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Sample records for hard mobile launcher

  1. Small ICBM area narrowing report. Volume 1. Hard mobile launcher in random movement basing mode

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to identify those areas that could potentially support deployment of the Small Intercontinental Ballistic Missile (ICBM) utilizing basing modes presently considered viable: the Hard Mobile Launcher in Random Movement, the Hard Mobile Launcher at Minuteman Facilities, and the Hard Silo in Patterned Array. Specifically, this report describes the process and the rationale supporting the application of Exclusionary and Evaluative Criteria and lists those locations that were eliminated through the application of these criteria. The remaining locations will be the subject of further investigations.

  2. Small ICBM area narrowing report. Volume 2. Hard mobile launcher at minuteman facilities basing mode

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to identify those areas that could potentially support deployment of the Small Intercontinental Ballistic Missile (ICBM) utilizing basing modes presently considered viable: the Hard Mobile Launcher in Random Movement, the Hard Mobile Launcher at Minuteman Facilities, and the Hard Silo in Patterned Array. Specifically, this report describes the process and the rationale supporting the application of Exclusionary and Evaluative Criteria and lists those locations that were eliminated through the application of these criteria. The remaining locations will be the subject of further investigations.

  3. Mobile Launcher Moves for Testing

    NASA Video Gallery

    In anticipation of launching NASA’s Space Launch System heavy-lift rocket later in this decade, engineers wanted to check the mobile launcher, or ML, to see how it would behave moving atop a craw...

  4. Time lapse: Mobile Launcher Moves

    NASA Video Gallery

    The mobile launcher returned from Launch Pad 39B at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida following two weeks of structural and other testing. The 355-foot-tall structure is to be used by the Spac...

  5. 6. MOBILE LAUNCHER SIDE 4, SHOWING MILK STOOL AND LUT. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. MOBILE LAUNCHER SIDE 4, SHOWING MILK STOOL AND LUT. PROTRUSION ON UPPER RIGHT HAND SIDE OF LUT IS SWING ARM NINE WHICH PROVIDED ACCESS TO CAPSULE OF LAUNCH VEHICLE WHILE ON LAUNCHER. - Mobile Launcher One, Kennedy Space Center, Titusville, Brevard County, FL

  6. 3. AERIAL VIEW OF MOBILE LAUNCHER. ON TOP OF LUT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. AERIAL VIEW OF MOBILE LAUNCHER. ON TOP OF LUT SITS A 25 TON HAMMERHEAD CRANE. STRUCTURE ON LEFT SIDE OF LAUNCH PLATFORM IS KNOWN AS A 'MILK STOOL' AND ALLOWS A SATURN 1B ROCKET TO BE USED IN PLACE OF THE SATURN V ROCKET. - Mobile Launcher One, Kennedy Space Center, Titusville, Brevard County, FL

  7. Time-Lapse: Mobile Launcher Moves to Launch Pad

    NASA Video Gallery

    The mobile launcher that will host NASA's Space Launch System and new Orion spacecraft was moved to Launch Pad 39B at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida to begin two weeks of structural and sys...

  8. Dr. Wernher Von Braun near the mobile launcher.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. George Mueller, NASA associate administrator for manned space flight, and Dr. Wernher Von Braun (right), director of the Marshall Space Flight Center, are seen near the mobile launcher carrying a 363 foot tall Saturn V space launch vehicle as the rocket is rolled from the vehicle assembly building at KSC for its three mile trip to the launch pad.

  9. VIEW OF HB1 (VAB HIGH BAY) WITH MOBILE LAUNCHER PLATFORM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF HB-1 (VAB HIGH BAY) WITH MOBILE LAUNCHER PLATFORM (VEHICLE ACCESS PLATFORMS ARE VISIBLE IN THE CENTER), FACING WEST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Vehicle Assembly Building, VAB Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  10. STS-30 Atlantis, OV-104, at KSC LC Pad 39B atop mobile launcher platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    STS-30 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, arrives at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Launch Complex (LC) Pad 39B atop mobile launcher platform. The fixed service structure (FSS) towers above OV-104, its external tank (ET), and its solid rocket boosters (SRBs). The rotating service structure (RSS) is retracted. The launch tower catwalks are also retracted.

  11. Workers in the VAB move sling into place to lift Columbia to mobile launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Workers in the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) move a specially-built sling into place to lift Orbiter Columbia from the transfer aisle to the mobile launcher platform (27015); Columbia is lifted from the floor of the VAB transfer aisle (27016).

  12. STS-30 Atlantis, OV-104, on the mobile launcher platform heads to KSC LC pad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    STS-30 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, riding atop the mobile launcher platform and the crawler transporter approaches Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Launch Complex (LC) pad 39B. This backlit view highlights OV-104's profile, the external tank (ET), and one of the two solid rocket boosters (SRBs) as it moves up LC pad 39B incline.

  13. Utilizing NX Advanced Simulation for NASA's New Mobile Launcher for Ares-l

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the use of NX to simulate the new Mobile Launcher (ML) for the Ares-I. It includes: a comparison of the sizes of the Saturn 5, the Space Shuttle, the Ares I, and the Ares V, with the height, and payload capability; the loads control plan; drawings of the base framing, the underside of the ML, beam arrangement, and the finished base and the origin of the 3D CAD data. It also reviews the modeling approach, meshing. the assembly Finite Element Modeling, the model summary. and beam improvements.

  14. The STS-93 external tank and booster stack sits at the Mobile Launcher Platform park site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The STS-93 stack of solid rocket boosters and external tank sits at the Mobile Launcher Platform park site waiting for lightning shield wires to be installed on the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) in the background. The stack is being temporarily stored outside the VAB while Space Shuttle Discovery undergoes repair to hail damage in High Bay 1. Discovery was rolled back from Pad 39B to the VAB for repairs because access to all of the damaged areas was not possible at the pad. The STS-93 stack will be moved under the wires at the VAB for protection until Discovery returns to the pad, later this week. The scheduled date for launch of mission STS-96 is no earlier than May 27. STS-93 is targeted for launch on July 22, carrying the Chandra X-ray Observatory.

  15. Chartering Launchers for Small Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Daniel

    The question of how to launch small satellites has been solved over the years by the larger launchers offering small satellites the possibility of piggy-backing. Specific fixtures have been developed and commercialized: Arianespace developed the ASAP interface, the USAF studied ESPA, NASA has promoted Shuttle launch possibilities, Russian authorities and companies have been able to find solutions with many different launchers... It is fair to say that most launcher suppliers have worked hard and finally often been able to find solutions to launch most small satellites into orbit. It is also true, however, that most of these small satellites were technology demonstration missions capable of accepting a wide range of orbit and launch characteristics: orbit altitude and inclination, launch date, etc. In some cases the small satellite missions required a well-defined type of orbit and have therefore been obliged to hire a small launcher on which they were the prime passenger. In our paper we would like to propose an additional solution to all these possibilities: launchers could plan well in advance (for example about 3 years), trips to precisely defined orbits to allow potential passengers to organize themselves and be ready on the D-Day. On the scheduled date the chartered launcher goes to the stated orbit while on another date, another chartered launcher goes to another orbit. The idea is to organize departures for space like trains or airplanes leaving on known schedules for known destinations.

  16. Small ICBM Area Narrowing Report. Volume 1. Hard Mobile Launcher in Random Movement Basing Mode

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-01

    operation. Nonagricultural i E-24 i SENSITIVE FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY employment in the region is very low , increasing the likelihood of inmigration of...project-related workers. Regional employment in the construction and military sectors is also low , which suggests that workers who inmigrate are likely to...in the region I U E-36 SENSITIVE I I FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY is very low , which increases the likelihood of inmigration of project-related workers. In

  17. Small ICBM Area Narrowing Report. Volume 2. Hard Mobile Launcher at Minuteman Facilities Basing Mode

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-01

    region indicates the potential for inmigration of project-related workers. 3 Low regional employment in the construction and military sectors...of goods and services is limited. 3 Nonagricultural employment in the region indicates the potential for inmigration of project-related workers. 3 Low ...employment in the region indicates the potential for 3 inmigration of project-related workers. Low regional employment in the construction and

  18. Grenade Launchers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-13

    energy (if specified in the test plan) (c) Force and stroke required Lo manually operate the trigger (e) Charging force (f) Test launcher length, width...Conduct nondestructive test ( NDT ) inspections of weapon components sub- jected to high stress during firing (bolt, sear, barrel, gas piston, etc...applicable, conduct NDT inspections of weapon components subject to high stress during firing. At the same intervals, record the follow- ing suggested

  19. Rotating mobile launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, T. J.

    1977-01-01

    Apparatus holds remotely piloted arm that accelerates until launching speed is reached. Then vehicle and counterweight at other end of arm are released simultaneously to avoid structural damage from unbalanced rotating forces.

  20. Electromagnetic launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Laskaris, E.T.; Chari, M.V.K.

    1990-11-20

    This paper describes an electromagnetic launcher. It comprises: a stationary superconductive coil situated coaxially in a cylindrical vacuum vessel for providing a magnetic field. The superconductive coil having a central aperture, the vacuum vessel having an axially extending bore passing through the central aperture of the superconducting coil; a resistive coil situated coaxially with the superconductive coil and movable axially relative to the stationary superconductive coil, the outer diameter of the resistive coil being smaller than the inner diameter of the bore permitting the resistive coil to pass therethrough; launch activating means coupled to the resistive coil. The launch activating means comprising a shaft joined at one end to the resistive coil, a tube open at both ends, a sliding piston situated in the tube and connected to the other end of the shaft; and power supply means coupled to the resistive coil for providing current of a desired direction and magnitude, so that energization of the resistive coil in the presence of the radial field component of the magnetic field of the superconductive coil creates an axial force on the movable coil, the direction and magnitude of which is dependent on the direction and magnitude of the current in the resistive coil.

  1. Electromagnetic launchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolm, H.; Mongeau, P.; Williams, F.

    1980-09-01

    Recent advances in energy storage, switching and magnet technology make electromagnetic acceleration a viable alternative to chemical propulsion for certain tasks, and a means to perform other tasks not previously feasible. Applications include the acceleration of gram-size particles for hypervelocity research and the initiation of fusion by impact, a replacement for chemically propelled artillery, the transportation of cargo and personnel over inaccessible terrain, and the launching of space vehicles to supply massive space operations, and for the disposal of nuclear waste. The simplest launcher of interest is the railgun, in which a short-circuit slide or an arc is driven along two rails by direct current. The most sophisticated studied thus far is the mass driver, in which a superconducting shuttle bucket is accelerated by a line of pulse coils energized by capacitors at energy conversion efficiencies better than 90%. Other accelerators of interest include helical, brush-commutated motors, discrete coil arc commutated drivers, flux compression momentum transformers, and various hybrid electrochemical devices.

  2. Generic Software Architecture for Launchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carre, Emilien; Gast, Philippe; Hiron, Emmanuel; Leblanc, Alain; Lesens, David; Mescam, Emmanuelle; Moro, Pierre

    2015-09-01

    The definition and reuse of generic software architecture for launchers is not so usual for several reasons: the number of European launcher families is very small (Ariane 5 and Vega for these last decades); the real time constraints (reactivity and determinism needs) are very hard; low levels of versatility are required (implying often an ad hoc development of the launcher mission). In comparison, satellites are often built on a generic platform made up of reusable hardware building blocks (processors, star-trackers, gyroscopes, etc.) and reusable software building blocks (middleware, TM/TC, On Board Control Procedure, etc.). If some of these reasons are still valid (e.g. the limited number of development), the increase of the available CPU power makes today an approach based on a generic time triggered middleware (ensuring the full determinism of the system) and a centralised mission and vehicle management (offering more flexibility in the design and facilitating the long term maintenance) achievable. This paper presents an example of generic software architecture which could be envisaged for future launchers, based on the previously described principles and supported by model driven engineering and automatic code generation.

  3. Small ICBM area narrowing report. Volume 3: Hard silo in patterned array basing mode

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to identify those areas that could potentially support deployment of the Small Intercontinental Ballistic Missile (ICBM) utilizing basing modes presently considered viable: the Hard Mobile Launcher in Random Movement, the Hard Mobile Launcher at Minuteman Facilities, or the Hard Silo in Patterned Array. Specifically, this report describes the process and the rationale supporting the application of Exclusionary and Evaluative Criteria and lists those locations that were eliminated through the application of these criteria. The remaining locations will be the subject of further investigations.

  4. Lightweight composite launcher pod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmeister, L. D.; Thompson, R. J.

    1984-08-01

    This patent application discloses a lightweight composite launcher pod which includes a multiplicity of elongated launcher tubes that are accurately aligned in a composite material with the composite material having four outer sides with alignment surfaces on three of the sides and bearing and alignment surfaces on the other side, and the lightweight composite launcher pod being capable of serving as the shipping and storage container for rockets before launching of the rockets as well as for launching the rockets therefrom when mounted in a launcher structure.

  5. 4. VAL PARTIAL ELEVATION SHOWING LAUNCHER BRIDGE ON SUPPORTS, LAUNCHER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VAL PARTIAL ELEVATION SHOWING LAUNCHER BRIDGE ON SUPPORTS, LAUNCHER SLAB, SUPPORT CARRIAGE, CONCRETE 'A' FRAME STRUCTURE AND CAMERA TOWER LOOKING SOUTHEAST. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  6. Stacked Buoyant Payload Launcher

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-14

    reserved for undersea launched missiles. Underwater deployment of smaller payloads has been limited to ejection from torpedo tubes, the trash disposal...COVERED 00-00-2014 to 00-00-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Stacked Buoyant Payload Launcher 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...1 of 11 STACKED BUOYANT PAYLOAD LAUNCHER STATEMENT OF GOVERNMENT INTEREST [0001] The invention described herein may be manufactured and

  7. Characterization of the Ignition Over-Pressure/Sound Suppression Water in the Space Launch System Mobile Launcher Using Volume of Fluid Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    The Space Launch System (SLS) Vehicle consists of a Core Stage with four RS-25 engines and two Solid Rocket Boosters (SRBs). This vehicle is launched from the Launchpad using a Mobile Launcher (ML) which supports the SLS vehicle until its liftoff from the ML under its own power. The combination of the four RS-25 engines and two SRBs generate a significant Ignition Over-Pressure (IOP) and Acoustic Sound environment. One of the mitigations of these environments is the Ignition Over-Pressure/Sound Suppression (IOP/SS) subsystem installed on the ML. This system consists of six water nozzles located parallel to and 24 inches downstream of each SRB nozzle exit plane as well as 16 water nozzles located parallel to and 53 inches downstream of the RS-25 nozzle exit plane. During launch of the SLS vehicle, water is ejected through each water nozzle to reduce the intensity of the transient pressure environment imposed upon the SLS vehicle. While required for the mitigation of the transient pressure environment on the SLS vehicle, the IOP/SS subsystem interacts (possibly adversely) with other systems located on the Launch Pad. One of the other systems that the IOP/SS water is anticipated to interact with is the Hydrogen Burn-Off Igniter System (HBOI). The HBOI system's purpose is to ignite the unburned hydrogen/air mixture that develops in and around the nozzle of the RS-25 engines during engine start. Due to the close proximity of the water system to the HBOI system, the presence of the IOP/SS may degrade the effectiveness of the HBOI system. Another system that the IOP/SS water may interact with adversely is the RS-25 engine nozzles and the SRB nozzles. The adverse interaction anticipated is the wetting, to a significant degree, of the RS-25 nozzles resulting in substantial weight of ice forming and water present to a significant degree upstream of the SRB nozzle exit plane inside the nozzle itself, posing significant additional blockage of the effluent that exits the nozzle

  8. History of Indian launchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh, B. N.

    2008-07-01

    A multitude of inter-disciplinary technologies have been mastered indigenously for realizing a series of operational space launch vehicles. The vehicles range from relatively tiny Rohini sounding rockets to gigantic satellite launchers, PSLV and GSLV. This paper gives the challenges faced, lessons learned during various development phases and the step-by-step evolution of launch vehicle technologies in India.

  9. Rocket launchers as passive controllers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochran, J. E., Jr.; Gunnels, R. T.; McCutchen, R. K., Jr.

    1981-12-01

    A concept is advanced for using the motion of launchers of a free-flight launcher/rocket system which is caused by random imperfections of the rockets launched from it to reduce the total error caused by the imperfections. This concept is called 'passive launcher control' because no feedback is generated by an active energy source after an error is sensed; only the feedback inherent in the launcher/rocket interaction is used. Relatively simple launcher models with two degrees of freedom, pitch and yaw, were used in conjunction with a more detailed, variable-mass model in a digital simulation code to obtain rocket trajectories with and without thrust misalignment and dynamic imbalance. Angular deviations of rocket velocities and linear deviations of the positions of rocket centers of mass at burnout were computed for cases in which the launcher was allowed to move ('flexible' launcher) and was constrained so that it did not rotate ('rigid' launcher) and ratios of flexible to rigid deviations were determined. Curves of these error ratios versus launcher frequency are presented. These show that a launcher which has a transverse moment of inertia about its pivot point of the same magnitude as that of the centroidal transverse moments of inertia of the rockets launched from it can be tuned to passively reduce the errors caused by rocket imperfections.

  10. Coilgun Launcher for Nanosatellites

    SciTech Connect

    Turman, B.N.

    1999-03-23

    Nanosatellite space launches could significantly benefit from an electrically powered launch complex, based on an electromagnetic coil launcher. This paper presents results of studies to estimate the required launcher parameters and some fixed facility issues. This study is based on electromagnetic launch, or electromagnetic gun technology, which is constrained to a coaxial geometry to take advantage of the efficiency of closely-coupled coils. A baseline configuration for analysis considers a payload mass of 10 kg, launch velocity of 6 km/s, a second stage solid booster for orbital insertion, and a payload fraction of about 0.1. The launch facility is envisioned as an inclined track, 1-2 km in length, mounted on a hillside at 25 degrees aimed in the orbital inclination of interest. The launcher energy and power requirements fall in the range of 2000 MJ and 2 MW electric. This energy would be supplied by 400 modules of energy storage and magnetic coils. With a prime power generator of 2 MW, a launch rate of some 200 satellites per day is possible. The launch requires high acceleration, so the satellite package must be hardened to launch acceleration on the order of 1000 gee. Parametric evaluations compare performance parameters for a launcher length of 1-2 km, exit velocity of 4-8 km/s, and payloads of 1-100 kg. The EM launch complex could greatly reduce the amount of fuels handling, reduce the turn-around time between launches, allow more concurrence in launch preparation, reduce the manpower requirements for launch vehicle preparation and increase the reliability of launch by using more standardized vehicle preparations. Most importantly, such a facility could reduce the cost per launch and could give true launch-on-demand capability for nanosatellites.

  11. Air-Powered Projectile Launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, T.; Bjorklund, R. A.; Elliott, D. G.; Jones, L. K.

    1987-01-01

    Air-powered launcher fires plastic projectiles without using explosive propellants. Does not generate high temperatures. Launcher developed for combat training for U.S. Army. With reservoir pressurized, air launcher ready to fire. When pilot valve opened, sleeve (main valve) moves to rear. Projectile rapidly propelled through barrel, pushed by air from reservoir. Potential applications in seismic measurements, avalanche control, and testing impact resistance of windshields on vehicles.

  12. Rocket/launcher structural dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferragut, N. J.

    1976-01-01

    The equations of motion describing the interactions between a rocket and a launcher were derived using Lagrange's Equation. A rocket launching was simulated. The motions of both the rocket and the launcher can be considered in detail. The model contains flexible elements and rigid elements. The rigid elements (masses) were judiciously utilized to simplify the derivation of the equations. The advantages of simultaneous shoe release were illustrated. Also, the loading history of the interstage structure of a boosted configuration was determined. The equations shown in this analysis could be used as a design tool during the modification of old launchers and the design of new launchers.

  13. Magnetic reconnection launcher

    DOEpatents

    Cowan, M.

    1987-04-06

    An electromagnetic launcher includes a plurality of electrical stages which are energized sequentially in the launcher with the passage of a projectiles. Each stage of the launcher includes two or more coils which are arranged coaxially on either closed-loop or straight lines to form gaps between their ends. The projectile has an electrically conductive gap-portion that passes through all the gaps of all the stages in a direction transverse to the axes of the coils. The coils receive an electric current, store magnetic energy, and convert a significant portion of the stored magnetic energy into kinetic energy of the projectile moves through the gap. The magnetic polarity of the opposing coils is in the same direction, e.g. N-S-N-S. A gap portion of the projectile may be made from aluminum and is propelled by the reconnection of magnetic flux stored in the coils which causes accelerating forces to act upon the projectile and at the horizontal surfaces of the projectile near its rear. The gap portion of the projectile may be flat, rectangular and longer than the length of the opposing coils. The gap portion of the projectile permits substantially unrestricted distribution of the induced currents so that current densities are only high where the useful magnetic force is high. This allows designs which permit ohmic oblation from the rear surfaces of the gap portion of the projectile allowing much high velocities to be achieved. An electric power apparatus controls the electric power supplied to the opposing coils until the gap portion of the projectile substantially occupies the gap between the coils, at which time the coils are supplied with peak current quickly. 8 figs.

  14. Electromagnetic Meissner effect launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Glen A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An electromagnetic projectile launcher provides acceleration of a superconducting projectile through the diamagnetic repulsion of the superconducting projectile. A superconducting layer is provided aft of the projectile, either directly on the projectile or on a platform upon which the projectile is carried, and a traveling magnetic field is caused to propagate along a magnetic field drive coil in which the projectile is disposed. The resulting diamagnetic repulsion between the superconducting projectile and the traveling magnetic field causes the projectile to be propelled along the coil. In one embodiment, a segmented drive coil is used to generate the traveling magnetic field.

  15. Magnetic reconnection launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, M.

    1989-04-04

    An electromagnetic launcher is described, which includes a plurality of electrical stages which are energized sequentially in synchrony with the passage of a projectile. Each stage of the launcher includes two or more coils which are arranged coaxially on either closed-loop or straight lines to form gaps between their ends. The projectile has an electrically conductive gap-portion that passes through all the gaps of all the stages in a direction transverse to the axes of the coils. The coils receive an electric current, store magnetic energy, and convert a significant portion of the stored magnetic energy into kinetic energy of the projectile by magnetic reconnection as the gap portion of the projectile moves through the gap. The magnetic polarity of the opposing coils is in the same direction, e.g. N-S-N-S. A gap portion of the projectile may be made from aluminum and is propelled by the reconnection of magnetic flux stored in the coils which causes accelerating forces to act upon the projectile at both the rear vertical surface of the projectile and at the horizontal surfaces of the projectile near its rear. The gap portion of the projectile may be flat, rectangular and longer than the length of the opposing coils and fit loosely within the gap between the opposing coils.

  16. Magnetic reconnection launcher

    DOEpatents

    Cowan, Maynard

    1989-01-01

    An electromagnetic launcher includes a plurality of electrical stages which are energized sequentially in synchrony with the passage of a projectile. Each stage of the launcher includes two or more coils which are arranged coaxially on either closed-loop or straight lines to form gaps between their ends. The projectile has an electrically conductive gap-portion that passes through all the gaps of all the stages in a direction transverse to the axes of the coils. The coils receive an electric current, store magnetic energy, and convert a significant portion of the stored magnetic energy into kinetic energy of the projectile by magnetic reconnection as the gap portion of the projectile moves through the gap. The magnetic polarity of the opposing coils is in the same direction, e.g. N-S-N-S. A gap portion of the projectile may be made from aluminum and is propelled by the reconnection of magnetic flux stored in the coils which causes accelerating forces to act upon the projectile at both the rear vertical surface of the projectile and at the horizontal surfaces of the projectile near its rear. The gap portion of the projectile may be flat, rectangular and longer than the length of the opposing coils and fit loosely within the gap between the opposing coils.

  17. Historic and Current Launcher Success Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, Randy

    2002-01-01

    This presentation reviews historic and current space launcher success rates from all nations with a mature launcher industry. Data from the 1950's through present day is reviewed for possible trends such as when in the launch timeline a failure occurred, which stages had the highest failure rate, overall launcher reliability, a decade by decade look at launcher reliability, when in a launchers history did failures occur, and the reliability of United States human-rated launchers. This information is useful in determining where launcher reliability can be improved and where additional measures for crew survival (i.e., Crew Escape systems) will have the greatest emphasis

  18. Kinetic model of phase separation in binary mixtures with hard mobile impurities.

    PubMed

    Ginzburg, V V; Peng, G; Qiu, F; Jasnow, D; Balazs, A C

    1999-10-01

    We develop a mean-field rate-equation model for the kinetics of phase separation in binary mixtures with hard mobile impurities. For impurities preferentially wet by one of the components, the phase separation is arrested in the late stage. The "steady-state" domain size depends strongly on both the particle diffusion constant and the particle concentration. We compare theoretical results with the simulation data and find good qualitative agreement.

  19. Does Mobility Have to Mean Being Hard to Reach? Mobile Pastoralists and Education's "Terms of Inclusion"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyer, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    Nomadic groups are highly discriminated against in access to education services, and the 2010 Education For All Global Monitoring Report demanded urgent action to address their education deprivation. Mobile pastoralists, particularly, appear to be falling beyond the remit of migration studies in education, although they are among the most mobile…

  20. The DSI small satellite launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, S.; Gibbons, D.; Wise, J.; Nguyen, D.

    1992-01-01

    A new launcher has been developed by DSI, that is compatible with the GAS canisters. It has the proven capability to deploy a satellite from an orbiting Shuttle that is 18 inches in diameter, 31 inches long, and weighing 190 pounds. These DSI Launchers were used aboard the Discovery (STS-39) in May 1991 as part of the Infrared Background Signature Survey (IBSS) to deploy three small satellites known as Chemical Release Observation (CRO) satellites A, B, and C. Because the satellites contained hazardous liquids (MMH, UDMH, and MON-10) and were launched from GAS Cylinders without motorized doors, the launchers were required to pass NASA Shuttle Payload safety and verification requirements. Some of the more interesting components of the design were the V-band retention and separation mechanism, the separation springs, and the launcher electronics which provided a properly inhibited release sequence operated through the Small Payload Accommodations Switch Panel (SPASP) on board the Orbiter. The original plan for this launcher was to use a motorized door. The launcher electronics, therefore has the capability to be modified to accommodate the door, if desired.

  1. 32. VAL, DETAIL SHOWING LOADING PLATFORM, PROJECTILE LOADING CAR, LAUNCHER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. VAL, DETAIL SHOWING LOADING PLATFORM, PROJECTILE LOADING CAR, LAUNCHER SLAB AND UNDERSIDE OF LAUNCHER BRIDGE LOOKING SOUTHWEST. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  2. Induction generator powered coaxial launchers

    SciTech Connect

    Nalty, K.E.; Driga, M.D. . Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering)

    1991-01-01

    Most coaxial accelerator concepts to date have used switched power supplies to energize coils in the vicinity of the projectile, or have tolerated a grossly oversized power supply which energizes all coils during the course of the launch. Coordination of the switching, while engineeringly possible, provides opportunities for failure which reduces the reliability of the system as compared to a passively activated system requiring no switching. Excitation of un-used sections of a launcher dramatically reduces launch efficiency, and increases both power supply and cooling requirements. A launcher design which avoids the need for switching and automatically excites only the windings in the vicinity of the projectile is presented in this paper. The energy store for the launcher consists of rotating induction machines. The excitation for the launcher is provided by an excitation winding on the projectile, which makes the projectile act like the rotor of a synchronous condenser. This combination of super-synchronous induction machines (the energy stores) and synchronous alternators (the projectile) is called an induction generator. This paper provides a description of the induction generator powered launcher concept, and investigates scaling laws to assess the applicability of this technology for tactical and space launch applications.

  3. MULTIPLE ECH LAUNCHER CONTROL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    GREEN,M.T; PONCE,D; GRUNLOH,H.J; ELLIS,R.A; GROSNICKLE,W.H; HUMPHREY,R.L

    2003-10-01

    OAK-B135 The addition of new, high power gyrotrons to the heating and current drive arsenal at DIII-D, required a system upgrade for control of fully steerable ECH Launchers. Each launcher contains two pointing mirrors with two degrees of mechanical freedom. The two flavors of motion are called facet and tilt. Therefore up to four channels of motion per launcher need to be controlled. The system utilizes absolute encoders to indicate mirror position and therefore direction of the microwave beam. The launcher movement is primarily controlled by PLC, but future iterations of design, may require this control to be accomplished by a CPU on fast bus such as Compact PCI. This will be necessary to accomplish real time position control. Safety of equipment and personnel is of primary importance when controlling a system of moving parts. Therefore multiple interlocks and fault status enunciators have been implemented. This paper addresses the design of a Multiple ECH Launcher Control System, and characterizes the flexibility needed to upgrade to a real time position control system in the future.

  4. Association of limited joint mobility and increased plantar hardness in diabetic foot ulceration in north Asian Indian: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Periyasamy, R; Anand, Sneh; Ammini, A C

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this article is to investigate the association of limited joint mobility and foot sole hardness in north Asian Indian type 2 diabetic patients. Limited joint mobility and hardness of the foot sole were measured for 39 subjects attending the AIIMS Endocrinology & Metabolism Clinic. The total subject divided into three groups: 13 control subjects (nondiabetic), 13 diabetic patients without neuropathy and 13 diabetic neuropathy patients. Neuropathy status was assessed using 10 gm Semen's Weinstein monofilament. Joint mobility parameters, such as ankle dorsiflexion/plantar flexion and metatarsophalangeal-1 dorsiflexion/plantar flexion, are measured using a goniometer. Foot sole hardness was measured using a durometer or shore meter. We found that diabetic patients with a neuropathic foot had significantly reduced joint mobility and increased foot sole hardness, placing them at risk for subsequent ulceration. Metatarsophalangeal-1 dorsiflexion/plantar flexion of both feet of diabetic patients had significant correlation (at p < 0.05, p < 0.001, p < 0.001 level) over age and body mass index. Also ankle plantar flexion/dorsiflexion and metatarsophalangeal-1 dorsiflexion/plantar flexion has a significant correlations (at p < 0.01, p < 0.05, p < 0.001, p < 0.001 level) with foot sole hardness in both feet of diabetic neuropathy subjects. Also linear regression analysis showed that duration of diabetes was significantly associated with the joint mobility parameters. In this study we conclude that joint mobility had reduced further if neuropathy and increased foot sole hardness coexisted owing to high plantar pressures. Hence, both limited joint mobility and increased foot sole hardness appears to be important determinants of foot sole ulceration in diabetic neuropathic subject.

  5. Electromagnetic launchers for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, J. M.; Gully, J. H.; Driga, M. D.

    1989-01-01

    An electromagnetic launcher (EML) was designed for NASA-Langley to boost large models to hypervelocity for flight evaluation. Two different concepts were developed using railgun and coilgun principles. A coilgun was designed to accelerate a 14-kg mass to 6 km/s and, by adding additional equipment, to accelerate a 10-kg mass to 11 km/s. The railgun system was designed to accelerate only 14 kg to 6 km/s. Of significance in this development is the opportunity to use the launcher for aeroballistic research of the upper atmosphere, eventually placing packages in low earth orbit using a small rocket. The authors describe the railgun and coilgun launch designs and suggest a reconfiguration for placement of 150-kg parcels into low earth orbit for aeroballistic studies and possible space lab support. Each design is detailed along with the performance adjustments which would be required for circular orbit payload placement.

  6. Electromagnetic Meissner-Effect Launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Glen A.

    1990-01-01

    Proposed electromagnetic Meissner-effect launching apparatus differs from previous electromagnetic launchers; no need for electromagnet coil on projectile. Result, no need for brush contacts and high-voltage commutation equipment to supply current directly to projectile coil, or for pulse circuitry to induce current in projectile coil if brush contacts not used. Compresses magnetic field surrounding rear surface of projectile, creating gradient of magnetic pressure pushing projectile forward.

  7. A multiple armature railgun launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Challita, Antonios; Maas, Brian L.; Bauer, David P.; Heyse, Mark

    1993-01-01

    Railgun launchers with multiple armatures, which can distribute the accelerating force on the projectile, supply each armature with gun current for acceleration through its own set of rails. Test results are reported which confirm the feasibility of this concept; it is shown that the control of current distribution to multiple armatures is possible. Attention is given to gun behavior for the case of high length/diameter projectiles.

  8. Teaching Math to Deaf/Hard-of-Hearing (DHH) Children Using Mobile Games: Outcomes with Student and Teacher Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shelton, Brett E.; Parlin, Mary Ann

    2016-01-01

    Leveraging the use of mobile devices for education, such as instructional games, is an area of increasing interest for targeted subpopulations of students including those who are deaf/hard-of-hearing (DHH). This paper outlines the perspectives of Deaf Education teachers and DHH children who participated in the GeePerS*Math project. Interviews and…

  9. Traveling-wave induction launchers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, David G.

    1989-01-01

    An analysis of traveling-wave induction launchers shows that induction is a feasible method of producing armature current and that efficient accelerators can be built without sliding contacts or arcs. In a traveling-wave induction launcher the armature current is induced by a slip speed between the armature and a traveling magnetic field. At 9 m/s slip speed a 9 kg projectile with an aluminum armature weighing 25 percent of the total mass can be accelerated to 3000 m/s in a 5 m-long barrel with a total ohmic loss in the barrel coils and armature of 4 percent of the launch kinetic energy and with an average armature temperature rise of 220 deg C, but a peak excitation frequency of 8600 Hz is required. With a 2 kg launch mass the ohmic loss is 7 percent. A launcher system optimized for rotating generators would have a peak frequency of 4850 Hz; with an aluminum armature weighing 33 percent of the launch mass and a slip speed of 30 m/s the total ohmic loss in the generators, cables, and accelerator would be 43 percent of the launch kinetic energy, and the average armature temperature rise would be 510 deg C.

  10. 46. VAL, DETAIL OF 'PILLOW BLOCK' WHERE LAUNCHER BRIDGE PIN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    46. VAL, DETAIL OF 'PILLOW BLOCK' WHERE LAUNCHER BRIDGE PIN SAT AT THE TOP OF THE CONNECTING BRIDGE. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  11. 48. VIEW ACROSS RESERVOIR OF SLOPE PREPARATION FOR VARIABLEANGLE LAUNCHER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    48. VIEW ACROSS RESERVOIR OF SLOPE PREPARATION FOR VARIABLE-ANGLE LAUNCHER (VAL) SLAB LOOKING NORTHEAST, November 6, 1946. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  12. 49. DETAIL VIEW OF SLOPE PREPARATION FOR VARIABLEANGLE LAUNCHER SLAB ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    49. DETAIL VIEW OF SLOPE PREPARATION FOR VARIABLE-ANGLE LAUNCHER SLAB LOOKING NORTH, November 6, 1946. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  13. 6. VAL LAUNCHER BRIDGE, CARRIAGE SUPPORT, CONCRETE 'A' FRAME STRUCTURE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VAL LAUNCHER BRIDGE, CARRIAGE SUPPORT, CONCRETE 'A' FRAME STRUCTURE AND CAMERA TOWER LOOKING NORTHWEST. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  14. An electomagnetic lunar launcher utilizing superconductivity technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilby, Curt; Nozette, Stewart; Kolm, Henry

    1989-01-01

    The application of superconductivity technology to the lunar launcher problem was considered, and a quenchgun concept was formulated to reduce the mass of the launcher system by incorporating the energy storage in the launcher itself and using the efficiency of the quenchgun to reduce the power requirements. A conceptual design for the quenchgun launcher is presented, and the integration of the system into a lunar base logistics model for evaluation is addressed. The results of these evaluations under the NASA Office of Exploration lunar base scenarios are reported.

  15. A 10-stage reconnection demonstration launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Cnare, E.C.; Widner, M.M.; Duggin, B.W.

    1989-01-01

    A small-scale, 10-stage cylindrical reconnection launcher has been designed, fabricated, and tested. Ten-gram projectiles are accelerated from rest to 317 m/s through the 0.44 m launcher assembly with a projectile kinetic energy to capacitor stored energy efficiency of 9%. Comparison of test results and computer code predictions will be presented. Results of these studies have substantiated launcher scaling at small size and have provided a useful test bed for launcher components and diagnostics. 5 refs., 6 figs.

  16. A 10-stage reconnection demonstration launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Cnare, E.G.; Widner, M.M.; Duggins, B.W. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on a small-scale, 10-stage cylindrical reconnection launcher that has been designed, fabricated, and tested. Ten-gram projectiles are accelerated from rest to 317 m/s through the 0.44 m launcher assembly with a projectile kinetic energy to capacitor stored energy efficiency of 9%. Comparison of test results and computer code predictions are presented. Results of these studies have substantiated launcher scaling at small size and have provided a useful test bed for launcher components and diagnostics.

  17. Mobile hard substrata - An additional biodiversity source in a high latitude shallow subtidal system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balazy, Piotr; Kuklinski, Piotr

    2013-03-01

    This study demonstrates the importance of a hard mobile substratum (hermit crab shells) for Arctic biodiversity. Based on previous observations from other geographic regions we hypothesized that this niche at high latitudes would support a higher biodiversity of epifauna than might be predicted from similar substrata. We test whether the hermit crab epifauna is specific to that substratum providing unique biodiversity components to the local community. From four study sites in Isfjorden (78°N), West Spitsbergen and two study sites in Northern Norway (69°N) we collected approximately 50 each of hermit crabs, gastropods and pebbles, of visually similar surface area using SCUBA diving. Hermit crab shells were colonized by a larger number of epifaunal species than either gastropods or pebbles, even when they were of a larger size. Among 87 taxa found on all the three substrata, 22 occurred only on hermit crab shells. Except for two study sites hermit crab shells also supported more individuals. This study shows that the contribution of shells carried by hermit crabs to high-latitude, shallow-subtidal diversity is higher than might be predicted by their surface area alone and that hermit crabs modify, maintain and create a unique habitat. This is the result of a number of factors interacting positively on the presence of epifauna including shell surface heterogeneity and the complex influence of the crab host.

  18. Hypervelocity Launcher for Aerothermodynamic Experiments. Phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholz, Timothy J.; Bauer, David P.

    1995-01-01

    The capability of an Ultra Distributed Energy Store System (UDESS) powered electromagnetic launcher (EM) is experimentally assessed. The UDESS system was developed specifically to address the velocity speed limit seen in plasma armature EM launchers. Metal armature launch packages were also developed and tested to assess the usefulness of the UDESS concept for low velocity applications.

  19. Himass electromagnetic launcher at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmermann, E.L.; Fowler, C.M.; Foley, E.; Parker, J.V.

    1986-01-01

    The HIMASS electromagnetic launcher is a unique large-bore, large-mass railgun driven by a helical flux compression generator. Two experiments were conducted at 3 to 4 MA current levels. The objective of the experiments was to study the effects of scaling, ablation, and material parameters on electromagnetic launcher performance. Data from these two experiments are presented.

  20. HIMASS electromagnetic launcher at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, E.L.; Fowler, C.M.; Foley, E.; Parker, J.V.

    1986-11-01

    The HIMASS electromagnetic launcher is a unique large-bore, large-mass railgun driven by a helical flux compression generator. Two experiments were conducted at 3-4 MA current levels. The objective of the experiments was to study the effects of scaling, ablation, and material parameters on electromagnetic launcher performance. Data from these two experiments are presented.

  1. 33 CFR 175.113 - Launchers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Launchers. 175.113 Section 175.113 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY EQUIPMENT REQUIREMENTS Visual Distress Signals § 175.113 Launchers. (a) When a visual...

  2. Winged launcher thermal design aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, K.

    1991-12-01

    The need for significant reduction in launch cost favors the consideration of reusable space transportation systems which are assisted by aerodynamic lift. The thermomechanical and thermochemical environments and the basic design requirements of two airbreathing vehicle classes are put in relation to vehiles like Shuttle and Hermes. Similarities as well as essential differences between the various vehicles are highlighted. State of the art thermal protection concepts and materials are analyzed with respect to winged launcher concepts. Future development trends for design and materials with potential application are identified. The need for improved thermostructural analysis and optimization techniques is outlined.

  3. The Scout Launcher - An update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, A.

    1981-05-01

    An update is given for the Scout launches since April 1978. Scout is a four-stage solid-propellant launcher with its motors divided by transition sections carrying electronics and attitude motors, topped by a payload and its shroud. The payloads have carried a wide range of experiments, including Explorer atmospheric, Navy navigation satellites, and all of Britain's Ariels. Since launch 98 in April 1978, Scout has been employed three times more in 1979, and when the program is phased out in 1985, well over 110 Scouts will have been launched. This last phase from launch 102 onward, will involve exclusively military missions.

  4. Parameter studies for traveling wave coaxial launchers

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, A.Y. . Center for Electromechanics)

    1991-01-01

    The traveling wave coaxial launcher is a complex machine that requires very extensive parameter studies to optimize. Most of previous attempts to realize hypervelocity using coaxial launchers have failed partly due to inadequate analyses. This paper reports the results of very extensive air-core coaxial launcher parameter studies performed using computers. These results and the methodology introduced should help future researchers on this topic. In the course of studying the feasibility of accelerating a 1-kg projectile to 10 km/s with an 18 m air-core multiphase coaxial launcher powered by a rising frequency generator (RFGs), a complete simulation code based on the current filament method was developed. Results from the simulation code indicate rather chaotic behavior of an arbitrary coaxial launcher design. More fundamental studies were then conducted using various computer codes based on the current filament method.

  5. The enhanced ASDEX Upgrade pellet centrifuge launcher.

    PubMed

    Plöckl, B; Lang, P T

    2013-10-01

    Pellets played an important role in the program of ASDEX Upgrade serving both for investigations on efficient particle fuelling and high density scenarios but also for pioneering work on Edge Localised Mode (ELM) pacing and mitigation. Initially designed for launching fuelling pellets from the magnetic low field side, the system was converted already some time ago to inject pellets from the magnetic high field side as much higher fuelling efficiency was found using this configuration. In operation for more than 20 years, the pellet launching system had to undergo a major revision and upgrading, in particular of its control system. Furthermore, the control system installed adjacent to the launcher had to be transferred to a more distant location enforcing a complete galvanic separation from torus potential and a fully remote control solution. Changing from a hybrid system consisting of PLC S5/S7 and some hard wired relay control to a state of the art PLC system allowed the introduction of several new operational options enabling more flexibility in the pellet experiments. This article describes the new system architecture of control hardware and software, the operating procedure, and the extended operational window. First successful applications for ELM pacing and triggering studies are presented as well as utilization for the development of high density scenarios.

  6. The enhanced ASDEX Upgrade pellet centrifuge launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plöckl, B.; Lang, P. T.

    2013-10-01

    Pellets played an important role in the program of ASDEX Upgrade serving both for investigations on efficient particle fuelling and high density scenarios but also for pioneering work on Edge Localised Mode (ELM) pacing and mitigation. Initially designed for launching fuelling pellets from the magnetic low field side, the system was converted already some time ago to inject pellets from the magnetic high field side as much higher fuelling efficiency was found using this configuration. In operation for more than 20 years, the pellet launching system had to undergo a major revision and upgrading, in particular of its control system. Furthermore, the control system installed adjacent to the launcher had to be transferred to a more distant location enforcing a complete galvanic separation from torus potential and a fully remote control solution. Changing from a hybrid system consisting of PLC S5/S7 and some hard wired relay control to a state of the art PLC system allowed the introduction of several new operational options enabling more flexibility in the pellet experiments. This article describes the new system architecture of control hardware and software, the operating procedure, and the extended operational window. First successful applications for ELM pacing and triggering studies are presented as well as utilization for the development of high density scenarios.

  7. The enhanced ASDEX Upgrade pellet centrifuge launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Plöckl, B.; Lang, P. T.

    2013-10-15

    Pellets played an important role in the program of ASDEX Upgrade serving both for investigations on efficient particle fuelling and high density scenarios but also for pioneering work on Edge Localised Mode (ELM) pacing and mitigation. Initially designed for launching fuelling pellets from the magnetic low field side, the system was converted already some time ago to inject pellets from the magnetic high field side as much higher fuelling efficiency was found using this configuration. In operation for more than 20 years, the pellet launching system had to undergo a major revision and upgrading, in particular of its control system. Furthermore, the control system installed adjacent to the launcher had to be transferred to a more distant location enforcing a complete galvanic separation from torus potential and a fully remote control solution. Changing from a hybrid system consisting of PLC S5/S7 and some hard wired relay control to a state of the art PLC system allowed the introduction of several new operational options enabling more flexibility in the pellet experiments. This article describes the new system architecture of control hardware and software, the operating procedure, and the extended operational window. First successful applications for ELM pacing and triggering studies are presented as well as utilization for the development of high density scenarios.

  8. 30. VAL LOOKING DOWN THE LAUNCHER SLAB STAIRS AT THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. VAL LOOKING DOWN THE LAUNCHER SLAB STAIRS AT THE PROJECTILE LOADING CAR AND LOADING PLATFORM ADJACENT TO THE PROJECTILE LOADING DECK AND LAUNCHER BRIDGE. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  9. Technology demonstration for reusable launchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baiocco, P.; Bonnal, Ch.

    2016-03-01

    Reusable launchers have been studied under CNES contracts for more than 30 years, with early concepts such as STS-2000 or Oriflamme, more recently with very significant efforts devoted to Liquid Fly Back Boosters as with the Bargouzin project led with Tsniimash, TSTO with the Everest concept studied by Airbus-DS as prime contractor or the RFS Reusable First Stage concept of a large first stage associated to a cryotechnic second stage. These investigations, summarized in the first part of the paper, enabled CNES to identify clearly the technology requirements associated to reusability, as well as cost efficiency through detailed non-recurring costs and mission costs analysis. In parallel, CNES set in place development logic for sub-systems and equipment based on demonstrators, hardware test benches enabling maturation of technologies up to a TRL such that an actual development can be decided with limited risk. This philosophy has been applied so far to a large number of cases, such as TPTech and TPX for Hydrogen turbo pump, GGPX as demonstrator of innovative gas generator, HX demonstrator of modern cryotechnic upper stage with a dozen of different objectives (Thermal Protection, 20K Helium storage, measurements …). This virtuous approach, "learn as you test", is currently applied in the phased approach towards scaled down reusable booster stage, whose possibility to be used as first stage of a microlaunch vehicle is under investigation. The selected technologies allow paving the way towards reusable booster stages for Ariane 6 evolutions or main reusable stage for a further generation of heavy launchers. The paper describes the logic behind this project, together with the demonstration objectives set for the various sub-systems as well as operations.

  10. Study of new materials for railgun launchers

    SciTech Connect

    Poltanov, A.; Jygailo, N.; Bykov, M.; Glinov, A.; Svobodov, A.; Belyakov, A.; Chernetskaya, N.

    1997-01-01

    The description of new materials which can be used in railgun launchers is presented. Mo-W compositions in the Cu matrix, binary composites with anisotropic conductivity, ceramics and ceramic covers have been studied as materials for rails, solid armature and insulator respectively. The tests have been conducted on a 1m long railgun launcher with a section of the bore 10mm x 10mm using a current with the amplitude 350--400 kA. Main test results are demonstrated.

  11. Design of a high power TM01 mode launcher optimized for manufacturing by milling

    SciTech Connect

    Dal Forno, Massimo

    2016-12-15

    Recent research on high gradient rf acceleration found that hard metals, such as hard copper and hard coppersilver, have lower breakdown rate than soft metals. Traditional high gradient accelerating structures are manufactured with parts joined by high temperature brazing. The high temperature used in brazing makes the metal soft, therefore this process cannot be used to manufacture structures out of hard metal alloys. In order to build the structure with hard metals, the components must be designed for joining without high temperature brazing. One method is to build the accelerating structures out of two halves, and joining them by using a low temperature techniques, at the symmetry plane along the beam axis. The structure has input and output rf power couplers. We use a TM01 mode launcher as a rf power coupler, which was introduced during the Next Linear Collider (NLC) work. The part of the mode launcher will be built in each half of the structure. This paper presents a novel geometry of a mode launcher, optimized for manufacturing by milling. The coupler was designed for the CERN CLIC working frequency f = 11.9942 GHz; the same geometry can be scaled to any other frequency.

  12. Performance of an induction coil launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Shokair, I.R.; Cowan, M.; Kaye, R.J.; Marder, B.M.

    1993-12-31

    Performance of an electromagnetic induction launcher is considered for three types of armatures. These are: Solid, 1-element wound and 16-element wound aluminum armatures. The one element wound armature has uniform current density throughout. Because of the uniformity of the current density, the wound armature can withstand field reversal and still maintain low temperature. Slingshot simulations were performed for several configurations. Best performance was obtained for a single element wound armature with two field reversals. For a 60 kg projectile, 10.5 cm coil inner radius and 5.5 cm coil build, the velocity after 50 meters of launcher length (670 stages) exceeded 3.5 km/sec with an overall efficiency of about 45%. For the same parameters the solid and 16-element wound armatures reach a velocity of about 3.3 km/sec after 800 stages (60 meters of launcher length) but without field reversal. A velocity of 3.5 km/sec is possible after 60 meters of launcher length with the 16-element wound armature with one field reversal, but the temperature is close to the melting temperature of aluminum. In all simulations with a solid armature, melting of some of the surface material occurs. However, it is shown that most of the melting occurs after contribution has been made to the forward going pressure, that is, melting does not affect the electrical performance of the launcher. The effect of coil firing time jitter on launcher performance is also considered and is found to be very small for realistic perturbations. For {plus_minus} 2 {mu}-secs random jitter, the reduction in the final velocity for a 60 meter launcher with a solid armature is less than 0.1% and the increase in temperature is only 2%. This result holds for all types of armatures.

  13. A multiple armature railgun launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyse, Mark W.; Challita, Antonios; Maas, Brian L.; Bauer, David P.

    1993-01-01

    As longer projectiles are accelerated, the efficiency (projectile mass/launch mass) of the launch package decreases. The reduction in efficiency makes launching projectiles with a L/D (length-to-diameter ratio) greater than 20 undesirable. EM guns have several launch characteristics that differ from conventional guns. Higher launch velocities are achievable in EM guns because sonic gas velocities do not limit the projectile velocity. Acceleration profiles for EM guns are more constant. The acceleration forces can be distributed on the projectile easily because the accelerating force can be distributed with multiple armatures. These characteristics combine to make EN guns a very attractive approach for launching very long (i.e.. high L/D ratio) projectiles. Railgun launchers with multiple armatures can distribute the accelerating force. Each armature is supplied gun current for acceleration through its own set of rails. This multi-rail, multi-armature concept was tested at the railgun test facility. The results demonstrated feasibility. We were able to control current distribution to multiple armatures. This paper describes the theory and test results for multi-armature launch of high L/D projectiles.

  14. The rise of the mobile phone in the hard drug scene of Rotterdam.

    PubMed

    Barendregt, Cas; van der Poel, Agnes; van de Mheen, Dike

    2006-03-01

    The rise of mobile phone dealing in the retail market of heroin and cocaine in the city of Rotterdam is described. Multiple methods were used for the study, including analysis of street survey data (1998, 2000, 2003), qualitative and quantitative analysis of fieldwork data, and semi-open interviews with drug users and key informants. In 2000, 70% of the respondents to a street survey bought drugs from a mobile dealer. Qualitative data showed that the majority of mobile dealers have an ethnic Moroccan background; the reasons for this may include the ambiguous attitude of the Moroccan community towards drug crime, and repressive legislation causing the market to find alternatives for basic street dealing. The rise of mobile dealing is discussed as a form of reshaping of the drug market under prohibition.

  15. Armature design for coaxial induction launchers

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, J.A.; Devine, J.R. . Center for Electromechanics)

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on the armature design for a coaxial induction launcher that is influenced by a large set of highly coupled parameters. The simplifying assumptions often employed in coaxial accelerator analysis, such as a uniform or sinusoidal axial distribution of the azimuthal armature current, are unrealistic in induction launchers with monolithic single-turn armatures. In order to better understand the true dynamic behavior of coaxial accelerators, the Center for Electromechanics at The University of Texas at Austin (CEM-UT) has developed series of computer codes based on the current filament method. By utilizing these performance codes in conjunction with electromagnetic (EM) and mechanical finite element programs, it is now possible to design high performance induction launchers with armatures that can withstand the considerable mechanical and thermal loads inherent in a coaxial accelerator launch.

  16. Distributed data fusion across multiple hard and soft mobile sensor platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinsley, Gregory

    is a younger field than centralized fusion. The main issues in distributed fusion that are addressed are distributed classification and distributed tracking. There are several well established methods for performing distributed fusion that are first reviewed. The chapter on distributed fusion concludes with a multiple unmanned vehicle collaborative test involving an unmanned aerial vehicle and an unmanned ground vehicle. The third issue this thesis addresses is that of soft sensor only data fusion. Soft-only fusion is a newer field than centralized or distributed hard sensor fusion. Because of the novelty of the field, the chapter on soft only fusion contains less background information and instead focuses on some new results in soft sensor data fusion. Specifically, it discusses a novel fuzzy logic based soft sensor data fusion method. This new method is tested using both simulations and field measurements. The biggest issue addressed in this thesis is that of combined hard and soft fusion. Fusion of hard and soft data is the newest area for research in the data fusion community; therefore, some of the largest theoretical contributions in this thesis are in the chapter on combined hard and soft fusion. This chapter presents a novel combined hard and soft data fusion method based on random set theory, which processes random set data using a particle filter. Furthermore, the particle filter is designed to be distributed across multiple robots and portable computers (used by human observers) so that there is no centralized failure point in the system. After laying out a theoretical groundwork for hard and soft sensor data fusion the thesis presents practical applications for hard and soft sensor data fusion in simulation. Through a series of three progressively more difficult simulations, some important hard and soft sensor data fusion capabilities are demonstrated. The first simulation demonstrates fusing data from a single soft sensor and a single hard sensor in

  17. 79. VIEW OF VAL FIRING RANGE LOOKING SOUTHWEST SHOWING LAUNCHER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    79. VIEW OF VAL FIRING RANGE LOOKING SOUTHWEST SHOWING LAUNCHER BRIDGE, BARGES, SONAR BUOY RANGE AND MORRIS DAM IN BACKGROUND, June 10, 1948. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  18. Predicting bore deformations and launcher stresses in railguns

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, R.F.; Cook, W.A.; Rabern, D.A.; Schnurr, N.M.

    1986-01-01

    The structural responses of launchers are important because they affect the projectile performance and the operating limits of the railgun system. Structural analysis makes it possible to make better decisions in launcher design. Example analyses of the Los Alamos HIMASS and Lethality Test System launchers are presented in this paper. Also, a discussion of the benefits and limitations of these analyses is included.

  19. Superconductive levitated armatures for electromagnetic launchers

    SciTech Connect

    Jasper, L.J.

    1988-03-14

    An electromagnetic railgun launcher and armature. The armature is made from superconducting material and is levitated between the rails of the launcher by the Meissner effect. The Meissner effect is created by cooling the armature and subjecting it to a magnetic field. The armature configuration has a closed-loop topology and defines two planes - one plane coincides with the plane of the rails; the other plane is oblique to the first. The armature configuration, when placed between the rails receives an unbalanced Lorentz force which accelerates the armature.

  20. External wave-launcher study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-06-30

    The rationale for liquid dielectrically-loaded external wave-guide launchers is discussed. The arguments are strongly indicative that a liquid dielectric-filled waveguide system could be a practical technique for launching ICRH power into a fusion reactor. A detailed summary of the work performed in the study is presented.

  1. Electromagnetic coilgun launcher for space applications

    SciTech Connect

    Turman, B.N.; Lipinski, R.J.

    1996-03-01

    A ground-based electrically-powered launcher could significantly reduce the complexity and cost of space launches for moderate-weight payloads. The electromagnetic launch complex could greatly reduce the amount of fuels handling, reduce the turn-around time between launches, allow more concurrence in launch preparation, reduce the manpower requirements for launch vehicle preparation and increase the reliability of launch by using more standardized vehicle preparations. The launch requires high acceleration, so the satellite package must be hardened. This paper presents results of a study to estimate the required launcher parameters, and estimate the cost of such a launch facility. This study is based on electromagnetic gun technology which is constrained to a coaxial geometry to take advantage of the efficiency of closely-coupled coils. The launcher energy and power requirements fall in the range of 40{endash}260 GJ and 20{endash}400 GW electric. Parametric evaluations have been conducted with a launcher length of 1{endash}2 km, exit velocity of 1{endash}6 km/s, and payloads to low earth orbit of 100{endash}1000 kg. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. External wave launcher study. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, K.G.

    1986-06-26

    The overall purpose of this study is to explore the applicability of dielectric filled waveguide launchers to couple ion cyclotron resonant frequency (ICRF) power to magnetically confined plasma. The major advantage of dielectric filled launchers is that the geometrical dimensions of a waveguide launcher required to accommodate an electromagnetic wave of any given frequency can be reduced by the square root of the relative permittivity of the dielectric compared to air or vacuum waveguide dimensions. However, removal of the intense heat load deposited by 14 MeV neutrons in a solid dielectric filled waveguide heating system in close proximity to a fusion reactor presents several major problems: Heat is distributed throughout the volume of solid dielectric by energetic neutrons, which necessitates that a substantial fraction of the dielectric filled waveguide must be occupied by channels containing liquid coolant to remove the heat. The uniformity of the internal dielectric media of the waveguide is disrupted, and electromagnetic waves in the guide will be reflected and scattered at the discontinuities. It is highly questionable that a waveguide or waveguide launcher constructed in this manner will be an efficient means of transmitting ICRF power. This circumstance leads to employing liquid dielectrics which could satisfy both electromagnetic and coolant requirements of ICRF auxiliary launching systems simultaneously. Additionally, liquid dielectrics facilitate the motion of tuning structures through the media and preserve its dielectric uniformity in contrast to the tuning restrictions imposed by solid dielectrics in this regard.

  3. Electromagnetic coilgun launcher for space applications

    SciTech Connect

    Turman, B.N.; Lipinski, R.J.

    1995-10-01

    A ground-based electrically-powered launcher could significantly reduce the complexity and cost of space launches for moderate-weight payloads. The EM launch complex could greatly reduce the amount of fuels handling, reduce the turnaround time between launches, allow more concurrence in launch preparation, reduce the manpower requirements for launch vehicle preparation and increase the reliability of launch by using more standardized vehicle preparations. The launch requires high acceleration, so the satellite package must be hardened. This paper presents results of a study to estimate the required launcher parameters, and estimate the cost of such a launch facility. This study is based on electromagnetic gun technology which is constrained to a coaxial geometry to take advantage of the efficiency of closely-coupled coils. The launcher energy and power requirements fall in the range of 40 {minus} 260 GJ and 20 {minus} 400 GW electric. Parametric evaluations have been conducted with a launcher length of 1-2 km, exit velocity of 1-6 kn/s, and payloads to low earth orbit of 100 1000 kg.

  4. Electromagnetic coilgun launcher for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turman, B. N.; Lipinski, R. J.

    1996-03-01

    A ground-based electrically-powered launcher could significantly reduce the complexity and cost of space launches for moderate-weight payloads. The electromagnetic launch complex could greatly reduce the amount of fuels handling, reduce the turn-around time between launches, allow more concurrence in launch preparation, reduce the manpower requirements for launch vehicle preparation and increase the reliability of launch by using more standardized vehicle preparations. The launch requires high acceleration, so the satellite package must be hardened. This paper presents results of a study to estimate the required launcher parameters, and estimate the cost of such a launch facility. This study is based on electromagnetic gun technology which is constrained to a coaxial geometry to take advantage of the efficiency of closely-coupled coils. The launcher energy and power requirements fall in the range of 40-260 GJ and 20-400 GW electric. Parametric evaluations have been conducted with a launcher length of 1-2 km, exit velocity of 1-6 km/s, and payloads to low earth orbit of 100-1000 kg.

  5. Dynamic Loads Affecting Artillery Launcher Crew

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-10-01

    limiters) front and rear wheel axles, the cabin, driving block, the launcher (or an open load-carrying body) as well as flexible- suppressing tyre ...Driver’s seat suspension change included the replacement of mechanical suspension with the pneumatic one, which can be characterized by a lower

  6. A Cost Effective Automatic Balloon Launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Berrigan J. Michael

    2000-06-08

    Approximately 800,000 balloon-borne radiosondes are hand-launched each year, a cost and labor-intensive procedure. Development of a low-cost Automatic Radiosonde Launcher would allow the manual procedure to be replaced with a reliable and less expensive process. Balloon-borne radiosondes provide essential meteorological data used by forecasters and researchers around the globe. The National Weather service alone launches tens of thousands of sondes from sites across the US. Although worldwide launching of radiosondes has been done for many years, it remains a labor intensive and therefore expensive operation. Using its own funding and, more recently with the help of a Phase I SBIR grant, Visidyne, Inc. has begun investigating the feasibility of building an Automatic Radiosonde Launcher (ARL) that can be built at a cost that will be acceptable to the commercial marketplace. That work has led to the issuing of four patents covering important innovations that will allow us to meet that goal. Under the recent Phase I effort, solutions to many of the key problems have been tested in the laboratory and in real-world demonstrations in the field. The balloon filling, battery wetting, and launch release mechanisms were designed, built, and tested. A breadboard launcher was constructed and tested to prove feasibility of key system elements. Demonstration launches of radiosondes were performed using the breadboard launcher from the National Weather Service facility in Gray, ME, and from Hanscom AFB in Lexington, MA. The cost and size of a full scale shelter prevented us from building one during Phase I, however, we do have a design that will accomplish our goals. The Automatic Radiosonde Launcher will significantly reduce the cost of launching balloon-borne instruments. US and foreign weather services and atmospheric, climatological, and meteorological researchers will all benefit from this innovation.

  7. SIDON: A simulator of radio-frequency networks. Application to WEST ICRF launchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helou, Walid; Dumortier, Pierre; Durodié, Frédéric; Goniche, Marc; Hillairet, Julien; Mollard, Patrick; Berger-By, Gilles; Bernard, Jean-Michel; Colas, Laurent; Lombard, Gilles; Maggiora, Riccardo; Magne, Roland; Milanesio, Daniele; Moreau, Didier

    2015-12-01

    SIDON (SImulator of raDiO-frequency Networks) is an in-house developed Radio-Frequency (RF) network solver that has been implemented to cross-validate the design of WEST ICRF launchers and simulate their impedance matching algorithm while considering all mutual couplings and asymmetries. In this paper, the authors illustrate the theory of SIDON as well as results of its calculations. The authors have built time-varying plasma scenarios (a sequence of launchers front-faces L-mode and H-mode Z-matrices), where at each time step (1 millisecond here), SIDON solves the RF network. At the same time, when activated, the impedance matching algorithm controls the matching elements (vacuum capacitors) and thus their corresponding S-matrices. Typically a 1-second pulse requires around 10 seconds of computational time on a desktop computer. These tasks can be hardly handled by commercial RF software. This innovative work allows identifying strategies for the launchers future operation while insuring the limitations on the currents, voltages and electric fields, matching and Load-Resilience, as well as the required straps voltage amplitude/phase balance. In this paper, a particular attention is paid to the simulation of the launchers behavior when arcs appear at several locations of their circuits using SIDON calculator. This latter work shall confirm or identify strategies for the arc detection using various RF electrical signals. One shall note that the use of such solvers in not limited to ICRF launchers simulations but can be employed, in principle, to any linear or linearized RF problem.

  8. Ratio of effective temperature to pressure controls the mobility of sheared hard spheres.

    PubMed

    Haxton, Thomas K

    2012-01-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we calculate fluctuations and responses for steadily sheared hard spheres over a wide range of packing fractions φ and shear strain rates γ[over ̇], using two different methods to dissipate energy. To a good approximation, shear stress and density fluctuations are related to their associated response functions by a single effective temperature T(eff) that is equal to or larger than the kinetic temperature T(kin). We find a crossover in the relationship between the relaxation time τ and the the nondimensionalized effective temperature T(eff)/pσ(3), where p is the pressure and σ is the sphere diameter. In the solid response regime, the behavior at a fixed packing fraction satisfies τ ̇γ∝exp(-cpσ(3)/T(eff)), where c depends weakly on φ, suggesting that the average local yield strain is controlled by the effective temperature in a way that is consistent with shear transformation zone theory. In the fluid response regime, the relaxation time depends on T(eff)/pσ(3) as it depends on T(kin)/pσ(3) in equilibrium. This regime includes both near-equilibrium conditions where T(eff)≃T(kin) and far-from-equilibrium conditions where T(eff)≠T(kin). We discuss the implications of our results for systems with soft repulsive interactions.

  9. Three-phase hypervelocity projectile launcher

    DOEpatents

    Fugelso, L. Erik; Langner, Gerald C.; Burns, Kerry L.; Albright, James N.

    1994-01-01

    A hypervelocity projectile launcher for use in perforating borehole casings provides improved penetration into the surrounding rock structure. The launcher includes a first cylinder of explosive material that defines an axial air-filled cavity, a second cylinder of explosive material defining an axial frustum-shaped cavity abutting and axially aligned with the first cylinder. A pliant washer is located between and axially aligned with the first and second cylinders. The frustum shaped cavity is lined with a metal liner effective to form a projectile when the first and second cylinders are detonated. The washer forms a unique intermediate projectile in advance of the liner projectile and enables the liner projectile to further penetrate into and fracture the adjacent rock structure.

  10. Impact performance of large scale electromagnetic launchers

    SciTech Connect

    Fahrenthold, E.P. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of high performance electromagnetic launchers and associated pulsed power supplies which has led to the aerodynamic and structural design of new projectile types. The impact performance of monolithic railgun projectiles between one and four kilograms in mass has been estimated using Lagrangian hydrocode simulations at velocities up to three kilometers per second. The simulation predictions are within expected bounds, based on existing correlations of experimental measurements on cylindrical projectiles of equivalent mass.

  11. Launchers - The first 50-year cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardoe, G. K. C.

    1986-11-01

    An assessment is made of the development history of spacecraft launch vehicles to the present date, with attention to mission economics and the criteria of profitability. Three technological generations are postulated: that dominated by expendable launch vehicles, lasting from 1957 to the introduction of the Space Shuttle; the Space Shuttle period of semireusable launch vehicles; and the soon-to-be-inaugurated era of fully reusable launchers which are expected to begin operations around the year 2000.

  12. Characterization of the Electrostatic Environment of Launchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soyah, Jamila; Mantion, Pascal; Herlem, Yannick

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to update knowledge in characterization of the electrostatic environment of launchers in order to be able to propose reductions of design constraints.The first part of this study showed that flashover discharges are the most energetic discharges likely to occur on a launcher. They are mostly due to accumulations of charges by triboelectricity on the external surface of the launcher while flying through clouds containing a lot of small solid particles.Actually flashover discharges are mitigated by limiting the surface's resistance of dielectric materials such as thermal protection set on the external skin of the launcher, thanks to antistatic paints that avoid significant accumulations of charges.But this specified limitation leads to a lot of non- conformances during production phases and, as a result, this leads to additional costs and delays in launches campaigns. That is why on-ground tests have been defined in order to assess the accessibility of a relaxation of those specifications, which would reduce non-conformances.On-ground tests have been carried out, in the second part, on samples of thermal protections covered with antistatic paints with different degraded values of surface resistance. These tests aimed at checking in which conditions a surface discharge can occur in order to deduce a relationship between characteristics of the samples (surface resistance, half-discharge time) and the occurrence of a surface discharge, at ambient pressure and at low pressure.In the third part, in-flight experiments have been defined in order to confirm some hypotheses considered in the study and to assess some parameters in a more accurate way like the incoming charges density per surface unit or the voltage between stages when they get separated, in order to assess more accurately whether the unwinding equalization wire dedicated to maintain the electrostatic balance between stages is necessary or not.

  13. Next Generation of Launcher & Space Vehicles Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laroye, J. F.; Brochard, P.; Grassien, J.-Y.; Masgrangeas, D.

    2008-09-01

    This paper presents several examples of Saft lithium batteries in use onboard launchers & space vehicles: ATV primary lithium manganese dioxide (LiMnO2) batteries and Rosetta primary lithium thionyl chloride (LiSOCl2) batteries as well as the VEGA rechargeable lithium-ion (Li-ion) avionics & thrust vector control (TVC) batteries.It gives an overview of possible chemistries and tradeoff to address these needs.

  14. Design and development of mode launcher for high frequency Gyrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaria, Mukesh Kumar; Sinha, A. K.; Khatun, H.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we describe the design and development of helical cut smooth wall mode launcher for high frequency and high power Gyrotron. A Vlasov-type helical cut mode launcher for converting TE22,6 mode to a Gaussian mode has been designed for 120 GHz, 1 MW Gyrotron. The initial design of mode launcher has been optimized using LOT/SURF-3D software. The mode launcher diameter and length are optimized considering the minimum return loss and the minimum insertion loss by using CST microwave studio. The return loss (S11) and insertion loss (S21) performance of helical cut smooth wall mode launcher have been obtained using CST-Microwave Studio. The fabrication of Vlasov-type helical cut mode launcher for 120 GHz Gyrotron has also been carried out.

  15. Final Report Advanced Quasioptical Launcher System

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey Neilson

    2010-04-30

    This program developed an analytical design tool for designing antenna and mirror systems to convert whispering gallery RF modes to Gaussian or HE11 modes. Whispering gallery modes are generated by gyrotrons used for electron cyclotron heating of fusion plasmas in tokamaks. These modes cannot be easily transmitted and must be converted to free space or waveguide modes compatible with transmission line systems.This program improved the capability of SURF3D/LOT, which was initially developed in a previous SBIR program. This suite of codes revolutionized quasi-optical launcher design, and this code, or equivalent codes, are now used worldwide. This program added functionality to SURF3D/LOT to allow creating of more compact launcher and mirror systems and provide direct coupling to corrugated waveguide within the vacuum envelope of the gyrotron. Analysis was also extended to include full-wave analysis of mirror transmission line systems. The code includes a graphical user interface and is available for advanced design of launcher systems.

  16. Additive Layer Manufacturing for Launcher's Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilanova, J.; Romera, P.; Lasagni, F.; Zorrilla, A.; Perinan, A.

    2014-06-01

    In the next years the European space industry has the challenge of maintaining its competitiveness in launch vehicles (LV) production, due to the growth of competition worldwide. It has to assure its position developing new applied technologies. In this field the effort is focussed on the production of short series of customized products, like payloads, flight components or launcher parts. ALM (Additive Layer Manufacturing) could be a powerful tool that offers new competitiveness factors for this industry, comprising a set of emerging technologies that are becoming a competitor to forming, casting and machining as well as being utilised directly as a complementary alternative.Originally used for prototypes and models, now ALM becomes a very useful technology capable to fabricate functional parts for the space industrial sector. Its demands on rapid technologies are different to "earth" industries, and they aren't so easily satisfied because space is a field with different requirements depending on its application: launchers, reusable vehicles, satellites, probes, low gravity researches, manned spacecraft, or even moon and planetary exploration.This paper reports on the ALM potential applications, under ESA requirements, exploring the challenges and possibilities for its use in the launchers market, trying to answer two basic questions: the first one, whether ALM is a mature technology to be ready for its use as flight hardware; and the second one, if it can be used to reduce the product cycle, and consequently, the development, production and operational costs.

  17. Nondestructive inspection of a composite missile launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ley, O.; Chung, S.; Butera, M.; Valatka, T.; Triplett, M. H.; Godinez, V.

    2012-05-01

    Lighter weight alternatives are being sought to replace metallic components currently used in high performance aviation and missile systems. Benefits of lightweight, high strength carbon fiber reinforced composites in missile launchers and rocket motor cases include improved fuel economy, increased flight times, enhanced lethality and/or increased velocity. In this work, various nondestructive inspection techniques are investigated for the damage assessment of a composite missile launcher system for use in U.S. Army attack helicopters. The launcher system, which includes rails and a hardback, can be subject to impact damage from accidental tool drops, routine operation, and/or ballistic threats. The composite hardback and the launch rails both have complex geometries that can challenge the inspection process. Scanning techniques such as line scanning thermography, ultrasonic, and acousto-ultrasonics will be used and compared to determine damage detection accuracy, reliability, and efficiency. Results will also be compared with visual observations to determine if there is a correlation. The goal is to establish an inspection method that quickly and accurately assesses damage extent in order to minimize service time and return the missile system back into the field [1].

  18. Photographic copy of photograph, view of rail launcher used for ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photographic copy of photograph, view of rail launcher used for 'Baby Corporal E' missiles on 6 and 7 May 1946 at JPL-Muroc Army Air Base (later Edwards Air Force Base) (This launcher was also used for 'Baby WAC' missiles at Goldstone, Fort Irwin, California in 1945). Photocopy of 35mm photograph made in December 1994, looking west with Test Stand 'A' immediately behind the rail launcher. - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  19. Multirail electromagnetic launcher powered from a pulsed magnetohydrodynamic generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afonin, A. G.; Butov, V. G.; Panchenko, V. P.; Sinyaev, S. V.; Solonenko, V. A.; Shvetsov, G. A.; Yakushev, A. A.

    2015-09-01

    The operation of an electromagnetic multirail launcher of solids powered from a pulsed magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generator is studied. The plasma flow in the channel of the pulsed MHD generator and the possibility of launching solids in a rapid-fire mode of launcher operation are considered. It is shown that this mode of launcher operation can be implemented by matching the plasma flow dynamics in the channel of the pulsed MHD generator and the launching conditions. It is also shown that powerful pulsed MHD generators can be used as a source of electrical energy for rapid-fire electromagnetic rail launchers operating in a burst mode.

  20. An efficient method for preliminary launcher/satellite coupled loads analysis by satellite developers using launcher user's manual data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavrinidis, Constantinos; Fransen, Sebastiaan

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a method used over the years by the authors in performing preliminary launcher/satellite coupled loads analysis (CLA) using in an innovative manner the quasi-static design loads defined in the launcher user's manual (LUM). The rationale and the value of the approach are addressed first. Subsequently the use of the method is presented, and the results derived by satellite developers using the proposed preliminary launcher/satellite CLA are compared with preliminary or full CLA results performed by launcher authorities for a number of industrial satellite applications.

  1. Modeling the effects of surfactant, hardness, and natural organic matter on deposition and mobility of silver nanoparticles in saturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Park, Chang Min; Heo, Jiyong; Her, Namguk; Chu, Kyoung Hoon; Jang, Min; Yoon, Yeomin

    2016-10-15

    This study aims to provide insights into the mechanisms governing the deposition and retention of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in saturated porous media. Column experiments were conducted with quartz sand under saturated conditions to investigate the deposition kinetics of AgNPs, their mobility at different groundwater hardnesses (10-400 mg/L as CaCO3), and humic acid (HA, 0-50 mg/L as dissolved organic carbon [DOC]). An anionic surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), was used as a dispersing agent to prepare a SDS-AgNPs suspension. The deposition kinetics of AgNPs were highly sensitive to the surfactant concentration, ionic strength, and cation type in solution. The breakthrough curves (BTCs) of SDS-AgNPs suggested that the transport and retention were influenced by groundwater hardness and HA. At low water hardness and high HA, high mobility of SDS-AgNPs was observed in saturated conditions. However, the retention of SDS-AgNPs increased substantially in very hard water with a low concentration of HA, because of a decreased primary energy barrier and the straining effect during the course of transport experiments. A modified clean-bed filtration theory and a two-site kinetic attachment model showed good fits with the BTCs of SDS-AgNPs. The fitted model parameters (katt and kstr) could be used successfully to describe that the retention behaviors were dominated by electrostatic and electrosteric repulsion, based on extended Derjaguin-Landau-Vaerwey-Overbeek calculations.

  2. 23. VIEW DOWN INTO LAUNCHER AND FLAME BUCKET FROM STATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. VIEW DOWN INTO LAUNCHER AND FLAME BUCKET FROM STATION 48 IN SLC-3W MST. NOTE REMOVABLE METAL PLANKS BELOW LAUNCHER AND ROPE NET OVER FLAME BUCKET. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 West, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  3. 1. VARIABLEANGLE LAUNCHER CAMERA CAR, VIEW OF CAMERA CAR AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VARIABLE-ANGLE LAUNCHER CAMERA CAR, VIEW OF CAMERA CAR AND TRACK WITH CAMERA STATION ABOVE LOOKING NORTH TAKEN FROM RESERVOIR. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Camera Car & Track, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  4. Explosively driven hypervelocity launcher: Second-stage augmentation techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baum, D. W.

    1973-01-01

    The results are described of a continuing study aimed at developing a two-stage explosively driven hypervelocity launcher capable of achieving projectile velocities between 15 and 20 km/sec. The testing and evaluation of a new cylindrical impact technique for collapsing the barrel of two-stage launcher are reported. Previous two-stage launchers have been limited in ultimate performance by incomplete barrel collapse behind the projectile. The cylindrical impact technique explosively collapses a steel tube concentric with and surrounding the barrel of the launcher. The impact of the tube on the barrel produces extremely high stresses which cause the barrel to collapse. The collapse rate can be adjusted by appropriate variation of the explosive charge and tubing parameters. Launcher experiments demonstrated that the technique did achieve complete barrel collapse and form a second-stage piston. However, jetting occurred in the barrel collapse process and was responsible for severe projectile damage.

  5. Development of Composite Technologies for the European Next Generation Launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatemi, Javad; van der Bas, Finn

    2014-06-01

    In the frame of the European Space Agency's Future Launchers Preparatory Programme (FLPP), in conjunction with national Research and Technology programs, Dutch Space has undertaken the development of composite technologies for application in the Europe's next generation launcher, Ariane 6. The efforts have focused on development of a Carbon Fibre Reinforced Plastic (CFRP) Engine Thrust Frame (ETF) for the upper-stage of Ariane6 launcher. These new technologies are expected to improve performance and to lower cost of development and exploitation of the launcher. Although the first targeted application is the thrust frame, the developed technologies are set to be generic in the sense that they can be applied to other structures of the launcher, e.g. inter-stage structures.This paper addresses the design, analysis, manufacturing and testing activities related to the composite technology developments.

  6. A future European launcher - Ariane 5/Hermes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cretenet, J. C.; Marx, P.

    1984-12-01

    The development of the Ariane launch vehicle was begun in Europe ten years ago to provide independence in terms of the commercial exploitation of telecommunications satellites. In connection with the spectacular development of the satellite market and, consequently, the launch services market, Ariane has now also a commercial objective, which is related to the penetration of the international launch services market. The current capacity of Ariane is adequate for short and medium-term European launch requirements. However, in the longer term, Ariane's capacity is insufficient and a new launcher is needed. It is attempted to evaluate future launching requirements for the 1995-2000 period, taking into account competing launch resources related to the U.S. Space Shuttle. The results of this evaluation lead to a discussion of the characteristics of the Ariane 5, which is to be the new launcher for the 1990s. Attention is given to improved geostationary orbit service, low orbit injection, and the Hermes European manned system.

  7. A hypervelocity projectile launcher for well perforation

    SciTech Connect

    Albright, J.N.; Fugelso, L.E.; Lagner, G.C.; Burns, K.L.

    1989-01-01

    Current oil well perforation techniques use low- to medium-velocity gun launchers for completing wells in soft rock. Shaped-charge jets are normally used in harder, more competent rock. A device to create a much higher velocity projectile was designed. This launcher will provide an alternative technique to be used when the conventional devices do not yield the maximum well performance. It is an adaptation of the axial cavity in a high explosive (HE) annulus design, with the axial cavity being filled with a low density foam material. Two configurations were tested; both had an HE annulus filled with organic foam, one had a projectile. Comparison of the two shots was made. A time sequence of Image Intensifier Camera photographs and sequential, orthogonal flash x-ray radiographs provided information on the propagation of the foam fragments, the first shock wave disturbance, the projectile motion and deformation, and the direct shock wave transmission from the main HE charge. DYNA2D calculations were made to assist in the experimental interpretation. 25 refs., 9 figs.

  8. Non-US electrodynamic launchers research and development

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, J.V.; Batteh, J.H.; Greig, J.R.; Keefer, D.; McNab, I.R.; Zabar, Z.

    1994-11-01

    Electrodynamic launcher research and development work of scientists outside the United States is analyzed and assessed by six internationally recognized US experts in the field of electromagnetic and electrothermal launchers. The assessment covers five broad technology areas: (1) Experimental railguns; (2) Railgun theory and design; (3) Induction launchers; (4) Electrothermal guns; (5) Energy storage and power supplies. The overall conclusion is that non-US work on electrodynamic launchers is maturing rapidly after a relatively late start in many countries. No foreign program challenges the US efforts in scope, but it is evident that the United States may be surpassed in some technologies within the next few years. Until recently, published Russian work focused on hypervelocity for research purposes. Within the last two years, large facilities have been described where military-oriented development has been underway since the mid-1980s. Financial support for these large facilities appears to have collapsed, leaving no effective effort to develop practical launchers for military or civilian applications. Electrodynamic launcher research in Europe is making rapid progress by focusing on a single application, tactical launchers for the military. Four major laboratories, in Britain, France, Germany, and the Netherlands, are working on this problem. Though narrower in scope than the US effort, the European work enjoys a continuity of support that has accelerated its progress. The next decade will see the deployment of electrodynamic launcher technology, probably in the form of an electrothermal-chemical upgrade for an existing gun system. The time scale for deployment of electromagnetic launchers is entirely dependent on the level of research-and-development effort. If resources remain limited, the advantage will lie with cooperative efforts that have reasonably stable funding such as the present French-German program.

  9. Thermal analysis of electromagnetic launcher rails

    SciTech Connect

    Schnurr, N.M.

    1987-10-01

    A numerical technique has been developed to analyze the combined thermal and electric field diffusion in electromagnetic launcher rails. TOPAZ2D, a two-dimensional finite-element thermal analysis code, has been adapted for this purpose. The resulting code, TOPAZRG, was used to predict the temperature field in the rails of the Lethality Test System being constructed at Los Alamos. Results of those calculations indicate the possibility of localized melting at the rail corners under full-power conditions. A parametric study was made to determine the effect of using tungsten coatings to prevent the melting of rail surfaces. The results of those computations show that the time to melt for a given surface heat flux can be increased by a factor of 2.8. Optimum coating thicknesses were determined for a range of heat fluxes. 11 refs.

  10. Infrared tracker for a portable missile launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, J.J.

    1993-07-13

    An infrared beam tracker is described for arrangement to a housing that is unitary with a portable missile launcher, comprising: a rotating beam splitter positioned to intercept the infrared beam passing a first portion of the beam through the beam splitter along a first direction and reflecting the remaining portion along a different direction; a first infrared detector for receiving the beam reflected portion from the beam splitter and produce electric signals responsive thereto; a second infrared detector for receiving the beam portion that passes through the beam splitter and providing electric signals responsive thereto; and means interconnected to the first and second infrared detectors and responsive to the electric signals generated by said detectors for determining errors in missile flight direction and communicating course correction information to the missile.

  11. Shuttle Hitchhiker Experiment Launcher System (SHELS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daelemans, Gerry

    1999-01-01

    NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center Shuttle Small Payloads Project (SSPP), in partnership with the United States Air Force and NASA's Explorer Program, is developing a Shuttle based launch system called SHELS (Shuttle Hitchhiker Experiment Launcher System), which shall be capable of launching up to a 400 pound spacecraft from the Shuttle cargo bay. SHELS consists of a Marman band clamp push-plate ejection system mounted to a launch structure; the launch structure is mounted to one Orbiter sidewall adapter beam. Avionics mounted to the adapter beam will interface with Orbiter electrical services and provide optional umbilical services and ejection circuitry. SHELS provides an array of manifesting possibilities to a wide range of satellites.

  12. Non-Rocket Missile Rope Launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolonkin, Alexander

    2002-01-01

    The method, installation, and estimation for delivering payload and missiles into outer space are presented. This method uses, in general, the engines and straight or closed-loop cables disposed on a planet surface. The installation consists of a space apparatus, power drive stations located along trajectory of the apparatus, the cables connected to the apparatus and to the power stations, a system for suspending the cable, and disconnected device. The drive stations accelerate the apparatus up to hypersonic speed. The estimations and computations show the possibility of making these projects a reality in a short period of time (see attached project: launcher for missiles and loads). The launch will be very cheap $1-$2 per LB. We need only light strong cable, which can be made from artificial fibers, whiskers, nanotubes, which exist in industry and scientific laboratories.

  13. 56. VIEW OF LAUNCHER FROM SOUTHWEST. NITROGEN CONTROL UNIT ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    56. VIEW OF LAUNCHER FROM SOUTHWEST. NITROGEN CONTROL UNIT ON RIGHT; UMBILICAL MAST ON LEFT. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  14. LH Power Losses In Front of the JET Launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Jacquet, P.; Arnoux, G.; Kirov, K.; Mailloux, J.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Ongena, J.

    2009-11-26

    In recent JET experiments, Lower Hybrid (LH) power losses in the Scrape-Off Layer (SOL) were characterized using infra-red (IR) thermography. Hot spots were observed on objects intercepting the field lines passing in front of the LH launcher, i.e. on poloidal limiters and on dumplates located at the top of the tokamak; their locations being in good agreement with magnetic field line tracing using the EFIT equilibrium code. The dumplate temperature was monitored while scanning the launcher position so that the radial distance between field lines intercepting the hot spots and the launcher was increased up to 3.5 cm. The dissipation layer in front of the launcher was estimated to be at least 3.5 cm wide, in agreement with recent measurements on Tore-Supra, but not with simple models that predict a dissipation layer in the mm range.

  15. LH Power Losses In Front of the JET Launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquet, P.; Arnoux, G.; Colas, L.; Delpech, L.; Ekedahl, A.; Frigione, D.; Goniche, M.; Kirov, K.; Leguen, F.; Mailloux, J.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Ongena, J.; Petrzilka, V.; Portafaix, C.; Rimini, F.

    2009-11-01

    In recent JET experiments, Lower Hybrid (LH) power losses in the Scrape-Off Layer (SOL) were characterized using infra-red (IR) thermography. Hot spots were observed on objects intercepting the field lines passing in front of the LH launcher, i.e. on poloidal limiters and on dumplates located at the top of the tokamak; their locations being in good agreement with magnetic field line tracing using the EFIT equilibrium code. The dumplate temperature was monitored while scanning the launcher position so that the radial distance between field lines intercepting the hot spots and the launcher was increased up to 3.5 cm. The dissipation layer in front of the launcher was estimated to be at least 3.5 cm wide, in agreement with recent measurements on Tore-Supra, but not with simple models that predict a dissipation layer in the mm range.

  16. The XLLGG — A Hypervelocity Launcher for Impact Cratering Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lexow, B.; Bückle, A.; Wickert, M.; Hiermaier, S.

    2015-09-01

    Hypervelocity launchers are used to accelerate projectiles that simulate impacting meteoroids or asteroids. The XLLGG (eXtra Large Light Gas Gun) at the EMI (Ernst-Mach-Institute) was used within the MEMIN program.

  17. Para: a computer simulation code for plasma driven electromagnetic launchers

    SciTech Connect

    Thio, Y.-C.

    1983-03-01

    A computer code for simulation of rail-type accelerators utilizing a plasma armature has been developed and is described in detail. Some time varying properties of the plasma are taken into account in this code thus allowing the development of a dynamical model of the behavior of a plasma in a rail-type electromagnetic launcher. The code is being successfully used to predict and analyse experiments on small calibre rail-gun launchers.

  18. Design of pressure vessel cascades for electromagnetic launchers

    SciTech Connect

    Fahrenthold, E.P. )

    1989-08-01

    The relatively recent development of very high-energy density pulsed power supplies has motivated a renewed interest in the structural design of electromagnetic launchers. Cascade design electromagnetic launcher pressure vessels offer convenient maintenance access to high wear rate components of the structure while satisfying an unusual combination of electromagnetic, strength, and preloading constraints imposed on the system designer. This analysis for design of such structures focuses on the accurate characterization of fluid-structure interaction under dynamic asymmetric loading.

  19. Parallel rail electromagnetic launcher with multiple current path armature

    SciTech Connect

    Kemeny, G. A.

    1984-12-04

    Electromagnetic projectile launchers utilize multiple current path armatures in an internally series augmented conductor rail configuration or an internally augmented system connected to multiple power supplies. The current paths include plasmas, conductors or combinations of both. Plasma separation is maintained by trailing insulating plasma dividers extending toward the launcher breech from arc driving faces on a projectile sabot. Arc length and/or plama volume is reduced by conductive assemblies adjacent to the arc driving faces.

  20. Computational model for simulation small testing launcher, technical solution

    SciTech Connect

    Chelaru, Teodor-Viorel; Cristian, Barbu; Chelaru, Adrian

    2014-12-10

    The purpose of this paper is to present some aspects regarding the computational model and technical solutions for multistage suborbital launcher for testing (SLT) used to test spatial equipment and scientific measurements. The computational model consists in numerical simulation of SLT evolution for different start conditions. The launcher model presented will be with six degrees of freedom (6DOF) and variable mass. The results analysed will be the flight parameters and ballistic performances. The discussions area will focus around the technical possibility to realize a small multi-stage launcher, by recycling military rocket motors. From technical point of view, the paper is focused on national project 'Suborbital Launcher for Testing' (SLT), which is based on hybrid propulsion and control systems, obtained through an original design. Therefore, while classical suborbital sounding rockets are unguided and they use as propulsion solid fuel motor having an uncontrolled ballistic flight, SLT project is introducing a different approach, by proposing the creation of a guided suborbital launcher, which is basically a satellite launcher at a smaller scale, containing its main subsystems. This is why the project itself can be considered an intermediary step in the development of a wider range of launching systems based on hybrid propulsion technology, which may have a major impact in the future European launchers programs. SLT project, as it is shown in the title, has two major objectives: first, a short term objective, which consists in obtaining a suborbital launching system which will be able to go into service in a predictable period of time, and a long term objective that consists in the development and testing of some unconventional sub-systems which will be integrated later in the satellite launcher as a part of the European space program. This is why the technical content of the project must be carried out beyond the range of the existing suborbital vehicle

  1. Computational model for simulation small testing launcher, technical solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chelaru, Teodor-Viorel; Cristian, Barbu; Chelaru, Adrian

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present some aspects regarding the computational model and technical solutions for multistage suborbital launcher for testing (SLT) used to test spatial equipment and scientific measurements. The computational model consists in numerical simulation of SLT evolution for different start conditions. The launcher model presented will be with six degrees of freedom (6DOF) and variable mass. The results analysed will be the flight parameters and ballistic performances. The discussions area will focus around the technical possibility to realize a small multi-stage launcher, by recycling military rocket motors. From technical point of view, the paper is focused on national project "Suborbital Launcher for Testing" (SLT), which is based on hybrid propulsion and control systems, obtained through an original design. Therefore, while classical suborbital sounding rockets are unguided and they use as propulsion solid fuel motor having an uncontrolled ballistic flight, SLT project is introducing a different approach, by proposing the creation of a guided suborbital launcher, which is basically a satellite launcher at a smaller scale, containing its main subsystems. This is why the project itself can be considered an intermediary step in the development of a wider range of launching systems based on hybrid propulsion technology, which may have a major impact in the future European launchers programs. SLT project, as it is shown in the title, has two major objectives: first, a short term objective, which consists in obtaining a suborbital launching system which will be able to go into service in a predictable period of time, and a long term objective that consists in the development and testing of some unconventional sub-systems which will be integrated later in the satellite launcher as a part of the European space program. This is why the technical content of the project must be carried out beyond the range of the existing suborbital vehicle

  2. Pellet acceleration using an ablation-controlled electrothermal launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Kincaid, R.W.; Bourham, M.A.; Gilligan, J.G.

    1995-12-31

    The NCSU ablation-controlled electrothermal launcher SIRENS has been used to accelerate plastic (Lexan polycarbonate) pellets to investigate the possibility of using electrothermal launchers as frozen pellet injectors for tokamak fueling. Successful installation of such a device would include a protective shell (sabot) to shield the hydrogenic pellet from ablation and allow it to maintain its integrity throughout the acceleration. The SIRENS device has been modified to include specially designed barrel sections equipped with diagnostic ports.

  3. 6. DETAIL OF DRIVE TRUCK ASSEMBLY. MOBILE SERVICE STRUCTURE SPANNING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. DETAIL OF DRIVE TRUCK ASSEMBLY. MOBILE SERVICE STRUCTURE SPANNING LAUNCHER BUILDING WITH FLAME DUCT FAR RIGHT; VIEW TO NORTHWEST. - Cape Canaveral Air Station, Launch Complex 17, Facility 28416, East end of Lighthouse Road, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  4. Use of mobile phones for improving vaccination coverage among children living in rural hard-to-reach areas and urban streets of Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Md Jasim; Shamsuzzaman, Md; Horng, Lily; Labrique, Alain; Vasudevan, Lavanya; Zeller, Kelsey; Chowdhury, Mridul; Larson, Charles P; Bishai, David; Alam, Nurul

    2016-01-04

    In Bangladesh, full vaccination rates among children living in rural hard-to-reach areas and urban streets are low. We conducted a quasi-experimental pre-post study of a 12-month mobile phone intervention to improve vaccination among 0-11 months old children in rural hard-to-reach and urban street dweller areas. Software named "mTika" was employed within the existing public health system to electronically register each child's birth and remind mothers about upcoming vaccination dates with text messages. Android smart phones with mTika were provided to all health assistants/vaccinators and supervisors in intervention areas, while mothers used plain cell phones already owned by themselves or their families. Pre and post-intervention vaccination coverage was surveyed in intervention and control areas. Among children over 298 days old, full vaccination coverage actually decreased in control areas--rural baseline 65.9% to endline 55.2% and urban baseline 44.5% to endline 33.9%--while increasing in intervention areas from rural baseline 58.9% to endline 76*8%, difference +18.8% (95% CI 5.7-31.9) and urban baseline 40.7% to endline 57.1%, difference +16.5% (95% CI 3.9-29.0). Difference-in-difference (DID) estimates were +29.5% for rural intervention versus control areas and +27.1% for urban areas for full vaccination in children over 298 days old, and logistic regression adjusting for maternal education, mobile phone ownership, and sex of child showed intervention effect odds ratio (OR) of 3.8 (95% CI 1.5-9.2) in rural areas and 3.0 (95% CI 1.4-6.4) in urban areas. Among all age groups, intervention effects on age-appropriate vaccination coverage were positive: DIDs +13.1-30.5% and ORs 2.5-4.6 (p<0.001 in all comparisons). Qualitative data showed the intervention was well-accepted. Our study demonstrated that a mobile phone intervention can improve vaccination coverage in rural hard-to-reach and urban street dweller communities in Bangladesh. This small-scale successful

  5. Calibrating Accelerometers Using an Electromagnetic Launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Erik Timpson

    2012-05-13

    A Pulse Forming Network (PFN), Helical Electromagnetic Launcher (HEML), Command Module (CM), and Calibration Table (CT) were built and evaluated for the combined ability to calibrate an accelerometer. The PFN has a maximum stored energy of 19.25 kJ bank and is fired by a silicon controlled rectifier (SCR), with appropriate safety precautions. The HEML is constructed out of G-10 fiberglass and is designed to accelerate 600 grams to 10 meters per second. The CM is microcontroller based running Arduino Software. The CM has a keypad input and 7 segment outputs of the bank voltage and desired voltage. After entering a desired bank voltage, the CM controls the charge of the PFN. When the two voltages are equal it allows the fire button to send a pulse to the SCR to fire the PFN and in turn, the HEML. The HEML projectile's tip hits a target that is held by the CT. The CT consists of a table to hold the PFN and HEML, a vacuum chuck, air bearing, velocity meter and catch pot. The Target is held with the vacuum chuck awaiting impact. After impact, the air bearing allows the target to fall freely for the velocity meter to get an accurate reading. A known acceleration is determined from the known change in velocity of the target. Thus, if an accelerometer was attached to the target, the measured value can be compared to the known value.

  6. Commercial space development needs cheap launchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, James William

    1998-01-01

    SpaceDev is in the market for a deep space launch, and we are not going to pay $50 million for it. There is an ongoing debate about the elasticity of demand related to launch costs. On the one hand there are the ``big iron'' NASA and DoD contractors who say that there is no market for small or inexpensive launchers, that lowering launch costs will not result in significantly more launches, and that the current uncompetitive pricing scheme is appropriate. On the other hand are commercial companies which compete in the real world, and who say that there would be innumerable new launches if prices were to drop dramatically. I participated directly in the microcomputer revolution, and saw first hand what happened to the big iron computer companies who failed to see or heed the handwriting on the wall. We are at the same stage in the space access revolution that personal computers were in the late '70s and early '80s. The global economy is about to be changed in ways that are just as unpredictable as those changes wrought after the introduction of the personal computer. Companies which fail to innovate and keep producing only big iron will suffer the same fate as IBM and all the now-extinct mainframe and minicomputer companies. A few will remain, but with a small share of the market, never again to be in a position to dominate.

  7. Calculations supporting HyperVelocity Launcher development

    SciTech Connect

    Trucano, T.G.; Chhabildas, L.C.

    1993-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a HyperVelocity Launcher (also referred to as HVL) in which a thin flier plate (nominally 1 mm thick) is launched to velocities in excess of 12 km/s. The length to diameter ratio of these launched flier plates varies from 0.02 to 0.06. The launch technique is based upon using structured, time-dependant, high-pressure, high-acceleration pulses to drive the flier plates. Such pulses are achieved by using a graded-density material to impact a stationary flier. A computational and experimental program at Sandia seeks to extend this technique to allow launching thick plates whose length-to-diameter ratio is 10 to 20 times larger than thin plates. Hydrodynamic codes are used to design modifications to the basic technique. The authors have controlled and used these effects to successfully launch a chunk-flier, consisting of 0.33 gm of titanium alloy, 0.3 cm thick by 0.6 cm in diameter, to a velocity of 10.2 km/s. This is the largest chunky size ever launched at this velocity from a gas gun configuration.

  8. Sharp and the Jules Verne Launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, J.; Cartland, H.

    1996-03-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has built the worlds largest hydrogen gas gun called SHARP, (Super High Altitude Research Project). Originally designed to launch 5 kg to a 450 km altitude, SHARP is configured horizontally at Site 300 in Tracy, California. SHARP is successfully delivering 5 kg scramjets at Mach 9 in aerophysics tests. Some of the results of the scramjet tests are enlightening and are presented insofar as they are relevant to future launches into space. Using a light gas gun to launch payloads into orbit has been analyzed. We look at LEO (Low Earth Orbit), GEO (Geosynchronous Earth Orbit), and LO (Lunar Orbit). We present a conceptual design for a large light gas gun called the Jules Verne Launcher (JVL). The JVL can deliver 3.3 metric tons to a 500 km low earth orbit. We anticipate one launch per day. We present the history of light gas guns, the SHARP design and performance, and the JVL design. Another section is devoted to the vehicle environment and resultant design. Lastly, we present a cost analysis. Our results indicated that the JVL will be able to deliver 1000 metric tons of payload to LEO yearly. The cost will be 5{percent} of the best US rocket delivery cost. This technology will enable the next phase of man{close_quote}s exploration of space. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. An Ergonomic Evaluation of the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Space Suit Hard Upper Torso (HUT) Size Effect on Metabolic, Mobility, and Strength Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Christopher; Harvill, Lauren; England, Scott; Young, Karen; Norcross, Jason; Rajulu, Sudhakar

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this project was to assess the performance differences between a nominally sized Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) space suit and a nominal +1 (plus) sized EMU. Method: This study evaluated suit size conditions by using metabolic cost, arm mobility, and arm strength as performance metrics. Results: Differences between the suit sizes were found only in shoulder extension strength being 15.8% greater for the plus size. Discussion: While this study was able to identify motions and activities that were considered to be practically or statistically different, it does not signify that use of a plus sized suit should be prohibited. Further testing would be required that either pertained to a particular mission critical task or better simulates a microgravity environment that the EMU suit was designed to work in.

  10. High-Efficiency Helical Coil Electromagnetic Launcher and High Power Hall-Effect Switch

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-29

    is performed with conventional railgun, augmented railgun, and helical gun launchers and is presented in terms of the launcher constant, inductance... gun launchers and is presented in terms of the launcher constant, inductance gradient, bore diameter, bore length, system resistance, and armature (i.e...sequentially-fired pulse forming networks for linear and non-linear loads," IEEE Transactions on Plasma Science, vol. 35, no. 2, pp. 484-490, 2007. 3 2. T.G

  11. Exploratory development of the reconnection launcher, 1986--1990

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, M.; Widner, M.M.; Cnare, E.C.; Duggin, B.W.; Kaye, R.J.; Freeman, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    We briefly summarize the exploratory development phase for the reconnection launcher. This is an induction launcher which features a contactless, solid armature with either flat-plate or cylindrical geometry. The strategy for successful design is discussed, emphasizing the way we resolve the issues of ohmic heating and high-voltage requirements for high velocity. The indispensable role of a fast-running, mesh-matrix code is stressed. We describe three multistage launchers. One of these achieved muzzle velocity of 1 km/s with a 150-gram flat-plate projectile. The other two have launched cylindrical projectiles at 335 m/s, one with relatively heavy projectiles of 5 kg, the other with relatively light ones of 10 grams. The cylindrical projectiles can be spin-stabilized prior to launch for improved flight. We outline the potential of this technology for earth-to-orbit launch of small satellites. 19 refs., 9 figs.

  12. Exploratory development of the reconnection launcher 1986-1990

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, M.; Widner, M.M.; Cnare, E.C.; Duggin, B.W.; Kaye, R.J.; Freeman, J.R. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper summarizes the exploratory development phase for the reconnection launcher. This is an induction launcher which features a contractless, solid armature with either flat-plate or cylindrical geometry. The strategy for successful design is discussed, emphasizing the way we resolve the issues of ohmic heating and high-voltage requirements for high velocity. The indispensable role of a fast-running, mesh-matrix code is stressed. The authors describe three multistage launchers. One of these achieved muzzle velocity of 1 km/s with a 150-gram flat-plate projectile. The other two have launched cylindrical projectiles at 335 m/s, one with relatively heavy projectiles of 5 kg, the other with relatively light ones of 10 grams. The cylindrical projectiles can be spin-stabilized prior to launch for improved flight. We outline the potential of this technology for earth-to-orbit launch of small satellites.

  13. Direct Energy Exchange Enhancement in Distributed Injection Light Gas Launchers

    SciTech Connect

    Alger, T W; Finucane, R G; Hall, J P; Penetrante, B M; Uphaus, T M

    2000-04-06

    It is not widely acknowledged or appreciated that conventional, two-stage light-gas launchers do not efficiently apply their high breech pressures to the design intent: accelerating the projectile. Our objective in this project was to carry out the analysis, design, construction, and testing of a new class of launchers that will address this limitation. Our particular application is to expand the pressure range of the conventional, two-stage gas launcher to overlap and validate the pressure regimes previously attainable only with shock waves generated by nuclear explosions, lasers, or multistage conventional explosions. That is, these launchers would have the capability to conduct--in a laboratory setting--high-velocity-impact, equation-of-state (EOS) measurements at up to 2-TPa (20 Mbar) pressure levels in high-Z materials. Our design entailed a new class of distributed-injection, gas-dynamic launchers that are designed to use a boat-tail projectile to overcome the fundamental gas-expansion phenomena known as escape velocity (the Riemann limit). Our program included analytical, numerical, and experimental studies of the fast gas release flow technique that is central to the success of our approach. The analyses led us to believe that, in a typical configuration, the pressure will be effectively applied to the projectile in a time short relative to its few-microsecond traverse time; the experimental program we conducted during FY1999 supported these estimates. In addition, our program revealed dramatic increased efficiency in this process that was previously unknown to the launcher community. The most fundamental practical restrictions on the performance of any gas launcher are the ability of the launcher to (1) contain pressure in a reservoir, and (2) effectively apply that pressure to the base of a moving projectile. Our gas-release test-fixture experiments showed that our design was capable of applying nearly twice the pressure to the projectile that is

  14. A preliminary study of pulse-laser powered orbital launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsurayama, Hiroshi; Komurasaki, Kimiya; Arakawa, Yoshihiro

    2009-10-01

    An air-breathing pulse-laser powered orbital launcher has been proposed as an alternative to conventional chemical launch systems. The aim of the present study is to assess its feasibility through the estimation of its achievable payload mass per unit beam power and launch cost. A transfer trajectory from the ground to a geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO) is proposed, and the launch trajectory to its geosynchronous transfer orbit (GTO) is computed using the realistic performance modeled in the pulsejet, ramjet, and rocket flight modes of the launcher. Results show that the launcher can transfer 0.084 kg of payload per 1 MW beam power to a geosynchronous earth orbit. The cost becomes a quarter of existing systems if one can divide a single launch into 24,000 multiple launches.

  15. Modes Interactions Due to Launcher Dynamic Behavior Variations During Flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foucaud, Simon; Gonidou, Luc-Olivier; Daniel, Jerome; Escudero, Luis

    2014-06-01

    Due to propellant consumption, mass and stiffness properties of a launcher are varying in a very wide range in a relatively short time. Consequently, dynamic behavior and first bending modes of the launcher are varying during the flight. This time evolutions can lead to modes interactions with potential impacts on launcher control. The prediction of modal behavior for all instants requires a strong effort of modelling and high computing cost using a classical finite element modelling (FEM) approach. An alternative method with relatively low computational costs has been developed in order to cover a large number of time instants. The approach considers a reference modal basis at a given time as a starting point and then derives the whole flight modal properties using mass and stiffness variations only.This paper intends to present the method and its applications. In a first step, the theoretical aspect of the method is described and results are shown in comparison with FEM results. The method reveals its ability to catch modal interactions occurring in-between reference time instants. Secondly, the method is coupled to a parametric tool in order to estimate the impact of payloads or supporting structures characteristics on launcher excitabilities. Finally, outputs are presented as three-dimensional maps representing launcher excitabilities with respect to time and frequency for a "cloud" of payloads. Results are presented for the next evolution of ARIANE 5 - so called A5ME version. The method gives an overview of the mechanical and piloting excitabilities of the A5ME launcher for a wide flight domain. This is a very powerful tool for estimating the validity of other dimensioning methodologies and the associated margins.

  16. Blocked edges on Eulerian maps and mobiles: application to spanning trees, hard particles and the Ising model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouttier, J.; Di Francesco, P.; Guitter, E.

    2007-07-01

    We introduce Eulerian maps with blocked edges as a general way to implement statistical matter models on random maps by a modification of intrinsic distances. We show how to code these dressed maps by means of mobiles, i.e. decorated trees with labelled vertices, leading to a closed system of recursion relations for their generating functions. We discuss particular solvable cases in detail, as well as various applications of our method to several statistical systems such as spanning trees on quadrangulations, mutually excluding particles on Eulerian triangulations or the Ising model on quadrangulations.

  17. Mesh-matrix analysis method for electromagnetic launchers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, David G.

    1989-01-01

    The mesh-matrix method is a procedure for calculating the current distribution in the conductors of electromagnetic launchers with coil or flat-plate geometry. Once the current distribution is known the launcher performance can be calculated. The method divides the conductors into parallel current paths, or meshes, and finds the current in each mesh by matrix inversion. The author presents procedures for writing equations for the current and voltage relations for a few meshes to serve as a pattern for writing the computer code. An available subroutine package provides routines for field and flux coefficients and equation solution.

  18. Metal vapor vacuum arc switching - Applications and results. [for launchers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cope, D.; Mongeau, P.

    1984-01-01

    The design of metal-vapor vacuum-arc switches (MVSs) for electromagnetic launchers is discussed, and preliminary results are presented for an experimental MVS. The general principles of triggered-vacuum-gap and vacuum-interrupter MVSs are reviewed, and the requirements of electromagnetic launchers are analyzed. High-current design problems such as electrode erosion, current sharing, magnetic effects, and thermal effects are examined. The experimental MVS employs stainless-steel flanges, a glass vacuum vessel, an adjustable electrode gap, autonomous internal magnetic-field coils, and a tungsten-pin trigger assembly. Some results from tests without magnetic augmentation are presented graphically.

  19. Flow Field Analysis of a Future Launcher Configuration during Start

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozic, O.; Otto, H.

    2005-02-01

    Within the German Future Space Launcher Technology Research Program ASTRA several reusable concepts have been investigated. Particularly one dedicated for near-term application consists of an Ariane 5-type expendable core stage and two liquid fly back boosters (LFBB). The present investigation focused on the interaction between the booster and the core stage during ascent phase. The analysis is carried out numerically by means of the DLR unstructured code TAU. The numerical results allow a compressive study of the complicate flow pattern between the boosters and the central core and address the changes on aerodynamic drag between the three configurations considered. Key words: launcher, ASTRA, LFBB, flow simulation, CFD simulation, unstructured grid

  20. Characteristics of a large multijunction launcher for high-power LHCD experiments on JT-60U

    SciTech Connect

    Seki, M.; Ikeda, Y.; Ushigusa, K.; Naito, O.; Kondoh, T.; Wolfe, S.W.; Imai, T. )

    1994-10-15

    This paper presents overview of a large multijunction launcher for JT-60U. The launcher is featured by the multijunction module with the oversized taper waveguide, in order to simplify structure of the launcher. This launcher allows high performances of current drive and current profile control by using very sharp and highly directive spectrum. Initial result of coupling property is also described. A good coupling was observed at a power level of [similar to]0.8 MW with plasma-launcher distance of [lt]14 cm.

  1. Note Launchers: Promoting Active Reading of Mathematics Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helms, Josh W.; Helms, Kimberly Turner

    2010-01-01

    Note launchers, an instructor-designed reading guide, model how to select, decide, and focus upon what textbook material is important to learn. Reading guides are specially-designed study aids that can steer students through difficult parts of assigned readings (Bean, 1996) while encouraging advance preparation. As an example of a reading guide,…

  2. 48. CONTROL PANEL FOR UMBILICAL MAST AND TRENCH DOORS. LAUNCHER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    48. CONTROL PANEL FOR UMBILICAL MAST AND TRENCH DOORS. LAUNCHER ON RIGHT IN BACKGROUND; TRENCH DOORS AND RAIL BEHIND CONTROL PANEL - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  3. 62. VIEW OF FLAME BUCKET BELOW LAUNCHER ON SOUTH END ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    62. VIEW OF FLAME BUCKET BELOW LAUNCHER ON SOUTH END OF LAUNCH PAD. FIRE SUPPRESSION EQUIPMENT RIGHT OF FLAME BUCKET. SOUTH FACE OF MST IS IN BACKGROUND. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  4. Feasibility study of superconducting LSM rocket launcher system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshida, Kinjiro; Ohashi, Takaaki; Shiraishi, Katsuto; Takami, Hiroshi

    1994-01-01

    A feasibility study is presented concerning an application of a superconducting linear synchronous motor (LSM) to a large-scale rocket launcher, whose acceleration guide tube of LSM armature windings is constructed 1,500 meters under the ground. The rocket is released from the linear launcher just after it gets to a peak speed of about 900 kilometers per hour, and it flies out of the guide tube to obtain the speed of 700 kilometers per hour at the height of 100 meters above ground. The linear launcher is brought to a stop at the ground surface for a very short time of 5 seconds by a quick control of deceleration. Very large current variations in the single-layer windings of the LSM armature, which are produced at the higher speed region of 600 to 900 kilometers per hour, are controlled successfully by adopting the double-layer windings. The proposed control method makes the rocket launcher ascend stably in the superconducting LSM system, controlling the Coriolis force.

  5. 58. VIEW OF SOUTHWEST SIDE OF LAUNCHER FROM ABOVE. AFRAME ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    58. VIEW OF SOUTHWEST SIDE OF LAUNCHER FROM ABOVE. A-FRAME PIVOT POINT IN CENTER OF PHOTOGRAPH; NITROGEN CONTROL UNIT IN UPPER LEFT CORNER OF PHOTOGRAPH. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  6. 63. VIEW OF FLAME BUCKET AND LAUNCHER FROM SOUTHEAST. TRICHLOROETHENE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    63. VIEW OF FLAME BUCKET AND LAUNCHER FROM SOUTHEAST. TRICHLOROETHENE RECOVERY TANK LEFT OF FLAME BUCKET; LIQUID OXYGEN CATCH TANK RIGHT OF FLAME BUCKET. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  7. Energy stores and switches for rail-launcher systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weldon, W. F.; Zowarka, R. C.; Marshall, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    An overview of existing switch and power supply technology applicable to space launch, a new candidate pulsed power supply for Earth-to-space rail launcher duty, the inverse railgun flux compressor, and a set of switching experiments to study further the feasibility of Earth-to-space launch are discussed.

  8. 13. Photocopy of drawing of missile launcher from 'Procedures and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Photocopy of drawing of missile launcher from 'Procedures and Drills for the NIKE Ajax System,' Department of the Army Field Manual, FM-44-80 from Institute for Military History, Carlisle Barracks, Carlisle, PA, 1956 - NIKE Missile Battery PR-79, East Windsor Road south of State Route 101, Foster, Providence County, RI

  9. Mobilization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    istic and romantic emotionalism that typifies this genre. Longino, James C., et al. “A Study of World War Procurement and Industrial Mobilization...States. Harrisburg, PA: Military Service Publishing Co., 1941. CARL 355.22 J72b. Written in rough prose , this World War II era document explains the

  10. Launcher Systems Development Cost: Behavior, Uncertainty, Influences, Barriers and Strategies for Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Eric J.

    2001-01-01

    This paper will report on the activities of the IAA Launcher Systems Economics Working Group in preparations for its Launcher Systems Development Cost Behavior Study. The Study goals include: improve launcher system and other space system parametric cost analysis accuracy; improve launcher system and other space system cost analysis credibility; and provide launcher system and technology development program managers and other decisionmakers with useful information on development cost impacts of their decisions. The Working Group plans to explore at least the following five areas in the Study: define and explain development cost behavior terms and concepts for use in the Study; identify and quantify sources of development cost and cost estimating uncertainty; identify and quantify significant influences on development cost behavior; identify common barriers to development cost understanding and reduction; and recommend practical, realistic strategies to accomplish reductions in launcher system development cost.

  11. Modeling the capillary discharge of an electrothermal (ET) launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Least, Travis

    Over the past few decades, different branches of the US Department of Defense (DoD) have invested at improving the field ability of electromagnetic launchers. One such focus has been on achieving hypervelocity launch velocities in excess of 7 km/s for direct launch to space applications [1]. It has been shown that pre-injection is required for this to be achieved. One method of pre-injection which has promise involves using an electro-thermal (ET) due to its ability to achieve the desired velocities with a minimal amount of hot plasma injected into the launcher behind the projectile. Despite the demonstration of pre-injection using this method, polymer ablation is not very well known and this makes it challenging to predict how the system will behave for a given input of electrical power. In this work, the rate of ablation has been studied and predicted using different models to generate the best possible characteristic curve. [1] - Wetz, David A., Francis Stefani, Jerald V. Parker, and Ian R. McNab. "Advancements in the Development of a Plasma-Driven Electromagnetic Launcher." IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MAGNETICS 45.1 (2009): 495--500. IEEE Xplore. Web. 18 Aug. 2012.

  12. Projectile transverse motion and stability in electromagnetic induction launchers

    SciTech Connect

    Shokair, I.R.

    1993-08-01

    The transverse motion of a projectile in an electromagnetic induction launcher is considered. The equations of motion for translation and rotation are derived assuming a rigid projectile and a flyway restoring force per unit length that is proportional to the local displacement. Transverse forces and torques due to energized coils are derived for displaced or tilted projectile elements based on a first order perturbation method. The resulting equations of motion for a rigid projectile composed of multiple elements in a multi-coil launcher are analyzed as a coupled oscillator system of equations and a simple stability condition is derived. The equations of motion are incorporated into the 2-D Slingshot code and numerical solutions for the transverse motion are obtained. For the 20 meter navy launcher parameters we find that stability is achieved with a flyway spring constant of k {approx} 1{times} 10{sup 8} N/m{sup 2}. For k {approx} 1.5 {times} 10{sup 8} N/m{sup 2} and sample coil misalignment modeled as a sine wave of I mm amplitude at wavelengths of one or two meters, the projectile displacement grows to a maximum of 4 mm. This growth is due to resonance between the natural frequency of the Projectile transverse motion and the coil displacement wavelength. This resonance does not persist because of the changing axial velocity. Random coil displacement is also found to cause roughly the same projectile displacement. For the maximum displacement a rough estimate of the transverse pressure is 50 bars.

  13. Propulsive jet influence on generic launcher base flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephan, S.; Wu, J.; Radespiel, R.

    2015-12-01

    Afterbody flow phenomena represent a significant source of uncertainties in the design of a launcher. Therefore, there is a demand for measuring such flows in wind tunnels. For propulsive jet simulation a new jet facility was integrated into a hypersonic/supersonic wind tunnel. The jet simulation resembles the generic model of a staged rocket launcher. The design and the qualification of the facility are reported. This includes measurements of pressure, temperature and Mach number distribution. Pressure and Schlieren measurements are conducted in the wake of the generic launcher. The unsteady pressure characteristics at the generic rocket base and fairing are analyzed for supersonic and hypersonic freestream. The influence of the under-expanded jet is reported and the jet temperatures are varied. On the base fluctuations at a Strouhal number around 0.25 dominates supersonic freestream flows. Additionally, a fluctuation level increase on the base is observed for Strouhal numbers above 0.75 in hypersonic flow regime, which is attributed to the interactions of wake flow and jet.

  14. Variable dual-frequency electrostatic wave launcher for plasma applications.

    PubMed

    Jorns, Benjamin; Sorenson, Robert; Choueiri, Edgar

    2011-12-01

    A variable tuning system is presented for launching two electrostatic waves concurrently in a magnetized plasma. The purpose of this system is to satisfy the wave launching requirements for plasma applications where maximal power must be coupled into two carefully tuned electrostatic waves while minimizing erosion to the launching antenna. Two parallel LC traps with fixed inductors and variable capacitors are used to provide an impedance match between a two-wave source and a loop antenna placed outside the plasma. Equivalent circuit analysis is then employed to derive an analytical expression for the normalized, average magnetic flux density produced by the antenna in this system as a function of capacitance and frequency. It is found with this metric that the wave launcher can couple to electrostatic modes at two variable frequencies concurrently while attenuating noise from the source signal at undesired frequencies. An example based on an experiment for plasma heating with two electrostatic waves is used to demonstrate a procedure for tailoring the wave launcher to accommodate the frequency range and flux densities of a specific two-wave application. This example is also used to illustrate a method based on averaging over wave frequencies for evaluating the overall efficacy of the system. The wave launcher is shown to be particularly effective for the illustrative example--generating magnetic flux densities in excess of 50% of the ideal case at two variable frequencies concurrently--with a high adaptability to a number of plasma dynamics and heating applications.

  15. Variable dual-frequency electrostatic wave launcher for plasma applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorns, Benjamin; Sorenson, Robert; Choueiri, Edgar

    2011-12-01

    A variable tuning system is presented for launching two electrostatic waves concurrently in a magnetized plasma. The purpose of this system is to satisfy the wave launching requirements for plasma applications where maximal power must be coupled into two carefully tuned electrostatic waves while minimizing erosion to the launching antenna. Two parallel LC traps with fixed inductors and variable capacitors are used to provide an impedance match between a two-wave source and a loop antenna placed outside the plasma. Equivalent circuit analysis is then employed to derive an analytical expression for the normalized, average magnetic flux density produced by the antenna in this system as a function of capacitance and frequency. It is found with this metric that the wave launcher can couple to electrostatic modes at two variable frequencies concurrently while attenuating noise from the source signal at undesired frequencies. An example based on an experiment for plasma heating with two electrostatic waves is used to demonstrate a procedure for tailoring the wave launcher to accommodate the frequency range and flux densities of a specific two-wave application. This example is also used to illustrate a method based on averaging over wave frequencies for evaluating the overall efficacy of the system. The wave launcher is shown to be particularly effective for the illustrative example—generating magnetic flux densities in excess of 50% of the ideal case at two variable frequencies concurrently—with a high adaptability to a number of plasma dynamics and heating applications.

  16. Improved Satellite Launcher Navigation Performance by Using the Reference Trajectory Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-16

    figuration is augmented to estimate the difference between the launcher and the reference tra- jectory attitude data. The assessment of the precision gain...information. Also, the robustness to a GPS outage is greatly improved for all estimated values. The augmented model can with- stand errors in the variances of...This model is augmented to estimate the difference between the launcher and reference attitude. Since the launcher attitude dynamics equation is given

  17. Design and coupling characteristics of lower-hybrid launcher for TPX

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, A.E.; Porkolab, M. ); Bernabei, S.; Greenough, N. ); Goranson, P.; Swain, D.; Yugo, J. )

    1994-10-15

    The physics and mechanical design of the LHCD launcher for the proposed TPX experiment is presented. The main role of this system is current drive and current profile control, requiring a flexible and well defined spectrum. The launcher features 32 independently phasable guides in each of 4 rows. Coupling calculations indicate that low reflection coefficients can be achieved over the whole range of phasing by adjusting the launcher position. Good directivity is predicted over a wide range of densities. The mechanical design of the launcher is complicated by the high expected thermal loads and radiation fluxes. A design which incorporates these requirements is outlined.

  18. Design and performance of a multi-stage cylindrical reconnection launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, R.J.; Brawley, E.L.; Duggin, B.W.; Cnare, E.C.; Rovang, D.C.; Widner, M.M. )

    1991-01-01

    A multi-stage, cylindrical reconnection launcher is being tested to demonstrate electrically-contactless, induction-launch technology for solenoidal coil geometry. A 6-stage launcher system is being developed to accelerate a 5 kg mass from rest to 300 m/s with a stored energy of {ge}200 kJ per coil stage. This launcher will provide data fro model verification and the engineering basis for proceeding with larger multistage systems. This paper describes the design of the multi-stage, discrete-coil launcher. Integration of coils, projectile, power systems, and real-time fire control are discussed. Results of multi-stage firings are presented.

  19. Electromechanical Dynamics Simulations of Superconducting LSM Rocket Launcher System in Attractive-Mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshida, Kinjiro; Hayashi, Kengo; Takami, Hiroshi

    1996-01-01

    Further feasibility study on a superconducting linear synchronous motor (LSM) rocket launcher system is presented on the basis of dynamic simulations of electric power, efficiency and power factor as well as the ascending motions of the launcher and rocket. The advantages of attractive-mode operation are found from comparison with repulsive-mode operation. It is made clear that the LSM rocket launcher system, of which the long-stator is divided optimally into 60 sections according to launcher speeds, can obtain high efficiency and power factor.

  20. The Physics Performance Of The Front Steering Launcher For The ITER ECRH Upper Port

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, M.; Chavan, R.; Nikkola, P.; Sanchez, F.; Sauter, O.; Shidara, H.; Ramponi, G.; Saibene, G.; Zohm, H.

    2005-09-26

    The capability of any given e.m.-wave plasma heating system to be utilized for physics applications depends strongly on the technical properties of the launching antenna (or launcher). An effective ECH launcher must project a small mm-wave beam spot size far into the plasma and 'steer' the beam across a large fraction of the plasma cross section (along the resonance surface). Thus the choice in the launcher concept and design may either severely limit or enhance the capability of a heating system to be effectively applied for physics applications, such as sawtooth stabilization, control of the Neoclassical Tearing Mode (NTM), Edge Localized Mode (ELM) control, etc. Presently, two antenna concepts are under consideration for the ITER upper port ECH launcher: front steering (FS) and remote steering (RS) launchers. The RS launcher has the technical advantage of easier maintenance access to the steering mirror, which is isolated from the torus vacuum. The FS launcher places the steering mirror near the plasma increasing the technical challenges, but significantly enhancing the focusing and steering capabilities of the launcher, offering a threefold increase in NTM stabilization efficiency over the RS launcher as well as the potential for application to other critical physics issues such as ELM or sawtooth control.

  1. Design of Launcher Towards Spacecraft Comfort: Ariane 6 Objectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourey, Patrick; Lambare, Hadrien; Valbuena, Matias F.

    2014-06-01

    Preliminary advanced studies were performed recently to select the possible concepts for a launcher that could succeed to Ariane 5. During the end of 2012 Space Ministry Conference, a configuration defining the propellant of the stages and the coarse staging ("PPH") was frozen in order to engage the preliminary selection concept studies. The first phase consisted to select the main features of the architecture in order to go deeper in the different matters or the advanced studies. The concept was selected mid of 2013.During all these phases of the preliminary project, different criteria (such as the recurring cost which is a major one) were used to quote the different concepts, among which the "payload comfort", ie the minimization of the environment generated by the launcher toward the satellites.The minimization of the environment was first expressed in term of objectives in the Mission Requirement Document (MRD) for the different mechanical environment such as quasi-static loads, dynamic loads, acoustics, shocks... Criteria such as usable volume, satellites frequency requirement and interface requirement are also expressed in the MRD.The definition of these different criteria was of course fixed taking benefit from the launcher operator experience based on a long story of dealing with spacecraft-launcher interface issues on Ariane, Soyouz and Vega. The general idea is to target improved or similar levels than those currently applicable for Ariane 5. For some environment for which a special need is anticipated from the potential end users, a special effort is aimed.The preliminary advanced study phase is currently running and has to address specific topics such as the definition of the upper part layout including geometry ofthe fairing, the definition of the launch pad with preliminary ideas to minimize acoustics and blast wave or first calculations on dimensioning dynamic load- cases such as thrust oscillations of the solid rocket motors (SRM).The present paper

  2. Assessing the role of syringe dispensing machines and mobile van outlets in reaching hard-to-reach and high-risk groups of injecting drug users (IDUs): a review.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Mofizul; Conigrave, Katherine M

    2007-10-24

    Reaching hard-to-reach and high-risk injecting drug users (IDUs) is one of the most important challenges for contemporary needle syringe programs (NSPs). The aim of this review is to examine, based upon the available international experience, the effectiveness of syringe vending machines and mobile van/bus based NSPs in making services more accessible to these hard-to-reach and high-risk groups of IDUs. A literature search revealed 40 papers/reports, of which 18 were on dispensing machines (including vending and exchange machines) and 22 on mobile vans. The findings demonstrate that syringe dispensing machines and mobile vans are promising modalities of NSPs, which can make services more accessible to the target group and in particular to the harder-to-reach and higher-risk groups of IDUs. Their anonymous and confidential approaches make services attractive, accessible and acceptable to these groups. These two outlets were found to be complementary to each other and to other modes of NSPs. Services through dispensing machines and mobile vans in strategically important sites are crucial elements in continuing efforts in reducing the spread of HIV and other blood borne viruses among IDUs.

  3. Projectile transverse motion and stability in electromagnetic induction launchers

    SciTech Connect

    Shokair, I.R.

    1993-12-31

    The transverse motion of a projectile in an electromagnetic induction launcher is considered. The equations of motion for translation and rotation are derived assuming a rigid projectile and a flyway restoring force per unit length that is proportional to the local displacement. Linearized transverse forces and torques due to energized coils are derived for displaced or tilted armature elements based on a first order perturbation method. The resulting equations of motion for a rigid projectile composed of multiple elements in a multi-coil launcher are analyzed as a coupled oscillator system of equations and a simple linear stability condition is derived. The equations of motion are incorporated into the 2-D Slingshot circuit code and numerical solutions for the transverse motion are obtained. For a launcher with a 10 cm bore radius with a 40 cm long solid armature, we find that stability is achieved with a restoring force (per unit length) constant of k {approx} 1 {times} 10{sup 8} N/m{sup 2}. For k = 1.5 {times} 10{sup 8} N/m{sup 2} and sample coil misalignment modeled as a sine wave of 1 mm amplitude at wavelengths of one or two meters, the projectile displacement grows to a maximum of 4 mm. This growth is due to resonance between the natural frequency of the projectile transverse motion and the coil displacement wavelength. This resonance does not persist because of the changing axial velocity. Random coil displacement is also found to cause roughly the same projectile displacement. For the maximum displacement a rough estimate of the transverse pressure is 50 bars. Results for a wound armature with uniform current density throughout show very similar displacements.

  4. Design Performance of Front Steering-Type Electron Cyclotron Launcher for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, K.; Imai, T.; Kobayashi, N.; Sakamoto, K.; Kasugai, A.; Hayakawa, A.; Mori, S.; Mohri, K.

    2005-01-15

    The performance of a front steering (FS)-type electron cyclotron launcher designed for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is evaluated with a thermal, electromagnetic, and nuclear analysis of the components; a mechanical test of a spiral tube for the steering mirror; and a rotational test of bearings. The launcher consists of a front shield and a launcher plug where three movable optic mirrors to steer incident multimegawatt radio-frequency beam power, waveguide components, nuclear shields, and vacuum windows are installed. The windows are located behind a closure plate to isolate the transmission lines from the radioactivated circumstance (vacuum vessel). The waveguide lines of the launcher are doglegged to reduce the direct neutron streaming toward the vacuum windows and other components. The maximum stresses on the critical components such as the steering mirror, its cooling tube, and the front shield are less than their allowable stresses. It was also identified that the stress on the launcher, which yielded from electromagnetic force caused by plasma disruption, was a little larger than the criteria, and a modification of the launcher plug structure was necessary. The nuclear analysis result shows that the neutron shield capability of the launcher satisfies the shield criteria of the ITER. It concludes that the design of the FS launcher is generally suitable for application to the ITER.

  5. 10. 22'X34' original blueprint, VariableAngle Launcher, 'SIDE VIEW CAMERA CARSTEEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. 22'X34' original blueprint, Variable-Angle Launcher, 'SIDE VIEW CAMERA CAR-STEEL FRAME AND AXLES' drawn at 1/2'=1'-0'. (BOURD Sketch # 209124). - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Camera Car & Track, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  6. 13. 22'X34' original vellum, VariableAngle Launcher, 'SIDEVIEW CAMERA CAR TRACK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. 22'X34' original vellum, Variable-Angle Launcher, 'SIDEVIEW CAMERA CAR TRACK DETAILS' drawn at 1/4'=1'-0' (BUORD Sketch # 208078, PAPW 908). - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Camera Car & Track, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  7. Inhibited Shaped Charge Launcher Testing of Spacecraft Shield Designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosch, Donald J.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes a test program in which several orbital debris shield designs were impact tested using the inhibited shaped charge launcher facility at Southwest Research Institute. This facility enables researchers to study the impact of one-gram aluminum projectiles on various shielding designs at velocities above 11 km/s. A total of twenty tests were conducted on targets provided by NASA-MSFC. This report discusses in detail the shield design, the projectile parameters and the test configuration used for each test. A brief discussion of the target damage is provided, as the detailed analysis of the target response will be done by NASA-MSFC.

  8. British government, industry agree to fund Hotel launcher studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, D. A.

    1986-02-01

    A program status assessment is presented for the horizontal takeoff and landing 'Hotol' single-stage-to-orbit space launcher, for which parallel, two-year airframe and propulsion system proof-of-concept studies have been approved. A two-year initial development program for the airframe would be followed by a four-year development and manufacturing phase that would begin upon the propulsion system concept's successful demonstration. Flight trials could begin in 1996. A number of significant modifications have already been made to the initial design concept, such as to the foreplanes, afterbody, engine intake, and orbital control system.

  9. Variational Dynamic Coupled-Loads Analysis within the Frame of Launcher Upper Stage Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meitzner, R.; Abdoly, K.; Beuchel, W.; Stellino, W.

    2014-06-01

    During development the definition of realistic mechanical loads is a major challenge and milestone for space launcher programs. Especially the definition of dynamic loads for large structures, e.g. cryogenic tanks, and equipments, based on multi-variational payload configurations is a key element in the frame of new launcher upper stage developments.This paper presents a methodology to define realistic dynamic loads based on multi-variational dynamic coupled- loads analyses in the global launcher system up to equipment level.The complex challenge towards this task is to perform about 256000 complete coupled-loads analyses for the entire launcher upper stage including various recovery items within two weeks.The shown example describes multi-variational dynamic coupled-loads analyses and their post processing for the complete Ariane 5 Midlife Evolution launcher including the new upper stage using Nastran and PUMA3D software.

  10. Numerical predictions of EML (electromagnetic launcher) system performance

    SciTech Connect

    Schnurr, N.M.; Kerrisk, J.F.; Davidson, R.F.

    1987-01-01

    The performance of an electromagnetic launcher (EML) depends on a large number of parameters, including the characteristics of the power supply, rail geometry, rail and insulator material properties, injection velocity, and projectile mass. EML system performance is frequently limited by structural or thermal effects in the launcher (railgun). A series of computer codes has been developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory to predict EML system performance and to determine the structural and thermal constraints on barrel design. These codes include FLD, a two-dimensional electrostatic code used to calculate the high-frequency inductance gradient and surface current density distribution for the rails; TOPAZRG, a two-dimensional finite-element code that simultaneously analyzes thermal and electromagnetic diffusion in the rails; and LARGE, a code that predicts the performance of the entire EML system. Trhe NIKE2D code, developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, is used to perform structural analyses of the rails. These codes have been instrumental in the design of the Lethality Test System (LTS) at Los Alamos, which has an ultimate goal of accelerating a 30-g projectile to a velocity of 15 km/s. The capabilities of the individual codes and the coupling of these codes to perform a comprehensive analysis is discussed in relation to the LTS design. Numerical predictions are compared with experimental data and presented for the LTS prototype tests.

  11. Methodologies for launcher-payload coupled dynamic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fransen, S. H. J. A.

    2012-06-01

    An important step in the design and verification process of spacecraft structures is the coupled dynamic analysis with the launch vehicle in the low-frequency domain, also referred to as coupled loads analysis (CLA). The objective of such analyses is the computation of the dynamic environment of the spacecraft (payload) in terms of interface accelerations, interface forces, center of gravity (CoG) accelerations as well as the internal state of stress. In order to perform an efficient, fast and accurate launcher-payload coupled dynamic analysis, various methodologies have been applied and developed. The methods are related to substructuring techniques, data recovery techniques, the effects of prestress and fluids and time integration problems. The aim of this paper was to give an overview of these methodologies and to show why, how and where these techniques can be used in the process of launcher-payload coupled dynamic analysis. In addition, it will be shown how these methodologies fit together in a library of procedures which can be used with the MSC.Nastran™ solution sequences.

  12. Chunk projectile launch using the Sandia Hypervelocity Launcher Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Chhabildas, L.C.; Trucano, T.G.; Reinhart, W.D.; Hall, C.A.

    1994-07-01

    An experimental technique is described to launch an intact ``chunk,`` i.e. a 0.3 cm thick by 0.6 cm diameter cylindrical titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V) flyer, to 10.2 km/s. The ability to launch fragments having such an aspect ratio is important for hypervelocity impact phenomenology studies. The experimental techniques used to accomplish this launch were similar but not identical to techniques developed for the Sandia HyperVelocity Launcher (HVL). A confined barrel impact is crucial in preventing the two-dimensional effects from dominating the loading response of the projectile chunk. The length to diameter ratio of the metallic chunk that is launched to 10.2 km/s is 0.5 and is an order of magnitude larger than those accomplished using the conventional hypervelocity launcher. The multi-dimensional, finite-difference (finite-volume), hydrodynamic code CTH was used to evaluate and assess the acceleration characteristics i.e., the in-bore ballistics of the chunky projectile launch. A critical analysis of the CTH calculational results led to the final design and the experimental conditions that were used in this study. However, the predicted velocity of the projectile chunk based on CTH calculations was {approximately} 6% lower than the measured velocity of {approximately}10.2 km/S.

  13. Comparative study of component erosion for electromagnetic and electrothermal launchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourham, M. A.; Hankins, O. E.; Gilligan, J. G.; Hurley, J. D.; Earnhart, J. R.

    1993-01-01

    The electrothermal launcher SIRENS has been used to study the erosion of critical components (rails and insulators) of plasma-driven launchers. SIRENS can produce high-density (above 10 exp 25/cu m) low-temperature (1-3 eV) plasma, formed by the ablation of the insulator (Lexan), with currents up to 100 kA. The incident heat flux varies between 2 to 90 GW/sq m over 100 microsec duration, for input energies 1-10 kJ. Erosion studies have been performed on several insulators, pure and coated metals, alloys and several graphite grades. The fraction of the total incident energy that is transmitted to the eroded surface varies from 12 to 30 percent for the materials tested and decreases to 5-7 percent as the incident energy fluence increases. Such reduction in erosion for a given incident fluence is due to the vapor shield effect. The scaling law for the energy transmission factor through the vapor shield layer was obtained for the exposed materials.

  14. Studies to reduce material erosion in electrothermal launchers

    SciTech Connect

    Gilligan, J.; Bourham, M.; Hankins, O.; Auciello, O.; Tallavarjula, S.; Mobanti, R. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that during the exposure of launcher components of high heat fluxes a vapor shield (plasma boundary layer) is formed which absorbs a fraction of the incoming energy, and thus naturally reduces the surface erosion. Computer simulation has shown that a strong externally applied magnetic field parallel to the surface may reduce the surface erosion, since the energy transport though the vapor shield will be reduced due to decreased turbulence. The experimental electrothermal launcher device SIRENS has been operated to measure the erosion of material surfaces subjected to high heat flux from a high density low temperature plasma (1-3 eV) with a strong applied magnetic field. The plasma is produced by the ablation of the insulator (Lexan), with currents up to 100 kA over a pulse length of 100{mu}s, and flows through a cylindrical barrel which serves as the material sample. Ablation and erosion for both the insulator and sample surfaces are caused by convection and radiation emitted from the plasma. The ablated thickness of the Lexan insulator compares favorably with predicted values. The key parameter is f, the fraction of total incident energy that is transmitted to the eroding surface which is flux and material dependent but in the range 5-20%.

  15. Effect of the electric field pattern on the generation of fast electrons in front of lower hybrid launchers

    SciTech Connect

    Valade, Laurent Ekedahl, Annika; Colas, Laurent; Goniche, Marc; Hillairet, Julien; Fuchs, Vladimir; Petrzilka, Vaclav; Li, Miaohui; Zhang, Bin

    2015-12-10

    The effect of the detailed waveguide spectrum on the electron acceleration has been studied for the 3.7 GHz LHCD launchers in Tore Supra, i.e. the ITER-like passive-active multijunction (PAM) launcher and the fully-active-multijunction (FAM) launcher, using test electron modelling technique. The detailed launched antenna wave spectrum is used as input to the code that computes the dynamics of the electrons in the electric field. Comparison with the LHCD launchers in EAST, operating at 2.45 GHz and 4.6 GHz, has also been made. The simulations show that the PAM-design generates lower flux of fast electrons than FAM-launchers, this could be the consequence of the wider waveguide of PAM-launcher (14.65 mm for Tore-Supra) than FAM-launcher (8 mm for Tore-Supra)

  16. Characterization of the supersonic wake of a generic space launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreyer, A.-M.; Stephan, S.; Radespiel, R.

    2017-03-01

    The wake flow of a generic axisymmetric space-launcher model is investigated experimentally for flow cases with and without propulsive jet to gain insight into the wake-flow phenomena at a supersonic stage of the flight trajectory which is especially critical with respect to dynamic loads on the structure. Measurements are performed at Mach 2.9 and a Reynolds number Re D = 1.3 × 106 based on model diameter D. The nozzle exit velocity of the jet is at Mach 2.5, and the flow is moderately underexpanded ( p e/ p ∞ = 5.7). The flow topology is described based on velocity measurements in the wake by means of particle image velocimetry and schlieren visualizations. Mean and fluctuating mass-flux profiles are obtained from hot-wire measurements, and unsteady wall-pressure measurements on the main-body base are performed simultaneously. This way, the evolution of the wake flow and its spectral content can be observed along with the footprint of this highly dynamic flow on the launcher main-body base. For the case without propulsive jet, a large separated zone is forming downstream of the main body shoulder, and the flow is reattaching further downstream on the afterbody. The afterexpanding propulsive jet (air) causes a displacement of the shear layer away from the wall, preventing the reattachment of the flow. In the spectral analysis of the baseline case, a dominant frequency around St D = 0.25 is found in the pressure-fluctuation signal at the main-body base of the launcher. This frequency is related to the shedding of the separation bubble and is less pronounced in the presence of the propulsive jet. In the shear layer itself, the spectra obtained from the hot-wire signal have a more broadband low-frequency content, which also reflects the characteristic frequency of turbulent structures convected in the shear layer, a swinging motion ( St D = 0.6), as well as the radial flapping motion of the shear layer ( St D = 0.85), respectively. Moving downstream along the

  17. Impact of Launchers on the Environment in French Guiana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, S.; Chemoul, B.

    2012-01-01

    The main combustion products of the Ariane 5 solid rocket boosters are alumina and chlorhyde gas. When the launcher lift off the significant concentrations of this components are around the launch zone. We use samplers to evaluate the concentrations of this two elements. To optimize the localisation of the samplers we use a model to obtain the projected traces of the combustion cloud according to meteorological data (software sarrim). During the first seconds of takes 1000 m3 of water flood the base right to decrease the acoustic vibration. The major parts of the pollutants fall close to the launch zone and acidic cloud is formed. Once having stabilized the cloud begins diluting, it is subjected to the influence of the different layers of wind. To measure air quality we use first continuous analysers, secondly containers with distilled water to sample the acidic particles from the cloud. We also monitor the physicochemical quality of water in a river near the launch zone, the impact of the combustion products on vegetation, the aquatic fauna. Noise and vibrations are also measured. For terrestrial fauna like birds, we monitor the general population and a colony of wade. The most important colony of this species is located on the base : around 75% of the population of the French Guiana. We use also a new protocol to estimate the impact of launch by measuring the thickness of eggshells. We use research results which show that calcium can be replaced by alumina. When the thickness of eggshells is thin, the reproduction can be affected. For each measurement campaign, we have more than 100 sites and around 600 samples. The results shows that the land around the space centre is like a natural refuge. The impact of the launches is low, hunting is forbidden and security personal controls the zone base is a protected zone. The space centre is now a natural wildlife refuge. For the two new launchers, Vega and Soyuz, we will also monitor the environmental impact of the launch

  18. Reconnection launcher projectile heating using the modified REGGIE code

    SciTech Connect

    Freemen, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    Modified REGGIE is a variant of the REGGIE reconnection launcher code. It was written to provide a more economical tool for studying multi-stage projectile heating. The validity of the approximations made in modified REGGIE was determined by comparisons with both full REGGIE and WARP-10 computations. Modified REGGIE runs about seven times faster than full REGGIE. Modified REGGIE was used to study projectile heating for a specific force profile proposed by M. Cowan. The total energy dissipated after seven stages was reduced by a factor of about eight compared to the present day conventional discrete coil system. This reduction would allow higher peak velocities to be achieved prior to ablation. 5 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Plasma-material interaction in electrothermal and electromagnetic launchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourham, M. A.; Gilligan, J. G.; Hankins, O. E.

    1993-07-01

    Various material surfaces have been exposed to high heat fluxes from 2 to 80 GW/sq m over 100 microsec duration using the electrothermal launcher, SIRENS. The vapor shield is effective in reducing the heat to the ablating surface, and the energy transmission factor through the vapor shield decreases as the incident heat flux increases. Results show good agreement with code predictions. Visible light emission spectra have been observed both in-bore and from the muzzle flash of the barrel, and from the flash of the source. Measurements of visible emission from the source indicate time averaged temperatures of 1 to 3 eV, and about 1 to 2 eV along the axis of the device, which agree with the theory and experimental measurements of the average heat flux and plasma conductivity.

  20. Design and performance of a multi-stage cylindrical reconnection launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, R.J.; Duggin, B.W.; Cnare, E.C.; Rovang, D.C.; Widner, M.M. ); Brawley, E.L. )

    1989-01-01

    A multi-stage, cylindrical, reconnection launcher is being tested to demonstrate electrically-contactless, induction-launch technology for solenoidal coil geometry. A 6-stage launcher system is being developed to accelerate a 5 kg mass from rest to 300 m/s with a stored energy of {ge}200 kJ per coil stage. This launcher will provide data for model verification and the engineering basis for proceeding with larger multistage systems. This paper describes the design of the multi-stage, discrete-coil launcher. Integration of coils, projectile, power systems, and real-time fire control are discussed. Results of multi-stage firings are presented. 6 refs., 10 figs.

  1. Advanced concepts for electromagnetic launcher power supplies incorporating magnetic flux compression

    SciTech Connect

    Driga, M.D. . Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering); Fair, H.D. )

    1991-01-01

    Electromagnetic coil launchers offer the potential for extremely high efficiency, flexible, noncontracting, hypervelocity electromagnetic accelerators. Unfortunately, their implementation and development has been severely limited by the lack of compact power supplies capable of providing the required high energy and high powers. Integrating novel magnetic flux compression features into multistage rotating machines provides the flexible means for generating tailored, high-energy, high-power electromagnetic pulses required to efficiently drive these promising coil launchers. This paper presents advanced concepts of high energy power supplies for coil launchers. These concepts are designed to produce high inductive compression ratios and large current and magnetic field multiplication ratios in the range of megamperes of current and gigawatts of active power. As a consequence of the flexibility of multiwinding rotating generators, such designs provide an extensive range of output pulse shaping in single or multiple pulses, enabling optimum operation of the coil launcher.

  2. WARP-10: A numerical simulation model for the cylindrical reconnection launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Widner, M.M.

    1989-01-01

    A fully self-consistent computer simulation code called WARP-10, used for modelling the Reconnection Launcher, is described. WARP-10 has been compared with various experiments with good agreement for performance and heating. Simulations predict that it is possible to obtain nearly uniform acceleration with high efficiency and low armature heating. There does not appear to be an armature heating limit to velocity provided the armature mass can be sufficiently large. Simulation results are presented which show it is possible to obtain conditions needed for Earth-to-Orbit (ETO) launch applications (4.15 km/s and a 950 kg launch mass). This 3100-stage launcher has an efficiency of 47.2% and a final ohmic energy/kinetic energy = .000146. The mode of launcher operation is similar to a traveling water induction launcher and is produced by properly times and tuned discrete stages. Further optimization and much high velocities appear possible. 15 refs., 6 figs.

  3. WARP-10; A numerical simulation model for the cylindrical reconnection launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Widner, M.M. )

    1991-01-01

    In this paper a fully self-consistent computer simulation code called WARP-10, used for modelling the Reconnection Launcher, is described. WARP-10 has been compared with various experiments with good agreement for performance and heating. Simulations predict that it is possible to obtain nearly uniform acceleration with high efficiency and low armature heating. There does not appear to be an armature heating limit to velocity provided the armature mass can be sufficiently large. Simulation results are presented which show it is possible to obtain conditions needed for Earth-to-Orbit (ETO) launch applications (4.15 km/s and a 850 kg launch mass). This 3100-stage launcher has an efficiency of 47.2% and a final ohmic energy/kinetic energy - .00146. The mode of launcher operation is similar to a traveling wave induction launcher and is produced by properly timed and tuned discrete stages. Further optimization and much higher velocities appear possible.

  4. Microwave impedance matching strategies of an applicator supplied by a bi-directional magnetron waveguide launcher.

    PubMed

    Roussy, Georges; Kongmark, Nils

    2003-01-01

    It is shown that a bi-directional waveguide launcher can be used advantageously for reducing the reflection coefficient mismatch of an input impedance of an applicator. In a simple bi-directional waveguide launcher, the magnetron is placed in the waveguide and generates a nominal field distribution with significant output impedance in both directions of the waveguide. If a standing wave is tolerated in the torus, which connects the launcher and the applicator, the power transfer from the magnetron to the applicator can be optimal, without using special matching devices. It is also possible to match the bi-directional launcher with two inductance stubs near the antenna of the magnetron and use them for supplying a two-input applicator without reflection.

  5. Study of the modelling of an electromagnetic launcher of fire extinguishing loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frunzulica, Florin; Oncescu, Cosmin; Dumitrache, Alexandru; Vintea, Adela

    2016-06-01

    The problem of launchers used in civil applications is a topical issue. The role of a launcher is to launch objects with a certain speed towards certain goals like for example dangerous fire outbreaks (drilling areas, fires in buildings). This paper is aiming to present the theoretical aspects and results regarding the launching objects, in this case spheres that contains firefighting substance, during the launching stage, the ballistic stage and the impact stage with a solid surface.

  6. 10. DRIVE TRUCK ASSEMBLY OF MOBILE SERVICE STRUCTURE IN POSITION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. DRIVE TRUCK ASSEMBLY OF MOBILE SERVICE STRUCTURE IN POSITION NEXT TO LAUNCHER BUILDING SHOWING CHASES, DUCTS, PIPES AND CONDUITS; VIEW TO NORTHWEST. - Cape Canaveral Air Station, Launch Complex 17, Facility 28501, East end of Lighthouse Road, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  7. "It Is Hard to Stay in England": Itineraries, Routes, and Dead Ends--An (Im)mobility Study of Nurses Who Became Carers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuban, Sondra

    2010-01-01

    This article presents findings from an Economic Social Research Council (ESRC) study on the roles of education in the trajectories of health care professionals who migrated to England and became carers. The study looks at the downward mobility and deskilling of these women, and their struggles to reverse their bungled career paths. The author maps…

  8. Rockot - a new cost effective launcher for small satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosenkis, Regina

    1996-01-01

    Daimler-Benz Aerospace of Germany and the Russian Khrunichev State Research and Production Space Center have formed a jointly owned EUROCKOT Launch Services GmbH to offer worldwide cost effective launch services for the ROCKOT launch vehicle. ROCKOT, produced by Khrunichev, builder of the famous PROTON launcher, aims at the market of small and medium size satellites ranging from 300 to 1800 kg to be launched into low earth or sunsynchronous orbits. These comprize scientific, earth observation and polar meteorological satellites as well as the new generation of small communication satellites in low earth orbits, known as the ``Constellations''. ROCKOT is a three stage liquid propellant launch vehicle, composed of a former Russian SS 19 strategic missile, which has been withdrawn from military use, and a highly sophisticated, flight-proven upper stage named Breeze, which is particularly suited for a variety of civic and commercial space applications. Usable payload envelope has a length of 4.75 meters and a maximum diameter of 2.26 meters for accomodating the payload within the payload fairing. ROCKOT can also accomodate multiple payloads which can be deployed into the same or different orbits. So far ROCKOT has been successfully launched three times from Baikonur. The commercial launch services on ROCKOT from the Plesetsk launch site, Russia, will begin in 1997 and will be available worldwide at a highly competitive price.

  9. High velocity electromagnetic particle launcher for aerosol production studies

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, D.A.; Rader, D.J.

    1986-05-01

    This report describes the development of a new device for study of metal combustion, breakup and production of aerosols in a high velocity environment. Metal wires are heated and electromagnetically launched with this device to produce molten metal droplets moving at velocities ranging up to about Mach 1. Such tests are presently intended to simulate the behavior of metal streamers ejected from a high-explosive detonation. A numerical model of the launcher performance in terms of sample properties, sample geometry and pulser electrical parameters is presented which can be used as a tool for design of specific test conditions. Results from several tests showing the range of sample velocities accessible with this device are described and compared with the model. Photographic measurements showing the behavior of tungsten and zirconium metal droplets are presented. Estimates of the Weber breakup and drag on the droplets, as well as calculations of the droplet trajectories, are described. Such studies may ultimately be useful in assessing environmental hazards in the handling and storage of devices containing metallic plutonium.

  10. Development of an accelerating-piston implosion-driven launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huneault, Justin; Loiseau, Jason; Higgins, Andrew

    2013-06-01

    The ability to soft-launch projectiles at velocities exceeding 10 km/s is of interest to several scientific fields, including orbital debris impact testing and equation of state research. Current soft-launch technologies have reached a performance plateau below this operating range. The energy and power density of high explosives provides a possible avenue to reach this velocity if used to dynamically compress a light driver gas to significantly higher pressures and temperatures compared to light-gas guns. In the implosion-driven launcher (IDL), linear implosion of a pressurized tube drives a strong shock into the gas ahead of the tube pinch, thereby forming an increasingly long column of compressed gas which can be used to propel a projectile. The McGill IDL has demonstrated the ability to launch a 0.1-g projectile to 9.1 km/s. This study focuses on the implementation of a novel launch cycle wherein the explosively driven pinch is accelerated down the length of the tube in order to maintain a relatively constant projectile base pressure early in the launch cycle. The experimental development of an accelerating driver which utilizes an explosive lens to phase the detonation wave is presented. The design and experimental performance of an accelerating-piston IDL is also discussed.

  11. Development of an accelerating piston implosion-driven launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huneault, J.; Loiseau, J.; Higgins, A. J.

    2014-05-01

    The ability to soft-launch projectiles to velocities exceeding 10 km/s is of interest for a number of scientific fields, including orbital debris impact testing and equation of state research. Current soft-launch technologies have reached a performance plateau below this operating range. In the implosion-driven launcher (ILD) concept, explosives are used to dynamically compress a light driver gas to significantly higher pressures and temperatures than the propellant of conventional light-gas guns. The propellant of the IDL is compressed through the linear implosion of a pressurized tube. The imploding tube behaves like a piston which travels into the light gas at the explosive detonation velocity, thus forming an increasingly long column of shock-compressed gas which can be used to propel a projectile. The McGill designed IDL has demonstrated the ability to launch a 0.1-g projectile to 9.1 km/s. This work will focus on the implementation of a novel launch cycle in which the explosively driven piston is accelerated in order to gradually increase driver gas compression, thus maintaining a relatively constant projectile driving pressure. The theoretical potential of the concept as well as the experimental development of an accelerating piston driver will be examined.

  12. A small scale lunar launcher for early lunar material utilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow, W. R.; Kubby, J. A.; Dunbar, R. S.

    1981-01-01

    A system for the launching of lunar derived oxygen or raw materials into low lunar orbit or to L2 for transfer to low earth orbit is presented. The system described is a greatly simplified version of the conventional and sophisticated approach suggested by O'Neill using mass drivers with recirculating buckets. An electromagnetic accelerator is located on the lunar surface which launches 125 kg 'smart' containers of liquid oxygen or raw materials into a transfer orbit. Upon reaching apolune a kick motor is fired to circularize the orbit at 100 km altitude or L2. These containers are collected and their payloads transferred to a tanker OTV. The empty containers then have their kick motors refurbished and then are returned to the launcher site on the lunar surface for reuse. Initial launch capability is designed for about 500T of liquid oxygen delivered to low earth orbit per year with upgrading to higher levels, delivery of lunar soil for shielding, or raw materials for processing given the demand.

  13. Preliminary analysis of space mission applications for electromagnetic launchers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, L. A.; Rice, E. E.; Earhart, R. W.; Conlon, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    The technical and economic feasibility of using electromagnetically launched EML payloads propelled from the Earth's surface to LEO, GEO, lunar orbit, or to interplanetary space was assessed. Analyses of the designs of rail accelerators and coaxial magnetic accelerators show that each is capable of launching to space payloads of 800 KG or more. A hybrid launcher in which EML is used for the first 2 KM/sec followed by chemical rocket stages was also tested. A cost estimates study shows that one to two EML launches per day are needed to break even, compared to a four-stage rocket. Development models are discussed for: (1) Earth orbital missions; (2) lunar base supply mission; (3) solar system escape mission; (4) Earth escape missions; (5) suborbital missions; (6) electromagnetic boost missions; and (7) space-based missions. Safety factors, environmental impacts, and EML systems analysis are discussed. Alternate systems examined include electrothermal thrustors, an EML rocket gun; an EML theta gun, and Soviet electromagnetic accelerators.

  14. Visible light emission measurements from a dense electrothermal launcher plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hankins, O. E.; Bourham, M. A.; Earnhart, J.; Gilligan, J. G.

    1993-01-01

    Measurements of the visible light emission from dense, weakly non-ideal plasmas have been performed on the experimental electrothermal launcher device 'SIRENS'. The plasma is created by the ablation or a Lexan insulator in the source, which then flows through a cylindrical barrel which serves as the material sample. Visible light emission spectra have been observed both in-bore and from the muzzle flash or the barrel, and from the flash or the source. Due to high plasma opacity (the plasma emits as a near blackbody) and absorption by the molecular components of the vapor shield, the hotter core or the arc has been difficult to observe. Recent measurements along the axis or the device indicate time-averaged plasma temperatures in the barrel or about 1 eV for lower energy shots, which agree with experimental measurements of the average heat flux and plasma conductivity along the barrel. Measurements or visible emission from the source indicate time averaged temperatures of 1 to 2 eV which agree with the theoretical estimates derived from ablated mass measurements and calculated estimates derived from plasma conductivity measurements.

  15. Studies to reduce material erosion in electrothermal launchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilligan, J.; Bourham, M.; Hankins, O.; Auciello, O.; Tallavarjula, S.

    1991-01-01

    Plasma erosion processes on insulators and conductors, using the SIRENS electrothermal launcher, have verified the vapor shield concept. The energy transmission factor through the vapor shield was found to vary from 20 percent to 5 percent as the heat flux increases. Metals have strong axial erosion dependence, with an average erosion depth of 15-45 micron/kJ for aluminum and 5-10 micron/kJ for pure copper. Insulators have uniform ablation along the axial direction, with an average ablation depth of 10-14 micron/kJ for Lexan. Aluminum has a higher erosion rate with an increase of energy input, while Lexan and pure copper have approximately equal erosion rates which are considerably less than that of aluminum. High-density graphite does not ablate at lower energies, and ablates only slightly at energies above 3 kJ (1-2 micron/kJ), while molded dense electrographite ablates at a higher rate (1-3 micron/kJ). Both types of graphite have considerably less ablation than other materials. Lexan and graphites showed greater evidence of the vapor shield effect than aluminum and copper, although there is tendency toward less erosion at higher values of heat fluxes. Multiple exposure of material surfaces demonstrated that insulators have better performance than metallic surfaces.

  16. Investigation of electromagnetic launcher behavior for impact fusion. Annual report, May 1, 1984-April 30, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Thio, Y.C.

    1985-05-01

    The second year of a 4-year program to develop an ultra-high velocity electromagnetic launcher has been completed, with significant progress made in the key technical areas. This lays firmly the cornerstone for major progress in Year 3 of the program. The launcher instrumentation and diagnostics system was developed. More than 20 launcher experiments were conducted using the SUVAC-I augmented launcher system. We tested our novel plasma generation technique using a lithium seeded propellant with encouraging success. We accelerated a 1.4 g projectile to 5.3 km/s in 1.6 m in the series. Unaugmented barrels for SUVAC-II were fabricated. The barrels were tested and commissioned with a total of 8 firings in single-stage configurations. The tests verified the basic soundness of the barrel mechanical and electrical design. Velocity up to 4.4 km/s was achieved with a 1.1 g projectile. Concurrently, we completed the fabrication, assembly and installation of SUVAC-II power supply (1 MJ) and its expanded control system. Experimentation with the multi-stage SUVAC-II launcher is expected to take place in the early part of Year 3. In the meantime, fabrication of the SUVAC-III power supply (an additional 0.4 MJ) has also been initiated.

  17. Zero Boil Off Cryogen Storage for Future Launchers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valentian, D.; Plachta, D.; Kittel, P.; Hastings, L. J.; Salerno, Louis J.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Zero boil off (ZBO) cryogen storage using both cryocoolers and passive insulation technologies will enable long-term exploration missions by allowing designers to optimize tankage without the need for excess cryogen storage to account for boil off. Studies of ZBO (zero boil off) have been on-going in the USA for several years. More recently, a review of the needs of advanced space propulsion took place in Europe. This showed the interest of the European community in cryogenic propulsion for planetary missions as well as the use of liquid hydrogen for large power electric propulsion (manned Mars missions). Although natural boiling could be acceptable for single leg missions, passive insulation techniques yield roughly a I% per month cryogen loss and this would not be cost effective for robotic planetary missions involving storage times greater than one year. To make economic sense, long-term exploration missions require lower tank capacity and longer storage times. Recent advances in cryocooler technology, resulting in vast improvements in both cooler efficiency and reliability, make ZBO is a clear choice for planetary exploration missions. Other, more near term applications of ZBO include boil-off reduction or elimination applied to first and upper stages of future earth-to-orbit (ETO) launchers. This would extend launch windows and reduce infrastructure costs. Successors to vehicles like Ariane 5 could greatly benefit by implementing ZBO. Zero Boil Off will only be successful in ETO launcher applications if it makes economic sense to implement. The energy cost is only a fraction of the total cost of buying liquid cryogen, the rest being transportation and other overhead. Because of this, higher boiling point cryogens will benefit more from on-board liquefaction, thus reducing the infrastructure costs. Since hydrogen requires a liquefier with at least a 17% efficiency just to break even from a cost standpoint, one approach for implementing ZBO in upper stages would

  18. A design study for the ECH launcher for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Prater, R.; Grunloh, H.J.; Moeller, C.P.; Doane, J.L.; Olstad, R.A.; Makowski, M.A.; Harvey, R.W.

    1997-04-01

    The Design Description Document for ITER calls for 50 MW of electron cyclotron power at a frequency of 170 GHz, upgradeable to 100 MW. This power is intended to heat the plasma from Ohmic temperatures to ignition, in concert with power from some combination of neutral injection and/or ICRF heating. The second major application of ECH power is current drive. In the advanced steady-state scenarios, the total current is 12 to 16 MA, of which 75% is driven by bootstrap effects. The current drive requirement is 2 to 3 MA at a relative minor radius of 0.7, plus a small current near the center of the discharge. ECH power is also used for plasma initiation and startup, using a separate ECH system of two fixed frequencies between 90 to 140 GHz and total power to 6 MW. Suppression or control of MHD instabilities like neoclassical tearing modes, sawteeth, ELMs, and locked modes are also important objectives for the ECH systems. However, the launching and power characteristics of the ECH for these applications is highly specialized. The ability to modulate at high frequency (at least several tens of kHz), the ability to redirect the beams with precision at relatively high speed, and the requirement that the stabilization be carried out at the same time as the bulk heating and current drive imply that separate and specialized ECH systems are needed for the stabilization activities. For example, for stabilization of neoclassical tearing modes current must be driven inside the islands near the q = 2 surface. If this is done near the outboard mid plane, a system with optimized frequency might be much more effective than what could be done with the main 170 GHz system. This paper does not treat the launchers for the stabilization systems.

  19. Integrated plasmonic semi-circular launcher for dielectric-loaded surface plasmon-polariton waveguide.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaowei; Huang, Lingling; Tan, Qiaofeng; Bai, Benfeng; Jin, Guofan

    2011-03-28

    A semi-circular plasmonic launcher integrated with dielectric-loaded surface plasmon-polaritons waveguide (DLSPPW) is proposed and analyzed theoretically, which can focus and efficiently couple the excited surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) into the DLSPPW via the highly matched spatial field distribution with the waveguide mode in the focal plane. By tuning the incident angle or polarization of the illuminating beam, it is shown that the launcher may be conveniently used as a switch or a multiplexer that have potential applications in plasmonic circuitry. Furthermore, from an applicational point of view, it is analyzed how the coupling performance of the launcher can be further improved by employing multiple semi-circular slits.

  20. Results from Sandia National Laboratories/Lockheed Martin Electromagnetic Missile Launcher (EMML).

    SciTech Connect

    Lockner, Thomas Ramsbeck; Skurdal, Ben; Gaigler, Randy; Basak, L; Root, G; Aubuchon, Matthew S.; Turman, Bobby N.; Floyd, Mendel D.

    2005-05-01

    Sandia national laboratories (SNL) and lockheed martin MS2 are designing an electromagnetic missile launcher (EMML) for naval applications. The EMML uses an induction coilgun topology with the requirement of launching a 3600 lb. missile up to a velocity of 40 m/s. To demonstrate the feasibility of the electromagnetic propulsion design, a demonstrator launcher was built that consists of approximately 10% of the propulsion coils needed for a tactical design. The demonstrator verified the design by launching a 1430 lb weighted sled to a height of 24 ft in mid-December 2004 (Figure 1). This paper provides the general launcher design, specific pulsed power system component details, system operation, and demonstration results.

  1. From Satellite To Launcher, Highlights On Powder/Wire ALM At Astrium Space Transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourenaud, Florent; Desagulier, Christian

    2012-07-01

    ALM (Additive Layer Manufacturing) or Direct Manufacturing has been one of EADS’ (and more recently Astrium ST’s) major interests for almost a decade. It consists in manufacturing a part by adding (metallic) material layer by layer instead of machining the desired shape from a blank. It therefore has many advantages directly suitable for the spatial business, ranging from satellite to launcher structures. The present paper describes the range of available additive processes suitable for our present or future metallic launcher structures. The operational domain is described, in close correlation with the specific spatial constraints. A first successful in-flight application has been recently demonstrated by Astrium ST, which clearly opens a wide range of opportunities for next generation launchers and satellite structures. This paper gives an overview of the (technically and economically) eligible spatial structures that represent strong ALM business cases, as well as the on-going R&T and development trends at Astrium ST

  2. Apparatus for and method of operating a cylindrical pulsed induction mass launcher

    DOEpatents

    Cowan, M. Jr.; Duggin, B.W.; Widner, M.M.

    1992-06-30

    An electromagnetic cylindrical projectile mass launcher and a method of operation is provided which includes a cylindrical projectile having a conducting armature, a cylindrical barrel in which the armature is received, a plurality of electromagnetic drive coil stages, a plurality of pulse energy sources, and a pulsed power arrangement for generating magnetic pulses forming a pulsed magnetic wave along the length of the launcher barrel. The pulsed magnetic wave provides a propelling force on the projectile along the drive coil. The pulsed magnetic wave of the drive coil stages is advanced along the armature faster than the projectile to thereby generate an induced current wave in the armature. The pulsed generation of the magnetic wave minimizes electromagnetic heating of the projectile and provides for smooth acceleration of the projectile through the barrel of the launcher. 2 figs.

  3. International Space Station-Based Electromagnetic Launcher for Space Science Payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Ross M.

    2013-01-01

    A method was developed of lowering the cost of planetary exploration missions by using an electromagnetic propulsion/launcher, rather than a chemical-fueled rocket for propulsion. An electromagnetic launcher (EML) based at the International Space Station (ISS) would be used to launch small science payloads to the Moon and near Earth asteroids (NEAs) for the science and exploration missions. An ISS-based electromagnetic launcher could also inject science payloads into orbits around the Earth and perhaps to Mars. The EML would replace rocket technology for certain missions. The EML is a high-energy system that uses electricity rather than propellant to accelerate payloads to high velocities. The most common type of EML is the rail gun. Other types are possible, e.g., a coil gun, also known as a Gauss gun or mass driver. The EML could also "drop" science payloads into the Earth's upper

  4. Apparatus for and method of operating a cylindrical pulsed induction mass launcher

    DOEpatents

    Cowan, Jr., Maynard; Duggin, Billy W.; Widner, Melvin M.

    1992-01-01

    An electromagnetic cylindrical projectile mass launcher and a method of operation is provided which includes a cylindrical projectile having a conducting armature, a cylindrical barrel in which the armature is received, a plurality of electromagnetic drive coil stages, a plurality of pulse energy sources, and a pulsed power arrangement for generating magnetic pulses forming a pulsed magnetic wave along the length of the launcher barrel. The pulsed magnetic wave provides a propelling force on the projectile along the drive coil. The pulsed magnetic wave of the drive coil stages is advanced along the armature faster than the projectile to thereby generate an induced current wave in the armature. The pulsed generation of the magnetic wave minimizes electromagnetic heating of the projectile and provides for smooth acceleration of the projectile through the barrel of the launcher.

  5. Test results for three prototype models of a linear induction launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Zabar, Z.; Lu, X.N.; He, J.L.; Birenbaum, L.; Levi, E.; Kuznetsov, S.B.; Nahemow, M.D. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on the work on the linear induction launcher (LIL) started with an analytical study tht was followed by computer simulations and then was tested by laboratory models. Two mathematical representations have been developed to describe the launcher. The first, based on the field approach with sinusoidal excitation, has been validated by static tests on a small scale prototype fed at constant current and variable frequency. The second, a transient representation using computer simulation allows consideration of energization by means of a capacitor bank and a power conditioner. Tests performed on three small-scale prototypes up to 100 m/s muzzle velocities show good agreement with predicted performance.

  6. LAUNCHER PERFORMANCE AND THERMAL CAPABILITY OF THE DIII-D ECH SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    KAJIWARA,K; LOHR,J; GORELOV,I.A; GREEN,M.T; PONCE,D; CALLIS,R.W; ELLIS,R.A

    2003-10-01

    OAK-B135 The temperatures of components of DIII-D ECH launchers were observed during 2003 tokamak operation. The injected power was typically 500-700 kW and the pulse length was typically 2s. Plasma shots were performed at intervals of about 17 min from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. The temperatures of a movable mirror, a fixed mirror and a launcher reached an equilibrium after about six hours of repetitive pulsing. The saturation temperature depends to some extent on the plasma stored energy. However, even in high {beta} plasma, the temperatures plateaued at acceptable values.

  7. The LHCD Launcher for Alcator C-Mod - Design, Construction, Calibration and Testing

    SciTech Connect

    J. Hosea; D. Beals; W. Beck; S. Bernabei; W. Burke; R. Childs; R. Ellis; E. Fredd; N. Greenough; M. Grimes; D. Gwinn; J. Irby; S. Jurczynski; P. Koert; C.C. Kung; G.D. Loesser; E. Marmar; R. Parker; J. Rushinski; G. Schilling; D. Terry; R. Vieira; J.R. Wilson; J. Zaks

    2005-06-27

    MIT and PPPL have joined together to fabricate a high-power lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) system for supporting steady-state AT regime research on Alcator C-Mod. The goal of the first step of this project is to provide 1.5 MW of 4.6 GHz rf [radio frequency] power to the plasma with a compact launcher which has excellent spectral selectivity and fits into a single C-Mod port. Some of the important design, construction, calibration and testing considerations for the launcher leading up to its installation on C-Mod are presented here.

  8. Design and Characterization of Thin Stainless Steel Burst Disks for Increasing Two-Stage Light Gas Launcher Efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tylka, Jonathan M.; Johnson, Kenneth L.; Henderson, Donald; Rodriguez, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Laser etched 300 series Stainless Steel Burst Disks (SSBD) ranging between 0.178 mm (0.007-in.) and 0.508mm (0.020-in.) thick were designed for use in a 17-caliber two-stage light gas launcher. First, a disk manufacturing method was selected using a combination of wire electrical discharge machining (EDM) to form the blank disks and laser etching to define the pedaling fracture pattern. Second, a replaceable insert was designed to go between the SSDB and the barrel. This insert reduced the stress concentration between the SSBD and the barrel, providing a place for the petals of the SSDB to open, and protecting the rifling on the inside of the barrel. Thereafter, a design of experiments was implemented to test and characterize the burst characteristics of SSBDs. Extensive hydrostatic burst testing of the SSBDs was performed to complete the design of experiments study with one-hundred and seven burst tests. The experiment simultaneously tested the effects of the following: two SSBD material states (full hard, annealed); five SSBD thicknesses 0.178, 0.254, 0.305, 0.381 mm (0.007, 0.010, 0.012, 0.015, 0.020-in.); two grain directions relative); number of times the laser etch pattern was repeated (varies between 5-200 times); two heat sink configurations (with and without heat sink); and, two barrel configurations (with and without insert). These tests resulted in the quantification of the relationship between SSBD thickness, laser etch parameters, and desired burst pressure. Of the factors investigated only thickness and number of laser etches were needed to develop a mathematical relationship predicting hydrostatic burst pressure of disks using the same barrel configuration. The fracture surfaces of two representative SSBD bursts were then investigated with a scanning electron microscope, one burst hydrostatically in a fixture and another dynamically in the launcher. The fracture analysis verified that both burst conditions resulted in a ductile overload failure

  9. Free transverse vibration analysis of an underwater launcher based on fluid-structure interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Qingyong; Li, Tianyun; Zhu, Xiang; Wang, Lu

    2014-06-01

    A pneumatic launcher is theoretically investigated to study its natural transverse vibration in water. Considering the mass effect of the sealing cover, the launcher is simplified as a uniform cantilever beam with a top point mass. By introducing the boundary and continuity conditions into the motion equation, the natural frequency equation and the mode shape function are derived. An iterative calculation method for added mass is also presented using the velocity potential function to account for the mass effect of the fluid on the launcher. The first 2 order natural frequencies and mode shapes are discussed in external flow fields and both external and internal flow fields. The results show good agreement with both natural frequencies and mode shapes between the theoretical analysis and the FEM studies. Also, the added mass is found to decrease with the increase of the mode shape orders of the launcher. And because of the larger added mass in both the external and internal flow fields than that in only the external flow field, the corresponding natural frequencies of the former are relatively smaller.

  10. Environmental Assessment for the Space Complex-5 SCOUT Launcher Relocation, Vandenberg Air Force Base, California

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    itself an endangered species, the buckwheat is. however. the host plant for an ESA-listed buttertly, the EI Segundo Blue Butterfly. Because this...endangered butterf!) relies on this host plant for part of its life cycle, this buckwheat is generally treated as a protected species. The SCOUT Launcher and

  11. Apparatus for and method of operating a cylindrical pulsed induction mass launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, M. Jr.; Duggin, B.W.; Widner, M.M.

    1990-12-06

    In accordance with the one aspect of the invention, an electromagnetic projectile launcher is provided which comprises: a conducting projectile, a barrel that receives the projectile, a plurality of electromagnetic drive coils, a plurality of pulsed energy sources, and pulse power means for generating a sequence of pulses forming a pulsed magnetic wave within the drive coil for propelling the projectile along the barrel, wherein the pulsed magnetic wave of the drive coil is advanced along the barrel faster than the projectile to thereby induce a current wave in the armature of the projectile and thereby minimize electromagnetic heating of the projectile and provide nearly constant acceleration of the projectile. In accordance with another aspect of the invention, a method is provided for propelling a projectile within a pulsed induction electromagnetic coil launcher, wherein the method comprises the steps of: generating a sequence of pulses forming a pulsed magnetic wave within the coil launcher, applying the pulsed magnetic wave initially at the aft end of the projectile to accelerate the projectile within the coil launcher, and advancing the position of the pulsed magnetic wave relative to the projectile to thereby generate an induced current wave in the armature, such that electromagnetic heating of the projectile is minimized and acceleration is nearly constant.

  12. Modeling electromagnetic rail launchers at speed using 3D finite elements

    SciTech Connect

    Rodger, D.; Leonard, P.J.; Eastham, J.F. )

    1991-01-01

    In this paper a new finite element technique for modelling 3D transient eddy currents in moving conductors is described. This has been implemented in the MEGA software package for 2 and 3D electromagnetic field analysis. The application of the technique to railgun launchers is illustrated.

  13. Optimization of the ITER electron cyclotron equatorial launcher for improved heating and current drive functional capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Farina, D.; Figini, L.; Henderson, M.; Saibene, G.

    2014-06-15

    The design of the ITER Electron Cyclotron Heating and Current Drive (EC H and CD) system has evolved in the last years both in goals and functionalities by considering an expanded range of applications. A large effort has been devoted to a better integration of the equatorial and the upper launchers, both from the point of view of the performance and of the design impact on the engineering constraints. However, from the analysis of the ECCD performance in two references H-mode scenarios at burn (the inductive H-mode and the advanced non-inductive scenario), it was clear that the EC power deposition was not optimal for steady-state applications in the plasma region around mid radius. An optimization study of the equatorial launcher is presented here aiming at removing this limitation of the EC system capabilities. Changing the steering of the equatorial launcher from toroidal to poloidal ensures EC power deposition out to the normalized toroidal radius ρ ≈ 0.6, and nearly doubles the EC driven current around mid radius, without significant performance degradation in the core plasma region. In addition to the improved performance, the proposed design change is able to relax some engineering design constraints on both launchers.

  14. Advanced Optics for a Full Quasi-Optical Front Steering ECRH Upper Launcher for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Moro, A.; Alessi, E.; Bruschi, A.; Platania, P.; Sozzi, C.; Chavan, R.; Collazos, A.; Goodman, T. P.; Udintsev, V. S.; Henderson, M. A.

    2009-11-26

    A full quasi-optical setup for the internal optics of the Front Steering Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ECRH) Upper Launcher for ITER was designed, proving to be feasible and favorable in terms of additional flexibility and cost reduction with respect to the former design. This full quasi-optical solution foresees the replacement of the mitre-bends in the final section of the launcher with dedicated free-space mirrors to realize the last changes of directions in the launcher. A description of the launcher is given and its advantages presented. The parameters of the expected output beams as well as preliminary evaluations of truncation effects with the physical optics GRASP code are shown. Moreover, a study of mitre-bends replacement with single mirrors for multiple beams is described. In principle it could allow the beams to be larger at the mirror locations (with a further decrease of the peak power density due to partial overlapping) and has the additional advantage to get a larger opening with compressed beams to avoid conflicts with side-walls port. Constraints on the setup, arising both from the resulting beam characteristics in the space of free parameters and from mechanical requirements are taken into account in the analysis.

  15. Performance of the ECH Transmission Lines and Launchers in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Kajiwara, K.; Mui, A.; Baxi, C.B.; Lohr, J.; Gorelov, I.A.; Green, M.T.; Ponce, D.; Callis, R.W.

    2005-09-26

    The efficiency of the transmission line for the 110 GHz ECH system was measured in DIII-D using a low power rf source. The measured efficiency was about 10% lower than expected from theoretical analysis of the components. The launcher temperature increase during rf pulses was measured and the peak mirror surface temperature was inferred from a simulation.

  16. Flow structure and unsteadiness in the supersonic wake of a generic space launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreyer, Anne-Marie; Stephan, Sören; Radespiel, Rolf

    2015-11-01

    At the junction between the rocket engine and the main body of a classical space launcher, a separation-dominated and highly unstable flow field develops and induces strong wall-pressure oscillations. These can excite structural vibrations detrimental to the launcher. It is desirable to minimize these effects, for which a better understanding of the flow field is required. We study the wake flow of a generic axisymmetric space-launcher model with and without propulsive jet (cold air). Experimental investigations are performed at Mach 2.9 and a Reynolds number ReD = 1 . 3 .106 based on model diameter D. The jet exits the nozzle at Mach 2.5. Velocity measurements by means of Particle Image Velocimetry and mean and unsteady wall-pressure measurements on the main-body base are performed simultaneously. Additionally, we performed hot-wire measurements at selected points in the wake. We can thus observe the evolution of the wake flow along with its spectral content. We describe the mean and turbulent flow topology and evolution of the structures in the wake flow and discuss the origin of characteristic frequencies observed in the pressure signal at the launcher base. The influence of a propulsive jet on the evolution and topology of the wake flow is discussed in detail. The German Research Foundation DFG is gratefully acknowledged for funding this research within the SFB-TR40 ``Technological foundations for the design of thermally and mechanically highly loaded components of future space transportation systems.''

  17. Advanced concepts. [specific impulse, mass drivers, electromagnetic launchers, and the rail gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, B. A.

    1980-01-01

    The relative strengths of those interactions which enable propulsive forces are listed as well as the specific impulse of various propellants. Graphics show the linear synchronous motor of the mass driver, the principle of the direct current electromagnetic launcher, and the characteristics of the rail gun.

  18. Preliminary feasibility assessment for Earth-to-space electromagnetic (Railgun) launchers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, E. E.; Miller, L. A.; Earhart, R. W.

    1982-01-01

    An Earth to space electromagnetic (railgun) launcher (ESRL) for launching material into space was studied. Potential ESRL applications were identified and initially assessed to formulate preliminary system requirements. The potential applications included nuclear waste disposal in space, Earth orbital applications, deep space probe launchers, atmospheric research, and boost of chemical rockets. The ESRL system concept consisted of two separate railgun launcher tubes (one at 20 deg from the horizontal for Earth orbital missions, the other vertical for solar system escape disposal missions) powered by a common power plant. Each 2040 m launcher tube is surrounded by 10,200 homopolar generator/inductor units to transmit the power to the walls. Projectile masses are 6500 kg for Earth orbital missions and 2055 kg for nuclear waste disposal missions. For the Earth orbital missions, the projectile requires a propulsion system, leaving an estimated payload mass of 650 kg. For the nuclear waste disposal in space mission, the high level waste mass was estimated at 250 kg. This preliminary assessment included technical, environmental, and economic analyses.

  19. Status of next generation expendable launchers concepts within the FLPP program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letourneur, Yann; Leleu, Frederic; Pinard, Didier; Krueger, Joerg; Balduccini, Mauro

    2010-05-01

    In the framework of the preparation of the next generation of launchers to be developed in Europe, the European Space Agency (ESA) has contracted NGL Prime and its industrial team to conduct a first slice of launch system and stage design activities and programmatic analyses for two types of launchers: A new expendable mid-term launch system relying on elements or "Building Blocks" from Ariane and Vega to be operational by 2015. A new long-term launch system called the Next Generation Launcher (NGL) to be operational by 2020-2025. The design reference missions include a 5 metric tons performance requirement into a Geostationary Transfer Orbit (GTO), to meet the European institutional need, with the increased capability to 8 metric tons into GTO by the addition of solid boosters, to meet the commercial market needs. In a first step, a series of trade-offs were conducted to select the concepts that best fit the requirements of the NGL and "Building Block" launcher options, in terms of propulsion (thrust level, engine characteristics), propellant choice (hydrogen, methane or solid propellants), launcher architecture (with or without strap-on boosters, bi or three stages architecture). In a second step, more detailed analyses were carried out in term of thermo-mechanical design, functional architecture, as well as in term of versatility capacity, i.e. the capability of the launcher to perform different missions than the reference ones. Consistently with this technical activity, a programmatic evaluation was consolidated by the industrial team. This paper details the outcomes of the activity carried out during this second step targeting at selecting one or two concepts. The paper will also give an overview and first results of the follow-on contract in which selected NGL concepts are being further investigated, in the prospect of creating a new European launcher family encompassing versions dedicated to the institutional needs and the commercial market (reference

  20. Mount mechanisms for the Saturn 5/Apollo mobile launcher at John F. Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balke, H. A.

    1975-01-01

    A support system was designed to resist hurricane wind loads at the launch pad and to allow the supported structural frame to expand and contract freely under wide ranges of temperature. This system consists of six mount mechanisms devised to meet the previously stated requirements plus a load-carrying capacity for each of 3.2-million kilograms (7-million pounds) downward and 1.6-million kilograms (3.5-million pounds) upward. A similar but lighter system of six mount mechanisms was designed for use in the sheltered environment of the vehicle assembly building. Each requirement and design result is discussed, and each mount mechanism is defined by location and type with references to visual presentations.

  1. Crew Launch Vehicle Mobile Launcher Solid Rocket Motor Plume Induced Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vu, Bruce T.; Sulyma, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The plume-induced environment created by the Ares 1 first stage, five-segment reusable solid rocket motor (RSRMV) will impose high heating rates and impact pressures on Launch Complex 39. The extremes of these environments pose a potential threat to weaken or even cause structural components to fail if insufficiently designed. Therefore the ability to accurately predict these environments is critical to assist in specifying structural design requirements to insure overall structural integrity and flight safety. This paper presents the predicted thermal and pressure environments induced by the launch of the Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV) from Launch Complex (LC) 39. Once the environments are predicted, a follow-on thermal analysis is required to determine the surface temperature response and the degradation rate of the materials. An example of structures responding to the plume-induced environment will be provided.

  2. Rf modeling and design of a folded waveguide launcher for the Alcator C-Mod tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Bigelow, T.S.; Fogelman, C.F.; Baity, F.W.; Carter, M.D.; Hoffman, D.J.; Ryan, P.M.; Yugo, J.J.; Golovato, S.N.; Bonoli, P.

    1993-12-01

    The folded waveguide (FWG) launcher is being investigated as an improved antenna configuration for plasma heating in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF). A development FWG launcher was successfully tested at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) with a low-density plasma load and found to have significantly greater power density capability than current strap-type antennas operating in similar plasmas. To further test the concept on a high density tokamak plasma, a collaboration has been set up between ORNL and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) to develop and test an 80-MHz, 2-MW FWG on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak at MIT. The radio frequency (rf) electromagnetic modeling techniques and laboratory measurements used in the design of this antenna are described in this paper. A companion paper describes the mechanical design of the FWG.

  3. Projectile and rail launcher design analysis for electromagnetic propulsion to velocities exceeding 10 km/s

    SciTech Connect

    Buckingham, A.C.

    1981-02-24

    Hypersonic projectile launch was achieved using thrust exerted by an expanding electromagnetic field acting on the projectile base. Previous designs were confined to simple parallel-opposing flat rails. The rails carried the induction current used to launch rectangular projectiles. The projectiles weighed up to several grams and were launched at nearly 10 km/s. Here, a revised design for the launcher and projectiles using a more conventional cylindrical bore is described. Projectile spin-stabilization was considered together with the associated added-stress loads to projectile and launcher. In addition, both the design of the projectile configuration and materials capable of withstanding earth orbital, earth- and solar-system-escape launch loads, aerodynamic loads, and ablation and erosion penalties were studied. Projectile masses of ten to several hundred kilograms and launch speeds from 20 to 50 km/s are included in the analysis and discussion.

  4. Angry Birds realized: water balloon launcher for teaching projectile motion with drag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Boyd F.; Sam, David D.; Christiansen, Michael A.; Booth, William A.; Jessup, Leslie O.

    2014-05-01

    A simple, collapsible design for a large water balloon slingshot launcher features a fully adjustable initial velocity vector and a balanced launch platform. The design facilitates quantitative explorations of the dependence of the balloon range and time of flight on the initial speed, launch angle, and projectile mass, in an environment where quadratic air drag is important. Presented are theory and experiments that characterize this drag, and theory and experiments that characterize the nonlinear elastic energy and hysteresis of the latex tubing used in the slingshot. The experiments can be carried out with inexpensive and readily available tools and materials. The launcher provides an engaging way to teach projectile motion and elastic energy to students of a wide variety of ages.

  5. Appraisal of UTIAS implosion-driven hypervelocity launchers and shock tubes.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, I. I.

    1972-01-01

    A critical appraisal is made of the design, research, development, and operation of the novel UTIAS implosion-driven hypervelocity launchers and shock tubes. Explosively driven (PbN6-lead azide, PETN-pentaerythritetetranitrate) implosions in detonating stoichiometric hydrogen-oxygen mixtures have been successfully developed as drivers for hypervelocity launchers and shock tubes in a safe and reusable facility. Intense loadings at very high calculated pressures, densities, and temperatures, at the implosion center, cause severe problems with projectile integrity. Misalignment of the focal point can occur and add to the difficulty in using small caliber projectiles. In addition, the extreme driving conditions cause barrel expansion, erosion, and possible gas leakage from the base to the head of the projectile which cut the predicted muzzle velocities to half or a third of the lossless calculated values. However, in the case of a shock-tube operation these difficulties are minimized or eliminated and the possibilities of approaching Jovian reentry velocities are encouraging.

  6. A Monte Carlo Analysis for Collision Risk Assessment on Vega Launcher Payloads and LARES Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sindoni, G.; Ciufolini, I.; Battie, F.

    2016-03-01

    This work has been developed in the framework of the LARES mission of the Italian Space Agency (ASI). The LARES satellite has been built to test, with high accuracy, the frame-dragging effect predicted by the theory of General Relativity, specifically the Lense-Thirring drag of its node. LARES was the main payload in the qualification flight of the European Space Agency launcher VEGA. A concern arose about the possibility of an impact between the eight secondary payloads among themselves, with LARES and with the last stage of the launcher (AVUM). An impact would have caused failure on the payloads and the production of debris in violation of the space debris mitigation measures established internationally. As an additional contribution, this study allowed the effect of the payload release on the final manoeuvers of the AVUM to be understood.

  7. ITER ECH launcher options for start-up assist, bulk heating, and EC current drive experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Bigelow, T.S.

    1994-03-01

    Electron Cyclotron Heating (ECH) is proposed for providing plasma start-up, bulk heating, current drive, and other applications on the International Tokamak Experimental Reactor (ITER) project. The requirements for ECH power launching systems for ITER have been investigated, and several possible configurations that have been devised are described in this report. The proposed launcher designs use oversized circular corrugated waveguides that make small penetrations through the blanket modules and radiate into the plasma. The criteria used for the design calls for minimum blanket penetration area, maximum reliability, and optimum launched beam quality. The effects of the harsh plasma edge environment on the launcher are discussed. Power generation systems, windows, and other components of the ECH systems are also investigated. The designs presented are believed to be capable of operating reliably and are relatively easy to maintain remotely.

  8. Development of Jettisonable Fluid Ground Connector for the ESA Next Generation Launcher Cryogenic Upper Stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, Nick

    2014-06-01

    RUAG Space have successfully designed, developed and tested a new cryogenic connector sub-system for Hydrogen and Oxygen Filling and Venting of a potential launcher Upper Stage tank. The work was performed within the ESA Cryogenic Upper Stage Technologies, Future Launchers Preparatory Programme. The scope of the work was the development of this technology within Europe to a Technology Readiness Level of 5. Basic requirements were that the connector is jettisoned at lift-off, and that the filling of tanks located within the payload fairing volume is feasible. Beginning with concept studies, basic approaches were described and traded off, and more detailed designs and analyses performed for selected concepts. Experimental validation of the connector design was performed using extensive testing to simulate the fluid, mechanical, dynamic and thermal environments of the connector in pre-launch, lift-off and flight conditions.

  9. Design and evaluation of coils for a 50 mm diameter induction coilgun launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, R.J.; Shokair, I.R.; Wavrik, R.W.; Dempsey, J.F.; Honey, W.E.; Shimp, K.J.; Douglas, G.M.

    1993-12-31

    Coilguns have the ability to provide magnetic pressure to projectiles which results in near constant acceleration. However, to achieve this performance and control projectile hearing, significant constraints are placed on the design of the coils. We are developing coils to produce an effective projectile base pressure of 100 MPa (1kbar) as a step toward reaching base pressures of 200 MPa. The design uses a scalable technology applicable to the entire range of breech to muzzle coils of a multi-stage launcher. This paper presents the design of capacitor-driven coils for launching nominal 50 mm, 350 gram projectiles. Design criteria, constraints, mechanical stress analysis, launcher performance, and test results are discussed.

  10. Infantry Weapons Test Methodology Study. Volume 4. Grenade Launcher Test Methodology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1972-04-01

    the window target; these data are fed into the computer contained data base manually . Any differences between competing weap- ons isolated by the time...procedures prescribed in the field manuals for standard launchers or rifle attachments, care must be taken to insure that pre- scribed methods and procedures...Under conditions where candidato weapons use different caliber projectiles, the irpact or signature of the projectile (shock wave, bullet strike

  11. Nano-Launcher Technologies, Approaches, and Life Cycle Assessment. Phase II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zapata, Edgar

    2014-01-01

    Assist in understanding NASA technology and investment approaches, and other driving factors, necessary for enabling dedicated nano-launchers by industry at a cost and flight rate that (1) could support and be supported by an emerging nano-satellite market and (2) would benefit NASAs needs. Develop life-cycle cost, performance and other NASA analysis tools or models required to understand issues, drivers and challenges.

  12. Qualification of the 4th stage propulsor of the Brazilian launcher. SLV: A new sounding rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boscov, Jayme; Toyama, Wilson Katsumi

    1989-06-01

    The development of the Satellite Launcher Vehicle (SLV) is presented. In particular, the attention is focused on the acquisition of the propulsion parameters of the 4th stage propulsor. The device feasibility analysis is considered. The system consists of a two staged sounding rocket. Its second stage contains the SVL, which can be launched by the 4th stage propulsor to a height range of about 50 to 60 km.

  13. Beam propagation and stray radiation in the ITER EC H&CD Upper Launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platania, Paola; Bruschi, Alex; Farina, Daniela; Figini, Lorenzo; Goodman, Timothy; Krause, Alexandra; Henderson, Mark A.; Moro, Alessandro; Saibene, Gabriella; Toussaint, Matthieu; Sozzi, Carlo

    2015-03-01

    The four ITER Electron Cyclotron Upper Launchers (UL) are designed to control Magneto- Hydrodynamic instabilities with the deposition of Electron Cyclotron power. According to the present design, each launcher comprises two rows of four input waveguides, whose output beam is focused and driven towards the plasma by four sets of mirrors. In order to study the beam-launcher interaction throughout quasi-optical propagation, with particular attention to straylight behaviour, and to verify analytical calculations, a 3D model of the UL optical system has been implemented with the electromagnetic code GRASP® and the Physical Optics method. Detailed description of the components are introduced: pure hybrid mode HE11 from cylindrical waveguide as input beams, real shapes of the mirror contours, semi-analytical description of the ellipsoidal surfaces of focussing mirrors. A conceptual calculation scheme has been developed in order to take into account not only the direct contribution of the single source on its next scatterer but also the first order indirect effects: crosstalk from different lines of the same row and crosstalk from different rows have been evaluated after reflection on the first and third set of mirrors. The evaluations presented have been performed on the preliminary UL design, the last major milestone before finalization; however, the numerical model is suitable to be applied to future evolutions of the setup and/or other configurations.

  14. Optimized use of superconducting magnetic energy storage for electromagnetic rail launcher powering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badel, Arnaud; Tixador, Pascal; Arniet, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Electromagnetic rail launchers (EMRLs) require very high currents, from hundreds of kA to several MA. They are usually powered by capacitors. The use of superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) in the supply chain of an EMRL is investigated, as an energy buffer and as direct powering source. Simulations of direct powering are conducted to quantify the benefits of this method in terms of required primary energy. In order to enhance further the benefits of SMES powering, a novel integration concept is proposed, the superconducting self-supplied electromagnetic launcher (S3EL). In the S3EL, the SMES is used as a power supply for the EMRL but its coil serves also as an additional source of magnetic flux density, in order to increase the thrust (or reduce the required current for a given thrust). Optimization principles for this new concept are presented. Simulations based on the characteristics of an existing launcher demonstrate that the required current could be reduced by a factor of seven. Realizing such devices with HTS cables should be possible in the near future, especially if the S3EL concept is used in combination with the XRAM principle, allowing current multiplication.

  15. Propulsive jet simulation with air and helium in launcher wake flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephan, Sören; Radespiel, Rolf

    2016-12-01

    The influence on the turbulent wake of a generic space launcher model due to the presence of an under-expanded jet is investigated experimentally. Wake flow phenomena represent a significant source of uncertainties in the design of a space launcher. Especially critical are dynamic loads on the structure. The wake flow is investigated at supersonic (M=2.9 ) and hypersonic (M=5.9 ) flow regimes. The jet flow is simulated using air and helium as working gas. Due to the lower molar mass of helium, higher jet velocities are realized, and therefore, velocity ratios similar to space launchers can be simulated. The degree of under-expansion of the jet is moderate for the supersonic case (p_e/p_∞ ≈ 5 ) and high for the hypersonic case (p_e/p_∞ ≈ 90 ). The flow topology is described by Schlieren visualization and mean-pressure measurements. Unsteady pressure measurements are performed to describe the dynamic wake flow. The influences of the under-expanded jet and different jet velocities are reported. On the base fluctuations at a Strouhal number, around St_D ≈ 0.25 dominate for supersonic free-stream flows. With air jet, a fluctuation-level increase on the base is observed for Strouhal numbers above St_D ≈ 0.75 in hypersonic flow regime. With helium jet, distinct peaks at higher frequencies are found. This is attributed to the interactions of wake flow and jet.

  16. Quantity Distance for the Kennedy Space Center Vehicle Assembly Building for Solid Propellant Fueled Launchers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stover, Steven; Diebler, Corey; Frazier, Wayne

    2006-01-01

    The NASA KSC VAB was built to process Apollo launchers in the 1960's, and later adapted to process Space Shuttles. The VAB has served as a place to assemble solid rocket motors (5RM) and mate them to the vehicle's external fuel tank and Orbiter before rollout to the launch pad. As Space Shuttle is phased out, and new launchers are developed, the VAB may again be adapted to process these new launchers. Current launch vehicle designs call for continued and perhaps increased use of SRM segments; hence, the safe separation distances are in the process of being re-calculated. Cognizant NASA personnel and the solid rocket contractor have revisited the above VAB QD considerations and suggest that it may be revised to allow a greater number of motor segments within the VAB. This revision assumes that an inadvertent ignition of one SRM stack in its High Bay need not cause immediate and complete involvement of boosters that are part of a vehicle in adjacent High Bay. To support this assumption, NASA and contractor personnel proposed a strawman test approach for obtaining subscale data that may be used to develop phenomenological insight and to develop confidence in an analysis model for later use on full-scale situations. A team of subject matter experts in safety and siting of propellants and explosives were assembled to review the subscale test approach and provide options to NASA. Upon deliberations regarding the various options, the team arrived at some preliminary recommendations for NASA.

  17. High Velocity Linear Induction Launcher with Exit-Edge Compensation for Testing of Aerospace Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuznetsov, Stephen; Marriott, Darin

    2008-01-01

    Advances in ultra high speed linear induction electromagnetic launchers over the past decade have focused on magnetic compensation of the exit and entry-edge transient flux wave to produce efficient and compact linear electric machinery. The paper discusses two approaches to edge compensation in long-stator induction catapults with typical end speeds of 150 to 1,500 m/s. In classical linear induction machines, the exit-edge effect is manifest as two auxiliary traveling waves that produce a magnetic drag on the projectile and a loss of magnetic flux over the main surface of the machine. In the new design for the Stator Compensated Induction Machine (SCIM) high velocity launcher, the exit-edge effect is nulled by a dual wavelength machine or alternately the airgap flux is peaked at a location prior to the exit edge. A four (4) stage LIM catapult is presently being constructed for 180 m/s end speed operation using double-sided longitudinal flux machines. Advanced exit and entry edge compensation is being used to maximize system efficiency, and minimize stray heating of the reaction armature. Each stage will output approximately 60 kN of force and produce over 500 G s of acceleration on the armature. The advantage of this design is there is no ablation to the projectile and no sliding contacts, allowing repeated firing of the launcher without maintenance of any sort. The paper shows results of a parametric study for 500 m/s and 1,500 m/s linear induction launchers incorporating two of the latest compensation techniques for an air-core stator primary and an iron-core primary winding. Typical thrust densities for these machines are in the range of 150 kN/sq.m. to 225 kN/sq.m. and these compete favorably with permanent magnet linear synchronous machines. The operational advantages of the high speed SCIM launcher are shown by eliminating the need for pole-angle position sensors as would be required by synchronous systems. The stator power factor is also improved.

  18. Comparison of the folded stripline and stacked stripline concepts to the folded waveguide launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, W.L.; Caughman, J.B.O.; Hoffman, D.J.; Probert, P.H.

    1993-12-31

    Two new concepts are being developed as possible upgrades to the folded waveguide launcher. The folded stripline is a folded waveguide with an additional conductor positioned inside. The term stripline refers to the resemblance of the design to microwave microstrip line. The conductor provides support for TEM mode propagation, which eliminates cutoff and the nonlinear frequency dependence of the waveguide impedance and phase velocity. A natural extension to the folded stripline is the stacked stripline, which comprises several stacked, independent TEM waveguides. Initial measurements indicate that both concepts have better magnetic flux coupling than the folded waveguide.

  19. Comparison of the folded stripline and stacked stripline concepts to the folded waveguide launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, W.L.; Caughman, J.B.O.; Hoffman, D.J. ); Probert, P.H. )

    1994-10-15

    Two new concepts are being developed as possible upgrades to the folded waveguide launcher. The folded stripline is a folded waveguide with an additional conductor positioned inside. The term [ital stripline] refers to the resemblance of the design to microwave microstrip line. The conductor provides support for TEM mode propagation, which eliminates cutoff and the nonlinear frequency dependence of the waveguide impedance and phase velocity. A natural extension to the folded stripline is the stacked stripline, which comprises several stacked, independent TEM waveguides. Initial measurements indicate that both concepts have better magnetic flux coupling than the folded waveguide.

  20. Large Debris Dragging and De-Orbiting by the VEGA Launcher Using a Tether

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roux, Christophe; Federico, Martina; Gallucci, Stefano

    2013-08-01

    Thanks to limited adaptations - additional propellant tanks, addition of a small probe, few SW and Guidance, Navigation and Control (GNC) modifications - the launcher VEGA can be shown to be suited in terms of performances, safety and costs to a de-orbiting mission. Such a mission consists of three main phases: rendezvous, capture and de-orbiting. Focused on the last phase, this work presents the adaptation of GNC algorithms to realize the de-orbiting of a debris dragged by VEGA by means of a tether.

  1. Wound helium pressurant tank development for 2nd stage of Ariane 4 launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valy, Y.; Coquet, P.

    1990-06-01

    The manufacture of a wound pressurant tank for the second stage of the Ariane 4 launcher is described. The goal of the manufacturing process is to save 26 kg per tank resulting in an overall savings of 78 kg for the second stage. This is equivalent to an extra mass payload of about 20 kg. The technical requirements of the tank are described. Development requirements and approach are outlined. Qualification standards of the design and qualification tests are described. Tank behavior is checked using acoustic emission and ultrasonic inspection.

  2. Feasibility of an earth-to-space rail launcher system. [emphasizing nuclear waste disposal application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, E. E.; Miller, L. A.; Marshall, R. A.; Kerslake, W. R.

    1982-01-01

    The feasibility of earth-to-space electromagnetic (railgun) launchers (ESRL) is considered, in order to determine their technical practicality and economic viability. The potential applications of the launcher include nuclear waste disposal into space, deep space probe launches, and atmospheric research. Examples of performance requirements of the ESRL system are a maximum acceleration of 10,000 g's for nuclear waste disposal in space (NWDS) missions and 2,500 g's for earth orbital missions, a 20 km/sec launch velocity for NWDS missions, and a launch azimuth of 90 degrees E. A brief configuration description is given, and test results indicate that for the 2020-2050 time period, as much as 3.0 MT per day of bulk material could be launched, and about 0.5 MT per day of high-level nuclear waste could be launched. For earth orbital missions, a significant projectile mass was approximately 6.5 MT, and an integral distributed energy store launch system demonstrated a good potential performance. ESRL prove to be economically and environmentally feasible, but an operational ESRL of the proposed size is not considered achievable before the year 2020.

  3. Fabrication issues and technology development for HELEOS (Hypervelocity Electromagnetic Launcher for Equation of State)

    SciTech Connect

    Susoeff, A.R.; Hawke, R.S.; Balk, J.K.; Hall, C.A.; McDonald, M.J.

    1988-02-01

    Starfire is a joint railgun project of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratory-Albuquerque. The goal of Starfire is to develop a Hypervelocity Electromagnetic Launcher for Equation of State (HELEOS) experiments. A two-stage light-gas gun is used as pre-injector. Each round-bore HELEOS railgun module is 12.7 mm in diameter and 2.4 m long. The muzzle end of the railgun is connected to a vacuum tank. Common materials and fabrication technology are used in the manufacture of all components,a nd modular design allows for extending the length of the railgun as progress dictates. The launcher uses a ''vee block'' geometry, which is designed to: provide compressive preload; operate with a 300-MPa (3-kbar) internal bore pressure; and easily accommodate interchangeable materials in the bore support structure and rail. We have performed full-scale material testing of the railgun and have developed a precision round-bore fabrication process. Air-gage inspection is used to determine bore diameter and straightness. We have also developed a surface mapping system to document the surface topography of the bore before and after an experiment. This paper presents fabrication details, results of tests conducted, and areas for potential improvement. 12 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Millimeter wave experiment of ITER equatorial EC launcher mock-up

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, K.; Oda, Y.; Kajiwara, K.; Kobayashi, N.; Isozaki, M.; Sakamoto, K.; Omori, T.; Henderson, M.

    2014-02-12

    The full-scale mock-up of the equatorial launcher was fabricated in basis of the baseline design to investigate the mm-wave propagation properties of the launcher, the manufacturability, the cooling line management, how to assemble the components and so on. The mock-up consists of one of three mm-wave transmission sets and one of eight waveguide lines can deliver the mm-wave power. The mock-up was connected to the ITER compatible transmission line and the 170GHz gyrotron and the high power experiment was carried out. The measured radiation pattern of the beam at the location of 2.5m away from the EL mock-up shows the successful steering capability of 20°∼40°. It was also revealed that the radiated profile at both steering and fixed focusing mirror agreed with the calculation. The result also suggests that some unwanted modes are included in the radiated beam. Transmission of 0.5MW-0.4sec and of 0.12MW-50sec were also demonstrated.

  5. Down-Bore Two-Laser Heterodyne Velocimetry of an Implosion-Driven Hypervelocity Launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildebrand, Myles; Huneault, Justin; Loiseau, Jason; Higgins, Andrew J.

    2015-06-01

    The implosion-driven launcher uses explosives to shock-compress helium, driving well-characterized projectiles to velocities exceeding 10 km/s. The masses of projectiles range between 0.1 - 10 g, and the design shows excellent scalability, reaching similar velocities across different projectile sizes. In the past, velocity measurements have been limited to muzzle velocity obtained via a high-speed videography upon the projectile exiting the launch tube. Recently, Photonic Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) has demonstrated the ability to continuously measure in-bore velocity, even in the presence of significant blow-by of high temperature helium propellant past the projectile. While a single-laser PDV is limited to approximately 8 km/s, a two-laser PDV system is developed that uses two lasers operating near 1550 nm to provide velocity measurement capabilities up to 16 km/s. The two laser PDV system is used to obtain a continuous velocity history of the projectile throughout the entire launch cycle. These continuous velocity data are used to validate models of the launcher cycle and compare different advanced concepts aimed at increasing the projectile velocity to well beyond 10 km/s.

  6. SHARP, a first step towards a full sized Jules Verne Launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Bertolini, L.R.; Hunter, J.W.; Powell, J.R.; Tidman, D.A.

    1993-05-01

    A vital element for space exploration and utilization is the ability to affordably place large quantities of consumables and building material into low earth orbit. Calculations and supportive data indicate this can be done with a large hydrogen gas gun referred to as the Jules Verne Launcher (JVL). We present a design for the JVL based upon the concept of side injecting preheated hydrogen along a long barrel. This dramatically reduces the peak pressures in the launcher as well as the pressures and g-loads at the vehicle. The JVL has the promise of reducing payload delivery costs to Low Earth Orbit (LEO) to below $500/kg. The Super High Altitude Research Project (SHARP) is a conventional two-stage hydrogen gas gun which is configured to launch 5 kg packages on suborbital trajectories. It is the first step towards the much larger Jules Verne system and will demonstrate several important features of the larger system. SHARP is currently in the middle of a series of tests aimed at its first milestone. This is to launch 5 kg at 4 km/sec horizontally. In its inclined configuration SHARP should launch vehicles to apogees in excess of 400 km and ranges in excess of 700 km.

  7. Aktiv De-Orbiting Onboard System from Leo of Upper Stages of Launchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trushlyakov, V.; Shalay, V.; Shatrov, J.; Jakovlev, M.; Kostantino, A.

    2009-03-01

    The active de-orbiting onboard system (VDOS) of upper separable parts (USP) stage of launchers from LEO into orbits of utilization with term of existence orbital lifetimes till 25 years is offered. ADOS it is based on use of power resources of not produced rests of liquid fuel onboard USP launchers with liquid propulsion module (LPM). Following systems enter in structure VDOS: the gas jet propulsion system consisting of a system of gasification, chambers of gas engines (GE), a control system. For gasification of the rests of liquid fuel the heat-carrier received in the autonomous gas generator is used. The gasification propellant components from each tank with temperature and the pressure determined by strength of the corresponding tank, move in chambers of the GE established on a top of a fuel compartment. After separation of a payload execute twist USP for preservation of its position in the space by activity of the GE. Ways of increase of a system effectiveness of gasification are offered by superposition on the entered heat-carrier of ultrasonic oscillations, and also introduction in gaseous fuel nanopowder of aluminum. The volume of adaptations of construction USP, connected with introduction VDOS does not exceed 5 % from weight of a dry construction.

  8. SAMP App Launcher: An On-Demand VO Application Starter by JMMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafrasse, S.; Bourges, L.; Mella, G.

    2012-09-01

    SAMP is the dedicated Virtual Observatory protocol to ensure data exchange between compatible astronomical software running on personal computers. However, one SAMP weakness lies in its requirement to have interoperable applications already running in order to gracefully ensure communication between them. To circumvent this requirement, we present a dedicated application, plus some new SAMP specifications, focused on Java™ software available through the Java Web Start application-deployment technology (JNLP) at this stage. JMMC AppLauncher software fakes any described application by registering stub clients on the central SAMP hub. When one of the fake clients is solicited by any third-party software, AppLauncher takes the responsibility to start the true application, and then forwards the waiting SAMP message once fully started. To achieve this, we propose a set of new SAMP key-value pair to hold JNLP URLs. In the future, other kind of software packages technology could also be supported. We also want to standardize this solution, and get one central registry-like interoperable repository of compatible software, in order to open our mechanism to any third-party SAMP application provider. To illustrate, we briefly present our own use case, which demonstrates the need of such a tool for the JMMC applications suite.

  9. Recent advance on design and manufacturing of composite anisogrid structures for space launchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Totaro, G.; De Nicola, F.

    2012-12-01

    Anisogrid composite shells have been developed and applied since the eighties by the Russian technology aiming at critical weight structures for space launchers, as interstages and cone adapters. The manufacturing process commonly applied is based on the wet filament winding. The paper concerns with some developments of design and manufacturing recently performed at the Italian Aerospace Research Center on a cylindrical structural model representative of this kind of structures. The framework of preliminary design is improved by introducing the concept of suboptimal configuration in order to match the stiffness requirement of the shell and minimise the mass, in conjunction with the typical strength constraints. The undertaken manufacturing process is based on dry robotic winding for the lattice structure and for the outer skin, with the aid of usual rubber tooling and new devices for the automated deposition strategy. Resin infusion under vacuum bag and co-cure of the system of ribs and skin is finally applied out-of-autoclave, with the aid of a heated mandrel. With such approach an interstage structural model (scale factor 1:1.5) has been designed, manufactured and tested. Design requirements and loads refer to a typical space launcher whose baseline configuration is made in aluminium. The global mechanical test of the manufactured structure has confirmed the expected high structural performance. The possibility to reach substantial weight savings in comparison with the aluminium benchmark has been fully demonstrated.

  10. Recommended Architecture for a Knowledge Management System for the Undersea Launchers Division at the Naval Undersea Warfare Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    processes, and technology . The architecture description is recommended for use in developing a more detailed system design for the Launchers Division...Command (NAVSEA) and the Fleet. The resulting architecture description integrates people, processes, and technology . The architecture description is...xii THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK xiii LIST OF ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS Acronym Term AIMTC Advanced Interactive Management Technology Center

  11. Ordering of hard particles between hard walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrzanowska, A.; Teixeira, P. I. C.; Ehrentraut, H.; Cleaver, D. J.

    2001-05-01

    The structure of a fluid of hard Gaussian overlap particles of elongation κ = 5, confined between two hard walls, has been calculated from density-functional theory and Monte Carlo simulations. By using the exact expression for the excluded volume kernel (Velasco E and Mederos L 1998 J. Chem. Phys. 109 2361) and solving the appropriate Euler-Lagrange equation entirely numerically, we have been able to extend our theoretical predictions into the nematic phase, which had up till now remained relatively unexplored due to the high computational cost. Simulation reveals a rich adsorption behaviour with increasing bulk density, which is described semi-quantitatively by the theory without any adjustable parameters.

  12. High temperature properties of alloys being considered for design of a concentric canister launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Kassner, M E; Lowry, R W; Rosen, R S

    1998-06-01

    This report describes a study to determine the high temperature mechanical properties of several titanium alloys and to compare them with properties of AISI 316L stainless steel and ASTM A 387 structural steel. The steel materials are less costly to procure but exhibit good resistance to corrosion in seawater environments. Six titanium alloys were evaluated as candidate materials for use in a c Concentric Canister Launcher (CCL). Each titanium alloy was tested at three temperatures (68°, 2000°F, and 2400°F). Strain-rate changes tests were used to determine the strain rate sensitivity of the alloys at each test temperature. Optical metallography was performed on two of the alloys to determine the relationship between test temperature and microstructure (presence of second phase precipitates, grain size). Complete test results are includes, a long with figures and tables of test data.

  13. Beam masking to reduce cyclic error in beam launcher of interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ames, Lawrence L. (Inventor); Bell, Raymond Mark (Inventor); Dutta, Kalyan (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Embodiments of the present invention are directed to reducing cyclic error in the beam launcher of an interferometer. In one embodiment, an interferometry apparatus comprises a reference beam directed along a reference path, and a measurement beam spatially separated from the reference beam and being directed along a measurement path contacting a measurement object. The reference beam and the measurement beam have a single frequency. At least a portion of the reference beam and at least a portion of the measurement beam overlapping along a common path. One or more masks are disposed in the common path or in the reference path and the measurement path to spatially isolate the reference beam and the measurement beam from one another.

  14. Specifications and implementation of the RT MHD control system for the EC launcher of FTU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galperti, C.; Alessi, E.; Boncagni, L.; Bruschi, A.; Granucci, G.; Grosso, A.; Iannone, F.; Marchetto, C.; Nowak, S.; Panella, M.; Sozzi, C.; Tilia, B.

    2012-09-01

    To perform real time plasma control experiments using EC heating waves by using the new fast launcher installed on FTU a dedicated data acquisition and elaboration system has been designed recently. A prototypical version of the acquisition/control system has been recently developed and will be tested on FTU machine in its next experimental campaign. The open-source framework MARTe (Multi-threaded Application Real-Time executor) on Linux/RTAI real-time operating system has been chosen as software platform to realize the control system. Standard open-architecture industrial PCs, based either on VME bus and CompactPCI bus equipped with standard input/output cards are the chosen hardware platform.

  15. Electromagnetic launcher studies of breakup and aerosol formation in molten uranium alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, D.A.; Rader, D.J.

    1990-03-01

    An understanding of dispersal of nuclear materials from an explosive event is needed to support design studies of weapon storage and transportation. Assessing the consequences and requirements for cleanup of a fire or nonnuclear detonation of a system containing nuclear material requires knowledge of the aerosol formation process. Information about the aerosol chemical composition, the physical size and shape of the particulates, as well as the efficiency of aerosol formation ate needed to conduct meaningful assessments. This report describes laboratory tests to study aerosol from materials of interest. An electromagnetic launcher is used to heat and propel molten metallic samples under energetic high-velocity conditions. We describe the apparatus and first results from tests using uranium-molybdenum alloy samples. Contained laboratory-scale measurements are described that determine aerosol morphology, chemical composition, and aerosol formation efficiency under high-velocity conditions. Data from the launcher tests describe (1) the aerodynamic breakup process of high-velocity molten liquid into droplets, and (2) the formation of still finer aerosols by combustion of these droplets at high velocity. The measurements show efficient aerosol production in air that is dominated by the formation of fine chain-agglomerate combustion aerosol. Particle morphology information for both the chain agglomerate and the less common liquid breakup products is described. The aerodynamic breakup of the liquid sample material is described. Lognormal distributions are shown to accurately represent the data. The geometric mean diameter is related to the mass mean diameter and maximum stable droplet diameter for the distributions. 28 refs., 27 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. ESC-B: The Cryogenic Upper Stage for Europe's Heavy Lift Launcher Ariane 5ECB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juhls, A.

    2002-01-01

    -A. Juhls, Astrium GmbH -M. Lepelletier, Snecma Moteurs -JM. Bahu, CNES -C. Poincheval, CNES. In the year 1998 the European ministerial council decided to initiate the Ariane 5 Plus programme in order to upgrade the European heavy lift launcher Ariane 5. The market was changing more rapidly than predicted showing steadily growing satellite mass and the demand for flexible missions while strong competitors were intensifying their preparations to enter the commercial business. The answer was to improve the Ariane 5 launcher by modifying the cryogenic first (or lower ?) stage and the solid boosters and by introducing two cryogenic upper stages in two steps: In order to cope with the short term need of a significant growth of GTO lift capacity up to 10 t the first denoted ESC-A shall enter commercial service in 2002. Four years later a more powerful second version shall take over enabling a GTO performance of 12 t and providing versatile mission capability. The paper will focus on this new cryogenic upper stage denoted ESC-B giving first a general description of main characteristics and constituents. The article will highlight different challenging aspects of the ESC-B development: Ambitious economical conditions regarding both limited development budgets and the strong need to reduce production cost require improved working methods and an adjustment of the conventional development logic, in particular regarding new verification methods. Furthermore Europe is now facing the complex combination of versatile mission capability together with a powerful cryogenic upper stage. The paper will present the approach to define reasonable mission scenarios in order to cover customer demands while avoiding too stringent system requirements. Along with VINCI, Europe's first expander cycle type engine featuring an extendable nozzle dedicated subsystems will be described which allow 4 re-ignitions and 6 hours of ballistic flight. The paper concludes with the summary of the

  17. In-bore diagnostic and modeling of an electrothermal plasma launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, J.D.

    1993-01-01

    A diagnostic method has been developed to measure the high heat flux produced in the electrothermal plasma launcher SIRENS. The method involves attaching a thermocouple to the back surface of a target to obtain the temperature history of the back surface, which is a direct indication of the heat flux incident on the front surface. The measured temperature history is an input to a developed one dimensional (1-D), time dependent heat conduction code which uses the temperature history of the back surface to determine the incident heat flux on the front surface of the target. A one dimensional time dependent code, ODIN, was developed to model the plasma formation and flow in electrothermal launchers. ODIN models the plasma formation and flow into the source section and the plasma expansion into and through the barrel section. ODIN models the energy transport, particle transport, plasma resistivity, plasma viscosity, and equation-of-state. The source and barrel sections were broken into a specific number of cells and each cell was considered to be in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE), with the plasma modeled as a viscous fluid. The primary objective of the numerical simulation was to predict the time and axial variation of the plasma flow and to predict the magnitude of the drag forces acting on the plasma. SIRENS has been operated at atmospheric conditions using a fuse placed between the two electrodes in the source section to initiate the discharge. Three different types of fuses were tested, with the best results obtaining using a thin triangular shaped aluminum fuse. SIRENS has also be used to launch projectiles, with projectile masses ranging from 400 mg to 1500 mg. The maximum velocity obtained was 1.74 km/sec at an input energy of 2.5 kJ, using a 540 mg Lexan projectile with an efficiency of 33%.

  18. In-Bore Diagnostic and Modeling of AN Electrothermal Plasma Launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurley, Jeffery Dale

    A diagnostic method has been developed to measure the high heat flux produced in the electrothermal plasma launcher SIRENS. The method involves attaching a thermocouple to the back surface of a target to obtain the temperature history of the back surface, which is a direct indication of the heat flux incident on the front surface. The measured temperature history is an input to a developed one dimensional (1-D), time dependent heat conduction code which uses the temperature history of the back surface to determine the incident heat flux on the front surface of the target. A one dimensional time dependent code, ODIN, was developed to model the plasma formation and flow in electrothermal launchers. ODIN models the plasma formation and flow in the source section and the plasma expansion into and through the barrel section. ODIN models the energy transport, particle transport, plasma resistivity, plasma viscosity, and equation-of-state. The source and barrel sections were broken into a specific number of cells and each cell was considered to be in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE), with the plasma modeled as a viscous fluid. The primary objective of the numerical simulation was to predict the time and axial variation of the plasma flow and to predict the magnitude of the drag forces acting on the plasma. SIRENS has been operated at atmospheric conditions using a fuse placed between the two electrodes in the source section to initiate the discharge. Three different types of fuses were tested, with the best results obtained using a thin triangular shaped aluminum fuse. SIRENS has also been used to launch projectiles, with projectile masses ranging from 400 mg to 1500 mg. The maximum velocity obtained was 1.74 km/sec at an input energy of 2.5 kJ, using a 540 mg Lexan projectile with an efficiency of 33%.

  19. Hardness Tester for Polyur

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauser, D. L.; Buras, D. F.; Corbin, J. M.

    1987-01-01

    Rubber-hardness tester modified for use on rigid polyurethane foam. Provides objective basis for evaluation of improvements in foam manufacturing and inspection. Typical acceptance criterion requires minimum hardness reading of 80 on modified tester. With adequate correlation tests, modified tester used to measure indirectly tensile and compressive strengths of foam.

  20. Session: Hard Rock Penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Dunn, James C.; Drumheller, Douglas S.; Glowka, David A.; Lysne, Peter

    1992-01-01

    This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five presentations: ''Hard Rock Penetration - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''Overview - Hard Rock Penetration'' by James C. Dunn; ''An Overview of Acoustic Telemetry'' by Douglas S. Drumheller; ''Lost Circulation Technology Development Status'' by David A. Glowka; ''Downhole Memory-Logging Tools'' by Peter Lysne.

  1. Dynamic hardness of metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xuecheng

    Dynamic hardness (Pd) of 22 different pure metals and alloys having a wide range of elastic modulus, static hardness, and crystal structure were measured in a gas pulse system. The indentation contact diameter with an indenting sphere and the radius (r2) of curvature of the indentation were determined by the curve fitting of the indentation profile data. r 2 measured by the profilometer was compared with that calculated from Hertz equation in both dynamic and static conditions. The results indicated that the curvature change due to elastic recovery after unloading is approximately proportional to the parameters predicted by Hertz equation. However, r 2 is less than the radius of indenting sphere in many cases which is contradictory to Hertz analysis. This discrepancy is believed due to the difference between Hertzian and actual stress distributions underneath the indentation. Factors which influence indentation elastic recovery were also discussed. It was found that Tabor dynamic hardness formula always gives a lower value than that directly from dynamic hardness definition DeltaE/V because of errors mainly from Tabor's rebound equation and the assumption that dynamic hardness at the beginning of rebound process (Pr) is equal to kinetic energy change of an impact sphere over the formed crater volume (Pd) in the derivation process for Tabor's dynamic hardness formula. Experimental results also suggested that dynamic to static hardness ratio of a material is primarily determined by its crystal structure and static hardness. The effects of strain rate and temperature rise on this ratio were discussed. A vacuum rotating arm apparatus was built to measure Pd at 70, 127, and 381 mum sphere sizes, these results exhibited that Pd is highly depended on the sphere size due to the strain rate effects. P d was also used to substitute for static hardness to correlate with abrasion and erosion resistance of metals and alloys. The particle size effects observed in erosion were

  2. Spacecraft configuration study for second generation mobile satellite system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Louie, M.; Vonstentzsch, W.; Zanella, F.; Hayes, R.; Mcgovern, F.; Tyner, R.

    1985-01-01

    A high power, high performance communicatons satellite bus being developed is designed to satisfy a broad range of multimission payload requirements in a cost effective manner and is compatible with both STS and expendable launchers. Results are presented of tradeoff studies conducted to optimize the second generation mobile satellite system for its mass, power, and physical size. Investigations of the 20-meter antenna configuration, transponder linearization techniques, needed spacecraft modifications, and spacecraft power, dissipation, mass, and physical size indicate that the advanced spacecraft bus is capable of supporting the required payload for the satellite.

  3. Organizing Your Hard Disk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stocker, H. Robert; Hilton, Thomas S. E.

    1991-01-01

    Suggests strategies that make hard disk organization easy and efficient, such as making, changing, and removing directories; grouping files by subject; naming files effectively; backing up efficiently; and using PATH. (JOW)

  4. Radiation from hard objects

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1997-02-01

    The inference of the diameter of hard objects is insensitive to radiation efficiency. Deductions of radiation efficiency from observations are very sensitive - possibly overly so. Inferences of the initial velocity and trajectory vary similarly, and hence are comparably sensitive.

  5. Analysis of near-surface flow physics in a two-stage, 10 km/s, electromagnetic launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Buckingham, A.C.; Hawke, R.S.

    1990-06-06

    This is a report of progress in the analysis of several apparently influential physical processes observed in current electromagnetic launcher performance experiments. Boundary layer and thin-film Couette flow processes in the hypervelocity range (approaching 10 km/s) are the focus of this work. The specific launch device under study has a two-stage acceleration: initially a light gas projectile injection phase followed by a plasma driven Lorentz force acceleration phase. Our emphasis is on understanding the concomitant influence of plasma transport, gas phase and gas/solid kinetics, skin depth, solid neutral and ionic particle seed additives on near-wall boundary layer and Couette flow processes. Studies are initiated on the effects of plasma-enriching ion additives and wall transpiration cooling with respect to increasing the integrity, performance, and launch-to-launch endurance of this type of electromagnetic launcher (EML). 14 refs., 8 figs.

  6. Probing the plasma near high power wave launchers in fusion devices for static and dynamic electric fields (invited).

    PubMed

    Klepper, C C; Martin, E H; Isler, R C; Colas, L; Goniche, M; Hillairet, J; Panayotis, S; Pegourié, B; Jacquot, J; Lotte, Ph; Colledani, G; Biewer, T M; Caughman, J B; Ekedahl, A; Green, D L; Harris, J H; Hillis, D L; Shannon, S C; Litaudon, X

    2014-11-01

    An exploratory study was carried out in the long-pulse tokamak Tore Supra, to determine if electric fields in the plasma around high-power, RF wave launchers could be measured with non-intrusive, passive, optical emission spectroscopy. The focus was in particular on the use of the external electric field Stark effect. The feasibility was found to be strongly dependent on the spatial extent of the electric fields and overlap between regions of strong (>∼1 kV/cm) electric fields and regions of plasma particle recycling and plasma-induced, spectral line emission. Most amenable to the measurement was the RF electric field in edge plasma, in front of a lower hybrid heating and current drive launcher. Electric field strengths and direction, derived from fitting the acquired spectra to a model including time-dependent Stark effect and the tokamak-range magnetic field Zeeman-effect, were found to be in good agreement with full-wave modeling of the observed launcher.

  7. Probing the plasma near high power wave launchers in fusion devices for static and dynamic electric fields (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Klepper, C. C. Isler, R. C.; Biewer, T. M.; Caughman, J. B.; Green, D. L.; Harris, J. H.; Hillis, D. L.; Martin, E. H.; Colas, L.; Goniche, M.; Hillairet, J.; Panayotis, S.; Pegourié, B.; Jacquot, J.; Lotte, Ph.; Colledani, G.; Ekedahl, A.; Litaudon, X.; Shannon, S. C.

    2014-11-15

    An exploratory study was carried out in the long-pulse tokamak Tore Supra, to determine if electric fields in the plasma around high-power, RF wave launchers could be measured with non-intrusive, passive, optical emission spectroscopy. The focus was in particular on the use of the external electric field Stark effect. The feasibility was found to be strongly dependent on the spatial extent of the electric fields and overlap between regions of strong (>∼1 kV/cm) electric fields and regions of plasma particle recycling and plasma-induced, spectral line emission. Most amenable to the measurement was the RF electric field in edge plasma, in front of a lower hybrid heating and current drive launcher. Electric field strengths and direction, derived from fitting the acquired spectra to a model including time-dependent Stark effect and the tokamak-range magnetic field Zeeman-effect, were found to be in good agreement with full-wave modeling of the observed launcher.

  8. European Space Agency's launcher multibody dynamics simulator used for system and subsystem level analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldesi, Gianluigi; Toso, Mario

    2012-06-01

    software (such as NASTRAN, CATIA, MATLAB/Simulink, etc.), it is possible to reproduce in detail most of the key subsystems and disciplines (such as trajectory, structures, configuration, mechanisms, aerodynamics, propulsion, GNC, propulsion, etc.) of the launcher in a single simulation. The simulator has been also tuned in order to be used in the studies on new launch vehicle feasibility concepts performed at ESA's Concurrent Design Facility. Furthermore, the code has been adjusted to tackle specific events, such as multi-payload separation dynamics (Swarm, Galileo, etc.), thrust vector control subsystem studies (such as GSTP3, GSTP4, Vega), lift-off analysis (such as Vega, etc.), general loads (Vega, etc.). In this paper, an overview of the launcher multibody dynamics simulator capabilities is presented by illustrating some examples.

  9. Mobile Learning Using Mobile Phones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vicente, Paula

    2013-01-01

    The participation in mobile learning programs is conditioned by having/using mobile communication technology. Those who do not have or use such technology cannot participate in mobile learning programs. This study evaluates who are the most likely participants of mobile learning programs by examining the demographic profile and mobile phone usage…

  10. Measurement Uncertainty Analysis of an Accelerometer Calibration Using a POC Electromagnetic Launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Timpson, Erik J.; Engel, T. G.

    2012-06-12

    A pulse forming network (PFN), helical electromagnetic launcher (HEML), command module (CM), and calibration table (CT) were built and evaluated for the combined ability to calibrate an accelerometer. The PFN has a maximum stored nergy of 19.25 kJ bank and is fired by a silicon controlled rectifier (SCR), with appropriate safety precautions. The HEML is constructed out of G-10 fiberglass reinforced epoxy and is designed to accelerate a mass of 600 grams to a velocity of 10 meters per second. The CM is microcontroller-based running Arduino Software. The CM has a keypad input and 7 segment outputs of the PFN voltage and desired charging voltage. After entering a desired PFN voltage, the CM controls the charging of the PFN. When the two voltages are equal it sends a pulse to the SCR to fire the PFN and in turn, the HEML. The HEML projectile’s tip hits a target that is held by the CT. The CT consists of a table to hold the PFN and HEML, a vacuum chuck, air bearing, velocimeter and catch pot. The target is held with the vacuum chuck awaiting impact. After impact, the air bearing allows the target to fall freely so that the velocimeter can accurately read. A known acceleration is determined from the known change in velocity of the target. Thus, if an accelerometer was attached to the target, the measured value can be compared to the known value.

  11. Numerical investigation of the near wake of generic space launcher systems at transonic and supersonic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Statnikov, V.; Glatzer, C.; Meiß, J.-H.; Meinke, M.; Schröder, W.

    2013-06-01

    Numerical simulations of the near wake of generic rocket configurations are performed at transonic and supersonic freestream conditions to improve the understanding of the highly intricate near wake structures. The Reynolds number in both flow regimes is 106 based on the main body diameter, i. e., specific freestream conditions of ESA's Ariane launcher trajectory. The geometry matches models used in experiments in the framework of the German Transregional Collaborative Research Center TRR40. Both axisymmetric wind tunnel models possess cylindrical sting supports, representing a nozzle to allow investigations of a less disturbed wake flow. A zonal approach consisting of a Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) and a large-eddy simulation (LES) is applied. It is shown that the highly unsteady transonic wake flow at Ma∞ = 0.7 is characterized by the expanding separated shear layer, while the Mach 6.0 wake is defined by a shock, expansion waves, and a recompression region. In both cases, an instantaneous view on the base characteristics reveals complex azimuthal flow structures even for axisymmetric geometries. The flow regimes are discussed by comparing the aerodynamic characteristics, such as the size of the recirculation region and the turbulent kinetic energy.

  12. Down-bore two-laser heterodyne velocimetry of an implosion-driven hypervelocity launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildebrand, Myles; Huneault, Justin; Loiseau, Jason; Higgins, Andrew J.

    2017-01-01

    The implosion-driven launcher uses explosives to shock-compress helium, driving well-characterized projectiles to velocities exceeding 10 km/s. The masses of projectiles range between 0.1 - 15 g, and the design shows excellent scalability, reaching similar velocities across different projectile sizes. In the past, velocity measurements have been limited to muzzle velocity obtained via a high-speed videography upon the projectile exiting the launch tube. Recently, Photon Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) has demonstrated the ability to continuously measure in-bore velocity, even in the presence of significant blow-by of high temperature helium propellant past the projectile. While a single laser system sampled at 40 GS/s with a 13 GHz detector/scope bandwidth is limited to 8 km/s, a two-laser PDV system is developed that uses two lasers operating near 1550 nm to provide velocity measurement capabilities up to 16 km/s with the same bandwidth and sampling rate. The two-laser PDV system is used to obtain a continuous velocity history of the projectile throughout the entire launch cycle. These internal ballistics trajectories are used to compare different advanced concepts aimed at increasing the projectile velocity to well beyond 10 km/s.

  13. A new HyperVelocity Launcher (HVL) for space science application

    SciTech Connect

    Chhabildas, L.C.

    1991-12-31

    Very high driving pressures (tens or hundreds of GPa), are required to accelerate flier plats to hypervelocities. This loading pressure pulse on the fiber plates must be nearly shockless to prevent the plate from melting or vaporizing. This is accomplished by using graded-density impactors referred to as ``pillows.`` When this graded-density material is used to impact a flier-plate in a modified two-stage light gas gun, nearly shockless megabar pressures are introduced into the flier plate. The pressure pulses must also be tailored to prevent spallation of the flier-plate. This technique has been used to launch nominally 1-mm-thick aluminum, magnesium and titanium (gram-size) intact plates to 10.4 km/s, and 0.5-mm-thick aluminum and titanium (half-gram size) intact plates to 12.2 km/s. This is the highest mass-velocity capability attained with laboratory launchers to data, and should open up new regimes of impact physics and lethality studies related to space sciences for laboratory investigations. 14 refs.

  14. A new HyperVelocity Launcher (HVL) for space science application

    SciTech Connect

    Chhabildas, L.C.

    1991-01-01

    Very high driving pressures (tens or hundreds of GPa), are required to accelerate flier plats to hypervelocities. This loading pressure pulse on the fiber plates must be nearly shockless to prevent the plate from melting or vaporizing. This is accomplished by using graded-density impactors referred to as pillows.'' When this graded-density material is used to impact a flier-plate in a modified two-stage light gas gun, nearly shockless megabar pressures are introduced into the flier plate. The pressure pulses must also be tailored to prevent spallation of the flier-plate. This technique has been used to launch nominally 1-mm-thick aluminum, magnesium and titanium (gram-size) intact plates to 10.4 km/s, and 0.5-mm-thick aluminum and titanium (half-gram size) intact plates to 12.2 km/s. This is the highest mass-velocity capability attained with laboratory launchers to data, and should open up new regimes of impact physics and lethality studies related to space sciences for laboratory investigations. 14 refs.

  15. A crude model to study radio frequency induced density modification close to launchers

    SciTech Connect

    Van Eester, Dirk; Crombé, Kristel

    2015-12-15

    The interplay between radio frequency (RF) waves and the density is discussed by adopting the general framework of a 2-time-scale multi-fluid treatment, allowing to separate the dynamics on the RF time scale from that on the time scale on which macroscopic density and flows vary as a result of the presence of electromagnetic and/or electrostatic fields. The focus is on regions close to launchers where charge neutrality is incomplete and waves are commonly evanescent. The fast time scale dynamics influences the slow time scale behavior via quasilinear terms (the Ponderomotive force for the case of the equation of motion). Electrons and ions are treated on the same footing. Also, both fast and slow waves are retained in the wave description. Although this work is meant as a subtopic of a large study—the wave induced “convective cell” physics at hand is of a 2- or 3-dimensional nature while this paper limits itself to a single dimension—a few tentative examples are presented.

  16. The Aquarius, A Proposal for a Nano-Satellite Launcher Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calero, J. S.

    Here we present a nano launcher vehicle capable of injecting a 14 kg satellite in a polar orbit of 400 kilometres of altitude. This vehicle, which we call Aquarius, has an approximate mass of 1,000 kg and is transported and launched as an external load from a fighter aircraft such as the F-18 Hornet or EF-2000 Typhoon. Although we are dealing with a theoretical exercise, the solution we propose here is totally realistic. The calculation methods employed are the usual ones in the preliminary phases of projects of this type, and the technology proposed for the systems corresponds to current state-of-the- art. Of course there are some areas in which conjecture was introduced as to study them in detail would take too long; however we have tried to provide solutions that are both realistic and likely. As regards the numerical values employed in the diverse parameters and magnitudes, we tended to be a bit more conservative. Conceptual aspects, calculation methods, technological solutions and economic and scheduling provisions all derive from knowledge acquired from the extinct Capricornio programme.

  17. Experimental Investigation Of Base Flow Buffeting On The Ariane 5 Launcher Using High Speed PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrijer, F. F. J.; Sciacchitano, A.; Scarrano, F.; Hannemann, K.; Pallegoix, J.-F.; Maseand, J. E. J.; Schwane, R.

    2011-05-01

    Experiments have been performed on a 1:60 scale Ariane 5 launcher in the DNW HST wind tunnel by means of two-component particle image velocimetry (2C-PIV). Measurements are performed for Mach 0.5 and Mach 0.8. The investigation focuses on studying the flow-buffeting phenomenon in the base of an Ariane V rocket. In total four configurations are tested: reference configuration, skirt, scoop and reference configuration without struts. It has been found that the presence of the struts has a large effect on the flow field; the secondary flow caused by the struts decreases the separated region and increases the overall turbulence. The skirt has the effect that the shear layer separates later and therefore does not reattach on the nozzle. Also in the separated region a secondary recirculation region is formed. For the scoop configuration it was observed that a second wake was formed by the scoop element causing the overall shear layer to become thicker. Finally using POD analysis two dominant modes are identified that can be associated to the separation bubble and shear layer dynamics.

  18. Cryogenic pellet launcher adapted for controlling of tokamak plasma edge instabilities.

    PubMed

    Lang, P T; Cierpka, P; Harhausen, J; Neuhauser, J; Wittmann, C; Gál, K; Kálvin, S; Kocsis, G; Sárközi, J; Szepesi, T; Dorner, C; Kauke, G

    2007-02-01

    One of the main challenges posed recently on pellet launcher systems in fusion-oriented plasma physics is the control of the plasma edge region. Strong energy bursts ejected from the plasma due to edge localized modes (ELMs) can form a severe threat for in-vessel components but can be mitigated by sufficiently frequent triggering of the underlying instabilities using hydrogen isotope pellet injection. However, pellet injection systems developed mainly for the task of ELM control, keeping the unwanted pellet fueling minimized, are still missing. Here, we report on a novel system developed under the premise of its suitability for control and mitigation of plasma edge instabilities. The system is based on the blower gun principle and is capable of combining high repetition rates up to 143 Hz with low pellet velocities. Thus, the flexibility of the accessible injection geometry can be maximized and the pellet size kept low. As a result the new system allows for an enhancement in the tokamak operation as well as for more sophisticated experiments investigating the underlying physics of the plasma edge instabilities. This article reports on the design of the new system, its main operational characteristics as determined in extensive test bed runs, and also its first test at the tokamak experiment ASDEX Upgrade.

  19. A new technology for production of high thickness carbon/carbon composites for launchers application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albano, Marta; Delfini, Andrea; Pastore, Roberto; Micheli, Davide; Marchetti, Mario

    2016-11-01

    Carbon-Carbon (C/C) composites are known for their extraordinary stability and excellent mechanical properties, almost unchanged at high temperatures. Among the several advanced applications, C/C based materials can be used in engines as nozzle throat section for launchers. In particular, the main feature for such employment is the material high resistance in extreme thermal environment. On the other hand, large-size items are required for this kind of purposes, thus introducing criticalities in terms of material uniformity and final overall properties. Up to now, there no standard for the production of high thickness C/C structures. In this paper a novel manufacturing method is analyzed, following each phase of the process, from the carbon fiber preform design and preparation to the carbon densification by chemical vapor infiltration method. Five preforms of large dimensions with different characteristics have been manufactured and infiltrated. The realized prototypes have been then analyzed by means of mechanical, physical and morphological tests. Aim of the results of this preliminary work is to establish a set of guidelines for a well-defined high thickness C/C production method.

  20. Update on Progress of Space Station Integrated Kinetic Launcher for Orbital Payload Systems (SSIKLOPS) - Cyclops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newswander, Daniel; Smith, James P.; Lamb, Craig R.; Ballard, Perry G.

    2014-01-01

    The Space Station Integrated Kinetic Launcher for Orbital Payload Systems (SSIKLOPS), known as "Cyclops" to the International Space Station (ISS) community, was introduced last August (2013) during Technical Session V: From Earth to Orbit of the 27th Annual AIAA/USU Conference on Small Satellites. Cyclops is a collaboration between the NASA ISS Program, NASA Johnson Space Center Engineering, and Department of Defense (DoD) Space Test Program (STP) communities to develop a dedicated 50-100 kg class ISS small satellite deployment system. This paper will address the progress of Cyclops through its fabrication, assembly, flight certification, and on-orbit demonstration phases. It will also go into more detail regarding its anatomy, its satellite deployment concept of operations, and its satellite interfaces and requirements. Cyclops is manifested to fly on Space-X 4 which is currently scheduled in July 2014 with its initial satellite deployment demonstration of DoD STP's SpinSat and UT/TAMU's Lonestar satellites being late summer or fall of 2014.

  1. Development of a high-velocity free-flight launcher : the Ames light-gas gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charters, A C; Denardo, B Pat; Rossow, Vernon J

    1955-01-01

    Recent interest in long-range missiles has stimulated a search for new experimental techniques which can reproduce in the laboratory the high temperatures and Mach numbers associated with the missiles' flight. One promising possibility lies in free-flight testing of laboratory models which are flown at the full velocity of the missile. In this type of test, temperatures are approximated and aerodynamic heating of the model is representative of that experienced by the missile in high-velocity flight. A prime requirement of the free-flight test technique is a device which had the capacity for launching models at the velocities desired. In response to thie need, a gun firing light models at velocities up to 15,000 feet per second has been developed at the Ames Aeronautical Laboratory. The design of this gun, the analysis of its performance, and the results of the initial firing trials are described in this paper. The firing trials showed that the measured velocities and pressures agreed well with the predicted values. Also, the erosion of the launch tube was very small for the eleven rounds fired. The performance of the gun suggests that it will prove to be a satisfactory launcher for high-velocity free-flight tests. However, it should be mentioned that only the gross performance has been evaluated so far, and, consequently, the operation of the gun must be investigated in further detail before its performance can be reliably predicted over its full operating range.

  2. Guidelines for internal optics optimization of the ITER EC H and CD upper launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Moro, A.; Bruschi, A.; Figini, L.; Farina, D.; Platania, P.; Sozzi, C.; Chavan, R.; Goodman, T. P.; Krause, A.; Landis, J. D.; Sanchez Galan, F.; Toussaint, M.; Henderson, M. A.; Saibene, G.

    2014-02-12

    The importance of localized injection of Electron Cyclotron waves to control Magneto-HydroDynamic instability is well assessed in tokamak physics and the set of four Electron Cyclotron (EC) Upper Launchers (UL) in ITER is mainly designed for this purpose. Each of the 4 ULs uses quasi-optical mirrors (shaping and planes, fixed and steerable) to redirect and focus 8 beams (in two rows, with power close to 1 MW per beam coming from the EC transmission lines) in the plasma region where the instability appears. Small beam dimensions and maximum beam superposition guarantee the necessary localization of the driven current. To achieve the goal of MHD stabilization with minimum EC power to preserve the energy confinement in the outer half of the plasma cross section, optimization of the quasi-optical design is required and a guideline of a strategy is presented. As a result of this process and following the guidelines indicated, modifications of the design (new mirrors positions, rotation axes and/or focal properties) will be proposed for the next step of an iterative process, including the mandatory compatibility check with the mechanical constraints.

  3. Budgeting in Hard Times.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrino, Frank M.

    2003-01-01

    Interviews with school board members and administrators produced a list of suggestions for balancing a budget in hard times. Among these are changing calendars and schedules to reduce heating and cooling costs; sharing personnel; rescheduling some extracurricular activities; and forming cooperative agreements with other districts. (MLF)

  4. Running in Hard Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, John N., III

    2009-01-01

    Roberta Stevens and Kent Oliver are campaigning hard for the presidency of the American Library Association (ALA). Stevens is outreach projects and partnerships officer at the Library of Congress. Oliver is executive director of the Stark County District Library in Canton, Ohio. They have debated, discussed, and posted web sites, Facebook pages,…

  5. CSI: Hard Drive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sturgeon, Julie

    2008-01-01

    Acting on information from students who reported seeing a classmate looking at inappropriate material on a school computer, school officials used forensics software to plunge the depths of the PC's hard drive, searching for evidence of improper activity. Images were found in a deleted Internet Explorer cache as well as deleted file space.…

  6. Investigation of battery-charged-capacitor pulsed-power systems for electromagnetic-launcher experiments. Final report, Jan 90-Apr 91

    SciTech Connect

    Cornette, J.B.

    1992-02-01

    Candidate pulsed power systems for electromagnetic launchers constitute two broad categories: rotating machinery and non-rotating devices. Rotating machinery for this purpose is under development at several industrial and educational institutions around the world. Non-rotating hardware includes capacitors, batteries, and inductors. These, too, are the subject of research programs, but as yet, are much larger than rotating supplies of equal power and energy capability. In 1988, system studies identified several attractive pulsed power systems for electromagnetic launchers. Battery charged capacitor pulsed power systems were among those identified as promising for electromagnetic launcher systems. The basic equations governing the battery charging capacitor sequence, and the capacitor discharge into an electromagnetic launcher are the subject of this report. A battery charged capacitor system powering an electromagnetic launcher has also been built and tested. This experiment not only validates the system concept with presently available hardware, but can be used to establish a baseline for evaluation of future systems when technology in capacitor and battery power and energy densities improve.

  7. Investigations on the turbulent wake of a generic space launcher geometry in the hypersonic flow regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saile, D.; Gülhan, A.; Henckels, A.; Glatzer, C.; Statnikov, V.; Meinke, M.

    2013-06-01

    The turbulent wake flow of generic rocket configurations is investigated experimentally and numerically at a freestream Mach number of 6.0 and a unit Reynolds number of 10·106 m-1. The flow condition is based on the trajectory of Ariane V-like launcher at an altitude of 50 km, which is used as the baseline to address the overarching tasks of wake flows in the hypersonic regime like fluid-structural coupling, reverse hot jets and base heating. Experimental results using pressure transducers and the high-speed Schlieren measurement technique are shown to gain insight into the local pressure fluctuations on the base and the oscillations of the recompression shock. This experimental configuration features a wedgeprofiled strut orthogonally mounted to the main body. Additionally, the influence of cylindrical dummy nozzles attached to the base of the rocket is investigated, which is the link to the numerical investigations. Here, the axisymmetric model possesses a cylindrical sting support of the same diameter as the dummy nozzles. The sting support allows investigations for an undisturbed wake flow. A time-accurate zonal Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes/Large Eddy Simulation (RANS/LES) approach is applied to identify shocks, expansion waves, and the highly unsteady recompression region numerically. Subsequently, experimental and numerical results in the strut-averted region are compared with regard to the wall pressure and recompression shock frequency spectra. For the compared configurations, experimental pressure spectra exhibit dominant Strouhal numbers at about SrD = 0.03 and 0.27, and the recompression shock oscillates at 0.2. In general, the pressure and recompression shock fluctuations numerically calculated agree reasonably with the experimental results. The experiments with a blunt base reveal base-pressure spectra with dominant Strouhal numbers at 0.08 at the center position and 0.145, 0.21-0.22, and 0.31-0.33 at the outskirts of the base.

  8. Wave induced density modification in RF sheaths and close to wave launchers

    SciTech Connect

    Van Eester, D.; Lu, Ling-Feng

    2015-12-10

    With the return to full metal walls - a necessary step towards viable fusion machines - and due to the high power densities of current-day ICRH (Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating) or RF (radio frequency) antennas, there is ample renewed interest in exploring the reasons for wave-induced sputtering and formation of hot spots. Moreover, there is experimental evidence on various machines that RF waves influence the density profile close to the wave launchers so that waves indirectly influence their own coupling efficiency. The present study presents a return to first principles and describes the wave-particle interaction using a 2-time scale model involving the equation of motion, the continuity equation and the wave equation on each of the time scales. Through the changing density pattern, the fast time scale dynamics is affected by the slow time scale events. In turn, the slow time scale density and flows are modified by the presence of the RF waves through quasilinear terms. Although finite zero order flows are identified, the usual cold plasma dielectric tensor - ignoring such flows - is adopted as a first approximation to describe the wave response to the RF driver. The resulting set of equations is composed of linear and nonlinear equations and is tackled in 1D in the present paper. Whereas the former can be solved using standard numerical techniques, the latter require special handling. At the price of multiple iterations, a simple ’derivative switch-on’ procedure allows to reformulate the nonlinear problem as a sequence of linear problems. Analytical expressions allow a first crude assessment - revealing that the ponderomotive potential plays a role similar to that of the electrostatic potential arising from charge separation - but numerical implementation is required to get a feeling of the full dynamics. A few tentative examples are provided to illustrate the phenomena involved.

  9. Combined experimental and numerical investigation of a transonic space launcher wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharnowski, S.; Statnikov, V.; Meinke, M.; Schröder, W.; Kähler, C. J.

    2015-06-01

    Combined experimental und numerical investigations of the turbulent wake of a generic space launcher at transonic free stream conditions (Ma∞ = 0.7 and ReD = 1.0 · 106) are performed to gain a better understanding of intricate phenomena of the wake flow physics and to validate new methods for its analysis. The experiments are conducted at the Bundeswehr University Munich using a high-repetition-rate particle image velocimetry (PIV) system, while the numerical investigation is performed by the Institute of Aerodynamics of RWTH Aachen University using a zonal Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) / large-eddy simulation (LES) approach. After a characterization of the wake flow topology, two applied methodologies are compared to each other with respect to the spatial and temporal resolution stressing their strengths and shortcomings. It is shown that both methods are well suitable for the prediction of the mean and instantaneous values of the turbulent velocity field, whereas for a reliable statistical analysis of the velocity fluctuations, the PIV approach is more appropriate due to the computational time limitations of the LES. On the other hand, the high spatial and temporal resolution of the LES allows for an accurate detection of relevant coherent structures as well as tracking their motion in time without any significant artificial vortex agglomeration that can be critical in the case of PIV. Furthermore, the influence of different model assumptions, e. g., the level of incoming turbulence and model vibrations, is discussed in order to emphasize the importance of a side-by-side combination of both investigation techniques.

  10. Structures, Material and Processes Technology in the Future Launchers Preparatory Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baiocco, P.; Ramusat, G.; Breteau, J.; Bouilly, Th.; Lavelle, Fl.; Cardone, T.; Fischer, H.; Appel, S.; Block, U.

    2014-06-01

    In the frame of the technology / demonstration activity for European launchers developments and evolutions, a top-down / bottom-up approach has been employed to identify promising technologies and alternative conception. The top-down approach consists in looking for system-driven design solutions and the bottom-up approach features design solutions leading to substantial advantages for the system. The main investigations have been devoted to structures, material and process technology.Preliminary specifications have been used in order to permit sub-system design with the goal to find the major benefit for the overall launch system. In this respect competitiveness factors have been defined to down- select the technology and the corresponding optimized design. The development cost, non-recurring cost, industrialization and operational aspects have been considered for the identification of the most interesting solutions. The TRL/IRL has been assessed depending on the manufacturing company and a preliminary development plan has been issued for some technology.The reference launch systems for the technology and demonstration programs are mainly Ariane 6 with its evolutions, VEGA C/E and others possible longer term systems. Requirements and reference structures architectures have been considered in order to state requirements for representative subscale or full scale demonstrators. The major sub-systems and structures analyzed are for instance the upper stage structures, the engine thrust frame (ETF), the inter stage structures (ISS), the cryogenic propellant tanks, the feeding lines and their attachments, the pressurization systems, the payload adapters and fairings. A specific analysis has been devoted to the efficiency of production processes associated to technologies and design features.The paper provides an overview of the main results of the technology and demonstration activities with the associated system benefits. The materials used for the main structures are

  11. Wave induced density modification in RF sheaths and close to wave launchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Eester, D.; Crombé, K.; Lu, Ling-Feng

    2015-12-01

    With the return to full metal walls - a necessary step towards viable fusion machines - and due to the high power densities of current-day ICRH (Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating) or RF (radio frequency) antennas, there is ample renewed interest in exploring the reasons for wave-induced sputtering and formation of hot spots. Moreover, there is experimental evidence on various machines that RF waves influence the density profile close to the wave launchers so that waves indirectly influence their own coupling efficiency. The present study presents a return to first principles and describes the wave-particle interaction using a 2-time scale model involving the equation of motion, the continuity equation and the wave equation on each of the time scales. Through the changing density pattern, the fast time scale dynamics is affected by the slow time scale events. In turn, the slow time scale density and flows are modified by the presence of the RF waves through quasilinear terms. Although finite zero order flows are identified, the usual cold plasma dielectric tensor - ignoring such flows - is adopted as a first approximation to describe the wave response to the RF driver. The resulting set of equations is composed of linear and nonlinear equations and is tackled in 1D in the present paper. Whereas the former can be solved using standard numerical techniques, the latter require special handling. At the price of multiple iterations, a simple 'derivative switch-on' procedure allows to reformulate the nonlinear problem as a sequence of linear problems. Analytical expressions allow a first crude assessment - revealing that the ponderomotive potential plays a role similar to that of the electrostatic potential arising from charge separation - but numerical implementation is required to get a feeling of the full dynamics. A few tentative examples are provided to illustrate the phenomena involved.

  12. Unemployment: Hard-Core or Hard-Shell?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lauer, Robert H.

    1972-01-01

    The term hard-core'' makes the unemployed culpable; the term hard shell'' shifts the burden to the employer, and the evidence from the suburban plant indicates that a substantial part of the problem must lie there. (DM)

  13. Super-Hard Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Philip; Prozorov, Ruslan

    2005-03-01

    We present the magnetic response of Type-II superconductivity in the extreme pinning limit, where screening currents within an order of magnitude of the Ginzburg-Landau depairing critical current density develop upon the application of a magnetic field. We show that this ``super-hard'' limit is well approximated in highly disordered, cold drawn, Nb wire whose magnetization response is characterized by a cascade of Meissner-like phases, each terminated by a catastrophic collapse of the magnetization. Direct magneto-optic measurements of the flux penetration depth in the virgin magnetization branch are in excellent agreement with the exponential model in which Jc(B)=Jco(-B/Bo), where Jco˜5x10^6 A/cm^2 for Nb. The implications for the fundamental limiting hardness of a superconductor will be discussed.

  14. Study on the eddy current damping of the spin dynamics of space debris from the Ariane launcher upper stages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Praly, N.; Hillion, M.; Bonnal, C.; Laurent-Varin, J.; Petit, N.

    2012-07-01

    This paper addresses the topic of damping of the spin dynamics of a spatial debris orbiting around the Earth. Such debris, which can consist of parts of heavy launchers such as the Ariane rocket under consideration in this article, are impacted by torques generated by eddy currents as their conducting non-ferromagnetic body orbits through the Earth magnetosphere. Several previous works have focused on describing this induction phenomenon and have proposed analysis of empirical observations of this particular and important effect which has attracted much attention since the number of spatial debris has emerged as a problem for the future of space programs, especially in low orbits. In this paper, we present a relatively comprehensive modeling of the induction phenomenon, by means of Maxwell's equations inside the conducting and non-ferromagnetic body. Through the generalized Ohm's law, we show how one can obtain a partial differential equation with Neumann's boundary conditions problem that, once solved, e.g. through a finite elements method, yields the values of induced currents and braking torques. The case of a depleted upper stage of a heavy launcher, having a cylindrical shape and thin walls is particularly studied. We show a methodology to estimate the decay-rate of the spinning velocity, which is proven to satisfy a first-order asymptotically stable linear dynamics. Special cases consisting of typical orbit of space debris are treated.

  15. Simulation of the acoustic environment of a launcher and of the noise-induced vibrations on its structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgine, A.

    1983-03-01

    During the launching and transonic flight of a launcher, high level and wide-band frequency vibrations are transmitted to the payload and equipments. Preliminary simulation tests are planned to reproduce these dangerous phenomena; however, classical test facilities (reverberant acoustic chambers) generally do not provide simultaneously the true space and time distribution of the flight pressure fluctuations. A method is described for forcing the vibratory response of the launcher wall, for instance at the shroud which shelters the satellite. (Statistical characteristics of this response are known by a previous analytical prediction). Forced vibrations are produced by using a few number of electrodynamic shakers acting on the wall; the N random forces are simultaneously synthesized on a digital computer. The proper simulation is realized when measured responses at N points exhibit spectral distributions and overall RMS levels very close to the predicted flight values. Then, the noise level inside the shroud and the vibrations transmitted to the payload are also very close to the flight conditions. Some examples of applications to realistic structures, as the shroud of the Ariane vehicle, are presented.

  16. Hard metal composition

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, H.

    1983-07-26

    A composition of matter having a Rockwell A hardness of at least 85 is formed from a precursor mixture comprising between 3 and 10 wt % boron carbide and the remainder a metal mixture comprising from 70 to 90% tungsten or molybdenum, with the remainder of the metal mixture comprising nickel and iron or a mixture thereof. The composition has a relatively low density of between 7 and 14 g/cc. The precursor is preferably hot pressed to yield a composition having greater than 100% of theoretical density.

  17. Hard metal composition

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, Haskell

    1986-01-01

    A composition of matter having a Rockwell A hardness of at least 85 is formed from a precursor mixture comprising between 3 and 10 weight percent boron carbide and the remainder a metal mixture comprising from 70 to 90 percent tungsten or molybdenum, with the remainder of the metal mixture comprising nickel and iron or a mixture thereof. The composition has a relatively low density of between 7 to 14 g/cc. The precursor is preferably hot pressed to yield a composition having greater than 100% of theoretical density.

  18. Steady-State Cycle Deck Launcher Developed for Numerical Propulsion System Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanDrei, Donald E.

    1997-01-01

    industry and NASA. The NPSS Steady-State Cycle Deck team released a batch version of the Steady-State Cycle Deck in March 1996. Version 1.1 was released in June 1996. During fiscal 1997, NPSS accepted enhancements and modifications to the Steady-State Cycle Deck launcher. Consistent with NPSS' commercialization plan, these modifications will be done by a third party that can provide long-term software support.

  19. Final Progress Report for the NASA Inductrack Model Rocket Launcher at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Tung, L S; Post, R F; Martinez-Frias, J

    2001-06-27

    The Inductrack magnetic levitation system, developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, was studied for its possible use for launching rockets. Under NASA sponsorship, a small model system was constructed at the Laboratory to pursue key technical aspects of this proposed application. The Inductrack is a passive magnetic levitation system employing special arrays of high-field permanent magnets (Halbach arrays) on the levitating cradle, moving above a ''track'' consisting of a close-packed array of shorted coils with which are interleaved with special drive coils. Halbach arrays produce a strong spatially periodic magnetic field on the front surface of the arrays, while canceling the field on their back surface. Relative motion between the Halbach arrays and the track coils induces currents in those coils. These currents levitate the cradle by interacting with the horizontal component of the magnetic field. Pulsed currents in the drive coils, synchronized with the motion of the carrier, interact with the vertical component of the magnetic field to provide acceleration forces. Motional stability, including resistance to both vertical and lateral aerodynamic forces, is provided by having Halbach arrays that interact with both the upper and the lower sides of the track coils. At present, a 7.8 meter track composed of drive and levitation coils has been built and the electronic drive circuitry performs as designed. A 9 kg cradle that carries the Halbach array of permanent magnets has been built. A mechanical launcher is nearly complete which will provide an initial cradle velocity of 9 m/s into the electronic drive section. We have found that the drag forces from the levitation coils were higher than in our original design. However, measurements of drag force at velocities less than 1 m/s are exactly as predicted by theory. Provided here are recommended design changes to improve the track's performance so that a final velocity of 40 m/s can be achieved with

  20. Experimental and numerical investigation of the turbulent wake flow of a generic space launcher configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Statnikov, V.; Saile, D.; Meiß, J.-H.; Henckels, A.; Meinke, M.; Gülhan, A.; Schröder, W.

    2015-06-01

    The turbulent wake of a generic space launcher at cold hypersonic freestream conditions is investigated experimentally and numerically to gain detailed insight into the intricate base flow phenomena of space vehicles at upper stages of the flight trajectory. The experiments are done at Ma∞ = 6 and ReD = 1.7 · 106 m-1 by the German Aerospace Center (DLR) and the corresponding computations are performed by the Institute of Aerodynamics Aachen using a zonal Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes / Large-Eddy Simulation (RANS/LES) approach. Two different aft-body geometries consisting of a blunt base and an attached cylindrical nozzle dummy are considered. It is found that the wind tunnel model support attached to the upper side of the main body has a nonnegligible impact on the wake along the whole circumference, albeit on the opposite side, the effects are minimal compared to an axisymmetric configuration. In the blunt-base case, the turbulent supersonic boundary layer undergoes a strong aftexpansion on the model shoulder leading to the formation of a confined low-pressure (p/p∞ ≈ 0.2) recirculation region. Adding a nozzle dummy causes the shear layer to reattach on the its wall at x/D ˜ 0.6 and the base pressure level to increase (p/p∞ ≈ 0.25) compared to the blunt-base case. For both configurations, the pressure fluctuations on the base wall feature dominant frequencies at SrD ≈ 0.05 and SrD ≈ 0.2-0.27, but are of small amplitudes (prms/p∞ = 0.02-0.025) compared to the main body boundary layer. For the nozzle dummy configuration, when moving downstream along the nozzle extension, the wall pressure is increasingly influenced by the reattaching shear layer and the periodic low-frequency behavior becomes less pronounced. Directly behind the reattachment point, the wall pressure reaches maximum mean and root-mean-square (rms) values of about p/p∞ = 1 and p'rms/p∞ = 0.1 and features a broadband specrms trum without distinct frequencies determined by the

  1. Hard Metal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bech, A. O.; Kipling, M. D.; Heather, J. C.

    1962-01-01

    In Great Britain there have been no published reports of respiratory disease occurring amongst workers in the hard metal (tungsten carbide) industry. In this paper the clinical and radiological findings in six cases and the pathological findings in one are described. In two cases physiological studies indicated mild alveolar diffusion defects. Histological examination in a fatal case revealed diffuse pulmonary interstitial fibrosis with marked peribronchial and perivascular fibrosis and bronchial epithelial hyperplasia and metaplasia. Radiological surveys revealed the sporadic occurrence and low incidence of the disease. The alterations in respiratory mechanics which occurred in two workers following a day's exposure to dust are described. Airborne dust concentrations are given. The industrial process is outlined and the literature is reviewed. The toxicity of the metals is discussed, and our findings are compared with those reported from Europe and the United States. We are of the opinion that the changes which we would describe as hard metal disease are caused by the inhalation of dust at work and that the component responsible may be cobalt. Images PMID:13970036

  2. Reviews Book: Enjoyable Physics Equipment: SEP Colorimeter Box Book: Pursuing Power and Light Equipment: SEP Bottle Rocket Launcher Equipment: Sciencescope GLE Datalogger Equipment: EDU Logger Book: Physics of Sailing Book: The Lightness of Being Software: Logotron Insight iLog Studio iPhone Apps Lecture: 2010 IOP Schools and Colleges Lecture Web Watch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-09-01

    WE RECOMMEND Enjoyable Physics Mechanics book makes learning more fun SEP Colorimeter Box A useful and inexpensive colorimeter for the classroom Pursuing Power and Light Account of the development of science in the 19th centuary SEP Bottle Rocket Launcher An excellent resource for teaching about projectiles GLE Datalogger GPS software is combined with a datalogger EDU Logger Remote datalogger has greater sensing abilities Logotron Insight iLog Studio Software enables datlogging, data analysis and modelling iPhone Apps Mobile phone games aid study of gravity WORTH A LOOK Physics of Sailing Book journeys through the importance of physics in sailing The Lightness of Being Study of what the world is made from LECTURE The 2010 IOP Schools and Colleges Lecture presents the physics of fusion WEB WATCH Planet Scicast pushes boundaries of pupil creativity

  3. Characteristics of surface-wave and volume-wave plasmas produced with internally mounted large-area planar microwave launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Nagatsu, Masaaki; Naito, Katsutoshi; Ogino, Akihisa; Ninomiya, Keigo; Nanko, Shohei

    2005-10-17

    We studied discharge characteristics of microwave plasmas excited with a large-area planar microwave launcher installed internally in a 600-mm-diam cylindrical vacuum chamber. With the microwave power less than roughly 400 W, we demonstrated the large volumetric volume-wave plasma (VWP) spread in the entire chamber at a pressure of 14-27 Pa in He. Above 400 W, the plasma discharge made a sudden transition to higher-density, uniform surface-wave plasma (SWP) having a spatial uniformity of {+-}3.5% over 300 mm in diameter. Electron energy probability functions in the downstream region were studied using Langmuir probe measurements with Druyvesteyn method in both the SWP and VWP discharges.

  4. RF Behavior and Launcher Design for a Fast Frequency Step-tunable 236 GHz Gyrotron for DEMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalaria, P. C.; Avramidis, K. A.; Franck, J.; Gantenbein, G.; Illy, S.; Jin, J.; Pagonakis, I. Gr.; Thumm, M.; Jelonnek, J.

    2017-03-01

    As part of the EUROfusion project, the conceptual design of a 1 MW 236 GHz hollow-cavity gyrotron is ongoing at IHM, KIT for a DEMOnstration Power Plant (DEMO), along with a 2 MW coaxial-cavity design concept. Fast frequency-tunable gyrotrons (tuning within a few seconds) are recommended for plasma stabilization using a non-steerable antenna. In this work, the mode-selection approach for such a frequency-tunable gyrotron is presented and suitable operating modes for fast frequency tunability are suggested. Magnetic field tuning has been studied as an effective technique to tune the gyrotron operating frequency. The step-tunability of the 236 GHz gyrotron within the frequency range of ±10 GHz in steps of 2-3 GHz is demonstrated in numerical simulations. A hybrid-type Quasi-Optical Launcher (QOL) has been designed for a step-frequency tunable gyrotron with sufficiently high Fundamental Gaussian Mode Content (FGMC).

  5. Overview: Hard Rock Penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, J.C.

    1992-08-01

    The Hard Rock Penetration program is developing technology to reduce the costs of drilling and completing geothermal wells. Current projects include: lost circulation control, rock penetration mechanics, instrumentation, and industry/DOE cost shared projects of the Geothermal Drilling organization. Last year, a number of accomplishments were achieved in each of these areas. A new flow meter being developed to accurately measure drilling fluid outflow was tested extensively during Long Valley drilling. Results show that this meter is rugged, reliable, and can provide useful measurements of small differences in fluid inflow and outflow rates. By providing early indications of fluid gain or loss, improved control of blow-out and lost circulation problems during geothermal drilling can be expected. In the area of downhole tools for lost circulation control, the concept of a downhole injector for injecting a two-component, fast-setting cementitious mud was developed. DOE filed a patent application for this concept during FY 91. The design criteria for a high-temperature potassium, uranium, thorium logging tool featuring a downhole data storage computer were established, and a request for proposals was submitted to tool development companies. The fundamental theory of acoustic telemetry in drill strings was significantly advanced through field experimentation and analysis. A new understanding of energy loss mechanisms was developed.

  6. Overview - Hard Rock Penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, James C.

    1992-03-24

    The Hard Rock Penetration program is developing technology to reduce the costs of drilling and completing geothermal wells. Current projects include: lost circulation control, rock penetration mechanics, instrumentation, and industry/DOE cost shared projects of the Geothermal Drilling Organization. Last year, a number of accomplishments were achieved in each of these areas. A new flow meter being developed to accurately measure drilling fluid outflow was tested extensively during Long Valley drilling. Results show that this meter is rugged, reliable, and can provide useful measurements of small differences in fluid inflow and outflow rates. By providing early indications of fluid gain or loss, improved control of blow-out and lost circulation problems during geothermal drilling can be expected. In the area of downhole tools for lost circulation control, the concept of a downhole injector for injecting a two-component, fast-setting cementitious mud was developed. DOE filed a patent application for this concept during FY 91. The design criteria for a high-temperature potassium, uranium, thorium logging tool featuring a downhole data storage computer were established, and a request for proposals was submitted to tool development companies. The fundamental theory of acoustic telemetry in drill strings was significantly advanced through field experimentation and analysis. A new understanding of energy loss mechanisms was developed.

  7. Overview: Hard Rock Penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, J.C.

    1992-01-01

    The Hard Rock Penetration program is developing technology to reduce the costs of drilling and completing geothermal wells. Current projects include: lost circulation control, rock penetration mechanics, instrumentation, and industry/DOE cost shared projects of the Geothermal Drilling organization. Last year, a number of accomplishments were achieved in each of these areas. A new flow meter being developed to accurately measure drilling fluid outflow was tested extensively during Long Valley drilling. Results show that this meter is rugged, reliable, and can provide useful measurements of small differences in fluid inflow and outflow rates. By providing early indications of fluid gain or loss, improved control of blow-out and lost circulation problems during geothermal drilling can be expected. In the area of downhole tools for lost circulation control, the concept of a downhole injector for injecting a two-component, fast-setting cementitious mud was developed. DOE filed a patent application for this concept during FY 91. The design criteria for a high-temperature potassium, uranium, thorium logging tool featuring a downhole data storage computer were established, and a request for proposals was submitted to tool development companies. The fundamental theory of acoustic telemetry in drill strings was significantly advanced through field experimentation and analysis. A new understanding of energy loss mechanisms was developed.

  8. Measuring the Hardness of Minerals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bushby, Jessica

    2005-01-01

    The author discusses Moh's hardness scale, a comparative scale for minerals, whereby the softest mineral (talc) is placed at 1 and the hardest mineral (diamond) is placed at 10, with all other minerals ordered in between, according to their hardness. Development history of the scale is outlined, as well as a description of how the scale is used…

  9. Palaeoecology and evolution of marine hard substrate communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, P. D.; Wilson, M. A.

    2003-07-01

    Marine organisms have occupied hard substrates since the Archaean. Shells, rocks, wood and sedimentary hardgrounds offer relatively stable habitats compared to unconsolidated sediments, but the plants and animals which inhabit them must develop means to gain and defend this premium attachment space. Hard substrate communities are formed by organisms with a variety of strategies for adhering to and/or excavating the substrates they inhabit. While mobile grazers, organically attached and even soft-bodied organisms may leave evidence of their former presence in ancient hard substrate communities, a superior fossil record is left by sessile encrusters with mineralised skeletons and by borers which leave trace fossils. Furthermore, encrusters and borers are preserved in situ, retaining their spatial relationships to one another and to the substrate. Spatial competition, ecological succession, oriented growth, and differential utilisation of exposed vs. hidden substrate surfaces can all be observed or inferred. Hard substrate communities are thus excellent systems with which to study community evolution over hundreds of millions of years. Here we review the research on modern and ancient hard substrate communities, and point to some changes that have affected them over geological time scales. Such changes include a general increase in bioerosion of hard substrates, particularly carbonate surfaces, through the Phanerozoic. This is, at least in part, analogous to the infaunalisation trends seen in soft substrate communities. Encrusting forms show an increase in skeletalisation from the Palaeozoic into the Mesozoic and Cenozoic, which may be a response to increasing levels of predation. Hard substrate communities, considering borers and encrusters together, show a rough increase in tiering through the Phanerozoic which again parallels trends seen in soft substrate communities. This extensive review of the literature on living and fossil hard substrate organisms shows that

  10. Beta Backscatter Measures the Hardness of Rubber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrissey, E. T.; Roje, F. N.

    1986-01-01

    Nondestructive testing method determines hardness, on Shore scale, of room-temperature-vulcanizing silicone rubber. Measures backscattered beta particles; backscattered radiation count directly proportional to Shore hardness. Test set calibrated with specimen, Shore hardness known from mechanical durometer test. Specimen of unknown hardness tested, and radiation count recorded. Count compared with known sample to find Shore hardness of unknown.

  11. Thin coatings and films hardness evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matyunin, V. M.; Marchenkov, A. Yu; Demidov, A. N.; Karimbekov, M. A.

    2016-10-01

    The existing thin coatings and films hardness evaluation methods based on indentation with pyramidal indenter on various scale levels are expounded. The impact of scale factor on hardness values is performed. The experimental verification of several existing hardness evaluation methods regarding the substrate hardness value and the “coating - substrate” composite hardness value is made.

  12. Nanoindentation hardness of mineralized tissues.

    PubMed

    Oyen, Michelle L

    2006-01-01

    A series elastic and plastic deformation model [Sakai, M., 1999. The Meyer hardness: a measure for plasticity? Journal of Materials Research 14(9), 3630-3639] is used to deconvolute the resistance to plastic deformation from the plane strain modulus and contact hardness parameters obtained in a nanoindentation test. Different functional dependencies of contact hardness on the plane strain modulus are examined. Plastic deformation resistance values are computed from the modulus and contact hardness for engineering materials and mineralized tissues. Elastic modulus and plastic deformation resistance parameters are used to calculate elastic and plastic deformation components, and to examine the partitioning of indentation deformation between elastic and plastic. Both the numerical values of plastic deformation resistance and the direct computation of deformation partitioning reveal the intermediate mechanical responses of mineralized composites when compared with homogeneous engineering materials.

  13. Production of Volume Wave Plasma with Internally Mounted Cylindrical Planar Microwave Launcher and Two-Dimensional Field Analysis Using Finite Difference Time Domain Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogino, Akihisa; Naito, Katsutoshi; Terashita, Fumie; Nanko, Shohei; Nagatsu, Masaaki

    2005-02-01

    In this paper, we presented experimental results on the production of volume wave plasma (VWP) using an internally mounted cylindrical planar microwave launcher, for application to novel plasma processings, such as inner wall coating, impurity-free etching or internal sterilization of medical instruments using VWP. It was demonstrated that the ellipsoidal VWP is produced in front of a microwave launcher in He or Ar gas atmosphere. Numerical analyses of microwave fields radiated from a planar launcher have been carried out using the two-dimensional finite difference time domain (FDTD) method to determine the mechanism of VWP production in middle of the chamber. It was shown that the calculation results showed fairly good agreements with the experimental results measured using a dipole antenna probe. The spatial distributions of plasma density and the temperature of VWP were also measured using a double probe. It was found that the electron density is comparable to or slightly less than cutoff density of 7.4 × 1010 cm-3 corresponding to the microwave frequency of fm=2.45 GHz, and that the electron temperature is approximately 6 eV at the plasma center.

  14. Mechanical Analysis of an SM 2 Blk IV restrained firing within a concentric canister launcher test unit

    SciTech Connect

    Kassner, M C; Kennedy, T C; Puttapitukporn, T; Rosen, R S

    1999-03-01

    The Office of Naval Research (ONR) and PMS512 have undertaken a program to develop a new Vertical Launching System (VLS) for future generation ships, such as the DD-21 Destroyer. The Naval Sea Systems Command Combat Weapons Program (NAVSEA 05K) and Naval Surface Warfare Center Dahlgren Division (NSWCDD) are working jointly with industry and universities to develop one such launcher design, the Concentric Canister Launcher (CCL). The basic CCL design consists of a tube made of two concentric cylinders; one end is open, the other is sealed with a hemispherical end cap. During firing, the missile exhaust gas is turned 180 degrees by the hemispherical end cap and flows through the annular space between inner and outer cylinders. Depending on the missile utilized and the particular service environment of the CCL, maximum temperatures within the cylinder material have been calculated to exceed 2000 F. In an earlier study [1], the authors determined the high temperature mechanical properties of several candidate alloys being considered for fabrication of the CCL. This study [1] found that, of these candidate materials, titanium alloys exhibit higher yield stresses than that of 316L stainless steel at temperatures up to about 1000 F; above 1500 F, the yield stress of 316L stainless steel is comparable to those of the titanium alloys. The 316L stainless steel was found to strain harden (increase its flow stress with increasing strain) at temperatures up to about 1800 F. The ability of the 316L stainless steel to strain harden at high temperatures may provide an added margin of safety for engineering design of the CCL. The objective of the current study was to perform a computer simulation of the structural response of a CCL during a restrained firing, one in which a SM-2 Blk IV missile would fail to exit the canister. A finite element model of the inner cylinder, outer cylinder, end rings (mounting brackets), and lateral restraints in the uptake was constructed. An elastic

  15. Laser Safety Evaluation of the Oscmar M203PI Grenade Launcher Simulator (GLS) and the Associated Umpire Control Gun

    SciTech Connect

    AUGUSTONI, ARNOLD L.

    2002-06-01

    A laser safety evaluation and pertinent output measurements were performed (during March and April 2002) on the M203PI Grenade Launcher Simulator (GLS) and its associated Umpire Control Gun manufactured by Oscmar International Limited, Auckland, New Zealand. The results were the Oscmar Umpire Gun is laser hazard Class 1 and can be used without restrictions. The radiant energy output of the Oscmar M203PI GLS, under ''Small Source'' criteria at 10 centimeters, is laser hazard Class 3b and not usable, under SNL policy, in force-on-force exercises. However, due to a relatively large exit diameter and an intentionally large beam divergence, to simulate a large area blast, the output beam geometry met the criteria for ''Extended Source'' viewing [ANSI Std. 2136.1-2000 (S.l)]. Under this ''Extended Source'' criteria the output of the M203PI GLS unit was, in fact, laser hazard Class 1 (eye safe), for 3 of the 4 possible modes of laser operation. The 4'h mode, ''Auto Fire'', which simulates a continuous grenade firing every second and is not used at SNL, was laser hazard Class 3a (under the ''Extended Source'' viewing criteria). The M203PI GLS does present a laser hazard Class 3a to aided viewing with binoculars inside 3 meters from the unit. Farther than 3 meters it is ''eye safe''. The M203PI GLS can be considered a Class 1 laser hazard and can be used under SNL policy with the following restrictions: (1) The M203PI GLS unit shall only be programmed for: the ''Single Fire'' (which, includes ''Rapid Fire'') and the ''Auto Align'' (used in adjusting the alignment of the grenade launcher simulator system to the target) modes of operation. (2) The M203PI GLS shall never be directed against personnel, using binoculars, inside of 3 meters. DOE Order 5480.16A, Firearms Safety, (Chapter 1)(5)(a)(8)(d) and DOE-STD-1091-96, Firearms Safety (Chapter 4); already prevents ESS laser engagement of personnel (with or without binoculars), ''closer than 10 feet (3.05 meters)''. Both of

  16. Mobile healthcare.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Stephen A; Agee, Nancy Howell

    2012-01-01

    Mobile technology's presence in healthcare has exploded over the past five years. The increased use of mobile devices by all segments of the US population has driven healthcare systems, providers, and payers to accept this new form of communication and to develop strategies to implement and leverage the use of mobile healthcare (mHealth) within their organizations and practices. As healthcare systems move toward a more value-driven model of care, patient centeredness and engagement are the keys to success. Mobile healthcare will provide the medium to allow patients to participate more in their care. Financially, mHealth brings to providers the ability to improve efficiency and deliver savings to both them and the healthcare consumer. However, mHealth is not without challenges. Healthcare IT departments have been reluctant to embrace this shift in technology without fully addressing security and privacy concerns. Providers have been hesitant to adopt mHealth as a form of communication with patients because it breaks with traditional models. Our healthcare system has just started the journey toward the development of mHealth. We offer an overview of the mobile healthcare environment and our approach to solving the challenges it brings to healthcare organizations.

  17. Small ICBM area narrowing report. Executive summary. Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This Area Narrowing Report Summarizes the results of the Comprehensive Siting Analysis Process for the Hard Mobile Launcher in Random Movement, Hard Mobile Launcher at Minuteman Facilities, and Hard Silo in Patterned Array basing modes of the Small Intercontinental Ballistic Missile (ICBM) system. Specifically, this report provides an overview of the system description; discusses technical, operational, legal, and policy siting criteria; describes the rationale and process for elimination of potential locations; and identifies potential locations for each basing mode that remain under consideration for deployment of the system.

  18. Optimizing mobilization strategies in difficult-to-mobilize patients: The role of plerixafor.

    PubMed

    Goker, Hakan; Etgul, Sezgin; Buyukasik, Yahya

    2015-08-01

    Peripheral blood stem cell collection is currently the most widely used source for hematopoietic autologous transplantation. Several factors such as advanced age, previous chemotherapy, disease and marrow infiltration at the time of mobilization influence the efficacy of CD34(+) progenitor cell mobilization. Despite the safety and efficiency of the standard mobilization protocols (G-CSF ± chemotherapy), there is still a significant amount of mobilization failure rate (10-40%), which necessitate novel agents for effective mobilization. Plerixafor, is a novel agent, has been recently approved for mobilization of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). The combination of Plerixafor with G-CSF provides the collection of large numbers of stem cells in fewer apheresis sessions and can salvage those who fail with standard mobilization regimens. The development and optimization of practical algorithms for the use Plerixafor is crucial to make hematopoietic stem cell mobilization more efficient in a cost-effective way. This review is aimed at summarizing how to identify poor mobilizers, and define rational use of Plerixafor for planning mobilization in hard-to-mobilize patients.

  19. Mobility Demonstrator

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-22

    Resilient Technologies (Polaris Defense) Technology: Non- Pneumatic Tire Description: Airless Tire/wheel with honeycombed shaped polymer supporting...self-adjusting track tensioners • The biggest advancement in these systems has been pneumatic external road-arm design (external suspensions...UNCLASSIFIED: Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release. 90 Payoff:  Enabler for silent mobility, hybridization , and export power capabilities

  20. Future hard disk drive systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Roger

    2009-03-01

    This paper briefly reviews the evolution of today's hard disk drive with the additional intention of orienting the reader to the overall mechanical and electrical architecture. The modern hard disk drive is a miracle of storage capacity and function together with remarkable economy of design. This paper presents a personal view of future customer requirements and the anticipated design evolution of the components. There are critical decisions and great challenges ahead for the key technologies of heads, media, head-disk interface, mechanics, and electronics.

  1. Magnetic levitation for hard superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Kordyuk, A.A.

    1998-01-01

    An approach for calculating the interaction between a hard superconductor and a permanent magnet in the field-cooled case is proposed. The exact solutions were obtained for the point magnetic dipole over a flat ideally hard superconductor. We have shown that such an approach is adaptable to a wide practical range of melt-textured high-temperature superconductors{close_quote} systems with magnetic levitation. In this case, the energy losses can be calculated from the alternating magnetic field distribution on the superconducting sample surface. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Dynamic indentation hardness of materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koeppel, Brian James

    Indentation hardness is one of the simplest and most commonly used measures for quickly characterizing material response under static loads. Hardness may mean resistance to cutting to a machinist, resistance to wear to a tribologist, or a measure of flow stress to a design engineer. In this simple technique, a predetermined force is applied to an indenter for 5-30 seconds causing it to penetrate a specimen. By measuring the load and the indentation size, a hardness value is determined. However, the rate of deformation during indenter penetration is of the order of 10sp{-4}\\ ssp{-1}. In most practical applications, such as high speed machining or impact, material deforms at strain rates in excess of 10sp3{-}10sp5\\ ssp{-1}. At such high rates, it is well established that the plastic behavior of materials is considerably different from their static counterpart. For example, materials exhibit an increase in their yield stress, flow stress, fracture stress, and fracture toughness at high strain rates. Hence, the use of static hardness as an indicator of material response under dynamic loads may not be appropriate. Accordingly, a simple dynamic indentation hardness tester is developed for characterizing materials at strain rates similar to those encountered in realistic situations. The experimental technique uses elastic stress wave propagation phenomena in a slender rod. The technique is designed to deliver a single indentation load of 100-200 mus duration. Similar to static measurements, the dynamic hardness is determined from the measured load and indentation size. Hardness measurements on a range of metals have revealed that the dynamic hardness is consistently greater than the static hardness. The increase in hardness is strongly dependent on the crystal structure of the material. The observed trends in hardness are also found to be consistent with the yield and flow stresses of these materials under uniaxial compression. Therefore, it is suggested that the

  3. Mobile Customer Relationship Management and Mobile Security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanayei, Ali; Mirzaei, Abas

    The purpose of this study is twofold. First, in order to guarantee a coherent discussion about mobile customer relationship management (mCRM), this paper presents a conceptualization of mCRM delineating its unique characteristics because of Among the variety of mobile services, considerable attention has been devoted to mobile marketing and in particular to mobile customer relationship management services. Second, the authors discusses the security risks in mobile computing in different level(user, mobile device, wireless network,...) and finally we focus on enterprise mobile security and it's subgroups with a series of suggestion and solution for improve mobile computing security.

  4. Metrics for Hard Goods Merchandising.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Gloria S., Ed.; Magisos, Joel H., Ed.

    Designed to meet the job-related metric measurement needs of students interested in hard goods merchandising, this instructional package is one of five for the marketing and distribution cluster, part of a set of 55 packages for metric instruction in different occupations. The package is intended for students who already know the occupational…

  5. Playing the Numbers: Hard Choices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doyle, William R.

    2009-01-01

    Stateline.org recently called this recession the worst in 50 years for state budgets. As has been the case in past economic downturns, higher education looks to be particularly hard hit. Funds from the American Recovery and Relief Act may have postponed some of the difficulty for many colleges and universities, but the outlook for public higher…

  6. Hard Trying and These Recipes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atwell, Nancie

    2003-01-01

    Writers thrive when they are motivated to work hard, have regular opportunities to practice and reflect, and benefit from a knowledgeable teacher who knows writing. Student feedback to lessons during writing workshop helped guide Nancie Atwell in her quest to provide the richest and most efficient path to better writing.

  7. FATIGUE OF BIOMATERIALS: HARD TISSUES

    PubMed Central

    Arola, D.; Bajaj, D.; Ivancik, J.; Majd, H.; Zhang, D.

    2009-01-01

    The fatigue and fracture behavior of hard tissues are topics of considerable interest today. This special group of organic materials comprises the highly mineralized and load-bearing tissues of the human body, and includes bone, cementum, dentin and enamel. An understanding of their fatigue behavior and the influence of loading conditions and physiological factors (e.g. aging and disease) on the mechanisms of degradation are essential for achieving lifelong health. But there is much more to this topic than the immediate medical issues. There are many challenges to characterizing the fatigue behavior of hard tissues, much of which is attributed to size constraints and the complexity of their microstructure. The relative importance of the constituents on the type and distribution of defects, rate of coalescence, and their contributions to the initiation and growth of cracks, are formidable topics that have not reached maturity. Hard tissues also provide a medium for learning and a source of inspiration in the design of new microstructures for engineering materials. This article briefly reviews fatigue of hard tissues with shared emphasis on current understanding, the challenges and the unanswered questions. PMID:20563239

  8. Hard processes in hadronic interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Satz, H. |; Wang, X.N.

    1995-07-01

    Quantum chromodynamics is today accepted as the fundamental theory of strong interactions, even though most hadronic collisions lead to final states for which quantitative QCD predictions are still lacking. It therefore seems worthwhile to take stock of where we stand today and to what extent the presently available data on hard processes in hadronic collisions can be accounted for in terms of QCD. This is one reason for this work. The second reason - and in fact its original trigger - is the search for the quark-gluon plasma in high energy nuclear collisions. The hard processes to be considered here are the production of prompt photons, Drell-Yan dileptons, open charm, quarkonium states, and hard jets. For each of these, we discuss the present theoretical understanding, compare the resulting predictions to available data, and then show what behaviour it leads to at RHIC and LHC energies. All of these processes have the structure mentioned above: they contain a hard partonic interaction, calculable perturbatively, but also the non-perturbative parton distribution within a hadron. These parton distributions, however, can be studied theoretically in terms of counting rule arguments, and they can be checked independently by measurements of the parton structure functions in deep inelastic lepton-hadron scattering. The present volume is the work of Hard Probe Collaboration, a group of theorists who are interested in the problem and were willing to dedicate a considerable amount of their time and work on it. The necessary preparation, planning and coordination of the project were carried out in two workshops of two weeks` duration each, in February 1994 at CERn in Geneva andin July 1994 at LBL in Berkeley.

  9. Mobility Bibliography.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-11-01

    Abele, G.; Walker, D.A.; Brown, J .; Brewer, M.C.; Atwood, D.M. TI - Effects of low ground pressure vehicle traffic on tundra aL Lonely, Alaska SO...resistance, bulldozing resistance. NTIS ’ DT ’ . [ Acces. J "D-4 CONTENTS Chapter I Snow vehicles or snowmobiles Chapter II Rolling resistance Chapter III...Russian Swe Swedish Eng English Jap Japanese Ger German Pol Polish Czech Czechoslovakian Nor Norwegian P reface This mobility bibliography was

  10. Going mobile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brus, Eric

    1987-12-01

    By 1990, all metropolitan areas in the U.S. and rural areas close to major cities or towns are expected to have cellular telephone service; 22 Canadian cities also feature cellular service. To supply mobile telecommunication services to sparsely-populated rural areas, a mobile satellite service (MSS) is now being developed. In this paper the projected possibilities of the MSS system are discussed, including a possibility that a piggyback-MSS payload be added to the GSTAR-4 satellite which is scheduled for a launch in 1988 or 1989; one in which some of the hardware from aborted direct-broadcast satellites would be used; and the possibility of building a new MSS satellite with large servicing capacity. Canada is planning to launch its own mobile satellite, MSAT, in the early 1990s. The MSS is expected to be 'generic', serving not only people on land but maritime and aeronautical users as well. It will also offer major benefits to truck and automobile drivers, making it possible for them to conduct business or to call for assistance from locations beyond the range of cellular systems.

  11. Large Spun Formed Friction-Stir Welded Tank Domes for Liquid Propellant Tanks Made from AA2195: A Technology Demonstration for the Next Generation of Heavy Lift Launchers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stachulla, M.; Pernpeinter, R.; Brewster J.; Curreri, P.; Hoffman, E.

    2010-01-01

    Improving structural efficiency while reducing manufacturing costs are key objectives when making future heavy-lift launchers more performing and cost efficient. The main enabling technologies are the application of advanced high performance materials as well as cost effective manufacture processes. This paper presents the status and main results of a joint industrial research & development effort to demonstrate TRL 6 of a novel manufacturing process for large liquid propellant tanks for launcher applications. Using high strength aluminium-lithium alloy combined with the spin forming manufacturing technique, this development aims at thinner wall thickness and weight savings up to 25% as well as a significant reduction in manufacturing effort. In this program, the concave spin forming process is used to manufacture tank domes from a single flat plate. Applied to aluminium alloy, this process allows reaching the highest possible material strength status T8, eliminating numerous welding steps which are typically necessary to assemble tank domes from 3D-curved panels. To minimize raw material costs for large diameter tank domes for launchers, the dome blank has been composed from standard plates welded together prior to spin forming by friction stir welding. After welding, the dome blank is contoured in order to meet the required wall thickness distribution. For achieving a material state of T8, also in the welding seams, the applied spin forming process allows the required cold stretching of the 3D-curved dome, with a subsequent ageing in a furnace. This combined manufacturing process has been demonstrated up to TRL 6 for tank domes with a 5.4 m diameter. In this paper, the manufacturing process as well as test results are presented. Plans are shown how this process could be applied to future heavy-lift launch vehicles developments, also for larger dome diameters.

  12. Transpecific microsatellites for hard pines.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, M.; Cross, M.; Maguire, L.; Dieters, J.; Williams, G.; Henry, J.

    2002-04-01

    Microsatellites are difficult to recover from large plant genomes so cross-specific utilisation is an important source of markers. Fifty microsatellites were tested for cross-specific amplification and polymorphism to two New World hard pine species, slash pine ( Pinus elliottii var. elliottii) and Caribbean pine ( P. caribaea var. hondurensis). Twenty-nine (58%) markers amplified in both hard pine species, and 23 of these 29 were polymorphic. Soft pine (subgenus Strobus) microsatellite markers did amplify, but none were polymorphic. Pinus elliottii var. elliottii and P. caribaea var. hondurensis showed mutational changes in the flanking regions and the repeat motif that were informative for Pinus spp. phylogenetic relationships. Most allele length variation could be attributed to variability in repeat unit number. There was no evidence for ascertainment bias.

  13. Ultrasonic material hardness depth measurement

    DOEpatents

    Good, Morris S.; Schuster, George J.; Skorpik, James R.

    1997-01-01

    The invention is an ultrasonic surface hardness depth measurement apparatus and method permitting rapid determination of hardness depth of shafts, rods, tubes and other cylindrical parts. The apparatus of the invention has a part handler, sensor, ultrasonic electronics component, computer, computer instruction sets, and may include a display screen. The part handler has a vessel filled with a couplant, and a part rotator for rotating a cylindrical metal part with respect to the sensor. The part handler further has a surface follower upon which the sensor is mounted, thereby maintaining a constant distance between the sensor and the exterior surface of the cylindrical metal part. The sensor is mounted so that a front surface of the sensor is within the vessel with couplant between the front surface of the sensor and the part.

  14. Ultrasonic material hardness depth measurement

    DOEpatents

    Good, M.S.; Schuster, G.J.; Skorpik, J.R.

    1997-07-08

    The invention is an ultrasonic surface hardness depth measurement apparatus and method permitting rapid determination of hardness depth of shafts, rods, tubes and other cylindrical parts. The apparatus of the invention has a part handler, sensor, ultrasonic electronics component, computer, computer instruction sets, and may include a display screen. The part handler has a vessel filled with a couplant, and a part rotator for rotating a cylindrical metal part with respect to the sensor. The part handler further has a surface follower upon which the sensor is mounted, thereby maintaining a constant distance between the sensor and the exterior surface of the cylindrical metal part. The sensor is mounted so that a front surface of the sensor is within the vessel with couplant between the front surface of the sensor and the part. 12 figs.

  15. Schwannoma of the hard palate

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Pradyumna Kumar; Mandal, Palash Kumar; Ghosh, Saradindu

    2014-01-01

    Schwannomas are benign encapsulated perineural tumors. The head and neck region is the most common site. Intraoral origin is seen in only 1% of cases, tongue being the most common site; its location in the palate is rare. We report a case of hard-palate schwannoma with bony erosion which was immunohistochemically confirmed. The tumor was excised completely intraorally. After two months of follow-up, the defect was found to be completely covered with palatal mucosa. PMID:25298716

  16. Rad-Hard Silicon Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giorgi, Marco

    2005-06-01

    For the next generation of High Energy Physics (HEP) Experiments silicon microstrip detectors working in harsh radiation environments with excellent performances are necessary. The irradiation causes bulk and surface damages that modify the electrical properties of the detector. Solutions like AC coupled strips, overhanging metal contact, <100> crystal lattice orientation, low resistivity n-bulk and Oxygenated substrate are studied for rad-hard detectors. The paper presents an outlook of these technologies.

  17. Microwave assisted hard rock cutting

    DOEpatents

    Lindroth, David P.; Morrell, Roger J.; Blair, James R.

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus for the sequential fracturing and cutting of subsurface volume of hard rock (102) in the strata (101) of a mining environment (100) by subjecting the volume of rock to a beam (25) of microwave energy to fracture the subsurface volume of rock by differential expansion; and , then bringing the cutting edge (52) of a piece of conventional mining machinery (50) into contact with the fractured rock (102).

  18. Nanomechanics of hard films on compliant substrates.

    SciTech Connect

    Reedy, Earl David, Jr.; Emerson, John Allen; Bahr, David F.; Moody, Neville Reid; Zhou, Xiao Wang; Hales, Lucas; Adams, David Price; Yeager,John; Nyugen, Thao D.; Corona, Edmundo; Kennedy, Marian S.; Cordill, Megan J.

    2009-09-01

    Development of flexible thin film systems for biomedical, homeland security and environmental sensing applications has increased dramatically in recent years [1,2,3,4]. These systems typically combine traditional semiconductor technology with new flexible substrates, allowing for both the high electron mobility of semiconductors and the flexibility of polymers. The devices have the ability to be easily integrated into components and show promise for advanced design concepts, ranging from innovative microelectronics to MEMS and NEMS devices. These devices often contain layers of thin polymer, ceramic and metallic films where differing properties can lead to large residual stresses [5]. As long as the films remain substrate-bonded, they may deform far beyond their freestanding counterpart. Once debonded, substrate constraint disappears leading to film failure where compressive stresses can lead to wrinkling, delamination, and buckling [6,7,8] while tensile stresses can lead to film fracture and decohesion [9,10,11]. In all cases, performance depends on film adhesion. Experimentally it is difficult to measure adhesion. It is often studied using tape [12], pull off [13,14,15], and peel tests [16,17]. More recent techniques for measuring adhesion include scratch testing [18,19,20,21], four point bending [22,23,24], indentation [25,26,27], spontaneous blisters [28,29] and stressed overlayers [7,26,30,31,32,33]. Nevertheless, sample design and test techniques must be tailored for each system. There is a large body of elastic thin film fracture and elastic contact mechanics solutions for elastic films on rigid substrates in the published literature [5,7,34,35,36]. More recent work has extended these solutions to films on compliant substrates and show that increasing compliance markedly changes fracture energies compared with rigid elastic solution results [37,38]. However, the introduction of inelastic substrate response significantly complicates the problem [10,39,40]. As

  19. Why Are Drugs So Hard to Quit?

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Quitting drugs is hard because addiction is a brain disease. Your brain is like a control tower that sends out ... and choices. Addiction changes the signals in your brain and makes it hard to feel OK without ...

  20. More Older Women Hitting the Bottle Hard

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_164321.html More Older Women Hitting the Bottle Hard Study found dramatic jump ... March 28, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- More older American women than ever are drinking -- and drinking hard, a ...

  1. Warren G. Harding and the Press.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitaker, W. Richard

    There are many parallels between the Richard M. Nixon administration and Warren G. Harding's term: both Republicans, both touched by scandal, and both having a unique relationship with the press. But in Harding's case the relationship was a positive one. One of Harding's first official acts as president was to restore the regular White House news…

  2. 30 CFR 56.15002 - Hard hats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hard hats. 56.15002 Section 56.15002 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Personal Protection § 56.15002 Hard hats. All persons shall wear suitable hard hats when in or around a mine or plant where falling...

  3. 30 CFR 57.15002 - Hard hats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hard hats. 57.15002 Section 57.15002 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... Underground § 57.15002 Hard hats. All persons shall wear suitable hard hats when in or around a mine or...

  4. 7 CFR 201.21 - Hard seed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hard seed. 201.21 Section 201.21 Agriculture..., Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Labeling Agricultural Seeds § 201.21 Hard seed. The label shall show the percentage of hard...

  5. 7 CFR 201.30 - Hard seed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hard seed. 201.30 Section 201.30 Agriculture..., Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Labeling Vegetable Seeds § 201.30 Hard seed. The label shall show the percentage of hard seed,...

  6. 7 CFR 201.57 - Hard seeds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS Germination Tests in the Administration of the Act § 201.57 Hard seeds. Seeds which remain hard at..., are to be counted as “hard seed.” If at the end of the germination period provided for legumes, okra... percentage of germination. For flatpea, continue the swollen seed in test for 14 days when germinating at...

  7. 7 CFR 201.57 - Hard seeds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS Germination Tests in the Administration of the Act § 201.57 Hard seeds. Seeds which remain hard at..., are to be counted as “hard seed.” If at the end of the germination period provided for legumes, okra... percentage of germination. For flatpea, continue the swollen seed in test for 14 days when germinating at...

  8. 7 CFR 201.57 - Hard seeds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS Germination Tests in the Administration of the Act § 201.57 Hard seeds. Seeds which remain hard at..., are to be counted as “hard seed.” If at the end of the germination period provided for legumes, okra... percentage of germination. For flatpea, continue the swollen seed in test for 14 days when germinating at...

  9. 7 CFR 201.57 - Hard seeds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS Germination Tests in the Administration of the Act § 201.57 Hard seeds. Seeds which remain hard at..., are to be counted as “hard seed.” If at the end of the germination period provided for legumes, okra... percentage of germination. For flatpea, continue the swollen seed in test for 14 days when germinating at...

  10. 7 CFR 201.57 - Hard seeds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS Germination Tests in the Administration of the Act § 201.57 Hard seeds. Seeds which remain hard at..., are to be counted as “hard seed.” If at the end of the germination period provided for legumes, okra... percentage of germination. For flatpea, continue the swollen seed in test for 14 days when germinating at...

  11. Fast reciprocating probe system for local scrape-off layer measurements in front of the lower hybrid launcher on JT-60U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asakura, N.; Tsuji-Iio, S.; Ikeda, Y.; Neyatani, Y.; Seki, M.

    1995-12-01

    A fast reciprocating probe system with a long drive shaft was incorporated into a multi-junction lower hybrid (LH) wave launcher on JT-60U in order to investigate an improved coupling mechanism of the radio frequency wave to the core plasma. The system has been operated reliably over a horizontal scan of 25 cm in 1.5 s using a compact pneumatic cylinder drive and springs. A double probe measurement provided the scrape-off layer plasma profile between the last closed flux surface and the first wall with the spatial resolution of 1-2 mm measured with a laser displacement gauge. The profiles of the electron density ne and temperature Te were in good agreement with those obtained with a triple probe method. During the LH wave injection with good coupling to the core plasma, an increase in the local Te was observed in front of the LH launcher mouth. The local ne was (7-10)×1016 m-3, consistent values needed for the good coupling.

  12. Fast reciprocating probe system for local scrape-off layer measurements in front of the lower hybrid launcher on JT-60U

    SciTech Connect

    Asakura, N.; Tsuji-Iio, S.; Ikeda, Y.; Neyatani, Y.; Seki, M.

    1995-12-01

    A fast reciprocating probe system with a long drive shaft was incorporated into a multi-junction lower hybrid (LH) wave launcher on JT-60U in order to investigate an improved coupling mechanism of the radio frequency wave to the core plasma. The system has been operated reliably over a horizontal scan of 25 cm in 1.5 s using a compact pneumatic cylinder drive and springs. A double probe measurement provided the scrape-off layer plasma profile between the last closed flux surface and the first wall with the spatial resolution of 1{minus}2 mm measured with a laser displacement gauge. The profiles of the electron density {ital n}{sub {ital e}} and temperature {ital T}{sub {ital e}} were in good agreement with those obtained with a triple probe method. During the LH wave injection with good coupling to the core plasma, an increase in the local {ital T}{sub {ital e}} was observed in front of the LH launcher mouth. The local {ital n}{sub {ital e}} was (7{minus}10){times}10{sup 16} m{sup {minus}3}, consistent values needed for the good coupling. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  13. Launcher Roadmap for the CrVI Substitution of Surface Treatments. Screening of Trivalent-Chromium Conversion Solutions and First Promising Results for Repair Applications on Aluminium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debout, Vincent; Pettier, Sophie

    2014-06-01

    Airbus Defence and Space, Space System is involved in a global roadmap for launchers in order to substitute hexavalent chromium (CrVI) and Cadmium in the current surface treatments on metallic structures.Within this framework, a screening of trivalent chromium (CrIII) conversion solutions for touch-up applications has been carried out since this step is crucial to perform local application or to repair minor damages on launcher structures but it leads to higher risks of exposure for the workers.Three commercial CrIII conversion solutions have been evaluated on high performance aluminum alloys such as AA2024 T3 and AA7175 T7351 that are often used as structural materials.This preliminary investigation highlights the effect of surface preparation, rinsing and conversion process on the final corrosion performance of conversion coatings (CCs). The results are also discussed in terms of visual aspect and adhesion with new Cr-free primers.Two operating sets of parameters are identified with promising results that represent the first steps towards the development of a new Cr-free touch-up process.

  14. Investigation of the turbulent wake flow of generic launcher configurations via a zonal RANS/LES method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Statnikov, V.; Meiß, J.-H.; Meinke, M.; Schröder, W.

    2013-09-01

    A numerical analysis of the turbulent wake flow of a generic space launcher at supersonic freestream conditions (Ma∞ = 6.0 and Re D = 1.7 × 106) is performed using a zonal RANS/LES method. To investigate the influence of various components of a rocket model on the base flow, three supported wind tunnel configurations with the same main body geometry and different aft-body extensions consisting of a blunt base, a nozzle dummy, and a full flowing underexpanded TIC nozzle (Mae = 2.52, p e/ p ∞ = 100) are considered. Flow topologies for three cases are described in detail including an estimate of the impact of the wind tunnel model support on the flow field. To validate the applied numerical method, the computed flow fields are compared to experimental data from high-speed schlieren measurements provided by DLR Cologne. The influence of the used aft-body extensions on the steady-state and dynamic base flow characteristics is evaluated by a detailed analysis and comparison of the pressure distribution and its spectra along the base and nozzle walls for three investigated configurations. The numerical findings are compared to experimental wall pressure oscillation measurements provided by DLR Cologne. The major results are the non-negligible influence of the model support on the wake even on the strut averted side, the base drag reduction effect of the aft-expanding jet plume consisting of an increase of the base pressure level from p/p_∞≈0.2-0.25 (blunt base and nozzle dummy configurations) up to p/p_∞≈0.7 leading to a decrease of the base pressure drag coefficient from C Dp base = 0.032 to 0.012 correspondingly, and the identified dominant low-frequency modes of the base pressure oscillations at Sr D ≈ 0.05, Sr D ≈ 0.1, and Sr D ≈ 0.2 also detected in the experiments.

  15. The Hard Problem of Cooperation

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, Kimmo; Strimling, Pontus

    2012-01-01

    Based on individual variation in cooperative inclinations, we define the “hard problem of cooperation” as that of achieving high levels of cooperation in a group of non-cooperative types. Can the hard problem be solved by institutions with monitoring and sanctions? In a laboratory experiment we find that the answer is affirmative if the institution is imposed on the group but negative if development of the institution is left to the group to vote on. In the experiment, participants were divided into groups of either cooperative types or non-cooperative types depending on their behavior in a public goods game. In these homogeneous groups they repeatedly played a public goods game regulated by an institution that incorporated several of the key properties identified by Ostrom: operational rules, monitoring, rewards, punishments, and (in one condition) change of rules. When change of rules was not possible and punishments were set to be high, groups of both types generally abided by operational rules demanding high contributions to the common good, and thereby achieved high levels of payoffs. Under less severe rules, both types of groups did worse but non-cooperative types did worst. Thus, non-cooperative groups profited the most from being governed by an institution demanding high contributions and employing high punishments. Nevertheless, in a condition where change of rules through voting was made possible, development of the institution in this direction was more often voted down in groups of non-cooperative types. We discuss the relevance of the hard problem and fit our results into a bigger picture of institutional and individual determinants of cooperative behavior. PMID:22792282

  16. The hard problem of cooperation.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Kimmo; Strimling, Pontus

    2012-01-01

    Based on individual variation in cooperative inclinations, we define the "hard problem of cooperation" as that of achieving high levels of cooperation in a group of non-cooperative types. Can the hard problem be solved by institutions with monitoring and sanctions? In a laboratory experiment we find that the answer is affirmative if the institution is imposed on the group but negative if development of the institution is left to the group to vote on. In the experiment, participants were divided into groups of either cooperative types or non-cooperative types depending on their behavior in a public goods game. In these homogeneous groups they repeatedly played a public goods game regulated by an institution that incorporated several of the key properties identified by Ostrom: operational rules, monitoring, rewards, punishments, and (in one condition) change of rules. When change of rules was not possible and punishments were set to be high, groups of both types generally abided by operational rules demanding high contributions to the common good, and thereby achieved high levels of payoffs. Under less severe rules, both types of groups did worse but non-cooperative types did worst. Thus, non-cooperative groups profited the most from being governed by an institution demanding high contributions and employing high punishments. Nevertheless, in a condition where change of rules through voting was made possible, development of the institution in this direction was more often voted down in groups of non-cooperative types. We discuss the relevance of the hard problem and fit our results into a bigger picture of institutional and individual determinants of cooperative behavior.

  17. Radiation Hardness Assurance (RHA) Guideline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campola, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Radiation Hardness Assurance (RHA) consists of all activities undertaken to ensure that the electronics and materials of a space system perform to their design specifications after exposure to the mission space environment. The subset of interests for NEPP and the REAG, are EEE parts. It is important to register that all of these undertakings are in a feedback loop and require constant iteration and updating throughout the mission life. More detail can be found in the reference materials on applicable test data for usage on parts.

  18. Radiation hard electronics for LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymond, M.; Millmore, M.; Hall, G.; Sachdeva, R.; French, M.; Nygård, E.; Yoshioka, K.

    1995-02-01

    A CMOS front end electronics chain is being developed by the RD20 collaboration for microstrip detector readout at LHC. It is based on a preamplifier and CR-RC filter, analogue pipeline and an analogue signal processor. Amplifiers and transistor test structures have been constructed and evaluated in detail using a Harris 1.2 μm radiation hardened CMOS process. Progress with larger scale elements, including 32 channel front end chips, is described. A radiation hard 128 channel chip, with a 40 MHz analogue multiplexer, is to be submitted for fabrication in July 1994 which will form the basis of the readout of the tracking system of the CMS experiment.

  19. Hard Scattering Studies at Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Harutyun Avagyan; Peter Bosted; Volker Burkert; Latifa Elouadrhiri

    2005-09-01

    We present current activities and future prospects for studies of hard scattering processes using the CLAS detector and the CEBAF polarized electron beam. Kinematic dependences of single and double spin asymmetries have been measured in a wide kinematic range at CLAS with a polarized NH{sub 3} and unpolarized liquid hydrogen targets. It has been shown that the data are consistent with factorization and observed target and beam asymmetries are in good agreement with measurements performed at higher energies, suggesting that the high energy-description of the semi-inclusive DIS process can be extended to the moderate energies of JLab measurements.

  20. Thermopile detector radiation hard readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaalema, Stephen; Van Duyne, Stephen; Gates, James L.; Foote, Marc C.

    2010-08-01

    The NASA Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO) conceptual payload contains a thermal instrument with six different spectral bands ranging from 8μm to 100μm. The thermal instrument is based on multiple linear arrays of thermopile detectors that are intrinsically radiation hard; however, the thermopile CMOS readout needs to be hardened to tolerate the radiation sources of the JEO mission. Black Forest Engineering is developing a thermopile readout to tolerate the JEO mission radiation sources. The thermal instrument and ROIC process/design techniques are described to meet the JEO mission requirements.

  1. Hardness correlation for uranium and its alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Humphreys, D L; Romig, Jr, A D

    1983-03-01

    The hardness of 16 different uranium-titanium (U-Ti) alloys was measured on six (6) different hardness scales (R/sub A/, R/sub B/, R/sub C/, R/sub D/, Knoop, and Vickers). The alloys contained between 0.75 and 2.0 wt % Ti. All of the alloys were solutionized (850/sup 0/C, 1 h) and ice-water quenched to produce a supersaturated martensitic phase. A range of hardnesses was obtained by aging the samples for various times and temperatures. The correlation of various hardness scales was shown to be virtually identical to the hardness-scale correlation for steels. For more-accurate conversion from one hardness scale to another, least-squares-curve fits were determined for the various hardness-scale correlations. 34 figures, 5 tables.

  2. Volume 4 - Mobile Sources

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Mobile source reference material for activity data collection from the Emissions Inventory Improvement Program (EIIP). Provides complete methods for collecting key inputs to onroad mobile and nonroad mobile emissions models.

  3. Hard and Soft Safety Verifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wetherholt, Jon; Anderson, Brenda

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the differences between and the effects of hard and soft safety verifications. Initially, the terminology should be defined and clarified. A hard safety verification is datum which demonstrates how a safety control is enacted. An example of this is relief valve testing. A soft safety verification is something which is usually described as nice to have but it is not necessary to prove safe operation. An example of a soft verification is the loss of the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) casings from Shuttle flight, STS-4. When the main parachutes failed, the casings impacted the water and sank. In the nose cap of the SRBs, video cameras recorded the release of the parachutes to determine safe operation and to provide information for potential anomaly resolution. Generally, examination of the casings and nozzles contributed to understanding of the newly developed boosters and their operation. Safety verification of SRB operation was demonstrated by examination for erosion or wear of the casings and nozzle. Loss of the SRBs and associated data did not delay the launch of the next Shuttle flight.

  4. Cooperating mobile robots

    DOEpatents

    Harrington, John J.; Eskridge, Steven E.; Hurtado, John E.; Byrne, Raymond H.

    2004-02-03

    A miniature mobile robot provides a relatively inexpensive mobile robot. A mobile robot for searching an area provides a way for multiple mobile robots in cooperating teams. A robotic system with a team of mobile robots communicating information among each other provides a way to locate a source in cooperation. A mobile robot with a sensor, a communication system, and a processor, provides a way to execute a strategy for searching an area.

  5. Mobile Schools for a Mobile World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Overwhelmingly, independent schools are embracing mobile devices--laptops, iPads or other tablets, and smartphones--to enhance teaching and learning. This article describes the results of the "NAIS 2012 Mobile Learning Survey." Among its findings were that 75 percent of NAIS-member schools currently use mobile learning devices in at…

  6. Induction launcher design considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Driga, M. D.; Weldon, W. F.

    1989-01-01

    New concepts in the design of induction accelerators and their power supplies for space and military applications are discussed. Particular attention is given to a piecewise-rising-frequency power supply in which each elementary generator (normal compulsator or rising frequency generator) has a different base frequency. A preliminary design of a coaxial induction accelerator for a hypersonic real gas facility is discussed to illustrate the concepts described.

  7. The Proton launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, A.; Parfitt, J.

    1985-08-01

    The capabilities, design features and missions for the Soviet Proton booster are described. The Proton, outfitted with six strap-on boosters, launched the Vega 1 and 2 Venus/Halley dual mission spacecraft. RD-253 engines burn N2O4 and UDMH fuels, possibly through a preburner before the combustion chamber. A vacuum thrust of 450,000 lb is projected for the engine. Analyses are presented to set the launch weight at 1,600,000 lb, implying that the vehicle is based on an ICBM design. It is suggested that the Proton has sufficiently high noise and vibration levels to prohibit it from being man-rated.

  8. Launcher Dynamic Data Acquisition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-31

    requires adequate electrical power (firm or generated) with an uninterruptable power supply (UPS). The shelter must include a heating ventilation and...longitudinal, transverse and vertical Axes (respectively) of the vehicle. There could be a third global coordinate system used for geodetic purposes...exposed to the flash, heat , and chemical exhaust products of the rocket motor must be protected by a suitable coating such as a silicone grease (black

  9. The Delta 2 launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ousley, Gilbert W., Sr.

    1991-12-01

    The utilization of the Delta 2 as the vehicle for launching Aristoteles into its near Sun synchronous orbit is addressed. Delta is NASA's most reliable launch vehicle and is well suited for placing the present Aristoteles spacecraft into a 400 m circular orbit. A summary of some of the Delta 2 flight parameters is presented. Diagrams of a typical Delta 2 two stage separation are included along with statistics on delta reliability and launch plans.

  10. Development of radiation hard scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Markley, F.; Woods, D.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Foster, G. ); Blackburn, R. )

    1992-05-01

    Substantial improvements have been made in the radiation hardness of plastic scintillators. Cylinders of scintillating materials 2.2 cm in diameter and 1 cm thick have been exposed to 10 Mrads of gamma rays at a dose rate of 1 Mrad/h in a nitrogen atmosphere. One of the formulations tested showed an immediate decrease in pulse height of only 4% and has remained stable for 12 days while annealing in air. By comparison a commercial PVT scintillator showed an immediate decrease of 58% and after 43 days of annealing in air it improved to a 14% loss. The formulated sample consisted of 70 parts by weight of Dow polystyrene, 30 pbw of pentaphenyltrimethyltrisiloxane (Dow Corning DC 705 oil), 2 pbw of p-terphenyl, 0.2 pbw of tetraphenylbutadiene, and 0.5 pbw of UVASIL299LM from Ferro.

  11. Hard X-ray astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothschild, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    Past hard X-ray and lower energy satellite instruments are reviewed and it is shown that observation above 20 keV and up to hundreds of keV can provide much valuable information on the astrophysics of cosmic sources. To calculate possible sensitivities of future arrays, the efficiencies of a one-atmosphere inch gas counter (the HEAO-1 A-2 xenon filled HED3) and a 3 mm phoswich scintillator (the HEAO-1 A-4 Na1 LED1) were compared. Above 15 keV, the scintillator was more efficient. In a similar comparison, the sensitivity of germanium detectors did not differ much from that of the scintillators, except at high energies where the sensitivity would remain flat and not rise with loss of efficiency. Questions to be addressed concerning the physics of active galaxies and the diffuse radiation background, black holes, radio pulsars, X-ray pulsars, and galactic clusters are examined.

  12. Application of the French Space Operation Act and the Development of Space Activities in the Field of Launchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahuzac, F.; Biard, A.

    2012-01-01

    The development of space activities has led France to define a new legal framework: French Space Operation Act (FSOA). The aim of this act, is to define the conditions according to which the French government authorizes and checks the spatial operations under its jurisdiction or its international responsibility as State of launch, according to the international treaties of the UN on space, in particular the Treaty (1967) on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, the Convention ( 1972 ) on International Liability for Damage Caused by Space Objects, and the Convention (1975) on Registration of Objects Launched into Outer Space. The main European space centre is the Guiana Space Centre (CSG), settled in France. A clarification of the French legal framework was compulsory to allow the arrival of new launchers (Soyuz and Vega). This act defines the competent authority, the procedure of authorization and licenses, the regime for operations led from foreign countries, the control of spatial objects, the enabling of inspectors, the delegation of monitoring to CNES, the procedure for urgent measures necessary for the safety, the registration of spatial objects. In this framework, the operator is fully responsible of the operation that he leads. He is subjected to a regime of authorization and to governmental technical monitoring delegated to CNES. In case of litigation, the operator gets the State guarantee above a certain level of damage to third party. The introduction of FSOA has led to issue a Technical Regulation set forth, in particular for the safety of persons and property, the protection of public health and the environment. This general regulation is completed by a specific regulation applicable to CSG that covers the preparation phase of the launch, and all specificities of the launch range, as regards the beginning of the launch. The Technical Regulation is based on 30 years of Ariane's activities and on the

  13. Habitat Suitability Index Models: Hard clam

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mulholland, Rosemarie

    1984-01-01

    Two species of hard clams occur along the Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico coasts of North America: the southern hard clam, Mercenaria campechiensis Gmelin 1791, and the northern hard clam, ~lercenaria mercenaria Linne 1758 (Wells 1957b). The latter species, also commonly kno\\'m as the quahog, was formerly named Venus mercenaria. The two species are closely related, produce viable hybrids (Menzel and Menzel 1965), and may be a single species.

  14. Tactics of Interventions: Student Mobility and Human Capital Building in Singapore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koh, Aaron

    2012-01-01

    Hitherto, research on transnational higher education student mobility tended to narrowly present hard statistics on student mobility, analysing these in terms of "trends" and the implication this has on policy and internationalizing strategies. What is missing from this "big picture" is a close-up analysis of the micropolitics…

  15. Tooth mobility changes subsequent to root fractures: a longitudinal clinical study of 44 permanent teeth.

    PubMed

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Ahrensburg, Søren Steno; Tsilingaridis, Georgios

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze tooth mobility changes in root-fractured permanent teeth and relate this to type of interfragment healing (hard tissue healing (HT), interfragment healing with periodontal ligament (PDL) and nonhealing with interposition of granulation tissue (GT) because of pulp necrosis in the coronal fragment. Furthermore, the effect of age, location of the fracture on the root, and observation period on mobility values was analyzed. Mobility values were measured for 44 of 95 previous reported root-fractured permanent incisors. Mobility changes were measured with a Mühlemanns periodontometer and noninjured incisors served as controls. The mobility values represented the labial-lingual excursion of the root measured in μm when the tooth received a frontal and a palatal impact of 100 g force. In 18 cases of hard tissue healing (HT), a slightly increased mobility was seen after 3 months and 1 year, and a normalization of mobility value was usually found after 5 and 10 years. In 17 cases of PDL healing, generally a higher mobility was found in comparison with root fractures healing with hard tissue, and a consistent decrease in mobility value was found in the course of the 10 year observation period. A tendency for reduced mobility over time was found, a relation that could possibly be explained by the known general decrease in tooth mobility with increasing age. Finally, nine cases of nonhealing with initial interposition of granulation tissue (GT) because of pulp necrosis in the coronal fragment resulted in increasing mobility values possibly related to a lateral breakdown of the PDL in relation to the fracture line. In control teeth, a lowering of mobility was found over the course of a 10-year observation period. In conclusion, mobility changes appeared to reflect the radiographic healing stages and known age effects upon tooth mobility.

  16. Handheld Libraries 101: Using Mobile Technologies in the Academic Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kosturski, Kate; Skornia, Frank

    2011-01-01

    The 2009 "Horizon Report" called mobile technologies "an opportunity for higher education to reach its constituents in new and compelling ways." The report implied that academic libraries would find them to be the ideal tools for bringing reluctant researchers to the library, mainly for their convenience. It's not hard to see why--in 2008, mobile…

  17. Mobile Devices at School: Possibilities, Problems, and Tough Choices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Dennis; Angeles, Rebecca

    2008-01-01

    This article takes a "point/counterpoint" approach to considering the educational use of mobile devices. It views the possibilities and problems surrounding the use of small laptops, cellphones, iPhones, etc. Although clear answers to questions regarding the classroom use of digital devices are hard to come by, the authors believe that educators…

  18. Persistence, Privilege, and Parenting: The Comparative Study of Intergenerational Mobility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smeeding, Timothy M., Ed.; Erikson, Robert, Ed.; Jantti, Markus, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    Americans like to believe that theirs is the land of opportunity, but the hard facts are that children born into poor families in the United States tend to stay poor and children born into wealthy families generally stay rich. Other countries have shown more success at lessening the effects of inequality on mobility--possibly by making public…

  19. Can Mobile Health Training Meet the Challenge of "Measuring Better"?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winters, Niall; Oliver, Martin; Langer, Laurenz

    2017-01-01

    Mobile learning has seen a large uptake in use in low- and middle-income countries. This is driven by rhetorics of easy scaling, reaching the hard-to-reach and the potential for generating analytics from the applications used by learners. Healthcare training has seen a proliferation of apps aimed at improving accountability through tracking and…

  20. 30 CFR 77.1710-1 - Distinctively colored hard hats or hard caps; identification for newly employed, inexperienced...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Distinctively colored hard hats or hard caps... Distinctively colored hard hats or hard caps; identification for newly employed, inexperienced miners. Hard hats or hard caps distinctively different in color from those worn by experienced miners shall be worn...

  1. 30 CFR 75.1720-1 - Distinctively colored hard hats, or hard caps; identification for newly employed, inexperienced...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Distinctively colored hard hats, or hard caps... STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1720-1 Distinctively colored hard hats, or hard caps; identification for newly employed, inexperienced miners. Hard hats or hard caps distinctively different in...

  2. Hardness of cubic solid solutions

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Faming

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate that a hardening rule exists in cubic solid solutions with various combinations of ionic, covalent and metallic bonding. It is revealed that the hardening stress ∆τFcg is determined by three factors: shear modulus G, the volume fraction of solute atoms fv, and the size misfit degree δb. A simple hardening correlation in KCl-KBr solid-solution is proposed as ∆τFcg = 0.27 G. It is applied to calculate the hardening behavior of the Ag-Au, KCl-KBr, InP-GaP, TiN-TiC, HfN-HfC, TiC-NbC and ZrC-NbC solid-solution systems. The composition dependence of hardness is elucidated quantitatively. The BN-BP solid-solution system is quantitatively predicted. We find a hardening plateau region around the x = 0.55–0.85 in BNxP1−x, where BNxP1−x solid solutions are far harder than cubic BN. Because the prediction is quantitative, it sets the stage for a broad range of applications. PMID:28054659

  3. Hardness of cubic solid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Faming

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate that a hardening rule exists in cubic solid solutions with various combinations of ionic, covalent and metallic bonding. It is revealed that the hardening stress ∆τFcg is determined by three factors: shear modulus G, the volume fraction of solute atoms fv, and the size misfit degree δb. A simple hardening correlation in KCl-KBr solid-solution is proposed as ∆τFcg = 0.27 G. It is applied to calculate the hardening behavior of the Ag-Au, KCl-KBr, InP-GaP, TiN-TiC, HfN-HfC, TiC-NbC and ZrC-NbC solid-solution systems. The composition dependence of hardness is elucidated quantitatively. The BN-BP solid-solution system is quantitatively predicted. We find a hardening plateau region around the x = 0.55–0.85 in BNxP1‑x, where BNxP1‑x solid solutions are far harder than cubic BN. Because the prediction is quantitative, it sets the stage for a broad range of applications.

  4. Hard X-ray delays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, Richard A.

    1986-01-01

    High time resolution hard X-ray rates with good counting statistics over 5 energy intervals were obtained using a large area balloon-borne scintillation detector during the 27 June 1980 solar flare. The impulsive phase of the flare was comprised of a series of major bursts of several to several tens of seconds long. Superimposed on these longer bursts are numerous smaller approximately 0.5 to 1.0 second spikes. The time profiles for different energies were cross-correlated for the major bursts. The rapid burst decay rates and the simultaneous peaks below 120 keV both indicate a rapid electron energy loss process. Thus, the flux profiles reflect the electron acceleration/injection process. The fast rate data was obtained by a burst memory in 8 and 32 msec resolution over the entire main impulsive phase. These rates will be cross-correlated to look for short time delays and to find rapid fluctuations. However, a cursory examination shows that almost all fluctuations, down to the 5% level, were resolved with 256 msec bins.

  5. Mobile Phone Application Development for the Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, P.; Oostra, D.; Crecelius, S.; Chambers, L. H.

    2012-08-01

    With smartphone sales currently surpassing laptop sales, it is hard not to think that these devices will have a place in the classroom. More specifically, with little to no monetary investment, classroom-centric mobile applications have the ability to suit the needs of teachers. Previously, programming such an item was a daunting task to the classroom teacher. But now, through the use of online visual tools, anyone has the ability to generate a mobile application to suit individual classroom needs. The "MY NASA DATA" (MND) project has begun work on such an application. Using online tools that are directed at the non-programmer, the team has developed two usable mobile applications ("apps") that fit right into the science classroom. The two apps generated include a cloud dichotomous key for cloud identification in the field, and an atmospheric science glossary to help with standardized testing key vocabulary and classroom assignments. Through the use of free online tools, teachers and students now have the ability to customize mobile applications to meet their individual needs. As an extension of the mobile applications, the MND team is planning web-based application programming interfaces (API's) that will be generated from data that is currently included in the MND Live Access Server. This will allow teachers and students to choose data sets that they want to include in the mobile application without having to populate the API themselves. Through the use of easy to understand online mobile app tutorials and MND data sets, teachers will have the ability to generate unit-specific mobile applications to further engage and empower students in the science classroom.

  6. New approaches to hard bubble suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, R. D.; Besser, P. J.; Warren, R. G.; Whitcomb, E. C.

    1973-01-01

    Description of a new double-layer method for the suppression of hard bubbles that is more versatile than previously reported suppression techniques. It is shown that it may be possible to prevent hard bubble generation without recourse to exchange coupling of multilayer films.

  7. Hard Spring Wheat Technical Committee 2016 Crop

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seven experimental lines of hard spring wheat were grown at up to five locations in 2016 and evaluated for kernel, milling, and bread baking quality against the check variety Glenn. Wheat samples were submitted through the Wheat Quality Council and processed and milled at the USDA-ARS Hard Red Spri...

  8. "Hard Science" for Gifted 1st Graders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeGennaro, April

    2006-01-01

    "Hard Science" is designed to teach 1st grade gifted students accurate and high level science concepts. It is based upon their experience of the world and attempts to build a foundation for continued love and enjoyment of science. "Hard Science" provides field experiences and opportunities for hands-on discovery working beside experts in the field…

  9. Hardness methods for testing maize kernels.

    PubMed

    Fox, Glen; Manley, Marena

    2009-07-08

    Maize is a highly important crop to many countries around the world, through the sale of the maize crop to domestic processors and subsequent production of maize products and also provides a staple food to subsistance farms in undeveloped countries. In many countries, there have been long-term research efforts to develop a suitable hardness method that could assist the maize industry in improving efficiency in processing as well as possibly providing a quality specification for maize growers, which could attract a premium. This paper focuses specifically on hardness and reviews a number of methodologies as well as important biochemical aspects of maize that contribute to maize hardness used internationally. Numerous foods are produced from maize, and hardness has been described as having an impact on food quality. However, the basis of hardness and measurement of hardness are very general and would apply to any use of maize from any country. From the published literature, it would appear that one of the simpler methods used to measure hardness is a grinding step followed by a sieving step, using multiple sieve sizes. This would allow the range in hardness within a sample as well as average particle size and/or coarse/fine ratio to be calculated. Any of these parameters could easily be used as reference values for the development of near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy calibrations. The development of precise NIR calibrations will provide an excellent tool for breeders, handlers, and processors to deliver specific cultivars in the case of growers and bulk loads in the case of handlers, thereby ensuring the most efficient use of maize by domestic and international processors. This paper also considers previous research describing the biochemical aspects of maize that have been related to maize hardness. Both starch and protein affect hardness, with most research focusing on the storage proteins (zeins). Both the content and composition of the zein fractions affect

  10. Mobile clinics in Haiti, part 2: Lessons learned through service.

    PubMed

    Haley, Janice M; Cone, Pamela H

    2016-11-01

    Learning from experience is a positive approach when preparing for mobile clinic service in a developing country. Mobile clinics provide healthcare services to people in hard to reach areas around the world, but preparation for their use needs to be done in collaboration with local leaders and healthcare providers. For over 16 years, Azusa Pacific University School of Nursing has sponsored mobile clinics to rural northern Haiti with the aim to provide culturally sensitive healthcare in collaboration with Haitian leaders. Past Haiti mobile clinic experiences have informed the APU-SON approach on best practices in study abroad, service-learning, and mission trips providing healthcare services. Hopefully, lessons learned from these experiences with mobile clinic service-learning opportunities in Haiti will benefit others who seek to plan study abroad service-learning trips for students in healthcare majors who desire to serve the underserved around the world.

  11. Hardness Evolution of Gamma-Irradiated Polyoxymethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Chuan-Hao; Harmon, Julie P.; Lee, Sanboh

    2016-12-01

    This study focuses on analyzing hardness evolution in gamma-irradiated polyoxymethylene (POM) exposed to elevated temperatures after irradiation. Hardness increases with increasing annealing temperature and time, but decreases with increasing gamma ray dose. Hardness changes are attributed to defects generated in the microstructure and molecular structure. Gamma irradiation causes a decrease in the glass transition temperature, melting point, and extent of crystallinity. The kinetics of defects resulting in hardness changes follow a first-order structure relaxation. The rate constant adheres to an Arrhenius equation, and the corresponding activation energy decreases with increasing dose due to chain scission during gamma irradiation. The structure relaxation of POM has a lower energy barrier in crystalline regions than in amorphous ones. The hardness evolution in POM is an endothermic process due to the semi-crystalline nature of this polymer.

  12. Thermal spray coatings replace hard chrome

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, M.; Unger, R.

    1997-08-01

    Hard chrome plating provides good wear and erosion resistance, as well as good corrosion protection and fine surface finishes. Until a few years ago, it could also be applied at a reasonable cost. However, because of the many environmental and financial sanctions that have been imposed on the process over the past several years, cost has been on a consistent upward trend, and is projected to continue to escalate. Therefore, it is very important to find a coating or a process that offers the same characteristics as hard chrome plating, but without the consequent risks. This article lists the benefits and limitations of hard chrome plating, and describes the performance of two thermal spray coatings (tungsten carbide and chromium carbide) that compared favorably with hard chrome plating in a series of tests. It also lists three criteria to determine whether plasma spray or hard chrome plating should be selected.

  13. Mobile Router Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.; Stewart, David H.; Bell, Terry L.; Kachmar, Brian A.; Shell, Dan; Leung, Kent

    2002-01-01

    Cisco Systems and NASA have been performing joint research on mobile routing technology under a NASA Space Act Agreement. Cisco developed mobile router technology and provided that technology to NASA for applications to aeronautic and space-based missions. NASA has performed stringent performance testing of the mobile router, including the interaction of routing and transport-level protocols. This paper describes mobile routing, the mobile router, and some key configuration parameters. In addition, the paper describes the mobile routing test network and test results documenting the performance of transport protocols in dynamic routing environments.

  14. Design and Implementation of a Hall Effect Sensor Array Applied to Recycling Hard Drive Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Kisner, Roger; Lenarduzzi, Roberto; Killough, Stephen M; McIntyre, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    Rare earths are an important resource for many electronic components and technologies. Examples abound including Neodymium magnets used in mobile devices and computer hard drives (HDDs), and a variety of renewable energy technologies (e.g., wind turbines). Approximately 21,000 metric tons of Neodymium is processed annually with less than 1% being recycled. An economic system to assist in the recycling of magnet material from post-consumer goods, such as Neodymium Iron Boron magnets commonly found in hard drives is presented. A central component of this recycling measurement system uses an array of 128 Hall Effect sensors arranged in two columns to detect the magnetic flux lines orthogonal to the HDD. Results of using the system to scan planar shaped objects such as hard drives to identify and spatially locate rare-earth magnets for removal and recycling from HDDs are presented. Applications of the sensor array in other identification and localization of magnetic components and assemblies will be presented.

  15. Magnetic and viscoelastic response of elastomers with hard magnetic filler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramarenko, E. Yu; Chertovich, A. V.; Stepanov, G. V.; Semisalova, A. S.; Makarova, L. A.; Perov, N. S.; Khokhlov, A. R.

    2015-03-01

    Magnetic elastomers (MEs) based on a silicone matrix and magnetically hard NdFeB particles have been synthesized and their magnetic and viscoelastic properties have been studied depending on the size and concentration of magnetic particles and the magnetizing field. It has been shown that magnetic particles can rotate in soft polymer matrix under applied magnetic field, this fact leading to some features in both magnetic and viscoelastic properties. In the maximum magnetic field used magnetization of MEs with smaller particles is larger while the coercivity is smaller due to higher mobility of the particles within the polymer matrix. Viscoelastic behavior is characterized by long relaxation times due to restructuring of the magnetic filler under the influence of an applied mechanical force and magnetic interactions. The storage and loss moduli of magnetically hard elastomers grow significantly with magnetizing field. The magnetic response of the magnetized samples depends on the mutual orientation of the external magnetic field and the internal sample magnetization. Due to the particle rotation within the polymer matrix, the loss factor increases abruptly when the magnetic field is turned on in the opposite direction to the sample magnetization, further decreasing with time. Moduli versus field dependences have minimum at non-zero field and are characterized by a high asymmetry with respect to the field direction.

  16. Tandem mobile robot system

    DOEpatents

    Buttz, James H.; Shirey, David L.; Hayward, David R.

    2003-01-01

    A robotic vehicle system for terrain navigation mobility provides a way to climb stairs, cross crevices, and navigate across difficult terrain by coupling two or more mobile robots with a coupling device and controlling the robots cooperatively in tandem.

  17. Ion mobility sensor system

    DOEpatents

    Xu, Jun; Watson, David B.; Whitten, William B.

    2013-01-22

    An ion mobility sensor system including an ion mobility spectrometer and a differential mobility spectrometer coupled to the ion mobility spectrometer. The ion mobility spectrometer has a first chamber having first end and a second end extending along a first direction, and a first electrode system that generates a constant electric field parallel to the first direction. The differential mobility spectrometer includes a second chamber having a third end and a fourth end configured such that a fluid may flow in a second direction from the third end to the fourth end, and a second electrode system that generates an asymmetric electric field within an interior of the second chamber. Additionally, the ion mobility spectrometer and the differential mobility spectrometer form an interface region. Also, the first end and the third end are positioned facing one another so that the constant electric field enters the third end and overlaps the fluid flowing in the second direction.

  18. ECG by mobile technologies.

    PubMed

    Guzik, Przemyslaw; Malik, Marek

    Mobile electrocardiographs consist of three components: a mobile device (e.g. a smartphone), an electrocardiographic device or accessory, and a mobile application. Mobile platforms are small computers with sufficient computational power, good quality display, suitable data storage, and several possibilities of data transmission. Electrocardiographic electrodes and sensors for mobile use utilize unconventional materials, e.g. rubber, e-textile, and inkjet-printed nanoparticle electrodes. Mobile devices can be handheld, worn as vests or T-shirts, or attached to patient's skin as biopatches. Mobile electrocardiographic devices and accessories may additionally record other signals including respiratory rate, activity level, and geolocation. Large-scale clinical studies that utilize electrocardiography are easier to conduct using mobile technologies and the collected data are suitable for "big data" processing. This is expected to reveal phenomena so far inaccessible by standard electrocardiographic techniques.

  19. Analysis of Hard Thin Film Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Dashen

    1998-01-01

    MSFC is interested in developing hard thin film coating for bearings. The wearing of the bearing is an important problem for space flight engine. Hard thin film coating can drastically improve the surface of the bearing and improve the wear-endurance of the bearing. However, many fundamental problems in surface physics, plasma deposition, etc, need further research. The approach is using electron cyclotron resonance chemical vapor deposition (ECRCVD) to deposit hard thin film an stainless steel bearing. The thin films in consideration include SiC, SiN and other materials. An ECRCVD deposition system is being assembled at MSFC.

  20. Analysis of Hard Thin Film Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Dashen

    1998-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is interested in developing hard thin film coating for bearings. The wearing of the bearing is an important problem for space flight engine. Hard thin film coating can drastically improve the surface of the bearing and improve the wear-endurance of the bearing. However, many fundamental problems in surface physics, plasma deposition, etc, need further research. The approach is using Electron Cyclotron Resonance Chemical Vapor Deposition (ECRCVD) to deposit hard thin film on stainless steel bearing. The thin films in consideration include SiC, SiN and other materials. An ECRCVD deposition system is being assembled at MSFC.

  1. Mobility and Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernard van Leer Foundation Newsletter, 1994

    1994-01-01

    This newsletter theme issue deals with the phenomenon of mobility or transience in India, Kenya, Greece, Ireland, Malaysia, Thailand and Israel. The primary focus is on mobility's effect on young children, specifically their health and education; some of the broader concerns also addressed by the newsletter are the causes of mobility and its…

  2. Mobile Student Information System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asif, Muhammad; Krogstie, John

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: A mobile student information system (MSIS) based on mobile computing and context-aware application concepts can provide more user-centric information services to students. The purpose of this paper is to describe a system for providing relevant information to students on a mobile platform. Design/methodology/approach: The research…

  3. Topological lifetimes of polydisperse colloidal hard spheres at a wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dullens, Roel P. A.; Kegel, Willem K.

    2005-01-01

    Confocal scanning laser microscopy was used to study the behavior of dense suspensions of model colloidal hard spheres at a single wall. Due to the slight polydispersity, our system shows a reentrant melting transition at high densities involving a hexatic structure [R. P. A. Dullens and W. K. Kegel, Phys. Rev. Lett 92, 195702 (2004)]. The reentrant melting transition is accompanied by an increase in the mean-squared displacement. The correlation between structure and dynamics was quantitatively analyzed on a single-particle level. In particular, the topological lifetime, being the average time that a particle spends having the same coordination number, is determined for all coordination numbers and as a function of volume fraction. The defective (non-sixfold-coordinated) particles exhibit shorter lifetimes than sixfold-coordinated particles, indicating that the mobility of the system is larger at or close to defective particles. The lifetime itself is a strong function of volume fraction. In particular, the global behavior of the mean-squared displacement is proportional to the hopping frequency (the inverse of the lifetime), showing that particles changing their coordination number contribute most to the local mobility.

  4. Studying Polymer Transport on Soft and Hard Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sanat

    2007-03-01

    We have employed experiments and simulations to understand the factors controlling the transport of polymers on surfaces. From an experimental viewpoint we have focused on the transport of DNA (single stranded) on lipid bilayers. We show that this behavior is slaved to the mobility of the lipids. More surprisingly, it appears that the transport of molecules adsorbed on surfaces follows the same dependence on lipid mobility as for molecules incorporated into the lipid layer. The ability to control this surface diffusion through the introduction of posts or varying the strength of adsorption (by the use of an AC field normal to the surfaces) will also be studied. Theoretically we have used molecular dynamics simulations of a polymer chain of length N dissolved in explicit solvent and adsorbed as a pancake at the solid-liquid interface to discriminate between respective influences on surface diffusion of hydrodynamics and adsorption energetics. Only for analytically-smooth surfaces do we observe a strong influence of hydrodynamics; the polymer lateral diffusion constant, D, scales as D 1/N^3/4, more weakly than for implicit solvent. For atomistic surface corrugation with uniform surface chemical makeup, D 1/N instead. This suggests that while we can understand the results for diffusion on lipid surfaces, more recent experimental observations of stronger N dependence for diffusion on hard solid surfaces originate not in hydrodynamic interactions but in spatially patchy energetic interactions.

  5. Automated radiation hard ASIC design tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Mike; Bartholet, Bill; Baze, Mark

    1993-01-01

    A commercial based, foundry independent, compiler design tool (ChipCrafter) with custom radiation hardened library cells is described. A unique analysis approach allows low hardness risk for Application Specific IC's (ASIC's). Accomplishments, radiation test results, and applications are described.

  6. 21 CFR 133.150 - Hard cheeses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... action of harmless lactic-acid-producing bacteria, with or without other harmless flavor-producing... minutes, or for a time and at a temperature equivalent thereto in phosphatase destruction. A hard...

  7. Macroindentation hardness measurement-Modernization and applications.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sarsvat; Sun, Changquan Calvin

    2016-06-15

    In this study, we first developed a modernized indentation technique for measuring tablet hardness. This technique is featured by rapid digital image capture, using a calibrated light microscope, and precise area-determination. We then systematically studied effects of key experimental parameters, including indentation force, speed, and holding time, on measured hardness of a very soft material, hydroxypropyl cellulose, and a very hard material, dibasic calcium phosphate, to cover a wide range of material properties. Based on the results, a holding period of 3min at the peak indentation load is recommended to minimize the effect of testing speed on H. Using this method, we show that an exponential decay function well describes the relationship between tablet hardness and porosity for seven commonly used pharmaceutical powders investigated in this work. We propose that H and H at zero porosity may be used to quantify the tablet deformability and powder plasticity, respectively.

  8. Electronic Teaching: Hard Disks and Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Samuel F.

    1984-01-01

    Describes floppy-disk and hard-disk based networks, electronic systems linking microcomputers together for the purpose of sharing peripheral devices, and presents points to remember when shopping for a network. (MBR)

  9. Novel hard compositions and methods of preparation

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, H.

    1981-02-03

    Novel very hard compositions of matter are prepared by using in all embodiments only a minor amount of a particular carbide (or materials which can form the carbide in situ when subjected to heat and pressure); and no strategic cobalt is needed. Under a particular range of conditions, densified compositions of matter of the invention are prepared having hardnesses on the Rockwell A test substantially equal to the hardness of pure tungsten carbide and to two of the hardest commercial cobalt-bonded tungsten carbides. Alternately, other compositions of the invention which have slightly lower hardnesses than those described above in one embodiment also possess the advantage of requiring no tungsten and in another embodiment possess the advantage of having a good fracture toughness value.

  10. 7 CFR 201.21 - Hard seed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., if any is present, for any seed required to be labeled as to the percentage of germination, and the percentage of hard seed shall not be included as part of the germination percentage. [24 FR 3953, May...

  11. 7 CFR 201.21 - Hard seed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., if any is present, for any seed required to be labeled as to the percentage of germination, and the percentage of hard seed shall not be included as part of the germination percentage. [24 FR 3953, May...

  12. 7 CFR 201.30 - Hard seed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... any is present, for any seed required to be labeled as to the percentage of germination, and the percentage of hard seed shall not be included as part of the germination percentage. [32 FR 12779, Sept....

  13. 7 CFR 201.30 - Hard seed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... any is present, for any seed required to be labeled as to the percentage of germination, and the percentage of hard seed shall not be included as part of the germination percentage. [32 FR 12779, Sept....

  14. Greedy data transportation scheme with hard packet deadlines for wireless ad hoc networks.

    PubMed

    Lee, HyungJune

    2014-01-01

    We present a greedy data transportation scheme with hard packet deadlines in ad hoc sensor networks of stationary nodes and multiple mobile nodes with scheduled trajectory path and arrival time. In the proposed routing strategy, each stationary ad hoc node en route decides whether to relay a shortest-path stationary node toward destination or a passing-by mobile node that will carry closer to destination. We aim to utilize mobile nodes to minimize the total routing cost as far as the selected route can satisfy the end-to-end packet deadline. We evaluate our proposed routing algorithm in terms of routing cost, packet delivery ratio, packet delivery time, and usability of mobile nodes based on network level simulations. Simulation results show that our proposed algorithm fully exploits the remaining time till packet deadline to turn into networking benefits of reducing the overall routing cost and improving packet delivery performance. Also, we demonstrate that the routing scheme guarantees packet delivery with hard deadlines, contributing to QoS improvement in various network services.

  15. Hard Suit With Adjustable Torso Length

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vykukal, Hubert C.

    1987-01-01

    Torso sizing rings allow single suit to fit variety of people. Sizing rings inserted between coupling rings of torso portion of hard suit. Number of rings chosen to fit torso length of suit to that of wearer. Rings mate with, and seal to, coupling rings and to each other. New adjustable-size concept with cost-saving feature applied to other suits not entirely constructed of "hard" materials, such as chemical defense suits and suits for industrial-hazard cleanup.

  16. A Novel Approach to Hardness Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiegel, F. Xavier; West, Harvey A.

    1996-01-01

    This paper gives a description of the application of a simple rebound time measuring device and relates the determination of relative hardness of a variety of common engineering metals. A relation between rebound time and hardness will be sought. The effect of geometry and surface condition will also be discussed in order to acquaint the student with the problems associated with this type of method.

  17. Laser Ablatin of Dental Hard Tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Seka, W.; Rechmann, P.; Featherstone, J.D.B.; Fried, D.

    2007-07-31

    This paper discusses ablation of dental hard tissue using pulsed lasers. It focuses particularly on the relevant tissue and laser parameters and some of the basic ablation processes that are likely to occur. The importance of interstitial water and its phase transitions is discussed in some detail along with the ablation processes that may or may not directly involve water. The interplay between tissue parameters and laser parameters in the outcome of the removal of dental hard tissue is discussed in detail.

  18. Mobile Virtual Private Networking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulkkis, Göran; Grahn, Kaj; Mårtens, Mathias; Mattsson, Jonny

    Mobile Virtual Private Networking (VPN) solutions based on the Internet Security Protocol (IPSec), Transport Layer Security/Secure Socket Layer (SSL/TLS), Secure Shell (SSH), 3G/GPRS cellular networks, Mobile IP, and the presently experimental Host Identity Protocol (HIP) are described, compared and evaluated. Mobile VPN solutions based on HIP are recommended for future networking because of superior processing efficiency and network capacity demand features. Mobile VPN implementation issues associated with the IP protocol versions IPv4 and IPv6 are also evaluated. Mobile VPN implementation experiences are presented and discussed.

  19. Residential mobility microsimulation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yifei; Wu, Lun

    2010-09-01

    Residential mobility refers to the spatial movement of individuals and households between dwellings within an urban area. This considerable amount of intra-urban movement affects the urban structure and has significant repercussions for urban transportation. In order to understand and project related impacts, a considerable number of residential mobility models has been developed and used in the regional planning process. Within this context, the history and state-of-art residential mobility models are discussed and indicated. Meanwhile, a residential mobility Microsimulation model, called URM-Microsim (Urban Residential Mobility Microsimulation), is introduced and discussed.

  20. Ion mobility sensor

    DOEpatents

    Koo, Jackson C.; Yu, Conrad M.

    2005-08-23

    An ion mobility sensor which can detect both ion and molecules simultaneously. Thus, one can measure the relative arrival times between various ions and molecules. Different ions have different mobility in air, and the ion sensor enables measurement of ion mobility, from which one can identify the various ions and molecules. The ion mobility sensor which utilizes a pair of glow discharge devices may be designed for coupling with an existing gas chromatograph, where various gas molecules are already separated, but numbers of each kind of molecules are relatively small, and in such cases a conventional ion mobility sensor cannot be utilized.

  1. Hard x ray highlights of AR 5395

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, R. A.; Dennis, Brian R.

    1989-01-01

    Active Region 5395 produced an exceptional series of hard x ray bursts notable for their frequency, intensity, and impulsivity. Over the two weeks from March 6 to 19, 447 hard x ray flares were observed by the Hard X Ray Burst Spectrometer on Solar Maximum Mission (HXRBS/SMM), a rate of approx. 35 per day which exceeded the previous high by more than 50 percent. During one 5 day stretch, more than 250 flares were detected, also a new high. The three largest GOES X-flares were observed by HXRBS and had hard x ray rates over 100,000 s(exp -1) compared with only ten flares above 100,000(exp -1) during the previous nine years of the mission. An ongoing effort for the HXRBS group has been the correlated analysis of hard x ray data with flare data at other wavelengths with the most recent emphasis on those measurements with spatial information. During a series of bursts from AR 5395 at 1644 to 1648 UT on 12 March 1989, simultaneous observations were made by HXRBS and UVSP (Ultra Violet Spectrometer Polarimeter) on SMM, the two-element Owens Valley Radio Observatory (OVRO) interferometric array, and R. Canfield's H-alpha Echelle spectrograph at the National Solar Observatory at Sacramento Peak. The data show strong correlations in the hard x ray, microwave, and UV lightcurves. This event will be the subject of a combined analysis.

  2. Strong mobility in weakly disordered systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-naim, Eli; Krapivsky, Pavel

    2009-01-01

    We study transport of interacting particles in weakly disordered media. Our one-dimensional system includes (i) disorder, the hopping rate governing the movement of a particle between two neighboring lattice sites is inhomogeneous, and (ii) hard core interaction, the maximum occupancy at each site is one particle. We find that over a substantial regime, the root-mean-square displacement of a particle s grows superdiffusively with time t, {sigma}{approx}({epsilon}t){sup 2/3}, where {epsilon} is the disorder strength. Without disorder the particle displacement is subdiffusive, {sigma} {approx}t{sup 1/4}, and therefore disorder strongly enhances particle mobility. We explain this effect using scaling arguments, and verify the theoretical predictions through numerical simulations. Also, the simulations show that regardless of disorder strength, disorder leads to stronger mobility over an intermediate time regime.

  3. Electric field determination in the plasma-antenna boundary of a lower-hybrid wave launcher in Tore Supra through dynamic Stark-effect spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Elijah H.; Goniche, M.; Klepper, C. Christopher; Hillairet, J.; Isler, Ralph C.; Bottereau, C.; Colas, L.; Ekedahl, A.; Panayotis, S.; Pegourie, B.; Lotte, Ph.; Colledani, G.; Caughman, J. B. O.; Harris, Jeffrey H.; Hillis, Donald Lee; Shannon, S.C.; Clairet, F.; Litaudon, X.

    2015-04-22

    Interaction of radio-frequency (RF) waves with the plasma in the near-field of a high-power wave launcher is now seen to be important, both in understanding the channeling of these waves through the plasma boundary and in avoiding power losses in the edge. In a recent Letter a direct non-intrusive measurement of a near antenna RF electric field in the range of lower hybrid (LH) frequencies ($E_{LH}$) was announced (Phys. Rev. Lett., 110:215005, 2013). The measurement was achieved through the fitting of Balmer series deuterium spectral lines utilizing a time dependent (dynamic) Stark effect model. In this article, the processing of the spectral data is discussed in detail and applied to a larger range of measurements and the accuracy and limitations of the experimental technique is investigated. We find through an analysis of numerous Tore Supra pulses that good quantitative agreement exists between the measured and full-wave modeled $E_{LH}$ when the launched power exceeds 0.5MW. For low power the measurement becomes formidable utilizing the implemented passive spectroscopic technique because the spectral noise overwhelms the effect of the RF electric field on the line profile. Additionally, effects of the ponderomotive force are suspected at sufficiently high power.

  4. Electric field determination in the plasma-antenna boundary of a lower-hybrid wave launcher in Tore Supra through dynamic Stark-effect spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Martin, Elijah H.; Goniche, M.; Klepper, C. Christopher; ...

    2015-04-22

    Interaction of radio-frequency (RF) waves with the plasma in the near-field of a high-power wave launcher is now seen to be important, both in understanding the channeling of these waves through the plasma boundary and in avoiding power losses in the edge. In a recent Letter a direct non-intrusive measurement of a near antenna RF electric field in the range of lower hybrid (LH) frequencies (more » $$E_{LH}$$) was announced (Phys. Rev. Lett., 110:215005, 2013). The measurement was achieved through the fitting of Balmer series deuterium spectral lines utilizing a time dependent (dynamic) Stark effect model. In this article, the processing of the spectral data is discussed in detail and applied to a larger range of measurements and the accuracy and limitations of the experimental technique is investigated. We find through an analysis of numerous Tore Supra pulses that good quantitative agreement exists between the measured and full-wave modeled $$E_{LH}$$ when the launched power exceeds 0.5MW. For low power the measurement becomes formidable utilizing the implemented passive spectroscopic technique because the spectral noise overwhelms the effect of the RF electric field on the line profile. Additionally, effects of the ponderomotive force are suspected at sufficiently high power.« less

  5. Hard error generation by neutron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Browning, J.S.; Gover, J.E.; Wrobel, T.F.; Hass, K.J.; Nasby, R.D.; Simpson, R.L.; Posey, L.D.; Boos, R.E.; Block, R.C.

    1987-01-01

    We have observed that neutron-induced fission of uranium contaminants present in alumina ceramic package lids results in the release of fission fragments that can cause hard errors in metal nitride-oxidenonvolatile RAMs (MNOS NVRAMs). Hard error generation requires the simultaneous presence of (1) a fission fragment with a linear energy transfer (LET) greater than 20 MeV/mg/cm/sup 2/ moving at an angle of 30/sup 0/ or less from the electric field in the high-field, gate region of the memory transistor and (2) a WRITE or ERASE voltage on the oxide-nitride transistor gate. In reactor experiments, we observe these hard errors when a ceramic lid is used on both MNOS NVRAMs and polysilicon-nitride-oxide-semiconductor (SNOS) capacitors, but hard errors are not observed when a gold-plated kovar lid is used on the package containing these die. We have mapped the tracks of the fission fragments released from the ceramic lids with a mica track detector and used a Monte Carlo model of fission fragment transport through the ceramic lid to measure the concentration of uranium present in the lids. Our concentration measurements are in excellent agreement with others' measurements of uranium concentration in ceramic lids. Our Monte Carlo analyses also agree closely with our measurements of hard error probability in MNOS NVRAMs. 15 refs., 13 figs., 8 tabs.

  6. Haptic search for hard and soft spheres.

    PubMed

    van Polanen, Vonne; Bergmann Tiest, Wouter M; Kappers, Astrid M L

    2012-01-01

    In this study the saliency of hardness and softness were investigated in an active haptic search task. Two experiments were performed to explore these properties in different contexts. In Experiment 1, blindfolded participants had to grasp a bundle of spheres and determine the presence of a hard target among soft distractors or vice versa. If the difference in compliance between target and distractors was small, reaction times increased with the number of items for both features; a serial strategy was found to be used. When the difference in compliance was large, the reaction times were independent of the number of items, indicating a parallel strategy. In Experiment 2, blindfolded participants pressed their hand on a display filled with hard and soft items. In the search for a soft target, increasing reaction times with the number of items were found, but the location of target and distractors appeared to have a large influence on the search difficulty. In the search for a hard target, reaction times did not depend on the number of items. In sum, this showed that both hardness and softness are salient features.

  7. Novel hard compositions and methods of preparation

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, Haskell

    1983-08-23

    Novel very hard compositions of matter are prepared by using in all embodiments only a minor amount of a particular carbide (or materials which can form the carbide in situ when subjected to heat and pressure); and no strategic cobalt is needed. Under a particular range of conditions, densified compositions of matter of the invention are prepared having hardnesses on the Rockwell A test substantially equal to the hardness of pure tungsten carbide and to two of the hardest commercial cobalt-bonded tungsten carbides. Alternately, other compositions of the invention which have slightly lower hardnesses than those described above in one embodiment also possess the advantage of requiring no tungsten and in another embodiment possess the advantage of having a good fracture toughness value. Photomicrographs show that the shapes of the grains of the alloy mixture with which the minor amount of carbide (or carbide-formers) is mixed are radically altered from large, rounded to small, very angular by the addition of the carbide. Superiority of one of these hard compositions of matter over cobalt-bonded tungsten carbide for ultra-high pressure anvil applications was demonstrated.

  8. Novel hard compositions and methods of preparation

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, H.

    1983-08-23

    Novel very hard compositions of matter are prepared by using in all embodiments only a minor amount of a particular carbide (or materials which can form the carbide in situ when subjected to heat and pressure); and no strategic cobalt is needed. Under a particular range of conditions, densified compositions of matter of the invention are prepared having hardnesses on the Rockwell A test substantially equal to the hardness of pure tungsten carbide and to two of the hardest commercial cobalt-bonded tungsten carbides. Alternately, other compositions of the invention which have slightly lower hardnesses than those described above in one embodiment also possess the advantage of requiring no tungsten and in another embodiment possess the advantage of having a good fracture toughness value. Photomicrographs show that the shapes of the grains of the alloy mixture with which the minor amount of carbide (or carbide-formers) is mixed are radically altered from large, rounded to small, very angular by the addition of the carbide. Superiority of one of these hard compositions of matter over cobalt-bonded tungsten carbide for ultra-high pressure anvil applications was demonstrated. 3 figs.

  9. Hard QCD rescattering in few nucleon systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maheswari, Dhiraj; Sargsian, Misak

    2017-01-01

    The theoretical framework of hard QCD rescattering mechanism (HRM) is extended to calculate the high energy γ3 He -> pd reaction at 900 center of mass angle. In HRM model , the incoming high energy photon strikes a quark from one of the nucleons in the target which subsequently undergoes hard rescattering with the quarks from the other nucleons generating hard two-body baryonic system in the final state of the reaction. Based on the HRM, a parameter free expression for the differential cross section for the reaction is derived, expressed through the 3 He -> pd transition spectral function, hard pd -> pd elastic scattering cross section and the effective charge of the quarks being interchanged in the hard rescattering process. The numerical estimates obtained from this expression for the differential cross section are in a good agreement with the data recently obtained at the Jefferson Lab experiment, showing the energy scaling of cross section with an exponent of s-17, also consistent with the quark counting rule. The angular and energy dependences of the cross section are also predicted within HRM which are in good agreement with the preliminary data of these distributions. Research is supported by the US Department of Energy.

  10. ACTS mobile SATCOM experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbe, Brian S.; Frye, Robert E.; Jedrey, Thomas C.

    1993-01-01

    Over the last decade, the demand for reliable mobile satellite communications (satcom) for voice, data, and video applications has increased dramatically. As consumer demand grows, the current spectrum allocation at L-band could become saturated. For this reason, NASA and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory are developing the Advanced Communications Technology Satellites (ACTS) mobile terminal (AMT) and are evaluating the feasibility of K/Ka-band (20/30 GHz) mobile satcom to meet these growing needs. U.S. industry and government, acting as co-partners, will evaluate K/Ka-band mobile satcom and develop new technologies by conducting a series of applications-oriented experiments. The ACTS and the AMT testbed will be used to conduct these mobile satcom experiments. The goals of the ACTS Mobile Experiments Program and the individual experiment configurations and objectives are further presented.

  11. Mobile learning in medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serkan Güllüoüǧlu, Sabri

    2013-03-01

    This paper outlines the main infrastructure for implicating mobile learning in medicine and present a sample mobile learning application for medical learning within the framework of mobile learning systems. Mobile technology is developing nowadays. In this case it will be useful to develop different learning environments using these innovations in internet based distance education. M-learning makes the most of being on location, providing immediate access, being connected, and acknowledges learning that occurs beyond formal learning settings, in places such as the workplace, home, and outdoors. Central to m-learning is the principle that it is the learner who is mobile rather than the device used to deliver m learning. The integration of mobile technologies into training has made learning more accessible and portable. Mobile technologies make it possible for a learner to have access to a computer and subsequently learning material and activities; at any time and in any place. Mobile devices can include: mobile phone, personal digital assistants (PDAs), personal digital media players (eg iPods, MP3 players), portable digital media players, portable digital multimedia players. Mobile learning (m-learning) is particularly important in medical education, and the major users of mobile devices are in the field of medicine. The contexts and environment in which learning occurs necessitates m-learning. Medical students are placed in hospital/clinical settings very early in training and require access to course information and to record and reflect on their experiences while on the move. As a result of this paper, this paper strives to compare and contrast mobile learning with normal learning in medicine from various perspectives and give insights and advises into the essential characteristics of both for sustaining medical education.

  12. Mobile computing for radiology.

    PubMed

    Auffermann, William F; Chetlen, Alison L; Sharma, Arjun; Colucci, Andrew T; DeQuesada, Ivan M; Grajo, Joseph R; Kung, Justin W; Loehfelm, Thomas W; Sherry, Steven J

    2013-12-01

    The rapid advances in mobile computing technology have the potential to change the way radiology and medicine as a whole are practiced. Several mobile computing advances have not yet found application to the practice of radiology, while others have already been applied to radiology but are not in widespread clinical use. This review addresses several areas where radiology and medicine in general may benefit from adoption of the latest mobile computing technologies and speculates on potential future applications.

  13. Research in the Hard Sciences, and in Very Hard "Softer" Domains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, D. C.

    2014-01-01

    The author of this commentary argues that physical scientists are attempting to advance knowledge in the so-called hard sciences, whereas education researchers are laboring to increase knowledge and understanding in an "extremely hard" but softer domain. Drawing on the work of Popper and Dewey, this commentary highlights the relative…

  14. Hard Water and Soft Soap: Dependence of Soap Performance on Water Hardness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osorio, Viktoria K. L.; de Oliveira, Wanda; El Seoud, Omar A.; Cotton, Wyatt; Easdon, Jerry

    2005-01-01

    The demonstration of the performance of soap in different aqueous solutions, which is due to water hardness and soap formulation, is described. The demonstrations use safe, inexpensive reagents and simple glassware and equipment, introduce important everyday topics, stimulates the students to consider the wider consequences of water hardness and…

  15. "We Can Get Everything We Want if We Try Hard": Young People, Celebrity, Hard Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendick, Heather; Allen, Kim; Harvey, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Drawing on 24 group interviews on celebrity with 148 students aged 14-17 across six schools, we show that "hard work" is valued by young people in England. We argue that we should not simply celebrate this investment in hard work. While it opens up successful subjectivities to previously excluded groups, it reproduces neoliberal…

  16. Exploring the mobility of mobile phone users

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csáji, Balázs Cs.; Browet, Arnaud; Traag, V. A.; Delvenne, Jean-Charles; Huens, Etienne; Van Dooren, Paul; Smoreda, Zbigniew; Blondel, Vincent D.

    2013-03-01

    Mobile phone datasets allow for the analysis of human behavior on an unprecedented scale. The social network, temporal dynamics and mobile behavior of mobile phone users have often been analyzed independently from each other using mobile phone datasets. In this article, we explore the connections between various features of human behavior extracted from a large mobile phone dataset. Our observations are based on the analysis of communication data of 100,000 anonymized and randomly chosen individuals in a dataset of communications in Portugal. We show that clustering and principal component analysis allow for a significant dimension reduction with limited loss of information. The most important features are related to geographical location. In particular, we observe that most people spend most of their time at only a few locations. With the help of clustering methods, we then robustly identify home and office locations and compare the results with official census data. Finally, we analyze the geographic spread of users’ frequent locations and show that commuting distances can be reasonably well explained by a gravity model.

  17. Saltwater and hard water bentonite mud

    SciTech Connect

    Pabley, A. S.

    1985-02-19

    A seawater/saltwater or hard water bentonite mud for use in drilling, and process for preparing same, comprising sequentially adding to seawater, to saltwater of a chloride concentration up to saturation, or hard water: a caustic agent; a filtration control agent; and bentonite. The resultant drilling mud meets API standards for viscosity and water loss, and is stable after aging and at tempertures in excess of 100/sup 0/ c. In another embodiment, the additives are premixed as dry ingredients and hydrated with seawater, saltwater or hard water. Unlike other bentonite drilling muds, the muds of this invention require no fresh water in their preparation, which makes them particularly useful at off-shore and remote on-shore drilling locations. The muds of this invention using bentonite further require less clay than known saltwater muds made with attapulgite, and provides superior filtration control, viscosity and stability.

  18. Erosion testing of hard materials and coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Hawk, Jeffrey A.

    2005-04-29

    Erosion is the process by which unconstrained particles, usually hard, impact a surface, creating damage that leads to material removal and component failure. These particles are usually very small and entrained in fluid of some type, typically air. The damage that occurs as a result of erosion depends on the size of the particles, their physical characteristics, the velocity of the particle/fluid stream, and their angle of impact on the surface of interest. This talk will discuss the basics of jet erosion testing of hard materials, composites and coatings. The standard test methods will be discussed as well as alternative approaches to determining the erosion rate of materials. The damage that occurs will be characterized in genera1 terms, and examples will be presented for the erosion behavior of hard materials and coatings (both thick and thin).

  19. Potential Health Impacts of Hard Water

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Pallav

    2013-01-01

    In the past five decades or so evidence has been accumulating about an environmental factor, which appears to be influencing mortality, in particular, cardiovascular mortality, and this is the hardness of the drinking water. In addition, several epidemiological investigations have demonstrated the relation between risk for cardiovascular disease, growth retardation, reproductive failure, and other health problems and hardness of drinking water or its content of magnesium and calcium. In addition, the acidity of the water influences the reabsorption of calcium and magnesium in the renal tubule. Not only, calcium and magnesium, but other constituents also affect different health aspects. Thus, the present review attempts to explore the health effects of hard water and its constituents. PMID:24049611

  20. Hard template synthesis of metal nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, Go; Muto, Hiroyuki; Matsuda, Atsunori

    2014-01-01

    Metal nanowires (NWs) have attracted much attention because of their high electron conductivity, optical transmittance, and tunable magnetic properties. Metal NWs have been synthesized using soft templates such as surface stabilizing molecules and polymers, and hard templates such as anodic aluminum oxide, mesoporous oxide, carbon nanotubes. NWs prepared from hard templates are composites of metals and the oxide/carbon matrix. Thus, selecting appropriate elements can simplify the production of composite devices. The resulting NWs are immobilized and spatially arranged, as dictated by the ordered porous structure of the template. This avoids the NWs from aggregating, which is common for NWs prepared with soft templates in solution. Herein, the hard template synthesis of metal NWs is reviewed, and the resulting structures, properties and potential applications are discussed. PMID:25453031

  1. Doctors going mobile.

    PubMed

    Romano, Ron; Baum, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Having a Web page and a blog site are the minimum requirements for an Internet presence in the new millennium. However, a Web page that loads on a personal computer or a laptop will be ineffective on a mobile or cellular phone. Today, with more existing and potential patients having access to cellular technology, it is necessary to reconfigure the appearance of your Web site that appears on a mobile phone. This article discusses mobile computing and suggestions for improving the appearance of your Web site on a mobile or cellular phone.

  2. Observational Aspects of Hard X-ray Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, Tanmoy

    2016-04-01

    retrieving polarization information from few of such spectroscopic instruments like RHESSI, INTEGRAL-IBIS, INTEGRAL-SPI. Cadmium Zinc Telluride Imager (CZTI) onboard Astrosat, India's first astronomical mission, is one of such instruments which is expected to provide sensitive polarization measurements for bright X-ray sources. CZTI consists of 64 CZT detector modules, each of which is 5 mm thick and 4 cm × 4 cm in size. Each CZT module is subdivided into 256 pixels with pixel pitch of 2.5 mm. Due to its pixelation nature and significant Compton scattering efficiency at energies beyond 100 keV, CZTI can work as a sensitive Compton polarimeter in hard X-rays. Detailed Geant-4 simulations and polarization experiments with the flight configuration of CZTI show that CZTI will have significant polarization measurement capability for bright sources in hard X-rays. CZTI is primarily a spectroscopic instrument with coded mask imaging. To properly utilize the spectroscopic capabilities of CZT detectors, it is important to generate accurate response matrix for CZTI, which in turn requires precise modelling of the CZT lines shapes for monoenergetic X-ray interaction. CZT detectors show an extended lower energy tail of an otherwise Gaussian line shape due to low mobility and lifetime of the charge carriers. On the other hand, interpixel charge sharing may also contribute to the lower energy tail making the line shape more complicated. We have developed a model to predict the line shapes from CZTI modules taking into account the mobility and lifetime of the charge carriers and charge sharing fractions. The model predicts the line shape quite well and can be used to generate pixel-wise response matrix for CZTI.

  3. Photocopy of drawing. MODIFICATIONS TO CONVERT ML NO. 3 TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of drawing. MODIFICATIONS TO CONVERT ML NO. 3 TO MOBILE LAUNCHER PLATFORM NO. 1. NASA, John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Drawing 79K04401, Reynolds, Smith and Hills, March, 1975. ISOMETRIC: EXISTING ML NO. 3 LAUNCHER. Sheet A1 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Mobile Launcher Platforms, Launcher Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  4. Hard-Core Unemployment: A Selected, Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cameron, Colin, Comp.; Menon, Anila Bhatt, Comp.

    This annotated bibliography contains references to various films, articles, and books on the subject of hard-core unemployment, and is divided into the following sections: (1) The Sociology of the Hard-Core Milieu, (2) Training Programs, (3) Business and the Hard-Core, (4) Citations of Miscellaneous References on Hard-Core Unemployment, (5)…

  5. Flexibility of hard gas permeable contact lenses.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, R W

    1988-11-01

    Gas permeable (GP) lenses can flex on some eyes producing unpredictable clinical results. A method of measuring the flexibility of hard GP materials has been developed and shown to be repeatable. Materials in the form of flats rather than lenses were used. Differences between materials were found and in general a linear relation was shown to exist between maximum flexing and quoted oxygen permeability (r = 0.78, p less than 0.05). It is recommended that flexibility be measured and reported in the data presented with all new GP polymers. The term "hard" rather than "rigid" in describing GP lenses is suggested.

  6. Novel Aspects of Hard Diffraction in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC

    2005-12-14

    Initial- and final-state interactions from gluon-exchange, normally neglected in the parton model have a profound effect in QCD hard-scattering reactions, leading to leading-twist single-spin asymmetries, diffractive deep inelastic scattering, diffractive hard hadronic reactions, and nuclear shadowing and antishadowing--leading-twist physics not incorporated in the light-front wavefunctions of the target computed in isolation. I also discuss the use of diffraction to materialize the Fock states of a hadronic projectile and test QCD color transparency.

  7. Advances in data representation for hard/soft information fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimland, Jeffrey C.; Coughlin, Dan; Hall, David L.; Graham, Jacob L.

    2012-06-01

    Information fusion is becoming increasingly human-centric. While past systems typically relegated humans to the role of analyzing a finished fusion product, current systems are exploring the role of humans as integral elements in a modular and extensible distributed framework where many tasks can be accomplished by either human or machine performers. For example, "participatory sensing" campaigns give humans the role of "soft sensors" by uploading their direct observations or as "soft sensor platforms" by using mobile devices to record human-annotated, GPS-encoded high quality photographs, video, or audio. Additionally, the role of "human-in-the-loop", in which individuals or teams using advanced human computer interface (HCI) tools such as stereoscopic 3D visualization, haptic interfaces, or aural "sonification" interfaces can help to effectively engage the innate human capability to perform pattern matching, anomaly identification, and semantic-based contextual reasoning to interpret an evolving situation. The Pennsylvania State University is participating in a Multi-disciplinary University Research Initiative (MURI) program funded by the U.S. Army Research Office to investigate fusion of hard and soft data in counterinsurgency (COIN) situations. In addition to the importance of this research for Intelligence Preparation of the Battlefield (IPB), many of the same challenges and techniques apply to health and medical informatics, crisis management, crowd-sourced "citizen science", and monitoring environmental concerns. One of the key challenges that we have encountered is the development of data formats, protocols, and methodologies to establish an information architecture and framework for the effective capture, representation, transmission, and storage of the vastly heterogeneous data and accompanying metadata -- including capabilities and characteristics of human observers, uncertainty of human observations, "soft" contextual data, and information pedigree

  8. van der Waals-Tonks-type equations of state for hard-disk and hard-sphere fluids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xian Zhi

    2002-09-01

    Using the known virial coefficients of hard-disk and hard-sphere fluids, we develop van der Waals-Tonks-type equations of state for hard-disk and hard-sphere fluids. In the low-density fluid regime, these equations of state are in good agreement with the simulation results and the existing equations of state.

  9. Judging hardness of an object from the sounds of tapping created by a white cane.

    PubMed

    Nunokawa, K; Seki, Y; Ino, S; Doi, K

    2014-01-01

    The white cane plays a vital role in the independent mobility support of the visually impaired. Allowing the recognition of target attributes through the contact of a white cane is an important function. We have conducted research to obtain fundamental knowledge concerning the exploration methods used to perceive the hardness of an object through contact with a white cane. This research has allowed us to examine methods that enhance accuracy in the perception of objects as well as the materials and structures of a white cane. Previous research suggest considering the roles of both auditory and tactile information from the white cane in determining objects' hardness is necessary. This experimental study examined the ability of people to perceive the hardness of an object solely through the tapping sounds of a white cane (i.e., auditory information) using a method of magnitude estimation. Two types of sounds were used to estimate hardness: 1) the playback of recorded tapping sounds and 2) the sounds produced on-site by tapping. Three types of handgrips were used to create different sounds of tapping on an object with a cane. The participants of this experiment were five sighted university students wearing eye masks and two totally blind students who walk independently with a white cane. The results showed that both sighted university students and totally blind participants were able to accurately judge the hardness of an object solely by using auditory information from a white cane. For the blind participants, different handgrips significantly influenced the accuracy of their estimation of an object's hardness.

  10. Lock-and-key dimerization in dense Brownian systems of hard annular sector particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodson, Wade D.; Mason, Thomas G.

    2016-08-01

    We develop a translational-rotational cage model that describes the behavior of dense two-dimensional (2D) Brownian systems of hard annular sector particles (ASPs), resembling C shapes. At high particle densities, pairs of ASPs can form mutually interdigitating lock-and-key dimers. This cage model considers either one or two mobile central ASPs which can translate and rotate within a static cage of surrounding ASPs that mimics the system's average local structure and density. By comparing with recent measurements made on dispersions of microscale lithographic ASPs [P. Y. Wang and T. G. Mason, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 137, 15308 (2015), 10.1021/jacs.5b10549], we show that mobile two-particle predictions of the probability of dimerization Pdimer, equilibrium constant K , and 2D osmotic pressure Π2 D as a function of the particle area fraction ϕA correspond closely to these experiments. By contrast, predictions based on only a single mobile particle do not agree well with either the two-particle predictions or the experimental data. Thus, we show that collective entropy can play an essential role in the behavior of dense Brownian systems composed of nontrivial hard shapes, such as ASPs.

  11. Mobile Goes Mainstream

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisele-Dyrli, Kurt

    2011-01-01

    Mobile learning--the use of mobile devices for educational purposes by students--is rapidly moving from an experimental initiative by a few innovative districts over the last five years to a broadly accepted concept in K12. The latest research and surveys, results of pilot programs, and analysis of trends in both public education and the broader…

  12. Mobile Christian - shuttle flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Erin Whittle, 14, (seated) and Brianna Johnson, 14, look on as Louis Stork, 13, attempts a simulated landing of a space shuttle at StenniSphere. The young people were part of a group from Mobile Christian School in Mobile, Ala., that visited StenniSphere on April 21.

  13. Mobile Learning Anytime, Anywhere

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hlodan, Oksana

    2010-01-01

    Some educational institutions are taking the leap to mobile learning (m-learning) by giving out free iPods. For example, Abilene Christian University gave iPods or iPhones to freshman students and developed 15 Web applications specifically for the mobile devices. The iPod is not the only ubiquitous m-learning device. Any technology that connects…

  14. Increasing mobile radiography productivity.

    PubMed

    Wong, Edward; Lung, Ngan Tsz; Ng, Kris; Jeor, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Mobile radiography using computed radiography (CR) cassettes is a common equipment combination with a workflow bottleneck limited by location of CR readers. Advent of direct digital radiography (DDR) mobile x-ray machines removes this limitation by immediate image review and quality control. Through the use of key performance indicators (KPIs), the increase in efficiency can be quantified.

  15. Mastering Mobile Security

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panettieri, Joseph C.

    2007-01-01

    Without proper security, mobile devices are easy targets for worms, viruses, and so-called robot ("bot") networks. Hackers increasingly use bot networks to launch massive attacks against eCommerce websites--potentially targeting one's online tuition payment or fundraising/financial development systems. How can one defend his mobile systems against…

  16. Mobility Test Article (MTA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    A concept of a possible Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) built for NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). This Mobility Test Article (MTA) is one of many that provided data contributing to the design of the LRV, developed under the direction of MSFC. The LRV was designed to allow Apollo astronauts a greater range of mobility during lunar exploration missions.

  17. Mobile Apps for Librarians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Power, June L.

    2013-01-01

    In an increasing mobile environment, library and reading-related activities often take place on a phone or tablet device. Not only does this mean that library Web sites must keep mobile navigability in mind, but also develop and utilize apps that allow patrons to interact with information and with libraries. While apps do not serve every purpose,…

  18. ACTS Mobile Terminals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbe, Brian S.; Agan, Martin J.; Jedrey, Thomas C.

    1997-01-01

    The development of the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Mobile Terminal (AMT) and its follow-on, the Broadband Aeronautical Terminal (BAT), have provided an excellent testbed for the evaluation of K- and Ka-band mobile satellite communications systems. An overview of both of these terminals is presented in this paper.

  19. Remember Hard But Think Softly: Metaphorical Effects of Hardness/Softness on Cognitive Functions.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jiushu; Lu, Zhi; Wang, Ruiming; Cai, Zhenguang G

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have found that bodily stimulation, such as hardness biases social judgment and evaluation via metaphorical association; however, it remains unclear whether bodily stimulation also affects cognitive functions, such as memory and creativity. The current study used metaphorical associations between "hard" and "rigid" and between "soft" and "flexible" in Chinese, to investigate whether the experience of hardness affects cognitive functions whose performance depends prospectively on rigidity (memory) and flexibility (creativity). In Experiment 1, we found that Chinese-speaking participants performed better at recalling previously memorized words while sitting on a hard-surface stool (the hard condition) than a cushioned one (the soft condition). In Experiment 2, participants sitting on a cushioned stool outperformed those sitting on a hard-surface stool on a Chinese riddle task, which required creative/flexible thinking, but not on an analogical reasoning task, which required both rigid and flexible thinking. The results suggest the hardness experience affects cognitive functions that are metaphorically associated with rigidity or flexibility. They support the embodiment proposition that cognitive functions and representations can be grounded in bodily states via metaphorical associations.

  20. Sustaining Transformation: "Resiliency in Hard Times"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guarasci, Richard; Lieberman, Devorah

    2009-01-01

    The strategic, systemic, and encompassing evolution of a college or university spans a number of years, and the vagaries of economic cycles inevitably catch transforming institutions in mid-voyage. "Sustaining Transformation: Resiliency in Hard Times" presents a study of Wagner College as it moves into its second decade of purposeful…

  1. Hard error generation by thermal neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Browning, J.S.; Gover, J.E.; Wrobel, T.F.; Hass, K.J.; Nasby, R.D.; Simpson, R.L.; Posey, L.D.; Block, R.C.

    1987-01-01

    The generation of hard errors in MNOS dielectric structures has been observed at thermal neutron fluence levels of 3.6 x 10/sup 13/ n/cm/sup 2/. Fission fragments from neutron induced fission of /sup 235/U contamination in ceramic lids have been shown to be responsible.

  2. Registration of 'Advance' Hard Red Spring Wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Grower and end-user acceptance of new hard red spring wheat (HRSW; Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars is largely contingent on satisfactory agronomic performance, end-use quality potential, and disease resistance levels. Additional characteristics, such as desirable plant height, can also help to maxi...

  3. Radiation-Hardness Data For Semiconductor Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, W. E.; Nichols, D. K.; Brown, S. F.; Gauthier, M. K.; Martin, K. E.

    1984-01-01

    Document presents data on and analysis of radiation hardness of various semiconductor devices. Data specifies total-dose radiation tolerance of devices. Volume 1 of report covers diodes, bipolar transistors, field effect transistors, silicon controlled rectifiers and optical devices. Volume 2 covers integrated circuits. Volume 3 provides detailed analysis of data in volumes 1 and 2.

  4. Carry Hard ICBM basing: A technical assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, J.R.; Schaffer, A.B.; Speed, R.; Todaro, A.F.

    1989-11-15

    Carry Hard is a deceptive, multiple-aimpoint ICBM basing concept in which hardened, encapsulated missiles are shuttled among several thousand, low-cost, water-filled vertical shelters. Since most of the essential launch and operational support equipment is carried with the missile (not provided with each shelter), the overall system costs are reduced. High system hardness permits relatively close shelter spacing, which in turn allows Carry Hard to be deployed on a comparatively small piece of land (a few hundred square miles) that could be removed from public access. Controlled access to the deployment area helps in maintaining concealment of the missiles among the shelters. If concealment is successfully maintained, the system is believed to be survivable against plausible Soviet threats, regardless of whether attack-warning information is received or acted upon. Thus, Carry Hard holds high promise as a feasible, affordable, and survivable means of ICBM deployment, and a high priority should be given to developing the concept to the point that an informed decision on full-scale engineering development can be made. 33 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Registration of 'Prevail' hard red spring wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Grower and end-user acceptance of new Hard Red Spring Wheat (HRSW; Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars is largely contingent upon satisfactory agronomic performance, end-use quality potential, and disease resistance levels. Additional characteristics, such as desirable plant height, can also contribute...

  6. Parallel Narrative Structure in Paul Harding's "Tinkers"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Çirakli, Mustafa Zeki

    2014-01-01

    The present paper explores the implications of parallel narrative structure in Paul Harding's "Tinkers" (2009). Besides primarily recounting the two sets of parallel narratives, "Tinkers" also comprises of seemingly unrelated fragments such as excerpts from clock repair manuals and diaries. The main stories, however, told…

  7. Hard Times: Philosophy and the Fundamentalist Imagination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allsup, Randall Everett

    2005-01-01

    A close reading of Gradgrind's opening monologue of Hard Times by Charles Dickens will provide the starting off point for an examination of the role and place of philosophy in the music curriculum. The Gradgrind philosophy finds easy parallel to current thinking in American education. In the fundamentalist imagination, sources of ambiguity must be…

  8. Skylab mobile laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Primeaux, G. R.; Larue, M. A.

    1975-01-01

    The Skylab mobile laboratory was designed to provide the capability to obtain necessary data on the Skylab crewmen 30 days before lift-off, within 1 hour after recovery, and until preflight physiological baselines were reattained. The mobile laboratory complex consisted of six laboratories that supported cardiovascular, metabolic, nutrition and endocrinology, operational medicine, blood, and microbiology experiments; a utility package; and two shipping containers. The objectives and equipment requirements of the Skylab mobile laboratory and the data acquisition systems are discussed along with processes such as permanently mounting equipment in the individual laboratories and methods of testing and transporting the units. The operational performance, in terms of amounts of data collected, and the concept of mobile laboratories for medical and scientific experiments are evaluated. The Skylab mobile laboratory succeeded in facilitating the data collection and sample preservation associated with the three Skylab manned flights.

  9. The French Space Operation Act: Scope and Main Features. Introduction to the Technical Regulation Considerations about the Implementation in the Launcher Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahuzac, Francois

    2010-09-01

    This publication provides a presentation of the new French Space Operation Act(hereafter FSOA). The main objectives of FSOA are to institute a clarified legal regime for launch operations. The technical regulation associated to the act is set forth, in particular for the safety of persons and property, the protection of public health and the environment. First, we give an overview of the institutional and legal framework implemented in accordance with the act. The general purpose of this French Space Operation Act(hereafter FSOA) is to set up a coherent national regime of authorization and control of Space operations under the French jurisdiction or for which the French Government bears international liability either under UN Treaties principles(namely the 1967 Outer Space Treaty, the 1972 Liability Convention and the 1976 Registration Convention) or in accordance with its European commitments with the ESA organization and its Members States. For a given space operation, the operator must show that systems and procedures that he intends to implement are compliant with the technical regulation. The regime of authorization leads to a request of authorization for each launch operation. Thus, licences concerning operator management organization or a given space system can be obtained. These licences help to simplify the authorization file required for a given space operation. The technical regulation is presented in another article, and will be issued in 2010 by the French Minister in charge of space activities. A brief description of the organization associated to the implementation of the authorization regime in the launcher field is presented.

  10. Gone Mobile? (Mobile Libraries Survey 2010)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Lisa Carlucci

    2010-01-01

    Librarians, like patrons and researchers, are caught between traditional library service models and the promise of evolving information technologies. In recent years, professional conferences have strategically featured programs and presentations geared toward building a mobile agenda and adapting or adopting services to meet new demands of mobile…

  11. Water resources of the Mobile area, Alabama, with a section on salinity of the Mobile River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, W.H.; Powell, William J.; Brown, Eugene; Corps of Engineers, U.S. Army

    1956-01-01

    Water is an abundant resource of the Mobile area. The Mobile River has an estimated average flow of 60, 000 cubic feet per second (cfs), or about 39,000 million gallons per day (mgd). It is the largest single source of water. Water is available in substantial quantities from the many local streams and extensive water-bearing formations almost anywhere in the area. Surface water is low in dissolved mineral matter and is extremely soft. Salt water moving up the Mobile River from Mobile Bay during periods of low river flow, however, limits the use of that stream as a source of supply. The principal water-bearing formations are the alluvium and sediments of Miocene age. The Miocene strata dip toward the southwest, forming an artesian basin in the downtown area of Mobile. Small groundwater supplies can be developed practically everywhere, and supplies for industrial or other large-scale uses are available north of Mobile. The average use of water from all sources in the area during 1954 was about 356 mgd, of which about 20 mgd was used for domestic supplies and 336 mgd was used by industry. An estimated 42 mgd of ground water is used in the Mobile area. The discharge from wells used by industry ranges from 10 to 1,500 gallons per minute (gpm}, and the specific capacity of the large-capacity wells ranges from less than 6 to about 6 3 gpm per foot of drawdown. Concentrated pumping in the downtown area of Mobile between 1941 and 1945 resulted in encroachment of salt water from the Mobile River into the alluvium. Because of a decrease in pumping in that vicinity, the sodium chloride content of the water has decreased substantially since 1945. The quality of ground water is variable. Hardness of waters sampled ranged from 1 to 2, 190 parts per million (ppm}, the dissolved solids from 27 to 13, 000 ppm, and the chloride from 2.2 to 6,760 ppm. The water of best quality occurs between McIntosh and Prichard, and the water of poorest quality occurs in the downtown area of Mobile

  12. Stochastic interactions of two Brownian hard spheres in the presence of depletants.

    PubMed

    Karzar-Jeddi, Mehdi; Tuinier, Remco; Taniguchi, Takashi; Fan, Tai-Hsi

    2014-06-07

    A quantitative analysis is presented for the stochastic interactions of a pair of Brownian hard spheres in non-adsorbing polymer solutions. The hard spheres are hypothetically trapped by optical tweezers and allowed for random motion near the trapped positions. The investigation focuses on the long-time correlated Brownian motion. The mobility tensor altered by the polymer depletion effect is computed by the boundary integral method, and the corresponding random displacement is determined by the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. From our computations it follows that the presence of depletion layers around the hard spheres has a significant effect on the hydrodynamic interactions and particle dynamics as compared to pure solvent and uniform polymer solution cases. The probability distribution functions of random walks of the two interacting hard spheres that are trapped clearly shift due to the polymer depletion effect. The results show that the reduction of the viscosity in the depletion layers around the spheres and the entropic force due to the overlapping of depletion zones have a significant influence on the correlated Brownian interactions.

  13. Stochastic interactions of two Brownian hard spheres in the presence of depletants

    SciTech Connect

    Karzar-Jeddi, Mehdi; Fan, Tai-Hsi; Tuinier, Remco; Taniguchi, Takashi

    2014-06-07

    A quantitative analysis is presented for the stochastic interactions of a pair of Brownian hard spheres in non-adsorbing polymer solutions. The hard spheres are hypothetically trapped by optical tweezers and allowed for random motion near the trapped positions. The investigation focuses on the long-time correlated Brownian motion. The mobility tensor altered by the polymer depletion effect is computed by the boundary integral method, and the corresponding random displacement is determined by the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. From our computations it follows that the presence of depletion layers around the hard spheres has a significant effect on the hydrodynamic interactions and particle dynamics as compared to pure solvent and uniform polymer solution cases. The probability distribution functions of random walks of the two interacting hard spheres that are trapped clearly shift due to the polymer depletion effect. The results show that the reduction of the viscosity in the depletion layers around the spheres and the entropic force due to the overlapping of depletion zones have a significant influence on the correlated Brownian interactions.

  14. Hard rectangles near curved hard walls: Tuning the sign of the Tolman length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitta, Christoph E.; Smallenburg, Frank; Wittkowski, Raphael; Löwen, Hartmut

    2016-11-01

    Combining analytic calculations, computer simulations, and classical density functional theory we determine the interfacial tension of orientable two-dimensional hard rectangles near a curved hard wall. Both a circular cavity holding the particles and a hard circular obstacle surrounded by particles are considered. We focus on moderate bulk densities (corresponding to area fractions up to 50%) where the bulk phase is isotropic and vary the aspect ratio of the rectangles and the curvature of the wall. The Tolman length, which gives the leading curvature correction of the interfacial tension, is found to change sign at a finite density, which can be tuned via the aspect ratio of the rectangles.

  15. Hardnesses of metal parts and constructions measured for comparison by small hardness testers with different principles of operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matyunin, V. M.; Karimbekov, M. A.; Marchenkov, A. Yu.; Demidov, A. N.

    2016-12-01

    The existing handheld and portable hardness testers are classified depending on their operating principles. The advantages and disadvantages of the measurement procedures and the hardness testers are considered. The hardnesses of the metal parts with different masses and stiffness are measured by mechanical and physical-mechanical hardness testers and compared. The test errors are estimated. Recommendations for the calibration of the hardness testers of physical and mechanical operating principles are given.

  16. Double biprism arrays design using for stereo-photography of mobile phone camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wen-Shing; Chu, Pu-Yi; Chao, Yu-Hao; Pan, Jui-Wen; Tien, Chuen-Lin

    2016-11-01

    Generally, mobile phone use one camera to catch the image, and it is hard to get stereo image pair. Adding a biprism array can help that get the image pair easily. So users can use their mobile phone to catch the stereo image anywhere by adding a biprism array, and if they want to get a normal image just remove it. Using biprism arrays will induce chromatic aberration. Therefore, we design a double biprism arrays to reduce chromatic aberration.

  17. Interfacial phenomena in hard-rod fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shundyak, K. Y.

    2004-05-01

    This thesis addresses questions of interfacial ordering in hard-rod fluids at coexistence of the isotropic and nematic phases and in their contact with simple model substrates. It is organized as follows. Chapter II provides some background information about the relation between the statistical mechanical and thermodynamical level of descriptions of bulk hard-rod fluids, as well as introduces the asymptotically exact Onsager model, and some basic facts of interfacial thermodynamics. Chapter III represents studies of the simplest free IN interface in a fluid of monodisperse Onsager hard rods. For the analysis of this system we develop an efficient perturbative method to determine the (biaxial) one-particle distribution function in inhomogeneous systems. Studies of the free planar isotropic-nematic interfaces are continued in Chapter IV, where they are considered in binary mixtures of hard rods. For sufficiently different particle shapes the bulk phase diagrams of these mixtures exhibit a triple point, where an isotropic (I) phase coexists with two nematic phases (N1 and N2) of different composition. For all explored mixtures we find that upon approach of the triple point the IN2 interface shows complete wetting by an intervening N1 film. We compute the surface tension of isotropic-nematic interfaces, and find a remarkable increase with fractionation. These studies are complemented by an analysis of bulk phase behavior and interfacial properties of nonadditive binary mixtures of thin and thick hard rods in Chapter V. The formulation of this model was motivated by recent experiments in the group of Fraden, who explored the phase behavior of a mixture of viruses with different effective diameters. In our model, species of the same types are considered as interacting with the hard-core repulsive potential, whereas the excluded volume for dissimilar rods is taken to be larger (smaller) then for the pure hard rods. Such a nonadditivity enhances (reduces) fractionation at

  18. Limits of social mobilization

    PubMed Central

    Rutherford, Alex; Cebrian, Manuel; Dsouza, Sohan; Moro, Esteban; Pentland, Alex; Rahwan, Iyad

    2013-01-01

    The Internet and social media have enabled the mobilization of large crowds to achieve time-critical feats, ranging from mapping crises in real time, to organizing mass rallies, to conducting search-and-rescue operations over large geographies. Despite significant success, selection bias may lead to inflated expectations of the efficacy of social mobilization for these tasks. What are the limits of social mobilization, and how reliable is it in operating at these limits? We build on recent results on the spatiotemporal structure of social and information networks to elucidate the constraints they pose on social mobilization. We use the DARPA Network Challenge as our working scenario, in which social media were used to locate 10 balloons across the United States. We conduct high-resolution simulations for referral-based crowdsourcing and obtain a statistical characterization of the population recruited, geography covered, and time to completion. Our results demonstrate that the outcome is plausible without the presence of mass media but lies at the limit of what time-critical social mobilization can achieve. Success relies critically on highly connected individuals willing to mobilize people in distant locations, overcoming the local trapping of diffusion in highly dense areas. However, even under these highly favorable conditions, the risk of unsuccessful search remains significant. These findings have implications for the design of better incentive schemes for social mobilization. They also call for caution in estimating the reliability of this capability. PMID:23576719

  19. Mobile Sensing Systems

    PubMed Central

    Macias, Elsa; Suarez, Alvaro; Lloret, Jaime

    2013-01-01

    Rich-sensor smart phones have made possible the recent birth of the mobile sensing research area as part of ubiquitous sensing which integrates other areas such as wireless sensor networks and web sensing. There are several types of mobile sensing: individual, participatory, opportunistic, crowd, social, etc. The object of sensing can be people-centered or environment-centered. The sensing domain can be home, urban, vehicular… Currently there are barriers that limit the social acceptance of mobile sensing systems. Examples of social barriers are privacy concerns, restrictive laws in some countries and the absence of economic incentives that might encourage people to participate in a sensing campaign. Several technical barriers are phone energy savings and the variety of sensors and software for their management. Some existing surveys partially tackle the topic of mobile sensing systems. Published papers theoretically or partially solve the above barriers. We complete the above surveys with new works, review the barriers of mobile sensing systems and propose some ideas for efficiently implementing sensing, fusion, learning, security, privacy and energy saving for any type of mobile sensing system, and propose several realistic research challenges. The main objective is to reduce the learning curve in mobile sensing systems where the complexity is very high. PMID:24351637

  20. Mobile sensing systems.

    PubMed

    Macias, Elsa; Suarez, Alvaro; Lloret, Jaime

    2013-12-16

    Rich-sensor smart phones have made possible the recent birth of the mobile sensing research area as part of ubiquitous sensing which integrates other areas such as wireless sensor networks and web sensing. There are several types of mobile sensing: individual, participatory, opportunistic, crowd, social, etc. The object of sensing can be people-centered or environment-centered. The sensing domain can be home, urban, vehicular… Currently there are barriers that limit the social acceptance of mobile sensing systems. Examples of social barriers are privacy concerns, restrictive laws in some countries and the absence of economic incentives that might encourage people to participate in a sensing campaign. Several technical barriers are phone energy savings and the variety of sensors and software for their management. Some existing surveys partially tackle the topic of mobile sensing systems. Published papers theoretically or partially solve the above barriers. We complete the above surveys with new works, review the barriers of mobile sensing systems and propose some ideas for efficiently implementing sensing, fusion, learning, security, privacy and energy saving for any type of mobile sensing system, and propose several realistic research challenges. The main objective is to reduce the learning curve in mobile sensing systems where the complexity is very high.

  1. Limits of social mobilization.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, Alex; Cebrian, Manuel; Dsouza, Sohan; Moro, Esteban; Pentland, Alex; Rahwan, Iyad

    2013-04-16

    The Internet and social media have enabled the mobilization of large crowds to achieve time-critical feats, ranging from mapping crises in real time, to organizing mass rallies, to conducting search-and-rescue operations over large geographies. Despite significant success, selection bias may lead to inflated expectations of the efficacy of social mobilization for these tasks. What are the limits of social mobilization, and how reliable is it in operating at these limits? We build on recent results on the spatiotemporal structure of social and information networks to elucidate the constraints they pose on social mobilization. We use the DARPA Network Challenge as our working scenario, in which social media were used to locate 10 balloons across the United States. We conduct high-resolution simulations for referral-based crowdsourcing and obtain a statistical characterization of the population recruited, geography covered, and time to completion. Our results demonstrate that the outcome is plausible without the presence of mass media but lies at the limit of what time-critical social mobilization can achieve. Success relies critically on highly connected individuals willing to mobilize people in distant locations, overcoming the local trapping of diffusion in highly dense areas. However, even under these highly favorable conditions, the risk of unsuccessful search remains significant. These findings have implications for the design of better incentive schemes for social mobilization. They also call for caution in estimating the reliability of this capability.

  2. Perspectives of women with disabilities on reaching those who are hard to reach.

    PubMed

    Smeltzer, Suzanne C; Sharts-Hopko, Nancy C; Ott, Barbara B; Zimmerman, Vanessa; Duffin, Janice

    2007-06-01

    Healthcare needs of women with disabilities are often neglected, even for women who are well connected to the community and to the healthcare system. So-called "hard-to-reach" women, whose degree of disability impedes use of community resources, have even greater difficulty obtaining health care. The purpose of this study was to gain insight into the perceptions of women with mobility and sensory limitations about several healthcare issues that may affect them: barriers to obtaining care, sources of information about health issues, ways to improve access to care, and ways to help hard-to-reach women overcome barriers to health care and health information. Researchers conducted six focus groups, comprising 43 women with limitations of mobility, hearing, or vision. To validate the women's input, researchers conducted two additional focus groups: the first comprised female physicians with special interest in the health care of women with disabilities, and the second included professional administrative staff of agencies that provide services for people with disabilities. In several cases, members of the physician and agency focus groups were themselves women with disabilities. In addition, 16 women with disabilities participated in an online survey; their responses were used to validate the findings of the face-to-face focus groups. Transcribed data were content analyzed and 10 themes identified. Seven of those themes are discussed in this article: communication barriers; lack of knowledge and awareness among healthcare providers; access issues; working the system; system issues; outreach to healthcare providers; and reaching hard-to-reach women. The findings of this study can provide direction to development of more effective outreach to hard-to-reach women with disabilities, resulting in better integration of healthcare services for this population.

  3. Voronoi neighbor statistics of hard-disks and hard-spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, V. Senthil; Kumaran, V.

    2005-08-01

    The neighbor distribution in hard-sphere and hard-disk fluids is analyzed using Voronoi tessellation. The statistical measures analyzed are the nth neighbor coordination number (Cn), the nth neighbor distance distribution [fn(r )], and the distribution of the number of Voronoi faces (Pn). These statistics are sensitive indicators of microstructure, and they distinguish thermodynamic and annealed structures. A sharp rise in the hexagon population marks the onset of hard-disk freezing transition, and Cn decreases sharply to the hexagonal lattice values. In hard-disk random structures the pentagon and heptagon populations remain significant even at high volume fraction. In dense hard-sphere (three-dimensional) structures at the freezing transition, C1 is close to 14, instead of the value of 12 expected for a face-centered-cubic lattice. This is found to be because of a topological instability, where a slight perturbation of the positions in the centers of a pair of particles transforms a vertex in the Voronoi polyhedron into a Voronoi surface. We demonstrate that the pair distribution function and the equation-of-state obtained from Voronoi tessellation are equal to those obtained from thermodynamic calculations. In hard-sphere random structures, the dodecahedron population decreases with increasing density. To demonstrate the utility of the neighbor analysis, we estimate the effective hard-sphere diameter of the Lennard-Jones fluid by identifying the diameter of the spheres in the hard-sphere fluid which has C1 equal to that for the Lennard-Jones fluid. The estimates are within 2% deviation from the theoretical results of Barker-Henderson and Weeks-Chandler-Andersen.

  4. Bond-orientational analysis of hard-disk and hard-sphere structures.

    PubMed

    Senthil Kumar, V; Kumaran, V

    2006-05-28

    We report the bond-orientational analysis results for the thermodynamic, random, and homogeneously sheared inelastic structures of hard-disks and hard-spheres. The thermodynamic structures show a sharp rise in the order across the freezing transition. The random structures show the absence of crystallization. The homogeneously sheared structures get ordered at a packing fraction higher than the thermodynamic freezing packing fraction, due to the suppression of crystal nucleation. On shear ordering, strings of close-packed hard-disks in two dimensions and close-packed layers of hard-spheres in three dimensions, oriented along the velocity direction, slide past each other. Such a flow creates a considerable amount of fourfold order in two dimensions and body-centered-tetragonal (bct) structure in three dimensions. These transitions are the flow analogs of the martensitic transformations occurring in metals due to the stresses induced by a rapid quench. In hard-disk structures, using the bond-orientational analysis we show the presence of fourfold order. In sheared inelastic hard-sphere structures, even though the global bond-orientational analysis shows that the system is highly ordered, a third-order rotational invariant analysis shows that only about 40% of the spheres have face-centered-cubic (fcc) order, even in the dense and near-elastic limits, clearly indicating the coexistence of multiple crystalline orders. When layers of close-packed spheres slide past each other, in addition to the bct structure, the hexagonal-close-packed (hcp) structure is formed due to the random stacking faults. Using the Honeycutt-Andersen pair analysis and an analysis based on the 14-faceted polyhedra having six quadrilateral and eight hexagonal faces, we show the presence of bct and hcp signatures in shear ordered inelastic hard-spheres. Thus, our analysis shows that the dense sheared inelastic hard-spheres have a mixture of fcc, bct, and hcp structures.

  5. Mobile sociology. 2000.

    PubMed

    Urry, John

    2010-01-01

    This article seeks to develop a manifesto for a sociology concerned with the diverse mobilities of peoples, objects, images, information, and wastes; and of the complex interdependencies between, and social consequences of, such diverse mobilities. A number of key concepts relevant for such a sociology are elaborated: 'gamekeeping', networks, fluids, scapes, flows, complexity and iteration. The article concludes by suggesting that a 'global civil society' might constitute the social base of a sociology of mobilities as we move into the twenty-first century.

  6. Land mobile satellite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiesling, John D.

    1990-07-01

    The general advantages and potential operating characteristics of the mobile satellite service (MSS) are described, and distinctions are made between radio telephone, which is interconnected to the public switched telephone network, and private mobile radio systems. Mobile satellite service offers voice, data, position location, and paging services, interconnection to the public switched telephone network, and the possibility of private networks. Performance and cost characteristics are given along with summaries of market needs and market demands. The space and ground systems of the MSS are described.

  7. Further links between the maximum hardness principle and the hard/soft acid/base principle: insights from hard/soft exchange reactions.

    PubMed

    Chattaraj, Pratim K; Ayers, Paul W; Melin, Junia

    2007-08-07

    Ayers, Parr, and Pearson recently showed that insight into the hard/soft acid/base (HSAB) principle could be obtained by analyzing the energy of reactions in hard/soft exchange reactions, i.e., reactions in which a soft acid replaces a hard acid or a soft base replaces a hard base [J. Chem. Phys., 2006, 124, 194107]. We show, in accord with the maximum hardness principle, that the hardness increases for favorable hard/soft exchange reactions and decreases when the HSAB principle indicates that hard/soft exchange reactions are unfavorable. This extends the previous work of the authors, which treated only the "double hard/soft exchange" reaction [P. K. Chattaraj and P. W. Ayers, J. Chem. Phys., 2005, 123, 086101]. We also discuss two different approaches to computing the hardness of molecules from the hardness of the composing fragments, and explain how the results differ. In the present context, it seems that the arithmetic mean of fragment softnesses is the preferable definition.

  8. Hard-on-hard lubrication in the artificial hip under dynamic loading conditions.

    PubMed

    Sonntag, Robert; Reinders, Jörn; Rieger, Johannes S; Heitzmann, Daniel W W; Kretzer, J Philippe

    2013-01-01

    The tribological performance of an artificial hip joint has a particularly strong influence on its success. The principle causes for failure are adverse short- and long-term reactions to wear debris and high frictional torque in the case of poor lubrication that may cause loosening of the implant. Therefore, using experimental and theoretical approaches models have been developed to evaluate lubrication under standardized conditions. A steady-state numerical model has been extended with dynamic experimental data for hard-on-hard bearings used in total hip replacements to verify the tribological relevance of the ISO 14242-1 gait cycle in comparison to experimental data from the Orthoload database and instrumented gait analysis for three additional loading conditions: normal walking, climbing stairs and descending stairs. Ceramic-on-ceramic bearing partners show superior lubrication potential compared to hard-on-hard bearings that work with at least one articulating metal component. Lubrication regimes during the investigated activities are shown to strongly depend on the kinematics and loading conditions. The outcome from the ISO gait is not fully confirmed by the normal walking data and more challenging conditions show evidence of inferior lubrication. These findings may help to explain the differences between the in vitro predictions using the ISO gait cycle and the clinical outcome of some hard-on-hard bearings, e.g., using metal-on-metal.

  9. Remember Hard But Think Softly: Metaphorical Effects of Hardness/Softness on Cognitive Functions

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jiushu; Lu, Zhi; Wang, Ruiming; Cai, Zhenguang G.

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have found that bodily stimulation, such as hardness biases social judgment and evaluation via metaphorical association; however, it remains unclear whether bodily stimulation also affects cognitive functions, such as memory and creativity. The current study used metaphorical associations between “hard” and “rigid” and between “soft” and “flexible” in Chinese, to investigate whether the experience of hardness affects cognitive functions whose performance depends prospectively on rigidity (memory) and flexibility (creativity). In Experiment 1, we found that Chinese-speaking participants performed better at recalling previously memorized words while sitting on a hard-surface stool (the hard condition) than a cushioned one (the soft condition). In Experiment 2, participants sitting on a cushioned stool outperformed those sitting on a hard-surface stool on a Chinese riddle task, which required creative/flexible thinking, but not on an analogical reasoning task, which required both rigid and flexible thinking. The results suggest the hardness experience affects cognitive functions that are metaphorically associated with rigidity or flexibility. They support the embodiment proposition that cognitive functions and representations can be grounded in bodily states via metaphorical associations. PMID:27672373

  10. Is hyper-hardness more chemically relevant than expected?

    PubMed

    Morell, Christophe; Grand, André; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro; Chermette, Henry

    2013-07-01

    In this work, the third derivative of the energy with respect to the number of electrons, the so-called hyper-hardness, is investigated to assess whether this quantity has a chemical meaning. To achieve this goal a new working expression for hyper-hardness is developed and analyzed. It transpired from this analysis that hyper-hardness, just like hardness, can measure the reactivity or the stability of electron systems. Interestingly, positive values of hyper-hardness point to quite stable species such as noble gases and molecules. On the other hand, radicals almost always display large negative values of hyper-hardness.

  11. Nature of the breakdown in the Stokes-Einstein relationship in a hard sphere fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sanat K.; Szamel, Grzegorz; Douglas, Jack F.

    2006-06-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of high density hard sphere fluids clearly show a breakdown of the Stokes-Einstein equation (SE). This result has been conjectured to be due to the presence of mobile particles, i.e., ones which have the propensity to "hop" distances that are integer multiples of the interparticle distance. We conclusively show that the sedentary particles, i.e., ones complementary to the "hoppers," obey the SE relationship to a good approximation, even though the fluid as a whole violates the SE equation at high densities. These results support the notion that the unusual diffusive behavior of supercooled liquids is dominated by the hopping particles.

  12. Fixed target electroweak and hard scattering physics

    SciTech Connect

    Brock, R. ); Brown, C.N.; Montgomery, H.E. ); Corcoran, M.D. )

    1990-02-01

    The possibilities for future physics and experiments involving weak and electromagnetic interactions, neutrino oscillations, general hard scattering and experiments involving nuclear targets were explored. The studies were limited to the physics accessible using fixed target experimentation. While some of the avenues explored turn out to be relatively unrewarding in the light of competition elsewhere in the world, there are a number of positive conclusions reached about experimentation in the energy range available to the Main Injector and Tevatron. Some of the experiments would benefit from the increased intensity available from the Tevatron utilizing the Main Injector, while some require this increase. Finally, some of the experiments would use the Main Injector low energy, high intensity extracted beams directly. A program of electroweak and hard scattering experiments at fixed target energies retains the potential for important contributions to physics. The key to major parts of this program would appear to be the existence of the Main Injector. 115 refs, 17 figs.

  13. Anomalous structural transition of confined hard squares.

    PubMed

    Gurin, Péter; Varga, Szabolcs; Odriozola, Gerardo

    2016-11-01

    Structural transitions are examined in quasi-one-dimensional systems of freely rotating hard squares, which are confined between two parallel walls. We find two competing phases: one is a fluid where the squares have two sides parallel to the walls, while the second one is a solidlike structure with a zigzag arrangement of the squares. Using transfer matrix method we show that the configuration space consists of subspaces of fluidlike and solidlike phases, which are connected with low probability microstates of mixed structures. The existence of these connecting states makes the thermodynamic quantities continuous and precludes the possibility of a true phase transition. However, thermodynamic functions indicate strong tendency for the phase transition and our replica exchange Monte Carlo simulation study detects several important markers of the first order phase transition. The distinction of a phase transition from a structural change is practically impossible with simulations and experiments in such systems like the confined hard squares.

  14. Laser ablated hard coating for microtools

    DOEpatents

    McLean, W. II; Balooch, M.; Siekhaus, W.J.

    1998-05-05

    Wear-resistant coatings composed of laser ablated hard carbon films, are deposited by pulsed laser ablation using visible light, on instruments such as microscope tips and micro-surgical tools. Hard carbon, known as diamond-like carbon (DLC), films produced by pulsed laser ablation using visible light enhances the abrasion resistance, wear characteristics, and lifetimes of small tools or instruments, such as small, sharp silicon tips used in atomic probe microscopy without significantly affecting the sharpness or size of these devices. For example, a 10--20 nm layer of diamond-like carbon on a standard silicon atomic force microscope (AFM) tip, enables the useful operating life of the tip to be increased by at least twofold. Moreover, the low inherent friction coefficient of the DLC coating leads to higher resolution for AFM tips operating in the contact mode. 12 figs.

  15. Hardness/intensity correlations among BATSE bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciesas, William S.; Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Fishman, Gerald J.; Meegan, Charles A.; Wilson, Robert B.

    1992-01-01

    Conclusions about the nature of gamma-ray bursts derived from the size-frequency distribution may be altered if a significant correlation exists between burst intensity and spectral shape. Moreover, if gamma-ray bursts have a cosmological origin, such a correlation may be expected to result from the expansion of the universe. We have performed a rudimentary search of the BATSE bursts for hardness/intensity correlations. The range of spectral shapes was determined for each burst by computing the ratio of the intensity in the range 100-300 keV to that in 55-300 keV. We find weak evidence for the existence of a correlation, the strongest effect being present when comparing the maximum hardness ratio for each burst with its maximum rate.

  16. Laser ablated hard coating for microtools

    DOEpatents

    McLean, II, William; Balooch, Mehdi; Siekhaus, Wigbert J.

    1998-05-05

    Wear-resistant coatings composed of laser ablated hard carbon films, are deposited by pulsed laser ablation using visible light, on instruments such as microscope tips and micro-surgical tools. Hard carbon, known as diamond-like carbon (DLC), films produced by pulsed laser ablation using visible light enhances the abrasion resistance, wear characteristics, and lifetimes of small tools or instruments, such as small, sharp silicon tips used in atomic probe microscopy without significantly affecting the sharpness or size of these devices. For example, a 10-20 nm layer of diamond-like carbon on a standard silicon atomic force microscope (AFM) tip, enables the useful operating life of the tip to be increased by at least twofold. Moreover, the low inherent friction coefficient of the DLC coating leads to higher resolution for AFM tips operating in the contact mode.

  17. Hard X-Ray Radio Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panessa, Francesca; Bassani, L.; Venturi, T.; Molina, M.; Dallacasa, D.; Ubertini, P.; Bazzano, A.; Malizia, A.; La Franca, F.; Landi, R.

    2016-10-01

    In order to investigate the role of absorption in AGN with jets, we have studied the column density distribution of a hard X-ray selected sample of radio galaxies, derived from the INTEGRAL/IBIS and Swift/BAT AGN catalogues. They represent 7-10% of the total AGN population and are characterized by high 20-100 keV luminosities and high Eddington ratios. The radio morphology is typical of FRII galaxies and all of them have an optical classification and a measure of the column density. The observed fraction of absorbed AGN is around 40% among the total sample, and 75% among type 2 AGN. The observed fraction of Compton thick AGN is 2-3%. In this talk we will discuss the obscuration characteristics of radio galaxies compared to non-radio galaxies selected at hard X-rays.

  18. The k-Anonymity Problem Is Hard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonizzoni, Paola; Della Vedova, Gianluca; Dondi, Riccardo

    The problem of publishing personal data without giving up privacy is becoming increasingly important. An interesting formalization recently proposed is the k-anonymity. This approach requires that the rows in a table are clustered in sets of size at least k and that all the rows in a cluster are related to the same tuple, after the suppression of some records. The problem has been shown to be NP-hard when the values are over a ternary alphabet, k = 3 and the rows length is unbounded. In this paper we give a lower bound on the approximation of two restrictions of the problem, when the records values are over a binary alphabet and k = 3, and when the records have length at most 8 and k = 4, showing that these restrictions of the problem are APX-hard.

  19. Laser thermographic technologies for hard copy recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessmel'tsev, Viktor P.; Baev, Sergej G.

    1995-04-01

    Methods of hard copies recording based on thermal interaction of the beam from CO2 or YAG lasers with various kinds of films on any substrates have been developed. The recording processes are single-step and require no additional development. Among them are: (1) Laser thermodestruction of thin mask layers or of a material surface on any kinds of substrates. (2) Laser thermochemical reactions of thermal decomposition of metal salts in solid state phase on a surface of various hygroscopic substrates. The laser recording devices using the methods, described above have been developed and are manufactured now; they allow one to record hard copies with a size of up to 27 X 31 inches, a resolution of 4000 dpi.

  20. Superhard material comparable in hardness to diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Badzian, A.R.

    1988-12-19

    Superhard boron suboxides, with hardness close to that of diamond, were synthesized from boron/boron oxide mixtures. Such hardness is expected when a material's molar volume approaches the value characteristic for diamond. These materials consist of boron-rich phases belonging to the boron-oxygen system. The phase which contains 4 at. % oxygen and a crystal structure related to ..beta..rhombohedral boron can scratch diamond faces. During scratching of diamond the suboxide is worn also, and the wear debris is amorphized. Wear on the lt. slash/100/ diamond faces results from a cleavage mechanism which leaves a rough surface covered with cleaved lt. slash/111/ microfaces. The lt. slash/100/ faces are more easily abraded than the lt. slash/111/ diamond faces. Wear on lt. slash/111/ faces consumes much more energy and leaves grooves of plastically deformed diamond.