, such as the biarticular organization, the dual innervations of biceps femoris (BF), fibre type distribution, muscle architecture and the degree of anterior pelvic tilt, have all been implicated. Each of these variables impact upon HSI risk via a number of different mechanisms that include increasing hamstring muscle strain and altering the susceptibility of the hamstrings to muscle damage. Reported risk factors for HSIs include age, previous injury, ethnicity, strength imbalances, flexibility and fatigue. Of these, little is known, definitively, about why previous injury increases the risk of future HSIs. Nevertheless, interventions put in place to reduce the incidence of HSIs by addressing modifiable risk factors have focused primarily on increasing eccentric strength, correcting strength imbalances and improving flexibility. The response to

  15. Hand rejuvenation with structural fat grafting.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Sydney R

    2002-12-01

    A simple, reliable technique of autologous fat grafting for long-lasting rejuvenation of the dorsum of the hand is presented. With this technique, small intact parcels of fatty tissue are harvested with a syringe and a blunt 3-mm cannula. Then, most of the nonviable components are removed from the harvested subcutaneous material by centrifugation, decanting, and wicking. Finally, a 17-gauge blunt cannula places the fat in minuscule parcels of tissue with many passes through five or six tiny incisions in the hand. Separation of the tiny parcels of fat maximizes contact between the surfaces of the transplanted fat and surrounding recipient tissues to encourage integration, anchoring, and long-term survival. Structured, purposeful placement of a thin layer of transplanted fat rejuvenates the dorsal hand by restoring a slight fullness to atrophic subcutaneous tissue, by softening the color and definition of exposed extensor tendons and dorsal hand veins, and by supporting the aging skin.

  16. Delayed reconstruction of a quadriceps tendon.

    PubMed

    Pocock, C A J; Trikha, S P; Bell, J S P

    2008-01-01

    Rupture of the quadriceps tendon is an uncommon injury and rapid diagnosis is important because delay in surgical repair generally is believed to adversely affect outcome. One study of 20 patients suggests repair should be done during the first 48 to 72 hours postinjury to achieve a successful outcome and late repair led to unsatisfactory recovery. Cases of delayed tendon repair have been reported, the longest to our knowledge being 11 months before surgical intervention. We present a case of successful outcome of a quadriceps tendon rupture reconstructed at least 8 years after occurrence and a review of the literature of delayed reconstructions. We show that successful restoration of extensor mechanism function can be achieved several years after tendon rupture.

  17. Heel pain and Achilles tendonitis - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... the length of the tendon when walking or running. Your pain and stiffness might increase in the ... or decrease activities that cause pain, such as running or jumping. Do activities that do not strain ...

  18. Glycosaminoglycans in Tendon Physiology, Pathophysiology, and Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Christina N M; Sorushanova, Anna; Lomas, Alex J; Mullen, Anne Maria; Pandit, Abhay; Zeugolis, Dimitrios I

    2015-07-15

    Although glycosaminoglycans constitute a minor portion of native tissues, they play a crucial role in various physiological processes, while their abnormal expression is associated with numerous pathophysiologies. Glycosaminoglycans have become increasingly prevalent in biomaterial design for tendon repair, given their low immunogenicity and their inherent capacity to stimulate the regenerative processes, while maintaining resident cell phenotype and function. Further, their incorporation into three-dimensional scaffold conformations significantly improves their mechanical properties, while reducing the formation of peritendinous adhesions. Herein, we discuss the role of glycosaminoglycans in tendon physiology and pathophysiology and the advancements achieved to date using glycosaminoglycan-functionalized scaffolds for tendon repair and regeneration. It is evidenced that glycosaminoglycan functionalization has led to many improvements in tendon tissue engineering and it is anticipated to play a pivotal role in future reparative therapies.

  19. Position Control of Tendon-Driven Fingers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdallah, Muhammad E.; Platt, Robert, Jr.; Hargrave, B.; Pementer, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Conventionally, tendon-driven manipulators implement some force control scheme based on tension feedback. This feedback allows the system to ensure that the tendons are maintained taut with proper levels of tensioning at all times. Occasionally, whether it is due to the lack of tension feedback or the inability to implement sufficiently high stiffnesses, a position control scheme is needed. This work compares three position controllers for tendon-driven manipulators. A new controller is introduced that achieves the best overall performance with regards to speed, accuracy, and transient behavior. To compensate for the lack of tension feedback, the controller nominally maintains the internal tension on the tendons by implementing a two-tier architecture with a range-space constraint. These control laws are validated experimentally on the Robonaut-2 humanoid hand. I

  20. Regional adaptations in three rat tendons.

    PubMed

    Covizi, D Z; Felisbino, S L; Gomes, L; Pimentel, E R; Carvalho, H F

    2001-10-01

    Although detailed histological and immunocytochemical studies have been published for the rat calcanear tendon (CT), little is known of the structure, composition and biomechanics of the deep (DFT) and superficial (SFT) flexor tendons. In this study, we examined the structural specialization of these three tendons in 90-day-old rats by applying histochemical and biochemical assays to different tendon regions (proximal, intermediate and distal regions of the DFT and SFT, and proximal and distal regions of the CT). There were regional differences in tissue structure, glycosaminoglycan type and content, swelling properties and in the amount and distribution of elastic fibers. Dermatan sulfate occurred in all regions, but chondroitin sulfate predominated in the intermediate region of the DFT and in the distal region of the CT. These two chondroitin sulfate-bearing regions showed swelling in water, while all other regions lost fluid in water. Fibrocartilaginous sites were observed on the CT, one at the insertion to the bone and another distally at the innermost area of the tendon. The intermediate region of the DFT showed round cells disposed in lacunae, while the proximal and distal regions were typically fibrous. The intermediate region of the SFT showed a wavy array of collagen bundles but neither toluidine blue staining in the matrix nor round cells. Elastic fibers were present in each region of the three tendons, but were more prominent in the intermediate zone of the SFT. These results demonstrate regional variation in the three tendons. Tendon differentiation may occur by an increase in the number of elastic fibers and by variations in the arrangement of collagen fibers, without fibrocartilage formation.

  1. [Tendinosis and ruptures of the Achilles tendon].

    PubMed

    Amlang, M H; Zwipp, H

    2012-02-01

    Tendinosis of the Achilles tendon is a degenerative-reparative structural change of the tendon with microdefects, increases in cross-section due to cicatricial tendon regeneration, neoangiogenesis and reduction of elasticity. The previously used term tendinitis is only rarely used for the chronic form since signs of inflammation such as redness and hyperthermia or elevated levels of inflammatory parameters on laboratory testing are generally absent. Duplex sonography with visualization of the neovascularization has become a valuable supplement not only for diagnostics but also for therapy planning. The classic, conservative therapy for painful tendinosis consists of oral anti-inflammatory drugs, pain-adapted load reduction, raising the heel, stretching the calf musculature, and various physiotherapeutic interventions. When conservative treatment over a period of 4 - 6 months fails to produce any or non-adequate pain relief, an indication for surgical treatment should be considered. In the therapy for fresh ruptures of the Achilles tendon further developments in minimally invasive techniques have led to a worldwide paradigm change over the past 10 years. The decisive advantage of minimally invasive surgical techniques is the lower risk of wound infection as compared to the sutures of the open technique. When compared with conservative functional therapy the minimally invasive repair has the advantage of being less dependent on the compliance of the patient since, in the early phase of tendon healing the suture prevents a separation of the tendon ends upon controlled movements. However, not every patient with a ruptured Achilles tendon should be treated with a minimally invasive repair. Open tendon reconstruction and functional conservative therapy are still justified when the correct indication is given. PMID:22344862

  2. [Bilateral rupture of the quadriceps tendon].

    PubMed

    Modrego, Francisco J; Molina, Juan

    2004-01-01

    Simultaneous, bilateral, and spontaneous rupture of the quadriceps tendon is a very rare injury. Individuals with this injury are usually predisposed by chronic renal disease with secondary hyperparathyroidism, gout, diabetes, and lupus erythematosus. Often, primary diagnostic confusion can lead to a delay in treatment. Two cases of a bilateral lesion of the quadriceps tendon, that were treated surgically using the technique of Scuderi, followed by an intense rehabilitation programme, are presented. Surgical treatment yields satisfactory results.

  3. A biomechanical assessment of tendon repair after radiofrequency treatment.

    PubMed

    Tibor, Lisa M; Leek, Bryan T; Chase, Derek C; Healey, Robert M; Linn, Michael S; Tasto, James P; Amiel, David

    2012-09-01

    After acute tendon injury, rapid mobilization prevents adhesions and improves the ultimate strength of the repair. Radiofrequency (RF) ablation is proposed to enhance angiogenesis in the early stages of healing. The mechanism and effect of RF have not yet been described in an animal model of tendon injury. To investigate the biomechanical effect of bipolar RF on acute injury in a rabbit model of partial Achilles tendon transection and suture repair, RF-treated tendon repairs were compared to untreated tendons. Cross-sectional area, Young's modulus, and ultimate tensile strength were determined. At 6 and 12 weeks after repair, RF-treated tendons had significant increases in cross-sectional area (P<.001; P< .0001) and ultimate tensile strength (P<.0001; P<.01). Young modulus of RF-treated tendons was increased at 6 weeks but not at 12 weeks (P<.01) Compared with untreated tendons, RF-treated tendons showed faster return to mechanical integrity. This may allow earlier rehabilitation.

  4. Tension Distribution in a Tendon-Driven Robotic Finger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdallah, Muhammad E. (Inventor); Platt, Robert (Inventor); Wampler, II, Charles W. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method is provided for distributing tension among tendons of a tendon-driven finger in a robotic system, wherein the finger characterized by n degrees of freedom and n+1 tendons. The method includes determining a maximum functional tension and a minimum functional tension of each tendon of the finger, and then using a controller to distribute tension among the tendons, such that each tendon is assigned a tension value less than the maximum functional tension and greater than or equal to the minimum functional tension. The method satisfies the minimum functional tension while minimizing the internal tension in the robotic system, and satisfies the maximum functional tension without introducing a coupled disturbance to the joint torques. A robotic system includes a robot having at least one tendon-driven finger characterized by n degrees of freedom and n+1 tendons, and a controller having an algorithm for controlling the tendons as set forth above.

  5. Grasp Assist Device with Shared Tendon Actuator Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Bergelin, Bryan J. (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A grasp assist device includes a glove with first and second tendon-driven fingers, a tendon, and a sleeve with a shared tendon actuator assembly. Tendon ends are connected to the respective first and second fingers. The actuator assembly includes a drive assembly having a drive axis and a tendon hook. The tendon hook, which defines an arcuate surface slot, is linearly translatable along the drive axis via the drive assembly, e.g., a servo motor thereof. The flexible tendon is routed through the surface slot such that the surface slot divides the flexible tendon into two portions each terminating in a respective one of the first and second ends. The drive assembly may include a ball screw and nut. An end cap of the actuator assembly may define two channels through which the respective tendon portions pass. The servo motor may be positioned off-axis with respect to the drive axis.

  6. In vivo identity of tendon stem cells and the roles of stem cells in tendon healing.

    PubMed

    Tan, Qi; Lui, Pauline Po Yee; Lee, Yuk Wa

    2013-12-01

    We investigated the spatial distribution of stem cells in tendons and the roles of stem cells in early tendon repair. The relationship between tendon-derived stem cells (TDSCs) isolated in vitro and tendon stem cells in vivo was also explored. Iododeoxyuridine (IdU) label-retaining method was used for labeling stem cells in rat patellar tendons with and without injury. Co-localization of label-retaining cells (LRCs) with different markers was done by immunofluorescent staining. TDSCs were isolated from patellar tendon mid-substance after IdU pulsing, and the expression of different markers in fresh and expanded cells was done by immunofluorescent staining. More LRCs were found at the peritenon and tendon-bone junction compared with the mid-substance. Some LRCs at the peritenon were located at the perivascular niche. The LRC number and the expression of proliferative, tendon-related, pluripotency, and pericyte-related markers in LRCs in the window wound increased. Most of the freshly isolated TDSCs expressed IdU, and some TDSCs expressed pericyte-related markers, which were lost during expansion. Both freshly isolated and subcultured TDSCs expressed pluripotency markers, which were absent in LRCs in intact tendons. In conclusion, we identified LRCs at the peritenon, mid-substance, and tendon-bone junction. There were both vascular and non-vascular sources of LRCs at the peritenon, while the source of LRCs at the mid-substance was non-vascular. LRCs participated in tendon repair via migration, proliferation, activation for tenogenesis, and increased pluripotency. Some LRCs in the window wound were pericyte like. Most of the mid-substance TDSCs were LRCs. The pluripotency markers and pericyte-related marker in LRCs might be important for function after injury.

  7. Arthroscopic quadriceps tendon repair: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Saito, Hidetomo; Shimada, Yoichi; Yamamura, Toshiaki; Yamada, Shin; Sato, Takahiro; Nozaka, Koji; Kijima, Hiroaki; Saito, Kimio

    2015-01-01

    Recently, although some studies of open repair of the tendon of the quadriceps femoris have been published, there have been no reports in the literature on primary arthroscopic repair. In our present study, we present two cases of quadriceps tendon injury arthroscopically repaired with excellent results. Case 1 involved a 68-year-old man who was injured while shifting his weight to prevent a fall. MRI showed complete rupture at the insertion of the patella of the quadriceps tendon. The rupture was arthroscopically repaired using both suture anchor and pull-out suture fixation methods via bone tunnels (hereafter, pull-out fixation). Two years after surgery, retearing was not observed on MRI and both Japan Orthopedic Association (JOA) Knee and Lysholm scores had recovered to 100. Case 2 involved a 50-year-old man who was also injured when shifting his weight to prevent a fall. MRI showed incomplete superficial rupture at the insertion of the patella of the quadriceps tendon. The rupture was arthroscopically repaired using pull-out fixation of six strand sutures. One year after surgery, MRI revealed a healed tendon and his JOA and Lysholm scores were 95 and 100, respectively. Thus, arthroscopic repair may be a useful surgical method for repairing quadriceps tendon injury.

  8. The cell biology of suturing tendons.

    PubMed

    Wong, J K F; Alyouha, S; Kadler, K E; Ferguson, M W J; McGrouther, D A

    2010-07-01

    Trauma by suturing tendon form areas devoid of cells termed "acellular zones" in the matrix. This study aimed to characterise the cellular insult of suturing and acellular zone formation in mouse tendon. Acellular zone formation was evaluated using single grasping sutures placed using flexor tendons with time lapse cell viability imaging for a period of 12h. Both tension and injury were required to induce cell death and cell movement in the formation of the acellular zone. DNA fragmentation studies and transmission electron microscopy indicated that cells necrosed. Parallel in vivo studies showed that cell-to-cell contacts were disrupted following grasping by the suture in tensioned tendon. Without tension, cell death was lessened and cell-to-cell contacts remained intact. Quantitative immunohistochemistry and 3D cellular profile mapping of wound healing markers over a one year time course showed that acellular zones arise rapidly and showed no evidence of healing whilst the wound healing response occurred in the surrounding tissues. The acellular zones were also evident in a standard modified "Kessler" clinical repair. In conclusion, the suture repair of injured tendons produces acellular zones, which may potentially cause early tendon failure. PMID:20600895

  9. Arthroscopic Quadriceps Tendon Repair: Two Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Hidetomo; Shimada, Yoichi; Yamamura, Toshiaki; Yamada, Shin; Sato, Takahiro; Nozaka, Koji; Kijima, Hiroaki; Saito, Kimio

    2015-01-01

    Recently, although some studies of open repair of the tendon of the quadriceps femoris have been published, there have been no reports in the literature on primary arthroscopic repair. In our present study, we present two cases of quadriceps tendon injury arthroscopically repaired with excellent results. Case 1 involved a 68-year-old man who was injured while shifting his weight to prevent a fall. MRI showed complete rupture at the insertion of the patella of the quadriceps tendon. The rupture was arthroscopically repaired using both suture anchor and pull-out suture fixation methods via bone tunnels (hereafter, pull-out fixation). Two years after surgery, retearing was not observed on MRI and both Japan Orthopedic Association (JOA) Knee and Lysholm scores had recovered to 100. Case 2 involved a 50-year-old man who was also injured when shifting his weight to prevent a fall. MRI showed incomplete superficial rupture at the insertion of the patella of the quadriceps tendon. The rupture was arthroscopically repaired using pull-out fixation of six strand sutures. One year after surgery, MRI revealed a healed tendon and his JOA and Lysholm scores were 95 and 100, respectively. Thus, arthroscopic repair may be a useful surgical method for repairing quadriceps tendon injury. PMID:25815224

  10. Biochemical and anisotropical properties of tendons.

    PubMed

    Aparecida de Aro, Andrea; Vidal, Benedicto de Campos; Pimentel, Edson Rosa

    2012-02-01

    Tendons are formed by dense connective tissue composed of an abundant extracellular matrix (ECM) that is constituted mainly of collagen molecules, which are organized into fibrils, fibers, fiber bundles and fascicles helicoidally arranged along the largest axis of the tendon. The biomechanical properties of tendons are directly related to the organization of the collagen molecules that aggregate to become a super-twisted cord. In addition to collagen, the ECM of tendons is composed of non-fibrillar components, such as proteoglycans and non-collagenous glycoproteins. The capacity of tendons to resist mechanical stress is directly related to the structural organization of the ECM. Collagen is a biopolymer and presents optical anisotropies, such as birefringence and linear dichroism, that are important optical properties in the characterization of the supramolecular organization of the fibers. The objective of this study was to present a review of the composition and organization of the ECM of tendons and to highlight the importance of the anisotropic optical properties in the study of alterations in the ECM.

  11. Flexor Digitorum Longus Tendon Transfer and Modified Kidner Technique in Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Maskill, James T; Pomeroy, Gregory C

    2016-01-01

    The modified Kidner procedure and flexor digitorum longus tendon transfer are common procedures used today when addressing posterior tibial tendon dysfunction. These techniques are often used in conjunction with a combination of osteotomies to correct flatfoot deformity, and have been proved to be reliable and predictable. PMID:26590720

  12. Is the Modified Tardieu Scale in Semi-Standing Position Better Associated with Knee Extension and Hamstring Activity in Terminal Swing than the Supine Tardieu?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faber, Irene R.; Nienhuis, Bart; Rijs, Nique P. A. M.; Geurts, Alexander C. H.; Duysens, Jacques

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether the modified Tardieu scale (MTS) in a semi-standing position, used for the assessment of hamstrings spasticity, was better associated with knee extension and hamstrings activity in terminal swing than the MTS in a supine position in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Seven children diagnosed with…

  13. Hand Rejuvenation: A Comprehensive Review of Fat Grafting.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Don; Orgel, Matthew I; Kulber, David A

    2016-05-01

    Dermal atrophy, bulging reticular veins, and prominent bones and tendons are characteristic of the aging hand. Demand for cosmetic procedures to restore a youthful appearance to the dorsum of the hand has risen in recent years. A review of the literature reveals that of the many options for hand restoration, autologous fat grafting stands out as the most promising choice compared with many available alternative options such as microdermabrasion, peeling agents, and dermal fillers. This article details the surgical technique and relevant anatomy necessary for successful hand rejuvenation. Future advancements may rely on further study into adipose-derived stem cells. PMID:27113709

  14. The effect of decellularized matrices on human tendon stem/progenitor cell differentiation and tendon repair.

    PubMed

    Yin, Zi; Chen, Xiao; Zhu, Ting; Hu, Jia-jie; Song, Hai-xin; Shen, Wei-liang; Jiang, Liu-yun; Heng, Boon Chin; Ji, Jun-feng; Ouyang, Hong-Wei

    2013-12-01

    It is reported that decellularized collagen matrices derived from dermal skin and bone have been clinically used for tendon repair. However, the varying biological and physical properties of matrices originating from different tissues may influence the differentiation of tendon stem cells, which has not been systematically evaluated. In this study, the effects of collagenous matrices derived from different tissues (tendon, bone and dermis) on the cell differentiation of human tendon stem/progenitor cells (hTSPCs) were investigated, in the context of tendon repair. It was found that all three matrices supported the adhesion and proliferation of hTSPCs despite differences in topography. Interestingly, tendon-derived decellularized matrix promoted the tendinous phenotype in hTSPCs and inhibited their osteogenesis, even under osteogenic induction conditions, through modulation of the teno- and osteolineage-specific transcription factors Scleraxis and Runx2. Bone-derived decellularized matrix robustly induced osteogenic differentiation of hTSPCs, whereas dermal skin-derived collagen matrix had no apparent effect on hTSPC differentiation. Based on the specific biological function of the tendon-derived decellularized matrix, a tissue-engineered tendon comprising TSPCs and tendon-derived matrix was successfully fabricated for Achilles tendon reconstruction. Implantation of this cell-scaffold construct led to a more mature structure (histology score: 4.08 ± 0.61 vs. 8.51 ± 1.66), larger collagen fibrils (52.2 ± 1.6 nm vs. 47.5 ± 2.8 nm) and stronger mechanical properties (stiffness: 21.68 ± 7.1 Nm m(-1) vs.13.2 ± 5.9 Nm m(-1)) of repaired tendons compared to the control group. The results suggest that stem cells promote the rate of repair of Achilles tendon in the presence of a tendinous matrix. This study thus highlights the potential of decellularized matrix for future tissue engineering applications, as well as developing a practical strategy for functional tendon

  15. Elastographic characteristics of the metacarpal tendons in horses without clinical evidence of tendon injury.

    PubMed

    Lustgarten, Meghann; Redding, W Rich; Labens, Raphael; Morgan, Michel; Davis, Weston; Seiler, Gabriela S

    2014-01-01

    Tendon and ligament injuries are common causes of impaired performance in equine athletes. Gray-scale ultrasonography is the current standard method for diagnosing and monitoring these injuries, however this modality only provides morphologic information. Elastography is an ultrasound technique that allows detection and measurement of tissue strain, and may provide valuable mechanical information about equine tendon and ligament injuries. The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility, reproducibility, and repeatability of elastography; and to describe elastographic characteristics of metacarpal tendons in sound horses. Nineteen legs for 17 clinically sound horses without evidence of musculoskeletal pathology were included. Elastographic images of the superficial and deep digital flexor tendons and the branches of the suspensory ligament (tendon of the interosseous muscle) were described quantitatively and qualitatively. There was no statistically significant difference between operators (P = 0.86) nor within operators (P = 0.93). For qualitative assessments, reproducibility (0.46) was moderate and repeatability (0.78) was good. Similar to human Achilles tendons, equine tendons were classified as predominantly hard using elastography. There was no statistically significant difference in stiffness of the flexor tendons (P = 0.96). No significant difference in stiffness was found with altered leg position during standing (P = 0.84) and while nonweight bearing (P = 0.61). The flexor tendons were softer when imaged in longitudinal versus transverse planes (P < 0.01) however, the suspensory branches were not (P = 0.67). Findings supported future clinical application of elastography as a noninvasive "stall-side" imaging modality for evaluation of the tendons and ligaments of the distal forelimb in horses.

  16. Recurrent hamstring muscle injury: applying the limited evidence in the professional football setting with a seven-point programme

    PubMed Central

    Brukner, Peter; Nealon, Andrew; Morgan, Christopher; Burgess, Darren; Dunn, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Recurrent hamstring injuries are a major problem in sports such as football. The aim of this paper was to use a clinical example to describe a treatment strategy for the management of recurrent hamstring injuries and examine the evidence for each intervention. A professional footballer sustained five hamstring injuries in a relatively short period of time. The injury was managed successfully with a seven-point programme—biomechanical assessment and correction, neurodynamics, core stability, eccentric strengthening, an overload running programme, injection therapies and stretching/relaxation. The evidence for each of these treatment options is reviewed. It is impossible to be definite about which aspects of the programme contributed to a successful outcome. Only limited evidence is available in most cases; therefore, decisions regarding the use of different treatment modalities must be made by using a combination of clinical experience and research evidence. PMID:23322894

  17. Effect of an eccentrically biased hamstring strengthening home program on knee flexor strength and the length-tension relationship.

    PubMed

    Orishimo, Karl F; McHugh, Malachy P

    2015-03-01

    The purposes of this study were to document relative activation intensities of the hamstrings and gluteus maximus during 4 eccentric hamstring strengthening exercises and to assess the effects of a short-term strengthening program comprised of these exercises on knee flexor strength and the length-tension relationship. Twelve healthy subjects participated in this study. Electromyographic (EMG) activities from the biceps femoris, semitendinosus, and gluteus maximus were recorded as subjects performed (a) standing hip extension with elastic resistance, (b) trunk flexion in single limb stance (diver), (c) standing split (glider), and (d) supine sliding bridge (slider). Baseline isometric knee flexor strength was measured at 90, 70, 50, and 30° of flexion at the knee with the subject seated and the hip flexed to 50° from horizontal. After completing the 4-week training program, strength tests were repeated. Repeated-measures analysis of variance were used to compare EMG activity between muscles and to assess angle-specific strength improvements. Hamstring activity exceeded gluteus maximus activity for resisted hip extension, glider, and slider exercises (p < 0.001) but not for the diver (p = 0.087). Hamstring activation was greatest during the slider and resisted hip extension and lowest during the glider and the diver. Knee flexor strength improved by 9.0% (p = 0.005) but was not angle specific (training by angle p = 0.874). The short-term home training program effectively targeted the hamstrings and resulted in strength gains that were similar at short and long muscle lengths. These data demonstrate that hamstring strength can be improved using eccentrically biased unilateral exercises without the use of weights or other equipments. PMID:25226327

  18. A pilot randomised controlled trial of eccentric exercise to prevent hamstring injuries in community-level Australian Football.

    PubMed

    Gabbe, B J; Branson, R; Bennell, K L

    2006-05-01

    Hamstring injuries are the most common injury sustained by Australian Football players. Eccentric training has been proposed as a potential preventative strategy. This pilot randomised controlled trial (RCT) evaluated the effectiveness of a pre-season eccentric training program for preventing hamstring injuries at the community level of Australian Football. Seven amateur clubs (n=220 players) were recruited. Players were randomised within clubs to the intervention (eccentric exercise) or control (stretching) groups and randomisation was stratified according to previous history of hamstring injury. Five exercise sessions were completed over a 12-week period, three during the pre-season and two during the first 6 weeks of the season. Compliance was recorded and players were monitored for the season to collect injury and participation data. There was no difference between the control (n=106) or intervention (n=114) groups with respect to baseline characteristics. Only 46.8% of all players completed at least two program sessions. Compliance was poorest for the intervention group. Intention-to-treat analysis suggested that players in the intervention group were not at reduced risk of hamstring injury (RR 1.2, 95% CI: 0.5, 2.8). When only control and intervention group players who participated in at least the first two sessions were analysed, 4.0% of intervention and 13.2% of control group players sustained a hamstring injury (RR 0.3, 95% CI: 0.1, 1.4; p=0.098). The findings suggest that a simple program of eccentric exercise could reduce the incidence of hamstring injuries in Australian Football but widespread implementation of this program is not likely because of poor compliance.

  19. Rapid hamstring/quadriceps force capacity in male vs. female elite soccer players.

    PubMed

    Zebis, Mette K; Andersen, Lars L; Ellingsgaard, Helga; Aagaard, Per

    2011-07-01

    Knee joint injuries are a serious issue in soccer. The ability to protect the knee from injury depends largely on the strength of the hamstring relatively to the quadriceps, that is, a low hamstring/quadriceps (H/Q) strength ratio is suggested as a risk factor. Although maximal muscle strength (MVC) has often been used to evaluate the H/Q ratio, the ability to rapidly develop force (rate of force development [RFD]) is more relevant in relation to fast dynamic movements. The aim of this study was to introduce and investigate a rapid RFD H/Q strength ratio compared with the traditional MVC H/Q strength ratio in elite soccer players. Twenty-three elite soccer players (11 women, 12 men) performed maximal voluntary static contraction for the hamstring and quadriceps in an isokinetic dynamometer, from which the maximal muscles strength (MVC) and RFD were extracted. Test-retest reliability for the RFD H/Q ratio was high (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.664-0.933). The initial contraction phase up to 50 milliseconds from the onset of contraction showed a low RFD H/Q ratio compared to the MVC H/Q ratio (p < 0.001). These results suggest a reduced potential for knee joint stabilization during the very initial phase of muscle contraction. Two female players-both with a markedly low RFD H/Q ratio, but a normal MVC H/Q ratio, compared with the group mean-sustained ACL rupture at a later occasion. The high reliability of the new RFD H/Q strength ratio indicates that the method is a relevant tool in standardized clinical evaluation of the knee joint agonist-antagonist relationship.

  20. Effect of modified hold-relax stretching and static stretching on hamstring muscle flexibility.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Hashi