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Sample records for harboring t315i mutation

  1. Aurora A Kinase Inhibitor AKI603 Induces Cellular Senescence in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Cells Harboring T315I Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Le-Xun; Wang, Jun-Dan; Chen, Jia-Jie; Long, Bing; Liu, Ling-Ling; Tu, Xi-Xiang; Luo, Yu; Hu, Yuan; Lin, Dong-Jun; Lu, Gui; Long, Zi-Jie; Liu, Quentin

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of resistance to imatinib mediated by mutations in the BCR-ABL has become a major challenge in the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Alternative therapeutic strategies to override imatinib-resistant CML are urgently needed. In this study, we investigated the effect of AKI603, a novel small molecule inhibitor of Aurora kinase A (AurA) to overcome resistance mediated by BCR-ABL-T315I mutation. Our results showed that AKI603 exhibited strong anti-proliferative activity in leukemic cells. AKI603 inhibited cell proliferation and colony formation capacities in imatinib-resistant CML cells by inducing cell cycle arrest with polyploidy accumulation. Surprisingly, inhibition of AurA by AKI603 induced leukemia cell senescence in both BCR-ABL wild type and T315I mutation cells. Furthermore, the induction of senescence was associated with enhancing reactive oxygen species (ROS) level. Moreover, the anti-tumor effect of AKI603 was proved in the BALB/c nude mice KBM5-T315I xenograft model. Taken together, our data demonstrate that the small molecule AurA inhibitor AKI603 may be used to overcome drug resistance induced by BCR-ABL-T315I mutation in CML. PMID:27824120

  2. PF-114, a potent and selective inhibitor of native and mutated BCR/ABL is active against Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph+) leukemias harboring the T315I mutation.

    PubMed

    Mian, A A; Rafiei, A; Haberbosch, I; Zeifman, A; Titov, I; Stroylov, V; Metodieva, A; Stroganov, O; Novikov, F; Brill, B; Chilov, G; Hoelzer, D; Ottmann, O G; Ruthardt, M

    2015-05-01

    Targeting BCR/ABL with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) is a proven concept for the treatment of Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph+) leukemias. Resistance attributable to either kinase mutations in BCR/ABL or nonmutational mechanisms remains the major clinical challenge. With the exception of ponatinib, all approved TKIs are unable to inhibit the 'gatekeeper' mutation T315I. However, a broad spectrum of kinase inhibition increases the off-target effects of TKIs and may be responsible for cardiovascular issues of ponatinib. Thus, there is a need for more selective options for the treatment of resistant Ph+ leukemias. PF-114 is a novel TKI developed with the specifications of (i) targeting T315I and other resistance mutations in BCR/ABL; (ii) achieving a high selectivity to improve safety; and (iii) overcoming nonmutational resistance in Ph+ leukemias. PF-114 inhibited BCR/ABL and clinically important mutants including T315I at nanomolar concentrations. It suppressed primary Ph+ acute lymphatic leukemia-derived long-term cultures that either displayed nonmutational resistance or harbor the T315I. In BCR/ABL- or BCR/ABL-T315I-driven murine leukemia as well as in xenograft models of primary Ph+ leukemia harboring the T315I, PF-114 significantly prolonged survival to a similar extent as ponatinib. Our work supports clinical evaluation of PF-114 for the treatment of resistant Ph+ leukemia.

  3. Ultra-deep sequencing leads to earlier and more sensitive detection of the tyrosine kinase inhibitor resistance mutation T315I in chronic myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Baer, Constance; Kern, Wolfgang; Koch, Sarah; Nadarajah, Niroshan; Schindela, Sonja; Meggendorfer, Manja; Haferlach, Claudia; Haferlach, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia cells acquire resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors through mutations in the ABL1 kinase domain. The T315I mutation mediates resistance to imatinib, dasatinib, nilotinib and bosutinib, whereas sensitivity to ponatinib remains. Mutation detection by conventional Sanger sequencing requires 10%–20% expansion of the mutated subclone. We studied the T315I mutation development by ultra-deep sequencing on the 454 XL+ platform (Roche) in comparison to Sanger sequencing. By ultra-deep sequencing, mutations were detected at loads of 1%–2%. We selected 40 patients who had failed first-line to third-line treatment (imatinib, dasatinib, nilotinib) and had high loads of the T315I mutation detected by Sanger sequencing. We confirmed T315I mutations by ultra-deep sequencing and investigated the mutation dynamics by backtracking earlier samples. In 20 of 40 patients, we identified the T315I three months (median) before Sanger sequencing detection limits were reached. To exclude sporadic low percentage mutation development without subsequent mutation outgrowth, we selected 42 patients without resistance mutations detected by Sanger sequencing but loss of major molecular response. Here, no mutation was detected by ultradeep sequencing. Additional non-T315I resistance mutations were found in 20 of 40 patients. Only 15% had two mutations per cell; the other cases showed multiple independently mutated clones and the T315I clone demonstrated a rapid outgrowth. In conclusion, T315I mutations could be detected earlier by ultra-deep sequencing compared to Sanger sequencing in a selected group of cases. Earlier mutation detection by ultra-deep sequencing might allow treatment to be changed before clonal increase of cells with the T315I mutation. PMID:27102501

  4. Ultra-deep sequencing leads to earlier and more sensitive detection of the tyrosine kinase inhibitor resistance mutation T315I in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Baer, Constance; Kern, Wolfgang; Koch, Sarah; Nadarajah, Niroshan; Schindela, Sonja; Meggendorfer, Manja; Haferlach, Claudia; Haferlach, Torsten

    2016-07-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia cells acquire resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors through mutations in the ABL1 kinase domain. The T315I mutation mediates resistance to imatinib, dasatinib, nilotinib and bosutinib, whereas sensitivity to ponatinib remains. Mutation detection by conventional Sanger sequencing requires 10%-20% expansion of the mutated subclone. We studied the T315I mutation development by ultra-deep sequencing on the 454 XL+ platform (Roche) in comparison to Sanger sequencing. By ultra-deep sequencing, mutations were detected at loads of 1%-2%. We selected 40 patients who had failed first-line to third-line treatment (imatinib, dasatinib, nilotinib) and had high loads of the T315I mutation detected by Sanger sequencing. We confirmed T315I mutations by ultra-deep sequencing and investigated the mutation dynamics by backtracking earlier samples. In 20 of 40 patients, we identified the T315I three months (median) before Sanger sequencing detection limits were reached. To exclude sporadic low percentage mutation development without subsequent mutation outgrowth, we selected 42 patients without resistance mutations detected by Sanger sequencing but loss of major molecular response. Here, no mutation was detected by ultradeep sequencing. Additional non-T315I resistance mutations were found in 20 of 40 patients. Only 15% had two mutations per cell; the other cases showed multiple independently mutated clones and the T315I clone demonstrated a rapid outgrowth. In conclusion, T315I mutations could be detected earlier by ultra-deep sequencing compared to Sanger sequencing in a selected group of cases. Earlier mutation detection by ultra-deep sequencing might allow treatment to be changed before clonal increase of cells with the T315I mutation.

  5. AP24534, a Pan-BCR-ABL Inhibitor for Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, Potently Inhibits the T315I Mutant and Overcomes Mutation-Based Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    O’Hare, Thomas; Shakespeare, William C.; Zhu, Xiaotian; Eide, Christopher A.; Rivera, Victor M.; Wang, Frank; Adrian, Lauren T.; Zhou, Tianjun; Huang, Wei-Sheng; Xu, Qihong; Metcalf, III, Chester A.; Tyner, Jeffrey W.; Loriaux, Marc M.; Corbin, Amie S.; Wardwell, Scott; Ning, Yaoyu; Keats, Jeffrey A.; Wang, Yihan; Sundaramoorthi, Raji; Thomas, Mathew; Zhou, Dong; Snodgrass, Joseph; Commodore, Lois; Sawyer, Tomi K.; Dalgarno, David C.; Deininger, Michael W.N.; Druker, Brian J.; Clackson, Tim

    2010-09-07

    Inhibition of BCR-ABL by imatinib induces durable responses in many patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), but resistance attributable to kinase domain mutations can lead to relapse and a switch to second-line therapy with nilotinib or dasatinib. Despite three approved therapeutic options, the cross-resistant BCR-ABL{sup T315I} mutation and compound mutants selected on sequential inhibitor therapy remain major clinical challenges. We report design and preclinical evaluation of AP24534, a potent, orally available multitargeted kinase inhibitor active against T315I and other BCR-ABL mutants. AP24534 inhibited all tested BCR-ABL mutants in cellular and biochemical assays, suppressed BCR-ABL{sup T315I}-driven tumor growth in mice, and completely abrogated resistance in cell-based mutagenesis screens. Our work supports clinical evaluation of AP24534 as a pan-BCR-ABL inhibitor for treatment of CML.

  6. AP24534, a Pan-BCR-ABL Inhibitor for Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, Potently Inhibits the T315I Mutant and Overcomes Mutation-Based Resistance

    PubMed Central

    O’Hare, Thomas; Shakespeare, William C.; Zhu, Xiaotian; Eide, Christopher A.; Rivera, Victor M.; Wang, Frank; Adrian, Lauren T.; Zhou, Tianjun; Huang, Wei-Sheng; Xu, Qihong; Metcalf, Chester A.; Tyner, Jeffrey W.; Loriaux, Marc M.; Corbin, Amie S.; Wardwell, Scott; Ning, Yaoyu; Keats, Jeffrey A.; Wang, Yihan; Sundaramoorthi, Raji; Thomas, Mathew; Zhou, Dong; Snodgrass, Joseph; Commodore, Lois; Sawyer, Tomi K.; Dalgarno, David C.; Deininger, Michael W.N.; Druker, Brian J.; Clackson, Tim

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Inhibition of BCR-ABL by imatinib induces durable responses in many patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), but resistance attributable to kinase domain mutations can lead to relapse and a switch to second-line therapy with nilotinib or dasatinib. Despite three approved therapeutic options, the cross-resistant BCR-ABLT315I mutation and compound mutants selected on sequential inhibitor therapy remain major clinical challenges. We report design and pre-clinical evaluation of AP24534, a potent, orally available multi-targeted kinase inhibitor active against T315I and other BCR-ABL mutants. AP24534 inhibited all tested BCR-ABL mutants in cellular and biochemical assays, suppressed BCR-ABLT315I-driven tumor growth in mice, and completely abrogated resistance in cell-based mutagenesis screens. Our work supports clinical evaluation of AP24534 as a pan-BCR-ABL inhibitor for treatment of CML. PMID:19878872

  7. Detailed conformation dynamics and activation process of wild type c-Abl and T315I mutant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Li-Jun; Zhao, Wen-Hua; Liu, Qian

    2014-10-01

    Bcr-Abl is an important target for therapy against chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL). The synergistic effect between myristyl pocket and the ATP pocket has been found. But its detailed information based on molecular level still has not been achieved. In this study, conventional molecular dynamics (CMD) and target molecular dynamics (TMD) simulations were performed to explore the effect of T315I mutation on dynamics and activation process of Abl containing the N-terminal cap (Ncap). The CMD simulation results reveal the increasing flexibility of ATP pocket in kinase domain (KD) after T315I mutation which confirms the disability of ATP-pocket inhibitors to the Abl-T315I mutant. On the contrary, the T315I mutation decreased the flexibility of remote helix αI which suggests the synergistic effect between them. The mobility of farther regions containing Ncap, SH3, SH2 and SH2-KD linker were not affected by T315I mutation. The TMD simulation results show that the activation process of wild type Abl and Abl-T315I mutant experienced global conformation change. Their differences were elucidated by the activation motion of subsegments including A-loop, P-loop and Ncap. Besides, the T315I mutation caused decreasing energy barrier and increasing intermediate number in activation process, which results easier activation process. The TMD and CMD results indicate that a drug targeting only the ATP pocket is not enough to inhibit the Abl-T315I mutant. An effective way to inhibit the abnormal activity of Abl-T315I mutant is to combine the ATP-pocket inhibitors with inhibitors binding at non-ATP pockets mainly related to Ncap, SH2-KD linker and myristyl pocket.

  8. Conformational control inhibition of the BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase, including the gatekeeper T315I mutant, by the switch-control inhibitor DCC-2036

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Wayne W.; Wise, Scott C.; Kaufman, Michael D.; Ahn, Yu Mi; Ensinger, Carol L.; Haack, Torsten; Hood, Molly M.; Jones, Jennifer; Lord, John W.; Lu, Wei Ping; Miller, David; Patt, William C.; Smith, Bryan D.; Petillo, Peter A.; Rutkoski, Thomas J.; Telikepalli, Hanumaiah; Vogeti, Lakshminarayana; Yao, Tony; Chun, Lawrence; Clark, Robin; Evangelista, Peter; Gavrilescu, L. Cristina; Lazarides, Katherine; Zaleskas, Virginia M.; Stewart, Lance J.; Van Etten, Richard A.; Flynn, Daniel L.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Acquired resistance to ABL1 tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) through ABL1 kinase domain mutations, particularly the gatekeeper mutant T315I, is a significant problem for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients. Using structure-based drug design, we developed compounds that bind to residues (Arg386/Glu282) ABL1 uses to switch between inactive and active conformations. The lead “switch-control” inhibitor, DCC-2036, potently inhibits both unphosphorylated and phosphorylated ABL1 by inducing a type II inactive conformation, and retains efficacy against the majority of clinically relevant CML resistance mutants, including T315I. DCC-2036 inhibits BCR-ABL1T315I-expressing cell lines, prolongs survival in mouse models of T315I-mutant CML and B-lymphoblastic leukemia, and inhibits primary patient leukemia cells expressing T315I in vitro and in vivo, supporting its clinical development in TKI-resistant Ph+ leukemia. PMID:21481795

  9. Sensitivity of imatinib-resistant T315I BCR-ABL CML to a synergistic combination of ponatinib and forskolin treatment.

    PubMed

    Oaxaca, Derrick M; Yang-Reid, Sun Ah; Ross, Jeremy A; Rodriguez, Georgialina; Staniswalis, Joan G; Kirken, Robert A

    2016-09-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have dramatically improved the life expectancy of patients suffering from chronic myeloid leukemia (CML); however, patients will eventually develop resistance to TKI therapy or adverse side effects due to secondary off-target mechanisms associated with TKIs. CML patients exhibiting TKI resistance are at greater risk of developing an aggressive and drug-insensitive disease. Drug-resistant CML typically arises in response to spontaneous mutations within the drug binding sites of the targeted oncoproteins. To better understand the mechanism of drug resistance in TKI-resistant CML patients, the BCR-ABL transformed cell line KCL22 was grown with increasing concentrations of imatinib for a period of 6 weeks. Subsequently, a drug-resistant derivative of the parental KCL22 cell line harboring the T315I gatekeeper mutation was isolated and investigated for TKI drug sensitivity via multi-agent drug screens. A synergistic combination of ponatinib- and forskolin-reduced cell viability was identified in this clinically relevant imatinib-resistant CML cell line, which also proved efficacious in other CML cell lines. In summary, this study provides new insight into the biological underpinnings of BCR-ABL-driven CML and potential rationale for investigating novel treatment strategies for patients with T315I CML.

  10. The chimeric ubiquitin ligase SH2-U-box inhibits the growth of imatinib-sensitive and resistant CML by targeting the native and T315I-mutant BCR-ABL

    PubMed Central

    Ru, Yi; Wang, Qinhao; Liu, Xiping; Zhang, Mei; Zhong, Daixing; Ye, Mingxiang; Li, Yuanchun; Han, Hua; Yao, Libo; Li, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is characterized by constitutively active fusion protein tyrosine kinase BCR-ABL. Although the tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) against BCR-ABL, imatinib, is the first-line therapy for CML, acquired resistance almost inevitably emerges. The underlying mechanism are point mutations within the BCR-ABL gene, among which T315I is notorious because it resists to almost all currently available inhibitors. Here we took use of a previously generated chimeric ubiquitin ligase, SH2-U-box, in which SH2 from the adaptor protein Grb2 acts as a binding domain for activated BCR-ABL, while U-box from CHIP functions as an E3 ubiquitin ligase domain, so as to target the ubiquitination and degradation of both native and T315I-mutant BCR-ABL. As such, SH2-U-box significantly inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis in CML cells harboring either the wild-type or T315I-mutant BCR-ABL (K562 or K562R), with BCR-ABL-dependent signaling pathways being repressed. Moreover, SH2-U-box worked in concert with imatinib in K562 cells. Importantly, SH2-U-box-carrying lentivirus could markedly suppress the growth of K562-xenografts in nude mice or K562R-xenografts in SCID mice, as well as that of primary CML cells. Collectively, by degrading the native and T315I-mutant BCR-ABL, the chimeric ubiquitin ligase SH2-U-box may serve as a potential therapy for both imatinib-sensitive and resistant CML. PMID:27329306

  11. SGX393 inhibits the CML mutant Bcr-Abl[superscript T315I] and preempts in vitro resistance when combined with nilotinib or dasatinib

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hare, Thomas; Eide, Christopher A.; Tyner, Jeffrey W.; Corbin, Amie S.; Wong, Matthew J.; Buchanan, Sean; Holme, Kevin; Jessen, Katayoun A.; Tang, Crystal; Lewis, Hal A.; Romero, Richard D.; Burley, Stephen K.; Deininger, Michael W.

    2010-01-12

    Imatinib inhibits Bcr-Abl, the oncogenic tyrosine kinase that causes chronic myeloid leukemia. The second-line inhibitors nilotinib and dasatinib are effective in patients with imatinib resistance resulting from Bcr-Abl kinase domain mutations. Bcr-Abl{sup T315I}, however, is resistant to all Abl kinase inhibitors in clinical use and is emerging as the most frequent cause of salvage therapy failure. SGX393 is a potent inhibitor of native and T315I-mutant Bcr-Abl kinase that blocks the growth of leukemia cell lines and primary hematopoietic cells expressing Bcr-Abl{sup T315I}, with minimal toxicity against Bcr-Abl-negative cell lines or normal bone marrow. A screen for Bcr-Abl mutants emerging in the presence of SGX393 revealed concentration-dependent reduction in the number and range of mutations. Combining SGX393 with nilotinib or dasatinib preempted emergence of resistant subclones, including Bcr-Abl{sup T315I}. These findings suggest that combination of a T315I inhibitor with the current clinically used inhibitors may be useful for reduction of Bcr-Abl mutants in Philadelphia chromosome-positive leukemia.

  12. Identification of novel tyrosine kinase inhibitors for drug resistant T315I mutant BCR-ABL: a virtual screening and molecular dynamics simulations study

    PubMed Central

    Banavath, Hemanth Naick; Sharma, Om Prakash; Kumar, Muthuvel Suresh; Baskaran, R.

    2014-01-01

    BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase plays a major role in the pathogenesis of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and is a proven target for drug development. Currently available drugs in the market are effective against CML; however, side-effects and drug-resistant mutations in BCR-ABL limit their full potential. Using high throughput virtual screening approach, we have screened several small molecule databases and docked against wild-type and drug resistant T315I mutant BCR-ABL. Drugs that are currently available, such as imatinib and ponatinib, were also docked against BCR-ABL protein to set a cutoff value for our screening. Selected lead compounds were further evaluated for chemical reactivity employing density functional theory approach, all selected ligands shows HLG value > 0.09900 and the binding free energy between protein-ligand complex interactions obtained was rescored using MM-GBSA. The selected compounds showed least ΔG score −71.53 KJ/mol to maximum −126.71 KJ/mol in both wild type and drug resistant T315I mutant BCR-ABL. Following which, the stability of the docking complexes were evaluated by molecular dynamics simulation (MD) using GROMACS4.5.5. Results uncovered seven lead molecules, designated with Drug-Bank and PubChem ids as DB07107, DB06977, ST013616, DB04200, ST007180 ST019342, and DB01172, which shows docking scores higher than imatinib and ponatinib. PMID:25382104

  13. Identification of novel tyrosine kinase inhibitors for drug resistant T315I mutant BCR-ABL: a virtual screening and molecular dynamics simulations study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banavath, Hemanth Naick; Sharma, Om Prakash; Kumar, Muthuvel Suresh; Baskaran, R.

    2014-11-01

    BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase plays a major role in the pathogenesis of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and is a proven target for drug development. Currently available drugs in the market are effective against CML; however, side-effects and drug-resistant mutations in BCR-ABL limit their full potential. Using high throughput virtual screening approach, we have screened several small molecule databases and docked against wild-type and drug resistant T315I mutant BCR-ABL. Drugs that are currently available, such as imatinib and ponatinib, were also docked against BCR-ABL protein to set a cutoff value for our screening. Selected lead compounds were further evaluated for chemical reactivity employing density functional theory approach, all selected ligands shows HLG value > 0.09900 and the binding free energy between protein-ligand complex interactions obtained was rescored using MM-GBSA. The selected compounds showed least ΔG score -71.53 KJ/mol to maximum -126.71 KJ/mol in both wild type and drug resistant T315I mutant BCR-ABL. Following which, the stability of the docking complexes were evaluated by molecular dynamics simulation (MD) using GROMACS4.5.5. Results uncovered seven lead molecules, designated with Drug-Bank and PubChem ids as DB07107, DB06977, ST013616, DB04200, ST007180 ST019342, and DB01172, which shows docking scores higher than imatinib and ponatinib.

  14. Natural-Based Indirubins Display Potent Cytotoxicity toward Wild-Type and T315I-Resistant Leukemia Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Gaboriaud-Kolar, Nicolas; Myrianthopoulos, Vasillios; Vougogiannopoulou, Konstantina; Gerolymatos, Panagiotis; Horne, David A; Jove, Richard; Mikros, Emmanuel; Nam, Sangkil; Skaltsounis, Alexios-Leandros

    2016-10-28

    Drug resistance in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) requires the development of new CML chemotherapeutic drugs. Indirubin, a well-known mutikinase inhibitor, is the major active component of "Danggui Longhui Wan", a Chinese traditional medicine used for the treatment of CML symptoms. An in-house collection of indirubin derivatives was screened at 1 μM on wild-type and imatinib-resistant T315I mutant CML cells. Herein are reported that only 15 analogues of the natural 6-bromoindirubin displayed potent cytotoxicity in the submicromolar range. Kinase assays in vitro show that eight out of the 15 active molecules strongly inhibited both c-Src and Abl oncogenic kinases in the nanomolar range. Most importantly, these eight molecules blocked the activity of T315I mutant Abl kinase at the submicromolar level and with analogue 22 exhibiting inhibitory activity at the low nanomolar range. Docking calculations suggested that active indirubins might inhibit T315I Abl kinase through an unprecedented binding to both active and Src-like inactive conformations. Analogue 22 is the first derivative of a natural product identified as an inhibitor of wild-type and imatinib-resistant T315I mutant Abl kinases.

  15. Discovery of 3-[2-(imidazo[1,2-b]pyridazin-3-yl)ethynyl]-4-methyl-N-{4-[(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)methyl]-3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl}benzamide (AP24534), a potent, orally active pan-inhibitor of breakpoint cluster region-abelson (BCR-ABL) kinase including the T315I gatekeeper mutant.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei-Sheng; Metcalf, Chester A; Sundaramoorthi, Raji; Wang, Yihan; Zou, Dong; Thomas, R Mathew; Zhu, Xiaotian; Cai, Lisi; Wen, David; Liu, Shuangying; Romero, Jan; Qi, Jiwei; Chen, Ingrid; Banda, Geetha; Lentini, Scott P; Das, Sasmita; Xu, Qihong; Keats, Jeff; Wang, Frank; Wardwell, Scott; Ning, Yaoyu; Snodgrass, Joseph T; Broudy, Marc I; Russian, Karin; Zhou, Tianjun; Commodore, Lois; Narasimhan, Narayana I; Mohemmad, Qurish K; Iuliucci, John; Rivera, Victor M; Dalgarno, David C; Sawyer, Tomi K; Clackson, Tim; Shakespeare, William C

    2010-06-24

    In the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) with BCR-ABL kinase inhibitors, the T315I gatekeeper mutant has emerged as resistant to all currently approved agents. This report describes the structure-guided design of a novel series of potent pan-inhibitors of BCR-ABL, including the T315I mutation. A key structural feature is the carbon-carbon triple bond linker which skirts the increased bulk of Ile315 side chain. Extensive SAR studies led to the discovery of development candidate 20g (AP24534), which inhibited the kinase activity of both native BCR-ABL and the T315I mutant with low nM IC(50)s, and potently inhibited proliferation of corresponding Ba/F3-derived cell lines. Daily oral administration of 20g significantly prolonged survival of mice injected intravenously with BCR-ABL(T315I) expressing Ba/F3 cells. These data, coupled with a favorable ADME profile, support the potential of 20g to be an effective treatment for CML, including patients refractory to all currently approved therapies.

  16. Discovery of 5-(arenethynyl) hetero-monocyclic derivatives as potent inhibitors of BCR-ABL including the T315I gatekeeper mutant.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Mathew; Huang, Wei-Sheng; Wen, David; Zhu, Xiaotian; Wang, Yihan; Metcalf, Chester A; Liu, Shuangying; Chen, Ingrid; Romero, Jan; Zou, Dong; Sundaramoorthi, Raji; Li, Feng; Qi, Jiwei; Cai, Lisi; Zhou, Tianjun; Commodore, Lois; Xu, Qihong; Keats, Jeff; Wang, Frank; Wardwell, Scott; Ning, Yaoyu; Snodgrass, Joseph T; Broudy, Marc I; Russian, Karin; Iuliucci, John; Rivera, Victor M; Sawyer, Tomi K; Dalgarno, David C; Clackson, Tim; Shakespeare, William C

    2011-06-15

    Ponatinib (AP24534) was previously identified as a pan-BCR-ABL inhibitor that potently inhibits the T315I gatekeeper mutant, and has advanced into clinical development for the treatment of refractory or resistant CML. In this study, we explored a novel series of five and six membered monocycles as alternate hinge-binding templates to replace the 6,5-fused imidazopyridazine core of ponatinib. Like ponatinib, these monocycles are tethered to pendant toluanilides via an ethynyl linker. Several compounds in this series displayed excellent in vitro potency against both native BCR-ABL and the T315I mutant. Notably, a subset of inhibitors exhibited desirable PK and were orally active in a mouse model of T315I-driven CML.

  17. Identification of common inhibitors of wild-type and T315I mutant of BCR-ABL through the parallel structure-based virtual screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hwangseo; Hong, Seunghee; Hong, Sungwoo

    2012-08-01

    Although the constitutively activated break-point cluster region-Abelson (BCR-ABL) tyrosine kinase was well known to be responsible for chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), the existence of drug-resistant mutants of BCR-ABL has made it difficult to develop effective anti-CML drugs. Here, we report the first example for a successful application of the structure-based virtual screening to identify two common inhibitors equipotent for the wild type and the most drug-resistant T315I mutant of BCR-ABL. Because both inhibitors were screened for having desirable physicochemical properties as a drug candidate and revealed micromolar inhibitory activities, they deserve consideration for further development by structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies to optimize the anti-CML activity. We also address the structural features relevant to the stabilizations of the identified inhibitors in the ATP-binding sites. The results indicate that the inhibitors should be less stabilized by the hydrogen-bond interactions with the change of the receptor from the wild type to T315I mutant due to the replacement of the hydroxy group with the ethyl moiety in the ATP-binding site. Nonetheless, the inhibitors are found to be capable of maintaining the potency for the mutant through the strengthening of hydrophobic interactions to the extent sufficient to compensate for the loss of some hydrogen bonds. This differential binding mode may serve as key information for designing new common inhibitors of the wild type and T315I mutant of BCR-ABL.

  18. Melanomas of unknown primary frequently harbor TERT-promoter mutations.

    PubMed

    Egberts, Friederike; Krüger, Sandra; Behrens, Hans M; Bergner, Inka; Papaspyrou, Giorgios; Werner, Jochen A; Alkatout, Ibrahim; Haag, Jochen; Hauschild, Axel; Röcken, Christoph

    2014-04-01

    Commonly, in patients with melanoma metastases of an unknown primary tumor (MUP), an extensive search for the primary tumor is carried out. Recently, highly recurrent telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT)-promoter mutations were found in malignant melanomas, which may function as driver mutations of skin cancer. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that MUP and mucosal melanomas harbor different prevalences of TERT-promoter mutations. Thirty-nine patients with MUP and 53 patients with mucosal melanomas were retrieved. In total, 152 paraffin samples of 92 patients were analyzed, and in 38 patients, multiple samples were tested. Mutational analysis of the TERT-promoter, BRAF, NRAS, and KIT genes was carried out. In total, 92 patients were eligible for mutational analysis. TERT-promoter mutations were found in 33 patients (35.9%): chr5, 1,295,228 C>T (18 patients); chr5, 1,295,250 C>T (11 patients); chr5, 1,295,228-229 CC>TT (three patients); chr5, 1,295,242-243 CC>TT (one patient). The mutations were significantly more prevalent in MUP [26 (66.7%)] than in mucosal melanomas [seven patients (13.2%); P<0.001]. In MUP, BRAF mutations were found in 46.2% of patients (18 patients) and NRAS mutations in 28.2% of patients (11 patients). In mucosal melanoma, NRAS mutations were found in 18.9% of patients (10), and BRAF and KIT mutations in 7.5% of patients (four patients), respectively. The prevalence of TERT-promoter mutations was associated with the patient's sex [23 (51.1%) men, 10 (21.3%) women; P=0.004]. No significant correlation was found between TERT-mutation and patient survival. The TERT-promoter genotype of MUP points toward a cutaneous and not mucosal origin. The significant sex differences merit further attention in having putative therapeutic implications.

  19. Strategies for Overcoming Resistance in Tumours Harboring BRAF Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Obaid, Nourah Mohammad; Bedard, Karen; Huang, Weei-Yuarn

    2017-01-01

    The development of resistance to previously effective treatments has been a challenge for health care providers and a fear for patients undergoing cancer therapy. This is an unfortunately frequent occurrence for patients undergoing targeted therapy for tumours harboring the activating V600E mutation of the BRAF gene. Since the initial identification of the BRAF mutation in 2002, a series of small molecular inhibitors that target the BRAFV600E have been developed, but intrinsic and acquired resistance to these drugs has presented an ongoing challenge. More recently, improvements in therapy have been achieved by combining the use of BRAF inhibitors with other drugs, such as inhibitors of the downstream effector mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK)/extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK) kinase (MEK). Despite improved success in response rates and in delaying resistance using combination therapy, ultimately, the acquisition of resistance remains a concern. Recent research articles have shed light on some of the underlying mechanisms of this resistance and have proposed numerous strategies that might be employed to overcome or avoid resistance to targeted therapies. This review will explore some of the resistance mechanisms, compare what is known in melanoma cancer to colorectal cancer, and discuss strategies under development to manage the development of resistance. PMID:28282860

  20. Strategies for Overcoming Resistance in Tumours Harboring BRAF Mutations.

    PubMed

    Obaid, Nourah Mohammad; Bedard, Karen; Huang, Weei-Yuarn

    2017-03-08

    The development of resistance to previously effective treatments has been a challenge for health care providers and a fear for patients undergoing cancer therapy. This is an unfortunately frequent occurrence for patients undergoing targeted therapy for tumours harboring the activating V600E mutation of the BRAF gene. Since the initial identification of the BRAF mutation in 2002, a series of small molecular inhibitors that target the BRAFV600E have been developed, but intrinsic and acquired resistance to these drugs has presented an ongoing challenge. More recently, improvements in therapy have been achieved by combining the use of BRAF inhibitors with other drugs, such as inhibitors of the downstream effector mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK)/extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK) kinase (MEK). Despite improved success in response rates and in delaying resistance using combination therapy, ultimately, the acquisition of resistance remains a concern. Recent research articles have shed light on some of the underlying mechanisms of this resistance and have proposed numerous strategies that might be employed to overcome or avoid resistance to targeted therapies. This review will explore some of the resistance mechanisms, compare what is known in melanoma cancer to colorectal cancer, and discuss strategies under development to manage the development of resistance.

  1. Fitness Conferred by BCR-ABL Kinase Domain Mutations Determines the Risk of Pre-Existing Resistance in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Skaggs, Brian; Gorre, Mercedes; Sawyers, Charles L.; Michor, Franziska

    2011-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is the first human malignancy to be successfully treated with a small molecule inhibitor, imatinib, targeting a mutant oncoprotein (BCR-ABL). Despite its successes, acquired resistance to imatinib leads to reduced drug efficacy and frequent progression of disease. Understanding the characteristics of pre-existing resistant cells is important for evaluating the benefits of first-line combination therapy with second generation inhibitors. However, due to limitations of assay sensitivity, determining the existence and characteristics of resistant cell clones at the start of therapy is difficult. Here we combined a mathematical modeling approach using branching processes with experimental data on the fitness changes (i.e., changes in net reproductive rate) conferred by BCR-ABL kinase domain mutations to investigate the likelihood, composition, and diversity of pre-existing resistance. Furthermore, we studied the impact of these factors on the response to tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Our approach predicts that in most patients, there is at most one resistant clone present at the time of diagnosis of their disease. Interestingly, patients are no more likely to harbor the most aggressive, pan-resistant T315I mutation than any other resistance mutation; however, T315I cells on average establish larger-sized clones at the time of diagnosis. We established that for patients diagnosed late, the relative benefit of combination therapy over monotherapy with imatinib is significant, while this benefit is modest for patients with a typically early diagnosis time. These findings, after pre-clinical validation, will have implications for the clinical management of CML: we recommend that patients with advanced-phase disease be treated with combination therapy with at least two tyrosine kinase inhibitors. PMID:22140458

  2. The impact of multiple low-level BCR-ABL1 mutations on response to ponatinib

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, David T. O.; Yeoman, Alexandra L.; Altamura, Haley K.; Jamison, Bronte A.; Field, Chani R.; Hodgson, J. Graeme; Lustgarten, Stephanie; Rivera, Victor M.; Hughes, Timothy P.; Branford, Susan

    2016-01-01

    The third-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) ponatinib shows activity against all common BCR-ABL1 single mutants, including the highly resistant BCR-ABL1-T315I mutant, improving outcome for patients with refractory chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). However, responses are variable, and causal baseline factors have not been well-studied. The type and number of low-level BCR-ABL1 mutations present after imatinib resistance has prognostic significance for subsequent treatment with nilotinib or dasatinib as second-line therapy. We therefore investigated the impact of low-level mutations detected by sensitive mass-spectrometry before ponatinib initiation (baseline) on treatment response in 363 TKI-resistant patients enrolled in the PONATINIB for Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Evaluation and Ph+ Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia trial, including 231 patients in chronic phase (CP-CML). Low-level mutations were detected in 53 patients (15%, including low-level T315I in 14 patients); most, however, did not undergo clonal expansion during ponatinib treatment and, moreover, no specific individual mutations were associated with inferior outcome. We demonstrate however, that the number of mutations detectable by mass spectrometry after TKI resistance is associated with response to ponatinib treatment and could be used to refine the therapeutic approach. Although CP-CML patients with T315I (63/231, 27%) had superior responses overall, those with multiple mutations detectable by mass spectrometry (20, 32%) had substantially inferior responses compared with those with T315I as the sole mutation detected (43, 68%). In contrast, for CP-CML patients without T315I, the inferior responses previously observed with nilotinib/dasatinib therapy for imatinib-resistant patients with multiple mutations were not seen with ponatinib treatment, suggesting that ponatinib may prove to be particularly advantageous for patients with multiple mutations detectable by mass spectrometry after TKI resistance

  3. Effective combination therapies in preclinical endocrine resistant breast cancer models harboring ER mutations

    PubMed Central

    Ladd, Brendon; Mazzola, Anne Marie; Bihani, Teeru; Lai, Zhongwu; Bradford, James; Collins, Michael; Barry, Evan; Goeppert, Anne U.; Weir, Hazel M.; Hearne, Kelly; Renshaw, Jonathan G.; Mohseni, Morvarid; Hurt, Elaine; Jalla, Sanjoo; Bao, Haifeng; Hollingsworth, Robert; Reimer, Corinne; Zinda, Michael; Fawell, Stephen; D'Cruz, Celina M.

    2016-01-01

    Although endocrine therapy is successfully used to treat patients with estrogen receptor (ER) positive breast cancer, a substantial proportion of this population will relapse. Several mechanisms of acquired resistance have been described including activation of the mTOR pathway, increased activity of CDK4 and activating mutations in ER. Using a patient derived xenograft model harboring a common activating ER ligand binding domain mutation (D538G), we evaluated several combinatorial strategies using the selective estrogen receptor degrader (SERD) fulvestrant in combination with chromatin modifying agents, and CDK4/6 and mTOR inhibitors. In this model, fulvestrant binds WT and MT ER, reduces ER protein levels, and downregulated ER target gene expression. Addition of JQ1 or vorinostat to fulvestrant resulted in tumor regression (41% and 22% regression, respectively) though no efficacy was seen when either agent was given alone. Interestingly, although the CDK4/6 inhibitor palbociclib and mTOR inhibitor everolimus were efficacious as monotherapies, long-term delayed tumor growth was only observed when co-administered with fulvestrant. This observation was consistent with a greater inhibition of compensatory signaling when palbociclib and everolimus were co-dosed with fulvestrant. The addition of fulvestrant to JQ1, vorinostat, everolimus and palbociclib also significantly reduced lung metastatic burden as compared to monotherapy. The combination potential of fulvestrant with palbociclib or everolimus were confirmed in an MCF7 CRISPR model harboring the Y537S ER activating mutation. Taken together, these data suggest that fulvestrant may have an important role in the treatment of ER positive breast cancer with acquired ER mutations. PMID:27472462

  4. Antitumor effects and molecular mechanisms of ponatinib on endometrial cancer cells harboring activating FGFR2 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Do-Hee; Kwak, Yeonui; Kim, Nam Doo; Sim, Taebo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aberrant mutational activation of FGFR2 is associated with endometrial cancers (ECs). AP24534 (ponatinib) currently undergoing clinical trials has been known to be an orally available multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Our biochemical kinase assay showed that AP24534 is potent against wild-type FGFR1-4 and 5 mutant FGFRs (V561M-FGFR1, N549H-FGFR2, K650E-FGFR3, G697C-FGFR3, N535K-FGFR4) and possesses the strongest kinase-inhibitory activity on N549H-FGFR2 (IC50 of 0.5 nM) among all FGFRs tested. We therefore investigated the effects of AP24534 on endometrial cancer cells harboring activating FGFR2 mutations and explored the underlying molecular mechanisms. AP24534 significantly inhibited the proliferation of endometrial cancer cells bearing activating FGFR2 mutations (N549K, K310R/N549K, S252W) and mainly induced G1/S cell cycle arrest leading to apoptosis. AP24534 also diminished the kinase activity of immunoprecipitated FGFR2 derived from MFE-296 and MFE-280 cells and reduced the phosphorylation of FGFR2 and FRS2 on MFE-296 and AN3CA cells. AP24534 caused substantial reductions in ERK phosphorylation, PLCγ signaling and STAT5 signal transduction on ECs bearing FGFR2 activating mutations. Akt signaling pathway was also deactivated by AP24534. AP24534 causes the chemotherapeutic effect through mainly the blockade of ERK, PLCγ and STAT5 signal transduction on ECs. Moreover, AP24534 inhibited migration and invasion of endometrial cancer cells with FGFR2 mutations. In addition, AP24534 significantly blocked anchorage-independent growth of endometrial cancer cells. We, for the first time, report the molecular mechanisms by which AP24534 exerts antitumor effects on ECs with FGFR2 activating mutations, which would provide mechanistic insight into ongoing clinical investigations of AP24534 for ECs. PMID:26574622

  5. Response to MET inhibitors in patients with stage IV lung adenocarcinomas harboring MET mutations causing exon 14 skipping

    PubMed Central

    Paik, Paul K.; Drilon, Alexander; Fan, Pang-Dian; Yu, Helena; Rekhtman, Natasha; Ginsberg, Michelle S.; Borsu, Laetitia; Schultz, Nikolaus; Berger, Michael F.; Rudin, Charles M.; Ladanyi, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the MET exon 14 RNA splice acceptor and donor sites, which lead to exon skipping, deletion of the juxtamembrane domain containing the Cbl E3-ubiquitin ligase binding site, and decreased turnover of the resultant aberrant MET protein, were previously reported to be oncogenic in preclinical models. We now report responses to the MET inhibitors crizotinib and cabozantinib in four patients with stage IV lung adenocarcinomas harboring mutations leading to MET exon 14 skipping, highlighting a new therapeutic strategy for the 4% of lung adenocarcinoma patients whose tumors harbor this previously underappreciated genetic alteration. PMID:25971939

  6. Efficacy of multimodal treatment for leptomeningeal metastases in a lung cancer harboring an EGFR mutation.

    PubMed

    Morichika, Daisuke; Kubo, Toshio; Gotoda, Hiroko; Tamura, Tomoki; Ohashi, Kadoaki; Hotta, Katsuyuki; Tabata, Masahiro; Kurozumi, Kazuhiko; Tanimoto, Mitsune; Kiura, Katsuyuki

    2016-01-01

    For lung cancer patients with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations, the advent of EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) has prolonged survival rates. Even though disease sites have been well controlled by EGFR-TKIs, some patients develop carcinomatous meningitis, which reduces their quality of life drastically. Although multidisciplinary approaches have improved patient survival and quality of life, the outcomes are not yet satisfactory. We report the case of a 54-year-old Japanese woman diagnosed with leptomeningeal metastases (LM) from a lung adenocarcinoma harboring an EGFR exon 21 L858R point mutation. She was treated with gefitinib for 2 months, and symptoms of LM emerged during the treatment period. Although the treatment was switched to erlotinib, disturbance of consciousness worsened because of progressive hydrocephalus. Because all extracranial lesions remained responsive to treatment, and the exon 20 T790M point mutation was not detected in cerebrospinal fluid, we placed a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. The patient's disturbed consciousness improved dramatically after the shunt was placed; however, the optic and auditory nerve impairments due to direct invasion of LM lesions into nerve canals persisted. Administration of bevacizumab subsequent to whole-brain radiotherapy reduced the cranial nerve impairment, and the patient survived for 10 months. In conclusion, a combination of erlotinib and ventriculoperitoneal shunt was effective for hydrocephalus, and the immediate administration of additional therapies, including bevacizumab and radiation therapy, was useful in a patient suffering from LM.

  7. Generation and analysis of mouse intestinal tumors and organoids harboring APC and K-Ras mutations.

    PubMed

    van Es, Johan H; Clevers, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Genetically engineered mouse models of intestinal cancer are experimental systems in which mice are genetically manipulated to develop malignancies in the gastrointestinal tract. These models enable researchers to study the mechanisms of onset, progression, and metastasis of the disease. They also provide a valuable biological system which is suitable for testing (novel) drugs in vivo. Recently, an in vitro culture model has been established in which intestinal epithelial stem cells can grow into three-dimensional, ever-expanding epithelial organoids that retain their original organ identity and genetic stability. This culture system has been applied to diseased epithelia, such as adenoma, adenocarcinoma, and Barrett's epithelium. These organoids can be particularly useful for studying the mechanisms of intestinal tumors and to test (novel) drugs in vitro. Here, we describe our current laboratory protocols to generate and analyze intestinal tumors and organoids harboring APC and K-Ras double mutations.

  8. BCR-ABL mutations in chronic myeloid leukemia treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors and impact on survival.

    PubMed

    Pagnano, Katia Borgia Barbosa; Bendit, Israel; Boquimpani, Carla; De Souza, Carmino Antonio; Miranda, Eliana C M; Zalcberg, Ilana; Larripa, Irene; Nardinelli, Luciana; Silveira, Rosana Antunes; Fogliatto, Laura; Spector, Nelson; Funke, Vaneuza; Pasquini, Ricardo; Hungria, Vania; Chiattone, Carlos Sérgio; Clementino, Nelma; Conchon, Monika; Moiraghi, Elena Beatriz; Lopez, Jose Luis; Pavlovsky, Carolina; Pavlovsky, Miguel A; Cervera, Eduardo E; Meillon, Luis Antonio; Simões, Belinda; Hamerschlak, Nelson; Bozzano, Alicia Helena Magarinos; Mayta, Ernesto; Cortes, Jorge; Bengió, Raquel M

    2015-01-01

    This is the largest Latin American study of BCR-ABL mutations in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients, resistant to imatinib (IM). In 195/467 (41%) patients, mutations were detected. The most frequent mutation was T315I (n = 31, 16%). Progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) at 5 years were lower in patients with BCR-ABL mutations (43% vs. 65%, p = 0.07 and 47% vs. 72%, p = 0.03, respectively) and in those with the T315I mutation (p = 0.003 and p = 0.03). OS and PFS were superior in subgroup who switched to second generation inhibitors (SGIs) after IM failure (OS: 50% vs. 39% p = 0.01; PFS: 48% vs. 30% p = 0.02). BCR-ABL mutations conferred a significant poor prognosis in CML patients.

  9. Adaptive responses to dasatinib-treated lung squamous cell cancer cells harboring DDR2 mutations.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yun; Kim, Jae-Young; Watters, January M; Fang, Bin; Kinose, Fumi; Song, Lanxi; Koomen, John M; Teer, Jamie K; Fisher, Kate; Chen, Yian Ann; Rix, Uwe; Haura, Eric B

    2014-12-15

    DDR2 mutations occur in approximately 4% of lung squamous cell cancer (SCC) where the tyrosine kinase inhibitor dasatinib has emerged as a new therapeutic option. We found that ERK and AKT phosphorylation was weakly inhibited by dasatinib in DDR2-mutant lung SCC cells, suggesting that dasatinib inhibits survival signals distinct from other oncogenic receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK) and/or compensatory signals exist that dampen dasatinib activity. To gain better insight into dasatinib's action in these cells, we assessed altered global tyrosine phosphorylation (pY) after dasatinib exposure using a mass spectrometry-based quantitative phosphoproteomics approach. Overlaying protein-protein interaction relationships upon this dasatinib-regulated pY network revealed decreased phosphorylation of Src family kinases and their targets. Conversely, dasatinib enhanced tyrosine phosphorylation in a panel of RTK and their signaling adaptor complexes, including EGFR, MET/GAB1, and IGF1R/IRS2, implicating a RTK-driven adaptive response associated with dasatinib. To address the significance of this observation, these results were further integrated with results from a small-molecule chemical library screen. We found that dasatinib combined with MET and insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF1R) inhibitors had a synergistic effect, and ligand stimulation of EGFR and MET rescued DDR2-mutant lung SCC cells from dasatinib-induced loss of cell viability. Importantly, we observed high levels of tyrosine-phosphorylated EGFR and MET in a panel of human lung SCC tissues harboring DDR2 mutations. Our results highlight potential RTK-driven adaptive-resistant mechanisms upon DDR2 targeting, and they suggest new, rationale cotargeting strategies for DDR2-mutant lung SCC.

  10. Degeneration of proprioceptive sensory nerve endings in mice harboring amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-causing mutations.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Sydney K; Kemp, Zachary; Hatzipetros, Theo; Vieira, Fernando; Valdez, Gregorio

    2015-12-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease that primarily targets the motor system. Although much is known about the effects of ALS on motor neurons and glial cells, little is known about its effect on proprioceptive sensory neurons. This study examines proprioceptive sensory neurons in mice harboring mutations associated with ALS, in SOD1(G93A) and TDP43(A315T) transgenic mice. In both transgenic lines, we found fewer proprioceptive sensory neurons containing fluorescently tagged cholera toxin in their soma five days after injecting this retrograde tracer into the tibialis anterior muscle. We asked whether this is due to neuronal loss or selective degeneration of peripheral nerve endings. We found no difference in the total number and size of proprioceptive sensory neuron soma between symptomatic SOD1(G93A) and control mice. However, analysis of proprioceptive nerve endings in muscles revealed early and significant alterations at Ia/II proprioceptive nerve endings in muscle spindles before the symptomatic phase of the disease. Although these changes occur alongside those at α-motor axons in SOD1(G93A) mice, Ia/II sensory nerve endings degenerate in the absence of obvious alterations in α-motor axons in TDP43(A315T) transgenic mice. We next asked whether proprioceptive nerve endings are similarly affected in the spinal cord and found that nerve endings terminating on α-motor neurons are affected during the symptomatic phase and after peripheral nerve endings begin to degenerate. Overall, we show that Ia/II proprioceptive sensory neurons are affected by ALS-causing mutations, with pathological changes starting at their peripheral nerve endings.

  11. Different spectra of recurrent gene mutations in subsets of chronic lymphocytic leukemia harboring stereotyped B-cell receptors

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Lesley-Ann; Young, Emma; Baliakas, Panagiotis; Hadzidimitriou, Anastasia; Moysiadis, Theodoros; Plevova, Karla; Rossi, Davide; Kminkova, Jana; Stalika, Evangelia; Pedersen, Lone Bredo; Malcikova, Jitka; Agathangelidis, Andreas; Davis, Zadie; Mansouri, Larry; Scarfò, Lydia; Boudjoghra, Myriam; Navarro, Alba; Muggen, Alice F.; Yan, Xiao-Jie; Nguyen-Khac, Florence; Larrayoz, Marta; Panagiotidis, Panagiotis; Chiorazzi, Nicholas; Niemann, Carsten Utoft; Belessi, Chrysoula; Campo, Elias; Strefford, Jonathan C.; Langerak, Anton W.; Oscier, David; Gaidano, Gianluca; Pospisilova, Sarka; Davi, Frederic; Ghia, Paolo; Stamatopoulos, Kostas; Rosenquist, Richard

    2016-01-01

    We report on markedly different frequencies of genetic lesions within subsets of chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients carrying mutated or unmutated stereotyped B-cell receptor immunoglobulins in the largest cohort (n=565) studied for this purpose. By combining data on recurrent gene mutations (BIRC3, MYD88, NOTCH1, SF3B1 and TP53) and cytogenetic aberrations, we reveal a subset-biased acquisition of gene mutations. More specifically, the frequency of NOTCH1 mutations was found to be enriched in subsets expressing unmutated immunoglobulin genes, i.e. #1, #6, #8 and #59 (22–34%), often in association with trisomy 12, and was significantly different (P<0.001) to the frequency observed in subset #2 (4%, aggressive disease, variable somatic hypermutation status) and subset #4 (1%, indolent disease, mutated immunoglobulin genes). Interestingly, subsets harboring a high frequency of NOTCH1 mutations were found to carry few (if any) SF3B1 mutations. This starkly contrasts with subsets #2 and #3 where, despite their immunogenetic differences, SF3B1 mutations occurred in 45% and 46% of cases, respectively. In addition, mutations within TP53, whilst enriched in subset #1 (16%), were rare in subsets #2 and #8 (both 2%), despite all being clinically aggressive. All subsets were negative for MYD88 mutations, whereas BIRC3 mutations were infrequent. Collectively, this striking bias and skewed distribution of mutations and cytogenetic aberrations within specific chronic lymphocytic leukemia subsets implies that the mechanisms underlying clinical aggressiveness are not uniform, but rather support the existence of distinct genetic pathways of clonal evolution governed by a particular stereotyped B-cell receptor selecting a certain molecular lesion(s). PMID:27198719

  12. Chemotherapeutic agents circumvent emergence of dasatinib-resistant BCR-ABL kinase mutations in a precise mouse model of Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Boulos, Nidal; Mulder, Heather L; Calabrese, Christopher R; Morrison, Jeffrey B; Rehg, Jerold E; Relling, Mary V; Sherr, Charles J; Williams, Richard T

    2011-03-31

    The introduction of cultured p185(BCR-ABL)-expressing (p185+) Arf (-/-) pre-B cells into healthy syngeneic mice induces aggressive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) that genetically and phenotypically mimics the human disease. We adapted this high-throughput Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph(+)) ALL animal model for in vivo luminescent imaging to investigate disease progression, targeted therapeutic response, and ALL relapse in living mice. Mice bearing high leukemic burdens (simulating human Ph(+) ALL at diagnosis) entered remission on maximally intensive, twice-daily dasatinib therapy, but invariably relapsed with disseminated and/or central nervous system disease. Although relapse was frequently accompanied by the eventual appearance of leukemic clones harboring BCR-ABL kinase domain (KD) mutations that confer drug resistance, their clonal emergence required prolonged dasatinib exposure. KD P-loop mutations predominated in mice receiving less intensive therapy, whereas high-dose treatment selected for T315I "gatekeeper" mutations resistant to all 3 Food and Drug Administration-approved BCR-ABL kinase inhibitors. The addition of dexamethasone and/or L-asparaginase to reduced-intensity dasatinib therapy improved long-term survival of the majority of mice that received all 3 drugs. Although non-tumor-cell-autonomous mechanisms can prevent full eradication of dasatinib-refractory ALL in this clinically relevant model, the emergence of resistance to BCR-ABL kinase inhibitors can be effectively circumvented by the addition of "conventional" chemotherapeutic agents with alternate antileukemic mechanisms of action.

  13. Immunostaining with EGFR mutation-specific antibodies: a reliable screening method for lung adenocarcinomas harboring EGFR mutation in biopsy and resection samples.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiangshan; Liu, Biao; Xu, Haodong; Yu, Bo; Shi, Shanshan; Zhang, Jin; Wang, Xuan; Wang, Jiandong; Lu, Zhenfeng; Ma, Henghui; Zhou, Xiaojun

    2013-08-01

    Mutation analysis of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is essential in determining the therapeutic strategy for lung adenocarcinoma. Immunohistochemical (IHC) staining with EGFR mutation-specific antibodies of del E746-A750 in exon 19 and L858R in exon 21 has been evaluated in resection specimens in a few studies but rarely in biopsy samples. A total of 169 cases (78 biopsies and 91 resected specimens) of lung adenocarcinoma with EGFR mutation status predefined by direct DNA sequencing were histologically examined, and IHC was performed using EGFR mutation-specific antibodies of del E746-A750 and L858R. The cases with positive results by IHC but negative results by direct DNA sequencing were examined by amplified refractory mutation system. Our results showed that the frequency of EGFR mutations for both E746-A750 deletion and L858R mutation was 38.5% (65/169) by DNA sequencing or amplified refractory mutation system and 34.3% (58/169) by IHC in lung adenocarcinomas. Based on molecular test results, the overall sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of IHC using these 2 antibodies in all (biopsy/resection) cases were 87.7% (80%/94.3%), 99.0% (97.9%/100%), 98.3% (96%/100%), and 92.8% (88.7%/96.6%), respectively. Lung adenocarcinomas with a predominant acinar, papillary, lepidic, or solid growth pattern more often harbor EGFR mutation of del E746-A750 or L858R. In conclusion, the immunostaining with EGFR del E746-A750 and L858R mutation antibodies is a reliable screening method with high specificity and sensitivity for identifying the EGFR mutation in both resected and biopsied lung adenocarcinomas.

  14. Rapid intracranial response to osimertinib, without radiotherapy, in nonsmall cell lung cancer patients harboring the EGFR T790M mutation

    PubMed Central

    Koba, Taro; Kijima, Takashi; Takimoto, Takayuki; Hirata, Haruhiko; Naito, Yujiro; Hamaguchi, Masanari; Otsuka, Tomoyuki; Kuroyama, Muneyoshi; Nagatomo, Izumi; Takeda, Yoshito; Kida, Hiroshi; Kumanogoh, Atsushi

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Most of nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients harboring epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activating mutations eventually acquire resistance to the first EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) therapy after varying periods of treatment. Of note, approximately one-third of those patients develop brain metastases, which deteriorate their quality of life and survival. The effect of systemic chemotherapy on brain metastases after acquisition of EGFR-TKI resistance is limited, and thus far, whole-brain radiation therapy, which may cause the harmful effect on neurocognitive functions, has been the only established therapeutic option for especially symptomatic brain metastases. Osimertinib is a third-generation oral, potent, and irreversible EGFR-TKI. It can bind to EGFRs with high affinity even when the EGFR T790M mutation exists in addition to the sensitizing mutations. Its clinical efficacy for NSCLC patients harboring the T790M mutation has already been shown; however, the evidence of osimertinib on brain metastases has not been documented well, especially in terms of the appropriate timing for treatment and its response evaluation. Patient concerns, Diagnoses, and Interventions: We experienced 2 NSCLC patients with the EGFR T790M mutation; a 67-year-old woman with symptomatic multiple brain metastases administered osimertinib as seventh-line chemotherapy, and a 76-year old man with an asymptomatic single brain metastasis administered osimertinib as fifth-line chemotherapy. Outcomes: These patients showed great response to osimertinib within 2 weeks without radiation therapy. Lessons: These are the first reports to reveal the rapid response of the brain metastases to osimertinib within 2 weeks. These cases suggest the possibility that preemptive administration of osimertinib may help patients to postpone or avoid radiation exposures. In addition, rapid reassessment of the effect of osimertinib on brain metastases could prevent patients

  15. Autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia in a Sicilian kindred harboring the 432insA mutation of the ARH gene.

    PubMed

    Barbagallo, C M; Emmanuele, G; Cefalù, A B; Fiore, B; Noto, D; Mazzarino, M C; Pace, A; Brogna, A; Rizzo, M; Corsini, A; Notarbartolo, A; Travali, S; Averna, M R

    2003-02-01

    We describe a Sicilian family presenting a recessive form of hypercholesterolemia harboring a mutation of the autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia (ARH) gene. In two of the three sibs, a 26-year-old male and a 22-year-old female, a severe hypercholesterolemia was diagnosed with very high levels of plasma cholesterol (15.9 and 12.2 mmol/l, respectively); tendon xanthomatas and xanthelasms were present and in the male proband was documented a diffuse coronary atherosclerotic disease with a rapid and fatal progression. Both the parents had normal or slightly increased levels of plasma cholesterol. All causes of secondary hypercholesterolemia were ruled out as well as an involvement of the LDL receptor or apoB genes. Beta-Sitosterol plasma levels were in the normal range. Cultured fibroblasts from skin biopsy from parents and the two probands displayed a normal ability to bind and degrade 125I-LDL. Direct sequencing of ARH gene demonstrated the presence of a 432insA mutation in homozygosis in the two probands; parents were heterozygotes for the same mutation. This mutation is the first report of a mutation of the ARH gene responsible for recessive forms of hypercholesterolemia in Sicily.

  16. Clinicopathologic features and outcomes of patients with lung adenocarcinomas harboring BRAF mutations in the Lung Cancer Mutation Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Villaruz, Liza C.; Socinski, Mark A.; Abberbock, Shira; Berry, Lynne D.; Johnson, Bruce E.; Kwiatkowski, David J; Iafrate, A. John; Varella-Garcia, Marileila; Franklin, Wilbur A.; Camidge, D. Ross; Sequist, Lecia V.; Haura, Eric B.; Ladanyi, Mark; Kurland, Brenda F.; Kugler, Kelly; Minna, John D; Bunn, Paul A.; Kris, Mark G.

    2014-01-01

    (1) PURPOSE The advent of effective targeted therapy in BRAFV600E mutant lung adenocarcinomas necessitates further exploration of the unique clinical features and behavior of advanced stage BRAF mutant lung adenocarcinomas. (2) PATIENTS AND METHODS We reviewed data from patients with advanced lung adenocarcinomas enrolled in the Lung Cancer Mutation Consortium whose tumors underwent testing for mutations in EGFR, KRAS, HER2, AKT1, BRAF, MEK1, NRAS, PIK3CA, ALK translocations, and MET amplification. (3) RESULTS Twenty-one BRAF mutations were identified in 951 patients with adenocarcinomas (2.2%: 95% CI 1.4 to 3.4%); 17 (81%: 95% CI 60 to 92%) were BRAFV600E and 4 were non-BRAFV600E mutations. Among the 733 cases tested for all 10 genes, BRAF mutations were more likely to occur in current or former smokers than most other genotypic abnormalities (BRAF versus sensitizing EGFR: 82% versus 36%, mid-P<0.001; versus ALK: 39%, mid-P=0.003; versus other mutations: 49%, mid-P=0.02; versus patients with more than one oncogenic driver (doubleton): 46%, mid-P=0.04.) The double mutation rate among patients with BRAF mutations was 16%, compared with 5% in patients with other genomic abnormalities (mid-P=0.045). Differences were not found in survival between patients with BRAF mutations and those with other genomic abnormalities (P>0.20). (4) CONCLUSIONS We demonstrate BRAF mutations occur in 2.2% of advanced stage lung adenocarcinomas, were most commonly V600E, were associated with distinct clinicopathologic features compared with other genomic subtypes and a high mutation rate in more than one gene, underscoring the importance of comprehensive genomic profiling in assessing patients with advanced lung adenocarcinomas. PMID:25273224

  17. Anti-cancer efficacy of SREBP inhibitor, alone or in combination with docetaxel, in prostate cancer harboring p53 mutations.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiangyan; Wu, Jason Boyang; Chung, Leland W K; Huang, Wen-Chin

    2015-12-01

    Mutant p53 proteins (mutant p53s) have oncogenic gain-of-function properties correlated with tumor grade, castration resistance, and prostate cancer (PCa) tumor recurrence. Docetaxel is a standard first-line treatment for metastatic castration-resistant PCa (mCRPC) after the failure of hormone therapy. However, most mCRPC patients who receive docetaxel experience only transient benefits and rapidly develop incurable drug resistance, which is closely correlated with the p53 mutation status. Mutant p53s were recently reported to regulate the metabolic pathways via sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs). Therefore, targeting the SREBP metabolic pathways with docetaxel as a combination therapy may offer a potential strategy to improve anti-tumor efficacy and delay cellular drug resistance in mCRPC harboring mutant p53s. Our previous data showed that fatostatin, a new SREBP inhibitor, inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in androgen receptor (AR)-positive PCa cell lines and xenograft mouse models. In this study, we demonstrated that mutant p53s activate the SREBP-mediated metabolic pathways in metastatic AR-negative PCa cells carrying mutant p53s. By blocking the SREBP pathways, fatostatin inhibited cell growth and induced apoptosis in metastatic AR-negative PCa cells harboring mutant p53s. Furthermore, the combination of fatostatin and docetaxel resulted in greater proliferation inhibition and apoptosis induction compared with single agent treatment in PCa cells in vitro and in vivo, especially those with mutant p53s. These data suggest for the first time that fatostatin alone or in combination with docetaxel could be exploited as a novel and promising therapy for metastatic PCa harboring p53 mutations.

  18. Anti-cancer efficacy of SREBP inhibitor, alone or in combination with docetaxel, in prostate cancer harboring p53 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiangyan; Wu, Jason Boyang; Chung, Leland W.K.; Huang, Wen-Chin

    2015-01-01

    Mutant p53 proteins (mutant p53s) have oncogenic gain-of-function properties correlated with tumor grade, castration resistance, and prostate cancer (PCa) tumor recurrence. Docetaxel is a standard first-line treatment for metastatic castration-resistant PCa (mCRPC) after the failure of hormone therapy. However, most mCRPC patients who receive docetaxel experience only transient benefits and rapidly develop incurable drug resistance, which is closely correlated with the p53 mutation status. Mutant p53s were recently reported to regulate the metabolic pathways via sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs). Therefore, targeting the SREBP metabolic pathways with docetaxel as a combination therapy may offer a potential strategy to improve anti-tumor efficacy and delay cellular drug resistance in mCRPC harboring mutant p53s. Our previous data showed that fatostatin, a new SREBP inhibitor, inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in androgen receptor (AR)-positive PCa cell lines and xenograft mouse models. In this study, we demonstrated that mutant p53s activate the SREBP-mediated metabolic pathways in metastatic AR-negative PCa cells carrying mutant p53s. By blocking the SREBP pathways, fatostatin inhibited cell growth and induced apoptosis in metastatic AR-negative PCa cells harboring mutant p53s. Furthermore, the combination of fatostatin and docetaxel resulted in greater proliferation inhibition and apoptosis induction compared with single agent treatment in PCa cells in vitro and in vivo, especially those with mutant p53s. These data suggest for the first time that fatostatin alone or in combination with docetaxel could be exploited as a novel and promising therapy for metastatic PCa harboring p53 mutations. PMID:26512780

  19. Esophageal melanomas harbor frequent NRAS mutations unlike melanomas of other mucosal sites.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Shigeki; Nakanishi, Yukihiro; Ogawa, Reiko; Kouda, Satoko; Kanai, Yae

    2009-05-01

    Mucosal melanomas have genetic alterations distinct from those in cutaneous melanomas. For example, NRAS- and BRAF-activating mutations occur frequently in cutaneous melanomas, but not in mucosal melanomas. We examined 16 esophageal melanomas for genetic alterations in NRAS, BRAF, and KIT to determine whether they exhibit genetic features common to melanomas arising from other mucosal sites. A sequencing analysis identified NRAS mutations in six cases; notably, four of these mutations were located in exon 1, an uncommon mutation site in cutaneous and other mucosal melanomas. BRAF and KIT mutations were found in one case each. Immunohistochemistry showed KIT expression in four cases, including the tumor with a KIT mutation and two other intramucosal tumors. The low frequency of BRAF mutations and the presence of a KIT mutation-positive case are findings similar to those of mucosal melanomas of other sites, but the prevalence of NRAS mutations was even higher than that of cutaneous melanomas. The present study implies that esophageal melanomas have genetic alterations unique from those observed in other mucosal melanomas.

  20. NF1-mutated melanoma tumors harbor distinct clinical and biological characteristics.

    PubMed

    Cirenajwis, Helena; Lauss, Martin; Ekedahl, Henrik; Törngren, Therese; Kvist, Anders; Saal, Lao H; Olsson, Håkan; Staaf, Johan; Carneiro, Ana; Ingvar, Christian; Harbst, Katja; Hayward, Nicholas K; Jönsson, Göran

    2017-03-07

    In general, melanoma can be considered as a UV-driven disease with an aggressive metastatic course and high mutational load, with only few tumors (acral, mucosal, and uveal melanomas) not induced by sunlight and possessing a lower mutational load. The most commonly activated pathway in melanoma is the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. However, the prognostic significance of mutational stratification is unclear and needs further investigation. Here, in silico we combined mutation data from 162 melanomas subjected to targeted deep sequencing with mutation data from three published studies. Tumors from 870 patients were grouped according to BRAF, RAS, NF1 mutation or triple-wild-type status and correlated with tumor and patient characteristics. We found that the NF1-mutated subtype had a higher mutational burden and strongest UV mutation signature. Searching for co-occurring mutated genes revealed the RASopathy genes PTPN11 and RASA2, as well as another RAS domain-containing gene RASSF2 enriched in the NF1 subtype after adjustment for mutational burden. We found that a larger proportion of the NF1-mutant tumors were from males and with older age at diagnosis. Importantly, we found an increased risk of death from melanoma (disease-specific survival, DSS; HR, 1.9; 95% CI, 1.21-3.10; P = 0.046) and poor overall survival (OS; HR, 2.0; 95% CI, 1.28-2.98; P = 0.01) in the NF1 subtype, which remained significant after adjustment for age, gender, and lesion type (DSS P = 0.03, OS P = 0.06, respectively). Melanoma genomic subtypes display different biological and clinical characteristics. The poor outcome observed in the NF1 subtype highlights the need for improved characterization of this group.

  1. Prolonged Response to Trastuzumab in a Patient With HER2-Nonamplified Breast Cancer With Elevated HER2 Dimerization Harboring an ERBB2 S310F Mutation.

    PubMed

    Chumsri, Saranya; Weidler, Jodi; Ali, Siraj; Balasubramanian, Sohail; Wallweber, Gerald; DeFazio-Eli, Lisa; Chenna, Ahmed; Huang, Weidong; DeRidder, Angela; Goicocheal, Lindsay; Perez, Edith A

    2015-09-01

    In the current genomic era, increasing evidence demonstrates that approximately 2% of HER2-negative breast cancers, by current standard testings, harbor activating mutations of ERBB2. However, whether patients with HER2-negative breast cancer with activating mutations of ERBB2 also experience response to anti-HER2 therapies remains unclear. This case report describes a patient with HER2-nonamplified heavily pretreated breast cancer who experienced prolonged response to trastuzumab in combination with pertuzumab and fulvestrant. Further molecular analysis demonstrated that her tumors had an elevated HER2 dimerization that corresponded to ERBB2 S310F mutation. Located in the extracellular domain of the HER2 protein, this mutation was reported to promote noncovalent dimerization that results in the activation of the downstream signaling pathways. This case highlights the fact that HER2-targeted therapy may be valuable in patients harboring an ERBB2 S310F mutation.

  2. Exon Skipping and Gene Transfer Restore Dystrophin Expression in Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells-Cardiomyocytes Harboring DMD Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Dick, Emily; Kalra, Spandan; Anderson, David; George, Vinoj; Ritso, Morten; Laval, Steven H.; Barresi, Rita; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; Lochmüller, Hanns

    2013-01-01

    With an incidence of ∼1:3,500 to 5,000 in male children, Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked disorder in which progressive muscle degeneration occurs and affected boys usually die in their twenties or thirties. Cardiac involvement occurs in 90% of patients and heart failure accounts for up to 40% of deaths. To enable new therapeutics such as gene therapy and exon skipping to be tested in human cardiomyocytes, we produced human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) from seven patients harboring mutations across the DMD gene. Mutations were retained during differentiation and analysis indicated the cardiomyocytes showed a dystrophic gene expression profile. Antisense oligonucleotide-mediated skipping of exon 51 restored dystrophin expression to ∼30% of normal levels in hiPSC-cardiomyocytes carrying exon 47–50 or 48–50 deletions. Alternatively, delivery of a dystrophin minigene to cardiomyocytes with a deletion in exon 35 or a point mutation in exon 70 allowed expression levels similar to those seen in healthy cells. This demonstrates that DMD hiPSC-cardiomyocytes provide a novel tool to evaluate whether new therapeutics can restore dystrophin expression in the heart. PMID:23829870

  3. Gene Coexpression Analyses Differentiate Networks Associated with Diverse Cancers Harboring TP53 Missense or Null Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Oros Klein, Kathleen; Oualkacha, Karim; Lafond, Marie-Hélène; Bhatnagar, Sahir; Tonin, Patricia N.; Greenwood, Celia M. T.

    2016-01-01

    In a variety of solid cancers, missense mutations in the well-established TP53 tumor suppressor gene may lead to the presence of a partially-functioning protein molecule, whereas mutations affecting the protein encoding reading frame, often referred to as null mutations, result in the absence of p53 protein. Both types of mutations have been observed in the same cancer type. As the resulting tumor biology may be quite different between these two groups, we used RNA-sequencing data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) from four different cancers with poor prognosis, namely ovarian, breast, lung and skin cancers, to compare the patterns of coexpression of genes in tumors grouped according to their TP53 missense or null mutation status. We used Weighted Gene Coexpression Network analysis (WGCNA) and a new test statistic built on differences between groups in the measures of gene connectivity. For each cancer, our analysis identified a set of genes showing differential coexpression patterns between the TP53 missense- and null mutation-carrying groups that was robust to the choice of the tuning parameter in WGCNA. After comparing these sets of genes across the four cancers, one gene (KIR3DL2) consistently showed differential coexpression patterns between the null and missense groups. KIR3DL2 is known to play an important role in regulating the immune response, which is consistent with our observation that this gene's strongly-correlated partners implicated many immune-related pathways. Examining mutation-type-related changes in correlations between sets of genes may provide new insight into tumor biology. PMID:27536319

  4. Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction in a child harboring a founder Hirschsprung RET mutation.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Valentina; Mosconi, Manuela; Nozza, Paolo; Murgia, Daniele; Mattioli, Girolamo; Ceccherini, Isabella; Pini Prato, Alessio

    2016-09-01

    Chronic intestinal pseudo obstruction (CIPO) is a rare clinical entity characterized by symptoms and signs of intestinal obstruction without either recognizable anatomical abnormalities or intestinal aganglionosis. A Chinese female infant presented to our institution with a clinical diagnosis of CIPO. Aganglionosis was ruled out by full thickness colonic and ileal biopsies and by rectal suction biopsies. Unexpectedly, direct sequencing and PCR amplification of RET proto-oncogene from peripheral blood extracted DNA identified a RET R114H mutation. This mutation has already been reported as strongly associated with Asian patients affected by Hirschsprung's disease (HSCR) and is considered a founder mutation in Asia. The same mutation has never been reported in patients with CIPO, so far. These findings support the role of RET in the development of the enteric nervous system but underline the importance of other genetic or environmental factors contributing to the gastrointestinal phenotype of the disease. Somehow, this RET R114H mutation proved to have a role in the etiology of both CIPO and HSCR and could contribute to a more diffuse imbalance of gut dysmotility. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Ampullary cancers harbor ELF3 tumor suppressor gene mutations and exhibit frequent WNT dysregulation

    PubMed Central

    Gingras, Marie-Claude; Covington, Kyle R.; Chang, David K.; Donehower, Lawrence A.; Gill, Anthony J.; Ittmann, Michael M.; Creighton, Chad J.; Johns, Amber L.; Shinbrot, Eve; Dewal, Ninad; Fisher, William E.; Pilarsky, Christian; Grützmann, Robert; Overman, Michael J.; Jamieson, Nigel B.; Van Buren, George; Drummond, Jennifer; Walker, Kimberly; Hampton, Oliver A.; Xi, Liu; Muzny, Donna M.; Doddapaneni, Harsha; Lee, Sandra L.; Bellair, Michelle; Hu, Jianhong; Han, Yi; Dinh, Huyen H.; Dahdouli, Mike; Samra, Jaswinder S.; Bailey, Peter; Waddell, Nicola; Pearson, John V.; Harliwong, Ivon; Wang, Huamin; Aust, Daniela; Oien, Karin A.; Hruban, Ralph H.; Hodges, Sally E.; McElhany, Amy; Saengboonmee, Charupong; Duthie, Fraser R.; Grimmond, Sean M.; Biankin, Andrew V.; Wheeler, David A.; Gibbs, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    The ampulla of Vater is a complex cellular environment from which adenocarcinomas arise to form a group of histopathologically heterogenous tumors. To evaluate the molecular features of these tumors, 98 ampullary adenocarcinomas, were evaluated and compared to 44 distal bile duct and 18 duodenal adenocarcinomas. Genomic analyses revealed mutations in the WNT signaling pathway among half of the patients and in all three adenocarcinomas irrespective of their origin and histological morphology. These tumors were characterized by a high frequency of inactivating mutations of ELF3, a high rate of microsatellite instability, and common focal deletions and amplifications, suggesting common attributes in the molecular pathogenesis are at play in these tumors. The high frequency of WNT pathway activating mutation, coupled with small molecule inhibitors of beta catenin in clinical trials, suggests future treatment decisions for these patients may be guided by genomic analysis. PMID:26804919

  6. Cardiolipin content in mitochondria from cultured skin fibroblasts harboring mutations in the mitochondrial ATP6 gene.

    PubMed

    El-Hafidi, Mohammed; Meschini, Maria Chiara; Rizza, Teresa; Santorelli, Filippo M; Bertini, Enrico; Carrozzo, Rosalba; Vázquez-Memije, Martha Elisa

    2011-12-01

    The role of phospholipids in normal assembly and organization of the membrane proteins has been well documented. Cardiolipin, a unique tetra-acyl phospholipid localized in the inner mitochondrial membrane, is implicated in the stability of many inner-membrane protein complexes. Loss of cardiolipin content, alterations in its acyl chain composition and/or cardiolipin peroxidation have been associated with dysfunction in multiple tissues in a variety of pathological conditions. The aim of this study was to analyze the phospholipid composition of the mitochondrial membrane in the four most frequent mutations in the ATP6 gene: L156R, L217R, L156P and L217P but, more importantly, to investigate the possible changes in the cardiolipin profile. Mitochondrial membranes from fibroblasts with mutations at codon 217 of the ATP6 gene, showed a different cardiolipin content compared to controls. Conversely, results similar to controls were obtained for mutations at codon 156. These findings may be attributed to differences in the biosynthesis and remodeling of cardiolipin at the level of the inner mitochondrial transmembrane related to some mutations of the ATP6 gene.

  7. BCR-ABL1 compound mutations combining key kinase domain positions confer clinical resistance to ponatinib in Ph chromosome-positive leukemia.

    PubMed

    Zabriskie, Matthew S; Eide, Christopher A; Tantravahi, Srinivas K; Vellore, Nadeem A; Estrada, Johanna; Nicolini, Franck E; Khoury, Hanna J; Larson, Richard A; Konopleva, Marina; Cortes, Jorge E; Kantarjian, Hagop; Jabbour, Elias J; Kornblau, Steven M; Lipton, Jeffrey H; Rea, Delphine; Stenke, Leif; Barbany, Gisela; Lange, Thoralf; Hernández-Boluda, Juan-Carlos; Ossenkoppele, Gert J; Press, Richard D; Chuah, Charles; Goldberg, Stuart L; Wetzler, Meir; Mahon, Francois-Xavier; Etienne, Gabriel; Baccarani, Michele; Soverini, Simona; Rosti, Gianantonio; Rousselot, Philippe; Friedman, Ran; Deininger, Marie; Reynolds, Kimberly R; Heaton, William L; Eiring, Anna M; Pomicter, Anthony D; Khorashad, Jamshid S; Kelley, Todd W; Baron, Riccardo; Druker, Brian J; Deininger, Michael W; O'Hare, Thomas

    2014-09-08

    Ponatinib is the only currently approved tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) that suppresses all BCR-ABL1 single mutants in Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph(+)) leukemia, including the recalcitrant BCR-ABL1(T315I) mutant. However, emergence of compound mutations in a BCR-ABL1 allele may confer ponatinib resistance. We found that clinically reported BCR-ABL1 compound mutants center on 12 key positions and confer varying resistance to imatinib, nilotinib, dasatinib, ponatinib, rebastinib, and bosutinib. T315I-inclusive compound mutants confer high-level resistance to TKIs, including ponatinib. In vitro resistance profiling was predictive of treatment outcomes in Ph(+) leukemia patients. Structural explanations for compound mutation-based resistance were obtained through molecular dynamics simulations. Our findings demonstrate that BCR-ABL1 compound mutants confer different levels of TKI resistance, necessitating rational treatment selection to optimize clinical outcome.

  8. Dual HER2 Blockade in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Harboring a HER2 Mutation.

    PubMed

    Mar, Nataliya; Vredenburgh, James J

    2015-10-01

    Identification of targetable oncogenic mutations in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has been a major advance in cancer treatment. Laboratory techniques to assess human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) positivity in NSCLC include immunohistochemistry (IHC) for protein overexpression, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) for gene amplification, and next generation sequencing (NGS) for HER2 gene mutations. These tests have a controversial prognostic and predictive value, with an emerging association between HER2 gene mutations and treatment response to HER2 targeted therapy. We present a case of a woman with metastatic lung adenocarcinoma with HER2 positivity assessed by IHC and FISH, as well as a high gene copy number noted on NGS. She was observed to have significant disease progression following standard first-line platinum doublet chemotherapy. She was started on dual HER2 blockade in the second-line setting, which yielded a great response in the liver with stable disease elsewhere. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing successful use of dual HER2 blockade in metastatic HER2 positive NSCLC. We also review common laboratory techniques for determining HER2 positivity in NSCLC and their clinical applications.

  9. Tau proteins harboring neurodegeneration-linked mutations impair kinesin translocation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dezhi; LaPointe, Nichole E; Guzman, Elmer; Pessino, Veronica; Wilson, Leslie; Feinstein, Stuart C; Valentine, Megan T

    2014-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that mutant tau proteins that cause neurodegeneration and dementia differentially alter kinesin translocation along microtubules (MTs) relative to normal tau in vitro. We employed complementary in vitro motility assays using purified recombinant kinesin, purified recombinant tau, and purified bovine brain α:β tubulin to isolate interactions among these components without any contribution by cellular regulatory mechanisms. We found that kinesin translocates slower along MTs assembled by any of three independent tau mutants (4-repeat P301L tau, 4-repeat ΔN296 tau, and 4-repeat R406W tau) relative to its translocation rate along MTs assembled by normal, 4-repeat wild type (WT) tau. Moreover, the R406W mutation exhibited isoform specific effects; while kinesin translocation along 4-repeat R406W tau assembled MTs is slower than along MTs assembled by 4-repeat WT tau, the R406W mutation had no effect in the 3-repeat tau context. These data provide strong support for the notion that aberrant modulation of kinesin translocation is a component of tau-mediated neuronal cell death and dementia. Finally, we showed that assembling MTs with taxol before coating them with mutant tau obscured effects of the mutant tau that were readily apparent using more physiologically relevant MTs assembled with tau alone, raising important issues regarding the use of taxol as an experimental reagent and novel insights into therapeutic mechanisms of taxol action.

  10. Efficient Generation of Gene-Modified Pigs Harboring Precise Orthologous Human Mutation via CRISPR/Cas9-Induced Homology-Directed Repair in Zygotes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaoyang; Wang, Lulu; Du, Yinan; Xie, Fei; Li, Liang; Liu, Yu; Liu, Chuanhong; Wang, Shiqiang; Zhang, Shibing; Huang, Xingxu; Wang, Yong; Wei, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Precise genetic mutation of model animals is highly valuable for functional investigation of human mutations. Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated 9 (Cas9)-induced homology-directed repair (HDR) is usually used for precise genetic mutation, being limited by the relatively low efficiency compared with that of non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). Although inhibition of NHEJ was shown to enhance HDR-derived mutation, in this work, without inhibition of NHEJ, we first generated gene-modified pigs harboring precise orthologous human mutation (Sox10 c.A325>T) via CRISPR/Cas9-induced HDR in zygotes using single-strand oligo DNA (ssODN) as template with an efficiency as high as 80%, indicating that pig zygotes exhibited high activities of HDR relative to NHEJ and were highly amendable to genetic mutation via CIRSPR/Cas9-induced HDR. Besides, we found a higher concentration of ssODN remarkably reduced HDR-derived mutation in pig zygotes, suggesting a possible balance for optimal HDR-derived mutation in zygotes between the excessive accessibility to HDR templates and the activities of HDR relative to NHEJ which appeared to be negatively correlated to ssODN concentration. In addition, the HDR-derived mutation, as well as those from NHEJ, extensively integrated into various tissues including gonad of founder pig without detected off-targeting, suggesting CRISPR/Cas9-induced HDR in zygotes is a reliable approach for precise genetic mutation in pigs.

  11. Anti-tumor activity of ESX1 on cancer cells harboring oncogenic K-ras mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Junta; Ishikawa, Susumu; Hamada, Jun-Ichi; Yanagihara, Masatomo; Koike, Takao; Hatakeyama, Masanori

    2008-05-23

    Human ESX1 is a 65-kilodalton (kDa) paired-like homeoprotein that is proteolytically processed into N-terminal 45-kDa and C-terminal 20-kDa fragments. The N-terminal ESX1 fragment, which contains the homeodomain, localizes to the nucleus and represses mRNA transcription from the K-ras gene. When we inoculated human colorectal carcinoma HCT116 constitutive expressing N-terminal region of ESX1 (N-ESX1) into nude mice, transfectant cells uniformly showed decreased tumor-forming activity compared with that of the parental cells. Furthermore, pretreatment of HCT116 carcinoma cells with a fusion protein consisting of N-ESX1 and the protein-transduction domain derived from the human immunodeficiency virus type-1 TAT protein gave rise to a dramatic reduction in the tumorigenicity of HCT116 cells in nude mice. Our results provide first in vivo evidence for the molecular targeting therapeutic application of the K-ras repressor ESX1, especially TAT-mediated transduction of N-ESX1, in the treatment of human cancers having oncogenic K-ras mutations.

  12. Characterization of acid flux in osteoclasts from patients harboring a G215R mutation in ClC-7

    SciTech Connect

    Henriksen, Kim Gram, Jeppe Neutzsky-Wulff, Anita Vibsig Jensen, Vicki Kaiser Dziegiel, Morten H. Bollerslev, Jens Karsdal, Morten A.

    2009-01-23

    The chloride-proton antiporter ClC-7 has been speculated to be involved in acidification of the lysosomes and the resorption lacunae in osteoclasts; however, neither direct measurements of chloride transport nor acidification have been performed. Human osteoclasts harboring a dominant negative mutation in ClC-7 (G215R) were isolated, and used these to investigate bone resorption measured by CTX-I, calcium release and pit scoring. The actin cytoskeleton of the osteoclasts was also investigated. ClC-7 enriched membranes from the osteoclasts were isolated, and used to test acidification rates in the presence of a V-ATPase and a chloride channel inhibitor, using a H{sup +} and Cl{sup -} driven approach. Finally, acidification rates in ClC-7 enriched membranes from ADOII osteoclasts and their corresponding controls were compared. Resorption by the G215R osteoclasts was reduced by 60% when measured by both CTX-I, calcium release, and pit area when comparing to age and sex matched controls. In addition, the ADOII osteoclasts showed no differences in actin ring formation. Finally, V-ATPase and chloride channel inhibitors completely abrogated the H{sup +} and Cl{sup -} driven acidification. Finally, the acid influx was reduced by maximally 50% in the ClC-7 deficient membrane fractions when comparing to controls. These data demonstrate that ClC-7 is essential for bone resorption, via its role in acidification of the lysosomes and resorption lacunae in osteoclasts.

  13. Increased co-expression of genes harboring the damaging de novo mutations in Chinese schizophrenic patients during prenatal development.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang; Li, Miaoxin; Yang, Zhenxing; Hu, Xun; Wu, Hei-Man; Ni, Peiyan; Ren, Hongyan; Deng, Wei; Li, Mingli; Ma, Xiaohong; Guo, Wanjun; Zhao, Liansheng; Wang, Yingcheng; Xiang, Bo; Lei, Wei; Sham, Pak C; Li, Tao

    2015-12-15

    Schizophrenia is a heritable, heterogeneous common psychiatric disorder. In this study, we evaluated the hypothesis that de novo variants (DNVs) contribute to the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. We performed exome sequencing in Chinese patients (N = 45) with schizophrenia and their unaffected parents (N = 90). Forty genes were found to contain DNVs. These genes had enriched transcriptional co-expression profile in prenatal frontal cortex (Bonferroni corrected p < 9.1 × 10(-3)), and in prenatal temporal and parietal regions (Bonferroni corrected p < 0.03). Also, four prenatal anatomical subregions (VCF, MFC, OFC and ITC) have shown significant enrichment of connectedness in co-expression networks. Moreover, four genes (LRP1, MACF1, DICER1 and ABCA2) harboring the damaging de novo mutations are strongly prioritized as susceptibility genes by multiple evidences. Our findings in Chinese schizophrenic patients indicate the pathogenic role of DNVs, supporting the hypothesis that schizophrenia is a neurodevelopmental disease.

  14. [Response of Erlotinib in Lung Adenocarcinoma Harboring EGFR Sensitive Mutation in Cerebrospinal Fluid: Case Report].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoyan; Yang, Hui; Xu, Huayan; Wang, Shasha; Gao, Hongjun

    2016-01-01

    背景与目的 脑是非小细胞肺癌(non-small cell lung cancer, NSCLC)常见的转移部位。有研究显示表皮生长因子受体酪氨酸激酶抑制剂(epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors, EGFR-TKI)可透过血脑屏障,发挥抗肿瘤作用。本例报道采用突变扩增阻滞系统(amplification refractory mutation system, ARMS)检测脑脊液EGFR突变指导临床治疗的可行性,并分析TKI治疗肺癌脑转移的疗效和安全性。方法 腰穿取得脑脊液标本,检测颅内压力,检验常规、生化及肿瘤标志物,查找脱落细胞,采用ARMS法检测EGFR基因突变,得到阳性结果后给予盐酸厄洛替尼(erlotinib,tarceva,特罗凯)治疗,150 mg,每天1次。按照实体瘤疗效评价标准1.1版(Response Evaluation Criteriation in Solid Tumours, RECIST v1.1)评价客观疗效,按照不良反应通用术语标准4.0版(Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v4.0, CTC AE v4.0)评估用药期间发生的不良事件。结果 该患者多线治疗后,颅内病灶控制欠佳,脑脊液中发现异型细胞,EGFR基因19外显子缺失突变,服用厄洛替尼4周后,颅内客观疗效为部分缓解(partial response, PR),颅外客观疗效为疾病稳定(stable disease, SD),颅内无进展生存期(progression-free survival, PFS)10.5个月,总生存期(overall survival, OS)11个月。主要不良反应为皮疹(1级)。结论 脑脊液检测EGFR突变可为制定治疗策略提供理论支持,根据不同的突变状态给予小分子靶向药物联合化疗,可分别控制颅内及颅外病灶。.

  15. Impact of regular aspirin use on overall and cancer-specific survival in patients with colorectal cancer harboring a PIK3CA mutation

    PubMed Central

    KOTHARI, NISHI; KIM, RICHARD; JORISSEN, ROBERT N.; DESAI, JAYESH; TIE, JEANNE; WONG, HUI-LI; FARRAGHER, IAN; JONES, IAN; DAY, FIONA L.; LI, SHAN; SAKTHINANDESWAREN, ANURATHA; PALMIERI, MICHELLE; LIPTON, LARA; SCHELL, MICHAEL; TEER, JAMIE K.; SHIBATA, DAVID; YEATMAN, TIMOTHY; SIEBER, OLIVER M.; GIBBS, PETER; TRAN, BEN

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent data have suggested that regular aspirin use improves overall and cancer-specific survival in the subset of colorectal cancer (CRC) patients harboring PIK3CA mutations. However, the number of PIK3CA-mutated CRC patients examined in these studies was modest. Our collaborative study aims to validate the association between regular aspirin use and survival in patients with PIK3CA-mutated CRC. Patients and methods Patients with PIK3CA-mutated CRC were identified at Moffitt Cancer Center (MCC) in the United States and Royal Melbourne Hospital (RMH) in Australia. Prospective clinicopathological data and survival data were available. At MCC, PIK3CA mutations were identified by targeted exome sequencing using the Illumina GAIIx Next Generation Sequencing platform. At RMH, Sanger sequencing was utilized. Multivariate survival analyses were conducted using Cox logistic regression. Results From a cohort of 1487 CRC patients, 185 patients harbored a PIK3CA mutation. Median age of patients with PIK3CA-mutated tumors was 72 years (range: 34 – 92) and median follow up was 54 months. Forty-nine (26%) patients used aspirin regularly. Regular aspirin use was not associated with improved overall survival (multivariate HR 0.96, p = 0.86). There was a trend towards improved cancer-specific survival (multivariate HR 0.60, p = 0.14), but this was not significant. Conclusions Despite examining a large number of patients, we did not confirm that regular aspirin use was associated with statistically significant improvements in survival in PIK3CA-mutated CRC patients. Prospective evaluation of this relationship is warranted. PMID:25549537

  16. Features and prognostic impact of distant metastasis in patients with stage IV lung adenocarcinoma harboring EGFR mutations: importance of bone metastasis.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Daichi; Ueda, Hiroyuki; Shimizu, Ryoko; Kato, Ryoji; Otoshi, Takehiro; Kawamura, Takahisa; Tamai, Koji; Shibata, Yumi; Matsumoto, Takeshi; Nagata, Kazuma; Otsuka, Kyoko; Nakagawa, Atsushi; Otsuka, Kojiro; Katakami, Nobuyuki; Tomii, Keisuke

    2014-06-01

    Mutated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and signaling pathways were associated with multiple brain and intra-pulmonary metastases, oncogenic progression and metastasis. However, features of metastasis to other organs and the independent prognostic influence of metastatic lesions were not elucidated in patients with lung cancer harboring EGFR mutations. Between January 2007 and April 2012, we treated 277 patients diagnosed with stage IV lung adenocarcinoma. Studied were 246 patients with available tumor EGFR mutation data who also underwent radiographic evaluation of lung, abdominal, brain, and bone metastases. The EGFR mutated group (N = 98) had significantly more metastatic lesions in the brain and bone than the wild-type group (N = 148): brain, 3 (1-93) versus 2 (1-32) median (range), P = 0.023; bone, 3 (1-43) versus 2 (1-27), P = 0.035, respectively. In addition, EGFR mutations were significantly more frequent in patients with multiple than non-multiple lung metastases (24/40 vs. 12/42, P = 0.004). Multivariate analysis showed that bone metastasis was a significant independent negative predictive factor of overall survival (OS) in patients with mutated [hazard ratio (HR) 2.04; 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.17-3.64; P = 0.011] and wild-type EGFR (HR 2.09; 95 % CI 1.37-3.20; P < 0.001). In conclusion, patients with mutated EGFR had more lung, brain, and bone metastases, and bone metastasis was an independent negative predictor of OS.

  17. Variable phenotypes in a family with mitochondrial encephalomyopathy harboring a 3291T > C mutation in mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Sunami, Yoko; Sugaya, Keizo; Chihara, Norio; Goto, Yu-ichi; Matsubara, Shiro

    2011-10-01

    We present a Japanese family suffering from mitochondrial encephalomyopathy associated with a T-to-C transition at mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) nucleotide position 3291. Clinical manifestations of the patients include cerebellar ataxia with myopathy, recurrent headache, and myoclonus and epilepsy. The phenotypic variation among the affected members of a single family and the mutational analysis showing maternal inheritance in a heteroplasmic fashion are consistent with well-recognized phenomena associated with many pathogenic point mutations of mtDNA tRNA genes. The 3291 mutation is a rare mtDNA mutation whose clinical presentation had only been reported in three sporadic cases. This is the first report of a family segregating the 3291 mutation with multigenerational matrilinear recurrence of mitochondrial encephalopathy. Our findings provide conclusive evidence for the pathogenicity of the 3291T > C mutation in mtDNA and its characteristic clinical heterogeneity.

  18. EGF-independent activation of cell-surface EGF receptors harboring mutations found in gefitinib-sensitive lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Choi, S H; Mendrola, J M; Lemmon, M A

    2007-03-08

    Several somatic mutations within the tyrosine kinase domain of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) have been identified that predict clinical response of non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) patients to gefitinib. To test the hypothesis that these mutations cause constitutive EGF receptor signaling, and to investigate its mechanistic basis, we expressed representative examples in a null background and analysed their biochemical properties. Each mutation caused significant EGF-independent tyrosine phosphorylation of EGFR, and allowed the receptor to promote Ba/F3 cell mitogenesis in the absence of EGF, arguing that these are oncogenic mutations. Active mutated receptors are present at the cell surface and are fully competent to bind EGF. Recent structural studies show that the inactive EGFR tyrosine kinase domain is autoinhibited by intramolecular interactions between its activation loop and alphaC helix. We find that mutations predicted to disrupt this autoinhibitory interaction (including several that have not been described in NSCLC) elevate EGF-independent tyrosine kinase activity, thus providing new insight into how somatic mutations activate EGFR and other ErbB family members.

  19. Intact Cohesion, Anaphase, and Chromosome Segregation in Human Cells Harboring Tumor-Derived Mutations in STAG2

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung-Sik; He, Xiaoyuan; Orr, Bernardo; Wutz, Gordana; Hill, Victoria; Peters, Jan-Michael; Compton, Duane A.; Waldman, Todd

    2016-01-01

    Somatic mutations of the cohesin complex subunit STAG2 are present in diverse tumor types. We and others have shown that STAG2 inactivation can lead to loss of sister chromatid cohesion and alterations in chromosome copy number in experimental systems. However, studies of naturally occurring human tumors have demonstrated little, if any, correlation between STAG2 mutational status and aneuploidy, and have further shown that STAG2-deficient tumors are often euploid. In an effort to provide insight into these discrepancies, here we analyze the effect of tumor-derived STAG2 mutations on the protein composition of cohesin and the expected mitotic phenotypes of STAG2 mutation. We find that many mutant STAG2 proteins retain their ability to interact with cohesin; however, the presence of mutant STAG2 resulted in a reduction in the ability of regulatory subunits WAPL, PDS5A, and PDS5B to interact with the core cohesin ring. Using AAV-mediated gene targeting, we then introduced nine tumor-derived mutations into the endogenous allele of STAG2 in cultured human cells. While all nonsense mutations led to defects in sister chromatid cohesion and a subset induced anaphase defects, missense mutations behaved like wild-type in these assays. Furthermore, only one of nine tumor-derived mutations tested induced overt alterations in chromosome counts. These data indicate that not all tumor-derived STAG2 mutations confer defects in cohesion, chromosome segregation, and ploidy, suggesting that there are likely to be other functional effects of STAG2 inactivation in human cancer cells that are relevant to cancer pathogenesis. PMID:26871722

  20. Clinical characteristics and response to tyrosine kinase inhibitors of patients with non-small cell lung cancer harboring uncommon epidermal growth factor receptor mutations

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Wang, Zheng; Hao, Xuezhi; Hu, Xingsheng; Wang, Hongyu; Wang, Yan; Ying, Jianming

    2017-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical features of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) harboring uncommon epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations, and the treatment outcomes of EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in these patients. Methods We retrospectively analyzed the data of 128 NSCLC patients pathologically diagnosed with uncommon EGFR mutation in the Department of Pathology, National Cancer Center/Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences & Peking Union Medical College and Beijing Hospital from January 2010 to December 2015, including 40 advanced patients who received EGFR-TKI. Results Among the total 128 patients, 11 patients were non-adenocarcinoma, including squamous carcinoma (3.9%), adenosquamous carcinoma (2.3%), large cell carcinoma (0.8%), and composite neuroendocrine carcinoma (1.6%). Single mutations accounted for 75.0% (96/128), including G719X (29.7%), S768I (18.0%), 20 exon insertion (13.3%), L861Q (12.5%),De novo T790M (0.8%), and T725 (0.8%). Thirty-two patients harbored complex mutations. Forty advanced patients received EGFR-TKI, the objective response rate (ORR) was 20.0%, the disease control rate (DCR) was 85.0%, and the progression-free survival (PFS) was 6.4 [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 4.8–7.9] months. The exploratory analysis of tumor response and PFS in 33 patients with G719X/S768I/L861Q subtypes showed that ORR was 21.2% (7/33), the DCR was 93.9% (31/33), and PFS was 7.6 (95% CI, 5.8–9.4) months. Patients with exon 20 insertion mutation andDe novo T790M experienced rapid disease progression with PFS no more than 2.7 months. Conclusions Uncommon EGFR-mutant NSCLCs are heterogeneous, EGFR-TKIs can have different efficacy in this specific subtype, and thus further individual assessment is required for each case. PMID:28373750

  1. Therapeutic efficacy of peramivir against H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses harboring the neuraminidase H275Y mutation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Masanori; Kodama, Makoto; Noshi, Takeshi; Yoshida, Ryu; Kanazu, Takushi; Nomura, Naoki; Soda, Kosuke; Isoda, Norikazu; Okamatsu, Masatoshi; Sakoda, Yoshihiro; Yamano, Yoshinori; Sato, Akihiko; Kida, Hiroshi

    2017-03-01

    High morbidity and mortality associated with human cases of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses, including H5N1 influenza virus, have been reported. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the antiviral effects of peramivir against HPAI viruses. In neuraminidase (NA) inhibition and virus replication inhibition assays, peramivir showed strong inhibitory activity against H5N1, H7N1 and H7N7 HPAI viruses with sub-nanomolar activity in enzyme assays. In H5N1 viruses containing the NA H275Y mutation, the antiviral activity of peramivir against the variant was lower than that against the wild-type. Evaluation of the in vivo antiviral activity showed that a single intravenous treatment of peramivir (10 mg/kg) prevented lethality in mice infected with wild-type H5N1 virus and also following infection with H5N1 virus with the H275Y mutation after a 5 day administration of peramivir (30 mg/kg). Furthermore, mice injected with peramivir showed low viral titers and low levels of proinflammatory cytokines in the lungs. These results suggest that peramivir has therapeutic activity against HPAI viruses even if the virus harbors the NA H275Y mutation.

  2. Dietary restriction-resistant human tumors harboring the PIK3CA-activating mutation H1047R are sensitive to metformin

    PubMed Central

    Cufí, Sílvia; Corominas-Faja, Bruna; Lopez-Bonet, Eugeni; Bonavia, Rosa; Pernas, Sonia; López, Isabel álvarez; Dorca, Joan; Martínez, Susana; López, Norberto Batista; Fernández, Severina Domínguez; Cuyàs, Elisabet; Visa, Joana; Rodríguez-Gallego, Esther; Quirantes-Piné, Rosa; Segura-Carretero, Antonio; Joven, Jorge; Martin-Castillo, Begoña; Menendez, Javier A.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer cells expressing constitutively active phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) are proliferative regardless of the absence of insulin, and they form dietary restriction (DR)-resistant tumors in vivo. Because the binding of insulin to its receptors activates the PI3K/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling cascade, activating mutations in the PIK3CA oncogene may determine tumor response to DR-like pharmacological strategies targeting the insulin and mTOR pathways. The anti-diabetic drug metformin is a stereotypical DR mimetic that exerts its anti-cancer activity through a dual mechanism involving insulin-related (systemic) and mTOR-related (cell-autonomous) effects. However, it remains unclear whether PIK3CA-activating mutations might preclude the anti-cancer activity of metformin in vivo. To model the oncogenic PIK3CA-driven early stages of cancer, we used the clonal breast cancer cell line MCF10DCIS.com, which harbors the gain-of-function H1047R hot-spot mutation in the catalytic domain of the PI3KCA gene and has been shown to form DR-refractory xenotumors. To model PIK3CA-activating mutations in late stages of cancer, we took advantage of the isogenic conversion of a PIK3CA-wild-type tumor into a PIK3CA H1047R-mutated tumor using the highly metastatic colorectal cancer cell line SW48. MCF10DCIS.com xenotumors, although only modestly affected by treatment with oral metformin (approximately 40% tumor growth inhibition), were highly sensitive to the intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of metformin, the anti-cancer activity of which increased in a time-dependent manner and reached >80% tumor growth inhibition by the end of the treatment. Metformin treatment via the i.p. route significantly reduced the proliferation factor mitotic activity index (MAI) and decreased tumor cellularity in MCF10DCIS.com cancer tissues. Whereas SW48-wild-type (PIK3CA+/+) cells rapidly formed metformin-refractory xenotumors in mice, ad libitum access to water containing

  3. Plasma MiRNA alterations between NSCLC patients harboring Del19 and L858R EGFR mutations

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yihan; Xu, Peiqi; Mi, Yanjun; Wang, Wenyi; Pan, Xiaoyan; Wu, Xiaoting; He, Qi; Liu, Hongming; Tang, Weiwei; An, Hanxiang

    2016-01-01

    Based on recognition of driver mutations, treatment paradigm for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients has been shifted. However, recently exon 19 deletion mutation (del19) of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) clearly shows better clinical benefit over single-point substitution mutation L858R in exon 21 (L858R). The aim of this study was to investigate the difference by analyzing the expression of plasma microRNAs (miRNAs) of NSCLC patients with EGFR mutation del19 or L858R. MiRNA microarray of plasma from patients' blood identified 79 mapped, network-eligible miRNAs (fold > 5), of which 76 were up regulated and 3 were down regulated. Genetic network was performed with Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA). Among analysis, MYC, Argonaute2 (AGO2), Y-box binding protein 1 (YBX1), cyclin E1 (CCNE1) were involved in organismal abnormalities and cancer. Our findings provide information on the epigenetic signature of the two major sensitive mutations among NSCLC and add to the understanding of mechanisms underlying the different outcomes. PMID:27463019

  4. Efficacy of Second-line Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors in the Treatment of Metastatic Advanced Non-small-cell Lung Cancer Harboring Exon 19 and 21 EGFR Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zhen; Jin, Xiance; Lin, Baochai; Su, Huafang; Chen, Hanbin; Fei, Shaoran; Zhao, Lihao; Deng, Xia; Xie, Deyao; Xie, Congying

    2017-01-01

    Background: Although superior clinical benefits of first-line epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in the treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) had been reported with different sensitivity, the sensitivity of second-line TKIs in NSCLC patients with different EFGR mutations was unknown. The purpose of this study is to investigate the clinical outcome of second-line EGFR-TKIs in the treatment of NSCLC patients according to different EGFR genotypes. Methods: The treatment outcomes of 166 NSCLC patients with different EGFR mutations treated by second-line TKIs were retrospectively reviewed. The efficacy was evaluated with Pearson chi-square or Fisher's exact tests, Log-rank test and Cox proportional hazards model. Results: The disease control rate (DCR) and objective response rate (ORR) of enrolled NSCLC patients were 77.7% and 11.4%, respectively. The exon 19 deletion group had a significantly longer median progression-free survival (PFS) (6.7 vs. 4.5 months, P=0.002) and overall survival (OS) (13.7 vs. 11.7 months, P=0.02) compared with the exon 19 L858R mutation group for NSCLC patients, as well for patients with brain metastasis [PFS: (6.7 vs. 3.9 months, p<0.001), OS: (13.7 vs. 7.9 months, p=0.006)]. No significant difference on PFS and OS was observed between exon 19 deletion and L858R mutation group for patients with bone metastasis. EGFR genotype and ECOG PS were independent predictors of PFS. Never smoking, exon 19 deletion, EGOC PS (0-1) and no brain metastasis were correlated with longer OS. No significant difference on side effect between exon 19 and 21 mutation group was observed. Conclusions: NSCLC patients harboring exon 19 deletion achieved better PFS and OS than those with L858R mutation, indicating that EGFR mutation is a significant prognostic factor for advanced NSCLC patients with and without brain metastasis receiving second-line EGFR-TKIs treatment. PMID:28367239

  5. Retigabine, a Kv7.2/Kv7.3-Channel Opener, Attenuates Drug-Induced Seizures in Knock-In Mice Harboring Kcnq2 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Ihara, Yukiko; Tomonoh, Yuko; Deshimaru, Masanobu; Zhang, Bo; Uchida, Taku; Ishii, Atsushi; Hirose, Shinichi

    2016-01-01

    The hetero-tetrameric voltage-gated potassium channel Kv7.2/Kv7.3, which is encoded by KCNQ2 and KCNQ3, plays an important role in limiting network excitability in the neonatal brain. Kv7.2/Kv7.3 dysfunction resulting from KCNQ2 mutations predominantly causes self-limited or benign epilepsy in neonates, but also causes early onset epileptic encephalopathy. Retigabine (RTG), a Kv7.2/ Kv7.3-channel opener, seems to be a rational antiepileptic drug for epilepsies caused by KCNQ2 mutations. We therefore evaluated the effects of RTG on seizures in two strains of knock-in mice harboring different Kcnq2 mutations, in comparison to the effects of phenobarbital (PB), which is the first-line antiepileptic drug for seizures in neonates. The subjects were heterozygous knock-in mice (Kcnq2Y284C/+ and Kcnq2A306T/+) bearing the Y284C or A306T Kcnq2 mutation, respectively, and their wild-type (WT) littermates, at 63–100 days of age. Seizures induced by intraperitoneal injection of kainic acid (KA, 12mg/kg) were recorded using a video-electroencephalography (EEG) monitoring system. Effects of RTG on KA-induced seizures of both strains of knock-in mice were assessed using seizure scores from a modified Racine’s scale and compared with those of PB. The number and total duration of spike bursts on EEG and behaviors monitored by video recording were also used to evaluate the effects of RTG and PB. Both Kcnq2Y284C/+ and Kcnq2A306T/+ mice showed significantly more KA-induced seizures than WT mice. RTG significantly attenuated KA-induced seizure activities in both Kcnq2Y284C/+ and Kcnq2A306T/+ mice, and more markedly than PB. This is the first reported evidence of RTG ameliorating KA-induced seizures in knock-in mice bearing mutations of Kcnq2, with more marked effects than those observed with PB. RTG or other Kv7.2-channel openers may be considered as first-line antiepileptic treatments for epilepsies resulting from KCNQ2 mutations. PMID:26910900

  6. Impact of active smoking on survival of patients with metastatic lung adenocarcinoma harboring an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation.

    PubMed

    Erdogan, Bulent; Kodaz, Hilmi; Karabulut, Senem; Cinkaya, Ahmet; Tozkir, Hilmi; Tanriverdi, Ozgur; Cabuk, Devrim; Hacioglu, Muhammed Bekir; Turkmen, Esma; Hacibekiroglu, Ilhan; Uzunoglu, Sernaz; Cicin, Irfan

    2016-11-10

    Lung cancer in smokers and non-smokers demonstrates distinct genetic profiles, and cigarette smoking affects epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) function and causes secondary EGFR tyrosine kinase resistance. We evaluated the effect of active smoking in patients with metastatic lung adenocarcinoma. A total of 132 metastatic lung adenocarcinoma patients, diagnosed between 2008 and 2013, with known EGFR mutation status, were evaluated retrospectively. Among these patients, 40 had an activating EGFR mutation. Patients who continued smoking during the treatment were defined as active smokers. Former smokers and never smokers were together defined as non-smokers. The outcomes of the treatment in relation to the EGFR mutation and smoking status were evaluated. The median follow-up time was 10.5 months. The overall response rate for the first-line therapy was significantly higher among the EGFR-mutant patients (p = 0.01), however, smoking status had no impact on the response rate (p = 0.1). The EGFR-mutant active smokers progressed earlier than the non-smokers (p < 0.01). The overall survival (OS) of the non-smokers and patients treated with erlotinib was significantly longer (p = 0.02 and p = 0.01, respectively). Smoking status did not affect the OS in EGFR wild type tumors (p = 0.49) but EGFR-mutant non-smokers had a longer OS than the active smokers (p = 0.01).The active smokers treated with erlotinib had poorer survival than the non-smokers (p = 0.03). Multivariate analysis of EGFR-mutant patients showed that erlotinib treatment at any line and non-smoking were independent prognostic factors for the OS (p = 0.04 and p = 0.01, respectively). Smoking during treatment is a negative prognostic factor in metastatic lung adenocarcinoma with an EGFR mutation.

  7. Increasing prevalence of ciprofloxacin-resistant food-borne Salmonella strains harboring multiple PMQR elements but not target gene mutations

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Dachuan; Chen, Kaichao; Wai-Chi Chan, Edward; Chen, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Fluoroquinolone resistance in Salmonella has become increasingly prevalent in recent years. To probe the molecular basis of this phenomenon, the genetic and phenotypic features of fluoroquinolone resistant Salmonella strains isolated from food samples were characterized. Among the 82 Salmonella strains tested, resistance rate of the three front line antibiotics of ceftriaxone, ciprofloxacin and azithromycin was 10%, 39% and 25% respectively, which is significantly higher than that reported in other countries. Ciprofloxacin resistant strains typically exhibited cross-resistance to multiple antibiotics including ceftriaxone, primarily due to the presence of multiple PMQR genes and the blaCTX-M-65, blaCTX-M-55 blaCMY-2 and blaCMY-72 elements. The prevalence rate of the oqxAB and aac(6’)-Ib-cr genes were 91% and 75% respectively, followed by qnrS (66%), qnrB (16%) and qnrD (3%). The most common PMQR combination observable was aac(6’)-Ib-cr-oqxAB-qnrS2, which accounted for 50% of the ciprofloxacin resistant strains. Interestingly, such isolates contained either no target mutations or only a single gyrA mutation. Conjugation and hybridization experiments suggested that most PMQR genes were located either in the chromosome or a non-transferrable plasmid. To summarize, findings in this work suggested that PMQRs greatly facilitate development of fluoroquinolone resistance in Salmonella by abolishing the requirement of target gene mutations. PMID:26435519

  8. mTOR inhibitors radiosensitize PTEN-deficient non-small-cell lung cancer cells harboring an EGFR activating mutation by inducing autophagy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Ju; Jeong, Jae-Hoon; Bae, Sangwoo; Kang, Seongman; Kim, Cheol Hyeon; Lim, Young-Bin

    2013-06-01

    Clinical resistance to gefitinib, an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI), in patients with lung cancer has been linked to acquisition of the T790M resistance mutation in activated EGFR or amplification of MET. Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) loss has been recently reported as a gefitinib resistance mechanism in lung cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of radiotherapy in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with acquired gefitinib resistance caused by PTEN deficiency to suggest radiotherapy as an alternative to EGFR TKIs. PTEN deficient-mediated gefitinib resistance was generated in HCC827 cells, an EGFR TKI sensitive NSCLC cell line, by PTEN knockdown with a lentiviral vector expressing short hairpin RNA-targeting PTEN. The impact of PTEN knockdown on sensitivity to radiation in the presence or absence of PTEN downstream signaling inhibitors was investigated. PTEN knockdown conferred acquired resistance not only to gefitinib but also to radiation on HCC827 cells. mTOR inhibitors alone failed to reduce HCC827 cell viability, regardless of PTEN expression, but ameliorated PTEN knockdown-induced radioresistance. PTEN knockdown-mediated radioresistance was accompanied by repression of radiation-induced cytotoxic autophagy, and treatment with mTOR inhibitors released the repression of cytotoxic autophagy to overcome PTEN knockdown-induced radioresistance in HCC827 cells. These results suggest that inhibiting mTOR signaling could be an effective strategy to radiosensitize NSCLC harboring the EGFR activating mutation that acquires resistance to both TKIs and radiotherapy due to PTEN loss or inactivation mutations.

  9. A Case of Birt-Hogg-Dubé (BHD) Syndrome Harboring a Novel Folliculin (FLCN) Gene Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Yukawa, Takuro; Fukazawa, Takuya; Yoshida, Masakazu; Morita, Ichiro; Kato, Katsuya; Monobe, Yasumasa; Furuya, Mitsuko; Naomoto, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 56 Final Diagnosis: Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome Symptoms: Dyspnea Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Pulmonology Objective: Rare disease Background: Birt-Hogg-Dubé (BHD) syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder clinically characterized by pulmonary cysts, spontaneous pneumothorax, renal cell cancer, and skin fibrofolliculomas. The disorder is caused by germline mutations in the FLCN gene. Case Report: A 56-year-old female was admitted to our hospital with a diagnosis of bilateral spontaneous pneumothorax. A computed tomography (CT) scan of the chest revealed bilateral multiple bullae predominantly located in the subpleural and mediastinal areas in the bilateral upper and lower lobes. Although she was cured by thoracic cavity drainage, she underwent resection of bilateral lung bullae because she had a prior history of right pneumothorax at 37- and 45-years of age. She had no signs of renal tumor but had fibrofolliculoma in her face and a family history of pneumothorax, we therefore suspected BHD syndrome. DNA sequence analyses determined that there was a two base pair deletion in exon 4 of the FLCN gene, confirming the diagnosis of BHD syndrome. Conclusions: Here we report a case of BHD syndrome with a previously unreported FLCN mutation. PMID:27780965

  10. A Case of Birt-Hogg-Dubé (BHD) Syndrome Harboring a Novel Folliculin (FLCN) Gene Mutation.

    PubMed

    Yukawa, Takuro; Fukazawa, Takuya; Yoshida, Masakazu; Morita, Ichiro; Kato, Katsuya; Monobe, Yasumasa; Furuya, Mitsuko; Naomoto, Yoshio

    2016-10-26

    BACKGROUND Birt-Hogg-Dubé (BHD) syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder clinically characterized by pulmonary cysts, spontaneous pneumothorax, renal cell cancer, and skin fibrofolliculomas. The disorder is caused by germline mutations in the FLCN gene. CASE REPORT A 56-year-old female was admitted to our hospital with a diagnosis of bilateral spontaneous pneumothorax. A computed tomography (CT) scan of the chest revealed bilateral multiple bullae predominantly located in the subpleural and mediastinal areas in the bilateral upper and lower lobes. Although she was cured by thoracic cavity drainage, she underwent resection of bilateral lung bullae because she had a prior history of right pneumothorax at 37- and 45-years of age. She had no signs of renal tumor but had fibrofolliculoma in her face and a family history of pneumothorax, we therefore suspected BHD syndrome. DNA sequence analyses determined that there was a two base pair deletion in exon 4 of the FLCN gene, confirming the diagnosis of BHD syndrome. CONCLUSIONS Here we report a case of BHD syndrome with a previously unreported FLCN mutation.

  11. Mitochondrial DNA heteroplasmy dynamics in a kindred harboring a novel pathogenic mutation in the mitochondrial tRNA glutamate gene

    SciTech Connect

    Moraes, C.T.; Hao, H.; Bonilla, E.; DiMauro, S.

    1994-09-01

    We have identified a novel mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutation in a 32-year-old male with a myopathy (without progressive external ophthalmoplegia) and mild pyramidal involvement. This A{yields}G transition at mtDNA position 14709 alters an evolutionary conserved nucleotide in a region coding for the anticodon loop of the mitcohondrial tRNA{sup Glu}. The 14709 mtDNA mutation was heteroplasmic but present at very high levels in the patient`s muscle (95%), white blood cells (81%) and hair follicles (90%). The same mutant mtDNA population was observed in white blood cells and hair follicles of all maternal relatives, but a lesser percentage (25-80%). The patient`s muscle showed many ragged-red fibers and a severe focal defect in cytochrome c oxidase activity, accompanied by the absence of cross-reacting material for mitochondrially synthesized polypeptides (ND 1 and COX II). The percentage of mutant mtDNA was not preferentially increased over two generations. Rather, the percentage of mutant mtDNA observed in siblings seemed to follow a normal distribution around the percentage observed in their mothers. Single hair PCR/RFLP analysis showed that the intercellular fluctuation in the percentage of mutant mtDNA differs among family members. Younger generations tend to have a more homogeneous distribution of mutant mtDNA in different hair follicles. The highest degree of variability between individual hair follicles was observed in the patient`s grandmother. These results suggest that the intercellular distribution of the mutant and wild-type mtDNA populations may drift towards homogeneity in subsequent generations.

  12. NVP-BKM120, a novel PI3K inhibitor, shows synergism with a STAT3 inhibitor in human gastric cancer cells harboring KRAS mutations

    PubMed Central

    PARK, EUNJU; PARK, JINAH; HAN, SAE-WON; IM, SEOCK-AH; KIM, TAE-YOU; OH, DO-YOUN; BANG, YUNG-JUE

    2012-01-01

    Aberrations of Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT signaling are frequently observed in many types of cancer, promoting its emergence as a promising target for cancer treatment. PI3K can become activated by various pathways, one of which includes RAS. RAS can not only directly activate the PI3K/AKT pathway via binding to p110 of PI3K, but also regulates mTOR via ERK or RSK independently of the PI3K/AKT pathway. Thus, actively mutated RAS can constitutively activate PI3K signaling. Additionally, in RAS tumorigenic transformation, signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) has been known also to be required. In this study, we examined the efficacy of NVP-BKM120, a pan-class I PI3K inhibitor in human gastric cancer cells and hypothesized that the combined inhibition of PI3K and STAT3 would be synergistic in KRAS mutant gastric cancer cells. NVP-BKM120 demonstrated anti-proliferative activity in 11 human gastric cancer cell lines by decreasing mTOR downstream signaling. But NVP-BKM120 treatment increased p-AKT by subsequent abrogation of feedback inhibition by stabilizing insulin receptor substrate-1. In KRAS mutant gastric cancer cells, either p-ERK or p-STAT3 was also increased upon treatment of NVP-BKM120. The synergistic efficacy study demonstrated that dual PI3K and STAT3 blockade showed a synergism in cells harboring mutated KRAS by inducing apoptosis. The synergistic effect was not seen in KRAS wild-type cells. Together, these findings suggest for the first time that the dual inhibition of PI3K and STAT3 signaling may be an effective therapeutic strategy for KRAS mutant gastric cancer patients. PMID:22159814

  13. Nicotine-induced dystonic arousal complex in a mouse line harboring a human autosomal-dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy mutation.

    PubMed

    Teper, Yaroslav; Whyte, Douglas; Cahir, Elizabeth; Lester, Henry A; Grady, Sharon R; Marks, Michael J; Cohen, Bruce N; Fonck, Carlos; McClure-Begley, Tristan; McIntosh, J Michael; Labarca, Cesar; Lawrence, Andrew; Chen, Feng; Gantois, Ilse; Davies, Philip J; Petrou, Steven; Murphy, Mark; Waddington, John; Horne, Malcolm K; Berkovic, Samuel F; Drago, John

    2007-09-19

    We generated a mouse line harboring an autosomal-dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (ADNFLE) mutation: the alpha4 nicotinic receptor S248F knock-in strain. In this mouse, modest nicotine doses (1-2 mg/kg) elicit a novel behavior termed the dystonic arousal complex (DAC). The DAC includes stereotypical head movements, body jerking, and forelimb dystonia; these behaviors resemble some core features of ADNFLE. A marked Straub tail is an additional component of the DAC. Similar to attacks in ADNFLE, the DAC can be partially suppressed by the sodium channel blocker carbamazepine or by pre-exposure to a very low dose of nicotine (0.1 mg/kg). The DAC is centrally mediated, genetically highly penetrant, and, surprisingly, not associated with overt ictal electrical activity as assessed by (1) epidural or frontal lobe depth-electrode electroencephalography or (2) hippocampal c-fos-regulated gene expression. Heterozygous knock-in mice are partially protected from nicotine-induced seizures. The noncompetitive antagonist mecamylamine does not suppress the DAC, although it suppresses high-dose nicotine-induced wild-type-like seizures. Experiments on agonist-induced 86Rb+ and neurotransmitter efflux from synaptosomes and on alpha4S248Fbeta2 receptors expressed in oocytes confirm that the S248F mutation confers resistance to mecamylamine blockade. Genetic background, gender, and mutant gene expression levels modulate expression of the DAC phenotype in mice. The S248F mouse thus appears to provide a model for the paroxysmal dystonic element of ADNFLE semiology. Our model complements what is seen in other ADNFLE animal models. Together, these mice cover the spectrum of behavioral and electrographic events seen in the human condition.

  14. Diversity of stroke presentation in CADASIL: study from patients harboring the predominant NOTCH3 mutation R544C.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jay Chol; Song, Sook-Keun; Lee, Jung Seok; Kang, Sa-Yoon; Kang, Ji-Hoon

    2013-02-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is a single-gene disorder of the cerebral small blood vessels caused by mutations in the NOTCH3 gene. Several characteristic population-specific clinical phenotypes and neuroimaging features have been reported in CADASIL. This study investigated the clinical stroke presentation and cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in a group of patients with CADASIL. We reviewed the clinical stroke presentation and brain MRI findings in 73 consecutive Korean patients aged >18 years diagnosed with CADASIL between May 2004 and April 2009. Brain MRI images were also scored for lacunar infarction and cerebral microbleeds. Intracranial atherosclerosis (ICAS) was assessed by magnetic resonance angiography. Disability was measured with the modified Rankin scale (mRS) and classified as good (mRS score 0-2) or poor (mRS score 3-5). In this study, 65 of the 73 patients (90.3%) had the same R544C genotype. A total of 40 episodes of cerebral infarction were confirmed in 31 patients, with a mean age at onset of 58.8 ± 11.4 years (range, 38-76 years). Twelve patients (16.9%) had ICAS, and 5 of these patients had symptomatic stenoses. Intracerebral hemorrhage occurred in 9 patients (12.3%). Both intracerebral hemorrhage and ICAS were associated with poor clinical outcome. Our data demonstrate the diversity of clinical stroke presentation according to ethnicity and vascular risk factors.

  15. Identification of new bacteria harboring qnrS and aac(6')-Ib/cr and mutations possibly involved in fluoroquinolone resistance in raw sewage and activated sludge samples from a full-scale WWTP.

    PubMed

    Paiva, Magna C; Reis, Mariana P; Costa, Patrícia S; Dias, Marcela F; Bleicher, Lucas; Scholte, Larissa L S; Nardi, Regina M D; Nascimento, Andréa M A

    2017-03-01

    Wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) harbor bacteria and antimicrobial resistance genes, favoring gene exchange events and resistance dissemination. Here, a culture-based and metagenomic survey of qnrA, qnrB, qnrS, and aac(6')-Ib genes from raw sewage (RS) and activated sludge (AS) of a full-scale municipal WWTP was performed. A total of 96 bacterial isolates were recovered from nalidixic acid-enrichment cultures. Bacteria harboring the aac(6')-Ib gene predominated in RS, whereas qnrS-positive isolates were specific to AS. Novel qnrS- and aac(6')-Ib-cr positive species were identified: Morganella morganii, Providencia rettgeri, and Pseudomonas guangdongensis (qnrS), and Alcaligenes faecalis and P. rettgeri (aac(6')-Ib-cr). Analysis of qnrS and aac(6')-Ib sequences from isolates and clone libraries suggested that the diversity of qnrS is wider than that of aac(6')-Ib. A large number of amino acid mutations were observed in the QnrS and AAC(6')-Ib proteins at previously undetected positions, whose structural implications are not clear. An accumulation of mutations at the C72, Q73, L74, A75 and M76 positions of QnrS, and D181 of AAC(6')-Ib might be important for resistance. These findings add significant information on bacteria harboring qnrS and aac(6')-Ib genes, and the presence of novel mutations that may eventually emerge in clinical isolates.

  16. Characterization of a Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) family harboring two primary LHON mutations m.11778G>A and m.14484T>C of the mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Catarino, Claudia B; Ahting, Uwe; Gusic, Mirjana; Iuso, Arcangela; Repp, Birgit; Peters, Katrin; Biskup, Saskia; von Livonius, Bettina; Prokisch, Holger; Klopstock, Thomas

    2016-10-06

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is an inherited mitochondrial disease that usually leads to acute or subacute bilateral central vision loss. In 95% of cases, LHON is caused by one of three primary mutations of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), m.11778G>A in the MT-ND4 gene, m.14484T>C in the MT-ND6 gene, or m.3460G>A in the MT-ND1 gene. Here we characterize clinically, genetically, and biochemically a LHON family with multiple patients harboring two of these primary LHON mutations, m.11778G>A homoplasmic and m.14484T>C heteroplasmic. The unusually low male-to-female ratio of affected family members is also seen among the other patients previously reported with two primary LHON mutations m.11778G>A and m.14484T>C. While the index patient had very late onset of symptoms at 75years and severe visual loss, her two daughters had both onset in childhood (6 and 9years), with moderate to mild visual loss. A higher degree of heteroplasmy of the m.14484T>C mutation was found to correlate with an earlier age at onset in this family. Ours is the first LHON family harboring two primary LHON mutations where functional studies were performed in several affected family members. A more pronounced bioenergetic defect was found to correlate with an earlier age at onset. The patient with the earliest age at onset had a more significant complex I dysfunction than all controls, including the LHON patient with only the m.11778G>A mutation, suggesting a synergistic effect of the two primary LHON mutations in this patient.

  17. [Pearl Harbor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Jennifer, Ed.

    1992-01-01

    This issue of "Loblolly Magazine" was written in observance of the 50th anniversary of the U.S. entrance into World War II. The publication features interviews conducted by East Texas high school students with Clarence Otterman, one of the few survivors of the crew of the USS Arizona, which was bombed during the attack on Pearl Harbor,…

  18. Good clinical response to gefitinib in a non-small cell lung cancer patient harboring a rare somatic epidermal growth factor gene point mutation; codon 768 AGC > ATC in exon 20 (S768I).

    PubMed

    Masago, Katsuhiro; Fujita, Shiro; Irisa, Kaoru; Kim, Yung Hak; Ichikawa, Masataka; Mio, Tadashi; Mishima, Michiaki

    2010-11-01

    Recently, two small-molecule kinase inhibitors targeting epidermal growth factor receptor have proven effective in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer. There are specific activating mutations within the tyrosine kinase domain of epidermal growth factor receptor related to the sensitivity of tyrosine kinase inhibitors. However, it is unknown whether rare mutations in the N-lobe (exons 18-20) and the C-lobe (exon 21) of the epidermal growth factor receptor kinase domain other than L858R in exon 21 and the in-frame deletion in exon 19 may predict the effectiveness of epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitors. We reported a case of non-small cell lung cancer harboring a rare epidermal growth factor somatic mutation, codon 768 AGC > ATC in exon 20 (S768I), who showed a good clinical response to gefitinib. Therefore, we may suggest that this rare mutation (S768I in exon 20) may not be an insensitive epidermal growth factor receptor somatic mutation in vivo.

  19. Acquired EGFR C797S mutation mediates resistance to AZD9291 in non-small cell lung cancer harboring EGFR T790M.

    PubMed

    Thress, Kenneth S; Paweletz, Cloud P; Felip, Enriqueta; Cho, Byoung Chul; Stetson, Daniel; Dougherty, Brian; Lai, Zhongwu; Markovets, Aleksandra; Vivancos, Ana; Kuang, Yanan; Ercan, Dalia; Matthews, Sarah E; Cantarini, Mireille; Barrett, J Carl; Jänne, Pasi A; Oxnard, Geoffrey R

    2015-06-01

    Here we studied cell-free plasma DNA (cfDNA) collected from subjects with advanced lung cancer whose tumors had developed resistance to the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) AZD9291. We first performed next-generation sequencing of cfDNA from seven subjects and detected an acquired EGFR C797S mutation in one; expression of this mutant EGFR construct in a cell line rendered it resistant to AZD9291. We then performed droplet digital PCR on serial cfDNA specimens collected from 15 AZD9291-treated subjects. All were positive for the T790M mutation before treatment, but upon developing AZD9291 resistance three molecular subtypes emerged: six cases acquired the C797S mutation, five cases maintained the T790M mutation but did not acquire the C797S mutation and four cases lost the T790M mutation despite the presence of the underlying EGFR activating mutation. Our findings provide insight into the diversity of mechanisms through which tumors acquire resistance to AZD9291 and highlight the need for therapies that are able to overcome resistance mediated by the EGFR C797S mutation.

  20. Lesions from patients with sporadic cerebral cavernous malformations harbor somatic mutations in the CCM genes: evidence for a common biochemical pathway for CCM pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, David A.; Shi, Changbin; Shenkar, Robert; Gallione, Carol J.; Akers, Amy L.; Li, Stephanie; De Castro, Nicholas; Berg, Michel J.; Corcoran, David L.; Awad, Issam A.; Marchuk, Douglas A.

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are vascular lesions affecting the central nervous system. CCM occurs either sporadically or in an inherited, autosomal dominant manner. Constitutional (germline) mutations in any of three genes, KRIT1, CCM2 and PDCD10, can cause the inherited form. Analysis of CCM lesions from inherited cases revealed biallelic somatic mutations, indicating that CCM follows a Knudsonian two-hit mutation mechanism. It is still unknown, however, if the sporadic cases of CCM also follow this genetic mechanism. We extracted DNA from 11 surgically excised lesions from sporadic CCM patients, and sequenced the three CCM genes in each specimen using a next-generation sequencing approach. Four sporadic CCM lesion samples (36%) were found to contain novel somatic mutations. Three of the lesions contained a single somatic mutation, and one lesion contained two biallelic somatic mutations. Herein, we also describe evidence of somatic mosaicism in a patient presenting with over 130 CCM lesions localized to one hemisphere of the brain. Finally, in a lesion regrowth sample, we found that the regrown CCM lesion contained the same somatic mutation as the original lesion. Together, these data bolster the idea that all forms of CCM have a genetic underpinning of the two-hit mutation mechanism in the known CCM genes. Recent studies have found aberrant Rho kinase activation in inherited CCM pathogenesis, and we present evidence that this pathway is activated in sporadic CCM patients. These results suggest that all CCM patients, including those with the more common sporadic form, are potentially amenable to the same therapy. PMID:24698976

  1. Lesions from patients with sporadic cerebral cavernous malformations harbor somatic mutations in the CCM genes: evidence for a common biochemical pathway for CCM pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    McDonald, David A; Shi, Changbin; Shenkar, Robert; Gallione, Carol J; Akers, Amy L; Li, Stephanie; De Castro, Nicholas; Berg, Michel J; Corcoran, David L; Awad, Issam A; Marchuk, Douglas A

    2014-08-15

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are vascular lesions affecting the central nervous system. CCM occurs either sporadically or in an inherited, autosomal dominant manner. Constitutional (germline) mutations in any of three genes, KRIT1, CCM2 and PDCD10, can cause the inherited form. Analysis of CCM lesions from inherited cases revealed biallelic somatic mutations, indicating that CCM follows a Knudsonian two-hit mutation mechanism. It is still unknown, however, if the sporadic cases of CCM also follow this genetic mechanism. We extracted DNA from 11 surgically excised lesions from sporadic CCM patients, and sequenced the three CCM genes in each specimen using a next-generation sequencing approach. Four sporadic CCM lesion samples (36%) were found to contain novel somatic mutations. Three of the lesions contained a single somatic mutation, and one lesion contained two biallelic somatic mutations. Herein, we also describe evidence of somatic mosaicism in a patient presenting with over 130 CCM lesions localized to one hemisphere of the brain. Finally, in a lesion regrowth sample, we found that the regrown CCM lesion contained the same somatic mutation as the original lesion. Together, these data bolster the idea that all forms of CCM have a genetic underpinning of the two-hit mutation mechanism in the known CCM genes. Recent studies have found aberrant Rho kinase activation in inherited CCM pathogenesis, and we present evidence that this pathway is activated in sporadic CCM patients. These results suggest that all CCM patients, including those with the more common sporadic form, are potentially amenable to the same therapy.

  2. Embryo genome profiling by single-cell sequencing for successful preimplantation genetic diagnosis in a family harboring COL4A1 c.1537G>A; p.G513S mutation

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Nayana H.; Bhadarka, Harsha K.; Patel, Kruti B.; Vaniawala, Salil N.; Acharya, Arpan; Mukhopadhyaya, Pratap N.; Sodagar, Nilofar R.

    2016-01-01

    CONTEXT: Genetic profiling of embryos (also known as preimplantation genetic diagnosis) before implantation has dramatically enhanced the success quotient of in vitro fertilization (IVF) in recent times. The technology helps in avoiding selective pregnancy termination since the baby is likely to be free of the disease under consideration. AIM: Screening of embryos free from c.1537G>A; p.G513S mutation within the COL4A1 gene for which the father was known in before be in heterozygous condition. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Processing of trophectoderm biopsies was done from twelve embryos for c.1537G>A; p.G513S mutation within the COL4A1 gene. DNA extracted from isolated cells were subjected to whole genome amplification using an isothermal amplification and strand displacement technology. Oligonucleotide primers bracketing the mutation were synthesized and used to amplify 162 base pairs (bp) polymerase chain reaction amplicons originating from each embryo which were subsequently sequenced to detect the presence or absence of the single base polymorphism. RESULTS: Three out of 12 embryos interrogated in this study were found to be normal while 9 were found to harbor the mutation in heterozygous condition. Implantation of one of the normal embryos following by chorionic villus sampling at 11th week of pregnancy indicated that the baby was free from c.1537G>A; p.G513S mutation within the COL4A1 gene. CONCLUSIONS: Single-cell sequencing is a helpful tool for preimplantation embryo profiling. This is the first report from India describing the birth of a normal child through IVF procedure where a potential pathogenic COL4A1 allele was avoided using this technology. PMID:27803589

  3. Atypical familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with initial symptoms of pain or tremor in a Chinese family harboring VAPB-P56S mutation.

    PubMed

    Di, Li; Chen, Hai; Da, Yuwei; Wang, Suobing; Shen, Xin-Ming

    2016-02-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is the most prevalent fatal motor neuron disease and ~10% of cases are hereditary. Mutations associated with ALS have been identified in more than 20 genes, but ALS type 8 (ALS8), which is caused by mutations in vesicle-associated membrane protein-associated protein B (VAPB), is rare. To date, the dominant missense mutation P56S, which is in the major sperm protein domain of VAPB, has been described in nine families of Portuguese-Brazilian origin and one family of German origin. Here, we report a Chinese family spanning three generations with ALS8 caused by the same VAPB-P56S mutation detected in these cohorts, but which in its initial manifestation displays different features. We also detected a R545Q variant of optineurin (OPTN) in this family and which was previously considered a pathogenic mutation. However, our analysis showed that OPTN-R545Q is benign and that VAPB-P56S accounts for the phenotype. Haplotype tests revealed that VAPB-P56S in the Chinese family has arisen independently from the Brazilian cohorts. To our knowledge, this is the first study to report ALS caused by a VAPB mutation in a Chinese population.

  4. Identification of a novel nuclear localization signal in Tbx1 that is deleted in DiGeorge syndrome patients harboring the 1223delC mutation.

    PubMed

    Stoller, Jason Z; Epstein, Jonathan A

    2005-04-01

    DiGeorge syndrome (DGS) is the most common human chromosomal deletion syndrome and is frequently associated with deletions on chromosome 22q11. Approximately 17% of patients with the phenotypic features of this syndrome have no detectable genomic deletion. Animal studies using mouse models have implicated Tbx1 as a critical gene within the commonly deleted region, and several mutations in TBX1 have been identified recently in non-deleted patients, including missense and frameshift mutations. The mechanisms by which these mutations cause disease have remained unclear. We have identified a previously unrecognized and novel nuclear localization signal (NLS) at the C-terminus of Tbx1 that is deleted by the 1223delC mutation, thus explaining the mechanism of disease in these patients. This NLS is conserved across species, among a subfamily of T-box proteins including Brachyury and Tbx10, and among additional nuclear proteins. By providing functional data to indicate loss-of-function produced by the 1223delC TBX1 mutation, our results provide strong support for the conclusion that TBX1 mutations can cause DGS in humans.

  5. Mild Clinical Features and Histopathologically Atypical Cores in Two Korean Families with Central Core Disease Harboring RYR1 Mutations at the C-Terminal Region

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Na-Yeon; Park, Yeong-Eun; Shin, Jin-Hong; Lee, Chang Hun; Jung, Dae-Soo

    2015-01-01

    Background Central core disease (CCD) is a congenital myopathy characterized by distinctive cores in muscle fibers. Mutations in the gene encoding ryanodine receptor 1 (RYR1) have been identified in most CCD patients. Case Report Two unrelated patients presented with slowly progressive or nonprogressive proximal muscle weakness since childhood. Their family history revealed some members with the same clinical problem. Histological analysis of muscle biopsy samples revealed numerous peripheral cores in the muscle fibers. RYR1 sequence analysis disclosed a novel mutation in exon 101 (c.14590T>C) and confirmed a previously reported mutation in exon 102 (c.14678G>A). Conclusions We report herein two families with CCD in whom missense mutations at the C-terminal of RYR1 were identified. Although it has been accepted that such mutations are usually associated with a severe clinical phenotype and clearly demarcated central cores, our patients exhibited a mild clinical phenotype without facial muscle involvement and skeletal deformities, and atypical cores in their muscle biopsy specimens. PMID:25628744

  6. Patient affected by neurofibromatosis type 1 and thyroid C-cell hyperplasia harboring pathogenic germ-line mutations in both NF1 and RET genes.

    PubMed

    Ercolino, Tonino; Lai, Roberta; Giachè, Valentino; Melchionda, Salvatore; Carella, Massimo; Delitala, Alessandro; Mannelli, Massimo; Fanciulli, Giuseppe

    2014-02-25

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a rare autosomal dominant disease with an estimated incidence of 1 in 3000/3500 live births. NF1 is caused by a mutation in a gene which encodes a protein known as neurofibromin. In up to 5% of cases, NF1 is associated with pheochromocytomas. RET proto-oncogene encodes a member of the receptor tyrosine kinase family involved in the normal development or the neoplastic growth of neural crest cell lineages. Germ-line RET mutations account for cases of Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 2 (MEN2), an autosomal dominant genetic syndrome where medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) is the major and more clinically severe feature, with nearly complete penetrance. C-cell hyperplasia (CCH) is described in MEN2 patients, and it has been implicated as the precursor of in situ MTC. Patients with RET mutations develop pheochromocytomas in 50% of cases. Rarely, patients with NF1 have been found to present, in addition to the NF1 clinical picture, other lesions, such as parathyroid hyperplasia/adenoma and/or medullary thyroid carcinoma. In spite of the presence of these MEN2 lesions, in none of these patients mutations of gene RET have been found so far. In this report, we describe the first case of a patient affected by a germ-line mutation in both NF1 and RET genes.

  7. Alternative Selection of β-Site APP-Cleaving Enzyme 1 (BACE1) Cleavage Sites in Amyloid β-Protein Precursor (APP) Harboring Protective and Pathogenic Mutations within the Aβ Sequence.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Ayano; Hata, Saori; Suzuki, Toshiharu

    2016-11-11

    β-Site APP-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) cleaves amyloid β-protein precursor (APP) at the bond between Met(671) and Asp(672) (β-site) to generate the carboxyl-terminal fragment (CTFβ/C99). BACE1 also cleaves APP at another bond between Thr(681) and Gln(682) (β'-site), yielding CTFβ'/C89. Cleavage of CTFβ/C99 by γ-secretase generates Aβ(1-XX), whereas cleavage of CTFβ'/C89 generates Aβ(11-XX). Thus, β'-site cleavage by BACE1 is amyloidolytic rather than amyloidogenic. β' cleavage of mouse APP is more common than the corresponding cleavage of human APP. We found that the H684R substitution within human Aβ, which replaces the histidine in the human protein with the arginine found at the corresponding position in mouse, facilitated β' cleavage irrespective of the species origin of BACE1, thereby significantly increasing the level of Aβ(11-XX) and decreasing the level of Aβ(1-XX). Thus, amino acid substitutions within the Aβ sequence influenced the selectivity of alternative β- or β'-site cleavage of APP by BACE1. In familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD), the APP gene harbors pathogenic variations such as the Swedish (K670N/M671L), Leuven (E682K), and A673V mutations, all of which decrease Aβ(11-40) generation, whereas the protective Icelandic mutation (A673T) increases generation of Aβ(11-40). Thus, A673T promotes β' cleavage of APP and protects subjects against AD. In addition, CTFβ/C99 was cleaved by excess BACE1 activity to generate CTFβ'/C89, followed by Aβ(11-40), even if APP harbored pathogenic mutations. The resultant Aβ(11-40) was more metabolically labile in vivo than Aβ(1-40). Our analysis suggests that some FAD mutations in APP are amyloidogenic and/or amyloidolytic via selection of alternative BACE1 cleavage sites.

  8. In Vivo-Selected Pyrazinoic Acid-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Strains Harbor Missense Mutations in the Aspartate Decarboxylase PanD and the Unfoldase ClpC1.

    PubMed

    Gopal, Pooja; Tasneen, Rokeya; Yee, Michelle; Lanoix, Jean-Philippe; Sarathy, Jansy; Rasic, George; Li, Liping; Dartois, Véronique; Nuermberger, Eric; Dick, Thomas

    2017-03-16

    Through mutant selection on agar containing pyrazinoic acid (POA), the bioactive form of the prodrug pyrazinamide (PZA), we recently showed that missense mutations in the aspartate decarboxylase PanD and the unfoldase ClpC1, and loss-of-function mutation of polyketide synthases Mas and PpsA-E involved in phthiocerol dimycocerosate synthesis, cause resistance to POA and PZA in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Here we first asked whether these in vitro-selected POA/PZA-resistant mutants are attenuated in vivo, to potentially explain the lack of evidence of these mutations among PZA-resistant clinical isolates. Infection of mice with panD, clpC1, and mas/ppsA-E mutants showed that whereas growth of clpC1 and mas/ppsA-E mutants was attenuated, the panD mutant grew as well as the wild-type. To determine whether these resistance mechanisms can emerge within the host, mice infected with wild-type M. tuberculosis were treated with POA, and POA-resistant colonies were confirmed for PZA and POA resistance. Genome sequencing revealed that 82 and 18% of the strains contained missense mutations in panD and clpC1, respectively. Consistent with their lower fitness and POA resistance level, independent mas/ppsA-E mutants were not found. In conclusion, we show that the POA/PZA resistance mechanisms due to panD and clpC1 missense mutations are recapitulated in vivo. Whereas the representative clpC1 mutant was attenuated for growth in the mouse infection model, providing a possible explanation for their absence among clinical isolates, the growth kinetics of the representative panD mutant was unaffected. Why POA/PZA resistance-conferring panD mutations are observed in POA-treated mice but not yet among clinical strains isolated from PZA-treated patients remains to be determined.

  9. Afatinib versus cisplatin plus pemetrexed in Japanese patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer harboring activating EGFR mutations: Subgroup analysis of LUX-Lung 3

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Terufumi; Yoshioka, Hiroshige; Okamoto, Isamu; Yokoyama, Akira; Hida, Toyoaki; Seto, Takashi; Kiura, Katsuyuki; Massey, Dan; Seki, Yoko; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki

    2015-01-01

    In LUX-Lung 3, afatinib significantly improved progression-free survival (PFS) versus cisplatin/pemetrexed in EGFR mutation-positive lung adenocarcinoma patients and overall survival (OS) in Del19 patients. Preplanned analyses in Japanese patients from LUX-Lung 3 were performed. Patients were randomized 2:1 to afatinib or cisplatin/pemetrexed, stratified by mutation type (Del19/L858R/Other). Primary endpoint was PFS (independent review). Secondary endpoints included OS, objective response, and safety. Median PFS (data cut-off: February 2012) for afatinib versus cisplatin/pemetrexed was 13.8 vs 6.9 months (hazard ratio [HR], 0.38; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.20–0.70; P = 0.0014) in all Japanese patients (N = 83), with more pronounced improvements in those with common mutations (Del19/L858R; HR, 0.28; 95% CI, 0.15–0.52; P < 0.0001) and Del19 mutations (HR, 0.16; 95% CI, 0.06–0.39; P < 0.0001). PFS was also improved in L858R patients (HR, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.20–1.25; P = 0.1309). Median OS (data cut-off: November 2013) with afatinib versus cisplatin/pemetrexed was 46.9 vs 35.8 months (HR, 0.75; 95% CI, 0.40–1.43; P = 0.3791) in all Japanese patients, with greater benefit in patients with common mutations (HR, 0.57; 95% CI, 0.29–1.12; P = 0.0966) and Del19 mutations (HR, 0.34; 95% CI, 0.13–0.87; P = 0.0181); OS was not significantly different in L858R patients (HR, 1.13; 95% CI, 0.40–3.21; P = 0.8212). Following study treatment discontinuation, most patients (93.5%) received subsequent anticancer therapy. The most common treatment-related adverse events were diarrhea, rash/acne, nail effects and stomatitis with afatinib and nausea, decreased appetite, neutropenia, and leukopenia with cisplatin/pemetrexed. Afatinib significantly improved PFS versus cisplatin/pemetrexed in Japanese EGFR mutation-positive lung adenocarcinoma patients and OS in Del19 but not L858R patients (www.clinicaltrials.gov; NCT00949650). PMID:26094656

  10. A human coronavirus OC43 variant harboring persistence-associated mutations in the S glycoprotein differentially induces the unfolded protein response in human neurons as compared to wild-type virus

    SciTech Connect

    Favreau, Dominique J.; Desforges, Marc; St-Jean, Julien R.; Talbot, Pierre J.

    2009-12-20

    We have reported that human respiratory coronavirus OC43 (HCoV-OC43) is neurotropic and neuroinvasive in humans and mice, and that neurons are the primary target of infection in mice, leading to neurodegenerative disabilities. We now report that an HCoV-OC43 mutant harboring two persistence-associated S glycoprotein point mutations (H183R and Y241H), induced a stronger unfolded protein response (UPR) and translation attenuation in infected human neurons. There was a major contribution of the IRE1/XBP1 pathway, followed by caspase-3 activation and nuclear fragmentation, with no significant role of the ATF6 and eIF2-alpha/ATF4 pathways. Our results show the importance of discrete molecular viral S determinants in virus-neuronal cell interactions that lead to increased production of viral proteins and infectious particles, enhanced UPR activation, and increased cytotoxicity and cell death. As this mutant virus is more neurovirulent in mice, our results also suggest that two mutations in the S glycoprotein could eventually modulate viral neuropathogenesis.

  11. Biomarkers of erlotinib response in non-small cell lung cancer tumors that do not harbor the more common epidermal growth factor receptor mutations

    PubMed Central

    López-Ayllón, Blanca D; de Castro-Carpeño, Javier; Rodriguez, Carlos; Pernía, Olga; de Cáceres, Inmaculada Ibañez; Belda-Iniesta, Cristobal; Perona, Rosario; Sastre, Leandro

    2015-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) represents approximately 85% of all lung cancers, which are the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the world. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors such as erlotinib represent one therapeutic options presently recommended for tumors produced by activating mutations in the gene coding of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). The aim of this study is the identification of possible biomarkers for tumor sensitivity to erlotinib in the absence of the main EGFR mutations. The erlotinib sensitivity of cells isolated from 41 untreated NSCLC patients was determined and compared with the presence of the more frequent EGFR mutations. Several patients had tumor cells highly sensitive to erlitinib in the absence of the EGFR mutations analyzed. The gene expression profile of 3 erlotinib-sensitive tumors was compared with that of 4 resistant tumors by DNA microarray hybridization. Sixteen genes were expressed at significantly higher levels in the resistant tumors than in the sensitive tumors. The possible correlation between erlotinib sensitivity and the expression of these genes was further analyzed using the data for the NSCLC, breast cancer and colon cancer cell lines of the NCI60 collection. The expression of these genes was correlated with the overall survival of 5 patients treated with erlotinib, according to The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database. Overlapping groups of 7, 5 and 3 genes, including UGT1A6, TRIB3, MET, MMP7, COL17A1, LCN2 and PTPRZ1, whose expression correlated with erlotinib activity was identified. In particular, low MET expression levels showed the strongest correlation. PMID:26045797

  12. Arabidopsis pab1, a mutant with reduced anthocyanins in immature seeds from banyuls, harbors a mutation in the MATE transporter FFT.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Satoshi; Oono, Yutaka; Narumi, Issay

    2016-01-01

    Forward genetics approaches have helped elucidate the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway in plants. Here, we used the Arabidopsis banyuls (ban) mutant, which accumulates anthocyanins, instead of colorless proanthocyanidin precursors, in immature seeds. In contrast to standard screens for mutants lacking anthocyanins in leaves/stems, we mutagenized ban plants and screened for mutants showing differences in pigmentation of immature seeds. The pale banyuls1 (pab1) mutation caused reduced anthocyanin pigmentation in immature seeds compared with ban. Immature pab1 ban seeds contained less anthocyanins and flavonols than ban, but showed normal expression of anthocyanin biosynthetic genes. In contrast to pab1, introduction of a flavonol-less mutation into ban did not produce paler immature seeds. Map-based cloning showed that two independent pab1 alleles disrupted the MATE-type transporter gene FFT/DTX35. Complementation of pab1 with FFT confirmed that mutation in FFT causes the pab1 phenotype. During development, FFT promoter activity was detected in the seed-coat layers that accumulate flavonoids. Anthocyanins accumulate in the vacuole and FFT fused to GFP mainly localized in the vacuolar membrane. Heterologous expression of grapevine MATE-type anthocyanin transporter gene partially complemented the pab1 phenotype. These results suggest that FFT acts at the vacuolar membrane in anthocyanin accumulation in the Arabidopsis seed coat, and that our screening strategy can reveal anthocyanin-related genes that have not been found by standard screening.

  13. Normal hematopoiesis and lack of β-catenin activation in osteoblasts of patients and mice harboring Lrp5 gain-of-function mutations.

    PubMed

    Galán-Díez, Marta; Isa, Adiba; Ponzetti, Marco; Nielsen, Morten Frost; Kassem, Moustapha; Kousteni, Stavroula

    2016-03-01

    Osteoblasts are emerging regulators of myeloid malignancies since genetic alterations in them, such as constitutive activation of β-catenin, instigate their appearance. The LDL receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5), initially proposed to be a co-receptor for Wnt proteins, in fact favors bone formation by suppressing gut-serotonin synthesis. This function of Lrp5 occurring in the gut is independent of β-catenin activation in osteoblasts. However, it is unknown whether Lrp5 can act directly in osteoblast to influence other functions that require β-catenin signaling, particularly, the deregulation of hematopoiesis and leukemogenic properties of β-catenin activation in osteoblasts, that lead to development of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Using mice with gain-of-function (GOF) Lrp5 alleles (Lrp5(A214V)) that recapitulate the human high bone mass (HBM) phenotype, as well as patients with the T253I HBM Lrp5 mutation, we show here that Lrp5 GOF mutations in both humans and mice do not activate β-catenin signaling in osteoblasts. Consistent with a lack of β-catenin activation in their osteoblasts, Lrp5(A214V) mice have normal trilinear hematopoiesis. In contrast to leukemic mice with constitutive activation of β-catenin in osteoblasts (Ctnnb1(CAosb)), accumulation of early myeloid progenitors, a characteristic of AML, myeloid-blasts in blood, and segmented neutrophils or dysplastic megakaryocytes in the bone marrow, are not observed in Lrp5(A214V) mice. Likewise, peripheral blood count analysis in HBM patients showed normal hematopoiesis, normal percentage of myeloid cells, and lack of anemia. We conclude that Lrp5 GOF mutations do not activate β-catenin signaling in osteoblasts. As a result, myeloid lineage differentiation is normal in HBM patients and mice. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Tumor Microenvironment Regulation of Cancer Cell Survival, Metastasis, Inflammation, and Immune Surveillance edited by Peter Ruvolo and Gregg L. Semenza.

  14. Impact of gross total resection in patients with WHO grade III glioma harboring the IDH 1/2 mutation without the 1p/19q co-deletion.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Tomohiro; Sonoda, Yukihiko; Shibahara, Ichiyo; Saito, Ryuta; Kanamori, Masayuki; Kumabe, Toshihiro; Tominaga, Teiji

    2016-09-01

    The prognosis of patients with WHO grade III gliomas is highly dependent on their genomic status such as the isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) 1/2 mutation and1p/19q co-deletion. However, difficulties have been associated with determining which tumors have certain genomic profiles by preoperative radiographical modalities, and the role of surgical resection in achieving better outcomes remains unclear. This retrospective study included 124 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed grade III gliomas. The genomic status of IDH1/2 and 1p/19q was analyzed in these patients. Tumors were then divided into 3 subgroups based on their genomic status; the IDH 1/2 mutation with the 1p/19q co-deletion (1p/19q co-del), the IDH 1/2 mutation without the 1p/19q co-deletion (non-1p/19q co-del), and the IDH 1/2 wild type (IDH wt). Survival times were compared between patients who underwent gross total resection and those who did not (GTR versus non-GTR). The relationships between genomic statuses and MR imaging characteristics such as ring-like or nodular enhancements by gadolinium, and very low intensity on T1-weighted images with blurry enhancements (T1VL) were also examined. Among all patients with grade III gliomas, GTR patients had longer median survival and progression-free times than those of non-GTR patients (undefined versus 87 months, p = 0.097, and 124 versus 34 months, p = 0.059, respectively). No significant differences were observed in survival between GTR and non-GTR patients in the 1p/19q co-del group (p = 0.14), or between GTR and non-GTR patients in the IDH wt group (26 and 27 months, p = 0.29). On the other hand, in non-1p/19q co-del group, survival was significantly longer in GTR patients than in non-GTR patients (undefined versus 77 months, p = 0.005). Radiographically, T1VL was detected in most tumors in the non-1p/19q co-del group (78.2 %), but only 6 (21.4 %) and 17 (41.5 %) tumors in the 1p/19q co-del and IDH wt groups

  15. Significant cytostatic effect of everolimus on a gefitinib-resistant anaplastic thyroid cancer cell line harboring PI3KCA gene mutation

    PubMed Central

    ONODA, NAOYOSHI; NAKAMURA, MASANORI; AOMATSU, NAOKI; NODA, SATORU; KASHIWAGI, SHINICHIRO; KURATA, KENTO; UCHINO, SHINYA; HIRAKAWA, KOSEI

    2015-01-01

    We previously demonstrated the efficacy of gefitinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), on an anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) cell line. We also observed that gefitinib was not effective in regulating cell growth in a different ATC cell line that exhibited an altered EGFR-initiated signal transduction pathway. In the present study, we attempted to regulate the downstream effector of EGFR-Akt-mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway by an mTOR inhibitor, everolimus. A total of 8 ATC cell lines were employed, 7 of which were established in our institute. OCUT-2 was known to carry a mutation in the phosphoinositide-3-kinase, catalytic, α polypeptide gene (PI3KCA) and to be gefitinib-resistant, whereas ACT-1 exhibited a remarkable growth arrest by gefitinib. All the cell lines were tested for the cytotoxic effect of everolimus. The mechanisms of cellular toxicity were investigated by EGFR stimulation, cell cycle and concurrent exposure to paclitaxel. In OCUT-2, but not in any of the other cell lines, everolimus achieved a significant growth inhibition (inhibition of 30 and 50% was achieved by concentrations of 0.8 and 5 nM, respectively). The growth in OCUT-2 was inhibited by everolimus, even with concordant EGFR stimulation. This effect was demonstrated by a G2M cell cycle arrest. An additive effect of everolimus onto the cytotoxic effect of paclitaxel was demonstrated at a dose of 1–2 nM. A significant growth inhibitory effect of everolimus on the gefitinib-resistant ATC cell line was demonstrated, suggesting a possible correlation between the efficacy of everolimus and PI3KCA gene mutation and the significance of molecular-targeted therapy in the management of ATC. PMID:26137260

  16. Sensitivity to low-dose/low-LET ionizing radiation in mammalian cells harboring mutations in succinate dehydrogenase subunit C is governed by mitochondria-derived reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Aykin-Burns, Nukhet; Slane, Benjamin G; Liu, Annie T Y; Owens, Kjerstin M; O'Malley, Malinda S; Smith, Brian J; Domann, Frederick E; Spitz, Douglas R

    2011-02-01

    It has been hypothesized that ionizing radiation-induced disruptions in mitochondrial O₂ metabolism lead to persistent heritable increases in steady-state levels of intracellular superoxide (O₂(•U+2212)) and hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) that contribute to the biological effects of radiation. Hamster fibroblasts (B9 cells) expressing a mutation in the gene coding for the mitochondrial electron transport chain protein succinate dehydrogenase subunit C (SDHC) demonstrate increases in steady-state levels of O₂•- and H₂O₂. When B9 cells were exposed to low-dose/low-LET radiation (5-50 cGy), they displayed significantly increased clonogenic cell killing compared with parental cells. Clones derived from B9 cells overexpressing a wild-type human SDHC (T4, T8) demonstrated significantly increased surviving fractions after exposure to 5-50 cGy relative to B9 vector controls. In addition, pretreatment with polyethylene glycol-conjugated CuZn superoxide dismutase and catalase as well as adenoviral-mediated overexpression of MnSOD and/or mitochondria-targeted catalase resulted in significantly increased survival of B9 cells exposed to 10 cGy ionizing radiation relative to vector controls. Adenoviral-mediated overexpression of either MnSOD or mitochondria-targeted catalase alone was equally as effective as when both were combined. These results show that mammalian cells over expressing mutations in SDHC demonstrate low-dose/low-LET radiation sensitization that is mediated by increased levels of O₂•- and H₂O₂. These results also support the hypothesis that mitochondrial O₂•- and H₂O₂ originating from SDH are capable of playing a role in low-dose ionizing radiation-induced biological responses.

  17. Favorable outcome of patients with acute myeloid leukemia harboring a low-allelic burden FLT3-ITD mutation and concomitant NPM1 mutation: relevance to post-remission therapy.

    PubMed

    Pratcorona, Marta; Brunet, Salut; Nomdedéu, Josep; Ribera, Josep Maria; Tormo, Mar; Duarte, Rafael; Escoda, Lourdes; Guàrdia, Ramon; Queipo de Llano, M Paz; Salamero, Olga; Bargay, Joan; Pedro, Carmen; Martí, Josep Maria; Torrebadell, Montserrat; Díaz-Beyá, Marina; Camós, Mireia; Colomer, Dolors; Hoyos, Montserrat; Sierra, Jorge; Esteve, Jordi

    2013-04-04

    Risk associated to FLT3 internal tandem duplication (FLT3-ITD) in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) may depend on mutational burden and its interaction with other mutations. We analyzed the effect of FLT3-ITD/FLT3 wild-type (FLT3wt) ratio depending on NPM1 mutation (NPM1mut) in 303 patients with intermediate-risk cytogenetics AML treated with intensive chemotherapy. Among NPM1mut patients, FLT3wt and low ratio (<0.5) subgroups showed similar overall survival, relapse risk, and leukemia-free survival, whereas high ratio (≥0.5) patients had a worse outcome. In NPM1wt AML, FLT3-ITD subgroups showed a comparable outcome, with higher risk of relapse and shortened overall survival than FLT3wt patients. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation in CR1 was associated with a reduced relapse risk in all molecular subgroups with the exception of NPM1mut AML with absent or low ratio FLT3-ITD. In conclusion, effect of FLT3 burden is modulated by NPM1 mutation, especially in patients with a low ratio.

  18. Concurrence of B-lymphoblastic leukemia and myeloproliferative neoplasm with copy neutral loss of heterozygosity at chromosome 1p harboring a MPL W515S mutation.

    PubMed

    Tao, Jiangchuan; Zhang, Xiaohui; Lancet, Jeffrey; Bennett, John M; Cai, Li; Papenhausen, Peter; Moscinski, Lynn; Zhang, Ling

    2014-01-01

    B-lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) is a neoplasm of precursors committed to B-cell lineage, whereas myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) is a clonal proliferation derived from myeloid stem cells. Concurrent B-ALL with MPN is uncommon except in the presence of abnormalities of the PDGFRA, PDGFRB, or FGFR1 genes or the BCR-ABL1 fusion gene. Herein, we describe a rare concurrence, B-ALL with MPN without the aforementioned genetic aberrations, in a 64-year-old male patient. The patient was initially diagnosed with B-ALL with normal karyotype and responded well to aggressive chemotherapy but had sustained leukocytosis and splenomegaly. The posttreatment restaging bone marrow was free of B-ALL but remained hypercellular with myeloid predominance. Using a single nucleotide polymorphism microarray study, we identified a copy neutral loss of heterozygosity at the terminus of 1p in the bone marrow samples taken at diagnosis and again at remission, 49% and 100%, respectively. Several additional genetic abnormalities were present in the initial marrow sample but not in the remission marrow samples. Retrospective molecular studies detected a MPL W515S homozygous mutation in both the initial and remission marrows for B-ALL, at 30-40% and 80% dosage effect, respectively. In summary, we present a case of concurrent B-ALL and MPN and demonstrate a stepwise cytogenetic and molecular approach to the final diagnosis.

  19. Next-generation EGFR/HER tyrosine kinase inhibitors for the treatment of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer harboring EGFR mutations: a review of the evidence

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaochun; Goldstein, David; Crowe, Philip J; Yang, Jia-Lin

    2016-01-01

    been approved for use as the first-line treatment of metastatic NSCLC with actEGFRm. This review will summarize and evaluate a broad range of evidence of recent development of EGFR/HER-TKIs, with a focus on the second- and third-generation EGFR/HER-TKIs, in the treatment of patients with NSCLC harboring EGFR mutations. PMID:27660463

  20. Great Lakes Harbors Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1966-11-01

    Locally.assigned Library of Congress number: HE396 S25 U55 Nj 19. KEY WORDS (Continue on reverse side if necessary and identify by block number) 1. HARBORS 2... WATER TRANSPORTATION 3. ECONOMIC ANALYSIS 4. GREAT LJAKES - 20. ABSTRACT (Continue on ie.er.se side It necesaty nd identify by blocA number) Harbor...Scope 2 DESCRIPTION AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 3 Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Navigation System 2 4 Navigation Season 3 5 Water Levels 4 6 Tributary Area 6

  1. Port and Harbor Security

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, T; Guthmuller, H; DeWeert, M

    2004-12-15

    Port and Harbor Security is a daunting task to which optics and photonics offers significant solutions. We are pleased to report that the 2005 Defense and Security Symposium (DSS, Orlando, FL) will include reports on active and passive photonic systems operating from both airborne and subsurface platforms. In addition to imaging techniques, there are various photonic applications, such as total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF), which can be used to ''sniff'' for traces of explosives or contaminants in marine. These non-imaging technologies are beyond the scope of this article, but will also be represented at DSS 2005. We encourage colleagues to join our technical group to help us to make our ports and harbors safer and more secure.

  2. Pearl Harbor Biological Survey

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-08-30

    Scalloped Hammerhead Shark , Sphyma leuini. In Hawaii", Pacific Science, 25(2):133-144. 2.1-11 "Surveillance, Sewage and Surprises", Navy Action 󈨌...Some fish tagged in the harbor were caught off Sand Island; others were returned from the Honolulu fish markets. The hammerhead shark {Sphyma...MYLIOBATIDAE Scalloped hammerhead shark ; Mano kihlkihi Sphyma lewini after K, S 4 W (16130101) ELOPIDAE fit. Spotted eagle ray; Hihimanu AetobatuB

  3. Norovirus Infection in Harbor Porpoises

    PubMed Central

    Bodewes, Rogier; van Elk, Cornelis E.; van de Bildt, Marco; Getu, Sarah; Aron, Georgina I.; Verjans, Georges M.G.M.; Osterhaus, Albert D.M.E.; van den Brand, Judith M.A.; Kuiken, Thijs; Koopmans, Marion P.G.

    2017-01-01

    A norovirus was detected in harbor porpoises, a previously unknown host for norovirus. This norovirus had low similarity to any known norovirus. Viral RNA was detected primarily in intestinal tissue, and specific serum antibodies were detected in 8 (24%) of 34 harbor porpoises from the North Sea. PMID:27983498

  4. Integrin alphavbeta3 enhances β-catenin signaling in acute myeloid leukemia harboring Fms-like tyrosine kinase-3 internal tandem duplication mutations: implications for microenvironment influence on sorafenib sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Hai; Zeng, Dongfeng; Shen, Zhaohua; Liao, Jun; Wang, Xiaoguo; Liu, Yao; Zhang, Xi; Kong, Peiyan

    2016-01-01

    Binding of leukemia cells to the bone marrow extracellular matrix (ECM) through integrins might influence drug response and the survival of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, the functions of integrin in AML are needed to be clarified. Data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) were retrieved and integrin β3 (ITGB3) expression and prognostic significance for AML were analyzed. Integrin alphavbeta3 (αvβ3) in sorafenib sensitivity and signaling pathway of FLT3-ITD AML cells was evaluated in vitro. The level of ITGB3 expression was positively correlated with risk stratification and prognosis of AML patients, especially in cytogenetic-normal patients with Fms-like tyrosine kinase-3 internal tandem duplication (FLT3-ITD) mutation. Integrin αvβ3 decreased sorafenib sensitivity when co-culture of MV4-11 cells and bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs), and it is crucial for osteopontin (OPN) induced sorafenib insensitivity in FLT3-ITD mutated AML cells. Mechanically, αvβ3 enhance β-catenin activation through phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/Glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta (GSK3β) pathway. Moreover, genetic inhibition of β-catenin by shRNA could increase sorafenib sensitivity in MV4-11 cells. Taken together, our study revealed a novel mechanism in microenvironment influence on sorafenib sensitivity in AML with FLT3-ITD mutation that was caused by activating integrin αvβ3/PI3K/Akt/GSK3β/β-catenin pathway. Integrin αvβ3/β-catenin could be considered as a new therapeutic target for AML especially for FLT3-ITD mutated AML. PMID:27248172

  5. Fluconazole and Echinocandin Resistance of Candida glabrata Correlates Better with Antifungal Drug Exposure Rather than with MSH2 Mutator Genotype in a French Cohort of Patients Harboring Low Rates of Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Dellière, Sarah; Healey, Kelley; Gits-Muselli, Maud; Carrara, Bastien; Barbaro, Alessandro; Guigue, Nicolas; Lecefel, Christophe; Touratier, Sophie; Desnos-Ollivier, Marie; Perlin, David S.; Bretagne, Stéphane; Alanio, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Candida glabrata is a major pathogenic yeast in humans that is known to rapidly acquire resistance to triazole and echinocandin antifungal drugs. A mutator genotype (MSH2 polymorphism) inducing a mismatch repair defect has been recently proposed to be responsible for resistance acquisition in C. glabrata clinical isolates. Our objectives were to evaluate the prevalence of antifungal resistance in a large cohort of patients in Saint-Louis hospital, Paris, France, some of whom were pre-exposed to antifungal drugs, as well as to determine whether MSH2 polymorphisms are associated with an increased rate of fluconazole or echinocandin resistance. We collected 268 isolates from 147 patients along with clinical data and previous antifungal exposure. Fluconazole and micafungin minimal inhibition concentrations (MICs) were tested, short tandem repeat genotyping was performed, and the MSH2 gene was sequenced. According to the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility breakpoints, 15.7% of isolates were resistant to fluconazole (MIC > 32 mg/L) and 0.7% were resistant to micafungin (MIC > 0.03 mg/L). A non-synonymous mutation within MSH2 occurred in 44% of the isolates, and 17% were fluconazole resistant. In comparison, fluconazole resistant isolates with no MSH2 mutation represented 15% (P = 0.65). MSH2 polymorphisms were associated with the short tandem repeat genotype. The rate of echinocandin resistance is low and correlates with prior exposure to echinocandin. The mutator genotype was not associated with enrichment in fluconazole resistance but instead corresponded to rare and specific genotypes. PMID:28066361

  6. Genetics Home Reference: Floating-Harbor syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Floating-Harbor syndrome Floating-Harbor syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Floating-Harbor syndrome is a disorder involving short stature, ...

  7. Sediment toxicity in Savannah Harbor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winger, P.V.; Lasier, P.J.

    1995-01-01

    Savannah Harbor, located near the mouth of the Savannah River, Georgia and South Carolina, is impacted by industrial and municipal effluents. Potential release of contaminants stored in harbor sediments through dredging and shipping operations requires that contaminated areas be identified for proper management of the system and protection of wildlife resources. During 1991, Hyalella azteca were exposed in 10-d static-renewal toxicity tests to pore-water and solid-phase sediment samples collected from 26 sites within Savannah Harbor. Pore-water toxicity was more pronounced than that for solidphase sediment. Toxicity and reduced leaf consumption demonstrated impaired sediment quality at specific sites within Savannah Harbor and Back River. Factors responsible for the decreased sediment quality were ammonia, alkalinity, and metal concentrations (cadmium, chromium, lead, molybdenum, and nickel). Elevated concentrations of metals and toxicities in Back River sediments indicated impacts from adjacent dredge-spoil areas.

  8. Depletion of the ubiquitin-binding adaptor molecule SQSTM1/p62 from macrophages harboring cftr ΔF508 mutation improves the delivery of Burkholderia cenocepacia to the autophagic machinery.

    PubMed

    Abdulrahman, Basant A; Khweek, Arwa Abu; Akhter, Anwari; Caution, Kyle; Tazi, Mia; Hassan, Hoda; Zhang, Yucheng; Rowland, Patrick D; Malhotra, Sankalp; Aeffner, Famke; Davis, Ian C; Valvano, Miguel A; Amer, Amal O

    2013-01-18

    Cystic fibrosis is the most common inherited lethal disease in Caucasians. It is caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), of which the cftr ΔF508 mutation is the most common. ΔF508 macrophages are intrinsically defective in autophagy because of the sequestration of essential autophagy molecules within unprocessed CFTR aggregates. Defective autophagy allows Burkholderia cenocepacia (B. cepacia) to survive and replicate in ΔF508 macrophages. Infection by B. cepacia poses a great risk to cystic fibrosis patients because it causes accelerated lung inflammation and, in some cases, a lethal necrotizing pneumonia. Autophagy is a cell survival mechanism whereby an autophagosome engulfs non-functional organelles and delivers them to the lysosome for degradation. The ubiquitin binding adaptor protein SQSTM1/p62 is required for the delivery of several ubiquitinated cargos to the autophagosome. In WT macrophages, p62 depletion and overexpression lead to increased and decreased bacterial intracellular survival, respectively. In contrast, depletion of p62 in ΔF508 macrophages results in decreased bacterial survival, whereas overexpression of p62 leads to increased B. cepacia intracellular growth. Interestingly, the depletion of p62 from ΔF508 macrophages results in the release of the autophagy molecule beclin1 (BECN1) from the mutant CFTR aggregates and allows its redistribution and recruitment to the B. cepacia vacuole, mediating the acquisition of the autophagy marker LC3 and bacterial clearance via autophagy. These data demonstrate that p62 differentially dictates the fate of B. cepacia infection in WT and ΔF508 macrophages.

  9. Depletion of the Ubiquitin-binding Adaptor Molecule SQSTM1/p62 from Macrophages Harboring cftr ΔF508 Mutation Improves the Delivery of Burkholderia cenocepacia to the Autophagic Machinery*

    PubMed Central

    Abdulrahman, Basant A.; Khweek, Arwa Abu; Akhter, Anwari; Caution, Kyle; Tazi, Mia; Hassan, Hoda; Zhang, Yucheng; Rowland, Patrick D.; Malhotra, Sankalp; Aeffner, Famke; Davis, Ian C.; Valvano, Miguel A.; Amer, Amal O.

    2013-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is the most common inherited lethal disease in Caucasians. It is caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), of which the cftr ΔF508 mutation is the most common. ΔF508 macrophages are intrinsically defective in autophagy because of the sequestration of essential autophagy molecules within unprocessed CFTR aggregates. Defective autophagy allows Burkholderia cenocepacia (B. cepacia) to survive and replicate in ΔF508 macrophages. Infection by B. cepacia poses a great risk to cystic fibrosis patients because it causes accelerated lung inflammation and, in some cases, a lethal necrotizing pneumonia. Autophagy is a cell survival mechanism whereby an autophagosome engulfs non-functional organelles and delivers them to the lysosome for degradation. The ubiquitin binding adaptor protein SQSTM1/p62 is required for the delivery of several ubiquitinated cargos to the autophagosome. In WT macrophages, p62 depletion and overexpression lead to increased and decreased bacterial intracellular survival, respectively. In contrast, depletion of p62 in ΔF508 macrophages results in decreased bacterial survival, whereas overexpression of p62 leads to increased B. cepacia intracellular growth. Interestingly, the depletion of p62 from ΔF508 macrophages results in the release of the autophagy molecule beclin1 (BECN1) from the mutant CFTR aggregates and allows its redistribution and recruitment to the B. cepacia vacuole, mediating the acquisition of the autophagy marker LC3 and bacterial clearance via autophagy. These data demonstrate that p62 differentially dictates the fate of B. cepacia infection in WT and ΔF508 macrophages. PMID:23148214

  10. Azole-resistant Aspergillus fumigatus harboring TR34/L98H, TR46/Y121F/T289A and TR53 mutations related to flower fields in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Moreno, Carlos; Lavergne, Rose-Anne; Hagen, Ferry; Morio, Florent; Meis, Jacques F.; Le Pape, Patrice

    2017-01-01

    Resistance to triazoles in Aspergillus fumigatus has been reported in azole-naive patients in Europe, Asia, Australia and North America. This resistance has been linked to fungicide-driven mutations in the cyp51A gene and its promoter region. We investigated the presence of environmental azole-resistant A. fumigatus strains related to the use of azole fungicides in Colombia. Soil samples were collected from flower beds, flower fields and public gardens from the outskirts, suburbs and city centre of Bogotá. Out of the 86 soil samples taken, 17 (19.8%) grew A. fumigatus of whom eight (9.3%) contained 40 strains able to grow on azole-containing itraconazole and/or voriconazole supplemented media. All but one triazole-resistant strains were isolated from soil samples collected from flower fields and flower beds (39/40). Importantly, the majority had the TR46/Y121F/T289A, TR34/L98H, and TR53 molecular resistance mechanisms and one azole resistant strain had a wild-type cyp51A gene. Soil samples from flower fields and beds contained 4 azole fungicides (penconazole, difenoconazole, tetraconazole and tebuconazole) above the limit of detection. Our findings underline the need for extensive investigations to determine azole-resistant A. fumigatus prevalence in both clinical and environmental samples in other regions of Latin America. PMID:28358115

  11. Giant thrombosed intracavernous carotid artery aneurysm presenting as Tolosa–Hunt syndrome in a patient harboring a new pathogenic neurofibromatosis type 1 mutation: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Conforti, Renata; Cirillo, Mario; Marrone, Valeria; Galasso, Rosario; Capaldo, Guglielmo; Giugliano, Teresa; Scuotto, Assunta; Piluso, Giulio; Melone, Mariarosa AB

    2014-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a relatively common single-gene disorder, and is caused by heterozygous mutations in the NF1 gene that result in a loss of activity or in a nonfunctional neurofibromin protein. Despite the common association of NF1 with neurocutaneous features, its pathology can extend to numerous tissues not derived from the neural crest. Among the rare cerebrovascular abnormalities in NF1, more than 85% of cases are of purely occlusive or stenotic nature, with intracranial aneurysm being uncommon. Predominantly, the aneurysms are located in the internal carotid arteries (ICAs), being very rare bilateral aneurysms. This report describes a very unusual case of fusiform aneurysms of both ICAs in a Caucasian NF1 patient, with a new pathogenic intragenic heterozygous deletion of the NF1 gene, presenting at age 22 years with Tolosa–Hunt syndrome, because of partial thrombosis of the left giant intracavernous aneurysm. Medical treatment with anticoagulant therapy allowed a good outcome for the patient. In conclusion, early identification of cerebral arteriopathy in NF1 and close follow-up of its progression by neuroimaging may lead to early medical or surgical intervention and prevention of significant neurologic complications. PMID:24476631

  12. Accelerated Implementation of Harbor Processes Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-31

    WATERSHEDS, *BIODEGRADATION, *SEDIMENTS, INDUSTRIES, STRATEGY, WATER, NAVY, SITES, SEASONAL VARIATIONS, SAMPLING, CONTAMINANTS, HARBORS, OCEAN BOTTOM, ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY , TOXICOLOGY, OCEANOGRAPHY, ESTUARIES.

  13. 33 CFR 207.480 - Lake Huron, Mich.; Harbor of refuge, Harbor Beach; use and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Lake Huron, Mich.; Harbor of refuge, Harbor Beach; use and navigation. 207.480 Section 207.480 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS... Huron, Mich.; Harbor of refuge, Harbor Beach; use and navigation. (a) All boats, barges, and...

  14. 33 CFR 207.480 - Lake Huron, Mich.; Harbor of refuge, Harbor Beach; use and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Lake Huron, Mich.; Harbor of refuge, Harbor Beach; use and navigation. 207.480 Section 207.480 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS... Huron, Mich.; Harbor of refuge, Harbor Beach; use and navigation. (a) All boats, barges, and...

  15. 33 CFR 207.480 - Lake Huron, Mich.; Harbor of refuge, Harbor Beach; use and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Lake Huron, Mich.; Harbor of refuge, Harbor Beach; use and navigation. 207.480 Section 207.480 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS... Huron, Mich.; Harbor of refuge, Harbor Beach; use and navigation. (a) All boats, barges, and...

  16. 33 CFR 207.480 - Lake Huron, Mich.; Harbor of refuge, Harbor Beach; use and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Lake Huron, Mich.; Harbor of refuge, Harbor Beach; use and navigation. 207.480 Section 207.480 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS... Huron, Mich.; Harbor of refuge, Harbor Beach; use and navigation. (a) All boats, barges, and...

  17. Army Engineers at Pearl Harbor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    the Honolulu Engi- neer District, then part of the South Pacific Division. Colonel Albert K.B. Lyman , a native Hawaiian who later attained the rank...aircraft dis- persal at Wheeler Field. On the civil side, Lieutenant Colonel Theodore Wyman, the Honolulu District Engineer, had offices employing 10...Army Engineers at Pearl Harbor Past in Review Native Hawaiian Colonel Albert K.B. Lyman , the Army’s Ha- waiian Department engineer during the attack

  18. The defining DNA methylation signature of Floating-Harbor Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hood, Rebecca L; Schenkel, Laila C; Nikkel, Sarah M; Ainsworth, Peter J; Pare, Guillaume; Boycott, Kym M; Bulman, Dennis E; Sadikovic, Bekim

    2016-12-09

    Floating-Harbor syndrome (FHS) is an autosomal dominant genetic condition characterized by short stature, delayed osseous maturation, expressive language impairment, and unique facial dysmorphology. We previously identified mutations in the chromatin remodeling protein SRCAP (SNF2-related CBP Activator Protein) as the cause of FHS. SRCAP has multiple roles in chromatin and transcriptional regulation; however, specific epigenetic consequences of SRCAP mutations remain to be described. Using high resolution genome-wide DNA methylation analysis, we identified a unique and highly specific DNA methylation "epi-signature" in the peripheral blood of individuals with FHS. Both hyper and hypomethylated loci are distributed across the genome, preferentially occurring in CpG islands. Clonal bisulfite sequencing of two hypermethylated (FIGN and STPG2) and two hypomethylated (MYO1F and RASIP1) genes confirmed these findings. The identification of a unique methylation signature in FHS provides further insight into the biological function of SRCAP and provides a unique biomarker for this disorder.

  19. Emergence of Fatal Avian Influenza in New England Harbor Seals

    PubMed Central

    Anthony, S. J.; St. Leger, J. A.; Pugliares, K.; Ip, H. S.; Chan, J. M.; Carpenter, Z. W.; Navarrete-Macias, I.; Sanchez-Leon, M.; Saliki, J. T.; Pedersen, J.; Karesh, W.; Daszak, P.; Rabadan, R.; Rowles, T.; Lipkin, W. I.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT From September to December 2011, 162 New England harbor seals died in an outbreak of pneumonia. Sequence analysis of postmortem samples revealed the presence of an avian H3N8 influenza A virus, similar to a virus circulating in North American waterfowl since at least 2002 but with mutations that indicate recent adaption to mammalian hosts. These include a D701N mutation in the viral PB2 protein, previously reported in highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza viruses infecting people. Lectin staining and agglutination assays indicated the presence of the avian-preferred SAα-2,3 and mammalian SAα-2,6 receptors in seal respiratory tract, and the ability of the virus to agglutinate erythrocytes bearing either the SAα-2,3 or the SAα-2,6 receptor. The emergence of this A/harbor seal/Massachusetts/1/2011 virus may herald the appearance of an H3N8 influenza clade with potential for persistence and cross-species transmission. PMID:22851656

  20. Emergence of fatal avian influenza in New England harbor seals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anthony, S.J.; St. Leger, J. A.; Pugliares, K.; Ip, H.S.; Chan, J.M.; Carpenter, Z.W.; Navarrete-Macias, I.; Sanchez-Leon, M.; Saliki, J.T.; Pedersen, J.; Karesh, W.; Daszak, P.; Rabadan, R.; Rowles, T.; Lipkin, W.I.

    2012-01-01

    From September to December 2011, 162 New England harbor seals died in an outbreak of pneumonia. Sequence analysis of postmortem samples revealed the presence of an avian H3N8 influenza A virus, similar to a virus circulating in North American waterfowl since at least 2002 but with mutations that indicate recent adaption to mammalian hosts. These include a D701N mutation in the viral PB2 protein, previously reported in highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza viruses infecting people. Lectin staining and agglutination assays indicated the presence of the avian-preferred SAα-2,3 and mammalian SAα-2,6 receptors in seal respiratory tract, and the ability of the virus to agglutinate erythrocytes bearing either the SAα-2,3 or the SAα-2,6 receptor. The emergence of this A/harbor seal/Massachusetts/1/2011 virus may herald the appearance of an H3N8 influenza clade with potential for persistence and cross-species transmission.

  1. Dissecting Genomic Aberrations in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms by Multiplex-PCR and Next Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Schubert, Claudia; Chatain, Nicolas; Sontag, Stephanie; Isfort, Susanne; Ortiz-Brüchle, Nadina; Schmitt, Karla; Krüger, Luisa; Zerres, Klaus; Zenke, Martin; Brümmendorf, Tim H.; Koschmieder, Steffen

    2015-01-01

    In order to assess the feasibility of amplicon-based parallel next generation sequencing (NGS) for the diagnosis of myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN), we investigated multiplex-PCR of 212 amplicons covering genomic mutational hotspots in 48 cancer-related genes. Samples from 64 patients with MPN and five controls as well as seven (myeloid) cell lines were analyzed. Healthy donor and reactive erythrocytosis samples showed several frequent single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) but no known pathogenic mutation. Sequencing of the cell lines confirmed the presence of the known mutations. In the patient samples, JAK2 V617F was present in all PV, 4 of 10 ET, and 16 of 19 MF patients. The JAK2 V617F allele burden was different in the three groups (ET, 33+/-22%; PV 48+/-28% and MF 68+/- 29%). Further analysis detected both previously described and undescribed mutations (i.e., G12V NRAS, IDH1 R132H, E255G ABL, and V125G IDH1 mutations). One patient with lymphoid BC/Ph+ ALL who harbored a T315I ABL mutation and was treated with ponatinib was found to have developed a newly acquired V216M TP53 mutation (12% of transcripts) when becoming resistant to ponatinib. Ponatinib led to a decrease of ABL T315I positive transcripts from 47% before ponatinib treatment to 16% at the time of ponatinib resistance in this patient, suggesting that both TP53 and ABL mutations were present in the same clone and that the newly acquired TP53 mutation might have caused ponatinib resistance in this patient. In conclusion, amplicon-sequencing-based NGS allows simultaneous analysis of multiple MPN associated genes for diagnosis and during treatment and measurement of the mutant allele burden. PMID:25894969

  2. 33 CFR 100.109 - Winter Harbor Lobster Boat Race, Winter Harbor, ME.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Winter Harbor Lobster Boat Race, Winter Harbor, ME. 100.109 Section 100.109 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Lobster Boat Race, Winter Harbor, ME. (a) Regulated area. The regulated area includes all waters of...

  3. Congenital ptosis, scoliosis, and malignant hyperthermia susceptibility in siblings with recessive RYR1 mutations.

    PubMed

    AlBakri, Amani; Karaoui, Mohammad; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; Khan, Arif O

    2015-12-01

    Malignant hyperthermia susceptibility is a rare pharmacogenic disorder of skeletal muscle calcium regulation caused by mutations in the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor 1 gene (RYR1). It is important to identify children who are candidates for ophthalmic surgery who might harbor RYR1 mutations because intraoperative malignant hyperthermia is potentially lethal. We report 2 siblings with congenital ptosis and scoliosis who were considered for ptosis surgery but were found to harbor underlying recessive RYR1 mutations.

  4. 33 CFR 117.1061 - Tacoma Harbor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Tacoma Harbor. 117.1061 Section 117.1061 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Washington § 117.1061 Tacoma Harbor. (a) When...

  5. 33 CFR 117.1061 - Tacoma Harbor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Tacoma Harbor. 117.1061 Section 117.1061 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Washington § 117.1061 Tacoma Harbor. (a) When...

  6. 33 CFR 117.1061 - Tacoma Harbor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Tacoma Harbor. 117.1061 Section 117.1061 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Washington § 117.1061 Tacoma Harbor. (a) When...

  7. 33 CFR 117.1061 - Tacoma Harbor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tacoma Harbor. 117.1061 Section 117.1061 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Washington § 117.1061 Tacoma Harbor. (a) When...

  8. 33 CFR 117.1061 - Tacoma Harbor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Tacoma Harbor. 117.1061 Section 117.1061 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Washington § 117.1061 Tacoma Harbor. (a) When...

  9. PTCH mutations: distribution and analyses.

    PubMed

    Lindström, Erika; Shimokawa, Takashi; Toftgård, Rune; Zaphiropoulos, Peter G

    2006-03-01

    Mutations in the PTCH (PTCH1) gene are the underlying cause of nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS), and are also found in many different sporadic tumors in which PTCH is thought to act as a tumor suppressor gene. To investigate the distribution pattern of these mutations in tumors and NBCCS, we analyzed 284 mutations and 48 SNPs located in the PTCH gene that were compiled from our PTCH mutation database. We found that the PTCH mutations were mainly clustered into the predicted two large extracellular loops and the large intracellular loop. The SNPs appeared to be clustered around the sterol sensing domain and the second half of the protein. The NBCCS cases and each class of tumor analyzed revealed a different distribution of the mutations in the various PTCH domains. Moreover, the types of mutations were also unique for the different groups. Finally, the PTCH gene harbors mutational hot spot residues and regions, including a slippage-sensitive sequence in the N-terminus.

  10. BCR: a new target in resistance mediated by BCR/ABL-315I?

    PubMed Central

    Haberbosch, Isabella; Rafiei, Anahita; Oancea, Claudia; Ottmann, Gerhart Oliver; Ruthardt, Martin; Mian, Afsar Ali

    2016-01-01

    Targeting BCR/ABL with Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) is a proven concept for the treatment of Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph+) leukemias but the “gatekeeper” mutation T315I confers resistance against all approved TKIs, with the only exception of ponatinib, a multi-targeted kinase inhibitor. Besides resistance to TKIs, T315I also confers additional features to the leukemogenic potential of BCR/ABL, involving endogenous BCR. Therefore we studied the role of BCR on BCR/ABL mutants lacking functional domains indispensable for the oncogenic activity of BCR/ABL. We used the factor independent growth of murine myeloid progenitor 32D cells and the transformation of Rat-1 fibroblasts both mediated by BCR/ABL. Here we report that T315I restores the capacity to mediate factor-independent growth and transformation potential of loss-of-function mutants of BCR/ABL. Targeting endogenous Bcr abrogated the capacity of oligomerization deficient mutant of BCR/ABL-T315I to mediate factor independent growth of 32D cells and strongly reduced their transformation potential in Rat-1 cells, as well as led to the up-regulation of mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. Our data show that the T315I restores the capacity of loss-of-function mutants to transform cells which is dependent on the transphosphorylation of endogenous Bcr, which becomes a putative therapeutic target to overcome resistance by T315I. PMID:27014420

  11. Hospital Room Floors May Harbor 'Superbugs'

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_163886.html Hospital Room Floors May Harbor 'Superbugs' But that area often overlooked when it comes ... Hospital room floors may be more of a "superbug" threat than many hospital staffers realize, new research ...

  12. West Harbor, Ohio Recreational Navigation Improvement. Revision.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-03-01

    natural sand beach at Gem Beach, and a length of shoreline which is essentially stable but which periodically ex- periences slight fluctuations in...dually to form an essentially flat plateau of land in the shoreward -11- direction. However, a few hundred feet to the east the beach rises from the...Harbor, which has remained essentially in its natural state in spite of the recreational and residential development of East and West Harbors, has been

  13. A Family Harboring CMT1A Duplication and HNPP Deletion.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Hwa; Kang, Hee Jin; Song, Hyunseok; Hwang, Su Jin; Cho, Sun-Young; Kim, Sang-Beom; Kim, Joonki; Chung, Ki Wha; Choi, Byung-Ok

    2007-06-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A) is associated with duplication of chromosome 17p11.2-p12, whereas hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP), which is an autosomal dominant neuropathy showing characteristics of recurrent pressure palsies, is associated with 17p11.2-p12 deletion. An altered gene dosage of PMP22 is believed to the main cause underlying the CMT1A and HNPP phenotypes. Although CMT1A and HNPP are associated with the same locus, there has been no report of these two mutations within a single family. We report a rare family harboring CMT1A duplication and HNPP deletion.

  14. 33 CFR 80.1122 - Channel Islands Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Channel Islands Harbor, CA. 80... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1122 Channel Islands Harbor, CA. (a) A line drawn from Channel Islands Harbor South Jetty Light 2 to Channel Islands Harbor...

  15. 33 CFR 80.1122 - Channel Islands Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Channel Islands Harbor, CA. 80... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1122 Channel Islands Harbor, CA. (a) A line drawn from Channel Islands Harbor South Jetty Light 2 to Channel Islands Harbor...

  16. 33 CFR 80.1122 - Channel Islands Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Channel Islands Harbor, CA. 80... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1122 Channel Islands Harbor, CA. (a) A line drawn from Channel Islands Harbor South Jetty Light 2 to Channel Islands Harbor...

  17. 33 CFR 80.1122 - Channel Islands Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Channel Islands Harbor, CA. 80... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1122 Channel Islands Harbor, CA. (a) A line drawn from Channel Islands Harbor South Jetty Light 2 to Channel Islands Harbor...

  18. 33 CFR 80.1122 - Channel Islands Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Channel Islands Harbor, CA. 80... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1122 Channel Islands Harbor, CA. (a) A line drawn from Channel Islands Harbor South Jetty Light 2 to Channel Islands Harbor...

  19. 33 CFR 80.1126 - Santa Barbara Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Santa Barbara Harbor, CA. 80.1126... NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1126 Santa Barbara Harbor, CA. A line drawn from Santa Barbara Harbor Light 4 to Santa Barbara Harbor Breakwater Light....

  20. 33 CFR 80.1138 - Santa Cruz Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Santa Cruz Harbor, CA. 80.1138... NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1138 Santa Cruz Harbor, CA. A line drawn from the seaward extremity of the Santa Cruz Harbor East Breakwater to Santa Cruz Harbor West...

  1. 33 CFR 165.904 - Lake Michigan at Chicago Harbor & Burnham Park Harbor-Safety and Security Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... & Burnham Park Harbor-Safety and Security Zone. 165.904 Section 165.904 Navigation and Navigable Waters... Guard District § 165.904 Lake Michigan at Chicago Harbor & Burnham Park Harbor—Safety and Security Zone... waters including Burnham Park Harbor and the southern part of Chicago Harbor, Lake Michigan, bounded...

  2. Sediment resuspension characteristics in Baltimore Harbor, Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maa, J.P.-Y.; Sanford, L.; Halka, J.P.

    1998-01-01

    Critical bed shear stress for sediment resuspension and sediment erosion rate were measured in-situ at sites from inner to outer Baltimore Harbor using the VIMS Sea Carousel. Clay mineral contents and biological conditions were almost the same at the four study sites. The experimental results indicated that the erosion rate increased from the outer harbor toward the inner harbor with a maximum difference of about 10 times at an excess bed shear stress of 0.1 Pa. The measured critical bed shear stress strongly depended on the existence of a fluff layer. It was approximately 0.05 Pa if a fluff layer existed, and increases to about 0.1 Pa in the absence of a fluff layer.

  3. The defining DNA methylation signature of Floating-Harbor Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hood, Rebecca L.; Schenkel, Laila C.; Nikkel, Sarah M.; Ainsworth, Peter J.; Pare, Guillaume; Boycott, Kym M.; Bulman, Dennis E.; Sadikovic, Bekim

    2016-01-01

    Floating-Harbor syndrome (FHS) is an autosomal dominant genetic condition characterized by short stature, delayed osseous maturation, expressive language impairment, and unique facial dysmorphology. We previously identified mutations in the chromatin remodeling protein SRCAP (SNF2-related CBP Activator Protein) as the cause of FHS. SRCAP has multiple roles in chromatin and transcriptional regulation; however, specific epigenetic consequences of SRCAP mutations remain to be described. Using high resolution genome-wide DNA methylation analysis, we identified a unique and highly specific DNA methylation “epi-signature” in the peripheral blood of individuals with FHS. Both hyper and hypomethylated loci are distributed across the genome, preferentially occurring in CpG islands. Clonal bisulfite sequencing of two hypermethylated (FIGN and STPG2) and two hypomethylated (MYO1F and RASIP1) genes confirmed these findings. The identification of a unique methylation signature in FHS provides further insight into the biological function of SRCAP and provides a unique biomarker for this disorder. PMID:27934915

  4. Mouse somatic mutation orthologous to MELAS A3302G mutation in the mitochondrial tRNA(Leu(UUR)) gene confers respiration defects.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Akinori; Enoki, Shunkei; Ishikawa, Kaori; Mito, Takayuki; Obata, Kanae; Nagashima, Ruriko; Yonekawa, Hiromichi; Nakada, Kazuto; Hayashi, Jun-Ichi

    2015-11-27

    We searched for mtDNA harboring somatic mutations in mouse B82 cells, and found an A2748G mutation orthologous to the A3302G mutation in tRNA(Leu(UUR)) gene reported in a patient with MELAS, the most prevalent mitochondrial disease. We isolated subclones of B82 cells until we obtained one subclone harboring >95% A2748G mtDNA. Cytoplasmic transfer of A2748G mtDNA resulted in cotransfer of A2748G mtDNA and respiration defects into mouse ES cells. Thus, A2748G mtDNA is responsible for respiration defects, and the ES cells harboring A2748G mtDNA may be useful for generation of transmitochondrial mice harboring A2748G mtDNA as potential disease models of MELAS.

  5. Estuarine studies in upper Grays Harbor, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beverage, Joseph P.; Swecker, Milton N.

    1969-01-01

    Improved management of the water resources of Grays Harbor, Wash., requires more data on the water quality of the harbor and a better understanding of the influences of industrial and domestic wastes on the local fisheries resources. To provide a more comprehensive understanding of these influences, the U.S. Geological Survey joined other agencies in a cooperative study of Grays Harbor. This report summarizes the Survey's study of circulation patterns, description of water-quality conditions, and characterization of bottom material in the upper harbor. Salt water was found to intrude at least as far as Montesano, 28.4 nautical miles from the mouth of the harbor. Longitudinal salinity distributions were used to compute dispersion (diffusivity) coefficients ranging from 842 to 3,520 square feet per second. These values were corroborated by half-tidal-cycle dye studies. The waters of the harbor were found to be well mixed after extended periods of low fresh-water flow but stratified at high flows. Salinity data were used lo define the cumulative 'mean age' of the harbor water, which may be used to approximate a mean 'flushing time.' Velocity-time curves for the upper harbor are distorted from simple harmonic functions owing to channel geometry and frictional effects. Surface and bottom velocity data were used to estimate net tidal 'separation' distance, neglecting vertical mixing. Net separation distances between top and bottom water ranged from 1.65 nautical miles when fresh-water inflow was 610 cubic feet per second to 13.4 miles when inflow was 15,900 cubic feet per second. The cumulative mean age from integration of the fresh-water velocity equation was about twice that obtained from the salinity distribution. Excursion distances obtained with dye over half-tidal cycles exceeded those estimated from longitudinal salinity distributions and those obtained by earlier investigators who used floats. Net tidal excursions were as much as twice those obtained with floats

  6. Oncogenic PIK3CA mutations occur in epidermal nevi and seborrheic keratoses with a characteristic mutation pattern

    PubMed Central

    Hafner, Christian; López-Knowles, Elena; Luis, Nuno M.; Toll, Agustí; Baselga, Eulàlia; Fernández-Casado, Alex; Hernández, Silvia; Ribé, Adriana; Mentzel, Thomas; Stoehr, Robert; Hofstaedter, Ferdinand; Landthaler, Michael; Vogt, Thomas; Pujol, Ramòn M.; Hartmann, Arndt; Real, Francisco X.

    2007-01-01

    Activating mutations of the p110 α subunit of PI3K (PIK3CA) oncogene have been identified in a broad spectrum of malignant tumors. However, their role in benign or preneoplastic conditions is unknown. Activating FGF receptor 3 (FGFR3) mutations are common in benign skin lesions, either as embryonic mutations in epidermal nevi (EN) or as somatic mutations in seborrheic keratoses (SK). FGFR3 mutations are also common in low-grade malignant bladder tumors, where they often occur in association with PIK3CA mutations. Therefore, we examined exons 9 and 20 of PIK3CA and FGFR3 hotspot mutations in EN (n = 33) and SK (n = 62), two proliferative skin lesions lacking malignant potential. Nine of 33 (27%) EN harbored PIK3CA mutations; all cases showed the E545G substitution, which is uncommon in cancers. In EN, R248C was the only FGFR3 mutation identified. By contrast, 10 of 62 (16%) SK revealed the typical cancer-associated PIK3CA mutations E542K, E545K, and H1047R. The same lesions displayed a wide range of FGFR3 mutations. Corresponding unaffected tissue was available for four EN and two mutant SK: all control samples displayed a WT sequence, confirming the somatic nature of the mutations found in lesional tissue. Forty of 95 (42%) lesions showed at least one mutation in either gene. PIK3CA and FGFR3 mutations displayed an independent distribution; 5/95 lesions harbored mutations in both genes. Our findings suggest that, in addition to their role in cancer, oncogenic PIK3CA mutations contribute to the pathogenesis of skin tumors lacking malignant potential. The remarkable genotype–phenotype correlation as observed in this study points to a distinct etiopathogenesis of the mutations in keratinocytes occuring either during fetal development or in adult life. PMID:17673550

  7. [Pathogenic mutation or polymorphism? (How to find criteria)].

    PubMed

    Kochański, Andrzej

    2006-01-01

    The classification of amino-acid substitutions into pathogenic mutations and harmless polymorphisms should be revised. In the recent years it was shown that some amino-acid substitutions considered as pathogenic mutations were polymorphisms. Similarly, some 'harmless' polymorphisms have been shown to be pathogenic mutations. Functional analysis considered as a good method to estimate the pathogenic nature of mutations is also limited. The selection of DNA samples for the control group is also difficult. Due to the molecular mechanism mediated by recently discovered exonic splicing enhancers and silencers (ESE and ESS) it is hard to predict a pathogenic effect of some mutations. In addition, the phenotype variability observed between unrelated patients harboring the same mutation may reflect the effects of modifying genes as well as the lack of association between mutation and "its" phenotype. The aim of this study is to describe the problem of the pathogenic effect of mutations.

  8. Sediment bioaccumulation testing: Manistique Harbor sediments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Manistique Harbor AOC public meeting and availability session on August 28th in Manistique, MI. This meeting/session is organized by GLNPO; they are EPA's lead on AOC restoration efforts. The goal of the meeting is to engage with the community with all the work that has been d...

  9. New Bedford Harbor Long Term Monitoring Program

    EPA Science Inventory

    New Bedford Harbor (NBH), located in southeastern Massachusetts, was designated as a Superfund site in 1983 due to unacceptably high levels of sediment contamination by polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Based on human health and environmental concerns, the decision was made to d...

  10. 16 CFR 312.10 - Safe harbors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., issued by representatives of the marketing or online industries, or by other persons, that, after notice... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Safe harbors. 312.10 Section 312.10 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS CHILDREN'S...

  11. 16 CFR 312.10 - Safe harbors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., issued by representatives of the marketing or online industries, or by other persons, that, after notice... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Safe harbors. 312.10 Section 312.10 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS CHILDREN'S...

  12. 16 CFR 312.10 - Safe harbors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., issued by representatives of the marketing or online industries, or by other persons, that, after notice... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Safe harbors. 312.10 Section 312.10 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS CHILDREN'S...

  13. 16 CFR 312.10 - Safe harbors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., issued by representatives of the marketing or online industries, or by other persons, that, after notice... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Safe harbors. 312.10 Section 312.10 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS CHILDREN'S...

  14. Frequent PIK3CA Mutations in Colorectal and Endometrial Cancer with Double Somatic Mismatch Repair Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Stacey A.; Turner, Emily H.; Beightol, Mallory B.; Jacobson, Angela; Gooley, Ted A.; Salipante, Stephen J.; Haraldsdottir, Sigurdis; Smith, Christina; Scroggins, Sheena; Tait, Jonathan F.; Grady, William M.; Lin, Edward H.; Cohn, David E.; Goodfellow, Paul J.; Arnold, Mark W.; de la Chapelle, Albert; Pearlman, Rachel; Hampel, Heather; Pritchard, Colin C.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims Double somatic mutations in mismatch repair (MMR) genes have recently been described in colorectal and endometrial cancers with microsatellite instability (MSI) not attributable to MLH1 hypermethylation or germline mutation. We sought to define the molecular phenotype of this newly recognized tumor subtype. Methods From two prospective Lynch syndrome screening studies, we identified patients with colorectal and endometrial tumors harboring ≥2 somatic MMR mutations, but normal germline MMR testing (“double somatic”). We determined the frequencies of tumor PIK3CA, BRAF, KRAS, NRAS, and PTEN mutations by targeted next-generation sequencing and used logistic-regression models to compare them to: Lynch syndrome, MLH1 hypermethylated, and microsatellite stable (MSS) tumors. We validated our findings using independent datasets from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Results Among colorectal cancer cases, we found that 14/21 (67%) of double somatic cases had PIK3CA mutations vs. 4/18 (22%) Lynch syndrome, 2/10 (20%) MLH1 hypermethylated, and 12/78 (15%) MSS tumors; p<0.0001. PIK3CA mutations were detected in 100% of 13 double somatic endometrial cancers (p=0.04). BRAF mutations were absent in double somatic and Lynch syndrome colorectal tumors. We found highly similar results in a validation cohort from TCGA (113 colorectal, 178 endometrial cancer), with 100% of double somatic cases harboring a PIK3CA mutation (p<0.0001). Conclusions PIK3CA mutations are present in double somatic mutated colorectal and endometrial cancers at substantially higher frequencies than other MSI subgroups. PIK3CA mutation status may better define an emerging molecular entity in colorectal and endometrial cancers, with the potential to inform screening and therapeutic decision making. PMID:27302833

  15. 1. PANORAMA, SHOWING COMMAND POST RELATION TO DUTCH HARBOR AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. PANORAMA, SHOWING COMMAND POST RELATION TO DUTCH HARBOR AND UNALASKA FROM THE TOP OF LITTLE SOUTH AMERICA - Naval Operating Base Dutch Harbor & Fort Mears, Hill 400 Fixed Defense Battery Command Post, Unalaska, Aleutian Islands, AK

  16. PANORAMA, SHOWING COMMAND POST RELATION TO DUTCH HARBOR AND UNALASKA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PANORAMA, SHOWING COMMAND POST RELATION TO DUTCH HARBOR AND UNALASKA FROM THE TOP OF LITTLE SOUTH AMERICA - Naval Operating Base Dutch Harbor & Fort Mears, Hill 400 Fixed Defense Battery Command Post, Unalaska, Aleutian Islands, AK

  17. Braf V600E mutation in melanoma: translational current scenario.

    PubMed

    Guadarrama-Orozco, J A; Ortega-Gómez, A; Ruiz-García, E B; Astudillo-de la Vega, H; Meneses-García, A; Lopez-Camarillo, C

    2016-09-01

    Melanoma was one of the translational cancer examples in clinic, including target therapy related to specific biomarkers impacting in the outcome of melanoma patients. Melanomagenesis involved a wide variety of mutations during his evolution; many of these mutated proteins have a kinase activity. One of the most cited proteins in melanoma is BRAF (about 50-60 % of melanomas harbors activating BRAF mutations), for these the most common is a substitution of valine to glutamic acid at codon 600 (p.V600E). Therefore, the precise identification of this underlying somatic mutation is essential; knowing the translational implications has opened a wide view of melanoma biology and therapy.

  18. Boussinesq Modeling for Inlets, Harbors, and Structures (Bouss-2D)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-30

    approach to evaluate the performance of navigation and flooding projects to advance coastal and hydraulic engineering practice and guidance. This...decision support technology maybe used in design/repair of ports/harbors and costal infrastructures, flood levees, flooding and inundation of...Mississippi River Gulf Outlet, New Orleans Flood Control Gates, LA; Buffalo Harbor, NY; Tau Harbor, and Faleasao Harbor, American Samoa. BMT helps

  19. 33 CFR 110.205 - Chicago Harbor, Ill.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Chicago Harbor, Ill. 110.205... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.205 Chicago Harbor, Ill. (a) The anchorage grounds—(1...) Anchorage D, Chicago Harbor Lock South. Beginning at a point 35.5 feet South (16 feet South of the...

  20. 33 CFR 110.83 - Chicago Harbor, Ill.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., 1940, along the West side of the harbor, said harbor line runs parallel to the overall alignment of... South of the South face of the former Naval Armory Dock, and 100 feet East of said bulkhead, that point... and bulkhead, 1,705 feet to a point that is 100 feet East of said harbor line and 150 feet East of...

  1. 32 CFR 765.6 - Regulations for Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Regulations for Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. 765.6... RULES RULES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC § 765.6 Regulations for Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. The Commander, U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, is responsible for prescribing and enforcing such rules...

  2. 77 FR 73889 - National Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-11

    ... Part V The President Proclamation 8914--National Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day, 2012 Executive Order... National Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day, 2012 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation... American people. In less than 2 hours, the bombs that rained on Pearl Harbor robbed thousands of men,...

  3. Teaching about Pearl Harbor. Curriculum Enhancement Series #1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shields, Anna Marshall

    These materials consist of sample lesson plans for teaching about the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, in both U.S. and world history classes. The lesson plans challenge students to examine how current attitudes toward the Japanese may be rooted in World War II and Pearl Harbor. Selected bibliographies on Pearl Harbor, World…

  4. 78 FR 68735 - Reduction or Suspension of Safe Harbor Contributions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-15

    ... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 1 RIN 1545-BI64 Reduction or Suspension of Safe Harbor Contributions... guidance on permitted mid-year reductions or suspensions of safe harbor nonelective contributions in... requirements for permitted mid-year reductions or suspensions of safe harbor matching contributions for...

  5. 7. Photocopy of c 1837 map of Cleveland Harbor with ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Photocopy of c 1837 map of Cleveland Harbor with two plans for additonal harbor. This is the first map to show the Cleveland Breakwater. Original in the Corps' files, Buffalo District. - Cleveland Breakwater at Cleveland Harbor, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  6. Decadal Changes In Benthic Community Measures In New York Harbor

    EPA Science Inventory

    Monitoring in New York Harbor, NY, as part of the Regional Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program has spanned a decade, and includes habitat and water quality measures and sediment contaminant levels from four sub-basins (Upper NY Harbor, Lower NY Harbor, Newark Bay, and...

  7. 33 CFR 162.155 - Sandusky and Huron Harbors, Ohio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sandusky and Huron Harbors, Ohio. 162.155 Section 162.155 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Harbors, Ohio. (a) In Sandusky Harbor, no vessel greater than 40 feet in length may exceed 10 miles...

  8. 33 CFR 162.155 - Sandusky and Huron Harbors, Ohio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sandusky and Huron Harbors, Ohio. 162.155 Section 162.155 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Harbors, Ohio. (a) In Sandusky Harbor, no vessel greater than 40 feet in length may exceed 10 miles...

  9. 32 CFR 765.6 - Regulations for Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Regulations for Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. 765.6... RULES RULES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC § 765.6 Regulations for Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. The Commander, U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, is responsible for prescribing and enforcing such rules...

  10. 32 CFR 765.6 - Regulations for Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Regulations for Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. 765.6... RULES RULES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC § 765.6 Regulations for Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. The Commander, U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, is responsible for prescribing and enforcing such rules...

  11. 32 CFR 765.6 - Regulations for Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Regulations for Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. 765.6... RULES RULES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC § 765.6 Regulations for Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. The Commander, U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, is responsible for prescribing and enforcing such rules...

  12. 32 CFR 765.6 - Regulations for Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Regulations for Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. 765.6... RULES RULES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC § 765.6 Regulations for Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. The Commander, U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, is responsible for prescribing and enforcing such rules...

  13. 78 FR 21597 - Marine Mammals: Alaska Harbor Seal Habitats

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-11

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-BB71 Marine Mammals: Alaska Harbor Seal Habitats... measures to protect glacially-associated harbor seal habitats in Alaska (78 FR 15669; March 12, 2013). During the workshops NMFS will present information regarding harbor seal habitat usage and...

  14. 33 CFR 117.272 - Boot Key Harbor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Boot Key Harbor. 117.272 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.272 Boot Key Harbor. The draw of the Boot Key Harbor drawbridge, mile 0.13, between Marathon and Boot Key, will open as necessary on...

  15. 33 CFR 117.272 - Boot Key Harbor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Boot Key Harbor. 117.272 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.272 Boot Key Harbor. The draw of the Boot Key Harbor drawbridge, mile 0.13, between Marathon and Boot Key, will open as necessary on...

  16. 33 CFR 80.1136 - Moss Landing Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Moss Landing Harbor, CA. 80.1136... NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1136 Moss Landing Harbor, CA. A line drawn from the seaward extremity of the pier located 0.3 mile south of Moss Landing Harbor Entrance to...

  17. 33 CFR 80.1136 - Moss Landing Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Moss Landing Harbor, CA. 80.1136... NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1136 Moss Landing Harbor, CA. A line drawn from the seaward extremity of the pier located 0.3 mile south of Moss Landing Harbor Entrance to...

  18. 33 CFR 80.1136 - Moss Landing Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Moss Landing Harbor, CA. 80.1136... NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1136 Moss Landing Harbor, CA. A line drawn from the seaward extremity of the pier located 0.3 mile south of Moss Landing Harbor Entrance to...

  19. 33 CFR 80.1136 - Moss Landing Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Moss Landing Harbor, CA. 80.1136... NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1136 Moss Landing Harbor, CA. A line drawn from the seaward extremity of the pier located 0.3 mile south of Moss Landing Harbor Entrance to...

  20. 33 CFR 80.1136 - Moss Landing Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Moss Landing Harbor, CA. 80.1136... NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1136 Moss Landing Harbor, CA. A line drawn from the seaward extremity of the pier located 0.3 mile south of Moss Landing Harbor Entrance to...

  1. Low frequency KRAS mutations in colorectal cancer patients and the presence of multiple mutations in oncogenic drivers in non-small cell lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Liyan; Huang, Jiaqi; Morehouse, Chris; Zhu, Wei; Korolevich, Susana; Sui, Dan; Ge, Xiaoxiao; Lehmann, Kim; Liu, Zheng; Kiefer, Christine; Czapiga, Meggan; Su, Xinying; Brohawn, Philip; Gu, Yi; Higgs, Brandon W; Yao, Yihong

    2013-01-01

    Intratumor heterogeneity can confound the results of mutation analyses in oncodriver genes using traditional methods thereby challenging the application of targeted cancer therapy strategies for patients Ultradeep sequencing can detect low frequency and expanded clonal mutations in primary tumors to better inform treatment decisions. KRAS coding exons in 61 treatment-naive colorectal cancer (CRC) tumors and KRAS, EGFR, ALK, and MET in lung tumors from three Chinese non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients were sequenced using ultradeep sequencing methods. Forty-one percent of CRC patients (25/61) harbored mutations in the KRAS active domain, eight of which (13%) were not detected by Sanger sequencing. Three (of eight) had frequencies less than 10% and one patient harbored more than one mutation. Low frequency KRAS active (G12R) and EGFR kinase domain mutations (G719A) were identified in one NSCLC patient. A second NSCLC patient showed an EML4-ALK fusion with ALK, EGFR, and MET mutations. A third NSCLC patient harbored multiple low frequency mutations in KRAS, EGFR, and MET as well as ALK gene copy number increases. Within the same patient, multiple low frequency mutations occurred within a gene. A complex pattern of intrinsic low frequency driver mutations in well-known tumor oncogenes may exist prior to treatment, resulting in resistance to targeted therapies. Ultradeep sequencing can characterize intratumor heterogeneity and identify such mutations to ultimately affect treatment decisions.

  2. Remembering Pearl Harbor at 75 Years.

    PubMed

    Liehr, Patricia; Sopcheck, Janet; Milbrath, Gwyneth

    2016-12-01

    : On December 7, 1941, the Sunday-morning quiet of the U.S. naval base in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, was shattered by dive-bombing Japanese fighter planes. The planes came in two waves-and when it was all over, more than 2,400 were killed and more than 1,100 were injured.Nurses were stationed at U.S. Naval Hospital Pearl Harbor, Tripler General Hospital (now Tripler Army Medical Center), Hickam Field Hospital, Schofield Barracks Station Hospital, and aboard the USS Solace, and witnessed the devastation. But they also did what nurses do in emergencies-they responded and provided care to those in need. Here are the stories of a few of those nurses.

  3. Mutation Accumulation in an Asexual Relative of Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Stephen I.; McKay, John K.

    2017-01-01

    Asexual populations experience weaker responses to natural selection, which causes deleterious mutations to accumulate over time. Additionally, stochastic loss of individuals free of deleterious mutations can lead to an irreversible increase in mutational load in asexuals (the “click” in Muller’s Ratchet). Here we report on the genomic divergence and distribution of mutations across eight sympatric pairs of sexual and apomictic (asexual) Boechera (Brassicaceae) genotypes. We show that apomicts harbor a greater number of derived mutations than sympatric sexual genotypes. Furthermore, in phylogenetically constrained sites that are subject to contemporary purifying selection, the ancestral, conserved allele is more likely to be retained in sexuals than apomicts. These results indicate that apomictic lineages accumulate mutations at otherwise conserved sites more often than sexuals, and support the conclusion that deleterious mutation accumulation can be a powerful force in the evolution of asexual higher plants. PMID:28068346

  4. Evaluation of Sediment Contamination in Pearl Harbor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-01

    configuration) largely engaged in the taking of skipjack tuna (aku) after purse seining for baitfish (nehu) in estuar- ies such as Pearl Harbor. Algae. A group...purpurea), a species used as a baitfish in the offshore tuna , "aku," fishery. This species is the most important bait- fish resource in Hawaii, and Pearl...34Science, risk, and public policy ," Science, vol. 221, pp. 1026-1028. Russell, M., and M. Gruber, 1987. "Risk assessment in environmental policy

  5. Taxonomic Evaluation of Cleveland Harbor Lake Areas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    Immature. Comparison to previous collections Although benthic invertebrates were not previously collected for USACE- LRB from the current study areas...areas in the lake. There were considerable differences in invertebrate community taxa between Vermillion and Cleveland Harbor, including the presence...Griffiths. 1984. Benthic invertebrates of the nearshore zone of eastern Lake Huron, Georgian Bay, and North Channel. Journal of Great Lakes Research 10:407

  6. A Guide for Marina and Harbor Managers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-01

    recommend changes in the context and format, - 1o determine possible future uses or futurp =* -s. Ten small boat harbor and marinas were selected...managers were asked if there were ways to improve the guide by adding information, deleting information, or changing the format. None of the managers...felt that any of 37 the information should be deleted, some recommendations were made for format changes , and all of the managers had recommendations

  7. Boson shells harboring charged black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Kleihaus, Burkhard; Kunz, Jutta; Laemmerzahl, Claus; List, Meike

    2010-11-15

    We consider boson shells in scalar electrodynamics coupled to Einstein gravity. The interior of the shells can be empty space, or harbor a black hole or a naked singularity. We analyze the properties of these types of solutions and determine their domains of existence. We investigate the energy conditions and present mass formulae for the composite black hole-boson shell systems. We demonstrate that these types of solutions violate black hole uniqueness.

  8. Light, Compact Pumper for Harbor Fires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    Report describes development of new transportable water-pumping unit for fire-fighting. Compact, self-contained unit provides fire protection at coastal and inland ports and is lighter than standard firetruck pumper of same capacity. Used to fight fires in harbors, cities, forests, refineries, chemical plants, and offshore drilling platforms. Other possible applications include cleaning up oilspills, pumping out ships, and flood control pumping.

  9. Barbers Point Harbor, Hawaii, Jetty Modification Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-11-01

    meter studies of the circulation patterns and flows in the channel, and (d) input from the sponsor, EPA , and harbor pilots. DISCLAIMER: The...tests and review study results. Participating in this meeting were Stanley Boc, HED, Dr. Wendy I. Wiltse, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency ( EPA ...U.S. Environmental Protection Agency ( EPA ), Capt. Dave Lyman, Hawaii Pilots Association, Capt. Thomas L. Heberle, Hawaii Pilots Association, and Capt

  10. Gulfport Harbor, Mississippi. Final Environmental Impact Statement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-01

    EIS-4 Littoral Zone Disposal Area EIS-75 EIS-5 Gulf of Mexico Ocean Dredge Material Disposal Sites EIS-76 EIS-6 Entrance Channel Alignment Alternatives...400-foot channel across Snip is’,rnd bar into the Gulf of Mexico . This --t ,recommendation al-eo included the modificatio.ri of the existing harbor...disposal in the Gulf of Mexico ; and 15.64 million cubic yards would be deposited by pipeline dredge in Mississippi Sound. Two economically and engineeringly

  11. 33 CFR 165.904 - Lake Michigan at Chicago Harbor & Burnham Park Harbor-Safety and Security Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Lake Michigan at Chicago Harbor & Burnham Park Harbor-Safety and Security Zone. 165.904 Section 165.904 Navigation and Navigable Waters... Guard District § 165.904 Lake Michigan at Chicago Harbor & Burnham Park Harbor—Safety and Security...

  12. Old Harbor Scammon Bay Hydro Feasibility

    SciTech Connect

    Brent Petrie

    2007-06-27

    The grantee, Alaska Village Electric Cooperative (AVEC), is a non-profit member owned rural electric generation and distribution cooperative. The proposed Project is located near the community of Old Harbor, Alaska. Old Harbor is on the southeastern coast of Kodiak Island, approximately 70 miles southwest of the City of Kodiak and 320 miles southwest of Anchorage. In 1998 sufficient information had been developed to apply for a license to construct the project and the cost was estimated to be $2,445,000 for a 500 KW project on Lagoon Creek. Major features of the project included an eight-foot high diversion dam on Mountain Creek, a desander box, a 9,800-foot long penstock to the powerhouse on Lagoon Creek, and a 5,500-foot long access road. It was also anticipated that the project could provide an additional source of water to Old Harbor. The report details the history and lessons learned in designing and permiting the proposed hydroelectric facility.

  13. Activating GNAS mutations in parosteal osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Carter, Jodi M; Inwards, Carrie Y; Jin, Long; Evers, Barbara; Wenger, Doris E; Oliveira, Andre M; Fritchie, Karen J

    2014-03-01

    Parosteal osteosarcoma is a surface-based osteosarcoma that often exhibits deceptively bland cytologic features, hindering diagnosis in small biopsies or when correlative radiologic imaging is not readily available. A number of benign and malignant fibro-osseous lesions, including fibrous dysplasia (FD) and low-grade central osteosarcoma, fall within the morphologic differential diagnosis of parosteal osteosarcoma. Somatic mutations in GNAS, encoding the α-subunit of the heterotrimeric G protein complex (Gsα), occur in FD and McCune-Albright syndrome but have not been reported in parosteal osteosarcoma. We evaluated GNAS mutational status in parosteal osteosarcoma and several of its histologic mimics to determine its utility in differentiating these entities. Eleven of 14 (79%) FD cases had GNAS mutations within codon 201 (5 R201C and 6 R201H mutations). GNAS mutations were not detected in any cases of adamantinoma or osteofibrous dysplasia. Direct sequencing of 9 parosteal osteosarcomas, including 3 of low grade and 6 with dedifferentiation, revealed activating GNAS mutations in 5 cases (55%), distributed as 4 R201C-mutated tumors and 1 tumor with an R201H mutation. GNAS codon 227 mutations were not detected in any of the cases. There was no association between GNAS mutational status and patient demographics, histologic dedifferentiation, or clinical outcome. To our knowledge, we report the first series of parosteal osteosarcomas harboring activating GNAS mutations. Our data suggest that GNAS mutational status may have limited utility as an ancillary technique in differentiating benign and malignant fibro-osseous lesions of the bone.

  14. Evaluation of sediment contamination in Pearl Harbor. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Grovhoug, J.G.

    1992-06-01

    Pearl Harbor demonstrates remarkable resilience to natural and human-induced contaminant stresses. A review of more than fifty harbor-specific data sets reveals a complex contamination and recovery history. Siltation is a major contaminant pathway in Pearl Harbor. Dredging operations, which are necessary due to high siltation rates, reduce contaminant loading by periodically removing the upper harbor sediment layers. The response of test organisms during sediment toxicity and bioaccumulation studies showed negligible effects from sediment toxicity. The environmental quality at an offshore dredge disposal site for the harbor is not measurable affected. Urban runoff via storm drains and tributaries is an important nonpoint source of contaminant exposure to the Pearl Harbor ecosystem. Most contaminants experience extensive physical, chemical, and biological, modification after entering the harbor environment. Certain contaminants, including PCBs, petroleum hydrocarbons, and silver, were reported at sufficiently elevated sediment concentrations to warrant environmental concern in some harbor regions and may warrant further evaluation. The overall sediment quality in Pearl Harbor, however, is less degraded than that of many U.S. mainland coastal harbors. Further detailed study of the abundance and distribution of important marine resources in Pearl Harbor is recommended.

  15. Group B Streptococcal Toxic Shock Syndrome and covR/S Mutations Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Sendi, Parham; el Hay, Muad Abd; Brandt, Claudia M.

    2017-01-01

    Gene mutations in the virulence regulator CovR/S of group A Streptococcus play a substantial role in the pathogenesis of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. We screened 25 group B Streptococcus (GBS) isolates obtained from patients with streptococcal toxic shock syndrome and found only 1 GBS clone harboring this kind of mutation. PMID:27983484

  16. The prevalence of CTNNB1 mutations in primary aldosteronism and consequences for clinical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Vin-Cent; Wang, Shuo-Meng; Chueh, Shih-Chieh Jeff; Yang, Shao-Yu; Huang, Kuo-How; Lin, Yen-Hung; Wang, Jian-Jhong; Connolly, Rory; Hu, Ya-Hui; Gomez-Sanchez, Celso E.; Peng, Kang-Yung; Wu, Kwan-Dun

    2017-01-01

    Constitutive activation of the Wnt pathway/β-catenin signaling may be important in aldosterone-producing adenoma (APA). However, significant gaps remain in our understanding of the prevalence and clinical outcomes after adrenalectomy in APA patients harboring CTNNB1 mutations. The molecular expression of CYP11B2 and gonadal receptors in adenomas were also explored. Adenomas from 219 APA patients (95 men; 44.2%; aged 50.5 ± 11.9 years) showed a high rate of somatic mutations (n = 128, 58.4%). The majority of them harbored KCNJ5 mutations (n = 116, 52.9%); 8 patients (3.7%, 6 women) had CTNNB1 mutations. Patients with APAs harboring CTNNB1 mutations were older and had shorter duration of hypertension. After adrenalectomy, CTNNB1 mutation carriers had a higher possibility (87.5%) of residual hypertension than other APA patients. APAs harboring CTNNB1 mutations have heterogeneous staining of β-catenin and variable expression of gonadal receptors and both CYP11B1 and CYP11B2. This suggests that CTNNB1 mutations may be more related to tumorigenesis rather than excessive aldosterone production. PMID:28102204

  17. eis Promoter C14G and C15G Mutations Do Not Confer Kanamycin Resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Pholwat, Suporn; Stroup, Suzanne; Heysell, Scott; Ogarkov, Oleg; Zhdanova, Svetlana; Ramakrishnan, Girija; Houpt, Eric

    2016-12-01

    We studied the significance of particular eis mutations on Mycobacterium tuberculosis drug resistance using a specialized transduction strategy. Recombinant strains harboring eis promoter mutations C14T, C12T, and G10A exhibited kanamycin resistance with MICs of 40, 10, and 20 μg/ml, respectively, while recombinant strains harboring C14G and C15G mutations were kanamycin susceptible (MIC, 2.5 to 5 μg/ml). Each of the eis mutants tested remained amikacin susceptible (MIC, 0.5 to 4 μg/ml). The identification of specific eis mutations is needed for accurate genotypic susceptibility testing for kanamycin.

  18. When chromatin organisation floats astray: the Srcap gene and Floating-Harbor syndrome.

    PubMed

    Messina, Giovanni; Atterrato, Maria Teresa; Dimitri, Patrizio

    2016-12-01

    Floating-Harbor syndrome (FHS) is a rare human disease characterised by delayed bone mineralisation and growth deficiency, often associated with mental retardation and skeletal and craniofacial abnormalities. FHS was first described at Boston's Floating Hospital 42 years ago, but the causative gene, called Srcap, was identified only recently. Truncated SRCAP protein variants have been implicated in the mechanism of FHS, but the molecular bases underlying the disease must still be elucidated and investigating the molecular defects leading to the onset of FHS remains a challenge. Here we comprehensively review recent work and provide alterative hypotheses to explain how the Srcap truncating mutations lead to the onset of FHS.

  19. Familial Essential Thrombocythemia Associated with MPL W515L Mutation in Father and JAK2 V617F Mutation in Daughter

    PubMed Central

    Trifa, Adrian P.; Cucuianu, Andrei; Popp, Radu A.

    2014-01-01

    Familial essential thrombocythemia features the acquisition of somatic mutations and an evolution similar to the sporadic form of the disease. Here we report two patients—father and daughter—with essential thrombocythemia who displayed a heterogeneous pattern of somatic mutations. The JAK2 V617F mutation was found in the daughter, while the father harbored the MPL W515L mutation. This case report may constitute further proof that in familial essential thrombocythemia there are other, still undefined, constitutional, inherited genetic factors predisposing to the acquisition of various somatic mutations (e.g., JAK2 V617F and MPL). PMID:25525531

  20. [BRAF V600E mutation in thyroid nodules in Argentina].

    PubMed

    Ilera, Verónica; Dourisboure, Ricardo; Colobraro, Antonio; Silva Croome, María Del Carmen; Olstein, Gustavo; Gauna, Alicia

    This prospective study analyzed the frequency of V600E mutation of oncogene BRAF in patients operated for benign thyroid nodules and for papillary thyroid cancer in an Argentine population. In patients with papillary thyroid cancer we compared clinicopathological characteristics between those harboring BRAF mutation and those without it. Twenty five consecutive patients operated for benign nodules and for papillary carcinoma were prospectively included. Fresh tissue samples of thyroid nodules and of adjacent thyroid parenchyma were obtained. DNA was extracted and amplified by amplification refractory mutation system polymerase chain reaction (ARMS PCR). Direct sequencing was performed in four samples. Of those patients operated for papillary thyroid cancer, 77% harbored BRAF mutation. All samples from adjacent thyroid parenchyma and from patients operated for benign nodules tested negative for the mutation. Direct sequencing confirmed the results obtained by ARMS PCR. Patients with BRAF mutation were significantly older at the time of diagnosis (BRAF+ 47.7 ± 12.7 years vs. BRAF- 24.7 ± 8.1 years, p < 0.01). Nine out of ten papillary carcinomas with BRAF mutation corresponded to the classic histological subtype, which was not observed in BRAF negative tumors (p < 0.02). In conclusion, we found a high frequency of BRAF V600E mutation in this population of patients operated for papillary thyroid carcinoma in Argentina. These results are consistent with those reported in the literature.

  1. Novel Insight into Mutational Landscape of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gaykalova, Daria A.; Mambo, Elizabeth; Choudhary, Ashish; Houghton, Jeffery; Buddavarapu, Kalyan; Sanford, Tiffany; Darden, Will; Adai, Alex; Hadd, Andrew; Latham, Gary; Danilova, Ludmila V.; Bishop, Justin; Li, Ryan J.; Westra, William H.; Hennessey, Patrick; Koch, Wayne M.; Ochs, Michael F.; Califano, Joseph A.; Sun, Wenyue

    2014-01-01

    Development of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is characterized by accumulation of mutations in several oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. We have formerly described the mutation pattern of HNSCC and described NOTCH signaling pathway alterations. Given the complexity of the HNSCC, here we extend the previous study to understand the overall HNSCC mutation context and to discover additional genetic alterations. We performed high depth targeted exon sequencing of 51 highly actionable cancer-related genes with a high frequency of mutation across many cancer types, including head and neck. DNA from primary tumor tissues and matched normal tissues was analyzed for 37 HNSCC patients. We identified 26 non-synonymous or stop-gained mutations targeting 11 of 51 selected genes. These genes were mutated in 17 out of 37 (46%) studied HNSCC patients. Smokers harbored 3.2-fold more mutations than non-smokers. Importantly, TP53 was mutated in 30%, NOTCH1 in 8% and FGFR3 in 5% of HNSCC. HPV negative patients harbored 4-fold more TP53 mutations than HPV positive patients. These data confirm prior reports of the HNSCC mutational profile. Additionally, we detected mutations in two new genes, CEBPA and FES, which have not been previously reported in HNSCC. These data extend the spectrum of HNSCC mutations and define novel mutation targets in HNSCC carcinogenesis, especially for smokers and HNSCC without HPV infection. PMID:24667986

  2. 33 CFR 207.480 - Lake Huron, Mich.; Harbor of refuge, Harbor Beach; use and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... at the time. (c) The use of chains in making fast to the breakwater will not be permitted. Lines must... floating property making fast to the breakwater must at once place such fenders between themselves and the... piece of floating property made fast to the breakwater, or anchored in the harbor, must keep...

  3. TP53 Mutational Spectrum in Endometrioid and Serous Endometrial Cancers.

    PubMed

    Schultheis, Anne M; Martelotto, Luciano G; De Filippo, Maria R; Piscuglio, Salvatore; Ng, Charlotte K Y; Hussein, Yaser R; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Soslow, Robert A; Weigelt, Britta

    2016-07-01

    Endometrial carcinomas (ECs) are heterogeneous at the genetic level. Although TP53 mutations are highly recurrent in serous endometrial carcinomas (SECs), these are also present in a subset of endometrioid endometrial carcinomas (EECs). Here, we sought to define the frequency, pattern, distribution, and type of TP53 somatic mutations in ECs by performing a reanalysis of the publicly available data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). A total of 228 EECs (n=186) and SECs (n=42) from the TCGA data set, for which an integrated genomic characterization was performed, were interrogated for the presence and type of TP53 mutations, and for mutations in genes frequently mutated in ECs. TP53 mutations were found in 15% of EECs and 88% of SECs, and in 91% of copy-number-high and 35% of polymerase (DNA directed), epsilon, catalytic subunit (POLE) integrative genomic subtypes. In addition to differences in prevalence, variations in the type and pattern of TP53 mutations were observed between histologic types and between integrative genomic subtypes. TP53 hotspot mutations were significantly more frequently found in SECs (46%) than in EECs (15%). TP53-mutant EECs significantly more frequently harbored a co-occurring PTEN mutation than TP53-mutant SECs. Finally, a subset of TP53-mutant ECs (22%) was found to harbor frameshift or nonsense mutations. Given that nonsense and frameshift TP53 mutations result in distinct p53 immunohistochemical results that require careful interpretation, and that EECs and SECs display different patterns, types, and distributions of TP53 mutations, the use of the TP53/p53 status alone for the differential diagnosis of EECs and SECs may not be sufficient.

  4. Pearl Harbor: strategy and principles of war. Student report

    SciTech Connect

    Isaman, R.J.

    1986-04-01

    Analysis of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor is presented to be used in developing programs of instruction for the Air Command and Staff College at the Air University. Chapter One provides a brief biographical sketch of Japanese Fleet Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto. Chapter Two consists of the prelude to battle, a battle description, and aftermath of the attack on Pearl Harbor. Chapter Three describes the Japanese strategy process which lead to the attack on Pearl Harbor while Chapter Four presents an analysis of the Japanese application of the principles of war at Pearl Harbor. The paper concludes with a guided discussion format for instructional use.

  5. A STUDY OF MARINE FOULING IN MONTEREY HARBOR.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    PIERS, *FOULING, *HARBORS, *MARINE BIOLOGY, CALIFORNIA, PACIFIC OCEAN, NAVAL RESEARCH, CRUSTACEA, ANIMALS, PERIODIC VARIATIONS, ENVIRONMENTAL TESTS, TIME, DISTRIBUTION, SEA WATER, PLATYHELMINTHES , OCEANOGRAPHIC DATA.

  6. How I treat FLT3-mutated AML

    PubMed Central

    Pratz, Keith W.

    2017-01-01

    FLT3-mutated acute myeloid leukemia (AML), despite not being recognized as a distinct entity in the World Health Organization (WHO) classification system, is readily recognized as a particular challenge by clinical specialists who treat acute leukemia. This is especially true with regards to the patients harboring the most common type of FLT3 mutation, the internal tandem duplication (FLT3-ITD) mutation. Here we present 4 patient cases from our institution and discuss how our management reflects what we have learned about this subtype of the disease. We also reflect on how we anticipate the management might change in the near future, with the emergence of clinically useful tyrosine kinase inhibitors. PMID:27872057

  7. Grays Harbor and Chehalis River Improvements to Navigation Environmental Studies. Benthic Invertebrate Studies in Grays Harbor, Washington,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-01

    invertebrates of the central California coast. Univ. of Calif. Press, Berkeley. 716 p. Tegelberg, H. C. 1969. A new Pacific razor clam species, Siliqua...favors: Drs. Ron Thom and John Armstrong, U.S. Army Corps of EnFineers; Dr. David Armstrong, University of ashinrton; Diane Carter, Grays Harbor College...Harbor, ashinfton, 1980-El...................... 102 49. Clam abundance for subtidal stations by season, Cr ’s Harbor, !ashinrtcn, 1980-l

  8. Submarine harbor navigation using image data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stubberud, Stephen C.; Kramer, Kathleen A.

    2017-01-01

    The process of ingress and egress of a United States Navy submarine is a human-intensive process that takes numerous individuals to monitor locations and for hazards. Sailors pass vocal information to bridge where it is processed manually. There is interest in using video imaging of the periscope view to more automatically provide navigation within harbors and other points of ingress and egress. In this paper, video-based navigation is examined as a target-tracking problem. While some image-processing methods claim to provide range information, the moving platform problem and weather concerns, such as fog, reduce the effectiveness of these range estimates. The video-navigation problem then becomes an angle-only tracking problem. Angle-only tracking is known to be fraught with difficulties, due to the fact that the unobservable space is not the null space. When using a Kalman filter estimator to perform the tracking, significant errors arise which could endanger the submarine. This work analyzes the performance of the Kalman filter when angle-only measurements are used to provide the target tracks. This paper addresses estimation unobservability and the minimal set of requirements that are needed to address it in this complex but real-world problem. Three major issues are addressed: the knowledge of navigation beacons/landmarks' locations, the minimal number of these beacons needed to maintain the course, and update rates of the angles of the landmarks as the periscope rotates and landmarks become obscured due to blockage and weather. The goal is to address the problem of navigation to and from the docks, while maintaining the traversing of the harbor channel based on maritime rules relying solely on the image-based data. The minimal number of beacons will be considered. For this effort, the image correlation from frame to frame is assumed to be achieved perfectly. Variation in the update rates and the dropping of data due to rotation and obscuration is considered

  9. Characterization of breast cancers with PI3K mutations in an academic practice setting using SNaPshot profiling.

    PubMed

    Abramson, Vandana G; Cooper Lloyd, M; Ballinger, Tarah; Sanders, Melinda E; Du, Liping; Lai, Darson; Su, Zengliu; Mayer, Ingrid; Levy, Mia; LaFrance, Delecia R; Vnencak-Jones, Cindy L; Shyr, Yu; Dahlman, Kimberly B; Pao, William; Arteaga, Carlos L

    2014-06-01

    Mutations in the PIK3CA gene are common in breast cancer and represent a clinically useful therapeutic target. Several larger, population-based studies have shown a positive prognostic significance associated with these mutations. This study aims to further identify characteristics of patients harboring PIK3CA mutations while evaluating the clinical impact of genomic testing for these mutations. Tumors from 312 patients at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center were analyzed for PIK3CA mutations using a multiplex screening assay (SNaPshot). Mutation rates, receptor status, histopathologic characteristics, and time to recurrence were assessed. The number of patients participating in clinical trials, specifically trials relating to the PIK3CA mutation, was examined. Statistically significant differences between wild-type and mutated tumors were determined using the Wilcoxon, Pearson, and Fischer exact tests. The PIK3CA mutation was found in 25 % of tumors tested. Patients with PIK3CA mutations were significantly more likely to express hormone receptors, be of lower combined histological grade, and have a reduced time to recurrence. Patients found to have a PIK3CA mutation were significantly more likely to enter a PIK3CA-specific clinical trial. In addition to confirming previously established positive prognostic characteristics of tumors harboring PIK3CA mutations, this study demonstrates the feasibility and utility of mutation profiling in a clinical setting. PIK3CA mutation testing impacted treatment and resulted in more patients entering mutation-specific clinical trials.

  10. Phase II Study of Nilotinib in Melanoma Harboring KIT Alterations Following Progression to Prior KIT Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Carvajal, Richard D.; Lawrence, Donald P.; Weber, Jeffrey S.; Gajewski, Thomas F.; Gonzalez, Rene; Lutzky, Jose; O’Day, Steven J.; Hamid, Omid; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Chapman, Paul B.; Sullivan, Ryan J.; Teitcher, Jerrold B.; Ramaiya, Nikhil; Giobbie-Hurder, Anita; Antonescu, Cristina R.; Heinrich, Michael C.; Bastian, Boris C.; Corless, Christopher L.; Fletcher, Jonathan A.; Hodi, F. Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Although durable responses can be achieved with tyrosine kinase inhibitors such as imatinib in melanomas harboring KIT mutations, the efficacy of alternative inhibitors after progression to imatinib and the activity of these agents on brain metastases is unknown. Experimental Design We conducted a phase II study of nilotinib 400 mg BID in two cohorts of patients with melanomas harboring KIT mutations or amplification: A) those refractory or intolerant to a prior KIT inhibitor; and B) those with brain metastases. The primary endpoint was 4-month disease control rate. Secondary endpoints included response rate, time-to-progression and overall survival. A Simon two-stage and a single-stage design was planned to assess for the primary endpoint in Cohorts A and B, respectively. Results Twenty patients were enrolled and 19 treated (11-Cohort A; 8-Cohort B). Three patients on Cohort A (27%; 95% CI, 8% – 56%) and 1 on Cohort B (12.5%; 90% CI, 0.6% – 47%) achieved the primary endpoint. Two partial responses were observed in Cohort A (18.2%, 90% CI, 3% – 47%); none were observed in Cohort B. The median time-to-progression and overall survival was 3·3 (90% CI, 2.1 – 3.9 months) and 9.1 months (90% CI, 4.3 – 14.2 months), respectively, in all treated patients. Conclusion Nilotinib may achieve disease control in patients with melanoma harboring KIT alterations and whose disease progressed after imatinib therapy. The efficacy of this agent in KIT altered melanoma with brain metastasis is limited. PMID:25695690

  11. Mitochondrial genes at Cold Spring Harbor.

    PubMed

    Grivell, L A

    1981-12-01

    The flowering dogwood trees and green lawns of Cold Spring Harbor provided the setting for a meeting devoted to Mitochondrial Genes from May 13-17th, 1981. Dedicated to the memory of Boris Ephrussi, who pioneered mitochondrial genetics at a time when the only kinds of genetics were nuclear or unclear, the meeting showed that the study of mtDNA has had impact on many areas of molecular biology including the genetic code and decoding, tRNA function, mechanisms of splicing and molecular evolution. Curiously, as Herschel Roman pointed out in his opening address, Ephrussi took great pains to avoid any mention of mitochondrial DNA in connection with his observations on cytoplasmic inheritance, preferring instead to refer to 'cytoplasmic particles, endowed with genetic continuity' (Ephrussi 1953). This reticence was not shared by participants at the meeting, as the following, brief report will show.

  12. Mutational status of nevus associated-melanomas

    PubMed Central

    Shitara, D.; Tell-Martí, G.; Badenas, C.; Enokihara, M.M.S.S.; Alós, L.; Larque, A.B.; Michalany, Nilceo; Puig-Butille, J.; Carrera, C.; Malvehy, J.; Puig, S.; Bagatin, E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Melanoma origin has always been a debated subject, as well as the role of adjacent melanocytic nevi. Epidemiological and histopathological studies point to melanomas arising either de novo or from a nevus. Methods Sixty-one melanomas found in association with a preexisting nevus were microdissected, after careful selection of cell subpopulations and submitted to Sanger sequencing of the BRAF, NRAS, C-KIT, PPP6C, STK19 and RAC1 genes. Each gene was evaluated twice in all samples by sequencing or by sequencing and another confirmation method, allele-specific fluorescent polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and capillary electrophoresis detection, or by SNaPshot Analysis. Only mutations confirmed via two different molecular methods or twice by sequencing were considered positive. Results The majority of cases presented concordance of mutational status between melanoma and the associated nevus for all 6 genes (40/60; 66.7%). Nine cases presented concomitant BRAF and NRAS mutations, including one case, in which both the melanoma and the adjacent nevus harbored V600E and Q61K double mutations. In two cases, both melanoma and associated nevus, located on acral sites were BRAF mutated, including an acral lentiginous melanoma. Conclusions This is the largest nevus-associated melanoma series molecularly evaluated to our knowledge. The majority of melanomas and adjacent nevi in our sample share the same mutational profile, corroborating the theory that the adjacent nevus and melanoma are clonally related and that melanoma originated within a nevus. PMID:25857817

  13. Charleston Harbor Deepening Project. Charleston Harbor and Shipyard River, South Carolina.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-04-01

    the diamondback terrapin . Other turtles that occur in the harbor and offshore waters include the Atlantic loggerhead and the Atlantic green turtle...king snake, southern co )erhead, pigmy rattlesnake, canebrake rattlesnake, eastern diamondback rattlesnake, southern toad, spring peener, green tree...Unpolluted body Of Salt Or-c tr’.n~iiu~vAo crustaceans, mollusks, * nkw ln to, it coiii re~i ertilies, ti, terrapin will not i, it tcd !)% ii uc u

  14. Sediment Budget for the Indiana Shore from Michigan City Harbor to Burns Waterway Harbor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    Engineer District, Chicago 111 N Canal Suite 600 Chicago, IL 60606 ERDC/CHL TR-12-17 ii Abstract Net sediment transport in the littoral cell...being filled with sand. The shoreline shows some additional trapping east of the NIPSCO BGS outfall canal and minor loss between the cross-shore...at Waukegan, Great Lakes, Wilmette, and Chicago in Illinois and Indiana Harbor and Ship Canal in East Chicago, Indiana, almost totally interrupted

  15. 33 CFR 110.83 - Chicago Harbor, Ill.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Chicago Harbor, Ill. 110.83... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.83 Chicago Harbor, Ill. (a) Grant Park North-A. Beginning at a point 2,120 feet South of the intersection of the North line of the Chicago Yacht...

  16. 33 CFR 117.181 - Oakland Inner Harbor Tidal Canal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Oakland Inner Harbor Tidal Canal. 117.181 Section 117.181 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements California § 117.181 Oakland Inner Harbor Tidal Canal. The draws of the...

  17. 33 CFR 80.1152 - Crescent City Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Crescent City Harbor, CA. 80.1152... NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1152 Crescent City Harbor, CA. A line drawn from Crescent City Entrance Light to the southeasternmost extremity of Whaler Island....

  18. 46 CFR 7.30 - New York Harbor, NY.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false New York Harbor, NY. 7.30 Section 7.30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC BOUNDARY LINES Atlantic Coast § 7.30 New York Harbor, NY. A line drawn from East Rockaway Inlet Breakwater Light to Ambrose...

  19. 33 CFR 110.255 - Ponce Harbor, P.R.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ponce Harbor, P.R. 110.255 Section 110.255 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.255 Ponce Harbor, P.R. (a) Small-craft anchorage. On...

  20. 33 CFR 110.208 - Buffalo Harbor, N.Y.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Buffalo Harbor, N.Y. 110.208 Section 110.208 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.208 Buffalo Harbor, N.Y. (a) The anchorage...

  1. 33 CFR 110.208 - Buffalo Harbor, N.Y.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Buffalo Harbor, N.Y. 110.208 Section 110.208 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.208 Buffalo Harbor, N.Y. (a) The anchorage...

  2. 33 CFR 110.208 - Buffalo Harbor, N.Y.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Buffalo Harbor, N.Y. 110.208 Section 110.208 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.208 Buffalo Harbor, N.Y. (a) The anchorage...

  3. 33 CFR 110.208 - Buffalo Harbor, N.Y.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Buffalo Harbor, N.Y. 110.208 Section 110.208 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.208 Buffalo Harbor, N.Y. (a) The anchorage...

  4. 33 CFR 110.255 - Ponce Harbor, P.R.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Ponce Harbor, P.R. 110.255 Section 110.255 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.255 Ponce Harbor, P.R. (a) Small-craft anchorage. On...

  5. 33 CFR 110.255 - Ponce Harbor, P.R.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Ponce Harbor, P.R. 110.255 Section 110.255 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.255 Ponce Harbor, P.R. (a) Small-craft anchorage. On...

  6. 33 CFR 110.255 - Ponce Harbor, P.R.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Ponce Harbor, P.R. 110.255 Section 110.255 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.255 Ponce Harbor, P.R. (a) Small-craft anchorage. On...

  7. 33 CFR 110.255 - Ponce Harbor, P.R.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Ponce Harbor, P.R. 110.255 Section 110.255 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.255 Ponce Harbor, P.R. (a) Small-craft anchorage. On...

  8. 33 CFR 80.1480 - Hilo Harbor, Hawaii, HI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hilo Harbor, Hawaii, HI. 80.1480 Section 80.1480 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Islands § 80.1480 Hilo Harbor, Hawaii, HI. A line...

  9. 33 CFR 80.1450 - Nawiliwili Harbor, Kauai, HI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Nawiliwili Harbor, Kauai, HI. 80.1450 Section 80.1450 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Islands § 80.1450 Nawiliwili Harbor, Kauai,...

  10. 33 CFR 80.1460 - Kahului Harbor, Maui, HI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Kahului Harbor, Maui, HI. 80.1460 Section 80.1460 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Islands § 80.1460 Kahului Harbor, Maui, HI. A line...

  11. 33 CFR 80.1470 - Kawaihae Harbor, Hawaii, HI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Kawaihae Harbor, Hawaii, HI. 80.1470 Section 80.1470 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Islands § 80.1470 Kawaihae Harbor, Hawaii,...

  12. 32 CFR 705.31 - USS Arizona Memorial, Pearl Harbor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false USS Arizona Memorial, Pearl Harbor. 705.31... NAVY REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS PUBLIC AFFAIRS REGULATIONS § 705.31 USS Arizona Memorial, Pearl Harbor. (a) Limited space and the desirability of keeping the Memorial simple and dignified require...

  13. 33 CFR 110.29 - Boston Inner Harbor, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Boston Inner Harbor, Mass. 110.29 Section 110.29 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.29 Boston Inner Harbor, Mass. (a) Vicinity of...

  14. 33 CFR 110.38 - Edgartown Harbor, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Edgartown Harbor, Mass. 110.38 Section 110.38 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.38 Edgartown Harbor, Mass. An area in the inner...

  15. 33 CFR 110.142 - Nantucket Harbor, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Nantucket Harbor, Mass. 110.142 Section 110.142 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.142 Nantucket Harbor, Mass. (a) The anchorage grounds. In...

  16. 33 CFR 110.29 - Boston Inner Harbor, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Boston Inner Harbor, Mass. 110.29 Section 110.29 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.29 Boston Inner Harbor, Mass. (a) Vicinity of...

  17. 33 CFR 110.37 - Sesuit Harbor, Dennis, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sesuit Harbor, Dennis, Mass. 110.37 Section 110.37 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.37 Sesuit Harbor, Dennis, Mass. All the...

  18. 33 CFR 110.29 - Boston Inner Harbor, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Boston Inner Harbor, Mass. 110.29 Section 110.29 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.29 Boston Inner Harbor, Mass. (a) Vicinity of...

  19. 33 CFR 110.26 - Marblehead Harbor, Marblehead, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Marblehead Harbor, Marblehead, Mass. 110.26 Section 110.26 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND..., Mass. The area comprises that portion of the harbor lying between the extreme low water line...

  20. 33 CFR 110.142 - Nantucket Harbor, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Nantucket Harbor, Mass. 110.142 Section 110.142 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.142 Nantucket Harbor, Mass. (a) The anchorage grounds. In...

  1. 33 CFR 110.142 - Nantucket Harbor, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Nantucket Harbor, Mass. 110.142 Section 110.142 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.142 Nantucket Harbor, Mass. (a) The anchorage grounds. In...

  2. 33 CFR 110.38 - Edgartown Harbor, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Edgartown Harbor, Mass. 110.38 Section 110.38 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.38 Edgartown Harbor, Mass. An area in the inner...

  3. 33 CFR 110.37 - Sesuit Harbor, Dennis, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sesuit Harbor, Dennis, Mass. 110.37 Section 110.37 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.37 Sesuit Harbor, Dennis, Mass. All the...

  4. 33 CFR 110.26 - Marblehead Harbor, Marblehead, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Marblehead Harbor, Marblehead, Mass. 110.26 Section 110.26 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND..., Mass. The area comprises that portion of the harbor lying between the extreme low water line...

  5. 33 CFR 110.29 - Boston Inner Harbor, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Boston Inner Harbor, Mass. 110.29 Section 110.29 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.29 Boston Inner Harbor, Mass. (a) Vicinity of...

  6. 33 CFR 110.38 - Edgartown Harbor, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Edgartown Harbor, Mass. 110.38 Section 110.38 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.38 Edgartown Harbor, Mass. An area in the inner...

  7. 33 CFR 110.37 - Sesuit Harbor, Dennis, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sesuit Harbor, Dennis, Mass. 110.37 Section 110.37 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.37 Sesuit Harbor, Dennis, Mass. All the...

  8. 33 CFR 110.26 - Marblehead Harbor, Marblehead, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Marblehead Harbor, Marblehead, Mass. 110.26 Section 110.26 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND..., Mass. The area comprises that portion of the harbor lying between the extreme low water line...

  9. 33 CFR 110.37 - Sesuit Harbor, Dennis, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sesuit Harbor, Dennis, Mass. 110.37 Section 110.37 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.37 Sesuit Harbor, Dennis, Mass. All the...

  10. 33 CFR 110.37 - Sesuit Harbor, Dennis, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sesuit Harbor, Dennis, Mass. 110.37 Section 110.37 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.37 Sesuit Harbor, Dennis, Mass. All the...

  11. 33 CFR 110.26 - Marblehead Harbor, Marblehead, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Marblehead Harbor, Marblehead, Mass. 110.26 Section 110.26 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND..., Mass. The area comprises that portion of the harbor lying between the extreme low water line...

  12. 33 CFR 110.38 - Edgartown Harbor, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Edgartown Harbor, Mass. 110.38 Section 110.38 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.38 Edgartown Harbor, Mass. An area in the inner...

  13. 33 CFR 110.38 - Edgartown Harbor, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Edgartown Harbor, Mass. 110.38 Section 110.38 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.38 Edgartown Harbor, Mass. An area in the inner...

  14. 33 CFR 110.29 - Boston Inner Harbor, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Boston Inner Harbor, Mass. 110.29 Section 110.29 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.29 Boston Inner Harbor, Mass. (a) Vicinity of...

  15. 33 CFR 110.142 - Nantucket Harbor, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Nantucket Harbor, Mass. 110.142 Section 110.142 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.142 Nantucket Harbor, Mass. (a) The anchorage grounds. In...

  16. 33 CFR 110.142 - Nantucket Harbor, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Nantucket Harbor, Mass. 110.142 Section 110.142 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.142 Nantucket Harbor, Mass. (a) The anchorage grounds. In...

  17. 33 CFR 110.26 - Marblehead Harbor, Marblehead, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Marblehead Harbor, Marblehead, Mass. 110.26 Section 110.26 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND..., Mass. The area comprises that portion of the harbor lying between the extreme low water line...

  18. 33 CFR 117.802 - New Rochelle Harbor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false New Rochelle Harbor. 117.802... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New York § 117.802 New Rochelle Harbor. (a) The draw of the Glen Island Bridge, mile 0.8, at New Rochelle, New York, shall open on signal, except...

  19. 32 CFR 705.31 - USS Arizona Memorial, Pearl Harbor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false USS Arizona Memorial, Pearl Harbor. 705.31... NAVY REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS PUBLIC AFFAIRS REGULATIONS § 705.31 USS Arizona Memorial, Pearl Harbor. (a) Limited space and the desirability of keeping the Memorial simple and dignified require...

  20. 32 CFR 705.31 - USS Arizona Memorial, Pearl Harbor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false USS Arizona Memorial, Pearl Harbor. 705.31... NAVY REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS PUBLIC AFFAIRS REGULATIONS § 705.31 USS Arizona Memorial, Pearl Harbor. (a) Limited space and the desirability of keeping the Memorial simple and dignified require...

  1. 32 CFR 705.31 - USS Arizona Memorial, Pearl Harbor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false USS Arizona Memorial, Pearl Harbor. 705.31... NAVY REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS PUBLIC AFFAIRS REGULATIONS § 705.31 USS Arizona Memorial, Pearl Harbor. (a) Limited space and the desirability of keeping the Memorial simple and dignified require...

  2. 32 CFR 705.31 - USS Arizona Memorial, Pearl Harbor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false USS Arizona Memorial, Pearl Harbor. 705.31... NAVY REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS PUBLIC AFFAIRS REGULATIONS § 705.31 USS Arizona Memorial, Pearl Harbor. (a) Limited space and the desirability of keeping the Memorial simple and dignified require...

  3. 49 CFR 578.7 - Criminal safe harbor provision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Criminal safe harbor provision. 578.7 Section 578... SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) CIVIL AND CRIMINAL PENALTIES § 578.7 Criminal safe harbor provision. (a) Scope. This section sets forth the requirements regarding...

  4. 33 CFR 80.165 - New York Harbor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false New York Harbor. 80.165 Section 80.165 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Atlantic Coast § 80.165 New York Harbor. A line drawn from...

  5. 33 CFR 80.130 - Boston Harbor entrance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Boston Harbor entrance. 80.130 Section 80.130 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Atlantic Coast § 80.130 Boston Harbor entrance. A line drawn...

  6. 46 CFR 7.30 - New York Harbor, NY.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false New York Harbor, NY. 7.30 Section 7.30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC BOUNDARY LINES Atlantic Coast § 7.30 New York Harbor, NY. A line drawn from East Rockaway Inlet Breakwater Light to Ambrose...

  7. 46 CFR 7.65 - Charleston Harbor, SC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Charleston Harbor, SC. 7.65 Section 7.65 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC BOUNDARY LINES Atlantic Coast § 7.65 Charleston Harbor, SC. A line drawn from Charleston Light on Sullivans Island to latitude...

  8. 33 CFR 80.1480 - Hilo Harbor, Hawaii, HI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hilo Harbor, Hawaii, HI. 80.1480 Section 80.1480 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Islands § 80.1480 Hilo Harbor, Hawaii, HI. A line...

  9. 33 CFR 80.1450 - Nawiliwili Harbor, Kauai, HI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Nawiliwili Harbor, Kauai, HI. 80.1450 Section 80.1450 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Islands § 80.1450 Nawiliwili Harbor, Kauai,...

  10. 33 CFR 80.1480 - Hilo Harbor, Hawaii, HI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hilo Harbor, Hawaii, HI. 80.1480 Section 80.1480 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Islands § 80.1480 Hilo Harbor, Hawaii, HI. A line...

  11. 33 CFR 80.1460 - Kahului Harbor, Maui, HI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Kahului Harbor, Maui, HI. 80.1460 Section 80.1460 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Islands § 80.1460 Kahului Harbor, Maui, HI. A line...

  12. 33 CFR 80.1450 - Nawiliwili Harbor, Kauai, HI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Nawiliwili Harbor, Kauai, HI. 80.1450 Section 80.1450 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Islands § 80.1450 Nawiliwili Harbor, Kauai,...

  13. 33 CFR 80.1470 - Kawaihae Harbor, Hawaii, HI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Kawaihae Harbor, Hawaii, HI. 80.1470 Section 80.1470 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Islands § 80.1470 Kawaihae Harbor, Hawaii,...

  14. 33 CFR 80.1480 - Hilo Harbor, Hawaii, HI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hilo Harbor, Hawaii, HI. 80.1480 Section 80.1480 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Islands § 80.1480 Hilo Harbor, Hawaii, HI. A line...

  15. 33 CFR 80.1450 - Nawiliwili Harbor, Kauai, HI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Nawiliwili Harbor, Kauai, HI. 80.1450 Section 80.1450 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Islands § 80.1450 Nawiliwili Harbor, Kauai,...

  16. 33 CFR 80.1480 - Hilo Harbor, Hawaii, HI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hilo Harbor, Hawaii, HI. 80.1480 Section 80.1480 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Islands § 80.1480 Hilo Harbor, Hawaii, HI. A line...

  17. 33 CFR 80.1470 - Kawaihae Harbor, Hawaii, HI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Kawaihae Harbor, Hawaii, HI. 80.1470 Section 80.1470 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Islands § 80.1470 Kawaihae Harbor, Hawaii,...

  18. 33 CFR 80.1460 - Kahului Harbor, Maui, HI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Kahului Harbor, Maui, HI. 80.1460 Section 80.1460 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Islands § 80.1460 Kahului Harbor, Maui, HI. A line...

  19. 33 CFR 80.1460 - Kahului Harbor, Maui, HI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Kahului Harbor, Maui, HI. 80.1460 Section 80.1460 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Islands § 80.1460 Kahului Harbor, Maui, HI. A line...

  20. 33 CFR 80.1460 - Kahului Harbor, Maui, HI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Kahului Harbor, Maui, HI. 80.1460 Section 80.1460 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Islands § 80.1460 Kahului Harbor, Maui, HI. A line...

  1. 33 CFR 80.1470 - Kawaihae Harbor, Hawaii, HI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Kawaihae Harbor, Hawaii, HI. 80.1470 Section 80.1470 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Islands § 80.1470 Kawaihae Harbor, Hawaii,...

  2. 33 CFR 80.1470 - Kawaihae Harbor, Hawaii, HI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Kawaihae Harbor, Hawaii, HI. 80.1470 Section 80.1470 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Islands § 80.1470 Kawaihae Harbor, Hawaii,...

  3. 33 CFR 80.1450 - Nawiliwili Harbor, Kauai, HI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Nawiliwili Harbor, Kauai, HI. 80.1450 Section 80.1450 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Islands § 80.1450 Nawiliwili Harbor, Kauai,...

  4. 33 CFR 162.120 - Harbors on Lake Michigan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Harbors on Lake Michigan. 162.120 Section 162.120 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND WATERWAYS NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.120 Harbors on Lake...

  5. 33 CFR 162.145 - Monroe Harbor, Mich.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Monroe Harbor, Mich. 162.145 Section 162.145 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND WATERWAYS NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.145 Monroe Harbor, Mich. (a)...

  6. 33 CFR 162.120 - Harbors on Lake Michigan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Harbors on Lake Michigan. 162.120 Section 162.120 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND WATERWAYS NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.120 Harbors on Lake...

  7. 33 CFR 162.145 - Monroe Harbor, Mich.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Monroe Harbor, Mich. 162.145 Section 162.145 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND WATERWAYS NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.145 Monroe Harbor, Mich. (a)...

  8. 33 CFR 117.722 - Great Egg Harbor Bay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Great Egg Harbor Bay. 117.722 Section 117.722 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.722 Great Egg Harbor Bay. The draw...

  9. 33 CFR 117.722 - Great Egg Harbor Bay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Great Egg Harbor Bay. 117.722 Section 117.722 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.722 Great Egg Harbor Bay. The draw...

  10. 33 CFR 117.722 - Great Egg Harbor Bay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Great Egg Harbor Bay. 117.722 Section 117.722 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.722 Great Egg Harbor Bay. The draw...

  11. 33 CFR 117.722 - Great Egg Harbor Bay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Great Egg Harbor Bay. 117.722 Section 117.722 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.722 Great Egg Harbor Bay. The draw...

  12. 33 CFR 117.722 - Great Egg Harbor Bay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Great Egg Harbor Bay. 117.722 Section 117.722 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.722 Great Egg Harbor Bay. The draw...

  13. 78 FR 28619 - Boston Harbor Islands Advisory Council Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-15

    ... Boston Harbor Islands Advisory Council Meeting AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Boston Harbor Islands Advisory Council. The agenda includes a presentation by author John Galluzzo, ``Peddocks Island, As Seen from Pemberton...

  14. 78 FR 9730 - Boston Harbor Islands Advisory Council Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-11

    ... National Park Service Boston Harbor Islands Advisory Council Meeting AGENCY: National Park Service... Islands Advisory Council. The agenda includes a presentation by Sally Snowman, 70th keeper of Boston Light... Jacobson, DFO, Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area, 408 Atlantic Avenue, Suite 228, Boston,...

  15. 33 CFR 165.1309 - Eagle Harbor, Bainbridge Island, WA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Eagle Harbor, Bainbridge Island, WA. 165.1309 Section 165.1309 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Eagle Harbor, Bainbridge Island, WA. (a) Regulated area. A regulated navigation area is established...

  16. 33 CFR 165.1309 - Eagle Harbor, Bainbridge Island, WA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Eagle Harbor, Bainbridge Island, WA. 165.1309 Section 165.1309 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Eagle Harbor, Bainbridge Island, WA. (a) Regulated area. A regulated navigation area is established...

  17. 33 CFR 165.1309 - Eagle Harbor, Bainbridge Island, WA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Eagle Harbor, Bainbridge Island, WA. 165.1309 Section 165.1309 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Eagle Harbor, Bainbridge Island, WA. (a) Regulated area. A regulated navigation area is established...

  18. 78 FR 52783 - Boston Harbor Islands Advisory Council Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-26

    ... National Park Service Boston Harbor Islands Advisory Council Meeting AGENCY: National Park Service... Islands Advisory Council. The agenda includes discussion of 2016 celebration planning for the 300th Anniversary of Boston Light, 20th Anniversary of Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area (NRA),...

  19. 33 CFR 165.1309 - Eagle Harbor, Bainbridge Island, WA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Eagle Harbor, Bainbridge Island, WA. 165.1309 Section 165.1309 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Eagle Harbor, Bainbridge Island, WA. (a) Regulated area. A regulated navigation area is established...

  20. 76 FR 50489 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Harbor Maintenance Fee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-15

    ... Fee AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: 30-Day Notice... approval in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act: Harbor Maintenance Fee (CBP Forms 349 and 350... information collection: Title: Harbor Maintenance Fee. OMB Number: 1651-0055. Form Number: CBP Forms 349...

  1. 78 FR 63381 - Safety Zones; Hawaiian Island Commercial Harbors, HI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zones; Hawaiian Island Commercial Harbors, HI.... 14-1414 Safety Zones; Hawaiian Islands Commercial Harbors; HI. (a) Location. The following...

  2. 78 FR 29089 - Safety Zones; Hawaiian Island Commercial Harbors, HI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zones; Hawaiian Island Commercial Harbors, HI... Safety Zones; Hawaiian Islands Commercial Harbors; HI. (a) Location. The following areas are safety...

  3. 33 CFR 110.147 - New London Harbor, Conn.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... emergencies, vessels shall not anchor in New London Harbor or the approaches thereto outside the anchorages... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false New London Harbor, Conn. 110.147 Section 110.147 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...

  4. 33 CFR 110.115 - Santa Barbara Harbor, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Santa Barbara Harbor, Calif. 110... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.115 Santa Barbara Harbor, Calif. North of the Santa Barbara breakwater; seaward of the line of mean high water; and southwest of a line bearing...

  5. 12 CFR 18.11 - Safe harbor provision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Safe harbor provision. 18.11 Section 18.11 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY DISCLOSURE OF FINANCIAL AND OTHER INFORMATION BY NATIONAL BANKS § 18.11 Safe harbor provision. The provisions of § 18.10(c)...

  6. 33 CFR 80.1142 - San Francisco Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false San Francisco Harbor, CA. 80.1142 Section 80.1142 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1142 San Francisco Harbor, CA. A straight...

  7. 33 CFR 80.1142 - San Francisco Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false San Francisco Harbor, CA. 80.1142 Section 80.1142 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1142 San Francisco Harbor, CA. A straight...

  8. 33 CFR 80.1142 - San Francisco Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false San Francisco Harbor, CA. 80.1142 Section 80.1142 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1142 San Francisco Harbor, CA. A straight...

  9. 33 CFR 80.1142 - San Francisco Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false San Francisco Harbor, CA. 80.1142 Section 80.1142 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1142 San Francisco Harbor, CA. A straight...

  10. 33 CFR 80.1142 - San Francisco Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false San Francisco Harbor, CA. 80.1142 Section 80.1142 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1142 San Francisco Harbor, CA. A straight...

  11. 33 CFR 110.111 - Marina del Rey Harbor, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Marina del Rey Harbor, Calif. 110.111 Section 110.111 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.111 Marina del Rey Harbor, Calif. An area...

  12. 18 CFR 1304.404 - Commercial marina harbor limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Commercial marina... ALTERATIONS Miscellaneous § 1304.404 Commercial marina harbor limits. The landward limits of commercial marina... of harbors at commercial marinas will be designated by TVA on the basis of the size and extent...

  13. 18 CFR 1304.404 - Commercial marina harbor limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Commercial marina... ALTERATIONS Miscellaneous § 1304.404 Commercial marina harbor limits. The landward limits of commercial marina... of harbors at commercial marinas will be designated by TVA on the basis of the size and extent...

  14. 33 CFR 110.208 - Buffalo Harbor, N.Y.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Buffalo Harbor, N.Y. 110.208 Section 110.208 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.208 Buffalo Harbor, N.Y. (a) The anchorage...

  15. 76 FR 26311 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Harbor Maintenance Fee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-06

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: Harbor Maintenance... concerning the Harbor Maintenance Fee (CBP Forms 349 and 350). This request for comment is being made... keepers from the collection of information (a total capital/startup costs and operations and...

  16. Familial isolated pituitary adenomas experience at a single center: clinical importance of AIP mutation screening.

    PubMed

    Pinho, Leandro Kasuki Jomori de; Vieira Neto, Leonardo; Wildemberg, Luiz Eduardo Armondi; Moraes, Aline Barbosa; Takiya, Christina M; Frohman, Lawrence A; Korbonits, Márta; Gadelha, Mônica R

    2010-11-01

    We present four FIPA kindred discussing clinical and molecular data and emphasizing the differences regarding AIP status, as well as the importance of genetic screening. Family 1 consists of five patients harboring somatotropinomas with germline E24X mutation in AIP. In one of the patients, acromegaly was diagnosed through active screening, being cured by surgery. Families 2 and 3 are composed of two patients with non-functioning pituitary adenomas. Family 4 comprises patients harboring a prolactinoma and a somatotropinoma. No mutations in AIP were found in these families. No patient in Family 1 was controlled with octreotide treatment, while the acromegalic patient in Family 4 was controlled with octreotide LAR. In conclusion, FIPA is a heterogeneous condition, which may be associated with AIP mutation. Genomic and clinical screening is recommended in families with two or more members harboring pituitary adenomas, allowing early diagnosis and better outcome.

  17. Charlotte Harbor initiative: assessing the ecological health of southwest Florida's Charlotte Harbor estuary.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Richard H; Wetzel, Dana L; Estevez, Ernest D

    2004-04-01

    Charlotte Harbor is the largest and one of the least impacted estuaries on the southwest Florida coast, encompassing about 270 square miles (700 km2) with a watershed of 4400 square miles (11,400 km2). The Harbor is distinguished by extensive phosphate mining in its watershed and declining freshwater inflows, more protected submerged and intertidal areas than most Gulf ecosystems, and is part of the National Estuary Program. A hypoxic event occurs annually in the Harbor for possibly natural rather than anthropogenic reasons providing an opportunity for the study of hypoxic effects on the ecology of a large subtropical ecosystem. A 5-year, multimillion dollar study was begun in 2001 to enable scientists of Mote Marine Laboratory (MML, Sarasota, Florida) to collaborate on ecological characterization of the estuary and provide data necessary for resource managers to predict consequences of future population growth in the region. Initial studies were organized around themes of preservation, conservation and restoration while subsequent years of work are organized around a core program of physical, chemical and biological studies that track the ecological consequences of freshwater inflow, hypoxia and anthropogenic-derived contaminants. Along with MML, scientists in federal and state agencies along with a number of colleges and universities are cooperating in the project.

  18. Therapeutic strategies to overcome crizotinib resistance in non-small cell lung cancers harboring the fusion oncogene EML4-ALK

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, Ryohei; Khan, Tahsin M.; Benes, Cyril; Lifshits, Eugene; Ebi, Hiromichi; Rivera, Victor M.; Shakespeare, William C.; Iafrate, A. John; Engelman, Jeffrey A.; Shaw, Alice T.

    2011-01-01

    The echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4)-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusion oncogene represents a molecular target in a small subset of non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs). This fusion leads to constitutive ALK activation with potent transforming activity. In a pivotal phase 1 clinical trial, the ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) crizotinib (PF-02341066) demonstrated impressive antitumor activity in the majority of patients with NSCLC harboring ALK fusions. However, despite these remarkable initial responses, cancers eventually develop resistance to crizotinib, usually within 1 y, thereby limiting the potential clinical benefit. To determine how cancers acquire resistance to ALK inhibitors, we established a model of acquired resistance to crizotinib by exposing a highly sensitive EML4-ALK–positive NSCLC cell line to increasing doses of crizotinib until resistance emerged. We found that cells resistant to intermediate doses of crizotinib developed amplification of the EML4-ALK gene. Cells resistant to higher doses (1 μM) also developed a gatekeeper mutation, L1196M, within the kinase domain, rendering EML4-ALK insensitive to crizotinib. This gatekeeper mutation was readily detected using a unique and highly sensitive allele-specific PCR assay. Although crizotinib was ineffectual against EML4-ALK harboring the gatekeeper mutation, we observed that two structurally different ALK inhibitors, NVP-TAE684 and AP26113, were highly active against the resistant cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, these resistant cells remained highly sensitive to the Hsp90 inhibitor 17-AAG. Thus, we have developed a model of acquired resistance to ALK inhibitors and have shown that second-generation ALK TKIs or Hsp90 inhibitors are effective in treating crizotinib-resistant tumors harboring secondary gatekeeper mutations. PMID:21502504

  19. Distribution of MED12 mutations in fibroadenomas and phyllodes tumors of the breast--implications for tumor biology and pathological diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Pfarr, Nicole; Kriegsmann, Mark; Sinn, Peter; Klauschen, Frederick; Endris, Volker; Herpel, Esther; Muckenhuber, Alexander; Jesinghaus, Moritz; Klosterhalfen, Bernd; Penzel, Roland; Lennerz, Jochen K; Weichert, Wilko; Stenzinger, Albrecht

    2015-07-01

    Somatic mutations in exon 2 of MED12 have been described in benign and malignant smooth muscle cell tumors suggesting a functional role in these neoplasms. Recently fibroadenomas of the breast were also reported to harbor MED12 mutations. Hence, we explored MED12 mutations in fibroepithelial tumors of the breast, histological subtypes of fibroadenomas and phyllodes tumors, to validate and extend previous efforts. Using conventional Sanger sequencing, we profiled 39 cases of fibroepithelial breast tumors comprising classic histological subtypes of fibroadenomas as well as benign and malignant phyllodes tumors for mutations in exon 2 of MED12. MED12 mutations were detected in 60% of all tumor samples with the majority being missense mutations affecting codon 44. Additionally, we report novel in-frame deletions that have not been described previously. Sixty-two percent of the fibroadenomas harbored mutated MED12 with intracanalicular fibroadenomas being the most frequently mutated histological subtype (82%). Of note, 8/11 of benign phyllodes tumors had MED12 mutations while only 1/5 of malignant phyllodes tumors showed mutations in exon 2 of MED12. In conclusion, we confirm the frequent occurrence of MED12 mutations in fibroadenomas, provide evidence that most intracanalicular fibroadenomas closely resembling benign phyllodes as well as benign phyllodes tumors harbor MED12 mutations, and conclude that MED12 mutations in malignant phyllodes tumors appear to be relatively rare.

  20. The complete genome sequences, unique mutational spectra and developmental potency of adult neurons revealed by cloning

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Alberto R.; Ferguson, William C.; Shumilina, Svetlana; Clark, Royden A.; Boland, Michael J.; Martin, Greg; Chubukov, Pavel; Tsunemoto, Rachel K.; Torkamani, Ali; Kupriyanov, Sergey; Hall, Ira M.; Baldwin, Kristin K.

    2016-01-01

    Somatic mutation in neurons is linked to neurologic disease and implicated in cell type diversification. However, the origin, extent and patterns of genomic mutation in neurons remain unknown. We established a nuclear transfer method to clonally amplify the genomes of neurons from adult mice for whole genome sequencing. Comprehensive mutation detection and independent validation revealed that individual neurons harbor ~100 unique mutations from all classes, but lack recurrent rearrangements. Most neurons contain at least one gene disrupting mutation and rare (0-2) mobile element insertions. The frequency and gene bias of neuronal mutations differs from other lineages, potentially due to novel mechanisms governing post-mitotic mutation. Fertile mice were cloned from several neurons, establishing the compatibility of mutated adult neuronal genomes with reprogramming to pluripotency and development. PMID:26948891

  1. The Complete Genome Sequences, Unique Mutational Spectra, and Developmental Potency of Adult Neurons Revealed by Cloning.

    PubMed

    Hazen, Jennifer L; Faust, Gregory G; Rodriguez, Alberto R; Ferguson, William C; Shumilina, Svetlana; Clark, Royden A; Boland, Michael J; Martin, Greg; Chubukov, Pavel; Tsunemoto, Rachel K; Torkamani, Ali; Kupriyanov, Sergey; Hall, Ira M; Baldwin, Kristin K

    2016-03-16

    Somatic mutation in neurons is linked to neurologic disease and implicated in cell-type diversification. However, the origin, extent, and patterns of genomic mutation in neurons remain unknown. We established a nuclear transfer method to clonally amplify the genomes of neurons from adult mice for whole-genome sequencing. Comprehensive mutation detection and independent validation revealed that individual neurons harbor ∼100 unique mutations from all classes but lack recurrent rearrangements. Most neurons contain at least one gene-disrupting mutation and rare (0-2) mobile element insertions. The frequency and gene bias of neuronal mutations differ from other lineages, potentially due to novel mechanisms governing postmitotic mutation. Fertile mice were cloned from several neurons, establishing the compatibility of mutated adult neuronal genomes with reprogramming to pluripotency and development.

  2. Ruminant feces harbor diverse uncultured symbiotic actinobacteria.

    PubMed

    Tan, Hongming; Deng, Qingli; Cao, Lixiang

    2014-03-01

    To isolate actinobacteria from ruminant feces and elucidate their correlations with ruminants, the actinobacterial community in sheep (Ovis aries) and cattle (Bos taurus) feces was determined by cultivation and clone library methods. Most of actinobacteria isolated belonged to Streptomyces, Amycolatopsis, Micromonospora, and Cellulosimicrobium genera. The strains showed above 99 % similarity with the type strains, respectively. All the strains isolated could grow on media containing pectin, cellulose, or xylan as the sole carbon sources. However, most antibacterial and antifungal activities were found in Streptomyces species. Clone library analysis revealed that the genera Mycobacterium, Aeromicrobium, Rhodococcus, Cellulomonas were present in cattle and sheep feces. In contrast, the 16S rRNA genes showed less than 98 % similarity with the type strains. The analysis of actinobacterial community in ruminant feces by clone library and cultivation yielded a total of 10 actinobacterial genera and three uncultured actinobacterial taxa. The ruminant feces harbored diverse actinobacterial community. Ruminants may represent an underexplored reservoir of novel actinomycetes of potential interest for probiotics and drug discovery.

  3. Recycling of harbor sediment as lightweight aggregate.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yu-Ling; Yang, Jing-Chiang; Lin, Yong-Yang; Chuang, Shih-Yu; Wang, H Paul

    2008-01-01

    Sediment sampled from Taichung Harbor was mixed with local reservoir sediment at different weight ratios to prepare lightweight aggregate at 1050, 1100, and 1150 degrees C. A pressure of 3000 or 5000 psi was used to shape the powder mixtures into pellets before the heating processes. The results indicate that the leaching levels of trace metals from the lightweight aggregate samples are considerably reduced to levels less than Taiwan Environmental Protection Administration regulatory limits. Increasing final process temperature tends to reduce the bulk density and crushing intensity of lightweight aggregate with a concomitant increase in water sorption capability. Lightweight aggregate with the lowest bulk density, 0.49 g cm(-3) for the 5000 psi sample, was obtained with the heating process to 1150 degrees C. Based on the X-ray absorption near edge structure results, FeSO(4) decomposition with a concomitant release of SO(x) (x = 2,3) is suggested to play an important role for the bloating process in present study.

  4. Mutations of SETBP1 and JAK3 in juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia: a report from the Italian AIEOP study group.

    PubMed

    Bresolin, Silvia; De Filippi, Paola; Vendemini, Francesca; D'Alia, Mirko; Zecca, Marco; Meyer, Lueder H; Danesino, Cesare; Locatelli, Franco; Masetti, Riccardo; Basso, Giuseppe; Te Kronnie, Geertruy

    2016-05-17

    Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML) is a rare aggressive disease of early childhood. Driver mutations in the Ras signaling pathways are a key feature of JMML patients. Mutations in SETBP1 and JAK3 were recently identified in a subset of JMML patients characterized by poor prognosis and progression of disease. In this study, we report the results of a screening for mutations in SETBP1 and JAK3 of a cohort of seventy Italian patients with JMML, identifying 11.4% of them harboring secondary mutations in these two genes and discovering two new mutations in the SKI domain of SETBP1.JMML xenotransplantation and colony assay provide an initial understanding of the secondary nature of these events occurring in early precursor cells and suggest a different propagating capacity of clones harboring particular mutations.

  5. Calreticulin (CALR) mutation in myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs)

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Wenyi

    2015-01-01

    As a heterogeneous group of disease, myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) have confused hematologists and hematopathologists with their protean clinical presentations and myriads of morphologies. A thought of classifying MPNs based on molecular alterations has gained popularity because there is increasing evidence that molecular or chromosomal alterations have a better correlation with clinical presentation, response to therapies, and prognosis than conventional morphological classification. This type of efforts has been facilitated by the advancement of molecular technologies. A significant number of gene mutations have been identified in MPNs with JAK2 and MPL being the major ones. However, a significant gap is present in that many cases of MPNs do not harbor any of these mutations. This gap is recently filled by the discovery of Calreticulin (CALR) mutation in MPNs without JAK2 or MPL mutation and since then, the clinical and molecular correlation in MPNs has become a hot research topic. There seems to be a fairly consistent correlation between CALR mutation and certain hematological parameters such as a high platelet count and a better prognosis in MPNs with CALR mutation. However, controversies are present regarding the risks of thrombosis, interactions of CALR with other gene mutation, the role of CALR in the pathogenesis, and the optimal treatment strategies. In addition, there are many questions remain to be answered, which all boiled down to the molecular mechanisms by which CALR causes or contributes to MPNs. Here, we summarized current published literatures on CALR mutations in MPNs with an emphasis on the clinical-molecular correlation. We also discussed the controversies and questions remain to be answered. PMID:27358884

  6. Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter mutations in Korean melanoma patients.

    PubMed

    Roh, Mi Ryung; Park, Kyu-Hyun; Chung, Kee Yang; Shin, Sang Joon; Rha, Sun Young; Tsao, Hensin

    2017-01-01

    Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) is the reverse transcriptase component of the telomeric complex, which synthesizes terminal DNA to protect chromosomal ends and to maintain genomic integrity. In melanoma, mutation in TERT promoter region is a common event and theses promoter variants have been shown to be associated with increased gene expression, decreased telomere length and poorer outcome. In this study, we determined the frequency of TERT promoter mutation in 88 Korean primary melanoma patients and aimed to see the association of TERT promoter mutation status to other major molecular features, such as BRAF, NRAS, KIT mutations and correlate with clinicopathological features. In our study, acral melanoma (n=46, 52.3%) was the most common type. Overall, TERT promoter mutation was observed in 15 cases (17%) with ten c. -124C>T altertions and five c. -146C>T alterations. None of our samples showed CC>TT mutation which is considered pathognomonic of UV induction. Among the 46 acral melanoma patients, 5 patients (10.9%) harbored TERT promoter mutation. Tumors with TERT promoter mutation showed significantly greater Breslow thickness compared to WT tumors (P=0.039). A combined analysis for the presence of TERT promoter and BRAF mutations showed that patients with both TERT promoter and BRAF mutation showed decreased survival compared with those with only TERT promoter mutation, only BRAF mutation, or without mutations in either TERT promoter or BRAF (P=0.035). Our data provides additional evidence that UV-induced TERT promoter mutation frequencies vary depending on melanoma subtype, but preserves its prognostic value.

  7. Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter mutations in Korean melanoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Mi Ryung; Park, Kyu-Hyun; Chung, Kee Yang; Shin, Sang Joon; Rha, Sun Young; Tsao, Hensin

    2017-01-01

    Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) is the reverse transcriptase component of the telomeric complex, which synthesizes terminal DNA to protect chromosomal ends and to maintain genomic integrity. In melanoma, mutation in TERT promoter region is a common event and theses promoter variants have been shown to be associated with increased gene expression, decreased telomere length and poorer outcome. In this study, we determined the frequency of TERT promoter mutation in 88 Korean primary melanoma patients and aimed to see the association of TERT promoter mutation status to other major molecular features, such as BRAF, NRAS, KIT mutations and correlate with clinicopathological features. In our study, acral melanoma (n=46, 52.3%) was the most common type. Overall, TERT promoter mutation was observed in 15 cases (17%) with ten c. -124C>T altertions and five c. -146C>T alterations. None of our samples showed CC>TT mutation which is considered pathognomonic of UV induction. Among the 46 acral melanoma patients, 5 patients (10.9%) harbored TERT promoter mutation. Tumors with TERT promoter mutation showed significantly greater Breslow thickness compared to WT tumors (P=0.039). A combined analysis for the presence of TERT promoter and BRAF mutations showed that patients with both TERT promoter and BRAF mutation showed decreased survival compared with those with only TERT promoter mutation, only BRAF mutation, or without mutations in either TERT promoter or BRAF (P=0.035). Our data provides additional evidence that UV-induced TERT promoter mutation frequencies vary depending on melanoma subtype, but preserves its prognostic value. PMID:28123854

  8. Mutation and the environment

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, M.L. ); Albertini, R.J. )

    1990-01-01

    This book is covered under the following topics: Somatic Mutation: Animal Model; Somatic Mutation: Human; Heritable Mutation: Animal Model; Heritable Mutation: Approaches to Human Induction Rates; Heritable Mutation: Human Risk; Epidemiology: Population Studies on Genotoxicity; and Epidemiology: Workplace Studies of Genotoxicity.

  9. Software and database for the analysis of mutations in the human FBN1 gene.

    PubMed Central

    Collod, G; Béroud, C; Soussi, T; Junien, C; Boileau, C

    1996-01-01

    Fibrillin is the major component of extracellular microfibrils. Mutations in the fibrillin gene on chromosome 15 (FBN1) were described at first in the heritable connective tissue disorder, Marfan syndrome (MFS). More recently, FBN1 has also been shown to harbor mutations related to a spectrum of conditions phenotypically related to MFS and many mutations will have to be accumulated before genotype/phenotype relationships emerge. To facilitate mutational analysis of the FBN1 gene, a software package along with a computerized database (currently listing 63 entries) have been created. PMID:8594563

  10. 160. VIEW FROM NEW YORK HARBOR SHOWING THE JERSEY WATER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    160. VIEW FROM NEW YORK HARBOR SHOWING THE JERSEY WATER FRONT. PLEASE NOTE THAT ARROWS WERE ON ORIGINAL PHOTOGRAPH AND WHAT THEY POINT OUT IS NOT CERTAIN. - Morris Canal, Phillipsburg, Warren County, NJ

  11. 1. VIEW TO NORTHEAST ACROSS RICHMOND INNER HARBOR FROM RICHMOND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW TO NORTHEAST ACROSS RICHMOND INNER HARBOR FROM RICHMOND SHIPYARD NO. 3. - Rosie the Riveter National Historical Park, Ford Assembly Plant, 1400 Harbour Way South, Richmond, Contra Costa County, CA

  12. 77 FR 22489 - Special Anchorage Regulations, Newport Bay Harbor, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-16

    ... special anchorage areas in Newport Bay Harbor, California, to encompass and replace temporary anchorage... safety that might disproportionately affect children. Indian Tribal Governments This rule does not have tribal implications under Executive Order 13175, Consultation and Coordination with Indian...

  13. BLDG 47, ELEVATION DETAIL AT NE END OF HARBOR SIDE. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BLDG 47, ELEVATION DETAIL AT NE END OF HARBOR SIDE. - Naval Magazine Lualualei, West Loch Branch, Explosive & Small Train Depot, Main wharf area adjacent to Wharf No. 3, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  14. BLDG 47, FRONT ELEVATION DETAIL OF NE END OF HARBOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BLDG 47, FRONT ELEVATION DETAIL OF NE END OF HARBOR SIDE WITH POLE. - Naval Magazine Lualualei, West Loch Branch, Explosive & Small Train Depot, Main wharf area adjacent to Wharf No. 3, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  15. Ground-water status report, Pearl Harbor area, Hawaii, 1978

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soroos, Ronald L.; Ewart, Charles J.

    1979-01-01

    Increasing demand for freshwater in Hawaii has placed heavy stress on many of the State 's basal aquifer systems. The most heavily stressed of these systems is the Pearl Harbor on Oahu. The Pearl Harbor basal aquifer supplies as much as 277 million gallons per day. Since early in this century, spring discharge has been declining while pumpage has been increasing. Total ground-water discharge has remained steady despite short-term fluctuations. Some wells show general increases in chloride concentration while others remain steady. Chloride concentrations throughout the area show no apparent increase since 1970. Basal water head maps of the Pearl Harbor area clearly reflect the natural discharge points, which are the springs located along the shore near the center of Pearl Harbor. Basal-water hydrographs show a general decline of about 0.09 foot per year. This implies depletion of storage at a rate of about 25 million gallons per day. (USGS).

  16. ADSORPTION OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN AGED HARBOR SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a group of hydrophobic organic contaminants which have low aqueous solubilities and are common pollutants in harbor sediments. Adsorption and desorption isotherms for PAHs are conducted to study the abiotic sorption of PAHs in uncontami...

  17. 33 CFR 100.107 - Windjammer Days, Boothbay Harbor, Maine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... follows: a line drawn due east from the southwest (43-50-10 North; 069-38-20 West to the Spruce Point Shore; thence following the shore north along Spruce Point and around the Boothbay Harbor to...

  18. The landslide tsunami of November 3, 1994, Skagway Harbor, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulikov, Evgueni A.; Rabinovich, Alexander B.; Thomson, Richard E.; Bornhold, Brian D.

    1996-03-01

    We show that the tsunami of November 3, 1994 in Skagway, Alaska was generated by an underwater landslide formed during the collapse of a cruise ship wharf undergoing construction at the head of Taiya Inlet. This event occurred at a time of extreme low tide and was not associated with a regional seismic event or incoming oceanic tsunami. Persistent wave motions with an amplitude of 1 m and a period of 3 min recorded by a tide gauge in Skagway Harbor following the landslide are linked to the formation of a cross-inlet seiche and quarter-wave resonance within the harbor. The high Q factor for the harbor (Q ≈ 20) indicates weak dissipation and strong resonance within the harbor.

  19. Building, roof, with machinery penthouses on left and harbor control ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Building, roof, with machinery penthouses on left and harbor control tower on right. Camera facing south - Naval Supply Center, Broadway Complex, Warehouse, 911 West Broadway, San Diego, San Diego County, CA

  20. Deepening and Extending Channels for Navigation. Charleston Harbor, South Carolina.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-01

    consists of deepening the existing Charleston Harbor and Shipyard River channels. Minor channel widening and improving the anchorage and turning basins to...channel depths of 42 feet in the outer bar and jetty channel, 40 feet in Charleston Harbor and 38 feet in Shipyard River . Additional channel and basin ...and Carbide Inc. plant on Shipyard River including two turning basins , one opposite the -K Gulf Oil Corporation terminal and another at the upper end

  1. Radiological survey results at Beverly Harbor, Beverly, Massachusetts (VB025)

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, R.D.; Johnson, C.A.

    1992-08-01

    At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted a radiological survey at Beverly Harbor, Beverly, Massachusetts. The survey was performed in may 1991. The purpose of the survey was to determine if uranium from work performed under government contract at the former Ventron facility had migrated off-site to the harbor and neighboring areas. The survey included a surface gamma scan and the collection of soil and biological samples for radionuclide analyses.

  2. Ambulance restocking could violate federal law, despite safe harbor.

    PubMed

    2000-09-01

    A proposed rule to create safe harbors for EDs that restock ambulances was published by the Office of the Inspector General, but EDs are still at risk for violations. Even common practices such as providing free food, waiving education tuition, and restocking ambulance supplies could violate federal anti-kickback laws. Violations of the anti-kickback statute place a hospital at risk of losing its Medicare status. The proposed rule gives EDs seven criteria to qualify for safe harbors for ambulance restocking.

  3. Frequent somatic TERT promoter mutations and CTNNB1 mutations in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Eun; Chang, Seong-Hwan; Kim, Wook Youn; Lim, So Dug; Kim, Wan Seop; Hwang, Tea Sook; Han, Hye Seung

    2016-01-01

    Genetic alterations of TERT and CTNNB1 have been documented in hepatocellular carcinoma. TERT promoter mutations are the earliest genetic events in the multistep process of hepatocarcinogenesis related to cirrhosis. However, analyses of TERT promoter and CTNNB1 mutations in hepatocellular carcinoma tumor samples have not been performed in the Korean population, where hepatitis B virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma is prevalent. In order to identify the role of TERT promoter and CTNNB1 mutations in the hepatocarcinogenesis and pathogenesis of recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma, we performed the sequence analyses in 140 hepatocellular nodules (including 107 hepatocellular carcinomas), and 8 pairs of matched primary and relapsed hepatocellular carcinomas. TERT promoter and CTNNB1 mutations were only observed in hepatocellular carcinomas but not in precursor lesions. Of 109 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma, 41 (39.0%) and 15 (14.6%) harbored TERT and CTNNB1 mutations, respectively. TERT promotermutations were significantly more frequent in hepatocellular carcinomas related to hepatitis C virus infection (5/6; 83.3%) compared to tumors of other etiologies (P = 0.001). In two cases, discordance in TERT promoter mutation status was observed between the primary and the corresponding recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma. The two patients with discordant cases had early relapses. In conclusion, we identified TERT promoter and CTNNB1 mutations as the most frequent somatic genetic alterations observed in hepatocellular carcinoma, indicating its pivotal role in hepatocarcinogenesis. Furthermore, we suggest the possibility of intratumoral genetic heterogeneity of TERT promoter mutations in hepatocellular carcinoma as indicated by the discordance in TERT promoter mutations between primary and corresponding recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:27661004

  4. High-throughput oncogene mutation profiling shows demographic differences in BRAF mutation rates among melanoma patients.

    PubMed

    van den Hurk, Karin; Balint, Balazs; Toomey, Sinead; O'Leary, Patrick C; Unwin, Louise; Sheahan, Kieran; McDermott, Enda W; Murphy, Ian; van den Oord, Joost J; Rafferty, Mairin; FitzGerald, Dara M; Moran, Julie; Cummins, Robert; MacEneaney, Owen; Kay, Elaine W; O'Brien, Cathal P; Finn, Stephen P; Heffron, Cynthia C B B; Murphy, Michelle; Yela, Ruben; Power, Derek G; Regan, Padraic J; McDermott, Clodagh M; O'Keeffe, Allan; Orosz, Zsolt; Donnellan, Paul P; Crown, John P; Hennessy, Bryan T; Gallagher, William M

    2015-06-01

    Because of advances in targeted therapies, the clinical evaluation of cutaneous melanoma is increasingly based on a combination of traditional histopathology and molecular pathology. Therefore, it is necessary to expand our knowledge of the molecular events that accompany the development and progression of melanoma to optimize clinical management. The central objective of this study was to increase our knowledge of the mutational events that complement melanoma progression. High-throughput genotyping was adapted to query 159 known single nucleotide mutations in 33 cancer-related genes across two melanoma cohorts from Ireland (n=94) and Belgium (n=60). Results were correlated with various clinicopathological characteristics. A total of 23 mutations in 12 genes were identified, that is--BRAF, NRAS, MET, PHLPP2, PIK3R1, IDH1, KIT, STK11, CTNNB1, JAK2, ALK, and GNAS. Unexpectedly, we discovered significant differences in BRAF, MET, and PIK3R1 mutations between the cohorts. That is, cases from Ireland showed significantly lower (P<0.001) BRAF(V600E) mutation rates (19%) compared with the mutation frequency observed in Belgian patients (43%). Moreover, MET mutations were detected in 12% of Irish cases, whereas none of the Belgian patients harbored these mutations, and Irish patients significantly more often (P=0.027) had PIK3R1-mutant (33%) melanoma versus 17% of Belgian cases. The low incidence of BRAF(V600E)(-) mutant melanoma among Irish patients was confirmed in five independent Irish cohorts, and in total, only 165 of 689 (24%) Irish cases carried mutant BRAF(V600E). Together, our data show that melanoma-driving mutations vary by demographic area, which has important implications for the clinical management of this disease.

  5. Parkinson disease (PARK) genes are somatically mutated in cutaneous melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Samuels, Yardena; Azizi, Esther; Qutob, Nouar; Inzelberg, Lilah; Domany, Eytan; Schechtman, Edna; Friedman, Eitan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess whether Parkinson disease (PD) genes are somatically mutated in cutaneous melanoma (CM) tissue, because CM occurs in patients with PD at higher rates than in the general population and PD is more common than expected in CM cohorts. Methods: We cross-referenced somatic mutations in metastatic CM detected by whole-exome sequencing with the 15 known PD (PARK) genes. We computed the empirical distribution of the sum of mutations in each gene (Smut) and of the number of tissue samples in which a given gene was mutated at least once (SSampl) for each of the analyzable genes, determined the 90th and 95th percentiles of the empirical distributions of these sums, and verified the location of PARK genes in these distributions. Identical analyses were applied to adenocarcinoma of lung (ADENOCA-LUNG) and squamous cell carcinoma of lung (SQUAMCA-LUNG). We also analyzed the distribution of the number of mutated PARK genes in CM samples vs the 2 lung cancers. Results: Somatic CM mutation analysis (n = 246) detected 315,914 mutations in 18,758 genes. Somatic CM mutations were found in 14 of 15 PARK genes. Forty-eight percent of CM samples carried ≥1 PARK mutation and 25% carried multiple PARK mutations. PARK8 mutations occurred above the 95th percentile of the empirical distribution for SMut and SSampl. Significantly more CM samples harbored multiple PARK gene mutations compared with SQUAMCA-LUNG (p = 0.0026) and with ADENOCA-LUNG (p < 0.0001). Conclusions: The overrepresentation of somatic PARK mutations in CM suggests shared dysregulated pathways for CM and PD. PMID:27123489

  6. Cerebral Cavernous Malformations: Somatic Mutations in Vascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gault, Judith; Awad, Issam A.; Recksiek, Peter; Shenkar, Robert; Breeze, Robert; Handler, Michael; Kleinschmidt-DeMasters, Bette Kay

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Germline mutations in three genes have been found in familial cases of cerebral cavernous malformations (CCM). We previously discovered somatic and germline truncating mutations in the KRIT1 gene supporting the “two-hit” mechanism of CCM lesion formation in a single lesion. The purpose of this study was to screen for somatic, nonheritable, mutations in three more lesions from different patients and identify the cell type(s) in which somatic mutations occur. METHODS Somatic mutations were sought in DNA from three surgically excised, fresh-frozen CCM lesions by cloning and screening PCR products generated from KRIT1 or PDCD10 coding regions. Laser capture microdissection (LCM) was used to isolated endothelial and nonendothelial cells in order to determine if somatic mutations were found in endothelial cells. RESULTS A CCM lesion harbored somatic and germline KRIT1 mutations on different chromosomes and are therefore biallelic. Both mutations are predicted to truncate the protein. The KRIT1 somatic mutations (novel c.1800delG mutation and previously identified 34 nucleotide deletion) in CCMs from two different patients were only found in the vascular endothelial cells lining caverns. No obvious somatic mutations were identified in the two other lesions; however, the results were inconclusive possibly due to the technical limitations or the fact that these specimens had a small proportion of vascular endothelial cells lining pristine caverns. CONCLUSION The “two-hit” mechanism occurs in vascular endothelial cells lining CCM caverns from two patients with somatic and Hispanic-American KRIT1 germline mutations. Methods for somatic mutation detection should focus on vascular endothelial cells lining pristine caverns. PMID:19574835

  7. Novel heterozygous mutation in the extracellular domain of FGFR1 associated with Hartsfield syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Takagi, Masaki; Miyoshi, Tatsuya; Nagashima, Yuka; Shibata, Nao; Yagi, Hiroko; Fukuzawa, Ryuji; Hasegawa, Tomonobu

    2016-01-01

    Heterozygous kinase domain mutations or homozygous extracellular domain mutations in FGFR1 have been reported to cause Hartsfield syndrome (HS), which is characterized by the triad of holoprosencephaly, ectrodactyly and cleft lip/palate. To date, more than 200 mutations in FGFR1 have been described; however, only 10 HS-associated mutations have been reported thus far. We describe a case of typical HS with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH) harboring a novel heterozygous mutation, p.His253Pro, in the extracellular domain of FGFR1. This is the first report of an HS-associated heterozygous mutation located in the extracellular domain of FGFR1, thus expanding our understanding of the phenotypic features and further developmental course associated with FGFR1 mutations. PMID:27790375

  8. BRCA1/2 germline mutations and their clinical importance in Turkish breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Cecener, Gulsah; Egeli, Unal; Tunca, Berrin; Erturk, Elif; Ak, Secil; Gokgoz, Sehsuvar; Tasdelen, Ismet; Tezcan, Gulcin; Demirdogen, Elif; Bayram, Nuran; Avci, Nilufer; Evrensel, Turkkan

    2014-10-01

    BRCA1/BRCA2 genes were screened in 117 patients with breast cancer by sequencing. Fourteen percent of patients tested positive for BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations. Four frame shift mutations, four pathogenic missense mutations, and 25 different sequence variations were detected. BRCA mutation positivity was significantly associated with Ki67 (p = .001). BRCA protein expressions were decreased in the patients harboring important mutations and polymorphisms (BRCA1;P508 stop, V1740G, Q1182R, Q1756P and BRCA2;V2466A) related with disease. Our findings contribute significantly to the types of germline BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations and their biological effects in Turkish women. These data could help guide the management of BRCA1/BRCA2 mutation-carrying patients when considering breast-conserving therapy.

  9. Los Angeles - Long Beach Harbors, California. Los Angeles Harbor Deepening Project. Final Phase 2. General Design Memorandum.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    O .. STOW SIZE S A DESIGN O EIGNTS U S. Ap.0y 00 ’ FRPLATECCXOOSANGENE [II ’~~LOS ANGELES5...in 1970, designate the Reeves Field Harbor area as "open" on their harbor model plan with the understanding that it would be used for recreational...dictated by peak electrical demand . PART III: THE PHYSICAL MODEL Description 18. The physical hydraulic model reproducEs San Pedro Bay and a portion of

  10. Inhibition of heat shock protein 90 prolongs survival of mice with BCR-ABL-T315I–induced leukemia and suppresses leukemic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Cong; Brain, Julia; Hu, Yiguo; Goodrich, Ami; Kong, Linghong; Grayzel, David; Pak, Roger; Read, Margaret

    2007-01-01

    Development of kinase domain mutations is a major drug-resistance mechanism for tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in cancer therapy. A particularly challenging example is found in Philadelphia chromosome–positive chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) where all available kinase inhibitors in clinic are ineffective against the BCR-ABL mutant, T315I. As an alternative approach to kinase inhibition, an orally administered heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) inhibitor, IPI-504, was evaluated in a murine model of CML. Treatment with IPI-504 resulted in BCR-ABL protein degradation, decreased numbers of leukemia stem cells, and prolonged survival of leukemic mice bearing the T315I mutation. Hsp90 inhibition more potently suppressed T315I-expressing leukemia clones relative to the wild-type (WT) clones in mice. Combination treatment with IPI-504 and imatinib was more effective than either treatment alone in prolonging survival of mice simultaneously bearing both WT and T315I leukemic cells. These results provide a rationale for use of an Hsp90 inhibitor as a first-line treatment in CML by inhibiting leukemia stem cells and preventing the emergence of imatinib-resistant clones in patients. Rather than inhibiting kinase activity, elimination of mutant kinases provides a new therapeutic strategy for treating BCR-ABL–induced leukemia as well as other cancers resistant to treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors. PMID:17395781

  11. BRAF-mutated clear cell sarcoma is sensitive to vemurafenib treatment.

    PubMed

    Protsenko, Svetlana A; Semionova, Anna I; Komarov, Yuri I; Aleksakhina, Svetlana N; Ivantsov, Alexandr O; Iyevleva, Aglaya G; Imyanitov, Evgeny N

    2015-10-01

    We report a patient with a metastatic relapse of clear cell sarcoma, whose tumor harbored BRAF V600E mutation. Standard chemotherapy with doxorubicin and ifosfamide failed to slow the disease progression. Subsequent administration of vemurafenib (960 mg twice a day) resulted in complete tumor response after 8 weeks of treatment. Literature data on the use of vemurafenib and dabrafenib in non-melanoma BRAF-mutated tumors are reviewed.

  12. Lethal Keratitis, Ichthyosis, and Deafness Syndrome Due to the A88V Connexin 26 Mutation.

    PubMed

    Esmer, Carmen; Salas-Alanis, Julio C; Fajardo-Ramirez, Oscar R; Ramírez, Brenda; Hua, Rong; Choate, Keith

    2016-01-01

    Keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness syndrome is a well-characterized disease that has been related to mutations in the GJB6 gene. Clinical features such as erythrokeratoderma, palmoplantar keratoderma, alopecia, and progressive vascularizing keratitis, among others, are well known in this entity. In this report we describe a newborn female patient diagnosed with keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness syndrome with a lethal outcome due to sepsis. The patient harbored the mutation A88V that has been previously reported in lethal cases.

  13. Mutations in phosphodiesterase 6 identified in familial cases of retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Ullah, Inayat; Kabir, Firoz; Gottsch, Clare Brooks S; Naeem, Muhammad Asif; Guru, Aditya A; Ayyagari, Radha; Khan, Shaheen N; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Akram, Javed; Riazuddin, S Amer

    2016-01-01

    To delineate the genetic determinants associated with retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a hereditary retinal disorder, we recruited four large families manifesting cardinal symptoms of RP. We localized these families to regions on the human genome harboring the α and β subunits of phosphodiesterase 6 and identified mutations that were absent in control chromosomes. Our data suggest that mutations in PDE6A and PDE6B are responsible for the retinal phenotype in these families. PMID:27917291

  14. 75 FR 26198 - Foreign-Trade Zone 152 - Burns Harbor, Indiana, Application for Reorganization under Alternative...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-11

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 152 - Burns Harbor, Indiana, Application for Reorganization...-purpose zone currently consists of six sites in the Burns Harbor/Gary, Indiana area: Site 1: (533,288 sq...); Site 2: (441 acres) within the Port of Indiana/Burns International Harbor, Burns Harbor (Porter...

  15. Tech Talk for Social Studies Teachers Lest We Forget: Remembering Pearl Harbor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Tim

    2001-01-01

    Presents an annotated bibliography that provides Web sites about Pearl Harbor (Hawaii). Includes Web sites that cover Pearl Harbor history, a live view of Pearl Harbor, stories from people who remember where they were during the attack, information on the naval station at Pearl Harbor, and a virtual tour of the USS Arizona. (CMK)

  16. Mutations of KRAS/NRAS/BRAF predict cetuximab resistance in metastatic colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Hung-Chih; Thiam, Tan Kien; Lu, Yen-Jung; Yeh, Chien Yuh; Tsai, Wen-Sy; You, Jeng Fu; Hung, Hsin Yuan; Tsai, Chi-Neu; Hsu, An; Chen, Hua-Chien; Chen, Shu-Jen; Yang, Tsai-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 45% of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients with wild-type KRAS exon 2 are resistant to cetuximab treatment. We set out to identify additional genetic markers that might predict the response to cetuximab treatment. Fifty-three wild-type KRAS exon 2 mCRC patients were treated with cetuximab/irinotecan-based chemotherapy as a first- or third-line therapy. The mutational statuses of 10 EGFR pathway genes were analyzed in primary tumors using next-generation sequencing. BRAF, PIK3CA, KRAS (exons 3 and 4), NRAS, PTEN, and AKT1 mutations were detected in 6, 6, 5, 4, 1, and 1 patient, respectively. Four of the BRAF mutations were non-V600 variants. Four tumors harbored multiple co-existing (complex) mutations. All patients with BRAF mutations or complex mutation patterns were cetuximab non-responders. All patients but one harboring KRAS, NRAS, or BRAF mutations were non-responders. Mutations in any one of these three genes were associated with a poor response rate (7.1%) and reduced survival (PFS = 8.0 months) compared to wild-type patients (74.4% and 11.6 months). Our data suggest that KRAS, NRAS, and BRAF mutations predict response to cetuximab treatment in mCRC patients. PMID:26989027

  17. Exome Sequencing Identifies Potentially Druggable Mutations in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Yock Ping; Tan, Lu Ping; Chai, San Jiun; Abdul Aziz, Norazlin; Choo, Siew Woh; Lim, Paul Vey Hong; Pathmanathan, Rajadurai; Mohd Kornain, Noor Kaslina; Lum, Chee Lun; Pua, Kin Choo; Yap, Yoke Yeow; Tan, Tee Yong; Teo, Soo Hwang; Khoo, Alan Soo-Beng; Patel, Vyomesh

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we first performed whole exome sequencing of DNA from 10 untreated and clinically annotated fresh frozen nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) biopsies and matched bloods to identify somatically mutated genes that may be amenable to targeted therapeutic strategies. We identified a total of 323 mutations which were either non-synonymous (n = 238) or synonymous (n = 85). Furthermore, our analysis revealed genes in key cancer pathways (DNA repair, cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, immune response, lipid signaling) were mutated, of which those in the lipid-signaling pathway were the most enriched. We next extended our analysis on a prioritized sub-set of 37 mutated genes plus top 5 mutated cancer genes listed in COSMIC using a custom designed HaloPlex target enrichment panel with an additional 88 NPC samples. Our analysis identified 160 additional non-synonymous mutations in 37/42 genes in 66/88 samples. Of these, 99/160 mutations within potentially druggable pathways were further selected for validation. Sanger sequencing revealed that 77/99 variants were true positives, giving an accuracy of 78%. Taken together, our study indicated that ~72% (n = 71/98) of NPC samples harbored mutations in one of the four cancer pathways (EGFR-PI3K-Akt-mTOR, NOTCH, NF-κB, DNA repair) which may be potentially useful as predictive biomarkers of response to matched targeted therapies. PMID:28256603

  18. A Novel Technique to Detect EGFR Mutations in Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuanbin; Lei, Ting; Liu, Zhiyu; Kuang, Yanbin; Lyu, Jianxin; Wang, Qi

    2016-05-23

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene mutations occur in multiple human cancers; therefore, the detection of EGFR mutations could lead to early cancer diagnosis. This study describes a novel EGFR mutation detection technique. Compared to direct DNA sequencing detection methods, this method is based on allele-specific amplification (ASA), recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA), peptide nucleic acid (PNA), and SYBR Green I (SYBR), referred to as the AS-RPA-PNA-SYBR (ARPS) system. The principle of this technique is based on three continuous steps: ASA or ASA combined with PNA to prevent non-target sequence amplification (even single nucleotide polymorphisms, SNPs), the rapid amplification advantage of RPA, and appropriate SYBR Green I detection (the samples harboring EGFR mutations show a green signal). Using this method, the EGFR 19Del(2) mutation was detected in 5 min, while the EGFR L858R mutation was detected in 10 min. In this study, the detection of EGFR mutations in clinical samples using the ARPS system was compatible with that determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA sequencing methods. Thus, this newly developed methodology that uses the ARPS system with appropriate primer sets is a rapid, reliable, and practical way to assess EGFR mutations in clinical samples.

  19. Ten Year Resurveys of the Biodiversity of Marine Communities and Introduced Species in Pearl Harbor, Honolulu Harbor, and Ke’Ehi Lagoon, O’Ahu, Hawai’i

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-30

    observations at the former collection stations, snorkeling surveys were conducted throughout Pearl Harbor and Ke’ehi Lagoon to estimate the abundance of introduced algae and in Pearl Harbor to document the occurrence of reef corals.

  20. An MRPS12 mutation modifies aminoglycoside sensitivity caused by 12S rRNA mutations

    PubMed Central

    Emperador, Sonia; Pacheu-Grau, David; Bayona-Bafaluy, M. Pilar; Garrido-Pérez, Nuria; Martín-Navarro, Antonio; López-Pérez, Manuel J.; Montoya, Julio; Ruiz-Pesini, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Several homoplasmic pathologic mutations in mitochondrial DNA, such as those causing Leber hereditary optic neuropathy or non-syndromic hearing loss, show incomplete penetrance. Therefore, other elements must modify their pathogenicity. Discovery of these modifying factors is not an easy task because in multifactorial diseases conventional genetic approaches may not always be informative. Here, we have taken an evolutionary approach to unmask putative modifying factors for a particular homoplasmic pathologic mutation causing aminoglycoside-induced and non-syndromic hearing loss, the m.1494C>T transition in the mitochondrial DNA. The mutation is located in the decoding site of the mitochondrial ribosomal RNA. We first looked at mammalian species that had fixed the human pathologic mutation. These mutations are called compensated pathogenic deviations because an organism carrying one must also have another that suppresses the deleterious effect of the first. We found that species from the primate family Cercopithecidae (old world monkeys) harbor the m.1494T allele even if their auditory function is normal. In humans the m.1494T allele increases the susceptibility to aminoglycosides. However, in primary fibroblasts from a Cercopithecidae species, aminoglycosides do not impair cell growth, respiratory complex IV activity and quantity or the mitochondrial protein synthesis. Interestingly, this species also carries a fixed mutation in the mitochondrial ribosomal protein S12. We show that the expression of this variant in a human m.1494T cell line reduces its susceptibility to aminoglycosides. Because several mutations in this human protein have been described, they may possibly explain the absence of pathologic phenotype in some pedigree members with the most frequent pathologic mutations in mitochondrial ribosomal RNA. PMID:25642242

  1. Clinical Manifestations in Paroxysmal Kinesigenic Dyskinesia Patients with Proline-Rich Transmembrane Protein 2 Gene Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Youn, Jinyoung; Kim, Ji Sun; Lee, Munhyang; Lee, Jeehun; Roh, Hakjae

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Given the diverse phenotypes including combined non-dyskinetic symptoms in patients harboring mutations of the gene encoding proline-rich transmembrane protein 2 (PRRT2), the clinical significance of these mutations in paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD) is questionable. In this study, we investigated the clinical characteristics of PKD patients with PRRT2 mutations. Methods Familial and sporadic PKD patients were enrolled and PRRT2 gene sequencing was performed. Demographic and clinical data were compared between PKD patients with and without a PRRT2 mutation. Results Among the enrolled PKD patients (8 patients from 5 PKD families and 19 sporadic patients), PRRT2 mutations were detected in 3 PKD families (60%) and 2 sporadic cases (10.5%). All familial patients with a PRRT2 gene mutation had the c.649dupC mutation, which is the most commonly reported mutation. Two uncommon mutations (c.649delC and c.629dupC) were detected only in the sporadic cases. PKD patients with PRRT2 mutation were younger at symptom onset and had more non-dyskinetic symptoms than those without PRRT2 mutation. However, the characteristics of dyskinetic movement did not differ between the two groups. Conclusions This is the first study of PRRT2 mutations in Korea. The presence of a PRRT2 mutation was more strongly related to familial PKD, and was clinically related with earlier age of onset and common non-dyskinetic symptoms in PKD patients. PMID:24465263

  2. In situ detection of specific p53 mutations in cultured cells using the amplification refractory mutation system polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Low, E O; Gibbins, J R; Walker, D M

    2000-12-01

    Accurate molecular detection of genetic mutations involved in tumorigenesis has been based predominantly on analysis of extracted DNA, but this does not provide detailed information on the location, number, type or clonal distribution of mutated cells and their precise anatomic location and clonal distribution. This study has used a sensitive and specific application of the amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in situ, combined with in situ hybridization to localize and identify cells with defined p53 mutations. The ARMS-PCR was performed in situ in SW480 cells in suspension and in cells either cultured or cytospun onto glass slides. Amplified mutant DNA PCR products were detected in SW480 cells using digoxigenin-labeled probes, visually identifying cells harboring specific mutations in the p53 gene. In situ hybridization alone of the mutant cells without the amplification step was negative. Normal human fibroblasts or endothelial cells were refractory to in situ amplification. This reaction was mutation-specific as CEM cells with different p53 mutations reacted negatively. Mutant messenger RNA (mRNA) in tumor cells was also selectively amplified in situ by ARMS-PCR following reverse transcription (RT). This study demonstrates the potential of in situ ARMS-PCR or RT-ARMS-PCR for mutation analysis in situ and could have useful clinical applications.

  3. A Survey of DICER1 Hotspot Mutations in Ovarian and Testicular Sex Cord-Stromal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Conlon, Niamh; Schultheis, Anne M; Piscuoglio, Salvatore; Silva, Annacarolina; Guerra, Esther; Tornos, Carmen; Reuter, Victor E; Soslow, Robert A; Young, Robert H; Oliva, Esther; Weigelt, Britta

    2015-01-01

    Sertoli-Leydig cell tumors are characterized by the presence of somatic DICER1 hotspot mutations. In this study, we sought to define the association between DICER1 hotspot mutations and different morphologic subtypes of ovarian Sertoli-Leydig cell tumors. Furthermore, we aimed to assess whether DICER1 hotspot mutations occur in other ovarian sex cord-stromal tumors, testicular sex cord-stromal tumors, or other female genital tract tumors with rhabdomyosarcomatous differentiation. We subjected a series of ovarian Sertoli-Leydig cell tumors (n=32), Sertoli cell tumors (n=5) and gynandroblastomas (n=5), testicular sex cord-stromal tumors (n=15) and a diverse group of female genital tract tumors with rhabdomyosarcomatous morphology (n=10) to DICER1 hotspot mutation analysis using Sanger sequencing. We also tested 2 gynandroblastomas for the presence of FOXL2 hotspot mutations (p.C134W; c.402C>G). Twenty of 32 (63%) Sertoli-Leydig cell tumors harbored a DICER1 hotspot mutation, of which 80% had the p.E1705K mutation. No association was found between DICER1 mutation status and the presence of heterologous or retiform differentiation in Sertoli-Leydig cell tumors. DICER1 mutations were found at similar frequencies in gynandroblastoma (2/5; 40%) and ovarian Sertoli cell tumors (5/8; 63%; p>0.1), and all mutated tumors harbored a p.E1705K mutation. DICER1 hotspot mutations were also identified in a single cervical rhabdomyosarcoma and in the rhabdomyosarcomatous component of a uterine carcinosarcoma. No DICER1 mutations were detected in testicular sex cord-stromal tumors. Two DICER1 wild-type gynandroblastomas harbored a p.C134W FOXL2 hotspot mutation in both tumor components. In this study we confirmed that DICER1 hotspot mutations occur in over half of ovarian Sertoli-Leydig cell tumors, and are unrelated to tumor differentiation. We also widened the spectrum of ovarian sex cord-stromal tumors with sertoliform differentiation, in which DICER1 mutations are known to occur

  4. A survey of DICER1 hotspot mutations in ovarian and testicular sex cord-stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Conlon, Niamh; Schultheis, Anne M; Piscuoglio, Salvatore; Silva, Annacarolina; Guerra, Esther; Tornos, Carmen; Reuter, Victor E; Soslow, Robert A; Young, Robert H; Oliva, Esther; Weigelt, Britta

    2015-12-01

    Sertoli-Leydig cell tumors are characterized by the presence of somatic DICER1 hotspot mutations. In this study, we sought to define the association between DICER1 hotspot mutations and different morphologic subtypes of ovarian Sertoli-Leydig cell tumors. Furthermore, we aimed to assess whether DICER1 hotspot mutations occur in other ovarian sex cord-stromal tumors, testicular sex cord-stromal tumors, or other female genital tract tumors with rhabdomyosarcomatous differentiation. We subjected a series of ovarian Sertoli-Leydig cell tumors (n=32), Sertoli cell tumors (n=5) and gynandroblastomas (n=5), testicular sex cord-stromal tumors (n=15) and a diverse group of female genital tract tumors with rhabdomyosarcomatous morphology (n=10) to DICER1 hotspot mutation analysis using Sanger sequencing. We also tested two gynandroblastomas for the presence of FOXL2 hotspot mutations (p.C134W; c.402C>G). Twenty of 32 (63%) Sertoli-Leydig cell tumors harbored a DICER1 hotspot mutation, of which 80% had the p.E1705K mutation. No association was found between DICER1 mutation status and the presence of heterologous or retiform differentiation in Sertoli-Leydig cell tumors. DICER1 mutations were found at similar frequencies in gynandroblastoma (2/5; 40%) and ovarian Sertoli cell tumors (5/8; 63%; P>0.1), and all mutated tumors harbored a p.E1705K mutation. DICER1 hotspot mutations were also identified in a single cervical rhabdomyosarcoma and in the rhabdomyosarcomatous component of a uterine carcinosarcoma. No DICER1 mutations were detected in testicular sex cord-stromal tumors. Two DICER1 wild-type gynandroblastomas harbored a p.C134W FOXL2 hotspot mutation in both tumor components. In this study we confirmed that DICER1 hotspot mutations occur in over half of ovarian Sertoli-Leydig cell tumors, and are unrelated to tumor differentiation. We also widened the spectrum of ovarian sex cord-stromal tumors with sertoliform differentiation, in which DICER1 mutations are known to

  5. 33 CFR 207.610 - St. Lawrence River, Cape Vincent Harbor, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation of the harbor...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false St. Lawrence River, Cape Vincent Harbor, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation of the harbor and U.S. breakwater. 207.610 Section 207... NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 207.610 St. Lawrence River, Cape Vincent Harbor, N.Y.; use, administration,...

  6. 33 CFR 207.610 - St. Lawrence River, Cape Vincent Harbor, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation of the harbor...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false St. Lawrence River, Cape Vincent Harbor, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation of the harbor and U.S. breakwater. 207.610 Section 207... NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 207.610 St. Lawrence River, Cape Vincent Harbor, N.Y.; use, administration,...

  7. 33 CFR 207.610 - St. Lawrence River, Cape Vincent Harbor, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation of the harbor...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false St. Lawrence River, Cape Vincent Harbor, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation of the harbor and U.S. breakwater. 207.610 Section 207... NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 207.610 St. Lawrence River, Cape Vincent Harbor, N.Y.; use, administration,...

  8. Mitochondrial tRNA mutations and disease.

    PubMed

    Yarham, John W; Elson, Joanna L; Blakely, Emma L; McFarland, Robert; Taylor, Robert W

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial (mt-) tRNA (MTT) gene mutations are an important cause of human morbidity and are associated with a wide range of pathology, from isolated organ-specific diseases such as myopathy or hearing loss, through to multisystem disorders with encephalopathy, gastrointestinal dysmotility, and life-threatening cardiomyopathy. Our understanding of how MTT mutations cause disease remains poor and progress has been hampered by the complex interaction of genotype with phenotype that can result in patients who harbor the same mutation exhibiting starkly contrasting phenotypes, whereas other (genetically heterogeneous) patients manifest clinically identical syndromes. A further complexity is the highly polymorphic nature of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), which must temper any reflex assumptions of pathogenicity for novel MTT substitutions. Nevertheless significant progress is being made and we shall review the methods employed to identify and characterize MTT mutations as pathogenic. Also important is our understanding of the molecular processes involved and we shall discuss the data available on two of the most studied MTT mutations (m.8344A > G and m.3243A > G) as well as other potential pathogenic mechanisms. Knowledge of factors influencing the inheritance of MTT mutations, and therefore the likelihood of disease transmission, is of particular importance to female patients. At present, the factors determining transmission remain elusive, but we shall examine several possible mechanisms and discuss the evidence for each. Finally, a number of different yeast and mouse models are currently used to investigate mitochondrial disease and we will assess the importance of and difficulties associated with each model as well as the future of possible therapies for patients with mitochondrial disease.

  9. A novel somatic MAPK1 mutation in primary ovarian mixed germ cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yang; Deng, Wei; Wang, Feng; Yu, Xiao-Hong; Liu, Fa-Ying; Yang, Bi-Cheng; Huang, Mei-Zhen; Guo, Jiu-Bai; Xie, Qiu-Hua; He, Ming; Huang, Ou-Ping

    2016-02-01

    A recent exome-sequencing study revealed prevalent mitogen-activated protein kinase 1 (MAPK1) p.E322K mutation in cervical carcinoma. It remains largely unknown whether ovarian carcinomas also harbor MAPK1 mutations. As paralogous gene mutations co‑occur frequently in human malignancies, we analyzed here a total of 263 ovarian carcinomas for the presence of MAPK1 and paralogous MAPK3 mutations by DNA sequencing. A previously unreported MAPK1 p.D321N somatic mutation was identified in 2 out of 18 (11.1%) ovarian mixed germ cell tumors, while no other MAPK1 or MAPK3 mutation was detected in our samples. Of note, OCC‑115, the MAPK1‑mutated sample with bilateral cancerous ovaries affected, harbored MAPK1 mutation in the right ovary while retained the left ovary intact, implicating that the genetic alterations underlying ovarian mixed germ cell tumor may be different, even in patients with similar genetic backgrounds and tumor microenvironments. The results of evolutionary conservation and protein structure modeling analysis implicated that MAPK1 p.D321N mutation may be pathogenic. Additionally, mutations in protein phosphatase 2 regulatory subunit α (PPP2R1A), ring finger protein 43 (RNF43), DNA directed polymerase ε (POLE1), ribonuclease type III (DICER1), CCCTC‑binding factor (CTCF), ribosomal protein L22 (RPL22), DNA methyltransferase 3α (DNMT3A), transformation/transcription domain‑associated protein (TRRAP), isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH)1 and IDH2 were not detected in ovarian mixed germ cell tumors, implicating these genetic alterations may be not associated with MAPK1 mutation in the development of this malignancy. The present study identified a previously unreported MAPK1 mutation in ovarian mixed germ cell tumors for the first time, and this mutation may be actively involved in the tumorigenesis of this disease.

  10. Towards a Molecular Understanding of the Link between Imatinib Resistance and Kinase Conformational Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Lovera, Silvia; Morando, Maria; Pucheta-Martinez, Encarna; Martinez-Torrecuadrada, Jorge L.; Saladino, Giorgio; Gervasio, Francesco L.

    2015-01-01

    Due to its inhibition of the Abl kinase domain in the BCR-ABL fusion protein, imatinib is strikingly effective in the initial stage of chronic myeloid leukemia with more than 90% of the patients showing complete remission. However, as in the case of most targeted anti-cancer therapies, the emergence of drug resistance is a serious concern. Several drug-resistant mutations affecting the catalytic domain of Abl and other tyrosine kinases are now known. But, despite their importance and the adverse effect that they have on the prognosis of the cancer patients harboring them, the molecular mechanism of these mutations is still debated. Here by using long molecular dynamics simulations and large-scale free energy calculations complemented by in vitro mutagenesis and microcalorimetry experiments, we model the effect of several widespread drug-resistant mutations of Abl. By comparing the conformational free energy landscape of the mutants with those of the wild-type tyrosine kinases we clarify their mode of action. It involves significant and complex changes in the inactive-to-active dynamics and entropy/enthalpy balance of two functional elements: the activation-loop and the conserved DFG motif. What is more the T315I gatekeeper mutant has a significant impact on the binding mechanism itself and on the binding kinetics. PMID:26606374

  11. Floating-Harbor syndrome associated with middle ear abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Hendrickx, Jan-Jaap; Keymolen, Kathelijn; Desprechins, Brigitte; Casselman, Jan; Gordts, Frans

    2010-01-01

    Floating-Harbor syndrome is a rare syndrome of unknown etiology, which was first described in 1973. A triad of main features characterizes Floating-Harbor syndrome: short stature, characteristic face, and an expressive speech delay. We present a patient in whom the hearing thresholds improved insufficiently after placement of grommets. High-resolution CT scan of the temporal bone showed a prominent soft-tissue thickening suspected of causing fixation of the malleus, and fusion of the malleus head with the body of the incus. To our knowledge this is the first reported abnormal middle ear anatomy in a patient with Floating-Harbor syndrome. A conservative treatment with hearing aids was preferred as an initial treatment in favor of a surgical exploration.

  12. Mitochondrial DNA mutations in single human blood cells.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yong-Gang; Kajigaya, Sachiko; Young, Neal S

    2015-09-01

    Determination mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences from extremely small amounts of DNA extracted from tissue of limited amounts and/or degraded samples is frequently employed in medical, forensic, and anthropologic studies. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification followed by DNA cloning is a routine method, especially to examine heteroplasmy of mtDNA mutations. In this review, we compare the mtDNA mutation patterns detected by three different sequencing strategies. Cloning and sequencing methods that are based on PCR amplification of DNA extracted from either single cells or pooled cells yield a high frequency of mutations, partly due to the artifacts introduced by PCR and/or the DNA cloning process. Direct sequencing of PCR product which has been amplified from DNA in individual cells is able to detect the low levels of mtDNA mutations present within a cell. We further summarize the findings in our recent studies that utilized this single cell method to assay mtDNA mutation patterns in different human blood cells. Our data show that many somatic mutations observed in the end-stage differentiated cells are found in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and progenitors within the CD34(+) cell compartment. Accumulation of mtDNA variations in the individual CD34+ cells is affected by both aging and family genetic background. Granulocytes harbor higher numbers of mutations compared with the other cells, such as CD34(+) cells and lymphocytes. Serial assessment of mtDNA mutations in a population of single CD34(+) cells obtained from the same donor over time suggests stability of some somatic mutations. CD34(+) cell clones from a donor marked by specific mtDNA somatic mutations can be found in the recipient after transplantation. The significance of these findings is discussed in terms of the lineage tracing of HSCs, aging effect on accumulation of mtDNA mutations and the usage of mtDNA sequence in forensic identification.

  13. Impact of bevacizumab in combination with erlotinib on EGFR-mutated non-small cell lung cancer xenograft models with T790M mutation or MET amplification.

    PubMed

    Furugaki, Koh; Fukumura, Junko; Iwai, Toshiki; Yorozu, Keigo; Kurasawa, Mitsue; Yanagisawa, Mieko; Moriya, Yoichiro; Yamamoto, Kaname; Suda, Kenichi; Mizuuchi, Hiroshi; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Harada, Naoki

    2016-02-15

    Erlotinib (ERL), an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor, shows notable efficacy against non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) harboring EGFR mutations. Bevacizumab (BEV), a humanized monoclonal antibody to vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF), in combination with ERL (BEV+ERL) significantly extended progression-free survival in patients with EGFR-mutated NSCLC compared with ERL alone. However, the efficacy of BEV+ERL against EGFR-mutated NSCLC harboring T790M mutation or MET amplification, is unclear. Here, we examined the antitumor activity of BEV+ERL in four xenograft models of EGFR-mutated NSCLC (three harboring ERL resistance mutations). In the HCC827 models (exon 19 deletion: DEL), ERL significantly inhibited tumor growth by blocking EGFR signal transduction. Although there was no difference between ERL and BEV+ERL in maximum tumor growth inhibition, BEV+ERL significantly suppressed tumor regrowth during a drug-cessation period. In the HCC827-EPR model (DEL+T790M) and HCC827-vTR model (DEL+MET amplification), ERL reduced EGFR signal transduction and showed less pronounced but still significant tumor growth inhibition than in the HCC827 model. In these models, tumor growth inhibition was significantly stronger with BEV+ERL than with each single agent. In the NCI-H1975 model (L858R+T790M), ERL did not inhibit growth or EGFR signal transduction, and BEV+ERL did not inhibit growth more than BEV. BEV alone significantly decreased microvessel density in each tumor. In conclusion, addition of BEV to ERL did not enhance antitumor activity in primarily ERL-resistant tumors with T790M mutation; however, BEV+ERL enhanced antitumor activity in T790M mutation- or MET amplification-positive tumors as long as their growth remained significantly suppressed by ERL.

  14. BRAF Mutation (V600E) Prevalence in Mexican Patients Diagnosed with Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Zepeda-Lopez, Priscilla Denise; Salas-Alanis, Julio Cesar; Toussaint-Caire, Sonia; Gutierrez-Mendoza, Daniela; Vega-Memije, Elisa; Silva, Saúl Lino; Fajardo-Ramírez, Oscar Raul; Alcazar, Gregorio; Moreno-Treviño, María Guadalupe; Saldaña, Hugo Alberto Barrera

    2016-01-01

    Background B-Raf is a serine/threonine protein kinase activating the MAP kinase/ERK-signaling pathway. It has been shown that 50% of melanomas harbor activating BRAF mutations, with over 90% being the V600E mutation. Objective The goal of this research was to determine the prevalence of the BRAF V600E mutation in patients from Central Mexico diagnosed with primary melanoma. Methods Skin biopsies from 47 patients with melanoma were obtained from the dermatology department of the Hospital General ‘Dr. Manuel Gea González’ in Mexico City. For BRAF mutation determination, after DNA isolation, the gene region where the mutation occurs was amplified by PCR. Subsequently, the presence or absence of the V600E mutation was detected by Sanger sequencing performed at the private molecular diagnostic laboratory Vitagénesis in Monterrey, Mexico. Results Of the 47 patients sampled, 6.4% harbored the V600E mutation. No statistical significance was found between mutations and the type of tumor. PMID:27194985

  15. Assessment of Modifications for Improving Navigation at Hilo Harbor, Hawaii

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-01

    officials anticipate that Hilo Harbor will become a regular port of call for the new-generation cruise vessels that are more than 1,000 ft (305 m) in...Pier 1 and the larger fleet that is projected to use the harbor in the future. The majority of the deeper-draft ship calls are cruise ships with... call . Such ships presently are unable to use this facility due to current Federal channel and turning basin constraints. The landward end of the

  16. Novel mutations conferring resistance to kanamycin in Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates from Northern India.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Simerpreet; Rana, Vibhuti; Singh, Pooja; Trivedi, Garima; Anand, Shashi; Kaur, Amanpreet; Gupta, Pawan; Jain, Amita; Sharma, Charu

    2016-01-01

    Twenty-nine Kanamycin resistant clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from Northern India were screened to evaluate genetic mutations in rrs gene, eis gene with its promoter, and whiB7 gene along with its 5'UTR. 14 strains (~48.0%) collectively exhibited mutations in rrs, eis or whiB7 target regions. While the highest frequency of mutations was found in rrs gene, eis and whiB7 loci displayed novel mutations. The novel mutations displayed by eis and whiB7 loci were found to be associated specifically with the Kanamycin resistance as none of the twenty nine Kanamycin sensitive strains harbor them. The inclusion of novel mutations of eis and whiB7 loci will be useful in improving the specificity of future diagnostics.

  17. BRAF V600E and TERT Promoter Mutations in Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma in Chinese Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jie; Ren, Xinyu; Teng, Lianghong; Duan, Huanli; Lin, Yansong; Li, Xiaoyi; Zhang, Bo; Liang, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    Background The BRAF V600E and telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter mutations have been reported in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). The aim of this retrospective cross-sectional study was to add further information regarding the prevalence of the BRAF V600E and TERT promoter mutations in Chinese PTC and their clinicopathological associations. Methods We detected the BRAF V600E mutation and TERT promoter mutations in 455 Chinese PTC patients and analyzed the association of these mutations with several clinicopathological features. Results The BRAF V600E mutation was detected in 343 (75.4%) of 455 cases and was significantly associated with older age (p<0.001) and conventional subtype (p = 0.003). TERT promoter mutations were detected in 19 (4.4%) of 434 PTCs and were associated with older age (p<0.001), larger tumor size (p = 0.024), and advanced TNM stage(p<0.001). Of the 19 patients that were positive for TERT promoter mutations, 18 (94.7%) also harbored the BRAF V600E mutation. Conclusion We determined the prevalence and clinicopathological associations of BRAF V600E and TERT promoter mutations in Chinese PTC patients. TERT promoter mutations but not the BRAF V600E mutation were associated with more advanced TNM stage upon diagnosis. PMID:27064992

  18. Tibial hemimelia-polydactyly-five-fingered hand syndrome associated with a 404 G>A mutation in a distant sonic hedgehog cis-regulator (ZRS): a case report.

    PubMed

    Cho, Tae-Joon; Baek, Goo Hyun; Lee, Hey-Ran; Moon, Hyuk Joo; Yoo, Won Joon; Choi, In Ho

    2013-05-01

    Tibial hemimelia-polydactyly-triphalangeal thumb syndrome is a distinct congenital limb anomaly complex, whose association with the 404 G>A mutation in a distant sonic hedgehog cis-regulator (ZRS) was suggested. The authors report a sporadic case of bilateral tibial hemimelia-preaxial polydactyly-five-fingered hands harboring the same mutation. This case further supports a causal relationship between this mutation and the phenotype.

  19. Two children with "dropped head" syndrome due to lamin A/C mutations.

    PubMed

    Chemla, Jeremy C; Kanter, Ronald J; Carboni, Michael P; Smith, Edward C

    2010-11-01

    LMNA-related congenital muscular dystrophy (L-CMD) is a recently described disorder characterized by infantile-onset myopathy due to mutations in the lamin A/C (LMNA) gene. We report the genetic and clinical characteristics of two unrelated L-CMD patients. Patient 1 harbored a novel, L35P mutation and patient 2 a previously reported R249W mutation. The striking phenotype associated with L-CMD is important to recognize, as molecular diagnostic testing can spare patients unnecessary procedures and prompt the physician to monitor for associated cardiac arrhythmias.

  20. 26 CFR 1.401(k)-3 - Safe harbor requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Safe harbor requirements. 1.401(k)-3 Section 1.401(k)-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.401(k)-3 Safe...

  1. White Sands Space Harbor Area 1, Microwave Scanning Beam Landing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    White Sands Space Harbor Area 1, Microwave Scanning Beam Landing Ground Stations, 1,500' to the south of the north end of Runway 17/35; 1,500' to the west of the east end of Runway 23/05; and 1,500' southwest of the northeast end of Runway 20/02., White Sands, Dona Ana County, NM

  2. Dolphin Morbillivirus Infection in a Captive Harbor Seal (Phoca vitulina)

    PubMed Central

    Peletto, Simone; Mondin, Alessandra; Centelleghe, Cinzia; Di Guardo, Giovanni; Di Francesco, Cristina Esmeralda; Casalone, Cristina; Acutis, Pier Luigi

    2013-01-01

    During the second morbillivirus epidemic (2007 to 2011) in cetaceans along the Italian coastline, dolphin morbillivirus (DMV) was detected by molecular analyses in a captive harbor seal (Phoca vitulina), with pathological findings consistent with morbillivirus infection. This report confirms interspecies DMV transmission from cetaceans to pinnipeds. PMID:23224101

  3. 33 CFR 110.45a - Mattapoisett Harbor, Mattapoisett, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Mattapoisett Harbor, Mattapoisett, Mass. 110.45a Section 110.45a Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND..., Mattapoisett, Mass. (a) Area No. 1 beginning at a point on the shore at latitude 41°39′23″ N., longitude...

  4. 33 CFR 110.45a - Mattapoisett Harbor, Mattapoisett, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Mattapoisett Harbor, Mattapoisett, Mass. 110.45a Section 110.45a Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND..., Mattapoisett, Mass. (a) Area No. 1 beginning at a point on the shore at latitude 41°39′23″ N., longitude...

  5. EARLY DETECTION MONITORING OF INVASIVE SPECIES IN GREAT LAKES HARBORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Great Ships Initiative (GSI) has asked for a presentation on designing harbor monitoring. Our research/development project on early detection provides some examples and lessons for GSI to consider in evaluating effectiveness of ballast water treatments; the presentation allo...

  6. 19 CFR 24.24 - Harbor maintenance fee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Ports3703—Green Bay 3702—Marinette Fee applies to all movements between points along the Sturgeon Bay and Lake Michigan Ship Canal. Fee also applies to Green Bay, Oconto, and Menominee/Marinette. Movements... Homer. Movements between these points are intraport. 3106—Dalton Cache Includes Haines Harbor....

  7. 19 CFR 24.24 - Harbor maintenance fee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Ports3703—Green Bay 3702—Marinette Fee applies to all movements between points along the Sturgeon Bay and Lake Michigan Ship Canal. Fee also applies to Green Bay, Oconto, and Menominee/Marinette. Movements... Homer. Movements between these points are intraport. 3106—Dalton Cache Includes Haines Harbor....

  8. 19 CFR 24.24 - Harbor maintenance fee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Ports3703—Green Bay 3702—Marinette Fee applies to all movements between points along the Sturgeon Bay and Lake Michigan Ship Canal. Fee also applies to Green Bay, Oconto, and Menominee/Marinette. Movements... Homer. Movements between these points are intraport. 3106—Dalton Cache Includes Haines Harbor....

  9. 33 CFR 110.80 - Milwaukee Harbor, Milwaukee, Wis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.80 Milwaukee Harbor, Milwaukee, Wis. (a) McKinley Park. The water area east of McKinley Park enclosed by a line beginning at McKinley Park Jetty.... The water area northeast of South Shore Park enclosed by a line beginning at the northeast corner...

  10. 33 CFR 110.80 - Milwaukee Harbor, Milwaukee, Wis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.80 Milwaukee Harbor, Milwaukee, Wis. (a) McKinley Park. The water area east of McKinley Park enclosed by a line beginning at McKinley Park Jetty.... The water area northeast of South Shore Park enclosed by a line beginning at the northeast corner...

  11. 33 CFR 165.1309 - Eagle Harbor, Bainbridge Island, WA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND LIMITED ACCESS AREAS Specific Regulated Navigation Areas and Limited Access Areas Thirteenth Coast Guard District § 165.1309 Eagle Harbor, Bainbridge Island, WA. (a) Regulated area. A regulated navigation area is established...

  12. 26 CFR 1.401(m)-3 - Safe harbor requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Safe harbor requirements. 1.401(m)-3 Section 1.401(m)-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.401(m)-3...

  13. 26 CFR 1.401(m)-3 - Safe harbor requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Safe harbor requirements. 1.401(m)-3 Section 1.401(m)-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.401(m)-3 Safe...

  14. 4. Overview of grade south of Skunk Harbor Road, looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Overview of grade south of Skunk Harbor Road, looking southwest. 1.8 miles east from southern end of railroad grade. - Slaughterhouse Canyon Railroad Grade, South of State Highway 28 on East shore of Lake Tahoe, Carson City, Carson City, NV

  15. Boussinesq Modeling for Inlets, Harbors & Structures (Bouss-2D)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-27

    harbors; wave transformation over reefs, shoals/berms and around artificial islands; and impacts of vessel-generated waves on erosion of coastal shorelines...longshore and rip currents, wave-current and wave interaction with porous media, wave propagation over vegetated areas, wetlands and marshes, and vessel

  16. Mulberry-American: The Artificial Harbor at Omaha

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-10

    were ordered. September 1943. Phoenix caisson design completed. October 1943. Mulberry harbor design began. November-December 1943. Sextant conference...designate a modified Roundup invasion. SEXTANT . The Cairo conference, 22 to 26 November 1943. SLEDGEHAMMER. Plan for limited objective attack across

  17. The New Bedford Harbor Superfund Site Long Term ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Background. New Bedford Harbor (NBH), located in southeastern Massachusetts, was designated as a marine Superfund site in 1983 due to sediment contamination by polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Based on risks to human health and the environment, the first two phases of the site cleanup involved dredging PCB-contaminated sediments from the harbor. Therefore, a long-term monitoring program (LTM) was developed to measure spatial and temporal chemical and biological changes in sediment, water, and biota to assess the effects and effectiveness of the remedial activities. Approach. A systematic, probabilistic sampling design was used to select approximately 70 sediment sampling stations. Sediment was collected at each station and chemical (e.g., PCBs, metals), physical (e.g., grain size), and biological (e.g., benthic community) measurements were conducted on all samples. There have been six sample collections to date: 1993-baseline, 1995-post hot spot removal, 1999-prior to full scale dredging, and then at 5 year intervals: 2004, 2009, and 2014. Mussel (Mytilus edulis) bioaccumulation has also been measured twice yearly. Results. There is a decreasing spatial gradient in sediment PCB concentrations from the northern boundary (upper harbor) to the southern boundary (outer harbor) of the site. Along this same transect, there is an increase in biological condition (e.g., benthic community diversity). Temporally, the contaminant and biological gradients have been

  18. Endocrine changes in harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) pups undergoing rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Trumble, Stephen J; O'Neil, Danielle; Cornick, Leslie A; Gulland, Frances M D; Castellini, Michael A; Atkinson, Shannon

    2013-03-01

    Rehabilitating pinniped pups are often admitted to care centers as neonates and generally lack maternal investment and are in poor body condition. Upon admittance to a rehabilitation facility, pups are typically fed a milk replacement formula via gavage, which is switched to frozen fish upon weaning. While rehabilitation has been successful in terms of recovery and release, preweaning growth rates in captivity are consistently lower than in the wild. Indicators of stress (cortisol and total thyroxine; TT4), and standard morphometrics, of harbor seal pups in rehabilitation (n = 20) were determined for both preweaned and weaned pups. Hormone concentrations and standard morphometrics from pups in care were compared with free-ranging harbor seal pups (n = 59). Pups in rehabilitation gained mass on both milk and fish diets. Preweaned pups had greater mean serum cortisol and similar TT4 concentrations than weaned pups. Free-ranging harbor seal pups were heavier and longer than preweaned and weaned pups in rehabilitation. The free-ranging pups had the lowest cortisol and highest TT4 concentrations of any of the pups. These results suggest that weaned pups that have undergone rehabilitation are not physiologically equivalent to free-ranging weaned pups. Additional research is needed regarding physiological changes in endocrine values during early development under captive care conditions. This information should be useful to marine mammal rehabilitation centers in their development of care protocols and release criteria for rehabilitating harbor seal pups.

  19. 16 CFR 312.11 - Safe harbor programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... mechanism for the independent assessment of subject operators' compliance with the self-regulatory program guidelines. At a minimum, this mechanism must include a comprehensive review by the safe harbor program, to... representations. The assessment mechanism required under this paragraph can be provided by an...

  20. EPA Fines Clean Harbors for Violations of Environmental Laws

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    DALLAS - (May 12, 2015) The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency recently issued a consent agreement and final order to Clean Harbors Deer Park, LLC, in La Porte, Texas. The company violated laws under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCR

  1. 27. VIEW TO NORTHEAST FROM BOSTON HARBOR, DEER ISLAND PUMPING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. VIEW TO NORTHEAST FROM BOSTON HARBOR, DEER ISLAND PUMPING STATION, CA. 1895 Photocopy of photograph (Massachusetts State Archives, Environmental Affairs, MDC, Construction, 313 V 193 1-5 Box 8, Deer Island Pumping Station) - Deer Island Pumping Station, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  2. 78 FR 75207 - National Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day, 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-10

    ... forces of tyranny and oppression in the Second World War. In remembrance of Pearl Harbor and to defend... Gardens or donated to the war effort to women who joined the assembly line alongside workers of every... the Great Depression, and built the largest middle class and strongest economy in history. Today,...

  3. RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY AT THE HAMPTON ROADS HARBOR FACILITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A radiological survey done to assess levels of environmental radioactivity in and around harbor facilities located in the Hampton Roads Area in southeastern Virginia. The facilities surveyed were the Norfolk Naval Shipyard, the Norfolk Naval Station, and the Newport News Shipbui...

  4. RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY AT THE NEW LONDON HARBOR FACILITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A radiological survey done to assess levels of environmental radioactivity in and around navy harbor facilities located on the Thames River near New London, Connecticut. These facilities include the New London Submarine Base at Groton, the Electric Boat Company at Groton, Sound ...

  5. Rapamycin drives selection against a pathogenic heteroplasmic mitochondrial DNA mutation.

    PubMed

    Dai, Ying; Zheng, Kangni; Clark, Joanne; Swerdlow, Russell H; Pulst, Stefan M; Sutton, James P; Shinobu, Leslie A; Simon, David K

    2014-02-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations cause a variety of mitochondrial disorders for which effective treatments are lacking. Emerging data indicate that selective mitochondrial degradation through autophagy (mitophagy) plays a critical role in mitochondrial quality control. Inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase activity can activate mitophagy. To test the hypothesis that enhancing mitophagy would drive selection against dysfunctional mitochondria harboring higher levels of mutations, thereby decreasing mutation levels over time, we examined the impact of rapamycin on mutation levels in a human cytoplasmic hybrid (cybrid) cell line expressing a heteroplasmic mtDNA G11778A mutation, the most common cause of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy. Inhibition of mTORC1/S6 kinase signaling by rapamycin induced colocalization of mitochondria with autophagosomes, and resulted in a striking progressive decrease in levels of the G11778A mutation and partial restoration of ATP levels. Rapamycin-induced upregulation of mitophagy was confirmed by electron microscopic evidence of increased autophagic vacuoles containing mitochondria-like organelles. The decreased mutational burden was not due to rapamycin-induced cell death or mtDNA depletion, as there was no significant difference in cytotoxicity/apoptosis or mtDNA copy number between rapamycin and vehicle-treated cells. These data demonstrate the potential for pharmacological inhibition of mTOR kinase activity to activate mitophagy as a strategy to drive selection against a heteroplasmic mtDNA G11778A mutation and raise the exciting possibility that rapamycin may have therapeutic potential for the treatment of mitochondrial disorders associated with heteroplasmic mtDNA mutations, although further studies are needed to determine if a similar strategy will be effective for other mutations and other cell types.

  6. STK11 Mutation Identified in Thyroid Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shuanzeng; LiVolsi, Virginia A; Brose, Marcia S; Montone, Kathleen T; Morrissette, Jennifer J D; Baloch, Zubair W

    2016-03-01

    Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS) is an autosomal-dominant disorder, in which germline mutation of serine threonine-protein kinase 11 (STK11) is identified in up to 90 % of the patients who meet clinical criteria for PJS. Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) slides of the tumor were reviewed to confirm areas with at least 25 % of tumor cellularity. Then, the designated area was extracted for genomic DNA. Targeted next-generation sequencing analysis was performed using a 47-gene panel. Case 1 is a 71-year-old man with high grade follicular thyroid carcinoma with clear cell and oncocytic features. The carcinoma showed a missense mutation in TP53 (p.R342G, c.1024C > G) and a 16-nucleotide intronic deletion started next to the 3' of exon 6 (involving the canonical +1 and +2 bases of the splice donor site) in STK11 (p.?, c.862 + 1_862 + 16delGTGGGAGCCTCATCCC). Case 2 is a 76-year-old woman with tall cell variant papillary thyroid carcinoma. The carcinoma demonstrated a missense mutation in BRAF (p.V600E, c.1799T > A) and a missense mutation in STK11 (p.F354L, c.1062C > G). In summary, we present two elderly patients with thyroid carcinoma harboring STK11 mutation without clinical manifestation of PJS. The findings suggest that STK11 may play a role in thyroid carcinoma development.

  7. Modeling tidal exchange and dispersion in Boston Harbor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Signell, Richard P.; Butman, Bradford

    1992-01-01

    Tidal dispersion and the horizontal exchange of water between Boston Harbor and the surrounding ocean are examined with a high-resolution (200 m) depth-averaged numerical model. The strongly varying bathymetry and coastline geometry of the harbor generate complex spatial patterns in the modeled tidal currents which are verified by shipboard acoustic Doppler surveys. Lagrangian exchange experiments demonstrate that tidal currents rapidly exchange and mix material near the inlets of the harbor due to asymmetry in the ebb/flood response. This tidal mixing zone extends roughly a tidal excursion from the inlets and plays an important role in the overall flushing of the harbor. Because the tides can only efficiently mix material in this limited region, however, harbor flushing must be considered a two step process: rapid exchange in the tidal mixing zone, followed by flushing of the tidal mixing zone by nontidal residual currents. Estimates of embayment flushing based on tidal calculations alone therefore can significantly overestimate the flushing time that would be expected under typical environmental conditions. Particle-release simulations from point sources also demonstrate that while the tides efficiently exchange material in the vicinity of the inlets, the exact nature of dispersion from point sources is extremely sensitive to the timing and location of the release, and the distribution of particles is streaky and patchlike. This suggests that high-resolution modeling of dispersion from point sources in these regions must be performed explicitly and cannot be parameterized as a plume with Gaussian-spreading in a larger scale flow field.

  8. Enhanced tumorigenicity by mitochondrial DNA mild mutations.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Bermúdez, Alberto; Vallejo, Carmen G; Vicente-Blanco, Ramiro J; Gallardo, María Esther; Fernández-Moreno, Miguel Ángel; Quintanilla, Miguel; Garesse, Rafael

    2015-05-30

    To understand how mitochondria are involved in malignant transformation we have generated a collection of transmitochondrial cybrid cell lines on the same nuclear background (143B) but with mutant mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variants with different degrees of pathogenicity. These include the severe mutation in the tRNALys gene, m.8363G>A, and the three milder yet prevalent Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) mutations in the MT-ND1 (m.3460G>A), MT-ND4 (m.11778G>A) and MT-ND6 (m.14484T>C) mitochondrial genes. We found that 143B ρ0 cells devoid of mtDNA and cybrids harboring wild type mtDNA or that causing severe mitochondrial dysfunction do not produce tumors when injected in nude mice. By contrast cybrids containing mild mutant mtDNAs exhibit different tumorigenic capacities, depending on OXPHOS dysfunction.The differences in tumorigenicity correlate with an enhanced resistance to apoptosis and high levels of NOX expression. However, the final capacity of the different cybrid cell lines to generate tumors is most likely a consequence of a complex array of pro-oncogenic and anti-oncogenic factors associated with mitochondrial dysfunction.Our results demonstrate the essential role of mtDNA in tumorigenesis and explain the numerous and varied mtDNA mutations found in human tumors, most of which give rise to mild mitochondrial dysfunction.

  9. Beyond BRAF(V600): clinical mutation panel testing by next-generation sequencing in advanced melanoma.

    PubMed

    Siroy, Alan E; Boland, Genevieve M; Milton, Denái R; Roszik, Jason; Frankian, Silva; Malke, Jared; Haydu, Lauren; Prieto, Victor G; Tetzlaff, Michael; Ivan, Doina; Wang, Wei-Lien; Torres-Cabala, Carlos; Curry, Jonathan; Roy-Chowdhuri, Sinchita; Broaddus, Russell; Rashid, Asif; Stewart, John; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E; Amaria, Rodabe N; Patel, Sapna P; Papadopoulos, Nicholas E; Bedikian, Agop; Hwu, Wen-Jen; Hwu, Patrick; Diab, Adi; Woodman, Scott E; Aldape, Kenneth D; Luthra, Rajyalakshmi; Patel, Keyur P; Shaw, Kenna R; Mills, Gordon B; Mendelsohn, John; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Kim, Kevin B; Routbort, Mark J; Lazar, Alexander J; Davies, Michael A

    2015-02-01

    The management of melanoma has evolved owing to improved understanding of its molecular drivers. To augment the current understanding of the prevalence, patterns, and associations of mutations in this disease, the results of clinical testing of 699 advanced melanoma patients using a pan-cancer next-generation sequencing (NGS) panel of hotspot regions in 46 genes were reviewed. Mutations were identified in 43 of the 46 genes on the panel. The most common mutations were BRAFV600 (36%), NRAS (21%), TP53 (16%), BRAFNon-V600 (6%), and KIT (4%). Approximately one-third of melanomas had >1 mutation detected, and the number of mutations per tumor was associated with melanoma subtype. Concurrent TP53 mutations were the most frequent events in tumors with BRAFV600 and NRAS mutations. Melanomas with BRAFNon-V600mutations frequently harbored concurrent NRAS mutations (18%), which were rare in tumors with BRAFV600 mutations (1.6%). The prevalence of BRAFV600 and KIT mutations were significantly associated with melanoma subtypes, and BRAFV600 and TP53 mutations were significantly associated with cutaneous primary tumor location. Multiple potential therapeutic targets were identified in metastatic unknown primary and cutaneous melanomas that lacked BRAFV600 and NRAS mutations. These results enrich our understanding of the patterns and clinical associations of oncogenic mutations in melanoma.

  10. Underwater noise from three types of offshore wind turbines: estimation of impact zones for harbor porpoises and harbor seals.

    PubMed

    Tougaard, Jakob; Henriksen, Oluf Damsgaard; Miller, Lee A

    2009-06-01

    Underwater noise was recorded from three different types of wind turbines in Denmark and Sweden (Middelgrunden, Vindeby, and Bockstigen-Valar) during normal operation. Wind turbine noise was only measurable above ambient noise at frequencies below 500 Hz. Total sound pressure level was in the range 109-127 dB re 1 microPa rms, measured at distances between 14 and 20 m from the foundations. The 1/3-octave noise levels were compared with audiograms of harbor seals and harbor porpoises. Maximum 1/3-octave levels were in the range 106-126 dB re 1 microPa rms. Maximum range of audibility was estimated under two extreme assumptions on transmission loss (3 and 9 dB per doubling of distance, respectively). Audibility was low for harbor porpoises extending 20-70 m from the foundation, whereas audibility for harbor seals ranged from less than 100 m to several kilometers. Behavioral reactions of porpoises to the noise appear unlikely except if they are very close to the foundations. However, behavioral reactions from seals cannot be excluded up to distances of a few hundred meters. It is unlikely that the noise reaches dangerous levels at any distance from the turbines and the noise is considered incapable of masking acoustic communication by seals and porpoises.

  11. A Pathway-Centric Survey of Somatic Mutations in Chinese Patients with Colorectal Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Chao; Wang, Lin; Wang, Zheng; Xu, Luming; Sun, Lifang; Yang, Hui; Li, Wei-Dong; Wang, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Previous genetic studies on colorectal carcinomas (CRC) have identified multiple somatic mutations in four candidate pathways (TGF-β, Wnt, P53 and RTK-RAS pathways) on populations of European ancestry. However, it is under-studied whether other populations harbor different sets of hot-spot somatic mutations in these pathways and other oncogenes. In this study, to evaluate the mutational spectrum of novel somatic mutations, we assessed 41 pairs of tumor-stroma tissues from Chinese patients with CRC, including 29 colon carcinomas and 12 rectal carcinomas. We designed Illumina Custom Amplicon panel to target 43 genes, including genes in the four candidate pathways, as well as several known oncogenes for other cancers. Candidate mutations were validated by Sanger sequencing, and we further used SIFT and PolyPhen-2 to assess potentially functional mutations. We discovered 3 new somatic mutations in gene APC, TCF7L2, and PIK3CA that had never been reported in the COSMIC or NCI-60 databases. Additionally, we confirmed 6 known somatic mutations in gene SMAD4, APC, FBXW7, BRAF and PTEN in Chinese CRC patients. While most were previously reported in CRC, one mutation in PTEN was reported only in malignant endometrium cancer. Our study confirmed the existence of known somatic mutations in the four candidate pathways for CRC in Chinese patients. We also discovered a number of novel somatic mutations in these pathways, which may have implications for the pathogenesis of CRC. PMID:25617745

  12. Molecular Diagnosis of Hereditary Fructose Intolerance: Founder Mutation in a Community from India.

    PubMed

    Bijarnia-Mahay, Sunita; Movva, Sireesha; Gupta, Neerja; Sharma, Deepak; Puri, Ratna D; Kotecha, Udhaya; Saxena, Renu; Kabra, Madhulika; Mohan, Neelam; Verma, Ishwar C

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) is a difficult-to-confirm diagnosis, requiring either invasive liver biopsy-enzyme assay or potentially hazardous fructose challenge test or expensive molecular genetic analysis. Therefore, worldwide there has been a trend towards finding "common mutations" in distinct ethnic groups to simplify the process of diagnosis. The nonspecific presentation of the disease often leads to diagnostic confusion with other metabolic liver disorders such as glycogenoses, galactosemia, and tyrosinemia. This leads to much delay in diagnosis with consequent harm to the patient.We report mutations in the ALDOB gene, from eleven Indian patients, seven of whom belong to the Agarwal community. Six patients from the Agarwal community and two non-Agarwal patients harbored one novel mutation, c.324+1G>A (five homozygous and one heterozygous), in the ALDOB gene. Haplotyping performed in families confirmed a founder effect. The community has been known to harbor founder mutations in other genes such as the MLC1, PANK2, and CAPN3 genes, thus providing another evidence for a founder effect in the community in case of HFI. This may pave the path for a simpler and quicker test at least for this community in India. In addition to the founder mutation, we report four other novel mutations, c.112+1delG, c.380-1G>A, c.677G>A, and c.689delA, and a previously reported mutation, c.1013C>T, in the cohort from India.

  13. Mutational and Functional Analysis of the Tumor-Suppressor PTPRD in Human Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Walia, Vijay; Prickett, Todd D.; Kim, Jung-Sik; Gartner, Jared J.; Lin, Jimmy C.; Zhou, Ming; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Elble, Randolph C.; Solomon, David A.; Waldman, Todd; Samuels, Yardena

    2015-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) tightly regulate tyrosine phosphorylation essential for cell growth, adhesion, migration, and survival. We performed a mutational analysis of the PTP gene family in cutaneous metastatic melanoma and identified 23 phosphatase genes harboring somatic mutations. Among these, receptor-type tyrosine–protein phosphatase delta (PTPRD) was one of the most highly mutated genes, harboring 17 somatic mutations in 79 samples, a prevalence of 21.5%. Functional evaluation of six PTPRD mutations revealed enhanced anchorage-dependent and anchorage-independent growth. Interestingly, melanoma cells expressing mutant PTPRD were significantly more migratory than cells expressing wild-type PTPRD or vector alone, indicating a novel gain-of-function associated with mutant PTPRD. To understand the molecular mechanisms of PTPRD mutations, we searched for its binding partners by converting the active PTPRD enzyme into a “substrate trap” form. Using mass spectrometry and coimmunoprecipitation, we report desmoplakin, a desmosomal protein that is implicated in cell–cell adhesion, as a novel PTPRD substrate. Further analysis showed reduced phosphatase activity of mutant PTPRD against desmoplakin. Our findings identify an essential signaling cascade that is disrupted in melanoma. Moreover, because PTPRD is also mutated in glioblastomas and adenocarcinoma of the colon and lung, our data might be applicable to a large number of human cancers. PMID:25113440

  14. Aldosterone-stimulating somatic gene mutations are common in normal adrenal glands.

    PubMed

    Nishimoto, Koshiro; Tomlins, Scott A; Kuick, Rork; Cani, Andi K; Giordano, Thomas J; Hovelson, Daniel H; Liu, Chia-Jen; Sanjanwala, Aalok R; Edwards, Michael A; Gomez-Sanchez, Celso E; Nanba, Kazutaka; Rainey, William E

    2015-08-18

    Primary aldosteronism (PA) represents the most common cause of secondary hypertension, but little is known regarding its adrenal cellular origins. Recently, aldosterone-producing cell clusters (APCCs) with high expression of aldosterone synthase (CYP11B2) were found in both normal and PA adrenal tissue. PA-causing aldosterone-producing adenomas (APAs) harbor mutations in genes encoding ion channels/pumps that alter intracellular calcium homeostasis and cause renin-independent aldosterone production through increased CYP11B2 expression. Herein, we hypothesized that APCCs have APA-related aldosterone-stimulating somatic gene mutations. APCCs were studied in 42 normal adrenals from kidney donors. To clarify APCC molecular characteristics, we used microarrays to compare the APCC transcriptome with conventional adrenocortical zones [zona glomerulosa (ZG), zona fasciculata, and zona reticularis]. The APCC transcriptome was most similar to ZG but with an enhanced capacity to produce aldosterone. To determine if APCCs harbored APA-related mutations, we performed targeted next generation sequencing of DNA from 23 APCCs and adjacent normal adrenal tissue isolated from both formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded, and frozen tissues. Known aldosterone driver mutations were identified in 8 of 23 (35%) APCCs, including mutations in calcium channel, voltage-dependent, L-type, α1D-subunit (CACNA1D; 6 of 23 APCCs) and ATPase, Na(+)/(K+) transporting, α1-polypeptide (ATP1A1; 2 of 23 APCCs), which were not observed in the adjacent normal adrenal tissue. Overall, we show three major findings: (i) APCCs are common in normal adrenals, (ii) APCCs harbor somatic mutations known to cause excess aldosterone production, and (iii) the mutation spectrum of aldosterone-driving mutations is different in APCCs from that seen in APA. These results provide molecular support for APCC as a precursor of PA.

  15. NF1 germline mutation differentially dictates optic glioma formation and growth in neurofibromatosis-1.

    PubMed

    Toonen, Joseph A; Anastasaki, Corina; Smithson, Laura J; Gianino, Scott M; Li, Kairong; Kesterson, Robert A; Gutmann, David H

    2016-05-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a common neurogenetic condition characterized by significant clinical heterogeneity. A major barrier to developing precision medicine approaches for NF1 is an incomplete understanding of the factors that underlie its inherent variability. To determine the impact of the germline NF1 gene mutation on the optic gliomas frequently encountered in children with NF1, we developed genetically engineered mice harboring two representative NF1-patient-derived Nf1 gene mutations (c.2542G>C;p.G848R and c.2041C>T;p.R681X). We found that each germline Nf1 gene mutation resulted in different levels of neurofibromin expression. Importantly, only R681X(CKO) but not G848R(CKO), mice develop optic gliomas with increased optic nerve volumes, glial fibrillary acid protein immunoreactivity, proliferation and retinal ganglion cell death, similar to Nf1 conditional knockout mice harboring a neomycin insertion (neo) as the germline Nf1 gene mutation. These differences in optic glioma phenotypes reflect both cell-autonomous and stromal effects of the germline Nf1 gene mutation. In this regard, primary astrocytes harboring the R681X germline Nf1 gene mutation exhibit increased basal astrocyte proliferation (BrdU incorporation) indistinguishable from neo(CKO) astrocytes, whereas astrocytes with the G848R mutation have lower levels of proliferation. Evidence for paracrine effects from the tumor microenvironment were revealed when R681X(CKO) mice were compared with conventional neo(CKO) mice. Relative to neo(CKO) mice, the optic gliomas from R681X(CKO) mice had more microglia infiltration and JNK(Thr183/Tyr185) activation, microglia-produced Ccl5, and glial AKT(Thr308) activation. Collectively, these studies establish that the germline Nf1 gene mutation is a major determinant of optic glioma development and growth through by both tumor cell-intrinsic and stromal effects.

  16. Blocking downstream signaling pathways in the context of HDAC inhibition promotes apoptosis preferentially in cells harboring mutant Ras

    PubMed Central

    Luchenko, Victoria; Basseville, Agnes; Chakraborty, Arup R.; Kozlowski, Hanna; Pauly, Gary T.; Patel, Paresma; Schneider, Joel P.; Gottesman, Michael M.; Bates, Susan E.

    2016-01-01

    We previously demonstrated activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway in a series of romidepsin-selected T-cell lymphoma cell lines as a mechanism of resistance to the histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDI), romidepsin. As Ras mutation leads to activation of both the MAPK and the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway, we examined whether combining romidepsin with small molecule pathway inhibitors would lead to increased apoptosis in cancers harboring Ras mutations. We treated 18 Ras mutant or wild-type cell lines with romidepsin in the presence of a MEK inhibitor (PD-0325901) and/or an AKT inhibitor (MK-2206) and examined apoptosis by flow cytometry. A short-term treatment schedule of romidepsin (25 ng/ml for 6 h) was used to more closely model clinical administration. Romidepsin in combination with a MEK and an AKT inhibitor induced apoptosis preferentially in cells harboring mutant versus wild-type Ras (69.1% vs. 21.1%, p < 0.0001). Similar results were found in a subset of cell lines when belinostat was combined with the MEK and AKT inhibitors and when romidepsin was combined with the dual extracellular signaling-related kinase (ERK)/PI3K inhibitor, D-87503, which inhibited both the MAPK and PI3K pathways at 5–10 μM. The observed apoptosis was caspase-dependent and required Bak and Bax expression. Cells with wild-type or mutant Ras treated with romidepsin alone or in combination with the MEK inhibitor displayed increased expression of proapoptotic Bim. We thus conclude that cancers bearing Ras mutations, such as pancreatic cancer, can be targeted by the combination of an HDI and a dual inhibitor of the MAPK and PI3K pathways. PMID:27634878

  17. 75 FR 71456 - Division of Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation Proposed Extension of Existing Collection...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-23

    ... of Workers' Compensation Programs Division of Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation Proposed... Office of Workers' Compensation (OWCP) is soliciting comments concerning the proposed collection: Pre... Workers' Compensation Programs, (OWCP) administers the Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation Act....

  18. 77 FR 16266 - Division of Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation; Proposed Extension of Existing Collection...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-20

    ... of Workers' Compensation Programs Division of Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation; Proposed... Office of Workers' Compensation Programs (OWCP) is soliciting comments concerning the proposed collection.... Background The Office of Workers' Compensation Programs (OWCP) administers the ] Longshore and Harbor...

  19. 75 FR 63862 - Division of Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation; Proposed Extension of Existing Collection...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-18

    ... of Workers' Compensation Programs Division of Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation; Proposed... Office of Workers' Compensation (OWCP) is soliciting comments concerning the proposed collection.... Background: The Office of Workers' Compensation Programs (OWCP), administers the Longshore and Harbor...

  20. 78 FR 57416 - Division of Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation Proposed Revision of Existing Collection...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-18

    ... of Workers' Compensation Programs Division of Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation Proposed... Office of Workers' Compensation Programs (OWCP) is soliciting comments concerning the proposed collection: Regulations Governing the Administration of the Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation Act (LS-200,...

  1. 75 FR 78270 - Division of Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation; Proposed Extension of Existing Collection...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-15

    ... of Workers' Compensation Programs Division of Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation; Proposed... Office of Workers' Compensation (OWCP) is soliciting comments concerning the proposed collection: Request.... Background The Office of Workers' Compensation Programs (OWCP) administers the Longshore and Harbor...

  2. 78 FR 35326 - Division of Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation; Proposed Extension of Existing Collection...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-12

    ... of Workers' Compensation Programs Division of Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation; Proposed... Office of Workers' Compensation (OWCP) is soliciting comments concerning the proposed collection: Securing Financial Obligations under the Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation Act and its...

  3. 33 CFR 165.1401 - Apra Harbor, Guam-safety zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Harbor encompassed within an arc of 725 yards radius centered at the center of Wharf H. (Located at 13°27... Safety Zone B—The waters of Apra Outer Harbor encompassed within an arc of 680 yards radius centered...

  4. U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Red Hill Underground Fuel Storage ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Red Hill Underground Fuel Storage System, Linear underground system extending from North Road to Icarus Way, Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Honolulu, Honolulu County, HI

  5. UV Signature Mutations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Sequencing complete tumor genomes and exomes has sparked the cancer field's interest in mutation signatures for identifying the tumor's carcinogen. This review and meta-analysis discusses signatures and their proper use. We first distinguish between a mutagen's canonical mutations – deviations from a random distribution of base changes to create a pattern typical of that mutagen – and the subset of signature mutations, which are unique to that mutagen and permit inference backward from mutations to mutagen. To verify UV signature mutations, we assembled literature datasets on cells exposed to UVC, UVB, UVA, or solar simulator light (SSL) and tested canonical UV mutation features as criteria for clustering datasets. A confirmed UV signature was: ≥60% of mutations are C→T at a dipyrimidine site, with ≥5% CC→TT. Other canonical features such as a bias for mutations on the non-transcribed strand or at the 3' pyrimidine had limited application. The most robust classifier combined these features with criteria for the rarity of non-UV canonical mutations. In addition, several signatures proposed for specific UV wavelengths were limited to specific genes or species; non-signature mutations induced by UV may cause melanoma BRAF mutations; and the mutagen for sunlight-related skin neoplasms may vary between continents. PMID:25354245

  6. Lake Superior Harbors of Refuge at Lutsen and Beaver Bay Cook and Lake Counties Minnesota.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-12-01

    craft avoid these large commercial harbors whenever possible because of the roughness of the large, exposed outer harbors, the poten- tial dangers ...constitute a health hazard, but that evidence is inadequate to show an immediate danger to public health exists. The circuit court, therefore, found that...emergency. Small craft avoid the commercial harbor whenever possible because of the roughness of the large, exposed outer harbor, the potential dangers

  7. A novel insertion mutation in Streptomyces coelicolor ribosomal S12 protein results in paromomycin resistance and antibiotic overproduction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guojun; Inaoka, Takashi; Okamoto, Susumu; Ochi, Kozo

    2009-03-01

    We identified a novel paromomycin resistance-associated mutation in rpsL, caused by the insertion of a glycine residue at position 92, in Streptomyces coelicolor ribosomal protein S12. This insertion mutation (GI92) resulted in a 20-fold increase in the paromomycin resistance level. In combination with another S12 mutation, K88E, the GI92 mutation markedly enhanced the production of the blue-colored polyketide antibiotic actinorhodin and the red-colored antibiotic undecylprodigiosin. The gene replacement experiments demonstrated that the K88E-GI92 double mutation in the rpsL gene was responsible for the marked enhancement of antibiotic production observed. Ribosomes with the K88E-GI92 double mutation were characterized by error restrictiveness (i.e., hyperaccuracy). Using a cell-free translation system, we found that mutant ribosomes harboring the K88E-GI92 double mutation but not ribosomes harboring the GI92 mutation alone displayed sixfold greater translation activity relative to that of the wild-type ribosomes at late growth phase. This resulted in the overproduction of actinorhodin, caused by the transcriptional activation of the pathway-specific regulatory gene actII-orf4, possibly due to the increased translation of transcripts encoding activators of actII-orf4. The mutant with the K88E-GI92 double mutation accumulated a high level of ribosome recycling factor at late stationary phase, underlying the high level of protein synthesis activity observed.

  8. Exome sequencing identifies recurrent somatic RAC1 mutations in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Krauthammer, Michael; Kong, Yong; Ha, Byung Hak; Evans, Perry; Bacchiocchi, Antonella; McCusker, James P; Cheng, Elaine; Davis, Matthew J; Goh, Gerald; Choi, Murim; Ariyan, Stephan; Narayan, Deepak; Dutton-Regester, Ken; Capatana, Ana; Holman, Edna C; Bosenberg, Marcus; Sznol, Mario; Kluger, Harriet M; Brash, Douglas E; Stern, David F; Materin, Miguel A; Lo, Roger S; Mane, Shrikant; Ma, Shuangge; Kidd, Kenneth K; Hayward, Nicholas K; Lifton, Richard P; Schlessinger, Joseph; Boggon, Titus J; Halaban, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    We characterized the mutational landscape of melanoma, the form of skin cancer with the highest mortality rate, by sequencing the exomes of 147 melanomas. Sun-exposed melanomas had markedly more ultraviolet (UV)-like C>T somatic mutations compared to sun-shielded acral, mucosal and uveal melanomas. Among the newly identified cancer genes was PPP6C, encoding a serine/threonine phosphatase, which harbored mutations that clustered in the active site in 12% of sun-exposed melanomas, exclusively in tumors with mutations in BRAF or NRAS. Notably, we identified a recurrent UV-signature, an activating mutation in RAC1 in 9.2% of sun-exposed melanomas. This activating mutation, the third most frequent in our cohort of sun-exposed melanoma after those of BRAF and NRAS, changes Pro29 to serine (RAC1P29S) in the highly conserved switch I domain. Crystal structures, and biochemical and functional studies of RAC1P29S showed that the alteration releases the conformational restraint conferred by the conserved proline, causes an increased binding of the protein to downstream effectors, and promotes melanocyte proliferation and migration. These findings raise the possibility that pharmacological inhibition of downstream effectors of RAC1 signaling could be of therapeutic benefit. PMID:22842228

  9. HPGD mutations cause cranioosteoarthropathy but not autosomal dominant digital clubbing.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Wenke; Beninde, Julia; Hoffmann, Katrin; Lindner, Tom H; Bassir, Christian; Aksu, Fuat; Hübner, Christoph; Verbeek, Nienke E; Mundlos, Stefan; Horn, Denise

    2009-12-01

    Cranio-osteoarthropathy, clinically classified as a variant of primary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy, is a very rare autosomal-recessive condition characterized by delayed closure of the cranial sutures and fontanels, digital clubbing, arthropathy, and periostosis. Recently, mutations in the gene HPGD, which encodes the NAD(+)-dependent 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase, were reported in four families affected with primary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy and one family with autosomal-recessive isolated nail clubbing. We report the clinical and molecular findings in four patients from two families affected with cranio-osteoarthropathy and one family with isolated, autosomal dominant digital clubbing. Genome-wide homozygosity mapping identified a locus for cranio-osteoarthropathy harboring the HPGD gene in one affected family. We detected two novel homozygous mutations in HPGD in these families: a missense mutation affecting the NAD(+) binding motif and a frameshift mutation. The clinical presentation in our patients was variable. Digital clubbing and hyperhidrosis were present in all cases. Delayed closure of the cranial sutures and fontanels, periostosis, and arthropathy were not consistent clinical features. No HPGD mutation was detected in a familial case of autosomal dominant isolated digital clubbing. The failure to identify any mutation in a family with an autosomal dominant type of isolated digital clubbing suggests that HPGD is not the major gene for this condition.

  10. Exome sequencing identifies recurrent somatic RAC1 mutations in melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Krauthammer, Michael; Kong, Yong; Ha, Byung Hak; Evans, Perry; Bacchiocchi, Antonella; McCusker, James P.; Cheng, Elaine; Davis, Matthew J.; Goh, Gerald; Choi, Murim; Ariyan, Stephan; Narayan, Deepak; Dutton-Regester, Ken; Capatana, Ana; Holman, Edna C.; Bosenberg, Marcus; Sznol, Mario; Kluger, Harriet M.; Brash, Douglas E.; Stern, David F.; Materin, Miguel A.; Lo, Roger S.; Mane, Shrikant; Ma, Shuangge; Kidd, Kenneth K.; Hayward, Nicholas K.; Lifton, Richard P.; Schlessinger, Joseph; Boggon, Titus J.; Halaban, Ruth

    2012-10-11

    We characterized the mutational landscape of melanoma, the form of skin cancer with the highest mortality rate, by sequencing the exomes of 147 melanomas. Sun-exposed melanomas had markedly more ultraviolet (UV)-like C>T somatic mutations compared to sun-shielded acral, mucosal and uveal melanomas. Among the newly identified cancer genes was PPP6C, encoding a serine/threonine phosphatase, which harbored mutations that clustered in the active site in 12% of sun-exposed melanomas, exclusively in tumors with mutations in BRAF or NRAS. Notably, we identified a recurrent UV-signature, an activating mutation in RAC1 in 9.2% of sun-exposed melanomas. This activating mutation, the third most frequent in our cohort of sun-exposed melanoma after those of BRAF and NRAS, changes Pro29 to serine (RAC1{sup P29S}) in the highly conserved switch I domain. Crystal structures, and biochemical and functional studies of RAC1{sup P29S} showed that the alteration releases the conformational restraint conferred by the conserved proline, causes an increased binding of the protein to downstream effectors, and promotes melanocyte proliferation and migration. These findings raise the possibility that pharmacological inhibition of downstream effectors of RAC1 signaling could be of therapeutic benefit.

  11. A smart ROV solution for ship hull and harbor inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Scott; Wood, Jon; Vazquez, Jose; Mignotte, Pierre-Yves; Privat, Benjamin

    2010-04-01

    Hull and harbor infrastructure inspections are frequently performed manually and involve quite a bit of risk and human and monetary resources. In any kind of threat and resource constrained environment, this involves unacceptable levels of risk and cost. Modern Remotely Operated Vehicles are highly refined machines that provide features and capabilities previously unavailable. Operations once carried out by divers can now be carried out more quickly, efficiently and safely by smart enabled ROVs. ROVs are rapidly deployable and capable of continuous, reliable operations in adverse conditions. They also provide a stable platform on which multiple sensors may be mounted and utilized to meet the harbor inspection problem. Automated Control software provides ROV's and their pilots with the capability to inspect complex, constrained environments such as those found in a harbor region. This application and the user interface allow the ROV to automatically conduct complex maneuvers relative to the area being inspected and relieves the training requirements and work load for the pilot, allowing he or she to focus on the primary task of survey, inspection and looking for possible threats (such as IEDs, Limpet Mines, signs of sabotage, etc). Real-time sensor processing tools can be integrated into the smart ROV solution to assist the operator. Automatic Target Recognition (ATR) algorithms are used to search through the sensor data collected by the ROV in real time. These algorithms provide immediate feedback on possible threats and notify the operator of regions that may require manual verification. Sensor data (sonar or video) is also mosaiced, providing the operator with real-time situational awareness and a coverage map of the hull or seafloor. Detected objects may also be placed in the context of the large scale characteristics of the hull (or bottom or pilings) and localized. Within the complex areas such as the harbor pier pilings and the running gear of the ship, real

  12. 75 FR 34365 - Safety Zone, Chicago Harbor, Navy Pier Southeast, Chicago, IL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-17

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 Safety Zone, Chicago Harbor, Navy Pier Southeast, Chicago, IL AGENCY... Navy Pier Southeast Safety Zone in Chicago Harbor for annual fireworks events during nine separate... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Coast Guard will enforce Safety Zone, Chicago Harbor, Navy Pier...

  13. 78 FR 42692 - Safety Zone; Chicago Harbor, Navy Pier Southeast, Chicago, IL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-17

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 Safety Zone; Chicago Harbor, Navy Pier Southeast, Chicago, IL AGENCY... Navy Pier Southeast Safety Zone in Chicago Harbor during specified periods from July 3, 2013, through...: The Coast Guard will enforce the Safety Zone; Chicago Harbor, Navy Pier Southeast, Chicago, IL...

  14. 78 FR 27035 - Safety Zone; Chicago Harbor, Navy Pier Southeast, Chicago, IL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-09

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 Safety Zone; Chicago Harbor, Navy Pier Southeast, Chicago, IL AGENCY... Navy Pier Southeast Safety Zone in Chicago Harbor during specified periods ] from May 25, 2013, through... Coast Guard will enforce the Safety Zone; Chicago Harbor, Navy Pier Southeast, Chicago, IL listed in...

  15. 78 FR 27304 - Safety Zone; Melrose Pyrotechnics Fireworks Display; Chicago Harbor, Chicago, IL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-10

    ...; Chicago Harbor, Chicago, IL AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is establishing a temporary safety zone on Lake Michigan in Chicago Harbor, Chicago Illinois. This safety zone is intended to restrict vessels from a portion of Chicago Harbor due to a Fireworks...

  16. 76 FR 52268 - Safety Zone; Chicago Harbor, Navy Pier East, Chicago, IL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-22

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Chicago Harbor, Navy Pier East, Chicago, IL... enforce the Navy Pier East Safety Zone in Chicago Harbor from August 12, 2011 through August 14, 2011 and... zone; 33 CFR 165.933-Chicago Harbor, Navy Pier East, Chicago, IL for the following events: (1)...

  17. 75 FR 18887 - Division of Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation; Proposed Collection; Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-13

    ... of Workers' Compensation Programs Division of Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation; Proposed... under the Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation Act and its Extension (LS-276, LS-275-IC and LS-275... Harbor Workers' Compensation Act (LHWCA) requires covered employers to secure the payment of...

  18. 78 FR 42016 - Safety Zone; Discovery World Fireworks, Milwaukee Harbor, Milwaukee, WI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-15

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Discovery World Fireworks, Milwaukee Harbor... restrict vessels from a portion of Milwaukee Harbor due to 4 fireworks displays at Discovery World Pier... proposed rulemaking entitled, ``Safety Zone; Discovery World Fireworks, Milwaukee Harbor,...

  19. 33 CFR 165.116 - Safety and Security Zones; Salem and Boston Harbors, Massachusetts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Safety and Security Zones; Salem... § 165.116 Safety and Security Zones; Salem and Boston Harbors, Massachusetts. (a) Location. The... Command (ISC) Boston piers and; (3) Salem Harbor. All waters of Salem Harbor within a two-hundred...

  20. 33 CFR 165.116 - Safety and Security Zones; Salem and Boston Harbors, Massachusetts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safety and Security Zones; Salem... § 165.116 Safety and Security Zones; Salem and Boston Harbors, Massachusetts. (a) Location. The... Command (ISC) Boston piers and; (3) Salem Harbor. All waters of Salem Harbor within a two-hundred...

  1. 33 CFR 165.116 - Safety and Security Zones; Salem and Boston Harbors, Massachusetts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Safety and Security Zones; Salem... § 165.116 Safety and Security Zones; Salem and Boston Harbors, Massachusetts. (a) Location. The... Command (ISC) Boston piers and; (3) Salem Harbor. All waters of Salem Harbor within a two-hundred...

  2. 33 CFR 165.116 - Safety and Security Zones; Salem and Boston Harbors, Massachusetts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Safety and Security Zones; Salem... § 165.116 Safety and Security Zones; Salem and Boston Harbors, Massachusetts. (a) Location. The... Command (ISC) Boston piers and; (3) Salem Harbor. All waters of Salem Harbor within a two-hundred...

  3. 33 CFR 165.116 - Safety and Security Zones; Salem and Boston Harbors, Massachusetts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Safety and Security Zones; Salem... § 165.116 Safety and Security Zones; Salem and Boston Harbors, Massachusetts. (a) Location. The... Command (ISC) Boston piers and; (3) Salem Harbor. All waters of Salem Harbor within a two-hundred...

  4. 46 CFR 45.181 - Load line exemption requirements for the Burns Harbor and Milwaukee routes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Load line exemption requirements for the Burns Harbor... line exemption requirements for the Burns Harbor and Milwaukee routes. Barges operating on the Burns... addresses and telephone numbers); (3) Service route (Milwaukee and/or Burns Harbor); (4) Design...

  5. 46 CFR 45.181 - Load line exemption requirements for the Burns Harbor and Milwaukee routes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Load line exemption requirements for the Burns Harbor... line exemption requirements for the Burns Harbor and Milwaukee routes. Barges operating on the Burns... addresses and telephone numbers); (3) Service route (Milwaukee and/or Burns Harbor); (4) Design...

  6. 46 CFR 45.181 - Load line exemption requirements for the Burns Harbor and Milwaukee routes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Load line exemption requirements for the Burns Harbor... line exemption requirements for the Burns Harbor and Milwaukee routes. Barges operating on the Burns... addresses and telephone numbers); (3) Service route (Milwaukee and/or Burns Harbor); (4) Design...

  7. 46 CFR 45.181 - Load line exemption requirements for the Burns Harbor and Milwaukee routes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Load line exemption requirements for the Burns Harbor... line exemption requirements for the Burns Harbor and Milwaukee routes. Barges operating on the Burns... (Milwaukee and/or Burns Harbor); (4) Design type (covered/uncovered hopper, deck, etc.); (5)...

  8. 46 CFR 45.181 - Load line exemption requirements for the Burns Harbor and Milwaukee routes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Load line exemption requirements for the Burns Harbor... line exemption requirements for the Burns Harbor and Milwaukee routes. Barges operating on the Burns... addresses and telephone numbers); (3) Service route (Milwaukee and/or Burns Harbor); (4) Design...

  9. 33 CFR 110.250 - St. Thomas Harbor, Charlotte Amalie, V.I.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false St. Thomas Harbor, Charlotte... SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.250 St. Thomas Harbor, Charlotte Amalie... the harbor of Charlotte Amalie. (6) Floats for marking anchors in place will be allowed in the...

  10. 33 CFR 110.250 - St. Thomas Harbor, Charlotte Amalie, V.I.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false St. Thomas Harbor, Charlotte... SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.250 St. Thomas Harbor, Charlotte Amalie... the harbor of Charlotte Amalie. (6) Floats for marking anchors in place will be allowed in the...

  11. 76 FR 4574 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Oakland Inner Harbor Tidal Canal, Oakland/Alameda, CA, Schedule...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-26

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Oakland Inner Harbor Tidal Canal... Harbor Tidal Canal, between Oakland and Alameda, California. The proposed change would have allowed the... Operation Regulation; Oakland Inner Harbor Tidal Canal, Oakland/Alameda, CA, Schedule Change'' in...

  12. 77 FR 75917 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; New Haven Harbor, Quinnipiac and Mill Rivers, CT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-26

    ... the final rule was delayed due to the construction of the I-95 Pearl Harbor Memorial Bridge across the... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 RIN 1625-AA09 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; New Haven Harbor... Operation Regulation; New Haven Harbor, Quinnipiac and Mill Rivers, CT,'' in the Federal Register (75...

  13. 33 CFR 110.100 - Los Angeles and Long Beach Harbors, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... east and west sides of Fish Harbor Entrance Channel described as follows: (1) Part 1. Beginning at a point at the intersection of westerly side of Fish Harbor Entrance Channel and the outer jetty; thence... side of Fish Harbor Entrance Channel to the point of beginning. (2) Part 2. Beginning at a point at...

  14. 33 CFR 110.100 - Los Angeles and Long Beach Harbors, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... east and west sides of Fish Harbor Entrance Channel described as follows: (1) Part 1. Beginning at a point at the intersection of westerly side of Fish Harbor Entrance Channel and the outer jetty; thence... side of Fish Harbor Entrance Channel to the point of beginning. (2) Part 2. Beginning at a point at...

  15. 77 FR 70183 - Notice of Meeting for Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-23

    ... National Park Service Notice of Meeting for Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area Advisory Council... notice that the Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area Advisory Council will hold a meeting. This..., Superintendent, Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area, at (617) 223-8669 or...

  16. 77 FR 43513 - Olympia Harbor Days Tug Boat Races, Budd Inlet, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-25

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 Olympia Harbor Days Tug Boat Races, Budd Inlet, WA AGENCY: Coast Guard... Local Regulation, Olympia Harbor Days Tug Boat Races, Budd Inlet, WA from 12 p.m. through 8 p.m. on... notice of enforcement of the Special Local Regulation for Olympia Harbor Days Tug Boat Races, Budd...

  17. 78 FR 32355 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Bass Harbor, ME

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-30

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Establishment of Class E Airspace; Bass Harbor, ME AGENCY... Airspace at Bass Harbor, ME, to accommodate a new Area Navigation (RNAV) Global Positioning System (GPS) special Standard Instrument Approach Procedure (SIAP) serving Bass Harbor Heliport. This action...

  18. 75 FR 59078 - Safety Zone; Ledge Removal Project, Bass Harbor, ME

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-27

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Ledge Removal Project, Bass Harbor, ME... temporary safety zone around a ledge removal project in Bass Harbor, Maine. The United States Army Corps of... and around Bass Harbor both to increase mooring capacity for fishing trawlers and recreational...

  19. 78 FR 18931 - Proposed Establishment of Class E Airspace; Bass Harbor, ME

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-28

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Proposed Establishment of Class E Airspace; Bass Harbor, ME...: This action proposes to establish Class E Airspace at Bass Harbor, ME, to accommodate a new Area...) serving Bass Harbor Heliport. This action would enhance the safety and airspace management of...

  20. 76 FR 20530 - Safety Zone; Boom Days, Buffalo Outer Harbor, Buffalo, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-13

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Boom Days, Buffalo Outer Harbor, Buffalo... temporary safety zone in the Buffalo Outer Harbor, Buffalo, NY for the Boom Days Fireworks. This zone is intended to restrict vessels from Doug's Dive, the NFTA small boat harbor and a portion of the...

  1. 78 FR 57319 - Children's Online Privacy Protection Rule Safe Harbor Proposed Self-Regulatory Guidelines...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-18

    ... Harbor Proposed Self-Regulatory Guidelines; kidSAFE Seal Program Application for Safe Harbor AGENCY... the kidSAFE Seal Program (``kidSAFE''), owned and operated by Samet Privacy, LLC, under the safe... section below. Write ``kidSAFE Application for Safe Harbor, Project No. P-135418'' on your comment,...

  2. 33 CFR 162.165 - Buffalo and Rochester Harbors, New York.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Buffalo and Rochester Harbors... SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND WATERWAYS NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.165 Buffalo and Rochester Harbors, New York. In Buffalo and Rochester Harbors, no vessel may exceed 6 miles...

  3. 33 CFR 162.165 - Buffalo and Rochester Harbors, New York.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Buffalo and Rochester Harbors... SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND WATERWAYS NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.165 Buffalo and Rochester Harbors, New York. In Buffalo and Rochester Harbors, no vessel may exceed 6 miles...

  4. 33 CFR 162.165 - Buffalo and Rochester Harbors, New York.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Buffalo and Rochester Harbors... SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND WATERWAYS NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.165 Buffalo and Rochester Harbors, New York. In Buffalo and Rochester Harbors, no vessel may exceed 6 miles...

  5. Hydrocarbon pollutants shape bacterial community assembly of harbor sediments.

    PubMed

    Barbato, Marta; Mapelli, Francesca; Magagnini, Mirko; Chouaia, Bessem; Armeni, Monica; Marasco, Ramona; Crotti, Elena; Daffonchio, Daniele; Borin, Sara

    2016-03-15

    Petroleum pollution results in co-contamination by different classes of molecules, entailing the occurrence of marine sediments difficult to remediate, as in the case of the Ancona harbor (Mediterranean Sea, Italy). Autochthonous bioaugmentation (ABA), by exploiting the indigenous microbes of the environment to be treated, could represent a successful bioremediation strategy. In this perspective we aimed to i) identify the main drivers of the bacterial communities' richness in the sediments, ii) establish enrichment cultures with different hydrocarbon pollutants evaluating their effects on the bacterial communities' composition, and iii) obtain a collection of hydrocarbon degrading bacteria potentially exploitable in ABA. The correlation between the selection of different specialized bacterial populations and the type of pollutants was demonstrated by culture-independent analyses, and by establishing a collection of bacteria with different hydrocarbon degradation traits. Our observations indicate that pollution dictates the diversity of sediment bacterial communities and shapes the ABA potential in harbor sediments.

  6. Historical bathymetric changes near the entrance to Grays Harbor, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Burch, T.L.; Sherwood, C.R.

    1992-12-01

    Large changes in the distribution of sediment near the entrance to Grays Harbor, Washington, have occurred since the long rock jetties were built to confine flow. Spits to the north and south of the entrance have grown, the entrance channel has deepened, and the outer bar has eroded and moved offshore. The shorelines of North Beach and South Beach have experienced significant amounts of both erosion and accretion since the jetties were constructed around the turn of the century. Recently, the erosion rate at South Beach has increased and, because Half Moon Bay is growing at the expense of the shoreward side of Point Chehalis, the vegetated portion of the spit is now less than 350 ft wide at the narrowest section. The US Army Corps of Engineers, Seattle District, requested that Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory evaluate long-term trends in erosion near the entrance to Grays Harbor.

  7. Criblamydia sequanensis Harbors a Megaplasmid Encoding Arsenite Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Bertelli, Claire; Goesmann, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Criblamydia sequanensis is an amoeba-resisting bacterium recently isolated from the Seine River. This Chlamydia-related bacterium harbors a genome of approximately 3 Mbp and a megaplasmid of 89,525 bp. The plasmid encodes several efflux systems and an operon for arsenite resistance. This first genome sequence within the Criblamydiaceae family enlarges our view on the evolution and the ecology of this important bacterial clade largely understudied so far. PMID:25342672

  8. 33 CFR 110.210 - San Diego Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... along the shoreline to the point of beginning. (2) Special anchorage for U.S. Government vessels (NAD 83...′30.5″ W 32°43′27.2″ N 117°11′14.0″ W and thence along the shoreline of Harbor Island to the point of... the shoreline, and thence along the shoreline and pier to the point of beginning. (b) The...

  9. Building Energy Audit Report for Pearl Harbor, HI

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Daryl R.; Chvala, William D.; De La Rosa, Marcus I.; Dixon, Douglas R.

    2010-09-30

    A building energy audit was performed by a team of engineers from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under contract to the Department of Energy/Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP). The effort used the Facility Energy Decision System (FEDS) model to determine how energy is consumed at selected Pearl Harbor buildings, identify cost-effective energy retrofit measures, and calculate the potential energy and cost savings. This report documents the findings of that assessment.

  10. 33 CFR 110.238 - Apra Harbor, Guam.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... a radius of 350 yards and located at: Latitude Longtitude 13°26′54.0″ N 144°37′53.5″ E (3) Naval Explosives Anchorage 702. The waters in the General Anchorage bounded by the arc of a circle with a radius of... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.238 Apra Harbor, Guam. (a) The anchorage grounds (Datum:...

  11. 4. VIEW OF MIANUS HARBOR LOOKING SOUTH FROM PEAK OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW OF MIANUS HARBOR LOOKING SOUTH FROM PEAK OF THE TURBINE HALL. MAIN SWITCH HOUSE WHICH ACCOMODATED AUTOTRANSFORMERS/RESISTANCE GRIDS (FIRST FLOOR) AND CIRCUIT BREAKERS/MAIN BUS (SECOND FLOOR IS IN THE LEFT CENTER. THE SPANISH MISSION STYLING IS APPARENT ON THE BACK OF THE FACADE IN THE RIGHT CENTER OF THE PHOTOGRAPH. - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Cos Cob Power Plant, Sound Shore Drive, Greenwich, Fairfield County, CT

  12. Big Bay Harbor Operation and Maintenance Activities, Marquette County, Michigan.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-04-01

    water disposal of polluted sediments. Resulting recommendations, however, noted that confinement of polluted dredged material for a period of years...combined with elimination of the sources of channel and harbor pollution , would result in improved water quality in the Great Lakes. 1.733 Present...Wisconsin boatyard and is packaged to be trans- ported to any Lake Superior site to clean up accidental oil spills. Adverse effects on air quality may result

  13. Los Angeles Beach Harbors, Los Angeles County, California.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-10-01

    Outdoor Recreation, USDI, Agricultural Research Service, USDA Pacific Southwest Regional Office Soil Conservation Service, USDA Geological Survey, USDI...of channels through a coastal salt marsh (once the estuary of the Los Angeles River ), filling of adjacent marshland areas, and both dredging and...the harbor area comes from: (a) the Los Angeles River , which drains an 832-square-mile basin, and (b) Dominguez Channel, an 8.5-mile-long structure

  14. Subsidence at the Fairport Harbor Water Level Gauge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conner, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    SUBSIDENCE AT THE FAIRPORT HARBOR WATER LEVEL GAUGE I will provide information on methods being used to monitor Lake Erie water levels and earth movement at Fairport Harbor, Ohio. Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA) is responsible for vertical movement throughout the Great Lakes region. Fairport Harbor is also experiencing vertical movement due to salt mining, so the nearby water level gauge operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is affected by both GIA and mining. NOAA's National Geodetic Survey (NGS) defines and maintains the National Spatial Reference System (NSRS). The NSRS includes a network of permanently marked points; a consistent, accurate, and up-to-date national shoreline; a network of Continuously Operating Reference Stations (CORS) which supports three-dimensional positioning activities; and a set of accurate models describing dynamic, geophysical processes that affect spatial measurements. The NSRS provides the spatial reference foundation for transportation, mapping, charting and a multitude of scientific and engineering applications. Fundamental elements of geodetic infrastructure include GPS CORS (3-D), water level and tide gauges (height) and a system of vertical bench marks (height). When two or more of these elements converge they may provide an independent determination of position and vertical stability as is the case here at the Fairport Harbor water level gauge. Analysis of GPS, leveling and water level data reveal that this gauge is subsiding at about 2-3 mm/year, independent of the effects of GIA. Analysis of data from the nearby OHLA GPS CORS shows it subsiding at about 4 mm/yr, four times faster than expected due to GIA alone. A long history of salt mine activity in the area is known to geologists but it came as a surprise to other scientists.

  15. Chances and choices: Cold Spring Harbor 1944-1955.

    PubMed

    M Witkin, Evelyn

    2002-01-01

    The author describes the circumstances and events that led her to begin graduate work in genetics at Columbia University in 1941 and to spend the summer of 1944 and the years 1945-1955 at the Department of Genetics of the Carnegie Institution of Washington at Cold Spring Harbor. She then recalls incidents and recounts anecdotes meant to convey something of the atmosphere of that place during those memorable years.

  16. Shoaling Analysis at Brazos Island, Harbor Inlet, Texas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    Island Harbor Channel Shoaling Project as part of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Monitoring Completed Navigation Projects (MCNP) Program. MCNP...is one of the USACE Navigation research programs. The analysis was performed to determine the historical dredging frequency and volume dredged...near Brownsville, TX (Figure 1). The BIH Project is a 42-feet (ft) mean low tide (MLT), deep-draft navigation channel extending 22.8 miles from the

  17. 29. VIEW TO NORTHEAST FROM BOSTON HARBOR, DEER ISLAND PUMPING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. VIEW TO NORTHEAST FROM BOSTON HARBOR, DEER ISLAND PUMPING STATION, CA. 1909. FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: COAL WHARF, 1895 PUMPING STATION, 1909 ENGINE/PUMP HOUSE EXTENSION, INTAKE AND DISCHARGE PIPES ON WOODEN TRESTLE, RESIDENCE, AND UNKNOWN STRUCTURE Photocopy of photograph (Massachusetts State Archives, Environmental Affairs, MDC, Construction, 313 V 193 1-5 Box 8, Deer Island Pumping Station - Deer Island Pumping Station, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  18. Hydrodynamic forcing and sediment character in Boston Harbor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ravens, T.M.; Madsen, O.S.; Signell, R.P.; Adams, E.E.; Gschwend, P.M.

    1998-01-01

    Calculated annual excess skin friction stress at various locations in Quincy Bay (outer Boston Harbor) was found to be correlated positively with sediment sand content. The correlation was optimized when a critical shear stress (??c) of 0.085 Pa was assumed for the bay. The excess shear stress was correlated negatively with sediment lead (Pb) and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) concentrations. These correlations suggest that area surveys of properties like sand content may be sufficient to estimate ??C.

  19. A Single Vehicle Solution for Hull Inspection and Harbor Survey

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-27

    harbor surveys and ship hull inspections in support of port security operations. Figure 1. REMUS 100 Duct Thruster UUV with multibeam sonar...Marine Sonic Technology dual frequency (900/1800 kHz) side scan sonar and a Blueview forward looking multibeam sonar. The side scan integration required...forward look multibeam . A second module was built N00014-08-1-0109 Page 3 for the Blueview dual frequency (900/2250 kHz) multibeam . Software for

  20. Towards an ethics safe harbor for global biomedical research

    PubMed Central

    Dove, Edward S.; Knoppers, Bartha M.; Zawati, Ma'n H.

    2014-01-01

    Although increasingly global, data-driven genomics and other ‘omics’-focused research hold great promise for health discoveries, current research ethics review systems around the world challenge potential improvements in human health from such research. To overcome this challenge, we propose a ‘Safe Harbor Framework for International Ethics Equivalency’ that facilitates the harmonization of ethics review of specific types of data-driven international research projects while respecting globally transposable research ethics norms and principles. The Safe Harbor would consist in part of an agency supporting an International Federation for Ethics Review (IFER), formed by a voluntary compact among countries, granting agencies, philanthropies, institutions, and healthcare, patient advocacy, and research organizations. IFER would be both a central ethics review body, and also a forum for review and follow-up of policies concerning ethics norms for international research projects. It would be built on five principle elements: (1) registration, (2) compliance review, (3) recognition, (4) monitoring and enforcement, and (5) public participation. The Safe Harbor would create many benefits for researchers, countries, and the general public, and may eventually have application beyond (gen)omics to other areas of biomedical research that increasingly engage in secondary use of data and present only negligible risks. PMID:27774154

  1. Human origins and evolution: Cold Spring Harbor, deja vu.

    PubMed

    White, T D

    2009-01-01

    The Cold Spring Harbor Symposia of the 1950s were key to integrating human evolutionary studies into biology. That integration provided a solid foundation for systematic and functional interpretations of an expanding base of fossil and molecular evidence during the latter half of the 20th century. Today, the paleontological record of human evolution amassed during the last 150 years illuminates the human clade on life's tree. However, the rise of Hennegian parsimony cladistics and punctuationalism during the end of the last century witnessed the partial abandonment of classificatory conventions cemented by Mayr, Simpson, Dobzhansky, and others at Cold Spring Harbor. This has led to an artificial, postmillennial amplification of apparent species diversity in the hominid clade. Work on a stratigraphically thick and temporally deep sedimentary sequence in the Middle Awash study area of Ethiopia's Afar Depression reveals an assembly order of hominid anatomies and behaviors that was impossible for Darwin to discern. Large parts of that record appear to reflect phyletic evolution, consistent with the lessons and expectations of Cold Spring Harbor in 1950. Molecular biology cannot reveal the assembly sequences or contexts of human origins and evolution without reference to adequate geological, geochronological, paleobiological, and archaeological records. Today's consilience of these disparate data sets would have impressed Charles Darwin.

  2. Detection of beta-catenin mutations in paraffin-embedded sporadic desmoid-type fibromatosis by mutation-specific restriction enzyme digestion (MSRED): an ancillary diagnostic tool.

    PubMed

    Amary, Maria Fernanda C; Pauwels, Patrick; Meulemans, Els; Roemen, Guido M; Islam, Lily; Idowu, Bernadine; Bousdras, Konstantinos; Diss, Timothy C; O'Donnell, Paul; Flanagan, Adrienne M

    2007-09-01

    Desmoid-type fibromatosis is a locally aggressive deep soft tissue tumor. Some cases are associated with adenosis polyposis coli germline mutations whereas others harbor somatic beta-catenin point mutations mainly in exon 3, codons 41 and 45. These mutations result in stabilization of beta-catenin, and activation of the Wnt signaling pathway. The aim of this study was to determine the specificity and sensitivity of these 3 most common beta-catenin mutations in the diagnosis of desmoid-type fibromatosis using paraffin-embedded material. The results were compared with nuclear expression of beta-catenin. Mutation-specific restriction enzyme digestion methodology was employed to detect the 3 mutations. One hundred and thirty-three cases were analyzed, including 76 desmoid-type, and 18 superficial fibromatosis, in addition to a further 39 fibromatosis mimics. A restriction site was present for analysis of the codon 41 mutation. Mismatch primers were designed for the codon 45 mutations. Mutations were detected in 66 cases (87%) of 76 desmoid-type fibromatosis (71 extra-abdominal). Of these, 34 (45%) were in codon 45 (TCT>TTT), 27 (35%) in codon 41 (ACC>GCC), and 5 (7%) in codon 45 (TCT>CCT). No mutations were detected in the other lesions studied. All desmoid-type fibromatosis cases and 72% of the mimics tested showed nuclear positivity for beta-catenin indicating immunohistochemistry is a sensitive but not a specific test for desmoid-type fibromatosis. In contrast, to date, beta-catenin mutations have not been detected in any lesions which mimic desmoid-type fibromatosis. Mutation-specific restriction enzyme digestion, a simple and efficient means of detecting the common beta-catenin mutations in desmoid-type fibromatosis, complements light microscopy in reaching a diagnosis.

  3. Search of the p.M918T Mutation in the RET Oncogene in Mexican Adult Patients with Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Garcia, Erika; Vidal-Millan, Silvia; Lopez-Yañez, Alicia; Torres, José Antonio Posada; Guadarrama-Orozco, Jorge Alberto; Lino-Silva, Leonardo Saul; Meneses-Garcia, Abelardo; Astudillo-de la Vega, Horacio; Garcia, Martin Granados

    2017-02-06

    Inherited mutations in the RET proto-oncogene, which encodes a receptor tyrosine kinase, predispose individuals to the multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (MEN 2) cancer syndromes. The major component tumor of these syndromes is medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). To date, somatic mutations in RET have been identified in tumors from individuals with MEN 2 finding. RET M918T mutation is present in 95% of the MEN2B cases, and approximately 50% of sporadic MTCs harbor this mutation. We performed a mutational analysis in 17 cases of Medullary thyroid carcinoma, the somatic missense mutation at codon 918 of RET was found in 2 of the 17 MTCs, and one case presented MEN2 phenotype including MTC. The percentage of RET M918T mutation is similar in Mexican MTC patients to other series, although other mutations could be implicated in our population.

  4. Effective Temperature of Mutations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derényi, Imre; Szöllősi, Gergely J.

    2015-02-01

    Biological macromolecules experience two seemingly very different types of noise acting on different time scales: (i) point mutations corresponding to changes in molecular sequence and (ii) thermal fluctuations. Examining the secondary structures of a large number of microRNA precursor sequences and model lattice proteins, we show that the effects of single point mutations are statistically indistinguishable from those of an increase in temperature by a few tens of kelvins. The existence of such an effective mutational temperature establishes a quantitative connection between robustness to genetic (mutational) and environmental (thermal) perturbations.

  5. 33 CFR 165.904 - Lake Michigan at Chicago Harbor & Burnham Park Harbor-Safety and Security Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... AREAS AND LIMITED ACCESS AREAS Specific Regulated Navigation Areas and Limited Access Areas Ninth Coast... entrance of the harbor connecting coordinates 41°51′09″ N, 087°36′36″W and 41°51′11″ N, 087°36′22″ W. (b.... Further, no person may enter or remain in the shoreline areas of the established safety and security...

  6. Mutations in PIK3CA sensitize breast cancer cells to physiologic levels of aspirin.

    PubMed

    Turturro, Sanja B; Najor, Matthew S; Ruby, Carl E; Cobleigh, Melody A; Abukhdeir, Abde M

    2016-02-01

    A review of the literature finds that women diagnosed with breast cancer, who were on an aspirin regimen, experienced a decreased risk of distant metastases and death. Several recent studies have reported an improvement in overall survival in colorectal cancer patients who harbored mutations in the oncogene PIK3CA and received a daily aspirin regimen. Breast cancer patients on a daily aspirin regimen experienced decreased risk of distant metastases and death. PIK3CA is the most frequently mutated oncogene in breast cancer, occurring in up to 45 % of all breast cancers. In order to determine if mutations in PIK3CA sensitized breast cancers to aspirin treatment, we employed the use of isogenic cellular clones of the non-tumorigenic, breast epithelial cell line MCF-10A that harbored mutations in either PIK3CA or KRAS or both. We report that mutations in both PIK3CA and KRAS are required for the greatest aspirin sensitivity in breast cancer, and that the GSK3β protein was hyperphosphorylated in aspirin-treated double knockin cells, but not in other clones/treatments. A more modest effect was observed with single mutant PIK3CA, but not KRAS alone. These observations were further confirmed in a panel of breast cancer cell lines. Our findings provide the first evidence that mutations in PIK3CA sensitize breast cancer cells to aspirin.

  7. Prognostic signature and clonality pattern of recurrently mutated genes in inactive chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Hurtado, A M; Chen-Liang, T-H; Przychodzen, B; Hamedi, C; Muñoz-Ballester, J; Dienes, B; García-Malo, M D; Antón, A I; de Arriba, F; Teruel-Montoya, R; Ortuño, F J; Vicente, V; Maciejewski, J P; Jerez, A

    2015-01-01

    An increasing numbers of patients are being diagnosed with asymptomatic early-stage chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), with no treatment indication at baseline. We applied a high-throughput deep-targeted analysis, especially designed for covering widely TP53 and ATM genes, in 180 patients with inactive disease at diagnosis, to test the independent prognostic value of CLL somatic recurrent mutations. We found that 40/180 patients harbored at least one acquired variant with ATM (n=17, 9.4%), NOTCH1 (n=14, 7.7%), TP53 (n=14, 7.7%) and SF3B1 (n=10, 5.5%) as most prevalent mutated genes. Harboring one ‘sub-Sanger' TP53 mutation granted an independent 3.5-fold increase of probability of needing treatment. Those patients with a double-hit ATM lesion (mutation+11q deletion) had the shorter median time to first treatment (17 months). We found that a genomic variable: TP53 mutations, most of them under the sensitivity of conventional techniques; a cell phenotypic factor: CD38-positive expression; and a classical marker as β2-microglobulin, remained as the unique independent predictors of outcome. The high-throughput determination of TP53 status, particularly in this set of patients frequently lacking high-risk chromosomal aberrations, emerges as a key step, not only for prediction modeling, but also for exploring mutation-specific therapeutic approaches and minimal residual disease monitoring. PMID:26314984

  8. GNA11 Mutation in a Patient With Cutaneous Origin Melanoma: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sapna P; Kim, Dae Won; Lacey, Carol L; Hwu, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The rapid advances in the molecular biology and genetics have improved the understanding of molecular pathogenesis of v-Raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B (BRAF), feline sarcoma viral oncogene v-kit (KIT), and neuroblastoma v-Ras oncogene homolog (NRAS) mutant melanomas with the subsequent development of targeted therapeutic agents. However, only limited data are available for melanoma harboring other somatic than BRAF, KIT, and NRAS mutations. Mutations in guanine nucleotide-binding protein Q polypeptide (GNAQ) and guanine nucleotide-binding protein alpha-11 (GNA11), alpha subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins, constitutively activate mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway in uveal melanoma. However, there are no reports of GNA11 mutations in cutaneous melanomas. A 48-year-old woman was diagnosed with cutaneous nodular melanoma on the left scalp. Mutation analysis of the tumor revealed a GNA11 Q209L mutation. There was no evidence of uveal melanoma or malignant blue nevus in ophthalmologic exam, imaging studies, and pathology review. To our knowledge, this is the first case report to demonstrate cutaneous origin melanoma harboring a GNA11 Q209L mutation.

  9. Recurrent MLK4 Loss-of-Function Mutations Suppress JNK Signaling to Promote Colon Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Marusiak, Anna A.; Stephenson, Natalie L.; Baik, Hayeon; Trotter, Eleanor W.; Li, Yaoyong; Blyth, Karen; Mason, Susan; Chapman, Phil; Puto, Lorena A.; Read, Jon A.; Brassington, Claire; Pollard, Hannah K.; Phillips, Chris; Green, Isabelle; Overman, Ross; Collier, Matthew; Testoni, Ewelina; Miller, Crispin J.; Hunter, Tony; Sansom, Owen J.; Brognard, John

    2015-01-01

    MLK4 is a member of the mixed-lineage family of kinases that regulate the JNK, p38, and ERK kinase signaling pathways. MLK4 mutations have been identified in various human cancers including frequently in colorectal cancer, where their function and pathobiological importance has been uncertain. In this study, we assessed the functional consequences of MLK4 mutations in colon tumorigenesis. Biochemical data indicated that a majority of MLK4 mutations are loss-of-function (LOF) mutations that can exert dominant negative effects. In seeking to understand the abrogated activity of these mutants, we elucidated a new MLK4 catalytic domain structure. To determine whether MLK4 is required to maintain the tumorigenic phenotype, we reconstituted its signaling axis in colon cancer cells harboring MLK4 inactivating mutations. We found that restoring MLK4 activity reduced cell viability, proliferation, and colony formation in vitro and delayed tumor growth in vivo. Mechanistic investigations established that restoring the function of MLK4 selectively induced the JNK pathway and its downstream targets, cJUN, ATF3 and the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors CDKN1A and CDKN2B. Our work indicates that MLK4 is a novel tumor suppressing kinase harboring frequent LOF mutations that lead to diminished signaling in the JNK pathway and enhanced proliferation in colon cancer. PMID:26637668

  10. PIK3CA mutations in the kinase domain (exon 20) of uterine endometrial adenocarcinomas are associated with adverse prognostic parameters.

    PubMed

    Catasus, Lluis; Gallardo, Alberto; Cuatrecasas, Miriam; Prat, Jaime

    2008-02-01

    Mutations of the oncogene PIK3CA occur frequently in endometrial carcinomas, but their prognostic significance is unclear. To determine the clinicopathological and molecular implications of these mutations, PIK3CA status was investigated in 109 endometrial (102 endometrioid and 7 mixed) carcinomas and the results were compared with clinicopathological parameters associated with prognosis. Tumors were also investigated for microsatellite instability and PTEN, beta-catenin gene (CTNNB1), K-RAS, and B-RAF mutations. We found 35 PIK3CA somatic missense mutations in 32 (29%) endometrial carcinomas. Eighteen mutations occurred in exon 20 (kinase domain), and 17 in exon 9 (helical domain). Almost all mutated tumors were pure endometrioid adenocarcinomas. All tumors with PIK3CA mutations exhibited myometrial invasion (P=0.032). Lymphovascular invasion was found more frequently in mutated (28%) than nonmutated carcinomas (18%). Histological grade varied significantly according to the location of the PIK3CA mutations whether in exon 9 or exon 20 (P=0.033). The frequency of exon 9 mutations was higher in grade 1 carcinomas (57%) than in grade 2 (29%) or grade 3 (14%) tumors. Conversely, mutations in exon 20 were more common in grade 3 (60%) than in grade 2 (20%) or grade 1 (20%) carcinomas. None of the tumors confined to the endometrium (stage IA) had PIK3CA mutations. Furthermore, whereas 64% of adenocarcinomas with exon 9 mutations had invaded < or =(1/2) of the myometrial thickness (stage IB), 73% of tumors with exon 20 mutations had either deeper myometrial invasion (stage IC) or cervical involvement (stage II) (P=0.045). PIK3CA mutations coexisted with microsatellite instability and mutations in PTEN, CTNNB1, K-RAS, and B-RAF genes. These results favor that PIK3CA mutations are associated with myometrial invasion and, moreover, that tumors harboring PIK3CA mutations in exon 20 are frequently high-grade, deeply invasive endometrial carcinomas that tend to exhibit

  11. TGF-beta(1) regulation of human AT(1) receptor mRNA splice variants harboring exon 2.

    PubMed

    Martin, Mickey M; Buckenberger, Jessica A; Knoell, Daren L; Strauch, Arthur R; Elton, Terry S

    2006-04-25

    At least four alternatively spliced mRNAs can be synthesized from the human AT(1)R (hAT(1)R) gene that differ only in the inclusion or exclusion of exon 2 and/or 3. RT-PCR experiments demonstrate that splice variants harboring exon 2 accounts for at least 30% of all the hAT(1)R mRNA transcripts expressed in the human tissues investigated. Since exon 2 contains two upstream AUGs or open reading frames (uORFs), we hypothesized that these AUGs would inhibit the translation of the downstream hAT(1)R protein ORF harbored in exon 4. This study demonstrates that the inclusion of exon 2 in hAT(1)R mRNA transcripts dramatically reduces hAT(1)R protein levels (nine-fold) and significantly attenuates Ang II responsiveness ( approximately four-fold). Interestingly, only when both AUGs were mutated in combination were the hAT(1)R density and Ang II signaling levels comparable with those values obtained using mRNA splice variants that did not include exon 2. This observation is consistent with a model where the majority of the ribosomes likely translate uORF#1 and are then unable to reinitiate at the downstream hAT(1)R ORF, in part due to the presence of AUG#2 and to the short intercistronic spacing. Importantly, TGF-beta(1) treatment (4ng/ml for 4h) of fibroblasts up-regulated hAT(1)R mRNA splice variants, which harbored exon 2, six-fold. Since AT(1)R activation is closely associated with cardiovascular disease, the inclusion of exon 2 by alternative splicing represents a novel mechanism to reduce the overall production of the hAT(1)R protein and possibly limit the potential pathological effects of AT(1)R activation.

  12. Comparative temporary threshold shifts in a harbor porpoise and harbor seal, and severe shift in a seal.

    PubMed

    Kastelein, Ronald A; Gransier, Robin; Hoek, Lean

    2013-07-01

    Anthropogenic noise may cause temporary hearing threshold shifts (TTSs) in marine mammals. Tests with identical methods show that harbor porpoises are more susceptible to TTS induced by octave-band white noise (OBN) centered around 4 kHz than harbor seals, although their unmasked (basic) hearing thresholds for that frequency are similar. A harbor seal was exposed for 1 h to an OBN with a very high sound pressure level (SPL), 22-30 dB above levels causing TTS onset. This elicited 44 dB TTS; hearing recovered within 4 days. Thus, for this signal and this single exposure, permanent threshold shift requires levels at least 22 dB above TTS onset levels. The severe TTS in the seal suggests that the critical level (above which TTS increases rapidly with increasing SPL) is between 150 and 160 dB re 1 μPa for a 60 min exposure to OBN centered at 4 kHz. In guidelines on TTS in marine mammals produced by policy makers in many countries, TTS is assumed to follow the equal energy hypothesis, so that when the sound exposure levels of fatiguing sounds are equal, the same TTS is predicted to be induced. However, like previous studies, the present study calls this model into question.

  13. Efficient Generation of Orthologous Point Mutations in Pigs via CRISPR-assisted ssODN-mediated Homology-directed Repair

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kankan; Tang, Xiaochun; Liu, Yan; Xie, Zicong; Zou, Xiaodong; Li, Mengjing; Yuan, Hongming; Ouyang, Hongsheng; Jiao, Huping; Pang, Daxin

    2016-01-01

    Precise genome editing in livestock is of great value for the fundamental investigation of disease modeling. However, genetically modified pigs carrying subtle point mutations were still seldom reported despite the rapid development of programmable endonucleases. Here, we attempt to investigate single-stranded oligonucleotides (ssODN) mediated knockin by introducing two orthologous pathogenic mutations, p.E693G for Alzheimer's disease and p.G2019S for Parkinson's disease, into porcine APP and LRRK2 loci, respectively. Desirable homology-directed repair (HDR) efficiency was achieved in porcine fetal fibroblasts (PFFs) by optimizing the dosage and length of ssODN templates. Interestingly, incomplete HDR alleles harboring partial point mutations were observed in single-cell colonies, which indicate the complex mechanism of ssODN-mediated HDR. The effect of mutation-to-cut distance on incorporation rate was further analyzed by deep sequencing. We demonstrated that a mutation-to-cut distance of 11 bp resulted in a remarkable difference in HDR efficiency between two point mutations. Finally, we successfully obtained one cloned piglet harboring the orthologous p.C313Y mutation at the MSTN locus via somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Our proof-of-concept study demonstrated efficient ssODN-mediated incorporation of pathogenic point mutations in porcine somatic cells, thus facilitating further development of disease modeling and genetic breeding in pigs. PMID:27898095

  14. EGFR mutation and lobar location of lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Chien-Hua; Chen, Kun-Chieh; Hsu, Kuo-Hsuan; Tseng, Jeng-Sen; Ho, Chao-Chi; Hsia, Te-Chun; Su, Kang-Yi; Wu, Ming-Fang; Chiu, Kuo-Liang; Liu, Chien-Ming; Wu, Tzu-Chin; Chen, Hung-Jen; Chen, Hsuan-Yu; Chang, Chi-Sheng; Hsu, Chung-Ping; Hsia, Jiun-Yi; Chuang, Cheng-Yen; Lin, Chin-Hung; Chen, Jeremy J W; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Liao, Wei-Yu; Shih, Jin-Yuan; Yu, Sung-Liang; Yu, Chong-Jen; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Yang, Tsung-Ying; Chang, Gee-Chen

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the associations among lung cancer location, and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation status. Treatment-naive, pathologically confirmed lung adenocarcinomas with tumor specimens available for genetic analysis were included from 2011 through 2014. Overall, 1771 patients with lung adenocarcinoma were included for analysis, after excluding those with carcinoma not otherwise specified, or synchronous multiple primary lung cancers. The median age was 64 years, and the female:male and never smoker:ever smoker ratios were 930:855 (52:48%) and 1167:604 (65:35%), respectively. The EGFR mutation rate was 56%. Among patients, 1093 (62%) had primary tumors in the upper lobes. Compared with the characteristics of the EGFR wild-type, tumors with EGFR activating mutations were more common in women (P < 0.001), never smokers (P < 0.001), and in the upper lobes (P = 0.004). Among EGFR activating mutations, compared with the EGFR exon 19 deletion, L858R mutation were more common in women (P = 0.002), never smokers (P = 0.038), and the upper lobes P < 0.0005). The present study is the first to address that different pulmonary lobar locations might harbor different EGFR mutation subtypes. We demonstrated that adenocarcinomas with L858R mutation, rather than exon 19 deletion or wild-type EGFR gene, prefer to locate over the upper lungs. This phenomenon was more significant in females and never-smokers, implying the result of complex interactions between genetic susceptibility and environmental factors. Therefore, EGFR L858R mutation and exon 19 deletion may not be identical disease entity from the point of carcinogenesis.

  15. Emergence of Proteus mirabilis harboring blaKPC-2 and qnrD in a Chinese Hospital.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yan-yan; Cai, Jia-chang; Zhang, Rong; Zhou, Hong-wei; Sun, Qian; Chen, Gong-xiang

    2012-05-01

    Nineteen carbapenem-nonsusceptible Proteus mirabilis isolates were recovered from intensive care units in the Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University during a 3-month period. The isolates showed a high level of resistance against ciprofloxacin, in addition to their resistance against the carbapenems. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis showed that these isolates belonged to three clonal strains. PCRs and DNA sequence analysis of the carbapenemase and other β-lactamase genes indicated that all the isolates harbored the bla(KPC-2) gene. Twelve of 19 isolates harbored the plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes, both the qnrD and aac(6')-Ib-cr genes. Eight representative isolates with high levels of quinolone resistance carried the similar mutation profiles of S83I in gyrA, E466D in gyrB, and S80I in parC. Reduced carbapenem susceptibility was transferred to Escherichia coli (EC600) in a conjugation experiment, while the quinolone resistance was not. DNA hybridization showed that qnrD was located on a plasmid of approximately 4.5 kb. In summary, large clonally related isolates of KPC-2-producing P. mirabilis emerged in a Chinese hospital, and qnrD was detected in KPC-producing P. mirabilis for the first time.

  16. Gestational mutations in radiation carcinogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meza, R.; Luebeck, G.; Moolgavkar, S.

    Mutations in critical genes during gestation could increase substantially the risk of cancer. We examine the consequences of such mutations using the Luebeck-Moolgavkar model for colorectal cancer and the Lea-Coulson modification of the Luria-Delbruck model for the accumulation of mutations during gestation. When gestational mutation rates are high, such mutations make a significant contribution to cancer risk even for adult tumors. Furthermore, gestational mutations ocurring at distinct times during emryonic developmemt lead to substantially different numbers of mutated cells at birth, with early mutations leading to a large number (jackpots) of mutated cells at birth and mutation occurring late leading to only a few mutated cells. Thus gestational mutations could confer considerable heterogeneity of the risk of cancer. If the fetus is exposed to an environmental mutagen, such as ionizing radiation, the gestational mutation rate would be expected to increase. We examine the consequences of such exposures during gestation on the subsequent development of cancer.

  17. Generation of Small Colony Variants in Biofilms by Escherichia coli Harboring a Conjugative F Plasmid

    PubMed Central

    Tashiro, Yosuke; Eida, Hiroaki; Ishii, Satoshi; Futamata, Hiroyuki; Okabe, Satoshi

    2017-01-01

    A conjugative F plasmid induces mature biofilm formation by Escherichia coli by promoting F-pili-mediated cell-cell interactions and increasing the expression of biofilm-related genes. We herein demonstrated another function for the F plasmid in E. coli biofilms; it contributes to the emergence of genetic and phenotypic variations by spontaneous mutations. Small colony variants (SCVs) were more frequently generated in a continuous flow-cell biofilm than in the planktonic state of E. coli harboring the F plasmid. E. coli SCVs represented typical phenotypic changes such as slower growth, less biofilm formation, and greater resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics than the parent strain. Genomic and complementation analyses indicated that the small colony phenotype was caused by the insertion of Tn1000, which was originally localized in the F plasmid, into the hemB gene. Furthermore, the Tn1000 insertion was removed from hemB in the revertant, which showed a normal colony phenotype. This study revealed that the F plasmid has the potential to increase genetic variations not only by horizontal gene transfer via F pili, but also by site-specific recombination within a single cell. PMID:28302951

  18. Chlamydia trachomatis Tarp harbors distinct G and F actin binding domains that bundle actin filaments.

    PubMed

    Jiwani, Shahanawaz; Alvarado, Stephenie; Ohr, Ryan J; Romero, Adriana; Nguyen, Brenda; Jewett, Travis J

    2013-02-01

    All species of Chlamydia undergo a unique developmental cycle that transitions between extracellular and intracellular environments and requires the capacity to invade new cells for dissemination. A chlamydial protein called Tarp has been shown to nucleate actin in vitro and is implicated in bacterial entry into human cells. Colocalization studies of ectopically expressed enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-Tarp indicate that actin filament recruitment is restricted to the C-terminal half of the effector protein. Actin filaments are presumably associated with Tarp via an actin binding alpha helix that is also required for actin nucleation in vitro, but this has not been investigated. Tarp orthologs from C. pneumoniae, C. muridarum, and C. caviae harbor between 1 and 4 actin binding domains located in the C-terminal half of the protein, but C. trachomatis serovar L2 has only one characterized domain. In this work, we examined the effects of domain-specific mutations on actin filament colocalization with EGFP-Tarp. We now demonstrate that actin filament colocalization with Tarp is dependent on two novel F-actin binding domains that endow the Tarp effector with actin-bundling activity. Furthermore, Tarp-mediated actin bundling did not require actin nucleation, as the ability to bundle actin filaments was observed in mutant Tarp proteins deficient in actin nucleation. These data shed molecular insight on the complex cytoskeletal rearrangements required for C. trachomatis entry into host cells.

  19. New England harbor seal H3N8 influenza virus retains avian-like receptor specificity

    PubMed Central

    Hussein, Islam T. M.; Krammer, Florian; Ma, Eric; Estrin, Michael; Viswanathan, Karthik; Stebbins, Nathan W.; Quinlan, Devin S.; Sasisekharan, Ram; Runstadler, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    An influenza H3N8 virus, carrying mammalian adaptation mutations, was isolated from New England harbor seals in 2011. We sought to assess the risk of its human transmissibility using two complementary approaches. First, we tested the binding of recombinant hemagglutinin (HA) proteins of seal H3N8 and human-adapted H3N2 viruses to respiratory tissues of humans and ferrets. For human tissues, we observed strong tendency of the seal H3 to bind to lung alveoli, which was in direct contrast to the human-adapted H3 that bound mainly to the trachea. This staining pattern was also consistent in ferrets, the primary animal model for human influenza pathogenesis. Second, we compared the binding of the recombinant HAs to a library of 610 glycans. In contrast to the human H3, which bound almost exclusively to α-2,6 sialylated glycans, the seal H3 bound preferentially to α-2,3 sialylated glycans. Additionally, the seal H3N8 virus replicated in human lung carcinoma cells. Our data suggest that the seal H3N8 virus has retained its avian-like receptor binding specificity, but could potentially establish infection in human lungs. PMID:26888262

  20. Structural Mechanism of the Pan-BCR-ABL Inhibitor Ponatinib (AP24534): Lessons for Overcoming Kinase Inhibitor Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Tianjun; Commodore, Lois; Huang, Wei-Sheng; Wang, Yihan; Thomas, Mathew; Keats, Jeff; Xu, Qihong; Rivera, Victor M.; Shakespeare, William C.; Clackson, Tim; Dalgarno, David C.; Zhu, Xiaotian

    2012-01-20

    The BCR-ABL inhibitor imatinib has revolutionized the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia. However, drug resistance caused by kinase domain mutations has necessitated the development of new mutation-resistant inhibitors, most recently against the T315I gatekeeper residue mutation. Ponatinib (AP24534) inhibits both native and mutant BCR-ABL, including T315I, acting as a pan-BCR-ABL inhibitor. Here, we undertook a combined crystallographic and structure-activity relationship analysis on ponatinib to understand this unique profile. While the ethynyl linker is a key inhibitor functionality that interacts with the gatekeeper, virtually all other components of ponatinib play an essential role in its T315I inhibitory activity. The extensive network of optimized molecular contacts found in the DFG-out binding mode leads to high potency and renders binding less susceptible to disruption by single point mutations. The inhibitory mechanism exemplified by ponatinib may have broad relevance to designing inhibitors against other kinases with mutated gatekeeper residues.