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Sample records for handheld pcr thermocycler

  1. PCR thermocycler

    DOEpatents

    Benett, William J.; Richards, James B.

    2003-01-01

    A sleeve-type silicon polymerase chain reaction (PCR) chamber or thermocycler having improved thermal performance. The silicon sleeve reaction chamber is improved in thermal performance by etched features therein that reduce thermal mass and increase the surface area of the sleeve for cooling. This improved thermal performance of the thermocycler enables an increase in speed and efficiency of the reaction chamber. The improvement is accomplished by providing grooves in the faces of the sleeve and a series of grooves on the interior surfaces that connect with grooves on the faces of the sleeve. The grooves can be anisotropically etched in the silicon sleeve simultaneously with formation of the chamber.

  2. PCR thermocycler

    DOEpatents

    Benett, William J.; Richards, James B.

    2005-05-17

    A sleeve-type silicon polymerase chain reaction (PCR) chamber or thermocycler having improved thermal performance. The silicon sleeve reaction chamber is improved in thermal performance by etched features therein that reduce thermal mass and increase the surface area of the sleeve for cooling. This improved thermal performance of the thermocycler enables an increase in speed and efficiency of the reaction chamber. The improvement is accomplished by providing grooves in the faces of the sleeve and a series of grooves on the interior surfaces that connect with grooves on the faces of the sleeve. The grooves can be anisotropically etched in the silicon sleeve simultaneously with formation of the chamber.

  3. Detection of Francisella tularensis within infected mouse tissues by using a hand-held PCR thermocycler.

    PubMed

    Emanuel, Peter A; Bell, Ryan; Dang, Jessica L; McClanahan, Rebecca; David, John C; Burgess, Robert J; Thompson, Joseph; Collins, Lisa; Hadfield, Ted

    2003-02-01

    The diagnosis of human cases of tularemia often relies upon the demonstration of an antibody response to Francisella tularensis or the direct culturing of the bacteria from the patient. Antibody response is not detectable until 2 weeks or more after infection, and culturing requires special media and suspicion of tularemia. In addition, handling live Francisella poses a risk to laboratory personnel due to the highly infectious nature of this pathogen. In an effort to develop a rapid diagnostic assay for tularemia, we investigated the use of TaqMan 5' hydrolysis fluorogenic PCR to detect the organism in tissues of infected mice. Mice were infected to produce respiratory tularemia. The fopA and tul4 genes of F. tularensis were amplified from infected spleen, lung, liver, and kidney tissues sampled over a 5-day period. The samples were analyzed using the laboratory-based Applied Biosystems International 7900 and the Smiths Detection-Edgewood BioSeeq, a hand-held portable fluorescence thermocycler designed for use in the field. A comparison of culturing and PCR for detection of bacteria in infected tissues shows that culturing was more sensitive than PCR. However, the results for culture take 72 h, whereas PCR results were available within 4 h. PCR was able to detect infection in all the tissues tested. Lung tissue showed the earliest response at 2 days when tested with the ABI 7900 and in 3 days when tested with the BioSeeq. The results were in agreement between the ABI 7900 and the BioSeeq when presented with the same sample. Template preparation may account for the loss of sensitivity compared to culturing techniques. The hand-held BioSeeq thermocycler shows promise as an expedient means of forward diagnosis of infection in the field.

  4. Rapid PCR thermocycling using microscale thermal convection.

    PubMed

    Muddu, Radha; Hassan, Yassin A; Ugaz, Victor M

    2011-03-05

    Many molecular biology assays depend in some way on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to amplify an initially dilute target DNA sample to a detectable concentration level. But the design of conventional PCR thermocycling hardware, predominantly based on massive metal heating blocks whose temperature is regulated by thermoelectric heaters, severely limits the achievable reaction speed(1). Considerable electrical power is also required to repeatedly heat and cool the reagent mixture, limiting the ability to deploy these instruments in a portable format. Thermal convection has emerged as a promising alternative thermocycling approach that has the potential to overcome these limitations(2-9). Convective flows are an everyday occurrence in a diverse array of settings ranging from the Earth's atmosphere, oceans, and interior, to decorative and colorful lava lamps. Fluid motion is initiated in the same way in each case: a buoyancy driven instability arises when a confined volume of fluid is subjected to a spatial temperature gradient. These same phenomena offer an attractive way to perform PCR thermocycling. By applying a static temperature gradient across an appropriately designed reactor geometry, a continuous circulatory flow can be established that will repeatedly transport PCR reagents through temperature zones associated with the denaturing, annealing, and extension stages of the reaction (Figure 1). Thermocycling can therefore be actuated in a pseudo-isothermal manner by simply holding two opposing surfaces at fixed temperatures, completely eliminating the need to repeatedly heat and cool the instrument. One of the main challenges facing design of convective thermocyclers is the need to precisely control the spatial velocity and temperature distributions within the reactor to ensure that the reagents sequentially occupy the correct temperature zones for a sufficient period of time(10,11). Here we describe results of our efforts to probe the full 3-D velocity and

  5. Chemical surface management for micro PCR in silicon chip thermocyclers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felbel, Jana; Bieber, Ivonne; Koehler, Johann M.

    2002-11-01

    Silicon, silicon dioxide, glass and other key materials of micro system technology show an inhibiting effect on PCR. This negative influence becomes seriously, if devices are miniaturized, particularly in case of flow-through devices due to their high surface to volume ratio. In contrast, alkyl-substituted surfaces do not inhibit the reaction. Although the silanization improves the compatibility, the suppression of inhibition by wall surface treatment was not stable over longer time intervals. Therefore, the stability of chemical surface modifications was studied in dependence of silanization, material, pH, temperature and buffer composition. The efficiency of surface covering by molecular substitution was characterized by wetting experiments as well as by PCR test runs. The results show that the surface treatment can be optimized by the choice of silanization agents and the concentration of surface active additives.

  6. Miniaturized detection system for handheld PCR assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, James B.; Benett, William J.; Stratton, Paul; Hadley, Dean R.; Nasarabadi, Shanavaz L.; Milanovich, Fred P.

    2000-12-01

    We have developed and delivered a four chamber, battery powered, handheld instrument referred to as the HANAA which monitors the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) process using a TaqMan based fluorescence assay. The detection system differs form standard configurations in two essential ways. First, the size is miniaturized, with a combined cycling and optics plug-in module for a duplex assay begin about the size of a small box of matches. Second, the detection/analysis system is designed to call a positive sample in real time.

  7. Handheld Real-Time PCR Device

    PubMed Central

    Ahrberg, Christian D.; Ilic, Bojan Robert; Manz, Andreas; Neužil, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Here we report one of the smallest real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) system up to date with approximate size of 100 mm × 60 mm × 33 mm. The system is an autonomous unit requiring an external 12 V power supply. Four simultaneous reactions are performed in form of virtual reaction chambers (VRC) where a ≈ 200 nL sample is covered with mineral oil and placed on a glass cover slip. Fast, 40 cycle amplification of an amplicon from the H7N9 gene was used to demonstrate PCR performance. The standard curve slope was (−3.02 ± 0.16) cycles at threshold per decade (mean ± standard deviation) corresponding to an amplification efficiency of (0.91 ± 0.05) per cycle (mean ± standard deviation). The PCR device was capable of detecting a single deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) copy. These results further suggest that our handheld PCR device may have broad, technologically-relevant applications extending to rapid detection of infectious diseases in small clinics. PMID:26753557

  8. Temperature control for PCR thermocyclers based on peltier-effect thermoelectric.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Xianbo; Yuan, Jingqi

    2005-01-01

    In thermal cycling of polymerase chain reaction, the process recipe is characterized by high ramp rates and short temperature holds. In order to reduce the time taken to complete a standard PCR protocol, a model-based hybrid control configuration is designed to rapidly track the thermal cycling recipe. The hybrid control configuration consists of feedforward, feedback and Bang-Bang actions, of which, the feedforward control is a model predictive control action and improves the dynamic performance of temperature tracking significantly. The model of the thermocycler is identified with step response data at different operating regions. Experimental results demonstrate that the hybrid control strategy performs better than the conventional PID controller both in setpoint response and in steady-state performance of temperature control, so that the accuracy and efficiency of PCR are improved accordingly.

  9. Gene synthesis by integrated polymerase chain assembly and PCR amplification using a high-speed thermocycler

    PubMed Central

    TerMaat, Joel R.; Pienaar, Elsje; Whitney, Scott E.; Mamedov, Tarlan G.; Subramanian, Anuradha

    2013-01-01

    Polymerase chain assembly (PCA) is a technique used to synthesize genes ranging from a few hundred base pairs to many kilobase pairs in length. In traditional PCA, equimolar concentrations of single stranded DNA oligonucleotides are repeatedly hybridized and extended by a polymerase enzyme into longer dsDNA constructs, with relatively few full-length sequences being assembled. Thus, traditional PCA is followed by a second primer-mediated PCR reaction to amplify the desired full-length sequence to useful, detectable quantities. Integration of assembly and primer-mediated amplification steps into a single reaction using a high-speed thermocycler is shown to produce similar results. For the integrated technique, the effects of oligo concentration, primer concentration, and number of oligonucleotides are explored. The technique is successfully demonstrated for the synthesis of two genes encoding EPCR-1 (653 bp) and pUC19 β-lactamase (929 bp) in under 20 min. However, rapid integrated PCA–PCR was found to be problematic when attempted with the TM-1 gene (1509 bp). Partial oligonucleotide sets of TM-1 could be assembled and amplified simultaneously, indicating that the technique may be limited to a maximum number of oligonucleotides due to competitive annealing and competition for primers. PMID:19799938

  10. Rapid screening method for compounds that affect the growth and germination of Candida albicans, using a real-time PCR thermocycler.

    PubMed

    Jarosz, Lucja M; Krom, Bastiaan P

    2011-11-01

    We propose a screening method for compounds affecting growth and germination in Candida albicans using a real-time PCR thermocycler to quantify green fluorescent protein (GFP) fluorescence. Using P(ACT1)-GFP and P(HWP1)-GFP reporter strains, the effects of a wide range of compounds on growth and hyphal formation were quantitatively assessed within 3 h after inoculation.

  11. Automated Forensic Animal Family Identification by Nested PCR and Melt Curve Analysis on an Off-the-Shelf Thermocycler Augmented with a Centrifugal Microfluidic Disk Segment

    PubMed Central

    Zengerle, Roland; von Stetten, Felix; Schmidt, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    Nested PCR remains a labor-intensive and error-prone biomolecular analysis. Laboratory workflow automation by precise control of minute liquid volumes in centrifugal microfluidic Lab-on-a-Chip systems holds great potential for such applications. However, the majority of these systems require costly custom-made processing devices. Our idea is to augment a standard laboratory device, here a centrifugal real-time PCR thermocycler, with inbuilt liquid handling capabilities for automation. We have developed a microfluidic disk segment enabling an automated nested real-time PCR assay for identification of common European animal groups adapted to forensic standards. For the first time we utilize a novel combination of fluidic elements, including pre-storage of reagents, to automate the assay at constant rotational frequency of an off-the-shelf thermocycler. It provides a universal duplex pre-amplification of short fragments of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA and cytochrome b genes, animal-group-specific main-amplifications, and melting curve analysis for differentiation. The system was characterized with respect to assay sensitivity, specificity, risk of cross-contamination, and detection of minor components in mixtures. 92.2% of the performed tests were recognized as fluidically failure-free sample handling and used for evaluation. Altogether, augmentation of the standard real-time thermocycler with a self-contained centrifugal microfluidic disk segment resulted in an accelerated and automated analysis reducing hands-on time, and circumventing the risk of contamination associated with regular nested PCR protocols. PMID:26147196

  12. Droplet centrifugation, droplet DNA extraction, and rapid droplet thermocycling for simpler and faster PCR assay using wire-guided manipulations

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A computer numerical control (CNC) apparatus was used to perform droplet centrifugation, droplet DNA extraction, and rapid droplet thermocycling on a single superhydrophobic surface and a multi-chambered PCB heater. Droplets were manipulated using “wire-guided” method (a pipette tip was used in this study). This methodology can be easily adapted to existing commercial robotic pipetting system, while demonstrated added capabilities such as vibrational mixing, high-speed centrifuging of droplets, simple DNA extraction utilizing the hydrophobicity difference between the tip and the superhydrophobic surface, and rapid thermocycling with a moving droplet, all with wire-guided droplet manipulations on a superhydrophobic surface and a multi-chambered PCB heater (i.e., not on a 96-well plate). Serial dilutions were demonstrated for diluting sample matrix. Centrifuging was demonstrated by rotating a 10 μL droplet at 2300 round per minute, concentrating E. coli by more than 3-fold within 3 min. DNA extraction was demonstrated from E. coli sample utilizing the disposable pipette tip to cleverly attract the extracted DNA from the droplet residing on a superhydrophobic surface, which took less than 10 min. Following extraction, the 1500 bp sequence of Peptidase D from E. coli was amplified using rapid droplet thermocycling, which took 10 min for 30 cycles. The total assay time was 23 min, including droplet centrifugation, droplet DNA extraction and rapid droplet thermocycling. Evaporation from of 10 μL droplets was not significant during these procedures, since the longest time exposure to air and the vibrations was less than 5 min (during DNA extraction). The results of these sequentially executed processes were analyzed using gel electrophoresis. Thus, this work demonstrates the adaptability of the system to replace many common laboratory tasks on a single platform (through re-programmability), in rapid succession (using droplets), and with a high level of

  13. Testing of the Bio-Seeq (Smiths Detection Handheld PCR Instrument): Sensitivity, Specificity, and Effect of Interferents on Bacillus Assay Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-07-01

    Smiths Detection-Edgewood (SDE), Inc., recently developed a handheld PCR instrument, the Bio -Seeq(Trademark), an updated, redesigned version of the...small, portable PCR instrument previously known as the Handheld Advanced Nucleic Acid Analyzer (HANAA). The SDE developed the Bio -Seeq(Trademark) to

  14. Testing of the Bio-Seeq (Smiths Detection Handheld PCR Instrument): Sensitivity, Specificity, and Effect of Interferents on Yersinia Pestis Assay Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    HANDHELD PCR INSTRUMENT): SENSITIVITY, SPECIFICITY, AND EFFECT OF INTERFERENTS ON YERSINIA PESTIS ASSAY PERFORMANCE Kevin P. O’Connell Patricia E...Bio-Seeq® (Smiths Detection Handheld PCR Instrument): Sensitivity, Specificity, and Effect of Interferents on Yersinia pestis Assay 5b. GRANT NUMBER...DIR, ECBC, ATTN: AMSRD-ECB- RT -BM, APG, MD 21010-5424 NUMBER ECBC-TR-437 9. SPONSORING I MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSORIMONITOR’S

  15. Rapid DNA amplification using a battery-powered thin-film resistive thermocycler.

    PubMed

    Herold, Keith E; Sergeev, Nikolay; Matviyenko, Andriy; Rasooly, Avraham

    2009-01-01

    A prototype handheld, compact, rapid thermocycler was developed for multiplex analysis of nucleic acids in an inexpensive, portable configuration. Instead of the commonly used Peltier heating/cooling element, electric thin-film resistive heater and a miniature fan enable rapid heating and cooling of glass capillaries leading to a simple, low-cost Thin-Film Resistive Thermocycler (TFRT). Computer-based pulse width modulation control yields heating rates of 6-7 K/s and cooling rates of 5 K/s. The four capillaries are closely coupled to the heater, resulting in low power consumption. The energy required by a nominal PCR cycle (20 s at each temperature) was found to be 57+/-2 J yielding an average power of approximately 1.0 W (not including the computer and the control system). Thus the device can be powered by a standard 9 V alkaline battery (or other 9 V power supply). The prototype TFRT was demonstrated (in a benchtop configuration) for detection of three important food pathogens (E. coli ETEC, Shigella dysenteriae, and Salmonella enterica). PCR amplicons were analyzed by gel electrophoresis. The 35 cycle PCR protocol using a single channel was completed in less then 18 min. Simple and efficient heating/cooling, low cost, rapid amplification, and low power consumption make the device suitable for portable DNA amplification applications including clinical point of care diagnostics and field use.

  16. Rapid DNA Amplification Using a Battery-Powered Thin-Film Resistive Thermocycler

    PubMed Central

    Herold, Keith E.; Sergeev, Nikolay; Matviyenko, Andriy; Rasooly, Avraham

    2010-01-01

    Summary A prototype handheld, compact, rapid thermocycler was developed for multiplex analysis of nucleic acids in an inexpensive, portable configuration. Instead of the commonly used Peltier heating/cooling element, electric thin-film resistive heater and a miniature fan enable rapid heating and cooling of glass capillaries leading to a simple, low-cost Thin-Film Resistive Thermocycler (TFRT). Computer-based pulse width modulation control yields heating rates of 6–7 K/s and cooling rates of 5 K/s. The four capillaries are closely coupled to the heater, resulting in low power consumption. The energy required by a nominal PCR cycle (20 s at each temperature) was found to be 57 ± 2 J yielding an average power of approximately 1.0 W (not including the computer and the control system). Thus the device can be powered by a standard 9 V alkaline battery (or other 9 V power supply). The prototype TFRT was demonstrated (in a benchtop configuration) for detection of three important food pathogens (E. coli ETEC, Shigella dysenteriae, and Salmonella enterica). PCR amplicons were analyzed by gel electrophoresis. The 35 cycle PCR protocol using a single channel was completed in less then 18 min. Simple and efficient heating/cooling, low cost, rapid amplification, and low power consumption make the device suitable for portable DNA amplification applications including clinical point of care diagnostics and field use. PMID:19159110

  17. Effects of chlorhexidine on bonding durability of different adhesive systems using a novel thermocycling method.

    PubMed

    Deng, D; Huang, X; Huang, C; Yang, T; Du, X; Wang, Y; Ouyang, X; Pei, D

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of chlorhexidine on the bonding durability of etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesive systems using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) thermocycling method. Twenty freshly extracted intact human third molars were ground and bonded with either an etch-and-rinse adhesive (Single-Bond) or a self-etch adhesive (G-Bond). Specimens were either left untouched or placed in PCR tubes filled with three thermocycling mediums: water, chlorhexidine or silicone oil. Thermocycling (5000 cycles) was done using the PCR programme at temperatures of 5 °C and 55 °C. The microtensile bond strength (μTBS) was evaluated and interfacial nanoleakage was assessed by scanning electron microscopy before and after thermocycling. Significant differences were detected among groups kept in different media after thermocycling. For Single-Bond, both the chlorhexidine and silicone oil groups could preserve the μTBS (p < 0.001). For G-Bond, μTBS of the chlorhexidine and water groups were significantly decreased (p < 0.05). No obvious increase in silver deposition was observed in specimens incubated in water after thermocycling, less silver penetration was found in specimens incubated in chlorhexidine. In this experimental model, chlorhexidine was found to preserve bonding durability in Single-Bond but have no significant effects on G-Bond. © 2013 Australian Dental Association.

  18. A quantitative method of measuring the microleakage of thermocycled or non-thermocycled posterior tooth restorations.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Flávio Henrique Baggio; Dos Santos, Alex José Souza; França, Fabiana Mantovani Gomes; Paulillo, Luis Alexandre Maffei Sartini; Lovadino, José Roberto

    2003-01-01

    This study quantified microleakage in restorations made with three packable resin composites-Solitaire, SureFil and P60; one hybrid resin composite-Z250 and an amalgam-Dispersalloy, with or without the thermocycling process. Sixty sound, freshly extracted human molars were sectioned mesiodistally, creating buccal and lingual blocks. One hundred blocks with the flattest surface were selected. Cylindrical cavities with a diameter of 1.85 +/- 0.05 mm and a depth of 1.5 mm were prepared with a special diamond bur. The blocks were randomly assigned to 10 test groups (n = 10): five restorative materials and two thermal stress groups (thermocycled groups at 3,000 cycles at 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C with a dwell time of one minute at each temperature, or non-thermocycled). After the thermocycling test, the samples were immersed in 2% methylene blue for 12 hours. The samples were ground and the powder prepared for analysis in an absorbance spectrophotometer. All the results were statistically analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis test and the Mann Whitney test. For the non-thermocycled groups, the means (microg/ml) of microleakage were: Amalgam-4.279 (a); Solitaire-4.148 (ab); Z250-3.418 (abc); P60-3.184 (bc); SureFil-2.890 (c). For the thermocycled groups, the means were: Amalgam-7.572 (a); Solitaire-5.471 (a); Z250-4.330 (ab); P60-3.418 (bc) and SureFil-2.779 (c). Thermocycling analysis showed no significant differences between the thermocycled and non-thermocycled groups for each material tested. It was concluded that no test material prevented microleakage. Only SureFil and P60 showed leakage means significantly lower than amalgam, with SureFil showing lower leakage than Solitaire. P60 only showed lower leakage than Solitaire in the thermocycled groups and Z250 showed results similar to the others materials.

  19. Handheld Searchlight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Streamlite Inc. reengineered the NASA searchlight for commercial use. The brightest hand-held light yet produced is result of Xenon-arc lights developed as solar simulators at Johnson Space Center. Intense battery powered searchlight is rated a million candlepower - 50 times brighter than high beam headlights of a car, and weighs only 7 pounds. Lifetime of xenon lamp is at least 200 hours at maximum intensity. Retail cost is under $400.00. Company has introduced smaller unit in shape of a flashlight, produces 20,000 candlepower and costs approximately $60.00.

  20. Handheld advanced nucleic acid analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benett, William J.; Richards, James B.; Stratton, Paul; Hadley, Dean R.; Bodtker, Brian H.; Nasarabadi, Shanavaz L.; Milanovich, Fred P.; Mariella, Raymond P., Jr.; Koopman, Ronald P.; Belgrader, Philip

    2000-12-01

    There is a growing need for portable, lightweight, battery operated instruments capable of detecting and identifying bio-warfare and bio-terrorism agents in the field. To address this need, we have developed a handheld PCR instrument. LLNLs advanced thermal cycling technology and expertise with portable, field tested biological instrumentation, combined with the development of real-time, fluorescence based PCR assays, has enabled the development of a very portable, versatile, power efficient PCR instrument with a simplified operating system designed for use by first responders. The heart of the instrument is the sample module, which incorporates the advanced silicon thermal cycler developed at LLNL.

  1. Thermocycling and dwell times in microleakage evaluation for bonded restorations.

    PubMed

    Rossomando, K J; Wendt, S L

    1995-01-01

    To answer criticisms of an insufficient number of cycles in thermocycling in an earlier paper (Wendt et al., 1992), this study was initiated to evaluate the effect of different dwell times during long-term thermocycling in microleakage analysis of bonded restoratives. A total of 90 resin-bonded restorations, Tytin/Liner F, (Kerr/Bisco), APH/Universal Bond 3, (LD Caulk) and Heliomolar/Syntac, (Vivadent), were inserted in Class V preparations in human third molars. Group A restorations were stored in 0.5% basic fuchsin dye for 166 h. Group B restorations were thermocycled for 5000 cycles in 0.5% basic fuchsin dye baths at 5 +/- 1 degrees C and 55 +/- 1 degrees C with a dwell time of 10 s in each bath. Group C was thermocycled as in Group B but with a dwell time of 60 s. Readings by defined criteria were taken from each of two 1 mm sections along the cemental margin. There were no significant differences (p < 0.05) in the extent of dye penetration at the tooth restoration interface for the thermocycled composite restorations when compared to composite restorations with no thermocycling. There was a significant difference (p < 0.05) in the extent of dye penetration at the tooth restoration interface for the thermocycled amalgam restorations when compared to dye-exposed amalgam specimens with no thermocycling. During microleakage analysis, the need for thermocycling is dependent upon the extent the restorative is thermally conductive in relation to its mass. The dwell time should be clinically relevant, i.e., 10 s, and is important only if the restorative is thermally conductive.

  2. Handheld computing in pathology

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seung; Parwani, Anil; Satyanarayanan, Mahadev; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2012-01-01

    Handheld computing has had many applications in medicine, but relatively few in pathology. Most reported uses of handhelds in pathology have been limited to experimental endeavors in telemedicine or education. With recent advances in handheld hardware and software, along with concurrent advances in whole-slide imaging (WSI), new opportunities and challenges have presented themselves. This review addresses the current state of handheld hardware and software, provides a history of handheld devices in medicine focusing on pathology, and presents future use cases for such handhelds in pathology. PMID:22616027

  3. Microleakage of temporary restorations after thermocycling and mechanical loading.

    PubMed

    Mayer, T; Eickholz, P

    1997-05-01

    The marginal seal of four temporary filling materials in endodontic access cavities was examined in vitro after thermocycling and mechanical loading using dye penetration tests and a quantitative marginal analysis of replicas in the SEM. Class I cavities were prepared in 44 extracted human molars and filled either with Cavit, Kalsogen, IRM, or TERM. After setting the reaction and thermocycling procedure, Cavit showed less microleakage in the dye penetration test and fewer marginal crevices in the quantitative marginal analysis. After loading, two Cavit fillings collapsed into the endodontic cavity. The marginal conditions of TERM were comparable to Cavit after thermocycling and mechanical loading. Kalsogen and IRM restorations demonstrated significantly increased microleakage and a higher percentage of marginal crevices after thermocycling and loading. In contrast to dye penetration tests, the effects of different factors on the marginal integrity of temporary fillings can be examined with the replica technique and quantitative marginal analysis.

  4. A power-efficient thermocycler based on induction heating for DNA amplification by polymerase chain reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Debjani; Venkataraman, V.; Mohan, K. Naga; Chandra, H. Sharat; Natarajan, Vasant

    2004-09-01

    We have built a thermocycler based on the principles of induction heating for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of target sequences in DNA samples of interest. The cycler has an average heating rate of ˜0.8 °C/s and a cooling rate of ˜0.5 °C/s, and typically takes ˜4 h to complete a 40-cycle PCR protocol. It is power-efficient (˜6 W per reaction tube), micro-processor controlled, and can be adapted for battery operation. Using this instrument, we have successfully amplified a 350 bp segment from a plasmid and SRY, the human sex determining gene, which occurs as a single-copy sequence in genomic DNA of human males. The PCR products from this thermocycler are comparable to those obtained by the use of commercially available machines. Its easy front-end operation, low-power design, portability and low cost makes it suitable for diagnostic field applications of PCR.

  5. Handheld Theodolite Concept

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    Handheld Theodolite Concept by Alan E. Wetmore ARL-TN-0430 April 2011 Approved...to the originator. Army Research Laboratory Adelphi, MD 20783-1197 ARL-TN-0430 April 2011 Handheld Theodolite Concept Alan E...2011 2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 1 October 2009 to 30 September 2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Handheld Theodolite Concept

  6. A Foothold for Handhelds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joyner, Amy

    2003-01-01

    Handheld computers provide students tremendous computing and learning power at about a 10th the cost of a regular computer. Describes the evolution of handhelds; provides some examples of their uses; and cites research indicating they are effective classroom tools that can improve efficiency and instruction. A sidebar lists handheld resources.…

  7. Bond strength of direct and indirect bonded brackets after thermocycling.

    PubMed

    Daub, Jacob; Berzins, David W; Linn, Brandon James; Bradley, Thomas Gerard

    2006-03-01

    Thermocycling simulates the temperature dynamics in the oral environment. With direct bonding, thermocycling reduces the bond strength of orthodontic adhesives to tooth structure. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strengths (SBS) of one direct and two indirect bonding methods/adhesives after thermocycling. Sixty human premolars were divided into three groups. Teeth in group 1 were bonded directly with Transbond XT. Teeth in group 2 were indirect bonded with Transbond XT/Sondhi Rapid Set, which is chemically cured. Teeth in group 3 were indirect bonded with Enlight LV/Orthosolo and light cured. Each sample was thermocycled between 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C for 500 cycles. Mean SBS in groups 1, 2, and 3 were not statistically significantly different (13.6 +/- 2.9, 12.3 +/- 3.0, and 11.6 +/- 3.2 MPa, respectively; P > .05). However, when these values were compared with the results of a previous study using the same protocol, but without thermocycling, the SBS was reduced significantly (P = .001). Weibull analysis further showed that group 3 had the lowest bonding survival rate at the minimum clinically acceptable bond-strength range. The Adhesive Remnant Index was also determined, and group 2 had a significantly (P < .05) higher percentage of bond failures at the resin/enamel interface.

  8. Microleakage beneath brackets bonded with flowable materials: effect of thermocycling.

    PubMed

    Vicente, Ascensión; Ortiz, Antonio J; Bravo, Luis A

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of thermocycling on microleakage beneath brackets bonded with an orthodontic composite and different flowable materials. Brackets were bonded to 200 bovine incisors divided into five groups: (1) Transbond XT, (2) X-Flow, (3) Dyract-Flow, (4) Admira-Flow, and (5) Beautiful-Flow. Half the teeth in each group were thermocycled. The specimens were dyed with 1 per cent methylene blue for 24 hours to determine the percentage of microleakage into the enamel-adhesive and adhesive-bracket interfaces using image analysis equipment. Data were analysed using the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U-tests (P < 0.05), applying Bonferroni correction when required (P < 0.005). Without thermocycling, microleakage at the enamel-adhesive interface was significantly greater for Admira-Flow than for X-Flow (P < 0.005). At the adhesive-bracket interface, there were no significant differences (P > 0.005). After thermocycling, microleakage of Beautiful-Flow at the enamel-adhesive interface was significantly less than for the other materials tested (P < 0.005), while at the adhesive-bracket interface, Admira-Flow and X-Flow showed significantly more microleakage than Beautiful-Flow and Transbond XT (P < 0.005). Analysis of the effect of thermocycling on each material showed that microleakage increased significantly at the enamel-adhesive interface with Transbond XT (P < 0.05), decreased with Beautiful-Flow (P < 0.05), increased significantly at both interfaces with X-Flow, but not to a statistically significant level with Dyract-Flow and Admira-Flow (P > 0.05). The giomer, Beautiful-Flow, demonstrated the best performance after thermocycling, while composite resins and, in particular, the flowables showed a poorer performance.

  9. Phase transformation changes in thermocycled nickel-titanium orthodontic wires.

    PubMed

    Berzins, David W; Roberts, Howard W

    2010-07-01

    In the oral environment, orthodontic wires will be subject to thermal fluctuations. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of thermocycling on nickel-titanium (NiTi) wire phase transformations. Straight segments from single 27 and 35 degrees C copper NiTi (Ormco), Sentalloy (GAC), and Nitinol Heat Activated (3M Unitek) archwires were sectioned into 5mm segments (n=20). A control group consisted of five randomly selected non-thermocycled segments. The remaining segments were thermocycled between 5 and 55 degrees C with five randomly selected segments analyzed with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC; -100<-->150 degrees C at 10 degrees C/min) after 1000, 5000, and 10,000 cycles. Thermal peaks were evaluated with results analyzed via ANOVA (alpha=0.05). Nitinol HA and Sentalloy did not demonstrate qualitative or quantitative phase transformation behavior differences. Significant differences were observed in some of the copper NiTi transformation temperatures, as well as the heating enthalpy with the 27 degrees C copper NiTi wires (p<0.05). Qualitatively, with increased thermocycling the extent of R-phase in the heating peaks decreased in the 35 degrees C copper NiTi, and an austenite to martensite peak shoulder developed during cooling in the 27 degrees C copper NiTi. Repeated temperature fluctuations may contribute to qualitative and quantitative phase transformation changes in some NiTi wires. Copyright 2010 Academy of Dental Materials. All rights reserved.

  10. Handheld Computing in Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Sandra; Stewart, Thomas E.; Mehta, Sangeeta; Wax, Randy; Lapinsky, Stephen E.

    2003-01-01

    Handheld computers have become a valuable and popular tool in various fields of medicine. A systematic review of articles was undertaken to summarize the current literature regarding the use of handheld devices in medicine. A variety of articles were identified, and relevant information for various medical fields was summarized. The literature search covered general information about handheld devices, the use of these devices to access medical literature, electronic pharmacopoeias, patient tracking, medical education, research, business management, e-prescribing, patient confidentiality, and costs as well as specialty-specific uses for personal digital assistants (PDAs). The authors concluded that only a small number of articles provide evidence-based information about the use of PDAs in medicine. The majority of articles provide descriptive information, which is nevertheless of value. This article aims to increase the awareness among physicians about the potential roles for handheld computers in medicine and to encourage the further evaluation of their use. PMID:12595403

  11. Handhelds, Testing and Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technology & Learning, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Research shows that technology makes a difference in student motivation, engagement, and active learning. It also helps students develop critical thinking, collaboration, and problem-solving skills. Providing each student with his or her own computing device such as a Palm handheld computer and appropriate software can have a great impact. This…

  12. Effect of cryogenic thermocycling treatment on the structure and properties of magnesium alloy AZ91

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, Jiang; Ding, Chen; Qiong, Jiang

    2012-03-01

    The effect of cryogenic thermocycling treatment on the microstructure, mechanical and cryogenic properties of alloy Mg - 9% Al - 0.9% Zn (AZ91) is studied. Thermocycling in the cryogenic range causes a change in the content and distribution of particles of segregations, which is responsible for improvement of the mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of the alloy.

  13. Ranque-Hilsch vortex tube thermocycler for fast DNA amplification and real-time optical detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebmeier, Ryan J.; Whitney, Scott E.; Sarkar, Amitabha; Nelson, Michael; Padhye, Nisha V.; Gogos, George; Viljoen, Hendrik J.

    2004-12-01

    An innovative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) thermocycler capable of performing real-time optical detection is described below. This device utilizes the Ranque-Hilsch vortex tube in a system to efficiently and rapidly cycle three 20 μL samples between the denaturation, annealing, and elongation temperatures. The reaction progress is displayed real-time by measuring the size of a fluorescent signal emitted by SYBR green/double-stranded DNA complexes. This device can produce significant reaction yields with very small amounts of initial DNA, for example, it can amplify 0.25 fg (˜5 copies) of a 96 bp bacteriophage λ-DNA fragment 2.7×1011-fold by performing 45 cycles in less than 12 min. The optical threshold (150% of the baseline intensity) was passed 8 min into the reaction at cycle 34. Besides direct applications, the speed and sensitivity of this device enables it to be used as a scientific instrument for basic studies such as PCR assembly and polymerase kinetics.

  14. Universal handheld micropipette

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beroz, Justin; Hart, A. John

    2016-11-01

    The handheld micropipette is the most ubiquitous instrument for precision handling of microliter-milliliter liquid volumes, which is an essential capability in biology and chemistry laboratories. The range of one pipette is typically adjustable up to 10-fold its minimum volume, requiring the use and maintenance of multiple pipettes for liquid handling across larger ranges. Here we propose a design for a single handheld pipette adjustable from 0.1 μl to 1000 μl (i.e., 104-fold) which spans the range of an entire suite of current commercial pipettes. This is accomplished by placing an elastic diaphragm between the existing pipette body and tip, thereby de-amplifying its native volume range while maintaining its simple manual operating procedure. For proof-of-concept, we adapted a commercial pipette (100-1000 μl nominal range) with a selection of rubber sheets to function as the diaphragms and confirmed the accuracy and precision of drawn volumes are within international ISO-8655 standards across the entire 104-fold volume range. The presence of the diaphragms introduces a nonlinear mechanical behavior and a time-dependency due to heat transfer, however, by model and experiment, these are redressed so as to maintain the pipette's accuracy and precision.

  15. Postirradiation thermocyclic loading of ferritic-martensitic structural materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaeva, L.; Orychtchenko, A.; Petersen, C.; Rybin, V.

    Thermonuclear fusion reactors of the Tokamak-type will be unique power engineering plants to operate in thermocyclic mode only. Ferritic-martensitic stainless steels are prime candidate structural materials for test blankets of the ITER fusion reactor. Beyond the radiation damage, thermomechanical cyclic loading is considered as the most detrimental lifetime limiting phenomenon for the above structure. With a Russian and a German facility for thermal fatigue testing of neutron irradiated materials a cooperation has been undertaken. Ampule devices to irradiate specimens for postirradiation thermal fatigue tests have been developed by the Russian partner. The irradiation of these ampule devices loaded with specimens of ferritic-martensitic steels, like the European MANET-II, the Russian 05K12N2M and the Japanese Low Activation Material F82H-mod, in a WWR-M-type reactor just started. A description of the irradiation facility, the qualification of the ampule device and the modification of the German thermal fatigue facility will be presented.

  16. Evaluation of shear bond strength between dual cure resin cement and zirconia ceramic after thermocycling treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-Jin; Kang, Cheol-Kyun; Oh, Ju-Won

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE This study was performed to evaluate shear bond strength (SBS) between three dual-cured resin cements and silica coated zirconia, before and after thermocycling treatment. MATERIALS AND METHODS Sixty specimens were cut in 15 × 2.75 mm discs using zirconia. After air blasting of 50 µm alumina, samples were prepared by tribochemical silica coating with Rocatec™ plus. The specimens were divided into three groups according to the dual-cure resin cement used: (1) Calibra silane+Calibra®, (2) Monobond S+Multilink® N and (3) ESPN sil+RelyX™ Unicem Clicker. After the resin cement was bonded to the zirconia using a Teflon mold, photopolymerization was carried out. Only 10 specimens in each group were thermocycled 6,000 times. Depending on thermocycling treatment, each group was divided into two subgroups (n=10) and SBS was measured by applying force at the speed of 1 mm/min using a universal testing machine. To find out the differences in SBS according to the types of cements and thermocycling using the SPSS, two-way ANOVA was conducted and post-hoc analysis was performed by Turkey's test. RESULTS In non-thermal aged groups, SBS of Multilink group (M1) was higher than that of Calibra (C1) and Unicem (U1) group (P<.05). Moreover, even after thermocycling treatment, SBS of Multilink group (M2) was higher than the other groups (C2 and U2). All three cements showed lower SBS after the thermocycling than before the treatments. But Multilink and Unicem had a significant difference (P<.05). CONCLUSION In this experiment, Multilink showed the highest SBS before and after thermocycling. Also, bond strengths of all three cements decreased after thermocycling. PMID:25722830

  17. Shear bond strength between an indirect composite veneering material and zirconia ceramics after thermocycling.

    PubMed

    Komine, Futoshi; Kobayashi, Kazuhisa; Saito, Ayako; Fushiki, Ryosuke; Koizumi, Hiroyasu; Matsumura, Hideo

    2009-12-01

    The present study evaluated the shear bond strength between an indirect composite material and zirconium dioxide (zirconia) ceramics after thermocycling. A total of 80 zirconia (Katana) discs were divided into five groups and primed with one of following agents: All Bond 2 Primer B (ABB), Alloy Primer (ALP), AZ Primer (AZP), Estenia Opaque Primer (EOP), and Porcelain Liner M Liquid A (PLA). An indirect composite material (Estenia C&B) was then bonded to the primed zirconia. One-half of the specimens (n = 8) in each group were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 24 h, and the remaining eight specimens were thermocycled 5,000 times before shear bond strength testing. Mean bond strengths before thermocycling varied from 10.1 to 15.6 MPa; bond strengths after thermocycling ranged from 4.3 to 17.6 MPa. The ALP group had the highest strengths after thermocycling; there were no significant differences among the PLA, AZP, and EOP groups. The bond strength values for PLA, AZP, EOP, and ALP did not decrease with thermocycling. The application of an acidic functional monomer containing carboxylic anhydride (4-META), phosphonic acid (6-MHPA), or phosphate monomer (MDP) provided durable bond strength between Estenia C&B indirect composite and Katana zirconia.

  18. The Impact of Thermocycling Process on the Dislodgement Force of Different Endodontic Cements

    PubMed Central

    Saghiri, Mohammad Ali; Asatourian, Armen; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin; Gutmann, James L.; Sheibani, Nader

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of thermocycling (500 cycles, 5°C/55°C) on the push-out bond strength of calcium silicate based cements including WMTA, Nano-WMTA, and Bioaggregate to root dentin. Forty-eight dentin slices were prepared and divided into 3 groups (n = 16) and filled with Angelus WMTA, Nano-WMTA, or Bioaggregate. After incubation, half of the samples were thermocycled while the other half remained untreated. Push-out bond strength was calculated, and the modes of the bond failures were determined by SEM. The highest bond strength was seen in nonthermocycled Nano-WMTA samples and the lowest in thermocycled Bioaggregate samples. The significant differences between nonthermocycled and thermocycled samples were only noticed in WMTA and Nano-WMTA groups (P < 0.001). The mode of failure for thermocycled samples of all three cements was mostly cohesive. Thermocycling process can drastically affect the push-out bond strength of calcium silicate based cements. The intrastructural damages occurred due to the thermal stresses, causing cohesive failures in set materials. Sealing property of endodontic cements which have experienced the thermal stresses can be jeopardized due to occlusal forces happening in furcation cites. PMID:24063004

  19. Handheld CZT radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Murray, William S.; Butterfield, Kenneth B.; Baird, William

    2004-08-24

    A handheld CZT radiation detector having a CZT gamma-ray sensor, a multichannel analyzer, a fuzzy-logic component, and a display component is disclosed. The CZT gamma-ray sensor may be a coplanar grid CZT gamma-ray sensor, which provides high-quality gamma-ray analysis at a wide range of operating temperatures. The multichannel analyzer categorizes pulses produce by the CZT gamma-ray sensor into channels (discrete energy levels), resulting in pulse height data. The fuzzy-logic component analyzes the pulse height data and produces a ranked listing of radioisotopes. The fuzzy-logic component is flexible and well-suited to in-field analysis of radioisotopes. The display component may be a personal data assistant, which provides a user-friendly method of interacting with the detector. In addition, the radiation detector may be equipped with a neutron sensor to provide an enhanced mechanism of sensing radioactive materials.

  20. Handheld Universal Diagnostic Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Eugene

    2012-01-01

    The rHEALTH technology is designed to shrink an entire hospital testing laboratory onto a handheld device. A physician or healthcare provider performs the test by collecting a fingerstick of blood from a patient. The tiny volume of blood is inserted into the rHEALTH device. Inside the device is a microfluidic chip that contains small channels about the width of a human hair. These channels help move the blood and analyze the blood sample. The rHEALTH sensor uses proprietary reagents called nanostrips, which are nanoscale test strips that enable the clinical assays. The readout is performed by laser-induced fluorescence. Overall, the time from blood collection through analysis is less than a minute.

  1. Handheld THz security imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duling, Irl N.

    2016-05-01

    Terahertz energy, with its ability to penetrate clothing and non-conductive materials, has held much promise in the area of security scanning. Millimeter wave systems (300 GHz and below) have been widely deployed. These systems have used full two-dimensional surface imaging, and have resulted in privacy concerns. Pulsed terahertz imaging, can detect the presence of unwanted objects without the need for two-dimensional photographic imaging. With high-speed waveform acquisition it is possible to create handheld tools that can be used to locate anomalies under clothing or headgear looking exclusively at either single point waveforms or cross-sectional images which do not pose a privacy concern. Identification of the anomaly to classify it as a potential threat or a benign object is also possible.

  2. Tensile Bond Strength between Soft Liners and Two Chemically Different Denture Base Materials: Effect of Thermocycling.

    PubMed

    Tugut, Faik; Coskun, Mehmet Emre; Dogan, Derya Ozdemir; Kirmali, Omer; Akin, Hakan

    2016-06-01

    The bond strength of soft denture liner to a recently introduced denture base resin after thermocycling has not been compared to traditional denture base materials. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of thermocycling on the tensile bond strength of soft denture liners to two chemically different denture base resins, polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and urethane dimethacrylate (UDMA). A total of 48 PMMA and UDMA tensile test specimens were fabricated by attaching two different soft denture liners (Molloplast-B, Permaflex) according to the manufacturers' instructions and assigned to two groups. Half of the specimens for each group were stored in water for 1 week, and the other half were thermocycled (5000 cycles) between baths of 5°C and 55°C. Specimens were mounted on a universal testing machine with a 5 mm/min crosshead speed. The data were analyzed with three-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey-Kramer multiple comparisons tests (α = 0.05). The highest bond strength was measured in the specimens from the UDMA/Molloplast groups, and the lowest was seen in the PMMA/Permaflex group. No significant difference in bond strength was detected in PMMA/Permaflex groups after thermocycling (p = 0.082), whereas other groups exhibited significant differences after thermocycling (p < 0.05). Thermocycling decreased the bond strength values in both the PMMA and UDMA groups. Regardless of types of soft liners, PMMA specimens presented lower bond strength values than UDMA specimens, both before and after thermocycling. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  3. Handheld computers in critical care

    PubMed Central

    Lapinsky, Stephen E; Weshler, Jason; Mehta, Sangeeta; Varkul, Mark; Hallett, Dave; Stewart, Thomas E

    2001-01-01

    Background Computing technology has the potential to improve health care management but is often underutilized. Handheld computers are versatile and relatively inexpensive, bringing the benefits of computers to the bedside. We evaluated the role of this technology for managing patient data and accessing medical reference information, in an academic intensive-care unit (ICU). Methods Palm III series handheld devices were given to the ICU team, each installed with medical reference information, schedules, and contact numbers. Users underwent a 1-hour training session introducing the hardware and software. Various patient data management applications were assessed during the study period. Qualitative assessment of the benefits, drawbacks, and suggestions was performed by an independent company, using focus groups. An objective comparison between a paper and electronic handheld textbook was achieved using clinical scenario tests. Results During the 6-month study period, the 20 physicians and 6 paramedical staff who used the handheld devices found them convenient and functional but suggested more comprehensive training and improved search facilities. Comparison of the handheld computer with the conventional paper text revealed equivalence. Access to computerized patient information improved communication, particularly with regard to long-stay patients, but changes to the software and the process were suggested. Conclusions The introduction of this technology was well received despite differences in users' familiarity with the devices. Handheld computers have potential in the ICU, but systems need to be developed specifically for the critical-care environment. PMID:11511337

  4. The effect of thermocycling on tensile bond strength of two soft liners.

    PubMed

    Geramipanah, Farideh; Ghandari, Masoumeh; Zeighami, Somayeh

    2013-09-01

    Failure of soft liners depends mostly on separation from the denture base resin; therefore measurement of the bond strength is very important. The purpose of this study was to compare the tensile bond strength of two soft liners (Acropars, Molloplast-B) to denture base resin before and after thermocycling. Twenty specimens fromeach of the two different soft liners were processed according to the manufacturer's instructions between two polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) sheets. Ten specimens in each group were maintained in 37°C water for 24 hours and 10 were thermocycled (5000 cycles) among baths of 5° and 55°C. The tensile bond strength was measured using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 5 mm/min. Mode of failure was determined with SEM (magnification ×30). Two-way ANOVA was used to analyze the data. The mean and standard deviation of tensile bond strength of Acropars and Molloplast-B before thermocycling were 6.59±1.85 and1.51±0.22 MPa, respectively and 5.89±1.52 and1.37±0.18 MPa, respectively after thermocycling. There was no significant difference before and after thermocycling. Mode of failure in Acropars and Molloplast-B were adhesive and cohesive, respectivley. The bond strength of Acropars was significantly higher than Molloplast-B (P<0.05).

  5. The effect of thermocycling on the determination of microleakage in Permite amalgam restorations.

    PubMed

    Rajbaran, S; Dannheimer, M; De Wet, F

    2009-10-01

    Microleakage is an important clinical performance parameter of restorative materials. A literature review of the effect of thermocycling on microleakage revealed an incongruity of results. The aim of this study was to describe the effect of thermocycling on microleakage in Class V Permite amalgam restorations. Class V cavities were prepared at the mesial and distal cemento-enamel junctions of 20 extracted, sound, human molar teeth. Cavities were treated with Polyvar cavity varnish and restored with Permite amalgam as per manufacturer's directions. Teeth were randomly divided into two groups of 10 teeth each. After one day only one group was thermocycled for 500 hundred cycles (5 - 55 degrees C; dwell time of 30 seconds: transfer time of 10 seconds). Teeth were subsequently submersed in 0.5% Basic Fuchsin solution (24 hours: room temperature), then cleaned and embedded in polyester potting resin. Teeth were sectioned longitudinally along the long axis of the tooth into three slices using the Isomet low speed saw. Microleakage was scored under a light microscope at 10 times magnification. While microleakage at cementum margins was significantly and negatively influenced by thermocycling, enamel margins appeared to be significantly unaffected. The effect of thermocycling on the determination of microleakage was only significant at the cementum margins of Permite restorations.

  6. Handheld Diffusion Test Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This photo shows the Handheld Diffusion Test Cell (HH-DTC) apparatus flown on the Space Shuttle. Similar cells (inside the plastic box) will be used in the Observable Protein Crystal Growth Apparatus (OPCGA) to be operated aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The principal investigator is Dr. Alex McPherson of the University of California, Irvine. Each individual cell comprises two sample chambers with a rotating center section that isolates the two from each other until the start of the experiment and after it is completed. The cells are made from optical-quality quartz glass to allow photography and interferometric observations. Each cell has a small light-emitting diode and lens to back-light the solution. In protein crystal growth experiments, a precipitating agent such as a salt solution is used to absorb and hold water but repel the protein molecules. This increases the concentration of protein until the molecules nucleate to form crystals. This cell is one of 96 that make up the experiment module portion of the OPCGA.

  7. Pyxis handheld polarimetric imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenault, David B.; Pezzaniti, J. Larry; Vaden, Justin P.

    2016-05-01

    The instrumentation for measuring infrared polarization signatures has seen significant advancement over the last decade. Previous work has shown the value of polarimetric imagery for a variety of target detection scenarios including detection of manmade targets in clutter and detection of ground and maritime targets while recent work has shown improvements in contrast for aircraft detection and biometric markers. These data collection activities have generally used laboratory or prototype systems with limitations on the allowable amount of target motion or the sensor platform and usually require an attached computer for data acquisition and processing. Still, performance and sensitivity have been steadily getting better while size, weight, and power requirements have been getting smaller enabling polarimetric imaging for a greater or real world applications. In this paper, we describe Pyxis®, a microbolometer based imaging polarimeter that produces live polarimetric video of conventional, polarimetric, and fused image products. A polarization microgrid array integrated in the optical system captures all polarization states simultaneously and makes the system immune to motion artifacts of either the sensor or the scene. The system is battery operated, rugged, and weighs about a quarter pound, and can be helmet mounted or handheld. On board processing of polarization and fused image products enable the operator to see polarimetric signatures in real time. Both analog and digital outputs are possible with sensor control available through a tablet interface. A top level description of Pyxis® is given followed by performance characteristics and representative data.

  8. Comparative strength of metal-ceramic and metal-composite bonds after extended thermocycling.

    PubMed

    Shimoe, S; Tanoue, N; Yanagida, H; Atsuta, M; Koizumi, H; Matsumura, H

    2004-07-01

    The relative strengths of ceramic-to-metal and composite-to-metal bonds were compared after prolonged thermocycling. A total of 104 cast discs were produced from a gold alloy (Pontor LFC). A ceramic material (Duceragold) was fused to 24 discs to assess the strength of the metal-ceramic bond. An indirect composite material (New Metacolor Infis) was bonded to the remaining discs after surface preparation by Rocatec tribochemical coating, tin plating and priming with a phosphate conditioner [10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (MDP), Cesead II], priming with a thione conditioner (V-Primer) or no treatment (unprimed control). Shear bond strengths were determined before and after thermocycling at 20,000 and 100,000 cycles. Pre-thermocycling bond strengths were ranked in the order: metal-ceramic (40.5 MPa); Rocatec treatment (33.1 MPa) and tin plating-MDP (31.0 MPa); V-Primer (20.9 MPa); and control (11.9 MPa). The bond strengths of the first three groups were not significantly different after 20,000 thermocycles, whereas those of the V-Primer and control groups were significantly reduced. After extended thermocycling (100,000 cycles) the metal-ceramic group had the highest mean shear bond strength (28.5 MPa; P < 0.05), followed by the Rocatec (23.9 MPa) and tin plating-MDP (22.1 MPa) groups. The metal-ceramic bond was the most durable, although its strength was reduced by 29.6% after extended thermocycling. On the basis of these results, we recommend the Rocatec and tin plating-MDP systems for composite-to-metal bonding. Metal-ceramic bonding, however, is superior to metal-composite bonding within the limitation of the current experiment.

  9. Real-Time PCR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evrard, A.; Boulle, N.; Lutfalla, G. S.

    Over the past few years there has been a considerable development of DNA amplification by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and real-time PCR has now superseded conventional PCR techniques in many areas, e.g., the quantification of nucleic acids and genotyping. This new approach is based on the detection and quantification of a fluorescent signal proportional to the amount of amplicons generated by PCR. Real-time detection is achieved by coupling a thermocycler with a fluorimeter. This chapter discusses the general principles of quantitative real-time PCR, the different steps involved in implementing the technique, and some examples of applications in medicine. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) provides a way of obtaining a large number of copies of a double-stranded DNA fragment of known sequence. This DNA amplification technique, developed in 1985 by K. Mullis (Cetus Corporation), saw a spectacular development over the space of a few years, revolutionising the methods used up to then in molecular biology. Indeed, PCR has many applications, such as the detection of small amounts of DNA, cloning, and quantitative analysis (assaying), each of which will be discussed further below.

  10. New generation handheld hyperspectral imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Huawen (Owen); Li, Hui; Tang, Shengjun

    2016-10-01

    A miniaturized hyper-spectral imager is enabled with image sensor integrated with dispersing elements in a very compact form factor, removing the need for expensive, moving, bulky and complex optics that have been used in conventional hyper-spectral imagers for decades. The result is a handheld spectral imager that can be installed on miniature UAV drones or conveyor belts in production lines. Eventually, small handhelds can be adapted for use in outpatient medical clinics for point-of-care diagnostics and other in-field applications.

  11. Effect of Bleaching and Thermocycling on Resin-Enamel Bond Strength

    PubMed Central

    Moosavi, Horieh; Mohammadipour, Hamideh Sadat; Ghavamnasiri, Marjaneh; Alizadeh, Sanaz

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of bleaching and thermocycling on microshear bond strength of bonded resin composites to enamel. Enamel slices were prepared from ninety-six intact human premolars and resin composite cylinders were bonded by using Adper Single Bond 2 + Filtek Z350 or Filtek silorane adhesive and resin composite. Each essential group was randomly subdivided to two subgroups: control and bleaching. In bleaching group, 35% hydrogen peroxide was applied on samples. Thermocycling procedure was conducted between 5°C and 55°C, for 3.000 cycles on the half of each subgroup specimen. Then microshear bond strength was tested. Methacrylate-based resin composite had higher bond strength than silorane-based one. The meyhacrylate-based group without bleaching along with thermocycling showed the most bond strength, while bleaching with 35% carbamide peroxide on silorane-based group without thermocycling showed the least microshear bond strength. Bleaching caused a significant degradation on shear bond strength of silorane-based resin composites that bonded using self-etch adhesive resin systems. PMID:26839550

  12. Effects of thermocycling on the degree of cure of two lingual retainer composites.

    PubMed

    Catalbas, Bulent; Uysal, Tancan; Nur, Metin; Demir, Abdullah; Gunduz, Beniz

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of thermocycling on the degree of cure (DC) and water sorption behavior of two lingual retainer composites. A total of 50 composite specimens, 5 mm diameter and 2 mm height, were prepared using Light Cure Retainer (LCR) (Reliance) and Transbond Lingual Retainer (TLR) (3M Unitek). After 40-second curing with a halogen light and after 24-hour water storage, the composite specimens were subjected to different thermocycling regimes. Absorbance peaks to monitor the DC were recorded using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, while water sorption was calculated in microg/mm(3). On DC, significant differences among the different thermocycling regimes were observed only for the TLR specimens (p<0.05). On water sorption behavior, an increase in the number of thermal cycles resulted in increased water sorption for both composites, but the statistical differences in these groups were not significant. On the effect of thermocycling up to 20,000 cycles, present findings showed that LCR was less affected than TLR. Further, LCR exhibited higher DC and lower water sorption values than TLR after thermal cycling.

  13. New Clothing for Handheld Devices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2013-01-01

    Clothing is influenced by many factors, trends, and social happenings. Much of what is worn today had utilitarian roots in the past. In the activitiy presented in this article, students will have the opportunity to redesign clothing for new trends, in this case, the explosion of handheld electronic devices.

  14. Handheld Concealed Weapons Detector Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-03-01

    Enforcement, Edward M. Carapezza, Donald Spector, Eds., Proc. SPIE 2938, 110 - 119 (1997). 3. Franklin Felber, Norbert Wild, Scott Nunan , Dennis Breuner... Nunan , D. Breuner, and F. Doft, "Handheld Ultrasound Concealed-Weapons Detector," in Enforcement and Security Technologies, A. Trent DePersia, J. J

  15. Handheld Broadband Electromagnetic UXO Sensor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE DEC 2006 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Handheld Broadband Electromagnetic...SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER(S) 12. DISTRIBUTION/AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for public release , distribution unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY...6 2.1.2.1 Response Stage Algorithms ....................................................... 6 2.1.2.2 Discrimination Stage Algorithms

  16. New Clothing for Handheld Devices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2013-01-01

    Clothing is influenced by many factors, trends, and social happenings. Much of what is worn today had utilitarian roots in the past. In the activitiy presented in this article, students will have the opportunity to redesign clothing for new trends, in this case, the explosion of handheld electronic devices.

  17. Hand-held medical robots.

    PubMed

    Payne, Christopher J; Yang, Guang-Zhong

    2014-08-01

    Medical robots have evolved from autonomous systems to tele-operated platforms and mechanically-grounded, cooperatively-controlled robots. Whilst these approaches have seen both commercial and clinical success, uptake of these robots remains moderate because of their high cost, large physical footprint and long setup times. More recently, researchers have moved toward developing hand-held robots that are completely ungrounded and manipulated by surgeons in free space, in a similar manner to how conventional instruments are handled. These devices provide specific functions that assist the surgeon in accomplishing tasks that are otherwise challenging with manual manipulation. Hand-held robots have the advantages of being compact and easily integrated into the normal surgical workflow since there is typically little or no setup time. Hand-held devices can also have a significantly reduced cost to healthcare providers as they do not necessitate the complex, multi degree-of-freedom linkages that grounded robots require. However, the development of such devices is faced with many technical challenges, including miniaturization, cost and sterility, control stability, inertial and gravity compensation and robust instrument tracking. This review presents the emerging technical trends in hand-held medical robots and future development opportunities for promoting their wider clinical uptake.

  18. Stability of bonds made to superficial vs. deep dentin, before and after thermocycling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Wang, Dan-yang; Fan, Jing; Li, Fang; Chen, Yu-jiang; Chen, Ji-hua

    2014-11-01

    Bonding stability of resinous adhesives to dentin is still problematic and may involve regional variations in dentin composition. This study is to evaluate the effect of dentin depth on the stability of resin-dentin bonds under thermocycling challenge. Dentin slabs with two flat surfaces parallel to the tooth axis were obtained from extracted human third molars. The slabs were randomized into eight groups according to the location of dentin [deep dentin (DD) or superficial dentin (SD)], the adhesive treatment (Single Bond 2 or Clearfil S(3) Bond), and the storage treatment (thermocycling for 5000 times vs. no). After the adhesive treatment and composite buildup on the dentin slabs, the micro-shear bond strength (μSBS) of each group was detected. The concentrations of cross-linked carboxyterminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP) were also evaluated using an immunoassay to detect the degree of collagen degradation in each group. Dentin depth, adhesive treatment and storage treatment all showed significant effects on both the μSBSs and the ICTP values (P<0.05). Regardless of the adhesive type, thermocycling decreased the μSBSs and increased the ICTP values (P<0.05). The DD groups showed significantly lower μSBSs and higher ICTP values than SD groups after thermocycling aging (P<0.05). The treatment with Single Bond 2 significantly increased the ICTP values (P<0.05), whereas Clearfil S(3) Bond showed no effect on the ICTP values (P>0.05). Deep dentin showed significantly more bond degradation after thermocycling than did superficial dentin. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Handheld vibration effects shoulder motion.

    PubMed

    Tripp, B L; Eberman, L E; Dwelly, P M

    2009-12-01

    We explored effects of handheld vibration on glenohumeral motion in competitive overhead-throwing athletes. We used a randomized, blinded pre-test post-test cross-over design. Each arm of each subject experienced 2 conditions (1-control, 1-experimental), each with pre-test and post-test measures; the order of which was randomized. Participants included Division-I baseball and softball players (n=35: age=20+/-2 yr, height=178+/-9 cm, mass=84+/-12 kg, years of sport participation=13+/-4 yrs). During the experimental condition, participants held a vibrating (2.2 mm, 15 Hz, 20 s), 2.55 kg (5.62 lbs) Mini-VibraFlex dumbbell (Orthometric, New York, NY) in neutral glenohumeral rotation. During the control condition, participants held the still dumbbell (0 mm, 0 Hz, 20 s). Participants rested one min after each trial (3). We used a digital protractor to assess range of motion bilaterally, employing a standard technique for measuring maximal internal (IR) and external rotation (ER). Repeated-measures analyses of variance indicated that range of dominant IR increased 6.8% ( P=0.001, ES=0.16) after handheld vibration. Handheld vibration did not affect range of dominant ER ( P>0.05, 1-beta=0.20), non-dominant IR ( P>0.05, 1-beta=0.41), or non-dominant ER ( P>0.05, 1-beta=0.05). Short bouts of handheld vibration increased dominant IR in collegiate baseball and softball athletes. These results suggest that handheld vibration may help maintain glenohumeral IR that is vital to the healthy and competitive throwing shoulder.

  20. Designing Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) Primer Multiplexes in the Forensic Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elkins, Kelly M.

    2011-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a common experiment in upper-level undergraduate biochemistry, molecular biology, and forensic laboratory courses as reagents and thermocyclers have become more affordable for institutions. Typically, instructors design PCR primers to amplify the region of interest and the students prepare their samples for…

  1. Designing Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) Primer Multiplexes in the Forensic Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elkins, Kelly M.

    2011-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a common experiment in upper-level undergraduate biochemistry, molecular biology, and forensic laboratory courses as reagents and thermocyclers have become more affordable for institutions. Typically, instructors design PCR primers to amplify the region of interest and the students prepare their samples for…

  2. Handheld ultrasound array imaging device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Juin-Jet; Quistgaard, Jens

    1999-06-01

    A handheld ultrasound imaging device, one that weighs less than five pounds, has been developed for diagnosing trauma in the combat battlefield as well as a variety of commercial mobile diagnostic applications. This handheld device consists of four component ASICs, each is designed using the state of the art microelectronics technologies. These ASICs are integrated with a convex array transducer to allow high quality imaging of soft tissues and blood flow in real time. The device is designed to be battery driven or ac powered with built-in image storage and cineloop playback capability. Design methodologies of a handheld device are fundamentally different to those of a cart-based system. As system architecture, signal and image processing algorithm as well as image control circuit and software in this device is deigned suitably for large-scale integration, the image performance of this device is designed to be adequate to the intent applications. To elongate the battery life, low power design rules and power management circuits are incorporated in the design of each component ASIC. The performance of the prototype device is currently being evaluated for various applications such as a primary image screening tool, fetal imaging in Obstetrics, foreign object detection and wound assessment for emergency care, etc.

  3. Evaluation of bovine and human teeth exposed to thermocycling for microleakage under bonded metal brackets.

    PubMed

    Canbek, Kerem; Karbach, Mareike; Gottschalk, Franziska; Erbe, Christina; Wehrbein, Heinrich

    2013-03-01

    Bovine teeth are commonly used as substitutes for human teeth in scientific investigations. The present study was performed in vitro with the objective of comparing bovine and human enamel subjected to thermocycling for microleakage beneath metal brackets. A total of 50 bovine and human teeth (25 per group) void of defects or carious decay were extracted and stored in chloramine B (0.5%). A light-curing adhesive (Transbond™ XT) was used as instructed by the manufacturer (3M Unitek, Monrovia, CA, USA) to bond a metal bracket (discovery®; Dentaurum, Ispringen, Germany) to the surface of each tooth following 30 s of enamel etching (phosphoric acid 35%). After 24 h of dye penetration in methylene blue (0.5%), the cervical and incisal bracket surfaces were analyzed by light microscopy for excess bonding material, dye penetration, and microleakage at the bracket-adhesive and adhesive-enamel interfaces. Staining and evaluation was repeated after thermocycling (5000 cycles at 5/55 °C). Before thermocycling, the number of human teeth showing marginal gaps was one-third the number of bovine teeth (p<0.001). After thermocycling, the distribution of gaps was similar (p=0.180). The adhesive-enamel interface was most frequently affected (on 74% of human and 64% of bovine teeth). No dye penetration in either group after examining a horizontal slice through the bracket basis was observed. Immediately after bonding, less microleakage was observed around the base of metal brackets on human than bovine teeth. These marginal gaps were, however, superficial in both groups, none of them involving deep penetration of dye under the bracket base.

  4. Thermocyclic stability of candidate Seebeck coefficient standard reference materials at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Joshua; Wong-Ng, Winnie; Caillat, Thierry; Yonenaga, I.; Green, Martin L.

    2014-05-01

    The Seebeck coefficient is the most widely measured property specific to thermoelectric materials. There is currently no consensus on measurement protocols, and researchers employ a variety of techniques to measure the Seebeck coefficient. The implementation of standardized measurement protocols and the use of reliable Seebeck Coefficient Standard Reference Materials (SRMs®) will allow the accurate interlaboratory comparison and validation of materials data, thereby accelerating the development and commercialization of more efficient thermoelectric materials and devices. To enable members of the thermoelectric materials community the means to calibrate Seebeck coefficient measurement equipment, NIST certified SRM® 3451 "Low Temperature Seebeck Coefficient Standard (10 K to 390 K)". Due to different practical requirements in instrumentation, sample contact methodology, and thermal stability, a complementary SRM® is required for the high temperature regime (300 K to 900 K). The principal requirement of a SRM® for the Seebeck coefficient at high temperature is thermocyclic stability. We therefore characterized the thermocyclic behavior of the Seebeck coefficient for a series of candidate materials: constantan, p-type single crystal SiGe, and p-type polycrystalline SiGe, by measuring the temperature dependence of the Seebeck coefficient as a function of 10 sequential thermal cycles, between 300 K and 900 K. We employed multiple regression analysis to interpolate and analyze the thermocyclic variability in the measurement curves.

  5. The effect of thermocycling on the adhesion of self-etching adhesives on dental enamel and dentin.

    PubMed

    El-Araby, Alaa Morsy; Talic, Yousef F

    2007-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effectiveness of one total-etch self-priming adhesive and two one-step self-etching adhesive systems on the adhesion of a resin composite to both dentin and enamel. The effect of thermocycling on the adhesion was also investigated. The null hypothesis tested was thermocycling would not affect bond strengths to enamel and dentin treated with self-etching adhesives or a total-etch adhesive. Two single-step self-etching adhesives [Xeno III (XE3) and Prompt L-Pop (PP)] and one two-step total-etch adhesive system (Prime & Bond NT) (P&B NT) were used in this study. Thirty caries-free unrestored human third molars were used to make specimens of enamel and dentin. Different adhesives were applied on enamel and dentin surfaces according to the manufacturer's instructions then hybrid composite restorative material was condensed on the surface using a mold. The bonded specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 masculineC for 24 hours before being tested. Half of the bonded specimens were tested for shear bond strength without thermocycling. The other half of the test specimens were thermocycled using a thermocycling apparatus in water baths held at 5 masculineC and 55 masculineC with a dwell time of one minute each for 10,000 cycles prior to shear testing. The mean shear bond strength before and after thermocycling was calculated, and the results were subjected to two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and repeated measure design to show the interaction between different materials and different times. The results showed shear bond strength on both enamel and dentin of the total-etch adhesive and the self-etching adhesives decreased after the specimens were subjected to thermocycling. The null hypothesis tested "thermocycling would not affect bond strengths treated with self-etching adhesives" was rejected. Furthermore, the study revealed the following: 1. The shear bond strength to both enamel and dentin of the total

  6. A Handheld Point-of-Care Genomic Diagnostic System

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Frank B.; Henrikson, Richard H.; Bone, Jennifer; Lee, Luke P.

    2013-01-01

    The rapid detection and identification of infectious disease pathogens is a critical need for healthcare in both developed and developing countries. As we gain more insight into the genomic basis of pathogen infectivity and drug resistance, point-of-care nucleic acid testing will likely become an important tool for global health. In this paper, we present an inexpensive, handheld, battery-powered instrument designed to enable pathogen genotyping in the developing world. Our Microfluidic Biomolecular Amplification Reader (µBAR) represents the convergence of molecular biology, microfluidics, optics, and electronics technology. The µBAR is capable of carrying out isothermal nucleic acid amplification assays with real-time fluorescence readout at a fraction of the cost of conventional benchtop thermocyclers. Additionally, the µBAR features cell phone data connectivity and GPS sample geotagging which can enable epidemiological surveying and remote healthcare delivery. The µBAR controls assay temperature through an integrated resistive heater and monitors real-time fluorescence signals from 60 individual reaction chambers using LEDs and phototransistors. Assays are carried out on PDMS disposable microfluidic cartridges which require no external power for sample loading. We characterize the fluorescence detection limits, heater uniformity, and battery life of the instrument. As a proof-of-principle, we demonstrate the detection of the HIV-1 integrase gene with the µBAR using the Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP) assay. Although we focus on the detection of purified DNA here, LAMP has previously been demonstrated with a range of clinical samples, and our eventual goal is to develop a microfluidic device which includes on-chip sample preparation from raw samples. The µBAR is based entirely around open source hardware and software, and in the accompanying online supplement we present a full set of schematics, bill of materials, PCB layouts, CAD drawings

  7. A smartphone controlled handheld microfluidic liquid handling system.

    PubMed

    Li, Baichen; Li, Lin; Guan, Allan; Dong, Quan; Ruan, Kangcheng; Hu, Ronggui; Li, Zhenyu

    2014-10-21

    Microfluidics and lab-on-a-chip technologies have made it possible to manipulate small volume liquids with unprecedented resolution, automation and integration. However, most current microfluidic systems still rely on bulky off-chip infrastructures such as compressed pressure sources, syringe pumps and computers to achieve complex liquid manipulation functions. Here, we present a handheld automated microfluidic liquid handling system controlled by a smartphone, which is enabled by combining elastomeric on-chip valves and a compact pneumatic system. As a demonstration, we show that the system can automatically perform all the liquid handling steps of a bead-based HIV1 p24 sandwich immunoassay on a multi-layer PDMS chip without any human intervention. The footprint of the system is 6 × 10.5 × 16.5 cm, and the total weight is 829 g including battery. Powered by a 12.8 V 1500 mAh Li battery, the system consumed 2.2 W on average during the immunoassay and lasted for 8.7 h. This handheld microfluidic liquid handling platform is generally applicable to many biochemical and cell-based assays requiring complex liquid manipulation and sample preparation steps such as FISH, PCR, flow cytometry and nucleic acid sequencing. In particular, the integration of this technology with read-out biosensors may help enable the realization of the long-sought Tricorder-like handheld in vitro diagnostic (IVD) systems.

  8. Microtensile bond strength of one- and two-step self-etching adhesives on sclerotic dentin: the effects of thermocycling.

    PubMed

    Xie, Chao; Han, Ying; Zhao, Xin-Yi; Wang, Zhong-Yi; He, Hui-Ming

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of thermocycling on the microtensile bond strength (microTBS) of one- and two-step self-etch adhesives (SEAs) to sclerotic dentin. Two adhesives, Clearfil S3 Bond (S3), a one-step self-etch adhesive (1-SEA), and Clearfil SE Bond (SE), a two-step self-etch adhesive (2-SEA), were applied on cervical lesions in human premolars with sclerotic or normal dentin. After adhesive application, the lesions were restored and built up using a resin composite (Clearfil AP-X). After 24 hours in water storage, the restored teeth were sectioned into 0.7 x 0.7 mm composite-dentin beams. The beams were then aged with 0, 5,000 or 10,000 thermocycles. The use of two adhesives, two substrate types and three thermocycling regimens yielded 12 experimental groups of 14-19 beams each. The beams were subsequently subjected to microTBS testing at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/minute and statistical analyses were computed with three-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc test at p < 0.05. Three-way ANOVA showed statistically significant effects on bonding effectiveness by lesion type, adhesive system, thermocycling or combinations of the adhesive system and thermocycling (p < 0.05). With sclerotic dentin, although S3 and SE provided comparable microTBS after 24 hours of water storage, S3 showed significantly lower microTBS than SE after thermocycling (p < 0.05). Regardless of lesion type, the microTBS for S3 decreased significantly after 5,000 or 10,000 thermocycles, while the microTBS for SE showed a significant decrease only after 10,000 thermocycles. Regardless of the extent of thermocycling, the microTBS values for either SE or S3 bonded to sclerotic dentin were significantly lower than to normal dentin (p < 0.05). The results suggested that thermocycling had a significant negative effect on the bond strength of the two SEAs tested. In contrast to 2-SEA, 1-SEA might not be a good choice for sclerotic dentin when seeking durability of the resin-dentin bond.

  9. Handheld Computers: A Boon for Principals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brazell, Wayne

    2005-01-01

    As I reflect on my many years as an elementary school principal, I realize how much more effective I would have been if I had owned a wireless handheld computer. This relatively new technology can provide considerable assistance to today?s principals and recent advancements have increased its functions and capacity. Handheld computers are…

  10. Wireless Handhelds to Support Clinical Nursing Practicum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Cheng-Chih; Lai, Chin-Yuan

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports our implementation and evaluation of a wireless handheld learning environment used to support a clinical nursing practicum course. The learning environment was designed so that nursing students could use handhelds for recording information, organizing ideas, assessing patients, and also for interaction and collaboration with…

  11. Handheld Computer Software for School Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergren, Martha Dewey; Murphy, Elizabeth Ann

    2005-01-01

    School nurses used computers in the 1980s, the Internet in the 1990s, and are embracing handheld computers in the first decade of the 21st century to improve their practice. The purpose of this article is to provide information about handheld computers and software applications that school nurses can use in day-to-day, emergency, and disaster…

  12. Envisioning the Handheld-Centric Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norris, Cathleen; Soloway, Elliot

    2004-01-01

    While appropriate as an initial focus, it is time that the educational community move beyond an emphasis on 1:1 computing (each child having his/her own personal computer) to a vision of a handheld-centric classroom, where each child not only has his/her own personal, handheld computer, but also has access to networked PCs, probeware, digital…

  13. Choosing a Hand-Held Inventory Device

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Lois; Hughes, Janet; Neff, Verne; Notartomas, Trish

    2008-01-01

    In spring of 2006, a task force was charged to look at the feasibility of acquiring hand-held inventory devices for the Pennsylvania State University Libraries (PSUL). The task force's charge was not to look at the whole concept of doing an inventory, but rather to focus on the feasibility of acquiring hand-held devices to use in an inventory.…

  14. Envisioning the Handheld-Centric Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norris, Cathleen; Soloway, Elliot

    2004-01-01

    While appropriate as an initial focus, it is time that the educational community move beyond an emphasis on 1:1 computing (each child having his/her own personal computer) to a vision of a handheld-centric classroom, where each child not only has his/her own personal, handheld computer, but also has access to networked PCs, probeware, digital…

  15. Handheld erythema and bruise detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Linghua; Sprigle, Stephen; Duckworth, Mark G.; Yi, Dingrong; Caspall, Jayme J.; Wang, Jiwu; Zhao, Futing

    2008-03-01

    Visual inspection of intact skin is commonly used when assessing persons for pressure ulcers and bruises. Melanin masks skin discoloration hindering visual inspection in people with darkly pigmented skin. The objective of the project is to develop a point of care technology capable of detecting erythema and bruises in persons with darkly pigmented skin. Two significant hardware components, a color filter array and illumination system have been developed and tested. The color filter array targets four defined wavelengths and has been designed to fit onto a CMOS sensor. The crafting process generates a multilayer film on a glass substrate using vacuum ion beam splitter and lithographic techniques. The illumination system is based upon LEDs and targets these same pre-defined wavelengths. Together, these components are being used to create a small, handheld multispectral imaging device. Compared to other multi spectral technologies (multi prisms, optical-acoustic crystal and others), the design provides simple, low cost instrumentation that has many potential multi spectral imaging applications which require a handheld detector.

  16. Durability of feldspathic veneering ceramic on glass-infiltrated alumina ceramics after long-term thermocycling.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, A M M; Ozcan, M; Souza, R O A; Kojima, A N; Nishioka, R S; Kimpara, E T; Bottino, M A

    2010-01-01

    This study compared the bond strength durability of a feldspathic veneering ceramic to glass-infiltrated reinforced ceramics in dry and aged conditions. Disc shaped (thickness: 4 mm, diameter: 4 mm) of glass-infiltrated alumina (In-Ceram Alumina) and glass-infiltrated alumina reinforced by zirconia (In-Ceram Zirconia) core ceramic specimens (N=48, N=12 per groups) were constructed according to the manufacturers' recommendations. Veneering ceramic (VITA VM7) was fired onto the core ceramics using a mold. The core-veneering ceramic assemblies were randomly divided into two conditions and tested either immediately after specimen preparation (Dry) or following 30000 thermocycling (5-55 ºC±1; dwell time: 30 seconds). Shear bond strength test was performed in a universal testing machine (cross-head speed: 1 mm/min). Failure modes were analyzed using optical microscope (x20). The bond strength data (MPa) were analyzed using ANOVA (α=0.05). Thermocycling did not decrease the bond strength results for both In-Ceram Alumina (30.6±8.2 MPa; P=0.2053) and In-Ceram zirconia (32.6±9 MPa; P=0.3987) core ceramic-feldspathic veneering ceramic combinations when compared to non-aged conditions (28.1±6.4 MPa, 29.7±7.3 MPa, respectively). There were also no significant differences between adhesion of the veneering ceramic to either In-Ceram Alumina or In-Ceram Zirconia ceramics (P=0.3289). Failure types were predominantly a mixture of adhesive failure between the veneering and the core ceramic together with cohesive fracture of the veneering ceramic. Long-term thermocycling aging conditions did not impair the adhesion of the veneering ceramic to the glass-infiltrated alumina core ceramics tested.

  17. Bond strength of three luting agents to zirconia ceramic - Influence of surface treatment and thermocycling

    PubMed Central

    ATTIA, Ahmed

    2011-01-01

    Objective This in vitro study aimed to evaluate the influence of different surface treatments, 3 luting agents and thermocycling on microtensile bond strength (µTBS) to zirconia ceramic. Material and Methods A total of 18 blocks (5x5x4 mm) were fabricated from zirconia ceramic (ICE Zirkonia) and duplicated into composite blocks (Alphadent). Ceramic blocks were divided into 3 groups (n=6) according to the following surface treatments: airborne-particle abrasion (AA), silica-coating, (SC) (CoJet) and silica coating followed by silane application (SCSI) (ESPE Sil). Each group was divided into 3 subgroups (n=2) according to the 3 luting agents used. Resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (RMGIC, Ketac Cem Plus), self-adhesive resin cement (UN, RelyX Unicem) and adhesive resin cement (ML, MultiLink Automix) were used for bonding composite and zirconia blocks. Each bonding assembly was cut into microbars (10 mm long and 1±0.1 mm2). Seven specimens of each subgroup were stored in water bath at 37ºC for 1 week. The o ther 7 specimens were stored in water bath at 37ºC for 30 days then thermocycled (TC) for 7,500 cycles. µTBS values were recorded for each specimen using a universal testing machine. Statistical analyses were performed using a 3-way ANOVA model followed by serial 1-way ANOVAs. Comparison of means was performed with Tukey's HSD test at (α=0.05). Results µTBS ranged from 16.8 to 31.8 MPa after 1 week and from 7.3 to 16.4 MPa after 30 days of storage in water and thermocycling. Artificial aging significantly decreased µTBS (p<0.05). Considering surface treatment, SCSI significantly increased µTBS (p<0.05) compared to SC and AA. Resin cements (UN and ML) demonstrated significantly higher µTBS (p<0.05) compared to RMGIC cement. Conclusions Silica coating followed by silane application together with adhesive resin cements significantly increased µTBS, while thermocycling significantly decreased µTBS. PMID:21710091

  18. EFFECT OF THERMOCYCLING ON THE TENSILE AND SHEAR BOND STRENGTHS OF THREE SOFT LINERS TO A DENTURE BASE RESIN

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Carlos Nelson; Henriques, Flavio Queiroz

    2007-01-01

    Statement of problem In clinical practice, loss of adhesion between the silicone-based denture liner and the denture base resin is always an undesirable event that might cause loss of material softness, water sorption, bacterial colonization and functional failure of the prosthesis. Purpose This study evaluated the effect of thermocycling on tensile and shear bond strengths of three soft liner materials to a denture base acrylic resin. Material and methods Three resilient liners (Mucopren-Soft, Mollosil-Plus and Dentusil) and a heat-polymerized acrylic resin (QC-20) were processed according to manufacturers’ directions. Sixty specimens (14 x 14 mm cross-sectional area) per bond strength test (20 for each liner) were fabricated and either stored in water at 37°C for 24 hours (control groups; n=10) or thermocycled 3,000 times in water between 5°C and 55°C (test groups; n=10). The specimens were tested in tensile and shear strength in a universal testing machine until fracture. Bond strength means were compared between water-stored and thermocycled groups for each material, as well as among materials for each treatment (water storage or thermocycling). Failure mode (adhesive, cohesive and mixed) after debonding was assessed. Data were analyzed statistically by paired Student’s t-test and ANOVA at 5% significance level. Results The water-stored groups had statistically significant higher bond strengths than the thermocycled groups (p<0.05). Without thermocycling, Mucopren-Soft (2.83 ± 0.48 MPa) had higher bond strength than Mollosil-Plus (1.04 ± 0.26 MPa) and Dentusil (1.14 ± 0.51 MPa). After thermocycling, Mucopren-Soft (1.63 ± 0.48 MPa) had the highest bond strength (p<0.05). Conclusion The bond strength of the three soft denture liners tested in this study changed with their chemical composition and all of them exhibited higher bond strengths than those usually reported as clinically acceptable. Clinical Implications All soft lining materials tested in

  19. Handheld ultrasonic concealed weapon detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilde, Norbert; Niederhaus, Steve; Lam, Hon; Lum, Chris

    2002-08-01

    A handheld, battery-operated prototype of a concealed weapon detector (CWD) has been built and tested. Designed to detect both metallic and non-metallic weapons, the sensor utilizes focused ultrasound (40 kHz frequency) to remotely detect concealed objects from beyond arm's length out to a range of about 25 feet (8 meters). Applications include weapon detection in prison settings, by officers in the field for stand-off frisking of suspects, and as supplemental security at courthouse entrances and other monitored portals. The detector emits an adjustable, audible alarm (with provision for an earphone jack) as well as a visible light-bar indicator when an object has been detected. An aiming light, with momentary switch, allows the user to accurately determine the location of the concealed object. A presentation of the detector's capabilities and limitations will be presented along with probability of detection (PD) data obtained using the latest prototype version.

  20. Video Browsing on Handheld Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hürst, Wolfgang

    Recent improvements in processing power, storage space, and video codec development enable users now to playback video on their handheld devices in a reasonable quality. However, given the form factor restrictions of such a mobile device, screen size still remains a natural limit and - as the term "handheld" implies - always will be a critical resource. This is not only true for video but any data that is processed on such devices. For this reason, developers have come up with new and innovative ways to deal with large documents in such limited scenarios. For example, if you look at the iPhone, innovative techniques such as flicking have been introduced to skim large lists of text (e.g. hundreds of entries in your music collection). Automatically adapting the zoom level to, for example, the width of table cells when double tapping on the screen enables reasonable browsing of web pages that have originally been designed for large, desktop PC sized screens. A multi touch interface allows you to easily zoom in and out of large text documents and images using two fingers. In the next section, we will illustrate that advanced techniques to browse large video files have been developed in the past years, as well. However, if you look at state-of-the-art video players on mobile devices, normally just simple, VCR like controls are supported (at least at the time of this writing) that only allow users to just start, stop, and pause video playback. If supported at all, browsing and navigation functionality is often restricted to simple skipping of chapters via two single buttons for backward and forward navigation and a small and thus not very sensitive timeline slider.

  1. Video Browsing on Handheld Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hürst, Wolfgang

    Recent improvements in processing power, storage space, and video codec development enable users now to playback video on their handheld devices in a reasonable quality. However, given the form factor restrictions of such a mobile device, screen size still remains a natural limit and - as the term "handheld" implies - always will be a critical resource. This is not only true for video but any data that is processed on such devices. For this reason, developers have come up with new and innovative ways to deal with large documents in such limited scenarios. For example, if you look at the iPhone, innovative techniques such as flicking have been introduced to skim large lists of text (e.g. hundreds of entries in your music collection). Automatically adapting the zoom level to, for example, the width of table cells when double tapping on the screen enables reasonable browsing of web pages that have originally been designed for large, desktop PC sized screens. A multi touch interface allows you to easily zoom in and out of large text documents and images using two fingers. In the next section, we will illustrate that advanced techniques to browse large video files have been developed in the past years, as well. However, if you look at state-of-the-art video players on mobile devices, normally just simple, VCR like controls are supported (at least at the time of this writing) that only allow users to just start, stop, and pause video playback. If supported at all, browsing and navigation functionality is often restricted to simple skipping of chapters via two single buttons for backward and forward navigation and a small and thus not very sensitive timeline slider.

  2. The effect of five kinds of surface treatment agents on the bond strength to various ceramics with thermocycle aging.

    PubMed

    Noda, Yukari; Nakajima, Masatoshi; Takahashi, Masahiro; Mamanee, Teerapong; Hosaka, Keiichi; Takagaki, Tomohiro; Ikeda, Masaomi; Foxton, Richard M; Tagami, Junji

    2017-07-12

    This study evaluated the effects of ceramic surface treatment agents on shear bond strengths to ceramic materials with and without thermocycling. Ceramic plates were prepared from feldspathic ceramic; AAA, lithium disilicate ceramic material; IPS e.max Press, zirconia ceramic; Lava. Ceramic surfaces were pretreated with one of five surface treatment agents (Clearfil PhotoBond mixed with Porcelainbond activator (PB), Clearfil SE One mixed with Porcelainbond activator (SO), Ceramic Primer (CP), Universal Primer (UP), Scotchbond Universal (SU)), and then a resin cement (Clapearl DC) was filled. After 0, 5,000, and 10,000 thermocycles, micro-shear bond strengths between ceramic-cement interfaces were determined. SU exhibited significantly lower initial bond strength to AAA and e.max than PB, SO, CP, and UP. For Lava, PB, SO, CP and SU exhibited higher initial bond strengths than UP. Thermocycles reduced bond strengths to all the ceramic materials with any surface treatment.

  3. A handheld real time thermal cycler for bacterial pathogen detection.

    PubMed

    Higgins, James A; Nasarabadi, Shanavaz; Karns, Jeffrey S; Shelton, Daniel R; Cooper, Mary; Gbakima, Aiah; Koopman, Ronald P

    2003-08-15

    The handheld advanced nucleic acid analyzer (HANAA) is a portable real time thermal cycler unit that weighs under 1 kg and uses silicon and platinum-based thermalcycler units to conduct rapid heating and cooling of plastic reaction tubes. Two light emitting diodes (LED) provide greater than 1 mW of electrical power at wavelengths of 490 nm (blue) and 525 nm (green), allowing detection of the dyes FAM and JOE/TAMRA. Results are displayed in real time as bar graphs, and up to three, 4-sample assays can be run on the charge of the 12 V portable battery pack. The HANAA was evaluated for detection of defined Escherichia coli strains, and wild-type colonies isolated from stream water, using PCR for the lac Z and Tir genes. PCR reactions using SYBR Green dye allowed detection of E. coli ATCC 11775 and E. coli O157:H7 cells in under 30 min of assay time; however, background fluorescence associated with dye binding to nonspecific PCR products was present. DNA extracted from three isolates of Bacillus anthracis Ames, linked to a bioterrorism incident in Washington DC in October 2001, were also successfully tested on the HANAA using primers for the vrrA and capA genes. Positive results were observed at 32 and 22 min of assay time, respectively. A TaqMan probe specific to the aroQ gene of Erwinia herbicola was tested on the HANAA and when 500 cells were used as template, positive results were observed after only 7 min of assay time. Background fluorescence associated with the use of the probe was negligible. The HANAA is unique in offering real time PCR in a handheld format suitable for field use; a commercial version of the instrument, offering six reaction chambers, is available as of Fall 2002.

  4. Effect of thermocycling with or without 1 year of water storage on retentive strengths of luting cements for zirconia crowns.

    PubMed

    Ehlers, Vicky; Kampf, Gabriel; Stender, Elmar; Willershausen, Brita; Ernst, Claus-Peter

    2015-06-01

    Bond stability between zirconia crowns and luting cement and between cement and dentin is a main concern; however, only limited evidence is available as to its longevity. The purpose of this in vitro study was to measure the retentive strengths of 7 self-adhesive cements (RelyX Unicem Aplicap, RelyX Unicem Clicker, RelyX Unicem 2 Automix, iCEM, Maxcem Elite, Bifix SE, SpeedCem), 2 adhesive cements with self-etch primers (Panavia 21, SEcure), 1 glass ionomer cement (Ketac Cem), 1 resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Meron Plus), and 1 zinc phosphate cement for luting zirconia crowns (LAVA) to extracted teeth after thermocycling with or without 1 year of water storage. Two-hundred-forty extracted human molars (2 treatments; n=10 per cement) were prepared in a standardized manner. All cements were used according to the manufacturers' recommendations. The intaglios of the crowns were treated with airborne-particle abrasion. After thermocycling (×5000, 5°C/55°C) with or without 1 year of water storage, the cemented ceramic crowns were removed by using a Zwick universal testing device. Statistical analyses were done with the Wilcoxon rank sum and the 2-independent-samples Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Median retentive strengths [MPa] for specimens thermocycled only/thermocycled with 1 year of water storage were as follows: Panavia 21: 1.7/2.5, SEcure: 3.0/3.0, RelyX Unicem Aplicap: 3.1/3.4, RelyX Unicem Clicker: 4.1/4.2, RelyX Unicem 2 Automix: 3.8/3.1, iCEM: 2.3/2.7, Maxcem Elite: 3.0/3.2, Bifix SE: 1.7/1.7, SpeedCem: 1.3/1.6, Meron Plus: 3.1/2.7, Ketac Cem: 1.4/1.4, and zinc phosphate cement: 1.1/1.6. Statistically significant differences were found only among specimens thermocycled only or thermocycled with 1-year water storage (P<.001). Significant differences in retentive strengths were observed among cements after thermocycling only or thermocycling with 1 year of water storage, but not for the effect of the additional 1 year of water storage. Copyright © 2015

  5. Evaluation of tensile bond strength of heat cure and autopolymerizing silicone-based resilient denture liners before and after thermocycling.

    PubMed

    Madan, Nishtha; Datta, Kusum

    2012-01-01

    To assess the effect of simulated mouth conditions reproduced with thermocycling on the tensile bond strength of two silicone based resilient denture liners with acrylic resin bases. Two silicone-based soft denture liners (Mollosil - Chairside autopolymerization and Molloplast B - Heat polymerization) were tested. For each liner, 30 specimens with a cross-sectional area of 10 Χ 10 mm and thickness 3 mm were processed between two acrylic blocks (Trevalon). Specimens were divided into a control group that was stored for 24 hours in water at 37°C and a test group that was thermocycled (2500 cycles) between baths of 5° and 55°C. Tensile bond strength (kg/cm²) was determined in a universal testing machine using crosshead speed of 5 mm/min. The student t-test was used to determine the significance of the difference in bond strength between the two liners. The mean tensile bond strength for control and thermocycled specimens of the two liners were: Mollosil (6.82 kg/cm² and 8.41 kg/cm²) and Molloplast-B (16.30 kg/cm² and 13.67 kg/cm²), respectively. Comparison of bond strength of control specimens with thermocycled specimens of the liners indicated a significant difference for both Mollosil (P=0.045) and Molloplast-B (P=0.027). Comparison between control specimens of both liners and thermocycled specimens of both liners indicated a highly significant difference (P<0.001). Heat polymerized resilient denture liner Molloplast-B had higher tensile bond strength than autopolymerizing liner Mollosil regardless of thermocycling. The bond strength of Mollosil increased after thermocycling while that of Molloplast-B decreased after thermocycling. Although heat-polymerized denture liners require more processing time than autopolymerizing liners, but they display much better adhesion properties to denture base resin and should thus be preferred when soft liner has to be used for a longer duration of time.

  6. Augmented Reality Simulations on Handheld Computers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Squire, Kurt; Klopfer, Eric

    2007-01-01

    Advancements in handheld computing, particularly its portability, social interactivity, context sensitivity, connectivity, and individuality, open new opportunities for immersive learning environments. This article articulates the pedagogical potential of augmented reality simulations in environmental engineering education by immersing students in…

  7. Augmented Reality Simulations on Handheld Computers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Squire, Kurt; Klopfer, Eric

    2007-01-01

    Advancements in handheld computing, particularly its portability, social interactivity, context sensitivity, connectivity, and individuality, open new opportunities for immersive learning environments. This article articulates the pedagogical potential of augmented reality simulations in environmental engineering education by immersing students in…

  8. Handheld ultrasound concealed weapons detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felber, Franklin S.; Wild, Norbert C.; Nunan, Scott C.; Breuner, Dennis; Doft, Frank

    1998-12-01

    A handheld, battery-operated prototype of a remove concealed weapons detector has been built and tested. The concealed weapons detector will enable law enforcement and security officers to detect metallic and nonmetallic weapons concealed beneath clothing remotely from beyond arm's length to about 20 feet. These detectors may be used to: (1) allow hands-off, stand-off frisking of suspects for metallic and nonmetallic weapons; and (2) search for metallic and nonmetallic weapons on cooperative subjects at courthouse entrances and other monitored security portals. We have demonstrated that we image weapons concealed under heavy clothing, not just detect them, at ranges up to 15 feet using the same ultrasound frequency (40 kHz) used by commercial rangefinders. The concealed weapons detector operates much as a rangefinder, but at higher peak fluxes and pulse repetition frequencies. The detector alerts the user to concealed weapons audibly and visibly by detecting ultrasound glints above a body/clothing baseline, and by compensating for changing range and attenuation. The detector locates concealed weapons within a 6-inch illuminated spot at 10 feet. The signal processor eliminates any signal from behind the target.

  9. Handheld interface for miniature sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedia, Sunny; Samson, Scott A.; Farmer, Andrew; Smith, Matthew C.; Fries, David; Bhansali, Shekhar

    2005-02-01

    Miniaturization of laboratory sensors has been enabled by continued evolution of technology. Field portable systems are often desired, because they reduce sample handling, provide rapid feedback capability, and enhance convenience. Fieldable sensor systems should include a method for initiating the analysis, storing and displaying the results, while consuming minimal power and being compact and portable. Low cost will allow widespread usage of these systems. In this paper, we discuss a reconfigurable Personal Data Assistant (PDA) based control and data collection system for use with miniature sensors. The system is based on the Handspring visor PDA and a custom designed motherboard, which connects directly to the PDA microprocessor. The PDA provides a convenient and low cost graphical user interface, moderate processing capability, and integrated battery power. The low power motherboard provides the voltage levels, data collection, and input/output (I/O) capabilities required by many MEMS and miniature sensors. These capabilities are relayed to connectors, where an application specific daughterboard is attached. In this paper, two applications are demonstrated. First, a handheld nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) detection sensor consisting of a heated and optical fluorescence detection system is discussed. Second, an electrostatically actuated MEMS micro mirror controller is realized.

  10. Handheld ultrasonic concealed weapon detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, Norbert C.; Doft, Frank; Breuner, Dennis; Felber, Franklin S.

    2001-02-01

    A handheld, battery-operated prototype of a concealed weapon detector has been built and tested. Designed to detect both metallic and non-metallic weapons, the sensor utilizes focused ultrasound (40 kHz frequency) to remotely detect concealed objects from beyond arm's length out to a range of about 12 feet (4 meters). The detector can be used in prison settings, by officers in the field to allow for stand-off frisking of suspects, and to supplement security at courthouse entrances and other monitored portals. The detector emits an audible alarm (with provision for an earphone jack) as well as a visible light-bar indicator when an object is detected. A high intensity aiming light, with momentary switch, allows the user to accurately determine the location of the concealed object. Current efforts are aimed at increasing the probability of detection, reducing the false-alarm rate, and extending the range of detectability out to 20 feet. Plans for accomplishing these tasks will be presented together with data showing the effective range and probability of detection for the present system.

  11. Effect of thermocycling on the durability of etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesives on dentin.

    PubMed

    Sangwichit, Ketkamon; Kingkaew, Ruksaphon; Pongprueksa, Pong; Senawongse, Pisol

    2016-01-01

    The objective was to compare bond strengths of adhesives with/without thermocycling and to analyze the micromorphology of resindentin interfaces. Flat dentin surfaces were prepared and divided into eight groups to bond with four etch-and-rinse adhesives (Optibond FL, Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose, Optibond Solo Plus, and Single Bond 2) and four self-etch adhesives (Clearfil SE Bond, Adper SE Plus, Clearfil S(3) Bond and Adper Easy Bond). Specimens were further divided into two subgroups subjected for with/without thermocycling and then subjected to both micro-tensile test and resin-dentin interface evaluation. The results revealed that there were significant differences in bond strength between the groups with and without thermocycling for all etch-and-rinse groups and for the Adper Easy Bond self-etch group (p<0.01). Clearfil SE Bond demonstrated highly durable bond strengths. Furthermore, more silver ion uptake was observed at the resin-dentin interfaces for all etch-and-rinse adhesives and Adper SE Plus and Adper Easy Bond after thermocycling.

  12. Effects of long-term storage and thermocycling on bond strength of two self-etching primer adhesive systems.

    PubMed

    Yuasa, Toshihiro; Iijima, Masahiro; Ito, Shuichi; Muguruma, Takeshi; Saito, Takashi; Mizoguchi, Itaru

    2010-06-01

    The effects of 2 years of storage and 6000 thermocycles on the shear bond strength (SBS) of two self-etching adhesive systems were studied. Two self-etching primer (SEP) systems (Transbond Plus and Beauty Ortho Bond) and one etch and rinse system (Transbond XT) were used to bond brackets to 126 human premolars that were then stored in artificial saliva for 24 hours or 2 years and thermocycled in distilled water before SBS testing with a universal testing machine. The adhesive remnant index (ARI) scores were calculated. Data were compared by two-way analysis of variance and chi-square analysis. Enamel/adhesive interfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy. There was no significant difference in the mean SBS for the bonding materials among the three conditions. ARI scores showed that Transbond XT and Beauty Ortho Bond had less adhesive remaining on the teeth after ageing compared with storage for 24 hours. Specimens bonded with Beauty Ortho Bond showed leakage between the resin adhesive and enamel after ageing. Both SEP systems produced adequate SBS even after 2 years or 6000 times thermocycling. Thermocycling is an appropriate technique for determining the durability of orthodontic bracket bonding materials.

  13. The effect of IDS (immediate dentin sealing) on dentin bond strength under various thermocycling periods

    PubMed Central

    Leesungbok, Richard; Lee, Sang-Min; Park, Su-Jung; Lee, Suk-Won; Lee, Do Yun; Im, Byung-Jin

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to find out the effect of immediate dentin sealing (IDS) on bond strength of ceramic restoration under various thermocycling periods with DBA (dentin bonding agent system). MATERIALS AND METHODS Fifty freshly extracted human mandibular third molars were divided into 5 groups (1 control and 4 experimental groups) of 10 teeth. We removed enamel layer of sound teeth and embedded them which will proceed to be IDS, using All Bond II. A thermocycling was applied to experimental groups for 1, 2, 7, 14 days respectively and was not applied to control group. IPS Empress II for ceramic was acid-etched with ceramic etchant (9.5% HF) and silane was applied. Each ceramic disc was bonded to specimens with Duo-link, dual curable resin cement by means of light curing for 100 seconds. After the cementation procedures, shear bond strength measurement and SEM analysis of the fractured surface were done. The data were analyzed with a one-way ANOVA and Tukey multiple comparison test (α=.05). RESULTS There were no statistically significant differences between 4 experimental groups and control group, however the mean value started to decrease in group 7d, and group 14d showed the lowest mean bond strength in all groups. Also, group 7d and 14d showed distinct exposed dentin and collapsed hybrid layer was observed in SEM analysis. CONCLUSION In the present study, it can be concluded that ceramic restorations like a laminate veneer restoration should be bonded using resin cement within one week after IDS procedure. PMID:26140174

  14. Experimental comparison of cavity sealing ability of five dental adhesive systems after thermocycling.

    PubMed

    Cao, Liem; Geerts, Sabine; Gueders, Audrey; Albert, Adelin; Seidel, Laurence; Charpentier, Joseph

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate the cavity sealing obtained after thermocycling with five adhesive systems in which one all-in-one adhesive was compared to three one-bottle adhesives, and to observe the effect of a low-charged resin layer added to a one-bottle adhesive. Twenty-five recently extracted teeth were randomly allocated to five experimental adhesive systems (n = 5 each): Optibond Solo (OS), Scotchbond 1 (SB1), PQ 1, Prompt-L-Pop (PLP), SB1+Revolution (R). On each tooth, two rectangular cavities at the cementoenamel junction were filled with a microhybrid composite (Z100) and the tested adhesives. Teeth were thermocycled and stained with AgNO3 + vitamin C. Leakage was evaluated on a 6-point (0-5) severity scale and the highest score was selected for each restoration. Results were treated by ordinal logistic regression and considered to be significant at p < 0.05. No significant difference was found between leakage values for enamel and dentin interfaces. Leakage scores never exceeded 2 for OS, SB1 and SB1+R, while they reached a maximum of 5 in 20% of PLP cases. OS was significantly better than the other adhesive systems, which were statistically equivalent. The addition of a flowable composite layer on SB1 did not yield a significant difference, but tended to give better results mainly at the dentin interface. The all-in-one adhesive PLP, because of quite variable results, seems less reliable than the one-bottle adhesives, of which OS provides significantly the best results. Addition of a flowable composite on SB1 appears to yield slightly better results.

  15. Effect of Storage Time, Thermocycling And Resin Coating on Durability of Dentin Bonding Systems

    PubMed Central

    Mousavinasab, Seyed-Mostafa; Farhadi, Azadeh; Shabanian, Mitra

    2009-01-01

    Background: Along with development of different dental adhesives, concerns about hydrolytic deg-radation of the adhesive components have arisen. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the in vitro influence of thermocycling, water storage and resin coating on the microshear bond strength of total etch and self etch adhesive systems to dentin. Methods: The superficial coronal dentin of eighty intact third molars were exposed and divided into 5 equal groups. Dental adhesives including Scotch Bond Multi Purpose (SBMP), Single Bond (SB), Clearfil SE Bond (CSE), Prompt L-Pop (PLP), and Prompt L-Pop plus Margin bond (PLPM) were applied according to the manufacturers’ instructions on prepared surfaces in the study groups, respectively. Then composite cylinders were bonded and specimens were divided into two subgroups. One subgroup was stored in water for 24 hours. The second subgroup was subjected to 3000 thermocycle shocks and then was stored in 37°C water for 3 months. Finally, all teeth were subjected to the microshear bond strength test. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests. One specimen similar to each subgroup was also prepared for SEM evaluation. Results: After one-day storage, the SBMP showed the highest bond strength followed by CSE, PLPM, SB and PLP. After three months storage, the highest bond strength was observed in SBMP followed by PLPM, CSE, SB, and PLP. Conclusion: SBMP showed the best bond strength while CSE represented acceptable bond durability. Resin coating on PLP improved bond strength and durability. PMID:21528027

  16. Influence of Light Source, Thermocycling and Silane on the Shear Bond Strength of Metallic Brackets to Ceramic.

    PubMed

    De Abreu Neto, Hugo Franco; Costa, Ana Rosa; Correr, Américo Bortolazzo; Vedovello, Silvia Amélia; Valdrighi, Heloísa Cristina; Santos, Eduardo Cesar Almada; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço; Vedovello Filho, Mário

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of different light sources, thermocycling and silane on the bond strength of metallic brackets to ceramic. Cylinders of feldspathic ceramic were etched with 10% hydrofluoric acid for 60 s. Half of the cylinders (Groups 1 to 4) received two layers of silane. Metallic brackets were bonded to the cylinders using Transbond XT and divided into 8 groups (n=20), according to light source (Radii Plus LED - 40 s; Groups 1, 2, 5 and 6 and XL 2500 halogen light - 40 s; Groups 3, 4, 7 and 8) and experimental conditions with (Groups 2, 4, 6 and 8) without thermocycling (Groups 1, 3, 5 and 7). Shear bond testing was carried out after 24 h of deionized water storage (Groups 1, 3, 5 and 7) and thermocycling (Groups 2, 4, 6 and 8; 7,000 cycles - 5°/55 °C). Date were submitted to three-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc test (α=0.05). The Adhesive Remnamt Index (ARI) was evaluated at 8× magnification. The application of silane was effective in increasing the shear bond strength of the brackets to ceramic (p<0.05). Significant difference (p<0.05) on the bond strength was observed between light sources with or without thermocycling. The ARI showed a predominance of scores 0 for all groups, with an increase in scores 1, 2 and 3 for the silane groups. In conclusion, silane improved significantly the shear bond strength of the brackets to ceramic. The thermocycling and light sources influence on the bond strength.

  17. Online monitoring of thermo-cycles and its correlation with microstructure in laser cladding of nickel based super alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muvvala, Gopinath; Patra Karmakar, Debapriya; Nath, Ashish Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Laser cladding, basically a weld deposition technique, is finding applications in many areas including surface coatings, refurbishment of worn out components and generation of functionally graded components owing to its various advantages over conventional methods like TIG, PTA etc. One of the essential requirements to adopt this technique in industrial manufacturing is to fulfil the increasing demand on product quality which could be controlled through online process monitoring and correlating the signals with the mechanical and metallurgical properties. Rapid thermo-cycle i.e. the fast heating and cooling rates involved in this process affect above properties of the deposited layer to a great extent. Therefore, the current study aims to monitor the thermo-cycles online, understand its variation with process parameters and its effect on different quality aspects of the clad layer, like microstructure, elemental segregations and mechanical properties. The effect of process parameters on clad track geometry is also studied which helps in their judicious selection to deposit a predefined thickness of coating. In this study Inconel 718, a nickel based super alloy is used as a clad material and AISI 304 austenitic steel as a substrate material. The thermo-cycles during the cladding process were recorded using a single spot monochromatic pyrometer. The heating and cooling rates were estimated from the recorded thermo-cycles and its effects on microstructures were characterised using SEM and XRD analyses. Slow thermo-cycles resulted in severe elemental segregations favouring Laves phase formation and increased γ matrix size which is found to be detrimental to the mechanical properties. Slow cooling also resulted in termination of epitaxial growth, forming equiaxed grains near the surface, which is not preferred for single crystal growth. Heat treatment is carried out and the effect of slow cooling and the increased γ matrix size on dissolution of segregated elements in

  18. Microtensile dentin bond strength of fifth with five seventh-generation dentin bonding agents after thermocycling: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Poptani, Bruhvi; Gohil, K. S.; Ganjiwale, Jaishree; Shukla, Manisha

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this in vitro study was to compare the microtensile dentin bond strength (μTBS) of five seventh-generation dentin bonding agents (DBA) with fifth-generation DBA before and after thermocycling. Materials and Methods: Ten extracted teeth were assigned to fifth generation control group (optibond solo) and each of the five experimental groups namely, Group I (G-Bond) ,Group II (S3 Clearfil), Group III (One Coat 7.0), Group IV (Xeno V), and Group V (Optibond all in one). The crown portions of the teeth were horizontally sectioned below the central groove to expose the dentin. The adhesive resins from all groups were bonded to the teeth with their respective composites. Specimens of sizes 1 × 1 × 6 mm3 were obtained. Fifty specimens that bonded to dentin from each group were selected. Twenty-five of the specimens were tested for debonding without thermocycling and the remaining were subjected to thermocycling followed by μTBS testing. The data were analyzed with one-way ANOVA and Dunnett's-test for comparison with the reference group(Vth Generation). Results: There was no significant difference (P > 0.05) between the fifth- and seventh-generation adhesives before and after thermocycling. The results of our study showed significantly higher value (P < 0.05) of μTBS of seventh-generation Group II (Clearfil S3) compared to the fifth-generation before and after thermocycling. Conclusion: The study demonstrated that the Clearfil S3 bond had the highest μTBS values. In addition, of the five tested seventh-generation adhesive resins were comparable to the fifth-generation DBA. PMID:23230355

  19. Vibration absorber modeling for handheld machine tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Mohd Azman; Mustafa, Mohd Muhyiddin; Jamil, Jazli Firdaus; Salim, Mohd Azli; Ramli, Faiz Redza

    2015-05-01

    Handheld machine tools produce continuous vibration to the users during operation. This vibration causes harmful effects to the health of users for repeated operations in a long period of time. In this paper, a dynamic vibration absorber (DVA) is designed and modeled to reduce the vibration generated by the handheld machine tool. Several designs and models of vibration absorbers with various stiffness properties are simulated, tested and optimized in order to diminish the vibration. Ordinary differential equation is used to derive and formulate the vibration phenomena in the machine tool with and without the DVA. The final transfer function of the DVA is later analyzed using commercial available mathematical software. The DVA with optimum properties of mass and stiffness is developed and applied on the actual handheld machine tool. The performance of the DVA is experimentally tested and validated by the final result of vibration reduction.

  20. Hand-Held and Integrated Single-Cell Pipettes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Successful single-cell isolation is a primary step for subsequent chemical and biological analyses of single cells. Conventional single-cell isolation methods often encounter operational complexity, limited efficiency, deterioration of cell viability, incompetence in the isolation of a single-cell into nanoliter liquid, and/or inability to select single adherent cells with specific phenotypes. Here, we develop a hand-held single-cell pipet (hSCP) that is rapid, operationally simple, highly efficient, and inexpensive for unbiased isolation of single viable suspended cells directly from submicroliter cell suspensions into nanoliter droplets without the assistance of any additional equipment. An integrated SCP (iSCP) has also been developed for selective isolation of single suspended and adherent cells according to the fluorescence imaging and morphological features. The isolated single cells can be conveniently transferred into standard 96-/384-well plates, Petri dishes, or vials for cloning, PCR, and other single-cell biochemical assays. PMID:25036187

  1. Hand-held multiple system gas chromatograph

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Conrad M.

    2001-01-01

    A multiple parallel hand-held gas chromatograph (GC) system which includes several independent GCs. Each independent GC has its own injector, separation column, detector and oven and the GCs are mounted in a light weight hand-held assembly. Each GC operates independently and simultaneously. Because of different coatings in different separation columns, different retention times for the same gas will be measured. Thus, for a GC system with multiple parallel GCs, the system can measure, in a short period, different retention times and provide a cross-reference in the determination of the measured gas and to become a two-dimensional system for direct field use.

  2. Handheld computers in medicine: the way forward

    PubMed Central

    Horsley, A; Forster, L

    2005-01-01

    Handheld computers are now a common sight in medicine, but there are scarce data on who actually uses them and what functions are found to be most useful. This is the first study of handheld computer use in a British hospital, and shows that there is already considerable use and acceptance of the technology, with 22 of 55 (40%) physicians possessing and using such a device. Doctors in training grades are more likely to make use of medical software, particularly textbooks, calculators, and formularies. The main barriers to greater use of this technology were cost of software and poor applicability to UK practice. PMID:15998828

  3. Handheld optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Li; Zhang, Pengfei; Xu, Song; Shi, Junhui; Li, Lei; Yao, Junjie; Wang, Lidai; Zou, Jun; Wang, Lihong V.

    2017-04-01

    Optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) offers label-free in vivo imaging with high spatial resolution by acoustically detecting optical absorption contrasts via the photoacoustic effect. We developed a compact handheld OR-PAM probe for fast photoacoustic imaging. Different from benchtop microscopes, the handheld probe provides flexibility in imaging various anatomical sites. Resembling a cup in size, the probe uses a two-axis water-immersible microelectromechanical system mirror to scan both the illuminating optical beam and resultant acoustic beam. The system performance was tested in vivo by imaging the capillary bed in a mouse ear and both the capillary bed and a mole on a human volunteer.

  4. Cross-platform evaluation of commercial real-time SYBR green RT-PCR kits for sensitive and rapid detection of European bat Lyssavirus type 1.

    PubMed

    Picard-Meyer, Evelyne; Peytavin de Garam, Carine; Schereffer, Jean Luc; Marchal, Clotilde; Robardet, Emmanuelle; Cliquet, Florence

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluates the performance of five two-step SYBR Green RT-qPCR kits and five one-step SYBR Green qRT-PCR kits using real-time PCR assays. Two real-time thermocyclers showing different throughput capacities were used. The analysed performance evaluation criteria included the generation of standard curve, reaction efficiency, analytical sensitivity, intra- and interassay repeatability as well as the costs and the practicability of kits, and thermocycling times. We found that the optimised one-step PCR assays had a higher detection sensitivity than the optimised two-step assays regardless of the machine used, while no difference was detected in reaction efficiency, R (2) values, and intra- and interreproducibility between the two methods. The limit of detection at the 95% confidence level varied between 15 to 981 copies/µL and 41 to 171 for one-step kits and two-step kits, respectively. Of the ten kits tested, the most efficient kit was the Quantitect SYBR Green qRT-PCR with a limit of detection at 95% of confidence of 20 and 22 copies/µL on the thermocyclers Rotor gene Q MDx and MX3005P, respectively. The study demonstrated the pivotal influence of the thermocycler on PCR performance for the detection of rabies RNA, as well as that of the master mixes.

  5. Designing Collaborative, Constructionist and Contextual Applications for Handheld Devices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patten, Bryan; Sanchez, Inmaculada Arnedillo; Tangney, Brendan

    2006-01-01

    This paper explores current applications for handheld devices and questions which of these make full use of the unique attributes of handheld devices in order to facilitate learning in a pedagogically sensible manner. In order to do so, the paper presents a functional framework which analyses handheld application in relation to their use as well…

  6. 30 CFR 56.12033 - Hand-held electric tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hand-held electric tools. 56.12033 Section 56.12033 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL....12033 Hand-held electric tools. Hand-held electric tools shall not be operated at high potential...

  7. 30 CFR 56.12033 - Hand-held electric tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hand-held electric tools. 56.12033 Section 56.12033 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL....12033 Hand-held electric tools. Hand-held electric tools shall not be operated at high potential...

  8. 30 CFR 57.12033 - Hand-held electric tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hand-held electric tools. 57.12033 Section 57.12033 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... Surface and Underground § 57.12033 Hand-held electric tools. Hand-held electric tools shall not be...

  9. 30 CFR 57.12033 - Hand-held electric tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hand-held electric tools. 57.12033 Section 57.12033 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... Surface and Underground § 57.12033 Hand-held electric tools. Hand-held electric tools shall not be...

  10. 30 CFR 56.7053 - Moving hand-held drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Moving hand-held drills. 56.7053 Section 56... MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Drilling § 56.7053 Moving hand-held drills. Before hand-held drills are moved from one...

  11. 30 CFR 56.7053 - Moving hand-held drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Moving hand-held drills. 56.7053 Section 56... MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Drilling § 56.7053 Moving hand-held drills. Before hand-held drills are moved from one...

  12. 30 CFR 56.7053 - Moving hand-held drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Moving hand-held drills. 56.7053 Section 56... MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Drilling § 56.7053 Moving hand-held drills. Before hand-held drills are moved from one...

  13. 30 CFR 56.7053 - Moving hand-held drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Moving hand-held drills. 56.7053 Section 56... MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Drilling § 56.7053 Moving hand-held drills. Before hand-held drills are moved from one...

  14. 30 CFR 57.7053 - Moving hand-held drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Moving hand-held drills. 57.7053 Section 57... MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Drilling-Surface and Underground § 57.7053 Moving hand-held drills. Before hand-held...

  15. 30 CFR 57.7053 - Moving hand-held drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Moving hand-held drills. 57.7053 Section 57... MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Drilling-Surface and Underground § 57.7053 Moving hand-held drills. Before hand-held...

  16. 30 CFR 57.7053 - Moving hand-held drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Moving hand-held drills. 57.7053 Section 57... MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Drilling-Surface and Underground § 57.7053 Moving hand-held drills. Before hand-held...

  17. 30 CFR 56.7053 - Moving hand-held drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Moving hand-held drills. 56.7053 Section 56... MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Drilling § 56.7053 Moving hand-held drills. Before hand-held drills are moved from one...

  18. 30 CFR 57.7053 - Moving hand-held drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Moving hand-held drills. 57.7053 Section 57... MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Drilling-Surface and Underground § 57.7053 Moving hand-held drills. Before hand-held...

  19. 30 CFR 57.7053 - Moving hand-held drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Moving hand-held drills. 57.7053 Section 57... MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Drilling-Surface and Underground § 57.7053 Moving hand-held drills. Before hand-held...

  20. 30 CFR 56.14116 - Hand-held power tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hand-held power tools. 56.14116 Section 56... Equipment Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 56.14116 Hand-held power tools. (a) Power drills, disc sanders, grinders and circular and chain saws, when used in the hand-held mode shall be operated...

  1. 30 CFR 57.12033 - Hand-held electric tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hand-held electric tools. 57.12033 Section 57.12033 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... Surface and Underground § 57.12033 Hand-held electric tools. Hand-held electric tools shall not be...

  2. 30 CFR 57.14116 - Hand-held power tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hand-held power tools. 57.14116 Section 57... Equipment Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 57.14116 Hand-held power tools. (a) Power drills, disc sanders, grinders and circular and chain saws, when used in the hand-held mode shall be operated...

  3. 30 CFR 57.14116 - Hand-held power tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hand-held power tools. 57.14116 Section 57... Equipment Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 57.14116 Hand-held power tools. (a) Power drills, disc sanders, grinders and circular and chain saws, when used in the hand-held mode shall be operated...

  4. 30 CFR 56.14116 - Hand-held power tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hand-held power tools. 56.14116 Section 56... Equipment Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 56.14116 Hand-held power tools. (a) Power drills, disc sanders, grinders and circular and chain saws, when used in the hand-held mode shall be operated...

  5. 30 CFR 56.14116 - Hand-held power tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hand-held power tools. 56.14116 Section 56... Equipment Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 56.14116 Hand-held power tools. (a) Power drills, disc sanders, grinders and circular and chain saws, when used in the hand-held mode shall be operated...

  6. 30 CFR 57.14116 - Hand-held power tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hand-held power tools. 57.14116 Section 57... Equipment Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 57.14116 Hand-held power tools. (a) Power drills, disc sanders, grinders and circular and chain saws, when used in the hand-held mode shall be operated...

  7. 30 CFR 57.14116 - Hand-held power tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hand-held power tools. 57.14116 Section 57... Equipment Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 57.14116 Hand-held power tools. (a) Power drills, disc sanders, grinders and circular and chain saws, when used in the hand-held mode shall be operated...

  8. 30 CFR 57.12033 - Hand-held electric tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hand-held electric tools. 57.12033 Section 57.12033 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... Surface and Underground § 57.12033 Hand-held electric tools. Hand-held electric tools shall not be...

  9. 30 CFR 56.14116 - Hand-held power tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hand-held power tools. 56.14116 Section 56... Equipment Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 56.14116 Hand-held power tools. (a) Power drills, disc sanders, grinders and circular and chain saws, when used in the hand-held mode shall be operated...

  10. 30 CFR 57.12033 - Hand-held electric tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hand-held electric tools. 57.12033 Section 57.12033 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... Surface and Underground § 57.12033 Hand-held electric tools. Hand-held electric tools shall not be...

  11. 30 CFR 56.14116 - Hand-held power tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hand-held power tools. 56.14116 Section 56... Equipment Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 56.14116 Hand-held power tools. (a) Power drills, disc sanders, grinders and circular and chain saws, when used in the hand-held mode shall be operated...

  12. 30 CFR 57.14116 - Hand-held power tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hand-held power tools. 57.14116 Section 57... Equipment Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 57.14116 Hand-held power tools. (a) Power drills, disc sanders, grinders and circular and chain saws, when used in the hand-held mode shall be operated...

  13. Effect of thermocycling and surface treatment on repair bond strength of composite

    PubMed Central

    Kiomarsi, Nazanin; Saburian, Pardis; Chiniforush, Nasim; Karazifard, Mohammad-Javd

    2017-01-01

    Background Repair of composite restorations is a conservative method that can increase the longevity and durability of restorations while preserving the tooth structure. Achieving a suitable bond between the old and new composite is difficult. To overcome this problem, some methods have been recommended to increase the repair bond strength of composite.This study aimed to assess the effect of aging by thermocycling (5,000 and 10,000 cycles) and mechanical surface treatments (Er,Cr:YSGG laser and bur) on repair shear bond strength of composite resin. Material and Methods Totally, 120 composite blocks measuring 6x4x4 mm were fabricated of Filtek Z250 composite and were randomly divided into three groups (n=40) based on initial aging protocol: (a) no aging: storage in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours, (b) 5,000 thermal cycles, (c) 10,000 thermal cycles. Each group was then randomly divided into two subgroups (n=20) based on mechanical surface treatment (laser and bur). The laser and bur-prepared surfaces were silanized and Adper Single Bond 2 was then applied. The repair composite was bonded to surfaces. Half of the samples in each subgroup (n=10) were subjected to 5,000 thermal cycles to assess durability of bond. The remaining half were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours and all samples were then subjected to shear bond strength testing in a universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 1mm/min. Data (in megapascals) were subjected to one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test (P=0.05). Mode of failure was determined under a stereomicroscope. Results Bur preparation significantly improved the bond strength compared to laser (P<0.001). Aging by 10,000 thermal cycles significantly decreased the repair bond strength of composite (P<0.001). No significant difference was noted in this regard between distilled water and 5,000 thermal cycles groups (P=0.699). Primary bond strength and bond strength after 5,000 thermal cycles in the same subgroups were not

  14. Handheld Computer Application for Medical Disaster Management

    PubMed Central

    Grasso, Michael A.

    2006-01-01

    We developed a prototype system that can provide reliable communications in the event of a medical disaster. The system uses redundant wireless protocols on handheld computers to deploy medical personnel, and to facilitate communication between ancillary treatment sites and a command center. PMID:17238551

  15. Trajectories in Operating a Handheld Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heuer, Herbert; Sulzenbruck, Sandra

    2009-01-01

    The authors studied the trajectories of the hand and of the tip of a handheld sliding first-order lever in aiming movements. With this kind of tool, straight trajectories of the hand are generally associated with curved trajectories of the tip of the lever and vice versa. Trajectories of the tip of the lever exhibited smaller deviations from…

  16. Handheld spectrometers: the state of the art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crocombe, Richard A.

    2013-05-01

    "Small" spectrometers fall into three broad classes: small versions of laboratory instruments, providing data, subsequently processed on a PC; dedicated analyzers, providing actionable information to an individual operator; and process analyzers, providing quantitative or semi-quantitative information to a process controller. The emphasis of this paper is on handheld dedicated analyzers. Many spectrometers have historically been large, possible fragile, expensive and complicated to use. The challenge over the last dozen years, as instruments have moved into the field, has been to make spectrometers smaller, affordable, rugged, easy-to-use, but most of all capable of delivering actionable results. Actionable results can dramatically improve the efficiency of a testing process and transform the way business is done. There are several keys to this handheld spectrometer revolution. Consumer electronics has given us powerful mobile platforms, compact batteries, clearly visible displays, new user interfaces, etc., while telecomm has revolutionized miniature optics, sources and detectors. While these technologies enable miniature spectrometers themselves, actionable information has demanded the development of rugged algorithms for material confirmation, unknown identification, mixture analysis and detection of suspicious materials in unknown matrices. These algorithms are far more sophisticated than the `correlation' or `dot-product' methods commonly used in benchtop instruments. Finally, continuing consumer electronics advances now enable many more technologies to be incorporated into handheld spectrometers, including Bluetooth, wireless, WiFi, GPS, cameras and bar code readers, and the continued size shrinkage of spectrometer `engines' leads to the prospect of dual technology or `hyphenated' handheld instruments.

  17. Handheld Computers in Education: An Industry Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van 't Hooft, Mark; Vahey, Philip

    2007-01-01

    Five representatives from the mobile computing industry provide their perspectives on handhelds in education. While some of their ideas differ, they all agree on the importance of staff development, appropriate curriculum development, and teacher support to create the kinds of personalized learning environments that mobile devices make possible.

  18. Handheld Devices: Toward a More Mobile Campus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fallon, Mary A. C.

    2002-01-01

    Offers an overview of the acceptance and use of handheld personal computing devices on campus that connect wirelessly to the campus network. Considers access; present and future software applications; uses in medial education; faculty training needs; and wireless technology issues. (Author/LRW)

  19. Trajectories in Operating a Handheld Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heuer, Herbert; Sulzenbruck, Sandra

    2009-01-01

    The authors studied the trajectories of the hand and of the tip of a handheld sliding first-order lever in aiming movements. With this kind of tool, straight trajectories of the hand are generally associated with curved trajectories of the tip of the lever and vice versa. Trajectories of the tip of the lever exhibited smaller deviations from…

  20. Adhesion to Er:YAG laser-prepared dentin after long-term water storage and thermocycling.

    PubMed

    do Amaral, Flávia Lucisano Botelho; Colucci, Vivian; de Souza-Gabriel, Aline Evangelista; Chinelatti, Michelle Alexandra; Palma-Dibb, Regina Guenka; Corona, Silmara Aparecida Milori

    2008-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the microtensile bond strength of a resin composite to Er:YAG-prepared dentin after long-term storage and thermocycling. Eighty bovine incisors were selected and their roots removed. The crowns were ground to expose superficial dentin. The samples were randomly divided according to cavity preparation method (I-Er:YAG laser and II-carbide bur). Subsequently, an etch & rinse adhesive system was applied and the samples were restored with a resin composite. The samples were subdivided according to time of water storage (WS)/number of thermocycles (TC) performed: A) 24 hours WS/no TC; B) 7 days WS/500 TC; C) 1 month WS/2,000 TC; D) 6 months WS/12,000 TC. The teeth were sectioned in sticks with a cross-sectional area of 1.0-mm2, which were loaded in tension in a universal testing machine. The data were subjected to two-way ANOVA, Scheffé and Fisher's tests at a 5% level. In general, the bur-prepared group displayed higher microtensile bond strength values than the laser-treated group. Based on one-month water stbrage and 2,000 thermocycles, the performance of the tested adhesive system to Er:YAG-laser irradiated dentin was negatively affected (Group IC), while adhesion of the bur-prepared group decreased only within six months of water storage combined with 12,000 thermocycles (Group IID). It may be concluded that adhesion to the Er:YAG laser cavity preparation was more affected by the methods used for simulating degradation of the adhesive interface.

  1. Effect of Endodontic Irrigants on Microtensile Bond Strength to Dentin After Thermocycling and Long-Term Water Storage

    PubMed Central

    Galafassi, Daniel; Colucci, Vivian; Cecchin, Doglas; Scatena, Camila; Nascimento, Telma N.; Corona, Silmara A. M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The bond strength of adhesives in irrigated dentin behaves differently over time. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of long-term water storage and thermocycling on the microtensile bond strength of adhesive systems to dentin irrigated with endodontic solutions. Materials and Methods: Sixty human molars were used after removal of the occlusal portion and exposure of the dentin by grinding. The specimens were irrigated with 2.5% NaOCl for 30 minutes and then 17% EDTA for 5 minutes and assigned to six groups according to the adhesive system (n=10): G1 and G2–Clearfil SE Bond; G3 and G4–Single Bond 2; and G5 and G6–XP Bond. The teeth were restored with composite and were subjected to water storage for different time periods. G1, G3 and G5 were stored for 24 h; G2, G4 and G6 were stored for 6 months and were subjected to thermocycling (12,000 cycles, 5°C to 55°C, 500 cycles per week for 6 months). After storage, the tooth/restoration assembly was sectioned to obtain four sticks of approximately 1 mm2, for microtensile bond strength testing. The results were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test. Results: Significant differences were observed among the adhesives (p<0.01). No significant differences were observed in the microtensile bond strength between samples after 24 hours of storage without thermocycling and after 6-month storage with 12,000 cycles (p<0.05). Conclusion: The bond strengths of G5 and G6 after irrigation with 2.5% NaOCl and 17% EDTA were significantly different from those of other groups. Long-term water storage/thermocycling had no effect on bond strength to dentin. PMID:24910650

  2. Thermocycling effect on microshear bond strength to zirconia ceramic using Er:YAG and tribochemical silica coating as surface conditioning.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Ana Luísa; Ramos, João Carlos; Santos-del Riego, Sérgio; Montero, Javier; Albaladejo, Alberto

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the thermocycling effect on the microshear bond strength (μSBS) of different self-adhesive resin cements to zirconia using tribochemical silica coating Rocatec™ (ROC) and Er:YAG as surface conditioners. Two hundred forty square-like zirconia samples were polished and randomly assigned in four groups according surface treatment applied as follows: (1) no treatment (NT), (2) silica coating with ROC, 3) Er:YAG laser irradiation (LAS: 2.940 nm, 200 mJ; 10 Hz), and (4) laser followed by Rocatec™ (LAROC). Each group was divided into two subgroups according the resin tested as follows: (A) BiFix SE (BIF) and (B) Clearfil SA (CLE). After 24 h, half of the specimens from each subgroup were tested. The other half was stored and thermocycled (5-55 °C/5,000 cycles). A μSBS test was performed using a universal testing machine (cross head speed = 0.5 mm/min). Failure modes were recorded and observed by scanning electronic microscopy. Data was analyzed with ANOVA, Student's t test, and chi-square tests, and linear regression was performed (p < 0.05). Before thermocycling, both cements showed higher μSBS results with ROC and LAROC. After aging, (1) all BIF specimens evidenced severely decreased adhesion with mostly adhesive failures and (2) CLE maintained the initial results in ROC and LAROC groups, performing better with ROC. Thermocycling did not negatively influence the resin-zirconia μSBS results in the self-adhesive resin cement containing 10-MDP when used on zirconia surface coated with silica, independently of previous Er:YAG surface treatment.

  3. Patient Perceptions of Physician Use of Handheld Computers

    PubMed Central

    Houston, Thomas K.; Ray, Midge N.; Crawford, Myra A.; Giddens, Tonya; Berner, Eta S.

    2003-01-01

    Background Handheld computers have advantages for physicians, including portability and integration into office workflow. However, negative patient perceptions of physician use of handheld computers in the examining room might limit integration. Objective To survey patients’ perceptions of handheld use, and compare those with their providers’ perceptions. Methods A survey of patient attitudes toward handhelds was conducted among patients at a low-income university clinic. Internal Medicine residents providing care were also surveyed. Results Patients (N=93) were mostly female (79%) and ethnic minorities (67%) with average age of 39. Only 10% of patients did not like the idea of a handheld computer in the exam room. Other negative attitudes were also seen in a minority of patients. Some physicians (23%) reported reservations about using the handheld with patients. Conclusions Negative attitudes were rare among patients, but some providers were concerned about using the handheld in the exam room. PMID:14728182

  4. Miniaturized thermocycler based on thermoelectric heating for diagnosis of sexually transmitted disease by DNA amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Hyunjung; Jo, Ga Eun; Kim, Kyong Soo; Back, Seung Min; Choi, Hyuk

    2017-05-01

    Sexually transmitted disease (STD) is among the most common infectious diseases; therefore, it is necessary to develop sensitive early diagnostic techniques. As the gold standard, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has been most widely employed for STD diagnosis; however, PCR requires large and expensive instruments. In this study, miniaturized thermal cycler using Peltier modules was developed for the PCR analysis. In comparison with the conventional PCR instrument, the Peltier-based micro-PCR (P-mPCR) device developed in this study enables one to amplify and successfully distinguish between DNA of different sizes. Furthermore, by using the clinical vaginal sample collected with the vaginal swab and tampon, different kinds of STD bacteria could be detected with high accuracy (˜94.19%) and high sensitivity (˜95.6%). Therefore, the P-mPCR device will be applicable in STD diagnosis as well as the detection of other bacteria/viruses using DNA amplification in regions including those with limited resources.

  5. Alcohol assessment using wireless handheld computers

    PubMed Central

    Bernhardt, Jay M.; Usdan, Stuart; Mays, Darren; Arriola, Kimberly Jacob; Martin, Ryan J.; Cremeens, Jennifer; McGill, Tia; Weitzel, Jessica Aungst

    2007-01-01

    The present study sought to test the feasibility of measuring quantity and frequency of self-reported alcohol consumption among college students using the Handheld Assisted Network Diary (HAND) by comparing results to a retrospective Timeline Followback (TLFB). A total of 40 undergraduate college students completed a HAND assessment during the two-week study period and completed a TLFB at follow-up. The HAND recorded similar levels of alcohol consumption compared to the TLFB. There were no significant differences in overall alcohol consumption, drinks per drinking day, or heavy drinking days between the two methods of assessment. Handheld computers may represent a useful tool for assessing daily alcohol use among college students. PMID:17499442

  6. NMR hand-held moisture sensor.

    PubMed

    Prado, P J

    2001-01-01

    An open magnet design, hand-held NMR sensor head is presented. Wood moisture content and cement hydration tests demonstrate the potential of the tool for in-situ material assessment. The magnetic field distribution was adjusted by positioning blocks of permanent magnets using millimeter scale 3-dimensional magnetic field modeling. A low Q-factor circuit was used for spin-echo sequences with short echo times.

  7. Critical care procedure logging using handheld computers.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Motta, J Carlos; Walker, Robin; Stewart, Thomas E; Granton, John; Abrahamson, Simon; Lapinsky, Stephen E

    2004-10-01

    We conducted this study to evaluate the feasibility of implementing an internet-linked handheld computer procedure logging system in a critical care training program. Subspecialty trainees in the Interdepartmental Division of Critical Care at the University of Toronto received and were trained in the use of Palm handheld computers loaded with a customized program for logging critical care procedures. The procedures were entered into the handheld device using checkboxes and drop-down lists, and data were uploaded to a central database via the internet. To evaluate the feasibility of this system, we tracked the utilization of this data collection system. Benefits and disadvantages were assessed through surveys. All 11 trainees successfully uploaded data to the central database, but only six (55%) continued to upload data on a regular basis. The most common reason cited for not using the system pertained to initial technical problems with data uploading. From 1 July 2002 to 30 June 2003, a total of 914 procedures were logged. Significant variability was noted in the number of procedures logged by individual trainees (range 13-242). The database generated by regular users provided potentially useful information to the training program director regarding the scope and location of procedural training among the different rotations and hospitals. A handheld computer procedure logging system can be effectively used in a critical care training program. However, user acceptance was not uniform, and continued training and support are required to increase user acceptance. Such a procedure database may provide valuable information that may be used to optimize trainees' educational experience and to document clinical training experience for licensing and accreditation.

  8. Use of handheld devices in critical care.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Pamela P

    2005-03-01

    Emergencies happen everyday in the acute care environment and demand nurses to make decisions quickly that can have serious, if not potentially fatal, ramifications. Being prepared to make decisions is partly the results of experience, but having access to ready resources can provide even the newest nurse with the potential to make critical decisions accurately. Handheld devices, such as personal digital assistants, can provide access to resources that can improve patient safety and, ultimately, patient care delivery.

  9. Microfluidic MEMS hand-held flow cytometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grafton, Meggie M. G.; Maleki, Teimour; Zordan, Michael D.; Reece, Lisa M.; Byrnes, Ron; Jones, Alan; Todd, Paul; Leary, James F.

    2011-02-01

    Due to a number of recent technological advances, a hand-held flow cytometer can be achieved by use of semiconductor illuminators, optical sensors (all battery powered) and sensitive cell markers such as immuno-quantum dot (Qdot) labels. The specific application described is of a handheld blood analyzer that can quickly process a drop of whole, unfractionated human peripheral blood by real-time, on-chip magnetic separation of white blood cells (WBCs) and red blood cells (RBCs) and further fluorescence analysis of Qdot labeled WBC subsets. Various microfluidic patterns were fabricated in PDMS and used to characterize flow of single cells and magnetic deflection of magnetically labeled cells. An LED excitation, avalanche photodiode detection system (SensL Technologies, Ltd., Cork, Ireland) was used for immuno-Qdot detection of WBC subsets. A static optical setup was used to determine the sensitivity of the detection system. In this work we demonstrate: valve-less, on-chip magnetic sorting of immunomagnetically labeled white blood cells, bright Qdot labeling of lymphocytes, and counting of labeled white blood cells. Comparisons of these results with conventional flow cytometric analyses are reported. Sample preparation efficiency was determined by labeling of isolated white blood cells. Appropriate flow rates were determined for optical detection and confirmed with flowing particles. Several enabling technologies required for a truly portable, battery powered, hand-held flow cytometer for use in future point-of-care diagnostic devices have been demonstrated. The combining of these technologies into an integrated handheld instrument is in progress and results on whole blood cell analysis are to be reported in another paper.

  10. Critical care procedure logging using handheld computers

    PubMed Central

    Carlos Martinez-Motta, J; Walker, Robin; Stewart, Thomas E; Granton, John; Abrahamson, Simon; Lapinsky, Stephen E

    2004-01-01

    Introduction We conducted this study to evaluate the feasibility of implementing an internet-linked handheld computer procedure logging system in a critical care training program. Methods Subspecialty trainees in the Interdepartmental Division of Critical Care at the University of Toronto received and were trained in the use of Palm handheld computers loaded with a customized program for logging critical care procedures. The procedures were entered into the handheld device using checkboxes and drop-down lists, and data were uploaded to a central database via the internet. To evaluate the feasibility of this system, we tracked the utilization of this data collection system. Benefits and disadvantages were assessed through surveys. Results All 11 trainees successfully uploaded data to the central database, but only six (55%) continued to upload data on a regular basis. The most common reason cited for not using the system pertained to initial technical problems with data uploading. From 1 July 2002 to 30 June 2003, a total of 914 procedures were logged. Significant variability was noted in the number of procedures logged by individual trainees (range 13–242). The database generated by regular users provided potentially useful information to the training program director regarding the scope and location of procedural training among the different rotations and hospitals. Conclusion A handheld computer procedure logging system can be effectively used in a critical care training program. However, user acceptance was not uniform, and continued training and support are required to increase user acceptance. Such a procedure database may provide valuable information that may be used to optimize trainees' educational experience and to document clinical training experience for licensing and accreditation. PMID:15469577

  11. High performance hand-held gas chromatograph

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, C.M.

    1998-04-28

    The Microtechnology Center of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has developed a high performance hand-held, real time detection gas chromatograph (HHGC) by Micro-Electro-Mechanical-System (MEMS) technology. The total weight of this hand-held gas chromatograph is about five lbs., with a physical size of 8{close_quotes} x 5{close_quotes} x 3{close_quotes} including carrier gas and battery. It consumes about 12 watts of electrical power with a response time on the order of one to two minutes. This HHGC has an average effective theoretical plate of about 40k. Presently, its sensitivity is limited by its thermal sensitive detector at PPM. Like a conventional G.C., this HHGC consists mainly of three major components: (1) the sample injector, (2) the column, and (3) the detector with related electronics. The present HHGC injector is a modified version of the conventional injector. Its separation column is fabricated completely on silicon wafers by means of MEMS technology. This separation column has a circular cross section with a diameter of 100 pm. The detector developed for this hand-held GC is a thermal conductivity detector fabricated on a silicon nitride window by MEMS technology. A normal Wheatstone bridge is used. The signal is fed into a PC and displayed through LabView software.

  12. Use of Handheld Computers in Medical Education

    PubMed Central

    Kho, Anna; Henderson, Laura E; Dressler, Daniel D; Kripalani, Sunil

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND Over the past decade, handheld computers (or personal digital assistants [PDAs]) have become a popular tool among medical trainees and physicians. Few comprehensive reviews of PDA use in medicine have been published. OBJECTIVE We systematically reviewed the literature to (1) describe medical trainees' use of PDAs for education or patient care, (2) catalog popular software applications, and (3) evaluate the impact of PDA use on patient care. DATA SOURCES MEDLINE (1993 to 2004), medical education-related conference proceedings, and hand search of article bibliographies. REVIEW METHODS We identified articles and abstracts that described the use of PDAs in medical education by trainees or educators. Reports presenting a qualitative or quantitative evaluation were included. RESULTS Sixty-seven studies met inclusion criteria. Approximately 60% to 70% of medical students and residents use PDAs for educational purposes or patient care. Satisfaction was generally high and correlated with the level of handheld computer experience. Most of the studies included described PDA use for patient tracking and documentation. By contrast, trainees rated medical textbooks, medication references, and medical calculators as the most useful applications. Only 1 randomized trial with educational outcomes was found, demonstrating improved learning and application of evidence-based medicine with use of PDA-based decision support software. No articles reported the impact of PDA use on patient outcomes. CONCLUSION Most medical trainees find handhelds useful in their medical education and patient care. Further studies are needed to evaluate how PDAs impact learning and clinical outcomes. PMID:16704405

  13. Long-term effects of handheld cell phone laws on driver handheld cell phone use.

    PubMed

    McCartt, Anne T; Hellinga, Laurie A; Strouse, Laura M; Farmer, Charles M

    2010-04-01

    As of October 2009, seven U.S. states and the District of Columbia (D.C.) ban driving while talking on a handheld cell phone. Long-term effects on driver handheld phone use in D.C., New York State, and Connecticut were examined. The percentage of drivers talking on handheld cell phones was measured over time with daytime observation surveys in the jurisdictions with bans and comparison jurisdictions without bans. Trends were modeled using Poisson regression to estimate differences between actual rates and rates that would have been expected without a ban. The D.C. ban immediately lowered the percentage of drivers talking on handheld cell phones by 41 percent. Nearly 5 years later, the rate was 43 percent lower than would have been expected without the ban. Use in Connecticut declined 76 percent immediately after the ban; 3.5 years later, use was 65 percent lower than would have been expected without the ban. In New York, use declined 47 percent immediately after the ban; 7 years later, use was 24 percent lower than expected without the ban. Fifteen months after the laws took effect, compliance in New York was lower than in D.C., and the difference appeared due to more intensive enforcement in D.C. However, this linkage is no longer clear because enforcement in New York picked up such that 2008 levels of enforcement appeared comparable in D.C. and New York, whereas enforcement in Connecticut lagged behind. In all three jurisdictions, the chance that a violator would receive a citation was low, and there were no publicized targeted enforcement campaigns. Jurisdictional bans have reduced handheld phone use and appear capable of maintaining reductions for the long term. However, it is unknown whether overall phone use is lower because many drivers may have switched to hands-free devices. Further research is needed to determine whether reduced handheld cell phone use has reduced crashes.

  14. Single-molecule emulsion PCR in microfluidic droplets.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhi; Jenkins, Gareth; Zhang, Wenhua; Zhang, Mingxia; Guan, Zhichao; Yang, Chaoyong James

    2012-06-01

    The application of microfluidic droplet PCR for single-molecule amplification and analysis has recently been extensively studied. Microfluidic droplet technology has the advantages of compartmentalizing reactions into discrete volumes, performing highly parallel reactions in monodisperse droplets, reducing cross-contamination between droplets, eliminating PCR bias and nonspecific amplification, as well as enabling fast amplification with rapid thermocycling. Here, we have reviewed the important technical breakthroughs of microfluidic droplet PCR in the past five years and their applications to single-molecule amplification and analysis, such as high-throughput screening, next generation DNA sequencing, and quantitative detection of rare mutations. Although the utilization of microfluidic droplet single-molecule PCR is still in the early stages, its great potential has already been demonstrated and will provide novel solutions to today's biomedical engineering challenges in single-molecule amplification and analysis.

  15. The effect of thermocycling liquid boronizing on the thickness of the boride layer and the transition zone

    SciTech Connect

    Oezsoy, A.; Yaman, Y.M. )

    1993-07-15

    Boronizing is a thermo-diffusion surface treatment, which is defined as enrichment of the surface of a workpiece with boron by means of thermo-chemical treatment. The processes are based on chemical or electrochemical reactions between the boron source and the respective base metal. Boron sources or boronizing compounds are solid, liquid or gas. Boride coatings, or the formation of boride compounds near the surface have been achieved by: (a) chemical methods; using gas boronizing agents, by immersion in molten salts, electrolysis and by pack cementation with powders; (b) physical methods; such as boron ion implantation, physical vacuum deposition, sputtering and ion plating. The methods of thermocycling treatment are used for intensification of the diffusion processes and forming more uniform microstructures and grain refinement. Krishtal and Kenis reported that the diffusion processes are accelerated with increasing grain boundary length, vacancy concentration, dislocation density inside the grains, and stress gradients in the thermocycling treatment. In practice, the type of structure favoring the intensification of diffusion processes is obtained using thermocycling treatment (TCT), either as a preliminary treatment before thermo-chemical treatment (TChT) or as a combined process before and during the thermochemical treatment. The steel is usually heated to 30-50 C above Ac[sub 1] and cooled to 50-100 C below Ar[sub 1]. Such treatment achieves an increase in the diffusion layer thickness, grain refinement and formation of a polygonal structure in the bulk of the metal. The combined use of TCT and TChT was studied during carburization of steel with a solid carburizer. It was demonstrated that, at the same duration of isothermal treatment (15 h), 5 cycles of 880-750 C, TCT produce grain size No. 5-6 in the bulk and grain size No. 9-10 in the diffusion layer, while the thickness of that layer increases 1.5 times. Improved fatigue resistance was also recorded.

  16. The effect of phosphoric acid pre-etching and thermocycling on self-etching adhesive enamel bonding.

    PubMed

    Sheets, James L; Wilcox, Charles W; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Nunn, Martha E

    2012-02-01

    When inserting a resin-bonded prosthesis, it is not known whether pumicing, rinsing, and using a self-etching primer (SE) on prepared surfaces is sufficient or whether the use of an additional conventional acid etchant is warranted due to the increased time and risk of contamination. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of pre-etching with phosphoric acid (PA) and thermocycling (TC) on the enamel shear bond strength (SBS) of an autopolymerizing adhesive system on ground enamel. Human teeth were embedded in phenolic rings with methyl methacrylate resin, and their enamel surfaces were ground flat to a 600 grit surface. The teeth were then divided into 4 subsets (n=22): 1) PSN, PA pre-etch with SE, no TC; 2) PST, PA pre-etch with self-etching primer and TC; 3) SEN, self-etching primer alone, no TC; and 4) SET, self-etching primer and TC. A multifactorial study design was used to evaluate 2 factors (pre-etching with PA and TC) at 2 levels (presence or absence) by grouping different subsets. Pre-etch consisted of teeth being etched for 30 seconds with PA, rinsed, re-etched, and rinsed. Self-etching consisted of 60 seconds with ED Primer. Rods of Rexillium III, airborne-particle abraded with 50 μm aluminum oxide, were bonded to enamel surfaces with Panavia 21 OP under a 19.6 N load. Thermocycling consisted of alternating between water baths of 5 ± 2°C and 55 ± 2°C for 5000 cycles. Shear bond strength (SBS) was determined by loading the specimens to failure at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Mean values were analyzed with a 2-way ANOVA (factors were surface treatment and TC) at α=.05. Pre-etching with phosphoric acid showed greater SBS to enamel (P=.028) than the self-etching primer alone. Thermocycling did not have a significant effect (P=.424). There was a significant difference in SBS between pre-etching enamel surfaces with phosphoric acid in addition to the self-etching primer and using the self-etching primer exclusively. Thermocycling did not

  17. Properties of Welded Joints from Alloy Zr - 2.5 % Nb after Electron-Beam Local Thermocycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, A. N.; Plyshevskii, M. I.; Melyukov, V. V.; Korepanov, A. G.; Rassoshkina, N. S.; Uvarov, A. A.

    2014-03-01

    Modes of electron-beam local thermocycling treatment of welded joints of ∅ 88 × 4 mm pipes from alloy É125 (Zr - 2.5 % Nb) are tested. The structure of the welds is studied. The characteristics of mechanical properties are determined under tension and static and dynamic bending. The corrosion resistance is determined in long-term tests in an autoclave with water at 285 °C and in fast tests in an autoclave at 360 °C for 336 h in accordance with the International Standard.

  18. Biaxial flexural strength and phase transformation of Ce-TZP/Al2O3 and Y-TZP core materials after thermocycling and mechanical loading.

    PubMed

    Bankoğlu Güngör, Merve; Yılmaz, Handan; Aydın, Cemal; Karakoca Nemli, Seçil; Turhan Bal, Bilge; Tıraş, Tülay

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of thermocycling and mechanical loading on the biaxial flexural strength and the phase transformation of one Ce-TZP/Al2O3 and two Y-TZP core materials. Thirty disc-shaped specimens were obtained from each material. The specimens were randomly divided into three groups (control, thermocycled, and mechanically loaded). Thermocycling was subjected in distilled water for 10000 cycles. Mechanical loading was subjected with 200 N loads at a frequency of 2 Hz for 100000 times. The mean biaxial flexural strength and phase transformation of the specimens were tested. The Weibull modulus, characteristic strength, 10%, 5% and 1% probabilities of failure were calculated using the biaxial flexural strength data. The characteristic strengths of Ce-TZP/Al2O3 specimens were significantly higher in all groups compared with the other tested materials (P<.001). Statistical results of X-ray diffraction showed that thermocycling and mechanical loading did not affect the monoclinic phase content of the materials. According to Raman spectroscopy results, at the same point and the same material, mechanical loading significantly affected the phase fraction of all materials (P<.05). It was concluded that thermocycling and mechanical loading did not show negative effect on the mean biaxial strength of the tested materials.

  19. 76 FR 22918 - In the Matter of Certain Handheld Electronic Computing Devices, Related Software, and Components...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-25

    ... COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Handheld Electronic Computing Devices, Related Software, and Components... States after importation of certain handheld electronic computing devices, related software, and... importation of certain handheld electronic computing devices, related software, and components thereof...

  20. Reproducibility and Validity of a Handheld Spirometer

    PubMed Central

    Barr, R Graham; Stemple, Kimberly J.; Mesia-Vela, Sonia; Basner, Robert C.; Derk, Susan; Henneberger, Paul; Milton, Donald K; Taveras, Brenda

    2013-01-01

    Background Handheld spirometers have several advantages over desktop spirometers but worries persist regarding their reproducibility and validity. We undertook an independent examination of an ultrasonic flow-sensing handheld spirometer. Methods Laboratory methods included reproducibility and validity testing using a waveform generator with standard American Thoracic Society (ATS) waveforms, in-line testing, calibration adaptor testing, and compression of the mouthpiece. Clinical testing involved repeated testing of 24 spirometry-naive volunteers and comparison to a volume-sensing dry rolling seal spirometer. Results The EasyOne Diagnostic spirometer exceeded standard thresholds of acceptability for ATS waveforms. In-line testing yielded valid results with relative differences (mean ± SD) between the EasyOne and the reference spirometer for the forced vital capacity (FVC) of 0.03±0.23 L and the forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) of −0.06±0.09 L. The calibration adaptor showed no appreciable problems, but extreme compression of the mouthpiece reduced measures. In clinical testing, coefficients of variation and limits of agreement were, respectively: 3.3% and 0.24 L for the FVC; 2.6% and 0.18 L for the FEV1; and 1.9% and 0.05 for the FEV1/FVC ratio. The EasyOne yielded lower values than the reference spirometry (FVC: −0.12 L; FEV1: −0.17 L; FEV1/FVC ratio: −0.02). Limits of agreement were within criteria for FVC but not for the FEV1, possibly due to a training effect. Conclusion The EasyOne spirometer yielded generally reproducible results that were generally valid compared to laboratory-based spirometry. The use of this handheld spirometer in clinical, occupational and research settings seems justified. PMID:18364054

  1. Handheld magnetic sensor for measurement of tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singal, K.; Rajamani, R.

    2012-04-01

    This letter develops an analytical formulation for measurement of tension in a string using a handheld sensor. By gently pushing the sensor against the string, the tension in the string can be obtained. An experimental sensor prototype is constructed to verify the analytical formulation. The centimeter-sized prototype utilizes three moving pistons and magnetic field based measurements of their positions. Experimental data show that the sensor can accurately measure tension on a bench top rig. The developed sensor could be useful in a variety of orthopedic surgical procedures, including knee replacement, hip replacement, ligament repair, shoulder stabilization, and tendon repair.

  2. Hand-held and automated breast ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Bassett, L.W.; Gold, R.H.; Kimme-Smith, C.

    1985-01-01

    The book is a guide for physicians and technologists who use US as an adjunct to mammography; it carefully outlines the pros and cons of US of the breast and its role in the diagnosis of benign and malignant diseases. After an introduction that discusses the philosophy of breast US, the chapters cover the physics of US and instrumentation (both hand-held transducers as well as automated water path scanners), then proceed to a discussion of the normal breast. Sections on benign disorders, malignant lesions, and pitfalls of diagnosis are followed by quiz cases.

  3. Effect of thermocycling on the temperatures of phase transformations, structure, and properties of the equiatomic alloy Ti50.0Ni50.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churakova, A. A.; Gunderov, D. V.

    2016-01-01

    This article is devoted to studying the influence of thermocycling in the range of temperatures of the thermoelastic martensitic transformation B2- B19' on the microstructure, the temperatures of the martensitic transformations, and the mechanical properties of the equiatomic alloy Ti50Ni50 in the coarse-grained (CG) and ultrafine-grained (UFG) states, the latter obtained by equal-channel angular pressing (ECAP). One hundred cycles of thermocycling and the related increase in the dislocation density in the CG alloy led to a decrease in the temperatures of martensitic transformations. In the UFG alloy, the temperatures of the forward transformation ( M s, M f) decrease by 2-3 K, and the temperatures of the reverse transformation ( A s, A f) increase by 6 K. The ultimate strength remains almost unaltered upon the thermocycling, but the yield stress increases substantially from 430 to 550 MPa and from 935 to 1120 MPa for the CG and UFG states, respectively.

  4. Handheld Technology Acceptance in Radiologic Science Education and Training Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Kevin Jay

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the behavioral intention of directors of educational programs in the radiologic sciences to adopt handheld devices to aid in managing student clinical data. Handheld devices were described to participants as a technology representing a class of mobile electronic devices including, but not limited to,…

  5. Handheld Technology Acceptance in Radiologic Science Education and Training Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Kevin Jay

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the behavioral intention of directors of educational programs in the radiologic sciences to adopt handheld devices to aid in managing student clinical data. Handheld devices were described to participants as a technology representing a class of mobile electronic devices including, but not limited to,…

  6. Educational Uses of Handheld Devices: What Are the Consequences?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Song, Yanjie

    2007-01-01

    Handheld devices are being used increasingly in schools and higher education. Many researchers assume that the use of these devices will exert considerable impact on educational practices. However, to date, it appears that such use has not been sustainable and transferable. The impact of educational uses of handheld devices does not yet seem…

  7. Evaluation of a Handheld Data Collection Interface for Science Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parr, Cynthia Sims; Jones, Tricia; Songer, Nancy Butler

    2004-01-01

    Despite a rise in the use of handheld computers in classrooms, meaningful learning with personal digital assistant (PDA) technology remains poorly studied. This article reports results from an evaluation of customized handheld data collection software, the BioKIDS Sequence, which was used during an 8-week biodiversity curriculum unit by 5th and…

  8. Evaluation of a Handheld Data Collection Interface for Science Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parr, Cynthia Sims; Jones, Tricia; Songer, Nancy Butler

    2004-01-01

    Despite a rise in the use of handheld computers in classrooms, meaningful learning with personal digital assistant (PDA) technology remains poorly studied. This article reports results from an evaluation of customized handheld data collection software, the BioKIDS Sequence, which was used during an 8-week biodiversity curriculum unit by 5th and…

  9. A Cognitive Style Perspective to Handheld Devices: Customization vs. Personalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsieh, Chen-Wei; Chen, Sherry Y.

    2016-01-01

    Handheld devices are widely applied to support open and distributed learning, where students are diverse. On the other hand, customization and personalization can be applied to accommodate students' diversities. However, paucity of research compares the effects of customization and personalization in the context of handheld devices. To this end, a…

  10. Handheld emissions detector (HED): overview and development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentino, George J.; Schimmel, David

    2009-05-01

    Nova Engineering, Cincinnati OH, a division of L-3 Communications (L-3 Nova), under the sponsorship of Program Manager Soldier Warrior (PM-SWAR), Fort Belvoir, VA, has developed a Soldier portable, light-weight, hand-held, geolocation sensor and processing system called the Handheld Emissions Detector (HED). The HED is a broadband custom receiver and processor that allows the user to easily sense, direction find, and locate a broad range of emitters in the user's surrounding area. Now in its second design iteration, the HED incorporates a set of COTS components that are complemented with L-3 Nova custom RF, power, digital, and mechanical components, plus custom embedded and application software. The HED user interfaces are designed to provide complex information in a readily-understandable form, thereby providing actionable results for operators. This paper provides, where possible, the top-level characteristics of the HED as well as the rationale behind its design philosophy along with its applications in both DOD and Commercial markets.

  11. A hand-held immaterial volumetric display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sand, Antti; Rakkolainen, Ismo

    2014-03-01

    We have created an ultralight, movable, "immaterial" fogscreen. It is based on the fogscreen mid-air imaging technology. The hand-held unit is roughly the size and weight of an ordinary toaster. If the screen is tracked, it can be swept in the air to create mid-air slices of volumetric objects, or to show augmented reality (AR) content on top of real objects. Interfacing devices and methodologies, such as hand and gesture trackers, camera-based trackers and object recognition, can make the screen interactive. The user can easily interact with any physical object or virtual information, as the screen is permeable. Any real objects can be seen through the screen, instead of e.g., through a video-based augmented reality screen. It creates a mixed reality setup where both the real world object and the augmented reality content can be viewed and interacted with simultaneously. The hand-held mid-air screen can be used e.g., as a novel collaborating or classroom tool for individual students or small groups.

  12. Practical applications of hand-held computers in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Goldblum, Orin M

    2002-09-01

    For physicians, hand-held computers are gaining popularity as point of care reference tools. The convergence of hand-held computers, the Internet, and wireless networks will enable these devices to assume more essential roles as mobile transmitters and receivers of digital medical Information. In addition to serving as portable medical reference sources, these devices can be Internet-enabled, allowing them to communicate over wireless wide and local area networks. With enhanced wireless connectivity, hand-held computers can be used at the point of patient care for charge capture, electronic prescribing, laboratory test ordering, laboratory result retrieval, web access, e-mail communication, and other clinical and administrative tasks. Physicians In virtually every medical specialty have begun using these devices in various ways. This review of hand-held computer use in dermatology illustrates practical examples of the many different ways hand-held computers can be effectively used by the practicing dermatologist.

  13. Adhesion of dental porcelain to cast, milled, and laser-sintered cobalt-chromium alloys: shear bond strength and sensitivity to thermocycling.

    PubMed

    Serra-Prat, Josep; Cano-Batalla, Jordi; Cabratosa-Termes, Josep; Figueras-Àlvarez, Oscar

    2014-09-01

    New technologies have led to the introduction of new materials, so an evaluation of the adhesion of ceramics to these materials is needed. The purpose of this study was to compare the shear bond strength of dental porcelain to cast, milled, and laser-sintered cobalt-chromium alloys, and to investigate the adhesive bond and failure type after thermocycling, 90 metal cylinders (10 mm diameter and 10 mm height) were prepared from cast (30 specimens), milled (30 specimens), and laser-sintered (30 specimens) alloys. Ceramic cylinders (2.5 mm diameter and 4 mm length) were fused to the alloy cylinders. For each group, 15 specimens were thermocycled 5500 times at temperatures between 4°C and 60°C before testing. After testing, the specimen surfaces were visually examined to determine the failure mode. Differences in adhesion values according to manufacturing method, testing condition (thermocycling or no thermocycling), and interaction between the factors were evaluated with a 2-way ANOVA. The χ(2) test (95% confidence level) was performed to determine whether the failure mode was associated with the testing condition. Adhesion strengths for the nonthermocycled specimens were 42.79 ±14.14 MPa (cast), 37.56 ±9.18 MPa (milled), and 29.09 ±6.95 MPa (laser-sintered), and, for the thermocycled specimens, 16.52 ±8.96 MPa (cast), 22.21 ±13.25 MPa (milled), and 24.28 ±10.13 MPa (laser-sintered). Two-way ANOVA results indicated no statistically significant differences in adhesion among the manufacturing methods (P=.257), but statistically significant differences were observed according to both testing conditions (P<.001) and interaction between the factors (P=.015). The χ(2) test indicated that the failure mode was not associated with the testing condition (thermocycled, P=.280; nonthermocycled, P=.240). The porcelain adhesion values for all the materials were adequate for clinical applications. No significant adhesion differences were observed between cast, milled

  14. Image Quality Characteristics of Handheld Display Devices for Medical Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Asumi; Liu, Peter; Cheng, Wei-Chung; Badano, Aldo

    2013-01-01

    Handheld devices such as mobile phones and tablet computers have become widespread with thousands of available software applications. Recently, handhelds are being proposed as part of medical imaging solutions, especially in emergency medicine, where immediate consultation is required. However, handheld devices differ significantly from medical workstation displays in terms of display characteristics. Moreover, the characteristics vary significantly among device types. We investigate the image quality characteristics of various handheld devices with respect to luminance response, spatial resolution, spatial noise, and reflectance. We show that the luminance characteristics of the handheld displays are different from those of workstation displays complying with grayscale standard target response suggesting that luminance calibration might be needed. Our results also demonstrate that the spatial characteristics of handhelds can surpass those of medical workstation displays particularly for recent generation devices. While a 5 mega-pixel monochrome workstation display has horizontal and vertical modulation transfer factors of 0.52 and 0.47 at the Nyquist frequency, the handheld displays released after 2011 can have values higher than 0.63 at the respective Nyquist frequencies. The noise power spectra for workstation displays are higher than 1.2×10−5 mm2 at 1 mm−1, while handheld displays have values lower than 3.7×10−6 mm2. Reflectance measurements on some of the handheld displays are consistent with measurements for workstation displays with, in some cases, low specular and diffuse reflectance coefficients. The variability of the characterization results among devices due to the different technological features indicates that image quality varies greatly among handheld display devices. PMID:24236113

  15. Do Handheld Devices Facilitate Face-to-Face Collaboration? Handheld Devices with Large Shared Display Groupware to Facilitate Group Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Chen-Chung; Kao, L.-C.

    2007-01-01

    One-to-one computing environments change and improve classroom dynamics as individual students can bring handheld devices fitted with wireless communication capabilities into the classrooms. However, the screens of handheld devices, being designed for individual-user mobile application, limit promotion of interaction among groups of learners. This…

  16. In vitro influence of ultrasonic stress, removal force preload and thermocycling on the retrievability of implant-retained crowns.

    PubMed

    Mehl, Christian; Harder, Sönke; Schwarz, Dorothee; Steiner, Martin; Vollrath, Oliver; Kern, Matthias

    2012-08-01

    The main goals of this in vitro study were to evaluate the influence of thermocycling, ultrasonic stress and the removal force preload on the retrievability of cemented implant crowns using a clinical removal device (Coronaflex) and evaluating the tensile strength using a universal testing machine (UTM). Thirty-six crowns were cast from a Co-Cr alloy for 36 tapered titanium abutments (5° taper, 4.3 mm diameter, 6 mm height, Camlog, Germany). The crowns were cemented with a glass-ionomer (Ketac Cem) or a polycarboxylate (Durelon) cement, followed by 3 days of storage in ionized water without thermocycling or 150 days of storage with 37,500 thermal cycles between 5°C and 55°C. Before removal, the crowns were subjected to ultrasonic stress for 0, 5 or 10 min with a contact pressure of either 50 or 500 g. The Coronaflex was used with a removal force preload of 50 or 400 cN, respectively, applied on the point of loading. Scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) was used to evaluate the impact of the removal on the abutment screws. Crowns cemented with the glass-ionomer cement were significantly easier to remove with the Coronaflex or the UTM than crowns cemented with the polycarboxylate cement (P≤0.05). Ultrasonic stress showed no significant impact on the retrievability regardless of the contact pressure or duration applied (P>0.05). No significant differences could be found for both cements when removed with the Coronaflex or the UTM (P>0.05) after thermocycling was applied. A removal force preload of 400 cN resulted in significantly reduced removal attempts in comparison with 50 cN for both cements (P≤0.05). Ultrasound and thermal cycling did not result in reduced cement strength, but to retrieve the crowns, the full impact of a removal instrument has to be applied. Ketac Cem can be used as a "semipermanent" solution, whereas Durelon might serve for permanent cementation. None of the abutment screws showed signs of wear caused by the removal process. © 2011 John

  17. Handheld Multi-Gas Meters Assessment Report

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Gustavious; Wald-Hopkins, Mark David; Obrey, Stephen J.; Akhadov, Valida Dushdurova

    2016-06-27

    Handheld multi-gas meters (MGMs) are equipped with sensors to monitor oxygen (O2) levels and additional sensors to detect the presence of combustible or toxic gases in the environment. This report is limited to operational response-type MGMs that include at least four different sensors. These sensors can vary by type and by the monitored chemical. In real time, the sensors report the concentration of monitored gases in the atmosphere near the MGM. In April 2016 the System Assessment and Validation for Emergency Responders (SAVER) Program conducted an operationally-oriented assessment of MGMs. Five MGMs were assessed by emergency responders. The criteria and scenarios used in this assessment were derived from the results of a focus group of emergency responders with experience in using MGMs. The assessment addressed 16 evaluation criteria in four SAVER categories: Usability, Capability, Maintainability, and Deployability.

  18. Digital hand-held temperature monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allin, L. V.; Ferrari, I.

    1980-09-01

    A hand-held non-invasive monitoring instrument has been designed, constructed and tested to allow core temperature measurements to be obtained from human subjects who have swallowed a temperature-sensing radio transmitter (radio pill). This instrument uses a simple AM radio for a receiver, digital circuitry to decode the received signal and a four-digit LED module to display the temperature. The unit, which is battery-powered, can be held in one hand while an antenna probe is swept over the abdomen of the subject until a continuously audible signal is generated by a piezoelectric sound source, indicating reception. The digital display then presents the body core temperature in tenths of a degree Celsius.

  19. Handheld microwave bomb-detecting imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorwara, Ashok; Molchanov, Pavlo

    2017-05-01

    Proposed novel imaging technique will provide all weather high-resolution imaging and recognition capability for RF/Microwave signals with good penetration through highly scattered media: fog, snow, dust, smoke, even foliage, camouflage, walls and ground. Image resolution in proposed imaging system is not limited by diffraction and will be determined by processor and sampling frequency. Proposed imaging system can simultaneously cover wide field of view, detect multiple targets and can be multi-frequency, multi-function. Directional antennas in imaging system can be close positioned and installed in cell phone size handheld device, on small aircraft or distributed around protected border or object. Non-scanning monopulse system allows dramatically decrease in transmitting power and at the same time provides increased imaging range by integrating 2-3 orders more signals than regular scanning imaging systems.

  20. Handheld four-wavelength retinal vessel oximeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heaton, Larry C.; Smith, Matthew H.; Denninghoff, Kurt R.; Hillman, Lloyd W.

    2000-06-01

    Several techniques for measuring the oxygen saturation of blood in retinal vessels have been reported. One interesting application of retinal vessel oximetry is the identification of occult blood loss in trauma victims. However, all the devices described to date are too bulky and cumbersome to be used in a trauma bay or in the field. We present a design for a handheld instrument that performs four-wavelength retinal vessel oximetry. This device is comparable in size and weight to a commercially available camcorder, and is suitable for use in the trauma bay. The compact size of this device could also extend its applications beyond traditional clinical settings, as it could be used by primary care physicians and home health care workers for the screening and monitoring of ophthalmic diseases. Principles of operation and preliminary data from the device will be described.

  1. [Development of ophthalmologic software for handheld devices].

    PubMed

    Grottone, Gustavo Teixeira; Pisa, Ivan Torres; Grottone, João Carlos; Debs, Fernando; Schor, Paulo

    2006-01-01

    The formulas for calculation of intraocular lenses have evolved since the first theoretical formulas by Fyodorov. Among the second generation formulas, the SRK-I formula has a simple calculation, taking into account a calculation that only involved anteroposterior length, IOL constant and average keratometry. With the evolution of those formulas, complexicity increased making the reconfiguration of parameters in special situations impracticable. In this way the production and development of software for such a purpose, can help surgeons to recalculate those values if needed. To idealize, develop and test a Brazilian software for calculation of IOL dioptric power for handheld computers. For the development and programming of software for calculation of IOL, we used PocketC program (OrbWorks Concentrated Software, USA). We compared the results collected from a gold-standard device (Ultrascan/Alcon Labs) with the simulation of 100 fictitious patients, using the same IOL parameters. The results were grouped for ULTRASCAN data and SOFTWARE data. Using SRK/T formula the range of those parameters included a keratometry varying between 35 and 55D, axial length between 20 and 28 mm, IOL constants of 118.7, 118.3 and 115.8. Using Wilcoxon test, it was shown that the groups do not differ (p=0.314). We had a variation in the Ultrascan sample between 11.82 and 27.97. In the tested program sample the variation was practically similar (11.83-27.98). The average of the Ultrascan group was 20.93. The software group had a similar average. The standard deviation of the samples was also similar (4.53). The precision of IOL software for handheld devices was similar to that of the standard devices using the SRK/T formula. The software worked properly, was steady without bugs in tested models of operational system.

  2. Optical links in handheld multimedia devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Geffen, S.; Duis, J.; Miller, R.

    2008-04-01

    Ever emerging applications in handheld multimedia devices such as mobile phones, laptop computers, portable video games and digital cameras requiring increased screen resolutions are driving higher aggregate bitrates between host processor and display(s) enabling services such as mobile video conferencing, video on demand and TV broadcasting. Larger displays and smaller phones require complex mechanical 3D hinge configurations striving to combine maximum functionality with compact building volumes. Conventional galvanic interconnections such as Micro-Coax and FPC carrying parallel digital data between host processor and display module may produce Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) and bandwidth limitations caused by small cable size and tight cable bends. To reduce the number of signals through a hinge, the mobile phone industry, organized in the MIPI (Mobile Industry Processor Interface) alliance, is currently defining an electrical interface transmitting serialized digital data at speeds >1Gbps. This interface allows for electrical or optical interconnects. Above 1Gbps optical links may offer a cost effective alternative because of their flexibility, increased bandwidth and immunity to EMI. This paper describes the development of optical links for handheld communication devices. A cable assembly based on a special Plastic Optical Fiber (POF) selected for its mechanical durability is terminated with a small form factor molded lens assembly which interfaces between an 850nm VCSEL transmitter and a receiving device on the printed circuit board of the display module. A statistical approach based on a Lean Design For Six Sigma (LDFSS) roadmap for new product development tries to find an optimum link definition which will be robust and low cost meeting the power consumption requirements appropriate for battery operated systems.

  3. 16 CFR 1225.2 - Requirements for hand-held infant carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Requirements for hand-held infant carriers... ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR HAND-HELD INFANT CARRIERS (Eff. 6-6-14) § 1225.2 Requirements for hand-held infant carriers. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, each hand-held...

  4. Effect of thermocycling on the shear bond strength of different resins bonded to thermoplastic foil applied in occlusal splint therapy.

    PubMed

    Wieckiewicz, Mieszko; Boening, Klaus W; Richter, Gert; Wieckiewicz, Wlodzimierz

    2015-04-01

    Temporomandibular disorders are a group of symptoms related to the impaired function of the temporomandibular joints and associated muscles. Occlusal splint therapy is a common treatment in the aforementioned syndrome. One of the methods of manufacturing occlusal splints is to place a polymer on thermoplastic foil. The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of light- and self-cured resins bonded to thermoplastic foil dependent on artificial aging. Thirty cylinders composed of light-cured resin and 30 cylinders made of self-cured resin were attached to 60 rectangular thermoplastic plates. All specimens were divided into six groups. A control study was conducted for groups 1 and 2. The other preparation groups were subjected to thermocycling by setting appropriately 1000 cycles for groups 3 and 4 and 3000 cycles for groups 5 and 6 in distilled water. Bond strength was measured in a universal testing machine. The results were subjected to statistical analysis using the Mann-Whitney U test (p ≤ 0.05). The statistics revealed that the values of the shear bond strength for specimens composed of self-cured resin after 1000 and 3000 thermocycles were significantly higher than on those made of light-cured resin (p = 0.003 and p = 0.002). The shear bond strength between the self-cured resin and the thermoplastic foil was higher and more resistant to aging than the shear bond strength between the light-cured resin and the thermoplastic foil. © 2014 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  5. The transforming effect of handheld computers on nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Brent W

    2005-01-01

    Handheld computers have the power to transform nursing care. The roots of this power are the shift to decentralization of communication, electronic health records, and nurses' greater need for information at the point of care. This article discusses the effects of handheld resources, calculators, databases, electronic health records, and communication devices on nursing practice. The US government has articulated the necessity of implementing the use of handheld computers in healthcare. Nurse administrators need to encourage and promote the diffusion of this technology, which can reduce costs and improve care.

  6. Electronic, Hand-Held, Wireless Text-And-Graphics Viewer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palumbo, Daniel L.

    1994-01-01

    Proposed electronic, hand-held, wireless viewer presents written material to reader in way that closely resembles that of paper reading material. Viewer presents text and graphics like those normally found in books, newspapers, and magazines. Its hand-held and wireless features enable it to be used in positions and areas where books and magazines are normally used. Device consists primarily of two parts: the receiver/information store and viewing screen.

  7. Electronic, Hand-Held, Wireless Text-And-Graphics Viewer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palumbo, Daniel L.

    1994-01-01

    Proposed electronic, hand-held, wireless viewer presents written material to reader in way that closely resembles that of paper reading material. Viewer presents text and graphics like those normally found in books, newspapers, and magazines. Its hand-held and wireless features enable it to be used in positions and areas where books and magazines are normally used. Device consists primarily of two parts: the receiver/information store and viewing screen.

  8. Handheld, point-of-care laser speckle imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farraro, Ryan; Fathi, Omid; Choi, Bernard

    2016-09-01

    Laser speckle imaging (LSI) enables measurement of relative changes in blood flow in biological tissues. We postulate that a point-of-care form factor will lower barriers to routine clinical use of LSI. Here, we describe a first-generation handheld LSI device based on a tablet computer. The coefficient of variation of speckle contrast was <2% after averaging imaging data collected over an acquisition period of 5.3 s. With a single, experienced user, handheld motion artifacts had a negligible effect on data collection. With operation by multiple users, we did not identify any significant difference (p>0.05) between the measured speckle contrast values using either a handheld or mounted configuration. In vivo data collected during occlusion experiments demonstrate that a handheld LSI is capable of both quantitative and qualitative assessment of changes in blood flow. Finally, as a practical application of handheld LSI, we collected data from a 53-day-old neonate with confirmed compromised blood flow in the hand. We readily identified with LSI a region of diminished blood flow in the thumb of the affected hand. Our data collectively suggest that handheld LSI is a promising technique to enable clinicians to obtain point-of-care measurements of blood flow.

  9. Doctors' experience with handheld computers in clinical practice: qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    McAlearney, Ann Scheck; Schweikhart, Sharon B; Medow, Mitchell A

    2004-01-01

    Objective To examine doctors' perspectives about their experiences with handheld computers in clinical practice. Design Qualitative study of eight focus groups consisting of doctors with diverse training and practice patterns. Setting Six practice settings across the United States and two additional focus group sessions held at a national meeting of general internists. Participants 54 doctors who did or did not use handheld computers. Results Doctors who used handheld computers in clinical practice seemed generally satisfied with them and reported diverse patterns of use. Users perceived that the devices helped them increase productivity and improve patient care. Barriers to use concerned the device itself and personal and perceptual constraints, with perceptual factors such as comfort with technology, preference for paper, and the impression that the devices are not easy to use somewhat difficult to overcome. Participants suggested that organisations can help promote handheld computers by providing advice on purchase, usage, training, and user support. Participants expressed concern about reliability and security of the device but were particularly concerned about dependency on the device and over-reliance as a substitute for clinical thinking. Conclusions Doctors expect handheld computers to become more useful, and most seem interested in leveraging (getting the most value from) their use. Key opportunities with handheld computers included their use as a stepping stone to build doctors' comfort with other information technology and ehealth initiatives and providing point of care support that helps improve patient care. PMID:15142920

  10. High performance hand-held gas chromatograph

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, C M; Koo, J C

    2001-01-10

    Gas chromatography is a prominent technique for separating complex gases and then analyzing the relative quantities of the separate components. This analytical technique is popular with scientists in a wide range of applications, including environmental restoration for air and water pollution, and chemical and biological analysis. Today the analytical instrumentation community is to working towards moving the analysis away from the laboratory to the point of origin of the sample (''the field'') to achieve real-time data collection and lower analysis costs. The Microtechnology Center of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, has developed a hand-held, real-time detection gas chromatograph (GC) through Micro-Electro-Mechanical-System (MEMS) technology. The total weight of this GC is approximately 8 pounds, and it measures 8 inches by 5 inches by 3 inches. It consumes approximately 12 watts of electrical power and has a response time on the order of 2 minutes. The current detector is a glow discharge detector with a sensitivity of parts per billion. The average retention time is about 30 to 45 seconds. Under optimum conditions, the calculated effective plate number is 40,000. The separation column in the portable GC is fabricated completely on silicon wafers. Silicon is a good thermal conductor and provides rapid heating and cooling of the column. The operational temperature can be as high as 350 degrees Celsius. The GC system is capable of rapid column temperature ramping and cooling operations. These are especially important for organic and biological analyses in the GC applications.

  11. Portable Handheld Optical Window Inspection Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihlefeld, Curtis; Dokos, Adam; Burns, Bradley

    2010-01-01

    The Portable Handheld Optical Window Inspection Device (PHOWID) is a measurement system for imaging small defects (scratches, pits, micrometeor impacts, and the like) in the field. Designed primarily for window inspection, PHOWID attaches to a smooth surface with suction cups, and raster scans a small area with an optical pen in order to provide a three-dimensional image of the defect. PHOWID consists of a graphical user interface, motor control subsystem, scanning head, and interface electronics, as well as an integrated camera and user display that allows a user to locate minute defects before scanning. Noise levels are on the order of 60 in. (1.5 m). PHOWID allows field measurement of defects that are usually done in the lab. It is small, light, and attaches directly to the test article in any orientation up to vertical. An operator can scan a defect and get useful engineering data in a matter of minutes. There is no need to make a mold impression for later lab analysis.

  12. Extensional rheometry with a handheld mobile device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Kristin A.; Liedtke, Aleesha M.; Todt, Anika H.; Walker, Travis W.

    2017-06-01

    The on-site characterization of complex fluids is important for a number of academic and industrial applications. Consequently, a need exists to develop portable rheometers that can provide in the field diagnostics and serve as tools for rapid quality assurance. With the advancement of smartphone technology and the widespread global ownership of smart devices, mobile applications are attractive as platforms for rheological characterization. The present work investigates the use of a smartphone device for the extensional characterization of a series of Boger fluids composed of glycerol/water and poly(ethylene oxide), taking advantage of the increasing high-speed video capabilities (currently up to 240 Hz capture rate at 720p) of smartphone cameras. We report a noticeable difference in the characterization of samples with slight variations in polymer concentration and discuss current device limitations. Potential benefits of a handheld extensional rheometer include its use as a point-of-care diagnostic tool, especially in developing communities, as well as a simple and inexpensive tool for assessing product quality in industry.

  13. Virtual PCR

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, S N; Clague, D S; Vandersall, J A; Hon, G; Williams, P L

    2006-02-23

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) stands among the keystone technologies for analysis of biological sequence data. PCR is used to amplify DNA, to generate many copies from as little as a single template. This is essential, for example, in processing forensic DNA samples, pathogen detection in clinical or biothreat surveillance applications, and medical genotyping for diagnosis and treatment of disease. It is used in virtually every laboratory doing molecular, cellular, genetic, ecologic, forensic, or medical research. Despite its ubiquity, we lack the precise predictive capability that would enable detailed optimization of PCR reaction dynamics. In this LDRD, we proposed to develop Virtual PCR (VPCR) software, a computational method to model the kinetic, thermodynamic, and biological processes of PCR reactions. Given a successful completion, these tools will allow us to predict both the sequences and concentrations of all species that are amplified during PCR. The ability to answer the following questions will allow us both to optimize the PCR process and interpret the PCR results: What products are amplified when sequence mixtures are present, containing multiple, closely related targets and multiplexed primers, which may hybridize with sequence mismatches? What are the effects of time, temperature, and DNA concentrations on the concentrations of products? A better understanding of these issues will improve the design and interpretation of PCR reactions. The status of the VPCR project after 1.5 years of funding is consistent with the goals of the overall project which was scoped for 3 years of funding. At half way through the projected timeline of the project we have an early beta version of the VPCR code. We have begun investigating means to improve the robustness of the code, performed preliminary experiments to test the code and begun drafting manuscripts for publication. Although an experimental protocol for testing the code was developed, the preliminary

  14. The association between handheld phone bans and the prevalence of handheld phone conversations among young drivers in the United States.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Motao; Rudisill, Toni M; Heeringa, Steven; Swedler, David; Redelmeier, Donald A

    2016-12-01

    Fourteen US states and the District of Columbia have banned handheld phone use for all drivers. We examined whether such legislation was associated with reduced handheld phone conversations among drivers aged younger than 25 years. Data from the 2008 to 2013 National Occupant Protection Use Survey were merged with states' legislation. The outcome was roadside-observed handheld phone conversation at stop signs or lights. Logistic regression was used. A total of 32,784 young drivers were observed. Relative to drivers who were observed in states without a universal handheld phone ban, the adjusted odds ratio of phone conversation was 0.42 (95% confidence interval, 0.33-0.53) for drivers who were observed in states with bans. The relative reduction in phone conversation was 46% (23%, 61%) for laws that were effective less than 1 year, 55% (32%, 70%) for 1-2 years, 63% (51%, 72%) for 2 years or more, relative to no laws. Universal handheld phone bans may be effective at reducing handheld phone use among young drivers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Use of handheld computers in clinical practice: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Many healthcare professionals use smartphones and tablets to inform patient care. Contemporary research suggests that handheld computers may support aspects of clinical diagnosis and management. This systematic review was designed to synthesise high quality evidence to answer the question; Does healthcare professionals’ use of handheld computers improve their access to information and support clinical decision making at the point of care? Methods A detailed search was conducted using Cochrane, MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Science and Social Science Citation Indices since 2001. Interventions promoting healthcare professionals seeking information or making clinical decisions using handheld computers were included. Classroom learning and the use of laptop computers were excluded. Two authors independently selected studies, assessed quality using the Cochrane Risk of Bias tool and extracted data. High levels of data heterogeneity negated statistical synthesis. Instead, evidence for effectiveness was summarised narratively, according to each study’s aim for assessing the impact of handheld computer use. Results We included seven randomised trials investigating medical or nursing staffs’ use of Personal Digital Assistants. Effectiveness was demonstrated across three distinct functions that emerged from the data: accessing information for clinical knowledge, adherence to guidelines and diagnostic decision making. When healthcare professionals used handheld computers to access clinical information, their knowledge improved significantly more than peers who used paper resources. When clinical guideline recommendations were presented on handheld computers, clinicians made significantly safer prescribing decisions and adhered more closely to recommendations than peers using paper resources. Finally, healthcare professionals made significantly more appropriate diagnostic decisions using clinical decision making tools on handheld computers compared to colleagues

  16. Use of handheld computers in clinical practice: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Mickan, Sharon; Atherton, Helen; Roberts, Nia Wyn; Heneghan, Carl; Tilson, Julie K

    2014-07-06

    Many healthcare professionals use smartphones and tablets to inform patient care. Contemporary research suggests that handheld computers may support aspects of clinical diagnosis and management. This systematic review was designed to synthesise high quality evidence to answer the question; Does healthcare professionals' use of handheld computers improve their access to information and support clinical decision making at the point of care? A detailed search was conducted using Cochrane, MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Science and Social Science Citation Indices since 2001. Interventions promoting healthcare professionals seeking information or making clinical decisions using handheld computers were included. Classroom learning and the use of laptop computers were excluded. Two authors independently selected studies, assessed quality using the Cochrane Risk of Bias tool and extracted data. High levels of data heterogeneity negated statistical synthesis. Instead, evidence for effectiveness was summarised narratively, according to each study's aim for assessing the impact of handheld computer use. We included seven randomised trials investigating medical or nursing staffs' use of Personal Digital Assistants. Effectiveness was demonstrated across three distinct functions that emerged from the data: accessing information for clinical knowledge, adherence to guidelines and diagnostic decision making. When healthcare professionals used handheld computers to access clinical information, their knowledge improved significantly more than peers who used paper resources. When clinical guideline recommendations were presented on handheld computers, clinicians made significantly safer prescribing decisions and adhered more closely to recommendations than peers using paper resources. Finally, healthcare professionals made significantly more appropriate diagnostic decisions using clinical decision making tools on handheld computers compared to colleagues who did not have access to these

  17. Microfluidic gradient PCR (MG-PCR): a new method for microfluidic DNA amplification.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunsun; Xing, Da

    2010-02-01

    This study develops a new microfluidic DNA amplification strategy for executing parallel DNA amplification in the microfluidic gradient polymerase chain reaction (MG-PCR) device. The developed temperature gradient microfluidic system is generated by using an innovative fin design. The device mainly consists of modular thermally conductive copper flake which is attached onto a finned aluminum heat sink with a small fan. In our microfluidic temperature gradient prototype, a non-linear temperature gradient is produced along the gradient direction. On the copper flake of length 45 mm, width 40 mm and thickness 4 mm, the temperature gradient easily spans the range from 97 to 52 degrees Celsius. By making full use of the hot (90-97 degrees Celsius) and cold (60-70 degrees Celsius) regions on the temperature gradient device, the parallel, two-temperature MG-PCR amplification is feasible. As a demonstration, the MG-PCR from three parallel reactions of 112-bp Escherichia coli DNA fragment is performed in a continuous-flow format, in which the flow of the PCR reagent in the closed loop is induced by the buoyancy-driven nature convection. Although the prototype is not optimized, the MG-PCR amplification can be completed in less than 45 min. However, the MG-PCR thermocycler presented herein can be further scaled-down, and thus the amplification times and reagent consumption can be further reduced. In addition, the currently developed temperature gradient technology can be applied onto other continuous-flow MG-PCR systems or used for other analytical purposes such as parallel and combination measurements, and fluorescent melting curve analysis.

  18. A novel fully integrated handheld gamma camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massari, R.; Ucci, A.; Campisi, C.; Scopinaro, F.; Soluri, A.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we present an innovative, fully integrated handheld gamma camera, namely designed to gather in the same device the gamma ray detector with the display and the embedded computing system. The low power consumption allows the prototype to be battery operated. To be useful in radioguided surgery, an intraoperative gamma camera must be very easy to handle since it must be moved to find a suitable view. Consequently, we have developed the first prototype of a fully integrated, compact and lightweight gamma camera for radiopharmaceuticals fast imaging. The device can operate without cables across the sterile field, so it may be easily used in the operating theater for radioguided surgery. The prototype proposed consists of a Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM) array coupled with a proprietary scintillation structure based on CsI(Tl) crystals. To read the SiPM output signals, we have developed a very low power readout electronics and a dedicated analog to digital conversion system. One of the most critical aspects we faced designing the prototype was the low power consumption, which is mandatory to develop a battery operated device. We have applied this detection device in the lymphoscintigraphy technique (sentinel lymph node mapping) comparing the results obtained with those of a commercial gamma camera (Philips SKYLight). The results obtained confirm a rapid response of the device and an adequate spatial resolution for the use in the scintigraphic imaging. This work confirms the feasibility of a small gamma camera with an integrated display. This device is designed for radioguided surgery and small organ imaging, but it could be easily combined into surgical navigation systems.

  19. Handheld chemiresistive gas sensor readout system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joubert, Trudi-Heleen; du Toit, Jurie; Mkwakikunga, Bonex; Bosscha, Peter

    2016-02-01

    Low-cost and non-invasive diabetes diagnosis is increasingly important [1], and this paper presents a handheld readout system for chemiresistive gas sensors in a breath acetone diagnostic application. The sensor contains reference and detection devices, used for the detection of gas concentration. Fabrication is by dropcasting a metaloxide nanowire solution onto gold interdigitated electrodes, which had been manufactured on silicon. The resulting layer is a wide bandgap n-type semiconductor material sensitive to acetone, producing a change in resistance between the electrode terminals [2]. Chemiresistive sensors typically require temperatures of 300-500 °C, while variation of sensing temperature is also employed for selective gas detection. The nano-structured functional material requires low temperatures due to large surface area, but heating is still required for acceptable recovery kinetics. Furthermore, UV illumination improves the sensor recovery [3], and is implemented in this system. Sensor resistances range from 100 Ω to 50 MΩ, while the sensor response time require a sampling frequency of 10Hz. Sensor resistance depends on temperature, humidity, and barometric pressure. The GE CC2A23 temperature sensor is used over a range of -10°C to 60°C, the Honeywell HIH5031 humidity sensor operates up to 85% over this temperature range, and the LPS331AP barometric pressure sensor measures up to 1.25 bar. Honeywell AWM43300V air flow sensors monitor the flow rate up to 1000 sccm. An LCD screen displays all the sensor data, as well as real time date and time, while all measurements are also logged in CSV-format. The system operates from a rechargeable battery.

  20. Advances in handheld FT-IR instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnó, Josep; Cardillo, Len; Judge, Kevin; Frayer, Maxim; Frunzi, Michael; Hetherington, Paul; Levy, Dustin; Oberndorfer, Kyle; Perec, Walter; Sauer, Terry; Stein, John; Zuidema, Eric

    2012-06-01

    FT-IR spectroscopy is the technology of choice to identify solid and liquid phase unknown samples. The challenges of ConOps (Concepts of Operation) in emergency response and military field applications require a significant redesign of the stationary FT-IR bench-top instruments typically used in laboratories. Specifically, field portable units require high levels of resistance against mechanical shock and chemical attack, ease of use in restrictive gear, quick and easy interpretation of results, and reduced size. In the last 20 years, FT-IR instruments have been re-engineered to fit in small suitcases for field portable use and recently further miniaturized for handheld operation. This article introduces the advances resulting from a project designed to overcome the challenges associated with miniaturizing FT-IR instruments. The project team developed a disturbance-corrected permanently aligned cube corner interferometer for improved robustness and optimized opto-mechanical design to maximize optical throughput and signal-to-noise ratios. Thermal management and heat flow were thoroughly modeled and studied to isolate sensitive components from heat sources and provide the widest temperature operation range. Similarly, extensive research on mechanical designs and compensation techniques to protect against shock and vibration will be discussed. A user interface was carefully created for military and emergency response applications to provide actionable information in a visual, intuitive format. Similar to the HazMatID family of products, state-of-the-art algorithms were used to quickly identify the chemical composition of complex samples based on the spectral information. This article includes an overview of the design considerations, tests results, and performance validation of the mechanical ruggedness, spectral, and thermal performance.

  1. Evolution of the Structure and Properties of Cold-Deformed Hardened System-Alloyed Steel 10Kh3G3MF Due to Intense Thermocycling Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panov, D. O.; Balakhnin, A. N.; Titova, M. G.; Orlova, E. N.; Smirnov, A. I.; Simonov, Yu N.

    2013-03-01

    Processes of formation of structure and properties in intense thermocycling treatment of steel 10Kh3G3MF preliminarily subjected to quenching and 60% cold plastic deformation by the method of radial forging are studied. The dynamics of variation of the grain structure of austenite, of the temperature of the start of formation of martensite, and of the level of mechanical properties is studied after different modes of heat treatment.

  2. Ultra-compact switchable SLO/OCT handheld probe design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaRocca, Francesco; Nankivil, Derek; DuBose, Theodore; Farsiu, Sina; Izatt, Joseph A.

    2015-03-01

    Handheld scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) systems facilitate imaging of young children and subjects that have difficulty fixating. More compact and lightweight probes allow for better portability and increased comfort for the operator of the handheld probe. We describe a very compact, novel SLO and OCT handheld probe design. A single 2D microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) scanner and a custom optical design using a converging beam prior to the scanner permitted significant reduction in the system size. Our design utilized a combination of commercial and custom optics that were optimized in Zemax to achieve near diffraction-limited resolution of 8 μm over a 7° field of view. The handheld probe has a form factor of 7 x 6 x 2.5 cm and a weight of only 94 g, which is over an order of magnitude lighter than prior SLO-OCT handheld probes. Images were acquired from a normal subject with an incident power on the eye under the ANSI limit. With this device, which is the world's lightest and smallest SLO-OCT system, we were able to visualize parafoveal cone photoreceptors and nerve fiber bundles without the use of adaptive optics.

  3. Handheld optical coherence tomography scanner for primary care diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Jung, Woonggyu; Kim, Jeehyun; Jeon, Mansik; Chaney, Eric J; Stewart, Charles N; Boppart, Stephen A

    2011-03-01

    The goal of this study is to develop an advanced point-of-care diagnostic instrument for use in a primary care office using handheld optical coherence tomography (OCT). This system has the potential to enable earlier detection of diseases and accurate image-based diagnostics. Our system was designed to be compact, portable, user-friendly, and fast, making it well suited for the primary care office setting. The unique feature of our system is a versatile handheld OCT imaging scanner which consists of a pair of computer-controlled galvanometer-mounted mirrors, interchangeable lens mounts, and miniaturized video camera. This handheld scanner has the capability to guide the physician in real time for finding suspicious regions to be imaged by OCT. In order to evaluate the performance and use of the handheld OCT scanner, the anterior chamber of a rat eye and in vivo human retina, cornea, skin, and tympanic membrane were imaged. Based on this feasibility study, we believe that this new type of handheld OCT device and system has the potential to be an efficient point-of-care imaging tool in primary care medicine.

  4. Effect of thermocycling and varying polymerization techniques on the restorative interface of class V cavities restored with different composite resin systems

    PubMed Central

    Júnior, Lindomar-Corrêa; Só, Marcus-Vinicius-Reis; Júnior, Newton-Fahl

    2017-01-01

    Background To evaluate marginal microleakage of two composite resins - a methacrylate- and a silorane-based submitted to different polymerization techniques and thermocycling. Material and Methods Ninety-six class V cavities were prepared in sound human molars and restored under different polymerization and thermocycling regimens. The adhesive systems employed were Adper Scotchbond Multipurpose and Filtek P-90 for cavities restored with Z250 and P-90. The specimens were restored with Z250 or P-90, and divided into 3 subgroups with different polymerization techniques. The data were analyzed by Three way Analysis of Variance Test (p<0.05). Results Micro infiltration lower scores were found in groups which were used silorane-based resin with significant statistical difference compared with the specimens restored with methacrylate-based resin, independently of polymerization type used and thermocycling (P>0.001). Conclusions Silorane-based composite resins present lower marginal microleakage values when compared to methacrylate-based composites resins. Key words:Composite resin, microleakage, polymerization. PMID:28298983

  5. Effect of air abrasion and thermocycling on resin adaptation and shear bond strength to dentin for an etch-and-rinse and self-etch resin adhesive.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Rebecca; Varanasi, Srinivas; Meyers, Ian A; Symons, Anne L

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effect of air abrasion and thermocycling on the adaptation and shear bond strength, of composite resin bonded to dentin using etch-and-rinse and self-etch resin adhesives. Confocal microscopy showed both adhesives closely adapted to dentin and a significantly (p<0.001) greater number of resin tags were observed for the etch-and-rinse adhesive. Air abrasion significantly increased resin tag length (p<0.05) for the etch-and-rinse adhesive and significantly increased the number (p<0.001), length (p<0.001) and thickness (p<0.01) of tags for the self-etch adhesive. However, air abrasion resulted in defect formation within the hybrid layer and thermocycling caused separation of the hybrid layer from adjacent dentin containing resin tags. A significant (p<0.05) reduction in shear bond strength was observed for the etch-and-rinse adhesive following thermocycling. Both adhesive systems adapted well to dentin in vitro and shear bond strengths were similar. The area of tag penetration into dentin was significantly (p<0.0001) enhanced following air abrasion.

  6. A case of recurrent, self-inflicted handheld laser retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Simonett, Joseph M; Scarinci, Fabio; Labriola, Leanne T; Jampol, Lee M; Goldstein, Debra A; Fawzi, Amani A

    2016-04-01

    A 17-year-old young man presented with vision loss and discrete, bilateral foveal lesions. The patient returned 6 weeks later with worsening vision, prominent bilateral retinal lesions, and a full-thickness macular hole in the right eye consistent with recurrent self-inflicted handheld laser retinopathy. After instructing the family to remove the patient's access to laser pointers, follow-up examination revealed spontaneous closure of the macular hole but minimal vision improvement. Recurrent ocular exposure to handheld lasers can masquerade as an organic process in patients who withhold pertinent history. Clinicians should rely on the distinguishing features seen on examination and multimodal imaging to make the diagnosis of handheld laser retinopathy.

  7. Design of a fiber-optic multiphoton microscopy handheld probe

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yuan; Sheng, Mingyu; Huang, Lin; Tang, Shuo

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a fiber-optic multiphoton microscopy (MPM) system with handheld probe using femtosecond fiber laser. Here we present the detailed optical design and analysis of the handheld probe. The optical systems using Lightpath 352140 and 352150 as objective lens were analyzed. A custom objective module that includes Lightpath 355392 and two customized corrective lenses was designed. Their performances were compared by wavefront error, field curvature, astigmatism, F-θ error, and tolerance in Zemax simulation. Tolerance analysis predicted the focal spot size to be 1.13, 1.19 and 0.83 µm, respectively. Lightpath 352140 and 352150 were implemented in experiment and the measured lateral resolution was 1.22 and 1.3 µm, respectively, which matched with the prediction. MPM imaging by the handheld probe were conducted on leaf, fish scale and rat tail tendon. The MPM resolution can potentially be improved by the custom objective module. PMID:27699109

  8. 77 FR 32996 - Certain Handheld Electronic Computing Devices, Related Software, and Components Thereof...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Certain Handheld Electronic Computing Devices, Related Software, and Components Thereof... importation of certain handheld electronic computing devices, related software, and components thereof...

  9. In vivo melanoma depth detection by a handheld photoacoustic microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yong; Xing, Wenxin; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Cornelius, Lynn A.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-03-01

    We developed a handheld photoacoustic microscope (PAM) to detect melanoma and determine tumor depth in nude mice in vivo. Compared to our previous PAM system for melanoma imaging, a new light delivery mechanism is introduced to improve light penetration. We show that melanomas with 4.1 mm and 3.3 mm thicknesses can be successfully detected in phantom and in vivo experiments, respectively. With its deep melanoma imaging ability and novel handheld design, this system is promising for clinical melanoma diagnosis, prognosis, and surgical planning for patients at the bedside.

  10. Effect of brushing and thermocycling on the shade and surface roughness of CAD-CAM ceramic restorations.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Judy Chia-Chun; Barão, Valentim Adelino Ricardo; Wee, Alvin G; Alfaro, Maria F; Afshari, Fatemeh S; Sukotjo, Cortino

    2017-09-29

    The effects of toothbrushing (B) and thermocycling (TC) on the surface texture of different materials with various fabrication processes have been investigated. However, studies of computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) ceramic restorations are limited. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of B and TC on the color stability and surface roughness of extrinsically characterized and glazed CAD-CAM ceramic restorations. Lithium disilicate CAD ceramic (n=90) and zirconia ceramic (n=90) were studied. All specimens were crystallized/sintered, characterized, and glazed following the manufacturer's recommendation. The specimens were divided into 9 different groups: B, TC, and a combination of B plus TC (B+TC). Brushing was performed at 50 000, 100 000, and 150 000 cycles, simulating an oral environment of 5, 10, and 15 years. Thermocycling was performed at 6000, 12 000, and 18 000 cycles, simulating an oral environment of 5, 10, and 15 years. Brushing plus TC was performed with the combination of the 50 000 cycles of B, then 6000 cycles of TC, and 10 000 cycles of B, then 12 000 cycles of TC, and 15 000 cycles of B, then 18 000 cycles of TC. The color and surface roughness of each specimen were measured before and after all interventions with simulated cycles. Color differences (ΔE) and surface roughness (ΔRa) data were analyzed using 2-way ANOVA, followed by the least significant difference test (α=.05). The correlation between ΔE and ΔRa was statistically analyzed using the Pearson correlation analysis. Within the lithium disilicate CAD groups, intervention did not result in any significant differences in color change (P>.05). Within the zirconia groups, a 15-year clinical simulation revealed significantly higher ΔE values than a simulated 5-year exposure (P=.017). Increased simulated cycles showed significantly higher Ra values for all groups. Within the zirconia groups, B revealed

  11. Comparative evaluation of tensile bond strength of silicone-based denture liners after thermocycling and surface treatment.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Harsimran; Datta, Kusum

    2015-01-01

    To examine, evaluate, and compare the tensile bond strength of two silicone-based liners; one autopolymerizing and one heat cured, when treated with different chemical etchants to improve their adhesion with denture base resin. Hundred and sixty test specimens of heat-cured polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) were fabricated; out of which 80 specimens were tested for tensile bond strength after bonding it to autopolymerizing resilient liner (Ufigel P) and rest 80 to heat-cured resilient liner (Molloplast B). Each main group was further divided into four subgroups of 20 specimens each, one to act as a control and three were subjected to surface treatment with different chemical etchants namely dichloromethane, MMA monomer, and chloroform. The two silicone-based denture liners were processed between 2 PMMA specimens (10 mm × 10 mm × 40 mm) in the space provided by a spacer of 3 mm, thermocycled (5-55°C) for 500 cycles, and then their tensile strength measurements were done in the universal testing machine. One-way ANOVA technique showed a highly significant difference in the mean tensile bond strength values for all the groups. The Student's t-test computed values of statistics for the compared groups were greater than the critical values both at 5% and at 1% levels. Surface treatment of denture base resin with chemical etchants prior to the application of silicone-based liner (Ufigel P and Molloplast-B) increased the tensile bond strength. The increase was the highest with specimens subjected to 180 s of MMA surface treatment and the lowest with control group specimens.

  12. An In Vitro Evaluation of Leakage of Two Etch and Rinse and Two Self-Etch Adhesives after Thermocycling

    PubMed Central

    Geerts, Sabine; Bolette, Amandine; Seidel, Laurence; Guéders, Audrey

    2012-01-01

    Our experiment evaluated the microleakage in resin composite restorations bonded to dental tissues with different adhesive systems. 40 class V cavities were prepared on the facial and lingual surfaces of each tooth with coronal margins in enamel and apical margins in cementum (root dentin). The teeth were restored with Z100 resin composite bonded with different adhesive systems: Scotchbond Multipurpose (SBMP), a 3-step Etch and Rinse adhesive, Adper Scotchbond 1 XT (SB1), a 2-step Etch and Rinse adhesive, AdheSE One (ADSE-1), a 1-step Self-Etch adhesive, and AdheSE (ADSE), a 2-step Self-Etch adhesive. Teeth were thermocycled and immersed in 50% silver nitrate solution. When both interfaces were considered, SBMP has exhibited significantly less microleakage than other adhesive systems (resp., for SB1, ADSE-1 and ADSE, P = 0.0007, P < 0.0001 and P < 0.0001). When enamel and dentin interfaces were evaluated separately, (1) for the Self-Etch adhesives, microleakage was found greater at enamel than at dentin interfaces (for ADSE, P = 0.024 and for ADSE-1, P < 0.0001); (2) for the Etch and Rinse adhesive systems, there was no significant difference between enamel and dentin interfaces; (3) SBMP was found significantly better than other adhesives both at enamel and dentin interfaces. In our experiment Etch and Rinse adhesives remain better than Self-Etch adhesives at enamel interface. In addition, there was no statistical difference between 1-step (ADSE-1) and 2-step (ADSE) Self-Etch adhesives. PMID:22675358

  13. 78 FR 27441 - NIJ Evaluation of Hand-Held Cell Phone Detector Devices

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-10

    ... of Justice Programs NIJ Evaluation of Hand-Held Cell Phone Detector Devices AGENCY: National...) is soliciting interest in supplying hand-held cell phone detector devices for participation in an... soliciting interest in supplying hand-held cell phone detector devices for participation in an evaluation...

  14. 75 FR 8400 - In the Matter of Certain Wireless Communications System Server Software, Wireless Handheld...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-24

    ... COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Wireless Communications System Server Software, Wireless Handheld Devices... server software, wireless handheld devices and battery packs by reason of infringement of certain claims... importation of certain wireless communications system server software, wireless handheld devices or...

  15. 75 FR 448 - In the Matter of: Certain Authentication Systems, Including Software and Handheld Electronic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-05

    ... Authentication Systems, Including Software and Handheld Electronic Devices; Notice of Investigation AGENCY: U.S... software and handheld electronic devices, by reason of infringement of certain claims of U.S. Patent No 7... software and handheld electronic devices, that infringe one or more of claims 31-35, 38, 41, 51, 54, 56,...

  16. Examining the Potential of Handheld Computers: Findings from the Ohio PEP Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van 't Hooft, Mark; Diaz, Sebastian; Swan, Karen

    2004-01-01

    Handheld devices have the potential to make a large impact on K-12 educational settings, due to their relative low cost, high mobility, and interactive learning capabilities. This article, the outcome of a large-scale project examining the use of handheld computers, examines how handheld computers can improve teaching and learning, what…

  17. Innovation and Integration: Case Studies of Effective Teacher Practices in the Use of Handheld Computers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chavez, Raymond Anthony

    2010-01-01

    Previous research conducted on the use of handheld computers in K-12 education has focused on how handheld computer use affects student motivation, engagement, and productivity. These four case studies sought to identify effective teacher practices in the integration of handhelds into the curriculum and the factors that affect those practices. The…

  18. 30 CFR 77.402 - Hand-held power tools; safety devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hand-held power tools; safety devices. 77.402... COAL MINES Safeguards for Mechanical Equipment § 77.402 Hand-held power tools; safety devices. Hand-held power tools shall be equipped with controls requiring constant hand or finger pressure to operate...

  19. 30 CFR 75.1724 - Hand-held power tools; safety devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hand-held power tools; safety devices. 75.1724... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1724 Hand-held power tools; safety devices. Hand-held power tools shall be equipped with controls requiring constant...

  20. 30 CFR 77.402 - Hand-held power tools; safety devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hand-held power tools; safety devices. 77.402... COAL MINES Safeguards for Mechanical Equipment § 77.402 Hand-held power tools; safety devices. Hand-held power tools shall be equipped with controls requiring constant hand or finger pressure to operate...

  1. 30 CFR 75.1724 - Hand-held power tools; safety devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hand-held power tools; safety devices. 75.1724... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1724 Hand-held power tools; safety devices. Hand-held power tools shall be equipped with controls requiring constant...

  2. 30 CFR 77.402 - Hand-held power tools; safety devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hand-held power tools; safety devices. 77.402... COAL MINES Safeguards for Mechanical Equipment § 77.402 Hand-held power tools; safety devices. Hand-held power tools shall be equipped with controls requiring constant hand or finger pressure to operate...

  3. 30 CFR 75.1724 - Hand-held power tools; safety devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hand-held power tools; safety devices. 75.1724... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1724 Hand-held power tools; safety devices. Hand-held power tools shall be equipped with controls requiring constant...

  4. 30 CFR 77.402 - Hand-held power tools; safety devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hand-held power tools; safety devices. 77.402... COAL MINES Safeguards for Mechanical Equipment § 77.402 Hand-held power tools; safety devices. Hand-held power tools shall be equipped with controls requiring constant hand or finger pressure to operate...

  5. 30 CFR 75.1724 - Hand-held power tools; safety devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hand-held power tools; safety devices. 75.1724... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1724 Hand-held power tools; safety devices. Hand-held power tools shall be equipped with controls requiring constant...

  6. 30 CFR 75.1724 - Hand-held power tools; safety devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hand-held power tools; safety devices. 75.1724... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1724 Hand-held power tools; safety devices. Hand-held power tools shall be equipped with controls requiring constant...

  7. 30 CFR 77.402 - Hand-held power tools; safety devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hand-held power tools; safety devices. 77.402... COAL MINES Safeguards for Mechanical Equipment § 77.402 Hand-held power tools; safety devices. Hand-held power tools shall be equipped with controls requiring constant hand or finger pressure to operate...

  8. 49 CFR 392.82 - Using a hand-held mobile telephone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... COMMERCIAL MOTOR VEHICLES Limiting the Use of Electronic Devices § 392.82 Using a hand-held mobile telephone. (a)(1) No driver shall use a hand-held mobile telephone while driving a CMV. (2) No motor carrier... 49 Transportation 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Using a hand-held mobile telephone. 392.82 Section...

  9. 49 CFR 392.82 - Using a hand-held mobile telephone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... COMMERCIAL MOTOR VEHICLES Limiting the Use of Electronic Devices § 392.82 Using a hand-held mobile telephone. (a)(1) No driver shall use a hand-held mobile telephone while driving a CMV. (2) No motor carrier... 49 Transportation 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Using a hand-held mobile telephone. 392.82 Section...

  10. Fast quantitative PCR, locked nucleic acid probes and reduced volume reactions are effective tools for detecting Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis DNA.

    PubMed

    Ruthig, Gregory R; Deridder, Benjamin P

    2012-01-24

    The fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis threatens amphibian populations around the world. The ability to detect this pathogen on infected animals and in the environment is critical for understanding and controlling this pandemic. We tested several advances in quantitative PCR (qPCR) techniques to detect B. dendrobatidis DNA. We used a fast PCR thermocycler and enzymes that reduced the volume and the duration of the reaction. We also compared a conventional TaqMan minor groove binding (MGB) probe to an identical locked nucleic acid (LNA) counterpart. The fast qPCR reaction had a high degree of sensitivity to B. dendrobatidis DNA. The LNA probe was effective for detecting B. dendrobatidis DNA and produced results -similar to those of the MGB probe. The modifications that we tested can improve the cost, time efficiency and specificity of quantitative PCR as a tool for detecting pathogen DNA.

  11. Monitoring invasive plants using hand-held GIS technology

    Treesearch

    Theresa M. Mau-Crimmins; Barron J. Orr

    2005-01-01

    Successful control of invasive species requires a clear picture of the spatial extent of infestations. The latest mapping technology involves coupling global position systems and handheld computers running geographic information systems software in the field. A series of workshops applying this technology to mapping weeds was developed and presented to Weed Management...

  12. 30 CFR 56.12033 - Hand-held electric tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hand-held electric tools. 56.12033 Section 56.12033 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Electricity §...

  13. 30 CFR 56.12033 - Hand-held electric tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hand-held electric tools. 56.12033 Section 56.12033 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Electricity §...

  14. 30 CFR 56.12033 - Hand-held electric tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hand-held electric tools. 56.12033 Section 56.12033 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Electricity §...

  15. Web-Based Spatial Training Using Handheld Touch Screen Devices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin-Dorta, Norena; Saorin, Jose Luis; Contero, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    This paper attempts to harness the opportunities for mobility and the new user interfaces that handheld touch screen devices offer, in a non-formal learning context, with a view to developing spatial ability. This research has addressed two objectives: first, analyzing the effects that training can have on spatial visualisation using the…

  16. Hand-held Calculators: Past, Present, and Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Max; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Recommendations of several publications with regard to the use of hand-held calculators in the mathematics curriculum are presented. Relevant portions of the NACOME and Euclid Conference reports are cited as well as a report to NSF and recommendations from an NIE/NSF conference. Recommendations support expanded use of, and research concerning,…

  17. The State of the Art in Museum Handhelds in 2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proctor, Nancy; Tellis, Chris

    This paper examines the rapidly changing state of museum handhelds from both a technology and content perspective. The paper also discusses the component parts for a successful museum installation: content, user interface, applications, form factor, positioning and the challenges to integrating these components. Specific examples are demonstrated…

  18. Evaluation of a hand-held lactate analyzer in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Thorneloe, Charlotte; Bédard, Christian; Boysen, Søren

    2007-01-01

    A hand-held lactate test device and a blood gas auto analyzer were compared. The objective of the study was to evaluate the performance of the hand-held device in dogs in a clinical setting. Blood lactate levels were evaluated on 30 samples from healthy client-owned dogs and 48 samples from client-owned dogs with various diseases. A blood sample was collected from each healthy dog by either jugular or cephalic venipuncture and from each sick dog from the jugular, cephalic, or saphenous vein, or from an arterial catheter if applicable. One and a half milliliters of the blood sample was immediately transferred to a heparinized vacutainer tube. Enough blood was then drawn from the heparinized tube to allow split sample simultaneous analysis with both machines. Samples from the sick dogs represented a wide range of clinically relevant lactate values. Good agreement between lactate values from both devices was obtained in both sick and healthy dogs. Lactate values in the healthy group (< 2.9 mmol/L with the hand-held device, < 2.6 mmol/L with the blood gas analyzer) were similar to those previously reported (< 2.5 mmol/L). The results of this study support the use of the hand-held device in dogs in a clinical setting. PMID:17436905

  19. Epilepsy Forewarning Using A Hand-Held Device

    SciTech Connect

    Hively, LM

    2005-02-21

    Over the last decade, ORNL has developed and patented a novel approach for forewarning of a large variety of machine and biomedical events. The present implementation uses desktop computers to analyze archival data. This report describes the next logical step in this effort, namely use of a hand-held device for the analysis.

  20. Neurosurgery contact handheld probe based on sapphire shaped crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikunova, I. A.; Stryukov, D. O.; Rossolenko, S. N.; Kiselev, A. M.; Kurlov, V. N.

    2017-01-01

    A handheld contact probe based on sapphire shaped crystal is developed for intraoperative spectrally-resolved optical diagnostics, laser coagulation and aspiration of malignant brain tissue. The technology was integrated into the neurosurgical workflow for intraoperative real-time identification and removing of invasive brain cancer.

  1. Development of Handheld Multispectral Imaging For Food Safety Inspection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this research was to develop a handheld multispectral instrument for food safety inspection for poultry carcasses. The prototype system developed in this research consisted of a compact dual-band spectral imaging system, Light Emitting diode (LED), and portable computer. The dual-...

  2. NEDLite user's manual: forest inventory for Palm OS handheld computers

    Treesearch

    Peter D. Knopp; Mark J. Twery

    2006-01-01

    A user's manual for NEDLite, software that enables collection of forest inventory data on Palm OS handheld computers, with the option of transferring data into NED software for analysis and subsequent prescription development. NEDLite software is included. Download the NEDLite software at: http://www.fs.fed.us/ne/burlington/ned

  3. Handheld technology acceptance in radiologic science education and training programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powers, Kevin Jay

    The purpose of this study was to explore the behavioral intention of directors of educational programs in the radiologic sciences to adopt handheld devices to aid in managing student clinical data. Handheld devices were described to participants as a technology representing a class of mobile electronic devices including, but not limited to, personal digital assistants such as a Palm TX, Apple iPod Touch, Apple iPad or Hewlett Packard iPaq, and cellular or smartphones with third generation mobile capabilities such as an Apple iPhone, Blackberry or Android device. The study employed a non-experimental, cross-sectional survey design to determine the potential of adopting handheld technologies based on the constructs of Davis's (1989) Technology Acceptance Model. An online self-report questionnaire survey instrument was used to gather study data from 551 entry level radiologic science programs specializing in radiography, radiation therapy, nuclear medicine and medical sonography. The study design resulted in a single point in time assessment of the relationship between the primary constructs of the Technology Acceptance Model: perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use, and the behavioral intention of radiography program directors to adopt the information technology represented by hand held devices. Study results provide justification for investing resources to promote the adoption of mobile handheld devices in radiologic science programs and study findings serve as a foundation for further research involving technology adoption in the radiologic sciences.

  4. Hand-held Calculators: Past, Present, and Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Max; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Recommendations of several publications with regard to the use of hand-held calculators in the mathematics curriculum are presented. Relevant portions of the NACOME and Euclid Conference reports are cited as well as a report to NSF and recommendations from an NIE/NSF conference. Recommendations support expanded use of, and research concerning,…

  5. Payload Specialist Charles Walker with handheld protein growth experiment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1985-11-26

    61B-02-014 (26 Nov-3 Dec 1985) --- Payload Specialist Charles D. Walker works with the handheld protein growth experiment -- one of a series of tests being flown to study the possibility of crystallizing biological materials. Walker rests the experiment against the larger continuous flow electrophoresis systems experiment.

  6. Imaging Emission Spectra with Handheld and Cellphone Cameras

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sitar, David

    2012-01-01

    As point-and-shoot digital camera technology advances it is becoming easier to image spectra in a laboratory setting on a shoestring budget and get immediate results. With this in mind, I wanted to test three cameras to see how their results would differ. Two undergraduate physics students and I used one handheld 7.1 megapixel (MP) digital Cannon…

  7. Comparative Evaluation of Handheld Robot-Aided Intraocular Laser Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Sungwook; MacLachlan, Robert A.; Martel, Joseph N.; Lobes, Louis A.; Riviere, Cameron N.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents robot-aided intraocular laser surgery using a handheld robot known as Micron. The micromanipulator incorporated in Micron enables visual servoing of a laser probe, while maintaining a constant distance of the tool tip from the retinal surface. The comparative study was conducted with various control methods for evaluation of robot-aided intraocular laser surgery. PMID:27019653

  8. Fabricating a custom earpiece for hand-held radios.

    PubMed

    Potter, James V; Hansen, Nancy A; Schroetlin, Robert G; Jones, John D

    2009-12-01

    This article describes the fabrication of a custom earpiece for use with hand-held radios. The technique can be used to fabricate custom earpieces, as a public service, for law enforcement personnel, firefighters, emergency medical services (EMS) personnel, and others, improving safety and providing a valuable benefit to the community.

  9. Handheld, Wireless Computers: Can They Improve Learning and Instruction?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moallem, Mahnaz; Kermani, Hengameh; Chen, Sue-Jen

    2006-01-01

    Reports show that handheld, wireless computers, once used by business professionals to keep track of appointments, contacts, e-mail, and the Internet, have found their way into classrooms and schools across the United States. However, there has not been much systematic research to investigate the effects of these new technology tools on student…

  10. 20. HANDHELD VIEW OF CREW AT REST WHILE UNDERWAY ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. HANDHELD VIEW OF CREW AT REST WHILE UNDERWAY ON MOBILE BAY TO TRAIN TAKEOVER CREW FROM DOMINICAN REPUBLIC. - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter WHITE PINE, U.S. Coast Guard 8th District Base, South Broad Street, Mobile, Mobile County, AL

  11. Hand-Held Ultrasonic Instrument for Reading Matrix Symbols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, Harry F.; Kula, John P.; Gurney, John W.; Lior, Ephraim D.

    2008-01-01

    A hand-held instrument that would include an ultrasonic camera has been proposed as an efficient means of reading matrix symbols. The proposed instrument could be operated without mechanical raster scanning. All electronic functions from excitation of ultrasonic pulses through final digital processing for decoding matrix symbols would be performed by dedicated circuitry within the single, compact instrument housing.

  12. Imaging Emission Spectra with Handheld and Cellphone Cameras

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sitar, David

    2012-01-01

    As point-and-shoot digital camera technology advances it is becoming easier to image spectra in a laboratory setting on a shoestring budget and get immediate results. With this in mind, I wanted to test three cameras to see how their results would differ. Two undergraduate physics students and I used one handheld 7.1 megapixel (MP) digital Cannon…

  13. Manual for 70 mm hand-held photography from Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowman, P. D., Jr.; Frey, H. V.; Shenk, W. E.; Dunkelman, L.

    1973-01-01

    A manual and atlas used on the Skylab mission for hand-held photography are presented. The manual covers terrain, environmental, meteorological, and dim light photography while the atlas covers sections from the Army Map Service 1:40.000,000 world map, a glossary of geologic terms, geologic maps, and recommended exposure times.

  14. Sensitive, microliter PCR with consensus degenerate primers for Epstein Barr virus amplification

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Kyudam; Pak, Nikita; Saunders, D. Curtis; Conrardy, Christina; Landers, James P.; Tong, Suxiang; Forest, Craig R.

    2016-01-01

    Sensitive identification of the etiology of viral diseases is key to implementing appropriate prevention and treatment. The gold standard for virus identification is the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), a technique that allows for highly specific and sensitive detection of pathogens by exponentially amplifying a specific region of DNA from as little as a single copy through thermocycling a biochemical cocktail. Today, molecular biology laboratories use commercial instruments that operate in 0.5–2 h/analysis using reaction volumes of 5–50 μL contained within polymer tubes or chambers. Towards reducing this volume and maintaining performance, we present a semi-quantitative, systematic experimental study of how PCR yield is affected by tube/chamber substrate, surface-area-to-volume ratio (SA:V), and passivation methods. We perform PCR experiments using traditional PCR tubes as well as using disposable polymer microchips with 1 μL reaction volumes thermocycled using water baths. We report the first oil encapsulation microfluidic PCR method without fluid flow and its application to the first microfluidic amplification of Epstein Barr virus using consensus degenerate primers, a powerful and broad PCR method to screen for both known and novel members of a viral family. The limit of detection is measured as 140 starting copies of DNA from a starting concentration of 3×105 copies/mL, regarded as an accepted sensitivity threshold for diagnostic purposes, and reaction specificity was improved as compared to conventional methods. Also notable, these experiments were conducted with conventional reagent concentrations, rather than commonly spiked enzyme and/or template mixtures. This experimental study of the effects of substrate, SA:V, and passivation, together with sensitive and specific microfluidic PCR with consensus degenerate primers represent advances towards lower cost and higher throughput pathogen screening. PMID:23080522

  15. Data for Users of Handheld Ion Mobility Spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Keith A. Daum; Sandra L. Fox

    2008-05-01

    Chemical detection technology end-user surveys conducted by Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in 2005 and 2007 indicated that first responders believed manufacturers’ claims for instruments sometimes were not supported in field applications, and instruments sometimes did not meet their actual needs. Based on these findings, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) asked INL to conduct a similar survey for handheld ion mobility spectrometers (IMS), which are used by a broad community of first responders as well as for other applications. To better access this broad community, the INL used the Center for Technology Commercialization, Inc. (CTC), Public Safety Technology Center (PSTC) to set up an online framework to gather information from users of handheld IMS units. This framework (Survey Monkey) was then used to perform an online Internet survey, augmented by e-mail prompts, to get information from first responders and personnel from various agencies about their direct experience with handheld IMS units. Overall, 478 individuals responded to the survey. Of these, 174 respondents actually owned a handheld IMS. Performance and satisfaction data from these 174 respondents are captured in this report. The survey identified the following observations: • The most common IMS unit used by respondents was the Advanced Portable Detector (APD 2000), followed by ChemRae, Sabre 4000, Sabre 2000, Draeger Multi IMS, Chemical Agent Monitor-2, Chemical Agent Monitor, Vapor Tracer, and Vapor Tracer 2. • The primary owners were HazMat teams (20%), fire services (14%), local police (12%), and sheriffs’ departments (9%). • IMS units are seldom used as part of an integrated system for detecting and identifying chemicals but instead are used independently. • Respondents are generally confused about the capabilities of their IMS unit. This is probably a result of lack of training. • Respondents who had no training or fewer than 8 hours were not satisfied with the overall

  16. Handheld UXO Sensor Improvements to Facilitate UXO/Clutter Discrimination. Volume 2: Signal Processing for Handheld UXO Improvements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-01

    points. ZPP is zero-position points. ZPPT represents the zero-position-update algorithm. . . . 41 54 Velocity calculated from raw acceleration by the...X V ˆ Y V ˆ X P ˆ Y P ZPP ? Parametric model Figure 53: Scheme for positioning the handheld UXO sensor. ZVP denotes zero-velocity points. ZPP is zero

  17. Hand-held radiometry: A set of notes developed for use at the Workshop of Hand-held radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, R. D.; Pinter, P. J., Jr.; Reginato, R. J.; Idso, S. B. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    A set of notes was developed to aid the beginner in hand-held radiometry. The electromagnetic spectrum is reviewed, and pertinent terms are defined. View areas of multiband radiometers are developed to show the areas of coincidence of adjacent bands. The amounts of plant cover seen by radiometers having different fields of view are described. Vegetation indices are derived and discussed. Response functions of several radiometers are shown and applied to spectrometer data taken over 12 wheat plots, to provide a comparison of instruments and bands within and among instruments. The calculation of solar time is reviewed and applied to the calculation of the local time of LANDSAT satellite overpasses for any particular location in the Northern Hemisphere. The use and misuse of hand-held infrared thermometers are discussed, and a procedure for photographic determination of plant cover is described. Some suggestions are offered concerning procedures to be followed when collecting hand-held spectral and thermal data. A list of references pertinent to hand-held radiometry is included.

  18. Solid state rapid thermocycling

    DOEpatents

    Beer, Neil Reginald; Spadaccini, Christopher

    2014-05-13

    The rapid thermal cycling of a material is targeted. A solid state heat exchanger with a first well and second well is coupled to a power module. A thermoelectric element is coupled to the first well, the second well, and the power module, is configured to transfer thermal energy from the first well to the second well when current from the power module flows through the thermoelectric element in a first direction, and is configured to transfer thermal energy from the second well to the first well when current from the power module flows through the thermoelectric element in a second direction. A controller may be coupled to the thermoelectric elements, and may switch the direction of current flowing through the thermoelectric element in response to a determination by sensors coupled to the wells that the amount of thermal energy in the wells falls below or exceeds a pre-determined threshold.

  19. Marginal quality and fracture strength of root-canal treated mandibular molars with overlay restorations after thermocycling and mechanical loading.

    PubMed

    Dere, Mustafa; Ozcan, Mutlu; Göhring, Till N

    2010-08-01

    To evaluate marginal quality, fracture modes, and loads-to-failure of different overlay restorations in rootcanal treated molars in a laboratory setup. Thirty-two mandibular first molars were randomly assigned to four groups (n = 8): UTR= untreated (control), RCT-COM= root canal treated (RCT)+ lab-made composite overlay, RCT-FRC= RCT+composite resin overlay with two layers of multidirectional woven glass fibers; RCT-CER: RCT+ceramic overlay. The teeth in all groups were subjected to thermocycling and mechanical loading (TCML) in a computer-controlled masticator (1,200,000 loads, 49 N, 1.7 Hz, 3000 temperature cycles of 5°C to 50°C). Marginal adaptation was evaluated before and after TCML with scanning electron microscopy at 200X at the tooth-to-luting composite (IF1) and luting composite-to restoration (IF2) interfaces. After TCML, all specimens were loaded to failure in a universal testing machine at 0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed with ANOVA and Bonferroni correction. Marginal adaptation decreased from 93 ± 3.4 to 82 ± 6.5 % at IF1 after TCML (p > 0.001) but the decrease was not significant between the groups (p = 0.8130). At IF2, ceramic overlays showed about 10% lower marginal adaptation than composite overlays (p < 0.0001). Loads-to-failure (in N) were as follows in descending order: RCT-FRC: 3619 ± 520; UTR: 3048 ± 905; RCT-COM: 2770 ± 457; RCT-CER 2036 ± 319. RCT-FRC showed significantly higher results than those of RCT-COM (p = 0.0077) and RCT-CER (p < 0.0001). Only RCT-CER showed significantly lower results than that of the control (p = 0.0019). While the fractures in the UTR occurred exclusively above the cementoenamel junction (Mode 1 and Mode 2) and were rated reparable, RCT-COM and RCT-CER showed exclusively catastrophic failures in varying modes (nodes 3 to 5). Only in group RCT-FRC, half of the specimens fractured in a reparable fracture mode (modes 1 and 2) with veneering composite delamination from the glass-fiber weaver layer. As cusp

  20. Monitoring biothreat agents (Francisella tularensis, Bacillus anthracis and Yersinia pestis) with a portable real-time PCR instrument.

    PubMed

    Mölsä, Markos; Hemmilä, Heidi; Katz, Anna; Niemimaa, Jukka; Forbes, Kristian M; Huitu, Otso; Stuart, Peter; Henttonen, Heikki; Nikkari, Simo

    2015-08-01

    In the event of suspected releases or natural outbreaks of contagious pathogens, rapid identification of the infectious agent is essential for appropriate medical intervention and disease containment. The purpose of this study was to compare the performance of a novel portable real-time PCR thermocycler, PikoReal™, to the standard real-time PCR thermocycler, Applied Biosystems® 7300 (ABI 7300), for the detection of three high-risk biothreat bacterial pathogens: Francisella tularensis, Bacillus anthracis and Yersinia pestis. In addition, a novel confirmatory real-time PCR assay for the detection of F. tularensis is presented and validated. The results show that sensitivity of the assays, based on a dilution series, for the three infectious agents ranged from 1 to 100 fg of target DNA with both instruments. No cross-reactivity was revealed in specificity testing. Duration of the assays with the PikoReal and ABI 7300 systems were 50 and 100 min, respectively. In field testing for F. tularensis, results were obtained with the PikoReal system in 95 min, as the pre-PCR preparation, including DNA extraction, required an additional 45 min. We conclude that the PikoReal system enables highly sensitive and rapid on-site detection of biothreat agents under field conditions, and may be a more efficient alternative to conventional diagnostic methods.

  1. The methylation status of plant genomic DNA influences PCR efficiency.

    PubMed

    Kiselev, K V; Dubrovina, A S; Tyunin, A P

    2015-03-01

    During the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), which is a versatile and widely used method, certain DNA sequences are rapidly amplified through thermocycling. Although there are numerous protocols of PCR optimization for different applications, little is known about the effect of DNA modifications, such as DNA methylation, on PCR efficiency. Recent studies show that cytosine methylation alters DNA mechanical properties and suggest that DNA methylation may directly or indirectly influence the effectiveness of DNA amplification during PCR. In the present study, using plant DNA, we found that highly methylated plant DNA genomic regions were amplified with lower efficiencies compared to that for the regions methylated at a lower level. The correlation was observed when amplifying stilbene synthase (STS1, STS10) genes of Vitis amurensis, the Actin2 gene of Arabidopsis thaliana, the internal transcribed spacer (AtITS), and tRNAPro of A. thaliana. The level of DNA methylation within the analyzed DNA regions has been analyzed with bisulfite sequencing. The obtained data show that efficient PCRs of highly methylated plant DNA regions can be hampered. Proteinase K treatment of the plant DNA prior to PCR and using HotTaq DNA polymerase improved amplification of the highly methylated plant DNA regions. We suggest that increased DNA denaturation temperatures of the highly methylated DNA and contamination with DNA-binding proteins contribute to the hampered PCR amplification of highly methylated DNA. The data show that it is necessary to use current DNA purification protocols and commercial kits with caution to ensure appropriate PCR product yield and prevent bias toward unmethylated DNA amplification in PCRs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. Real-time focal stack compositing for handheld mobile cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solh, Mashhour

    2013-03-01

    Extending the depth of field using a single lens camera on a mobile device can be achieved by capturing a set of images each focused at a different depth or focal stack then combine these samples of the focal stack to form a single all-in-focus image or an image refocused at a desired depth of field. Focal stack compositing in real time for a handheld mobile camera has many challenges including capturing, processing power, handshaking, rolling shutter artifacts, occlusion, and lens zoom effect. In this paper, we describe a system for a real time focal stack compositing system for handheld mobile device with an alignment and compositing algorithms. We will also show all-in-focus images captured and processed by a cell phone camera running on Android OS.

  3. Engineering issues for hand-held sensing devices, with examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freiwald, David A.; Freiwald, Joyce

    1994-03-01

    It is now U.S. defense policy that there will be no new platform starts. The emphasis for platforms will be on O&M cost reduction, life-extension improvements, and force-multiplier- device upgrades. There is also an increasing emphasis on hand-held force-multiplier devices for individuals, which is the focus of this paper. Engineering issues include operations analysis, weight, cube, cost, prime power, ease of use, data storage, reliability, fault tolerance, data communications and human factors. Two examples of hand-held devices are given. Applications include USMC, Army, SOCOM, DEA, FBI, SS, Border Patrol and others. Barriers to adoption of such technology are also discussed.

  4. Handheld Multi-Gas Meters Market Survey Report

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Gustavious; Wald-Hopkins, Mark David; Obrey, Stephen J.; Akhadov, Valida Dushdurova

    2016-06-23

    Handheld multi-gas meters (MGMs) are equipped with sensors to monitor oxygen (O2) levels and additional sensors to detect the presence of combustible or toxic gases in the environment. This report is limited to operational response-type MGMs that include at least four different sensors. These sensors can vary by type and by the chemical monitored. In real time, the sensors report the concentration of monitored gases in the atmosphere near the MGM. To provide emergency responders with information on handheld multi-gas meters, the System Assessment and Validation for Emergency Responders (SAVER) Program conducted a market survey. This market survey report is based on information gathered between November 2015 and February 2016 from vendors, Internet research, industry publications, an emergency responder focus group, and a government issued Request for Information (RFI) that was posted on the Federal Business Opportunities website.

  5. A First Look at Mobile Hand-Held Device Traffic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Gregor; Schneider, Fabian; Feldmann, Anja

    Although mobile hand-held devices (MHDs) are ubiquitous today, little is know about how they are used - especially at home. In this paper, we cast a first look on mobile hand-held device usage from a network perspective. We base our study on anonymized packet level data representing more than 20,000 residential DSL customers. Our characterization of the traffic shows that MHDs are active on up to 3% of the monitored DSL lines. Mobile devices from Apple (i.e., iPhones and iPods) are, by a huge margin, the most commonly used MHDs and account for most of the traffic. We find that MHD traffic is dominated by multimedia content and downloads of mobile applications.

  6. Integrating RFID technique to design mobile handheld inventory management system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yo-Ping; Yen, Wei; Chen, Shih-Chung

    2008-04-01

    An RFID-based mobile handheld inventory management system is proposed in this paper. Differing from the manual inventory management method, the proposed system works on the personal digital assistant (PDA) with an RFID reader. The system identifies electronic tags on the properties and checks the property information in the back-end database server through a ubiquitous wireless network. The system also provides a set of functions to manage the back-end inventory database and assigns different levels of access privilege according to various user categories. In the back-end database server, to prevent improper or illegal accesses, the server not only stores the inventory database and user privilege information, but also keeps track of the user activities in the server including the login and logout time and location, the records of database accessing, and every modification of the tables. Some experimental results are presented to verify the applicability of the integrated RFID-based mobile handheld inventory management system.

  7. Alcohol assessment using wireless handheld computers: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Bernhardt, Jay M; Usdan, Stuart; Mays, Darren; Arriola, Kimberly Jacob; Martin, Ryan J; Cremeens, Jennifer; McGill, Tia; Weitzel, Jessica Aungst

    2007-12-01

    The present study sought to test the feasibility of measuring quantity and frequency of self-reported alcohol consumption among college students using the Handheld Assisted Network Diary (HAND) by comparing results to a retrospective Timeline Followback (TLFB). A total of 40 undergraduate college students completed a HAND assessment during the two-week study period and completed a TLFB at follow-up. The HAND recorded similar levels of alcohol consumption compared to the TLFB. There were no significant differences in overall alcohol consumption, drinks per drinking day, or heavy drinking days between the two methods of assessment. Handheld computers may represent a useful tool for assessing daily alcohol use among college students.

  8. Adaptive difference in daily timing of hatch in two locust species, Schistocerca gregaria and Locusta migratoria: the effects of thermocycles and phase polyphenism.

    PubMed

    Nishide, Yudai; Tanaka, Seiji; Saeki, Shinjiro

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the effects of temperature and phase polyphenism on egg hatching time in the desert locust, Schistocerca gregaria, and the migratory locust, Locusta migratoria. The two species exhibited differences and similarities in hatching behavior when exposed to different temperature conditions. In 12-h thermocycles of various temperatures, the S. gregaria eggs hatched during the cryoperiod (low temperature period), whereas L. migratoria eggs hatched during the thermoperiod (high temperature period). The eggs of both species hatched during the species-specific period of the thermoperiod in response to a temperature difference as small as 1 °C. Furthermore, the locusts adjusted hatching time to a new thermal environment that occurred shortly before the expected hatching time. In both species, the hatching of the eggs was synchronized to a specific time of the day, and two hatching peaks separated by approximately 1 day were observed at a constant temperature after the eggs were transferred from thermocycles 3 days before hatching. Eggs laid by gregarious females hatched earlier than those laid by solitarious females in S. gregaria but this difference was not observed in L. migratoria.

  9. A Cheap, Semiquantitative Hand-Held Conductivity Tester.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zawacky, Susan K. S.

    1995-01-01

    Describes a design for a hand-held conductivity tester powered by a 9V battery that gives semi-quantitative results for aqueous electrolyte solutions of concentrations ranging from 0.001 M to 0.1 M. The tester uses a bar-graph LED driven by an LM3914 integrated circuit to indicate the level of conductivity. A list of parts, procedures, and results…

  10. A Cheap, Semiquantitative Hand-Held Conductivity Tester.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zawacky, Susan K. S.

    1995-01-01

    Describes a design for a hand-held conductivity tester powered by a 9V battery that gives semi-quantitative results for aqueous electrolyte solutions of concentrations ranging from 0.001 M to 0.1 M. The tester uses a bar-graph LED driven by an LM3914 integrated circuit to indicate the level of conductivity. A list of parts, procedures, and results…

  11. Elemental analysis using a handheld X-Ray fluorescence spectrometer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Groover, Krishangi D.; Izbicki, John

    2016-06-24

    The U.S. Geological Survey is collecting geologic samples from local stream channels, aquifer materials, and rock outcrops for studies of trace elements in the Mojave Desert, southern California. These samples are collected because geologic materials can release a variety of elements to the environment when exposed to water. The samples are to be analyzed with a handheld X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometer to determine the concentrations of up to 27 elements, including chromium.

  12. Long-wavelength 256x256 QWIP handheld camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunapala, Sarath D.; Liu, J. K.; Sundaram, Mani; Bandara, Sumith V.; Shott, C. A.; Hoelter, T.; Maker, Paul D.; Muller, Richard E.

    1996-06-01

    In this paper, we discuss the development of very sensitive long wavelength infrared GaAs/AlxGa1-xAs quantum well infrared photodetectors (QWIPs), fabrication of random reflectors for efficient light coupling, and the demonstration of first hand-held long-wavelength 256 X 256 QWIP focal plane array camera. Excellent imagery, with a noise equivalent differential temperature of 25 mK has been achieved.

  13. Hand-held calculators augment optimized drilling programs. Part 9

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, B.

    1982-09-01

    This paper shows how common calculations of drilling and rig parameters can be simplified with the use of a hand-held programmable calculator. It presents a program which is divided into 6 sections: annular velocities, pump output, bottoms up (or bit-to-surface calculations), surface to bit, tripping ton miles, and drilling ton miles. Each section is examined. User instructions, program description, and program listing for the rig utility program are provided.

  14. Isotope Identification in the GammaTracker Handheld Radioisotope Identifier

    SciTech Connect

    Batdorf, Michael T.; Hensley, Walter K.; Seifert, Carolyn E.; Kirihara, Leslie J.; Erikson, Luke E.; Jordan, David V.

    2009-11-13

    GammaTracker is a portable handheld radioisotope identifier using position sensitive CdZnTe crystals. The device uses a peak-based method for isotope identification implemented on an embedded computing platform within the device. This paper presents the run-time optimized algorithms used in this peak-based approach. Performance of the algorithms is presented using measured data from gamma-ray sources.

  15. Distributing Data from Desktop to Hand-Held Computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elmore, Jason L.

    2005-01-01

    A system of server and client software formats and redistributes data from commercially available desktop to commercially available hand-held computers via both wired and wireless networks. This software is an inexpensive means of enabling engineers and technicians to gain access to current sensor data while working in locations in which such data would otherwise be inaccessible. The sensor data are first gathered by a data-acquisition server computer, then transmitted via a wired network to a data-distribution computer that executes the server portion of the present software. Data in all sensor channels -- both raw sensor outputs in millivolt units and results of conversion to engineering units -- are made available for distribution. Selected subsets of the data are transmitted to each hand-held computer via the wired and then a wireless network. The selection of the subsets and the choice of the sequences and formats for displaying the data is made by means of a user interface generated by the client portion of the software. The data displayed on the screens of hand-held units can be updated at rates from 1 to

  16. Identification of handheld objects for electro-optic/FLIR applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyer, Steve K.; Flug, Eric; Edwards, Timothy C.; Krapels, Keith A.; Scarbrough, John

    2004-08-01

    This paper describes research on the determination of the fifty-percent probability of identification cycle criterion (N50) for two sets of handheld objects. The first set consists of 12 objects which are commonly held in a single hand. The second set consists of 10 objects commonly held in both hands. These sets consist of not only typical civilian handheld objects but also objects that are potentially lethal. A pistol, a cell phone, a rocket propelled grenade (RPG) launcher, and a broom are examples of the objects in these sets. The discrimination of these objects is an inherent part of homeland security, force protection, and also general population security. Objects were imaged from each set in the visible and mid-wave infrared (MWIR) spectrum. Various levels of blur are then applied to these images. These blurred images were then used in a forced choice perception experiment. Results were analyzed as a function of blur level and target size to give identification probability as a function of resolvable cycles on target. These results are applicable to handheld object target acquisition estimates for visible imaging systems and MWIR systems. This research provides guidance in the design and analysis of electro-optical systems and forward-looking infrared (FLIR) systems for use in homeland security, force protection, and also general population security.

  17. Detecting buried explosive hazards with handheld GPR and deep learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besaw, Lance E.

    2016-05-01

    Buried explosive hazards (BEHs), including traditional landmines and homemade improvised explosives, have proven difficult to detect and defeat during and after conflicts around the world. Despite their various sizes, shapes and construction material, ground penetrating radar (GPR) is an excellent phenomenology for detecting BEHs due to its ability to sense localized differences in electromagnetic properties. Handheld GPR detectors are common equipment for detecting BEHs because of their flexibility (in part due to the human operator) and effectiveness in cluttered environments. With modern digital electronics and positioning systems, handheld GPR sensors can sense and map variation in electromagnetic properties while searching for BEHs. Additionally, large-scale computers have demonstrated an insatiable appetite for ingesting massive datasets and extracting meaningful relationships. This is no more evident than the maturation of deep learning artificial neural networks (ANNs) for image and speech recognition now commonplace in industry and academia. This confluence of sensing, computing and pattern recognition technologies offers great potential to develop automatic target recognition techniques to assist GPR operators searching for BEHs. In this work deep learning ANNs are used to detect BEHs and discriminate them from harmless clutter. We apply these techniques to a multi-antennae, handheld GPR with centimeter-accurate positioning system that was used to collect data over prepared lanes containing a wide range of BEHs. This work demonstrates that deep learning ANNs can automatically extract meaningful information from complex GPR signatures, complementing existing GPR anomaly detection and classification techniques.

  18. Using hand-held computer technologies to improve dietary intake.

    PubMed

    Atienza, Audie A; King, Abby C; Oliveira, Brian M; Ahn, David K; Gardner, Christopher D

    2008-06-01

    Portable hand-held information technology offers much promise not only in assessing dietary intake in the real world, but also in providing dietary feedback to individuals. However, stringent research designs have not been employed to examine whether it can be effective in modifying dietary behaviors. The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the efficacy of a hand-held computer (i.e., personal digital assistant [PDA]) for increasing vegetable and whole-grain intake over 8 weeks in mid-life and older adults, using a randomized study design. Twenty-seven healthy adults aged > or =50 were randomized and completed the 8-week study. Intervention participants received an instructional session and a PDA programmed to monitor their vegetable and whole-grain intake levels twice per day and to provide daily individualized feedback, goal-setting, and support. Controls received standard, age-appropriate, written nutritional education materials. Dietary intake was assessed via the Block Food Frequency Questionnaire at baseline and 8 weeks. Relative to controls, intervention participants reported significantly greater increases in vegetable servings (1.5-2.5 servings/day; p=0.02), as well as a trend toward greater intake of dietary fiber from grains (3.7-4.5 servings/day; p=0.10). This study's findings provide preliminary evidence that using portable hand-held technology to provide daily individualized feedback on dietary behavior in the real world can increase the dietary intake of healthy food groups.

  19. Handheld reflectance confocal microscopy for the diagnosis of conjunctival tumors.

    PubMed

    Cinotti, Elisa; Perrot, Jean-Luc; Labeille, Bruno; Campolmi, Nelly; Espinasse, Marine; Grivet, Damien; Thuret, Gilles; Gain, Philippe; Douchet, Catherine; Andrea, Caroline; Haouas, Maher; Cambazard, Frédéric

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate whether the handheld in vivo reflectance confocal microscopy that has been recently developed for the study of skin tumors is suitable for the diagnosis of conjunctival tumors. Prospective study, observational case series. We prospectively evaluated the reflectance confocal microscopy features of 53 conjunctival lesions clinically suspicious for tumors of 46 patients referred to the University Hospital of Saint-Etienne (France) by using the handheld device. Twenty-three lesions were excised (3 nevi, 10 melanomas, 5 squamous cell carcinoma, 2 lymphomas, and 3 pinguecula/pterygium) while the other 30, presenting no reflectance confocal microscopy malignant features, were under follow-up for at least 1 year. Clinical reflectance confocal microscopy and histologic diagnosis were compared. In vivo reflectance confocal microscopy diagnosis was in agreement with the histologic diagnosis in all cases and none of the lesions that were not excised show any clinical progression under follow-up. In vivo reflectance confocal microscopy with a handheld dermatology-dedicated microscope can play a role in the noninvasive diagnosis of conjunctival lesions. Further studies should be performed to better define the diagnostic ability of this technique. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The use of a handheld Raman system for virus detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Chunyuan; Driskell, Jeremy D.; Tripp, Ralph A.; Cui, Yiping; Zhao, Yiping

    2012-06-01

    The combination of surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) with a handheld Raman system would lead to a powerful portable device for defense and security applications. The Thermo Scientific FirstDefender RM instrument is a 785-nm handheld Raman spectrometer intended for rapid field identification of unknown solid and liquid samples. Its sensitivity and effectiveness for SERS-based detection was initially confirmed by evaluating detection of 1,2-di(4- pyridyl)ethylene as a reporter molecule on a silver nanorod (AgNR) substrate, and the results are comparable to those from a confocal Bruker Raman system. As avian influenza A viruses (AIV) are recognized as an important emerging threat to public health, this portable handheld Raman spectrometer is used, for the first time, to detect and identify avian influenza A viruses using a multi-well AgNR SERS chip. The SERS spectra obtained had rich peaks which demonstrated that the instrument can be effectively used for SERS-based influenza virus detection. According to the SERS spectra, these different influenza viruses were distinguished from the negative control via the principal component analysis and by partial least squares-discriminate analysis. Together, these results show that the combination effective SERS substrates when combined with a portable Raman spectrometer provides a powerful field device for chemical and biological sensing.

  1. Temperature-tolerant COLD-PCR reduces temperature stringency and enables robust mutation enrichment.

    PubMed

    Castellanos-Rizaldos, E; Liu, Pingfang; Milbury, Coren A; Guha, Minakshi; Brisci, Angela; Cremonesi, Laura; Ferrari, Maurizio; Mamon, Harvey; Makrigiorgos, G Mike

    2012-07-01

    Low-level mutations in clinical tumor samples often reside below mutation detection limits, thus leading to false negatives that may impact clinical diagnosis and patient management. COLD-PCR (coamplification at lower denaturation temperature PCR) is a technology that magnifies unknown mutations during PCR, thus enabling downstream mutation detection. However, a practical difficulty in applying COLD-PCR has been the requirement for strict control of the denaturation temperature for a given sequence, to within ±0.3 °C. This requirement precludes simultaneous mutation enrichment in sequences of substantially different melting temperature (T(m)) and limits the technique to a single sequence at a time. We present a temperature-tolerant (TT) approach (TT-COLD-PCR) that reduces this obstacle. We describe thermocycling programs featuring a gradual increase of the denaturation temperature during COLD-PCR. This approach enabled enrichment of mutations when the cycling achieves the appropriate critical denaturation temperature of each DNA amplicon that is being amplified. Validation was provided for KRAS (v-Ki-ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog) and TP53 (tumor protein p53) exons 6-9 by use of dilutions of mutated DNA, clinical cancer samples, and plasma-circulating DNA. A single thermocycling program with a denaturation-temperature window of 2.5-3.0 °C enriches mutations in all DNA amplicons simultaneously, despite their different T(m)s. Mutation enrichments of 6-9-fold were obtained with TT-full-COLD-PCR. Higher mutation enrichments were obtained for the other 2 forms of COLD-PCR, fast-COLD-PCR, and ice-COLD-PCR. Low-level mutations in diverse amplicons with different T(m)s can be mutation enriched via TT-COLD-PCR provided that their T(m)s fall within the denaturation-temperature window applied during amplification. This approach enables simultaneous enrichment of mutations in several amplicons and increases significantly the versatility of COLD-PCR.

  2. Assessment of Preparation of Samples Under the Field Conditions and a Portable Real-Time RT-PCR Assay for the Rapid On-Site Detection of Newcastle Disease Virus.

    PubMed

    Liu, L; Benyeda, Z; Zohari, S; Yacoub, A; Isaksson, M; Leijon, M; LeBlanc, N; Benyeda, J; Belák, S

    2016-04-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV), also known as virulent forms of avian paramyxovirus serotype 1 (AMPV-1), is the causative agent of Newcastle disease affecting many species of birds and causing heavy losses to the poultry industry worldwide. Early, rapid and sensitive detection of the viruses or the viral nucleic acids is very important for disease diagnosis and control. This study aimed to evaluate sample preparation under field conditions and the application of a real-time RT-PCR method in the portable T-COR4 platform for the rapid, on-site detection of NDV on a farm. In the laboratory setting, the portable real-time RT-PCR assay had a similar performance compared with that obtained with a larger, stationary Rotor Gene real-time thermocycler. In the field conditions, viral nucleic acids were manually extracted just outside of animal units with minimal equipment and real-time RT-PCR detection was performed with the portable thermocycler T-COR4 placed in a nearby room. The portable assay at the farm detected viral RNA in 15 samples and reached an agreement of 83% (39/47) when the same RNA preparations were tested in the Rotor Gene thermocycler under the laboratory setting. The results demonstrated the feasibility of performing field detection but also the need to improve and further simplify sample preparation procedures. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  3. Impact of patient feedback on residents' handheld computer use: a multi-site study.

    PubMed

    Berner, Eta S; Savage, Grant T; Houston, Thomas K; Williams, Eric S; Crawford, Myra A; Ray, Midge N

    2004-01-01

    Handheld computers are being proposed as a resource for ambulatory care, yet physician reluctance to use the devices in the presence of patients is reported to be a barrier to optimal use. This study examined patient attitudes toward the use of handheld computers and the impact of those attitudes on the physicians' use of the handheld computers in the patient care setting. Most patients hold favorable attitudes toward physician use of handheld computers. Providing these data to physicians, however, did not uniformly lead to significant increases in handheld use in the presence of the patient. More understanding of the factors that influence behavior change and methods that will decrease barriers to the use of handhelds is needed

  4. Risk management considerations and the pregnancy handheld record. An audit of the return rate of the pregnancy handheld record.

    PubMed

    Toohill, Jocelyn; Soong, Barbara; Meldrum, Melissa

    2006-12-01

    Risk management is integral to the provision of contemporary health care. As maternity practices change and with a commitment on women being at the centre of care, one strategy has been for women to retain their records during the antenatal period. This paper explores the return rate of the pregnancy handheld record in a major tertiary facility and discusses the risk management implications when the record is not available upon presentation to the treating practitioner. Four audits were conducted over a 2 year period to determine the return rate of the pregnancy handheld record at time of admission for labour and birth. A total of 1096 records were returned out of a possible 1256 during the study. A 6.6% increase in the return rate was achieved over the 4 audit periods (82-88.5%) with an overall return rate of 85%. Our audit highlights the need for consumers, clinicians and heath care facilities to consider the advantages and disadvantages of the pregnancy handheld record, as well as the medico-legal responsibilities that ultimately fall back on the health facility.

  5. Joint Tactical Radio System Handheld, Manpack, and Small Form Fit Radios (JTRS HMS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    Selected Acquisition Report (SAR) RCS: DD-A&T(Q&A)823-385 Joint Tactical Radio System Handheld, Manpack, and Small Form Fit Radios (JTRS HMS) As...2014 Program Information Program Name Joint Tactical Radio System Handheld, Manpack, and Small Form Fit Radios (JTRS HMS) DoD Component Army Joint...18:21:36 UNCLASSIFIED 5 Mission and Description The Handheld, Manpack, and Small Form Fit (HMS) radio program is a materiel solution meeting the

  6. Diagnostic accuracy of new handheld echocardiography with Doppler and harmonic imaging properties.

    PubMed

    Borges, Adrian Constantin; Knebel, Fabian; Walde, Torsten; Sanad, Wasiem; Baumann, Gert

    2004-03-01

    The first generation of handheld echocardiography devices was evaluated with divergent results because of inherent technical limitations. New handheld devices with continuous/pulsed wave Doppler and tissue harmonic imaging were introduced recently. In this study, comparisons were drawn among standard echocardiography, invasively measured systolic pulmonary artery pressure, and these new devices. We sought to evaluate new handheld echocardiography and its diagnostic accuracy compared with standard echocardiography. Two consecutive echocardiographic examinations were performed by experienced and independent examiners using handheld and standard echocardiography. Systolic pulmonary artery pressure was measured by Swan-Ganz catheter. In all, 177 (56.2%) patients had normal cardiac function; 138 (43.8%) had underlying cardiac pathology. Handheld echocardiography had an overall agreement of 94.8% and kappa of 0.89 to detect the main echocardiographic finding. Handheld echocardiography detected valve disease with an agreement of 96.7% and kappa of 0.93; global left ventricular function was assessed correctly in 85.6% of cases. Pericardial effusion was diagnosed with an agreement of 91.2%. Dyssynergy was found by handheld echocardiography with an agreement of 95.4% and kappa value of 0.88. Systolic pulmonary artery pressure measured by handheld echocardiography and Swan-Ganz catheter had a correlation of 0.97. This study demonstrates the high diagnostic accuracy of handheld devices with continuous/pulsed wave Doppler and harmonic imaging, and that these devices broaden the diagnostic spectrum while allowing for enhanced mobility in everyday clinical applications.

  7. Electronic imaging system incorporating a hand-held fundus camera for canine ophthalmology.

    PubMed

    Hoang, H D; Brant, L M; Jaksetic, M D; Lake, S G; Stuart, B P

    2001-11-01

    An electronic imaging system incorporating a hand-held fundus camera was used to collect images of the canine ocular fundus. The electronic imaging system comprised a hand-held fundus camera, an IBM personal computer (PC 350), Microsoft Windows NT 4.0, Adobe Photoshop, and a color printer (Tektronix Phaser 550) and was used to store, edit, and print the images captured by the fundus camera. Hand-held fundus cameras are essential for use in canine ophthalmology. The Nidek NM-100 hand-held fundus camera digitalizes images, enabling their direct transfer into reports and their storage on writeable CDs.

  8. 75 FR 43206 - In the Matter of Certain Wireless Communications System Server Software, Wireless Handheld...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-23

    ... and Battery Packs: Notice of Commission Determination Not To Review An Initial Determination... communications system server software, wireless handheld devices and battery packs by reason of infringement...

  9. Effects of surface treatments, thermocycling, and cyclic loading on the bond strength of a resin cement bonded to a lithium disilicate glass ceramic.

    PubMed

    Guarda, G B; Correr, A B; Gonçalves, L S; Costa, A R; Borges, G A; Sinhoreti, M A C; Correr-Sobrinho, L

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Objectives : The aim of this present study was to investigate the effect of two surface treatments, fatigue and thermocycling, on the microtensile bond strength of a newly introduced lithium disilicate glass ceramic (IPS e.max Press, Ivoclar Vivadent) and a dual-cured resin cement. Methods : A total of 18 ceramic blocks (10 mm long × 7 mm wide × 3.0 mm thick) were fabricated and divided into six groups (n=3): groups 1, 2, and 3-air particle abraded for five seconds with 50-μm aluminum oxide particles; groups 4, 5, and 6-acid etched with 10% hydrofluoric acid for 20 seconds. A silane coupling agent was applied onto all specimens and allowed to dry for five seconds, and the ceramic blocks were bonded to a block of composite Tetric N-Ceram (Ivoclar Vivadent) with RelyX ARC (3M ESPE) resin cement and placed under a 500-g static load for two minutes. The cement excess was removed with a disposable microbrush, and four periods of light activation for 40 seconds each were performed at right angles using an LED curing unit (UltraLume LED 5, Ultradent) with a final 40 second light exposure from the top surface. All of the specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours. Groups 2 and 5 were submitted to 3,000 thermal cycles between 5°C and 55°C, and groups 3 and 6 were submitted to a fatigue test of 100,000 cycles at 2 Hz. Specimens were sectioned perpendicular to the bonding area to obtain beams with a cross-sectional area of 1 mm(2) (30 beams per group) and submitted to a microtensile bond strength test in a testing machine (EZ Test) at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were submitted to analysis of variance and Tukey post hoc test (p≤0.05). Results : The microtensile bond strength values (MPa) were 26.9 ± 6.9, 22.2 ± 7.8, and 21.2 ± 9.1 for groups 1-3 and 35.0 ± 9.6, 24.3 ± 8.9, and 23.9 ± 6.3 for groups 4-6. For the control group, fatigue testing and thermocycling produced a predominance of adhesive failures. Fatigue and

  10. Loop mediated isothermal amplification assay using hydroxy naphthol blue, conventional polymerase chain reaction and real-time PCR in the diagnosis of intraocular tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Balne, P K; Basu, S; Rath, S; Barik, M R; Sharma, S

    2015-01-01

    This study is a comparative evaluation (Chi-square test) of a closed tube loop mediated isothermal amplification assay using hydroxy naphthol blue dye (HNB-LAMP), real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and conventional PCR in the diagnosis of intraocular tuberculosis. Considering clinical presentation as the gold standard in 33 patients, the sensitivity of HNB-LAMP assay (75.8%) was higher (not significant, P value 0.2) than conventional PCR (57.6%) and lower than real-time PCR (90.9%). Specificity was 100% by all three methods. No amplification was observed in negative controls (n = 20) by all three methods. The cost of the HNB-LAMP assay was Rs. 500.00 and it does not require thermocycler, therefore, it can be used as an alternative to conventional PCR in resource-poor settings.

  11. Promoting physical activity through hand-held computer technology.

    PubMed

    King, Abby C; Ahn, David K; Oliveira, Brian M; Atienza, Audie A; Castro, Cynthia M; Gardner, Christopher D

    2008-02-01

    Efforts to achieve population-wide increases in walking and similar moderate-intensity physical activities potentially can be enhanced through relevant applications of state-of-the-art interactive communication technologies. Yet few systematic efforts to evaluate the efficacy of hand-held computers and similar devices for enhancing physical activity levels have occurred. The purpose of this first-generation study was to evaluate the efficacy of a hand-held computer (i.e., personal digital assistant [PDA]) for increasing moderate intensity or more vigorous (MOD+) physical activity levels over 8 weeks in mid-life and older adults relative to a standard information control arm. Randomized, controlled 8-week experiment. Data were collected in 2005 and analyzed in 2006-2007. Community-based study of 37 healthy, initially underactive adults aged 50 years and older who were randomized and completed the 8-week study (intervention=19, control=18). Participants received an instructional session and a PDA programmed to monitor their physical activity levels twice per day and provide daily and weekly individualized feedback, goal setting, and support. Controls received standard, age-appropriate written physical activity educational materials. Physical activity was assessed via the Community Healthy Activities Model Program for Seniors (CHAMPS) questionnaire at baseline and 8 weeks. Relative to controls, intervention participants reported significantly greater 8-week mean estimated caloric expenditure levels and minutes per week in MOD+ activity (p<0.04). Satisfaction with the PDA was reasonably high in this largely PDA-naive sample. Results from this first-generation study indicate that hand-held computers may be effective tools for increasing initial physical activity levels among underactive adults.

  12. Promoting Physical Activity through Hand-Held Computer Technology

    PubMed Central

    King, Abby C.; Ahn, David K.; Oliveira, Brian M.; Atienza, Audie A.; Castro, Cynthia M.; Gardner, Christopher D.

    2009-01-01

    Background Efforts to achieve population-wide increases in walking and similar moderate-intensity physical activities potentially can be enhanced through relevant applications of state-of-the-art interactive communication technologies. Yet few systematic efforts to evaluate the efficacy of hand-held computers and similar devices for enhancing physical activity levels have occurred. The purpose of this first-generation study was to evaluate the efficacy of a hand-held computer (i.e., personal digital assistant [PDA]) for increasing moderate intensity or more vigorous (MOD+) physical activity levels over 8 weeks in mid-life and older adults relative to a standard information control arm. Design Randomized, controlled 8-week experiment. Data were collected in 2005 and analyzed in 2006-2007. Setting/Participants Community-based study of 37 healthy, initially underactive adults aged 50 years and older who were randomized and completed the 8-week study (intervention=19, control=18). Intervention Participants received an instructional session and a PDA programmed to monitor their physical activity levels twice per day and provide daily and weekly individualized feedback, goal setting, and support. Controls received standard, age-appropriate written physical activity educational materials. Main Outcome Measure Physical activity was assessed via the Community Healthy Activities Model Program for Seniors (CHAMPS) questionnaire at baseline and 8 weeks. Results Relative to controls, intervention participants reported significantly greater 8-week mean estimated caloric expenditure levels and minutes per week in MOD+ activity (p<0.04). Satisfaction with the PDA was reasonably high in this largely PDA-naive sample. Conclusions Results from this first-generation study indicate that hand-held computers may be effective tools for increasing initial physical activity levels among underactive adults. PMID:18201644

  13. Microshear Bond Strength of OptiBond All-in-One Self-adhesive Agent to Er:YAG Laser Treated Enamel After Thermocycling and Water Storage

    PubMed Central

    Kasraei, Shahin; Yarmohammadi, Ebrahim; Ghazizadeh, Mohammad Vahid

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This study aimed to compare the microshear bond strength of composite to enamel treated with Erbium-Doped Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Er:YAG) laser using a self-etch one step bonding agent. Methods: Seventy-six enamel surfaces were prepared from 38 sound human third molar teeth. Specimens were randomly divided into four groups of 18. The enamel surface in half the specimens was irradiated with Er:YAG laser. One extra specimen from each group was evaluated under a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Composite micro-cylinders were bonded to the specimen surfaces using OptiBond All-In-One (OB) adhesive agent and stored in distilled water for 24 hours. Half the specimens were thermocycled (2000 cycles) and stored in distilled water at 37°C for three months (TW). The microshear bond strength of composite to enamel was measured using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The fractured surfaces were evaluated under a stereomicroscope at ×40 magnification to determine the mode of failure. Data were analyzed using repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) and t test. Results: The mean values (±standard deviation) were 17.96 ± 2.92 MPa in OB group, 22.29 ± 4.25 MPa in laser + OB group, 18.11 ± 3.52 MPa in laser + OB + TW group and 9.42 ± 2.47 MPa in OB + TW group. Repeated measures ANOVA showed that laser irradiation increased the microshear bond strength (P < 0.001). Bond strength decreased when the samples were thermocycled and stored for three months (P < 0.001). The interaction effect of water storage and laser treatment on bond strength was significant (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Enamel surface preparation with Er:YAG laser is recommended to enhance the durability of the bond of self-etch bonding systems to enamel. PMID:28144434

  14. Microshear Bond Strength of OptiBond All-in-One Self-adhesive Agent to Er:YAG Laser Treated Enamel After Thermocycling and Water Storage.

    PubMed

    Kasraei, Shahin; Yarmohammadi, Ebrahim; Ghazizadeh, Mohammad Vahid

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This study aimed to compare the microshear bond strength of composite to enamel treated with Erbium-Doped Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Er:YAG) laser using a self-etch one step bonding agent. Methods: Seventy-six enamel surfaces were prepared from 38 sound human third molar teeth. Specimens were randomly divided into four groups of 18. The enamel surface in half the specimens was irradiated with Er:YAG laser. One extra specimen from each group was evaluated under a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Composite micro-cylinders were bonded to the specimen surfaces using OptiBond All-In-One (OB) adhesive agent and stored in distilled water for 24 hours. Half the specimens were thermocycled (2000 cycles) and stored in distilled water at 37°C for three months (TW). The microshear bond strength of composite to enamel was measured using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The fractured surfaces were evaluated under a stereomicroscope at ×40 magnification to determine the mode of failure. Data were analyzed using repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) and t test. Results: The mean values (±standard deviation) were 17.96 ± 2.92 MPa in OB group, 22.29 ± 4.25 MPa in laser + OB group, 18.11 ± 3.52 MPa in laser + OB + TW group and 9.42 ± 2.47 MPa in OB + TW group. Repeated measures ANOVA showed that laser irradiation increased the microshear bond strength (P < 0.001). Bond strength decreased when the samples were thermocycled and stored for three months (P < 0.001). The interaction effect of water storage and laser treatment on bond strength was significant (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Enamel surface preparation with Er:YAG laser is recommended to enhance the durability of the bond of self-etch bonding systems to enamel.

  15. Using handheld GPS for data acquisition in blasting operations

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, D.L.

    1994-12-31

    Blasters in the field for years have been faced with the task of plotting blast locations for future reference and calculating scaled distances or seismograph placement from maps, aerial photo`s etc. With the constellation fully operational, GPS provides a satellite signal transmitted to a ground receiver which will display the desired coordinate positioning worldwide, 24 hours a day in any kind of weather conditions. There are a variety of GPS receivers available with varying levels of accuracy. The field trials of a handheld navigational quality instrument for plotting blast and seismograph locations along with other necessary industry related data is the basis of this paper.

  16. Handheld portable real-time tracking and communications device

    DOEpatents

    Wiseman, James M [Albuquerque, NM; Riblett, Jr., Loren E.; Green, Karl L [Albuquerque, NM; Hunter, John A [Albuquerque, NM; Cook, III, Robert N.; Stevens, James R [Arlington, VA

    2012-05-22

    Portable handheld real-time tracking and communications devices include; a controller module, communications module including global positioning and mesh network radio module, data transfer and storage module, and a user interface module enclosed in a water-resistant enclosure. Real-time tracking and communications devices can be used by protective force, security and first responder personnel to provide situational awareness allowing for enhance coordination and effectiveness in rapid response situations. Such devices communicate to other authorized devices via mobile ad-hoc wireless networks, and do not require fixed infrastructure for their operation.

  17. Skylab-2 handheld photography alphabetized geographical features list

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcniel, J. L.; Devalcourt, C. C.

    1974-01-01

    This publication represents a relisting of the Skylab-2, PTD Handheld Photography Catalog. The purpose of this publication is to provide imagery researchers a supplement to the PTD Catalog by alphabetically sorting together all similar major and minor features. Some cross-referencing of feature names was accomplished where the authors deemed necessary; however, no attempt was made to exhaust all possible means of cross-referencing. An example of the cross-referencing which was done: Kuril Islands may be found under the major feature column and also as a minor feature of Islands.

  18. Development of dual sensor hand-held detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sezgin, Mehmet

    2010-04-01

    In this paper hand-held dual sensor detector development requirements are considered dedicated to buried object detection. Design characteristics of such a system are categorized and listed. Hardware and software structures, ergonomics, user interface, environmental and EMC/EMI tests to be applied and performance test issues are studied. Main properties of the developed system (SEZER) are presented, which contains Metal Detector (MD) and Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR). The realized system has ergonomic structure and can detect both metallic and non-metallic buried objects. Moreover classification of target is possible if it was defined to the signal processing software in learning phase.

  19. Fast, cheap and in control: spectral imaging with handheld devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gooding, Edward A.; Deutsch, Erik R.; Huehnerhoff, Joseph; Hajian, Arsen R.

    2017-05-01

    Remote sensing has moved out of the laboratory and into the real world. Instruments using reflection or Raman imaging modalities become faster, cheaper and more powerful annually. Enabling technologies include virtual slit spectrometer design, high power multimode diode lasers, fast open-loop scanning systems, low-noise IR-sensitive array detectors and low-cost computers with touchscreen interfaces. High-volume manufacturing assembles these components into inexpensive portable or handheld devices that make possible sophisticated decision-making based on robust data analytics. Examples include threat, hazmat and narcotics detection; remote gas sensing; biophotonic screening; environmental remediation and a host of other applications.

  20. Video indirect ophthalmoscopy using a hand-held video camera.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Mahesh P

    2011-01-01

    Fundus photography in adults and cooperative children is possible with a fundus camera or by using a slit lamp-mounted digital camera. Retcam TM or a video indirect ophthalmoscope is necessary for fundus imaging in infants and young children under anesthesia. Herein, a technique of converting and using a digital video camera into a video indirect ophthalmoscope for fundus imaging is described. This device will allow anyone with a hand-held video camera to obtain fundus images. Limitations of this technique involve a learning curve and inability to perform scleral depression.

  1. Imaging Emission Spectra with Handheld and Cellphone Cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitar, David

    2012-12-01

    As point-and-shoot digital camera technology advances it is becoming easier to image spectra in a laboralory setting on a shoestring budget and get immediale results. With this in mind, I wanted to test three cameras to see how their results would differ. Two undergraduate physics students and I used one handheld 7.1 megapixel (MP) digital Cannon point-and-shoot auto focusing camera and two different cellphone cameras: one at 6.1 MP and the other at 5.1 MP.

  2. Ball lens fiber optic sensor based smart handheld microsurgical instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Cheol; Gehlbach, Peter L.; Kang, Jin U.

    2013-03-01

    During freehand performance of vitreoretinal microsurgery the surgeon must perform precise and stable maneuvers that achieve surgical objectives and avoid surgical risk. Here, we present an improved smart handheld microsurgical tool which is based on a ball lens fiber optic sensor that utilizes common path swept source optical coherence tomography. Improvements include incorporation of a ball lens single mode fiber optic probe that increases the working angle of the tool to greater than 45 degrees; and increases the magnitude of the distance sensing signal through water. Also presented is a cutting function with an improved ergonomic design.

  3. Hand-held portable microarray reader for biodetection

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, Deanna Lynn; Coleman, Matthew A; Lane, Stephen M; Matthews, Dennis L; Albala, Joanna; Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian

    2013-04-23

    A hand-held portable microarray reader for biodetection includes a microarray reader engineered to be small enough for portable applications. The invention includes a high-powered light-emitting diode that emits excitation light, an excitation filter positioned to receive the excitation light, a slide, a slide holder assembly for positioning the slide to receive the excitation light from the excitation filter, an emission filter positioned to receive the excitation light from the slide, a lens positioned to receive the excitation light from the emission filter, and a CCD camera positioned to receive the excitation light from the lens.

  4. Sex Determination Using PCR

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kima, Peter E.; Rasche, Madeline E.

    2004-01-01

    PCR has revolutionized many aspects of biochemistry and molecular biology research. In the following exercise, students learn PCR by isolating their own DNA, amplifying specific segments of the X and Y chromosomes, and estimating the sizes of the PCR products using agarose gel electrophoresis. Based on the pattern of PCR products, students can…

  5. Sex Determination Using PCR

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kima, Peter E.; Rasche, Madeline E.

    2004-01-01

    PCR has revolutionized many aspects of biochemistry and molecular biology research. In the following exercise, students learn PCR by isolating their own DNA, amplifying specific segments of the X and Y chromosomes, and estimating the sizes of the PCR products using agarose gel electrophoresis. Based on the pattern of PCR products, students can…

  6. 40 CFR 90.129 - Fuel tank permeation from handheld engines and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fuel tank permeation from handheld... KILOWATTS Emission Standards and Certification Provisions § 90.129 Fuel tank permeation from handheld... equipment with respect to fuel tanks. For the purposes of this section, fuel tanks do not include fuel...

  7. An Investigation of Game-Embedded Handheld Devices to Enhance English Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hung, Hui-Chun; Young, Shelley Shwu-Ching

    2015-01-01

    This study proposed and implemented a system combining the advantages of both educational games and wireless handheld technology to promote the interactive English learning in the classroom setting. An interactive English vocabulary acquisition board game was designed with the system being implemented on handheld devices. Thirty sixth-grade…

  8. My-Mini-Pet: A Handheld Pet-Nurturing Game to Engage Students in Arithmetic Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liao, C. C. Y.; Chen, Z-H.; Cheng, H. N. H.; Chen, F-C.; Chan, T-W.

    2011-01-01

    In the last decade, more and more games have been developed for handheld devices. Furthermore, the popularity of handheld devices and increase of wireless computing can be taken advantage of to provide students with more learning opportunities. Games also could bring promising benefits--specifically, motivating students to learn/play, sustaining…

  9. An Investigation of Game-Embedded Handheld Devices to Enhance English Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hung, Hui-Chun; Young, Shelley Shwu-Ching

    2015-01-01

    This study proposed and implemented a system combining the advantages of both educational games and wireless handheld technology to promote the interactive English learning in the classroom setting. An interactive English vocabulary acquisition board game was designed with the system being implemented on handheld devices. Thirty sixth-grade…

  10. Mining What We Know about Handheld Computers: A Review of the [Anecdotal] Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ray, Beverly B.

    2005-01-01

    Handheld computers have gone beyond the world of business and are finding their way into the hands of teachers and students. The empirical evidence suggests that the integration of handheld technology into the K-12 classrooms promotes 1) teacher productivity and 2) student-centered learning. Despite a wealth of anecdotal evidence little research…

  11. My-Mini-Pet: A Handheld Pet-Nurturing Game to Engage Students in Arithmetic Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liao, C. C. Y.; Chen, Z-H.; Cheng, H. N. H.; Chen, F-C.; Chan, T-W.

    2011-01-01

    In the last decade, more and more games have been developed for handheld devices. Furthermore, the popularity of handheld devices and increase of wireless computing can be taken advantage of to provide students with more learning opportunities. Games also could bring promising benefits--specifically, motivating students to learn/play, sustaining…

  12. Are Handheld Computers Dependable? A New Data Collection System for Classroom-Based Observations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adiguzel, Tufan; Vannest, Kimberly J.; Parker, Richard I.

    2009-01-01

    Very little research exists on the dependability of handheld computers used in public school classrooms. This study addresses four dependability criteria--reliability, maintainability, availability, and safety--to evaluate a data collection tool on a handheld computer. Data were collected from five sources: (1) time-use estimations by 19 special…

  13. The impact of legislation in Ireland on handheld mobile phone use by drivers.

    PubMed

    O'Meara, M; Bedford, D; Finnegan, P; Howell, F; Murray, C

    2008-01-01

    Under the Road Traffic Act, 2006 handheld mobile phone use whilst driving is an offence liable to a fine and penalty points. The aim of this study was to determine whether there has been a change in driver behaviour following the introduction of this legislation. This study found that 2.3% of drivers were still using a handheld mobile phone.

  14. Students Using Handheld Computers to Learn Collaboratively in a First Grade Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fritz, Megan Lynne

    2005-01-01

    This ethnographic study investigated how first grade students used handheld computers to learn in collaboration with others throughout the learning process. This research focused specifically on how the use of handheld computers impacts students' learning outcomes and relates to technology standards. A qualitative methodology was used to capture…

  15. Orchestrating the Instruments: Integrating ICT in the Secondary Mathematics Classroom through Handheld Technology Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, David

    2010-01-01

    This article reports on a study into the integration of ICT for students' personal use in the secondary mathematics classroom through using small software applications on handheld computing devices (graphical calculators). The handhelds were networked through wireless hubs so that data, software and output can be shared and an interactive space…

  16. Designing Handheld Software to Support Classroom Assessment: An Analysis of Conditions for Teacher Adoption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penuel, William R.; Yarnall, Louise

    2005-01-01

    Since 2002, Project WHIRL (Wireless Handhelds In Reflection on Learning) has investigated potential uses of handheld computers in K-12 science classrooms using a teacher-involved process of software development and field trials. Te project is a three-year research and development grant from the National Science Foundation, and it is a partnership…

  17. Using Handheld Computers to Support Improved Classroom Assessment in Science: Results from a Field Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yarnall, Louise; Shechtman, Nicole; Penuel, William R.

    2006-01-01

    A variety of handheld applications and curricular materials have been developed to support inquiry science learning in recent years, but there are few handheld-supported assessment activities available to teachers. In Project WHIRL, researchers from SRI International worked in partnership with teachers from Beaufort County School District (SC) to…

  18. Evaluation of an enclosed ultraviolet-C radiation device for decontamination of mobile handheld devices.

    PubMed

    Mathew, J Itty; Cadnum, Jennifer L; Sankar, Thriveen; Jencson, Annette L; Kundrapu, Sirisha; Donskey, Curtis J

    2016-06-01

    Mobile handheld devices used in health care settings may become contaminated with health care-associated pathogens. We demonstrated that an enclosed ultraviolet-C radiation device was effective in rapidly reducing methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and with longer exposure times, Clostridium difficile spores, on glass slides and reducing contamination on in-use mobile handheld devices. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. An Empirical Study on Operator Interface Design for Handheld Devices to Control Micro Aerial Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-01

    An Empirical Study on Operator Interface Design for Handheld Devices to Control Micro Aerial Vehicles Ming Hou...Report DRDC Toronto TR 2010-075 October 2010 An Empirical Study on Operator Interface Design for Handheld Devices to...drives the need for a small and light controller which will not hinder a soldier carrying it. This requirement brings an issue of designing an

  20. Development of a Real-Time Microchip PCR System for Portable Plant Disease Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun Soo; Cifci, Osman S.; Vaughn-Diaz, Vanessa L.; Ma, Bo; Kim, Sungman; Abdel-Raziq, Haron; Ong, Kevin; Jo, Young-Ki; Gross, Dennis C.; Shim, Won-Bo; Han, Arum

    2013-01-01

    Rapid and accurate detection of plant pathogens in the field is crucial to prevent the proliferation of infected crops. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) process is the most reliable and accepted method for plant pathogen diagnosis, however current conventional PCR machines are not portable and require additional post-processing steps to detect the amplified DNA (amplicon) of pathogens. Real-time PCR can directly quantify the amplicon during the DNA amplification without the need for post processing, thus more suitable for field operations, however still takes time and require large instruments that are costly and not portable. Microchip PCR systems have emerged in the past decade to miniaturize conventional PCR systems and to reduce operation time and cost. Real-time microchip PCR systems have also emerged, but unfortunately all reported portable real-time microchip PCR systems require various auxiliary instruments. Here we present a stand-alone real-time microchip PCR system composed of a PCR reaction chamber microchip with integrated thin-film heater, a compact fluorescence detector to detect amplified DNA, a microcontroller to control the entire thermocycling operation with data acquisition capability, and a battery. The entire system is 25×16×8 cm3 in size and 843 g in weight. The disposable microchip requires only 8-µl sample volume and a single PCR run consumes 110 mAh of power. A DNA extraction protocol, notably without the use of liquid nitrogen, chemicals, and other large lab equipment, was developed for field operations. The developed real-time microchip PCR system and the DNA extraction protocol were used to successfully detect six different fungal and bacterial plant pathogens with 100% success rate to a detection limit of 5 ng/8 µl sample. PMID:24349341

  1. Development of a real-time microchip PCR system for portable plant disease diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Koo, Chiwan; Malapi-Wight, Martha; Kim, Hyun Soo; Cifci, Osman S; Vaughn-Diaz, Vanessa L; Ma, Bo; Kim, Sungman; Abdel-Raziq, Haron; Ong, Kevin; Jo, Young-Ki; Gross, Dennis C; Shim, Won-Bo; Han, Arum

    2013-01-01

    Rapid and accurate detection of plant pathogens in the field is crucial to prevent the proliferation of infected crops. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) process is the most reliable and accepted method for plant pathogen diagnosis, however current conventional PCR machines are not portable and require additional post-processing steps to detect the amplified DNA (amplicon) of pathogens. Real-time PCR can directly quantify the amplicon during the DNA amplification without the need for post processing, thus more suitable for field operations, however still takes time and require large instruments that are costly and not portable. Microchip PCR systems have emerged in the past decade to miniaturize conventional PCR systems and to reduce operation time and cost. Real-time microchip PCR systems have also emerged, but unfortunately all reported portable real-time microchip PCR systems require various auxiliary instruments. Here we present a stand-alone real-time microchip PCR system composed of a PCR reaction chamber microchip with integrated thin-film heater, a compact fluorescence detector to detect amplified DNA, a microcontroller to control the entire thermocycling operation with data acquisition capability, and a battery. The entire system is 25 × 16 × 8 cm(3) in size and 843 g in weight. The disposable microchip requires only 8-µl sample volume and a single PCR run consumes 110 mAh of power. A DNA extraction protocol, notably without the use of liquid nitrogen, chemicals, and other large lab equipment, was developed for field operations. The developed real-time microchip PCR system and the DNA extraction protocol were used to successfully detect six different fungal and bacterial plant pathogens with 100% success rate to a detection limit of 5 ng/8 µl sample.

  2. Evidence of Effectiveness of Health Care Professionals Using Handheld Computers: A Scoping Review of Systematic Reviews

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Handheld computers and mobile devices provide instant access to vast amounts and types of useful information for health care professionals. Their reduced size and increased processing speed has led to rapid adoption in health care. Thus, it is important to identify whether handheld computers are actually effective in clinical practice. Objective A scoping review of systematic reviews was designed to provide a quick overview of the documented evidence of effectiveness for health care professionals using handheld computers in their clinical work. Methods A detailed search, sensitive for systematic reviews was applied for Cochrane, Medline, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Allied and Complementary Medicine Database (AMED), Global Health, and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) databases. All outcomes that demonstrated effectiveness in clinical practice were included. Classroom learning and patient use of handheld computers were excluded. Quality was assessed using the Assessment of Multiple Systematic Reviews (AMSTAR) tool. A previously published conceptual framework was used as the basis for dual data extraction. Reported outcomes were summarized according to the primary function of the handheld computer. Results Five systematic reviews met the inclusion and quality criteria. Together, they reviewed 138 unique primary studies. Most reviewed descriptive intervention studies, where physicians, pharmacists, or medical students used personal digital assistants. Effectiveness was demonstrated across four distinct functions of handheld computers: patient documentation, patient care, information seeking, and professional work patterns. Within each of these functions, a range of positive outcomes were reported using both objective and self-report measures. The use of handheld computers improved patient documentation through more complete recording, fewer documentation errors, and increased efficiency. Handheld computers provided easy access to

  3. Evidence of effectiveness of health care professionals using handheld computers: a scoping review of systematic reviews.

    PubMed

    Mickan, Sharon; Tilson, Julie K; Atherton, Helen; Roberts, Nia Wyn; Heneghan, Carl

    2013-10-28

    Handheld computers and mobile devices provide instant access to vast amounts and types of useful information for health care professionals. Their reduced size and increased processing speed has led to rapid adoption in health care. Thus, it is important to identify whether handheld computers are actually effective in clinical practice. A scoping review of systematic reviews was designed to provide a quick overview of the documented evidence of effectiveness for health care professionals using handheld computers in their clinical work. A detailed search, sensitive for systematic reviews was applied for Cochrane, Medline, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Allied and Complementary Medicine Database (AMED), Global Health, and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) databases. All outcomes that demonstrated effectiveness in clinical practice were included. Classroom learning and patient use of handheld computers were excluded. Quality was assessed using the Assessment of Multiple Systematic Reviews (AMSTAR) tool. A previously published conceptual framework was used as the basis for dual data extraction. Reported outcomes were summarized according to the primary function of the handheld computer. Five systematic reviews met the inclusion and quality criteria. Together, they reviewed 138 unique primary studies. Most reviewed descriptive intervention studies, where physicians, pharmacists, or medical students used personal digital assistants. Effectiveness was demonstrated across four distinct functions of handheld computers: patient documentation, patient care, information seeking, and professional work patterns. Within each of these functions, a range of positive outcomes were reported using both objective and self-report measures. The use of handheld computers improved patient documentation through more complete recording, fewer documentation errors, and increased efficiency. Handheld computers provided easy access to clinical decision support systems and

  4. Programming Wireless Handheld Devices for Applications in Teaching Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budiardja, R.; Saranathan, V.; Guidry, M.

    2002-12-01

    Wireless technology implemented with handheld devices has attractive features because of the potential to access large amounts of data and the prospect of on-the-fly computational analysis from a device that can be carried in a shirt pocket. We shall describe applications of such technology to the general paradigm of making digital wireless connections from the field to upload information and queries to network servers, executing (potentially complex) data analysis and/or database operations on fast network computers, and returning real-time information from this analysis to the handheld device in the field. As illustration, we shall describe several client/server programs that we have written for applications in teaching introductory astronomy. For example, one program allows static and dynamic properties of astronomical objects to be accessed in a remote observation laboratory setting using a digital cell phone or PDA. Another implements interactive quizzing over a cell phone or PDA using a 700-question introductory astronomy quiz database, thus permitting students to study for astronomy quizzes in any environment in which they have a few free minutes and a digital cell phone or wireless PDA. The presentation will include hands-on demonstrations with real devices.

  5. A hand-held EPR scanner for transcutaneous oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfson, Helen; Ahmad, Rizwan; Twig, Ygal; Blank, Aharon; Kuppusamy, Periannan

    2015-03-01

    Cutaneous (skin) oxygenation is an important prognostic factor for the treatment of chronic wounds, skin cancer, diabetes side effects, and limb amputation. Currently, there are no reliable methods for measuring this parameter. Oximetry, using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, is emerging as a potential tool for clinical oximetry, including cutaneous applications. The problem with EPR oximetry, however, is that the conventional EPR design requires the use of a large magnet that can generate homogeneous field across the sample, making it unattractive for clinical practice. We present a novel approach that makes use of a miniature permanent magnet, combined with a small microwave resonator, to enable the acquisition of EPR signals from paramagnetic species placed on the skin. The instrumentation consists of a hand-held, modular, cylindrical probehead with overall dimensions of 36-mm diameter and 24-mm height, with 150-g weight. The probehead includes a Halbach array of 16 pieces (4×4×8 mm3) of Sm-Co permanent magnet and a loop-gap resonator (2.24 GHz). Preliminary measurements using a Hahn-echo pulse sequence (800 echos in 20 ms) showed a signalto- noise ratio of ~70 compared to ~435 in a homogenous magnet under identical settings. Further work is in progress to improve the performance of the probehead and to optimize the hand-held system for clinical use

  6. Design of a handheld optical coherence microscopy endoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korde, Vrushali R.; Liebmann, Erica; Barton, Jennifer K.

    2009-02-01

    Optical Coherence Microscopy (OCM) combines coherence gating, high numerical aperture optics, and a fiber core pinhole to provide high axial and lateral resolution with relatively large depth of imaging. We present a handheld rigid OCM endoscope with a 6 mm diameter tip, 1 mm scan width, and 1 mm imaging depth. This probe will allow noninvasive imaging of fine structural detail in vivo. X-Y scanning is performed distally with mirrors mounted to micro galvonometer scanners incorporated into the endoscope handle. Two scanning doublet lenses relay the stop from the galvonometers to the afocal relay stop. The endoscope optical design consists of an afocal Hopkins relay lens system and a 0.4 NA objective. To allow focusing at various depths in the tissue, the endoscope housing is designed in two pieces screwed together with a fine pitch threads. A small rotation of the outer housing moves the lenses proximal and distal relative to the window, causing the focal location in the tissue to change. The space between the final objective lens and the window is filled with distilled water to avoid misalignment of the focus and coherence gate. A knife edge test was performed and the line spread function FWHM was measured to be 2.25 μm. The MTF has at least 0.3 contrast at a 5 μm line pair. This rigid handheld OCM endoscope will be useful for application ranging from minimally invasive surgical imaging to assessing dysplasia and sun damage in skin.

  7. Simulation for optimal design of hand-held surgical robots.

    PubMed

    Zahraee, Ali Hassan; Szewczyk, Jerome; Morel, Guillaume

    2009-01-01

    Hand-held surgical robots are manipulators with dexterous effectors to be used by surgeons in minimally invasive surgery and especially in laparoscopy. Mechanical manipulators for laparoscopy have appeared on the markets in recent years with various interfaces and dexterities. 2 examples are RealHand and Laparo-Angle. The question of which interface and control mode is the best has not been answered yet. Also, the effector kinematics has not been studied much. We have made a simulator to study the robot's interface, control mode and kinematics to design a hand-held surgical robot for laparoscopic surgery. We asked test subjects to use the simulator and try to make sutures in a virtual environment. Users opinion is that a joystick as interface is easier to use, compared to a jointed interface translating hand's orientation to that of the effector. It appears that a 6 DOF effector coupled to the shaft is necessary and dexterous enough to make sutures in different angles.

  8. Ultratrace detector for hand-held gas chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Andresen, Brian D.; Miller, Fred S.

    1999-01-01

    An ultratrace detector system for hand-held gas chromatography having high sensitivity, for example, to emissions generated during production of weapons, biological compounds, drugs, etc. The detector system is insensitive to water, air, helium, argon, oxygen, and C0.sub.2. The detector system is basically composed of a hand-held capillary gas chromatography (GC), an insulated heated redox-chamber, a detection chamber, and a vapor trap. For example, the detector system may use gas phase redox reactions and spectral absorption of mercury vapor. The gas chromatograph initially separates compounds that percolate through a bed of heated mercuric oxide (HgO) in a silica--or other metal--aerogel material which acts as an insulator. Compounds easily oxidized by HgO liberate atomic mercury that subsequently pass through a detection chamber which includes a detector cell, such as quartz, that is illuminated with a 254 nm ultra-violet (UV) mercury discharge lamp which generates the exact mercury absorption bands that are used to detect the liberated mercury atoms. Atomic mercury strongly absorbs 254 nm energy is therefore a specific signal for reducing compounds eluting from the capillary GC, whereafter the atomic mercury is trapped for example, in a silicon-aerogel trap.

  9. Ultratrace detector for hand-held gas chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, B.D.; Miller, F.S.

    1999-11-09

    An ultratrace detector system is described for hand-held gas chromatography having high sensitivity, for example, to emissions generated during production of weapons, biological compounds, drugs, etc. The detector system is insensitive to water, air, helium, argon, oxygen, and CO{sub 2}. The detector system is basically composed of a hand-held capillary gas chromatography (GC), an insulated heated redox-chamber, a detection chamber, and a vapor trap. For example, the detector system may use gas phase redox reactions and spectral absorption of mercury vapor. The gas chromatograph initially separates compounds that percolate through a bed of heated mercuric oxide (HgO) in a silica-or other metal-aerogel material which acts as an insulator. Compounds easily oxidized by HgO liberate atomic mercury that subsequently pass through a detection chamber which includes a detector cell, such as quartz, that is illuminated with a 254 nm ultra-violet (UV) mercury discharge lamp which generates the exact mercury absorption bands that are used to detect the liberated mercury atoms. Atomic mercury strongly absorbs 254 nm energy is therefore a specific signal for reducing compounds eluting from the capillary GC, whereafter the atomic mercury is trapped for example, in a silicon-aerogel trap.

  10. Handheld simultaneous scanning laser ophthalmoscopy and optical coherence tomography system

    PubMed Central

    LaRocca, Francesco; Nankivil, Derek; Farsiu, Sina; Izatt, Joseph A.

    2013-01-01

    Scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) are widely used retinal imaging modalities that can assist in the diagnosis of retinal pathologies. The combination of SLO and OCT provides a more comprehensive imaging system and a method to register OCT images to produce motion corrected retinal volumes. While high quality, bench-top SLO-OCT systems have been discussed in the literature and are available commercially, there are currently no handheld designs. We describe the first design and fabrication of a handheld SLO/spectral domain OCT probe. SLO and OCT images were acquired simultaneously with a combined power under the ANSI limit. High signal-to-noise ratio SLO and OCT images were acquired simultaneously from a normal subject with visible motion artifacts. Fully automated motion estimation methods were performed in post-processing to correct for the inter- and intra-frame motion in SLO images and their concurrently acquired OCT volumes. The resulting set of reconstructed SLO images and the OCT volume were without visible motion artifacts. At a reduced field of view, the SLO resolved parafoveal cones without adaptive optics at a retinal eccentricity of 11° in subjects with good ocular optics. This system may be especially useful for imaging young children and subjects with less stable fixation. PMID:24298396

  11. Handheld probes and galvanometer scanning for optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duma, V.-F.; Dobre, G.; Demian, D.; Cernat, R.; Sinescu, C.; Topala, F. I.; Negrutiu, M. L.; Hutiu, Gh.; Bradu, A.; Rolland, J. P.; Podoleanu, A. G.

    2015-09-01

    As part of the ongoing effort of the biomedical imaging community to move Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) systems from the lab to the clinical environment and produce OCT systems appropriate for multiple types of investigations in a medical department, handheld probes equipped with different types of scanners need to be developed. These allow different areas of a patient's body to be investigated using OCT with the same system and even without changing the patient's position. This paper reviews first the state of the art regarding OCT handheld probes. Novel probes with a uni-dimensional (1D) galvanometer-based scanner (GS) developed in our groups are presented. Their advantages and limitations are discussed. Aspects regarding the use of galvoscanners with regard to Micro-Electro- Mechanical Systems (MEMS) are pointed out, in relationship with our studies on optimal scanning functions of galvanometer devices in OCT. These scanning functions are briefly discussed with regard to their main parameters: profile, theoretical duty cycle, scan frequency, and scan amplitude. The optical design of the galvoscanner and refractive optics combination in the probe head, optimized for various applications, is considered. Perspectives of the field are pointed out in the final part of the paper.

  12. Handheld standoff mine detection system (HSTAMIDS) field evaluation in Namibia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doheny, Robert C.; Burke, Sean; Cresci, Roger; Ngan, Peter; Walls, Richard; Chernoff, Jeff

    2006-05-01

    The Humanitarian Demining Research and Development Program of the US Army RDECOM CERDEC Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD), under the direction of the Office of Assistant Secretary of Defense for Special Operations and Low-Intensity Conflict (OASD SO/LIC) and with participation from the International Test and Evaluation Program (ITEP) for humanitarian demining, conducted an in-country field evaluation of the Handheld Standoff Mine Detection System (HSTAMIDS) in the southern African country of Namibia. Participants included the US Humanitarian Demining Team of NVESD; ITEP personnel from several member countries; deminers from two non-governmental organizations in Angola, Menschen Gegen Minen (MgM) and HALO Trust; and CyTerra Corporation. The primary objectives were to demonstrate the performance of the U.S. Army's newest handheld multisensor mine detector, the HSTAMIDS, to the performance of the metal detector being used by local demining organizations and also to assess the performance of deminers using the HSTAMIDS after limited experience and training.

  13. Detecting small groundwater discharge springs using handheld thermal infrared imagery.

    PubMed

    Röper, Tania; Greskowiak, Janek; Massmann, Gudrun

    2014-01-01

    Ground-based handheld thermal infrared imagery was used for the detection of small-scale groundwater springs at the northwestern beach of Spiekeroog Island (northwest Germany). The surveys and in situ measurements of electric conductivity were carried out from shortly before to shortly after low tide along the low water line. Several brackish groundwater discharge springs with a diameter of 1-2 cm were observed along the beach at a distance of 2-3 m above the low water line. The high fresh water portion in the discharging water derives from the fresh water lens in the center of the island. During cold weather, the springs were identified by a significantly increased temperature (3-5 °C higher) and a lower electric conductivity (<10 mS/cm) in contrast to the surrounding sea water (1-2 °C, >30 mS/cm). During warmer weather conditions, an inverse temperature contrast was observed. The measurements confirm the applicability of thermal imagery for the detection of small-scale groundwater discharge locations as an extension to the established method of aerial thermal scans and prove the existence of submarine groundwater seeps in porous systems. A ground-based handheld thermal infrared imagery survey enables a precise installation of sampling devices as, for example, seepage meters. © 2013, National Ground Water Association.

  14. Micron: an Actively Stabilized Handheld Tool for Microsurgery

    PubMed Central

    MacLachlan, Robert A.; Becker, Brian C.; Tabarés, Jaime Cuevas; Podnar, Gregg W.; Lobes, Louis A.; Riviere, Cameron N.

    2011-01-01

    We describe the design and performance of a hand-held actively stabilized tool to increase accuracy in micro-surgery or other precision manipulation. It removes involuntary motion such as tremor by actuating the tip to counteract the effect of the undesired handle motion. The key components are a three-degree-of-freedom piezoelectric manipulator that has 400 μm range of motion, 1 N force capability, and bandwidth over 100 Hz, and an optical position measurement subsystem that acquires the tool pose with 4 μm resolution at 2000 samples/s. A control system using these components attenuates hand motion by at least 15 dB (a fivefold reduction). By considering the effect of the frequency response of Micron on the human visual feedback loop, we have developed a filter that reduces unintentional motion, yet preserves intuitive eye-hand coordination. We evaluated the effectiveness of Micron by measuring the accuracy of the human/machine system in three simple manipulation tasks. Handheld testing by three eye surgeons and three non-surgeons showed a reduction in position error of between 32% and 52%, depending on the error metric. PMID:23028266

  15. Military GPS handheld display development: past, present, and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiel, Alicia P.; Smothers, Andrew D.

    1998-09-01

    The military Precision Lightweight Global Positioning System (GPS) Receiver or 'PLGR' hand-held product eliminated many technical barriers to bring a low cost 'commercial' transflective display to be a standard military issue. This low cost display, combined with silicone keypad, provides a human interface that has been extremely successful at a current rate of 190 units built per day. With the PLGR and more recent PLGR-II success in meeting the challenges of the military GPS market with a low-cost display, the PLGR is now a platform to provide affordable military-commercial display solutions for the future. The paper will provide technical background on the display provided for the initial GPS hand- held award and the technology changes that were based on the voice of the customer. The display performance in the areas of contrast, Night Vision Goggle (NVG) compatibility, backlighting, and off axis viewability will be presented. Current and future challenges in hand-held and vehicular GPS products will also be presented with possible applications of new display technologies.

  16. Covert situational awareness with handheld ultrawideband short-pulse radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Mark A.; Nag, Soumya; Payment, Tim

    2001-08-01

    Law enforcement and emergency services all face the difficult task of determining the locations of people within a building. A handheld radar able to detect motion through walls and other obstructions has been developed to fill this need. This paper describes the attributes and difficulties of the radar design and includes test results of the radar's performance. This discussion begins by summarizing key user requirements and the electromagnetic losses of typical building materials. Ultra-wideband (UWB) short pulse radars are well suited for a handheld sensor primarily because of their inherit time isolation in high clutter environments and their capability to achieve high resolution at low spectral center frequencies. There are also constraints that complicate the system design. Using a technique referred to as time-modulation allows the radars to reject range ambiguities and enhances electromagnetic compatibility with similar radars and ambient systems. An outline of the specifications of the radar developed and a process diagram on how it generates a motion map showing range and direction of the people moving within structures is included. Images are then presented to illustrate its performance. The images include adults, child, and a dog. The test results also include data showing the radar's performance through a variety of building materials.

  17. Inquiry-Based Instruction through Handheld-Based Science Activities: Preservice Teachers' Attitudes and Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gado, Issaou; Ferguson, Robert; van't Hooft, Mark

    2006-01-01

    This study investigates conditions and factors that affect preservice teachers' decisions to use handheld computers in scientific investigations and explores aspects of student learning and classroom practices that would be affected by handheld-based science activities. A Handheld-Based Laboratory (HBL) was designed to model strategies for…

  18. A palmtop PCR system with a disposable polymer chip operated by the thermosiphon effect.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kwang Hyo; Park, Se Ho; Choi, Yo Han

    2010-01-21

    A small thermocyling system to perform DNA amplification by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is presented in this report. PCR reactants are convected along a triangular closed-loop channel in a polymer chip by the thermosiphon effect. In an effort to develop a convection-based PCR for real application, we adopted a molded channel to define the flow path inside the chip, so that the chip may be suitable for disposability together with the merits of LOC; mass production, versatile integration and facile handling. We developed the geometry of the flow loop that made it easier to load the PCR reactants without air pockets inside. Based on systematic simulations and theoretical considerations of buoyant flows, the loop channel was designed to acquire an optimized flow for PCR. A PCR sample was dropped on a chip to fill the loop channel, and the chip was inserted into a slot of a heating block unit that was composed of three metal blocks with different temperatures. The temperature differences within the closed loop gave rise to buoyancy differences and the liquid reactant continuously circulated along the closed loop by the thermosiphon effect. Because there was no loss of time among the temperature shifts in the reaction steps, approximately 10 min were sufficient for the detectable amplification of 127 bp target gene from 10 pg microl(-1) of PCR fragments. In addition, it took 20 min for the mass amplification of 470 bp gene from PCR fragments or genomic DNA. The entire PCR system is compact enough even to be palmtop because it requires only a tiny temperature controller for a self-actuated thermosiphon flow. This thermocycling system would be a prototypical model for the field application of PCR.

  19. Texting while driving: is speech-based text entry less risky than handheld text entry?

    PubMed

    He, J; Chaparro, A; Nguyen, B; Burge, R J; Crandall, J; Chaparro, B; Ni, R; Cao, S

    2014-11-01

    Research indicates that using a cell phone to talk or text while maneuvering a vehicle impairs driving performance. However, few published studies directly compare the distracting effects of texting using a hands-free (i.e., speech-based interface) versus handheld cell phone, which is an important issue for legislation, automotive interface design and driving safety training. This study compared the effect of speech-based versus handheld text entries on simulated driving performance by asking participants to perform a car following task while controlling the duration of a secondary text-entry task. Results showed that both speech-based and handheld text entries impaired driving performance relative to the drive-only condition by causing more variation in speed and lane position. Handheld text entry also increased the brake response time and increased variation in headway distance. Text entry using a speech-based cell phone was less detrimental to driving performance than handheld text entry. Nevertheless, the speech-based text entry task still significantly impaired driving compared to the drive-only condition. These results suggest that speech-based text entry disrupts driving, but reduces the level of performance interference compared to text entry with a handheld device. In addition, the difference in the distraction effect caused by speech-based and handheld text entry is not simply due to the difference in task duration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Radioactive uranium measurement in vivo using a handheld interfaced analyzer.

    PubMed

    Ly, Suw Young; Lee, Jin-Hui; Jung, Dong Ho

    2010-05-01

    A trace uranium (U) detection method was developed with a handheld voltammetric analyzer that was the size of a mobile phone, with working sensors made of simple graphite pencil electrode (PE). The optimum stripping voltammetric conditions were sought, and the following results were obtained: 0.0 to 0.08 ng/L working ranges and a statistically relative standard deviation of 1.78% (RSD; n=15) at a 10.0 microg/L U spike. The experiment accumulation time used was only 150 s. Under this condition, the diagnostic detection limit approached 0.007 ng/L. The method was applied to soil of a natural rock in a radioactive mineralogy site. Earthworms that resided at this site were assayed. The method was found to be applicable in biological diagnosis or in real-time in vivo survey.

  1. Design of a handheld electronic pain, treatment and activity diary.

    PubMed

    Luckmann, Roger; Vidal, Amin

    2010-10-01

    Effective tools for recording and analyzing data on patients' pain experience, use of pain treatments, and physical function are needed to improve communication between providers and patients with noncancer chronic pain. A handheld electronic diary (HED) that can be used throughout the day may provide more useful and accurate information about pain, treatments, and function than available paper and on-line diaries that are designed to be used once daily, weekly or less often. Based on user-specified requirements we designed and built a prototype HED with 7 modules. Diary queries are followed by multiple choice responses customized to the patients' expected responses. Usability testing confirmed user comprehension and acceptability of the queries, response sets, and interface. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Hand-Held Devices Detect Explosives and Chemical Agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Ion Applications Inc., of West Palm Beach, Florida, partnered with Ames Research Center through Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) agreements to develop a miniature version ion mobility spectrometer (IMS). While NASA was interested in the instrument for detecting chemicals during exploration of distant planets, moons, and comets, the company has incorporated the technology into a commercial hand-held IMS device for use by the military and other public safety organizations. Capable of detecting and identifying molecules with part-per-billion sensitivity, the technology now provides soldiers with portable explosives and chemical warfare agent detection. The device is also being adapted for detecting drugs and is employed in industrial processes such as semiconductor manufacturing.

  3. Center of percussion of hand-held implements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Rod

    2004-05-01

    The center of percussion is commonly regarded as a sweet spot when referring to a baseball bat or a tennis racquet because it is assumed that there will be no sudden motion of the handle with respect to the hand if the corresponding axis of rotation passes through the hand. A problem with this interpretation is that the hand extends over a finite length of the handle and exerts an opposing reaction force on the handle. The hand also changes the total mass and moment of inertia of the system, while the arm restricts free motion of the hand. Experimental results are presented showing that the axis of rotation passes through the hand or the wrist for all the usual impact points on a hand-held implement. As a result, the impact point that feels best is usually the node of the fundamental vibration mode, not the center of percussion.

  4. Hand-held spectrophotometer design for textile fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böcekçi, Veysel Gökhan; Yıldız, Kazım

    2017-09-01

    In this study, a hand-held spectrophotometer was designed by taking advantage of the developments in modern optoelectronic technology. Spectrophotometer devices are used to determine the color information from the optic properties of the materials. As an alternative to a desktop spectrophotometer device we have implemented, it is the first prototype, low cost and portable. The prototype model designed for the textile industry can detect the color tone of any fabric. The prototype model consists of optic sensor, processor, display floors. According to the color applied on the optic sensor, it produces special frequency information on its output at that color value. In Arduino type processor, the frequency information is evaluated by the program we have written and the color tone information between 0-255 ton is decided and displayed on the screen.

  5. A Smart Haptic Hand-Held Device for Neurosurgical Microdissection.

    PubMed

    Payne, Christopher J; Marcus, Hani J; Yang, Guang-Zhong

    2015-09-01

    Microneurosurgery requires dexterity, precision and delicate force application in order to be carried out safely and effectively. Neurosurgeons must apply sufficient force in order to carry out microsurgical procedures effectively but not excessive force such that iatrogenic injury occurs. This paper presents a smart hand-held microsurgical instrument that indicates to the surgeon when a force-threshold has been exceeded by providing vibrotactile feedback. Many existing haptic-feedback systems, particularly master-slave robotic platforms, are large, highly complex, and costly. By comparison, the proposed device is compact, fail-safe and low cost. Two psychophysical user studies were carried out to assess the proposed vibrotactile force-threshold feedback system. A cadaveric pilot study was carried out to evaluate the device in a microdissection task. In all the studies performed, the haptic dissector device has shown to be effective in providing real-time feedback in terms of force application during microsurgical tasks.

  6. The ARES test system for palm OS handheld computers.

    PubMed

    Elsmore, Timothy F; Reeves, Dennis L; Reeves, Andrea N

    2007-02-01

    The ARES (ANAM Readiness Evaluation System) is a cognitive testing system designed for operation on palm OS handheld computers i.e., Personal Digital Assistants (PDA). It provides an inexpensive and portable testing platform for field and clinical applications. ARES test batteries can be configured from a library of tests derived from the ANAM test system. ARES features include support of multiple users on a single PDA, a Microsoft Windows test battery authoring program, and a program for downloading, viewing, graphing, and archiving data. In validity tests, the same subjects were tested on identical ARES and conventional ANAM NeuroCog test batteries. Scores from the two platforms correlated highly, but absolute scores differed slightly. In reliability testing with the ARES Warrior battery, ARES scores were highly correlated in daily tests.

  7. Physician order entry of ultrasound examination with handheld wireless terminal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuya, Shiro; Onogi, Yuzo; Shinohara, Nobuo; Yamaguchi, Izumi; Watanabe, Hiroki; Ohe, Kazuhiko; Yamaguchi, Kenichi; Niidome, Takuro; Oyama, Hiroshi

    2004-04-01

    Although our hospital has an electronic order entry system, physician order entries must be performed using one of a limited number of terminals which are located in places like nurse stations. Due to this limitation, the mobility of the ultrasound machine cannot be fully exploited if a physician wants to perform a mobile ultrasound examination far from an entry terminal. In addition, this situation increases the possibility that a physician will fail to issue a paper voucher of the examination. In an attempt to resolve these problems, we have developed a mobile physician order entry system that incorporates ultrasound machines equipped with handheld wireless terminals, which use the 802.11b standard and the bandwidth is 11 Mbps. This is an efficient way to order ultrasound examination entries because physicians can register entries at any location in a hospital ward. In addition, the proposed system is a reliable method by which to attach images upon ultrasound examination entry.

  8. Development of an automated handheld immunoaffinity fluorometric biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Terry E.; Bargeron, C. Brent; Benson, Richard C.; Carlson, Micah A.; Fraser, Allan B.; Groopman, John D.; Ko, Harvey W.; Strickland, Paul T.; Velky, James

    2000-04-01

    A new immunoaffinity fluorometric biosensor has been developed for detecting and quantifying aflatoxins, a family of potent fungi-produced carcinogens that are commonly found in a variety of agriculture products. They have also been cited as a biological agent under weapons development. The handheld, self-contained biosensor is fully automatic, highly sensitive, quick, quantitative, and requires no special storage. Concentration from 0.1 parts per billion to 50 ppb can be determined in less than 2 minutes with a 1 ml sample volume. Higher concentrations can be determined by simply reducing the sample volume. The device operates on the principles of immunoaffinity for specificity and fluorescence for a quantitative assay. The analytic procedure is flexible so that other chemical and biological analytes could be detected with minor modifications to the current device.

  9. Occupational risk identification using hand-held or laptop computers.

    PubMed

    Naumanen, Paula; Savolainen, Heikki; Liesivuori, Jyrki

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the Work Environment Profile (WEP) program and its use in risk identification by computer. It is installed into a hand-held computer or a laptop to be used in risk identification during work site visits. A 5-category system is used to describe the identified risks in 7 groups, i.e., accidents, biological and physical hazards, ergonomic and psychosocial load, chemicals, and information technology hazards. Each group contains several qualifying factors. These 5 categories are colour-coded at this stage to aid with visualization. Risk identification produces visual summary images the interpretation of which is facilitated by colours. The WEP program is a tool for risk assessment which is easy to learn and to use both by experts and nonprofessionals. It is especially well adapted to be used both in small and in larger enterprises. Considerable time is saved as no paper notes are needed.

  10. Object localization in handheld thermal images for fireground understanding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandecasteele, Florian; Merci, Bart; Jalalvand, Azarakhsh; Verstockt, Steven

    2017-05-01

    Despite the broad application of the handheld thermal imaging cameras in firefighting, its usage is mostly limited to subjective interpretation by the person carrying the device. As remedies to overcome this limitation, object localization and classification mechanisms could assist the fireground understanding and help with the automated localization, characterization and spatio-temporal (spreading) analysis of the fire. An automated understanding of thermal images can enrich the conventional knowledge-based firefighting techniques by providing the information from the data and sensing-driven approaches. In this work, transfer learning is applied on multi-labeling convolutional neural network architectures for object localization and recognition in monocular visual, infrared and multispectral dynamic images. Furthermore, the possibility of analyzing fire scene images is studied and their current limitations are discussed. Finally, the understanding of the room configuration (i.e., objects location) for indoor localization in reduced visibility environments and the linking with Building Information Models (BIM) are investigated.

  11. Robot Assisted Stapedotomy ex vivo with an Active Handheld Instrument*

    PubMed Central

    Vendrametto, Tobia; McAfee, Jacob S.; Hirsch, Barry E.; Riviere, Cameron N.; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; De Momi, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Micron is a fully handheld active micromanipulator that helps to improve position accuracy and precision in microsurgery by cancelling hand tremor. This work describes adaptation, tuning, and testing of the Micron system for stapedotomy, a microsurgical procedure performed in the middle ear to restore hearing that requires accurate manipulation in narrow spaces. Two end-effectors, a handle, and a brace (or rest) were designed and prototyped. The control system was adapted for the new hardware. The system was tested ex vivo in stapedotomy procedure comparing manually-performed and Micron-assisted surgical tasks. Tremor amplitude was found to be reduced significantly. Further testing is needed in order to obtain statistically significant results regarding other parameters dealing with regularity of the fenestra shape. PMID:26737386

  12. Comparative Geometrical Investigations of Hand-Held Scanning Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kersten, T. P.; Przybilla, H.-J.; Lindstaedt, M.; Tschirschwitz, F.; Misgaiski-Hass, M.

    2016-06-01

    An increasing number of hand-held scanning systems by different manufacturers are becoming available on the market. However, their geometrical performance is little-known to many users. Therefore the Laboratory for Photogrammetry & Laser Scanning of the HafenCity University Hamburg has carried out geometrical accuracy tests with the following systems in co-operation with the Bochum University of Applied Sciences (Laboratory for Photogrammetry) as well as the Humboldt University in Berlin (Institute for Computer Science): DOTProduct DPI-7, Artec Spider, Mantis Vision F5 SR, Kinect v1 + v2, Structure Sensor and Google's Project Tango. In the framework of these comparative investigations geometrically stable reference bodies were used. The appropriate reference data were acquired by measurement with two structured light projection systems (AICON smartSCAN and GOM ATOS I 2M). The comprehensive test results of the different test scenarios are presented and critically discussed in this contribution.

  13. Infrared detection, recognition and identification of handheld objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adomeit, Uwe

    2012-10-01

    A main criterion for comparison and selection of thermal imagers for military applications is their nominal range performance. This nominal range performance is calculated for a defined task and standardized target and environmental conditions. The only standardization available to date is STANAG 4347. The target defined there is based on a main battle tank in front view. Because of modified military requirements, this target is no longer up-to-date. Today, different topics of interest are of interest, especially differentiation between friend and foe and identification of humans. There is no direct way to differentiate between friend and foe in asymmetric scenarios, but one clue can be that someone is carrying a weapon. This clue can be transformed in the observer tasks detection: a person is carrying or is not carrying an object, recognition: the object is a long / medium / short range weapon or civil equipment and identification: the object can be named (e. g. AK-47, M-4, G36, RPG7, Axe, Shovel etc.). These tasks can be assessed experimentally and from the results of such an assessment, a standard target for handheld objects may be derived. For a first assessment, a human carrying 13 different handheld objects in front of his chest was recorded at four different ranges with an IR-dual-band camera. From the recorded data, a perception experiment was prepared. It was conducted with 17 observers in a 13-alternative forced choice, unlimited observation time arrangement. The results of the test together with Minimum Temperature Difference Perceived measurements of the camera and temperature difference and critical dimension derived from the recorded imagery allowed defining a first standard target according to the above tasks. This standard target consist of 2.5 / 3.5 / 5 DRI line pairs on target, 0.24 m critical size and 1 K temperature difference. The values are preliminary and have to be refined in the future. Necessary are different aspect angles, different

  14. The use of handheld computers in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Koop, Andreas; Mösges, Ralph

    2002-10-01

    A recently completed, randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial is presented in which Palm handheld computers were used as a substitute for normal paper-based patient diaries. In this nasal provocation study, a common antihistamine approved for the treatment of seasonal allergic rhinitis was tested against placebo for evidence of additional properties. In addition to their medical examinations, the 12 study volunteers rated subjective complaints in a diary program on 4 examination days, for a duration of 4.5 hours every 15 minutes at each visit. This resulted in 903 data sets consisting of five questions each, or 4515 data points total. In this study the use of handheld computers resulted in an increase in data quality and shortened the time needed to close the database. Moreover, the benefit of electronic reminders for protocol compliance is clearly demonstrated. Our findings support the results found in the literature we reviewed. For more than 16 years, mobile computers have been supporting the implementation of clinical trials. Our review of 27 articles out of more than 100 clinical trials in which mobile computers have been used elaborates on the advantages and problems of this technology. We give a comprehensive overview of the various technologies as used in different settings, and then discuss the methodology of using mobile devices in comparison to traditional methods, the considerations that need to be made and things to be avoided in order to conduct a successful clinical trial with mobile tools. We conclude that mobile devices are very useful in most cases, especially when design and software validation aspects have been taken into account.

  15. Handheld laser scanner automatic registration based on random coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Lei; Yu, Chun-ping; Wang, Li

    2011-06-01

    Current research on Laser Scanner often focuses mainly on the static measurement. Little use has been made of dynamic measurement, that are appropriate for more problems and situations. In particular, traditional Laser Scanner must Keep stable to scan and measure coordinate transformation parameters between different station. In order to make the scanning measurement intelligently and rapidly, in this paper ,we developed a new registration algorithm for handleheld laser scanner based on the positon of target, which realize the dynamic measurement of handheld laser scanner without any more complex work. the double camera on laser scanner can take photograph of the artificial target points to get the three-dimensional coordinates, this points is designed by random coding. And then, a set of matched points is found from control points to realize the orientation of scanner by the least-square common points transformation. After that the double camera can directly measure the laser point cloud in the surface of object and get the point cloud data in an unified coordinate system. There are three major contributions in the paper. Firstly, a laser scanner based on binocular vision is designed with double camera and one laser head. By those, the real-time orientation of laser scanner is realized and the efficiency is improved. Secondly, the coding marker is introduced to solve the data matching, a random coding method is proposed. Compared with other coding methods,the marker with this method is simple to match and can avoid the shading for the object. Finally, a recognition method of coding maker is proposed, with the use of the distance recognition, it is more efficient. The method present here can be used widely in any measurement from small to huge obiect, such as vehicle, airplane which strengthen its intelligence and efficiency. The results of experiments and theory analzing demonstrate that proposed method could realize the dynamic measurement of handheld laser

  16. Handheld camera 3D modeling system using multiple reference panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimura, Kouta; Oue, Yasuhiro; Terauchi, Tomoya; Emi, Tetsuichi

    2002-03-01

    A novel 3D modeling system in which a target object is easily captured and modeled by using a hand-held camera with several reference panels is presented in this paper. The reference panels are designed to be able to obtain the camera position and discriminate between each other. A conventional 3D modeling system using a reference panel has several restrictions regarding the target object, specifically the size and its location. Our system uses multiple reference panels, which are set around the target object to remove these restrictions. The main features of this system are as follows: 1) The whole shape and photo-realistic textures of the target object can be digitized based on several still images or a movie captured by using a hand-held camera; as well as each location of the camera that can be calculated using the reference panels. 2) Our system can be provided as a software product only. That means there are no special requirements for hardware; even the reference panels , because they can be printed from image files or software. 3) This system can be applied to digitize a larger object. In the experiments, we developed and used an interactive region selection tool to detect the silhouette on each image instead of using the chroma -keying method. We have tested our system with a toy object. The calculation time is about 10 minutes (except for the capturing the images and extracting the silhouette by using our tool) on a personal computer with a Pentium-III processor (600MHz) and 320MB memory. However, it depends on how complex the images are and how many images you use. Our future plan is to evaluate the system with various kind of objects, specifically, large ones in outdoor environments.

  17. Font size and viewing distance of handheld smart phones.

    PubMed

    Bababekova, Yuliya; Rosenfield, Mark; Hue, Jennifer E; Huang, Rae R

    2011-07-01

    The use of handheld smart phones for written communication is becoming ubiquitous in modern society. The relatively small screens found in these devices may necessitate close working distances and small text sizes, which can increase the demands placed on accommodation and vergence. Font size and viewing distance were measured while subjects used handheld electronic devices in two separate trials. In the first study (n=129), subjects were asked to show a typical text message on their own personal phone and to hold the device "as if they were about to read a text message." A second trial was conducted in a similar manner except subjects (n=100) were asked to view a specific web page from the internet. For text messages and internet viewing, the mean font size was 1.1 M (range, 0.7 to 2.1 M) and 0.8 M (range, 0.3 to 1.4 M), respectively. The mean working distance for text messages and internet viewing was 36.2 cm (range, 17.5 to 58.0 cm) and 32.2 cm (range, 19 to 60 cm), respectively. The mean font size for both conditions was comparable with newspaper print, although some subjects viewed text that was considerably smaller. However, the mean working distances were closer than the typical near working distance of 40 cm for adults when viewing hardcopy text. These close distances place increased demands on both accommodation and vergence, which could exacerbate symptoms. Practitioners need to consider the closer distances adopted while viewing material on smart phones when examining patients and prescribing refractive corrections for use at near, as well as when treating patients presenting with asthenopia associated with nearwork. Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Optometry

  18. Use of handheld sonar to locate a missing diver.

    PubMed

    McGrane, Owen; Cronin, Aaron; Hile, David

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether a handheld sonar device significantly reduces the mean time needed to locate a missing diver. This institutional review board approved, prospective, crossover study used a voluntary convenience sample of 10 scuba divers. Participants conducted both a standard and modified search to locate a simulated missing diver. The standard search utilized a conventional search pattern starting at the point where the missing diver (simulated) was last seen. The modified search used a sonar beacon to augment the search. For each search method, successful completion of the search was defined as locating the missing diver within 40 minutes. Twenty total dives were completed. Using a standard search pattern, the missing diver was found by only 1 diver (10%), taking 18 minutes and 45 seconds. In the sonar-assisted search group, the missing diver was found by all 10 participants (100%), taking an average of 2 minutes and 47 seconds (SD 1 minute, 20 seconds). Using the nonparametric related samples Wilcoxon signed rank test, actual times between the sonar group and the standard group were significant (P < .01). Using paired samples t tests, the sonar group's self-assessed confidence increased significantly after using the sonar (P < .001), whereas the standard group decreased in confidence (not statistically significant, P = .111). Handheld sonar significantly reduces the mean duration to locate a missing diver as well as increasing users' confidence in their ability to find a missing diver when compared with standard search techniques. Copyright © 2013 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Innovative qPCR using interfacial effects to enable low threshold cycle detection and inhibition relief

    PubMed Central

    Harshman, Dustin K.; Rao, Brianna M.; McLain, Jean E.; Watts, George S.; Yoon, Jeong-Yeol

    2015-01-01

    Molecular diagnostics offers quick access to information but fails to operate at a speed required for clinical decision-making. Our novel methodology, droplet-on-thermocouple silhouette real-time polymerase chain reaction (DOTS qPCR), uses interfacial effects for droplet actuation, inhibition relief, and amplification sensing. DOTS qPCR has sample-to-answer times as short as 3 min 30 s. In infective endocarditis diagnosis, DOTS qPCR demonstrates reproducibility, differentiation of antibiotic susceptibility, subpicogram limit of detection, and thermocycling speeds of up to 28 s/cycle in the presence of tissue contaminants. Langmuir and Gibbs adsorption isotherms are used to describe the decreasing interfacial tension upon amplification. Moreover, a log-linear relationship with low threshold cycles is presented for real-time quantification by imaging the droplet-on-thermocouple silhouette with a smartphone. DOTS qPCR resolves several limitations of commercially available real-time PCR systems, which rely on fluorescence detection, have substantially higher threshold cycles, and require expensive optical components and extensive sample preparation. Due to the advantages of low threshold cycle detection, we anticipate extending this technology to biological research applications such as single cell, single nucleus, and single DNA molecule analyses. Our work is the first demonstrated use of interfacial effects for sensing reaction progress, and it will enable point-of-care molecular diagnosis of infections. PMID:26601245

  20. Handheld Computer Use in U.S. Family Practice Residency Programs

    PubMed Central

    Criswell, Dan F.; Parchman, Michael L.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the uses of handheld computers (also called personal digital assistants, or PDAs) in family practice residency programs in the United States. Study Design: In November 2000, the authors mailed a questionnaire to the program directors of all American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP) and American College of Osteopathic Family Practice (ACOFP) residency programs in the United States. Measurements: Data and patterns of the use and non-use of handheld computers were identified. Results: Approximately 50 percent (306 of 610) of the programs responded to the survey. Two thirds of the programs reported that handheld computers were used in their residencies, and an additional 14 percent had plans for implementation within 24 months. Both the Palm and the Windows CE operating systems were used, with the Palm operating system the most common. Military programs had the highest rate of use (8 of 10 programs, 80 percent), and osteopathic programs had the lowest (23 of 55 programs, 42 percent). Of programs that reported handheld computer use, 45 percent had required handheld computer applications that are used uniformly by all users. Funding for handheld computers and related applications was non-budgeted in 76percent of the programs in which handheld computers were used. In programs providing a budget for handheld computers, the average annual budget per user was $461.58. Interested faculty or residents, rather than computer information services personnel, performed upkeep and maintenance of handheld computers in 72 percent of the programs in which the computers are used. In addition to the installed calendar, memo pad, and address book, the most common clinical uses of handheld computers in the programs were as medication reference tools, electronic textbooks, and clinical computational or calculator-type programs. Conclusions: Handheld computers are widely used in family practice residency programs in the United States

  1. CODEHOP PCR and CODEHOP PCR primer design.

    PubMed

    Staheli, Jeannette P; Boyce, Richard; Kovarik, Dina; Rose, Timothy M

    2011-01-01

    While PCR primer design for the amplification of known sequences is usually quite straightforward, the design, and successful application of primers aimed at the detection of as yet unknown genes is often not. The search for genes that are presumed to be distantly related to a known gene sequence, such as homologous genes in different species, paralogs in the same genome, or novel pathogens in diverse hosts, often turns into the proverbial search for the needle in the haystack. PCR-based methods commonly used to address this issue involve the use of either consensus primers or degenerate primers, both of which have significant shortcomings regarding sensitivity and specificity. We have developed a novel primer design approach that diminishes these shortcomings and instead takes advantage of the strengths of both consensus and degenerate primer designs, by combining the two concepts into a Consensus-Degenerate Hybrid Oligonucleotide Primer (CODEHOP) approach. CODEHOP PCR primers contain a relatively short degenerate 3' core and a 5' nondegenerate clamp. The 3' degenerate core consists of a pool of primers containing all possible codons for a 3-4 aminoacid motif that is highly conserved in multiply aligned sequences from known members of a protein family. Each primer in the pool also contains a single 5' nondegenerate nucleotide sequence derived from a codon consensus across the aligned aminoacid sequences flanking the conserved motif. During the initial PCR amplification cycles, the degenerate core is responsible for specific binding to sequences encoding the conserved aminoacid motif. The longer consensus clamp region serves to stabilize the primer and allows the participation of all primers in the pool in the efficient amplification of products during later PCR cycles. We have developed an interactive web site and algorithm (iCODEHOP) for designing CODEHOP PCR primers from multiply aligned protein sequences, which is freely available online. Here, we describe the

  2. Optimal enhancement of in situ hybridization for the detection of porcine circovirus 2 in formalin-fixed, paraffin-wax-embedded tissues using a combined pretreatment of thermocycler and proteinase K.

    PubMed

    Kim, J; Chae, C

    2003-06-01

    Optimal enhancement of the hybridization signal was developed for the detection of porcine circovirus (PCV) 2 in formalin-fixed, paraffin-wax-embedded tissues from pigs with postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome. The hybridization signal obtained after thermocycler pretreatment was very uniform across the section, whereas the signal obtained after either proteinase K or microwave pretreatment not only was weaker but was of variable intensity across sections. Thermocycler pretreatment combined with brief proteinase K digestion can enhance signal detection for target viral nucleic acid in formalin-fixed, paraffin-wax-embedded tissues. A strong hybridization signal was detected in the cytoplasm of macrophages and multinucleated giant cells in lymph node and spleen without background staining and morphological damage. The technical improvement results, therefore, in an identical background at the same time as an increased signal and, thus, may help detect lower levels of PCV2 DNA in formalin-fixed, paraffin-wax-embedded tissues.

  3. Detection of infectious bronchitis virus with the use of real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR and correlation with virus detection in embryonated eggs.

    PubMed

    Roh, Ha-Jung; Hilt, Deborah A; Jackwood, Mark W

    2014-09-01

    Real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) assays have been used to detect the presence of challenge virus when the efficacy of infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) vaccine against field viruses is being experimentally evaluated. However, federal guidelines for licensing IBV vaccines indicate that challenge-virus detection following vaccination is to be conducted in embryonated eggs. In this study, we examined qRT-PCR data with the use of universal and type-specific primers and probe sets for IBV detection and compared those data with challenge-virus detection in embryonated eggs to determine if the two methods of evaluating vaccine efficacy are comparable. In addition, we tested the qRT-PCR assays on thermocyclers from two different manufacturers. We found the universal IBV primers and probe set to be comparable to challenge-virus detection in embryonated eggs. However, for some IBV types (Mass41 and Conn on the SmartCycler II and Ark, Mass41, Conn, and GA98 on the ABI 7500) the qRT-PCR assay was more sensitive than virus detection in embryonated eggs. This may simply be due to the universal IBV qRT-PCR assay being more sensitive than virus detection in eggs or to the assay detecting nucleic acid from nonviable virus. This finding is important and needs to be considered when evaluating challenge-virus detection for vaccination and challenge studies, because qRT-PCR could potentially identify positive birds that would otherwise be negative by virus detection in embryonated eggs; thus it could lead to a more stringent measure of vaccine efficacy. We also found that the IBV type-specific primers and probe sets designed in this study were in general less sensitive than the universal IBV primers and probe set. Only the Ark-DPI-spedcific assay on the SmartCycler II and the Ark-DPI-, Mass41-, and DE072/GA98- (for detection of GA98 virus only) specific assays on the ABI 7500 were comparable in sensitivity to virus detection in eggs. We

  4. Application of three duplex real-time PCR assays for simultaneous detection of human seasonal and avian influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Stefańska, Ilona; Dzieciatkowski, Tomasz; Brydak, Lidia B; Romanowska, Magdalena

    2013-08-01

    This study was performed to develop real-time PCR (qPCR) for detection of human seasonal and avian influenza viruses in duplex format. First duplex qPCR detects haemagglutinin (HA) gene of influenza virus A(H1N1)pdm09 and HA gene of influenza virus A(H3N2), the second reaction detects neuraminidase (NA) gene of influenza virus A(H3N2) and NA gene of influenza virus A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H5N1), and the third reaction detects HA gene of influenza A(H5N1) and nonstructural protein gene of influenza B virus. Primers and probes were designed using multiple alignments of target gene sequences of different reference strains. Assays were optimised for identical thermocycling conditions. Their specificity was confirmed by conventional PCR and monoplex qPCR with nucleic acids isolated from different influenza viruses and other respiratory pathogens. Plasmid constructs with a fragment of specific gene were used to assess sensitivity of the assay. The limit of detection ranged from 27 to 96 cDNA copies/reaction. Clinical specimens (n = 107) have been tested using new assays, immunofluorescence and monoplex qRT-PCR. It has been shown that developed assays have been capable of rapid and accurate simultaneous detection and differentiation of influenza viruses. They are more sensitive than immunofluorescence and at least as sensitive as monoplex qRT-PCR.

  5. Electrochemistry-based real-time PCR on a microchip.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Stephen S W; Lee, Thomas M H; Hsing, I-Ming

    2008-01-15

    The development of handheld instruments for point-of-care DNA analysis can potentially contribute to the medical diagnostics and environmental monitoring for decentralized applications. In this work, we demonstrate the implementation of a recently developed electrochemical real-time polymerase chain reaction (ERT-PCR) technique on a silicon-glass microchip for simultaneous DNA amplification and detection. This on-chip ERT-PCR process requires the extension of an oligonucleotide in both solution and at solid phases and intermittent electrochemical signal measurement in the presence of all the PCR reagents. Several important parameters, related to the surface passivation and electrochemical scanning of working electrodes, were investigated. It was found that the ERT-PCR's onset thermal cycle ( approximately 3-5), where the analytical signal begins to be distinguishable from the background, is much lower than that of the fluorescence-based counterparts for high template DNA situations (3 x 10(6) copies/microL). By carefully controlling the concentrations of the immobilized probe and the enzyme polymerase, improvements have been made in obtaining a meaningful electrochemical signal using a lower initial template concentration. This ERT-PCR technique on a microchip platform holds significant promise for rapid DNA detection for point-of-care testing applications.

  6. Implementation of the 7-point checklist for melanoma detection on smart handheld devices.

    PubMed

    Wadhawan, Tarun; Situ, Ning; Rui, Hu; Lancaster, Keith; Yuan, Xiaojing; Zouridakis, George

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we implement the 7-point checklist, a set of dermoscopic criteria widely used by clinicians for melanoma detection, on smart handheld devices, such as the Apple iPhone and iPad. The application developed is using sophisticated image processing and pattern recognition algorithms, yet it is light enough to run on a handheld device with limited memory and computational speed. When combined with a commercially available handheld dermoscope that provides proper lesion illumination, this application provides a truly self-contained handheld system for melanoma detection. Such a device can be used in a clinical setting for routine skin screening, or as an assistive diagnostic device in underserved areas and in developing countries with limited healthcare infrastructure.

  7. Discrimination of Pigments of Microalgae, Bacteria and Yeasts Using Lightweight Handheld Raman Spectrometers: Prospects for Astrobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jehlicka, J.; Osterrothova, K.; Nedbalova, L.; Gunde-Cimerman, N.; Oren, A.

    2014-06-01

    Handheld Raman instrumentation with 532 nm lasers can be used to distinguish carotenoids of autotrophic microalgae, purple sulfur bacteria, halophilic Archaea and pigmented yeasts. Pigments are proposed as biomarkers for astrobiology of Mars.

  8. Using Handheld Computers to Support Improved Classroom Assessment in Science: Results from a Field Trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarnall, Louise; Shechtman, Nicole; Penuel, William R.

    2006-04-01

    A variety of handheld applications and curricular materials have been developed to support inquiry science learning in recent years, but there are few handheld-supported assessment activities available to teachers. In Project WHIRL, researchers from SRI International worked in partnership with teachers from Beaufort County School District (SC) to develop a suite of handheld software applications that could be used to support classroom assessment in upper elementary and middle school science classrooms. In this paper, we will analyze results from a field trial conducted in 2003-2004 with 18 teachers in the district, focusing on how teachers' enactment of handheld-supported assessment activities altered the frequency and quality of their assessment practices.

  9. 49 CFR 392.82 - Using a hand-held mobile telephone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... COMMERCIAL MOTOR VEHICLES Limiting the Use of Electronic Devices § 392.82 Using a hand-held mobile telephone... highway, including while temporarily stationary because of traffic, a traffic control device, or other...

  10. Handheld low-temperature plasma probe for portable "point-and-shoot" ambient ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wiley, Joshua S; Shelley, Jacob T; Cooks, R Graham

    2013-07-16

    We describe a handheld, wireless low-temperature plasma (LTP) ambient ionization source and its performance on a benchtop and a miniature mass spectrometer. The source, which is inexpensive to build and operate, is battery-powered and utilizes miniature helium cylinders or air as the discharge gas. Comparison of a conventional, large-scale LTP source against the handheld LTP source, which uses less helium and power than the large-scale version, revealed that the handheld source had similar or slightly better analytical performance. Another advantage of the handheld LTP source is the ability to quickly interrogate a gaseous, liquid, or solid sample without requiring any setup time. A small, 7.4-V Li-polymer battery is able to sustain plasma for 2 h continuously, while the miniature helium cylinder supplies gas flow for approximately 8 continuous hours. Long-distance ion transfer was achieved for distances up to 1 m.

  11. PCR und Real-Time PCR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konrad, Regina; Busch, Ulrich

    Die vielfältigen Anwendungsmöglichkeiten der Polymerasekettenreaktion (polymerase chain reaction, PCR) machen sie zu einer der wichtigsten und am häufigsten eingesetzten Methoden in der molekularbiologischen Forschung und Diagnostik. Für diese Technologie wurde der Erfinder der Methode, Kary Mullis, 1993 mit dem Nobelpreis ausgezeichnet. Die PCR erlaubt einen hochsensitiven und spezifischen in-vitro-Nachweis von Desoxyribonukleinsäuren (DNA), da im Zuge der Reaktion Sequenzabschnitte gezielt vermehrt werden. Innerhalb weniger Stunden können aus einem einzigen Zielmolekül 1012 identische Moleküle entstehen [1].

  12. Comparison of handheld ultrasound and automated breast ultrasound in women recalled after mammography screening.

    PubMed

    Hellgren, Roxanna; Dickman, Paul; Leifland, Karin; Saracco, Ariel; Hall, Per; Celebioglu, Fuat

    2017-05-01

    Background Automated breast volume scanner (ABVS) is an ultrasound (US) device with a wide scanner that sweeps over a large area of the breast and the acquired transverse images are sent to a workstation for reconstruction and review. Whether ABVS is as reliable as handheld US is, however, still not established. Purpose To compare the sensitivity and specificity of ABVS to handheld breast US for detection of breast cancer, in the situation of recall after mammography screening. Material and Methods A total of 113 women, five with bilateral suspicious findings, undergoing handheld breast US due to a suspicious mammographic finding in screening, underwent additional ABVS. The methods were assessed for each breast and each detected lesion separately and classified into two categories: breasts with mammographic suspicion of malignancy and breasts with a negative mammogram. Results Twenty-six cancers were found in 25 women. In the category of breasts with a suspicious mammographic finding (n = 118), the sensitivity of both handheld US and ABVS was 88% (22/25). The specificity of handheld US was 93.5% (87/93) and ABVS was 89.2% (83/93). In the category of breasts with a negative mammography (n = 103), the sensitivity of handheld US and ABVS was 100% (1/1). The specificity of handheld US was 100% (102/102) and ABVS was 94.1% (96/102). Conclusion ABVS can potentially replace handheld US in the investigation of women recalled from mammography screening due to a suspicious finding. Due to the small size of our study population, further investigation with larger study populations is necessary before the implementation of such practice.

  13. Demonstration Report: Handheld UXO Discriminator, SERDP No. MR-1667

    SciTech Connect

    Gasperikova, E.

    2010-09-01

    In 2003, the Defense Science Board observed: 'The problem is that instruments that can detect the buried UXOs also detect numerous scrap metal objects and other artifacts, which leads to an enormous amount of expensive digging. Typically 100 holes may be dug before a real UXO is unearthed! The Task Force assessment is that much of this wasteful digging can be eliminated by the use of more advanced technology instruments that exploit modern digital processing and advanced multi-mode sensors to achieve an improved level of discrimination of scrap from UXOs.' In keeping with these remarks and with prior funding (UX-1225, MM-0437, and MM-0838), the LBNL group has successfully designed and built the cart-mounted Berkeley UXO Discriminator (BUD) and demonstrated its performance at various test sites (cf. Gasperikova et al., 2007, 2008, and 2009). Because hand-held systems have the advantage of being lightweight, compact, portable, and deployable under most site conditions, they are particularly useful in areas of dense vegetation or challenging terrain. In heavily wooded areas or areas with steep or uneven terrain, hand-held sensors may be the only suitable device for UXO detection and discrimination because it can be carried through spaces that the operator could walk through or at least approach. Furthermore, it is desirable to find and characterize a metallic object without the need to accurately locate the sensors at multiple positions around the target. The ideal system would thus locate and characterize the target from a single position of the sensor and indicate to the operator where to flag the target for subsequent study. Based on these considerations, we designed and built a sensor package in a shape of a 14-in (0.35 m) cube. This hand-held prototype incorporates the key features of the cart-mounted system - (a) three orthogonal transmitters and ten pairs of receivers, and (b) difference or gradient measurements that significantly reduce the ambient and motion

  14. Hand-held water fluoride analysis: An accessible caries prevention tool for dental professionals.

    PubMed

    Quock, Ryan L; Yank, Stephanie W; Chan, Jarvis T

    2011-01-01

    This study sought to compare the relative accuracy of a commercially available hand-held water fluoride analysis unit with a standard laboratory bench-top fluoride-specific electrode/millivoltmeter apparatus, with the goal of identifying possible practical applications of the hand-held unit for preventive dentistry. The units analyzed identical gravimetrically prepared fluoride solutions ranging from 0.1 to 4.0 ppm. The average difference between the measurements from the hand-held unit and the nominal values of the fluoride solutions was 0.011 ppm (SD = 0.068), and the average difference between the hand-held unit's measurements and the bench-top unit's measurements was 0.030 ppm (SD = 0.115). T-test analysis demonstrated no statistical difference between measurements from the hand-held unit with either the nominal values of the fluoride solutions or the bench-top unit's measurements. Results indicate that the hand-held water fluoride analysis unit has an appropriate level of accuracy for the measurement of fluoride levels in drinking water samples by dental professionals.

  15. Improving car passengers' comfort and experience by supporting the use of handheld devices.

    PubMed

    van Veen, S A T; Hiemstra-van Mastrigt, S; Kamp, I; Vink, P

    2014-01-01

    There is a demand for interiors to support other activities in a car than controlling the vehicle. Currently, this is the case for the car passengers and--in the future--autonomous driving cars will also facilitate drivers to perform other activities. One of these activities is working with handheld devices. Previous research shows that people experience problems when using handheld devices in a moving vehicle and the use of handheld devices generally causes unwanted neck flexion [Young et al. 2012; Sin and Zu 2011; Gold et al.2011]. In this study, armrests are designed to support the arms when using handheld devices in a driving car in order to decrease neck flexion. Neck flexion was measured by attaching markers on the C7 and tragus. Discomfort was indicated on a body map on a scale 1-10. User experience was evaluated in a semi-structured interview. Neck flexion is significantly decreased by the support of the armrests and approaches a neutral position. Furthermore, overall comfort and comfort in the neck region specifically are significantly increased. Subjects appreciate the body posture facilitated by the armrests and 9 out of 10 prefer using handheld devices with the armrests compared to using handheld devices without the armrests. More efforts are needed to develop the mock-up into an established product, but the angles and dimensions presented in this study could serve as guidelines.

  16. Comparing hand-held computers and paper diaries for haemophilia home therapy: a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Walker, I; Sigouin, C; Sek, J; Almonte, T; Carruthers, J; Chan, A; Pai, M; Heddle, N

    2004-11-01

    Treatment of severe haemophilia with factor concentrates is by self-infusion in the home. Adherence to record keeping on paper diaries is poor. A randomized-controlled trial compared adherence with record keeping of paper diaries with hand-held computers. Forty-one individuals with severe haemophilia, were randomized to hand-held computers (n = 22) or paper diaries (n = 19) and followed for 6 months. About 86.2% (679 of 788) of infusions by patients in the computer group were in compliance with the data submission schedule compared with only 48.3% (358 of 741) of infusions by patients using paper diaries (P < 0.0001). The time intervals between infusions and the receipt of data were shorter in the computer group (median 0.25 vs. 25 days respectively, P < 0.0001). Reminder phone calls by the clinic were made less frequently to users of hand-held computers than to users of paper diaries (median one vs. five times, P < 0.0001). Accuracy of data was similar for both methods. Compliance with hand-held computers was superior to paper diaries. The clinic received data from hand-held computers mostly on the same day, and nurses could thereby provide clinical advice more effectively. Although hand-held computers did not result in increased accuracy, errors could be detected and corrected more rapidly. Electronic data can more easily be verified, analysed and summarized than that from paper diaries.

  17. Handheld scanning probes for optical coherence tomography: developments, applications, and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duma, V.-F.; Demian, D.; Sinescu, C.; Cernat, R.; Dobre, G.; Negrutiu, M. L.; Topala, F. I.; Hutiu, Gh.; Bradu, A.; Podoleanu, A. G.

    2016-03-01

    We present the handheld scanning probes that we have recently developed in our current project for biomedical imaging in general and for Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) in particular. OCT is an established, but dynamic imagistic technique based on laser interferometry, which offers micrometer resolutions and millimeters penetration depths. With regard to existing devices, the newly developed handheld probes are simple, light and relatively low cost. Their design is described in detail to allow for the reproduction in any lab, including for educational purposes. Two probes are constructed almost entirely from off-the-shelf components, while a third, final variant is constructed with dedicated components, in an ergonomic design. The handheld probes have uni-dimensional (1D) galvanometer scanners therefore they achieve transversal sections through the biological sample investigated - in contrast to handheld probes equipped with bi-dimensional (2D) scanners that can also achieve volumetric (3D) reconstructions of the samples. These latter handheld probes are therefore also discussed, as well as the possibility to equip them with galvanometer 2D scanners or with Risley prisms. For galvanometer scanners the optimal scanning functions studied in a series of previous works are pointed out; these functions offer a higher temporal efficiency/duty cycle of the scanning process, as well as artifact-free OCT images. The testing of the handheld scanning probes in dental applications is presented, for metal ceramic prosthesis and for teeth.

  18. DNA amplification in the field: move over PCR, here comes LAMP.

    PubMed

    Lee, Patricia L M

    2017-03-01

    It would not be an exaggeration to say that among molecular technologies, it is PCR (polymerase chain reaction) that underpins the discipline of molecular ecology as we know it today. With PCR, it has been possible to target the amplification of particular fragments of DNA, which can then be analysed in a multitude of ways. The capability of PCR to amplify DNA from a mere handful of copies further means that conservationists and ecologists are able to sample DNA unobtrusively and with minimal disturbance to the environment and the organisms of interest. However, a key disadvantage of PCR-based methods has been the necessity for a generally non-portable, laboratory setting to undertake the time-consuming thermocycling protocols. LAMP (loop-mediated isothermal amplification) offers a logistically simpler protocol: a relatively rapid DNA amplification reaction occurs at one temperature, and the products are visualized with a colour change within the reaction tubes. In the first field application of LAMP for an ecological study, Centeno-Cuadros et al. () demonstrates how LAMP can be used to determine the sex of three raptor species. By enabling DNA amplification in situ and in 'real-time', LAMP promises to revolutionize how molecular ecology is practised in the field.

  19. Military forensic use of handheld 3D camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, Hâkan; Letalick, Dietmar

    2013-05-01

    One of the main threats for armed forces in conflict areas are attacks by improvised explosive devices (IED). After an IED attack a forensic investigation of the site is undertaken. In many ways military forensic work is similar to the civilian counterpart. There are the same needs to acquire evidence in the crime scene, such as fingerprints, DNA, and samples of the remains of the IED. Photos have to be taken and the geometry of the location shall be measured, preferably in 3D. A main difference between the military and the civilian forensic work is the time slot available for the scene investigation. The military must work under the threat of fire assault, e.g. snipers. The short time slot puts great demands on the forensic team and the equipment they use. We have done performance measurements of the Mantis-Vision F5 sensor and evaluated the usefulness in military forensic applications. This paper will describe some applications and show possibilities and also limitations of using a handheld laser imaging sensor for military forensic investigations.

  20. Assessment of vibration levels associated with hand-held roadbreakers.

    PubMed

    Tasker, E G

    1986-08-01

    The hand-held roadbreaker plays a vital role in enabling the British gas distribution workforce to install gas supply pipework. Hence, any potential problem which could lead to a restriction of the use of this equipment would present pipework installation departments with serious operational problems. A test program was therefore set up to enable risks to operators to be quantified. The vibration levels measured exceeded proposed limits laid down in current guidelines for vibration exposure. If these limits were realistic, a high prevalence of vibration-induced white finger (VWF) would have been expected. However, a survey of the workforce using the roadbreakers indicated a VWF prevalence of 20 times less than that predicted by the guidelines. It was concluded that a possible explanation could be that the current frequency-weighting factors used in the guidelines are inappropriate for application to this type of equipment with dominant frequencies below 25 Hz. The application of the current weighting factors to the test data produced during the program led to high weighted acceleration values and unrealistic dose-response relationships. It is proposed that the application of the various guidelines to the use of this equipment be reconsidered.

  1. Cordless hand-held optical 3D sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munkelt, Christoph; Bräuer-Burchardt, Christian; Kühmstedt, Peter; Schmidt, Ingo; Notni, Gunther

    2007-07-01

    A new mobile optical 3D measurement system using phase correlation based fringe projection technique will be presented. The sensor consist of a digital projection unit and two cameras in a stereo arrangement, whereby both are battery powered. The data transfer to a base station will be done via WLAN. This gives the possibility to use the system in complicate, remote measurement situations, which are typical in archaeology and architecture. In the measurement procedure the sensor will be hand-held by the user, illuminating the object with a sequence of less than 10 fringe patterns, within a time below 200 ms. This short sequence duration was achieved by a new approach, which combines the epipolar constraint with robust phase correlation utilizing a pre-calibrated sensor head, containing two cameras and a digital fringe projector. Furthermore, the system can be utilized to acquire the all around shape of objects by using the phasogrammetric approach with virtual land marks introduced by the authors 1, 2. This way no matching procedures or markers are necessary for the registration of multiple views, which makes the system very flexible in accomplishing different measurement tasks. The realized measurement field is approx. 100 mm up to 400 mm in diameter. The mobile character makes the measurement system useful for a wide range of applications in arts, architecture, archaeology and criminology, which will be shown in the paper.

  2. Hand-held metal detector identification of ingested foreign bodies.

    PubMed

    Sacchetti, A; Carraccio, C; Lichenstein, R

    1994-08-01

    The study purpose was to determine the ability of hand-held metal detectors (HHMDs) to identify the presence of ingested metallic foreign bodies (MFBs). Twenty-three children presenting to the emergency department with a complaint of MFBs ingested were enrolled. Sixteen of 23 patients had radiographically proven foreign bodies. The MFBs comprised coins (n = 11), a button battery (n = 1), a medallion (n = 1), a token (n = 1), a needle (n = 1), and a marble (leaded glass) (n = 1). The HHMD correctly detected 15 of 16 radiographically positive MFBs (93%) and correctly excluded a potential MFB in six of six radiographically negative cases. The only foreign body not detected was an ingested needle. One radiograph was equivocal. Radiographic localization of the ingested objects was as follows: esophagus, n = 4; stomach, n = 9; and intestines, n = 3. The HHMD correctly localized all detected MFBs. The HHMD had a sensitivity of 94%, a specificity of 100%, a positive predictive value of 100%, and a negative predictive value of 86%. HHMDs are effective screening devices for possible ingested MFBs. Positive studies localized to the stomach and lower gastrointestinal tract do not require confirmatory radiographic studies.

  3. Handheld underwater 3D sensor based on fringe projection technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bräuer-Burchardt, Christian; Heinze, Matthias; Schmidt, Ingo; Meng, Lichun; Ramm, Roland; Kühmstedt, Peter; Notni, Gunther

    2015-05-01

    A new, handheld 3D surface scanner was developed especially for underwater use until a diving depth of about 40 meters. Additionally, the sensor is suitable for the outdoor use under bad weather circumstance like splashing water, wind, and bad illumination conditions. The optical components of the sensor are two cameras and one projector. The measurement field is about 250 mm x 200 mm. The depth resolution is about 50 μm and the lateral resolution is approximately 150 μm. The weight of the scanner is about 10 kg. The housing was produced of synthetic powder using a 3D printing technique. The measurement time for one scan is between a third and a half second. The computer for measurement control and data analysis is already integrated into the housing of the scanner. A display on the backside presents the results of each measurement graphically for a real-time evaluation of the user during the recording of the measurement data.

  4. Review of manual control methods for handheld maneuverable instruments.

    PubMed

    Fan, Chunman; Dodou, Dimitra; Breedveld, Paul

    2013-06-01

    By the introduction of new technologies, surgical procedures have been varying from free access in open surgery towards limited access in minimal access surgery. Improving access to difficult-to-reach anatomic sites, e.g. in neurosurgery or percutaneous interventions, needs advanced maneuverable instrumentation. Advances in maneuverable technology require the development of dedicated methods enabling surgeons to stay in direct, manual control of these complex instruments. This article gives an overview of the state-of-the-art in the development of manual control methods for handheld maneuverable instruments. It categorizes the manual control methods in three levels: a) number of steerable segments, b) number of Degrees Of Freedom (DOF), and c) coupling between control motion of the handle and steering motion of the tip. The literature research was completed by using Web of Science, Scopus and PubMed. The study shows that in controlling single steerable segments, direct as well as indirect control methods have been developed, whereas in controlling multiple steerable segments, a gradual shift can be noticed from parallel and serial control to integrated control. The development of multi-segmented maneuverable instruments is still at an early stage, and an intuitive and effective method to control them has to become a primary focus in the domain of minimal access surgery.

  5. A simple handheld pupillometer for chromatic Flicker studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernabei, M.; Tinarelli, R.; Peretto, L.; Rovati, L.

    2014-02-01

    A portable pupillometer has been developed which is capable of performing accurate measurements of the pupil diameter during chromatic flicker stimulations. The handheld measuring system records the near-infrared image of the pupil at the rate of 25 fps and simultaneously stimulates the eye using a diffused flicker light generated by light emitting diodes (LEDs). Intensity, frequency and chromatic coordinates of the stimulus can be easily adjusted using a user-friendly graphical interface. Thanks to a chromatic monitoring of the stimulus close to the plane of the eye, photopically matched conditions can be easily achieved. The pupil diameter/area can be measured during flickering stimuli that are generated with frequency in a range of 0.1-20 Hz. The electronic unit, properly connected to the personal computer through a USB port, drives the optical unit, which can be easily held in a hand. The software interface controlling the system was developed in LabVIEW. This paper describes the instrument optical setup, front-end electronics and data processing. Moreover preliminary results obtained on a voluntary are reported.

  6. Active Guidance of a Handheld Micromanipulator using Visual Servoing

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Brian C.; Voros, Sandrine; MacLachlan, Robert A.; Hager, Gregory D.; Riviere, Cameron N.

    2010-01-01

    In microsurgery, a surgeon often deals with anatomical structures of sizes that are close to the limit of the human hand accuracy. Robotic assistants can help to push beyond the current state of practice by integrating imaging and robot-assisted tools. This paper demonstrates control of a handheld tremor reduction micromanipulator with visual servo techniques, aiding the operator by providing three behaviors: snap-to, motion-scaling, and standoff-regulation. A stereo camera setup viewing the workspace under high magnification tracks the tip of the micromanipulator and the desired target object being manipulated. Individual behaviors activate in task-specific situations when the micromanipulator tip is in the vicinity of the target. We show that the snap-to behavior can reach and maintain a position at a target with an accuracy of 17.5 ± 0.4μm Root Mean Squared Error (RMSE) distance between the tip and target. Scaling the operator’s motions and preventing unwanted contact with non-target objects also provides a larger margin of safety. PMID:21666882

  7. Hand-held digital line-scanning laser ophthalmoscope (LSLO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Daniel X.; Ferguson, R. D.; Ustun, Teoman E.; Maislin, Gami; Webb, Robert H.

    2004-07-01

    Scanning laser ophthalmoscopy is a powerful research tool with specialized but, to date, limited use in ophthalmic clinics due in part to the size, cost, and complexity of instruments. Conversely, low-cost retinal imaging devices have limited capabilities in screening, detection, and diagnosis of diseases. To fill the niche between these two, a low-cost, hand-held, line-scanning laser ophthalmoscope (LSLO) was designed, constructed, and tested on normal human subjects. The LSLO has only one moving part, multiple imaging modes, and uses low-cost but highly sensitive complimentary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) linear arrays for imaging with a detector dynamic range of 12-bits. The line-scanning approach produces high contrast quasi-confocal images with nearly the same performance as a flying-spot SLO. Imaging modes include simultaneous dual wavelength illumination and live stereoscopic imaging with a split aperture. Image processing and display functions are controlled with two stacked prototype compact printed circuit boards using field-programmable gated arrays (FPGA) and other digital electronic elements. With near shot-noise limited performance, the digital LSLO camera requires low illumination power (~ 100 μW) at near-infrared wavelengths. Wide field fundus images with several imaging modes have been obtained from several human subjects. The LSLO will significantly enhance confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy for routine use by ophthalmologist, optometrists, general practitioners and also non-specialized emergency medical personnel and technicians in the field for retinal disease detection and other diverse applications.

  8. Bone age maturity assessment using hand-held device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratib, Osman M.; Gilsanz, Vicente; Liu, Xiaodong; Boechat, M. I.

    2004-04-01

    Purpose: Assessment of bone maturity is traditionally performed through visual comparison of hand and wrist radiograph with existing reference images in textbooks. Our goal was to develop a digital index based on idealized hand Xray images that can be incorporated in a hand held computer and used for visual assessment of bone age for patients. Material and methods: Due to the large variability in bone maturation in normals, we generated a set of "ideal" images obtained by computer combinations of images from our normal reference data sets. Software for hand-held PDA devices was developed for easy navigation through the set of images and visual selection of matching images. A formula based on our statistical analysis provides the standard deviation from normal based on the chronological age of the patient. The accuracy of the program was compared to traditional interpretation by two radiologists in a double blind reading of 200 normal Caucasian children (100 boys, 100 girls). Results: Strong correlations were present between chronological age and bone age (r > 0.9) with no statistical difference between the digital and traditional assessment methods. Determinations of carpal bone maturity in adolescents was slightly more accurate using the digital system. The users did praise the convenience and effectiveness of the digital Palm Index in clinical practice. Conclusion: An idealized digital Palm Bone Age Index provides a convenient and effective alternative to conventional atlases for the assessment of skeletal maturity.

  9. Pulsed photoacoustic flow imaging with a handheld system.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, Pim J; Daoudi, Khalid; Steenbergen, Wiendelt

    2016-02-01

    Flow imaging is an important technique in a range of disease areas, but estimating low flow speeds, especially near the walls of blood vessels, remains challenging. Pulsed photoacoustic flow imaging can be an alternative since there is little signal contamination from background tissue with photoacoustic imaging. We propose flow imaging using a clinical photoacoustic system that is both handheld and portable. The system integrates a linear array with 7.5 MHz central frequency in combination with a high-repetition-rate diode laser to allow high-speed photoacoustic imaging--ideal for this application. This work shows the flow imaging performance of the system in vitro using microparticles. Both two-dimensional (2-D) flow images and quantitative flow velocities from 12 to 75  mm/s were obtained. In a transparent bulk medium, flow estimation showed standard errors of ∼7% the estimated speed; in the presence of tissue-realistic optical scattering, the error increased to 40% due to limited signal-to-noise ratio. In the future, photoacoustic flow imaging can potentially be performed in vivo using fluorophore-filled vesicles or with an improved setup on whole blood.

  10. The social acceptability of handheld umbrellas for sun protection.

    PubMed

    McMichael, Josette R; Ezirike, Jennifer; Veledar, Emir; Rice, Jessica E; Chen, Suephy C

    2014-08-01

    Little is known about handheld umbrella (HU) use for sun protection in the United States. We sought to determine whether women consider the HU a socially acceptable form of sun protection and whether viewing pictures of famous women carrying umbrellas is influential. This is a cross-sectional survey study of 382 women. Participants viewed a collage of famous women carrying umbrellas to assess effect on social acceptability. Twelve percent had used a HU for sun protection. Participants were more likely to use an umbrella after viewing the collage (P<0.001). The majority would consider umbrella use if recommended by a dermatologist. Independent predictors of social acceptability were age, had not lived in another country, sun protective clothing use and no sunscreen use, while skin color, ethnicity and education were not. Mean rating of social acceptability was an intermediate score of 5.41 (1=not acceptable, 10=totally acceptable) and increased to 5.88 postcollage (P<0.001). Social acceptability of HUs was moderate. Popular media may play a role in whether women view HUs as a socially acceptable form of sun protection. Dermatologists may consider recommending HUs as an adjunct but not replacement for other methods of sun protection. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Automated working distance adjustment for a handheld OCT-Laryngoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donner, Sabine; Bleeker, Sebastian; Ripken, Tammo; Krueger, Alexander

    2014-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an imaging technique which enables diagnosis of vocal cord tissue structure by non-contact optical biopsies rather than invasive tissue biopsies. For diagnosis on awake patients OCT was adapted to a rigid indirect laryngoscope. The working distance must match the probe-sample distance, which varies from patient to patient. Therefore the endoscopic OCT sample arm has a variable working distance of 40 mm to 80 mm. The current axial position is identified by automated working distance adjustments based on image processing. The OCT reference plane and the focal plane of the sample arm are moved according to position errors. Repeated position adjustment during the whole diagnostic procedure keeps the tissue sample at the optimal axial position. The auto focus identifies and adjusts the working distance within the range of 50 mm within a maximum time of 2.7 s. Continuous image stabilisation reduces axial sample movement within the sampling depth for handheld OCT scanning. Rapid autofocus reduces the duration of the diagnostic procedure and axial position stabilisation eases the use of the OCT laryngoscope. Therefore this work is an important step towards the integration of OCT into indirect laryngoscopes.

  12. Temperature and Structure of Active Eruptions from a Handheld Camcorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radebaugh, Jani; Carling, Greg T.; Saito, Takeshi; Dangerfield, Anne; Tingey, David G.; Lorenz, Ralph D.; Lopes, Rosaly M.; Howell, Robert R.; Diniega, Serina; Turtle, Elizabeth P.

    2014-11-01

    A commercial handheld digital camcorder can operate as a high-resolution, short-wavelength, low-cost thermal imaging system for monitoring active volcanoes, when calibrated against a laboratory heated rock of similar composition to the given eruptive material. We utilize this system to find full pixel brightness temperatures on centimeter scales at close but safe proximity to active lava flows. With it, observed temperatures of a Kilauea tube flow exposed in a skylight reached 1200 C, compared with pyrometer measurements of the same flow of 1165 C, both similar to reported eruption temperatures at that volcano. The lava lake at Erta Ale, Ethiopia had crack and fountain temperatures of 1175 C compared with previous pyrometer measurements of 1165 C. Temperature calibration of the vigorously active Marum lava lake in Vanuatu is underway, challenges being excessive levels of gas and distance from the eruption (300 m). Other aspects of the fine-scale structure of the eruptions are visible in the high-resolution temperature maps, such as flow banding within tubes, the thermal gradient away from cracks in lake surfaces, heat pathways through pahoehoe crust and temperature zoning in spatter and fountains. High-resolution measurements such as these reveal details of temperature, structure, and change over time at the rapidly evolving settings of active lava flows. These measurement capabilities are desirable for future instruments exploring bodies with active eruptions like Io, Enceladus and possibly Venus.

  13. [Intraoperative Measurement of Refraction with a Hand-Held Autorefractometer].

    PubMed

    Gesser, C; Küper, T; Richard, G; Hassenstein, A

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate an intraoperative measurement of objective refraction with a hand-held retinomax instrument. At the end of cataract surgery objective refraction in a lying position was measured with a retinomax instrument. On the first postoperative day the same measurement was performed with a retinomax and a standard autorefractometer. To evaluate the differences between measurements, the spherical equivalent (SE) and Jackson's cross cylinder at 0° (J0) and 45° (J45) was used. 103 eyes were included. 95 of them had normal cataract surgery. Differences between retinomax at the operative day and the standard autorefractometer were 0.68 ± 2.58 D in SE, 0.05 ± 1.4D in J0 and 0.05 ± 1.4D in J45. There were no statistically significant differences between the groups. Intraoperative measurement of the refraction with a retinomax can predict the postoperative refraction. Nevertheless, in a few patients great differences may occur. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Portable multiwavelength laser diode source for handheld photoacoustic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canal, Celine; Laugustin, Arnaud; Kohl, Andreas; Rabot, Olivier

    2016-04-01

    The ageing population faces today an increase of chronic diseases such as rheumatism/arthritis, cancer and cardio vascular diseases for which appropriate treatments based on a diagnosis at an early-stage of the disease are required. Some imaging techniques are already available in order to get structural information. Within the non-invasive group, ultrasound images are common in these fields of medicine. However, there is a need for a point-of-care device for imaging smaller structures such as blood vessels that cannot be observed with purely ultrasound based devices. Photoacoustics proved to be an attractive candidate. This novel imaging technique combines pulsed laser light for excitation of tissues and an ultrasound transducer as a receptor. Introduction of this technique into the clinic requires to drastically shrink the size and cost of the expensive and bulky nanosecond lasers generally used for light emission. In that context, demonstration of ultra-short pulse emission with highly efficient laser diodes in the near-infrared range has been performed by Quantel, France. A multi-wavelength laser source as small as a hand emitted more than 1 mJ per wavelength with four different wavelengths available in pulses of about 90 ns. Such a laser source can be integrated into high sensitivity photoacoustic handheld systems due to their outstanding electrical-to-optical efficiency of about 25 %. Further work continues to decrease the pulse length as low as 40 ns while increasing the pulse energy to 2 mJ.

  15. Handheld Electrical Impedance Myography Probe for Assessing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhao; Chen, Lingfen; Zhu, Yu; Wei, Qingquan; Liu, Wenwen; Tian, Dong; Yu, Yude

    2017-03-30

    Electrical impedance myography (EIM) is a novel, noninvasive, and painless technique for quantitatively assessing muscle health as well as disease status and progression. The preparatory work for commercial adhesive electrodes used in previous EIM measurements is tedious, as the electrodes need to be cut, repeatedly applied, and removed. Moreover, the electrode distances need to be measured many times. To overcome these problems, we developed a convenient and practical handheld EIM probe for assessing carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) in the small hand muscles. To reduce the electrode-skin contact impedance (ESCI), the micropillared and microholed stainless steel electrodes (SSEs) contained in the probe were fabricated using a laser processing technique. When covered with saline, these electrodes showed lower ESCIs than a smooth SSE and Ag/AgCl electrode. The probe was shown to have excellent test-retest reproducibility in both healthy subjects and CTS patients, with intraclass correlation coefficients exceeding 0.975. The reactance and phase values of the abductor pollicis brevis (affected muscle) for CTS patients were consistently lower than those for healthy subjects, with a 50-kHz difference of 37.1% (p < 0.001) and 31.0% (p < 0.001), respectively. Further, no significant differences were detected in the case of the abductor digiti minimi (unaffected muscle). These results indicate that EIM has considerable potential for CTS assessment and hence merits further investigation.

  16. Microleakage after thermocycling of 4 etch and rinse and 3 self-etch adhesives with and without a flowable composite lining.

    PubMed

    Guéders, A M; Charpentier, J F; Albert, A I; Geerts, S O

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluated the microleakage of composite fillings prepared with 4 etch and rinse and 3 self-etch adhesive systems after thermocycling. Also evaluated was the potential improvement of cavity sealing when utilizing a low charged resin lining for cavity preparations. Seventy recently extracted teeth were randomly allocated to 7 experimental adhesive systems: two 3-step etch and rinse adhesive systems, Scotchbond Multipurpose (SBMP) and Optibond Solo Plus (OS); two 2-step etch and rinse adhesive systems, referred to as "one-bottle," Scotchbond 1 (SB1) and Gluma Comfort Bond + Desensitizer (G); and 3 self-etch "all-in-one" adhesives, Adper Prompt-L-Pop (PLP), Xeno III (X-III) and iBond (iB). On each tooth, 2 rectangular cavities were prepared at the cemento-enamel junction: 1 cavity was prepared with adhesive and the hybrid composite and the second was filled with the same adhesive and a thin layer of flowable composite (Filtek Flow) under the resin composite (Z100). All teeth were thermocycled for 800 cycles (5 degrees C-55 degrees C, 30 seconds dwell time). Leakage was evaluated on a 6-point (0-5) severity scale for enamel and dentin on 4 interfaces for each restoration. The results are expressed as means +/- standard deviation (SD). Microleakage scores were analyzed by means of generalized linear mixed models (GLMM), assuming an ordinal logistic link function. Covariates in the model were: (1) adhesives, (2) fluid composite and (3) interface. The model also accounts for repeated measurements on the various teeth. The authors found that the mean score of microleakage per tooth was significantly higher at the enamel rather than at the dentin interfaces (1.21 +/- 0.51 and 0.87 +/- 0.48; p<0.0001). In this study, there was no significant difference among the 4 etch and rinse adhesive systems. On the other hand, these adhesives yielded smaller mean scores of microleakage than the 3 self-etch systems (respectively, 0.85 +/- 0.2 and 1.3 +/- 0.5; p<0.0001). Among

  17. Hand-Held Units for Short-Range Wireless Biotelemetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, Felix A.; Simons, Rainee N.

    2008-01-01

    Special-purpose hand-held radiotransceiver units have been proposed as means of short-range radio powering and interrogation of surgically implanted microelectromechanical sensors and actuators. These units are based partly on the same principles as those of the units described in "Printed Multi- Turn Loop Antennas for RF Biotelemetry" (LEW-17879-1), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 31, No. 6 (June 2007), page 48. Like the previously reported units, these units would make it unnecessary to have wire connections between the implanted devices and the external equipment used to activate and interrogate them. Like a unit of the previously reported type, a unit of the type now proposed would include a printed-circuit antenna on a dielectric substrate. The antenna circuitry would include integrated surface-mount inductors for impedance tuning. Circuits for processing the signals transmitted and received by the antenna would be included on the substrate. During operation, the unit would be positioned near (but not in electrical contact with) a human subject, in proximity to a microelectromechanical sensor or actuator that has been surgically implanted in the subject. It has been demonstrated that significant electromagnetic coupling with an implanted device could be established at a distance of as much as 4 in. (.10 cm). During operation in the interrogation mode, the antenna of the unit would receive a radio telemetry signal transmitted by the surgically implanted device. The antenna substrate would have dimensions of approximately 3.25 by 3.75 inches (approximately 8.3 by 9.5 cm). The substrate would have a thickness of the order of 30 mils (of the order of a somewhat less than a millimeter). The substrate would be made of low-radiofrequency- loss dielectric material that could be, for example, fused quartz, alumina, or any of a number of commercially available radio-frequency dielectric composite materials. The antenna conductors would typically be made of copper or a

  18. Portable Hand-Held Electrochemical Sensor for the Transuranics

    SciTech Connect

    Dale D. Russell, William B. Knowlton, Ph.D.; Russel Hertzog, Ph.D

    2005-11-25

    sensitive detector for uranium. Millimeter scale electrodes, operated by a hand-held instrument assembled in this lab and operated in the voltammetric mode, were transported to the DOE-Nevada test site (Las Vegas, NV) where field detection and quantitation of plutonium, uranium, and a mixture of these two elements was also demonstrated. Several probe designs were prepared, built and tested including probes with movable protective windows. A miniature, battery powered potentiostat was designed, built and demonstrated for use in a hand-held field portable instrument. This work was performed largely by undergraduates who gained valuable research experience, and many of them have continued on to graduate schools. In addition, they all gained exposure to and appreciation for national security research, in particular non-proliferation research. Four graduate students participated and one earned the MS degree on this project.

  19. A high resolution hand-held focused beam profiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapata-Farfan, J.; Garduño-Mejía, J.; Rosete-Aguilar, M.; Ascanio, G.; Román-Moreno, C. J.

    2017-05-01

    The shape of a beam is important in any laser application and depending on the final implementation, there exists a preferred one which is defined by the irradiance distribution.1 The energy distribution (or laser beam profile) is an important parameter in a focused beam, for instance, in laser cut industry, where the beam shape determines the quality of the cut. In terms of alignment and focusing, the energy distribution also plays an important role since the system must be configured in order to reduce the aberration effects and achieve the highest intensity. Nowadays a beam profiler is used in both industry and research laboratories with the aim to characterize laser beams used in free-space communications, focusing and welding, among other systems. The purpose of the profile analyzers is to know the main parameters of the beam, to control its characteristics as uniformity, shape and beam size as a guide to align the focusing system. In this work is presented a high resolution hand-held and compact design of a beam profiler capable to measure at the focal plane, with covered range from 400 nm to 1000 nm. The detection is reached with a CMOS sensor sized in 3673.6 μm x 2738.4 μm which acquire a snap shot of the previously attenuated focused beam to avoid the sensor damage, the result is an image of beam intensity distribution, which is digitally processed with a RaspberryTMmodule gathering significant parameters such as beam waist, centroid, uniformity and also some aberrations. The profiler resolution is 1.4 μm and was probed and validated in three different focusing systems. The spot sizes measurements were compared with the Foucault knife-edge test.

  20. Accuracy of Handheld Blood Glucose Meters at High Altitude

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Suzanna T.; Fokkert, Marion J.; Dikkeschei, Bert D.; Rienks, Rienk; Bilo, Karin M.; Bilo, Henk J. G.

    2010-01-01

    Background Due to increasing numbers of people with diabetes taking part in extreme sports (e.g., high-altitude trekking), reliable handheld blood glucose meters (BGMs) are necessary. Accurate blood glucose measurement under extreme conditions is paramount for safe recreation at altitude. Prior studies reported bias in blood glucose measurements using different BGMs at high altitude. We hypothesized that glucose-oxidase based BGMs are more influenced by the lower atmospheric oxygen pressure at altitude than glucose dehydrogenase based BGMs. Methodology/Principal Findings Glucose measurements at simulated altitude of nine BGMs (six glucose dehydrogenase and three glucose oxidase BGMs) were compared to glucose measurement on a similar BGM at sea level and to a laboratory glucose reference method. Venous blood samples of four different glucose levels were used. Moreover, two glucose oxidase and two glucose dehydrogenase based BGMs were evaluated at different altitudes on Mount Kilimanjaro. Accuracy criteria were set at a bias <15% from reference glucose (when >6.5 mmol/L) and <1 mmol/L from reference glucose (when <6.5 mmol/L). No significant difference was observed between measurements at simulated altitude and sea level for either glucose oxidase based BGMs or glucose dehydrogenase based BGMs as a group phenomenon. Two GDH based BGMs did not meet set performance criteria. Most BGMs are generally overestimating true glucose concentration at high altitude. Conclusion At simulated high altitude all tested BGMs, including glucose oxidase based BGMs, did not show influence of low atmospheric oxygen pressure. All BGMs, except for two GDH based BGMs, performed within predefined criteria. At true high altitude one GDH based BGM had best precision and accuracy. PMID:21103399

  1. Direction-Sensitive Hand-Held Gamma-Ray Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, S.

    2012-10-04

    A novel, light-weight, hand-held gamma-ray detector with directional sensitivity is being designed. The detector uses a set of multiple rings around two cylindrical surfaces, which provides precise location of two interaction points on two concentric cylindrical planes, wherefrom the source location can be traced back by back projection and/or Compton imaging technique. The detectors are 2.0 × 2.0 mm europium-doped strontium iodide (SrI2:Eu2+) crystals, whose light output has been measured to exceed 120,000 photons/MeV, making it one of the brightest scintillators in existence. The crystal’s energy resolution, less than 3% at 662 keV, is also excellent, and the response is highly linear over a wide range of gamma-ray energies. The emission of SrI2:Eu2+ is well matched to both photo-multiplier tubes and blue-enhanced silicon photodiodes. The solid-state photomultipliers used in this design (each 2.0 × 2.0 mm) are arrays of active pixel sensors (avalanche photodiodes driven beyond their breakdown voltage in reverse bias); each pixel acts as a binary photon detector, and their summed output is an analog representation of the total photon energy, while the individual pixel accurately defines the point of interaction. A simple back-projection algorithm involving cone-surface mapping is being modeled. The back projection for an event cone is a conical surface defining the possible location of the source. The cone axis is the straight line passing through the first and second interaction points.

  2. Evaluation of the SVOne: A Handheld, Smartphone-Based Autorefractor

    PubMed Central

    Ciuffreda, Kenneth J.; Rosenfield, Mark

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose The SVOne is a portable Hartmann-Shack wavefront aberrometer that can be attached to a smartphone to determine the refractive error of the eye objectively. The aim of the present study was to compare the findings of the SVOne with retinoscopy, subjective refraction, and two commercially available autorefractors (Topcon KR-1W and Righton Retinomax-3). Methods Refractive error was assessed both with and without cycloplegia in 50 visually normal, young adults using the five techniques described above. Further, to assess repeatability of the instruments, the entire procedure was repeated in a subgroup of 10 subjects. All data were analyzed in terms of power vectors (M, J0, and J45). Results No significant difference was observed between the mean values of M (spherical equivalent) for the different techniques. However, a significantly higher mean value of precyclopegic J0 was recorded for the SVOne, which also had the highest limits of agreement for both the J0 and J45 astigmatic components. Retinoscopy and subjective refraction showed the best repeatability (in terms of M values) for precycloplegic and postcycloplegic measurements, respectively. High and significant linear correlations were observed between the subjective findings and the other four techniques. Conclusions The results indicate that the SVOne handheld aberrometer provides measurements of refractive error in normal, young individuals that are not significantly different from other subjective and objective procedures. This instrument is valuable for vision screenings, as well as examinations taking place outside the clinical office. It may also serve as an adjunct in the standard optometric examination. PMID:26540478

  3. Accuracy of handheld blood glucose meters at high altitude.

    PubMed

    de Mol, Pieter; Krabbe, Hans G; de Vries, Suzanna T; Fokkert, Marion J; Dikkeschei, Bert D; Rienks, Rienk; Bilo, Karin M; Bilo, Henk J G

    2010-11-12

    Due to increasing numbers of people with diabetes taking part in extreme sports (e.g., high-altitude trekking), reliable handheld blood glucose meters (BGMs) are necessary. Accurate blood glucose measurement under extreme conditions is paramount for safe recreation at altitude. Prior studies reported bias in blood glucose measurements using different BGMs at high altitude. We hypothesized that glucose-oxidase based BGMs are more influenced by the lower atmospheric oxygen pressure at altitude than glucose dehydrogenase based BGMs. Glucose measurements at simulated altitude of nine BGMs (six glucose dehydrogenase and three glucose oxidase BGMs) were compared to glucose measurement on a similar BGM at sea level and to a laboratory glucose reference method. Venous blood samples of four different glucose levels were used. Moreover, two glucose oxidase and two glucose dehydrogenase based BGMs were evaluated at different altitudes on Mount Kilimanjaro. Accuracy criteria were set at a bias <15% from reference glucose (when >6.5 mmol/L) and <1 mmol/L from reference glucose (when <6.5 mmol/L). No significant difference was observed between measurements at simulated altitude and sea level for either glucose oxidase based BGMs or glucose dehydrogenase based BGMs as a group phenomenon. Two GDH based BGMs did not meet set performance criteria. Most BGMs are generally overestimating true glucose concentration at high altitude. At simulated high altitude all tested BGMs, including glucose oxidase based BGMs, did not show influence of low atmospheric oxygen pressure. All BGMs, except for two GDH based BGMs, performed within predefined criteria. At true high altitude one GDH based BGM had best precision and accuracy.

  4. Detection of Staphylococcus Aureus Enterotoxin A and B Genes with PCR-EIA and a Hand-Held Electrochemical Sensor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-06-11

    that included genomic and cloned S. aureus DNA, and genomic DNA from Alcaligens , Bacillus, Bacteroides, Bordetella, Borkholderia, Clostridium...studies, each with 81 samples that included genomic and cloned S. aureus DNA, and genomic DNA from Alcaligens , Bacillus, Bacteroides, Bordetella...Organism Strain/ isolate Alcaligens xylosoxidans 19606 Pseudomonas aeruginosa 17933D Bacillus anthracis Ames Salmonella choleraesuis 9150D Bacillus anthracis

  5. Transfer alignment from a personal locator system to a handheld or head-mounted instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojeda, Lauro; Borenstein, Johann

    2011-06-01

    This paper presents a method for computing position and attitude of an instrument attached to the human body such as a handheld or head-mounted video camera. The system uses two Inertial Measurement Units (IMUs). One IMU is part of our earlier-developed Personal Dead-Reckoning (PDR) system, which tracks the position and heading of a walking person relative to a known starting position. The other IMU is rigidly attached to the handheld or head-mounted instrument. Our existing PDR system is substantially more accurate than conventional IMU-based systems because the IMU is mounted on the foot of the user where error correction techniques can be applied that are unavailable for IMUs mounted anywhere else on the body. However, if the walker is waving a handheld or head-mounted instrument, the position and attitude of the instrument is not known. Equipping the instrument with an additional IMU is by itself an unsatisfactory solution because that IMU is subject to accelerometer and gyro drift, which, unlike in the case of the foot-mounted IMU, cannot be corrected and cause unbounded position and heading errors. Our approach uses transfer alignment techniques and takes advantage of the fact that the handheld IMU moves with the walker. This constraint is used to bound and correct errors by a Kalman filter. The paper explains our method and presents extensive experimental results. The results show up to a five-fold reduction in heading errors for the handheld IMU.

  6. Digital droplet PCR (ddPCR) for the precise quantification of human T-lymphotropic virus 1 proviral loads in peripheral blood and cerebrospinal fluid of HAM/TSP patients and identification of viral mutations.

    PubMed

    Brunetto, Giovanna S; Massoud, Raya; Leibovitch, Emily C; Caruso, Breanna; Johnson, Kory; Ohayon, Joan; Fenton, Kaylan; Cortese, Irene; Jacobson, Steven

    2014-08-01

    An elevated human T cell lymphotropic virus 1 (HTLV)-1 proviral load (PVL) is the main risk factor for developing HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) in HTLV-1 infected subjects, and a high cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) to peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) PVL ratio may be diagnostic of the condition. However, the standard method for quantification of HTLV-1 PVL-real-time PCR-has multiple limitations, including increased inter-assay variability in compartments with low cell numbers, such as CSF. Therefore, in this study, we evaluated a novel technique for HTVL-1 PVL quantification, digital droplet PCR (ddPCR). In ddPCR, PCR samples are partitioned into thousands of nanoliter-sized droplets, amplified on a thermocycler, and queried for fluorescent signal. Due to the high number of independent events (droplets), Poisson algorithms are used to determine absolute copy numbers independently of a standard curve, which enables highly precise quantitation. This assay has low intra-assay variability allowing for reliable PVL measurement in PBMC and CSF compartments of both asymptomatic carriers (AC) and HAM/TSP patients. It is also useful for HTLV-1-related clinical applications, such as longitudinal monitoring of PVL and identification of viral mutations within the region targeted by the primers and probe.

  7. Marginal adaptation and fracture resistance of root-canal treated mandibular molars with intracoronal restorations: effect of thermocycling and mechanical loading.

    PubMed

    Hitz, Thomas; Ozcan, Mutlu; Göhring, Till N

    2010-08-01

    This study evaluated the marginal adaptation, fracture modes, and loads to failure of different mesio-occlusal- distal (MOD) restorations in root canal treated molars in vitro. Forty mandibular first molars were randomly assigned to five groups (n = 8): UTR= untreated, RCT-AM= root-canal treated (RCT)+amalgam filling; RCT-COM= RCT+direct composite resin restoration; RCTFRC= RCT+composite resin restoration with two layers of multidirectional woven glass fibers; RCT-CER= RCT+ceramic inlay. All teeth were subjected to thermocycling and mechanical loading (TCML) in a computer-controlled masticator (1,200,000 loads, 49 N, 1.7 Hz, 3000 temperature cycles of 5°C to 50°C). Marginal adaptation was evaluated before and after TCML by scanning electron microscopy at 200X at the tooth/restoration interfaces. After TCML, all specimens were loaded to failure in a universal testing machine at 0.5 mm/min. Failure types were analyzed and scored (reparable: modes 1 and 2; catastrophic: modes 3 to 5). Data were analyzed with ANOVA and Bonferroni correction. Marginal adaptation decreased significantly after TCML in all groups. The highest decrease was observed in RCT-FRC (before: 89.9 ± 2.2%, after TCML: 49.8 ± 11.9%) and the lowest in RCT-CER (before TCML: 90.3 ± 2.6% after TCML 80.4 ± 9.0%). Loads to failure (in N) were in descending order as follows: UTR: 3048 ± 905; RCT-CER: 1853 ± 477; RCT-AM: 1447 ± 363; RCT-FRC: 1066 ± 306; RCT-COM 960 ± 228. While UTR resulted in statistically higher loads to failure than those of all other groups (p < 0.0001), RCT-CER showed significantly higher results than those of RCT-COM (p = 0.0014) and RCT-FRC (p = 0.0042). The UTR group showed exclusively reparable failures in the form of either superficial (mode 1) or complete cusp chipping (mode 2), but all restored teeth exhibited catastrophic failures involving fractures along or through the restoration (modes 3 to 5). None of the restored teeth in any group were able to bear the same

  8. Diagnosis of Opisthorchis viverrini Infection with Handheld Microscopy in Lao People's Democratic Republic

    PubMed Central

    Bogoch, Isaac I.; Sayasone, Somphou; Vonghachack, Youthanavanh; Meister, Isabel; Utzinger, Jürg; Odermatt, Peter; Andrews, Jason R.; Keiser, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Opisthorchiasis is a neglected tropical disease, yet it is of considerable public health importance in Southeast Asia given the predilection for chronically infected persons to develop cholangiocarcinoma. We evaluated a handheld microscope for the diagnosis of Opisthorchis viverrini in a community-based setting in Lao People's Democratic Republic in comparison with conventional light microscopy. In stool samples collected from 104 individuals, handheld microscopy revealed a sensitivity of 70.6% and a specificity of 89.5% for O. viverrini infection. Pearson's correlation for quantitative fecal egg counts between the two devices was 0.98 (95% confidence interval: 0.98–0.99). With small adjustments to further increase diagnostic sensitivity, a handheld microscope may become a helpful tool to screen for O. viverrini and other helminth infections in public health settings. PMID:26526923

  9. Soap opera video on handheld computers to reduce young urban women's HIV sex risk.

    PubMed

    Jones, Rachel

    2008-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a soap opera video, A Story about Toni, Mike, and Valerie, designed to communicate HIV risk reduction themes. The study evaluated viewing the video and responding to audio computer assisted self-interview (ACASI) on a handheld computer. The sample was 76 predominately African American women, aged 18-29, in sexual relationships with men. Data were collected in urban neighborhoods in the northeastern United States. A pretest-posttest control group design with systematic assignment indicated statistically significant reduction in expectations to engage in unprotected sex in the experimental group. The handheld computer was found to be acceptable to view the near feature length video and complete ACASI. To date, no study has reported on use of video and ACASI on a handheld device to reduce HIV risk. The significance is the potential to stream health promotion videos to personal devices, such as cell phones.

  10. Open source handheld-based EMR for paramedics working in rural areas.

    PubMed Central

    Anantraman, Vishwanath; Mikkelsen, Tarjei; Khilnani, Reshma; Kumar, Vikram S.; Pentland, Alex; Ohno-Machado, Lucila

    2002-01-01

    We describe a handheld-based electronic medical record (EMR) for use in certain rural settings. The system is based on the Linux operating system and allows access to large mobile databases. The open source system is designed for paramedical health workers serving remote areas in rural India. A PDA loaded with the handheld-based EMR provides workers who have little access to medical doctors with different kinds of decision support and alerts. It addresses two important problems in developing countries: prenatal care and child health. This paper describes the technical challenges and innovation needed in the design, development, adaptation and implementation of the handheld EMR in a real setting in India PMID:12463777

  11. Diagnosis of Opisthorchis viverrini Infection with Handheld Microscopy in Lao People's Democratic Republic.

    PubMed

    Bogoch, Isaac I; Sayasone, Somphou; Vonghachack, Youthanavanh; Meister, Isabel; Utzinger, Jürg; Odermatt, Peter; Andrews, Jason R; Keiser, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Opisthorchiasis is a neglected tropical disease, yet it is of considerable public health importance in Southeast Asia given the predilection for chronically infected persons to develop cholangiocarcinoma. We evaluated a handheld microscope for the diagnosis of Opisthorchis viverrini in a community-based setting in Lao People's Democratic Republic in comparison with conventional light microscopy. In stool samples collected from 104 individuals, handheld microscopy revealed a sensitivity of 70.6% and a specificity of 89.5% for O. viverrini infection. Pearson's correlation for quantitative fecal egg counts between the two devices was 0.98 (95% confidence interval: 0.98-0.99). With small adjustments to further increase diagnostic sensitivity, a handheld microscope may become a helpful tool to screen for O. viverrini and other helminth infections in public health settings.

  12. Performance of a 6-degree-of-freedom active microsurgical manipulator in handheld tasks.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sungwook; Wells, Trent S; Maclachlan, Robert A; Riviere, Cameron N

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the first experimental results from human users of a new 6-degree-of-freedom handheld micromanipulator. This is the latest prototype of a fully-handheld system, known as "Micron," which performs active compensation of hand tremor for microsurgery. The manipulator is a miniature Gough-Stewart platform incorporating linear ultrasonic motors that provide a cylindrical workspace 4 mm long and 4 mm wide. In addition, the platform allows the possibility of imposing a remote center of motion for controlling motion not only at the tip but also at the entry point in the sclera of the eye. We demonstrate hand tremor reduction in both static and dynamic micromanipulation tasks on a rubber pad. The handheld performance is also evaluated in an artificial eye model while imposing a remote center of motion. In all cases, hand tremor is significantly reduced.

  13. Measurement of nasal nitric oxide by hand-held and stationary devices.

    PubMed

    Montella, Silvia; Alving, Kjell; Maniscalco, Mauro; Sofia, Matteo; De Stefano, Sara; Raia, Valeria; Santamaria, Francesca

    2011-10-01

    Nasal nitric oxide (nNO) is assessed by nasal aspiration/insufflation via one nostril or by nasal silent exhalation through a facemask and is also measured during humming, a manoeuvre that results in increased nNO in the presence of a patent osteomeatal complex. Humming nNO peak is absent in primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) and in cystic fibrosis (CF). Hand-held devices are used successfully for exhaled or nNO analysis. No study compared nNO during silent and humming exhalation using hand-held and stationary analysers. Thirty-eight subjects (14 PCD; 11 CF; 13 healthy individuals) measured nNO with a stationary and a hand-held analyser during silent and humming exhalations. No difference between nNO obtained from stationary or hand-held analyser during silent and humming exhalation was found (P > 0·05). Patients with PCD exhibited lower silent and humming nNO than CF or controls (P < 0·001). During both silent and humming exhalation, there was a significant correlation between nNO from the two analyzers both in the whole study population and within each group (r ≥ 0·7, P < 0·01). Bland-Altman plots confirmed this agreement. Using the hand-held device during humming, nNO values of 50, 81 and 21 ppb had sensitivity and specificity > 90% for discriminating PCD or CF from healthy subjects, and patients with PCD from patients with CF, respectively. The hand-held device is as effective as the stationary analyzer for assessing nNO during silent and humming exhalation. Its wider use might result in an increased number of subjects suspected to have PCD. © 2011 The Authors. European Journal of Clinical Investigation © 2011 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  14. Longer-term effects of Washington, DC, law on drivers' hand-held cell phone use.

    PubMed

    McCartt, Anne T; Hellinga, Laurie A

    2007-06-01

    To determine whether the substantial short-term declines in drivers' use of hand-held phones achieved in the District of Columbia (DC) were sustained 1 year after a ban. Drivers' daytime hand-held cell phone use was observed in DC and nearby areas of Virginia and Maryland, states without bans. Observations were conducted several months before the ban, shortly after, and 1 year later. The number of vehicles observed in all three surveys combined was 51,945 in DC, 36,796 in Maryland, and 43,033 in Virginia. The rate of talking on hand-held phones declined significantly from 6.1 percent before the law to 3.5 percent shortly after; when measured 1 year later, use was 4.0 percent, still significantly lower than baseline. Based on increases in rates of talking on hand-held phones in Maryland and Virginia, longer-term phone use in DC was estimated to be 53 percent lower than would have been expected without the ban. Declines in DC were identified for drivers of vehicles registered in all three jurisdictions. In DC, there was an initial decline of about 50 percent in drivers talking on hand-held cell phones following a ban, and this decline was sustained about 1 year later. After a similar ban in New York, there was an initial decline in phone use comparable with the initial decline in DC, but the decline a year after the New York ban took full effect was only about 21 percent and not statistically significant. The potential difference in sustained effectiveness for the DC ban may reflect tougher enforcement in DC. Even if full compliance with hand-held phone bans can be achieved, the risks from drivers' use of hands-free phones will remain.

  15. Effect of posture and artificial tears on corneal power measurements with a handheld automated keratometer.

    PubMed

    Lam, Andrew K C; Chan, Rufina; Chiu, Roger

    2004-03-01

    To study the effect of posture and artificial tears on handheld automated keratometry. Department of Optometry and Radiography, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, China. Thirty-five subjects were recruited to have corneal curvature measurement in 1 eye (randomly selected) by a Medmont topographic keratometer and a Nidek handheld keratometer. In handheld keratometry, the measurements were taken with the subject in a sitting and lying posture (both with and without the use of artificial tears). The sequence of measurements was randomly assigned, but the application of artificial tears was always the last. The steepest and flattest corneal curvatures were compared between the 4 conditions. The corneal power was converted to orthogonal power vector components and rectangular Fourier form (M, J(0), J(45)) for another comparison. There was a significant difference in the steepest and flattest meridians between the 4 conditions (P<.01). However, the mean difference between the handheld keratometer and the topographic keratometer was less than 0.50 diopter, and the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was very high (0.96), indicating good clinical reliability. When analyzed in rectangular Fourier form, the difference was also significant but the ICCs were lower (0.97, 0.89, and 0.64 for M, J(0), and J(45), respectively). The greatest difference was when subjects were in the lying posture and had received artificial tears. Handheld keratometry provided different results from topographic keratometry. The difference was greatest with the use of artificial tears. Cataract surgeons should take this into consideration, especially when using the handheld keratometry in the operating theater in patients under general anesthesia. Results show that the power vector method is best for studying corneal shape.

  16. Measurement of neonatal heart rate using handheld Doppler ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Dyson, Amanda; Jeffrey, Michele; Kluckow, Martin

    2017-03-01

    This pilot study aimed to determine whether handheld Doppler ultrasound is feasible and reliable for measuring neonatal heart rate (HR) when compared with ECG. Stable newborns were recruited from the neonatal intensive care unit and postnatal ward between July 2014 and January 2015 at Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, Australia. Each newborn had their HR recorded every 15 s over 145 s using four different modalities: ECG, counted audible Doppler (AD) over 10 s, pulse oximetry (PO) and the Doppler display (DD). The correlation and variation between each modality and ECG. 51 newborns with a median gestational age of 38 weeks (27-41) and a mean weight of 2.78 kg (0.82 to 4.76) with a median postnatal age of 3 days (0-87) were studied. There was a mean difference of 0.69 bpm (95% CI -2.9 to +1.5) between AD-HR and ECG-HR with good correlation between modalities (r=0.94, p<0.01). The median time to achieve AD-HR was 3 s (1-45). The mean difference between DD-HR and ECG-HR was 5.37 bpm (95% CI -12.8 to +2.1) with moderate correlation (r=0.37, p=0.04). The mean difference between PO-HR and ECG-HR was 0.49 bpm (95% CI -1.5 to +0.51) with good correlation (r=0.99, p<0.01). The variability between AD-HR and ECG-HR decreased with decreasing weight. AD-HR correlates well with ECG-HR. Further research in the delivery room is recommended before using AD-HR in this area. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  17. Hand-Held Color Meters Based on Interference Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, G. Jeffrey; Fleurial, Jean-Pierre; Caillat, Thierry; Chen, Gang; Yang, Rong Gui

    2004-01-01

    Small, inexpensive, hand-held optoelectronic color-measuring devices based on metal-film/dielectric-film interference filters are undergoing development. These color meters could be suitable for use in a variety of applications in which there are requirements to quantify or match colors for aesthetic purposes but there is no need for the high spectral resolution of scientific-grade spectrometers. Such applications typically occur in the paint, printing, and cosmetic industries, for example. The figure schematically depicts a color meter of this type being used to measure the color of a sample in terms of the spectrum of light reflected from the sample. Light from a white source (for example, a white light-emitting diode) passes through a collimating lens to the sample. Another lens collects some of the light reflected from the sample and focuses the light onto the input end of optical fiber. Light emerging from the output end of the optical fiber illuminates an array of photodetectors covered with metal/dielectric-film interference filters like those described in Metal/Dielectric-film Interference Color Filters (NPO-20217), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 23, No. 2 (February 1999), page 70. Typically, these are wide-band-pass filters, as shown at the bottom of the figure. The photodetector array need not be of any particular design: it could be something as simple as an assembly containing several photodiodes or something as elaborate as an active-pixel sensor or other imaging device. What is essential is that each of the photodetectors or each of several groups of photodetectors is covered with a metal/dielectric-film filter of a different color. In most applications, it would be desirable to have at least three different filters, each for a spectral band that contains one of the three primary additive red, green, and blue colors. In some applications, it may be necessary to have more than three different color filters in order to characterize subtle differences in color

  18. A Review of Research Methodologies Used in Studies on Mobile Handheld Devices in K-12 and Higher Education Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheung, Wing Sum; Hew, Khe Foon

    2009-01-01

    Mobile handheld devices are increasingly being used in education. In this paper, we undertook a review of empirical based articles to summarise the current research regarding the use of mobile handheld devices (personal digital assistants/PDAs, palmtops, and mobile phones) in K-12 and higher education settings. This review was guided by the…

  19. Semi-quantification of surface-enhanced Raman scattering using a handheld Raman spectrometer: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jinkai; Pang, Shintaro; Labuza, Theodore P; He, Lili

    2013-12-07

    The feasibility of utilizing a handheld Raman spectrometer for surface-enhanced Raman scattering detection was evaluated on the pesticide ferbam. A layman's "answer box" was established for semi-quantifying the risk level of ferbam. This study advanced the application of a handheld Raman spectrometer to on-site evaluation of trace amounts of analytes.

  20. Technology and the Prospective Teacher: Exploring the Use of the TI-83 Handheld Devices in Social Studies Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowe, Alicia; van 't Hooft, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Using technology to enhance student learning in social studies has become an important area for discussion and study within the field of social studies education. Handheld devices are one of the recently emerging technologies. This article describes an initial study of the TI-83 handheld device in the education of preservice social studies…

  1. Hand-Held Dynamometer Measurements Obtained in a Home Environment Are Reliable but Not Correlated Strongly with Function.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohannon, R. W.

    1996-01-01

    This research report describes the reliability and validity of hand-held dynamometer measurements of knee extension force obtained from 13 patients referred for physical therapy. Results found that hand-held dynamometry can be used to obtain reliable measures of muscle strength; however, correlation between strength measures and function was not…

  2. Hand-Held Dynamometer Measurements Obtained in a Home Environment Are Reliable but Not Correlated Strongly with Function.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohannon, R. W.

    1996-01-01

    This research report describes the reliability and validity of hand-held dynamometer measurements of knee extension force obtained from 13 patients referred for physical therapy. Results found that hand-held dynamometry can be used to obtain reliable measures of muscle strength; however, correlation between strength measures and function was not…

  3. 78 FR 20695 - Walk-Through Metal Detectors and Hand-Held Metal Detectors Test Method Validation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-05

    ... Office of Justice Programs Walk-Through Metal Detectors and Hand-Held Metal Detectors Test Method... has recently developed updated versions of its minimum performance standards for walk-through metal detectors and hand-held metal detectors. In order to ensure that the test methods in the standards...

  4. Final Report Nucleic Acid System - PCR, Multiplex Assays and Sample Preparation Project

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, R.P.; Langlois, R.G.; Nasarabadi, S.; Benett, W.J.; Richards, J.B.; Hadley, D.R.; Miles, R.R.; Brown, S.B.; Stratton, P.L.; Milanovich, F.P.

    2001-04-20

    The objective of this project was to reduce to practice the detection and identification of biological warfare pathogens by the nucleic acid recognition technique of PCR (polymerase chain reaction). This entailed not only building operationally functional instrumentation but also developing the chemical assays for detection of priority pathogens. This project had two principal deliverables: (1) design, construct, test and deliver a 24 chamber, multiplex capable suitcase sized PCR instrument, and (2) develop and reduce to practice a multiplex assay for the detection of PCR product by flow cytometry. In addition, significant resources were allocated to test and evaluation of the Hand-held Advanced Nucleic Acid Analyzer (HANAA). This project helps provide the signature and intelligence gathering community the ability to perform, on-site or remote, rapid analysis of environmental or like samples for the presence of a suite of biological warfare pathogens.

  5. Characterization of the magnetic fields around walk-through and hand-held metal detectors.

    PubMed

    Boivin, W; Coletta, J; Kerr, L

    2003-05-01

    Magnetic field strength measurements were made around eight hand-held and 10 walk-through metal detectors. The method was similar to that used in previous research for Electronic Article Surveillance units except a Cartesian rather than cylindrical coordinate system was used. Special magnetic field probes specifically designed for metal detector measurements were used. A non-metallic positioning apparatus was designed and fabricated. Magnetic field strength measurements were collected on one hand-held metal detector in the laboratory. The remaining data were collected at airport terminals, federal and state government buildings, and a local high school. Walk-through metal detectors had considerably higher magnetic field strengths [up to 299 Am(-1) p-p (3,741 mG)] than hand-held metal detectors [up to 6 Am(-1) p-p (76 mG)]. The frequencies of the magnetic field signal for walk-through detectors were between 0.1 kHz and 3.5 kHz while those for hand-held detectors were between 89 kHz and 133 kHz. Waveforms for all hand-held metal detectors were sinusoidal; those for walk-through metal detectors varied with most being saw-toothed or pulsed. Due to their higher field strengths and the pulsed nature of their magnetic fields, walk-through metal detectors likely pose a higher risk for medical device electromagnetic interference than do hand-held units. Root mean squared magnetic field strengths were calculated from the peak-to-peak values and compared to occupational and general public exposure limits. None of these limits were exceeded. Measurement repeatability was examined for one hand-held and two walk-through metal detectors. For the hand-held metal detector measurements at the location of the maximum magnetic field strength, measurements by three individuals had a repeatability (percent standard deviation) of 5.9%. Limited repeatability data were collected for on-site measurements of walk-through detectors. One unit showed repeatability of 0.1 to 4.5%; a multi

  6. Application of Handheld Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) to Geochemical Analysis.

    PubMed

    Connors, Brendan; Somers, Andrew; Day, David

    2016-05-01

    While laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been in use for decades, only within the last two years has technology progressed to the point of enabling true handheld, self-contained instruments. Several instruments are now commercially available with a range of capabilities and features. In this paper, the SciAps Z-500 handheld LIBS instrument functionality and sub-systems are reviewed. Several assayed geochemical sample sets, including igneous rocks and soils, are investigated. Calibration data are presented for multiple elements of interest along with examples of elemental mapping in heterogeneous samples. Sample preparation and the data collection method from multiple locations and data analysis are discussed.

  7. Hand-held radiometer red and photographic infrared spectral measurements of agricultural crops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, C. J.; Fan, C. J.; Elgin, J. H., Jr.; Mcmurtrey, J. E., III

    1978-01-01

    Red and photographic infrared radiance data, collected under a variety of conditions at weekly intervals throughout the growing season using a hand-held radiometer, were used to monitor crop growth and development. The vegetation index transformation was used to effectively compensate for the different irradiational conditions encountered during the study period. These data, plotted against time, compared the different crops measured by comparing their green leaf biomass dynamics. This approach, based entirely upon spectral inputs, closely monitors crop growth and development and indicates the promise of ground-based hand-held radiometer measurements of crops.

  8. Dual-path handheld system for cornea and retina imaging using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirazi, Muhammad Faizan; Wijesinghe, Ruchire Eranga; Ravichandran, Naresh Kumar; Kim, Pilun; Jeon, Mansik; Kim, Jeehyun

    2017-04-01

    A dual-path handheld system is proposed for cornea and retina imaging using spectral domain optical coherence tomography. The handheld sample arm is designed to acquire two images simultaneously. Both eyes of a person can be imaged at the same time to obtain the images of the cornea of one eye and the retina of the other eye. Cornea, retina, and optic disc images are acquired with the proposed sample arm. Experimental results demonstrate the usefulness of this system for imaging of different eye segments. This system reduces the time required for imaging of the two eyes and is cost effective.

  9. Use of the handheld programmable calculator in the preparation of TPN solutions.

    PubMed

    DiDonato, L J

    1983-10-01

    A handheld programmable calculator was used to increase speed and decrease errors when calculating and labeling total parenteral nutrition formulations for pediatric patients. A program was developed and tested and an evaluation of the calculator vs. the manual method was performed. The time required to calculate total parenteral nutrition formulations decreased 50% and errors decreased from 3% to 0. Use of a handheld programmable calculator saves time and increases the accuracy of calculations and labels when preparing total parenteral nutrition formulations. The approximate total cost of the calculator, printer, and card reader is $1000.

  10. Rapid detection of Bordetella pertussis by real-time PCR using SYBR green I and a LightCycler instrument.

    PubMed

    Poddar, S K

    2004-01-01

    A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay in real-time for detection of B. pertussis using SYBR green I as the reporter fluorophore and LightCycler instrument (a thermocycler coupled to a fluorescence detection device) was established and evaluated. The amplified amplicon using series diluted control prototype strain (ATCC strain #9797) of B. pertussis was analyzed for the fluorescent melting profile, and melting temperature (Tm) was determined. When examined, amplicons using a representative set of clinical isolates of B. pertussis were found to have the same Tm value (86 +/- 0.5 degrees C, the specificity parameter of detection) as the control prototype strain as expected. Amplified product was also analyzed and detected by agarose gel electrophoresis. The detection limit by fluorescent profile and Tm analysis was 10-fold better than that detected by agarose gel analysis.

  11. QUALITY CONTROLS FOR PCR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this presentation is to present an overview of the quality control (QC) sections of a draft EPA document entitled, "Quality Assurance/Quality Control Guidance for Laboratories Performing PCR Analyses on Environmental Samples." This document has been prepared by th...

  12. QUALITY ASSURANCE FOR PCR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) held a workshop in January 2003 on the detection of viruses in water using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods. Speakers were asked to address a series of specific questions, including whether a single standard method coul...

  13. QUALITY CONTROLS FOR PCR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this presentation is to present an overview of the quality control (QC) sections of a draft EPA document entitled, "Quality Assurance/Quality Control Guidance for Laboratories Performing PCR Analyses on Environmental Samples." This document has been prepared by th...

  14. QUALITY ASSURANCE FOR PCR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) held a workshop in January 2003 on the detection of viruses in water using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods. Speakers were asked to address a series of specific questions, including whether a single standard method coul...

  15. Explanatory chapter: PCR primer design.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Fernández, Rubén

    2013-01-01

    This chapter is intended as a guide on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primer design (for information on PCR, see General PCR and Explanatory Chapter: Troubleshooting PCR). In the next section, general guidelines will be provided, followed by a discussion on primer design for specific applications. A list of recommended software tools is shown at the end. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Handheld single photon emission computed tomography (handheld SPECT) navigated video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery of computer tomography-guided radioactively marked pulmonary lesions.

    PubMed

    Müller, Joachim; Putora, Paul Martin; Schneider, Tino; Zeisel, Christoph; Brutsche, Martin; Baty, Florent; Markus, Alexander; Kick, Jochen

    2016-09-01

    Radioactive marking can be a valuable extension to minimally invasive surgery. The technique has been clinically applied in procedures involving sentinel lymph nodes, parathyroidectomy as well as interventions in thoracic surgery. Improvements in equipment and techniques allow one to improve the limits. Pulmonary nodules are frequently surgically removed for diagnostic or therapeutic reasons; here video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) is the preferred technique. VATS might be impossible with nodules that are small or located deep in the lung. In this study, we examined the clinical application and safety of employing the newly developed handheld single photon emission tomography (handheld SPECT) device in combination with CT-guided radioactive marking of pulmonary nodules. In this pilot study, 10 subjects requiring surgical resection of a pulmonary nodule were included. The technique involved CT-guided marking of the target nodule with a 20-G needle, with subsequent injection of 25-30 MBq (effective: 7-14 MBq) Tc-99m MAA (Macro Albumin Aggregate). Quality control was made with conventional SPECT-CT to confirm the correct localization and exclude possible complications related to the puncture procedure. VATS was subsequently carried out using the handheld SPECT to localize the radioactivity intraoperatively and therefore the target nodule. A 3D virtual image was superimposed on the intraoperative visual image for surgical guidance. In 9 of the 10 subjects, the radioactive application was successfully placed directly in or in the immediate vicinity of the target nodule. The average size of the involved nodules was 9 mm (range 4-15). All successfully marked nodules were subsequently completely excised (R0) using VATS. The procedure was well tolerated. An asymptomatic clinically insignificant pneumothorax occurred in 5 subjects. Two subjects were found to have non-significant discrete haemorrhage in the infiltration canal of the needle. In a single subject, the

  17. Detection of fecal contamination on beef meat surfaces using handheld fluorescence imaging device (HFID)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Current meat inspection in slaughter plants, for food safety and quality attributes including potential fecal contamination, is conducted through by visual examination human inspectors. A handheld fluorescence-based imaging device (HFID) was developed to be an assistive tool for human inspectors by ...

  18. Monitoring of WEEE plastics in regards to brominated flame retardants using handheld XRF.

    PubMed

    Aldrian, Alexia; Ledersteger, Alfred; Pomberger, Roland

    2015-02-01

    This contribution is focused on the on-site determination of the bromine content in waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE), in particular waste plastics from television sets (TV) and personal computer monitors (PC) using a handheld X-ray fluorescence (XRF) device. The described approach allows the examination of samples in regards to the compliance with legal specifications for polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) directly after disassembling and facilitates the sorting out of plastics with high contents of brominated flame retardants (BFRs). In all, over 3000 pieces of black (TV) and 1600 pieces of grey (PC) plastic waste were analysed with handheld XRF technique for this study. Especially noticeable was the high percentage of pieces with a bromine content of over 50,000ppm for TV (7%) and PC (39%) waste plastics. The applied method was validated by comparing the data of handheld XRF with results obtained by GC-MS. The results showed the expected and sufficiently accurate correlation between these two methods. It is shown that handheld XRF technique is an effective tool for fast monitoring of large volumes of WEEE plastics in regards to BFRs for on-site measurements. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Handheld multispectral dual-axis confocal microscope for cervical cancer screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarapukdee, Pongsak; Rattanavarin, Santi; Jarujareet, Ungkarn; Khemthongcharoen, Numfon; Jolivot, Romuald; Jung, Il Woong; López, Daniel; Mandella, Michael J.; Piyawattanametha, Wibool

    2013-03-01

    Our work demonstrates a MEMS based handheld dual-axis confocal microscope for cervical cancer screening. Imaging demonstration is performed with plant and animal tissue biopsies. The data is collected and displayed in real time with 2-5 Hz frame rates.

  20. Surgical procedure logging with use of a hand-held computer

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Sandra; Lapinsky, Stephen E.; Weshler, Jason; Howard, Frazer; Rotstein, Lorne E.; Cohen, Zane; Stewart, Thomas E.

    2002-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the feasibility of incorporating hand-held computing technology in a surgical residency program, by means of hand-held devices for surgical procedure logging linked through the Internet to a central database. Setting Division of General Surgery, University of Toronto. Design A survey of general surgery residents. Methods The 69 residents in the general surgery training program received hand-held computers with preinstalled medical programs and a program designed for surgical procedure logging. Procedural data were uploaded via the Internet to a central database. Survey data were collected regarding previous computer use as well as previous procedure logging methods. Main outcome measure Utilization of the procedure logging system. Results After a 5-month pilot period, 38% of surgical residents were using the procedure-logging program successfully and on a regular basis. Program use was higher among more junior trainees. Analysis of the database provided valuable information on individual trainees, hospital programs and supervising surgeons, data that would assist in program development. Conclusions Hand-held devices can be implemented in a large division of general surgery to provide a reference database and a procedure-logging platform. However, user acceptance is not uniform and continued training and support are necessary to increase acceptance. The procedure database provides important information for optimizing trainees’ educational experience. PMID:12387537

  1. Efficacy of Handheld Electronic Visual Supports to Enhance Vocabulary in Children with ASD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganz, Jennifer B.; Boles, Margot B.; Goodwyn, Fara D.; Flores, Margaret M.

    2014-01-01

    Although electronic tools such as handheld computers have become increasingly common throughout society, implementation of such tools to improve skills in individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities has lagged in the professional literature. However, the use of visual scripts for individuals with disabilities, particularly those…

  2. What Works Clearinghouse Quick Review: "Conceptualizing Astronomical Scale: Virtual Simulations on Handheld Tablet Computers Reverse Misconceptions"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This study examined how using two different ways of displaying the solar system--a true-to-scale mode vs. an orrery mode--affected students' knowledge of astronomical concepts. Solar system displays were presented in a software application on a handheld tablet computer. In the true-to-scale mode, users navigated a simulated three-dimensional solar…

  3. PDAs and Handhelds: ICT at Your Side and Not in Your Face

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wishart, Jocelyn; Ramsden, Andy; McFarlane, Angela

    2007-01-01

    In order to evaluate the potential of Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs) or handheld computers to support initial teacher training (ITT), 14 science teacher trainees at the Graduate School of Education in the University of Bristol were given PDAs with mobile phone connectivity to use throughout the academic year. The following areas were…

  4. Physician Use of Hand-Held Computers for Drug Information and Prescribing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    variables such as psychomotor skills that may influence behavior intentions and actual usage of hand-held technology. The learning of new technology...handwriting the prescriptions. 0.84 a 3 Perceived ease of use: No human factors limitations with computing devices ( psychomotor skills ) • I have

  5. Surgical procedure logging with use of a hand-held computer.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Sandra; Lapinsky, Stephen E; Weshler, Jason; Howard, Frazer; Rotstein, Lorne E; Cohen, Zane; Stewart, Thomas E

    2002-10-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of incorporating hand-held computing technology in a surgical residency program, by means of hand-held devices for surgical procedure logging linked through the Internet to a central database. Division of General Surgery, University of Toronto. A survey of general surgery residents. The 69 residents in the general surgery training program received hand-held computers with preinstalled medical programs and a program designed for surgical procedure logging. Procedural data were uploaded via the Internet to a central database. Survey data were collected regarding previous computer use as well as previous procedure logging methods. Utilization of the procedure logging system. After a 5-month pilot period, 38% of surgical residents were using the procedure-logging program successfully and on a regular basis. Program use was higher among more junior trainees. Analysis of the database provided valuable information on individual trainees, hospital programs and supervising surgeons, data that would assist in program development. Hand-held devices can be implemented in a large division of general surgery to provide a reference database and a procedure-logging platform. However, user acceptance is not uniform and continued training and support are necessary to increase acceptance. The procedure database provides important information for optimizing trainees' educational experience.

  6. 75 FR 27504 - Substantial Product Hazard List: Hand-Held Hair Dryers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-17

    ... serious injury or death to a consumer. An estimated 23 million units of hand-held hair dryers are sold... 104 deaths and 43 electric shock injuries due to hair dryer immersion/water contact from 1984 to 2004. Of the 104 electrocutions resulting in death, the most incidents (91) occurred during 1984-90...

  7. The Impact of Handheld Graphing Calculator Use on Student Achievement in Algebra 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heller, Joan I.; Curtis, Deborah A.; Jaffe, Rebecca; Verboncoeur, Carol J.

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between instructional use of handheld graphing calculators and student achievement in Algebra 1. Three end-of-course test forms were administered (without calculators) using matrix sampling to 458 high-school students in two suburban school districts in Oregon and Kansas. Test questions on two forms were…

  8. The Use of Handheld Devices for Improved Phonemic Awareness in a Traditional Kindergarten Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magagna-McBee, Cristy Ann

    2010-01-01

    Effective teaching strategies that improve the development of phonemic awareness are important to ensure students are fluent readers by third grade. The use of handheld devices to improve phonemic awareness with kindergarten students may be such a strategy, but no research exists that evaluates the use of these devices. This study explored the…

  9. A Mobile Mixed-Reality Environment for Children's Storytelling Using a Handheld Projector and a Robot

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sugimoto, Masanori

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a system called GENTORO that uses a robot and a handheld projector for supporting children's storytelling activities. GENTORO differs from many existing systems in that children can make a robot play their own story in a physical space augmented by mixed-reality technologies. Pilot studies have been conducted to clarify the…

  10. Enhancing Mathematical Concepts through Leading Questions and Hand-Held Data Collection Tools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laughbaum, Edward D.

    Hand-held data collection technology allows for access to real-world data collection--at any other time and almost any place. Is the use of data and its collection desirable to the mathematical learning process? The answer is a resounding yes! Not only can significant mathematical ideas be taught in the process; colleagues are also helped in the…

  11. The Use and Efficacy of Handheld Computers for School-Based Data Collection: A Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adiguzel, Tufan; Vannest, Kimberly J.; Zellner, Ronald D.

    2009-01-01

    Given the increasing influence of technology and the explosion in data collection demands, the acceptance and assimilation of new paradigms and technologies require today's educators, researchers, and evaluators to consider alternative tools, and apply them effectively. One of these alternatives, handheld computers, also known as personal digital…

  12. A handheld computer as part of a portable in vivo knee joint load monitoring system

    PubMed Central

    Szivek, JA; Nandakumar, VS; Geffre, CP; Townsend, CP

    2009-01-01

    In vivo measurement of loads and pressures acting on articular cartilage in the knee joint during various activities and rehabilitative therapies following focal defect repair will provide a means of designing activities that encourage faster and more complete healing of focal defects. It was the goal of this study to develop a totally portable monitoring system that could be used during various activities and allow continuous monitoring of forces acting on the knee. In order to make the monitoring system portable, a handheld computer with custom software, a USB powered miniature wireless receiver and a battery-powered coil were developed to replace a currently used computer, AC powered bench top receiver and power supply. A Dell handheld running Windows Mobile operating system(OS) programmed using Labview was used to collect strain measurements. Measurements collected by the handheld based system connected to the miniature wireless receiver were compared with the measurements collected by a hardwired system and a computer based system during bench top testing and in vivo testing. The newly developed handheld based system had a maximum accuracy of 99% when compared to the computer based system. PMID:19789715

  13. Engaging Students with Disabilities in the Learning Process through Handheld Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poel, Elissa Wolfe

    2010-01-01

    Through a grant from the Regional Alliance for Science, Engineering, and Math (RASEM[squared]), funded by the National Science Foundation, a research study was conducted to explore the use of handheld technology with students with disabilities in elementary and middle school settings. The purpose of the project was to (a) introduce electronic task…

  14. 3D tomographic breast imaging in-vivo using a handheld optical imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Sarah J.; Martinez, Sergio; Gonzalez, Jean; Roman, Manuela; Nunez, Annie; Godavarty, Anuradha

    2011-02-01

    Hand-held optical imagers are currently developed toward clinical imaging of breast tissue. However, the hand-held optical devices developed to are not able to coregister the image to the tissue geometry for 3D tomography. We have developed a hand-held optical imager which has demonstrated automated coregistered imaging and 3D tomography in phantoms, and validated coregistered imaging in normal human subjects. Herein, automated coregistered imaging is performed in a normal human subject with a 0.45 cm3 spherical target filled with 1 μM indocyanine green (fluorescent contrast agent) placed superficially underneath the flap of the breast tissue. The coregistered image data is used in an approximate extended Kalman filter (AEKF) based reconstruction algorithm to recover the 3D location of the target within the breast tissue geometry. The results demonstrate the feasibility of performing 3D tomographic imaging and recovering a fluorescent target in breast tissue of a human subject for the first time using a hand-held based optical imager. The significance of this work is toward clinical imaging of breast tissue for cancer diagnostics and therapy monitoring.

  15. Learning Motivation and Adaptive Video Caption Filtering for EFL Learners Using Handheld Devices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, Ching-Kun

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide adaptive assistance to improve the listening comprehension of eleventh grade students. This study developed a video-based language learning system for handheld devices, using three levels of caption filtering adapted to student needs. Elementary level captioning excluded 220 English sight words (see Section 1…

  16. Handheld Technology as a Supplemental Tool for Elementary General Music Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlisle, Katie

    2014-01-01

    This article argues that "The Eclectic Curriculum in American Music Education" warrants consideration within current elementary general music education contexts. One way to consider this foundational text is in terms of how technology can serve as a tool for enriching instructional approaches. While handheld technology use within these…

  17. Online Responses towards Parental Rearing Styles Regarding Hand-Held Devices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geng, Gretchen; Disney, Leigh

    2014-01-01

    This article reviewed the literature on parental rearing styles and used responses from an online discussion forum to investigate people's opinions towards parental rearing styles and strategies when children use hand-held devices. Critical discourse analysis (CDA) was used as an analysis method via micro, meso and macro multi-level…

  18. A Fresh Look at the Crystal Violet Lab with Handheld Camera Colorimetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knutson, Theodore R.; Knutson, Cassandra M.; Mozzetti, Abbie R.; Campos, Antonio R.; Haynes, Christy L.; Penn, R. Lee

    2015-01-01

    Chemical kinetic experiments to determine rate laws are common in high school and college chemistry courses. For reactions involving a color change, rate laws can be determined experimentally using spectrophotometric or colorimetric equipment though this equipment can be cost prohibitive. Previous work demonstrated that inexpensive handheld camera…

  19. Wireless live streaming video of laparoscopic surgery: a bandwidth analysis for handheld computers.

    PubMed

    Gandsas, Alex; McIntire, Katherine; George, Ivan M; Witzke, Wayne; Hoskins, James D; Park, Adrian

    2002-01-01

    Over the last six years, streaming media has emerged as a powerful tool for delivering multimedia content over networks. Concurrently, wireless technology has evolved, freeing users from desktop boundaries and wired infrastructures. At the University of Kentucky Medical Center, we have integrated these technologies to develop a system that can wirelessly transmit live surgery from the operating room to a handheld computer. This study establishes the feasibility of using our system to view surgeries and describes the effect of bandwidth on image quality. A live laparoscopic ventral hernia repair was transmitted to a single handheld computer using five encoding speeds at a constant frame rate, and the quality of the resulting streaming images was evaluated. No video images were rendered when video data were encoded at 28.8 kilobytes per second (Kbps), the slowest encoding bitrate studied. The highest quality images were rendered at encoding speeds greater than or equal to 150 Kbps. Of note, a 15 second transmission delay was experienced using all four encoding schemes that rendered video images. We believe that the wireless transmission of streaming video to handheld computers has tremendous potential to enhance surgical education. For medical students and residents, the ability to view live surgeries, lectures, courses and seminars on handheld computers means a larger number of learning opportunities. In addition, we envision that wireless enabled devices may be used to telemonitor surgical procedures. However, bandwidth availability and streaming delay are major issues that must be addressed before wireless telementoring becomes a reality.

  20. MS Mastracchio uses the hand-held laser rangefinder during STS-106

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-09-18

    STS106-320-014 (10 September 2000) --- Astronaut Richard A. Mastracchio, mission specialist, uses a handheld laser device on the aft flight deck of the Space Shuttle Atlantis to track the range of the International Space Station during rendezvous operations.

  1. Analysis of Peer Interaction in Learning Activities with Personal Handhelds and Shared Displays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Chen-Chung; Chung, Chen-Wei; Chen, Nian-Shing; Liu, Baw-Jhiune

    2009-01-01

    Collaborative learning is extensively applied in classroom activities, but the screens on handheld devices are designed for individual-user mobile applications and may constrain interaction among group learners. The small screen size may lead to fragmented and tete-a-tete communication patterns and frequently obstruct the externalization of the…

  2. The Use of Handheld Devices for Improved Phonemic Awareness in a Traditional Kindergarten Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magagna-McBee, Cristy Ann

    2010-01-01

    Effective teaching strategies that improve the development of phonemic awareness are important to ensure students are fluent readers by third grade. The use of handheld devices to improve phonemic awareness with kindergarten students may be such a strategy, but no research exists that evaluates the use of these devices. This study explored the…

  3. Hand-Held Model of a Sarcomere to Illustrate the Sliding Filament Mechanism in Muscle Contraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jittivadhna, Karnyupha; Ruenwongsa, Pintip; Panijpan, Bhinyo

    2009-01-01

    From our teaching of the contractile unit of the striated muscle, we have found limitations in using textbook illustrations of sarcomere structure and its related dynamic molecular physiological details. A hand-held model of a striated muscle sarcomere made from common items has thus been made by us to enhance students' understanding of the…

  4. The Weak Link HP-41C hand-held calculator program

    Treesearch

    Ross A. Phillips; Penn A. Peters; Gary D. Falk

    1982-01-01

    The Weak Link hand-held calculator program (HP-41C) quickly analyzes a system for logging production and costs. The production equations model conventional chain saw, skidder, loader, and tandemaxle truck operations in eastern mountain areas. Production of each function of the logging system may be determined so that the system may be balanced for minimum cost. The...

  5. Hand-held optical imager (Gen-2): improved instrumentation and target detectability.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Jean; Decerce, Joseph; Erickson, Sarah J; Martinez, Sergio L; Nunez, Annie; Roman, Manuela; Traub, Barbara; Flores, Cecilia A; Roberts, Seigbeh M; Hernandez, Estrella; Aguirre, Wenceslao; Kiszonas, Richard; Godavarty, Anuradha

    2012-08-01

    Hand-held optical imagers are developed by various researchers towards reflectance-based spectroscopic imaging of breast cancer. Recently, a Gen-1 handheld optical imager was developed with capabilities to perform two-dimensional (2-D) spectroscopic as well as three-dimensional (3-D) tomographic imaging studies. However, the imager was bulky with poor surface contact (~30%) along curved tissues, and limited sensitivity to detect targets consistently. Herein, a Gen-2 hand-held optical imager that overcame the above limitations of the Gen-1 imager has been developed and the instrumentation described. The Gen-2 hand-held imager is less bulky, portable, and has improved surface contact (~86%) on curved tissues. Additionally, the forked probe head design is capable of simultaneous bilateral reflectance imaging of both breast tissues, and also transillumination imaging of a single breast tissue. Experimental studies were performed on tissue phantoms to demonstrate the improved sensitivity in detecting targets using the Gen-2 imager. The improved instrumentation of the Gen-2 imager allowed detection of targets independent of their location with respect to the illumination points, unlike in Gen-1 imager. The developed imager has potential for future clinical breast imaging with enhanced sensitivity, via both reflectance and transillumination imaging.

  6. How to use hand-held computers to evaluate wood drying.

    Treesearch

    Howard N. Rosen; Darrell S. Martin

    1985-01-01

    Techniques have been developed to evaluate end generate wood drying curves with hand-held computers (3-5K memory). Predictions of time to dry to a specific moisture content, drying rates, and other characteristics of wood drying curves can be made. The paper describes the development of programs and illustrates their use.

  7. "New Directions for Traditional Lessons": Can Handheld Game Consoles Enhance Mental Mathematics Skills?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Main, Susan; O'Rourke, John

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on a pilot study that compared the use of commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) handheld game consoles (HGCs) with traditional teaching methods to develop the automaticity of mathematical calculations and self-concept towards mathematics for year 4 students in two metropolitan schools. One class conducted daily sessions using the HGCs…

  8. Software Aids for radiologists: Part 2, Essential apps for handheld devices.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Michael L

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this review is to summarize applications (apps) for hand-held computing devices that can be essential aids to radiologists. Numerous apps are relevant to radiologists. Although the author prefers Apple iPad and iPhone apps, similar Android apps fill many of the same software niches.

  9. 78 FR 73415 - Safety Standard for Hand-Held Infant Carriers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-06

    ...-sided'' and ``semi- rigid-sided'' products. III. Incident Data The preamble to the NPR summarized incident data involving bassinets and cradles reported to the Commission as of June 8, 2012. 77 FR 73354... include hand-held infant carrier- related incident data reported to the Commission from June 8, 2012...

  10. Learning Motivation and Adaptive Video Caption Filtering for EFL Learners Using Handheld Devices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, Ching-Kun

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide adaptive assistance to improve the listening comprehension of eleventh grade students. This study developed a video-based language learning system for handheld devices, using three levels of caption filtering adapted to student needs. Elementary level captioning excluded 220 English sight words (see Section 1…

  11. PDAs and Handhelds: ICT at Your Side and Not in Your Face

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wishart, Jocelyn; Ramsden, Andy; McFarlane, Angela

    2007-01-01

    In order to evaluate the potential of Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs) or handheld computers to support initial teacher training (ITT), 14 science teacher trainees at the Graduate School of Education in the University of Bristol were given PDAs with mobile phone connectivity to use throughout the academic year. The following areas were…

  12. Automated coregistered imaging using a hand-held probe-based optical imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regalado, Steven; Erickson, Sarah J.; Zhu, Banghe; Ge, Jiajia; Godavarty, Anuradha

    2010-02-01

    Near-infrared optical imaging holds a promise as a noninvasive technology toward cancer diagnostics and other tissue imaging applications. In recent years, hand-held based imagers are of great interest toward the clinical translation of the technology. However hand-held imagers developed to date are typically designed to obtain surface images and not tomography information due to lack of coregistration facilities. Herein, a recently developed hand-held probe-based optical imager in our Optical Imaging Laboratory has been implemented with novel coregistration facilities toward real-time and tomographic imaging of tissue phantoms. Continuous-wave fluorescence-enhanced optical imaging studies were performed using an intensified charge coupled device camera based imaging system in order to demonstrate the feasibility of automated coregistered imaging of flat phantom surfaces, using a flexible probe that can also contour to curvatures. Three-dimensional fluorescence tomographic reconstructions were also demonstrated using coregistered frequency-domain measurements obtained using the hand-held based optical imager. It was also observed from preliminary studies on cubical phantoms that multiple coregistered scans differentiated deeper targets (˜3 cm) from artifacts that were not feasible from a single coregistered scan, demonstrating the possibility of improved target depth detectability in the future.

  13. Hand-held optical imager (Gen-2): improved instrumentation and target detectability

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Jean; DeCerce, Joseph; Erickson, Sarah J.; Martinez, Sergio L.; Nunez, Annie; Roman, Manuela; Traub, Barbara; Flores, Cecilia A.; Roberts, Seigbeh M.; Hernandez, Estrella; Aguirre, Wenceslao; Kiszonas, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. Hand-held optical imagers are developed by various researchers towards reflectance-based spectroscopic imaging of breast cancer. Recently, a Gen-1 handheld optical imager was developed with capabilities to perform two-dimensional (2-D) spectroscopic as well as three-dimensional (3-D) tomographic imaging studies. However, the imager was bulky with poor surface contact (∼30%) along curved tissues, and limited sensitivity to detect targets consistently. Herein, a Gen-2 hand-held optical imager that overcame the above limitations of the Gen-1 imager has been developed and the instrumentation described. The Gen-2 hand-held imager is less bulky, portable, and has improved surface contact (∼86%) on curved tissues. Additionally, the forked probe head design is capable of simultaneous bilateral reflectance imaging of both breast tissues, and also transillumination imaging of a single breast tissue. Experimental studies were performed on tissue phantoms to demonstrate the improved sensitivity in detecting targets using the Gen-2 imager. The improved instrumentation of the Gen-2 imager allowed detection of targets independent of their location with respect to the illumination points, unlike in Gen-1 imager. The developed imager has potential for future clinical breast imaging with enhanced sensitivity, via both reflectance and transillumination imaging. PMID:23224163

  14. STS-116 MS Higginbotham uses handheld ranging device on the aft FD on Space Shuttle Discovery

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-12-11

    S116-E-05528 (11 Dec. 2006) --- Astronaut Joan E. Higginbotham, STS-116 mission specialist, uses a handheld laser ranging device on the aft flight deck of the Space Shuttle Discovery to track the range of the International Space Station during rendezvous operations.

  15. Hand-Held Self-Maneuvering Unit to be used during EVA on Gemini 4

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-06-02

    Hand-Held Self-Maneuvering Unit to be used during extravehicular activity (EVA) on Gemini 4 flight. It is an integral unit that contains its own high pressure metering valves and nozzles required to produce controlled thrust. A camera is mounted on the front of the unit.

  16. Handheld Technology as a Supplemental Tool for Elementary General Music Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlisle, Katie

    2014-01-01

    This article argues that "The Eclectic Curriculum in American Music Education" warrants consideration within current elementary general music education contexts. One way to consider this foundational text is in terms of how technology can serve as a tool for enriching instructional approaches. While handheld technology use within these…

  17. 40 CFR 90.129 - Fuel tank permeation from handheld engines and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... engines and equipment. 90.129 Section 90.129 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... KILOWATTS Emission Standards and Certification Provisions § 90.129 Fuel tank permeation from handheld... it may be combined with the emission control information label required in § 90.114. If the label...

  18. 40 CFR 90.129 - Fuel tank permeation from handheld engines and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... engines and equipment. 90.129 Section 90.129 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... KILOWATTS Emission Standards and Certification Provisions § 90.129 Fuel tank permeation from handheld... it may be combined with the emission control information label required in § 90.114. If the label...

  19. A Mobile Mixed-Reality Environment for Children's Storytelling Using a Handheld Projector and a Robot

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sugimoto, Masanori

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a system called GENTORO that uses a robot and a handheld projector for supporting children's storytelling activities. GENTORO differs from many existing systems in that children can make a robot play their own story in a physical space augmented by mixed-reality technologies. Pilot studies have been conducted to clarify the…

  20. A Study of the Use of a Handheld Computer Algebra System in Discrete Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Robert A.; Allison, Dean E.; Grassl, Richard M.

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of the TI-92 handheld Computer Algebra System (CAS) on student achievement in a discrete mathematics course. Specifically, the researchers examined the differences between a CAS section and a control section of discrete mathematics on students' in-class examinations. Additionally, they analysed student approaches…

  1. "A New Way of Looking?" Reflections upon One Teacher's Experience of Supporting Learners Using Handheld Computers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burkett, Ellie

    2008-01-01

    This article explores the experiences of students who used interactive learning material on handheld computers in a gallery to support their understanding and appreciation of artwork. The article considers the wider implications of using technology to change relationships between teacher, learners and subject matter, and attempts to offer positive…

  2. Using Hand-Held Calculators in Sixth Grade Classes. A Brief Report of an Educational Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Ray; Keefe, Michael

    This brief report describes an exploratory pilot project in which sixth-grade students used hand-held calculators throughout the school year. The report includes guidelines on the purchase and use of calculators as well as advice on gaining community support for such a project. Issues related to classroom management are discussed; in particular,…

  3. Hand-Held Model of a Sarcomere to Illustrate the Sliding Filament Mechanism in Muscle Contraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jittivadhna, Karnyupha; Ruenwongsa, Pintip; Panijpan, Bhinyo

    2009-01-01

    From our teaching of the contractile unit of the striated muscle, we have found limitations in using textbook illustrations of sarcomere structure and its related dynamic molecular physiological details. A hand-held model of a striated muscle sarcomere made from common items has thus been made by us to enhance students' understanding of the…

  4. A Fresh Look at the Crystal Violet Lab with Handheld Camera Colorimetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knutson, Theodore R.; Knutson, Cassandra M.; Mozzetti, Abbie R.; Campos, Antonio R.; Haynes, Christy L.; Penn, R. Lee

    2015-01-01

    Chemical kinetic experiments to determine rate laws are common in high school and college chemistry courses. For reactions involving a color change, rate laws can be determined experimentally using spectrophotometric or colorimetric equipment though this equipment can be cost prohibitive. Previous work demonstrated that inexpensive handheld camera…

  5. Engaging Students with Disabilities in the Learning Process through Handheld Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poel, Elissa Wolfe

    2010-01-01

    Through a grant from the Regional Alliance for Science, Engineering, and Math (RASEM[squared]), funded by the National Science Foundation, a research study was conducted to explore the use of handheld technology with students with disabilities in elementary and middle school settings. The purpose of the project was to (a) introduce electronic task…

  6. Breast cancer imaging and tomography using a hand-held optical imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Sarah J.; Roman, Manuela; Gonzalez, Jean; Kiszonas, Richard; Lopez-Penalver, Cristina; Godavarty, Anuradha

    2012-03-01

    Hand-held optical imaging devices are currently developed by several research groups as a noninvasive and non-ionizing method towards clinical imaging of breast cancer. The devices developed to date are typically utilized towards spectroscopic imaging via reflectance-based measurements. Additionally, a couple of devices have been used to perform 3D tomography with the addition of a second modality (e.g. ultrasound). A hand-held optical device that is unique in its ability to perform rapid 2D imaging and 3D tomography (without the use of a second modality) has been developed in our Optical Imaging laboratory. Herein, diffuse optical imaging studies are performed in breast cancer subjects. For these studies, the subject lay in a recliner chair and both breast tissues were imaged with the hand-held optical device which uses 785 nm laser source and an intensified CCD camera-based detector. Preliminary results demonstrate the ability to image invasive ductal carcinoma and lymphatic spread, as compared to the patient's medical records (e.g. xray, ultrasound, MRI). Multiple imaging studies with a subject undergoing chemotherapy demonstrated the potential to monitor response to treatment. Currently, studies are carried out to tomographically determine the 3D location of the tumor(s) in breast cancer subjects using the hand-held optical device.

  7. Note: A hand-held high-Tc superconducting quantum interference device operating without shielding.

    PubMed

    He, D F

    2011-02-01

    By improving the compensation circuit, a hand-held high-Tc rf superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUID) system was developed. It could operate well when moving in unshielded environment. To check the operation, it was used to do eddy-current testing by hand moving the SQUID, and the artificial defect under 6 mm aluminum plate could be successfully detected in shielded environment.

  8. Simultaneous detection of Fusarium culmorum and F. graminearum in plant material by duplex PCR with melting curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Brandfass, Christoph; Karlovsky, Petr

    2006-01-23

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) is a disease of cereal crops, which has a severe impact on wheat and barley production worldwide. Apart from reducing the yield and impairing grain quality, FHB leads to contamination of grain with toxic secondary metabolites (mycotoxins), which pose a health risk to humans and livestock. The Fusarium species primarily involved in FHB are F. graminearum and F. culmorum. A key prerequisite for a reduction in the incidence of FHB is an understanding of its epidemiology. We describe a duplex-PCR-based method for the simultaneous detection of F. culmorum and F. graminearum in plant material. Species-specific PCR products are identified by melting curve analysis performed in a real-time thermocycler in the presence of the fluorescent dye SYBR Green I. In contrast to multiplex real-time PCR assays, the method does not use doubly labeled hybridization probes. PCR with product differentiation by melting curve analysis offers a cost-effective means of qualitative analysis for the presence of F. culmorum and F. graminearum in plant material. This method is particularly suitable for epidemiological studies involving a large number of samples.

  9. Agreement Between an Automated Volume Breast Scanner and Handheld Ultrasound for Diagnostic Breast Examinations.

    PubMed

    Barr, Richard G; DeVita, Robert; Destounis, Stamatia; Manzoni, Federica; De Silvestri, Annalisa; Tinelli, Carmine

    2017-06-01

    To compare the agreement and interobserver variability of diagnostic handheld ultrasound (US) and a single volume on an automated breast volume scanner (ABVS) and to determine whether there was a significant difference if the ABVS was used by a sonographer or mammographic technologist. Ninety patients scheduled for diagnostic US examinations were randomized to either handheld US or the ABVS first. The AVBS was randomized between a sonographer and a mammographic technologist performing the study. The studies were blinded, randomized, and read by 2 radiologists. The lesion with the highest Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) score was used in the analysis. Final diagnoses were made by core biopsy or follow-up for 2 years. Lesions included 9 malignant and 81 benign. The 90 patients had a mean age ± SD of 53.1 ± 16.3 years. The κ value for agreement between the ABVS and handheld US was 0.831 (95% confidence interval, 0.744-0.925), whereas the global agreement for a 7-point BI-RADS score was 0.488 (0.372-0.560). The agreement between the ABVS and handheld US was nearly the same when the ABVS was used by a mammographic technologist (κ = 0.858 [0.723-0.963]) or sonographer (κ = 0.803 [0.596-1.000]; P = .47). The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves for characterization by the ABVS were 0.91 (0.84-0.96) for reader 1 and 0.91 (0.83-0.96) for reader 2; those for handheld US were 0.91 (0.84-0.96) for reader 1 and 0.83 (0.74-0.90) for reader 2, with no statistical difference. The agreement based on pathologic images was κ = 0.831 (0.718-0.944); for handheld US, κ = 0.795 (0.623-0.967); and for the AVBS, κ = 0.869 (0.725-1.000). Performing a single-view diagnostic ABVS examination has good agreement with a handheld diagnostic US workup. There is no difference if the ABVS is used by a sonographer or mammographic technologist. © 2017 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  10. Active case finding strategy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with handheld spirometry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joo Kyung; Lee, Chang Min; Park, Ji Young; Kim, Joo Hee; Park, Sung-Hoon; Jang, Seung Hun; Jung, Ki-Suck; Yoo, Kwang Ha; Park, Yong Bum; Rhee, Chin Kook; Kim, Deog Kyeom; Hwang, Yong Il

    2016-12-01

    The early detection and diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is critical to providing appropriate and timely treatment. We explored a new active case-finding strategy for COPD using handheld spirometry.We recruited subjects over 40 years of age with a smoking history of more than 10 pack-years who visited a primary clinic complaining of respiratory symptoms. A total of 190 of subjects were enrolled. Medical information was obtained from historical records and physical examination by general practitioners. All subjects had their pulmonary function evaluated using handheld spirometry with a COPD-6 device. Because forced expiratory volume in 6 seconds (FEV6) has been suggested as an alternative to FVC, we measured forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1)/FEV6 for diagnosis of airflow limitation. All subjects were then referred to tertiary referral hospitals to complete a "Could it be COPD?" questionnaire, handheld spiromtery, and conventional spirometry. The results of each instrument were compared to evaluate the efficacy of both handheld spirometry and the questionnaire.COPD was newly diagnosed in 45 (23.7%) patients. According to our receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, sensitivity and specificity were maximal when the FEV1/FEV6 ratio was less than 77%. The area under the ROC curve was 0.759. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were 72.7%, 77.1%, 50%, and 90%, respectively. The area under the ROC curve of respiratory symptoms listed on the questionnaire ranged from 0.5 to 0.65, which indicates that there is almost no difference compared with the results of handheld spirometry.The present study demonstrated the efficacy of handheld spirometry as an active case-finding tool for COPD in a primary clinical setting. This study suggested that physicians should recommend handheld spirometry for people over the age of 40, who have a smoking history of more than 10 pack

  11. Active case finding strategy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with handheld spirometry

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joo Kyung; Lee, Chang Min; Park, Ji Young; Kim, Joo Hee; Park, Sung-hoon; Jang, Seung Hun; Jung, Ki-Suck; Yoo, Kwang Ha; Park, Yong Bum; Rhee, Chin Kook; Kim, Deog Kyeom; Hwang, Yong Il

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The early detection and diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is critical to providing appropriate and timely treatment. We explored a new active case-finding strategy for COPD using handheld spirometry. We recruited subjects over 40 years of age with a smoking history of more than 10 pack-years who visited a primary clinic complaining of respiratory symptoms. A total of 190 of subjects were enrolled. Medical information was obtained from historical records and physical examination by general practitioners. All subjects had their pulmonary function evaluated using handheld spirometry with a COPD-6 device. Because forced expiratory volume in 6 seconds (FEV6) has been suggested as an alternative to FVC, we measured forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1)/FEV6 for diagnosis of airflow limitation. All subjects were then referred to tertiary referral hospitals to complete a “Could it be COPD?” questionnaire, handheld spiromtery, and conventional spirometry. The results of each instrument were compared to evaluate the efficacy of both handheld spirometry and the questionnaire. COPD was newly diagnosed in 45 (23.7%) patients. According to our receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, sensitivity and specificity were maximal when the FEV1/FEV6 ratio was less than 77%. The area under the ROC curve was 0.759. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were 72.7%, 77.1%, 50%, and 90%, respectively. The area under the ROC curve of respiratory symptoms listed on the questionnaire ranged from 0.5 to 0.65, which indicates that there is almost no difference compared with the results of handheld spirometry. The present study demonstrated the efficacy of handheld spirometry as an active case-finding tool for COPD in a primary clinical setting. This study suggested that physicians should recommend handheld spirometry for people over the age of 40, who have a smoking history of more than

  12. Handheld computers for self-administered sensitive data collection: A comparative study in Peru

    PubMed Central

    Bernabe-Ortiz, Antonio; Curioso, Walter H; Gonzales, Marco A; Evangelista, Wilfredo; Castagnetto, Jesus M; Carcamo, Cesar P; Hughes, James P; Garcia, Patricia J; Garnett, Geoffrey P; Holmes, King K

    2008-01-01

    Background Low-cost handheld computers (PDA) potentially represent an efficient tool for collecting sensitive data in surveys. The goal of this study is to evaluate the quality of sexual behavior data collected with handheld computers in comparison with paper-based questionnaires. Methods A PDA-based program for data collection was developed using Open-Source tools. In two cross-sectional studies, we compared data concerning sexual behavior collected with paper forms to data collected with PDA-based forms in Ancon (Lima). Results The first study enrolled 200 participants (18–29 years). General agreement between data collected with paper format and handheld computers was 86%. Categorical variables agreement was between 70.5% and 98.5% (Kappa: 0.43–0.86) while numeric variables agreement was between 57.1% and 79.8% (Spearman: 0.76–0.95). Agreement and correlation were higher in those who had completed at least high school than those with less education. The second study enrolled 198 participants. Rates of responses to sensitive questions were similar between both kinds of questionnaires. However, the number of inconsistencies (p = 0.0001) and missing values (p = 0.001) were significantly higher in paper questionnaires. Conclusion This study showed the value of the use of handheld computers for collecting sensitive data, since a high level of agreement between paper and PDA responses was reached. In addition, a lower number of inconsistencies and missing values were found with the PDA-based system. This study has demonstrated that it is feasible to develop a low-cost application for handheld computers, and that PDAs are feasible alternatives for collecting field data in a developing country. PMID:18366687

  13. Performance assessments of Android-powered military applications operating on tactical handheld devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Brian A.; Fronczek, Lisa; Morse, Emile; Kootbally, Zeid; Schlenoff, Craig

    2013-05-01

    Transformative Apps (TransApps) is a Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) funded program whose goal is to develop a range of militarily-relevant software applications ("apps") to enhance the operational-effectiveness of military personnel on (and off) the battlefield. TransApps is also developing a military apps marketplace to facilitate rapid development and dissemination of applications to address user needs by connecting engaged communities of endusers with development groups. The National Institute of Standards and Technology's (NIST) role in the TransApps program is to design and implement evaluation procedures to assess the performance of: 1) the various software applications, 2) software-hardware interactions, and 3) the supporting online application marketplace. Specifically, NIST is responsible for evaluating 50+ tactically-relevant applications operating on numerous Android™-powered platforms. NIST efforts include functional regression testing and quantitative performance testing. This paper discusses the evaluation methodologies employed to assess the performance of three key program elements: 1) handheld-based applications and their integration with various hardware platforms, 2) client-based applications and 3) network technologies operating on both the handheld and client systems along with their integration into the application marketplace. Handheld-based applications are assessed using a combination of utility and usability-based checklists and quantitative performance tests. Client-based applications are assessed to replicate current overseas disconnected (i.e. no network connectivity between handhelds) operations and to assess connected operations envisioned for later use. Finally, networked applications are assessed on handhelds to establish baselines of performance for when connectivity will be common usage.

  14. Monitoring of WEEE plastics in regards to brominated flame retardants using handheld XRF

    SciTech Connect

    Aldrian, Alexia; Ledersteger, Alfred; Pomberger, Roland

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Specification of an empirical factor for conversion from bromine to PBB and PBDE. • The handheld XRF device was validated for this particular application. • A very large number of over 4600 pieces of monitor housings was analysed. • The recyclable fraction mounts up to 85% for TV but only 53% of PC waste plastics. • A high percentage of pieces with bromine contents of over 50,000 ppm was obtained. - Abstract: This contribution is focused on the on-site determination of the bromine content in waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE), in particular waste plastics from television sets (TV) and personal computer monitors (PC) using a handheld X-ray fluorescence (XRF) device. The described approach allows the examination of samples in regards to the compliance with legal specifications for polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) directly after disassembling and facilitates the sorting out of plastics with high contents of brominated flame retardants (BFRs). In all, over 3000 pieces of black (TV) and 1600 pieces of grey (PC) plastic waste were analysed with handheld XRF technique for this study. Especially noticeable was the high percentage of pieces with a bromine content of over 50,000 ppm for TV (7%) and PC (39%) waste plastics. The applied method was validated by comparing the data of handheld XRF with results obtained by GC–MS. The results showed the expected and sufficiently accurate correlation between these two methods. It is shown that handheld XRF technique is an effective tool for fast monitoring of large volumes of WEEE plastics in regards to BFRs for on-site measurements.

  15. Diagnosis and treatment planning of acute aortic emergencies using a handheld DICOM viewer.

    PubMed

    Choudhri, Asim F; Norton, Patrick T; Carr, Thomas M; Stone, James R; Hagspiel, Klaus D; Dake, Michael D

    2013-08-01

    Acute aortic syndromes and traumatic aortic injury are often diagnosed on CT angiography, possibly requiring emergent intervention. Advances in handheld computing have created the possibility of viewing full DICOM datasets from a remote location. We evaluated the ability to diagnose and characterize acute aortic pathologies on CT angiograms of the thorax using an iPhone-based DICOM viewer. This study was performed after Institutional Review Board approval. Fifteen CT angiograms of the thorax in suspected acute aortic syndromes were evaluated by three blinded radiologists on a handheld device using a DICOM viewer. Studies were evaluated for the ability to identify and classify aortic dissection, transection, or intramural hematoma, measure aortic dimensions, and identify mediastinal hematoma, arch variants, and pulmonary pathology. Studies were compared to blinded interpretations on a dedicated PACS workstation. The aortic pathology was correctly identified as aortic transection/pseudoaneurysm (n = 5), type A dissection (n = 2), and type A intramural hematoma (n = 1) by all reviewers, with no false-positive interpretations. This represents a sensitivity and specificity of 100 %. Mediastinal hematoma (n = 6), pneumothorax (five right, three left), and arch vessel involvement (n = 2) were identified in all cases. There was 88.5 % accuracy in identifying arch variants. Measurement of the size of the involved aortic segment was similar on handheld device and PACS workstation; however the adjacent normal aorta was 1.2 ± 1.0 mm larger on the handheld device (p = 0.03). Handheld DICOM viewers may be useful for emergent consultations and triage, and may expedite preprocedure planning to reduce the time interval between diagnostic scan and therapeutic intervention.

  16. The accuracy of a hand-held navigation system in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Loh, Bryan; Chen, Jerry Yongqiang; Yew, Andy Khye Soon; Pang, Hee Nee; Tay, Darren Keng Jin; Chia, Shi-Lu; Lo, Ngai Nung; Yeo, Seng Jin

    2017-03-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of a new hand-held navigation system. The authors of this study hypothesize that this navigation system will improve overall lower limb alignment and implant placement without causing a delay in surgery. Two hundred consecutive patients diagnosed with tricompartmental osteoarthritis and underwent total knee arthroplasty by a senior surgeon were included in this study. One hundred patients underwent TKA using the hand-held navigation system, while the other 100 patients underwent TKA using the conventional technique. The primary outcomes of this study were the overall alignment of the lower limb and the position of the components. This was determined radiologically using the: (1) Hip-Knee-Ankle angle (HKA) for lower limb alignment; (2) Coronal Femoral-Component angle (CFA); and (3) Coronal Tibia-Component angle (CTA) for component position. Normal alignment was taken as 180° ± 3° for the HKA and 90° ± 3° for both the CFA and CTA. For the CFA, the proportion of outliers was 7 and 17% in the hand-held navigation and conventional group, respectively (p = 0.030). For the HKA and CTA, there was no difference in the proportion of outliers between the two groups. The duration of surgery was 73 ± 9 min and 87 ± 15 min in the hand-held navigation and conventional group, respectively (p < 0.001). This hand-held navigation system is an effective intraoperative tool for reducing the proportion of outliers for femoral implant placement as well as the duration of surgery. The authors conclude that it can be considered for use to check femoral implant placement intra-operatively. III.

  17. Hand-held probe based optical imaging system towards breast cancer diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Jiajia; Jayachandran, Bhavani; Regalado, Steven; Zhu, Banghe; Godavarty, Anuradha

    2007-02-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) optical imaging is an emerging noninvasive modality for breast cancer diagnosis. However, the currently available optical imaging systems towards tomography studies are limited either by instrument portability, patient comfort, or flexibility to image any given tissue volume. Herein, a hand-held based optical imaging system is developed such that it can possibly overcome some of the above limitations. The unique features of the hand-held optical probe are: (i) to perform simultaneous multiple point illumination and detection, thus decreasing the total imaging time and improving the overall signal strength; (ii) to adapt to the contour of tissue surface, thus decreasing the leakage of excitation and emission signal at contact surface; and (iii) to obtain trans-illumination measurements apart from reflectance measurements, thus improving the depth information. The increased detected signal strength as well as total interrogated tissue volume is demonstrated by simulation studies (i.e. forward model) over a 5×10×10 cc slab phantom. The appropriate number and layout of the source and detection points on the probe head is determined and the hand-held optical probe is developed. A frequency-domain ICCD (intensified charge coupled device) detection system, which allows simultaneous multiple points detection, is developed and coupled to the hand-held probe in order to perform fluorescence-enhanced optical imaging of tissue phantoms. In the future, imaging of homogenous liquid phantoms will be used for the assessment of this hand-held system, followed by extensive imaging studies on different phantoms types under various experimental conditions.

  18. Development of real-time dual-display handheld and bench-top hybrid-mode SD-OCTs.

    PubMed

    Cho, Nam Hyun; Park, Kibeom; Wijesinghe, Ruchire Eranga; Shin, Yong Seung; Jung, Woonggyu; Kim, Jeehyun

    2014-01-27

    Development of a dual-display handheld optical coherence tomography (OCT) system for retina and optic-nerve-head diagnosis beyond the volunteer motion constraints is reported. The developed system is portable and easily movable, containing the compact portable OCT system that includes the handheld probe and computer. Eye posterior chambers were diagnosed using the handheld probe, and the probe could be fixed to the bench-top cradle depending on the volunteers' physical condition. The images obtained using this handheld probe were displayed in real time on the computer monitor and on a small secondary built-in monitor; the displayed images were saved using the handheld probe's built-in button. Large-scale signal-processing procedures such as k-domain linearization, fast Fourier transform (FFT), and log-scaling signal processing can be rapidly applied using graphics-processing-unit (GPU) accelerated processing rather than central-processing-unit (CPU) processing. The Labview-based system resolution is 1,024 × 512 pixels, and the frame rate is 56 frames/s, useful for real-time display. The 3D images of the posterior chambers including the retina, optic-nerve head, blood vessels, and optic nerve were composed using real-time displayed images with 500 × 500 × 500 pixel resolution. A handheld and bench-top hybrid mode with a dual-display handheld OCT was developed to overcome the drawbacks of the conventional method.

  19. A hand-held ultrasound machine vs. conventional ultrasound machine in the bedside assessment of post-liver transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Trinquart, Ludovic; Bruno, Onorina; Angeli, Maria Luigia; Belghiti, Jacques; Chatellier, Gilles; Vilgrain, Valérie

    2009-10-01

    The purpose was to assess the diagnostic accuracy of a hand-held Doppler ultrasound (US) machine for the bedside detection of liver and vascular abnormalities after liver transplantation in the intensive care unit. The IRB approved this study, and written informed consent was obtained from all patients or the patient's legal representative. Any liver transplant recipient at our institution who needed a bedside Doppler US examination in the intensive care unit was eligible. Patients underwent routine grey-scale, colour, and spectral Doppler US examinations of the liver with a conventional machine, which was taken as the reference method, and with a hand-held machine on the same day. Examinations followed one another and were performed in a blinded fashion by two radiologists. Over a 4-month period, 24 consecutive patients (16 men, median age 54 years old; 16 cadaveric and 8 living related right liver transplantations) underwent 43 examinations with both conventional and hand-held machines. Image quality and overall satisfaction scores of grey-scale were lower with the hand-held than with the conventional machine. The hand-held was similar to the conventional machine for assessing the patency of portal veins, hepatic veins and the IVC in all patients but one. The hand-held machine failed to detect signals in the right branch of the hepatic artery and in the hilum in two and one cases, respectively. There was no abnormal hepatic arterial flow with the conventional machine in any of the patients, and the results were the same with the hand-held machine. Total examination time was significantly longer with the hand-held machine. The hand-held US machine had a high diagnostic accuracy for both parenchymal and vascular analyses compared with a conventional US machine in the bedside assessment of post-liver transplant patients.

  20. Pcr by Thermal Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Dieter

    The Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) allows for highly sensitive and specific amplification of DNA. It is the backbone of many genetic experiments and tests. Recently, three labs independently uncovered a novel and simple way to perform a PCR reaction. Instead of repetitive heating and cooling, a temperature gradient across the reaction vessel drives thermal convection. By convection, the reaction liquid circulates between hot and cold regions of the chamber. The convection triggers DNA amplification as the DNA melts into two single strands in the hot region and replicates into twice the amount in the cold region. The amplification progresses exponentially as the convection moves on. We review the characteristics of the different approaches and show the benefits and prospects of the method.