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Sample records for hapke radiative transfer

  1. Surface roughness estimation by inversion of the Hapke photometric model on optical data simulated using a ray tracing code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champion, J.; Ristorcelli, T.; Ferrari, C. C.; Briottet, X.; Jacquemoud, S.

    2013-12-01

    Surface roughness is a key physical parameter that governs various processes (incident radiation distribution, temperature, erosion,...) on Earth and other Solar System objects. Its impact on the scattering function of incident electromagnetic waves is difficult to model. In the 80's, Hapke provided an approximate analytic solution for the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) of a particulate medium and, later on, included the effect of surface roughness as a correction factor for the BRDF of a smooth surface. This analytical radiative transfer model is widely used in solar system science whereas its ability to remotely determine surface roughness is still a question at issue. The validation of the Hapke model has been only occasionally undertaken due to the lack of radiometric data associated with field measurement of surface roughness. We propose to validate it on Earth, on several volcanic terrains for which very high resolution digital elevation models are available at small scale. We simulate the BRDF of these DEMs thanks to a ray-tracing code and fit them with the Hapke model to retrieve surface roughness. The mean slope angle of the facets, which quantifies surface roughness, can be fairly well retrieved when most conditions are met, i.e. a random-like surface and little multiple scattering between the facets. A directional sensitivity analysis of the Hapke model confirms that both surface intrinsic optical properties (facet's reflectance or single scattering albedo) and roughness are the most influential variables on ground BRDFs. Their interactions in some directions explain why their separation may be difficult, unless some constraints are introduced in the inversion process. Simulation of soil surface BRDF at different illumination and viewing angles

  2. A Blind Test of Hapke's Photometric Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfenstein, P.; Shepard, M. K.

    2003-01-01

    Hapke's bidirectional reflectance equation is a versatile analytical tool for predicting (i.e. forward modeling) the photometric behavior of a particulate surface from the observed optical and structural properties of its constituents. Remote sensing applications of Hapke s model, however, generally seek to predict the optical and structural properties of particulate soil constituents from the observed photometric behavior of a planetary surface (i.e. inverse-modeling). Our confidence in the latter approach can be established only if we ruthlessly test and optimize it. Here, we summarize preliminary results from a blind-test of the Hapke model using laboratory measurements obtained with the Bloomsburg University Goniometer (B.U.G.). The first author selected eleven well-characterized powder samples and measured the spectrophotometric behavior of each. A subset of twenty undisclosed examples of the photometric measurement sets were sent to the second author who fit the data using the Hapke model and attempted to interpret their optical and mechanical properties from photometry alone.

  3. Fast multilevel radiative transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paletou, Frédéric; Léger, Ludovick

    2007-01-01

    The vast majority of recent advances in the field of numerical radiative transfer relies on approximate operator methods better known in astrophysics as Accelerated Lambda-Iteration (ALI). A superior class of iterative schemes, in term of rates of convergence, such as Gauss-Seidel and Successive Overrelaxation methods were therefore quite naturally introduced in the field of radiative transfer by Trujillo Bueno & Fabiani Bendicho (1995); it was thoroughly described for the non-LTE two-level atom case. We describe hereafter in details how such methods can be generalized when dealing with non-LTE unpolarised radiation transfer with multilevel atomic models, in monodimensional geometry.

  4. Determining the source locations of martian meteorites: Hapke mixture models applied to CRISM simulated data of igneous mineral mixtures and martian meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Jennifer; Grindrod, Peter

    2017-04-01

    At present, martian meteorites represent the only samples of Mars available for study in terrestrial laboratories. However, these samples have never been definitively tied to source locations on Mars, meaning that the fundamental geological context is missing. The goal of this work is to link the bulk mineralogical analyses of martian meteorites to the surface geology of Mars through spectral mixture analysis of hyperspectral imagery. Hapke radiation transfer modelling has been shown to provide accurate (within 5 - 10% absolute error) mineral abundance values from laboratory derived hyperspectral measurements of binary [1] and ternary [2] mixtures of plagioclase, pyroxene and olivine. These three minerals form the vast bulk of the SNC meteorites [3] and the bedrock of the Amazonian provinces on Mars that are inferred to be the source regions for these meteorites based on isotopic aging. Spectral unmixing through the Hapke model could be used to quantitatively analyse the Martian surface and pinpoint the exact craters from which the SNC meteorites originated. However the Hapke model is complex with numerous variables, many of which are determinable in laboratory conditions but not from remote measurements of a planetary surface. Using binary and tertiary spectral mixtures and martian meteorite spectra from the RELAB spectral library, the accuracy of Hapke abundance estimation is investigated in the face of increasing constraints and simplifications to simulate CRISM data. Constraints and simplifications include reduced spectral resolution, additional noise, unknown endmembers and unknown particle physical characteristics. CRISM operates in two spectral resolutions, the Full Resolution Targeted (FRT) with which it has imaged approximately 2% of the martian surface, and the lower spectral resolution MultiSpectral Survey mode (MSP) with which it has covered the vast majority of the surface. On resampling the RELAB spectral mixtures to these two wavelength ranges it was

  5. Radiative Transfer in Seagrass Canopies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-09-30

    Radiative Transfer in Seagrass Canopies Richard C. Zimmerman Moss Landing Marine Laboratories P. O. Box 450 Moss Landing, CA 95039 phone (831) 655...models of radiative transfer for optically shallow waters with benthic substrates colonized by submerged plant canopies ( seagrasses and seaweeds). Such...coastal resources. SCIENTIFIC OBJECTIVES The objectives of this study are to • Develop radiative transfer models of seagrass and seaweed canopies in

  6. Modeling the reflectance of the lunar regolith by a new method combining Monte Carlo Ray tracing and Hapke's model with application to Chang'E-1 IIM data.

    PubMed

    Wong, Un-Hong; Wu, Yunzhao; Wong, Hon-Cheng; Liang, Yanyan; Tang, Zesheng

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we model the reflectance of the lunar regolith by a new method combining Monte Carlo ray tracing and Hapke's model. The existing modeling methods exploit either a radiative transfer model or a geometric optical model. However, the measured data from an Interference Imaging spectrometer (IIM) on an orbiter were affected not only by the composition of minerals but also by the environmental factors. These factors cannot be well addressed by a single model alone. Our method implemented Monte Carlo ray tracing for simulating the large-scale effects such as the reflection of topography of the lunar soil and Hapke's model for calculating the reflection intensity of the internal scattering effects of particles of the lunar soil. Therefore, both the large-scale and microscale effects are considered in our method, providing a more accurate modeling of the reflectance of the lunar regolith. Simulation results using the Lunar Soil Characterization Consortium (LSCC) data and Chang'E-1 elevation map show that our method is effective and useful. We have also applied our method to Chang'E-1 IIM data for removing the influence of lunar topography to the reflectance of the lunar soil and to generate more realistic visualizations of the lunar surface.

  7. Modeling the Reflectance of the Lunar Regolith by a New Method Combining Monte Carlo Ray Tracing and Hapke's Model with Application to Chang'E-1 IIM Data

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yunzhao; Tang, Zesheng

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we model the reflectance of the lunar regolith by a new method combining Monte Carlo ray tracing and Hapke's model. The existing modeling methods exploit either a radiative transfer model or a geometric optical model. However, the measured data from an Interference Imaging spectrometer (IIM) on an orbiter were affected not only by the composition of minerals but also by the environmental factors. These factors cannot be well addressed by a single model alone. Our method implemented Monte Carlo ray tracing for simulating the large-scale effects such as the reflection of topography of the lunar soil and Hapke's model for calculating the reflection intensity of the internal scattering effects of particles of the lunar soil. Therefore, both the large-scale and microscale effects are considered in our method, providing a more accurate modeling of the reflectance of the lunar regolith. Simulation results using the Lunar Soil Characterization Consortium (LSCC) data and Chang'E-1 elevation map show that our method is effective and useful. We have also applied our method to Chang'E-1 IIM data for removing the influence of lunar topography to the reflectance of the lunar soil and to generate more realistic visualizations of the lunar surface. PMID:24526892

  8. Realistic uncertainties on Hapke model parameters from photometric measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Frédéric; Fernando, Jennifer

    2015-11-01

    The single particle phase function describes the manner in which an average element of a granular material diffuses the light in the angular space usually with two parameters: the asymmetry parameter b describing the width of the scattering lobe and the backscattering fraction c describing the main direction of the scattering lobe. Hapke proposed a convenient and widely used analytical model to describe the spectro-photometry of granular materials. Using a compilation of the published data, Hapke (Hapke, B. [2012]. Icarus 221, 1079-1083) recently studied the relationship of b and c for natural examples and proposed the hockey stick relation (excluding b > 0.5 and c > 0.5). For the moment, there is no theoretical explanation for this relationship. One goal of this article is to study a possible bias due to the retrieval method. We expand here an innovative Bayesian inversion method in order to study into detail the uncertainties of retrieved parameters. On Emission Phase Function (EPF) data, we demonstrate that the uncertainties of the retrieved parameters follow the same hockey stick relation, suggesting that this relation is due to the fact that b and c are coupled parameters in the Hapke model instead of a natural phenomena. Nevertheless, the data used in the Hapke (Hapke, B. [2012]. Icarus 221, 1079-1083) compilation generally are full Bidirectional Reflectance Diffusion Function (BRDF) that are shown not to be subject to this artifact. Moreover, the Bayesian method is a good tool to test if the sampling geometry is sufficient to constrain the parameters (single scattering albedo, surface roughness, b, c , opposition effect). We performed sensitivity tests by mimicking various surface scattering properties and various single image-like/disk resolved image, EPF-like and BRDF-like geometric sampling conditions. The second goal of this article is to estimate the favorable geometric conditions for an accurate estimation of photometric parameters in order to provide

  9. Testing and Improving Theories of Radiative Transfer for Determining the Mineralogy of Planetary Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudmundsson, E.; Ehlmann, B. L.; Mustard, J. F.; Hiroi, T.; Poulet, F.

    2012-12-01

    Two radiative transfer theories, the Hapke and Shkuratov models, have been used to estimate the mineralogic composition of laboratory mixtures of anhydrous mafic minerals from reflected near-infrared light, accurately modeling abundances to within 10%. For this project, we tested the efficacy of the Hapke model for determining the composition of mixtures (weight fraction, particle diameter) containing hydrous minerals, including phyllosilicates. Modal mineral abundances for some binary mixtures were modeled to +/-10% of actual values, but other mixtures showed higher inaccuracies (up to 25%). Consequently, a sensitivity analysis of selected input and model parameters was performed. We first examined the shape of the model's error function (RMS error between modeled and measured spectra) over a large range of endmember weight fractions and particle diameters and found that there was a single global minimum for each mixture (rather than local minima). The minimum was sensitive to modeled particle diameter but comparatively insensitive to modeled endmember weight fraction. Derivation of the endmembers' k optical constant spectra using the Hapke model showed differences with the Shkuratov-derived optical constants originally used. Model runs with different sets of optical constants suggest that slight differences in the optical constants used significantly affect the accuracy of model predictions. Even for mixtures where abundance was modeled correctly, particle diameter agreed inconsistently with sieved particle sizes and varied greatly for individual mix within suite. Particle diameter was highly sensitive to the optical constants, possibly indicating that changes in modeled path length (proportional to particle diameter) compensate for changes in the k optical constant. Alternatively, it may not be appropriate to model path length and particle diameter with the same proportionality for all materials. Across mixtures, RMS error increased in proportion to the fraction

  10. Radiative Transfer in Stellar Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutten, Robert J.

    2003-05-01

    The main topic treated in these graduate course notes is the classical theory of radiative transfer for explaining stellar spectra. It needs relatively much attention to be mastered. Radiative transfer in gaseous media that are neither optically thin nor fully opaque and scatter to boot is a key part of astrophysics but not a transparent subject. These course notes represent a middle road between Mihalas' "Stellar Atmospheres" (graduate level and up) and the books by Novotny and Boehm-Vitense (undergraduate level). They are at about the level of Gray's "The observation and analysis of stellar photospheres" but emphasize NLTE radiative transfer rather than observational techniques and data interpretation.

  11. Radiative transfer dynamo effect

    DOE PAGES

    Munirov, Vadim R.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2017-01-17

    Here, magnetic fields in rotating and radiating astrophysical plasma can be produced due to a radiative interaction between plasma layers moving relative to each other. The efficiency of current drive, and with it the associated dynamo effect, is considered in a number of limits. It is shown here, however, that predictions for these generated magnetic fields can be significantly higher when kinetic effects, previously neglected, are taken into account.

  12. Radiative transfer dynamo effect.

    PubMed

    Munirov, Vadim R; Fisch, Nathaniel J

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic fields in rotating and radiating astrophysical plasma can be produced due to a radiative interaction between plasma layers moving relative to each other. The efficiency of current drive, and with it the associated dynamo effect, is considered in a number of limits. It is shown here, however, that predictions for these generated magnetic fields can be significantly higher when kinetic effects, previously neglected, are taken into account.

  13. Pluto's global surface composition through pixel-by-pixel Hapke modeling of New Horizons Ralph/LEISA data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Protopapa, S.; Grundy, W. M.; Reuter, D. C.; Hamilton, D. P.; Dalle Ore, C. M.; Cook, J. C.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Schmitt, B.; Philippe, S.; Quirico, E.; Binzel, R. P.; Earle, A. M.; Ennico, K.; Howett, C. J. A.; Lunsford, A. W.; Olkin, C. B.; Parker, A.; Singer, K. N.; Stern, A.; Verbiscer, A. J.; Weaver, H. A.; Young, L. A.; New Horizons Science Team

    2017-05-01

    On July 14th 2015, NASA's New Horizons mission gave us an unprecedented detailed view of the Pluto system. The complex compositional diversity of Pluto's encounter hemisphere was revealed by the Ralph/LEISA infrared spectrometer on board of New Horizons. We present compositional maps of Pluto defining the spatial distribution of the abundance and textural properties of the volatiles methane and nitrogen ices and non-volatiles water ice and tholin. These results are obtained by applying a pixel-by-pixel Hapke radiative transfer model to the LEISA scans. Our analysis focuses mainly on the large scale latitudinal variations of methane and nitrogen ices and aims at setting observational constraints to volatile transport models. Specifically, we find three latitudinal bands: the first, enriched in methane, extends from the pole to 55°N, the second dominated by nitrogen, continues south to 35°N, and the third, composed again mainly of methane, reaches 20°N. We demonstrate that the distribution of volatiles across these surface units can be explained by differences in insolation over the past few decades. The latitudinal pattern is broken by Sputnik Planitia, a large reservoir of volatiles, with nitrogen playing the most important role. The physical properties of methane and nitrogen in this region are suggestive of the presence of a cold trap or possible volatile stratification. Furthermore our modeling results point to a possible sublimation transport of nitrogen from the northwest edge of Sputnik Planitia toward the south.

  14. Pluto's Global Surface Composition Through Pixel-by-Pixel Hapke Modeling of New Horizons Ralph LEISA Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Protopapa, S.; Grundy, W. M.; Reuter, D. C.; Hamilton, D. P.; Dalle Ore, C. M.; Cook, J. C.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Schmitt, B.; Philippe, S.; Quirico, E.; hide

    2016-01-01

    On July 14th 2015, NASA's New Horizons mission gave us an unprecedented detailed view of the Pluto system. The complex compositional diversity of Pluto's encounter hemisphere was revealed by the Ralph/LEISA infrared spectrometer on board of New Horizons. We present compositional maps of Pluto defining the spatial distribution of the abundance and textural properties of the volatiles methane and nitrogen ices and non-volatiles water ice and tholin. These results are obtained by applying a pixel-by-pixel Hapke radiative transfer model to the LEISA scans. Our analysis focuses mainly on the large scale latitudinal variations of methane and nitrogen ices and aims at setting observational constraints to volatile transport models. Specifically, we find three latitudinal bands: the first, enriched in methane, extends from the pole to 55degN, the second dominated by nitrogen, continues south to 35 degN, and the third, com- posed again mainly of methane, reaches 20 degN. We demonstrate that the distribution of volatiles across these surface units can be explained by differences in insolation over the past few decades. The latitudinal pattern is broken by Sputnik Planitia, a large reservoir of volatiles, with nitrogen playing the most important role. The physical properties of methane and nitrogen in this region are suggestive of the presence of a cold trap or possible volatile stratification. Furthermore our modeling results point to a possible sublimation transport of nitrogen from the northwest edge of Sputnik Planitia toward the south.

  15. Radiation transfer and stellar atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swihart, T. L.

    This is a revised and expanded version of the author's Basic Physics of Stellar Atmospheres, published in 1971. The equation of transfer is considered, taking into account the intensity and derived quantities, the absorption coefficient, the emission coefficient, the source function, and special integrals for plane media. The gray atmosphere is discussed along with the nongray atmosphere, and aspects of line formation. Topics related to polarization are explored, giving attention to pure polarized radiation, general polarized radiation, transfer in a magnetic plasma, and Rayleigh scattering and the sunlit sky. Physical and astronomical constants, and a number of problems related to the subjects of the book are presented in an appendix.

  16. Radiative transfer in molecular lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asensio Ramos, A.; Trujillo Bueno, J.; Cernicharo, J.

    2001-07-01

    The highly convergent iterative methods developed by Trujillo Bueno and Fabiani Bendicho (1995) for radiative transfer (RT) applications are generalized to spherical symmetry with velocity fields. These RT methods are based on Jacobi, Gauss-Seidel (GS), and SOR iteration and they form the basis of a new NLTE multilevel transfer code for atomic and molecular lines. The benchmark tests carried out so far are presented and discussed. The main aim is to develop a number of powerful RT tools for the theoretical interpretation of molecular spectra.

  17. Estimating mineral abundances of clay and gypsum mixtures using radiative transfer models applied to visible-near infrared reflectance spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, K. M.; Milliken, R. E.; Li, S.

    2016-10-01

    Quantitative mineral abundances of lab derived clay-gypsum mixtures were estimated using a revised Hapke VIS-NIR and Shkuratov radiative transfer model. Montmorillonite-gypsum mixtures were used to test the effectiveness of the model in distinguishing between subtle differences in minor absorption features that are diagnostic of mineralogy in the presence of strong H2O absorptions that are not always diagnostic of distinct phases or mineral abundance. The optical constants (k-values) for both endmembers were determined from bi-directional reflectance spectra measured in RELAB as well as on an ASD FieldSpec3 in a controlled laboratory setting. Multiple size fractions were measured in order to derive a single k-value from optimization of the optical path length in the radiative transfer models. It is shown that with careful experimental conditions, optical constants can be accurately determined from powdered samples using a field spectrometer, consistent with previous studies. Variability in the montmorillonite hydration level increased the uncertainties in the derived k-values, but estimated modal abundances for the mixtures were still within 5% of the measured values. Results suggest that the Hapke model works well in distinguishing between hydrated phases that have overlapping H2O absorptions and it is able to detect gypsum and montmorillonite in these simple mixtures where they are present at levels of ∼10%. Care must be taken however to derive k-values from a sample with appropriate H2O content relative to the modeled spectra. These initial results are promising for the potential quantitative analysis of orbital remote sensing data of hydrated minerals, including more complex clay and sulfate assemblages such as mudstones examined by the Curiosity rover in Gale crater.

  18. Comment on "The surface of lo: A new model" by Bruce Hapke

    McEwen, A.S.; Lunine, J.I.

    1990-01-01

    Hapke (1989, Icarus 79, 56-74) proposed that the surface of Io is dominantly basaltic with thin coatings of polysulfur oxide, S2O, ad SO,2. However, observations and models of the active volcanism indicate that volatiles such as sulfur and SO2 must be more abundant than envisioned by Hapke. ?? 1990.

  19. Light Reflection from Packed Layers of Transparent Spheres: Is Hapke's Photometric Model Accurate Enough to Make Predictions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Voss, K. J.

    2011-03-01

    We demonstrate that the diffraction removal procedure outlined by Hapke et al. [Icarus, 199, 210 (2009)] contains an error. By following their intended scheme we found that the Hapke model is not anisotropic enough to describe the reflectance patterns.

  20. Radiative Transfer in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graziani, L.; Aiello, S.; Belleni-Morante, A.; Cecchi-Pestellini, C.

    2008-09-01

    Abstract Protoplanetary disks are the precursors of planetary systems. All building materials needed to assembly the planetary systems are supplied by these reservoirs, including many organic molecules [1,2]. Thus, the physical and chemical properties in Protoplanetary disks set the boundary conditions for the formation and evolution of planets and other solar system bodies. In standard radiative scenario structure and chemistry of protoplanetary disks depend strongly on the nature of central star around which they formed. The dust temperature is manly set by the stellar luminosity, while the chemistry of the whole disk depends on the UV and X ray fluxes [3,4,6,8]. Therefore, a knowledge as accurate as possible of the radiative transfer (RT) inside disks is a prerequisite for their modelling. Actually, real disks are complex, stratified and inhomogeneous environments requiring a detailed dust mixture modelling and the ability to follow the radiation transfer across radial and vertical gradients. Different energetic processes as the mass accretion processes onto the star surface, the viscous dissipative heating dominating the midplane region, and the flared atmospheres radiation reprocessing, have a significant role in the disk structuring [4,5,8]. During the last 10 years many authors suggested various numerical and analytical techniques to resolve the disk temperature structure providing vertical temperature profiles and disk SED databases [4,6]. In this work we present the results of our semi analytical and numerical model solving the radiative transfer problem in two separate interesting disk regions: 1) Disk atmospheres at large radius, r > 10 AU. 2) Vertical disk structure over 1 < r < 10 AU and 10 < r < 100 AU. A simplified analytical approach based on P-N approximation [7] for a rectified disk surface (suitable for limited range of r) is compared and contrasted with a more accurate Monte Carlo integration [5]. Our code can handle arbitrary dust

  1. Radiative Transfer Photometric Analysis of Surface Materials at the Mars Exploration Rover Landing Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seelos, F. P.; Arvidson, R. E.; Guinness, E. A.; Wolff, M. J.

    2004-12-01

    The Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Panoramic Camera (Pancam) observation strategy included the acquisition of multispectral data sets specifically designed to support the photometric analysis of Martian surface materials (J. R. Johnson, this conference). We report on the numerical inversion of observed Pancam radiance-on-sensor data to determine the best-fit surface bidirectional reflectance parameters as defined by Hapke theory. The model bidirectional reflectance parameters for the Martian surface provide constraints on physical and material properties and allow for the direct comparison of Pancam and orbital data sets. The parameter optimization procedure consists of a spatial multigridding strategy driving a Levenberg-Marquardt nonlinear least squares optimization engine. The forward radiance models and partial derivatives (via finite-difference approximation) are calculated using an implementation of the DIScrete Ordinate Radiative Transfer (DISORT) algorithm with the four-parameter Hapke bidirectional reflectance function and the two-parameter Henyey-Greenstein phase function defining the lower boundary. The DISORT implementation includes a plane-parallel model of the Martian atmosphere derived from a combination of Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES), Pancam, and Mini-TES atmospheric data acquired near in time to the surface observations. This model accounts for bidirectional illumination from the attenuated solar beam and hemispherical-directional skylight illumination. The initial investigation was limited to treating the materials surrounding the rover as a single surface type, consistent with the spatial resolution of orbital observations. For more detailed analyses the observation geometry can be calculated from the correlation of Pancam stereo pairs (J. M. Soderblom et al., this conference). With improved geometric control, the radiance inversion can be applied to constituent surface material classes such as ripple and dune forms in addition to the soils

  2. The Eighth International Symposium On Radiative Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemonnier, Denis; Webb, Brent W.; Mengüç, M. Pınar

    2017-08-01

    This Special Issue of The Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer is based on the papers selected from RAD-16, the Eighth International Symposium on Radiative Transfer, which was held June 2016, in Cappadocia, Turkey. This Symposium is a follow-up of the seven previous meetings held in Kuşadası in 1995, 1997, and 2013; Antalya in 2001 and 2010; Istanbul in 2004; and Bodrum in 2007, all in Turkey. The Symposium was another enjoyable opportunity for the international radiation transfer community to assemble in a comfortable setting to present and discuss the state-of-the-art in research and application.

  3. Atmospheric Radiative Transfer for Satellite Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshak, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    I will discuss the science of satellite remote sensing which involves the interpretation and inversion of radiometric measurements made from space. The goal of remote sensing is to retrieve some physical aspects of the medium which are sensitive to the radiation at specific wavelengths. This requires the use of fundamentals of atmospheric radiative transfer. I will talk about atmospheric radiation or, more specifically, about the interactions of solar radiation with aerosols and cloud particles. The focus will be more on cloudy atmospheres. I will also show how a standard one-dimensional approach, that is traced back at least 100 years, can fail to interpret the complexity of real clouds. I n these cases, three-dimensional radiative transfer should be used. Examples of satellite retrievals will illustrate the cases.

  4. Transfer matrix method for four-flux radiative transfer.

    PubMed

    Slovick, Brian; Flom, Zachary; Zipp, Lucas; Krishnamurthy, Srini

    2017-07-20

    We develop a transfer matrix method for four-flux radiative transfer, which is ideally suited for studying transport through multiple scattering layers. The model predicts the specular and diffuse reflection and transmission of multilayer composite films, including interface reflections, for diffuse or collimated incidence. For spherical particles in the diffusion approximation, we derive closed-form expressions for the matrix coefficients and show remarkable agreement with numerical Monte Carlo simulations for a range of absorption values and film thicknesses, and for an example multilayer slab.

  5. Tests of Exoplanet Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrington, Joseph; Challener, Ryan; DeLarme, Emerson; Cubillos, Patricio; Blecic, Jasmina; Foster, Austin; Garland, Justin

    2016-10-01

    Atmospheric radiative transfer codes are used both to predict planetary spectra and in retrieval algorithms to interpret data. Observational plans, theoretical models, and scientific results thus depend on the correctness of these calculations. Yet, the calculations are complex and the codes implementing them are often written without modern software-verification techniques. In the process of writing our own code, we became aware of several others with artifacts of unknown origin and even outright errors in their spectra. We present a series of tests to verify atmospheric radiative-transfer codes. These include: simple, single-line line lists that, when combined with delta-function abundance profiles, should produce a broadened line that can be verified easily; isothermal atmospheres that should produce analytically-verifiable blackbody spectra at the input temperatures; and model atmospheres with a range of complexities that can be compared to the output of other codes. We apply the tests to our own code, Bayesian Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (BART) and to several other codes. The test suite is open-source software. We propose this test suite as a standard for verifying current and future radiative transfer codes, analogous to the Held-Suarez test for general circulation models. This work was supported by NASA Planetary Atmospheres grant NX12AI69G and NASA Astrophysics Data Analysis Program grant NNX13AF38G.

  6. Groups in the radiative transfer theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikoghossian, Arthur

    2016-11-01

    The paper presents a group-theoretical description of radiation transfer in inhomogeneous and multi-component atmospheres with the plane-parallel geometry. It summarizes and generalizes the results obtained recently by the author for some standard transfer problems of astrophysical interest with allowance of the angle and frequency distributions of the radiation field. We introduce the concept of composition groups for media with different optical and physical properties. Group representations are derived for two possible cases of illumination of a composite finite atmosphere. An algorithm for determining the reflectance and transmittance of inhomogeneous and multi-component atmospheres is described. The group theory is applied also to determining the field of radiation inside an inhomogeneous atmosphere. The concept of a group of optical depth translations is introduced. The developed theory is illustrated with the problem of radiation diffusion with partial frequency distribution assuming that the inhomogeneity is due to depth-variation of the scattering coefficient. It is shown that once reflectance and transmittance of a medium are determined, the internal field of radiation in the source-free atmosphere is found without solving any new equations. The transfer problems for a semi-infinite atmosphere and an atmosphere with internal sources of energy are discussed. The developed theory allows to derive summation laws for the mean number of scattering events underwent by the photons in the course of diffusion in the atmosphere.

  7. ASTRORAY: General relativistic polarized radiative transfer code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbakov, Roman V.

    2014-07-01

    ASTRORAY employs a method of ray tracing and performs polarized radiative transfer of (cyclo-)synchrotron radiation. The radiative transfer is conducted in curved space-time near rotating black holes described by Kerr-Schild metric. Three-dimensional general relativistic magneto hydrodynamic (3D GRMHD) simulations, in particular performed with variations of the HARM code, serve as an input to ASTRORAY. The code has been applied to reproduce the sub-mm synchrotron bump in the spectrum of Sgr A*, and to test the detectability of quasi-periodic oscillations in its light curve. ASTRORAY can be readily applied to model radio/sub-mm polarized spectra of jets and cores of other low-luminosity active galactic nuclei. For example, ASTRORAY is uniquely suitable to self-consistently model Faraday rotation measure and circular polarization fraction in jets.

  8. Coherent Backscattering: Conceptions and Misconceptions (Reply to Comments by Bruce W. Hapke and Robert M. Nelson)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tishkovets, Victor P.; Mishchenko, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Although the note by Hapke and Nelson has virtually no relevance to our original publication, it contains a number of statements that are misleading and/or wrong. We, therefore, use this opportunity to dispel several profound misconceptions that continue to hinder the progress in remote sensing of planetary surfaces.

  9. Reversible and irreversible heat transfer by radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Río, Fernando; de la Selva, Sara María Teresa

    2015-05-01

    The theme of heat transfer by radiation is absent from most textbooks on thermodynamics, and its treatment in the applied literature presents some basic discrepancies concerning the validity of the Clausius relation between the quantity of heat exchanged, δ Q, and the accompanying entropy change, dS. We review the reversible and irreversible heat transfers by radiation to clarify the validity of the Clausius relation, and we show that in both cases, the Clausius relation is obeyed, as it should be. We also deal with radiation diluted by the presence of matter, introducing a dilution coefficient, ϕ, and an irreversibility factor, χ (φ ). This treatment requires the use of the correct relation between energy and heat fluxes, the spectral fluxes of energy and entropy, and Planck’s equation for the entropy of monochromatic radiation. For the irreversible case of diluted radiation, we recover the ratio between the fluxes of heat and entropy that agree with Clausius’ inequality, including an irreversibility factor, (4/3)χ (φ ). An improved modification for the explicit function χ (φ ) is given. As an illustration, the fluxes of energy and entropy from the Sun to the Earth are obtained. We also calculate the fluxes re-emitted by the Earth, taking into account the greenhouse effect. We find the value of 1.258 W{{m}-2}{{K}-1} for the re-emitted entropy flux after the radiation has been thermalized, which is much larger than the incident flux, in agreement with other authors.

  10. Discrete diffusion Lyman α radiative transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Aaron; Tsang, Benny T.-H.; Bromm, Volker; Milosavljević, Miloš

    2018-06-01

    Due to its accuracy and generality, Monte Carlo radiative transfer (MCRT) has emerged as the prevalent method for Lyα radiative transfer in arbitrary geometries. The standard MCRT encounters a significant efficiency barrier in the high optical depth, diffusion regime. Multiple acceleration schemes have been developed to improve the efficiency of MCRT but the noise from photon packet discretization remains a challenge. The discrete diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) scheme has been successfully applied in state-of-the-art radiation hydrodynamics (RHD) simulations. Still, the established framework is not optimal for resonant line transfer. Inspired by the DDMC paradigm, we present a novel extension to resonant DDMC (rDDMC) in which diffusion in space and frequency are treated on equal footing. We explore the robustness of our new method and demonstrate a level of performance that justifies incorporating the method into existing Lyα codes. We present computational speedups of ˜102-106 relative to contemporary MCRT implementations with schemes that skip scattering in the core of the line profile. This is because the rDDMC runtime scales with the spatial and frequency resolution rather than the number of scatterings—the latter is typically ∝τ0 for static media, or ∝(aτ0)2/3 with core-skipping. We anticipate new frontiers in which on-the-fly Lyα radiative transfer calculations are feasible in 3D RHD. More generally, rDDMC is transferable to any computationally demanding problem amenable to a Fokker-Planck approximation of frequency redistribution.

  11. Infrared radiative energy transfer in gaseous systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, Surendra N.

    1991-01-01

    Analyses and numerical procedures are presented to investigate the radiative interactions in various energy transfer processes in gaseous systems. Both gray and non-gray radiative formulations for absorption and emission by molecular gases are presented. The gray gas formulations are based on the Planck mean absorption coefficient and the non-gray formulations are based on the wide band model correlations for molecular absorption. Various relations for the radiative flux and divergence of radiative flux are developed. These are useful for different flow conditions and physical problems. Specific plans for obtaining extensive results for different cases are presented. The procedure developed was applied to several realistic problems. Results of selected studies are presented.

  12. Enhancing radiative energy transfer through thermal extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Yixuan; Liu, Baoan; Shen, Sheng; Yu, Zongfu

    2016-06-01

    Thermal radiation plays an increasingly important role in many emerging energy technologies, such as thermophotovoltaics, passive radiative cooling and wearable cooling clothes [1]. One of the fundamental constraints in thermal radiation is the Stefan-Boltzmann law, which limits the maximum power of far-field radiation to P0 = σT4S, where σ is the Boltzmann constant, S and T are the area and the temperature of the emitter, respectively (Fig. 1a). In order to overcome this limit, it has been shown that near-field radiations could have an energy density that is orders of magnitude greater than the Stefan-Boltzmann law [2-7]. Unfortunately, such near-field radiation transfer is spatially confined and cannot carry radiative heat to the far field. Recently, a new concept of thermal extraction was proposed [8] to enhance far-field thermal emission, which, conceptually, operates on a principle similar to oil immersion lenses and light extraction in light-emitting diodes using solid immersion lens to increase light output [62].Thermal extraction allows a blackbody to radiate more energy to the far field than the apparent limit of the Stefan-Boltzmann law without breaking the second law of thermodynamics. Thermal extraction works by using a specially designed thermal extractor to convert and guide the near-field energy to the far field, as shown in Fig. 1b. The same blackbody as shown in Fig. 1a is placed closely below the thermal extractor with a spacing smaller than the thermal wavelength. The near-field coupling transfers radiative energy with a density greater than σT4. The thermal extractor, made from transparent and high-index or structured materials, does not emit or absorb any radiation. It transforms the near-field energy and sends it toward the far field. As a result, the total amount of far-field radiative heat dissipated by the same blackbody is greatly enhanced above SσT4, where S is the area of the emitter. This paper will review the progress in thermal

  13. Radiative transfer in a plane stratified dielectric

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilheit, T. T., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    A model is developed for calculating radiative transfer in a stratified dielectric. This model is used to show that the reflectivity of a stratified dielectric is primarily determined by gradients in the real part of the refractive index over distances on the order of 1/10 wavelength in the medium. The effective temperature of the medium is determined by the thermodynamic temperature profile over distances of the order delta T.

  14. Introductory Tools for Radiative Transfer Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, D.; Kuai, L.; Natraj, V.; Yung, Y.

    2006-12-01

    Satellite data are currently so voluminous that, despite their unprecedented quality and potential for scientific application, only a small fraction is analyzed due to two factors: researchers' computational constraints and a relatively small number of researchers actively utilizing the data. Ultimately it is hoped that the terabytes of unanalyzed data being archived can receive scientific scrutiny but this will require a popularization of the methods associated with the analysis. Since a large portion of complexity is associated with the proper implementation of the radiative transfer model, it is reasonable and appropriate to make the model as accessible as possible to general audiences. Unfortunately, the algorithmic and conceptual details that are necessary for state-of-the-art analysis also tend to frustrate the accessibility for those new to remote sensing. Several efforts have been made to have web- based radiative transfer calculations, and these are useful for limited calculations, but analysis of more than a few spectra requires the utilization of home- or server-based computing resources. We present a system that is designed to allow for easier access to radiative transfer models with implementation on a home computing platform in the hopes that this system can be utilized in and expanded upon in advanced high school and introductory college settings. This learning-by-doing process is aided through the use of several powerful tools. The first is a wikipedia-style introduction to the salient features of radiative transfer that references the seminal works in the field and refers to more complicated calculations and algorithms sparingly5. The second feature is a technical forum, commonly referred to as a tiki-wiki, that addresses technical and conceptual questions through public postings, private messages, and a ranked searching routine. Together, these tools may be able to facilitate greater interest in the field of remote sensing.

  15. Laplace Transform Based Radiative Transfer Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Y.; Lin, B.; Ng, T.; Yang, P.; Wiscombe, W.; Herath, J.; Duffy, D.

    2006-12-01

    Multiple scattering is the major uncertainty for data analysis of space-based lidar measurements. Until now, accurate quantitative lidar data analysis has been limited to very thin objects that are dominated by single scattering, where photons from the laser beam only scatter a single time with particles in the atmosphere before reaching the receiver, and simple linear relationship between physical property and lidar signal exists. In reality, multiple scattering is always a factor in space-based lidar measurement and it dominates space- based lidar returns from clouds, dust aerosols, vegetation canopy and phytoplankton. While multiple scattering are clear signals, the lack of a fast-enough lidar multiple scattering computation tool forces us to treat the signal as unwanted "noise" and use simple multiple scattering correction scheme to remove them. Such multiple scattering treatments waste the multiple scattering signals and may cause orders of magnitude errors in retrieved physical properties. Thus the lack of fast and accurate time-dependent radiative transfer tools significantly limits lidar remote sensing capabilities. Analyzing lidar multiple scattering signals requires fast and accurate time-dependent radiative transfer computations. Currently, multiple scattering is done with Monte Carlo simulations. Monte Carlo simulations take minutes to hours and are too slow for interactive satellite data analysis processes and can only be used to help system / algorithm design and error assessment. We present an innovative physics approach to solve the time-dependent radiative transfer problem. The technique utilizes FPGA based reconfigurable computing hardware. The approach is as following, 1. Physics solution: Perform Laplace transform on the time and spatial dimensions and Fourier transform on the viewing azimuth dimension, and convert the radiative transfer differential equation solving into a fast matrix inversion problem. The majority of the radiative transfer

  16. Earth Sciences Push Radiative Transfer Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Anthony; Mishchenko, Michael

    2009-12-01

    2009 International Conference on Advances in Mathematics, Computational Methods, and Reactor Physics; Saratoga Springs, New York, 4-7 May 2009; The theories of radiative transfer and particle—particularly neutron—transport are grounded in distinctive microscale physics that deals with either optics or particle dynamics. However, it is not practical to track every wave or particle in macroscopic systems, nor do all of these details matter. That is why Newton's laws, which describe individual particles, are replaced by those of Euler, Navier-Stokes, Maxwell, Boltzmann, Gibbs, and others, which describe the collective behavior of vast numbers of particles. And that is why the radiative transfer (RT) equation is used to describe the flow of radiation through geophysical-scale systems, leaving to Maxwell's wave equations only the task of providing the optical properties of the medium, be it air, water, snow, ice, or biomass. Interestingly, particle transport is determined by the linear transport equation, which is mathematically identical to the RT equation, so geophysicists and nuclear scientists are interested in the same mathematics and computational techniques.

  17. Accurate radiative transfer calculations for layered media.

    PubMed

    Selden, Adrian C

    2016-07-01

    Simple yet accurate results for radiative transfer in layered media with discontinuous refractive index are obtained by the method of K-integrals. These are certain weighted integrals applied to the angular intensity distribution at the refracting boundaries. The radiative intensity is expressed as the sum of the asymptotic angular intensity distribution valid in the depth of the scattering medium and a transient term valid near the boundary. Integrated boundary equations are obtained, yielding simple linear equations for the intensity coefficients, enabling the angular emission intensity and the diffuse reflectance (albedo) and transmittance of the scattering layer to be calculated without solving the radiative transfer equation directly. Examples are given of half-space, slab, interface, and double-layer calculations, and extensions to multilayer systems are indicated. The K-integral method is orders of magnitude more accurate than diffusion theory and can be applied to layered scattering media with a wide range of scattering albedos, with potential applications to biomedical and ocean optics.

  18. SKIRT: Hybrid parallelization of radiative transfer simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verstocken, S.; Van De Putte, D.; Camps, P.; Baes, M.

    2017-07-01

    We describe the design, implementation and performance of the new hybrid parallelization scheme in our Monte Carlo radiative transfer code SKIRT, which has been used extensively for modelling the continuum radiation of dusty astrophysical systems including late-type galaxies and dusty tori. The hybrid scheme combines distributed memory parallelization, using the standard Message Passing Interface (MPI) to communicate between processes, and shared memory parallelization, providing multiple execution threads within each process to avoid duplication of data structures. The synchronization between multiple threads is accomplished through atomic operations without high-level locking (also called lock-free programming). This improves the scaling behaviour of the code and substantially simplifies the implementation of the hybrid scheme. The result is an extremely flexible solution that adjusts to the number of available nodes, processors and memory, and consequently performs well on a wide variety of computing architectures.

  19. Studies of radiative transfer in planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irvine, W. M.; Schloerb, F. P.

    1984-01-01

    Progress is reported in modeling cometary emission in the 18-cm OH transition with specific application and predictions for Comet Halley. Radiative transfer is also being studied in rough and porous media. The kinematics of the cold, dark interstellar cloud Li34N were examined, and CO monitoring of Venus and Mars continues. Analysis of 3.4 mm maps of the lunar surface shows thermal anomalies associated with such surface features as the Crater Copernicus, Mare Imbrium, Mare Nubium, Mare Serenitatis, and Mare Tranquillatis.

  20. Arcmancer: Geodesics and polarized radiative transfer library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pihajoki, Pauli; Mannerkoski, Matias; Nättilä, Joonas; Johansson, Peter H.

    2018-05-01

    Arcmancer computes geodesics and performs polarized radiative transfer in user-specified spacetimes. The library supports Riemannian and semi-Riemannian spaces of any dimension and metric; it also supports multiple simultaneous coordinate charts, embedded geometric shapes, local coordinate systems, and automatic parallel propagation. Arcmancer can be used to solve various problems in numerical geometry, such as solving the curve equation of motion using adaptive integration with configurable tolerances and differential equations along precomputed curves. It also provides support for curves with an arbitrary acceleration term and generic tools for generating ray initial conditions and performing parallel computation over the image, among other tools.

  1. Radiative transfer analyses of Titan's tropical atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, Caitlin A.; Doose, Lyn; Tomasko, Martin G.; Penteado, Paulo F.; See, Charles

    2012-04-01

    Titan's optical and near-IR spectra result primarily from the scattering of sunlight by haze and its absorption by methane. With a column abundance of 92 km amagat (11 times that of Earth), Titan's atmosphere is optically thick and only ˜10% of the incident solar radiation reaches the surface, compared to 57% on Earth. Such a formidable atmosphere obstructs investigations of the moon's lower troposphere and surface, which are highly sensitive to the radiative transfer treatment of methane absorption and haze scattering. The absorption and scattering characteristics of Titan's atmosphere have been constrained by the Huygens Probe Descent Imager/Spectral Radiometer (DISR) experiment for conditions at the probe landing site (Tomasko, M.G., Bézard, B., Doose, L., Engel, S., Karkoschka, E. [2008a]. Planet. Space Sci. 56, 624-247; Tomasko, M.G. et al. [2008b]. Planet. Space Sci. 56, 669-707). Cassini's Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) data indicate that the rest of the atmosphere (except for the polar regions) can be understood with small perturbations in the high haze structure determined at the landing site (Penteado, P.F., Griffith, C.A., Tomasko, M.G., Engel, S., See, C., Doose, L., Baines, K.H., Brown, R.H., Buratti, B.J., Clark, R., Nicholson, P., Sotin, C. [2010]. Icarus 206, 352-365). However the in situ measurements were analyzed with a doubling and adding radiative transfer calculation that differs considerably from the discrete ordinates codes used to interpret remote data from Cassini and ground-based measurements. In addition, the calibration of the VIMS data with respect to the DISR data has not yet been tested. Here, VIMS data of the probe landing site are analyzed with the DISR radiative transfer method and the faster discrete ordinates radiative transfer calculation; both models are consistent (to within 0.3%) and reproduce the scattering and absorption characteristics derived from in situ measurements. Constraints on the atmospheric

  2. Efficient radiative transfer techniques in hydrodynamic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercer, A.; Stamatellos, D.; Dunhill, A.

    2018-05-01

    Radiative transfer is an important component of hydrodynamic simulations as it determines the thermal properties of a physical system. It is especially important in cases where heating and cooling regulate significant processes, such as in the collapse of molecular clouds, the development of gravitational instabilities in protostellar discs, disc-planet interactions, and planet migration. We compare two approximate radiative transfer methods which indirectly estimate optical depths within hydrodynamic simulations using two different metrics: (i) the gravitational potential and density of the gas (Stamatellos et al.), and (ii) the pressure scale-height (Lombardi et al.). We find that both methods are accurate for spherical configurations e.g. in collapsing molecular clouds and within clumps that form in protostellar discs. However, the pressure scale-height approach is more accurate in protostellar discs (low and high-mass discs, discs with spiral features, discs with embedded planets). We also investigate the β-cooling approximation which is commonly used when simulating protostellar discs, and in which the cooling time is proportional to the orbital period of the gas. We demonstrate that the use of a constant β cannot capture the wide range of spatial and temporal variations of cooling in protostellar discs, which may affect the development of gravitational instabilities, planet migration, planet mass growth, and the orbital properties of planets.

  3. Microwave radiative transfer studies of precipitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bringi, V. N.; Vivekanandan, J.; Turk, F. Joseph

    1993-01-01

    Since the deployment of the DMSP SSM/I microwave imagers in 1987, increased utilization of passive microwave radiometry throughout the 10 - 100 GHz spectrum has occurred for measurement of atmospheric constituents and terrestrial surfaces. Our efforts have focused on observations and analysis of the microwave radiative transfer behavior of precipitating clouds. We have focused particular attention on combining both aircraft and SSM/I radiometer imagery with ground-based multiparameter radar observations. As part of this and the past NASA contract, we have developed a multi-stream, polarized radiative transfer model which incorporates scattering. The model has the capability to be initialized with cloud model output or multiparameter radar products. This model provides the necessary 'link' between the passive microwave radiometer and active microwave radar observations. This unique arrangement has allowed the brightness temperatures (TB) to be compared against quantities such as rainfall, liquid/ice water paths, and the vertical structure of the cloud. Quantification of the amounts of ice and water in precipitating clouds is required for understanding of the global energy balance.

  4. A rapid radiative transfer model for reflection of solar radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xiang, X.; Smith, E. A.; Justus, C. G.

    1994-01-01

    A rapid analytical radiative transfer model for reflection of solar radiation in plane-parallel atmospheres is developed based on the Sobolev approach and the delta function transformation technique. A distinct advantage of this model over alternative two-stream solutions is that in addition to yielding the irradiance components, which turn out to be mathematically equivalent to the delta-Eddington approximation, the radiance field can also be expanded in a mathematically consistent fashion. Tests with the model against a more precise multistream discrete ordinate model over a wide range of input parameters demonstrate that the new approximate method typically produces average radiance differences of less than 5%, with worst average differences of approximately 10%-15%. By the same token, the computational speed of the new model is some tens to thousands times faster than that of the more precise model when its stream resolution is set to generate precise calculations.

  5. Radiatively driven relativistic spherical winds under relativistic radiative transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukue, J.

    2018-05-01

    We numerically investigate radiatively driven relativistic spherical winds from the central luminous object with mass M and luminosity L* under Newtonian gravity, special relativity, and relativistic radiative transfer. We solve both the relativistic radiative transfer equation and the relativistic hydrodynamical equations for spherically symmetric flows under the double-iteration processes, to obtain the intensity and velocity fields simultaneously. We found that the momentum-driven winds with scattering are quickly accelerated near the central object to reach the terminal speed. The results of numerical solutions are roughly fitted by a relation of \\dot{m}=0.7(Γ _*-1)\\tau _* β _* β _out^{-2.6}, where \\dot{m} is the mass-loss rate normalized by the critical one, Γ* the central luminosity normalized by the critical one, τ* the typical optical depth, β* the initial flow speed at the central core of radius R*, and βout the terminal speed normalized by the speed of light. This relation is close to the non-relativistic analytical solution, \\dot{m} = 2(Γ _*-1)\\tau _* β _* β _out^{-2}, which can be re-expressed as β _out^2/2 = (Γ _*-1)GM/c^2 R_*. That is, the present solution with small optical depth is similar to that of the radiatively driven free outflow. Furthermore, we found that the normalized luminosity (Eddington parameter) must be larger than unity for the relativistic spherical wind to blow off with intermediate or small optical depth, i.e. Γ _* ≳ \\sqrt{(1+β _out)^3/(1-β _out)}. We briefly investigate and discuss an isothermal wind.

  6. Radiative energy transfer in molecular gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, Surendra N.

    1992-01-01

    Basic formulations, analyses, and numerical procedures are presented to study radiative interactions in gray as well as nongray gases under different physical and flow conditions. After preliminary fluid-dynamical considerations, essential governing equations for radiative transport are presented that are applicable under local and nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium conditions. Auxiliary relations for relaxation times and spectral absorption models are also provided. For specific applications, several simple gaseous systems are analyzed. The first system considered consists of a gas bounded by two parallel plates having the same temperature. Within the gas there is a uniform heat source per unit volume. For this system, both vibrational nonequilibrium effects and radiation conduction interactions are studied. The second system consists of fully developed laminar flow and heat transfer in a parallel plate duct under the boundary condition of a uniform surface heat flux. For this system, effects of gray surface emittance are studied. With the single exception of a circular geometry, the third system is considered identical to the second system. Here, the influence of nongray walls is also studied.

  7. Planetary Atmosphere Dynamics and Radiative Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkinson, David H.

    1996-01-01

    This research program has dealt with two projects in the field of planetary atmosphere dynamics and radiative energy transfer, one theoretical and one experimental. The first project, in radiative energy transfer, incorporated the capability to isolate and quantify the contribution of individual atmospheric components to the Venus radiative balance and thermal structure to greatly improve the current understanding of the radiative processes occurring within the Venus atmosphere. This is possible by varying the mixing ratios of each gas species, and the location, number density and aerosol size distributions of the clouds. This project was a continuation of the work initiated under a 1992 University Consortium Agreement. Under the just completed grant, work has continued on the use of a convolution-based algorithm that provided the capability to calculate the k coefficients of a gas mixture at different temperatures, pressures and spectral intervals from the separate k-distributions of the individual gas species. The second primary goal of this research dealt with the Doppler wind retrieval for the Successful Galileo Jupiter probe mission in December, 1995. In anticipation of the arrival of Galileo at Jupiter, software development continued to read the radioscience and probe/orbiter trajectory data provided by the Galileo project and required for Jupiter zonal wind measurements. Sample experiment radioscience data records and probe/orbiter trajectory data files provided by the Galileo Radioscience and Navigation teams at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, respectively, were used for the first phase of the software development. The software to read the necessary data records was completed in 1995. The procedure by which the wind retrieval takes place begins with initial consistency checks of the raw data, preliminary data reductions, wind recoveries, iterative reconstruction of the probe descent profile, and refined wind recoveries. At each stage of the wind recovery

  8. Radiative transfer in scattering stochastic atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silant'ev, N. A.; Alekseeva, G. A.; Novikov, V. V.

    2017-12-01

    Many stars, active galactic nuclei, accretion discs etc. are affected by the stochastic variations of temperature, turbulent gas motions, magnetic fields, number densities of atoms and dust grains. These stochastic variations influence on the extinction factors, Doppler widths of lines and so on. The presence of many reasons for fluctuations gives rise to Gaussian distribution of fluctuations. The usual models leave out of account the fluctuations. In many cases the consideration of fluctuations improves the coincidence of theoretical values with the observed data. The objective of this paper is the investigation of the influence of the number density fluctuations on the form of radiative transfer equations. We consider non-magnetized atmosphere in continuum.

  9. Optical space weathering on Vesta: Radiative-transfer models and Dawn observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blewett, David T.; Denevi, Brett W.; Le Corre, Lucille; Reddy, Vishnu; Schröder, Stefan E.; Pieters, Carle M.; Tosi, Federico; Zambon, Francesca; De Sanctis, Maria Cristina; Ammannito, Eleonora; Roatsch, Thomas; Raymond, Carol A.; Russell, Christopher T.

    2016-02-01

    Exposure to ion and micrometeoroid bombardment in the space environment causes physical and chemical changes in the surface of an airless planetary body. These changes, called space weathering, can strongly influence a surface's optical characteristics, and hence complicate interpretation of composition from reflectance spectroscopy. Prior work using data from the Dawn spacecraft (Pieters, C.M. et al. [2012]. Nature 491, 79-82) found that accumulation of nanophase metallic iron (npFe0), which is a key space-weathering product on the Moon, does not appear to be important on Vesta, and instead regolith evolution is dominated by mixing with carbonaceous chondrite (CC) material delivered by impacts. In order to gain further insight into the nature of space weathering on Vesta, we constructed model reflectance spectra using Hapke's radiative-transfer theory and used them as an aid to understanding multispectral observations obtained by Dawn's Framing Cameras (FC). The model spectra, for a howardite mineral assemblage, include both the effects of npFe0 and that of a mixed CC component. We found that a plot of the 438-nm/555-nm ratio vs. the 555-nm reflectance for the model spectra helps to separate the effects of lunar-style space weathering (LSSW) from those of CC-mixing. We then constructed ratio-reflectance pixel scatterplots using FC images for four areas of contrasting composition: a eucritic area at Vibidia crater, a diogenitic area near Antonia crater, olivine-bearing material within Bellicia crater, and a light mantle unit (referred to as an ;orange patch; in some previous studies, based on steep spectral slope in the visible) northeast of Oppia crater. In these four cases the observed spectral trends are those expected from CC-mixing, with no evidence for weathering dominated by production of npFe0. In order to survey a wider range of surfaces, we also defined a spectral parameter that is a function of the change in 438-nm/555-nm ratio and the 555-nm reflectance

  10. Radiatively-suppressed spherical accretion under relativistic radiative transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukue, Jun

    2018-03-01

    We numerically examine radiatively-suppressed relativistic spherical accretion flows on to a central object with mass M under Newtonian gravity and special relativity. We simultaneously solve both the relativistic radiative transfer equation and the relativistic hydrodynamical equations for spherically symmetric flows under the double iteration process in the case of the intermediate optical depth. We find that the accretion flow is suppressed, compared with the freefall case in the nonrelativistic regime. For example, in the case of accretion on to a luminous core with accretion luminosity L*, the freefall velocity v normalized by the speed of light c under the radiative force in the nonrelativistic regime is β (\\hat{r}) = v/c = -√{(1-Γ _*)/(\\hat{r}+1-Γ _*)}, where Γ* (≡ L*/LE, LE being the Eddington luminosity) is the Eddington parameter and \\hat{r} (= r/rS, rS being the Schwarzschild radius) the normalized radius, whereas the infall speed at the central core is ˜0.7β(1), irrespective of the mass-accretion rate. This is due to the relativistic effect; the comoving flux is enhanced by the advective flux. We briefly examine and discuss an isothermal case, where the emission takes place in the entire space.

  11. Assessment of different radiative transfer equation solvers for combined natural convection and radiation heat transfer problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yujia; Zhang, Xiaobing; Howell, John R.

    2017-06-01

    This work investigates the performance of the DOM, FVM, P1, SP3 and P3 methods for 2D combined natural convection and radiation heat transfer for an absorbing, emitting medium. The Monte Carlo method is used to solve the RTE coupled with the energy equation, and its results are used as benchmark solutions. Effects of the Rayleigh number, Planck number and optical thickness are considered, all covering several orders of magnitude. Temperature distributions, heat transfer rate and computational performance in terms of accuracy and computing time are presented and analyzed.

  12. Radiative transfer modeling of dust-coated Pancam calibration target materials: Laboratory visible/near-infrared spectrogoniometry

    Johnson, J. R.; Sohl-Dickstein, J.; Grundy, W.M.; Arvidson, R. E.; Bell, J.F.; Christensen, P.R.; Graff, T.; Guinness, E.A.; Kinch, K.; Morris, Robert; Shepard, M.K.

    2006-01-01

    Laboratory visible/near-infrared multispectral observations of Mars Exploration Rover Pancam calibration target materials coated with different thicknesses of Mars spectral analog dust were acquired under variable illumination geometries using the Bloomsburg University Goniometer. The data were fit with a two-layer radiative transfer model that combines a Hapke formulation for the dust with measured values of the substrate interpolated using a He-Torrance approach. We first determined the single-scattering albedo, phase function, opposition effect width, and amplitude for the dust using the entire data set (six coating thicknesses, three substrates, four wavelengths, and phase angles 3??-117??). The dust exhibited single-scattering albedo values similar to other Mars analog soils and to Mars Pathfinder dust and a dominantly forward scattering behavior whose scattering lobe became narrower at longer wavelengths. Opacity values for each dust thickness corresponded well to those predicted from the particles sizes of the Mars analog dust. We then restricted the number of substrates, dust thicknesses, and incidence angles input to the model. The results suggest that the dust properties are best characterized when using substrates whose reflectances are brighter and darker than those of the deposited dust and data that span a wide range of dust thicknesses. The model also determined the dust photometric properties relatively well despite limitations placed on the range of incidence angles. The model presented here will help determine the photometric properties of dust deposited on the MER rovers and to track the multiple episodes of dust deposition and erosion that have occurred at both landing sites. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  13. Surface Roughness Retrieval By Inversion Of Hapke Model: A Multi-scale Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labarre, S.; Ferrari, C. C.; Jacquemoud, S.

    2015-12-01

    Surface roughness is a key property of soils that affects the various processes involved in their evolution such as solar absorption, erosion or moisture, both on Earth and other Solar System surfaces. In the 80's, B.Hapke provided an approximate analytic solution for the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) of a particulate medium and, later on, included the effect of surface roughness as a correction factor for the BRDF of a smooth surface. The effect of roughness on the BRDF is modeled as a shadowing function of the so-called roughness parameter, which is the mean slope angle of the facets composing the surface integrated over all scales from the sub-millimeter to the kilometer scales. Hapke model is widely used in planetary sciences to retrieve the roughness parameter from observed BRDFs. Yet the physical meaning of the retrieved roughness is not clear as the scale at which it happens is not defined. This work aims at understanding the relative impact of the roughness defined at each scale to the BRDF in order to test the ability of the singly retrieved roughness parameter at describing the ground truth. We propose to perform a wavelet analysis on meter-sized digital elevation models (DEM) generated from various volcanic and sedimentary terrains at high-mm-scale spatial resolution. It consists in splitting the DEM in several spatial frequencies and in simulating the BRDF at each scale with a ray-tracing code. Also the global BRDF is simulated so that the relative contribution of each scale can be studied. Then the Hapke model is fitted to the global BRDF to retrieve the roughness parameter. We will expose and discuss the results of this study. Figure: BRDF of a'a lava DEM simulated at varying azimut (φi) and incidence angles (i), in the principal plan. The direction of the light source is given by the colored squares. Mean slope angle of the surface is 36°.

  14. Surface roughness retrieval by inversion of the Hapke model: A multiscale approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labarre, S.; Ferrari, C.; Jacquemoud, S.

    2017-07-01

    Surface roughness is a key property of soils that controls many surface processes and influences the scattering of incident electromagnetic waves at a wide range of scales. Hapke (2012b) designed a photometric model providing an approximate analytical solution of the Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) of a particulate medium: he introduced the effect of surface roughness as a correction factor of the BRDF of a smooth surface. This photometric roughness is defined as the mean slope angle of the facets composing the surface, integrated over all scales from the grain size to the local topography. Yet its physical meaning is still a question at issue, as the scale at which it occurs is not clearly defined. This work aims at better understanding the relative influence of roughness scales on soil BRDF and to test the ability of the Hapke model to retrieve a roughness that depicts effectively the ground truth. We apply a wavelet transform on millimeter digital terrain models (DTM) acquired over volcanic terrains. This method allows splitting the frequency band of a signal in several sub-bands, each corresponding to a spatial scale. We demonstrate that sub-centimeter surface features dominate both the integrated roughness and the BRDF shape. We investigate the suitability of the Hapke model for surface roughness retrieval by inversion on optical data. A global sensitivity analysis of the model shows that soil BRDF is very sensitive to surface roughness, nearly as much as the single scattering albedo according to the phase angle, but also that these two parameters are strongly correlated. Based on these results, a simplified two-parameter model depending on surface albedo and roughness is proposed. Inversion of this model on BRDF data simulated by a ray-tracing code over natural targets shows a good estimation of surface roughness when the assumptions of the model are verified, with a priori knowledge on surface albedo.

  15. Radiative Transfer Modeling and Retrievals for Advanced Hyperspectral Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Xu; Zhou, Daniel K.; Larar, Allen M.; Smith, William L., Sr.; Mango, Stephen A.

    2009-01-01

    A novel radiative transfer model and a physical inversion algorithm based on principal component analysis will be presented. Instead of dealing with channel radiances, the new approach fits principal component scores of these quantities. Compared to channel-based radiative transfer models, the new approach compresses radiances into a much smaller dimension making both forward modeling and inversion algorithm more efficient.

  16. Radiative heat transfer in the extreme near field.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyeongtae; Song, Bai; Fernández-Hurtado, Víctor; Lee, Woochul; Jeong, Wonho; Cui, Longji; Thompson, Dakotah; Feist, Johannes; Reid, M T Homer; García-Vidal, Francisco J; Cuevas, Juan Carlos; Meyhofer, Edgar; Reddy, Pramod

    2015-12-17

    Radiative transfer of energy at the nanometre length scale is of great importance to a variety of technologies including heat-assisted magnetic recording, near-field thermophotovoltaics and lithography. Although experimental advances have enabled elucidation of near-field radiative heat transfer in gaps as small as 20-30 nanometres (refs 4-6), quantitative analysis in the extreme near field (less than 10 nanometres) has been greatly limited by experimental challenges. Moreover, the results of pioneering measurements differed from theoretical predictions by orders of magnitude. Here we use custom-fabricated scanning probes with embedded thermocouples, in conjunction with new microdevices capable of periodic temperature modulation, to measure radiative heat transfer down to gaps as small as two nanometres. For our experiments we deposited suitably chosen metal or dielectric layers on the scanning probes and microdevices, enabling direct study of extreme near-field radiation between silica-silica, silicon nitride-silicon nitride and gold-gold surfaces to reveal marked, gap-size-dependent enhancements of radiative heat transfer. Furthermore, our state-of-the-art calculations of radiative heat transfer, performed within the theoretical framework of fluctuational electrodynamics, are in excellent agreement with our experimental results, providing unambiguous evidence that confirms the validity of this theory for modelling radiative heat transfer in gaps as small as a few nanometres. This work lays the foundations required for the rational design of novel technologies that leverage nanoscale radiative heat transfer.

  17. Microwave Radiative Transfer: Theory and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilheit, T. T.

    2006-12-01

    The same physical laws govern visible, infrared and microwave radiative transfer. However, frequency dependence of the Planck function and of the properties of geophysically important materials create apparent differences. The applicability of the Rayleigh-Jeans to most of the microwave spectrum is a convenience, and makes it easier to illustrate some physical principles, but is of very little fundamental importance. Line widths of gaseous constituents are determined by collision frequencies and are of the order of 1 GHz throughout the troposphere in the visible, infrared and microwave portions of the spectrum. However, it is easy to make a radiometer that has a bandwidth small compared to this width in the microwave portion of the spectrum and significantly more difficult in the infrared and visible. As a result, computations in the microwave are monochromatic (or very close to it). In the microwave portion of the spectrum there is no need for elaborate band models. Clouds are a fundamental difference because the opacity of most clouds is very high in the visible and infrared and fairly small in the microwave. This quantitative difference necessitates qualitative differences in approach. Probably, the most counter-intuitive differences between the microwave regions and shorter wavelengths result from the preponderance of highly reflective surfaces in the microwave. The oceans reflect on the order of 50% but the details depend strongly on frequency, polarization and view angle. The large glaciers of Greenland and Antarctica are also highly reflective but less dependant on view angle and polarization. This high reflectivity means that introducing an absorber into the atmosphere at a temperature colder than the surface temperature will, nevertheless increase the observed radiance. This has fundamental importance for the retrieval of constituents from the atmosphere. Even over land surfaces, the observed radiance in microwave window channels depends more on the

  18. Transient radiative transfer in a scattering slab considering polarization.

    PubMed

    Yi, Hongliang; Ben, Xun; Tan, Heping

    2013-11-04

    The characteristics of the transient and polarization must be considered for a complete and correct description of short-pulse laser transfer in a scattering medium. A Monte Carlo (MC) method combined with a time shift and superposition principle is developed to simulate transient vector (polarized) radiative transfer in a scattering medium. The transient vector radiative transfer matrix (TVRTM) is defined to describe the transient polarization behavior of short-pulse laser propagating in the scattering medium. According to the definition of reflectivity, a new criterion of reflection at Fresnel surface is presented. In order to improve the computational efficiency and accuracy, a time shift and superposition principle is applied to the MC model for transient vector radiative transfer. The results for transient scalar radiative transfer and steady-state vector radiative transfer are compared with those in published literatures, respectively, and an excellent agreement between them is observed, which validates the correctness of the present model. Finally, transient radiative transfer is simulated considering the polarization effect of short-pulse laser in a scattering medium, and the distributions of Stokes vector in angular and temporal space are presented.

  19. Heat transfer augmentation of a car radiator using nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, Adnan M.; Bakar, R. A.; Kadirgama, K.; Sharma, K. V.

    2014-05-01

    The car radiator heat transfer enhancement by using TiO2 and SiO2 nanoparticles dispersed in water as a base fluid was studied experimentally. The test rig is setup as a car radiator with tubes and container. The range of Reynolds number and volume fraction are (250-1,750) and (1.0-2.5 %) respectively. Results showed that the heat transfer increases with increasing of nanofluid volume fraction. The experimental data is agreed with other investigator.

  20. Modeling of Radiative Heat Transfer in an Electric Arc Furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opitz, Florian; Treffinger, Peter; Wöllenstein, Jürgen

    2017-12-01

    Radiation is an important means of heat transfer inside an electric arc furnace (EAF). To gain insight into the complex processes of heat transfer inside the EAF vessel, not only radiation from the surfaces but also emission and absorption of the gas phase and the dust cloud need to be considered. Furthermore, the radiative heat exchange depends on the geometrical configuration which is continuously changing throughout the process. The present paper introduces a system model of the EAF which takes into account the radiative heat transfer between the surfaces and the participating medium. This is attained by the development of a simplified geometrical model, the use of a weighted-sum-of-gray-gases model, and a simplified consideration of dust radiation. The simulation results were compared with the data of real EAF plants available in literature.

  1. General Relativistic Radiative Transfer: Applications to Black-Hole Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Kinwah; Fuerst, Steven V.; Mizuno, Yosuke; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Branduardi-Raymont, Graziella; Lee, Khee-Gan

    2007-01-01

    We present general relativistic radiation transfer formulations which include opacity effects due to absorption, emission and scattering explicitly. We consider a moment expansions for the transfer in the presence of scattering. The formulation is applied to calculation emissions from accretion and outflows in black-hole systems. Cases with thin accretion disks and accretion tori are considered. Effects, such as emission anisotropy, non-stationary flows and geometrical self-occultation are investigated. Polarisation transfer in curved space-time is discussed qualitatively.

  2. Radiation Transfer in the Atmosphere: Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishchenko, M.; Travis, L.; Lacis, Andrew A.

    2014-01-01

    Sunlight illuminating the Earth's atmosphere is scattered by gas molecules and suspended particles, giving rise to blue skies, white clouds, and optical displays such as rainbows and halos. By scattering and absorbing the shortwave solar radiation and the longwave radiation emitted by the underlying surface, cloud and aerosol particles strongly affect the radiation budget of the terrestrial climate system. As a consequence of the dependence of scattering characteristics on particle size, morphology, and composition, scattered light can be remarkably rich in information on particle properties and thus provides a sensitive tool for remote retrievals of macro- and microphysical parameters of clouds and aerosols.

  3. HO-CHUNK: Radiation Transfer code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitney, Barbara A.; Wood, Kenneth; Bjorkman, J. E.; Cohen, Martin; Wolff, Michael J.

    2017-11-01

    HO-CHUNK calculates radiative equilibrium temperature solution, thermal and PAH/vsg emission, scattering and polarization in protostellar geometries. It is useful for computing spectral energy distributions (SEDs), polarization spectra, and images.

  4. Discontinuous finite element method for vector radiative transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cun-Hai; Yi, Hong-Liang; Tan, He-Ping

    2017-03-01

    The discontinuous finite element method (DFEM) is applied to solve the vector radiative transfer in participating media. The derivation in a discrete form of the vector radiation governing equations is presented, in which the angular space is discretized by the discrete-ordinates approach with a local refined modification, and the spatial domain is discretized into finite non-overlapped discontinuous elements. The elements in the whole solution domain are connected by modelling the boundary numerical flux between adjacent elements, which makes the DFEM numerically stable for solving radiative transfer equations. Several various problems of vector radiative transfer are tested to verify the performance of the developed DFEM, including vector radiative transfer in a one-dimensional parallel slab containing a Mie/Rayleigh/strong forward scattering medium and a two-dimensional square medium. The fact that DFEM results agree very well with the benchmark solutions in published references shows that the developed DFEM in this paper is accurate and effective for solving vector radiative transfer problems.

  5. Spectrally-Invariant Approximation Within Atmospheric Radiative Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshak, A.; Knyazikhin, Y.; Chiu, J. C.; Wiscombe, W. J.

    2011-01-01

    Certain algebraic combinations of single scattering albedo and solar radiation reflected from, or transmitted through, vegetation canopies do not vary with wavelength. These "spectrally invariant relationships" are the consequence of wavelength independence of the extinction coefficient and scattering phase function in vegetation. In general, this wavelength independence does not hold in the atmosphere, but in clouddominated atmospheres the total extinction and total scattering phase function vary only weakly with wavelength. This paper identifies the atmospheric conditions under which the spectrally invariant approximation can accurately describe the extinction. and scattering properties of cloudy atmospheres. The validity of the assumptions and the accuracy of the approximation are tested with ID radiative transfer calculations using publicly available radiative transfer models: Discrete Ordinate Radiative Transfer (DISORT) and Santa Barbara DISORT Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (SBDART). It is shown for cloudy atmospheres with cloud optical depth above 3, and for spectral intervals that exclude strong water vapor absorption, that the spectrally invariant relationships found in vegetation canopy radiative transfer are valid to better than 5%. The physics behind this phenomenon, its mathematical basis, and possible applications to remote sensing and climate are discussed.

  6. Radiative heat transfer in low-dimensional systems -- microscopic mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, Lilia; Phan, Anh; Drosdoff, David

    2013-03-01

    Radiative heat transfer between objects can increase dramatically at sub-wavelength scales. Exploring ways to modulate such transport between nano-systems is a key issue from fundamental and applied points of view. We advance the theoretical understanding of radiative heat transfer between nano-objects by introducing a microscopic model, which takes into account the individual atoms and their atomic polarizabilities. This approach is especially useful to investigate nano-objects with various geometries and give a detailed description of the heat transfer distribution. We employ this model to study the heat exchange in graphene nanoribbon/substrate systems. Our results for the distance separations, substrates, and presence of extended or localized defects enable making predictions for tailoring the radiative heat transfer at the nanoscale. Financial support from the Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-FG02-06ER46297 is acknowledged.

  7. Algorithms for radiative transfer simulations for aerosol retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukai, Sonoyo; Sano, Itaru; Nakata, Makiko

    2012-11-01

    Aerosol retrieval work from satellite data, i.e. aerosol remote sensing, is divided into three parts as: satellite data analysis, aerosol modeling and multiple light scattering calculation in the atmosphere model which is called radiative transfer simulation. The aerosol model is compiled from the accumulated measurements during more than ten years provided with the world wide aerosol monitoring network (AERONET). The radiative transfer simulations take Rayleigh scattering by molecules and Mie scattering by aerosols in the atmosphere, and reflection by the Earth surface into account. Thus the aerosol properties are estimated by comparing satellite measurements with the numerical values of radiation simulations in the Earth-atmosphere-surface model. It is reasonable to consider that the precise simulation of multiple light-scattering processes is necessary, and needs a long computational time especially in an optically thick atmosphere model. Therefore efficient algorithms for radiative transfer problems are indispensable to retrieve aerosols from space.

  8. Atmospheric Radiative Transfer for Satellite Remote Sensing: Validation and Uncertainty

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshak, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    My presentation will begin with the discussion of the Intercomparison of three-dimensional (3D) Radiative Codes (13RC) project that has been started in 1997. I will highlight the question of how well the atmospheric science community can solve the 3D radiative transfer equation. Initially I3RC was focused only on algorithm intercomparison; now it has acquired a broader identity providing new insights and creating new community resources for 3D radiative transfer calculations. Then I will switch to satellite remote sensing. Almost all radiative transfer calculations for satellite remote sensing are one-dimensional (1D) assuming (i) no variability inside a satellite pixel and (ii) no radiative interactions between pixels. The assumptions behind the 1D approach will be checked using cloud and aerosol data measured by the MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on board of two NASA satellites TERRA and AQUA. In the discussion, I will use both analysis technique: statistical analysis over large areas and time intervals, and single scene analysis to validate how well the 1D radiative transfer equation describes radiative regime in cloudy atmospheres.

  9. Light-Cone Effect of Radiation Fields in Cosmological Radiative Transfer Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Kyungjin

    2015-02-01

    We present a novel method to implement time-delayed propagation of radiation fields in cosmo-logical radiative transfer simulations. Time-delayed propagation of radiation fields requires construction of retarded-time fields by tracking the location and lifetime of radiation sources along the corresponding light-cones. Cosmological radiative transfer simulations have, until now, ignored this "light-cone effect" or implemented ray-tracing methods that are computationally demanding. We show that radiative trans-fer calculation of the time-delayed fields can be easily achieved in numerical simulations when periodic boundary conditions are used, by calculating the time-discretized retarded-time Green's function using the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) method and convolving it with the source distribution. We also present a direct application of this method to the long-range radiation field of Lyman-Werner band photons, which is important in the high-redshift astrophysics with first stars.

  10. 3D Radiative Transfer in Cloudy Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshak, Alexander; Davis, Anthony

    Developments in three-dimensional cloud radiation over the past few decades are assessed and distilled into this contributed volume. Chapters are authored by subject-matter experts who address a broad audience of graduate students, researchers, and anyone interested in cloud-radiation processes in the solar and infrared spectral regions. After two introductory chapters and a section on the fundamental physics and computational techniques, the volume extensively treats two main application areas: the impact of clouds on the Earth's radiation budget, which is an essential aspect of climate modeling; and remote observation of clouds, especially with the advanced sensors on current and future satellite missions. http://www.springeronline.com/alert/article?a=3D1_1fva7w_1j826l_41z_6

  11. User's Manual: Routines for Radiative Heat Transfer and Thermometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Risch, Timothy K.

    2016-01-01

    Determining the intensity and spectral distribution of radiation emanating from a heated surface has applications in many areas of science and engineering. Areas of research in which the quantification of spectral radiation is used routinely include thermal radiation heat transfer, infrared signature analysis, and radiation thermometry. In the analysis of radiation, it is helpful to be able to predict the radiative intensity and the spectral distribution of the emitted energy. Presented in this report is a set of routines written in Microsoft Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) (Microsoft Corporation, Redmond, Washington) and incorporating functions specific to Microsoft Excel (Microsoft Corporation, Redmond, Washington) that are useful for predicting the radiative behavior of heated surfaces. These routines include functions for calculating quantities of primary importance to engineers and scientists. In addition, the routines also provide the capability to use such information to determine surface temperatures from spectral intensities and for calculating the sensitivity of the surface temperature measurements to unknowns in the input parameters.

  12. Super-Planckian far-field radiative heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Hurtado, V.; Fernández-Domínguez, A. I.; Feist, J.; García-Vidal, F. J.; Cuevas, J. C.

    2018-01-01

    We present here a theoretical analysis that demonstrates that the far-field radiative heat transfer between objects with dimensions smaller than the thermal wavelength can overcome the Planckian limit by orders of magnitude. To guide the search for super-Planckian far-field radiative heat transfer, we make use of the theory of fluctuational electrodynamics and derive a relation between the far-field radiative heat transfer and the directional absorption efficiency of the objects involved. Guided by this relation, and making use of state-of-the-art numerical simulations, we show that the far-field radiative heat transfer between highly anisotropic objects can largely overcome the black-body limit when some of their dimensions are smaller than the thermal wavelength. In particular, we illustrate this phenomenon in the case of suspended pads made of polar dielectrics like SiN or SiO2. These structures are widely used to measure the thermal transport through nanowires and low-dimensional systems and can be employed to test our predictions. Our work illustrates the dramatic failure of the classical theory to predict the far-field radiative heat transfer between micro- and nanodevices.

  13. Radiative interactions in transient energy transfer in gaseous systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N.

    1985-01-01

    Analyses and numerical procedures are presented to investigate the radiative interactions in transient energy transfer processes in gaseous systems. The nongray radiative formulations are based on the wide-band model correlations for molecular absorption. Various relations for the radiative flux are developed; these are useful for different flow conditions and physical problems. Specific plans for obtaining extensive results for different cases are presented. The methods presented in this study can be extended easily to investigate the radiative interactions in realistic flows of hydrogen-air species in the scramjet engine.

  14. Heat Transfer Analysis of a Closed Brayton Cycle Space Radiator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhasz, Albert J.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a mathematical analysis of the heat transfer processes taking place in a radiator for a closed cycle gas turbine (CCGT), also referred to as a Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) space power system. The resulting equations and relationships have been incorporated into a radiator sub-routine of a numerical triple objective CCGT optimization program to determine operating conditions yielding maximum cycle efficiency, minimum radiator area and minimum overall systems mass. Study results should be of interest to numerical modeling of closed cycle Brayton space power systems and to the design of fluid cooled radiators in general.

  15. High-Order Thermal Radiative Transfer

    SciT

    Woods, Douglas Nelson; Cleveland, Mathew Allen; Wollaeger, Ryan Thomas

    2017-09-18

    The objective of this research is to asses the sensitivity of the linearized thermal radiation transport equations to finite element order on unstructured meshes and to investigate the sensitivity of the nonlinear TRT equations due to evaluating the opacities and heat capacity at nodal temperatures in 2-D using high-order finite elements.

  16. Vectorial finite elements for solving the radiative transfer equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badri, M. A.; Jolivet, P.; Rousseau, B.; Le Corre, S.; Digonnet, H.; Favennec, Y.

    2018-06-01

    The discrete ordinate method coupled with the finite element method is often used for the spatio-angular discretization of the radiative transfer equation. In this paper we attempt to improve upon such a discretization technique. Instead of using standard finite elements, we reformulate the radiative transfer equation using vectorial finite elements. In comparison to standard finite elements, this reformulation yields faster timings for the linear system assemblies, as well as for the solution phase when using scattering media. The proposed vectorial finite element discretization for solving the radiative transfer equation is cross-validated against a benchmark problem available in literature. In addition, we have used the method of manufactured solutions to verify the order of accuracy for our discretization technique within different absorbing, scattering, and emitting media. For solving large problems of radiation on parallel computers, the vectorial finite element method is parallelized using domain decomposition. The proposed domain decomposition method scales on large number of processes, and its performance is unaffected by the changes in optical thickness of the medium. Our parallel solver is used to solve a large scale radiative transfer problem of the Kelvin-cell radiation.

  17. Transfer of radiation technology to developing countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markovic, Vitomir; Ridwan, Mohammad

    1993-10-01

    Transfer of technology is a complex process with many facets, options and constraints. While the concept is an important step in bringing industrialization process to agricultural based countries, it is clear, however, that a country will only benefit from a new technology if it addresses a real need, and if it can be absorbed and adapted to suit the existing cultural and technological base. International Atomic Energy Agency, as UN body, has a mandate to promote nuclear applicationsand assist Member States in transfer of technology for peaceful applications. This mandate has been pursued by many different mechanisms developed in the past years: technical assistance, coordinated research programmes, scientific and technical meetings, publications, etc. In all these activities the Agency is the organizer and initiator, but main contributions come from expert services from developed countries and, increasingly, from developing countries themselves. The technical cooperation among developing coutries more and more becomes part of different programmes. In particular, regional cooperation has been demonstrated as an effective instrument for transfer of technology from developed and among developing countries. Some examples of actual programmes are given.

  18. Formal Solutions for Polarized Radiative Transfer. III. Stiffness and Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janett, Gioele; Paganini, Alberto

    2018-04-01

    Efficient numerical approximation of the polarized radiative transfer equation is challenging because this system of ordinary differential equations exhibits stiff behavior, which potentially results in numerical instability. This negatively impacts the accuracy of formal solvers, and small step-sizes are often necessary to retrieve physical solutions. This work presents stability analyses of formal solvers for the radiative transfer equation of polarized light, identifies instability issues, and suggests practical remedies. In particular, the assumptions and the limitations of the stability analysis of Runge–Kutta methods play a crucial role. On this basis, a suitable and pragmatic formal solver is outlined and tested. An insightful comparison to the scalar radiative transfer equation is also presented.

  19. Strain-induced modulation of near-field radiative transfer.

    PubMed

    Ghanekar, Alok; Ricci, Matthew; Tian, Yanpei; Gregory, Otto; Zheng, Yi

    2018-06-11

    In this theoretical study, we present a near-field thermal modulator that exhibits change in radiative heat transfer when subjected to mechanical stress/strain. The device has two terminals at different temperatures separated by vacuum: one fixed and one stretchable. The stretchable side contains one-dimensional grating. When subjected to mechanical strain, the effective optical properties of the stretchable side are affected upon deformation of the grating. This results in modulation of surface waves across the interfaces influencing near-field radiative heat transfer. We show that for a separation of 100 nm, it is possible to achieve 25% change in radiative heat transfer for a strain of 10%.

  20. Hapke modeling of Rhea surface properties through Cassini-VIMS spectra

    Ciarniello, M.; Capaccioni, F.; Filacchione, G.; Clark, R.N.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Cerroni, P.; Coradini, A.; Brown, R.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Tosi, F.; Stephan, K.

    2011-01-01

    The surface properties of the icy bodies in the saturnian system have been investigated by means of the Cassini-VIMS (Visual Infrared Mapping Spectrometer) hyperspectral imager which operates in the 0.35-5.1. ??m wavelength range. In particular, we have analyzed 111 full disk hyperspectral images of Rhea ranging in solar phase between 0.08?? and 109.8??. These data have been previously analyzed by Filacchione et al. (Filacchione, G. et al. [2007]. Icarus 186, 259-290; Filacchione, G. et al. [2010]. Icarus 206, 507-523) to study, adopting various "spectral indicators" (such as spectral slopes, band depth, and continuum level), the relations among various saturnian satellites. As a further step we proceed in this paper to a quantitative evaluation of the physical parameters determining the spectrophotometric properties of Rhea's surface. To do this we have applied Hapke (Hapke, B. [1993]. Theory of Reflectance and Emittance Spectroscopy, Topics in Remote Sensing: 3 Springer, Berlin) IMSA model (Isotropic Multiple Scattering Approximation) which allow us to model the phase function at VIS-IR (visible-infrared) wavelengths as well as the spectra taking into account various types of mixtures of surface materials. Thanks to this method we have been able to constrain the size of water ice particles covering the surface, the amount of organic contaminants, the large scale surface roughness and the opposition effect surge. From our analysis it appears that wavelength dependent parameters, e.g. opposition surge width (h) and single-particle phase function parameters (b,. v), are strongly correlated to the estimated single-scattering albedo of particles. For Rhea the best fit solution is obtained by assuming: (1) an intraparticle mixture of crystalline water ice and a small amount (0.4%) of Triton tholin; (2) a monodisperse grain size distribution having a particle diameter am= 38. ??m; and (3) a surface roughness parameter value of 33??. The study of phase function shows

  1. Dynamic Modulation of Radiative Heat Transfer beyond the Blackbody Limit.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kota; Nishikawa, Kazutaka; Miura, Atsushi; Toshiyoshi, Hiroshi; Iizuka, Hideo

    2017-07-12

    Dynamic control of electromagnetic heat transfer without changing mechanical configuration opens possibilities in intelligent thermal management in nanoscale systems. We confirmed by experiment that the radiative heat transfer is dynamically modulated beyond the blackbody limit. The near-field electromagnetic heat exchange mediated by phonon-polariton is controlled by the metal-insulator transition of tungsten-doped vanadium dioxide. The functionalized heat flux is transferred over an area of 1.6 cm 2 across a 370 nm gap, which is maintained by the microfabricated spacers and applied pressure. The uniformity of the gap is validated by optical interferometry, and the measured heat transfer is well modeled as the sum of the radiative and the parasitic conductive components. The presented methodology to form a nanometric gap with functional heat flux paves the way to the smart thermal management in various scenes ranging from highly integrated systems to macroscopic apparatus.

  2. Solution of Radiation and Convection Heat-Transfer Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oneill, R. F.

    1986-01-01

    Computer program P5399B developed to accommodate variety of fin-type heat conduction applications involving radiative or convective boundary conditions with additionally imposed local heat flux. Program also accommodates significant variety of one-dimensional heat-transfer problems not corresponding specifically to fin-type applications. Program easily accommodates all but few specialized one-dimensional heat-transfer analyses as well as many twodimensional analyses.

  3. A simplified scheme for computing radiation transfer in the troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katayama, A.

    1973-01-01

    A scheme is presented, for the heating of clear and cloudy air by solar and infrared radiation transfer, designed for use in tropospheric general circulation models with coarse vertical resolution. A bulk transmission function is defined for the infrared transfer. The interpolation factors, required for computing the bulk transmission function, are parameterized as functions of such physical parameters as the thickness of the layer, the pressure, and the mixing ratio at a reference level. The computation procedure for solar radiation is significantly simplified by the introduction of two basic concepts. The first is that the solar radiation spectrum can be divided into a scattered part, for which Rayleigh scattering is significant but absorption by water vapor is negligible, and an absorbed part for which absorption by water vapor is significant but Rayleigh scattering is negligible. The second concept is that of an equivalent cloud water vapor amount which absorbs the same amount of radiation as the cloud.

  4. SEURAT: SPH scheme extended with ultraviolet line radiative transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Makito; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Hasegawa, Kenji; Semelin, Benoit; Yajima, Hidenobu; Umemura, Masayuki

    2018-05-01

    We present a novel Lyman alpha (Ly α) radiative transfer code, SEURAT (SPH scheme Extended with Ultraviolet line RAdiative Transfer), where line scatterings are solved adaptively with the resolution of the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). The radiative transfer method implemented in SEURAT is based on a Monte Carlo algorithm in which the scattering and absorption by dust are also incorporated. We perform standard test calculations to verify the validity of the code; (i) emergent spectra from a static uniform sphere, (ii) emergent spectra from an expanding uniform sphere, and (iii) escape fraction from a dusty slab. Thereby, we demonstrate that our code solves the {Ly} α radiative transfer with sufficient accuracy. We emphasize that SEURAT can treat the transfer of {Ly} α photons even in highly complex systems that have significantly inhomogeneous density fields. The high adaptivity of SEURAT is desirable to solve the propagation of {Ly} α photons in the interstellar medium of young star-forming galaxies like {Ly} α emitters (LAEs). Thus, SEURAT provides a powerful tool to model the emergent spectra of {Ly} α emission, which can be compared to the observations of LAEs.

  5. Computation of Radiation Heat Transfer in Aeroengine Combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patankar, S. V.

    1996-01-01

    In this report the highlights of the research completed for the NASA are summarized. This research has been completed in the form of two Ph.D. theses by Chai (1994) and Parthasarathy (1996). Readers are referred to these theses for a complete details of the work and lists of references. In the following sections, first objectives of this research are introduced, then the finite-volume method for radiation heat transfer is described, and finally computations of radiative heat transfer in non-gray participating media is presented.

  6. Analytic solution for quasi-Lambertian radiation transfer.

    PubMed

    Braun, Avi; Gordon, Jeffrey M

    2010-02-10

    An analytic solution is derived for radiation transfer between flat quasi-Lambertian surfaces of arbitrary orientation, i.e., surfaces that radiate in a Lambertian fashion but within a numerical aperture smaller than unity. These formulas obviate the need for ray trace simulations and provide exact, physically transparent results. Illustrative examples that capture the salient features of the flux maps and the efficiency of flux transfer are presented for a few configurations of practical interest. There is also a fundamental reciprocity relation for quasi-Lambertian exchange, akin to the reciprocity theorem for fully Lambertian surfaces. Applications include optical fiber coupling, fiber-optic biomedical procedures, and solar concentrators.

  7. Maximal near-field radiative heat transfer between two plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nefzaoui, Elyes; Ezzahri, Younès; Drévillon, Jérémie; Joulain, Karl

    2013-09-01

    Near-field radiative transfer is a promising way to significantly and simultaneously enhance both thermo-photovoltaic (TPV) devices power densities and efficiencies. A parametric study of Drude and Lorentz models performances in maximizing near-field radiative heat transfer between two semi-infinite planes separated by nanometric distances at room temperature is presented in this paper. Optimal parameters of these models that provide optical properties maximizing the radiative heat flux are reported and compared to real materials usually considered in similar studies, silicon carbide and heavily doped silicon in this case. Results are obtained by exact and approximate (in the extreme near-field regime and the electrostatic limit hypothesis) calculations. The two methods are compared in terms of accuracy and CPU resources consumption. Their differences are explained according to a mesoscopic description of nearfield radiative heat transfer. Finally, the frequently assumed hypothesis which states a maximal radiative heat transfer when the two semi-infinite planes are of identical materials is numerically confirmed. Its subsequent practical constraints are then discussed. Presented results enlighten relevant paths to follow in order to choose or design materials maximizing nano-TPV devices performances.

  8. Theory of heat transfer and hydraulic resistance of oil radiators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mariamov, N B

    1942-01-01

    In the present report the coefficients of heat transfer and hydraulic resistance are theoretically obtained for the case of laminar flow of a heated viscous liquid in a narrow rectangular channel. The results obtained are applied to the computation of oil radiators, which to a first approximation may be considered as made up of a system of such channels. In conclusion, a comparison is given of the theoretical with the experimental results obtained from tests on airplane oil radiators.

  9. Super-Eddington radiation transfer in soft gamma repeaters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulmer, Andrew

    1994-01-01

    Bursts from soft gamma repeaters (SGRs) have been shown to be super-Eddington by a factor of 1000 and have been persuasively associated with compact objects. Super-Eddington radiation transfer on the surface of a strongly magnetic (greater than or equal to 10(exp 13) G) neutron star is studied and related to the observational constraints on SGRs. In strong magnetic fields, Thompson scattering is suppressed in one polarization state, so super-Eddington fluxes can be radiated while the plasma remains in hydrostatic equilibrium. We discuss a model which offers a somewhat natural explanation for the observation that the energy spectra of bursts with varying intensity are similar. The radiation produced is found to be linearly polarized to one part in 1000 in a direction determined by the local magnetic field, and intensity variations between bursts are understood as a change in the radiating area on the source. The net polarization is inversely correlated with burst intensity. Further, it is shown that for radiation transfer calculations in limit of superstrong magnetic fields, it is sufficient to solve the radiation transfer for the low opacity state rather than the coupled equations for both. With this approximation, standard stellar atmosphere techniques are utilized to calculate the model energy spectrum.

  10. Photometric Modeling of a Cometary Nucleus: Taking Hapke Modeling to the Limit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buratti, B. J.; Hicks, M. D.; Soderblom, L.; Hillier, J.; Britt, D.

    2002-01-01

    In the past two decades, photometric models developed by Bruce Hapke have been fit to a wide range of bodies in the Solar System: The Moon, Mercury, several asteroids, and many icy and rocky satellites. These models have enabled comparative descriptions of the physical attributes of planetary surfaces, including macroscopic roughness, particle size and size-distribution, the single scattering albedo, and the compaction state of the optically active portion of the regolith. One challenging type of body to observe and model, a cometary nucleus, awaited the first space based mission to obtain images unobscured by coma. The NASA-JPL Deep Space 1 Mission (DS1) encountered the short-period Jupiter-family comet 19/P Borrelly on September 22, 2001, about 8 days after perihelion. Prior to its closest approach of 2171 km, the remote-sensing package on the spacecraft obtained 25 CCD images of the comet, representing the first closeup, unobscured view of a comet's nucleus. At closest approach, corresponding to a resolution of 47 meters per pixel, the intensity of the coma was less than 1% of that of the nucleus. An unprecedented range of high solar phase angles (52-89 degrees), viewing geometries that are in general attainable only when a comet is active, enabled the first quantitative and disk-resolved modeling of surface photometric physical parameters.

  11. Radiative transfer through terrestrial atmosphere and ocean: Software package SCIATRAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozanov, V. V.; Rozanov, A. V.; Kokhanovsky, A. A.; Burrows, J. P.

    2014-01-01

    SCIATRAN is a comprehensive software package for the modeling of radiative transfer processes in the terrestrial atmosphere and ocean in the spectral range from the ultraviolet to the thermal infrared (0.18 - 40 μm) including multiple scattering processes, polarization, thermal emission and ocean-atmosphere coupling. The software is capable of modeling spectral and angular distributions of the intensity or the Stokes vector of the transmitted, scattered, reflected, and emitted radiation assuming either a plane-parallel or a spherical atmosphere. Simulations are done either in the scalar or in the vector mode (i.e. accounting for the polarization) for observations by space-, air-, ship- and balloon-borne, ground-based, and underwater instruments in various viewing geometries (nadir, off-nadir, limb, occultation, zenith-sky, off-axis). All significant radiative transfer processes are accounted for. These are, e.g. the Rayleigh scattering, scattering by aerosol and cloud particles, absorption by gaseous components, and bidirectional reflection by an underlying surface including Fresnel reflection from a flat or roughened ocean surface. The software package contains several radiative transfer solvers including finite difference and discrete-ordinate techniques, an extensive database, and a specific module for solving inverse problems. In contrast to many other radiative transfer codes, SCIATRAN incorporates an efficient approach to calculate the so-called Jacobians, i.e. derivatives of the intensity with respect to various atmospheric and surface parameters. In this paper we discuss numerical methods used in SCIATRAN to solve the scalar and vector radiative transfer equation, describe databases of atmospheric, oceanic, and surface parameters incorporated in SCIATRAN, and demonstrate how to solve some selected radiative transfer problems using the SCIATRAN package. During the last decades, a lot of studies have been published demonstrating that SCIATRAN is a valuable

  12. Computational Challenges of 3D Radiative Transfer in Atmospheric Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakub, Fabian; Bernhard, Mayer

    2017-04-01

    The computation of radiative heating and cooling rates is one of the most expensive components in todays atmospheric models. The high computational cost stems not only from the laborious integration over a wide range of the electromagnetic spectrum but also from the fact that solving the integro-differential radiative transfer equation for monochromatic light is already rather involved. This lead to the advent of numerous approximations and parameterizations to reduce the cost of the solver. One of the most prominent one is the so called independent pixel approximations (IPA) where horizontal energy transfer is neglected whatsoever and radiation may only propagate in the vertical direction (1D). Recent studies implicate that the IPA introduces significant errors in high resolution simulations and affects the evolution and development of convective systems. However, using fully 3D solvers such as for example MonteCarlo methods is not even on state of the art supercomputers feasible. The parallelization of atmospheric models is often realized by a horizontal domain decomposition, and hence, horizontal transfer of energy necessitates communication. E.g. a cloud's shadow at a low zenith angle will cast a long shadow and potentially needs to communication through a multitude of processors. Especially light in the solar spectral range may travel long distances through the atmosphere. Concerning highly parallel simulations, it is vital that 3D radiative transfer solvers put a special emphasis on parallel scalability. We will present an introduction to intricacies computing 3D radiative heating and cooling rates as well as report on the parallel performance of the TenStream solver. The TenStream is a 3D radiative transfer solver using the PETSc framework to iteratively solve a set of partial differential equation. We investigate two matrix preconditioners, (a) geometric algebraic multigrid preconditioning(MG+GAMG) and (b) block Jacobi incomplete LU (ILU) factorization. The

  13. Heat transfer studies on the liquid droplet radiator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattick, A. T.; Nelson, M.

    1987-01-01

    This paper examines radiation transfer in the droplet sheet of a liquid droplet radiator including non-isotropic scattering by the droplets. Non-isotropic scattering becomes significant for small droplets (diameter less than 0.1 mm) and for low emissivity liquids. For droplets with an emittance of 0.1 and for a droplet sheet optical depth or 5, the radiated power varies by about 12 percent, depending on whether scattering is predominantly forward or backward. An experimental measurement of the power emitted by a cylindrical cloud of heated droplets of silicone fluid is also reported. The measured cloud emissivity correlates, within experimental error, with the analytical model.

  14. A modular radiative transfer program for gas filter correlation radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casas, J. C.; Campbell, S. A.

    1977-01-01

    The fundamentals of a computer program, simulated monochromatic atmospheric radiative transfer (SMART), which calculates atmospheric path transmission, solar radiation, and thermal radiation in the 4.6 micrometer spectral region, are described. A brief outline of atmospheric absorption properties and line by line transmission calculations is explained in conjunction with an outline of the SMART computational procedures. Program flexibility is demonstrated by simulating the response of a gas filter correlation radiometer as one example of an atmospheric infrared sensor. Program limitations, input data requirements, program listing, and comparison of SMART transmission calculations are presented.

  15. Validation of the Poisson Stochastic Radiative Transfer Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhuravleva, Tatiana; Marshak, Alexander

    2004-01-01

    A new approach to validation of the Poisson stochastic radiative transfer method is proposed. In contrast to other validations of stochastic models, the main parameter of the Poisson model responsible for cloud geometrical structure - cloud aspect ratio - is determined entirely by matching measurements and calculations of the direct solar radiation. If the measurements of the direct solar radiation is unavailable, it was shown that there is a range of the aspect ratios that allows the stochastic model to accurately approximate the average measurements of surface downward and cloud top upward fluxes. Realizations of the fractionally integrated cascade model are taken as a prototype of real measurements.

  16. Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko Surface Composition as a Playground for Radiative Transfer Modeling and Laboratory Measurements: an international ISSI team

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephan, K.; Ciarniello, M.; Beck, P.; Filacchione, G.; Moroz, L.; Pilorget, C.; Pommerol, A.; Quirico, E.; Raponi, A.; Schröder, S.; Kappel, D.; Vinogradoff, V.; Istiqomah, I.; Rousseau, B.

    2017-12-01

    Remote sensing observations at visible-infrared (VIS-IR) wavelengths of the nucleus of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko performed by VIRTIS (Coradini et al., 2007) aboard the Rosetta mission have revealed a surface ubiquitously covered by low-albedo material (Capaccioni et al., 2015; Ciarniello et al., 2015), characterized by the presence of refractory and semi-volatile organics and dark opaque phases (Capaccioni et al., 2015; Quirico et al., 2016). However, a quantitative determination of the physical properties (grain size, porosity) and chemical composition of the surface regolith, from spectrophotometric analysis, is still missing. This subject will be investigated within an international team hosted by ISSI (International Space Science Institute), taking advantage of available and dedicated laboratory reflectance measurements on cometary analogue samples and radiative transfer models (Hapke, 2012; Shkuratov et al., 1999; Monte Carlo ray-tracing), applied to Rosetta spectrophotometric observations of the nucleus. The convergence between models and measurements will allow us to provide a thorough characterization of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko surface. At the same time, the comparison of theoretical predictions with results from laboratory reflectance spectroscopy on powders of analog materials give us the possibility to constrain the capability of the models to characterize their composition (endmember abundances and mixing modalities) and physical properties. We report about the state of the art of laboratory reflectance spectroscopy and spectral modeling applied to 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko VIS-IR spectrum as well as preliminary results of the team activity and planned future work. Acknowledgements: the team thanks ISSI-Switzerland for the logistic and financial support.

  17. Redshifted Cherenkov Radiation for in vivo Imaging: Coupling Cherenkov Radiation Energy Transfer to multiple Förster Resonance Energy Transfers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhard, Yann; Collin, Bertrand; Decréau, Richard A.

    2017-03-01

    Cherenkov Radiation (CR), this blue glow seen in nuclear reactors, is an optical light originating from energetic β-emitter radionuclides. CR emitter 90Y triggers a cascade of energy transfers in the presence of a mixed population of fluorophores (which each other match their respective absorption and emission maxima): Cherenkov Radiation Energy Transfer (CRET) first, followed by multiple Förster Resonance Energy transfers (FRET): CRET ratios were calculated to give a rough estimate of the transfer efficiency. While CR is blue-weighted (300-500 nm), such cascades of Energy Transfers allowed to get a) fluorescence emission up to 710 nm, which is beyond the main CR window and within the near-infrared (NIR) window where biological tissues are most transparent, b) to amplify this emission and boost the radiance on that window: EMT6-tumor bearing mice injected with both a radionuclide and a mixture of fluorophores having a good spectral overlap, were shown to have nearly a two-fold radiance boost (measured on a NIR window centered on the emission wavelength of the last fluorophore in the Energy Transfer cascade) compared to a tumor injected with the radionuclide only. Some CR embarked light source could be converted into a near-infrared radiation, where biological tissues are most transparent.

  18. Redshifted Cherenkov Radiation for in vivo Imaging: Coupling Cherenkov Radiation Energy Transfer to multiple Förster Resonance Energy Transfers.

    PubMed

    Bernhard, Yann; Collin, Bertrand; Decréau, Richard A

    2017-03-24

    Cherenkov Radiation (CR), this blue glow seen in nuclear reactors, is an optical light originating from energetic β-emitter radionuclides. CR emitter 90 Y triggers a cascade of energy transfers in the presence of a mixed population of fluorophores (which each other match their respective absorption and emission maxima): Cherenkov Radiation Energy Transfer (CRET) first, followed by multiple Förster Resonance Energy transfers (FRET): CRET ratios were calculated to give a rough estimate of the transfer efficiency. While CR is blue-weighted (300-500 nm), such cascades of Energy Transfers allowed to get a) fluorescence emission up to 710 nm, which is beyond the main CR window and within the near-infrared (NIR) window where biological tissues are most transparent, b) to amplify this emission and boost the radiance on that window: EMT6-tumor bearing mice injected with both a radionuclide and a mixture of fluorophores having a good spectral overlap, were shown to have nearly a two-fold radiance boost (measured on a NIR window centered on the emission wavelength of the last fluorophore in the Energy Transfer cascade) compared to a tumor injected with the radionuclide only. Some CR embarked light source could be converted into a near-infrared radiation, where biological tissues are most transparent.

  19. Redshifted Cherenkov Radiation for in vivo Imaging: Coupling Cherenkov Radiation Energy Transfer to multiple Förster Resonance Energy Transfers

    PubMed Central

    Bernhard, Yann; Collin, Bertrand; Decréau, Richard A.

    2017-01-01

    Cherenkov Radiation (CR), this blue glow seen in nuclear reactors, is an optical light originating from energetic β-emitter radionuclides. CR emitter 90Y triggers a cascade of energy transfers in the presence of a mixed population of fluorophores (which each other match their respective absorption and emission maxima): Cherenkov Radiation Energy Transfer (CRET) first, followed by multiple Förster Resonance Energy transfers (FRET): CRET ratios were calculated to give a rough estimate of the transfer efficiency. While CR is blue-weighted (300–500 nm), such cascades of Energy Transfers allowed to get a) fluorescence emission up to 710 nm, which is beyond the main CR window and within the near-infrared (NIR) window where biological tissues are most transparent, b) to amplify this emission and boost the radiance on that window: EMT6-tumor bearing mice injected with both a radionuclide and a mixture of fluorophores having a good spectral overlap, were shown to have nearly a two-fold radiance boost (measured on a NIR window centered on the emission wavelength of the last fluorophore in the Energy Transfer cascade) compared to a tumor injected with the radionuclide only. Some CR embarked light source could be converted into a near-infrared radiation, where biological tissues are most transparent. PMID:28338043

  20. One-dimensional transient radiative transfer by lattice Boltzmann method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Yi, Hongliang; Tan, Heping

    2013-10-21

    The lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is extended to solve transient radiative transfer in one-dimensional slab containing scattering media subjected to a collimated short laser irradiation. By using a fully implicit backward differencing scheme to discretize the transient term in the radiative transfer equation, a new type of lattice structure is devised. The accuracy and computational efficiency of this algorithm are examined firstly. Afterwards, effects of the medium properties such as the extinction coefficient, the scattering albedo and the anisotropy factor, and the shapes of laser pulse on time-resolved signals of transmittance and reflectance are investigated. Results of the present method are found to compare very well with the data from the literature. For an oblique incidence, the LBM results in this paper are compared with those by Monte Carlo method generated by ourselves. In addition, transient radiative transfer in a two-Layer inhomogeneous media subjected to a short square pulse irradiation is investigated. At last, the LBM is further extended to study the transient radiative transfer in homogeneous medium with a refractive index discontinuity irradiated by the short pulse laser. Several trends on the time-resolved signals different from those for refractive index of 1 (i.e. refractive-index-matched boundary) are observed and analysed.

  1. Coupling radiative heat transfer in participating media with other heat transfer modes

    SciT

    Tencer, John; Howell, John R.

    The common methods for finding the local radiative flux divergence in participating media through solution of the radiative transfer equation are outlined. The pros and cons of each method are discussed in terms of their speed, ability to handle spectral properties and scattering phenomena, as well as their accuracy in different ranges of media transport properties. The suitability of each method for inclusion in the energy equation to efficiently solve multi-mode thermal transfer problems is discussed. Lastly, remaining topics needing research are outlined.

  2. Coupling radiative heat transfer in participating media with other heat transfer modes

    DOE PAGES

    Tencer, John; Howell, John R.

    2015-09-28

    The common methods for finding the local radiative flux divergence in participating media through solution of the radiative transfer equation are outlined. The pros and cons of each method are discussed in terms of their speed, ability to handle spectral properties and scattering phenomena, as well as their accuracy in different ranges of media transport properties. The suitability of each method for inclusion in the energy equation to efficiently solve multi-mode thermal transfer problems is discussed. Lastly, remaining topics needing research are outlined.

  3. Radiative transfer in a polluted urban planetary boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viskanta, R.; Johnson, R. O.; Bergstrom, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    Radiative transfer in a polluted urban atmosphere is studied using a dynamic model. The diurnal nature of radiative transfer for summer conditions is simulated for an urban area 40 km in extent and the effects of various parameters arising in the problem are investigated. The results of numerical computations show that air pollution has the potential of playing a major role in the radiative regime of the urban area. Absorption of solar energy by aerosols in realistic models of urban atmosphere are of the same order of magnitude as that due to water vapor. The predicted effect of the air pollution aerosol in the city is to warm the earth-atmosphere system, and the net effect of gaseous pollutant is to warm the surface and cool the planetary boundary layer, particularly near the top.

  4. Intercomparison of shortwave radiative transfer schemes in global aerosol modeling: results from the AeroCom Radiative Transfer Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randles, C. A.; Kinne, S.; Myhre, G.; Schulz, M.; Stier, P.; Fischer, J.; Doppler, L.; Highwood, E.; Ryder, C.; Harris, B.; Huttunen, J.; Ma, Y.; Pinker, R. T.; Mayer, B.; Neubauer, D.; Hitzenberger, R.; Oreopoulos, L.; Lee, D.; Pitari, G.; Di Genova, G.; Quaas, J.; Rose, Fred G.; Kato, S.; Rumbold, S. T.; Vardavas, I.; Hatzianastassiou, N.; Matsoukas, C.; Yu, H.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, H.; Lu, P.

    2012-12-01

    In this study we examine the performance of 31 global model radiative transfer schemes in cloud-free conditions with prescribed gaseous absorbers and no aerosols (Rayleigh atmosphere), with prescribed scattering-only aerosols, and with more absorbing aerosols. Results are compared to benchmark results from high-resolution, multi-angular line-by-line radiation models. For purely scattering aerosols, model bias relative to the line-by-line models in the top-of-the atmosphere aerosol radiative forcing ranges from roughly -10 to 20%, with over- and underestimates of radiative cooling at higher and lower sun elevation, respectively. Inter-model diversity (relative standard deviation) increases from ~10 to 15% as sun elevation increases. Inter-model diversity in atmospheric and surface forcing decreases with increased aerosol absorption, indicating that the treatment of multiple-scattering is more variable than aerosol absorption in the models considered. Aerosol radiative forcing results from multi-stream models are generally in better agreement with the line-by-line results than the simpler two-stream schemes. Considering radiative fluxes, model performance is generally the same or slightly better than results from previous radiation scheme intercomparisons. However, the inter-model diversity in aerosol radiative forcing remains large, primarily as a result of the treatment of multiple-scattering. Results indicate that global models that estimate aerosol radiative forcing with two-stream radiation schemes may be subject to persistent biases introduced by these schemes, particularly for regional aerosol forcing.

  5. Intercomparison of shortwave radiative transfer schemes in global aerosol modeling: results from the AeroCom Radiative Transfer Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randles, C. A.; Kinne, S.; Myhre, G.; Schulz, M.; Stier, P.; Fischer, J.; Doppler, L.; Highwood, E.; Ryder, C.; Harris, B.; Huttunen, J.; Ma, Y.; Pinker, R. T.; Mayer, B.; Neubauer, D.; Hitzenberger, R.; Oreopoulos, L.; Lee, D.; Pitari, G.; Di Genova, G.; Quaas, J.; Rose, F. G.; Kato, S.; Rumbold, S. T.; Vardavas, I.; Hatzianastassiou, N.; Matsoukas, C.; Yu, H.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, H.; Lu, P.

    2013-03-01

    In this study we examine the performance of 31 global model radiative transfer schemes in cloud-free conditions with prescribed gaseous absorbers and no aerosols (Rayleigh atmosphere), with prescribed scattering-only aerosols, and with more absorbing aerosols. Results are compared to benchmark results from high-resolution, multi-angular line-by-line radiation models. For purely scattering aerosols, model bias relative to the line-by-line models in the top-of-the atmosphere aerosol radiative forcing ranges from roughly -10 to 20%, with over- and underestimates of radiative cooling at lower and higher solar zenith angle, respectively. Inter-model diversity (relative standard deviation) increases from ~10 to 15% as solar zenith angle decreases. Inter-model diversity in atmospheric and surface forcing decreases with increased aerosol absorption, indicating that the treatment of multiple-scattering is more variable than aerosol absorption in the models considered. Aerosol radiative forcing results from multi-stream models are generally in better agreement with the line-by-line results than the simpler two-stream schemes. Considering radiative fluxes, model performance is generally the same or slightly better than results from previous radiation scheme intercomparisons. However, the inter-model diversity in aerosol radiative forcing remains large, primarily as a result of the treatment of multiple-scattering. Results indicate that global models that estimate aerosol radiative forcing with two-stream radiation schemes may be subject to persistent biases introduced by these schemes, particularly for regional aerosol forcing.

  6. Polarized radiative transfer considering thermal emission in semitransparent media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben, Xun; Yi, Hong-Liang; Tan, He-Ping

    2014-09-01

    The characteristics of the polarization must be considered for a complete and correct description of radiation transfer in a scattering medium. Observing and identifying the polarizition characteristics of the thermal emission of a hot semitransparent medium have a major significance to analyze the optical responses of the medium for different temperatures. In this paper, a Monte Carlo method is developed for polarzied radiative transfer in a semitransparent medium. There are mainly two kinds of mechanisms leading to polarization of light: specular reflection on the Fresnel boundary and scattering by particles. The determination of scattering direction is the key to solve polarized radiative transfer problem using the Monte Carlo method. An optimized rejection method is used to calculate the scattering angles. In the model, the treatment of specular reflection is also considered, and in the process of tracing photons, the normalization must be applied to the Stokes vector when scattering, reflection, or transmission occurs. The vector radiative transfer matrix (VRTM) is defined and solved using Monte Carlo strategy, by which all four Stokes elements can be determined. Our results for Rayleigh scattering and Mie scattering are compared well with published data. The accuracy of the developed Monte Carlo method is shown to be good enough for the solution to vector radiative transfer. Polarization characteristics of thermal emission in a hot semitransparent medium is investigated, and results show that the U and V parameters of Stokes vector are equal to zero, an obvious peak always appear in the Q curve instead of the I curve, and refractive index has a completely different effect on I from Q.

  7. A Fast Infrared Radiative Transfer Model for Overlapping Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niu, Jianguo; Yang, Ping; Huang, Huang-Lung; Davies, James E.; Li, Jun; Baum, Bryan A.; Hu, Yong X.

    2006-01-01

    A fast infrared radiative transfer model (FIRTM2) appropriate for application to both single-layered and overlapping cloud situations is developed for simulating the outgoing infrared spectral radiance at the top of the atmosphere (TOA). In FIRTM2 a pre-computed library of cloud reflectance and transmittance values is employed to account for one or two cloud layers, whereas the background atmospheric optical thickness due to gaseous absorption can be computed from a clear-sky radiative transfer model. FIRTM2 is applicable to three atmospheric conditions: 1) clear-sky, 2) single-layered ice or water cloud, and 3) two simultaneous cloud layers in a column (e.g., ice cloud overlying water cloud). Moreover, FIRTM2 outputs the derivatives (i.e., Jacobians) of the TOA brightness temperature with respect to cloud optical thickness and effective particle size. Sensitivity analyses have been carried out to assess the performance of FIRTM2 for two spectral regions, namely the longwave (LW) band (587.3 - 1179.5/cm) and the short-to-medium wave (SMW) band (1180.1 - 2228.9/cm). The assessment is carried out in terms of brightness temperature differences (BTD) between FIRTM2 and the well-known discrete ordinates radiative transfer model (DISORT), henceforth referred to as BTD (F-D). The BTD (F-D) values for single-layered clouds are generally less than 0.8 K. For the case of two cloud layers (specifically ice cloud over water cloud), the BTD(F-D) values are also generally less than 0.8 K except for the SMW band for the case of a very high altitude (>15 km) cloud comprised of small ice particles. Note that for clear-sky atmospheres, FIRTM2 reduces to the clear-sky radiative transfer model that is incorporated into FIRTM2, and the errors in this case are essentially those of the clear-sky radiative transfer model.

  8. Radiation transfer in plant canopies - Scattering of solar radiation and canopy reflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verstraete, Michel M.

    1988-01-01

    The one-dimensional vertical model of radiation transfer in a plant canopy described by Verstraete (1987) is extended to account for the transfer of diffuse radiation. This improved model computes the absorption and scattering of both visible and near-infrared radiation in a multilayer canopy as a function of solar position and leaf orientation distribution. Multiple scattering is allowed, and the spectral reflectance of the vegetation stand is predicted. The results of the model are compared to those of other models and actual observations.

  9. Radiative enhancement of tube-side heat transfer.

    SciT

    Im, K. H.; Ahluwalia, R. K.; Engineering Physics

    1994-01-01

    The potential of augmenting film coefficient by uniformly dispersing thin metallic/ceramic filaments oriented longitudinally along a tube is investigated. The purpose of the rigidly held filaments is to create a participating medium from a gas otherwise transparent to thermal radiation. The filaments absorb the thermal radiation emitted by the tube and transfer the heat convectively to the flowing gas. Wave theory shows that optical thickness > 10 can be achieved with 50 {micro}m SiC filaments at 300 cm{sup 2} number density in a 2.54 cm diameter tube. Solution of the radiation transport equation indicates that the radiative film coefficients aremore » a function of filament material, diameter and number density, and gas and surface temperatures.« less

  10. Hydroxyl Impurities Enhance Radiative Transfer in the Upper Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmeister, A. M.

    2002-12-01

    Modelling radiative heat transfer is essential to geodynamics because the increase of the diffusive radiative thermal conductivity (krdf) with temperature promotes stability through feedback (Dubuffet et al., 2002, Nonlinear Proc. Geophys., 9: 1-13). Measuring krdf is virtually impossible, and therefore krdf is calculated from spectroscopic measurements. Previous efforts show that Fe2+ impurities in olivine engender radiative transfer when luminous emissions of "hot" grains are absorbed by slightly cooler nearest-neighbor grains. Hydroxyl impurities provide a similar mechanism of emission/absorption. Hydroxyl is important to radiative transfer because (1) OH absorptions are located in the transparent gap between the lattice modes and the Fe2+ transitions (2) small amounts of OH produce intense absorptions, (3) the specific frequencies enable transfer at lower temperatures than is possible with Fe transitions, i.e. even in the cold interiors of slabs, and (4) OH is preferentially located in mineral phases such as garnet and wadsleyite, whereas Fe contents are distributed more or less uniformly. The effect of changing OH concentration on krdf is explored using forsteritic olivine to represent mantle material. Polarized (absorption and reflection) spectroscopic measurements from 77 to 623 K show that the changes in frequency, width, and intensity of the OH bands are small, and that peak area is constant. This allows the effect of OH to be treated independently of temperature. However, OH content and grain size (d) cannot be separated, because the strength of the emissions within a self-emitting medium depends on d. For d = 3 mm, concentrations below 200 H/10{6) Si atoms contribute negligibly to radiative transfer. With low OH contents krdf increases, whereas above ca 1000 H /106 Si, krdf is inverse with concentration. The maxima for krdf depends on d and OH content. Kimberlite samples suggest that the upper mantle has evolved to towards conditions which maximize krdf

  11. Radiative heat transfer in 2D Dirac materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-López, Pablo; Tse, Wang-Kong; Dalvit, Diego A. R.

    2015-06-01

    We compute the radiative heat transfer between two sheets of 2D Dirac materials, including topological Chern insulators and graphene, within the framework of the local approximation for the optical response of these materials. In this approximation, which neglects spatial dispersion, we derive both numerically and analytically the short-distance asymptotic of the near-field heat transfer in these systems, and show that it scales as the inverse of the distance between the two sheets. Finally, we discuss the limitations to the validity of this scaling law imposed by spatial dispersion in 2D Dirac materials.

  12. Radiative heat transfer in 2D Dirac materials

    DOE PAGES

    Rodriguez-López, Pablo; Tse, Wang -Kong; Dalvit, Diego A. R.

    2015-05-12

    We compute the radiative heat transfer between two sheets of 2D Dirac materials, including topological Chern insulators and graphene, within the framework of the local approximation for the optical response of these materials. In this approximation, which neglects spatial dispersion, we derive both numerically and analytically the short-distance asymptotic of the near-field heat transfer in these systems, and show that it scales as the inverse of the distance between the two sheets. In conclusion, we discuss the limitations to the validity of this scaling law imposed by spatial dispersion in 2D Dirac materials.

  13. Advanced Computational Methods for Thermal Radiative Heat Transfer

    SciT

    Tencer, John; Carlberg, Kevin Thomas; Larsen, Marvin E.

    2016-10-01

    Participating media radiation (PMR) in weapon safety calculations for abnormal thermal environments are too costly to do routinely. This cost may be s ubstantially reduced by applying reduced order modeling (ROM) techniques. The application of ROM to PMR is a new and unique approach for this class of problems. This approach was investigated by the authors and shown to provide significant reductions in the computational expense associated with typical PMR simulations. Once this technology is migrated into production heat transfer analysis codes this capability will enable the routine use of PMR heat transfer in higher - fidelity simulations of weaponmore » resp onse in fire environments.« less

  14. An Improved Radiative Transfer Model for Climate Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstrom, Robert W.; Mlawer, Eli J.; Sokolik, Irina N.; Clough, Shepard A.; Toon, Owen B.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents a radiative transfer model that has been developed to accurately predict the atmospheric radiant flux in both the infrared and the solar spectrum with a minimum of computational effort. The model is designed to be included in numerical climate models To assess the accuracy of the model, the results are compared to other more detailed models for several standard cases in the solar and thermal spectrum. As the thermal spectrum has been treated in other publications, we focus here on the solar part of the spectrum. We perform several example calculations focussing on the question of absorption of solar radiation by gases and aerosols.

  15. Radiative transfer model validations during the First ISLSCP Field Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frouin, Robert; Breon, Francois-Marie; Gautier, Catherine

    1990-01-01

    Two simple radiative transfer models, the 5S model based on Tanre et al. (1985, 1986) and the wide-band model of Morcrette (1984) are validated by comparing their outputs with results obtained during the First ISLSCP Field Experiment on concomitant radiosonde, aerosol turbidity, and radiation measurements and sky photographs. Results showed that the 5S model overestimates the short-wave irradiance by 13.2 W/sq m, whereas the Morcrette model underestimated the long-wave irradiance by 7.4 W/sq m.

  16. Implications of a quadratic stream definition in radiative transfer theory.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitney, C.

    1972-01-01

    An explicit definition of the radiation-stream concept is stated and applied to approximate the integro-differential equation of radiative transfer with a set of twelve coupled differential equations. Computational efficiency is enhanced by distributing the corresponding streams in three-dimensional space in a totally symmetric way. Polarization is then incorporated in this model. A computer program based on the model is briefly compared with a Monte Carlo program for simulation of horizon scans of the earth's atmosphere. It is found to be considerably faster.

  17. A Radiation Transfer Solver for Athena Using Short Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Shane W.; Stone, James M.; Jiang, Yan-Fei

    2012-03-01

    We describe the implementation of a module for the Athena magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) code that solves the time-independent, multi-frequency radiative transfer (RT) equation on multidimensional Cartesian simulation domains, including scattering and non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) effects. The module is based on well known and well tested algorithms developed for modeling stellar atmospheres, including the method of short characteristics to solve the RT equation, accelerated Lambda iteration to handle scattering and non-LTE effects, and parallelization via domain decomposition. The module serves several purposes: it can be used to generate spectra and images, to compute a variable Eddington tensor (VET) for full radiation MHD simulations, and to calculate the heating and cooling source terms in the MHD equations in flows where radiation pressure is small compared with gas pressure. For the latter case, the module is combined with the standard MHD integrators using operator splitting: we describe this approach in detail, including a new constraint on the time step for stability due to radiation diffusion modes. Implementation of the VET method for radiation pressure dominated flows is described in a companion paper. We present results from a suite of test problems for both the RT solver itself and for dynamical problems that include radiative heating and cooling. These tests demonstrate that the radiative transfer solution is accurate and confirm that the operator split method is stable, convergent, and efficient for problems of interest. We demonstrate there is no need to adopt ad hoc assumptions of questionable accuracy to solve RT problems in concert with MHD: the computational cost for our general-purpose module for simple (e.g., LTE gray) problems can be comparable to or less than a single time step of Athena's MHD integrators, and only few times more expensive than that for more general (non-LTE) problems.

  18. SMRT: A new, modular snow microwave radiative transfer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picard, Ghislain; Sandells, Melody; Löwe, Henning; Dumont, Marie; Essery, Richard; Floury, Nicolas; Kontu, Anna; Lemmetyinen, Juha; Maslanka, William; Mätzler, Christian; Morin, Samuel; Wiesmann, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Forward models of radiative transfer processes are needed to interpret remote sensing data and derive measurements of snow properties such as snow mass. A key requirement and challenge for microwave emission and scattering models is an accurate description of the snow microstructure. The snow microwave radiative transfer model (SMRT) was designed to cater for potential future active and/or passive satellite missions and developed to improve understanding of how to parameterize snow microstructure. SMRT is implemented in Python and is modular to allow easy intercomparison of different theoretical approaches. Separate modules are included for the snow microstructure model, electromagnetic module, radiative transfer solver, substrate, interface reflectivities, atmosphere and permittivities. An object-oriented approach is used with carefully specified exchanges between modules to allow future extensibility i.e. without constraining the parameter list requirements. This presentation illustrates the capabilities of SMRT. At present, five different snow microstructure models have been implemented, and direct insertion of the autocorrelation function from microtomography data is also foreseen with SMRT. Three electromagnetic modules are currently available. While DMRT-QCA and Rayleigh models need specific microstructure models, the Improved Born Approximation may be used with any microstructure representation. A discrete ordinates approach with stream connection is used to solve the radiative transfer equations, although future inclusion of 6-flux and 2-flux solvers are envisioned. Wrappers have been included to allow existing microwave emission models (MEMLS, HUT, DMRT-QMS) to be run with the same inputs and minimal extra code (2 lines). Comparisons between theoretical approaches will be shown, and evaluation against field experiments in the frequency range 5-150 GHz. SMRT is simple and elegant to use whilst providing a framework for future development within the

  19. RAPTOR. I. Time-dependent radiative transfer in arbitrary spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronzwaer, T.; Davelaar, J.; Younsi, Z.; Mościbrodzka, M.; Falcke, H.; Kramer, M.; Rezzolla, L.

    2018-05-01

    Context. Observational efforts to image the immediate environment of a black hole at the scale of the event horizon benefit from the development of efficient imaging codes that are capable of producing synthetic data, which may be compared with observational data. Aims: We aim to present RAPTOR, a new public code that produces accurate images, animations, and spectra of relativistic plasmas in strong gravity by numerically integrating the equations of motion of light rays and performing time-dependent radiative transfer calculations along the rays. The code is compatible with any analytical or numerical spacetime. It is hardware-agnostic and may be compiled and run both on GPUs and CPUs. Methods: We describe the algorithms used in RAPTOR and test the code's performance. We have performed a detailed comparison of RAPTOR output with that of other radiative-transfer codes and demonstrate convergence of the results. We then applied RAPTOR to study accretion models of supermassive black holes, performing time-dependent radiative transfer through general relativistic magneto-hydrodynamical (GRMHD) simulations and investigating the expected observational differences between the so-called fast-light and slow-light paradigms. Results: Using RAPTOR to produce synthetic images and light curves of a GRMHD model of an accreting black hole, we find that the relative difference between fast-light and slow-light light curves is less than 5%. Using two distinct radiative-transfer codes to process the same data, we find integrated flux densities with a relative difference less than 0.01%. Conclusions: For two-dimensional GRMHD models, such as those examined in this paper, the fast-light approximation suffices as long as errors of a few percent are acceptable. The convergence of the results of two different codes demonstrates that they are, at a minimum, consistent. The public version of RAPTOR is available at the following URL: http://https://github.com/tbronzwaer/raptor

  20. Radiative transfer in falling snow: A two-stream approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Gary

    1989-04-01

    Light transmission measurements through falling snow have produced results unexplainable by single scattering arguments. A two-stream approximation to radiative transfer is used to derive an analytical expression that describes the effects of multiple scattering as a function of the snow optical depth and the snow asymmetry parameter. The approximate solution is simple and it may be as accurate as the exact solution for describing the transmission measurements within the limits of experimental uncertainties.

  1. Millimeter wave radiative transfer studies for precipitation measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vivekanandan, J.; Evans, Frank

    1989-01-01

    Scattering calculations using the discrete dipole approximation and vector radiative transfer calculations were performed to model multiparameter radar return and passive microwave emission for a simple model of a winter storm. The issue of dendrite riming was addressed by computing scattering properties of thin ice disks with varying bulk density. It was shown that C-band multiparameter radar contains information about particle density and the number concentration of the ice particles. The radiative transfer modeling indicated that polarized multifrequency passive microwave emission may be used to infer some properties of ice hydrometers. Detailed radar modeling and vector radiative transfer modeling is in progress to enhance the understanding of simultaneous radar and radiometer measurements, as in the case of the proposed TRMM field program. A one-dimensional cloud model will be used to simulate the storm structure in detail and study the microphysics, such as size and density. Multifrequency polarized radiometer measurements from the SSMI satellite instrument will be analyzed in relation to dual-frequency and dual-polarization radar measurements.

  2. IPRT polarized radiative transfer model intercomparison project - Phase A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emde, Claudia; Barlakas, Vasileios; Cornet, Céline; Evans, Frank; Korkin, Sergey; Ota, Yoshifumi; Labonnote, Laurent C.; Lyapustin, Alexei; Macke, Andreas; Mayer, Bernhard; Wendisch, Manfred

    2015-10-01

    The polarization state of electromagnetic radiation scattered by atmospheric particles such as aerosols, cloud droplets, or ice crystals contains much more information about the optical and microphysical properties than the total intensity alone. For this reason an increasing number of polarimetric observations are performed from space, from the ground and from aircraft. Polarized radiative transfer models are required to interpret and analyse these measurements and to develop retrieval algorithms exploiting polarimetric observations. In the last years a large number of new codes have been developed, mostly for specific applications. Benchmark results are available for specific cases, but not for more sophisticated scenarios including polarized surface reflection and multi-layer atmospheres. The International Polarized Radiative Transfer (IPRT) working group of the International Radiation Commission (IRC) has initiated a model intercomparison project in order to fill this gap. This paper presents the results of the first phase A of the IPRT project which includes ten test cases, from simple setups with only one layer and Rayleigh scattering to rather sophisticated setups with a cloud embedded in a standard atmosphere above an ocean surface. All scenarios in the first phase A of the intercomparison project are for a one-dimensional plane-parallel model geometry. The commonly established benchmark results are available at the IPRT website.

  3. SPAMCART: a code for smoothed particle Monte Carlo radiative transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomax, O.; Whitworth, A. P.

    2016-10-01

    We present a code for generating synthetic spectral energy distributions and intensity maps from smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulation snapshots. The code is based on the Lucy Monte Carlo radiative transfer method, I.e. it follows discrete luminosity packets as they propagate through a density field, and then uses their trajectories to compute the radiative equilibrium temperature of the ambient dust. The sources can be extended and/or embedded, and discrete and/or diffuse. The density is not mapped on to a grid, and therefore the calculation is performed at exactly the same resolution as the hydrodynamics. We present two example calculations using this method. First, we demonstrate that the code strictly adheres to Kirchhoff's law of radiation. Secondly, we present synthetic intensity maps and spectra of an embedded protostellar multiple system. The algorithm uses data structures that are already constructed for other purposes in modern particle codes. It is therefore relatively simple to implement.

  4. A RADIATION TRANSFER SOLVER FOR ATHENA USING SHORT CHARACTERISTICS

    SciT

    Davis, Shane W.; Stone, James M.; Jiang Yanfei

    2012-03-01

    We describe the implementation of a module for the Athena magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) code that solves the time-independent, multi-frequency radiative transfer (RT) equation on multidimensional Cartesian simulation domains, including scattering and non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) effects. The module is based on well known and well tested algorithms developed for modeling stellar atmospheres, including the method of short characteristics to solve the RT equation, accelerated Lambda iteration to handle scattering and non-LTE effects, and parallelization via domain decomposition. The module serves several purposes: it can be used to generate spectra and images, to compute a variable Eddington tensor (VET) for full radiationmore » MHD simulations, and to calculate the heating and cooling source terms in the MHD equations in flows where radiation pressure is small compared with gas pressure. For the latter case, the module is combined with the standard MHD integrators using operator splitting: we describe this approach in detail, including a new constraint on the time step for stability due to radiation diffusion modes. Implementation of the VET method for radiation pressure dominated flows is described in a companion paper. We present results from a suite of test problems for both the RT solver itself and for dynamical problems that include radiative heating and cooling. These tests demonstrate that the radiative transfer solution is accurate and confirm that the operator split method is stable, convergent, and efficient for problems of interest. We demonstrate there is no need to adopt ad hoc assumptions of questionable accuracy to solve RT problems in concert with MHD: the computational cost for our general-purpose module for simple (e.g., LTE gray) problems can be comparable to or less than a single time step of Athena's MHD integrators, and only few times more expensive than that for more general (non-LTE) problems.« less

  5. Efficient radiative transfer methods for continuum and line transfer in large three-dimensional models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juvela, Mika J.

    The relationship between physical conditions of an interstellar cloud and the observed radiation is defined by the radiative transfer problem. Radiative transfer calculations are needed if, e.g., one wants to disentangle abundance variations from excitation effects or wants to model variations of dust properties inside an interstellar cloud. New observational facilities (e.g., ALMA and Herschel) will bring improved accuracy both in terms of intensity and spatial resolution. This will enable detailed studies of the densest sub-structures of interstellar clouds and star forming regions. Such observations must be interpreted with accurate radiative transfer methods and realistic source models. In many cases this will mean modelling in three dimensions. High optical depths and observed wide range of linear scales are, however, challenging for radiative transfer modelling. A large range of linear scales can be accessed only with hierarchical models. Figure 1 shows an example of the use of a hierarchical grid for radiative transfer calculations when the original model cloud (L=10 pc, =500 cm-3) was based a MHD simulation carried out on a regular grid (Juvela & Padoan, 2005). For computed line intensities an accuracy of 10% was still reached when the number of individual cells (and the run time) was reduced by a factor of ten. This illustrates how, as long as cloud is not extremely optically thick, most of the emission comes from a small sub-volume. It is also worth noting that while errors are ~10% for any given point they are much smaller when compared with intensity variations. In particular, calculations on hierarchical grid recovered the spatial power spectrum of line emission with very good accuracy. Monte Carlo codes are used widely in both continuum and line transfer calculations. Like any lambda iteration schemes these suffer from slow convergence when models are optically thick. In line transfer Accelerated Monte Carlo methods (AMC) present a partial solution

  6. Modeling Radiative Heat Transfer and Turbulence-Radiation Interactions in Engines

    SciT

    Paul, Chandan; Sircar, Arpan; Ferreyro-Fernandez, Sebastian

    Detailed radiation modelling in piston engines has received relatively little attention to date. Recently, it is being revisited in light of current trends towards higher operating pressures and higher levels of exhaust-gas recirculation, both of which enhance molecular gas radiation. Advanced high-efficiency engines also are expected to function closer to the limits of stable operation, where even small perturbations to the energy balance can have a large influence on system behavior. Here several different spectral radiation property models and radiative transfer equation (RTE) solvers have been implemented in an OpenFOAM-based engine CFD code, and simulations have been performed for amore » full-load (peak pressure ~200 bar) heavy-duty diesel engine. Differences in computed temperature fields, NO and soot levels, and wall heat transfer rates are shown for different combinations of spectral models and RTE solvers. The relative importance of molecular gas radiation versus soot radiation is examined. And the influence of turbulence-radiation interactions is determined by comparing results obtained using local mean values of composition and temperature to compute radiative emission and absorption with those obtained using a particle-based transported probability density function method.« less

  7. Radiative Heat Transfer and Turbulence-Radiation Interactions in a Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, C.; Sircar, A.; Ferreyro, S.; Imren, A.; Haworth, D. C.; Roy, S.; Ge, W.; Modest, M. F.

    2016-11-01

    Radiation in piston engines has received relatively little attention to date. Recently, it is being revisited in light of current trends towards higher operating pressures and higher levels of exhaust-gas recirculation, both of which enhance molecular gas radiation. Advanced high-efficiency engines also are expected to function closer to the limits of stable operation, where even small perturbations to the energy balance can have a large influence on system behavior. Here several different spectral radiation property models and radiative transfer equation (RTE) solvers have been implemented in an OpenFOAM-based engine CFD code, and simulations have been performed for a heavy-duty diesel engine. Differences in computed temperature fields, NO and soot levels, and wall heat transfer rates are shown for different combinations of spectral models and RTE solvers. The relative importance of molecular gas radiation versus soot radiation is examined. And the influence of turbulence-radiation interactions is determined by comparing results obtained using local mean values of composition and temperature to compute radiative emission and absorption with those obtained using a particle-based transported probability density function method. DOE, NSF.

  8. Computing Radiative Transfer in a 3D Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Allmen, Paul; Lee, Seungwon

    2012-01-01

    A package of software computes the time-dependent propagation of a narrow laser beam in an arbitrary three- dimensional (3D) medium with absorption and scattering, using the transient-discrete-ordinates method and a direct integration method. Unlike prior software that utilizes a Monte Carlo method, this software enables simulation at very small signal-to-noise ratios. The ability to simulate propagation of a narrow laser beam in a 3D medium is an improvement over other discrete-ordinate software. Unlike other direct-integration software, this software is not limited to simulation of propagation of thermal radiation with broad angular spread in three dimensions or of a laser pulse with narrow angular spread in two dimensions. Uses for this software include (1) computing scattering of a pulsed laser beam on a material having given elastic scattering and absorption profiles, and (2) evaluating concepts for laser-based instruments for sensing oceanic turbulence and related measurements of oceanic mixed-layer depths. With suitable augmentation, this software could be used to compute radiative transfer in ultrasound imaging in biological tissues, radiative transfer in the upper Earth crust for oil exploration, and propagation of laser pulses in telecommunication applications.

  9. Efficient Radiative Transfer for Dynamically Evolving Stratified Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judge, Philip G.

    2017-12-01

    We present a fast multi-level and multi-atom non-local thermodynamic equilibrium radiative transfer method for dynamically evolving stratified atmospheres, such as the solar atmosphere. The preconditioning method of Rybicki & Hummer (RH92) is adopted. But, pressed for the need of speed and stability, a “second-order escape probability” scheme is implemented within the framework of the RH92 method, in which frequency- and angle-integrals are carried out analytically. While minimizing the computational work needed, this comes at the expense of numerical accuracy. The iteration scheme is local, the formal solutions for the intensities are the only non-local component. At present the methods have been coded for vertical transport, applicable to atmospheres that are highly stratified. The probabilistic method seems adequately fast, stable, and sufficiently accurate for exploring dynamical interactions between the evolving MHD atmosphere and radiation using current computer hardware. Current 2D and 3D dynamics codes do not include this interaction as consistently as the current method does. The solutions generated may ultimately serve as initial conditions for dynamical calculations including full 3D radiative transfer. The National Center for Atmospheric Research is sponsored by the National Science Foundation.

  10. Radiative transfer of X-rays in the solar corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acton, L. W.

    1978-01-01

    The problem of resonance scattering of X-ray emission lines in the solar corona is investigated. For the resonance lines of some helium-like ions, significant optical depths are reached over distances small compared with the size of typical coronal features. A general integral equation for the transfer of resonance-line radiation under solar coronal conditions is derived. This expression is in a form useful for modeling the complex three-dimensional temperature and density structure of coronal active regions. The transfer equation is then cast in a form illustrating the terms which give rise to the attenuation or enhancement of the resonance-line intensity. The source function for helium-like oxygen (O VII) under coronal conditions is computed and discussed in terms of the relative importance of scattering.

  11. Comparison of vibrational conductivity and radiative energy transfer methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bot, A.

    2005-05-01

    This paper is concerned with the comparison of two methods well suited for the prediction of the wideband response of built-up structures subjected to high-frequency vibrational excitation. The first method is sometimes called the vibrational conductivity method and the second one is rather known as the radiosity method in the field of acoustics, or the radiative energy transfer method. Both are based on quite similar physical assumptions i.e. uncorrelated sources, mean response and high-frequency excitation. Both are based on analogies with some equations encountered in the field of heat transfer. However these models do not lead to similar results. This paper compares the two methods. Some numerical simulations on a pair of plates joined along one edge are provided to illustrate the discussion.

  12. Unravelling radiative energy transfer in solid-state lighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melikov, Rustamzhon; Press, Daniel Aaron; Ganesh Kumar, Baskaran; Sadeghi, Sadra; Nizamoglu, Sedat

    2018-01-01

    Today, a wide variety of organic and inorganic luminescent materials (e.g., phosphors, quantum dots, etc.) are being used for lighting and new materials (e.g., graphene, perovskite, etc.) are currently under investigation. However, the understanding of radiative energy transfer is limited, even though it is critical to understand and improve the performance levels of solid-state lighting devices. In this study, we derived a matrix approach that includes absorption, reabsorption, inter-absorption and their iterative and combinatorial interactions for one and multiple types of fluorophores, which is simplified to an analytical matrix. This mathematical approach gives results that agree well with the measured spectral and efficiency characteristics of color-conversion light-emitting diodes. Moreover, it also provides a deep physical insight by uncovering the entire radiative interactions and their contribution to the output optical spectrum. The model is universal and applicable for all kinds of fluorophores.

  13. Formal Solutions for Polarized Radiative Transfer. I. The DELO Family

    SciT

    Janett, Gioele; Carlin, Edgar S.; Steiner, Oskar

    The discussion regarding the numerical integration of the polarized radiative transfer equation is still open and the comparison between the different numerical schemes proposed by different authors in the past is not fully clear. Aiming at facilitating the comprehension of the advantages and drawbacks of the different formal solvers, this work presents a reference paradigm for their characterization based on the concepts of order of accuracy , stability , and computational cost . Special attention is paid to understand the numerical methods belonging to the Diagonal Element Lambda Operator family, in an attempt to highlight their specificities.

  14. Projection methods for line radiative transfer in spherical media.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anusha, L. S.; Nagendra, K. N.

    An efficient numerical method called the Preconditioned Bi-Conjugate Gradient (Pre-BiCG) method is presented for the solution of radiative transfer equation in spherical geometry. A variant of this method called Stabilized Preconditioned Bi-Conjugate Gradient (Pre-BiCG-STAB) is also presented. These methods are based on projections on the subspaces of the n dimensional Euclidean space mathbb {R}n called Krylov subspaces. The methods are shown to be faster in terms of convergence rate compared to the contemporary iterative methods such as Jacobi, Gauss-Seidel and Successive Over Relaxation (SOR).

  15. The diffusion approximation. An application to radiative transfer in clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arduini, R. F.; Barkstrom, B. R.

    1976-01-01

    It is shown how the radiative transfer equation reduces to the diffusion equation. To keep the mathematics as simple as possible, the approximation is applied to a cylindrical cloud of radius R and height h. The diffusion equation separates in cylindrical coordinates and, in a sample calculation, the solution is evaluated for a range of cloud radii with cloud heights of 0.5 km and 1.0 km. The simplicity of the method and the speed with which solutions are obtained give it potential as a tool with which to study the effects of finite-sized clouds on the albedo of the earth-atmosphere system.

  16. Peregrinations through topics in light scattering and radiative transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kattawar, George W.

    2016-07-01

    In this van de Hulst essay, I have taken the liberty to present a journey through some topics in light scattering and radiative transfer which I feel were major contributions to the field but the number of topics I would like to cover is far more numerous than I have the time or the space to present. I also wanted to share with the reader some heartwarming memories I have of my wonderful friend and truly distinguished colleague Hendrik Christoffel van de Hulst (affectionately known to his colleagues as "Henk") whom I consider to be one of the preeminent scientists of his era.

  17. Numerical Radiative Transfer and the Hydrogen Reionization of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkova, M.

    2011-03-01

    One of the most interesting questions in cosmology is to understand how the Universe evolved from its nearly uniform and simple state briefly after the Big Bang to the complex state we see around us today. In particular, we would like to explain how galaxies have formed, and why they have the properties that we observe in the local Universe. Computer simulations play a highly important role in studying these questions, because they allow one to follow the dynamical equations of gravity and hydrodynamics well into the non-linear regime of the growth of cosmic structures. The current generation of simulation codes for cosmological structure formation calculates the self-gravity of dark matter and cosmic gas, and the fluid dynamics of the cosmic gas, but radiation processes are typically not taken into account, or only at the level of a spatially uniform, externally imposed background field. However, we know that the radiation field has been highly inhomogeneous during certain phases of the growth of structure, and may have in fact provided important feedback effects for galaxy formation. In particular, it is well established that the diffuse gas in the universe was nearly fully neutral after recombination at very high redshift, but today this gas is highly ionized. Sometime during the evolution, a transition to the ionized state must have occurred, a process we refer to as reionization. The UV radiation responsible for this reionization is now permeating the universe and may in part explain why small dwarf galaxies have so low luminosities. It is therefore clear that accurate and self-consistent studies of galaxy formation and of the dynamics of the reionization process should ideally be done with simulation codes that directly include a treatment of radiative transfer, and that account for all relevant source and sink terms of the radiation. We present a novel numerical implementation of radiative transfer in the cosmological smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH

  18. Infrared radiative transfer through a regular array of cuboidal clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    HARSHVARDHAN; Weinman, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    Infrared radiative transfer through a regular array of cuboidal clouds is studied and the interaction of the sides of the clouds with each other and the ground is considered. The theory is developed for black clouds and is extended to scattering clouds using a variable azimuth two-stream approximation. It is shown that geometrical considerations often dominate over the microphysical aspects of radiative transfer through the clouds. For example, the difference in simulated 10 micron brightness temperature between black isothermal cubic clouds and cubic clouds of optical depth 10, is less than 2 deg for zenith angles less than 50 deg for all cloud fractions when viewed parallel to the array. The results show that serious errors are made in flux and cooling rate computations if broken clouds are modeled as planiform. Radiances computed by the usual practice of area-weighting cloudy and clear sky radiances are in error by 2 to 8 K in brightness temperature for cubic clouds over a wide range of cloud fractions and zenith angles. It is also shown that the lapse rate does not markedly affect the exiting radiances for cuboidal clouds of unit aspect ratio and optical depth 10.

  19. Radiative transfer code SHARM for atmospheric and terrestrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyapustin, A. I.

    2005-12-01

    An overview of the publicly available radiative transfer Spherical Harmonics code (SHARM) is presented. SHARM is a rigorous code, as accurate as the Discrete Ordinate Radiative Transfer (DISORT) code, yet faster. It performs simultaneous calculations for different solar zenith angles, view zenith angles, and view azimuths and allows the user to make multiwavelength calculations in one run. The Δ-M method is implemented for calculations with highly anisotropic phase functions. Rayleigh scattering is automatically included as a function of wavelength, surface elevation, and the selected vertical profile of one of the standard atmospheric models. The current version of the SHARM code does not explicitly include atmospheric gaseous absorption, which should be provided by the user. The SHARM code has several built-in models of the bidirectional reflectance of land and wind-ruffled water surfaces that are most widely used in research and satellite data processing. A modification of the SHARM code with the built-in Mie algorithm designed for calculations with spherical aerosols is also described.

  20. Radiative transfer code SHARM for atmospheric and terrestrial applications.

    PubMed

    Lyapustin, A I

    2005-12-20

    An overview of the publicly available radiative transfer Spherical Harmonics code (SHARM) is presented. SHARM is a rigorous code, as accurate as the Discrete Ordinate Radiative Transfer (DISORT) code, yet faster. It performs simultaneous calculations for different solar zenith angles, view zenith angles, and view azimuths and allows the user to make multiwavelength calculations in one run. The Delta-M method is implemented for calculations with highly anisotropic phase functions. Rayleigh scattering is automatically included as a function of wavelength, surface elevation, and the selected vertical profile of one of the standard atmospheric models. The current version of the SHARM code does not explicitly include atmospheric gaseous absorption, which should be provided by the user. The SHARM code has several built-in models of the bidirectional reflectance of land and wind-ruffled water surfaces that are most widely used in research and satellite data processing. A modification of the SHARM code with the built-in Mie algorithm designed for calculations with spherical aerosols is also described.

  1. Suomi NPP VIIRS Striping Analysis using Radiative Transfer Model Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Cao, C.

    2015-12-01

    Modern satellite radiometers such as VIIRS have many detectors with slightly different relative spectral response (RSR). These differences can introduce artifacts such as striping in the imagery. In recent studies we have analyzed the striping pattern related to the detector level RSR difference in VIIRS Thermal Emissive Bands (TEB) M15 and M16, which includes line-by-line radiative transfer model (LBLRTM) detector level response study and onboard detector stability evaluation using the solar diffuser. Now we extend these analysis to the Reflective Solar Bands (RSB) using MODTRAN atmospheric radiative transfer model (RTM) for detector level radiance simulation. Previous studies analyzed the striping pattern in the images of VIIRS ocean color and reflectance in RSB, further studies about the root cause for striping are still needed. In this study, we will use the MODTRAN model at spectral resolution of 1 cm^-1 under different atmospheric conditions for VIIRS RSB, for example band M1 centered at 410nm which is used for Ocean Color product retrieval. The impact of detector level RSR difference, atmospheric dependency, and solar geometry on the striping in VIIRS SDR imagery will be investigated. The cumulative histogram method used successfully for the TEB striping analysis will be used to quantify the striping. These analysis help S-NPP and J1 to better understand the root cause for VIIRS image artifacts and reduce the uncertainties in geophysical retrievals to meet the user needs.

  2. Radiative Transfer Modeling in Proto-planetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasper, David; Jang-Condell, Hannah; Kloster, Dylan

    2016-01-01

    Young Stellar Objects (YSOs) are rich astronomical research environments. Planets form in circumstellar disks of gas and dust around YSOs. With ever increasing capabilities of the observational instruments designed to look at these proto-planetary disks, most notably GPI, SPHERE, and ALMA, more accurate interfaces must be made to connect modeling of the disks with observation. PaRTY (Parallel Radiative Transfer in YSOs) is a code developed previously to model the observable density and temperature structure of such a disk by self-consistently calculating the structure of the disk based on radiative transfer physics. We present upgrades we are implementing to the PaRTY code to improve its accuracy and flexibility. These upgrades include: creating a two-sided disk model, implementing a spherical coordinate system, and implementing wavelength-dependent opacities. These upgrades will address problems in the PaRTY code of infinite optical thickness, calculation under/over-resolution, and wavelength-independent photon penetration depths, respectively. The upgraded code will be used to better model disk perturbations resulting from planet formation.

  3. 3ARM: A Fast, Accurate Radiative Transfer Model for Use in Climate Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstrom, R. W.; Kinne, S.; Sokolik, I. N.; Toon, O. B.; Mlawer, E. J.; Clough, S. A.; Ackerman, T. P.; Mather, J.

    1996-01-01

    A new radiative transfer model combining the efforts of three groups of researchers is discussed. The model accurately computes radiative transfer in a inhomogeneous absorbing, scattering and emitting atmospheres. As an illustration of the model, results are shown for the effects of dust on the thermal radiation.

  4. 3ARM: A Fast, Accurate Radiative Transfer Model for use in Climate Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstrom, R. W.; Kinne, S.; Sokolik, I. N.; Toon, O. B.; Mlawer, E. J.; Clough, S. A.; Ackerman, T. P.; Mather, J.

    1996-01-01

    A new radiative transfer model combining the efforts of three groups of researchers is discussed. The model accurately computes radiative transfer in a inhomogeneous absorbing, scattering and emitting atmospheres. As an illustration of the model, results are shown for the effects of dust on the thermal radiation.

  5. 3ARM: A Fast, Accurate Radiative Transfer Model For Use in Climate Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstrom, R. W.; Kinne, S.; Sokolik, I. N.; Toon, O. B.; Mlawer, E. J.; Clough, S. A.; Ackerman, T. P.; Mather, J.

    1996-01-01

    A new radiative transfer model combining the efforts of three groups of researchers is discussed. The model accurately computes radiative transfer in a inhomogeneous absorbing, scattering and emitting atmospheres. As an illustration of the model, results are shown for the effects of dust on the thermal radiation.

  6. Impact of Multiple Scattering on Longwave Radiative Transfer Involving Clouds

    DOE PAGES

    Kuo, Chia-Pang; Yang, Ping; Huang, Xianglei; ...

    2017-12-13

    General circulation models (GCMs) are extensively used to estimate the influence of clouds on the global energy budget and other aspects of climate. Because radiative transfer computations involved in GCMs are costly, it is typical to consider only absorption but not scattering by clouds in longwave (LW) spectral bands. In this study, the flux and heating rate biases due to neglecting the scattering of LW radiation by clouds are quantified by using advanced cloud optical property models, and satellite data from Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO), CloudSat, Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES), and Moderatemore » Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) merged products (CCCM). From the products, information about the atmosphere and clouds (microphysical and buck optical properties, and top and base heights) is used to simulate fluxes and heating rates. One-year global simulations for 2010 show that the LW scattering decreases top-of-atmosphere (TOA) upward flux and increases surface downward flux by 2.6 and 1.2 W/m 2, respectively, or approximately 10% and 5% of the TOA and surface LW cloud radiative effect, respectively. Regional TOA upward flux biases are as much as 5% of global averaged outgoing longwave radiation (OLR). LW scattering causes approximately 0.018 K/d cooling at the tropopause and about 0.028 K/d heating at the surface. Furthermore, over 40% of the total OLR bias for ice clouds is observed in 350–500 cm -1. Overall, the radiative effects associated with neglecting LW scattering are comparable to the counterpart due to doubling atmospheric CO 2 under clear-sky conditions.« less

  7. Preliminary design for Arctic atmospheric radiative transfer experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, B. D.; Church, H. W.; Stamnes, K.; Shaw, G.; Filyushkin, V.; Jin, Z.; Ellingson, R. G.; Tsay, S. C.

    1995-01-01

    If current plans are realized, within the next few years, an extraordinary set of coordinated research efforts focusing on energy flows in the Arctic will be implemented. All are motivated by the prospect of global climate change. SHEBA (Surface Energy Budget of the Arctic Ocean), led by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the Office of Naval Research (ONR), involves instrumenting an ice camp in the perennial Arctic ice pack, and taking data for 12-18 months. The ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement) North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Arctic Ocean (NSA/AAO) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) focuses on atmospheric radiative transport, especially in the presence of clouds. The NSA/AAO CART involves instrumenting a sizeable area on the North Slope of Alaska and adjacent waters in the vicinity of Barrow, and acquiring data over a period of about 10 years. FIRE (First ISCCP (International Satellite Cloud Climatology Program) Regional Experiment) Phase 3 is a program led by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) which focuses on Arctic clouds, and which is coordinated with SHEBA and ARM. FIRE has historically emphasized data from airborne and satellite platforms. All three program anticipate initiating Arctic data acquisition during spring, 1997. In light of his historic opportunity, the authors discuss a strawman atmospheric radiative transfer experimental plan that identifies which features of the radiative transport models they think should be tested, what experimental data are required for each type of test, the platforms and instrumentation necessary to acquire those data, and in general terms, how the experiments could be conducted. Aspects of the plan are applicable to all three programs.

  8. Discrete angle radiative transfer. 3. Numerical results and meteorological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Anthony; Gabriel, Philip; Lovejoy, Shuan; Schertzer, Daniel; Austin, Geoffrey L.

    1990-07-01

    In the first two installments of this series, various cloud models were studied with angularly discretized versions of radiative transfer. This simplification allows the effects of cloud inhomogeneity to be studied in some detail. The families of scattering media investigated were those whose members are related to each other by scale changing operations that involve only ratios of their sizes (``scaling'' geometries). In part 1 it was argued that, in the case of conservative scattering, the reflection and transmission coefficients of these families should vary algebraically with cloud size in the asymptotically thick regime, thus allowing us to define scaling exponents and corresponding ``universality'' classes. In part 2 this was further justified (by using analytical renormalization methods) for homogeneous clouds in one, two, and three spatial dimensions (i.e., slabs, squares, or triangles and cubes, respectively) as well as for a simple deterministic fractal cloud. Here the same systems are studied numerically. The results confirm (1) that renormalization is qualitatively correct (while quantitatively poor), and (2) more importantly, they support the conjecture that the universality classes of discrete and continuous angle radiative transfer are generally identical. Additional numerical results are obtained for a simple class of scale invariant (fractal) clouds that arises when modeling the concentration of cloud liquid water into ever smaller regions by advection in turbulent cascades. These so-called random ``β models'' are (also) characterized by a single fractal dimension. Both open and cyclical horizontal boundary conditions are considered. These and previous results are constrasted with plane-parallel predictions, and measures of systematic error are defined as ``packing factors'' which are found to diverge algebraically with average optical thickness and are significant even when the scaling behavior is very limited in range. Several meteorological

  9. Discrete Angle Radiative Transfer in Uniform and Extremely Variable Clouds.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriel, Philip Mitri

    The transfer of radiant energy in highly inhomogeneous media is a difficult problem that is encountered in many geophysical applications. It is the purpose of this thesis to study some problems connected with the scattering of solar radiation in natural clouds. Extreme variability in the optical density of these clouds is often believed to occur regularly. In order to facilitate study of very inhomogeneous optical media such as clouds, the difficult angular part of radiative transfer calculations is simplified by considering a series of models in which conservative scattering only occurs in discrete directions. Analytic and numerical results for the radiative properties of these Discrete Angle Radiative Transfer (DART) systems are obtained in the limits of both optically thin and thick media. Specific results include: (a) In thick homogeneous media, the albedo (reflection coefficient), unlike the transmission, cannot be obtained by a diffusion equation. (b) With the aid of an exact analogy with an early model of conductor/superconductor mixtures, it is argued that inhomogeneous media with embedded holes, neither the transmission, nor the albedo can be described by diffusive random walks. (c) Using renormalization methods, it is shown that thin cloud behaviour is sensitive to the scattering phase functions since it is associated with a repelling fixed point, whereas, the thick cloud limit is universal in that it is phase function independent, and associated with an attracting fixed point. (d) In fractal media, the optical thickness required for a given albedo or transmission can differ by large factors from that required in the corresponding plane parallel geometry. The relevant scaling exponents have been calculated in a very simple example. (e) Important global meteorological and climatological implications of the above are discussed when applied to the scattering of visible light in clouds. In the remote sensing context, an analysis of satellite data reveals that

  10. Community Radiative Transfer Model for Satellite Radiance Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Q.; Han, Y.; Chen, Y.; van Delst, P.; Weng, F.

    2007-12-01

    The Community Radiative Transfer Model (CRTM) [Weng et al., 2005], developed at U.S. Joint Center for Satellite Data Assimilation (JCSDA), has been used for the satellite radiance simulation and the radiance derivatives to the surface/atmospheric parameters in the physical retrieval [Boukabara et al., 2007], data assimilation [Le Marshall et al., 2006] and many others [Han et al., 2006; Liu and Weng, 2006]. CRTM has been become a key component in U.S. data assimilation at the National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) [Okamoto and. Derber, 2006]. It is a core engine for NOAA/NESDIS Microwave Integrated Retrieval System (MIRS) [Boukabara et al., 2007]. The CRTM has also been implemented into Weather Research Forecasting (WRF) model. The CRTM is known as modular program development [van Delst et al., 2006], which breaks down the radiative transfer model into components, each of which is encapsulated in one or several program modules and can be developed independently of the others. The key components of the CRTM are the advanced surface emissivity and reflectivity models [van Delst and Wu, 2000; English 1999; Weng et al. 2001] including a polarimetric surface emissivity model [Liu and Weng, 2003], the fast Optical Path Transmittance (OPTRAN) model [Xiong et al., 2006], the cloud absorption/scattering look-up tables [Yang et al., 2000], and the advanced radiative solver [Liu and Weng, 2006]. The CRTM can also compute aerosol radiance. The CRTM can deal with Zeeman splitting effect, the energy received in the channels for the stratosphere and mesosphere depends strongly on the geomagnetic field and its orientation with respect to the direction of observation [Han et al., 2007]. We will also present the applications of the CRTM in hurricane detection and forecasting, in the determination of stratospheric temperature, a key contributing factor to photochemical ozone depletion, and in reanalysis and climate studies.

  11. Radiation transfer in plant canopies - Transmission of direct solar radiation and the role of leaf orientation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verstraete, Michel M.

    1987-01-01

    Understanding the details of the interaction between the radiation field and plant structures is important climatically because of the influence of vegetation on the surface water and energy balance, but also biologically, since solar radiation provides the energy necessary for photosynthesis. The problem is complex because of the extreme variety of vegetation forms in space and time, as well as within and across plant species. This one-dimensional vertical multilayer model describes the transfer of direct solar radiation through a leaf canopy, accounting explicitly for the vertical inhomogeneities of a plant stand and leaf orientation, as well as heliotropic plant behavior. This model reproduces observational results on homogeneous canopies, but it is also well adapted to describe vertically inhomogeneous canopies. Some of the implications of leaf orientation and plant structure as far as light collection is concerned are briefly reviewed.

  12. Matrix operator theory of radiative transfer. I - Rayleigh scattering.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plass, G. N.; Kattawar, G. W.; Catchings, F. E.

    1973-01-01

    An entirely rigorous method for the solution of the equations for radiative transfer based on the matrix operator theory is reviewed. The advantages of the present method are: (1) all orders of the reflection and transmission matrices are calculated at once; (2) layers of any thickness may be combined, so that a realistic model of the atmosphere can be developed from any arbitrary number of layers, each with different properties and thicknesses; (3) calculations can readily be made for large optical depths and with highly anisotropic phase functions; (4) results are obtained for any desired value of the surface albedo including the value unity and for a large number of polar and azimuthal angles; (5) all fundamental equations can be interpreted immediately in terms of the physical interactions appropriate to the problem; and (6) both upward and downward radiance can be calculated at interior points from relatively simple expressions.

  13. Radiative Transfer Analysis of Neptune’s New Dark Vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tollefson, Joshua; Luszcz-Cook, Statia H.; Wong, Michael H.; de Pater, Imke

    2017-10-01

    A new dark spot on Neptune was discovered in late 2015, named: "SDS-2015" for "Southern Dark Spot discovered in 2015". Subsequent observations from Hubble Space Telescope Mid-Cycle 23 (PI: Wong) and the Outer Planetary Atmospheres Legacy (OPAL) programs (PI: Simon-Miller) took the first multispectral data over multiple viewing geometries of a Neptunian dark spot, spanning wavelengths from 336 to 763nm. SDS-2015 is visible at blue wavelengths, with contrast from the background atmosphere peaking at 467nm. In this abstract, we present a radiative transfer analysis of the dark spot and surrounding background atmosphere. We summarize our retrieved properties of Neptune's background atmosphere, including its aerosol structure and methane profile, and compare our findings in the optical wavelengths to those in the near-infrared. We then discuss various hypotheses about the make up of SDS-2015 and its interaction with the background atmosphere.

  14. Radiative Transfer Theory Verified by Controlled Laboratory Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.; Goldstein, Dennis H.; Chowdhary, Jacek; Lompado, Arthur

    2013-01-01

    We report the results of high-accuracy controlled laboratory measurements of the Stokes reflection matrix for suspensions of submicrometer-sized latex particles in water and compare them with the results of a numerically exact computer solution of the vector radiative transfer equation (VRTE). The quantitative performance of the VRTE is monitored by increasing the volume packing density of the latex particles from 2 to 10. Our results indicate that the VRTE can be applied safely to random particulate media with packing densities up to 2. VRTE results for packing densities of the order of 5 should be taken with caution, whereas the polarized bidirectional reflectivity of suspensions with larger packing densities cannot be accurately predicted. We demonstrate that a simple modification of the phase matrix entering the VRTE based on the so-called static structure factor can be a promising remedy that deserves further examination.

  15. Casimir effect and radiative heat transfer between Chern Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez Lopez, Pablo; Grushin, Adolfo; Tse, Wang-Kong; Dalvit, Diego

    2015-03-01

    Chern Insulators are a class of two-dimensional topological materials. Their electronic properties are different from conventional materials, and lead to interesting new physics as quantum Hall effect in absence of an external magnetic field. Here we will review some of their special properties and, in particular, we will discuss the radiative heat transfer and the Casimir effect between two planar Chern Insulators sheets. Finally, we will see how to control the intensity and sign of this Casimir force and the requirements to observe a repulsive Casimir force in the lab with those materials. The research leading to these results has received funding from the People Programme (Marie Curie Actions) of the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under REA Grant Agreement No. 302005.

  16. Radiative transfer and radiative driving of outflows in active galactic nuclei and starbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, G. S.; Ostriker, J. P.; Ciotti, L.

    2012-12-01

    To facilitate the study of black hole fuelling, star formation and feedback in galaxies, we outline a method for treating the radial forces on interstellar gas due to absorption of photons by dust grains. The method gives the correct behaviour in all of the relevant limits [dominated by the central point source; dominated by the distributed isotropic source; optically thin; optically thick to ultraviolet (UV)/optical; optically thick to infrared (IR)] and reasonably interpolates between the limits when necessary. The method is explicitly energy conserving so that UV/optical photons that are absorbed are not lost, but are rather redistributed to the IR where they may scatter out of the galaxy. We implement the radiative transfer algorithm in a two-dimensional hydrodynamical code designed to study feedback processes in the context of early-type galaxies. We find that the dynamics and final state of simulations are measurably but only moderately affected by radiative forces on dust, even when assumptions about the dust-to-gas ratio are varied from zero to a value appropriate for the Milky Way. In simulations with high gas densities designed to mimic ultraluminous IR galaxies with a star formation rate of several hundred solar masses per year, dust makes a more substantial contribution to the dynamics and outcome of the simulation. We find that, despite the large opacity of dust to UV radiation, the momentum input to the flow from radiation very rarely exceeds L/c due to two factors: the low opacity of dust to the re-radiated IR and the tendency for dust to be destroyed by sputtering in hot gas environments. We also develop a simplification of our radiative transfer algorithm that respects the essential physics but is much easier to implement and requires a fraction of the computational cost.

  17. A Radiative Transfer Simulation of Water Rotational Excitation in Comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, V.; Biver, N.; Bockelee-Morvan, D.; Crovisier, J.; Lecacheux, A.

    2005-08-01

    In order to interpret comet observations of the 557 GHz water line performed with the Odin satellite (e.g., Lecacheux et al. 2003, A&A, 402, 55), we have developed a numerical model for the simulation of optically thick water rotational emission in cometary coma. For the treatment of radiative transfer, we have elaborated a Monte Carlo code based on the accelerated lambda iteration algorithm presented in Hogerheijde and van der Tak (2000, A&A, 362, 697). The model assumes a spherically symmetric density distribution with constant expansion velocity. It includes the seven lowest rotational levels of ortho-water, which are the primarily populated levels in the rotationally cold gas of the coma. Collisions with water and electrons, and infrared pumping, are taken into account. The model is similar to that presented by Bensch and Bergin (2004, ApJ, 615, 531). We compared the results obtained with this new model with those obtained by the model of Bockelee-Morvan (1987, A&A, 181, 169). Bockelee-Morvan used the escape probability formalism to treat radiation trapping, which is in principle only valid for large velocity gradients. Surprisingly, the results of both models differ only by a few percent, showing that the escape probability formalism can be used with good confidence to treat rotational excitation in cometary atmospheres. This model will allow us to prepare future observations by the ESA Herschel Space Observatory. V.Zakharov acknowledges financial support from CNES.

  18. Martian Radiative Transfer Modeling Using the Optimal Spectral Sampling Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eluszkiewicz, J.; Cady-Pereira, K.; Uymin, G.; Moncet, J.-L.

    2005-01-01

    The large volume of existing and planned infrared observations of Mars have prompted the development of a new martian radiative transfer model that could be used in the retrievals of atmospheric and surface properties. The model is based on the Optimal Spectral Sampling (OSS) method [1]. The method is a fast and accurate monochromatic technique applicable to a wide range of remote sensing platforms (from microwave to UV) and was originally developed for the real-time processing of infrared and microwave data acquired by instruments aboard the satellites forming part of the next-generation global weather satellite system NPOESS (National Polarorbiting Operational Satellite System) [2]. As part of our on-going research related to the radiative properties of the martian polar caps, we have begun the development of a martian OSS model with the goal of using it to perform self-consistent atmospheric corrections necessary to retrieve caps emissivity from the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) spectra. While the caps will provide the initial focus area for applying the new model, it is hoped that the model will be of interest to the wider Mars remote sensing community.

  19. Radiative transfer of HCN: interpreting observations of hyperfine anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullins, A. M.; Loughnane, R. M.; Redman, M. P.; Wiles, B.; Guegan, N.; Barrett, J.; Keto, E. R.

    2016-07-01

    Molecules with hyperfine splitting of their rotational line spectra are useful probes of optical depth, via the relative line strengths of their hyperfine components. The hyperfine splitting is particularly advantageous in interpreting the physical conditions of the emitting gas because with a second rotational transition, both gas density and temperature can be derived. For HCN however, the relative strengths of the hyperfine lines are anomalous. They appear in ratios which can vary significantly from source to source, and are inconsistent with local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). This is the HCN hyperfine anomaly, and it prevents the use of simple LTE models of HCN emission to derive reliable optical depths. In this paper, we demonstrate how to model HCN hyperfine line emission, and derive accurate line ratios, spectral line shapes and optical depths. We show that by carrying out radiative transfer calculations over each hyperfine level individually, as opposed to summing them over each rotational level, the anomalous hyperfine emission emerges naturally. To do this requires not only accurate radiative rates between hyperfine states, but also accurate collisional rates. We investigate the effects of different sets of hyperfine collisional rates, derived via the proportional method and through direct recoupling calculations. Through an extensive parameter sweep over typical low-mass star-forming conditions, we show the HCN line ratios to be highly variable to optical depth. We also reproduce an observed effect whereby the red-blue asymmetry of the hyperfine lines (an infall signature) switches sense within a single rotational transition.

  20. Radiative transfer model of snow for bare ice regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanikawa, T.; Aoki, T.; Niwano, M.; Hosaka, M.; Shimada, R.; Hori, M.; Yamaguchi, S.

    2016-12-01

    Modeling a radiative transfer (RT) for coupled atmosphere-snow-bare ice systems is of fundamental importance for remote sensing applications to monitor snow and bare ice regions in the Greenland ice sheet and for accurate climate change predictions by regional and global climate models. Recently, the RT model for atmosphere-snow system was implemented for our regional and global climate models. However, the bare ice region where recently it has been expanded on the Greenland ice sheet due to the global warming, has not been implemented for these models, implying that this region leads miscalculations in these climate models. Thus, the RT model of snow for bare ice regions is needed for accurate climate change predictions. We developed the RT model for coupled atmosphere-snow-bare ice systems, and conducted a sensitivity analysis of the RT model to know the effect of snow, bare ice and geometry parameters on the spectral radiant quantities. The RT model considers snow and bare-ice inherent optical properties (IOPs), including snow grain size, air bubble size and its concentration and bare ice thickness. The conventional light scattering theory, Mie theory, was used for IOP calculations. Monte Carlo method was used for the multiple scattering. The sensitivity analyses showed that spectral albedo for the bare ice increased with increasing the concentration of the air bubble in the bare ice for visible wavelengths because the air bubble is scatterer with no absorption. For near infrared wavelengths, spectral albedo has no dependence on the air bubble due to the strong light absorption by ice. When increasing solar zenith angle, the spectral albedo were increased for all wavelengths. This is the similar trend with spectral snow albedo. Cloud cover influenced the bare ice spectral albedo by covering direct radiation into diffuse radiation. The purely diffuse radiation has an effective solar zenith angle near 50°. Converting direct into diffuse radiation reduces the

  1. Stochastic Radiative Transfer Model for Contaminated Rough Surfaces: A Framework for Detection System Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-01

    STOCHASTIC RADIATIVE TRANSFER MODEL FOR CONTAMINATED ROUGH SURFACES: A...of law, no person shall be subject to any penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid ...COVERED (From - To) Jan 2013 - Sep 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Stochastic Radiative Transfer Model for Contaminated Rough Surfaces: A Framework for

  2. A scalable plant-resolving radiative transfer model based on optimized GPU ray tracing

    A new model for radiative transfer in participating media and its application to complex plant canopies is presented. The goal was to be able to efficiently solve complex canopy-scale radiative transfer problems while also representing sub-plant heterogeneity. In the model, individual leaf surfaces ...

  3. Combined natural convection and non-gray radiation heat transfer in a horizontal annulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yujia; Zhang, Xiaobing; Howell, John R.

    2018-02-01

    Natural convection and non-gray radiation in an annulus containing a radiative participating gas is investigated. To determine the effect of non-gray radiation, the spectral line based weighted sum of gray gas is adopted to model the gas radiative properties. Case with only surface radiation (transparent medium) is also considered to see the relative contributions of surface radiation and gas radiation. The finite volume method is used to solve the mass, momentum, energy and radiative transfer equations. Comparisons between pure convection, case considering only surface radiation and case considering both gas radiation and surface radiation are made and the results show that radiation is not negligible and gas radiation becomes more important with increasing Rayleigh number (and the annulus size).

  4. Numerical study of radiative heat transfer and effects of thermal boundary conditions on CLC fuel reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Mansour, R.; Li, H.; Habib, M. A.; Hossain, M. M.

    2018-02-01

    Global warming has become a worldwide concern due to its severe impacts and consequences on the climate system and ecosystem. As a promising technology proving good carbon capture ability with low-efficiency penalty, Chemical Looping Combustion technology has risen much interest. However, the radiative heat transfer was hardly studied, nor its effects were clearly declared. The present work provides a mathematical model for radiative heat transfer within fuel reactor of chemical looping combustion systems and conducts a numerical research on the effects of boundary conditions, solid particles reflectivity, particles size, and the operating temperature. The results indicate that radiative heat transfer has very limited impacts on the flow pattern. Meanwhile, the temperature variations in the static bed region (where solid particles are dense) brought by radiation are also insignificant. However, the effects of radiation on temperature profiles within free bed region (where solid particles are very sparse) are obvious, especially when convective-radiative (mixed) boundary condition is applied on fuel reactor walls. Smaller oxygen carrier particle size results in larger absorption & scattering coefficients. The consideration of radiative heat transfer within fuel reactor increases the temperature gradient within free bed region. On the other hand, the conversion performance of fuel is nearly not affected by radiation heat transfer within fuel reactor. However, the consideration of radiative heat transfer enhances the heat transfer between the gas phase and solid phase, especially when the operating temperature is low.

  5. Lessons Learned from Radiative Transfer Simulations of the Venus Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arney, G.; Meadows, V. S.; Lincowski, A.

    2017-01-01

    The Venus atmosphere is extremely complex, and because of this the spectrum of Earths sister planet is likewise intricate and a challenge to model accurately. However, accurate modeling of Venus spectrum opens up multiple opportunities to better understand the planet next door, and even for understanding Venus-like planets beyond our solar system. Near-infrared (1-2.5 um, NIR) spectral windows observable on the Venus nigthside present the opportunity to probe beneath the Venusian cloud deck and measure thermal emission from the surface and lower atmosphere remotely from Earth or from orbit. These nigthside spectral windows were discovered by Allen and Crawford (1984) and have since been used measure trace gas abundances in the Venus lower atmosphere (less than 45 km), map surface emissivity varisions, and measure properties of the lower cloud deck. These windows sample radiation from below the cloud base at roughly 45 km, and pressures in this region range from roughly Earthlike (approx. 1 bar) up to 90 bars at the surface. Temperatures in this region are high: they range from about 400 K at the base of the cloud deck up to about 740 K at the surface. This high temperature and pressure presents several challenges to modelers attempting radiative transfer simulations of this region of the atmosphere, which we will review. Venus is also important to spectrally model to predict the remote observables of Venus-like exoplanets in anticipation of data from future observatories. Venus-like planets are likely one of the most common types of terrestrial planets and so simulations of them are valuable for planning observatory and detector properties of future telescopes being designed, as well as predicting the types of observations required to characterize them.

  6. Matrix operator theory of radiative transfer. 1: rayleigh scattering.

    PubMed

    Plass, G N; Kattawar, G W; Catchings, F E

    1973-02-01

    An entirely rigorous method for the solution of the equations for radiative transfer based on the matrix operator theory is reviewed. The advantages of the present method are: (1) all orders of the reflection and transmission matrices are calculated at once; (2) layers of any thickness may be combined, so that a realistic model of the atmosphere can be developed from any arbitrary number of layers, each with different properties and thicknesses; (3) calculations can readily be made for large optical depths and with highly anisotropic phase functions; (4) results are obtained for any desired value of the surface albedo including the value unity and for a large number of polar and azimuthal angles including the polar angle theta = 0 degrees ; (5) all fundamental equations can be interpreted immediately in terms of the physical interactions appropriate to the problem; (6) both upward and downward radiance can be calculated at interior points from relatively simple expressions. Both the general theory and its history together with the method of calculation are discussed. As a first example of the method numerous curves are given for both the reflected and transmitted radiance for Rayleigh scattering from a homogeneous layer for a range of optical thicknesses from 0.0019 to 4096, surface albedo A = 0, 0.2, and 1, and cosine of solar zenith angle micro = 1, 0.5397, and 0.1882. It is shown that the matrix operator approach contains the doubling method as a special case.

  7. Modeling Planet-Building Stellar Disks with Radiative Transfer Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swearingen, Jeremy R.; Sitko, Michael L.; Whitney, Barbara; Grady, Carol A.; Wagner, Kevin Robert; Champney, Elizabeth H.; Johnson, Alexa N.; Warren, Chelsea C.; Russell, Ray W.; Hammel, Heidi B.; Lisse, Casey M.; Cure, Michel; Kraus, Stefan; Fukagawa, Misato; Calvet, Nuria; Espaillat, Catherine; Monnier, John D.; Millan-Gabet, Rafael; Wilner, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the nature of the many planetary systems found outside of our own solar system cannot be completed without knowledge of the beginnings these systems. By detecting planets in very young systems and modeling the disks of material around stars from which they form, we can gain a better understanding of planetary origin and evolution. The efforts presented here have been in modeling two pre-transitional disk systems using a radiative transfer code. With the first of these systems, V1247 Ori, a model that fits the spectral energy distribution (SED) well and whose parameters are consistent with existing interferometry data (Kraus et al 2013) has been achieved. The second of these two systems, SAO 206462, has presented a different set of challenges but encouraging SED agreement between the model and known data gives hope that the model can produce images that can be used in future interferometry work. This work was supported by NASA ADAP grant NNX09AC73G, and the IR&D program at The Aerospace Corporation.

  8. Advanced Machine Learning Emulators of Radiative Transfer Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camps-Valls, G.; Verrelst, J.; Martino, L.; Vicent, J.

    2017-12-01

    Physically-based model inversion methodologies are based on physical laws and established cause-effect relationships. A plethora of remote sensing applications rely on the physical inversion of a Radiative Transfer Model (RTM), which lead to physically meaningful bio-geo-physical parameter estimates. The process is however computationally expensive, needs expert knowledge for both the selection of the RTM, its parametrization and the the look-up table generation, as well as its inversion. Mimicking complex codes with statistical nonlinear machine learning algorithms has become the natural alternative very recently. Emulators are statistical constructs able to approximate the RTM, although at a fraction of the computational cost, providing an estimation of uncertainty, and estimations of the gradient or finite integral forms. We review the field and recent advances of emulation of RTMs with machine learning models. We posit Gaussian processes (GPs) as the proper framework to tackle the problem. Furthermore, we introduce an automatic methodology to construct emulators for costly RTMs. The Automatic Gaussian Process Emulator (AGAPE) methodology combines the interpolation capabilities of GPs with the accurate design of an acquisition function that favours sampling in low density regions and flatness of the interpolation function. We illustrate the good capabilities of our emulators in toy examples, leaf and canopy levels PROSPECT and PROSAIL RTMs, and for the construction of an optimal look-up-table for atmospheric correction based on MODTRAN5.

  9. Advanced Doubling Adding Method for Radiative Transfer in Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Quanhua; Weng, Fuzhong

    2006-12-01

    The doubling adding method (DA) is one of the most accurate tools for detailed multiple-scattering calculations. The principle of the method goes back to the nineteenth century in a problem dealing with reflection and transmission by glass plates. Since then the doubling adding method has been widely used as a reference tool for other radiative transfer models. The method has never been used in operational applications owing to tremendous demand on computational resources from the model. This study derives an analytical expression replacing the most complicated thermal source terms in the doubling adding method. The new development is called the advanced doubling adding (ADA) method. Thanks also to the efficiency of matrix and vector manipulations in FORTRAN 90/95, the advanced doubling adding method is about 60 times faster than the doubling adding method. The radiance (i.e., forward) computation code of ADA is easily translated into tangent linear and adjoint codes for radiance gradient calculations. The simplicity in forward and Jacobian computation codes is very useful for operational applications and for the consistency between the forward and adjoint calculations in satellite data assimilation.

  10. History of one family of atmospheric radiative transfer codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Gail P.; Wang, Jinxue; Hoke, Michael L.; Kneizys, F. X.; Chetwynd, James H., Jr.; Rothman, Laurence S.; Kimball, L. M.; McClatchey, Robert A.; Shettle, Eric P.; Clough, Shepard (.; Gallery, William O.; Abreu, Leonard W.; Selby, John E. A.

    1994-12-01

    Beginning in the early 1970's, the then Air Force Cambridge Research Laboratory initiated a program to develop computer-based atmospheric radiative transfer algorithms. The first attempts were translations of graphical procedures described in a 1970 report on The Optical Properties of the Atmosphere, based on empirical transmission functions and effective absorption coefficients derived primarily from controlled laboratory transmittance measurements. The fact that spectrally-averaged atmospheric transmittance (T) does not obey the Beer-Lambert Law (T equals exp(-(sigma) (DOT)(eta) ), where (sigma) is a species absorption cross section, independent of (eta) , the species column amount along the path) at any but the finest spectral resolution was already well known. Band models to describe this gross behavior were developed in the 1950's and 60's. Thus began LOWTRAN, the Low Resolution Transmittance Code, first released in 1972. This limited initial effort has how progressed to a set of codes and related algorithms (including line-of-sight spectral geometry, direct and scattered radiance and irradiance, non-local thermodynamic equilibrium, etc.) that contain thousands of coding lines, hundreds of subroutines, and improved accuracy, efficiency, and, ultimately, accessibility. This review will include LOWTRAN, HITRAN (atlas of high-resolution molecular spectroscopic data), FASCODE (Fast Atmospheric Signature Code), and MODTRAN (Moderate Resolution Transmittance Code), their permutations, validations, and applications, particularly as related to passive remote sensing and energy deposition.

  11. Algorithmic vs. finite difference Jacobians for infrared atmospheric radiative transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreier, Franz; Gimeno García, Sebastián; Vasquez, Mayte; Xu, Jian

    2015-10-01

    Jacobians, i.e. partial derivatives of the radiance and transmission spectrum with respect to the atmospheric state parameters to be retrieved from remote sensing observations, are important for the iterative solution of the nonlinear inverse problem. Finite difference Jacobians are easy to implement, but computationally expensive and possibly of dubious quality; on the other hand, analytical Jacobians are accurate and efficient, but the implementation can be quite demanding. GARLIC, our "Generic Atmospheric Radiation Line-by-line Infrared Code", utilizes algorithmic differentiation (AD) techniques to implement derivatives w.r.t. atmospheric temperature and molecular concentrations. In this paper, we describe our approach for differentiation of the high resolution infrared and microwave spectra and provide an in-depth assessment of finite difference approximations using "exact" AD Jacobians as a reference. The results indicate that the "standard" two-point finite differences with 1 K and 1% perturbation for temperature and volume mixing ratio, respectively, can exhibit substantial errors, and central differences are significantly better. However, these deviations do not transfer into the truncated singular value decomposition solution of a least squares problem. Nevertheless, AD Jacobians are clearly recommended because of the superior speed and accuracy.

  12. Thermal radiation heat transfer in participating media by finite volume discretization using collimated beam incidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harijishnu, R.; Jayakumar, J. S.

    2017-09-01

    The main objective of this paper is to study the heat transfer rate of thermal radiation in participating media. For that, a generated collimated beam has been passed through a two dimensional slab model of flint glass with a refractive index 2. Both Polar and azimuthal angle have been varied to generate such a beam. The Temperature of the slab and Snells law has been validated by Radiation Transfer Equation (RTE) in OpenFOAM (Open Field Operation and Manipulation), a CFD software which is the major computational tool used in Industry and research applications where the source code is modified in which radiation heat transfer equation is added to the case and different radiation heat transfer models are utilized. This work concentrates on the numerical strategies involving both transparent and participating media. Since Radiation Transfer Equation (RTE) is difficult to solve, the purpose of this paper is to use existing solver buoyantSimlpeFoam to solve radiation model in the participating media by compiling the source code to obtain the heat transfer rate inside the slab by varying the Intensity of radiation. The Finite Volume Method (FVM) is applied to solve the Radiation Transfer Equation (RTE) governing the above said physical phenomena.

  13. Radiative heat transfer in anisotropic many-body systems: Tuning and enhancement

    SciT

    Nikbakht, Moladad, E-mail: mnik@znu.ac.ir

    2014-09-07

    A general formalism for calculating the radiative heat transfer in many body systems with anisotropic component is presented. Our scheme extends the theory of radiative heat transfer in isotropic many body systems to anisotropic cases. In addition, the radiative heating of the particles by the thermal bath is taken into account in our formula. It is shown that the radiative heat exchange (HE) between anisotropic particles and their radiative cooling/heating (RCH) could be enhanced several order of magnitude than that of isotropic particles. Furthermore, we demonstrate that both the HE and RCH can be tuned dramatically by particles relative orientationmore » in many body systems.« less

  14. Numerical Investigation of Radiative Heat Transfer in Laser Induced Air Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, J.; Chen, Y. S.; Wang, T. S.; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Radiative heat transfer is one of the most important phenomena in the laser induced plasmas. This study is intended to develop accurate and efficient methods for predicting laser radiation absorption and plasma radiative heat transfer, and investigate the plasma radiation effects in laser propelled vehicles. To model laser radiation absorption, a ray tracing method along with the Beer's law is adopted. To solve the radiative transfer equation in the air plasmas, the discrete transfer method (DTM) is selected and explained. The air plasma radiative properties are predicted by the LORAN code. To validate the present nonequilibrium radiation model, several benchmark problems are examined and the present results are found to match the available solutions. To investigate the effects of plasma radiation in laser propelled vehicles, the present radiation code is coupled into a plasma aerodynamics code and a selected problem is considered. Comparisons of results at different cases show that plasma radiation plays a role of cooling plasma and it lowers the plasma temperature by about 10%. This change in temperature also results in a reduction of the coupling coefficient by about 10-20%. The present study indicates that plasma radiation modeling is very important for accurate modeling of aerodynamics in a laser propelled vehicle.

  15. High-order solution methods for grey discrete ordinates thermal radiative transfer

    DOE PAGES

    Maginot, Peter G.; Ragusa, Jean C.; Morel, Jim E.

    2016-09-29

    This paper presents a solution methodology for solving the grey radiative transfer equations that is both spatially and temporally more accurate than the canonical radiative transfer solution technique of linear discontinuous finite element discretization in space with implicit Euler integration in time. We solve the grey radiative transfer equations by fully converging the nonlinear temperature dependence of the material specific heat, material opacities, and Planck function. The grey radiative transfer equations are discretized in space using arbitrary-order self-lumping discontinuous finite elements and integrated in time with arbitrary-order diagonally implicit Runge–Kutta time integration techniques. Iterative convergence of the radiation equation ismore » accelerated using a modified interior penalty diffusion operator to precondition the full discrete ordinates transport operator.« less

  16. High-order solution methods for grey discrete ordinates thermal radiative transfer

    SciT

    Maginot, Peter G., E-mail: maginot1@llnl.gov; Ragusa, Jean C., E-mail: jean.ragusa@tamu.edu; Morel, Jim E., E-mail: morel@tamu.edu

    This work presents a solution methodology for solving the grey radiative transfer equations that is both spatially and temporally more accurate than the canonical radiative transfer solution technique of linear discontinuous finite element discretization in space with implicit Euler integration in time. We solve the grey radiative transfer equations by fully converging the nonlinear temperature dependence of the material specific heat, material opacities, and Planck function. The grey radiative transfer equations are discretized in space using arbitrary-order self-lumping discontinuous finite elements and integrated in time with arbitrary-order diagonally implicit Runge–Kutta time integration techniques. Iterative convergence of the radiation equation ismore » accelerated using a modified interior penalty diffusion operator to precondition the full discrete ordinates transport operator.« less

  17. High-order solution methods for grey discrete ordinates thermal radiative transfer

    SciT

    Maginot, Peter G.; Ragusa, Jean C.; Morel, Jim E.

    This paper presents a solution methodology for solving the grey radiative transfer equations that is both spatially and temporally more accurate than the canonical radiative transfer solution technique of linear discontinuous finite element discretization in space with implicit Euler integration in time. We solve the grey radiative transfer equations by fully converging the nonlinear temperature dependence of the material specific heat, material opacities, and Planck function. The grey radiative transfer equations are discretized in space using arbitrary-order self-lumping discontinuous finite elements and integrated in time with arbitrary-order diagonally implicit Runge–Kutta time integration techniques. Iterative convergence of the radiation equation ismore » accelerated using a modified interior penalty diffusion operator to precondition the full discrete ordinates transport operator.« less

  18. A passive and active microwave-vector radiative transfer (PAM-VRT) model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jun; Min, Qilong

    2015-11-01

    A passive and active microwave vector radiative transfer (PAM-VRT) package has been developed. This fast and accurate forward microwave model, with flexible and versatile input and output components, self-consistently and realistically simulates measurements/radiation of passive and active microwave sensors. The core PAM-VRT, microwave radiative transfer model, consists of five modules: gas absorption (two line-by-line databases and four fast models); hydrometeor property of water droplets and ice (spherical and nonspherical) particles; surface emissivity (from Community Radiative Transfer Model (CRTM)); vector radiative transfer of successive order of scattering (VSOS); and passive and active microwave simulation. The PAM-VRT package has been validated against other existing models, demonstrating good accuracy. The PAM-VRT not only can be used to simulate or assimilate measurements of existing microwave sensors, but also can be used to simulate observation results at some new microwave sensors.

  19. HELIOS: A new open-source radiative transfer code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, Matej; Grosheintz, Luc; Lukas Grimm, Simon; Mendonça, João; Kitzmann, Daniel; Heng, Kevin

    2015-12-01

    I present the new open-source code HELIOS, developed to accurately describe radiative transfer in a wide variety of irradiated atmospheres. We employ a one-dimensional multi-wavelength two-stream approach with scattering. Written in Cuda C++, HELIOS uses the GPU’s potential of massive parallelization and is able to compute the TP-profile of an atmosphere in radiative equilibrium and the subsequent emission spectrum in a few minutes on a single computer (for 60 layers and 1000 wavelength bins).The required molecular opacities are obtained with the recently published code HELIOS-K [1], which calculates the line shapes from an input line list and resamples the numerous line-by-line data into a manageable k-distribution format. Based on simple equilibrium chemistry theory [2] we combine the k-distribution functions of the molecules H2O, CO2, CO & CH4 to generate a k-table, which we then employ in HELIOS.I present our results of the following: (i) Various numerical tests, e.g. isothermal vs. non-isothermal treatment of layers. (ii) Comparison of iteratively determined TP-profiles with their analytical parametric prescriptions [3] and of the corresponding spectra. (iii) Benchmarks of TP-profiles & spectra for various elemental abundances. (iv) Benchmarks of averaged TP-profiles & spectra for the exoplanets GJ1214b, HD189733b & HD209458b. (v) Comparison with secondary eclipse data for HD189733b, XO-1b & Corot-2b.HELIOS is being developed, together with the dynamical core THOR and the chemistry solver VULCAN, in the group of Kevin Heng at the University of Bern as part of the Exoclimes Simulation Platform (ESP) [4], which is an open-source project aimed to provide community tools to model exoplanetary atmospheres.-----------------------------[1] Grimm & Heng 2015, ArXiv, 1503.03806[2] Heng, Lyons & Tsai, Arxiv, 1506.05501Heng & Lyons, ArXiv, 1507.01944[3] e.g. Heng, Mendonca & Lee, 2014, ApJS, 215, 4H[4] exoclime.net

  20. Magnetic field and radiative transfer modelling of a quiescent prominence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunár, S.; Schwartz, P.; Dudík, J.; Schmieder, B.; Heinzel, P.; Jurčák, J.

    2014-07-01

    Aims: The aim of this work is to analyse the multi-instrument observations of the June 22, 2010 prominence to study its structure in detail, including the prominence-corona transition region and the dark bubble located below the prominence body. Methods: We combined results of the 3D magnetic field modelling with 2D prominence fine structure radiative transfer models to fully exploit the available observations. Results: The 3D linear force-free field model with the unsheared bipole reproduces the morphology of the analysed prominence reasonably well, thus providing useful information about its magnetic field configuration and the location of the magnetic dips. The 2D models of the prominence fine structures provide a good representation of the local plasma configuration in the region dominated by the quasi-vertical threads. However, the low observed Lyman-α central intensities and the morphology of the analysed prominence suggest that its upper central part is not directly illuminated from the solar surface. Conclusions: This multi-disciplinary prominence study allows us to argue that a large part of the prominence-corona transition region plasma can be located inside the magnetic dips in small-scale features that surround the cool prominence material located in the dip centre. We also argue that the dark prominence bubbles can be formed because of perturbations of the prominence magnetic field by parasitic bipoles, causing them to be devoid of the magnetic dips. Magnetic dips, however, form thin layers that surround these bubbles, which might explain the occurrence of the cool prominence material in the lines of sight intersecting the prominence bubbles. Movie and Appendix A are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  1. Ultraviolet Radiative Transfer Modeling of Nearby Galaxies with Extraplanar Dusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinn, Jong-Ho; Seon, Kwang-Il

    2015-12-01

    In order to examine their relation to the host galaxy, the extraplanar dusts of six nearby galaxies are modeled, employing a three-dimensional Monte Carlo radiative transfer code. The targets are from the highly inclined galaxies that show dust-scattered ultraviolet halos, and the archival Galaxy Evolution Explorer FUV band images were fitted with the model. The observed images are generally well-reproduced by two dust layers and one light source layer, whose vertical and radial distributions have exponential profiles. We obtained several important physical parameters, such as star formation rate (SFRUV), face-on optical depth, and scale-heights. Three galaxies (NGC 891, NGC 3628, and UGC 11794) show clear evidence for the existence of an extraplanar dust layer. However, it is found that the remaining three targets (IC 5249, NGC 24, and NGC 4173) do not necessarily need a thick dust disk to model the ultraviolet (UV) halo, because its contribution is too small and the UV halo may be caused by the wing part of the GALEX point spread function. This indicates that the galaxy samples reported to have UV halos may be contaminated by galaxies with negligible extraplanar (halo) dust. The galaxies showing evidence of an extraplanar dust layer fall within a narrow range on the scatter plots between physical parameters such as SFRUV and extraplanar dust mass. Several mechanisms that could possibly produce the extraplanar dust are discussed. We also found a hint that the extraplanar dust scale-height might not be much different from the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission characteristic height.

  2. A 1D radiative transfer benchmark with polarization via doubling and adding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganapol, B. D.

    2017-11-01

    Highly precise numerical solutions to the radiative transfer equation with polarization present a special challenge. Here, we establish a precise numerical solution to the radiative transfer equation with combined Rayleigh and isotropic scattering in a 1D-slab medium with simple polarization. The 2-Stokes vector solution for the fully discretized radiative transfer equation in space and direction derives from the method of doubling and adding enhanced through convergence acceleration. Updates to benchmark solutions found in the literature to seven places for reflectance and transmittance as well as for angular flux follow. Finally, we conclude with the numerical solution in a partially randomly absorbing heterogeneous medium.

  3. Principles of the radiosity method versus radiative transfer for canopy reflectance modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerstl, Siegfried A. W.; Borel, Christoph C.

    1992-01-01

    The radiosity method is introduced to plant canopy reflectance modeling. We review the physics principles of the radiosity method which originates in thermal radiative transfer analyses when hot and cold surfaces are considered within a given enclosure. The radiosity equation, which is an energy balance equation for discrete surfaces, is described and contrasted with the radiative transfer equation, which is a volumetric energy balance equation. Comparing the strengths and weaknesses of the radiosity method and the radiative transfer method, we conclude that both methods are complementary to each other. Results of sample calculations are given for canopy models with up to 20,000 discrete leaves.

  4. A three-dimensional model of solar radiation transfer in a non-uniform plant canopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levashova, N. T.; Mukhartova, Yu V.

    2018-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) model of solar radiation transfer in a non-uniform plant canopy was developed. It is based on radiative transfer equations and a so-called turbid medium assumption. The model takes into account the multiple scattering contributions of plant elements in radiation fluxes. These enable more accurate descriptions of plant canopy reflectance and transmission in different spectral bands. The model was applied to assess the effects of plant canopy heterogeneity on solar radiation transmission and to quantify the difference in a radiation transfer between photosynthetically active radiation PAR (=0.39-0.72 μm) and near infrared solar radiation NIR (Δλ = 0.72-3.00 μm). Comparisons of the radiative transfer fluxes simulated by the 3D model within a plant canopy consisted of sparsely planted fruit trees (plant area index, PAI - 0.96 m2 m-2) with radiation fluxes simulated by a one-dimensional (1D) approach, assumed horizontal homogeneity of plant and leaf area distributions, showed that, for sunny weather conditions with a high solar elevation angle, an application of a simplified 1D approach can result in an underestimation of transmitted solar radiation by about 22% for PAR, and by about 26% for NIR.

  5. IPRT polarized radiative transfer model intercomparison project - Three-dimensional test cases (phase B)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emde, Claudia; Barlakas, Vasileios; Cornet, Céline; Evans, Frank; Wang, Zhen; Labonotte, Laurent C.; Macke, Andreas; Mayer, Bernhard; Wendisch, Manfred

    2018-04-01

    Initially unpolarized solar radiation becomes polarized by scattering in the Earth's atmosphere. In particular molecular scattering (Rayleigh scattering) polarizes electromagnetic radiation, but also scattering of radiation at aerosols, cloud droplets (Mie scattering) and ice crystals polarizes. Each atmospheric constituent produces a characteristic polarization signal, thus spectro-polarimetric measurements are frequently employed for remote sensing of aerosol and cloud properties. Retrieval algorithms require efficient radiative transfer models. Usually, these apply the plane-parallel approximation (PPA), assuming that the atmosphere consists of horizontally homogeneous layers. This allows to solve the vector radiative transfer equation (VRTE) efficiently. For remote sensing applications, the radiance is considered constant over the instantaneous field-of-view of the instrument and each sensor element is treated independently in plane-parallel approximation, neglecting horizontal radiation transport between adjacent pixels (Independent Pixel Approximation, IPA). In order to estimate the errors due to the IPA approximation, three-dimensional (3D) vector radiative transfer models are required. So far, only a few such models exist. Therefore, the International Polarized Radiative Transfer (IPRT) working group of the International Radiation Commission (IRC) has initiated a model intercomparison project in order to provide benchmark results for polarized radiative transfer. The group has already performed an intercomparison for one-dimensional (1D) multi-layer test cases [phase A, 1]. This paper presents the continuation of the intercomparison project (phase B) for 2D and 3D test cases: a step cloud, a cubic cloud, and a more realistic scenario including a 3D cloud field generated by a Large Eddy Simulation (LES) model and typical background aerosols. The commonly established benchmark results for 3D polarized radiative transfer are available at the IPRT website (http

  6. Directional Radiometry and Radiative Transfer: the Convoluted Path From Centuries-old Phenomenology to Physical Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.

    2014-01-01

    This Essay traces the centuries-long history of the phenomenological disciplines of directional radiometry and radiative transfer in turbid media, discusses their fundamental weaknesses, and outlines the convoluted process of their conversion into legitimate branches of physical optics.

  7. Two Experiments for Estimating Free Convection and Radiation Heat Transfer Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Economides, Michael J.; Maloney, J. O.

    1978-01-01

    This article describes two simple undergraduate heat transfer experiments which may reinforce a student's understanding of free convection and radiation. Apparatus, experimental procedure, typical results, and discussion are included. (Author/BB)

  8. Extending generalized Kubelka-Munk to three-dimensional radiative transfer.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, Christopher; Kim, Arnold D

    2015-08-10

    The generalized Kubelka-Munk (gKM) approximation is a linear transformation of the double spherical harmonics of order one (DP1) approximation of the radiative transfer equation. Here, we extend the gKM approximation to study problems in three-dimensional radiative transfer. In particular, we derive the gKM approximation for the problem of collimated beam propagation and scattering in a plane-parallel slab composed of a uniform absorbing and scattering medium. The result is an 8×8 system of partial differential equations that is much easier to solve than the radiative transfer equation. We compare the solutions of the gKM approximation with Monte Carlo simulations of the radiative transfer equation to identify the range of validity for this approximation. We find that the gKM approximation is accurate for isotropic scattering media that are sufficiently thick and much less accurate for anisotropic, forward-peaked scattering media.

  9. Mathematical modeling of radiative-conductive heat transfer in semitransparent medium with phase change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savvinova, Nadezhda A.; Sleptsov, Semen D.; Rubtsov, Nikolai A.

    2017-11-01

    A mathematical phase change model is a formulation of the Stefan problem. Various formulations of the Stefan problem modeling of radiative-conductive heat transfer during melting or solidification of a semitransparent material are presented. Analysis of numerical results show that the radiative heat transfer has a significant effect on temperature distributions during melting (solidification) of the semitransparent material. In this paper conditions for application of various statements of the Stefan problem are analyzed.

  10. Approximate Solution Methods for Spectral Radiative Transfer in High Refractive Index Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, R.; Spuckler, C. M.

    1994-01-01

    Some ceramic materials for high temperature applications are partially transparent for radiative transfer. The refractive indices of these materials can be substantially greater than one which influences internal radiative emission and reflections. Heat transfer behavior of single and laminated layers has been obtained in the literature by numerical solutions of the radiative transfer equations coupled with heat conduction and heating at the boundaries by convection and radiation. Two-flux and diffusion methods are investigated here to obtain approximate solutions using a simpler formulation than required for exact numerical solutions. Isotropic scattering is included. The two-flux method for a single layer yields excellent results for gray and two band spectral calculations. The diffusion method yields a good approximation for spectral behavior in laminated multiple layers if the overall optical thickness is larger than about ten. A hybrid spectral model is developed using the two-flux method in the optically thin bands, and radiative diffusion in bands that are optically thick.

  11. Spectrophotometric study of Saturn's main rings by means of Monte Carlo ray-tracing and Hapke's theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciarniello, Mauro; Filacchione, Gianrico; D'Aversa, Emiliano; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; Capaccioni, Fabrizio; Hedman, Matthew M.; Dalle Ore, Cristina M.; Nicholson, Philip D.; Clark, Roger Nelson; Brown, Robert H.; Cerroni, Priscilla; Spilker, Linda

    2017-10-01

    This work is devoted to the investigation of the spectrophotometric properties of Saturn's rings from Cassini-VIMS (Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer) observations. The dataset used for this analysis is represented by ten radial spectrograms of the rings which have been derived in Filacchione et al. (2014) by radial mosaics produced by VIMS. Spectrograms report the measured radiance factor of the main Saturn's rings as a function of both radial distance (from 73.500 to 141.375 km) and wavelength (0.35-5.1 µm) for different observation geometries (phase angle ranging in the 1.9°-132.2° interval). We take advantage of a Monte Carlo ray-tracing routine to characterize the photometric behavior of the rings at each wavelength and derive the spectral Bond albedo of rings particles. This quantity is used to infer the composition of the regolith covering rings particles by applying Hapke's theory. Four different regions, characterized by different optical depths, and respectively located in the C ring, inner B ring, mid B ring and A ring, have been investigated. Results from spectral modeling indicate that rings spectrum can be described by water ice with minimal inclusion of organic materials (tholin, < 1%) mixed with variable amounts of a neutral absorber such as amorphous carbon and amorphous silicates. The abundance of the neutral absorber anti-correlates with the optical depth of the investigated regions, being maximum in the thinnest C ring and minimum in the thickest mid B ring. This distribution of the neutral absorber is interpreted as the result of a contamination by exogenous material, which is more effective in the less dense regions of the rings because of their lower content of pure water ice.

  12. Multiscale solutions of radiative heat transfer by the discrete unified gas kinetic scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xiao-Ping; Wang, Cun-Hai; Zhang, Yong; Yi, Hong-Liang; Tan, He-Ping

    2018-06-01

    The radiative transfer equation (RTE) has two asymptotic regimes characterized by the optical thickness, namely, optically thin and optically thick regimes. In the optically thin regime, a ballistic or kinetic transport is dominant. In the optically thick regime, energy transport is totally dominated by multiple collisions between photons; that is, the photons propagate by means of diffusion. To obtain convergent solutions to the RTE, conventional numerical schemes have a strong dependence on the number of spatial grids, which leads to a serious computational inefficiency in the regime where the diffusion is predominant. In this work, a discrete unified gas kinetic scheme (DUGKS) is developed to predict radiative heat transfer in participating media. Numerical performances of the DUGKS are compared in detail with conventional methods through three cases including one-dimensional transient radiative heat transfer, two-dimensional steady radiative heat transfer, and three-dimensional multiscale radiative heat transfer. Due to the asymptotic preserving property, the present method with relatively coarse grids gives accurate and reliable numerical solutions for large, small, and in-between values of optical thickness, and, especially in the optically thick regime, the DUGKS demonstrates a pronounced computational efficiency advantage over the conventional numerical models. In addition, the DUGKS has a promising potential in the study of multiscale radiative heat transfer inside the participating medium with a transition from optically thin to optically thick regimes.

  13. Adipose veno-lymphatic transfer for management of post-radiation lymphedema

    SciT

    Pho, R.W.; Bayon, P.; Tan, L.

    1989-01-01

    In a patient who had post-radiation lymphedema after excision of liposarcoma, a method is described that is called adipose veno-lymphatic transfer. The technique involves transferring adipose tissue containing lymphatic vessels that surround the long saphenous vein, from the normal, healthy leg to the irradiated leg, with the creation of an arteriovenous fistula.

  14. Bridging the Radiative Transfer Models for Meteorology and Solar Energy Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Y.; Sengupta, M.

    2017-12-01

    Radiative transfer models are used to compute solar radiation reaching the earth surface and play an important role in both meteorology and solar energy studies. Therefore, they are designed to meet the needs of specialized applications. For instance, radiative transfer models for meteorology seek to provide more accurate cloudy-sky radiation compared to models used in solar energy that are geared towards accuracy in clear-sky conditions associated with the maximum solar resource. However, models for solar energy applications are often computationally faster, as the complex solution of the radiative transfer equation is parameterized by atmospheric properties that can be acquired from surface- or satellite-based observations. This study introduces the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) recent efforts to combine the advantages of radiative transfer models designed for meteorology and solar energy applictions. A fast all-sky radiation model, FARMS-NIT, was developed to efficiently compute narrowband all-sky irradiances over inclined photovoltaic (PV) panels. This new model utilizes the optical preperties from a solar energy model, SMARTS, to computes surface radiation by considering all possible paths of photon transmission and the relevent scattering and absorption attenuation. For cloudy-sky conditions, cloud bidirectional transmittance functions (BTDFs) are provided by a precomputed lookup table (LUT) by LibRadtran. Our initial results indicate that FARMS-NIT has an accuracy that is similar to LibRadtran, a highly accurate multi-stream model, but is significantly more efficient. The development and validation of this model will be presented.

  15. Realistic NLTE Radiative Transfer for Modeling Stellar Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Philip D.

    1999-01-01

    This NASA grant supported the development of codes to solve the non-LTE multi-level spherical radiative transfer problem in the presence of velocity fields. Much of this work was done in collaboration with Graham Harper (CASA, University of Colorado). These codes were developed for application to the cool, low-velocity winds of evolved late-type stars. Particular emphasis was placed on modeling the wind of lambda Velorum (K4 lb), the brightest K supergiant in the sky, based on extensive observations of the ultraviolet spectrum with the HST/GHRS from GO program 5307. Several solution techniques were examined, including the Eddington factor Approach described in detail by Bennett & Harper (1997). An Eddington factor variant of Harper's S-MULTI code (Harper 1994) for stationary atmospheres was developed and implemented, although full convergence was not realized. The ratio of wind terminal velocity to turbulent velocity is large (approx. 0.3-0.5) in these cool star winds so this assumption of stationarity provides reasonable starting models. Final models, incorporating specified wind laws, were converged using the comoving CRD S-MULTI code. Details of the solution procedure were published by Bennett & Harper (1997). Our analysis of the wind of lambda Vel, based on wind absorption superimposed on chromospheric emission lines in the ultraviolet, can be found in Carpenter et al. (1999). In this paper, we compare observed wind absorption features to an exact CRD calculation in the comoving frame, and also to a much quicker, but approximate, method using the SEI (Sobolev with Exact Integration) code of Lamers, Cerruti-Sola, & Perinotto (1987). Carpenter et al. (1999) provide detailed comparisons of the exact CRD and approximate SEI results and discuss when SEI is adequate to use for computing wind line profiles. Unfortunately, the observational material is insufficient to unambiguously determine the wind acceleration law for lambda Vel. Relatively few unblended Fe II lines

  16. A generalized analytical model for radiative transfer in vacuum thermal insulation of space vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krainova, Irina V.; Dombrovsky, Leonid A.; Nenarokomov, Aleksey V.; Budnik, Sergey A.; Titov, Dmitry M.; Alifanov, Oleg M.

    2017-08-01

    The previously developed spectral model for radiative transfer in vacuum thermal insulation of space vehicles is generalized to take into account possible thermal contact between a fibrous spacer and one of the neighboring aluminum foil layers. An approximate analytical solution based on slightly modified two-flux approximation for radiative transfer in a semi-transparent fibrous spacer is derived. It was shown that thermal contact between the spacer and adjacent foil may decrease significantly the quality of thermal insulation because of an increase in radiative flux to/from the opposite aluminum foil. Theoretical predictions are confirmed by comparison with new results of laboratory experiments.

  17. Thermal radiation influence on MHD flow of a rotating fluid with heat transfer through EFGM solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, D. V. V. Krishna; Chaitanya, G. S. Krishna; Raju, R. Srinivasa

    2018-05-01

    The aim of this research work is to find the EFGM solutions of the unsteady magnetohydromagnetic natural convection heat transfer flow of a rotating, incompressible, viscous, Boussinesq fluid is presented in this study in the presence of radiative heat transfer. The Rosseland approximation for an optically thick fluid is invoked to describe the radiative flux. Numerical results obtained show that a decrease in the temperature boundary layer occurs when the Prandtl number and the radiation parameter are increased and the flow velocity approaches steady state as the time parameter t is increased. These findings are in quantitative agreement with earlier reported studies.

  18. An assessment on convective and radiative heat transfer modelling in tubular solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, D.; Muñoz, A.; Sánchez, T.

    Four models of convective and radiative heat transfer inside tubular solid oxide fuel cells are presented in this paper, all of them applicable to multidimensional simulations. The work is aimed at assessing if it is necessary to use a very detailed and complicated model to simulate heat transfer inside this kind of device and, for those cases when simple models can be used, the errors are estimated and compared to those of the more complex models. For the convective heat transfer, two models are presented. One of them accounts for the variation of film coefficient as a function of local temperature and composition. This model gives a local value for the heat transfer coefficients and establishes the thermal entry length. The second model employs an average value of the transfer coefficient, which is applied to the whole length of the duct being studied. It is concluded that, unless there is a need to calculate local temperatures, a simple model can be used to evaluate the global performance of the cell with satisfactory accuracy. For the radiation heat transfer, two models are presented again. One of them considers radial radiation exclusively and, thus, radiative exchange between adjacent cells is neglected. On the other hand, the second model accounts for radiation in all directions but increases substantially the complexity of the problem. For this case, it is concluded that deviations between both models are higher than for convection. Actually, using a simple model can lead to a not negligible underestimation of the temperature of the cell.

  19. Effect of radiator position and mass flux on the dryer room heat transfer rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirmanto, M.; Sulistyowati, E. D.; Okariawan, I. D. K.

    A room radiator as usually used in cold countries, is actually able to be used as a heat source to dry goods, especially in the rainy season where the sun seldom shines due to much rain and cloud. Experiments to investigate effects of radiator position and mass flux on heat transfer rate were performed. This study is to determine the best position of the radiator and the optimum mass flux. The radiator used was a finned radiator made of copper pipes and aluminum fins with an overall dimension of 220 mm × 50 mm × 310 mm. The prototype room was constructed using plywood and wood frame with an overall size of 1000 mm × 1000 mm × 1000 mm. The working fluid was heated water flowing inside the radiator and air circulating naturally inside the prototype room. The nominal mass fluxes employed were 800, 900 and 1000 kg/m2 s. The water was kept at 80 °C at the radiator entrance, while the initial air temperature inside the prototype room was 30 °C. Three positions of the radiator were examined. The results show that the effect of the mass flux on the forced and free convection heat transfer rate is insignificant but the radiator position strongly affects the heat transfer rate for both forced and free convection.

  20. Numerical Modeling of Electromagnetic Radiation Within a Particulate Medium.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noe Dobrea, E. Z.

    2017-12-01

    Numerical modeling of electromagnetic radiation with a particulate medium. Understanding the effect of particulate media and coatings on electromagnetic radiation is key to understanding the effects of multiple scattering on the spectra of geologic materials. Multiple radiative transfer theories have been developed that provide a good approximation to these effects [1,2]. However, approximations regarding particle size, distribution, shape, and other parameters need to be made and in some cases, the theory is limited to specific geometries [2]. In this work, we seek to develop an numerical radiative transfer algorithm to simulate the passage of light through a particulate medium. The code allows arbitrary particle size distributions (uniform, bimodal, trimodal, composition dependent), compositions, and viewing geometries, as well as arbitrary coating thicknesses and compositions. Here, we report on the the status of our model and present comparisons of model predictions with the spectra of well-characterize minerals and mixtures. Future work will include particle size-dependent effects of diffraction as well as particle emittance due to fluorescence and Raman excitation. [1] Hapke, B. (2012). Theory of reflectance and emittance spectroscopy. Cambridge University Press, 2nd edition, 528 p. [2] Shkuratov et al. (1999) Icarus 137

  1. Bidirectional plant canopy reflection models derived from the radiation transfer equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beeth, D. R.

    1975-01-01

    A collection of bidirectional canopy reflection models was obtained from the solution of the radiation transfer equation for a horizontally homogeneous canopy. A phase function is derived for a collection of bidirectionally reflecting and transmitting planar elements characterized geometrically by slope and azimuth density functions. Two approaches to solving the radiation transfer equation for the canopy are presented. One approach factors the radiation transfer equation into a solvable set of three first-order linear differential equations by assuming that the radiation field within the canopy can be initially approximated by three components: uniformly diffuse downwelling, uniformly diffuse upwelling, and attenuated specular. The solution to these equations, which can be iterated to any degree of accuracy, was used to obtain overall canopy reflection from the formal solution to the radiation transfer equation. A programable solution to canopy overall bidirectional reflection is given for this approach. The special example of Lambertian leaves with constant leaf bidirectional reflection and scattering functions is considered, and a programmable solution for this example is given. The other approach to solving the radiation transfer equation, a generalized Chandrasekhar technique, is presented in the appendix.

  2. Radiative transfer modeling through terrestrial atmosphere and ocean accounting for inelastic processes: Software package SCIATRAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozanov, V. V.; Dinter, T.; Rozanov, A. V.; Wolanin, A.; Bracher, A.; Burrows, J. P.

    2017-06-01

    SCIATRAN is a comprehensive software package which is designed to model radiative transfer processes in the terrestrial atmosphere and ocean in the spectral range from the ultraviolet to the thermal infrared (0.18-40 μm). It accounts for multiple scattering processes, polarization, thermal emission and ocean-atmosphere coupling. The main goal of this paper is to present a recently developed version of SCIATRAN which takes into account accurately inelastic radiative processes in both the atmosphere and the ocean. In the scalar version of the coupled ocean-atmosphere radiative transfer solver presented by Rozanov et al. [61] we have implemented the simulation of the rotational Raman scattering, vibrational Raman scattering, chlorophyll and colored dissolved organic matter fluorescence. In this paper we discuss and explain the numerical methods used in SCIATRAN to solve the scalar radiative transfer equation including trans-spectral processes, and demonstrate how some selected radiative transfer problems are solved using the SCIATRAN package. In addition we present selected comparisons of SCIATRAN simulations with those published benchmark results, independent radiative transfer models, and various measurements from satellite, ground-based, and ship-borne instruments. The extended SCIATRAN software package along with a detailed User's Guide is made available for scientists and students, who are undertaking their own research typically at universities, via the web page of the Institute of Environmental Physics (IUP), University of Bremen: http://www.iup.physik.uni-bremen.de.

  3. Parameterization and analysis of 3-D radiative transfer in clouds

    SciT

    Varnai, Tamas

    2012-03-16

    This report provides a summary of major accomplishments from the project. The project examines the impact of radiative interactions between neighboring atmospheric columns, for example clouds scattering extra sunlight toward nearby clear areas. While most current cloud models don't consider these interactions and instead treat sunlight in each atmospheric column separately, the resulting uncertainties have remained unknown. This project has provided the first estimates on the way average solar heating is affected by interactions between nearby columns. These estimates have been obtained by combining several years of cloud observations at three DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility sitesmore » (in Alaska, Oklahoma, and Papua New Guinea) with simulations of solar radiation around the observed clouds. The importance of radiative interactions between atmospheric columns was evaluated by contrasting simulations that included the interactions with those that did not. This study provides lower-bound estimates for radiative interactions: It cannot consider interactions in cross-wind direction, because it uses two-dimensional vertical cross-sections through clouds that were observed by instruments looking straight up as clouds drifted aloft. Data from new DOE scanning radars will allow future radiative studies to consider the full three-dimensional nature of radiative processes. The results reveal that two-dimensional radiative interactions increase overall day-and-night average solar heating by about 0.3, 1.2, and 4.1 Watts per meter square at the three sites, respectively. This increase grows further if one considers that most large-domain cloud simulations have resolutions that cannot specify small-scale cloud variability. For example, the increases in solar heating mentioned above roughly double for a fairly typical model resolution of 1 km. The study also examined the factors that shape radiative interactions between atmospheric

  4. Circumstellar shells, the formation of grains, and radiation transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lefevre, Jean

    1987-01-01

    Advances in infrared astronomy during the last decade have firmly established the presence of dust around a large number of cold giant and supergiant stars. To describe the properties of stars and to understand their evolution, it is necessary to know the nature of the giants and their influence on stellar radiation. Two questions are considered: the formation of grains around cold stars and the modification of stellar radiation by the stellar shell.

  5. Radiative Heat Transfer During Atmosphere Entry at Parabolic Velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshikawa, Kenneth K.; Wick, Bradford H.

    1961-01-01

    Stagnation point radiative heating rates for manned vehicles entering the earth's atmosphere at parabolic velocity are presented and compared with corresponding laminar convective heating rates. The calculations were made for both nonlifting and lifting entry trajectories for vehicles of varying nose radius, weight-to-area ratio, and drag. It is concluded from the results presented that radiative heating will be important for the entry conditions considered.

  6. Introduction to the Theory of Atmospheric Radiative Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buglia, J. J.

    1986-01-01

    The fundamental physical and mathematical principles governing the transmission of radiation through the atmosphere are presented, with emphasis on the scattering of visible and near-IR radiation. The classical two-stream, thin-atmosphere, and Eddington approximations, along with some of their offspring, are developed in detail, along with the discrete ordinates method of Chandrasekhar. The adding and doubling methods are discussed from basic principles, and references for further reading are suggested.

  7. Single-node orbit analsyis with radiation heat transfer only

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peoples, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    The steady-state temperature of a single node which dissipates energy by radiation only is discussed for a nontime varying thermal environment. Relationships are developed to illustrate how shields can be utilized to represent a louver system. A computer program is presented which can assess periodic temperature characteristics of a single node in a time varying thermal environment having energy dissipation by radiation only. The computer program performs thermal orbital analysis for five combinations of plate, shields, and louvers.

  8. Applications of the similarity relations in radiative transfer to remote sensing implementation and flux simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, P.; Ding, J.; Tang, G.; King, M. D.; Platnick, S. E.; Meyer, K.; Mlawer, E. J.

    2017-12-01

    Van de Hulst (1974) showed several quasi-invariant quantities in radiative transfer concerning multiple scattering. Recently, we illustrated that the aforesaid quasi-invariant quantities are useful in remote sensing of ice cloud properties from spaceborne radiometric observations (Ding et al. 2017). Specifically, the overall performance of an ice cloud optical property model can be estimated without carrying out detailed retrieval implementation. In this presentation, we will review the radiative transfer similarity relations and some recent results including the study by Ding et al. (2017). Furthermore, we will illustrate an application of the similarity relations to improvement of broadband radiative flux computation. For example, the Rapid Radiative Transfer Model (RRTM, Mlawer et al, 1999) does not consider multiple scattering in the longwave spectral regime (RRTMG-LW) ("G" indicates a version suitable for GCM applications). We show that the similarity relations can be used to effectively improve the accuracy of RRTMG-LW without increasing computational effort.

  9. SCIATRAN 3.1: A new radiative transfer model and retrieval package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozanov, Alexei; Rozanov, Vladimir; Kokhanovsky, Alexander; Burrows, John P.

    The SCIATRAN 3.1 package is a result of further development of the SCIATRAN 2.X software family which, similar to previous versions, comprises a radiative transfer model and a retrieval block. After an implementation of the vector radiative transfer model in SCIATRAN 3.0 the spectral range covered by the model has been extended into the thermal infrared ranging to approximately 40 micrometers. Another major improvement has been done accounting for the underlying surface effects. Among others, a sophisticated representation of the water surface with a bidirectional reflection distribution function (BRDF) has been implemented accounting for the Fresnel reflection of the polarized light and for the effect of foam. A newly developed representation for a snow surface allows radiative transfer calculations to be performed within an unpolluted or soiled snow layer. Furthermore, a new approach has been implemented allowing radiative transfer calculations to be performed for a coupled atmosphere-ocean system. This means that, the underlying ocean is not considered as a purely reflecting surface any more. Instead, full radiative transfer calculations are performed within the water allowing the user to simulate the radiance within both the atmosphere and the ocean. Similar to previous versions, the simulations can be performed for any viewing geometry typi-cal for atmospheric observations in the UV-Vis-NIR-TIR spectral range (nadir, limb, off-axis, etc.) as well as for any observer location within or outside the Earth's atmosphere including underwater observations. Similar to the precursor version, the new model is freely available for non-commercial use via the web page of the University of Bremen. In this presentation a short description of the software package, especially of the new features of the radiative transfer model is given, including remarks on the availability for the scientific community. Furthermore, some application examples of the radiative transfer model are

  10. Spectral tuning of near-field radiative heat transfer by graphene-covered metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Zhiheng; Wang, Ao; Xuan, Yimin

    2018-03-01

    When two gratings are respectively covered by a layer of graphene sheet, the near-field radiative heat transfer between two parallel gratings made of silica (SiO2) could be greatly improved. As the material properties of doped silicon (n-type doping concentration is 1020 cm-3, marked as Si-20) and SiO2 differ greatly, we theoretically investigate the near-field radiative heat transfer between two parallel graphene-covered gratings made of Si-20 to explore some different phenomena, especially for modulating the spectral properties. The radiative heat flux between two parallel bulks made of Si-20 can be enhanced by using gratings instead of bulks. When the two gratings are respectively covered by a layer of graphene sheet, the radiative heat flux between two gratings made of Si-20 can be further enhanced. By tuning graphene chemical potential μ and grating filling factor f, due to the interaction between surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) of graphene sheets and grating structures, the spectral properties of the radiative heat flux between two parallel graphene-covered gratings can be effectively regulated. This work will develop and supplement the effects of materials on the near-field radiative heat transfer for this kind of system configuration, paving a way to modulate the spectral properties of near-field radiative heat transfer.

  11. Tools for Atmospheric Radiative Transfer: Streamer and FluxNet. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Key, Jeffrey R.; Schweiger, Axel J.

    1998-01-01

    Two tools for the solution of radiative transfer problems are presented. Streamer is a highly flexible medium spectral resolution radiative transfer model based on the plane-parallel theory of radiative transfer. Capable of computing either fluxes or radiances, it is suitable for studying radiative processes at the surface or within the atmosphere and for the development of remote-sensing algorithms. FluxNet is a fast neural network-based implementation of Streamer for computing surface fluxes. It allows for a sophisticated treatment of radiative processes in the analysis of large data sets and potential integration into geophysical models where computational efficiency is an issue. Documentation and tools for the development of alternative versions of Fluxnet are available. Collectively, Streamer and FluxNet solve a wide variety of problems related to radiative transfer: Streamer provides the detail and sophistication needed to perform basic research on most aspects of complex radiative processes while the efficiency and simplicity of FluxNet make it ideal for operational use.

  12. General relativistic radiative transfer code in rotating black hole space-time: ARTIST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Rohta; Umemura, Masayuki

    2017-02-01

    We present a general relativistic radiative transfer code, ARTIST (Authentic Radiative Transfer In Space-Time), that is a perfectly causal scheme to pursue the propagation of radiation with absorption and scattering around a Kerr black hole. The code explicitly solves the invariant radiation intensity along null geodesics in the Kerr-Schild coordinates, and therefore properly includes light bending, Doppler boosting, frame dragging, and gravitational redshifts. The notable aspect of ARTIST is that it conserves the radiative energy with high accuracy, and is not subject to the numerical diffusion, since the transfer is solved on long characteristics along null geodesics. We first solve the wavefront propagation around a Kerr black hole that was originally explored by Hanni. This demonstrates repeated wavefront collisions, light bending, and causal propagation of radiation with the speed of light. We show that the decay rate of the total energy of wavefronts near a black hole is determined solely by the black hole spin in late phases, in agreement with analytic expectations. As a result, the ARTIST turns out to correctly solve the general relativistic radiation fields until late phases as t ˜ 90 M. We also explore the effects of absorption and scattering, and apply this code for a photon wall problem and an orbiting hotspot problem. All the simulations in this study are performed in the equatorial plane around a Kerr black hole. The ARTIST is the first step to realize the general relativistic radiation hydrodynamics.

  13. Retrieving the hydrous minerals on Mars by sparse unmixing and the Hapke model using MRO/CRISM data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Honglei; Zhang, Xia

    2017-05-01

    The hydrous minerals on Mars preserve records of potential past aqueous activity. Quantitative information regarding mineralogical composition would enable a better understanding of the formation processes of these hydrous minerals, and provide unique insights into ancient habitable environments and the geological evolution of Mars. The Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) has the advantage of both a high spatial and spectral resolution, which makes it suitable for the quantitative analysis of minerals on Mars. However, few studies have attempted to quantitatively retrieve the mineralogical composition of hydrous minerals on Mars using visible-infrared (VISIR) hyperspectral data due to their distribution characteristics (relatively low concentrations, located primarily in Noachian terrain, and unclear or unknown background minerals) and limitations of the spectral unmixing algorithms. In this study, we developed a modified sparse unmixing (MSU) method, combining the Hapke model with sparse unmixing. The MSU method considers the nonlinear mixed effects of minerals and avoids the difficulty of determining the spectra and number of endmembers from the image. The proposed method was tested successfully using laboratory mixture spectra and an Airborne Visible Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) image of the Cuprite site (Nevada, USA). Then it was applied to CRISM hyperspectral images over Gale crater. Areas of hydrous mineral distribution were first identified by spectral features of water and hydroxyl absorption. The MSU method was performed on these areas, and the abundances were retrieved. The results indicated that the hydrous minerals consisted mostly of hydrous silicates, with abundances of up to 35%, as well as hydrous sulfates, with abundances ≤10%. Several main subclasses of hydrous minerals (e.g., Fe/Mg phyllosilicate, prehnite, and kieserite) were retrieved. Among these, Fe/Mg- phyllosilicate was the most abundant, with abundances

  14. Transient radiative energy transfer in incompressible laminar flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N.; Singh, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    Analysis and numerical procedures are presented to investigate the transient radiative interactions of nongray absorbing-emitting species in laminar fully-developed flows between two parallel plates. The particular species considered are OH, CO, CO2, and H2O and different mixtures of these. Transient and steady-state results are obtained for the temperaure distribution and bulk temperature for different plate spacings, wall temperatures, and pressures. Results, in general, indicate that the rate of radiative heating can be quite high during earlier times. This information is useful in designing thermal protection systems for transient operations.

  15. A tensor formulation of the equation of transfer for spherically symmetric flows. [radiative transfer in seven dimensional Riemannian space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haisch, B. M.

    1976-01-01

    A tensor formulation of the equation of radiative transfer is derived in a seven-dimensional Riemannian space such that the resulting equation constitutes a divergence in any coordinate system. After being transformed to a spherically symmetric comoving coordinate system, the transfer equation contains partial derivatives in angle and frequency, as well as optical depth due to the effects of aberration and the Doppler shift. However, by virtue of the divergence form of this equation, the divergence theorem may be applied to yield a numerical differencing scheme which is expected to be stable and to conserve luminosity. It is shown that the equation of transfer derived by this method in a Lagrangian coordinate system may be reduced to that given by Castor (1972), although it is, of course, desirable to leave the equation in divergence form.

  16. Heat transfer performance characteristics of hybrid nanofluids as coolant in louvered fin automotive radiator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Rashmi R.; Sarkar, Jahar

    2017-06-01

    Present study deals with the enhancement of convective heat transfer performance of EG brine based various hybrid nanofluids i.e. Ag, Cu, SiC, CuO and TiO2 in 0-1% volume fraction of Al2O3 nanofluid, as coolants for louvered fin automobile radiator. The effects of nanoparticles combination and operating parameters on thermo physical properties, heat transfer, effectiveness, pumping power and performance index of hybrid nanofluids have been evaluated. Comparison of studied hybrid nanofluids based on radiator size and pumping power has been made as well. Among all studied hybrid nanofluids, 1% Ag hybrid nanofluid (0.5% Ag and 0.5% Al2O3) yields highest effectiveness and heat transfer rate as well as pumping power. However, SiC + Al2O3 dispersed hybrid nanofluid yields maximum performance index and hence this can be recommended for best coolant. For the same radiator size and heat transfer rate, pumping power increases by using Ag hybrid nanofluids leading to increase in engine thermal efficiency and hence reduction in engine fuel consumption. For same coolant flow rate and heat transfer rate, the radiator size reduces and pumping power increases by using Ag hybrid nanofluids leading to reduction in radiator size, weight and cost.

  17. Discontinuous Galerkin finite element methods for radiative transfer in spherical symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitzmann, D.; Bolte, J.; Patzer, A. B. C.

    2016-11-01

    The discontinuous Galerkin finite element method (DG-FEM) is successfully applied to treat a broad variety of transport problems numerically. In this work, we use the full capacity of the DG-FEM to solve the radiative transfer equation in spherical symmetry. We present a discontinuous Galerkin method to directly solve the spherically symmetric radiative transfer equation as a two-dimensional problem. The transport equation in spherical atmospheres is more complicated than in the plane-parallel case owing to the appearance of an additional derivative with respect to the polar angle. The DG-FEM formalism allows for the exact integration of arbitrarily complex scattering phase functions, independent of the angular mesh resolution. We show that the discontinuous Galerkin method is able to describe accurately the radiative transfer in extended atmospheres and to capture discontinuities or complex scattering behaviour which might be present in the solution of certain radiative transfer tasks and can, therefore, cause severe numerical problems for other radiative transfer solution methods.

  18. A NUMERICAL SCHEME FOR SPECIAL RELATIVISTIC RADIATION MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS BASED ON SOLVING THE TIME-DEPENDENT RADIATIVE TRANSFER EQUATION

    SciT

    Ohsuga, Ken; Takahashi, Hiroyuki R.

    2016-02-20

    We develop a numerical scheme for solving the equations of fully special relativistic, radiation magnetohydrodynamics (MHDs), in which the frequency-integrated, time-dependent radiation transfer equation is solved to calculate the specific intensity. The radiation energy density, the radiation flux, and the radiation stress tensor are obtained by the angular quadrature of the intensity. In the present method, conservation of total mass, momentum, and energy of the radiation magnetofluids is guaranteed. We treat not only the isotropic scattering but also the Thomson scattering. The numerical method of MHDs is the same as that of our previous work. The advection terms are explicitlymore » solved, and the source terms, which describe the gas–radiation interaction, are implicitly integrated. Our code is suitable for massive parallel computing. We present that our code shows reasonable results in some numerical tests for propagating radiation and radiation hydrodynamics. Particularly, the correct solution is given even in the optically very thin or moderately thin regimes, and the special relativistic effects are nicely reproduced.« less

  19. Free Thyroid Transfer: A Novel Procedure to Prevent Radiation-induced Hypothyroidism

    SciT

    Harris, Jeffrey; Almarzouki, Hani; Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah

    Purpose: The incidence of hypothyroidism after radiation therapy for head and neck cancer (HNC) has been found to be ≤53%. Medical treatment of hypothyroidism can be costly and difficult to titrate. The aim of the present study was to assess the feasibility of free thyroid transfer as a strategy for the prevention of radiation-induced damage to the thyroid gland during radiation therapy for HNC. Methods and Materials: A prospective feasibility study was performed involving 10 patients with a new diagnosis of advanced HNC undergoing ablative surgery, radial forearm free-tissue transfer reconstruction, and postoperative adjuvant radiation therapy. During the neck dissection,more » hemithyroid dissection was completed with preservation of the thyroid arterial and venous supply for implantation into the donor forearm site. All patients underwent a diagnostic thyroid technetium scan 6 weeks and 12 months postoperatively to examine the functional integrity of the transferred thyroid tissue. Results: Free thyroid transfer was executed in 9 of the 10 recruited patients with advanced HNC. The postoperative technetium scans demonstrated strong uptake of technetium at the forearm donor site at 6 weeks and 12 months for all 9 of the transplanted patients. Conclusions: The thyroid gland can be transferred as a microvascular free transfer with maintenance of function. This technique could represent a novel strategy for maintenance of thyroid function after head and neck irradiation.« less

  20. Mathematical simulation of convective-radiative heat transfer in a ventilated rectangular cavity with consideration of internal mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheremet, M. A.; Shishkin, N. I.

    2012-07-01

    Mathematical simulation of the nonstationary regimes of heat-and-mass transfer in a ventilated rectangular cavity with heat-conducting walls of finite thickness in the presence of a heat-generating element of constant temperature has been carried out with account for the radiative heat transfer in the Rosseland approximation. As mechanisms of energy transfer in this cavity, the combined convection and the thermal radiation in the gas space of the cavity and the heat conduction in the elements of its fencing solid shell were considered. The mathematical model formulated in the dimensionless stream function-vorticity vector-temperature-concentration variables was realized numerically with the use of the finite-difference method. The streamline, temperature-field, and concentration distributions reflecting the influence of the Rayleigh number (Ra = 104, 105, 106), the nonstationarity (0 < τ ≤ 1000), and the optical thickness of the medium (τλ = 50, 100, 200) on the regimes of the gas flow and the heat-and-mass transfer in the cavity have been obtained.

  1. Heat Transfer Issues in Thin-Film Thermal Radiation Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, Mamadou Y.

    1999-01-01

    The Thermal Radiation Group at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University has been working closely with scientists and engineers at NASA's Langley Research Center to develop accurate analytical and numerical models suitable for designing next generation thin-film thermal radiation detectors for earth radiation budget measurement applications. The current study provides an analytical model of the notional thermal radiation detector that takes into account thermal transport phenomena, such as the contact resistance between the layers of the detector, and is suitable for use in parameter estimation. It was found that the responsivity of the detector can increase significantly due to the presence of contact resistance between the layers of the detector. Also presented is the effect of doping the thermal impedance layer of the detector with conducting particles in order to electrically link the two junctions of the detector. It was found that the responsivity and the time response of the doped detector decrease significantly in this case. The corresponding decrease of the electrical resistance of the doped thermal impedance layer is not sufficient to significantly improve the electrical performance of the detector. Finally, the "roughness effect" is shown to be unable to explain the decrease in the thermal conductivity often reported for thin-film layers.

  2. Radiation Heat Transfer Between Diffuse-Gray Surfaces Using Higher Order Finite Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, Dana C.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents recent work on developing methods for analyzing radiation heat transfer between diffuse-gray surfaces using p-version finite elements. The work was motivated by a thermal analysis of a High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) wing structure which showed the importance of radiation heat transfer throughout the structure. The analysis also showed that refining the finite element mesh to accurately capture the temperature distribution on the internal structure led to very large meshes with unacceptably long execution times. Traditional methods for calculating surface-to-surface radiation are based on assumptions that are not appropriate for p-version finite elements. Two methods for determining internal radiation heat transfer are developed for one and two-dimensional p-version finite elements. In the first method, higher-order elements are divided into a number of sub-elements. Traditional methods are used to determine radiation heat flux along each sub-element and then mapped back to the parent element. In the second method, the radiation heat transfer equations are numerically integrated over the higher-order element. Comparisons with analytical solutions show that the integration scheme is generally more accurate than the sub-element method. Comparison to results from traditional finite elements shows that significant reduction in the number of elements in the mesh is possible using higher-order (p-version) finite elements.

  3. High performance computation of radiative transfer equation using the finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badri, M. A.; Jolivet, P.; Rousseau, B.; Favennec, Y.

    2018-05-01

    This article deals with an efficient strategy for numerically simulating radiative transfer phenomena using distributed computing. The finite element method alongside the discrete ordinate method is used for spatio-angular discretization of the monochromatic steady-state radiative transfer equation in an anisotropically scattering media. Two very different methods of parallelization, angular and spatial decomposition methods, are presented. To do so, the finite element method is used in a vectorial way. A detailed comparison of scalability, performance, and efficiency on thousands of processors is established for two- and three-dimensional heterogeneous test cases. Timings show that both algorithms scale well when using proper preconditioners. It is also observed that our angular decomposition scheme outperforms our domain decomposition method. Overall, we perform numerical simulations at scales that were previously unattainable by standard radiative transfer equation solvers.

  4. Near-field radiative heat transfer in scanning thermal microscopy computed with the boundary element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, K. L.; Merchiers, O.; Chapuis, P.-O.

    2017-11-01

    We compute the near-field radiative heat transfer between a hot AFM tip and a cold substrate. This contribution to the tip-sample heat transfer in Scanning Thermal Microscopy is often overlooked, despite its leading role when the tip is out of contact. For dielectrics, we provide power levels exchanged as a function of the tip-sample distance in vacuum and spatial maps of the heat flux deposited into the sample which indicate the near-contact spatial resolution. The results are compared to analytical expressions of the Proximity Flux Approximation. The numerical results are obtained by means of the Boundary Element Method (BEM) implemented in the SCUFF-EM software, and require first a thorough convergence analysis of the progressive implementation of this method to the thermal emission by a sphere, the radiative transfer between two spheres, and the radiative exchange between a sphere and a finite substrate.

  5. Radiative transfer models for retrieval of cloud parameters from EPIC/DSCOVR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina García, Víctor; Sasi, Sruthy; Efremenko, Dmitry S.; Doicu, Adrian; Loyola, Diego

    2018-07-01

    In this paper we analyze the accuracy and efficiency of several radiative transfer models for inferring cloud parameters from radiances measured by the Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC) on board the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR). The radiative transfer models are the exact discrete ordinate and matrix operator methods with matrix exponential, and the approximate asymptotic and equivalent Lambertian cloud models. To deal with the computationally expensive radiative transfer calculations, several acceleration techniques such as, for example, the telescoping technique, the method of false discrete ordinate, the correlated k-distribution method and the principal component analysis (PCA) are used. We found that, for the EPIC oxygen A-band absorption channel at 764 nm, the exact models using the correlated k-distribution in conjunction with PCA yield an accuracy better than 1.5% and a computation time of 18 s for radiance calculations at 5 viewing zenith angles.

  6. Assessment and validation of the community radiative transfer model for ice cloud conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Bingqi; Yang, Ping; Weng, Fuzhong; Liu, Quanhua

    2014-11-01

    The performance of the Community Radiative Transfer Model (CRTM) under ice cloud conditions is evaluated and improved with the implementation of MODIS collection 6 ice cloud optical property model based on the use of severely roughened solid column aggregates and a modified Gamma particle size distribution. New ice cloud bulk scattering properties (namely, the extinction efficiency, single-scattering albedo, asymmetry factor, and scattering phase function) suitable for application to the CRTM are calculated by using the most up-to-date ice particle optical property library. CRTM-based simulations illustrate reasonable accuracy in comparison with the counterparts derived from a combination of the Discrete Ordinate Radiative Transfer (DISORT) model and the Line-by-line Radiative Transfer Model (LBLRTM). Furthermore, simulations of the top of the atmosphere brightness temperature with CRTM for the Crosstrack Infrared Sounder (CrIS) are carried out to further evaluate the updated CRTM ice cloud optical property look-up table.

  7. Simplified multiple scattering model for radiative transfer in turbid water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghovanlou, A. H.; Gupta, G. N.

    1978-01-01

    Quantitative analytical procedures for relating selected water quality parameters to the characteristics of the backscattered signals, measured by remote sensors, require the solution of the radiative transport equation in turbid media. Presented is an approximate closed form solution of this equation and based on this solution, the remote sensing of sediments is discussed. The results are compared with other standard closed form solutions such as quasi-single scattering approximations.

  8. Radiative Heat Transfer Modeling in Fibrous Porous Media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobhani, Sadaf; Panerai, Francesco; Borner, Arnaud; Ferguson, Joseph C.; Wray, Alan; Mansour, Nagi N.

    2017-01-01

    Phenolic-Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) was developed at NASA Ames Research Center as a lightweight thermal protection system material for successful atmospheric entries. The objective of the current work is to compute the effective radiative conductivity of fibrous porous media, such as preforms used to make PICA, to enable the efficient design of materials that can meet the thermal performance goals of forthcoming space exploration missions.

  9. Heat transfer analysis of radiator using graphene oxide nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao Ponangi, Babu; Sumanth, S.; Krishna, V.; Seetharam, T. R.; Seetharamu, K. N.

    2018-04-01

    As the technology is developing day by day, there is a requirement for enhancement in performance of automobile radiator to have a better performance of the IC Engine and fuel effectiveness. One of the major and recent approach to upgrade the performance of a radiator is that nanoparticles must be suspended in the general coolant (Ethylene Glycol – Water) which form nanofluids. Present work has been carried out by suspending graphene oxide nanoparticles in 50:50 Ethylene Glycol and RO-Water as base fluid. Experimentation is carried out by using three volume concentrations of the nanofluid (0.02%, 0.03% and 0.04%) and at different volumetric flow rates ranging from 3 to 6 LPM. Effect of volume concentration, inlet temperature and flow rate on Effectiveness, pressure drop and friction factor has been studied experimentally. Effectiveness versus NTU curves are plotted for further design calculations. The results show that the nanofluids will enhance the performance of an automobile radiator when compared with base fluid. Results also shows a maximum of 56.45% and 41.47% improvement in effectiveness for 0.03% volume concentration and 5 LPM flow rate at 40°C and 50°C inlet temperatures respectively.

  10. Ultra thin metallic coatings to control near field radiative heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esquivel-Sirvent, R.

    2016-09-01

    We present a theoretical calculation of the changes in the near field radiative heat transfer between two surfaces due to the presence of ultra thin metallic coatings on semiconductors. Depending on the substrates, the radiative heat transfer is modulated by the thickness of the ultra thin film. In particular we consider gold thin films with thicknesses varying from 4 to 20 nm. The ultra-thin film has an insulator-conductor transition close to a critical thickness of dc = 6.4 nm and there is an increase in the near field spectral heat transfer just before the percolation transition. Depending on the substrates (Si or SiC) and the thickness of the metallic coatings we show how the near field heat transfer can be increased or decreased as a function of the metallic coating thickness. The calculations are based on available experimental data for the optical properties of ultrathin coatings.

  11. Near-field radiative heat transfer between graphene-covered hyperbolic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Xiao-Juan; Li, Jian-Wen; Wang, Tong-Biao; Zhang, De-Jian; Liu, Wen-Xing; Liao, Qing-Hua; Yu, Tian-Bao; Liu, Nian-Hua

    2018-04-01

    We propose the use of graphene-covered silicon carbide (SiC) nanowire arrays (NWAs) for theoretical studies of near-field radiative heat transfer. The SiC NWAs exhibit a hyperbolic characteristic at an appropriately selected filling-volume fraction. The surface plasmon supported by graphene and the hyperbolic modes supported by SiC NWAs significantly affect radiative heat transfer. The heat-transfer coefficient (HTC) between the proposed structures is larger than that between SiC NWAs. We also find that the chemical potential of graphene plays an important role in modulating the HTC. The tunability of chemical potential through gate voltage enables flexible control of heat transfer using the graphene-covered SiC NWAs.

  12. Theory of many-body radiative heat transfer without the constraint of reciprocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Linxiao; Guo, Yu; Fan, Shanhui

    2018-03-01

    Using a self-consistent scattered field approach based on fluctuational electrodynamics, we develop compact formulas for radiative heat transfer in many-body systems without the constraint of reciprocity. The formulas allow for efficient numerical calculation for a system consisting of a large number of bodies, and are in principle exact. As a demonstration, for a nonreciprocal many-body system, we investigate persistent heat current at thermal equilibrium and directional heat transfer when the system is away from thermal equilibrium.

  13. CFD analysis of heat transfer performance of graphene based hybrid nanofluid in radiators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharadwaj, Bharath R.; Sanketh Mogeraya, K.; Manjunath, D. M.; Rao Ponangi, Babu; Rajendra Prasad, K. S.; Krishna, V.

    2018-04-01

    For Improved performance of an automobile engine, Cooling systems are one of the critical systems that need attention. With increased capacity to carry away large amounts of wasted heat, performance of an engine is increased. Current research on Nano-fluids suggests that they offer higher heat transfer rate compared to that of conventional coolants. Hence this project seeks to investigate the use of hybrid-nanofluids in radiators so as to increase its heat transfer performance. Carboxyl Graphene and Graphene Oxide based nanoparticles were selected due to the very high thermal conductivity of Graphene. System Analysis of the radiator was performed by considering a small part of the whole automobile radiator modelled using SEIMENS NX. CFD analysis was conducted using ANSYS FLUENT® for the nanofluid defined and the increase in effectiveness was compared to that of conventional coolants. Usage of such nanofluids for a fixed cooling requirement in the future can lead to significant downsizing of the radiator.

  14. Two-dimensional HID light source radiative transfer using discrete ordinates method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghrib, Basma; Bouaoun, Mohamed; Elloumi, Hatem

    2016-08-01

    This paper shows the implementation of the Discrete Ordinates Method for handling radiation problems in High Intensity Discharge (HID) lamps. Therefore, we start with presenting this rigorous method for treatment of radiation transfer in a two-dimensional, axisymmetric HID lamp. Furthermore, the finite volume method is used for the spatial discretization of the Radiative Transfer Equation. The atom and electron densities were calculated using temperature profiles established by a 2D semi-implicit finite-element scheme for the solution of conservation equations relative to energy, momentum, and mass. Spectral intensities as a function of position and direction are first calculated, and then axial and radial radiative fluxes are evaluated as well as the net emission coefficient. The results are given for a HID mercury lamp on a line-by-line basis. A particular attention is paid on the 253.7 nm resonance and 546.1 nm green lines.

  15. Radiative transfer theory for active remote sensing of a layer of small ellipsoidal scatterers. [of vegetation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsang, L.; Kubacsi, M. C.; Kong, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    The radiative transfer theory is applied within the Rayleigh approximation to calculate the backscattering cross section of a layer of randomly positioned and oriented small ellipsoids. The orientation of the ellipsoids is characterized by a probability density function of the Eulerian angles of rotation. The radiative transfer equations are solved by an iterative approach to first order in albedo. In the half space limit the results are identical to those obtained via the approach of Foldy's and distorted Born approximation. Numerical results of the theory are illustrated using parameters encountered in active remote sensing of vegetation layers. A distinctive characteristic is the strong depolarization shown by vertically aligned leaves.

  16. Derivation and application of the reciprocity relations for radiative transfer with internal illumination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cogley, A. C.

    1975-01-01

    A Green's function formulation is used to derive basic reciprocity relations for planar radiative transfer in a general medium with internal illumination. Reciprocity (or functional symmetry) allows an explicit and generalized development of the equivalence between source and probability functions. Assuming similar symmetry in three-dimensional space, a general relationship is derived between planar-source intensity and point-source total directional energy. These quantities are expressed in terms of standard (universal) functions associated with the planar medium, while all results are derived from the differential equation of radiative transfer.

  17. Plant architecture, growth and radiative transfer for terrestrial and space environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, John M.; Goel, Narendra S.

    1993-01-01

    The overall objective of this research was to develop a hardware implemented model that would incorporate realistic and dynamic descriptions of canopy architecture in physiologically based models of plant growth and functioning, with an emphasis on radiative transfer while accommodating other environmental constraints. The general approach has five parts: a realistic mathematical treatment of canopy architecture, a methodology for combining this general canopy architectural description with a general radiative transfer model, the inclusion of physiological and environmental aspects of plant growth, inclusion of plant phenology, and integration.

  18. Scattering by a slab containing randomly located cylinders: comparison between radiative transfer and electromagnetic simulation.

    PubMed

    Roux, L; Mareschal, P; Vukadinovic, N; Thibaud, J B; Greffet, J J

    2001-02-01

    This study is devoted to the examination of scattering of waves by a slab containing randomly located cylinders. For the first time to our knowledge, the complete transmission problem has been solved numerically. We have compared the radiative transfer theory with a numerical solution of the wave equation. We discuss the coherent effects, such as forward-scattering dip and backscattering enhancement. It is seen that the radiative transfer equation can be used with great accuracy even for optically thin systems whose geometric thickness is comparable with the wavelength. We have also shown the presence of dependent scattering.

  19. A fast method to compute Three-Dimensional Infrared Radiative Transfer in non scattering medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makke, Laurent; Musson-Genon, Luc; Carissimo, Bertrand

    2014-05-01

    The Atmospheric Radiation field has seen the development of more accurate and faster methods to take into account absoprtion in participating media. Radiative fog appears with clear sky condition due to a significant cooling during the night, so scattering is left out. Fog formation modelling requires accurate enough method to compute cooling rates. Thanks to High Performance Computing, multi-spectral approach of Radiative Transfer Equation resolution is most often used. Nevertheless, the coupling of three-dimensionnal radiative transfer with fluid dynamics is very detrimental to the computational cost. To reduce the time spent in radiation calculations, the following method uses analytical absorption functions fitted by Sasamori (1968) on Yamamoto's charts (Yamamoto,1956) to compute a local linear absorption coefficient. By averaging radiative properties, this method eliminates the spectral integration. For an isothermal atmosphere, analytical calculations lead to an explicit formula between emissivities functions and linear absorption coefficient. In the case of cooling to space approximation, this analytical expression gives very accurate results compared to correlated k-distribution. For non homogeneous paths, we propose a two steps algorithm. One-dimensional radiative quantities and linear absorption coefficient are computed by a two-flux method. Then, three-dimensional RTE under the grey medium assumption is solved with the DOM. Comparisons with measurements of radiative quantities during ParisFOG field (2006) shows the cability of this method to handle strong vertical variations of pressure/temperature and gases concentrations.

  20. Radiative Heat Transfer modelling in a Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine

    SciT

    Paul, Chandan; Sircar, Arpan; Ferreyro-Fernandez, Sebastian

    Detailed radiation modelling in piston engines has received relatively little attention to date. Recently, it is being revisited in light of current trends towards higher operating pressures and higher levels of exhaust-gas recirculation, both of which enhance molecular gas radiation. Advanced high-efficiency engines also are expected to function closer to the limits of stable operation, where even small perturbations to the energy balance can have a large influence on system behavior. Here several different spectral radiation property models and radiative transfer equation (RTE) solvers have been implemented in an OpenFOAM-based engine CFD code, and simulations have been performed for amore » heavy-duty diesel engine. Differences in computed temperature fields, NO and soot levels, and wall heat transfer rates are shown for different combinations of spectral models and RTE solvers. The relative importance of molecular gas radiation versus soot radiation is examined. And the influence of turbulence-radiation interactions is determined by comparing results obtained using local mean values of composition and temperature to compute radiative emission and absorption with those obtained using a particle-based transported probability density function method.« less

  1. Radiative transfer in spherical shell atmospheres. 2: Asymmetric phase functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kattawar, G. W.; Adams, C. N.

    1977-01-01

    The effects are investigated of sphericity on the radiation reflected from a planet with a homogeneous, conservative scattering atmosphere of optical thicknesses of 0.25 and 1.0. A Henyey-Greenstein phase function with asymmetry factors of 0.5 and 0.7 is considered. Significant differences were found when these results were compared with the plane-parallel calculations. Also large violations of the reciprocity theorem, which is only true for plane-parallel calculations, were noted. Results are presented for the radiance versus height distributions as a function of planetary phase angle.

  2. Theory of Radiation Transfer in Neutron Star Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zavlin, Vyacheslav

    2006-01-01

    The possibility for direct investigation of thermal emission from isolated neutron stars opened about a quarter of century ago with the launch of the first X-ray observatories Einstein and EXOSAT stimulated developing models of the neutron star surface radiation which began at the end of 80's. Confronting observational data with theoretical models of thermal emission allows one to infer the surface temperatures, magnetic fields, chemical composition, and neutron star masses and radii. This information, supplemented with the model equations of state and neutron star cooling models, provides an opportunity to understand the fundamental properties of the superdense matter in the stars' interiors. Almost all available models are based on the assumption that thermal radiation emitted by a neutron star is formed in the superficial star's layers--atmosphere. The neutron star atmospheres are very different from those of usual stars due to the immense gravity and huge magnetic fields. In this presentation we review the current status of the neutron star atmosphere modeling, present most important results, discuss problems and possible future developments.

  3. Studying effects of non-equilibrium radiative transfer via HPC

    SciT

    Holladay, Daniel

    This report presents slides on Ph.D. Research Goals; Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE) Implications; Calculating an Opacity; Opacity: Pictographic Representation; Opacity: Pictographic Representation; Opacity: Pictographic Representation; Collisional Radiative Modeling; Radiative and Collisional Excitation; Photo and Electron Impact Ionization; Autoionization; The Rate Matrix; Example: Total Photoionization rate; The Rate Coefficients; inlinlte version 1.1; inlinlte: Verification; New capabilities: Rate Matrix – Flexibility; Memory Option Comparison; Improvements over previous DCA solver; Inter- and intra-node load balancing; Load Balance – Full Picture; Load Balance – Full Picture; Load Balance – Internode; Load Balance – Scaling; Description; Performance; xRAGE Simulation; Post-process @ 2hr; Post-process @ 4hr;more » Post-process @ 8hr; Takeaways; Performance for 1 realization; Motivation for QOI; Multigroup Er; Transport and NLTE large effects (1mm, 1keV); Transport large effect, NLTE lesser (1mm, 750eV); Blastwave Diagnostici – Description & Performance; Temperature Comparison; NLTE has effect on dynamics at wall; NLTE has lesser effect in the foam; Global Takeaways; The end.« less

  4. A second order radiative transfer equation and its solution by meshless method with application to strongly inhomogeneous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, J. M.; Tan, J. Y.; Liu, L. H.

    2013-01-01

    A new second order form of radiative transfer equation (named MSORTE) is proposed, which overcomes the singularity problem of a previously proposed second order radiative transfer equation [J.E. Morel, B.T. Adams, T. Noh, J.M. McGhee, T.M. Evans, T.J. Urbatsch, Spatial discretizations for self-adjoint forms of the radiative transfer equations, J. Comput. Phys. 214 (1) (2006) 12-40 (where it was termed SAAI), J.M. Zhao, L.H. Liu, Second order radiative transfer equation and its properties of numerical solution using finite element method, Numer. Heat Transfer B 51 (2007) 391-409] in dealing with inhomogeneous media where some locations have very small/zero extinction coefficient. The MSORTE contains a naturally introduced diffusion (or second order) term which provides better numerical property than the classic first order radiative transfer equation (RTE). The stability and convergence characteristics of the MSORTE discretized by central difference scheme is analyzed theoretically, and the better numerical stability of the second order form radiative transfer equations than the RTE when discretized by the central difference type method is proved. A collocation meshless method is developed based on the MSORTE to solve radiative transfer in inhomogeneous media. Several critical test cases are taken to verify the performance of the presented method. The collocation meshless method based on the MSORTE is demonstrated to be capable of stably and accurately solve radiative transfer in strongly inhomogeneous media, media with void region and even with discontinuous extinction coefficient.

  5. Performance tuning Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Goddard longwave radiative transfer scheme on Intel Xeon Phi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mielikainen, Jarno; Huang, Bormin; Huang, Allen H.

    2015-10-01

    Next-generation mesoscale numerical weather prediction system, the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, is a designed for dual use for forecasting and research. WRF offers multiple physics options that can be combined in any way. One of the physics options is radiance computation. The major source for energy for the earth's climate is solar radiation. Thus, it is imperative to accurately model horizontal and vertical distribution of the heating. Goddard solar radiative transfer model includes the absorption duo to water vapor,ozone, ozygen, carbon dioxide, clouds and aerosols. The model computes the interactions among the absorption and scattering by clouds, aerosols, molecules and surface. Finally, fluxes are integrated over the entire longwave spectrum.In this paper, we present our results of optimizing the Goddard longwave radiative transfer scheme on Intel Many Integrated Core Architecture (MIC) hardware. The Intel Xeon Phi coprocessor is the first product based on Intel MIC architecture, and it consists of up to 61 cores connected by a high performance on-die bidirectional interconnect. The coprocessor supports all important Intel development tools. Thus, the development environment is familiar one to a vast number of CPU developers. Although, getting a maximum performance out of MICs will require using some novel optimization techniques. Those optimization techniques are discusses in this paper. The optimizations improved the performance of the original Goddard longwave radiative transfer scheme on Xeon Phi 7120P by a factor of 2.2x. Furthermore, the same optimizations improved the performance of the Goddard longwave radiative transfer scheme on a dual socket configuration of eight core Intel Xeon E5-2670 CPUs by a factor of 2.1x compared to the original Goddard longwave radiative transfer scheme code.

  6. Near-field radiative transfer in spectrally tunable double-layer phonon-polaritonic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didari, Azadeh; Elçioğlu, Elif Begüm; Okutucu-Özyurt, Tuba; Mengüç, M. Pinar

    2018-06-01

    Understanding of near-field radiative transfer is crucial for many advanced applications such as nanoscale energy harvesting, nano-manufacturing, thermal imaging, and radiative cooling. Near-field radiative transfer has been shown to be dependent on the material and morphological characteristics of systems, the gap distances between structures, and their temperatures. Surface interactions of phononic materials in close proximity of each other has led to promising results for novel near-field radiative transfer applications. For systems involving thin films and small structures, as the dimension(s) through which the heat transfer takes place is/are on the order of sub-micrometers, it is important to identify the impacts of size-related parameters on the results. In this work, we investigated the impact of geometric design and characteristics in a double-layer metamaterial system made up of GaN, SiC, h-BN; all of which have potential importance in micro-and nano-technological systems. The numerical study is performed using the NF-RT-FDTD algorithm, which is a versatile method to study near-field thermal radiation performances of advanced configurations of materials, even with arbitrary shapes. We have systematically investigated the thin film thickness, the substrate material, and the nanostructured surfaces effects, and reported on the best combination of scenarios among the studied cases to obtain maximum enhancement of radiative heat transfer rate. The findings of this work may be used in design and fabrication of new corrugated surfaces for energy harvesting purposes.

  7. Radiative transfer in spherical shell atmospheres. II - Asymmetric phase functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kattawar, G. W.; Adams, C. N.

    1978-01-01

    This paper investigates the effects of sphericity on the radiation reflected from a planet with a homogeneous conservative-scattering atmosphere of optical thicknesses of 0.25 and 1.0. A Henyey-Greenstein phase function with asymmetry factors of 0.5 and 0.7 was considered. Significant differences were found when these results were compared with the plane-parallel calculations. Also, large violations of the reciprocity theorem, which is only true for plane-parallel calculations, were noted. Results are presented for the radiance versus height distributions as a function of planetary phase angle. These results will be useful to researchers in the field of remote sensing and planetary spectroscopy.

  8. MODTRAN4 radiative transfer modeling for atmospheric correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berk, Alexander; Anderson, Gail P.; Bernstein, Lawrence S.; Acharya, Prabhat K.; Dothe, H.; Matthew, Michael W.; Adler-Golden, Steven M.; Chetwynd, James H.; Richtsmeier, Steven C.; Pukall, Brian; Allred, Clark L.; Jeong, Laila S.; Hoke, Michael L.

    1999-10-01

    MODTRAN4, the latest publicly released version of MODTRAN, provides many new and important options for modeling atmospheric radiation transport. A correlated-k algorithm improves multiple scattering, eliminates Curtis-Godson averaging, and introduces Beer's Law dependencies into the band model. An optimized 15 cm(superscript -1) band model provides over a 10-fold increase in speed over the standard MODTRAN 1 cm(superscript -1) band model with comparable accuracy when higher spectral resolution results are unnecessary. The MODTRAN ground surface has been upgraded to include the effects of Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Functions (BRDFs) and Adjacency. The BRDFs are entered using standard parameterizations and are coupled into line-of-sight surface radiance calculations.

  9. Three-dimensional radiation transfer modeling in a dicotyledon leaf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govaerts, Yves M.; Jacquemoud, Stéphane; Verstraete, Michel M.; Ustin, Susan L.

    1996-11-01

    The propagation of light in a typical dicotyledon leaf is investigated with a new Monte Carlo ray-tracing model. The three-dimensional internal cellular structure of the various leaf tissues, including the epidermis, the palisade parenchyma, and the spongy mesophyll, is explicitly described. Cells of different tissues are assigned appropriate morphologies and contain realistic amounts of water and chlorophyll. Each cell constituent is characterized by an index of refraction and an absorption coefficient. The objective of this study is to investigate how the internal three-dimensional structure of the tissues and the optical properties of cell constituents control the reflectance and transmittance of the leaf. Model results compare favorably with laboratory observations. The influence of the roughness of the epidermis on the reflection and absorption of light is investigated, and simulation results confirm that convex cells in the epidermis focus light on the palisade parenchyma and increase the absorption of radiation.

  10. Solution of the radiative transfer equation for Rayleigh scattering using the infinite medium Green's function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biçer, M.; Kaşkaş, A.

    2018-03-01

    The infinite medium Green's function is used to solve the half-space albedo, slab albedo and Milne problems for the unpolarized Rayleigh scattering case; these problems are the most classical problems of radiative transfer theory. The numerical results are obtained and are compared with previous ones.

  11. Bayesian Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (BART) Code and Application to WASP-43b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blecic, Jasmina; Harrington, Joseph; Cubillos, Patricio; Bowman, Oliver; Rojo, Patricio; Stemm, Madison; Lust, Nathaniel B.; Challener, Ryan; Foster, Austin James; Foster, Andrew S.; Blumenthal, Sarah D.; Bruce, Dylan

    2016-01-01

    We present a new open-source Bayesian radiative-transfer framework, Bayesian Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (BART, https://github.com/exosports/BART), and its application to WASP-43b. BART initializes a model for the atmospheric retrieval calculation, generates thousands of theoretical model spectra using parametrized pressure and temperature profiles and line-by-line radiative-transfer calculation, and employs a statistical package to compare the models with the observations. It consists of three self-sufficient modules available to the community under the reproducible-research license, the Thermochemical Equilibrium Abundances module (TEA, https://github.com/dzesmin/TEA, Blecic et al. 2015}, the radiative-transfer module (Transit, https://github.com/exosports/transit), and the Multi-core Markov-chain Monte Carlo statistical module (MCcubed, https://github.com/pcubillos/MCcubed, Cubillos et al. 2015). We applied BART on all available WASP-43b secondary eclipse data from the space- and ground-based observations constraining the temperature-pressure profile and molecular abundances of the dayside atmosphere of WASP-43b. This work was supported by NASA Planetary Atmospheres grant NNX12AI69G and NASA Astrophysics Data Analysis Program grant NNX13AF38G. JB holds a NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship.

  12. An abstract model for radiative transfer in an atmosphere with reflection by the planetary surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenberg, W.; van der Mee, C. V. M.

    1985-07-01

    A Hilbert-space model is developed that applies to radiative transfer in a homogeneous, plane-parallel planetary atmosphere. Reflection and absorption by the planetary surface are taken into account by imposing a reflective boundary condition. The existence and uniqueness of the solution of this boundary value problem are established by proving the invertibility of a scattering operator using the Fredholm alternative.

  13. Use of Maple Seeding Canopy Reflectance Dataset for Validation of SART/LEAFMOD Radiative Transfer Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, Barbara J.; Peterson, David L.

    1999-01-01

    This project was a collaborative effort by researchers at ARC, OSU and the University of Arizona. The goal was to use a dataset obtained from a previous study to "empirically validate a new canopy radiative-transfer model (SART) which incorporates a recently-developed leaf-level model (LEAFMOD)". The document includes a short research summary.

  14. Analytical Solution of the Radiative Transfer Equation in a Thin Dusty Circumstellar Shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruzalèbes, P.; Sacuto, S.

    The radiative transfer equation can be solved analytically for optically thin shells. The solution leads to a semi-analytical expression of the visibility function, which can be compared to the numerical solution given by the DUSTY code. Best-fit model parameters are given using real measurements of ISO fluxes, ISI and VLTI-MIDI visibilities for 3 late-type stars.

  15. Principal Component-Based Radiative Transfer Model (PCRTM) for Hyperspectral Sensors. Part I; Theoretical Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Xu; Smith, William L.; Zhou, Daniel K.; Larar, Allen

    2005-01-01

    Modern infrared satellite sensors such as Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), Cosmic Ray Isotope Spectrometer (CrIS), Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES), Geosynchronous Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GIFTS) and Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) are capable of providing high spatial and spectral resolution infrared spectra. To fully exploit the vast amount of spectral information from these instruments, super fast radiative transfer models are needed. This paper presents a novel radiative transfer model based on principal component analysis. Instead of predicting channel radiance or transmittance spectra directly, the Principal Component-based Radiative Transfer Model (PCRTM) predicts the Principal Component (PC) scores of these quantities. This prediction ability leads to significant savings in computational time. The parameterization of the PCRTM model is derived from properties of PC scores and instrument line shape functions. The PCRTM is very accurate and flexible. Due to its high speed and compressed spectral information format, it has great potential for super fast one-dimensional physical retrievals and for Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) large volume radiance data assimilation applications. The model has been successfully developed for the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System Airborne Sounder Testbed - Interferometer (NAST-I) and AIRS instruments. The PCRTM model performs monochromatic radiative transfer calculations and is able to include multiple scattering calculations to account for clouds and aerosols.

  16. A Comparison of Numerical and Analytical Radiative-Transfer Solutions for Plane Albedo in Natural Waters

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several numerical and analytical solutions of the radiative transfer equation (RTE) for plane albedo were compared for solar light reflection by sea water. The study incorporated the simplest case, that being a semi-infinite one-dimensional plane-parallel absorbing and scattering...

  17. Green's function solution to radiative heat transfer between longitudinal gray fins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frankel, J. I.; Silvestri, J. J.

    1991-01-01

    A demonstration is presented of the applicability and versatility of a pure integral formulation for radiative-conductive heat-transfer problems. Preliminary results have been obtained which indicate that this formulation allows an accurate, fast, and stable computation procedure to be implemented. Attention is given to the accessory problem defining Green's function.

  18. Evaluation of Multispectral Based Radiative Transfer Model Inversion to Estimate Leaf Area Index in Wheat

    Leaf area index (LAI) is a critical variable for predicting the growth and productivity of crops. Remote sensing estimates of LAI have relied upon empirical relationships between spectral vegetation indices and ground measurements that are costly to obtain. Radiative transfer model inversion based o...

  19. Estimating crop biophysical properties from remote sensing data by inverting linked radiative transfer and ecophysiological models

    Remote sensing technology can rapidly provide spatial information on crop growth status, which ideally could be used to invert radiative transfer models or ecophysiological models for estimating a variety of crop biophysical properties. However, the outcome of the model inversion procedure will be ...

  20. Influence of absorption by environmental water vapor on radiation transfer in wildland fires

    D. Frankman; B. W. Webb; B. W. Butler

    2008-01-01

    The attenuation of radiation transfer from wildland flames to fuel by environmental water vapor is investigated. Emission is tracked from points on an idealized flame to locations along the fuel bed while accounting for absorption by environmental water vapor in the intervening medium. The Spectral Line Weighted-sum-of-gray-gases approach was employed for treating the...

  1. A Comparison of Numerical and Analytical Radiative-Transfer Solutions for Plane Albedo of Natural Waters

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three numerical algorithms were compared to provide a solution of a radiative transfer equation (RTE) for plane albedo (hemispherical reflectance) in semi-infinite one-dimensional plane-parallel layer. Algorithms were based on the invariant imbedding method and two different var...

  2. A new exact method for line radiative transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elitzur, Moshe; Asensio Ramos, Andrés

    2006-01-01

    We present a new method, the coupled escape probability (CEP), for exact calculation of line emission from multi-level systems, solving only algebraic equations for the level populations. The CEP formulation of the classical two-level problem is a set of linear equations, and we uncover an exact analytic expression for the emission from two-level optically thick sources that holds as long as they are in the `effectively thin' regime. In a comparative study of a number of standard problems, the CEP method outperformed the leading line transfer methods by substantial margins. The algebraic equations employed by our new method are already incorporated in numerous codes based on the escape probability approximation. All that is required for an exact solution with these existing codes is to augment the expression for the escape probability with simple zone-coupling terms. As an application, we find that standard escape probability calculations generally produce the correct cooling emission by the CII 158-μm line but not by the 3P lines of OI.

  3. Shape-Independent Limits to Near-Field Radiative Heat Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Owen D.; Johnson, Steven G.; Rodriguez, Alejandro W.

    2015-11-01

    We derive shape-independent limits to the spectral radiative heat transfer rate between two closely spaced bodies, generalizing the concept of a blackbody to the case of near-field energy transfer. Through conservation of energy and reciprocity, we show that each body of susceptibility χ can emit and absorb radiation at enhanced rates bounded by |χ |2/Im χ , optimally mediated by near-field photon transfer proportional to 1 /d2 across a separation distance d . Dipole-dipole and dipole-plate structures approach restricted versions of the limit, but common large-area structures do not exhibit the material enhancement factor and thus fall short of the general limit. By contrast, we find that particle arrays interacting in an idealized Born approximation (i.e., neglecting multiple scattering) exhibit both enhancement factors, suggesting the possibility of orders-of-magnitude improvement beyond previous designs and the potential for radiative heat transfer to be comparable to conductive heat transfer through air at room temperature, and significantly greater at higher temperatures.

  4. Radiative transfer calculated from a Markov chain formalism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esposito, L. W.; House, L. L.

    1978-01-01

    The theory of Markov chains is used to formulate the radiative transport problem in a general way by modeling the successive interactions of a photon as a stochastic process. Under the minimal requirement that the stochastic process is a Markov chain, the determination of the diffuse reflection or transmission from a scattering atmosphere is equivalent to the solution of a system of linear equations. This treatment is mathematically equivalent to, and thus has many of the advantages of, Monte Carlo methods, but can be considerably more rapid than Monte Carlo algorithms for numerical calculations in particular applications. We have verified the speed and accuracy of this formalism for the standard problem of finding the intensity of scattered light from a homogeneous plane-parallel atmosphere with an arbitrary phase function for scattering. Accurate results over a wide range of parameters were obtained with computation times comparable to those of a standard 'doubling' routine. The generality of this formalism thus allows fast, direct solutions to problems that were previously soluble only by Monte Carlo methods. Some comparisons are made with respect to integral equation methods.

  5. Radiative transfer in an atmosphere-ocean system.

    PubMed

    Plass, G N; Kattawar, G W

    1969-02-01

    The radiation field for an atmosphere-ocean system is calculated by a Monte Carlo method. In the atmosphere, both Rayleigh scattering by the molecules and Mie scattering by the aerosols and water droplets, when present, as well as molecular and aerosol absorption are included in the model. Similarly, in the ocean, both Rayleigh scattering by the water molecules and Mie scattering by the hydrosols as well as absorption by the water molecules and hydrosols are considered. Separate scattering functions are calculated from the Mie theory for the water droplets in clouds, the aerosols, and the hydrosols with an appropriate and different size distribution in each case. The photon path is followed accurately in three dimensions with new scattering angles determined from the appropriate scattering function including the strong forward scattering peak. Both the reflected and refracted rays, as well as the rays that undergo total internal reflection, are followed at the ocean surface, which is assumed smooth. The ocean floor is represented by a Lambert surface. The radiance and flux are given for two wavelengths, three solar angles, shallow and deep oceans, various albedos of ocean floor, various depths in atmosphere and ocean, and with and without clouds in the atmosphere.

  6. A new vector radiative transfer model as a part of SCIATRAN 3.0 software package.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozanov, Alexei; Rozanov, Vladimir; Burrows, John P.

    The SCIATRAN 3.0 package is a result of further development of the SCIATRAN 2.x software family which, similar to previous versions, comprises a radiative transfer model and a retrieval block. A major improvement was achieved in comparison to previous software versions by adding the vector mode to the radiative transfer model. Thus, the well-established Discrete Ordinate solver can now be run in the vector mode to calculate the scattered solar radiation including polarization, i.e., to simulate all four components of the Stockes vector. Similar to the scalar version, the simulations can be performed for any viewing geometry typical for atmospheric observations in the UV-Vis-NIR spectral range (nadir, limb, off-axis, etc.) as well as for any observer position within or outside the Earth's atmosphere. Similar to the precursor version, the new model is freely available for non-commercial use via the web page of the University of Bremen. In this presentation a short description of the software package, especially of the new vector radiative transfer model will be given, including remarks on the availability for the scientific community. Furthermore, comparisons to other vector models will be shown and some example problems will be considered where the polarization of the observed radiation must be accounted for to obtain high quality results.

  7. Comprehensive analysis of heat transfer of gold-blood nanofluid (Sisko-model) with thermal radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eid, Mohamed R.; Alsaedi, Ahmed; Muhammad, Taseer; Hayat, Tasawar

    Characteristics of heat transfer of gold nanoparticles (Au-NPs) in flow past a power-law stretching surface are discussed. Sisko bio-nanofluid flow (with blood as a base fluid) in existence of non-linear thermal radiation is studied. The resulting equations system is abbreviated to model the suggested problem in non-linear PDEs. Along with initial and boundary-conditions, the equations are made non-dimensional and then resolved numerically utilizing 4th-5th order Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg (RKF45) technique with shooting integration procedure. Various flow quantities behaviors are examined for parametric consideration such as the Au-NPs volume fraction, the exponentially stretching and thermal radiation parameters. It is observed that radiation drives to shortage the thermal boundary-layer thickness and therefore resulted in better heat transfer at surface.

  8. Active and Passive Radiative Transfer Modeling with Preferentially-Aligned Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Ian Stuart

    2017-01-01

    The fluid dynamics of falling hydrometeors often results in preferential orientations that can affect both the intensity and polarization of electromagnetic radiation. In order to properly interpret remote sensing observations of ice and snow, such alignments should be considered when constructing databases of scattering particles; however, the inclusion of aligned particles increases the complexity of the scattering data. To demonstrate the use of scattering properties of preferentially-aligned particles, millimeter-wave brightness temperatures and radar observables, including reflectivity and linear depolarization ratio, are modeled using the Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Simulator (ARTS). The necessary scattering parameters for vector radiative transfer, particularly with respect to ARTS, are reviewed, and the exploitation of particle symmetries, as well as scattering reciprocity relationships, are detailed.

  9. Giant Enhancement in Radiative Heat Transfer in Sub-30 nm Gaps of Plane Parallel Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Fiorino, Anthony; Thompson, Dakotah; Zhu, Linxiao; Song, Bai; Reddy, Pramod; Meyhofer, Edgar

    2018-06-13

    Radiative heat transfer rates that exceed the blackbody limit by several orders of magnitude are expected when the gap size between plane parallel surfaces is reduced to the nanoscale. To date, experiments have only realized enhancements of ∼100 fold as the smallest gap sizes in radiative heat transfer studies have been limited to ∼50 nm by device curvature and particle contamination. Here, we report a 1,200-fold enhancement with respect to the far-field value in the radiative heat flux between parallel planar silica surfaces separated by gaps as small as ∼25 nm. Achieving such small gap sizes and the resultant dramatic enhancement in near-field energy flux is critical to achieve a number of novel near-field based nanoscale energy conversion systems that have been theoretically predicted but remain experimentally unverified.

  10. Equivalent isotropic scattering formulation for transient short-pulse radiative transfer in anisotropic scattering planar media.

    PubMed

    Guo, Z; Kumar, S

    2000-08-20

    An isotropic scaling formulation is evaluated for transient radiative transfer in a one-dimensional planar slab subject to collimated and/or diffuse irradiation. The Monte Carlo method is used to implement the equivalent scattering and exact simulations of the transient short-pulse radiation transport through forward and backward anisotropic scattering planar media. The scaled equivalent isotropic scattering results are compared with predictions of anisotropic scattering in various problems. It is found that the equivalent isotropic scaling law is not appropriate for backward-scattering media in transient radiative transfer. Even for an optically diffuse medium, the differences in temporal transmittance and reflectance profiles between predictions of backward anisotropic scattering and equivalent isotropic scattering are large. Additionally, for both forward and backward anisotropic scattering media, the transient equivalent isotropic results are strongly affected by the change of photon flight time, owing to the change of flight direction associated with the isotropic scaling technique.

  11. SKIRT: The design of a suite of input models for Monte Carlo radiative transfer simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baes, M.; Camps, P.

    2015-09-01

    The Monte Carlo method is the most popular technique to perform radiative transfer simulations in a general 3D geometry. The algorithms behind and acceleration techniques for Monte Carlo radiative transfer are discussed extensively in the literature, and many different Monte Carlo codes are publicly available. On the contrary, the design of a suite of components that can be used for the distribution of sources and sinks in radiative transfer codes has received very little attention. The availability of such models, with different degrees of complexity, has many benefits. For example, they can serve as toy models to test new physical ingredients, or as parameterised models for inverse radiative transfer fitting. For 3D Monte Carlo codes, this requires algorithms to efficiently generate random positions from 3D density distributions. We describe the design of a flexible suite of components for the Monte Carlo radiative transfer code SKIRT. The design is based on a combination of basic building blocks (which can be either analytical toy models or numerical models defined on grids or a set of particles) and the extensive use of decorators that combine and alter these building blocks to more complex structures. For a number of decorators, e.g. those that add spiral structure or clumpiness, we provide a detailed description of the algorithms that can be used to generate random positions. Advantages of this decorator-based design include code transparency, the avoidance of code duplication, and an increase in code maintainability. Moreover, since decorators can be chained without problems, very complex models can easily be constructed out of simple building blocks. Finally, based on a number of test simulations, we demonstrate that our design using customised random position generators is superior to a simpler design based on a generic black-box random position generator.

  12. A New Method for 3D Radiative Transfer with Adaptive Grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folini, D.; Walder, R.; Psarros, M.; Desboeufs, A.

    2003-01-01

    We present a new method for 3D NLTE radiative transfer in moving media, including an adaptive grid, along with some test examples and first applications. The central features of our approach we briefly outline in the following. For the solution of the radiative transfer equation, we make use of a generalized mean intensity approach. In this approach, the transfer eqation is solved directly, instead of using the moments of the transfer equation, thus avoiding the associated closure problem. In a first step, a system of equations for the transfer of each directed intensity is set up, using short characteristics. Next, the entity of systems of equations for each directed intensity is re-formulated in the form of one system of equations for the angle-integrated mean intensity. This system then is solved by a modern, fast BiCGStab iterative solver. An additional advantage of this procedure is that convergence rates barely depend on the spatial discretization. For the solution of the rate equations we use Housholder transformations. Lines are treated by a 3D generalization of the well-known Sobolev-approximation. The two parts, solution of the transfer equation and solution of the rate equations, are iteratively coupled. We recently have implemented an adaptive grid, which allows for recursive refinement on a cell-by-cell basis. The spatial resolution, which is always a problematic issue in 3D simulations, we can thus locally reduce or augment, depending on the problem to be solved.

  13. Equivalence of internal and external mixture schemes of single scattering properties in vector radiative transfer

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Lipi; Zhai, Peng-Wang; Hu, Yongxiang; Winker, David M.

    2018-01-01

    Polarized radiation fields in a turbid medium are influenced by single-scattering properties of scatterers. It is common that media contain two or more types of scatterers, which makes it essential to properly mix single-scattering properties of different types of scatterers in the vector radiative transfer theory. The vector radiative transfer solvers can be divided into two basic categories: the stochastic and deterministic methods. The stochastic method is basically the Monte Carlo method, which can handle scatterers with different scattering properties explicitly. This mixture scheme is called the external mixture scheme in this paper. The deterministic methods, however, can only deal with a single set of scattering properties in the smallest discretized spatial volume. The single-scattering properties of different types of scatterers have to be averaged before they are input to deterministic solvers. This second scheme is called the internal mixture scheme. The equivalence of these two different mixture schemes of scattering properties has not been demonstrated so far. In this paper, polarized radiation fields for several scattering media are solved using the Monte Carlo and successive order of scattering (SOS) methods and scattering media contain two types of scatterers: Rayleigh scatterers (molecules) and Mie scatterers (aerosols). The Monte Carlo and SOS methods employ external and internal mixture schemes of scatterers, respectively. It is found that the percentage differences between radiances solved by these two methods with different mixture schemes are of the order of 0.1%. The differences of Q/I, U/I, and V/I are of the order of 10−5 ~ 10−4, where I, Q, U, and V are the Stokes parameters. Therefore, the equivalence between these two mixture schemes is confirmed to the accuracy level of the radiative transfer numerical benchmarks. This result provides important guidelines for many radiative transfer applications that involve the mixture of

  14. An asymptotic preserving unified gas kinetic scheme for frequency-dependent radiative transfer equations

    SciT

    Sun, Wenjun, E-mail: sun_wenjun@iapcm.ac.cn; Jiang, Song, E-mail: jiang@iapcm.ac.cn; Xu, Kun, E-mail: makxu@ust.hk

    This paper presents an extension of previous work (Sun et al., 2015 [22]) of the unified gas kinetic scheme (UGKS) for the gray radiative transfer equations to the frequency-dependent (multi-group) radiative transfer system. Different from the gray radiative transfer equations, where the optical opacity is only a function of local material temperature, the simulation of frequency-dependent radiative transfer is associated with additional difficulties from the frequency-dependent opacity. For the multiple frequency radiation, the opacity depends on both the spatial location and the frequency. For example, the opacity is typically a decreasing function of frequency. At the same spatial region themore » transport physics can be optically thick for the low frequency photons, and optically thin for high frequency ones. Therefore, the optical thickness is not a simple function of space location. In this paper, the UGKS for frequency-dependent radiative system is developed. The UGKS is a finite volume method and the transport physics is modeled according to the ratio of the cell size to the photon's frequency-dependent mean free path. When the cell size is much larger than the photon's mean free path, a diffusion solution for such a frequency radiation will be obtained. On the other hand, when the cell size is much smaller than the photon's mean free path, a free transport mechanism will be recovered. In the regime between the above two limits, with the variation of the ratio between the local cell size and photon's mean free path, the UGKS provides a smooth transition in the physical and frequency space to capture the corresponding transport physics accurately. The seemingly straightforward extension of the UGKS from the gray to multiple frequency radiation system is due to its intrinsic consistent multiple scale transport modeling, but it still involves lots of work to properly discretize the multiple groups in order to design an asymptotic preserving (AP) scheme in

  15. Radiative Heat Transfer in Finite Cylindrical Enclosures with Nonhomogeneous Participating Media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, Pei-Feng; Ku, Jerry C.

    1994-01-01

    Results of a numerical solution for radiative heat transfer in homogeneous and nonhomogeneous participating media are presented. The geometry of interest is a finite axisymmetric cylindrical enclosure. The integral formulation for radiative transport is solved by the YIX method. A three-dimensional solution scheme is applied to two-dimensional axisymmetric geometry to simplify kernel calculations and to avoid difficulties associated with treating boundary conditions. As part of the effort to improve modeling capabilities for turbulent jet diffusion flames, predicted distributions for flame temperature and soot volume fraction are used to calculate radiative heat transfer from soot particles in such flames. It is shown that the nonhomogeneity of radiative property has very significant effects. The peak value of the divergence of radiative heat flux could be underestimated by 2 factor of 7 if a mean homogeneous radiative property is used. Since recent studies have shown that scattering by soot agglomerates is significant in flames, the effect of magnitude of scattering is also investigated and found to be nonnegligible.

  16. An iterative phase-space explicit discontinuous Galerkin method for stellar radiative transfer in extended atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Almeida, Valmor F.

    2017-07-01

    A phase-space discontinuous Galerkin (PSDG) method is presented for the solution of stellar radiative transfer problems. It allows for greater adaptivity than competing methods without sacrificing generality. The method is extensively tested on a spherically symmetric, static, inverse-power-law scattering atmosphere. Results for different sizes of atmospheres and intensities of scattering agreed with asymptotic values. The exponentially decaying behavior of the radiative field in the diffusive-transparent transition region, and the forward peaking behavior at the surface of extended atmospheres were accurately captured. The integrodifferential equation of radiation transfer is solved iteratively by alternating between the radiative pressure equation and the original equation with the integral term treated as an energy density source term. In each iteration, the equations are solved via an explicit, flux-conserving, discontinuous Galerkin method. Finite elements are ordered in wave fronts perpendicular to the characteristic curves so that elemental linear algebraic systems are solved quickly by sweeping the phase space element by element. Two implementations of a diffusive boundary condition at the origin are demonstrated wherein the finite discontinuity in the radiation intensity is accurately captured by the proposed method. This allows for a consistent mechanism to preserve photon luminosity. The method was proved to be robust and fast, and a case is made for the adequacy of parallel processing. In addition to classical two-dimensional plots, results of normalized radiation intensity were mapped onto a log-polar surface exhibiting all distinguishing features of the problem studied.

  17. Analytical Solutions for Radiative Transfer: Implications for Giant Planet Formation by Disk Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boss, Alan P.

    2009-03-01

    The disk instability mechanism for giant planet formation is based on the formation of clumps in a marginally gravitationally unstable protoplanetary disk, which must lose thermal energy through a combination of convection and radiative cooling if they are to survive and contract to become giant protoplanets. While there is good observational support for forming at least some giant planets by disk instability, the mechanism has become theoretically contentious, with different three-dimensional radiative hydrodynamics codes often yielding different results. Rigorous code testing is required to make further progress. Here we present two new analytical solutions for radiative transfer in spherical coordinates, suitable for testing the code employed in all of the Boss disk instability calculations. The testing shows that the Boss code radiative transfer routines do an excellent job of relaxing to and maintaining the analytical results for the radial temperature and radiative flux profiles for a spherical cloud with high or moderate optical depths, including the transition from optically thick to optically thin regions. These radial test results are independent of whether the Eddington approximation, diffusion approximation, or flux-limited diffusion approximation routines are employed. The Boss code does an equally excellent job of relaxing to and maintaining the analytical results for the vertical (θ) temperature and radiative flux profiles for a disk with a height proportional to the radial distance. These tests strongly support the disk instability mechanism for forming giant planets.

  18. Active control of near-field radiative heat transfer between graphene-covered metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qimei; Zhou, Ting; Wang, Tongbiao; Liu, Wenxing; Liu, Jiangtao; Yu, Tianbao; Liao, Qinghua; Liu, Nianhua

    2017-04-01

    In this study, the near-field radiative heat transfer between graphene-covered metamaterials is investigated. The electric surface plasmons (SPs) supported by metamaterials can be coupled with the SPs supported by graphene. The near-field heat transfer between the graphene-covered metamaterials is significantly larger than that between metamaterials because of the strong coupling in our studied frequency range. The relationship between heat flux and chemical potential is studied for different vacuum gaps. Given that the chemical potential of graphene can be tuned by the external electric field, heat transfer can be actively controlled by modulating the chemical potential. The heat flux for certain vacuum gaps can reach a maximum value when the chemical potential is at a particular value. The results of this study are beneficial for actively controlling energy transfer.

  19. Heat Transfer and Geometrical Analysis of Thermoelectric Converters Driven by Concentrated Solar Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Suter, Clemens; Tomeš, Petr; Weidenkaff, Anke; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2010-01-01

    A heat transfer model that couples radiation/conduction/convection heat transfer with electrical potential distribution is developed for a thermoelectric converter (TEC) subjected to concentrated solar radiation. The 4-leg TEC module consists of two pairs of p-type La1.98Sr0.02CuO4 and n-type CaMn0.98Nb0.02O3 legs that are sandwiched between two ceramic Al2O3 hot/cold plates and connected electrically in series and thermally in parallel. The governing equations for heat transfer and electrical potential are formulated, discretized and solved numerically by applying the finite volume (FV) method. The model is validated in terms of experimentally measured temperatures and voltages/power using a set of TEC demonstrator modules, subjected to a peak radiative flux intensity of 300 suns. The heat transfer model is then applied to examine the effect of the geometrical parameters (e.g. length/width of legs) on the solar-to-electricity energy conversion efficiency.

  20. Study of radiative heat transfer in Ångström- and nanometre-sized gaps

    DOE PAGES

    Cui, Longji; Jeong, Wonho; Fernández-Hurtado, Víctor; ...

    2017-02-15

    Radiative heat transfer in Ångström- and nanometre-sized gaps is of great interest because of both its technological importance and open questions regarding the physics of energy transfer in this regime. Here in this paper we report studies of radiative heat transfer in few Å to 5nm gap sizes, performed under ultrahigh vacuum conditions between a Au-coated probe featuring embedded nanoscale thermocouples and a heated planar Au substrate that were both subjected to various surface-cleaning procedures. By drawing on the apparent tunnelling barrier height as a signature of cleanliness, we found that upon systematically cleaning via a plasma or locally pushingmore » the tip into the substrate by a few nanometres, the observed radiative conductances decreased from unexpectedly large values to extremely small ones—below the detection limit of our probe—as expected from our computational results. Our results show that it is possible to avoid the confounding effects of surface contamination and systematically study thermal radiation in Ångström- and nanometre-sized gaps.« less

  1. A statewide teleradiology system reduces radiation exposure and charges in transferred trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Watson, Justin J J; Moren, Alexis; Diggs, Brian; Houser, Ben; Eastes, Lynn; Brand, Dawn; Bilyeu, Pamela; Schreiber, Martin; Kiraly, Laszlo

    2016-05-01

    Trauma transfer patients routinely undergo repeat imaging because of inefficiencies within the radiology system. In 2009, the virtual private network (VPN) telemedicine system was adopted throughout Oregon allowing virtual image transfer between hospitals. The startup cost was a nominal $3,000 per hospital. A retrospective review from 2007 to 2012 included 400 randomly selected adult trauma transfer patients based on a power analysis (200 pre/200 post). The primary outcome evaluated was reduction in repeat computed tomography (CT) scans. Secondary outcomes included cost savings, emergency department (ED) length of stay (LOS), and spared radiation. All data were analyzed using Mann-Whitney U and chi-square tests. P less than .05 indicated significance. Spared radiation was calculated as a weighted average per body region, and savings was calculated using charges obtained from Oregon Health and Science University radiology current procedural terminology codes. Four-hundred patients were included. Injury Severity Score, age, ED and overall LOS, mortality, trauma type, and gender were not statistically different between groups. The percentage of patients with repeat CT scans decreased after VPN implementation: CT abdomen (13.2% vs 2.8%, P < .01) and cervical spine (34.4% vs 18.2%, P < .01). Post-VPN, the total charges saved in 2012 for trauma transfer patients was $333,500, whereas the average radiation dose spared per person was 1.8 mSV. Length of stay in the ED for patients with Injury Severity Score less than 15 transferring to the ICU was decreased (P < .05). Implementation of a statewide teleradiology network resulted in fewer total repeat CT scans, significant savings, decrease in radiation exposure, and decreased LOS in the ED for patients with less complex injuries. The potential for health care savings by widespread adoption of a VPN is significant. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Two-Flux Method for Transient Radiative Transfer in a Semitransparent Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, Robert

    1996-01-01

    The two-flux method was used to obtain transient solutions for a plane layer including internal reflections and scattering. The layer was initially at uniform temperature, and was heated or cooled by external radiation and convection. The two-flux equations were examined as a means for evaluating the radiative flux gradient in the transient energy equation. Comparisons of transient temperature distributions using the two-flux method were made with results where the radiative flux gradient was evaluated from the exact radiative transfer equations. Good agreement was obtained for optical thicknesses from 0.5 to 5 and for refractive indices of 1 and 2. Illustrative results obtained with the two-flux method demonstrate the effect of isotropic scattering coupled with changing the refractive index. For small absorption with large scattering the maximum layer temperature is increased when the refractive index is increased. For larger absorption the effect is opposite, and the maximum temperature decreases with increased refractive index .

  3. Combined experimental-numerical identification of radiative transfer coefficients in white LED phosphor layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akolkar, A.; Petrasch, J.; Finck, S.; Rahmatian, N.

    2018-02-01

    An inverse analysis of the phosphor layer of a commercially available, conformally coated, white LED is done based on tomographic and spectrometric measurements. The aim is to determine the radiative transfer coefficients of the phosphor layer from the measurements of the finished device, with minimal assumptions regarding the composition of the phosphor layer. These results can be used for subsequent opto-thermal modelling and optimization of the device. For this purpose, multiple integrating sphere and gonioradiometric measurements are done to obtain statistical bounds on spectral radiometric values and angular color distributions for ten LEDs belonging to the same color bin of the product series. Tomographic measurements of the LED package are used to generate a tetrahedral grid of the 3D LED geometry. A radiative transfer model using Monte Carlo Ray Tracing in the tetrahedral grid is developed. Using a two-wavelength model consisting of a blue emission wavelength and a yellow, Stokes-shifted re-emission wavelength, the angular color distribution of the LED is simulated over wide ranges of the absorption and scattering coefficients of the phosphor layer, for the blue and yellow wavelengths. Using a two-step, iterative space search, combinations of the radiative transfer coefficients are obtained for which the simulations are consistent with the integrating sphere and gonioradiometric measurements. The results show an inverse relationship between the scattering and absorption coefficients of the phosphor layer for blue light. Scattering of yellow light acts as a distribution and loss mechanism for yellow light and affects the shape of the angular color distribution significantly, especially at larger viewing angles. The spread of feasible coefficients indicates that measured optical behavior of the LEDs may be reproduced using a range of combinations of radiative coefficients. Given that coefficients predicted by the Mie theory usually must be corrected in order

  4. Direct Collapse to Supermassive Black Hole Seeds with Radiation Transfer: Cosmological Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardaneh, Kazem; Luo, Yang; Shlosman, Isaac; Nagamine, Kentaro; Wise, John H.; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    2018-06-01

    We have modeled direct collapse of a primordial gas within dark matter halos in the presence of radiative transfer, in high-resolution zoom-in simulations in a cosmological framework, down to the formation of the photosphere and the central object. Radiative transfer has been implemented in the flux-limited diffusion (FLD) approximation. Adiabatic models were run for comparison. We find that (a) the FLD flow forms an irregular central structure and does not exhibit fragmentation, contrary to adiabatic flow which forms a thick disk, driving a pair of spiral shocks, subject to Kelvin-Helmholtz shear instability forming fragments; (b) the growing central core in the FLD flow quickly reaches ˜10 M⊙ and a highly variable luminosity of 1038 - 1039 erg s-1, comparable to the Eddington luminosity. It experiences massive recurrent outflows driven by radiation force and thermal pressure gradients, which mix with the accretion flow and transfer the angular momentum outwards; and (c) the interplay between these processes and a massive accretion, results in photosphere at ˜10 AU. We conclude that in the FLD model (1) the central object exhibits dynamically insignificant rotation and slower than adiabatic temperature rise with density; (2) does not experience fragmentation leading to star formation, thus promoting the fast track formation of a supermassive black hole (SMBH) seed; (3) inclusion of radiation force leads to outflows, resulting in the mass accumulation within the central 10-3 pc, which is ˜100 times larger than characteristic scale of star formation. The inclusion of radiative transfer reveals complex early stages of formation and growth of the central structure in the direct collapse scenario of SMBH seed formation.

  5. Experimental Investigation of Heat Transfer Characteristics of Automobile Radiator using TiO2-Nanofluid Coolant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salamon, V.; Senthil kumar, D.; Thirumalini, S.

    2017-08-01

    The use of nanoparticle dispersed coolants in automobile radiators improves the heat transfer rate and facilitates overall reduction in size of the radiators. In this study, the heat transfer characteristics of water/propylene glycol based TiO2 nanofluid was analyzed experimentally and compared with pure water and water/propylene glycol mixture. Two different concentrations of nanofluids were prepared by adding 0.1 vol. % and 0.3 vol. % of TiO2 nanoparticles into water/propylene glycol mixture (70:30). The experiments were conducted by varying the coolant flow rate between 3 to 6 lit/min for various coolant temperatures (50°C, 60°C, 70°C, and 80°C) to understand the effect of coolant flow rate on heat transfer. The results showed that the Nusselt number of the nanofluid coolant increases with increase in flow rate. At low inlet coolant temperature the water/propylene glycol mixture showed higher heat transfer rate when compared with nanofluid coolant. However at higher operating temperature and higher coolant flow rate, 0.3 vol. % of TiO2 nanofluid enhances the heat transfer rate by 8.5% when compared to base fluids.

  6. Radiation exposure and performance of multiple burn LEO-GEO orbit transfer trajectories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorland, S. H.

    1985-01-01

    Many potential strategies exist for the transfer of spacecraft from low Earth orbit (LEO) to geosynchronous (GEO) orbit. One strategy has generally been utilized, that being a single impulsive burn at perigee and a GEO insertion burn at apogee. Multiple burn strategies were discussed for orbit transfer vehicles (OTVs) but the transfer times and radiation exposure, particularly for potentially manned missions, were used as arguments against those options. Quantitative results concerning the trip time and radiation encountered by multiple burn orbit transfer missions in order to establish the feasibility of manned missions, the vulnerability of electronics, and the shielding requirements are presented. The performance of these multiple burn missions is quantified in terms of the payload and propellant variances from the minimum energy mission transfer. The missions analyzed varied from one to eight perigee burns and ranged from a high thrust, 1 g acceleration, cryogenic hydrogen-oxygen chemical prpulsion system to a continuous burn, 0.001 g acceleration, hydrogen fueled resistojet propulsion system with a trip time of 60 days.

  7. An asymptotic preserving unified gas kinetic scheme for gray radiative transfer equations

    SciT

    Sun, Wenjun, E-mail: sun_wenjun@iapcm.ac.cn; Jiang, Song, E-mail: jiang@iapcm.ac.cn; Xu, Kun, E-mail: makxu@ust.hk

    The solutions of radiative transport equations can cover both optical thin and optical thick regimes due to the large variation of photon's mean-free path and its interaction with the material. In the small mean free path limit, the nonlinear time-dependent radiative transfer equations can converge to an equilibrium diffusion equation due to the intensive interaction between radiation and material. In the optical thin limit, the photon free transport mechanism will emerge. In this paper, we are going to develop an accurate and robust asymptotic preserving unified gas kinetic scheme (AP-UGKS) for the gray radiative transfer equations, where the radiation transportmore » equation is coupled with the material thermal energy equation. The current work is based on the UGKS framework for the rarefied gas dynamics [14], and is an extension of a recent work [12] from a one-dimensional linear radiation transport equation to a nonlinear two-dimensional gray radiative system. The newly developed scheme has the asymptotic preserving (AP) property in the optically thick regime in the capturing of diffusive solution without using a cell size being smaller than the photon's mean free path and time step being less than the photon collision time. Besides the diffusion limit, the scheme can capture the exact solution in the optical thin regime as well. The current scheme is a finite volume method. Due to the direct modeling for the time evolution solution of the interface radiative intensity, a smooth transition of the transport physics from optical thin to optical thick can be accurately recovered. Many numerical examples are included to validate the current approach.« less

  8. An interface for simulating radiative transfer in and around volcanic plumes with the Monte Carlo radiative transfer model McArtim

    Kern, Christoph

    2016-03-23

    This report describes two software tools that, when used as front ends for the three-dimensional backward Monte Carlo atmospheric-radiative-transfer model (RTM) McArtim, facilitate the generation of lookup tables of volcanic-plume optical-transmittance characteristics in the ultraviolet/visible-spectral region. In particular, the differential optical depth and derivatives thereof (that is, weighting functions), with regard to a change in SO2 column density or aerosol optical thickness, can be simulated for a specific measurement geometry and a representative range of plume conditions. These tables are required for the retrieval of SO2 column density in volcanic plumes, using the simulated radiative-transfer/differential optical-absorption spectroscopic (SRT-DOAS) approach outlined by Kern and others (2012). This report, together with the software tools published online, is intended to make this sophisticated SRT-DOAS technique available to volcanologists and gas geochemists in an operational environment, without the need for an indepth treatment of the underlying principles or the low-level interface of the RTM McArtim.

  9. Salivary gland transfer to prevent radiation-induced xerostomia: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Sood, Amit J; Fox, Nyssa F; O'Connell, Brendan P; Lovelace, Tiffany L; Nguyen, Shaun A; Sharma, Anand K; Hornig, Joshua D; Day, Terry A

    2014-02-01

    Salivary gland transfer (SGT) has the potential to prevent radiation-induced xerostomia. We attempt to analyze the efficacy of SGT in prevention of xerostomia and maintenance of salivary flow rates after radiation treatment (XRT). Systematic review and meta-analysis. Primary endpoint was efficacy of SGT in prevention of radiation-induced xerostomia. Secondary endpoint was change from baseline of unstimulated and stimulated salivary flow rates after XRT. Seven articles, accruing data from 12 institutions, met inclusion criteria. In a total of 177 patients at mean follow-up of 22.7months, SGT prevented radiation-induced xerostomia in 82.7% (95% CI, 76.6-87.7%) of patients. Twelve months after XRT, unstimulated and stimulated salivary flow rates rose to 88% and 76% of baseline values, respectively. In comparison to control subjects twelve months after XRT, SGT subjects' unstimulated (75% vs. 11%) and stimulated (86% vs. 8%) salivary flow rates were drastically higher in SGT patients. Salivary gland transfer appears to be highly effective in preventing the incidence of xerostomia in patients receiving definitive head and neck radiation therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Reconstruction of solar spectral surface UV irradiances using radiative transfer simulations.

    PubMed

    Lindfors, Anders; Heikkilä, Anu; Kaurola, Jussi; Koskela, Tapani; Lakkala, Kaisa

    2009-01-01

    UV radiation exerts several effects concerning life on Earth, and spectral information on the prevailing UV radiation conditions is needed in order to study each of these effects. In this paper, we present a method for reconstruction of solar spectral UV irradiances at the Earth's surface. The method, which is a further development of an earlier published method for reconstruction of erythemally weighted UV, relies on radiative transfer simulations, and takes as input (1) the effective cloud optical depth as inferred from pyranometer measurements of global radiation (300-3000 nm); (2) the total ozone column; (3) the surface albedo as estimated from measurements of snow depth; (4) the total water vapor column; and (5) the altitude of the location. Reconstructed daily cumulative spectral irradiances at Jokioinen and Sodankylä in Finland are, in general, in good agreement with measurements. The mean percentage difference, for instance, is mostly within +/-8%, and the root mean square of the percentage difference is around 10% or below for wavelengths over 310 nm and daily minimum solar zenith angles (SZA) less than 70 degrees . In this study, we used pseudospherical radiative transfer simulations, which were shown to improve the performance of our method under large SZA (low Sun).

  11. Diffusion approximation of the radiative-conductive heat transfer model with Fresnel matching conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chebotarev, Alexander Yu.; Grenkin, Gleb V.; Kovtanyuk, Andrey E.; Botkin, Nikolai D.; Hoffmann, Karl-Heinz

    2018-04-01

    The paper is concerned with a problem of diffraction type. The study starts with equations of complex (radiative and conductive) heat transfer in a multicomponent domain with Fresnel matching conditions at the interfaces. Applying the diffusion, P1, approximation yields a pair of coupled nonlinear PDEs describing the radiation intensity and temperature for each component of the domain. Matching conditions for these PDEs, imposed at the interfaces between the domain components, are derived. The unique solvability of the obtained problem is proven, and numerical experiments are conducted.

  12. Vector radiative transfer code SORD: Performance analysis and quick start guide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korkin, Sergey; Lyapustin, Alexei; Sinyuk, Alexander; Holben, Brent; Kokhanovsky, Alexander

    2017-10-01

    We present a new open source polarized radiative transfer code SORD written in Fortran 90/95. SORD numerically simulates propagation of monochromatic solar radiation in a plane-parallel atmosphere over a reflecting surface using the method of successive orders of scattering (hence the name). Thermal emission is ignored. We did not improve the method in any way, but report the accuracy and runtime in 52 benchmark scenarios. This paper also serves as a quick start user's guide for the code available from ftp://maiac.gsfc.nasa.gov/pub/skorkin, from the JQSRT website, or from the corresponding (first) author.

  13. Improvement and Application of Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Models for Prediction of the Climatic Effects of Aerosol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstrom, Robert W.; Mlawer, Eli J.; Sokolik, Irina N.; Clough, Shepard A.; Toon, Owen B.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents a radiative transfer model that has been developed to accurately predict the atmospheric radiant flux in both the infrared and the solar spectrum with a minimum of computational effort. The model is designed to be included in numerical climate models. To assess the accuracy of the model, the results are compared to other more detailed models for several standard cases in the solar and thermal spectrum. As the thermal spectrum has been treated in other publications, we focus here on the solar part of the spectrum. We perform several example calculations focussing on the question of absorption of solar radiation by gases and aerosols.

  14. Improvement and Application of Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Models for Prediction of the Climatic Effects of Aerosol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstrom, Robert W.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents a radiative transfer model that has been developed to accurately predict the atmospheric radiant flux in both the infrared and the solar spectrum with a minimum of computational effort. The model is designed to be included in numerical climate models. To assess the accuracy of the model, the results are compared to other more detailed models for several standard cases in the solar and thermal spectrum. As the thermal spectrum has been treated in other publications we focus here on the solar part of the spectrum. We perform several example calculations focussing on the question of absorption of solar radiation by gases and aerosols.

  15. Numerical techniques in radiative heat transfer for general, scattering, plane-parallel media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, A.; Cogley, A. C.

    1982-01-01

    The study of radiative heat transfer with scattering usually leads to the solution of singular Fredholm integral equations. The present paper presents an accurate and efficient numerical method to solve certain integral equations that govern radiative equilibrium problems in plane-parallel geometry for both grey and nongrey, anisotropically scattering media. In particular, the nongrey problem is represented by a spectral integral of a system of nonlinear integral equations in space, which has not been solved previously. The numerical technique is constructed to handle this unique nongrey governing equation as well as the difficulties caused by singular kernels. Example problems are solved and the method's accuracy and computational speed are analyzed.

  16. Determining the infrared radiative effects of Saharan dust: a radiative transfer modelling study based on vertically resolved measurements at Lampedusa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meloni, Daniela; di Sarra, Alcide; Brogniez, Gérard; Denjean, Cyrielle; De Silvestri, Lorenzo; Di Iorio, Tatiana; Formenti, Paola; Gómez-Amo, José L.; Gröbner, Julian; Kouremeti, Natalia; Liuzzi, Giuliano; Mallet, Marc; Pace, Giandomenico; Sferlazzo, Damiano M.

    2018-03-01

    Detailed measurements of radiation, atmospheric and aerosol properties were carried out in summer 2013 during the Aerosol Direct Radiative Impact on the regional climate in the MEDiterranean region (ADRIMED) campaign in the framework of the Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment (ChArMEx) experiment. This study focusses on the characterization of infrared (IR) optical properties and direct radiative effects of mineral dust, based on three vertical profiles of atmospheric and aerosol properties and IR broadband and narrowband radiation from airborne measurements, made in conjunction with radiosonde and ground-based observations at Lampedusa, in the central Mediterranean. Satellite IR spectra from the Infrared Atmospheric Sounder Interferometer (IASI) are also included in the analysis. The atmospheric and aerosol properties are used as input to a radiative transfer model, and various IR radiation parameters (upward and downward irradiance, nadir and zenith brightness temperature at different altitudes) are calculated and compared with observations. The model calculations are made for different sets of dust particle size distribution (PSD) and refractive index (RI), derived from observations and from the literature. The main results of the analysis are that the IR dust radiative forcing is non-negligible and strongly depends on PSD and RI. When calculations are made using the in situ measured size distribution, it is possible to identify the refractive index that produces the best match with observed IR irradiances and brightness temperatures (BTs). The most appropriate refractive indices correspond to those determined from independent measurements of mineral dust aerosols from the source regions (Tunisia, Algeria, Morocco) of dust transported over Lampedusa, suggesting that differences in the source properties should be taken into account. With the in situ size distribution and the most appropriate refractive index the estimated dust IR radiative forcing

  17. Influence of radiation absorption by environmental water vapor on radiation transfer in wildland fires

    David Frankman; Brent W. Webb; Bret W. Butler

    2007-01-01

    Thermal radiation emission from a simulated black flame surface to a fuel bed is analyzed by a ray-tracing technique, tracking emission from points along the flame to locations along the fuel bed while accounting for absorption by environmental water vapor in the intervening medium. The Spectral Line Weighted-sum-of-gray-gases approach was adopted for treating the...

  18. Radiative transfer codes for atmospheric correction and aerosol retrieval: intercomparison study.

    PubMed

    Kotchenova, Svetlana Y; Vermote, Eric F; Levy, Robert; Lyapustin, Alexei

    2008-05-01

    Results are summarized for a scientific project devoted to the comparison of four atmospheric radiative transfer codes incorporated into different satellite data processing algorithms, namely, 6SV1.1 (second simulation of a satellite signal in the solar spectrum, vector, version 1.1), RT3 (radiative transfer), MODTRAN (moderate resolution atmospheric transmittance and radiance code), and SHARM (spherical harmonics). The performance of the codes is tested against well-known benchmarks, such as Coulson's tabulated values and a Monte Carlo code. The influence of revealed differences on aerosol optical thickness and surface reflectance retrieval is estimated theoretically by using a simple mathematical approach. All information about the project can be found at http://rtcodes.ltdri.org.

  19. Radiative transfer codes for atmospheric correction and aerosol retrieval: intercomparison study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotchenova, Svetlana Y.; Vermote, Eric F.; Levy, Robert; Lyapustin, Alexei

    2008-05-01

    Results are summarized for a scientific project devoted to the comparison of four atmospheric radiative transfer codes incorporated into different satellite data processing algorithms, namely, 6SV1.1 (second simulation of a satellite signal in the solar spectrum, vector, version 1.1), RT3 (radiative transfer), MODTRAN (moderate resolution atmospheric transmittance and radiance code), and SHARM (spherical harmonics). The performance of the codes is tested against well-known benchmarks, such as Coulson's tabulated values and a Monte Carlo code. The influence of revealed differences on aerosol optical thickness and surface reflectance retrieval is estimated theoretically by using a simple mathematical approach. All information about the project can be found at http://rtcodes.ltdri.org.

  20. Hybrid numerical method for solution of the radiative transfer equation in one, two, or three dimensions.

    PubMed

    Reinersman, Phillip N; Carder, Kendall L

    2004-05-01

    A hybrid method is presented by which Monte Carlo (MC) techniques are combined with an iterative relaxation algorithm to solve the radiative transfer equation in arbitrary one-, two-, or three-dimensional optical environments. The optical environments are first divided into contiguous subregions, or elements. MC techniques are employed to determine the optical response function of each type of element. The elements are combined, and relaxation techniques are used to determine simultaneously the radiance field on the boundary and throughout the interior of the modeled environment. One-dimensional results compare well with a standard radiative transfer model. The light field beneath and adjacent to a long barge is modeled in two dimensions and displayed. Ramifications for underwater video imaging are discussed. The hybrid model is currently capable of providing estimates of the underwater light field needed to expedite inspection of ship hulls and port facilities.

  1. Polarimetric signatures of a coniferous forest canopy based on vector radiative transfer theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karam, M. A.; Fung, A. K.; Amar, F.; Mougin, E.; Lopes, A.; Beaudoin, A.

    1992-01-01

    Complete polarization signatures of a coniferous forest canopy are studied by the iterative solution of the vector radiative transfer equations up to the second order. The forest canopy constituents (leaves, branches, stems, and trunk) are embedded in a multi-layered medium over a rough interface. The branches, stems and trunk scatterers are modeled as finite randomly oriented cylinders. The leaves are modeled as randomly oriented needles. For a plane wave exciting the canopy, the average Mueller matrix is formulated in terms of the iterative solution of the radiative transfer solution and used to determine the linearly polarized backscattering coefficients, the co-polarized and cross-polarized power returns, and the phase difference statistics. Numerical results are presented to investigate the effect of transmitting and receiving antenna configurations on the polarimetric signature of a pine forest. Comparison is made with measurements.

  2. ARTS, the Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Simulator - version 2.2, the planetary toolbox edition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buehler, Stefan A.; Mendrok, Jana; Eriksson, Patrick; Perrin, Agnès; Larsson, Richard; Lemke, Oliver

    2018-04-01

    This article describes the latest stable release (version 2.2) of the Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Simulator (ARTS), a public domain software for radiative transfer simulations in the thermal spectral range (microwave to infrared). The main feature of this release is a planetary toolbox that allows simulations for the planets Venus, Mars, and Jupiter, in addition to Earth. This required considerable model adaptations, most notably in the area of gaseous absorption calculations. Other new features are also described, notably radio link budgets (including the effect of Faraday rotation that changes the polarization state) and the treatment of Zeeman splitting for oxygen spectral lines. The latter is relevant, for example, for the various operational microwave satellite temperature sensors of the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) family.

  3. Effects of cloud condensate vertical alignment on radiative transfer calculations in deep convective regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaocong

    2017-04-01

    Effects of cloud condensate vertical alignment on radiative transfer process were investigated using cloud resolving model explicit simulations, which provide a surrogate for subgrid cloud geometry. Diagnostic results showed that the decorrelation length Lcw varies in the vertical dimension, with larger Lcw occurring in convective clouds and smaller Lcw in cirrus clouds. A new parameterization of Lcw is proposed that takes into account such varying features and gives rise to improvements in simulations of cloud radiative forcing (CRF) and radiative heating, i.e., the peak of bias is respectively reduced by 8 W m- 2 for SWCF and 2 W m- 2 for LWCF in comparison with Lcw = 1 km. The role of Lcw in modulating CRFs is twofold. On the one hand, larger Lcw tends to increase the standard deviation of optical depth στ, as dense and tenuous parts of the clouds would be increasingly aligned in the vertical dimension, thereby broadening the probability distribution. On the other hand, larger στ causes a decrease in the solar albedo and thermal emissivity, as implied in their convex functions on τ. As a result, increasing (decreasing) Lcwleads to decreased (increased) CRFs, as revealed by comparisons among Lcw = 0, Lcw = 1 km andLcw = ∞. It also affects the vertical structure of radiative flux and thus influences the radiative heating. A better representation of στ in the vertical dimension yields an improved simulation of radiative heating. Although the importance of vertical alignment of cloud condensate is found to be less than that of cloud cover in regards to their impacts on CRFs, it still has enough of an effect on modulating the cloud radiative transfer process.

  4. Formal Solutions for Polarized Radiative Transfer. II. High-order Methods

    SciT

    Janett, Gioele; Steiner, Oskar; Belluzzi, Luca, E-mail: gioele.janett@irsol.ch

    When integrating the radiative transfer equation for polarized light, the necessity of high-order numerical methods is well known. In fact, well-performing high-order formal solvers enable higher accuracy and the use of coarser spatial grids. Aiming to provide a clear comparison between formal solvers, this work presents different high-order numerical schemes and applies the systematic analysis proposed by Janett et al., emphasizing their advantages and drawbacks in terms of order of accuracy, stability, and computational cost.

  5. Investigation of Field-Collected Data Using Diffuse and Specular, Forward and Reverse Radiative Transfer Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-26

    Statement It is very difficult to obtain and use spectral BRDFs due to aforementioned reasons, while the need to accurately model the spectral and...Lambertian and MERL nickel-shaped BRDF models (Butler, 2014:1- 3 10), suggesting that accurate BRDFs are required to account for the significance of... BRDF -based radiative transfer models . Research Objectives /Hypotheses The need to represent the spectral reflected radiance of a material using

  6. Analysis of Atmospheric Aerosol Data Sets and Application of Radiative Transfer Models to Compute Aerosol Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, Beat; Bergstrom, Robert W.; Redemann, Jens

    2002-01-01

    This report is the final report for "Analysis of Atmospheric Aerosol Data Sets and Application of Radiative Transfer Models to Compute Aerosol Effects". It is a bibliographic compilation of 29 peer-reviewed publications (published, in press or submitted) produced under this Cooperative Agreement and 30 first-authored conference presentations. The tasks outlined in the various proposals are listed below with a brief comment as to the research performed. Copies of title/abstract pages of peer-reviewed publications are attached.

  7. The Physics of Imaging with Remote Sensors : Photon State Space & Radiative Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Anthony B.

    2012-01-01

    Standard (mono-pixel/steady-source) retrieval methodology is reaching its fundamental limit with access to multi-angle/multi-spectral photo- polarimetry. Next... Two emerging new classes of retrieval algorithm worth nurturing: multi-pixel time-domain Wave-radiometry transition regimes, and more... Cross-fertilization with bio-medical imaging. Physics-based remote sensing: - What is "photon state space?" - What is "radiative transfer?" - Is "the end" in sight? Two wide-open frontiers! center dot Examples (with variations.

  8. Non-contact pumping of light emitters via non-radiative energy transfer

    DOEpatents

    Klimov, Victor I.; Achermann, Marc

    2010-01-05

    A light emitting device is disclosed including a primary light source having a defined emission photon energy output, and, a light emitting material situated near to said primary light source, said light emitting material having an absorption onset equal to or less in photon energy than the emission photon energy output of the primary light source whereby non-radiative energy transfer from said primary light source to said light emitting material can occur yielding light emission from said light emitting material.

  9. Extending radiative transfer models by use of Bayes rule. [in atmospheric science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitney, C.

    1977-01-01

    This paper presents a procedure that extends some existing radiative transfer modeling techniques to problems in atmospheric science where curvature and layering of the medium and dynamic range and angular resolution of the signal are important. Example problems include twilight and limb scan simulations. Techniques that are extended include successive orders of scattering, matrix operator, doubling, Gauss-Seidel iteration, discrete ordinates and spherical harmonics. The procedure for extending them is based on Bayes' rule from probability theory.

  10. Two-dimensional radiative transfer for the retrieval of limb emission measurements in the martian atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinböhl, Armin; Friedson, A. James; Schofield, John T.

    2017-01-01

    The remote sounding of infrared emission from planetary atmospheres using limb-viewing geometry is a powerful technique for deriving vertical profiles of structure and composition on a global scale. Compared with nadir viewing, limb geometry provides enhanced vertical resolution and greater sensitivity to atmospheric constituents. However, standard limb profile retrieval techniques assume spherical symmetry and are vulnerable to biases produced by horizontal gradients in atmospheric parameters. We present a scheme for the correction of horizontal gradients in profile retrievals from limb observations of the martian atmosphere. It characterizes horizontal gradients in temperature, pressure, and aerosol extinction along the line-of-sight of a limb view through neighboring measurements, and represents these gradients by means of two-dimensional radiative transfer in the forward model of the retrieval. The scheme is applied to limb emission measurements from the Mars Climate Sounder instrument on Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Retrieval simulations using data from numerical models indicate that biases of up to 10 K in the winter polar region, obtained with standard retrievals using spherical symmetry, are reduced to about 2 K in most locations by the retrieval with two-dimensional radiative transfer. Retrievals from Mars atmospheric measurements suggest that the two-dimensional radiative transfer greatly reduces biases in temperature and aerosol opacity caused by observational geometry, predominantly in the polar winter regions.

  11. Radiative Transfer Model for Operational Retrieval of Cloud Parameters from DSCOVR-EPIC Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y.; Molina Garcia, V.; Doicu, A.; Loyola, D. G.

    2016-12-01

    The Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC) onboard the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) measures the radiance in the backscattering region. To make sure that all details in the backward glory are covered, a large number of streams is required by a standard radiative transfer model based on the discrete ordinates method. Even the use of the delta-M scaling and the TMS correction do not substantially reduce the number of streams. The aim of this work is to analyze the capability of a fast radiative transfer model to retrieve operationally cloud parameters from EPIC measurements. The radiative transfer model combines the discrete ordinates method with matrix exponential for the computation of radiances and the matrix operator method for the calculation of the reflection and transmission matrices. Standard acceleration techniques as, for instance, the use of the normalized right and left eigenvectors, telescoping technique, Pade approximation and successive-order-of-scattering approximation are implemented. In addition, the model may compute the reflection matrix of the cloud by means of the asymptotic theory, and may use the equivalent Lambertian cloud model. The various approximations are analyzed from the point of view of efficiency and accuracy.

  12. Cost-effective computational method for radiation heat transfer in semi-crystalline polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boztepe, Sinan; Gilblas, Rémi; de Almeida, Olivier; Le Maoult, Yannick; Schmidt, Fabrice

    2018-05-01

    This paper introduces a cost-effective numerical model for infrared (IR) heating of semi-crystalline polymers. For the numerical and experimental studies presented here semi-crystalline polyethylene (PE) was used. The optical properties of PE were experimentally analyzed under varying temperature and the obtained results were used as input in the numerical studies. The model was built based on optically homogeneous medium assumption whereas the strong variation in the thermo-optical properties of semi-crystalline PE under heating was taken into account. Thus, the change in the amount radiative energy absorbed by the PE medium was introduced in the model induced by its temperature-dependent thermo-optical properties. The computational study was carried out considering an iterative closed-loop computation, where the absorbed radiation was computed using an in-house developed radiation heat transfer algorithm -RAYHEAT- and the computed results was transferred into the commercial software -COMSOL Multiphysics- for solving transient heat transfer problem to predict temperature field. The predicted temperature field was used to iterate the thermo-optical properties of PE that varies under heating. In order to analyze the accuracy of the numerical model experimental analyses were carried out performing IR-thermographic measurements during the heating of the PE plate. The applicability of the model in terms of computational cost, number of numerical input and accuracy was highlighted.

  13. Least-squares collocation meshless approach for radiative heat transfer in absorbing and scattering media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L. H.; Tan, J. Y.

    2007-02-01

    A least-squares collocation meshless method is employed for solving the radiative heat transfer in absorbing, emitting and scattering media. The least-squares collocation meshless method for radiative transfer is based on the discrete ordinates equation. A moving least-squares approximation is applied to construct the trial functions. Except for the collocation points which are used to construct the trial functions, a number of auxiliary points are also adopted to form the total residuals of the problem. The least-squares technique is used to obtain the solution of the problem by minimizing the summation of residuals of all collocation and auxiliary points. Three numerical examples are studied to illustrate the performance of this new solution method. The numerical results are compared with the other benchmark approximate solutions. By comparison, the results show that the least-squares collocation meshless method is efficient, accurate and stable, and can be used for solving the radiative heat transfer in absorbing, emitting and scattering media.

  14. Gauss-Seidel and Successive Overrelaxation Methods for Radiative Transfer with Partial Frequency Redistribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampoorna, M.; Trujillo Bueno, J.

    2010-04-01

    The linearly polarized solar limb spectrum that is produced by scattering processes contains a wealth of information on the physical conditions and magnetic fields of the solar outer atmosphere, but the modeling of many of its strongest spectral lines requires solving an involved non-local thermodynamic equilibrium radiative transfer problem accounting for partial redistribution (PRD) effects. Fast radiative transfer methods for the numerical solution of PRD problems are also needed for a proper treatment of hydrogen lines when aiming at realistic time-dependent magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the solar chromosphere. Here we show how the two-level atom PRD problem with and without polarization can be solved accurately and efficiently via the application of highly convergent iterative schemes based on the Gauss-Seidel and successive overrelaxation (SOR) radiative transfer methods that had been previously developed for the complete redistribution case. Of particular interest is the Symmetric SOR method, which allows us to reach the fully converged solution with an order of magnitude of improvement in the total computational time with respect to the Jacobi-based local accelerated lambda iteration method.

  15. Bayesian modelling of uncertainties of Monte Carlo radiative-transfer simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaujean, Frederik; Eggers, Hans C.; Kerzendorf, Wolfgang E.

    2018-04-01

    One of the big challenges in astrophysics is the comparison of complex simulations to observations. As many codes do not directly generate observables (e.g. hydrodynamic simulations), the last step in the modelling process is often a radiative-transfer treatment. For this step, the community relies increasingly on Monte Carlo radiative transfer due to the ease of implementation and scalability with computing power. We show how to estimate the statistical uncertainty given the output of just a single radiative-transfer simulation in which the number of photon packets follows a Poisson distribution and the weight (e.g. energy or luminosity) of a single packet may follow an arbitrary distribution. Our Bayesian approach produces a posterior distribution that is valid for any number of packets in a bin, even zero packets, and is easy to implement in practice. Our analytic results for large number of packets show that we generalise existing methods that are valid only in limiting cases. The statistical problem considered here appears in identical form in a wide range of Monte Carlo simulations including particle physics and importance sampling. It is particularly powerful in extracting information when the available data are sparse or quantities are small.

  16. A Fast Vector Radiative Transfer Model for Atmospheric and Oceanic Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, J.; Yang, P.; King, M. D.; Platnick, S. E.; Meyer, K.

    2017-12-01

    A fast vector radiative transfer model is developed in support of atmospheric and oceanic remote sensing. This model is capable of simulating the Stokes vector observed at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) and the terrestrial surface by considering absorption, scattering, and emission. The gas absorption is parameterized in terms of atmospheric gas concentrations, temperature, and pressure. The parameterization scheme combines a regression method and the correlated-K distribution method, and can easily integrate with multiple scattering computations. The approach is more than four orders of magnitude faster than a line-by-line radiative transfer model with errors less than 0.5% in terms of transmissivity. A two-component approach is utilized to solve the vector radiative transfer equation (VRTE). The VRTE solver separates the phase matrices of aerosol and cloud into forward and diffuse parts and thus the solution is also separated. The forward solution can be expressed by a semi-analytical equation based on the small-angle approximation, and serves as the source of the diffuse part. The diffuse part is solved by the adding-doubling method. The adding-doubling implementation is computationally efficient because the diffuse component needs much fewer spherical function expansion terms. The simulated Stokes vector at both the TOA and the surface have comparable accuracy compared with the counterparts based on numerically rigorous methods.

  17. Bayesian modelling of uncertainties of Monte Carlo radiative-transfer simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaujean, Frederik; Eggers, Hans C.; Kerzendorf, Wolfgang E.

    2018-07-01

    One of the big challenges in astrophysics is the comparison of complex simulations to observations. As many codes do not directly generate observables (e.g. hydrodynamic simulations), the last step in the modelling process is often a radiative-transfer treatment. For this step, the community relies increasingly on Monte Carlo radiative transfer due to the ease of implementation and scalability with computing power. We consider simulations in which the number of photon packets is Poisson distributed, while the weight assigned to a single photon packet follows any distribution of choice. We show how to estimate the statistical uncertainty of the sum of weights in each bin from the output of a single radiative-transfer simulation. Our Bayesian approach produces a posterior distribution that is valid for any number of packets in a bin, even zero packets, and is easy to implement in practice. Our analytic results for large number of packets show that we generalize existing methods that are valid only in limiting cases. The statistical problem considered here appears in identical form in a wide range of Monte Carlo simulations including particle physics and importance sampling. It is particularly powerful in extracting information when the available data are sparse or quantities are small.

  18. Radiative Transfer Modeling of a Large Pool Fire by Discrete Ordinates, Discrete Transfer, Ray Tracing, Monte Carlo and Moment Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, K. A.; Ripoll, J.-F.; Wray, A. A.; Joseph, D.; ElHafi, M.

    2004-01-01

    Five computational methods for solution of the radiative transfer equation in an absorbing-emitting and non-scattering gray medium were compared on a 2 m JP-8 pool fire. The temperature and absorption coefficient fields were taken from a synthetic fire due to the lack of a complete set of experimental data for fires of this size. These quantities were generated by a code that has been shown to agree well with the limited quantity of relevant data in the literature. Reference solutions to the governing equation were determined using the Monte Carlo method and a ray tracing scheme with high angular resolution. Solutions using the discrete transfer method, the discrete ordinate method (DOM) with both S(sub 4) and LC(sub 11) quadratures, and moment model using the M(sub 1) closure were compared to the reference solutions in both isotropic and anisotropic regions of the computational domain. DOM LC(sub 11) is shown to be the more accurate than the commonly used S(sub 4) quadrature technique, especially in anisotropic regions of the fire domain. This represents the first study where the M(sub 1) method was applied to a combustion problem occurring in a complex three-dimensional geometry. The M(sub 1) results agree well with other solution techniques, which is encouraging for future applications to similar problems since it is computationally the least expensive solution technique. Moreover, M(sub 1) results are comparable to DOM S(sub 4).

  19. A New Look into the Effect of Large Drops on Radiative Transfer Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshak, Alexander

    2003-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that a cloudy atmosphere absorbs more solar radiation than any current 1D or 3D radiation model can predict. The excess absorption is not large, perhaps 10-15 W/sq m or less, but any such systematic bias is of concern since radiative transfer models are assumed to be sufficiently accurate for remote sensing applications and climate modeling. The most natural explanation would be that models do not capture real 3D cloud structure and, as a consequence, their photon path lengths are too short. However, extensive calculations, using increasingly realistic 3D cloud structures, failed to produce photon paths long enough to explain the excess absorption. Other possible explanations have also been unsuccessful so, at this point, conventional models seem to offer no solution to this puzzle. The weakest link in conventional models is the way a size distribution of cloud particles is mathematically handled. Basically, real particles are replaced with a single average particle. This "ensemble assumption" assumes that all particle sizes are well represented in any given elementary volume. But the concentration of larger particles can be so low that this assumption is significantly violated. We show how a different mathematical route, using the concept of a cumulative distribution, avoids the ensemble assumption. The cumulative distribution has jumps, or steps, corresponding to the rarer sizes. These jumps result in an additional term, a kind of Green's function, in the solution of the radiative transfer equation. Solving the cloud radiative transfer equation with the measured particle distributions, described in a cumulative rather than an ensemble fashion, may lead to increased cloud absorption of the magnitude observed.

  20. Validation of radiative transfer computation with Monte Carlo method for ultra-relativistic background flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Ayako; Ohnishi, Naofumi; Nagakura, Hiroki; Ito, Hirotaka; Yamada, Shoichi

    2017-11-01

    We developed a three-dimensional radiative transfer code for an ultra-relativistic background flow-field by using the Monte Carlo (MC) method in the context of gamma-ray burst (GRB) emission. For obtaining reliable simulation results in the coupled computation of MC radiation transport with relativistic hydrodynamics which can reproduce GRB emission, we validated radiative transfer computation in the ultra-relativistic regime and assessed the appropriate simulation conditions. The radiative transfer code was validated through two test calculations: (1) computing in different inertial frames and (2) computing in flow-fields with discontinuous and smeared shock fronts. The simulation results of the angular distribution and spectrum were compared among three different inertial frames and in good agreement with each other. If the time duration for updating the flow-field was sufficiently small to resolve a mean free path of a photon into ten steps, the results were thoroughly converged. The spectrum computed in the flow-field with a discontinuous shock front obeyed a power-law in frequency whose index was positive in the range from 1 to 10 MeV. The number of photons in the high-energy side decreased with the smeared shock front because the photons were less scattered immediately behind the shock wave due to the small electron number density. The large optical depth near the shock front was needed for obtaining high-energy photons through bulk Compton scattering. Even one-dimensional structure of the shock wave could affect the results of radiation transport computation. Although we examined the effect of the shock structure on the emitted spectrum with a large number of cells, it is hard to employ so many computational cells per dimension in multi-dimensional simulations. Therefore, a further investigation with a smaller number of cells is required for obtaining realistic high-energy photons with multi-dimensional computations.

  1. Plasmon-enhanced energy transfer for improved upconversion of infrared radiation in doped-lanthanide nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qi; Mundoor, Haridas; Ribot, Josep; Singh, Vivek; Smalyukh, Ivan; Nagpal, Prashant

    2014-03-01

    Upconversion of infrared radiation into visible light has been investigated for applications in biological imaging and photovoltaics. However, low conversion efficiency due to small absorption cross-section for infrared light (Yb3+) , and slow rate of energy transfer (to Er3+ states) has prevented application of upconversion photoluminescence (UPL) for diffuse sunlight or imaging tissue samples. Here, we utilize resonant surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) waves to enhance UPL in doped-lanthanide nanocrystals. Our analysis indicates that SPP waves not only enhance the electromagnetic field, and hence weak Purcell effect, but also increases the rate of resonant energy transfer from Yb3+ to Er3+ ions by 6 fold. While we do observe strong metal mediated quenching (14 fold) of green fluorescence on flat metal surfaces, the nanostructured metal is resonant in the infrared, and hence enhances the nanocrystal UPL. This strong columbic effect on energy transfer can have important implications for other fluorescent and excitonic systems too.

  2. Radiative energy transfer from MoS2 excitons to surface plasmons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Yimin; Li, Bowen; Fang, Zheyu

    2017-12-01

    In this work, we demonstrated the energy transfer process from few-layer MoS2 to gold dimer arrays via ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy. With the overlap between the MoS2 exciton and the designed plasmon dipolar modes in the frequency domain, the exciton energy can be radiatively transferred to plasmonic structures, excited the localized surface plasmon resonance, and then enhanced the oscillation of coherent acoustic phonons. Power-dependent differential reflection signals and an analytical model based on the rate equation of exciton density were carried out to quantitatively study the energy transfer process. Our finding explores the energy flow between MoS2 excitons and surface plasmons, and can be contributed to the design of exciton-plasmon structures utilizing ultrathin materials.

  3. 3D-radiative transfer in terrestrial atmosphere: An efficient parallel numerical procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bass, L. P.; Germogenova, T. A.; Nikolaeva, O. V.; Kokhanovsky, A. A.; Kuznetsov, V. S.

    2003-04-01

    Light propagation and scattering in terrestrial atmosphere is usually studied in the framework of the 1D radiative transfer theory [1]. However, in reality particles (e.g., ice crystals, solid and liquid aerosols, cloud droplets) are randomly distributed in 3D space. In particular, their concentrations vary both in vertical and horizontal directions. Therefore, 3D effects influence modern cloud and aerosol retrieval procedures, which are currently based on the 1D radiative transfer theory. It should be pointed out that the standard radiative transfer equation allows to study these more complex situations as well [2]. In recent year the parallel version of the 2D and 3D RADUGA code has been developed. This version is successfully used in gammas and neutrons transport problems [3]. Applications of this code to radiative transfer in atmosphere problems are contained in [4]. Possibilities of code RADUGA are presented in [5]. The RADUGA code system is an universal solver of radiative transfer problems for complicated models, including 2D and 3D aerosol and cloud fields with arbitrary scattering anisotropy, light absorption, inhomogeneous underlying surface and topography. Both delta type and distributed light sources can be accounted for in the framework of the algorithm developed. The accurate numerical procedure is based on the new discrete ordinate SWDD scheme [6]. The algorithm is specifically designed for parallel supercomputers. The version RADUGA 5.1(P) can run on MBC1000M [7] (768 processors with 10 Gb of hard disc memory for each processor). The peak productivity is equal 1 Tfl. Corresponding scalar version RADUGA 5.1 is working on PC. As a first example of application of the algorithm developed, we have studied the shadowing effects of clouds on neighboring cloudless atmosphere, depending on the cloud optical thickness, surface albedo, and illumination conditions. This is of importance for modern satellite aerosol retrieval algorithms development. [1] Sobolev

  4. A discrete spherical harmonics method for radiative transfer analysis in inhomogeneous polarized planar atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapimo, Romuald; Tagne Kamdem, Hervé Thierry; Yemele, David

    2018-03-01

    A discrete spherical harmonics method is developed for the radiative transfer problem in inhomogeneous polarized planar atmosphere illuminated at the top by a collimated sunlight while the bottom reflects the radiation. The method expands both the Stokes vector and the phase matrix in a finite series of generalized spherical functions and the resulting vector radiative transfer equation is expressed in a set of polar directions. Hence, the polarized characteristics of the radiance within the atmosphere at any polar direction and azimuthal angle can be determined without linearization and/or interpolations. The spatial dependent of the problem is solved using the spectral Chebyshev method. The emergent and transmitted radiative intensity and the degree of polarization are predicted for both Rayleigh and Mie scattering. The discrete spherical harmonics method predictions for optical thin atmosphere using 36 streams are found in good agreement with benchmark literature results. The maximum deviation between the proposed method and literature results and for polar directions \\vert μ \\vert ≥0.1 is less than 0.5% and 0.9% for the Rayleigh and Mie scattering, respectively. These deviations for directions close to zero are about 3% and 10% for Rayleigh and Mie scattering, respectively.

  5. Effects of radiative heat transfer on the turbulence structure in inert and reacting mixing layers

    SciT

    Ghosh, Somnath, E-mail: sghosh@aero.iitkgp.ernet.in; Friedrich, Rainer

    2015-05-15

    We use large-eddy simulation to study the interaction between turbulence and radiative heat transfer in low-speed inert and reacting plane temporal mixing layers. An explicit filtering scheme based on approximate deconvolution is applied to treat the closure problem arising from quadratic nonlinearities of the filtered transport equations. In the reacting case, the working fluid is a mixture of ideal gases where the low-speed stream consists of hydrogen and nitrogen and the high-speed stream consists of oxygen and nitrogen. Both streams are premixed in a way that the free-stream densities are the same and the stoichiometric mixture fraction is 0.3. Themore » filtered heat release term is modelled using equilibrium chemistry. In the inert case, the low-speed stream consists of nitrogen at a temperature of 1000 K and the highspeed stream is pure water vapour of 2000 K, when radiation is turned off. Simulations assuming the gas mixtures as gray gases with artificially increased Planck mean absorption coefficients are performed in which the large-eddy simulation code and the radiation code PRISSMA are fully coupled. In both cases, radiative heat transfer is found to clearly affect fluctuations of thermodynamic variables, Reynolds stresses, and Reynolds stress budget terms like pressure-strain correlations. Source terms in the transport equation for the variance of temperature are used to explain the decrease of this variance in the reacting case and its increase in the inert case.« less

  6. Generalized source Finite Volume Method for radiative transfer equation in participating media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Biao; Xu, Chuan-Long; Wang, Shi-Min

    2017-03-01

    Temperature monitoring is very important in a combustion system. In recent years, non-intrusive temperature reconstruction has been explored intensively on the basis of calculating arbitrary directional radiative intensities. In this paper, a new method named Generalized Source Finite Volume Method (GSFVM) was proposed. It was based on radiative transfer equation and Finite Volume Method (FVM). This method can be used to calculate arbitrary directional radiative intensities and is proven to be accurate and efficient. To verify the performance of this method, six test cases of 1D, 2D, and 3D radiative transfer problems were investigated. The numerical results show that the efficiency of this method is close to the radial basis function interpolation method, but the accuracy and stability is higher than that of the interpolation method. The accuracy of the GSFVM is similar to that of the Backward Monte Carlo (BMC) algorithm, while the time required by the GSFVM is much shorter than that of the BMC algorithm. Therefore, the GSFVM can be used in temperature reconstruction and improvement on the accuracy of the FVM.

  7. Exploring Near-Field Radiative Heat Transfer for Thermo-photovoltaic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganjeh, Yashar; Song, Bai; Sadat, Seid; Thompson, Dakotah; Fiorino, Anthony; Reddy, Pramod; Meyhofer, Edgar

    2014-03-01

    Understanding near-field radiative heat transfer (NFRHT) is critical for developing efficient thermo-photovoltaic devices. Theoretical predictions suggest that when the spatial separation of two parallel planes at different temperatures is less than their Wien's thermal wavelength, thermal transport via radiation can be greatly enhanced. The radiative heat flow across nanoscale gaps is predicted to be orders-of-magnitude higher than that given by Stefan-Boltzmann law, due to contribution of evanescent waves. In order to test these predictions, a novel experimental platform was designed and built enabling parallelization of two planar surfaces (50 μm by 50 μm) with 500 microradian resolution in their relative orientation. This platform was used to probe NFRHT between two planes and also between a plane and a sphere. It was found that, when a 50 μm diameter silica sphere was approximately 20 nm away from a 50 by 50 μm2 silica plane, a significant increase in radiative heat transfer coefficient was observed. This increase is 3 orders of magnitude higher than the value predicted by the blackbody limit. Other setups, including Au spheres and planes, and the plane-plane geometries are currently being investigated. 1) Army Research office (W911NF-12-1-0612), 2) NSF Thermal Transport Prcesses (CBET 1235691), 3) Center for Solar and Thermal Energy conversion, funded by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences under award no. DE-SC0000957.

  8. Effects of radiative heat transfer on the turbulence structure in inert and reacting mixing layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Somnath; Friedrich, Rainer

    2015-05-01

    We use large-eddy simulation to study the interaction between turbulence and radiative heat transfer in low-speed inert and reacting plane temporal mixing layers. An explicit filtering scheme based on approximate deconvolution is applied to treat the closure problem arising from quadratic nonlinearities of the filtered transport equations. In the reacting case, the working fluid is a mixture of ideal gases where the low-speed stream consists of hydrogen and nitrogen and the high-speed stream consists of oxygen and nitrogen. Both streams are premixed in a way that the free-stream densities are the same and the stoichiometric mixture fraction is 0.3. The filtered heat release term is modelled using equilibrium chemistry. In the inert case, the low-speed stream consists of nitrogen at a temperature of 1000 K and the highspeed stream is pure water vapour of 2000 K, when radiation is turned off. Simulations assuming the gas mixtures as gray gases with artificially increased Planck mean absorption coefficients are performed in which the large-eddy simulation code and the radiation code PRISSMA are fully coupled. In both cases, radiative heat transfer is found to clearly affect fluctuations of thermodynamic variables, Reynolds stresses, and Reynolds stress budget terms like pressure-strain correlations. Source terms in the transport equation for the variance of temperature are used to explain the decrease of this variance in the reacting case and its increase in the inert case.

  9. Research Advances on Radiation Transfer Modeling and Inversion for Multi-Scale Land Surface Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Q.

    2011-09-01

    At first, research advances on radiation transfer modeling on multi-scale remote sensing data are presented: after a general overview of remote sensing radiation transfer modeling, several recent research advances are presented, including leaf spectrum model (dPROS-PECT), vegetation canopy BRDF models, directional thermal infrared emission models(TRGM, SLEC), rugged mountains area radiation models, and kernel driven models etc. Then, new methodologies on land surface parameters inversion based on multi-source remote sensing data are proposed. The land surface Albedo, leaf area index, temperature/emissivity, and surface net radiation etc. are taken as examples. A new synthetic land surface parameter quantitative remote sensing product generation system is designed and the software system prototype will be demonstrated. At last, multi-scale field experiment campaigns, such as the field campaigns in Gansu and Beijing, China will be introduced briefly. The ground based, tower based, and airborne multi-angular measurement system have been built to measure the directional reflectance, emission and scattering characteristics from visible, near infrared, thermal infrared and microwave bands for model validation and calibration. The remote sensing pixel scale "true value" measurement strategy have been designed to gain the ground "true value" of LST, ALBEDO, LAI, soil moisture and ET etc. at 1-km2 for remote sensing product validation.

  10. Research Advances on Radiation Transfer Modeling and Inversion for Multi-scale Land Surface Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Q.; Li, J.; Du, Y.; Wen, J.; Zhong, B.; Wang, K.

    2011-12-01

    As the remote sensing data accumulating, it is a challenge and significant issue how to generate high accurate and consistent land surface parameter product from the multi source remote observation and the radiation transfer modeling and inversion methodology are the theoretical bases. In this paper, recent research advances and unresolved issues are presented. At first, after a general overview, recent research advances on multi-scale remote sensing radiation transfer modeling are presented, including leaf spectrum model, vegetation canopy BRDF models, directional thermal infrared emission models, rugged mountains area radiation models, and kernel driven models etc. Then, new methodologies on land surface parameters inversion based on multi-source remote sensing data are proposed, taking the land surface Albedo, leaf area index, temperature/emissivity, and surface net radiation as examples. A new synthetic land surface parameter quantitative remote sensing product generation system is suggested and the software system prototype will be demonstrated. At last, multi-scale field experiment campaigns, such as the field campaigns in Gansu and Beijing, China are introduced briefly. The ground based, tower based, and airborne multi-angular measurement system have been built to measure the directional reflectance, emission and scattering characteristics from visible, near infrared, thermal infrared and microwave bands for model validation and calibration. The remote sensing pixel scale "true value" measurement strategy have been designed to gain the ground "true value" of LST, ALBEDO, LAI, soil moisture and ET etc. at 1-km2 for remote sensing product validation.

  11. Radiative transfer in CO2-rich atmospheres: 1. Collisional line mixing implies a colder early Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozak, N.; Aharonson, O.; Halevy, I.

    2016-06-01

    Fast and accurate radiative transfer methods are essential for modeling CO2-rich atmospheres, relevant to the climate of early Earth and Mars, present-day Venus, and some exoplanets. Although such models already exist, their accuracy may be improved as better theoretical and experimental constraints become available. Here we develop a unidimensional radiative transfer code for CO2-rich atmospheres, using the correlated k approach and with a focus on modeling early Mars. Our model differs from existing models in that it includes the effects of CO2 collisional line mixing in the calculation of the line-by-line absorption coefficients. Inclusion of these effects results in model atmospheres that are more transparent to infrared radiation and, therefore, in colder surface temperatures at radiative-convective equilibrium, compared with results of previous studies. Inclusion of water vapor in the model atmosphere results in negligible warming due to the low atmospheric temperatures under a weaker early Sun, which translate into climatically unimportant concentrations of water vapor. Overall, the results imply that sustained warmth on early Mars would not have been possible with an atmosphere containing only CO2 and water vapor, suggesting that other components of the early Martian climate system are missing from current models or that warm conditions were not long lived.

  12. Discrete ordinates solutions of nongray radiative transfer with diffusely reflecting walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menart, J. A.; Lee, Haeok S.; Kim, Tae-Kuk

    1993-01-01

    Nongray gas radiation in a plane parallel slab bounded by gray, diffusely reflecting walls is studied using the discrete ordinates method. The spectral equation of transfer is averaged over a narrow wavenumber interval preserving the spectral correlation effect. The governing equations are derived by considering the history of multiple reflections between two reflecting wails. A closure approximation is applied so that only a finite number of reflections have to be explicitly included. The closure solutions express the physics of the problem to a very high degree and show relatively little error. Numerical solutions are obtained by applying a statistical narrow-band model for gas properties and a discrete ordinates code. The net radiative wail heat fluxes and the radiative source distributions are obtained for different temperature profiles. A zeroth-degree formulation, where no wall reflection is handled explicitly, is sufficient to predict the radiative transfer accurately for most cases considered, when compared with increasingly accurate solutions based on explicitly tracing a larger number of wail reflections without any closure approximation applied.

  13. An interative solution of an integral equation for radiative transfer by using variational technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshikawa, K. K.

    1973-01-01

    An effective iterative technique is introduced to solve a nonlinear integral equation frequently associated with radiative transfer problems. The problem is formulated in such a way that each step of an iterative sequence requires the solution of a linear integral equation. The advantage of a previously introduced variational technique which utilizes a stepwise constant trial function is exploited to cope with the nonlinear problem. The method is simple and straightforward. Rapid convergence is obtained by employing a linear interpolation of the iterative solutions. Using absorption coefficients of the Milne-Eddington type, which are applicable to some planetary atmospheric radiation problems. Solutions are found in terms of temperature and radiative flux. These solutions are presented numerically and show excellent agreement with other numerical solutions.

  14. A simple radiative transfer model of the high latitude mesospheric scattering layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hummel, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    A simple radiative transfer model of the particle layer found at 85 km over the summer poles is presented. The effects of the layer on the global radiative temperature, the polar region temperature, and the greenhouse effect are discussed. The estimated magnitude of the global radiative temperature change is 3.5 x .001 K to 2.2 x .01 K, depending on the value of the imaginary part of the particle index of refraction. The layer is shown to have a possible secondary influence on the temperature of the polar region while the contribution which the layer makes to the greenhouse effect is shown to be negligible. The imaginary part of the particle index of refraction is shown to be important in determining the attenuation properties of the layer.

  15. The vector radiative transfer numerical model of coupled ocean-atmosphere system using the matrix-operator method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xianqiang, He; Delu, Pan; Yan, Bai; Qiankun, Zhu

    2005-10-01

    The numerical model of the vector radiative transfer of the coupled ocean-atmosphere system is developed based on the matrix-operator method, which is named PCOART. In PCOART, using the Fourier analysis, the vector radiative transfer equation (VRTE) splits up into a set of independent equations with zenith angle as only angular coordinate. Using the Gaussian-Quadrature method, VRTE is finally transferred into the matrix equation, which is calculated by using the adding-doubling method. According to the reflective and refractive properties of the ocean-atmosphere interface, the vector radiative transfer numerical model of ocean and atmosphere is coupled in PCOART. By comparing with the exact Rayleigh scattering look-up-table of MODIS(Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer), it is shown that PCOART is an exact numerical calculation model, and the processing methods of the multi-scattering and polarization are correct in PCOART. Also, by validating with the standard problems of the radiative transfer in water, it is shown that PCOART could be used to calculate the underwater radiative transfer problems. Therefore, PCOART is a useful tool to exactly calculate the vector radiative transfer of the coupled ocean-atmosphere system, which can be used to study the polarization properties of the radiance in the whole ocean-atmosphere system and the remote sensing of the atmosphere and ocean.

  16. Three-dimensional aspects of radiative transfer in remote sensing of precipitation: Application to the 1986 COHMEX storm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haferman, J. L.; Krajewski, W. F.; Smith, T. F.

    1994-01-01

    Several multifrequency techniques for passive microwave estimation of precipitation based on the absorption and scattering properties of hydrometers have been proposed in the literature. In the present study, plane-parallel limitations are overcome by using a model based on the discrete-ordinates method to solve the radiative transfer equation in three-dimensional rectangular domains. This effectively accounts for the complexity and variety of radiation problems encountered in the atmosphere. This investigation presents result for plane-parallel and three-dimensional radiative transfer for a precipitating system, discusses differences between these results, and suggests possible explanations for these differences. Microphysical properties were obtained from the Colorado State University Regional Atmospehric Modeling System and represent a hailstorm observed during the 1986 Cooperative Huntsville Meteorological Experiment. These properties are used as input to a three-dimensional radiative transfer model in order to simulate satellite observation of the storm. The model output consists of upwelling brightness temperatures at several of the frequencies on the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager. The radiative transfer model accounts for scattering and emission of atmospheric gases and hydrometers in liquid and ice phases. Brightness temperatures obtained from the three-dimensional model of this investigation indicate that horizontal inhomogeneities give rise to brightness temperature fields that can be quite different from fields obtained using plane-parallel radiative transfer theory. These differences are examined for various resolutions of the satellite sensor field of view. In adddition, the issue of boundary conditions for three-dimensional atmospheric radiative transfer is addressed.

  17. An iterative phase-space explicit discontinuous Galerkin method for stellar radiative transfer in extended atmospheres

    SciT

    de Almeida, Valmor F.

    In this work, a phase-space discontinuous Galerkin (PSDG) method is presented for the solution of stellar radiative transfer problems. It allows for greater adaptivity than competing methods without sacrificing generality. The method is extensively tested on a spherically symmetric, static, inverse-power-law scattering atmosphere. Results for different sizes of atmospheres and intensities of scattering agreed with asymptotic values. The exponentially decaying behavior of the radiative field in the diffusive-transparent transition region, and the forward peaking behavior at the surface of extended atmospheres were accurately captured. The integrodifferential equation of radiation transfer is solved iteratively by alternating between the radiative pressure equationmore » and the original equation with the integral term treated as an energy density source term. In each iteration, the equations are solved via an explicit, flux-conserving, discontinuous Galerkin method. Finite elements are ordered in wave fronts perpendicular to the characteristic curves so that elemental linear algebraic systems are solved quickly by sweeping the phase space element by element. Two implementations of a diffusive boundary condition at the origin are demonstrated wherein the finite discontinuity in the radiation intensity is accurately captured by the proposed method. This allows for a consistent mechanism to preserve photon luminosity. The method was proved to be robust and fast, and a case is made for the adequacy of parallel processing. In addition to classical two-dimensional plots, results of normalized radiation intensity were mapped onto a log-polar surface exhibiting all distinguishing features of the problem studied.« less

  18. An iterative phase-space explicit discontinuous Galerkin method for stellar radiative transfer in extended atmospheres

    DOE PAGES

    de Almeida, Valmor F.

    2017-04-19

    In this work, a phase-space discontinuous Galerkin (PSDG) method is presented for the solution of stellar radiative transfer problems. It allows for greater adaptivity than competing methods without sacrificing generality. The method is extensively tested on a spherically symmetric, static, inverse-power-law scattering atmosphere. Results for different sizes of atmospheres and intensities of scattering agreed with asymptotic values. The exponentially decaying behavior of the radiative field in the diffusive-transparent transition region, and the forward peaking behavior at the surface of extended atmospheres were accurately captured. The integrodifferential equation of radiation transfer is solved iteratively by alternating between the radiative pressure equationmore » and the original equation with the integral term treated as an energy density source term. In each iteration, the equations are solved via an explicit, flux-conserving, discontinuous Galerkin method. Finite elements are ordered in wave fronts perpendicular to the characteristic curves so that elemental linear algebraic systems are solved quickly by sweeping the phase space element by element. Two implementations of a diffusive boundary condition at the origin are demonstrated wherein the finite discontinuity in the radiation intensity is accurately captured by the proposed method. This allows for a consistent mechanism to preserve photon luminosity. The method was proved to be robust and fast, and a case is made for the adequacy of parallel processing. In addition to classical two-dimensional plots, results of normalized radiation intensity were mapped onto a log-polar surface exhibiting all distinguishing features of the problem studied.« less

  19. TRUST. I. A 3D externally illuminated slab benchmark for dust radiative transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, K. D.; Baes, M.; Bianchi, S.; Camps, P.; Juvela, M.; Kuiper, R.; Lunttila, T.; Misselt, K. A.; Natale, G.; Robitaille, T.; Steinacker, J.

    2017-07-01

    Context. The radiative transport of photons through arbitrary three-dimensional (3D) structures of dust is a challenging problem due to the anisotropic scattering of dust grains and strong coupling between different spatial regions. The radiative transfer problem in 3D is solved using Monte Carlo or Ray Tracing techniques as no full analytic solution exists for the true 3D structures. Aims: We provide the first 3D dust radiative transfer benchmark composed of a slab of dust with uniform density externally illuminated by a star. This simple 3D benchmark is explicitly formulated to provide tests of the different components of the radiative transfer problem including dust absorption, scattering, and emission. Methods: The details of the external star, the slab itself, and the dust properties are provided. This benchmark includes models with a range of dust optical depths fully probing cases that are optically thin at all wavelengths to optically thick at most wavelengths. The dust properties adopted are characteristic of the diffuse Milky Way interstellar medium. This benchmark includes solutions for the full dust emission including single photon (stochastic) heating as well as two simplifying approximations: One where all grains are considered in equilibrium with the radiation field and one where the emission is from a single effective grain with size-distribution-averaged properties. A total of six Monte Carlo codes and one Ray Tracing code provide solutions to this benchmark. Results: The solution to this benchmark is given as global spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and images at select diagnostic wavelengths from the ultraviolet through the infrared. Comparison of the results revealed that the global SEDs are consistent on average to a few percent for all but the scattered stellar flux at very high optical depths. The image results are consistent within 10%, again except for the stellar scattered flux at very high optical depths. The lack of agreement between

  20. Evaluating radiative transfer schemes treatment of vegetation canopy architecture in land surface models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braghiere, Renato; Quaife, Tristan; Black, Emily

    2016-04-01

    Incoming shortwave radiation is the primary source of energy driving the majority of the Earth's climate system. The partitioning of shortwave radiation by vegetation into absorbed, reflected, and transmitted terms is important for most of biogeophysical processes, including leaf temperature changes and photosynthesis, and it is currently calculated by most of land surface schemes (LSS) of climate and/or numerical weather prediction models. The most commonly used radiative transfer scheme in LSS is the two-stream approximation, however it does not explicitly account for vegetation architectural effects on shortwave radiation partitioning. Detailed three-dimensional (3D) canopy radiative transfer schemes have been developed, but they are too computationally expensive to address large-scale related studies over long time periods. Using a straightforward one-dimensional (1D) parameterisation proposed by Pinty et al. (2006), we modified a two-stream radiative transfer scheme by including a simple function of Sun zenith angle, so-called "structure factor", which does not require an explicit description and understanding of the complex phenomena arising from the presence of vegetation heterogeneous architecture, and it guarantees accurate simulations of the radiative balance consistently with 3D representations. In order to evaluate the ability of the proposed parameterisation in accurately represent the radiative balance of more complex 3D schemes, a comparison between the modified two-stream approximation with the "structure factor" parameterisation and state-of-art 3D radiative transfer schemes was conducted, following a set of virtual scenarios described in the RAMI4PILPS experiment. These experiments have been evaluating the radiative balance of several models under perfectly controlled conditions in order to eliminate uncertainties arising from an incomplete or erroneous knowledge of the structural, spectral and illumination related canopy characteristics typical

  1. Ultrafast endothermic transfer of non-radiative exciplex state to radiative excitons in polyfluorene random copolymer for blue electroluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghe, Dhanashree A.; Dey, Amrita; Johnson, Kerr; Lu, L.-P.; Friend, Richard H.; Kabra, Dinesh

    2018-04-01

    We report a blue-emitting random copolymer (termed modified Aryl-F8) consisting of three repeat units of polydioctylfluorene (F8), Aryl-polydioctylfluorene (Aryl-F8), and an aromatic amine comonomer unit, poly(bis-N,Ν'-(4-butylphenyl)-bis-N,N'-phenyl-1,4 phenylenediamine) chemically linked to get an improved charge carrier balance without compromising on the photoluminescence (PL) quantum yield with respect to the Aryl-F8 homo-polymer. The measured photoluminescence quantum efficiency (˜70%) of the blue-emitting polymer is comparable to or greater than the individual monomer units. The time resolved PL spectra from the modified Aryl-F8 are similar to those of Arylated-poly(9,9'-dioctylfluorene-co-bis-N,N'-(4-butylphenyl)-bis-N,N'-phenyl-1,4 phenylenediamine) (PFB) even at a time scale of 100-250 ps, indicating an ultrafast energy transfer from the (Aryl-F8 or F8):Arylated-PFB interface to Arylated-PFB, i.e., endothermic transfer of non-radiative exciplex to a radiative molecular exciton. Furthermore, the presence of non-radiative exciplex is confirmed by the photoluminescence decay profile and temperature dependent PL spectra. The luminance efficiency achieved for the modified Aryl-F8 polymer light-emitting diodes is ˜11 cd A-1 with an external quantum efficiency (EQE) of ˜4.5%, whereas it is 0.05 cd/A with an EQE of ˜0.025% for Aryl-F8. Almost two orders of higher efficiency is achieved due to the improved charge carrier balance from the random copolymer without compromising on the photoluminescence yield.

  2. Consistent radiative transfer modeling of active and passive observations of precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Ian

    2016-04-01

    Spaceborne platforms such as the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) and the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission exploit a combination of active and passive sensors to provide a greater understanding of the three-dimensional structure of precipitation. While "operationalized" retrieval algorithms require fast forward models, the ability to perform higher fidelity simulations is necessary in order to understand the physics of remote sensing problems by testing assumptions and developing parameterizations for the fast models. To ensure proper synergy between active and passive modeling, forward models must be consistent when modeling the responses of radars and radiometers. This work presents a self-consistent transfer model for simulating radar reflectivities and millimeter wave brightness temperatures for precipitating scenes. To accomplish this, we extended the Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Simulator (ARTS) version 2.3 to solve the radiative transfer equation for active sensors and multiple scattering conditions. Early versions of ARTS (1.1) included a passive Monte Carlo solver, and ARTS is capable of handling atmospheres of up to three dimensions with ellipsoidal planetary geometries. The modular nature of ARTS facilitates extensibility, and the well-developed ray-tracing tools are suited for implementation of Monte Carlo algorithms. Finally, since ARTS handles the full Stokes vector, co- and cross-polarized reflectivity products are possible for scenarios that include nonspherical particles, with or without preferential alignment. The accuracy of the forward model will be demonstrated with precipitation events observed by TRMM and GPM, and the effects of multiple scattering will be detailed. The three-dimensional nature of the radiative transfer model will be useful for understanding the effects of nonuniform beamfill and multiple scattering for spatially heterogeneous precipitation events. The targets of this forward model are GPM (the

  3. Radiative transfer theory for a random distribution of low velocity spheres as resonant isotropic scatterers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Haruo; Hayakawa, Toshihiko

    2014-10-01

    Short-period seismograms of earthquakes are complex especially beneath volcanoes, where the S wave mean free path is short and low velocity bodies composed of melt or fluid are expected in addition to random velocity inhomogeneities as scattering sources. Resonant scattering inherent in a low velocity body shows trap and release of waves with a delay time. Focusing of the delay time phenomenon, we have to consider seriously multiple resonant scattering processes. Since wave phases are complex in such a scattering medium, the radiative transfer theory has been often used to synthesize the variation of mean square (MS) amplitude of waves; however, resonant scattering has not been well adopted in the conventional radiative transfer theory. Here, as a simple mathematical model, we study the sequence of isotropic resonant scattering of a scalar wavelet by low velocity spheres at low frequencies, where the inside velocity is supposed to be low enough. We first derive the total scattering cross-section per time for each order of scattering as the convolution kernel representing the decaying scattering response. Then, for a random and uniform distribution of such identical resonant isotropic scatterers, we build the propagator of the MS amplitude by using causality, a geometrical spreading factor and the scattering loss. Using those propagators and convolution kernels, we formulate the radiative transfer equation for a spherically impulsive radiation from a point source. The synthesized MS amplitude time trace shows a dip just after the direct arrival and a delayed swelling, and then a decaying tail at large lapse times. The delayed swelling is a prominent effect of resonant scattering. The space distribution of synthesized MS amplitude shows a swelling near the source region in space, and it becomes a bell shape like a diffusion solution at large lapse times.

  4. Some New Results in Astrophysical Problems of Nonlinear Theory of Radiative Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikichyan, H. V.

    2017-07-01

    In the interpretation of the observed astrophysical spectra, a decisive role is related to nonlinear problems of radiative transfer, because the processes of multiple interactions of matter of cosmic medium with the exciting intense radiation ubiquitously occur in astrophysical objects, and in their vicinities. Whereas, the intensity of the exciting radiation changes the physical properties of the original medium, and itself was modified, simultaneously, in a self-consistent manner under its influence. In the present report, we show that the consistent application of the principle of invariance in the nonlinear problem of bilateral external illumination of a scattering/absorbing one-dimensional anisotropic medium of finite geometrical thickness allows for simplifications that were previously considered as a prerogative only of linear problems. The nonlinear problem is analyzed through the three methods of the principle of invariance: (i) an adding of layers, (ii) its limiting form, described by differential equations of invariant imbedding, and (iii) a transition to the, so-called, functional equations of the "Ambartsumyan's complete invariance". Thereby, as an alternative to the Boltzmann equation, a new type of equations, so-called "kinetic equations of equivalence", are obtained. By the introduction of new functions - the so-called "linear images" of solution of nonlinear problem of radiative transfer, the linear structure of the solution of the nonlinear problem under study is further revealed. Linear images allow to convert naturally the statistical characteristics of random walk of a "single quantum" or their "beam of unit intensity", as well as widely known "probabilistic interpretation of phenomena of transfer", to the field of nonlinear problems. The structure of the equations obtained for determination of linear images is typical of linear problems.

  5. Reconstruction of forest geometries from terrestrial laser scanning point clouds for canopy radiative transfer modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bremer, Magnus; Schmidtner, Korbinian; Rutzinger, Martin

    2015-04-01

    The architecture of forest canopies is a key parameter for forest ecological issues helping to model the variability of wood biomass and foliage in space and time. In order to understand the nature of subpixel effects of optical space-borne sensors with coarse spatial resolution, hypothetical 3D canopy models are widely used for the simulation of radiative transfer in forests. Thereby, radiation is traced through the atmosphere and canopy geometries until it reaches the optical sensor. For a realistic simulation scene we decompose terrestrial laser scanning point cloud data of leaf-off larch forest plots in the Austrian Alps and reconstruct detailed model ready input data for radiative transfer simulations. The point clouds are pre-classified into primitive classes using Principle Component Analysis (PCA) using scale adapted radius neighbourhoods. Elongated point structures are extracted as tree trunks. The tree trunks are used as seeds for a Dijkstra-growing procedure, in order to obtain single tree segmentation in the interlinked canopies. For the optimized reconstruction of branching architectures as vector models, point cloud skeletonisation is used in combination with an iterative Dijkstra-growing and by applying distance constraints. This allows conducting a hierarchical reconstruction preferring the tree trunk and higher order branches and avoiding over-skeletonization effects. Based on the reconstructed branching architectures, larch needles are modelled based on the hierarchical level of branches and the geometrical openness of the canopy. For radiative transfer simulations, branch architectures are used as mesh geometries representing branches as cylindrical pipes. Needles are either used as meshes or as voxel-turbids. The presented workflow allows an automatic classification and single tree segmentation in interlinked canopies. The iterative Dijkstra-growing using distance constraints generated realistic reconstruction results. As the mesh representation

  6. Estimation of photosynthetically available radiation (PAR) from OCEANSAT-I OCM using a simple atmospheric radiative transfer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathy, Madhumita; Raman, Mini; Chauhan, Prakash

    2015-10-01

    Photosynthetically available radiation (PAR) is an important variable for radiation budget, marine and terrestrial ecosystem models. OCEANSAT-1 Ocean Color Monitor (OCM) PAR was estimated using two different methods under both clear and cloudy sky conditions. In the first approach, aerosol optical depth (AOD) and cloud optical depth (COD) were estimated from OCEANSAT-1 OCM TOA (top-of-atmosphere) radiance data on a pixel by pixel basis and PAR was estimated from extraterrestrial solar flux for fifteen spectral bands using a radiative transfer model. The second approach used TOA radiances measured by OCM in the PAR spectral range to compute PAR. This approach also included surface albedo and cloud albedo as inputs. Comparison between OCEANSAT-1 OCM PAR at noon with in situ measured PAR shows that root mean square difference was 5.82% for the method I and 7.24% for the method II in daily time scales. Results indicate that methodology adopted to estimate PAR from OCEANSAT-1 OCM can produce reasonably accurate PAR estimates over the tropical Indian Ocean region. This approach can be extended to OCEANSAT-2 OCM and future OCEANSAT-3 OCM data for operational estimation of PAR for regional marine ecosystem applications.

  7. Relativistic radiative transfer in a moving stratus irradiated by a luminous flat source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukue, Jun

    2015-06-01

    Relativistic radiative transfer in a geometrically thin stratus (sheet-like gaseous cloud with finite optical depth), which is moving at a relativistic speed around a luminous flat source, such as accretion disks, and is irradiated by the source, is examined under the special relativistic treatment. Incident radiation is aberrated and Doppler-shifted when it is received by the stratus, and emitted radiation is also aberrated and Doppler-shifted when it leaves the stratus. Considering these relativistic effects, we analytically obtain the emergent intensity as well as other radiative quantities in the purely scattering case for both infinite and finite strati. We mainly consider the frequency-integrated case, but also briefly show the frequency-dependent one. We also solve the relativistic radiative transfer equation numerically, and compare the results with the analytical solutions. In the infinite stratus, the mean intensity in the comoving and inertial frames decreases and becomes constant, as the stratus speed increases. The flux in the comoving frame decreases exponentially with the optical depth. The emergent intensity decreases as the speed increases, since the incident photons are redshifted at the bottom-side of the stratus. In the finite stratus, the mean intensity in the comoving and inertial frames quickly increases in the top-side region due to the aberrated photons. The flux in the comoving frame is positive in the range of 0 < β ≤ 0.4, while it becomes negative for β ≳ 0.5. The behavior of the emergent intensity is similar to that of the infinite case, although there is an irradiation effect caused by the aberrated photons.

  8. Coupling hydrodynamics with comoving frame radiative transfer. I. A unified approach for OB and WR stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sander, A. A. C.; Hamann, W.-R.; Todt, H.; Hainich, R.; Shenar, T.

    2017-07-01

    Context. For more than two decades, stellar atmosphere codes have been used to derive the stellar and wind parameters of massive stars. Although they have become a powerful tool and sufficiently reproduce the observed spectral appearance, they can hardly be used for more than measuring parameters. One major obstacle is their inconsistency between the calculated radiation field and the wind stratification due to the usage of prescribed mass-loss rates and wind-velocity fields. Aims: We present the concepts for a new generation of hydrodynamically consistent non-local thermodynamical equilibrium (non-LTE) stellar atmosphere models that allow for detailed studies of radiation-driven stellar winds. As a first demonstration, this new kind of model is applied to a massive O star. Methods: Based on earlier works, the PoWR code has been extended with the option to consistently solve the hydrodynamic equation together with the statistical equations and the radiative transfer in order to obtain a hydrodynamically consistent atmosphere stratification. In these models, the whole velocity field is iteratively updated together with an adjustment of the mass-loss rate. Results: The concepts for obtaining hydrodynamically consistent models using a comoving-frame radiative transfer are outlined. To provide a useful benchmark, we present a demonstration model, which was motivated to describe the well-studied O4 supergiant ζPup. The obtained stellar and wind parameters are within the current range of literature values. Conclusions: For the first time, the PoWR code has been used to obtain a hydrodynamically consistent model for a massive O star. This has been achieved by a profound revision of earlier concepts used for Wolf-Rayet stars. The velocity field is shaped by various elements contributing to the radiative acceleration, especially in the outer wind. The results further indicate that for more dense winds deviations from a standard β-law occur.

  9. Integrated simulation of continuous-scale and discrete-scale radiative transfer in metal foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Xin-Lin; Li, Yang; Sun, Chuang; Ai, Qing; Tan, He-Ping

    2018-06-01

    A novel integrated simulation of radiative transfer in metal foams is presented. It integrates the continuous-scale simulation with the direct discrete-scale simulation in a single computational domain. It relies on the coupling of the real discrete-scale foam geometry with the equivalent continuous-scale medium through a specially defined scale-coupled zone. This zone holds continuous but nonhomogeneous volumetric radiative properties. The scale-coupled approach is compared to the traditional continuous-scale approach using volumetric radiative properties in the equivalent participating medium and to the direct discrete-scale approach employing the real 3D foam geometry obtained by computed tomography. All the analyses are based on geometrical optics. The Monte Carlo ray-tracing procedure is used for computations of the absorbed radiative fluxes and the apparent radiative behaviors of metal foams. The results obtained by the three approaches are in tenable agreement. The scale-coupled approach is fully validated in calculating the apparent radiative behaviors of metal foams composed of very absorbing to very reflective struts and that composed of very rough to very smooth struts. This new approach leads to a reduction in computational time by approximately one order of magnitude compared to the direct discrete-scale approach. Meanwhile, it can offer information on the local geometry-dependent feature and at the same time the equivalent feature in an integrated simulation. This new approach is promising to combine the advantages of the continuous-scale approach (rapid calculations) and direct discrete-scale approach (accurate prediction of local radiative quantities).

  10. Direct Collapse to Supermassive Black Hole Seeds with Radiative Transfer: Isolated Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yang; Ardaneh, Kazem; Shlosman, Isaac; Nagamine, Kentaro; Wise, John H.; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    2018-05-01

    Direct collapse within dark matter haloes is a promising path to form supermassive black hole seeds at high redshifts. The outer part of this collapse remains optically thin. However, the innermost region of the collapse is expected to become optically thick and requires to follow the radiation field in order to understand its evolution. So far, the adiabatic approximation has been used exclusively for this purpose. We apply radiative transfer in the flux-limited diffusion (FLD) approximation to solve the evolution of coupled gas and radiation for isolated haloes. We find that (1) the photosphere forms at 10-6 pc and rapidly expands outwards. (2) A central core forms, with a mass of 1 M⊙, supported by gas pressure gradients and rotation. (3) Growing gas and radiation pressure gradients dissolve it. (4) This process is associated with a strong anisotropic outflow; another core forms nearby and grows rapidly. (5) Typical radiation luminosity emerging from the photosphere is 5 × 1037-5 × 1038 erg s-1, of the order the Eddington luminosity. (6) Two variability time-scales are associated with this process: a long one, which is related to the accretion flow within the central 10-4-10-3 pc, and 0.1 yr, related to radiation diffusion. (7) Adiabatic models evolution differs profoundly from that of the FLD models, by forming a geometrically thick disc. Overall, an adiabatic equation of state is not a good approximation to the advanced stage of direct collapse, because the radiation is capable of escaping due to anisotropy in the optical depth and associated gradients.

  11. A Discrete Probability Function Method for the Equation of Radiative Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sivathanu, Y. R.; Gore, J. P.

    1993-01-01

    A discrete probability function (DPF) method for the equation of radiative transfer is derived. The DPF is defined as the integral of the probability density function (PDF) over a discrete interval. The derivation allows the evaluation of the PDF of intensities leaving desired radiation paths including turbulence-radiation interactions without the use of computer intensive stochastic methods. The DPF method has a distinct advantage over conventional PDF methods since the creation of a partial differential equation from the equation of transfer is avoided. Further, convergence of all moments of intensity is guaranteed at the basic level of simulation unlike the stochastic method where the number of realizations for convergence of higher order moments increases rapidly. The DPF method is described for a representative path with approximately integral-length scale-sized spatial discretization. The results show good agreement with measurements in a propylene/air flame except for the effects of intermittency resulting from highly correlated realizations. The method can be extended to the treatment of spatial correlations as described in the Appendix. However, information regarding spatial correlations in turbulent flames is needed prior to the execution of this extension.

  12. Intercomparison of three microwave/infrared high resolution line-by-line radiative transfer codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreier, Franz; Milz, Mathias; Buehler, Stefan A.; von Clarmann, Thomas

    2018-05-01

    An intercomparison of three line-by-line (lbl) codes developed independently for atmospheric radiative transfer and remote sensing - ARTS, GARLIC, and KOPRA - has been performed for a thermal infrared nadir sounding application assuming a HIRS-like (High resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder) setup. Radiances for the 19 HIRS infrared channels and a set of 42 atmospheric profiles from the "Garand dataset" have been computed. The mutual differences of the equivalent brightness temperatures are presented and possible causes of disagreement are discussed. In particular, the impact of path integration schemes and atmospheric layer discretization is assessed. When the continuum absorption contribution is ignored because of the different implementations, residuals are generally in the sub-Kelvin range and smaller than 0.1 K for some window channels (and all atmospheric models and lbl codes). None of the three codes turned out to be perfect for all channels and atmospheres. Remaining discrepancies are attributed to different lbl optimization techniques. Lbl codes seem to have reached a maturity in the implementation of radiative transfer that the choice of the underlying physical models (line shape models, continua etc) becomes increasingly relevant.

  13. A computer simulation model to compute the radiation transfer of mountainous regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuguang; Zhao, Feng; Song, Rui

    2011-11-01

    In mountainous regions, the radiometric signal recorded at the sensor depends on a number of factors such as sun angle, atmospheric conditions, surface cover type, and topography. In this paper, a computer simulation model of radiation transfer is designed and evaluated. This model implements the Monte Carlo ray-tracing techniques and is specifically dedicated to the study of light propagation in mountainous regions. The radiative processes between sun light and the objects within the mountainous region are realized by using forward Monte Carlo ray-tracing methods. The performance of the model is evaluated through detailed comparisons with the well-established 3D computer simulation model: RGM (Radiosity-Graphics combined Model) based on the same scenes and identical spectral parameters, which shows good agreements between these two models' results. By using the newly developed computer model, series of typical mountainous scenes are generated to analyze the physical mechanism of mountainous radiation transfer. The results show that the effects of the adjacent slopes are important for deep valleys and they particularly affect shadowed pixels, and the topographic effect needs to be considered in mountainous terrain before accurate inferences from remotely sensed data can be made.

  14. Equilibrium structure of solar magnetic flux tubes: Energy transport with multistream radiative transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasan, S. S.; Kalkofen, W.

    1994-01-01

    We examine the equilibrium structure of vertical intense magnetic flux tubes on the Sun. Assuming cylindrical geometry, we solve the magnetohydrostatic equations in the thin flux-tube approximation, allowing for energy transport by radiation and convection. The radiative transfer equation is solved in the six-stream approximation, assuming gray opacity and local thermodynamic equilibrium. This constitutes a significant improvement over a previous study, in which the transfer was solved using the multidimensional generalization of the Eddington approximation. Convection in the flux tube is treated using mixing-length theory, with an additional parameter alpha, characterizing the suppression of convective energy transport in the tube by the strong magnetic field. The equations are solved using the method of partial linearization. We present results for tubes with different values of the magnetic field strength and radius at a fixed depth in the atmosphere. In general, we find that, at equal geometric heights, the temperature on the tube axis, compared to the ambient medium, is higher in the photosphere and lower in the convection zone, with the difference becoming larger for thicker tubes. At equal optical depths the tubes are generally hotter than their surroundings. The results are comparatively insensitive to alpha but depend upon whether radiative and convective energy transport operate simultaneously or in separate layers. A comparison of our results with semiempirical models shows that the temperature and intensity contrast are in broad agreement. However, the field strengths of the flux-tube models are somewhat lower than the values inferred from observations.

  15. Investigation of Radiation and Chemical Resistance of Flexible HLW Transfer Hose

    SciT

    E. Skidmore; Billings, K.; Hubbard, M.

    A chemical transfer hose constructed of an EPDM (ethylene-propylene diene monomer) outer covering with a modified cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) lining was evaluated for use in high level radioactive waste transfer applications. Laboratory analysis involved characterization of the hose liner after irradiation to doses of 50 to 300 Mrad and subsequent exposure to 25% NaOH solution at 93 C for 30 days, simulating 6 months intermittent service. The XLPE liner mechanical and structural properties were characterized at varying dose levels. Burst testing of irradiated hose assemblies was also performed. Literature review and test results suggest that radiation effects below doses ofmore » 100 kGy are minimal, with acceptable property changes to 500 kGy. Higher doses may be feasible. At a bounding dose of 2.5 MGy, the burst pressure is reduced to the working pressure (1.38 MPa) at room temperature. Radiation exposure slightly reduces liner tensile strength, with more significant decrease in liner elongation. Subsequent exposure to caustic solutions at elevated temperature slightly increases elongation, suggesting an immersion/hydrolytic effect or possible thermal annealing of radiation damage. This paper summarizes the laboratory results and recommendations for field deployment.« less

  16. Spatial radiation environment in a heterogeneous oak woodland using a three-dimensional radiative transfer model and multiple constraints from observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, H.; Ryu, Y.; Ustin, S.; Baldocchi, D. D.

    2009-12-01

    B15: Remote Characterization of Vegetation Structure: Including Research to Inform the Planned NASA DESDynI and ESA BIOMASS Missions Title: Spatial radiation environment in a heterogeneous oak woodland using a three-dimensional radiative transfer model and multiple constraints from observations Hideki Kobayashi, Youngryel Ryu, Susan Ustin, and Dennis Baldocchi Abstract Accurate evaluations of radiation environments of visible, near infrared, and thermal infrared wavebands in forest canopies are important to estimate energy, water, and carbon fluxes. Californian oak woodlands are sparse and highly clumped so that radiation environments are extremely heterogeneous spatially. The heterogeneity of radiation environments also varies with wavebands which depend on scattering and emission properties. So far, most of modeling studies have been performed in one dimensional radiative transfer models with (or without) clumping effect in the forest canopies. While some studies have been performed by using three dimensional radiative transfer models, several issues are still unresolved. For example, some 3D models calculate the radiation field with individual tree basis, and radiation interactions among trees are not considered. This interaction could be important in the highly scattering waveband such as near infrared. The objective of this study is to quantify the radiation field in the oak woodland. We developed a three dimensional radiative transfer model, which includes the thermal waveband. Soil/canopy energy balances and canopy physiology models, CANOAK, are incorporated in the radiative transfer model to simulate the diurnal patterns of thermal radiation fields and canopy physiology. Airborne LiDAR and canopy gap data measured by the several methods (digital photographs and plant canopy analyzer) were used to constrain the forest structures such as tree positions, crown sizes and leaf area density. Modeling results were tested by a traversing radiometer system that

  17. Linearized Flux Evolution (LiFE): A technique for rapidly adapting fluxes from full-physics radiative transfer models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Tyler D.; Crisp, David

    2018-05-01

    Solar and thermal radiation are critical aspects of planetary climate, with gradients in radiative energy fluxes driving heating and cooling. Climate models require that radiative transfer tools be versatile, computationally efficient, and accurate. Here, we describe a technique that uses an accurate full-physics radiative transfer model to generate a set of atmospheric radiative quantities which can be used to linearly adapt radiative flux profiles to changes in the atmospheric and surface state-the Linearized Flux Evolution (LiFE) approach. These radiative quantities describe how each model layer in a plane-parallel atmosphere reflects and transmits light, as well as how the layer generates diffuse radiation by thermal emission and by scattering light from the direct solar beam. By computing derivatives of these layer radiative properties with respect to dynamic elements of the atmospheric state, we can then efficiently adapt the flux profiles computed by the full-physics model to new atmospheric states. We validate the LiFE approach, and then apply this approach to Mars, Earth, and Venus, demonstrating the information contained in the layer radiative properties and their derivatives, as well as how the LiFE approach can be used to determine the thermal structure of radiative and radiative-convective equilibrium states in one-dimensional atmospheric models.

  18. Solving transient conduction and radiation heat transfer problems using the lattice Boltzmann method and the finite volume method

    SciT

    Mishra, Subhash C.; Roy, Hillol K.

    2007-04-10

    The lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) was used to solve the energy equation of a transient conduction-radiation heat transfer problem. The finite volume method (FVM) was used to compute the radiative information. To study the compatibility of the LBM for the energy equation and the FVM for the radiative transfer equation, transient conduction and radiation heat transfer problems in 1-D planar and 2-D rectangular geometries were considered. In order to establish the suitability of the LBM, the energy equations of the two problems were also solved using the FVM of the computational fluid dynamics. The FVM used in the radiative heatmore » transfer was employed to compute the radiative information required for the solution of the energy equation using the LBM or the FVM (of the CFD). To study the compatibility and suitability of the LBM for the solution of energy equation and the FVM for the radiative information, results were analyzed for the effects of various parameters such as the scattering albedo, the conduction-radiation parameter and the boundary emissivity. The results of the LBM-FVM combination were found to be in excellent agreement with the FVM-FVM combination. The number of iterations and CPU times in both the combinations were found comparable.« less

  19. Landauer's formula breakdown for radiative heat transfer and nonequilibrium Casimir forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubio López, Adrián E.; Poggi, Pablo M.; Lombardo, Fernando C.; Giannini, Vincenzo

    2018-04-01

    In this work, we analyze the incidence of the plates' thickness on the Casimir force and radiative heat transfer for a configuration of parallel plates in a nonequilibrium scenario, relating to Lifshitz's and Landauer's formulas. From a first-principles canonical quantization scheme for the study of the matter-field interaction, we give closed-form expressions for the nonequilibrium Casimir force and the heat transfer between plates of thicknesses dL,dR . We distinguish three different contributions to the Casimir force and the heat transfer in the general nonequilibrium situation: two associated with each of the plates and one to the initial state of the field. We analyze the dependence of the Casimir force and heat transfer with the plate thickness (setting dL=dR≡d ), showing the scale at which each magnitude converges to the value of infinite thickness (d →+∞ ) and how to correctly reproduce the nonequilibrium Lifshitz's formula. For the heat transfer, we show that Landauer's formula does not apply to every case (where the three contributions are present), but it is correct for some specific situations. We also analyze the interplay of the different contributions for realistic experimental and nanotechnological conditions, showing the impact of the thickness in the measurements. For small thicknesses (compared to the separation distance), the plates act to decrease the background blackbody flux, while for large thicknesses the heat is given by the baths' contribution only. The combination of these behaviors allows for the possibility, on one hand, of having a tunable minimum in the heat transfer that is experimentally attainable and observable for metals and, on the other hand, of having vanishing heat flux in the gap when those difference are of opposite signs (thermal shielding). These features turns out to be relevant for nanotechnological applications.

  20. Acoustic radiation force on a heated sphere including effects of heat transfer and acoustic streaming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Chun P.; Wang, Taylor G.

    1988-01-01

    A previous theoretical result on the subject of the acoustic radiation force on a heated sphere (Lee and Wang, 1984) is reexamined. For a more complete understanding, effects of heat transfer and acoustic streaming are taken into consideration. Essentially, it was found that, at high sound-pressure levels in a steady situation, the force is not affected significantly by the temperature profile, consistent with the result of an experimental work (Leung and Wang, 1985). This resolves the earlier apparent contradiction between the theory and the experiment. If excessive hot air is accumulated around the sphere, which can happen in transient situations, the force can be weakened or reversed in sign. A heat transfer model due to acoustic streaming was also found.

  1. Active and Passive 3D Vector Radiative Transfer with Preferentially-Aligned Ice Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, I. S.; Munchak, S. J.; Pelissier, C.; Kuo, K. S.; Heymsfield, G. M.

    2017-12-01

    To support the observation of clouds and precipitation using combinations of radars and radiometers, a forward model capable of representing diverse sensing geometries for active and passive instruments is necessary for correctly interpreting and consistently combining multi-sensor measurements from ground-based, airborne, and spaceborne platforms. As such, the Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Simulator (ARTS) uses Monte Carlo integration to produce radar reflectivities and radiometric brightness temperatures for three-dimensional cloud and precipitation input fields. This radiative transfer framework is capable of efficiently sampling Gaussian antenna beams and fully accounting for multiple scattering. By relying on common ray-tracing tools, gaseous absorption models, and scattering properties, the model reproduces accurate and consistent radar and radiometer observables. While such a framework is an important component for simulating remote sensing observables, the key driver for self-consistent radiative transfer calculations of clouds and precipitation is scattering data. Research over the past decade has demonstrated that spheroidal models of frozen hydrometeors cannot accurately reproduce all necessary scattering properties at all desired frequencies. The discrete dipole approximation offers flexibility in calculating scattering for arbitrary particle geometries, but at great computational expense. When considering scattering for certain pristine ice particles, the Extended Boundary Condition Method, or T-Matrix, is much more computationally efficient; however, convergence for T-Matrix calculations fails at large size parameters and high aspect ratios. To address these deficiencies, we implemented the Invariant Imbedding T-Matrix Method (IITM). A brief overview of ARTS and IITM will be given, including details for handling preferentially-aligned hydrometeors. Examples highlighting the performance of the model for simulating space-based and airborne measurements

  2. Polarimetry of hot-Jupiter systems and radiative transfer models of planetary atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bott, Kimberly; Bailey, Jeremy; Kedziora-Chudczer, Lucyna; Cotton, Daniel; Marshall, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Thousands of exoplanets and planet candidates have been detected. The next important step in the contexts of astrobiology, planetary classification and planet formation is to characterise them. My dissertation aims to provide further characterisation to four hot Jupiter exoplanets: the relatively well-characterised HD 189733b, WASP-18b which is nearly large enough to be a brown dwarf, and two minimally characterised non-transiting hot Jupiters: HD 179949b and tau Bootis b.For the transiting planets, this is done through two means. First, published data from previous observations of the secondary eclipse (and transit for HD 189733b) are compared to models created with the Versatile Software for the Transfer of Atmospheric Radiation (VSTAR). Second, new polarimetric observations from the HIgh Precision Polarimetric Instrument are compared to Lambert-Rayleigh polarised light phase curves. For the non-transiting planets, only the polarimetric measurements are compared to models, but toy radiative transfer models are produced for concept. As an introduction to radiative transfer models, VSTAR is applied to the planet Uranus to measure its D/H isotope ratio. A preliminary value is derived for D/H in one part of the atmosphere.Fitting a single atmospheric model to the transmitted, reflected, and emitted light, I confirm the presence of water on HD 189733b, and present a new temperature profile and cloud profile for the planet. For WASP-18b, I confirm the general shape of the temperature profile. No conclusions can be drawn from the polarimetric measurements for the non-transiting planets. I detect a possible variation with phase for transiting planet WASP-18b but cannot confirm it at this time. Alternative sources to the planet are discussed. For HD 189733b, I detect possible variability in the polarised light at the scale expected for the planet. However, the data are also statistically consistent with no variability and are not matched to the phase of the planet.

  3. Radiative-Transfer Modeling of Spectra of Densely Packed Particulate Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, G.; Mishchenko, M. I.; Glotch, T. D.

    2017-12-01

    Remote sensing measurements over a wide range of wavelengths from both ground- and space-based platforms have provided a wealth of data regarding the surfaces and atmospheres of various solar system bodies. With proper interpretations, important properties, such as composition and particle size, can be inferred. However, proper interpretation of such datasets can often be difficult, especially for densely packed particulate media with particle sizes on the order of wavelength of light being used for remote sensing. Radiative transfer theory has often been applied to the study of densely packed particulate media like planetary regoliths and snow, but with difficulty, and here we continue to investigate radiative transfer modeling of spectra of densely packed media. We use the superposition T-matrix method to compute scattering properties of clusters of particles and capture the near-field effects important for dense packing. Then, the scattering parameters from the T-matrix computations are modified with the static structure factor correction, accounting for the dense packing of the clusters themselves. Using these corrected scattering parameters, reflectance (or emissivity via Kirchhoff's Law) is computed with the method of invariance imbedding solution to the radiative transfer equation. For this work we modeled the emissivity spectrum of the 3.3 µm particle size fraction of enstatite, representing some common mineralogical and particle size components of regoliths, in the mid-infrared wavelengths (5 - 50 µm). The modeled spectrum from the T-matrix method with static structure factor correction using moderate packing densities (filling factors of 0.1 - 0.2) produced better fits to the laboratory measurement of corresponding spectrum than the spectrum modeled by the equivalent method without static structure factor correction. Future work will test the method of the superposition T-matrix and static structure factor correction combination for larger particles

  4. The reflection for dense plant canopies from the one-angle radiative transfer equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganapol, B. D.; Lawless, James G. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    An essential component of remote sensing of vegetation canopies from satellites is fundamental understanding. Since passive remote is driven by photons, the modeling of photon interactions with vegetation is a basic building block in that understanding. Several such photon transport models have been developed during the past two decades and continue to be developed. Different approaches have been followed including monte carlo, radiosity methods, geometric shadowing, and radiative transfer. In general, each approach has application for canopies with specific attributes. This presentation concerns the application of radiative transfer to dense vegetation canopies in which the soil does not participate. The approach taken here is novel in that a consistent theory for photon transport for non-rotationally invariant leaf scattering is developed in a canopy with a general leaf angle distribution (LAD). The theory is limited to the one-angle approximation (azimuthally averaged radiance) and is based on Chandrasekhar's analytical theory. While such a model is admittedly only approximate, it does fulfill a unique function in our search for understanding. In particular, the model is simple in its construct yet contains the essential features of canopy architecture that are mainly responsible for observed responses. Thus, this model will not only be a predictive tool but also an educational one. The mathematical setting is the radiative transfer equation in a dense (semiinfinite) canopy. The leaf scattering phase function is assumed to be Lambertian with different reflectance and transmittance. In addition, abaxial and adaxial differentiation is allowed which effectively destroys optical reciprocity. The analytical solution for the canopy BRDF is obtained by manipulation of the integral transport equation (a la Chandrasekhar) for a general LAD. With discretization of the. leaf angle, the resulting set of integral equations are solved iteratively including an acceleration

  5. Radiative heat transfer in strongly forward scattering media using the discrete ordinates method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granate, Pedro; Coelho, Pedro J.; Roger, Maxime

    2016-03-01

    The discrete ordinates method (DOM) is widely used to solve the radiative transfer equation, often yielding satisfactory results. However, in the presence of strongly forward scattering media, this method does not generally conserve the scattering energy and the phase function asymmetry factor. Because of this, the normalization of the phase function has been proposed to guarantee that the scattering energy and the asymmetry factor are conserved. Various authors have used different normalization techniques. Three of these are compared in the present work, along with two other methods, one based on the finite volume method (FVM) and another one based on the spherical harmonics discrete ordinates method (SHDOM). In addition, the approximation of the Henyey-Greenstein phase function by a different one is investigated as an alternative to the phase function normalization. The approximate phase function is given by the sum of a Dirac delta function, which accounts for the forward scattering peak, and a smoother scaled phase function. In this study, these techniques are applied to three scalar radiative transfer test cases, namely a three-dimensional cubic domain with a purely scattering medium, an axisymmetric cylindrical enclosure containing an emitting-absorbing-scattering medium, and a three-dimensional transient problem with collimated irradiation. The present results show that accurate predictions are achieved for strongly forward scattering media when the phase function is normalized in such a way that both the scattered energy and the phase function asymmetry factor are conserved. The normalization of the phase function may be avoided using the FVM or the SHDOM to evaluate the in-scattering term of the radiative transfer equation. Both methods yield results whose accuracy is similar to that obtained using the DOM along with normalization of the phase function. Very satisfactory predictions were also achieved using the delta-M phase function, while the delta

  6. Incorporation of Three-dimensional Radiative Transfer into a Very High Resolution Simulation of Horizontally Inhomogeneous Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, H.; Ota, Y.; Sekiguchi, M.; Sato, Y.

    2016-12-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) radiative transfer calculation scheme is developed to estimate horizontal transport of radiation energy in a very high resolution (with the order of 10 m in spatial grid) simulation of cloud evolution, especially for horizontally inhomogeneous clouds such as shallow cumulus and stratocumulus. Horizontal radiative transfer due to inhomogeneous clouds seems to cause local heating/cooling in an atmosphere with a fine spatial scale. It is, however, usually difficult to estimate the 3D effects, because the 3D radiative transfer often needs a large resource for computation compared to a plane-parallel approximation. This study attempts to incorporate a solution scheme that explicitly solves the 3D radiative transfer equation into a numerical simulation, because this scheme has an advantage in calculation for a sequence of time evolution (i.e., the scene at a time is little different from that at the previous time step). This scheme is also appropriate to calculation of radiation with strong absorption, such as the infrared regions. For efficient computation, this scheme utilizes several techniques, e.g., the multigrid method for iteration solution, and a correlated-k distribution method refined for efficient approximation of the wavelength integration. For a case study, the scheme is applied to an infrared broadband radiation calculation in a broken cloud field generated with a large eddy simulation model. The horizontal transport of infrared radiation, which cannot be estimated by the plane-parallel approximation, and its variation in time can be retrieved. The calculation result elucidates that the horizontal divergences and convergences of infrared radiation flux are not negligible, especially at the boundaries of clouds and within optically thin clouds, and the radiative cooling at lateral boundaries of clouds may reduce infrared radiative heating in clouds. In a future work, the 3D effects on radiative heating/cooling will be able to be

  7. Introduction of Parallel GPGPU Acceleration Algorithms for the Solution of Radiative Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godoy, William F.; Liu, Xu

    2011-01-01

    General-purpose computing on graphics processing units (GPGPU) is a recent technique that allows the parallel graphics processing unit (GPU) to accelerate calculations performed sequentially by the central processing unit (CPU). To introduce GPGPU to radiative transfer, the Gauss-Seidel solution of the well-known expressions for 1-D and 3-D homogeneous, isotropic media is selected as a test case. Different algorithms are introduced to balance memory and GPU-CPU communication, critical aspects of GPGPU. Results show that speed-ups of one to two orders of magnitude are obtained when compared to sequential solutions. The underlying value of GPGPU is its potential extension in radiative solvers (e.g., Monte Carlo, discrete ordinates) at a minimal learning curve.

  8. Linear Energy Transfer (LET) spectra of cosmic radiation in low Earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parnell, T. A.; Watts, J. W., Jr.; Akopova, A. B.; Magradze, N. V.; Dudkin, V. E.; Kovalev, E. E.; Potapov, Yu. V.; Benton, E. V.; Frank, A. L.; Benton, E. R.

    1995-01-01

    Integral linear energy transfer (LET) spectra of cosmic radiation (CR) particles were measured on five Cosmos series spacecraft in low Earth orbit (LEO). Particular emphasis is placed on results of the Cosmos 1887 biosatellite which carried a set of joint U.S.S.R.-U.S.A. radiation experiments involving passive detectors that included thermoluminescent detectors (TLD's), plastic nuclear track detectors (PNTD's), fission foils, nuclear photo-emulsions, etc. which were located both inside and outside the spacecraft. Measured LET spectra are compared with those theoretically calculated. Results show that there is some dependence of LET spectra on orbital parameters. The results are used to estimate the CR quality factor (QF) for the COSMOS 1887 mission.

  9. Inverse atmospheric radiative transfer problems - A nonlinear minimization search method of solution. [aerosol pollution monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fymat, A. L.

    1976-01-01

    The paper studies the inversion of the radiative transfer equation describing the interaction of electromagnetic radiation with atmospheric aerosols. The interaction can be considered as the propagation in the aerosol medium of two light beams: the direct beam in the line-of-sight attenuated by absorption and scattering, and the diffuse beam arising from scattering into the viewing direction, which propagates more or less in random fashion. The latter beam has single scattering and multiple scattering contributions. In the former case and for single scattering, the problem is reducible to first-kind Fredholm equations, while for multiple scattering it is necessary to invert partial integrodifferential equations. A nonlinear minimization search method, applicable to the solution of both types of problems has been developed, and is applied here to the problem of monitoring aerosol pollution, namely the complex refractive index and size distribution of aerosol particles.

  10. A new hybrid transfinite element computational methodology for applicability to conduction/convection/radiation heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tamma, Kumar K.; Railkar, Sudhir B.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes new and recent advances in the development of a hybrid transfinite element computational methodology for applicability to conduction/convection/radiation heat transfer problems. The transfinite element methodology, while retaining the modeling versatility of contemporary finite element formulations, is based on application of transform techniques in conjunction with classical Galerkin schemes and is a hybrid approach. The purpose of this paper is to provide a viable hybrid computational methodology for applicability to general transient thermal analysis. Highlights and features of the methodology are described and developed via generalized formulations and applications to several test problems. The proposed transfinite element methodology successfully provides a viable computational approach and numerical test problems validate the proposed developments for conduction/convection/radiation thermal analysis.

  11. Overcoming limits to near-field radiative heat transfer in uniform planar media through multilayer optimization.

    PubMed

    Jin, Weiliang; Messina, Riccardo; Rodriguez, Alejandro W

    2017-06-26

    Radiative heat transfer between uniform plates is bounded by the narrow range and limited contribution of surface waves. Using a combination of analytical calculations and numerical gradient-based optimization, we show that such a limitation can be overcome in complicated multilayer geometries, allowing the scattering and coupling rates of slab resonances to be altered over a broad range of evanescent wavevectors. We conclude that while the radiative flux between two inhomogeneous slabs can only be weakly enhanced, the flux between a dipolar particle and an inhomogeneous slab-proportional to the local density of states-can be orders of magnitude larger, albeit at the expense of increased frequency selectivity. A brief discussion of hyperbolic metamaterials shows that they provide far less enhancement than optimized inhomogeneous slabs.

  12. Study of multi-dimensional radiative energy transfer in molecular gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Jiwen; Tiwari, S. N.

    1993-01-01

    The Monte Carlo method (MCM) is applied to analyze radiative heat transfer in nongray gases. The nongray model employed is based on the statistical arrow band model with an exponential-tailed inverse intensity distribution. Consideration of spectral correlation results in some distinguishing features of the Monte Carlo formulations. Validation of the Monte Carlo formulations has been conducted by comparing results of this method with other solutions. Extension of a one-dimensional problem to a multi-dimensional problem requires some special treatments in the Monte Carlo analysis. Use of different assumptions results in different sets of Monte Carlo formulations. The nongray narrow band formulations provide the most accurate results.

  13. Radiative transfer in dusty nebulae. III - The effects of dust albedo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrosian, V.; Dana, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of an albedo of internal dust, such as ionization structure and temperature of dust grain, were studied by the quasi-diffusion method with an iterative technique for solving the radiative heat transfer equations. It was found that the generalized on-the-spot approximation solution is adequate for most astrophysical applications for a zero albedo; for a nonzero albedo, the Eddington approximation is more accurate. The albedo increases the average energy of the diffuse photons, increasing the ionization level of hydrogen and heavy elements if the Eddington approximation is applied; the dust thermal gradient is reduced so that the infrared spectrum approaches blackbody spectrum with an increasing albedo.

  14. Single scattering solution for radiative transfer through Rayleigh and aerosol atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otterman, J.

    1977-01-01

    A solution is presented to the radiative transfer of the solar irradiation through a turbid atmosphere, based on the single-scattering approximation, i.e., an assumption that a photon that underwent scattering either leaves the top of the atmosphere or strikes the surface. The solution depends on a special idealization of the scattering phase function of the aerosols. The equations developed are subsequently applied to analyze quantitatively the enhancement of the surface irradiation and the enhancement of the scattered radiant emittance as seen from above the atmosphere, caused by the surface reflectance and atmospheric back scattering. An order of magnitude error analysis is presented.

  15. Clues to Coral Reef Health: Integrating Radiative Transfer Modeling and Hyperspectral Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guild, Liane; Ganapol, Barry; Kramer, Philip; Armstrong, Roy; Gleason, Art; Torres, Juan; Johnson, Lee; Garfield, Toby; Peterson, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    An important contribution to coral reef research is to improve spectral distinction between various health states of coral species in areas subject to harmful anthropogenic activity and climate change. New insights into radiative transfer properties of corals under healthy and stressed conditions can advance understandings of ecological processes on reefs and allow better assessments of the impacts of large-scale bleaching and disease events, Our objective was to examine the spectral and spatial properties of hyperspectral sensors that may be used to remotely sense changes in reef community health. We compare in situ reef environment spectra (healthy coral, stressed coral, dead coral, algae, and sand) with airborne hyperspectral data to identify important spectral characteristics and indices. Additionally, spectral measurements over a range of water depths, relief, and bottom types are compared to help quantify bottom-water column influences. In situ spectra were collected in July and August 2002 at the Long Rock site in the Andros Island, Bahamas coastal zone coral reef. Our primary emphasis was on Acropora palmata (or elkhorn coral), a major reef building coral, which is prevalent in the study area, but is suffering from white band disease. A. palmata is currently being, proposed as an endangered species because its populations have severely declined in many areas of the Caribbean. In addition to the A. palmata biotope, we have collected spectra of at least seven other coral biotopes that exist within the study area, each with different coral community composition, density of corals, relief, and size of corals. Coral spectral reflectance was then input into a radiative transfer model, CORALMOD (CM1), which is based on a leaf radiative transfer model. In CM1, input coral reflectance measurements produce modeled reflectance through an inversion at each visible wavelength to provide the absorption spectrum. Initially, we imposed a scattering baseline that is the

  16. A radiative transfer model for microwave emissions from bare agricultural soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, W. J.; Paris, J. F.

    1975-01-01

    A radiative transfer model for microwave emissions from bare, stratified agricultural soils was developed to assist in the analysis of data gathered in the joint soil moisture experiment. The predictions of the model were compared with preliminary X band (2.8 cm) microwave and ground based observations. Measured brightness temperatures at vertical and horizontal polarizations can be used to estimate the moisture content of the top centimeter of soil with + or - 1 percent accuracy. It is also shown that the Stokes parameters can be used to distinguish between moisture and surface roughness effects.

  17. Theorems on symmetries and flux conservation in radiative transfer using the matrix operator theory.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kattawar, G. W.

    1973-01-01

    The matrix operator approach to radiative transfer is shown to be a very powerful technique in establishing symmetry relations for multiple scattering in inhomogeneous atmospheres. Symmetries are derived for the reflection and transmission operators using only the symmetry of the phase function. These results will mean large savings in computer time and storage for performing calculations for realistic planetary atmospheres using this method. The results have also been extended to establish a condition on the reflection matrix of a boundary in order to preserve reciprocity. Finally energy conservation is rigorously proven for conservative scattering in inhomogeneous atmospheres.

  18. 2D/3D Dust Continuum Radiative Transfer Codes to Analyze and Predict VLTI Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascucci, I.; Henning, Th.; Steinacker, J.; Wolf, S.

    Radiative Transfer (RT) codes with image capability are a fundamental tool for preparing interferometric observations and for interpreting visibility data. In view of the upcoming VLTI facilities, we present the first comparison of images/visibilities coming from two 3D codes that use completely different techniques to solve the problem of self-consistent continuum RT. In addition, we focus on the astrophysical case of a disk distorted by tidal interaction with by-passing stars or internal planets and investigate for which parameters the distortion can be best detected in the mid-infrared using the mid-infrared interferometric device MIDI.

  19. Active and Passive 3D Vector Radiative Transfer with Preferentially-Aligned Ice Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Ian S.; Munchak, Stephen J.; Pelissier, Craig S.; Kuo, Kwo-Sen; Heymsfield, Gerald M.

    2017-01-01

    For the purposes of interpreting active (radar) and passive (radiometer) microwave and millimeter wave remote sensing data, we have constructed a consistent radiative transfer modeling framework to simulate the responses for arbitrary sensors with differing sensing geometries and hardware configurations. As part of this work, we have implemented a recent method for calculating the electromagnetic properties of individual ice crystals and snow flakes. These calculations will allow us to exploit polarized remote sensing observations to discriminate different particles types and elucidate dynamics of cloud and precipitating systems.

  20. A study of the 3D radiative transfer effect in cloudy atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okata, M.; Teruyuki, N.; Suzuki, K.

    2015-12-01

    Evaluation of the effect of clouds in the atmosphere is a significant problem in the Earth's radiation budget study with their large uncertainties of microphysics and the optical properties. In this situation, we still need more investigations of 3D cloud radiative transer problems using not only models but also satellite observational data.For this purpose, we have developed a 3D-Monte-Carlo radiative transfer code that is implemented with various functions compatible with the OpenCLASTR R-Star radiation code for radiance and flux computation, i.e. forward and backward tracing routines, non-linear k-distribution parameterization (Sekiguchi and Nakajima, 2008) for broad band solar flux calculation, and DM-method for flux and TMS-method for upward radiance (Nakajima and Tnaka 1998). We also developed a Minimum cloud Information Deviation Profiling Method (MIDPM) as a method for a construction of 3D cloud field with MODIS/AQUA and CPR/CloudSat data. We then selected a best-matched radar reflectivity factor profile from the library for each of off-nadir pixels of MODIS where CPR profile is not available, by minimizing the deviation between library MODIS parameters and those at the pixel. In this study, we have used three cloud microphysical parameters as key parameters for the MIDPM, i.e. effective particle radius, cloud optical thickness and top of cloud temperature, and estimated 3D cloud radiation budget. We examined the discrepancies between satellite observed and mode-simulated radiances and three cloud microphysical parameter's pattern for studying the effects of cloud optical and microphysical properties on the radiation budget of the cloud-laden atmospheres.

  1. Bayesian Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (BART): Model, Statistics Driver, and Application to HD 209458b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubillos, Patricio; Harrington, Joseph; Blecic, Jasmina; Stemm, Madison M.; Lust, Nate B.; Foster, Andrew S.; Rojo, Patricio M.; Loredo, Thomas J.

    2014-11-01

    Multi-wavelength secondary-eclipse and transit depths probe the thermo-chemical properties of exoplanets. In recent years, several research groups have developed retrieval codes to analyze the existing data and study the prospects of future facilities. However, the scientific community has limited access to these packages. Here we premiere the open-source Bayesian Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (BART) code. We discuss the key aspects of the radiative-transfer algorithm and the statistical package. The radiation code includes line databases for all HITRAN molecules, high-temperature H2O, TiO, and VO, and includes a preprocessor for adding additional line databases without recompiling the radiation code. Collision-induced absorption lines are available for H2-H2 and H2-He. The parameterized thermal and molecular abundance profiles can be modified arbitrarily without recompilation. The generated spectra are integrated over arbitrary bandpasses for comparison to data. BART's statistical package, Multi-core Markov-chain Monte Carlo (MC3), is a general-purpose MCMC module. MC3 implements the Differental-evolution Markov-chain Monte Carlo algorithm (ter Braak 2006, 2009). MC3 converges 20-400 times faster than the usual Metropolis-Hastings MCMC algorithm, and in addition uses the Message Passing Interface (MPI) to parallelize the MCMC chains. We apply the BART retrieval code to the HD 209458b data set to estimate the planet's temperature profile and molecular abundances. This work was supported by NASA Planetary Atmospheres grant NNX12AI69G and NASA Astrophysics Data Analysis Program grant NNX13AF38G. JB holds a NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship.

  2. A radiative transfer model for remote sensing of laser induced fluorescence of phytoplankton in non-homogeneous turbid water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venable, D. D.

    1980-01-01

    A radiative transfer computer model was developed to characterize the total flux of chlorophyll a fluoresced or backscattered photons when laser radiation is incident on turbid water that contains a non-homogeneous suspension of inorganic sediments and phytoplankton. The radiative transfer model is based on the Monte Carlo technique and assumes that: (1) the aquatic medium can be represented by a stratified concentration profile; and (2) that appropriate optical parameters can be defined for each layer. The model was designed to minimize the required computer resources and run time. Results are presented for an anacystis marinus culture.

  3. Multi-Group Reductions of LTE Air Plasma Radiative Transfer in Cylindrical Geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scoggins, James; Magin, Thierry Edouard Bertran; Wray, Alan; Mansour, Nagi N.

    2013-01-01

    Air plasma radiation in Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE) within cylindrical geometries is studied with an application towards modeling the radiative transfer inside arc-constrictors, a central component of constricted-arc arc jets. A detailed database of spectral absorption coefficients for LTE air is formulated using the NEQAIR code developed at NASA Ames Research Center. The database stores calculated absorption coefficients for 1,051,755 wavelengths between 0.04 µm and 200 µm over a wide temperature (500K to 15 000K) and pressure (0.1 atm to 10.0 atm) range. The multi-group method for spectral reduction is studied by generating a range of reductions including pure binning and banding reductions from the detailed absorption coefficient database. The accuracy of each reduction is compared to line-by-line calculations for cylindrical temperature profiles resembling typical profiles found in arc-constrictors. It is found that a reduction of only 1000 groups is sufficient to accurately model the LTE air radiation over a large temperature and pressure range. In addition to the reduction comparison, the cylindrical-slab formulation is compared with the finite-volume method for the numerical integration of the radiative flux inside cylinders with varying length. It is determined that cylindrical-slabs can be used to accurately model most arc-constrictors due to their high length to radius ratios.

  4. Quasi-analytical treatment of spatially averaged radiation transfer in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LöWe, H.; Helbig, N.

    2012-10-01

    We provide a new quasi-analytical method to compute the subgrid topographic influences on the shortwave radiation fluxes and the effective albedo in complex terrain as required for large-scale meteorological, land surface, or climate models. We investigate radiative transfer in complex terrain via the radiosity equation on isotropic Gaussian random fields. Under controlled approximations we derive expressions for domain-averaged fluxes of direct, diffuse, and terrain radiation and the sky view factor. Domain-averaged quantities can be related to a type of level-crossing probability of the random field, which is approximated by long-standing results developed for acoustic scattering at ocean boundaries. This allows us to express all nonlocal horizon effects in terms of a local terrain parameter, namely, the mean-square slope. Emerging integrals are computed numerically, and fit formulas are given for practical purposes. As an implication of our approach, we provide an expression for the effective albedo of complex terrain in terms of the Sun elevation angle, mean-square slope, the area-averaged surface albedo, and the ratio of atmospheric direct beam to diffuse radiation. For demonstration we compute the decrease of the effective albedo relative to the area-averaged albedo in Switzerland for idealized snow-covered and clear-sky conditions at noon in winter. We find an average decrease of 5.8% and spatial patterns which originate from characteristics of the underlying relief. Limitations and possible generalizations of the method are discussed.

  5. Evaluation of FSK models for radiative heat transfer under oxyfuel conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clements, Alastair G.; Porter, Rachael; Pranzitelli, Alessandro; Pourkashanian, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Oxyfuel is a promising technology for carbon capture and storage (CCS) applied to combustion processes. It would be highly advantageous in the deployment of CCS to be able to model and optimise oxyfuel combustion, however the increased concentrations of CO2 and H2O under oxyfuel conditions modify several fundamental processes of combustion, including radiative heat transfer. This study uses benchmark narrow band radiation models to evaluate the influence of assumptions in global full-spectrum k-distribution (FSK) models, and whether they are suitable for modelling radiation in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations of oxyfuel combustion. The statistical narrow band (SNB) and correlated-k (CK) models are used to calculate benchmark data for the radiative source term and heat flux, which are then compared to the results calculated from FSK models. Both the full-spectrum correlated k (FSCK) and the full-spectrum scaled k (FSSK) models are applied using up-to-date spectral data. The results show that the FSCK and FSSK methods achieve good agreement in the test cases. The FSCK method using a five-point Gauss quadrature scheme is recommended for CFD calculations in oxyfuel conditions, however there are still potential inaccuracies in cases with very wide variations in the ratio between CO2 and H2O concentrations.

  6. Contributions of the ARM Program to Radiative Transfer Modeling for Climate and Weather Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mlawer, Eli J.; Iacono, Michael J.; Pincus, Robert; Barker, Howard W.; Oreopoulos, Lazaros; Mitchell, David L.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate climate and weather simulations must account for all relevant physical processes and their complex interactions. Each of these atmospheric, ocean, and land processes must be considered on an appropriate spatial and temporal scale, which leads these simulations to require a substantial computational burden. One especially critical physical process is the flow of solar and thermal radiant energy through the atmosphere, which controls planetary heating and cooling and drives the large-scale dynamics that moves energy from the tropics toward the poles. Radiation calculations are therefore essential for climate and weather simulations, but are themselves quite complex even without considering the effects of variable and inhomogeneous clouds. Clear-sky radiative transfer calculations have to account for thousands of absorption lines due to water vapor, carbon dioxide, and other gases, which are irregularly distributed across the spectrum and have shapes dependent on pressure and temperature. The line-by-line (LBL) codes that treat these details have a far greater computational cost than can be afforded by global models. Therefore, the crucial requirement for accurate radiation calculations in climate and weather prediction models must be satisfied by fast solar and thermal radiation parameterizations with a high level of accuracy that has been demonstrated through extensive comparisons with LBL codes. See attachment for continuation.

  7. Balancing accuracy, efficiency, and flexibility in a radiative transfer parameterization for dynamical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pincus, R.; Mlawer, E. J.

    2017-12-01

    Radiation is key process in numerical models of the atmosphere. The problem is well-understood and the parameterization of radiation has seen relatively few conceptual advances in the past 15 years. It is nonthelss often the single most expensive component of all physical parameterizations despite being computed less frequently than other terms. This combination of cost and maturity suggests value in a single radiation parameterization that could be shared across models; devoting effort to a single parameterization might allow for fine tuning for efficiency. The challenge lies in the coupling of this parameterization to many disparate representations of clouds and aerosols. This talk will describe RRTMGP, a new radiation parameterization that seeks to balance efficiency and flexibility. This balance is struck by isolating computational tasks in "kernels" that expose as much fine-grained parallelism as possible. These have simple interfaces and are interoperable across programming languages so that they might be repalced by alternative implementations in domain-specific langauges. Coupling to the host model makes use of object-oriented features of Fortran 2003, minimizing branching within the kernels and the amount of data that must be transferred. We will show accuracy and efficiency results for a globally-representative set of atmospheric profiles using a relatively high-resolution spectral discretization.

  8. X-ray Radiative Transfer in Protoplanetary Disks with ProDiMo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rab, Christian; Woitke, Peter; Güdel, Manuel; Min, Michiel; Diana Team

    2013-07-01

    X-ray emission is a common property of YSOs. T Tauri stars show X-ray luminosities up to 10^32 erg/s but also Herbig Ae/Be stars can have moderate X-ray emission in the range of 10^28 to 10^31 erg/s. We want to investigate the impact of X-ray radiation on the thermal and chemical structure of protoplanetary discs around these YSOs. Therefore we have added a new X-ray Radiative Transfer module to the radiation thermo-chemical code ProDiMo (Protoplanetary Disc Modeling) extending the existing implementation of X-ray chemistry implemented by Aresu et al. This new module considers gas and dust opacities (including scattering) and a possible X-ray background field. Further we added a new set of FUV - photoreactions to the X-ray chemistry module of ProDiMo as fast electrons created in X-ray ionisation can produce a significant secondary FUV radiation field by exciting atomic or molecular hydrogen. We discuss the importance of these processes on the thermal and chemical structure of the protoplanetary disc, and present them on the basis of a typical T Tauri disc model. This work is performed in the context of the EU FP7-project DIANA (www.diana-project.com).

  9. Laser Radiation in Active Amplifying Media Treated as a Transport Problem - Transfer Equation Derived and Exactly Solved

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das Gupta, Santanu; Das Gupta, S. R.

    1991-10-01

    The flow of laser radiation in a plane-parallel cylindrical slab of active amplifying medium with axial symmetry is treated as a problem in radiative transfer. The appropriate one-dimensional transfer equation describing the transfer of laser radiation has been derived by an appeal to Einstein'sA, B coefficients (describing the processes of stimulated line absorption, spontaneous line emission, and stimulated line emission sustained by population inversion in the medium) and considering the ‘rate equations’ to completely establish the rational of the transfer equation obtained. The equation is then exactly solved and the angular distribution of the emergent laser beam intensity is obtained; its numerically computed values are given in tables and plotted in graphs showing the nature of peaks of the emerging laser beam intensity about the axis of the laser cylinder.

  10. Laser radiation in active amplifying media treated as a transport problem - Transfer equation derived and exactly solved

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, S. R. D.; Gupta, Santanu D.

    1991-10-01

    The flow of laser radiation in a plane-parallel cylindrical slab of active amplifying medium with axial symmetry is treated as a problem in radiative transfer. The appropriate one-dimensional transfer equation describing the transfer of laser radiation has been derived by an appeal to Einstein's A, B coefficients (describing the processes of stimulated line absorption, spontaneous line emission, and stimulated line emission sustained by population inversion in the medium) and considering the 'rate equations' to completely establish the rational of the transfer equation obtained. The equation is then exactly solved and the angular distribution of the emergent laser beam intensity is obtained; its numerically computed values are given in tables and plotted in graphs showing the nature of peaks of the emerging laser beam intensity about the axis of the laser cylinder.

  11. Modeling the Atmosphere of Solar and Other Stars: Radiative Transfer with PHOENIX/3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baron, Edward

    The chemical composition of stars is an important ingredient in our understanding of the formation, structure, and evolution of both the Galaxy and the Solar System. The composition of the sun itself is an essential reference standard against which the elemental contents of other astronomical objects are compared. Recently, redetermination of the elemental abundances using three-dimensional, time-dependent hydrodynamical models of the solar atmosphere has led to a reduction in the inferred metal abundances, particularly C, N, O, and Ne. However, this reduction in metals reduces the opacity such that models of the Sun no longer agree with the observed results obtained using helioseismology. Three dimensional (3-D) radiative transfer is an important problem in physics, astrophysics, and meteorology. Radiative transfer is extremely computationally complex and it is a natural problem that requires computation on the exascale. We intend to calculate the detailed compositional structure of the Sun and other stars at high resolution with full NLTE, treating the turbulent velocity flows in full detail in order to compare results from hydrodynamics and helioseismology, and understand the nature of the discrepancies found between the two approaches. We propose to perform 3-D high-resolution radiative transfer calculations with the PHOENIX/3D suite of solar and other stars using 3-D hydrodynamic models from different groups. While NLTE radiative transfer has been treated by the groups doing hydrodynamics, they are necessarily limited in their resolution to the consideration of only a few (4-20) frequency bins, whereas we can calculate full NLTE including thousands of wavelength points, resolving the line profiles, and solving the scattering problem with extremely high angular resolution. The code has been used for the analysis of supernova spectra, stellar and planetary spectra, and for time-dependent modeling of transient objects. PHOENIX/3D runs and scales very well on Cray

  12. A linear stability analysis for nonlinear, grey, thermal radiative transfer problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollaber, Allan B.; Larsen, Edward W.

    2011-02-01

    We present a new linear stability analysis of three time discretizations and Monte Carlo interpretations of the nonlinear, grey thermal radiative transfer (TRT) equations: the widely used “Implicit Monte Carlo” (IMC) equations, the Carter Forest (CF) equations, and the Ahrens-Larsen or “Semi-Analog Monte Carlo” (SMC) equations. Using a spatial Fourier analysis of the 1-D Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) equations that are linearized about an equilibrium solution, we show that the IMC equations are unconditionally stable (undamped perturbations do not exist) if α, the IMC time-discretization parameter, satisfies 0.5 < α ⩽ 1. This is consistent with conventional wisdom. However, we also show that for sufficiently large time steps, unphysical damped oscillations can exist that correspond to the lowest-frequency Fourier modes. After numerically confirming this result, we develop a method to assess the stability of any time discretization of the 0-D, nonlinear, grey, thermal radiative transfer problem. Subsequent analyses of the CF and SMC methods then demonstrate that the CF method is unconditionally stable and monotonic, but the SMC method is conditionally stable and permits unphysical oscillatory solutions that can prevent it from reaching equilibrium. This stability theory provides new conditions on the time step to guarantee monotonicity of the IMC solution, although they are likely too conservative to be used in practice. Theoretical predictions are tested and confirmed with numerical experiments.

  13. Probability theory for 3-layer remote sensing radiative transfer model: univariate case.

    PubMed

    Ben-David, Avishai; Davidson, Charles E

    2012-04-23

    A probability model for a 3-layer radiative transfer model (foreground layer, cloud layer, background layer, and an external source at the end of line of sight) has been developed. The 3-layer model is fundamentally important as the primary physical model in passive infrared remote sensing. The probability model is described by the Johnson family of distributions that are used as a fit for theoretically computed moments of the radiative transfer model. From the Johnson family we use the SU distribution that can address a wide range of skewness and kurtosis values (in addition to addressing the first two moments, mean and variance). In the limit, SU can also describe lognormal and normal distributions. With the probability model one can evaluate the potential for detecting a target (vapor cloud layer), the probability of observing thermal contrast, and evaluate performance (receiver operating characteristics curves) in clutter-noise limited scenarios. This is (to our knowledge) the first probability model for the 3-layer remote sensing geometry that treats all parameters as random variables and includes higher-order statistics. © 2012 Optical Society of America

  14. Radiative transfer and spectroscopic databases: A line-sampling Monte Carlo approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galtier, Mathieu; Blanco, Stéphane; Dauchet, Jérémi; El Hafi, Mouna; Eymet, Vincent; Fournier, Richard; Roger, Maxime; Spiesser, Christophe; Terrée, Guillaume

    2016-03-01

    Dealing with molecular-state transitions for radiative transfer purposes involves two successive steps that both reach the complexity level at which physicists start thinking about statistical approaches: (1) constructing line-shaped absorption spectra as the result of very numerous state-transitions, (2) integrating over optical-path domains. For the first time, we show here how these steps can be addressed simultaneously using the null-collision concept. This opens the door to the design of Monte Carlo codes directly estimating radiative transfer observables from spectroscopic databases. The intermediate step of producing accurate high-resolution absorption spectra is no longer required. A Monte Carlo algorithm is proposed and applied to six one-dimensional test cases. It allows the computation of spectrally integrated intensities (over 25 cm-1 bands or the full IR range) in a few seconds, regardless of the retained database and line model. But free parameters need to be selected and they impact the convergence. A first possible selection is provided in full detail. We observe that this selection is highly satisfactory for quite distinct atmospheric and combustion configurations, but a more systematic exploration is still in progress.

  15. ODYSSEY: A PUBLIC GPU-BASED CODE FOR GENERAL RELATIVISTIC RADIATIVE TRANSFER IN KERR SPACETIME

    SciT

    Pu, Hung-Yi; Yun, Kiyun; Yoon, Suk-Jin

    General relativistic radiative transfer calculations coupled with the calculation of geodesics in the Kerr spacetime are an essential tool for determining the images, spectra, and light curves from matter in the vicinity of black holes. Such studies are especially important for ongoing and upcoming millimeter/submillimeter very long baseline interferometry observations of the supermassive black holes at the centers of Sgr A* and M87. To this end we introduce Odyssey, a graphics processing unit (GPU) based code for ray tracing and radiative transfer in the Kerr spacetime. On a single GPU, the performance of Odyssey can exceed 1 ns per photon, per Runge–Kutta integrationmore » step. Odyssey is publicly available, fast, accurate, and flexible enough to be modified to suit the specific needs of new users. Along with a Graphical User Interface powered by a video-accelerated display architecture, we also present an educational software tool, Odyssey-Edu, for showing in real time how null geodesics around a Kerr black hole vary as a function of black hole spin and angle of incidence onto the black hole.« less

  16. A linear stability analysis for nonlinear, grey, thermal radiative transfer problems

    SciT

    Wollaber, Allan B., E-mail: wollaber@lanl.go; Larsen, Edward W., E-mail: edlarsen@umich.ed

    2011-02-20

    We present a new linear stability analysis of three time discretizations and Monte Carlo interpretations of the nonlinear, grey thermal radiative transfer (TRT) equations: the widely used 'Implicit Monte Carlo' (IMC) equations, the Carter Forest (CF) equations, and the Ahrens-Larsen or 'Semi-Analog Monte Carlo' (SMC) equations. Using a spatial Fourier analysis of the 1-D Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) equations that are linearized about an equilibrium solution, we show that the IMC equations are unconditionally stable (undamped perturbations do not exist) if {alpha}, the IMC time-discretization parameter, satisfies 0.5 < {alpha} {<=} 1. This is consistent with conventional wisdom. However, wemore » also show that for sufficiently large time steps, unphysical damped oscillations can exist that correspond to the lowest-frequency Fourier modes. After numerically confirming this result, we develop a method to assess the stability of any time discretization of the 0-D, nonlinear, grey, thermal radiative transfer problem. Subsequent analyses of the CF and SMC methods then demonstrate that the CF method is unconditionally stable and monotonic, but the SMC method is conditionally stable and permits unphysical oscillatory solutions that can prevent it from reaching equilibrium. This stability theory provides new conditions on the time step to guarantee monotonicity of the IMC solution, although they are likely too conservative to be used in practice. Theoretical predictions are tested and confirmed with numerical experiments.« less

  17. Linearized radiative transfer models for retrieval of cloud parameters from EPIC/DSCOVR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina García, Víctor; Sasi, Sruthy; Efremenko, Dmitry S.; Doicu, Adrian; Loyola, Diego

    2018-07-01

    In this paper, we describe several linearized radiative transfer models which can be used for the retrieval of cloud parameters from EPIC (Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera) measurements. The approaches under examination are (1) the linearized forward approach, represented in this paper by the linearized discrete ordinate and matrix operator methods with matrix exponential, and (2) the forward-adjoint approach based on the discrete ordinate method with matrix exponential. To enhance the performance of the radiative transfer computations, the correlated k-distribution method and the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) technique are used. We provide a compact description of the proposed methods, as well as a numerical analysis of their accuracy and efficiency when simulating EPIC measurements in the oxygen A-band channel at 764 nm. We found that the computation time of the forward-adjoint approach using the correlated k-distribution method in conjunction with PCA is approximately 13 s for simultaneously computing the derivatives with respect to cloud optical thickness and cloud top height.

  18. An Open-Source Bayesian Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (BART) Code, with Application to WASP-12b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrington, Joseph; Blecic, Jasmina; Cubillos, Patricio; Rojo, Patricio; Loredo, Thomas J.; Bowman, M. Oliver; Foster, Andrew S. D.; Stemm, Madison M.; Lust, Nate B.

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric retrievals for solar-system planets typically fit, either with a minimizer or by eye, a synthetic spectrum to high-resolution (Δλ/λ ~ 1000-100,000) data with S/N > 100 per point. In contrast, exoplanet data often have S/N ~ 10 per point, and may have just a few points representing bandpasses larger than 1 um. To derive atmospheric constraints and robust parameter uncertainty estimates from such data requires a Bayesian approach. To date there are few investigators with the relevant codes, none of which are publicly available. We are therefore pleased to announce the open-source Bayesian Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (BART) code. BART uses a Bayesian phase-space explorer to drive a radiative-transfer model through the parameter phase space, producing the most robust estimates available for the thermal profile and chemical abundances in the atmosphere. We present an overview of the code and an initial application to Spitzer eclipse data for WASP-12b. We invite the community to use and improve BART via the open-source development site GitHub.com. This work was supported by NASA Planetary Atmospheres grant NNX12AI69G and NASA Astrophysics Data Analysis Program grant NNX13AF38G. JB holds a NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship.

  19. Exoplanet Atmospheres: From Light-Curve Analyses to Radiative-Transfer Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubillos, Patricio; Harrington, Joseph; Blecic, Jasmina; Rojo, Patricio; Stemm, Madison; Lust, Nathaniel B.; Foster, Andrew S.; Loredo, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Multi-wavelength transit and secondary-eclipse light-curve observations are some of the most powerful techniques to probe the thermo-chemical properties of exoplanets. Although the small planet-to-star constrast ratios demand a meticulous data analysis, and the limited available spectral bands can further restrain constraints, a Bayesian approach can robustly reveal what constraints can we set, given the data.We review the main aspects considered during the analysis of Spitzer time-series data by our group with an aplication to WASP-8b and TrES-1. We discuss the applicability and limitations of the most commonly used correlated-noise estimators. We describe our open-source Bayesian Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (BART) code. BART calculates the planetary emission or transmission spectrum by solving a 1D line-by-line radiative-transfer equation. The generated spectra are integrated over determined bandpasses for comparison to the data. Coupled to our Multi-core Markov-chain Monte Carlo (MC3) statistical package, BART constrains the temperature profile and chemical abundances in the planet's atmosphere. We apply the BART retrieval code to the HD 209458b data set to estimate the planet's temperature profile and molecular abundances.This work was supported by NASA Planetary Atmospheres grant NNX12AI69G and NASA Astrophysics Data Analysis Program grant NNX13AF38G. JB holds a NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship.

  20. An Open-Source Bayesian Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (BART) Code, and Application to WASP-12b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrington, Joseph; Blecic, Jasmina; Cubillos, Patricio; Rojo, Patricio M.; Loredo, Thomas J.; Bowman, Matthew O.; Foster, Andrew S.; Stemm, Madison M.; Lust, Nate B.

    2014-11-01

    Atmospheric retrievals for solar-system planets typically fit, either with a minimizer or by eye, a synthetic spectrum to high-resolution (Δλ/λ ~ 1000-100,000) data with S/N > 100 per point. In contrast, exoplanet data often have S/N ~ 10 per point, and may have just a few points representing bandpasses larger than 1 um. To derive atmospheric constraints and robust parameter uncertainty estimates from such data requires a Bayesian approach. To date there are few investigators with the relevant codes, none of which are publicly available. We are therefore pleased to announce the open-source Bayesian Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (BART) code. BART uses a Bayesian phase-space explorer to drive a radiative-transfer model through the parameter phase space, producing the most robust estimates available for the thermal profile and chemical abundances in the atmosphere. We present an overview of the code and an initial application to Spitzer eclipse data for WASP-12b. We invite the community to use and improve BART via the open-source development site GitHub.com. This work was supported by NASA Planetary Atmospheres grant NNX12AI69G and NASA Astrophysics Data Analysis Program grant NNX13AF38G. JB holds a NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship.

  1. Radiative transfer theory for active remote sensing of a forested canopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karam, M. A.; Fung, A. K.

    1989-01-01

    A canopy is modeled as a two-layer medium above a rough interface. The upper layer stands for the forest crown, with the leaves modeled as randomly oriented and distributed disks and needles and the branches modeled as randomly oriented finite dielectric cylinders. The lower layer contains the tree trunks, modeled as randomly positioned vertical cylinders above the rough soil. Radiative-transfer theory is applied to calculate EM scattering from such a canopy, is expressed in terms of the scattering-amplitude tensors (SATs). For leaves, the generalized Rayleigh-Gans approximation is applied, whereas the branch and trunk SATs are obtained by estimating the inner field by fields inside a similar cylinder of infinite length. The Kirchhoff method is used to calculate the soil SAT. For a plane wave exciting the canopy, the radiative-transfer equations are solved by iteration to the first order in albedo of the leaves and the branches. Numerical results are illustrated as a function of the incidence angle.

  2. The FluxCompensator: Making Radiative Transfer Models of Hydrodynamical Simulations Directly Comparable to Real Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koepferl, Christine M.; Robitaille, Thomas P.

    2017-11-01

    When modeling astronomical objects throughout the universe, it is important to correctly treat the limitations of the data, for instance finite resolution and sensitivity. In order to simulate these effects, and to make radiative transfer models directly comparable to real observations, we have developed an open-source Python package called the FluxCompensator that enables the post-processing of the output of 3D Monte Carlo radiative transfer codes, such as Hyperion. With the FluxCompensator, realistic synthetic observations can be generated by modeling the effects of convolution with arbitrary point-spread functions, transmission curves, finite pixel resolution, noise, and reddening. Pipelines can be applied to compute synthetic observations that simulate observatories, such as the Spitzer Space Telescope or the Herschel Space Observatory. Additionally, this tool can read in existing observations (e.g., FITS format) and use the same settings for the synthetic observations. In this paper, we describe the package as well as present examples of such synthetic observations.

  3. Heat transfer in melt ponds with convection and radiative heating: observationally-inspired modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, A.; Langton, T.; Rees Jones, D. W.; Moon, W.; Kim, J. H.; Wilkinson, J.

    2016-12-01

    Melt ponds have key impacts on the evolution of Arctic sea ice and summer ice melt. Small changes to the energy budget can have significant consequences, with a net heat-flux perturbation of only a few Watts per square metre sufficient to explain the thinning of sea ice over recent decades. Whilst parameterisations of melt-pond thermodynamics often assume that pond temperatures remain close to the freezing point, recent in-situ observations show more complex thermal structure with significant diurnal and synoptic variability. We here consider the energy budget of melt ponds and explore the role of internal convective heat transfer in determining the thermal structure within the pond in relatively calm conditions with low winds. We quantify the energy fluxes and temperature variability using two-dimensional direct numerical simulations of convective turbulence within a melt pond, driven by internal radiative heating and surface fluxes. Our results show that the convective flow dynamics are modulated by changes to the incoming radiative flux and sensible heat flux at the pond surface. The evolving pond surface temperature controls the outgoing longwave emissions from the pond. Hence the convective flow modifies the net energy balance of a melt pond, modulating the relative fractions of the incoming heat flux that is re-emitted to the atmosphere or transferred downward into the sea ice to drive melt.

  4. First and Higher Order Effects on Zero Order Radiative Transfer Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neelam, M.; Mohanty, B.

    2014-12-01

    Microwave radiative transfer model are valuable tool in understanding the complex land surface interactions. Past literature has largely focused on local sensitivity analysis for factor priotization and ignoring the interactions between the variables and uncertainties around them. Since land surface interactions are largely nonlinear, there always exist uncertainties, heterogeneities and interactions thus it is important to quantify them to draw accurate conclusions. In this effort, we used global sensitivity analysis to address the issues of variable uncertainty, higher order interactions, factor priotization and factor fixing for zero-order radiative transfer (ZRT) model. With the to-be-launched Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission of NASA, it is very important to have a complete understanding of ZRT for soil moisture retrieval to direct future research and cal/val field campaigns. This is a first attempt to use GSA technique to quantify first order and higher order effects on brightness temperature from ZRT model. Our analyses reflect conditions observed during the growing agricultural season for corn and soybeans in two different regions in - Iowa, U.S.A and Winnipeg, Canada. We found that for corn fields in Iowa, there exist significant second order interactions between soil moisture, surface roughness parameters (RMS height and correlation length) and vegetation parameters (vegetation water content, structure and scattering albedo), whereas in Winnipeg, second order interactions are mainly due to soil moisture and vegetation parameters. But for soybean fields in both Iowa and Winnipeg, we found significant interactions only to exist between soil moisture and surface roughness parameters.

  5. Specular reflection treatment for the 3D radiative transfer equation solved with the discrete ordinates method

    SciT

    Le Hardy, D.; Favennec, Y., E-mail: yann.favennec@univ-nantes.fr; Rousseau, B.

    The contribution of this paper relies in the development of numerical algorithms for the mathematical treatment of specular reflection on borders when dealing with the numerical solution of radiative transfer problems. The radiative transfer equation being integro-differential, the discrete ordinates method allows to write down a set of semi-discrete equations in which weights are to be calculated. The calculation of these weights is well known to be based on either a quadrature or on angular discretization, making the use of such method straightforward for the state equation. Also, the diffuse contribution of reflection on borders is usually well taken intomore » account. However, the calculation of accurate partition ratio coefficients is much more tricky for the specular condition applied on arbitrary geometrical borders. This paper presents algorithms that calculate analytically partition ratio coefficients needed in numerical treatments. The developed algorithms, combined with a decentered finite element scheme, are validated with the help of comparisons with analytical solutions before being applied on complex geometries.« less

  6. The FluxCompensator: Making Radiative Transfer Models of Hydrodynamical Simulations Directly Comparable to Real Observations

    SciT

    Koepferl, Christine M.; Robitaille, Thomas P., E-mail: koepferl@usm.lmu.de

    When modeling astronomical objects throughout the universe, it is important to correctly treat the limitations of the data, for instance finite resolution and sensitivity. In order to simulate these effects, and to make radiative transfer models directly comparable to real observations, we have developed an open-source Python package called the FluxCompensator that enables the post-processing of the output of 3D Monte Carlo radiative transfer codes, such as Hyperion. With the FluxCompensator, realistic synthetic observations can be generated by modeling the effects of convolution with arbitrary point-spread functions, transmission curves, finite pixel resolution, noise, and reddening. Pipelines can be applied tomore » compute synthetic observations that simulate observatories, such as the Spitzer Space Telescope or the Herschel Space Observatory . Additionally, this tool can read in existing observations (e.g., FITS format) and use the same settings for the synthetic observations. In this paper, we describe the package as well as present examples of such synthetic observations.« less

  7. Radiative transfer model for aerosols at infrared wavelengths for passive remote sensing applications: revisited.

    PubMed

    Ben-David, Avishai; Davidson, Charles E; Embury, Janon F

    2008-11-01

    We introduced a two-dimensional radiative transfer model for aerosols in the thermal infrared [Appl. Opt.45, 6860-6875 (2006)APOPAI0003-693510.1364/AO.45.006860]. In that paper we superimposed two orthogonal plane-parallel layers to compute the radiance due to a two-dimensional (2D) rectangular aerosol cloud. In this paper we revisit the model and correct an error in the interaction of the two layers. We derive new expressions relating to the signal content of the radiance from an aerosol cloud based on the concept of five directional thermal contrasts: four for the 2D diffuse radiance and one for direct radiance along the line of sight. The new expressions give additional insight on the radiative transfer processes within the cloud. Simulations for Bacillus subtilis var. niger (BG) bioaerosol and dustlike kaolin aerosol clouds are compared and contrasted for two geometries: an airborne sensor looking down and a ground-based sensor looking up. Simulation results suggest that aerosol cloud detection from an airborne platform may be more challenging than for a ground-based sensor and that the detection of an aerosol cloud in emission mode (negative direct thermal contrast) is not the same as the detection of an aerosol cloud in absorption mode (positive direct thermal contrast).

  8. BARTTest: Community-Standard Atmospheric Radiative-Transfer and Retrieval Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrington, Joseph; Himes, Michael D.; Cubillos, Patricio E.; Blecic, Jasmina; Challener, Ryan C.

    2018-01-01

    Atmospheric radiative transfer (RT) codes are used both to predict planetary and brown-dwarf spectra and in retrieval algorithms to infer atmospheric chemistry, clouds, and thermal structure from observations. Observational plans, theoretical models, and scientific results depend on the correctness of these calculations. Yet, the calculations are complex and the codes implementing them are often written without modern software-verification techniques. The community needs a suite of test calculations with analytically, numerically, or at least community-verified results. We therefore present the Bayesian Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Test Suite, or BARTTest. BARTTest has four categories of tests: analytically verified RT tests of simple atmospheres (single line in single layer, line blends, saturation, isothermal, multiple line-list combination, etc.), community-verified RT tests of complex atmospheres, synthetic retrieval tests on simulated data with known answers, and community-verified real-data retrieval tests.BARTTest is open-source software intended for community use and further development. It is available at https://github.com/ExOSPORTS/BARTTest. We propose this test suite as a standard for verifying atmospheric RT and retrieval codes, analogous to the Held-Suarez test for general circulation models. This work was supported by NASA Planetary Atmospheres grant NX12AI69G, NASA Astrophysics Data Analysis Program grant NNX13AF38G, and NASA Exoplanets Research Program grant NNX17AB62G.

  9. Radiated chemical reaction impacts on natural convective MHD mass transfer flow induced by a vertical cone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sambath, P.; Pullepu, Bapuji; Hussain, T.; Ali Shehzad, Sabir

    2018-03-01

    The consequence of thermal radiation in laminar natural convective hydromagnetic flow of viscous incompressible fluid past a vertical cone with mass transfer under the influence of chemical reaction with heat source/sink is presented here. The surface of the cone is focused to a variable wall temperature (VWT) and wall concentration (VWC). The fluid considered here is a gray absorbing and emitting, but non-scattering medium. The boundary layer dimensionless equations governing the flow are solved by an implicit finite-difference scheme of Crank-Nicolson which has speedy convergence and stable. This method converts the dimensionless equations into a system of tri-diagonal equations and which are then solved by using well known Thomas algorithm. Numerical solutions are obtained for momentum, temperature, concentration, local and average shear stress, heat and mass transfer rates for various values of parameters Pr, Sc, λ, Δ, Rd are established with graphical representations. We observed that the liquid velocity decreased for higher values of Prandtl and Schmidt numbers. The temperature is boost up for decreasing values of Schimdt and Prandtl numbers. The enhancement in radiative parameter gives more heat to liquid due to which temperature is enhanced significantly.

  10. An Algorithm to Compress Line-transition Data for Radiative-transfer Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubillos, Patricio E.

    2017-11-01

    Molecular line-transition lists are an essential ingredient for radiative-transfer calculations. With recent databases now surpassing the billion-line mark, handling them has become computationally prohibitive, due to both the required processing power and memory. Here I present a temperature-dependent algorithm to separate strong from weak line transitions, reformatting the large majority of the weaker lines into a cross-section data file, and retaining the detailed line-by-line information of the fewer strong lines. For any given molecule over the 0.3-30 μm range, this algorithm reduces the number of lines to a few million, enabling faster radiative-transfer computations without a significant loss of information. The final compression rate depends on how densely populated the spectrum is. I validate this algorithm by comparing Exomol’s HCN extinction-coefficient spectra between the complete (65 million line transitions) and compressed (7.7 million) line lists. Over the 0.6-33 μm range, the average difference between extinction-coefficient values is less than 1%. A Python/C implementation of this algorithm is open-source and available at https://github.com/pcubillos/repack. So far, this code handles the Exomol and HITRAN line-transition format.

  11. Studies of radiative transfer in the earth's atmosphere with emphasis on the influence of the radiation budget in the joint institute for advancement of flight sciences at the NASA-Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Earth and solar radiation budget measurements were examined. Sensor calibration and measurement accuracy were emphasized. Past works on the earth's radiation field that must be used in reducing observations of the radiation field were reviewed. Using a finite difference radiative transfer algorithm, models of the angular and spectral dependence of the earth's radiation field were developed.

  12. The COBAIN (COntact Binary Atmospheres with INterpolation) Code for Radiative Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochoska, Angela; Prša, Andrej; Horvat, Martin

    2018-01-01

    Standard binary star modeling codes make use of pre-existing solutions of the radiative transfer equation in stellar atmospheres. The various model atmospheres available today are consistently computed for single stars, under different assumptions - plane-parallel or spherical atmosphere approximation, local thermodynamical equilibrium (LTE) or non-LTE (NLTE), etc. However, they are nonetheless being applied to contact binary atmospheres by populating the surface corresponding to each component separately and neglecting any mixing that would typically occur at the contact boundary. In addition, single stellar atmosphere models do not take into account irradiance from a companion star, which can pose a serious problem when modeling close binaries. 1D atmosphere models are also solved under the assumption of an atmosphere in hydrodynamical equilibrium, which is not necessarily the case for contact atmospheres, as the potentially different densities and temperatures can give rise to flows that play a key role in the heat and radiation transfer.To resolve the issue of erroneous modeling of contact binary atmospheres using single star atmosphere tables, we have developed a generalized radiative transfer code for computation of the normal emergent intensity of a stellar surface, given its geometry and internal structure. The code uses a regular mesh of equipotential surfaces in a discrete set of spherical coordinates, which are then used to interpolate the values of the structural quantites (density, temperature, opacity) in any given point inside the mesh. The radiaitive transfer equation is numerically integrated in a set of directions spanning the unit sphere around each point and iterated until the intensity values for all directions and all mesh points converge within a given tolerance. We have found that this approach, albeit computationally expensive, is the only one that can reproduce the intensity distribution of the non-symmetric contact binary atmosphere and

  13. Comptonization in Ultra-Strong Magnetic Fields: Numerical Solution to the Radiative Transfer Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ceccobello, C.; Farinelli, R.; Titarchuk, L.

    2014-01-01

    We consider the radiative transfer problem in a plane-parallel slab of thermal electrons in the presence of an ultra-strong magnetic field (B approximately greater than B(sub c) approx. = 4.4 x 10(exp 13) G). Under these conditions, the magnetic field behaves like a birefringent medium for the propagating photons, and the electromagnetic radiation is split into two polarization modes, ordinary and extraordinary, that have different cross-sections. When the optical depth of the slab is large, the ordinary-mode photons are strongly Comptonized and the photon field is dominated by an isotropic component. Aims. The radiative transfer problem in strong magnetic fields presents many mathematical issues and analytical or numerical solutions can be obtained only under some given approximations. We investigate this problem both from the analytical and numerical point of view, provide a test of the previous analytical estimates, and extend these results with numerical techniques. Methods. We consider here the case of low temperature black-body photons propagating in a sub-relativistic temperature plasma, which allows us to deal with a semi-Fokker-Planck approximation of the radiative transfer equation. The problem can then be treated with the variable separation method, and we use a numerical technique to find solutions to the eigenvalue problem in the case of a singular kernel of the space operator. The singularity of the space kernel is the result of the strong angular dependence of the electron cross-section in the presence of a strong magnetic field. Results. We provide the numerical solution obtained for eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the space operator, and the emerging Comptonization spectrum of the ordinary-mode photons for any eigenvalue of the space equation and for energies significantly lesser than the cyclotron energy, which is on the order of MeV for the intensity of the magnetic field here considered. Conclusions. We derived the specific intensity of the

  14. Influence of Orientation and Radiative Heat Transfer on Aluminum Foams in Buoyancy-Induced Convection

    PubMed Central

    Billiet, Marijn; De Schampheleire, Sven; Huisseune, Henk; De Paepe, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Two differently-produced open-cell aluminum foams were compared to a commercially available finned heat sink. Further, an aluminum plate and block were tested as a reference. All heat sinks have the same base plate dimensions of four by six inches. The first foam was made by investment casting of a polyurethane preform and has a porosity of 0.946 and a pore density of 10 pores per linear inch. The second foam is manufactured by casting over a solvable core and has a porosity of 0.85 and a pore density of 2.5 pores per linear inch. The effects of orientation and radiative heat transfer are experimentally investigated. The heat sinks are tested in a vertical and horizontal orientation. The effect of radiative heat transfer is investigated by comparing a painted/anodized heat sink with an untreated one. The heat flux through the heat sink for a certain temperature difference between the environment and the heat sink’s base plate is used as the performance indicator. For temperature differences larger than 30 ∘C, the finned heat sink outperforms the in-house-made aluminum foam heat sink on average by 17%. Furthermore, the in-house-made aluminum foam dissipates on average 12% less heat than the other aluminum foam for a temperature difference larger than 40 ∘C. By painting/anodizing the heat sinks, the heat transfer rate increased on average by 10% to 50%. Finally, the thermal performance of the horizontal in-house-made aluminum foam heat sink is up to 18% larger than the one of the vertical aluminum foam heat sink. PMID:28793601

  15. Influence of Orientation and Radiative Heat Transfer on Aluminum Foams in Buoyancy-Induced Convection.

    PubMed

    Billiet, Marijn; De Schampheleire, Sven; Huisseune, Henk; De Paepe, Michel

    2015-10-09

    Two differently-produced open-cell aluminum foams were compared to a commercially available finned heat sink. Further, an aluminum plate and block were tested as a reference. All heat sinks have the same base plate dimensions of four by six inches. The first foam was made by investment casting of a polyurethane preform and has a porosity of 0.946 and a pore density of 10 pores per linear inch. The second foam is manufactured by casting over a solvable core and has a porosity of 0.85 and a pore density of 2.5 pores per linear inch. The effects of orientation and radiative heat transfer are experimentally investigated. The heat sinks are tested in a vertical and horizontal orientation. The effect of radiative heat transfer is investigated by comparing a painted/anodized heat sink with an untreated one. The heat flux through the heat sink for a certain temperature difference between the environment and the heat sink's base plate is used as the performance indicator. For temperature differences larger than 30 °C, the finned heat sink outperforms the in-house-made aluminum foam heat sink on average by 17%. Furthermore, the in-house-made aluminum foam dissipates on average 12% less heat than the other aluminum foam for a temperature difference larger than 40 °C. By painting/anodizing the heat sinks, the heat transfer rate increased on average by 10% to 50%. Finally, the thermal performance of the horizontal in-house-made aluminum foam heat sink is up to 18% larger than the one of the vertical aluminum foam heat sink.

  16. HT-FRTC: a fast radiative transfer code using kernel regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thelen, Jean-Claude; Havemann, Stephan; Lewis, Warren

    2016-09-01

    The HT-FRTC is a principal component based fast radiative transfer code that can be used across the electromagnetic spectrum from the microwave through to the ultraviolet to calculate transmittance, radiance and flux spectra. The principal components cover the spectrum at a very high spectral resolution, which allows very fast line-by-line, hyperspectral and broadband simulations for satellite-based, airborne and ground-based sensors. The principal components are derived during a code training phase from line-by-line simulations for a diverse set of atmosphere and surface conditions. The derived principal components are sensor independent, i.e. no extra training is required to include additional sensors. During the training phase we also derive the predictors which are required by the fast radiative transfer code to determine the principal component scores from the monochromatic radiances (or fluxes, transmittances). These predictors are calculated for each training profile at a small number of frequencies, which are selected by a k-means cluster algorithm during the training phase. Until recently the predictors were calculated using a linear regression. However, during a recent rewrite of the code the linear regression was replaced by a Gaussian Process (GP) regression which resulted in a significant increase in accuracy when compared to the linear regression. The HT-FRTC has been trained with a large variety of gases, surface properties and scatterers. Rayleigh scattering as well as scattering by frozen/liquid clouds, hydrometeors and aerosols have all been included. The scattering phase function can be fully accounted for by an integrated line-by-line version of the Edwards-Slingo spherical harmonics radiation code or approximately by a modification to the extinction (Chou scaling).

  17. Fast and Accurate Radiative Transfer Calculations Using Principal Component Analysis for (Exo-)Planetary Retrieval Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopparla, P.; Natraj, V.; Shia, R. L.; Spurr, R. J. D.; Crisp, D.; Yung, Y. L.

    2015-12-01

    Radiative transfer (RT) computations form the engine of atmospheric retrieval codes. However, full treatment of RT processes is computationally expensive, prompting usage of two-stream approximations in current exoplanetary atmospheric retrieval codes [Line et al., 2013]. Natraj et al. [2005, 2010] and Spurr and Natraj [2013] demonstrated the ability of a technique using principal component analysis (PCA) to speed up RT computations. In the PCA method for RT performance enhancement, empirical orthogonal functions are developed for binned sets of inherent optical properties that possess some redundancy; costly multiple-scattering RT calculations are only done for those few optical states corresponding to the most important principal components, and correction factors are applied to approximate radiation fields. Kopparla et al. [2015, in preparation] extended the PCA method to a broadband spectral region from the ultraviolet to the shortwave infrared (0.3-3 micron), accounting for major gas absorptions in this region. Here, we apply the PCA method to a some typical (exo-)planetary retrieval problems. Comparisons between the new model, called Universal Principal Component Analysis Radiative Transfer (UPCART) model, two-stream models and line-by-line RT models are performed, for spectral radiances, spectral fluxes and broadband fluxes. Each of these are calculated at the top of the atmosphere for several scenarios with varying aerosol types, extinction and scattering optical depth profiles, and stellar and viewing geometries. We demonstrate that very accurate radiance and flux estimates can be obtained, with better than 1% accuracy in all spectral regions and better than 0.1% in most cases, as compared to a numerically exact line-by-line RT model. The accuracy is enhanced when the results are convolved to typical instrument resolutions. The operational speed and accuracy of UPCART can be further improved by optimizing binning schemes and parallelizing the codes, work

  18. The Poynting-Stokes Tensor And Radiative Transfer In Turbid Media: The Microphysical Paradigm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishchenko, M. I.

    2010-12-01

    This paper solves the long-standing problem of establishing the fundamental physical link between the radiative transfer theory and macroscopic electromagnetics in the case of elastic scattering by a sparse discrete random medium. The radiative transfer equation (RTE) is derived directly from the macroscopic Maxwell equations by computing theoretically the appropriately defined so-called Poynting-Stokes tensor carrying informa-tion on both the direction, magnitude, and polarization characteristics of lo-cal electromagnetic energy flow. Our derivation from first principles shows that to compute the local Poynting vector averaged over a sufficiently long period of time, one can solve the RTE for the direction-dependent specific intensity column vector and then integrate the direction-weighted specific intensity over all directions. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the specific intensity (or specific intensity column vector) can be measured with a well-collimated radiometer (photopolarimeter), which provides the ultimate physical justification for the use of such instruments in radiation-budget and particle-characterization applications. However, the specific intensity cannot be interpreted in phenomenological terms as signifying the amount of elec-tromagnetic energy transported in a given direction per unit area normal to this direction per unit time per unit solid angle. Also, in the case of a densely packed scattering medium the relation of the measurement with a well-collimated radiometer to the time-averaged local Poynting vector re-mains uncertain, and the theoretical modeling of this measurement is likely to require a much more complicated approach than solving an RTE.

  19. New Radiative Transfer Capability in the EPIC Atmospheric Model with Application to Saturn and Uranus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, Timothy Edward; Greathouse, T. K.; Sussman, M. G.; Chanover, N. J.

    2010-10-01

    We have adapted radiative transfer (RT) schemes from the gas-giant seasonal models of Greathouse et al. (EGU 2010) and Sussman et al. (AGU 2009) into the EPIC atmospheric model, and applied them to Saturn and Uranus. These additions give EPIC a hierarchy of RT options to account for solar heating via CH4 absorption from 5 microns to the UV, and radiative cooling due to thermal emission of CH4, C2H2, C2H6, and collision-induced opacity between 0 and 1600 cm-1. We have written an IDL tool to calculate radiative-equilibrium T(p) profiles for model initialization. We have ported the versatile DISORT RT model (Stamnes et al. 1988) from Fortran to C, and are incorporating it into an IDL post-processing tool to allow us to create synthetic spectra from EPIC output that accounts for thermal emission, reflected solar light, and aerosol and Rayleigh scattering. We give an update of applications to simulations of middle-atmosphere temperatures for Saturn and zonal-wind spin-up experiments for Uranus. This research is supported by NASA Planetary Atmospheres grant NNX08AE64G and NSF Planetary Astronomy grant AST-0807989.

  20. Quasi-analytical treatment of spatially averaged radiation transfer in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löwe, H.; Helbig, N.

    2012-04-01

    We provide a new quasi-analytical method to compute the topographic influence on the effective albedo of complex topography as required for meteorological, land-surface or climate models. We investigate radiative transfer in complex terrain via the radiosity equation on isotropic Gaussian random fields. Under controlled approximations we derive expressions for domain averages of direct, diffuse and terrain radiation and the sky view factor. Domain averaged quantities are related to a type of level-crossing probability of the random field which is approximated by longstanding results developed for acoustic scattering at ocean boundaries. This allows us to express all non-local horizon effects in terms of a local terrain parameter, namely the mean squared slope. Emerging integrals are computed numerically and fit formulas are given for practical purposes. As an implication of our approach we provide an expression for the effective albedo of complex terrain in terms of the sun elevation angle, mean squared slope, the area averaged surface albedo, and the direct-to-diffuse ratio of solar radiation. As an application, we compute the effective albedo for the Swiss Alps and discuss possible generalizations of the method.

  1. Surface temperatures in New York City: Geospatial data enables the accurate prediction of radiative heat transfer.

    PubMed

    Ghandehari, Masoud; Emig, Thorsten; Aghamohamadnia, Milad

    2018-02-02

    Despite decades of research seeking to derive the urban energy budget, the dynamics of thermal exchange in the densely constructed environment is not yet well understood. Using New York City as a study site, we present a novel hybrid experimental-computational approach for a better understanding of the radiative heat transfer in complex urban environments. The aim of this work is to contribute to the calculation of the urban energy budget, particularly the stored energy. We will focus our attention on surface thermal radiation. Improved understanding of urban thermodynamics incorporating the interaction of various bodies, particularly in high rise cities, will have implications on energy conservation at the building scale, and for human health and comfort at the urban scale. The platform presented is based on longwave hyperspectral imaging of nearly 100 blocks of Manhattan, in addition to a geospatial radiosity model that describes the collective radiative heat exchange between multiple buildings. Despite assumptions in surface emissivity and thermal conductivity of buildings walls, the close comparison of temperatures derived from measurements and computations is promising. Results imply that the presented geospatial thermodynamic model of urban structures can enable accurate and high resolution analysis of instantaneous urban surface temperatures.

  2. Radiative transfer modeling applied to sea water constituent determination. [Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faller, K. H.

    1979-01-01

    Optical radiation from the sea is influenced by pigments dissolved in the water and contained in discrete organisms suspended in the sea, and by pigmented and unpigmented inorganic and organic particles. The problem of extracting the information concerning these pigments and particulates from the optical properties of the sea is addressed and the properties which determine characteristics of the radiation that a remote sensor will detect and measure are considered. The results of the application of the volume scattering function model to the data collected in the Gulf of Mexico and its environs indicate that the size distribution of the concentrations of particles found in the sea can be predicted from measurements of the volume scattering function. Furthermore, with the volume scattering function model and knowledge of the absorption spectra of dissolved pigments, the radiative transfer model can compute a distribution of particle sizes and indices of refraction and concentration of dissolved pigments that give an upwelling light spectrum that closely matches measurements of that spectrum at sea.

  3. Transfer of Real-time Dynamic Radiation Environment Assimilation Model; Research to Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, K. S. F.; Hwang, J.; Shin, D. K.; Kim, G. J.; Morley, S.; Henderson, M. G.; Friedel, R. H.; Reeves, G. D.

    2015-12-01

    Real-time Dynamic Radiation Environment Assimilation Model (rtDREAM) was developed by LANL for nowcast of energetic electrons' flux at the radiation belt to quantify potential risks from radiation damage at the satellites. Assimilated data are from multiple sources including LANL assets (GEO, GPS). For transfer from research to operation of the rtDREAM code, LANL/KSWC/NOAA makes a Memorandum Of Understanding (MOU) on the collaboration between three parts. By this MOU, KWSC/RRA provides all the support for transitioning the research version of DREAM to operations. KASI is primarily responsible for providing all the interfaces between the current scientific output formats of the code and useful space weather products that can be used and accessed through the web. In the second phase, KASI will be responsible in performing the work needed to transform the Van Allen Probes beacon data into "DREAM ready" inputs. KASI will also provide the "operational" code framework and additional data preparation, model output, display and web page codes back to LANL and SWPC. KASI is already a NASA partnering ground station for the Van Allen Probes' space weather beacon data and can here show use and utility of these data for comparison between rtDREAM and observations by web. NOAA has offered to take on some of the data processing tasks specific to the GOES data.

  4. Spectral collocation method with a flexible angular discretization scheme for radiative transfer in multi-layer graded index medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Linyang; Qi, Hong; Sun, Jianping; Ren, Yatao; Ruan, Liming

    2017-05-01

    The spectral collocation method (SCM) is employed to solve the radiative transfer in multi-layer semitransparent medium with graded index. A new flexible angular discretization scheme is employed to discretize the solid angle domain freely to overcome the limit of the number of discrete radiative direction when adopting traditional SN discrete ordinate scheme. Three radial basis function interpolation approaches, named as multi-quadric (MQ), inverse multi-quadric (IMQ) and inverse quadratic (IQ) interpolation, are employed to couple the radiative intensity at the interface between two adjacent layers and numerical experiments show that MQ interpolation has the highest accuracy and best stability. Variable radiative transfer problems in double-layer semitransparent media with different thermophysical properties are investigated and the influence of these thermophysical properties on the radiative transfer procedure in double-layer semitransparent media is also analyzed. All the simulated results show that the present SCM with the new angular discretization scheme can predict the radiative transfer in multi-layer semitransparent medium with graded index efficiently and accurately.

  5. A radiation transfer model for the Milky Way: I. Radiation fields and application to high-energy astrophysics★

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, C. C.; Yang, R.; Tuffs, R. J.; Natale, G.; Rushton, M.; Aharonian, F.

    2017-09-01

    We present a solution for the ultraviolet - submillimetre (submm) interstellar radiation fields (ISRFs) of the Milky Way (MW), derived from modelling COBE, IRAS and Planck maps of the all-sky emission in the near-, mid-, far-infrared and submm. The analysis uses the axisymmetric radiative transfer model that we have previously implemented to model the panchromatic spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of star-forming galaxies in the nearby universe, but with a new methodology allowing for optimization of the radial and vertical geometry of stellar emissivity and dust opacity, as deduced from the highly resolved emission seen from the vantage point of the Sun. As such, this is the first self-consistent model of the broad-band continuum emission from the MW. In this paper, we present model predictions for the spatially integrated SED of the MW as seen from the Sun, showing good agreement with the data, and give a detailed description of the solutions for the distribution of ISRFs, as well as their physical origin, throughout the volume of the galaxy. We explore how the spatial and spectral distributions of our new predictions for the ISRF in the MW affects the amplitude and spectral distributions of the gamma rays produced via inverse Compton scattering for cosmic ray (CR) electrons situated at different positions in the galaxy, as well as the attenuation of the gamma rays due to interactions of the gamma-ray photons with photons of the ISRF. We also compare and contrast our solutions for the ISRF with those incorporated in the galprop package used for modelling the high-energy emission from CR in the MW.

  6. GPU-BASED MONTE CARLO DUST RADIATIVE TRANSFER SCHEME APPLIED TO ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciT

    Heymann, Frank; Siebenmorgen, Ralf, E-mail: fheymann@pa.uky.edu

    2012-05-20

    A three-dimensional parallel Monte Carlo (MC) dust radiative transfer code is presented. To overcome the huge computing-time requirements of MC treatments, the computational power of vectorized hardware is used, utilizing either multi-core computer power or graphics processing units. The approach is a self-consistent way to solve the radiative transfer equation in arbitrary dust configurations. The code calculates the equilibrium temperatures of two populations of large grains and stochastic heated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Anisotropic scattering is treated applying the Heney-Greenstein phase function. The spectral energy distribution (SED) of the object is derived at low spatial resolution by a photon counting proceduremore » and at high spatial resolution by a vectorized ray tracer. The latter allows computation of high signal-to-noise images of the objects at any frequencies and arbitrary viewing angles. We test the robustness of our approach against other radiative transfer codes. The SED and dust temperatures of one- and two-dimensional benchmarks are reproduced at high precision. The parallelization capability of various MC algorithms is analyzed and included in our treatment. We utilize the Lucy algorithm for the optical thin case where the Poisson noise is high, the iteration-free Bjorkman and Wood method to reduce the calculation time, and the Fleck and Canfield diffusion approximation for extreme optical thick cells. The code is applied to model the appearance of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at optical and infrared wavelengths. The AGN torus is clumpy and includes fluffy composite grains of various sizes made up of silicates and carbon. The dependence of the SED on the number of clumps in the torus and the viewing angle is studied. The appearance of the 10 {mu}m silicate features in absorption or emission is discussed. The SED of the radio-loud quasar 3C 249.1 is fit by the AGN model and a cirrus component to account for the far

  7. Comparison of Commonly-Used Microwave Radiative Transfer Models for Snow Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Royer, Alain; Roy, Alexandre; Montpetit, Benoit; Saint-Jean-Rondeau, Olivier; Picard, Ghislain; Brucker, Ludovic; Langlois, Alexandre

    2017-01-01

    This paper reviews four commonly-used microwave radiative transfer models that take different electromagnetic approaches to simulate snow brightness temperature (T(sub B)): the Dense Media Radiative Transfer - Multi-Layer model (DMRT-ML), the Dense Media Radiative Transfer - Quasi-Crystalline Approximation Mie scattering of Sticky spheres (DMRT-QMS), the Helsinki University of Technology n-Layers model (HUT-nlayers) and the Microwave Emission Model of Layered Snowpacks (MEMLS). Using the same extensively measured physical snowpack properties, we compared the simulated T(sub B) at 11, 19 and 37 GHz from these four models. The analysis focuses on the impact of using different types of measured snow microstructure metrics in the simulations. In addition to density, snow microstructure is defined for each snow layer by grain optical diameter (Do) and stickiness for DMRT-ML and DMRT-QMS, mean grain geometrical maximum extent (D(sub max)) for HUT n-layers and the exponential correlation length for MEMLS. These metrics were derived from either in-situ measurements of snow specific surface area (SSA) or macrophotos of grain sizes (D(sub max)), assuming non-sticky spheres for the DMRT models. Simulated T(sub B) sensitivity analysis using the same inputs shows relatively consistent T(sub B) behavior as a function of Do and density variations for the vertical polarization (maximum deviation of 18 K and 27 K, respectively), while some divergences appear in simulated variations for the polarization ratio (PR). Comparisons with ground based radiometric measurements show that the simulations based on snow SSA measurements have to be scaled with a model-specific factor of Do in order to minimize the root mean square error (RMSE) between measured and simulated T(sub B). Results using in-situ grain size measurements (SSA or D(sub max), depending on the model) give a mean T(sub B) RMSE (19 and 37 GHz) of the order of 16-26 K, which is similar for all models when the snow

  8. Radiative heat transfer in strongly forward scattering media of circulating fluidized bed combustors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ates, Cihan; Ozen, Guzide; Selçuk, Nevin; Kulah, Gorkem

    2016-10-01

    Investigation of the effect of particle scattering on radiative incident heat fluxes and source terms is carried out in the dilute zone of the lignite-fired 150 kWt Middle East Technical University Circulating Fluidized Bed Combustor (METU CFBC) test rig. The dilute zone is treated as an axisymmetric cylindrical enclosure containing grey/non-grey, absorbing, emitting gas with absorbing, emitting non/isotropically/anisotropically scattering particles surrounded by grey diffuse walls. A two-dimensional axisymmetric radiation model based on Method of Lines (MOL) solution of Discrete Ordinates Method (DOM) coupled with Grey Gas (GG)/Spectral Line-Based Weighted Sum of Grey Gases Model (SLW) and Mie theory/geometric optics approximation (GOA) is extended for incorporation of anisotropic scattering by using normalized Henyey-Greenstein (HG)/transport approximation for the phase function. Input data for the radiation model is obtained from predictions of a comprehensive model previously developed and benchmarked against measurements on the same CFBC burning low calorific value indigenous lignite with high volatile matter/fixed carbon (VM/FC) ratio in its own ash. Predictive accuracy and computational efficiency of nonscattering, isotropic scattering and forward scattering with transport approximation are tested by comparing their predictions with those of forward scattering with HG. GG and GOA based on reflectivity with angular dependency are found to be accurate and CPU efficient. Comparisons reveal that isotropic assumption leads to under-prediction of both incident heat fluxes and source terms for which discrepancy is much larger. On the other hand, predictions obtained by neglecting scattering were found to be in favorable agreement with those of forward scattering at significantly less CPU time. Transport approximation is as accurate and CPU efficient as HG. These findings indicate that negligence of scattering is a more practical choice in solution of the radiative

  9. Retrieval of cloud microphysical parameters from INSAT-3D: a feasibility study using radiative transfer simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jinya, John; Bipasha, Paul S.

    2016-05-01

    Clouds strongly modulate the Earths energy balance and its atmosphere through their interaction with the solar and terrestrial radiation. They interact with radiation in various ways like scattering, emission and absorption. By observing these changes in radiation at different wavelength, cloud properties can be estimated. Cloud properties are of utmost importance in studying different weather and climate phenomena. At present, no satellite provides cloud microphysical parameters over the Indian region with high temporal resolution. INSAT-3D imager observations in 6 spectral channels from geostationary platform offer opportunity to study continuous cloud properties over Indian region. Visible (0.65 μm) and shortwave-infrared (1.67 μm) channel radiances can be used to retrieve cloud microphysical parameters such as cloud optical thickness (COT) and cloud effective radius (CER). In this paper, we have carried out a feasibility study with the objective of cloud microphysics retrieval. For this, an inter-comparison of 15 globally available radiative transfer models (RTM) were carried out with the aim of generating a Look-up- Table (LUT). SBDART model was chosen for the simulations. The sensitivity of each spectral channel to different cloud properties was investigated. The inputs to the RT model were configured over our study region (50°S - 50°N and 20°E - 130°E) and a large number of simulations were carried out using random input vectors to generate the LUT. The determination of cloud optical thickness and cloud effective radius from spectral reflectance measurements constitutes the inverse problem and is typically solved by comparing the measured reflectances with entries in LUT and searching for the combination of COT and CER that gives the best fit. The products are available on the website www.mosdac.gov.in

  10. Radiative transfer equation accounting for rotational Raman scattering and its solution by the discrete-ordinates method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozanov, Vladimir V.; Vountas, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Rotational Raman scattering of solar light in Earth's atmosphere leads to the filling-in of Fraunhofer and telluric lines observed in the reflected spectrum. The phenomenological derivation of the inelastic radiative transfer equation including rotational Raman scattering is presented. The different forms of the approximate radiative transfer equation with first-order rotational Raman scattering terms are obtained employing the Cabannes, Rayleigh, and Cabannes-Rayleigh scattering models. The solution of these equations is considered in the framework of the discrete-ordinates method using rigorous and approximate approaches to derive particular integrals. An alternative forward-adjoint technique is suggested as well. A detailed description of the model including the exact spectral matching and a binning scheme that significantly speeds up the calculations is given. The considered solution techniques are implemented in the radiative transfer software package SCIATRAN and a specified benchmark setup is presented to enable readers to compare with own results transparently.

  11. Radiative heat transfer exceeding the blackbody limit between macroscale planar surfaces separated by a nanosize vacuum gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardi, Michael P.; Milovich, Daniel; Francoeur, Mathieu

    2016-09-01

    Using Rytov's fluctuational electrodynamics framework, Polder and Van Hove predicted that radiative heat transfer between planar surfaces separated by a vacuum gap smaller than the thermal wavelength exceeds the blackbody limit due to tunnelling of evanescent modes. This finding has led to the conceptualization of systems capitalizing on evanescent modes such as thermophotovoltaic converters and thermal rectifiers. Their development is, however, limited by the lack of devices enabling radiative transfer between macroscale planar surfaces separated by a nanosize vacuum gap. Here we measure radiative heat transfer for large temperature differences (~120 K) using a custom-fabricated device in which the gap separating two 5 × 5 mm2 intrinsic silicon planar surfaces is modulated from 3,500 to 150 nm. A substantial enhancement over the blackbody limit by a factor of 8.4 is reported for a 150-nm-thick gap. Our device paves the way for the establishment of novel evanescent wave-based systems.

  12. RTE: A UNIX library with on-line documentation and sample programs for microwave radiative transfer calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, J. C.; Schroeder, J. A.

    1993-03-01

    The FORTRAN library that the NOAA Wave Propagation Laboratory (WPL) developed to perform radiative transfer calculations for an upward-looking microwave radiometer is described. Although the theory and algorithms have been used for many years in WPL radiometer research, the Radiative Transfer Equation (RTE) software has combined them into a toolbox that is portable, readable, application independent, and easy to update. RTE has been optimized for the UNIX environment. However, the FORTRAN source code can be compiled on any platform that provides a Standard FORTRAN 77 compiler. RTE allows a user to do cloud modeling, calibrate radiometers, simulate hypothetical radiometer systems, develop retrieval techniques, and compute weighting functions. The radiative transfer model used is valid for channel frequencies below 1000 GHz in clear conditions and for frequencies below 100 GHz when clouds are present.

  13. In Vivo 18-FDG/18-Choline-Mediated Cerenkov Radiation Energy Transfer (CRET) Multiplexed Optical Imaging for Human Prostate Carcinoma Detection and Staging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-12-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0138 TITLE: In Vivo 18-FDG/18-Choline-Mediated Cerenkov Radiation Energy Transfer (CRET) Multiplexed Optical...18Ffluorocholine/ 18F-FDG Cerenkov radiation energy transfer (CRET) coupled with TF- and ErbB2/3- molecularly targeted nearinfrared (NIR) QDs can be used to detect...to examine whether internal illumination via 18F-fluorocholine Cerenkov radiation energy transfer (CRET) coupled with TF- and ErbB2/3- molecularly

  14. The solution of radiative transfer problems in molecular bands without the LTE assumption by accelerated lambda iteration methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kutepov, A. A.; Kunze, D.; Hummer, D. G.; Rybicki, G. B.

    1991-01-01

    An iterative method based on the use of approximate transfer operators, which was designed initially to solve multilevel NLTE line formation problems in stellar atmospheres, is adapted and applied to the solution of the NLTE molecular band radiative transfer in planetary atmospheres. The matrices to be constructed and inverted are much smaller than those used in the traditional Curtis matrix technique, which makes possible the treatment of more realistic problems using relatively small computers. This technique converges much more rapidly than straightforward iteration between the transfer equation and the equations of statistical equilibrium. A test application of this new technique to the solution of NLTE radiative transfer problems for optically thick and thin bands (the 4.3 micron CO2 band in the Venusian atmosphere and the 4.7 and 2.3 micron CO bands in the earth's atmosphere) is described.

  15. Simulations of recoiling black holes: adaptive mesh refinement and radiative transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meliani, Zakaria; Mizuno, Yosuke; Olivares, Hector; Porth, Oliver; Rezzolla, Luciano; Younsi, Ziri

    2017-02-01

    Context. In many astrophysical phenomena, and especially in those that involve the high-energy regimes that always accompany the astronomical phenomenology of black holes and neutron stars, physical conditions that are achieved are extreme in terms of speeds, temperatures, and gravitational fields. In such relativistic regimes, numerical calculations are the only tool to accurately model the dynamics of the flows and the transport of radiation in the accreting matter. Aims: We here continue our effort of modelling the behaviour of matter when it orbits or is accreted onto a generic black hole by developing a new numerical code that employs advanced techniques geared towards solving the equations of general-relativistic hydrodynamics. Methods: More specifically, the new code employs a number of high-resolution shock-capturing Riemann solvers and reconstruction algorithms, exploiting the enhanced accuracy and the reduced computational cost of adaptive mesh-refinement (AMR) techniques. In addition, the code makes use of sophisticated ray-tracing libraries that, coupled with general-relativistic radiation-transfer calculations, allow us to accurately compute the electromagnetic emissions from such accretion flows. Results: We validate the new code by presenting an extensive series of stationary accretion flows either in spherical or axial symmetry that are performed either in two or three spatial dimensions. In addition, we consider the highly nonlinear scenario of a recoiling black hole produced in the merger of a supermassive black-hole binary interacting with the surrounding circumbinary disc. In this way, we can present for the first time ray-traced images of the shocked fluid and the light curve resulting from consistent general-relativistic radiation-transport calculations from this process. Conclusions: The work presented here lays the ground for the development of a generic computational infrastructure employing AMR techniques to accurately and self

  16. Radiation heat transfer calculations for the uranium fuel-containment region of the nuclear light bulb engine.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodgers, R. J.; Latham, T. S.; Krascella, N. L.

    1971-01-01

    Calculation results are reviewed of the radiant heat transfer characteristics in the fuel and buffer gas regions of a nuclear light bulb engine based on the transfer of energy by thermal radiation from gaseous uranium fuel in a neon vortex, through an internally cooled transparent wall, to seeded hydrogen propellant. The results indicate that the fraction of UV energy incident on the transparent walls increases with increasing power level. For the reference engine power level of 4600 megw, it is necessary to employ space radiators to reject the UV radiated energy absorbed by the transparent walls. This UV energy can be blocked by employing nitric oxide and oxygen seed gases in the fuel and buffer gas regions. However, this results in increased UV absorption in the buffer gas which also requires space radiators to reject the heat load.

  17. Numerical analysis of the effects of radiation heat transfer and ionization energy loss on the cavitation Bubble's dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdi, M.; Ebrahimi, R.; Shams, M.

    2011-06-01

    A numerical scheme for simulating the acoustic and hydrodynamic cavitation was developed. Bubble instantaneous radius was obtained using Gilmore equation which considered the compressibility of the liquid. A uniform temperature was assumed for the inside gas during the collapse. Radiation heat transfer inside the bubble and the heat conduction to the bubble was considered. The numerical code was validated with the experimental data and a good correspondence was observed. The dynamics of hydrofoil cavitation bubble were also investigated. It was concluded that the thermal radiation heat transfer rate strongly depended on the cavitation number, initial bubble radius and hydrofoil angle of attack.

  18. Radiative heat transfer enhancement using geometric and spectral control for achieving high-efficiency solar-thermophotovoltaic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohiyama, Asaka; Shimizu, Makoto; Yugami, Hiroo

    2018-04-01

    We numerically investigate radiative heat transfer enhancement using spectral and geometric control of the absorber/emitter. A high extraction of the radiative heat transfer from the emitter as well as minimization of the optical losses from the absorber leads to high extraction and solar thermophotovoltaic (STPV) system efficiency. The important points for high-efficiency STPV design are discussed for the low and high area ratio of the absorber/emitter. The obtained general guideline will support the design of various types of STPV systems.

  19. 3D Hydrodynamic & Radiative Transfer Models of HETG Line Profiles from Colliding Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Christopher

    2016-09-01

    Chandra has invested 2.52 Ms of HETG observations into 4 colliding-wind binary (CWB) systems. WR140 and eta Car are massive-star binaries with long periods that produce X-rays in a 3D, warped shock cone, while delta Ori A and HD150136 are short-period systems that show line profile changes due to embedded-wind-shock emission in the primary wind being partially evacuated by the secondary wind. HETG observations resolve the velocity structure in both types of systems. We propose 3D line-profile radiative-transfer calculations on existing 3D hydrodynamic simulations of these 4 CWBs. This is the first confrontation of these data with this level of modeling, and will provide greater understanding of their stellar, wind, and orbital properties, as well as the underlying CWB shock physics.

  20. MODTRAN6: a major upgrade of the MODTRAN radiative transfer code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berk, Alexander; Conforti, Patrick; Kennett, Rosemary; Perkins, Timothy; Hawes, Frederick; van den Bosch, Jeannette

    2014-06-01

    The MODTRAN6 radiative transfer (RT) code is a major advancement over earlier versions of the MODTRAN atmospheric transmittance and radiance model. This version of the code incorporates modern software ar- chitecture including an application programming interface, enhanced physics features including a line-by-line algorithm, a supplementary physics toolkit, and new documentation. The application programming interface has been developed for ease of integration into user applications. The MODTRAN code has been restructured towards a modular, object-oriented architecture to simplify upgrades as well as facilitate integration with other developers' codes. MODTRAN now includes a line-by-line algorithm for high resolution RT calculations as well as coupling to optical scattering codes for easy implementation of custom aerosols and clouds.

  1. Machine learning based cloud mask algorithm driven by radiative transfer modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, N.; Li, W.; Tanikawa, T.; Hori, M.; Shimada, R.; Stamnes, K. H.

    2017-12-01

    Cloud detection is a critically important first step required to derive many satellite data products. Traditional threshold based cloud mask algorithms require a complicated design process and fine tuning for each sensor, and have difficulty over snow/ice covered areas. With the advance of computational power and machine learning techniques, we have developed a new algorithm based on a neural network classifier driven by extensive radiative transfer modeling. Statistical validation results obtained by using collocated CALIOP and MODIS data show that its performance is consistent over different ecosystems and significantly better than the MODIS Cloud Mask (MOD35 C6) during the winter seasons over mid-latitude snow covered areas. Simulations using a reduced number of satellite channels also show satisfactory results, indicating its flexibility to be configured for different sensors.

  2. Estimates of the Tropospheric Vertical Structure of Neptune Based on Microwave Radiative Transfer Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeBoer, David R.; Steffes, Paul G.

    1996-01-01

    A radiative transfer model incorporating, among other things, the recently measured centimeter wavelength opacity of H2S, the full line catalog of PH3, and absorption due to CO has been developed to study the tropospheric vertical structure of Neptune. To match radio-telescope observations, subsolar amounts of NH3 and supersolar amounts of H2S are found to be needed, as has been previously noted. To match both the measured microwave emission and the measured opacity at 13 cm and 6.3 bars by Voyager 2, an H2S dominant atmosphere (H2S/NH3 approximately equals 40) with enhanced PH3 (15 x solar) or NH3 supersaturation with respect to the putative NH4SH cloud (400 ppbv) seems to be indicated. Due to the possible importance of PH3 opacity, it is suggested that measurements of its opacity could aid in resolving some of the outstanding ambiguities concerning Neptune's tropospheric structure.

  3. A path to practical Solar Pumped Lasers via Radiative Energy Transfer

    DOE PAGES

    Reusswig, Philip D.; Nechayev, Sergey; Scherer, Jennifer M.; ...

    2015-10-05

    The optical conversion of incoherent solar radiation into a bright, coherent laser beam enables the application of nonlinear optics to solar energy conversion and storage. Here, we present an architecture for solar pumped lasers that uses a luminescent solar concentrator to decouple the conventional trade-off between solar absorption efficiency and the mode volume of the optical gain material. We report a 750-μm-thick Nd 3+ -doped YAG planar waveguide sensitized by a luminescent CdSe/CdZnS (core/shell) colloidal nanocrystal, yielding a peak cascade energy transfer of 14%, a broad spectral response in the visible portion of the solar spectrum, and an equivalent quasi-CWmore » solar lasing threshold of 23 W-cm -2, or approximately 230 suns. The efficient coupling of incoherent, spectrally broad sunlight in small gain volumes should allow the generation of coherent laser light from intensities of less than 100 suns.« less

  4. An analytic solution of the radiative transfer equation for a gray scattering atmosphere in motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pistinner, Shlomi; Shaviv, Giora

    1994-12-01

    We provide a formal analytic solution of the radiative transfer equation for a gray moving atmosphere in a plane parallel geometry. A formal solution in the diffusion and the free-streaming limit is also provided in the case of a spherically extended atmosphere. The formal solutions are written explicitly for scattering atmospheres in which the density and the velocity fields are given by a power law. A self-consistent temperature profile accurate to O(Beta = v/c) is provided for the case in which the absorption or the scattering are temperature independent. The gray extinction temperature profile is considerably simplified in the case of a scattering atmosphere. Steady state flow and homologous expansion are special cases that are considered in detail.

  5. An analytic solution of the radiative transfer equation for a gray scattering atmosphere in motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pistinner, Shlomi; Shaviv, Giora

    1994-01-01

    We provide a formal analytic solution of the radiative transfer equation for a gray moving atmosphere in a plane parallel geometry. A formal solution in the diffusion and the free-streaming limit is also provided in the case of a spherically extended atmosphere. The formal solutions are written explicitly for scattering atmospheres in which the density and the velocity fields are given by a power law. A self-consistent temperature profile accurate to O(Beta = v/c) is provided for the case in which the absorption or the scattering are temperature independent. The gray extinction temperature profile is considerably simplified in the case of a scattering atmosphere. Steady state flow and homologous expansion are special cases that are considered in detail.

  6. Line-Mixing Relaxation Matrix model for spectroscopic and radiative transfer studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendaza, Teresa; Martin-Torres, Javier

    2016-04-01

    We present a generic model to compute the Relaxation Matrix easily adaptable to any molecule and type of spectroscopic lines or bands in non-reactive molecule collisions regimes. It also provides the dipole moment of every transition and level population of the selected molecule. The model is based on the Energy-Corrected Sudden (ECS) approximation/theory introduced by DePristo (1980), and on previous Relaxation Matrix studies for the interaction between molecular ro-vibrational levels (Ben-Rueven, 1966), atoms (Rosenkranz, 1975), linear molecules (Strow and Reuter, 1994; Niro, Boulet and Hartmann, 2004), and symmetric but not linear molecules (Tran et al., 2006). The model is open source, and it is user-friendly. To the point that the user only has to select the wished molecule and vibrational band to perform the calculations. It reads the needed spectroscopic data from the HIgh-resolution TRANsmission molecular absorption (HITRAN) (Rothman et al., 2013) and ExoMol (Tennyson and Yurchenko, 2012). In this work we present an example of the calculations with our model for the case of the 2ν3 band of methane (CH4), and a comparison with a previous work (Tran et al., 2010). The data produced by our model can be used to characterise the line-mixing effects on ro-vibrational lines of the infrared emitters of any atmosphere, to calculate accurate absorption spectra, that are needed in the interpretation of atmospheric spectra, radiative transfer modelling and General Circulation Models (GCM). References [1] A.E. DePristo, Collisional influence on vibration-rotation spectral line shapes: A scaling theoretical analysis and simplification, J. Chem. Phys. 73(5), 1980. [2] A. Ben-Reuven, Impact broadening of microwave spectra, Phys. Rev. 145(1), 7-22, 1966. [3] P.W. Rosenkranz, Shape of the 5 mm Oxygen Band in the Atmosphere, IEEE Transactions on Antennas and Propagation, vol. AP-23, no. 4, pp. 498-506, 1975. [4] Strow, L.L., D.D. Tobin, and S.E. Hannon, A compilation of

  7. The application of the principles of invariance to the radiative transfer equation in plant canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganapol, B. D.; Myneni, R. B.

    1992-01-01

    Solutions of the radiative transfer equation describing photon interactions with vegetation canopies are important in remote sensing since they provide the canopy reflectance distribution required in the interpretation of satellite acquired information. The general one-dimensional two-angle transport problem for a finite copy of arbitrary leaf angle distribution is considered. Analytical solutions are obtained in terms of generalized Chandrasekhar's X- and Y-functions by invoking the principles of invariance. A critical step in the formulation involves the decomposition of the integral of the scattering phase function into a product of known functions of the incident and scattered photon directions. Several simplified cases previously considered in the literature are derived from the generalized solution. Various symmetries obeyed by the scattering operator and reciprocity relations are formally proved.

  8. Separating intrinsic and scattering attenuation in full waveform sonic logging with radiative transfer theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durán, Evert L.; van Wijk, Kasper; Adam, Ludmila; Wallis, Irene C.

    2018-05-01

    Fitting the intensity of ensembles of sonic log waveforms with a radiative transfer model allows us to separate scattering from intrinsic attenuation in two wells of the Ngatamariki geothermal field, New Zealand. Independent estimates of scattering and intrinsic attenuation add to the geologic interpretation based on other well log data. Particularly, our estimates of the intrinsic attenuation confirm or refine inferences on fluid mobility in the subsurface. Zones of strong intrinsic attenuation in Well 1 correlate with identified feed zones in three of the six cases, and hint at permeability just above two of the other three zones. In Well 2, intrinsic attenuation estimates help identify all three identified permeable intervals, including a washout.

  9. A conjugate gradient method for solving the non-LTE line radiation transfer problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paletou, F.; Anterrieu, E.

    2009-12-01

    This study concerns the fast and accurate solution of the line radiation transfer problem, under non-LTE conditions. We propose and evaluate an alternative iterative scheme to the classical ALI-Jacobi method, and to the more recently proposed Gauss-Seidel and successive over-relaxation (GS/SOR) schemes. Our study is indeed based on applying a preconditioned bi-conjugate gradient method (BiCG-P). Standard tests, in 1D plane parallel geometry and in the frame of the two-level atom model with monochromatic scattering are discussed. Rates of convergence between the previously mentioned iterative schemes are compared, as are their respective timing properties. The smoothing capability of the BiCG-P method is also demonstrated.

  10. A path to practical Solar Pumped Lasers via Radiative Energy Transfer.

    PubMed

    Reusswig, Philip D; Nechayev, Sergey; Scherer, Jennifer M; Hwang, Gyu Weon; Bawendi, Moungi G; Baldo, Marc A; Rotschild, Carmel

    2015-10-05

    The optical conversion of incoherent solar radiation into a bright, coherent laser beam enables the application of nonlinear optics to solar energy conversion and storage. Here, we present an architecture for solar pumped lasers that uses a luminescent solar concentrator to decouple the conventional trade-off between solar absorption efficiency and the mode volume of the optical gain material. We report a 750-μm-thick Nd(3+)-doped YAG planar waveguide sensitized by a luminescent CdSe/CdZnS (core/shell) colloidal nanocrystal, yielding a peak cascade energy transfer of 14%, a broad spectral response in the visible portion of the solar spectrum, and an equivalent quasi-CW solar lasing threshold of 23 W-cm(-2), or approximately 230 suns. The efficient coupling of incoherent, spectrally broad sunlight in small gain volumes should allow the generation of coherent laser light from intensities of less than 100 suns.

  11. Comparisons of Aquarius Measurements over Oceans with Radiative Transfer Models at L-Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinnat, E.; LeVine, D.; Abraham, S.; DeMattheis, P.; Utku, C.

    2012-01-01

    The Aquarius/SAC-D spacecraft includes three L-band (1.4 GHz) radiometers dedicated to measuring sea surface salinity. It was launched in June 2011 by NASA and CONAE (Argentine space agency). We report detailed comparisons of Aquarius measurements with radiative transfer model predictions. These comparisons are used as part of the initial assessment of Aquarius data and to estimate the radiometer calibration bias and stability. Comparisons are also being performed to assess the performance of models used in the retrieval algorithm for correcting the effect of various sources of geophysical "noise" (e.g. Faraday rotation, surface roughness). Such corrections are critical in bringing the error in retrieved salinity down to the required 0.2 practical salinity unit on monthly global maps at 150 km by 150 km resolution.

  12. General Relativistic Radiative Transfer and General Relativistic MHD Simulations of Accretion and Outflows of Black Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuerst, Steven V.; Mizuno, Yosuke; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Wu, Kinwah

    2007-01-01

    We have calculated the emission from relativistic flows in black hole systems using a fully general relativistic radiative transfer, with flow structures obtained by general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations. We consider thermal free-free emission and thermal synchrotron emission. Bright filament-like features are found protruding (visually) from the accretion disk surface, which are enhancements of synchrotron emission when the magnetic field is roughly aligned with the line-of-sight in the co-moving frame. The features move back and forth as the accretion flow evolves, but their visibility and morphology are robust. We propose that variations and location drifts of the features are responsible for certain X-ray quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) observed in black-hole X-ray binaries.

  13. Effects of virtualization on a scientific application - Running a hyperspectral radiative transfer code on virtual machines.

    SciT

    Tikotekar, Anand A; Vallee, Geoffroy R; Naughton III, Thomas J

    2008-01-01

    The topic of system-level virtualization has recently begun to receive interest for high performance computing (HPC). This is in part due to the isolation and encapsulation offered by the virtual machine. These traits enable applications to customize their environments and maintain consistent software configurations in their virtual domains. Additionally, there are mechanisms that can be used for fault tolerance like live virtual machine migration. Given these attractive benefits to virtualization, a fundamental question arises, how does this effect my scientific application? We use this as the premise for our paper and observe a real-world scientific code running on a Xenmore » virtual machine. We studied the effects of running a radiative transfer simulation, Hydrolight, on a virtual machine. We discuss our methodology and report observations regarding the usage of virtualization with this application.« less

  14. A review of the matrix-exponential formalism in radiative transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efremenko, Dmitry S.; Molina García, Víctor; Gimeno García, Sebastián; Doicu, Adrian

    2017-07-01

    This paper outlines the matrix exponential description of radiative transfer. The eigendecomposition method which serves as a basis for computing the matrix exponential and for representing the solution in a discrete ordinate setting is considered. The mathematical equivalence of the discrete ordinate method, the matrix operator method, and the matrix Riccati equations method is proved rigorously by means of the matrix exponential formalism. For optically thin layers, approximate solution methods relying on the Padé and Taylor series approximations to the matrix exponential, as well as on the matrix Riccati equations, are presented. For optically thick layers, the asymptotic theory with higher-order corrections is derived, and parameterizations of the asymptotic functions and constants for a water-cloud model with a Gamma size distribution are obtained.

  15. An Efficient Monte Carlo Method for Modeling Radiative Transfer in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Stacy

    2011-01-01

    Monte Carlo methods have been shown to be effective and versatile in modeling radiative transfer processes to calculate model temperature profiles for protoplanetary disks. Temperatures profiles are important for connecting physical structure to observation and for understanding the conditions for planet formation and migration. However, certain areas of the disk such as the optically thick disk interior are under-sampled, or are of particular interest such as the snow line (where water vapor condenses into ice) and the area surrounding a protoplanet. To improve the sampling, photon packets can be preferentially scattered and reemitted toward the preferred locations at the cost of weighting packet energies to conserve the average energy flux. Here I report on the weighting schemes developed, how they can be applied to various models, and how they affect simulation mechanics and results. We find that improvements in sampling do not always imply similar improvements in temperature accuracies and calculation speeds.

  16. Python Radiative Transfer Emission code (PyRaTE): non-LTE spectral lines simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tritsis, A.; Yorke, H.; Tassis, K.

    2018-05-01

    We describe PyRaTE, a new, non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) line radiative transfer code developed specifically for post-processing astrochemical simulations. Population densities are estimated using the escape probability method. When computing the escape probability, the optical depth is calculated towards all directions with density, molecular abundance, temperature and velocity variations all taken into account. A very easy-to-use interface, capable of importing data from simulations outputs performed with all major astrophysical codes, is also developed. The code is written in PYTHON using an "embarrassingly parallel" strategy and can handle all geometries and projection angles. We benchmark the code by comparing our results with those from RADEX (van der Tak et al. 2007) and against analytical solutions and present case studies using hydrochemical simulations. The code will be released for public use.

  17. A path to practical Solar Pumped Lasers via Radiative Energy Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Reusswig, Philip D.; Nechayev, Sergey; Scherer, Jennifer M.; Hwang, Gyu Weon; Bawendi, Moungi G.; Baldo, Marc. A.; Rotschild, Carmel

    2015-01-01

    The optical conversion of incoherent solar radiation into a bright, coherent laser beam enables the application of nonlinear optics to solar energy conversion and storage. Here, we present an architecture for solar pumped lasers that uses a luminescent solar concentrator to decouple the conventional trade-off between solar absorption efficiency and the mode volume of the optical gain material. We report a 750-μm-thick Nd3+-doped YAG planar waveguide sensitized by a luminescent CdSe/CdZnS (core/shell) colloidal nanocrystal, yielding a peak cascade energy transfer of 14%, a broad spectral response in the visible portion of the solar spectrum, and an equivalent quasi-CW solar lasing threshold of 23 W-cm−2, or approximately 230 suns. The efficient coupling of incoherent, spectrally broad sunlight in small gain volumes should allow the generation of coherent laser light from intensities of less than 100 suns. PMID:26434400

  18. Performance of the dot product function in radiative transfer code SORD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korkin, Sergey; Lyapustin, Alexei; Sinyuk, Aliaksandr; Holben, Brent

    2016-10-01

    The successive orders of scattering radiative transfer (RT) codes frequently call the scalar (dot) product function. In this paper, we study performance of some implementations of the dot product in the RT code SORD using 50 scenarios for light scattering in the atmosphere-surface system. In the dot product function, we use the unrolled loops technique with different unrolling factor. We also considered the intrinsic Fortran functions. We show results for two machines: ifort compiler under Windows, and pgf90 under Linux. Intrinsic DOT_PRODUCT function showed best performance for the ifort. For the pgf90, the dot product implemented with unrolling factor 4 was the fastest. The RT code SORD together with the interface that runs all the mentioned tests are publicly available from ftp://maiac.gsfc.nasa.gov/pub/skorkin/SORD_IP_16B (current release) or by email request from the corresponding (first) author.

  19. A study of the radiative transfer equation using a spherical harmonics-nodal collocation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capilla, M. T.; Talavera, C. F.; Ginestar, D.; Verdú, G.

    2017-03-01

    Optical tomography has found many medical applications that need to know how the photons interact with the different tissues. The majority of the photon transport simulations are done using the diffusion approximation, but this approximation has a limited validity when optical properties of the different tissues present large gradients, when structures near the photons source are studied or when anisotropic scattering has to be taken into account. As an alternative to the diffusion model, the PL equations for the radiative transfer problem are studied. These equations are discretized in a rectangular mesh using a nodal collocation method. The performance of this model is studied by solving different 1D and 2D benchmark problems of light propagation in tissue having media with isotropic and anisotropic scattering.

  20. Optical properties reconstruction using the adjoint method based on the radiative transfer equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Addoum, Ahmad; Farges, Olivier; Asllanaj, Fatmir

    2018-01-01

    An efficient algorithm is proposed to reconstruct the spatial distribution of optical properties in heterogeneous media like biological tissues. The light transport through such media is accurately described by the radiative transfer equation in the frequency-domain. The adjoint method is used to efficiently compute the objective function gradient with respect to optical parameters. Numerical tests show that the algorithm is accurate and robust to retrieve simultaneously the absorption μa and scattering μs coefficients for lowly and highly absorbing medium. Moreover, the simultaneous reconstruction of μs and the anisotropy factor g of the Henyey-Greenstein phase function is achieved with a reasonable accuracy. The main novelty in this work is the reconstruction of g which might open the possibility to image this parameter in tissues as an additional contrast agent in optical tomography.

  1. Radiative transfer in the surfaces of atmosphereless bodies. III - Interpretation of lunar photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lumme, K.; Irvine, W. M.

    1982-01-01

    Narrowband and UBV photoelectric phase curves of the entire lunar disk and surface photometry of some craters have been interpreted using a newly developed generalized radiative transfer theory for planetary regoliths. The data are well fitted by the theory, yielding information on both macroscopic and microscopic lunar properties. Derived values for the integrated disk geometric albedo are considerably higher than quoted previously, because of the present inclusion of an accurately determined opposition effect. The mean surface roughness, defined as the ratio of the height to the radius of a typical irregularity, is found to be 0.9 + or - 0.1, or somewhat less than the mean value of 1.2 obtained for the asteroids. From the phase curves, wavelength-dependent values of the single scattering albedo and the Henyey-Greenstein asymmetry factor for the average surface particle are derived.

  2. Inversion of chlorophyll contents by use of hyperspectral CHRIS data based on radiative transfer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, M. C.; Niu, X. F.; Chen, S. B.; Guo, P. J.; Yang, Q.; Wang, Z. J.

    2014-03-01

    Chlorophyll content, the most important pigment related to photosynthesis, is the key parameter for vegetation growth. The continuous spectrum characteristics of ground objects can be captured through hyperspectral remotely sensed data. In this study, based on the coniferous forest radiative transfer model, chlorophyll contents were inverted by use of hyperspectral CHRIS data in the coniferous forest coverage of Changbai Mountain Area. In addition, the sensitivity of LIBERTY model was analyzed. The experimental results validated that the reflectance simulation of different chlorophyll contents was coincided with that of the field measurement, and hyperspectral vegetation indices applied to the quantitative inversion of chlorophyll contents was feasible and accurate. This study presents a reasonable method of chlorophyll inversion for the coniferous forest, promotes the inversion precision, is of significance in coniferous forest monitoring.

  3. Exact first order scattering correction for vector radiative transfer in coupled atmosphere and ocean systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Peng-Wang; Hu, Yongxiang; Josset, Damien B.; Trepte, Charles R.; Lucker, Patricia L.; Lin, Bing

    2012-06-01

    We have developed a Vector Radiative Transfer (VRT) code for coupled atmosphere and ocean systems based on the successive order of scattering (SOS) method. In order to achieve efficiency and maintain accuracy, the scattering matrix is expanded in terms of the Wigner d functions and the delta fit or delta-M technique is used to truncate the commonly-present large forward scattering peak. To further improve the accuracy of the SOS code, we have implemented the analytical first order scattering treatment using the exact scattering matrix of the medium in the SOS code. The expansion and truncation techniques are kept for higher order scattering. The exact first order scattering correction was originally published by Nakajima and Takana.1 A new contribution of this work is to account for the exact secondary light scattering caused by the light reflected by and transmitted through the rough air-sea interface.

  4. A Parallel Numerical Algorithm To Solve Linear Systems Of Equations Emerging From 3D Radiative Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wichert, Viktoria; Arkenberg, Mario; Hauschildt, Peter H.

    2016-10-01

    Highly resolved state-of-the-art 3D atmosphere simulations will remain computationally extremely expensive for years to come. In addition to the need for more computing power, rethinking coding practices is necessary. We take a dual approach by introducing especially adapted, parallel numerical methods and correspondingly parallelizing critical code passages. In the following, we present our respective work on PHOENIX/3D. With new parallel numerical algorithms, there is a big opportunity for improvement when iteratively solving the system of equations emerging from the operator splitting of the radiative transfer equation J = ΛS. The narrow-banded approximate Λ-operator Λ* , which is used in PHOENIX/3D, occurs in each iteration step. By implementing a numerical algorithm which takes advantage of its characteristic traits, the parallel code's efficiency is further increased and a speed-up in computational time can be achieved.

  5. A new formulation for anisotropic radiative transfer problems. I - Solution with a variational technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheyney, H., III; Arking, A.

    1976-01-01

    The equations of radiative transfer in anisotropically scattering media are reformulated as linear operator equations in a single independent variable. The resulting equations are suitable for solution by a variety of standard mathematical techniques. The operators appearing in the resulting equations are in general nonsymmetric; however, it is shown that every bounded linear operator equation can be embedded in a symmetric linear operator equation and a variational solution can be obtained in a straightforward way. For purposes of demonstration, a Rayleigh-Ritz variational method is applied to three problems involving simple phase functions. It is to be noted that the variational technique demonstrated is of general applicability and permits simple solutions for a wide range of otherwise difficult mathematical problems in physics.

  6. New numerical method for radiation heat transfer in nonhomogeneous participating media

    SciT

    Howell, J.R.; Tan, Zhiqiang

    A new numerical method, which solves the exact integral equations of distance-angular integration form for radiation transfer, is introduced in this paper. By constructing and prestoring the numerical integral formulas for the distance integral for appropriate kernel functions, this method eliminates the time consuming evaluations of the kernels of the space integrals in the formal computations. In addition, when the number of elements in the system is large, the resulting coefficient matrix is quite sparse. Thus, either considerable time or much storage can be saved. A weakness of the method is discussed, and some remedies are suggested. As illustrations, somemore » one-dimensional and two-dimensional problems in both homogeneous and inhomogeneous emitting, absorbing, and linear anisotropic scattering media are studied. Some results are compared with available data. 13 refs.« less

  7. Numerical modeling of the radiative transfer in a turbid medium using the synthetic iteration.

    PubMed

    Budak, Vladimir P; Kaloshin, Gennady A; Shagalov, Oleg V; Zheltov, Victor S

    2015-07-27

    In this paper we propose the fast, but the accurate algorithm for numerical modeling of light fields in the turbid media slab. For the numerical solution of the radiative transfer equation (RTE) it is required its discretization based on the elimination of the solution anisotropic part and the replacement of the scattering integral by a finite sum. The solution regular part is determined numerically. A good choice of the method of the solution anisotropic part elimination determines the high convergence of the algorithm in the mean square metric. The method of synthetic iterations can be used to improve the convergence in the uniform metric. A significant increase in the solution accuracy with the use of synthetic iterations allows applying the two-stream approximation for the regular part determination. This approach permits to generalize the proposed method in the case of an arbitrary 3D geometry of the medium.

  8. Performance Analysis of GFDL's GCM Line-By-Line Radiative Transfer Model on GPU and MIC Architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzel, R.; Paynter, D.; Jones, A. L.

    2017-12-01

    Due to their relatively low computational cost, radiative transfer models in global climate models (GCMs) run on traditional CPU architectures generally consist of shortwave and longwave parameterizations over a small number of wavelength bands. With the rise of newer GPU and MIC architectures, however, the performance of high resolution line-by-line radiative transfer models may soon approach those of the physical parameterizations currently employed in GCMs. Here we present an analysis of the current performance of a new line-by-line radiative transfer model currently under development at GFDL. Although originally designed to specifically exploit GPU architectures through the use of CUDA, the radiative transfer model has recently been extended to include OpenMP in an effort to also effectively target MIC architectures such as Intel's Xeon Phi. Using input data provided by the upcoming Radiative Forcing Model Intercomparison Project (RFMIP, as part of CMIP 6), we compare model results and performance data for various model configurations and spectral resolutions run on both GPU and Intel Knights Landing architectures to analogous runs of the standard Oxford Reference Forward Model on traditional CPUs.

  9. Microbubble-assisted p53, RB, and p130 gene transfer in combination with radiation therapy in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Nande, Rounak; Greco, Adelaide; Gossman, Michael S; Lopez, Jeffrey P; Claudio, Luigi; Salvatore, Marco; Brunetti, Arturo; Denvir, James; Howard, Candace M; Claudio, Pier Paolo

    2013-06-01

    Combining radiation therapy and direct intratumoral (IT) injection of adenoviral vectors has been explored as a means to enhance the therapeutic potential of gene transfer. A major challenge for gene transfer is systemic delivery of nucleic acids directly into an affected tissue. Ultrasound (US) contrast agents (microbubbles) are viable candidates to enhance targeted delivery of systemically administered genes. Here we show that p53, pRB, and p130 gene transfer mediated by US cavitation of microbubbles at the tumor site resulted in targeted gene transduction and increased reduction in tumor growth compared to DU-145 prostate cancer cell xenografts treated intratumorally with adenovirus (Ad) or radiation alone. Microbubble-assisted/US-mediated Ad.p53 and Ad.RB treated tumors showed significant reduction in tumor volume compared to Ad.p130 treated tumors (p<0.05). Additionally, US mediated microbubble delivery of p53 and RB combined with external beam radiation resulted in the most profound tumor reduction in DU-145 xenografted nude mice (p<0.05) compared to radiation alone. These findings highlight the potential therapeutic applications of this novel image-guided gene transfer technology in combination with external beam radiation for prostate cancer patients with therapy resistant disease.

  10. XCO2 Retrieval Errors from a PCA-based Approach to Fast Radiative Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somkuti, Peter; Boesch, Hartmut; Natraj, Vijay; Kopparla, Pushkar

    2017-04-01

    Multiple-scattering radiative transfer (RT) calculations are an integral part of forward models used to infer greenhouse gas concentrations in the shortwave-infrared spectral range from satellite missions such as GOSAT or OCO-2. Such calculations are, however, computationally expensive and, combined with the recent growth in data volume, necessitate the use of acceleration methods in order to make retrievals feasible on an operational level. The principle component analysis (PCA)-based approach to fast radiative transfer introduced by Natraj et al. 2005 is a spectral binning method, in which the many line-by-line monochromatic calculations are replaced by a small set of representative ones. From the PCA performed on the optical layer properties for a scene-dependent atmosphere, the results of the representative calculations are mapped onto all spectral points in the given band. Since this RT scheme is an approximation, the computed top-of-atmosphere radiances exhibit errors compared to the "full" line-by-line calculation. These errors ultimately propagate into the final retrieved greenhouse gas concentrations, and their magnitude depends on scene-dependent parameters such as aerosol loadings or viewing geometry. An advantage of this method is the ability to choose the degree of accuracy by increasing or decreasing the number of empirical orthogonal functions used for the reconstruction of the radiances. We have performed a large set of global simulations based on real GOSAT scenes and assess the retrieval errors induced by the fast RT approximation through linear error analysis. We find that across a wide range of geophysical parameters, the errors are for the most part smaller than ± 0.2 ppm and ± 0.06 ppm (out of roughly 400 ppm) for ocean and land scenes respectively. A fast RT scheme that produces low errors is important, since regional biases in XCO2 even in the low sub-ppm range can cause significant changes in carbon fluxes obtained from inversions

  11. Efficacy of Radiative Transfer Model Across Space, Time and Hydro-climates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, B.; Neelam, M.

    2017-12-01

    The efficiency of radiative transfer model for better soil moisture retrievals is not yet clearly understood over natural systems with great variability and heterogeneity with respect to soil, land cover, topography, precipitation etc. However, this knowledge is important to direct and strategize future research direction and field campaigns. In this work, we present global sensitivity analysis (GSA) technique to study the influence of heterogeneity and uncertainties on radiative transfer model (RTM) and to quantify climate-soil-vegetation interactions. A framework is proposed to understand soil moisture mechanisms underlying these interactions, and influence of these interactions on soil moisture retrieval accuracy. Soil moisture dynamics is observed to play a key role in variability of these interactions, i.e., it enhances both mean and variance of soil-vegetation coupling. The analysis is conducted for different support scales (Point Scale, 800 m, 1.6 km, 3.2 km, 6.4 km, 12.8 km, and 36 km), seasonality (time), hydro-climates, aggregation (scaling) methods and across Level I and Level II ecoregions of contiguous USA (CONUS). For undisturbed natural environments such as SGP'97 (Oklahoma, USA) and SMEX04 (Arizona, USA), the sensitivity of TB to land surface variables remain nearly uniform and are not influenced by extent, support scales or averaging method. On the contrary, for anthropogenically-manipulated environments such as SMEX02 (Iowa, USA) and SMAPVEX12 (Winnipeg, Canada), the sensitivity to variables are highly influenced by the distribution of land surface heterogeneity and upscaling methods. The climate-soil-vegetation interactions analyzed across all ecoregions are presented through a probability distribution function (PDF). The intensity of these interactions are categorized accordingly to yield "hotspots", where the RTM model fails to retrieve soil moisture. A ecoregion specific scaling function is proposed for these hotspots to rectify RTM for

  12. Significance of multidimensional radiative transfer effects measured in surface fluxes at an Antarctic coastline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubin, Dan; Ricchiazzi, Paul; Payton, Allison; Gautier, Catherine

    2002-10-01

    At a coastal high-latitude site, multiple reflection of photons between the high albedo surface and an overlying cloud can enhance the downwelling shortwave flux out over the adjacent open water to a distance of several kilometers. This coastal albedo effect has been predicted by theoretical radiative transfer studies and has also been measured under ideal conditions. In this study, three multispectral solar ultraviolet radiometers were deployed in the vicinity of Palmer Station, Antarctica (64° 46'S, 64° 04'W) to determine the prevalence of the coastal albedo effect under the region's natural variability in cloud cover. One radiometer was deployed near the base of a glacier, and the other two radiometers were deployed on Janus Island and Outcast Island, islets ˜2.8 km (1.5 nautical miles) and 5.6 km (3 nautical miles) distant from Palmer Station, respectively. The radiometers were operated simultaneously for 16 days during late December 1999 and January 2000. Under all cloudy sky conditions sampled by this experiment the coastal albedo effect is seen in the data 60% of the time, in the form of a decreasing gradient in surface flux from Palmer Station through Janus and Outcast Islands. During the other 40% of the cloudy sky measurements, local cloud inhomogeneity obscured the coastal albedo effect. The effect is more apparent under overcast layers that appear spatially uniform and occurs 86% of the time under the low overcast decks sampled. The presence of stratus fractus of bad weather, under higher overcast layers, obscures the coastal albedo effect such that it occurs only 43% of the time. A wavelength dependence is noted in the data under optically thin cloud cover: the ratio of a flux measured at an islet to that measured at the station increases with wavelength. This wavelength dependence can be explained by plane-parallel radiative transfer theory.

  13. Clues to Coral Reef Ecosystem Health: Spectral Analysis Coupled with Radiative Transfer Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guild, L.; Ganapol, B.; Kramer, P.; Armstrong, R.; Gleason, A.; Torres, J.; Johnson, L.; Garfield, N.

    2003-12-01

    Coral reefs are among the world's most productive and biologically rich ecosystems and are some of the oldest ecosystems on Earth. Coralline structures protect coastlines from storms, maintain high diversity of marine life, and provide nurseries for marine species. Coral reefs play a role in carbon cycling through high rates of organic carbon metabolism and calcification. Coral reefs provide fisheries habitat that are the sole protein source for humans on remote islands. Reefs respond immediately to environmental change and therefore are considered "canaries" of the oceans. However, the world's reefs are in peril: they have shrunk 10-50% from their historical extent due to climate change and anthropogenic activity. An important contribution to coral reef research is improved spectral distinction of reef species' health where anthropogenic activity and climate change impacts are high. Relatively little is known concerning the spectral properties of coral or how coral structures reflect and transmit light. New insights into optical processes of corals under stressed conditions can lead to improved interpretation of airborne and satellite data and forecasting of immediate or long-term impacts of events such as bleaching and disease in coral. We are investigating the spatial and spectral resolution required to detect remotely changes in reef health by coupling spectral analysis of in situ spectra and airborne spectral data with a new radiative transfer model called CorMOD2. Challenges include light attenuation by the water column, atmospheric scattering, and scattering caused by the coral themselves that confound the spectral signal. In CorMOD2, input coral reflectance measurements produce modeled absorption through an inversion at each visible wavelength. The first model development phase of CorMOD2 imposes a scattering baseline that is constant regardless of coral condition, and further specifies that coral is optically thick. Evolution of CorMOD2 is towards a coral

  14. Multidimensional radiative transfer with multilevel atoms. II. The non-linear multigrid method.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabiani Bendicho, P.; Trujillo Bueno, J.; Auer, L.

    1997-08-01

    A new iterative method for solving non-LTE multilevel radiative transfer (RT) problems in 1D, 2D or 3D geometries is presented. The scheme obtains the self-consistent solution of the kinetic and RT equations at the cost of only a few (<10) formal solutions of the RT equation. It combines, for the first time, non-linear multigrid iteration (Brandt, 1977, Math. Comp. 31, 333; Hackbush, 1985, Multi-Grid Methods and Applications, springer-Verlag, Berlin), an efficient multilevel RT scheme based on Gauss-Seidel iterations (cf. Trujillo Bueno & Fabiani Bendicho, 1995ApJ...455..646T), and accurate short-characteristics formal solution techniques. By combining a valid stopping criterion with a nested-grid strategy a converged solution with the desired true error is automatically guaranteed. Contrary to the current operator splitting methods the very high convergence speed of the new RT method does not deteriorate when the grid spatial resolution is increased. With this non-linear multigrid method non-LTE problems discretized on N grid points are solved in O(N) operations. The nested multigrid RT method presented here is, thus, particularly attractive in complicated multilevel transfer problems where small grid-sizes are required. The properties of the method are analyzed both analytically and with illustrative multilevel calculations for Ca II in 1D and 2D schematic model atmospheres.

  15. Mandibular reconstruction in the radiated patient: the role of osteocutaneous free tissue transfers

    SciT

    Duncan, M.J.; Manktelow, R.T.; Zuker, R.M.

    1985-12-01

    This paper discusses our experience with the second metatarsal and iliac crest osteocutaneous transfers for mandibular reconstruction. The prime indication for this type of reconstruction was for anterior mandibular defects when the patient had been previously resected. Midbody to midbody defects were reconstructed with the metatarsal and larger defects with the iliac crest. In most cases, an osteotomy was done to create a mental angle. The evaluation of speech, oral continence, and swallowing revealed good results in all patients unless lip or tongue resection compromised function. Facial contour was excellent in metatarsal reconstructions. The iliac crest cutaneous flap provided amore » generous supply of skin for both intraoral reconstruction and external skin coverage but tended to be bulky, particularly when used in the submental area. Thirty three of 36 flaps survived completely. Flap losses were due to anastomosis thrombosis (1), pedicle compression (1), and pedicle destruction during exploration for suspected carotid blowout (1). Ninety three percent of bone junctions developed a solid bony union despite the mandible having had a full therapeutic dose of preoperative radiation. Despite wound infections in 8 patients, and intraoral dehiscence with bone exposure in 12 patients, all but one of these transfers went on to good bony union without infection in the bone graft.« less

  16. TIME-DEPENDENT MULTI-GROUP MULTI-DIMENSIONAL RELATIVISTIC RADIATIVE TRANSFER CODE BASED ON SPHERICAL HARMONIC DISCRETE ORDINATE METHOD

    SciT

    Tominaga, Nozomu; Shibata, Sanshiro; Blinnikov, Sergei I., E-mail: tominaga@konan-u.ac.jp, E-mail: sshibata@post.kek.jp, E-mail: Sergei.Blinnikov@itep.ru

    We develop a time-dependent, multi-group, multi-dimensional relativistic radiative transfer code, which is required to numerically investigate radiation from relativistic fluids that are involved in, e.g., gamma-ray bursts and active galactic nuclei. The code is based on the spherical harmonic discrete ordinate method (SHDOM) which evaluates a source function including anisotropic scattering in spherical harmonics and implicitly solves the static radiative transfer equation with ray tracing in discrete ordinates. We implement treatments of time dependence, multi-frequency bins, Lorentz transformation, and elastic Thomson and inelastic Compton scattering to the publicly available SHDOM code. Our code adopts a mixed-frame approach; the source functionmore » is evaluated in the comoving frame, whereas the radiative transfer equation is solved in the laboratory frame. This implementation is validated using various test problems and comparisons with the results from a relativistic Monte Carlo code. These validations confirm that the code correctly calculates the intensity and its evolution in the computational domain. The code enables us to obtain an Eddington tensor that relates the first and third moments of intensity (energy density and radiation pressure) and is frequently used as a closure relation in radiation hydrodynamics calculations.« less

  17. Hydration induced material transfer in membranes of osmotic pump tablets measured by synchrotron radiation based FTIR.

    PubMed

    Wu, Li; Yin, Xianzhen; Guo, Zhen; Tong, Yajun; Feng, Jing; York, Peter; Xiao, Tiqiao; Chen, Min; Gu, Jingkai; Zhang, Jiwen

    2016-03-10

    Osmotic pump tablets are reliable oral controlled drug delivery systems based on their semipermeable membrane coating. This research used synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared (SR-FTIR) microspectroscopy and imaging to investigate the hydration induced material transfer in the membranes of osmotic pump tablets. SR-FTIR was applied to record and map the chemical information of a micro-region of the membranes, composed of cellulose acetate (CA, as the water insoluble matrix) and polyethylene glycol (PEG, as the soluble pore forming agent and plasticizing agent). The microstructure and chemical change of membranes hydrated for 0, 5, 10 and 30min were measured using SR-FTIR, combined with scanning electronic microscopy and atom force microscopy. The SR-FTIR microspectroscopy results indicated that there was a major change at the absorption range of 2700-3100cm(-1) in the membranes after different periods of hydration time. The absorption bands at 2870-2880cm(-1) and 2950-2960cm(-1) were assigned to represent CA and PEG, respectively. The chemical group signal distribution illustrated by the ratio of PEG to CA demonstrated that the trigger of drug release in the preliminary stage was due to the rapid transfer of PEG into liquid medium with a sharp decrease of PEG in the membranes. The SR-FTIR mapping results have demonstrated the hydration induced material transfer in the membranes of osmotic pump tablets and enabled reassessment of the drug release mechanism of membrane controlled osmotic pump systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Modeling radiative transfer with the doubling and adding approach in a climate GCM setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacis, A. A.

    2017-12-01

    The nonlinear dependence of multiply scattered radiation on particle size, optical depth, and solar zenith angle, makes accurate treatment of multiple scattering in the climate GCM setting problematic, due primarily to computational cost issues. In regard to the accurate methods of calculating multiple scattering that are available, their computational cost is far too prohibitive for climate GCM applications. Utilization of two-stream-type radiative transfer approximations may be computationally fast enough, but at the cost of reduced accuracy. We describe here a parameterization of the doubling/adding method that is being used in the GISS climate GCM, which is an adaptation of the doubling/adding formalism configured to operate with a look-up table utilizing a single gauss quadrature point with an extra-angle formulation. It is designed to closely reproduce the accuracy of full-angle doubling and adding for the multiple scattering effects of clouds and aerosols in a realistic atmosphere as a function of particle size, optical depth, and solar zenith angle. With an additional inverse look-up table, this single-gauss-point doubling/adding approach can be adapted to model fractional cloud cover for any GCM grid-box in the independent pixel approximation as a function of the fractional cloud particle sizes, optical depths, and solar zenith angle dependence.

  19. A Fast Hyperspectral Vector Radiative Transfer Model in UV to IR spectral bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, J.; Yang, P.; Sun, B.; Kattawar, G. W.; Platnick, S. E.; Meyer, K.; Wang, C.

    2016-12-01

    We develop a fast hyperspectral vector radiative transfer model with a spectral range from UV to IR with 5 nm resolutions. This model can simulate top of the atmosphere (TOA) diffuse radiance and polarized reflectance by considering gas absorption, Rayleigh scattering, and aerosol and cloud scattering. The absorption component considers several major atmospheric absorbers such as water vapor, CO2, O3, and O2 including both line and continuum absorptions. A regression-based method is used to parameterize the layer effective optical thickness for each gas, which substantially increases the computation efficiency for absorption while maintaining high accuracy. This method is over 500 times faster than the existing line-by-line method. The scattering component uses the successive order of scattering (SOS) method. For Rayleigh scattering, convergence is fast due to the small optical thickness of atmospheric gases. For cloud and aerosol layers, a small-angle approximation method is used in SOS calculations. The scattering process is divided into two parts, a forward part and a diffuse part. The scattering in the small-angle range in the forward direction is approximated as forward scattering. A cloud or aerosol layer is divided into thin layers. As the ray propagates through each thin layer, a portion diverges as diffuse radiation, while the remainder continues propagating in forward direction. The computed diffuse radiance is the sum of all of the diffuse parts. The small-angle approximation makes the SOS calculation converge rapidly even in a thick cloud layer.

  20. Stochastic transfer of polarized radiation in finite cloudy atmospheric media with reflective boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallah, M.

    2014-03-01

    The problem of monoenergetic radiative transfer in a finite planar stochastic atmospheric medium with polarized (vector) Rayleigh scattering is proposed. The solution is presented for an arbitrary absorption and scattering cross sections. The extinction function of the medium is assumed to be a continuous random function of position, with fluctuations about the mean taken as Gaussian distributed. The joint probability distribution function of these Gaussian random variables is used to calculate the ensemble-averaged quantities, such as reflectivity and transmissivity, for an arbitrary correlation function. A modified Gaussian probability distribution function is also used to average the solution in order to exclude the probable negative values of the optical variable. Pomraning-Eddington approximation is used, at first, to obtain the deterministic analytical solution for both the total intensity and the difference function used to describe the polarized radiation. The problem is treated with specular reflecting boundaries and angular-dependent externally incident flux upon the medium from one side and with no flux from the other side. For the sake of comparison, two different forms of the weight function, which introduced to force the boundary conditions to be fulfilled, are used. Numerical results of the average reflectivity and average transmissivity are obtained for both Gaussian and modified Gaussian probability density functions at the different degrees of polarization.

  1. A radiosity-based model to compute the radiation transfer of soil surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Feng; Li, Yuguang

    2011-11-01

    A good understanding of interactions of electromagnetic radiation with soil surface is important for a further improvement of remote sensing methods. In this paper, a radiosity-based analytical model for soil Directional Reflectance Factor's (DRF) distributions was developed and evaluated. The model was specifically dedicated to the study of radiation transfer for the soil surface under tillage practices. The soil was abstracted as two dimensional U-shaped or V-shaped geometric structures with periodic macroscopic variations. The roughness of the simulated surfaces was expressed as a ratio of the height to the width for the U and V-shaped structures. The assumption was made that the shadowing of soil surface, simulated by U or V-shaped grooves, has a greater influence on the soil reflectance distribution than the scattering properties of basic soil particles of silt and clay. Another assumption was that the soil is a perfectly diffuse reflector at a microscopic level, which is a prerequisite for the application of the radiosity method. This radiosity-based analytical model was evaluated by a forward Monte Carlo ray-tracing model under the same structural scenes and identical spectral parameters. The statistics of these two models' BRF fitting results for several soil structures under the same conditions showed the good agreements. By using the model, the physical mechanism of the soil bidirectional reflectance pattern was revealed.

  2. Markov chain formalism for generalized radiative transfer in a plane-parallel medium, accounting for polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Feng; Davis, Anthony B.; Diner, David J.

    2016-11-01

    A Markov chain formalism is developed for computing the transport of polarized radiation according to Generalized Radiative Transfer (GRT) theory, which was developed recently to account for unresolved random fluctuations of scattering particle density and can also be applied to unresolved spectral variability of gaseous absorption as an improvement over the standard correlated-k method. Using Gamma distribution to describe the probability density function of the extinction or absorption coefficient, a shape parameter a that quantifies the variability is introduced, defined as the mean extinction or absorption coefficient squared divided by its variance. It controls the decay rate of a power-law transmission that replaces the usual exponential Beer-Lambert-Bouguer law. Exponential transmission, hence classic RT, is recovered when a→∞. The new approach is verified to high accuracy against numerical benchmark results obtained with a custom Monte Carlo method. For a<∞, angular reciprocity is violated to a degree that increases with the spatial variability, as observed for finite portions of real-world cloudy scenes. While the degree of linear polarization in liquid water cloudbows, supernumerary bows, and glories is affected by spatial heterogeneity, the positions in scattering angle of these features are relatively unchanged. As a result, a single-scattering model based on the assumption of subpixel homogeneity can still be used to derive droplet size distributions from polarimetric measurements of extended stratocumulus clouds.

  3. A multidimensional unified gas-kinetic scheme for radiative transfer equations on unstructured mesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wenjun; Jiang, Song; Xu, Kun

    2017-12-01

    In order to extend the unified gas kinetic scheme (UGKS) to solve radiative transfer equations in a complex geometry, a multidimensional asymptotic preserving implicit method on unstructured mesh is constructed in this paper. With an implicit formulation, the CFL condition for the determination of the time step in UGKS can be much relaxed, and a large time step is used in simulations. Differently from previous direction-by-direction UGKS on orthogonal structured mesh, on unstructured mesh the interface flux transport takes into account multi-dimensional effect, where gradients of radiation intensity and material temperature in both normal and tangential directions of a cell interface are included in the flux evaluation. The multiple scale nature makes the UGKS be able to capture the solutions in both optically thin and thick regions seamlessly. In the optically thick region the condition of cell size being less than photon's mean free path is fully removed, and the UGKS recovers a solver for diffusion equation in such a limit on unstructured mesh. For a distorted quadrilateral mesh, the UGKS goes to a nine-point scheme for the diffusion equation, and it naturally reduces to the standard five-point scheme for a orthogonal quadrilateral mesh. Numerical computations covering a wide range of transport regimes on unstructured and distorted quadrilateral meshes will be presented to validate the current approach.

  4. Mixing Single Scattering Properties in Vector Radiative Transfer for Deterministic and Stochastic Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, L.; Zhai, P.; Hu, Y.; Winker, D. M.

    2016-12-01

    Among the primary factors, which determine the polarized radiation, field of a turbid medium are the single scattering properties of the medium. When multiple types of scatterers are present, the single scattering properties of the scatterers need to be properly mixed in order to find the solutions to the vector radiative transfer theory (VRT). The VRT solvers can be divided into two types: deterministic and stochastic. The deterministic solver can only accept one set of single scattering property in its smallest discretized spatial volume. When the medium contains more than one kind of scatterer, their single scattering properties are averaged, and then used as input for the deterministic solver. The stochastic solver, can work with different kinds of scatterers explicitly. In this work, two different mixing schemes are studied using the Successive Order of Scattering (SOS) method and Monte Carlo (MC) methods. One scheme is used for deterministic and the other is used for the stochastic Monte Carlo method. It is found that the solutions from the two VRT solvers using two different mixing schemes agree with each other extremely well. This confirms the equivalence to the two mixing schemes and also provides a benchmark for the VRT solution for the medium studied.

  5. Radionuclide Ionization in Protoplanetary Disks: Calculations of Decay Product Radiative Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleeves, L. Ilsedore; Adams, Fred C.; Bergin, Edwin A.; Visser, Ruud

    2013-11-01

    We present simple analytic solutions for the ionization rate ζSLR arising from the decay of short-lived radionuclides (SLRs) within protoplanetary disks. We solve the radiative transfer problem for the decay products within the disk, and thereby allow for the loss of radiation at low disk surface densities; energy loss becomes important outside R >~ 30 AU for typical disk masses Mg = 0.04 M ⊙. Previous studies of chemistry/physics in these disks have neglected the impact of ionization by SLRs, and often consider only cosmic rays (CRs), because of the high CR-rate present in the interstellar medium. However, recent work suggests that the flux of CRs present in the circumstellar environment could be substantially reduced by relatively modest stellar winds, resulting in severely modulated CR ionization rates, ζCR, equal to or substantially below that of SLRs (ζSLR <~ 10-18 s-1). We compute the net ionizing particle fluxes and corresponding ionization rates as a function of position within the disk for a variety of disk models. The resulting expressions are especially simple for the case of vertically Gaussian disks (frequently assumed in the literature). Finally, we provide a power-law fit to the ionization rate in the midplane as a function of gas disk surface density and time. Depending on location in the disk, the ionization rates by SLRs are typically in the range ζSLR ~ (1-10) × 10-19 s-1.

  6. Random variable transformation for generalized stochastic radiative transfer in finite participating slab media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Wakil, S. A.; Sallah, M.; El-Hanbaly, A. M.

    2015-10-01

    The stochastic radiative transfer problem is studied in a participating planar finite continuously fluctuating medium. The problem is considered for specular- and diffusly-reflecting boundaries with linear anisotropic scattering. Random variable transformation (RVT) technique is used to get the complete average for the solution functions, that are represented by the probability-density function (PDF) of the solution process. In the RVT algorithm, a simple integral transformation to the input stochastic process (the extinction function of the medium) is applied. This linear transformation enables us to rewrite the stochastic transport equations in terms of the optical random variable (x) and the optical random thickness (L). Then the transport equation is solved deterministically to get a closed form for the solution as a function of x and L. So, the solution is used to obtain the PDF of the solution functions applying the RVT technique among the input random variable (L) and the output process (the solution functions). The obtained averages of the solution functions are used to get the complete analytical averages for some interesting physical quantities, namely, reflectivity and transmissivity at the medium boundaries. In terms of the average reflectivity and transmissivity, the average of the partial heat fluxes for the generalized problem with internal source of radiation are obtained and represented graphically.

  7. 3D Radiative Transfer Code for Polarized Scattered Light with Aligned Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelkonen, V. M.; Penttilä, A.; Juvela, M.; Muinonen, K.

    2017-12-01

    Polarized scattered light has been observed in cometary comae and in circumstellar disks. It carries information about the grains from which the light scattered. However, modelling polarized scattered light is a complicated problem. We are working on a 3D Monte Carlo radiative transfer code which incorporates hierarchical grid structure (octree) and the full Stokes vector for both the incoming radiation and the radiation scattered by dust grains. In octree grid format an upper level cell can be divided into 8 subcells by halving the cell in each of the three axis. Levels of further refinement of the grid may be added, until the desired resolution is reached. The radiation field is calculated with Monte Carlo methods. The path of the model ray is traced in the cloud: absorbed intensity is counted in each cell, and from time to time, the model ray is scattered towards a new direction as determined by the dust model. Due to the non-spherical grains and the polarization, the scattering problem will be the main issue for the code and most time consuming. The scattering parameters will be taken from the models for individual grains. We can introduce populations of different grain shapes into the dust model, and randomly select, based on their amounts, from which shape the model ray scatters. Similarly, we can include aligned and non-aligned subpopulations of these grains, based on the grain alignment calculations, to see which grains should be oriented with the magnetic field, or, in the absence of a magnetic field close to the comet nucleus, with another axis of alignment (e.g., the radiation direction). The 3D nature of the grid allows us to assign these values, as well as density, for each computational cell, to model phenomena like e.g., cometary jets. The code will record polarized scattered light towards one or more observer directions within a single simulation run. These results can then be compared with the observations of comets at different phase angles, or

  8. Cloud Forecasting and 3-D Radiative Transfer Model Validation using Citizen-Sourced Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasiewski, A. J.; Heymsfield, A.; Newman Frey, K.; Davis, R.; Rapp, J.; Bansemer, A.; Coon, T.; Folsom, R.; Pfeufer, N.; Kalloor, J.

    2017-12-01

    Cloud radiative feedback mechanisms are one of the largest sources of uncertainty in global climate models. Variations in local 3D cloud structure impact the interpretation of NASA CERES and MODIS data for top-of-atmosphere radiation studies over clouds. Much of this uncertainty results from lack of knowledge of cloud vertical and horizontal structure. Surface-based data on 3-D cloud structure from a multi-sensor array of low-latency ground-based cameras can be used to intercompare radiative transfer models based on MODIS and other satellite data with CERES data to improve the 3-D cloud parameterizations. Closely related, forecasting of solar insolation and associated cloud cover on time scales out to 1 hour and with spatial resolution of 100 meters is valuable for stabilizing power grids with high solar photovoltaic penetrations. Data for cloud-advection based solar insolation forecasting with requisite spatial resolution and latency needed to predict high ramp rate events obtained from a bottom-up perspective is strongly correlated with cloud-induced fluctuations. The development of grid management practices for improved integration of renewable solar energy thus also benefits from a multi-sensor camera array. The data needs for both 3D cloud radiation modelling and solar forecasting are being addressed using a network of low-cost upward-looking visible light CCD sky cameras positioned at 2 km spacing over an area of 30-60 km in size acquiring imagery on 30 second intervals. Such cameras can be manufactured in quantity and deployed by citizen volunteers at a marginal cost of 200-400 and operated unattended using existing communications infrastructure. A trial phase to understand the potential utility of up-looking multi-sensor visible imagery is underway within this NASA Citizen Science project. To develop the initial data sets necessary to optimally design a multi-sensor cloud camera array a team of 100 citizen scientists using self-owned PDA cameras is being

  9. Polarized scattered light from self-luminous exoplanets. Three-dimensional scattering radiative transfer with ARTES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolker, T.; Min, M.; Stam, D. M.; Mollière, P.; Dominik, C.; Waters, L. B. F. M.

    2017-11-01

    Context. Direct imaging has paved the way for atmospheric characterization of young and self-luminous gas giants. Scattering in a horizontally-inhomogeneous atmosphere causes the disk-integrated polarization of the thermal radiation to be linearly polarized, possibly detectable with the newest generation of high-contrast imaging instruments. Aims: We aim to investigate the effect of latitudinal and longitudinal cloud variations, circumplanetary disks, atmospheric oblateness, and cloud particle properties on the integrated degree and direction of polarization in the near-infrared. We want to understand how 3D atmospheric asymmetries affect the polarization signal in order to assess the potential of infrared polarimetry for direct imaging observations of planetary-mass companions. Methods: We have developed a three-dimensional Monte Carlo radiative transfer code (ARTES) for scattered light simulations in (exo)planetary atmospheres. The code is applicable to calculations of reflected light and thermal radiation in a spherical grid with a parameterized distribution of gas, clouds, hazes, and circumplanetary material. A gray atmosphere approximation is used for the thermal structure. Results: The disk-integrated degree of polarization of a horizontally-inhomogeneous atmosphere is maximal when the planet is flattened, the optical thickness of the equatorial clouds is large compared to the polar clouds, and the clouds are located at high altitude. For a flattened planet, the integrated polarization can both increase or decrease with respect to a spherical planet which depends on the horizontal distribution and optical thickness of the clouds. The direction of polarization can be either parallel or perpendicular to the projected direction of the rotation axis when clouds are zonally distributed. Rayleigh scattering by submicron-sized cloud particles will maximize the polarimetric signal whereas the integrated degree of polarization is significantly reduced with micron

  10. Radiation heat transfer in multitube, alkaline-metal thermal-to-electric converter

    SciT

    Tournier, J.M.P.; El-Genk, M.S.

    Vapor anode, multitube Alkali-Metal Thermal-to-Electric Converters (AMTECs) are being considered for a number of space missions, such as the NASA Pluto/Express (PX) and Europa missions, scheduled for the years 2004 and 2005, respectively. These static converters can achieve a high fraction of Carnot efficiency at relatively low operating temperatures. An optimized cell can potentially provide a conversion efficiency between 20 and 30 percent, when operated at a hot-side temperature of 1000--1200 K and a cold-side temperature of 550--650 K. A comprehensive modeling and testing program of vapor anode, multitube AMTEC cells has been underway for more than three years atmore » the Air Force Research Laboratory`s Power and Thermal Group (AFRL/VSDVP), jointly with the University of New Mexico`s Institute for Space and Nuclear Power Studies. The objective of this program is to demonstrate the readiness of AMTECs for flight on fu