Science.gov

Sample records for hard mast production

  1. Initial Effects of Reproduction Cutting Treatments on Residual Hard Mast Production in the Ouachita Mountains

    Treesearch

    Roger W. Perry; Ronald E. Thill

    2003-01-01

    We compared indices of total hard mast production (oak and hickory combined) in 20, second-growth, pine-hardwood stands under five treatments to determine the effects of different reproduction treatments on mast production in the Ouachita Mountains. We evaluated mast production in mature unharvested controls and stands under four reproduction cutting methods (single-...

  2. The Relationship Between Basal Area and Hard Mast Production in the Ouachita Mountains

    Treesearch

    Roger W. Perry; Ronald E. Thill; Philip A. Tappe; David G. Peitz

    2004-01-01

    Abstract - Because the relationship between stand density and hard mast production is not clear, we investigated the effects of varying total overstory basal area (BA) on acorn and hickory nut production in the Ouachita Mountains. We used Whitehead visual surveys to estimate mast production in oaks (Quercus spp.) and hickories (...

  3. Mast importance, production, and management

    Treesearch

    Harmon P., Jr. Weeks

    1989-01-01

    Mast is a broad term that refers to the various nuts and fruits produced by woody plants. It is usually subdivided into hard mast (nuts) and soft mast (fleshy fruits). Forest tree and shrub mast is an important seasonal food for many forest wildlife species.

  4. Long-term monitoring of fleshy fruit and hard mast production and seasonal bird distribution at the Savannah River Site, South Carolina.

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, Cathryn, H.; Levey, Douglas J.

    2009-06-15

    A final report of Fruit and hard mast production in five habitat types at SRS with a comparison of fruit consumption by fledgling versus adult birds at SRS and Relative importance of fruit, seeds, and insects in the diets of overwintering birds at SRS.

  5. Bait stations, hard mast, and black bear population growth in Great Smoky Mountains National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Joseph D.; van Manen, Frank T.; Pelton, Michael R.

    2005-01-01

    Bait-station surveys are used by wildlife managers as an index to American black bear (Ursus americanus) population abundance, but the relationship is not well established. Hard mast surveys are similarly used to assess annual black bear food availability which may affect mortality and natality rates. We used data collected in Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GSMNP) from 1989 to 2003 to determine whether changes in the bait-station index (ΔBSI) were associated with estimated rates of bear population growth (λ) and whether hard mast production was related to bear visitation to baits. We also evaluated whether hard mast production from previous years was related to λ. Estimates of λ were based on analysis of capture-recapture data with the Pradel temporal symmetry estimator. Using the Akaike's Information Criterion (AIC), our analysis revealed no direct relationship between ΔBSI and λ. A simulation analysis indicated that our data were adequate to detect a relationship had one existed. Model fit was marginally improved when we added total oak mast production of the previous year as an interaction term suggesting that the BSI was confounded with environmental variables. Consequently the utility of the bait-station survey as a population monitoring technique is questionable at the spatial and temporal scales we studied. Mast survey data, however, were valuable covariates of λ. Population growth for a given year was negatively related to oak mast production 4 and 5 years prior. That finding supported our hypothesis that mast failures can trigger reproductive synchrony, which may not be evident from the trapped sample until years later.

  6. Effects of different silvicultural systems on initial soft mast production

    Treesearch

    Roger W. Perry; Ronald E. Thill; David G. Peitz; Philip A. Tappe

    1999-01-01

    Recent policy changes by federal land management agencies such as the United States [Department of Agriculture] Forest Service have led to increased use of silvicultural systems other than clearcutting. Because soft mast is an integral part of wildlife habitat and the effects of these alternative silviculture systems on soft mast production are unknown, we evaluated...

  7. Gypsy moth effects on mast production

    Treesearch

    Kurt W. Gottschalk

    1990-01-01

    Gypsy moth outbreaks can have drastic effects on many forest resources and uses. Because the gypsy moth prefers oak foliage, oak stands are the most susceptible to defoliation and resultant damage. The value of oak mast for many wildlife species is high. The high carbohydrate content of acorns provides the energy necessary for winter survival. Loss of mast crops due to...

  8. A rapid hard-mast index from acorn presence-absence tallies

    Treesearch

    Cathryn H. Greenberg; Gordon S. Warburton

    2007-01-01

    We used 21 years of acorn data from visual surveys of oak (Quercus spp.) trees (n ¼ 20,113) conducted in western North Carolina, USA, to develop predictive equations for hard-mast indices (HMIs) based on the proportion of trees bearing acorns (PBA). We calculated PBA using visual estimates of the percentage of oak crown with acorns (PCA), assigning acorn presence if...

  9. Products from mast cells influence T lymphocyte proliferation and cytokine production--relevant to allergic asthma?

    PubMed

    de Pater-Huijsen, F L; Pompen, M; Jansen, H M; Out, T A

    1997-06-01

    In IgE allergic diseases both mast cells and T lymphocytes play an important role. Whereas mast cels have been implicated in immediate allergic responses, T lymphocytes mediate subsequent late phase responses and chronic inflammation. Here we review possible links between the early mast cell activation and the later T lymphocyte stimulation. Products from mast cells were found to exert effects on T lymphocytes. Human Mast Cell line-1 (HMC-1) mast cells modulated proliferation and cytokine production of a human CD8+ T-cell clone in vitro. Activated mast cells seemed to drive this CD8+ T-cell clone towards a more pronounced T (helper) 1 type of response, simultaneously decreasing T-cell numbers. It is hypothesized that this might be a negative feed back mechanism operating in allergic subjects, by which the Th2-driven IgE production and eosinophilia are counteracted.

  10. Restoration of hard mast species for wildlife in Missouri using precocious flowering oak in the Missouri River floodplain, USA

    Treesearch

    B. C. Grossman; M. A. Gold; Daniel C. Dey

    2003-01-01

    Increased planting of hard mast oak species in the Lower Missouri River floodplain is critical as natural regeneration of oak along the Upper Mississippi and Lower Missouri Rivers has been limited following major flood events in 1993 and 1995. Traditional planting methods have limited success due to frequent flood events, competition from faster growing vegetation and...

  11. New Kepler Data Products At MAST For Stellar Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, Scott W.; Shiao, B.; Tseng, S.; Million, C.; Thompson, R.; Seibert, M.; Abney, F.; Donaldson, T.; Dower, T.; Fraquelli, D. A.; Handy, S.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Levay, K.; Matuskey, J.; McLean, B.; Quick, L.; Rogers, A.; Wallace, G.; White, R. L.

    2014-01-01

    The Kepler Mission has collected high-precision, time-series photometry of over 200,000 stars. The reduced lightcurves, target pixel files, and a variety of catalog metadata are already available at MAST. We present new data products and services at MAST that will further aid researchers as Kepler begins its transition to a legacy mission, particularly in the realm of stellar astrophysics. New photometric catalogs to accompany the Kepler targets have arrived at MAST within the past year, and several more will be coming in the relative future. These include the second half of the Kepler INT survey (U,g,r,i,H_alpha; available now), an improved GALEX source catalog (NUV and FUV; available now), PanSTARRS (g,r,i,z; available soon), and WISE (3.4, 4.6, 12, and 22 microns; planned). We expect searches for variability will become one of the most active areas of archive use, so MAST is including a wide range of variability statistics as part of the archive database. In addition to being searchable through database queries and web forms, each Preview page will now include a summary of these variability indices for each of the target's lightcurves within a Quarter. Along with updated NUV and FUV fluxes, a new tool at MAST called gPhoton will allow users to create time-series lightcurves, including animated movies and intensity images, from any set of GALEX photons with arbitrary aperture and bin sizes. We show some examples of the ways GALEX UV lightcurves generated with gPhoton can be used in conjunction with the Kepler data. Finally, MAST has released an initial version of its Data Discovery Portal. This one-stop, interactive web application gives users the ability to search and access data from any of MAST's missions (HST, GALEX, Kepler, FUSE, IUE, JWST, etc.), as well as any data available through the Virtual Observatory. It includes filtering options, access to interactive displays, an accompanying AstroViewer with data footprints on-sky, the ability to upload your own

  12. MAST 1 purchased products--components. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.J.

    1995-10-01

    AlliedSignal Inc., Kansas City Division, the production agency, was provided with funding to acquire purchased product components in support of the MAST (Multi-Application Surety Technology) Program. Implementation efforts, closing procurement status, and proposals for improvements in the procurement process are presented. The intent of this project was to fund the Purchased Product Team`s traditional procurement of components, with significantly reduced flowtime, in accordance with the Qualification Evaluation System, and to exercise the system to the extent possible. When funding was reduced, it became obvious that full implementation of the Qualification Evaluation System could not be achieved due to limited resources.

  13. The relationships between weather, mast production, and the breeding ecology of eastern wild turkeys in South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Carlisle, William, D.

    2003-02-26

    Carlisle, W.D. 2003. The relationship between weather, mast production, and the breeding ecology of eastern wild turkeys. MS Thesis. Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina. 41 pp. From 1998 to 2001, 134 wild turkeys were captured, including 2 recaptures. Hens were fitted with radio transmitters to monitor nesting, brooding and movement activities. Of 37 known nests, including 6 renests, overall nest success was 28%. Causes of nest failure included abandonment, depredation, and fire. Mean clutch size was 11. Mean date of nest initiation was April 9 for first nests and May 14 for renests. Mean annual poult to hen ratios were determined for 1990 to 2000 from a South Carolina Department of Natural Resources roadside survey and ranged from 0.6 to 4.0 poults per hen. Soft mast and hard mast production data were provided by D.J. Levey, Univ. of Florida. Rainfall and temperature data were collected at 12 weather stations on Savannah River Site. Notable correlations were found between hard mast production and jake weight, and June rainfall and poult to hen ratio.

  14. Products from human mast cell line cells enhance the production of interferon-γ by CD8+ and CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    De Pater-Huijsen, Francina L; De Riemer, Mariëlle J; Reijneke, Richard M R; Pompen, Marjolein; Lutter, René; Jansen, Henk M; Out, Theo A

    2002-01-01

    In patients with allergic asthma, T-cell cytokines are implicated in the regulation of the local inflammation in the airways. The ability of sensitized mast cells to release mediators and cytokines early upon allergen stimulation makes them important candidates for local immunoregulation. We have studied the effects of human mast cells on T cells with the use of the human mast cell line HMC-1. We showed that activated human mast cells or their soluble products induced and enhanced the interferon-γ (IFN-γ) production by T cells up to about 60-fold. The production of interleukin (IL)-4 was hardly affected and that of IL-5 was slightly enhanced. The enhancement of IFN-γ production was induced both in polyclonal CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and in CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell clones. Further characterization of the factors involved demonstrated a molecular mass above 30 000. Our results implicate that by this mechanism mast cells may account for a negative feedback system locally down-regulating allergen-induced T helper 2 responses via IFN-γ production by the T cells. PMID:11972627

  15. Products from human mast cell line cells enhance the production of interferon-gamma by CD8+ and CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    de Pater-Huijsen, Francina L; de Riemer, MariElle J; Reijneke, Richard M R; Pompen, Marjolein; Lutter, René; Jansen, Henk M; Out, Theo A

    2002-05-01

    In patients with allergic asthma, T-cell cytokines are implicated in the regulation of the local inflammation in the airways. The ability of sensitized mast cells to release mediators and cytokines early upon allergen stimulation makes them important candidates for local immunoregulation. We have studied the effects of human mast cells on T cells with the use of the human mast cell line HMC-1. We showed that activated human mast cells or their soluble products induced and enhanced the interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) production by T cells up to about 60-fold. The production of interleukin (IL)-4 was hardly affected and that of IL-5 was slightly enhanced. The enhancement of IFN-gamma production was induced both in polyclonal CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and in CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell clones. Further characterization of the factors involved demonstrated a molecular mass above 30 000. Our results implicate that by this mechanism mast cells may account for a negative feedback system locally down-regulating allergen-induced T helper 2 responses via IFN-gamma production by the T cells.

  16. New GALEX UV Data Products At MAST For Stellar Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiao, Bernie; Fleming, S. W.; Million, C.; Seibert, M.; Bianchi, L.; Thompson, R.; Tseng, S.; Adler, W. J.; Hubbard, M.; Levay, K.; Madore, B. F.; Martin, C. D.; Nieto-Santisteban, M. A.; Sahai, R.; Schiminovich, D.; White, R. L.; Wyder, T. K.

    2014-01-01

    The Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) mission ended in June 2013 after ten years in orbit. Its FUV and NUV microchannel plate detectors were used to conduct a variety of direct imaging and spectroscopic astronomical surveys with various depths and sky coverage, recording individual photon events with a time resolution of five thousandths of a second. Although the mission has ended, MAST is continuing to provide new data products as the mission transitions to a legacy archive. One product is the GCAT (Seibert et al., in prep), a catalog of GALEX sources across the entire GR6 data release that removes duplicate objects found in the GALEX MCAT. The GCAT defines "primary" NUV and FUV fluxes within the AIS and MIS surveys 40 million and 22 million sources, respectively), accounting for tile overlaps, and with visual inspection of every tile to flag artifacts and conduct other quality control checks. Another catalog of unique sources is that of Bianchi et al. (2013). Similar to the GCAT, their catalog produces a list of distinct GALEX sources in both the FUV and NUV from the AIS and MIS surveys, and includes data from GR7 (through the end of 2012). They have also cross-matched their sources with SDSS DR9, GSC-II, PanSTARRS, and 2MASS. We review access options for these catalogs, including updated matches between the GCAT and SDSS / Kepler available at MAST. In addition to these unique GALEX source catalogs, MAST will provide a database and software package that archives each of the ~1.5 trillion photon events detected over the lifetime of the mission. For the first time, users will be able to create calibrated lightcurves, intensity maps, and animated movies from any set of photons selected across any tile, and with specified aperture sizes, coordinates, and time steps. Users can access the data using either a python-based command-line software package, through a web interface at MAST, or (eventually) through CasJobs using direct SQL queries. We present some example

  17. Beyond The Prime Directive: The MAST Discovery Portal and High Level Science Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, Scott W.; Abney, Faith; Donaldson, Tom; Dower, Theresa; Fraquelli, Dorothy A.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Levay, Karen; Matuskey, Jacob; McLean, Brian; Quick, Lee; Rogers, Anthony; Shiao, Bernie; Thompson, Randy; Tseng, Shui-Ay; Wallace, Geoff; White, Richard L.

    2015-01-01

    The Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST) is a NASA-funded archive for a wide range of astronomical missions, primarily supporting space-based UV and optical telescopes. What is less well-known is that MAST provides much more than just a final resting place for primary data products and documentation from these missions. The MAST Discovery Portal is our new search interface that integrates all the missions that MAST supports into a single interface, allowing users to discover (and retrieve) data from other missions that overlap with your targets of interest. In addition to searching MAST, the Portal allows users to search the Virtual Observatory, granting access to data from thousands of collections registered with the VO, including large missions spanning the electromagnetic spectrum (e.g., Chandra, SDSS, Spitzer, 2MASS, WISE). The Portal features table import/export, coordinate-based cross-matching, dynamic chart plotting, and the AstroView sky viewer with footprint overlays. We highlight some of these capabilities with science-driven examples. MAST also accepts High Level Science Products (HLSPs) from the community. These HLSPs are user-generated data products that can be related to a MAST-supported mission. MAST provides a permanent archive for these data with linked references, and integrates it within MAST infrastructure and services. We highlight some of the most recent HLSPs MAST has released, including the HST Frontier Fields, GALEX All-Sky Diffuse Radiation Mapping, a survey of the intergalactic medium with HST-COS, and one of the most complete line lists ever derived for a white dwarf using FUSE AND HST-STIS. These HLSPs generate substantial interest from the community, and are an excellent way to increase visibility and ensure the longevity of your data.

  18. Reversible condensation of mast cell secretory products in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, J M; Villalón, M; Verdugo, P

    1991-01-01

    We have investigated the mechanisms responsible for the condensation and decondensation of secretory products that occur in mast cell secretion. We show here that the hydrated matrix of an exocytosed secretory granule can be recondensed to its original volume by exposure to acidic solutions containing histamine at concentrations that mimic those found in vivo. Recondensation by acidic histamine began in the range of 1-10 mM with a dose response curve that was accurately predicted by a Hill type equation with four highly cooperative binding sites and a half maximum concentration of [Hi++] = 3.9 mM. Recondensation by histamine showed a sigmoidal dependency on pH (critical range pH 5.5-6.5) and was fully reversible. These experiments suggest that histamine, possibly by binding to anionic sites in the protein-heparin complex of the granule matrix, triggers a change in the polymeric structures of the granule matrix from an extended coil to a collapsed globular state. This may be a useful model for understanding the condensation of secretory products into dense core granules and their subsequent decondensation upon exocytosis. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 4 PMID:1868152

  19. Codeine induces human mast cell chemokine and cytokine production: involvement of G-protein activation

    PubMed Central

    Sheen, C. H.; Schleimer, R. P.; Kulka, M.

    2007-01-01

    Background Activation of mast cells and the systemic release of histamine are common side effects of opiates such as codeine and morphine. In some individuals, codeine not only elicits a sizable early response due to mast cell degranulation, but can also lead to late cutaneous allergic inflammation possibly through the production of chemokines. However, individuals who exhibit a late phase reaction to codeine often do not react to its synthetic analog, meperidine. The goal of this study was to test whether codeine and meperidine induce secretion of inflammatory mediators in human mast cells. Methods To characterize opiate activation of human mast cells, we stimulated cultured human (LAD2 cell line and CD34+-derived) mast cells with codeine and meperidine and measured degranulation and chemokine production. Results Codeine, but not meperidine, activated human mast cell degranulation within 30 min in a dose-dependent manner. Degranulation was blocked by the phosphoinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, wortmannin, and pertussis toxin but not by Ro-31-8220, a PKC inhibitor or forskolin, a cyclic adenylyl cyclase activator. After 3 and 8 h of stimulation, codeine, but not meperidine, activated human mast cells to release monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (CCL2), regulated on activation, normal T expressed and secreted (RANTES, CCL5) and interleukin-8 (CXCL 8) but not inducible protein-10 (CXCL10). Conclusions Codeine activates human mast cell degranulation and chemokine production by activating protein kinase A and PI3 kinase, possibly leading to NF-κB activation. Therefore, opiates may regulate late phase allergic inflammation by activating chemokine production by human mast cells. PMID:17441793

  20. Tests of wildlife habitat models to evaluate oak-mast production

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schroeder, R.L.; Vangilder, L.D.

    1997-01-01

    We measured oak-mast production and forest structure and composition in the Ozark Mountains of Missouri and tested the accuracy of oak-mast prediction variables from 5 Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) species models. Acorn production was positively associated with several measures of abundance and canopy cover of oak trees, and with an index of mast production for all 5 HSI models. We developed 2 modified oak-mast models, based on inputs related to either oak tree density or oak canopy cover and diversity of oak tree species. The revised models accounted for 22-32% of the variance associated with acorn abundance. Future tests of HSI models should consider: (1) the concept of upper limits imposed by habitat and the effects of nonhabitat factors; (2) the benefits of a top-down approach to model development; and (3) testing models across broad geographic regions.

  1. TRAF6 specifically contributes to FcepsilonRI-mediated cytokine production but not mast cell degranulation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong Jun; Chen, Wei; Carrigan, Svetlana O; Chen, Wei-Min; Roth, Kristy; Akiyama, Taishin; Inoue, Jun-ichiro; Marshall, Jean S; Berman, Jason N; Lin, Tong-Jun

    2008-11-14

    TRAF6 (tumor necrosis factor-associated factor 6) is an essential adaptor downstream from the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor and Toll-like receptor superfamily members. This molecule is critical for dendritic cell maturation and T cell homeostasis. Here we show that TRAF6 is important in high affinity IgE receptor, FcepsilonRI-mediated mast cell activation. In contrast to dendritic cells and T cells, TRAF6-deficient mast cells matured normally and showed normal IgE-dependent degranulation. Importantly, TRAF6-deficient mast cells showed impaired production of cytokine interleukin-6, CCL-9, interleukin-13, and TNF following FcepsilonRI aggregation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed decreased NF-kappaB p65 binding to CCL-9 and TNF promoters in TRAF6-deficient mast cells. Antigen and IgE-induced IkappaB phosphorylation and NF-kappaB p65 translocation to the nucleus were diminished in TRAF6-deficient mast cells. NF-kappaB luciferase activity in response to antigen and IgE stimulation was severely impaired in TRAF6-deficient mast cells. In addition, antigen and IgE-induced phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase p38 and JNK, but not ERK1/2, was significantly reduced in TRAF6-deficient mast cells. These results identified TRAF6 as an important signal transducer in FcepsilonRI-mediated signaling in mast cells. Our findings implicate TRAF6 as a new adaptor/regulator molecule for allergen-mediated inflammation in allergy.

  2. Oak mast production and animal impacts on acorn survival in the central hardwoods

    Treesearch

    Kenneth F. Kellner; Jeffery K. Riegel; Nathanael I. Lichti; Robert K. Swihart

    2013-01-01

    As part of the Hardwood Ecosystem Experiment we measured mast production in white (Quercus alba) and black (Q. velutina) oak, and quantified the impacts of seed predators on acorn survival over a 3-year period. Specifically, we measured the proportion of acorns of each species infested with weevils (Curculio spp...

  3. Mast cell growth-enhancing activity (MEA) stimulates interleukin 6 production in a mouse bone marrow-derived mast cell line and a malignant subline.

    PubMed

    Hültner, L; Moeller, J

    1990-09-01

    A novel mast cell growth-enhancing activity (MEA/P40/interleukin 9 [IL-9]) purified from the conditioned medium of a murine interleukin 2 (IL-2)-dependent Mlsa-specific T-cell line (MLS4.2) was tested for its capacity to induce interleukin 6 (IL-6) production in a mouse bone marrow-derived factor-dependent mast cell line (L138.8A). This interleukin 3 (IL-3)/interleukin 4 (IL-4)/MEA-responsive cell line was demonstrated recently to express IL-6 mRNA and to secrete IL-6 when cultured with IL-3/IL-4. Now we were able to show that conditioned medium from L138.8A mast cells stimulated with MEA alone contained growth factor activity for the IL-6-dependent mouse hybridoma cell line 7TD1 that was completely blocked by the monoclonal anti-IL-6 antibody 6B4. A dose-response study including IL-3, IL-4, and MEA tested either alone or in different combinations revealed that among these growth factors MEA was the most potent inducer of IL-6 in L138.8A cells. Moreover, IL-4 but not IL-3 had a strong synergistic effect on MEA-induced IL-6 production. The autonomous malignant mast cell subline L138Cauto also showed enhanced IL-6 production when stimulated with MEA. Our findings indicate that MEA (IL-9) not only provides a proliferation signal, but also leads to a marked functional activation of responsive mast cells.

  4. Mast cell activation disorders.

    PubMed

    Akin, Cem

    2014-01-01

    Disorders associated with mast cell activation range from relatively common IgE-mediated disease and chronic urticaria to rarer conditions such as mastocytosis or monoclonal mast cell activation disorder. Mast cell activation disorders can be mechanistically classified into primary (associated with abnormal production of mast cells that carry pathologic markers of clonality), secondary (normal mast cells activated in reaction to a microenvironmental trigger), and idiopathic (no etiology is found). Clinical presentations, diagnostic criteria as well as general principles of a stepwise therapy approach are discussed.

  5. The role of STAT6 in mast cell IL-4 production.

    PubMed

    Sherman, M A

    2001-02-01

    Interleukin (IL)-4 has an important role in regulating antibody production and inflammation. The major IL-4 producers are CD4+ T cells, but the development of an IL-4-producing phenotype in these cells requires IL-4 signaling through the STAT6 pathway during differentiation. The cellular source of this early IL-4 is not known, but mast cells are a possible candidate due to their immediate and indiscriminate release of IL-4 upon activation. In this review we summarize the evidence that STAT6 signaling is not required for mast cell IL-4 production, which is consistent with their possible role as a link between the innate immune response and T-cell activation. We also describe an isoform of STAT6 that is expressed in mast cells and that appears to act as a repressor of IL-4 transcription. This STAT6 signaling pathway may be part of a feedback mechanism to protect surrounding tissues from IL-4-mediated inflammation during an infection.

  6. The stem of sinomenium acutum inhibits mast cell-mediated anaphylactic reactions and tumor necrosis factor-alpha production from rat peritoneal mast cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, H M; Moon, P D; Chae, H J; Kim, H R; Chung, J G; Kim, J J; Lee, E J

    2000-05-01

    The aqueous extract of Sinomenium acutum stem (SSAE) (0.1-1000 mg/kg) dose-dependently inhibited systemic anaphylactic reaction induced by compound 48/80 in mice. In particular, SSAE reduced compound 48/80-induced anaphylactic reaction with 50% at the dose of 1000 mg/kg. SSAE (100-1000 mg/kg) also significantly inhibited local anaphylactic reaction activated by anti-dinitrophenyl (DNP) IgE. When mice were pretreated with SSAE at a concentration ranging from 0.1 to 1000 mg/kg, the plasma histamine levels were reduced in a dose-dependent manner. SSAE (1-1000 microg/ml) dose-dependently inhibited histamine release from the rat peritoneal mast cells (RPMCs) activated by compound 48/80 or anti-DNP IgE. In addition, SSAE (0.1 microg/ml) had a significant inhibitory effect on anti-DNP IgE-induced tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) production. These results indicate that SSAE inhibits mast cell-mediated anaphylactic reactions and TNF-alpha production from mast cells.

  7. Hard Exclusive Meson Production at COMPASS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ter Wolbeek, Johannes

    2016-02-01

    The concept of Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) combines two-dimensional spatial information given by form factors, with longitudinal momentum information from Parton Distribution Functions. GPDs provide comprehensive description of the nucleon structure involving a wealth of new information. For instance, according to Ji’s sum rule, the GPDs H and E enable access to the total angular momenta of quarks, antiquarks and gluons. While H can be approached using measurements of electroproduction cross sections, asymmetry measurements in hard exclusive meson production off transversely polarized targets can help to constrain the GPD E and chiral-odd GPDs. In 2007 and 2010 the COMPASS experiment at CERN collected data by scattering a 160GeV/c muon beam off a transversely polarized NH3 target. Exclusive vector-meson production μ + p → μ‧ + p + V with a ρ0 or ω meson in the final state is studied and five single-spin and three double-spin azimuthal asymmetries are measured.

  8. The production and secretion of complement component C1q by human mast cells.

    PubMed

    van Schaarenburg, Rosanne A; Suurmond, Jolien; Habets, Kim L L; Brouwer, Mieke C; Wouters, Diana; Kurreeman, Fina A S; Huizinga, Tom W J; Toes, René E M; Trouw, Leendert A

    2016-10-01

    C1q is the initiation molecule of the classical pathway of the complement system and is produced by macrophages and immature dendritic cells. As mast cells share the same myeloid progenitor cells, we have studied whether also mast cells can produce and secrete C1q. Mast cells were generated in vitro from CD34+ progenitor cells from buffy coats or cord blood. Fully differentiated mast cells were shown by both RNA sequencing and qPCR to express C1QA, C1QB and C1QC. C1q produced by mast cells has a similar molecular make-up as serum C1q. Reconstituting C1q depleted serum with mast cell supernatant in haemolytic assays, indicated that C1q secreted by mast cells is functionally active. The level of C1q in supernatants produced under basal conditions was considerably enhanced upon stimulation with LPS, dexamethasone in combination with IFN- γ or via FcεRI triggering. Mast cells in human tissues stained positive for C1q in both healthy and in inflamed tissue. Moreover, mast cells in healthy and diseased skin appear to be the predominant C1q positive cells. Together, our data reveal that mast cells are able to produce and secrete functional active C1q and indicate mast cells as a local source of C1q in human tissue.

  9. Mast cell-derived TNF contributes to airway hyperreactivity, inflammation, and TH2 cytokine production in an asthma model in mice.

    PubMed

    Nakae, Susumu; Ho, Lien H; Yu, Mang; Monteforte, Rossella; Iikura, Motoyasu; Suto, Hajime; Galli, Stephen J

    2007-07-01

    Mast cells, IgE, and TNF, which have been implicated in human atopic asthma, contribute significantly to the allergic airway inflammation induced by ovalbumin (OVA) challenge in mice sensitized with OVA without alum. However, it is not clear to what extent mast cells represent a significant source of TNF in this mouse model. We investigated the importance of mast cell-derived TNF in a mast cell-dependent model of OVA-induced airway hyperreactivity (AHR) and allergic airway inflammation. Features of this model of airway inflammation were analyzed in C57BL/6J-wild-type mice, mast cell-deficient C57BL/6J-Kit(W-sh)(/W-sh) mice, and C57BL/6J Kit(W-sh/W-sh) mice that had been systemically engrafted with bone marrow-derived cultured mast cells from C57BL/6J-wild-type or C57BL/6J-TNF(-/-) mice. Ovalbumin-induced AHR and airway inflammation were significantly reduced in mast cell-deficient Kit(W-sh/W-sh) mice versus wild-type mice. By contrast, Kit(W-sh/W-sh) mice that had been engrafted with wild-type but not with TNF(-/-) bone marrow-derived cultured mast cells exhibited responses very similar to those observed in wild-type mice. Mast cells and mast cell-derived TNF were not required for induction of OVA-specific memory T cells in the sensitization phase, but significantly enhanced lymphocyte recruitment and T(H)2 cytokine production in the challenge phase. Mast cell-derived TNF contributes significantly to the pathogenesis of mast cell-dependent and IgE-dependent, OVA-induced allergic inflammation and AHR in mice, perhaps in part by enhancing lymphocyte recruitment and T(H)2 cytokine production. Our findings in mice support the hypothesis that mast cell-derived TNF can promote allergic inflammation and AHR in asthma.

  10. Entamoeba histolytica-secreted cysteine proteases induce IL-8 production in human mast cells via a PAR2-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Ah; Nam, Young Hee; Min, Arim; Kim, Kyeong Ah; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi; Saito-Nakano, Yumiko; Mirelman, David; Shin, Myeong Heon

    2014-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is an extracellular tissue parasite causing colitis and occasional liver abscess in humans. E. histolytica-derived secretory products (SPs) contain large amounts of cysteine proteases (CPs), one of the important amoebic virulence factors. Although tissue-residing mast cells play an important role in the mucosal inflammatory response to this pathogen, it is not known whether the SPs induce mast cell activation. In this study, when human mast cells (HMC-1 cells) were stimulated with SPs collected from pathogenic wild-type amoebae, interleukin IL-8 mRNA expression and production were significantly increased compared with cells incubated with medium alone. Inhibition of CP activity in the SPs with heat or the CP inhibitor E64 resulted in significant reduction of IL-8 production. Moreover, SPs obtained from inhibitors of cysteine protease (ICP)-overexpressing amoebae with low CP activity showed weaker stimulatory effects on IL-8 production than the wild-type control. Preincubation of HMC-1 cells with antibodies to human protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) did not affect the SP-induced IL-8 production. These results suggest that cysteine proteases in E. histolytica-derived secretory products stimulate mast cells to produce IL-8 via a PAR2-independent mechanism, which contributes to IL-8-mediated tissue inflammatory responses during the early phase of human amoebiasis. © Y.A. Lee et al., published by EDP Sciences, 2014.

  11. Lipid droplets in activated mast cells - a significant source of triglyceride-derived arachidonic acid for eicosanoid production.

    PubMed

    Dichlberger, Andrea; Schlager, Stefanie; Kovanen, Petri T; Schneider, Wolfgang J

    2016-08-15

    Mast cells are potent effectors of immune reactions and key players in various inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis, asthma, and rheumatoid arthritis. The cellular defense response of mast cells represents a unique and powerful system, where external signals can trigger cell activation resulting in a stimulus-specific and highly coordinated release of a plethora of bioactive mediators. The arsenal of mediators encompasses preformed molecules stored in cytoplasmic secretory granules, as well as newly synthesized proteinaceous and lipid mediators. The release of mediators occurs in strict chronological order and requires proper coordination between the endomembrane system and various enzymatic machineries. For the generation of lipid mediators, cytoplasmic lipid droplets have been shown to function as a major intracellular pool of arachidonic acid, the precursor for eicosanoid biosynthesis. Recent studies have revealed that not only phospholipids in mast cell membranes, but also triglycerides in mast cell lipid droplets are a substrate source for eicosanoid formation. The present review summarizes current knowledge about mast cell lipid droplet biology, and discusses expansions and challenges of traditional mechanistic models for eicosanoid production.

  12. Chemically modified tetracycline (CMT)-3 inhibits histamine release and cytokine production in mast cells: possible involvement of protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Sandler, C; Ekokoski, E; Lindstedt, K A; Vainio, P J; Finel, M; Sorsa, T; Kovanen, P T; Golub, L M; Eklund, K K

    2005-07-01

    To find novel inhibitors of mast cell function we have studied the effect of a potent, non-antimicrobial, chemically modified tetracycline, CMT-3 or COL-3, on key functions of mast cells. In the presence of 25 microM CMT-3, the 48/80-induced histamine release from rat serosal mast cells was inhibited significantly, to 43.0 +/- 7.3% of control. Similarly, the activation-induced secretion of TNF-alpha and IL-8 by HMC-1 cells were decreased in the presence of 25 microM CMT-3 to 13.5 +/- 4.1% and 9.7 +/- 1.1% of control, respectively. CMT-3 did not cause intracellular accumulation of TNF-alpha but instead it reduced the expression of TNF-alpha mRNA in HMC-1 cells. Moreover, CMT-3 was found to significantly inhibit the protein kinase C (PKC) activity with IC(50) value of 31 microM. CMT-3 inhibited effectively both human recombinant PKCalpha and PKCdelta isoforms. In comparison to doxycycline, CMT-3 was more effective as an inhibitor of both cytokine production and PKC activity. Considering the central role of PKC in mast cell activation, PKC inhibition could, at least partially, explain the observed inhibitory effects of CMT-3. The inhibition of the key proinflammatory functions of mast cells by CMT-3 suggests its potential clinical usefulness in the treatment of allergic and inflammatory disorders.

  13. Macelignan inhibits histamine release and inflammatory mediator production in activated rat basophilic leukemia mast cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Young Sun; Kim, Myung-Suk; Hwang, Jae-Kwan

    2012-10-01

    Type I allergy is characterized by the release of granule-associated mediators, lipid-derived substances, cytokines, and chemokines by activated mast cells. To evaluate the anti-allergic effects of macelignan isolated from Myristica fragrans Houtt., we determined its ability to inhibit calcium (Ca(2+)) influx, degranulation, and inflammatory mediator production in RBL-2 H3 cells stimulated with A23187 and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. Macelignan inhibited Ca(2+) influx and the secretion of β-hexosaminidase, histamine, prostaglandin E(2), and leukotriene C(4); decreased mRNA levels of cyclooxygenase-2, 5-lipoxygenase, interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-13, and tumor necrosis factor-α; and attenuated phosphorylation of Akt and the mitogen-activated protein kinases extracellular signal-regulated kinase, p38, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase. These results indicate the potential of macelignan as a type I allergy treatment.

  14. Resveratrol preferentially inhibits IgE-dependent PGD2 biosynthesis but enhances TNF production from human skin mast cells.

    PubMed

    Shirley, Devon; McHale, Cody; Gomez, Gregorio

    2016-04-01

    Resveratrol, a natural polyphenol found in the skin of red grapes, is reported to have anti-inflammatory properties including protective effects against aging. Consequently, Resveratrol is a common nutritional supplement and additive in non-prescription lotions and creams marketed as anti-aging products. Studies in mice and with mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) have indicated anti-allergic effects of Resveratrol. However, the effects of Resveratrol on human primary mast cells have not been reported. Human mast cells were isolated and purified from normal skin tissue of different donors. The effect of Resveratrol on IgE-dependent release of allergic inflammatory mediators was determined using various immunoassays, Western blotting, and quantitative real-time PCR. Resveratrol at low concentrations (≤10 μM) inhibited PGD2 biosynthesis but not degranulation. Accordingly, COX-2 expression was inhibited but phosphorylation of Syk, Akt, p38, and p42/44 (ERKs) remained intact. Surprisingly, TNF production was significantly enhanced with Resveratrol. At a high concentration (100 μM), Resveratrol significantly inhibited all parameters analyzed except Syk phosphorylation. Here, we show that Resveratrol at low concentrations exerts its anti-inflammatory properties by preferentially targeting the arachidonic acid pathway. We also demonstrate a previously unrecognized pro-inflammatory effect of Resveratrol--the enhancement of TNF production from human mature mast cells following IgE-dependent activation. These findings suggest that Resveratrol as a therapeutic agent could inhibit PGD2-mediated inflammation but would be ineffective against histamine-mediated allergic reactions. However, Resveratrol could potentially exacerbate or promote allergic inflammation by enhancing IgE-dependent TNF production from mast cells in human skin. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Dissecting components of population-level variation in seed production and the evolution of masting behavior.

    Treesearch

    W. D. Koenig; D. Kelly; V. L. Sork; R. P. Duncan; J. S. Elkinton; M.S. Peltonen; R. D. Westfall

    2003-01-01

    Mast-fruiting or masting behavior is the cumulative result of the reproductive patterns of individuals within a population and thus involves components of individual variability, between-individual synchrony, and endogenous cycles of temporal autocorrelation. Extending prior work by Herrera, we explore the interrelationships of these components using data on individual...

  16. Production of proteolytic enzymes in mast cells, fibroblasts, vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cells cultivated under normoxic or hypoxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Maxová, H; Bačáková, L; Lisá, V; Novotná, J; Tomášová, H; Vízek, M; Herget, J

    2010-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) is a family of proteolytic enzymes involved in remodeling of extracellular matrix. Although proteolytic enzymes are produced by many cell types, mast cells seem to be more important than other types in remodeling of pulmonary arteries during hypoxia. Therefore, we tested in vitro production of MMPs and serine proteases in four cell types (mast cells, fibroblasts, vascular smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells) cultivated for 48 h under normoxic or hypoxic (3% O2) conditions. MMP-13 was visualized by immunohistochemistry, MMP-2 and MMP-9 were detected by zymography in cell lysates. Enzymatic activities (MMPs, tryptase and chymase) were estimated in the cultivation media. Hypoxia had a minimal effect on total MMP activity in the cultivation media of all types of cells, but immunofluorescence revealed higher intensity of MMP-13 in the cells exposed to hypoxia except of fibroblasts. Tryptase activity was three times higher and chymase activity twice higher in mast cells cultivated in hypoxia than in those cultured in normoxia. Among all cell types studied here, mast cells are the most abundant source of proteolytic enzymes under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Moreover, in these cells hypoxia increases the production of both specific serine proteases tryptase and chymase, which can act as MMPs activators.

  17. Acidic environment augments FcεRI-mediated production of IL-6 and IL-13 in mast cells.

    PubMed

    Kamide, Yosuke; Ishizuka, Tamotsu; Tobo, Masayuki; Tsurumaki, Hiroaki; Aoki, Haruka; Mogi, Chihiro; Nakakura, Takashi; Yatomi, Masakiyo; Ono, Akihiro; Koga, Yasuhiko; Sato, Koichi; Hisada, Takeshi; Dobashi, Kunio; Yamada, Masanobu; Okajima, Fumikazu

    2015-08-28

    Although blood pH is maintained in a narrow range of around pH 7.4 in living organisms, inflammatory loci are characterized by acidic conditions. Mast cells tend to reside close to the surface of the body in areas such as the mucosa and skin where they may be exposed to exogenous acids, and they play an important role in immune responses. However, little is known about the effects of extracellular acidification on the functions of mast cell. Here, we found that extracellular acidification increased the dinitrophenyl-conjugated human serum albumin (DNP-HSA)-induced production of interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-13 in MC/9 cells or bone marrow-derived mouse mast cells sensitized with anti-DNP IgE. Extracellular acidification also inhibited migration of MC/9 cells toward DNP-HSA. In addition, acidic pH stimulated antigen-induced activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and protein kinase B (Akt). These findings suggest that extracellular acidification augmented antigen/IgE-induced and FcεRI-mediated production of IL-6 and IL-13 in mast cells, and that this was associated with the enhancement of p38 MAPK and Akt activation.

  18. Simultaneous detection of histamine release and lactate production in rat mast cells induced by compound 48/80 using sup 1 H NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshizaki, Kazuo; Arizono, Naoki )

    1991-04-01

    {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy was used to evaluate histamine release and lactate production in intact mast cells isolated from rats. The resonance lines of the aromatic histamine protons in mast cells, detected by the selective spin-excitation technique, were broader and located in a lower magnetic field than those in free histamine solution. When exocytosis of mast-cell granules was induced by compound 48/80, free histamine appeared, with a corresponding decrease in the amount of histamine in the mast cells; the lactate signal was also detected in the spectrum. On the addition of compound 48/ 80, there was a further release of histamine from mast cells, accompanied by further production of lactate. This result indicates that the mechanisms which induce the exocytosis of granules, and/or the events following exocytosis, activate glycolysis.

  19. Acidic environment augments FcεRI-mediated production of IL-6 and IL-13 in mast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kamide, Yosuke; Ishizuka, Tamotsu; Tobo, Masayuki; Tsurumaki, Hiroaki; Aoki, Haruka; Mogi, Chihiro; Nakakura, Takashi; Yatomi, Masakiyo; Ono, Akihiro; Koga, Yasuhiko; Sato, Koichi; Hisada, Takeshi; Dobashi, Kunio; Yamada, Masanobu; Okajima, Fumikazu

    2015-08-28

    Although blood pH is maintained in a narrow range of around pH 7.4 in living organisms, inflammatory loci are characterized by acidic conditions. Mast cells tend to reside close to the surface of the body in areas such as the mucosa and skin where they may be exposed to exogenous acids, and they play an important role in immune responses. However, little is known about the effects of extracellular acidification on the functions of mast cell. Here, we found that extracellular acidification increased the dinitrophenyl-conjugated human serum albumin (DNP-HSA)-induced production of interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-13 in MC/9 cells or bone marrow-derived mouse mast cells sensitized with anti-DNP IgE. Extracellular acidification also inhibited migration of MC/9 cells toward DNP-HSA. In addition, acidic pH stimulated antigen-induced activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and protein kinase B (Akt). These findings suggest that extracellular acidification augmented antigen/IgE-induced and FcεRI-mediated production of IL-6 and IL-13 in mast cells, and that this was associated with the enhancement of p38 MAPK and Akt activation. - Highlights: • Antigen-induced IL-6 and IL-13 production was augmented by acidic pH in mast cells. • Acidic pH-induced actions were associated with activation of p38 MAPK and Akt. • Inhibition of p38 MAPK and Akt attenuated cytokine responses to acidic pH. • Acidic pH effects are not attributable to actions of known proton-sensing GPCRs.

  20. The dopamine D3 receptor regulates the effects of methamphetamine on LPS-induced cytokine production in murine mast cells.

    PubMed

    Xue, Li; Li, Xia; Ren, Hui-Xun; Wu, Feng; Li, Ming; Wang, Biao; Chen, Fang-Yuan; Cheng, Wei-Ying; Li, Ju-Ping; Chen, Yan-Jiong; Chen, Teng

    2015-06-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that methamphetamine (METH) alter inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokine production in the periphery. However, the effect of METH on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced immune responses and its underlying mechanism of action remains unclear. The dopamine D3 receptor (D3R) plays an important role in METH addiction, indicating that the D3R may regulate METH-mediated immune responses. In this study, we examined the effect of METH on mast cell released cytokines in the lungs and thymi of mice stimulated by LPS, and on LPS-induced murine bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs). Moreover, we used D3R-deficient mice to investigate the effect of this receptor on LPS-stimulated mast cell released cytokine production after METH treatment in the lungs and thymi. The effects of a D3R agonist and antagonist on LPS-induced cytokine production after METH treatment in murine BMMCs were also evaluated. METH suppressed LPS-induced cytokine production in the lungs and thymi of wild-type (WT) mice and BMMCs. However, METH did not alter LPS-induced cytokine production in the lungs and thymi of D3R-deficient mice. When BMMCs were treated with the D3R receptor antagonist, NGB2904 hydrochloride (NGB-2904), METH did not alter LPS-induced cytokine production. However, treatment with the D3R agonist, 7-hydroxy-(di-n-propylamino) tetralin (7-OH-DPAT), significantly enhanced the effects of METH on LPS-induced cytokine production. Our results suggest that METH regulates mast cell released cytokines production in an LPS-induced mouse model via the D3R. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Interspeaker Variability in Hard Palate Morphology and Vowel Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lammert, Adam; Proctor, Michael; Narayanan, Shrikanth

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Differences in vocal tract morphology have the potential to explain interspeaker variability in speech production. The potential acoustic impact of hard palate shape was examined in simulation, in addition to the interplay among morphology, articulation, and acoustics in real vowel production data. Method: High-front vowel production from…

  2. Interspeaker Variability in Hard Palate Morphology and Vowel Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lammert, Adam; Proctor, Michael; Narayanan, Shrikanth

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Differences in vocal tract morphology have the potential to explain interspeaker variability in speech production. The potential acoustic impact of hard palate shape was examined in simulation, in addition to the interplay among morphology, articulation, and acoustics in real vowel production data. Method: High-front vowel production from…

  3. Inhibition of degranulation and cytokine production in bone marrow-derived mast cells by hydrolyzed rice bran.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Yuka; Hirashima, Naohide; Nakanishi, Mamoru; Furuno, Tadahide

    2010-08-01

    We investigated the effects of hydrolyzed rice bran (HRB), an arabinoxylan extracted from rice bran, on mast cell degranulation and cytokine production. HRB was obtained by treating rice bran with an extract obtained from shiitake mushrooms. Bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) were prepared by culturing bone marrow cells from BALB/c mice in the presence of interleukin-3 and stem cell factor for 4 weeks. BMMCs were pretreated with HRB (0-3 mg/ml) for 30 min and were then antigen activated. Pretreatment of BMMCs with HRB significantly inhibited antigen-induced degranulation and cytokine production (tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-4) in a dose-dependent manner. HRB also diminished membrane fusion between liposomes in which soluble N-ethyl maleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors were reconstituted. Phosphorylation of RelA and mitogen-activated kinases after antigen stimulation was suppressed by pretreatment of BMMCs with HRB. These findings suggest that HRB may have an anti-inflammatory effect by inhibiting mast cell degranulation and cytokine production.

  4. Adipose triglyceride lipase regulates eicosanoid production in activated human mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Dichlberger, Andrea; Schlager, Stefanie; Maaninka, Katariina; Schneider, Wolfgang J.; Kovanen, Petri T.

    2014-01-01

    Human mast cells (MCs) contain TG-rich cytoplasmic lipid droplets (LDs) with high arachidonic acid (AA) content. Here, we investigated the functional role of adipose TG lipase (ATGL) in TG hydrolysis and the ensuing release of AA as substrate for eicosanoid generation by activated human primary MCs in culture. Silencing of ATGL in MCs by siRNAs induced the accumulation of neutral lipids in LDs. IgE-dependent activation of MCs triggered the secretion of the two major eicosanoids, prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) and leukotriene C4 (LTC4). The immediate release of PGD2 from the activated MCs was solely dependent on cyclooxygenase (COX) 1, while during the delayed phase of lipid mediator production, the inducible COX-2 also contributed to its release. Importantly, when ATGL-silenced MCs were activated, the secretion of both PGD2 and LTC4 was significantly reduced. Interestingly, the inhibitory effect on the release of LTC4 was even more pronounced in ATGL-silenced MCs than in cytosolic phospholipase A2-silenced MCs. These data show that ATGL hydrolyzes AA-containing TGs present in human MC LDs and define ATGL as a novel regulator of the substrate availability of AA for eicosanoid generation upon MC activation. PMID:25114172

  5. Mast cells enhance T cell activation: Importance of mast cell-derived TNF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakae, Susumu; Suto, Hajime; Kakurai, Maki; Sedgwick, Jonathon D.; Tsai, Mindy; Galli, Stephen J.

    2005-05-01

    Mast cells are not only important effector cells in immediate hypersensitivity reactions and immune responses to pathogens but also can contribute to T cell-mediated disorders. However, the mechanisms by which mast cells might influence T cells in such settings are not fully understood. We find that mast cells can enhance proliferation and cytokine production in multiple T cell subsets. Mast cell-dependent enhancement of T cell activation can be promoted by FcRI-dependent mast cell activation, TNF production by both mast cells and T cells, and mast cell-T cell contact. However, at high concentrations of cells, mast cells can promote T cell activation independent of IgE or TNF. Finally, mast cells also can promote T cell activation by means of soluble factors. These findings identify multiple mechanisms by which mast cells can influence T cell proliferation and cytokine production. allergy | asthma | autoimmunity | cytokines | immune response

  6. Interspeaker variability in hard palate morphology and vowel production.

    PubMed

    Lammert, Adam; Proctor, Michael; Narayanan, Shrikanth

    2013-12-01

    Differences in vocal tract morphology have the potential to explain interspeaker variability in speech production. The potential acoustic impact of hard palate shape was examined in simulation, in addition to the interplay among morphology, articulation, and acoustics in real vowel production data. High-front vowel production from 5 speakers of American English was examined using midsagittal real-time magnetic resonance imaging data with synchronized audio. Relationships among hard palate morphology, tongue shaping, and formant frequencies were analyzed. Simulations were performed to determine the acoustical properties of vocal tracts whose area functions are altered according to prominent hard palate variations. Simulations revealed that altering the height and position of the palatal dome alters formant frequencies. Examinations of real speech data showed that palatal morphology is not significantly correlated with any formant frequency but is correlated with major aspects of lingual articulation. Certain differences in hard palate morphology can substantially affect vowel acoustics, but those effects are not noticeable in real speech. Speakers adapt their lingual articulation to accommodate palate shape differences with the potential to substantially affect formant frequencies, while ignoring palate shape differences with relatively little acoustic impact, lending support for acoustic goals of vowel production.

  7. ST Rad-Hard Power Bipolar Transistors Product Portfolio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camonita, Giuseppe; Pintacuda, Francesco

    2011-10-01

    This article describes the STMicroelectronics Rad-Hard Bipolar Transistors product range addressed specifically for space applications. Available up to 100krad Total Ionized Dose radiation level at LDRS (Low Dose Rate Sensitivity) conditions, they are qualified according to the ESCC specifications. Here follows the main features, the characterization curves including static and dynamic behaviours, and the radiation performances for some products. Also some application examples are given.

  8. Targeting mast cells in inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Reber, Laurent L; Frossard, Nelly

    2014-06-01

    Although mast cells have long been known to play a critical role in anaphylaxis and other allergic diseases, they also participate in some innate immune responses and may even have some protective functions. Data from the study of mast cell-deficient mice have facilitated our understanding of some of the molecular mechanisms driving mast cell functions during both innate and adaptive immune responses. This review presents an overview of the biology of mast cells and their potential involvement in various inflammatory diseases. We then discuss some of the current pharmacological approaches used to target mast cells and their products in several diseases associated with mast cell activation.

  9. Estimating mast production: an evaluation of visual surveys and comparison with seed traps using white oaks

    Treesearch

    Roger W. Perry; Ronald E. Thill

    1999-01-01

    Perry and Thill compared five types of visual mast surveyed with seed trap data from 105 white oaks (Quercus alba L.) during 1996-1997 in the Ouachita Mountains of Arkansas. They also evaluated these visual survey methods for their usefulness in detecting differences in acorn density among areas. Indices derived from all five methods were highly...

  10. Fruit production in three masting tree species does not rely on stored carbon reserves.

    PubMed

    Hoch, Günter; Siegwolf, Rolf T W; Keel, Sonja G; Körner, Christian; Han, Qingmin

    2013-03-01

    Fruiting is typically considered to massively burden the seasonal carbon budget of trees. The cost of reproduction has therefore been suggested as a proximate factor explaining observed mast-fruiting patterns. Here, we used a large-scale, continuous (13)C labeling of mature, deciduous trees in a temperate Swiss forest to investigate to what extent fruit formation in three species with masting reproduction behavior (Carpinus betulus, Fagus sylvatica, Quercus petraea) relies on the import of stored carbon reserves. Using a free-air CO2 enrichment system, we exposed trees to (13)C-depleted CO2 during 8 consecutive years. By the end of this experiment, carbon reserve pools had significantly lower δ(13)C values compared to control trees. δ(13)C analysis of new biomass during the first season after termination of the CO2 enrichment allowed us to distinguish the sources of built-in carbon (old carbon reserves vs. current assimilates). Flowers and expanding leaves carried a significant (13)C label from old carbon stores. In contrast, fruits and vegetative infructescence tissues were exclusively produced from current, unlabeled photoassimilates in all three species, including F. sylvatica, which had a strong masting season. Analyses of δ(13)C in purified starch from xylem of fruit-bearing shoots revealed a complete turn-over of starch during the season, likely due to its usage for bud break. This study is the first to directly demonstrate that fruiting is independent from old carbon reserves in masting trees, with significant implications for mechanistic models that explain mast seeding.

  11. Mast cells play a key role in Th2 cytokine-dependent asthma model through production of adhesion molecules by liberation of TNF-α.

    PubMed

    Chai, Ok Hee; Han, Eui-Hyeog; Lee, Hern-Ku; Song, Chang Ho

    2011-01-31

    Mast cells are well recognized as key cells in allergic reactions, such as asthma and allergic airway diseases. However, the effects of mast cells and TNF-α on T-helper type 2 (Th2) cytokine-dependent asthma are not clearly understood. Therefore, an aim of this study was to investigate the role of mast cells on Th2 cytokine-dependent airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation. We used genetically mast cell-deficient WBB6F1/J-Kitw/Kitw-v (W/Wv), congenic normal WBB6F1/J-Kit+/Kit+ (+/+), and mast cell-reconstituted W/Wv mouse models of allergic asthma to investigate the role of mast cells in Th2 cytokine-dependent asthma induced by ovalbumin (OVA). And we investigated whether the intratracheal injection of TNF-α directly induce the expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 in W/Wv mice. This study, with OVA-sensitized and OVA-challenged mice, revealed the following typical histopathologic features of allergic diseases: increased inflammatory cells of the airway, airway hyperresponsiveness, and increased levels of TNF-α, intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1, and vascular cellular adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1. However, the histopathologic features and levels of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 proteins in W/Wv mice after OVA challenges were significantly inhibited. Moreover, mast cell-reconstituted W/Wv mice showed restoration of histopathologic features and recovery of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 protein levels that were similar to those found in +/+ mice. Intratracheal administration of TNF-α resulted in increased ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 protein levels in W/Wv mice. These results suggest that mast cells play a key role in a Th2 cytokine-dependent asthma model through production of adhesion molecules, including ICAM-1 and VCAM-1, by liberation of TNF-α.

  12. Inhibitory effects of geranium essential oil and its major component, citronellol, on degranulation and cytokine production by mast cells.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yuko; Sato, Harumi; Yorita, Mika; Nakayama, Hiroto; Miyazato, Hironari; Sugimoto, Keiichiro; Jippo, Tomoko

    2016-06-01

    We investigated the effects of geranium essential oil (GEO) on anaphylaxis. GEO can exert antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects, but its roles in allergic reactions are incompletely understood. Here, we used mouse cells to show that GEO inhibited the degranulation of cultured mast cells (CMCs). Citronellol is the major component of GEO and inhibited CMC degranulation. The l-enantiomer of citronellol more effectively suppressed CMC degranulation than did d-citronellol. We also examined whether citronellol could inhibit the immunoglobulin (Ig) E-induced production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. Treatment with various concentrations of citronellol before CMC activation with IgE significantly inhibited the induction of TNF-α in a dose-dependent manner. Mechanistically, citronellol suppressed the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK), which is critical for ERK activation and the production of inflammatory cytokines in mast cells. These findings suggest that citronellol may represent a candidate compound for the effective treatment of allergic diseases.

  13. IL-21 reduces immediate hypersensitivity reactions in mouse skin by suppressing mast cell activation or IgE production.

    PubMed

    Tamagawa-Mineoka, Risa; Kishida, Tsunao; Mazda, Osam; Katoh, Norito

    2011-07-01

    IL-21 regulates activation, proliferation, and differentiation of various immune cells. We have previously shown that exogenous IL-21 administration reduces allergic reactions in mouse models of anaphylaxis and allergic rhinitis. However, the effects of IL-21 in allergic cutaneous reactions remain unclear. In this study, we examined the effects of IL-21 in a mouse model of the IgE-mediated cutaneous immediate hypersensitivity reaction (IHR). We also investigated the mechanism of IL-21-induced regulation of allergic cutaneous reactions. Mice were sensitized by intraperitoneal ovalbumin (OVA) injection and challenged by injecting OVA intradermally into the ears, with intraperitoneal administration of recombinant murine (rm)IL-21 during the sensitization period or after completion of sensitization. After challenge, IL-21-untreated allergic mice developed biphasic responses characterized by early-phase and late-phase reactions. The biphasic reactions were significantly reduced by rmIL-21 treatment during sensitization or after completion of sensitization. Administration of rmIL-21 during sensitization reduced the cutaneous IHR by suppressing allergen-specific IgE production. In contrast, administration of rmIL-21 after completion of sensitization did not decrease serum levels of allergen-specific IgE, but significantly suppressed mast cell degranulation in skin. These results suggest that the regulatory effects of IL-21 on the cutaneous IHR involve suppression of allergen-specific IgE production or mast cell degranulation.

  14. Hard single diffractive jet production at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Abachi, S.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; D0 Collaboration

    1996-08-01

    Preliminary results from the D{null} experiment on jet production with forward rapidity gaps in {ital p{anti p}} collisions are presented. A class of dijet events with a forward rapidity gap is observed at center-of-mass energies {radical}s = 1800 GeV and 630 GeV. The number of events with rapidity gaps at both center-of-mass energies is significantly greater than the expectation from multiplicity fluctuations and is consistent with a hard single diffractive process. A small class of events with two forward gaps and central dijets is also observed at 1800 GeV. This topology is consistent with hard double pomeron exchange.

  15. The Role of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor in Mast Cell-Stimulated Fibroblast Proliferation and Collagen Production

    PubMed Central

    Ningyan, Gu; Xu, Yao; Hongfei, Shi; Jingjing, Chen; Min, Chen

    2015-01-01

    Current clinical and translational studies have shown that mast cell plays a pivotal role in multiple fibrotic diseases including scleroderma. However, the lack of mature human mast cell culture model exhibits a major obstacle for further dissection of cytokines and signaling molecules required for mast cell mediated fibrosis in various diseases. Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor is a mast cell released pro-inflammatory cytokine which is deregulated in scleroderma patients and is also involved in non-scleroderma related fibrosis. In the current study, we successfully generated a practical and reliable human mast cell culture system with bone marrow CD34+ hematopietic precursors. The derivative mast cell is normal in terms of both morphology and function as manifested by normal degranulation. More importantly, we were able to show mast cell conditioned medium as well as MIF supplementation augments fibroblast proliferation and collagen synthesis. This positive regulatory effect of mast cell conditioned medium can be dampened by MIF antibody. In addition, MIF-knockdown significantly inhibits pro-fibrotic activities of CD34+ hematopietic precursor derived mast cells. These data strongly suggest that mast cell released MIF is required for mast cell mediated fibrogenic activities. The current manuscript seems to be the first mechanistic report showing the significance of MIF in mast cell mediated fibrosis, which may pave the way for the development of potential MIF-targeted therapy for fibrotic diseases to a further extent. Moreover, we strongly believe mast cell culture and differentiation model as well as corresponding genetic manipulation methodology will be helpful in characterizing novel mast cell based therapeutic targets. PMID:25826375

  16. Bacterial activation of mast cells.

    PubMed

    Chi, David S; Walker, Elaine S; Hossler, Fred E; Krishnaswamy, Guha

    2006-01-01

    Mast cells often are found in a perivascular location but especially in mucosae, where they may response to various stimuli. They typically associate with immediate hypersensitive responses and are likely to play a critical role in host defense. In this chapter, a common airway pathogen, Moraxella catarrhalis, and a commensal bacterium, Neiserria cinerea, are used to illustrate activation of human mast cells. A human mast cell line (HMC-1) derived from a patient with mast cell leukemia was activated with varying concentrations of heat-killed bacteria. Active aggregation of bacteria over mast cell surfaces was detected by scanning electron microscopy. The activation of mast cells was analyzed by nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation and cytokine production in culture supernatants. Both M. catarrhalis and N. cinerea induce mast cell activation and the secretion of two key inflammatory cytokines, interleukin-6 and MCP-1. This is accompanied by NF-kappaB activation. Direct bacterial contact with mast cells appears to be essential for this activation because neither cell-free bacterial supernatants nor bacterial lipopolysaccharide induce cytokine secretion.

  17. Masting in wind-pollinated trees: system-specific roles of weather and pollination dynamics in driving seed production.

    PubMed

    Bogdziewicz, Michał; Szymkowiak, Jakub; Kasprzyk, Idalia; Grewling, Łukasz; Borowski, Zbigniew; Borycka, Katarzyna; Kantorowicz, Władysław; Myszkowska, Dorota; Piotrowicz, Katarzyna; Ziemianin, Monika; Pesendorfer, Mario B

    2017-10-01

    Masting, the highly variable production of synchronized large seed crops, is a common reproductive strategy in plant populations. In wind-pollinated trees, flowering and pollination dynamics are hypothesized to provide the mechanistic link for the well-known relationship between weather and population-level seed production. Several hypotheses make predictions about the effect of weather on annual pollination success. The pollen coupling hypothesis predicts that weather and plant resources drive the flowering effort of trees, which directly translates into the size of seed crops through efficient pollination. In contrast, the pollination Moran effect hypothesis predicts that weather affects pollination efficiency, leading to occasional bumper crops. Furthermore, the recently formulated phenology synchrony hypothesis predicts that Moran effects can arise because of weather effects on flowering synchrony, which, in turn, drives pollination efficiency. We investigated the relationship between weather, airborne pollen, and seed production in common European trees, two oak species (Quercus petraea and Q. robur) and beech (Fagus sylvatica) with a 19-yr data set from three sites in Poland. Our results show that warm summers preceding flowering correlated with high pollen abundance and warm springs resulted in short pollen seasons (i.e., high flowering synchrony) for all three species. Pollen abundance was the best predictor for seed crops in beech, as predicted under pollen coupling. In oaks, short pollen seasons, rather than pollen abundance, correlated with large seed crops, providing support for the pollination Moran effect and phenology synchrony hypotheses. Fundamentally different mechanisms may therefore drive masting in species of the family Fagacae. © 2017 by the Ecological Society of America.

  18. Hard four-jet production in pA collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blok, B.; Strikman, M.; Wiedemann, U. A.

    2013-06-01

    In a suitably chosen back-to-back kinematics, four-jet production in hadronic collisions is known to be dominated by contributions from two independent partonic scattering processes, thus giving experimental access to the structure of generalized two-parton distributions (2GPDs). Here, we show that a combined measurement of the double hard four-jet cross section in proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions will allow one to disentangle different sources of two-parton correlations in the proton that cannot be disentangled with 4-jet measurements in proton-proton collisions alone. To this end, we analyze in detail the structure of 2GPDs in the nucleus (A), we calculate in the independent nucleon approximation all contributions to the double hard four-jet cross section in pA, and we determine corrections arising from the nuclear dependence of single parton distribution functions. We then outline an experimental strategy for determining the longitudinal two-parton correlations in the proton.

  19. Mast cells and COPD.

    PubMed

    Mortaz, Esmaeil; Folkerts, Gert; Redegeld, Frank

    2011-08-01

    The pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is based on the innate and adaptive inflammatory immune response to the inhalation of toxic particles and gases. Although tobacco smoking is the primary cause of this inhalation injury, many other environmental and occupational exposures contribute to the pathology of COPD. The immune inflammatory changes associated with COPD are linked to a tissue-repair and -remodeling process that increases mucus production and causes emphysematous destruction of the gas-exchanging surface of the lung. The common form of emphysema observed in smokers begins in the respiratory bronchioles near the thickened and narrowed small bronchioles that become the major site of obstruction in COPD. The inflamed airways of COPD patients contain several inflammatory cells including neutrophils, macrophages, T lymphocytes, and dendritic cells. The relative contribution of mast cells to airway injury and remodeling is not well documented. In this review, an overview is given on the possible role of mast cells and their mediators in the pathogenesis of COPD. Activation of mast cells and mast cell signaling in response to exposure to cigarette smoke is further discussed.

  20. Hard thermal photon production in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, F. D.; Thoma, M. H.

    2001-06-01

    The recent status of hard thermal photon production in relativistic heavy ion collisions is reviewed and the current rates are presented with emphasis on corrected bremsstrahlung processes in the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) and quark-hadron duality. Employing Bjorken hydrodynamics with an EOS supporting the phase transition from QGP to hot hadron gas (HHG), thermal photon spectra are computed. For SPS 158 GeV Pb+Pb collisions, comparison with other theoretical results and the WA98 direct photon data indicates significant contributions due to prompt photons. Extrapolating the presented approach to RHIC and LHC experiments, predictions of the thermal photon spectrum show a QGP outshining the HHG in the high-pT-region.

  1. Stimulus-Selective Regulation of Human Mast Cell Gene Expression, Degranulation and Leukotriene Production by Fluticasone and Salmeterol

    PubMed Central

    Catalli, Adriana; Karpov, Victor; Erdos, Levente E.; Tancowny, Brian P.; Schleimer, Robert P.; Kulka, Marianna

    2014-01-01

    Despite the fact that glucocorticoids and long acting beta agonists are effective treatments for asthma, their effects on human mast cells (MC) appear to be modest. Although MC are one of the major effector cells in the underlying inflammatory reactions associated with asthma, their regulation by these drugs is not yet fully understood and, in some cases, controversial. Using a human immortalized MC line (LAD2), we studied the effects of fluticasone propionate (FP) and salmeterol (SM), on the release of early and late phase mediators. LAD2 cells were pretreated with FP (100 nM), SM (1 µM), alone and in combination, at various incubation times and subsequently stimulated with agonists substance P, C3a and IgE/anti-IgE. Degranulation was measured by the release of β-hexosaminidase. Cytokine and chemokine expression were measured using quantitative PCR, ELISA and cytometric bead array (CBA) assays. The combination of FP and SM synergistically inhibited degranulation of MC stimulated with substance P (33% inhibition compared to control, n = 3, P<.05). Degranulation was inhibited by FP alone, but not SM, when MC were stimulated with C3a (48% inhibition, n = 3, P<.05). As previously reported, FP and SM did not inhibit degranulation when MC were stimulated with IgE/anti-IgE. FP and SM in combination inhibited substance P-induced release of tumor necrosis factor (TNF), CCL2, and CXCL8 (98%, 99% and 92% inhibition, respectively, n = 4, P<.05). Fluticasone and salmeterol synergistically inhibited mediator production by human MC stimulated with the neuropeptide substance P. This synergistic effect on mast cell signaling may be relevant to the therapeutic benefit of combination therapy in asthma. PMID:24819142

  2. Malicious Activity Simulation Tool (MAST) and Trust

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    research will enable a more secure implementation of MAST. 14. SUBJECT TERMS Malware , network security, training, Security Control...operational information systems that they manage day-to-day. MAST is a software suite that allows for simulated malware activity on operational...discussed in [1]. Particular emphasis is on the unique risk MAST represents as a malware simulation platform designed to run on production and

  3. Listeria monocytogenes induces mast cell extracellular traps.

    PubMed

    Campillo-Navarro, Marcia; Leyva-Paredes, Kahiry; Donis-Maturano, Luis; González-Jiménez, Marco; Paredes-Vivas, Yuriria; Cerbulo-Vázquez, Arturo; Serafín-López, Jeanet; García-Pérez, Blanca; Ullrich, Stephen E; Flores-Romo, Leopoldo; Pérez-Tapia, Sonia M; Estrada-Parra, Sergio; Estrada-García, Iris; Chacón-Salinas, Rommel

    2017-02-01

    Mast cells play an essential role in different immunological phenomena including allergy and infectious diseases. Several bacteria induce mast cell activation leading to degranulation and the production of several cytokines and chemokines. However, mast cells also have different microbicidal activities such as phagocytosis and the release of DNA with embedded granular proteins known as Mast Cell Extracellular Traps (MCETs). Although previous reports indicate that extracellular bacteria are able to induce MCETs little is known if intracellular bacteria can induce these structures. In this work, we evaluated MCETs induction by the intracellular bacteria Listeria monocytogenes. We found that mast cells released DNA after stimulation with L. monocytogenes, and this DNA was complexed to histone and tryptase. Before extracellular DNA release, L. monocytogenes induced modifications to the mast cell nuclear envelope and DNA was detected outside the nucleus. L. monocytogenes stimulated mast cells to produce significant amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and blocking NADPH oxidase diminished DNA release by mast cells. Finally, MCETs showed antimicrobial activity against L. monocytogenes that was partially blocked when β-hexosaminidase activity was inhibited. These results show that L. monocytogenes induces mast cells to produce microbicidal MCETs, suggesting a role for mast cells in containing infection beyond the induction of inflammation.

  4. Characterization of the choroidal mast cell.

    PubMed Central

    Godfrey, W A

    1987-01-01

    The experimental studies performed on nonpigmented rat choroids and the review of the important literature covered in this thesis seem to justify the following statements: 1. Mast cells are present in the choroid in significant numbers. 2. Mast cell numbers vary considerably from one individual to another and from one location in the choroid to another. 3. The major concentration of mast cells in the uvea is in the posterior choroid. 4. The mast cells of the choroid have a preferential location along arterial vessels. 5. Choroidal mast cell population density apparently decreases with senescence. 6. Mast cell products are present in sufficient quantity to exert substantial effects on physiologic, immunologic, and inflammatory responses in the choroid. 7. Choroidal mast cell products are released with appropriate stimulation and share some properties with the connective-tissue mast cell. 8. Choroidal mast cell demonstrate enough differences to suggest that a local differentiation may be present and may represent a locally controlled modulating effect for choroidal physiologic, immunologic, and inflammatory reactions. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 15 FIGURE 16 FIGURE 17 PMID:3328921

  5. Nicotine inhibits Fc epsilon RI-induced cysteinyl leukotrienes and cytokine production without affecting mast cell degranulation through alpha 7/alpha 9/alpha 10-nicotinic receptors.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Neerad C; Rir-sima-ah, Jules; Boyd, R Thomas; Singh, Shashi P; Gundavarapu, Sravanthi; Langley, Raymond J; Razani-Boroujerdi, Seddigheh; Sopori, Mohan L

    2010-07-01

    Smokers are less likely to develop some inflammatory and allergic diseases. In Brown-Norway rats, nicotine inhibits several parameters of allergic asthma, including the production of Th2 cytokines and the cysteinyl leukotriene LTC(4). Cysteinyl leukotrienes are primarily produced by mast cells, and these cells play a central role in allergic asthma. Mast cells express a high-affinity receptor for IgE (FcepsilonRI). Following its cross-linking, cells degranulate and release preformed inflammatory mediators (early phase) and synthesize and secrete cytokines/chemokines and leukotrienes (late phase). The mechanism by which nicotine modulates mast cell activation is unclear. Using alpha-bungarotoxin binding and quantitative PCR and PCR product sequencing, we showed that the rat mast/basophil cell line RBL-2H3 expresses nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) alpha7, alpha9, and alpha10; exposure to exceedingly low concentrations of nicotine (nanomolar), but not the biologically inactive metabolite cotinine, for > or = 8 h suppressed the late phase (leukotriene/cytokine production) but not degranulation (histamine and hexosaminidase release). These effects were unrelated to those of nicotine on intracellular free calcium concentration but were causally associated with the inhibition of cytosolic phospholipase A(2) activity and the PI3K/ERK/NF-kappaB pathway, including phosphorylation of Akt and ERK and nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB. The suppressive effect of nicotine on the late-phase response was blocked by the alpha7/alpha9-nAChR antagonists methyllycaconitine and alpha-bungarotoxin, as well as by small interfering RNA knockdown of alpha7-, alpha9-, or alpha10-nAChRs, suggesting a functional interaction between alpha7-, alpha9-, and alpha10-nAChRs that might explain the response of RBL cells to nanomolar concentrations of nicotine. This "hybrid" receptor might serve as a target for novel antiallergic/antiasthmatic therapies.

  6. Mosla dianthera inhibits mast cell-mediated allergic reactions through the inhibition of histamine release and inflammatory cytokine production

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Dong-Hee; Kim, Sang-Hyun . E-mail: shkim72@knu.ac.kr; Eun, Jae-Soon; Shin, Tae-Yong . E-mail: tyshin@woosuk.ac.kr

    2006-11-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of the aqueous extract of Mosla dianthera (Maxim.) (AEMD) on the mast cell-mediated allergy model and studied the possible mechanism of action. Mast cell-mediated allergic disease is involved in many diseases such as asthma, sinusitis and rheumatoid arthritis. The discovery of drugs for the treatment of allergic disease is an important subject in human health. AEMD inhibited compound 48/80-induced systemic reactions in mice. AEMD decreased immunoglobulin E-mediated local allergic reactions, passive cutaneous anaphylaxis. AEMD attenuated intracellular calcium level and release of histamine from rat peritoneal mast cells activated by compound 48/80. Furthermore, AEMD attenuated the phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and calcium ionophore A23187-stimulated TNF-{alpha}, IL-8 and IL-6 secretion in human mast cells. The inhibitory effect of AEMD on the pro-inflammatory cytokines was nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) dependent. AEMD decreased PMA and A23187-induced degradation of I{kappa}B{alpha} and nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B. Our findings provide evidence that AEMD inhibits mast cell-derived immediate-type allergic reactions and involvement of pro-inflammatory cytokines and NF-{kappa}B in these effects.

  7. T helper 2 and regulatory T-cell cytokine production by mast cells: a key factor in the pathogenesis of IgG4-related disease.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Mai; Sato, Yasuharu; Ohno, Kyotaro; Tanaka, Satoshi; Takata, Katsuyoshi; Gion, Yuka; Orita, Yorihisa; Ito, Toshihiro; Tachibana, Tomoyasu; Yoshino, Tadashi

    2014-08-01

    IgG4-related disease is a systemic disorder with unique clinicopathological features and uncertain etiological features and is frequently related to allergic disease. T helper 2 and regulatory T-cell cytokines have been reported to be upregulated in the affected tissues; thus, the production of these cytokines by T helper 2 and regulatory T cells has been suggested as an important factor in the pathogenesis of IgG4-related disease. However, it is not yet clear which cells produce these cytokines in IgG4-related disease, and some aspects of the disorder cannot be completely explained by T-cell-related processes. To address this, we analyzed paraffin-embedded sections of tissues from nine cases of IgG4-related submandibular gland disease, five cases of submandibular sialolithiasis, and six cases of normal submandibular gland in order to identify potential key players in the pathogenesis of IgG4-related disease. Real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis confirmed the significant upregulation of interleukin (IL)4, IL10, and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGFβ1) in IgG4-related disease. Interestingly, immunohistochemical studies indicated the presence of mast cells expressing these cytokines in diseased tissues. In addition, dual immunofluorescence assays identified cells that were double-positive for each cytokine and for KIT, which is expressed by mast cells. In contrast, the distribution of T cells did not correlate with cytokine distribution in affected tissues. We also found that the mast cells were strongly positive for IgE. This observation supports the hypothesis that mast cells are involved in IgG4-related disease, as mast cells are known to be closely related to allergic reactions and are activated in the presence of elevated non-specific IgE levels. In conclusion, our results indicate that mast cells produce T helper 2 and regulatory T-cell cytokines in tissues affected by IgG4-related disease and possibly have an important role in disease

  8. Mast Cell-Airway Smooth Muscle Crosstalk

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Davinder; Doe, Camille; Woodman, Lucy; Heidi Wan, Wing-Yan; Sutcliffe, Amanda; Hollins, Fay

    2012-01-01

    Background: The mast cell localization to airway smooth muscle (ASM) bundle in asthma is important in the development of disordered airway physiology. Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) is expressed by airway structural cells. Whether it has a role in the crosstalk between these cells is uncertain. We sought to define TSLP expression in bronchial tissue across the spectrum of asthma severity and to investigate the TSLP and TSLP receptor (TSLPR) expression and function by primary ASM and mast cells alone and in coculture. Methods: TSLP expression was assessed in bronchial tissue from 18 subjects with mild to moderate asthma, 12 with severe disease, and nine healthy control subjects. TSLP and TSLPR expression in primary mast cells and ASM was assessed by immunofluorescence, flow cytometry, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and its function was assessed by calcium imaging. The role of TSLP in mast cell and ASM proliferation, survival, differentiation, synthetic function, and contraction was examined. Results: TSLP expression was increased in the ASM bundle in mild-moderate disease. TSLP and TSLPR were expressed by mast cells and ASM and were functional. Mast cell activation by TSLP increased the production of a broad range of chemokines and cytokines, but did not affect mast cell or ASM proliferation, survival, or contraction. Conclusions: TSLP expression by the bronchial epithelium and ASM was upregulated in asthma. TSLP promoted mast cell synthetic function, but did not contribute to other functional consequences of mast cell-ASM crosstalk. PMID:22052771

  9. T cell-derived microvesicles induce mast cell production of IL-24: relevance to inflammatory skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Shefler, Irit; Pasmanik-Chor, Metsada; Kidron, Dvora; Mekori, Yoseph A; Hershko, Alon Y

    2014-01-01

    It has recently been shown that microvesicles derived from activated T cells can stimulate human mast cells (MCs) to degranulate and release several cytokines. The aim of this study was to characterize microvesicle-induced MC expression patterns. Through identification of unique cytokine and chemokine expression, we attempted to reveal pathogenetic roles for this pathway of MC activation. T cell-derived microvesicles were labeled with PKH67 to allow visualization of their interaction with human MCs. Consequent gene expression profiling was studied by using a whole-genome microarray and analyzed for identification of cellular pathway clusters. Expression of 3 selected genes, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 3 (CCL3), chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 7 (CCL7), and IL24, was validated by means of quantitative RT-PCR and specific ELISA. IL24, which has not been recognized heretofore in MCs, was also tested for its effect on keratinocyte signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 phosphorylation and for its presence in MCs in psoriatic skin lesions. Uptake and internalization of activated T cell-derived microvesicles into human MCs occurred within 24 hours. Microvesicles induced the upregulation of several clusters of genes, notably those that are cytokine related. Among these, IL24 appeared to be a hallmark of microvesicle-induced activation. MC-derived IL-24, in turn, activates keratinocytes in vitro, as manifested by signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) phosphorylation, and is produced in MCs within psoriatic lesions. Production of IL-24 is a unique feature of microvesicle-induced MC activation because its production by these cells has not been recognized thus far. We propose that this MC-derived cytokine might contribute to the pathologic findings in T cell-mediated skin inflammation. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Expulsion of Hymenolepis nana from mice with congenital deficiencies of IgE production or of mast cell development.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, N; Nawa, Y; Okamoto, K; Kobayashi, A

    1994-03-01

    The roles of IgE and mast cells on expulsion of adult Hymenolepis nana from the intestine were examined in mice. IgE-dependency was determined by comparing congenitally IgE-deficient SJA/9 and IgE-producing SJL/J mice infected with 50 H. nana eggs. Anti-H. nana IgE antibody was detected at three weeks post infection (p.i.) in SJL but not in SJA mice. The number of adult worms in the intestines of SJA and of SJL mice were similar at two weeks, but significantly more were found in SJA mice at three weeks p.i. Treatment of mice with anti-epsilon antibody also resulted in an increased worm burden at three weeks, suggesting participation of IgE in expulsion of H. nana. Intestinal mastocytosis was induced by infection regardless of the IgE status of the mice. Mast cell-dependency was tested in mast cell-deficient W/Wv and in normal littermate +/+ mice infected with 100 H. nana eggs. Anti-H. nana antibody was detected in both groups of mice at three weeks p.i. Worm expulsion seemed to be mast cell dependent because expulsion was less complete in W/Wv mice at three weeks p.i. Peripheral blood eosinophilia was comparable at three weeks p.i. in both IgE and mast cell sufficient and deficient mice. These results suggest that IgE and mast cells participate in the expulsion of H. nana adults from intestine in mice.

  11. Effects of cigarette smoke on degranulation and NO production by mast cells and epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xiu M; Kim, Henry S; Kumar, Rakesh K; Heywood, Gavin J; Hunt, John E; McNeil, H Patrick; Thomas, Paul S

    2005-01-01

    Exhaled nitric oxide (eNO) is decreased by cigarette smoking. The hypothesis that oxides of nitrogen (NOX) in cigarette smoke solution (CSS) may exert a negative feedback mechanism upon NO release from epithelial (AEC, A549, and NHTBE) and basophilic cells (RBL-2H3) was tested in vitro. CSS inhibited both NO production and degranulation (measured as release of beta-hexosaminidase) in a dose-dependent manner from RBL-2H3 cells. Inhibition of NO production by CSS in AEC, A549, and NHTBE cells was also dose-dependent. In addition, CSS decreased expression of NOS mRNA and protein expression. The addition of NO inhibitors and scavengers did not, however, reverse the effects of CSS, nor did a NO donor (SNP) or nicotine mimic CSS. N-acetyl-cysteine, partially reversed the inhibition of beta-hexosaminidase release suggesting CSS may act via oxidative free radicals. Thus, some of the inhibitory effects of CSS appear to be via oxidative free radicals rather than a NOX -related negative feedback. PMID:16168067

  12. Trade-offs between vegetative growth and acorn production in Quercus lobata during a mast year: the relevance of crop size and hierarchical level within the canopy.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Humanes, Belén; Sork, Victoria L; Espelta, Josep Maria

    2011-05-01

    The concept of trade-offs between reproduction and other fitness traits is a fundamental principle of life history theory. For many plant species, the cost of sexual reproduction affects vegetative growth in years of high seed production through the allocation of resources to reproduction at different hierarchical levels of canopy organization. We have examined these tradeoffs at the shoot and branch level in an endemic California oak, Quercus lobata, during a mast year. To determine whether acorn production caused a reduction in vegetative growth, we studied trees that were high and low acorn producers, respectively. We observed that in both low and high acorn producers, shoots without acorns located adjacent to reproductive shoots showed reduced vegetative growth but that reduced branch-level growth on acorn-bearing branches occurred only in low acorn producers. The availability of local resources, measured as previous year growth, was the main factor determining acorn biomass. These findings show that the costs of reproduction varied among hierarchical levels, suggesting some degree of physiological autonomy of shoots in terms of acorn production. Costs also differed among trees with different acorn crops, suggesting that trees with large acorn crops had more available resources to allocate for growth and acorn production and to compensate for immediate local costs of seed production. These findings provide new insight into the proximate mechanisms for mast-seeding as a reproductive strategy.

  13. Method for Developing Descriptions of Hard-to-Price Products: Results of the Telecommunications Product Study

    SciTech Connect

    Conrad, F.; Tonn, B.

    1999-05-01

    This report presents the results of a study to test a new method for developing descriptions of hard-to-price products. The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) is responsible for collecting data to estimate price indices such as the Consumers Price Index (BLS) is responsible for collecting data to estimate price indices such as the Consumers Price Index (CPI). BLS accomplishes this task by sending field staff to places of business to price actual products. The field staff are given product checklists to help them determine whether products found today are comparable to products priced the previous month. Prices for non-comparable products are not included in the current month's price index calculations. A serious problem facing BLS is developing product checklists for dynamic product areas, new industries, and the service sector. It is difficult to keep checklists up-to-date and quite often simply to develop checklists for service industry products. Some people estimates that upwards of 50 % of US economic activity is not accounted for in the CPI

  14. A nebulized complex traditional Chinese medicine inhibits Histamine and IL-4 production by ovalbumin in guinea pigs and can stabilize mast cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Traditional Chinese medicines have been used for anti-asthma treatment for several centuries in many Asian countries, and have been shown to effectively relieve symptoms. Our previous study demonstrated that a complex traditional Chinese medicine (CTCM) administered in nebulized form through the intratracheal route is effective against early-phase air-flow obstruction and can inhibit IL-5 production in ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitized guinea pigs. However, the antiasthmatic mechanisms of CTCMs are still unclear. Methods In this study, we examined the underlying mechanism of a CTCM that we used in our previous study in order to ascertain its function in the early-phase response to OVA challenge. In each group, 10–12 unsensitized or OVA-sensitized guinea pigs were treated with nebulized CTCM before OVA challenge, and the airway responses of the animals to OVA were recorded. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) samples were collected 5 min after OVA challenge, and the histamine and IL-4 contents in the BALF were measured. P815 cells (a mouse mast cell line) were untreated or pretreated with CTCM or cromolyn sodium (a mast cell stabilizer), and incubated with Compound 48/80 (mast cell activator) for 9 hr. The levels of histamine and IL-4 released from the cells were quantified. Results We found that the inhibition of bronchoconstriction by the CTCM was attenuated by pretreatment with propranolol, suggesting that the CTCM has a bronchodilator effect that is associated with beta-adrenergic receptor. Our results also showed that the CTCM inhibited histamine and IL-4 secretion in the OVA-induced airway hypersensitivity in guinea pigs at 5 min post-OVA challenge, and in vitro study revealed that the CTCM is able to stabilize mast cells. Conclusion In conclusion, our results suggested that the CTCM is a kind of bronchodilator and also a mast cell stabilizer. Our findings provide useful information regarding the possible mechanism of the CTCM, and show its potential

  15. Overview of MAST results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, I. T.; Adamek, J.; Akers, R. J.; Allan, S.; Appel, L.; Asunta, O.; Barnes, M.; Ben Ayed, N.; Bigelow, T.; Boeglin, W.; Bradley, J.; Brünner, J.; Cahyna, P.; Carr, M.; Caughman, J.; Cecconello, M.; Challis, C.; Chapman, S.; Chorley, J.; Colyer, G.; Conway, N.; Cooper, W. A.; Cox, M.; Crocker, N.; Crowley, B.; Cunningham, G.; Danilov, A.; Darrow, D.; Dendy, R.; Diallo, A.; Dickinson, D.; Diem, S.; Dorland, W.; Dudson, B.; Dunai, D.; Easy, L.; Elmore, S.; Field, A.; Fishpool, G.; Fox, M.; Fredrickson, E.; Freethy, S.; Garzotti, L.; Ghim, Y. C.; Gibson, K.; Graves, J.; Gurl, C.; Guttenfelder, W.; Ham, C.; Harrison, J.; Harting, D.; Havlickova, E.; Hawke, J.; Hawkes, N.; Hender, T.; Henderson, S.; Highcock, E.; Hillesheim, J.; Hnat, B.; Holgate, J.; Horacek, J.; Howard, J.; Huang, B.; Imada, K.; Jones, O.; Kaye, S.; Keeling, D.; Kirk, A.; Klimek, I.; Kocan, M.; Leggate, H.; Lilley, M.; Lipschultz, B.; Lisgo, S.; Liu, Y. Q.; Lloyd, B.; Lomanowski, B.; Lupelli, I.; Maddison, G.; Mailloux, J.; Martin, R.; McArdle, G.; McClements, K.; McMillan, B.; Meakins, A.; Meyer, H.; Michael, C.; Militello, F.; Milnes, J.; Morris, A. W.; Motojima, G.; Muir, D.; Nardon, E.; Naulin, V.; Naylor, G.; Nielsen, A.; O'Brien, M.; O'Gorman, T.; Ono, Y.; Oliver, H.; Pamela, S.; Pangione, L.; Parra, F.; Patel, A.; Peebles, W.; Peng, M.; Perez, R.; Pinches, S.; Piron, L.; Podesta, M.; Price, M.; Reinke, M.; Ren, Y.; Roach, C.; Robinson, J.; Romanelli, M.; Rozhansky, V.; Saarelma, S.; Sangaroon, S.; Saveliev, A.; Scannell, R.; Schekochihin, A.; Sharapov, S.; Sharples, R.; Shevchenko, V.; Silburn, S.; Simpson, J.; Storrs, J.; Takase, Y.; Tanabe, H.; Tanaka, H.; Taylor, D.; Taylor, G.; Thomas, D.; Thomas-Davies, N.; Thornton, A.; Turnyanskiy, M.; Valovic, M.; Vann, R.; Walkden, N.; Wilson, H.; van Wyk, F.; Yamada, T.; Zoletnik, S.; MAST; MAST Upgrade Teams

    2015-10-01

    in solenoid-free start-up. A new proton detector has characterized escaping fusion products. Langmuir probes and a high-speed camera suggest filaments play a role in particle transport in the private flux region whilst coherence imaging has measured scrape-off layer (SOL) flows. BOUT++ simulations show that fluxes due to filaments are strongly dependent on resistivity and magnetic geometry of the SOL, with higher radial fluxes at higher resistivity. Finally, MAST Upgrade is due to begin operation in 2016 to support ITER preparation and importantly to operate with a Super-X divertor to test extended leg concepts for particle and power exhaust.

  16. Cordyceps militaris extract suppresses dextran sodium sulfate-induced acute colitis in mice and production of inflammatory mediators from macrophages and mast cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Eun Su; Oh, Joo Yeon; Park, Hye-Jin

    2011-04-12

    Cordyceps militaris is a well-known medicinal mushroom used for treatment of asthma, and other bronchial and lung inflammatory diseases. To investigate the anti-inflammatory effects and mechanism of Cordyceps militaris extract on a murine model of acute colitis. We induced colitis using DSS for 1 week. The disease activity index (DAI) took into account body weight loss, diarrhea, and bleeding. Colon length and crypt length were measured using a microscope. Structural changes of the colon were observed by H&E staining. NO, iNOS, and TNF-α were determined using the Griess assay. iNOS protein was determined using western blotting and quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, respectively. Degranulated mast cells in colon tissue were stained using toluidine blue. The degree of degranulated RBL-2H3 cells was measured by the β-hexosaminidase assay. Cordyceps militaris extract significantly attenuated DSS-induced DAI scores (e.g., body weight loss, diarrhea, gross bleeding). Cordyceps militaris extract also effectively prevented shortening of colon length and crypt length. Histological analysis indicated that Cordyceps militaris extract suppressed epithelial damage, loss of goblet cells, loss of crypts, and infiltration of inflammatory cells induced by DSS. In addition, Cordyceps militaris extract inhibited iNOS and TNF-α mRNA expression in colon tissue of DSS-induced colitis and in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. Cordyceps militaris extract suppressed degranulation of mast cells in the colon of mice with DSS-induced colitis and in antigen-stimulated mast cells. These results suggest that Cordyceps militaris extract has anti-inflammatory activity in DSS-induced acute colitis by down-regulating production and expression of inflammatory mediators. These findings suggest that Cordyceps militaris extract might be applied as an agent for prevention or treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights

  17. 46. BASE OF UMBILICAL MAST FROM UMBILICAL MAST TRENCH. ERECTION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    46. BASE OF UMBILICAL MAST FROM UMBILICAL MAST TRENCH. ERECTION AND RETRACTION CYLINDERS BETWEEN MAST AND TRENCH WALL. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  18. Resveratrol Suppresses Cytokine Production Linked to FcεRI-MAPK Activation in IgE-Antigen Complex-Exposed Basophilic Mast Cells and Mice.

    PubMed

    Han, Seon-Young; Choi, Yean-Jung; Kang, Min-Kyung; Park, Jung Han Yoon; Kang, Young-Hee

    2015-01-01

    A complicated interplay between resident mast cells and other recruited inflammatory cells contributes to the development and progression of allergic inflammation entailing the promotion of T helper 2 (Th2) cytokine responses. The current study examined whether resveratrol suppressed the production of inflammatory Th2 cytokines in cultured rat basophilic leukemia RBL-2H3 cells. Cells pre-treated with resveratrol nontoxic at 1–25 μM were sensitized with anti-dinitrophenyl (anti-DNP), and subsequently stimulated by dinitrophenyl-human serum albumin (DNP–HSA) antigen. Resveratrol dose-dependently diminished the secretion of interleukin (IL)-3, IL-4, IL-13 as well as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α by the antigen stimulation from sensitized cells. It was found that resveratrol mitigated the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, ERK, and JNK elevated in mast cells exposed to Fc epsilon receptor I (FcεRI)-mediated immunoglobulin E (IgE)-antigen complex. The FcεRI aggregation was highly enhanced on the surface of mast cells following the HSA stimulation, which was retarded by treatment with 1–25 μM resveratrol. The IgE-receptor engagement rapidly induced tyrosine phosphorylation of c-Src-related focal adhesion protein paxillin involved in the cytoskeleton rearrangement. The FcεRI-mediated rapid activation of c-Src and paxillin was attenuated in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, the paxillin activation entailed p38 MAPK and ERK-responsive signaling, but the JNK activation was less involved. Consistently, oral administration of resveratrol reduced the tissue level of phosphorylated paxillin in the dorsal skin of DNP–HSA-challenged mice. The other tyrosine kinase Tyk2-STAT1 signaling was activated in the dorsal epidermis of antigen-exposed mice, which was associated with allergic inflammation. These results showed that resveratrol inhibited Th2 cytokines- and paxillin-linked allergic responses dependent upon MAPK signaling. Therefore, resveratrol may possess the

  19. Immune Response to Snake Envenoming and Treatment with Antivenom; Complement Activation, Cytokine Production and Mast Cell Degranulation

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Shelley F.; Isbister, Geoffrey K.; Shahmy, Seyed; Mohamed, Fahim; Abeysinghe, Chandana; Karunathilake, Harendra; Ariaratnam, Ariaranee; Jacoby-Alner, Tamara E.; Cotterell, Claire L.; Brown, Simon G. A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Snake bite is one of the most neglected public health issues in poor rural communities worldwide. In addition to the clinical effects of envenoming, treatment with antivenom frequently causes serious adverse reactions, including hypersensitivity reactions (including anaphylaxis) and pyrogenic reactions. We aimed to investigate the immune responses to Sri Lankan snake envenoming (predominantly by Russell's viper) and antivenom treatment. Methodology/Principal Findings Plasma concentrations of Interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), soluble TNF receptor I (sTNFRI), anaphylatoxins (C3a, C4a, C5a; markers of complement activation), mast cell tryptase (MCT), and histamine were measured in 120 Sri Lankan snakebite victims, both before and after treatment with antivenom. Immune mediator concentrations were correlated with envenoming features and the severity of antivenom-induced reactions including anaphylaxis. Envenoming was associated with complement activation and increased cytokine concentrations prior to antivenom administration, which correlated with non-specific systemic symptoms of envenoming but not with coagulopathy or neurotoxicity. Typical hypersensitivity reactions to antivenom occurred in 77/120 patients (64%), satisfying criteria for a diagnosis of anaphylaxis in 57/120 (48%). Pyrogenic reactions were observed in 32/120 patients (27%). All patients had further elevations in cytokine concentrations, but not complement activation, after the administration of antivenom, whether a reaction was noted to occur or not. Patients with anaphylaxis had significantly elevated concentrations of MCT and histamine. Conclusions/Significance We have demonstrated that Sri Lankan snake envenoming is characterized by significant complement activation and release of inflammatory mediators. Antivenom treatment further enhances the release of inflammatory mediators in all patients, with anaphylactic reactions characterised by high levels of mast

  20. Mast cell secretome: Soluble and vesicular components.

    PubMed

    Vukman, Krisztina V; Försönits, András; Oszvald, Ádám; Tóth, Eszter Á; Buzás, Edit I

    2017-02-09

    Mast cells are multifunctional master cells implicated in both innate and adaptive immune responses. Their role has been best characterized in allergy and anaphylaxis; however, emerging evidences support their contribution to a wide variety of human diseases. Mast cells, being capable of both degranulation and subsequent recovery, have recently attracted substantial attention as also being rich sources of secreted extracellular vesicles (including exosomes and microvesicles). Along with secreted de novo synthesized soluble molecules and secreted preformed granules, the membrane-enclosed extracellular vesicles represent a previously unexplored part of the mast cell secretome. In this review article we summarize available data regarding the different soluble molecules and membrane-enclosed structures secreted by mast cells. Furthermore, we provide an overview of the release mechanisms including degranulation, piecemeal degranulation, transgranulation, and secretion of different types of extracellular vesicles. Finally, we aim to give a summary of the known biological functions associated with the different mast cell-derived secretion products. The increasingly recognized complexity of mast cell secretome may provide important novel clues to processes by which mast cells contribute to the development of different pathologies and are capable of orchestrating immune responses both in health and disease.

  1. Mast Cell Stabilization Ameliorates Autoimmune Anti-Myeloperoxidase Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Poh-Yi; O’Sullivan, Kim M.; Ooi, Joshua D.; Alikhan, Maliha A.; Odobasic, Dragana; Summers, Shaun A.; Kitching, A. Richard

    2016-01-01

    Observations in experimental murine myeloperoxidase (MPO)-ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) show mast cells degranulate, thus enhancing injury as well as producing immunomodulatory IL-10. Here we report that, compared with biopsy specimens from control patients, renal biopsy specimens from 44 patients with acute AAV had more mast cells in the interstitium, which correlated with the severity of tubulointerstitial injury. Furthermore, most of the mast cells were degranulated and spindle-shaped in patients with acute AAV, indicating an activated phenotype. We hypothesized that the mast cell stabilizer disodium cromoglycate would attenuate mast cell degranulation without affecting IL-10 production. We induced anti-MPO GN by immunizing mice with MPO and a low dose of anti-glomerular basement membrane antibody. When administered before or after induction of MPO autoimmunity in these mice, disodium cromoglycate attenuated mast cell degranulation, development of autoimmunity, and development of GN, without diminishing IL-10 production. In contrast, administration of disodium cromoglycate to mast cell-deficient mice had no effect on the development of MPO autoimmunity or GN. MPO-specific CD4+ effector T cell proliferation was enhanced by co-culture with mast cells, but in the presence of disodium cromoglycate, proliferation was inhibited and IL-10 production was enhanced. These results indicate that disodium cromoglycate blocks injurious mast cell degranulation specifically without affecting the immunomodulatory role of these cells. Thus as a therapeutic, disodium cromoglycate may substantially enhance the regulatory role of mast cells in MPO-AAV. PMID:26374606

  2. Inhibitory effects of Piper betle on production of allergic mediators by bone marrow-derived mast cells and lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wirotesangthong, Mali; Inagaki, Naoki; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Thanakijcharoenpath, Witchuda; Nagai, Hiroichi

    2008-03-01

    The leaves of the Piper betle Linn. (Piperaceae) are used in traditional medicine and possess anti-oxidant, anti-bacterial, anti-fungal, anti-diabetic and radioprotective activities. However, little is known about their anti-allergic activity. Therefore, the effects of P. betle ethanolic extract (PE) on the production of histamine and granulocyte macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) by murine bone marrow mast cells (BMMCs) and on the secretion of eotaxin and IL-8 by the human lung epithelial cell line, BEAS-2B, were investigated in vitro. PE significantly decreased histamine and GM-CSF produced by an IgE-mediated hypersensitive reaction, and inhibited eotaxin and IL-8 secretion in a TNF-alpha and IL-4-induced allergic reaction. The results suggest that P. betle may offer a new therapeutic approach for the control of allergic diseases through inhibition of production of allergic mediators.

  3. Effect of water hardness on the production and microbicidal efficacy of slightly acidic electrolyzed water.

    PubMed

    Forghani, Fereidoun; Park, Joong-Hyun; Oh, Deog-Hwan

    2015-06-01

    Slightly acidic electrolyzed water (SAEW) has been proved as an effective sanitizer against microorganisms attached to foods. However, its physical properties and inactivation efficacy are affected by several factors such as water hardness. Therefore, in this study the effect of water hardness on SAEW properties were studied. Pure cultures of foodborne bacteria were used in vitro and in vivo to evaluate the inactivation efficacy of the SAEWs produced. Results obtained showed water hardness to be an important factor in the production of SAEW. Low water hardness may result in the necessity of further optimization of production process. In this study the addition of 5% HCl and 2 M NaCl at 1.5 mL/min flow rate was found to be the best electrolyte concentration for the optimization of SAEW production from low hardness water (34 ± 2 mg/L). Furthermore, the results showed that pre-heating was a better approach compared to post-production heating of SAEW, resulting in higher ACC values and therefor better sanitization efficacy.

  4. Sources and methods to reconstruct past masting patterns in European oak species

    PubMed Central

    Szabó, Péter

    2017-01-01

    The irregular occurrence of good seed years in forest trees is known in many parts of the world. Mast year frequency in the past few decades can be examined through field observational studies; however, masting patterns in the more distant past are equally important in gaining a better understanding of long-term forest ecology. Past masting patterns can be studied through the examination of historical written sources. These pose considerable challenges, because data in them were usually not recorded with the aim of providing information about masting. Several studies examined masting in the deeper past, however, authors hardly ever considered the methodological implications of using and combining various source types. This paper provides a critical overview of the types of archival written that are available for the reconstruction of past masting patterns for European oak species and proposes a method to unify and evaluate different types of data. Available sources cover approximately eight centuries and can be put into two basic categories: direct observations on the amount of acorns and references to sums of money received in exchange for access to acorns. Because archival sources are highly different in origin and quality, the optimal solution for creating databases for past masting data is a three-point scale: zero mast, moderate mast, good mast. When larger amounts of data are available in a unified three-point-scale database, they can be used to test hypotheses about past masting frequencies, the driving forces of masting or regional masting patterns. PMID:28503019

  5. Strong impact parameter dependence of hard photon production in intermediate energy heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migneco, E.; Agodi, C.; Alba, R.; Bellia, G.; Coniglione, R.; Del Zoppo, A.; Finocchiaro, P.; Maiolino, C.; Piattelli, P.; Russo, G.; Sapienza, P.; Badalá, A.; Barbera, R.; Palmeri, A.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Riggi, F.; Russo, A. C.; Peghaire, A.; Bonasera, A.

    1993-01-01

    The dependence of the high energy photon production on the impact parameter has been investigated in the reaction 129Xe+ 197Au at 44 MeV/u using the multidetector array MEDEA. A strong dependence of the high energy photon production probability on the impact parameter has been observed, while the slope parameter of the photon spectrum is almost constant. The data support the interpretation of the hard photon production in terms of first chance n-p collisions.

  6. Mast Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Elaine Zayas Marcelino; Jamur, Maria Célia

    2014-01-01

    Since first described by Paul Ehrlich in 1878, mast cells have been mostly viewed as effectors of allergy. It has been only in the past two decades that mast cells have gained recognition for their involvement in other physiological and pathological processes. Mast cells have a widespread distribution and are found predominantly at the interface between the host and the external environment. Mast cell maturation, phenotype and function are a direct consequence of the local microenvironment and have a marked influence on their ability to specifically recognize and respond to various stimuli through the release of an array of biologically active mediators. These features enable mast cells to act as both first responders in harmful situations as well as to respond to changes in their environment by communicating with a variety of other cells implicated in physiological and immunological responses. Therefore, the critical role of mast cells in both innate and adaptive immunity, including immune tolerance, has gained increased prominence. Conversely, mast cell dysfunction has pointed to these cells as the main offenders in several chronic allergic/inflammatory disorders, cancer and autoimmune diseases. This review summarizes the current knowledge of mast cell function in both normal and pathological conditions with regards to their regulation, phenotype and role. PMID:25062998

  7. Mast cells and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Frenzel, Laurent; Hermine, Olivier

    2013-03-01

    The prominent role for mast cells in the inflammatory response has been increasingly well documented in recent years. Mast cells not only contribute to maintain homeostasis via degranulation and to generate IgE-mediated allergic reactions, but also sit at a major crossroads for both innate and adaptive immune responses. The part played by mast cells in chronic inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis identifies mast cells as a valuable treatment target in these diseases. Tyrosine-kinase inhibitors targeting the c-Kit mast cell receptor have been found effective in treating rheumatoid arthritis, asthma, and multiple sclerosis. When used in combination with other available drugs, tyrosine-kinase inhibitors may improve the therapeutic management of these diseases.

  8. Mast cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Georgin-Lavialle, Sophie; Lhermitte, Ludovic; Dubreuil, Patrice; Chandesris, Marie-Olivia; Hermine, Olivier; Damaj, Gandhi

    2013-02-21

    Mast cell leukemia (MCL) is a very rare form of aggressive systemic mastocytosis accounting for < 1% of all mastocytosis. It may appear de novo or secondary to previous mastocytosis and shares more clinicopathologic aspects with systemic mastocytosis than with acute myeloid leukemia. Symptoms of mast cell activation-involvement of the liver, spleen, peritoneum, bones, and marrow-are frequent. Diagnosis is based on the presence of ≥ 20% atypical mast cells in the marrow or ≥ 10% in the blood; however, an aleukemic variant is frequently encountered in which the number of circulating mast cells is < 10%. The common phenotypic features of pathologic mast cells encountered in most forms of mastocytosis are unreliable in MCL. Unexpectedly, non-KIT D816V mutations are frequent and therefore, complete gene sequencing is necessary. Therapy usually fails and the median survival time is < 6 months. The role of combination therapies and bone marrow transplantation needs further investigation.

  9. The Comprehension and Production of Wh-Questions in Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedmann, Naama; Szterman, Ronit

    2011-01-01

    Hearing loss during the critical period for language acquisition restricts spoken language input. This input limitation, in turn, may hamper syntactic development. This study examined the comprehension, production, and repetition of Wh-questions in deaf or hard-of-hearing (DHH) children. The participants were 11 orally trained Hebrew-speaking…

  10. Mast cells and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Stassen, Michael; Hültner, Lothar; Müller, Christian; Schmitt, Edgar

    2002-01-01

    Mast cells have long been recognized as potent producers of a large panel of biologically highly active mediators such as biogenic amines, arachidonic acid metabolites, cytokines and chemokines, but most of their biological functions have been elusive and speculative. By taking advantage of mast cell-deficient mice, the role of mast cells in a variety of experimental settings can now be studied in detail and such approaches have dramatically altered and enlarged our knowledge about mast cell biology and function. Herein we will focus on the role of mast cells in inflammatory reactions of diverse origin, such as delayed type hypersensitivity, atopy, immune complex-mediated inflammation and innate immune responses. From the current standpoint, there is no doubt that the most outstanding and beneficial feature of mast cells is their recently discovered ability to induce a life-saving inflammatory response rapidly upon encountering microbes and microbial constituents. Nevertheless, the picture is also emerging that mast cells are deeply involved in the induction and maintenance of a variety of severe allergic and autoimmune diseases. However, a deeper understanding of their activation and immune-modulatory capacity might open a new window for the development of curative strategies.

  11. Imaging the proton via hard exclusive production in diffractive pp scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Hyde; Leonid Frankfurt; Mark Strikman; Christian Weiss

    2007-05-21

    We discuss the prospects for probing Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) via exclusive production of a high-mass system (H = heavy quarkonium, di-photon, di-jet, Higgs boson) in diffractive pp scattering, pp -> p + H + p. In such processes the interplay of hard and soft interactions gives rise to a diffraction pattern in the final-state proton transverse momenta, which is sensitive to the transverse spatial distribution of partons in the colliding protons. We comment on the plans for diffractive pp measurements at RHIC and LHC. Such studies could complement future measurements of GPDs in hard exclusive ep scattering (JLab, COMPASS, EIC).

  12. Process for casting hard-faced, lightweight camshafts and other cylindrical products

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Jeffrey S.; Turner, Paul C.; Argetsinger, Edward R.; Wilson, Rick D.

    1996-01-01

    A process for casting a hard-faced cylindrical product such as an automobile camshaft includes the steps of: (a) preparing a composition formed from a molten base metal and an additive in particle form and having a hardness value greater than the hardness value of the base metal; (b) introducing the composition into a flask containing a meltable pattern of a cylindrical product such as an automobile camshaft to be manufactured and encased in sand to allow the composition to melt the pattern and assume the shape of the pattern within the sand; and (c) rotating the flask containing the pattern about the longitudinal axes of both the flask and the pattern as the molten base metal containing the additive in particle form is introduced into the flask to cause particles of the additive entrained in the molten base metal to migrate by centrifugal action to the radial extremities of the pattern and thereby provide a cylindrical product having a hardness value greater at it's radial extremities than at its center when the molten base metal solidifies.

  13. Increased local IgE production induced by common aeroallergens and phenotypic alteration of mast cells in Chinese eosinophilic, but not non-eosinophilic, chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Ping-Ping; Zhang, Ya-Na; Liao, Bo; Ma, Jin; Wang, Bao-Feng; Wang, Heng; Zeng, Ming; Liu, Wei-Hong; Schleimer, Robert P.; Liu, Zheng

    2014-01-01

    Background Eosinophilic and non-eosinophilic chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) display distinct patterns of inflammation. However, the pathogenic mechanisms underlying the heterogeneity of CRSwNP need further investigation. Objective To investigate local immunoglobulin E (IgE) production and phenotype of mast cells in eosinophilic and non-eosinophilic CRSwNP in Chinese. Methods Total and specific IgE levels were analyzed by means of the ImmunoCAP system. The molecular steps involved in class switch recombination to IgE were investigated using RT-PCR assays. Mast cell phenotypes, IgE- and high affinity IgE receptor (FcεRI)-positive cells, and allergen binding to specific IgE in sinonasal mucosa were determined by means of immunohistochemistry. Results Compared with controls and non-eosinophilic CRSwNP, local total IgE levels were increased, and local specific IgE to common aeroallergens was more frequently found, in Chinese eosinophilic CRSwNP independent of atopy and without significant association with Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxins. The ε germline gene transcript was also more frequently detected in eosinophilic CRSwNP. The number of IgE- and FcεRI-positive cells was increased in eosinophilic CRSwNP. Most IgE- and FcεRI-positive cells were mast cells. Dust mite antigens could bind to IgE on mast cells in situ. The number of mast cells positive for both tryptase and chymase and activated mast cells was increased in eosinophilic CRSwNP and the number of activated mast cells positively correlated with local IgE level, eotaxin-1 level, and eosinophil count in CRSwNP. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance The local IgE induced by common aeroallergens may mediate mast cell activation and contribute to subsequent eosinophilic inflammation in Chinese CRSwNP. This study offers a rationale for considering intervention strategies designed to target “local allergy” in eosinophilic CRSwNP. PMID:24597471

  14. Chemical Characterization of Beer Aging Products Derived from Hard Resin Components in Hops (Humulus lupulus L.).

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Yoshimasa; Yamada, Makiko; Taniguchi, Harumi; Matsukura, Yasuko; Shindo, Kazutoshi

    2015-11-25

    The bitter taste of beer originates from resins in hops (Humulus lupulus L.), which are classified into two subtypes (soft and hard). Whereas the nature and reactivity of soft-resin-derived compounds, such as α-, β-, and iso-α-acids, are well studied, there is only a little information on the compounds in hard resin. For this work, hard resin was prepared from stored hops and investigated for its compositional changes in an experimental model of beer aging. The hard resin contained a series of α-acid oxides. Among them, 4'-hydroxyallohumulinones were unstable under beer storage conditions, and their transformation induced primary compositional changes of the hard resin during beer aging. The chemical structures of the products, including novel polycyclic compounds scorpiohumulinols A and B and dicyclohumulinols A and B, were determined by HRMS and NMR analyses. These compounds were proposed to be produced via proton-catalyzed cyclization reactions of 4'-hydroxyallohumulinones. Furthermore, they were more stable than their precursor 4'-hydroxyallohumulinones during prolonged storage periods.

  15. Mast and weather influences on population trends of a species of concern: The allegheny woodrat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manjerovic, M.B.; Wood, P.B.; Edwards, J.W.

    2009-01-01

    Over the past 20-30 y. northern and western populations of the Allegheny woodrat (Neotoma magister) have experienced large declines. whereas populations in the core of the range are assumed to be stable. We examined population trends at two study areas in northcentral West Virginia along the western ridge of the central Appalachian Mountains. Temperature and precipitation parameters along with mast production were examined to determine if these environmental variables impacted the population. Based on a 5 y dataset. our results indicate a yearly decrease in the overall population. with adult females most affected. Hard and soft mast availability related to adult female capture rates. whereas temperatures significantly affected juvenile. adult female and overall capture rates. Juvenile summer capture rates increased with warmer temperatures the preceding winter. Female summer capture rates decreased with warmer temperatures the preceding spring suggesting that effects of warming should be added as a potential threat to the Allegheny woodrat.

  16. Analytical Expressions for the Hard-Scattering Production of Massive Partons

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Cheuk-Yin

    2016-01-01

    We obtain explicit expressions for the two-particle differential cross section $E_c E_\\kappa d\\sigma (AB \\to c\\kappa X) /d\\bb c d \\bb \\kappa$ and the two-particle angular correlation function \\break $d\\sigma(AB$$ \\to$$ c\\kappa X)/d\\Delta \\phi \\, d\\Delta y$ in the hard-scattering production of massive partons in order to exhibit the ``ridge" structure on the away side in the hard-scattering process. The single-particle production cross section $d\\sigma(AB \\to cX) /dy_c c_T dc_T $ is also obtained and compared with the ALICE experimental data for charm production in $pp$ collisions at 7 TeV at LHC.

  17. Seasonal Mast Availability for Wildlife in the Piedmont Region of Georgia

    Treesearch

    John W. Edwards; David C. Guynn; Susan C. Loeb

    1993-01-01

    We measured mast production by traditional and buffer species for 2 years on the Piedmont National Wildlife Refuge in Georgia. Our objectives were to determine how these two types varied on a seasonal, annual, and habitat basis. Mast from buffer species was more frequent and diverse than that from traditional mast producers. Our findings suggest that although...

  18. Potential role of mast cells in hamster cheek pouch carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Aromando, Romina F; Pérez, Miguel A; Heber, Elisa M; Trivillin, Verónica A; Tomasi, Víctor H; Schwint, Amanda E; Itoiz, María E

    2008-11-01

    During the process of activation, mast cells release products stored in their granules. Tryptase, a protease released from mast cell granules after activation, induces tumor cell proliferation through the activation of PAR-2 (protease activated receptor 2) on the plasma membrane of carcinoma cells. Chemical cancerization (DMBA) of the hamster cheek pouch is the most accepted model of oral cancer. However, there are no reports on the activation of mast cells during experimental carcinogenesis or on the correlation between mast cell activation and cell proliferation. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the potential effect of mast cells on the proliferation of epithelial cells at different times during the cancerization process. Paraffin serial sections of cancerized, tumor-bearing pouches were stained with Alcian Blue-Safranin to identify the different degrees of mast cell activation. Immunohistochemistry was performed to identify BrdU-positive cells to study tumor cell proliferation. Mast cells were counted and grouped into two categories: inactive mast cells AB-S+++ (red) and active mast cells AB+++S- (blue). Mast cell counts were performed in tumor stroma, base of the tumor (connective tissue immediately below the exophytic tumor), connective and muscle tissue underlying the cancerized epithelium (pouch wall) and adventitious tissue underlying the pouch wall. There was a significant increase in the number of mast cells at the base of tumors (p<0.001) compared to the number of mast cells in the wall of the pouch and in tumor stroma. In normal non-cancerized pouches, inactive mast cells were prevalent both in the wall (AB:S=1:2.15; p<0.001) and in the adventitious tissue (AB:S=1:1.6; p<0.004) of the hamster cheek pouch. At most of the experimental times examined, the ratio of active/inactive mast cells (AB/S) in the wall approximated unity and even reverted. The ratio of mast cells was AB:S 1:1.05 at the base of the tumor and 1:0.24 in tumor stroma (p<0

  19. LPS-induced production of TNF-α and IL-6 in mast cells is dependent on p38 but independent of TTP.

    PubMed

    Hochdörfer, Thomas; Tiedje, Christopher; Stumpo, Deborah J; Blackshear, Perry J; Gaestel, Matthias; Huber, Michael

    2013-06-01

    The production of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-6 is regulated by various mRNA-binding proteins, influencing stability and translation of the respective transcripts. Research in macrophages has shown the importance of the p38-MK2-tristetraprolin (TTP) axis for regulation of TNF-α mRNA stability and translation. In the current study we examined a possible involvement of p38 and TTP in LPS-induced cytokine production in bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs). Using pharmacological inhibitors we initially found a strong dependence of LPS-induced TNF-α and IL-6 production on p38 activation, whereas activation of the Erk pathway appeared dispensable. LPS treatment also induced p38-dependent expression of the TTP gene. This prompted us to analyze the proinflammatory cytokine response in BMMCs generated from TTP-deficient mice. Unexpectedly, there were no significant differences in cytokine production between TTP-deficient and WT BMMCs in response to LPS. Gene expression and cytokine production of TNF-α and IL-6 as well as stability of the TNF-α transcript were comparable between TTP-deficient and WT BMMCs. In contrast to TTP mRNA expression, TTP protein expression could not be detected in BMMCs. While we successfully precipitated and detected TTP from lysates of LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages, this was not accomplished from BMMC lysates. In contrast, we found mRNA and protein expressions of the other TIS11 family members connected to regulation of mRNA stability, BRF1 and BRF2, and detected their interaction with 14-3-3 proteins. These data suggest that control of cytokine mRNA stability and translation in MCs is exerted by proteins different from TTP.

  20. 45. VIEW OF UMBILICAL MAST TRENCH FROM BASE OF MAST, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. VIEW OF UMBILICAL MAST TRENCH FROM BASE OF MAST, FROM SOUTH. ACTUATORS FOR MAST TRENCH DOORS VISIBLE CONNECTING DOORS AND WALL. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  1. Mast cells and mastocytosis

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Mast cells have been recognized for well over 100 years. With time, human mast cells have been documented to originate from CD34+ cells, and have been implicated in host responses in both innate and acquired immunity. In clinical immunology, they are recognized for their central role in IgE-mediated degranulation and allergic inflammation by virtue of their expression of the high-affinity receptor for IgE and release of potent proinflammatory mediators. In hematology, the clinical disease of mastocytosis is characterized by a pathologic increase of mast cells in tissues, often associated with mutations in KIT, the receptor for stem cell factor. More recently, and with increased understanding of how human mast cells are activated through receptors including the high-affinity receptor for IgE and KIT, specific tyrosine kinase inhibitors have been identified with the potential to interrupt signaling pathways and thus limit the proliferation of mast cells as well as their activation through immunoglobulin receptors. PMID:18684881

  2. Growth and Saxitoxin Production by Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii (Cyanobacteria) Correlate with Water Hardness

    PubMed Central

    Carneiro, Ronaldo Leal; Pacheco, Ana Beatriz Furlanetto; Azevedo, Sandra Maria Feliciano de Oliveira e

    2013-01-01

    The cosmopolitan and increasing distribution of Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii can be attributed to its ecophysiological plasticity and tolerance to changing environmental factors in water bodies. In reservoirs in the semi-arid region of Brazil, the presence and common dominance of C. raciborskii have been described in waters that are considered hard. We investigated the response of a Brazilian C. raciborskii strain to water hardness by evaluating its growth and saxitoxin production. Based on environmental data, a concentration of 5 mM of different carbonate salts was tested. These conditions affected growth either positively (MgCO3) or negatively (CaCO3 and Na2CO3). As a control for the addition of cations, MgCl2, CaCl2 and NaCl were tested at 5 or 10 mM, and MgCl2 stimulated growth, NaCl slowed but sustained growth, and CaCl2 inhibited growth. Most of the tested treatments increased the saxitoxin (STX) cell quota after six days of exposure. After 12 days, STX production returned to concentrations similar to that of the control, indicating an adaptation to the altered water conditions. In the short term, cell exposure to most of the tested conditions favored STX production over neoSTX production. These results support the noted plasticity of C. raciborskii and highlight its potential to thrive in hard waters. Additionally, the observed relationship between saxitoxin production and water ion concentrations characteristic of the natural environments can be important for understanding toxin content variation in other harmful algae that produce STX. PMID:23955286

  3. The FcepsilonRIbeta immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif exerts inhibitory control on MAPK and IkappaB kinase phosphorylation and mast cell cytokine production.

    PubMed

    Furumoto, Yasuko; Nunomura, Satoshi; Terada, Tomoyoshi; Rivera, Juan; Ra, Chisei

    2004-11-19

    The high affinity IgE Fc receptor (FcepsilonRI) beta chain functions as a signal amplifier and has been linked to atopy, asthma, and allergy. Herein, we report on a previously unrecognized negative regulatory role for the nonconventional beta chain immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif that contains three tyrosine residues (YX5YX3Y). Degranulation and leukotriene production was found to be impaired in cells expressing the mutated FcepsilonRIbeta immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs FYY, YYF, FYF, and FFF. In contrast, cytokine synthesis and secretion were enhanced in the YFY and FFF mutants. FcepsilonRI phosphorylation and Lyn kinase co-immunoprecipitation was intact in the YFY mutant but was lost in the FYF and FFF mutants. The phosphorylation of Syk, LAT, phospholipase gamma1/2, and Srchomology 2 domain-containing protein phosphatase 2 was intact, whereas the phosphorylation of SHIP-1 was significantly reduced in the YFY mutant cells. The FYF and FFF mutants were defective in phosphorylating all of these molecules. In contrast, the phosphorylation of ERK, p38 MAPK, IkappaB kinase beta (IKKbeta), and nuclear NFkappaB activity was enhanced in the YFY and FFF mutants. These findings show that the FcepsilonRIbeta functions to both selectively amplify (degranulation and leukotriene secretion) and dampen (lymphokine) mast cell effector responses.

  4. Mast Cell and Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yunzhi; Chen, Guangjie

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells are important in innate immune system. They have been appreciated as potent contributors to allergic reaction. However, increasing evidence implicates the important role of mast cells in autoimmune disease like rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. Here we review the current stage of knowledge about mast cells in autoimmune diseases. PMID:25944979

  5. The impact of mast cells on cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Kritikou, Eva; Kuiper, Johan; Kovanen, Petri T; Bot, Ilze

    2016-05-05

    Mast cells comprise an innate immune cell population, which accumulates in tissues proximal to the outside environment and, upon activation, augments the progression of immunological reactions through the release and diffusion of either pre-formed or newly generated mediators. The released products of mast cells include histamine, proteases, as well as a variety of cytokines, chemokines and growth factors, which act on the surrounding microenvironment thereby shaping the immune responses triggered in various diseased states. Mast cells have also been detected in the arterial wall and are implicated in the onset and progression of numerous cardiovascular diseases. Notably, modulation of distinct mast cell actions using genetic and pharmacological approaches highlights the crucial role of this cell type in cardiovascular syndromes. The acquired evidence renders mast cells and their mediators as potential prognostic markers and therapeutic targets in a broad spectrum of pathophysiological conditions related to cardiovascular diseases.

  6. Chlamydia pneumoniae and atherosclerosis: the role of mast cells.

    PubMed

    Di Pietro, M; Schiavoni, G; Del Piano, M; Shaik, Y; Boscolo, P; Caraffa, A; Grano, M; Teté, S; Conti, F; Sessa, R

    2009-01-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae (C. pneumoniae), a respiratory pathogen, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, an inflammatory progressive disease, characterized by the formation of atherosclerotic plaques. Among several types of inflammatory cells involved in the atherogenesis process, recently particular attention has been directed toward the mast cells. Experimental studies have provided several mechanisms by which C. pneumoniae and mast cells could play a role in all stages of atherosclerosis, from initial inflammatory lesions to plaque rupture. C. pneumoniae, as well as mast cells, may actively participate both through the production of cytokines and matrix-degrading metalloproteinases and by provoking apoptosis of atheroma-associated vascular cells, key events in plaque rupture. This mini-review provides a brief overview on adventitial inflammatory effects of C. pneumoniae and mast cells and their potential role in plaque instability. In addition, in this paper we review the role of mast cells in innate immunity.

  7. Distinguishing Mast Cell Progenitors from Mature Mast Cells in Mice.

    PubMed

    Dahlin, Joakim S; Ding, Zhoujie; Hallgren, Jenny

    2015-07-15

    Mast cells originate from the bone marrow and develop into c-kit(+) FcɛRI(+) cells. Both mast cell progenitors (MCp) and mature mast cells express these cell surface markers, and ways validated to distinguish between the two maturation forms with flow cytometry have been lacking. Here, we show that primary peritoneal MCp from naïve mice expressed high levels of integrin β7 and had a low side scatter (SSC) light profile; whereas mature mast cells expressed lower levels of integrin β7 and had a high SSC light profile. The maturation statuses of the cells were confirmed using three main strategies: (1) MCp, but not mature mast cells, were shown to be depleted by sublethal whole-body γ-irradiation. (2) The MCp were small and immature in terms of granule formation, whereas the mature mast cells were larger and had fully developed metachromatic granules. (3) The MCp had fewer transcripts of mast cell-specific proteases and the enzyme responsible for sulfation of heparin than mature mast cells. Moreover, isolated peritoneal MCp gave rise to mast cells when cultured in vitro. To summarize, we have defined MCp and mature mast cells in naïve mice by flow cytometry. Using this strategy, mast cell maturation can be studied in vivo.

  8. Speech sound production in 2-year-olds who are hard of hearing.

    PubMed

    Ambrose, Sophie E; Unflat Berry, Lauren M; Walker, Elizabeth A; Harrison, Melody; Oleson, Jacob; Moeller, Mary Pat

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of the study was to (a) compare the speech sound production abilities of 2-year-old children who are hard of hearing (HH) to children with normal hearing (NH), (b) identify sources of risk for individual children who are HH, and (c) determine whether speech sound production skills at age 2 were predictive of speech sound production skills at age 3. Seventy children with bilateral, mild-to-severe hearing loss who use hearing aids and 37 age- and socioeconomic status-matched children with NH participated. Children's speech sound production abilities were assessed at 2 and 3 years of age. At age 2, the HH group demonstrated vowel production abilities on par with their NH peers but weaker consonant production abilities. Within the HH group, better outcomes were associated with hearing aid fittings by 6 months of age, hearing loss of less than 45 dB HL, stronger vocabulary scores, and being female. Positive relationships existed between children's speech sound production abilities at 2 and 3 years of age. Assessment of early speech sound production abilities in combination with demographic, audiologic, and linguistic variables may be useful in identifying HH children who are at risk for delays in speech sound production.

  9. Speech Sound Production in Two-Year-Olds who are Hard of Hearing

    PubMed Central

    Ambrose, Sophie E.; Unflat Berry, Lauren M.; Walker, Elizabeth A.; Harrison, Melody; Oleson, Jacob; Moeller, Mary Pat

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of the study was to 1) compare the speech sound production abilities of 2-year-old children who are hard of hearing (HH) to children with normal hearing (NH), 2) identify sources of risk for individual children who are HH, and 3) determine whether speech sound production skills at age two were predictive of speech sound production skills at age three. Method Seventy children with bilateral, mild-to-severe hearing loss who use hearing aids and 37 age- and SES-matched children with NH participated. Children’s speech sound production abilities were assessed at 2 and 3 years of age. Results At age two, the HH group demonstrated vowel production abilities on par with their NH peers, but weaker consonant production abilities. Within the HH group, better outcomes were associated with hearing aid fittings by 6 months of age, hearing loss of less than 45 dB HL, stronger vocabulary scores, and being female. Positive relationships existed between children’s speech sound production abilities at 2 and 3 years of age. Conclusions Assessment of early speech sound production abilities in combination with demographic, audiologic, and linguistic variables may be useful in identifying HH children who are at risk of delays in speech sound production. PMID:24686852

  10. Contribution of engineered nanomaterials physicochemical properties to mast cell degranulation

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Monica M.; Mendoza, Ryan; Raghavendra, Achyut J.; Podila, Ramakrishna; Brown, Jared M.

    2017-01-01

    The rapid development of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) has grown dramatically in the last decade, with increased use in consumer products, industrial materials, and nanomedicines. However, due to increased manufacturing, there is concern that human and environmental exposures may lead to adverse immune outcomes. Mast cells, central to the innate immune response, are one of the earliest sensors of environmental insult and have been shown to play a role in ENM-mediated immune responses. Our laboratory previously determined that mast cells are activated via a non-FcεRI mediated response following silver nanoparticle (Ag NP) exposure, which was dependent upon key physicochemical properties. Using bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs), we tested the hypothesis that ENM physicochemical properties influence mast cell degranulation. Exposure to 13 physicochemically distinct ENMs caused a range of mast degranulation responses, with smaller sized Ag NPs (5 nm and 20 nm) causing the most dramatic response. Mast cell responses were dependent on ENMs physicochemical properties such as size, apparent surface area, and zeta potential. Surprisingly, minimal ENM cellular association by mast cells was not correlated with mast cell degranulation. This study suggests that a subset of ENMs may elicit an allergic response and contribute to the exacerbation of allergic diseases. PMID:28262689

  11. Contribution of engineered nanomaterials physicochemical properties to mast cell degranulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Monica M.; Mendoza, Ryan; Raghavendra, Achyut J.; Podila, Ramakrishna; Brown, Jared M.

    2017-03-01

    The rapid development of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) has grown dramatically in the last decade, with increased use in consumer products, industrial materials, and nanomedicines. However, due to increased manufacturing, there is concern that human and environmental exposures may lead to adverse immune outcomes. Mast cells, central to the innate immune response, are one of the earliest sensors of environmental insult and have been shown to play a role in ENM-mediated immune responses. Our laboratory previously determined that mast cells are activated via a non-FcεRI mediated response following silver nanoparticle (Ag NP) exposure, which was dependent upon key physicochemical properties. Using bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs), we tested the hypothesis that ENM physicochemical properties influence mast cell degranulation. Exposure to 13 physicochemically distinct ENMs caused a range of mast degranulation responses, with smaller sized Ag NPs (5 nm and 20 nm) causing the most dramatic response. Mast cell responses were dependent on ENMs physicochemical properties such as size, apparent surface area, and zeta potential. Surprisingly, minimal ENM cellular association by mast cells was not correlated with mast cell degranulation. This study suggests that a subset of ENMs may elicit an allergic response and contribute to the exacerbation of allergic diseases.

  12. Human mast cell transcriptome project.

    PubMed

    Saito, H; Nakajima, T; Matsumoto, K

    2001-05-01

    After draft reading of the human genome sequence, systemic analysis of the transcriptome (the whole transcripts present in a cell) is progressing especially in commonly available cell types. Until recently, human mast cells were not commonly available. We have succeeded to generate a substantial number of human mast cells from umbilical cord blood and from adult peripheral blood progenitors. Then, we have examined messenger RNA selectively transcribed in these mast cells using high-density oligonucleotide probe arrays. Many unexpected but important transcripts were selectively expressed in human mast cells. We discuss the results obtained from transcriptome screening by introducing our data regarding mast-cell-specific genes.

  13. Initial response of individual soft mast-producing plants to different forest regeneration methods in the Ouachita Mountains

    Treesearch

    Roger W. Perry; Ronald E. Thill; Philip A. Tappe; David G. Peitz

    2004-01-01

    Abstract - Recent policy changes have eliminated clearcutting as the primary pine regeneration method on Federal lands in the Southern United States. However, the effects of alternative natural regeneration methods on soft mast production are unknown. We compared plant coverage and mast production of 37 soft mast-producing plants among four...

  14. Electroweak corrections to top quark pair production in association with a hard photon at hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Peng-Fei; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Yong; Song, Mao; Li, Gang

    2017-03-01

    We present the next-to-leading order (NLO) electroweak (EW) corrections to the top quark pair production associated with a hard photon at the current and future hadron colliders. The dependence of the leading order (LO) and NLO EW corrected cross sections on the photon transverse momentum cut are investigated. We also provide the LO and NLO EW corrected distributions of the transverse momentum of final top quark and photon and the invariant mass of top quark pair and top-antitop-photon system. The results show that the NLO EW corrections are significant in high energy regions due to the EW Sudakov effect.

  15. Tetraspanins in Mast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Köberle, Martin; Kaesler, Susanne; Kempf, Wolfgang; Wölbing, Florian; Biedermann, Tilo

    2012-01-01

    Mast cells (MC) are key mediators of the immune system, most prominently known for their role in eliciting harmful allergic reactions. Mast cell mediator release (e.g. by degranulation) is triggered by FcεRI recognition of antigen – IgE complexes. Until today no therapeutic targeting of this and other mast cell activation pathways is established. Among possible new candidates there are tetraspanins that have been described on MC already several years ago. Tetraspanins are transmembrane proteins acting as scaffolds, mediating local clustering of their interaction partners, and thus amplify their activities. More recently, tetraspanins were also found to exert intrinsic receptor functions. Tetraspanins have been found to be crucial components of fundamental biological processes like cell motility and adhesion. In immune cells, they not only boost the effectiveness of antigen presentation by clustering MHC molecules, they are also key players in all kinds of degranulation events and immune receptor clustering. This review focuses on the contribution of tetraspanins clustered with FcεRI or residing in granule membranes to classical MC functions but also undertakes an outlook on the possible contribution of tetraspanins to newly described mast cell functions and discusses possible targets for drug development. PMID:22783251

  16. Masting promotes individual- and population-level reproduction by increasing pollination efficiency.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Xoaquín; Abdala-Roberts, Luis; Linhart, Yan B; Mooney, Kailen A

    2014-04-01

    Masting is a reproductive strategy defined as the intermittent and synchronized production of large seed crops by a plant population. The pollination efficiency hypothesis proposes that masting increases pollination success in plants. Despite its general appeal, no previous studies have used long-term data together with population- and individual-level analyses to assess pollination efficiency between mast and non-mast events. Here we rigorously tested the pollination efficiency hypothesis in ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa), a long-lived monoecious, wind-pollinated species, using a data set on 217 trees monitored annually for 20 years. Relative investment in male and female function by individual trees did not vary between mast and non-mast years. At both the population and individual level, the rate of production of mature female cones relative to male strobili production was higher in mast than non-mast years, consistent with the predicted benefit of reproductive synchrony on reproductive success. In addition, at the individual level we found a higher conversion of unfertilized female conelets into mature female cones during a mast year compared to a non-mast year. Collectively, parallel results at the population and individual tree level provide robust evidence for the ecological, and potentially also evolutionary, benefits of masting through increased pollination efficiency.

  17. New Roles for Mast Cells in Modulating Allergic Reactions and Immunity Against Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Alison M.; Abraham, Soman N.

    2009-01-01

    Mast cells have primarily been associated with mediating the pathological secondary responses to allergens in sensitized hosts. In view of the recent evidence for a mast cell role in modulating primary immune responses to pathogens, the likelihood for a role of mast cells in influencing primary immune response to allergens has grown. New evidence suggests that mast cells drive the development of Th2 responses to allergens, particularly when allergen exposure occurs concomitantly with exposure to pathogen products present in the environment. These new roles for mast cells in allergy and infection suggest additional drug targets to prevent development of allergic disease and allergic exacerbations of established disease. PMID:19828301

  18. Mast cell activation syndrome: a review.

    PubMed

    Frieri, Marianne; Patel, Reenal; Celestin, Jocelyn

    2013-02-01

    Mast cell activation syndrome (MCAS) is a condition with signs and symptoms involving the skin, gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, respiratory, and neurologic systems. It can be classified into primary, secondary, and idiopathic. Earlier proposed criteria for the diagnosis of MCAS included episodic symptoms consistent with mast cell mediator release affecting two or more organ systems with urticaria, angioedema, flushing, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal cramping, hypotensive syncope or near syncope, tachycardia, wheezing, conjunctival injection, pruritus, and nasal stuffiness. Other criteria included a decrease in the frequency, severity, or resolution of symptoms with anti-mediator therapy including H(1) and H(2)histamine receptor antagonists, anti-leukotrienes, or mast cell stabilizers. Laboratory data that support the diagnosis include an increase of a validated urinary or serum marker of mast cell activation (MCA), namely the documentation of an increase of the marker above the patient's baseline value during symptomatic periods on more than two occasions, or baseline serum tryptase levels that are persistently above 15 ng/ml, or documentation of an increase of the tryptase level above baseline value on one occasion. Less specific assays are 24-h urine histamine metabolites, PGD(2) (Prostaglandin D(2)) or its metabolite, 11-β-prostaglandin F(2) alpha. A recent global definition, criteria, and classification include typical clinical symptoms, a substantial transient increase in serum total tryptase level or an increase in other mast cell derived mediators, such as histamine or PGD2 or their urinary metabolites, and a response of clinical symptoms to agents that attenuate the production or activities of mast cell mediators.

  19. Induction of Mast Cell Accumulation by Tryptase via a Protease Activated Receptor-2 and ICAM-1 Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin; Wang, Junling; Zhang, Huiyun; Zhan, Mengmeng; Chen, Hanqiu; Fang, Zeman; Xu, Chiyan; Chen, Huifang; He, Shaoheng

    2016-01-01

    Mast cells are primary effector cells of allergy, and recruitment of mast cells in involved tissue is one of the key events in allergic inflammation. Tryptase is the most abundant secretory product of mast cells, but little is known of its influence on mast cell accumulation. Using mouse peritoneal model, cell migration assay, and flow cytometry analysis, we investigated role of tryptase in recruiting mast cells. The results showed that tryptase induced up to 6.7-fold increase in mast cell numbers in mouse peritoneum following injection. Inhibitors of tryptase, an antagonist of PAR-2 FSLLRY-NH2, and pretreatment of mice with anti-ICAM-1, anti-CD11a, and anti-CD18 antibodies dramatically diminished tryptase induced mast cell accumulation. On the other hand, PAR-2 agonist peptides SLIGRL-NH2 and tc-LIGRLO-NH2 provoked mast cell accumulation following injection. These implicate that tryptase induced mast cell accumulation is dependent on its enzymatic activity, activation of PAR-2, and interaction between ICAM-1 and LFA-1. Moreover, induction of trans-endothelium migration of mast cells in vitro indicates that tryptase acts as a chemoattractant. In conclusion, provocation of mast cell accumulation by mast cell tryptase suggests a novel self-amplification mechanism of mast cell accumulation. Mast cell stabilizers as well as PAR-2 antagonist agents may be useful for treatment of allergic reactions. PMID:27378825

  20. Mast cell tryptase and asthma

    PubMed Central

    Timmerman, H.

    1997-01-01

    Recent physiological and pharmacological studies have indicated the potential importance of tryptase, the major protein component in mast cells, in inflammatory diseases (especially asthma). Being released at inflammatory sites after the activation of mast cells, tryptase is capable of causing bronchohyperresponsiveness and infiltration of eosinophils, neutrophils, etc. in animal airways. The mechanisms by which tryptase causes bronchoconstriction involve probably the potentiation of other chemical mediators such as histamine, production of bradykinin via the hydrolysis of kininogen, and cleavage of the bronchodilating peptides VIP (vasoactive intestinal peptide) and PHM (peptide histidine-methionine). Tryptase has also been found to be a potent mitogen in vitro for airway smooth muscle cells and epithelial cells, implying its role in the hyperplasia of the asthmatic airways. The experimental data providing evidence for the above roles of tryptase are summarized in the present review, as well as the effects of tryptase inhibition in animal asthma models. The potential strategies for the development of anti-asthmatic agents based on the inhibition of tryptase are discussed. PMID:18472864

  1. Mast, a conserved microtubule-associated protein required for bipolar mitotic spindle organization.

    PubMed

    Lemos, C L; Sampaio, P; Maiato, H; Costa, M; Omel'yanchuk, L V; Liberal, V; Sunkel, C E

    2000-07-17

    Through mutational analysis in Drosopjila we have identified the gene multiple asters (mast), which encodes a new 165 kDa protein. mast mutant neuroblasts are highly polyploid and show severe mitotic abnormalities including the formation of mono- and multi-polar spindles organized by an irregular number of microtubule-organizing centres of abnormal size and shape. The mast gene product is evolutionarily conserved since homologues were identified from yeast to man, revealing a novel protein family. Antibodies against Mast and analysis of tissue culture cells expressing an enhanced green fluorescent protein-Mast fusion protein show that during mitosis, this protein localizes to centrosomes, the mitotic spindle, centromeres and spindle midzone. Microtubule-binding assays indicate that Mast is a microtubule-associated protein displaying strong affinity for polymerized microtubules. The defects observed in the mutant alleles and the intracellular localization of the protein suggest that Mast plays an essential role in centrosome separation and organization of the bipolar mitotic spindle.

  2. Abundance and Production of Berry-producing Plants on the MOFEP Study Sites: The Soft Mast Study Pre-harvest Conditions (1994-1995)

    Treesearch

    Debby K. Fantz; David A. Hamilton

    1997-01-01

    We surveyed the permanent Missouri Ozark Forest Ecosystem Project (MOFEP) forest vegetation cluster plots in 1994 and 1995 to determine pre-treatment frequency of occurrence, amount of vegetative cover, and number of berries for plants that produce soft mast. Mean percentage occurrence of selected plants for each site ranged from 0.1 to 33.0 for Vaccinium...

  3. Heavy-Quark Associated Production with One Hard Photon at Hadron Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Hartanto, Heribertus Bayu

    2013-01-01

    We present the calculation of heavy-quark associated production with a hard photon at hadron colliders, namely $pp(p\\bar p) → Q\\bar Q +X$γ (for $Q=t,b$), at Next-to-Leading Order (NLO) in Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). We study the impact of NLO QCD corrections on the total cross section and several differential distributions at both the Tevatron and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). For $t\\bar t$γ production we observe a sizeable reduction of the renormalization and factorization scale dependence when the NLO QCD corrections are included, while for $b\\bar b$γ production a considerable scale dependence still persists at NLO in QCD. This is consistent with what emerges in similar processes involving $b$ quarks and vector bosons and we explain its origin in detail. For $b\\bar b$γ production we study both the case in which at least one $b$ jet and the case in which at least two $b$ jets are observed. We perform the $b\\bar b$γ calculation using the Four Flavor Number Scheme (4FNS) and compare the case where at least one $b$ jet is observed with the corresponding results from the Five Flavor Number Scheme (5FNS) calculation. Finally we compare our results for $p\\bar p →+b+X$γ with the Tevatron data.

  4. Are Basophils and Mast Cells Masters in HIV Infection?

    PubMed

    Marone, Gianni; Varricchi, Gilda; Loffredo, Stefania; Galdiero, Maria Rosaria; Rivellese, Felice; de Paulis, Amato

    2016-01-01

    The World Health Organization AIDS epidemic update estimates that more than 37 million people are living with HIV infection. Despite the unprecedented success of antiretroviral treatments, significant challenges remain in the fight against HIV. In particular, how uninfected cells capture HIV and transmit virions to target cells remains an unanswered question. Tissue mast cells and peripheral blood basophils can be exposed to virions or HIV products during infection. Several HIV proteins (i.e., envelope glycoproteins gp120 and gp41, Tat, and Nef) can interact with distinct surface receptors expressed by human basophils and mast cells and modulate their functional responses at different levels. Additionally, several groups have provided evidence that human mast cells can be infected in vitro, as well as in vivo, by certain strains of HIV. Recently, it has been demonstrated that basophils purified from healthy donors and intestinal mast cells can efficiently capture HIV on their cell surface and, cocultured with CD4+ T cells, they can transfer the virus to the cocultured cells leading to infection. Direct contact between human basophils or intestinal mast cells and CD4+ T cells can mediate viral trans-infection of T cells through the formation of viral synapses. Thus, basophils and mast cells can provide a cellular basis for capturing and then spreading viruses throughout the body. Collectively, these findings suggest that human basophils and mast cells play a complex and possibly distinct role in HIV infection, warranting further investigations.

  5. Stem cell factor programs the mast cell activation phenotype.

    PubMed

    Ito, Tomonobu; Smrž, Daniel; Jung, Mi-Yeon; Bandara, Geethani; Desai, Avanti; Smržová, Šárka; Kuehn, Hye Sun; Beaven, Michael A; Metcalfe, Dean D; Gilfillan, Alasdair M

    2012-06-01

    Mast cells, activated by Ag via FcεRI, release an array of proinflammatory mediators that contribute to allergic disorders, such as asthma and anaphylaxis. The KIT ligand, stem cell factor (SCF), is critical for mast cell expansion, differentiation, and survival, and under acute conditions, it enhances mast cell activation. However, extended SCF exposure in vivo conversely protects against fatal Ag-mediated anaphylaxis. In investigating this dichotomy, we identified a novel mode of regulation of the mast cell activation phenotype through SCF-mediated programming. We found that mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells chronically exposed to SCF displayed a marked attenuation of FcεRI-mediated degranulation and cytokine production. The hyporesponsive phenotype was not a consequence of altered signals regulating calcium flux or protein kinase C, but of ineffective cytoskeletal reorganization with evidence implicating a downregulation of expression of the Src kinase Hck. Collectively, these findings demonstrate a major role for SCF in the homeostatic control of mast cell activation with potential relevance to mast cell-driven disease and the development of novel approaches for the treatment of allergic disorders.

  6. Production and calibration of the first HEFT hard x-ray optics module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koglin, Jason E.; Chen, C. M. H.; Chonko, James; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; Decker, Todd R.; Gunderson, Kurt S.; Hailey, Charles J.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Jensen, Carsten P.; Madsen, Kristin K.; Stern, Marcela; Windt, David L.; Yu, Haitao; Ziegler, Eric

    2004-02-01

    Complete hard X-ray optics modules are currently being produced for the High Energy Focusing Telescope (HEFT), a balloon born mission that will observe a wide range of objects including young supernova remnants, active galactic nuclei, and galaxy clusters at energies between 20 and 70 keV. Large collecting areas are achieved by tightly nesting layers of grazing incidence mirrors in a conic approximation Wolter-I design. The segmented layers are made of thermally-formed glass substrates coated with depth-graded multilayer films for enhanced reflectivity. Our novel mounting technique involves constraining these mirror segments to successive layers of precisely machined graphite spacers. We report the production and calibration of the first HEFT optics module.

  7. Singular Values of Products of Ginibre Random Matrices, Multiple Orthogonal Polynomials and Hard Edge Scaling Limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuijlaars, Arno B. J.; Zhang, Lun

    2014-12-01

    Akemann, Ipsen and Kieburg recently showed that the squared singular values of products of M rectangular random matrices with independent complex Gaussian entries are distributed according to a determinantal point process with a correlation kernel that can be expressed in terms of Meijer G-functions. We show that this point process can be interpreted as a multiple orthogonal polynomial ensemble. We give integral representations for the relevant multiple orthogonal polynomials and a new double contour integral for the correlation kernel, which allows us to find its scaling limits at the origin (hard edge). The limiting kernels generalize the classical Bessel kernels. For M = 2 they coincide with the scaling limits found by Bertola, Gekhtman, and Szmigielski in the Cauchy-Laguerre two-matrix model, which indicates that these kernels represent a new universality class in random matrix theory.

  8. Interleukin-33 and Mast Cells Bridge Innate and Adaptive Immunity: From the Allergologist’s Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Tae Young; Kim, Young Hyo

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin (IL) 33, a member of the IL-1 superfamily, is an “alarmin” protein and is secreted in its active form from damaged cells undergoing necrotic cell death. Mast cells are one of the main effector cell types in allergic disorders. They secrete a variety of mediators, including T helper 2 cytokines. As mast cells have high-affinity IgE receptors (FcεRI) on their surface, they can capture circulating IgE. IgE-bound mast cells degranulate large amounts of histamine, heparin, and proteases when they encounter antigens. As IL-33 is an important mediator of innate immunity and mast cells play an important role in adaptive immune responses, interactions between the two could link innate and adaptive immunity. IL-33 promotes the adhesion of mast cells to laminin, fibronectin, and vitronectin. IL-33 increases the expression of adhesion molecules, such as intracellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, in endothelial cells, thus enhancing mast cell adhesion to blood vessel walls. IL-33 stimulates mast cell proliferation by activating the ST2/Myd88 pathway; increases mast cell survival by the activation of survival proteins such as Bcl-XL; and promotes the growth, development, and maturation of mast cell progenitors. IL-33 is also involved in the activation of mature mast cells and production of different proinflammatory cytokines. The interaction of IL-33 and mast cells could have important clinical implications in the field of clinical urology. Epithelial dysfunction and mast cells could play an important role in the pathogenesis of interstitial cystitis. Urinary levels of IL-33 significantly increase in patients with interstitial cystitis. In addition, the number of mast cells significantly increase in the urinary bladders of patients with interstitial cystitis. Therefore, inhibition of mast cell activation and degranulation in response to increase in IL-33 is a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of interstitial cystitis

  9. Use of scopoletin to inhibit the production of inflammatory cytokines through inhibition of the IkappaB/NF-kappaB signal cascade in the human mast cell line HMC-1.

    PubMed

    Moon, Phil-Dong; Lee, Byung-Hee; Jeong, Hyun-Ja; An, Hyo-Jin; Park, Seok-Jae; Kim, Hyung-Ryong; Ko, Seong-Gyu; Um, Jae-Young; Hong, Seung-Heon; Kim, Hyung-Min

    2007-01-26

    Scopoletin (6-methoxy-7-hydroxycoumarin) is a coumarin compound and a pharmacologically active agent that has been isolated from several plant species. However, as yet there is no clear explanation of how scopoletin affects the production of inflammatory cytokine. We therefore used cells from the human mast cell line (HMC-1) to investigate this effect. Scopoletin significantly and dose-dependently inhibits the way in which phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) plus A23187 induces the production of inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin (IL)-6, and IL-8 (P<0.05). The maximal rates at which scopoletin (0.2 mM) inhibited the production of TNF-alpha, IL-6, and IL-8 were 41.6%+/-4.2%, 71.9%+/-2.5%, and 43.0%+/-5.7%, respectively. In activated HMC-1 cells, the expression level of nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB/Rel A protein was increased in the nucleus whereas the level of NF-kappaB/Rel A in nucleus was decreased by treatment with scopoletin. Scopoletin decreased PMA plus A23187-induced luciferase activity. Scopoletin also inhibits IkappaBalpha phosphorylation and degradation in cytoplasm. These results indicate that scopoletin has a potential regulatory effect on inflammatory reactions that are mediated by mast cells.

  10. Mast cells in rheumatic disease.

    PubMed

    Suurmond, Jolien; van der Velden, Daniël; Kuiper, Johan; Bot, Ilze; Toes, René E M

    2016-05-05

    Rheumatoid Arthritis is a chronic autoimmune disease with a complex disease pathogenesis leading to inflammation and destruction of synovial tissue in the joint. Several molecules lead to activation of immune pathways, including autoantibodies, Toll-Like Receptor ligands and cytokines. These pathways can cooperate to create the pro-inflammatory environment that results in tissue destruction. Each of these pathways can activate mast cells, inducing the release of a variety of inflammatory mediators, and in combination can markedly enhance mast cell responses. Mast cell-derived cytokines, chemokines, and proteases have the potential to induce recruitment of other leukocytes able to evoke tissue remodeling or destruction. Likewise, mast cells can secrete a plethora of factors that can contribute to tissue remodeling and fibroblast activation. Although the functional role of mast cells in arthritis pathogenesis in mice is not yet elucidated, the increased numbers of mast cells and mast cell-specific mediators in synovial tissue of rheumatoid arthritis patients suggest that mast cell activation in rheumatoid arthritis may contribute to its pathogenesis.

  11. Mast cells in gastrointestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Bischoff, Stephan C

    2016-05-05

    Mast cells are constitutively found in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. The three major physiological functions of GI mast cells comprise of - as far as we know - regulation of GI functions, namely epithelial and endothelial functions, crosstalk with the enteric nervous system, and contribution to the host defense against bacterial, viral and parasitic agents. A number of chronic GI diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease (Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis), celiac disease, irritable bowel syndrome, and food allergies, are thought to be associated with mast cell hyperplasia and humoral activity. Clinical conditions characterized by a decrease in mast cell functionality are not known so far. In the present review, we summarize current evidence which show that human mast cells play a central role at the GI barrier, both in health and disease.

  12. Mast cells in atopic dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Toshiaki; Ando, Tomoaki; Kimura, Miho; Wilson, Bridget S.; Kawakami, Yuko

    2009-01-01

    Summary of Recent Advances Mast cells play as the major effector cells in immediate hypersensitivity through activation via the high-affinity IgE receptor, FcεRI, although many other functions have recently been discovered for this cell type. Given the broad array of proinflammatory mediators secreted from FcεRI-activated mast cells, as well as sensitization to allergens, IgE elevation, and increased mast cells in a majority of atopic dermatitis patients, mast cells are believed to be involved in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis. Numerous animal models have been used to study this epidemic disease. Here we review the recent progress to synthesize our current understanding of this disease and potential mechanisms for a mast cell's role in the disease. PMID:19828304

  13. Angiopoietin1 Inhibits Mast Cell Activation and Protects against Anaphylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Meng-Tao; Liu, Yi-Nan; He, Qi-Hua; Xiao, Jun-Jun; Bai, Yun

    2014-01-01

    Since morbidity and mortality rates of anaphylaxis diseases have been increasing year by year, how to prevent and manage these diseases effectively has become an important issue. Mast cells play a central regulatory role in allergic diseases. Angiopoietin1 (Ang-1) exhibits anti-inflammatory properties by inhibiting vascular permeability, leukocyte migration and cytokine production. However, Ang-1's function in mast cell activation and anaphylaxis diseases is unknown. The results of our study suggest that Ang-1 decreased lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines production of mast cells by suppressing IκB phosphorylation and NF-κB nuclear translocation. Ang-1 also strongly inhibited compound 48/80 induced and FcεRI-mediated mast cells degranulation by decreasing intracellular calcium levels in vitro. In vivo lentivirus-mediated delivery of Ang-1 in mice exhibited alleviated leakage in IgE-dependent passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA). Furthermore, exogenous Ang-1 intervention treatment prevented mice from compound 48/80-induced mesentery mast cell degranulation, attenuated increases in pro-inflammatory cytokines, relieved lung injury, and improved survival in anaphylaxis shock. The results of our study reveal, for the first time, the important role of Ang-1 in the activation of mast cells, and identify a therapeutic effect of Ang-1 on anaphylaxis diseases. PMID:24586553

  14. Mast cells protect against Pseudomonas aeruginosa-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Junkins, Robert D; Carrigan, Svetlana O; Wu, Zhengli; Stadnyk, Andrew W; Cowley, Elizabeth; Issekutz, Thomas; Berman, Jason; Lin, Tong-Jun

    2014-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic pathogen, is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in immune-compromised individuals. Maintaining the integrity of the respiratory epithelium is critical for an effective host response to P. aeruginosa. Given the close spatial relationship between mast cells and the respiratory epithelium, and the importance of tightly regulated epithelial permeability during lung infections, we examined whether mast cells influence airway epithelial integrity during P. aeruginosa lung infection in a mouse model. We found that mast cell-deficient Kit(W-sh)/Kit(W-sh) mice displayed greatly increased epithelial permeability, bacterial dissemination, and neutrophil accumulation compared with wild-type animals after P. aeruginosa infection; these defects were corrected on reconstitution with mast cells. An in vitro Transwell co-culture model further demonstrated that a secreted mast cell factor decreased epithelial cell apoptosis and tumor necrosis factor production after P. aeruginosa infection. Together, our data demonstrate a previously unrecognized role for mast cells in the maintenance of epithelial integrity during P. aeruginosa infection, through a mechanism that likely involves prevention of epithelial apoptosis and tumor necrosis factor production. Our understanding of mechanisms of the host response to P. aeruginosa will open new avenues for the development of successful preventative and treatment strategies.

  15. Within-population spatial synchrony in mast seeding of North American oaks.

    Treesearch

    A.V. Liebhold; M. Sork; O.N. Peltonen; Westfall R. Bjørnstad; J. Elkinton; M. H. J. Knops

    2004-01-01

    Mast seeding, the synchronous production of large crops of seeds, has been frequently documented in oak species. In this study we used several North American oak data-sets to quantify within-stand (10 km) synchrony in mast dynamics. Results indicated that intraspecific synchrony in seed production always exceeded interspecific synchrony and was essentially constant...

  16. Mast cells in neoangiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Nienartowicz, Andrzej; Sobaniec-Łotowska, Maria E; Jarocka-Cyrta, Elzbieta; Lemancewicz, Dorota

    2006-03-01

    Mast cells (MCs) always accompany connective tissue and are located in the proximity of lymphatic and blood vessels and nerve fibers. They are round or oval mononuclear cells with a diameter of 4-20 microm containing in their cytoplasm specific exocrine granules (storing neutral proteases) enclosed by a single membrane, whose presence is regarded as an index of the MC's static state. In view of their wide distribution in the organism, they play various roles in, for example, type I hypersensitivity reactions, chronic inflammatory processes, tissue reconstruction and wound healing, and pathological pulmonary fibrosis. They also play a role in angiogenesis, both in normal conditions during tissue regeneration and in pathological neoplastic states. The microcirculation provides building and nutritional substances to cancer cells and enables cancer spread via the blood. On the other hand, a tumor with good vascularization is more prone to penetration by cytostatics, which is why angiogenesis is a very important process in the course of neoplastic disease. Many authors indicate a close association between mast cells and angiogenesis. Some substances contained in the cytoplasm of these cells are potent stimulators of angiogenesis (tryptase, heparin), while others may inhibit it (protamine, platelet factor 4), and this conditions cancer growth and the development of the metastatic process. It is not known, however, what interactions occur between stimulants and inhibitors and what the proportional involvement of particular mediators in the formation of new vessels is.

  17. Masting behaviour in a Mediterranean pine tree alters seed predator selection on reproductive output.

    PubMed

    Moreira, X; Abdala-Roberts, L; Zas, R; Merlo, E; Lombardero, M J; Sampedro, L; Mooney, K A

    2016-11-01

    Context-dependency in species interactions is widespread and can produce concomitant patterns of context-dependent selection. Masting (synchronous production of large seed crops at irregular intervals by a plant population) has been shown to reduce seed predation through satiation (reduction in rates of seed predation with increasing seed cone output) and thus represents an important source of context-dependency in plant-animal interactions. However, the evolutionary consequences of such dynamics are not well understood. Here we describe masting behaviour in a Mediterranean model pine species (Pinus pinaster) and present a test of the effects of masting on selection by seed predators on reproductive output. We predicted that masting, by enhancing seed predator satiation, could in turn strengthen positive selection by seed predators for larger cone output. For this we collected six-year data (spanning one mast year and five non-mast years) on seed cone production and seed cone predation rates in a forest genetic trial composed by 116 P. pinaster genotypes. Following our prediction, we found stronger seed predator satiation during the masting year, which in turn led to stronger seed predator selection for increased cone production relative to non-masting years. These findings provide evidence that masting can alter the evolutionary outcome of plant-seed predator interactions. More broadly, our findings highlight that changes in consumer responses to resource abundance represent a widespread mechanism for predicting and understanding context dependency in plant-consumer evolutionary dynamics.

  18. Protective Role of Mast Cells in Primary Systemic Vasculitis: A Perspective.

    PubMed

    Springer, Jason M; Raveendran, Vineesh V; Gierer, Selina A; Maz, Mehrdad; Dileepan, Kottarappat N

    2017-01-01

    Mast cells are important cells of the immune system. Although traditionally considered as key players in allergic and hypersensitivity reactions, emerging evidence suggests that mast cells have many complex roles in vascular disease. These include regulation of vasodilation, angiogenesis, activation of matrix metalloproteinases, apoptosis of smooth muscle cells, and activation of the renin angiotensin system. Mast cells are also known to play an immunomodulatory role via modulation of regulatory T-cell (Treg), macrophage and endothelial cell functions. This dual role of the mast cells is evident in myeloperoxidase anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies-mouse model of glomerulonephritis in which mast cell deficiency worsens glomerulonephritis, whereas inhibition of mast cell degranulation is effective in abrogating the development of glomerulonephritis. Our previous work demonstrated that mast cell degranulation inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced interleukin 6 (IL-6) production in mice. This effect was not seen in histamine-1-receptor knockout (H1R(-/-)) mice suggesting a role for histamine in IL-6 homeostasis. In addition, mast cell degranulation-mediated decrease in IL-6 production was associated with an upregulation of suppressor of cytokine signaling-1 protein in the aorta. We propose that mast cells regulate large artery inflammation through T-cells, shifting a primarily Th1 and Th17 toward a Th2 response and leading to enhanced IL-10 production, activation Treg cells, and the inhibition of macrophage functions.

  19. Conversion of pesticides to biologically active products on urban hard surfaces.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Weiying; Gan, Jay

    2016-06-15

    Impervious pavements such as concrete are a dominant feature of urban landscapes, but their role in the fate of environmental contaminants is largely ignored. This study considered the case of urban-use pesticides, and demonstrated for the first time that surfaces such as concrete were capable of converting pesticides to other biologically active intermediates. Rapid transformation of pesticides was observed in both bench and field scale setups. Under outdoor conditions, permethrin, a heavily used pyrethroid insecticide, quickly formed 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3-PBA) that is a known endocrine disruptor, and the level of 3-PBA was >100μg/L in the runoff water even 3months after the treatment. Fipronil, a product used for termite and ant control, was quickly transformed to desulfinyl and sulfone derivatives, with the desulfinyl level exceeding that of parent in the runoff water only 1week after treatment. Fipronil derivatives have aquatic toxicity similar or even greater than the parent fipronil. Direct sampling of deposited particles from residential exterior pavements revealed widespread presence of fipronil sulfone and desulfinyl and demonstrated their in-situ formation and accumulation on concrete. The extensive transformations were likely caused by the alkalinity and metal oxides in concrete and conducive photolytic conditions at the hard surfaces. The study findings highlight the role of urban pavements and urbanization in the geochemical cycling of anthropogenic contaminants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. [Lipid networks in mast cell biology].

    PubMed

    Taketomi, Yoshitaka; Murakami, Makoto

    2011-01-01

    Tissue-resident mast cells are derived from circulating committed progenitors, which are originated from pluripotential hematopoietic stem cells in bone marrow. These progenitors migrate into extravascular tissues, where they undergo differentiation and maturation into tissue-specific mature phenotypes. When activated by IgE/antigen, stem cell factor, neuropeptides, or other stimuli, mature mast cells release three classes of biologically active products, including pre-formed mediators stored in secretory granules, newly transcribed cytokines and chemokines, and de novo synthesized lipid mediators. Therefore, these cells have been implicated as major effector cells in acute and chronic inflammatory diseases. In recent years, it has become clear that lipid mediators including arachidonic acid metabolites (prostaglandins and leukotrienes) and lysophospholipid-derived products play crucial roles in mast cell-associated pathology. In this article, we will provide an overview of the roles of various lipid mediators in allergic diseases fueled by studies of their biosynthetic enzymes or receptors. In the latter part, we will make a particular focus on phospholipase A(2) enzymes, which are placed at the bottleneck (rate-limiting) step of the lipid mediator-biosynthetic pathways.

  1. Evidence for an anticorrelation effect in the production of hard photons and preequilibrium protons in heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapienza, P.; Coniglione, R.; Alba, R.; del Zoppo, A.; Migneco, E.; Agodi, C.; Bellia, G.; Finocchiaro, P.; Loukachine, K.; Maiolino, C.; Peghaire, A.; Piattelli, P.; Santonocito, D.

    1994-09-01

    An exclusive study of the hard photon production in the reaction 40Ar51V at 44 MeV/nucleon has been carried on with the 4π multidetector MEDEA. An anticorrelation effect in the emission of very energetic photons and protons has been observed for the first time. This is a strong indication for the first-chance n-p bremsstrahlung production mechanism.

  2. Mast cell sarcoma: clinical management.

    PubMed

    Weiler, Catherine R; Butterfield, Joseph

    2014-05-01

    Mast cell sarcoma is a disorder that results in abnormal mast cells as identified by morphology, special stains, and in some publications, c-kit mutation analysis. It affects animal species such as canines more commonly than humans. In humans it is a very rare condition, with variable clinical presentation. There is no standard therapy for the disorder. It can affect any age group. It is occasionally associated with systemic mastocytosis and/or urticaria pigmentosa. The prognosis of mast cell sarcoma in published literature is very poor in humans.

  3. Mast Wake Reduction by Shaping

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-11-03

    piercing masts, hydrofoil boats 4 and oilrig platforms. Incorporating the technology will also 5 reduce the wave heights generated by such marine...on the 4 leading and trailing edges of the mast. For example: a I 5 caliber ogive with no straight mid-sections results in a 6 thickness to chord ratio...trailing edges of the mast. More specifically a 1 3 caliber ogive with no straight mid-sections results in a 4 thickness to chord ratio of 0.5 and has

  4. Preliminary effects of water hardness on triactinomyxon production and development from eastern tubifex worms infected with Myxobolus cerebralis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waldrop, Thomas B.; Densmore, Christine; Blazer, Vicki; Smith, Dave; Schill, Bane; Schill, B.; Waldrop, T.; Blazer, V.

    1999-01-01

    Whirling disease is caused by Myxobolus cerebralis and requires an intermediate oligochaete host identified as Tubifex tubifex (Wolf, Markiw, and Hiltunen, 1986). M. cerebralis spores ingested by the tubifex worms develop into triactinomyxons (tams) that are eventually released into the water column to infect salmonid fish. There may be many environmental parameters, biotic or abiotic, that may affect the development of waterborne tams in eastern tubifex worms. This study will focus on one of those environmental parameters, total water hardness. Total water hardness is defined as the concentration of calcium and magnesium in a water sample expressed in milligrams per liter of equivalent CACO3 (Boyd, 1990). This study will address whether different levels of water hardness affect the development and production of tams released by infected tubifex worms.

  5. Human mast cells transmigrate through human umbilical vein endothelial monolayers and selectively produce IL-8 in response to stromal cell-derived factor-1 alpha.

    PubMed

    Lin, T J; Issekutz, T B; Marshall, J S

    2000-07-01

    Mature mast cells are generally considered to be less mobile cells residing within tissue sites. However, mast cell numbers are known to increase in the context of inflammation, and mast cells are recognized to be important in regulating local neutrophil infiltration. CXC chemokines may play a critical role in this process. In this study two human mast cell-like lines, HMC-1 and KU812, and human cord blood-derived primary cultured mast cells were employed to examine role of stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) in regulating mast cell migration and mediator production. It was demonstrated that human mast cells constitutively express mRNA and protein for CXCR4. Stimulation of human mast cells with SDF-1, the only known ligand for CXCR4, induced a significant increase in intracellular calcium levels. In vitro, SDF-1 alpha mediated dose-dependent migration of human cord blood-derived mast cells and HMC-1 cells across HUVEC monolayers. Although SDF-1 alpha did not induce mast cell degranulation, it selectively stimulated production of the neutrophil chemoattractant IL-8 without affecting TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, IL-6, GM-CSF, IFN-gamma, or RANTES production, providing further evidence of the selective modulation of mast cell function by this chemokine. These findings provide a novel, SDF-1-dependent mechanism for mast cell transendothelial migration and functional regulation, which may have important implications for the local regulation of mast cells in disease.

  6. Dexamethasone rapidly suppresses IL-33-stimulated mast cell function by blocking transcription factor activity.

    PubMed

    Paranjape, Anuya; Chernushevich, Oksana; Qayum, Amina Abdul; Spence, Andrew J; Taruselli, Marcela T; Abebayehu, Daniel; Barnstein, Brian O; McLeod, Jamie Josephine Avila; Baker, Bianca; Bajaj, Gurjas S; Chumanevich, Alena P; Oskeritzian, Carole A; Ryan, John J

    2016-12-01

    Mast cells are critical effectors of allergic disease and can be activated by IL-33, a proinflammatory member of the IL-1 cytokine family. IL-33 worsens the pathology of mast cell-mediated diseases, but therapies to antagonize IL-33 are still forthcoming. Because steroids are the mainstay of allergic disease treatment and are well known to suppress mast cell activation by other stimuli, we examined the effects of the steroid dexamethasone on IL-33-mediated mast cell function. We found that dexamethasone potently and rapidly suppressed cytokine production elicited by IL-33 from murine bone marrow-derived and peritoneal mast cells. IL-33 enhances IgE-mediated mast cell cytokine production, an activity that was also antagonized by dexamethasone. These effects were consistent in human mast cells. We additionally observed that IL-33 augmented migration of IgE-sensitized mast cells toward antigen. This enhancing effect was similarly reversed by dexamethasone. Simultaneous addition of dexamethasone with IL-33 had no effect on the phosphorylation of MAP kinases or NFκB p65 subunit; however, dexamethasone antagonized AP-1- and NFκB-mediated transcriptional activity. Intraperitoneal administration of dexamethasone completely abrogated IL-33-mediated peritoneal neutrophil recruitment and prevented plasma IL-6 elevation. These data demonstrate that steroid therapy may be an effective means of antagonizing the effects of IL-33 on mast cells in vitro and in vivo, acting partly by suppressing IL-33-induced NFκB and AP-1 activity.

  7. Gs-coupled adenosine receptors differentially limit antigen-induced mast cell activation.

    PubMed

    Hua, Xiaoyang; Chason, Kelly D; Jania, Corey; Acosta, Tatiana; Ledent, Catherine; Tilley, Stephen L

    2013-02-01

    Mast cell activation results in the immediate release of proinflammatory mediators prestored in cytoplasmic granules, as well as initiation of lipid mediator production and cytokine synthesis by these resident tissue leukocytes. Allergen-induced mast cell activation is central to the pathogenesis of asthma and other allergic diseases. Presently, most pharmacological agents for the treatment of allergic disease target receptors for inflammatory mediators. Many of these mediators, such as histamine, are released by mast cells. Targeting pathways that limit antigen-induced mast cell activation may have greater therapeutic efficacy by inhibiting the synthesis and release of many proinflammatory mediators produced in the mast cell. In vitro studies using cultured human and mouse mast cells, and studies of mice lacking A(2B) receptors, suggest that adenosine receptors, specifically the G(s)-coupled A(2A) and A(2B) receptors, might provide such a target. Here, using a panel of mice lacking various combinations of adenosine receptors, and mast cells derived from these animals, we show that adenosine receptor agonists provide an effective means of inhibition of mast cell degranulation and induction of cytokine production both in vitro and in vivo. We identify A(2B) as the primary receptor limiting mast cell degranulation, whereas the combined activity of A(2A) and A(2B) is required for the inhibition of cytokine synthesis.

  8. Subthreshold IKK activation modulates the effector functions of primary mast cells and allows specific targeting of transformed mast cells.

    PubMed

    Drube, Sebastian; Weber, Franziska; Loschinski, Romy; Beyer, Mandy; Rothe, Mandy; Rabenhorst, Anja; Göpfert, Christiane; Meininger, Isabel; Diamanti, Michaela A; Stegner, David; Häfner, Norman; Böttcher, Martin; Reinecke, Kirstin; Herdegen, Thomas; Greten, Florian R; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Hartmann, Karin; Krämer, Oliver H; Kamradt, Thomas

    2015-03-10

    Mast cell differentiation and proliferation depends on IL-3. IL-3 induces the activation of MAP-kinases and STATs and consequently induces proliferation and survival. Dysregulation of IL-3 signaling pathways also contribute to inflammation and tumorigenesis. We show here that IL-3 induces a SFK- and Ca²⁺-dependent activation of the inhibitor of κB kinases 2 (IKK2) which results in mast cell proliferation and survival but does not induce IκBα-degradation and NFκB activation. Therefore we propose the term "subthreshold IKK activation".This subthreshold IKK activation also primes mast cells for enhanced responsiveness to IL-33R signaling. Consequently, co-stimulation with IL-3 and IL-33 increases IKK activation and massively enhances cytokine production induced by IL-33.We further reveal that in neoplastic mast cells expressing constitutively active Ras, subthreshold IKK activation is associated with uncontrolled proliferation. Consequently, pharmacological IKK inhibition reduces tumor growth selectively by inducing apoptosis in vivo.Together, subthreshold IKK activation is crucial to mediate the full IL-33-induced effector functions in primary mast cells and to mediate uncontrolled proliferation of neoplastic mast cells. Thus, IKK2 is a new molecularly defined target structure.

  9. Subthreshold IKK activation modulates the effector functions of primary mast cells and allows specific targeting of transformed mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Drube, Sebastian; Beyer, Mandy; Rothe, Mandy; Rabenhorst, Anja; Göpfert, Christiane; Meininger, Isabel; Diamanti, Michaela A.; Stegner, David; Häfner, Norman; Böttcher, Martin; Reinecke, Kirstin; Herdegen, Thomas; Greten, Florian R.; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Hartmann, Karin; Krämer, Oliver H.; Kamradt, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Mast cell differentiation and proliferation depends on IL-3. IL-3 induces the activation of MAP-kinases and STATs and consequently induces proliferation and survival. Dysregulation of IL-3 signaling pathways also contribute to inflammation and tumorigenesis. We show here that IL-3 induces a SFK- and Ca2+-dependent activation of the inhibitor of κB kinases 2 (IKK2) which results in mast cell proliferation and survival but does not induce IκBα-degradation and NFκB activation. Therefore we propose the term “subthreshold IKK activation”. This subthreshold IKK activation also primes mast cells for enhanced responsiveness to IL-33R signaling. Consequently, co-stimulation with IL-3 and IL-33 increases IKK activation and massively enhances cytokine production induced by IL-33. We further reveal that in neoplastic mast cells expressing constitutively active Ras, subthreshold IKK activation is associated with uncontrolled proliferation. Consequently, pharmacological IKK inhibition reduces tumor growth selectively by inducing apoptosis in vivo. Together, subthreshold IKK activation is crucial to mediate the full IL-33-induced effector functions in primary mast cells and to mediate uncontrolled proliferation of neoplastic mast cells. Thus, IKK2 is a new molecularly defined target structure. PMID:25749030

  10. Twenty-first century mast cell stabilizers

    PubMed Central

    Finn, D F; Walsh, J J

    2013-01-01

    Mast cell stabilizing drugs inhibit the release of allergic mediators from mast cells and are used clinically to prevent allergic reactions to common allergens. Despite the relative success of the most commonly prescribed mast cell stabilizer, disodium cromoglycate, in use for the preventative treatment of bronchial asthma, allergic conjunctivitis and vernal keratoconjunctivitis, there still remains an urgent need to design new substances that are less expensive and require less frequent dosing schedules. In this regard, recent developments towards the discovery of the next generation of mast cell stabilizing drugs has included studies on substances isolated from natural sources, biological, newly synthesized compounds and drugs licensed for other indications. The diversity of natural products evaluated range from simple phenols, alkaloids, terpenes to simple amino acids. While in some cases their precise mode of action remains unknown it has nevertheless sparked interest in the development of synthetic derivatives with improved pharmacological properties. Within the purely synthetic class of inhibitors, particular attention has been devoted to the inhibition of important signalling molecules including spleen TK and JAK3. The statin class of cholesterol-lowering drugs as well as nilotinib, a TK inhibitor, are just some examples of clinically used drugs that have been evaluated for their anti-allergic properties. Here, we examine each approach under investigation, summarize the test data generated and offer suggestions for further preclinical evaluation before their therapeutic potential can be realized. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed issue on Histamine Pharmacology Update. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2013.170.issue-1 PMID:23441583

  11. Immunotherapy and mast cell activation.

    PubMed

    Carlos, A G; Carlos, M L; Santos, M A; Pedro, E; Santos, S; Lopes-Pregal, A

    1998-10-01

    Tryptase is the more specific markers for mast cell activation and mediators release and can be used as an index of mast cell activation after challenge. Nasal provocation tests have been done in patients allergic to the pollen of Parietaria (pellitory wall) before and after specific systemic immunotherapy and tryptase release evaluated in nasal lavage fluid. After specific immunotherapy the concentration of tryptase in nasal lavage was significantly decreased to all the concentrations used in challenge and the peack of tryptase release was delayed. These results confirm that assays of tryptase in nasal fluid after nasal provocation are a reliable markers of mast cell activation. Immunotherapy with specific allergen decreases mast cell reactivity to the same allergen.

  12. Acorn Production Prediction Models for Five Common Oak Species of the Eastern United States

    Treesearch

    Anita K. Rose; Cathryn H. Greenberg; Todd M. Fearer

    2011-01-01

    Acorn production varies considerably among oak (Quercus) species, individual trees, years, and locations, which directly affects oak regeneration and populations of wildlife species that depend on acorns for food. Hard mast indices provide a relative ranking and basis for comparison of within- and between-year acorn crop size at a broad scale, but do...

  13. Virus-Infected Human Mast Cells Enhance Natural Killer Cell Functions.

    PubMed

    Portales-Cervantes, Liliana; Haidl, Ian D; Lee, Patrick W; Marshall, Jean S

    2017-01-01

    Mucosal surfaces are protected from infection by both structural and sentinel cells, such as mast cells. The mast cell's role in antiviral responses is poorly understood; however, they selectively recruit natural killer (NK) cells following infection. Here, the ability of virus-infected mast cells to enhance NK cell functions was examined. Cord blood-derived human mast cells infected with reovirus (Reo-CBMC) and subsequent mast cell products were used for the stimulation of human NK cells. NK cells upregulated the CD69 molecule and cytotoxicity-related genes, and demonstrated increased cytotoxic activity in response to Reo-CBMC soluble products. NK cell interferon (IFN)-γ production was also promoted in the presence of interleukin (IL)-18. In vivo, SCID mice injected with Reo-CBMC in a subcutaneous Matrigel model, could recruit and activate murine NK cells, a property not shared by normal human fibroblasts. Soluble products of Reo-CBMC included IL-10, TNF, type I and type III IFNs. Blockade of the type I IFN receptor abrogated NK cell activation. Furthermore, reovirus-infected mast cells expressed multiple IFN-α subtypes not observed in reovirus-infected fibroblasts or epithelial cells. Our data define an important mast cell IFN response, not shared by structural cells, and a subsequent novel mast cell-NK cell immune axis in human antiviral host defense.

  14. Suppression of Brain Mast Cells Degranulation Inhibits Microglial Activation and Central Nervous System Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hongquan; Zhang, Xiang; Wang, Yiming; Zhou, Xiqiao; Qian, Yanning; Zhang, Shu

    2017-03-01

    Brain inflammation has a critical role in the pathophysiology of brain diseases. Microglia, the resident immune cells in the brain, play an important role in brain inflammation, while brain mast cells are the "first responder" in the injury rather than microglia. Functional aspects of mast cell-microglia interactions remain poorly understood. Our results demonstrated that site-directed injection of the "mast cell degranulator" compound 48/80 (C48/80) in the hypothalamus induced mast cell degranulation, microglial activation, and inflammatory factor production, which initiated the acute brain inflammatory response. "Mast cell stabilizer" disodium cromoglycate (cromolyn) inhibited this effect, including decrease of inflammatory cytokines, reduced microglial activation, inhibition of MAPK and AKT pathways, and repression of protein expression of histamine receptor 1 (H1R), histamine receptor 4 (H4R), protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2), and toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in microglia. We also demonstrated that C48/80 had no effect on microglial activation in mast cell-deficient Kit(W-sh/W-sh) mice. These results implicate that activated brain mast cells trigger microglial activation and stabilization of mast cell inhibits microglial activation-induced central nervous system (CNS) inflammation. Interactions between mast cells and microglia could constitute a new and unique therapeutic target for CNS immune inflammation-related diseases.

  15. Role of mast cells in fibrosis of classical Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Shoko; Yokote, Taiji; Hiraoka, Nobuya; Nishiwaki, Uta; Hanafusa, Toshiaki; Nishimura, Yasuichiro; Tsuji, Motomu

    2016-12-01

    The underlying mechanism of fibrosis in classical Hodgkin lymphoma (CHL) remains uncertain. This study aimed to investigate the association of fibrosis in the lymph nodes of patients with CHL through histological examination of the expression of cytokines associated with fibrosis and mast cell proliferation. Additionally, we sought to determine the degree of mast cell infiltration in a nodular sclerosis subtype of CHL (NSCHL) compared with that in non-NSCHL. We analyzed lymph nodes from 22 patients with CHL, of which eight were of the NSCHL and 14 of the non-NSCHL subtype, using immunohistochemical staining of forkhead box P3 (FOXP3), transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, interleukin (IL)-3, IL-13, and stem cell factor (SCF). Mast cells were positive for TGF-β and IL-13, and FOXP3-positive cells were negative for TGF-β. Only the expression of IL-13 in Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells was significantly more frequently observed in NSCHL than that in non-NSCHL (P = 0.0028) and was associated with a higher rate of fibrosis (P = 0.0097). The number of mast cells was significantly higher in NSCHL than that in non-NSCHL (P = 0.0001). A significantly positive correlation was observed between the rate of fibrosis and the number of mast cells (correlation coefficient, 0.8524; 95% CI, 0.6725-0.9372) (P <0.0001). The number of mast cells was significantly higher in the group with IL-13-positive HRS cells than that in the group with IL-13-negative HRS cells (P = 0.0157). Based on these findings, we hypothesize that IL-13 production by HRS cells may lead to fibrosis, and furthermore, promote mast cell proliferation and infiltration. This in turn might further produce the fibrotic cytokines IL-13 and TGF-β, resulting in fibrosis typical of NSCHL.

  16. Blockade of mast cell activation reduces cutaneous scar formation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin; Schrementi, Megan E; Ranzer, Matthew J; Wilgus, Traci A; DiPietro, Luisa A

    2014-01-01

    Damage to the skin initiates a cascade of well-orchestrated events that ultimately leads to repair of the wound. The inflammatory response is key to wound healing both through preventing infection and stimulating proliferation and remodeling of the skin. Mast cells within the tissue are one of the first immune cells to respond to trauma, and upon activation they release pro-inflammatory molecules to initiate recruitment of leukocytes and promote a vascular response in the tissue. Additionally, mast cells stimulate collagen synthesis by dermal fibroblasts, suggesting they may also influence scar formation. To examine the contribution of mast cells in tissue repair, we determined the effects the mast cell inhibitor, disodium cromoglycate (DSCG), on several parameters of dermal repair including, inflammation, re-epithelialization, collagen fiber organization, collagen ultrastructure, scar width and wound breaking strength. Mice treated with DSCG had significantly reduced levels of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1α, IL-1β, and CXCL1. Although DSCG treatment reduced the production of inflammatory mediators, the rate of re-epithelialization was not affected. Compared to control, inhibition of mast cell activity caused a significant decrease in scar width along with accelerated collagen re-organization. Despite the reduced scar width, DSCG treatment did not affect the breaking strength of the healed tissue. Tryptase β1 exclusively produced by mast cells was found to increase significantly in the course of wound healing. However, DSCG treatment did not change its level in the wounds. These results indicate that blockade of mast cell activation reduces scar formation and inflammation without further weakening the healed wound.

  17. Blockade of Mast Cell Activation Reduces Cutaneous Scar Formation

    PubMed Central

    Ranzer, Matthew J.; Wilgus, Traci A.; DiPietro, Luisa A.

    2014-01-01

    Damage to the skin initiates a cascade of well-orchestrated events that ultimately leads to repair of the wound. The inflammatory response is key to wound healing both through preventing infection and stimulating proliferation and remodeling of the skin. Mast cells within the tissue are one of the first immune cells to respond to trauma, and upon activation they release pro-inflammatory molecules to initiate recruitment of leukocytes and promote a vascular response in the tissue. Additionally, mast cells stimulate collagen synthesis by dermal fibroblasts, suggesting they may also influence scar formation. To examine the contribution of mast cells in tissue repair, we determined the effects the mast cell inhibitor, disodium cromoglycate (DSCG), on several parameters of dermal repair including, inflammation, re-epithelialization, collagen fiber organization, collagen ultrastructure, scar width and wound breaking strength. Mice treated with DSCG had significantly reduced levels of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1α, IL-1β, and CXCL1. Although DSCG treatment reduced the production of inflammatory mediators, the rate of re-epithelialization was not affected. Compared to control, inhibition of mast cell activity caused a significant decrease in scar width along with accelerated collagen re-organization. Despite the reduced scar width, DSCG treatment did not affect the breaking strength of the healed tissue. Tryptase β1 exclusively produced by mast cells was found to increase significantly in the course of wound healing. However, DSCG treatment did not change its level in the wounds. These results indicate that blockade of mast cell activation reduces scar formation and inflammation without further weakening the healed wound. PMID:24465509

  18. Thermally-dried free and immobilized kefir cells as starter culture in hard-type cheese production.

    PubMed

    Katechaki, Eleftheria; Panas, Panayiotis; Kourkoutas, Yiannis; Koliopoulos, Dionisis; Koutinas, Athanasios A

    2009-07-01

    In an attempt to seek for suitable dried cultures, thermally-dried kefir was employed as starter in hard-type cheese production and tested in cheeses ripened at 5, 18 and 22 degrees C. Both free and immobilised on casein kefir cells were used and compared to cheese made without starter culture. Cheese products made with free cells of kefir culture were characterized by longer preservation time, improved aroma, taste, texture characteristics and increased degree of openness. Volatile profiles obtained by GC/MS analysis revealed a 216% increase in total concentration of esters, organic acids, alcohols and carbonyl compounds between cheeses prepared with and without kefir culture.

  19. Cytoskeleton in Mast Cell Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Dráber, Pavel; Sulimenko, Vadym; Dráberová, Eduarda

    2012-01-01

    Mast cell activation mediated by the high affinity receptor for IgE (FcεRI) is a key event in allergic response and inflammation. Other receptors on mast cells, as c-Kit for stem cell factor and G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) synergistically enhance the FcεRI-mediated release of inflammatory mediators. Activation of various signaling pathways in mast cells results in changes in cell morphology, adhesion to substrate, exocytosis, and migration. Reorganization of cytoskeleton is pivotal in all these processes. Cytoskeletal proteins also play an important role in initial stages of FcεRI and other surface receptors induced triggering. Highly dynamic microtubules formed by αβ-tubulin dimers as well as microfilaments build up from polymerized actin are affected in activated cells by kinases/phosphatases, Rho GTPases and changes in concentration of cytosolic Ca2+. Also important are nucleation proteins; the γ-tubulin complexes in case of microtubules or Arp 2/3 complex with its nucleation promoting factors and formins in case of microfilaments. The dynamic nature of microtubules and microfilaments in activated cells depends on many associated/regulatory proteins. Changes in rigidity of activated mast cells reflect changes in intermediate filaments build up from vimentin. This review offers a critical appraisal of current knowledge on the role of cytoskeleton in mast cells signaling. PMID:22654883

  20. Mast cells in innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Jean S; Jawdat, Dunia M

    2004-07-01

    Mast cells have been most extensively studied in their traditional role as an early effector cell of allergic disease. However, in the majority of individuals, it might be the role of this cell as a sentinel in host defense that is most important. Mast cells have been repeatedly demonstrated to play a critical role in defense against bacterial infections, and evidence for their involvement in early responses to viral and fungal pathogens is growing. Mast cells are activated during innate immune responses by multiple mechanisms, including well-established responses to complement components. In addition, novel mechanisms have emerged as a result of the explosion of knowledge in our understanding of pattern-recognition receptors. The mast cell shares many features with other innate immune effector cells, such as neutrophils and macrophages. However, a unique role for mast cells is defined not only by their extensive mediator profile but also by their ability to interact with the vasculature, to expedite selective cell recruitment, and to set the stage for an appropriate acquired response. Copyright 2004 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology

  1. Production of hard-type cheese using free or immobilized freeze-dried kefir cells as a starter culture.

    PubMed

    Katechaki, Eleftheria; Panas, Panayiotis; Rapti, Katerina; Kandilogiannakis, Leonidas; Koutinas, Athanasios A

    2008-07-09

    This study provides a contribution to hard-type cheese starter culture production through the use of a freeze-dried culture in the ripening of hard-type cheeses. The effect of initial cell concentration, ripening temperature, and cell immobilization of kefir on the degree of openness, mold spoilage, microbial associations, physicochemical characteristics, and aroma-related compounds was studied. Use of kefir starter cultures resulted in cheese with an increased shelf life and resistance to spoilage as compared to control cheeses without kefir inoculants. Furthermore, the freeze-dried kefir culture improved aroma, taste, and texture characteristics while increasing the degree of openness in comparison to traditional hard-type cheese products. The kefir culture resulted in an increase in counts of total aerobic bacteria, yeasts and molds, lactococci, and lactobacilli until the 15th day of ripening. From then on, only lactobacilli counts increased, reaching levels up to 9.17 log CFU/g in cheeses ripened at 5 degrees C using freeze-dried kefir cells immobilized on casein. SPME-GC/MS analysis revealed major differences in volatile composition, especially with regard to alcohols (up to 75%), carbonyl compounds (up to 75%), and esters (up to 64%) between cheeses made with kefir cells and cheeses made without kefir inoculants.

  2. Mast cell ontogeny: an historical overview.

    PubMed

    Ribatti, Domenico; Crivellato, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Mast cells were first identified by Paul Ehrlich in 1878, when he was still a medical student. Many fundamental aspects of mast cell ontogeny have been elucidated since Ehrlich's first identification. Demonstration of mast cell derivation from bone marrow precursors could be established in 1977 when Kitamura's group first showed reconstitution of mast cells in mast cell-deficient mice by the adaptive transfer of wild type bone marrow and indicated that these cells were of hematopoietic origin. It is now definitively established that development of mast cells in bone marrow occurs along the myeloid pathway. However, several aspects need further clarification. In particular, identification and chemical characterization of growth factors expressing mast cell differentiating properties and the relationship between mast cell and basophils developmental pathways.

  3. Curiosity on Tilt Table with Mast Up

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-03-25

    The Mast Camera Mastcam on NASA Mars rover Curiosity has two rectangular eyes near the top of the rover remote sensing mast. This image shows Curiosity on a tilt table NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California.

  4. Mast cell release of superoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Dileepan, K.N.; Simpson, K.M.; Stechschulte, D.J.

    1987-05-01

    The ability of rat serosal mast cells (MC) to release superoxide (O/sub 2//sup -/) upon activation by immunologic and nonimmunologic stimuli was investigated. Purified MC (90-95%) were either sensitized with monoclonal IgE reactive against dinitrophenyl bovine serum albumin (DNP-BSA) and challenged with DNP-BSA, or naive MC were treated with compound 48/80 or ionophore A23187. O/sub 2//sup -/ release was measured by O/sub 2//sup -/ dismutase (SOD)-sensitive reduction of cytochrome C and MC activation was assessed by the release of histamine or (/sup 14/C)5-hydroxytryptamine (5HT). The results reveal that activation of MC by 48/80 or immunologic challenge does not release O/sub 2//sup -/, although these stimuli induce substantial release of histamine and 5HT (40-70%). In contrast, A23187 released O/sub 2//sup -/ (3-6 nMols/10/sup 6/ MC) and histamine (40-80%). In mixed cell preparations containing MC and macrophages (M0), activation of MC with 48/80 resulted in inhibition of M0 O/sub 2//sup -/ release. The MC-mediated inhibition of O/sub 2//sup -/ production was not due to histamine or 5HT, but was due to MC-granule SOD. MC contain abundant quantities of SOD and, therefore, release O/sub 2//sup -/ only when its production exceeds the intracellular SOD threshold following activation with selective stimuli. In addition, the apparent differences in the mode and site of action of various stimuli on MC may contribute to the discriminative release of O/sub 2//sup -/.

  5. Targeting cardiac mast cells: pharmacological modulation of the local renin-angiotensin system.

    PubMed

    Reid, Alicia C; Brazin, Jacqueline A; Morrey, Christopher; Silver, Randi B; Levi, Roberto

    2011-11-01

    Enhanced production of angiotensin II and excessive release of norepinephrine in the ischemic heart are major causes of arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. Mast cell-dependent mechanisms are pivotal in the local formation of angiotensin II and modulation of norepinephrine release in cardiac pathophysiology. Cardiac mast cells increase in number in myocardial ischemia and are located in close proximity to sympathetic neurons expressing angiotensin AT1- and histamine H3-receptors. Once activated, cardiac mast cells release a host of potent pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic cytokines, chemokines, preformed mediators (e.g., histamine) and proteases (e.g., renin). In myocardial ischemia, angiotensin II (formed locally from mast cell-derived renin) and histamine (also released from local mast cells) respectively activate AT1- and H3-receptors on sympathetic nerve endings. Stimulation of angiotensin AT1-receptors is arrhythmogenic whereas H3-receptor activation is cardioprotective. It is likely that in ischemia/reperfusion the balance may be tipped toward the deleterious effects of mast cell renin, as demonstrated in mast cell-deficient mice, lacking mast cell renin and histamine in the heart. In these mice, no ventricular fibrillation occurs at reperfusion following ischemia, as opposed to wild-type hearts which all fibrillate. Preventing mast cell degranulation in the heart and inhibiting the activation of a local renin-angiotensin system, hence abolishing its detrimental effects on cardiac rhythmicity, appears to be more significant than the loss of histamine-induced cardioprotection. This suggests that therapeutic targets in the treatment of myocardial ischemia, and potentially congestive heart failure and hypertension, should include prevention of mast cell degranulation, mast cell renin inhibition, local ACE inhibition, ANG II antagonism and H3-receptor activation.

  6. 30 CFR 57.7004 - Drill mast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Drill mast. 57.7004 Section 57.7004 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Drilling-Surface Only § 57.7004 Drill mast. Persons shall not be on a mast while the drill-bit is in...

  7. 30 CFR 57.7004 - Drill mast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Drill mast. 57.7004 Section 57.7004 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Drilling-Surface Only § 57.7004 Drill mast. Persons shall not be on a mast while the drill-bit is in...

  8. 30 CFR 56.7004 - Drill mast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Drill mast. 56.7004 Section 56.7004 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Drilling § 56.7004 Drill mast. Persons shall not be on a mast while the drill-bit is in operation unless...

  9. 30 CFR 56.7004 - Drill mast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Drill mast. 56.7004 Section 56.7004 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Drilling § 56.7004 Drill mast. Persons shall not be on a mast while the drill-bit is in operation unless...

  10. 30 CFR 56.7004 - Drill mast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Drill mast. 56.7004 Section 56.7004 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Drilling § 56.7004 Drill mast. Persons shall not be on a mast while the drill-bit is in operation unless...

  11. 30 CFR 57.7004 - Drill mast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Drill mast. 57.7004 Section 57.7004 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Drilling-Surface Only § 57.7004 Drill mast. Persons shall not be on a mast while the drill-bit is in...

  12. 30 CFR 56.7004 - Drill mast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Drill mast. 56.7004 Section 56.7004 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Drilling § 56.7004 Drill mast. Persons shall not be on a mast while the drill-bit is in operation unless...

  13. 30 CFR 56.7004 - Drill mast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Drill mast. 56.7004 Section 56.7004 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Drilling § 56.7004 Drill mast. Persons shall not be on a mast while the drill-bit is in operation unless...

  14. 30 CFR 57.7004 - Drill mast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Drill mast. 57.7004 Section 57.7004 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Drilling-Surface Only § 57.7004 Drill mast. Persons shall not be on a mast while the drill-bit is in...

  15. 30 CFR 57.7004 - Drill mast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Drill mast. 57.7004 Section 57.7004 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Drilling-Surface Only § 57.7004 Drill mast. Persons shall not be on a mast while the drill-bit is in...

  16. 46 CFR 111.05-9 - Masts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Masts. 111.05-9 Section 111.05-9 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Equipment Ground, Ground Detection, and Grounded Systems § 111.05-9 Masts. Each nonmetallic mast and...

  17. Mast cell infiltrates in vulvodynia represent secondary and idiopathic mast cell hyperplasias.

    PubMed

    Regauer, Sigrid; Eberz, Barbara; Beham-Schmid, Christine

    2015-05-01

    Mast cell infiltrates in tissues of vulvodynia are common, but they have not been characterized for criteria of neoplastic mast cell disease or correlated with patient's concomitant diseases associated with increased mast cells. Formalin-fixed specimens of 35 patients with vulvodynia were evaluated immunohistochemically with antibodies to CD 3,4,8,20,117c and human mast cell tryptase, and for WHO-criteria of neoplastic mastocytosis (>25% spindled mast cell, CD25 expression, point mutations of the c-kit gene (D816V), and chronically elevated serum tryptase levels). Only 20/35 specimens showed a T-lymphocyte dominant inflammatory infiltrate on HE-stained sections, but all showed mast cells. 4/35 biopsies showed <10 mast cells/mm(2) , 15/35 specimens 40-60 mast cells/mm(2) and 16/35 specimens >60 mast cells/mm(2) (average 80/mm(2) ). Control tissue contained typically <10 mast cells/mm(2) . Spindling, CD25-expression, c-kit gene mutations, or increased serum tryptase levels were not detected. 26/35 (74%) patients had concomitant autoimmune diseases, psoriasis, atopy, various allergies, preceding infections. Independent of the subtype of vulvodynia, the majority of mast cell rich biopsies with >40 mast cells/mm(2) were classified as a secondary mast cell disorder reflecting an activated immune system in 75% of vulvodynia patients. Patients with increased mast cells may benefit from medical therapy targeting mast cells.

  18. Live Staphylococcus aureus Induces Expression and Release of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor in Terminally Differentiated Mouse Mast Cells.

    PubMed

    Johnzon, Carl-Fredrik; Rönnberg, Elin; Guss, Bengt; Pejler, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    Mast cells have been shown to express vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), thereby implicating mast cells in pro-angiogenic processes. However, the mechanism of VEGF induction in mast cells and the possible expression of VEGF in fully mature mast cells have not been extensively studied. Here, we report that terminally differentiated peritoneal cell-derived mast cells can be induced to express VEGF in response to challenge with Staphylococcus aureus, thus identifying a mast cell-bacteria axis as a novel mechanism leading to VEGF release. Whereas live bacteria produced a robust upregulation of VEGF in mast cells, heat-inactivated bacteria failed to do so, and bacteria-conditioned media did not induce VEGF expression. The induction of VEGF was not critically dependent on direct cell-cell contact between bacteria and mast cells. Hence, these findings suggest that VEGF can be induced by soluble factors released during the co-culture conditions. Neither of a panel of bacterial cell-wall products known to activate toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling promoted VEGF expression in mast cells. In agreement with the latter, VEGF induction occurred independently of Myd88, an adaptor molecule that mediates the downstream events following TLR engagement. The VEGF induction was insensitive to nuclear factor of activated T-cells inhibition but was partly dependent on the nuclear factor kappa light-chain enhancer of activated B cells signaling pathway. Together, these findings identify bacterial challenge as a novel mechanism by which VEGF is induced in mast cells.

  19. Mast cell activation syndromes presenting as anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Akin, Cem

    2015-05-01

    Anaphylaxis results from severe systemic mast cell activation. In addition to IgE-mediated and physical triggers, it may occur with a clonal mast cell disease and in an idiopathic fashion without clear provoking factors. Disorders of mast cell activation are classified into primary (clonal), secondary, and idiopathic. Mast cell activation syndrome (MCAS) is a multisystem disorder characterized by objective documentation of elevated mast cell mediators during attacks and a favorable response to antimediator therapy. It should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with recurrent anaphylaxis without a clear cause. This article discusses the diagnosis of MCAS.

  20. An update on mast cell disorders.

    PubMed

    Cookson, Hannah; Grattan, Clive

    2016-12-01

    Disorders of mast cell activation can be classified as primary (mastocytosis), secondary (reactive) or idiopathic. This article discusses how to recognise and approach the diagnosis of patients suspected to have symptoms of abnormal mast cell activation. Given the highly varied and often complex symptomatology of such patients, we advocate applying a logical step-wise approach to investigating these patients to ensure the correct diagnosis is made. Treatments of mast cell activation disorders are discussed, dividing them into those that ameliorate the effects of mast cell mediators and those that act to stabilise the mast cell.

  1. Archiving Community Contributed Data in MAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levay, K.; Kamp, I.; Thompson, R.; Smith, M.; White, R. L.

    2007-10-01

    High-Level Science Products (HLSPs) are community contributed, fully processed (reduced, co-added, cosmic-ray cleaned etc.) images and spectra that are ready for scientific analysis. HLSPs also include files such as object catalogs, spectral atlases, and README files describing a given set of data. The Multi-mission Archive at the Space Telescope Science Institute (MAST) solicits HLSPs from the community by (a) sending letters to the PIs of approved Treasury, Archival Legacy and Large proposals on HST, (b) discussing with scientists and distributing flyers at conferences and meetings, (c) newsletter articles, and (d) communicating with authors after reading pertinent journal papers. We work with the scientist to ensure a proper data format (e.g. by using a FITS verifier), a proper description of the data reduction process and the entire data product in the form of an ASCII file (README), and (if necessary) web pages. The HLSPs are kept separate from the original MAST data, although information is preserved to indicate how one is related to the other. Several image-based HLSPs are already provided through the Virtual Observatory (VO) Simple Image Access Protocol (SIAP), and spectral data will eventually be available using the Simple Spectral Access Protocol.

  2. Spatio-temporal availability of soft mast in clearcuts in the Southern Appalachians

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reynolds-Hogland, M. J.; Mitchell, M.S.; Powell, R.A.

    2006-01-01

    Soft mast is an important resource for many wild populations in the Southern Appalachians, yet the way clear-cutting affects availability of soft mast though time is not fully understood. We tested a theoretical model of temporal availability of soft mast in clearcuts using empirical data on percent cover and berry production of Gaylussacia, Vaccinium, and Rubus spp. plants in 100 stands that were clearcut (0-122 years old) in the Southern Appalachian Mountains. We modeled the relationship between soft mast availability and stand age, evaluated the effects of topography and forest type on soft mast, developed statistical models for predicting the spatio-temporal distribution of soft mast, and tested the hypothesis that percent cover of berry plants and berry production provided similar information about soft mast availability. We found temporal dynamics explained berry production better than it predicted percent plant cover, whereas topographic variables influenced percent plant cover more than they influenced berry production. Berry production and percent plant cover were highest in ???2-9-year-old stands. Percent plant cover was lowest in 10-69-year-old stands and intermediate in 70+-year-old stands. Three of our spatio-temporal models performed well during model testing and they were not biased by the training data, indicating the inferences about spatio-temporal availability of soft mast extended beyond our sample data. The methods we used to estimate the distribution of soft mast may be useful for modeling distributions of other resources. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Hard X-ray bremsstrahlung production in solar flares by high-energy proton beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emslie, A. G.; Brown, J. C.

    1985-01-01

    The possibility that solar hard X-ray bremsstrahlung is produced by acceleration of stationary electrons by fast-moving protons, rather than vice versa, as commonly assumed, was investigated. It was found that a beam of protons which involves 1836 times fewer particles, each having an energy 1836 times greater than that of the electrons in the equivalent electron beam model, has exactly the same bremsstrahlung yield for a given target, i.e., the mechanism has an energetic efficiency equal to that of conventional bremsstrahlung models. Allowance for the different degrees of target ionization appropriate to the two models (for conventional flare geometries) makes the proton beam model more efficient than the electron beam model, by a factor of order three. The model places less stringent constraints than a conventional electron beam model on the flare energy release mechanism. It is also consistent with observed X-ray burst spectra, intensities, and directivities. The altitude distribution of hard X-rays predicted by the model agrees with observations only if nonvertical injection of the protons is assumed. The model is inconsistent with gamma-ray data in terms of conventional modeling.

  4. SuperCam_MastUnit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deleuze, M. D.; Bernardi, P. B.; Caïs, Ph. C.; Perez, R. P.; Rees, J. M. R.; Pares, L. P.; Dubois, B. D.; Parot, Y. P.; Quertier, B. Q.; Maurice, S. M.; Maccabe, K. M.; Wiens, R. W.; Rull, F. R.

    2016-10-01

    This paper will describe and give a development status of SuperCam's mast unit. SuperCam will be carried on the Mars 2020 rover, and consists in an enhanced version of the ChemCam LIBS which is still performing at the surface of Mars, on Curiosity.

  5. Mast Cell Proteases and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Hongyan; Korthuis, Ronald J.

    2011-01-01

    Mast cells are best known for their role in allergic reactions but are also now recognized for their important contributions to a number of disparate inflammatory conditions through the release of inflammatory mediators, serglycin and other proteoglycans, and proteases. Because these tissue resident inflammatory cells express proteases in such great abundance and their enzymatic activity results in cleavage of a multitude of proteins and peptides, which in turn modify tissue function, their substrate specificity, tissue distribution, and mode of action have become the subjects of great interest. Although mast cell protease-dependent proteolysis is critical to host defense against invading pathogens, regulation of these hydrolytic enzymes is essential to limiting self-induced damage as well. Indeed, dysregulated release of mast cell proteases is now recognized to contribute to the pathogenesis of a number of inflammatory conditions including asthma, abdominal aortic aneurysm formation, vessel damage in atherosclerosis and hypertension, arthritis, and ischemia/reperfusion injury. Understanding how mast cell proteases contribute to inflammation will thus help unravel molecular mechanisms that underlie such immunologic disorders and will help identify new therapeutic targets for drug development. PMID:22125569

  6. Lipid Rafts in Mast Cell Biology

    PubMed Central

    Silveira e Souza, Adriana Maria Mariano; Mazucato, Vivian Marino; Jamur, Maria Célia; Oliver, Constance

    2011-01-01

    Mast cells have long been recognized to have a direct and critical role in allergic and inflammatory reactions. In allergic diseases, these cells exert both local and systemic responses, including allergic rhinitis and anaphylaxis. Mast cell mediators are also related to many chronic inflammatory conditions. Besides the roles in pathological conditions, the biological functions of mast cells include roles in innate immunity, involvement in host defense mechanisms against parasites, immunomodulation of the immune system, tissue repair, and angiogenesis. Despite their growing significance in physiological and pathological conditions, much still remains to be learned about mast cell biology. This paper presents evidence that lipid rafts or raft components modulate many of the biological processes in mast cells, such as degranulation and endocytosis, play a role in mast cell development and recruitment, and contribute to the overall preservation of mast cell structure and organization. PMID:21490812

  7. Mast Cells in Allergic Diseases and Mastocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Marquardt, Diana L.; Wasserman, Stephen I.

    1982-01-01

    Mast cells with their stores of vasoactive and chemotactic mediators are central to the pathogenesis of allergic diseases. The cross-linking of receptorbound IgE molecules on the surface of mast cells initiates a complex chain of events, including calcium ion influx, phospholipid methylation and turnover and cyclic nucleotide metabolism, ultimately resulting in the release of mediators of immediate hypersensitivity. These mast cell mediators are important in smooth muscle reactivity, in the recruitment of eosinophilic and neutrophilic leukocytes and in the generation of secondary chemical mediators. Histologic evidence of mast cell degranulation, biochemical evidence of mast cell mediators in blood and tissues and clinical evidence of signs and symptoms reproducible by these mediators have strongly supported the crucial role of mast cells in asthma, urticaria, anaphylaxis, rhinitis and mastocytosis. Because of their unique location at host environment interfaces, mast cells may both participate in allergic diseases and promote homeostasis. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3. PMID:6293204

  8. Hardness testing

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    This technical manual is a handbook dealing with all aspects of hardness testing. Every hardness testing method is fully covered, from Rockwell to ultrasonic hardness testing. Specific hardness testing problems are also discussed, and methods are offered for many applications. One chapter examines how to select the correct hardness testing method. A directory of manufacturers, distributors and suppliers of hardness testing equipment and supplies in the United States and Canada is also included. The book consist of eight chapters and an appendix. It discusses common concepts of hardness, and the theories and methods of hardness testing. Coverage includes specific hardness testing methods - Brinell, Rockwell, Vickers, and microhardness testing; and other hardness testing methods, such as scleroscope, ultrasonic, scratch and file testing, and hardness evaluation by eddy current testing.

  9. Mast cell mediated inflammatory response in chickens after infection with very virulent infectious bursal disease virus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Decheng; Xiong, Jinmao; She, Ruiping; Liu, Liqiang; Zhang, Yanmei; Luo, Dongmei; Li, Wengui; Hu, Yanxin; Wang, Yinghua; Zhang, Qiong; Sun, Quan

    2008-07-15

    The potential role of the mast cells in the invasion of very virulent infectious bursal disease virus (vvIBDV) is unknown. We evaluated mast cell activity and tryptase production after vvIBDV infection in special pathogen-free (SPF) chickens using cytochemistry and immunohistochemistry analyses. The results were as follows: (1) severe histologic lesions were observed in the thymus, spleen, cloacal bursa, liver, kidney and other tissues. vvIBDV viral antigens were detected and presented extensively in the parenchymatous organs, in particular, the cloacal bursa, liver, kidney, thymus, spleen and pancreas. (2) In the vvIBDV-infected group, the mast cell population increased markedly in the liver, kidney, thymus, glandular stomach, spleen and cloacal bursa on days 1, 2 and 3 after vvIBDV infection (p<0.05). However, very few mast cells were observed in those same tissues in the controls, especially in the bursa of Fabricius. (3) Tryptase, a marker for activated mast cells, has a positive correlation with mast cell distribution. The mast cells identified in the tissues were likely to be activated since they were associated with cell degranulation and the presence of tryptase. Furthermore, the co-localization of mast cells, and presence of vvIBDV antigens suggests that the mast cells were activated by vvIBDV infection. Our results also suggest that tryptase may contribute to the inflammation of acute IBD induced by vvIBDV infection. Our research contributes to the further understanding of inflammatory response mechanisms and the contribution of mast cell activity to this process.

  10. The EUVE Permanent Archive at HEASARC and MAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christian, D. J.; McGlynn, T.; Drake, S.; White, N. E.; Newman, P.; Postman, M.; Hanisch, R. J.; Donahue, M.; Imhoff, C.; Kimball, T.; Levay, K.; Padovani, P.; Smith, M.; Thompson, R. W.; Malina, R. F.; Stroozas, B.

    2000-05-01

    We present an overview of the EUVE permanent archive data, which is available from the High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC; http://heasarc.gsfc.nasa.gov/) and accessible through the Multi Mission Archive at Space Telescope Science Institute (MAST; http://archive.stsci.edu/mast.html). The EUVE permanent archive data contains two main data products: 2-dimensional FITS image files of the Deep Survey and spectrometer instruments, and event files for these instruments that include information for temporal analysis. Both archive sites have web retrieval and search pages that allow researchers to search the EUVE holdings by several parameters, including object name, object class, or coordinates. Selected data is easily down-loaded via the web. HEASARC also provides an anonymous ftp option. Both archives include EUVE mission information, data analysis documentation and software, and links to all-sky survey data products. MAST currently has EUVE 1-dimensional quick-look spectra for most EUVE sources, an option to display FITS headers, and/or to down-load spectra in ASCII or FITS formats. Support for MAST for non-HST data is provided by the NASA Office of Space Science via grant NAG5-7584 and by other grants and contracts.

  11. Inhibition of c-kit tyrosine kinase by imatinib mesylate induces apoptosis in mast cells in rheumatoid synovia: a potential approach to the treatment of arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Juurikivi, A; Sandler, C; Lindstedt, K; Kovanen, P; Juutilainen, T; Leskinen, M; Maki, T; Eklund, K

    2005-01-01

    Background: Mast cells have been implicated in the pathogenesis of arthritis, but elucidation of their precise role has been hampered by a lack of efficient and selective inhibitors of their function. Objective: To elucidate the role of mast cells in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and to assess whether apoptosis of cultured and synovial tissue mast cells can be induced by inhibiting mast cell growth factor receptor, c-kit tyrosine kinase. Methods and results: Double staining with tumour necrosis factor (TNF) α and tryptase antibodies showed the presence of TNFα positive mast cells in human rheumatoid synovial tissue. Selective activation of mast cells by anti-IgE resulted in production of TNFα in synovial tissue cultures. Inhibition of the c-kit tyrosine kinase with imatinib mesylate (1.0–10 µmol/l) induced profound apoptosis in cultured mast cells as judged by typical apoptotic morphology, increased number of apoptotic nucleosomes, and activation of caspases 8 and 9. Importantly, imatinib also induced apoptosis of mast cells in explant cultures of synovial tissue obtained from patients with RA as judged by a TUNEL assay. Inhibition of c-kit tyrosine kinase was accompanied by significant reduction of TNFα production in synovial tissue cultures. Conclusion: Mast cells may have a role in the pathogenesis of RA, and inhibition of c-kit may be a new means of inhibiting mast cell activity and of abrogating the contribution of mast cells to synovial inflammation in RA. PMID:16014680

  12. Phaeton Mast Dynamics: On-Orbit Characterization of Deployable Masts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michaels, Darren J.

    2011-01-01

    The PMD instrument is a set of three custom-designed triaxial accelerometer systems designed specifically to detect and characterize the modal dynamics of deployable masts in orbit. The instrument was designed and built as a payload for the NuSTAR spacecraft, but it is now sponsored by the Air Force Research Laboratory's DSX project. It can detect acceleration levels from 1 micro gram to 0.12g over a frequency range of 0.1Hz to 30Hz, the results of which can support future modeling and designing of deployable mast structures for space. This paper details the hardware architecture and design, calibration test and results, and current status of the PMD instrument.

  13. Defective bone repair in mast cell-deficient Cpa3Cre/+ mice

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Daniel; Samberg, Robert; Abou-Rjeili, Mira; Wong, Timothy H.; Li, Ailian; Feyerabend, Thorsten B.; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer; Henderson, Janet E.; Martineau, Paul A.

    2017-01-01

    In the adult skeleton, cells of the immune system interact with those of the skeleton during all phases of bone repair to influence the outcome. Mast cells are immune cells best known for their pathologic role in allergy, and may be involved in chronic inflammatory and fibrotic disorders. Potential roles for mast cells in tissue homeostasis, vascularization and repair remain enigmatic. Previous studies in combined mast cell- and Kit-deficient KitW-sh/W-sh mice (KitW-sh) implicated mast cells in bone repair but KitW-sh mice suffer from additional Kit-dependent hematopoietic and non- hematopoietic deficiencies that could have confounded the outcome. The goal of the current study was to compare bone repair in normal wild type (WT) and Cpa3Cre/+ mice, which lack mast cells in the absence of any other hematopoietic or non- hematopoietic deficiencies. Repair of a femoral window defect was characterized using micro CT imaging and histological analyses from the early inflammatory phase, through soft and hard callus formation, and finally the remodeling phase. The data indicate 1) mast cells appear in healing bone of WT mice but not Cpa3Cre/+ mice, beginning 14 days after surgery; 2) re-vascularization of repair tissue and deposition of mineralized bone was delayed and dis-organised in Cpa3Cre/+ mice compared with WT mice; 3) the defects in Cpa3Cre/+ mice were associated with little change in anabolic activity and biphasic alterations in osteoclast and macrophage activity. The outcome at 56 days postoperative was complete bridging of the defect in most WT mice and fibrous mal-union in most Cpa3Cre/+ mice. The results indicate that mast cells promote bone healing, possibly by recruiting vascular endothelial cells during the inflammatory phase and coordinating anabolic and catabolic activity during tissue remodeling. Taken together the data indicate that mast cells have a positive impact on bone repair. PMID:28350850

  14. Defective bone repair in mast cell-deficient Cpa3Cre/+ mice.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-GarciaLuna, Jose Luis; Chan, Daniel; Samberg, Robert; Abou-Rjeili, Mira; Wong, Timothy H; Li, Ailian; Feyerabend, Thorsten B; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer; Henderson, Janet E; Martineau, Paul A

    2017-01-01

    In the adult skeleton, cells of the immune system interact with those of the skeleton during all phases of bone repair to influence the outcome. Mast cells are immune cells best known for their pathologic role in allergy, and may be involved in chronic inflammatory and fibrotic disorders. Potential roles for mast cells in tissue homeostasis, vascularization and repair remain enigmatic. Previous studies in combined mast cell- and Kit-deficient KitW-sh/W-sh mice (KitW-sh) implicated mast cells in bone repair but KitW-sh mice suffer from additional Kit-dependent hematopoietic and non- hematopoietic deficiencies that could have confounded the outcome. The goal of the current study was to compare bone repair in normal wild type (WT) and Cpa3Cre/+ mice, which lack mast cells in the absence of any other hematopoietic or non- hematopoietic deficiencies. Repair of a femoral window defect was characterized using micro CT imaging and histological analyses from the early inflammatory phase, through soft and hard callus formation, and finally the remodeling phase. The data indicate 1) mast cells appear in healing bone of WT mice but not Cpa3Cre/+ mice, beginning 14 days after surgery; 2) re-vascularization of repair tissue and deposition of mineralized bone was delayed and dis-organised in Cpa3Cre/+ mice compared with WT mice; 3) the defects in Cpa3Cre/+ mice were associated with little change in anabolic activity and biphasic alterations in osteoclast and macrophage activity. The outcome at 56 days postoperative was complete bridging of the defect in most WT mice and fibrous mal-union in most Cpa3Cre/+ mice. The results indicate that mast cells promote bone healing, possibly by recruiting vascular endothelial cells during the inflammatory phase and coordinating anabolic and catabolic activity during tissue remodeling. Taken together the data indicate that mast cells have a positive impact on bone repair.

  15. Tetraspanin CD151 Is a Negative Regulator of FcεRI-Mediated Mast Cell Activation.

    PubMed

    Abdala-Valencia, Hiam; Bryce, Paul J; Schleimer, Robert P; Wechsler, Joshua B; Loffredo, Lucas F; Cook-Mills, Joan M; Hsu, Chia-Lin; Berdnikovs, Sergejs

    2015-08-15

    Mast cells are critical in the pathogenesis of allergic disease due to the release of preformed and newly synthesized mediators, yet the mechanisms controlling mast cell activation are not well understood. Members of the tetraspanin family are recently emerging as modulators of FcεRI-mediated mast cell activation; however, mechanistic understanding of their function is currently lacking. The tetraspanin CD151 is a poorly understood member of this family and is specifically induced on mouse and human mast cells upon FcεRI aggregation but its functional effects are unknown. In this study, we show that CD151 deficiency significantly exacerbates the IgE-mediated late phase inflammation in a murine model of passive cutaneous anaphylaxis. Ex vivo, FcεRI stimulation of bone marrow-derived mast cells from CD151(-/-) mice resulted in significantly enhanced expression of proinflammatory cytokines IL-4, IL-13, and TNF-α compared with wild-type controls. However, FcεRI-induced mast cell degranulation was unaffected. At the molecular signaling level, CD151 selectively regulated IgE-induced activation of ERK1/2 and PI3K, associated with cytokine production, but had no effect on the phospholipase Cγ1 signaling, associated with degranulation. Collectively, our data indicate that CD151 exerts negative regulation over IgE-induced late phase responses and cytokine production in mast cells.

  16. Phaeton Mast Dynamics: On-Orbit Characterization of Deployable Masts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michaels, Darren

    2011-01-01

    This presentation discusses the Phaeton Mast Dynamics (PMD) instrument architecture and design, including design constraints, design solutions, and instrument results. Since the design and build phases were completed with PMD as a NuSTAR payload, the presentation discusses NuSTAR's constraints and initial accommodations. The instrument results presented here are independent of the host mission, but the effects of a host mission's data handling design on PMD capabilities is discussed in 2011 IEEEAC Paper 1305.

  17. In Situ Production of Hard Metal Matrix Composite Coating on Engineered Surfaces Using Laser Cladding Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raza, Mohammad Shahid; Hussain, Manowar; Kumar, Vikash; Das, Alok Kumar

    2016-11-01

    The growing need for high wear-resistant surface with enhanced physical properties has led to extensive researches in the field of surface engineering. Laser cladding emerged to be a promising method to achieve these objectives in a cost-effective way. The present paper studies the viability of cladding of tungsten disulfide (WS2) powder by using 400 W continuous-wave fiber laser. WS2 was used as a coating material, which was decomposed at higher temperature and underwent several chemical reactions. By this process, in situ formation of metal matrix composites and hard face coating on the substrate surface were attained. The characterization of laser cladded surface was done to study its morphological, microstructural, mechanical and tribological properties. It was observed that cladding of WS2 powder on 304 SS resulted in the formation of Cr-W-C-Fe metal matrix composite having improved mechanical and tribological properties. The value of microhardness of the coated surface was found to increase three to four times in comparison with the parent material surface. Wear test results indicated a decrease in wear by 1/9th (maximum) as compared to the parent 304 SS surface. The volume fractions of tungsten particles on the cladded surface were also investigated through EDS analysis.

  18. Cheese milk low homogenization enhanced early lipolysis and volatiles compounds production in hard cooked cheeses.

    PubMed

    Vélez, María A; Hynes, Erica R; Meinardi, Carlos A; Wolf, Verónica I; Perotti, María C

    2017-06-01

    Homogenization applied to cheese milk has shown to increase lipolysis but its use is not spread as it can induce detrimental effects. The aim of this work was to assess the effect of low-pressure homogenization of the cream followed by pre-incubation of cheese milk on the composition, ripening index, lipolysis and volatile profiles of hard cooked cheeses. For that, control and experimental miniature Reggianito cheeses were made and analyzed during ripening (3, 45 and 90days). Homogenization had no impact on composition and proteolysis. An acceleration of the lipolysis reaction was clearly noticed in cheeses made with homogenized milk at the beginning of ripening, while both type of cheeses reached similar levels at 90days. We found the level of several compounds derived from fatty acid catabolism were noticeably influenced by the treatment applied: straight-chain aldehydes such as hexanal, heptanal and nonanal and methylketones from C5 to C9 were preferentially formed in experimental cheeses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. In Situ Production of Hard Metal Matrix Composite Coating on Engineered Surfaces Using Laser Cladding Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raza, Mohammad Shahid; Hussain, Manowar; Kumar, Vikash; Das, Alok Kumar

    2017-01-01

    The growing need for high wear-resistant surface with enhanced physical properties has led to extensive researches in the field of surface engineering. Laser cladding emerged to be a promising method to achieve these objectives in a cost-effective way. The present paper studies the viability of cladding of tungsten disulfide (WS2) powder by using 400 W continuous-wave fiber laser. WS2 was used as a coating material, which was decomposed at higher temperature and underwent several chemical reactions. By this process, in situ formation of metal matrix composites and hard face coating on the substrate surface were attained. The characterization of laser cladded surface was done to study its morphological, microstructural, mechanical and tribological properties. It was observed that cladding of WS2 powder on 304 SS resulted in the formation of Cr-W-C-Fe metal matrix composite having improved mechanical and tribological properties. The value of microhardness of the coated surface was found to increase three to four times in comparison with the parent material surface. Wear test results indicated a decrease in wear by 1/9th (maximum) as compared to the parent 304 SS surface. The volume fractions of tungsten particles on the cladded surface were also investigated through EDS analysis.

  20. Effect of five different dental products on surface hardness of enamel exposed to chlorinated water in vitro.

    PubMed

    Rirattanapong, Praphasri; Vongsavan, Kadkao; Tepvichaisillapakul, Mullika

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the effect of five different dental products on surface microhardness of enamel exposed to chlorinated water in vitro. Sixty human sound premolar teeth, extracted for orthodontic reasons, were used and randomly divided into 6 groups (10 specimens each group: artificial saliva, 1,000 ppm fluoride toothpaste, CPP-ACP paste, CPP-ACP with 900 ppm fluoride paste, CPP toothpaste and tricalcium phosphate with 950 ppm fluoride paste. All specimens were immersed in chlorinated water at pH 5 for 24 hours and then remineralized by coating with a dental product from each group for 5 minutes and kept in artificial saliva at 37 degrees C for 6 hours. The surface microhardness of the enamel was measured with a Vickers hardness tester at baseline, after erosion by chlorinated water and after remineralization. Comparisons of the mean microhardness within each group were made a one-way repeated measures ANOVA and between groups using a one-way ANOVA and an LSD test at p < 0.05. The mean surface microhardness in all groups decreased significantly after eroding with chlorinated water and increased after remineralization. After remineralization, the mean surface microhardness of the artificial saliva group was significantly less than the other groups. Five different dental products (1,000 ppm fluoride toothpaste, CPP-ACP paste, CPP-ACP with 900 ppm fluoride paste, CPP toothpaste and tricalcium phosphate with 950 ppm fluoride paste) increased the hardness in vitro of eroded enamel caused by chlorinated water.

  1. Asymmetric divertor biasing in MAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helander, P.; Cohen, R.; Counsell, G. C.; Ryutov, D. D.

    2002-11-01

    Experiments are being carried out on the Mega-Ampere Spherical Tokamak (MAST) where the divertor tiles are electrically biased in a toroidally alternating way. The aim is to induce convective cells in the divertor plasma, broaden the SOL and reduce the divertor heat load. This paper describes the underlying theory and experimental results. Criteria are presented for achieving strong broadening and exciting shear-flow turbulence in the SOL, and properties of the expected turbulence are derived. It is also shown that magnetic shear near the X-point is likely to confine the potential perturbations to the divertor region, leaving the part of the SOL that is in direct contact with the core plasma intact. Preliminary comparison of the theory with MAST data is encouraging: the distortion of the heat deposition pattern, its broadening, and the incremental heat load are qualitatively in agreement; quantitative comparisons are underway.

  2. On the nature of the Fe-bearing particles influencing hard anodizing behavior of AA 7075 extrusion products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, A. K.

    1998-03-01

    The deleterious effects of Fe-bearing constituent particles on the fracture toughness of wrought A1 alloys have been known. Recent studies have shown that the presence of Fe-bearing, constituent particles is also determental to the nature and growth of the hard anodic oxide coating formed on such materials. The present study, using a combination of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), was made to examine the influence of the nature of the Fe-bearing particles on the hard anodizing behavior of AA 7075 extrusion products containing varying amounts of Si, Mn, and Fe impurities. It was found that, in the alloy containing 0.25 wt pct Si, 0.27 wt pct Mn, and 0.25 wt pct Fe, the Fe-bearing constituent particles are based on the Al12(FeMn)3Si phase (bcc with α=1.260 nm). These particles survive the hard anodizing treatment, add resistance to the electrical path, causing a rapid rise in the bath voltage with time, and cause a nonuniform growth of the anodic oxide film. In the materials containing 0.05 wt pct Si, 0.04 wt pct Mn, and 0.18 wt pct Fe, on the other hand, the formation of the Al12(FeMn)3Si-based phase is suppressed, and two different Fe-bearing phases, based on Al-Fe-Cu-Mn-based (simple cubic with a=1.265 nm) and Al7Cu2Fe, respectively form. Neither the Al-Fe-Cu-Mn-based phase nor the Al7Cu2Fe-based phase survive the hard anodizing treatment, and this results in a steady rise in the bath voltage with time and a relatively uniform growth of the anodic oxide film. Consideration of the size of the Fe-bearing, particles reveals that the smaller the particle, the more uniform the growth of the anodic oxide film.

  3. Recognition of Candida albicans by Dectin-1 induces mast cell activation.

    PubMed

    Nieto-Patlán, Alejandro; Campillo-Navarro, Marcia; Rodríguez-Cortés, Octavio; Muñoz-Cruz, Samira; Wong-Baeza, Isabel; Estrada-Parra, Sergio; Estrada-García, Iris; Serafín-López, Jeanet; Chacón-Salinas, Rommel

    2015-09-01

    Mast cells are crucial elements of the innate immune response. They reside in tissues that are commonly exposed to the external environment, such as the skin and mucosae, where they can rapidly detect the presence of pathogens and mount a potent inflammatory response that recruits other cellular effectors of the immune response. The contribution of mast cells to the immune response to viruses, bacteria, protozoa and multicellular parasites is well established, but there is scarce information about the role of these cells in fungal infections. In this study, we analyzed if mast cells are activated by Candida albicans and if the C-type lectin receptor Dectin-1 is involved in its recognition. We found that both yeasts and hyphae of C. albicans-induced mast cell degranulation and production of TNF-α, IL-6, IL-10, CCL3 and CCL4, while only yeasts were able to induce IL-1β. Mast cells also produced ROS after stimulation with both dimorphic phases of C. albicans. When mast cells were activated with yeasts and hyphae, they showed decreased expression of IκBα and increased presence of phosphorylated Syk. Blockade of the receptor Dectin-1, but not Toll-like receptor 2, decreased TNF-α production by mast cell in response to C. albicans. These results indicate that mast cells are capable of sensing the two phases of C. albicans, and suggest that mast cells participate as an early inductor of inflammation during the early innate immune response to this fungus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  4. Tyramine production in Dutch-type semi-hard cheese from two different producers.

    PubMed

    Komprda, T; Burdychová, R; Dohnal, V; Cwiková, O; Sládková, P; Dvorácková, H

    2008-04-01

    Tyramine content and counts of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and enterococci were measured (including tyrosine-decarboxylase activity testing, and testing of the presence of the tyrosine-decarboxylase gene sequence, tyrdc, by PCR) during ripening (0, 26, 54, 88, 119, 146, and 176 days) in the core (C)- and edge (E)-samples of Dutch-type semi-hard cheese produced from pasteurized milk by two dairies (R, H) with two levels of fat content (30 and 45%) using two different starter cultures (Y, L), respectively. Tyramine content (y, mgkg(-1)) increased (P<0.001) with increasing time of ripening (x, days) in the cheeses of both producers (R: y=0.88x-31.4, R(2)=0.30; H: y=0.50x-6.3, R(2)=0.18), and its content was higher (P<0.01) in E-samples in comparison with C-samples. Time of ripening, part of the cheese and starter culture accounted for 67%, 28%, and 4% of explained variability of tyramine content in the cheese, respectively. After 26 days of ripening, using decarboxylase screening medium (DCM), tyrosine-decarboxylase positive LAB isolates constituted 7-27% and 6-32% of the square root of total countable colonies of LAB isolates of the producer R and H, respectively; tyrosine-decarboxylase positive enterococci were present only in R-cheeses (4-26% of the square root of total countable colonies). Tyrdc was confirmed only in 13% and 42% of the tyrosine-decarboxylase positive LAB and enterococci isolates, respectively (presumably due to the tendency of DCM to give false-positive results). Lactobacillus curvatus subsp. curvatus and Enterococcus durans, Enterococcus faecalis, and Enterococcus casseliflavus were identified as tyrdc-positive LAB and enterococci in the cheeses, respectively.

  5. Mast cells as effectors in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Bot, Ilze; Shi, Guo-Ping; Kovanen, Petri T

    2015-02-01

    The mast cell is a potent immune cell known for its functions in host defense responses and diseases, such as asthma and allergies. In the past years, accumulating evidence established the contribution of the mast cell to cardiovascular diseases as well, in particular, by its effects on atherosclerotic plaque progression and destabilization. Through its release not only of mediators, such as the mast cell-specific proteases chymase and tryptase, but also of growth factors, histamine, and chemokines, activated mast cells can have detrimental effects on its immediate surroundings in the vessel wall. This results in matrix degradation, apoptosis, and enhanced recruitment of inflammatory cells, thereby actively contributing to cardiovascular diseases. In this review, we will discuss the current knowledge on mast cell function in cardiovascular diseases and speculate on potential novel therapeutic strategies to prevent acute cardiovascular syndromes via targeting of mast cells.

  6. Mast cells as effectors in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Bot, Ilze; Shi, Guo-Ping; Kovanen, Petri T.

    2014-01-01

    The mast cell is a potent immune cell known for its functions in host defense responses and diseases such as asthma and allergies. In the past years, accumulating evidence established the contribution of the mast cell to cardiovascular diseases as well, in particular by its effects on atherosclerotic plaque progression and destabilization. Through its release of mediators, such as the mast cell-specific proteases chymase and tryptase, but also of growth factors, histamine and chemokines, activated mast cells can have detrimental effects on its immediate surroundings in the vessel wall. This results in matrix degradation, apoptosis and enhanced recruitment of inflammatory cells, thereby actively contributing to cardiovascular diseases. In this review, we will discuss the current knowledge on mast cell function in cardiovascular diseases and speculate on potential novel therapeutic strategies to prevent acute cardiovascular syndromes via targeting of mast cells. PMID:25104798

  7. The role of mast cells in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Wezel, A; Quax, P H A; Kuiper, J; Bot, I

    2015-01-01

    Rupture of an atherosclerotic plaque is the major underlying cause of adverse cardiovascular events such as myocardial infarction or stroke. Therapeutic interventions should therefore be directed towards inhibiting growth of atherosclerotic lesions as well as towards prevention of lesion destabilization. Interestingly, the presence of mast cells has been demonstrated in both murine and human plaques, and multiple interventional murine studies have pointed out a direct role for mast cells in early and late stages of atherosclerosis. Moreover, it has recently been described that activated lesional mast cells correlate with major cardiovascular events in patients suffering from cardiovascular disease. This review focuses on the effect of different mast cell derived mediators in atherogenesis and in late stage plaque destabilization. Also, possible ligands for mast cell activation in the context of atherosclerosis are discussed. Finally, we will elaborate on the predictive value of mast cells, together with therapeutic implications, in cardiovascular disease.

  8. Mast material test program (MAMATEP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciancone, Michael L.; Rutledge, Sharon K.

    1988-01-01

    The Mast Material Test Program (MAMATEP) at NASA Lewis is discussed. Objectives include verifying the need for, and evaluating the performance of, various protection techniques for the Solar Array Assembly mast of the Space Station Photovoltaic Power Module. Mast material samples were evaluated in terms of mass and bending modulus, measured before and after environmental exposure. Test environments included atomic oxygen exposure (RF plasma asher), thermal cycling, and mechanical flexing. Protective coatings included CV-1144 silicon, a Ni/Au/InSn eutectic, and an open weave, Al braid. Results indicate that unprotected samples degrade in an atomic oxygen environment at a steady rate. Open weave, Al braid offers little protection for the fiberglass-epoxy sample in an asher environment. Ni/Au/InSn eutectic offers excellent protection in an asher environment prior to thermal cycling and mechanical flexing. Long duration asher results from unprotected samples indicate that, even though the fiberglass-epoxy degrades, a protection technique may not be necessary to ensure structural integrity. However, a protection technique may be desirable to limit or contain the amount of debris generated by the degradation of the fiberglass-epoxy.

  9. Adenine suppresses IgE-mediated mast cell activation.

    PubMed

    Silwal, Prashanta; Shin, Keuna; Choi, Seulgi; Kang, Seong Wook; Park, Jin Bong; Lee, Hyang-Joo; Koo, Suk-Jin; Chung, Kun-Hoe; Namgung, Uk; Lim, Kyu; Heo, Jun-Young; Park, Jong Il; Park, Seung-Kiel

    2015-06-01

    Nucleobase adenine is produced by dividing human lymphoblasts mainly from polyamine synthesis and inhibits immunological functions of lymphocytes. We investigated the anti-allergic effect of adenine on IgE-mediated mast cell activation in vitro and passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) in mice. Intraperitoneal injection of adenine to IgE-sensitized mice attenuated IgE-mediated PCA reaction in a dose dependent manner, resulting in a median effective concentration of 4.21 mg/kg. In mast cell cultures, only adenine among cytosine, adenine, adenosine, ADP and ATP dose-dependently suppressed FcɛRI (a high affinity receptor for IgE)-mediated degranulation with a median inhibitory concentration of 1.6mM. It also blocked the production of LTB4, an inflammatory lipid mediator, and inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-4. In addition, adenine blocked thapsigargin-induced degranulation which is FcɛRI-independent but shares FcɛRI-dependent signaling events. Adenine inhibited the phosphorylation of signaling molecules important to FcɛRI-mediated allergic reactions such as Syk, PLCγ2, Gab2, Akt, and mitogen activated protein kinases ERK and JNK. From this result, we report for the first time that adenine inhibits PCA in mice and allergic reaction by inhibiting FcɛRI-mediated signaling events in mast cells. Therefore, adenine may be useful for the treatment of mast cell-mediated allergic diseases. Also, the upregulation of adenine production may provide another mechanism for suppressing mast cell activity especially at inflammatory sites.

  10. Atherosclerosis: a chronic inflammatory disease mediated by mast cells.

    PubMed

    Conti, Pio; Shaik-Dasthagirisaeb, Yazdami

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is a process that plays an important role in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis and immune disease, involving multiple cell types, including macrophages, T-lymphocytes, endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells and mast cells. The fundamental damage of atherosclerosis is the atheromatous or fibro-fatty plaque which is a lesion that causes several diseases. In atherosclerosis the innate immune response, which involves macrophages, is initiated by the arterial endothelial cells which respond to modified lipoproteins and lead to Th1 cell subset activation and generation of inflammatory cytokines and chemoattractant chemokines. Other immune cells, such as CD4+ T inflammatory cells, which play a critical role in the development and progression of atherosclerosis, and regulatory T cells [Treg], which have a protective effect on the development of atherosclerosis are involved. Considerable evidence indicates that mast cells and their products play a key role in inflammation and atherosclerosis. Activated mast cells can have detrimental effects, provoking matrix degradation, apoptosis, and enhancement as well as recruitment of inflammatory cells, which actively contributes to atherosclerosis and plaque formation. Here we discuss the relationship between atherosclerosis, inflammation and mast cells.

  11. Mast cell depletion in the preclinical phase of collagen-induced arthritis reduces clinical outcome by lowering the inflammatory cytokine profile.

    PubMed

    van der Velden, Daniël; Lagraauw, H Maxime; Wezel, Anouk; Launay, Pierre; Kuiper, Johan; Huizinga, Tom W J; Toes, René E M; Bot, Ilze; Stoop, Jeroen N

    2016-06-13

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a multifactorial autoimmune disease, which is characterized by inflammation of synovial joints leading to the destruction of cartilage and bone. Infiltrating mast cells can be found within the inflamed synovial tissue, however their role in disease pathogenesis is unclear. Therefore we have studied the role of mast cells during different phases of experimental arthritis. We induced collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), the most frequently used animal model of arthritis, in an inducible mast cell knock-out mouse and determined the effect of mast cell depletion on the development and severity of arthritis. Depletion of mast cells in established arthritis did not affect clinical outcome. However, depletion of mast cells during the preclinical phase resulted in a significant reduction in arthritis. This reduction coincided with a decrease in circulating CD4(+) T cells and inflammatory monocytes but not in the collagen-specific antibody levels. Mast cell depletion resulted in reduced levels of IL-6 and IL-17 in serum. Furthermore, stimulation of splenocytes from mast cell-depleted mice with collagen type II resulted in reduced levels of IL-17 and enhanced production of IL-10. Here we show that mast cells contribute to the preclinical phase of CIA. Depletion of mast cells before disease onset resulted in an altered collagen-specific T cell and cytokine response. These data may suggest that mast cells play a role in the regulation of the adaptive immune response during the development of arthritis.

  12. Scale-up of thermally dried kefir production as starter culture for hard-type cheese making: an economic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Koutinas, Athanasios A; Bekatorou, Argyro; Katechaki, Eleftheria; Dimitrellou, Dimitra; Kopsahelis, Nikolaos; Papapostolou, Harris; Panas, Panayiotis; Sideris, Kostas; Kallis, Mihalis; Bosnea, Loulouda A; Koliopoulos, Dionisis; Sotiropoulos, Panayiotis; Panteli, Ageliki; Kourkoutas, Yiannis; Kanellaki, Maria; Soupioni, Magdalini

    2010-03-01

    This paper concerns the effect of thermal-drying methodology on the investment cost for dried kefir cells production in order to be used as starter culture in cheese manufacturing. Kefir cells were produced at pilot plant scale using a 250-L bioreactor and whey as the main substrate. Kefir cells were subsequently dried in a thermal dryer at 38 degrees C and used as a starter culture in industrial-scale production of hard-type cheeses. The use of thermally dried kefir as starter culture accelerated ripening of cheeses by increasing both lipolysis and fermentation rate as indicated by the ethanol, lactic acid, and glycerol formation. Additionally, it reduced coliforms and enterobacteria as ripening proceeded. This constituted the basis of developing an economic study in which industrial-scale production of thermally dried kefir starter culture is discussed. The industrial design involved a three-step process using three bioreactors of 100, 3,000, and 30,000 L for a plant capacity of 300 kg of thermally dried kefir culture per day. The cost of investment was estimated at 238,000 euro, which is the 46% of the corresponding cost using freeze-drying methodology. Production cost was estimated at 4.9 euro/kg of kefir biomass for a 300-kg/day plant capacity, which is the same as with the corresponding cost of freeze-dried cells. However, the estimated added value is up to 10.8 x 10(9) euro within the European Union.

  13. Solar Array Mast Imagery Discussion for ISIW

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilgo, Gary

    2017-01-01

    SAW Mast inspection background: In 2012, NASA's Flight Safety Office requested the Micro Meteoroid and Orbital Debris (MMOD) office determine the probability of damage to the Solar Array Wing (SAW) mast based on the exposure over the life time of the ISS program. As part of the risk mitigation of the potential MMOD strikes. ISS Program office along with the Image Science and Analysis Group (ISAG) began developing methods for imaging the structural components of the Mast.

  14. Fluvastatin Suppresses Mast Cell and Basophil IgE Responses: Genotype-Dependent Effects

    PubMed Central

    Kolawole, Elizabeth Motunrayo; McLeod, Jamie Josephine Avila; Ndaw, Victor; Abebayehu, Daniel; Barnstein, Brian O.; Faber, Travis; Spence, Andrew J.; Taruselli, Marcela; Paranjape, Anuya; Haque, Tamara T.; Qayum, Amina Abdul; Wijesinghe, Dayanjan S.; Sturgill, Jamie L.; Chalfant, Charles E.; Straus, David B.; Oskeritzian, Carole A.; Ryan, John J.

    2015-01-01

    Mast cell- and basophil-associated inflammatory diseases are a considerable burden to society. A significant portion of patients have symptoms despite standard-of-care therapy. Statins, used to lower serum cholesterol, have immune modulating activities. We tested the in vitro and in vivo effects of statins on IgE-mediated mast cell and basophil activation. Fluvastatin showed the most significant inhibitory effects of the six statins tested, suppressing IgE-induced cytokine secretion among mouse mast cells and basophils. Fluvastatin's effects were reversed by mevalonic acid or geranylgeranyl pyrophosphatase, and mimicked by geranylgeranyl transferase inhibition. Fluvastatin selectively suppressed key FcεRI signaling pathways, including Syk, Akt, and ERK. While mast cells and basophils from the C57BL/6J mouse strain were responsive to fluvastatin, those from 129/SvImJ mice were completely resistant. Resistance correlated with fluvastatin-induced upregulation of the statin target HMG-CoA reductase. Human mast cell cultures from eight donors showed a wide range of fluvastatin responsiveness. These data demonstrate that fluvastatin is a potent suppressor of IgE-mediated mast cell activation, acting at least partly via blockade of geranyl lipid production downstream of HMG-CoA reductase. Importantly, consideration of statin use for treating mast cell-associated disease needs to incorporate genetic background effects, which can yield drug resistance. PMID:26773154

  15. Naturally occurring polyphenolic antioxidants modulate IgE-mediated mast cell activation.

    PubMed

    Chen, S; Gong, J; Liu, F; Mohammed, U

    2000-08-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are known to modulate activities of a host of kinases, phosphatases and transcription factors. Rutin and chlorogenic acid (CGA) are the major polyphenolic antioxidants present in the small molecular fraction of smokeless tobacco leaf extracts, as ascertained by reverse-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) and mass spectrometry. Levels of intracellular ROS in resting versus antigen-immunoglobulin E (IgE)-challenged murine mast cells were measured at 510 nm by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) using carboxy-dichlorofluorescein (DCFH-DA). Enhanced ROS production was observed in IgE-sensitized mast cells following antigenic challenge. Rutin and CGA reduced ROS levels in antigen-IgE-activated mast cells. Concomitantly, they also profoundly inhibited histamine release by these activated mast cells. In contrast, rutin and CGA augmented the inducible cytokine messages, i.e. interleukin (IL)-10, IL-13, interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), IL-6 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) in IgE-sensitized mast cells following antigen challenge. This study indicates that tobacco polyphenolic antioxidants that quench intracellular ROS, differentially affect two effector functions of antigen-IgE-activated mast cells. This model system may be employed to determine the molecular target of polyphenols. The potential role of these polyphenolic antioxidants on IgE-mediated allergy in vivo depends on a balance of their differential effects on mast cell activation.

  16. [Bacteria and viruses modulate FcεRI-dependent mast cell activity].

    PubMed

    Słodka, Aleksandra; Brzezińska-Błaszczyk, Ewa

    2013-03-08

    Undoubtedly, mast cells play a central role in allergic processes. Specific allergen cross-linking of IgE bound to the high affinity receptors (FcεRI) on the mast cell surface leads to the release of preformed mediators and newly synthesized mediators, i.e. metabolites of arachidonic acid and cytokines. More and more data indicate that bacteria and viruses can influence FcεRI-dependent mast cell activation. Some bacterial and viral components can reduce the surface expression of FcεRI. There are also findings that ligation of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) by bacterial or viral antigens can affect IgE-dependent mast cell degranulation and preformed mediator release as well as eicosanoid production. The synergistic interaction of TLR ligands and allergen can also modify cytokine synthesis by mast cells stimulated via FcεRI. Moreover, data suggest that specific IgE for bacterial or viral antigens can influence mast cell activity. What is more, some bacterial and viral components or some endogenous proteins produced during viral infection can act as superantigens by interacting with the VH3 domain of IgE. All these observations indicate that bacterial and viral infections modify the course of allergic diseases by affecting FcεRI-dependent mast cell activation. 

  17. Mast, a conserved microtubule-associated protein required for bipolar mitotic spindle organization

    PubMed Central

    Lemos, Catarina L.; Sampaio, Paula; Maiato, Helder; Costa, Madalena; Omel’yanchuk, Leonid V.; Liberal, Vasco; Sunkel, Claudio E.

    2000-01-01

    Through mutational analysis in Drosophila, we have identified the gene multiple asters (mast), which encodes a new 165 kDa protein. mast mutant neuroblasts are highly polyploid and show severe mitotic abnormalities including the formation of mono- and multi-polar spindles organized by an irregular number of microtubule-organizing centres of abnormal size and shape. The mast gene product is evolutionarily conserved since homologues were identified from yeast to man, revealing a novel protein family. Antibodies against Mast and analysis of tissue culture cells expressing an enhanced green fluorescent protein–Mast fusion protein show that during mitosis, this protein localizes to centrosomes, the mitotic spindle, centromeres and spindle midzone. Microtubule-binding assays indicate that Mast is a microtubule-associated protein displaying strong affinity for polymerized microtubules. The defects observed in the mutant alleles and the intracellular localization of the protein suggest that Mast plays an essential role in centrosome separation and organization of the bipolar mitotic spindle. PMID:10899121

  18. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-β/δ modulates mast cell phenotype.

    PubMed

    Yao, Pei-Li; Morales, Jose L; Gonzalez, Frank J; Peters, Jeffrey M

    2017-04-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-β/δ (PPARβ/δ) is known to have multiple anti-inflammatory effects, typically observed in endothelial cells, macrophages, T cells and B cells. Despite the fact that mast cells are important mediators of inflammation, to date, the role of PPARβ/δ in mast cells has not been examined. Hence, the present study examined the hypothesis that PPARβ/δ modulates mast cell phenotype. Bone-marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) and peritoneal mast cells from Pparβ/δ(+/+) mice expressed higher levels of high-affinity IgE receptor (FcεRI) compared with Pparβ/δ(-/-) mice. BMMCs from Pparβ/δ(+/+) mice also exhibited dense granules, associated with higher expression of enzymes and proteases compared with Pparβ/δ(-/-) mice. Resting BMMCs from Pparβ/δ(+/+) mice secreted lower levels of inflammatory cytokines, associated with the altered activation of phospholipase Cγ1 and extracellular signal-regulated kinases compared with Pparβ/δ(-/-) mice. Moreover, the production of cytokines by mast cells induced by various stimuli was highly dependent on PPARβ/δ expression. This study demonstrates that PPARβ/δ is an important regulator of mast cell phenotype.

  19. Impaired mast cell maturation and degranulation and attenuated allergic responses in Ndrg1-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Taketomi, Yoshitaka; Sunaga, Kohei; Tanaka, Satoshi; Nakamura, Masanori; Arata, Satoru; Okuda, Tomohiko; Moon, Tae-Chul; Chang, Hyeun-Wook; Sugimoto, Yukihiko; Kokame, Koichi; Miyata, Toshiyuki; Murakami, Makoto; Kudo, Ichiro

    2007-06-01

    We have previously reported that N-myc downstream regulated gene-1 (NDRG1) is an early inducible protein during the maturation of mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) toward a connective tissue mast cell-like phenotype. To clarify the function of NDRG1 in mast cells and allergic responses, we herein analyzed mast cell-associated phenotypes of mice lacking the Ndrg1 gene. Allergic responses including IgE-mediated passive systemic and cutaneous anaphylactic reactions were markedly attenuated in Ndrg1-deficient mice as compared with those in wild-type mice. In Ndrg1-deficient mice, dermal and peritoneal mast cells were decreased in number and morphologically abnormal with impaired degranulating ability. Ex vivo, Ndrg1-deficient BMMCs cocultured with Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts in the presence of stem cell factor, a condition that facilitates the maturation of BMMCs toward a CTMC-like phenotype, displayed less exocytosis than replicate wild-type cells after the cross-linking of FcepsilonRI or stimulation with compound 48/80, even though the exocytotic response of IL-3-maintained, immature BMMCs from both genotypes was comparable. Unlike degranulation, the production of leukotriene and cytokines by cocultured BMMCs was unaffected by NDRG1 deficiency. Taken together, the altered phenotypes of Ndrg1-deficient mast cells both in vivo and ex vivo suggest that NDRG1 has roles in the terminal maturation and effector function (degranulation) of mast cells.

  20. Mast cells in human health and disease.

    PubMed

    DeBruin, Erin J; Gold, Matthew; Lo, Bernard C; Snyder, Kimberly; Cait, Alissa; Lasic, Nikola; Lopez, Martin; McNagny, Kelly M; Hughes, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells are primarily known for their role in defense against pathogens, particularly bacteria; neutralization of venom toxins; and for triggering allergic responses and anaphylaxis. In addition to these direct effector functions, activated mast cells rapidly recruit other innate and adaptive immune cells and can participate in "tuning" the immune response. In this review we touch briefly on these important functions and then focus on some of the less-appreciated roles of mast cells in human disease including cancer, autoimmune inflammation, organ transplant, and fibrosis. Although it is difficult to formally assign causal roles to mast cells in human disease, we offer a general review of data that correlate the presence and activation of mast cells with exacerbated inflammation and disease progression. Conversely, in some restricted contexts, mast cells may offer protective roles. For example, the presence of mast cells in some malignant or cardiovascular diseases is associated with favorable prognosis. In these cases, specific localization of mast cells within the tissue and whether they express chymase or tryptase (or both) are diagnostically important considerations. Finally, we review experimental animal models that imply a causal role for mast cells in disease and discuss important caveats and controversies of these findings.

  1. Directed spray mast

    DOEpatents

    Nance, Thomas A.; Siddall, Alvin A.; Cheng, William Y.; Counts, Kevin T.

    2005-05-10

    Disclosed is an elongated, tubular, compact high pressure sprayer apparatus for insertion into an access port of vessels having contaminated interior areas that require cleaning by high pressure water spray. The invention includes a spray nozzle and a camera adjacent thereto with means for rotating and raising and lowering the nozzle so that areas identified through the camera may be cleaned with a minimum production of waste water to be removed.

  2. Mast Pulses Shape Trophic Interactions between Fluctuating Rodent Populations in a Primeval Forest

    PubMed Central

    Selva, Nuria; Hobson, Keith A.; Cortés-Avizanda, Ainara; Zalewski, Andrzej; Donázar, José Antonio

    2012-01-01

    How different functional responses of consumers exploiting pulsed resources affect community dynamics is an ongoing question in ecology. Tree masting is a common resource pulse in terrestrial ecosystems that can drive rodent population cycles. Using stable isotope (δ13C, δ15N) analyses, we investigated the dietary response of two fluctuating rodent species, the yellow-necked mouse Apodemus flavicollis and the bank vole Myodes glareolus, to mast events in Białowieża Forest (NE Poland). Rodent hair samples were obtained non-invasively from faeces of their predators for an 11-year period that encompassed two mast events. Spectacular seed crops of deciduous trees, namely oak Quercus robur and hornbeam Carpinus betulus, occur after several intermediate years of moderate seed production, with a post-mast year characterised by a nil crop. While a Bayesian isotopic (SIAR) mixing model showed a variety of potential vegetation inputs to rodent diets, the isotopic niche of the yellow-necked mouse was strongly associated with mast of deciduous trees (>80% of diet), showing no variation among years of different seed crop. However, bank voles showed a strong functional response; in mast years the vole shifted its diet from herbs in deciduous forest (∼66% of diet) to mast (∼74%). Only in mast years did the isotopic niche of both rodent species overlap. Previous research showed that bank voles, subordinate and more generalist than mice, showed higher fluctuations in numbers in response to masting. This study provides unique data on the functional response of key pulse consumers in forest food webs, and contributes to our understanding of rodent population fluctuations and the mechanisms governing pulse–consumer interactions. PMID:23251475

  3. Interleukin-17-positive mast cells contribute to synovial inflammation in spondylarthritis.

    PubMed

    Noordenbos, Troy; Yeremenko, Nataliya; Gofita, Ioana; van de Sande, Marleen; Tak, Paul P; Caňete, Juan D; Baeten, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    Studies comparing spondylarthritis (SpA) to rheumatoid arthritis (RA) synovitis suggest that innate immune cells may play a predominant role in the pathogenesis of SpA. Recent observations have indicated a marked synovial mast cell infiltration in psoriatic SpA. We therefore undertook the present study to investigate the potential contribution of mast cells to synovial inflammation in SpA. Synovial tissue and fluid were obtained from patients with either nonpsoriatic or psoriatic SpA (n=82) and patients with RA (n=50). Synovial biopsy tissue was analyzed by immunostaining and used in ex vivo cultures. Synovial fluid was analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. We observed a strong and specific increase of c-Kit-positive mast cells in the synovium from patients with SpA compared to the synovium from patients with RA synovitis, which was independent of disease subtype (nonpsoriatic versus psoriatic), disease duration, and treatment. Staining of mast cell granules, analysis of synovial fluid, and results in ex vivo tissue culture did not indicate increased degranulation in SpA synovitis. However, mast cells expressed significantly more interleukin-17 (IL-17) in SpA than in RA synovitis, and mast cells constituted the major IL-17-expressing cell population in the SpA synovium. Ex vivo targeting of synovial mast cells with the c-Kit inhibitor imatinib mesylate significantly decreased the production of IL-17 as well as other proinflammatory cytokines in synovial tissue cultures. Analysis of paired pre- and posttreatment synovial tissue samples indicated that the mast cell/IL-17 axis in SpA was not modulated by effective tumor necrosis factor (TNF) blockade. The specific and TNF-independent increase in IL-17-expressing mast cells may contribute to the progression of synovial inflammation in peripheral SpA. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  4. Dual topological unitarization of hard and soft hadronic cross sections: A new approach to multiparticle production at hadron colliders in the TeV energy range

    SciTech Connect

    Ranft, J.; Hahn, K. . SSC Central Design Group); Aurenche, P.; Maire, P. . Lab. de Physique des Particules Elementaires); Bopp, F. . Fachbereich Physik); Capella, A.; Tran Thanh Van, J. . Lab. de Physique Theorique et Particules Elementaires); Kwi

    1987-12-01

    The dual topological unitarization of hard and soft hadronic collisions is formulated as a Monte-Carlo event generator for events containing both the soft (low p{perpendicular}) and hard (jets, minijets) component of hadron production. The parameters of the model are determined from fits to the energy dependence of the total and inelastic hadron cross-sections and from the predictions of the QCD-parton model for the perturbative hard constituent scattering cross sections. The properties of the model are studied. Good agreement of the model predictions is found with data at present accelerator and collider energies. The predictions of the model for TeV colliders are presented. Interesting changes of the produced multiparticle system are formed when selecting classes of events with and without hard jets or minijets. 35 refs., 22 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Marine brevetoxin induces IgE-independent mast cell activation.

    PubMed

    Hilderbrand, Susana C; Murrell, Rachel N; Gibson, James E; Brown, Jared M

    2011-02-01

    Brevetoxins (PbTx) are sodium channel neurotoxins produced by the marine dinoflagellate Karenia brevis during red tide blooms. Inhalation of PbTx in normal individuals and individuals with pre-existing airways disease results in adverse airway symptoms including bronchoconstriction. In animal models of allergic inflammation, inhalation of PbTx results in a histamine H₁-mediated bronchoconstriction suggestive of mast cell activation. How mast cells would respond directly to PbTx is unknown. We thus explored the activation of mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) following exposure to purified PbTx-2. Following in vitro exposure to PbTx-2, we examined cellular viability, mast cell degranulation (β-hexosaminidase release), intracellular Ca²+ and Na+ flux, and the production of inflammatory mediators (IL-6). PbTx-2 induced significant cellular toxicity within 24 h as measured by LDH release and Annexin-V staining. However, within 1 h of exposure, PbTx-2 induced BMMC degranulation and an increase in IL-6 mRNA expression independent of the high-affinity IgE receptor (FcεRI) stimulation. Activation of BMMCs by PbTx-2 was associated with altered intracellular Ca²+ and Na+ levels. Brevenal, a naturally produced compound that antagonizes the activity of PbTx, prevented changes in intracellular Na+ levels but did not alter activation of BMMCs by PbTx-2. These findings demonstrate that PbTx-2 activates mast cells independent of FcεRI providing insight into critical events in the pathogenesis and a potential therapeutic target in brevetoxin-induced airway symptoms.

  6. Cross-linking of wheat gluten proteins during production of hard pretzels.

    PubMed

    Rombouts, Ine; Lagrain, Bert; Brijs, Kristof; Delcour, Jan A

    2012-06-01

    The impact of the hot alkaline dip, prior to pretzel-baking, on the types and levels of cross-links between wheat proteins was studied. Protein extractability of pretzel dough in sodium dodecyl sulfate containing buffer decreased during alkaline dipping [45 s, 1.0% (w/v) NaOH, 90°C], and even more during baking (3 min at 250°C) and drying (10 min at 135°C). Reducing agent increased the extractability partly, indicating that both reducible (disulfide, SS) and non-reducible (non-SS) protein cross-links had been formed. The decrease in cystine levels suggested β-elimination of cystine releasing Cys and dehydroalanine (DHA). Subsequent reaction of DHA with Lys and Cys, induced the unusual and potentially cross-linking amino acids lysinoalanine (LAL) and lanthionine (LAN), respectively, in alkaline dipped dough (7 μmol LAN/g protein) and in the end product (9 μmol LAL and 50 μmol LAN/g protein). The baking/drying step increased sample redness, decreased Lys levels more than expected based on LAL formation (57 μmol/g protein), and induced a loss of reducing sugars (99 μmol/g protein), which suggested the potential contribution of Maillard-derived cross-links to the observed extractability loss. However, levels of Maillard products which possibly cross-link proteins, are small compared to DHA-derived cross-links. Higher dipping temperatures, longer dipping times, and higher NaOH concentrations increased protein extractability losses and redness, as well as LAL and LAN levels in the end product. No indications for Maillard-derived cross-links or LAL in pretzel dough immediately after dipping were found, even when severe dipping conditions were used.

  7. Heavy ion precompound phenomena: A glance at hard gamma and subthreshold pion production

    SciTech Connect

    Blann, M.; Remington, B.A.

    1987-08-01

    We test a relaxation model based on two body nucleon-nucleon scattering processes to interpret phenomena observed in heavy ion reactions. We use the Boltzmann master equation to accomplish this. By assuming that the projectile nucleons share the total excitation with equal a-priori probability of all configurations, we are able to reproduce several sets of neutron spectra from /sup 20/Ne and /sup 12/C induced reactions on /sup 165/Ho. With no additional free parameters our model successfully reproduces subthreshold pion production cross sections, high energy ..gamma..-ray spectra, and angular distributions of high energy ..gamma..-rays. 40 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Antibodies against nonstructural protein 1 protect mice from dengue virus-induced mast cell activation.

    PubMed

    Chu, Ya-Ting; Wan, Shu-Wen; Chang, Yu-Chang; Lee, Chien-Kuo; Wu-Hsieh, Betty A; Anderson, Robert; Lin, Yee-Shin

    2017-02-27

    Dengue virus (DENV) infection causes dengue fever, dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), and dengue shock syndrome (DSS). DHF/DSS patients have been reported to have increased levels of urinary histamine, chymase, and tryptase, which are major granule-associated mediators from mast cells. Previous studies also showed that DENV-infected human mast cells induce production of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, suggesting a role played by mast cells in vascular perturbation as well as leukocyte recruitment. In this study, we show that DENV but not UV-inactivated DENV enhanced degranulation of mast cells and production of chemokines (MCP-1, RANTES, and IP-10) in a mouse model. We have previously shown that antibodies (Abs) against a modified DENV nonstructural protein 1 (NS1), designated DJ NS1, provide protection in mice against DENV challenge. In the present study, we investigate the effects of DJ NS1 Abs on mast cell-associated activities. We showed that administration of anti-DJ NS1 Abs into mice resulted in a reduction of mast cell degranulation and macrophage infiltration at local skin DENV infection sites. The production of DENV-induced chemokines (MCP-1, RANTES, and IP-10) and the percentages of tryptase-positive activated mast cells were also reduced by treatment with anti-DJ NS1 Abs. These results indicate that Abs against NS1 protein provide multiple therapeutic benefits, some of which involve modulating DENV-induced mast cell activation.Laboratory Investigation advance online publication, 27 February 2017; doi:10.1038/labinvest.2017.10.

  9. The tetraspanin CD63 is required for efficient IgE-mediated mast cell degranulation and anaphylaxis1

    PubMed Central

    Kraft, Stefan; Jouvin, Marie-Hélène; Kulkarni, Nitin; Kissing, Sandra; Morgan, Ellen S.; Dvorak, Ann M.; Schröder, Bernd; Saftig, Paul; Kinet, Jean-Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Mast cell activation through the high affinity IgE receptor FcεRI leads to the release of mediators involved in immediate-type allergic reactions. While antibodies against the tetraspanins CD63 and CD81 inhibit FcεRI-induced mast cell degranulation, the intrinsic role of these molecules in FcεRI-induced mast cell activation is unknown. In mast cells, CD63 is expressed at the cell surface and in lysosomes (particularly secretory lysosomes that contain allergic mediators). Here, we investigated the role of CD63 in mast cells using a CD63 knockout mouse model. CD63-deficiency did not affect in vivo mast cell numbers and tissue distribution. Bone-marrow-derived mast cells (BMMC) developed normally in the absence of CD63 protein. However, CD63-deficient BMMC showed a significant decrease in FcεRI-mediated degranulation, but not PMA/ionomycin-induced degranulation, as shown by β-hexosaminidase release assays. The secretion of TNF-α, which is both released from granules and synthesized de novo upon mast cell activation, was also decreased. IL-6 secretion, and production of the lipid mediator leukotriene C4 were unaffected. There were no ultrastructural differences in granule content and morphology, late endosomal/lysosomal marker expression, FcεRI-induced global tyrosine phosphorylation, and Akt phosphorylation. Finally, local reconstitution in genetically mast cell-deficient Kitw/w-v mice was unaffected by the absence of CD63. However, the sites reconstituted with CD63-deficient mast cells developed significantly attenuated cutaneous anaphylactic reactions. These findings demonstrate that the absence of CD63 results in a significant decrease of mast cell degranulation, which translates into a reduction of acute allergic reactions in vivo, thus identifying CD63 as an important component of allergic inflammation. PMID:23945142

  10. Variable-Tilt Helicopter Rotor Mast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, Henry L.

    1995-01-01

    Variable-tilt helicopter rotor mast proposed to improve helicopter performance and reduce vibration, especially at upper end of forward-speed range of helicopters. Achieved by use of universal coupling in main rotor mast or by tilting entire engine-and-transmission platform. Performance, energy efficiency, and safety enhanced.

  11. Analyzing Vibrations in a Long Mast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, B.

    1984-01-01

    Report describes mathematical prediction and measurement of vibrations in light weight extensible mast of lattice structure. With mast suspended from 10 vertical wires, vibrations excited in horizontal plane by motor-driven mechanism or by hand. Vibrations recorded photographically and with accelerometers.

  12. Are mast cells important in diabetes?

    PubMed

    Kempuraj, Duraisamy; Caraffa, Alessandro; Ronconi, Gianpaolo; Lessiani, Gianfranco; Conti, Pio

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is a metabolic disorder characterized by hyperglycemia and associated with microvascular and macrovascular syndromes mediated by mast cells. Mast cells are activated through cross-linking of their surface high affinity receptors for IgE (FcRI) or other antigens, leading to degranulation and release of stored inflammatory mediators, and cytokines/chemokines without degranulation. Mast cells are implicated in innate and acquired immunity, inflammation and metabolic disorders such as diabetes. Histamine and tryptase genes in mast cells are overexpressed in pancreatic tissue of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients. Histamine is a classic inflammatory mediator generated by activated receptors of mast cells from the histamine-forming enzyme histidine decarboxylase (HDC), which can be activated by two inflammatory chemokines, RANTES and MPC1, when injected intramuscularly or intradermally in mice. This activation is inhibited in genetically mast cell-deficient W/Wv mice, which show higher insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance. This study contributes to understanding the mechanism by which mast cells profoundly affect diabetes, and their manipulation could represent a new therapeutic strategy. However, further studies are needed to clarify the role of mast cells in inflammation and metabolic disorders such as diabetes.

  13. Mast cells in nonmammalian vertebrates: an overview.

    PubMed

    Baccari, Gabriella Chieffi; Pinelli, Claudia; Santillo, Alessandra; Minucci, Sergio; Rastogi, Rakesh Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Mast cells are best known as multifunctional entities that may confer a benefit on immune system. This review presents the known facts on mast-cell system and breakthroughs in mast-cell biology in fish, amphibians, reptiles, and birds. As compared to mammals, there are relatively few data available on mast cells in many nonmammalian vertebrates. Nevertheless, like in mammals, mast cells in nonmammalian vertebrates contain a wide range of bioactive compounds including histamine, heparin, neuropeptides, and neutral proteases. In bony fishes, these cells secrete antimicrobial peptides as well. Mast cells have a widespread distribution in the brain, endocrine glands, intestine, liver, kidney, skin, tongue, and lungs, the highest concentration occurring in different tissues in the different taxa. Currently, researchers are grappling with the nature of scientific support to substantiate the functional importance of mast cells in nonmammalian vertebrates. Ultimately, the origin and evolution of vertebrate mast cell is of great interest to comparative immunologists seeking an underlying trend in the phylogenetic development of immunity.

  14. [Mast cells and basophils and their disorders].

    PubMed

    Bösiger, J; Fehr, J

    2006-01-01

    This short review gives a brief overview on recent findings about the roles of basophils and mast cells in acquired and innate immunity. We try to give some insight into the methods used to study physiologic functions of mast cells and basophils. We mention variations of circulating basophil numbers as an epiphenomenon of some internal diseases and present an update on mastocytosis.

  15. Marshall Avionics Testbed System (MAST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Wayne D.

    1989-01-01

    Work accomplished in the summer of 1989 in association with the NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Research Fellowship Program at Marshall Space Flight Center is summarized. The project was aimed at developing detailed specifications for the Marshall Avionics System Testbed (MAST). This activity was to include the definition of the testbed requirements and the development of specifications for a set of standard network nodes for connecting the testbed to a variety of networks. The project was also to include developing a timetable for the design, implementation, programming and testing of the testbed. Specifications of both hardware and software components for the system were to be included.

  16. Mast Cells: Pivotal Players in Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bot, Ilze; van Berkel, Theo J.C; Biessen, Erik A.L

    2008-01-01

    The clinical outcome of cardiovascular diseases as myocardial infarction and stroke are generally caused by rupture of an atherosclerotic plaque. However, the actual cause of a plaque to rupture is not yet established. Interestingly, pathology studies have shown an increased presence of the mast cell, an important inflammatory effector cell in allergy and host defense, in (peri)vascular tissue during plaque progression, which may point towards a causal role for mast cells. Very recent data in mouse models show that mast cells and derived mediators indeed can profoundly impact plaque progression, plaque stability and acute cardiovascular syndromes such as vascular aneurysm or myocardial infarction. In this review, we discuss recent evidence on the role of mast cells in the progression of cardiovascular disorders and give insight in the therapeutic potential of modulation of mast cell function in these processes to improve the resilience of a plaque to rupture. PMID:19936193

  17. Mast cell biology: introduction and overview.

    PubMed

    Gilfillan, Alasdair M; Austin, Sarah J; Metcalfe, Dean D

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, the field of mast cell biology has expanded well beyond the boundaries of atopic disorders and anaphy laxis, on which it has been historically focused. The biochemical and signaling events responsible for the development and regulation of mast cells has been increasingly studied, aided in large part by novel breakthroughs in laboratory techniques used to study these cells. The result of these studies has been a more comprehensive definition of mast cells that includes added insights to their overall biology as well as the various disease states that can now be traced to defects in mast cells. This introductory chapter outlines and highlights the various topics of mast cell biology that will be discussed in further detail in subsequent chapters.

  18. Ion channels regulating mast cell biology.

    PubMed

    Ashmole, I; Bradding, P

    2013-05-01

    Mast cells play a central role in the pathophysiology of asthma and related allergic conditions. Mast cell activation leads to the degranulation of preformed mediators such as histamine and the secretion of newly synthesised proinflammatory mediators such as leukotrienes and cytokines. Excess release of these mediators contributes to allergic disease states. An influx of extracellular Ca2+ is essential for mast cell mediator release. From the Ca2+ channels that mediate this influx, to the K+ , Cl- and transient receptor potential channels that set the cell membrane potential and regulate Ca2+ influx, ion channels play a critical role in mast cell biology. In this review we provide an overview of our current knowledge of ion channel expression and function in mast cells with an emphasis on how channels interact to regulate Ca2+ signalling.

  19. Fate of Listeria innocua during production and ripening of smeared hard cheese made from raw milk.

    PubMed

    Hammer, P; Bockelmann, W; Hoffmann, W

    2017-10-01

    The fate of 2 different Listeria innocua strains was analyzed during the production and ripening of smeared raw milk Greyerzer cheese (Gruyère). These strains were used as surrogates for the pathogenic Listeria monocytogenes, as they are physiologically very similar. Bacterial cells were added to the cheese milk at levels of 10(5) cfu/mL. During the first 24 h of cheese making, the number of the test strains decreased to a level of below 10(2) cfu/g. Obviously, the cooking temperature of 56°C and the subsequent slight temperature decrease to 50°C within 70 min contributed to a distinct reduction of Listeria counts. The counts in the cheese cores did not exceed 10(3) cfu/g within 12 wk of cheese ripening and Listeria was not detectable after 24 wk. In contrast to the cores of the cheeses of the 4 batches in this study, their rinds always contained a high listerial load of approximately 10(6) to 10(8) cfu/g throughout the entire ripening period. The smeared surface showed an increase of pH to alkaline values, corresponding to smear microbiota development. Coryneforms and Staphylococcus counts were stable at >10(7) cfu/cm(2) over 175 d, whereas yeast counts decreased to about 10(5) cfu/cm(2) at the end of ripening. The study shows that the smear culture had no noticeable anti-listerial potential. When removing the rind or portioning such smeared cheese loaves with a cutting device, a postprocess contamination of the core might occur, thus presenting a major hygienic risk. Copyright © 2017 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Nitric oxide synthesis inhibition induces leukocyte adhesion via superoxide and mast cells.

    PubMed

    Kubes, P; Kanwar, S; Niu, X F; Gaboury, J P

    1993-10-01

    Recent work has demonstrated that inhibition of nitric oxide production with various nitric oxide synthesis inhibitors (L-NAME, L-NMMA) initiate leukocyte adhesion to postcapillary venules. The objective of this study was to elucidate the mechanism (or mechanisms) that promote the L-NAME-induced leukocyte response. Intravital microscopy was used to examine 25-40 microns venules in the rat mesentery. Nitric oxide synthesis was inhibited with L-NAME and leukocyte adhesion was observed over the first 60 min. The fourfold increase in leukocyte adhesion was independent of alterations in venular red blood cell velocity. The adhesion was superoxide-mediated inasmuch as superoxide dismutase (SOD) abolished the rise in leukocyte adhesion associated with nitric oxide synthesis inhibition. Ketotifen, a mast cell stabilizer, also abolished the rise in leukocyte adhesion induced by L-NAME. Histology revealed that mast cell degranulation occurred only in animals treated with L-NAME but not in animals pretreated with SOD or ketotifen. This observation suggests that mast cells become activated in the absence of nitric oxide production and superoxide contributes to the mast cell activation. The L-NAME-induced leukocyte adhesion could be reproduced by infusing hypoxanthine/xanthine oxidase (a superoxide generating system) or compound 48/80 (an activator of mast cells) and both responses were attenuated by ketotifen. These data suggest that inhibition of nitric oxide synthesis results in a superoxide and mast cell-dependent leukocyte adhesion.

  1. Mast cells promote melanoma colonization of lungs.

    PubMed

    Öhrvik, Helena; Grujic, Mirjana; Waern, Ida; Gustafson, Ann-Marie; Ernst, Nancy; Roers, Axel; Hartmann, Karin; Pejler, Gunnar

    2016-10-18

    Mast cells have been implicated in malignant processes, mainly through clinical correlative studies and by experiments performed using animals lacking mast cells due to defective c-kit signaling. However, mast cell-deficient mouse models based on c-kit defects have recently been questioned for their relevance. Here we addressed the effect of mast cells in a tumor setting by using transgenic Mcpt5-Cre+ R-DTA+ mice, in which the deficiency of mast cells is independent of c-kit defects. Melanoma cells (B16.F10) were administered either subcutaneously or intravenously into Mcpt5-Cre+ R-DTA+ mice or Mcpt5-Cre- R-DTA+ littermate controls, followed by the assessment of formed tumors. In the subcutaneous model, mast cells were abundant in the tumor stroma of control mice but were absent in Mcpt5-Cre+ R-DTA+ mice. However, the absence of mast cells did not affect tumor size. In contrast, after intravenous administration of B16.F10 cells, melanoma colonization of the lungs was markedly reduced in Mcpt5-Cre+ R-DTA+ vs. Mcpt5-Cre- R-DTA+ animals. Decreased melanoma colonization of the lungs in Mcpt5-Cre+ R-DTA+ animals was accompanied by increased inflammatory cell recruitment into the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, suggesting that mast cells suppress inflammation in this setting. Further, qPCR analysis revealed significant alterations in the expression of Twist and E-cadherin in lungs of Mcpt5-Cre+ R-DTA+ vs. control Mcpt5-Cre- R-DTA+ animals, suggesting an impact of mast cells on epithelial-mesenchymal transition. In conclusion, this study reveals that mast cells promote melanoma colonization of the lung.

  2. The human mast cell: an overview.

    PubMed

    Krishnaswamy, Guha; Ajitawi, Omar; Chi, David S

    2006-01-01

    Mast cells are fascinating, multifunctional, tissue-dwelling cells that have been traditionally associated with the allergic response. However, recent studies suggest these cells may be capable of regulating inflammation, host defense, and innate immunity. The purpose of this review is to present salient aspects of mast cell biology in the context of mast cell function in physiology and disease. After their development from bone marrow-derived progenitor cells that are primed with stem cell factor, mast cells continue their maturation and differentiation in peripheral tissue, developing into two well-described subsets of cells, MC(T) and MC(TC) cells. These cells can be distinguished on the basis of their tissue location, dependence on T lymphocytes, and their granule contents. Mast cells can undergo activation by antigens/allergens, superoxides, complement proteins, neuropeptides, and lipoproteins. After activation, mast cells express histamine, leukotrienes, and prostanoids, as well as proteases, and many cytokines and chemokines. These mediators may be pivotal to the genesis of an inflammatory response. By virtue of their location and mediator expression, mast cells may play an active role in many diseases, such as allergy, parasitic diseases, atherosclerosis, malignancy, asthma, pulmonary fibrosis, and arthritis. Recent data also suggest that mast cells play a vital role in host defense against pathogens by elaboration of tumor necrosis factor alpha. Mast cells also express the Toll-like receptor, which may further accentuate their role in the immune-inflammatory response. This chapter summarizes the many well-known and novel functional aspects of human mast cell biology and emphasizes their unique role in the inflammatory response.

  3. Lactic dehydrogenase virus infection enhances parasite egg production and inhibits eosinophil and mast cell responses in mice infected with the nematode Nippostrongylus brasiliensis.

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, M; Yamada, M; Arizono, N; Hayashi, T

    1998-01-01

    The effects of lactic dehydrogenase virus (LDV) infection on the protective immune responses to the nematode Nippostrongylus brasiliensis were studied. Mice with chronic LDV infection showed significantly higher levels of parasite egg production than non-LDV-infected (control) mice after N. brasiliensis infection. Concurrent LDV infection also suppressed peripheral blood eosinophilia and the lung mastocytosis induced by this nematode. LDV infection showed higher expression levels of the interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) mRNA in lymph nodes compared with control mice before N. brasiliensis infection. In addition, the IgG2a production in LDV-infected mice was higher than that in control mice before and after N. brasiliensis infection. These results suggest that LDV infection modulates protective immune responses against N. brasiliensis infection by the activation of T-helper type 1 cells. PMID:9659227

  4. Human Dermal Mast Cells Contain and Release Tumor Necrosis Factor α, which Induces Endothelial Leukocyte Adhesion Molecule 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Laurence J.; Trinchieri, Giorgio; Waldorf, Heidi A.; Whitaker, Diana; Murphy, George F.

    1991-05-01

    Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) is a proinflammatory cytokine that mediates endothelial leukocyte interactions by inducing expression of adhesion molecules. In this report, we demonstrate that human dermal mast cells contain sizeable stores of immunoreactive and biologically active TNF-α within granules, which can be released rapidly into the extracellular space upon degranulation. Among normal human dermal cells, mast cells are the predominant cell type that expresses both TNF-α protein and TNF-α mRNA. Moreover, induction of endothelial leukocyte adhesion molecule 1 expression is a direct consequence of release of mast cell-derived TNF-α. These findings establish a role for human mast cells as "gatekeepers" of the dermal microvasculature and indicate that mast cell products other than vasoactive amines influence endothelium in a proinflammatory fashion.

  5. Porcine mast cells infected with H1N1 influenza virus release histamine and inflammatory cytokines and chemokines.

    PubMed

    Lee, In Hong; Kim, Hyun Soo; Seo, Sang Heui

    2017-04-01

    Mast cells reside in many tissues, including the lungs, and might play a role in enhancing influenza virus infections in animals. In this study, we cultured porcine mast cells from porcine bone marrow cells with IL-3 and stem cell factor to study the infectivity and activation of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus of swine origin. Porcine mast cells were infected with H1N1 influenza virus, without the subsequent production of infectious viruses but were activated, as indicated by the release of histamines. Inflammatory cytokine- and chemokine-encoding genes, including IL-1α, IL-6, CXCL9, CXCL10, and CXCL11, were upregulated in the infected porcine mast cells. Our results suggest that mast cells could be involved in enhancing influenza-virus-mediated disease in infected animals.

  6. Temporal regulation of the IgE-dependent 1,2-diacylglycerol production by tyrosine kinase activation in a rat (RBL 2H3) mast-cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Lin, P; Fung, S J; Li, S; Chen, T; Repetto, B; Huang, K S; Gilfillan, A M

    1994-01-01

    We explored the possible role of tyrosine kinases in the IgE-dependent regulation of 1,2-diacylglycerol (DAG) production in RBL 2H3 cells. When triggered via their high-affinity IgE receptors (Fc epsilon RI), there was a rapid phosphorylation of tyrosine residues on a number of proteins. The phosphorylation of these proteins and ultimately histamine release were inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner by the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, tyrphostin. In cells labelled with [3H]myristic acid, we observed a characteristic biphasic increase in [3H]DAG production. In the presence of tyrosine kinase inhibitor, the initial increase in DAG was still observed, but the secondary increase, which was dependent on phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase D (PC-PLD) activation, was completely abolished. Tyrphostin significantly inhibited IgE-dependent activation of PC-PLD, suggesting that PC-PLD activation was regulated by tyrosine phosphorylation. Furthermore, when proteins from RBL 2H3 cells were immunoprecipitated with an anti-phosphotyrosine antibody, PC-PLD activity was recovered from the immunoprecipitated fraction. These results demonstrate that the secondary, but not the initial, phase of 1,2-DAG production in response to Fc epsilon RI aggregation is regulated by the initial activation of tyrosine kinases and that PC-PLD may be regulated directly by this mechanism. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7513150

  7. Analyzing the Functions of Mast Cells In Vivo Using 'Mast Cell Knock-in' Mice.

    PubMed

    Gaudenzio, Nicolas; Sibilano, Riccardo; Starkl, Philipp; Tsai, Mindy; Galli, Stephen J; Reber, Laurent L

    2015-05-27

    Mast cells (MCs) are hematopoietic cells which reside in various tissues, and are especially abundant at sites exposed to the external environment, such as skin, airways and gastrointestinal tract. Best known for their detrimental role in IgE-dependent allergic reactions, MCs have also emerged as important players in host defense against venom and invading bacteria and parasites. MC phenotype and function can be influenced by microenvironmental factors that may differ according to anatomic location and/or based on the type or stage of development of immune responses. For this reason, we and others have favored in vivo approaches over in vitro methods to gain insight into MC functions. Here, we describe methods for the generation of mouse bone marrow-derived cultured MCs (BMCMCs), their adoptive transfer into genetically MC-deficient mice, and the analysis of the numbers and distribution of adoptively transferred MCs at different anatomical sites. This method, named the 'mast cell knock-in' approach, has been extensively used over the past 30 years to assess the functions of MCs and MC-derived products in vivo. We discuss the advantages and limitations of this method, in light of alternative approaches that have been developed in recent years.

  8. The role of Lin28b in myeloid and mast cell differentiation and mast cell malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Leo D.; Rao, Tata Nageswara; Rowe, R. Grant; Nguyen, Phi T.; Sullivan, Jessica L.; Pearson, Daniel S.; Doulatov, Sergei; Wu, Linwei; Lindsley, R. Coleman; Zhu, Hao; DeAngelo, Daniel J.; Daley, George Q.; Wagers, Amy J.

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells are critical components of the innate immune system and important for host defense, allergy, autoimmunity, tissue regeneration, and tumor progression. Dysregulated mast cell development leads to systemic mastocytosis, a clinically variable but often devastating family of hematologic disorders. Here we report that induced expression of Lin28, a heterochronic gene and pluripotency factor implicated in driving a fetal hematopoietic program, caused mast cell accumulation in adult mice in target organs such as the skin and peritoneal cavity. In vitro assays revealed a skewing of myeloid commitment in LIN28B-expressing hematopoietic progenitors, with increased levels of LIN28B in common myeloid and basophil-mast cell progenitors altering gene expression patterns to favor cell fate choices that enhanced mast cell specification. In addition, LIN28B-induced mast cells appeared phenotypically and functionally immature, and in vitro assays suggested a slowing of mast cell terminal differentiation in the context of LIN28B upregulation. Finally, interrogation of human mast cell leukemia samples revealed upregulation of LIN28B in abnormal mast cells from patients with systemic mastocytosis (SM). This work identifies Lin28 as a novel regulator of innate immune function and a new protein of interest in mast cell disease. PMID:25655194

  9. Co-Production Dynamics and Time Dollar Programs in Community-Based Child Welfare Initiatives for Hard-to-Serve Youth and Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks, Michael B.; Lawson, Hal A.

    2005-01-01

    Hard-to-serve youth and families residing in high-poverty communities often have multiple, interlocking needs. These needs necessitate complex service models. The complex model described in this article combines a unique approach to wraparound services with a co-production framework and related theories. The model aims to improve outcomes for…

  10. The Mast Cell-IgE Paradox

    PubMed Central

    Galli, Stephen J.

    2017-01-01

    Mast cells and IgE are so inextricably linked to the pathology of allergic disorders, including fatal anaphylaxis, that it can be difficult to think of them in other contexts. Surely, we do not have mast cells and IgE so that we can eat a peanut and die! It is thought that mast cells and IgE and basophils (circulating granulocytes, whose functions partially overlap with those of mast cells) can contribute to host defense as components of adaptive T helper cell type 2 immune responses to helminths, ticks, and certain other parasites. Accordingly, it was suggested that allergies are misdirected type 2 immune responses in which IgE antibodies are produced against any of a broad variety of apparently harmless antigens. However, components of animal venoms also can sensitize individuals to develop severe IgE-associated allergic reactions, including fatal anaphylaxis, on subsequent venom exposure. Here, I describe evidence that mast cells can enhance innate host resistance to reptile or arthropod venoms during responses to an initial exposure to such venoms and that acquired type 2 immune responses, IgE antibodies, the high-affinity IgE receptor FcεRI, and mast cells can contribute toward acquired resistance in mice to the lethal effects of honeybee or Russell's viper venom. These findings support the hypothesis that mast cells and IgE can help protect the host against noxious substances. PMID:26776074

  11. Involvement of mast cells and histamine in edema induced in mice by Scolopendra viridicornis centipede venom.

    PubMed

    Távora, Bianca C L F; Kimura, Louise F; Antoniazzi, Marta M; Chiariello, Thiago M; Faquim-Mauro, Eliana L; Barbaro, Katia C

    2016-10-01

    Bites caused by Scolopendra viridicornis centipede are mainly characterized by burning pain, paresthesia and edema. On this regard, the aim of this work was to study the involvement of mast cells and histamine in edema induced by Scolopendra viridicornis (Sv) centipede venom. The edema was analyzed on mice paws. The mice were pretreated with cromolyn (mast cell degranulation inhibitor) and antagonists of histamine receptors, such as promethazine (H1R), cimetidine (H2R) and thioperamide (H3/H4R). The analyses were carried out at different times after the injection of Sv venom (15 μg) or PBS in the footpad of mice. Our results showed a significant inhibition of the edema induced by Sv venom injection in mice previously treated: cromolyn (38-91%), promethazine (50-59%) and thioperamide (around 30%). The treatment with cimetidine did not alter the edema induced by Sv venom. Histopathological analysis showed that Sv venom injection (15 μg) induced edema, leukocyte recruitment and mast cells degranulation, when compared with the PBS-injected mice. Direct effects of the Sv venom on mast cells were studied in PT-18 line (mouse mast cell) and RBL-2H3 cells (rat mast cells). The data showed that higher doses (3.8 and 7.5 μg) of Sv venom were cytotoxic for both cell lineages and induced morphological changes. However, lower doses of the venom induced degranulation of both mast cell lines, as well as the secretion of MCP-1, IL-6 and IL-1β. The production of PGD2 was only observed in the RBL-2H3 line incubated with Sv venom. Taking our results together, we demonstrated that upon Sv venom exposure, mast cells and histamine are crucial for the establishment of the local inflammatory reaction.

  12. Mast cells modulate the pathogenesis of elastase-induced abdominal aortic aneurysms in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jiusong; Sukhova, Galina K.; Yang, Min; Wolters, Paul J.; MacFarlane, Lindsey A.; Libby, Peter; Sun, Chongxiu; Zhang, Yadong; Liu, Jian; Ennis, Terri L.; Knispel, Rebecca; Xiong, Wanfen; Thompson, Robert W.; Baxter, B. Timothy; Shi, Guo-Ping

    2007-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), an inflammatory disease, involves leukocyte recruitment, immune responses, inflammatory cytokine production, vascular remodeling, neovascularization, and vascular cell apoptosis, all of which contribute to aortic dilatation. This study demonstrates that mast cells, key participants in human allergic immunity, participate in AAA pathogenesis in mice. Mast cells were found to accumulate in murine AAA lesions. Mast cell–deficient KitW-sh/KitW-sh mice failed to develop AAA elicited by elastase perfusion or periaortic chemical injury. KitW-sh/KitW-sh mice had reduced aortic expansion and internal elastic lamina degradation; decreased numbers of macrophages, CD3+ T lymphocytes, SMCs, apoptotic cells, and CD31+ microvessels; and decreased levels of aortic tissue IL-6 and IFN-γ. Activation of mast cells in WT mice via C48/80 injection resulted in enhanced AAA growth while mast cell stabilization with disodium cromoglycate diminished AAA formation. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that mast cells participated in angiogenesis, aortic SMC apoptosis, and matrix-degrading protease expression. Reconstitution of KitW-sh/KitW-sh mice with bone marrow–derived mast cells from WT or TNF-α–/– mice, but not from IL-6–/– or IFN-γ–/– mice, caused susceptibility to AAA formation to be regained. These results demonstrate that mast cells participate in AAA pathogenesis in mice by releasing proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IFN-γ, which may induce aortic SMC apoptosis, matrix-degrading protease expression, and vascular wall remodeling, important hallmarks of arterial aneurysms. PMID:17932568

  13. Mast cell TLR2 signaling is crucial for effective killing of Francisella tularensis.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Annette R; Yu, Jieh-Juen; Guentzel, M Neal; Navara, Christopher S; Klose, Karl E; Forsthuber, Thomas G; Chambers, James P; Berton, Michael T; Arulanandam, Bernard P

    2012-06-01

    TLR signaling is critical for early host defense against pathogens, but the contributions of mast cell TLR-mediated mechanisms and subsequent effector functions during pulmonary infection are largely unknown. We have previously demonstrated that mast cells, through the production of IL-4, effectively control Francisella tularensis replication. In this study, the highly human virulent strain of F. tularensis SCHU S4 and the live vaccine strain were used to investigate the contribution of mast cell/TLR regulation of Francisella. Mast cells required TLR2 for effective bacterial killing, regulation of the hydrolytic enzyme cathepsin L, and for coordination and trafficking of MHC class II and lysosomal-associated membrane protein 2. Infected TLR2(-/-) mast cells, in contrast to wild-type and TLR4(-/-) cells, lacked detectable IL-4 and displayed increased cell death with a 2-3 log increase of F. tularensis replication, but could be rescued with rIL-4 treatment. Importantly, MHC class II and lysosomal-associated membrane protein 2 localization with labeled F. tularensis in the lungs was greater in wild-type than in TLR2(-/-) mice. These results provide evidence for the important effector contribution of mast cells and TLR2-mediated signaling on early innate processes in the lung following pulmonary F. tularensis infection and provide additional insight into possible mechanisms by which intracellular pathogens modulate respiratory immune defenses.

  14. Autoimmunity-inducing metals (Hg, Au and Ag) modulate mast cell signaling, function and survival.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yoshihiro; Inoue, Toshio; Ra, Chisei

    2011-11-01

    The three heavy metals, mercury, gold and silver commonly and specifically induce aberrant immunological responses leading to autoimmune disorders in genetically susceptible animals and humans. The disorders are characterized by autoantibody production, increases in serum IgG and IgE, polyclonal activation of B and T lymphocytes and renal immune complex deposition and glomerulonephritis. Mast cells play key roles in allergic and inflammatory reactions. A growing body of evidence suggests that mast cells are key players in innate and adaptive immunity and involved in autoimmune diseases. Mast cells are also direct targets for autoimmunity-inducing metals both in vitro and in vivo and play a role in the development of metal-induced autoimmune disorders. The three metals specifically modulate mast cell function, including degranulation and secretion of arachidonic acid metabolites and cytokines such as interleukin-4. Divergent signaling components, including mitogen-activated protein kinase activation, reactive oxygen and nitric oxide generation and Ca2+ influx are modulated by the metals. Furthermore, the metals have considerable impacts on mast cell survival, which also species seems to be involved in the development of metal-induced autoimmune disorders. In this review, we provide an overview of recent advances in our understanding of the impacts of the three metals on mast cell signaling, function and survival and their possible roles in the pathologies of metal-induced autoimmunity.

  15. 4-Chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline inhibits activation of Syk kinase to suppress mast cells in vitro and mast cell-mediated passive cutaneous anaphylaxis in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Kui Lea; Ko, Na Young; Lee, Jun Ho; Kim, Do Kyun; Kim, Hyuk Soon; Kim, A-Ram; Her, Erk; Kim, Bokyung; Kim, Hyung Sik; Moon, Eun-Yi; Kim, Young Mi; Kim, Hang-Rae; Choi, Wahn Soo

    2011-12-15

    4-Chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline is a quinoxaline derivative. We aimed to study the effects of 4-chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline on activation of mast cells in vitro and in mice. 4-Chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline reversibly inhibited degranulation of mast cells in a dose-dependent manner, and also suppressed the expression and secretion of TNF-{alpha} and IL-4 in mast cells. Mechanistically, 4-chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline inhibited activating phosphorylation of Syk and LAT, which are crucial for early Fc{epsilon}RI-mediated signaling events, as well as Akt and MAP kinases, which play essential roles in the production of various pro-inflammatory cytokines in mast cells. Notably, although 4-chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline inhibited the activation of Fyn and Syk, minimal inhibition was observed in mast cells in the case of Lyn. Furthermore, consistent with its in vitro activity, 4-chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline significantly suppressed mast cell-mediated passive cutaneous anaphylaxis in mice. In summary, the results from this study demonstrate that 4-chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline shows an inhibitory effect on mast cells in vitro and in vivo, and that this is mediated by inhibiting the activation of Syk in mast cells. Therefore, 4-chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline could be useful in the treatment of mast cell-mediated allergic diseases. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 4-chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline is a quinoxaline derivative. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of 4-chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline on mast cells was investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 4-chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline reversibly inhibited Syk activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 4-chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline could be useful for IgE-mediated allergy.

  16. The hard metal diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Cugell, D.W. )

    1992-06-01

    Hard metal is a mixture of tungsten carbide and cobalt, to which small amounts of other metals may be added. It is widely used for industrial purposes whenever extreme hardness and high temperature resistance are needed, such as for cutting tools, oil well drilling bits, and jet engine exhaust ports. Cobalt is the component of hard metal that can be a health hazard. Respiratory diseases occur in workers exposed to cobalt--either in the production of hard metal, from machining hard metal parts, or from other sources. Adverse pulmonary reactions include asthma, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, and interstitial fibrosis. A peculiar, almost unique form of lung fibrosis, giant cell interstitial pneumonia, is closely linked with cobalt exposure.66 references.

  17. The hard metal diseases.

    PubMed

    Cugell, D W

    1992-06-01

    Hard metal is a mixture of tungsten carbide and cobalt, to which small amounts of other metals may be added. It is widely used for industrial purposes whenever extreme hardness and high temperature resistance are needed, such as for cutting tools, oil well drilling bits, and jet engine exhaust ports. Cobalt is the component of hard metal that can be a health hazard. Respiratory diseases occur in workers exposed to cobalt--either in the production of hard metal, from machining hard metal parts, or from other sources. Adverse pulmonary reactions include asthma, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, and interstitial fibrosis. A peculiar, almost unique form of lung fibrosis, giant cell interstitial pneumonia, is closely linked with cobalt exposure.

  18. 44. VIEW OF UMBILICAL MAST AND LAUNCH PAD FROM SOUTHWEST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    44. VIEW OF UMBILICAL MAST AND LAUNCH PAD FROM SOUTHWEST. DOORS FOR THE UMBILICAL MAST TRENCH RAISED FOR MAINTENANCE POSITION OF 10 DEGREES. LAUNCHER IS RIGHT OF MAST; RAILS PARALLEL TO MAST. CONTROL PANELS LEFT TO RIGHT: ELECTRICAL PANEL, COMMUNICATIONS PANEL, AND MAST CONTROL PANEL. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  19. Benign mast cell hyperplasia and atypical mast cell infiltrates in penile lichen planus in adult men.

    PubMed

    Regauer, Sigrid; Beham-Schmid, Christine

    2014-08-01

    Introduction. Lichen planus (LP) is a chronic cytokine-mediated disease of possible auto-immune etiology. 25% of men have anogenital manifestations. Erosive penile LP causes a scarring phimosis of the foreskin in uncircumcised men. Mast cells as potent immune modulators have been implicated in a number of autoimmune and chronic inflammatory diseases, but have not been investigated in LP. Material and Methods. Formalin-fixed tissues of 117 circumcision specimens of adult men affected by LP were evaluated for the extent of mast cell and lymphocyte infiltrates, characterized immunohistochemically with antibodies to CD 3, 4, 8, 20, 21, 25, 30, 117c and human mast cell tryptase. Specimens with dense mast cell infiltrates were analyzed for point mutations of the c-kit gene (D816V). Results. Unaffected skin and modified mucosa of foreskins contained ⟨5 mast cells/mm². The inflammatory infiltrate of LP-lesions displayed ⟨15 mast cells/mm² in 33/117 foreskins, 16-40 mast cells/mm² in 22/117 and ⟩40 mast cells/mm² (average 70, range 40-100) in 62/117 foreskins. Lesional mast cells of 29/117 (24%) foreskins showed aberrant CD25-expression and/or spindled morphology, with 11/29 men having erosive LP, 13/29 a lymphocytic vasculitis and 1/28 a systemic mastocytosis. Neither CD30-expression nor c-kit mutations were identified. Atypical mast cell infiltrates in LP correlated with high disease activity, erosive LP and presence of lymphocytic vasculitis Conclusions. Increased mast cells in penile LP, mostly representing a benign hyperplasia/activation syndrome, suggests them as targets for innovative therapy options for symptomatic LP-patients not responding to corticosteroid therapy. Presently, the biological implications of atypical mast cell infiltrates in penile LP are unknown.

  20. Analysis of the components of hard resin in hops (Humulus lupulus L.) and structural elucidation of their transformation products formed during the brewing process.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Yoshimasa; Taniguchi, Harumi; Yamada, Makiko; Matsukura, Yasuko; Koizumi, Hideki; Furihata, Kazuo; Shindo, Kazutoshi

    2014-11-26

    The resins from hops (Humulus lupulus L.), which add the bitter taste to beer, are classified into two main sub-fractions, namely, soft and hard resins. α- and β-Acids in soft resin and their transformation during the wort boiling process are well-studied; however, other constituents in resins, especially hard resin, have been unidentified. In this study, we identified humulinones and hulupones as soft-resin components, in addition to 4'-hydroxyallohumulinones and tricyclooxyisohumulones A and B as hard-resin components. These compounds are all oxidation products derived from α- or β-acids. We also investigated compositional changes in the hard resin during the wort boiling process, which has a significant effect on the taste of the beer, by using model boiling experiments. The major changes were identified to be isomerization of 4'-hydroxyallohumulinones into 4'-hydroxyallo-cis-humulinones, followed by decomposition into cis-oxyhumulinic acids. These findings will be helpful in systematically evaluating and optimizing the effect of the hard resin on beer quality.

  1. Tail Service Mast Umbilical Arrival

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-08-02

    A crane lowers the first Tail Service Mast Umbilical (TSMU) onto a test stand at the Launch Equipment Test Facility at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Two TSMUs will provide liquid propellants and power to the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket’s core stage engine. Both TSMUs will connect to the zero-level deck on the mobile launcher, providing fuel and electricity to the SLS rocket before it launches on Exploration Mission 1. The TSMU will undergo testing and validation at the LETF to verify it is functioning properly. The center’s Engineering Directorate and the Ground Systems Development and Operations Program are overseeing processing and testing of the umbilicals.

  2. Tail Service Mast Umbilical Arrival

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-08-02

    A crane is attached to the first Tail Service Mast Umbilical (TSMU) for NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) at the Launch Equipment Test Facility at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Two TSMUs will provide liquid propellants and power to the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket’s core stage engine. Both TSMUs will connect to the zero-level deck on the mobile launcher, providing fuel and electricity to the SLS rocket before it launches on Exploration Mission 1. The TSMU will undergo testing and validation at the LETF to verify it is functioning properly. The center’s Engineering Directorate and the Ground Systems Development and Operations Program are overseeing processing and testing of the umbilicals.

  3. Tail Service Mast Umbilical Arrival

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-08-02

    A technician monitors the progress as a crane lifts the first Tail Service Mast Umbilical (TSMU) for transfer to a test stand at the Launch Equipment Test Facility at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Two TSMUs will provide liquid propellants and power to the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket’s core stage engine. Both TSMUs will connect to the zero-level deck on the mobile launcher, providing fuel and electricity to the SLS rocket before it launches on Exploration Mission 1. The TSMU will undergo testing and validation at the LETF to verify it is functioning properly. The center’s Engineering Directorate and the Ground Systems Development and Operations Program are overseeing processing and testing of the umbilicals.

  4. Tail Service Mast Umbilical Arrival

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-08-02

    Technicians assist as a crane is used to lift the first Tail Service Mast Umbilical (TSMU) away from the flatbed of the transport truck at the Launch Equipment Test Facility (LETF) at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Two TSMUs will provide liquid propellants and power to the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket’s core stage engine. Both TSMUs will connect to the zero-level deck on the mobile launcher, providing fuel and electricity to the SLS rocket before it launches on Exploration Mission 1. The TSMU will undergo testing and validation at the LETF to verify it is functioning properly. The center’s Engineering Directorate and the Ground Systems Development and Operations Program are overseeing processing and testing of the umbilicals.

  5. Tail Service Mast Umbilical Arrival

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-08-02

    A crane lifts the first Tail Service Mast Umbilical (TSMU) up for placement on a test stand at the Launch Equipment Test Facility at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Two TSMUs will provide liquid propellants and power to the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket’s core stage engine. Both TSMUs will connect to the zero-level deck on the mobile launcher, providing fuel and electricity to the SLS rocket before it launches on Exploration Mission 1. The TSMU will undergo testing and validation at the LETF to verify it is functioning properly. The center’s Engineering Directorate and the Ground Systems Development and Operations Program are overseeing processing and testing of the umbilicals.

  6. Tail Service Mast Umbilical Arrival

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-08-02

    A crane is prepared to help lift the first Tail Service Mast Umbilical (TSMU) for NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) at the Launch Equipment Test Facility (LETF) at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Two TSMUs will provide liquid propellants and power to the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket’s core stage engine. Both TSMUs will connect to the zero-level deck on the mobile launcher, providing fuel and electricity to the SLS rocket before it launches on Exploration Mission 1. The TSMU will undergo testing and validation at the LETF to verify it is functioning properly. The center’s Engineering Directorate and the Ground Systems Development and Operations Program are overseeing processing and testing of the umbilicals.

  7. Tail Service Mast Umbilical Arrival

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-08-02

    Technicians assist as a crane is used to lift the first Tail Service Mast Umbilical (TSMU) up from the flatbed of the transport truck at the Launch Equipment Test Facility (LETF) at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Two TSMUs will provide liquid propellants and power to the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket’s core stage engine. Both TSMUs will connect to the zero-level deck on the mobile launcher, providing fuel and electricity to the SLS rocket before it launches on Exploration Mission 1. The TSMU will undergo testing and validation at the LETF to verify it is functioning properly. The center’s Engineering Directorate and the Ground Systems Development and Operations Program are overseeing processing and testing of the umbilicals.

  8. Tail Service Mast Umbilical Arrival

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-08-02

    A heavy-lift transport truck arrives at the Launch Equipment Test Facility (LETF) at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, with the first of two Tail Service Mast Umbilicals (TSMU) for NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS). Two TSMUs will provide liquid propellants and power to the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket’s core stage engine. Both TSMUs will connect to the zero-level deck on the mobile launcher, providing fuel and electricity to the SLS rocket before it launches on Exploration Mission 1. The TSMU will undergo testing and validation at the LETF to verify it is functioning properly. The center’s Engineering Directorate and the Ground Systems Development and Operations Program are overseeing processing and testing of the umbilicals.

  9. Tail Service Mast Umbilical Arrival

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-08-02

    Technicians assist as a crane is used to lift the first Tail Service Mast Umbilical (TSMU) into the vertical position at the Launch Equipment Test Facility (LETF) at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Two TSMUs will provide liquid propellants and power to the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket’s core stage engine. Both TSMUs will connect to the zero-level deck on the mobile launcher, providing fuel and electricity to the SLS rocket before it launches on Exploration Mission 1. The TSMU will undergo testing and validation at the LETF to verify it is functioning properly. The center’s Engineering Directorate and the Ground Systems Development and Operations Program are overseeing processing and testing of the umbilicals.

  10. Tail Service Mast Umbilical Arrival

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-08-02

    Technician monitors the progress as a crane lowers the first Tail Service Mast Umbilical (TSMU) onto a test stand at the Launch Equipment Test Facility at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Two TSMUs will provide liquid propellants and power to the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket’s core stage engine. Both TSMUs will connect to the zero-level deck on the mobile launcher, providing fuel and electricity to the SLS rocket before it launches on Exploration Mission 1. The TSMU will undergo testing and validation at the LETF to verify it is functioning properly. The center’s Engineering Directorate and the Ground Systems Development and Operations Program are overseeing processing and testing of the umbilicals.

  11. Fuel retention studies on MAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mast Team Huang, J.; Lisgo, S.; Maddison, G.

    2011-08-01

    Fuel retention has been studied on MAST using gas-balance analysis. With 8-15 min of inter-shot helium glow-discharge cleaning (4He-GDC), the wall retention fraction stays very high (>90%) during the flat-top of the plasma current, indicating this component is dominant during the discharge. Recovery of wall conditioning with 4He-GDC suggests the retention process is dominated by direct implantation of particles in shallow surface layers. The effect of 4He-GDC duration on the particle balance has also been investigated. It is shown that when there was no preceding 4He-GDC, the wall pumping capacity was reduced, causing higher plasma density and tank pressure for the next shot.

  12. How mast cells make decisions

    PubMed Central

    Karhausen, Jörn; Abraham, Soman N.

    2016-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are present in various tissues and are responsible for initiating many of the early inflammatory responses to extrinsic challenges. Recent studies have demonstrated that MCs can tailor their responses, depending on the stimulus encountered and the tissue in which they are stimulated. In this issue of the JCI, Gaudenzio and colleagues examine the mechanistic differences between MC responses observed after engagement of Fcε receptor I and those seen after MC stimulation via the recently identified G protein–coupled receptor MRGPRX2. By showing that discrete cellular activation patterns affect the phenotype of the MC response in vivo and in vitro, the authors provide important information about how MCs differentially process various stimuli into distinct degranulation programs. PMID:27643441

  13. A mast-seeding desert shrub regulates population dynamics and behavior of its heteromyid dispersers.

    PubMed

    Auger, Janene; Meyer, Susan E; Jenkins, Stephen H

    2016-04-01

    Granivorous rodent populations in deserts are primarily regulated through precipitation-driven resource pulses rather than pulses associated with mast-seeding, a pattern more common in mesic habitats. We studied heteromyid responses to mast-seeding in the desert shrub blackbrush (Coleogyne ramosissima), a regionally dominant species in the Mojave-Great Basin Desert transition zone. In a 5-year study at Arches National Park, Utah, USA, we quantified spatiotemporal variation in seed resources in mast and intermast years in blackbrush-dominated and mixed desert vegetation and measured responses of Dipodomys ordii (Ord's kangaroo rat) and Perognathus flavescens (plains pocket mouse). In blackbrush-dominated vegetation, blackbrush seeds comprised >79% of seed production in a mast year, but 0% in the first postmast year. Kangaroo rat abundance in blackbrush-dominated vegetation was highest in the mast year, declined sharply at the end of the first postmast summer, and then remained at low levels for 3 years. Pocket mouse abundance was not as strongly associated with blackbrush seed production. In mixed desert vegetation, kangaroo rat abundance was higher and more uniform through time. Kangaroo rats excluded the smaller pocket mice from resource-rich patches including a pipeline disturbance and also moved their home range centers closer to this disturbance in a year of low blackbrush seed production. Home range size for kangaroo rats was unrelated to seed resource density in the mast year, but resource-poor home ranges were larger (P < 0.001) in the first postmast year, when resources were limiting. Blackbrush seeds are higher in protein and fat but lower in carbohydrates than the more highly preferred seeds of Indian ricegrass (Achnatherum hymenoides) and have similar energy value per unit of handling time. Kangaroo rats cached seeds of these two species in similar spatial configurations, implying that they were equally valued as stored food resources. Blackbrush mast

  14. Effects of relaxin on mast cells. In vitro and in vivo studies in rats and guinea pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Masini, E; Bani, D; Bigazzi, M; Mannaioni, P F; Bani-Sacchi, T

    1994-01-01

    The results of the current study demonstrate that relaxin inhibits histamine release by mast cells. This effect is related to the peptide concentrations, and could be observed in both isolated rat serosal mast cells stimulated with compound 48/80 or calcium ionophore A 23187, and in serosal mast cells isolated from sensitized guinea pigs and challenged with the antigen. The morphological findings agree with the functional data, revealing that relaxin attenuates calcium ionophore-induced granule exocytosis by isolated rat serosal mast cells. Similar effects of relaxin have also been recognized in vivo by light microscopic and densitometric analysis of the mesenteric mast cells of rats which received the hormone intraperitoneally 20 min before local treatment of the mesentery with calcium ionophore. Moreover, evidence is provided that relaxin stimulates endogenous production of nitric oxide and attenuates the rise of intracellular Ca2+ concentration induced by calcium ionophore. The experiments with drugs capable of influencing nitric oxide production also provide indirect evidence that the inhibiting effect of relaxin on mast cell histamine release is related to an increased generation of nitric oxide. It is suggested that relaxin may have a physiological role in modulating mast cell function through the L-arginine-nitric oxide pathway. Images PMID:7525651

  15. Mast cell mediators and peritoneal adhesion formation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Langer, J C; Liebman, S M; Monk, P K; Pelletier, G J

    1995-09-01

    We have previously shown that mast cell stabilization attenuates peritoneal adhesion formation in the rat. The present study investigated the mechanism of this protection. Adhesions were created in weanling rats using cecal scraping and application of 95% ethanol. Rats received specific blockers for the mast cell products histamine, serotonin (5HT), leukotriene D4, and platelet activating factor intraperitoneally 30 min before laparotomy and at the time of abdominal closure. Control animals received saline. Adhesions were assessed blindly 1 week later using a standardized scale. Adhesion formation was not affected by histamine blockade using combined mepyramine and ranitidine, 5-HT1 blockade using methysergide, 5-HT3 blockade using ondansetron, leukotriene D4 blockade using MK-571, or platelet activating factor blockade using WEB-2086. However, blockade of the 5-HT2 receptor using ketanserin resulted in significant dose-dependent attenuation of adhesions compared to saline. These data suggest that mast cells mediate peritoneal adhesion formation in the rat through release of serotonin acting on 5HT2 receptors. Further understanding of this process may lead to new strategies for the prevention of postoperative adhesions.

  16. Acrolein induction of oxidative stress and degranulation in mast cells.

    PubMed

    Hochman, Daniel J; Collaco, Christopher R; Brooks, Edward G

    2014-08-01

    Increases in asthma worldwide have been associated epidemiologically with expanding urban air pollution. The mechanistic relationship between airway hyper-responsiveness, inflammation, and ambient airborne triggers remains ambiguous. Acrolein, a ubiquitous aldehyde pollutant, is a product of incomplete combustion reactions. Acrolein is abundant in cigarette smoke, effluent from industrial smokestacks, diesel exhaust, and even hot oil cooking vapors. Acrolein is a potent airway irritant and can induce airway hyper-responsiveness and inflammation in the lungs of animal models. In the present study, we utilized the mast cell analog, RBL-2H3, to interrogate the responses of cells relevant to airway inflammation and allergic responses as a model for the induction of asthma-like conditions upon exposure to acrolein. We hypothesized that acrolein would induce oxidative stress and degranulation in airway mast cells. Our results indicate that acrolein at 1 ppm initiated degranulation and promoted the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Introduction of antioxidants to the system significantly reduced both ROS generation and degranulation. At higher levels of exposure (above 100 ppm), RBL-2H3 cells displayed signs of severe toxicity. This experimental data indicates acrolein can induce an allergic inflammation in mast cell lines, and the initiation of degranulation was moderated by the application of antioxidants. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., a Wiley company.

  17. The Role of Mast Cells in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Shaik-Dasthagirisaheb, Yasdani B; Conti, Pio

    2016-01-01

    Immunity and inflammation are deeply involved in Alzheimer's disease. The most important properties of pathological Alzheimer's disease are the extracellular deposits of amyloid â-protein plaque aggregates along with other unknown mutated proteins, which are implicated in immunity and inflammation. Mast cells are found in the brain of all mammalian species and in the periphery, and their biological mediators, including cytokines/chemokines, arachidonic acid products and stored enzymes, play an import role in Alzheimer's disease. Cytokines/chemokines, which are generated mostly by microglia and astrocytes in Alzheimer's disease, contribute to nearly every aspect of neuroinflammation and amyloid â-protein plaque aggregates may induce in mast cells the release of a plethora of mediators, including pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines such as interleukin-1, interleukin-6, interleukin-8, interleukin-10, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, vascular endothelial growth factor, transforming growth factor beta, CXCL8 and CCL2-3-4. These proinflammatory cytokines/chemokines are prominent mediators of neuroinflammation in brain disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, and their inhibition may be associated with improved recovery. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge regarding the roles of mast cell mediators (stored and de novo synthesis) in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease.

  18. Further characterization of protein kinase C in mouse mast cells

    SciTech Connect

    White, J.R.; Ishizaka, T.

    1986-03-01

    Bridging of cell-bound IgE antibody molecules on colony stimulating factor dependent mouse mast cell line (PT-18) cells by multivalent antigen induces the mobilization and uptake of Ca/sup 2 +/ monitored by Quin-2 and the production of diacylglycerol. Exposure of the sensitized cells to antigen also induces a substantial increase in protein kinase C (PKC) activity in the plasma membrane (340 units to 1375 units: 1 unit = 1 pmol of /sup 32/P incorporated into Histone H-1/min/10/sup 7/ cells), within 30 seconds. There is also an increase in /sup 3/H phorbol-12, 13-dibutyrate (/sup 3/H-PDB) binding which parallels the increase in PKC activity both in kinetics and antigen dose dependency. Determination of K/sub m/ and V/sub max/ for PKC revealed no difference between the cytosolic and membranous forms of PKC. Partial purification of PKC from the membrane of sensitized mast cells which had been labeled with /sup 32/P and stimulated with DNP-HSA revealed a protein of 80-84,000 molecular weight, which migrated on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis just above an authentic standard of PKC purified from rat brain. Treatment of the PKC from mouse mast cell membrane with alkaline phosphatase resulted in a reduction of phosphorylating activity and bindability of /sup 3/H-PDB. In conclusion, the authors speculate that activation of mouse mast cells by cross-linking IgE results in the phosphorylation of a silent-pool of PKC converting it from an inactive state to an activated form.

  19. Overview of MAST results and future plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Brian

    2005-10-01

    The MAST experimental programme is focused both on physics studies for ITER and on addressing key issues for the long term potential of the spherical tokamak such as non-solenoidal start-up, current drive and plasma exhaust. ITER physics studies cover confinement scaling, transport physics including the generation and sustainment of transport barriers, pedestal physics, scrape-off layer transport, error fields and performance limiting instabilities such as ELMs, neo-classical tearing modes etc. These studies are carried out in close collaboration with international partners including joint experiments with other devices. Substantial upgrades to MAST have been implemented during the last two years including a new divertor, centre column and error field correction coils as well as many diagnostic enhancements. An upgrade to the neutral beam heating system is well-advanced. An overview of the latest MAST results in the areas described above, exploiting the new MAST capabilities, will be presented together with future plans.

  20. Modelling and Analysis Capabilities for Lightweight Masts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-02-01

    Defence R&D Canada National Défense Defence nationale Modelling and Analysis Capabilities for Lightweight Masts T.S. Koko , D.P. Brennan, X. Luo, M.E...Modelling and Analysis Capabilities for Lightweight Masts T. S. Koko , D. P. Brennan, X. Luo, M. E. Norwood, L. Jiang, and U. O. Akpan... Koko The scientific or technical validity of this Contract Report is entirely the responsibility of the contractor and the contents do not necessarily

  1. Mast cell activation syndromes: definition and classification.

    PubMed

    Valent, P

    2013-04-01

    Mast cell activation (MCA) occurs in a number of different clinical conditions, including IgE-dependent allergies, other inflammatory reactions, and mastocytosis. MCA-related symptoms may be mild, moderate, severe, or even life-threatening. The severity of MCA depends on a number of different factors, including genetic predisposition, the number and releasability of mast cells involved in the reaction, the type of allergen, presence of specific IgE, and presence of certain comorbidities. In severe reactions, MCA can be documented by a substantial increase in the serum tryptase level above baseline. When symptoms are recurrent, are accompanied by an increase in mast cell-derived mediators in biological fluids, and are responsive to treatment with mast cell-stabilizing or mediator-targeting drugs, the diagnosis of mast cell activation syndrome (MCAS) is appropriate. Based on the underlying condition, these patients can further be classified into i) primary MCAS where KIT-mutated, clonal mast cells are detected, ii) secondary MCAS where an underlying inflammatory disease, often in the form of an IgE-dependent allergy, but no KIT-mutated mast cells, is found, and iii) idiopathic MCAS, where neither an allergy or other underlying disease, nor KIT-mutated mast cells are detectable. It is important to note that in many patients with MCAS, several different factors act together to lead to severe or even life-threatening anaphylaxis. Detailed knowledge about the pathogenesis and complexity of MCAS, and thus establishing the exact final diagnosis, may greatly help in the management and therapy of these patients.

  2. Mast cells in laser and surgical wounds.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, A L; Browne, R M; Frame, J W; Matthews, J B

    1995-01-01

    Precooling of tissues was investigated as a possible means of reducing thermal damage during CO2 laser surgery of the oral mucosa. The changes in mast cells in scalpel, and in non-cooled and precooled (tissue temperature lowered to approximately 10 degrees C) CO2 laser wounds were studied. Standard wounds five mm in length were created with the CO2 laser or scalpel on the dorsum of the tongues of 32 Sprague-Dawley rats under general anesthesia with fentanyl/fluanisone and midazolam. Animals were killed with excess anesthetic immediately or six hours after surgery, their tongues were removed, trimmed, fixed in neutral formalin and processed to paraffin wax. Acid (pH 1.4) toluidine blue stained sections were used to count normal and degranulated mast cells in five fields (0.1 mm2) located at defined positions immediately adjacent to the wound site. At both 0 and 6 hours normal mast cell numbers were significantly different between treatment groups (P<0.045; ANOVA) with mean numbers highest in scalpel wounds and lowest in uncooled laser wounds. Similarly, at 0 time, there were significant differences in degranulated mast cells between treatment groups (P=0.004; ANOVA) but highest numbers were detected in uncooled laser wounds and lowest in scalpel wounds. There were no significant differences in degranulated mast cell counts at six hours although there was a similar distribution in numbers between groups. Total numbers of mast cells (normal + degranulated) did not differ between treatment groups. These results demonstrated that i) laser wounds are associated with greater levels of mast cell degranulation than scalpel wounds and ii) precooling of tissues prior to laser treatment decreases the level of mast cell degranulation. It is concluded that tissue damage in CO2 laser surgery may be reduced by precooling of tissue.

  3. Expanding spectrum of mast cell activation disorders: monoclonal and idiopathic mast cell activation syndromes.

    PubMed

    Picard, Matthieu; Giavina-Bianchi, Pedro; Mezzano, Veronica; Castells, Mariana

    2013-05-01

    In recent years, 2 new syndromes of mast cell activation have been described in patients with episodes of mast cell mediator release that range from flushing and abdominal cramping to anaphylaxis: monoclonal mast cell activation syndrome (MMAS) and idiopathic mast cell activation syndrome (MCAS). This review will discuss these 2 new syndromes in the larger context of mast cell activation disorders as well as the diagnostic and treatment approaches for these conditions. PubMed was searched using the following terms: mast cell activation disorder, mast cell activation syndrome, and clonal mast cell. Only English-language articles published up until February 27, 2013, were considered. MMAS has been diagnosed in patients with systemic reactions to hymenoptera stings and elevated baseline serum tryptase as well as in patients with unexplained episodes of anaphylaxis. A bone marrow biopsy establishes the diagnosis by revealing the presence of monoclonal mast cells that carry the D816V KIT mutation and/or express CD25 while the diagnostic requirements for systemic mastocytosis are not met. MCAS affects predominantly women in whom no mast cell abnormality or external triggers account for their episodes of mast cell activation. MCAS is a diagnosis of exclusion, and primary and secondary mast cell activation disorders as well as idiopathic anaphylaxis have to be ruled out before making the diagnosis. Patients with MCAS and MMAS are treated in a stepwise fashion with drugs that block the effects of mediators released by mast cells on activation. One third of MCAS patients experience complete resolution of symptoms with treatment, while one third have a major response and one third a minor response to treatment. A combination of drugs is usually necessary to achieve symptom control. No drug trial has been performed in patients with MMAS and MCAS. MMAS and MCAS are 2 newly described, rare syndromes of mast cell activation. Further studies will be necessary to better understand

  4. Impact of mast cells on the skin.

    PubMed

    Kritas, S K; Saggini, A; Varvara, G; Murmura, G; Caraffa, A; Antinolfi, P; Toniato, E; Pantalone, A; Neri, G; Frydas, S; Rosati, M; Tei, M; Speziali, A; Saggini, R; Pandolfi, F; Cerulli, G; Theoharides, T C; Conti, P

    2013-01-01

    When through the skin a foreign antigen enters it provokes an immune response and inflammatory reaction. Mast cells are located around small vessels that are involved in vasaldilation. They mature under the influence of local tissue to various cytokines. Human skin mast cells play an essential role in diverse physiological and pathological processes and mediate immediate hypersensitive reaction and allergic diseases. Injection of anti-IgE in the skin or other agents that directly activate mast cells may cause the decrease in vascular tone, leakage of plasma and may lead to a fall in blood pressure with fatal anaphylactic shock. Skin mast cells are also implicated as effector cells in response to multiple parasites such as Leishmania which is primarily characterized by its tissue cutaneous tropism. Activated macrophages by IFNgamma, cytotoxic T cells, activated mast cells and several cytokines are involved in the elimination of the parasites and immunoprotection. IL-33 is one of the latest cytokines involved in IgE-induced anaphylaxis and in the pathogenesis of allergic skin disorders. IL-33 has been shown in epidermis of patients with psoriasis and its skin expression causes atopic dermatitis and it is crucial for the development of this disease. Here we review the impact of mast cells on the skin.

  5. Interaction of phosphatidylserine with mast cells.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, T W; Lagunoff, D

    1978-01-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) potentiates histamine secretion from mast cells exposed to concanavalin A and Ca2+. In order to identify the form of PtdSer that is responsible for its effect on mast cell secretion, PtdSer containing a tritium-labeled serine moiety (3H-PtdSer) was synthesized from egg yolk phosphatidylcholine. The critical micelle concentration (CMC) of 3H-PtdSer and the binding isotherm for 3H-PtdSer interaction with mast cells were determined. The midpoints of the binding isotherm and the dose-response curve for potentiation of secretion coincide and are 2 orders of magnitude greater than the CMC. The shape of the binding curve is explicable either in terms of simple binding of preformed PtdSer micelles or of cooperative binding of monomeric PtdSer in which the number of molecules cooperatively associating with a mast cell binding site is equal to the number of monomers in a PtdSer micelle. In either case, at equilibrium, PtdSer micelles are bound to the mast cells. The number of PtdSer molecules bound to a single mast cell at equilibrium was estimated to be 3.7 X 10(9). PMID:84384

  6. Mast cells as targets of pimecrolimus.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhongcai; Jiao, Zongjiu

    2011-11-01

    Mast cells, the multi-functional secretory cells, are the pivotal effector cells in immune response, and contribute to the pathogenesis of many diverse diseases, like asthma and mastocytosis, by releasing numerous proinflammatory mediators. Pimecrolimus (SDZ ASM 981) is a derivative of the macrolactam ascomycin and is a member of the calcineurin inhibitor class of immunosuppressors. It inhibits the calcineurin-dependent activation of nuclear factor of activated T cells and the expression of a number of proinflammatory cytokines in turn. Pimecrolimus has high and selective anti-inflammatory activity within the skin, and with much lower potential to affect local and systemic immune responses. Therefore it has been widely used for treatment of various inflammatory skin diseases. It has a cellselective mode of action, and mast cells are its specific target cells. Pimecrolimus inhibits the release of both preformed and de novo synthesized mediators from activated mast cells and inhibits accumulation of mast cells by inducing apoptosis. Several experimental and clinical reports have demonstrated the successful application of pimecrolimus and other calcineurin inhibitors, such as tacrolimus and cyclosporine A, to treat mastocytosis, a spectrum of disorders characterized by mast cell hyperplasia, especially cutaneous mastocytosis. These new findings suggest that pimecrolimus and other calcineurin inhibitors may be a novel and effective therapeutic approach for mast cell-associated diseases such as asthma and mastocytosis.

  7. Physical stability and resistance to peroxidation of a range of liquid-fill hard gelatin capsule products on extreme long-term storage.

    PubMed

    Bowtle, William; Kanyowa, Lionel; Mackenzie, Mark; Higgins, Paul

    2011-06-01

    The industrial take-up of liquid-fill hard capsule technology is limited in part by lack of published long-term physical and chemical stability data which demonstrate the robustness of the system. To assess the effects of extreme long-term storage on liquid-fill capsule product quality and integrity, with respect to both the capsules per se and a standard blister-pack type (foil-film blister). Fourteen sets of stored peroxidation-sensitive liquid-fill hard gelatin capsule product samples, originating ~20 years from the current study, were examined with respect to physical and selected chemical properties, together with microbiological evaluation. All sets retained physical integrity of capsules and blister-packs. Capsules were free of leaks, gelatin cross-linking, and microbiological growth. Eight samples met a limit (anisidine value, 20) commonly used as an index of peroxidation for lipid-based products with shelf lives of 2-3 years. Foil-film blister-packs using PVC or PVC-PVdC as the thermoforming film were well-suited packaging components for the liquid-fill capsule format. The study confirms the long-term physical robustness of the liquid-fill hard capsule format, together with its manufacturing and banding processes. It also indicates that various peroxidation-sensitive products using the capsule format may be maintained satisfactorily over very prolonged storage periods.

  8. Mast cells in allergy: innate instructors of adaptive responses.

    PubMed

    Stelekati, Erietta; Orinska, Zane; Bulfone-Paus, Silvia

    2007-01-01

    The function of mast cells as effector cells in allergy has been extensively studied. However, increasing insight into mast cell physiology has revealed new mast cell functions and has introduced mast cells as key players in the regulation of innate as well as adaptive immunity. For example, mast cells have recently been found to express Toll-like receptors (TLRs), which enable them to participate in the innate immune response against pathogens. Furthermore, mast cells have been reported to interact with B cells, dendritic cells and T cells and thereby modulate the direction of an adaptive immune response. Finally, recent documentation that mast cells express functional MHC class II and costimulatory molecules and release immunologically active exosomes, has raised the possibility that mast cells also engage in (as yet) poorly understood antigen presentation functions. In this review, we explore the hypothesis that mast cells serve as central mediators between innate and adaptive immunity, rather as pure effector cells, during allergic innate responses.

  9. Mast cells are activated by Staphylococcus aureus in vitro but do not influence the outcome of intraperitoneal S. aureus infection in vivo.

    PubMed

    Rönnberg, Elin; Johnzon, Carl-Fredrik; Calounova, Gabriela; Garcia Faroldi, Gianni; Grujic, Mirjana; Hartmann, Karin; Roers, Axel; Guss, Bengt; Lundequist, Anders; Pejler, Gunnar

    2014-10-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major pathogen that can cause a broad spectrum of serious infections including skin infections, pneumonia and sepsis. Peritoneal mast cells have been implicated in the host response towards various bacterial insults and to provide mechanistic insight into the role of mast cells in intraperitoneal bacterial infection we here studied the global effects of S. aureus on mast cell gene expression. After co-culture of peritoneal mast cells with live S. aureus we found by gene array analysis that they up-regulate a number of genes. Many of these corresponded to pro-inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-3, interleukin-13 and tumour necrosis factor-α. The cytokine induction in response to S. aureus was confirmed by ELISA. To study the role of peritoneal mast cells during in vivo infection with S. aureus we used newly developed Mcpt5-Cre(+) × R-DTA mice in which mast cell deficiency is independent of c-Kit. This is in contrast to previous studies in which an impact of mast cells on bacterial infection has been proposed based on the use of mice whose mast cell deficiency is a consequence of defective c-Kit signalling. Staphylococcus aureus was injected intraperitoneally into mast-cell-deficient Mcpt5-Cre(+) × R-DTA mice using littermate mast-cell-sufficient mice as controls. We did not observe any difference between mast-cell-deficient and control mice with regard to weight loss, bacterial clearance, inflammation or cytokine production. We conclude that, despite peritoneal mast cells being activated by S. aureus in vitro, they do not influence the in vivo manifestations of intraperitoneal S. aureus infection.

  10. Eosinophils and mast cells in leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Mary E.

    2016-01-01

    Leishmania spp. are parasitic protozoa endemic in tropical and subtropical regions and the causative agent of leishmaniasis, a collection of syndromes whose clinical manifestations vary according to host and pathogen factors. Leishmania spp. are inoculated into the mammalian host by the bite of an infected sand fly, whereupon they are taken up by phagocytosis, convert into the replicative amastigote stage within macrophages, reproduce, spread to new macrophages and cause disease manifestations. A curative response against leishmaniasis depends in the classical activation of macrophages and the IL-12-dependent onset of an adaptive type 1 response characterized by the production of IFN-γ. Emerging evidence suggests that neutrophils, dendritic cells and other immune cells can serve as either temporary or stable hosts for Leishmania spp. Furthermore, it is becoming apparent that the initial interactions of the parasite with resident or early recruited immune cells can shape both the macrophage response and the type of adaptive immune response being induced. In this review, we compile a growing number of studies demonstrating how the earliest interactions of Leishmania spp. with eosinophils and mast cells influence the macrophage response to infection and the development of the adaptive immune response, hence, determining the ultimate outcome of infection. PMID:24838146

  11. Role(s) of IL-2 inducible T cell kinase and Bruton's tyrosine kinase in mast cell response to lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Huang, Weishan; August, Avery

    2016-06-01

    Mast cells play critical roles during immune responses to the bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) that can lead to fatal septic hypothermia [1], [2], [3]. IL-2 inducible T cell kinase (ITK) and Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) are non-receptor tyrosine kinases that act downstream of numerous receptors, and have been shown to modulate mast cell responses downstream of FcεRIα [4], however, their roles in regulating mast cell responses to endotoxic stimuli were unclear. We found that the absence of ITK and BTK alters the mast cell response to LPS, and leads to enhanced pro-inflammatory cytokine production by mast cells and more severe LPS-induced hypothermia in mice [5]. Here, we detail our investigation using microarray analysis to study the transcriptomic profiles of mast cell responses to LPS, and the roles of ITK and/or BTK expression in this process. Mouse whole genome array data of WT, Itk (-/-) , Btk (-/-) , and Itk (-/-)  Btk (-/-) bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) stimulated by PBS (control) or LPS for 1 h were used in our latest research article [5] and is available in the Gene Expression Omnibus under accession number GSE64287.

  12. Effect of fruits of Opuntia elatior Mill on mast cell degranulation.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Sanjay P; Sheth, N R; Suhagia, B N

    2015-01-01

    The presence of potentially active nutrients and their multifunctional properties make prickly pear a perfect candidate for the production of phytopharmaceutical products. Among the numerous Opuntia species, bioactive compounds have been isolated and characterized primarily from Opuntia ficus-indica, Opuntia polycantha, Opuntia stricta, Opuntia dilleni for various medicinal properties. Based on the traditional use of prickly pear for enhancement of immune function, the objective of the present study to evaluate the effect of prickly pear on mast cell degranulation function. The Opuntia fruit juice (OFJ) (10-200 μl/ml) were studied for the effect on sensitized rat peritoneal mast cell degranulation induced by immunological (egg albumin), and nonimmunological (compound 48/80) stimuli and compared with that of the reference standard, sodium cromoglycate and ketotifen (10 μg/ml). The OFJ exhibited significantly (P < 0.001) concentration dependent inhibition of mast cell degranulation. The IC50 value of OFJ was found 12.24 and 18 μl/ml for immunological and nonimmunological induced mast cell degranulation, respectively. The betacyanin is an active principle compound in prickly pear that may responsible for mast cell stabilizing action.

  13. Effect of fruits of Opuntia elatior Mill on mast cell degranulation

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Sanjay P.; Sheth, N. R.; Suhagia, B. N.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The presence of potentially active nutrients and their multifunctional properties make prickly pear a perfect candidate for the production of phytopharmaceutical products. Among the numerous Opuntia species, bioactive compounds have been isolated and characterized primarily from Opuntia ficus-indica, Opuntia polycantha, Opuntia stricta, Opuntia dilleni for various medicinal properties. Objective: Based on the traditional use of prickly pear for enhancement of immune function, the objective of the present study to evaluate the effect of prickly pear on mast cell degranulation function. Materials and Methods: The Opuntia fruit juice (OFJ) (10-200 μl/ml) were studied for the effect on sensitized rat peritoneal mast cell degranulation induced by immunological (egg albumin), and nonimmunological (compound 48/80) stimuli and compared with that of the reference standard, sodium cromoglycate and ketotifen (10 μg/ml). Results and Conclusion: The OFJ exhibited significantly (P < 0.001) concentration dependent inhibition of mast cell degranulation. The IC50 value of OFJ was found 12.24 and 18 μl/ml for immunological and nonimmunological induced mast cell degranulation, respectively. The betacyanin is an active principle compound in prickly pear that may responsible for mast cell stabilizing action. PMID:25883521

  14. Mast cells and mast cell mediators as targets of dietary supplements.

    PubMed

    Theoharides, Theoharis C; Bielory, Leonard

    2004-08-01

    To review the increasing amount of data that support or dispel the use of dietary supplements in the treatment of inflammatory conditions that involve mast cells, such as allergies, arthritis, and chronic pelvic pain syndrome. A search was conducted in MEDLINE for natural substances, dietary supplements, flavonoids, and proteoglycans for their in vitro or in vivo effects on allergic and inflammatory conditions. Studies were selected for inclusion because of the impact factor of the journal, the definitive nature of the findings, the soundness of the study design, and the expert opinion of the authors. Dietary supplements include a large group of products, such as vitamins, minerals, plant, or animal extracts, as well as herbal preparations that are often called medicinal herbs. Many of the available dietary supplements contain a multitude of ingredients, the source and/or purity of which is seldom disclosed; some of these may have biologic effects of their own or may interact with other supplements or drugs, often leading to adverse effects. The most well-documented evidence published to date is on the inhibitory action of natural compounds, especially flavonoids, on mast cells and allergic symptoms. Some flavonoids have weak inhibitory activity, whereas others may have no benefit or may be detrimental. Sulfated proteoglycans could provide synergistic action but require formulations with increased absorption. Combining the most active flavonoids with proteoglycans could be helpful in atopic and inflammatory conditions. However, a complete list of active ingredients and their source, purity, and exact concentration should be a requirement for nutraceuticals to standardize, compare, and promote their safe use.

  15. Enzymatic production of trans-free hard fat stock from fractionated rice bran oil, fully hydrogenated soybean oil, and conjugated linoleic Acid.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, P; Shin, J-A; Lee, J-H; Hu, J-N; Hwang, K T; Lee, K-T

    2009-03-01

    Rice bran oil (RBO) was fractionated into 2 phases, solid (S-RBO) and liquid (L-RBO), using acetone at -18 degrees C and the weight yield of each S-RBO and L-RBO was 45.5% and 54.5%, respectively. Then, trans-free hard fat was synthesized from trans-free substrate of S-RBO and fully hydrogenated soybean oil (FHSBO) at different molar ratios (S-RBO : FHSBO; 1 : 1, 1 : 1.5, 1 : 2, and 1 : 3) with Lipozyme TL IM lipase (10% of total substrate). Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA, 20% of total substrate) was used as functional fatty acids for the production of trans-free hard fat. After fatty acid analysis, CLA (12.2% to 14.2%) was found on the triacylglycerol (TAG) backbone of the interesterified products along with stearic (37.6% to 49%), palmitic (15% to 17.9%), and oleic acids (13.3% to 19.2%). The interesterified product contained higher level of saturated fatty acid (62.6% to 70.1%) at sn-2 position. Total tocopherols (alpha-, gamma-, and delta-; 1.4 to 2.6 mg/100 g) and phytosterols (campesterol, stigmasterol, and beta-sitosterol; 220.5 to 362.7 mg/100 g) were found in the interesterified products. From DSC results, solid fat contents of the interesterified products (S-RBO : FHSBO 1 : 1, 1 : 1.5, 1 : 2, and 1 : 3) at 25 degrees C were 23.1%, 27%, 30.1%, and 44.9%. The interesterified products consisted mostly of beta' form crystal with a small portion of beta form. The interesterified product (S-RBO : FHSBO 1 : 1.5) was softer than the physical blend but slightly harder than commercial shortenings as measured by texture analyzer. Thus, trans-free hard fat stock, which may have a potential functionality could be produced with various physical properties.

  16. Ancient origin of mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Wong, G. William; Zhuo, Lisheng; Kimata, Koji; Lam, Bing K.; Satoh, Nori; Stevens, Richard L.

    2014-01-01

    The sentinel roles of mammalian mast cells (MCs) in varied infections raised the question of their evolutionary origin. We discovered that the test cells in the sea squirt Ciona intestinalis morphologically and histochemically resembled cutaneous human MCs. Like the latter, C. intestinalis test cells stored histamine and varied heparin•serine protease complexes in their granules. Moreover, they exocytosed these preformed mediators when exposed to compound 48/80. In support of the histamine data, a C. intestinalis-derived cDNA was isolated that resembled that which encodes histidine decarboxylase in human MCs. Like heparin-expressing mammalian MCs, activated test cells produced prostaglandin D2 and contained cDNAs that encode a protein that resembles the synthase needed for its biosynthesis in human MCs. The accumulated morphological, histochemical, biochemical, and molecular biology data suggest that the test cells in C. intestinalis are the counterparts of mammalian MCs that reside in varied connective tissues. The accumulated data point to an ancient origin of MCs that predates the emergence of the chordates >500 million years ago, well before the development of adaptive immunity. The remarkable conservation of MCs throughout evolution is consistent with their importance in innate immunity. PMID:25094046

  17. Inhibitory effect of putranjivain A on allergic inflammation through suppression of mast cell activation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hui-Hun; Park, Seung-Bin; Lee, Soyoung; Kwon, Taeg Kyu; Shin, Tae-Yong; Park, Pil-Hoon; Lee, Seung-Ho; Kim, Sang-Hyun

    2014-02-01

    A great number of people are suffering from allergic inflammatory disease such as asthma, atopic dermatitis, and sinusitis. Therefore discovery of drugs for the treatment of these diseases is an important subject in human health. Putranjivain A (PJA), member of ellagitannin, is known to possess beneficial effects including anti-cancer and anti-viral activities. The aim of the present study was to elucidate whether PJA modulates the allergic inflammatory reaction and to study its possible mechanisms of action using mast cell-based in vitro and in vivo models. The study was performed in anaphylaxis mouse model and cultured mast cells. PJA inhibited the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in immunoglobulin E-stimulated mast cells. PJA reduced this expression by inhibiting nuclear factor (NF)-κB and nuclear factor of activated T cell. The oral administration of PJA reduced systemic and cutaneous anaphylaxis, the release of serum histamine, and the expression of the histamine H{sub 1} receptor. In addition, PJA attenuated the activation of mast cells. PJA inhibited the release of histamine from various types of mast cells by the suppression of intracellular calcium. The inhibitory activity of PJA on the allergic reaction was similar to that of disodium cromoglycate, a known anti-allergic drug. These results suggest that PJA can facilitate the prevention or treatment of allergic inflammatory diseases mediated by mast cells. - Highlights: • PJA reduced the degranulation of mast cells. • PJA inhibited the production of inflammatory cytokines. • The effect of PJA on allergic reaction was comparable to the DSCG. • PJA might be a candidate for the treatment of allergic inflammatory diseases.

  18. Mast cells exert pro-inflammatory effects of relevance to the pathophyisology of tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction We have previously found an increased mast cell density in tendon biopsies from patients with patellar tendinopathy compared to controls. This study examined the influence of mast cells on basic tenocyte functions, including production of the inflammatory mediator prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), extracellular matrix remodeling and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) gene transcription, and collagen synthesis. Methods Primary human tenocytes were stimulated with an established human mast cell line (HMC-1). Extracellular matrix remodeling was studied by culturing tenocytes in a three-dimensional collagen lattice. Survival/proliferation was assessed with the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium salt (MTS) assay. Levels of mRNA for COX-2, COL1A1, MMP1, and MMP7 were determined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Cox-2 protein level was assessed by Western blot analysis and type I procollagen was detected by immunofluorescent staining. PGE2 levels were determined using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results Mast cells stimulated tenocytes to produce increased levels of COX-2 and the pro-inflammatory mediator PGE2, which in turn decreased COL1A1 mRNA expression. Additionally, mast cells reduced the type I procollagen protein levels produced by tenocytes. Transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) was responsible for the induction of Cox-2 and PGE2 by tenocytes. Mast cells increased MMP1 and MMP7 transcription and increased the contraction of a three-dimensional collagen lattice by tenocytes, a phenomenon which was blocked by a pan-MMP inhibitor (Batimastat). Conclusion Our data demonstrate that mast cell-derived PGE2 reduces collagen synthesis and enhances expression and activities of MMPs in human tenocytes. PMID:24517261

  19. Mast cells and IgE in defense against venoms: Possible "good side" of allergy?

    PubMed

    Galli, Stephen J; Starkl, Philipp; Marichal, Thomas; Tsai, Mindy

    2016-01-01

    Physicians think of mast cells and IgE primarily in the context of allergic disorders, including fatal anaphylaxis. This 'bad side' of mast cells and IgE is so well accepted that it can be difficult to think of them in other contexts, particularly those in which they may have beneficial functions. However, there is evidence that mast cells and IgE, as well as basophils (circulating granulocytes whose functions partially overlap with those of mast cells), can contribute to host defense as components of adaptive type 2 immune responses to helminths, ticks and certain other parasites. Accordingly, allergies often are conceptualized as "misdirected" type 2 immune responses, in which IgE antibodies are produced against any of a diverse group of apparently harmless antigens, as well as against components of animal venoms. Indeed, certain unfortunate patients who have become sensitized to venoms develop severe IgE-associated allergic reactions, including fatal anaphylaxis, upon subsequent venom exposure. In this review, we will describe evidence that mast cells can enhance innate resistance to reptile or arthropod venoms during a first exposure to such venoms. We also will discuss findings indicating that, in mice which survive an initial encounter with venom, acquired type 2 immune responses, IgE antibodies, the high affinity IgE receptor (FcɛRI), and mast cells can contribute to acquired resistance to the lethal effects of both honeybee venom and Russell's viper venom. These findings support the hypothesis that mast cells and IgE can help protect the host against venoms and perhaps other noxious substances. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Mast cells drive mesenteric afferent signalling during acute intestinal ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wen; Kirkup, Anthony J; Grundy, David

    2011-08-01

    mesenteric afferents during acute intestinal ischaemia, whereas enteric reflex mechanisms and cyclooxygenase products contribute primarily to ischaemia-induced changes in intestinal motility. Therefore, targeting mast cells may provide benefits in patients with abdominal pain resulting from an ischaemic insult to the gastrointestinal tract.

  1. Role of the furrow of the proximal colon in the production of soft and hard feces in nutrias, Myocastor coypus.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, T; Sakaguchi, E

    2000-11-01

    The bacterial level of soft feces is higher than that of hard feces in nutrias. This suggests the heterogeneity of bacterial density in the large intestine. To show the heterogeneity of bacteria in the contents of the large intestine in nutrias, we divided the contents of the large intestine into 12 regions, then measured the nitrogen (N), total amino acids (TAA) and diaminopimelic acid (DAP), a bacterial marker, of these regions. Levels of N, TAA and DAP varied along the cross section of the proximal colon. The greater curvature of the main lumen and furrow had higher N, TAA and DAP concentrations than the lesser curvature. We also examined the involvement of the furrow in producing two types of feces differing in bacterial nitrogen content by surgically preventing the flow of the furrow contents. We compared the concentrations of N, TAA and DAP between soft and hard feces among operated, sham-operated and intact animals. Surgical closure of the furrow abolished the difference in levels of N, TAA and DAP between soft and hard feces, suggesting that the furrow of the proximal colon is responsible for making the bacterial density higher in soft feces than in hard feces.

  2. Molecular markers linked to genes important for Hard Winter Wheat production and marketing in the U.S. Great Plains

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Biotic stresses including diseases [leaf, stem and stripe rusts, and wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV)] and insects [greenbug (GB), Hessian fly (Hf), Russian wheat aphid (RWA) and wheat curl mite (WCM)] significantly affect grain yield and end-use quality of hard winter wheat (HWW, Triticum aestivum ...

  3. Signal transduction and chemotaxis in mast cells.

    PubMed

    Draber, Petr; Halova, Ivana; Polakovicova, Iva; Kawakami, Toshiaki

    2016-05-05

    Mast cells play crucial roles in both innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. Along with basophils, mast cells are essential effector cells for allergic inflammation that causes asthma, allergic rhinitis, food allergy and atopic dermatitis. Mast cells are usually increased in inflammatory sites of allergy and, upon activation, release various chemical, lipid, peptide and protein mediators of allergic reactions. Since antigen/immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated activation of these cells is a central event to trigger allergic reactions, innumerable studies have been conducted on how these cells are activated through cross-linking of the high-affinity IgE receptor (FcεRI). Development of mature mast cells from their progenitor cells is under the influence of several growth factors, of which the stem cell factor (SCF) seems to be the most important. Therefore, how SCF induces mast cell development and activation via its receptor, KIT, has been studied extensively, including a cross-talk between KIT and FcεRI signaling pathways. Although our understanding of the signaling mechanisms of the FcεRI and KIT pathways is far from complete, pharmaceutical applications of the knowledge about these pathways are underway. This review will focus on recent progresses in FcεRI and KIT signaling and chemotaxis.

  4. Mast cell-orchestrated immunity to pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Soman N.; St John, Ashley L.

    2015-01-01

    Although mast cells were discovered more than a century ago, their functions beyond their role in allergic responses remained elusive until recently. However, there is a growing appreciation that an important physiological function of these cells is the recognition of pathogens and modulation of appropriate immune responses. Because of their ability to instantly release several pro-inflammatory mediators from intracellular stores and their location at the host–environment interface, mast cells have been shown to be crucial for optimal immune responses during infection. Mast cells seem to exert these effects by altering the inflammatory environment after detection of a pathogen and by mobilizing various immune cells to the site of infection and to draining lymph nodes. Interestingly, the character and timing of these responses can vary depending on the type of pathogen stimulus, location of pathogen recognition and sensitization state of the responding mast cells. Recent studies using mast cell activators as effective vaccine adjuvants show the potential of harnessing these cells to confer protective immunity against microbial pathogens. PMID:20498670

  5. Signal transduction and chemotaxis in mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Draber, Petr; Halova, Ivana; Polakovicova, Iva; Kawakami, Toshiaki

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells play crucial roles in both innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. Along with basophils, mast cells are essential effector cells for allergic inflammation that causes asthma, allergic rhinitis, food allergy and atopic dermatitis. Mast cells are usually increased in inflammatory sites of allergy and, upon activation, release various chemical, lipid, peptide and protein mediators of allergic reactions. Since antigen/immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated activation of these cells is a central event to trigger allergic reactions, innumerable studies have been conducted on how these cells are activated through cross-linking of the high-affinity IgE receptor (FcεRI). Development of mature mast cells from their progenitor cells is under the influence of several growth factors, of which the stem cell factor (SCF) seems to be the most important. Therefore, how SCF induces mast cell development and activation via its receptor, KIT, has been studied extensively, including a cross-talk between KIT and FcεRI signaling pathways. Although our understanding of the signaling mechanisms of the FcεRI and KIT pathways is far from complete, pharmaceutical applications of the knowledge about these pathways are underway. This review will focus on recent progresses in FcεRI and KIT signaling and chemotaxis. PMID:25941081

  6. Vaccine adjuvants: Tailor-made mast-cell granules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunzer, Matthias

    2012-03-01

    Mast cells induce protective immune responses through secretion of stimulatory granules. Microparticles modelled after mast-cell granules are now shown to replicate and enhance the functions of their natural counterparts and to direct the character of the resulting immunity.

  7. The emerging role of mast cells in liver disease.

    PubMed

    Jarido, Veronica; Kennedy, Lindsey; Hargrove, Laura; Demieville, Jennifer; Thomson, Joanne; Stephenson, Kristen; Francis, Heather

    2017-08-01

    The depth of our knowledge regarding mast cells has widened exponentially in the last 20 years. Once thought to be only important for allergy-mediated events, mast cells are now recognized to be important regulators of a number of pathological processes. The revelation that mast cells can influence organs, tissues, and cells has increased interest in mast cell research during liver disease. The purpose of this review is to refresh the reader's knowledge of the development, type, and location of mast cells and to review recent work that demonstrates the role of hepatic mast cells during diseased states. This review focuses primarily on liver diseases and mast cells during autoimmune disease, hepatitis, fatty liver disease, liver cancer, and aging in the liver. Overall, these studies demonstrate the potential role of mast cells in disease progression.

  8. Extendable mast used in one shot soil penetrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hotz, G. M.; Howard, G. A.

    1966-01-01

    Penetrometer to test soil characteristics has a piercing head with soil instrumentation equipment attached to an expandable mast actuated by compressed air. The penetrometer gives continuous measurements as the mast pushes the piercing head through the soil.

  9. Arm and Mast of NASA Mars Rover Curiosity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-04-06

    The arm and the remote sensing mast of the Mars rover Curiosity each carry science instruments and other tools for NASA Mars Science Laboratory mission. This image shows the arm on the left and the mast just right of center.

  10. Mast cells in the human alveolar wall: an electronmicroscopic study.

    PubMed Central

    Fox, B; Bull, T B; Guz, A

    1981-01-01

    Mast cells were identified by electronmicroscopy in the alveolar wall of the lung in 20 subjects (10 normal, 10 abnormal). A quantitative and qualitative study was made of the mast cells. In the normal lung there was an average concentration of 350 mast cells/mm2 of alveolar wall and in the abnormal 523/mm2. Mast cells occupied approximately 1.6-2.1% of the area of the alveolar wall. There was marked variation in the structure of the mast cell granules but no differences between those in the normal and abnormal lungs. There was evidence that constant degranulation of mast cells may be occurring in the lung. The role that alveolar mast cells may play in the vasoconstrictor response to alveolar hypoxia is discussed. It is suggested that the tachypnoea present in asthma may partly be due to release of mediators from sensitised mast cells within the alveolar wall. Images PMID:7328180

  11. Effect of Omegaven on mast cell concentration in diabetic wound healing.

    PubMed

    Babaei, Saeid; Ansarihadipour, Hadi; Nakhaei, Mahmoodreza; Darabi, Mohammadreza; Bayat, Parvindokht; Sakhaei, Mohammadhassan; Baazm, Maryam; Mohammadhoseiny, Atefe

    2017-05-01

    Diabetic wound healing is a complicated process. In all over the world 15% of 200 million diabetic people suffer from diabetic foot problems. Mast cells are known to participate in three phases of wound healing: the inflammatory reaction, angiogenesis and extracellular-matrix reabsorption. The inflammatory reaction is mediated by released histamine and arachidonic acid metabolites. Omega-3 fatty acids alter proinflammatory cytokine production during wound healing which affects the presence of inflammatory cells in wound area as well, but how this events specifically influences the presence of mast cells in wound healing is not clearly understood. This study is conducted to determine the effect of Omegaven, eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic (DHA) on pattern of presence of mast cells in diabetic wound area. Diabetic male wistar rats were euthanized at 1, 3, 5, 7 and 15 days after the excision was made. To estimate the number of mast cells histological sections were provided from wound area and stained with toluidine blue. In this relation wound area (8400 microscopic field, 45.69 mm(2)) were examined by stereological methods by light microscope. We found that comparing experimental and control group, omega-3 fatty acids significantly decreased wound area in day 7 and also the number of grade three mast cells in day 3 and 5. We also found that wound strength has significantly increased in experimental group at day 15. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Association between perfluorooctanoic acid exposure and degranulation of mast cells in allergic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun-Kyoung; Lee, Soyoung; Baek, Moon-Chang; Lee, Byung-Heon; Lee, Hyun-Shik; Kwon, Taeg Kyu; Park, Pil-Hoon; Shin, Tae-Yong; Khang, Dongwoo; Kim, Sang-Hyun

    2017-05-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) has wide applications, including as a raw material for converted paper and packaging products. With the widespread use of PFOA, concerns regarding its potential environmental and health impacts have increased. In spite of the known hepatotoxicity and genotoxicity of PFOA, correlation with PFOA and allergic inflammation is not well known. In this study, the effect of PFOA on the degranulation of mast cells and mast cell-mediated allergic inflammation in the presence of FcεRI cross-linking was evaluated. In immunoglobulin (Ig) E-stimulated mast cells, PFOA increased the release of histamine and β-hexosaminidase by the up-regulation of intracellular calcium levels. PFOA enhanced gene expression of several pro-inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and IL-8 by the activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB in IgE-stimulated mast cells. Also, PFOA exacerbated allergic symptoms via hypothermia, and an increase of serum histamine, TNF-α, IgE and IgG1 in the ovalbumin-induced systemic anaphylaxis. The present data indicate that PFOA aggravated FcɛRI-mediated mast cell degranulation and allergic symptoms. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Expression of Mast Cell Proteases Correlates with Mast Cell Maturation and Angiogenesis during Tumor Progression

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Devandir Antonio; Toso, Vanina Danuza; Campos, Maria Rita de Cássia; Lara, Vanessa Soares; Oliver, Constance; Jamur, Maria Célia

    2012-01-01

    Tumor cells are surrounded by infiltrating inflammatory cells, such as lymphocytes, neutrophils, macrophages, and mast cells. A body of evidence indicates that mast cells are associated with various types of tumors. Although role of mast cells can be directly related to their granule content, their function in angiogenesis and tumor progression remains obscure. This study aims to understand the role of mast cells in these processes. Tumors were chemically induced in BALB/c mice and tumor progression was divided into Phases I, II and III. Phase I tumors exhibited a large number of mast cells, which increased in phase II and remained unchanged in phase III. The expression of mouse mast cell protease (mMCP)-4, mMCP-5, mMCP-6, mMCP-7, and carboxypeptidase A were analyzed at the 3 stages. Our results show that with the exception of mMCP-4 expression of these mast cell chymase (mMCP-5), tryptases (mMCP-6 and 7), and carboxypeptidase A (mMC-CPA) increased during tumor progression. Chymase and tryptase activity increased at all stages of tumor progression whereas the number of mast cells remained constant from phase II to III. The number of new blood vessels increased significantly in phase I, while in phases II and III an enlargement of existing blood vessels occurred. In vitro, mMCP-6 and 7 are able to induce vessel formation. The present study suggests that mast cells are involved in induction of angiogenesis in the early stages of tumor development and in modulating blood vessel growth in the later stages of tumor progression. PMID:22815822

  14. Production of a magnetic material with the ability to change from very soft to semi-hard magnetic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Sharma, Parmanand; Yodoshi, Noriharu; Makino, Akihiro

    2015-05-01

    Development and magnetic properties of an alloy that can change from very soft to semi-hard magnetic are reported. We found that as quenched ribbons of Fe75.3Pt8B12P4Cu0.7 alloy are amorphous by X-ray. Heat treatment in the temperature range of 400-450 °C causes formation of many α-Fe grains in the amorphous matrix. Hard magnetic L10 FePt grains appear at ˜520 °C. This alloy shows a high saturation magnetic flux density [Bs (≈ Ms) > 1.55 T] along with the ability to vary coercivity (Hc) from ˜25 A/m to 11 000 A/m. The Hc can be increased further to more than 21 000 A/m, but at the expense of a significant decrease in Bs. The ability to control magnetic properties lies in a precise control over the soft and hard magnetic phases, which are strongly exchange coupled.

  15. Mast Cell-Mediated Mechanisms of Nociception

    PubMed Central

    Aich, Anupam; Afrin, Lawrence B.; Gupta, Kalpna

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells are tissue-resident immune cells that release immuno-modulators, chemo-attractants, vasoactive compounds, neuropeptides and growth factors in response to allergens and pathogens constituting a first line of host defense. The neuroimmune interface of immune cells modulating synaptic responses has been of increasing interest, and mast cells have been proposed as key players in orchestrating inflammation-associated pain pathobiology due to their proximity to both vasculature and nerve fibers. Molecular underpinnings of mast cell-mediated pain can be disease-specific. Understanding such mechanisms is critical for developing disease-specific targeted therapeutics to improve analgesic outcomes. We review molecular mechanisms that may contribute to nociception in a disease-specific manner. PMID:26690128

  16. Mast Cell-Mediated Mechanisms of Nociception.

    PubMed

    Aich, Anupam; Afrin, Lawrence B; Gupta, Kalpna

    2015-12-04

    Mast cells are tissue-resident immune cells that release immuno-modulators, chemo-attractants, vasoactive compounds, neuropeptides and growth factors in response to allergens and pathogens constituting a first line of host defense. The neuroimmune interface of immune cells modulating synaptic responses has been of increasing interest, and mast cells have been proposed as key players in orchestrating inflammation-associated pain pathobiology due to their proximity to both vasculature and nerve fibers. Molecular underpinnings of mast cell-mediated pain can be disease-specific. Understanding such mechanisms is critical for developing disease-specific targeted therapeutics to improve analgesic outcomes. We review molecular mechanisms that may contribute to nociception in a disease-specific manner.

  17. Mast cell activation syndrome: Proposed diagnostic criteria.

    PubMed

    Akin, Cem; Valent, Peter; Metcalfe, Dean D

    2010-12-01

    The term mast cell activation syndrome (MCAS) is finding increasing use as a diagnosis for subjects who present with signs and symptoms involving the dermis, gastrointestinal track, and cardiovascular system frequently accompanied by neurologic complaints. Such patients often have undergone multiple extensive medical evaluations by different physicians in varied disciplines without a definitive medical diagnosis until the diagnosis of MCAS is applied. However, MCAS as a distinct clinical entity has not been generally accepted, nor do there exist definitive criteria for diagnosis. Based on current understanding of this disease "syndrome" and on what we do know about mast cell activation and resulting pathology, we will explore and propose criteria for its diagnosis. The proposed criteria will be discussed in the context of other disorders involving mast cells or with similar presentations and as a basis for further scientific study and validation.

  18. Effect of disodium cromoglycate on mast cell-mediated immediate-type allergic reactions.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hye-Young; Kim, Jung-Sook; An, Nyeon-Hyoung; Park, Rae-Kil; Kim, Hyung-Min

    2004-04-23

    We investigated the effect of disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) on mast cell-mediated immediate-type hypersensitivity. DSCG inhibited systemic allergic reaction induced by compound 48/80 dose-dependently. Passive cutaneous anaphylaxis was inhibited by 71.6% by oral administration of DSCG (1 g/kg). When DSCG was pretreated at concentration rang from 0.01-1000 g/kg, the serum histamine levels were reduced in a dose dependent manner. DSCG also significantly inhibited histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cell (RPMC) by compound 48/80. We confirmed that DSCG inhibited compound 48/80-induced degranulation of RPMC by alcian blue/nuclear fast red staining. In addition, DSCG showed a significant inhibitory effect on anti-dinitrophenyl IgE-mediated tumor necrosis factor-alpha production. These results indicate that DSCG inhibits mast cell-mediated immediate-type allergic reaction.

  19. Insights into mast cell functions in asthma using mouse models.

    PubMed

    Lei, Ying; Gregory, Joshua A; Nilsson, Gunnar P; Adner, Mikael

    2013-10-01

    Therapeutics targeting specific mechanisms of asthma have shown promising results in mouse models of asthma. However, these successes have not transferred well to the clinic or to the treatment of asthma sufferers. We suggest a reason for this incongruity is that mast cell-dependent responses, which may play an important role in the pathogenesis of both atopic and non-atopic asthma, are not a key component in most of the current asthma mouse models. Two reasons for this are that wild type mice have, in contrast to humans, a negligible number of mast cells localized in the smaller airways and in the parenchyma, and that only specific protocols show mast cell-dependent reactions. The development of mast cell-deficient mice and the reconstitution of mast cells within these mice have opened up the possibility to generate mouse models of asthma with a marked role of mast cells. In addition, mast cell-deficient mice engrafted with mast cells have a distribution of mast cells more similar to humans. In this article we review and highlight the mast cell-dependent and -independent responses with respect to airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation in asthma models using mast cell-deficient and mast cell-engrafted mice.

  20. The Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test (MAST): A Statistical Validation Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laux, John M.; Newman, Isadore; Brown, Russ

    2004-01-01

    This study extends the Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test (MAST; M. L. Selzer, 1971) literature base by examining 4 issues related to the validity of the MAST scores. Specifically, the authors examine the validity of the MAST scores in light of the presence of impression management, participant demographic variables, and item endorsement…

  1. 43. TOP PART OF UMBILICAL MAST, NORTH AND WEST SIDES. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. TOP PART OF UMBILICAL MAST, NORTH AND WEST SIDES. AIR CONDITIONING DUCTING IS VISIBLE ON INTERIOR OF MAST. RAIL IS VISIBLE LEFT OF THE MAST. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  2. 53. VIEW FROM FLOOR OF MAST TRENCH SHOWING BASE OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    53. VIEW FROM FLOOR OF MAST TRENCH SHOWING BASE OF ERECT UMBILICAL MAST. AIR-CONDITIONING DUCTS VISIBLE ON RIGHT SIDE OF MAST. HYDRAULIC ACTUATOR ARMS FOR OPENING TRENCH DOORS VISIBLE ON LEFT SIDE OF PHOTO. 'DOOR STOP' PEDESTAL IN FOREGROUND. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 West, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  3. The Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test (MAST): A Statistical Validation Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laux, John M.; Newman, Isadore; Brown, Russ

    2004-01-01

    This study extends the Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test (MAST; M. L. Selzer, 1971) literature base by examining 4 issues related to the validity of the MAST scores. Specifically, the authors examine the validity of the MAST scores in light of the presence of impression management, participant demographic variables, and item endorsement…

  4. Pavlovian Conditioning of Rat Mucosal Mast Cells to Secrete Rat Mast Cell Protease II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacQueen, Glenda; Marshall, Jean; Perdue, Mary; Siegel, Shepard; Bienenstock, John

    1989-01-01

    Antigen (egg albumin) injections, which stimulate mucosal mast cells to secrete mediators, were paired with an audiovisual cue. After reexposure to the audiovisual cue, a mediator (rat mast cell protease II) was measured with a sensitive and specific assay. Animals reexposed to only the audiovisual cue released a quantity of protease not significantly different from animals reexposed to both the cue and the antigen; these groups released significantly more protease than animals that had received the cue and antigen in a noncontingent manner. The results support a role for the central nervous system as a functional effector of mast cell function in the allergic state.

  5. Association of mast cells with calcification in the human pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Maślińska, Danuta; Laure-Kamionowska, Milena; Deręgowski, Krzysztof; Maśliński, Sławomir

    2010-01-01

    advanced stages of calcification. Our results lead to the conclusion that the tryptase mast cells play a major role in the pineal calcification process as sites where this process starts and as a source of production of numerous biologically active substances including tryptase that participate in calcification.

  6. Interleukin 3-dependent and -independent mast cells stimulated with IgE and antigen express multiple cytokines

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    In response to IgE and specific multivalent antigen, mast cell lines (both growth factor-dependent and -independent) induce the transcription and/or secretion of a number of cytokines having a wide spectrum of activities. We have identified IL-1, IL-3, IL-5, IL-6, IFN- gamma, GM-CSF, JE, MIP1 alpha, MIP1 beta, and TCA3 RNA in at least two of four mast cell clones. The production of these products (except JE) is activation-associated and can be induced by IgE plus antigen. In selected instances cytokine expression can also be induced by activation with Con A or phorbol ester plus ionophore, albeit to levels less than those observed with IgE plus antigen. In addition, long-term mast cell clones and primary cultures of bone marrow-derived mast cells specifically release IL-1, IL-4, and/or IL-6 bioactivity after activation. These findings suggest that in addition to their inflammatory effector function mast cells may serve as a source of growth and regulatory factors. The relationship of mast cells to cells of the T lymphocyte lineage is discussed. PMID:2473161

  7. Revisiting the roles of mast cells in allergic rhinitis and its relation to local IgE synthesis.

    PubMed

    Pawankar, R; Yamagishi, S; Yagi, T

    2000-01-01

    Mast cells are important effector cells in the immediate-phase allergic reaction. However, in recent years much evidence has accumulated on the versatile role of mast cells in allergic inflammation. The present article is an overview of the roles of mast cells in allergic inflammation, especially in light of the local production of IgE and the IgE-IgE receptor network. Although both nasal mast cells (NMC) and T cells in allergic rhinitics are important sources of Th2-type cytokines like IL-4 and IL-13, and can induce IgE synthesis, we report here that antigen-activated NMC can secrete greater levels of IL-4/IL-13 and induce increased levels of IgE synthesis than antigen-activated nasal T cells. Furthermore, IgE production can occur locally in the nasal mucosa (target organ) and IgE itself can enhance the Fc epsilon RI expression and subsequent mediator release from NMC, thus contributing to the perpetuation of on-going allergic inflammation. Again, mast cells can contribute to the late-phase allergic reaction not only via the upregulation of adhesion molecules like VCAM-1, but also through the interactions of NMC with the extracellular matrix proteins, and interaction of NMC with nasal epithelial cells (NEC). Thus, it is increasingly evident that mast cells are not only important for the genesis of the allergic reaction, but also contribute to the late-phase allergic reaction and on-going allergic inflammation.

  8. Extendable retractable telescopic mast for deployable structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, M.; Aguirre, M.

    1986-01-01

    The Extendable and Retractable Mast (ERM) which is presently developed by Dornier in the frame of an ESA-contract, will be used to deploy and retract large foldable structures. The design is based on a telescopic carbon-fiber structure with high stiffness, strength and pointing accuracy. To verify the chosen design, a breadboard model of an ERM was built and tested under thermal vacuum (TV)-conditions. It is planned as a follow-on development to manufacture and test an Engineering Model Mast. The Engineering Model will be used to establish the basis for an ERM-family covering a wide range of requirements.

  9. VEGF secretion during hypoxia depends on free radicals-induced Fyn kinase activity in mast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Roman, Jonathan; Ibarra-Sanchez, Alfredo; Lamas, Monica; Gonzalez Espinosa, Claudia

    2010-10-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) secrete functional VEGF but do not degranulate after Cobalt chloride-induced hypoxia. {yields} CoCl{sub 2}-induced VEGF secretion in mast cells occurs by a Ca{sup 2+}-insensitive but brefeldin A and Tetanus toxin-sensitive mechanism. {yields} Trolox and N-acetylcysteine inhibit hypoxia-induced VEGF secretion but only Trolox inhibits Fc{epsilon}RI-dependent anaphylactic degranulation in mast cells. {yields} Src family kinase Fyn activation after free radical production is necessary for hypoxia-induced VEGF secretion in mast cells. -- Abstract: Mast cells (MC) have an important role in pathologic conditions such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), where hypoxia conduce to deleterious inflammatory response. MC contribute to hypoxia-induced angiogenesis producing factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), but the mechanisms behind the control of hypoxia-induced VEGF secretion in this cell type is poorly understood. We used the hypoxia-mimicking agent cobalt chloride (CoCl{sub 2}) to analyze VEGF secretion in murine bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs). We found that CoCl{sub 2} promotes a sustained production of functional VEGF, able to induce proliferation of endothelial cells in vitro. CoCl{sub 2}-induced VEGF secretion was independent of calcium rise but dependent on tetanus toxin-sensitive vesicle-associated membrane proteins (VAMPs). VEGF exocytosis required free radicals formation and the activation of Src family kinases. Interestingly, an important deficiency on CoCl{sub 2}-induced VEGF secretion was observed in Fyn kinase-deficient BMMCs. Moreover, Fyn kinase was activated by CoCl{sub 2} in WT cells and this activation was prevented by treatment with antioxidants such as Trolox and N-acetylcysteine. Our results show that BMMCs are able to release VEGF under hypoxic conditions through a tetanus toxin-sensitive mechanism, promoted by free radicals

  10. Myeloid derived suppressor cells enhance IgE-mediated mast cell responses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We previously demonstrated that enhanced development of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC) in ADAM10 transgenic mice yielded resistance to infection with Nippostrongylus brasiliensis infection, and that co-culturing MDSC with IgE-activated mast cells enhanced cytokine production. In the current...

  11. Evolutionary drivers of mast-seeding in a long-lived desert shrub

    Treesearch

    Susan E. Meyer; Burton K. Pendleton

    2015-01-01

    Patterns of reproductive output in blackbrush did not track current growing season precipitation, but instead were regulated by prior-year weather cues. The strength of the response to the masting cue depended on habitat quality, with higher mean reproductive output, shorter intervals between years of high seed production, and lower CVp at more favorable sites...

  12. Activation‑induced upregulation of MMP9 in mast cells is a positive feedback mediator for mast cell activation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lin; Cai, Zhijian; Yang, Fei; Chen, Ming

    2017-04-01

    Activated mast cells are involved in the pathogenesis of allergic rhinitis (AR). As a member of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family, MMP9 has been previously demonstrated act in a pro‑inflammatory manner. Mast cells regulate the activity of MMP9, and mast cells themselves have been reported to produce MMP9. However, to the best of our knowledge, the involvement of MMP9 in mast cell activation remains to be elucidated. The present study demonstrated an upregulation of MMP9 protein and mRNA expression levels in mast cells activated by phorbol ester and ionomycin. Phosphorylated ERK and AKT protein levels also markedly increased in activated mast cells, and inhibition of the ERK and AKT signaling pathways prevented the increase of MMP9 in activated mast cells. MMP9 was demonstrated to be involved in mast cell activation, since inhibition of MMP9 activity or expression inhibited mast cell activation. Furthermore, IL‑4 treatment reduced MMP9 upregulation in activated mast cells, and interference with IL‑4 signaling with an IL‑4 neutralizing antibody promoted MMP9 upregulation in activated mast cells. These results revealed a novel MMP9‑mediated mechanism underlying mast cell activation, thus providing novel ideas for AR therapy.

  13. Mast Cell: A Multi-Functional Master Cell

    PubMed Central

    Krystel-Whittemore, Melissa; Dileepan, Kottarappat N.; Wood, John G.

    2016-01-01

    Mast cells are immune cells of the myeloid lineage and are present in connective tissues throughout the body. The activation and degranulation of mast cells significantly modulates many aspects of physiological and pathological conditions in various settings. With respect to normal physiological functions, mast cells are known to regulate vasodilation, vascular homeostasis, innate and adaptive immune responses, angiogenesis, and venom detoxification. On the other hand, mast cells have also been implicated in the pathophysiology of many diseases, including allergy, asthma, anaphylaxis, gastrointestinal disorders, many types of malignancies, and cardiovascular diseases. This review summarizes the current understanding of the role of mast cells in many pathophysiological conditions. PMID:26779180

  14. Mast cells in airway diseases and interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Cruse, Glenn; Bradding, Peter

    2016-05-05

    Mast cells are major effector cells of inflammation and there is strong evidence that mast cells play a significant role in asthma pathophysiology. There is also a growing body of evidence that mast cells contribute to other inflammatory and fibrotic lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. This review discusses the role that mast cells play in airway diseases and highlights how mast cell microlocalisation within specific lung compartments and their cellular interactions are likely to be critical for their effector function in disease.

  15. Microscopy assays for evaluation of mast cell migration and chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Bambousková, Monika; Hájková, Zuzana; Dráber, Pavel; Dráber, Petr

    2014-01-01

    A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms leading to mast cell migration and chemotaxis is the long-term goal in mast cell research and is essential for comprehension of mast cell function in health and disease. Various techniques have been developed in recent decades for in vitro and in vivo assessment of mast cell motility and chemotaxis. In this chapter three microscopy assays facilitating real-time quantification of mast cell chemotaxis and migration are described, focusing on individual cell tracking and data analysis.

  16. Probing the Small- x Gluon Tomography in Correlated Hard Diffractive Dijet Production in Deep Inelastic Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Hatta, Yoshitaka; Xiao, Bo-Wen; Yuan, Feng

    2016-05-20

    The close connection between the quantum phase space Wigner distribution of small-x gluons and the color dipole scattering amplitude is investigated, and studying it experimentally is proposed in the hard diffractive dijet production at the planned electron-ion collider. The angular correlation between the nucleon recoiled momentum and the dijet transverse momentum probes the nontrivial correlation in the phase space Wigner distribution. This experimental study not only provides three-dimensional tomographic pictures of gluons inside high energy protons - it gives a unique and interesting signal for the small-x dynamics with QCD evolution effects.

  17. iMAST Quarterly, Number 3, 2000

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-01

    imast.html NAVY PROGRAM MANAGER James G. Mattern (703) 602-9570 ext. 453 matternjg@navsea.navy.mil ©2000. The iMAST quarterly newsletter is published...and Technology Conference hosted by the U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory at Wright- Patterson Air Force Base was held recently at the Dayton Convention

  18. Mast fruiting and seedling survival of the ectomycorrhizal, monodominant Dicymbe corymbosa (Caesalpiniaceae) in Guyana.

    PubMed

    Henkel, Terry W; Mayor, Jordan R; Woolley, Lance P

    2005-08-01

    In Guyana, we investigated seed output, and resulting seedling establishment and survival, during a 'mast' year, by the ectomycorrhizal, monodominant rainforest canopy tree Dicymbe corymbosa (Caesalpiniaceae), a species with high, synchronous seed production at intermittent years. By utilizing seed traps, the mast seed output, predation, carbon and mineral investment, and masting synchrony were quantified in 2003 in primary D. corymbosa forests. Establishment of seedling cohorts was monitored, and climatic conditions associated with masting were assessed. During 2003, D. corymbosa in the Pakaraima Mountains exhibited high, synchronous seed production with low dispersal and predation. Investment in reproductive biomass was large relative to that in other tropical forests. Recent D. corymbosa reproductive events followed El Nino-induced droughts, with little intervening seed production. Over 12 months, 40% of the 2003 seedling cohort survived. Our results suggest that D. corymbosa has a strongly bimodal fruiting pattern that allows the establishment of a large seedling bank, facilitating persistent monodominance. Resource investment in large seed crops may depend on mineral recycling via ectomycorrhizas, coupled with the reallocation of carbon from vegetative maintenance.

  19. Mast cells mediate neutrophil recruitment during atherosclerotic plaque progression.

    PubMed

    Wezel, Anouk; Lagraauw, H Maxime; van der Velden, Daniël; de Jager, Saskia C A; Quax, Paul H A; Kuiper, Johan; Bot, Ilze

    2015-08-01

    Activated mast cells have been identified in the intima and perivascular tissue of human atherosclerotic plaques. As mast cells have been described to release a number of chemokines that mediate leukocyte fluxes, we propose that activated mast cells may play a pivotal role in leukocyte recruitment during atherosclerotic plaque progression. Systemic IgE-mediated mast cell activation in apoE(-/-)μMT mice resulted in an increase in atherosclerotic lesion size as compared to control mice, and interestingly, the number of neutrophils was highly increased in these lesions. In addition, peritoneal mast cell activation led to a massive neutrophil influx into the peritoneal cavity in C57Bl6 mice, whereas neutrophil numbers in mast cell deficient Kit(W(-sh)/W(-sh)) mice were not affected. Within the newly recruited neutrophil population, increased levels of CXCR2(+) and CXCR4(+) neutrophils were observed after mast cell activation. Indeed, mast cells were seen to contain and release CXCL1 and CXCL12, the ligands for CXCR2 and CXCR4. Intriguingly, peritoneal mast cell activation in combination with anti-CXCR2 receptor antagonist resulted in decreased neutrophil recruitment, thus establishing a prominent role for the CXCL1/CXCR2 axis in mast cell-mediated neutrophil recruitment. Our data suggest that chemokines, and in particular CXCL1, released from activated mast cells induce neutrophil recruitment to the site of inflammation, thereby aggravating the ongoing inflammatory response and thus affecting plaque progression and destabilization. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Mast Cells Synthesize, Store, and Release Nerve Growth Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leon, A.; Buriani, A.; dal Toso, R.; Fabris, M.; Romanello, S.; Aloe, L.; Levi-Montalcini, R.

    1994-04-01

    Mast cells and nerve growth factor (NGF) have both been reported to be involved in neuroimmune interactions and tissue inflammation. In many peripheral tissues, mast cells interact with the innervating fibers. Changes in the behaviors of both of these elements occur after tissue injury/inflammation. As such conditions are typically associated with rapid mast cell activation and NGF accumulation in inflammatory exudates, we hypothesized that mast cells may be capable of producing NGF. Here we report that (i) NGF mRNA is expressed in adult rat peritoneal mast cells; (ii) anti-NGF antibodies clearly stain vesicular compartments of purified mast cells and mast cells in histological sections of adult rodent mesenchymal tissues; and (iii) medium conditioned by peritoneal mast cells contains biologically active NGF. Mast cells thus represent a newly recognized source of NGF. The known actions of NGF on peripheral nerve fibers and immune cells suggest that mast cell-derived NGF may control adaptive/reactive responses of the nervous and immune systems toward noxious tissue perturbations. Conversely, alterations in normal mast cell behaviors may provoke maladaptive neuroimmune tissue responses whose consequences could have profound implications in inflammatory disease states, including those of an autoimmune nature.

  1. P2 receptor-mediated signaling in mast cell biology.

    PubMed

    Bulanova, Elena; Bulfone-Paus, Silvia

    2010-03-01

    Mast cells are widely recognized as effector cells of allergic inflammatory reactions. They contribute to the pathogenesis of different chronic inflammatory diseases, wound healing, fibrosis, thrombosis/fibrinolysis, and anti-tumor immune responses. In this paper, we summarized the role of P2X and P2Y receptors in mast cell activation and effector functions. Mast cells are an abundant source of ATP which is stored in their granules and secreted upon activation. We discuss the contribution of mast cells to the extracellular ATP release and to the maintenance of extracellular nucleotides pool. Recent publications highlight the importance of purinergic signaling for the pathogenesis of chronic airway inflammation. Therefore, the role of ATP and P2 receptors in allergic inflammation with focus on mast cells was analyzed. Finally, ATP functions as mast cell autocrine/paracrine factor and as messenger in intercellular communication between mast cells, nerves, and glia in the central nervous system.

  2. Marker Sequential Test (MaST) design.

    PubMed

    Freidlin, Boris; Korn, Edward L; Gray, Robert

    2014-02-01

    New targeted anticancer therapies often benefit only a subset of patients with a given cancer. Definitive evaluation of these agents may require phase III randomized clinical trial designs that integrate evaluation of the new treatment and the predictive ability of the biomarker that putatively determines the sensitive subset. We propose a new integrated biomarker design, the Marker Sequential Test (MaST) design, that allows sequential testing of the treatment effect in the biomarker subgroups and overall population while controlling the relevant type I error rates. After defining the testing and error framework for integrated biomarker designs, we review the commonly used approaches to integrated biomarker testing. We then present a general form of the MaST design and describe how it can be used to provide proper control of false-positive error rates for biomarker-positive and biomarker-negative subgroups. The operating characteristics of the MaST design are compared by analytical methods and simulations to the sequential subgroup-specific design that sequentially assesses the treatment effect in the biomarker subgroups. Practical aspects of MaST design implementation are discussed. The MaST design is shown to have higher power relative to the sequential subgroup-specific design in situations where the treatment effect is homogeneous across biomarker subgroups, while preserving the power for settings where treatment benefit is limited to biomarker-positive subgroup. For example, in the time-to-event setting considered with 30% biomarker-positive prevalence, the MaST design provides up to a 30% increase in power in the biomarker-positive and biomarker-negative subgroups when the treatment benefits all patients equally, while sustaining less than a 2% loss of power against alternatives where the benefit is limited to the biomarker-positive subgroup. The proposed design is appropriate for settings where it is reasonable to assume that the treatment will not be

  3. Further studies on the effect of nitrogen dioxide on mast cells: The effect of the metabolite, nitrite

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimaki, Hidekazu ); Ozawa, Masashi ); Bissonnette, E.; Befus, A.D. )

    1993-05-01

    To evaluate the relationship between atmospheric nitrogen dioxide exposure and the development of allergic diseases, the effects of nitrite as a chemical product of inhaled nitrogen dioxide on mast cell functions were investigated. We have studied nitride-induced histamine release from two functionally distinct mast cell populations, namely peritoneal mast cells (PMC) and intestinal mucosal mast cells (IMMC) of Nippostrongylus brasiliensis-infected rats. High concentrations of nitrite alone (10, 20, and 50 mM) induced histamine release from IMMC, but not from PMC. Moreover, histamine release from PMC and IMMC stimulated with sensitizing antigen was significantly enhanced by pretreatment with 50 mM nitrite or nitrate. No differences in histamine release from nitrite-treated and control PMC were seen below 1 mM. To investigate the effect of nitrite on tumor cell cytotoxic activity, PMC were incubated with various concentrations of nitrite. Pretreatment with 5 and 50 mM nitrite markedly depressed tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-[alpha]-dependent natural cytotoxicity of PMC for the tumor target WEHI-164. Thus, high concentrations of nitrite enhanced mast cell histamine release, but depressed TNF-[alpha]-dependent cytotoxicity. However, low concentrations of nitrite (<1 mM) that would normally be produced by short-term atmospheric exposure to nitrogen dioxide may have no significant effects on mast cell functions. 27 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Lipid mediator metabolic profiling demonstrates differences in eicosanoid patterns in two phenotypically distinct mast cell populations[S

    PubMed Central

    Lundström, Susanna L.; Saluja, Rohit; Adner, Mikael; Haeggström, Jesper Z.; Nilsson, Gunnar; Wheelock, Craig E.

    2013-01-01

    Mast cells are inflammatory cells that play key roles in health and disease. They are distributed in all tissues and appear in two main phenotypes, connective tissue and mucosal mast cells, with differing capacities to release inflammatory mediators. A metabolic profiling approach was used to obtain a more comprehensive understanding of the ability of mast cell phenotypes to produce eicosanoids and other lipid mediators. A total of 90 lipid mediators (oxylipins) were characterized using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), representing the cyclooxygenase (COX), lipoxygenase (LO), and cytochrome P450 (CYP) metabolic pathways. In vitro-derived murine mucosal-like mast cells (MLMC) and connective tissue-like mast cells (CTLMC) exhibited distinct mRNA expression patterns of enzymes involved in oxylipin biosynthesis. Oxylipins produced by 5-LO and COX pathways were the predominant species in both phenotypes, with 5-LO products constituting 90 ± 2% of the CTLMCs compared with 58 ± 8% in the MLMCs. Multivariate analyses demonstrated that CTLMCs and MLMCs secrete differing oxylipin profiles at baseline and following calcium ionophore stimulation, evidencing specificity in both a time- and biosynthetic pathway-dependent manner. In addition to the COX-regulated prostaglandin PGD2 and 5-LO-regulated cysteinyl-leukotrienes (e.g., LTC4), several other mediators evidenced phenotype-specificity, which may have biological implications in mast cell-mediated regulation of inflammatory responses. PMID:23034214

  5. Development, significance, and heterogeneity of mast cells with particular regard to the mast cell-specific proteases chymase and tryptase.

    PubMed

    Welle, M

    1997-03-01

    Mast cells are one of the major effector cells in the pathogenesis of the immediate-type hypersensitivity reaction in a number of non-allergic immune disorders as well as in normal physiological processes. In addition, it has been shown recently that mast cells also play a significant role in a life-saving host response to bacterial reactions. But as much as the immunopathological role of mast cells has been acknowledged, these cells have also aroused much controversy and confusion. By now it is clear that one explanation for the sometimes even contradictory opinions on mast cell function arise from mast cell heterogeneity. This heterogeneity can express itself as differences in histochemical, biochemical, and functional characteristics. In vitro systems provided a powerful tool for the investigation of the basic mechanisms for mast cell development and differentiation and helped to demonstrate that mast cell heterogeneity can be traced back to certain cytokine patterns that are present in different microenvironments. In this context it has also been shown that the growth factors required for human mast cell differentiation are somewhat different than those for rodents. In rodents, the atypical, T cell-dependent mucosal type mast cell can be distinguished from the T cell-independent connective tissue-type mast cell. In humans, the strict classification into mucosal and connective tissue-type mast cells is not possible and the content of mast cell-specific proteases chymase and tryptase is the main criterion for mast cell subtypes in humans. The large quantities of tryptase and chymase that are synthesized by mast cells suggest and emphasize the significance of these proteinases in mast cell function and stimulated investigations about the biological properties of these mast cell-specific proteases. Comparing their biological activities it becomes clear that they share some activities. On the other hand, tryptase seems to participate in proinflammatory mast cell

  6. Ability of Interleukin-33- and Immune Complex-Triggered Activation of Human Mast Cells to Down-Regulate Monocyte-Mediated Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Rivellese, Felice; Suurmond, Jolien; Habets, Kim; Dorjée, Annemarie L; Ramamoorthi, Nandhini; Townsend, Michael J; de Paulis, Amato; Marone, Gianni; Huizinga, Tom W J; Pitzalis, Costantino; Toes, René E M

    2015-09-01

    Mast cells have been implicated in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In particular, their activation by interleukin-33 (IL-33) has been linked to the development of arthritis in animal models. The aim of this study was to evaluate the functional responses of human mast cells to IL-33 in the context of RA. Human mast cells were stimulated with IL-33 combined with plate-bound IgG or IgG anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPAs), and their effects on monocyte activation were evaluated. Cellular interactions of mast cells in RA synovium were assessed by immunofluorescence analysis, and the expression of messenger RNA (mRNA) for mast cell-specific genes was evaluated in synovial biopsy tissue from patients with early RA who were naive to treatment with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. IL-33 induced the up-regulation of Fcγ receptor type IIa and enhanced the activation of mast cells by IgG, including IgG ACPAs, as indicated by the production of CXCL8/IL-8. Intriguingly, mast cell activation triggered with IL-33 and IgG led to the release of mediators such as histamine and IL-10, which inhibited monocyte activation. Synovial mast cells were found in contact with CD14+ monocyte/macrophages. Finally, mRNA levels of mast cell-specific genes were inversely associated with disease severity, and IL-33 mRNA levels showed an inverse correlation with the levels of proinflammatory markers. When human mast cells are activated by IL-33, an immunomodulatory phenotype develops, with human mast cells gaining the ability to suppress monocyte activation via the release of IL-10 and histamine. These findings, together with the presence of synovial mast cell-monocyte interactions and the inverse association between the expression of mast cell genes at the synovial level and disease activity, suggest that these newly described mast cell-mediated inhibitory pathways might have a functional relevance in the pathogenesis of RA. © 2015, American College of Rheumatology.

  7. Microjet formation and hard x-ray production from a liquid metal target irradiated by intense femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Lar'kin, A. Uryupina, D.; Ivanov, K.; Savel'ev, A.; Bonnet, T.; Gobet, F.; Hannachi, F.; Tarisien, M.; Versteegen, M.; Spohr, K.; Breil, J.; Chimier, B.; Dorchies, F.; Fourment, C.; Leguay, P.-M.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.

    2014-09-15

    By using a liquid metal as a target one may significantly enhance the yield of hard x-rays with a sequence of two intense femtosecond laser pulses. The influence of the time delay between the two pulses is studied experimentally and interpreted with numerical simulations. It was suggested that the first arbitrary weak pulse produces microjets from the target surface, while the second intense pulse provides an efficient electron heating and acceleration along the jet surface. These energetic electrons are the source of x-ray emission while striking the target surface. The microjet formation is explained based on the results given by both optical diagnostics and hydrodynamic modeling by a collision of shocks originated from two distinct zones of laser energy deposition.

  8. Inhibitory Effects of Viscum coloratum Extract on IgE/Antigen-Activated Mast Cells and Mast Cell-Derived Inflammatory Mediator-Activated Chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jae-Myung; Yang, Ju-Hye; Kim, Young Soo; Yang, Hye Jin; Cho, Won-Kyung; Ma, Jin Yeul

    2016-12-28

    The accumulation and infiltration of mast cells are found in osteoarthritic lesions in humans and rodents. Nonetheless, the roles of mast cells in osteoarthritis are almost unknown. Although Viscum coloratum has various beneficial actions, its effect on allergic and osteoarthritic responses is unknown. In this study, we established an in vitro model of mast cell-mediated osteoarthritis and investigated the effect of the ethanol extract of Viscum coloratum (VEE) on IgE/antigen (IgE/Ag)-activated mast cells and mast cell-derived inflammatory mediator (MDIM)-stimulated chondrocytes. The anti-allergic effect of VEE was evaluated by degranulation, inflammatory mediators, and the FcεRI signaling cascade in IgE/Ag-activated RBL-2H3 cells. The anti-osteoarthritic action of VEE was evaluated by cell migration, and the expression, secretion, and activity of MMPs in MDIM-stimulated SW1353 cells. VEE significantly inhibited degranulation (IC50: 93.04 μg/mL), the production of IL-4 (IC50: 73.28 μg/mL), TNF-α (IC50: 50.59 μg/mL), PGD₂ and LTC₄, and activation of the FcεRI signaling cascade in IgE/Ag-activated RBL-2H3 cells. Moreover, VEE not only reduced cell migration but also inhibited the expression, secretion, and/or activity of MMP-1, MMP-3, or MMP-13 in MDIM-stimulated SW1353 cells. In conclusion, VEE possesses both anti-allergic and anti-osteoarthritic properties. Therefore, VEE could possibly be considered a new herbal drug for anti-allergic and anti-osteoarthritic therapy. Moreover, the in vitro model may be useful for the development of anti-osteoarthritic drugs.

  9. Influence of milk pretreatment on production of free fatty acids and volatile compounds in hard cheeses: heat treatment and mechanical agitation.

    PubMed

    Vélez, M A; Perotti, M C; Wolf, I V; Hynes, E R; Zalazar, C A

    2010-10-01

    This work aimed to identify technological steps that can increase fat hydrolysis and volatile compounds production in hard cheeses; these biochemical events have been related with improved piquant taste and development of genuine flavor during cheese ripening. For that purpose, 2 different pretreatments of cheese milk were tested: heat treatment and mechanical agitation. Both factors were assayed at 2 levels: milk was either batch pasteurized or nonthermally treated, and mechanical agitation was either applied or not applied. For all combinations, hard cheeses (Reggianito type) were produced in a pilot plant and ripened for 90 d. In all cheeses the degree of lipolysis, assessed by gas chromatography, increased similarly during ripening. However, the proportion of short-chain fatty acids was higher in the cheeses made with unpasteurized milk, suggesting a higher activity of lipases with positional specificity toward the sn-3 position of the triglyceride, among which milk lipoprotein lipase is found. Similar results were found for most of the volatile compounds, determined by solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography flame-ionization detector/mass spectrometry, which constitute the groups of ketones, alcohols, esters, and the group of acids. On the contrary, no effect of mechanical agitation was observed, although some interactions between factors were found. In the conditions of the study, results suggest that heat treatment had a higher effect on cheese lipolysis and volatile compounds production than partial destabilization of the fat emulsion produced by the agitation method applied.

  10. Innate defense regulator IDR-1018 activates human mast cells through G protein-, phospholipase C-, MAPK- and NF-ĸB-sensitive pathways.

    PubMed

    Yanashima, Kensuke; Chieosilapatham, Panjit; Yoshimoto, Eri; Okumura, Ko; Ogawa, Hideoki; Niyonsaba, François

    2017-08-01

    Host defense (antimicrobial) peptides not only display antimicrobial activities against numerous pathogens but also exert a broader spectrum of immune-modulating functions. Innate defense regulators (IDRs) are a class of host defense peptides synthetically developed from natural or endogenous cationic host defense peptides. Of the IDRs developed to date, IDR-1018 is more efficient not only in killing bacteria but also in regulating the various functions of macrophages and neutrophils and accelerating the wound healing process. Because mast cells intimately participate in wound healing and a number of host defense peptides involved in wound healing are also known to activate mast cells, this study aimed to investigate the effects of IDR-1018 on mast cell activation. Here, we showed that IDR-1018 induced the degranulation of LAD2 human mast cells and caused their production of leukotrienes, prostaglandins and various cytokines and chemokines, including granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, interleukin-8, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and -3, macrophage-inflammatory protein-1α and -1β, and tumor necrosis factor-α. Furthermore, IDR-1018 increased intracellular calcium mobilization and induced mast cell chemotaxis. The mast cell activation was markedly suppressed by pertussis toxin, U-73122, U0126, SB203580, JNK inhibitor II, and NF-κB activation inhibitor II, suggesting the involvement of G-protein, phospholipase C, ERK, p38, JNK and NF-κB pathways, respectively, in IDR-1018-induced mast cell activation. Notably, we confirmed that IDR-1018 caused the phosphorylation of MAPKs and IκB. Altogether, the current study suggests a novel immunomodulatory role of IDR-1018 through its ability to recruit and activate human mast cells at the sites of inflammation and wounds. We report that IDR-1018 stimulates various functions of human mast cells. IDR-1018-induced mast cell activation is mediated through G protein, PLC, MAPK and NF-κB pathways. IDR-1018

  11. A Microplate Assay to Assess Chemical Effects on RBL-2H3 Mast Cell Degranulation: Effects of Triclosan without Use of an Organic Solvent

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Juyoung; Gosse, Julie A.

    2013-01-01

    Mast cells play important roles in allergic disease and immune defense against parasites. Once activated (e.g. by an allergen), they degranulate, a process that results in the exocytosis of allergic mediators. Modulation of mast cell degranulation by drugs and toxicants may have positive or adverse effects on human health. Mast cell function has been dissected in detail with the use of rat basophilic leukemia mast cells (RBL-2H3), a widely accepted model of human mucosal mast cells3-5. Mast cell granule component and the allergic mediator β-hexosaminidase, which is released linearly in tandem with histamine from mast cells6, can easily and reliably be measured through reaction with a fluorogenic substrate, yielding measurable fluorescence intensity in a microplate assay that is amenable to high-throughput studies1. Originally published by Naal et al.1, we have adapted this degranulation assay for the screening of drugs and toxicants and demonstrate its use here. Triclosan is a broad-spectrum antibacterial agent that is present in many consumer products and has been found to be a therapeutic aid in human allergic skin disease7-11, although the mechanism for this effect is unknown. Here we demonstrate an assay for the effect of triclosan on mast cell degranulation. We recently showed that triclosan strongly affects mast cell function2. In an effort to avoid use of an organic solvent, triclosan is dissolved directly into aqueous buffer with heat and stirring, and resultant concentration is confirmed using UV-Vis spectrophotometry (using ε280 = 4,200 L/M/cm)12. This protocol has the potential to be used with a variety of chemicals to determine their effects on mast cell degranulation, and more broadly, their allergic potential. PMID:24300285

  12. Do variations in mast cell hyperplasia account for differences in radiation-induced lung injury among different mouse strains, rats and nonhuman primates?

    PubMed

    Down, Julian D; Medhora, Meetha; Jackson, Isabel L; Cline, J Mark; Vujaskovic, Zeljko

    2013-08-01

    The role of mast cell infiltrates in the pathology of radiation damage to the lung has been a subject of continuing investigation over the past four decades. This has been accompanied by a number of proposals as to how mast cells and the secretory products thereof participate in the generation of acute inflammation (pneumonitis) and the chronic process of collagen deposition (fibrosis). An additional pathophysiology examines the possible connection between mast cell hyperplasia and pulmonary hypertension through the release of vasoactive mediators. The timing and magnitude of pneumonitis and fibrosis are known to vary tremendously among different genetic mouse strains and animal species. Therefore, we have systematically compared mast cell numbers in lung sections from nine mouse strains, two rat strains and nonhuman primates (NHP) after whole thorax irradiation (WTI) at doses ranging from 10-15 Gy and at the time of entering respiratory distress. Mice of the BALB/c strain had a dramatic increase in interstitial mast cell numbers, similar to WAG/Rij and August rats, while relatively low levels of mast cell infiltrate were observed in other mouse strains (CBA, C3H, B6, C57L, WHT and TO mice). Enumeration of mast cell number in five NHPs (rhesus macaque), exhibiting severe pneumonitis at 17 weeks after 10 Gy WTI, also indicated a low response shared by the majority of mouse strains. There appeared to be no relationship between the mast cell response and the strain-dependent susceptibility towards pneumonitis or fibrosis. Further investigations are required to explore the possible participation of mast cells in mediating specific vascular responses and whether a genetically diverse mast cell response occurs in humans.

  13. Do Variations in Mast Cell Hyperplasia Account for Differences in Radiation-Induced Lung Injury among Different Mouse Strains, Rats and Nonhuman Primates?

    PubMed Central

    Down, Julian D.; Medhora, Meetha; Jackson, Isabel L.; Cline, J. Mark; Vujaskovic, Zeljko

    2013-01-01

    The role of mast cell infiltrates in the pathology of radiation damage to the lung has been a subject of continuing investigation over the past four decades. This has been accompanied by a number of proposals as to how mast cells and the secretory products thereof participate in the generation of acute inflammation (pneumonitis) and the chronic process of collagen deposition (fibrosis). An additional pathophysiology examines the possible connection between mast cell hyperplasia and pulmonary hypertension through the release of vasoactive mediators. The timing and magnitude of pneumonitis and fibrosis are known to vary tremendously among different genetic mouse strains and animal species. Therefore, we have systematically compared mast cell numbers in lung sections from nine mouse strains, two rat strains and nonhuman primates (NHP) after whole thorax irradiation (WTI) at doses ranging from 10–15 Gy and at the time of entering respiratory distress. Mice of the BALB/c strain had a dramatic increase in interstitial mast cell numbers, similar to WAG/Rij and August rats, while relatively low levels of mast cell infiltrate were observed in other mouse strains (CBA, C3H, B6, C57L, WHT and TO mice). Enumeration of mast cell number in five NHPs (rhesus macaque), exhibiting severe pneumonitis at 17 weeks after 10 Gy WTI, also indicated a low response shared by the majority of mouse strains. There appeared to be no relationship between the mast cell response and the strain-dependent susceptibility towards pneumonitis or fibrosis. Further investigations are required to explore the possible participation of mast cells in mediating specific vascular responses and whether a genetically diverse mast cell response occurs in humans. PMID:23819595

  14. The natural compound nujiangexanthone A suppresses mast cell activation and allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yue; Cai, Shuangfan; Nie, Jia; Li, Yangyang; Shi, Guochao; Hao, Jimin; Fu, Wenwei; Tan, Hongsheng; Chen, Shilin; Li, Bin; Xu, Hongxi

    2016-01-15

    Mast cells play an important role in allergic diseases such as asthma, allergic rhinitis and atopic dermatitis. The genus Garcinia of the family Guttiferae is well known as a prolific source of polycyclic polyprenylated acylphloroglucinols and bioactive prenylated xanthones, which exhibit various biological activities including antibacterial, antifungal, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and cytotoxic effects. Nujiangexanthone A (N7) is a novel compound isolated from the leaves of Garcinia nujiangensis. In this paper, we sought to determine the anti-allergic and anti-inflammation activity of N7 in vivo and its mechanism in vitro. We found N7 suppressed IgE/Ag induced mast cell activiation, including degranulation and production of cytokines and eicosanoids, through inhibiting Src kinase activity and Syk dependent pathways. N7 inhibited histamine release, prostaglandin D2 and leukotriene C4 generation in mast cell dependent passive cutaneous anaphylaxis animal model. We also found N7 inhibited the IL-4, IL-5, IL-13 and IgE levels in ovalbumin-induced asthma model. Histological studies demonstrated that N7 substantially inhibited OVA-induced cellular infiltration and increased mucus production in the lung tissue. Our study reveals the anti-allergic function of N7, thereby suggesting the utility of this compound as a possible novel agent for preventing mast cell-related immediate and delayed allergic diseases.

  15. Propagation by Cutting of Grewia coriacea Mast. (Malvaceae).

    PubMed

    Mercier, Bita Alain; Attibayéba; Pierre, Kampé Jean; Léon, Ngantsoué; Fidèle, Mialoundama

    2016-01-01

    Congolese forests contain important spontaneous food plants. Among these plants, there is the Grewia coriacea Mast., called in the national language "Tsui-téké", which is a tree of 4-25 m high and of 12-40 cm in diameter. Its fruits are used in several drinks making (juice, sparkling wine, syrup) and lollipops. Grewia's barks are used in pharmacopoeia to cure of stomach aches, syphilis. However, the fruits harvesting method based on branches or trees cutting as well as swidden agriculture by local people dangerously threatens the Grewia in the natural ecosystems of Congo. To insure the longevity of this species, we undertook trials of vegetative reproduction of the plant by means of propagation by cuttings for its domestication. Less woody leafless cuttings of 30 cm in length provided best results with a resumption rate of 63.3%, a good rooting production and an average duration of the apparent plastochrone of three days from the second to the fifth leaf. The study shows that domestication of the Grewia coriacea Mast. is possible today by cuttings. Its culture might allow the diversification of species which can be used in orchards.

  16. Mast cells as targets for immunotherapy of solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Oldford, Sharon A; Marshall, Jean S

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells have historically been studied mainly in the context of allergic disease. In recent years, we have come to understand the critical importance of mast cells in tissue remodeling events and their role as sentinel cells in the induction and development of effective immune responses to infection. Studies of the role of mast cells in tumor immunity are more limited. The pro-tumorigenic role of mast cells has been widely reported. However, mast cell infiltration predicts improved prognosis in some cancers, suggesting that their prognostic value may be dependent on other variables. Such factors may include the nature of local mast cell subsets and the various activation stimuli present within the tumor microenvironment. Experimental models have highlighted the importance of mast cells in orchestrating the anti-tumor events that follow immunotherapies that target innate immunity. Mast cells are long-lived tissue resident cells that are abundant around many solid tumors and are radiation resistant making them unique candidates for combined treatment modalities. This review will examine some of the key roles of mast cells in tumor immunity, with a focus on potential immunotherapeutic interventions that harness the sentinel role of mast cells.

  17. Mast Cells Produce a Unique Chondroitin Sulfate Epitope.

    PubMed

    Farrugia, Brooke L; Whitelock, John M; O'Grady, Robert; Caterson, Bruce; Lord, Megan S

    2016-02-01

    The granules of mast cells contain a myriad of mediators that are stored and protected by the sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chains that decorate proteoglycans. Whereas heparin is the GAG predominantly associated with mast cells, mast cell proteoglycans are also decorated with heparan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate (CS). This study investigated a unique CS structure produced by mast cells that was detected with the antibody clone 2B6 in the absence of chondroitinase ABC digestion. Mast cells in rodent tissue sections were characterized using toluidine blue, Leder stain and the presence of mast cell tryptase. The novel CS epitope was identified in rodent tissue sections and localized to cells that were morphologically similar to cells chemically identified as mast cells. The rodent mast cell-like line RBL-2H3 was also shown to express the novel CS epitope. This epitope co-localized with multiple CS proteoglycans in both rodent tissue and RBL-2H3 cultured cells. These findings suggest that the novel CS epitope that decorates mast cell proteoglycans may play a role in the way these chains are structured in mast cells.

  18. Mast Cells Produce a Unique Chondroitin Sulfate Epitope

    PubMed Central

    Farrugia, Brooke L.; Whitelock, John M.; O’Grady, Robert; Caterson, Bruce; Lord, Megan S.

    2015-01-01

    The granules of mast cells contain a myriad of mediators that are stored and protected by the sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chains that decorate proteoglycans. Whereas heparin is the GAG predominantly associated with mast cells, mast cell proteoglycans are also decorated with heparan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate (CS). This study investigated a unique CS structure produced by mast cells that was detected with the antibody clone 2B6 in the absence of chondroitinase ABC digestion. Mast cells in rodent tissue sections were characterized using toluidine blue, Leder stain and the presence of mast cell tryptase. The novel CS epitope was identified in rodent tissue sections and localized to cells that were morphologically similar to cells chemically identified as mast cells. The rodent mast cell-like line RBL-2H3 was also shown to express the novel CS epitope. This epitope co-localized with multiple CS proteoglycans in both rodent tissue and RBL-2H3 cultured cells. These findings suggest that the novel CS epitope that decorates mast cell proteoglycans may play a role in the way these chains are structured in mast cells. PMID:26586669

  19. Brain mast cell relationship to neurovasculature during development.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Mona; Ronda, Jocelyn; Weintraub, Michael; Jain, Kim; Silver, Rae; Silverman, Ann-Judith

    2007-09-26

    Mast cells, derived from the hematopoietic stem cell, are present in the brain from birth. During development, mast cells occur in two locations, namely the pia and the brain parenchyma. The current hypothesis regarding their origin states that brain mast cells (or their precursors) enter the pia and access the thalamus by traveling along the abluminal wall of penetrating blood vessels. The population in the pia reaches a maximum at postnatal (PN) day 11, and declines rapidly thereafter. Chromatin fragmentation suggests that this cell loss is due to apoptosis. In contrast, the thalamic population expands from PN8 to reach adult levels at PN30. Stereological analysis demonstrates that mast cells home to blood vessels. More than 96% of mast cells are inside the blood-brain barrier, with ~90% contacting the blood vessel wall or its extracellular matrix. Mast cells express alpha4 integrins -- a potential mechanism for adhesion to the vascular wall. Despite the steady increase in the volume of microvasculature, at all ages studied, mast cells are preferentially located on large diameter vessels (>16 microm; possibly arteries), and contact only those maturing blood vessels that are ensheathed by astroglial processes. Mast cells not only home to large vessels but also maintain a preferential position at branch points, sites of vessel growth. This observation presents the possibility that mast cells participate in and/or regulate vasculature growth or differentiation. The biochemical and molecular signals that induce mast cell homing in the CNS is an area of active investigation.

  20. Isolation, culture, and characterization of intestinal mast cells.

    PubMed

    Sellge, Gernot; Bischoff, Stephan C

    2006-01-01

    Mast cells are bone-marrow-derived tissue cells typically located at barrier sites of the body, such as skin, mucosal barriers, or blood barriers, that is, around blood vessels. This location suggests that mast cells might have a function as immunological "gate-keepers" or "watch dogs" and, indeed, some recent functional data support this idea. Mast cells derive from myeloid progenitors, but in contrast to other myeloid cells, they leave the bone marrow in an immature state; therefore, mast cells are not found in the blood under normal conditions. For full maturation, the tissue environment is necessary. Thus, mature mast cells can be only isolated from tissue such as skin or mucosal sites, which makes mast cell isolation rather complicated. Alternatively, mast cell progenitors can be isolated from the bone marrow, peripheral blood, or cord blood, which is easier but requires subsequent in vitro maturation of mast cells as far as possible using cytokines. This chapter describes a rather new technique of mast cell isolation from human intestinal mucosal tissue yielding approx 1-5 million pure and viable human mast cells suitable to perform functional and cell culture experiments.

  1. New models for analyzing mast cell functions in vivo.

    PubMed

    Reber, Laurent L; Marichal, Thomas; Galli, Stephen J

    2012-12-01

    In addition to their well-accepted role as critical effector cells in anaphylaxis and other acute IgE-mediated allergic reactions, mast cells (MCs) have been implicated in a wide variety of processes that contribute to disease or help to maintain health. Although some of these roles were first suggested by analyses of MC products or functions in vitro, it is critical to determine whether, and under which circumstances, such potential roles actually can be performed by MCs in vivo. This review discusses recent advances in the development and analysis of mouse models to investigate the roles of MCs and MC-associated products during biological responses in vivo, and comments on some of the similarities and differences in the results obtained with these newer versus older models of MC deficiency.

  2. Mast cells contribute to double-stranded RNA-induced augmentation of airway eosinophilia in a murine model of asthma.

    PubMed

    Kan-o, Keiko; Matsunaga, Yuko; Fukuyama, Satoru; Moriwaki, Atsushi; Hirai-Kitajima, Hiroko; Yokomizo, Takehiko; Aritake, Kosuke; Urade, Yoshihiro; Nakanishi, Yoichi; Inoue, Hiromasa; Matsumoto, Koichiro

    2013-03-04

    Clinical studies showed the contribution of viral infection to the development of asthma. Although mast cells have multiple roles in the pathogenesis of allergic asthma, their role of in the virus-associated pathogenesis of asthma remains unknown. Most respiratory viruses generate double-stranded (ds) RNA during their replication. dsRNA provokes innate immune responses. We recently showed that an administration of polyinocinic polycytidilic acid (poly IC), a mimetic of viral dsRNA, during allergen sensitization augments airway eosinophilia and hyperresponsiveness in mice via enhanced production of IL-13. The effect of poly IC on allergen-induced airway eosinophilia was investigated for mast cell-conserved Kit+/+ mice and -deficient KitW/KitW-v mice. The outcome of mast cell reconstitution was further investigated. Airway eosinophilia and IL-13 production were augmented by poly IC in Kit+/+ mice but not in KitW/KitW-v mice. When KitW/KitW-v mice were reconstituted with bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs), the augmentation was restored. The augmentation was not induced in the mice systemically deficient for TIR domain-containing adaptor-inducing IFN-β (TRIF) or interferon regulatory factor (IRF)-3, both mediate dsRNA-triggered innate immune responses. The augmentation was, however, restored in KitW/KitW-v mice reconstituted with TRIF-deficient or IRF-3-deficient BMMCs. Although leukotriene B4 and prostaglandin D2 are major lipid mediators released from activated mast cells, no their contribution was shown to the dsRNA-induced augmentation of airway eosinophilia. We conclude that mast cells contribute to dsRNA-induced augmentation of allergic airway inflammation without requiring direct activation of mast cells with dsRNA or involvement of leukotriene B4 or prostaglandin D2.

  3. Mast cells contribute to double-stranded RNA-induced augmentation of airway eosinophilia in a murine model of asthma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Clinical studies showed the contribution of viral infection to the development of asthma. Although mast cells have multiple roles in the pathogenesis of allergic asthma, their role of in the virus-associated pathogenesis of asthma remains unknown. Most respiratory viruses generate double-stranded (ds) RNA during their replication. dsRNA provokes innate immune responses. We recently showed that an administration of polyinocinic polycytidilic acid (poly IC), a mimetic of viral dsRNA, during allergen sensitization augments airway eosinophilia and hyperresponsiveness in mice via enhanced production of IL-13. Methods The effect of poly IC on allergen-induced airway eosinophilia was investigated for mast cell-conserved Kit+/+ mice and -deficient KitW/KitW-v mice. The outcome of mast cell reconstitution was further investigated. Results Airway eosinophilia and IL-13 production were augmented by poly IC in Kit+/+ mice but not in KitW/KitW-v mice. When KitW/KitW-v mice were reconstituted with bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs), the augmentation was restored. The augmentation was not induced in the mice systemically deficient for TIR domain-containing adaptor-inducing IFN-β (TRIF) or interferon regulatory factor (IRF)-3, both mediate dsRNA-triggered innate immune responses. The augmentation was, however, restored in KitW/KitW-v mice reconstituted with TRIF-deficient or IRF-3-deficient BMMCs. Although leukotriene B4 and prostaglandin D2 are major lipid mediators released from activated mast cells, no their contribution was shown to the dsRNA-induced augmentation of airway eosinophilia. Conclusions We conclude that mast cells contribute to dsRNA-induced augmentation of allergic airway inflammation without requiring direct activation of mast cells with dsRNA or involvement of leukotriene B4 or prostaglandin D2. PMID:23452625

  4. Resource limitation underlying multiple masting models makes mast seeding sensitive to future climate change.

    PubMed

    Monks, Adrian; Monks, Joanne M; Tanentzap, Andrew J

    2016-04-01

    Mechanistic models can help resolve controversy over the responses of mast seeding plants to future environmental change. We evaluate drivers of mast seeding by: developing and validating a new mechanistic resource-based model of mast seeding using four 40-yr Chionochloa (snow tussock) datasets; and comparing the performance of competing empirically-based statistical models, that aim to approximate the mechanisms underlying mast seeding, in explaining simulated and observed data. Our mechanistic model explained 90-99% of the variation in Chionochloa flowering, with higher rates of stored resource mobilisation and lower probability of climatic induction of flowering occurring at lower fertility sites. Inter-annual variation in floral induction and the degree to which seeding is resource-limited explained shifts in the relative performance of different empirical models fitted to data simulated from the mechanistic model. Empirical models explicitly capturing the interaction between the floral induction cue and internal resource state underlying the resource-limited induction mechanism had > 8.7× the statistical support of alternatives when fitted to Chionochloa datasets. We find support for resource-limited floral induction with multiple empirical models consistent with this same mechanism. As both resource acquisition and flowering cues are climate sensitive, we expect climate change to impact upon patterns of mast seeding. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  5. Of mast and mean: differential-temperature cue makes mast seeding insensitive to climate change.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Dave; Geldenhuis, Andre; James, Alex; Penelope Holland, E; Plank, Michael J; Brockie, Robert E; Cowan, Philip E; Harper, Grant A; Lee, William G; Maitland, Matt J; Mark, Alan F; Mills, James A; Wilson, Peter R; Byrom, Andrea E

    2013-01-01

    Mast-seeding plants often produce high seed crops the year after a warm spring or summer, but the warm-temperature model has inconsistent predictive ability. Here, we show for 26 long-term data sets from five plant families that the temperature difference between the two previous summers (ΔT) better predicts seed crops. This discovery explains how masting species tailor their flowering patterns to sites across altitudinal temperature gradients; predicts that masting will be unaffected by increasing mean temperatures under climate change; improves prediction of impacts on seed consumers; demonstrates that strongly masting species are hypersensitive to climate; explains the rarity of consecutive high-seed years without invoking resource constraints; and generates hypotheses about physiological mechanisms in plants and insect seed predators. For plants, ΔT has many attributes of an ideal cue. This temperature-difference model clarifies our understanding of mast seeding under environmental change, and could also be applied to other cues, such as rainfall.

  6. Generation, isolation, and maintenance of human mast cells and mast cell lines derived from peripheral blood or cord blood.

    PubMed

    Rådinger, Madeleine; Jensen, Bettina M; Kuehn, Hye Sun; Kirshenbaum, Arnold; Gilfillan, Alasdair M

    2010-08-01

    Antigen-mediated mast cell activation is a pivotal step in the initiation of allergic disorders including anaphylaxis and atopy. To date, studies aimed at investigating the mechanisms regulating these responses, and studies designed to identify potential ways to prevent them, have primarily been conducted in rodent mast cells. However, to understand how these responses pertain to human disease, and to investigate and develop novel therapies for the treatment of human mast cell-driven disease, human mast cell models may have greater relevance. Recently, a number of systems have been developed to allow investigators to readily obtain sufficient quantities of human mast cells to conduct these studies. These mast cells release the appropriate suite of inflammatory mediators in response to known mast cell activators including antigen. These systems have also been employed to examine the signaling events regulating these responses. Proof of principle studies has also demonstrated utility of these systems for the identification of potential inhibitors of mast cell activation and growth. In this unit, techniques for the development and culture of human mast cells from their progenitors and the culture of human mast cell lines are described. The relative merits and drawbacks of each model are also described.

  7. Updated Draft Protocol for the Evaluation of Bactericidal Activity of Hard, Non-porous Copper Containing Surface Products

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document describes the updated draft testing protocol recommended by the EPA to support the registration of copper-containing surface products (such as door knobs, or other items that are not intended for food contact) that bear sanitizer claims.

  8. Molecular basis of mast cell disease.

    PubMed

    Soucie, Erinn; Brenet, Fabienne; Dubreuil, Patrice

    2015-01-01

    Mastocytosis is an incurable and sometimes fatal haematological disorder grossly described as the accumulation of abnormal mast cells in the bone marrow and other organs causing tissue and organ damage. The clinical manifestations of this disease are extremely variable; disease phenotypes range from indolent to aggressive, and often present with associated non-mast cell haematological disorders (AHNMD), mainly myeloproliferative neoplasm and myelodysplastic syndromes. Recent efforts to genetically dissect the mechanisms that define aggressive and non-aggressive mastocytosis have generated a list of recurrent somatic mutations in mastocytosis patients that are associated with and may predict the evolution towards aggressive disease phenotypes. Here we review these mutations and discuss the molecular mechanisms associated with these mutations in an effort to better understand the biology of this disease and to predict its onset and evolution, with the ultimate goal of devising new and improved treatment strategies.

  9. MAST Propellant and Delivery System Design Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nadeem, Uzair; Mc Cleskey, Carey M.

    2015-01-01

    A Mars Aerospace Taxi (MAST) concept and propellant storage and delivery case study is undergoing investigation by NASA's Element Design and Architectural Impact (EDAI) design and analysis forum. The MAST lander concept envisions landing with its ascent propellant storage tanks empty and supplying these reusable Mars landers with propellant that is generated and transferred while on the Mars surface. The report provides an overview of the data derived from modeling between different methods of propellant line routing (or "lining") and differentiate the resulting design and operations complexity of fluid and gaseous paths based on a given set of fluid sources and destinations. The EDAI team desires a rough-order-magnitude algorithm for estimating the lining characteristics (i.e., the plumbing mass and complexity) associated different numbers of vehicle propellant sources and destinations. This paper explored the feasibility of preparing a mathematically sound algorithm for this purpose, and offers a method for the EDAI team to implement.

  10. Anaphylaxis: mechanisms of mast cell activation.

    PubMed

    Kalesnikoff, Janet; Galli, Stephen J

    2010-01-01

    Anaphylaxis is a severe systemic allergic response that is rapid in onset and potentially lethal, and that typically is induced by an otherwise innocuous substance. In IgE-dependent and other examples of anaphylaxis, tissue mast cells and circulating basophilic granulocytes (basophils) are thought to represent major (if not the major) sources of the biologically active mediators that contribute to the pathology and, in unfortunate individuals, fatal outcome, of anaphylaxis. In this chapter, we will describe the mechanisms of mast cell (and basophil) activation in anaphylaxis, with a focus on IgE-dependent activation, which is thought to be responsible for most examples of antigen-induced anaphylaxis in humans. We will also discuss the use of mouse models to investigate the mechanisms that can contribute to anaphylaxis in that species in vivo, and the relevance of such mouse studies to human anaphylaxis. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. EBW simulation for MAST and NSTX experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Preinhaelter, J.; Urban, J.; Pavlo, P.; Shevchenko, V.; Valovic, M.; Vahala, G.

    2005-09-26

    The interpretation of EBW emission from spherical tokamaks is nontrivial. We report on a 3D simulation model of this process that incorporates Gaussian beams for the antenna, a full wave solution of EBW-X and EBW-X-O conversions using adaptive finite elements, and EBW ray tracing to determine the radiative temperature. This model is then used to interpret the experimental results from MAST and NSTX. EBW for ELM free H-modes in MAST suggests that the magnetic equilibrium determined by the EFIT code does not adequately represent the B-field within the transport barrier. Using the EBW signal for the reconstruction of the radial profile of the magnetic field, we determine a new equilibrium and see that the EBW simulation now yields better agreement with experimental results. EBW simulations yield excellent results for the time development of the plasma temperature as measured by the EBW radiometer on NSTX.

  12. The mast cell: a multifunctional effector cell.

    PubMed

    Crivellato, Enrico; Ribatti, Domenico; Mallardi, Franco; Beltrami, Carlo Alberto

    2003-01-01

    Mast cells (MC) are recognized key cells of type I hypersensitivity reactions. Several lines of evidence, however, indicate that MC not only express critical effector functions in classic IgE-associated allergic disorders, but also play important roles in host defence against parasites, bacteria and perhaps even viruses. Indeed, it is now clear that MC can contribute to host defence in the context of either acquired or innate immune responses through the release of a myriad of pro-inflammatory and immunoregulatory molecules and the expression of a wide spectrum of surface receptors for cytokines and chemokines. Moreover, there is growing evidence that MC exert distinct nonimmunological functions, playing a relevant role in tissue homeostasis, remodeling and fibrosis as well as in the processes of tissue angiogenesis. In this review, we provide a small insight into the biology of mast cells and their potential implications in human pathology.

  13. Hymenoptera Allergy and Mast Cell Activation Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Bonadonna, Patrizia; Bonifacio, Massimiliano; Lombardo, Carla; Zanotti, Roberta

    2016-01-01

    Mast cell activation syndrome (MCAS) can be diagnosed in patients with recurrent, severe symptoms from mast cell (MC)-derived mediators, which are transiently increased in serum and are attenuated by mediator-targeting drugs. When KIT-mutated, clonal MC are detected in these patients, a diagnosis of primary MCAS can be made. Severe systemic reactions to hymenoptera venom (HV) represent the most common form of anaphylaxis in patients with mastocytosis. Patients with primary MCAS and HV anaphylaxis are predominantly males and do not have skin lesions in the majority of cases, and anaphylaxis is characterized by hypotension and syncope in the absence of urticaria and angioedema. A normal value of tryptase (≤11.4 ng/ml) in these patients does not exclude a diagnosis of mastocytosis. Patients with primary MCAS and HV anaphylaxis have to undergo lifelong venom immunotherapy, in order to prevent further potentially fatal severe reactions.

  14. Spectrum of mast cell activation disorders.

    PubMed

    Petra, Anastasia I; Panagiotidou, Smaro; Stewart, Julia M; Conti, Pio; Theoharides, Theoharis C

    2014-06-01

    Mast cell (MC) activation disorders present with multiple symptoms including flushing, pruritus, hypotension, gastrointestinal complaints, irritability, headaches, concentration/memory loss and neuropsychiatric issues. These disorders are classified as: cutaneous and systemic mastocytosis with a c-kit mutation and clonal MC activation disorder, allergies, urticarias and inflammatory disorders and mast cell activation syndrome (MCAS), idiopathic urticaria and angioedema. MCs are activated by IgE, but also by cytokines, environmental, food, infectious, drug and stress triggers, leading to secretion of multiple mediators. The symptom profile and comorbidities associated with these disorders, such as chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia, are confusing. We propose the use of the term 'spectrum' and highlight the main symptoms, useful diagnostic tests and treatment approaches.

  15. iMAST Quarterly, 2007 Number 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    pitting surface damage due to corrosion and fatigue. Removal of the surface damage on these gears, however, using the ISF process, has shown that the...the flight control bridge where both corrosion and Figure . Micrograph of Copper powder deposited on Al- 6061 . The mixing of the materials at...the interface is clearly visible.[7] Figure 3. SH-60 Helicopter Transmission Gearbox Figure 4. Corrosion on Gearbox Al- 6061 Cu iMAST Quarterly 007 No

  16. Characterization of mast cell secretory granules and their cell biology.

    PubMed

    Azouz, Nurit Pereg; Hammel, Ilan; Sagi-Eisenberg, Ronit

    2014-10-01

    Exocytosis and secretion of secretory granule (SG) contained inflammatory mediators is the primary mechanism by which mast cells exert their protective immune responses in host defense, as well as their pathological functions in allergic reactions and anaphylaxis. Despite their central role in mast cell function, the molecular mechanisms underlying the biogenesis and secretion of mast cell SGs remain largely unresolved. Early studies have established the lysosomal nature of the mast cell SGs and implicated SG homotypic fusion as an important step occurring during both their biogenesis and compound secretion. However, the molecular mechanisms that account for key features of this process largely remain to be defined. A novel high-resolution imaging based methodology allowed us to screen Rab GTPases for their phenotypic and functional impact and identify Rab networks that regulate mast cell secretion. This screen has identified Rab5 as a novel regulator of homotypic fusion of the mast cell SGs that thereby regulates their size and cargo composition.

  17. Controversial role of mast cells in skin cancers.

    PubMed

    Varricchi, Gilda; Galdiero, Maria R; Marone, Giancarlo; Granata, Francescopaolo; Borriello, Francesco; Marone, Gianni

    2017-01-01

    Cancer development is a multistep process characterized by genetic and epigenetic alterations during tumor initiation and progression. The stromal microenvironment can promote tumor development. Mast cells, widely distributed throughout all tissues, are a stromal component of many solid and haematologic tumors. Mast cells can be found in human and mouse models of skin cancers such as melanoma, basal and squamous cell carcinomas, primary cutaneous lymphomas, haemangiomas and Merkel cell carcinoma. However, human and animal studies addressing potential functions of mast cells and their mediators in skin cancers have provided conflicting results. In several studies, mast cells play a pro-tumorigenic role, whereas in others, they play an anti-tumorigenic role. Other studies have failed to demonstrate a clear role for tumor-associated mast cells. Many unanswered questions need to be addressed before we understand whether tumor-associated mast cells are adversaries, allies or simply innocent bystanders in different types and subtypes of skin cancers.

  18. Sclerosing mediastinitis and mast cell activation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Afrin, Lawrence B

    2012-03-15

    Sclerosing mediastinitis (ScM) is a rare, potentially life-threatening disorder, idiopathic in roughly half the cases. Systemic symptoms not attributable to sclerosis often appear in idiopathic ScM. Mast cell activation disease (MCAD) is a potential cause of these symptoms and also can cause sclerosis. ScM has not previously been associated with MCAD. Presented here are the first two cases of ScM associated with MCAD, specifically mast cell activation syndrome (MCAS). CASE 1: A 58-year-old chronically polymorbid woman developed ScM following matched sibling allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Eight years later MCAS, likely underlying most of her chronic issues, was identified. CASE 2: A 30-year-old chronically polymorbid woman presented with superior vena cava syndrome and was diagnosed with ScM. On further evaluation, MCAS was identified. Treatment promptly effected symptomatic improvement; sclerosis has been stable. Non-compliance yielded symptomatic relapse; restored compliance re-achieved symptomatic remission. Different MCAS presentations reflect elaboration of different mediators, some of which can induce inflammation and fibrosis. Thus, MCAS may have directly and/or indirectly driven ScM in these patients. MCAS should be considered in ScM presenting with comorbidities better explained by mast cell mediator release. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. Characterization of Mast Cell Activation Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Afrin, Lawrence B; Self, Sally; Menk, Jeremiah; Lazarchick, John

    2017-03-01

    Mast cell activation syndrome (MCAS), a recently recognized nonneoplastic mast cell disease driving chronic multisystem inflammation and allergy, appears prevalent and thus important. We report the first systematic characterization of a large MCAS population. Demographics, comorbidities, symptoms, family histories, physical examination and laboratory findings were reviewed in 298 retrospective and 115 prospective patients with MCAS. Blood samples from prospective subjects were examined by flow cytometry for clonal mast cell disease and tested for cytokines potentially driving the monocytosis frequent in MCAS. Demographically, white females dominated. Median ages at symptom onset and diagnosis were 9 and 49 years, respectively (range: 0-88 and 16-92, respectively) and median time from symptom onset to diagnosis was 30 years (range: 1-85). Median numbers of comorbidities, symptoms, and family medical issues were 11, 20, and 4, respectively (range: 1-66, 2-84, and 0-33, respectively). Gastroesophageal reflux, fatigue and dermatographism were the most common comorbidity, symptom and examination finding. Abnormalities in routine laboratories were common and diverse but typically modest. The most useful diagnostic markers were heparin, prostaglandin D2, histamine and chromogranin A. Flow cytometric and cytokine assessments were unhelpful. Our study highlights MCAS׳s morbidity burden and challenging heterogeneity. Recognition is important given good survival and treatment prospects. Copyright © 2017 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Development of human mast cells in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Furitsu, T; Saito, H; Dvorak, A M; Schwartz, L B; Irani, A M; Burdick, J F; Ishizaka, K; Ishizaka, T

    1989-01-01

    Nucleated cells of human umbilical cord blood were cocultured with mouse skin-derived 3T3 fibroblasts. After 7-8 weeks in culture, when the number of the other hematopoietic cells declined, metachromatic granule-containing mononuclear cells appeared in the cultures, and the number of the cells increased up to 12 weeks. After 11-14 weeks in culture, the metachromatic mononuclear cells comprised a substantial portion of the cultured cells. These cells contained 1.8-2 micrograms of histamine per 10(6) cells and bore receptors for IgE. All of the cells contained tryptase in their granules. Electron microscopic analysis showed that these cells were mature human mast cells, clearly different from the basophilic granulocytes or eosinophils that arise in a variety of circumstances in cord blood cell cultures. Most of the cultured mast cells expressed some granules with regular crystalline arrays and contained both tryptase and chymase, and thus resembled human skin mast cells. Images PMID:2532357

  1. Macroscopic stability of high β MAST plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, I. T.; Cooper, W. A.; Graves, J. P.; Gryaznevich, M. P.; Hastie, R. J.; Hender, T. C.; Howell, D. F.; Hua, M.-D.; Huysmans, G. T. A.; Keeling, D. L.; Liu, Y. Q.; Meyer, H. F.; Michael, C. A.; Pinches, S. D.; Saarelma, S.; Sabbagh, S. A.; MAST Team

    2011-07-01

    The high-beta capability of the spherical tokamak, coupled with a suite of world-leading diagnostics on MAST, has facilitated significant improvements in the understanding of performance-limiting core instabilities in high performance plasmas. For instance, the newly installed motional Stark effect diagnostic, with radial resolution <25 mm, has enabled detailed study of saturated long-lived modes in hybrid scenarios. Similarly, the upgraded Thomson scattering system, with radial resolution <10 mm and the possibility of temporal resolution of 1 µs, has allowed detailed analysis of the density and temperature profiles during transient activity in the plasma, such as at a sawtooth crash. High resolution charge exchange recombination spectroscopy provided measurement of rotation braking induced by both applied magnetic fields and by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities, allowing tests of neoclassical toroidal viscosity theory predictions. Finally, MAST is also equipped with internal and external coils that allow non-axisymmetric fields to be applied for active MHD spectroscopy of instabilities near the no-wall beta limit. MAST has been able to operate above the pressure at which the resonant field amplification is observed to strongly increase. In order to access such high pressures, the resistive wall mode must be damped, and so numerical modelling has focused on assessing the kinetic damping of the mode and its nonlinear interaction with other instabilities. The enhanced understanding of the physical mechanisms driving deleterious MHD activity given by these leading-edge capabilities has provided guidance to optimize operating scenarios for improved plasma performance.

  2. Mast cell activation syndrome masquerading as agranulocytosis.

    PubMed

    Afrin, Lawrence B

    2012-01-01

    Acquired agranulocytosis is a rare, life-threatening disorder. The few known causes/associations usually are readily identifiable (e.g., drug reaction, Felty syndrome, megaloblastosis, large granular lymphocytic leukemia, etc.). We report a novel association with mast cell disease. A 61-year-old morbidly obese man developed rheumatoid arthritis unresponsive to several medications. Agranulocytosis developed shortly after sulfasalazine was started but did not improve when the drug was soon stopped. Other symptoms across many systems developed including hives and presyncope. Marrow aspiration and biopsy showed only neutropenia. Serum tryptase was mildly elevated; urinary prostaglandin D2 was markedly elevated. Other causes were not found. Mast cell activation syndrome (MCAS) was diagnosed. Oral antihistamines, montelukast, and cromolyn were unhelpful; aspirin was initially felt contraindicated. Imatinib immediately increased neutrophils from 0% to 25% but did not help symptoms; subsequent addition of aspirin increased neutrophils further and abated symptoms. Different presentations of different MCAS patients reflect elaboration of different mediators likely consequent to different Kit mutations. Mast cells (MCs) help regulate adipocytes, and adipocytes can inhibit granulopoiesis; thus, a Kit-mutated MC clone may have directly and/or indirectly driven agranulocytosis. MCAS should be considered in otherwise idiopathic agranulocytosis presenting with comorbidities best explained by MC mediator release.

  3. SWAP-70 regulates mast cell FcεRI-mediated signaling and anaphylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Sivalenka, Raja Rajeswari; Sinha, Manoj; Jessberger, Rolf

    2010-01-01

    Mast cells, perhaps best known by their ability to trigger allergic reactions after stimulation through the FcεRI, express the unusual phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)-dependent, Rac-binding protein SWAP-70. Here we show that the IgE-mediated passive cutaneous and the systemic anaphylactic responses are strongly reduced in SWAP-70−/− mice. Cultured SWAP-70−/− immature bone marrow mast cells (BMMC) are also impaired in FcεRI-mediated degranulation, which can be restored by expression of exogenous wild-type SWAP-70, but less so if a phosphatidylinositol trisphosphate (PIP3) binding mutant is expressed. SWAP-70 itself supports inositol-3-phosphate and PIP3 production, the latter indicating a potential feedback from SWAP-70 towards PI3K. FcεRI-stimulated transcription and release of cytokines is controlled by SWAP-70. Key FcεRI signal transduction events like activation of LAT by phosphorylation, activation of Akt/PKB and of p38 MAPKinase are reduced in SWAP-70−/− BMMC, but ERK is strongly hyperactivated. Some requirements for SWAP-70 were apparent only under limited-strength signaling conditions. We suggest that SWAP-70 defines a new element of efficient mast cell activation upon FcεRI signaling, important for the control of mast cell dependent anaphylaxis. PMID:18236401

  4. Evidence that Meningeal Mast Cells Can Worsen Stroke Pathology in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Arac, Ahmet; Grimbaldeston, Michele A.; Nepomuceno, Andrew R.B.; Olayiwola, Oluwatobi; Pereira, Marta P.; Nishiyama, Yasuhiro; Tsykin, Anna; Goodall, Gregory J.; Schlecht, Ulrich; Vogel, Hannes; Tsai, Mindy; Galli, Stephen J.; Bliss, Tonya M.; Steinberg, Gary K.

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of adult disability and the fourth most common cause of death in the United States. Inflammation is thought to play an important role in stroke pathology, but the factors that promote inflammation in this setting remain to be fully defined. An understudied but important factor is the role of meningeal-located immune cells in modulating brain pathology. Although different immune cells traffic through meningeal vessels en route to the brain, mature mast cells do not circulate but are resident in the meninges. With the use of genetic and cell transfer approaches in mice, we identified evidence that meningeal mast cells can importantly contribute to the key features of stroke pathology, including infiltration of granulocytes and activated macrophages, brain swelling, and infarct size. We also obtained evidence that two mast cell-derived products, interleukin-6 and, to a lesser extent, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 7, can contribute to stroke pathology. These findings indicate a novel role for mast cells in the meninges, the membranes that envelop the brain, as potential gatekeepers for modulating brain inflammation and pathology after stroke. PMID:25134760

  5. Mast cells boost myeloid-derived suppressor cell activity and contribute to the development of tumor-favoring microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Danelli, Luca; Frossi, Barbara; Gri, Giorgia; Mion, Francesca; Guarnotta, Carla; Bongiovanni, Lucia; Tripodo, Claudio; Mariuzzi, Laura; Marzinotto, Stefania; Rigoni, Alice; Blank, Ulrich; Colombo, Mario P; Pucillo, Carlo E

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation plays crucial roles at different stages of tumor development and may lead to the failure of immune surveillance and immunotherapy. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are one of the major components of the immune-suppressive network that favors tumor growth, and their interaction with mast cells is emerging as critical for the outcome of the tumor-associated immune response. Herein, we showed the occurrence of cell-to-cell interactions between MDSCs and mast cells in the mucosa of patients with colon carcinoma and in the colon and spleen of tumor-bearing mice. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the CT-26 colon cancer cells induced the accumulation of CD11b(+)Gr1(+) immature MDSCs and the recruitment of protumoral mast cells at the tumor site. Using ex vivo analyses, we showed that mast cells have the ability to increase the suppressive properties of spleen-derived monocytic MDSCs, through a mechanism involving IFNγ and nitric oxide production. In addition, we demonstrated that the CD40:CD40L cross-talk between the two cell populations is responsible for the instauration of a proinflammatory microenvironment and for the increase in the production of mediators that can further support MDSC mobilization and tumor growth. In light of these results, interfering with the MDSC:mast cell axis could be a promising approach to abrogate MDSC-related immune suppression and to improve the antitumor immune response. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. Mast Cells Can Enhance Resistance to Snake and Honeybee Venoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metz, Martin; Piliponsky, Adrian M.; Chen, Ching-Cheng; Lammel, Verena; Åbrink, Magnus; Pejler, Gunnar; Tsai, Mindy; Galli, Stephen J.

    2006-07-01

    Snake or honeybee envenomation can cause substantial morbidity and mortality, and it has been proposed that the activation of mast cells by snake or insect venoms can contribute to these effects. We show, in contrast, that mast cells can significantly reduce snake-venom-induced pathology in mice, at least in part by releasing carboxypeptidase A and possibly other proteases, which can degrade venom components. Mast cells also significantly reduced the morbidity and mortality induced by honeybee venom. These findings identify a new biological function for mast cells in enhancing resistance to the morbidity and mortality induced by animal venoms.

  7. Olopatadine: a drug for allergic conjunctivitis targeting the mast cell.

    PubMed

    Leonardi, Andrea; Quintieri, Luigi

    2010-04-01

    Ocular allergic diseases are characterized by specific activation of conjunctival mast cells with subsequent release of preformed and newly formed mediators. Mast cells are thus the first therapeutic target of ocular anti-allergic treatments. In this review, a Medline literature search was conducted on conjunctival mast cells, their role in ocular allergy and mast cell stabilization by ocular anti-allergic compounds. Olopatadine hydrochloride, a mast cell stabilizer and histamine receptor antagonist, has been shown to inhibit mast cell activation in an in vitro model of human mast cell culture, reducing histamine and TNF-alpha release and upregulating proinflammatory mediators in conjunctival epithelial cells. In the in vivo conjunctival allergen challenge (CAC) model in allergic subjects, combined with objective evaluations of tear mediators and cytology, olopatadine reduced histamine tear levels and all aspects of allergic inflammation, confirming the positive clinical effects observed in active allergic patients. Mast cells play a central role in the pathogenesis of ocular allergy. The CAC model is ideal for assessing the mast cell stabilizing effects of anti-allergic compounds. This review of clinical studies demonstrates the superiority of olopatadine compared with other topical allergic drugs.

  8. Augmented mast cell infiltration and microvessel density in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wagrowska-Danilewicz, Małgorzata; Stasikowska-Kanicka, Olga; Tuka, Elżbieta; Danilewicz, Marian

    2013-01-01

    Aim of the study Recent investigations have taken into account the role of mast cells in prostate cancer formation, analyzing their dual functions (as tumour growth promoters and tumour growth inhibitors). The aim of our study was to compare mast cell infiltration and microvessel density in prostate cancer and in benign prostate hyperplasia. We also attempted to find possible relationships among mast cell infiltration and microvessel density, Gleason score, as well as serum levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA). Material and methods The investigation was confined to evaluations of material from prostate needle biopsies, carried out in 26 patients with prostate cancer, and of 14 specimens diagnosed as benign hyperplasia. The numbers of tryptase positive mast cells and CD34 positive vessels were determined using a computer image analysis system. In the patients with prostate cancer, both mast cell infiltrates and microvessel density were significantly increased, as compared to the control patients. Results Significant positive correlations were identified between the mean numbers of mast cells and microvessel densities, both in the prostate cancer group and in the control group. Moreover, significant positive correlations were observed between Gleason score on one hand and the number of mast cells and microvessel density on the other. The correlations between PSA serum levels and both mast cell infiltration and microvessel density were positive, but not in a statistically significant way. Conclusions The reported investigations may support the assumption of mast cell promoter function in prostate cancer development, whereas no evidence was found for their opposite PMID:24592126

  9. Mast cells in human and experimental cardiometabolic diseases.

    PubMed

    Shi, Guo-Ping; Bot, Ilze; Kovanen, Petri T

    2015-11-01

    Mast cells, like many other types of inflammatory cell, perform pleiotropic roles in cardiometabolic diseases such as atherosclerosis, abdominal aortic aneurysms, obesity, and diabetes mellitus, as well as complications associated with these diseases. Low numbers of mast cells are present in the heart, aorta, and adipose tissue of healthy humans, but patients with cardiometabolic diseases and animals with experimentally-induced cardiometabolic pathologies have high numbers of mast cells with increased activity in the affected tissues. Mediators released by the activated mast cells, such as chemokines, cytokines, growth factors, heparin, histamine, and proteases, not only function as biomarkers of cardiometabolic diseases, but might also directly contribute to the pathogenesis of such diseases. Mast-cell mediators impede the functions of vascular cells, the integrity of the extracellular matrix, and the activity of other inflammatory cells, thereby contributing to the pathobiology of the conditions at multiple levels. In mouse models, mast-cell activation aggravates the progression of various cardiometabolic pathologies, whereas a genetic deficiency or pharmacological stabilization of mast cells, or depletion or inhibition of specific mast-cell mediators, tends to delay the progression of such conditions. Pharmacological inhibition of mast-cell activation or their targeted effector functions offers potential novel therapeutic strategies for patients with cardiometabolic disorders.

  10. Overview of physics results from MAST

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, H.; Maingi, Rajesh

    2009-01-01

    Several improvements to the MAST plant and diagnostics have facilitated new studies advancing the physics basis for ITER and DEMO, as well as for future spherical tokamaks (STs). Using the increased heating capabilities P-NBI <= 3.8 MW H-mode at I-P = 1.2 MA was accessed showing that the energy confinement on MAST scales more weakly with I-P and more strongly with B-t than in the ITER IPB98(y, 2) scaling. Measurements of the fuel retention of shallow pellets extrapolate to an ITER particle throughput of 70% of its original designed total throughput capacity. The anomalous momentum diffusion, chi(phi), is linked to the ion diffusion, chi(i), with a Prandtl number close to P-phi approximate to chi(phi)/chi(i) approximate to 1, although chi(i) approaches neoclassical values. New high spatial resolution measurements of the edge radial electric field, E-r, show that the position of steepest gradients in electron pressure and E-r (i.e. shearing rate) are coincident, but their magnitudes are not linked. The T-e pedestal width on MAST scales with root beta(ped)(pol) rather than rho(pol). The edge localized mode (ELM) frequency for type-IV ELMs, new in MAST, was almost doubled using n = 2 resonant magnetic perturbations from a set of four external coils (n = 1, 2). A new internal 12 coil set (n <= 3) has been commissioned. The filaments in the inter-ELM and L-mode phase are different from ELM filaments, and the characteristics in L-mode agree well with turbulence calculations. A variety of fast particle driven instabilities were studied from 10 kHz saturated fishbone like activity up to 3.8 MHz compressional Alfven eigenmodes. Fast particle instabilities also affect the off-axis NBI current drive, leading to fast ion diffusion of the order of 0.5 m(2) s(-1) and a reduction in the driven current fraction from 40% to 30%. EBW current drive start-up is demonstrated for the first time in a ST generating plasma currents up to 55 kA. Many of these studies contributed to the

  11. Annual and spatial variation in shoot demography associated with masting in Betula grossa: comparison between mature trees and saplings

    PubMed Central

    Ishihara, Masae Iwamoto; Kikuzawa, Kihachiro

    2009-01-01

    Backgrounds and Aims Shoot demography affects the growth of the tree crown and the number of leaves on a tree. Masting may cause inter-annual and spatial variation in shoot demography of mature trees, which may in turn affect the resource budget of the tree. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of masting on the temporal and spatial variations in shoot demography of mature Betula grossa. Methods The shoot demography was analysed in the upper and lower parts of the tree crown in mature trees and saplings over 7 years. Mature trees and saplings were compared to differentiate the effect of masting from the effect of exogenous environment on shoot demography. The fate of different shoot types (reproductive, vegetative, short, long), shoot length and leaf area were investigated by monitoring and by retrospective survey using morphological markers on branches. The effects of year and branch position on demographic parameters were evaluated. Key Results Shoot increase rate, production of long shoots, bud mortality, length of long shoots and leaf area of a branch fluctuated periodically from year to year in mature trees over 7 years, in which two masting events occurred. Branches within a crown showed synchronized annual variation, and the extent of fluctuation was larger in the upper branches than the lower branches. Vegetative shoots varied in their bud differentiation each year and contributed to the dynamic shoot demography as much as did reproductive shoots, suggesting physiological integration in shoot demography through hormonal regulation and resource allocation. Conclusions Masting caused periodic annual variation in shoot demography of the mature trees and the effect was spatially variable within a tree crown. Since masting is a common phenomenon among tree species, annual variation in shoot demography and leaf area should be incorporated into resource allocation models of mature masting trees. PMID:19734164

  12. Silver Nanoparticle-Directed Mast Cell Degranulation Is Mediated through Calcium and PI3K Signaling Independent of the High Affinity IgE Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Alsaleh, Nasser B.; Persaud, Indushekhar; Brown, Jared M.

    2016-01-01

    Engineered nanomaterial (ENM)-mediated toxicity often involves triggering immune responses. Mast cells can regulate both innate and adaptive immune responses and are key effectors in allergic diseases and inflammation. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are one of the most prevalent nanomaterials used in consumer products due to their antimicrobial properties. We have previously shown that AgNPs induce mast cell degranulation that was dependent on nanoparticle physicochemical properties. Furthermore, we identified a role for scavenger receptor B1 (SR-B1) in AgNP-mediated mast cell degranulation. However, it is completely unknown how SR-B1 mediates mast cell degranulation and the intracellular signaling pathways involved. In the current study, we hypothesized that SR-B1 interaction with AgNPs directs mast cell degranulation through activation of signal transduction pathways that culminate in an increase in intracellular calcium signal leading to mast cell degranulation. For these studies, we utilized bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMC) isolated from C57Bl/6 mice and RBL-2H3 cells (rat basophilic leukemia cell line). Our data support our hypothesis and show that AgNP-directed mast cell degranulation involves activation of PI3K, PLCγ and an increase in intracellular calcium levels. Moreover, we found that influx of extracellular calcium is required for the cells to degranulate in response to AgNP exposure and is mediated at least partially via the CRAC channels. Taken together, our results provide new insights into AgNP-induced mast cell activation that are key for designing novel ENMs that are devoid of immune system activation. PMID:27907088

  13. Silver Nanoparticle-Directed Mast Cell Degranulation Is Mediated through Calcium and PI3K Signaling Independent of the High Affinity IgE Receptor.

    PubMed

    Alsaleh, Nasser B; Persaud, Indushekhar; Brown, Jared M

    2016-01-01

    Engineered nanomaterial (ENM)-mediated toxicity often involves triggering immune responses. Mast cells can regulate both innate and adaptive immune responses and are key effectors in allergic diseases and inflammation. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are one of the most prevalent nanomaterials used in consumer products due to their antimicrobial properties. We have previously shown that AgNPs induce mast cell degranulation that was dependent on nanoparticle physicochemical properties. Furthermore, we identified a role for scavenger receptor B1 (SR-B1) in AgNP-mediated mast cell degranulation. However, it is completely unknown how SR-B1 mediates mast cell degranulation and the intracellular signaling pathways involved. In the current study, we hypothesized that SR-B1 interaction with AgNPs directs mast cell degranulation through activation of signal transduction pathways that culminate in an increase in intracellular calcium signal leading to mast cell degranulation. For these studies, we utilized bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMC) isolated from C57Bl/6 mice and RBL-2H3 cells (rat basophilic leukemia cell line). Our data support our hypothesis and show that AgNP-directed mast cell degranulation involves activation of PI3K, PLCγ and an increase in intracellular calcium levels. Moreover, we found that influx of extracellular calcium is required for the cells to degranulate in response to AgNP exposure and is mediated at least partially via the CRAC channels. Taken together, our results provide new insights into AgNP-induced mast cell activation that are key for designing novel ENMs that are devoid of immune system activation.

  14. Human mast cell tryptase: Multiple cDNAs and genes reveal a multigene serine protease family

    SciTech Connect

    Vanderslice, P.; Ballinger, S.M., Tam, E.K.; Goldstein, S.M.; Craik, C.S.; Caughey, G.H. )

    1990-05-01

    Three different cDNAs and a gene encoding human skin mast cell tryptase have been cloned and sequenced in their entirety. The deduced amino acid sequences reveal a 30-amino acid prepropeptide followed by a 245-amino acid catalytic domain. The C-terminal undecapeptide of the human preprosequence is identical in dog tryptase and appears to be part of a prosequence unique among serine proteases. The differences among the three human tryptase catalytic domains include the loss of a consensus N-glycosylation site in one cDNA, which may explain some of the heterogeneity in size and susceptibility to deglycosylation seen in tryptase preparations. All three tryptase cDNAs are distinct from a recently reported cDNA obtained from a human lung mast cell library. A skin tryptase cDNA was used to isolate a human tryptase gene, the exons of which match one of the skin-derived cDNAs. The organization of the {approx}1.8-kilobase-pair tryptase gene is unique and is not closely related to that of any other mast cell or leukocyte serine protease. The 5{prime} regulatory regions of the gene share features with those of other serine proteases, including mast cell chymase, but are unusual in being separated from the protein-coding sequence by an intron. High-stringency hybridization of a human genomic DNA blot with a fragment of the tryptase gene confirms the presence of multiple tryptase genes. These findings provide genetic evidence that human mast cell tryptases are the products of a multigene family.

  15. Human mast cell tryptase: multiple cDNAs and genes reveal a multigene serine protease family.

    PubMed Central

    Vanderslice, P; Ballinger, S M; Tam, E K; Goldstein, S M; Craik, C S; Caughey, G H

    1990-01-01

    Three different cDNAs and a gene encoding human skin mast cell tryptase have been cloned and sequenced in their entirety. The deduced amino acid sequences reveal a 30-amino acid prepropeptide followed by a 245-amino acid catalytic domain. The C-terminal undecapeptide of the human preprosequence is identical in dog tryptase and appears to be part of a prosequence unique among serine proteases. The differences among the three human tryptase catalytic domains include the loss of a consensus N-glycosylation site in one cDNA, which may explain some of the heterogeneity in size and susceptibility to deglycosylation seen in tryptase preparations. All three tryptase cDNAs are distinct from a recently reported cDNA obtained from a human lung mast cell library. A skin tryptase cDNA was used to isolate a human tryptase gene, the exons of which match one of the skin-derived cDNAs. The organization of the approximately 1.8-kilobase-pair tryptase gene is unique and is not closely related to that of any other mast cell or leukocyte serine protease. The 5' regulatory regions of the gene share features with those of other serine proteases, including mast cell chymase, but are unusual in being separated from the protein-coding sequence by an intron. High-stringency hybridization of a human genomic DNA blot with a fragment of the tryptase gene confirms the presence of multiple tryptase genes. These findings provide genetic evidence that human mast cell tryptases are the products of a multigene family. Images PMID:2187193

  16. Kalanchoe pinnata inhibits mast cell activation and prevents allergic airway disease.

    PubMed

    Cruz, E A; Reuter, S; Martin, H; Dehzad, N; Muzitano, M F; Costa, S S; Rossi-Bergmann, B; Buhl, R; Stassen, M; Taube, C

    2012-01-15

    Aqueous extract of Kalanchoe pinnata (Kp) have been found effective in models to reduce acute anaphylactic reactions. In the present study, we investigate the effect of Kp and the flavonoid quercetin (QE) and quercitrin (QI) on mast cell activation in vitro and in a model of allergic airway disease in vivo. Treatment with Kp and QE in vitro inhibited degranulation and cytokine production of bone marrow-derived mast cells following IgE/FcɛRI crosslinking, whereas treatment with QI had no effect. Similarly, in vivo treatment with Kp and QE decreased development of airway hyperresponsiveness, airway inflammation, goblet cell metaplasia and production of IL-5, IL-13 and TNF. In contrast, treatment with QI had no effect on these parameters. These findings demonstrate that treatment with Kp or QE is effective in treatment of allergic airway disease, providing new insights to the immunomodulatory functions of this plant.

  17. Inhibitory effects of Acorus calamus extracts on mast cell-dependent anaphylactic reactions using mast cell and mouse model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Young; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Kim, Wan-Jae; Jiang, Jun; Kim, Myong-Ki; Shin, Yong-Kook; Kim, Dong-Woo; Moon, Won-Kook; Kwon, Sang-Chul; Koppula, Sushruta; Kang, Tae-Bong; Lee, Kwang-Ho

    2012-05-07

    Acorus calamus Linn. (Araceae) is a traditional herbal plant used for centuries to treat various allergic symptoms including asthma and bronchitis. The present study was focused to provide a pharmacological basis for the traditional use of Acorus calamus in allergic symptoms using the mast cell-dependent anaphylactic reactions in in vitro and in vivo models. Cell viabilities were measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Dinitrophenyl-human serum albumin (DNP-HSA) induced β-hexosaminidase and interleukin (IL)-4 productions in IgE-sensitized rat basophilic leukaemia (RBL-2H3) cells were measured by enzymatic assay and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) reaction mouse model was implemented for in vivo studies. Hot water (HW), butylene glycol (BG), hexane (HE) and steam distilled (SD) extracts of Acorus calamus showed different cytoxicity levels evaluated in RBL-2H3 cells. Sub-toxic doses of HW extract suppressed the β-hexosaminidase secretion and IL-4 production significantly and dose dependently in DNP-HSA induced IgE-sensitized RBL-2H3 cells compared to other extracts of Acorus calamus. Further, in vivo studies also revealed that the HW extract significantly inhibited the PCA reaction in mouse compared to the normal control group. HW extract of Acorus calamus most effectively inhibited degranulation and IL-4 secretion in DNP-HSA-stimulated RBL-2H3 cells and also reduced the mast cell-mediated PCA reaction in mouse, providing a therapeutic evidence for its traditional use in ameliorating allergic reactions. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  18. Mast cells have no impact on cutaneous leishmaniasis severity and related Th2 differentiation in resistant and susceptible mice.

    PubMed

    Paul, Christoph; Wolff, Svenja; Zapf, Thea; Raifer, Hartmann; Feyerabend, Thorsten B; Bollig, Nadine; Camara, Bärbel; Trier, Claudia; Schleicher, Ulrike; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer; Lohoff, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The genus leishmania comprises different protozoan parasites which are causative agents of muco-cutaneous and systemic, potentially lethal diseases. After infection with the species Leishmania major, resistant mice expand Th1 cells which stimulate macrophages for Leishmania destruction. In contrast, susceptible mice generate Th2 cells which deactivate macrophages, leading to systemic spread of the pathogens. Th-cell differentiation is determined within the first days, and Th2 cell differentiation requires IL-4, whereby the initial IL-4 source is often unknown. Mast cells are potential sources of IL-4, and hence their role in murine leishmaniasis has previously been studied in mast cell-deficient Kit mutant mice, although these mice display immunological phenotypes beyond mast cell deficiency. We therefore readdressed this question by infecting Kit-independent mast cell-deficient mice that are Th1 (C57BL/6 Cpa(Cre) ) or Th2 (BALB/c Cpa(Cre) ) prone with L. major. Using different parasite doses and intra- or subcutaneous infection routes, the results demonstrate no role of mast cells on lesion size development, parasite load, immune cell phenotypes expanding in draining lymph nodes, and cytokine production during murine cutaneous leishmaniasis. Thus, other cell types such as ILCs or T cells have to be considered as primary source of Th2-driving IL-4.

  19. Hard Hitters!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dupont, Stephen

    2000-01-01

    Presents a selection of computers and peripherals designed to enhance the classroom. They include personal digital assistants (the AlphaSmart 30001R, CalcuScribe Duo, and DreamWriter IT); new Apple products (the iBook laptop, improved iMac, and OS 9 operating system); PC options (new Gateway and Compaq computers); and gadgets (imagiLab, the QX3…

  20. Hard Hitters!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dupont, Stephen

    2000-01-01

    Presents a selection of computers and peripherals designed to enhance the classroom. They include personal digital assistants (the AlphaSmart 30001R, CalcuScribe Duo, and DreamWriter IT); new Apple products (the iBook laptop, improved iMac, and OS 9 operating system); PC options (new Gateway and Compaq computers); and gadgets (imagiLab, the QX3…

  1. Mast Cells Contribute to Scar Formation During Fetal Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Wulff, Brian C.; Parent, Allison E.; Meleski, Melissa A.; DiPietro, Luisa A.; Schrementi, Megan E.; Wilgus, Traci A.

    2011-01-01

    Scar formation is a potentially detrimental process of tissue restoration in adults, affecting organ form and function. During fetal development, cutaneous wounds heal without inflammation or scarring at early stages of development, but begin to heal with significant inflammation and scarring as the skin becomes more mature. One possible cell type that could regulate the change from scarless to fibrotic healing is the mast cell. We show here that dermal mast cells in scarless wounds generated at embryonic day 15 (E15) are fewer in number, less mature and do not degranulate in response to wounding as effectively as mast cells of fibrotic wounds made at embryonic day 18 (E18). Differences were also observed between cultured mast cells from E15 and E18 skin with regard to degranulation and preformed cytokine levels. Injection of mast cell lysates into E15 wounds disrupted scarless healing, suggesting that mast cells interfere with scarless repair. Finally, wounds produced at E18, which normally heal with a scar, healed with significantly smaller scars in mast cell-deficient KitW/W-v mice compared to Kit+/+ littermates. Together, these data suggest that mast cells enhance scar formation, and that these cells may mediate the transition from scarless to fibrotic healing during fetal development. PMID:21993557

  2. 123. UMBILICAL MAST PUMP ROOM (209), LSB (BLDG. 751). PUMP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    123. UMBILICAL MAST PUMP ROOM (209), LSB (BLDG. 751). PUMP ON LEFT; HYDRAULIC CONTROL PANEL FOR UMBILICAL MAST AND TRENCH DOORS IN CENTER OF ROOM, FACING WEST. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  3. 125. HYDRAULIC CONTROLS FOR MAST TRENCH DOORS ON LEFT SIDE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    125. HYDRAULIC CONTROLS FOR MAST TRENCH DOORS ON LEFT SIDE OF HYDRAULIC CONTROL PANEL IN UMBILICAL MAST PUMP ROOM (209), LSB (BLDG. 751) - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  4. 33 CFR 401.82 - Reporting mast height.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reporting mast height. 401.82... mast height. A vessel, any part of which extends more than 33.5 m above water level, shall not transit any part of the Seaway until precise information concerning the height of the vessel has been...

  5. Mast Cells: A Pivotal Role in Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Veerappan, Arul; O'Connor, Nathan J.; Brazin, Jacqueline; Reid, Alicia C.; Jung, Albert; McGee, David; Summers, Barbara; Branch-Elliman, Dascher; Stiles, Brendon; Worgall, Stefan; Kaner, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis is characterized by an inflammatory response that includes macrophages, neutrophils, lymphocytes, and mast cells. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether mast cells play a role in initiating pulmonary fibrosis. Pulmonary fibrosis was induced with bleomycin in mast-cell-deficient WBB6F1-W/Wv (MCD) mice and their congenic controls (WBB6F1-+/+). Mast cell deficiency protected against bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis, but protection was reversed with the re-introduction of mast cells to the lungs of MCD mice. Two mast cell mediators were identified as fibrogenic: histamine and renin, via angiotensin (ANG II). Both human and rat lung fibroblasts express the histamine H1 and ANG II AT1 receptor subtypes and when activated, they promote proliferation, transforming growth factor β1 secretion, and collagen synthesis. Mast cells appear to be critical to pulmonary fibrosis. Therapeutic blockade of mast cell degranulation and/or histamine and ANG II receptors should attenuate pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:23570576

  6. The role of mast cells in allergic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Amin, Kawa

    2012-01-01

    The histochemical characteristics of human basophils and tissue mast cells were described over a century ago by Paul Ehrlich. When mast cells are activated by an allergen that binds to serum IgE attached to their FcɛRI receptors, they release cytokines, eicosanoids and their secretory granules. Mast cells are now thought to exert critical proinflammatory functions, as well as potential immunoregulatory roles, in various immune disorders through the release of mediators such as histamine, leukotrienes, cytokines chemokines, and neutral proteases (chymase and tryptase). The aim of this review is to describe the role of mast cells in allergic inflammation. Mast cells interact directly with bacteria and appear to play a vital role in host defense against pathogens. Drugs, such as glucocorticoids, cyclosporine and cromolyn have been shown to have inhibitory effects on mast cell degranulation and mediator release. This review shows that mast cells play an active role in such diverse diseases as asthma, rhinitis, middle ear infection, and pulmonary fibrosis. In conclusion, mast cells may not only contribute to the chronic airway inflammatory response, remodeling and symptomatology, but they may also have a central role in the initiation of the allergic immune response, that is providing signals inducing IgE synthesis by B-lymphocytes and inducing Th2 lymphocyte differentiation.

  7. 127. HYDRAULIC CONTROLS AND GAUGES FOR THE UMBILICAL MAST ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    127. HYDRAULIC CONTROLS AND GAUGES FOR THE UMBILICAL MAST ON UPPER RIGHT SIDE OF HYDRAULIC CONTROL PANEL IN UMBILICAL MAST PUMP ROOM (209), LSB (BLDG. 751) - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  8. Machine Tool Advanced Skills Technology Program (MAST). Overview and Methodology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas State Technical Coll., Waco.

    The Machine Tool Advanced Skills Technology Program (MAST) is a geographical partnership of six of the nation's best two-year colleges located in the six states that have about one-third of the density of metals-related industries in the United States. The purpose of the MAST grant is to develop and implement a national training model to overcome…

  9. Space Shuttle Tail Service Mast Concept Verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uda, R. T.

    1976-01-01

    Design studies and analyses were performed to describe the loads and dynamics of the space shuttle tail service masts (TSMs). Of particular interest are the motion and interaction of the umbilical carrier plate, lanyard system, vacuum jacketed hoses, latches, links, and masthead. A development test rig was designed and fabricated to obtain experimental data. The test program is designed to (1) verify the theoretical dynamics calculations, (2) prove the soundness of design concepts, and (3) elucidate problem areas (if any) in the design of mechanisms and structural components. Design, fabrication, and initiation of TSM development testing at Kennedy Space Center are described.

  10. Marine asset security and tracking (MAST) system

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, Gregory Richard [Clinton, TN; Smith, Stephen Fulton [Loudon, TN; Moore, Michael Roy [Corryton, TN; Dobson, Eric Lesley [Charleston, SC; Blair, Jeffrey Scott [Charleston, SC; Duncan, Christopher Allen [Marietta, GA; Lenarduzzi, Roberto [Knoxville, TN

    2008-07-01

    Methods and apparatus are described for marine asset security and tracking (MAST). A method includes transmitting identification data, location data and environmental state sensor data from a radio frequency tag. An apparatus includes a radio frequency tag that transmits identification data, location data and environmental state sensor data. Another method includes transmitting identification data and location data from a radio frequency tag using hybrid spread-spectrum modulation. Another apparatus includes a radio frequency tag that transmits both identification data and location data using hybrid spread-spectrum modulation.

  11. Testing the 'toxin hypothesis of allergy': mast cells, IgE, and innate and acquired immune responses to venoms.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Mindy; Starkl, Philipp; Marichal, Thomas; Galli, Stephen J

    2015-10-01

    Work in mice indicates that innate functions of mast cells, particularly degradation of venom toxins by mast cell-derived proteases, can enhance resistance to certain arthropod or reptile venoms. Recent reports indicate that acquired Th2 immune responses associated with the production of IgE antibodies, induced by Russell's viper venom or honeybee venom, or by a component of honeybee venom, bee venom phospholipase 2 (bvPLA2), can increase the resistance of mice to challenge with potentially lethal doses of either of the venoms or bvPLA2. These findings support the conclusion that, in contrast to the detrimental effects associated with allergic type 2 (Th2) immune responses, mast cells and IgE-dependent immune responses to venoms can contribute to innate and adaptive resistance to venom-induced pathology and mortality. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Testing the "toxin hypothesis of allergy": Mast cells, IgE, and innate and acquired immune responses to venoms*

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Mindy; Starkl, Philipp; Marichal, Thomas; Galli, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Work in mice indicates that innate functions of mast cells, particularly degradation of venom toxins by mast cell-derived proteases, can enhance resistance to certain arthropod or reptile venoms. Recent reports indicate that acquired Th2 immune responses associated with the production of IgE antibodies, induced by Russell’s viper venom or honeybee venom, or by a component of honeybee venom, bee venom phospholipase 2 (bvPLA2), can increase the resistance of mice to challenge with potentially lethal doses of either of the venoms or bvPLA2. These findings support the conclusion that, in contrast to the detrimental effects associated with allergic Th2 immune responses, mast cells and IgE-dependent immune responses to venoms can contribute to innate and adaptive resistance to venom-induced pathology and mortality. PMID:26210895

  13. Mast Cells in Lung Homeostasis: Beyond Type I Hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Campillo-Navarro, Marcia; Chávez-Blanco, Alma D; Wong-Baeza, Isabel; Serafín-López, Jeanet; Flores-Mejía, Raúl; Estrada-Parra, Sergio; Estrada-García, Iris; Chacón-Salinas, Rommel

    2014-06-01

    Lungs are indispensable organs for the respiratory process, and maintaining their homeostasis is essential for human health and survival. However, during the lifetime of an individual, the lungs suffer countless insults that put at risk their delicate organization and function. Many cells of the immune system participate to maintain this equilibrium and to keep functional lungs. Among these cells, mast cells have recently attracted attention because of their ability to rapidly secrete many chemical and biological mediators that modulate different processes like inflammation, angiogenesis, cell proliferation, etc. In this review, we focus on recent advances in the understanding of the role that mast cells play in lung protection during infections, and of the relation of mast cell responses to type I hypersensitivity-associated pathologies. Furthermore, we discuss the potential role of mast cells during wound healing in the lung and its association with lung cancer, and how mast cells could be exploited as therapeutic targets in some diseases.

  14. Alterations in MAST suit pressure with changes in ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Sanders, A B; Meislin, H W; Daub, E

    1983-01-01

    A study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that change in ambient air temperature has an effect on MAST suit pressure according to the ideal gas law. Two different MAST suits were tested on Resusci-Annie dummies. The MAST suits were applied in a cold room at 4.4 degrees C and warmed to 44 degrees C. Positive linear correlations were found in nine trials, but the two suits differed in their rate of increase in pressure. Three trials using humans were conducted showing increased pressure with temperature but at a lesser rate than with dummies. A correlation of 0.5 to 1.0 mm Hg increase in MAST suit pressure for each 1.0 degrees C increase in ambient temperature was found. Implications are discussed for the use of the MAST suit in environmental conditions where the temperature changes.

  15. Roles and relevance of mast cells in infection and vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Yu; Xiang, Zou

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In addition to their well-established role in allergy mast cells have been described as contributing to functional regulation of both innate and adaptive immune responses in host defense. Mast cells are of hematopoietic origin but typically complete their differentiation in tissues where they express immune regulatory functions by releasing diverse mediators and cytokines. Mast cells are abundant at mucosal tissues which are portals of entry for common infectious agents in addition to allergens. Here, we review the current understanding of the participation of mast cells in defense against infection. We also discuss possibilities of exploiting mast cell activation to provide adequate adjuvant activity that is needed in high-quality vaccination against infectious diseases. PMID:26565602

  16. Basic science for the clinician 53: mast cells.

    PubMed

    Sigal, Leonard H

    2011-10-01

    Mast cells stand at the interface between the innate immune system and the acquired (adaptive) immune response, serving as sentinels detecting invaders and directing a concerted and coordinated response. Mast cells reside immediately under body surfaces and within lymph nodes, near blood vessels and nerves, perfectly situated to for early detection and defense. They secrete a wide array of prostanoids, cytokines, chemokines, and other proteins mediators and modifiers of a variety of immune and inflammatory functions and bear surface markers suggesting broad functions, including as antigen-presenting cells. Although usually not given their due in medical school lectures, there is great likelihood that mast cells will be implicated in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis, scleroderma, multiple sclerosis, and perhaps cancer. Thus, better insights into mast cell functions and mast cell-derived effector molecules should command our attention as we move forward in better understanding disease immunopathogenesis and directed intelligent therapeutics development.

  17. Regulation of basophil and mast cell development by transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Haruka; Kurotaki, Daisuke; Tamura, Tomohiko

    2016-04-01

    Basophils and mast cells play important roles in host defense against parasitic infections and allergic responses. Several progenitor populations, either shared or specific, for basophils and/or mast cells have been identified, thus elucidating the developmental pathways of these cells. Multiple transcription factors essential for their development and the relationships between them have been also revealed. For example, IRF8 induces GATA2 expression to promote the generation of both basophils and mast cells. The STAT5-GATA2 axis induces C/EBPα and MITF expression, facilitating the differentiation into basophils and mast cells, respectively. In addition, C/EBPα and MITF mutually suppress each other's expression. This review provides an overview of recent advances in our understanding of how transcription factors regulate the development of basophils and mast cells.

  18. Mast Cells in Lung Homeostasis: Beyond Type I Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Campillo-Navarro, Marcia; Chávez-Blanco, Alma D; Wong-Baeza, Isabel; Serafín-López, Jeanet; Flores-Mejía, Raúl; Estrada-Parra, Sergio; Estrada-García, Iris; Chacón-Salinas, Rommel

    2014-01-01

    Lungs are indispensable organs for the respiratory process, and maintaining their homeostasis is essential for human health and survival. However, during the lifetime of an individual, the lungs suffer countless insults that put at risk their delicate organization and function. Many cells of the immune system participate to maintain this equilibrium and to keep functional lungs. Among these cells, mast cells have recently attracted attention because of their ability to rapidly secrete many chemical and biological mediators that modulate different processes like inflammation, angiogenesis, cell proliferation, etc. In this review, we focus on recent advances in the understanding of the role that mast cells play in lung protection during infections, and of the relation of mast cell responses to type I hypersensitivity-associated pathologies. Furthermore, we discuss the potential role of mast cells during wound healing in the lung and its association with lung cancer, and how mast cells could be exploited as therapeutic targets in some diseases PMID:25484639

  19. A practical method to evaluate radiofrequency exposure of mast workers.

    PubMed

    Alanko, Tommi; Hietanen, Maila

    2008-01-01

    Assessment of occupational exposure to radiofrequency (RF) fields in telecommunication transmitter masts is a challenging task. For conventional field strength measurements using manually operated instruments, it is difficult to document the locations of measurements while climbing up a mast. Logging RF dosemeters worn by the workers, on the other hand, do not give any information about the location of the exposure. In this study, a practical method was developed and applied to assess mast workers' exposure to RF fields and the corresponding location. This method uses a logging dosemeter for personal RF exposure evaluation and two logging barometers to determine the corresponding height of the worker's position on the mast. The procedure is not intended to be used for compliance assessments, but to indicate locations where stricter assessments are needed. The applicability of the method is demonstrated by making measurements in a TV and radio transmitting mast.

  20. Histamine release from human buffy coat-derived mast cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xian Song; Lau, Hang Yung Alaster

    2007-04-01

    Mast cells are unique immune cells that release a spectrum of chemical mediators contributing to the inflammatory symptoms of allergic disorders. Although mast cell biology has been extensively studied in the rodents, research on human mast cells is hampered by the lack of a convenient preparation source. This problem has now been addressed by culturing human mast cells from CD34(+) progenitors. We have recently discovered that human buffy coat preparations from local blood banks are an abundant and convenient source of progenitors for culturing mature mast cells which express functional high affinity IgE receptors and contain histamine and tryptase in their granules. In the current study, we further characterize these buffy coat-derived mast cells by studying their responses to common mast cell secretagogues and stabilizers. Mature human mast cells were obtained by culturing isolated progenitors in methylcellulose containing stem cell factor (SCF), IL-3 and IL-6 for 6 weeks and subsequently in liquid medium containing SCF and IL-6 for another 6 to 8 weeks. Following sensitisation with human IgE, these cells released histamine dose-dependently upon activation by anti-IgE and calcium ionophores while compound 48/80 and substance P were relatively ineffective. When the effects of anti-asthmatic agents on anti-IgE-induced mediator release from these cells were compared, only the beta(2)-adrenoceptor agonists and phosphodiesterase inhibitors produced dose-dependent inhibition but not cromolyn or nedocromil. In total, mast cells cultured from human buffy coat progenitors shared similar functional properties of MC(T) subtype of mast cells found predominantly in human lung parenchyma and intestinal mucosa.

  1. GPR30 decreases cardiac chymase/angiotensin II by inhibiting local mast cell number

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Zhuo; Wang, Hao; Lin, Marina; Groban, Leanne

    2015-03-27

    Chronic activation of the novel estrogen receptor GPR30 by its agonist G1 mitigates the adverse effects of estrogen (E2) loss on cardiac structure and function. Using the ovariectomized (OVX) mRen2.Lewis rat, an E2-sensitive model of diastolic dysfunction, we found that E2 status is inversely correlated with local cardiac angiotensin II (Ang II) levels, likely via Ang I/chymase-mediated production. Since chymase is released from cardiac mast cells during stress (e.g., volume/pressure overload, inflammation), we hypothesized that GPR30-related cardioprotection after E2 loss might occur through its opposing actions on cardiac mast cell proliferation and chymase production. Using real-time quantitative PCR, immunohistochemistry, and immunoblot analysis, we found mast cell number, chymase expression, and cardiac Ang II levels were significantly increased in the hearts of OVX-compared to ovary-intact mRen2.Lewis rats and the GPR30 agonist G1 (50 mg/kg/day, s.c.) administered for 2 weeks limited the adverse effects of estrogen loss. In vitro studies revealed that GPR30 receptors are expressed in the RBL-2H3 mast cell line and G1 inhibits serum-induced cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner, as determined by cell counting, BrdU incorporation assay, and Ki-67 staining. Using specific antagonists to estrogen receptors, blockage of GPR30, but not ERα or ERβ, attenuated the inhibitory effects of estrogen on BrdU incorporation in RBL-2H3 cells. Further study of the mechanism underlying the effect on cell proliferation showed that G1 inhibits cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1) mRNA and protein expression in RBL-2H3 cells in a dose-dependent manner. - Highlights: • GPR30 activation limits mast cell number in hearts from OVX mRen2.Lewis rats. • GPR30 activation decreases cardiac chymase/angiotensin II after estrogen loss. • GPR30 activation inhibits RBL-2H3 mast cell proliferation and CDK1 expression.

  2. Ceramide-CD300f binding suppresses experimental colitis by inhibiting ATP-mediated mast cell activation.

    PubMed

    Matsukawa, Toshihiro; Izawa, Kumi; Isobe, Masamichi; Takahashi, Mariko; Maehara, Akie; Yamanishi, Yoshinori; Kaitani, Ayako; Okumura, Ko; Teshima, Takanori; Kitamura, Toshio; Kitaura, Jiro

    2016-05-01

    Extracellular ATP mediates mast cell-dependent intestinal inflammation via P2X7 purinoceptors. We have previously shown that CD300f (also called the leucocyte mono-immunoglobulin-like receptor 3 (LMIR3)) suppresses immunoglobulin E-dependent and mast cell-dependent allergic responses by binding to ceramide. The aim of the present study was to clarify the role of ceramide-LMIR3 interaction in the development of IBD. The dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis model was used in wild-type (WT), LMIR3(-/-), mast cell-deficient Kit(W-sh/W-sh), Kit(W-sh/W-sh)LMIR3(-/-) or Kit(W-sh/W-sh) mice engrafted with WT or LMIR3(-/-) bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs). The severity of colitis was determined by clinical and histological criteria. Lamina propria cell populations were assessed by flow cytometry. Production of chemical mediators from lamina propria cells was measured by real-time reverse transcription PCR. Production of chemical mediators from ATP-stimulated BMMCs in the presence or absence of ceramide was measured by ELISA. The severity of DSS-induced colitis was assessed in mice given either an Fc fusion protein containing an extracellular domain of LMIR3, and anticeramide antibody, or ceramide liposomes. LMIR3 deficiency exacerbated DSS-induced colitis in mice. Kit(W-sh/W-sh) mice harbouring LMIR3(-/-) mast cells exhibited more severe colitis than those harbouring WT mast cells. Ceramide-LMIR3 interaction inhibited ATP-stimulated activation of BMMCs. DSS-induced colitis was aggravated by disrupting the ceramide-LMIR3 interaction, whereas it was suppressed by treating with ceramide liposomes. LMIR3-deficient colonic mast cells were pivotal in the exacerbation of DSS-induced colitis in LMIR3(-/-) mice. Ceramide liposomes attenuated DSS-induced colitis by inhibiting ATP-mediated activation of colonic mast cells through ceraimide-LMIR3 binding. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence

  3. Overview of recent physics results from MAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, A.; Adamek, J.; Akers, R. J.; Allan, S.; Appel, L.; Arese Lucini, F.; Barnes, M.; Barrett, T.; Ben Ayed, N.; Boeglin, W.; Bradley, J.; Browning, P. K.; Brunner, J.; Cahyna, P.; Cardnell, S.; Carr, M.; Casson, F.; Cecconello, M.; Challis, C.; Chapman, I. T.; Chapman, S.; Chorley, J.; Conroy, S.; Conway, N.; Cooper, W. A.; Cox, M.; Crocker, N.; Crowley, B.; Cunningham, G.; Danilov, A.; Darrow, D.; Dendy, R.; Dickinson, D.; Dorland, W.; Dudson, B.; Dunai, D.; Easy, L.; Elmore, S.; Evans, M.; Farley, T.; Fedorczak, N.; Field, A.; Fishpool, G.; Fitzgerald, I.; Fox, M.; Freethy, S.; Garzotti, L.; Ghim, Y. C.; Gi, K.; Gibson, K.; Gorelenkova, M.; Gracias, W.; Gurl, C.; Guttenfelder, W.; Ham, C.; Harrison, J.; Harting, D.; Havlickova, E.; Hawkes, N.; Hender, T.; Henderson, S.; Highcock, E.; Hillesheim, J.; Hnat, B.; Horacek, J.; Howard, J.; Howell, D.; Huang, B.; Imada, K.; Inomoto, M.; Imazawa, R.; Jones, O.; Kadowaki, K.; Kaye, S.; Keeling, D.; Klimek, I.; Kocan, M.; Kogan, L.; Komm, M.; Lai, W.; Leddy, J.; Leggate, H.; Hollocombe, J.; Lipschultz, B.; Lisgo, S.; Liu, Y. Q.; Lloyd, B.; Lomanowski, B.; Lukin, V.; Lupelli, I.; Maddison, G.; Madsen, J.; Mailloux, J.; Martin, R.; McArdle, G.; McClements, K.; McMillan, B.; Meakins, A.; Meyer, H.; Michael, C.; Militello, F.; Milnes, J.; Morris, A. W.; Motojima, G.; Muir, D.; Naylor, G.; Nielsen, A.; O'Brien, M.; O'Gorman, T.; O'Mullane, M.; Olsen, J.; Omotani, J.; Ono, Y.; Pamela, S.; Pangione, L.; Parra, F.; Patel, A.; Peebles, W.; Perez, R.; Pinches, S.; Piron, L.; Price, M.; Reinke, M.; Ricci, P.; Riva, F.; Roach, C.; Romanelli, M.; Ryan, D.; Saarelma, S.; Saveliev, A.; Scannell, R.; Schekochihin, A.; Sharapov, S.; Sharples, R.; Shevchenko, V.; Shinohara, K.; Silburn, S.; Simpson, J.; Stanier, A.; Storrs, J.; Summers, H.; Takase, Y.; Tamain, P.; Tanabe, H.; Tanaka, H.; Tani, K.; Taylor, D.; Thomas, D.; Thomas-Davies, N.; Thornton, A.; Turnyanskiy, M.; Valovic, M.; Vann, R.; Van Wyk, F.; Walkden, N.; Watanabe, T.; Wilson, H.; Wischmeier, M.; Yamada, T.; Young, J.; Zoletnik, S.; the MAST Team; the EUROfusion MST1 Team

    2017-10-01

    New results from MAST are presented that focus on validating models in order to extrapolate to future devices. Measurements during start-up experiments have shown how the bulk ion temperature rise scales with the square of the reconnecting field. During the current ramp-up, models are not able to correctly predict the current diffusion. Experiments have been performed looking at edge and core turbulence. At the edge, detailed studies have revealed how filament characteristics are responsible for determining the near and far scrape off layer density profiles. In the core the intrinsic rotation and electron scale turbulence have been measured. The role that the fast ion gradient has on redistributing fast ions through fishbone modes has led to a redesign of the neutral beam injector on MAST Upgrade. In H-mode the turbulence at the pedestal top has been shown to be consistent with being due to electron temperature gradient modes. A reconnection process appears to occur during edge localized modes (ELMs) and the number of filaments released determines the power profile at the divertor. Resonant magnetic perturbations can mitigate ELMs provided the edge peeling response is maximised and the core kink response minimised. The mitigation of intrinsic error fields with toroidal mode number n  >  1 has been shown to be important for plasma performance.

  4. Mast cell distribution in normal adult skin.

    PubMed

    Janssens, A S; Heide, R; den Hollander, J C; Mulder, P G M; Tank, B; Oranje, A P

    2005-03-01

    To investigate mast cell distribution in normal adult skin to provide a reference range for comparison with mastocytosis. Mast cells (MCs) were counted in uninvolved skin adjacent to basal cell carcinomas and other dermatological disorders in adults. There was an uneven distribution of MCs in different body sites using the anti-tryptase monoclonal antibody technique. Numbers of MCs on the trunk, upper arm, and upper leg were similar, but were significantly different from those found on the lower leg and forearm. Two distinct groups were formed--proximal and distal. There were 77.0 MCs/mm2 at proximal body sites and 108.2 MCs/mm2 at distal sites. Adjusted for the adjacent diagnosis and age, this difference was consistent. The numbers of MCs in uninvolved skin adjacent to basal cell carcinomas and other dermatological disorders were not different from those in the control group. Differences in the numbers of MCs between the distal and the proximal body sites must be considered when MCs are counted for a reliable diagnosis of mastocytosis. A pilot study in patients with mastocytosis underlined the variation in the numbers of MCs in mastocytosis and normal skin, but showed a considerable overlap. The observed numbers of MCs in adults cannot be extrapolated to children. MC numbers varied significantly between proximal and distal body sites and these differences must be considered when MCs are counted for a reliable diagnosis of mastocytosis. There was a considerable overlap between the numbers of MCs in mastocytosis and normal skin.

  5. Mast cells, angiogenesis, and tumour growth.

    PubMed

    Ribatti, Domenico; Crivellato, Enrico

    2012-01-01

    Accumulation of mast cells (MCs) in tumours was described by Ehrlich in his doctoral thesis. Since this early account, ample evidence has been provided highlighting participation of MCs to the inflammatory reaction that occurs in many clinical and experimental tumour settings. MCs are bone marrow-derived tissue-homing leukocytes that are endowed with a panoply of releasable mediators and surface receptors. These cells actively take part to innate and acquired immune reactions as well as to a series of fundamental functions such as angiogenesis, tissue repair, and tissue remodelling. The involvement of MCs in tumour development is debated. Although some evidence suggests that MCs can promote tumourigenesis and tumour progression, there are some clinical sets as well as experimental tumour models in which MCs seem to have functions that favour the host. One of the major issues linking MCs to cancer is the ability of these cells to release potent pro-angiogenic factors. This review will focus on the most recent acquisitions about this intriguing field of research. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mast cells in inflammation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Hodgkin's lymphoma is a rare form of clonal haematological non-mast cell disease in systemic mastocytosis.

    PubMed

    Gasljevic, Gorana; Grcar-Kuzmanov, Biljana; Grosel, Alenka; Sever, Matjaz; Gazic, Barbara; Kloboves-Prevodnik, Veronika

    2015-03-14

    The association of systemic mastocytosis (SM) with a non-mast cell haematological neoplasm represents a specific subtype of mastocytosis termed systemic mastocytosis with associated haematological non-mast cell disease (SM-AHNMD). The overwhelming majority of the associated neoplasms are of myeloid origin, while lymphoid neoplasms associated with SM have been reported rarely. Association of SM with Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) is exceedingly rare; so far, only two cases of HL as associated hematological non-mast cell disease in systemic mastocytosis have been published in the recent English literature. We present a case of a 37-year-old otherwise healthy male who was referred to our institution because of a one-month lasting dysphagia of both hard and liquid food. Physical examination showed tumour in the left jugular area measuring 2 cm in the largest diameter while computer tomography of the thorax revealed a 5.2 cm large, hypodense, soft tissue tumour between the trachea and left arteria carotis communis. On the basis of FNAB findings, the diagnosis of a "neutrophil-rich" Hodgkin's lymphoma was established. Excisional biopsy of mediastinal tumor showed lymphoid neoplasm with morphology and immunophenotype consistent with nodular sclerosis classical Hodgkin's lymphoma (NScHL). Bone marrow trephine biopsy and the MGG-stained smear of the bone marrow aspirate performed for lymphoma staging revealed an existence of systemic mastocytosis which was unexpected and incidental finding. Mast cells were highlighted by CD117 and tryptase immunostainings while CD25 positivity of mast cells was consistent with their neoplastic phenotype.There were no HL infiltrates present in the bone marrow. We report a very rare combination of systemic mastocytosis with Hodgkin's lymphoma as associated clonal haematological non-mast cell lineage disease. Systemic mastocytosis was an unexpected finding. The diagnosis of SM in bone marrow in our case was straight-forward, but it can be difficult

  7. 21 CFR 133.150 - Hard cheeses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hard cheeses. 133.150 Section 133.150 Food and... CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.150 Hard cheeses. (a) The cheeses for which definitions and standards of identity are...

  8. Hybrid hard- and soft-modeling of spectrophotometric data for monitoring of ciprofloxacin and its main photodegradation products at different pH values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razuc, Mariela; Garrido, Mariano; Caro, Yamile S.; Teglia, Carla M.; Goicoechea, Héctor C.; Fernández Band, Beatriz S.

    2013-04-01

    A simple and fast on line spectrophotometric method combined with a hybrid hard-soft modeling multivariate curve resolution (HS-MCR) was proposed for the monitoring of photodegradation reaction of ciprofloxacin under UV radiation. The studied conditions attempt to emulate the effect of sunlight on these antibiotics that could be eventually present in the environment. The continuous flow system made it possible to study the ciprofloxacin degradation at different pH values almost at real time, avoiding errors that could arise from typical batch monitoring of the reaction. On the base of a concentration profiles obtained by previous pure soft-modeling approach, reaction pathways have been proposed for the parent compound and its photoproducts at different pH values. These kinetic models were used as a constraint in the HS-MCR analysis. The kinetic profiles and the corresponding pure response profile (UV-Vis spectra) of ciprofloxacin and its main degradation products were recovered after the application of HS-MCR analysis to the spectra recorded throughout the reaction. The observed behavior showed a good agreement with the photodegradation studies reported in the bibliography. Accordingly, the photodegradation reaction was studied by high performance liquid chromatography coupled with UV-Vis diode array detector (HPLC-DAD). The spectra recorded during the chromatographic analysis present a good correlation with the ones recovered by UV-Vis/HS-MCR method.

  9. Effects of super-hard rice bread blended with black rice bran on amyloid β peptide production and abrupt increase in postprandial blood glucose levels in mice.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Sumiko; Hara, Takashi; Joh, Toshio; Kobayashi, Atsushi; Yamazaki, Akira; Kasuga, Kensaku; Ikeuchi, Takeshi; Ohtsubo, Ken'ichi

    2017-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease and type 2 diabetes are very serious diseases with the latter having been suggested to cause the former. We prepared super-hard rice bread blended with black rice bran (SRBBB), which contained a high amount of resistant starch that showed strong inhibitory activities against β-secretase and acetylcholinesterase even after heating. Black rice bran showed greater β-secretase inhibitory activity (3.6-fold) than Koshihikari rice. The bran contained more oleic acid and anthocyanin, meaning that it is potentially a biofunctional food with a high antioxidant capacity. Furthermore, aged mice, which were fed a SRBBB diet for four weeks, showed lower amyloid β 40 peptide in the blood than mice fed a commercial diet (p < 0.01). Additionally, their initial blood glucose levels (BGLs) after 12 weeks of being fed SRBBB were significantly lower than those in the control group. Taken together, our results indicate SRBBB shows promise for inhibiting not only amyloid β production, but also abrupt increases in postprandial BGLs.

  10. Use of two varieties of hard-to-cook beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) and cowpeas (Vigna unguiculata) in the processing of koki (a steamed legume product).

    PubMed

    Mbofung, C M; Rigby, N; Waldron, K

    1999-01-01

    Koki is a nutritious cowpea-based food product usually processed by steam cooking whipped cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) paste mixed with spices and palm oil. A study was carried out to investigate the effect of the partial replacement of cowpeas (CP) with hard-to-cook (HTC) beans on the chemical, nutritional and sensory characteristics of koki. Towards this objective, two varieties of beans--Phaseolus vulgaris (red kidney beans--RKB and mottled brown beans--MBB), each with the HTC defect, were separately incorporated into cowpea paste in the following Bean:CP ratios 0:100, 20:80, 30:70, 40:60, 50:50, 60:40 and processed into koki. Incorporation of dry HTC beans into cowpeas in the making of koki affected the bulking properties of the uncooked paste, the nutrient composition, essential amino acid content, antinutritional factors, digestibility as well as the sensory attributes of cooked koki. Sensory tests showed that a highly acceptable, nutritious and digestible koki can be processed from cowpeas partially replaced with dry HTC bean paste up to levels of about 40-50% depending on the variety of dry bean used.

  11. Hybrid hard- and soft-modeling of spectrophotometric data for monitoring of ciprofloxacin and its main photodegradation products at different pH values.

    PubMed

    Razuc, Mariela; Garrido, Mariano; Caro, Yamile S; Teglia, Carla M; Goicoechea, Héctor C; Fernández Band, Beatriz S

    2013-04-01

    A simple and fast on line spectrophotometric method combined with a hybrid hard-soft modeling multivariate curve resolution (HS-MCR) was proposed for the monitoring of photodegradation reaction of ciprofloxacin under UV radiation. The studied conditions attempt to emulate the effect of sunlight on these antibiotics that could be eventually present in the environment. The continuous flow system made it possible to study the ciprofloxacin degradation at different pH values almost at real time, avoiding errors that could arise from typical batch monitoring of the reaction. On the base of a concentration profiles obtained by previous pure soft-modeling approach, reaction pathways have been proposed for the parent compound and its photoproducts at different pH values. These kinetic models were used as a constraint in the HS-MCR analysis. The kinetic profiles and the corresponding pure response profile (UV-Vis spectra) of ciprofloxacin and its main degradation products were recovered after the application of HS-MCR analysis to the spectra recorded throughout the reaction. The observed behavior showed a good agreement with the photodegradation studies reported in the bibliography. Accordingly, the photodegradation reaction was studied by high performance liquid chromatography coupled with UV-Vis diode array detector (HPLC-DAD). The spectra recorded during the chromatographic analysis present a good correlation with the ones recovered by UV-Vis/HS-MCR method. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The plasma membrane shuttling of CAPRI is related to regulation of mast cell activation

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Rika; Furuno, Tadahide; Nakanishi, Mamoru . E-mail: mamoru@dpc.agu.ac.jp

    2006-08-18

    The Ca{sup 2+}-promoted Ras inactivator (CAPRI), a Ras GTPase-activating protein, is involved in the inactivation of mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. However, a precise role of CAPRI in immune responses is still unknown. Here we showed that overexpression of CAPRI suppresses antigen-induced degranulation and cytokine production in mast cells (RBL cells). Antigen elicited the translocation of CAPRI to the plasma membrane from the cytoplasm, which was concomitant with the increase in the intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration. The nuclear import of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK2) occurred after the re-localization of CAPRI to the cytoplasm in the mast cells, suggesting that the early phase of ERK2 activation is eliminated. A mutant of GAP-related domain, CAPRI(R472S), showed a feeble translocation to the plasma membrane but did not affect the degranulation, ERK2 activation, and cytokine production. The results suggested that the translocation of CAPRI to the plasma membranes regulates crucially cellular responses in mast cells.

  13. Ceramide-CD300f binding suppresses experimental colitis by inhibiting ATP-mediated mast cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Matsukawa, Toshihiro; Izawa, Kumi; Isobe, Masamichi; Takahashi, Mariko; Maehara, Akie; Yamanishi, Yoshinori; Kaitani, Ayako; Okumura, Ko; Teshima, Takanori; Kitamura, Toshio; Kitaura, Jiro

    2016-01-01

    Objective Extracellular ATP mediates mast cell-dependent intestinal inflammation via P2X7 purinoceptors. We have previously shown that CD300f (also called the leucocyte mono-immunoglobulin-like receptor 3 (LMIR3)) suppresses immunoglobulin E-dependent and mast cell-dependent allergic responses by binding to ceramide. The aim of the present study was to clarify the role of ceramide–LMIR3 interaction in the development of IBD. Design The dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis model was used in wild-type (WT), LMIR3−/−, mast cell-deficient KitW-sh/W-sh, KitW-sh/W-shLMIR3−/− or KitW-sh/W-sh mice engrafted with WT or LMIR3−/− bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs). The severity of colitis was determined by clinical and histological criteria. Lamina propria cell populations were assessed by flow cytometry. Production of chemical mediators from lamina propria cells was measured by real-time reverse transcription PCR. Production of chemical mediators from ATP-stimulated BMMCs in the presence or absence of ceramide was measured by ELISA. The severity of DSS-induced colitis was assessed in mice given either an Fc fusion protein containing an extracellular domain of LMIR3, and anticeramide antibody, or ceramide liposomes. Results LMIR3 deficiency exacerbated DSS-induced colitis in mice. KitW-sh/W-sh mice harbouring LMIR3−/− mast cells exhibited more severe colitis than those harbouring WT mast cells. Ceramide–LMIR3 interaction inhibited ATP-stimulated activation of BMMCs. DSS-induced colitis was aggravated by disrupting the ceramide–LMIR3 interaction, whereas it was suppressed by treating with ceramide liposomes. Conclusions LMIR3-deficient colonic mast cells were pivotal in the exacerbation of DSS-induced colitis in LMIR3−/− mice. Ceramide liposomes attenuated DSS-induced colitis by inhibiting ATP-mediated activation of colonic mast cells through ceraimide–LMIR3 binding. PMID:25673319

  14. Microbes taming mast cells: Implications for allergic inflammation and beyond.

    PubMed

    Forsythe, Paul

    2016-05-05

    There is increasing awareness of a relationship between our microbiota and the pathogenesis of allergy and other inflammatory diseases. In investigating the mechanisms underlying microbiota modulation of allergy the focus has been on the induction phase; alterations in the phenotype and function of antigen presenting cells, induction of regulatory T cells and shifts in Th1/Th2 balance. However there is evidence that microbes can influence the effector phase of disease, specifically that certain potentially beneficial bacteria can attenuate mast cell activation and degranulation. Furthermore, it appears that different non-pathogenic bacteria can utilize distinct mechanisms to stabilize mast cells, acting locally though direct interaction with the mast cell at mucosal sites or attenuating systemic mast cell dependent responses, likely through indirect signaling mechanisms. The position of mast cells on the frontline of defense against pathogens also suggests they may play an important role in fostering the host-microbiota relationship. Mast cells are also conduits of neuro-immuo-endocrine communication, suggesting the ability of microbes to modulate cell responses may have implications for host physiology beyond immunology. Further investigation of mast cell regulation by non-pathogenic or symbiotic bacteria will likely lead to a greater understanding of host microbiota interaction and the role of the microbiome in health and disease.

  15. Widespread immunological functions of mast cells: fact or fiction?

    PubMed

    Rodewald, Hans-Reimer; Feyerabend, Thorsten B

    2012-07-27

    Immunological functions of mast cells are currently considered to be much broader than the original role of mast cells in IgE-driven allergic disease. The spectrum of proposed mast cell functions includes areas as diverse as the regulation of innate and adaptive immune responses, protective immunity against viral, microbial, and parasitic pathogens, autoimmunity, tolerance to graft rejection, promotion of or protection from cancer, wound healing, angiogenesis, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, obesity, and others. The vast majority of in vivo mast cell data have been based on mast cell-deficient Kit mutant mice. However, work in new mouse mutants with unperturbed Kit function, which have a surprisingly normal immune system, has failed to corroborate some key immunological aspects, formerly attributed to mast cells. Here, we consider the implications of these recent developments for the state of the field as well as for future work, aiming at deciphering the physiological functions of mast cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. New insights in mast cell modulation by palmitoylethanolamide.

    PubMed

    De Filippis, D; Negro, L; Vaia, M; Cinelli, M P; Iuvone, T

    2013-02-01

    Since its discovery palmitoylethanolamide was considered as an endogenous compound able to negatively modulate the inflammatory process. Its effects have been extensively investigated in in vitro, in vivo and in clinical studies. Notwithstanding some discrepancy, nowadays the efficacy of palmitoylethanolamide in controlling mast cell behaviour, which likely accounts for its many anti-inflammatory, anti-angiogenic and analgesic effects, is well recognized. In view of their strategic localization at sites directly interfacing with the external environment, mast cells act as surveillance antennae against different types of injury and can undergo activation, thereby regulating both innate and adaptive immune reactions through the release of several preformed and newly synthesized mediators. Mast cells are now viewed as key players in orchestrating several disorders including both acute and chronic inflammatory processes, and have a role in angiogenesis and hyperalgesia. Since mast cells exert also important physiological, homeostatic functions, the most recent goal for pharmacologists is to control, rather than block, mast cell degranulation in order to modulate the pathological scenario. The aim of the present review is to summarise the evidence regarding the role played by palmitoylethanolamide in the control of mast cell activation, starting from in vitro studies, going through in vivo evidence in animal models of disease sustained by mast cell activation, and finally reviewing recent clinical studies using this molecule.

  17. Mast cells and IgE: from history to today.

    PubMed

    Saito, Hirohisa; Ishizaka, Teruko; Ishizaka, Kimishige

    2013-03-01

    Role of mast cells in allergy had remained undetermined until the discovery of IgE in 1966. Then, IgE purified from many Liters of plasma, which had been donated from a patient with fatal myeloma, was distributed to researchers all over the world, and thus accelerated exploring the mechanisms involved in allergic reactions, particularly about the role of mast cells and basophils in the IgE-mediated reactions. Identification of mast cells as a progeny of a bone marrow hematopoietic stem cell in 1977 led us to successful in vitro culture of human mast cells. Along with the development of molecular biological techniques, the structure of the high affinity IgE receptor (FcεRI) was determined in 1989. These findings and subsequent investigations brought deeper understanding of IgE-mediated allergic diseases in the past half century, especially where mast cells are involved. We have now even obtained the information about whole genome expression of FcεRI-dependently activated mast cells. In sharp contrast to our comprehension of allergic diseases where IgE and mast cells are involved, the mechanisms involved in non-IgE-mediated allergic diseases or non-IgE-mediated phase of IgE-mediated diseases are almost left unsolved and are waiting for devoted investigators to reveal it.

  18. Mucosal mast cells and developmental changes in gastric absorption.

    PubMed

    Catto-Smith, A G; Ripper, J L

    1995-01-01

    We aimed to establish whether gastric mucosal mast cells undergo degranulation during normal postnatal development and to correlate this with gastric electrical parameters, paracellular permeability, and macromolecular absorption. Sprague-Dawley rats were studied between 10 and 30 days after birth. Gastric mucosal mast cell degranulation occurred and was maximal on days 15 and 17, measured by histology and gastric and serum levels of rat mast cell protease II. Short-circuit current, transepithelial conductance, and permeability of voltage-clamped glandular stomach were elevated in younger animals, falling with age except for a transient but significant increase in conductance and permeability at 17 days, closely correlated with maximal mast cell degranulation. Macromolecular uptake was significantly increased in animals aged 10-15 days. Concanavalin A and antigen-induced mast cell degranulation increased conductance and permeability in vitro in younger animals. We conclude that 1) gastric mucosal mast cells degranulate during development, 2) the neonatal stomach has increased permeability and uptake of macromolecules, and 3) gastric mucosal mast cell degranulation during development may affect mucosal permeability.

  19. Activation of human mast cells by retrocyclin and protegrin highlight their immunomodulatory and antimicrobial properties.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Kshitij; Kotian, Akhil; Subramanian, Hariharan; Daniell, Henry; Ali, Hydar

    2015-10-06

    Preclinical evaluation of Retrocyclins (RC-100, RC-101) and Protegrin-1 (PG-1) antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) is important because of their therapeutic potential against bacterial, fungal and viral infections. Human mast cells (HMCs) play important roles in host defense and wound healing but the abilities of retrocyclins and protegrin-1 to harness these functions have not been investigated. Here, we report that chemically synthesized RC-100 and PG-1 caused calcium mobilization and degranulation in HMCs but these responses were not blocked by an inhibitor of formyl peptide receptor-like 1 (FPRL1), a known receptor for AMPs. However, RC-100 and PG-1 induced degranulation in rat basophilic leukemia (RBL-2H3) cells stably expressing Mas related G protein coupled receptor X2 (MrgX2). Chemical synthesis of these AMPs is prohibitively expensive and post-synthesis modifications (cyclization, disulfide bonds, folding) are inadequate for optimal antimicrobial activity. Indeed, we found that synthetic RC-100, which caused mast cell degranulation via MrgX2, did not display any antimicrobial activity. Green-fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged RC-101 (analog of RC-100) and GFP-tagged PG-1 purified from transgenic plant chloroplasts killed bacteria and induced mast cell degranulation. Furthermore, GFP-PG1 bound specifically to RBL-2H3 cells expressing MrgX2. These findings suggest that retrocyclins and protegrins activate HMCs independently of FPRL1 but via MrgX2. Harnessing this novel feature of AMPs to activate mast cell's host defense/wound healing properties in addition to their antimicrobial activities expands their clinical potential. Low cost production of AMPs in plants should facilitate their advancement to the clinic overcoming major hurdles in current production systems.

  20. Link between mast cells and bacteria: Antimicrobial defense, function and regulation by cytokines.

    PubMed

    Conti, Pio; Carinci, Francesco; Caraffa, Alessandro; Ronconi, Gianpaolo; Lessiani, Gianfranco; Theoharides, Theoharis C

    2017-09-01

    Bacteria and their products, such as LPS, act on mast cells (MCs) to induce the secretion of multiple cytokines, including IL-1, TNF, IL-18 and IL-33, which can be dosed in the site of infected tissues. Antigen-binding IgE cross-links FcεRI on mast cells involves the generation and activation of PKCδ, ERK, tyrosine kinases (Syk and Lyn) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), inducing the release of chemical mediators which provoke inflammation and hypersensitive reaction. Other stimuli, including, cytokines, neuropeptides, chemical and physical activators, can also act on MCs to release a plethora of inflammatory compounds. Activated MCs produce a broad spectrum of inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, lipid compounds and vasoactive amines, all involved in immune response. By producing TNF, MCs have an antibacterial defense and a protective function; while pathogenic bacteria and their products, such as LPS, have an inflammatory response through MC activation. LPS binding TLR4 produce MC generation IL-1 family members, and chemokines, which may recruit inflammatory cells at the infection site; whereas in Kit(W/W-v) mice, where MCs are genetically absent, the inflammatory effect is not present. We report for the first time a link between MCs and bacteria emphasizing the mediation of inflammatory cytokines/chemokines. We can conclude that mast cells fight bacteria, and their immune response is perfectly integrated in the immune network. We hope that the understanding of microbial and mast cell interaction leads to more efficient therapeutic development in relation to microbial resistance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The strain difference in the effect of mercuric chloride on antigen-triggered serotonin release from rat mast cells is not mediated via interferon-gamma.

    PubMed Central

    Hodson, D; Oliveira, D B

    1996-01-01

    Previous work has shown that in vitro exposure of Brown-Norway (BN) rat peritoneal mast cells to mercuric chloride (HgCl2) causes enhancement of subsequent mediator release induced by cross-linking of surface immunoglobulin E (IgE). This enhancing effect is seen significantly less often with peritoneal cells from Lewis rats. In addition HgCl2 has been shown to suppress interferon (IFN)-gamma production by BN but not Lewis splenocytes. Given that IFN-gamma is known to inhibit mediator release by mast cells, we hypothesized that the strain difference in the effect of HgCl2 on mediator release was mediated via a differential effect on IFN-gamma release from T cells in the mixed peritoneal cell population: IFN-gamma release would be suppressed in the case of the BN rat, releasing the mast cells from inhibition and resulting in the enhancing effect of HgCl2. The aim of the study was to test two predictions of this hypothesis. Exposure of BN rat mast cells to IFN-gamma inhibited subsequent antigen-induced mediator release but did not significantly reduce HgCl2-mediated enhancement of this release. Exposure of Lewis rat mast cells to blocking concentrations of anti-IFN-gamma did not reveal any HgCl2-mediated enhancement of mediator release. These observations provide strong evidence against the hypothesis that the differential effects of HgCl2 on BN and Lewis rat mast cells are mediated via IFN-gamma. In addition the results revealed that BN rat mast cells are significantly more sensitive than Lewis rat mast cells to the inhibitory effects of IFN-gamma on antigen-induced mediator release. PMID:8958063

  2. Cornuside inhibits mast cell-mediated allergic response by down-regulating MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Liangchang; Jin, Guangyu; Jiang, Jingzhi; Zheng, Mingyu; Jin, Yan; Lin, Zhenhua; Li, Guangzhao; Choi, Yunho; Yan, Guanghai

    2016-04-29

    Aims: The present study is to investigate the effect of cornuside on mast cell-mediated allergic response, as well as its possible mechanisms of action. Methods: To test the anti-allergic effects of cornuside in vivo, local extravasation was induced by local injection of anti-dinitrophenyl immunoglobulin E (IgE) followed by intravenous antigenic challenge in passive cutaneous anaphylaxis model rats. Mast cell viability was determined using MTT assay. Histamine content from rat peritoneal mast cells was measured by the radioenzymatic method. To investigate the mechanisms by which cornuside affects the reduction of histamine release, the levels of calcium uptake were measured. To examine whether cornuside affects the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, Western blotting and ELISA were carried out. Results: Oral administration of cornuside inhibited passive cutaneous anaphylaxis in rats. Presence of cornuside attenuated IgE-induced histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells. The inhibitory effect of cornuside on histamine release was mediated by the modulation of intracellular calcium. In addition, cornuside decreased phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and calcium ionophore A23187-stimulated production and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α and IL-6 in human mast cells. The inhibitory effect of cornuside on pro-inflammatory cytokines was dependent on nuclear factor-κB and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase. Conclusions: The present study provides evidence that cornuside inhibits mast cell-derived inflammatory allergic reactions by blocking histamine release and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. Furthermore, in vivo and in vitro anti-allergic effects of cornuside suggest a possible therapeutic application of this agent in inflammatory allergic diseases.

  3. Possible Involvement of the Inhibition of NF-κB Factor in Anti-Inflammatory Actions That Melatonin Exerts on Mast Cells.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, M D; García-Moreno, H; González-Yanes, C; Calvo, J R

    2016-08-01

    Melatonin is a molecule endogenously produced in a wide variety of immune cells, including mast cells (RBL-2H3). It exhibits immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic properties. The physiologic mechanisms underlying these activities of melatonin have not been clarified in mast cells. This work is designed to determine the anti-inflammatory effect and mechanism of action of melatonin on activated mast cells. RBL-2H3 were pre-treated with exogenous melatonin (MELx) at physiological (100nM) and pharmacological (1 mM) doses for 30 min, washed and activated with PMACI (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate plus calcium ionophore A23187) for 2 h and 12 h. The data shows that pre-treatment of MELx in stimulated mast cells, significantly reduced the levels of endogenous melatonin production (MELn), TNF-α and IL-6. These effects are directly related with the MELx concentration used. MELx also inhibited IKK/NF-κB signal transduction pathway in stimulated mast cells. These results indicate a molecular basis for the ability of melatonin to prevent inflammation and for the treatment of allergic inflammatory diseases through the down-regulation of mast cell activation. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1926-1933, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Mast cells and histamine are triggering the NF-κB-mediated reactions of adult and aged perilymphatic mesenteric tissues to acute inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Nizamutdinova, Irina Tsoy; Dusio, Giuseppina F.; Gasheva, Olga Yu.; Skoog, Hunter; Tobin, Richard; Peddaboina, Chander; Meininger, Cynthia J.; Zawieja, David C.; Newell-Rogers, M. Karen; Gashev, Anatoliy A.

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to establish mechanistic links between the aging-associated changes in the functional status of mast cells and the altered responses of mesenteric tissue and mesenteric lymphatic vessels (MLVs) to acute inflammation. We used an in vivo model of acute peritoneal inflammation induced by lipopolysaccharide treatment of adult (9-month) and aged (24-month) F-344 rats. We analyzed contractility of isolated MLVs, mast cell activation, activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) without and with stabilization of mast cells by cromolyn or blockade of all types of histamine receptors and production of 27 major pro-inflammatory cytokines in adult and aged perilymphatic mesenteric tissues and blood. We found that the reactivity of aged contracting lymphatic vessels to LPS-induced acute inflammation was abolished and that activated mast cells trigger NF-κB signaling in the mesentery through release of histamine. The aging-associated basal activation of mesenteric mast cells limits acute inflammatory NF-κB activation in aged mesentery. We conclude that proper functioning of the mast cell/histamine/NF-κB axis is necessary for reactions of the lymphatic vessels to acute inflammatory stimuli as well as for interaction and trafficking of immune cells near and within the collecting lymphatics. PMID:27875806

  5. Martian environmental simulation for a deployable lattice mast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warden, Robert M.

    1994-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder mission (formerly Mars Environmental Survey or MESUR) is scheduled for launch in December 1996 and is designed to place a small lander on the surface of Mars. After impact, the lander unfolds to expose its solar panels and release a miniature rover. Also on board is the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) binocular camera which is elevated by a deployable mast to obtain a panoramic view of the landing area. The design of this deployable mast is based on similar designs which have a long and successful flight history. In the past when this type of self-deployable mast has been used, a rate limiter has been incorporated to control the speed of deployment. In this application, to reduce weight and complexity, it was proposed to eliminate the rate limiter so that the mast would deploy without restraint. Preliminary tests showed that this type of deployment was possible especially if the deployed length was relatively short, as in this application. Compounding the problem, however, was the requirement to deploy the mast at an angle of up to 30 degrees from vertical. The deployment process was difficult to completely analyze due to the effects of gravitational and inertial loads on the mast and camera during rapid extension. Testing in a realistic manner was imperative to verify the system performance. A deployment test was therefore performed to determine the maximum tilt angle at which the mast could reliably extend and support the camera on Mars. The testing of the deployable mast requires partial gravity compensation to simulate the smaller force of Martian gravity. During the test, mass properties were maintained while weight properties were reduced. This paper describes the testing of a deployable mast in a simulated Martian environment as well as the results of the tests.

  6. Quantification and localization of mast cells in periapical lesions.

    PubMed

    Mahita, V N; Manjunatha, B S; Shah, R; Astekar, M; Purohit, S; Kovvuru, S

    2015-01-01

    Periapical lesions occur in response to chronic irritation in periapical tissue, generally resulting from an infected root canal. Specific etiological agents of induction, participating cell population and growth factors associated with maintenance and resolution of periapical lesions are incompletely understood. Among the cells found in periapical lesions, mast cells have been implicated in the inflammatory mechanism. Quantifications and the possible role played by mast cells in the periapical granuloma and radicular cyst. Hence, this study is to emphasize the presence (localization) and quantification of mast cells in periapical granuloma and radicular cyst. A total of 30 cases and out of which 15 of periapical granuloma and 15 radicular cyst, each along with the case details from the previously diagnosed cases in the department of oral pathology were selected for the study. The gender distribution showed male 8 (53.3%) and females 7 (46.7%) in periapical granuloma cases and male 10 (66.7%) and females 5 (33.3%) in radicular cyst cases. The statistical analysis used was unpaired t-test. Mean mast cell count in periapical granuloma subepithelial and deeper connective tissue, was 12.40 (0.99%) and 7.13 (0.83%), respectively. The mean mast cell counts in subepithelial and deeper connective tissue of radicular cyst were 17.64 (1.59%) and 12.06 (1.33%) respectively, which was statistically significant. No statistical significant difference was noted among males and females. Mast cells were more in number in radicular cyst. Based on the concept that mast cells play a critical role in the induction of inflammation, it is logical to use therapeutic agents to alter mast cell function and secretion, to thwart inflammation at its earliest phases. These findings may suggest the possible role of mast cells in the pathogenesis of periapical lesions.

  7. Quantification and Localization of Mast Cells in Periapical Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Mahita, VN; Manjunatha, BS; Shah, R; Astekar, M; Purohit, S; Kovvuru, S

    2015-01-01

    Background: Periapical lesions occur in response to chronic irritation in periapical tissue, generally resulting from an infected root canal. Specific etiological agents of induction, participating cell population and growth factors associated with maintenance and resolution of periapical lesions are incompletely understood. Among the cells found in periapical lesions, mast cells have been implicated in the inflammatory mechanism. Aim: Quantifications and the possible role played by mast cells in the periapical granuloma and radicular cyst. Hence, this study is to emphasize the presence (localization) and quantification of mast cells in periapical granuloma and radicular cyst. Materials and Methods: A total of 30 cases and out of which 15 of periapical granuloma and 15 radicular cyst, each along with the case details from the previously diagnosed cases in the department of oral pathology were selected for the study. The gender distribution showed male 8 (53.3%) and females 7 (46.7%) in periapical granuloma cases and male 10 (66.7%) and females 5 (33.3%) in radicular cyst cases. The statistical analysis used was unpaired t-test. Results: Mean mast cell count in periapical granuloma subepithelial and deeper connective tissue, was 12.40 (0.99%) and 7.13 (0.83%), respectively. The mean mast cell counts in subepithelial and deeper connective tissue of radicular cyst were 17.64 (1.59%) and 12.06 (1.33%) respectively, which was statistically significant. No statistical significant difference was noted among males and females. Conclusion: Mast cells were more in number in radicular cyst. Based on the concept that mast cells play a critical role in the induction of inflammation, it is logical to use therapeutic agents to alter mast cell function and secretion, to thwart inflammation at its earliest phases. These findings may suggest the possible role of mast cells in the pathogenesis of periapical lesions. PMID:25861530

  8. Martian environmental simulation for a deployable lattice mast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warden, Robert M.

    1994-11-01

    The Mars Pathfinder mission (formerly Mars Environmental Survey or MESUR) is scheduled for launch in December 1996 and is designed to place a small lander on the surface of Mars. After impact, the lander unfolds to expose its solar panels and release a miniature rover. Also on board is the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) binocular camera which is elevated by a deployable mast to obtain a panoramic view of the landing area. The design of this deployable mast is based on similar designs which have a long and successful flight history. In the past when this type of self-deployable mast has been used, a rate limiter has been incorporated to control the speed of deployment. In this application, to reduce weight and complexity, it was proposed to eliminate the rate limiter so that the mast would deploy without restraint. Preliminary tests showed that this type of deployment was possible especially if the deployed length was relatively short, as in this application. Compounding the problem, however, was the requirement to deploy the mast at an angle of up to 30 degrees from vertical. The deployment process was difficult to completely analyze due to the effects of gravitational and inertial loads on the mast and camera during rapid extension. Testing in a realistic manner was imperative to verify the system performance. A deployment test was therefore performed to determine the maximum tilt angle at which the mast could reliably extend and support the camera on Mars. The testing of the deployable mast requires partial gravity compensation to simulate the smaller force of Martian gravity. During the test, mass properties were maintained while weight properties were reduced. This paper describes the testing of a deployable mast in a simulated Martian environment as well as the results of the tests.

  9. Changes in numbers and types of mast cell colony-forming cells in the peritoneal cavity of mice after injection of distilled water: evidence that mast cells suppress differentiation of bone marrow-derived precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Kanakura, Y.; Kuriu, A.; Waki, N.; Nakano, T.; Asai, H.; Yonezawa, T.; Kitamura, Y.

    1988-03-01

    Two different types of cells in the peritoneal cavity of mice produce mast cell colonies in methylcellulose. Large mast cell colonies are produced by bone marrow-derived precursors resembling lymphoid cells by light microscopy (L-CFU-Mast), whereas medium and small mast cell colonies are produced by morphologically identifiable mast cells (M-CFU-Mast and S-CFU-Mast, respectively). In the present study we eradicated peritoneal mast cells by intraperitoneal (IP) injection of distilled water. The regeneration process was investigated to clarify the relationship between L-CFU-Mast, M-CFU-Mast, and S-CFU-Mast. After injection of distilled water, M-CFU-Mast and S-CFU-Mast disappeared, but L-CFU-Mast increased, and then M-CFU-Mast and S-CFU-Mast appeared, suggesting the presence of a hierarchic relationship. When purified peritoneal mast cells were injected two days after the water injection, the L-CFU-Mast did not increase. In the peritoneal cavity of WBB6F1-+/+ mice that had been lethally irradiated and rescued by bone marrow cells of C57BL/6-bgJ/bgJ (beige, Chediak-Higashi syndrome) mice, L-CFU-Mast were of bgJ/bgJ type, but M-CFU-Mast and S-CFU-Mast were of +/+ type. The injection of distilled water to the radiation chimeras resulted in the development of bgJ/bgJ-type M-CFU-Mast and then S-CFU-Mast. The presence of mast cells appeared to suppress the recruitment of L-CFU-Mast from the bloodstream and to inhibit the differentiation of L-CFU-Mast to M-CFU-Mast.

  10. Preliminary sizing of vibration absorber for space mast structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Card, M. F.; Mccomb, H. G., Jr.; Peebles, S. W.

    1982-01-01

    A simple method of sizing a vibration absorber for a large, cantilevered flexible mast is presented. The method is based on Den Hartog's vibration absorber theory for two-degree-of-freedom systems. Generalized design curves are presented as well as specific numerical results for a candidate space experiment in which a long flexible antenna mast is attached to the shuttle orbiter and dynamically excited by orbiter accelerations. Results indicate that for large flexible masts, the mass of the vibration absorber required to meet stringent tip deflection tolerances becomes prohibitively large.

  11. Mast Cell Proteases as Protective and Inflammatory Mediators

    PubMed Central

    Caughey, George H.

    2014-01-01

    Proteases are the most abundant class of proteins produced by mast cells. Many of these are stored in membrane-enclosed intracellular granules until liberated by degranulating stimuli, which include cross-linking of high affinity IgE receptor FcεRI by IgE bound to multivalent allergen. Understanding and separating the functions of the proteases is important because expression differs among mast cells in different tissue locations. Differences between laboratory animals and humans in protease expression also influence the degree of confidence with which results obtained in animal models of mast cell function can be extrapolated to humans. The inflammatory potential of mast cell proteases was the first aspect of their biology to be explored and has received the most attention, in part because some of them—notably tryptases and chymases—are biomarkers of local and systemic mast cell degranulation and anaphylaxis. Although some of the proteases indeed augment allergic inflammation and are potential targets for inhibition to treat asthma and related allergic disorders, they are protective and even anti-inflammatory in some settings. For example, mast cell tryptases may protect from serious bacterial lung infections and may limit the “rubor” component of inflammation caused by vasodilating neuropeptides in the skin. Chymases help to maintain intestinal barrier function and to expel parasitic worms, and may support blood pressure during anaphylaxis by generating angiotensin II. In other life-or-death examples, carboxypeptidase A3 and other mast cell peptidases limit systemic toxicity of endogenous peptides like endothelin and neurotensin during septic peritonitis, and inactivate venom-associated peptides. On the other hand, mast cell peptidase-mediated destruction of protective cytokines, like IL-6, can enhance mortality from sepsis. Peptidases released from mast cells also influence non-mast cell proteases, such as by activating matrix metalloproteinase cascades

  12. Self-Anchoring Mast for Deploying a High-Speed Submersible Mixer in a Tank

    SciTech Connect

    Cato, Joseph E. Jr.; Shearer, Paul M.; Rodwell, Philip 0.

    2004-10-12

    A self-anchoring mast for deploying a high-speed submersible mixer in a tank includes operably connected first and second mast members (20, 22) and a foot member 46 operably connected to the second mast member for supporting the mast in a tank. The second mast member includes a track (36, 38) for slidably receiving a bearing of the mixer to change the orientation of the mixer in the tank.

  13. Self-anchoring mast for deploying a high-speed submersible mixer in a tank

    SciTech Connect

    Cato, Jr., Joseph E.; Shearer, Paul M.; Rodwell, Philip O.

    2004-10-12

    A self-anchoring mast for deploying a high-speed submersible mixer in a tank includes operably connected first and second mast members (20, 22) and a foot member 46 operably connected to the second mast member for supporting the mast in a tank. The second mast member includes a track (36, 38) for slidably receiving a bearing of the mixer to change the orientation of the mixer in the tank.

  14. Mast cells phagocyte Candida albicans and produce nitric oxide by mechanisms involving TLR2 and Dectin-1.

    PubMed

    Pinke, Karen Henriette; Lima, Heliton Gustavo de; Cunha, Fernando Queiroz; Lara, Vanessa Soares

    2016-02-01

    Candida albicans (C. albicans) is a fungus commonly found in the human mucosa, which may cause superficial and systemic infections, especially in immunosuppression. Until now, the main actors in the defense against this fungus are the epithelial cells, neutrophils, macrophages/monocytes and dendritic cells. However, mast cells are strategically located to play a first line of anti-Candida defense and it has appropriate mechanisms to do it. As with other cells, the recognition of C. albicans occurs meanly via TLR2 and Dectin-1. We assess the TLR2/Dectin-1 involvement in phagocytosis and production of nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) by mast cells challenged with C. albicans. Bone marrow-derived mast cells (MC) from wild type (Wt) or knockout (TLR2-/-) mice C57BL/6 were subjected to in vitro Dectin-1 blockade. After challenged with FITC-labeled C. albicans or zymosan, phagocytosis was analyzed by microscopy. The intracellular production of NO and ROS was measured by DAF-FM diacetate and CellROX Deep/Red Reagent kits. The nitrite formation and hydrogen peroxide release were analyzed by Griess reaction and Amplex Red Hydrogen Peroxide/Peroxidase Assay Kit. Wt/MC phagocytose C. albicans with production of intracellular NO, but not ROS. Moreover, increased levels of nitrite were also observed. The absence and/or blockade of TLR2/Dectin-1 caused significant decreased in C. albicans phagocytosis and NO production. Our results showed that mast cells are able to phagocytose and produce NO against C. albicans via TLR2/Dectin-1. Therefore, mast cells could be important during the course of Candida infection and as a therapeutic target.

  15. Pancam Mast Assembly on Mars Rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warden, Robert M.; Cross, Mike; Harvison, Doug

    2004-01-01

    The Pancam Mast Assembly (PMA) for the 2003 Mars Rover is a deployable structure that provides an elevated platform for several cameras. The PMA consists of several mechanisms that enable it to raise the cameras as well as point the cameras in all directions. This paper describes the function of the various mechanisms as well as a description of the mechanisms and some test parameters. Designing these mechanisms to operate on the surface of Mars presented several challenges. Typical spacecraft mechanisms must operate in zero-gravity and high vacuum. These mechanisms needed to be designed to operate in Martian gravity and atmosphere. Testing conditions were a little easier because the mechanisms are not required to operate in a vacuum. All of the materials are vacuum compatible, but the mechanisms were tested in a dry nitrogen atmosphere at various cold temperatures.

  16. Mini-mast CSI testbed user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanner, Sharon E.; Pappa, Richard S.; Sulla, Jeffrey L.; Elliott, Kenny B.; Miserentino, Robert; Bailey, James P.; Cooper, Paul A.; Williams, Boyd L., Jr.; Bruner, Anne M.

    1992-01-01

    The Mini-Mast testbed is a 20 m generic truss highly representative of future deployable trusses for space applications. It is fully instrumented for system identification and active vibrations control experiments and is used as a ground testbed at NASA-Langley. The facility has actuators and feedback sensors linked via fiber optic cables to the Advanced Real Time Simulation (ARTS) system, where user defined control laws are incorporated into generic controls software. The object of the facility is to conduct comprehensive active vibration control experiments on a dynamically realistic large space structure. A primary goal is to understand the practical effects of simplifying theoretical assumptions. This User's Guide describes the hardware and its primary components, the dynamic characteristics of the test article, the control law implementation process, and the necessary safeguards employed to protect the test article. Suggestions for a strawman controls experiment are also included.

  17. The MAST motional Stark effect diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, N. J.; De Bock, M. F. M.; Michael, C. A.; Walsh, M. J.; Carolan, P. G.; Hawkes, N. C.; Shibaev, S.; Wearing, G.; McCone, J. F. G.

    2010-10-15

    A motional Stark effect (MSE) diagnostic is now installed and operating routinely on the MAST spherical tokamak, with 35 radial channels, spatial resolution of {approx}2.5 cm, and time resolution of {approx}1 ms at angular noise levels of {approx}0.5 deg. Conventional (albeit very narrow) interference filters isolate {pi} or {sigma} polarized emission. Avalanche photodiode detectors with digital phase-sensitive detection measure the harmonics of a pair of photoelastic modulators operating at 20 and 23 kHz, and thus the polarization state. The {pi} component is observed to be significantly stronger than {sigma}, in reasonably good agreement with atomic physics calculations, and as a result, almost all channels are now operated on {pi}. Trials with a wide filter that admits the entire Stark pattern (relying on the net polarization of the emission) have demonstrated performance almost as good as the conventional channels. MSE-constrained equilibrium reconstructions can readily be produced between pulses.

  18. Immunohistochemical characterization of feline mast cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Mallett, C L; Northrup, N C; Saba, C F; Rodriguez, C O; Rassnick, K M; Gieger, T L; Childress, M O; Howerth, E W

    2013-01-01

    Expression of histamine, serotonin, and KIT was evaluated in 61 archived feline mast cell tumors (MCTs) from the skin (n = 29), spleen (n = 17), and gastrointestinal (GI) tract (n = 15) using immunohistochemistry. Twenty-eight percent of cutaneous MCTs, 18% of splenic MCTs, and 53% of GI MCTs displayed histamine immunoreactivity. Serotonin immunoreactivity was detected in 3 GI and 1 cutaneous MCT. Sixty-nine percent of cutaneous MCTs, 35% of splenic MCTs, and 33% of GI MCTs were positive for KIT. Expression of these biogenic amines and KIT was less common than expected. Results of this study suggest heterogeneity in feline MCTs based on anatomic location. Further studies are needed to explain the significance of these differences.

  19. The mechanisms of exocytosis in mast cells.

    PubMed

    Blank, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    Upon activation through high affinity IgE receptors (FcεRI), mast cells (MCs) can release up to 100% of their content of preformed mediators stored in cytoplasmic secretory granules by compound exocytosis. This causes Type I immediate hypersensitivity reactions and, in the case of inappropriate activation by allergens, the symptoms of allergy. Recent work has uncovered a central role of SNARE (Soluble N-ethylmaleimide-Sensitive Factor (NSF) Attachment Protein (SNAP) Receptors) proteins in regulating the numerous membrane fusion events during exocytosis. This has defined a series of new molecular actors in MC exocytosis that participate in the regulation of membrane fusion and the connection of the fusion machinery with early signaling events. The purpose of this chapter is to describe these proteins and provide a brief overview on their mechanism of action.

  20. Novel Identified Receptors on Mast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Migalovich-Sheikhet, Helena; Friedman, Sheli; Mankuta, David; Levi-Schaffer, Francesca

    2012-01-01

    Mast cells (MC) are major participants in the allergic reaction. In addition they possess immunomodulatory roles in the innate and adaptive immune reactions. Their functions are modulated through a number of activating and inhibitory receptors expressed on their surface. This review deals with some of the most recently described receptors, their expression patterns, ligand(s), signal transduction mechanisms, possible cross-talk with other receptors and, last but not least, regulatory functions that the MC can perform based on their receptor expression in health or in disease. Where the receptor role on MC is still not clear, evidences from other hematopoietic cells expressing them is provided as a possible insight for their function on MC. Suggested strategies to modulate these receptors’ activity for the purpose of therapeutic intervention are also discussed. PMID:22876248

  1. Impurity transport driven by fishbones in MAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecconello, M.; Jones, O. M.; Garzotti, L.; McClements, K. G.; Carr, M.; Henderson, S. S.; Sharapov, S. E.; Klimek, I.; the MAST Team

    2015-03-01

    In MAST, bursting toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes and fishbones are observed to give rise to an asymmetric perturbation to the soft x-ray (SXR) emission close to the magnetic axis which grows and decays on the time scale of the fishbone evolution. As the fishbone nears its maximum amplitude, the SXR emission starts to increase (decrease) at radial positions smaller (larger) than the radial position of the magnetic axis. This trend in the SXR emission persists for a few milliseconds, until the fishbone starts to decay in amplitude and the slower overall trend of the SXR emission once again becomes dominant. A preliminary analysis suggests that the change in the SXR emission is due to the localized accumulation of high-Z impurities, sustained against parallel transport by the effects of fishbones on the fast ion population.

  2. Methods and Guidance for Testing the Efficacy of Antimicrobial Products Against Spores of Clostridium difficile on Hard Non-Porous Surfaces (September 2017)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document provides an update to the Agency’s interim guidance for the efficacy evaluation of antimicrobial pesticides that are labeled for treating hard non-porous surfaces in healthcare settings contaminated with spores of Clostridium difficile.

  3. Breeding system and pollen limitation in the masting tree Sorbus aucuparia L. (Rosaceae) in the NW Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pías, Beatriz; Guitián, Pablo

    2006-01-01

    Mast seeding or masting is the supra-annual periodic production of a large number of seeds by long-lived plants. It has been suggested that this may be a strategy to increase pollination efficiency. Sorbus aucuparia is a masting tree typically showing rather low fruit set, though with some variation among years and populations, together with marked among-year variation in flower and fruit production. Here we report a study of the reproductive biology and insect-visitor spectrum of S. aucuparia in the NW Iberian Peninsula. Results obtained over a 4-year period indicate marked self-incompatibility, so that fruit set is strongly dependent on pollinator service. Nevertheless, fruit and seed set were not limited by pollen supply in any of the years of study, since fruit and seed set after manual cross-pollination were no higher than after natural pollination. Inflorescences were visited by diverse insect species. There was no significant correlation between fruit set and insect visit frequency. Taken together, these findings indicate that the rather low fruit and seed sets observed in this species, and the spatiotemporal variation in these parameters, must be attributed to other factors, such as abiotic resource availability. We conclude that masting in S. aucuparia is probably not a strategy for increasing pollination efficiency.

  4. DA-9601 inhibits activation of the human mast cell line HMC-1 through inhibition of NF-kappaB.

    PubMed

    Lee, S; Park, H-H; Son, H-Y; Ha, J-H; Lee, M-G; Oh, T-Y; Sohn, D H; Jeong, T C; Lee, S H; Son, J-K; Lee, S G; Jun, C-D; Kim, S-H

    2007-03-01

    Mast cell-mediated allergic inflammation is involved in many diseases such as asthma, sinusitis, and rheumatoid arthritis. Mast cells induce synthesis and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines including tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1beta and IL-6 with immune regulatory properties. The formulated ethanol extract of Artemisia asiatica Nakai (DA-9601) has been reported to have antioxidative and anti-inflammatory activities. In this report, we investigated the effect of DA-9601 on the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines by the activated human mast cell line HMC-1 and studied its possible mechanisms of action. DA-9601 dose-dependently decreased the gene expression and production of TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, and IL-6 on phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)- and calcium ionophore A23187-stimulated HMC-1 cells. In addition, DA-9601 attenuated PMA- and A23187-induced activation of NF-kappaB as indicated by inhibition of degradation of IkappaBalpha, nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB, NF-kappaB/DNA binding, and NF-kappaB-dependent gene reporter assay. Our in vitro studies provide evidence that DA-9601 might contribute to the treatment of mast cell-derived allergic inflammatory diseases.

  5. Establishment and characterization of mouse bone marrow-derived mast cell hybridomas

    SciTech Connect

    Kawahara, Takeshi

    2012-11-01

    Interleukin (IL)-3-dependent mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) are an important model for studying the function of mucosal-type mast cells. In the present study, BMMCs were successfully immortalized by cell fusion using a hypoxanthine-aminopterin-thymidine medium-sensitive variant of P815 mouse mastocytoma (P815-6TgR) as a partner cell line. The established mouse mast cell hybridomas (MMCHs) expressed {alpha}, {beta}, and {gamma} subunits of high-affinity immunoglobulin E (IgE) receptor (Fc{epsilon}RI) and possessed cytoplasmic granules devoid of or partially filled with electron-dense material. Four independent MMCH clones continuously proliferated without supplemental exogenous IL-3 and showed a degranulation response on stimulation with IgE+antigen. Furthermore, histamine synthesis and release by degranulation were confirmed in MMCH-D5, a MMCH clone that showed the strongest degranulation response. MMCH-D5 exhibited elevated levels of IL-3, IL-4, IL-13, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}, and cyclooxygenase 2, and production of prostaglandin D{sub 2} and leukotriene C{sub 4} in response to IgE-induced stimulation. MMCH clones also expressed Toll-like receptors (TLRs) 1, 2, 4, and 6 and showed elevated levels of TNF-{alpha} expression in response to stimulation with TLR2 and TLR4 ligands. The MMCHs established using this method should be suitable for studies on Fc{epsilon}RI- and TLR-mediated effector functions of mast cells.

  6. Design and Development of the Space Shuttle Tail Service Masts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dandage, S. R.; Herman, N. A.; Godfrey, S. E.; Uda, R. T.

    1977-01-01

    The results of the tail service masts (TSM) concept verification test are presented along with the resulting impact on prototype design. The design criteria are outlined, and the proposed prototype TSM tests are described.

  7. 19. DECK VIEW LOOKING FORWARD WITH MAST, RIGGING AND BOWSPRIT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. DECK VIEW LOOKING FORWARD WITH MAST, RIGGING AND BOWSPRIT DETAILS - HATCH COVER REMOVED TO SHOW CENTERBOARD TRUNK - KATHRYN-Two-sail Bateau "Skipjack", Dogwood Harbor, Chesapeake Bay, Tilghman, Talbot County, MD

  8. 51. STERN VIEW AFTER CONVERSION TO AFRAME MAST AND NEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    51. STERN VIEW AFTER CONVERSION TO A-FRAME MAST AND NEW CRANE FOR HOISTING BUOYS. - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter WHITE PINE, U.S. Coast Guard 8th District Base, South Broad Street, Mobile, Mobile County, AL

  9. 47. BASE OF UMBILICAL MAST, WITH ELECTRICAL POWER CABLES ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    47. BASE OF UMBILICAL MAST, WITH ELECTRICAL POWER CABLES ON LEFT; AIR-CONDITIONER DUCTS ON RIGHT - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  10. Anaphylaxis and mast cell disease: what is the risk?

    PubMed

    Akin, Cem

    2010-01-01

    Mastocytosis is a proliferative disorder of the hematopoietic mast cell progenitor that results from expansion of a clone carrying the D816V c-kit mutation. Based on the dramatic increase in incidence of anaphylaxis in patients with mastocytosis, recent studies analyzed the presence of clonal mast cell markers, including D816V c-kit mutation, in patients with recurrent IgE- and non-IgE-mediated anaphylaxis. These studies demonstrated the presence of an aberrant mast cell clone in a significant proportion of patients with unexplained anaphylaxis, or anaphylaxis due to hymenoptera venom. Clonal mast cell disease should be suspected in particular in patients presenting with profound cardiovascular manifestations such as hypotension and syncope in the absence of urticaria.

  11. ChemCam Mast Unit Being Prepared for Laser Firing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-12-23

    Researchers prepare for a test of the Chemistry and Camera ChemCam instrument that will fly on NASA Mars Science Laboratory mission; researchers are preparing the instrument mast unit for a laser firing test.

  12. A new technique for staining mast cells using ferroin.

    PubMed

    Tomasi, V H; Orrea, S C; Raimondi, A R; Itoiz, M E

    2003-10-01

    We describe here a new method for specific staining of mast cells using ferroin. Different hamster tissues were fixed in 4% formalin and processed for paraffin embedding. Sections were stained with hematoxylin followed by ferroin acidified with 2.5 N sulfuric acid to pH 4.0. Mast cells stained an intense orange color that contrasted markedly with bluish violet nuclei. High contrast was also observed when ferroin colored sections were counterstained with light green instead of hematoxylin. To evaluate the specificity of the stain, hamster cheek pouch sections were stained with toluidine blue, alcian blue-safranin O, and ferroin. Quantitative evaluation of mast cells stained with the three techniques showed no statistical difference. The simplicity and selectivity of this method is sufficient for image analysis of mast cells.

  13. Mast cells in allergy and autoimmunity: implications for adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Gregory D; Brown, Melissa A

    2006-01-01

    As in the fashion industry, trends in a particular area of scientific investigation often are fleeting but then return with renewed and enthusiastic interest. Studies of mast cell biology are good examples of this. Although dogma once relegated mast cells almost exclusively to roles in pathological inflammation associated with allergic disease, these cells are emerging as important players in a number of other physiological processes. Consequently, they are quickly becoming the newest "trendy" cell, both within and outside the field of immunology. As sources of a large array of pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators, mast cells also express cell surface molecules with defined functions in lymphocyte activation and trafficking. Here, we provide an overview of the traditional and newly appreciated contributions of mast cells to both innate and adaptive immune responses.

  14. Top of Mars Rover Curiosity Remote Sensing Mast

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-04-06

    The remote sensing mast on NASA Mars rover Curiosity holds two science instruments for studying the rover surroundings and two stereo navigation cameras for use in driving the rover and planning rover activities.

  15. Cash boost for UK’s MAST tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2017-06-01

    The Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak (MAST) at the Culham Centre for Fusion Energy in Oxfordshire, UK, has received £21m for a series of upgrades to study the best way to extract waste fuel from the plasma it contains.

  16. A poloidal section neutron camera for MAST upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Sangaroon, S.; Weiszflog, M.; Cecconello, M.; Conroy, S.; Ericsson, G.; Wodniak, I.; Keeling, D.; Turnyanskiy, M. [EURATOM Collaboration: MAST Team

    2014-08-21

    The Mega Ampere Spherical Tokamak Upgrade (MAST Upgrade) is intended as a demonstration of the physics viability of the Spherical Tokamak (ST) concept and as a platform for contributing to ITER/DEMO physics. Concerning physics exploitation, MAST Upgrade plasma scenarios can contribute to the ITER Tokamak physics particularly in the field of fast particle behavior and current drive studies. At present, MAST is equipped with a prototype neutron camera (NC). On the basis of the experience and results from previous experimental campaigns using the NC, the conceptual design of a neutron camera upgrade (NC Upgrade) is being developed. As part of the MAST Upgrade, the NC Upgrade is considered a high priority diagnostic since it would allow studies in the field of fast ions and current drive with good temporal and spatial resolution. In this paper, we explore an optional design with the camera array viewing the poloidal section of the plasma from different directions.

  17. Burning mouth syndrome and mast cell activation disorder.

    PubMed

    Afrin, Lawrence B

    2011-04-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS), a chronic diffuse oral pain syndrome affecting ∼1% of the general population, is diagnosed when explanatory oral pathology and other identifiable causes are absent. BMS has been recognized for decades, but its etiology remains unknown and has not previously been attributed to mast cell disease. Three cases of BMS are reported in which evidence of an underlying mast cell activation disorder (MCAD) was found; all 3 patients' oral pain responded well to MCAD-directed therapy. Mediators released from mast cells have a wide range of local and remote effects and potentially may cause the neuropathic changes and/or inflammation thought to lead to the symptoms of BMS. Mast cell disease either in oral tissue or at sites remote from the mouth should be considered in the differential diagnosis of BMS.

  18. Proliferation of Prostate Stromal Cell Induced by Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia Epithelial Cell Stimulated With Trichomonas vaginalis via Crosstalk With Mast Cell.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Hyun; Kim, Sang-Su; Han, Ik-Hwan; Sim, Seobo; Ahn, Myoung-Hee; Ryu, Jae-Sook

    2016-11-01

    Chronic inflammation has a role in the pathogenesis of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer. Mast cells have been detected in chronic inflammatory infiltrate of the prostate, and it is possible that the interaction between prostate epithelial cells and Trichomonas vaginalis influences the activity of mast cells in the prostate stroma. Activated mast cells might influence the biological functions of nearby tissues and cells. In this study, we investigated whether mast cells reacted with the culture supernatant of BPH epithelial cells infected with T. vaginalis may induce the proliferation of prostate stromal cells. To measure the proliferation of prostate stromal cells in response to chronic inflammation caused by the infection of BPH-1 cells with T. vaginalis, the CCK-8 assay and wound healing assay were used. ELISAs, quantitative real-time PCR, western blotting and immunofluorescence were used to measure the production and expression of inflammatory cytokine and cytokine receptor. BPH-1 cells incubated with live trichomonads produced increased levels of CCL2, IL-1β, IL-6, and CXCL8, and induced the migration of mast cells and monocytes. When the culture supernatant of BPH-1 cells stimulated with trichomonads (TCM) was added to mast cells, they became activated, as confirmed by release of β-hexosaminidase and CXCL8. Prostate stromal cells incubated with the culture supernatant of mast cells activated with TCM (M-TCM) proliferated and expressed increased levels of CXCL8, CCL2, and the cytokine receptors CXCR1 and CCR2. Blocking the chemokine receptors reduced the proliferation of stromal cells and also decreased the production of CXCL8 and CCL2. Moreover, the expression of FGF2, cyclin D1, and Bcl-2 was increased in the proliferated stromal cells stimulated with M-TCM. Additionally, the M-TCM-treated stromal cells were more invasive than control cells. The inflammatory mediators released by BPH epithelial cells in response to infection by

  19. Alum induces innate immune responses through macrophage and mast cell sensors, but these are not required for alum to act as an adjuvant for specific immunity.12

    PubMed Central

    McKee, Amy S.; Munks, Michael W.; MacLeod, Megan K. L.; Fleenor, Courtney J.; Van Rooijen, Nico; Kappler, John W.; Marrack, Philippa

    2010-01-01

    To understand more about how the body recognizes alum we characterized the early innate and adaptive responses in mice injected with the adjuvant. Within hours of exposure, alum induces a type 2 innate response characterized by an influx of eosinophils, monocytes, neutrophils, DCs, NK cells and NKT cells. In addition, at least thirteen cytokines and chemokines are produced within 4 hours of injection including IL-1β and IL-5. Optimal production of some of these, including IL-1β, depends upon both macrophages and mast cells, while production of others, such as IL-5, depends on mast cells only, suggesting that both of these cell types can detect alum. Alum induces eosinophil accumulation partly through the production of mast cell derived IL-5 and histamine. Alum greatly enhances priming of endogenous CD4 and CD8 T cells independently of mast cells, macrophages and of eosinophils. In addition, antibody levels and Th2 bias was similar in the absence of these cells. We found that the inflammation induced by alum was unchanged in caspase-1 deficient mice, which cannot produce IL-1β. Furthermore, endogenous CD4 and CD8 T cell responses, antibody responses and the Th2 bias were also not impacted by the absence of caspase-1 or NLRP3. These data suggest that activation of the inflammasome and the type 2 innate response orchestrated by macrophages and mast cells in vivo are not required for alum's adjuvant effects on endogenous T and B cell responses. PMID:19734227

  20. Thermodynamic hardness and the maximum hardness principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco-Pérez, Marco; Gázquez, José L.; Ayers, Paul W.; Vela, Alberto

    2017-08-01

    An alternative definition of hardness (called the thermodynamic hardness) within the grand canonical ensemble formalism is proposed in terms of the partial derivative of the electronic chemical potential with respect to the thermodynamic chemical potential of the reservoir, keeping the temperature and the external potential constant. This temperature dependent definition may be interpreted as a measure of the propensity of a system to go through a charge transfer process when it interacts with other species, and thus it keeps the philosophy of the original definition. When the derivative is expressed in terms of the three-state ensemble model, in the regime of low temperatures and up to temperatures of chemical interest, one finds that for zero fractional charge, the thermodynamic hardness is proportional to T-1(I -A ) , where I is the first ionization potential, A is the electron affinity, and T is the temperature. However, the thermodynamic hardness is nearly zero when the fractional charge is different from zero. Thus, through the present definition, one avoids the presence of the Dirac delta function. We show that the chemical hardness defined in this way provides meaningful and discernible information about the hardness properties of a chemical species exhibiting integer or a fractional average number of electrons, and this analysis allowed us to establish a link between the maximum possible value of the hardness here defined, with the minimum softness principle, showing that both principles are related to minimum fractional charge and maximum stability conditions.

  1. Thermodynamic hardness and the maximum hardness principle.

    PubMed

    Franco-Pérez, Marco; Gázquez, José L; Ayers, Paul W; Vela, Alberto

    2017-08-21

    An alternative definition of hardness (called the thermodynamic hardness) within the grand canonical ensemble formalism is proposed in terms of the partial derivative of the electronic chemical potential with respect to the thermodynamic chemical potential of the reservoir, keeping the temperature and the external potential constant. This temperature dependent definition may be interpreted as a measure of the propensity of a system to go through a charge transfer process when it interacts with other species, and thus it keeps the philosophy of the original definition. When the derivative is expressed in terms of the three-state ensemble model, in the regime of low temperatures and up to temperatures of chemical interest, one finds that for zero fractional charge, the thermodynamic hardness is proportional to T(-1)(I-A), where I is the first ionization potential, A is the electron affinity, and T is the temperature. However, the thermodynamic hardness is nearly zero when the fractional charge is different from zero. Thus, through the present definition, one avoids the presence of the Dirac delta function. We show that the chemical hardness defined in this way provides meaningful and discernible information about the hardness properties of a chemical species exhibiting integer or a fractional average number of electrons, and this analysis allowed us to establish a link between the maximum possible value of the hardness here defined, with the minimum softness principle, showing that both principles are related to minimum fractional charge and maximum stability conditions.

  2. Lysophosphatidic acid synthesis and phospholipid metabolism in rat mast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fagan, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    The role of lysophosphatidic acid in mast cell response to antigen was investigated using an isolated rat serosal mast cell model. The cells were incubated with monoclonal murine immunoglobulin E to the dinitrophenyl hapten and prelabeled with /sup 32/P-orthophosphate or /sup 3/H-fatty acids. Lysophosphatidic acid was isolated form cell extracts by 2-dimensional thin-layer chromatography, and the incorporated radioactivity was assessed by liquid scintillation counting. Lysophosphatidic acid labeling with /sup 32/P was increased 2-4 fold within 5 minutes after the addition of antigen or three other mast cell agonists. Functional group analyses unequivocally showed that the labeled compound was lysophosphatidic acid. Lysophosphatidic acid synthesis was dependent on the activity of diacylglycerol lipase, suggesting formation from monoacylglycerol. In addition, the studies of lysophosphatidic acid synthesis suggest that the addition of antigen to mast cells may initiate more than one route of phospholipid degradation and resynthesis. Whatever the origin of lysophosphatidic acid, the results of this study demonstrated that lysophosphatidic acid synthesis is stimulated by a variety of mast cell agonists. Dose-response, kinetic, and pharmacologic studies showed close concordance between histamine release and lysophosphatidic acid labeling responses. These observations provide strong evidence that lysophosphatidic acid plays an important role in mast cell activation.

  3. Mast cells: new therapeutic target in helminth immune modulation.

    PubMed

    Vukman, K V; Lalor, R; Aldridge, A; O'Neill, S M

    2016-01-01

    Helminth infection and their secreted antigens have a protective role in many immune-mediated inflammatory disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. However, studies have focused primarily on identifying immune protective mechanisms of helminth infection and their secreted molecules on dendritic cells and macrophages. Given that mast cells have been shown to be implicated in the pathogenesis and progression of many inflammatory disorders, their role should also be examined and considered as cellular target for helminth-based therapies. As there is a dearth of studies examining the interaction of helminth-derived antigens and mast cells, this review will focus on the role of mast cells during helminth infection and examine our current understanding of the involvement of mast cells in TH 1/TH 17-mediated immune disorders. In this context, potential mechanisms by which helminths could target the TH 1/TH 17 promoting properties of mast cells can be identified to unveil novel therapeutic mast cell driven targets in combating these inflammatory disorders.

  4. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance studies of mast cell histamine

    SciTech Connect

    Rabenstein, D.L.; Ludowyke, R.; Lagunoff, D.

    1987-11-03

    The state of histamine in mast cells was studied by /sup 1/H NMR spectroscopy. Spectra were measured for histamine in situ in intact mast cells, for histamine in suspensions of mast cell granule matrices that had been stripped of their membranes, and for histamine in solutions of heparin. The /sup 1/H NMR spectrum of intact mast cells is relatively simple, consisting predominantly of resonances for intracellular histamine superimposed on a weaker background of resonances from heparin and proteins of the cells. All of the intracellular histamine contributes of the NMR signals, indicating it must be relatively mobile and not rigidly associated with the negatively charged granule matrix. Spectra for intracellular histamine and for histamine in granule matrices are similar, indicating the latter to be a reasonable model for the in situ situation. The dynamics of binding of histamine by granule matrices and by heparin are considerably different; exchange of histamine between the bulk water and the granule matrices is slow on the /sup 1/H NMR time scale, whereas exchange between the free and bound forms in heparin solution is fast. The chemical shifts of resonances for histamine in mast cells are pH dependent, decreasing as the intragranule pH increases without splitting or broadening. The results are interpreted to indicate that histamine in mast cells is relatively labile, with rapid exchange between histamine and pools of free histamine in water compartments confined in the granule matrix.

  5. Mast cells in rheumatoid arthritis: Friends or foes?

    PubMed

    Rivellese, Felice; Nerviani, Alessandra; Rossi, Francesca Wanda; Marone, Gianni; Matucci-Cerinic, Marco; de Paulis, Amato; Pitzalis, Costantino

    2017-04-11

    Mast cells are tissue-resident cells of the innate immunity, implicated in the pathogenesis of many autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA). They are present in synovia and their activation has been linked to the potentiation of inflammation in the course of RA. However, recent investigations questioned the role of mast cells in arthritis. In particular, animal models generated conflicting results, so that many of their pro-inflammatory, i.e. pro-arthritogenic functions, even though supported by robust experimental evidences, have been labelled as redundant. At the same time, a growing body of evidences suggests that mast cells can act as tunable immunomodulatory cells. These characteristics, not yet fully understood in the context of RA, could partially explain the inconsistent results obtained with experimental models, which do not account for the pro- and anti-inflammatory functions exerted in more chronic heterogeneous conditions such as RA. Here we present an overview of the current knowledge on mast cell involvement in RA, including the intriguing hypothesis of mast cells acting as subtle immunomodulatory cells and the emerging concept of synovial mast cells as potential biomarkers for patient stratification.

  6. Mast Cell-Derived Histamine Mediates Cystitis Pain

    PubMed Central

    Rudick, Charles N.; Bryce, Paul J.; Guichelaar, Laura A.; Berry, Ruth E.; Klumpp, David J.

    2008-01-01

    Background Mast cells trigger inflammation that is associated with local pain, but the mechanisms mediating pain are unclear. Interstitial cystitis (IC) is a bladder disease that causes debilitating pelvic pain of unknown origin and without consistent inflammation, but IC symptoms correlate with elevated bladder lamina propria mast cell counts. We hypothesized that mast cells mediate pelvic pain directly and examined pain behavior using a murine model that recapitulates key aspects of IC. Methods and Findings Infection of mice with pseudorabies virus (PRV) induces a neurogenic cystitis associated with lamina propria mast cell accumulation dependent upon tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF), TNF-mediated bladder barrier dysfunction, and pelvic pain behavior, but the molecular basis for pelvic pain is unknown. In this study, both PRV-induced pelvic pain and bladder pathophysiology were abrogated in mast cell-deficient mice but were restored by reconstitution with wild type bone marrow. Pelvic pain developed normally in TNF- and TNF receptor-deficient mice, while bladder pathophysiology was abrogated. Conversely, genetic or pharmacologic disruption of histamine receptor H1R or H2R attenuated pelvic pain without altering pathophysiology. Conclusions These data demonstrate that mast cells promote cystitis pain and bladder pathophysiology through the separable actions of histamine and TNF, respectively. Therefore, pain is independent of pathology and inflammation, and histamine receptors represent direct therapeutic targets for pain in IC and other chronic pain conditions. PMID:18461160

  7. Carbonic anhydrase enzymes regulate mast cell-mediated inflammation.

    PubMed

    Henry, Everett K; Sy, Chandler B; Inclan-Rico, Juan M; Espinosa, Vanessa; Ghanny, Saleena S; Dwyer, Daniel F; Soteropoulos, Patricia; Rivera, Amariliz; Siracusa, Mark C

    2016-08-22

    Type 2 cytokine responses are necessary for the development of protective immunity to helminth parasites but also cause the inflammation associated with allergies and asthma. Recent studies have found that peripheral hematopoietic progenitor cells contribute to type 2 cytokine-mediated inflammation through their enhanced ability to develop into mast cells. In this study, we show that carbonic anhydrase (Car) enzymes are up-regulated in type 2-associated progenitor cells and demonstrate that Car enzyme inhibition is sufficient to prevent mouse mast cell responses and inflammation after Trichinella spiralis infection or the induction of food allergy-like disease. Further, we used CRISPR/Cas9 technology and illustrate that genetically editing Car1 is sufficient to selectively reduce mast cell development. Finally, we demonstrate that Car enzymes can be targeted to prevent human mast cell development. Collectively, these experiments identify a previously unrecognized role for Car enzymes in regulating mast cell lineage commitment and suggest that Car enzyme inhibitors may possess therapeutic potential that can be used to treat mast cell-mediated inflammation. © 2016 Henry et al.

  8. Dermal mast cell responses in Paragonimus westermani-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Shin, M H

    1997-12-01

    This study was carried out to determine whether dermal mast cell responses to Paragonimus westermani in an abnormal host, the mouse, were dependent on the site of metacercarial inoculation. In mice during subcutaneous infection, the number of dermal mast cells were increased significantly (p < 0.05) at the first week (38.3/mm2) and then persisted at a high level until the sixth week (45.2/mm2) of infection compared with PBS-injected (control) mice (range: 19.4-25.1/mm2). In mice during oral infection, the number of dermal mast cells were increased significantly (p < 0.05) at two weeks (33.5/mm2) after infection and remained at these levels thereafter compared with non-infected (control) mice (range: 17.4-22.3/mm2). In mice both during subcutaneous and oral infection, the recruited dermal mast cells showed extensive degranulation at the second week (68.4% and 60.7%, respectively), reached a peak at the third week (81.4%, and 92.1%, respectively) and then declined slightly thereafter. By contrast, in both control mice, about 10% of dermal mast cells were degranulated. In conclusion, this study suggests that dermal mast cell responses to P. westermani in mice are dependent on cutaneous sensitization by larval excretory-secretory antigens, irrespective of infection route.

  9. Thrombomodulin inhibits the activation of eosinophils and mast cells.

    PubMed

    Roeen, Ziaurahman; Toda, Masaaki; D'Alessandro-Gabazza, Corina N; Onishi, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Tetsu; Yasuma, Taro; Urawa, Masahito; Taguchi, Osamu; Gabazza, Esteban C

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophils and mast cells play critical roles in the pathogenesis of bronchial asthma. Activation of both cells leads to the release of pro-inflammatory mediators in the airway of asthmatic patients. Recently, we have shown that inhaled thrombomodulin inhibits allergic bronchial asthma in a mouse model. In the present study, we hypothesize that thrombomodulin can inhibit the activation of eosinophils and mast cells. The effect of thrombomodulin on the activation and release of inflammatory mediators from eosinophils and mast cells was evaluated. Thrombomodulin inhibited the eotaxin-induced chemotaxis, upregulation of CD11b and degranulation of eosinophils. Treatment with thrombomodulin also significantly suppressed the degranulation and synthesis of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in eosinophils and mast cells. Mice treated with a low-dose of inhaled thrombomodulin have decreased number of eosinophils and activated mast cells and Th2 cytokines in the lungs compared to untreated mice. The results of this study suggest that thrombomodulin may modulate allergic responses by inhibiting the activation of both eosinophils and mast cells.

  10. Increased Bone Mass in Female Mice Lacking Mast Cell Chymase

    PubMed Central

    Lind, Thomas; Gustafson, Ann-Marie; Calounova, Gabriela; Hu, Lijuan; Rasmusson, Annica; Jonsson, Kenneth B.; Wernersson, Sara; Åbrink, Magnus; Andersson, Göran; Larsson, Sune; Melhus, Håkan; Pejler, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    Here we addressed the potential impact of chymase, a mast-cell restricted protease, on mouse bone phenotype. We show that female mice lacking the chymase Mcpt4 acquired a persistent expansion of diaphyseal bone in comparison with wild type controls, reaching a 15% larger diaphyseal cross sectional area at 12 months of age. Mcpt4-/- mice also showed increased levels of a bone anabolic serum marker and higher periosteal bone formation rate. However, they were not protected from experimental osteoporosis, suggesting that chymase regulates normal bone homeostasis rather than the course of osteoporosis. Further, the absence of Mcpt4 resulted in age-dependent upregulation of numerous genes important for bone formation but no effects on osteoclast activity. In spite of the latter, Mcpt4-/- bones had increased cortical porosity and reduced endocortical mineralization. Mast cells were found periosteally and, notably, bone-proximal mast cells in Mcpt4-/- mice were degranulated to a larger extent than in wild type mice. Hence, chymase regulates degranulation of bone mast cells, which could affect the release of mast cell-derived factors influencing bone remodelling. Together, these findings reveal a functional impact of mast cell chymase on bone. Further studies exploring the possibility of using chymase inhibitors as a strategy to increase bone volume may be warranted. PMID:27936149

  11. Carbonic anhydrase enzymes regulate mast cell–mediated inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Soteropoulos, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 cytokine responses are necessary for the development of protective immunity to helminth parasites but also cause the inflammation associated with allergies and asthma. Recent studies have found that peripheral hematopoietic progenitor cells contribute to type 2 cytokine–mediated inflammation through their enhanced ability to develop into mast cells. In this study, we show that carbonic anhydrase (Car) enzymes are up-regulated in type 2–associated progenitor cells and demonstrate that Car enzyme inhibition is sufficient to prevent mouse mast cell responses and inflammation after Trichinella spiralis infection or the induction of food allergy–like disease. Further, we used CRISPR/Cas9 technology and illustrate that genetically editing Car1 is sufficient to selectively reduce mast cell development. Finally, we demonstrate that Car enzymes can be targeted to prevent human mast cell development. Collectively, these experiments identify a previously unrecognized role for Car enzymes in regulating mast cell lineage commitment and suggest that Car enzyme inhibitors may possess therapeutic potential that can be used to treat mast cell–mediated inflammation. PMID:27526715

  12. SNARE complex-mediated degranulation in mast cells.

    PubMed

    Woska, Joseph R; Gillespie, Marc E

    2012-04-01

    Mast cell function and dysregulation is important in the development and progression of allergic and autoimmune disease. Identifying novel proteins involved in mast cell function and disease progression is the first step in the design of new therapeutic strategies. Soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs) are a family of proteins demonstrated to mediate the transport and fusion of secretory vesicles to the membrane in mast cells, leading to the subsequent release of the vesicle cargo through an exocytotic mechanism. The functional role[s] of specific SNARE family member complexes in mast cell degranulation has not been fully elucidated. Here, we review recent and historical data on the expression, formation and localization of various SNARE proteins and their complexes in murine and human mast cells. We summarize the functional data identifying the key SNARE family members that appear to participate in mast cell degranulation. Furthermore, we discuss the utilization of RNA interference (RNAi) methods to validate SNARE function and the use of siRNA as a therapeutic approach to the treatment of inflammatory disease. These studies provide an overview of the specific SNARE proteins and complexes that serve as novel targets for the development of new therapies to treat allergic and autoimmune disease.

  13. Lactic Acid Suppresses IL-33-Mediated Mast Cell Inflammatory Responses via Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α-Dependent miR-155 Suppression.

    PubMed

    Abebayehu, Daniel; Spence, Andrew J; Qayum, Amina Abdul; Taruselli, Marcela T; McLeod, Jamie J A; Caslin, Heather L; Chumanevich, Alena P; Kolawole, Elizabeth Motunrayo; Paranjape, Anuya; Baker, Bianca; Ndaw, Victor S; Barnstein, Brian O; Oskeritzian, Carole A; Sell, Scott A; Ryan, John J

    2016-10-01

    Lactic acid (LA) is present in tumors, asthma, and wound healing, environments with elevated IL-33 and mast cell infiltration. Although IL-33 is a potent mast cell activator, how LA affects IL-33-mediated mast cell function is unknown. To investigate this, mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells were cultured with or without LA and activated with IL-33. LA reduced IL-33-mediated cytokine and chemokine production. Using inhibitors for monocarboxylate transporters (MCT) or replacing LA with sodium lactate revealed that LA effects are MCT-1- and pH-dependent. LA selectively altered IL-33 signaling, suppressing TGF-β-activated kinase-1, JNK, ERK, and NF-κB phosphorylation, but not p38 phosphorylation. LA effects in other contexts have been linked to hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α, which was enhanced in bone marrow-derived mast cells treated with LA. Because HIF-1α has been shown to regulate the microRNA miR-155 in other systems, LA effects on miR-155-5p and miR-155-3p species were measured. In fact, LA selectively suppressed miR-155-5p in an HIF-1α-dependent manner. Moreover, overexpressing miR-155-5p, but not miR-155-3p, abolished LA effects on IL-33-induced cytokine production. These in vitro effects of reducing cytokines were consistent in vivo, because LA injected i.p. into C57BL/6 mice suppressed IL-33-induced plasma cytokine levels. Lastly, IL-33 effects on primary human mast cells were suppressed by LA in an MCT-dependent manner. Our data demonstrate that LA, present in inflammatory and malignant microenvironments, can alter mast cell behavior to suppress inflammation. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  14. Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Derived Microvesicles Prevent the Rupture of Intracranial Aneurysm in Part by Suppression of Mast Cell Activation via a PGE2-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jia; Kuwabara, Atsushi; Kamio, Yoshinobu; Hu, Shuling; Park, Jeonghyun; Hashimoto, Tomoki; Lee, Jae-Woo

    2017-01-01

    Background Activation of mast cells participates in the chronic inflammation associated with cerebral arteries in intracranial aneurysm formation and rupture. Several studies have shown that the anti-inflammatory effect of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is beneficial for the treatment of aneurysms. However, some long-term safety concerns exist regarding stem cell-based therapy for clinical use. Objective We investigated the therapeutic potential of microvesicles (MVs) derived from human MSCs, anuclear membrane bound fragments with reparative properties, in preventing the rupture of intracranial aneurysm in mice, particularly in the effect of MVs on mast cell activation. Methods and Results Intracranial aneurysm was induced in C57BL/6 mice by the combination of systemic hypertension and intrathecal elastase injection. Intravenous administration of MSC-derived MVs on day 6 and day 9 after aneurysm induction significantly reduced the aneurysmal rupture rate, which was associated with reduced number of activated mast cells in the brain. A23187-induced activation of both primary cultures of murine mast cells and a human mast cell line, LAD2, was suppressed by MVs treatment, leading to a decrease in cytokine release and tryptase and chymase activities. Up-regulation of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production and E-prostanoid 4 (EP4) receptor expression were also observed on mast cells with MVs treatment. Administration of an EP4 antagonist with the MVs eliminated the protective effect of MVs against the aneurysmal rupture in vivo. Conclusions Human MSC-derived MVs prevented the rupture of intracranial aneurysm, in part due to their anti-inflammatory effect on mast cells, which was mediated by PGE2 production and EP4 activation. PMID:27350036

  15. 2-Hydroxy-3-methoxybenzoic acid attenuates mast cell-mediated allergic reaction in mice via modulation of the FcεRI signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeon-Yong; Je, In-Gyu; Kim, Min Jong; Kang, Byeong-Cheol; Choi, Young-Ae; Baek, Moon-Chang; Lee, Byungheon; Choi, Jin Kyeong; Park, Hae Ran; Shin, Tae-Yong; Lee, Soyoung; Yoon, Seung-Bin; Lee, Sang-Rae; Khang, Dongwoo; Kim, Sang-Hyun

    2017-01-01

    Mast cells are important effector cells in immunoglobulin (Ig) E-mediated allergic reactions such as asthma, atopic dermatitis and rhinitis. Vanillic acid, a natural product, has shown anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. In the present study, we investigated the anti-allergic inflammatory effects of ortho-vanillic acid (2-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzoic acid, o-VA) that was a derivative of vanillic acid isolated from Amomum xanthioides. In mouse anaphylaxis models, oral administration of o-VA (2, 10, 50 mg/kg) dose-dependently attenuated ovalbumin-induced active systemic anaphylaxis and IgE-mediated cutaneous allergic reactions such as hypothermia, histamine release, IgE production and vasodilation; administration of o-VA also suppressed the mast cell degranulator compound 48/80-induced anaphylaxis. In cultured mast cell line RBL-2H3 and isolated rat peritoneal mast cells in vitro, pretreatment with o-VA (1–100 μmol/L) dose-dependently inhibited DNP-HSA-induced degranulation of mast cells by decreasing the intracellular free calcium level, and suppressed the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-4. Pretreatment of RBL-2H3 cells with o-VA suppressed DNP-HSA-induced phosphorylation of Lyn, Syk, Akt, and the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-κB. In conclusion, o-VA suppresses the mast cell-mediated allergic inflammatory response by blocking the signaling pathways downstream of high affinity IgE receptor (FcεRI) on the surface of mast cells. PMID:27890918

  16. Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Derived Microvesicles Prevent the Rupture of Intracranial Aneurysm in Part by Suppression of Mast Cell Activation via a PGE2-Dependent Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Kuwabara, Atsushi; Kamio, Yoshinobu; Hu, Shuling; Park, Jeonghyun; Hashimoto, Tomoki; Lee, Jae-Woo

    2016-12-01

    Activation of mast cells participates in the chronic inflammation associated with cerebral arteries in intracranial aneurysm formation and rupture. Several studies have shown that the anti-inflammatory effect of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is beneficial for the treatment of aneurysms. However, some long-term safety concerns exist regarding stem cell-based therapy for clinical use. We investigated the therapeutic potential of microvesicles (MVs) derived from human MSCs, anuclear membrane bound fragments with reparative properties, in preventing the rupture of intracranial aneurysm in mice, particularly in the effect of MVs on mast cell activation. Intracranial aneurysm was induced in C57BL/6 mice by the combination of systemic hypertension and intrathecal elastase injection. Intravenous administration of MSC-derived MVs on day 6 and day 9 after aneurysm induction significantly reduced the aneurysmal rupture rate, which was associated with reduced number of activated mast cells in the brain. A23187-induced activation of both primary cultures of murine mast cells and a human mast cell line, LAD2, was suppressed by MVs treatment, leading to a decrease in cytokine release and tryptase and chymase activities. Upregulation of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production and E-prostanoid 4 (EP4) receptor expression were also observed on mast cells with MVs treatment. Administration of an EP4 antagonist with the MVs eliminated the protective effect of MVs against the aneurysmal rupture in vivo. Human MSC-derived MVs prevented the rupture of intracranial aneurysm, in part due to their anti-inflammatory effect on mast cells, which was mediated by PGE2 production and EP4 activation. Stem Cells 2016;34:2943-2955.

  17. Prostaglandin F{sub 2{alpha}} regulates cytokine responses of mast cells through the receptors for prostaglandin E

    SciTech Connect

    Kaneko, Izumi; Hishinuma, Takanori; Suzuki, Kaori; Owada, Yuji; Kitanaka, Noriko; Kondo, Hisatake; Goto, Junichi; Furukawa, Hiroshi; Ono, Masao

    2008-03-14

    There is an increasing body of evidence that prostanoids modulate mast cell functions and contribute to the development of allergic inflammation. The present study aimed to identify an undetermined function of prostaglandin (PG) F{sub 2{alpha}} in mast cell activation and the signaling mechanism involved in it. Simultaneous quantification of prostanoids by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry revealed the constitutive release of PGF{sub 2{alpha}}, thromboxane B{sub 2}, and 6-keto-PGF{sub 1{alpha}} from bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs). Upon activation of BMMCs by lipopolysaccharide, the cytokine production in BMMCs was enhanced when the culture was supplemented with PGF{sub 2{alpha}}. However, F prostanoid receptor-a selective receptor for PGF{sub 2{alpha}}-was not detected in BMMCs. Further investigations performed using prostanoid receptor antagonists revealed an alternative mechanism wherein the receptors for PGE species-E prostanoid receptors-mediated the PGF{sub 2{alpha}} signal in BMMCs. The present study provides an insight into a novel function of PGF{sub 2{alpha}}, i.e., an autocrine accelerator for mast cell activation.

  18. Meliae cortex extract exhibits anti-allergic activity through the inhibition of Syk kinase in mast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jun Ho; Ko, Na Young; Kim, Nam Wook; Mun, Se Hwan; Kim, Jie Wan; Her, Erk; Kim, Bo Kyung; Seo, Dong Wan; Chang, Hyun Wook; Moon, Tae Chul; Han, Jeung Whan; Kim, Young Mi; Choi, Wahn Soo . E-mail: wahnchoi@kku.ac.kr

    2007-05-01

    The anti-allergic action of various Oriental medicinal herbs was investigated using in vitro and in vivo experimental models. Of these extracts, the ethanol extract of Meliae cortex (MC) exhibited the most potent activity in mast cells; its IC{sub 50} values were 29 {+-} 1.5 {mu}g/ml for antigen stimulation and 57 {+-} 3.4 {mu}g/ml for thapsigargin stimulation. It inhibited compound-48/80-induced systemic anaphylaxis by 52.9% at a dose of 300 mg/kg in mice; it also inhibited the expression of the proinflammatory mediator TNF-{alpha}. With regard to its mechanism of action, MC suppressed the activating phosphorylation of Syk, a key enzyme in mast-cell signaling processes and that of Akt in a dose-dependent manner. It also inhibited the MAP kinase ERK1/2, which is critical for the production of inflammatory cytokines in mast cells, as indicated by the suppression of the activating phosphorylation of ERK1/2. Taken together, these results suggest that the anti-allergic activity of MC may be due to the inhibition of histamine secretion and cytokine expression through the Syk inhibition in mast cells.

  19. IgE and IgA produced by OX40-OX40L or CD40-CD40L interaction in B cells-mast cells re-activate FcεRI or FcαRI on mast cells in mouse allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Hong, Gwan Ui; Lim, Ji Yeun; Kim, Nam Goo; Shin, Joo-Ho; Ro, Jai Youl

    2015-05-05

    Mast cells are major effector cells of allergic diseases related to IgE. This study was undertaken to determine whether IgE or IgA, produced by CD40-CD40L or OX40-OX40L interactions between B cells and mast cells, re-activate FcεRI or FcαRI on mast cell surface. C57BL mice were sensitized and subjected to OVA challenge to induce asthma. Bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) and primary B cells were co-cultured. Mast cell recruitment into airways was stained by May-Grünwald Giemsa, the expression of markers or signaling molecules were determined by immunohistochemistry or Western blotting, and co-localization of B cells and mast cells by immunofluorescence. Anti-CD40 plus anti-OX40L Abs synergistically reduced IgE and IgA production, and mediators (histamine, LTs and cytokines) released in mast cells, and additively reduced other responses, such as, numbers of mast cells, the expression of markers (tryptase, mMCP5, B220 and CD19), surface molecules (CD40, CD40L, OX40 and OX40L), FcεRI or FcαRI and the co-localization of BMMCs and B cells, and IgE- or IgA-producing cells, as compared with individual blocking Ab treatment which reducedresponses in BAL cells or lung tissues of OVA-challenged mice or in co-culture of B and mast cells. The data suggest that IgE and IgA, produced by OX40-OX40L or CD40-CD40L interaction between B cells and mast cells, may re-activate receptors of FCεRI and FcαRI on mast cell surfaces, followed by more mediator release, and furthermore, that treatment with anti-CD40 plus anti-OX40L Abs offers a potential treatment for allergic asthma.

  20. Overview of physics results from MAST towards ITER/DEMO and the MAST Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, H.; Abel, I. G.; Akers, R. J.; Allan, A.; Allan, S. Y.; Appel, L. C.; Asunta, O.; Barnes, M.; Barratt, N. C.; Ben Ayed, N.; Bradley, J. W.; Canik, J.; Cahyna, P.; Cecconello, M.; Challis, C. D.; Chapman, I. T.; Ciric, D.; Colyer, G.; Conway, N. J.; Cox, M.; Crowley, B. J.; Cowley, S. C.; Cunningham, G.; Danilov, A.; Darke, A.; De Bock, M. F. M.; De Temmerman, G.; Dendy, R. O.; Denner, P.; Dickinson, D.; Dnestrovsky, A. Y.; Dnestrovsky, Y.; Driscoll, M. D.; Dudson, B.; Dunai, D.; Dunstan, M.; Dura, P.; Elmore, S.; Field, A. R.; Fishpool, G.; Freethy, S.; Fundamenski, W.; Garzotti, L.; Ghim, Y. C.; Gibson, K. J.; Gryaznevich, M. P.; Harrison, J.; Havlíčková, E.; Hawkes, N. C.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Hender, T. C.; Highcock, E.; Higgins, D.; Hill, P.; Hnat, B.; Hole, M. J.; Horáček, J.; Howell, D. F.; Imada, K.; Jones, O.; Kaveeva, E.; Keeling, D.; Kirk, A.; Kočan, M.; Lake, R. J.; Lehnen, M.; Leggate, H. J.; Liang, Y.; Lilley, M. K.; Lisgo, S. W.; Liu, Y. Q.; Lloyd, B.; Maddison, G. P.; Mailloux, J.; Martin, R.; McArdle, G. J.; McClements, K. G.; McMillan, B.; Michael, C.; Militello, F.; Molchanov, P.; Mordijck, S.; Morgan, T.; Morris, A. W.; Muir, D. G.; Nardon, E.; Naulin, V.; Naylor, G.; Nielsen, A. H.; O'Brien, M. R.; O'Gorman, T.; Pamela, S.; Parra, F. I.; Patel, A.; Pinches, S. D.; Price, M. N.; Roach, C. M.; Robinson, J. R.; Romanelli, M.; Rozhansky, V.; Saarelma, S.; Sangaroon, S.; Saveliev, A.; Scannell, R.; Seidl, J.; Sharapov, S. E.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Shevchenko, V.; Shibaev, S.; Stork, D.; Storrs, J.; Sykes, A.; Tallents, G. J.; Tamain, P.; Taylor, D.; Temple, D.; Thomas-Davies, N.; Thornton, A.; Turnyanskiy, M. R.; Valovič, M.; Vann, R. G. L.; Verwichte, E.; Voskoboynikov, P.; Voss, G.; Warder, S. E. V.; Wilson, H. R.; Wodniak, I.; Zoletnik, S.; Zagôrski, R.; MAST, the; NBI Teams

    2013-10-01

    New diagnostic, modelling and plant capability on the Mega Ampère Spherical Tokamak (MAST) have delivered important results in key areas for ITER/DEMO and the upcoming MAST Upgrade, a step towards future ST devices on the path to fusion currently under procurement. Micro-stability analysis of the pedestal highlights the potential roles of micro-tearing modes and kinetic ballooning modes for the pedestal formation. Mitigation of edge localized modes (ELM) using resonant magnetic perturbation has been demonstrated for toroidal mode numbers n = 3, 4, 6 with an ELM frequency increase by up to a factor of 9, compatible with pellet fuelling. The peak heat flux of mitigated and natural ELMs follows the same linear trend with ELM energy loss and the first ELM-resolved Ti measurements in the divertor region are shown. Measurements of flow shear and turbulence dynamics during L-H transitions show filaments erupting from the plasma edge whilst the full flow shear is still present. Off-axis neutral beam injection helps to strongly reduce the redistribution of fast-ions due to fishbone modes when compared to on-axis injection. Low-k ion-scale turbulence has been measured in L-mode and compared to global gyro-kinetic simulations. A statistical analysis of principal turbulence time scales shows them to be of comparable magnitude and reasonably correlated with turbulence decorrelation time. Te inside the island of a neoclassical tearing mode allow the analysis of the island evolution without assuming specific models for the heat flux. Other results include the discrepancy of the current profile evolution during the current ramp-up with solutions of the poloidal field diffusion equation, studies of the anomalous Doppler resonance compressional Alfvén eigenmodes, disruption mitigation studies and modelling of the new divertor design for MAST Upgrade. The novel 3D electron Bernstein synthetic imaging shows promising first data sensitive to the edge current profile and flows.