Science.gov

Sample records for hard mast production

  1. Long-term monitoring of fleshy fruit and hard mast production and seasonal bird distribution at the Savannah River Site, South Carolina.

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, Cathryn, H.; Levey, Douglas J.

    2009-06-15

    A final report of Fruit and hard mast production in five habitat types at SRS with a comparison of fruit consumption by fledgling versus adult birds at SRS and Relative importance of fruit, seeds, and insects in the diets of overwintering birds at SRS.

  2. Bait stations, hard mast, and black bear population growth in Great Smoky Mountains National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Joseph D.; van Manen, Frank T.; Pelton, Michael R.

    2005-01-01

    Bait-station surveys are used by wildlife managers as an index to American black bear (Ursus americanus) population abundance, but the relationship is not well established. Hard mast surveys are similarly used to assess annual black bear food availability which may affect mortality and natality rates. We used data collected in Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GSMNP) from 1989 to 2003 to determine whether changes in the bait-station index (ΔBSI) were associated with estimated rates of bear population growth (λ) and whether hard mast production was related to bear visitation to baits. We also evaluated whether hard mast production from previous years was related to λ. Estimates of λ were based on analysis of capture-recapture data with the Pradel temporal symmetry estimator. Using the Akaike's Information Criterion (AIC), our analysis revealed no direct relationship between ΔBSI and λ. A simulation analysis indicated that our data were adequate to detect a relationship had one existed. Model fit was marginally improved when we added total oak mast production of the previous year as an interaction term suggesting that the BSI was confounded with environmental variables. Consequently the utility of the bait-station survey as a population monitoring technique is questionable at the spatial and temporal scales we studied. Mast survey data, however, were valuable covariates of λ. Population growth for a given year was negatively related to oak mast production 4 and 5 years prior. That finding supported our hypothesis that mast failures can trigger reproductive synchrony, which may not be evident from the trapped sample until years later.

  3. New Kepler Data Products At MAST For Stellar Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, Scott W.; Shiao, B.; Tseng, S.; Million, C.; Thompson, R.; Seibert, M.; Abney, F.; Donaldson, T.; Dower, T.; Fraquelli, D. A.; Handy, S.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Levay, K.; Matuskey, J.; McLean, B.; Quick, L.; Rogers, A.; Wallace, G.; White, R. L.

    2014-01-01

    The Kepler Mission has collected high-precision, time-series photometry of over 200,000 stars. The reduced lightcurves, target pixel files, and a variety of catalog metadata are already available at MAST. We present new data products and services at MAST that will further aid researchers as Kepler begins its transition to a legacy mission, particularly in the realm of stellar astrophysics. New photometric catalogs to accompany the Kepler targets have arrived at MAST within the past year, and several more will be coming in the relative future. These include the second half of the Kepler INT survey (U,g,r,i,H_alpha; available now), an improved GALEX source catalog (NUV and FUV; available now), PanSTARRS (g,r,i,z; available soon), and WISE (3.4, 4.6, 12, and 22 microns; planned). We expect searches for variability will become one of the most active areas of archive use, so MAST is including a wide range of variability statistics as part of the archive database. In addition to being searchable through database queries and web forms, each Preview page will now include a summary of these variability indices for each of the target's lightcurves within a Quarter. Along with updated NUV and FUV fluxes, a new tool at MAST called gPhoton will allow users to create time-series lightcurves, including animated movies and intensity images, from any set of GALEX photons with arbitrary aperture and bin sizes. We show some examples of the ways GALEX UV lightcurves generated with gPhoton can be used in conjunction with the Kepler data. Finally, MAST has released an initial version of its Data Discovery Portal. This one-stop, interactive web application gives users the ability to search and access data from any of MAST's missions (HST, GALEX, Kepler, FUSE, IUE, JWST, etc.), as well as any data available through the Virtual Observatory. It includes filtering options, access to interactive displays, an accompanying AstroViewer with data footprints on-sky, the ability to upload your own

  4. MAST 1 purchased products--components. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.J.

    1995-10-01

    AlliedSignal Inc., Kansas City Division, the production agency, was provided with funding to acquire purchased product components in support of the MAST (Multi-Application Surety Technology) Program. Implementation efforts, closing procurement status, and proposals for improvements in the procurement process are presented. The intent of this project was to fund the Purchased Product Team`s traditional procurement of components, with significantly reduced flowtime, in accordance with the Qualification Evaluation System, and to exercise the system to the extent possible. When funding was reduced, it became obvious that full implementation of the Qualification Evaluation System could not be achieved due to limited resources.

  5. First Results from a Charged Fusion Products Diagnostic at MAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Ramona V.; Allan, Scott Y.; Boeglin, Werner U.; Cecconello, Marco; McClements, Ken G.; Darrow, Douglass S.; MAST Team

    2013-10-01

    We designed, built and installed in MAST a 4-channel solid-state detector array for the detection of the charged deuterium-deuterium fusion products protons and tritons. The array has been mounted at the end of the reciprocating probe arm in MAST allowing it to sample a range of radial positions. First data have been taken in August 2013. The detector signals have been digitized with a 60 MHz sampling rate and have been continuously recorded during plasma discharges. Protons and tritons were readily identified and counted. The observed count rates showed clear dependence on the neutral beam power and were modulated synchronous with saw-teeth. Comparison with data obtained from the MAST neutron camera and the fission chamber neutron detector is planned. We found that time resolutions as low as at least 1 ms were achievable. The detector performance and first analysis results for various plasma scenarios will be presented. Supported in part by DOE grant DE-SC0001157.

  6. The relationships between weather, mast production, and the breeding ecology of eastern wild turkeys in South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Carlisle, William, D.

    2003-02-26

    Carlisle, W.D. 2003. The relationship between weather, mast production, and the breeding ecology of eastern wild turkeys. MS Thesis. Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina. 41 pp. From 1998 to 2001, 134 wild turkeys were captured, including 2 recaptures. Hens were fitted with radio transmitters to monitor nesting, brooding and movement activities. Of 37 known nests, including 6 renests, overall nest success was 28%. Causes of nest failure included abandonment, depredation, and fire. Mean clutch size was 11. Mean date of nest initiation was April 9 for first nests and May 14 for renests. Mean annual poult to hen ratios were determined for 1990 to 2000 from a South Carolina Department of Natural Resources roadside survey and ranged from 0.6 to 4.0 poults per hen. Soft mast and hard mast production data were provided by D.J. Levey, Univ. of Florida. Rainfall and temperature data were collected at 12 weather stations on Savannah River Site. Notable correlations were found between hard mast production and jake weight, and June rainfall and poult to hen ratio.

  7. New GALEX UV Data Products At MAST For Stellar Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiao, Bernie; Fleming, S. W.; Million, C.; Seibert, M.; Bianchi, L.; Thompson, R.; Tseng, S.; Adler, W. J.; Hubbard, M.; Levay, K.; Madore, B. F.; Martin, C. D.; Nieto-Santisteban, M. A.; Sahai, R.; Schiminovich, D.; White, R. L.; Wyder, T. K.

    2014-01-01

    The Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) mission ended in June 2013 after ten years in orbit. Its FUV and NUV microchannel plate detectors were used to conduct a variety of direct imaging and spectroscopic astronomical surveys with various depths and sky coverage, recording individual photon events with a time resolution of five thousandths of a second. Although the mission has ended, MAST is continuing to provide new data products as the mission transitions to a legacy archive. One product is the GCAT (Seibert et al., in prep), a catalog of GALEX sources across the entire GR6 data release that removes duplicate objects found in the GALEX MCAT. The GCAT defines "primary" NUV and FUV fluxes within the AIS and MIS surveys 40 million and 22 million sources, respectively), accounting for tile overlaps, and with visual inspection of every tile to flag artifacts and conduct other quality control checks. Another catalog of unique sources is that of Bianchi et al. (2013). Similar to the GCAT, their catalog produces a list of distinct GALEX sources in both the FUV and NUV from the AIS and MIS surveys, and includes data from GR7 (through the end of 2012). They have also cross-matched their sources with SDSS DR9, GSC-II, PanSTARRS, and 2MASS. We review access options for these catalogs, including updated matches between the GCAT and SDSS / Kepler available at MAST. In addition to these unique GALEX source catalogs, MAST will provide a database and software package that archives each of the ~1.5 trillion photon events detected over the lifetime of the mission. For the first time, users will be able to create calibrated lightcurves, intensity maps, and animated movies from any set of photons selected across any tile, and with specified aperture sizes, coordinates, and time steps. Users can access the data using either a python-based command-line software package, through a web interface at MAST, or (eventually) through CasJobs using direct SQL queries. We present some example

  8. Stimulation of cysteinyl leukotriene production in mast cells by heat shock and acetylsalicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Mortaz, Esmaeil; Redegeld, Frank A; Dunsmore, Kathy; Odoms, Kelli; Wong, Hector R; Nijkamp, Frans P; Engels, Ferdi

    2007-04-30

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) E-dependent activation of mast cells is central to the allergic response. The engagement of IgE-occupied receptors initiates a series of molecular events that causes the release of preformed, and de novo synthesis of, allergic mediators. Cysteinyl leukotrienes are able to contract airway smooth muscle and increase mucus secretion and vascular permeability and recruit eosinophils. Mast cells have also recently been recognized as active participants in innate immune responses. Heat stress can modulate innate immunity by inducing stress proteins such as heat-shock proteins (HSPs). We previously demonstrated that treatment of mast cells with heat shock or acetylsalicylic acid results in an increase of TNF-alpha and IL-6 release. This effect was paralleled by expression of HSP70. In the current study, we further investigated the effects of heat shock and acetylsalicylic acid on the activation of mast cells and the release of cysteinyl leukotrienes. In mouse mast cells, derived from a culture of bone marrow cells, responsiveness to heat shock, acetylsalicylic acid and exogenous or endogenous HSP70 was monitored by measuring leukotriene C4 release. We show that after heat shock treatment and exposure to acetylsalicylic acid leukotriene production was increased. Moreover, exogenous rHSP70 also induced leukotriene production. Because it has been reported that leukotriene production in mast cells may be mediated by Toll like receptor (TLR) activation, and HSP70 also activates TLRs signaling, we further explored these issues by using mast cells that are not able to produce HSP70, i.e. heat shock factor-1 (HSF-1) knockout cells. We found that in HSF-1 knockout bone marrow derived mast cells, heat shock and acetylsalicylic acid failed to induce release of leukotrienes. Moreover, in wild type cells the surface expression of TLR4 was attenuated, whereas the intracellular expression was up-regulated. We conclude that heat shock and acetylsalicylic acid induce

  9. Results on hard diffractive production

    SciTech Connect

    Goulianos, K.

    1995-07-01

    The results of experiments at hadron colliders probing the structure of the pomeron through hard diffraction are reviewed. Some results on deep inelastic diffractive scattering obtained a HERA are also discussed and placed in perspective. By using a properly normalized pomeron flux factor in single diffraction dissociation, as dictated by unitarity, the pomeron emerges as a combination of valence quark and gluon color singlets in a ratio suggested by asymptopia.

  10. Involvement of Bruton's Tyrosine Kinase in FcεRI-dependent Mast Cell Degranulation and Cytokine Production

    PubMed Central

    Hata, Daisuke; Kawakami, Yuko; Inagaki, Naoki; Lantz, Chris S.; Kitamura, Toshio; Khan, Wasif N.; Maeda-Yamamoto, Mari; Miura, Toru; Han, Wei; Hartman, Stephen E.; Yao, Libo; Nagai, Hiroichi; Goldfeld, Anne E.; Alt, Frederick W.; Galli, Stephen J.; Witte, Owen N.; Kawakami, Toshiaki

    1998-01-01

    We investigated the role of Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) in FcεRI-dependent activation of mouse mast cells, using xid and btk null mutant mice. Unlike B cell development, mast cell development is apparently normal in these btk mutant mice. However, mast cells derived from these mice exhibited significant abnormalities in FcεRI-dependent function. xid mice primed with anti-dinitrophenyl monoclonal IgE antibody exhibited mildly diminished early-phase and severely blunted late-phase anaphylactic reactions in response to antigen challenge in vivo. Consistent with this finding, cultured mast cells derived from the bone marrow cells of xid or btk null mice exhibited mild impairments in degranulation, and more profound defects in the production of several cytokines, upon FcεRI cross-linking. Moreover, the transcriptional activities of these cytokine genes were severely reduced in FcεRI-stimulated btk mutant mast cells. The specificity of these effects of btk mutations was confirmed by the improvement in the ability of btk mutant mast cells to degranulate and to secrete cytokines after the retroviral transfer of wild-type btk cDNA, but not of vector or kinase-dead btk cDNA. Retroviral transfer of Emt (= Itk/Tsk), Btk's closest relative, also partially improved the ability of btk mutant mast cells to secrete mediators. Taken together, these results demonstrate an important role for Btk in the full expression of FcεRI signal transduction in mast cells. PMID:9547335

  11. Inhibition of mast cell secretion by oxidation products of natural polyamines.

    PubMed

    Vliagoftis, H; Boucher, W S; Mak, L L; Theoharides, T C

    1992-05-28

    Mast cells secrete many biologically active compounds upon stimulation by immunoglobulin E (IgE) and specific antigen (Ag), anaphylatoxins, as well as a number of cationic compounds which include drugs, kinins and neuropeptides. The effects of the two naturally occurring polyamines, spermine (SP) and spermidine (SPD), on mast cell secretion were studied because they have been implicated in the modulation of cellular processes, possibly through their cationic charge or the regulation of calcium ions. SP and SPD over the range of 10(-7) to 10(-4) M inhibited the release of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT, serotonin) triggered by compound 48/80 (C48/80) in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, as long as at least 2% calf serum (CS) was present. SP also inhibited secretion of both histamine and serotonin stimulated immunologically by using IgE and anti-rat IgE. This inhibition was not accompanied by cytotoxicity. The major available polyamine metabolites tested, N1-acetyl spermine (N1-acSP) and N8-acetyl spermidine (N8-acSPD), also showed inhibition in the presence of CS, whereas putrescine, N8,N1-hexamethylene-bis-acetamide (HMBA) and benzylamine did not. Fetal bovine serum (FBS), as well as human and rat serum, which do not contain polyamine oxidase, did not result in any inhibition with the polyamines tested. Inhibitors of the polyamine oxidase blocked the polyamine effect, indicating that the inhibition of mast cell secretion must derive from aldehydes produced from these polyamines. Addition of the aldehyde inhibitor phenylhydrazine (phi-HDZ), simultaneously with, but not following the polyamines, blocked their inhibitory effect, further strengthening the involvement of aldehydes. These results indicate that naturally occurring polyamines may regulate mast cell secretion through metabolic products of polyamine oxidase, a similar enzyme of which is also present in human liver, placenta and pregnant serum.

  12. Leukotriene C4 production by murine mast cells: evidence of a role for extracellular leukotriene A4.

    PubMed

    Dahinden, C A; Clancy, R M; Gross, M; Chiller, J M; Hugli, T E

    1985-10-01

    The glutathione-containing leukotriene C4 (LTC4) is a major mediator of smooth muscle contraction and is released by mast cells when antigen interacts with cell-bound IgE. Antigen-stimulated mast cells undergo phospholipase activation. We report a pathway of LTC4 production by mast cells that does not require phospholipase activation but depends on the interaction of activated neutrophils with unstimulated mast cells, using as an intermediate extracellular leukotriene A4 (LTA4). The epoxide LTA4 is released by neutrophils and, together with leukotriene B4 and 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid, constitutes the major lipoxygenase metabolites found in supernatants of stimulated neutrophils. Five minutes after activation of neutrophils by calcium ionophore A23187 we measured 136 pmol of extracellular LTA4 per 10(7) neutrophils (range 40-300, n = 7) by trapping the epoxide with alcohols. Therefore, we conclude that LTA4 is not just an intracellular leukotriene precursor but is released as a lipoxygenase metabolite. LTA4 is known to be stabilized by albumin and is efficiently converted by mast cells into LTC4 even at low LTA4 concentrations. The LTA4 complexed to albumin is converted into LTC4 rapidly and completely within 10-15 min. More than 50% of the LTA4 presented to mast cells is metabolized to LTC4 at concentrations of LTA4 between 0.2 and 2 nmol of LTA4 per 10(7) mast cells. This observation establishes a potential physiologic role for extracellular LTA4. Therefore, interactions between various cell types that release or utilize LTA4 may provide an important metabolic pathway for the production of leukotrienes.

  13. Hard Exclusive Meson Production at COMPASS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ter Wolbeek, Johannes

    2016-02-01

    The concept of Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) combines two-dimensional spatial information given by form factors, with longitudinal momentum information from Parton Distribution Functions. GPDs provide comprehensive description of the nucleon structure involving a wealth of new information. For instance, according to Ji’s sum rule, the GPDs H and E enable access to the total angular momenta of quarks, antiquarks and gluons. While H can be approached using measurements of electroproduction cross sections, asymmetry measurements in hard exclusive meson production off transversely polarized targets can help to constrain the GPD E and chiral-odd GPDs. In 2007 and 2010 the COMPASS experiment at CERN collected data by scattering a 160GeV/c muon beam off a transversely polarized NH3 target. Exclusive vector-meson production μ + p → μ‧ + p + V with a ρ0 or ω meson in the final state is studied and five single-spin and three double-spin azimuthal asymmetries are measured.

  14. Butyrate suppresses murine mast cell proliferation and cytokine production through inhibiting histone deacetylase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hanying; Du, Min; Yang, Qiyuan; Zhu, Mei-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Beyond their nutritional impact to colonic epithelial cells, the intestinal microbiota metabolite butyrate has pleotropic effects to host cells and is known for its beneficial effects on intestinal homeostasis and metabolism. However, it remains unclear how it modulates mast cell function. Here, we demonstrate that butyrate profoundly inhibited proliferation of mouse mastocytoma P815 cells through inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, as well as decreasing c-Kit activation. In addition, butyrate increased early- and late-stage apoptotic P815 cells. In murine bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMC), butyrate-suppressed FcεRI-dependent tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) release without affecting β-Hexosaminidase, but that was associated with decreased mitogen-activated protein kinase extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, p38 and c-Jun N-terminal kinases activation. Butyrate treatment substantially enhanced histone 3 acetylation in both P815 and BMMC and decreased FcεRI-dependent mRNA expression of tnf-α and il-6 in BMMC, mimicking the effect of Trichostatin A, a known histone deacetylase inhibitor. Chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed that butyrate enhanced acetylation of the tnf-α and il-6 promoter regions but blocked RNA polymerase II binding to the promoters of tnf-α and il-6 genes, indicating suppressed transcription initiation. These phenotypes mimicked those of Trichostatin A treatment. In conclusion, butyrate inhibits cell proliferation and increases cell apoptosis in mastocytoma P815 cells and suppresses FcεRI-dependent cytokine production in murine primary BMMC, which are likely mediated by HDAC inhibition.

  15. Acidic environment augments FcεRI-mediated production of IL-6 and IL-13 in mast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kamide, Yosuke; Ishizuka, Tamotsu; Tobo, Masayuki; Tsurumaki, Hiroaki; Aoki, Haruka; Mogi, Chihiro; Nakakura, Takashi; Yatomi, Masakiyo; Ono, Akihiro; Koga, Yasuhiko; Sato, Koichi; Hisada, Takeshi; Dobashi, Kunio; Yamada, Masanobu; Okajima, Fumikazu

    2015-08-28

    Although blood pH is maintained in a narrow range of around pH 7.4 in living organisms, inflammatory loci are characterized by acidic conditions. Mast cells tend to reside close to the surface of the body in areas such as the mucosa and skin where they may be exposed to exogenous acids, and they play an important role in immune responses. However, little is known about the effects of extracellular acidification on the functions of mast cell. Here, we found that extracellular acidification increased the dinitrophenyl-conjugated human serum albumin (DNP-HSA)-induced production of interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-13 in MC/9 cells or bone marrow-derived mouse mast cells sensitized with anti-DNP IgE. Extracellular acidification also inhibited migration of MC/9 cells toward DNP-HSA. In addition, acidic pH stimulated antigen-induced activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and protein kinase B (Akt). These findings suggest that extracellular acidification augmented antigen/IgE-induced and FcεRI-mediated production of IL-6 and IL-13 in mast cells, and that this was associated with the enhancement of p38 MAPK and Akt activation. - Highlights: • Antigen-induced IL-6 and IL-13 production was augmented by acidic pH in mast cells. • Acidic pH-induced actions were associated with activation of p38 MAPK and Akt. • Inhibition of p38 MAPK and Akt attenuated cytokine responses to acidic pH. • Acidic pH effects are not attributable to actions of known proton-sensing GPCRs.

  16. The dopamine D3 receptor regulates the effects of methamphetamine on LPS-induced cytokine production in murine mast cells.

    PubMed

    Xue, Li; Li, Xia; Ren, Hui-Xun; Wu, Feng; Li, Ming; Wang, Biao; Chen, Fang-Yuan; Cheng, Wei-Ying; Li, Ju-Ping; Chen, Yan-Jiong; Chen, Teng

    2015-06-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that methamphetamine (METH) alter inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokine production in the periphery. However, the effect of METH on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced immune responses and its underlying mechanism of action remains unclear. The dopamine D3 receptor (D3R) plays an important role in METH addiction, indicating that the D3R may regulate METH-mediated immune responses. In this study, we examined the effect of METH on mast cell released cytokines in the lungs and thymi of mice stimulated by LPS, and on LPS-induced murine bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs). Moreover, we used D3R-deficient mice to investigate the effect of this receptor on LPS-stimulated mast cell released cytokine production after METH treatment in the lungs and thymi. The effects of a D3R agonist and antagonist on LPS-induced cytokine production after METH treatment in murine BMMCs were also evaluated. METH suppressed LPS-induced cytokine production in the lungs and thymi of wild-type (WT) mice and BMMCs. However, METH did not alter LPS-induced cytokine production in the lungs and thymi of D3R-deficient mice. When BMMCs were treated with the D3R receptor antagonist, NGB2904 hydrochloride (NGB-2904), METH did not alter LPS-induced cytokine production. However, treatment with the D3R agonist, 7-hydroxy-(di-n-propylamino) tetralin (7-OH-DPAT), significantly enhanced the effects of METH on LPS-induced cytokine production. Our results suggest that METH regulates mast cell released cytokines production in an LPS-induced mouse model via the D3R.

  17. Expression, localization, and regulation of NOS in human mast cell lines: effects on leukotriene production.

    PubMed

    Gilchrist, Mark; McCauley, Scott D; Befus, A Dean

    2004-07-15

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a potent radical produced by nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and has pleiotrophic activities in health and disease. As mast cells (MCs) play a central role in both homeostasis and pathology, we investigated NOS expression and NO production in human MC populations. Endothelial NOS (eNOS) was ubiquitously expressed in both human MC lines and skin-derived MCs, while neuronal NOS (nNOS) was variably expressed in the MC populations studied. The inducible (iNOS) isoform was not detected in human MCs. Both growth factor-independent (HMC-1) and -dependent (LAD 2) MC lines showed predominant nuclear eNOS protein localization, with weaker cytoplasmic expression. nNOS showed exclusive cytoplasmic localization in HMC-1. Activation with Ca(2+) ionophore (A23187) or IgE-anti-IgE induced eNOS phosphorylation and translocation to the nucleus and nuclear and cytoplasmic NO formation. eNOS colocalizes with the leukotriene (LT)-initiating enzyme 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) in the MC nucleus. The NO donor, S-nitrosoglutathione (SNOG), inhibited, whereas the NOS inhibitor, N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), potentiated LT release in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, human MC lines produce NO in both cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments, and endogenously produced NO can regulate LT production by MCs. PMID:15044250

  18. Adipose triglyceride lipase regulates eicosanoid production in activated human mast cells.

    PubMed

    Dichlberger, Andrea; Schlager, Stefanie; Maaninka, Katariina; Schneider, Wolfgang J; Kovanen, Petri T

    2014-12-01

    Human mast cells (MCs) contain TG-rich cytoplasmic lipid droplets (LDs) with high arachidonic acid (AA) content. Here, we investigated the functional role of adipose TG lipase (ATGL) in TG hydrolysis and the ensuing release of AA as substrate for eicosanoid generation by activated human primary MCs in culture. Silencing of ATGL in MCs by siRNAs induced the accumulation of neutral lipids in LDs. IgE-dependent activation of MCs triggered the secretion of the two major eicosanoids, prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) and leukotriene C4 (LTC4). The immediate release of PGD2 from the activated MCs was solely dependent on cyclooxygenase (COX) 1, while during the delayed phase of lipid mediator production, the inducible COX-2 also contributed to its release. Importantly, when ATGL-silenced MCs were activated, the secretion of both PGD2 and LTC4 was significantly reduced. Interestingly, the inhibitory effect on the release of LTC4 was even more pronounced in ATGL-silenced MCs than in cytosolic phospholipase A2-silenced MCs. These data show that ATGL hydrolyzes AA-containing TGs present in human MC LDs and define ATGL as a novel regulator of the substrate availability of AA for eicosanoid generation upon MC activation. PMID:25114172

  19. Inhibitory effects of BiRyuChe-bang on mast cell-mediated allergic reactions and inflammatory cytokines production.

    PubMed

    Moon, Phil-Dong; Choi, Il Sang; Go, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Byong-Joo; Kang, Sang Woo; Yoon, Sunhee; Han, Seung-Jun; Nam, Sun-Young; Oh, Hyun-A; Han, Na-Ra; Kim, Young-Sick; Kim, Ju-Sung; Kim, Myong-Jo; Jeong, Hyun-Ja; Kim, Hyung-Min

    2013-01-01

    BiRyuChe-bang (BRC) is a Korean prescription medicine, which has been used to treat allergic rhinitis at Kyung Hee Medical Center. In this work, we investigated the effects of BRC on mast cell-mediated allergic reactions and inflammatory cytokines production, and identified the active component of BRC. Histamine release was measured from rat peritoneal mast cells (RPMCs). Ear swelling and passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) were examined in mouse models. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) plus A23187-induced inflammatory cytokines production was measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction was used for the expressions of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-6, and IL-8. Activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB was analyzed by Western blotting. BRC significantly inhibited the compound 48/80-induced ear swelling response, histamine release from RPMCs, PCA activated by anti-dinitrophenyl IgE, and PMA plus A23187-induced inflammatory cytokines production (p < 0.05). In addition, BRC dose-dependently inhibited the mRNA expressions of TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-8 as well as the activation of NF-κB in a human mast cell line, HMC-1 cells. BRC inhibited the levels of TNF-α and IL-6 in mice induced with PCA. Several components of BRC, such as 1,8-Cineole, Linalool, Linalyl acetate, α-Pinene, and α-Terpineol, significantly inhibited the release of histamine from RPMCs (p < 0.05). Among these components, Linalyl acetate was the most effective for inhibiting histamine release. These results indicate that BRC has a potential regulatory effect on allergic and inflammatory reactions mediated by mast cells.

  20. Fruit production in three masting tree species does not rely on stored carbon reserves.

    PubMed

    Hoch, Günter; Siegwolf, Rolf T W; Keel, Sonja G; Körner, Christian; Han, Qingmin

    2013-03-01

    Fruiting is typically considered to massively burden the seasonal carbon budget of trees. The cost of reproduction has therefore been suggested as a proximate factor explaining observed mast-fruiting patterns. Here, we used a large-scale, continuous (13)C labeling of mature, deciduous trees in a temperate Swiss forest to investigate to what extent fruit formation in three species with masting reproduction behavior (Carpinus betulus, Fagus sylvatica, Quercus petraea) relies on the import of stored carbon reserves. Using a free-air CO2 enrichment system, we exposed trees to (13)C-depleted CO2 during 8 consecutive years. By the end of this experiment, carbon reserve pools had significantly lower δ(13)C values compared to control trees. δ(13)C analysis of new biomass during the first season after termination of the CO2 enrichment allowed us to distinguish the sources of built-in carbon (old carbon reserves vs. current assimilates). Flowers and expanding leaves carried a significant (13)C label from old carbon stores. In contrast, fruits and vegetative infructescence tissues were exclusively produced from current, unlabeled photoassimilates in all three species, including F. sylvatica, which had a strong masting season. Analyses of δ(13)C in purified starch from xylem of fruit-bearing shoots revealed a complete turn-over of starch during the season, likely due to its usage for bud break. This study is the first to directly demonstrate that fruiting is independent from old carbon reserves in masting trees, with significant implications for mechanistic models that explain mast seeding.

  1. Interspeaker Variability in Hard Palate Morphology and Vowel Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lammert, Adam; Proctor, Michael; Narayanan, Shrikanth

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Differences in vocal tract morphology have the potential to explain interspeaker variability in speech production. The potential acoustic impact of hard palate shape was examined in simulation, in addition to the interplay among morphology, articulation, and acoustics in real vowel production data. Method: High-front vowel production from…

  2. Informativeness Improvement of Hardness Test Methods for Metal Product Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osipov, S.; Podshivalov, I.; Osipov, O.; Zhantybaev, A.

    2016-06-01

    The paper presents a combination of theoretical suggestions, results, and observations allowing to improve the informativeness of hardness testing process in solving problems of metal product assessment while in operation. The hardness value of metal surface obtained by a single measurement is considered to be random. Various measures of location and scattering of the random variable were experimentally estimated for a number of test samples using the correlation analysis, and their close interaction was studied. It was stated that in metal assessment, the main informative characteristics of hardness testing process are its average value and mean-square deviation for measures of location and scattering, respectively.

  3. Rosae Multiflorae Fructus Hot Water Extract Inhibits a Murine Allergic Asthma Via the Suppression of Th2 Cytokine Production and Histamine Release from Mast Cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Chang Ho; Bui, Thi Tho; Piao, Chun Hua; Shin, Hee Soon; Shon, Dong-Hwa; Han, Eui-Hyeog; Kim, Hyoung Tae; Chai, Ok Hee

    2016-09-01

    Mast cell-mediated anaphylactic reactions are involved in many allergic diseases, including asthma and allergic rhinitis. In Korea, where it has been used as a traditional medicine, Rosae Multiflorae fructus (RMF) is known to have potent antioxidative, analgesic, and anti-inflammatory activities and to have no obvious acute toxicity. However, its specific effect on asthma is still unknown. In this study, we evaluated whether or not RMF hot water extracts (RMFW) could inhibit ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergic asthma and evaluated compound 48/80-induced mast cell activation to elucidate the mechanisms of asthma inhibition by RMFW. Oral administration of RMFW decreased the number of eosinophils and lymphocytes in the lungs of mice challenged by OVA and downregulated histological changes such as eosinophil infiltration, mucus accumulation, goblet cell hyperplasia, and collagen fiber deposits. In addition, RMFW significantly reduced T helper 2 cytokines, TNF-α, IL-4, and IL-6 levels in the BAL fluid of mice challenged by OVA. Moreover, RMFW suppressed compound 48/80-induced rat peritoneal mast cell degranulation and inhibited histamine release from mast cells induced by compound 48/80 in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that RMFW may act as an antiallergic agent by inhibitingTh2 cytokine production from Th2 cells and histamine release from mast cells, and could be used as a therapy for patients with Th2-mediated or mast cell-mediated allergic diseases. PMID:27574849

  4. The Role of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor in Mast Cell-Stimulated Fibroblast Proliferation and Collagen Production

    PubMed Central

    Ningyan, Gu; Xu, Yao; Hongfei, Shi; Jingjing, Chen; Min, Chen

    2015-01-01

    Current clinical and translational studies have shown that mast cell plays a pivotal role in multiple fibrotic diseases including scleroderma. However, the lack of mature human mast cell culture model exhibits a major obstacle for further dissection of cytokines and signaling molecules required for mast cell mediated fibrosis in various diseases. Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor is a mast cell released pro-inflammatory cytokine which is deregulated in scleroderma patients and is also involved in non-scleroderma related fibrosis. In the current study, we successfully generated a practical and reliable human mast cell culture system with bone marrow CD34+ hematopietic precursors. The derivative mast cell is normal in terms of both morphology and function as manifested by normal degranulation. More importantly, we were able to show mast cell conditioned medium as well as MIF supplementation augments fibroblast proliferation and collagen synthesis. This positive regulatory effect of mast cell conditioned medium can be dampened by MIF antibody. In addition, MIF-knockdown significantly inhibits pro-fibrotic activities of CD34+ hematopietic precursor derived mast cells. These data strongly suggest that mast cell released MIF is required for mast cell mediated fibrogenic activities. The current manuscript seems to be the first mechanistic report showing the significance of MIF in mast cell mediated fibrosis, which may pave the way for the development of potential MIF-targeted therapy for fibrotic diseases to a further extent. Moreover, we strongly believe mast cell culture and differentiation model as well as corresponding genetic manipulation methodology will be helpful in characterizing novel mast cell based therapeutic targets. PMID:25826375

  5. Isolated hard photon radiation in multijet production at LEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glover, E. W. N.; Stirling, W. J.

    1992-11-01

    We present a detailed, quantitative analysis of isolated hard photon radiation in multiparton final states at LEP energies. Since a perfectly isolated photon is not an infrared safe quantity different definitions of an “isolated photon” can influence the relative production rates for photon plus jets events. We argue that there is no obvious discrepancy between recent experimental measurements and the theoretical predictions and compute the next-to-leading order corrections to photon +1, 2 jet production, using a clustering algorithm more closely matched to the experimental procedure.

  6. The Novel Receptor C5aR2 Is Required for C5a-Mediated Human Mast Cell Adhesion, Migration, and Proinflammatory Mediator Production.

    PubMed

    Pundir, Priyanka; MacDonald, Clayton A; Kulka, Marianna

    2015-09-15

    C5a generated during complement activation possesses proinflammatory and immunoregulatory properties critical for the development and modulation of allergic immune responses. In immune cells, C5a mediates its effects through binding to two G protein-coupled receptors, C5aR1 and C5aR2. Mast cells are key effectors in allergic reactions, and decades of research have suggested that the majority of C5a effects on mast cells are mediated through C5aR1, whereas the expression and function of C5aR2 have not been explored. We demonstrated that the human mast cell line Laboratory of Allergic Diseases 2 (LAD2) expresses surface C5aR2 but not C5aR1, whereas CD34(+) cell-derived primary mast cells do not express surface C5aR1 or C5aR2. Stem cell factor and IL-4 upregulated C5aR2 expression on LAD2 cells. Furthermore, C5a caused internalization of LAD2 cell-surface C5aR2. We therefore used LAD2 cells as a model to study C5a/C5aR2-induced biological responses and signaling in human mast cells. We found that whereas C5a was unable to induce degranulation, it stimulated GM-CSF, TNF, CXCL10, and CCL2 production. C5a caused ERK phosphorylation, a signaling molecule important in cytokine and chemokine generation. In addition, C5a stimulated adhesion and chemotaxis of mast cells. Wortmannin, an inhibitor of PI3K, and small interfering RNA against β-arrestin-2 blocked C5a-induced adhesion. Silencing of C5aR2 using lentiviral short hairpin RNA rendered the cells unresponsive to C5a-induced adhesion, chemotaxis, and mediator release, as well as ERK phosphorylation. Overall, this study reveals a novel role for C5aR2 in C5a-mediated activation of mast cells and demonstrates that C5aR2 ligation initiates a β-arrestin-2-, PI3K-, and ERK-dependent signaling pathway in these cells.

  7. Nicotine inhibits Fc epsilon RI-induced cysteinyl leukotrienes and cytokine production without affecting mast cell degranulation through alpha 7/alpha 9/alpha 10-nicotinic receptors.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Neerad C; Rir-sima-ah, Jules; Boyd, R Thomas; Singh, Shashi P; Gundavarapu, Sravanthi; Langley, Raymond J; Razani-Boroujerdi, Seddigheh; Sopori, Mohan L

    2010-07-01

    Smokers are less likely to develop some inflammatory and allergic diseases. In Brown-Norway rats, nicotine inhibits several parameters of allergic asthma, including the production of Th2 cytokines and the cysteinyl leukotriene LTC(4). Cysteinyl leukotrienes are primarily produced by mast cells, and these cells play a central role in allergic asthma. Mast cells express a high-affinity receptor for IgE (FcepsilonRI). Following its cross-linking, cells degranulate and release preformed inflammatory mediators (early phase) and synthesize and secrete cytokines/chemokines and leukotrienes (late phase). The mechanism by which nicotine modulates mast cell activation is unclear. Using alpha-bungarotoxin binding and quantitative PCR and PCR product sequencing, we showed that the rat mast/basophil cell line RBL-2H3 expresses nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) alpha7, alpha9, and alpha10; exposure to exceedingly low concentrations of nicotine (nanomolar), but not the biologically inactive metabolite cotinine, for > or = 8 h suppressed the late phase (leukotriene/cytokine production) but not degranulation (histamine and hexosaminidase release). These effects were unrelated to those of nicotine on intracellular free calcium concentration but were causally associated with the inhibition of cytosolic phospholipase A(2) activity and the PI3K/ERK/NF-kappaB pathway, including phosphorylation of Akt and ERK and nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB. The suppressive effect of nicotine on the late-phase response was blocked by the alpha7/alpha9-nAChR antagonists methyllycaconitine and alpha-bungarotoxin, as well as by small interfering RNA knockdown of alpha7-, alpha9-, or alpha10-nAChRs, suggesting a functional interaction between alpha7-, alpha9-, and alpha10-nAChRs that might explain the response of RBL cells to nanomolar concentrations of nicotine. This "hybrid" receptor might serve as a target for novel antiallergic/antiasthmatic therapies.

  8. Mosla dianthera inhibits mast cell-mediated allergic reactions through the inhibition of histamine release and inflammatory cytokine production

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Dong-Hee; Kim, Sang-Hyun . E-mail: shkim72@knu.ac.kr; Eun, Jae-Soon; Shin, Tae-Yong . E-mail: tyshin@woosuk.ac.kr

    2006-11-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of the aqueous extract of Mosla dianthera (Maxim.) (AEMD) on the mast cell-mediated allergy model and studied the possible mechanism of action. Mast cell-mediated allergic disease is involved in many diseases such as asthma, sinusitis and rheumatoid arthritis. The discovery of drugs for the treatment of allergic disease is an important subject in human health. AEMD inhibited compound 48/80-induced systemic reactions in mice. AEMD decreased immunoglobulin E-mediated local allergic reactions, passive cutaneous anaphylaxis. AEMD attenuated intracellular calcium level and release of histamine from rat peritoneal mast cells activated by compound 48/80. Furthermore, AEMD attenuated the phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and calcium ionophore A23187-stimulated TNF-{alpha}, IL-8 and IL-6 secretion in human mast cells. The inhibitory effect of AEMD on the pro-inflammatory cytokines was nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) dependent. AEMD decreased PMA and A23187-induced degradation of I{kappa}B{alpha} and nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B. Our findings provide evidence that AEMD inhibits mast cell-derived immediate-type allergic reactions and involvement of pro-inflammatory cytokines and NF-{kappa}B in these effects.

  9. Houttuynia cordata Thunb inhibits the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines through inhibition of the NFκB signaling pathway in HMC-1 human mast cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hee Joe; Seo, Hye-Sook; Kim, Gyung-Jun; Jeon, Chan Yong; Park, Jong Hyeong; Jang, Bo-Hyoung; Park, Sun-Ju; Shin, Yong-Cheol; Ko, Seong-Gyu

    2013-09-01

    Houttuynia cordata Thunb (HCT) is widely used in oriental medicine as a remedy for inflammation. However, at present there is no explanation for the mechanism by which HCT affects the production of inflammatory cytokines. The current study aimed to determine the effect of an essence extracted from HCT on mast cell-mediated inflammatory responses. Inflammatory cytokine production induced by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) plus a calcium ionophore, A23187, was measured in the human mast cell line, HMC-1, incubated with various concentrations of HCT. TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-8 secreted protein levels were measured using an ELISA assay. TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-8 mRNA levels were measured using RT-PCR analysis. Nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins were examined by western blot analysis. The NF-κB promoter activity was examined by luciferase assay. It was observed that HCT inhibited PMA plus A23187-induced TNF-α and IL-6 secretion and reduced the mRNA levels of TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-8. It was also noted that HCT suppressed the induction of NF-κB activity, inhibited nuclear translocation of NF-κB and blocked the phosphorylation of IκBα in stimulated HMC-1 cells. It was concluded that HCT is an inhibitor of NF-κB and cytokines blocking mast cell-mediated inflammatory responses. These results indicate that HCT may be used for the treatment of mast cell-derived allergic inflammatory diseases. PMID:23846481

  10. Genitourinary mast cells and survival.

    PubMed

    Theoharides, Theoharis C; Stewart, Julia M

    2015-10-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are ubiquitous in the body, but they have historically been associated with allergies, and most recently with regulation of immunity and inflammation. However, it remains a puzzle why so many MCs are located in the diencephalon, which regulates emotions and in the genitourinary tract, including the bladder, prostate, penis, vagina and uterus that hardly ever get allergic reactions. A number of papers have reported that MCs have estrogen, gonadotropin and corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) receptors. Moreover, animal experiments have shown that diencephalic MCs increase in number during courting in doves. We had reported that allergic stimulation of nasal MCs leads to hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal (HPA) activation. Interestingly, anecdotal information indicates that female patients with mastocytosis or mast cell activation syndrome may have increased libido. Preliminary evidence also suggests that MCs may have olfactory receptors. MCs may, therefore, have been retained phylogenetically not only to "smell danger", but to promote survival and procreation. PMID:26813805

  11. Genitourinary mast cells and survival

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Julia M.

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are ubiquitous in the body, but they have historically been associated with allergies, and most recently with regulation of immunity and inflammation. However, it remains a puzzle why so many MCs are located in the diencephalon, which regulates emotions and in the genitourinary tract, including the bladder, prostate, penis, vagina and uterus that hardly ever get allergic reactions. A number of papers have reported that MCs have estrogen, gonadotropin and corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) receptors. Moreover, animal experiments have shown that diencephalic MCs increase in number during courting in doves. We had reported that allergic stimulation of nasal MCs leads to hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal (HPA) activation. Interestingly, anecdotal information indicates that female patients with mastocytosis or mast cell activation syndrome may have increased libido. Preliminary evidence also suggests that MCs may have olfactory receptors. MCs may, therefore, have been retained phylogenetically not only to “smell danger”, but to promote survival and procreation. PMID:26813805

  12. Mosla punctulata Inhibits Mast Cell-mediated Allergic Reactions Through the Inhibition of Histamine Release and Inflammatory Cytokine Production

    PubMed Central

    Je, I. G.; Shin, T. Y.; Kim, S. H.

    2013-01-01

    Allergic inflammatory diseases such as food allergy, asthma, sinusitis and atopic dermatitis are increasing worldwide. This study examined the effects of aqueous extract of Mosla punctulata on mast cell-mediated allergic inflammation and studied the possible mechanism of action. Aqueous extract of Mosla punctulata inhibited compound 48/80-induced systemic and immunoglobulin E-mediated local anaphylaxis and it also reduced intracellular calcium level and down-streamed histamine release from mast cells. In addition, aqueous extract of Mosla punctulata decreased gene expression and secretion of tumour necrosis factor alpha, an important proinflammatory cytokine, in mast cells. The inhibitory effect on tumour necrosis factor alpha expression was nuclear factor kappa B dependent. The results indicate that aqueous extract of Mosla punctulata inhibited mast cell-mediated allergic inflammatory reaction by suppressing histamine release and expression of tumour necrosis factor alpha, and involvement of calcium and nuclear factor kappa B in these effects. Hence it can be concluded that, the aqueous extract of Mosla punctulata might be a possible therapeutic candidate for allergic inflammatory disorders. PMID:24591741

  13. Overview of MAST results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, I. T.; Adamek, J.; Akers, R. J.; Allan, S.; Appel, L.; Asunta, O.; Barnes, M.; Ben Ayed, N.; Bigelow, T.; Boeglin, W.; Bradley, J.; Brünner, J.; Cahyna, P.; Carr, M.; Caughman, J.; Cecconello, M.; Challis, C.; Chapman, S.; Chorley, J.; Colyer, G.; Conway, N.; Cooper, W. A.; Cox, M.; Crocker, N.; Crowley, B.; Cunningham, G.; Danilov, A.; Darrow, D.; Dendy, R.; Diallo, A.; Dickinson, D.; Diem, S.; Dorland, W.; Dudson, B.; Dunai, D.; Easy, L.; Elmore, S.; Field, A.; Fishpool, G.; Fox, M.; Fredrickson, E.; Freethy, S.; Garzotti, L.; Ghim, Y. C.; Gibson, K.; Graves, J.; Gurl, C.; Guttenfelder, W.; Ham, C.; Harrison, J.; Harting, D.; Havlickova, E.; Hawke, J.; Hawkes, N.; Hender, T.; Henderson, S.; Highcock, E.; Hillesheim, J.; Hnat, B.; Holgate, J.; Horacek, J.; Howard, J.; Huang, B.; Imada, K.; Jones, O.; Kaye, S.; Keeling, D.; Kirk, A.; Klimek, I.; Kocan, M.; Leggate, H.; Lilley, M.; Lipschultz, B.; Lisgo, S.; Liu, Y. Q.; Lloyd, B.; Lomanowski, B.; Lupelli, I.; Maddison, G.; Mailloux, J.; Martin, R.; McArdle, G.; McClements, K.; McMillan, B.; Meakins, A.; Meyer, H.; Michael, C.; Militello, F.; Milnes, J.; Morris, A. W.; Motojima, G.; Muir, D.; Nardon, E.; Naulin, V.; Naylor, G.; Nielsen, A.; O'Brien, M.; O'Gorman, T.; Ono, Y.; Oliver, H.; Pamela, S.; Pangione, L.; Parra, F.; Patel, A.; Peebles, W.; Peng, M.; Perez, R.; Pinches, S.; Piron, L.; Podesta, M.; Price, M.; Reinke, M.; Ren, Y.; Roach, C.; Robinson, J.; Romanelli, M.; Rozhansky, V.; Saarelma, S.; Sangaroon, S.; Saveliev, A.; Scannell, R.; Schekochihin, A.; Sharapov, S.; Sharples, R.; Shevchenko, V.; Silburn, S.; Simpson, J.; Storrs, J.; Takase, Y.; Tanabe, H.; Tanaka, H.; Taylor, D.; Taylor, G.; Thomas, D.; Thomas-Davies, N.; Thornton, A.; Turnyanskiy, M.; Valovic, M.; Vann, R.; Walkden, N.; Wilson, H.; Wyk, L. V.; Yamada, T.; Zoletnik, S.; MAST; MAST Upgrade Teams

    2015-10-01

    in solenoid-free start-up. A new proton detector has characterized escaping fusion products. Langmuir probes and a high-speed camera suggest filaments play a role in particle transport in the private flux region whilst coherence imaging has measured scrape-off layer (SOL) flows. BOUT++ simulations show that fluxes due to filaments are strongly dependent on resistivity and magnetic geometry of the SOL, with higher radial fluxes at higher resistivity. Finally, MAST Upgrade is due to begin operation in 2016 to support ITER preparation and importantly to operate with a Super-X divertor to test extended leg concepts for particle and power exhaust.

  14. Effects of cigarette smoke on degranulation and NO production by mast cells and epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xiu M; Kim, Henry S; Kumar, Rakesh K; Heywood, Gavin J; Hunt, John E; McNeil, H Patrick; Thomas, Paul S

    2005-01-01

    Exhaled nitric oxide (eNO) is decreased by cigarette smoking. The hypothesis that oxides of nitrogen (NOX) in cigarette smoke solution (CSS) may exert a negative feedback mechanism upon NO release from epithelial (AEC, A549, and NHTBE) and basophilic cells (RBL-2H3) was tested in vitro. CSS inhibited both NO production and degranulation (measured as release of beta-hexosaminidase) in a dose-dependent manner from RBL-2H3 cells. Inhibition of NO production by CSS in AEC, A549, and NHTBE cells was also dose-dependent. In addition, CSS decreased expression of NOS mRNA and protein expression. The addition of NO inhibitors and scavengers did not, however, reverse the effects of CSS, nor did a NO donor (SNP) or nicotine mimic CSS. N-acetyl-cysteine, partially reversed the inhibition of beta-hexosaminidase release suggesting CSS may act via oxidative free radicals. Thus, some of the inhibitory effects of CSS appear to be via oxidative free radicals rather than a NOX -related negative feedback. PMID:16168067

  15. A nebulized complex traditional Chinese medicine inhibits Histamine and IL-4 production by ovalbumin in guinea pigs and can stabilize mast cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Traditional Chinese medicines have been used for anti-asthma treatment for several centuries in many Asian countries, and have been shown to effectively relieve symptoms. Our previous study demonstrated that a complex traditional Chinese medicine (CTCM) administered in nebulized form through the intratracheal route is effective against early-phase air-flow obstruction and can inhibit IL-5 production in ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitized guinea pigs. However, the antiasthmatic mechanisms of CTCMs are still unclear. Methods In this study, we examined the underlying mechanism of a CTCM that we used in our previous study in order to ascertain its function in the early-phase response to OVA challenge. In each group, 10–12 unsensitized or OVA-sensitized guinea pigs were treated with nebulized CTCM before OVA challenge, and the airway responses of the animals to OVA were recorded. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) samples were collected 5 min after OVA challenge, and the histamine and IL-4 contents in the BALF were measured. P815 cells (a mouse mast cell line) were untreated or pretreated with CTCM or cromolyn sodium (a mast cell stabilizer), and incubated with Compound 48/80 (mast cell activator) for 9 hr. The levels of histamine and IL-4 released from the cells were quantified. Results We found that the inhibition of bronchoconstriction by the CTCM was attenuated by pretreatment with propranolol, suggesting that the CTCM has a bronchodilator effect that is associated with beta-adrenergic receptor. Our results also showed that the CTCM inhibited histamine and IL-4 secretion in the OVA-induced airway hypersensitivity in guinea pigs at 5 min post-OVA challenge, and in vitro study revealed that the CTCM is able to stabilize mast cells. Conclusion In conclusion, our results suggested that the CTCM is a kind of bronchodilator and also a mast cell stabilizer. Our findings provide useful information regarding the possible mechanism of the CTCM, and show its potential

  16. Mast cells and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Theoharides, Theoharis C.; Alysandratos, Konstantinos-Dionysios; Angelidou, Asimenia; Delivanis, Danae-Anastasia; Sismanopoulos, Nikolaos; Zhang, Bodi; Asadi, Shahrzad; Vasiadi, Magdalini; Weng, Zuyi; Miniati, Alexandra; Kalogeromitros, Dimitrios

    2012-01-01

    Mast cells are well known for their role in allergic and anaphylactic reactions, as well as their involvement in acquired and innate immunity. Increasing evidence now implicates mast cells in inflammatory diseases where they are activated by non-allergic triggers, such as neuropeptides and cytokines, often exerting synergistic effects as in the case of IL-33. Mast cells can also release pro-inflammatory mediators selectively without degranulation. In particular, IL-1 induces selective release of IL-6, while corticotropin-releasing hormone secreted under stress induces the release of vascular endothelial growth factor. Many inflammatory diseases involve mast cells in cross-talk with T cells, such as atopic dermatitis, psoriasis and multiple sclerosis, which all worsen by stress. How mast cell differential responses are regulated is still unresolved. Preliminary evidence suggests that mitochondrial function and dynamics control mast cell degranulation, but not selective release. Recent findings also indicate that mast cells have immunomodulatory properties. Understanding selective release of mediators could explain how mast cells participate in numerous diverse biologic processes, and how they exert both immunostimulatory and immunosuppressive actions. Unraveling selective mast cell secretion could also help develop unique mast cell inhibitors with novel therapeutic applications. PMID:21185371

  17. Mountain cedar pollen induces IgE-independent mast cell degranulation, IL-4 production, and intracellular reactive oxygen species generation

    PubMed Central

    Endo, Shuichiro; Hochman, Daniel J.; Midoro-Horiuti, Terumi; Goldblum, Randall M.; Brooks, Edward G.

    2011-01-01

    Cedar pollens cause severe allergic disease throughout the world. We have previously characterized allergenic pollen glycoproteins from mountain cedar (Juniperus ashei) that bind to allergen-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE). In the present report, we investigated an alternative pathway of mast cell activation by mountain cedar pollen extract through IgE-independent mechanisms. We show that mountain cedar pollen directly induces mast cell serotonin and IL-4 release and enhances release induced by IgE cross-linking. Concomitant with mediator release, high levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were generated, and both ROS and serotonin release were inhibited by anti-oxidants. These findings suggest that alternative mechanisms exist whereby pollen exposure enhances allergic inflammatory mediator release through mechanisms that involve ROS. These mechanisms have the potential for enhancing the allergenic potency of pollens. PMID:21944563

  18. Mast Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Elaine Zayas Marcelino; Jamur, Maria Célia

    2014-01-01

    Since first described by Paul Ehrlich in 1878, mast cells have been mostly viewed as effectors of allergy. It has been only in the past two decades that mast cells have gained recognition for their involvement in other physiological and pathological processes. Mast cells have a widespread distribution and are found predominantly at the interface between the host and the external environment. Mast cell maturation, phenotype and function are a direct consequence of the local microenvironment and have a marked influence on their ability to specifically recognize and respond to various stimuli through the release of an array of biologically active mediators. These features enable mast cells to act as both first responders in harmful situations as well as to respond to changes in their environment by communicating with a variety of other cells implicated in physiological and immunological responses. Therefore, the critical role of mast cells in both innate and adaptive immunity, including immune tolerance, has gained increased prominence. Conversely, mast cell dysfunction has pointed to these cells as the main offenders in several chronic allergic/inflammatory disorders, cancer and autoimmune diseases. This review summarizes the current knowledge of mast cell function in both normal and pathological conditions with regards to their regulation, phenotype and role. PMID:25062998

  19. The human lung mast cell.

    PubMed Central

    Wasserman, S I

    1984-01-01

    Mast cells are present in human lung tissue, pulmonary epithelium, and free in the bronchial lumen. By virtue of their location and their possession of specific receptors for IgE and complement fragments, these cells are sentinel cells in host defense. The preformed granular mediators and newly generated lipid mediators liberated upon activation of mast cells by a variety of secretagogues supply potent vasoactive-spasmogenic mediators, chemotactic factors, active enzymes, and proteoglycans to the local environment. These factors acting together induce an immediate response manifest as edema, smooth muscle constriction, mucus production, and cough. Later these mediators and those provided from plasma and leukocytes generate a tissue infiltrate of inflammatory cells and more prolonged vasoactive-bronchospastic responses. Acute and prolonged responses may be homeostatic and provide for defense of the host, but if excessive in degree or duration may provide a chronic inflammatory substrate upon which such disorders as asthma and pulmonary fibrosis may ensue. PMID:6428878

  20. Method for Developing Descriptions of Hard-to-Price Products: Results of the Telecommunications Product Study

    SciTech Connect

    Conrad, F.; Tonn, B.

    1999-05-01

    This report presents the results of a study to test a new method for developing descriptions of hard-to-price products. The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) is responsible for collecting data to estimate price indices such as the Consumers Price Index (BLS) is responsible for collecting data to estimate price indices such as the Consumers Price Index (CPI). BLS accomplishes this task by sending field staff to places of business to price actual products. The field staff are given product checklists to help them determine whether products found today are comparable to products priced the previous month. Prices for non-comparable products are not included in the current month's price index calculations. A serious problem facing BLS is developing product checklists for dynamic product areas, new industries, and the service sector. It is difficult to keep checklists up-to-date and quite often simply to develop checklists for service industry products. Some people estimates that upwards of 50 % of US economic activity is not accounted for in the CPI

  1. Human and rat mast cell high-affinity immunoglobulin E receptors: Characterization of putative. alpha. -chain gene products

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, Akira; Benfey, P.N.; Leder, P. ); Tepler, I. Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA ); Berenstein, E.H.; Siraganian, R.P. )

    1988-03-01

    The authors have cloned and determined the entire nucleotide sequence of cDNAs corresponding to the putative {alpha} subunits of the human and rat mast cell high-affinity IgE receptors. Both human and rat cDNAs encode an NH{sub 2}-terminal signal peptide, two immunoglobulin-like extracellular domains (encoded by discrete exons), a hydrophobic transmembrane region, and a positively charged cytoplasmic tail. The human and rat {alpha} subunits share an overall homology with one another and the immunoglobulin gene family, suggesting that they arose from a common ancestral gene and continue to share structural homology with their ligands. In addition, the rat gene is transcribed into at least three distinct forms, each of which yields a somewhat different coding sequence.

  2. Mast and weather influences on population trends of a species of concern: The allegheny woodrat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manjerovic, M.B.; Wood, P.B.; Edwards, J.W.

    2009-01-01

    Over the past 20-30 y. northern and western populations of the Allegheny woodrat (Neotoma magister) have experienced large declines. whereas populations in the core of the range are assumed to be stable. We examined population trends at two study areas in northcentral West Virginia along the western ridge of the central Appalachian Mountains. Temperature and precipitation parameters along with mast production were examined to determine if these environmental variables impacted the population. Based on a 5 y dataset. our results indicate a yearly decrease in the overall population. with adult females most affected. Hard and soft mast availability related to adult female capture rates. whereas temperatures significantly affected juvenile. adult female and overall capture rates. Juvenile summer capture rates increased with warmer temperatures the preceding winter. Female summer capture rates decreased with warmer temperatures the preceding spring suggesting that effects of warming should be added as a potential threat to the Allegheny woodrat.

  3. Recent PHENIX results on hard probes and direct photon production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riabov, V.; PHENIX Collaboration

    2016-02-01

    A hot and dense matter called strongly interacting quark-gluon plasma (sQGP) is created in heavy ion collisions at RHIC energies. Detailed study of the properties of this new state of matter is a driving force of recent research at RHIC. In these proceedings we present most recent PHENIX results for system size and energy dependence of hadron and jet production at high transverse momentum in heavy ion collisions at RHIC. We also report latest results for direct photon production including soft direct photon yields and anisotropic flow.

  4. Mast Cells and Neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Hongquan; Zhang, Xiang; Qian, Yanning

    2014-01-01

    It has been determined that there is extensive communication between the immune system and the central nervous system (CNS). Proinflammatory cytokines play a key role in this communication. There is an emerging realization that glia and microglia, in particular, (which are the brain’s resident macrophages), are an important source of inflammatory mediators and may have fundamental roles in CNS disorders. Microglia respond also to proinflammatory signals released from other non-neuronal cells, principally those of immune origin, such as mast cells. Mast cells reside in the CNS and are capable of migrating across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in situations where the barrier is compromised as a result of CNS pathology. Mast cells are both sensors and effectors in communication among nervous, vascular, and immune systems. In the brain, they reside on the brain side of the BBB, and interact with astrocytes, microglia, and blood vessels via their neuroactive stored and newly synthesized chemicals. They are first responders, acting as catalysts and recruiters to initiate, amplify, and prolong other immune and nervous responses upon activation. Mast cells both promote deleterious outcomes in brain function and contribute to normative behavioral functioning, particularly cognition and emotion. Mast cells may play a key role in treating systemic inflammation or blockade of signaling pathways from the periphery to the brain. PMID:25529562

  5. Mast cells and mastocytosis

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Mast cells have been recognized for well over 100 years. With time, human mast cells have been documented to originate from CD34+ cells, and have been implicated in host responses in both innate and acquired immunity. In clinical immunology, they are recognized for their central role in IgE-mediated degranulation and allergic inflammation by virtue of their expression of the high-affinity receptor for IgE and release of potent proinflammatory mediators. In hematology, the clinical disease of mastocytosis is characterized by a pathologic increase of mast cells in tissues, often associated with mutations in KIT, the receptor for stem cell factor. More recently, and with increased understanding of how human mast cells are activated through receptors including the high-affinity receptor for IgE and KIT, specific tyrosine kinase inhibitors have been identified with the potential to interrupt signaling pathways and thus limit the proliferation of mast cells as well as their activation through immunoglobulin receptors. PMID:18684881

  6. What is the physiological function of mast cells?

    PubMed

    Maurer, M; Theoharides, T; Granstein, R D; Bischoff, S C; Bienenstock, J; Henz, B; Kovanen, P; Piliponsky, A M; Kambe, N; Vliagoftis, H; Levi-Schaffer, F; Metz, M; Miyachi, Y; Befus, D; Forsythe, P; Kitamura, Y; Galli, S

    2003-12-01

    Under physiological conditions, skin mast cells preferentially localize around nerves, blood vessels and hair follicles. This observation, which dates back to Paul Ehrlich, intuitively suggests that these enigmatic, multifacetted protagonists of natural immunity are functionally relevant to many more aspects of tissue physiology than just to the generation of inflammatory and vasodilatory responses to IgE-dependent environmental antigens. And yet, for decades, mainstream-mast cell research has been dominated by a focus on the -undisputedly prominent and important - mast cell functions in type I immune responses and in the pathogenesis and management of allergic diseases. Certainly, it is hard to believe that the very large and rather selectively distributed number of mast cells in normal, uninflamed, non-infected, non-traumatized mammalian skin or mucosal tissue simply hanging around there lazily day and night, just wait for the odd allergen or parasite-associated antigen to come by so the mast cell can finally swing into action. Indeed, the past decade has witnessed a renaissance of mast cell research 'beyond allergy', along with a more systematic exploration of the surprisingly wide range of physiological functions that mast cells may be involved in. The current debate sketches many exciting horizons that have recently come into our vision during this intriguing, ongoing search. PMID:14719507

  7. Mast cells and company.

    PubMed

    Jönsson, Friederike; Daëron, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Classically, allergy depends on IgE antibodies and on high-affinity IgE receptors expressed by mast cells and basophils. This long accepted IgE/FcεRI/mast cell paradigm, on which the definition of immediate hypersensitivity was based in the Gell and Coomb's classification, appears too reductionist. Recently accumulated evidence indeed requires that not only IgE but also IgG antibodies, that not only FcεRI but also FcγR of the different types, that not only mast cells and basophils but also neutrophils, monocytes, macrophages, eosinophils, and other myeloid cells be considered as important players in allergy. This view markedly changes our understanding of allergic diseases and, possibly, their treatment.

  8. Mast Cell and Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yunzhi; Chen, Guangjie

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells are important in innate immune system. They have been appreciated as potent contributors to allergic reaction. However, increasing evidence implicates the important role of mast cells in autoimmune disease like rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. Here we review the current stage of knowledge about mast cells in autoimmune diseases. PMID:25944979

  9. Mast cell and autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yunzhi; Chen, Guangjie

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells are important in innate immune system. They have been appreciated as potent contributors to allergic reaction. However, increasing evidence implicates the important role of mast cells in autoimmune disease like rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. Here we review the current stage of knowledge about mast cells in autoimmune diseases. PMID:25944979

  10. Mast cells: Versatile regulators of inflammation, tissue remodeling, host defense and homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Galli, Stephen J.; Tsai, Mindy

    2009-01-01

    Summary The possible roles of mast cells in heath and disease have been a topic of interest for over one hundred and twenty five years. Many adaptive or pathological processes affecting the skin or other anatomical sites have been associated with morphological evidence of mast cell activation, and/or with changes in mast cell numbers or phenotype. Such observations, taken together with the known functions of the diverse mediators, cytokines and growth factors which can be secreted by mast cells, have suggested many potential functions for mast cells in health and disease. Definitively identifying the importance of mast cells in biological responses in humans is difficult. However, mutant mice which are profoundly mast cell-deficient, especially those which can undergo engraftment with wild type or genetically-altered mast cells, provide an opportunity to investigate the importance of mast cells, and specific mast cell functions or products, in various adaptive or pathological responses in mice. Such work has shown that mast cells can significantly influence multiple features of inflammatory or immune responses, through diverse effects that can either promote or, surprisingly, suppress, aspects of these responses. Through such functions, mast cells can significantly influence inflammation, tissue remodeling, host defense and homeostasis. PMID:18024086

  11. The Comprehension and Production of Wh-Questions in Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedmann, Naama; Szterman, Ronit

    2011-01-01

    Hearing loss during the critical period for language acquisition restricts spoken language input. This input limitation, in turn, may hamper syntactic development. This study examined the comprehension, production, and repetition of Wh-questions in deaf or hard-of-hearing (DHH) children. The participants were 11 orally trained Hebrew-speaking…

  12. Masting promotes individual- and population-level reproduction by increasing pollination efficiency.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Xoaquín; Abdala-Roberts, Luis; Linhart, Yan B; Mooney, Kailen A

    2014-04-01

    Masting is a reproductive strategy defined as the intermittent and synchronized production of large seed crops by a plant population. The pollination efficiency hypothesis proposes that masting increases pollination success in plants. Despite its general appeal, no previous studies have used long-term data together with population- and individual-level analyses to assess pollination efficiency between mast and non-mast events. Here we rigorously tested the pollination efficiency hypothesis in ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa), a long-lived monoecious, wind-pollinated species, using a data set on 217 trees monitored annually for 20 years. Relative investment in male and female function by individual trees did not vary between mast and non-mast years. At both the population and individual level, the rate of production of mature female cones relative to male strobili production was higher in mast than non-mast years, consistent with the predicted benefit of reproductive synchrony on reproductive success. In addition, at the individual level we found a higher conversion of unfertilized female conelets into mature female cones during a mast year compared to a non-mast year. Collectively, parallel results at the population and individual tree level provide robust evidence for the ecological, and potentially also evolutionary, benefits of masting through increased pollination efficiency.

  13. Imaging the proton via hard exclusive production in diffractive pp scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Hyde; Leonid Frankfurt; Mark Strikman; Christian Weiss

    2007-05-21

    We discuss the prospects for probing Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) via exclusive production of a high-mass system (H = heavy quarkonium, di-photon, di-jet, Higgs boson) in diffractive pp scattering, pp -> p + H + p. In such processes the interplay of hard and soft interactions gives rise to a diffraction pattern in the final-state proton transverse momenta, which is sensitive to the transverse spatial distribution of partons in the colliding protons. We comment on the plans for diffractive pp measurements at RHIC and LHC. Such studies could complement future measurements of GPDs in hard exclusive ep scattering (JLab, COMPASS, EIC).

  14. Cross-talk between human mast cells and bronchial epithelial cells in plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 production via transforming growth factor-β1.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seong H; Lee, Sun H; Kato, Atsushi; Takabayashi, Tetsuji; Kulka, Marianna; Shin, Soon C; Schleimer, Robert P

    2015-01-01

    Previous reports suggest that plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) promotes airway remodeling and that human and mouse mast cells (MCs) are an important source of PAI-1. In the present study we investigated MC-epithelial cell (EC) interactions in the production of PAI-1. We stimulated the human MC line LAD2 with IgE-receptor cross-linking and collected the supernatants. We incubated the human bronchial EC line BEAS-2B with the LAD2 supernatants and measured the level of PAI-1. When the supernatants from IgE-stimulated LAD2 were added to BEAS-2B, there was a significant enhancement of PAI-1 production by BEAS-2B. When we treated the MC supernatants with a transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 neutralizing antibody, the MC-derived induction of PAI-1 from BEAS-2B was completely abrogated. Although TGF-β1 mRNA was constitutively expressed in resting LAD2, it was not highly induced by IgE-mediated stimulation. Nonetheless, active TGF-β1 protein was significantly increased in LAD2 after IgE-mediated stimulation. Active TGF-β1 produced by primary cultured human MCs was significantly reduced in the presence of a chymase inhibitor, suggesting a role of MC chymase as an activator of latent TGF-β1. This study indicates that stimulation of human MCs by IgE receptor cross-linking triggers activation of TGF-β1, at least in part via chymase, which in turn induces the production of PAI-1 by bronchial ECs. Our data suggest that human MCs may play an important role in airway remodeling in asthma as a direct source of PAI-1 and by activating bronchial ECs to produce further PAI-1 via a TGF-β1-mediated activation pathway.

  15. Induction of Mast Cell Accumulation by Tryptase via a Protease Activated Receptor-2 and ICAM-1 Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin; Wang, Junling; Zhang, Huiyun; Zhan, Mengmeng; Chen, Hanqiu; Fang, Zeman; Xu, Chiyan; Chen, Huifang; He, Shaoheng

    2016-01-01

    Mast cells are primary effector cells of allergy, and recruitment of mast cells in involved tissue is one of the key events in allergic inflammation. Tryptase is the most abundant secretory product of mast cells, but little is known of its influence on mast cell accumulation. Using mouse peritoneal model, cell migration assay, and flow cytometry analysis, we investigated role of tryptase in recruiting mast cells. The results showed that tryptase induced up to 6.7-fold increase in mast cell numbers in mouse peritoneum following injection. Inhibitors of tryptase, an antagonist of PAR-2 FSLLRY-NH2, and pretreatment of mice with anti-ICAM-1, anti-CD11a, and anti-CD18 antibodies dramatically diminished tryptase induced mast cell accumulation. On the other hand, PAR-2 agonist peptides SLIGRL-NH2 and tc-LIGRLO-NH2 provoked mast cell accumulation following injection. These implicate that tryptase induced mast cell accumulation is dependent on its enzymatic activity, activation of PAR-2, and interaction between ICAM-1 and LFA-1. Moreover, induction of trans-endothelium migration of mast cells in vitro indicates that tryptase acts as a chemoattractant. In conclusion, provocation of mast cell accumulation by mast cell tryptase suggests a novel self-amplification mechanism of mast cell accumulation. Mast cell stabilizers as well as PAR-2 antagonist agents may be useful for treatment of allergic reactions. PMID:27378825

  16. Process for casting hard-faced, lightweight camshafts and other cylindrical products

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, Jeffrey S.; Turner, Paul C.; Argetsinger, Edward R.; Wilson, Rick D.

    1996-01-01

    A process for casting a hard-faced cylindrical product such as an automobile camshaft includes the steps of: (a) preparing a composition formed from a molten base metal and an additive in particle form and having a hardness value greater than the hardness value of the base metal; (b) introducing the composition into a flask containing a meltable pattern of a cylindrical product such as an automobile camshaft to be manufactured and encased in sand to allow the composition to melt the pattern and assume the shape of the pattern within the sand; and (c) rotating the flask containing the pattern about the longitudinal axes of both the flask and the pattern as the molten base metal containing the additive in particle form is introduced into the flask to cause particles of the additive entrained in the molten base metal to migrate by centrifugal action to the radial extremities of the pattern and thereby provide a cylindrical product having a hardness value greater at it's radial extremities than at its center when the molten base metal solidifies.

  17. Chemical Characterization of Beer Aging Products Derived from Hard Resin Components in Hops (Humulus lupulus L.).

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Yoshimasa; Yamada, Makiko; Taniguchi, Harumi; Matsukura, Yasuko; Shindo, Kazutoshi

    2015-11-25

    The bitter taste of beer originates from resins in hops (Humulus lupulus L.), which are classified into two subtypes (soft and hard). Whereas the nature and reactivity of soft-resin-derived compounds, such as α-, β-, and iso-α-acids, are well studied, there is only a little information on the compounds in hard resin. For this work, hard resin was prepared from stored hops and investigated for its compositional changes in an experimental model of beer aging. The hard resin contained a series of α-acid oxides. Among them, 4'-hydroxyallohumulinones were unstable under beer storage conditions, and their transformation induced primary compositional changes of the hard resin during beer aging. The chemical structures of the products, including novel polycyclic compounds scorpiohumulinols A and B and dicyclohumulinols A and B, were determined by HRMS and NMR analyses. These compounds were proposed to be produced via proton-catalyzed cyclization reactions of 4'-hydroxyallohumulinones. Furthermore, they were more stable than their precursor 4'-hydroxyallohumulinones during prolonged storage periods.

  18. Chemical Characterization of Beer Aging Products Derived from Hard Resin Components in Hops (Humulus lupulus L.).

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Yoshimasa; Yamada, Makiko; Taniguchi, Harumi; Matsukura, Yasuko; Shindo, Kazutoshi

    2015-11-25

    The bitter taste of beer originates from resins in hops (Humulus lupulus L.), which are classified into two subtypes (soft and hard). Whereas the nature and reactivity of soft-resin-derived compounds, such as α-, β-, and iso-α-acids, are well studied, there is only a little information on the compounds in hard resin. For this work, hard resin was prepared from stored hops and investigated for its compositional changes in an experimental model of beer aging. The hard resin contained a series of α-acid oxides. Among them, 4'-hydroxyallohumulinones were unstable under beer storage conditions, and their transformation induced primary compositional changes of the hard resin during beer aging. The chemical structures of the products, including novel polycyclic compounds scorpiohumulinols A and B and dicyclohumulinols A and B, were determined by HRMS and NMR analyses. These compounds were proposed to be produced via proton-catalyzed cyclization reactions of 4'-hydroxyallohumulinones. Furthermore, they were more stable than their precursor 4'-hydroxyallohumulinones during prolonged storage periods. PMID:26507444

  19. Analytical Expressions for the Hard-Scattering Production of Massive Partons

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Cheuk-Yin

    2016-01-01

    We obtain explicit expressions for the two-particle differential cross section $E_c E_\\kappa d\\sigma (AB \\to c\\kappa X) /d\\bb c d \\bb \\kappa$ and the two-particle angular correlation function \\break $d\\sigma(AB$$ \\to$$ c\\kappa X)/d\\Delta \\phi \\, d\\Delta y$ in the hard-scattering production of massive partons in order to exhibit the ``ridge" structure on the away side in the hard-scattering process. The single-particle production cross section $d\\sigma(AB \\to cX) /dy_c c_T dc_T $ is also obtained and compared with the ALICE experimental data for charm production in $pp$ collisions at 7 TeV at LHC.

  20. Effect of supraglottic and super-supraglottic swallows on tongue pressure production against hard palate.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Shigehiro; Ono, Takahiro; Minagi, Yoshitomo; Fujiu-Kurachi, Masako; Hori, Kazuhiro; Maeda, Yoshinobu; Boroumand, Sara; Nitschke, Ina; Ursula, Vith; Bohlender, Jörg

    2014-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the state of tongue pressure production during supraglottic swallow (SS) and super-supraglottic swallow (SSS) performed by healthy adults, and to investigate the effects of these swallowing maneuvers on the oral stage of swallowing. The participants were 19 healthy individuals. Tongue pressure against the hard palate during swallowing was measured using a tongue pressure sensor sheet system with five pressure-sensitive points. The tasks comprised swallowing 5 mL of water by normal wet swallow, SS, and SSS, and the parameters for analysis were the duration, the maximal magnitude, and the integrated value of tongue pressure during swallowing. The duration of tongue pressure was significantly longer at the anterior-median part of the hard palate during both SS and SSS than with normal wet swallow. The maximal magnitude increased significantly only at the posterior part of the hard palate during SS, but at all points during SSS. The integrated value increased significantly only at the posterior-median part of the hard palate during SS, but at all points except the mid-median part of the hard palate during SSS. The maximal magnitude and integrated value were also significantly higher at the anterior-median and posterior circumferential parts during SSS than during SS. These results show that these two swallowing maneuvers, which are known primarily as techniques to protect the airway, also function to strengthen the tongue pressure produced by the contact between the tongue and the hard palate during swallowing and this effect is more pronounced during SSS.

  1. Growth and saxitoxin production by Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii (cyanobacteria) correlate with water hardness.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Ronaldo Leal; Pacheco, Ana Beatriz Furlanetto; de Oliveira e Azevedo, Sandra Maria Feliciano

    2013-08-15

    The cosmopolitan and increasing distribution of Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii can be attributed to its ecophysiological plasticity and tolerance to changing environmental factors in water bodies. In reservoirs in the semi-arid region of Brazil, the presence and common dominance of C. raciborskii have been described in waters that are considered hard. We investigated the response of a Brazilian C. raciborskii strain to water hardness by evaluating its growth and saxitoxin production. Based on environmental data, a concentration of 5 mM of different carbonate salts was tested. These conditions affected growth either positively (MgCO3) or negatively (CaCO3 and Na2CO3). As a control for the addition of cations, MgCl2, CaCl2 and NaCl were tested at 5 or 10 mM, and MgCl2 stimulated growth, NaCl slowed but sustained growth, and CaCl2 inhibited growth. Most of the tested treatments increased the saxitoxin (STX) cell quota after six days of exposure. After 12 days, STX production returned to concentrations similar to that of the control, indicating an adaptation to the altered water conditions. In the short term, cell exposure to most of the tested conditions favored STX production over neoSTX production. These results support the noted plasticity of C. raciborskii and highlight its potential to thrive in hard waters. Additionally, the observed relationship between saxitoxin production and water ion concentrations characteristic of the natural environments can be important for understanding toxin content variation in other harmful algae that produce STX.

  2. Overview of MAST results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Counsell, G. F.; Akers, R. J.; Appel, L. C.; Applegate, D.; Axon, K. B.; Baranov, Y.; Brickley, C.; Bunting, C.; Buttery, R. J.; Carolan, P. G.; Challis, C.; Ciric, D.; Conway, N. J.; Cox, M.; Cunningham, G.; Darke, A.; Dnestrovskij, A.; Dowling, J.; Dudson, B.; Dunstan, M. R.; Delchambre, E.; Field, A. R.; Foster, A.; Gee, S.; Gryaznevich, M. P.; Helander, P.; Hender, T. C.; Hole, M.; Howell, D. H.; Joiner, N.; Keeling, D.; Kirk, A.; Lehane, I. P.; Lisgo, S.; Lloyd, B.; Lott, F.; Maddison, G. P.; Manhood, S. J.; Martin, R.; McArdle, G. J.; McClements, K. G.; Meyer, H.; Morris, A. W.; Nelson, M.; O'Brien, M. R.; Patel, A.; Pinfold, T.; Preinhaelter, J.; Price, M. N.; Roach, C. M.; Rozhansky, V.; Saarelma, S.; Saveliev, A.; Scannell, R.; Sharapov, S.; Shevchenko, V.; Shibaev, S.; Stammers, K.; Storrs, J.; Sykes, A.; Tabasso, A.; Tallents, S.; Taylor, D.; Tournianski, M. R.; Turner, A.; Turri, G.; Valovic, M.; Volpe, F.; Voss, G.; Walsh, M. J.; Watkins, J. R.; Wilson, H. R.; Wisse, M.; MAST, the; NBI; ECRH Teams

    2005-10-01

    Significant progress has been made on the Mega Ampere Spherical Tokamak (MAST) towards a fundamental understanding of transport, stability and edge physics and addressing technological issues for future large devices. Collaborative studies of the L-H transition with NSTX and ASDEX Upgrade confirm that operation in a connected double-null configuration significantly reduces the threshold power, Pthr. The MAST data provide support for a theory for the transition based on finite β drift wave turbulence suppression by self-generated zonal flows. Analysis of low and high field side density gradients in the H-mode pedestal provides support for an analytical model of the density pedestal width dependent on the neutral penetration depth. Adding MAST data to international confinement databases has enhanced confidence in scalings for ITER by significantly expanding the range of β and ɛ explored and indicates a slightly stronger ɛ dependence than in current scalings. Studies of core transport have been conducted for well-diagnosed L-mode, H-mode and internal transport barrier (ITB) discharges using TRANSP, and microstability and turbulence studies have been carried out using GS2. Linear micro-stability analysis indicates that ITG modes are typically unstable on all flux surfaces with growth rates that are comparable to the equilibrium E × B flow shearing rate. Mixing length estimates of transport coefficients from ITG (neglecting flow shear) give diffusion coefficients that are broadly comparable with observed thermal diffusivities. Non-linear, collisionless ETG calculations have been performed and suggest radially extended electrostatic streamers up to 100ρe across in radius. Transport from ITG could easily be suppressed in regions where the E × B shear flow rate, ωSE, exceeds the ITG growth rate, possibly contributing to ITBs. Toroidal rotation, driven by neutral beam torque, is the dominant contribution to ωSE via the vphiBθ term in the radial electric field

  3. Mast cell heparin stimulates migration of capillary endothelial cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    Migration of capillary endothelial cells is an important component of angiogenesis in vivo. Increased numbers of mast cells have been associated with several types of angiogenesis. We have used a quantitative assay in vitro to demonstrate that mast cells release a factor that significantly increases bovine capillary endothelial cell migration. The factor is present in medium conditioned by mast cells as well as lysates of mast cells. The stimulatory effect of mast cells on migration is specific for capillary endothelial cells. Furthermore, mast cells have no mitogenic activity for capillary endothelial cells. Of all the secretory products of mast cells tested, only heparin stimulated capillary endothelial cell migration in vitro. Heparin preparations from a variety of sources stimulated capillary endothelial cell migration to the same degree but did not stimulate migration of several other cell types. The migration activity of heparin and mast cell conditioned medium was blocked by specific antagonists of heparin (protamine and heparinase), but not by chondroitinase ABC. The migration activity of mast cell conditioned medium was resistant to heat (100 degrees C) and incubation with proteolytic enzymes. These results suggest that the role of mast cells in angiogenesis may be to enhance migration of the endothelial cells of growing capillaries. PMID:7420025

  4. Mast cell sarcoma: clinical management.

    PubMed

    Weiler, Catherine R; Butterfield, Joseph

    2014-05-01

    Mast cell sarcoma is a disorder that results in abnormal mast cells as identified by morphology, special stains, and in some publications, c-kit mutation analysis. It affects animal species such as canines more commonly than humans. In humans it is a very rare condition, with variable clinical presentation. There is no standard therapy for the disorder. It can affect any age group. It is occasionally associated with systemic mastocytosis and/or urticaria pigmentosa. The prognosis of mast cell sarcoma in published literature is very poor in humans.

  5. Subthreshold IKK activation modulates the effector functions of primary mast cells and allows specific targeting of transformed mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Drube, Sebastian; Beyer, Mandy; Rothe, Mandy; Rabenhorst, Anja; Göpfert, Christiane; Meininger, Isabel; Diamanti, Michaela A.; Stegner, David; Häfner, Norman; Böttcher, Martin; Reinecke, Kirstin; Herdegen, Thomas; Greten, Florian R.; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Hartmann, Karin; Krämer, Oliver H.; Kamradt, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Mast cell differentiation and proliferation depends on IL-3. IL-3 induces the activation of MAP-kinases and STATs and consequently induces proliferation and survival. Dysregulation of IL-3 signaling pathways also contribute to inflammation and tumorigenesis. We show here that IL-3 induces a SFK- and Ca2+-dependent activation of the inhibitor of κB kinases 2 (IKK2) which results in mast cell proliferation and survival but does not induce IκBα-degradation and NFκB activation. Therefore we propose the term “subthreshold IKK activation”. This subthreshold IKK activation also primes mast cells for enhanced responsiveness to IL-33R signaling. Consequently, co-stimulation with IL-3 and IL-33 increases IKK activation and massively enhances cytokine production induced by IL-33. We further reveal that in neoplastic mast cells expressing constitutively active Ras, subthreshold IKK activation is associated with uncontrolled proliferation. Consequently, pharmacological IKK inhibition reduces tumor growth selectively by inducing apoptosis in vivo. Together, subthreshold IKK activation is crucial to mediate the full IL-33-induced effector functions in primary mast cells and to mediate uncontrolled proliferation of neoplastic mast cells. Thus, IKK2 is a new molecularly defined target structure. PMID:25749030

  6. Subthreshold IKK activation modulates the effector functions of primary mast cells and allows specific targeting of transformed mast cells.

    PubMed

    Drube, Sebastian; Weber, Franziska; Loschinski, Romy; Beyer, Mandy; Rothe, Mandy; Rabenhorst, Anja; Göpfert, Christiane; Meininger, Isabel; Diamanti, Michaela A; Stegner, David; Häfner, Norman; Böttcher, Martin; Reinecke, Kirstin; Herdegen, Thomas; Greten, Florian R; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Hartmann, Karin; Krämer, Oliver H; Kamradt, Thomas

    2015-03-10

    Mast cell differentiation and proliferation depends on IL-3. IL-3 induces the activation of MAP-kinases and STATs and consequently induces proliferation and survival. Dysregulation of IL-3 signaling pathways also contribute to inflammation and tumorigenesis. We show here that IL-3 induces a SFK- and Ca²⁺-dependent activation of the inhibitor of κB kinases 2 (IKK2) which results in mast cell proliferation and survival but does not induce IκBα-degradation and NFκB activation. Therefore we propose the term "subthreshold IKK activation".This subthreshold IKK activation also primes mast cells for enhanced responsiveness to IL-33R signaling. Consequently, co-stimulation with IL-3 and IL-33 increases IKK activation and massively enhances cytokine production induced by IL-33.We further reveal that in neoplastic mast cells expressing constitutively active Ras, subthreshold IKK activation is associated with uncontrolled proliferation. Consequently, pharmacological IKK inhibition reduces tumor growth selectively by inducing apoptosis in vivo.Together, subthreshold IKK activation is crucial to mediate the full IL-33-induced effector functions in primary mast cells and to mediate uncontrolled proliferation of neoplastic mast cells. Thus, IKK2 is a new molecularly defined target structure. PMID:25749030

  7. Progesterone inhibits mast cell secretion.

    PubMed

    Vasiadi, M; Kempuraj, D; Boucher, W; Kalogeromitros, D; Theoharides, T C

    2006-01-01

    Mast cells are involved in allergic reactions, where they secrete numerous vasoactive, inflammatory and nociceptive mediators in response to immunoglobulin E (IgE) and antigen. However, they have also been implicated in inflammatory conditions, such as painful bladder syndrome/interstitial cystitis (PBS/IC), irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and migraines, all of which occur more often in women and are exacerbated during ovulation, but are suppressed during pregnancy. Mast cells express high affinity estrogen receptors and estradiol augments their secretion, while tamoxifen inhibits it. Here we report that progesterone (100 nM), but not the structurally related cholesterol, inhibits histamine secretion from purified rat peritoneal mast cells stimulated immunologically or by substance P (SP), an effect also documented by electron microscopy. These results suggest that mast cell secretion may be regulated by progesterone and may explain the reduced symptoms of certain inflammatory conditions during pregnancy.

  8. Twenty-first century mast cell stabilizers

    PubMed Central

    Finn, D F; Walsh, J J

    2013-01-01

    Mast cell stabilizing drugs inhibit the release of allergic mediators from mast cells and are used clinically to prevent allergic reactions to common allergens. Despite the relative success of the most commonly prescribed mast cell stabilizer, disodium cromoglycate, in use for the preventative treatment of bronchial asthma, allergic conjunctivitis and vernal keratoconjunctivitis, there still remains an urgent need to design new substances that are less expensive and require less frequent dosing schedules. In this regard, recent developments towards the discovery of the next generation of mast cell stabilizing drugs has included studies on substances isolated from natural sources, biological, newly synthesized compounds and drugs licensed for other indications. The diversity of natural products evaluated range from simple phenols, alkaloids, terpenes to simple amino acids. While in some cases their precise mode of action remains unknown it has nevertheless sparked interest in the development of synthetic derivatives with improved pharmacological properties. Within the purely synthetic class of inhibitors, particular attention has been devoted to the inhibition of important signalling molecules including spleen TK and JAK3. The statin class of cholesterol-lowering drugs as well as nilotinib, a TK inhibitor, are just some examples of clinically used drugs that have been evaluated for their anti-allergic properties. Here, we examine each approach under investigation, summarize the test data generated and offer suggestions for further preclinical evaluation before their therapeutic potential can be realized. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed issue on Histamine Pharmacology Update. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2013.170.issue-1 PMID:23441583

  9. The dark side of mast cell-targeted therapy in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Pittoni, Paola; Colombo, Mario Paolo

    2012-02-15

    Tumor development requires accomplices among white blood cells. Other than macrophages, mast cells have been observed to support the outgrowth of certain neoplasias because of their proangiogenic properties. In some tumor settings, however, mast cells may have a protective role, exerted by their proinflammatory mediators. In prostate cancer, no conclusive data on mast cell function were available. Here, we discuss recent work on the role of mast cells in mouse and human prostate cancer, showing that mast cells can behave alternatively as dangerous promoters, innocent bystanders, or essential guardians of tumors, according to the stage and origin of transformed cells. In particular, mast cells are essential for the outgrowth of early-stage tumors due to their matrix metalloproteinase-9 production, become dispensable in advanced-stage, post-epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, and are protective against neuroendocrine prostate tumor variants. The common expression of c-Kit by mast cells and neuroendocrine clones suggests a possible competition for the ligand Stem cell factor and offers the chance of curing early-stage disease while preventing neuroendocrine tumors using c-Kit-targeted therapy. This review discusses the implications of these findings on the advocated mast cell-targeted cancer therapy and considers future directions in the study of mast cells and their interactions with other c-Kit-expressing cells. PMID:22307838

  10. Skin Mast Cells Protect Mice Against Vaccinia Virus by Triggering Mast Cell Receptor S1PR2 and Releasing Antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhenping; Lai, Yuping; Bernard, Jamie J; MacLeod, Daniel; Cogen, Anna L; Moss, Bernard; Di Nardo, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are well known effectors of allergic reactions and are considered sentinels in the skin and mucosa. In addition, through their production of cathelicidin, mast cells have the capacity to oppose invading pathogens. We therefore hypothesized that mast cells could act as sentinels in the skin against viral infections using antimicrobial peptides. Here, we demonstrate that mast cells react to Vaccinia virus (VV) and degranulate using a membrane-activated pathway that leads to antimicrobial peptide discharge and virus inactivation. This finding was supported using a mouse model of viral infection. Mast cell-deficient (Kitwsh−/−) mice were more susceptible to skin VV infection than the wild-type animals, while Kitwsh−/− mice reconstituted with mast cells in the skin showed a normal response to VV. Using mast cells derived from mice deficient in cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide, we showed that antimicrobial peptides are one important antiviral granule component in vivo skin infections. In conclusion, our paper demonstrates that: MC presence protects mice from VV skin infection. MC degranulation is required for protecting mice from VV. Neutralizing antibody to the L1 fusion entry protein of VV inhibits degranulation apparently by preventing S1PR2 activation by viral membrane lipids. Antimicrobial peptide release from mast cell granules is necessary to inactivate VV infectivity. PMID:22140255

  11. Heavy-Quark Associated Production with One Hard Photon at Hadron Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Hartanto, Heribertus Bayu

    2013-01-01

    We present the calculation of heavy-quark associated production with a hard photon at hadron colliders, namely $pp(p\\bar p) → Q\\bar Q +X$γ (for $Q=t,b$), at Next-to-Leading Order (NLO) in Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). We study the impact of NLO QCD corrections on the total cross section and several differential distributions at both the Tevatron and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). For $t\\bar t$γ production we observe a sizeable reduction of the renormalization and factorization scale dependence when the NLO QCD corrections are included, while for $b\\bar b$γ production a considerable scale dependence still persists at NLO in QCD. This is consistent with what emerges in similar processes involving $b$ quarks and vector bosons and we explain its origin in detail. For $b\\bar b$γ production we study both the case in which at least one $b$ jet and the case in which at least two $b$ jets are observed. We perform the $b\\bar b$γ calculation using the Four Flavor Number Scheme (4FNS) and compare the case where at least one $b$ jet is observed with the corresponding results from the Five Flavor Number Scheme (5FNS) calculation. Finally we compare our results for $p\\bar p →+b+X$γ with the Tevatron data.

  12. Singular Values of Products of Ginibre Random Matrices, Multiple Orthogonal Polynomials and Hard Edge Scaling Limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuijlaars, Arno B. J.; Zhang, Lun

    2014-12-01

    Akemann, Ipsen and Kieburg recently showed that the squared singular values of products of M rectangular random matrices with independent complex Gaussian entries are distributed according to a determinantal point process with a correlation kernel that can be expressed in terms of Meijer G-functions. We show that this point process can be interpreted as a multiple orthogonal polynomial ensemble. We give integral representations for the relevant multiple orthogonal polynomials and a new double contour integral for the correlation kernel, which allows us to find its scaling limits at the origin (hard edge). The limiting kernels generalize the classical Bessel kernels. For M = 2 they coincide with the scaling limits found by Bertola, Gekhtman, and Szmigielski in the Cauchy-Laguerre two-matrix model, which indicates that these kernels represent a new universality class in random matrix theory.

  13. Blockade of mast cell activation reduces cutaneous scar formation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin; Schrementi, Megan E; Ranzer, Matthew J; Wilgus, Traci A; DiPietro, Luisa A

    2014-01-01

    Damage to the skin initiates a cascade of well-orchestrated events that ultimately leads to repair of the wound. The inflammatory response is key to wound healing both through preventing infection and stimulating proliferation and remodeling of the skin. Mast cells within the tissue are one of the first immune cells to respond to trauma, and upon activation they release pro-inflammatory molecules to initiate recruitment of leukocytes and promote a vascular response in the tissue. Additionally, mast cells stimulate collagen synthesis by dermal fibroblasts, suggesting they may also influence scar formation. To examine the contribution of mast cells in tissue repair, we determined the effects the mast cell inhibitor, disodium cromoglycate (DSCG), on several parameters of dermal repair including, inflammation, re-epithelialization, collagen fiber organization, collagen ultrastructure, scar width and wound breaking strength. Mice treated with DSCG had significantly reduced levels of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1α, IL-1β, and CXCL1. Although DSCG treatment reduced the production of inflammatory mediators, the rate of re-epithelialization was not affected. Compared to control, inhibition of mast cell activity caused a significant decrease in scar width along with accelerated collagen re-organization. Despite the reduced scar width, DSCG treatment did not affect the breaking strength of the healed tissue. Tryptase β1 exclusively produced by mast cells was found to increase significantly in the course of wound healing. However, DSCG treatment did not change its level in the wounds. These results indicate that blockade of mast cell activation reduces scar formation and inflammation without further weakening the healed wound.

  14. Mast Cell Chemotaxis – Chemoattractants and Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Halova, Ivana; Draberova, Lubica; Draber, Petr

    2012-01-01

    Migration of mast cells is essential for their recruitment within target tissues where they play an important role in innate and adaptive immune responses. These processes rely on the ability of mast cells to recognize appropriate chemotactic stimuli and react to them by a chemotactic response. Another level of intercellular communication is attained by production of chemoattractants by activated mast cells, which results in accumulation of mast cells and other hematopoietic cells at the sites of inflammation. Mast cells express numerous surface receptors for various ligands with properties of potent chemoattractants. They include the stem cell factor (SCF) recognized by c-Kit, antigen, which binds to immunoglobulin E (IgE) anchored to the high affinity IgE receptor (FcεRI), highly cytokinergic (HC) IgE recognized by FcεRI, lipid mediator sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), which binds to G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Other large groups of chemoattractants are eicosanoids [prostaglandin E2 and D2, leukotriene (LT) B4, LTD4, and LTC4, and others] and chemokines (CC, CXC, C, and CX3C), which also bind to various GPCRs. Further noteworthy chemoattractants are isoforms of transforming growth factor (TGF) β1–3, which are sensitively recognized by TGF-β serine/threonine type I and II β receptors, adenosine, C1q, C3a, and C5a components of the complement, 5-hydroxytryptamine, neuroendocrine peptide catestatin, tumor necrosis factor-α, and others. Here we discuss the major types of chemoattractants recognized by mast cells, their target receptors, as well as signaling pathways they utilize. We also briefly deal with methods used for studies of mast cell chemotaxis and with ways of how these studies profited from the results obtained in other cellular systems. PMID:22654878

  15. Cytoskeleton in Mast Cell Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Dráber, Pavel; Sulimenko, Vadym; Dráberová, Eduarda

    2012-01-01

    Mast cell activation mediated by the high affinity receptor for IgE (FcεRI) is a key event in allergic response and inflammation. Other receptors on mast cells, as c-Kit for stem cell factor and G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) synergistically enhance the FcεRI-mediated release of inflammatory mediators. Activation of various signaling pathways in mast cells results in changes in cell morphology, adhesion to substrate, exocytosis, and migration. Reorganization of cytoskeleton is pivotal in all these processes. Cytoskeletal proteins also play an important role in initial stages of FcεRI and other surface receptors induced triggering. Highly dynamic microtubules formed by αβ-tubulin dimers as well as microfilaments build up from polymerized actin are affected in activated cells by kinases/phosphatases, Rho GTPases and changes in concentration of cytosolic Ca2+. Also important are nucleation proteins; the γ-tubulin complexes in case of microtubules or Arp 2/3 complex with its nucleation promoting factors and formins in case of microfilaments. The dynamic nature of microtubules and microfilaments in activated cells depends on many associated/regulatory proteins. Changes in rigidity of activated mast cells reflect changes in intermediate filaments build up from vimentin. This review offers a critical appraisal of current knowledge on the role of cytoskeleton in mast cells signaling. PMID:22654883

  16. Influence of Physicochemical Properties of Silver Nanoparticles on Mast Cell Activation and Degranulation

    PubMed Central

    Aldossari, Abdullah A.; Shannahan, Jonathan H.; Podila, Ramakrishna; Brown, Jared M.

    2014-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are increasingly being incorporated into products for their antimicrobial properties. This has resulted in increased human exposures and the possibility of adverse health effects. Mast cells orchestrate allergic immune responses through degranulation and release of pre-formed mediators. Little data exists on understanding interactions of AgNPs with mast cells and the properties that influence activation and degranulation. Using bone marrow-derived mast cells and AgNPs of varying physicochemical properties we tested the hypothesis that AgNP physicochemical properties influence mast cell degranulation and osteopontin production. AgNPs evaluated included spherical 20 nm and 110 nm suspended in either polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) or citrate, Ag plates suspended in PVP of diameters between 40–60 nm or 100–130 nm, and Ag nanowires suspended in PVP with thicknesses <100 nm and length up to 2 microns. Mast cell responses were found to be dependent on the physicochemical properties of the AgNP. Further, we determined a role for scavenger receptor B1 in AgNP-induced mast cell responses. Mast cell degranulation was not dependent on AgNP dissolution but was prevented by tyrosine kinsase inhibitor pretreatment. This study suggests that exposure to AgNPs may elicit adverse mast cell responses that could contribute to the initiation or exacerbation of allergic disease. PMID:25458489

  17. 30 CFR 56.7004 - Drill mast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Drill mast. 56.7004 Section 56.7004 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Drilling § 56.7004 Drill mast. Persons shall not be on a mast while the drill-bit is in operation...

  18. 30 CFR 56.7004 - Drill mast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Drill mast. 56.7004 Section 56.7004 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Drilling § 56.7004 Drill mast. Persons shall not be on a mast while the drill-bit is in operation...

  19. 30 CFR 56.7004 - Drill mast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Drill mast. 56.7004 Section 56.7004 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Drilling § 56.7004 Drill mast. Persons shall not be on a mast while the drill-bit is in operation...

  20. 30 CFR 56.7004 - Drill mast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Drill mast. 56.7004 Section 56.7004 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Drilling § 56.7004 Drill mast. Persons shall not be on a mast while the drill-bit is in operation...

  1. 30 CFR 57.7004 - Drill mast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Drill mast. 57.7004 Section 57.7004 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Drilling-Surface Only § 57.7004 Drill mast. Persons shall not be on a mast while the drill-bit is...

  2. 30 CFR 57.7004 - Drill mast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Drill mast. 57.7004 Section 57.7004 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Drilling-Surface Only § 57.7004 Drill mast. Persons shall not be on a mast while the drill-bit is...

  3. 30 CFR 57.7004 - Drill mast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Drill mast. 57.7004 Section 57.7004 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Drilling-Surface Only § 57.7004 Drill mast. Persons shall not be on a mast while the drill-bit is...

  4. 30 CFR 57.7004 - Drill mast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Drill mast. 57.7004 Section 57.7004 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Drilling-Surface Only § 57.7004 Drill mast. Persons shall not be on a mast while the drill-bit is...

  5. 30 CFR 57.7004 - Drill mast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Drill mast. 57.7004 Section 57.7004 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Drilling-Surface Only § 57.7004 Drill mast. Persons shall not be on a mast while the drill-bit is...

  6. 30 CFR 56.7004 - Drill mast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Drill mast. 56.7004 Section 56.7004 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Drilling § 56.7004 Drill mast. Persons shall not be on a mast while the drill-bit is in operation...

  7. The functional response of a hoarding seed predator to mast seeding.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Quinn E; Boutin, Stan; Lane, Jeffrey E; LaMontagne, Jalene M; McAdam, Andrew G; Krebs, Charles J; Humphries, Murray M

    2010-09-01

    Mast seeding involves the episodic and synchronous production of large seed crops by perennial plants. The predator satiation hypothesis proposes that mast seeding maximizes seed escape because seed predators consume a decreasing proportion of available seeds with increasing seed production. However, the seed escape benefits of masting depend not only on whether predators are satiated at high levels of seed production, but also on the shape of their functional response (type II vs. type III), and the actual proportion of available seeds that they consume at different levels of seed production. North American red squirrels (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus) are the primary vertebrate predator of white spruce (Picea glauca) mast seed crops in many boreal regions because they hoard unopened cones in underground locations, preempting the normal sequence of cone opening, seed dispersal, and seed germination. We document the functional response of cone-hoarding by red squirrels across three non-mast years and one mast year by estimating the number of cones present in the territories of individual red squirrels and the proportion of these cones that they hoarded each autumn. Even though red squirrels are not constrained by the ingestive and on-body (fat reserves) energy reserve limitations experienced by animals that consume seeds directly, most squirrels hoarded < 10% of the cones present on their territories under mast conditions. Cone availability during non-mast years also reached levels that satiated the hoarding activity of red squirrels; however, this occurred only on the highest-quality territories. Squirrels switched to mushroom-hoarding when cone production was low and mushrooms were abundant. This resulted in type III functional response whereby the proportional harvest of cones was highest at levels of cone availability that were intermediate within non-mast years. Overall, more cones escaped squirrel cone-hoarding during a mast event than when cone production was low

  8. Signal transduction pathways in mast cell granule-mediated endothelial cell activation.

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Luqi; Stehno-Bittel, Lisa; Smirnova, Irina; Stechschulte, Daniel J; Dileepan, Kottarappat N

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We have previously shown that incubation of human endothelial cells with mast cell granules results in potentiation of lipopolysaccharide-induced production of interleukin-6 and interleukin-8. AIMS: The objective of the present study was to identify candidate molecules and signal transduction pathways involved in the synergy between mast cell granules and lipopolysaccharide on endothelial cell activation. METHODS: Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were incubated with rat mast cell granules in the presence and absence of lipopolysaccharide, and IL-6 production was quantified. The status of c-Jun amino-terminal kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 activation, nuclear factor-kappaB translocation and intracellular calcium levels were determined to identify the mechanism of synergy between mast cell granules and lipopolysaccaride. RESULTS: Mast cell granules induced low levels of interleukin-6 production by endothelial cells, and this effect was markedly enhanced by lipopolysaccharide. The results revealed that both serine proteases and histamine present in mast cell granules were involved in this activation process. Mast cell granules increased intracellular calcium, and activated c-Jun amino-terminal kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2. The combination of lipopolysaccharide and mast cell granules prolonged c-Jun amino-terminal kinase activity beyond the duration of induction by either stimulant alone and was entirely due to active proteases. However, both proteases and histamine contributed to calcium mobilization and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 activation. The nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-kappaB proteins was of greater magnitude in endothelial cells treated with the combination of mast cell granules and lipopolysaccharide. CONCLUSIONS:Mast cell granule serine proteases and histamine can amplify lipopolysaccharide-induced endothelial cell activation, which involves calcium mobilization, mitogen

  9. Live Staphylococcus aureus Induces Expression and Release of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor in Terminally Differentiated Mouse Mast Cells.

    PubMed

    Johnzon, Carl-Fredrik; Rönnberg, Elin; Guss, Bengt; Pejler, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    Mast cells have been shown to express vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), thereby implicating mast cells in pro-angiogenic processes. However, the mechanism of VEGF induction in mast cells and the possible expression of VEGF in fully mature mast cells have not been extensively studied. Here, we report that terminally differentiated peritoneal cell-derived mast cells can be induced to express VEGF in response to challenge with Staphylococcus aureus, thus identifying a mast cell-bacteria axis as a novel mechanism leading to VEGF release. Whereas live bacteria produced a robust upregulation of VEGF in mast cells, heat-inactivated bacteria failed to do so, and bacteria-conditioned media did not induce VEGF expression. The induction of VEGF was not critically dependent on direct cell-cell contact between bacteria and mast cells. Hence, these findings suggest that VEGF can be induced by soluble factors released during the co-culture conditions. Neither of a panel of bacterial cell-wall products known to activate toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling promoted VEGF expression in mast cells. In agreement with the latter, VEGF induction occurred independently of Myd88, an adaptor molecule that mediates the downstream events following TLR engagement. The VEGF induction was insensitive to nuclear factor of activated T-cells inhibition but was partly dependent on the nuclear factor kappa light-chain enhancer of activated B cells signaling pathway. Together, these findings identify bacterial challenge as a novel mechanism by which VEGF is induced in mast cells. PMID:27446077

  10. Reversible expansion of primate mast cell populations in vivo by stem cell factor.

    PubMed Central

    Galli, S J; Iemura, A; Garlick, D S; Gamba-Vitalo, C; Zsebo, K M; Andrews, R G

    1993-01-01

    Mast cell development in mice is critically regulated by stem cell factor (SCF), the term used here to designate a product of fibroblasts and other cell types that is a ligand for the tyrosine kinase receptor protein encoded by the proto-oncogene c-kit. However, the factors which regulate the size of mast cell populations in primates are poorly understood. Here we report that the subcutaneous administration of recombinant human SCF (rhSCF) to baboons (Papio cynocephalus) or cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) produced a striking expansion of mast cell populations in many anatomical sites, with numbers of mast cells in some organs of rhSCF-treated monkeys exceeding the corresponding values in control monkeys by more than 100-fold. Animals treated with rhSCF did not exhibit clinical evidence of mast cell activation, and discontinuation of treatment with rhSCF resulted in a rapid decline of mast cell numbers nearly to baseline levels. These findings are the first to demonstrate that a specific cytokine can regulate mast cell development in primates in vivo. They also provide the first evidence, in any mammalian species, to indicate that the cytokine-dependent expansion of tissue mast cell populations can be reversed when administration of the cytokine is discontinued. Images PMID:7678600

  11. Lipid Rafts in Mast Cell Biology

    PubMed Central

    Silveira e Souza, Adriana Maria Mariano; Mazucato, Vivian Marino; Jamur, Maria Célia; Oliver, Constance

    2011-01-01

    Mast cells have long been recognized to have a direct and critical role in allergic and inflammatory reactions. In allergic diseases, these cells exert both local and systemic responses, including allergic rhinitis and anaphylaxis. Mast cell mediators are also related to many chronic inflammatory conditions. Besides the roles in pathological conditions, the biological functions of mast cells include roles in innate immunity, involvement in host defense mechanisms against parasites, immunomodulation of the immune system, tissue repair, and angiogenesis. Despite their growing significance in physiological and pathological conditions, much still remains to be learned about mast cell biology. This paper presents evidence that lipid rafts or raft components modulate many of the biological processes in mast cells, such as degranulation and endocytosis, play a role in mast cell development and recruitment, and contribute to the overall preservation of mast cell structure and organization. PMID:21490812

  12. Mast Cells in Allergic Diseases and Mastocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Marquardt, Diana L.; Wasserman, Stephen I.

    1982-01-01

    Mast cells with their stores of vasoactive and chemotactic mediators are central to the pathogenesis of allergic diseases. The cross-linking of receptorbound IgE molecules on the surface of mast cells initiates a complex chain of events, including calcium ion influx, phospholipid methylation and turnover and cyclic nucleotide metabolism, ultimately resulting in the release of mediators of immediate hypersensitivity. These mast cell mediators are important in smooth muscle reactivity, in the recruitment of eosinophilic and neutrophilic leukocytes and in the generation of secondary chemical mediators. Histologic evidence of mast cell degranulation, biochemical evidence of mast cell mediators in blood and tissues and clinical evidence of signs and symptoms reproducible by these mediators have strongly supported the crucial role of mast cells in asthma, urticaria, anaphylaxis, rhinitis and mastocytosis. Because of their unique location at host environment interfaces, mast cells may both participate in allergic diseases and promote homeostasis. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3. PMID:6293204

  13. Mast cells mediate acute inflammatory responses to implanted biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Liping; Jennings, Timothy A.; Eaton, John W.

    1998-01-01

    Implanted biomaterials trigger acute and chronic inflammatory responses. The mechanisms involved in such acute inflammatory responses can be arbitrarily divided into phagocyte transmigration, chemotaxis, and adhesion to implant surfaces. We earlier observed that two chemokines—macrophage inflammatory protein 1α/monocyte chemoattractant protein 1—and the phagocyte integrin Mac-1 (CD11b/CD18)/surface fibrinogen interaction are, respectively, required for phagocyte chemotaxis and adherence to biomaterial surfaces. However, it is still not clear how the initial transmigration of phagocytes through the endothelial barrier into the area of the implant is triggered. Because implanted biomaterials elicit histaminic responses in the surrounding tissue, and histamine release is known to promote rapid diapedesis of inflammatory cells, we evaluated the possible role of histamine and mast cells in the recruitment of phagocytes to biomaterial implants. Using i.p. and s.c. implantation of polyethylene terephthalate disks in mice we find: (i) Extensive degranulation of mast cells, accompanied by histamine release, occurs adjacent to short-term i.p. implants. (ii) Simultaneous administration of H1 and H2 histamine receptor antagonists (pyrilamine and famotidine, respectively) greatly diminishes recruitment and adhesion of both neutrophils (<20% of control) and monocytes/macrophages (<30% of control) to implants. (iii) Congenitally mast cell-deficient mice also exhibit markedly reduced accumulation of phagocytes on both i.p. and s.c implants. (iv) Finally, mast cell reconstitution of mast cell-deficient mice restores “normal” inflammatory responses to biomaterial implants. We conclude that mast cells and their granular products, especially histamine, are important in recruitment of inflammatory cells to biomaterial implants. Improved knowledge of such responses may permit purposeful modulation of both acute and chronic inflammation affecting implanted biomaterials. PMID

  14. Spatio-temporal availability of soft mast in clearcuts in the Southern Appalachians

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reynolds-Hogland, M. J.; Mitchell, M.S.; Powell, R.A.

    2006-01-01

    Soft mast is an important resource for many wild populations in the Southern Appalachians, yet the way clear-cutting affects availability of soft mast though time is not fully understood. We tested a theoretical model of temporal availability of soft mast in clearcuts using empirical data on percent cover and berry production of Gaylussacia, Vaccinium, and Rubus spp. plants in 100 stands that were clearcut (0-122 years old) in the Southern Appalachian Mountains. We modeled the relationship between soft mast availability and stand age, evaluated the effects of topography and forest type on soft mast, developed statistical models for predicting the spatio-temporal distribution of soft mast, and tested the hypothesis that percent cover of berry plants and berry production provided similar information about soft mast availability. We found temporal dynamics explained berry production better than it predicted percent plant cover, whereas topographic variables influenced percent plant cover more than they influenced berry production. Berry production and percent plant cover were highest in ???2-9-year-old stands. Percent plant cover was lowest in 10-69-year-old stands and intermediate in 70+-year-old stands. Three of our spatio-temporal models performed well during model testing and they were not biased by the training data, indicating the inferences about spatio-temporal availability of soft mast extended beyond our sample data. The methods we used to estimate the distribution of soft mast may be useful for modeling distributions of other resources. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Preliminary effects of water hardness on triactinomyxon production and development from eastern tubifex worms infected with Myxobolus cerebralis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waldrop, Thomas B.; Densmore, Christine; Blazer, Vicki; Smith, Dave; Schill, Bane; Schill, B.; Waldrop, T.; Blazer, V.

    1999-01-01

    Whirling disease is caused by Myxobolus cerebralis and requires an intermediate oligochaete host identified as Tubifex tubifex (Wolf, Markiw, and Hiltunen, 1986). M. cerebralis spores ingested by the tubifex worms develop into triactinomyxons (tams) that are eventually released into the water column to infect salmonid fish. There may be many environmental parameters, biotic or abiotic, that may affect the development of waterborne tams in eastern tubifex worms. This study will focus on one of those environmental parameters, total water hardness. Total water hardness is defined as the concentration of calcium and magnesium in a water sample expressed in milligrams per liter of equivalent CACO3 (Boyd, 1990). This study will address whether different levels of water hardness affect the development and production of tams released by infected tubifex worms.

  16. Nitrogen storage dynamics are affected by masting events in Fagus crenata.

    PubMed

    Han, Qingmin; Kabeya, Daisuke; Iio, Atsuhiro; Inagaki, Yoshiyuki; Kakubari, Yoshitaka

    2014-03-01

    It is generally assumed that the production of a large crop of seeds depletes stores of resources and that these take more than 1 year to replenish; this is accepted, theoretically, as the proximate mechanism of mast seeding (resource budget model). However, direct evidence of resource depletion in masting trees is very rare. Here, we trace seasonal and inter-annual variations in nitrogen (N) concentration and estimate the N storage pool of individuals after full masting of Fagus crenata in two stands. In 2005, a full masting year, the amount of N in fruit litter represented half of the N present in mature leaves in an old stand (age 190-260 years), and was about equivalent to the amount of N in mature leaves in a younger stand (age 83-84 years). Due to this additional burden, both tissue N concentration and individual N storage decreased in 2006; this was followed by significant replenishment in 2007, although a substantial N store remained even after full masting. These results indicate that internal storage may be important and that N may be the limiting factor for fruiting. In the 4 years following full masting, the old stand experienced two moderate masting events separated by 2 years, whilst trees in the younger stand did not fruit. This different fruiting behavior may be related to different "costs of reproduction" in the full masting year 2005, thus providing more evidence that N may limit fruiting. Compared to the non-fruiting stand, individuals in the fruiting stand exhibited an additional increase in N concentrations in roots early in the 2007 growing season, suggesting additional N uptake from the soil to supply resource demand. The enhanced uptake may alleviate the N storage depletion observed in the full masting year. This study suggests that masting affects N cycle dynamics in mature Fagus crenata and N may be one factor limiting fruiting. PMID:24221082

  17. Role of mast cells in tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Conti, Pio; Castellani, Maria L; Kempuraj, Durasamy; Salini, Vincenzo; Vecchiet, Jacopo; Tetè, Stefano; Mastrangelo, Filiberto; Perrella, Alessandro; De Lutiis, Maria Anna; Tagen, Michael; Theoharides, Theoharis C

    2007-01-01

    The growth of malignant tumors is determined in large part by the proliferative capacity of the tumor cells. Clinical observations and animal experiments have established that tumor cells elicit immune responses. Histopathologic studies show that many tumors are surrounded by mononuclear cell and mast cell infiltrates. Mast cells are ubiquitous in the body and are critical for allergic reactions. Increasing evidence indicates that mast cells secrete proinflammatory cytokines and are involved in neuro-inflammatory processes and cancer. Mast cells accumulate in the stroma surrounding certain tumors, especially mammary adenocarcinoma, and the molecules they secrete can benefit the tumor. However, mast cells can also increase at the site of tumor growth and participate in tumor rejection. Mast cells may be recruited by tumor-derived chemoattractants and selectively secrete molecules such as growth factors, histamine, heparin, VEGF, and IL-8, as well as proteases that permit the formation of new blood vessels and metastases. Tumor mast cell intersections play regulatory and modulatory roles affecting various aspects of tumor growth. Discovery of these new roles of mast cells further complicates the understanding of tumor growth. This review focuses on the strategic importance of mast cells to the progression of tumors, and proposes a revised immune effector mechanism of mast cell involvement in tumor growth. PMID:18000287

  18. Tetraspanin CD151 Is a Negative Regulator of FcεRI-Mediated Mast Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Abdala-Valencia, Hiam; Bryce, Paul J.; Schleimer, Robert P.; Wechsler, Joshua B.; Loffredo, Lucas F.; Cook-Mills, Joan M.; Hsu, Chia-Lin; Berdnikovs, Sergejs

    2016-01-01

    Mast cells are critical in the pathogenesis of allergic disease due to the release of preformed and newly synthesized mediators, yet the mechanisms controlling mast cell activation are not well understood. Members of the tetraspanin family are recently emerging as modulators of FcεRI-mediated mast cell activation; however, mechanistic understanding of their function is currently lacking. The tetraspanin CD151 is a poorly understood member of this family and is specifically induced on mouse and human mast cells upon FcεRI aggregation but its functional effects are unknown. In this study, we show that CD151 deficiency significantly exacerbates the IgE-mediated late phase inflammation in a murine model of passive cutaneous anaphylaxis. Ex vivo, FcεRI stimulation of bone marrow–derived mast cells from CD151−/− mice resulted in significantly enhanced expression of proinflammatory cytokines IL-4, IL-13, and TNF-α compared with wild-type controls. However, FcεRI -induced mast cell degranulation was unaffected. At the molecular signaling level, CD151 selectively regulated IgE-induced activation of ERK1/2 and PI3K, associated with cytokine production, but had no effect on the phospholipase Cγ1 signaling, associated with degranulation. Collectively, our data indicate that CD151 exerts negative regulation over IgE-induced late phase responses and cytokine production in mast cells. PMID:26136426

  19. [Mast cells, their adenosine receptors and reactive oxygen species in chronic inflammatory pathologies of childhood].

    PubMed

    Renke, Joanna; Popadiuk, Stefan; Wozniak, Michał; Szlagatys-Sidorkiewicz, Agnieszka; Hansdorfer-Korzon, Rita

    2006-01-01

    Mast cells were described by Erhlich at the end of XIX-th century. Their role was deeply investigated in asthma and allergy. The massive degranulation of mast cells in allergy can lead to anaphylactic shock. Recently, mast cells have been recognized again as a very interesting topic for investigation, due to their possible role in chronic inflammation. Moreover, through adenosine receptors, mast cells can be activated or inactivated. That is why these cells are regarded as a potential target of new drugs. It has been reported, that mast cells generate intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in response to stimulation with divergent physiologically relevant stimulants. The intensification of ROS production may be measured by the level of carbonyl groups, as a marker of protein peroxidation. However, the role of mast cells in other than asthma diseases with chronic inflammation needs further investigation. It was found out that the information about mast cell distribution in colonic mucosa may serve as help in differentiation between inflammatory bowel disease and collagenous colitis. Moreover, its accumulation in focal active gastritis was confirmed in patients with Crohn's disease. An important role in regulation of inflammatory process seems to be reserved for adenosine receptors present on mastocytes. The activation of mast cells through the adenosine receptor is connected with 11-8 release, which stimulate the migration of leukocytes and oxidation reactions. The detection of mast cells in tissues should not be limited only to the simple histologic examination. It should be completed by the detection of products of degranulation, e.g. tryptase. This is the way to find out their actual function and state of activation. PMID:17203808

  20. Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles Demoted MDM2 Expression to Suppress TSLP-Induced Mast Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Ho; Jeong, Hyun-Ja

    2016-03-01

    Activation of murine double minute 2 (MDM2) through thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP)-induced signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT6) phosphorylation plays a critical role in proliferation and survival of mast cells. Previously, we reported that zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO-NP) effectively decrease the mast cell-mediated allergic inflammatory reactions. Here, we evaluated the effect of ZnO-NP on TSLP-induced proliferation of mast cells. ZnO-NP significantly reduced the number of BrdU-incorporating mast cells increased by TSLP. ZnO-NP decreased the expression of MDM2 through the blockade of STAT6 phosphorylation. TSLP increased the production and mRNA expression of interleukin-13 (a growth factor of mast cells), its increase was significantly decreased by ZnO-NP (10 μg/mL). ZnO-NP induced the down-regulation of Bcl2 (an anti-apoptotic factor) and up-regulation of Bax (an apoptotic factor) through the stabilization of p53 protein. However, ZnO-NP has no effect on caspase-3 activation, cytochrome c release into cytosol, and apoptosis-inducing factor translocation into nucleus in TSLP-stimulated cells. The results of the present study demonstrated that ZnO-NP inhibited the proliferation of mast cells through the regulation of MDM2 and p53 protein levels. These finding suggest that ZnO-NP could be improved mast cell-mediated various diseases.

  1. Our perception of the mast cell from Paul Ehrlich to now.

    PubMed

    Beaven, Michael A

    2009-01-01

    Just over a century ago Paul Ehrlich received the Nobel Prize for his studies of immunity. This review describes one of his legacies, the histochemical description of the mast cell, and the research that has ensued since then. After a long period of largely descriptive studies, which revealed little about the biological role of the mast cell, the field was galvanized in the 1950s by the recognition that the mast cell was the main repository of histamine and a key participant in anaphylactic reactions. Although the mast cell was long-viewed in these terms, recent research has now shown that the mast cell also plays a key role in innate and adaptive immune responses, autoimmune disease, and possibly tissue homeostasis by virtue of its expression of a diverse array of receptors and biologically active products. In addition, the responsiveness of mast cells to immunological and pathological stimulants is highly modulated by the tissue cytokine environment and by synergistic, or inhibitory, interactions among the various mast cell receptor systems. This once enigmatic cell of Paul Ehrlich has proved to be both adaptable and multifunctional.

  2. Directed spray mast

    DOEpatents

    Nance, Thomas A.; Siddall, Alvin A.; Cheng, William Y.; Counts, Kevin T.

    2005-05-10

    Disclosed is an elongated, tubular, compact high pressure sprayer apparatus for insertion into an access port of vessels having contaminated interior areas that require cleaning by high pressure water spray. The invention includes a spray nozzle and a camera adjacent thereto with means for rotating and raising and lowering the nozzle so that areas identified through the camera may be cleaned with a minimum production of waste water to be removed.

  3. Mast pulses shape trophic interactions between fluctuating rodent populations in a primeval forest.

    PubMed

    Selva, Nuria; Hobson, Keith A; Cortés-Avizanda, Ainara; Zalewski, Andrzej; Donázar, José Antonio

    2012-01-01

    How different functional responses of consumers exploiting pulsed resources affect community dynamics is an ongoing question in ecology. Tree masting is a common resource pulse in terrestrial ecosystems that can drive rodent population cycles. Using stable isotope (δ(13)C, δ(15)N) analyses, we investigated the dietary response of two fluctuating rodent species, the yellow-necked mouse Apodemus flavicollis and the bank vole Myodes glareolus, to mast events in Białowieża Forest (NE Poland). Rodent hair samples were obtained non-invasively from faeces of their predators for an 11-year period that encompassed two mast events. Spectacular seed crops of deciduous trees, namely oak Quercus robur and hornbeam Carpinus betulus, occur after several intermediate years of moderate seed production, with a post-mast year characterised by a nil crop. While a Bayesian isotopic (SIAR) mixing model showed a variety of potential vegetation inputs to rodent diets, the isotopic niche of the yellow-necked mouse was strongly associated with mast of deciduous trees (>80% of diet), showing no variation among years of different seed crop. However, bank voles showed a strong functional response; in mast years the vole shifted its diet from herbs in deciduous forest (~66% of diet) to mast (~74%). Only in mast years did the isotopic niche of both rodent species overlap. Previous research showed that bank voles, subordinate and more generalist than mice, showed higher fluctuations in numbers in response to masting. This study provides unique data on the functional response of key pulse consumers in forest food webs, and contributes to our understanding of rodent population fluctuations and the mechanisms governing pulse-consumer interactions. PMID:23251475

  4. Dual effect of spermine on mast cell secretion exhibits different calcium and temperature requirements.

    PubMed

    Vliagoftis, H; Mak, L; Boucher, W; Theoharides, T C

    1999-09-01

    Mast cells release many biologically active molecules upon stimulation by a variety of molecules such as immunoglobulin E (IgE) and specific antigen, anaphylatoxins, as well as a number of cationic compounds which include drugs, kinins and neuropeptides. The effect of the naturally occurring polyamine spermine was studied because, even though it is polycationic, it has been implicated in the modulation of secretory processes in a variety of cells. In particular, it was previously shown that oxidation products of spermine inhibit mast cell secretion. High concentrations of spermine (5 x 10(-3) M) added at 37 degrees C induced mast cell secretion that had similar characteristics with that triggered by compound 48/80 (48/80). However, spermine inhibited mast cell secretion in a dose-dependent manner as long as it was added at 4-10 degrees C for at least 10 min in the absence of Ca++ before warming the cells to 37 degrees C and triggering them with 48/80. These findings were true both for purified rat peritoneal mast cells and for rat skin mast cells in situ. Addition of calcium after the cells had been warmed to 37 degrees C could not reverse this inhibition. The inhibition seen when spermine was added at 4 degrees C was, however, overcome if phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) or NaF, which activate PKC and G proteins respectively, were added to mast cells at 37 degrees C together with Ca++. These results indicate that polyamines could be important modulators of the activation state of mast cells and might help further define the biochemical events involved in mast cell secretion.

  5. Mast pulses shape trophic interactions between fluctuating rodent populations in a primeval forest.

    PubMed

    Selva, Nuria; Hobson, Keith A; Cortés-Avizanda, Ainara; Zalewski, Andrzej; Donázar, José Antonio

    2012-01-01

    How different functional responses of consumers exploiting pulsed resources affect community dynamics is an ongoing question in ecology. Tree masting is a common resource pulse in terrestrial ecosystems that can drive rodent population cycles. Using stable isotope (δ(13)C, δ(15)N) analyses, we investigated the dietary response of two fluctuating rodent species, the yellow-necked mouse Apodemus flavicollis and the bank vole Myodes glareolus, to mast events in Białowieża Forest (NE Poland). Rodent hair samples were obtained non-invasively from faeces of their predators for an 11-year period that encompassed two mast events. Spectacular seed crops of deciduous trees, namely oak Quercus robur and hornbeam Carpinus betulus, occur after several intermediate years of moderate seed production, with a post-mast year characterised by a nil crop. While a Bayesian isotopic (SIAR) mixing model showed a variety of potential vegetation inputs to rodent diets, the isotopic niche of the yellow-necked mouse was strongly associated with mast of deciduous trees (>80% of diet), showing no variation among years of different seed crop. However, bank voles showed a strong functional response; in mast years the vole shifted its diet from herbs in deciduous forest (~66% of diet) to mast (~74%). Only in mast years did the isotopic niche of both rodent species overlap. Previous research showed that bank voles, subordinate and more generalist than mice, showed higher fluctuations in numbers in response to masting. This study provides unique data on the functional response of key pulse consumers in forest food webs, and contributes to our understanding of rodent population fluctuations and the mechanisms governing pulse-consumer interactions.

  6. Mast Pulses Shape Trophic Interactions between Fluctuating Rodent Populations in a Primeval Forest

    PubMed Central

    Selva, Nuria; Hobson, Keith A.; Cortés-Avizanda, Ainara; Zalewski, Andrzej; Donázar, José Antonio

    2012-01-01

    How different functional responses of consumers exploiting pulsed resources affect community dynamics is an ongoing question in ecology. Tree masting is a common resource pulse in terrestrial ecosystems that can drive rodent population cycles. Using stable isotope (δ13C, δ15N) analyses, we investigated the dietary response of two fluctuating rodent species, the yellow-necked mouse Apodemus flavicollis and the bank vole Myodes glareolus, to mast events in Białowieża Forest (NE Poland). Rodent hair samples were obtained non-invasively from faeces of their predators for an 11-year period that encompassed two mast events. Spectacular seed crops of deciduous trees, namely oak Quercus robur and hornbeam Carpinus betulus, occur after several intermediate years of moderate seed production, with a post-mast year characterised by a nil crop. While a Bayesian isotopic (SIAR) mixing model showed a variety of potential vegetation inputs to rodent diets, the isotopic niche of the yellow-necked mouse was strongly associated with mast of deciduous trees (>80% of diet), showing no variation among years of different seed crop. However, bank voles showed a strong functional response; in mast years the vole shifted its diet from herbs in deciduous forest (∼66% of diet) to mast (∼74%). Only in mast years did the isotopic niche of both rodent species overlap. Previous research showed that bank voles, subordinate and more generalist than mice, showed higher fluctuations in numbers in response to masting. This study provides unique data on the functional response of key pulse consumers in forest food webs, and contributes to our understanding of rodent population fluctuations and the mechanisms governing pulse–consumer interactions. PMID:23251475

  7. The role of mast cells in cancers

    PubMed Central

    Maciel, Thiago T.; Moura, Ivan C.

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells are immune cells that accumulate in the tumors and their microenvironment during disease progression. Mast cells are armed with a wide array of receptors that sense environment modifications and, upon stimulation, they are able to secrete several biologically active factors involved in the modulation of tumor growth. For example, mast cells are able to secrete pro-angiogenic and growth factors but also pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators. Recent studies have allowed substantial progress in understanding the role of mast cells in tumorigenesis/disease progression but further studies are necessary to completely elucidate their impact in the pathophysiology of cancer. Here we review observations suggesting that mast cells could modulate tumor growth in humans. We also discuss the drawbacks related to observations from mast cell-deficient mouse models, which could have consequences in the determination of a potential causative relationship between mast cells and cancer. We believe that the understanding of the precise role of mast cells in tumor development and progression will be of critical importance for the development of new targeted therapies in human cancers. PMID:25705392

  8. Marshall Avionics Testbed System (MAST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Wayne D.

    1989-01-01

    Work accomplished in the summer of 1989 in association with the NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Research Fellowship Program at Marshall Space Flight Center is summarized. The project was aimed at developing detailed specifications for the Marshall Avionics System Testbed (MAST). This activity was to include the definition of the testbed requirements and the development of specifications for a set of standard network nodes for connecting the testbed to a variety of networks. The project was also to include developing a timetable for the design, implementation, programming and testing of the testbed. Specifications of both hardware and software components for the system were to be included.

  9. Non FcεR-bearing Mast Cells Secrete Sufficient Interleukin-4 to Control Francisella tularensis Replication within Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Thathiah, Prea; Sanapala, Shilpa; Rodriguez, Annette R.; Yu, Jieh-Juen; Murthy, Ashlesh K.; Guentzel, M. Neal; Forsthuber, Thomas G.; Chambers, James P.; Arulanandam, Bernard P.

    2011-01-01

    Mast cells have classically been implicated in the triggering of allergic and anaphylactic reactions. However, recent findings have elucidated the ability of these cells to selectively release a variety of cytokines leading to bacterial clearance through neutrophil and dendritic cell mobilization, and suggest an important role in innate host defenses. Our laboratory has established a primary bone marrow derived mast cell-macrophage co-culture system and found that mast cells mediated a significant inhibition of Francisella tularensis LVS uptake and replication within macrophages through contact and the secreted product interleukin-4 (IL-4). In this study, we utilized P815 mast cells and J774 macrophages to further investigate whether mast cell activation by non-FcεR driven signals could produce IL-4 and control intramacrophage LVS replication. P815 supernatants collected upon activation by the mast cell activating peptide MP7, as well as P815 cells co-cultured with J774 macrophages, exhibited marked inhibition of bacterial uptake and replication, which correlated with the production of IL-4. The inhibition noted in vitro was titratable and preserved at ratios relevant to cellular infiltration events following pulmonary challenge. Collectively, our data suggest that both primary mast cell and P815 mast cell (lacking FcεR) secreted IL-4 can control intramacrophage Francisella replication. PMID:21565523

  10. Chondroitin sulphate inhibits connective tissue mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Theoharides, T C; Patra, P; Boucher, W; Letourneau, R; Kempuraj, D; Chiang, G; Jeudy, S; Hesse, Leah; Athanasiou, A

    2000-01-01

    Mast cells derive from the bone marrow and are responsible for the development of allergic and possibly inflammatory reactions. Mast cells are stimulated by immunoglobulin E (IgE) and specific antigen, but also by a number of neuropeptides such as neurotensin (NT), somatostatin or substance P (SP), to secrete numerous pro-inflammatory molecules that include histamine, cytokines and proteolytic enzymes.Chondroitin sulphate, a major constituent of connective tissues and of mast cell secretory granules, had a dose-dependent inhibitory effect on rat peritoneal mast cell release of histamine induced by the mast cell secretagogue compound 48/80 (48/80). This inhibition was stronger than that of the clinically available mast cell ‘stabilizer' disodium cromoglycate (cromolyn). Inhibition by chondroitin sulphate increased with the length of preincubation and persisted after the drug was washed off, while the effect of cromolyn was limited by rapid tachyphylaxis.Immunologic stimulation of histamine secretion from rat connective tissue mast cells (CTMC) was also inhibited, but this effect was weaker in umbilical cord-derived human mast cells and was absent in rat basophilic leukemia (RBL) cells which are considered homologous to mucosal mast cells (MMC). Oligo- and monosaccharides were not as effective as the polysaccharides.Inhibition, documented by light and electron microscopy, involved a decrease of intracellular calcium ion levels shown by confocal microscopy and image analysis. Autoradiography at the ultrastructural level showed that chondroitin sulphate was mostly associated with plasma and perigranular membranes.Chondroitin sulphate appears to be a potent mast cell inhibitor of allergic and nonimmune stimulation with potential clinical implications. PMID:11082109

  11. Human mast cells capture, store, and release bioactive, exogenous IL-17A.

    PubMed

    Noordenbos, Troy; Blijdorp, Iris; Chen, Sijia; Stap, Jan; Mul, Erik; Cañete, Juan D; Lubberts, Erik; Yeremenko, Nataliya; Baeten, Dominique

    2016-09-01

    IL-17A, a major proinflammatory cytokine, can be produced by a variety of leukocytes, but its exact cellular source in human inflammatory diseases remains incompletely understood. IL-17A protein is abundantly found in mast cells in human tissues, such as inflamed synovium, but surprisingly, mechanistic murine studies failed to demonstrate IL-17A production by mast cells. Here, we demonstrate that primary human tissue mast cells do not produce IL-17A themselves but actively capture exogenous IL-17A through receptor-mediated endocytosis. The exogenous IL-17A is stored in intracellular granules and can subsequently be released in a bioactive form. This novel mechanism confers to mast cells the capacity to steer IL-17A-mediated tissue inflammation by the rapid release of preformed cytokine. PMID:27034403

  12. Probing the Small-x Gluon Tomography in Correlated Hard Diffractive Dijet Production in Deep Inelastic Scattering.

    PubMed

    Hatta, Yoshitaka; Xiao, Bo-Wen; Yuan, Feng

    2016-05-20

    We investigate the close connection between the quantum phase space Wigner distribution of small-x gluons and the color dipole scattering amplitude, and we propose studying it experimentally in the hard diffractive dijet production at the planned electron-ion collider. The angular correlation between the nucleon recoiled momentum and the dijet transverse momentum probes the nontrivial correlation in the phase space Wigner distribution. This experimental study not only provides us with three-dimensional tomographic pictures of gluons inside high energy protons-it gives a unique and interesting signal for the small-x dynamics with QCD evolution effects. PMID:27258865

  13. Probing the Small-x Gluon Tomography in Correlated Hard Diffractive Dijet Production in Deep Inelastic Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatta, Yoshitaka; Xiao, Bo-Wen; Yuan, Feng

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the close connection between the quantum phase space Wigner distribution of small-x gluons and the color dipole scattering amplitude, and we propose studying it experimentally in the hard diffractive dijet production at the planned electron-ion collider. The angular correlation between the nucleon recoiled momentum and the dijet transverse momentum probes the nontrivial correlation in the phase space Wigner distribution. This experimental study not only provides us with three-dimensional tomographic pictures of gluons inside high energy protons—it gives a unique and interesting signal for the small-x dynamics with QCD evolution effects.

  14. Tespa1 negatively regulates FcεRI-mediated signaling and the mast cell–mediated allergic response

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Mingzhu; Qiu, Yuanjun; Guo, Chuansheng; Ji, Jian; Lei, Lei; Zhang, Xue; Liang, Jingjing; Lou, Jun; Huang, Wei; Dong, Bowen; Wu, Songquan; Wang, Jianli; Ke, Yuehai; Cao, Xuetao; Zhou, Yi Ting

    2014-01-01

    Antigen-mediated cross-linking of IgE on mast cells triggers a signaling cascade that results in their degranulation and proinflammatory cytokine production, which are key effectors in allergic reactions. We show that the activation of mast cells is negatively regulated by the newly identified adaptor protein Tespa1. Loss of Tespa1 in mouse mast cells led to hyper-responsiveness to stimulation via FcεRI. Mice lacking Tespa1 also displayed increased sensitivity to IgE-mediated allergic responses. The dysregulated signaling in KO mast cells was associated with increased activation of Grb2-PLC-γ1-SLP-76 signaling within the LAT1 (linker for activation of T cells family, member 1) signalosome versus the LAT2 signalosome. Collectively, these findings show that Tespa1 orchestrates mast cell activation by tuning the balance of LAT1 and LAT2 signalosome assembly. PMID:25422497

  15. Hard x-ray production from high intensity laser solid interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sefcik, J. A., LLNL

    1998-06-03

    Intense laser (> 10{sup 21} W/cm{sup 2}) driven hard x-ray sources offer a new alternative to conventional electron accelerator bremsstrahlung sources. These laser driven sources offer considerable simplicity in design and cost advantage for multiple axis views and have the potential for much higher spatial and temporal resolution than is achievable with accelerator sources We have begun a series of experiments using the Petawatt Laser system at LLNL to determine the potential of these sources for radiography applications Absolutely calibrated spectra extending to 20 MeV and high resolution radiographs through a {rho}r{>=}150 gm/cm{sup 2} have been obtained The physics of these sources and the scaling relationships and laser technology required to provide the dose levels necessary for radiography applications will be discussed Diagnostics of the laser produced electrons and photons will be addressed

  16. AN EMERGING ROLE FOR THE LIPID MEDIATOR SPHINGOSINE-1-PHOSPHATE IN MAST CELL EFFECTOR FUNCTION AND ALLERGIC DISEASE*

    PubMed Central

    Olivera, Ana; Rivera, Juan

    2011-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) plays important roles regulating functions of diverse biological systems, including the immune system. S1P affects immune cell function mostly by acting through its receptors at the cell membrane but it can also induce S1P receptor-independent responses in the cells where it is generated. S1P produced in allergically stimulated mast cells mediates degranulation, cytokine and lipid mediator production, and migration of mast cells towards antigen by mechanisms that are both S1P receptor-dependent and independent. Even in the absence of an antigen challenge, the differentiation and responsiveness of mast cells can be affected by chronic exposure to elevated S1P from a non-mast cell source, which may occur under pathophysiological conditions, potentially leading to the hyper-responsiveness of mast cells. The role of S1P extends beyond the regulation of the function of mast cells to the regulation of the surrounding or distal environment. S1P is exported out of antigen-stimulated mast cells and into the extracellular space and the resulting S1P gradient within the tissue may influence diverse surrounding tissue cells and several aspects of the allergic disease, such as inflammation or tissue remodeling. Furthermore, recent findings indicate that vasoactive mediators released systemically by mast cells induce the production of S1P in non-hematopoietic compartments, where it plays a role in regulating the vascular tone and reducing the hypotension characteristic of the anaphylactic shock and thus helping the recovery. The dual actions of S1P, promoting the immediate response of mast cells, while controlling the systemic consequences of mast cell activity will be discussed in detail. PMID:21713655

  17. Critical role of tissue mast cells in controlling long-term glucose sensor function in vivo.

    PubMed

    Klueh, Ulrike; Kaur, Manjot; Qiao, Yi; Kreutzer, Donald L

    2010-06-01

    Little is known about the specific cells, mediators and mechanisms involved in the loss of glucose sensor function (GSF) in vivo. Since mast cells (MC) are known to be key effector cells in inflammation and wound healing, we hypothesized that MC and their products are major contributors to the skin inflammation and wound healing that controls GSF at sites of sensor implantation. To test this hypothesis we utilized a murine model of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) in vivo in both normal C57BL/6 mice (mast cell sufficient), as well as mast cell deficient B6.Cg-Kit(W-sh)/HNihrJaeBsmJ (Sash) mice over a 28 day CGM period. As expected, both strains of mice displayed excellent CGM for the first 7 days post sensor implantation (PSI). CGM in the mast cell sufficient C57BL/6 mice was erratic over the remaining 21 days PSI. CGM in the mast cell deficient Sash mice displayed excellent sensor function for the entire 28 day of CGM. Histopathologic evaluation of implantation sites demonstrated that tissue reactions in Sash mice were dramatically less compared to the reactions in normal C57BL/6 mice. Additionally, mast cells were also seen to be consistently associated with the margins of sensor tissue reactions in normal C57BL/6 mice. Finally, direct injection of bone marrow derived mast cells at sites of sensor implantation induced an acute and dramatic loss of sensor function in both C57BL/6 and Sash mice. These results demonstrate the key role of mast cells in controlling glucose sensor function in vivo. PMID:20226521

  18. 44. VIEW OF UMBILICAL MAST AND LAUNCH PAD FROM SOUTHWEST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    44. VIEW OF UMBILICAL MAST AND LAUNCH PAD FROM SOUTHWEST. DOORS FOR THE UMBILICAL MAST TRENCH RAISED FOR MAINTENANCE POSITION OF 10 DEGREES. LAUNCHER IS RIGHT OF MAST; RAILS PARALLEL TO MAST. CONTROL PANELS LEFT TO RIGHT: ELECTRICAL PANEL, COMMUNICATIONS PANEL, AND MAST CONTROL PANEL. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  19. Mast cells, angiogenesis and cancer.

    PubMed

    Ribatti, Domenico; Crivellato, Enrico

    2011-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) were first described by Paul Ehrlich 1 in his doctoral thesis. MCs have long been implicated in the pathogenesis of allergic reactions and certain protective responses to parasites. As most tumors contain inflammatory cell infiltrates, which often include plentiful MCs, the question as to the possible contribution of MCs to tumor development has progressively been emerging. In this chapter, the specific involvement of MCs in tumor biology and tumor fate will be considered, with particular emphasis on the capacity of these cells to stimulate tumor growth by promoting angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis. Data from experimental carcinogenesis and from different tumor settings in human pathology will be summarized. Information to be presented will suggest that MCs may serve as a novel therapeutic target for cancer treatment. PMID:21713661

  20. Quantification of mast cells and blood vessels in the skin of patients with cutaneous mucinosis.

    PubMed

    Martins, Clarice; Nascimento, Adriana Paulino; Monte-Alto-Costa, Andréa; Alves, Maria de Fátima Scotelaro; Carneiro, Sueli Coelho; Porto, Luís Cristóvão de Moraes Sobrino

    2010-07-01

    Recent studies have suggested that mast cell numbers are increased in the skin of patients with cutaneous mucinosis and that these cells may have an important role in angiogenesis and production of mucin. Then, skin biopsies from 30 patients with cutaneous mucinosis (papular mucinosis, focal mucinosis, and mucinosis associated with lupus erythematosus) and from 10 healthy subjects were analyzed. Mast cells and blood vessels were immunolabeled with anti-tryptase and anti-CD34 antibodies, respectively, and then quantified stereologically. Counting was performed in papillary and reticular dermis. An increase in the number of mast cells was observed in the skin of patients with cutaneous mucinosis compared with the control group. Only minimal differences were observed in vessel stereology. There was no correlation between the increase in the number of mast cells and the number of blood vessels in the patients studied. There was no significant difference in the numbers of mast cells or blood vessels between the 3 subgroups of cutaneous mucinosis. Although many clinical forms of mucinosis have been described, neither mast cell number nor vessel distribution seems to distinguish the 3 different forms studied here.

  1. Impaired expression of the mitochondrial calcium uniporter suppresses mast cell degranulation.

    PubMed

    Furuno, Tadahide; Shinkai, Narumi; Inoh, Yoshikazu; Nakanishi, Mamoru

    2015-12-01

    Calcium ion (Ca(2+)) uptake into the mitochondrial matrix influences ATP production, Ca(2+) homeostasis, and apoptosis regulation. Ca(2+) uptake across the ion-impermeable inner mitochondrial membrane is mediated by the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter (MCU) complex. The MCU complex forms a pore structure composed of several proteins. MCU is a Ca(2+)-selective channel in the inner-mitochondrial membrane that allows electrophoretic Ca(2+) entry into the matrix. Mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake 1 (MICU1) functions as a Ca(2+)-sensing regulator of the MCU complex. Previously, by microscopic analysis at the single-cell level, we found that during mast cell activation, mitochondria capture cytosolic Ca(2+) in two steps. Consequently, mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake likely plays a role in cellular function through cytosolic Ca(2+) buffering. Here, we investigate the role of MCU and MICU1 in mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake and mast cell degranulation using MCU- and MICU1-knockdown (KD) mast cells. Whereas MCU- and MICU1-KD mast cells show normal proliferation rates and mitochondrial membrane potential, they exhibit slow and reduced cytosolic and mitochondrial Ca(2+) elevation after antigen stimulation. Moreover, β-hexosaminidase release induced by antigen was significantly suppressed in MCU-KD cells but not MICU1-KD cells. This suggests that both MCU and MICU1 are involved in mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake in mast cells, while MCU plays a role in mast cell degranulation.

  2. Ripe fruit of Rubus coreanus inhibits mast cell-mediated allergic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hui-Hun; Choi, Phil Hyung; Yoo, Jin-Su; Jeon, Hoon; Chae, Byeong-Suk; Park, Jeong-Suk; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Shin, Tae-Yong

    2012-02-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of a water extract of the ripe fruits of Rubus coreanus Miq. (Rosaceae) (RFRC) on mast cell-mediated allergic inflammation and studied the possible mechanism of action. Mast cell-mediated allergic disease is involved in many diseases such as anaphylaxis, rhinitis, asthma and atopic dermatitis. RFRC dose-dependently inhibited compound 48/80-induced systemic anaphylaxis and serum histamine release in mice. RFRC reduced the immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated local allergic reaction, passive cutaneous anaphylaxis. RFRC attenuated histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells and human mast cells by the reduction of intracellular calcium. RFRC decreased the phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and the calcium ionophore A23187 (PMACI)-stimulated expression and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines in human mast cells. The inhibitory effect of RFRC on cytokine production was nuclear factor (NF)-κB- and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-dependent. In addition, RFRC suppressed the activation of caspase-1. Our findings provide evidence that RFRC inhibits mast cell-derived allergic inflammatory reactions, and for the involvement of calcium, NF-κB, MAPKs and caspase-1 in these effects. Furthermore, in vivo and in vitro anti-allergic inflammatory effects of RFRC provide affirmative proof of a possible therapeutic application of this agent in allergic inflammatory diseases. PMID:22075758

  3. Benign mast cell hyperplasia and atypical mast cell infiltrates in penile lichen planus in adult men.

    PubMed

    Regauer, Sigrid; Beham-Schmid, Christine

    2014-08-01

    Introduction. Lichen planus (LP) is a chronic cytokine-mediated disease of possible auto-immune etiology. 25% of men have anogenital manifestations. Erosive penile LP causes a scarring phimosis of the foreskin in uncircumcised men. Mast cells as potent immune modulators have been implicated in a number of autoimmune and chronic inflammatory diseases, but have not been investigated in LP. Material and Methods. Formalin-fixed tissues of 117 circumcision specimens of adult men affected by LP were evaluated for the extent of mast cell and lymphocyte infiltrates, characterized immunohistochemically with antibodies to CD 3, 4, 8, 20, 21, 25, 30, 117c and human mast cell tryptase. Specimens with dense mast cell infiltrates were analyzed for point mutations of the c-kit gene (D816V). Results. Unaffected skin and modified mucosa of foreskins contained ⟨5 mast cells/mm². The inflammatory infiltrate of LP-lesions displayed ⟨15 mast cells/mm² in 33/117 foreskins, 16-40 mast cells/mm² in 22/117 and ⟩40 mast cells/mm² (average 70, range 40-100) in 62/117 foreskins. Lesional mast cells of 29/117 (24%) foreskins showed aberrant CD25-expression and/or spindled morphology, with 11/29 men having erosive LP, 13/29 a lymphocytic vasculitis and 1/28 a systemic mastocytosis. Neither CD30-expression nor c-kit mutations were identified. Atypical mast cell infiltrates in LP correlated with high disease activity, erosive LP and presence of lymphocytic vasculitis Conclusions. Increased mast cells in penile LP, mostly representing a benign hyperplasia/activation syndrome, suggests them as targets for innovative therapy options for symptomatic LP-patients not responding to corticosteroid therapy. Presently, the biological implications of atypical mast cell infiltrates in penile LP are unknown. PMID:24402730

  4. 4-Chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline inhibits activation of Syk kinase to suppress mast cells in vitro and mast cell-mediated passive cutaneous anaphylaxis in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Kui Lea; Ko, Na Young; Lee, Jun Ho; Kim, Do Kyun; Kim, Hyuk Soon; Kim, A-Ram; Her, Erk; Kim, Bokyung; Kim, Hyung Sik; Moon, Eun-Yi; Kim, Young Mi; Kim, Hang-Rae; Choi, Wahn Soo

    2011-12-15

    4-Chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline is a quinoxaline derivative. We aimed to study the effects of 4-chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline on activation of mast cells in vitro and in mice. 4-Chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline reversibly inhibited degranulation of mast cells in a dose-dependent manner, and also suppressed the expression and secretion of TNF-{alpha} and IL-4 in mast cells. Mechanistically, 4-chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline inhibited activating phosphorylation of Syk and LAT, which are crucial for early Fc{epsilon}RI-mediated signaling events, as well as Akt and MAP kinases, which play essential roles in the production of various pro-inflammatory cytokines in mast cells. Notably, although 4-chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline inhibited the activation of Fyn and Syk, minimal inhibition was observed in mast cells in the case of Lyn. Furthermore, consistent with its in vitro activity, 4-chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline significantly suppressed mast cell-mediated passive cutaneous anaphylaxis in mice. In summary, the results from this study demonstrate that 4-chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline shows an inhibitory effect on mast cells in vitro and in vivo, and that this is mediated by inhibiting the activation of Syk in mast cells. Therefore, 4-chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline could be useful in the treatment of mast cell-mediated allergic diseases. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 4-chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline is a quinoxaline derivative. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of 4-chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline on mast cells was investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 4-chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline reversibly inhibited Syk activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 4-chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline could be useful for IgE-mediated allergy.

  5. Lactic dehydrogenase virus infection enhances parasite egg production and inhibits eosinophil and mast cell responses in mice infected with the nematode Nippostrongylus brasiliensis.

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, M; Yamada, M; Arizono, N; Hayashi, T

    1998-01-01

    The effects of lactic dehydrogenase virus (LDV) infection on the protective immune responses to the nematode Nippostrongylus brasiliensis were studied. Mice with chronic LDV infection showed significantly higher levels of parasite egg production than non-LDV-infected (control) mice after N. brasiliensis infection. Concurrent LDV infection also suppressed peripheral blood eosinophilia and the lung mastocytosis induced by this nematode. LDV infection showed higher expression levels of the interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) mRNA in lymph nodes compared with control mice before N. brasiliensis infection. In addition, the IgG2a production in LDV-infected mice was higher than that in control mice before and after N. brasiliensis infection. These results suggest that LDV infection modulates protective immune responses against N. brasiliensis infection by the activation of T-helper type 1 cells. PMID:9659227

  6. Involvement of mast cells in systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Yukawa, Sonosuke; Yamaoka, Kunihiro; Sawamukai, Norifumi; Shimajiri, Shohei; Saito, Kazuyoshi; Tanaka, Yoshiya

    2010-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis is characterized by tissue fibrosis, obliterative microangiopathy and immune abnormalities. The etiology of SSc is largely unknown and is known to be resistant to existing corticosteroid and immunosuppressive drugs. Therefore, establishment of a treatment strategy especially for SSc patients with organ involvement is strongly desired. Mast cells are widely recognized as effector cells in allergic disorders and other IgE-mediated immune responses. However, recently, mast cells have become known to play a role in bridging innate immunity and adaptive immunity. Additionally, there is growing evidence of mast cell to be involved in pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis, and is expected as a novel therapeutic target. We describe here the role of mast cell in SSc pathology and suggest as a novel therapeutic target.

  7. Mast cell proteases as pharmacological targets.

    PubMed

    Caughey, George H

    2016-05-01

    Mast cells are rich in proteases, which are the major proteins of intracellular granules and are released with histamine and heparin by activated cells. Most of these proteases are active in the granule as well as outside of the mast cell when secreted, and can cleave targets near degranulating mast cells and in adjoining tissue compartments. Some proteases released from mast cells reach the bloodstream and may have far-reaching actions. In terms of relative amounts, the major mast cell proteases include the tryptases, chymases, cathepsin G, carboxypeptidase A3, dipeptidylpeptidase I/cathepsin C, and cathepsins L and S. Some mast cells also produce granzyme B, plasminogen activators, and matrix metalloproteinases. Tryptases and chymases are almost entirely mast cell-specific, whereas other proteases, such as cathepsins G, C, and L are expressed by a variety of inflammatory cells. Carboxypeptidase A3 expression is a property shared by basophils and mast cells. Other proteases, such as mastins, are largely basophil-specific, although human basophils are protease-deficient compared with their murine counterparts. The major classes of mast cell proteases have been targeted for development of therapeutic inhibitors. Also, a human β-tryptase has been proposed as a potential drug itself, to inactivate of snake venins. Diseases linked to mast cell proteases include allergic diseases, such as asthma, eczema, and anaphylaxis, but also include non-allergic diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease, autoimmune arthritis, atherosclerosis, aortic aneurysms, hypertension, myocardial infarction, heart failure, pulmonary hypertension and scarring diseases of lungs and other organs. In some cases, studies performed in mouse models suggest protective or homeostatic roles for specific proteases (or groups of proteases) in infections by bacteria, worms and other parasites, and even in allergic inflammation. At the same time, a clearer picture has emerged of differences in the

  8. A mast-seeding desert shrub regulates population dynamics and behavior of its heteromyid dispersers.

    PubMed

    Auger, Janene; Meyer, Susan E; Jenkins, Stephen H

    2016-04-01

    Granivorous rodent populations in deserts are primarily regulated through precipitation-driven resource pulses rather than pulses associated with mast-seeding, a pattern more common in mesic habitats. We studied heteromyid responses to mast-seeding in the desert shrub blackbrush (Coleogyne ramosissima), a regionally dominant species in the Mojave-Great Basin Desert transition zone. In a 5-year study at Arches National Park, Utah, USA, we quantified spatiotemporal variation in seed resources in mast and intermast years in blackbrush-dominated and mixed desert vegetation and measured responses of Dipodomys ordii (Ord's kangaroo rat) and Perognathus flavescens (plains pocket mouse). In blackbrush-dominated vegetation, blackbrush seeds comprised >79% of seed production in a mast year, but 0% in the first postmast year. Kangaroo rat abundance in blackbrush-dominated vegetation was highest in the mast year, declined sharply at the end of the first postmast summer, and then remained at low levels for 3 years. Pocket mouse abundance was not as strongly associated with blackbrush seed production. In mixed desert vegetation, kangaroo rat abundance was higher and more uniform through time. Kangaroo rats excluded the smaller pocket mice from resource-rich patches including a pipeline disturbance and also moved their home range centers closer to this disturbance in a year of low blackbrush seed production. Home range size for kangaroo rats was unrelated to seed resource density in the mast year, but resource-poor home ranges were larger (P < 0.001) in the first postmast year, when resources were limiting. Blackbrush seeds are higher in protein and fat but lower in carbohydrates than the more highly preferred seeds of Indian ricegrass (Achnatherum hymenoides) and have similar energy value per unit of handling time. Kangaroo rats cached seeds of these two species in similar spatial configurations, implying that they were equally valued as stored food resources. Blackbrush mast

  9. A mast-seeding desert shrub regulates population dynamics and behavior of its heteromyid dispersers.

    PubMed

    Auger, Janene; Meyer, Susan E; Jenkins, Stephen H

    2016-04-01

    Granivorous rodent populations in deserts are primarily regulated through precipitation-driven resource pulses rather than pulses associated with mast-seeding, a pattern more common in mesic habitats. We studied heteromyid responses to mast-seeding in the desert shrub blackbrush (Coleogyne ramosissima), a regionally dominant species in the Mojave-Great Basin Desert transition zone. In a 5-year study at Arches National Park, Utah, USA, we quantified spatiotemporal variation in seed resources in mast and intermast years in blackbrush-dominated and mixed desert vegetation and measured responses of Dipodomys ordii (Ord's kangaroo rat) and Perognathus flavescens (plains pocket mouse). In blackbrush-dominated vegetation, blackbrush seeds comprised >79% of seed production in a mast year, but 0% in the first postmast year. Kangaroo rat abundance in blackbrush-dominated vegetation was highest in the mast year, declined sharply at the end of the first postmast summer, and then remained at low levels for 3 years. Pocket mouse abundance was not as strongly associated with blackbrush seed production. In mixed desert vegetation, kangaroo rat abundance was higher and more uniform through time. Kangaroo rats excluded the smaller pocket mice from resource-rich patches including a pipeline disturbance and also moved their home range centers closer to this disturbance in a year of low blackbrush seed production. Home range size for kangaroo rats was unrelated to seed resource density in the mast year, but resource-poor home ranges were larger (P < 0.001) in the first postmast year, when resources were limiting. Blackbrush seeds are higher in protein and fat but lower in carbohydrates than the more highly preferred seeds of Indian ricegrass (Achnatherum hymenoides) and have similar energy value per unit of handling time. Kangaroo rats cached seeds of these two species in similar spatial configurations, implying that they were equally valued as stored food resources. Blackbrush mast

  10. Amarogentin Displays Immunomodulatory Effects in Human Mast Cells and Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wölfle, Ute; Haarhaus, Birgit; Schempp, Christoph M.

    2015-01-01

    Keratinocytes express the bitter taste receptors TAS2R1 and TAS2R38. Amarogentin as an agonist for TAS2R1 and other TAS2Rs promotes keratinocyte differentiation. Similarly, mast cells are known to express bitter taste receptors. The aim of this study was to assess whether bitter compounds display immunomodulatory effects on these immunocompetent cells in the skin, so that they might be a target in chronic inflammatory diseases such as atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. Here, we investigated the impact of amarogentin on substance P-induced release of histamine and TNF-α from the human mast cell line LAD-2. Furthermore, the effect of amarogentin on HaCaT keratinocytes costimulated with TNF-α and histamine was investigated. Amarogentin inhibited in LAD-2 cells substance P-induced production of newly synthesized TNF-α, but the degranulation and release of stored histamine were not affected. In HaCaT keratinocytes histamine and TNF-α induced IL-8 and MMP-1 expression was reduced by amarogentin to a similar extent as with azelastine. In conclusion amarogentin displays immunomodulatory effects in the skin by interacting with mast cells and keratinocytes. PMID:26600671

  11. The Role of Mast Cells in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Shaik-Dasthagirisaheb, Yasdani B; Conti, Pio

    2016-01-01

    Immunity and inflammation are deeply involved in Alzheimer's disease. The most important properties of pathological Alzheimer's disease are the extracellular deposits of amyloid â-protein plaque aggregates along with other unknown mutated proteins, which are implicated in immunity and inflammation. Mast cells are found in the brain of all mammalian species and in the periphery, and their biological mediators, including cytokines/chemokines, arachidonic acid products and stored enzymes, play an import role in Alzheimer's disease. Cytokines/chemokines, which are generated mostly by microglia and astrocytes in Alzheimer's disease, contribute to nearly every aspect of neuroinflammation and amyloid â-protein plaque aggregates may induce in mast cells the release of a plethora of mediators, including pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines such as interleukin-1, interleukin-6, interleukin-8, interleukin-10, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, vascular endothelial growth factor, transforming growth factor beta, CXCL8 and CCL2-3-4. These proinflammatory cytokines/chemokines are prominent mediators of neuroinflammation in brain disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, and their inhibition may be associated with improved recovery. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge regarding the roles of mast cell mediators (stored and de novo synthesis) in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27629855

  12. Acrolein induction of oxidative stress and degranulation in mast cells.

    PubMed

    Hochman, Daniel J; Collaco, Christopher R; Brooks, Edward G

    2014-08-01

    Increases in asthma worldwide have been associated epidemiologically with expanding urban air pollution. The mechanistic relationship between airway hyper-responsiveness, inflammation, and ambient airborne triggers remains ambiguous. Acrolein, a ubiquitous aldehyde pollutant, is a product of incomplete combustion reactions. Acrolein is abundant in cigarette smoke, effluent from industrial smokestacks, diesel exhaust, and even hot oil cooking vapors. Acrolein is a potent airway irritant and can induce airway hyper-responsiveness and inflammation in the lungs of animal models. In the present study, we utilized the mast cell analog, RBL-2H3, to interrogate the responses of cells relevant to airway inflammation and allergic responses as a model for the induction of asthma-like conditions upon exposure to acrolein. We hypothesized that acrolein would induce oxidative stress and degranulation in airway mast cells. Our results indicate that acrolein at 1 ppm initiated degranulation and promoted the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Introduction of antioxidants to the system significantly reduced both ROS generation and degranulation. At higher levels of exposure (above 100 ppm), RBL-2H3 cells displayed signs of severe toxicity. This experimental data indicates acrolein can induce an allergic inflammation in mast cell lines, and the initiation of degranulation was moderated by the application of antioxidants.

  13. Amarogentin Displays Immunomodulatory Effects in Human Mast Cells and Keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Wölfle, Ute; Haarhaus, Birgit; Schempp, Christoph M

    2015-01-01

    Keratinocytes express the bitter taste receptors TAS2R1 and TAS2R38. Amarogentin as an agonist for TAS2R1 and other TAS2Rs promotes keratinocyte differentiation. Similarly, mast cells are known to express bitter taste receptors. The aim of this study was to assess whether bitter compounds display immunomodulatory effects on these immunocompetent cells in the skin, so that they might be a target in chronic inflammatory diseases such as atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. Here, we investigated the impact of amarogentin on substance P-induced release of histamine and TNF-α from the human mast cell line LAD-2. Furthermore, the effect of amarogentin on HaCaT keratinocytes costimulated with TNF-α and histamine was investigated. Amarogentin inhibited in LAD-2 cells substance P-induced production of newly synthesized TNF-α, but the degranulation and release of stored histamine were not affected. In HaCaT keratinocytes histamine and TNF-α induced IL-8 and MMP-1 expression was reduced by amarogentin to a similar extent as with azelastine. In conclusion amarogentin displays immunomodulatory effects in the skin by interacting with mast cells and keratinocytes. PMID:26600671

  14. The Role of Mast Cells in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Shaik-Dasthagirisaheb, Yasdani B; Conti, Pio

    2016-01-01

    Immunity and inflammation are deeply involved in Alzheimer's disease. The most important properties of pathological Alzheimer's disease are the extracellular deposits of amyloid â-protein plaque aggregates along with other unknown mutated proteins, which are implicated in immunity and inflammation. Mast cells are found in the brain of all mammalian species and in the periphery, and their biological mediators, including cytokines/chemokines, arachidonic acid products and stored enzymes, play an import role in Alzheimer's disease. Cytokines/chemokines, which are generated mostly by microglia and astrocytes in Alzheimer's disease, contribute to nearly every aspect of neuroinflammation and amyloid â-protein plaque aggregates may induce in mast cells the release of a plethora of mediators, including pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines such as interleukin-1, interleukin-6, interleukin-8, interleukin-10, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, vascular endothelial growth factor, transforming growth factor beta, CXCL8 and CCL2-3-4. These proinflammatory cytokines/chemokines are prominent mediators of neuroinflammation in brain disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, and their inhibition may be associated with improved recovery. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge regarding the roles of mast cell mediators (stored and de novo synthesis) in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease.

  15. Hard Surface Biocontrol in Hospitals Using Microbial-Based Cleaning Products

    PubMed Central

    Vandini, Alberta; Temmerman, Robin; Frabetti, Alessia; Caselli, Elisabetta; Antonioli, Paola; Balboni, Pier Giorgio; Platano, Daniela; Branchini, Alessio; Mazzacane, Sante

    2014-01-01

    Background Healthcare-Associated Infections (HAIs) are one of the most frequent complications occurring in healthcare facilities. Contaminated environmental surfaces provide an important potential source for transmission of many healthcare-associated pathogens, thus indicating the need for new and sustainable strategies. Aim This study aims to evaluate the effect of a novel cleaning procedure based on the mechanism of biocontrol, on the presence and survival of several microorganisms responsible for HAIs (i.e. coliforms, Staphyloccus aureus, Clostridium difficile, and Candida albicans) on hard surfaces in a hospital setting. Methods The effect of microbial cleaning, containing spores of food grade Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus pumilus and Bacillus megaterium, in comparison with conventional cleaning protocols, was evaluated for 24 weeks in three independent hospitals (one in Belgium and two in Italy) and approximately 20000 microbial surface samples were collected. Results Microbial cleaning, as part of the daily cleaning protocol, resulted in a reduction of HAI-related pathogens by 50 to 89%. This effect was achieved after 3–4 weeks and the reduction in the pathogen load was stable over time. Moreover, by using microbial or conventional cleaning alternatively, we found that this effect was directly related to the new procedure, as indicated by the raise in CFU/m2 when microbial cleaning was replaced by the conventional procedure. Although many questions remain regarding the actual mechanisms involved, this study demonstrates that microbial cleaning is a more effective and sustainable alternative to chemical cleaning and non-specific disinfection in healthcare facilities. Conclusions This study indicates microbial cleaning as an effective strategy in continuously lowering the number of HAI-related microorganisms on surfaces. The first indications on the actual level of HAIs in the trial hospitals monitored on a continuous basis are very promising, and may pave the

  16. Hard photon production and matrix-element parton-shower merging

    SciTech Connect

    Hoeche, Stefan; Schumann, Steffen; Siegert, Frank

    2010-02-01

    We present a Monte Carlo approach to prompt-photon production, where photons and QCD partons are treated democratically. The photon fragmentation function is modeled by an interleaved QCD+QED parton shower. This known technique is improved by including higher-order real-emission matrix elements. To this end, we extend a recently proposed algorithm for merging matrix elements and truncated parton showers. We exemplify the quality of the Monte Carlo predictions by comparing them to measurements of the photon fragmentation function at LEP and to measurements of prompt photon and diphoton production from the Tevatron experiments.

  17. Scale-up of thermally dried kefir production as starter culture for hard-type cheese making: an economic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Koutinas, Athanasios A; Bekatorou, Argyro; Katechaki, Eleftheria; Dimitrellou, Dimitra; Kopsahelis, Nikolaos; Papapostolou, Harris; Panas, Panayiotis; Sideris, Kostas; Kallis, Mihalis; Bosnea, Loulouda A; Koliopoulos, Dionisis; Sotiropoulos, Panayiotis; Panteli, Ageliki; Kourkoutas, Yiannis; Kanellaki, Maria; Soupioni, Magdalini

    2010-03-01

    This paper concerns the effect of thermal-drying methodology on the investment cost for dried kefir cells production in order to be used as starter culture in cheese manufacturing. Kefir cells were produced at pilot plant scale using a 250-L bioreactor and whey as the main substrate. Kefir cells were subsequently dried in a thermal dryer at 38 degrees C and used as a starter culture in industrial-scale production of hard-type cheeses. The use of thermally dried kefir as starter culture accelerated ripening of cheeses by increasing both lipolysis and fermentation rate as indicated by the ethanol, lactic acid, and glycerol formation. Additionally, it reduced coliforms and enterobacteria as ripening proceeded. This constituted the basis of developing an economic study in which industrial-scale production of thermally dried kefir starter culture is discussed. The industrial design involved a three-step process using three bioreactors of 100, 3,000, and 30,000 L for a plant capacity of 300 kg of thermally dried kefir culture per day. The cost of investment was estimated at 238,000 euro, which is the 46% of the corresponding cost using freeze-drying methodology. Production cost was estimated at 4.9 euro/kg of kefir biomass for a 300-kg/day plant capacity, which is the same as with the corresponding cost of freeze-dried cells. However, the estimated added value is up to 10.8 x 10(9) euro within the European Union.

  18. Heavy ion precompound phenomena: A glance at hard gamma and subthreshold pion production

    SciTech Connect

    Blann, M.; Remington, B.A.

    1987-08-01

    We test a relaxation model based on two body nucleon-nucleon scattering processes to interpret phenomena observed in heavy ion reactions. We use the Boltzmann master equation to accomplish this. By assuming that the projectile nucleons share the total excitation with equal a-priori probability of all configurations, we are able to reproduce several sets of neutron spectra from /sup 20/Ne and /sup 12/C induced reactions on /sup 165/Ho. With no additional free parameters our model successfully reproduces subthreshold pion production cross sections, high energy ..gamma..-ray spectra, and angular distributions of high energy ..gamma..-rays. 40 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Dual topological unitarization of hard and soft hadronic cross sections: A new approach to multiparticle production at hadron colliders in the TeV energy range

    SciTech Connect

    Ranft, J.; Hahn, K. . SSC Central Design Group); Aurenche, P.; Maire, P. . Lab. de Physique des Particules Elementaires); Bopp, F. . Fachbereich Physik); Capella, A.; Tran Thanh Van, J. . Lab. de Physique Theorique et Particules Elementaires); Kwi

    1987-12-01

    The dual topological unitarization of hard and soft hadronic collisions is formulated as a Monte-Carlo event generator for events containing both the soft (low p{perpendicular}) and hard (jets, minijets) component of hadron production. The parameters of the model are determined from fits to the energy dependence of the total and inelastic hadron cross-sections and from the predictions of the QCD-parton model for the perturbative hard constituent scattering cross sections. The properties of the model are studied. Good agreement of the model predictions is found with data at present accelerator and collider energies. The predictions of the model for TeV colliders are presented. Interesting changes of the produced multiparticle system are formed when selecting classes of events with and without hard jets or minijets. 35 refs., 22 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Effect of fruits of Opuntia elatior Mill on mast cell degranulation

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Sanjay P.; Sheth, N. R.; Suhagia, B. N.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The presence of potentially active nutrients and their multifunctional properties make prickly pear a perfect candidate for the production of phytopharmaceutical products. Among the numerous Opuntia species, bioactive compounds have been isolated and characterized primarily from Opuntia ficus-indica, Opuntia polycantha, Opuntia stricta, Opuntia dilleni for various medicinal properties. Objective: Based on the traditional use of prickly pear for enhancement of immune function, the objective of the present study to evaluate the effect of prickly pear on mast cell degranulation function. Materials and Methods: The Opuntia fruit juice (OFJ) (10-200 μl/ml) were studied for the effect on sensitized rat peritoneal mast cell degranulation induced by immunological (egg albumin), and nonimmunological (compound 48/80) stimuli and compared with that of the reference standard, sodium cromoglycate and ketotifen (10 μg/ml). Results and Conclusion: The OFJ exhibited significantly (P < 0.001) concentration dependent inhibition of mast cell degranulation. The IC50 value of OFJ was found 12.24 and 18 μl/ml for immunological and nonimmunological induced mast cell degranulation, respectively. The betacyanin is an active principle compound in prickly pear that may responsible for mast cell stabilizing action. PMID:25883521

  1. Mast cells drive mesenteric afferent signalling during acute intestinal ischaemia

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wen; Kirkup, Anthony J; Grundy, David

    2011-01-01

    of mesenteric afferents during acute intestinal ischaemia, whereas enteric reflex mechanisms and cyclooxygenase products contribute primarily to ischaemia-induced changes in intestinal motility. Therefore, targeting mast cells may provide benefits in patients with abdominal pain resulting from an ischaemic insult to the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:21669977

  2. Development and production of hard X-ray multilayer optics for HEFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koglin, Jason E.; Christensen, Finn E.; Chonko, Jim; Craig, William W.; Decker, Todd R.; Jimenez-Garate, Mario A.; Gunderson, Kurt S.; Hailey, Charles J.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Jensen, Carsten P.; Sileo, Mike; Windt, David L.; Yu, Haitao

    2003-03-01

    The High Energy Focusing Telescope (HEFT) will observe a wide range of objects including young supernova remnants, active galactic nuclei, and galaxy clusters at energies between 20 and 70 keV. Large collecting areas are achieved by tightly nesting layers of grazing incidence mirrors in a conic approximation Wolter-I design. The segmented mirrors that form these layers are made of thermally formed glass substrates coated with depth-graded multilayer films for enhanced reflectivity. The mirrors are assembled using an over-constraint method that forces the overall shape of the nominally cylindrical substrates to the appropriate conic form. We will present performance data on the HEFT optics and report the current status of the assembly production.

  3. Mast cell activation and neutrophil recruitment promotes early and robust inflammation in the meninges in EAE.

    PubMed

    Christy, Alison L; Walker, Margaret E; Hessner, Martin J; Brown, Melissa A

    2013-05-01

    The meninges are often considered inert tissues that house the CSF and provide protection for the brain and spinal cord. Yet emerging data demonstrates that they are also active sites of immune responses. Furthermore, the blood-CSF barrier surrounding meningeal blood vessels, together with the blood-brain barrier (BBB), is postulated to serve as a gateway for the pathological infiltration of immune cells into the CNS in multiple sclerosis (MS). Our previous studies using mast cell-deficient (Kit(W/Wv)) mice demonstrated that mast cells resident in the dura mater and pia mater exacerbate experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a rodent model of MS, by facilitating CNS inflammatory cell influx. Here we examined the underlying mechanisms that mediate these effects. We demonstrate that there are dramatic alterations in immune associated gene expression in the meninges in pre-clinical disease, including those associated with mast cell and neutrophil function. Meningeal mast cells are activated within 24 h of disease induction, but do not directly compromise CNS vascular integrity. Rather, through production of TNF, mast cells elicit an early influx of neutrophils, cells known to alter vascular permeability, into the meninges. These data add to the growing evidence that inflammation in the meninges precedes CNS immune cell infiltration and establish that mast cells are among the earliest participants in these disease-initiating events. We hypothesize that mast cell-dependent neutrophil recruitment and activation in the meninges promotes early breakdown of the local BBB and CSF-blood barrier allowing initial immune cell access to the CNS.

  4. Inhibitory effect of putranjivain A on allergic inflammation through suppression of mast cell activation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hui-Hun; Park, Seung-Bin; Lee, Soyoung; Kwon, Taeg Kyu; Shin, Tae-Yong; Park, Pil-Hoon; Lee, Seung-Ho; Kim, Sang-Hyun

    2014-02-01

    A great number of people are suffering from allergic inflammatory disease such as asthma, atopic dermatitis, and sinusitis. Therefore discovery of drugs for the treatment of these diseases is an important subject in human health. Putranjivain A (PJA), member of ellagitannin, is known to possess beneficial effects including anti-cancer and anti-viral activities. The aim of the present study was to elucidate whether PJA modulates the allergic inflammatory reaction and to study its possible mechanisms of action using mast cell-based in vitro and in vivo models. The study was performed in anaphylaxis mouse model and cultured mast cells. PJA inhibited the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in immunoglobulin E-stimulated mast cells. PJA reduced this expression by inhibiting nuclear factor (NF)-κB and nuclear factor of activated T cell. The oral administration of PJA reduced systemic and cutaneous anaphylaxis, the release of serum histamine, and the expression of the histamine H{sub 1} receptor. In addition, PJA attenuated the activation of mast cells. PJA inhibited the release of histamine from various types of mast cells by the suppression of intracellular calcium. The inhibitory activity of PJA on the allergic reaction was similar to that of disodium cromoglycate, a known anti-allergic drug. These results suggest that PJA can facilitate the prevention or treatment of allergic inflammatory diseases mediated by mast cells. - Highlights: • PJA reduced the degranulation of mast cells. • PJA inhibited the production of inflammatory cytokines. • The effect of PJA on allergic reaction was comparable to the DSCG. • PJA might be a candidate for the treatment of allergic inflammatory diseases.

  5. Mast cells exert pro-inflammatory effects of relevance to the pathophyisology of tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction We have previously found an increased mast cell density in tendon biopsies from patients with patellar tendinopathy compared to controls. This study examined the influence of mast cells on basic tenocyte functions, including production of the inflammatory mediator prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), extracellular matrix remodeling and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) gene transcription, and collagen synthesis. Methods Primary human tenocytes were stimulated with an established human mast cell line (HMC-1). Extracellular matrix remodeling was studied by culturing tenocytes in a three-dimensional collagen lattice. Survival/proliferation was assessed with the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium salt (MTS) assay. Levels of mRNA for COX-2, COL1A1, MMP1, and MMP7 were determined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Cox-2 protein level was assessed by Western blot analysis and type I procollagen was detected by immunofluorescent staining. PGE2 levels were determined using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results Mast cells stimulated tenocytes to produce increased levels of COX-2 and the pro-inflammatory mediator PGE2, which in turn decreased COL1A1 mRNA expression. Additionally, mast cells reduced the type I procollagen protein levels produced by tenocytes. Transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) was responsible for the induction of Cox-2 and PGE2 by tenocytes. Mast cells increased MMP1 and MMP7 transcription and increased the contraction of a three-dimensional collagen lattice by tenocytes, a phenomenon which was blocked by a pan-MMP inhibitor (Batimastat). Conclusion Our data demonstrate that mast cell-derived PGE2 reduces collagen synthesis and enhances expression and activities of MMPs in human tenocytes. PMID:24517261

  6. Immunomodulation of mast cells by nutrients.

    PubMed

    Hagenlocher, Yvonne; Lorentz, Axel

    2015-01-01

    In the past decades an increasing prevalence of allergic disorders was observed in industrialized countries. Thus, it is necessary to develop adequate therapeutic and preventive strategies. Many of the conservative strategies possess diverse harmful side effects. Therefore agents with fewer side effects and a better compliance among afflicted patients would be of interest. Especially substances with natural origin acting immunomodulatory on mast cells - the key effector cells of allergic diseases - could be used. Among them there are components of the daily diet such as distinct fatty acids and amino acids as well as a range of secondary plant substances such as carotenoids, flavonoids and spices. These nutritional substances could be applied as nutraceuticals in the therapy of mast cell associated diseases. Many of these substances show inhibitory influences on the release of prestored mast cell mediators such as histamine or de novo expression of mast cell mediators such as cytokines and eicosanoids which are involved in the pathogenesis of mast cell associated inflammatory conditions like allergic reactions.

  7. Vaccine adjuvants: Tailor-made mast-cell granules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunzer, Matthias

    2012-03-01

    Mast cells induce protective immune responses through secretion of stimulatory granules. Microparticles modelled after mast-cell granules are now shown to replicate and enhance the functions of their natural counterparts and to direct the character of the resulting immunity.

  8. Singular Values for Products of Complex Ginibre Matrices with a Source: Hard Edge Limit and Phase Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrester, Peter J.; Liu, Dang-Zheng

    2016-05-01

    The singular values squared of the random matrix product {Y = {Gr G_{r-1}} ldots G1 (G0 + A)}, where each {Gj} is a rectangular standard complex Gaussian matrix while A is non-random, are shown to be a determinantal point process with the correlation kernel given by a double contour integral. When all but finitely many eigenvalues of A* A are equal to bN, the kernel is shown to admit a well-defined hard edge scaling, in which case a critical value is established and a phase transition phenomenon is observed. More specifically, the limiting kernel in the subcritical regime of {0 < b < 1} is independent of b, and is in fact the same as that known for the case b = 0 due to Kuijlaars and Zhang. The critical regime of b = 1 allows for a double scaling limit by choosing {{b = (1 - τ/√{N})^{-1}}}, and for this the critical kernel and outlier phenomenon are established. In the simplest case r = 0, which is closely related to non-intersecting squared Bessel paths, a distribution corresponding to the finite shifted mean LUE is proven to be the scaling limit in the supercritical regime of {b > 1} with two distinct scaling rates. Similar results also hold true for the random matrix product {Tr T_{r-1} ldots T1 (G0 + A)}, with each {Tj} being a truncated unitary matrix.

  9. Lung mast cells in plexogenic pulmonary arteriopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Heath, D; Yacoub, M

    1991-01-01

    The numbers of mast cells/mm2 of lung parenchyma were counted in four controls, 15 cases of primary plexogenic pulmonary arteriopathy (PPA), and 17 cases in which the arteriopathy was secondary to congenital heart disease, to determine if increased numbers occur in PPA and with what stage of disease they might be associated. Considerable accumulations of lung mast cells may occur in this disease, but these are not closely related to any particular histological stage in the development of the arteriopathy. It is postulated that while mast cells could conceivably exert a vasodilatory effect on constricted small pulmonary arteries, it seems more likely that they are part of the parenchymal changes that commonly develop in this disease. Images PMID:1791199

  10. Mast Cell-Mediated Mechanisms of Nociception

    PubMed Central

    Aich, Anupam; Afrin, Lawrence B.; Gupta, Kalpna

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells are tissue-resident immune cells that release immuno-modulators, chemo-attractants, vasoactive compounds, neuropeptides and growth factors in response to allergens and pathogens constituting a first line of host defense. The neuroimmune interface of immune cells modulating synaptic responses has been of increasing interest, and mast cells have been proposed as key players in orchestrating inflammation-associated pain pathobiology due to their proximity to both vasculature and nerve fibers. Molecular underpinnings of mast cell-mediated pain can be disease-specific. Understanding such mechanisms is critical for developing disease-specific targeted therapeutics to improve analgesic outcomes. We review molecular mechanisms that may contribute to nociception in a disease-specific manner. PMID:26690128

  11. Human lung fibroblasts express interleukin-6 in response to signaling after mast cell contact.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, S Matthew; Lee, Steven A; Hall, H Kenton; Chi, David S; Krishnaswamy, Guha

    2004-04-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways. Mast cell-derived cytokines may mediate both airway inflammation and remodeling. It has also been shown that fibroblasts can be the source of proinflammatory cytokines. In the human airways, mast cell-fibroblast interactions may have pivotal effects on modulating inflammation. To study this further, we cocultured normal human lung fibroblasts (NHLF) with a human mast cell line (HMC-1) and assayed for production of interleukin (IL)-6, an important proinflammatory cytokine. When cultured together, NHLF/HMC-1 contact induced IL-6 secretion. Separation of HMC-1 and NHLF cells by a porous membrane inhibited this induction. HMC-1-derived cellular membranes caused an increase in IL-6 production in NHLF. Activation of p38 MAPK was also seen in cocultures by Western blot, whereas IL-6 production in cocultures was significantly inhibited by the p38 inhibitor SB203580. IL-6 production in cocultures was minimally inhibited by a chemical inhibitor of nuclear factor-kappaB (Bay11), indicating that nuclear factor-kappaB may have a minimal role in signaling IL-6 production in mast cell/fibroblasts cocultures. Blockade of inter-cellular adhesion molecule-1, tumor necrosis factor-RI, and surface IL-1beta with neutralizing antibodies failed to significantly decrease IL-6 production in our coculture, indicating that other receptor-ligand associations may be responsible for this activation. These novel studies reveal the importance of cell-cell interactions in the complex milieu of airway inflammation.

  12. Mast cells contribute to fibrin deposition in reverse passive Arthus reaction in mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Ramos, B F; Zhang, Y; Jakschik, B A

    1992-09-01

    The activation of the clotting system is an important process during inflammation to contain the injury and initiate tissue repair. In the present study, we investigated the effect of mast cells on fibrin deposition in reverse passive Arthus reaction in mast cell-deficient WBB6F1-W/Wv(W/Wv) and control WBB6F1-(+)/+(+/+) mice, that were given 125I-labeled fibrogen intravenousty. An antibody dose-dependent increase in radioactivity was observed in the challenged skin sites. Sequential water and urea extractions characterized the radioiodinated fibrinogen derivatives present in the tissue. The radioactivity found in the various fractions of the stimulated samples from +/+ was 2-10-fold higher than that in specimens from W/Wv mice. The greatest difference was observed in the urea-insoluble pellet (cross-linked fibrin and its early degradation products). Reconstitution of W/Wv mice with mast cells augmented the response to levels similar to those in +/+ mice. Pretreatment with the antihistamine pyrilamine blocked the accumulation of 125I-labeled fibrinogen and its derivatives by approximately 70% in +/+ but not in W/Wv mice. Inhibition of leukotriene synthesis by A-63162 markedly decreased the accumulation of iodinated fibrinogen in both +/+ and W/Wv mice. The data suggest that mast cells and their vasoactive mediator histamine contribute to the exudation of clotting factors, which results in fibrin deposition and that mast cells also enhance fibrin cross-linkage.

  13. Identification and characterization of the inducible murine mast cell gene, imc-415.

    PubMed

    Cho, S H; Cho, J J; Kim, I S; Vliagoftis, H; Metcalfe, D D; Oh, C K

    1998-11-01

    Activation of mast cells results in the generation and release of bioactive mediators which in turn initiate allergic inflammation. Mast cell function is enhanced following stimulation in part because of the induction of specific genes and their products. To identify additional genes induced in mast cells that support this process, we thus constructed an activation-specific mast cell subtraction library. To date, we have isolated 26 novel inducible murine mast cell (imc) cDNA clones. Among them, a full-coding region of the murine gene imc-415 was found to have a greater than 90% nucleotide sequence homology and a 97.5% amino acid sequence homology to both a human beta4 integrin-binding protein (p27(BBP)) and a human translation initiation factor 6 (eIF6), which in turn are identical. In vitro translation of the imc-415 gene yielded a band of an approximately 26 kDa. This is the same as the calculated molecular weight of murine IMC-415 protein based on the predicted amino acid sequence and is the molecular weight of p27(BBP)/eIF6. Murine imc-415 message was also induced in inflamed lung tissues in a mouse model of asthma. These results suggest a role for murine imc-415 in allergic inflammation where it may enhance protein synthesis. Human eIF6/p27(BBP) may also play a role in allergic diseases based on the similarities in sequence and in gene expression patterns.

  14. [Mast cell-derived exosome participates in acupoint-stimulation initiated local network activities].

    PubMed

    Chen, Bo; Li, Ming-yue; Guo, Yi; Zhao, Xue; Liu, Yang-yang

    2015-02-01

    The exosome, released from mast cells, T cells, B cells and many other types of cells, is the common form of vesicle transportation between cells and participates in the exchange of information between cells, and may be also involved in acupuncture induced clinical effects. In the present paper, the authors reviewed recent development of researches on this field from 1) acupuncture stimulation induces changes of number and function of mast cells in the local acupoint area, probably being the key factor for initiating acupuncture effect; 2) acupuncture stimulation induces release of neurotransmitters, hormones, cytokines, Ca2+, etc., in the local acupoint region, possibly being closely associated with the production of clinical effects; 3) acupuncture stimulation results in excitation of sensory afferent nerve fibers, triggering neuro-regulation; 4) exosomes derived from mast cells contain multiple neurotransmitters, hormones, cytokines, etc. to activate immune cells and sensory afferent fibers, inducing immuno-regulation and neuro-regulation; and 5) acupuncture stimulation induced release of Ca2+, ATP, etc. may potentiate release and transportation of exosomes. However, current researches are lack of excavation of network connection and transformation from basic research to clinical application. The authors hold that the exosome, released from mast cells by needling acupoints, acts as a messenger in network connection of nerve-mast cell-signal molecule in the body and may be one of the key factors of therapeutic effects.

  15. Responses of dermal mast cells to injury.

    PubMed Central

    el Sayed, S O; Dyson, M

    1993-01-01

    The effect on dermal mast cell numbers and degranulation of making a partial thickness skin wound on the right flank of Wistar rats was studied immediately after operation and 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 24 and 72 h postoperatively. An equivalent area of intact dermis on the left flank was used as a control. In the injured dermis the mean number of detectable mast cells in the experimental group immediately after making the partial thickness wound was not significantly different from the control side (P > 0.25) but it later decreased, reaching its lowest value after 2 h and increasing from 16 h to 72 h postoperatively when the final assessment was made. The possibility that the reduction in mast cell number per unit area might be an artefact resulting from increased tissue volume due to oedema was investigated and disproved. The total number of dermal mast cells in equivalent areas of the intact left flank remained unchanged throughout this period. The percentage of degranulating mast cells started rising 0.5 h postoperatively, increased gradually to reach its highest value after 2 h, remained high up to 8 h postoperatively and then decreased to reach its lowest value after 72 h. The percentage of degranulating mast cells of the intact dermis of the left flank did not alter during this period. The lack of a significant change in the control groups shows either the absence of any systemic effect or that the technique used was not sensitive enough to detect it. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8226292

  16. Pavlovian Conditioning of Rat Mucosal Mast Cells to Secrete Rat Mast Cell Protease II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacQueen, Glenda; Marshall, Jean; Perdue, Mary; Siegel, Shepard; Bienenstock, John

    1989-01-01

    Antigen (egg albumin) injections, which stimulate mucosal mast cells to secrete mediators, were paired with an audiovisual cue. After reexposure to the audiovisual cue, a mediator (rat mast cell protease II) was measured with a sensitive and specific assay. Animals reexposed to only the audiovisual cue released a quantity of protease not significantly different from animals reexposed to both the cue and the antigen; these groups released significantly more protease than animals that had received the cue and antigen in a noncontingent manner. The results support a role for the central nervous system as a functional effector of mast cell function in the allergic state.

  17. Perivascular mast cells regulate vein graft neointimal formation and remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Grassia, Gianluca; Cambrook, Helen; Ialenti, Armando; MacRitchie, Neil; Carberry, Jaclyn; Lawrence, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Emerging evidence suggests an important role for mast cells in vein graft failure. This study addressed the hypothesis that perivascular mast cells regulate in situ vascular inflammatory and proliferative responses and subsequent vein graft neointimal lesion formation, using an optimized local mast cell reconstitution method. Methods and Results. Neointimal hyperplasia was induced by insertion of a vein graft into the right carotid artery in wild type and mast cell deficient KitW−sh/W−sh mice. In some experiments, mast cells were reconstituted systemically (tail vein injection of bone marrow-derived mast cells) or locally (directly into the right neck area) prior to vein grafting. Vein graft neointimal lesion formation was significantly (P < 0.05) reduced in KitW−sh/W−sh mice. Mast cell deficiency reduced the number of proliferating cells, and inhibited L-selectin, CCL2, M-CSF and MIP-3α expression in the vein grafts. Local but not systemic mast cell reconstitution restored a perivascular mast cell population that subsequently promoted neointimal formation in mast cell deficient mice. Conclusion. Our data demonstrate that perivascular mast cells play a key role in promoting neointima formation by inducing local acute inflammatory and proliferative responses. These results suggest that ex vivo intraoperative targeting of mast cells may have therapeutic potential for the prevention of pathological vein graft remodeling. PMID:26312183

  18. 53. VIEW FROM FLOOR OF MAST TRENCH SHOWING BASE OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    53. VIEW FROM FLOOR OF MAST TRENCH SHOWING BASE OF ERECT UMBILICAL MAST. AIR-CONDITIONING DUCTS VISIBLE ON RIGHT SIDE OF MAST. HYDRAULIC ACTUATOR ARMS FOR OPENING TRENCH DOORS VISIBLE ON LEFT SIDE OF PHOTO. 'DOOR STOP' PEDESTAL IN FOREGROUND. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 West, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  19. 43. TOP PART OF UMBILICAL MAST, NORTH AND WEST SIDES. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. TOP PART OF UMBILICAL MAST, NORTH AND WEST SIDES. AIR CONDITIONING DUCTING IS VISIBLE ON INTERIOR OF MAST. RAIL IS VISIBLE LEFT OF THE MAST. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  20. The Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test (MAST): A Statistical Validation Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laux, John M.; Newman, Isadore; Brown, Russ

    2004-01-01

    This study extends the Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test (MAST; M. L. Selzer, 1971) literature base by examining 4 issues related to the validity of the MAST scores. Specifically, the authors examine the validity of the MAST scores in light of the presence of impression management, participant demographic variables, and item endorsement…

  1. Extendable retractable telescopic mast for deployable structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, M.; Aguirre, M.

    1986-01-01

    The Extendable and Retractable Mast (ERM) which is presently developed by Dornier in the frame of an ESA-contract, will be used to deploy and retract large foldable structures. The design is based on a telescopic carbon-fiber structure with high stiffness, strength and pointing accuracy. To verify the chosen design, a breadboard model of an ERM was built and tested under thermal vacuum (TV)-conditions. It is planned as a follow-on development to manufacture and test an Engineering Model Mast. The Engineering Model will be used to establish the basis for an ERM-family covering a wide range of requirements.

  2. Association of mast cells with calcification in the human pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Maślińska, Danuta; Laure-Kamionowska, Milena; Deręgowski, Krzysztof; Maśliński, Sławomir

    2010-01-01

    advanced stages of calcification. Our results lead to the conclusion that the tryptase mast cells play a major role in the pineal calcification process as sites where this process starts and as a source of production of numerous biologically active substances including tryptase that participate in calcification.

  3. Association of mast cells with calcification in the human pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Maślińska, Danuta; Laure-Kamionowska, Milena; Deręgowski, Krzysztof; Maśliński, Sławomir

    2010-01-01

    advanced stages of calcification. Our results lead to the conclusion that the tryptase mast cells play a major role in the pineal calcification process as sites where this process starts and as a source of production of numerous biologically active substances including tryptase that participate in calcification. PMID:21225510

  4. The hard metal diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Cugell, D.W. )

    1992-06-01

    Hard metal is a mixture of tungsten carbide and cobalt, to which small amounts of other metals may be added. It is widely used for industrial purposes whenever extreme hardness and high temperature resistance are needed, such as for cutting tools, oil well drilling bits, and jet engine exhaust ports. Cobalt is the component of hard metal that can be a health hazard. Respiratory diseases occur in workers exposed to cobalt--either in the production of hard metal, from machining hard metal parts, or from other sources. Adverse pulmonary reactions include asthma, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, and interstitial fibrosis. A peculiar, almost unique form of lung fibrosis, giant cell interstitial pneumonia, is closely linked with cobalt exposure.66 references.

  5. The hard metal diseases.

    PubMed

    Cugell, D W

    1992-06-01

    Hard metal is a mixture of tungsten carbide and cobalt, to which small amounts of other metals may be added. It is widely used for industrial purposes whenever extreme hardness and high temperature resistance are needed, such as for cutting tools, oil well drilling bits, and jet engine exhaust ports. Cobalt is the component of hard metal that can be a health hazard. Respiratory diseases occur in workers exposed to cobalt--either in the production of hard metal, from machining hard metal parts, or from other sources. Adverse pulmonary reactions include asthma, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, and interstitial fibrosis. A peculiar, almost unique form of lung fibrosis, giant cell interstitial pneumonia, is closely linked with cobalt exposure.

  6. The hard metal diseases.

    PubMed

    Cugell, D W

    1992-06-01

    Hard metal is a mixture of tungsten carbide and cobalt, to which small amounts of other metals may be added. It is widely used for industrial purposes whenever extreme hardness and high temperature resistance are needed, such as for cutting tools, oil well drilling bits, and jet engine exhaust ports. Cobalt is the component of hard metal that can be a health hazard. Respiratory diseases occur in workers exposed to cobalt--either in the production of hard metal, from machining hard metal parts, or from other sources. Adverse pulmonary reactions include asthma, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, and interstitial fibrosis. A peculiar, almost unique form of lung fibrosis, giant cell interstitial pneumonia, is closely linked with cobalt exposure. PMID:1511554

  7. Hard particle production in pp, pA, and AA collisions at 20-200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papp, Gábor; Zhang, Yi; Fai, George; Lévai, Péter

    1999-10-01

    Hard pion and photon production is calculated in the perturbative QCD (pQCD) improved parton model. In pp collisions we achieve a good agreement with data from several experiments with √s ≈ 20 -- 60 GeV by using an energy-dependent width of the transverse momentum (k_T) distribution of partons.(G. Papp, P. Levai, and G. Fai, Phys. Rev. Lett., submitted, nucl- th/9903012, KSUCNR-102-99.) We study the sensitivity of these results to the scales of the pQCD calculations and to other assumptions. Having separated the < k_T^2 > already present in pp, we examine the nuclear enhancement (Cronin effect) in pA collisions. The influence of different ways of modeling the nuclear distribution on the details of the saturated Cronin picture^2 is investigated. Nuclear density distributions and the implementation of the Glauber model become even more important in AA collisions, in particular for 3 GeV/c < pT < 6 GeV/c. We discuss these uncertainties in extending our model to Au + Au collisions at RHIC energies.

  8. VEGF secretion during hypoxia depends on free radicals-induced Fyn kinase activity in mast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Roman, Jonathan; Ibarra-Sanchez, Alfredo; Lamas, Monica; Gonzalez Espinosa, Claudia

    2010-10-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) secrete functional VEGF but do not degranulate after Cobalt chloride-induced hypoxia. {yields} CoCl{sub 2}-induced VEGF secretion in mast cells occurs by a Ca{sup 2+}-insensitive but brefeldin A and Tetanus toxin-sensitive mechanism. {yields} Trolox and N-acetylcysteine inhibit hypoxia-induced VEGF secretion but only Trolox inhibits Fc{epsilon}RI-dependent anaphylactic degranulation in mast cells. {yields} Src family kinase Fyn activation after free radical production is necessary for hypoxia-induced VEGF secretion in mast cells. -- Abstract: Mast cells (MC) have an important role in pathologic conditions such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), where hypoxia conduce to deleterious inflammatory response. MC contribute to hypoxia-induced angiogenesis producing factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), but the mechanisms behind the control of hypoxia-induced VEGF secretion in this cell type is poorly understood. We used the hypoxia-mimicking agent cobalt chloride (CoCl{sub 2}) to analyze VEGF secretion in murine bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs). We found that CoCl{sub 2} promotes a sustained production of functional VEGF, able to induce proliferation of endothelial cells in vitro. CoCl{sub 2}-induced VEGF secretion was independent of calcium rise but dependent on tetanus toxin-sensitive vesicle-associated membrane proteins (VAMPs). VEGF exocytosis required free radicals formation and the activation of Src family kinases. Interestingly, an important deficiency on CoCl{sub 2}-induced VEGF secretion was observed in Fyn kinase-deficient BMMCs. Moreover, Fyn kinase was activated by CoCl{sub 2} in WT cells and this activation was prevented by treatment with antioxidants such as Trolox and N-acetylcysteine. Our results show that BMMCs are able to release VEGF under hypoxic conditions through a tetanus toxin-sensitive mechanism, promoted by free radicals

  9. Mast Cell: A Multi-Functional Master Cell

    PubMed Central

    Krystel-Whittemore, Melissa; Dileepan, Kottarappat N.; Wood, John G.

    2016-01-01

    Mast cells are immune cells of the myeloid lineage and are present in connective tissues throughout the body. The activation and degranulation of mast cells significantly modulates many aspects of physiological and pathological conditions in various settings. With respect to normal physiological functions, mast cells are known to regulate vasodilation, vascular homeostasis, innate and adaptive immune responses, angiogenesis, and venom detoxification. On the other hand, mast cells have also been implicated in the pathophysiology of many diseases, including allergy, asthma, anaphylaxis, gastrointestinal disorders, many types of malignancies, and cardiovascular diseases. This review summarizes the current understanding of the role of mast cells in many pathophysiological conditions. PMID:26779180

  10. Myeloid derived suppressor cells enhance IgE-mediated mast cell responses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We previously demonstrated that enhanced development of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC) in ADAM10 transgenic mice yielded resistance to infection with Nippostrongylus brasiliensis infection, and that co-culturing MDSC with IgE-activated mast cells enhanced cytokine production. In the current...

  11. A protective role of mast cells in intestinal tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Sinnamon, Mark J; Carter, Kathy J; Sims, Lauren P; Lafleur, Bonnie; Fingleton, Barbara; Matrisian, Lynn M

    2008-04-01

    Mast cells have been observed in numerous types of tumors; however, their role in carcinogenesis remains poorly understood. The majority of epidemiological evidence suggests a negative association between the presence of mast cells and tumor progression in breast, lung and colonic neoplasms. Intestinal adenomas in the multiple intestinal neoplasia (Min, APC(Min/+)) mouse displayed increased numbers of mast cells and increased abundance of mast cell-associated proteinases as determined by transcriptional profiling with the Hu/Mu ProtIn microarray. To examine the role of mast cells in intestinal tumorigenesis, a mutant mouse line deficient in mast cells, Sash mice (c-kit(W-sh/W-sh)), was crossed with the Min mouse, a genetic model of intestinal neoplasia. The resulting mast cell-deficient Min-Sash mice developed 50% more adenomas than littermate controls and the tumors were 33% larger in Min-Sash mice. Mast cell deficiency did not affect tumor cell proliferation; however, apoptosis was significantly inhibited in mast cell-deficient mice. Mast cells have been shown to act as critical upstream regulators of numerous inflammatory cells. Neutrophil, macrophage and T cell populations were similar between Min and Min-Sash mice; however, eosinophils were significantly less abundant in tumors obtained from Min-Sash animals. These results indicate a protective, antitumor role of mast cells in a genetic model of early-stage intestinal tumorigenesis. PMID:18258601

  12. Analysis of the components of hard resin in hops (Humulus lupulus L.) and structural elucidation of their transformation products formed during the brewing process.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Yoshimasa; Taniguchi, Harumi; Yamada, Makiko; Matsukura, Yasuko; Koizumi, Hideki; Furihata, Kazuo; Shindo, Kazutoshi

    2014-11-26

    The resins from hops (Humulus lupulus L.), which add the bitter taste to beer, are classified into two main sub-fractions, namely, soft and hard resins. α- and β-Acids in soft resin and their transformation during the wort boiling process are well-studied; however, other constituents in resins, especially hard resin, have been unidentified. In this study, we identified humulinones and hulupones as soft-resin components, in addition to 4'-hydroxyallohumulinones and tricyclooxyisohumulones A and B as hard-resin components. These compounds are all oxidation products derived from α- or β-acids. We also investigated compositional changes in the hard resin during the wort boiling process, which has a significant effect on the taste of the beer, by using model boiling experiments. The major changes were identified to be isomerization of 4'-hydroxyallohumulinones into 4'-hydroxyallo-cis-humulinones, followed by decomposition into cis-oxyhumulinic acids. These findings will be helpful in systematically evaluating and optimizing the effect of the hard resin on beer quality.

  13. Spatial distribution of mast cells in chronic venous leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Abd-El-Aleem, S A; Morgan, C; Ferguson, M W J; McCollum, C N; Ireland, G W

    2005-01-01

    Chronic venous leg ulcers (CVUs) show chronic inflammation but different pathological changes occur in different parts of the ulcer. There is a lack of re-epithelialisation and defective matrix deposition in the ulcer base but epidermal hyperproliferation and increased matrix deposition in the surrounding skin. The role of mast cells in wound healing, inflammation, fibrosis and epidermal hyperproliferation has been extensively studied but less is known about their role in CVUs. In the present study, we investigated the distribution of mast cells in CVUs with specific consideration of the differences between the ulcer base and the skin surrounding the ulcer. Both histochemical and immunohistological methods were used to detect the mast cell marker tryptase in frozen sections of CVU biopsies. Mast cells were counted in the dermis of normal skin, in the ulcer base and in the skin surrounding the ulcer. Double immunofluorescence staining was used to study the location of mast cells in relation to blood vessels. In normal skin few mast cells were seen in the dermis but none in the epidermis. However in CVUs there was a significant increase in intact and degranulated mast cells in the surrounding skin and ulcer edge (184 per field, p<0.003) of CVUs and a significant reduction in the ulcer base (20.5 per field p<0.05) in comparison to normal skin (61 per field). In CVUs mast cells showed a characteristic location near the epithelial basement membrane whilst mast cell granules and phantom cells (mast cells devoid of granules) were predominantly seen in the epidermis. In the dermis, mast cells were seen associated with blood vessels. The marked increase in mast cells in the surrounding skin of CVUs and depletion of mast cells in the ulcer base could implicate mast cell mediators in the pathological changes in CVUs particularly in the epidermal and vascular changes occurring in the surrounding skin.

  14. Activation and function of the mTORC1 pathway in mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi-Sun; Kuehn, Hye Sun; Metcalfe, Dean D.; Gilfillan, Alasdair M.

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about the signals downstream of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) which regulate mast cell homeostasis and function following FcεRI aggregation and Kit ligation. Here, we investigated the role of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) pathway in these responses. In human and mouse mast cells, stimulation via FcεRI or Kit resulted in a marked PI3K-dependent activation of the mTORC1 pathway, as revealed by the wortmannin-sensitive sequential phosphorylation of tuberin, mTOR, p70S6 kinase (p70S6K), and 4E-BP1. In contrast, in human tumor mast cells, the mTORC1 pathway was constitutively activated and this was associated with markedly elevated levels of mTORC1 pathway components. Rapamycin, a specific inhibitor of mTORC1, selectively and completely blocked the FcεRI- and Kit-induced mTORC1-dependent p70S6K phosphorylation and partially blocked the 4E-BP1 phosphorylation. In parallel, although rapamycin had no effect on FcεRI-mediated degranulation or Kit-mediated cell adhesion, it inhibited cytokine production, Kit-mediated chemotaxis and cell survival. Furthermore, Rapamycin also blocked the constitutive activation of the mTORC1 pathway and inhibited cell survival of tumor mast cells. These data provide evidence that mTORC1 is a point of divergency for the PI3K-regulated downstream events of FcεRI and Kit for the selective regulation of mast cell functions. Specifically, the mTORC1 pathway may play a critical role in normal and dysregulated control of mast cell homeostasis. PMID:18354181

  15. Further studies on the effect of nitrogen dioxide on mast cells: The effect of the metabolite, nitrite

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimaki, Hidekazu ); Ozawa, Masashi ); Bissonnette, E.; Befus, A.D. )

    1993-05-01

    To evaluate the relationship between atmospheric nitrogen dioxide exposure and the development of allergic diseases, the effects of nitrite as a chemical product of inhaled nitrogen dioxide on mast cell functions were investigated. We have studied nitride-induced histamine release from two functionally distinct mast cell populations, namely peritoneal mast cells (PMC) and intestinal mucosal mast cells (IMMC) of Nippostrongylus brasiliensis-infected rats. High concentrations of nitrite alone (10, 20, and 50 mM) induced histamine release from IMMC, but not from PMC. Moreover, histamine release from PMC and IMMC stimulated with sensitizing antigen was significantly enhanced by pretreatment with 50 mM nitrite or nitrate. No differences in histamine release from nitrite-treated and control PMC were seen below 1 mM. To investigate the effect of nitrite on tumor cell cytotoxic activity, PMC were incubated with various concentrations of nitrite. Pretreatment with 5 and 50 mM nitrite markedly depressed tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-[alpha]-dependent natural cytotoxicity of PMC for the tumor target WEHI-164. Thus, high concentrations of nitrite enhanced mast cell histamine release, but depressed TNF-[alpha]-dependent cytotoxicity. However, low concentrations of nitrite (<1 mM) that would normally be produced by short-term atmospheric exposure to nitrogen dioxide may have no significant effects on mast cell functions. 27 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Mast cell toll-like receptor 2 signaling is crucial for effective killing of Francisella tularensis1

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Annette R.; Yu, Jieh-Juen; Guentzel, M. N.; Navara, Christopher S.; Klose, Karl E.; Forsthuber, Thomas G.; Chambers, James P.; Berton, Michael T.; Arulanandam, Bernard P

    2012-01-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling is critical for early host defense against pathogens, but the contribution of mast cell TLR-mediated mechanisms and subsequent effector functions during pulmonary infection is largely unknown. We have previously demonstrated that mast cells, through the production of IL-4, effectively control Francisella tularensis replication. In this study, the highly human virulent strain of F. tularensis SCHU S4 and the Live Vaccine Strain (LVS) were utilized to investigate the contribution of mast cell-TLR regulation of Francisella. Mast cells required TLR2 for effective bacterial killing, regulation of the hydrolytic enzyme cathepsin L, and for coordination and trafficking of MHCII and lysosomal associated membrane protein 2 (LAMP2). Infected TLR2−/− mast cells, in contrast to WT and TLR4−/−, lacked detectable IL-4 and displayed increased cell death with a 2–3 log increase of F. tularensis replication, but could be rescued with recombinant IL-4 treatment. Importantly, MHCII and LAMP2 localization with labeled F. tularensis in the lungs was greater in WT than in TLR2−/− mice. These results provide evidence for the important effector contribution of mast cells and TLR2-mediated signaling on early innate processes in the lung following pulmonary F. tularensis infection and provide additional insight into possible mechanisms by which intracellular pathogens modulate respiratory immune defenses. PMID:22529298

  17. A Microplate Assay to Assess Chemical Effects on RBL-2H3 Mast Cell Degranulation: Effects of Triclosan without Use of an Organic Solvent

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Juyoung; Gosse, Julie A.

    2013-01-01

    Mast cells play important roles in allergic disease and immune defense against parasites. Once activated (e.g. by an allergen), they degranulate, a process that results in the exocytosis of allergic mediators. Modulation of mast cell degranulation by drugs and toxicants may have positive or adverse effects on human health. Mast cell function has been dissected in detail with the use of rat basophilic leukemia mast cells (RBL-2H3), a widely accepted model of human mucosal mast cells3-5. Mast cell granule component and the allergic mediator β-hexosaminidase, which is released linearly in tandem with histamine from mast cells6, can easily and reliably be measured through reaction with a fluorogenic substrate, yielding measurable fluorescence intensity in a microplate assay that is amenable to high-throughput studies1. Originally published by Naal et al.1, we have adapted this degranulation assay for the screening of drugs and toxicants and demonstrate its use here. Triclosan is a broad-spectrum antibacterial agent that is present in many consumer products and has been found to be a therapeutic aid in human allergic skin disease7-11, although the mechanism for this effect is unknown. Here we demonstrate an assay for the effect of triclosan on mast cell degranulation. We recently showed that triclosan strongly affects mast cell function2. In an effort to avoid use of an organic solvent, triclosan is dissolved directly into aqueous buffer with heat and stirring, and resultant concentration is confirmed using UV-Vis spectrophotometry (using ε280 = 4,200 L/M/cm)12. This protocol has the potential to be used with a variety of chemicals to determine their effects on mast cell degranulation, and more broadly, their allergic potential. PMID:24300285

  18. Mast Cells Produce a Unique Chondroitin Sulfate Epitope.

    PubMed

    Farrugia, Brooke L; Whitelock, John M; O'Grady, Robert; Caterson, Bruce; Lord, Megan S

    2016-02-01

    The granules of mast cells contain a myriad of mediators that are stored and protected by the sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chains that decorate proteoglycans. Whereas heparin is the GAG predominantly associated with mast cells, mast cell proteoglycans are also decorated with heparan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate (CS). This study investigated a unique CS structure produced by mast cells that was detected with the antibody clone 2B6 in the absence of chondroitinase ABC digestion. Mast cells in rodent tissue sections were characterized using toluidine blue, Leder stain and the presence of mast cell tryptase. The novel CS epitope was identified in rodent tissue sections and localized to cells that were morphologically similar to cells chemically identified as mast cells. The rodent mast cell-like line RBL-2H3 was also shown to express the novel CS epitope. This epitope co-localized with multiple CS proteoglycans in both rodent tissue and RBL-2H3 cultured cells. These findings suggest that the novel CS epitope that decorates mast cell proteoglycans may play a role in the way these chains are structured in mast cells.

  19. Propagation by Cutting of Grewia coriacea Mast. (Malvaceae).

    PubMed

    Mercier, Bita Alain; Attibayéba; Pierre, Kampé Jean; Léon, Ngantsoué; Fidèle, Mialoundama

    2016-01-01

    Congolese forests contain important spontaneous food plants. Among these plants, there is the Grewia coriacea Mast., called in the national language "Tsui-téké", which is a tree of 4-25 m high and of 12-40 cm in diameter. Its fruits are used in several drinks making (juice, sparkling wine, syrup) and lollipops. Grewia's barks are used in pharmacopoeia to cure of stomach aches, syphilis. However, the fruits harvesting method based on branches or trees cutting as well as swidden agriculture by local people dangerously threatens the Grewia in the natural ecosystems of Congo. To insure the longevity of this species, we undertook trials of vegetative reproduction of the plant by means of propagation by cuttings for its domestication. Less woody leafless cuttings of 30 cm in length provided best results with a resumption rate of 63.3%, a good rooting production and an average duration of the apparent plastochrone of three days from the second to the fifth leaf. The study shows that domestication of the Grewia coriacea Mast. is possible today by cuttings. Its culture might allow the diversification of species which can be used in orchards. PMID:26930798

  20. The SNARE Machinery in Mast Cell Secretion.

    PubMed

    Lorentz, Axel; Baumann, Anja; Vitte, Joana; Blank, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    Mast cells are known as inflammatory cells which exert their functions in allergic and anaphylactic reactions by secretion of numerous inflammatory mediators. During an allergic response, the high-affinity IgE receptor, FcεRI, becomes cross-linked by receptor-bound IgE and antigen resulting in immediate release of pre-synthesized mediators - stored in granules - as well as in de novo synthesis of various mediators like cytokines and chemokines. Soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein (SNAP) receptors (SNARE) proteins were found to play a central role in regulating membrane fusion events during exocytosis. In addition, several accessory regulators like Munc13, Munc18, Rab GTPases, secretory carrier membrane proteins, complexins, or synaptotagmins were found to be involved in membrane fusion. In this review we summarize our current knowledge about the SNARE machinery and its mechanism of action in mast cell secretion.

  1. The mast cell: a multifunctional effector cell.

    PubMed

    Crivellato, Enrico; Ribatti, Domenico; Mallardi, Franco; Beltrami, Carlo Alberto

    2003-01-01

    Mast cells (MC) are recognized key cells of type I hypersensitivity reactions. Several lines of evidence, however, indicate that MC not only express critical effector functions in classic IgE-associated allergic disorders, but also play important roles in host defence against parasites, bacteria and perhaps even viruses. Indeed, it is now clear that MC can contribute to host defence in the context of either acquired or innate immune responses through the release of a myriad of pro-inflammatory and immunoregulatory molecules and the expression of a wide spectrum of surface receptors for cytokines and chemokines. Moreover, there is growing evidence that MC exert distinct nonimmunological functions, playing a relevant role in tissue homeostasis, remodeling and fibrosis as well as in the processes of tissue angiogenesis. In this review, we provide a small insight into the biology of mast cells and their potential implications in human pathology.

  2. Hymenoptera Allergy and Mast Cell Activation Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Bonadonna, Patrizia; Bonifacio, Massimiliano; Lombardo, Carla; Zanotti, Roberta

    2016-01-01

    Mast cell activation syndrome (MCAS) can be diagnosed in patients with recurrent, severe symptoms from mast cell (MC)-derived mediators, which are transiently increased in serum and are attenuated by mediator-targeting drugs. When KIT-mutated, clonal MC are detected in these patients, a diagnosis of primary MCAS can be made. Severe systemic reactions to hymenoptera venom (HV) represent the most common form of anaphylaxis in patients with mastocytosis. Patients with primary MCAS and HV anaphylaxis are predominantly males and do not have skin lesions in the majority of cases, and anaphylaxis is characterized by hypotension and syncope in the absence of urticaria and angioedema. A normal value of tryptase (≤11.4 ng/ml) in these patients does not exclude a diagnosis of mastocytosis. Patients with primary MCAS and HV anaphylaxis have to undergo lifelong venom immunotherapy, in order to prevent further potentially fatal severe reactions. PMID:26714690

  3. The SNARE Machinery in Mast Cell Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Lorentz, Axel; Baumann, Anja; Vitte, Joana; Blank, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    Mast cells are known as inflammatory cells which exert their functions in allergic and anaphylactic reactions by secretion of numerous inflammatory mediators. During an allergic response, the high-affinity IgE receptor, FcεRI, becomes cross-linked by receptor-bound IgE and antigen resulting in immediate release of pre-synthesized mediators – stored in granules – as well as in de novo synthesis of various mediators like cytokines and chemokines. Soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein (SNAP) receptors (SNARE) proteins were found to play a central role in regulating membrane fusion events during exocytosis. In addition, several accessory regulators like Munc13, Munc18, Rab GTPases, secretory carrier membrane proteins, complexins, or synaptotagmins were found to be involved in membrane fusion. In this review we summarize our current knowledge about the SNARE machinery and its mechanism of action in mast cell secretion. PMID:22679448

  4. Hymenoptera Allergy and Mast Cell Activation Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Bonadonna, Patrizia; Bonifacio, Massimiliano; Lombardo, Carla; Zanotti, Roberta

    2016-01-01

    Mast cell activation syndrome (MCAS) can be diagnosed in patients with recurrent, severe symptoms from mast cell (MC)-derived mediators, which are transiently increased in serum and are attenuated by mediator-targeting drugs. When KIT-mutated, clonal MC are detected in these patients, a diagnosis of primary MCAS can be made. Severe systemic reactions to hymenoptera venom (HV) represent the most common form of anaphylaxis in patients with mastocytosis. Patients with primary MCAS and HV anaphylaxis are predominantly males and do not have skin lesions in the majority of cases, and anaphylaxis is characterized by hypotension and syncope in the absence of urticaria and angioedema. A normal value of tryptase (≤11.4 ng/ml) in these patients does not exclude a diagnosis of mastocytosis. Patients with primary MCAS and HV anaphylaxis have to undergo lifelong venom immunotherapy, in order to prevent further potentially fatal severe reactions.

  5. MAST Propellant and Delivery System Design Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nadeem, Uzair; Mc Cleskey, Carey M.

    2015-01-01

    A Mars Aerospace Taxi (MAST) concept and propellant storage and delivery case study is undergoing investigation by NASA's Element Design and Architectural Impact (EDAI) design and analysis forum. The MAST lander concept envisions landing with its ascent propellant storage tanks empty and supplying these reusable Mars landers with propellant that is generated and transferred while on the Mars surface. The report provides an overview of the data derived from modeling between different methods of propellant line routing (or "lining") and differentiate the resulting design and operations complexity of fluid and gaseous paths based on a given set of fluid sources and destinations. The EDAI team desires a rough-order-magnitude algorithm for estimating the lining characteristics (i.e., the plumbing mass and complexity) associated different numbers of vehicle propellant sources and destinations. This paper explored the feasibility of preparing a mathematically sound algorithm for this purpose, and offers a method for the EDAI team to implement.

  6. Molecular markers linked to genes important for Hard Winter Wheat production and marketing in the U.S. Great Plains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biotic stresses including diseases [leaf, stem and stripe rusts, and wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV)] and insects [greenbug (GB), Hessian fly (Hf), Russian wheat aphid (RWA) and wheat curl mite (WCM)] significantly affect grain yield and end-use quality of hard winter wheat (HWW, Triticum aestivum ...

  7. Mast cells: multitalented facilitators of protection against bacterial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Trivedi, Nikita H; Guentzel, M Neal; Rodriguez, Annette R; Yu, Jieh-Juen; Forsthuber, Thomas G; Arulanandam, Bernard P

    2014-01-01

    Mast cells are crucial effector cells evoking immune responses against bacterial pathogens. The positioning of mast cells at the host–environment interface, and the multitude of pathogen-recognition receptors and preformed mediator granules make these cells potentially the earliest to respond to an invading pathogen. In this review, the authors summarize the receptors used by mast cells to recognize invading bacteria and discuss the function of immune mediators released by mast cells in control of bacterial infection. The interaction of mast cells with other immune cells, including macrophages, dendritic cells and T cells, to induce protective immunity is highlighted. The authors also discuss mast cell-based vaccine strategies and the potential application in control of bacterial disease. PMID:23390944

  8. Characterization of Mast Cell Secretory Granules and Their Cell Biology

    PubMed Central

    Azouz, Nurit Pereg; Hammel, Ilan

    2014-01-01

    Exocytosis and secretion of secretory granule (SG) contained inflammatory mediators is the primary mechanism by which mast cells exert their protective immune responses in host defense, as well as their pathological functions in allergic reactions and anaphylaxis. Despite their central role in mast cell function, the molecular mechanisms underlying the biogenesis and secretion of mast cell SGs remain largely unresolved. Early studies have established the lysosomal nature of the mast cell SGs and implicated SG homotypic fusion as an important step occurring during both their biogenesis and compound secretion. However, the molecular mechanisms that account for key features of this process largely remain to be defined. A novel high-resolution imaging based methodology allowed us to screen Rab GTPases for their phenotypic and functional impact and identify Rab networks that regulate mast cell secretion. This screen has identified Rab5 as a novel regulator of homotypic fusion of the mast cell SGs that thereby regulates their size and cargo composition. PMID:24988214

  9. Hard Diffraction at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Melese, P.; CDF Collaboration

    1997-06-01

    We present results on diffractive production of hard processes in {anti p}p collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV at the Tevatron using the CDF detector. The signatures used to identify diffractive events are the forward rapidity gap and/or the detection of a recoil antiproton with high forward momentum. We have observed diffractive W- boson, dijet, and heavy quark production. We also present results on double-pomeron production of dijets.

  10. Commensal bacteria promote migration of mast cells into the intestine.

    PubMed

    Kunii, Junichi; Takahashi, Kyoko; Kasakura, Kazumi; Tsuda, Masato; Nakano, Kou; Hosono, Akira; Kaminogawa, Shuichi

    2011-06-01

    Mast cells differentiate from hematopoietic stem cells in the bone marrow and migrate via the circulation to peripheral tissues, where they play a pivotal role in induction of both innate and adaptive immune responses. In this study, the effect of intestinal commensal bacteria on the migration of mast cells into the intestine was investigated. Histochemical analyses showed that germ-free (GF) mice had lower mast cell densities in the small intestine than normal mice. It was also shown that GF mice had lower mast cell proportion out of lamina propria leukocytes in the small intestine and higher mast cell percentages in the blood than normal mice by flow cytometry. These results indicate that migration of mast cells from the blood to the intestine is promoted by intestinal commensal bacteria. In addition, MyD88⁻/⁻ mice had lower densities of intestinal mast cells than CV mice, suggesting that the promotive effect of commensals is, at least in part, TLR-dependent. The ligands of CXC chemokine receptor 2 (CXCR2), which is critical for homing of mast cells to the intestine, were expressed higher in intestinal tissues and in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) of normal mice than in those of GF or MyD88⁻/⁻ mice. Collectively, it is suggested that commensals promote migration of mast cells into the intestine through the induction of CXCR2 ligands from IECs in a TLR-dependent manner.

  11. The effects of aspartame on mast cells and basophils.

    PubMed

    Szucs, E F; Barrett, K E; Metcalfe, D D

    1986-02-01

    The artificial sweetener aspartame was studied to determine whether it had any direct effects on mast cells and basophils. Aspartame was not shown to be a direct mast cell or basophil secretagogue in vitro, or in vivo as assessed by skin testing. During an acute incubation, aspartame did not affect IgE-mediated histamine release from mast cells. However, mast cells cultured in aspartame for periods of up to 9 days showed enhanced rates of proliferation and decreased responsiveness to releasing stimuli. The effect of aspartame on proliferation of cells in culture could be ascribed to a non-specific enhancing effect of its constituent amino acids.

  12. Tick Salivary Sialostatin L Represses the Initiation of Immune Responses by Targeting IRF4-Dependent Transcription in Murine Mast Cells.

    PubMed

    Klein, Matthias; Brühl, Till-Julius; Staudt, Valérie; Reuter, Sebastian; Grebe, Nadine; Gerlitzki, Bastian; Hoffmann, Markus; Bohn, Toszka; Ulges, Alexander; Stergiou, Natascha; de Graaf, Jos; Löwer, Martin; Taube, Christian; Becker, Marc; Hain, Tobias; Dietzen, Sarah; Stassen, Michael; Huber, Magdalena; Lohoff, Michael; Campos Chagas, Andrezza; Andersen, John; Kotál, Jan; Langhansová, Helena; Kopecký, Jan; Schild, Hansjörg; Kotsyfakis, Michalis; Schmitt, Edgar; Bopp, Tobias

    2015-07-15

    Coevolution of ticks and the vertebrate immune system has led to the development of immunosuppressive molecules that prevent immediate response of skin-resident immune cells to quickly fend off the parasite. In this article, we demonstrate that the tick-derived immunosuppressor sialostatin L restrains IL-9 production by mast cells, whereas degranulation and IL-6 expression are both unaffected. In addition, the expression of IL-1β and IRF4 is strongly reduced in the presence of sialostatin L. Correspondingly, IRF4- or IL-1R-deficient mast cells exhibit a strong impairment in IL-9 production, demonstrating the importance of IRF4 and IL-1 in the regulation of the Il9 locus in mast cells. Furthermore, IRF4 binds to the promoters of Il1b and Il9, suggesting that sialostatin L suppresses mast cell-derived IL-9 preferentially by inhibiting IRF4. In an experimental asthma model, mast cell-specific deficiency in IRF4 or administration of sialostatin L results in a strong reduction in asthma symptoms, demonstrating the immunosuppressive potency of tick-derived molecules.

  13. Tick salivary Sialostatin L represses the initiation of immune responses by targeting IRF4-dependent transcription in murine mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Matthias; Brühl, Till-Julius; Staudt, Valérie; Reuter, Sebastian; Grebe, Nadine; Gerlitzki, Bastian; Hoffmann, Markus; Bohn, Toszka; Ulges, Alexander; Stergiou, Natascha; de Graaf, Jos; Löwer, Martin; Taube, Christian; Becker, Marc; Hain, Tobias; Dietzen, Sarah; Stassen, Michael; Huber, Magdalena; Lohoff, Michael; Chagas, Andrezza Campos; Andersen, John; Kotál, Jan; Langhansová, Helena; Kopecký, Jan; Schild, Hansjörg; Kotsyfakis, Michalis; Schmitt, Edgar; Bopp, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Co-evolution of ticks and the vertebrate immune system has led to the development of immunosuppressive molecules that prevent immediate response of skin-resident immune cells to quickly fend off the parasite. Herein, we demonstrate that the tick-derived immunosuppressor sialostatin L restrains IL-9 production by mast cells while degranulation and IL-6 expression are both unaffected. In addition, the expression of IL-1β and IRF4 is strongly reduced in the presence of sialostatin L. Correspondingly, IRF4- or IL-1 receptor-deficient mast cells exhibit strong impairment in IL-9 production demonstrating the importance of IRF4 and IL-1 in the regulation of the Il9 locus in mast cells. Furthermore, IRF4 binds to the promoters of Il1b and Il9 suggesting that sialostatin L suppresses mast cell-derived IL-9 preferentially by inhibiting IRF4. In an experimental asthma model, mast cell-specific deficiency in IRF4 or administration of sialostatin L results in a strong reduction of asthma symptoms demonstrating the immunosuppressive potency of tick-derived molecules. PMID:26078269

  14. Hard π0 and η production in S+Au nuclear collisions at SPS energies and possible signature of quark-gluon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, Yu. A.

    1998-11-01

    Hard π0 and η production is investigated in Landau and Bjorken hydrodynamical models taking into account great number of hadronic resonances (16 and 42) in hadronic phase. We consider two different scenario: with quark-gluon plasma (QGP) formation and with only hadronic gas one without QGP. The Cronin effect and hard direct pions emission are taken into account. It is shown that these two scenario give similar p⊥ spectra which agrees with experimental data obtained by WA80 collaboration. Therefore we conclude that from hadronic spectra it is difficult to extract the proof of QGP formation. However we calculate also the η/π0 ratio. We show that this value agrees with experiment only for scenario with QGP and phase transition to hadrons. The hadronic gas scenario without QGP disagrees with experimental data.

  15. Human mast cell tryptase: Multiple cDNAs and genes reveal a multigene serine protease family

    SciTech Connect

    Vanderslice, P.; Ballinger, S.M., Tam, E.K.; Goldstein, S.M.; Craik, C.S.; Caughey, G.H. )

    1990-05-01

    Three different cDNAs and a gene encoding human skin mast cell tryptase have been cloned and sequenced in their entirety. The deduced amino acid sequences reveal a 30-amino acid prepropeptide followed by a 245-amino acid catalytic domain. The C-terminal undecapeptide of the human preprosequence is identical in dog tryptase and appears to be part of a prosequence unique among serine proteases. The differences among the three human tryptase catalytic domains include the loss of a consensus N-glycosylation site in one cDNA, which may explain some of the heterogeneity in size and susceptibility to deglycosylation seen in tryptase preparations. All three tryptase cDNAs are distinct from a recently reported cDNA obtained from a human lung mast cell library. A skin tryptase cDNA was used to isolate a human tryptase gene, the exons of which match one of the skin-derived cDNAs. The organization of the {approx}1.8-kilobase-pair tryptase gene is unique and is not closely related to that of any other mast cell or leukocyte serine protease. The 5{prime} regulatory regions of the gene share features with those of other serine proteases, including mast cell chymase, but are unusual in being separated from the protein-coding sequence by an intron. High-stringency hybridization of a human genomic DNA blot with a fragment of the tryptase gene confirms the presence of multiple tryptase genes. These findings provide genetic evidence that human mast cell tryptases are the products of a multigene family.

  16. Overview of physics results from MAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, B.; Akers, R. J.; Alladio, F.; Allan, S.; Appel, L. C.; Barnes, M.; Barratt, N. C.; Ben Ayed, N.; Breizman, B. N.; Cecconello, M.; Challis, C. D.; Chapman, I. T.; Ciric, D.; Colyer, G.; Connor, J. W.; Conway, N. J.; Cox, M.; Cowley, S. C.; Cunningham, G.; Darke, A.; De Bock, M.; Delchambre, E.; De Temmerman, G.; Dendy, R. O.; Denner, P.; Driscoll, M. D.; Dudson, B.; Dunai, D.; Dunstan, M.; Elmore, S.; Field, A. R.; Fishpool, G.; Freethy, S.; Garzotti, L.; Gibson, K. J.; Gryaznevich, M. P.; Guttenfelder, W.; Harrison, J.; Hastie, R. J.; Hawkes, N. C.; Hender, T. C.; Hnat, B.; Howell, D. F.; Hua, M.-D.; Hubbard, A.; Huysmans, G.; Keeling, D.; Kim, Y. C.; Kirk, A.; Liang, Y.; Lilley, M. K.; Lisak, M.; Lisgo, S.; Liu, Y. Q.; Maddison, G. P.; Maingi, R.; Manhood, S. J.; Martin, R.; McArdle, G. J.; McCone, J.; Meyer, H.; Michael, C.; Mordijck, S.; Morgan, T.; Morris, A. W.; Muir, D. G.; Nardon, E.; Naylor, G.; O'Brien, M. R.; O'Gorman, T.; Páleník, J.; Patel, A.; Pinches, S. D.; Price, M. N.; Roach, C. M.; Rozhansky, V.; Saarelma, S.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Saveliev, A.; Scannell, R.; Sharapov, S. E.; Shevchenko, V.; Shibaev, S.; Stork, D.; Storrs, J.; Suttrop, W.; Sykes, A.; Tamain, P.; Taylor, D.; Temple, D.; Thomas-Davies, N.; Thornton, A.; Turnyanskiy, M. R.; Valovic, M.; Vann, R. G. L.; Voss, G.; Walsh, M. J.; Warder, S. E. V.; Wilson, H. R.; Windridge, M.; Wisse, M.; Zoletnik, S.; MAST, the; NBI Teams.

    2011-09-01

    Major developments on the Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak (MAST) have enabled important advances in support of ITER and the physics basis of a spherical tokamak (ST) based component test facility (CTF), as well as providing new insight into underlying tokamak physics. For example, L-H transition studies benefit from high spatial and temporal resolution measurements of pedestal profile evolution (temperature, density and radial electric field) and in support of pedestal stability studies the edge current density profile has been inferred from motional Stark effect measurements. The influence of the q-profile and E × B flow shear on transport has been studied in MAST and equilibrium flow shear has been included in gyro-kinetic codes, improving comparisons with the experimental data. H-modes exhibit a weaker q and stronger collisionality dependence of heat diffusivity than implied by IPB98(y,2) scaling, which may have important implications for the design of an ST-based CTF. ELM mitigation, an important issue for ITER, has been demonstrated by applying resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) using both internal and external coils, but full stabilization of type-I ELMs has not been observed. Modelling shows the importance of including the plasma response to the RMP fields. MAST plasmas with q > 1 and weak central magnetic shear regularly exhibit a long-lived saturated ideal internal mode. Measured plasma braking in the presence of this mode compares well with neo-classical toroidal viscosity theory. In support of basic physics understanding, high resolution Thomson scattering measurements are providing new insight into sawtooth crash dynamics and neo-classical tearing mode critical island widths. Retarding field analyser measurements show elevated ion temperatures in the scrape-off layer of L-mode plasmas and, in the presence of type-I ELMs, ions with energy greater than 500 eV are detected 20 cm outside the separatrix. Disruption mitigation by massive gas injection has

  17. Overview of physics results from MAST

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, B.; Akers, R. J.; Alladio, F.; Appel, L. C.; Barnes, M.; Barratt, N. C.; Ben Ayed, N.; Breizman, B. N.; Cecconello, M.; Challis, C. D.; Chapman, I. T.; Ciric, D.; Colyer, G.; Connor, J. W.; Conway, N. J.; Cox, M.; Cowley, S. C.; Cunningham, G.; Darke, A.; De Bock, M.; Delchambre, E.; De Temmerman, G.; Dendy, R. O.; Denner, P.; Driscoll, M.; Dudson, B.; Dunai, D.; Dunstan, M.; Elmore, S.; Field, A. R.; Fishpool, G.; Freethy, S.; Garzotti, L.; Gibson, K. J.; Gryaznevich, M. P.; Guttenfelder, W.; Harrison, J.; Hastie, R.; Hawkes, N. C.; Hender, T. C.; Hnat, B.; Howell, D. F.; Hua, M. D.; Hubbard, A.; Huysmans, G.; Keeling, D.; Kim, Y. C.; Kirk, A.; Liang, Y.; Lilley, M.; et al.

    2011-01-01

    Major developments on the Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak (MAST) have enabled important advances in support of ITER and the physics basis of a spherical tokamak (ST) based component test facility (CTF), as well as providing new insight into underlying tokamak physics. For example, L H transition studies benefit from high spatial and temporal resolution measurements of pedestal profile evolution (temperature, density and radial electric field) and in support of pedestal stability studies the edge current density profile has been inferred from motional Stark effect measurements. The influence of the q-profile and E B flow shear on transport has been studied in MAST and equilibrium flow shear has been included in gyro-kinetic codes, improving comparisons with the experimental data. H-modes exhibit a weaker q and stronger collisionality dependence of heat diffusivity than implied by IPB98(y,2) scaling, which may have important implications for the design of an ST-based CTF. ELM mitigation, an important issue for ITER, has been demonstrated by applying resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) using both internal and external coils, but full stabilization of type-I ELMs has not been observed. Modelling shows the importance of including the plasma response to the RMP fields. MAST plasmas with q > 1 and weak central magnetic shear regularly exhibit a long-lived saturated ideal internal mode. Measured plasma braking in the presence of this mode compares well with neo-classical toroidal viscosity theory. In support of basic physics understanding, high resolution Thomson scattering measurements are providing new insight into sawtooth crash dynamics and neo-classical tearing mode critical island widths. Retarding field analyser measurements show elevated ion temperatures in the scrape-off layer of L-mode plasmas and, in the presence of type-I ELMs, ions with energy greater than 500 eV are detected 20 cm outside the separatrix. Disruption mitigation by massive gas injection has

  18. 123. UMBILICAL MAST PUMP ROOM (209), LSB (BLDG. 751). PUMP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    123. UMBILICAL MAST PUMP ROOM (209), LSB (BLDG. 751). PUMP ON LEFT; HYDRAULIC CONTROL PANEL FOR UMBILICAL MAST AND TRENCH DOORS IN CENTER OF ROOM, FACING WEST. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  19. Mast cell function: a new vision of an old cell.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Elaine Zayas Marcelino; Jamur, Maria Célia; Oliver, Constance

    2014-10-01

    Since first described by Paul Ehrlich in 1878, mast cells have been mostly viewed as effectors of allergy. It has been only in the past two decades that mast cells have gained recognition for their involvement in other physiological and pathological processes. Mast cells have a widespread distribution and are found predominantly at the interface between the host and the external environment. Mast cell maturation, phenotype and function are a direct consequence of the local microenvironment and have a marked influence on their ability to specifically recognize and respond to various stimuli through the release of an array of biologically active mediators. These features enable mast cells to act as both first responders in harmful situations as well as to respond to changes in their environment by communicating with a variety of other cells implicated in physiological and immunological responses. Therefore, the critical role of mast cells in both innate and adaptive immunity, including immune tolerance, has gained increased prominence. Conversely, mast cell dysfunction has pointed to these cells as the main offenders in several chronic allergic/inflammatory disorders, cancer and autoimmune diseases. This review summarizes the current knowledge of mast cell function in both normal and pathological conditions with regards to their regulation, phenotype and role.

  20. Involvement of mast cells in adipose tissue fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Shizuka; Ohyane, Chie; Kim, Young-Il; Lin, Shan; Goto, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Kim, Chu-Sook; Kang, Jihey; Yu, Rina; Kawada, Teruo

    2014-02-01

    Recently, fibrosis is observed in obese adipose tissue; however, the pathogenesis remains to be clarified. Obese adipose tissue is characterized by chronic inflammation with massive accumulation of immune cells including mast cells. The objective of the present study was to clarify the relationship between fibrosis and mast cells in obese adipose tissue, as well as to determine the origin of infiltrating mast cells. We observed the enhancement of mast cell accumulation and fibrosis in adipose tissue of severely obese diabetic db/db mice. Furthermore, adipose tissue-conditioned medium (ATCM) from severely obese diabetic db/db mice significantly enhanced collagen 5 mRNA expression in NIH-3T3 fibroblasts, and this enhancement was suppressed by the addition of an anti-mast cell protease 6 (MCP-6) antibody. An in vitro study showed that only collagen V among various types of collagen inhibited preadipocyte differentiation. Moreover, we found that ATCM from the nonobese but not obese stages of db/db mice significantly enhanced the migration of bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs). These findings suggest that immature mast cells that infiltrate into adipose tissue at the nonobese stage gradually mature with the progression of obesity and diabetes and that MCP-6 secreted from mature mast cells induces collagen V expression in obese adipose tissue, which may contribute to the process of adipose tissue fibrosis. Induction of collagen V by MCP-6 might accelerate insulin resistance via the suppression of preadipocyte differentiation.

  1. 109. REDUNDANCY SYSTEM CONTROLS FOR UMBILICAL MAST RETRACTION AT LOWER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    109. REDUNDANCY SYSTEM CONTROLS FOR UMBILICAL MAST RETRACTION AT LOWER LEFT SIDE OF HYDRAULIC CONTROL PANEL IN UMBILICAL MAST PUMP ROOM (109), LSB (BLDG. 770) - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 West, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  2. 126. REDUNDANCY SYSTEM CONTROLS FOR UMBILICAL MAST RETRACTION AT LOWER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    126. REDUNDANCY SYSTEM CONTROLS FOR UMBILICAL MAST RETRACTION AT LOWER LEFT SIDE OF HYDRAULIC CONTROL PANEL IN UMBILICAL MAST PUMP ROOM (209), LSB (BLDG. 751) - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  3. Mast cells aggravate sepsis by inhibiting peritoneal macrophage phagocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Dahdah, Albert; Gautier, Gregory; Attout, Tarik; Fiore, Frédéric; Lebourdais, Emeline; Msallam, Rasha; Daëron, Marc; Monteiro, Renato C.; Benhamou, Marc; Charles, Nicolas; Davoust, Jean; Blank, Ulrich; Malissen, Bernard; Launay, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Controlling the overwhelming inflammatory reaction associated with polymicrobial sepsis remains a prevalent clinical challenge with few treatment options. In septic peritonitis, blood neutrophils and monocytes are rapidly recruited into the peritoneal cavity to control infection, but the role of resident sentinel cells during the early phase of infection is less clear. In particular, the influence of mast cells on other tissue-resident cells remains poorly understood. Here, we developed a mouse model that allows both visualization and conditional ablation of mast cells and basophils to investigate the role of mast cells in severe septic peritonitis. Specific depletion of mast cells led to increased survival rates in mice with acute sepsis. Furthermore, we determined that mast cells impair the phagocytic action of resident macrophages, thereby allowing local and systemic bacterial proliferation. Mast cells did not influence local recruitment of neutrophils and monocytes or the release of inflammatory cytokines. Phagocytosis inhibition by mast cells involved their ability to release prestored IL-4 within 15 minutes after bacterial encounter, and treatment with an IL-4–neutralizing antibody prevented this inhibitory effect and improved survival of septic mice. Our study uncovers a local crosstalk between mast cells and macrophages during the early phase of sepsis development that aggravates the outcome of severe bacterial infection. PMID:25180604

  4. Marine asset security and tracking (MAST) system

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, Gregory Richard; Smith, Stephen Fulton; Moore, Michael Roy; Dobson, Eric Lesley; Blair, Jeffrey Scott; Duncan, Christopher Allen; Lenarduzzi, Roberto

    2008-07-01

    Methods and apparatus are described for marine asset security and tracking (MAST). A method includes transmitting identification data, location data and environmental state sensor data from a radio frequency tag. An apparatus includes a radio frequency tag that transmits identification data, location data and environmental state sensor data. Another method includes transmitting identification data and location data from a radio frequency tag using hybrid spread-spectrum modulation. Another apparatus includes a radio frequency tag that transmits both identification data and location data using hybrid spread-spectrum modulation.

  5. A practical method to evaluate radiofrequency exposure of mast workers.

    PubMed

    Alanko, Tommi; Hietanen, Maila

    2008-01-01

    Assessment of occupational exposure to radiofrequency (RF) fields in telecommunication transmitter masts is a challenging task. For conventional field strength measurements using manually operated instruments, it is difficult to document the locations of measurements while climbing up a mast. Logging RF dosemeters worn by the workers, on the other hand, do not give any information about the location of the exposure. In this study, a practical method was developed and applied to assess mast workers' exposure to RF fields and the corresponding location. This method uses a logging dosemeter for personal RF exposure evaluation and two logging barometers to determine the corresponding height of the worker's position on the mast. The procedure is not intended to be used for compliance assessments, but to indicate locations where stricter assessments are needed. The applicability of the method is demonstrated by making measurements in a TV and radio transmitting mast.

  6. Alterations in MAST suit pressure with changes in ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Sanders, A B; Meislin, H W; Daub, E

    1983-01-01

    A study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that change in ambient air temperature has an effect on MAST suit pressure according to the ideal gas law. Two different MAST suits were tested on Resusci-Annie dummies. The MAST suits were applied in a cold room at 4.4 degrees C and warmed to 44 degrees C. Positive linear correlations were found in nine trials, but the two suits differed in their rate of increase in pressure. Three trials using humans were conducted showing increased pressure with temperature but at a lesser rate than with dummies. A correlation of 0.5 to 1.0 mm Hg increase in MAST suit pressure for each 1.0 degrees C increase in ambient temperature was found. Implications are discussed for the use of the MAST suit in environmental conditions where the temperature changes. PMID:6679851

  7. Roles and relevance of mast cells in infection and vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Yu; Xiang, Zou

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In addition to their well-established role in allergy mast cells have been described as contributing to functional regulation of both innate and adaptive immune responses in host defense. Mast cells are of hematopoietic origin but typically complete their differentiation in tissues where they express immune regulatory functions by releasing diverse mediators and cytokines. Mast cells are abundant at mucosal tissues which are portals of entry for common infectious agents in addition to allergens. Here, we review the current understanding of the participation of mast cells in defense against infection. We also discuss possibilities of exploiting mast cell activation to provide adequate adjuvant activity that is needed in high-quality vaccination against infectious diseases. PMID:26565602

  8. A practical method to evaluate radiofrequency exposure of mast workers.

    PubMed

    Alanko, Tommi; Hietanen, Maila

    2008-01-01

    Assessment of occupational exposure to radiofrequency (RF) fields in telecommunication transmitter masts is a challenging task. For conventional field strength measurements using manually operated instruments, it is difficult to document the locations of measurements while climbing up a mast. Logging RF dosemeters worn by the workers, on the other hand, do not give any information about the location of the exposure. In this study, a practical method was developed and applied to assess mast workers' exposure to RF fields and the corresponding location. This method uses a logging dosemeter for personal RF exposure evaluation and two logging barometers to determine the corresponding height of the worker's position on the mast. The procedure is not intended to be used for compliance assessments, but to indicate locations where stricter assessments are needed. The applicability of the method is demonstrated by making measurements in a TV and radio transmitting mast. PMID:19054796

  9. Testing the "toxin hypothesis of allergy": Mast cells, IgE, and innate and acquired immune responses to venoms*

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Mindy; Starkl, Philipp; Marichal, Thomas; Galli, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Work in mice indicates that innate functions of mast cells, particularly degradation of venom toxins by mast cell-derived proteases, can enhance resistance to certain arthropod or reptile venoms. Recent reports indicate that acquired Th2 immune responses associated with the production of IgE antibodies, induced by Russell’s viper venom or honeybee venom, or by a component of honeybee venom, bee venom phospholipase 2 (bvPLA2), can increase the resistance of mice to challenge with potentially lethal doses of either of the venoms or bvPLA2. These findings support the conclusion that, in contrast to the detrimental effects associated with allergic Th2 immune responses, mast cells and IgE-dependent immune responses to venoms can contribute to innate and adaptive resistance to venom-induced pathology and mortality. PMID:26210895

  10. Mast cells, angiogenesis, and tumour growth.

    PubMed

    Ribatti, Domenico; Crivellato, Enrico

    2012-01-01

    Accumulation of mast cells (MCs) in tumours was described by Ehrlich in his doctoral thesis. Since this early account, ample evidence has been provided highlighting participation of MCs to the inflammatory reaction that occurs in many clinical and experimental tumour settings. MCs are bone marrow-derived tissue-homing leukocytes that are endowed with a panoply of releasable mediators and surface receptors. These cells actively take part to innate and acquired immune reactions as well as to a series of fundamental functions such as angiogenesis, tissue repair, and tissue remodelling. The involvement of MCs in tumour development is debated. Although some evidence suggests that MCs can promote tumourigenesis and tumour progression, there are some clinical sets as well as experimental tumour models in which MCs seem to have functions that favour the host. One of the major issues linking MCs to cancer is the ability of these cells to release potent pro-angiogenic factors. This review will focus on the most recent acquisitions about this intriguing field of research. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mast cells in inflammation.

  11. SOL Width Scaling in the MAST Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Joon-Wook; Counsell, Glenn; Connor, Jack; Kirk, Andrew

    2002-11-01

    Target heat loads are determined in large part by the upstream SOL heat flux width, Δ_h. Considerable effort has been made in the past to develop analytical and empirical scalings for Δh to allow reliable estimates to be made for the next-step device. The development of scalings for a large spherical tokamak (ST) such as MAST is particularly important both for development of the ST concept and for improving the robustness of scalings derived for conventional tokamaks. A first such scaling has been developed in MAST DND plasmas. The scaling was developed by flux-mapping data from the target Langmuir probe arrays to the mid-plane and fitting to key upstream parameters such as P_SOL, bar ne and q_95. In order to minimise the effects of co-linearity, dedicated campaigns were undertaken to explore the widest possible range of each parameter while keeping the remainder as fixed as possible. Initial results indicate a weak inverse dependence on P_SOL and approximately linear dependence on bar n_e. Scalings derived from consideration of theoretical edge transport models and integration with data from conventional devices is under way. The established scaling laws could be used for the extrapolations to the future machine such as Spherical Tokamak Power Plant (STPP). This work is jointly funded by Euratom and UK Department of Trade and Industry. J-W. Ahn would like to recognise the support of a grant from the British Foreign & Commonwealth Office.

  12. The Killer Cell Ig-like Receptor 2DL4 Expression in Human Mast Cells and Its Potential Role in Breast Cancer Invasion.

    PubMed

    Ueshima, Chiyuki; Kataoka, Tatsuki R; Hirata, Masahiro; Furuhata, Ayako; Suzuki, Eiji; Toi, Masakazu; Tsuruyama, Tatsuaki; Okayama, Yoshimichi; Haga, Hironori

    2015-08-01

    The killer-cell Ig-like receptor (KIR) 2DL4 (CD158d) acts as a receptor for human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G and is expressed on almost all human natural killer (NK) cells. The expression and function of KIR2DL4 in other hematopoietic cells is poorly understood. Here, we focused on human mast cells, which exhibit cytotoxic activity similar to that of NK cells. KIR2DL4 was detected in all examined human cultured mast cells established from peripheral blood derived from healthy volunteers (PB-mast), the human mast cell line LAD2, and human nonneoplastic mast cells, including those on pathologic specimens. An agonistic antibody against KIR2DL4 decreased KIT-mediated and IgE-triggered responses, and enhanced the granzyme B production by PB-mast and LAD2 cells, by activating Src homology 2-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase (SHP-2). Next, we performed a coculture assay between LAD2 cells and the HLA-G(+) cancer cells, MCF-7 and JEG-3, and showed that KIR2DL4 on LAD2 cells enhanced MMP-9 production and the invasive activity of both cell lines via HLA-G. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that the direct interaction between HLA-G(+) breast cancer cells and KIR2DL4(+) tissue mast cells (observed in 12 of 36 cases; 33.3%) was statistically correlated with the presence of lymph node metastasis or lymph-vascular invasion (observed in 11 of 12 cases; 91.7%; χ(2) = 7.439; P < 0.01; degrees of freedom, 1) in the clinical samples. These findings suggest that the KIR2DL4 on human mast cells facilitates HLA-G-expressing cancer invasion and the subsequent metastasis.

  13. GPR30 decreases cardiac chymase/angiotensin II by inhibiting local mast cell number

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Zhuo; Wang, Hao; Lin, Marina; Groban, Leanne

    2015-03-27

    Chronic activation of the novel estrogen receptor GPR30 by its agonist G1 mitigates the adverse effects of estrogen (E2) loss on cardiac structure and function. Using the ovariectomized (OVX) mRen2.Lewis rat, an E2-sensitive model of diastolic dysfunction, we found that E2 status is inversely correlated with local cardiac angiotensin II (Ang II) levels, likely via Ang I/chymase-mediated production. Since chymase is released from cardiac mast cells during stress (e.g., volume/pressure overload, inflammation), we hypothesized that GPR30-related cardioprotection after E2 loss might occur through its opposing actions on cardiac mast cell proliferation and chymase production. Using real-time quantitative PCR, immunohistochemistry, and immunoblot analysis, we found mast cell number, chymase expression, and cardiac Ang II levels were significantly increased in the hearts of OVX-compared to ovary-intact mRen2.Lewis rats and the GPR30 agonist G1 (50 mg/kg/day, s.c.) administered for 2 weeks limited the adverse effects of estrogen loss. In vitro studies revealed that GPR30 receptors are expressed in the RBL-2H3 mast cell line and G1 inhibits serum-induced cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner, as determined by cell counting, BrdU incorporation assay, and Ki-67 staining. Using specific antagonists to estrogen receptors, blockage of GPR30, but not ERα or ERβ, attenuated the inhibitory effects of estrogen on BrdU incorporation in RBL-2H3 cells. Further study of the mechanism underlying the effect on cell proliferation showed that G1 inhibits cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1) mRNA and protein expression in RBL-2H3 cells in a dose-dependent manner. - Highlights: • GPR30 activation limits mast cell number in hearts from OVX mRen2.Lewis rats. • GPR30 activation decreases cardiac chymase/angiotensin II after estrogen loss. • GPR30 activation inhibits RBL-2H3 mast cell proliferation and CDK1 expression.

  14. Martian environmental simulation for a deployable lattice mast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warden, Robert M.

    1994-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder mission (formerly Mars Environmental Survey or MESUR) is scheduled for launch in December 1996 and is designed to place a small lander on the surface of Mars. After impact, the lander unfolds to expose its solar panels and release a miniature rover. Also on board is the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) binocular camera which is elevated by a deployable mast to obtain a panoramic view of the landing area. The design of this deployable mast is based on similar designs which have a long and successful flight history. In the past when this type of self-deployable mast has been used, a rate limiter has been incorporated to control the speed of deployment. In this application, to reduce weight and complexity, it was proposed to eliminate the rate limiter so that the mast would deploy without restraint. Preliminary tests showed that this type of deployment was possible especially if the deployed length was relatively short, as in this application. Compounding the problem, however, was the requirement to deploy the mast at an angle of up to 30 degrees from vertical. The deployment process was difficult to completely analyze due to the effects of gravitational and inertial loads on the mast and camera during rapid extension. Testing in a realistic manner was imperative to verify the system performance. A deployment test was therefore performed to determine the maximum tilt angle at which the mast could reliably extend and support the camera on Mars. The testing of the deployable mast requires partial gravity compensation to simulate the smaller force of Martian gravity. During the test, mass properties were maintained while weight properties were reduced. This paper describes the testing of a deployable mast in a simulated Martian environment as well as the results of the tests.

  15. Quantification and Localization of Mast Cells in Periapical Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Mahita, VN; Manjunatha, BS; Shah, R; Astekar, M; Purohit, S; Kovvuru, S

    2015-01-01

    Background: Periapical lesions occur in response to chronic irritation in periapical tissue, generally resulting from an infected root canal. Specific etiological agents of induction, participating cell population and growth factors associated with maintenance and resolution of periapical lesions are incompletely understood. Among the cells found in periapical lesions, mast cells have been implicated in the inflammatory mechanism. Aim: Quantifications and the possible role played by mast cells in the periapical granuloma and radicular cyst. Hence, this study is to emphasize the presence (localization) and quantification of mast cells in periapical granuloma and radicular cyst. Materials and Methods: A total of 30 cases and out of which 15 of periapical granuloma and 15 radicular cyst, each along with the case details from the previously diagnosed cases in the department of oral pathology were selected for the study. The gender distribution showed male 8 (53.3%) and females 7 (46.7%) in periapical granuloma cases and male 10 (66.7%) and females 5 (33.3%) in radicular cyst cases. The statistical analysis used was unpaired t-test. Results: Mean mast cell count in periapical granuloma subepithelial and deeper connective tissue, was 12.40 (0.99%) and 7.13 (0.83%), respectively. The mean mast cell counts in subepithelial and deeper connective tissue of radicular cyst were 17.64 (1.59%) and 12.06 (1.33%) respectively, which was statistically significant. No statistical significant difference was noted among males and females. Conclusion: Mast cells were more in number in radicular cyst. Based on the concept that mast cells play a critical role in the induction of inflammation, it is logical to use therapeutic agents to alter mast cell function and secretion, to thwart inflammation at its earliest phases. These findings may suggest the possible role of mast cells in the pathogenesis of periapical lesions. PMID:25861530

  16. Ceramide-CD300f binding suppresses experimental colitis by inhibiting ATP-mediated mast cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Matsukawa, Toshihiro; Izawa, Kumi; Isobe, Masamichi; Takahashi, Mariko; Maehara, Akie; Yamanishi, Yoshinori; Kaitani, Ayako; Okumura, Ko; Teshima, Takanori; Kitamura, Toshio; Kitaura, Jiro

    2016-01-01

    Objective Extracellular ATP mediates mast cell-dependent intestinal inflammation via P2X7 purinoceptors. We have previously shown that CD300f (also called the leucocyte mono-immunoglobulin-like receptor 3 (LMIR3)) suppresses immunoglobulin E-dependent and mast cell-dependent allergic responses by binding to ceramide. The aim of the present study was to clarify the role of ceramide–LMIR3 interaction in the development of IBD. Design The dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis model was used in wild-type (WT), LMIR3−/−, mast cell-deficient KitW-sh/W-sh, KitW-sh/W-shLMIR3−/− or KitW-sh/W-sh mice engrafted with WT or LMIR3−/− bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs). The severity of colitis was determined by clinical and histological criteria. Lamina propria cell populations were assessed by flow cytometry. Production of chemical mediators from lamina propria cells was measured by real-time reverse transcription PCR. Production of chemical mediators from ATP-stimulated BMMCs in the presence or absence of ceramide was measured by ELISA. The severity of DSS-induced colitis was assessed in mice given either an Fc fusion protein containing an extracellular domain of LMIR3, and anticeramide antibody, or ceramide liposomes. Results LMIR3 deficiency exacerbated DSS-induced colitis in mice. KitW-sh/W-sh mice harbouring LMIR3−/− mast cells exhibited more severe colitis than those harbouring WT mast cells. Ceramide–LMIR3 interaction inhibited ATP-stimulated activation of BMMCs. DSS-induced colitis was aggravated by disrupting the ceramide–LMIR3 interaction, whereas it was suppressed by treating with ceramide liposomes. Conclusions LMIR3-deficient colonic mast cells were pivotal in the exacerbation of DSS-induced colitis in LMIR3−/− mice. Ceramide liposomes attenuated DSS-induced colitis by inhibiting ATP-mediated activation of colonic mast cells through ceraimide–LMIR3 binding. PMID:25673319

  17. [Quantitative analysis for mast cells in obstructive sialadenitis].

    PubMed

    Diao, G X

    1993-03-01

    Quantitative analysis for mast cells in 27 cases of obstructive sialadenitis, 12 cases of approximate normal salivary gland tissues and 5 cases of lymphoepithelial lesion of salivary glands shows that the number of mast cells is slightly increased with the increase of gravity-grade of obstructive sialadenitis and this is closely related to fibrosis of salivary glands and infiltration grade of inflammation cells (dominated by lymphocyte cells), whereas not closely relating to the age change of patients. For the cases of benign lymphoepithelial lesion of salivary glands with malignant changes despite of malignant lymphoma or squamous cell carcinoma the numbers of mast cells are obviously decreased.

  18. Fc Gamma Receptor Signaling in Mast Cells Links Microbial Stimulation to Mucosal Immune Inflammation in the Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiao; Feng, Bai-Sui; Zheng, Peng-Yuan; Liao, Xue-Qing; Chong, Jasmine; Tang, Shang-Guo; Yang, Ping-Chang

    2008-01-01

    Microbes and microbial products are closely associated with the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD); however, the mechanisms behind this connection remain unclear. It has been previously reported that flagellin-specific antibodies are increased in IBD patient sera. As mastocytosis is one of the pathological features of IBD, we hypothesized that flagellin-specific immune responses might activate mast cells that then contribute to the initiation and maintenance of intestinal inflammation. Thirty-two colonic biopsy samples were collected from IBD patients. A flagellin/flagellin-specific IgG/Fc gamma receptor I complex was identified on biopsied mast cells using both immunohistochemistry and co-immunoprecipitation experiments; this complex was shown to co-localize on the surfaces of mast cells in the colonic mucosa of patients with IBD. In addition, an ex vivo study showed flagellin-IgG was able to bind to human mast cells. These cells were found to be sensitized to flagellin-specific IgG; re-exposure to flagellin induced the mast cells to release inflammatory mediators. An animal model of IBD was then used to examine flagellin-specific immune responses in the intestine. Mice could be sensitized to flagellin, and repeated challenges with flagellin induced an IBD-like T helper 1 pattern of intestinal inflammation that could be inhibited by pretreatment with anti-Fc gamma receptor I antibodies. Therefore, flagellin-specific immune responses activate mast cells in the intestine and play important roles in the pathogenesis of intestinal immune inflammation. PMID:18974296

  19. Self-anchoring mast for deploying a high-speed submersible mixer in a tank

    DOEpatents

    Cato, Jr., Joseph E.; Shearer, Paul M.; Rodwell, Philip O.

    2004-10-12

    A self-anchoring mast for deploying a high-speed submersible mixer in a tank includes operably connected first and second mast members (20, 22) and a foot member 46 operably connected to the second mast member for supporting the mast in a tank. The second mast member includes a track (36, 38) for slidably receiving a bearing of the mixer to change the orientation of the mixer in the tank.

  20. Self-Anchoring Mast for Deploying a High-Speed Submersible Mixer in a Tank

    SciTech Connect

    Cato, Joseph E. Jr.; Shearer, Paul M.; Rodwell, Philip 0.

    2004-10-12

    A self-anchoring mast for deploying a high-speed submersible mixer in a tank includes operably connected first and second mast members (20, 22) and a foot member 46 operably connected to the second mast member for supporting the mast in a tank. The second mast member includes a track (36, 38) for slidably receiving a bearing of the mixer to change the orientation of the mixer in the tank.

  1. Activation of human mast cells by retrocyclin and protegrin highlight their immunomodulatory and antimicrobial properties.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Kshitij; Kotian, Akhil; Subramanian, Hariharan; Daniell, Henry; Ali, Hydar

    2015-10-01

    Preclinical evaluation of Retrocyclins (RC-100, RC-101) and Protegrin-1 (PG-1) antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) is important because of their therapeutic potential against bacterial, fungal and viral infections. Human mast cells (HMCs) play important roles in host defense and wound healing but the abilities of retrocyclins and protegrin-1 to harness these functions have not been investigated. Here, we report that chemically synthesized RC-100 and PG-1 caused calcium mobilization and degranulation in HMCs but these responses were not blocked by an inhibitor of formyl peptide receptor-like 1 (FPRL1), a known receptor for AMPs. However, RC-100 and PG-1 induced degranulation in rat basophilic leukemia (RBL-2H3) cells stably expressing Mas related G protein coupled receptor X2 (MrgX2). Chemical synthesis of these AMPs is prohibitively expensive and post-synthesis modifications (cyclization, disulfide bonds, folding) are inadequate for optimal antimicrobial activity. Indeed, we found that synthetic RC-100, which caused mast cell degranulation via MrgX2, did not display any antimicrobial activity. Green-fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged RC-101 (analog of RC-100) and GFP-tagged PG-1 purified from transgenic plant chloroplasts killed bacteria and induced mast cell degranulation. Furthermore, GFP-PG1 bound specifically to RBL-2H3 cells expressing MrgX2. These findings suggest that retrocyclins and protegrins activate HMCs independently of FPRL1 but via MrgX2. Harnessing this novel feature of AMPs to activate mast cell's host defense/wound healing properties in addition to their antimicrobial activities expands their clinical potential. Low cost production of AMPs in plants should facilitate their advancement to the clinic overcoming major hurdles in current production systems. PMID:26378047

  2. Pancam Mast Assembly on Mars Rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warden, Robert M.; Cross, Mike; Harvison, Doug

    2004-01-01

    The Pancam Mast Assembly (PMA) for the 2003 Mars Rover is a deployable structure that provides an elevated platform for several cameras. The PMA consists of several mechanisms that enable it to raise the cameras as well as point the cameras in all directions. This paper describes the function of the various mechanisms as well as a description of the mechanisms and some test parameters. Designing these mechanisms to operate on the surface of Mars presented several challenges. Typical spacecraft mechanisms must operate in zero-gravity and high vacuum. These mechanisms needed to be designed to operate in Martian gravity and atmosphere. Testing conditions were a little easier because the mechanisms are not required to operate in a vacuum. All of the materials are vacuum compatible, but the mechanisms were tested in a dry nitrogen atmosphere at various cold temperatures.

  3. Mini-mast CSI testbed user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanner, Sharon E.; Pappa, Richard S.; Sulla, Jeffrey L.; Elliott, Kenny B.; Miserentino, Robert; Bailey, James P.; Cooper, Paul A.; Williams, Boyd L., Jr.; Bruner, Anne M.

    1992-01-01

    The Mini-Mast testbed is a 20 m generic truss highly representative of future deployable trusses for space applications. It is fully instrumented for system identification and active vibrations control experiments and is used as a ground testbed at NASA-Langley. The facility has actuators and feedback sensors linked via fiber optic cables to the Advanced Real Time Simulation (ARTS) system, where user defined control laws are incorporated into generic controls software. The object of the facility is to conduct comprehensive active vibration control experiments on a dynamically realistic large space structure. A primary goal is to understand the practical effects of simplifying theoretical assumptions. This User's Guide describes the hardware and its primary components, the dynamic characteristics of the test article, the control law implementation process, and the necessary safeguards employed to protect the test article. Suggestions for a strawman controls experiment are also included.

  4. D Ebw Emission Studies in Mast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevchenko, Vladimir F.; de Bock, Maarten; Freethy, Simon; Vann, Roddy; Saveliev, Alexander N.

    2011-02-01

    Angular scanning of EBW emission (EBE) has been conducted in MAST. From EBE measurements over a range of viewing angles the angular position and orientation of the B-X-O mode conversion (MC) window can be estimated giving the pitch angle of the magnetic field in the MC layer. The radial position of the corresponding MC layer is found from Thomson scattering measurements. Measurements at several frequencies can provide a pitch angle profile. Results of pitch angle profile reconstruction from EBE measurements are presented in comparison with motional Stark effect measurements. Microwave imaging of the B-X-O Me window is proposed as an alternative to the angular scanning. The proposed scheme is based on an imaging phased array of antennas allowing the required angular resolution. Image acquisition time is much shorter than MHD time scales so the EBE imaging can be used for pitch angle measurements even in the presence of MHD activity.

  5. Possible Involvement of the Inhibition of NF-κB Factor in Anti-Inflammatory Actions That Melatonin Exerts on Mast Cells.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, M D; García-Moreno, H; González-Yanes, C; Calvo, J R

    2016-08-01

    Melatonin is a molecule endogenously produced in a wide variety of immune cells, including mast cells (RBL-2H3). It exhibits immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic properties. The physiologic mechanisms underlying these activities of melatonin have not been clarified in mast cells. This work is designed to determine the anti-inflammatory effect and mechanism of action of melatonin on activated mast cells. RBL-2H3 were pre-treated with exogenous melatonin (MELx) at physiological (100nM) and pharmacological (1 mM) doses for 30 min, washed and activated with PMACI (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate plus calcium ionophore A23187) for 2 h and 12 h. The data shows that pre-treatment of MELx in stimulated mast cells, significantly reduced the levels of endogenous melatonin production (MELn), TNF-α and IL-6. These effects are directly related with the MELx concentration used. MELx also inhibited IKK/NF-κB signal transduction pathway in stimulated mast cells. These results indicate a molecular basis for the ability of melatonin to prevent inflammation and for the treatment of allergic inflammatory diseases through the down-regulation of mast cell activation. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1926-1933, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Preferential Signaling and Induction of Allergy-promoting Lymphokines Upon Weak Stimulation of the High Affinity IgE Receptor on Mast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Espinosa, Claudia; Odom, Sandra; Olivera, Ana; Hobson, J. Peyton; Martinez, Maria Eugenia Cid; Oliveira-dos-Santos, Antonio; Barra, Lillian; Spiegel, Sarah; Penninger, Josef M.; Rivera, Juan

    2003-01-01

    Mast cell degranulation and de novo cytokine production is a consequence of antigen-aggregation of the immunoglobulin E (IgE)-occupied high affinity receptor for IgE (FcɛRI). Herein, we report that lymphokines that promote allergic inflammation, like MCP-1, were potently induced at low antigen (Ag) concentrations or at low receptor occupancy with IgE whereas some that down-regulate this response, like interleukin (IL)-10, required high receptor occupancy. Weak stimulation of mast cells caused minimal degranulation whereas a half-maximal secretory response was observed for chemokines and, with the exception of TNF-α, a weaker cytokine secretory response was observed. The medium from weakly stimulated mast cells elicited a monocyte/macrophage chemotactic response similar to that observed at high receptor occupancy. Weak stimulation also favored the phosphorylation of Gab2 and p38MAPK, while LAT and ERK2 phosphorylation was induced by a stronger stimulus. Gab2-deficient mast cells were severely impaired in chemokine mRNA induction whereas LAT-deficient mast cells showed a more pronounced defect in cytokines. These findings demonstrate that perturbation of small numbers of IgE receptors on mast cells favors certain signals that contribute to a lymphokine response that can mediate allergic inflammation. PMID:12782712

  7. Mast cells phagocyte Candida albicans and produce nitric oxide by mechanisms involving TLR2 and Dectin-1.

    PubMed

    Pinke, Karen Henriette; Lima, Heliton Gustavo de; Cunha, Fernando Queiroz; Lara, Vanessa Soares

    2016-02-01

    Candida albicans (C. albicans) is a fungus commonly found in the human mucosa, which may cause superficial and systemic infections, especially in immunosuppression. Until now, the main actors in the defense against this fungus are the epithelial cells, neutrophils, macrophages/monocytes and dendritic cells. However, mast cells are strategically located to play a first line of anti-Candida defense and it has appropriate mechanisms to do it. As with other cells, the recognition of C. albicans occurs meanly via TLR2 and Dectin-1. We assess the TLR2/Dectin-1 involvement in phagocytosis and production of nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) by mast cells challenged with C. albicans. Bone marrow-derived mast cells (MC) from wild type (Wt) or knockout (TLR2-/-) mice C57BL/6 were subjected to in vitro Dectin-1 blockade. After challenged with FITC-labeled C. albicans or zymosan, phagocytosis was analyzed by microscopy. The intracellular production of NO and ROS was measured by DAF-FM diacetate and CellROX Deep/Red Reagent kits. The nitrite formation and hydrogen peroxide release were analyzed by Griess reaction and Amplex Red Hydrogen Peroxide/Peroxidase Assay Kit. Wt/MC phagocytose C. albicans with production of intracellular NO, but not ROS. Moreover, increased levels of nitrite were also observed. The absence and/or blockade of TLR2/Dectin-1 caused significant decreased in C. albicans phagocytosis and NO production. Our results showed that mast cells are able to phagocytose and produce NO against C. albicans via TLR2/Dectin-1. Therefore, mast cells could be important during the course of Candida infection and as a therapeutic target.

  8. 47. BASE OF UMBILICAL MAST, WITH ELECTRICAL POWER CABLES ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    47. BASE OF UMBILICAL MAST, WITH ELECTRICAL POWER CABLES ON LEFT; AIR-CONDITIONER DUCTS ON RIGHT - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  9. 9. DETAIL OF UMBILICAL MAST BASE WITH STEEL STOPS AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. DETAIL OF UMBILICAL MAST BASE WITH STEEL STOPS AT EAST END OF MOBILE SERVICE STRUCTURE RAIL; VIEW TO NORTHWEST. - Cape Canaveral Air Station, Launch Complex 17, Facility 28501, East end of Lighthouse Road, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  10. Assessment of the COFSI/MAST I project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chew, Meng-Sang

    1987-01-01

    The COFS (MAST I) deployer/retractor assembly (DRA) which has a cluster of mechanisms that constitute the collapsible/extensible Mast, contains mechanisms/linkages that deploy and retract. The Mast is a flexible spatial (3D) linkage with hinges that lock into place during deployment to form a truss type structure. It is 60 meters long with repeating sections of two bays. Each bay has alternating diagonals. All joints are single degree-of-freedom hinges, arranged such that the Mast does not rotate during deployment/restow and that deformation energy is minimized. Mispan hinges are incorporated in the diagonals and half of the batten members. The various operational aspects and characteristics of the various mechanisms within the DRA are analyzed. In view of the disadvantages of statical in determinancy as well as the inefficiencies inherent in recirculating gear trains, it is recommended that the bevel gear trains and the bell-crank mechanisms be redesigned.

  11. A poloidal section neutron camera for MAST upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Sangaroon, S.; Weiszflog, M.; Cecconello, M.; Conroy, S.; Ericsson, G.; Wodniak, I.; Keeling, D.; Turnyanskiy, M. [EURATOM Collaboration: MAST Team

    2014-08-21

    The Mega Ampere Spherical Tokamak Upgrade (MAST Upgrade) is intended as a demonstration of the physics viability of the Spherical Tokamak (ST) concept and as a platform for contributing to ITER/DEMO physics. Concerning physics exploitation, MAST Upgrade plasma scenarios can contribute to the ITER Tokamak physics particularly in the field of fast particle behavior and current drive studies. At present, MAST is equipped with a prototype neutron camera (NC). On the basis of the experience and results from previous experimental campaigns using the NC, the conceptual design of a neutron camera upgrade (NC Upgrade) is being developed. As part of the MAST Upgrade, the NC Upgrade is considered a high priority diagnostic since it would allow studies in the field of fast ions and current drive with good temporal and spatial resolution. In this paper, we explore an optional design with the camera array viewing the poloidal section of the plasma from different directions.

  12. Mast cells in allergy and autoimmunity: implications for adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Gregory D; Brown, Melissa A

    2006-01-01

    As in the fashion industry, trends in a particular area of scientific investigation often are fleeting but then return with renewed and enthusiastic interest. Studies of mast cell biology are good examples of this. Although dogma once relegated mast cells almost exclusively to roles in pathological inflammation associated with allergic disease, these cells are emerging as important players in a number of other physiological processes. Consequently, they are quickly becoming the newest "trendy" cell, both within and outside the field of immunology. As sources of a large array of pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators, mast cells also express cell surface molecules with defined functions in lymphocyte activation and trafficking. Here, we provide an overview of the traditional and newly appreciated contributions of mast cells to both innate and adaptive immune responses.

  13. 19. DECK VIEW LOOKING FORWARD WITH MAST, RIGGING AND BOWSPRIT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. DECK VIEW LOOKING FORWARD WITH MAST, RIGGING AND BOWSPRIT DETAILS - HATCH COVER REMOVED TO SHOW CENTERBOARD TRUNK - KATHRYN-Two-sail Bateau "Skipjack", Dogwood Harbor, Chesapeake Bay, Tilghman, Talbot County, MD

  14. 51. STERN VIEW AFTER CONVERSION TO AFRAME MAST AND NEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    51. STERN VIEW AFTER CONVERSION TO A-FRAME MAST AND NEW CRANE FOR HOISTING BUOYS. - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter WHITE PINE, U.S. Coast Guard 8th District Base, South Broad Street, Mobile, Mobile County, AL

  15. Breeding system and pollen limitation in the masting tree Sorbus aucuparia L. (Rosaceae) in the NW Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pías, Beatriz; Guitián, Pablo

    2006-01-01

    Mast seeding or masting is the supra-annual periodic production of a large number of seeds by long-lived plants. It has been suggested that this may be a strategy to increase pollination efficiency. Sorbus aucuparia is a masting tree typically showing rather low fruit set, though with some variation among years and populations, together with marked among-year variation in flower and fruit production. Here we report a study of the reproductive biology and insect-visitor spectrum of S. aucuparia in the NW Iberian Peninsula. Results obtained over a 4-year period indicate marked self-incompatibility, so that fruit set is strongly dependent on pollinator service. Nevertheless, fruit and seed set were not limited by pollen supply in any of the years of study, since fruit and seed set after manual cross-pollination were no higher than after natural pollination. Inflorescences were visited by diverse insect species. There was no significant correlation between fruit set and insect visit frequency. Taken together, these findings indicate that the rather low fruit and seed sets observed in this species, and the spatiotemporal variation in these parameters, must be attributed to other factors, such as abiotic resource availability. We conclude that masting in S. aucuparia is probably not a strategy for increasing pollination efficiency.

  16. Establishment and characterization of mouse bone marrow-derived mast cell hybridomas

    SciTech Connect

    Kawahara, Takeshi

    2012-11-01

    Interleukin (IL)-3-dependent mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) are an important model for studying the function of mucosal-type mast cells. In the present study, BMMCs were successfully immortalized by cell fusion using a hypoxanthine-aminopterin-thymidine medium-sensitive variant of P815 mouse mastocytoma (P815-6TgR) as a partner cell line. The established mouse mast cell hybridomas (MMCHs) expressed {alpha}, {beta}, and {gamma} subunits of high-affinity immunoglobulin E (IgE) receptor (Fc{epsilon}RI) and possessed cytoplasmic granules devoid of or partially filled with electron-dense material. Four independent MMCH clones continuously proliferated without supplemental exogenous IL-3 and showed a degranulation response on stimulation with IgE+antigen. Furthermore, histamine synthesis and release by degranulation were confirmed in MMCH-D5, a MMCH clone that showed the strongest degranulation response. MMCH-D5 exhibited elevated levels of IL-3, IL-4, IL-13, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}, and cyclooxygenase 2, and production of prostaglandin D{sub 2} and leukotriene C{sub 4} in response to IgE-induced stimulation. MMCH clones also expressed Toll-like receptors (TLRs) 1, 2, 4, and 6 and showed elevated levels of TNF-{alpha} expression in response to stimulation with TLR2 and TLR4 ligands. The MMCHs established using this method should be suitable for studies on Fc{epsilon}RI- and TLR-mediated effector functions of mast cells.

  17. Characterizing the inhibitory action of zinc oxide nanoparticles on allergic-type mast cell activation.

    PubMed

    Feltis, B N; Elbaz, A; Wright, P F A; Mackay, G A; Turney, T W; Lopata, A L

    2015-08-01

    The development of nanoparticles (NPs) for commercial products is undergoing a dramatic expansion. Many sunscreens and cosmetics now use zinc oxide (ZnO) or titania (TiO2) NPs, which are effective ultraviolet (UV) filters. Zinc oxide topical creams are also used in mild anti-inflammatory treatments. In this study we evaluated the effect of size and dispersion state of ZnO and TiO2 NPs, compared to "bulk" ZnO, on mast cell degranulation and viability. ZnO and TiO2 NPs were characterized using dynamic light scattering and disc centrifugation. Rat basophilic leukaemia (RBL-2H3) cells and primary mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) were exposed to ZnO and TiO2 NPs of different sizes (25-200 nm) and surface coatings at concentrations from 1 to 200 μg/mL. The effect of NPs on immunoglobulin E (IgE)-dependent mast cell degranulation was assessed by measuring release of both β-hexosaminidase and histamine via colorimetric and ELISA assays. The intracellular level of Zn(2+) and Ca(2+) ions were measured using zinquin ethyl ester and Fluo-4 AM fluorescence probes, respectively. Cellular viability was determined using the soluble tetrazolium-based MTS colorimetric assay. Exposure of RBL-2H3 and primary mouse BMMC to ZnO NPs markedly inhibited both histamine and β-hexosaminidase release. This effect was both particle size and dispersion dependent. In contrast, TiO2 NPs did not inhibit the allergic response. These effects were independent of cytotoxicity, which was observed only at high concentrations of ZnO NPs, and was not observed for TiO2 NPs. The inhibitory effects of ZnO NPs on mast cells were inversely proportional to particle size and dispersion status, and thus these NPs may have greater potential than "bulk" zinc in the inhibition of allergic responses.

  18. Carbonic anhydrase enzymes regulate mast cell-mediated inflammation.

    PubMed

    Henry, Everett K; Sy, Chandler B; Inclan-Rico, Juan M; Espinosa, Vanessa; Ghanny, Saleena S; Dwyer, Daniel F; Soteropoulos, Patricia; Rivera, Amariliz; Siracusa, Mark C

    2016-08-22

    Type 2 cytokine responses are necessary for the development of protective immunity to helminth parasites but also cause the inflammation associated with allergies and asthma. Recent studies have found that peripheral hematopoietic progenitor cells contribute to type 2 cytokine-mediated inflammation through their enhanced ability to develop into mast cells. In this study, we show that carbonic anhydrase (Car) enzymes are up-regulated in type 2-associated progenitor cells and demonstrate that Car enzyme inhibition is sufficient to prevent mouse mast cell responses and inflammation after Trichinella spiralis infection or the induction of food allergy-like disease. Further, we used CRISPR/Cas9 technology and illustrate that genetically editing Car1 is sufficient to selectively reduce mast cell development. Finally, we demonstrate that Car enzymes can be targeted to prevent human mast cell development. Collectively, these experiments identify a previously unrecognized role for Car enzymes in regulating mast cell lineage commitment and suggest that Car enzyme inhibitors may possess therapeutic potential that can be used to treat mast cell-mediated inflammation. PMID:27526715

  19. Mast cells: new therapeutic target in helminth immune modulation.

    PubMed

    Vukman, K V; Lalor, R; Aldridge, A; O'Neill, S M

    2016-01-01

    Helminth infection and their secreted antigens have a protective role in many immune-mediated inflammatory disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. However, studies have focused primarily on identifying immune protective mechanisms of helminth infection and their secreted molecules on dendritic cells and macrophages. Given that mast cells have been shown to be implicated in the pathogenesis and progression of many inflammatory disorders, their role should also be examined and considered as cellular target for helminth-based therapies. As there is a dearth of studies examining the interaction of helminth-derived antigens and mast cells, this review will focus on the role of mast cells during helminth infection and examine our current understanding of the involvement of mast cells in TH 1/TH 17-mediated immune disorders. In this context, potential mechanisms by which helminths could target the TH 1/TH 17 promoting properties of mast cells can be identified to unveil novel therapeutic mast cell driven targets in combating these inflammatory disorders. PMID:26577605

  20. Mast Cell-Derived Histamine Mediates Cystitis Pain

    PubMed Central

    Rudick, Charles N.; Bryce, Paul J.; Guichelaar, Laura A.; Berry, Ruth E.; Klumpp, David J.

    2008-01-01

    Background Mast cells trigger inflammation that is associated with local pain, but the mechanisms mediating pain are unclear. Interstitial cystitis (IC) is a bladder disease that causes debilitating pelvic pain of unknown origin and without consistent inflammation, but IC symptoms correlate with elevated bladder lamina propria mast cell counts. We hypothesized that mast cells mediate pelvic pain directly and examined pain behavior using a murine model that recapitulates key aspects of IC. Methods and Findings Infection of mice with pseudorabies virus (PRV) induces a neurogenic cystitis associated with lamina propria mast cell accumulation dependent upon tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF), TNF-mediated bladder barrier dysfunction, and pelvic pain behavior, but the molecular basis for pelvic pain is unknown. In this study, both PRV-induced pelvic pain and bladder pathophysiology were abrogated in mast cell-deficient mice but were restored by reconstitution with wild type bone marrow. Pelvic pain developed normally in TNF- and TNF receptor-deficient mice, while bladder pathophysiology was abrogated. Conversely, genetic or pharmacologic disruption of histamine receptor H1R or H2R attenuated pelvic pain without altering pathophysiology. Conclusions These data demonstrate that mast cells promote cystitis pain and bladder pathophysiology through the separable actions of histamine and TNF, respectively. Therefore, pain is independent of pathology and inflammation, and histamine receptors represent direct therapeutic targets for pain in IC and other chronic pain conditions. PMID:18461160

  1. Generation of leukotrienes by purified human lung mast cells.

    PubMed Central

    MacGlashan, D W; Schleimer, R P; Peters, S P; Schulman, E S; Adams, G K; Newball, H H; Lichtenstein, L M

    1982-01-01

    Although mediator release from mast cells and basophils plays a central role in the pathogenesis of human allergic disease, biochemical studies have been restricted to rat peritoneal mast cells and basophilic leukemia cells because they could be easily purified. We have used two new techniques of cell separation to purify human lung mast cells to 98% homogeneity. Lung cell suspensions were obtained by dispersion of chopped lung tissue with proteolytic enzymes. Mast cells were then purified from the suspensions by countercurrent centrifugal elutriation and affinity chromatography. The purified mast cells released both histamine and slow-reacting substance of anaphylaxis (SRS-A) (leukotriene C and D) during stimulation with goat anti-human IgE antibody. Moreover, these preparations were able to generate significant quantities of SRS-A (32 +/- 7 x 10(-17) LTD mole-equivalents/mast cell) at all stages of purification, indicating that a secondary cell is not necessary for the antigen-induced release of SRS. Images PMID:7119113

  2. Dynamic mast cell-stromal cell interactions promote growth of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ying; Hwang, Rosa F.; Logsdon, Craig D.; Ullrich, Stephen E.

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) exists in a complex desmoplastic microenvironment, which includes cancer-associated fibroblasts (also known as pancreatic stellate cells, PSCs) and immune cells that provide a fibrotic niche that impedes successful cancer therapy. We have found that mast cells are essential for PDAC tumorigenesis. Whether mast cells contribute to the growth of PDAC and/or PSCs is unknown. Here we tested the hypothesis that mast cells contribute to the growth of PSCs and tumor cells, thus contributing to PDAC development. Tumor cells promoted mast cell migration. Both tumor cells and PSCs stimulated mast cell activation. Conversely, mast cell-derived IL-13 and tryptase stimulated PSC proliferation. Treating tumor-bearing mice with agents that block mast cell migration and function depressed PDAC growth. Our findings suggest that mast cells exacerbate the cellular and extracellular dynamics of the tumor microenvironment found in PDAC. Therefore, targeting mast cells may inhibit stromal formation and improve therapy. PMID:23633481

  3. Overview of physics results from MAST towards ITER/DEMO and the MAST Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, H.; Abel, I. G.; Akers, R. J.; Allan, A.; Allan, S. Y.; Appel, L. C.; Asunta, O.; Barnes, M.; Barratt, N. C.; Ben Ayed, N.; Bradley, J. W.; Canik, J.; Cahyna, P.; Cecconello, M.; Challis, C. D.; Chapman, I. T.; Ciric, D.; Colyer, G.; Conway, N. J.; Cox, M.; Crowley, B. J.; Cowley, S. C.; Cunningham, G.; Danilov, A.; Darke, A.; De Bock, M. F. M.; De Temmerman, G.; Dendy, R. O.; Denner, P.; Dickinson, D.; Dnestrovsky, A. Y.; Dnestrovsky, Y.; Driscoll, M. D.; Dudson, B.; Dunai, D.; Dunstan, M.; Dura, P.; Elmore, S.; Field, A. R.; Fishpool, G.; Freethy, S.; Fundamenski, W.; Garzotti, L.; Ghim, Y. C.; Gibson, K. J.; Gryaznevich, M. P.; Harrison, J.; Havlíčková, E.; Hawkes, N. C.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Hender, T. C.; Highcock, E.; Higgins, D.; Hill, P.; Hnat, B.; Hole, M. J.; Horáček, J.; Howell, D. F.; Imada, K.; Jones, O.; Kaveeva, E.; Keeling, D.; Kirk, A.; Kočan, M.; Lake, R. J.; Lehnen, M.; Leggate, H. J.; Liang, Y.; Lilley, M. K.; Lisgo, S. W.; Liu, Y. Q.; Lloyd, B.; Maddison, G. P.; Mailloux, J.; Martin, R.; McArdle, G. J.; McClements, K. G.; McMillan, B.; Michael, C.; Militello, F.; Molchanov, P.; Mordijck, S.; Morgan, T.; Morris, A. W.; Muir, D. G.; Nardon, E.; Naulin, V.; Naylor, G.; Nielsen, A. H.; O'Brien, M. R.; O'Gorman, T.; Pamela, S.; Parra, F. I.; Patel, A.; Pinches, S. D.; Price, M. N.; Roach, C. M.; Robinson, J. R.; Romanelli, M.; Rozhansky, V.; Saarelma, S.; Sangaroon, S.; Saveliev, A.; Scannell, R.; Seidl, J.; Sharapov, S. E.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Shevchenko, V.; Shibaev, S.; Stork, D.; Storrs, J.; Sykes, A.; Tallents, G. J.; Tamain, P.; Taylor, D.; Temple, D.; Thomas-Davies, N.; Thornton, A.; Turnyanskiy, M. R.; Valovič, M.; Vann, R. G. L.; Verwichte, E.; Voskoboynikov, P.; Voss, G.; Warder, S. E. V.; Wilson, H. R.; Wodniak, I.; Zoletnik, S.; Zagôrski, R.; MAST, the; NBI Teams

    2013-10-01

    New diagnostic, modelling and plant capability on the Mega Ampère Spherical Tokamak (MAST) have delivered important results in key areas for ITER/DEMO and the upcoming MAST Upgrade, a step towards future ST devices on the path to fusion currently under procurement. Micro-stability analysis of the pedestal highlights the potential roles of micro-tearing modes and kinetic ballooning modes for the pedestal formation. Mitigation of edge localized modes (ELM) using resonant magnetic perturbation has been demonstrated for toroidal mode numbers n = 3, 4, 6 with an ELM frequency increase by up to a factor of 9, compatible with pellet fuelling. The peak heat flux of mitigated and natural ELMs follows the same linear trend with ELM energy loss and the first ELM-resolved Ti measurements in the divertor region are shown. Measurements of flow shear and turbulence dynamics during L-H transitions show filaments erupting from the plasma edge whilst the full flow shear is still present. Off-axis neutral beam injection helps to strongly reduce the redistribution of fast-ions due to fishbone modes when compared to on-axis injection. Low-k ion-scale turbulence has been measured in L-mode and compared to global gyro-kinetic simulations. A statistical analysis of principal turbulence time scales shows them to be of comparable magnitude and reasonably correlated with turbulence decorrelation time. Te inside the island of a neoclassical tearing mode allow the analysis of the island evolution without assuming specific models for the heat flux. Other results include the discrepancy of the current profile evolution during the current ramp-up with solutions of the poloidal field diffusion equation, studies of the anomalous Doppler resonance compressional Alfvén eigenmodes, disruption mitigation studies and modelling of the new divertor design for MAST Upgrade. The novel 3D electron Bernstein synthetic imaging shows promising first data sensitive to the edge current profile and flows.

  4. Lactic Acid Suppresses IL-33-Mediated Mast Cell Inflammatory Responses via Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α-Dependent miR-155 Suppression.

    PubMed

    Abebayehu, Daniel; Spence, Andrew J; Qayum, Amina Abdul; Taruselli, Marcela T; McLeod, Jamie J A; Caslin, Heather L; Chumanevich, Alena P; Kolawole, Elizabeth Motunrayo; Paranjape, Anuya; Baker, Bianca; Ndaw, Victor S; Barnstein, Brian O; Oskeritzian, Carole A; Sell, Scott A; Ryan, John J

    2016-10-01

    Lactic acid (LA) is present in tumors, asthma, and wound healing, environments with elevated IL-33 and mast cell infiltration. Although IL-33 is a potent mast cell activator, how LA affects IL-33-mediated mast cell function is unknown. To investigate this, mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells were cultured with or without LA and activated with IL-33. LA reduced IL-33-mediated cytokine and chemokine production. Using inhibitors for monocarboxylate transporters (MCT) or replacing LA with sodium lactate revealed that LA effects are MCT-1- and pH-dependent. LA selectively altered IL-33 signaling, suppressing TGF-β-activated kinase-1, JNK, ERK, and NF-κB phosphorylation, but not p38 phosphorylation. LA effects in other contexts have been linked to hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α, which was enhanced in bone marrow-derived mast cells treated with LA. Because HIF-1α has been shown to regulate the microRNA miR-155 in other systems, LA effects on miR-155-5p and miR-155-3p species were measured. In fact, LA selectively suppressed miR-155-5p in an HIF-1α-dependent manner. Moreover, overexpressing miR-155-5p, but not miR-155-3p, abolished LA effects on IL-33-induced cytokine production. These in vitro effects of reducing cytokines were consistent in vivo, because LA injected i.p. into C57BL/6 mice suppressed IL-33-induced plasma cytokine levels. Lastly, IL-33 effects on primary human mast cells were suppressed by LA in an MCT-dependent manner. Our data demonstrate that LA, present in inflammatory and malignant microenvironments, can alter mast cell behavior to suppress inflammation. PMID:27559047

  5. Does the mast cell have an intrinsic role in the pathogenesis of interstitial cystitis?

    PubMed

    Frenz, A M; Christmas, T J; Pearce, F L

    1994-06-01

    In order to examine the role of mast cells in the inflammatory bladder disease interstitial cystitis, mast cells isolated from the human bladder of normal and diseased tissue were challenged with a range of secretagogues. Calcium ionophore A23187 and anti-IgE caused histamine release from all bladder mast cells in a dose-related manner. Mast cells from the diseased tissue were far more responsive than those from the normal tissue. Mast cells from the muscle of normal bladder were responsive towards substance P and compound 48/80. However, mast cells from interstitial cystitis bladder did not release significant amounts of histamine with these two secretagogues.

  6. Prostaglandin F{sub 2{alpha}} regulates cytokine responses of mast cells through the receptors for prostaglandin E

    SciTech Connect

    Kaneko, Izumi; Hishinuma, Takanori; Suzuki, Kaori; Owada, Yuji; Kitanaka, Noriko; Kondo, Hisatake; Goto, Junichi; Furukawa, Hiroshi; Ono, Masao

    2008-03-14

    There is an increasing body of evidence that prostanoids modulate mast cell functions and contribute to the development of allergic inflammation. The present study aimed to identify an undetermined function of prostaglandin (PG) F{sub 2{alpha}} in mast cell activation and the signaling mechanism involved in it. Simultaneous quantification of prostanoids by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry revealed the constitutive release of PGF{sub 2{alpha}}, thromboxane B{sub 2}, and 6-keto-PGF{sub 1{alpha}} from bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs). Upon activation of BMMCs by lipopolysaccharide, the cytokine production in BMMCs was enhanced when the culture was supplemented with PGF{sub 2{alpha}}. However, F prostanoid receptor-a selective receptor for PGF{sub 2{alpha}}-was not detected in BMMCs. Further investigations performed using prostanoid receptor antagonists revealed an alternative mechanism wherein the receptors for PGE species-E prostanoid receptors-mediated the PGF{sub 2{alpha}} signal in BMMCs. The present study provides an insight into a novel function of PGF{sub 2{alpha}}, i.e., an autocrine accelerator for mast cell activation.

  7. Regulation of human mast cell and basophil function by anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Hydar

    2009-01-01

    Allergic diseases such as asthma result from inappropriate immunologic responses to common environmental allergens in genetically susceptible individuals. Following allergen exposure, interaction of dendritic cells (DC) with CD4+ T cells leads to the production of Th2 cytokines, which induce B cells to synthesize IgE molecules (sensitization phase). These IgE molecules bind to their high affinity receptors (FcεRI) on the surface of mast cells and basophils and their subsequent cross-linking by allergen results in the release of preformed and newly synthesized mediators, which cause bronchoconstriction, lung inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) in asthma (effector phase). The complement components C3a and C5a levels are increased in the lungs of patients with asthma and are likely generated via the actions of both allergen and mast cell proteases. In vivo studies with rodents have shown that while C3a facilitates allergen sensitization in some models C5a inhibits this response. Despite this difference, both anaphylatoxins promote lung inflammation and AHR in vivo indicating that cells other than DC and T cells likely mediate the functional effects of C3a and C5a in asthma. This review focuses on the contribution of C3a and C5a in the pathogenesis of asthma with a particular emphasis on mast cells and basophils. It discusses the mechanisms by which anaphylatoxins activate mast cells and basophils and the associated signaling pathways via which their receptors are regulated by priming and desensitization. PMID:19895849

  8. Granule changes of human skin mast cells characteristic of piecemeal degranulation and associated with recovery during wound healing in situ.

    PubMed

    Dvorak, A M; Kissell, S

    1991-02-01

    Human skin mast cells (HSMC) in situ were examined by electron microscopy of surgical biopsy specimens obtained from a wide variety of circumstances. From these studies, it is apparent that the general ultrastructural morphology of normal HSMC is similar to that of human mast cells from other sites, except that the most prevalent granule pattern is that of crystal granules. Scroll granules, particle granules, and mixed granules can also occur in HSMC. Cytoplasmic lipid bodies occur in HSMC extremely rarely, unlike mast cells from lung and gut. Circumstances in which piecemeal degranulation (PMD) of HSMC occurs, such as bullous pemphigoid, examined at high magnifications, revealed typical, focal geographic losses from cytoplasmic granules, often leaving completely empty granule containers in the cytoplasm. Crystal portions of mixed granules were uniquely susceptible to granule losses typified by PMD. Cytoplasmic smooth vesicles were prominent in PMD. These structures were either empty or contained granule-like dense materials and were free in the cytoplasm or attached to granules. HSMC present in wound healing revealed recovery from PMD losses. Typically these granules contained numerous irregular foci of markedly dense new granule products within empty or partially empty granule containers. The morphology of PMD and recovery of HSMC in vivo is contrasted with the morphology of anaphylactic degranulation (AND) and recovery of human mast cells ex vivo.

  9. Meliae cortex extract exhibits anti-allergic activity through the inhibition of Syk kinase in mast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jun Ho; Ko, Na Young; Kim, Nam Wook; Mun, Se Hwan; Kim, Jie Wan; Her, Erk; Kim, Bo Kyung; Seo, Dong Wan; Chang, Hyun Wook; Moon, Tae Chul; Han, Jeung Whan; Kim, Young Mi; Choi, Wahn Soo . E-mail: wahnchoi@kku.ac.kr

    2007-05-01

    The anti-allergic action of various Oriental medicinal herbs was investigated using in vitro and in vivo experimental models. Of these extracts, the ethanol extract of Meliae cortex (MC) exhibited the most potent activity in mast cells; its IC{sub 50} values were 29 {+-} 1.5 {mu}g/ml for antigen stimulation and 57 {+-} 3.4 {mu}g/ml for thapsigargin stimulation. It inhibited compound-48/80-induced systemic anaphylaxis by 52.9% at a dose of 300 mg/kg in mice; it also inhibited the expression of the proinflammatory mediator TNF-{alpha}. With regard to its mechanism of action, MC suppressed the activating phosphorylation of Syk, a key enzyme in mast-cell signaling processes and that of Akt in a dose-dependent manner. It also inhibited the MAP kinase ERK1/2, which is critical for the production of inflammatory cytokines in mast cells, as indicated by the suppression of the activating phosphorylation of ERK1/2. Taken together, these results suggest that the anti-allergic activity of MC may be due to the inhibition of histamine secretion and cytokine expression through the Syk inhibition in mast cells.

  10. Mast cells as modulators of hair follicle cycling.

    PubMed

    Maurer, M; Paus, R; Czarnetzki, B M

    1995-08-01

    While the central role of mast cells (MC) in allergy and inflammation is well-appreciated, much less is known about their physiological functions. The impressive battery of potent growth modulatory MC products, and increasing evidence of MC involvement in hyperproliferative and fibrotic disorders suggest that tissue remodelling may be one of those, namely in the skin. Here, we delineate why this may best be studied by analysing the potential role of MC in hair growth regulation. On the background of numerous, yet widely under-appreciated hints from the older literature, we summarize and discuss our recent observations from the C57BL/6 mouse model for hair research which support the concept that MC are functionally important modulators of hair follicle cycling, specifically during anagen development. This invites to exploit the murine hair cycle as a model for dissecting the physiological growth modulatory functions of MC and encourages the exploration of MC-targeting pharmaceutical strategies for the treatment of hair growth disorders.

  11. Lipid body formation during maturation of human mast cells.

    PubMed

    Dichlberger, Andrea; Schlager, Stefanie; Lappalainen, Jani; Käkelä, Reijo; Hattula, Katarina; Butcher, Sarah J; Schneider, Wolfgang J; Kovanen, Petri T

    2011-12-01

    Lipid droplets, also called lipid bodies (LB) in inflammatory cells, are important cytoplasmic organelles. However, little is known about the molecular characteristics and functions of LBs in human mast cells (MC). Here, we have analyzed the genesis and components of LBs during differentiation of human peripheral blood-derived CD34(+) progenitors into connective tissue-type MCs. In our serum-free culture system, the maturing MCs, derived from 18 different donors, invariably developed triacylglycerol (TG)-rich LBs. Not known heretofore, the MCs transcribe the genes for perilipins (PLIN)1-4, but not PLIN5, and PLIN2 and PLIN3 display different degrees of LB association. Upon MC activation and ensuing degranulation, the LBs were not cosecreted with the cytoplasmic secretory granules. Exogenous arachidonic acid (AA) enhanced LB genesis in Triacsin C-sensitive fashion, and it was found to be preferentially incorporated into the TGs of LBs. The large TG-associated pool of AA in LBs likely is a major precursor for eicosanoid production by MCs. In summary, we demonstrate that cultured human MCs derived from CD34(+) progenitors in peripheral blood provide a new tool to study regulatory mechanisms involving LB functions, with particular emphasis on AA metabolism, eicosanoid biosynthesis, and subsequent release of proinflammatory lipid mediators from these cells.

  12. Mast cells mediate malignant pleural effusion formation

    PubMed Central

    Giannou, Anastasios D.; Marazioti, Antonia; Spella, Magda; Kanellakis, Nikolaos I.; Apostolopoulou, Hara; Psallidas, Ioannis; Prijovich, Zeljko M.; Vreka, Malamati; Zazara, Dimitra E.; Lilis, Ioannis; Papaleonidopoulos, Vassilios; Kairi, Chrysoula A.; Patmanidi, Alexandra L.; Giopanou, Ioanna; Spiropoulou, Nikolitsa; Harokopos, Vaggelis; Aidinis, Vassilis; Spyratos, Dionisios; Teliousi, Stamatia; Papadaki, Helen; Taraviras, Stavros; Snyder, Linda A.; Eickelberg, Oliver; Kardamakis, Dimitrios; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Feyerabend, Thorsten B.; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer; Kalomenidis, Ioannis; Blackwell, Timothy S.; Agalioti, Theodora; Stathopoulos, Georgios T.

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) have been identified in various tumors; however, the role of these cells in tumorigenesis remains controversial. Here, we quantified MCs in human and murine malignant pleural effusions (MPEs) and evaluated the fate and function of these cells in MPE development. Evaluation of murine MPE-competent lung and colon adenocarcinomas revealed that these tumors actively attract and subsequently degranulate MCs in the pleural space by elaborating CCL2 and osteopontin. MCs were required for effusion development, as MPEs did not form in mice lacking MCs, and pleural infusion of MCs with MPE-incompetent cells promoted MPE formation. Once homed to the pleural space, MCs released tryptase AB1 and IL-1β, which in turn induced pleural vasculature leakiness and triggered NF-κB activation in pleural tumor cells, thereby fostering pleural fluid accumulation and tumor growth. Evaluation of human effusions revealed that MCs are elevated in MPEs compared with benign effusions. Moreover, MC abundance correlated with MPE formation in a human cancer cell–induced effusion model. Treatment of mice with the c-KIT inhibitor imatinib mesylate limited effusion precipitation by mouse and human adenocarcinoma cells. Together, the results of this study indicate that MCs are required for MPE formation and suggest that MC-dependent effusion formation is therapeutically addressable. PMID:25915587

  13. The Role of TRP Proteins in Mast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Freichel, Marc; Almering, Julia; Tsvilovskyy, Volodymyr

    2012-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) proteins form cation channels that are regulated through strikingly diverse mechanisms including multiple cell surface receptors, changes in temperature, in pH and osmolarity, in cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i), and by phosphoinositides which makes them polymodal sensors for fine tuning of many cellular and systemic processes in the body. The 28 TRP proteins identified in mammals are classified into six subfamilies: TRPC, TRPV, TRPM, TRPA, TRPML, and TRPP. When activated, they contribute to cell depolarization and Ca2+ entry. In mast cells, the increase of [Ca2+]i is fundamental for their biological activity, and several entry pathways for Ca2+ and other cations were described including Ca2+ release activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channels. Like in other non-excitable cells, TRP channels could directly contribute to Ca2+ influx via the plasma membrane as constituents of Ca2+ conducting channel complexes or indirectly by shifting the membrane potential and regulation of the driving force for Ca2+ entry through independent Ca2+ entry channels. Here, we summarize the current knowledge about the expression of individual Trp genes with the majority of the 28 members being yet identified in different mast cell models, and we highlight mechanisms how they can regulate mast cell functions. Since specific agonists or blockers are still lacking for most members of the TRP family, studies to unravel their function and activation mode still rely on experiments using genetic approaches and transgenic animals. RNAi approaches suggest a functional role for TRPC1, TRPC5, and TRPM7 in mast cell derived cell lines or primary mast cells, and studies using Trp gene knock-out mice reveal a critical role for TRPM4 in mast cell activation and for mast cell mediated cutaneous anaphylaxis, whereas a direct role of cold- and menthol-activated TRPM8 channels seems to be unlikely for the development of cold urticaria at least in mice. PMID:22701456

  14. Approaches for Analyzing the Roles of Mast Cells and Their Proteases In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Galli, Stephen J.; Tsai, Mindy; Marichal, Thomas; Tchougounova, Elena; Reber, Laurent L.; Pejler, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    The roles of mast cells in health and disease remain incompletely understood. While the evidence that mast cells are critical effector cells in IgE-dependent anaphylaxis and other acute IgE-mediated allergic reactions seems unassailable, studies employing various mice deficient in mast cells or mast cell-associated proteases have yielded divergent conclusions about the roles of mast cells or their proteases in certain other immunological responses. Such “controversial” results call into question the relative utility of various older versus newer approaches to ascertain the roles of mast cells and mast cell proteases in vivo. This review discusses how both older and more recent mouse models have been used to investigate the functions of mast cells and their proteases in health and disease. We particularly focus on settings in which divergent conclusions about the importance of mast cells and their proteases have been supported by studies that employed different models of mast cell or mast cell protease deficiency. We think that two major conclusions can be drawn from such findings: (1) no matter which models of mast cell or mast cell protease deficiency one employs, the conclusions drawn from the experiments always should take into account the potential limitations of the models (particularly abnormalities affecting cell types other than mast cells) and (2) even when analyzing a biological response using a single model of mast cell or mast cell protease deficiency, details of experimental design are critical in efforts to define those conditions under which important contributions of mast cells or their proteases can be identified. PMID:25727288

  15. Imaging immune response of skin mast cells in vivo with two-photon microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunqiang; Pastila, Riikka K.; Lin, Charles P.

    2012-02-01

    Intravital multiphoton microscopy has provided insightful information of the dynamic process of immune cells in vivo. However, the use of exogenous labeling agents limits its applications. There is no method to perform functional imaging of mast cells, a population of innate tissue-resident immune cells. Mast cells are widely recognized as the effector cells in allergy. Recently their roles as immunoregulatory cells in certain innate and adaptive immune responses are being actively investigated. Here we report in vivo mouse skin mast cells imaging with two-photon microscopy using endogenous tryptophan as the fluorophore. We studied the following processes. 1) Mast cells degranulation, the first step in the mast cell activation process in which the granules are released into peripheral tissue to trigger downstream reactions. 2) Mast cell reconstitution, a procedure commonly used to study mast cells functioning by comparing the data from wild type mice, mast cell-deficient mice, and mast-cell deficient mice reconstituted with bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs). Imaging the BMMCs engraftment in tissue reveals the mast cells development and the efficiency of BMMCs reconstitution. We observed the reconstitution process for 6 weeks in the ear skin of mast cell-deficient Kit wsh/ w-sh mice by two-photon imaging. Our finding is the first instance of imaging mast cells in vivo with endogenous contrast.

  16. Mast cell-cholinergic nerve interaction in mouse airways.

    PubMed

    Weigand, Letitia A; Myers, Allen C; Meeker, Sonya; Undem, Bradley J

    2009-07-01

    We addressed the mechanism by which antigen contracts trachea isolated from actively sensitized mice. Trachea were isolated from mice (C57BL/6J) that had been actively sensitized to ovalbumin (OVA). OVA (10 microg ml(-1)) caused histamine release (approximately total tissue content), and smooth muscle contraction that was rapid in onset and short-lived (t(1/2) < 1 min), reaching approximately 25% of the maximum tissue response. OVA contraction was mimicked by 5-HT, and responses to both OVA and 5-HT were sensitive to 10 microm-ketanserin (5-HT(2) receptor antagonist) and strongly inhibited by atropine (1microm). Epithelial denudation had no effect on the OVA-induced contraction. Histological assessment revealed about five mast cells/tracheal section the vast majority of which contained 5-HT. There were virtually no mast cells in the mast cell-deficient (sash -/-) mouse trachea. OVA failed to elicit histamine release or contractile responses in trachea isolated from sensitized mast cell-deficient (sash -/-) mice. Intracellular recordings of the membrane potential of parasympathetic neurons in mouse tracheal ganglia revealed a ketanserin-sensitive 5-HT-induced depolarization and similar depolarization in response to OVA challenge. These data support the hypothesis that antigen-induced contraction of mouse trachea is epithelium-independent, and requires mast cell-derived 5-HT to activate 5-HT(2) receptors on parasympathetic cholinergic neurons. This leads to acetylcholine release from nerve terminals, and airway smooth muscle contraction. PMID:19403609

  17. Borrelia burgdorferi Spirochetes Induce Mast Cell Activation and Cytokine Release

    PubMed Central

    Talkington, Jeffrey; Nickell, Steven P.

    1999-01-01

    The Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, is introduced into human hosts via tick bites. Among the cell types present in the skin which may initially contact spirochetes are mast cells. Since spirochetes are known to activate a variety of cell types in vitro, we tested whether B. burgdorferi spirochetes could activate mast cells. We report here that freshly isolated rat peritoneal mast cells or mouse MC/9 mast cells cultured in vitro with live or freeze-thawed B. burgdorferi spirochetes undergo low but detectable degranulation, as measured by [5-3H] hydroxytryptamine release, and they synthesize and secrete the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). In contrast to findings in previous studies, where B. burgdorferi-associated activity was shown to be dependent upon protein lipidation, mast cell TNF-α release was not induced by either lipidated or unlipidated recombinant OspA. This activity was additionally shown to be protease sensitive and surface expressed. Finally, comparisons of TNF-α-inducing activity in known low-, intermediate-, and high-passage B. burgdorferi B31 isolates demonstrated passage-dependent loss of activity, indicating that the activity is probably plasmid encoded. These findings document the presence in low-passage B. burgdorferi spirochetes of a novel lipidation-independent activity capable of inducing cytokine release from host cells. PMID:10024550

  18. The transcription factor Zeb2 regulates signaling in mast cells.

    PubMed

    Barbu, Emilia Alina; Zhang, Juan; Berenstein, Elsa H; Groves, Jacqueline R; Parks, Lauren M; Siraganian, Reuben P

    2012-06-15

    Mast cell activation results in the release of stored and newly synthesized inflammatory mediators. We found that Zeb2 (also named Sip1, Zfhx1b), a zinc finger transcription factor, regulates both early and late mast cell responses. Transfection with small interfering RNA (siRNA) reduced Zeb2 expression and resulted in decreased FcεRI-mediated degranulation, with a parallel reduction in receptor-induced activation of NFAT and NF-κB transcription factors, but an enhanced response to the LPS-mediated activation of NF-κB. There was variable and less of a decrease in the Ag-mediated release of the cytokines TNF-α, IL-13, and CCL-4. This suggests that low Zeb2 expression differentially regulates signaling pathways in mast cells. Multiple phosphorylation events were impaired that affected molecules both at early and late events in the signaling pathway. The Zeb2 siRNA-treated mast cells had altered cell cycle progression, as well as decreased expression of several molecules including cell surface FcεRI and its β subunit, Gab2, phospholipase-Cγ1, and phospholipase-Cγ2, all of which are required for receptor-induced signal transduction. The results indicate that the transcription factor Zeb2 controls the expression of molecules thereby regulating signaling in mast cells.

  19. Mast Cells as Cellular Sensors in Inflammation and Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Beghdadi, Walid; Madjene, Lydia Célia; Benhamou, Marc; Charles, Nicolas; Gautier, Gregory; Launay, Pierre; Blank, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    Mast cells are localized in tissues. Intense research on these cells over the years has demonstrated their role as effector cells in the maintenance of tissue integrity following injury produced by infectious agents, toxins, metabolic states, etc. After stimulation they release a sophisticated array of inflammatory mediators, cytokines, and growth factors to orchestrate an inflammatory response. These mediators can directly initiate tissue responses on resident cells, but they have also been shown to regulate other infiltrating immune cell functions. Research in recent years has revealed that the outcome of mast cell actions is not always detrimental for the host but can also limit disease development. In addition, mast cell functions highly depend on the physiological context in the organism. Depending on the genetic background, strength of the injurious event, the particular microenvironment, mast cells direct responses ranging from pro- to anti-inflammatory. It appears that they have evolved as cellular sensors to discern their environment in order to initiate an appropriate physiological response either aimed to favor inflammation for repair or at the contrary limit the inflammatory process to prevent further damage. Like every sophisticated machinery, its dysregulation leads to pathology. Given the broad distribution of mast cells in tissues this also explains their implication in many inflammatory diseases. PMID:22566827

  20. Mast cell heterogeneity in non-human primates

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, K.E.; Szucs, E.F.; Metcalfe, D.D.

    1986-03-05

    Mast cells of rodents may be subdivided in terms of their properties, but the extent of such heterogeneity in man and higher animals is still unknown. The authors have compared lung (LMC) and intestinal (IMC) mast cells obtained from individual monkeys. LMC contained more histamine (HA) than IMC (6.61+/-1.3 vs. 1.6+/-0.6 pg/cell, means+/-SEM, n=3). LMC released more HA (17.7+/-2.1% vs. 9.2+/-1.0%, means+/-SEM, n=16) and also generated more LTC/sub 4/ equivalents as measured by radioimmunoassay (range 13.4-41.5 vs. 3.0-4.0 ng/10/sup 6/ mast cells) following an anaphylactic stimulus. The majority (>90%) of LMC stained metachromatically under conditions appropriate for heparin-containing cells, whereas IMC required more forcing conditions to display metachromasia. In contrast to these quantitative and qualitative mediator differences, functional responses of LMC and IMC were similar. Thus, HA release was inhibited comparably by theophylline, isoprenaline and dibutyryl cyclic AMP, but quercetin was slightly more active on IMC. Substance P caused dose-related HA release from both cell types, although the amount released varied between individual animal, (range LMC 1.2-20.2%, IMC 1.8-23.0%, n=4). Other neuropeptides (pentagastrin) vasoactive intestinal peptide, neurotensin, somatostatin) did not release HA. They conclude that mast cell heterogeneity in higher animals may be reflected more by cytochemical rather than functional differences between mast cell classes.

  1. Effect of methylmercury on the rat mast cell degranulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graevskaya, E. E.; Yasutake, A.; Aramai, R.; Rubin, A. B.

    2003-05-01

    Methylmercury is the well-known neurotoxicant as weil as a modulator of the immune system. We investigated the effects of MeHg on the rat mast cell degranulation induced by nonimmunological stimuli (the selective liberator of histamine, compound 48/80, and calcium ionophore A23187) both in vivo and in vitro. In 8, 12 and 15 days afterthe final administration of MeHg we observed the suppression of calcium ionophore A23187-and 48/80-induced histamine release, which enhanced with time. In experiments in vitro incubation of peritoneal mast cells with MeHg alone in the dose range 10^{-8} to 10^{-6} did not induce mast cell degranulation, however modified the activation of mast cells by compound 48/80, and calcium ionophore A23187. We observed activation of stimulated secretion by preliminary incubation with low dose of MeHg 10^{-8} M and inhibition by dose of MeHg 10^{-6} M. These results show that MeHg treatment can modify mast cell function in vivo and in vitro and provide insight into the understanding what role this cell has in the pathogenesis of Minamata disease-comlected disorders.

  2. The influence of masting phenomenon on growth-climate relationships in trees: explaining the influence of previous summers' climate on ring width.

    PubMed

    Hacket-Pain, Andrew J; Friend, Andrew D; Lageard, Jonathan G A; Thomas, Peter A

    2015-03-01

    Tree growth is frequently linked to weather conditions prior to the growing season but our understanding of these lagged climate signatures is still poorly developed. We investigated the influence of masting behaviour on the relationship between growth and climate in European Beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) using a rare long-term dataset of seed production and a new regional tree ring chronology. Fagus sylvatica is a masting species with synchronous variations in seed production which are strongly linked to the temperature in the previous two summers. We noted that the weather conditions associated with years of heavy seed production (mast years) were the same as commonly reported correlations between growth and climate for this species. We tested the hypothesis that a trade-off between growth and reproduction in mast years could be responsible for the observed lagged correlations between growth and previous summers' temperatures. We developed statistical models of growth based on monthly climate variables, and show that summer drought (negative correlation), temperature of the previous summer (negative) and temperature of the summer 2 years previous (positive) are significant predictors of growth. Replacing previous summers' temperature in the model with annual seed production resulted in a model with the same predictive power, explaining the same variance in growth. Masting is a common behaviour in many tree species and these findings therefore have important implications for the interpretation of general climate-growth relationships. Lagged correlations can be the result of processes occurring in the year of growth (that are determined by conditions in previous years), obviating or reducing the need for 'carry-over' processes such as carbohydrate depletion to be invoked to explain this climate signature in tree rings. Masting occurs in many tree species and these findings therefore have important implications for the interpretation of general climate

  3. Expression profiling of constitutive mast cells reveals a unique identity within the immune system

    PubMed Central

    Dwyer, Daniel F.; Barrett, Nora A.; Austen, K. Frank

    2016-01-01

    Mast cells are evolutionarily ancient sentinel cells. Like basophils, mast cells express the high-affinity IgE receptor and are implicated in host defense and diverse immune-mediated diseases. To better characterize the function of these cells, we assessed the transcriptional profiles of mast cells isolated from peripheral connective tissues and basophils isolated from spleen and blood. We found that mast cells were transcriptionally distinct, clustering independently from all other profiled cells, and that mast cells demonstrated considerably greater heterogeneity across tissues than previously appreciated. We observed minimal homology between mast cells and basophils, which share more overlap with other circulating granulocytes than with mast cells. Derivation of mast cell and basophil transcriptional signatures underscores their differential capacity to detect environmental signals and influence the inflammatory milieu. PMID:27135604

  4. 21 CFR 133.150 - Hard cheeses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hard cheeses. 133.150 Section 133.150 Food and... CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.150 Hard cheeses. (a) The cheeses for which definitions and standards of identity...

  5. Principles of treatment for mast cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Govier, Susanne M

    2003-05-01

    Mast cell tumors (MCT) are the most common malignant cutaneous tumors that occur in dogs. They are most commonly found on the trunk, accounting for approximately 50% to 60% of all sites. MCTs associated with the limbs account for approximately 25% of all sites. Cutaneous MCTs have a wide variety of clinical appearances. Histologic grade is the most consistent prognostic factor available for dogs. MCTs located at 'nail bed' (subungual), inguinal/preputial area, and any mucocutaneous area like perineum or oral cavity carry a guarded prognosis and tend to metastasize. MCTs usually exfoliate well and are cytologically distinct. The extent of staging procedures following fine-needle aspirate cytologic diagnosis is based on the presence or absence of negative prognostic indicators. Surgery is the treatment of choice for solitary MCTs with no evidence of metastasis. Reponses rates to chemotherapy, (partial response) as high as 78% have been reported, and preliminary evidence suggests that multiagent (prednisone and vinblastine) protocols may confer a higher response rate than single-agent therapy. MCTs are the second most common cutaneous tumor in the cat. There are two distinct forms of cutaneous MCTs in the cat. The more common form is the mastocytic form, and the less common is the histiocytic form. Unlike in the dog, the head and neck are the most common sites for MCTs in the cat followed by the trunk and limbs. Cats with disseminated forms of MCT often present with systemic signs of illness, which include depression, anorexia, weight loss, and vomiting. The diagnosis and staging of MCTs in cats is similar to that in the dog. As with dogs with cutaneous MCTs, surgery is the treatment of choice. Little is known about the effectiveness of adjunctive chemotherapy options for cutaneous MCTs. Adjunctive chemotherapy does not appear to increase survival times.

  6. Dual view FIDA measurements on MAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, C. A.; Conway, N.; Crowley, B.; Jones, O.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Pinches, S.; Braeken, E.; Akers, R.; Challis, C.; Turnyanskiy, M.; Patel, A.; Muir, D.; Gaffka, R.; Bailey, S.

    2013-09-01

    A fast-ion deuterium alpha (FIDA) spectrometer was installed on MAST to measure radially resolved information about the fast-ion density and its distribution in energy and pitch angle. Toroidally and vertically directed collection lenses are employed, to detect both passing and trapped particle dynamics, and reference views are installed to subtract the background. This background is found to contain a substantial amount of passive FIDA emission driven by edge neutrals, and to depend delicately on viewing geometry. Results are compared with theoretical expectations based on the codes NUBEAM (for fast-ion distributions) and FIDASIM. Calibrating via the measured beam emission peaks, the toroidal FIDA signal profile agrees with classical simulations in magnetohydrodynamic quiescent discharges where the neutron rate is also classical. Long-lived modes (LLMs) and chirping modes decrease the core FIDA signal significantly, and the profile can be matched closely to simulations using anomalous diffusive transport; a spatially uniform diffusion coefficient is sufficient for chirping modes, while a core localized diffusion is better for a LLM. Analysis of a discharge with chirping mode activity shows a dramatic drop in the core FIDA signal and rapid increase in the edge passive signal at the onset of the burst indicating a very rapid redistribution towards the edge. Vertical-viewing measurements show a discrepancy with simulations at higher Doppler shifts when the neutron rate is classical, which, combined with the fact that the toroidal signals agree, means that the difference must be occurring for pitch angles near the trapped-passing boundary, although uncertainties in the background subtraction, which are difficult to assess, may contribute to this. Further evidence of an anomalous transport mechanism for these particles is provided by the fact that an increase of beam power does not increase the higher energy vertical FIDA signals, while the toroidal signals do increase.

  7. Use of two varieties of hard-to-cook beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) and cowpeas (Vigna unguiculata) in the processing of koki (a steamed legume product).

    PubMed

    Mbofung, C M; Rigby, N; Waldron, K

    1999-01-01

    Koki is a nutritious cowpea-based food product usually processed by steam cooking whipped cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) paste mixed with spices and palm oil. A study was carried out to investigate the effect of the partial replacement of cowpeas (CP) with hard-to-cook (HTC) beans on the chemical, nutritional and sensory characteristics of koki. Towards this objective, two varieties of beans--Phaseolus vulgaris (red kidney beans--RKB and mottled brown beans--MBB), each with the HTC defect, were separately incorporated into cowpea paste in the following Bean:CP ratios 0:100, 20:80, 30:70, 40:60, 50:50, 60:40 and processed into koki. Incorporation of dry HTC beans into cowpeas in the making of koki affected the bulking properties of the uncooked paste, the nutrient composition, essential amino acid content, antinutritional factors, digestibility as well as the sensory attributes of cooked koki. Sensory tests showed that a highly acceptable, nutritious and digestible koki can be processed from cowpeas partially replaced with dry HTC bean paste up to levels of about 40-50% depending on the variety of dry bean used.

  8. Hybrid hard- and soft-modeling of spectrophotometric data for monitoring of ciprofloxacin and its main photodegradation products at different pH values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razuc, Mariela; Garrido, Mariano; Caro, Yamile S.; Teglia, Carla M.; Goicoechea, Héctor C.; Fernández Band, Beatriz S.

    2013-04-01

    A simple and fast on line spectrophotometric method combined with a hybrid hard-soft modeling multivariate curve resolution (HS-MCR) was proposed for the monitoring of photodegradation reaction of ciprofloxacin under UV radiation. The studied conditions attempt to emulate the effect of sunlight on these antibiotics that could be eventually present in the environment. The continuous flow system made it possible to study the ciprofloxacin degradation at different pH values almost at real time, avoiding errors that could arise from typical batch monitoring of the reaction. On the base of a concentration profiles obtained by previous pure soft-modeling approach, reaction pathways have been proposed for the parent compound and its photoproducts at different pH values. These kinetic models were used as a constraint in the HS-MCR analysis. The kinetic profiles and the corresponding pure response profile (UV-Vis spectra) of ciprofloxacin and its main degradation products were recovered after the application of HS-MCR analysis to the spectra recorded throughout the reaction. The observed behavior showed a good agreement with the photodegradation studies reported in the bibliography. Accordingly, the photodegradation reaction was studied by high performance liquid chromatography coupled with UV-Vis diode array detector (HPLC-DAD). The spectra recorded during the chromatographic analysis present a good correlation with the ones recovered by UV-Vis/HS-MCR method.

  9. Hybrid hard- and soft-modeling of spectrophotometric data for monitoring of ciprofloxacin and its main photodegradation products at different pH values.

    PubMed

    Razuc, Mariela; Garrido, Mariano; Caro, Yamile S; Teglia, Carla M; Goicoechea, Héctor C; Fernández Band, Beatriz S

    2013-04-01

    A simple and fast on line spectrophotometric method combined with a hybrid hard-soft modeling multivariate curve resolution (HS-MCR) was proposed for the monitoring of photodegradation reaction of ciprofloxacin under UV radiation. The studied conditions attempt to emulate the effect of sunlight on these antibiotics that could be eventually present in the environment. The continuous flow system made it possible to study the ciprofloxacin degradation at different pH values almost at real time, avoiding errors that could arise from typical batch monitoring of the reaction. On the base of a concentration profiles obtained by previous pure soft-modeling approach, reaction pathways have been proposed for the parent compound and its photoproducts at different pH values. These kinetic models were used as a constraint in the HS-MCR analysis. The kinetic profiles and the corresponding pure response profile (UV-Vis spectra) of ciprofloxacin and its main degradation products were recovered after the application of HS-MCR analysis to the spectra recorded throughout the reaction. The observed behavior showed a good agreement with the photodegradation studies reported in the bibliography. Accordingly, the photodegradation reaction was studied by high performance liquid chromatography coupled with UV-Vis diode array detector (HPLC-DAD). The spectra recorded during the chromatographic analysis present a good correlation with the ones recovered by UV-Vis/HS-MCR method. PMID:23376269

  10. Use of two varieties of hard-to-cook beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) and cowpeas (Vigna unguiculata) in the processing of koki (a steamed legume product).

    PubMed

    Mbofung, C M; Rigby, N; Waldron, K

    1999-01-01

    Koki is a nutritious cowpea-based food product usually processed by steam cooking whipped cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) paste mixed with spices and palm oil. A study was carried out to investigate the effect of the partial replacement of cowpeas (CP) with hard-to-cook (HTC) beans on the chemical, nutritional and sensory characteristics of koki. Towards this objective, two varieties of beans--Phaseolus vulgaris (red kidney beans--RKB and mottled brown beans--MBB), each with the HTC defect, were separately incorporated into cowpea paste in the following Bean:CP ratios 0:100, 20:80, 30:70, 40:60, 50:50, 60:40 and processed into koki. Incorporation of dry HTC beans into cowpeas in the making of koki affected the bulking properties of the uncooked paste, the nutrient composition, essential amino acid content, antinutritional factors, digestibility as well as the sensory attributes of cooked koki. Sensory tests showed that a highly acceptable, nutritious and digestible koki can be processed from cowpeas partially replaced with dry HTC bean paste up to levels of about 40-50% depending on the variety of dry bean used. PMID:10646560

  11. 30 CFR 56.7051 - Loose objects on the mast or drill platform.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Loose objects on the mast or drill platform. 56... Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Drilling § 56.7051 Loose objects on the mast or drill platform. To prevent injury to personnel, tools and other objects shall not be left loose on the mast or drill platform....

  12. 30 CFR 56.7051 - Loose objects on the mast or drill platform.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Loose objects on the mast or drill platform. 56... Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Drilling § 56.7051 Loose objects on the mast or drill platform. To prevent injury to personnel, tools and other objects shall not be left loose on the mast or drill platform....

  13. 30 CFR 77.807-2 - Booms and masts; minimum distance from high-voltage lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Surface High-Voltage Distribution § 77.807-2 Booms and masts; minimum distance from high-voltage lines. The booms and masts of equipment operated on the surface of any... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Booms and masts; minimum distance from...

  14. 30 CFR 77.807-2 - Booms and masts; minimum distance from high-voltage lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Surface High-Voltage Distribution § 77.807-2 Booms and masts; minimum distance from high-voltage lines. The booms and masts of equipment operated on the surface of any... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Booms and masts; minimum distance from...

  15. 30 CFR 77.807-2 - Booms and masts; minimum distance from high-voltage lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Surface High-Voltage Distribution § 77.807-2 Booms and masts; minimum distance from high-voltage lines. The booms and masts of equipment operated on the surface of any... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Booms and masts; minimum distance from...

  16. 30 CFR 77.807-2 - Booms and masts; minimum distance from high-voltage lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Surface High-Voltage Distribution § 77.807-2 Booms and masts; minimum distance from high-voltage lines. The booms and masts of equipment operated on the surface of any... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Booms and masts; minimum distance from...

  17. Vaginal bacterial flora activates rat peritoneal mast cells.

    PubMed

    Brzezińska - Błaszczyk, E.; Wasiela, M.

    2002-01-01

    Sixteen strains of physiological and pathological vaginal bacteria were tested for their ability to secrete histamine from rat peritoneal mast cells in vitro. We noticed that Mycoplasma hominis-induced histamine release was very high (up to 53.6%). The stimulation of rat mast cells with Staphylococccus cohnii, Staphylococcus coagulase(-) (two strains), Ureaplasma urealyticum, Peptostreptococcus spp., Bacteroides capillosus, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae resulted in lower but significant histamine secretion (11.2%-17.5%). Other bacteria strains (Staphylococcus epidermidids, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Actinomyces naeslundii (two strains) and Lactobacillus fermentum (two strains) caused very low (4.2% - 8.8%) histamine release.

  18. Mast cells mediate the immune suppression induced by dermal exposure to JP-8 jet fuel.

    PubMed

    Limón-Flores, Alberto Y; Chacón-Salinas, Rommel; Ramos, Gerardo; Ullrich, Stephen E

    2009-11-01

    Applying jet propulsion-8 (JP-8) jet fuel to the skin of mice induces immune suppression. Applying JP-8 to the skin of mice suppresses T-cell-mediated immune reactions including, contact hypersensitivity (CHS) delayed-type hypersensitivity and T-cell proliferation. Because dermal mast cells play an important immune regulatory role in vivo, we tested the hypothesis that mast cells mediate jet fuel-induced immune suppression. When we applied JP-8 to the skin of mast cell deficient mice CHS was not suppressed. Reconstituting mast cell deficient mice with wild-type bone marrow derived mast cells (mast cell "knock-in mice") restored JP-8-induced immune suppression. When, however, mast cells from prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2))-deficient mice were used, the ability of JP-8 to suppress CHS was not restored, indicating that mast cell-derived PGE(2) was activating immune suppression. Examining the density of mast cells in the skin and lymph nodes of JP-8-treated mice indicated that jet fuel treatment caused an initial increase in mast cell density in the skin, followed by increased numbers of mast cells in the subcutaneous space and then in draining lymph nodes. Applying JP-8 to the skin increased mast cell expression of CXCR4, and increased the expression of CXCL12 by draining lymph node cells. Because CXCL12 is a chemoattractant for CXCR4+ mast cells, we treated JP-8-treated mice with AMD3100, a CXCR4 antagonist. AMD3100 blocked the mobilization of mast cells to the draining lymph node and inhibited JP-8-induced immune suppression. Our findings demonstrate the importance of mast cells in mediating jet fuel-induced immune suppression.

  19. High-throughput charge exchange recombination spectroscopy system on MAST

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, N. J.; Carolan, P. G.; McCone, J.; Walsh, M. J.; Wisse, M.

    2006-10-15

    A major upgrade to the charge exchange recombination spectroscopy system on MAST has recently been implemented. The new system consists of a high-throughput spectrometer coupled to a total of 224 spatial channels, including toroidal and poloidal views of both neutral heating beams on MAST. Radial resolution is {approx}1 cm, comparable to the ion Larmor radius. The toroidal views are configured with 64 channels per beam, while the poloidal views have 32 channels per beam. Background channels for both poloidal and toroidal views are also provided. A large transmission grating is at the heart of the new spectrometer, with high quality single lens reflex lenses providing excellent imaging performance and permitting the full exploitation of the available etendue of the camera sensor. The charge-coupled device camera chosen has four-tap readout at a maximum aggregate speed of 8.8 MHz, and it is capable of reading out the full set of 224 channels in less than 4 ms. The system normally operates at 529 nm, viewing the C{sup 5+} emission line, but can operate at any wavelength in the range of 400-700 nm. Results from operating the system on MAST are shown, including impurity ion temperature and velocity profiles. The system's excellent spatial resolution is ideal for the study of transport barrier phenomena on MAST, an activity which has already been advanced significantly by data from the new diagnostic.

  20. Diagnosis and treatment of mast cell disorders: practical recommendations.

    PubMed

    Sandes, Alex Freire; Medeiros, Raphael Salles Scortegagna; Rizzatti, Edgar Gil

    2013-01-01

    CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE The term mastocytosis covers a group of rare disorders characterized by neoplastic proliferation and accumulation of clonal mast cells in one or more organs. The aim of this study was to assess the principal elements for diagnosing and treating these disorders. DESIGN AND SETTING Narrative review of the literature conducted at Grupo Fleury, São Paulo, Brazil. METHODS This study reviewed the scientific papers published in the PubMed, Embase (Excerpta Medica Database), Lilacs (Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde) and Cochrane Library databases that were identified using the search term "mastocytosis." RESULTS The clinical presentation of mastocytosis is remarkably heterogeneous and ranges from skin lesions that may regress spontaneously to aggressive forms associated with organ failure and short survival. Currently, seven subtypes of mastocytosis are recognized through the World Health Organization classification system for hematopoietic tumors. These disorders are diagnosed based on clinical manifestations and on identification of neoplastic mast cells using morphological, immunophenotypic, genetic and molecular methods. Abnormal mast cells display atypical and frequently spindle-shaped morphology, and aberrant expression of the CD25 and CD2 antigens. Elevation of serum tryptase is a common finding in some subtypes, and more than 90% of the patients present the D816V KIT mutation in mast cells. CONCLUSION Here, we described the most common signs and symptoms among patients with mastocytosis and suggested a practical approach for the diagnosis, classification and initial clinical treatment of mastocytosis.

  1. Design of deployable-truss masts for Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowden, Mary; Benton, Max

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of three deployable-truss designs that were considered for use on Space Station Freedom to deploy the solar array wings. The first design chosen early in the program was a nut-deployed coilable longeron mast which has the advantage of being lightweight and reliable, with considerable flight history. Subsequently, because of the restructure of Space Station, a second design was chosen: a lanyard-deployed FASTMast (Folding Articulated Square Truss Mast), which has improved strength and redundancy characteristics for a given stowed volume. After further definition of the load requirements during deployment, however, it became necessary to modify the deployment system, resulting in the third mast design for space station solar arrays: a nut-deployed FASTMast, which was ultimately selected to provide increased stiffness and strength during deployment. This paper presents a brief review of these mast designs and their associated deployment systems, emphasizing the trade-offs involved in selecting between them. In addition, some innovative features of the FASTMast design as it stands currently for Space Station are described, and a brief review of the test program that is underway to qualify this design for flight is included.

  2. Clonal mast cell activation syndrome with anaphylaxis to sulfites.

    PubMed

    Cifuentes, Liliana; Ring, Johannes; Brockow, Knut

    2013-01-01

    Sulfites are rarely suspected as causative agents of immediate-type hypersensitivity. We report on a 49-year-old male patient who developed recurrent severe hypotension after food ingestion. A diagnosis of monoclonal mast cell activation syndrome was established. In the double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenge, the patient reacted to potassium metabisulfite with anaphylaxis.

  3. Mast Cell Targeted Chimeric Toxin Can Be Developed as an Adjunctive Therapy in Colon Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shan; Li, Linmei; Shi, Renren; Liu, Xueting; Zhang, Junyan; Zou, Zehong; Hao, Zhuofang; Tao, Ailin

    2016-01-01

    The association of colitis with colorectal cancer has become increasingly clear with mast cells being identified as important inflammatory cells in the process. In view of the relationship between mast cells and cancer, we studied the effect and mechanisms of mast cells in the development of colon cancer. Functional and mechanistic insights were gained from ex vivo and in vivo studies of cell interactions between mast cells and CT26 cells. Further evidence was reversely obtained in studies of mast cell targeted Fcε-PE40 chimeric toxin. Experiments revealed mast cells could induce colon tumor cell proliferation and invasion. Cancer progression was found to be related to the density of mast cells in colonic submucosa. The activation of MAPK, Rho-GTPase, and STAT pathways in colon cancer cells was triggered by mast cells during cell-to-cell interaction. Lastly, using an Fcε-PE40 chimeric toxin we constructed, we confirmed the promoting effect of mast cells in development of colon cancer. Mast cells are a promoting factor of colon cancer and thus also a potential therapeutic target. The Fcε-PE40 chimeric toxin targeting mast cells could effectively prevent colon cancer in vitro and in vivo. Consequently, these data may demonstrate a novel immunotherapeutic approach for the treatment of tumors. PMID:26978404

  4. Coevolution of mast seeding in trees and extended diapause of seed predators.

    PubMed

    Tachiki, Yuuya; Iwasa, Yoh

    2013-12-21

    Many trees in forests show synchronized and intermittent reproduction, which is called "masting" or mast seeding. According to recent theoretical studies, the evolution of masting is promoted both by recruitment through the seedling bank and by seed predators. An important class of specialist seed predators (e.g., weevils and some moths) are parasitoids that oviposit on or in fruits from which the next generation emerges over the following several years. This staggered emergence is called "extended diapause". In this paper, we study the simultaneous evolution of tree masting and extended diapause of seed predators. If a fixed fraction of diapausing larvae matures every year, the evolution of trees results in masting (intermittent reproduction with a large fluctuation in reproductive activity) or non-masting (trees reproduce every year). The transition occurs discontinuously, showing evolutionary jumping. The range of seedling survivorship for which masting evolves is broader when the ovipositing efficiency and larval survivorship of the seed predators are large. Interestingly, the conditions for the evolution of masting are broadest for an intermediate fraction of extended diapause of seed predators. When both tree masting and the extended diapause of seed predators evolve simultaneously, the evolutionary end point of the fraction of extended diapause is clearly greater than the value that most favors masting evolution. The stochasticity caused by the finiteness of the number of trees tends to promote masting evolution.

  5. Granulocytes in Ocular HSV-1 Infection: Opposing Roles of Mast Cells and Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Royer, Derek J.; Zheng, Min; Conrady, Christopher D.; Carr, Daniel J. J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The contributions of mast cells (MCs) to immunologic defense against pathogens in the eye are unknown. We have characterized pericorneal MCs as tissue-resident innate sentinels and determined their impact on the immune response to herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1), a common ocular pathogen. Methods. The impact of mast cells on the immune response to HSV-1 infection was investigated using MC-deficient KitW-sh mice. Virus titers, inflammatory cytokine production, eicosanoid profiles, cellular immune responses, and ocular pathology were evaluated and compared with C57BL/6J mice during an acute corneal HSV-1 infection. Results. Corneas of KitW-sh mice have higher viral titers, increased edema, and greater leukocyte infiltration following HSV-1 infection. Following infection, cytokine profiles were slightly elevated overall in KitW-sh mice. Eicosanoid profiles were remarkably different only when comparing uninfected corneas from both groups. Neutrophils within infected corneas expressed HSV-1 antigen, lytic genes, and served as a disease-causing vector when adoptively transferred into immunocompromised animals. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells did not infiltrate into the cornea or suppress the expansion, recruitment, or cytokine production by CD8+ T cells following acute HSV-1 infection. Conclusions. Collectively, these findings provide new insight into host defense in the cornea and the pathogenesis of HSV-1 infection by identifying previously unacknowledged MCs as protective innate sentinels for infection of the ocular surface and reinforcing that neutrophils are detrimental to corneal infection. PMID:26066745

  6. The Kepler Data Archive at MAST: What`s in it for me?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraquelli, Dorothy A.; Thompson, R.; Tseng, S.; Smith, M.

    2011-01-01

    Hosted by MAST, the Multi-Mission Archive at Space Telescope, the Kepler Archive now contains over a year's worth of observations on more than 150,000 objects. The observations consist of light curves, both public and proprietary, target pixel files and full frame images (FFI). Supporting information includes data release notes, the Instrument Handbook, an Archive Manual and SPIE papers describing the instrument and data processing (in advance of the Kepler Data Hand Book). High level science products (HLSP) for the announced planets are available. The archive also contains the Kepler Input Catalog (KIC), the Kepler Target Catalog (KTC) and the Characteristics Table (CT). We will show examples of how to search for and retrieve data, including FFIs and light curves, how Kepler GOs and science team members can download their data from an ftp area, how to view public light curves and FFIs, and, for Kepler proposers, how to locate objects in the KIC. We will discuss the different ways of retrieving Kepler data. A companion poster details MAST's GALEX-Kepler cross-match catalog, a unique product that supplies UV colors to complement the KIC's ground-based observations. Demos of the web site are available at the STScI booth.

  7. Complement Activation by Giardia duodenalis Parasites through the Lectin Pathway Contributes to Mast Cell Responses and Parasite Control.

    PubMed

    Li, Erqiu; Tako, Ernest A; Singer, Steven M

    2016-04-01

    Infection with Giardia duodenalis is one of the most common causes of diarrheal disease in the world. While numerous studies have identified important contributions of adaptive immune responses to parasite control, much less work has examined innate immunity and its connections to the adaptive response during this infection. We explored the role of complement in immunity to Giardia using mice deficient in mannose-binding lectin (Mbl2) or complement factor 3a receptor (C3aR). Both strains exhibited delayed clearance of parasites and a reduced ability to recruit mast cells in the intestinal submucosa. C3aR-deficient mice had normal production of antiparasite IgA, butex vivo T cell recall responses were impaired. These data suggest that complement is a key factor in the innate recognition of Giardia and that recruitment of mast cells and activation of T cell immunity through C3a are important for parasite control.

  8. Cutaneous mast cell tumor (Mastocytoma): Cyto- histopathological and haematological investigations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous mast cell tumours (MCTs) are the most common skin tumours in dogs. Due to the prevalence of canine MCTs and the variable biologic behavior of this disease, accurate prognostication and a thorough understanding of MCT biology are critical for the treatment of this disease. A cytologic diagnosis of mast cell tumor with evidence of prior hemorrhage was made, and the masses were surgically removed. Cytological evaluation of fine-needle aspirates from the cutaneous mass from the axillary comprised many well-differentiated, highly granulated mast cells with moderate numbers of eosinophils. Nuclei were varied in size and shape with high nuclear’to’cytoplasmic ratio, prominent nucleoli, marked atypical and mitotic figures. Microscopically, mass consisted of sheets of neoplastic round cells that formed nonencapsulated nodules in the dermis and infiltrated into the adjacent dermal collagen, and also there was diffuse subcutis invasion of round to pleomorphic tumor cells. Tumor cells had moderate to abundant cytoplasm, round to ovoid nuclei with scattered chromatin, and mitotic figures. In this tumor, cytoplasmic granules showed atypical metachromasia. In addition, eosinophils were scattered among the mast cells at the periphery of the nodules. The presence of eosinophils and the observation, at high magnification, of cells with cytoplasmic metachromatic granules. Invasion of the deep subcutaneous fat or cutaneous muscles were a common feature of grade III tumour. Finally, a diagnosis of grade III cutaneous mast cell tumor was made. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s) of this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/4755249151157024. PMID:24444100

  9. Mast cell-derived tryptase in odontogenic cysts.

    PubMed

    Teronen, O; Hietanen, J; Lindqvist, C; Salo, T; Sorsa, T; Eklund, K K; Sommerhoff, C P; Ylipaavalniemi, P; Konttinen, Y T

    1996-08-01

    Inflammatory and developmental cysts of the jaws are relatively common bone destructive lesions in the human maxillofacial skeleton but their pathogenesis is still poorly understood. In this study the role of mast cells (MC), and mast cell tryptase in particular, was evaluated in the pathophysiology of bone resorption and jaw cyst formation in different types of cysts. The distribution of MC and the amount of tryptase in histological tissue sections were determined by immunohistochemistry using monoclonal antihuman tryptase antibodies and the results were quantitated by using an image analyzing system. The amount of tryptase was further studied by Western-blotting and measurement of trypsin-like activity from the neutral salt extracts obtained from different types of jaw cysts. In contrast to control tissue, high trypsin-like activities and abundant immunoreactive tryptase were observed in the extracts of all types of cysts studied (radicular, dentigerous and keratocyst). In tissue sections the highest amount of tryptase-positive staining was observed in radicular cysts (mean 6.2% of reference area) and the lowest amount in keratocysts (mean 2.1% of reference area, P < 0.01). MC were found to be located in inflammatory cell-rich tissue areas and just beneath the cyst epithelium. Importantly, MC located at the border of bone were observed to be degranulated, indicating high activity of MC and release of tryptase at the regions of early bone destruction. Based on previous findings addressing the role of mast cell tryptase in proteolytic cascades, and the known association of MC with osteoporosis, we suggest that mast cells and mast cell tryptase may contribute significantly to jaw cyst tissue remodelling during growth of a cyst, and to the destruction of the surrounding bone, resulting in jaw cyst expansion.

  10. Are testicular mast cells involved in the regulation of germ cells in man?

    PubMed

    Windschüttl, S; Nettersheim, D; Schlatt, S; Huber, A; Welter, H; Schwarzer, J U; Köhn, F M; Schorle, H; Mayerhofer, A

    2014-07-01

    Protease activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) is the receptor for the prototype mast cell product tryptase. PAR-2 expression by cells of the human germinal epithelium was reported, but the exact cellular sites of testicular expression remained unknown. That became of interest, because mast cells, expressing tryptase, were found in the walls of seminiferous tubules of patients suffering from sub- and infertility. This location suggested that mast cells via tryptase might be able to influence PAR-2-expressing cells in the germinal epithelium. To explore these points, we used testicular paraffin-embedded sections for immunohistochemistry. PAR-2-positive cells were mostly basally located cells of the seminiferous epithelium, namely spermatogonia. Some stained for the receptor for GDNF (GFRalpha-1), and possibly represent spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs). As true human SSCs could not be examined, we turned to TCam-2 seminoma cells, expressing PAR-2 and stem cell markers, including GFRalpha-1. TCam-2 cells robustly responded to stimulation with a specific PAR-2 agonist (SLIGKV) by increased intracellular Ca(2+) levels. Recombinant tryptase and trypsin, but not a control peptide (VKGILS) evoked this response, implying functional PAR-2. Video imaging and caspase 3/7 assays showed that SLIGKV and tryptase prevented spontaneous apoptosis and increased proliferation of TCam-2 cells. The expression of the marker of pluripotency OCT3/4 was unchanged upon activation of PAR-2, suggesting that the stem cell-like character is not changed. Furthermore, human germ cell cancers were examined. A subset of seminoma and carcinoma in situ samples expressed PAR-2, indicating that yet unknown subgroups exist. Collectively, the descriptive data obtained in human testicular sections, in germ cell cancers and the functional results in TCam-2 cells imply a trophic role of mast cell-derived tryptase for human germ cells. This may be relevant for subtypes of human germ cell cancers, and possibly SSCs. It

  11. Potential effector and immunoregulatory functions of mast cells in mucosal immunity

    PubMed Central

    Reber, Laurent L; Sibilano, Riccardo; Mukai, Kaori; Galli, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are cells of hematopoietic origin that normally reside in mucosal tissues, often near epithelial cells, glands, smooth muscle cells, and nerves. Best known for their contributions to pathology during IgE-associated disorders such as food allergy, asthma, and anaphylaxis, MCs are also thought to mediate IgE-associated effector functions during certain parasite infections. However, various MC populations also can be activated to express functional programs – such as secreting pre-formed and/or newly synthesized biologically active products – in response to encounters with products derived from diverse pathogens, other host cells (including leukocytes and structural cells), damaged tissue, or the activation of the complement or coagulation systems, as well as by signals derived from the external environment (including animal toxins, plant products, and physical agents). In this review, we will discuss evidence suggesting that MCs can perform diverse effector and immunoregulatory roles that contribute to homeostasis or pathology in mucosal tissues. PMID:25669149

  12. Most probable distance between the nucleus and HOMO electron: the latent meaning of atomic radius from the product of chemical hardness and polarizability.

    PubMed

    Szarek, Paweł; Grochala, Wojciech

    2014-11-01

    The simple relationship between size of an atom, the Pearson hardness, and electronic polarizability is described. The estimated atomic radius correlates well with experimental as well as theoretical covalent radii reported in the literature. Furthermore, the direct connection of atomic radius to HOMO electron density and important notions of conceptual DFT (such as frontier molecular orbitals and Fukui function) has been shown and interpreted. The radial maximum of HOMO density distribution at (αη)(1/2) minimizes the system energy. Eventually, the knowledge of the Fukui function of an atom is sufficient to estimate its electronic polarizability, chemical potential, and hardness.

  13. Software Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    MAST is a decision support system to help in the management of dairy herds. Data is collected on dairy herds around the country and processed at regional centers. One center is Cornell University, where Dr. Lawrence Jones and his team developed MAST. The system draws conclusions from the data and summarizes it graphically. CLIPS, which is embedded in MAST, gives the system the ability to make decisions without user interaction. With this technique, dairy managers can identify herd problems quickly, resulting in improved animal health and higher milk quality. CLIPS (C Language Integrated Production System) was developed by NASA's Johnson Space Center. It is a shell for developing expert systems designed to permit research, development and delivery on conventional computers.

  14. Human mast cells produce and release the cytotoxic lymphocyte associated protease granzyme B upon activation.

    PubMed

    Strik, Merel C M; de Koning, Pieter J A; Kleijmeer, Monique J; Bladergroen, Bellinda A; Wolbink, Angela M; Griffith, Janice M; Wouters, Dorine; Fukuoka, Yoshihiro; Schwartz, Lawrence B; Hack, C Erik; van Ham, S Marieke; Kummer, J Alain

    2007-07-01

    Mast cells are widely distributed throughout the body and express effector functions in allergic reactions, inflammatory diseases, and host defense. Activation of mast cells results in exocytosis of preformed chemical mediators and leads to novel synthesis and secretion of lipid mediators and cytokines. Here, we show that human mast cells also express and release the cytotoxic lymphocyte-associated protease, granzyme B. Granzyme B was active and localized in cytoplasmic granules, morphologically resembling those present in cytotoxic lymphocytes. Expression and release of granzyme B by mast cell-lines HMC-1 and LAD 2 and by cord blood- and mature skin-derived human mast cells depended on the mode of activation of these cells. In mast cell lines and cord blood-derived mast cells, granzyme B expression was mainly induced by non-physiological stimuli (A23187/PMA, Compound 48/80) and substance P. In contrast, mature skin-derived mast cells only produced granzyme B upon IgE-dependent stimulation. We conclude that granzyme B is expressed and released by human mast cells upon physiologic stimulation. This suggests a role for granzyme B as a novel mediator in mast cell biology.

  15. Quantitative evaluation of mast cells in cellularly dynamic and adynamic vascular malformations.

    PubMed

    Pasyk, K A; Cherry, G W; Grabb, W C; Sasaki, G H

    1984-01-01

    Mast cells were counted in 78 histologic specimens from 70 patients with various vascular malformations showing cellularly dynamic and cellularly adynamic lesions. In growing stages of strawberry hemangiomas, there was an increased number of mast cells (mean 11.0 cells per high-power field in stage III and 23.7 in stage IV), as well as a high number of mast cells in the initial involution of strawberry hemangiomas (stage V, mean 21.0 cells per high-power field). In later involuting stages (stages VI and VII), the number of mast cells decreased (mean 9.3 in stage VI; mean 4.7 in stage VII). In cellularly adynamic lesions, i.e., port wine stains, the mean number of mast cells was 4.8, and in congenital arteriovenous malformations, it was 3.6. In normal skin, the mean number of mast cells was 3.2. In cellular hemangiomas that showed active growth (stages III to IV), the number of mast cells was strikingly low (mean 1.3). It seems that the mast cells are not responsible for the proliferation of the endothelium or for growth of the hemangioma. The markedly increased number of mast cells in the growing stages and initial involuting stage of strawberry hemangiomas parallels the gradual growth of fibrous connective tissue inside the tumor. Mast cells may thus be a precursor of the beginning of the involution of a strawberry hemangioma. PMID:6691077

  16. Quantitative observations on iliac bone marrow mast cells in chronic renal failure.

    PubMed Central

    Peart, K M; Ellis, H A

    1975-01-01

    Mast cells have been counted in sections of iliac bone from 61 control subjects at necropsy. Mast cells were found in all but three, and the range was 0-33-7, median 1-95 per mm2 marrow. The majority (82%) had less than 4-99 mast cells per mm2 marrow; in 37-7% there was less than 1 mast cell per mm2 marrow. In a group of 45 patients with chronic renal failure there was a significant increase in the numbers of mast cells (P less than 0-001) with a range of 0-96-55-63, median 9-55 per mm2 marrow. Mast cells were common in the areas of marrow fibrosis associated with osteitis fibrosa but this was not the sole cause of the increase since there was also an excess of mast cells in the non-fibrous parts of the marrow. There was a tendency towards greater numbers of mast cells in those cases with most marked osteitis fibrosa in association with the prominent marrow fibrosis, but there was no significant relationship between mast cell numbers and other features of oesteitis fibrosa such as the number of osteoclasts and the amount of woven bone formation. There was no relationship between the numbers of mast cells and the amounts of total bone, ostoid, percentage mineralization of cancellous bone, or the presence of osteomalacia. PMID:1206118

  17. Studies on the specific degranulation of mast cell sensitized by several allergens in vitro.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yongchao; Li, Zhenxing; Lin, Hong; Samee, Haider; Khalid, Jamil

    2009-04-01

    Food allergy is a major health issue worldwide. Mast cells play a very important role in the immediate hypersensitivity for which mast cell degranulation needs to be studied extensively. In this study, an approach was taken to study the characteristics of sensitized mast cell degranulation in vitro, which associated with the study of mast cells and animal models. BALB/c mice were immunized respectively by several food allergens, then blood and peritoneal mast cells were collected at different time points. A dynamic determination was carried out between mast cells and serumal IgE. Comparative analysis on sequential time points showed that there was a close coincidence between mast cell degranulation and IgE antibody titers in sensitized BALB/c mice. Furthermore, it is interesting that sensitized mast cells could implement specific degranulation against the challenges in vitro, but the closely tropomyosins induced mast cell degranulation displayed cross reactions. This is very similar to IgE resisting the allergens in vivo. The study disclosed some characteristics on mast cells, coming from sensitized BALB/c mice, degranulation in vitro.

  18. Tim-3 enhances FcεRI-proximal signaling to modulate mast cell activation.

    PubMed

    Phong, Binh L; Avery, Lyndsay; Sumpter, Tina L; Gorman, Jacob V; Watkins, Simon C; Colgan, John D; Kane, Lawrence P

    2015-12-14

    T cell (or transmembrane) immunoglobulin and mucin domain protein 3 (Tim-3) has attracted significant attention as a novel immune checkpoint receptor (ICR) on chronically stimulated, often dysfunctional, T cells. Antibodies to Tim-3 can enhance antiviral and antitumor immune responses. Tim-3 is also constitutively expressed by mast cells, NK cells and specific subsets of macrophages and dendritic cells. There is ample evidence for a positive role for Tim-3 in these latter cell types, which is at odds with the model of Tim-3 as an inhibitory molecule on T cells. At this point, little is known about the molecular mechanisms by which Tim-3 regulates the function of T cells or other cell types. We have focused on defining the effects of Tim-3 ligation on mast cell activation, as these cells constitutively express Tim-3 and are activated through an ITAM-containing receptor for IgE (FcεRI), using signaling pathways analogous to those in T cells. Using a variety of gain- and loss-of-function approaches, we find that Tim-3 acts at a receptor-proximal point to enhance Lyn kinase-dependent signaling pathways that modulate both immediate-phase degranulation and late-phase cytokine production downstream of FcεRI ligation.

  19. Tim-3 enhances FcεRI-proximal signaling to modulate mast cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Phong, Binh L.; Avery, Lyndsay; Sumpter, Tina L.; Gorman, Jacob V.; Watkins, Simon C.; Colgan, John D.

    2015-01-01

    T cell (or transmembrane) immunoglobulin and mucin domain protein 3 (Tim-3) has attracted significant attention as a novel immune checkpoint receptor (ICR) on chronically stimulated, often dysfunctional, T cells. Antibodies to Tim-3 can enhance antiviral and antitumor immune responses. Tim-3 is also constitutively expressed by mast cells, NK cells and specific subsets of macrophages and dendritic cells. There is ample evidence for a positive role for Tim-3 in these latter cell types, which is at odds with the model of Tim-3 as an inhibitory molecule on T cells. At this point, little is known about the molecular mechanisms by which Tim-3 regulates the function of T cells or other cell types. We have focused on defining the effects of Tim-3 ligation on mast cell activation, as these cells constitutively express Tim-3 and are activated through an ITAM-containing receptor for IgE (FcεRI), using signaling pathways analogous to those in T cells. Using a variety of gain- and loss-of-function approaches, we find that Tim-3 acts at a receptor-proximal point to enhance Lyn kinase-dependent signaling pathways that modulate both immediate-phase degranulation and late-phase cytokine production downstream of FcεRI ligation. PMID:26598760

  20. Identification of a Gene Product Induced by Hard-Surface Contact of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides Conidia as a Ubiquitin-Conjugating Enzyme by Yeast Complementation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi-Mei; Kolattukudy, Pappachan E.

    1998-01-01

    The germinating conidia of many phytopathogenic fungi on hosts must differentiate into an infection structure called the appressorium in order to penetrate their hosts. Chemical signals, such as the host’s surface wax or fruit ripening hormone, ethylene, trigger germination and appressorium formation of the avocado pathogen Colletotrichum gloeosporioides only after the conidia are in contact with a hard surface. What role this contact plays is unknown. Here, we describe isolation of genes expressed during the early stage of hard-surface treatment by a differential-display method and report characterization of one of these cloned genes, chip1 (Colletotrichum hard-surface induced protein 1 gene), which encodes a ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme. RNA blots clearly showed that it is induced by hard-surface contact and that ethylene treatment enhanced this induction. The predicted open reading frame (ubc1Cg) would encode a 16.2-kDa ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme, which shows 82% identity to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae UBC4-UBC5 E2 enzyme, comprising a major part of total ubiquitin-conjugating activity in stressed yeast cells. UBC1Cg can complement the proteolysis deficiency of the S. cerevisiae ubc4 ubc5 mutant, indicating that ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation is involved in conidial germination and appressorial differentiation. PMID:9658002

  1. Histamine and chondroitin sulfate E proteoglycan released by cultured human colonic mucosa: indication for possible presence of E mast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Eliakim, R.; Gilead, L.; Ligumsky, M; Okon, E.; Rachmilewitz, D.; Razin, E.

    1986-01-01

    An association between the release of histamine and chondroitin sulfate E proteoglycan (PG) was demonstrates in human colonic mucosa (HCM). Colonic biopsy samples incorporated (/sup 35/S)sulfate into PG, which was partially released into the culture medium during the incubation period. Ascending thin-layer chromatography of the released /sup 35/S-labeled PG after its digestion by chondroitin ABC lyase (chondroitinase, EC 4.2.2.4) followed by autoradiography yielded three products that migrated in the position of monosulfated disaccharides of N-acetylgalactosamine 4-sulfate and N-acetylgalactosoamine 6-sulfate and of an oversulfated disaccharide possessing N-acetylgalatosamine 4,6-disulfate. Cultured colonic mucosa released 23.6 +/- 3.7ng of histamine per mg of wet tissue without any special trigger. Comparison by linear regression analysis of the release of histamine and chondroitin (/sup 35/S)sulfate E PG revealed a correlation coefficient (r) of 0.7. Histological examination of the colonic biopsies revealed the presence of many mast cells in various degrees of degranulation in the mucosa and submucosa. The above correlation, the observation that most of the mast cells showed various degrees of degranulation, and the lack of heparin synthesis as opposed to the synthesis and immunological release of chondroitin sulfate E strongly suggest that the E mast cell exists in the human colon.

  2. Sequential phosphorylation of SLP-76 at tyrosine 173 is required for activation of T and mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Sela, Meirav; Bogin, Yaron; Beach, Dvora; Oellerich, Thomas; Lehne, Johanna; Smith-Garvin, Jennifer E; Okumura, Mariko; Starosvetsky, Elina; Kosoff, Rachelle; Libman, Evgeny; Koretzky, Gary; Kambayashi, Taku; Urlaub, Henning; Wienands, Jürgen; Chernoff, Jonathan; Yablonski, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    Cooperatively assembled signalling complexes, nucleated by adaptor proteins, integrate information from surface receptors to determine cellular outcomes. In T and mast cells, antigen receptor signalling is nucleated by three adaptors: SLP-76, Gads and LAT. Three well-characterized SLP-76 tyrosine phosphorylation sites recruit key components, including a Tec-family tyrosine kinase, Itk. We identified a fourth, evolutionarily conserved SLP-76 phosphorylation site, Y173, which was phosphorylated upon T-cell receptor stimulation in primary murine and Jurkat T cells. Y173 was required for antigen receptor-induced phosphorylation of phospholipase C-γ1 (PLC-γ1) in both T and mast cells, and for consequent downstream events, including activation of the IL-2 promoter in T cells, and degranulation and IL-6 production in mast cells. In intact cells, Y173 phosphorylation depended on three, ZAP-70-targeted tyrosines at the N-terminus of SLP-76 that recruit and activate Itk, a kinase that selectively phosphorylated Y173 in vitro. These data suggest a sequential mechanism whereby ZAP-70-dependent priming of SLP-76 at three N-terminal sites triggers reciprocal regulatory interactions between Itk and SLP-76, which are ultimately required to couple active Itk to its substrate, PLC-γ1. PMID:21725281

  3. Fyn kinase controls Fc{epsilon}RI receptor-operated calcium entry necessary for full degranulation in mast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Miranda, Elizabeth; Ibarra-Sanchez, Alfredo; Gonzalez-Espinosa, Claudia

    2010-01-22

    IgE-antigen-dependent crosslinking of the high affinity IgE receptor (Fc{epsilon}RI) on mast cells leads to degranulation, leukotriene synthesis and cytokine production. Calcium (Ca{sup 2+}) mobilization is a sine qua non requisite for degranulation, allowing the rapid secretion of stored pro-inflammatory mediators responsible for allergy symptoms. Fyn is a Src-family kinase that positively controls Fc{epsilon}RI-induced mast cell degranulation. However, our understanding of the mechanism connecting Fyn activation to secretion of pre-synthesized mediators is very limited. We analyzed Fc{epsilon}RI-dependent Ca{sup 2+} mobilization in bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) differentiated from WT and Fyn -/- knock out mice. Fyn -/- BMMCs showed a marked defect in extracellular Ca{sup 2+} influx after Fc{epsilon}RI crosslinking but not after thapsigargin addition. High concentrations of Gadolinium (Gd{sup 3+}) partially blocked Fc{epsilon}RI-induced Ca{sup 2+} influx in WT cells but, in contrast, completely inhibited Ca{sup 2+} mobilization in Fyn -/- cells. Low concentrations of an inhibitor of the canonical transient receptor potential (TRPC) Ca{sup 2+} channels (2-aminoethoxyphenyl-borane, 2-APB) blocked Fc{epsilon}RI-induced maximal Ca{sup 2+} rise in WT but not in Fyn -/- cells. Ca{sup 2+} entry through Fyn-controlled, 2-APB sensitive channels was found to be important for full degranulation and IL-2 mRNA accumulation in WT cells. Immunoprecipitation assays showed that Fyn kinase interacts with TRPC 3/6/7 channels after IgE-antigen stimulation, but its association is not related to protein tyrosine phosphorylation. Results indicate Fyn kinase mediates the receptor-dependent activation of TRPC channels that contribute to degranulation in Fc{epsilon}RI-stimulated mast cells.

  4. FAST Mast Structural Response to Axial Loading: Modeling and Verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Elliott, Kenny B.; Templeton, Justin D.; Song, Kyongchan; Rayburn, Jeffery T.

    2012-01-01

    The International Space Station s solar array wing mast shadowing problem is the focus of this paper. A building-block approach to modeling and analysis is pursued for the primary structural components of the solar array wing mast structure. Starting with an ANSYS (Registered Trademark) finite element model, a verified MSC.Nastran (Trademark) model is established for a single longeron. This finite element model translation requires the conversion of several modeling and analysis features for the two structural analysis tools to produce comparable results for the single-longeron configuration. The model is then reconciled using test data. The resulting MSC.Nastran (Trademark) model is then extended to a single-bay configuration and verified using single-bay test data. Conversion of the MSC. Nastran (Trademark) single-bay model to Abaqus (Trademark) is also performed to simulate the elastic-plastic longeron buckling response of the single bay prior to folding.

  5. Hard X-ray total scattering study on the structure of Si-dopped ferric oxyhydroxides and products of their transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieczara, Gabriela; Borkiewicz, Olaf; Manecki, Maciej; Rzepa, Grzegorz

    2016-04-01

    Here we report the results of a detailed structural investigation, using synchrotron-based pair distribution function analyses (PDF) and high-resolution X-ray diffraction (HR-XRD), on a series of Si-bearing synthetic analogues of ferrihydrite with a range of Si/Fe ratio relevant to geological environments and on products of their thermal transformation. Hard X-ray total scattering data suitable for PDF analyses have been collected at the PDF-dedicated beamline 11-ID-B and the HR-XRD data at beamline 11-BM of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). Ferrihydrite is a poorly crystalline, nano-sized hydrous ferric oxyhydroxide with a nominal/ideal formula Fe5HO8•4H2O. Its chemical composition however, can vary significantly and the atomic structure is yet to be fully understood despite multitude of structural studies undertaken over the past two decades (Michel et al., 2007; Manceau, 2009). One of the most commonly discussed and still unsettled contention points regarding the structural arrangements of ferrihydrite is related to the presence or absence of tetraherdally coordinated iron(III) within its structure. The majority of experimental work carried out to date focused on pure, synthetic ferrihydrite analogues with chemical composition close to ideal/nominal. This approach is clearly a significant oversimplification of natural ferrihydrite which always contains substantial amounts of admixtures, with Si, C, P, As, Ca, S and Al being the most common. One of the most important and the most commonly encountered impurities is Si, in the form of silicate ion that has strong affinity for ferrihydrite. SiO2content in natural ferrihydrites can vary substantially but generally falls with the range of 2.6-31.5 wt% (Cismasu et al., 2011). In certain environments however, such as modern seafloor hydrothermal vents, higher Si/Fe ratios (up to ca. 3) have been reported (Sun et al., 2013). The results of previous reports indicate that silicate

  6. Autonomous Performance Monitoring System: Monitoring and Self-Tuning (MAST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Chariya; Ziyad, Nigel A.

    2000-01-01

    Maintaining the long-term performance of software onboard a spacecraft can be a major factor in the cost of operations. In particular, the task of controlling and maintaining a future mission of distributed spacecraft will undoubtedly pose a great challenge, since the complexity of multiple spacecraft flying in formation grows rapidly as the number of spacecraft in the formation increases. Eventually, new approaches will be required in developing viable control systems that can handle the complexity of the data and that are flexible, reliable and efficient. In this paper we propose a methodology that aims to maintain the accuracy of flight software, while reducing the computational complexity of software tuning tasks. The proposed Monitoring and Self-Tuning (MAST) method consists of two parts: a flight software monitoring algorithm and a tuning algorithm. The dependency on the software being monitored is mostly contained in the monitoring process, while the tuning process is a generic algorithm independent of the detailed knowledge on the software. This architecture will enable MAST to be applicable to different onboard software controlling various dynamics of the spacecraft, such as attitude self-calibration, and formation control. An advantage of MAST over conventional techniques such as filter or batch least square is that the tuning algorithm uses machine learning approach to handle uncertainty in the problem domain, resulting in reducing over all computational complexity. The underlying concept of this technique is a reinforcement learning scheme based on cumulative probability generated by the historical performance of the system. The success of MAST will depend heavily on the reinforcement scheme used in the tuning algorithm, which guarantees the tuning solutions exist.

  7. Communication between mast cells and rat submucosal neurons.

    PubMed

    Bell, Anna; Althaus, Mike; Diener, Martin

    2015-08-01

    Histamine is a mast cell mediator released e.g. during food allergy. The aim of the project was to identify the effect of histamine on rat submucosal neurons and the mechanisms involved. Cultured submucosal neurons from rat colon express H1, H2 and H3 receptors as shown by immunocytochemical staining confirmed by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with messenger RNA (mRNA) isolated from submucosal homogenates as starting material. Histamine evoked a biphasic rise of the cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration in cultured submucosal neurons, consisting in a release of intracellularly stored Ca(2+) followed by an influx from the extracellular space. Although agonists of all three receptor subtypes evoked an increase in the cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration, experiments with antagonists revealed that mainly H1 (and to a lesser degree H2) receptors mediate the response to histamine. In coculture experiments with RBL-2H3 cells, a mast cell equivalent, compound 48/80, evoked an increase in the cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration of neighbouring neurons. Like the response to native histamine, the neuronal response to the mast cell degranulator was strongly inhibited by the H1 receptor antagonist pyrilamine and reduced by the H2 receptor antagonist cimetidine. In rats sensitized against ovalbumin, exposure to the antigen induced a rise in short-circuit current (I sc) across colonic mucosa-submucosa preparations without a significant increase in paracellular fluorescein fluxes. Pyrilamine strongly inhibited the increase in I sc, a weaker inhibition was observed after blockade of protease receptors or 5-lipoxygenase. Consequently, H1 receptors on submucosal neurons seem to play a pivotal role in the communication between mast cells and the enteric nervous system. PMID:25224285

  8. The progress and promise of zebrafish as a model to study mast cells.

    PubMed

    Prykhozhij, Sergey V; Berman, Jason N

    2014-09-01

    Immunological and hematological research using the zebrafish (Danio rerio) has significantly advanced our understanding of blood lineage ontology, cellular functions and mechanisms, and provided opportunities for disease modeling. Mast cells are an immunological cell type involved in innate and adaptive immune systems, hypersensitivity reactions and cancer progression. The application of zebrafish to study mast cell biology exploits the developmental and imaging opportunities inherent in this model system to enable detailed genetic and molecular studies of this lineage outside of traditional mammalian models. In this review, we first place the importance of mast cell research in zebrafish into the context of comparative studies of mast cells in other fish species and highlight its advantages due to superior experimental tractability and direct visualization in transparent embryos. We discuss current and future tools for mast cell research in zebrafish and the notable results of using zebrafish for understanding mast cell fate determination and our development of a systemic mastocytosis model.

  9. Identification of a lysophosphatidylserine receptor on mast cells.

    PubMed

    Sugo, Tsukasa; Tachimoto, Hiroshi; Chikatsu, Tomoko; Murakami, Yuko; Kikukawa, Yuhsuke; Sato, Shuji; Kikuchi, Kuniko; Nagi, Toshimi; Harada, Mioko; Ogi, Kazuhiro; Ebisawa, Motohiro; Mori, Masaaki

    2006-03-24

    Lysophosphatidyl-L-serine (lysoPS) is thought to be an immunological regulator because it dramatically augments the degranulation of rat peritoneal mast cells (RPMCs). This stimulatory effect may be mediated by a lysoPS receptor, but its molecule has not been identified yet. During a ligand fishing study for the orphan G-protein-coupled receptor 34 (GPR34), we found that lysoPS caused a dose-dependent inhibition of forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation in human GPR34-expressing Chinese hamster ovary (CHO/hGPR34) cells. The CHO/hGPR34 cells were unresponsive to other structurally related phospholipids examined. Quantitative real-time-PCR demonstrated that mRNAs of GPR34 are particularly abundant in mast cells. The effective lysoPS concentration for RPMC degranulation was similar to that required for GPR34 activation, and the structural requirement of lysoPS for RPMC degranulation was in good agreement with that observed in CHO/hGPR34 cells. These results suggest that GPR34 is the functional mast cell lysoPS receptor. PMID:16460680

  10. Weather model verification using Sodankylä mast measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kangas, Markku; Rontu, Laura; Fortelius, Carl; Aurela, Mika; Poikonen, Antti

    2016-04-01

    Sodankylä, in the heart of Arctic Research Centre of the Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI ARC) in northern Finland, is an ideal site for atmospheric and environmental research in the boreal and sub-Arctic zone. With temperatures ranging from -50 to +30 °C, it provides a challenging testing ground for numerical weather forecasting (NWP) models as well as weather forecasting in general. An extensive set of measurements has been carried out in Sodankylä for more than 100 years. In 2000, a 48 m-high micrometeorological mast was erected in the area. In this article, the use of Sodankylä mast measurements in NWP model verification is described. Starting in 2000, with the NWP model HIRLAM and Sodankylä measurements, the verification system has now been expanded to include comparisons between 12 NWP models and seven measurement masts, distributed across Europe. A case study, comparing forecasted and observed radiation fluxes, is also presented. It was found that three different radiation schemes, applicable in NWP model HARMONIE-AROME, produced somewhat different downwelling longwave radiation fluxes during cloudy days, which however did not change the overall cold bias of the predicted screen-level temperature.

  11. Weather model verification using Sodankylä mast measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kangas, M.; Rontu, L.; Fortelius, C.; Aurela, M.; Poikonen, A.

    2015-12-01

    Sodankylä, in the heart of Arctic Research Centre of the Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI ARC) in northern Finland, is an ideal site for atmospheric and environmental research in the boreal and sub-arctic zone. With temperatures ranging from -50 to +30 °C, it provides a challenging testing ground for numerical weather forecasting (NWP) models as well as weather forecasting in general. An extensive set of measurements has been carried out in Sodankylä for more than 100 years. In 2000, a 48 m high micrometeorological mast was erected in the area. In this article, the use of Sodankylä mast measurements in NWP model verification is described. Started in 2000 with NWP model HIRLAM and Sodankylä measurements, the verification system has now been expanded to include comparisons between 12 NWP models and seven measurement masts. A case study, comparing forecasted and observed radiation fluxes, is also presented. It was found that three different radiation schemes, applicable in NWP model HARMONIE-AROME, produced during cloudy days somewhat different downwelling long-wave radiation fluxes, which however did not change the overall cold bias of the predicted screen-level temperature.

  12. Eigensystem realization algorithm modal identification experiences with mini-mast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappa, Richard S.; Schenk, Axel; Noll, Christopher

    1992-01-01

    This paper summarizes work performed under a collaborative research effort between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the German Aerospace Research Establishment (DLR, Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fur Luft- und Raumfahrt). The objective is to develop and demonstrate system identification technology for future large space structures. Recent experiences using the Eigensystem Realization Algorithm (ERA), for modal identification of Mini-Mast, are reported. Mini-Mast is a 20 m long deployable space truss used for structural dynamics and active vibration-control research at the Langley Research Center. A comprehensive analysis of 306 frequency response functions (3 excitation forces and 102 displacement responses) was performed. Emphasis is placed on two topics of current research: (1) gaining an improved understanding of ERA performance characteristics (theory vs. practice); and (2) developing reliable techniques to improve identification results for complex experimental data. Because of nonlinearities and numerous local modes, modal identification of Mini-Mast proved to be surprisingly difficult. Methods were available, ERA, for obtaining detailed, high-confidence results.

  13. Mast cells in canine cutaneous hemangioma, hemangiosarcoma and mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Woldemeskel, Moges; Rajeev, Sreekumari

    2010-02-01

    Mast cell count (MCC) in 45 dogs with cutaneous hemangioma (HA, n = 12), hemangiosarcoma (HSA, n = 12), mammary adenoma (AD, n = 9) and mammary adenocarcinoma (AC, n = 12) was made using Toluidine blue stained sections. Antibodies against endothelial cell markers, Factor VIII and VEGF were used to visualize and determine the hot spot micro-vessel density (MVD). Total MCC and MCC along the invasive edges were significantly higher (p < 0.001) in canine mammary AC than in AD. The total MCC did not significantly differ (p > 0.05), in HSAs (8.6 +/- 3.3) than in HAs (5.5 +/- 2.8). There is a positive correlation (r = 0.14) between the hot spot MCC and MVD in mammary AC, although not significant (p = 0.3172), indicating that mast cells are associated with angiogenesis in canine mammary AC. This study suggests that mast cells may play an important role in neovascularization of canine cutaneous vascular and mammary neoplasms. Detailed studies encompassing correlation of MCC and MVD with clinical outcomes and prognosis in these neoplasms are recommended.

  14. Session: Hard Rock Penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Dunn, James C.; Drumheller, Douglas S.; Glowka, David A.; Lysne, Peter

    1992-01-01

    This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five presentations: ''Hard Rock Penetration - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''Overview - Hard Rock Penetration'' by James C. Dunn; ''An Overview of Acoustic Telemetry'' by Douglas S. Drumheller; ''Lost Circulation Technology Development Status'' by David A. Glowka; ''Downhole Memory-Logging Tools'' by Peter Lysne.

  15. Hardness Tester for Polyur

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauser, D. L.; Buras, D. F.; Corbin, J. M.

    1987-01-01

    Rubber-hardness tester modified for use on rigid polyurethane foam. Provides objective basis for evaluation of improvements in foam manufacturing and inspection. Typical acceptance criterion requires minimum hardness reading of 80 on modified tester. With adequate correlation tests, modified tester used to measure indirectly tensile and compressive strengths of foam.

  16. Measurement of the dependence of transverse energy production at large pseudorapidity on the hard-scattering kinematics of proton-proton collisions at √{ s} = 2.76 TeV with ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bieniek, S. P.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. 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R.; Suzuki, S.; Svatos, M.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, P. T. E.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Temple, D.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thun, R. P.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todome, K.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; True, P.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Velz, T.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yao, W.-M.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, Q.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2016-05-01

    The relationship between jet production in the central region and the underlying-event activity in a pseudorapidity-separated region is studied in 4.0 pb-1 of √{ s} = 2.76 TeVpp collision data recorded with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The underlying event is characterised through measurements of the average value of the sum of the transverse energy at large pseudorapidity downstream of one of the protons, which are reported here as a function of hard-scattering kinematic variables. The hard scattering is characterised by the average transverse momentum and pseudorapidity of the two highest transverse momentum jets in the event. The dijet kinematics are used to estimate, on an event-by-event basis, the scaled longitudinal momenta of the hard-scattered partons in the target and projectile beam-protons moving toward and away from the region measuring transverse energy, respectively. Transverse energy production at large pseudorapidity is observed to decrease with a linear dependence on the longitudinal momentum fraction in the target proton and to depend only weakly on that in the projectile proton. The results are compared to the predictions of various Monte Carlo event generators, which qualitatively reproduce the trends observed in data but generally underpredict the overall level of transverse energy at forward pseudorapidity.

  17. Measurement of the dependence of transverse energy production at large pseudorapidity on the hard-scattering kinematics of proton-proton collisions at √{ s} = 2.76 TeV with ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. 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H.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Cleland, W.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Cogan, J. G.; Colasurdo, L.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cúth, J.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dandoy, J. R.; Dang, N. P.; Daniells, A. C.; Danninger, M.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davison, P.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Benedetti, A.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. V.; Deigaard, I.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delgove, D.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Dell'Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; DeMarco, D. A.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Donato, C.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Di Valentino, D.; Diaconu, C.; Diamond, M.; Dias, F. A.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Diglio, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Djuvsland, J. I.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Dobos, D.; Dobre, M.; Doglioni, C.; Dohmae, T.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Drechsler, E.; Dris, M.; Dubreuil, E.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Ducu, O. A.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Duflot, L.; Duguid, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Durglishvili, A.; Duschinger, D.; Dyndal, M.; Eckardt, C.; Ecker, K. M.; Edgar, R. C.; Edson, W.; Edwards, N. C.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Elliot, A. A.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Endo, M.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Ernis, G.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Ezhilov, A.; Fabbri, L.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falla, R. J.; Faltova, J.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Faucci Giannelli, M.; Favareto, A.; Fayard, L.; Federic, P.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Feigl, S.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Feng, H.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Feremenga, L.; Fernandez Martinez, P.; Fernandez Perez, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. E.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferretto Parodi, A.; Fiascaris, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filipuzzi, M.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Finelli, K. D.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, A.; Fischer, C.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, W. C.; Fitzgerald, E. A.; Flaschel, N.; Fleck, I.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleischmann, S.; Fletcher, G. T.; Fletcher, G.; Fletcher, R. R. M.; Flick, T.; Floderus, A.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Fournier, D.; Fox, H.; Fracchia, S.; Francavilla, P.; Franchini, M.; Francis, D.; Franconi, L.; Franklin, M.; Frate, M.; Fraternali, M.; Freeborn, D.; French, S. T.; Friedrich, F.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fulsom, B. G.; Fusayasu, T.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gabrielli, A.; Gabrielli, A.; Gach, G. P.; Gadatsch, S.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Galhardo, B.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Galster, G.; Gan, K. 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A.; Oliveira Damazio, D.; Oliver Garcia, E.; Olszewski, A.; Olszowska, J.; Onofre, A.; Onogi, K.; Onyisi, P. U. E.; Oram, C. J.; Oreglia, M. J.; Oren, Y.; Orestano, D.; Orlando, N.; Oropeza Barrera, C.; Orr, R. S.; Osculati, B.; Ospanov, R.; Otero y Garzon, G.; Otono, H.; Ouchrif, M.; Ould-Saada, F.; Ouraou, A.; Oussoren, K. P.; Ouyang, Q.; Ovcharova, A.; Owen, M.; Owen, R. E.; Ozcan, V. E.; Ozturk, N.; Pachal, K.; Pacheco Pages, A.; Padilla Aranda, C.; Pagáčová, M.; Pagan Griso, S.; Paganis, E.; Paige, F.; Pais, P.; Pajchel, K.; Palacino, G.; Palestini, S.; Palka, M.; Pallin, D.; Palma, A.; Pan, Y. B.; Panagiotopoulou, E. St.; Pandini, C. E.; Panduro Vazquez, J. G.; Pani, P.; Panitkin, S.; Pantea, D.; Paolozzi, L.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Papageorgiou, K.; Paramonov, A.; Paredes Hernandez, D.; Parker, M. A.; Parker, K. A.; Parodi, F.; Parsons, J. A.; Parzefall, U.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passaggio, S.; Pastore, F.; Pastore, Fr.; Pásztor, G.; Pataraia, S.; Patel, N. D.; Pater, J. R.; Pauly, T.; Pearce, J.; Pearson, B.; Pedersen, L. E.; Pedersen, M.; Pedraza Lopez, S.; Pedro, R.; Peleganchuk, S. V.; Pelikan, D.; Penc, O.; Peng, C.; Peng, H.; Penning, B.; Penwell, J.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perez Codina, E.; Pérez García-Estañ, M. T.; Perini, L.; Pernegger, H.; Perrella, S.; Peschke, R.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Peters, K.; Peters, R. F. Y.; Petersen, B. A.; Petersen, T. C.; Petit, E.; Petridis, A.; Petridou, C.; Petroff, P.; Petrolo, E.; Petrucci, F.; Pettersson, N. E.; Pezoa, R.; Phillips, P. W.; Piacquadio, G.; Pianori, E.; Picazio, A.; Piccaro, E.; Piccinini, M.; Pickering, M. A.; Piegaia, R.; Pignotti, D. T.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pilkington, A. D.; Pin, A. W. J.; Pina, J.; Pinamonti, M.; Pinfold, J. L.; Pingel, A.; Pires, S.; Pirumov, H.; Pitt, M.; Pizio, C.; Plazak, L.; Pleier, M.-A.; Pleskot, V.; Plotnikova, E.; Plucinski, P.; Pluth, D.; Poettgen, R.; Poggioli, L.; Pohl, D.; Polesello, G.; Poley, A.; Policicchio, A.; Polifka, R.; Polini, A.; Pollard, C. S.; Polychronakos, V.; Pommès, K.; Pontecorvo, L.; Pope, B. G.; Popeneciu, G. A.; Popovic, D. S.; Poppleton, A.; Pospisil, S.; Potamianos, K.; Potrap, I. N.; Potter, C. J.; Potter, C. T.; Poulard, G.; Poveda, J.; Pozdnyakov, V.; Pralavorio, P.; Pranko, A.; Prasad, S.; Prell, S.; Price, D.; Price, L. E.; Primavera, M.; Prince, S.; Proissl, M.; Prokofiev, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Protopapadaki, E.; Protopopescu, S.; Proudfoot, J.; Przybycien, M.; Ptacek, E.; Puddu, D.; Pueschel, E.; Puldon, D.; Purohit, M.; Puzo, P.; Qian, J.; Qin, G.; Qin, Y.; Quadt, A.; Quarrie, D. R.; Quayle, W. B.; Queitsch-Maitland, M.; Quilty, D.; Raddum, S.; Radeka, V.; Radescu, V.; Radhakrishnan, S. K.; Radloff, P.; Rados, P.; Ragusa, F.; Rahal, G.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rammensee, M.; Rangel-Smith, C.; Rauscher, F.; Rave, S.; Ravenscroft, T.; Raymond, M.; Read, A. L.; Readioff, N. P.; Rebuzzi, D. M.; Redelbach, A.; Redlinger, G.; Reece, R.; Reeves, K.; Rehnisch, L.; Reichert, J.; Reisin, H.; Relich, M.; Rembser, C.; Ren, H.; Renaud, A.; Rescigno, M.; Resconi, S.; Rezanova, O. L.; Reznicek, P.; Rezvani, R.; Richter, R.; Richter, S.; Richter-Was, E.; Ricken, O.; Ridel, M.; Rieck, P.; Riegel, C. J.; Rieger, J.; Rifki, O.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rinaldi, L.; Ristić, B.; Ritsch, E.; Riu, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rizvi, E.; Robertson, S. H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robinson, D.; Robinson, J. E. M.; Robson, A.; Roda, C.; Roe, S.; Røhne, O.; Rolli, S.; Romaniouk, A.; Romano, M.; Romano Saez, S. M.; Romero Adam, E.; Rompotis, N.; Ronzani, M.; Roos, L.; Ros, E.; Rosati, S.; Rosbach, K.; Rose, P.; Rosendahl, P. L.; Rosenthal, O.; Rossetti, V.; Rossi, E.; Rossi, L. P.; Rosten, J. H. N.; Rosten, R.; Rotaru, M.; Roth, I.; Rothberg, J.; Rousseau, D.; Royon, C. R.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Rubbo, F.; Rubinskiy, I.; Rud, V. I.; Rudolph, C.; Rudolph, M. S.; Rühr, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Ruschke, A.; Russell, H. L.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruthmann, N.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Rybar, M.; Rybkin, G.; Ryder, N. C.; Saavedra, A. F.; Sabato, G.; Sacerdoti, S.; Saddique, A.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sadykov, R.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Saha, P.; Sahinsoy, M.; Saimpert, M.; Saito, T.; Sakamoto, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Salazar Loyola, J. E.; Saleem, M.; Salek, D.; Sales De Bruin, P. H.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sammel, D.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sanchez, A.; Sánchez, J.; Sanchez Martinez, V.; Sandaker, H.; Sandbach, R. L.; Sander, H. G.; Sanders, M. P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandoval, C.; Sandstroem, R.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sannino, M.; Sansoni, A.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, H.; Santoyo Castillo, I.; Sapp, K.; Sapronov, A.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarrazin, B.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, Y.; Sato, K.; Sauvage, G.; Sauvan, E.; Savage, G.; Savard, P.; Sawyer, C.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, J.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scanlon, T.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Scarcella, M.; Scarfone, V.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schaefer, D.; Schaefer, R.; Schaeffer, J.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Schiavi, C.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, B.; Schnellbach, Y. J.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schoenrock, B. D.; Schopf, E.; Schorlemmer, A. L. S.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schramm, S.; Schreyer, M.; Schroeder, C.; Schuh, N.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwarz, T. A.; Schwegler, Ph.; Schweiger, H.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Sciacca, F. G.; Scifo, E.; Sciolla, G.; Scuri, F.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Sedov, G.; Sedykh, E.; Seema, P.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekhon, K.; Sekula, S. J.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Serre, T.; Sessa, M.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfiligoj, T.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shang, R.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shaw, S. M.; Shcherbakova, A.; Shehu, C. Y.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shoaleh Saadi, D.; Shochet, M. J.; Shojaii, S.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Shushkevich, S.; Sicho, P.; Sidebo, P. E.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simon, D.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sioli, M.; Siragusa, G.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinner, M. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smith, R. W.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snidero, G.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Sokhrannyi, G.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Song, H. Y.; Soni, N.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, B.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosa, D.; Sosebee, M.; Sotiropoulou, C. L.; Soualah, R.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Sowden, B. C.; Spagnolo, S.; Spalla, M.; Spangenberg, M.; Spanò, F.; Spearman, W. R.; Sperlich, D.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stabile, A.; Staerz, S.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramaniam, R.; Succurro, A.; Suchek, S.; Sugaya, Y.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Svatos, M.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, P. T. E.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Temple, D.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thun, R. P.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todome, K.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; True, P.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Velz, T.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yao, W.-M.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, Q.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2016-05-01

    The relationship between jet production in the central region and the underlying-event activity in a pseudorapidity-separated region is studied in 4.0 pb-1 of √{ s} = 2.76 TeVpp collision data recorded with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The underlying event is characterised through measurements of the average value of the sum of the transverse energy at large pseudorapidity downstream of one of the protons, which are reported here as a function of hard-scattering kinematic variables. The hard scattering is characterised by the average transverse momentum and pseudorapidity of the two highest transverse momentum jets in the event. The dijet kinematics are used to estimate, on an event-by-event basis, the scaled longitudinal momenta of the hard-scattered partons in the target and projectile beam-protons moving toward and away from the region measuring transverse energy, respectively. Transverse energy production at large pseudorapidity is observed to decrease with a linear dependence on the longitudinal momentum fraction in the target proton and to depend only weakly on that in the projectile proton. The results are compared to the predictions of various Monte Carlo event generators, which qualitatively reproduce the trends observed in data but generally underpredict the overall level of transverse energy at forward pseudorapidity.

  18. Hard to Believe : Produced by Ken Stone and Irene Silber, 2015, Swoop Films and Stone Soup Productions (New York, 56 minutes, unrated).

    PubMed

    Northam, Holly Louise

    2016-06-01

    This article presents a review of Hard to Believe, a compelling documentary reporting the forced organ procurement and death of Chinese prisoners of conscience. The documentary is targeted to ignite political and public pressure to stop these practices that are thought to be motivated by financial and political gain. Narrated by journalist and author Ethan Gutmann, the documentary pricks at the collective conscience, as credible witnesses provide evidence that point to an abrogation of every ethical principle ascribed to legitimate organ procurement.

  19. Mast cells promote scar remodeling and functional recovery after spinal cord injury via mouse mast cell protease 6.

    PubMed

    Vangansewinkel, Tim; Geurts, Nathalie; Quanten, Kirsten; Nelissen, Sofie; Lemmens, Stefanie; Geboes, Lies; Dooley, Dearbhaile; Vidal, Pia M; Pejler, Gunnar; Hendrix, Sven

    2016-05-01

    An important barrier for axon regeneration and recovery after traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is attributed to the scar that is formed at the lesion site. Here, we investigated the effect of mouse mast cell protease (mMCP) 6, a mast cell (MC)-specific tryptase, on scarring and functional recovery after a spinal cord hemisection injury. Functional recovery was significantly impaired in both MC-deficient and mMCP6-knockout (mMCP6(-/-)) mice after SCI compared with wild-type control mice. This decrease in locomotor performance was associated with an increased lesion size and excessive scarring at the injury site. Axon growth-inhibitory chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans and the extracellular matrix components fibronectin, laminin, and collagen IV were significantly up-regulated in MC-deficient and mMCP6(-/-) mice, with an increase in scar volume between 23 and 32%. A degradation assay revealed that mMCP6 directly cleaves fibronectin and collagen IV in vitro In addition, gene expression levels of the scar components fibronectin, aggrecan, and collagen IV were increased up to 6.8-fold in mMCP6(-/-) mice in the subacute phase after injury. These data indicate that endogenous mMCP6 has scar-suppressing properties after SCI via indirect cleavage of axon growth-inhibitory scar components and alteration of the gene expression profile of these factors.-Vangansewinkel, T., Geurts, N., Quanten, K., Nelissen, S., Lemmens, S., Geboes, L., Dooley, D., Vidal, P. M., Pejler, G., Hendrix, S. Mast cells promote scar remodeling and functional recovery after spinal cord injury via mouse mast cell protease 6.

  20. Mitigation of MHD induced fast-ion redistribution in MAST and implications for MAST-Upgrade design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeling, D. L.; Barrett, T. R.; Cecconello, M.; Challis, C. D.; Hawkes, N.; Jones, O. M.; Klimek, I.; McClements, K. G.; Meakins, A.; Milnes, J.; Turnyanskiy, M.; the MAST Team

    2015-01-01

    The phenomenon of the redistribution of neutral beam fast ions due to magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activity in plasma has been observed on many tokamaks and more recently has been a focus of research on MAST (Turnyanskiy et al 2013 Nucl. Fusion 53 053016). n = 1 fishbone modes are observed to cause a large decrease in the neutron emission rate indicating the existence of a significant perturbation of the fast-ion population in the plasma. Theoretical work on fishbone modes states that the fast-ion distribution itself acts as the source of free energy driving the modes that cause the redistribution. Therefore a series of experiments have been carried out on MAST to investigate a range of plasma densities at two neutral-beam power levels to determine the region within this parameter space in which fishbone activity and consequent fast-ion redistribution is suppressed. Analysis of these experiments shows complete suppression of fishbone activity at high densities with increasing activity and fast-ion redistribution at lower densities and higher neutral-beam power, accompanied by strong evidence that the redistribution effect primarily affects a specific region in the plasma core with a weaker effect over a wider region of the plasma. The results also indicate the existence of correlations between gradients in the modelled fast-ion distribution function, the amplitude and growth rate of the fishbone modes, and the magnitude of the redistribution effect. The same analysis has been carried out on models of MAST-Upgrade baseline plasma scenarios to determine whether significant fast-ion redistribution due to fishbone modes is likely to occur in that device. A simple change to the neutral-beam injector geometry is proposed which is shown to have a significant mitigating effect in terms of the fishbone mode drive and is therefore expected to allow effective plasma heating and current drive over a wider range of plasma conditions in MAST-Upgrade.

  1. Spacelab system analysis: A study of the Marshall Avionics System Testbed (MAST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingels, Frank M.; Owens, John K.; Daniel, Steven P.; Ahmad, F.; Couvillion, W.

    1988-01-01

    An analysis of the Marshall Avionics Systems Testbed (MAST) communications requirements is presented. The average offered load for typical nodes is estimated. Suitable local area networks are determined.

  2. Neutrophil Recruitment by Tumor Necrosis Factor from Mast Cells in Immune Complex Peritonitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Ramos, Bernard F.; Jakschik, Barbara A.

    1992-12-01

    During generalized immune complex-induced inflammation of the peritoneal cavity, two peaks of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) were observed in the peritoneal exudate of normal mice. In mast cell-deficient mice, the first peak was undetected, and the second peak of TNF and neutrophil influx were significantly reduced. Antibody to TNF significantly inhibited neutrophil infiltration in normal but not in mast cell-deficient mice. Mast cell repletion of the latter normalized TNF, neutrophil mobilization, and the effect of the antibody to TNF. Thus, in vivo, mast cells produce the TNF that augments neutrophil emigration.

  3. Anti-inflammatory effect of Columbianetin on activated human mast cells.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hyun-Ja; Na, Ho-Jeong; Kim, Su-Jin; Rim, Hong-Kun; Myung, Noh-Yil; Moon, Phil-Dong; Han, Na-Ra; Seo, Jae-Uk; Kang, Tae-Hee; Kim, Jae-Joong; Choi, Youngjin; Kang, In-Cheol; Hong, Seung-Heon; Kim, You-Ah; Seo, Young-Wan; Kim, Hyung-Min; Um, Jae-Young

    2009-06-01

    In the present study, we extracted Corydalis heterocarpa with various solvents in order to find the bioactive constituents that demonstrated anti-inflammatory effects. We isolated the active compound, Columbianetin. Anti-inflammatory effect of Columbianetin has been reported but the precise effects of Columbianetin in experimental models have remained unknown. In the present study, we investigate the effect of Columbianetin on the production of histamine, interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) by using the human mast cell line (HMC-1). Various concentrations of Columbianetin were treated before the activation of HMC-1 cells with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) plus calcium ionophore, A23187. PMA plus A23187 significantly increased IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-alpha production compared with media control (p<0.05). We also show that the increased cytokines IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-alpha level was significantly inhibited by Columbianetin in a dose-dependent manner (p<0.05). Maximal inhibition rates of IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-alpha production by Columbianetin were about 102.6%, 101.1%, 95.8%, and 103.9%, respectively. Columbianetin inhibited expression of COX-2. In addition, the effect of Columbianetin was investigated on the histamine release from HMC-1 stimulated by substance P, which promotes histamine release. Columbianetin also inhibited the histamine release by substance P. In conclusion, these results indicate that Columbianetin may be helpful in regulating mast cell-mediated allergic inflammatory responses.

  4. 21 CFR 133.148 - Hard grating cheeses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hard grating cheeses. 133.148 Section 133.148 Food... Related Products § 133.148 Hard grating cheeses. (a) The cheeses for which definitions and standards of identity are prescribed by this section are hard grating cheeses for which specifically...

  5. Lung mast cells are a source of secreted phospholipases A2

    PubMed Central

    Triggiani, Massimo; Giannattasio, Giorgio; Calabrese, Cecilia; Loffredo, Stefania; Granata, Francescopaolo; Fiorello, Alfonso; Santini, Mario; Gelb, Michael H.; Marone, Gianni

    2009-01-01

    Background Secreted phospholipases A2 (sPLA2s) are released in plasma and other biologic fluids of patients with inflammatory, autoimmune, and allergic diseases. Objective We sought to evaluate sPLA2 activity in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of asthmatic patients and to examine the expression and release of sPLA2s from primary human lung mast cells (HLMCs). Methods sPLA2 activity was measured in BALF and supernatants of either unstimulated or anti-IgE–activated HLMCs as hydrolysis of oleic acid from radiolabeled Escherichia coli membranes. Expression of sPLA2s was examined by using RT-PCR. The release of cysteinyl leukotriene (LT) C4 was measured by means of enzyme immunoassay. Results Phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activity was higher in the BALF of asthmatic patients than in the control group. BALF PLA2 activity was blocked by the sPLA2 inhibitors dithiothreitol and Me-Indoxam but not by the cytosolic PLA2 inhibitor AZ-1. HLMCs spontaneously released a PLA2 activity that was increased on stimulation with anti-IgE. This PLA2 activity was blocked by dithiothreitol and Me-Indoxam but not by AZ-1. HLMCs constitutively express mRNA for group IB, IIA, IID, IIE, IIF, III, V, X, XIIA, and XIIB sPLA2s. Anti-IgE did not modify the expression of sPLA2s. The cell-impermeable inhibitor Me-Indoxam significantly reduced (up to 40%) the production of LTC4 from anti-IgE–stimulated HLMCs. Conclusions sPLA2 activity is increased in the airways of asthmatic patients. HLMCs express multiple sPLA2s and release 1 or more of them when activated by anti-IgE. The sPLA2s released by mast cells contribute to LTC4 production by acting in an autocrine fashion. Mast cells can be a source of sPLA2s in the airways of asthmatic patients. PMID:19541351

  6. Hard processes in hadronic interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Satz, H. |; Wang, X.N.

    1995-07-01

    Quantum chromodynamics is today accepted as the fundamental theory of strong interactions, even though most hadronic collisions lead to final states for which quantitative QCD predictions are still lacking. It therefore seems worthwhile to take stock of where we stand today and to what extent the presently available data on hard processes in hadronic collisions can be accounted for in terms of QCD. This is one reason for this work. The second reason - and in fact its original trigger - is the search for the quark-gluon plasma in high energy nuclear collisions. The hard processes to be considered here are the production of prompt photons, Drell-Yan dileptons, open charm, quarkonium states, and hard jets. For each of these, we discuss the present theoretical understanding, compare the resulting predictions to available data, and then show what behaviour it leads to at RHIC and LHC energies. All of these processes have the structure mentioned above: they contain a hard partonic interaction, calculable perturbatively, but also the non-perturbative parton distribution within a hadron. These parton distributions, however, can be studied theoretically in terms of counting rule arguments, and they can be checked independently by measurements of the parton structure functions in deep inelastic lepton-hadron scattering. The present volume is the work of Hard Probe Collaboration, a group of theorists who are interested in the problem and were willing to dedicate a considerable amount of their time and work on it. The necessary preparation, planning and coordination of the project were carried out in two workshops of two weeks` duration each, in February 1994 at CERn in Geneva andin July 1994 at LBL in Berkeley.

  7. The Lectin ArtinM Induces Recruitment of Rat Mast Cells from the Bone Marrow to the Peritoneal Cavity

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida Buranello, Patricia Andressa; Moulin, Maria Raquel Isnard; Souza, Devandir Antonio; Jamur, Maria Célia; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina; Oliver, Constance

    2010-01-01

    Background The D-mannose binding lectin ArtinM is known to recruit neutrophils, to degranulate mast cells and may have potential therapeutic applications. However, the effect of ArtinM on mast cell recruitment has not been investigated. Methodology Male Wistar rats were injected i.p. with ArtinM or ConA (control). The ability of the lectin to degranulate peritoneal and mesenteric mast cells was examined. Recruitment of mast cells to the peritoneal cavity and mesentery after ArtinM injection was examined with or without depletion of peritoneal mast cells by distilled water. Results ArtinM degranulated both peritoneal and mesentery mast cells in vitro. Three days after i.p. injection of the lectin there were reduced numbers of mast cells in the peritoneal lavage, while at 7 days post injection of ArtinM, the number of peritoneal mast cells was close to control values. Since immature mast cells are recruited from the bone marrow, the effect of the lectin on bone marrow mast cells was examined. Injection of ArtinM resulted in an increased number of mast cells in the bone marrow. To determine if degranulation of mast cells in the peritoneal cavity was required for the increase in bone marrow mast cells, the peritoneal cavity was depleted of mast cells with ultrapure water. Exposure to ArtinM increased the number of mast cells in the bone marrow of rats depleted of peritoneal mast cells. Conclusions The ArtinM induced recruitment of mast cells from the bone marrow to the peritoneal cavity may partially explain the therapeutic actions of ArtinM. PMID:20339538

  8. PREFACE: 5th International Conference on Materials and Applications for Sensors and Transducers (IC-MAST2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hristoforou, E.; Vlachos, D. S.; Giouroudi, I.; Kar-Narayan, S.; Potirakis, S.

    2016-03-01

    advantage of arranging and concluding research proposals and projects, otherwise not having a visible possibility of such realization The 5th IC-MAST organizing committee is proud that the Conference Keynote Speaker was Prof George Hadjipanayis, University of Delaware. We are also proud for the invited speakers of the conference: • Stergios Logothetidis, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece • Dimitris Tsoukalas, National Technical University of Athens, Greece • Susana Cardoso de Freitas, INESC Microsistemas e Nanotecnologias • Yuris Dzenis, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, USA The IC-MAST 2015 organizers believe that the target of the Conference has been successfully met by enhancing knowledge in sensors by all participants, accelerating the achievement of results and optimizing the under design products, in a quite friendly way! Therefore, participants made an appointment for the next year in Athens, Greece, where the 6th International MAST Conference will be realized!

  9. Hard to Believe : Produced by Ken Stone and Irene Silber, 2015, Swoop Films and Stone Soup Productions (New York, 56 minutes, unrated).

    PubMed

    Northam, Holly Louise

    2016-06-01

    This article presents a review of Hard to Believe, a compelling documentary reporting the forced organ procurement and death of Chinese prisoners of conscience. The documentary is targeted to ignite political and public pressure to stop these practices that are thought to be motivated by financial and political gain. Narrated by journalist and author Ethan Gutmann, the documentary pricks at the collective conscience, as credible witnesses provide evidence that point to an abrogation of every ethical principle ascribed to legitimate organ procurement. PMID:27029052

  10. Mast cells and histamine enhance the proliferation of non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Stoyanov, Evgeniy; Uddin, Mohib; Mankuta, David; Dubinett, Steven M; Levi-Schaffer, Francesca

    2012-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common form of lung cancer with an extremely low survival rate. It is characterized by a chronic inflammatory process with intense mast cell infiltrate that is associated with reduced survival. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that mast cells have an enhancing effect on NSCLC proliferation. To assess the tumor-promoting potential of mast cells, we used the human alveolar basal adenocarcinoma (A549) and the mouse Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cell lines, umbilical cord blood-derived mast cells (CBMC) and the mast cell-deficient mouse Sash model. The proliferation rate of A549/LLC cells was markedly increased by mast cells and histamine. Histamine proliferating activity was mediated via H(1), H(2) and H(4) receptors and caused ERK phosphorylation. LLC induced in Sash mice or in wild-type mice treated with the mast cell stabilizer nedocromil sodium displayed an accelerated growth (number of metastic colonies in the lungs, total lung area and lung/total mice weight ratio). In summary, we have shown a significant effect of mast cells and histamine in enhancing NSCLC/LLCX growth in vitro, while in a mouse LLC model in vivo we have found that mast cells are important negative regulators of cancer development. Therefore our results would indicate a pro-tumorogenic effect of the mast cells in vitro on established lung tumor cell lines, and anti-tumorogenic effect in mice at lung cancer induction. In conclusion, mast cell/anti-histamine targeted therapies should carefully consider this dual effect. PMID:21733595

  11. The STAT5-GATA2 Pathway Is Critical in Basophil and Mast Cell Differentiation and Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yapeng; Qi, Xiaopeng; Liu, Bing; Huang, Hua

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factor GATA2 plays critical roles in hematopoietic stem cell survival and proliferation, GMP differentiation, and basophil and mast cell differentiation. However, precise roles of GATA2 in basophil and mast cell differentiation and maintenance have not been delineated. We have identified GATA2 as an essential transcription factor in differentiation of newly identified common basophil and mast cell progenitors into basophils and mast cells. We observed Gata2 haploinsufficiency for mast cell differentiation but not for basophil differentiation. We examined the precise role of GATA2 in maintaining the expression of a wide range of genes that are important for performing basophil or mast cell functions. The effects of GATA2 on gene expression were broadly based. We demonstrated that GATA2 was required for maintaining Fcer1a mRNA and FcεRIα protein expression on both basophils and mast cells as well as for maintaining Kit mRNA and c-Kit protein expression on mast cells. GATA2 was required for histamine synthesis and was also critical for Il4 mRNA expression in basophils and Il13 mRNA expression in mast cells. We demonstrate a STAT5-GATA2 connection, showing that the STAT5 transcription factor directly bound to the promoter and an intronic region of the Gata2 gene. Overexpression of the Gata2 gene was sufficient to direct basophil and mast cell differentiation in the absence of the Stat5 gene. Our study reveals that the STAT5-GATA2 pathway is critical for basophil and mast cell differentiation and maintenance. PMID:25801432

  12. Organizing Your Hard Disk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stocker, H. Robert; Hilton, Thomas S. E.

    1991-01-01

    Suggests strategies that make hard disk organization easy and efficient, such as making, changing, and removing directories; grouping files by subject; naming files effectively; backing up efficiently; and using PATH. (JOW)

  13. Traceability in hardness measurements: from the definition to industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germak, Alessandro; Herrmann, Konrad; Low, Samuel

    2010-04-01

    The measurement of hardness has been and continues to be of significant importance to many of the world's manufacturing industries. Conventional hardness testing is the most commonly used method for acceptance testing and production quality control of metals and metallic products. Instrumented indentation is one of the few techniques available for obtaining various property values for coatings and electronic products in the micrometre and nanometre dimensional scales. For these industries to be successful, it is critical that measurements made by suppliers and customers agree within some practical limits. To help assure this measurement agreement, a traceability chain for hardness measurement traceability from the hardness definition to industry has developed and evolved over the past 100 years, but its development has been complicated. A hardness measurement value not only requires traceability of force, length and time measurements but also requires traceability of the hardness values measured by the hardness machine. These multiple traceability paths are needed because a hardness measurement is affected by other influence parameters that are often difficult to identify, quantify and correct. This paper describes the current situation of hardness measurement traceability that exists for the conventional hardness methods (i.e. Rockwell, Brinell, Vickers and Knoop hardness) and for special-application hardness and indentation methods (i.e. elastomer, dynamic, portables and instrumented indentation).

  14. Determination of annatto in high-fat dairy products, margarine and hard candy by solvent extraction followed by high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, F E; Lawrence, J F

    1995-01-01

    Utilizing solvents such as ethanolic aqueous ammonia, petroleum ether, hexane and chloroform, annatto components alpha- and beta-norbixin and alpha- and beta-bixin were extracted from cheese, butter, margarine and hard candy. After transferring the extract into a solution of aqueous acetic acid in methanol, bixin and norbixin were determined quantitatively using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and an absorbance detector set at 500 nm. Recovery of norbixin from spiked cheese samples averaged 92.6% over a range of 1 to 110 micrograms/g. Commercial cheese samples were found to contain 1.1-68.8 microgram/g total norbixin, and two samples also contained 5.1-5.6 micrograms/g total bixin. Samples of uncoloured butter were spiked with bixin and recovery averaged 93.2% over a range of 0.1 to 445 micrograms/g. Levels of 0.2 microgram/g total bixin and 0.91 microgram/g total norbixin were found in one commercial butter sample; the others contained trace levels of both compounds. Hard candies were prepared in the laboratory and recovery studies conducted. Recovery of norbixin averaged 88%.

  15. Deciphering the unconventional peptide binding to the PDZ domain of MAST2.

    PubMed

    Delhommel, Florent; Chaffotte, Alain; Terrien, Elouan; Raynal, Bertrand; Buc, Henri; Delepierre, Muriel; Cordier, Florence; Wolff, Nicolas

    2015-07-01

    Phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) and microtubule-associated serine threonine kinase 2 (MAST2) are key negative regulators of survival pathways in neuronal cells. The two proteins interact via the PDZ (PSD-95, Dlg1, Zo-1) domain of MAST2 (MAST2-PDZ). During infection by rabies virus, the viral glycoprotein competes with PTEN for interaction with MAST2-PDZ and promotes neuronal survival. The C-terminal PDZ-binding motifs (PBMs) of the two proteins bind similarly to MAST2-PDZ through an unconventional network of connectivity involving two anchor points. Combining stopped-flow fluorescence, analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC), microcalorimetry and NMR, we document the kinetics of interaction between endogenous and viral ligands to MAST2-PDZ as well as the dynamic and structural effects of these interactions. Viral and PTEN peptide interactions to MAST2-PDZ occur via a unique kinetic step which involves both canonical C-terminal PBM binding and N-terminal anchoring. Indirect effects induced by the PBM binding include modifications to the structure and dynamics of the PDZ dimerization surface which prevent MAST2-PDZ auto-association. Such an energetic communication between binding sites and distal surfaces in PDZ domains provides interesting clues for protein regulation overall. PMID:25942057

  16. Involvement of mast cells in inflammation induced by Trichomonas vaginalis via crosstalk with vaginal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Han, I H; Park, S J; Ahn, M H; Ryu, J S

    2012-01-01

    Vaginal epithelial cells (VECs) are thought to function as immune-responsive cells in trichomoniasis, and mast cells have been detected in vaginal smears and the vaginal wall in trichomoniasis. It therefore seemed possible that the VEC-trichomonad reaction might affect the activity of mast cells present in the lamina propria of the vaginal mucosa. In this study, we tested whether culture supernatants of VEC incubated with Trichomonas vaginalis (TCM) could stimulate mast cells. When VECs (MS74) were incubated with live trichomonads, IL-8, IL-6 and MCP-1 expressions increased in the TCM, and mast cells (HMC-1) and human neutrophils migrated more actively towards the TCM. Also, when the TCM was added to mast cells, β-hexosaminidase and cytokines (IL-8 and TNF-α) expressions were increased. Moreover, the culture supernatant of mast cells incubated with TCM (M-TCM) had more increased chemotactic activity for neutrophils than that of TCM. We conclude that inflammatory mediators made by VECs in response to activation by T. vaginalis activate and attract mast cells and then stimulate them to induce neutrophil migration. Our results indicate, for the first time, that VECs play a role in the infiltration of mast cells and neutrophils early in T. vaginalis infection. PMID:21981317

  17. 30 CFR 57.7051 - Loose objects on the mast or drill platform.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Loose objects on the mast or drill platform. 57... Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Drilling-Surface and Underground § 57.7051 Loose objects on the mast or drill platform. To prevent injury to personnel, tools and other objects shall not be left loose on...

  18. 30 CFR 57.7051 - Loose objects on the mast or drill platform.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Loose objects on the mast or drill platform. 57... Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Drilling-Surface and Underground § 57.7051 Loose objects on the mast or drill platform. To prevent injury to personnel, tools and other objects shall not be left loose on...

  19. Immunohistochemical Evaluation of Mast Cells in Leukoplakia and Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Narasimhan, Malathi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction More than 90% of oral cancers are squamous cell carcinomas with oral leukoplakia being the most common potentially malignant disorder. Among the cell types in the stroma, mast cells play an important role in tumourigenesis through various mechanisms. Aim The present study was aimed at comparing the mast cell count among normal oral mucosa, leukoplakia and Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSSC) and to evaluate the possible role of mast cells in carcinogenesis. Materials and Methods Mast cell count was assessed immunohistochemically using anti-mast cell tryptase amongst 20 cases of leukoplakia and OSSC each and 10 normal gingival samples. Overall comparison was done using Kruskal Wallis test and intergroup comparison was done using Mann-Whitney U test. Results The results of the present study showed an increase in mast cell count from normal oral mucosa (Mean: 7.73) to leukoplakia (Mean: 15.11) to squamous cell carcinoma (Mean: 22.73). Comparison of mean number of mast cells amongst three groups (p-value: 0.001) and intergroup comparisons showed statistical significance. Conclusion Mast cells favour malignant transformation and can be used as indicators of disease progression. PMID:27656549

  20. 52. VIEW FROM NORTH END OF SLC3W MAST TRENCH SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    52. VIEW FROM NORTH END OF SLC-3W MAST TRENCH SHOWING NORTH FACE OF ERECT UMBILICAL MAST. LAUNCHER IN BACKGROUND. METEOROLOGICAL TOWER AND SLC-3E MST IN DISTANT BACKGROUND. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 West, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  1. Mast Cells and Irritable Bowel Syndrome: From the Bench to the Bedside

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Song, Jun; Hou, Xiaohua

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is traditionally defined as a functional disorder since it lacks demonstrable pathological abnormalities. However, in recent years, low grade inflammatory infiltration, often rich in mast cells, in both the small and large bowel, has been observed in some patients with IBS. The close association of mast cells with major intestinal functions, such as epithelial secretion and permeability, neuroimmune interactions, visceral sensation, and peristalsis, makes researchers and gastroenterologists to focus attention on the key roles of mast cells in the pathogenesis of IBS. Numerous studies have been carried out to identify the mechanisms in the development, infiltration, activation, and degranulation of intestinal mast cells, as well as the actions of mast cells in the processes of mucosal barrier disruption, mucosal immune dysregulation, visceral hypersensitivity, dysmotility, and local and central stress in IBS. Moreover, therapies targeting mast cells, such as mast cell stabilizers (cromoglycate and ketotifen) and antagonists of histamine and serotonin receptors, have been tried in IBS patients, and have partially exhibited considerable efficacy. This review focuses on recent advances in the role of mast cells in IBS, with particular emphasis on bridging experimental data with clinical therapeutics for IBS patients. PMID:26755686

  2. Mast cell-derived neurotrophin 4 mediates allergen-induced airway hyperinnervation in early life

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Kruti R.; Aven, Linh; Shao, Fengzhi; Krishnamoorthy, Nandini; Duvall, Melody G.; Levy, Bruce D.; Ai, Xingbin

    2016-01-01

    Asthma often progresses from early episodes of insults. How early life events connect to long-term airway dysfunction remains poorly understood. We demonstrated previously that increased neurotrophin 4 (NT4) levels following early life allergen exposure cause persistent changes in airway smooth muscle (ASM) innervation and airway hyper-reactivity (AHR) in mice. Herein, we identify pulmonary mast cells as a key source of aberrant NT4 expression following early insults. NT4 is selectively expressed by ASM and mast cells in mice, nonhuman primates and humans. We show in mice that mast cell-derived NT4 is dispensable for ASM innervation during development. However, upon insults, mast cells expand in number and degranulate to release NT4 and thus become the major source of NT4 under pathological condition. Adoptive transfer of wild type mast cells, but not NT4−/− mast cells restores ASM hyperinnervation and AHR in KitW-sh/W-sh mice following early life insults. Notably, an infant nonhuman primate model of asthma also exhibits ASM hyperinnervation associated with the expansion and degranulation of mast cells. Together, these findings identify an essential role of mast cells in mediating ASM hyperinnervation following early life insults by producing NT4. This role may be evolutionarily conserved in linking early insults to long-term airway dysfunction. PMID:26860818

  3. In vitro inhibition of human conjunctival mast-cell degranulation by ketotifen.

    PubMed

    Schoch, C

    2003-02-01

    Ketotifen relieves the symptoms of allergic conjunctivitis through multiple mechanisms of action. One such mechanism may involve stabilization of conjunctival mast cells. Because of inter- and intra-species variation, however, this hypothesis cannot be adequately tested using mast cells from animals or other human tissues. We therefore employed human conjunctival mast cells. The mast cells were prepared using human conjunctival tissues obtained from US eye banks. Cell suspensions were sensitized with human IgE and incubated with ketotifen fumarate or control. After antigenic challenge of sensitized cells with anti-IgE, levels of histamine and tryptase, two mast-cell granule markers, were measured in the supernatant fluid. Cell viability was assessed with a Trypan Blue assay. Ketotifen at concentrations of approximately 10(-11) to 10(-4) M inhibited mast-cell histamine release by 90% or more. Similarly, ketotifen at approximately 10(-10) to 10(-4) M inhibited tryptase release by 90% or more (apart from a single anomalous reading). At all ketotifen concentrations that stabilized mast cells, cell viability was preserved. Moreover, ketotifen did not impair cell viability unless concentrations were increased above the clinically relevant range, i.e., above the order of magnitude of 10(-4) M. These data demonstrate that ketotifen can stabilize human conjunctival mast cells, without impairing cell viability.

  4. [The effect of a mite allergen on Na/H metabolic activity in peritoneal mast cells].

    PubMed

    Khlgatian, S V; Pinelis, V G; Berzhets, V M; Strukova, S M

    1992-12-01

    Mite allergen interacting with mast cells treated with sera from bronchial patient sensitized to home dust Dermatophagoides farinae causes changes in intracellular pH. Regulation of pHi peritoneal mast cells is participated by Na/H metabolism probably activated by protein kinase C.

  5. Effect of sulfur mustard on mast cells in hairless guinea pig skin

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, J.S.; Bryant, M.A.; Braue, E.H.

    1993-05-13

    The skin of 24 anesthetized hairless guinea pigs was exposed to saturated sulfur mustard (bis-2-chloroethyl sulfide; HD) for 5 and 7 minutes using 14-mm diameter vapor cups. Animals were euthanatized 24 hours after exposure and skin specimens taken for morphometric evaluation of granulated mast cells with an image analysis system (IAS). Tissue specimens were processed in paraffin, sectioned at 5 microns and stained with Unna's stain for mast cells. The number of granulated mast cells and the area occupied by mast cell granules was determined. There were significantly fewer mast cells (p < 0.05) in either HD exposure group than in sham-exposed animals, with significantly fewer mast cells in the 7-minute than the 5-minute HD group. There were also significantly smaller areas occupied by granules in either HD exposure group than in sham-exposed animals. HD-induced lesions in the hairless guinea pig have shown signs of an inflammatory response, and with their granules of vasoactive histamine, mast cells might be expected to play a role in HD-induced injury. Changes in mast cells exposed to low sulfur mustard levels, as detected by an IAS, may serve as an early marker for cutaneous damage, which might not be as easily determined with routine light microscopy.

  6. 2D/3D Visual Tracker for Rover Mast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bajracharya, Max; Madison, Richard W.; Nesnas, Issa A.; Bandari, Esfandiar; Kunz, Clayton; Deans, Matt; Bualat, Maria

    2006-01-01

    A visual-tracker computer program controls an articulated mast on a Mars rover to keep a designated feature (a target) in view while the rover drives toward the target, avoiding obstacles. Several prior visual-tracker programs have been tested on rover platforms; most require very small and well-estimated motion between consecutive image frames a requirement that is not realistic for a rover on rough terrain. The present visual-tracker program is designed to handle large image motions that lead to significant changes in feature geometry and photometry between frames. When a point is selected in one of the images acquired from stereoscopic cameras on the mast, a stereo triangulation algorithm computes a three-dimensional (3D) location for the target. As the rover moves, its body-mounted cameras feed images to a visual-odometry algorithm, which tracks two-dimensional (2D) corner features and computes their old and new 3D locations. The algorithm rejects points, the 3D motions of which are inconsistent with a rigid-world constraint, and then computes the apparent change in the rover pose (i.e., translation and rotation). The mast pan and tilt angles needed to keep the target centered in the field-of-view of the cameras (thereby minimizing the area over which the 2D-tracking algorithm must operate) are computed from the estimated change in the rover pose, the 3D position of the target feature, and a model of kinematics of the mast. If the motion between the consecutive frames is still large (i.e., 3D tracking was unsuccessful), an adaptive view-based matching technique is applied to the new image. This technique uses correlation-based template matching, in which a feature template is scaled by the ratio between the depth in the original template and the depth of pixels in the new image. This is repeated over the entire search window and the best correlation results indicate the appropriate match. The program could be a core for building application programs for systems

  7. Masting in oaks: Disentangling the effect of flowering phenology, airborne pollen load and drought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Martínez, Marcos; Belmonte, Jordina; Maria Espelta, Josep

    2012-08-01

    Quercus species exhibit an extreme inter-annual variability in seed production often synchronized over large geographical areas (masting). Since this reproductive behavior is mostly observed in anemophilous plants, pollination efficiency is suggested as one hypothesis to explain it, although resource-based hypotheses are also suggested as alternatives. We analyzed the effect of flowering phenology, airborne pollen presence and meteorological conditions in the pattern of acorn production in mixed evergreen-deciduous oak forests (Quercus ilex and Quercus pubescens) in NE Spain for twelve years (1998-2009). In both oaks, higher temperatures advanced the onset of flowering and increased the amount of airborne pollen. Nevertheless, inter-annual differences in pollen production did not influence acorn crop size. Acorn production was enhanced by a delay in flowering onset in Q. ilex but not in Q. pubescens. This suggests that in perennial oaks a larger number of photosynthates produced before flowering could benefit reproduction while the lack of effects on deciduous oaks could be because these species flush new leaves and flowers at the same time. Notwithstanding this effect, spring water deficit was the most relevant factor in explaining inter-annual variability in acorn production in both species. Considering that future climate scenarios predict progressive warmer and dryer spring seasons in the Mediterranean Basin, this might result in earlier onsets of flowering and higher water deficits that would constrain acorn production.

  8. Mast cell gastritis: Children complaining of chronic abdominal pain with histologically normal gastric mucosal biopsies except for increase in mast cells, proposing a new entity

    PubMed Central

    Mahjoub, Fatemeh E; Farahmand, Fatemeh; Pourpak, Zahra; Asefi, Hoda; Amini, Zahra

    2009-01-01

    Background Mast cells reside within the connective tissue of a variety of tissues and all vascularized organs. Since 1996, few studies have been performed on mast cell density in gastrointestinal biopsies, mainly in adult age group. We recently studied mast cell density in pediatric age group on rather larger number of cases in a referral children hospital. Mast cell density was 12.6 ± 0.87 in 0.25 mm2 (range: 0-81) in our study. Since we frequently encounter cases with rather normal gastric biopsies with no H.pylori, which mainly complain of chronic abdominal pain, we gathered those cases with mast cell density more than 30/0.25 mm2. from 895 gastric biopsies and wanted to study their clinical and endoscopic findings and propose a new entity. Methods Between April 2005 and May 2008, 895 children (< 14 years old), with gastrointestinal complaints who underwent endoscopy were selected and antral biopsies were obtained for histological examination. Among these children, those who had normal or erythematous (but not nodular or ulcerative) gastric mucosa on endoscopic view, plus pathologic report of normal mucosa or mild gastritis in addition to mast cell count more than 30/25 mm2, were chosen and a questionnaire was filled for each patient including clinical, endoscopic and pathologic findings. The statistical analysis was performed using SPSS, version 13 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). Results Over a 3 year period of study, of 895 selected children, 86 patients fulfilled the entrance criteria. The major complaint of patients was recurrent abdominal pain. The mean mast cell density was 45.59 ± 13.81 in 0.25 mm2 (range: 30-93). Among our cases, about 67.4% (n = 58) had 30 to 49, 23.3% (n = 20) had 50 to 69, 8.1% (n = 7) had 70 to 89 and 1.2% (n = 1) had 93 mast cells/0.25 mm2 in their specimens Discussion In 29% of our cases, neither endoscopic nor pathologic change was detected and only increase in mast cell number was reported and in others endoscopic and

  9. Antibacterial agent triclosan suppresses RBL-2H3 mast cell function

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, Rachel K.; Hutchinson, Lee M.; Burpee, Benjamin T.; Tupper, Emily J.; Pelletier, Jonathan H.; Kormendy, Zsolt; Hopke, Alex R.; Malay, Ethan T.; Evans, Brieana L.; Velez, Alejandro; Gosse, Julie A.

    2012-01-01

    Triclosan is a broad-spectrum antibacterial agent, which has been shown previously to alleviate human allergic skin disease. The purpose of this study was to investigate the hypothesis that the mechanism of this action of triclosan is, in part, due to effects on mast cell function. Mast cells play important roles in allergy, asthma, parasite defense, and carcinogenesis. In response to various stimuli, mast cells degranulate, releasing allergic mediators such as histamine. In order to investigate the potential anti-inflammatory effect of triclosan on mast cells, we monitored the level of degranulation in a mast cell model, rat basophilic leukemia cells, clone 2H3. Having functional homology to human mast cells, as well as a very well defined signaling pathway leading to degranulation, this cell line has been widely used to gain insight into mast-cell driven allergic disorders in humans. Using a fluorescent microplate assay, we determined that triclosan strongly dampened the release of granules from activated rat mast cells starting at 2 μM treatment, with dose-responsive suppression through 30 μM. These concentrations were found to be non-cytotoxic. The inhibition was found to persist when early signaling events (such as IgE receptor aggregation and tyrosine phosphorylation) were bypassed by using calcium ionophore stimulation, indicating that the target for triclosan in this pathway is likely downstream of the calcium signaling event. Triclosan also strongly suppressed F-actin remodeling and cell membrane ruffling, a physiological process that accompanies degranulation. Our finding that triclosan inhibits mast cell function may explain the clinical data mentioned above and supports the use of triclosan or a mechanistically similar compound as a topical treatment for allergic skin disease, such as eczema. -- Highlights: ►The effects of triclosan on mast cell function using a murine mast cell model. ►Triclosan strongly inhibits degranulation of mast cells.

  10. Mast cell-deficient W-sash c-kit mutant Kit W-sh/W-sh mice as a model for investigating mast cell biology in vivo.

    PubMed

    Grimbaldeston, Michele A; Chen, Ching-Cheng; Piliponsky, Adrian M; Tsai, Mindy; Tam, See-Ying; Galli, Stephen J

    2005-09-01

    Mice carrying certain mutations in the white spotting (W) locus (ie, c-kit) exhibit reduced c-kit tyrosine kinase-dependent signaling that results in mast cell deficiency and other phenotypic abnormalities. The c-kit mutations in Kit(W/W-v) mice impair melanogenesis and result in anemia, sterility, and markedly reduced levels of tissue mast cells. In contrast, Kit(W-sh/W-sh) mice, bearing the W-sash (W(sh)) inversion mutation, have mast cell deficiency but lack anemia and sterility. We report that adult Kit(W-sh/W-sh) mice had a profound deficiency in mast cells in all tissues examined but normal levels of major classes of other differentiated hematopoietic and lymphoid cells. Unlike Kit(W/W-v) mice, Kit(W-sh/W-sh) mice had normal numbers of TCR gammadelta intraepithelial lymphocytes in the intestines and did not exhibit a high incidence of idiopathic dermatitis, ulcers, or squamous papillomas of the stomach, but like Kit(W/W-v) mice, they lacked interstitial cells of Cajal in the gut and exhibited bile reflux into the stomach. Systemic or local reconstitution of mast cell populations was achieved in nonirradiated adult Kit(W-sh/W-sh) mice by intravenous, intraperitoneal, or intradermal injection of wild-type bone marrow-derived cultured mast cells but not by transplantation of wild-type bone marrow cells. Thus, Kit(W-sh/W-sh) mice represent a useful model for mast cell research, especially for analyzing mast cell function in vivo. PMID:16127161

  11. Application of cultured human mast cells (CHMC) for the design and structure-activity relationship of IgE-mediated mast cell activation inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Argade, Ankush; Bhamidipati, Somasekhar; Li, Hui; Carroll, David; Clough, Jeffrey; Keim, Holger; Sylvain, Catherine; Rossi, Alexander B; Coquilla, Christina; Issakani, Sarkiz D; Masuda, Esteban S; Payan, Donald G; Singh, Rajinder

    2015-01-01

    Here we report the optimization of small molecule inhibitors of human mast cell degranulation via anti-IgE-mediated tryptase release following cross-linking and activation of IgE-loaded FcεR1 receptors. The compounds are selective upstream inhibitors of FcεR1-dependent human mast cell degranulation and proved to be devoid of activity in downstream ionomycin mediated degranulation. Structure-activity relationship (SAR) leading to compound 26 is outlined.

  12. Influence of mass moment of inertia on normal modes of preloaded solar array mast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armand, Sasan C.; Lin, Paul

    1992-01-01

    Earth-orbiting spacecraft often contain solar arrays or antennas supported by a preloaded mast. Because of weight and cost considerations, the structures supporting the spacecraft appendages are extremely light and flexible; therefore, it is vital to investigate the influence of all physical and structural parameters that may influence the dynamic behavior of the overall structure. The study primarily focuses on the mast for the space station solar arrays, but the formulations and the techniques developed in this study apply to any large and flexible mast in zero gravity. Furthermore, to determine the influence on the circular frequencies, the mass moment of inertia of the mast was incorporated into the governing equation of motion for bending. A finite element technique (MSC/NASTRAN) was used to verify the formulation. Results indicate that when the mast is relatively flexible and long, the mass moment inertia influences the circular frequencies.

  13. Quantitative changes in mast cells and microvascular pattern associated with dietary gastric ulceration in rats.

    PubMed

    Jayaraj, A P; Tovey, F I; Riley, P A; Clark, C G

    1985-01-01

    The regional distribution of mast cells and the microvascular pattern in the stomach of Wistar rats fed on an ulcerogenic diet were compared with those of control animals. Mounts of the distended stomach were made and stained for blood vessels and mast cells in the subserosal layer. Measurements made under dark ground illumination in 12 operationally defined regions of the serosa demonstrated that the stomach wall in the region around the oesophagus is more richly vascularised and possesses a greater number of mast cells (60 cells per mm2) than other regions. Changes in the mast cells and microvasculature were observed in rats fed an ulcerogenic diet, notably in the zone around the oesophagus, where more than 30% mast cells were degranulated and the mean vascular diameter increased by 26%. The severity of the vascular changes correlated with the location of the ulcers of which 50% were in the zone surrounding the oesophagus.

  14. Immunoreactivity for CD25 in gastrointestinal mucosal mast cells is specific for systemic mastocytosis.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Hejin P; Hornick, Jason L

    2007-11-01

    Systemic mastocytosis (SM) is characterized by the accumulation of neoplastic mast cells in bone marrow and other organs. Gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms are common in both SM and cutaneous mastocytosis [urticaria pigmentosa (UP)], and are usually caused by the release of histamine and other inflammatory mediators. Occasionally, neoplastic mast cells may also directly infiltrate the GI tract. Previous studies have suggested that enumeration of the mast cells in GI biopsies may help establish the diagnosis of SM. However, mast cells have been reported to be increased in various inflammatory diseases, and mast cell density has not been systematically evaluated in other GI disorders. Recently, expression of CD25 by mast cells in bone marrow has been shown to be specific for SM. The purpose of this study was (1) to quantitate and compare mast cells in mucosal biopsies from patients with SM involving the GI tract, UP with GI symptoms, and a control group of diverse inflammatory disorders, and (2) to determine whether immunostaining for CD25 can be used to distinguish neoplastic from reactive mast cells in GI biopsies. Seventeen GI biopsies from 6 patients with SM; 17 GI biopsies from 5 patients with UP; and 157 control cases including 10 each normal stomach, duodenum, terminal ileum, and colon, Helicobacter pylori gastritis, bile reflux gastropathy, peptic duodenitis, celiac disease, Crohn disease, ulcerative colitis, lymphocytic colitis, and collagenous colitis, 20 biopsies from 16 patients with irritable bowel syndrome, 8 biopsies from 5 patients with parasitic infections, and 9 biopsies from 7 patients with eosinophilic gastroenteritis were immunostained for mast cell tryptase, c-kit (CD117), and CD25. Mucosal mast cells were quantitated, and the presence or absence of CD25 expression on mast cells was determined. In SM patients, mast cells in the small intestine and colon numbered >100/high-power field (HPF) in nearly all cases (mean 196/HPF; range 74 to 339). This

  15. Characteristics of mast cells in normal bladder, bacterial cystitis and interstitial cystitis.

    PubMed

    Christmas, T J; Rode, J

    1991-11-01

    An analysis was made of the numbers and characteristics of mast cells in lateral bladder wall biopsies from 22 patients with interstitial cystitis, 6 with bacterial cystitis and 8 normal controls, using toluidine blue stains and computerised video image analysis techniques. A significantly greater number of mast cells were found within the detrusor muscle in interstitial cystitis than in bacterial cystitis or normal controls. Within the urothelium and submucosa, mast cell numbers were significantly greater than in normal controls in both interstitial and bacterial cystitis. In interstitial cystitis mast cells were significantly larger within the detrusor than in the urothelium/submucosa and they appeared to degranulate predominantly within the superficial layers. Differential staining techniques, using long and short toluidine blue stains, failed to reveal statistically significant evidence of mast cell heterogeneity within the bladder wall in interstitial cystitis.

  16. Antimicrobial agent triclosan is a proton ionophore uncoupler of mitochondria in living rat and human mast cells and in primary human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Weatherly, Lisa M; Shim, Juyoung; Hashmi, Hina N; Kennedy, Rachel H; Hess, Samuel T; Gosse, Julie A

    2016-06-01

    Triclosan (TCS) is an antimicrobial used widely in hospitals and personal care products, at ~10 mm. Human skin efficiently absorbs TCS. Mast cells are ubiquitous key players both in physiological processes and in disease, including asthma, cancer and autism. We previously showed that non-cytotoxic levels of TCS inhibit degranulation, the release of histamine and other mediators, from rat basophilic leukemia mast cells (RBL-2H3), and in this study, we replicate this finding in human mast cells (HMC-1.2). Our investigation into the molecular mechanisms underlying this effect led to the discovery that TCS disrupts adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production in RBL-2H3 cells in glucose-free, galactose-containing media (95% confidence interval EC50 = 7.5-9.7 µm), without causing cytotoxicity. Using these same glucose-free conditions, 15 µm TCS dampens RBL-2H3 degranulation by 40%. The same ATP disruption was found with human HMC-1.2 cells (EC50 4.2-13.7 µm), NIH-3 T3 mouse fibroblasts (EC50 4.8-7.4 µm) and primary human keratinocytes (EC50 3.0-4.1 µm) all with no cytotoxicity. TCS increases oxygen consumption rate in RBL-2H3 cells. Known mitochondrial uncouplers (e.g., carbonyl cyanide 3-chlorophenylhydrazone) previously were found to inhibit mast cell function. TCS-methyl, which has a methyl group in place of the TCS ionizable proton, affects neither degranulation nor ATP production at non-cytotoxic doses. Thus, the effects of TCS on mast cell function are due to its proton ionophore structure. In addition, 5 µm TCS inhibits thapsigargin-stimulated degranulation of RBL-2H3 cells: further evidence that TCS disrupts mast cell signaling. Our data indicate that TCS is a mitochondrial uncoupler, and TCS may affect numerous cell types and functions via this mechanism. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26204821

  17. Isolation of Mature (Peritoneum-Derived) Mast Cells and Immature (Bone Marrow-Derived) Mast Cell Precursors from Mice

    PubMed Central

    Meurer, Steffen K.; Neß, Melanie; Weiskirchen, Sabine; Kim, Philipp; Tag, Carmen G.; Kauffmann, Marlies; Huber, Michael; Weiskirchen, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are a versatile cell type playing key roles in tissue morphogenesis and host defence against bacteria and parasites. Furthermore, they can enhance immunological danger signals and are implicated in inflammatory disorders like fibrosis. This granulated cell type originates from the myeloid lineage and has similarities to basophilic granulocytes, both containing large quantities of histamine and heparin. Immature murine mast cells mature in their destination tissue and adopt either the connective tissue (CTMC) or mucosal (MMC) type. Some effector functions are executed by activation/degranulation of MCs which lead to secretion of a typical set of MC proteases (MCPT) and of the preformed or newly synthesized mediators from its granules into the local microenvironment. Due to the potential accumulation of mutations in key signalling pathway components of corresponding MC cell-lines, primary cultured MCs are an attractive mean to study general features of MC biology and aspects of MC functions relevant to human disease. Here, we describe a simple protocol for the simultaneous isolation of mature CTMC-like murine MCs from the peritoneum (PMCs) and immature MC precursors from the bone marrow (BM). The latter are differentiated in vitro to yield BM-derived MCs (BMMC). These cells display the typical morphological and phenotypic features of MCs, express the typical MC surface markers, and can be propagated and kept in culture for several weeks. The provided protocol allows simple amplification of large quantities of homogenous, non-transformed MCs from the peritoneum and bone marrow-derived mast cells for cell- and tissue-based biomedical research. PMID:27337047

  18. 3T3 fibroblasts induce cloned interleukin 3-dependent mouse mast cells to resemble connective tissue mast cells in granular constituency

    SciTech Connect

    Dayton, E.T.; Pharr, P.; Ogawa, M.; Serafin, W.E.; Austen, K.F.; Levi-Schaffer, F.; Stevens, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    As assessed by ultrastructure, histochemical staining, and T-cell dependency, in vitro-differentiated interleukin 3-dependent mouse mast cells are comparable to the mast cells that reside in the gastrointestinal mucosa but not in the skin or the serosal cavity of the mouse. The authors now demonstrate that when cloned interleukin 3-dependent mast cells are cocultured with mouse skin-derived 3T3 fibroblasts in the presence of WEHI-3 conditioned medium for 28 days, the mast cells acquire the ability to stain with safranin, increase their histamine content approx. 50-fold and their carboxypeptidase. A content approx. 100-fold, and augment approx. their biosynthesis of proteoglycans bearing /sup 35/S-labeled haparin relative to /sup 35/S-labeled chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycans. Thus, fibroblasts induce interleukin 3-dependent mouse mast cells to change phenotype from mucosal-like to connective tissue-like, indicating that the biochemical and functional characteristics of this mast cell type are strongly influenced by the connective tissue microenvironment.

  19. Exposure to tobacco-derived materials induces overproduction of secreted proteinases in mast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Small-Howard, Andrea; Turner, Helen . E-mail: hturner@queens.org

    2005-04-15

    Mast cells reside at interfaces with the environment, including the mucosa of the respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts. This localization exposes mast cells to inhaled, or ingested, environmental challenges. In the airways of smokers, resident immune cells will be in contact with the condensed components of cigarette smoke. Mast cells are of particular interest due to their ability to promote airway remodeling and mucus hypersecretion. Clinical data show increased levels of mast cell-secreted tryptase and increased numbers of degranulated mast cells in the lavage and bronchial tissue of smokers. Since mast cell-secreted proteinases (MCPTs), including tryptases, contribute to pathological airway remodeling, we investigated the relationship between mast cell proteinases and smoke exposure. We exposed a mast cell line to cigarette smoke condensate (CSC). We show that CSC exposure increases MCPT levels in mast cells using an assay for tryptase-type MCPT activity. We hypothesized that this increase in MCPT activity reflects a CSC-induced increase in the cytosolic pool of proteinase molecules, via stimulation of MCPT transcription. Transcript array data suggested that mRNA changes in response to CSC were limited in number and peaked after 3 h of CSC exposure. However, we noted marked transcriptional regulation of several MCPT genes. CSC-induced changes in the mRNA levels for MCPTs were confirmed using quantitative RT-PCR. Taken together, our data suggest that chronic exposure to cigarette smoke up-regulates MCPT levels in mast cells at both the protein and the mRNA level. We suggest that the pathological airway remodeling that has been described in clinical studies of smoke inhalation may be attributable to MCPT overproduction in vivo.

  20. Mast cells, disease and gastrointestinal cancer: A comprehensive review of recent findings

    PubMed Central

    Hodges, Kyle; Kennedy, Lindsey; Meng, Fanyin; Alpini, Gianfranco; Francis, Heather

    2012-01-01

    Paul Ehrlich, a German scientist, discovered what is known as the mast cell in the late 1800’s, which has proven to be an important player in the immune system of vertebrates. Mast cells are ubiquitous throughout the tissues of the human body and play numerous roles, both beneficial and destructive. We know they are important in our army of immunity warrior cells, which defend us against viruses, bacteria and parasitic invaders. They are also very well known for the havoc they wreak, causing uncomfortable symptoms due to their release of histamine and other mediators which cause the all too familiar itching, sneezing, urticaria and rhinorrhea of allergic responses. Mast cell activities are diverse and include painful inflammatory reactions in autoimmune conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis. In the gastrointestinal system, mast cells are implicated in diverse actions such as increased gastric acid secretion, polyp formation and uncomfortable conditions such as Irritable Bowel Syndrome. The role of immunology and mast cells in these areas is intriguing but less well understood than their role in allergic responses. Because mast cells have been implicated in both physiologic as well as pathogenic processes, they have been the subjects of avid study. Review of the current literature on mast cell biology reveals that there are many studies of their presence within the tumor microenvironment and evidence, which supports mast cell influence on tumor angiogenesis, tumor invasion, and immune suppression. The studies reviewed in this article concentrate largely on mast cells in human GI malignancies. This review also provides background information regarding mast cells, such as their origination, their location within the body, how they are activated and how they function as mediators. PMID:22943044

  1. Extracellular matrix-anchored serum amyloid A preferentially induces mast cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Hershkoviz, R; Preciado-Patt, L; Lider, O; Fridkin, M; Dastych, J; Metcalfe, D D; Mekori, Y A

    1997-07-01

    Mast cells are known to accumulate in various inflammatory processes, some of which are known to be associated with increased local and systemic levels of acute-phase reactants such as serum amyloid A (SAA) or with amyloid deposition. The mechanism(s) by which mast cells are recruited to these sites, however, has not been fully elucidated. It has recently been shown that SAA interacts with extracellular matrix (ECM) components and thereby acts as a chemoattractant and regulator of immune cell migration. On the basis of these observations, we examined the effect of SAA on mast cell adhesion to ECM, an essential step in cellular transmigration. We could first demonstrate strong specific binding of recombinant human SAA (rSAA) to murine mast cells using flow cytometry. Moreover, radiolabeled rSAA was found to bind, in a saturable manner, to mast cells, reaching a binding affinity of 10(-8) M. When immobilized by preincubation with ECM, SAA or its proteolytically degraded amyloid A fragment (amino acid residues 2-82), which contains RGD-related adhesion motif but not the COOH-terminal portion of SAA (amino acid residues 77-104), induced the adhesion of resting mast cells to ECM or laminin. SAA and AA, in soluble or immobilized forms, did not activate mast cells to release mediators. Mast cell adhesion to the immobilized ECM-SAA complex appeared to occur through an integrin recognition, inasmuch as adhesion was calcium dependent and could be blocked by an RGD-containing peptide or by anti-CD29 monoclonal antibody. Genistein also inhibited adhesion, indicating that tyrosine kinase activity was involved. These data suggest that SAA bound to ECM may serve as an important inducer of mast cell adhesion, thus regulating mast cell recruitment and accumulation at these sites, which in turn could potentiate further pathology. PMID:9252455

  2. Functional heterogeneity of mast cells isolated from different microenvironments within nasal polyp tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Finotto, S; Dolovich, J; Denburg, J A; Jordana, M; Marshall, J S

    1994-01-01

    Nasal polyposis is a chronic inflammatory condition of the upper airways characterized by infiltration of activated inflammatory cells, including mast cells, both in the epithelium and in the stroma. The aim of this work was to study human mast cells derived from two different anatomical sites within the same nasal polyp tissue. To this end, we isolated two distinct mast cell populations, one from the epithelial and the other from the stromal layers of individual human nasal polyp tissues. We examined the mediator content of the two mast cell populations and found that stromal mast cells had a significantly higher content of tryptase compared with the epithelial mast cells from the same tissue. In addition, mast cells from the stromal compartment, but not those from the epithelium, released a significant amount of histamine after anti-IgE stimulation. By contrast, both populations released over 50% of the total histamine after non-specific stimuli (A23187 10(-6) M). The content of mediators and the response to immunological activation were not significantly altered in patients receiving topical steroid therapy. It remains to be determined if the observed differences are the result of an intrinsic characteristic of the mast cell populations localized to separate tissue compartments, or reflect a different in vivo exposure to stimuli such as antigens, or different surrounding structural or infiltrating cells. In conclusion, these data provide evidence of functional heterogeneity and differences in mediator content between mast cell subpopulations from a single human tissue. The failure of release of epithelial mast cell mediators from an immunologic stimulus may have implications concerning acute effects of antigen exposure in nasal polyposis. Images Fig. 1 PMID:7508349

  3. The architectural relationship of components controlling mast cell endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Cleyrat, Cédric; Darehshouri, Anza; Anderson, Karen L.; Page, Christopher; Lidke, Diane S.; Volkmann, Niels; Hanein, Dorit; Wilson, Bridget S.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Eukaryotic cells use multiple routes for receptor internalization. Here, we examine the topographical relationships of clathrin-dependent and clathrin-independent endocytic structures on the plasma membranes of leukemia-derived mast cells. The high affinity IgE receptor (FcεRI) utilizes both pathways, whereas transferrin receptor serves as a marker for the classical clathrin-mediated endocytosis pathway. Both receptors were tracked by live-cell imaging in the presence or absence of inhibitors that established their differential dependence on specific endocytic adaptor proteins. The topology of antigen-bound FcεRI, clathrin, dynamin, Arf6 and Eps15-positive structures were analyzed by 2D and 3D immunoelectron microscopy techniques, revealing their remarkable spatial relationships and unique geometry. We conclude that the mast cell plasma membrane has multiple specialized domains for endocytosis. Their close proximity might reflect shared components, such as lipids and adaptor proteins, that facilitate inward membrane curvature. Intersections between these specialized domains might represent sorting stations that direct cargo to specific endocytic pathways. PMID:23986485

  4. Inhibitory Effects of Angelica Polysaccharide on Activation of Mast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Wei-An; Sun, Yuan-Yuan; Mao, Jing-Yi; Wang, Li; Zhang, Jian; Zhou, Jie; Rahman, Khalid; Ye, Ying

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the inhibitory effects of Angelica polysaccharide (AP) on activation of mast cells and its possible molecular mechanism. In our study, we determined the proinflammatory cytokines and allergic mediators in anti-DNP IgE stimulated RBL-2H3 cells and found that AP (50, 100, and 200 μg/mL) significantly decreased the release of histamine, β-hexosaminidase, leukotrienes C4 (LTC4), IL-1, IL-4, TNF-α, IL-6, and human monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2) (p < 0.05). In addition, Ca2+ entry was inhibited by treatment with AP. AP also downregulated the protein expressions of p-Fyn, p-Akt, p-P38, IL-4, TNF-α, and NF-κB p65 in both Fyn gene upregulated and normal RBL-2H3 cells (p < 0.05). Collectively, our results showed that AP could inhibit the activation of mast cells via suppressing the releases of proinflammatory cytokines allergic mediators, Gab2/PI3-K/Akt and Fyn/Syk pathways. PMID:27200102

  5. Analysis and simulation of the MAST (COFS-1 flight hardware)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horta, Lucas G.; Walsh, Joanne L.; Horner, Garnett C.; Bailey, James P.

    1986-01-01

    In-house analysis work in support of the Control of Flexible Structures (COFS) program is being performed at the NASA Langley Research Center. The work involves evaluation of the proposed design configuration, controller design as well as actuator dynamic modeling, and MAST/actuator dynamic simulation of excitation and damping. A complete finite element model of the MAST has been developed. This finite element model has been incorporated into an optimization procedure which minimizes total mass while maintaining modal coupling. Results show an increase in the total mass due to additional constraints (namely, the diagonal frequency constraint) imposed on the baseline design. A valid actuator dynamic model is presented and a complete test sequence of the proposed flight experiment is demonstrated. The actuator dynamic model is successfully used for damping and the stroke limitations for first mode excitation are demonstrated. Plans are to incorporate additional design variables and constraints into the optimization procedure (such as actuator location) and explore alternative formulations of the objective function. A different actuator dynamic model to include hardware limitations will be investigated.

  6. Electron and ion heating characteristics during magnetic reconnection in MAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabe, Hiroshi; Yamada, Takuma; Watanabe, Takenori; Gi, Keii; Kadowaki, Kazutake; Inomoto, Michiaki; Imazawa, Ryota; Gryaznevich, Mikhail; Michael, Clive; Conway, Neil; Scannell, Rory; Crowley, Brendan; McClements, Ken; Ono, Yasushi; MAST Team

    2015-11-01

    Localized electron heating at X point and global ion heating in the downstream during merging/reconnection startup of ST in MAST have been studied in detail using 130 channel YAG- and 300 channel Ruby-Thomson scattering measurement and a new 32 chord ion Doppler tomography diagnostics. In addition to the previously achieved record heating of ~1keV, 2D profile of electron temperature revealed highly localized heating structure at X point with the characteristic scale length of 0.02-0.05m < c /ωpi , while the ion temperature increases in the downstream of outflow jet with the width of c /ωpi ~ 0 . 1 m where reconnected field forms thick layer of closed flux surface. The effect of Ti -Te energy relaxation also affects both heating profiles in MAST, finally the formation of triple peak structure for both profiles was observed with the delay of τeiE. The toroidal guide field mostly contributes to the formation of a localized electron heating structure at the X point but not to bulk ion heating downstream. This work is supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 15H05750 and 15K20921.

  7. Electrogene therapy with interleukin-12 in canine mast cell tumors

    PubMed Central

    Pavlin, Darja; Cemazar, Maja; Cör, Andrej; Sersa, Gregor; Pogacnik, Azra; Tozon, Natasa

    2011-01-01

    Background Mast cell tumors (MCT) are the most common malignant cutaneous tumors in dogs with extremely variable biological behaviour. Different treatment approaches can be used in canine cutaneous MCT, with surgical excision being the treatment of choice. In this study, electrogene therapy (EGT) as a new therapeutic approach to canine MCTs, was established. Materials and methods. Eight dogs with a total of eleven cutaneous MCTs were treated with intratumoral EGT using DNA plasmid encoding human interleukin-12 (IL-12). The local response to the therapy was evaluated by repeated measurements of tumor size and histological examination of treated tumors. A possible systemic response was assessed by determination of IL-12 and interferon- γ (IFN-γ) in patients’ sera. The occurence of side effects was monitored with weekly clinical examinations of treated animals and by performing basic bloodwork, consisting of the complete bloodcount and determination of selected biochemistry parameters. Results Intratumoral EGT with IL-12 elicits significant reduction of treated tumors’ size, ranging from 13% to 83% (median 50%) of the initial tumor volume. Additionally, a change in the histological structure of treated nodules was seen. There was a reduction in number of malignant mast cells and inflammatory cell infiltration of treated tumors. Systemic release of IL-12 in four patients was detected, without any noticeable local or systemic side effects. Conclusions These data suggest that intratumoral EGT with plasmid encoding IL-12 may be useful in the treatment of canine MCTs, exerting a local antitumor effect. PMID:22933932

  8. Microstability analysis of pellet fuelled discharges in MAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzotti, L.; Figueiredo, J.; Roach, C. M.; Valovič, M.; Dickinson, D.; Naylor, G.; Romanelli, M.; Scannell, R.; Szepesi, G.; the MAST Team

    2014-03-01

    Reactor grade plasmas are likely to be fuelled by pellet injection. This technique transiently perturbs the profiles, driving the density profile hollow and flattening the edge temperature profile. After the pellet perturbation, the density and temperature profiles relax towards their quasi-steady-state shape. Microinstabilities influence plasma confinement and will play a role in determining the evolution of the profiles in pellet fuelled plasmas. In this paper we present the microstability analysis of pellet fuelled H-mode MAST plasmas. Taking advantage of the unique capabilities of the MAST Thomson scattering system and the possibility of synchronizing the eight lasers with the pellet injection, we were able to measure the evolution of the post-pellet electron density and temperature profiles with high temporal and spatial resolution. These profiles, together with ion temperature profiles measured using a charge exchange diagnostic, were used to produce equilibria suitable for microstability analysis of the equilibrium changes induced by pellet injection. This analysis, carried out using the local gyrokinetic code GS2, reveals that the microstability properties are extremely sensitive to the rapid and large transient excursions of the density and temperature profiles, which also change collisionality and βe significantly in the region most strongly affected by the pellet ablation.

  9. Anti-allergic activity of R-phycocyanin from Porphyra haitanensis in antigen-sensitized mice and mast cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qingmei; Wang, Youzhao; Cao, Minjie; Pan, Tzuming; Yang, Yang; Mao, Haiyan; Sun, Lechang; Liu, Guangming

    2015-04-01

    The prevalence of food allergy has increased in Asian countries. Marine algae have been proposed as the potential resource for anti-allergic therapeutics. The present study was aimed at isolating R-phycocyanin (RPC) from Porphyra haitanensis and determining the anti-allergy potential of RPC in antigen-sensitized mice and mast cells. In animal experiments, RPC could effectively reduce tropomyosin (TM)-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) and histamine levels, alleviate allergy symptoms and jejunum tissue inflammation in mice, and inhibit the expression and release of cytokines (interleukin-4 (IL-4) and IL-13) in peritoneal lavage fluid. In spleen lymphocyte experiments, high purity of RPC skewed the immunological function of CD4(+) T cells towards Th1 activity. A higher expression of interferon (IFN)-γ was induced by a synergistic effect of TM and RPC. Through the Jun N-terminal kinase and Janus kinase 2 signaling pathways, IFN-γ synthesis was induced by RPC in combination with TM. Anti-allergic effect of RPC was evaluated in IgE-mediated rat mast RBL-2H3 cells. The results demonstrated that RPC inhibited allergy markers, including the release of β-hexosaminidase, histamine and ROS in antigen-sensitized RBL-2H3 cells. RPC also suppressed the production of pro-inflammatory factors (IL-4 and tumor necrosis factor-α). In conclusion, RPC decreased allergic sensitization against TM by blocking Th2 cell polarization as well as suppressed the release of allergic-mediators in antigen-stimulated mast cells. It may be used as a functional food component or active pharmaceutical ingredient for allergic patients.

  10. Anti-allergic activity of R-phycocyanin from Porphyra haitanensis in antigen-sensitized mice and mast cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qingmei; Wang, Youzhao; Cao, Minjie; Pan, Tzuming; Yang, Yang; Mao, Haiyan; Sun, Lechang; Liu, Guangming

    2015-04-01

    The prevalence of food allergy has increased in Asian countries. Marine algae have been proposed as the potential resource for anti-allergic therapeutics. The present study was aimed at isolating R-phycocyanin (RPC) from Porphyra haitanensis and determining the anti-allergy potential of RPC in antigen-sensitized mice and mast cells. In animal experiments, RPC could effectively reduce tropomyosin (TM)-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) and histamine levels, alleviate allergy symptoms and jejunum tissue inflammation in mice, and inhibit the expression and release of cytokines (interleukin-4 (IL-4) and IL-13) in peritoneal lavage fluid. In spleen lymphocyte experiments, high purity of RPC skewed the immunological function of CD4(+) T cells towards Th1 activity. A higher expression of interferon (IFN)-γ was induced by a synergistic effect of TM and RPC. Through the Jun N-terminal kinase and Janus kinase 2 signaling pathways, IFN-γ synthesis was induced by RPC in combination with TM. Anti-allergic effect of RPC was evaluated in IgE-mediated rat mast RBL-2H3 cells. The results demonstrated that RPC inhibited allergy markers, including the release of β-hexosaminidase, histamine and ROS in antigen-sensitized RBL-2H3 cells. RPC also suppressed the production of pro-inflammatory factors (IL-4 and tumor necrosis factor-α). In conclusion, RPC decreased allergic sensitization against TM by blocking Th2 cell polarization as well as suppressed the release of allergic-mediators in antigen-stimulated mast cells. It may be used as a functional food component or active pharmaceutical ingredient for allergic patients. PMID:25746371

  11. Mast Cells are Important Modifiers of Autoimmune Disease: With so Much Evidence, Why is There Still Controversy?

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Melissa A.; Hatfield, Julianne K.

    2012-01-01

    There is abundant evidence that mast cells are active participants in events that mediate tissue damage in autoimmune disease. Disease-associated increases in mast cell numbers accompanied by mast cell degranulation and elaboration of numerous mast cell mediators at sites of inflammation are commonly observed in many human autoimmune diseases including multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and bullous pemphigoid. In animal models, treatment with mast cell stabilizing drugs or mast cell ablation can result in diminished disease. A variety of receptors including those engaged by antibody, complement, pathogens, and intrinsic danger signals are implicated in mast cell activation in disease. Similar to their role as first responders in infection settings, mast cells likely orchestrate early recruitment of immune cells, including neutrophils, to the sites of autoimmune destruction. This co-localization promotes cellular crosstalk and activation and results in the amplification of the local inflammatory response thereby promoting and sustaining tissue damage. Despite the evidence, there is still a debate regarding the relative role of mast cells in these processes. However, by definition, mast cells can only act as accessory cells to the self-reactive T and/or antibody driven autoimmune responses. Thus, when evaluating mast cell involvement using existing and somewhat imperfect animal models of disease, their importance is sometimes obscured. However, these potent immune cells are undoubtedly major contributors to autoimmunity and should be considered as important targets for therapeutic disease intervention. PMID:22701454

  12. Mast Cell-Derived Tumor Necrosis Factor Can Promote Nerve Fiber Elongation in the Skin during Contact Hypersensitivity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kakurai, Maki; Monteforte, Rossella; Suto, Hajime; Tsai, Mindy; Nakae, Susumu; Galli, Stephen J.

    2006-01-01

    In humans, lesions of contact eczema or atopic dermatitis can exhibit increases in epidermal nerves, but the mechanism resulting in such nerve elongation are not fully understood. We found that contact hypersensitivity reactions to oxazolone in mice were associated with significant increases in the length of nerves in the epidermis and dermis. Using genetically mast cell-deficient c-kit mutant mice selectively repaired of their dermal mast cell deficiency with either wild-type or tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-deficient mast cells, we found that mast cells, and mast cell-derived TNF, significantly contributed to the elongation of epidermal and dermal PGP 9.5+ nerves and dermal CGRP+ nerves, as well as to the inflammation observed at sites of contact hypersensitivity in response to oxazolone. Moreover, the percentage of mast cells in close proximity to dermal PGP 9.5+ nerve fibers was significantly higher in wild-type mice and in c-kit mutant mice repaired of their dermal mast cell deficiency by the adoptive transfer of wild-type mast cells than in TNF-deficient mice or in TNF−/− mast cell-engrafted c-kit mutant mice. These observations show that mast cells, and mast cell-derived TNF, can promote the elongation of cutaneous nerve fibers during contact hypersensitivity in the mouse. PMID:17071594

  13. Budgeting in Hard Times.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrino, Frank M.

    2003-01-01

    Interviews with school board members and administrators produced a list of suggestions for balancing a budget in hard times. Among these are changing calendars and schedules to reduce heating and cooling costs; sharing personnel; rescheduling some extracurricular activities; and forming cooperative agreements with other districts. (MLF)

  14. Hard (and Soft) Facts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Mike

    1999-01-01

    Provides guidelines to help schools maintain hard floors and carpets, including special areas in schools and colleges that need attention and the elements needed to have a successful carpet-maintenance program. The importance of using heavy equipment to lessen time and effort is explained as are the steps maintenance workers can take to make the…

  15. CSI: Hard Drive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sturgeon, Julie

    2008-01-01

    Acting on information from students who reported seeing a classmate looking at inappropriate material on a school computer, school officials used forensics software to plunge the depths of the PC's hard drive, searching for evidence of improper activity. Images were found in a deleted Internet Explorer cache as well as deleted file space.…

  16. Running in Hard Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, John N., III

    2009-01-01

    Roberta Stevens and Kent Oliver are campaigning hard for the presidency of the American Library Association (ALA). Stevens is outreach projects and partnerships officer at the Library of Congress. Oliver is executive director of the Stark County District Library in Canton, Ohio. They have debated, discussed, and posted web sites, Facebook pages,…

  17. A TRPV2–PKA Signaling Module for Transduction of Physical Stimuli in Mast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Stokes, Alexander J.; Shimoda, Lori M.N.; Koblan-Huberson, Murielle; Adra, Chaker N.; Turner, Helen

    2004-01-01

    Cutaneous mast cell responses to physical (thermal, mechanical, or osmotic) stimuli underlie the pathology of physical urticarias. In vitro experiments suggest that mast cells respond directly to these stimuli, implying that a signaling mechanism couples functional responses to physical inputs in mast cells. We asked whether transient receptor potential (vanilloid) (TRPV) cation channels were present and functionally coupled to signaling pathways in mast cells, since expression of this channel subfamily confers sensitivity to thermal, osmotic, and pressure inputs. Transcripts for a range of TRPVs were detected in mast cells, and we report the expression, surface localization, and oligomerization of TRPV2 protein subunits in these cells. We describe the functional coupling of TRPV2 protein to calcium fluxes and proinflammatory degranulation events in mast cells. In addition, we describe a novel protein kinase A (PKA)–dependent signaling module, containing PKA and a putative A kinase adapter protein, Acyl CoA binding domain protein (ACBD)3, that interacts with TRPV2 in mast cells. We propose that regulated phosphorylation by PKA may be a common pathway for TRPV modulation. PMID:15249591

  18. Methoxychlor enhances degranulation of murine mast cells by regulating FcεRI-mediated signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Yasunaga, Sho; Nishi, Kosuke; Nishimoto, Sogo; Sugahara, Takuya

    2015-01-01

    Methoxychlor, an organochlorine insecticide developed to replace DDT (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane), has been reported to induce mast cell degranulation and to enhance IgE-mediated allergic responses. However, the mechanisms underlying these effects are not clear. To clarify potential mechanisms, the effects of methoxychlor on degranulation of mast cells were examined. Degranulation responses were evaluated using RBL-2H3 cells and mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells with either the antigen-induced or calcium ionophore-induced stimulation. Phosphorylation of enzymes related to signaling events associated with mast cell degranulation was analyzed by immunoblotting. Effects on vascular permeability in the passive cutaneous anaphylaxis reaction were evaluated following oral administration of methoxychlor to BALB/c mice. The results indicated that methoxychlor caused increased mast cell degranulation in the presence of antigen, whereas it had no effect on calcium ionophore-induced degranulation of RBL-2H3 cells. Immunoblot analyses demonstrated that the phosphorylation level of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (which plays a central role in mast cell signaling) was increased by methoxychlor during antigen-induced degranulation. In addition, methoxychlor activated the signaling pathway via the high-affinity IgE receptor by inducing phosphorylation of Syk and PLCγ1/2, which transfer the signal for degranulation downstream. Lastly, oral administration of methoxychlor exhibited a tendency to promote vascular permeability in passive cutaneous anaphylaxis model mice. Taken together, the results here suggested that methoxychlor enhanced degranulation through FcεRI-mediated signaling and promoted allergenic symptoms involved in mast cell degranulation.

  19. Mast cell activation by conidia of Sporothrix schenckii: role in the severity of infection.

    PubMed

    Romo-Lozano, Y; Hernández-Hernández, F; Salinas, E

    2012-07-01

    Mast cells are abundant in the skin and other peripheral tissues, where they are one of the first immune cells to make contact with invading pathogens. As a result of pathogen recognition, mast cells can be activated and release different preformed and de novo-synthesized mediators. Sporothrix schenckii is the fungus that causes sporotrichosis, a worldwide-distributed subcutaneous mycosis considered as an important emerging health problem. It remains unknown whether or not mast cells are activated by S. schenckii. Here, we investigated the in vitro response of mast cells to conidia of S. schenckii and their in vivo involvement in sporotrichosis. Mast cells became activated after interaction with conidia, releasing early response cytokines as TNF-α and IL-6. Although histamine release was not significantly stimulated by S. schenckii, we determined that conidia potentiate histamine secretion induced by compound 48/80. Furthermore, functional depletion of peritoneal mast cells before S. schenckii infection significantly reduced the severity of cutaneous lesions of the sporotrichosis. These data demonstrate that mast cells are important contributors in the host response to S. schenckii infection, suggesting a role of these cells in the progress of clinical manifestations in sporotrichosis. PMID:22486186

  20. Developmental changes of mast cell populations in the cerebral meninges of the rat.

    PubMed

    Michaloudi, Helen; Batzios, Christos; Chiotelli, Maria; Papadopoulos, Georgios C

    2007-10-01

    It is known that both the dura and the pia mater attract and support the differentiation of mast cells. The present study shows that unevenly distributed mast cells in the cerebral meninges of the rat can be found in perivascular sites and vessel ramification points, but can also be unrelated to the meningeal vasculature. It also documents changes in the number, localization and staining preferences of the mast cells in the two meninges of the developing and mature rat brain. Quantitative examination of all types of histochemically differentiated meningeal mast cells reveals no major (although some exist) differences between right and left side subpopulations, but strongly suggests a different origin and fate of the dural and the pial mast cells. The number of dural mast cells, already high from postnatal day 0, although declining from postnatal day 21 onwards, remains conspicuous up to postnatal day 180. In contrast, pial mast cells are comparatively very few in the first day of the postnatal life, and despite a transient significant increase in the following two weeks, they reach almost zero levels from postnatal day 21.

  1. Mast cell activation by conidia of Sporothrix schenckii: role in the severity of infection.

    PubMed

    Romo-Lozano, Y; Hernández-Hernández, F; Salinas, E

    2012-07-01

    Mast cells are abundant in the skin and other peripheral tissues, where they are one of the first immune cells to make contact with invading pathogens. As a result of pathogen recognition, mast cells can be activated and release different preformed and de novo-synthesized mediators. Sporothrix schenckii is the fungus that causes sporotrichosis, a worldwide-distributed subcutaneous mycosis considered as an important emerging health problem. It remains unknown whether or not mast cells are activated by S. schenckii. Here, we investigated the in vitro response of mast cells to conidia of S. schenckii and their in vivo involvement in sporotrichosis. Mast cells became activated after interaction with conidia, releasing early response cytokines as TNF-α and IL-6. Although histamine release was not significantly stimulated by S. schenckii, we determined that conidia potentiate histamine secretion induced by compound 48/80. Furthermore, functional depletion of peritoneal mast cells before S. schenckii infection significantly reduced the severity of cutaneous lesions of the sporotrichosis. These data demonstrate that mast cells are important contributors in the host response to S. schenckii infection, suggesting a role of these cells in the progress of clinical manifestations in sporotrichosis.

  2. Meningeal mast cell-T cell crosstalk regulates T cell encephalitogenicity.

    PubMed

    Russi, Abigail E; Walker-Caulfield, Margaret E; Guo, Yong; Lucchinetti, Claudia F; Brown, Melissa A

    2016-09-01

    GM-CSF is a cytokine produced by T helper (Th) cells that plays an essential role in orchestrating neuroinflammation in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, a rodent model of multiple sclerosis. Yet where and how Th cells acquire GM-CSF expression is unknown. In this study we identify mast cells in the meninges, tripartite tissues surrounding the brain and spinal cord, as important contributors to antigen-specific Th cell accumulation and GM-CSF expression. In the absence of mast cells, Th cells do not accumulate in the meninges nor produce GM-CSF. Mast cell-T cell co-culture experiments and selective mast cell reconstitution of the meninges of mast cell-deficient mice reveal that resident meningeal mast cells are an early source of caspase-1-dependent IL-1β that licenses Th cells to produce GM-CSF and become encephalitogenic. We also provide evidence of mast cell-T cell co-localization in the meninges and CNS of recently diagnosed acute MS patients indicating similar interactions may occur in human demyelinating disease. PMID:27396526

  3. Mast cells are dispensable in a genetic mouse model of chronic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Sulcova, Jitka; Meyer, Michael; Guiducci, Eva; Feyerabend, Thorsten B; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer; Werner, Sabine

    2015-06-01

    Chronic inflammatory skin diseases, such as atopic dermatitis, affect a large percentage of the population, but the role of different immune cells in the pathogenesis of these disorders is largely unknown. Recently, we found that mice lacking fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (Fgfr1) and Fgfr2 (K5-R1/R2 mice) in the epidermis have a severe impairment in the epidermal barrier, which leads to the development of a chronic inflammatory skin disease that shares many features with human atopic dermatitis. Using Fgfr1-/Fgfr2-deficient mice, we analyzed the consequences of the loss of mast cells. Mast cells accumulated and degranulated in the skin of young Fgfr1-/Fgfr2-deficient mice, most likely as a consequence of increased expression of the mast cell chemokine Ccl2. The increase in mast cells occurred before the development of histological abnormalities, indicating a functional role of these cells in the inflammatory skin phenotype. To test this hypothesis, we mated the Fgfr1-/Fgfr2-deficient mice with mast cell-deficient CreMaster mice. Surprisingly, loss of mast cells did not or only mildly affect keratinocyte proliferation, epidermal thickness, epidermal barrier function, accumulation and activation of different immune cells, or expression of different proinflammatory cytokines in the skin. These results reveal that mast cells are dispensable for the development of chronic inflammation in response to a defect in the epidermal barrier.

  4. Effects of a Moderately Lower Temperature on the Proliferation and Degranulation of Rat Mast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ruoyu; Yin, Xiaoqin; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Jiwei; Chen, Lin; Chen, Jingwen; Han, Xiaodong; Xiang, Zou; Li, Dongmei

    2016-01-01

    Mast cells are traditionally considered as key effector cells in IgE-mediated allergic diseases. However, the roles of mast cells have also been implicated in diverse physiological and pathological processes. Mast cells are distributed in various organs and tissues of various species. Some of the organs and tissues, such as testis, skin, and the upper part of the respiratory tract, have a temperature that is lower than the body's core temperature. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of a lower temperature on the proliferation and degranulation of rat mast cells. Here, we demonstrate that cell growth was retarded at 35°C compared to 37°C for both rat peritoneal mast cells (RPMC) and RBL-2H3, a rat mast cell line. Furthermore, RPMC became more susceptible to degranulation at 35°C compared to 37°C. In contrast, degranulation of RBL-2H3 was not as sensitive to temperature change as RPMC. The functionality of mast cells in unique organs with a lower temperature warrants further analysis. PMID:27195304

  5. Myocardial remodeling in diabetic cardiomyopathy associated with cardiac mast cell activation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhi Gang; Jin, Qun; Fan, Min; Cong, Xiao Liang; Han, Shu Fang; Gao, Hai; Shan, Yi

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy is a specific disease process distinct from coronary artery disease and hypertension. The disease features cardiac remodeling stimulated by hyperglycemia of the left ventricle wall and disrupts contractile functions. Cardiac mast cells may be activated by metabolic byproducts resulted from hyperglycermia and then participate in the remodeling process by releasing a multitude of cytokines and bioactive enzymes. Nedocromil, a pharmacologic stabilizer of mast cells, has been shown to normalize cytokine levels and attenuate cardiac remodeling. In this study, we describe the activation of cardiac mast cells by inducing diabetes in normal mice using streptozotocin (STZ). Next, we treated the diabetic mice with nedocromil for 12 weeks and then examined their hearts for signs of cardiac remodeling and quantified contractile function. We observed significantly impaired heart function in diabetic mice, as well as increased cardiac mast cell density and elevated mast cell secretions that correlated with gene expression and aberrant cytokine levels associated with cardiac remodeling. Nedocromil treatment halted contractile dysfunction in diabetic mice and reduced cardiac mast cell density, which correlated with reduced bioactive enzyme secretions, reduced expression of extracellular matrix remodeling factors and collagen synthesis, and normalized cytokine levels. However, the results showed nedocromil treatments did not return diabetic mice to a normal state. We concluded that manipulation of cardiac mast cell function is sufficient to attenuate cardiomyopathy stimulated by diabetes, but other cellular pathways also contribute to the disease process.

  6. The lectin ArtinM binds to mast cells inducing cell activation and mediator release.

    PubMed

    Barbosa-Lorenzi, Valéria Cintra; Buranello, Patrícia Andressa de Almeida; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina; Jamur, Maria Célia; Oliver, Constance; Pereira-da-Silva, Gabriela

    2011-12-16

    Mast cells are inflammatory cells that respond to signals of innate and adaptive immunity with immediate and delayed release of mediators. ArtinM, a lectin from Artocarpus integrifolia with immunomodulatory activities, is able to induce mast cell activation, but the mechanisms remain unknown. This study sought to further investigate the effects of the lectin on mast cells. We showed that ArtinM binds to mast cells, possibly to the high affinity receptor for immunoglobulin E (IgE) - FcεRI - and/or to IgE bound to FcεRI. Binding of the lectin resulted in protein tyrosine phosphorylation and release of the pre- and newly-formed mediators, β-hexosaminidase and LTB(4) by mast cells, activities that were potentiated in the presence of IgE. ArtinM also induced the activation of the transcription factors NFκB and NFAT, resulting in expression of some of their target genes such as IL-4 and TNF-α. In view of the established significance of mast cells in many immunological and inflammatory reactions, a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in mast cell activation by ArtinM is crucial to the pharmacological application of the lectin.

  7. Bone marrow-derived cultured mast cells and peritoneal mast cells as targets of a growth activity secreted by BALB/3T3 fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Jozaki, K.; Kuriu, A.; Hirota, S.; Onoue, H.; Ebi, Y.; Adachi, S.; Ma, J.Y.; Tarui, S.; Kitamura, Y. )

    1991-03-01

    When fibroblast cell lines were cultured in contact with bone marrow-derived cultured mast cells (CMC), both NIH/3T3 and BALB/3T3 cell lines supported the proliferation of CMC. In contrast, when contact between fibroblasts and CMC was prohibited by Biopore membranes or soft agar, only BALB/3T3 fibroblasts supported CMC proliferation, suggesting that BALB/3T3 but not NIH/3T3 cells secreted a significant amount of a mast cell growth activity. Moreover, the BALB/3T3-derived growth activity induced the incorporation of (3H)thymidine by CMC and the clonal growth of peritoneal mast cells in methylcellulose. The mast cell growth activity appeared to be different from interleukin 3 (IL-3) and interleukin 4 (IL-4), because mRNAs for these interleukins were not detectable in BALB/3T3 fibroblasts. Although mast cells are genetically deficient in tissues of W/Wv mice, CMC did develop when bone marrow cells of W/Wv mice were cultured with pokeweed mitogen-stimulated spleen cell-conditioned medium. Because BALB/3T3 fibroblast-conditioned medium (BALB-FCM) did not induce the incorporation of (3H)thymidine by W/Wv CMC, the growth activity in BALB-FCM appeared to be a ligand for the receptor encoded by the W (c-kit) locus. Because CMC and peritoneal mast cells are obtained as homogeneous suspensions rather easily, these cells may be potentially useful as targets for the fibroblast-derived mast cell growth activity.

  8. Role of mast cell in the late phase of contact hypersensitivity induced by trimellitic anhydride

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Ok Hee

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells are known as effector cells of IgE-mediated allergic responses, but role of mast cells in contact hypersensitivity (CHS) has been considered controversial. In this study, we investigated role of mast cell in trimellitic anhydride (TMA)-induced CHS. The mice were sensitized to TMA on the back and repeatedly challenged with TMA on the left ear at 1-week intervals. The ear after challenge showed biphasic responses. The repetition of TMA challenge shifted in time course of ear response and enlarged the extent of early and late phase reactions in proportion to the frequency of TMA challenges in C57BL/6 mice. In late phase reaction, peak of ear response by single challenge showed at 24 hours after challenge, but the peak by repeat challenges at 8 hours after the last challenge. Number of mast cells and eosinophils per unit area increased in proportion to frequency of TMA challenges. However, mast cell-deficient WBB6F1/J-KitW/KitW-v mice developed the late phase reaction without the early phase reaction. The repetition of TMA challenge shifted in time course of ear response and enlarged the extent of ear response and the infiltration of eosinophils. The magnitude of these responses observed according to the frequency of the TMA challenge in mast cell-deficient WBB6F1/J-KitW/KitW-v mice was significantly lower than that in C57BL/6 mice. Also TMA elicited mast cell degranulation and histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Conclusively, TMA induces the early and late phase reactions in CHS, and mast cells may be required for TMA-induced CHS. PMID:26770872

  9. Design, Fabrication and Testing of Mooring Masts for Remotely Controlled Indoor and Outdoor Airships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaleelullah, Syed; Bhardwaj, Utsav; Pant, Rajkumar Sureshchandra

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the design and structural details of two mooring masts, one for remotely controlled outdoor airships and another one for remotely controlled indoor airships. In a previous study, a mast for outdoor remotely controlled airship was designed to meet several user-specified operating requirements, and a simplified version of the same was fabricated. A spring loaded device was incorporated that sounds an alarm when the wind-loads exceed a threshold value, so that the airship can be taken indoors. The present study started with a critical analysis of that mast, and a new mast was designed and fabricated to remove several of its shortcomings. This mast consists of power screw operated telescopic module made of aluminium, mounted on a five legged base with castor wheels, for ease in mobility. Components of the existing mast were used to the possible extent, and the design was simplified to meet the assembly and transportation requirements. The spring mechanism used in alarming device was also modified to ensure higher sensitivity in the range of maximum expected wind-loads acting on the airship. A lightweight mooring mast for indoor remotely controlled airships was also designed and fabricated, which can accommodate non-rigid indoor airships of length up to 5 m. The mast consists of an elevating bolt operated telescopic module mounted on a tripod adapter base, with lockable castor wheels, and has a specially designed mooring-clamp at the top. The various modules and components of the mast were designed to enable quick assembly and transportation.

  10. Histamine from Brain Resident MAST Cells Promotes Wakefulness and Modulates Behavioral States

    PubMed Central

    Chikahisa, Sachiko; Kodama, Tohru; Soya, Atsushi; Sagawa, Yohei; Ishimaru, Yuji; Séi, Hiroyoshi; Nishino, Seiji

    2013-01-01

    Mast cell activation and degranulation can result in the release of various chemical mediators, such as histamine and cytokines, which significantly affect sleep. Mast cells also exist in the central nervous system (CNS). Since up to 50% of histamine contents in the brain are from brain mast cells, mediators from brain mast cells may significantly influence sleep and other behaviors. In this study, we examined potential involvement of brain mast cells in sleep/wake regulations, focusing especially on the histaminergic system, using mast cell deficient (W/Wv) mice. No significant difference was found in the basal amount of sleep/wake between W/Wv mice and their wild-type littermates (WT), although W/Wv mice showed increased EEG delta power and attenuated rebound response after sleep deprivation. Intracerebroventricular injection of compound 48/80, a histamine releaser from mast cells, significantly increased histamine levels in the ventricular region and enhanced wakefulness in WT mice, while it had no effect in W/Wv mice. Injection of H1 antagonists (triprolidine and mepyramine) significantly increased the amounts of slow-wave sleep in WT mice, but not in W/Wv mice. Most strikingly, the food-seeking behavior observed in WT mice during food deprivation was completely abolished in W/Wv mice. W/Wv mice also exhibited higher anxiety and depression levels compared to WT mice. Our findings suggest that histamine released from brain mast cells is wake-promoting, and emphasizes the physiological and pharmacological importance of brain mast cells in the regulation of sleep and fundamental neurobehavior. PMID:24205232

  11. Histamine from brain resident MAST cells promotes wakefulness and modulates behavioral states.

    PubMed

    Chikahisa, Sachiko; Kodama, Tohru; Soya, Atsushi; Sagawa, Yohei; Ishimaru, Yuji; Séi, Hiroyoshi; Nishino, Seiji

    2013-01-01

    Mast cell activation and degranulation can result in the release of various chemical mediators, such as histamine and cytokines, which significantly affect sleep. Mast cells also exist in the central nervous system (CNS). Since up to 50% of histamine contents in the brain are from brain mast cells, mediators from brain mast cells may significantly influence sleep and other behaviors. In this study, we examined potential involvement of brain mast cells in sleep/wake regulations, focusing especially on the histaminergic system, using mast cell deficient (W/W(v)) mice. No significant difference was found in the basal amount of sleep/wake between W/W(v) mice and their wild-type littermates (WT), although W/W(v) mice showed increased EEG delta power and attenuated rebound response after sleep deprivation. Intracerebroventricular injection of compound 48/80, a histamine releaser from mast cells, significantly increased histamine levels in the ventricular region and enhanced wakefulness in WT mice, while it had no effect in W/W(v) mice. Injection of H1 antagonists (triprolidine and mepyramine) significantly increased the amounts of slow-wave sleep in WT mice, but not in W/W(v) mice. Most strikingly, the food-seeking behavior observed in WT mice during food deprivation was completely abolished in W/W(v) mice. W/W(v) mice also exhibited higher anxiety and depression levels compared to WT mice. Our findings suggest that histamine released from brain mast cells is wake-promoting, and emphasizes the physiological and pharmacological importance of brain mast cells in the regulation of sleep and fundamental neurobehavior.

  12. Consumers' preferences for Iberian dry-cured ham and the influence of mast feeding: An application of conjoint analysis in Spain.

    PubMed

    Mesías, Francisco J; Gaspar, Paula; Pulido, Angel F; Escribano, Miguel; Pulido, Francisco

    2009-12-01

    This paper analyzes consumers' preferences for Iberian dry-cured ham, one of the most typical and highly prized meat products in Spain. The data were obtained by a survey carried out between April and May 2006 with a sample of 417 consumers in Extremadura (SW Spain). Conjoint Analysis was used to estimate the relative importance of the main attributes affecting preferences for Iberian ham and to create consumer segments with similar preference profiles. Results have shown that Price and Type of ham are the most important attributes for the choice of ham. Simulation analyses determined the surcharge that consumers are willing to pay for an Iberian mast-fed ham instead of an Iberian ham, thus identifying an ideal cluster for Iberian mast-fed ham.

  13. Mast cells and histamine play an important role in edema and leukocyte recruitment induced by Potamotrygon motoro stingray venom in mice.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Louise F; Prezotto-Neto, José Pedro; Távora, Bianca C L F; Faquim-Mauro, Eliana L; Pereira, Nicole A; Antoniazzi, Marta M; Jared, Simone G S; Teixeira, Catarina F P; Santoro, Marcelo L; Barbaro, Katia C

    2015-09-01

    This work aimed to investigate mechanisms underlying the inflammatory response caused by Potamotrygon motoro stingray venom (PmV) in mouse paws. Pre-treatment of animals with a mast cell degranulation inhibitor (cromolyn) diminished edema (62% of inhibition) and leukocyte influx into the site of PmV injection. Promethazine (histamine type 1 receptor antagonist) or thioperamide (histamine type 3 and 4 receptor antagonist) also decreased edema (up to 30%) and leukocyte numbers, mainly neutrophils (40-50 %). Cimetidine (histamine type 2 receptor antagonist) had no effect on PmV-induced inflammation. In the RBL-2H3 lineage of mast cells, PmV caused proper cell activation, in a dose-dependent manner, with release of PGD2 and PGE2. In addition, the role of COXs products on PmV inflammatory response was evaluated. Indomethacin (COX-1/COX-2 inhibitor) or etoricoxib (COX-2 inhibitor) partially diminished edema (around 20%) in PmV-injected mice. Indomethacin, but not etoricoxib, modulated neutrophil influx into the site of venom injection. In conclusion, mast cell degranulation and histamine, besides COXs products, play an important role in PmV-induced reaction. Since PmV mechanism of action remains unknown, hindering accurate treatment, clinical studies can be performed to validate the prescription of antihistaminic drugs, besides NSAIDs, to patients injured by freshwater stingrays. PMID:26100666

  14. Mast cells and histamine play an important role in edema and leukocyte recruitment induced by Potamotrygon motoro stingray venom in mice.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Louise F; Prezotto-Neto, José Pedro; Távora, Bianca C L F; Faquim-Mauro, Eliana L; Pereira, Nicole A; Antoniazzi, Marta M; Jared, Simone G S; Teixeira, Catarina F P; Santoro, Marcelo L; Barbaro, Katia C

    2015-09-01

    This work aimed to investigate mechanisms underlying the inflammatory response caused by Potamotrygon motoro stingray venom (PmV) in mouse paws. Pre-treatment of animals with a mast cell degranulation inhibitor (cromolyn) diminished edema (62% of inhibition) and leukocyte influx into the site of PmV injection. Promethazine (histamine type 1 receptor antagonist) or thioperamide (histamine type 3 and 4 receptor antagonist) also decreased edema (up to 30%) and leukocyte numbers, mainly neutrophils (40-50 %). Cimetidine (histamine type 2 receptor antagonist) had no effect on PmV-induced inflammation. In the RBL-2H3 lineage of mast cells, PmV caused proper cell activation, in a dose-dependent manner, with release of PGD2 and PGE2. In addition, the role of COXs products on PmV inflammatory response was evaluated. Indomethacin (COX-1/COX-2 inhibitor) or etoricoxib (COX-2 inhibitor) partially diminished edema (around 20%) in PmV-injected mice. Indomethacin, but not etoricoxib, modulated neutrophil influx into the site of venom injection. In conclusion, mast cell degranulation and histamine, besides COXs products, play an important role in PmV-induced reaction. Since PmV mechanism of action remains unknown, hindering accurate treatment, clinical studies can be performed to validate the prescription of antihistaminic drugs, besides NSAIDs, to patients injured by freshwater stingrays.

  15. Influence of ethanolic extract of Tephrosia purpurea Linn. on mast cells and erythrocytes membrane integrity.

    PubMed

    Gokhale, A B; Dikshit, V J; Damre, A S; Kulkarni, K R; Saraf, M N

    2000-08-01

    The ethanolic extract of T. purpurea Linn. was studied for its in vitro effect on rat mast cell degranulation and erythrocyte membrane integrity in vitro. The extract in concentration of 25-200 microg/ml showed a dose-dependant inhibition of rat mast cell degranulation induded by compound 48/80 and egg albumin. T. purpurea extract was found to inhibit haemolysis of erythrocytes induced by hypotonic solution but accelerated haemolysis induced by heat at a concentration of 100 microg/ml. The studies reveal that the ethanolic extract of T. purpurea may inhibit degranulation of mast cells by a mechanism other than membrane stabilization.

  16. ANTI-INFLAMMATORY AND MAST CELL PROTECTIVE EFFECT OF FICUS RELIGIOSA

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, S.; Thirugnanasambantham, P.; Reddy, M. Kannappa; Narasimhan, S.; Subramaniam, G. Anantha

    1990-01-01

    The aqueous extract of bark of Ficus religiosa was prepared and investigated for its anti-inflammatory effect and for its protective effect on mast cells against degranulation. A significant anti-inflammatory effect was observed in both acute and chronic models of inflammation. The extract also protected mast cells from degranulation induced by various degranulatiors. The observed anti-inflammatory and mast cell protective effect may be responsible for the beneficial effect of Ficus religiosa in kumkum dermatitis and other inflammatory conditions. PMID:22556521

  17. Anti-inflammatory and mast cell protective effect of ficus religiosa.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, S; Thirugnanasambantham, P; Reddy, M K; Narasimhan, S; Subramaniam, G A

    1990-10-01

    The aqueous extract of bark of Ficus religiosa was prepared and investigated for its anti-inflammatory effect and for its protective effect on mast cells against degranulation. A significant anti-inflammatory effect was observed in both acute and chronic models of inflammation. The extract also protected mast cells from degranulation induced by various degranulatiors. The observed anti-inflammatory and mast cell protective effect may be responsible for the beneficial effect of Ficus religiosa in kumkum dermatitis and other inflammatory conditions. PMID:22556521

  18. Subcutaneous Allergic Sensitization to Protease Allergen Is Dependent on Mast Cells but Not IL-33: Distinct Mechanisms between Subcutaneous and Intranasal Routes.

    PubMed

    Kamijo, Seiji; Suzuki, Mayu; Hara, Mutsuko; Shimura, Sakiko; Ochi, Hirono; Maruyama, Natsuko; Matsuda, Akira; Saito, Hirohisa; Nakae, Susumu; Suto, Hajime; Ichikawa, Saori; Ikeda, Shigaku; Ogawa, Hideoki; Okumura, Ko; Takai, Toshiro

    2016-05-01

    Protease activity of papain, a plant-derived occupational allergen homologous to mite major allergens, is essential to IgE/IgG1 production and lung eosinophilia induced by intranasal papain administration in mice, and IL-33 contributes to these responses. In this work, we investigate skin and Ab responses induced by s.c. papain administration into ear lobes and responses induced by subsequent airway challenge with papain. Subcutaneous papain injection induced swelling associated with increased epidermal thickness, dermal inflammation, serum IgE/IgG1 responses, and Th2 cytokine production in draining lymph node cells restimulated in vitro. These responses were markedly less upon s.c. administration of protease inhibitor-treated papain. Results obtained by using mast cell-deficient mice and reconstitution of tissue mast cells suggested the contribution of mast cells to papain-specific IgE/IgG1 responses and eosinophil infiltration. The responses were equivalent between wild-type and IL-33(-/-) mice. After the subsequent airway challenge, the s.c. presensitized wild-type mice showed more severe lung eosinophilia than those without the presensitization. The presensitized IL-33(-/-) mice showed modest lung eosinophilia, which was absent without the presensitization, but its severity and IgE boost by the airway challenge were markedly less than the presensitized wild-type mice, in which protease activity of inhaled papain contributed to the responses. The results suggest that mechanisms for the protease-dependent sensitization differ between skin and airway and that cooperation of mast cell-dependent, IL-33-independent initial sensitization via skin and protease-induced, IL-33-mediated mechanism in re-exposure via airway to protease allergens maximizes the magnitude of the transition from skin inflammation to asthma in natural history of progression of allergic diseases. PMID:27001956

  19. Regulation of rat basophilic leukemia-2H3 mast cell secretion by a constitutive Lyn kinase interaction with the high affinity IgE receptor (Fc epsilon RI).

    PubMed

    Vonakis, Becky M; Gibbons, Scott P; Rotté, Masashi J; Brothers, Elizabeth A; Kim, Seok C; Chichester, Kristin; MacDonald, Susan M

    2005-10-01

    Signaling through the high affinity IgE receptor is initiated by noncovalently associated Lyn kinase, resulting in the secretion of inflammatory mediators from mast cells. A fraction of the total cellular Lyn is associated via its N-terminal unique domain with the cytoplasmic domain of the Fc epsilonRI beta subunit before receptor aggregation. In the current study, we stably transfected the unique domain of Lyn into rat basophilic leukemia-2H3 mast cells and examined the consequences on Fc epsilonRI-induced signal transduction and mediator secretion to further define the role of the unique domain of Lyn in mast cell secretion. Tyrosine phosphorylation of Fc epsilonRI beta and gamma subunits was partially inhibited in the Lyn unique domain transfectants after Ag stimulation. Ag stimulation of Lyn unique domain transfectants was accompanied by enhanced phosphorylation of MEK and ERK-2, which are required for leukotriene C4 (LTC4) release, and production of LTC4 was increased 3- to 5-fold, compared with cells transfected with vector alone. Conversely, tyrosine phosphorylation of the adaptor protein Gab2, which is essential for mast cell degranulation, was inhibited after Ag stimulation of Lyn unique domain transfectants, and Ag-induced release of histamine was inhibited up to 48%. In rat basophilic leukemia-2H3 cells, Lyn thus plays a dual role by positively regulating Fc epsilonRI phosphorylation and degranulation while negatively regulating LTC4 production. This study provides further evidence that the constitutive interaction between the unique domain of Lyn and the Fc epsilonRI beta subunit is a crucial step in the initiation of Fc epsilonRI signaling and that Lyn is limiting for Fc epsilonRI-induced secretion of inflammatory mediators.

  20. New Developments in Mast Cell Biology: Clinical Implications.

    PubMed

    Arthur, Greer; Bradding, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are present in connective tissue and at mucosal surfaces in all classes of vertebrates. In health, they contribute to tissue homeostasis, host defense, and tissue repair via multiple receptors regulating the release of a vast stockpile of proinflammatory mediators, proteases, and cytokines. However, these potentially protective cells are a double-edged sword. When there is a repeated or long-term stimulus, MC activation leads to tissue damage and dysfunction. Accordingly, MCs are implicated in the pathophysiologic aspects of numerous diseases covering all organs. Understanding the biology of MCs, their heterogeneity, mechanisms of activation, and signaling cascades may lead to the development of novel therapies for many diseases for which current treatments are lacking or are of poor efficacy. This review will focus on updates and developments in MC biology and their clinical implications, with a particular focus on their role in respiratory diseases.

  1. Differential effects of protoporphyrin and uroporphyrin on murine mast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, H.W.; Gigli, I.; Wasserman, S.I.

    1987-03-01

    To investigate the mechanisms responsible for the distinct cutaneous manifestations of erythropoietic protoporphyria and porphyria cutanea tarda, the effects of protoporphyrin (PP) and uroporphyrin (URO), the predominant porphyrins in the respective disease, on mast cells were examined. Release of preformed and generated mediators was assessed by the release of radioactivity from cells labeled with (/sup 3/H)serotonin and (/sup 14/C)arachidonic acid, respectively. Clinically relevant doses of PP (25-500 ng/ml) and 396-407 nm irradiation (3-16 X 10(2)J/m2) induced maximal net release of preformed mediators ,f 44.52 +/- 6.6 to 58.01 +/- 4.0% (mean +/- SE). In contrast, irradiation in the presence of URO (50-5000 ng/ml) resulted in less than 5% net release. (3H)Serotonin release induced by PP and irradiation was calcium-independent, and was not enhanced by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, a known activator of protein kinase C. This release was suppressed by catalase, a scavenger of hydrogen peroxide. Furthermore, irradiation in the presence of PP, but not in the presence of URO, resulted in perturbation of cell membrane. Irradiation in the presence of PP also resulted in a maximal net release of generated mediators of 9.98 +/- 3.5% (mean +/- SE), whereas similar treatment in the presence of URO induced less than 0.5% net release. These results suggested that the burning, stinging, erythema, and edema experienced by patients with erythropoietic protoporphyria following sun exposure, and the lack of such findings in patients with porphyria cutanea tarda, may be explained, at least in part, by the differential effects of PP and URO on mast cells.

  2. Martian Arctic Dust Devil and Phoenix Meteorology Mast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Surface Stereo Imager on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander caught this dust devil in action west-southwest of the lander at 11:16 a.m. local Mars time on Sol 104, or the 104th Martian day of the mission, Sept. 9, 2008.

    Dust devils have not been detected in any Phoenix images from earlier in the mission, but at least six were observed in a dozen images taken on Sol 104.

    Dust devils are whirlwinds that often occur when the Sun heats the surface of Mars, or some areas on Earth. The warmed surface heats the layer of atmosphere closest to it, and the warm air rises in a whirling motion, stirring dust up from the surface like a miniature tornado.

    The vertical post near the left edge of this image is the mast of the Meteorological Station on Phoenix. The dust devil visible at the horizon just to the right of the mast is estimated to be 600 to 700 meters (about 2,000 to 2,300 feet) from Phoenix, and 4 to 5 meters (10 to 13 feet) in diameter. It is much smaller than dust devils that have been observed by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit much closer to the equator. It is closer in size to dust devils seen from orbit in the Phoenix landing region, though still smaller than those.

    The image has been enhanced to make the dust devil easier to see.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  3. Stimulation of mast cells leads to cholesterol accumulation in macrophages in vitro by a mast cell granule-mediated uptake of low density lipoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Kokkonen, J.O.; Kovanen, P.T.

    1987-04-01

    The uptake of low density lipoprotein (LDL) by cultured mouse macrophages was markedly promoted by isolated rat mast cell granules present in the culture medium. The granule-mediated uptake of /sup 125/I-LDL enhanced the rate of cholesteryl ester synthesis in the macrophages, the result being accumulation of cholesteryl esters in these cells. Binding of LDL to the granules was essential for the granule-mediated uptake of LDL by macrophages, for the uptake process was prevented by treating the granules with avidin or protamine chloride or by treating LDL with 1,2-cyclohexanedione, all of which inhibit the binding of LDL to the granules. Inhibition of granule phagocytosis by the macrophages with cytochalasin B also abolished the granule-mediated uptake of LDL. Finally, mouse macrophage monolayers and LDL were incubated in the presence of isolated rat serosal mast cells. Stimulation of the mast cells with compound 48/80, a degranulating agent, resulted in dose-dependent release of secretory granules from the mast cells and a parallel increase in /sup 14/C cholesteryl ester synthesis in the macrophages. The results show that, in this in vitro model, the sequence of events leading to accumulation of cholesteryl esters in macrophages involves initial stimulation of mast cells, subsequent release of their secretory granules, binding of LDL to the exocytosed granules, and, finally, phagocytosis of the LDL-containing granules by macrophages.

  4. Multiple bidirectional alterations of phenotype and changes in proliferative potential during the in vitro and in vivo passage of clonal mast cell populations derived from mouse peritoneal mast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kanakura, Y.; Thompson, H.; Nakano, T.; Yamamura, T.; Asai, H.; Kitamura, Y.; Metcalfe, D.D.; Galli, S.J.

    1988-09-01

    Mouse peritoneal mast cells (PMC) express a connective tissue-type mast cell (CTMC) phenotype, including reactivity with the heparin-binding fluorescent dye berberine sulfate and incorporation of (35S) sulfate predominantly into heparin proteoglycans. When PMC purified to greater than 99% purity were cultured in methylcellulose with IL-3 and IL-4, approximately 25% of the PMC formed colonies, all of which contained both berberine sulfate-positive and berberine sulfate-negative mast cells. When these mast cells were transferred to suspension culture, they generated populations that were 100% berberine sulfate-negative, a characteristic similar to that of mucosal mast cells (MMC), and that synthesized predominantly chondroitin sulfate (35S) proteoglycans. When ''MMC-like'' cultured mast cells derived from WBB6F1-+/+ PMC were injected into the peritoneal cavities of mast cell-deficient WBB6F1-W/Wv mice, the adoptively transferred mast cell population became 100% berberine sulfate-positive. In methylcellulose culture, these ''second generation PMC'' formed clonal colonies containing both berberine sulfate-positive and berberine sulfate-negative cells, but exhibited significantly less proliferative ability than did normal +/+ PMC. Thus, clonal mast cell populations initially derived from single PMC exhibited multiple and bidirectional alterations between CTMC-like and MMC-like phenotypes. However, this process was associated with a progressive diminution of the mast cells' proliferative ability.

  5. Hard Times Hit Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, Michele

    2008-01-01

    Hard-to-grasp dollar amounts are forcing real cuts in K-12 education at a time when the cost of fueling buses and providing school lunches is increasing and the demands of the federal No Child Left Behind Act still loom larger over states and districts. "One of the real challenges is to continue progress in light of the economy," said Gale Gaines,…

  6. Work Hard. Be Nice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathews, Jay

    2009-01-01

    In 1994, fresh from a two-year stint with Teach for America, Mike Feinberg and Dave Levin inaugurated the Knowledge Is Power Program (KIPP) in Houston with an enrollment of 49 5th graders. By this Fall, 75 KIPP schools will be up and running, setting children from poor and minority families on a path to college through a combination of hard work,…

  7. SUPER HARD SURFACED POLYMERS

    SciTech Connect

    Mansur, Louis K; Bhattacharya, R; Blau, Peter Julian; Clemons, Art; Eberle, Cliff; Evans, H B; Janke, Christopher James; Jolly, Brian C; Lee, E H; Leonard, Keith J; Trejo, Rosa M; Rivard, John D

    2010-01-01

    High energy ion beam surface treatments were applied to a selected group of polymers. Of the six materials in the present study, four were thermoplastics (polycarbonate, polyethylene, polyethylene terephthalate, and polystyrene) and two were thermosets (epoxy and polyimide). The particular epoxy evaluated in this work is one of the resins used in formulating fiber reinforced composites for military helicopter blades. Measures of mechanical properties of the near surface regions were obtained by nanoindentation hardness and pin on disk wear. Attempts were also made to measure erosion resistance by particle impact. All materials were hardness tested. Pristine materials were very soft, having values in the range of approximately 0.1 to 0.5 GPa. Ion beam treatment increased hardness by up to 50 times compared to untreated materials. For reference, all materials were hardened to values higher than those typical of stainless steels. Wear tests were carried out on three of the materials, PET, PI and epoxy. On the ion beam treated epoxy no wear could be detected, whereas the untreated material showed significant wear.

  8. The multitasking mast cell: positive and negative roles in the progression of autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Christy, Alison L; Brown, Melissa A

    2007-09-01

    Among the potential outcomes of an aberrantly functioning immune system are allergic disease and autoimmunity. Although it has been assumed that the underlying mechanisms mediating these conditions are completely different, recent evidence shows that mast cells provide a common link. Mast cells reside in most tissues, are particularly prevalent at sites of Ag entry, and act as sentinel cells of the immune system. They express many inflammatory mediators that affect both innate and adaptive cellular function. They contribute to pathologic allergic inflammation but also serve an important protective role in bacterial and parasite infections. Given the proinflammatory nature of autoimmune responses, it is not surprising that studies using murine models of autoimmunity clearly implicate mast cells in the initiation and/or progression of autoimmune disease. In this review, we discuss the defined and hypothesized mechanisms of mast cell influence on autoimmune diseases, including their surprising and newly discovered role as anti-inflammatory cells.

  9. Key regulators control distinct transcriptional programmes in blood progenitor and mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Calero-Nieto, Fernando J; Ng, Felicia S; Wilson, Nicola K; Hannah, Rebecca; Moignard, Victoria; Leal-Cervantes, Ana I; Jimenez-Madrid, Isabel; Diamanti, Evangelia; Wernisch, Lorenz; Göttgens, Berthold

    2014-01-01

    Despite major advances in the generation of genome-wide binding maps, the mechanisms by which transcription factors (TFs) regulate cell type identity have remained largely obscure. Through comparative analysis of 10 key haematopoietic TFs in both mast cells and blood progenitors, we demonstrate that the largely cell type-specific binding profiles are not opportunistic, but instead contribute to cell type-specific transcriptional control, because (i) mathematical modelling of differential binding of shared TFs can explain differential gene expression, (ii) consensus binding sites are important for cell type-specific binding and (iii) knock-down of blood stem cell regulators in mast cells reveals mast cell-specific genes as direct targets. Finally, we show that the known mast cell regulators Mitf and c-fos likely contribute to the global reorganisation of TF binding profiles. Taken together therefore, our study elucidates how key regulatory TFs contribute to transcriptional programmes in several distinct mammalian cell types. PMID:24760698

  10. Preservation of the secretory response of peritoneal mast cells in the absence of extracellular calcium.

    PubMed

    Bronner, C; Gies, J P; Vallé, A; Landry, Y

    1987-12-01

    The transfer of rat peritoneal mast cells from balanced salt solution to calcium-free buffer led to a time-dependent decrease in their response to compound 48/80 and to ionophore A23187. The concomittant absence of potassium from the calcium-free buffer enabled the mast cells to retain their secretory response. The increase in potassium level, with a parallel decrease in sodium to maintain osmolarity, led to a slight potentiation of the response to 48/80 and to a large but transient potentiation of the response to A23187. Mast cells can be considered nonexcitable. The apparent dependency upon extracellular calcium of mast cell secretory responses might be related to the presumed tight equilibrium between endoplasmic reticulum calcium stores and extracellular calcium. The control of this equilibrium by transmembrane gradients of monovalent ions is proposed. PMID:2446099

  11. Beyond apoptosis: The mechanism and function of phosphatidylserine asymmetry in the membrane of activating mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Rysavy, Noel M.; Shimoda, Lori M. N.; Dixon, Alyssa M.; Speck, Mark; Stokes, Alexander J.; Turner, Helen; Umemoto, Eric Y.

    2014-01-01

    Loss of plasma membrane asymmetry is a hallmark of apoptosis, but lipid bilayer asymmetry and loss of asymmetry can contribute to numerous cellular functions and responses that are independent of programmed cell death. Exofacial exposure of phosphatidylserine occurs in lymphocytes and mast cells after antigenic stimulation and in the absence of apoptosis, suggesting that there is a functional requirement for phosphatidylserine exposure in immunocytes. In this review we examine current ideas as to the nature of this functional role in mast cell activation. Mechanistically, there is controversy as to the candidate proteins responsible for phosphatidylserine translocation from the internal to external leaflet, and here we review the candidacies of mast cell PLSCR1 and TMEM16F. Finally we examine the potential relationship between functionally important mast cell membrane perturbations and phosphatidylserine exposure during activation. PMID:25759911

  12. Paul Ehrlich's mastzellen: a historical perspective of relevant developments in mast cell biology.

    PubMed

    Ghably, Jack; Saleh, Hana; Vyas, Harsha; Peiris, Emma; Misra, Niva; Krishnaswamy, Guha

    2015-01-01

    Following the discovery of mast cells (or mastzellen) by the prolific physician researcher, Paul Ehrlich, many advances have improved our understanding of these cells and their fascinating biology. The discovery of immunoglobulin E and receptors for IgE and IgG on mast cells heralded further in vivo and in vitro studies, using molecular technologies and gene knockout models. Mast cells express an array of inflammatory mediators including tryptase, histamine, cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors. They play a role in many varying disease states, from atopic diseases, parasitic infections, hematological malignancies, and arthritis to osteoporosis. This review will attempt to summarize salient evolving areas in mast cell research over the last few centuries that have led to our current understanding of this pivotal multifunctional cell.

  13. Pollen limitation and flower abortion in a wind-pollinated, masting tree.

    PubMed

    Pearse, Ian S; Koenig, Walter D; Funk, Kyle A; Pesendorfer, Mario B

    2015-02-01

    Pollen limitation is a key assumption of theories that explain mast seeding, which is common among wind-pollinated and woody plants. In particular, the pollen coupling hypothesis and pollination Moran effect hypothesis assume pollen limitation as a factor that synchronizes seed crops across individuals. The existence of pollen limitation has not, however, been unambiguously demonstrated in wind-pollinated, masting trees. We conducted a two-year pollen supplementation experiment on a masting oak species, Quercus lobata. Supplemental pollen increased acorn set in one year but not in the other, supporting the importance of pollen coupling and pollination Moran effect models of mast seeding. We also tracked the fate of female flowers over five years and found that the vast majority of flowers were aborted for reasons unrelated to pollination, even in the presence of excess pollen. Pollen limitation can reduce annual seed set in a wind-pollinated tree, but factors other than pollen limitation cause the majority of flower abortion.

  14. Dengue Virus Infection of Mast Cells Triggers Endothelial Cell Activation ▿

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Michael G.; Hermann, Laura L.; Issekutz, Andrew C.; Marshall, Jean S.; Rowter, Derek; Al-Afif, Ayham; Anderson, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Vascular perturbation is a hallmark of severe forms of dengue disease. We show here that antibody-enhanced dengue virus infection of primary human cord blood-derived mast cells (CBMCs) and the human mast cell-like line HMC-1 results in the release of factor(s) which activate human endothelial cells, as evidenced by increased expression of the adhesion molecules ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. Endothelial cell activation was prevented by pretreatment of mast cell-derived supernatants with a tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-specific blocking antibody, thus identifying TNF as the endothelial cell-activating factor. Our findings suggest that mast cells may represent an important source of TNF, promoting vascular endothelial perturbation following antibody-enhanced dengue virus infection. PMID:21068256

  15. Emerging Role of Mast Cells and Macrophages in Cardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jia-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Mast cells are essential in allergic immune responses. Recent discoveries have revealed their direct participation in cardiovascular diseases and metabolic disorders. Although more sophisticated mechanisms are still unknown, data from animal studies suggest that mast cells act similarly to macrophages and other inflammatory cells and contribute to human diseases through cell–cell interactions and the release of proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and proteases to induce inflammatory cell recruitment, cell apoptosis, angiogenesis, and matrix protein remodeling. Reduced cardiovascular complications and improved metabolic symptoms in animals receiving over-the-counter antiallergy medications that stabilize mast cells open another era of mast cell biology and bring new hope to human patients suffering from these conditions. PMID:22240242

  16. 14. Hold, port side,looking forward to mast and strongback, centerboard ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Hold, port side,looking forward to mast and strongback, centerboard trunk to starboard. - Two-Sail Bateau E. C. COLLIER, Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum, Mills Street, Saint Michaels, Talbot County, MD

  17. Development of a continuous manufacturing method for a CFRP collapsible tube mast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, D. H.; Davidson, R.; Lee, R. J.; Thorpe, T.

    1986-06-01

    A sequential molding process was developed for forming continuous lengths of profiled carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) sheet, and for the edge-bonding of two identical profiles to produce a lenticular-shaped collapsible tube mast (CTM). The process was designed to enable a wide range of CTM sizes, characterized by the shape radius r, to be produced, and it will accept either thermosetting or thermoplastic matrix composites. The Tube Manufacturing Method (TMM) was proved by the construction of a laboratory scale rig and its use to produce continuously 10 m lengths of mast profile of uniform section and surface finish. The mechanical properties of the fabrics impregnated with the two resins were measured to provide basic tube mast design data. Viscoelastic relaxations in both types of composites were determined after storing sections of mast profile in the flattened condition over periods of time as a function of temperature.

  18. Involvement of mast cells and proteinase-activated receptor 2 in oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia in mice.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Ayumi; Andoh, Tsugunobu; Kuraishi, Yasushi

    2016-03-01

    The chemotherapeutic agent oxaliplatin induces neuropathic pain, a dose-limiting side effect, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Here, we show the potential involvement of cutaneous mast cells in oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia in mice. A single intraperitoneal injection of oxaliplatin induced mechanical allodynia, which peaked on day 10 after injection. Oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia was almost completely prevented by congenital mast cell deficiency. The numbers of total and degranulated mast cells was significantly increased in the skin after oxaliplatin administration. Repetitive topical application of the mast cell stabilizer azelastine hydrochloride inhibited mechanical allodynia and the degranulation of mast cells without affecting the number of mast cells in oxaliplatin-treated mice. The serine protease inhibitor camostat mesilate and the proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) antagonist FSLLRY-NH2 significantly inhibited oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia. However, it was not inhibited by the H1 histamine receptor antagonist terfenadine. Single oxaliplatin administration increased the activity of cutaneous serine proteases, which was attenuated by camostat and mast cell deficiency. Depletion of the capsaicin-sensitive primary afferents by neonatal capsaicin treatment almost completely prevented oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia, the increase in the number of mast cells, and the activity of cutaneous serine proteases. These results suggest that serine protease(s) released from mast cells and PAR2 are involved in oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia. Therefore, oxaliplatin may indirectly affect the functions of mast cells through its action on capsaicin-sensitive primary afferents.

  19. Involvement of mast cells and proteinase-activated receptor 2 in oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia in mice.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Ayumi; Andoh, Tsugunobu; Kuraishi, Yasushi

    2016-03-01

    The chemotherapeutic agent oxaliplatin induces neuropathic pain, a dose-limiting side effect, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Here, we show the potential involvement of cutaneous mast cells in oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia in mice. A single intraperitoneal injection of oxaliplatin induced mechanical allodynia, which peaked on day 10 after injection. Oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia was almost completely prevented by congenital mast cell deficiency. The numbers of total and degranulated mast cells was significantly increased in the skin after oxaliplatin administration. Repetitive topical application of the mast cell stabilizer azelastine hydrochloride inhibited mechanical allodynia and the degranulation of mast cells without affecting the number of mast cells in oxaliplatin-treated mice. The serine protease inhibitor camostat mesilate and the proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) antagonist FSLLRY-NH2 significantly inhibited oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia. However, it was not inhibited by the H1 histamine receptor antagonist terfenadine. Single oxaliplatin administration increased the activity of cutaneous serine proteases, which was attenuated by camostat and mast cell deficiency. Depletion of the capsaicin-sensitive primary afferents by neonatal capsaicin treatment almost completely prevented oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia, the increase in the number of mast cells, and the activity of cutaneous serine proteases. These results suggest that serine protease(s) released from mast cells and PAR2 are involved in oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia. Therefore, oxaliplatin may indirectly affect the functions of mast cells through its action on capsaicin-sensitive primary afferents. PMID:26804251

  20. Transmembrane Adaptor Protein PAG/CBP Is Involved in both Positive and Negative Regulation of Mast Cell Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Draberova, Lubica; Bugajev, Viktor; Potuckova, Lucie; Halova, Ivana; Bambouskova, Monika; Polakovicova, Iva; Xavier, Ramnik J.; Seed, Brian

    2014-01-01

    The transmembrane adaptor protein PAG/CBP (here, PAG) is expressed in multiple cell types. Tyrosine-phosphorylated PAG serves as an anchor for C-terminal SRC kinase, an inhibitor of SRC-family kinases. The role of PAG as a negative regulator of immunoreceptor signaling has been examined in several model systems, but no functions in vivo have been determined. Here, we examined the activation of bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) with PAG knockout and PAG knockdown and the corresponding controls. Our data show that PAG-deficient BMMCs exhibit impaired antigen-induced degranulation, extracellular calcium uptake, tyrosine phosphorylation of several key signaling proteins (including the high-affinity IgE receptor subunits, spleen tyrosine kinase, and phospholipase C), production of several cytokines and chemokines, and chemotaxis. The enzymatic activities of the LYN and FYN kinases were increased in nonactivated cells, suggesting the involvement of a LYN- and/or a FYN-dependent negative regulatory loop. When BMMCs from PAG-knockout mice were activated via the KIT receptor, enhanced degranulation and tyrosine phosphorylation of the receptor were observed. In vivo experiments showed that PAG is a positive regulator of passive systemic anaphylaxis. The combined data indicate that PAG can function as both a positive and a negative regulator of mast cell signaling, depending upon the signaling pathway involved. PMID:25246632

  1. Mast cells in common wolffish Anarhichas lupus L.: ontogeny, distribution and association with lymphatic vessels.

    PubMed

    Hellberg, Hege; Bjerkås, Inge; Vågnes, Øyvind B; Noga, Edward J

    2013-12-01

    The morphology, ontogeny and tissue distribution of mast cells were studied in common wolffish(Anarhichas lupus L.) at the larval, juvenile and adult life stages using light and electron-microscopy and immunohistochemistry. Fish were sampled at 1 day, 1, 2, 3, 4, 8 and 12 weeks post-hatching in addition to 6 and 9 months and 2 years and older. From 8 weeks post-hatching, mast cells in common wolffish mainly appeared as oval or rounded cells 8-15 mm in diameter with an eccentrically placed, ovoid nucleus and filled with cytoplasmic granules up to 1.2 mm in diameter. Granules were refractile and eosinophilic to slightly basophilic in H&E and stained bright red with Martius-scarlet-blue and purple with pinacyanol erythrosinate in formalin-fixed tissues. Mast cells stained positive for piscidin 4 and Fc ε RI by immunohistochemistry. From 1 day to 4 weeks post-hatching, immature mast cell containing only a few irregularly sized cytoplasmic granules were observed by light and electron-microscopy in loose connective tissue of cranial areas. From 1 day post-hatching, these cells stained positive for piscidin 4 and Fc ε RI by immunohistochemistry. From 12 weeks post-hatching, mast cells showed a primarily perivascular distribution and were particularly closely associated with lymphatic vessels and sinuses. Mast cells were mainly located at the peripheral border of the adventitia of arteries and veins, while they were in intimate contact with the endothelium of the lymphatic vessels. Numerous mast cells were observed in the intestine. A stratum compactum, as described in salmonids, was not observed in wolffish intestine,nor were mast cells confined to a separate layer, a stratum granulosum. Lymphatic vessels consisting of endothelium, intimal connective tissue and a poorly developed basal lamina were observed in the intestine. Scanning electron microscopy was used to compare the structure and localization of intestinal mast cells of common wolffish and rainbow trout

  2. Ultrasonic characterization of materials hardness

    PubMed

    Badidi Bouda A; Benchaala; Alem

    2000-03-01

    In this paper, an experimental technique has been developed to measure velocities and attenuation of ultrasonic waves through a steel with a variable hardness. A correlation between ultrasonic measurements and steel hardness was investigated.

  3. Factorization and non-factorization in diffractive hard scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Berera, Arjun

    1997-04-20

    Factorization, in the sense defined for inclusive hard scattering, is discussed for diffractive hard scattering. A factorization theorem similar to its inclusive counterpart is presented for diffractive DIS. For hadron-hadron diffractive hard scattering, in contrast to its inclusive counterpart, the expected breakdown of factorization is discussed. Cross section estimates are given from a simple field theory model for non-factorizing double-pomeron-exchange (DPE) dijet production with and without account for Sudakov suppression.

  4. Innervation of enteric mast cells by primary spinal afferents in guinea pig and human small intestine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guo-Du; Wang, Xi-Yu; Liu, Sumei; Qu, Meihua; Xia, Yun; Needleman, Bradley J; Mikami, Dean J; Wood, Jackie D

    2014-10-01

    Mast cells express the substance P (SP) neurokinin 1 receptor and the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor in guinea pig and human small intestine. Enzyme-linked immunoassay showed that activation of intramural afferents by antidromic electrical stimulation or by capsaicin released SP and CGRP from human and guinea pig intestinal segments. Electrical stimulation of the afferents evoked slow excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) in the enteric nervous system. The slow EPSPs were mediated by tachykinin neurokinin 1 and CGRP receptors. Capsaicin evoked slow EPSP-like responses that were suppressed by antagonists for protease-activated receptor 2. Afferent stimulation evoked slow EPSP-like excitation that was suppressed by mast cell-stabilizing drugs. Histamine and mast cell protease II were released by 1) exposure to SP or CGRP, 2) capsaicin, 3) compound 48/80, 4) elevation of mast cell Ca²⁺ by ionophore A23187, and 5) antidromic electrical stimulation of afferents. The mast cell stabilizers cromolyn and doxantrazole suppressed release of protease II and histamine when evoked by SP, CGRP, capsaicin, A23187, electrical stimulation of afferents, or compound 48/80. Neural blockade by tetrodotoxin prevented mast cell protease II release in response to antidromic electrical stimulation of mesenteric afferents. The results support a hypothesis that afferent innervation of enteric mast cells releases histamine and mast cell protease II, both of which are known to act in a diffuse paracrine manner to influence the behavior of enteric nervous system neurons and to elevate the sensitivity of spinal afferent terminals.

  5. Incidence of Mast Cells in Gingival and Periapical Inflammation- A Kaleidoscopic Study

    PubMed Central

    Sreedhar, Gadiputi; George, Jiji

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Mast cells are large granular cells that have classically been related to neutrophil stimulation during early step of inflammation. Aim The objective of this work was to identify the incidence of mast cells in inflammatory lesions like periapical granuloma, pyogenic granuloma, gingival hyperplasia. 1. To assess the staining intensity of mast cells by using different metachromatic stains. 2. To correlate the above findings histopathologically. Materials and Methods In this study, we used 5 micron thick sections from paraffin-embedded tissue blocks of previously diagnosed periapical and gingival inflammatory lesions. The sections were stained with routine H & E and metachromatic stains like Toluidine blue, Alcian blue, Aldehyde fuchsin and Giemsa. The number of mast cells was quantified. Statistical analysis was done and mast cell numbers were compared. Results In both gingival and periapical inflammatory lesions, toludine blue showed more number of mast cells followed by giemsa. Giemsa stain showed statistical significance in differentiating both periapical and gingival lesions (p<0.05) in terms of mast cell count. Moderate inflammation (46.4%) was seen in a higher propotion of gingival inflammations whereas periapical inflammatory lesions revealed severe inflammation (53.3%). In both types of inflammatory lesions, higher staining intensity was shown by toludine blue followed by giemsa which was statistically significant. Conclusion Mast cell number is inversely proportional to inflammatory response in gingival inflammatory lesions and directly proportional to inflammatory response in periapical inflammatory lesions. Although, toludine blue is found to be a better stain, giemsa has equivalent properties as that of toludine blue. PMID:27437338

  6. Mast cells respond to urticating extract from lepidoptera larva Morpheis ehrenbergii in the rat.

    PubMed

    Galicia-Curiel, María Fernanda; Quintanar, J Luis; Jiménez, Mariela; Salinas, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Mast cells and histamine participate in toxic effects of hairs from some caterpillars. This study reports that a crude extract of Morpheis ehrenbergii caterpillar hairs induces in vitro mast cells activation, triggers the release of histamine and causes a rapid urticarial reaction in the rat skin. Heating of the extract abolishes the inflammatory reaction. These results suggest that the use of antihistamines may improve the adverse skin reactions caused by the Mexican caterpillar M. ehrenbergii.

  7. Mast cells modulate acute ozone-induced inflammation of the murine lung

    SciTech Connect

    Kleeberger, S.R.; Seiden, J.E.; Levitt, R.C.; Zhang, L.Y. )

    1993-11-01

    We hypothesized that mast cells modulate lung inflammation that develops after acute ozone (O3) exposure. Two tests were done: (1) genetically mast-cell-deficient (WBB6F1-W/Wv, WCB6F1-SI/SId) and bone-marrow-transplanted W/Wv mice were exposed to O3 or filtered air, and the inflammatory responses were compared with those of mast-cell-sufficient congenic mice (WBB6F1-(+)/+, WCB6F1-(+)/+); (2) genetically O3-susceptible C57BL/6J mice were treated pharmacologically with putative mast-cell modulators or vehicle, and the O3-induced inflammatory responses were compared. Mice were exposed to 1.75 ppm O3 or air for 3 h, and lung inflammation was assessed by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) 6 and 24 h after exposure. Relative to O3-exposed W/Wv and SI/SId mice, the mean numbers of lavageable polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and total BAL protein concentration (a marker of permeability) were significantly greater in the respective O3-exposed normal congenic +/+ mice (p < 0.05). Mast cells were reconstituted in W/Wv mice by transplantation of bone marrow cells from congenic +/+ mice, and O3-induced lung inflammation was assessed in the mast-cell-replete W/Wv mice. After O3 exposure, the changes in lavageable PMNs and total protein of mast-cell-replete W/Wv mice were not different from age-matched normal +/+ control mice, and they were significantly greater than those of sham-transplanted W/Wv mice (p < 0.05). Genetically susceptible C57BL/6J mice were pretreated with a mast-cell stabilizer (nedocromil sodium), secretagogue (compound 48/80), or vehicle, and the mice were exposed to O3.

  8. Environmental Estrogens Induce Mast Cell Degranulation and Enhance IgE-Mediated Release of Allergic Mediators

    PubMed Central

    Narita, Shin-ichiro; Goldblum, Randall M.; Watson, Cheryl S.; Brooks, Edward G.; Estes, D. Mark; Curran, Edward M.; Midoro-Horiuti, Terumi

    2007-01-01

    Background Prevalence and morbidity of allergic diseases have increased over the last decades. Based on the recently recognized differences in asthma prevalence between the sexes, we have examined the effect of endogenous estrogens on a key element of the allergic response. Some lipophilic pollutants have estrogen-like activities and are termed environmental estrogens. These pollutants tend to degrade slowly in the environment and to bioaccumulate and bioconcentrate in the food chain; they also have long biological half-lives. Objectives Our goal in this study was to identify possible pathogenic roles for environmental estrogens in the development of allergic diseases. Methods We screened a number of environmental estrogens for their ability to modulate the release of allergic mediators from mast cells. We incubated a human mast cell line and primary mast cell cultures derived from bone marrow of wild type and estrogen receptor α (ER-α )–deficient mice with environmental estrogens with and without estradiol or IgE and allergens. We assessed degranulation of mast cells by quantifying the release of β -hexosaminidase. Results All of the environmental estrogens tested caused rapid, dose-related release of β -hexosaminidase from mast cells and enhanced IgE-mediated release. The combination of physiologic concentrations of 17β -estradiol and several concentrations of environmental estrogens had additive effects on mast cell degranulation. Comparison of bone marrow mast cells from ER-α –sufficient and ER-α –deficient mice indicated that much of the effect of environmental estrogens was mediated by ER-α . Conclusions Our findings suggest that estrogenic environmental pollutants might promote allergic diseases by inducing and enhancing mast cell degranulation by physiologic estrogens and exposure to allergens. PMID:17366818

  9. Aspergillus oryzae lectin induces anaphylactoid oedema and mast cell activation through its interaction with fucose of mast cell-bound non-specific IgE.

    PubMed

    Yamaki, K; Yoshino, S

    2011-11-01

    We investigated whether Aspergillus oryzae lectin (AOL), a fucose-specific lectin, induces anaphylactoid reactions and mast cell activation. The injection of AOL into footpads of mice produced a dose-related acute paw oedema. The AOL-induced oedema was attenuated by predose of histamine H1 receptor blocker or pretreatment of the lectin with fucose before injection and was not observed in SCID and mast cell-deficient WBB6F1-W/Wv mice. These results suggested that the AOL-induced anaphylactoid reaction was mediated by histamine released from mast cells. In addition, the activation of mast cells was seemed to be induced by the crosslinking of IgE on the cell surface following the binding of AOL to fucose residues in IgE. Consistent with the in vivo results, AOL induced the degranulation of the rat mast cell line RBL2H3 sensitized with monoclonal IgE. As AOL induced the increase in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration of IgE-sensitized RBL2H3 cells as well as antigen stimulation, AOL could input signals from FcεRI. The degranulation of IgE-sensitized RBL2H3 cells by AOL was diminished by pretreatment of AOL with fucose. Defucosylated IgE did not induce degranulation of RBL2H3 cells in response to AOL stimulation, in spite of its ability to induce degranulation by antigen stimulation as intact IgE. These results indicated that AOL bound to fucose residue of IgE causing antigen-independent IgE-mediated mast cell activation and anaphylactoid reactions in vitro and in vivo, respectively. AOL bound to human IgE as well as to mouse IgE, suggesting the possible implication of AOL in the allergic response to Aspergillus oryzae in humans.

  10. 5-Hydroxytryptamine receptor agonists for the abortive treatment of vascular headaches block mast cell, endothelial and platelet activation within the rat dura mater after trigeminal stimulation.

    PubMed

    Buzzi, M G; Dimitriadou, V; Theoharides, T C; Moskowitz, M A

    1992-06-26

    Antidromic stimulation of small caliber trigeminal axons causes neurogenic inflammation in the dura mater and tongue as evidenced by marked increases in mast cell activation, protein extravasation, as well as in the numbers of endothelial cytoplasmic vesicles, endothelial microvilli and platelet aggregates within ipsilateral post-capillary venules. In this report, we examined the effects of pretreatment with serotonin1 receptor agonists, dihydroergotamine (50 micrograms/kg, i.v.) and sumatriptan (100 micrograms/kg, i.v.) on the light and electron microscopic changes which develop after trigeminal ganglion stimulation. Both dihydroergotamine and sumatriptan are useful in the acute treatment of vascular headaches and bind with high affinity to 5-HT1D receptors. Both drugs decreased significantly the number of dural vessels showing endothelial or platelet changes and the numbers of activated mast cells, but did not affect the neurogenic response in the tongue. The drugs also blocked the accumulation of horseradish peroxidase reaction product within the endothelium and perivascular space on the stimulated side. The receptor is not present on trigeminovascular fibers innervating extracranial cephalic tissues. Drug mechanism probably involves inhibition of a proximal step in the pathophysiological cascade (e.g., via activation of a prejunctional receptor) because (a) receptors for sumatriptan have not been identified on mast cells whereas the inflammatory response was attenuated in mast cells as well as within platelets and the endothelium and (b) previous work indicates that sumatriptan and dihydroergotamine block neurotransmitter release. Hence, constriction of vascular smooth muscle mediated by postjunctional 5-hydroxytryptamine receptors is unlikely to explain the anti-inflammatory actions of dihydroergotamine or sumatriptan reported here.

  11. Ethanol Inhibits High-Affinity Immunoglobulin E Receptor (FcεRI) Signaling in Mast Cells by Suppressing the Function of FcεRI-Cholesterol Signalosome.

    PubMed

    Draberova, Lubica; Paulenda, Tomas; Halova, Ivana; Potuckova, Lucie; Bugajev, Viktor; Bambouskova, Monika; Tumova, Magda; Draber, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Ethanol has multiple effects on biochemical events in a variety of cell types, including the high-affinity immunoglobulin E receptor (FcεRI) signaling in antigen-activated mast cells. However, the underlying molecular mechanism remains unknown. To get better understanding of the effect of ethanol on FcεRI-mediated signaling we examined the effect of short-term treatment with non-toxic concentrations of ethanol on FcεRI signaling events in mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells. We found that 15 min exposure to ethanol inhibited antigen-induced degranulation, calcium mobilization, expression of proinflammatory cytokine genes (tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, and interleukin-13), and formation of reactive oxygen species in a dose-dependent manner. Removal of cellular cholesterol with methyl-β-cyclodextrin had a similar effect and potentiated some of the inhibitory effects of ethanol. In contrast, exposure of the cells to cholesterol-saturated methyl-β-cyclodextrin abolished in part the inhibitory effect of ethanol on calcium response and production of reactive oxygen species, supporting lipid-centric theories of ethanol action on the earliest stages of mast cell signaling. Further studies showed that exposure to ethanol and/or removal of cholesterol inhibited early FcεRI activation events, including tyrosine phosphorylation of the FcεRI β and γ subunits, SYK kinases, LAT adaptor protein, phospholipase Cγ, STAT5, and AKT and internalization of aggregated FcεRI. Interestingly, ethanol alone, and particularly in combination with methyl-β-cyclodextrin, enhanced phosphorylation of negative regulatory tyrosine 507 of LYN kinase. Finally, we found that ethanol reduced passive cutaneous anaphylactic reaction in mice, suggesting that ethanol also inhibits FcεRI signaling under in vivo conditions. The combined data indicate that ethanol interferes with early antigen-induced signaling events in mast cells by suppressing the function of Fc

  12. Targeting Mast Cells and Basophils with Anti-FcεRIα Fab-Conjugated Celastrol-Loaded Micelles Suppresses Allergic Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xia; Wang, Juan; Li, Xianyang; Lin, Lihui; Xie, Guogang; Cui, Zelin; Li, Jia; Wang, Yuping; Li, Li

    2015-12-01

    Mast cells and basophils are effector cells in the pathophysiology of allergic diseases. Targeted elimination of these cells may be a promising strategy for the treatment of allergic disorders. Our present study aims at targeted delivery of anti-FcεRIα Fab-conjugated celastrol-loaded micelles toward FcεRIα receptors expressed on mast cells and basophils to have enhanced anti-allergic effect. To achieve this aim, we prepared celastrol-loaded (PEO-block-PPO-block-PEO, Pluronic) polymeric nanomicelles using thin-film hydration method. The anti-FcεRIα Fab Fragment was then conjugated to carboxyl groups on drug-loaded micelles via EDC amidation reaction. The anti-FcεRIα Fab-conjugated celastrol-loaded micelles revealed uniform particle size (93.43 ± 12.93 nm) with high loading percentage (21.2 ± 1.5% w/w). The image of micelles showed oval and rod like. The anti-FcεRIα Fab-conjugated micelles demonstrated enhanced cellular uptake and cytotoxity toward target KU812 cells than non-conjugated micelles in vitro. Furthermore, diffusion of the drug into the cells allowed an efficient induction of cell apoptosis. In mouse model of allergic asthma, treatment with anti-FcεRIα Fab-conjugated micelles increased lung accumulation of micelles, and significantly reduced OVA-sIgE, histamine and Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, TNF-α) levels, eosinophils infiltration and mucus production. In addition, in mouse model of passive cutaneous anaphylaxis, anti-FcεRIα Fab-conjugated celastrol-loaded micelles treatment significantly decreased extravasated evan's in the ear. These results indicate that anti-FcεRIα Fab-conjugated celastrol-loaded micelles can target and selectively kill mast cells and basophils which express FcεRIα, and may be efficient reagents for the treatment of allergic disorders and mast cell related diseases.

  13. Inhibitory effect of 1,2,4,5-tetramethoxybenzene on mast cell-mediated allergic inflammation through suppression of IκB kinase complex

    SciTech Connect

    Je, In-Gyu; Choi, Hyun Gyu; Kim, Hui-Hun; Lee, Soyoung; Choi, Jin Kyeong; Kim, Sung-Wan; Kim, Duk-Sil; Kwon, Taeg Kyu; Shin, Tae-Yong; Park, Pil-Hoon; Khang, Dongwoo; Kim, Sang-Hyun

    2015-09-01

    As the importance of allergic disorders such as atopic dermatitis and allergic asthma, research on potential drug candidates becomes more necessary. Mast cells play an important role as initiators of allergic responses through the release of histamine; therefore, they should be the target of pharmaceutical development for the management of allergic inflammation. In our previous study, anti-allergic effect of extracts of Amomum xanthioides was demonstrated. To further investigate improved candidates, 1,2,4,5-tetramethoxybenzene (TMB) was isolated from methanol extracts of A. xanthioides. TMB dose-dependently attenuated the degranulation of mast cells without cytotoxicity by inhibiting calcium influx. TMB decreased the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin (IL)-4 at both the transcriptional and translational levels. Increased expression of these cytokines was caused by translocation of nuclear factor-κB into the nucleus, and it was hindered by suppressing activation of IκB kinase complex. To confirm the effect of TMB in vivo, the ovalbumin (OVA)-induced active systemic anaphylaxis (ASA) and IgE-mediated passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) models were used. In the ASA model, hypothermia was decreased by oral administration of TMB, which attenuated serum histamine, OVA-specific IgE, and IL-4 levels. Increased pigmentation of Evans blue was reduced by TMB in a dose-dependent manner in the PCA model. Our results suggest that TMB is a possible therapeutic candidate for allergic inflammatory diseases that acts through the inhibition of mast cell degranulation and expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. - Highlights: • TMB reduced the degranulation of mast cells. • TMB inhibited the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. • TMB suppressed both active and passive anaphylaxis. • Anti-allergic inflammatory effects of TMB might be due to the blocking IKK complex. • TMB might be a candidate for the treatment of

  14. Substance P primes lipoteichoic acid- and Pam3CysSerLys4-mediated activation of human mast cells by up-regulating Toll-like receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Tancowny, Brian P; Karpov, Victor; Schleimer, Robert P; Kulka, Marianna

    2010-10-01

    Substance P (SP) is a neuropeptide with neuroimmunoregulatory activity that may play a role in susceptibility to infection. Human mast cells, which are important in innate immune responses, were analysed for their responses to pathogen-associated molecules via Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in the presence of SP. Human cultured mast cells (LAD2) were activated by SP and TLR ligands including lipopolysaccharide (LPS), Pam3CysSerLys4 (Pam3CSK4) and lipoteichoic acid (LTA), and mast cell leukotriene and chemokine production was assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and gene expression by quantitative PCR (qPCR). Mast cell degranulation was determined using a β-hexosaminidase (β-hex) assay. SP treatment of LAD2 up-regulated mRNA for TLR2, TLR4, TLR8 and TLR9 while anti-immunoglobulin E (IgE) stimulation up-regulated expression of TLR4 only. Flow cytometry and western blot confirmed up-regulation of TLR2 and TLR8. Pretreatment of LAD2 with SP followed by stimulation with Pam3CSK4 or LTA increased production of leukotriene C4 (LTC(4) ) and interleukin (IL)-8 compared with treatment with Pam3CSK4 or LTA alone (>2-fold; P<0·01). SP alone activated 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) nuclear translocation but also augmented Pam3CSK4 and LTA-mediated 5-LO translocation. Pam3CSK4, LPS and LTA did not induce LAD2 degranulation. SP primed LTA and Pam3CSK4-mediated activation of JNK, p38 and extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and activated the nuclear translocation of c-Jun, nuclear factor (NF)-κB, activating transcription factor 2 (ATF-2) and cyclic-AMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB) transcription factors. Pretreatment with SP followed by LTA stimulation synergistically induced production of chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 8 (CXCL8)/IL-8, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2)/monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1), tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and IL-6 protein. SP primes TLR2-mediated activation of human mast cells by up-regulating TLR expression and

  15. Brain mast cells link the immune system to anxiety-like behavior.

    PubMed

    Nautiyal, Katherine M; Ribeiro, Ana C; Pfaff, Donald W; Silver, Rae

    2008-11-18

    Mast cells are resident in the brain and contain numerous mediators, including neurotransmitters, cytokines, and chemokines, that are released in response to a variety of natural and pharmacological triggers. The number of mast cells in the brain fluctuates with stress and various behavioral and endocrine states. These properties suggest that mast cells are poised to influence neural systems underlying behavior. Using genetic and pharmacological loss-of-function models we performed a behavioral screen for arousal responses including emotionality, locomotor, and sensory components. We found that mast cell deficient Kit(W-sh/W-sh) (sash(-/-)) mice had a greater anxiety-like phenotype than WT and heterozygote littermate control animals in the open field arena and elevated plus maze. Second, we show that blockade of brain, but not peripheral, mast cell activation increased anxiety-like behavior. Taken together, the data implicate brain mast cells in the modulation of anxiety-like behavior and provide evidence for the behavioral importance of neuroimmune links. PMID:19004805

  16. Mast Cells and Influenza A Virus: Association with Allergic Responses and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Amy C.; Temple, Rachel M.; Obar, Joshua J.

    2015-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) is a widespread infectious agent commonly found in mammalian and avian species. In humans, IAV is a respiratory pathogen that causes seasonal infections associated with significant morbidity in young and elderly populations, and has a large economic impact. Moreover, IAV has the potential to cause both zoonotic spillover infection and global pandemics, which have significantly greater morbidity and mortality across all ages. The pathology associated with these pandemic and spillover infections appear to be the result of an excessive inflammatory response leading to severe lung damage, which likely predisposes the lungs for secondary bacterial infections. The lung is protected from pathogens by alveolar epithelial cells, endothelial cells, tissue resident alveolar macrophages, dendritic cells, and mast cells. The importance of mast cells during bacterial and parasitic infections has been extensively studied; yet, the role of these hematopoietic cells during viral infections is only beginning to emerge. Recently, it has been shown that mast cells can be directly activated in response to IAV, releasing mediators such histamine, proteases, leukotrienes, inflammatory cytokines, and antiviral chemokines, which participate in the excessive inflammatory and pathological response observed during IAV infections. In this review, we will examine the relationship between mast cells and IAV, and discuss the role of mast cells as a potential drug target during highly pathological IAV infections. Finally, we proposed an emerging role for mast cells in other viral infections associated with significant host pathology. PMID:26042121

  17. The granzyme B inhibitor proteinase inhibitor 9 (PI9) is expressed by human mast cells.

    PubMed

    Bladergroen, Bellinda A; Strik, Merel C M; Wolbink, Angela M; Wouters, Dorine; Broekhuizen, Roel; Kummer, J Alain; Hack, C Erik

    2005-04-01

    The activity of granzyme B, a main effector molecule of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) and natural killer cells, is regulated by the human intracellular serpin proteinase inhibitor 9 (PI9). This inhibitor is particularly expressed by CTL and dendritic cells, in which it serves to protect these cells against endogenous and locally released granzyme B. Moreover, PI9 expression by neoplastic cells may constitute one of the mechanisms for tumors to escape immune surveillance. Here we show that PI9 is also expressed by human mast cells. In immunohistochemical studies using a PI9-specific monoclonal antibody, strong cytoplasmic staining for PI9 was found in normal mast cells in various tissues throughout the body. In addition, in 80% of all cases of cutaneous and systemic mastocytosis tested the majority of the mast cells expressed PI9. As an in vitro model for PI9 expression by mast cells, we studied expression by the human mast cell line HMC-1. Stimulation of HMC-1 with PMA and the calcium ionophore A23187 resulted in a marked increase of PI9 expression. Thus, PI9 is expressed by activated mast cells. We suggest that this expression serves to protect these cells against apoptosis induced by granzyme B released during initiation of the local inflammatory response.

  18. Mast cell degranulation by a hemolytic lipid toxin decreases GBS colonization and infection

    PubMed Central

    Gendrin, Claire; Vornhagen, Jay; Ngo, Lisa; Whidbey, Christopher; Boldenow, Erica; Santana-Ufret, Veronica; Clauson, Morgan; Burnside, Kellie; Galloway, Dionne P.; Waldorf, Kristina Adams; Piliponsky, Adrian M.; Rajagopal, Lakshmi

    2015-01-01

    Ascending infection of microbes from the lower genital tract into the amniotic cavity increases the risk of preterm birth, stillbirth, and newborn infections. Host defenses that are critical for preventing ascending microbial infection are not completely understood. Group B Streptococcus (GBS) are Gram-positive bacteria that frequently colonize the lower genital tract of healthy women but cause severe infections during pregnancy, leading to preterm birth, stillbirth, or early-onset newborn infections. We recently described that the GBS pigment is hemolytic, and increased pigment expression promotes GBS penetration of human placenta. Here, we show that the GBS hemolytic pigment/lipid toxin and hyperpigmented GBS strains induce mast cell degranulation, leading to the release of preformed and proinflammatory mediators. Mast cell–deficient mice exhibit enhanced bacterial burden, decreased neutrophil mobilization, and decreased immune responses during systemic GBS infection. In a vaginal colonization model, hyperpigmented GBS strains showed increased persistence in mast cell–deficient mice compared to mast cell–proficient mice. Consistent with these observations, fewer rectovaginal GBS isolates from women in their third trimester of pregnancy were hyperpigmented/hyperhemolytic. Our work represents the first example of a bacterial hemolytic lipid that induces mast cell degranulation and emphasizes the role of mast cells in limiting genital colonization by hyperpigmented GBS. PMID:26425734

  19. Brain mast cells link the immune system to anxiety-like behavior

    PubMed Central

    Nautiyal, Katherine M.; Ribeiro, Ana C.; Pfaff, Donald W.; Silver, Rae

    2008-01-01

    Mast cells are resident in the brain and contain numerous mediators, including neurotransmitters, cytokines, and chemokines, that are released in response to a variety of natural and pharmacological triggers. The number of mast cells in the brain fluctuates with stress and various behavioral and endocrine states. These properties suggest that mast cells are poised to influence neural systems underlying behavior. Using genetic and pharmacological loss-of-function models we performed a behavioral screen for arousal responses including emotionality, locomotor, and sensory components. We found that mast cell deficient KitW−sh/W−sh (sash−/−) mice had a greater anxiety-like phenotype than WT and heterozygote littermate control animals in the open field arena and elevated plus maze. Second, we show that blockade of brain, but not peripheral, mast cell activation increased anxiety-like behavior. Taken together, the data implicate brain mast cells in the modulation of anxiety-like behavior and provide evidence for the behavioral importance of neuroimmune links. PMID:19004805

  20. Inhibition of tryptase release from human colon mast cells by histamine receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    He, Shao-Heng; Xie, Hua; Fu, Yi-Ling

    2005-03-01

    The main objective of this study was to investigate the ability of histamine receptor antagonists to modulate tryptase release from human colon mast cells induced by histamine. Enzymatically dispersed cells from human colon were challenged with histamine in the absence or presence of the histamine receptor antagonists, and the tryptase release was determined. It was found that histamine induced tryptase release from colon mast cells was inhibited by up to approximately 61.5% and 24% by the H1 histamine receptor antagonist terfenadine and the H2 histamine receptor antagonist cimetidine, respectively, when histamine and its antagonists were added to cells at the same time. The H3 histamine receptor antagonist clobenpropit had no effect on histamine induced tryptase release from colon mast cells at all concentrations tested. Preincubation of terfenadine, cimetidine or clobenpropit with cells for 20 minutes before challenging with histamine did not enhance the ability of these antihistamines to inhibit histamine induced tryptase release. Apart from terfenadine at 100 microg/ml, the antagonists themselves did not stimulate tryptase release from colon mast cells following both 15 minutes and 35 minutes incubation periods. It was concluded that H1 and H2 histamine receptor antagonists were able to inhibit histamine induced tryptase release from colon mast cells. This not only added some new data to our hypothesis of self-amplification mechanisms of mast cell degranulation, but also suggested that combining these two types of antihistamine drugs could be useful for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).

  1. Regulation of GATA Factor Expression Is Distinct between Erythroid and Mast Cell Lineages

    PubMed Central

    Ohmori, Shin'ya; Takai, Jun; Ishijima, Yasushi; Suzuki, Mikiko; Moriguchi, Takashi; Philipsen, Sjaak; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2012-01-01

    The zinc finger transcription factors GATA1 and GATA2 participate in mast cell development. Although the expression of these factors is regulated in a cell lineage-specific and differentiation stage-specific manner, their regulation during mast cell development has not been clarified. Here, we show that the GATA2 mRNA level was significantly increased while GATA1 was maintained at low levels during the differentiation of mast cells derived from mouse bone marrow (BMMCs). Unlike in erythroid cells, forced expression or small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of GATA1 rarely affected GATA2 expression, and vice versa, in mast cells, indicating the absence of cross-regulation between Gata1 and Gata2 genes. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that both GATA factors bound to most of the conserved GATA sites of Gata1 and Gata2 loci in BMMCs. However, the GATA1 hematopoietic enhancer (G1HE) of the Gata1 gene, which is essential for GATA1 expression in erythroid and megakaryocytic lineages, was bound only weakly by both GATA factors in BMMCs. Furthermore, transgenic-mouse reporter assays revealed that the G1HE is not essential for reporter expression in BMMCs and peritoneal mast cells. Collectively, these results demonstrate that the expression of GATA factors in mast cells is regulated in a manner quite distinct from that in erythroid cells. PMID:22988301

  2. Mast cell activation contributes to sickle cell pathobiology and pain in mice

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Lucile; Vang, Derek; Nguyen, Julia; Gupta, Mihir; Luk, Kathryn; Ericson, Marna E.; Simone, Donald A.

    2013-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia (SCA) is an inherited disorder associated with severe lifelong pain and significant morbidity. The mechanisms of pain in SCA remain poorly understood. We show that mast cell activation/degranulation contributes to sickle pain pathophysiology by promoting neurogenic inflammation and nociceptor activation via the release of substance P in the skin and dorsal root ganglion. Mast cell inhibition with imatinib ameliorated cytokine release from skin biopsies and led to a correlative decrease in granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and white blood cells in transgenic sickle mice. Targeting mast cells by genetic mutation or pharmacologic inhibition with imatinib ameliorates tonic hyperalgesia and prevents hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced hyperalgesia in sickle mice. Pretreatment with the mast cell stabilizer cromolyn sodium improved analgesia following low doses of morphine that were otherwise ineffective. Mast cell activation therefore underlies sickle pathophysiology leading to inflammation, vascular dysfunction, pain, and requirement for high doses of morphine. Pharmacological targeting of mast cells with imatinib may be a suitable approach to address pain and perhaps treat SCA. PMID:23775718

  3. Optical imaging of fibrin deposition to elucidate participation of mast cells in foreign body responses

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Hong; Tang, Ewin N.; Baker, David W.; Tang, Liping

    2014-01-01

    Mast cell activation has been shown to be an initiator and a key determinant of foreign body reactions. However, there is no non-invasive method that can quantify the degree of implant-associated mast cell activation. Taking advantage of the fact that fibrin deposition is a hallmark of mast cell activation around biomaterial implants, a near infrared probe was fabricated to have high affinity to fibrin. Subsequent in vitro testing confirmed that this probe has high affinity to fibrin. Using a subcutaneous particle implantation model, we found significant accumulation of fibrin-affinity probes at the implant sites as early as 15 min following particle implantation. The accumulation of fibrin-affinity probes at the implantation sites could also be substantially reduced if anti-coagulant – heparin was administered at the implant sites. Further studies have shown that subcutaneous administration of mast cell activator – compound 48/80 – prompted the accumulation of fibrin-affinity probes. However, implant-associated fibrin-affinity probe accumulation was substantially reduced in mice with mast cell deficiency. The results show that our fibrin-affinity probes may serve as a powerful tool to monitor and measure the extent of biomaterial-mediated fibrin deposition and mast cell activation in vivo. PMID:24342726

  4. Mast cells in renal inflammation and fibrosis: lessons learnt from animal studies.

    PubMed

    Madjene, Lydia Celia; Pons, Maguelonne; Danelli, Luca; Claver, Julien; Ali, Liza; Madera-Salcedo, Iris K; Kassas, Asma; Pellefigues, Christophe; Marquet, Florian; Dadah, Albert; Attout, Tarik; El-Ghoneimi, Alaa; Gautier, Gregory; Benhamou, Marc; Charles, Nicolas; Daugas, Eric; Launay, Pierre; Blank, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells are hematopoietic cells involved in inflammation and immunity and have been recognized also as important effector cells in kidney inflammation. In humans, only a few mast cells reside in kidneys constitutively but in progressive renal diseases their numbers increase substantially representing an essential part of the interstitial infiltrate of inflammatory cells. Recent data obtained in experimental animal models have emphasized a complex role of these cells and the mediators they release as they have been shown both to promote, but also to protect from disease and fibrosis development. Sometimes conflicting results have been reported in similar models suggesting a very narrow window between these activities depending on the pathophysiological context. Interestingly in mice, mast cell or mast cell mediator specific actions became also apparent in the absence of significant mast cell kidney infiltration supporting systemic or regional actions via draining lymph nodes or kidney capsules. Many of their activities rely on the capacity of mast cells to release, in a timely controlled manner, a wide range of inflammatory mediators, which can promote anti-inflammatory actions and repair activities that contribute to healing, but in some circumstances or in case of inappropriate regulation may also promote kidney disease.

  5. Nanoimaging granule dynamics and subcellular structures in activated mast cells using soft X-ray tomography

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huan-Yuan; Chiang, Dapi Meng-Lin; Lin, Zi-Jing; Hsieh, Chia-Chun; Yin, Gung-Chian; Weng, I.-Chun; Guttermann, Peter; Werner, Stephan; Henzler, Katja; Schneider, Gerd; Lai, Lee-Jene; Liu, Fu-Tong

    2016-01-01

    Mast cells play an important role in allergic responses. During activation, these cells undergo degranulation, a process by which various kinds of mediators stored in the granules are released. Granule homeostasis in mast cells has mainly been studied by electron microscopy (EM), where the fine structures of subcellular organelles are partially destroyed during sample preparation. Migration and fusion of granules have not been studied in detail in three dimensions (3D) in unmodified samples. Here, we utilized soft X-ray tomography (SXT) coupled with fluorescence microscopy to study the detailed structures of organelles during mast cell activation. We observed granule fission, granule fusion to plasma membranes, and small vesicles budding from granules. We also detected lipid droplets, which became larger and more numerous as mast cells were activated. We observed dramatic morphological changes of mitochondria in activated mast cells and 3D-reconstruction revealed the highly folded cristae inner membrane, features of functionally active mitochondria. We also observed giant vesicles containing granules, mitochondria, and lipid droplets, which we designated as granule-containing vesicles (GCVs) and verified their presence by EM in samples prepared by cryo-substitution, albeit with a less clear morphology. Thus, our studies using SXT provide significant insights into mast cell activation at the organelle level. PMID:27748356

  6. Effect of LED phototherapy (λ630 +/- 20nm) on mast cells during wound healing in hypothyroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paraguassú, Gardênia M.; De Castro, Isabele Cardoso V.; Vasconcelos, Rebeca M.; da Guarda, Milena G.; Rodriguez, Tânia T.; Ramalho, Maria José P.; Pinheiro, Antônio Luiz B.; Ramalho, Luciana Maria P.

    2014-02-01

    Hypothyroidism has been associated with the disruption of the body's metabolism, including the healing process. LED phototherapy has been studied using several healing models, but their effects on mast cells proliferation associated to hypothyroidism remains unknown. The aim of this study was to assess the effect LED (λ630+/-20nm) phototherapy on mast cells proliferation during tissue repair in hypothyroid rats. Under general anesthesia, a standard surgical wound (1cm2) was created on the dorsum of 24 male Wistar rats divided into 4 groups of 6 animals each: EC-Control Euthyroid; ED-Euthyroid+LED; HC-Control Hypothyroid and HD-Hypothyroid+LED. The irradiation started immediately after surgery and was repeated every other day for 7 days, when animals death occurred. Hypothyroidism was induced in rats with propylthiouracil (0.05g/100mL) administered orally for 4 weeks and maintained until the end of the experiment. The specimens removed were processed to wax and stained with toluidine blue for mast cell identification. The mast cell proliferation was significantly higher in HC group than in EC group (Mann Whitney, p<0.05), but when ED group was compared to HD group, no significant difference was found. Our results showed that there was increase of mast cells in the presence of hypothyroidism, prolonging the inflammatory phase of repair, and the LED light has a biomodulative effect on mast cell population, even when hipothyroidism was present.

  7. Thyroid status affects number and localization of thyroid hormone receptor expressing mast cells in bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Siebler, T; Robson, H; Bromley, M; Stevens, D A; Shalet, S M; Williams, G R

    2002-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (T(3)) plays a key role in endochondral ossification. The process relies on the coordinated synthesis and degradation of cartilage matrix and is disrupted in juvenile hypothyroidism, leading to abnormal skeletal development. Mast cells synthesize and store matrix-degrading enzymes. We examined whether thyroid status influences skeletal mast cell distribution in growing rats to determine whether they might modulate the actions of T(3) in bone. Tibiae were collected for histological, histochemical, immunohistochemical, and immunofluorescence analysis. Mast cells were increased throughout the bone marrow in hypothyroid rats compared with euthyroid, thyrotoxic, and hypothyroid-thyroxine replaced animals. Large numbers were present in metaphyseal marrow adjacent to the growth plate in hypothyroid animals and cells were distributed evenly throughout the marrow. Very few mast cells were present in metaphyseal marrow in other groups, but their numbers increased with increasing distance from the growth plate. T(3) receptor alpha1 (TRalpha1) was expressed in the nucleus and cytoplasm of skeletal mast cells, whereas TRalpha2 and TRbeta1 were restricted to the cytoplasm. Localization of TRs was not affected by altered thyroid status. Thus, disrupted endochondral ossification in hypothyroidism may be mediated in part by skeletal mast cells, which express TR proteins and may function as T(3) target cells.

  8. IgE and mast cells in host defense against parasites and venoms.

    PubMed

    Mukai, Kaori; Tsai, Mindy; Starkl, Philipp; Marichal, Thomas; Galli, Stephen J

    2016-09-01

    IgE-dependent mast cell activation is a major effector mechanism underlying the pathology associated with allergic disorders. The most dramatic of these IgE-associated disorders is the fatal anaphylaxis which can occur in some people who have developed IgE antibodies to otherwise innocuous antigens, such as those contained in certain foods and medicines. Why would such a highly "maladaptive" immune response develop in evolution and be retained to the present day? Host defense against parasites has long been considered the only beneficial function that might be conferred by IgE and mast cells. However, recent studies have provided evidence that, in addition to participating in host resistance to certain parasites, mast cells and IgE are critical components of innate (mast cells) and adaptive (mast cells and IgE) immune responses that can enhance host defense against the toxicity of certain arthropod and animal venoms, including enhancing the survival of mice injected with such venoms. Yet, in some people, developing IgE antibodies to insect or snake venoms puts them at risk for having a potentially fatal anaphylactic reaction upon subsequent exposure to such venoms. Delineating the mechanisms underlying beneficial versus detrimental innate and adaptive immune responses associated with mast cell activation and IgE is likely to enhance our ability to identify potential therapeutic targets in such settings, not only for reducing the pathology associated with allergic disorders but perhaps also for enhancing immune protection against pathogens and animal venoms. PMID:27225312

  9. Arsenic inhibits mast cell degranulation via suppression of early tyrosine phosphorylation events.

    PubMed

    Shim, Juyoung; Kennedy, Rachel H; Weatherly, Lisa M; Hutchinson, Lee M; Pelletier, Jonathan H; Hashmi, Hina N; Blais, Kayla; Velez, Alejandro; Gosse, Julie A

    2016-11-01

    Exposure to arsenic is a global health concern. We previously documented an inhibitory effect of inorganic Arsenite on IgE-mediated degranulation of RBL-2H3 mast cells (Hutchinson et al., 2011; J. Appl. Toxicol. 31: 231-241). Mast cells are tissue-resident cells that are positioned at the host-environment interface, thereby serving vital roles in many physiological processes and disease states, in addition to their well-known roles in allergy and asthma. Upon activation, mast cells secrete several mediators from cytoplasmic granules, in degranulation. The present study is an investigation of Arsenite's molecular target(s) in the degranulation pathway. Here, we report that arsenic does not affect degranulation stimulated by either the Ca(2) (+) ionophore A23187 or thapsigargin, which both bypass early signaling events. Arsenic also does not alter degranulation initiated by another non-IgE-mediated mast cell stimulant, the G-protein activator compound 48/80. However, arsenic inhibits Ca(2) (+) influx into antigen-activated mast cells. These results indicate that the target of arsenic in the degranulation pathway is upstream of the Ca(2) (+) influx. Phospho-Syk and phospho-p85 phosphoinositide 3-kinase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays data show that arsenic inhibits early phosphorylation events. Taken together, this evidence indicates that the mechanism underlying arsenic inhibition of mast cell degranulation occurs at the early tyrosine phosphorylation steps in the degranulation pathway. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27018130

  10. [Sex differences in neuromodulation of mucosal mast cells in the rat jejunum].

    PubMed

    Gottwald, T; Becker, H D; Stead, R H

    1997-01-01

    The effect of electrical stimulation of both cervical vagal nerves on mucosal mast cells in the jejunum was investigated in an in vivo animal model with rats of both sexes. Males showed a significant increase of mast cell densities after electrical stimulation (1.0 mA, 5 Hz, 5 ms, 12 min) in the lamina propria. Simultaneously, we observed a significant increase of tissue histamine levels (ANOVA: P < 0.05), whereas serum levels remained unchanged. However, even though females had significantly higher levels throughout compared to males (ANOVA: P < 0.05), they did not show any significant reaction to electrical stimulation. These in vivo data support morphological and in vitro data from other investigators, who hypothesized a functional interaction between mucosal mast cells and nerves. However, degranulation seems to be a poor in situ indicator for mast-cell stimulation, as mast-cell densities increased in males, while the percentage of degranulated cells remained the same in all groups (about 40%). Instead, electrical stimulation of the vagal nerve seems to trigger histamine synthesis, or simply stabilization of mast cells. Interestingly, this phenomenon seems to be sex-dependent, suggesting a regulatory role for sex hormones in this scenario.

  11. Mast cell maturation is driven via a group III phospholipase A2-prostaglandin D2–DP1 receptor paracrine axis

    PubMed Central

    Taketomi, Yoshitaka; Ueno, Noriko; Kojima, Takumi; Sato, Hiroyasu; Murase, Remi; Yamamoto, Kei; Tanaka, Satoshi; Sakanaka, Mariko; Nakamura, Masanori; Nishito, Yasumasa; Kawana, Momoko; Kambe, Naotomo; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Taguchi, Ryo; Nakamizo, Satoshi; Kabashima, Kenji; Gelb, Michael H.; Arita, Makoto; Yokomizo, Takehiko; Nakamura, Motonao; Watanabe, Kikuko; Hirai, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Masataka; Okayama, Yoshimichi; Ra, Chisei; Aritake, Kosuke; Urade, Yoshihiro; Morimoto, Kazushi; Sugimoto, Yukihiko; Shimizu, Takao; Narumiya, Shuh; Hara, Shuntaro; Murakami, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    Microenvironment-based alterations in phenotypes of mast cells influence the susceptibility to anaphylaxis, yet the mechanisms underlying proper maturation of mast cells toward an anaphylaxis-sensitive phenotype are incompletely understood. Here we report that PLA2G3, a mammalian homolog of anaphylactic bee venom phospholipase A2, regulates this process. PLA2G3 secreted from mast cells is coupled with fibroblastic lipocalin-type PGD2 synthase (L-PGDS) to provide PGD2, which facilitates mast-cell maturation via PGD2 receptor DP1. Mice lacking PLA2G3, L-PGDS or DP1, mast cell–deficient mice reconstituted with PLA2G3-null or DP1-null mast cells, or mast cells cultured with L-PGDS–ablated fibroblasts exhibited impaired maturation and anaphylaxis of mast cells. Thus, we describe a lipid-driven PLA2G3–L-PGDS–DP1 loop that drives mast cell maturation. PMID:23624557

  12. Hard metal composition

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, H.

    1983-07-26

    A composition of matter having a Rockwell A hardness of at least 85 is formed from a precursor mixture comprising between 3 and 10 wt % boron carbide and the remainder a metal mixture comprising from 70 to 90% tungsten or molybdenum, with the remainder of the metal mixture comprising nickel and iron or a mixture thereof. The composition has a relatively low density of between 7 and 14 g/cc. The precursor is preferably hot pressed to yield a composition having greater than 100% of theoretical density.

  13. Hard metal composition

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, Haskell

    1986-01-01

    A composition of matter having a Rockwell A hardness of at least 85 is formed from a precursor mixture comprising between 3 and 10 weight percent boron carbide and the remainder a metal mixture comprising from 70 to 90 percent tungsten or molybdenum, with the remainder of the metal mixture comprising nickel and iron or a mixture thereof. The composition has a relatively low density of between 7 to 14 g/cc. The precursor is preferably hot pressed to yield a composition having greater than 100% of theoretical density.

  14. Hard Exclusive Pion Leptoproduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroll, Peter

    2016-08-01

    In this talk it is reported on an analysis of hard exclusive leptoproduction of pions within the handbag approach. It is argued that recent measurements of this process performed by HERMES and CLAS clearly indicate the occurrence of strong contributions from transversely polarized photons. Within the handbag approach such γ ^{ *}_T→ π transitions are described by the transversity GPDs accompanied by twist-3 pion wave functions. It is shown that the handbag approach leads to results on cross sections and single-spin asymmetries in fair agreement with experiment. Predictions for other pseudoscalar meson channels are also briefly discussed.

  15. Mast cells in human keloid, small intestine, and lung by an immunoperoxidase technique using a murine monoclonal antibody against tryptase.

    PubMed Central

    Craig, S. S.; DeBlois, G.; Schwartz, L. B.

    1986-01-01

    A murine monoclonal antibody (G5) against human lung mast cell tryptase was used for selective staining of human mast cells by an indirect immunoperoxidase method. Human tissues (keloid, small bowel, lung) were fixed in either Carnoy's fluid or neutral buffered formalin. In all three tissues the number and location of G5-stained mast cells corresponded closely with metachromatic toluidine blue-stained mast cells, although the immunospecific technique appeared to be more sensitive. In lung the average concentration of G5-positive mast cells after Carnoy's fixation was 15,695/cu mm of subepithelial tissue in bronchi and bronchioles and 26,580/cu mm of alveolar wall, in small bowel was 20,958/cu mm of mucosa and 8576/cu mm of submucosa, and in keloid was 3068/cu mm. Formalin fixation significantly reduced concentrations of G5-positive mast cells in all tissues except keloid. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:3532813

  16. Mast cells as effector cells of innate immunity and regulators of adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Cardamone, Chiara; Parente, Roberta; Feo, Giulia De; Triggiani, Massimo

    2016-10-01

    Mast cells are widely distributed in human organs and tissues and they are particularly abundant at major body interfaces with the external environment such as the skin, the lung and the gastrointestinal tract. Moreover, mast cells are located around blood vessels and are highly represented within central and peripheral lymphoid organs. The strategic distribution of mast cells closely reflects the primary role of these cells in providing first-line defense against environmental dangers, in regulating local and systemic inflammatory reactions and in shaping innate and adaptive immune responses. Human mast cells have pleiotropic and multivalent functions that make them highly versatile cells able to rapidly adapt responses to microenvironmental changes. They express a wide variety of surface receptors including immunoglobulin receptors, pathogen-associated molecular pattern receptors and danger signal receptors. The abundance of these receptors makes mast cells unique and effective surveillance cells able to detect promptly aggression by viral, bacterial and parasitic agents. In addition, mast cells express multiple receptors for cytokines and chemokines that confer them the capacity of being recruited and activated at sites of inflammation. Once activated by immunological or nonimmunological stimuli mast cells secrete a wide spectrum of preformed (early) and de novo synthesized (late) mediators. Preformed mediators are stored within granules and are rapidly released in the extracellular environment to provide a fast vascular response that promotes inflammation and local recruitment of other innate immunity cells such as neutrophils, eosinophils, basophils and monocyte/macrophages. Later on, delayed release of multiple cytokines and chemokines from mast cells further induce modulation of cells of adaptive immunity and regulates tissue injury and, eventually, resolution of inflammation. Finally, mast cells express several costimulatory and inhibitory surface molecules

  17. Epicutaneous sensitization results in IgE-dependent intestinal mast cell expansion and food anaphylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Bartnikas, Lisa M.; Gurish, Michael F.; Burton, Oliver T.; Leisten, Sabine; Janssen, Erin; Oettgen, Hans C.; Beaupré, Jacqueline; Lewis, Christopher N.; Austen, K. Frank; Schulte, Stephanie; Hornick, Jason L.; Geha, Raif S.; Oyoshi, Michiko K.

    2013-01-01

    Background Sensitization to food antigen may occur through cutaneous exposure. Objective Test the hypothesis that epicutaneous (EC) sensitization with food antigen predisposes to IgE-mediated anaphylaxis upon oral allergen challenge. Methods BALB/c mice were EC sensitized by repeated application of ovalbumin (OVA) to tape-stripped skin over 7 weeks, or orally immunized with OVA and cholera toxin (CT) weekly for 8 weeks, then orally challenged with OVA. Body temperature was monitored and serum mouse mast cell protease 1 (mMCP-1) level was determined following challenge. Tissue mast cells (MCs) were examined by chloroacetate esterase (CAE) staining. Serum OVA-specific IgE and IgG1 antibodies, and cytokines in supernatants of OVA-stimulated splenocytes, were measured by ELISA. Serum interleukin-4 (IL-4) levels were measured using an in vivo cytokine capture assay (IVCCA). Results EC sensitized mice exhibited expansion of connective tissue MC in the jejunum, increased serum IL-4 levels, and systemic anaphylaxis following oral challenge, as evidenced by decreased body temperature and increased serum mMCP-1 level. Intestinal MC expansion and anaphylaxis were IgE-dependent, as they did not occur in EC sensitized IgE−/− mice. Mice orally immunized with OVA+CT failed to increase serum IL-4 levels, expand their intestinal MCs, or develop anaphylaxis following oral challenge, despite OVA-specific IgE levels and splenocyte cytokine production in response to OVA stimulation, which were comparable to those of EC sensitized mice. Conclusion EC sensitized mice, but not mice orally immunized with antigen+CT, develop expansion of intestinal MCs and IgE-mediated anaphylaxis following single oral antigen challenge. IgE is necessary but not sufficient for food anaphylaxis, and MC expansion in the gut may play an important role in the development of anaphylaxis. Clinical Implications The skin may be an important route of sensitization to food antigens. Avoidance of cutaneous

  18. Novel production method and in-vitro cell compatibility of porous Ti-6Al-4V alloy disk for hard tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Bhattarai, Shanta Raj; Khalil, Khalil Abdel-Razek; Dewidar, Montasser; Hwang, Pyoung Han; Yi, Ho Keun; Kim, Hak Yong

    2008-08-01

    Porous metals are attractive due to its unique physical, mechanical, and new bone tissue ingrowth properties. In the present study, the production of highly porous Ti-6Al-4V parts by powder metallurgical technology and subsequently it's uses in in vitro bone tissue engineering is described. A space-holder method using carbamide with different particle size to produce parts with porosities between 35 and 70% were applied. The compressive strength and Young's modulus of porous Ti-6Al-4V were determined. Results indicated that stress and Young's modulus decrease with increasing porosity and pore size. The porous parts are characterized by scanning electron microscopy. Furthermore, study was to investigate the effects of three different porosities of porous Ti-6Al-4V (35, 50, and 70%) on proliferation, differentiation, and cell-matrix interaction of mouse osteoblast-like cells, MC-3T3. Results showed that the cell proliferation was significantly (p < 0.05) higher on 70% porous Ti-6Al-4V. However, synthesis of different types of extra cellular matrix proteins was also more abundant on 70% porous Ti-6Al-4V than 35 and 50% porous Ti-6Al-4V disk except some specific proteins. An increase in alkaline phosphate activity was significantly (p < 0.05) higher on 70 and 50% porous Ti-6Al-4V disk after 12 days of MC-3T3 cells incubation. Above all, results indicated that porosity (nearly 70%) of porous Ti-6Al-4V topography affects proliferation and differentiation of osteoblast-like MC-3T3 cells. The results showed that this novel process is a promise to fabricate porous biomaterials for bone implants.

  19. The regulatory effect of SC-236 (4-[5-(4-chlorophenyl)-3-(trifluoromethyl)-1-pyrazol-1-l] benzenesulfonamide) on stem cell factor induced migration of mast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Su-Jin; Jeong, Hyun-Ja; Park, Rae-Kil; Lee, Kang-Min; Kim, Hyung-Min; Um, Jae-Young; Hong, Seung-Heon . E-mail: jooklim@wonkwang.ac.kr

    2007-04-15

    SC-236 (4-[5-(4-chlorophenyl)-3-(trifluoromethyl)-1-pyrazol-1-]benzenesulfonamide; C{sub 16}H{sub 11}ClF{sub 3}N{sub 3}O{sub 2}S), is a highly selective cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitor. Recently, there have been reports that SC-236 protects against cartilage damage in addition to reducing inflammation and pain in osteoarthritis. However, the mechanism involved in the inflammatory allergic reaction has not been examined. Mast cells accumulation can be related to inflammatory conditions, including allergic rhinitis, asthma, and rheumatoid arthritis. The aim of the present study is to investigate the effects of SC-236 on stem cell factor (SCF)-induced migration, morphological alteration, and cytokine production of rat peritoneal mast cells (RPMCs). We observed that SCF significantly induced the migration and morphological alteration. The ability of SCF to enhance migration and morphological alteration was abolished by treatment with SC-236. In addition, production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}, interleukin (IL)-1{beta}, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production induced by SCF was significantly inhibited by treatment with SC-236. Previous work has demonstrated that SCF-induced migration and cytokine production of mast cells require p38 MAPK activation. We also showed that SC-236 suppresses the SCF-induced p38 MAPK activation in RPMCs. These data suggest that SC-236 inhibits migration and cytokine production through suppression of p38 MAPK activation. These results provided new insight into the pharmacological actions of SC-236 and its potential therapeutic role in the treatment of inflammatory allergic diseases.

  20. Induction of mast cell proliferation, maturation, and heparin synthesis by the rat c-kit ligand, stem cell factor

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, M.; Takeishi, Takashi; Geissler, E.N. ); Thompson, H.; Metcalfe, D.D. ); Langley, K.E.; Zsebo, K.M.; Galli, S.J. )

    1991-07-15

    The authors investigated the effects of a newly recognized multifunctional growth factor, the c-kit ligand stem cell factor (SCF), on mouse mast cell proliferation and phenotype. Recombinant rat SCF{sup 164} (rrSCF{sup 164}) induced the development of large numbers of dermal mast cells in normal mice in vivo. Many of these mast cells had features of connective tissue-type mast cells (CTMC), in that they were reactive both with the heparin-binding fluorescent dye berberine sulfate and with safranin. In vitro, rrSCF{sup 164} induced the proliferation of cloned interleukin 3 (IL-3)-dependent mouse mast cells and primary populations of IL-3-dependent, bone marrow-derived cultured mast cells (BMCMC), which represent immature mast cells, and purified peritoneal mast cells, which represent a type of mature CTMC> BMCMC maintained in rrSCF{sup 164} not only proliferated but also matured. These findings identify SCF as a single cytokine that can induce immature, IL-3-dependent mast cells to mature and to acquire multiple characteristics of CTMC. These findings also directly demonstrate that SCF can regulate the development of a cellular lineage expressing c-kit through effects on both proliferation and maturation.

  1. Production of CMS FPIX detector modules and development of novel radiation-hard silicon sensors for future upgrades of the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koybasi, Ozhan

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment currently taking data at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has the largest ever built all-silicon tracking system with a pixel detector as the innermost component. The pixel detector consists of three 53 cm long barrel layers (BPIX) at radial distances of r= 4.4, 7.3, and 10.2 cm from the interaction point complemented with two end-cap disks (FPIX) on each side of the interaction region covering radial distances from ˜6 cm to 15 cm. The development, production, and qualification of the silicon detector modules used for the construction of the CMS FPIX disks are described. The plan for the luminosity upgrade of the LHC foresees a phase I upgrade increasing the peak luminosity from 1034 cm.2s.1 (original design figure) to 2-3 x 1034 cm-2s-1 after about 5 years of operation, followed by phase II upgrade eventually reaching a value of 5x1034 cm-2 s-1 (the so-called "High Luminosity-LHC" or "HL-LHC"). At Phase I, the CMS pixel detector will be replaced by a new detector, which will have an additional fourth barrel layer at r=16 cm and two extra forward disks on each side with radial coverage of all disks increased to r =4.5-16.1 cm. Although the present non- n silicon pixel sensor technology meets the performance requirements, it is possible to achieve the same performance with the relatively new n-on-p technology, which would reduce the cost by ˜50%. The phase II upgrade, on the other hand, faces a challenge for the detector technology to be adopted for the innermost tracking layers (at r ˜ 4 cm) where the radiation fluence is expected to reach values close to 1016 neq /cm2, since the conventional planar silicon sensors are functional only up to a fluence of ˜1015 neq/cm2. The 3D silicon sensor technology is regarded as one of the most promising solutions for the radiation tolerance requirements of innermost pixel tracking layers at the HL-LHC. Improvements to the current n-on-n silicon pixel sensor design; and development

  2. Mast cells: innate attractors recruiting protective CD8 T cells to sites of cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Podlech, Jürgen; Ebert, Stefan; Becker, Marc; Reddehase, Matthias J; Stassen, Michael; Lemmermann, Niels A W

    2015-06-01

    Reactivation of latent cytomegalovirus (CMV) in the transient immunocompromised state after hematoablative treatment is a major concern in patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) as a therapy of hematopoietic malignancies. Timely reconstitution of antiviral CD8 T cells and their efficient recruitment to the lungs is crucial for preventing interstitial pneumonia, the most severe disease manifestation of CMV in HCT recipients. Here, we review recent work in a murine model, implicating mast cells (MC) in the control of pulmonary infection. Murine CMV (mCMV) productively infects MC in vivo and triggers their degranulation, resulting in the release of the CC chemokine ligand 5 (CCL5) that attracts CD8 T cells to infiltrate infected tissues. Comparing infection of MC-sufficient C57BL/6 mice and congenic MC-deficient Kit (W-sh/W-sh) "sash" mutants revealed an inverse relation between the number of lung-infiltrating CD8 T cells and viral burden in the lungs. Specifically, reduced lung infiltration by CD8 T cells in "sash" mutants was associated with an impaired infection control. The causal, though indirect, involvement of MC in antiviral control was confirmed by reversion of the deficiency phenotype in "sash" mutants reconstituted with MC. These recent findings predict that efficient MC reconstitution facilitates the control of CMV infection also in immunocompromised HCT recipients. PMID:25648117

  3. Expression of Recombinant Human Mast Cell Chymase with Asn-linked Glycans in Glycoengineered Pichia pastoris

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Eliot T.; Perry, Evan T.; Sears, Megan B.; Johnson, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant human mast cell chymase (rhChymase) was expressed in secreted form as an active enzyme in the SuperMan5 strain of GlycoSwitch® Pichia pastoris, which is engineered to produce proteins with (Man)5(GlcNAc)2 Asn-linked glycans. Cation exchange and heparin affinity chromatography yielded 5 mg of active rhChymase per liter of fermentation medium. Purified rhChymase migrated on SDSPAGE as a single band of 30 kDa and treatment with peptide N-glycosidase F decreased this to 25 kDa, consistent with the established properties of native human chymase (hChymase). Polyclonal antibodies against hChymase detected rhChymase by Western blot. Active site titration with Eglin C, a potent chymase inhibitor, quantified the concentration of purified active enzyme. Kinetic analyses with succinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe (suc-AAPF) p-nitroanilide and thiobenzyl ester synthetic substrates showed that heparin significantly reduced Km, whereas heparin effects on kcat were minor. Pure rhChymase with Asn-linked glycans closely resembles hChymase. This bioengineering approach avoided hyperglycosylation and provides a source of active rhChymase for other studies as well as a foundation for production of recombinant enzyme with human glycosylation patterns. PMID:25131858

  4. Velocity statistics and spectra over a forested site measured with a tall mast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segalini, Antonio; Alfredsson, Henrik; Dellwik, Ebba; Arnqvist, Johan; Bergström, Hans

    2012-11-01

    In the large expansion of wind power it becomes necessary to use also non-ideal sites for the placement of turbines. Such sites may have a complex terrain in terms of surface elevation as well as being forested. The atmospheric boundary layer is assumed to be severely different as compared to the one over flat, low-vegetation areas, which changes the mean velocity distribution as well as the turbulence intensity, thereby negatively affecting both the power production and loads on the turbines. In this study we use data from a 140 m tall mast in a forest in South-Eastern Sweden, where a unique measurement campaign with sonic anemometers has been running since November 2010 for 16 months. The sonic anemometers give the three velocity components with a frequency resolution of about 10 Hz. The site is covered by approximately 20 m high trees and a 40 degree sector, representative of an approximately homogeneous forest flow, is selected for the analysis of the velocity statistics. The screening of the results indicates the presence of a constant stress layer up to 3-5 canopy heights from the ground. An evaluation of the turbulence statistics in this layer and the levels above is presented. In addition, the spectra are evaluated and compared with the commonly used turbulence models.

  5. Mast Cells as a Potential Prognostic Marker in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Taverna, Gianluigi; Giusti, Guido; Seveso, Mauro; Hurle, Rodolfo; Colombo, Piergiuseppe; Stifter, Sanja

    2013-01-01

    Despite years of intensive investigation that has been made in understanding prostate cancer, it remains one of the major men's health issues and the leading cause of death worldwide. It is now ascertained that prostate cancer emerges from multiple spontaneous and/or inherited alterations that induce changes in expression patterns of genes and proteins that function in complex networks controlling critical cellular events. It is now accepted that several innate and adaptive immune cells, including T- and B-lymphocytes, macrophages, natural killer cells, dendritic cells, neutrophils, eosinophils, and mast cells (MCs), infiltrate the prostate cancer. All of these cells are irregularly scattered within the tumor and loaded with an assorted array of cytokines, chemokines, and inflammatory and cytotoxic mediators. This complex framework reflects the diversity in tumor biology and tumor-host interactions. MCs are well-established effector cells in Immunoglobulin-E (Ig-E) associated immune responses and potent effector cells of the innate immune system; however, their clinical significance in prostate cancer is still debated. Here, these controversies are summarized, focusing on the implications of these findings in understanding the roles of MCs in primary prostate cancer. PMID:24324287

  6. Mast Cell Stabilization Improves Survival by Preventing Apoptosis in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Laura; Peña, Geber; Cai, Bolin; Deitch, E. A.; Ulloa, Luis