Science.gov

Sample records for hard outer shell

  1. NIF Double Shell outer-shell experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merritt, E. C.; Montgomery, D. S.; Kline, J. L.; Daughton, W. S.; Wilson, D. C.; Dodd, E. S.; Renner, D. B.; Cardenas, T.; Batha, S. H.

    2016-10-01

    At the core of the Double Shell concept is the kinetic energy transfer from the outer shell to the inner shell via collision. This collision sets both the implosion shape of the inner shell, from imprinting of the shape of the outer shell, as well as the maximum energy available to compress the DT fuel. Therefore, it is crucial to be able to control the time-dependent shape of the outer shell, such that the outer shell is nominally round at the collision time. We present the experiment results from our sub-scale ( 1 MJ) NIF outer-shell only shape tuning campaign, where we vary shape by changing a turn-on time delay between the same pulse shape on the inner and outer cone beams. This type of shape tuning is unique to this platform and only possible since the Double Shell design uses a single-shock drive (4.5 ns reverse ramp pulse). The outer-shell only targets used a 5.75 mm diameter standard near-vacuum NIF hohlraum with 0.032 mg/cc He gas fill, and a Be capsule with 0.4% uniform Cu dopant, with 242 um thick ablator. We also present results from a third outer-shell only shot used to measure shell trajectory, which is critical in determining the shell impact time. This work conducted under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by LANL under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  2. Double Shell Plans and First Results from Outer Shell Keyhole Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, D. S.; Merritt, E. C.; Daughton, W. S.; Loomis, E. N.; Wilson, D. C.; Dodd, E. S.; Kline, J. L.; Batha, S. H.; Robey, H. F.

    2016-10-01

    Double-shells are an alternative approach to achieving indirect drive ignition on NIF. These targets consist of a low-Z ablatively-driven outer shell that impacts a high-Z inner shell filled with DT fuel. In contrast to single-shell designs, double-shell targets burn the fuel via volume ignition, albeit with a lower gain. While double-shell capsules are complicated to fabricate, their design includes several beneficial metrics such as a low convergence pusher (C.R. < 10), low implosion speed (250 km/s), a simple few-ns laser drive in a vacuum hohlraum, less sensitivity to hohlraum asymmetries, and low expected laser-plasma instabilities. We describe plans for developing double shell capsule implosions on NIF, and discuss challenges as well as uncertainties and trade-offs in the physics issues compared to single-shells, such as sensitivity to hard x-ray preheat of the inner shell. First experimental results measuring hard x-ray preheat, shock breakout and shock symmetry from outer-shell experiments using the NIF Keyhole platform will be presented. Work performed under the auspices of DOE by LANL under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  3. Unemployment: Hard-Core or Hard-Shell?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lauer, Robert H.

    1972-01-01

    The term hard-core'' makes the unemployed culpable; the term hard shell'' shifts the burden to the employer, and the evidence from the suburban plant indicates that a substantial part of the problem must lie there. (DM)

  4. Apparatus and methods for installing, removing and adjusting an inner turbine shell section relative to an outer turbine shell section

    DOEpatents

    Leach, David; Bergendahl, Peter Allen; Waldo, Stuart Forrest; Smith, Robert Leroy; Phelps, Robert Kim

    2001-01-01

    A turbine includes upper and lower inner shell sections mounting the nozzles and shrouds and which inner shell is supported by pins secured to a surrounding outer shell. To disassemble the turbine for access to the inner shell sections and rotor, an alignment fixture is secured to the lower outer shell section and has pins engaging the inner shell section. To disassemble the turbine, the inner shell weight is transferred to the lower outer shell section via the alignment fixture and cradle pins. Roller assemblies are inserted through access openings vacated by support pins to permit rotation of the lower inner shell section out of and into the lower outer shell section during disassembly and assembly. The alignment fixture includes adjusting rods for adjusting the inner shell axially, vertically, laterally and about a lateral axis. A roller over-cage is provided to rotate the inner shell and a dummy shell to facilitate assembly and disassembly in the field.

  5. Stagnant lid convection in the outer shell of icy moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Chloe; Deschamps, Frédéric; Tackley, Paul; Lowman, Julian; Sanchez-Valle, Carmen

    2013-04-01

    In the past decade, from both theoretical studies and spacecraft missions measurements, the internal structure of large icy moons including a subsurface ocean has gained an increasing support. The exact thickness of subsurface ocean, if present, depends on the detailed thermal evolution of each moon, and on its primordial composition. A crucial process is the heat transfer through the outer ice I layer, which controls the cooling of the satelitte interior. Convection is the most likely and efficient way to transfer heat through this layer, but the regime of convection (and therefore the heat transfer) depends on the rheology of the fluid. The viscosity of ice is strongly temperature dependent and thermal convection in the outer ice shell follows a stagnant lid regime : it means that a conductive stagnant lid forms at the top of the system, and convection is confined in a sublayer. Previous numerical studies including strongly temperature-dependent viscosities have already been performed in 2D Cartesian geometry allowing the determination of scaling laws relating the mean temperature and heat flux to the vigor of convection (described by the Rayleigh number) and the ratio of the top to the bottom viscosity, but 3D spherical geometry may provide a more accurate description of convection within the outer ice layer of icy moons. In this work, we model the heat transfer in spherical shells for a strongly temperature-dependent viscosity fluid heated from below. We use StagYY to run simulations for different ratios of the inner to outer radii of the ice layer (f), Rayleigh number (Ra), and thermal viscosity contrast (Δη). The inversion of the results of more than 30 numerical experiments allows the determination of scaling laws for the temperature of the well-mixed interior and surface heat flux. In particular, we find that depending on the curvature, the stagnant lid regime does not appear for the same values of the Rayleigh number and the viscosity contrast. These

  6. Comparative study of the shell development of hard- and soft-shelled turtles.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Hiroshi; Shibata, Masahiro; Taniguchi, Mari; Ueno, Shintaro; Kamezaki, Naoki; Sato, Noboru

    2014-07-01

    The turtle shell provides a fascinating model for the investigation of the evolutionary modifications of developmental mechanisms. Different conclusions have been put forth for its development, and it is suggested that one of the causes of the disagreement could be the differences in the species of the turtles used - the differences between hard-shelled turtles and soft-shelled turtles. To elucidate the cause of the difference, we compared the turtle shell development in the two groups of turtle. In the dorsal shell development, these two turtle groups shared the gene expression profile that is required for formation, and shared similar spatial organization of the anatomical elements during development. Thus, both turtles formed the dorsal shell through a folding of the lateral body wall, and the Wnt signaling pathway appears to have been involved in the development. The ventral portion of the shell, on the other hand, contains massive dermal bones. Although expression of HNK-1 epitope has suggested that the trunk neural crest contributed to the dermal bones in the hard-shelled turtles, it was not expressed in the initial anlage of the skeletons in either of the types of turtle. Hence, no evidence was found that would support a neural crest origin.

  7. Linear Evolution of the Outer and Inner Surfaces of Imploding Spherical Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, V. N.; Betti, R.; McCrory, R. L.; Verdon, C. P.

    1997-11-01

    In ICF implosions, the perturbations on the outer surface of a spherical shell grow and feed through the target during the acceleration phase. When the acceleration is reversed (deceleration phase), such perturbation is expected to grow, causing the fuel to mix with the shell material. A sharp boundary model is developed to investigate the time evolution of the inner and outer surfaces of an imploding spherical shell. The model includes mass ablation and target compressibility. The Rayleigh-Taylor and Bell-Plesset growths are studied in acceleration and deceleration phases. The inner- and outer-surface deformations are related to ablation velocity, target acceleration, and shell compressibility determined by using the one-dimensional hydrocode LILAC*. A detailed comparison with two-dimensional simulation is also presented. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC03-92SF19460.

  8. DETECTING THE RAPIDLY EXPANDING OUTER SHELL OF THE CRAB NEBULA: WHERE TO LOOK

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xiang; Ferland, G. J.; Baldwin, J. A.; Loh, E. D.; Richardson, C. T.

    2013-09-10

    We present a range of steady-state photoionization simulations, corresponding to different assumed shell geometries and compositions, of the unseen postulated rapidly expanding outer shell to the Crab Nebula. The properties of the shell are constrained by the mass that must lie within it, and by limits to the intensities of hydrogen recombination lines. In all cases the photoionization models predict very strong emissions from high ionization lines that will not be emitted by the Crab's filaments, alleviating problems with detecting these lines in the presence of light scattered from brighter parts of the Crab. The near-NIR [Ne VI] {lambda}7.652 {mu}m line is a particularly good case; it should be dramatically brighter than the optical lines commonly used in searches. The C IV {lambda}1549 doublet is predicted to be the strongest absorption line from the shell, which is in agreement with Hubble Space Telescope observations. We show that the cooling timescale for the outer shell is much longer than the age of the Crab, due to the low density. This means that the temperature of the shell will actually ''remember'' its initial conditions. However, the recombination time is much shorter than the age of the Crab, so the predicted level of ionization should approximate the real ionization. In any case, it is clear that IR observations present the best opportunity to detect the outer shell and so guide future models that will constrain early events in the original explosion.

  9. Double-stranded RNA virus outer shell assembly by bona fide domain-swapping.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhaoyang; El Omari, Kamel; Sun, Xiaoyu; Ilca, Serban L; Kotecha, Abhay; Stuart, David I; Poranen, Minna M; Huiskonen, Juha T

    2017-03-13

    Correct outer protein shell assembly is a prerequisite for virion infectivity in many multi-shelled dsRNA viruses. In the prototypic dsRNA bacteriophage φ6, the assembly reaction is promoted by calcium ions but its biomechanics remain poorly understood. Here, we describe the near-atomic resolution structure of the φ6 double-shelled particle. The outer T=13 shell protein P8 consists of two alpha-helical domains joined by a linker, which allows the trimer to adopt either a closed or an open conformation. The trimers in an open conformation swap domains with each other. Our observations allow us to propose a mechanistic model for calcium concentration regulated outer shell assembly. Furthermore, the structure provides a prime exemplar of bona fide domain-swapping. This leads us to extend the theory of domain-swapping from the level of monomeric subunits and multimers to closed spherical shells, and to hypothesize a mechanism by which closed protein shells may arise in evolution.

  10. 77 FR 3771 - Notice of Issuance of Final Outer Continental Shelf Air Permit for Shell Offshore, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Notice of Issuance of Final Outer Continental Shelf Air Permit for Shell Offshore, Inc. AGENCY... on November 30, 2011, EPA issued a final Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) air permit for Shell...

  11. 77 FR 27054 - Notice of Approval of Clean Air Act Outer Continental Shelf Permits Issued to Shell Offshore, Inc...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-08

    ... AGENCY Notice of Approval of Clean Air Act Outer Continental Shelf Permits Issued to Shell Offshore, Inc. for the Kulluk Conical Drilling Unit AGENCY: United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... Title V air quality operating permit to Shell Offshore, Inc. (``Shell'') for operation of the...

  12. 77 FR 7148 - Notice of Approval of Clean Air Act Outer Continental Shelf Permits Issued to Shell Gulf of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-10

    ... AGENCY Notice of Approval of Clean Air Act Outer Continental Shelf Permits Issued to Shell Gulf of Mexico... Region 10 has issued two final permit decisions granting Clean Air Act Outer Continental Shelf (OCS... entities: (1) The Inupiat Community of the Arctic Slope (ICAS); \\1\\ (2) The Native Village of Point...

  13. Interaction of magnetic field and flow in the outer shells of giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Junjun

    This study of the interaction of magnetic field and flow in the outer shells of giant planets consists of three parts. Part one . The atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn exhibit strong and stable zonal winds. Busse suggested that they might be the surface expression of deep flows on cylinders. However, the deep flow hypothesis experiences difficulty when account is taken of the electrical conductivity of molecular hydrogen as measured in shockwave experiments. The deep zonal flow of an electrically conducting fluid would produce a toroidal magnetic field, an associated poloidal electrical current, and Ohmic dissipation. In steady state, the total Ohmic dissipation cannot exceed the planet's net luminosity. If we assume that the observed zonal flow penetrates along cylinders until it is truncated to (near) zero at some spherical radius, the upper bound on Ohmic dissipation constrains this radius to be no smaller than 0.95 Jupiter radius and 0.87 Saturn radius. The truncation of the cylindrical flow in the convective envelope requires an appropriate force to break the Taylor-Proudman constraint. We have been unable to identify any plausible candidate. Thus we conclude that deep-seated cylindrical flows do not exist. Part two . A fluid shell with sufficient electrical conductivity and azimuthal velocity shear outside of the dynamo generation region can attenuate the non- axisymmetric component of the magnetic field. However, the interaction of the axisymmetric component of the magnetic field and the zonal flow is able to reduce the magnitude of zonal flow. The dimensionless number characterizing this reduction is the Chandrasekhar number. The smaller Saturnian field may allow a larger velocity shear and a greater attenuation of the non-axisymmetric field, thereby providing a possible explanation for the nearly axisymmetric field. Part three . Combining the study for the attenuation effect produced by the semiconducting layer and the observation of the magnetic field by

  14. Structure and dynamics of Titan’s outer icy shell constrained from Cassini data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefevre, Axel; Tobie, Gabriel; Choblet, Gaël; Čadek, Ondřej

    2014-07-01

    The Cassini-Huygens mission has brought evidence for an internal ocean lying beneath an outer icy shell on Titan. The observed topography differs significantly from the reference hydrostatic shape, while the measured geoid anomalies (estimated up to degree three) remain weak. This suggests compensation either by deflections of the ocean/ice interface or by density variations in an upper crust. However, the observed degree-three gravity signal indicates either that the topography is not perfectly compensated, or that mass anomalies exist in the deep interior, or a combination of both. To investigate the compensation mechanisms, we developed an interior structure model satisfying simultaneously the surface gravity and long-wavelength topography. We quantified the excess deflection of ocean/ice I interface, the density anomalies in the upper crust, or the deflection of the ice/rock interface needed to explain the observed degree-three anomalies. Finally, we tested the long-term mechanical stability of the internal mass anomalies by computing the relaxation rate of each internal interface in response to interface mass load. We showed that the computed deflection of the ocean/ice I interface is stable only for a conductive highly viscous layer above a relatively cold ocean (T < 250 K). Solutions with a moderately convecting ice shell are possible only for models with crustal density variations. Due to fast relaxation, the high pressure ice layer cannot be the source of the degree three geoid anomalies. The existence of mass anomalies in the rocky core remains a possible explanation. Estimation of the degree-four gravity signal by future Cassini flybys will further constrain the compensation mechanism and the source of gravity anomalies.

  15. Transcriptome response to copper heavy metal stress in hard-shelled mussel (Mytilus coruscus)

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Meiying; Jiang, Lihua; Shen, Kang-Ning; Wu, Changwen; He, Guangyuan; Hsiao, Chung-Der

    2015-01-01

    The hard-shelled mussel (Mytilus coruscus) has considerably one of the most economically important marine shellfish worldwide and considered as a good invertebrate model for ecotoxicity study for a long time. In the present study, we used Illumina sequencing technology (HiSeq2000) to sequence, assemble and annotate the transcriptome of the hard-shelled mussel which challenged with copper pollution. A total of 21,723,913 paired-end clean reads (NCBI SRA database SRX1411195) were generated from HiSeq2000 sequencer and 96,403 contigs (with N50 = 1118 bp) were obtained after de novo assembling with Trinity software. Digital gene expression analysis reveals 1156 unigenes are upregulated and 1681 unigenes are downregulated when challenged with copper. By KEGG pathway enrichment analysis, we found that unigenes in four KEGG pathways (aminoacyl-tRNA biosynthesis, apoptosis, DNA replication and mismatch repair) show significant differential expressed between control and copper treated groups. We hope that the gill transcriptome in copper treated hard-shelled mussel can give useful information to understand how mussel handles with heavy metal stress at molecular level. PMID:26981394

  16. Building nanocomposite magnets by coating a hard magnetic core with a soft magnetic shell.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fei; Zhu, Jinghan; Yang, Wenlong; Dong, Yunhe; Hou, Yanglong; Zhang, Chenzhen; Yin, Han; Sun, Shouheng

    2014-02-17

    Controlling exchange coupling between hard magnetic and soft magnetic phases is the key to the fabrication of advanced magnets with tunable magnetism and high energy density. Using FePt as an example, control over the magnetism in exchange-coupled nanocomposites of hard magnetic face-centered tetragonal (fct) FePt and soft magnetic Co (or Ni, Fe2C) is shown. The dispersible hard magnetic fct-FePt nanoparticles are first prepared with their coercivity (Hc) reaching 33 kOe. Then core/shell fct-FePt/Co (or Ni, Fe2C) nanoparticles are synthesized by reductive thermal decomposition of the proper metal precursors in the presence of fct-FePt nanoparticles. These core/shell nanoparticles are strongly coupled by exchange interactions and their magnetic properties can be rationally tuned by the shell thickness of the soft phase. This work provides an ideal model system for the study of exchange coupling at the nanoscale, which will be essential for building superstrong magnets for various permanent magnet applications in the future.

  17. The active outer shell of Earth: What remains to be explored in carbon and life interactions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boetius, Antje

    2016-04-01

    Recent advances in methods and technologies have allowed us to explore the interaction between life and abiotic resources from nano to megascales in space and time, and this has set new challenges to the geosciences. This lecture aims at discussing key biological factors in the question of the dynamics of carbon reservoirs and fluxes on Earth, and the challenges to the geosciences to incorporate and further this knowledge. Humans themselves as one such biological factor have considerably changed the dynamics of carbon and other elements, with repercussions to most other life forms on Earth. Which other life forms shape carbon fluxes and reservoirs, and what do we know about their key traits in catalyzing geochemical reactions, their past and their future? I will use case studies from my own research field - geobiology of the oceans and the cryosphere - and from other geoscience areas to highlight the considerable non-linearity introduced by life to element fluxes and the environment; and discuss advances but also gaps in knowledge and research approaches concerning assessing and predicting carbon transformations in the active outer shell of Earth.

  18. Collision safety of a hard-shell low-mass vehicle.

    PubMed

    Kaeser, R; Walz, F H; Brunner, A

    1994-06-01

    Low-mass vehicles and in particular low-mass electric vehicles as produced today in very small quantities are in general not designed for crashworthiness in collisions. Particular problems of compact low-mass cars are: reduced length of the car front, low mass compared to other vehicles, and heavy batteries in the case of an electric car. With the intention of studying design improvements, three frontal crash tests were run last year: the first one with a commercial, lightweight electric car; the second with a reinforced version of the same car; and the last one with a car based on a different structural design with a "hard-shell" car body. Crash tests showed that the latter solution made better use of the small zone available for continuous energy absorption. The paper discusses further the problem of frontal collisions between vehicles of different weight and, in particular, the side collision. A side-collision test was run with the hard-shell vehicle following the ECE lateral-impact test procedure at 50 km/h and led to results for the EuroSID1-dummy well below current injury tolerance criteria.

  19. Collision safety of a hard-shell low-mass vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Kaeser, R.; Walz, F.H.; Brunner, A.

    1994-06-01

    Low-mass vehicles and in particular low-mass electric vehicles as produced today in very small quantities are in general not designed for crashworthiness in collisions. Particular problems of compact low-mass cars are: reduced length of the car front, low mass compared to other vehicles, and heavy batteries in the case of an electric car. With the intention of studying design improvements, three frontal crash tests were run last year: the first one with a commercial, lightweight electric car; the second with a reinforced version of the same car; and the last one with a car based on a different structural design with a `hard-shell` car body. Crash tests showed that the latter solution made better use of the small zone available for continuous energy absorption. The paper discusses further the problem of frontal collisions between vehicles of different weight and, in particular, the side collision. A side-collision test was run with the hard-shell vehicle following the ECE lateral-impact test procedure at 50 km/h and led to results for the EuroSIDI-dummy well below current injury tolerance criteria.

  20. Equatorial symmetry of Boussinesq convective solutions in a rotating spherical shell allowing rotation of the inner and outer spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Keiji; Takehiro, Shin-ichi; Yamada, Michio

    2014-08-15

    We investigate properties of convective solutions of the Boussinesq thermal convection in a moderately rotating spherical shell allowing the respective rotation of the inner and outer spheres due to the viscous torque of the fluid. The ratio of the inner and outer radii of the spheres, the Prandtl number, and the Taylor number are fixed to 0.4, 1, and 500{sup 2}, respectively. The Rayleigh number is varied from 2.6 × 10{sup 4} to 3.4 × 10{sup 4}. In this parameter range, the behaviours of obtained asymptotic convective solutions are almost similar to those in the system whose inner and outer spheres are restricted to rotate with the same constant angular velocity, although the difference is found in the transition process to chaotic solutions. The convective solution changes from an equatorially symmetric quasi-periodic one to an equatorially symmetric chaotic one, and further to an equatorially asymmetric chaotic one, as the Rayleigh number is increased. This is in contrast to the transition in the system whose inner and outer spheres are assumed to rotate with the same constant angular velocity, where the convective solution changes from an equatorially symmetric quasi-periodic one, to an equatorially asymmetric quasi-periodic one, and to equatorially asymmetric chaotic one. The inner sphere rotates in the retrograde direction on average in the parameter range; however, it sometimes undergoes the prograde rotation when the convective solution becomes chaotic.

  1. Wrinkle-assisted linear assembly of hard-core/soft-shell particles: impact of the soft shell on the local structure.

    PubMed

    Müller, Mareen; Karg, Matthias; Fortini, Andrea; Hellweg, Thomas; Fery, Andreas

    2012-04-07

    This article addresses wrinkle assisted assembly of core-shell particles with hard cores and soft poly-(N-isopropylacrylamide) shells. As core materials we chose silica as well as silver nanoparticles. The assembled structures show that the soft shells act as a separator between the inorganic cores. Anisotropic alignment is found on two length scales, macroscopically guided through the wrinkle structure and locally due to deformation of the polymer shell leading to smaller inter-core separations as compared to assembly on flat substrates without confinement. The structures were analysed by means of scanning electron microscopy. Radial distribution functions are shown, clearly highlighting the impact of confinement on nearest neighbour distances and symmetry. The observed ordering is directly compared to Monte-Carlo simulations for hard-core/soft-shell particles, showing that the observed symmetries are a consequence of the soft interaction potential and differ qualitatively from a hard-sphere situation. For the silver-poly-(N-isopropylacrylamide) particles, we show UV-vis absorbance measurements revealing optical anisotropy of the generated structures due to plasmon coupling. Furthermore, the high degree of order of the assembled structures on macroscopic areas is demonstrated by laser diffraction effects.

  2. Some Investigations on Hardness of Investment Casting Process After Advancements in Shell Moulding for Reduction in Cycle Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, R.; Mahajan, V.

    2014-07-01

    In the present work surface hardness investigations have been made on acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) pattern based investment castings after advancements in shell moulding for replication of biomedical implants. For the present study, a hip joint, made of ABS material, was fabricated as a master pattern by fused deposition modelling (FDM). After preparation of master pattern, mold was prepared by deposition of primary (1°), secondary (2°) and tertiary (3°) coatings with the addition of nylon fibre (1-2 cm in length of 1.5D). This study outlines the surface hardness mechanism for cast component prepared from ABS master pattern after advancement in shell moulding. The results of study highlight that during shell production, fibre modified shells have a much reduced drain time. Further the results are supported by cooling rate and micro structure analysis of casting.

  3. Environmental salinity modulates the effects of elevated CO2 levels on juvenile hard-shell clams, Mercenaria mercenaria.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Gary H; Matoo, Omera B; Tourek, Robert T; Sokolova, Inna M; Beniash, Elia

    2013-07-15

    Ocean acidification due to increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations results in a decrease in seawater pH and shifts in the carbonate chemistry that can negatively affect marine organisms. Marine bivalves such as the hard-shell clam, Mercenaria mercenaria, serve as ecosystem engineers in estuaries and coastal zones of the western Atlantic and, as for many marine calcifiers, are sensitive to the impacts of ocean acidification. In estuaries, the effects of ocean acidification can be exacerbated by low buffering capacity of brackish waters, acidic inputs from freshwaters and land, and/or the negative effects of salinity on the physiology of organisms. We determined the interactive effects of 21 weeks of exposure to different levels of CO2 (~395, 800 and 1500 μatm corresponding to pH of 8.2, 8.1 and 7.7, respectively) and salinity (32 versus 16) on biomineralization, shell properties and energy metabolism of juvenile hard-shell clams. Low salinity had profound effects on survival, energy metabolism and biomineralization of hard-shell clams and modulated their responses to elevated PCO2. Negative effects of low salinity in juvenile clams were mostly due to the strongly elevated basal energy demand, indicating energy deficiency, that led to reduced growth, elevated mortality and impaired shell maintenance (evidenced by the extensive damage to the periostracum). The effects of elevated PCO2 on physiology and biomineralization of hard-shell clams were more complex. Elevated PCO2 (~800-1500 μatm) had no significant effects on standard metabolic rates (indicative of the basal energy demand), but affected growth and shell mechanical properties in juvenile clams. Moderate hypercapnia (~800 μatm PCO2) increased shell and tissue growth and reduced mortality of juvenile clams in high salinity exposures; however, these effects were abolished under the low salinity conditions or at high PCO2 (~1500 μatm). Mechanical properties of the shell (measured as microhardness and

  4. Shell hardness and compressive strength of the Eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica, and the Asian oyster, Crassostrea ariakensis.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, Sara A; Chon, Grace D; Lee, James Jin-Wu; Lane, Hillary A; Paynter, Kennedy T

    2013-12-01

    The valves of oysters act as a physical barrier between tissues and the external environment, thereby protecting the oyster from environmental stress and predation. To better understand differences in shell properties and predation susceptibilities of two physiologically and morphologically similar oysters, Crassostrea virginica and Crassostrea ariakensis, we quantified and compared two mechanical properties of shells: hardness (resistance to irreversible deformation; GPa) and compressive strength (force necessary to produce a crack; N). We found no differences in the hardness values between foliated layers (innermost and outermost foliated layers), age class (C. virginica: 1, 4, 6, 9 years; C. ariakensis: 4, 6 years), or species. This suggests that the foliated layers have similar properties and are likely composed of the same material. The compressive force required to break wet and dry shells was also not different. However, the shells of both six- and nine-year-old C. virginica withstood higher compressive force than C. virginica shells aged either one or four, and the shells of C. ariakensis at both ages studied (4- and 6-years-old). Differences in ability to withstand compressive force are likely explained by differences in thickness and density between age classes and species. Further, we compared the compressive strength of differing ages of these two species to the crushing force of common oyster predators in the Chesapeake Bay. By studying the physical properties of shells, this work may contribute to a better understanding of the mechanical defenses of oysters as well as of their predation vulnerabilities.

  5. Harnessing the advantages of hard and soft colloids by the use of core-shell particles as interfacial stabilizers.

    PubMed

    Buchcic, C; Tromp, R H; Meinders, M B J; Cohen Stuart, M A

    2017-02-15

    The ability of colloidal particles to penetrate fluid interfaces is a crucial factor in the preparation of particle stabilized disperse systems such as foams and emulsions. For hard micron-sized particles the insertion into fluid interfaces requires substantial energy input, but soft particles are known to adsorb spontaneously. Particle hardness, however, may also affect foam and emulsion stability. The high compliance of soft particles may compromise their ability to withstand the lateral compression associated with disproportionation. Hence, particles which can spontaneously adsorb onto fluid interfaces, and yet depict low compliance may be ideal as interfacial stabilizers. In the present work, we prepared core-shell particles comprising a hard, polystyrene core and a soft poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) based shell. We found that such core-shell particles adsorb spontaneously onto various fluid interfaces. The absence of a pronounced energy barrier for interfacial adsorption allowed the facile preparation of particle-stabilized bubbles as well as emulsion droplets. For bubbles, the stability was better than that of bubbles stabilized by entirely soft particles, but disproportionation was not stopped completely. Emulsion droplets, in contrast, showed excellent stability against both coalescence and disproportionation. Lateral compression of core-shell particles due to disproportionation was clearly limited by the presence of the polystyrene core, leading to long-lasting stability. For emulsions, we even observed non-spherical droplets, indicating a negligible Laplace pressure. Our results indicate that core-shell particles comprising a hard core and a soft shell combine the advantageous properties of hard and soft particles, namely spontaneous adsorption and limited compliance, and can therefore be superior materials for the preparation of particle-stabilized dispersions.

  6. Shells of charge: a density functional theory for charged hard spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Roland; Gillespie, Dirk

    2016-06-01

    A functional for the electrostatic excess free-energy for charged, hard sphere fluids is proposed. The functional is derived from two complementary, but equivalent, interpretations of the mean spherical approximation (MSA). The first combines fundamental measure theory (FMT) from hard-core interactions with the idea that MSA can be interpreted in terms of the interaction spherical shells of charge. This formulation gives the free-energy density as a function of weighted densities. When all the ions have the same size, the functional adopts an FMT-like form. The second in effect ‘functionalizes’ the derivation of MSA; that is, it generalizes the MSA as a functional-based version of MSA (fMSA). This formulation defines the free-energy density as a function of a position-dependent MSA screening parameter and the weighted densities of the FMT approach. This FMT/fMSA functional is shown to give accurate density profiles, as compared to Monte Carlo simulations, under a wide range of ion concentrations, size asymmetries, and valences.

  7. Double-Shelled Nanocages with Cobalt Hydroxide Inner Shell and Layered Double Hydroxides Outer Shell as High-Efficiency Polysulfide Mediator for Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jintao; Hu, Han; Li, Zhen; Lou, Xiong Wen David

    2016-03-14

    Lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries have been considered as a promising candidate for next-generation electrochemical energy-storage technologies because of their overwhelming advantages in energy density. Suppression of the polysulfide dissolution while maintaining a high sulfur utilization is the main challenge for Li-S batteries. Here, we have designed and synthesized double-shelled nanocages with two shells of cobalt hydroxide and layered double hydroxides (CH@LDH) as a conceptually new sulfur host for Li-S batteries. Specifically, the hollow CH@LDH polyhedra with complex shell structures not only maximize the advantages of hollow nanostructures for encapsulating a high content of sulfur (75 wt %), but also provide sufficient self-functionalized surfaces for chemically bonding with polysulfides to suppress their outward dissolution. When evaluated as cathode material for Li-S batteries, the CH@LDH/S composite shows a significantly improved electrochemical performance.

  8. Immunocytochemistry suggests that the prevalence of a sub-type of beta-proteins determines the hardness in the epidermis of the hard-shelled turtle.

    PubMed

    Alibardi, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    The corneous layer of the epidermis in hard-shelled turtles largely derives from the accumulation of beta-proteins as indicated by microscopic, in situ hybridization, and immunocytochemical and Western blotting analysis. The expression of mRNAs of one of the most common type of beta-proteins shows higher expression in upper spinosus and pre-corneous keratinocytes of growing scutes. Two beta-proteins of 14-16 kDa, indicated as Tu2 and Tu17 and representing two subtypes of beta-proteins co-accumulate in the thick corneous layer of the epidermis in hard-shelled turtle. The two beta-proteins apparently mix in differentiating and mature corneocytes although Tu2 appears more prevalent than Tu17. The specific role of the different subtypes in the formation of the hard corneous material of the carapace and plastron is not clear. It is hypothesized that the relative amount of beta-proteins belonging to the two subclasses in relation to the alpha-keratin meshwork present in keratinocytes contributes to the formation of a variably resistant and inflexible corneous layer. Tu17 may have a more globular structure than Tu2 and is likely present in denser areas of the corneous layer containing also alpha-keratin. The increase of cysteine-glycine-rich beta-proteins in the matrix located among alpha-keratin filaments may allow the formation of a hard corneous material, probably through increase of cross-bridge formation and hydrophobicity.

  9. Studies on applicability of press-coated tablets using hydroxypropylcellulose (HPC) in the outer shell for timed-release preparations.

    PubMed

    Fukui, E; Uemura, K; Kobayashi, M

    2000-08-10

    Press-coated tablets, containing diltiazem hydrochloride (DIL) in the core tablet and coated with hydroxypropylcellulose (HPC) as the outer shell, were examined for applicability as timed-release tablets with a predetermined lag time and subsequent rapid drug release phase. Various types of press-coated tablets were prepared using a rotary tabletting machine and their DIL dissolution behavior was evaluated by the JP paddle method. The results indicated that tablets with the timed-release function could be prepared, and that the lag times were prolonged as the viscosity of HPC and the amount of the outer shell were increased. The lag times could be controlled widely by the above method, however, the compression load had little effect. Two different kinds of timed-release press-coated tablets that showed lag times of 3 and 6 h in the in vitro test (denoted PCT(L3) and PCT(L6), respectively) were administered to beagle dogs. DIL was first detected in the plasma more than 3 h after administration, and both tablets showed timed-release. The lag times showed a good agreement between the in vivo and in vitro tests in PCT(L3). However, the in vivo lag times were about 4 h in PCT(L6) and were much shorter than the in vitro lag time. The dissolution test was performed at different paddle rotation speeds, and good agreement was obtained between the in vivo and in vitro lag times at 150 rpm. This suggested that the effects of gastrointestinal peristalsis and contraction should also be taken into consideration for the further development of drug delivery systems.

  10. Evidence for a Highly Elastic Shell-Core Organization of Cochlear Outer Hair Cells by Local Membrane Indentation

    PubMed Central

    Zelenskaya, Alexandra; Boutet de Monvel, Jacques; Pesen, Devrim; Radmacher, Manfred; Hoh, Jan H.; Ulfendahl, Mats

    2005-01-01

    Cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs) are thought to play an essential role in the high sensitivity and sharp frequency selectivity of the hearing organ by generating forces that amplify the vibrations of this organ at frequencies up to several tens of kHz. This tuning process depends on the mechanical properties of the cochlear partition, which OHC activity has been proposed to modulate on a cycle-by-cycle basis. OHCs have a specialized shell-core ultrastructure believed to be important for the mechanics of these cells and for their unique electromotility properties. Here we use atomic force microscopy to investigate the mechanical properties of isolated living OHCs and to show that indentation mechanics of their membrane is consistent with a shell-core organization. Indentations of OHCs are also found to be highly nonhysteretic at deformation rates of more than 40 μm/s, which suggests the OHC lateral wall is a highly elastic structure, with little viscous dissipation, as would appear to be required in view of the very rapid changes in shape and mechanics OHCs are believed to undergo in vivo. PMID:15653728

  11. Flexural models of trench/outer rise topography of coronae on Venus with axisymmetric spherical shell elastic plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, W.; Schubert, Gerald; Sandwell, David T.

    1992-01-01

    Magellan altimetry has revealed that many coronae on Venus have trenches or moats around their peripheries and rises outboard of the trenches. This trench/outer rise topographic signature is generally associated with the tectonic annulus of the corona. Sandwell and Schubert have interpreted the trench/outer rise topography and the associated tectonic annulus around coronae to be the result of elastic bending of the Venus lithosphere (though the tectonic structures are consequences of inelastic deformation of the lithosphere). They used two-dimensional elastic plate flexure theory to fit topographic profiles across a number of large coronae and inferred elastic lithosphere thicknesses between about 15 and 40 km, similar to inferred values of elastic thickness for the Earth's lithosphere at subduction zones around the Pacific Ocean. Here, we report the results of using axisymmetric elastic flexure theory for the deformation of thin spherical shell plates to interpret the trench/outer rise topography of the large coronae modeled by Sandwell and Schubert and of coronae as small as 250 km in diameter. In the case of a corona only a few hundred kilometers in diameter, the model accounts for the small planform radius of the moat and the nonradial orientation of altimetric traces across the corona. By fitting the flexural topography of coronae we determine the elastic thickness and loading necessary to account for the observed flexure. We calculate the associated bending moment and determine whether the corona interior topographic load can provide the required moment. We also calculate surface stresses and compare the stress distribution with the location of annular tectonic features.

  12. Bubble generation and venous air filtration by hard-shell venous reservoirs: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, S J; Willcox, T; Gorman, D F

    1997-09-01

    We have previously shown significant bubble formation in Medtronic Maxima hard-shell venous reservoirs (HSVRs). In the present study, we not only investigated the mechanism of this bubble formation, but also the extent of bubble clearance by membrane oxygenators and arterial line filters. In addition, we also compared the performance of five HSVRs with respect to bubble formation and venous air filtration. Salvaged clinical CPB circuits containing different HSVRs were studied by downstream Doppler monitoring under fixed flow-decreasing volume, fixed volume-increasing flow, and entrained venous air conditions. Bubbles formed in the Medtronic Maxima top entry HSVR at volumes below 800 ml and flows above 3.5 l min-1, and were incompletely removed by a membrane oxygenator and arterial line filter. Decreased bubbling was seen when the reservoir atmosphere was flushed with CO2, suggesting that these bubbles formed in a fountain at the venous inflow. The Medtronic Maxima Forte HSVR formed significantly fewer bubbles at low volumes, and filtered venous air effectively. Negligible bubble formation occurred in the Sorin, Terumo, or Baxter reservoirs. The minimum recommended operating volume for the Medtronic Maxima top entry reservoir should be reset at 600 ml and this device should always be used with an arterial filter. Bubble formation is substantially reduced in the new Medtronic Maxima Forte HSVR and this device is a good filter for venous air.

  13. Images of Soft-bodied Animals with External Hard Shell: 3D Visualization of the Embedded Soft Tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Donepudi V.; Akatsuka, Takao; Tromba, Giuliana

    2004-05-12

    Images of soft-bodied animals (snails) of various types with external hard shell are obtained for 25, 27 and 29 keV synchrotron X-rays. The SYRMEP facility at Elettra,Trieste, Italy and the associated detection system has been used for the image acquisition. The interior properties of the embedded soft tissue are analysed utilizing the software. From the reconstructed images, the soft tissue distribution, void spaces associated with the soft tissue and external hard shell are identified. 3D images are reconstructed at these energies and optimum energy is chosen based on the quality of the image for further analysis. The optimum energy allowed us to visualize the visibility of low absorbing details and interior microstructure of the embedded soft tissue.

  14. Adsorption of gold ions from industrial wastewater using activated carbon derived from hard shell of apricot stones - an agricultural waste.

    PubMed

    Soleimani, Mansooreh; Kaghazchi, Tahereh

    2008-09-01

    In this study, hard shell of apricot stones was selected from agricultural solid wastes to prepare effective and low cost adsorbent for the gold separation from gold-plating wastewater. Different adsorption parameters like adsorbent dose, particle size of activated carbon, pH and agitation speed of mixing on the gold adsorption were studied. The results showed that under the optimum operating conditions, more than 98% of gold was adsorbed onto activated carbon after only 3h. The equilibrium adsorption data were well described by the Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms. Isotherms have been used to obtain thermodynamic parameters. Gold desorption studies were performed with aqueous solution mixture of sodium hydroxide and organic solvents at ambient temperatures. Quantitative recovery of gold ions is possible by this method. As hard shell of apricot stones is a discarded as waste from agricultural and food industries, the prepared activated carbon is expected to be an economical product for gold ion recovery from wastewater.

  15. Influence of capsule shell composition on the performance indicators of hypromellose capsule in comparison to hard gelatin capsules.

    PubMed

    Al-Tabakha, Moawia M; Arida, Adi Issam; Fahelelbom, Khairi M S; Sadek, Bassem; Saeed, Dima Ahmed; Abu Jarad, Rami A; Jawadi, Jeevani

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the in vitro performances of "vegetable" capsules in comparison to hard gelatin capsules in terms of shell weight variation, reaction to different humidity conditions, resistance to stress in the absence of moisture, powder leakage, disintegration and dissolution. Two types of capsules made of HPMC produced with (Capsule 2) or without (Capsule 3) a gelling agent and hard gelatin capsules (Capsule 1) were assessed. Shell weight variability was relatively low for all tested capsules shells. Although Capsule 1 had the highest moisture content under different humidity conditions, all capsule types were unable to protect the encapsulated hygroscopic polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) powder from surrounding humidity. The initial disintegration for all Capsule 1 occurred within 3 min, but for other types of capsules within 6 min (n = 18). Dissolution of acetaminophen was better when the deionized water (DIW) temperature increased from 32 to 42 °C in case of Capsule 1, but the effect of temperature was not significant for the other types of capsules. Acetaminphen dissolution from Capsule 1 was the fastest (i.e. >90% in 10 min) and independent of the media pH or contents unlike Capsule 2 which was influenced by the pH and dissolution medium contents. It is feasible to use hypromellose capsules shells with or without gelling agent for new lines of pharmaceutical products, however, there is a window for capsule shells manufacturing companies to improve the dissolution of their hypromellose capsules to match the conventional gelatin capsule shells and eventually replace them.

  16. A Detailed Kinematic Map of Cassiopeia A's Optical Main Shell and Outer High-velocity Ejecta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milisavljevic, Dan; Fesen, Robert A.

    2013-08-01

    We present three-dimensional (3D) kinematic reconstructions of optically emitting material in the young Galactic supernova remnant Cassiopeia A (Cas A). These Doppler maps have the highest spectral and spatial resolutions of any previous survey of Cas A and represent the most complete catalog of its optically emitting material to date. We confirm that the bulk of Cas A's optically bright ejecta populate a torus-like geometry tilted approximately 30° with respect to the plane of the sky with a -4000 to +6000 km s-1 radial velocity asymmetry. Near-tangent viewing angle effects and an inhomogeneous surrounding circumstellar material/interstellar medium environment suggest that this geometry and velocity asymmetry may not be faithfully representative of the remnant's true 3D structure or the kinematic properties of the original explosion. The majority of the optical ejecta are arranged in several well-defined and nearly circular ring-like structures with diameters between approximately 30'' (0.5 pc) and 2' (2 pc). These ejecta rings appear to be a common phenomenon of young core-collapse remnants and may be associated with post-explosion input of energy from plumes of radioactive 56Ni-rich ejecta that rise, expand, and compress non-radioactive material. Our optical survey encompasses Cas A's faint outlying ejecta knots and exceptionally high-velocity NE and SW streams of S-rich debris often referred to as "jets." These outer knots, which exhibit a chemical make-up suggestive of an origin deep within the progenitor star, appear to be arranged in opposing and wide-angle outflows with opening half-angles of ≈40°.

  17. A DETAILED KINEMATIC MAP OF CASSIOPEIA A'S OPTICAL MAIN SHELL AND OUTER HIGH-VELOCITY EJECTA

    SciTech Connect

    Milisavljevic, Dan; Fesen, Robert A.

    2013-08-01

    We present three-dimensional (3D) kinematic reconstructions of optically emitting material in the young Galactic supernova remnant Cassiopeia A (Cas A). These Doppler maps have the highest spectral and spatial resolutions of any previous survey of Cas A and represent the most complete catalog of its optically emitting material to date. We confirm that the bulk of Cas A's optically bright ejecta populate a torus-like geometry tilted approximately 30 Degree-Sign with respect to the plane of the sky with a -4000 to +6000 km s{sup -1} radial velocity asymmetry. Near-tangent viewing angle effects and an inhomogeneous surrounding circumstellar material/interstellar medium environment suggest that this geometry and velocity asymmetry may not be faithfully representative of the remnant's true 3D structure or the kinematic properties of the original explosion. The majority of the optical ejecta are arranged in several well-defined and nearly circular ring-like structures with diameters between approximately 30'' (0.5 pc) and 2' (2 pc). These ejecta rings appear to be a common phenomenon of young core-collapse remnants and may be associated with post-explosion input of energy from plumes of radioactive {sup 56}Ni-rich ejecta that rise, expand, and compress non-radioactive material. Our optical survey encompasses Cas A's faint outlying ejecta knots and exceptionally high-velocity NE and SW streams of S-rich debris often referred to as ''jets''. These outer knots, which exhibit a chemical make-up suggestive of an origin deep within the progenitor star, appear to be arranged in opposing and wide-angle outflows with opening half-angles of Almost-Equal-To 40 Degree-Sign.

  18. Neutron production in deuterium gas-puff z-pinch with outer plasma shell at current of 3 MA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cikhardt, J.; Klir, D.; Rezac, K.; Cikhardtova, B.; Kravarik, J.; Kubes, P.; Sila, O.; Shishlov, A. V.; Cherdizov, R. K.; Frusov, F. I.; Kokshenev, V. A.; Kurmaev, N. E.; Labetsky, A. Yu.; Ratakhin, N. A.; Dudkin, G. N.; Garapatsky, A. A.; Padalko, V. N.; Varlachev, V. A.; Turek, K.; Krasa, J.

    2015-11-01

    Z-pinch experiments at the current of about 3 MA were carried out on the GIT-12 generator. The outer plasma shell of deuterium gas-puff was generated by the system of 48 plasma guns. This configuration exhibits a high efficiency of the production of DD fusion neutrons with the yield of above 1012 neutrons produced in a single shot with the duration of about 20 ns. The maximum energy of the neutrons produced in this pulse exceeded 30 MeV. The neutron radiation was measured using scintillation TOF detectors, CR-39 nuclear track detectors, bubble detectors BD-PND and BDS-10000 and by several types of nuclear activation detectors. These diagnostic tools were used to measure the anisotropy of neutron fluence and neutron energy spectra. It allows us to estimate the total number of DD neutrons, the contribution of other nuclear reactions, the amount of scattered neutrons, and other parameters of neutron production. This work was supported by the MSMT grants LH13283, LD14089.

  19. Khα1,2 X-Ray Hypersatellite Line Broadening as a Signature of K-Shell Double Photoionization Followed by Outer-Shell Ionization and Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polasik, M.; Słabkowska, K.; Rzadkiewicz, J.; Kozioł, K.; Starosta, J.; Wiatrowska-Kozioł, E.; Dousse, J.-Cl.; Hoszowska, J.

    2011-08-01

    We propose a novel approach for the theoretical analysis of the photoinduced high-resolution Khα1,2 x-ray hypersatellite spectra, which allows us to obtain reliable values of lifetimes of the doubly K-shell ionized states and fundamental information about the relative role of K-shell double photoionization (DPI) mechanisms. It is demonstrated for the first time that the Khα1,2 hypersatellite natural line broadening observed for selected metal atoms with 20≤Z≤30 can be well reproduced quantitatively by taking into account the influences of the open-shell valence configuration (adopted from predictions of the band-structure method) and the outer-shell ionization and excitation following the DPI process.

  20. Molecular characterization of alpha-keratins in comparison to associated beta-proteins in soft-shelled and hard-shelled turtles produced during the process of epidermal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Dalla Valle, L; Michieli, F; Benato, F; Skobo, T; Alibardi, L

    2013-11-01

    The tough corneous layer in the carapace and plastron of hard-shelled turtles derives from the accumulation of keratin-associated beta-proteins (KAbetaPs, formerly called beta-keratins) while these proteins are believed to be absent in soft-shelled turtles. Our bioinformatics and molecular study has instead shown that the epidermis of the soft-shelled turtle Apalone spinifera expresses beta-proteins like or even in higher amount than in the hard-shelled turtle Pseudemys nelsoni. The analysis of a carapace cDNAs library has allowed the identification and characterization of three alpha-keratins of type I and of ten beta-proteins (beta-keratins). The acidic alpha-keratins probably combine with the basic beta-proteins but the high production of beta-proteins in A. spinifera is not prevalent over that of alpha-keratin so that their combination does not determine the formation of hard corneous material. Furthermore the presence of a proline and cisteine in the beta-sheet region of beta-proteins in A. spinifera may be unsuited to form hard masses of corneous material. The higher amount of beta-proteins over alpha-keratins instead occurs in keratinocytes of the hard and inflexible epidermis of P. nelsoni determining the deposition of hard corneous material. The study suggests that the hardness of the corneous layer derives not exclusively from the interactions between alpha-keratins with KAbetaPs but also from the different dynamic of accumulation and loss of corneocytes in the corneous layer of the hard shelled turtles where a prevalent accumulation and piling of corneocytes takes place versus the soft shelled turtle where a rapid turnover of the stratum corneum occurs.

  1. Combining hard and soft magnetism into a single core-shell nanoparticle to achieve both hyperthermia and image contrast

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qiuhong; Gong, Maogang; Cai, Shuang; Zhang, Ti; Douglas, Justin T; Chikan, Viktor; Davies, Neal M; Lee, Phil; Choi, In-Young; Ren, Shenqiang; Forrest, M Laird

    2015-01-01

    Background A biocompatible core/shell structured magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) was developed to mediate simultaneous cancer therapy and imaging. Methods & results A 22-nm MNP was first synthesized via magnetically coupling hard (FePt) and soft (Fe3O4) materials to produce high relative energy transfer. Colloidal stability of the FePt@Fe3O4 MNPs was achieved through surface modification with silane-polyethylene glycol (PEG). Intravenous administration of PEG-MNPs into tumor-bearing mice resulted in a sustained particle accumulation in the tumor region, and the tumor burden of treated mice was a third that of the mice in control groups 2 weeks after a local hyperthermia treatment. In vivo magnetic resonance imaging exhibited enhanced T2 contrast in the tumor region. Conclusion This work has demonstrated the feasibility of cancer theranostics with PEG-MNPs. PMID:26606855

  2. [Preparation and evaluation of press-coated aminophylline tablet using crystalline cellulose and polyethylene glycol in the outer shell for timed-release dosage forms].

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yoshiteru; Mukai, Baku; Kawamura, Ken-ichi; Ishikawa, Tatsuya; Namiki, Michihiro; Utoguchi, Naoki; Fujii, Makiko

    2002-02-01

    In an attempt to achieve chronopharmacotherapy for asthma, press-coated tablets (250 mg), which contained aminophylline in the core tablet in the form of low-substituted hydroxypropylcellulose (L-HPC) and coated with crystalline cellulose (PH-102) and polyethylene glycol (PEG) at various molecular weights and mixing ratios in the amounts of PH-102 and PEG as the outer shell (press-coating material), were prepared (chronopharmaceutics). Their applicability as timed-release (delayed-release) tablets with a lag time of disintegration and a subsequent rapid drug release phase was investigated. Various types of press-coated tablets were prepared using a tableting machine, and their aminophylline dissolution profiles were evaluated by the JP paddle method. Tablets with the timed-release characteristics could be prepared, and the lag time of disintegration was prolonged as the molecular weight and the amount of PEG, for example PEG 500,000, in the outer shell were increased. The lag time of disintegration could be controlled by the above-mentioned method, however, the pH of the medium had no effect on disintegration of the tablet and dissolution behavior of theophylline. The press-coated tablet (core tablet:aminophylline 50 mg, L-HPC and PEG 6000; outer shell:PH-102:PEG = 8:2 200 mg) with the timed-release characteristics was administered orally to rabbits for an in vivo test. Theophylline was first detected in plasma more than 2 h after administration; thus, this tablet showed a timed-release characteristics in the gastrointestinal tract. The time (tmax) required to reach the maximum plasma theophylline concentration (Cmax) observed after administration of the press-coated tablet was significantly (p < 0.05) delayed compared with that observed after administration of aminophylline solution in the control experiment. However, there was no difference in Cmax and area under the plasma theophylline concentration-time curve (AUC0-->24) between the press-coated tablet and

  3. L-shell bifurcation of electron outer belt at the recovery phase of geomagnetic storm as observed by STEP-F and SphinX instruments onboard the CORONAS-Photon satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudnik, Oleksiy; Sylwester, Janusz; Kowalinski, Miroslaw; Podgorski, Piotr

    2016-07-01

    Radiation belts and sporadically arising volumes comprising enhanced charged particle fluxes in the Earth's magnetosphere are typically studied by space-borne telescopes, semiconductor, scintillation, gaseous and other types of detectors. Ambient and internal electron bremsstrahlung in hard X-ray arises as a result of interaction of precipitating particles with the atmosphere (balloon experiments) and with the satellite's housings and instrument boxes (orbital experiments). Theses emissions provide a number of new information on the physics of radiation belts. The energies of primary electrons and their spectra responsible for measured X-ray emissions remain usually unknown. Combined measurements of particle fluxes, and their bremsstrahlung by individual satellite instruments placed next to each other provide insight to respective processes. The satellite telescope of electrons and protons STEP-F and the solar X-ray spectrophotometer SphinX were placed in close proximity to each other aboard CORONAS-Photon, the low, circular and highly inclined orbit satellite. Based on joint analysis of the data we detected new features in the high energy particle distributions of the Earth's magnetosphere during deep minimum of solar activity [1-3]. In this research the bifurcation of Van Allen outer electron radiation belt during the weak geomagnetic storm and during passage of interplanetary shock are discussed. Outer belt bifurcation and growth of electron fluxes in a wide energy range were recorded by both instruments during the recovery phase of May 8, 2009 substorm. STEP-F recorded also barely perceptible outer belt splitting on August 5, 2009, after arrival of interplanetary shock to the Earth's magnetosphere bowshock. The STEP-F and SphinX data are compared with the space weather indexes, and with relativistic electron fluxes observed at geostationary orbit. We discuss possible mechanism of the phenomena consisting in the splitting of drift shells because of Earth

  4. Removal of Escherichia coli, Enterococcus fecalis, coliphage MS2, poliovirus, and hepatitis A virus from oysters (Crassostrea virginica) and hard shell clams (Mercinaria mercinaria) by depuration.

    PubMed

    Love, David C; Lovelace, Greg L; Sobsey, Mark D

    2010-10-15

    Filter-feeding bivalve mollusks (shellfish) can bioaccumulate pathogenic microorganisms in up to 1000-fold higher levels than overlying waters, and therefore disease risks are associated with consuming raw or partially cooked shellfish. Many of these shellfish-borne diseases are due to enteric bacteria and viruses associated with fecal contamination. To control shellfish-borne diseases, guidelines for shellfish harvest waters and shellfish meat have been devised, which include cleansing of contaminated shellfish by depuration in controlled systems, heat pasteurization, or relay to clean waters. This study examines the depuration of oysters (Crassostrea virginica) and hard shell clams (Mercinaria mercinaria) in a flow-through depuration system under variable temperature (12 °C, 18 °C, and 25 °C), salinity (8 ppt, 18 ppt, and 28 ppt), turbidity (<1NTU, 10NTU, and 20NTU), pH (pH 7 and pH 8), and algae conditions (0 cells/mL and 50,000 cells/mL), with constant dissolved oxygen (5-7 mg/L). Oysters and hard shell clams were artificially contaminated with enteric microorganisms: Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, coliphage MS2, Poliovirus type-1 and Hepatitis A virus HM-175 (HAV), then depurated in 5-day trials with daily sampling. In oysters, optimizing environmental parameters of water temperature improved E. coli, MS2, poliovirus and HAV depuration, and optimized salinity improved E. coli, E. faecalis, and MS2 depuration rates. In hard shell clams, salinity improved E. coli and E. faecalis depuration rates. Adjusting turbidity, pH or algae did not improve microorganism depuration in either oysters or hard shell clams, with the exception of turbidity on E. faecalis in hard shell clams. Microorganism depuration rates in oysters from greatest to least were: MS2>E. coli>E. faecalis>poliovirus>HAV, and in clams depuration rates from greatest to least were: E. coli>E. faecalis>HAV>MS2>poliovirus. Because E. coli and E. faecalis were removed at faster rates than HAV

  5. Antioxidant response of the hard shelled mussel Mytilus coruscus exposed to reduced pH and oxygen concentration.

    PubMed

    Sui, Yanming; Hu, Menghong; Shang, Yueyong; Wu, Fangli; Huang, Xizhi; Dupont, Sam; Storch, Daniela; Pörtner, Hans-Otto; Li, Jiale; Lu, Weiqun; Wang, Youji

    2017-03-01

    Ocean acidification (OA) and hypoxic events are increasing worldwide problems, their interactive effects have not been well clarified, although their co-occurrence is prevalent. The East China Sea (the Yangtze River estuary area) suffers from not only coastal hypoxia but also pH fluctuation, representing an ideal study site to explore the combined effect of OA and hypoxia on marine bivalves. We experimentally evaluated the antioxidant response of the mussel Mytilus coruscus exposed to three pH levels (8.1, 7.7 and 7.3) at two dissolved oxygen (DO) levels (2.0mgL(-1) and 6.0mgL(-1)) for 72h. Activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, acid phosphatase, and alkaline phosphatase and levels of malondialdehyde were measured in gills and hemolymph. All enzymatic activities in hemolymph and gills followed a similar pattern throughout the experiment duration. Generally, low DO showed greater effects on enzyme activities than elevated CO2. Significant interactions between DO, pH and time were only observed at superoxide dismutase and catalase in both tissues. PCA revealed positive relationships between most enzyme activities in both gills and hemolymph with the exception of alkaline phosphatase activity and the level of malondialdehyde in the hemolymph. Overall, our results suggested that decreased pH and low DO induced similar antioxidant responses in the hard shelled mussel, and showed an additive effect on most enzyme activities. The evaluation of multiple environmental stressors, a more realistic scenario than single ones, is crucial to predict the effect of future global changes on coastal species and our results supply some insights on the potential combined effects of reduced pH and DO on marine bivalves.

  6. Light absorption and plasmon – exciton interaction in three-layer nanorods with a gold core and outer shell composed of molecular J- and H-aggregates of dyes

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, B I; Tyshkunova, E S; Kondorskiy, A D; Lebedev, V S

    2015-12-31

    Optical properties of hybrid rod-like nanoparticles, consisting of a gold core, an intermediate passive organic layer (spacer) and outer layer of ordered molecular cyanine dye aggregates, are experimentally and theoretically investigated. It is shown that these dyes can form not only ordered J-aggregates but also H-aggregates (differing by the packing angle of dye molecules in an aggregate and having other spectral characteristics) in the outer shell of the hybrid nanostructure. Absorption spectra of synthesised three-layer nanorods are recorded, and their sizes are determined. The optical properties of the composite nanostructures under study are found to differ significantly, depending on the type of the molecular aggregate formed in the outer shell. The experimental data are quantitatively explained based on computer simulation using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, and characteristic features of the plasmon – exciton interaction in the systems under study are revealed. (nanophotonics)

  7. One-pot synthesis of biocompatible Te@phenol formaldehyde resin core-shell nanowires with uniform size and unique fluorescent properties by a synergized soft-hard template process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Haisheng; Zhu, Enbo; Zheng, Shunji; Li, Zhengquan; Hu, Yong; Guo, Changfa; Yang, Xingyun; Li, Liangchao; Tong, Guoxiu; Guo, Huichen

    2010-12-01

    One-pot hydrothermal process has been developed to synthesize uniform Te@phenol formaldehyde resin core-shell nanowires with unique fluorescent properties. A synergistic soft-hard template mechanism has been proposed to explain the formation of the core-shell nanowires. The Te@phenol formaldehyde resin core-shell nanowires display unique fluorescent properties, which give strong luminescent emission in the blue-violet and green regions with excitation wavelengths of 270 nm and 402 nm, respectively.

  8. Evaluating the sensitivity, reproducibility and flexibility of a method to test hard shell capsules intended for use in dry powder inhalers.

    PubMed

    Chong, Rosalind H E; Jones, Brian E; Díez, Fernando; Birchall, James C; Coulman, Sion A

    2016-03-16

    Pharmaceutical tests for hard shell capsules are designed for orally administered capsules. The use of capsules in dry powder inhalers is widespread and increasing and therefore more appropriate tests are required to ensure quality and determine if these capsules are fit for purpose. This study aims to determine the flexibility, reproducibility and sensitivity of a quantitative method that is designed to evaluate the puncture characteristics of different capsule shell formulations under different climatic conditions. A puncture testing method was used to generate force displacement curves for five capsule formulations that were stored and tested at two different temperatures (5°C and 19°C). Force-displacement puncture profiles were reproducible for individual capsule shell formulations. The methodology was able to discriminate between capsules produced using different primary materials i.e. gelatin versus hypromellose, as well as more minor changes to capsule formulation i.e. different material grades and excipients. Reduced temperature increased the forces required for capsule puncture however further work is required to confirm its significance. Results indicate the method provides a reproducible and sensitive means of evaluating capsule puncture. Future studies should validate the methodology at different test sites, using different operators and with different capsule shell formulations.

  9. Ocean acidification alters the material properties of Mytilus edulis shells

    PubMed Central

    Fitzer, Susan C.; Zhu, Wenzhong; Tanner, K. Elizabeth; Phoenix, Vernon R.; Kamenos, Nicholas A.; Cusack, Maggie

    2015-01-01

    Ocean acidification (OA) and the resultant changing carbonate saturation states is threatening the formation of calcium carbonate shells and exoskeletons of marine organisms. The production of biominerals in such organisms relies on the availability of carbonate and the ability of the organism to biomineralize in changing environments. To understand how biomineralizers will respond to OA the common blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, was cultured at projected levels of pCO2 (380, 550, 750, 1000 µatm) and increased temperatures (ambient, ambient plus 2°C). Nanoindentation (a single mussel shell) and microhardness testing were used to assess the material properties of the shells. Young's modulus (E), hardness (H) and toughness (KIC) were measured in mussel shells grown in multiple stressor conditions. OA caused mussels to produce shell calcite that is stiffer (higher modulus of elasticity) and harder than shells grown in control conditions. The outer shell (calcite) is more brittle in OA conditions while the inner shell (aragonite) is softer and less stiff in shells grown under OA conditions. Combining increasing ocean pCO2 and temperatures as projected for future global ocean appears to reduce the impact of increasing pCO2 on the material properties of the mussel shell. OA may cause changes in shell material properties that could prove problematic under predation scenarios for the mussels; however, this may be partially mitigated by increasing temperature. PMID:25540244

  10. Ocean acidification alters the material properties of Mytilus edulis shells.

    PubMed

    Fitzer, Susan C; Zhu, Wenzhong; Tanner, K Elizabeth; Phoenix, Vernon R; Kamenos, Nicholas A; Cusack, Maggie

    2015-02-06

    Ocean acidification (OA) and the resultant changing carbonate saturation states is threatening the formation of calcium carbonate shells and exoskeletons of marine organisms. The production of biominerals in such organisms relies on the availability of carbonate and the ability of the organism to biomineralize in changing environments. To understand how biomineralizers will respond to OA the common blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, was cultured at projected levels of pCO2 (380, 550, 750, 1000 µatm) and increased temperatures (ambient, ambient plus 2°C). Nanoindentation (a single mussel shell) and microhardness testing were used to assess the material properties of the shells. Young's modulus (E), hardness (H) and toughness (KIC) were measured in mussel shells grown in multiple stressor conditions. OA caused mussels to produce shell calcite that is stiffer (higher modulus of elasticity) and harder than shells grown in control conditions. The outer shell (calcite) is more brittle in OA conditions while the inner shell (aragonite) is softer and less stiff in shells grown under OA conditions. Combining increasing ocean pCO2 and temperatures as projected for future global ocean appears to reduce the impact of increasing pCO2 on the material properties of the mussel shell. OA may cause changes in shell material properties that could prove problematic under predation scenarios for the mussels; however, this may be partially mitigated by increasing temperature.

  11. Chemical modification of the cocoa shell surface using diazonium salts.

    PubMed

    Fioresi, Flavia; Vieillard, Julien; Bargougui, Radhouane; Bouazizi, Nabil; Fotsing, Patrick Nkuigue; Woumfo, Emmanuel Djoufac; Brun, Nicolas; Mofaddel, Nadine; Le Derf, Franck

    2017-05-15

    The outer portion of the cocoa bean, also known as cocoa husk or cocoa shell (CS), is an agrowaste material from the cocoa industry. Even though raw CS is used as food additive, garden mulch, and soil conditioner or even burnt for fuel, this biomass material has hardly ever been investigated for further modification. This article proposes a strategy of chemical modification of cocoa shell to add value to this natural material. The study investigates the grafting of aryl diazonium salt on cocoa shell. Different diazonium salts were grafted on the shell surface and characterized by infrared spectroscopy and scanning electronic microscopy imaging. Strategies were developed to demonstrate the spontaneous grafting of aryl diazonium salt on cocoa shell and to elucidate that lignin is mainly involved in immobilizing the phenyl layer.

  12. Micromechanical properties and structural characterization of modern inarticulated brachiopod shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkel, C.; Griesshaber, E.; Kelm, K.; Neuser, R.; Jordan, G.; Logan, A.; Mader, W.; Schmahl, W. W.

    2007-06-01

    We investigated micromechanical properties and ultrastructure of the shells of the modern brachiopod species Lingula anatina, Discinisca laevis, and Discradisca stella with scanning electron microscopy (SEM, EDX), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Vickers microhardness indentation analyses. The shells are composed of two distinct layers, an outer primary layer and an inner secondary layer. Except for the primary layer in Lingula anatina, which is composed entirely of organic matter, all other shell layers are laminated organic/inorganic composites. The organic matter is built of chitin fibers, which provide the matrix for the incorporation of calcium phosphate. Amorphous calcium phosphate in the outer, primary layer and crystalline apatite is deposited into the inner, secondary layer of the shell. Apatite crystallite sizes in the umbonal region of the shell are about 50 × 50 nm, while within the valves crystallite sizes are significantly smaller, averanging 10 × 25 nm. There is great variation in hardness values between shell layers and between the investigated brachiopod species. The microhardness of the investigated shells is significantly lower than that of inorganic hydroxyapatite. This is caused by the predominantly organic material component that in these shells is either developed as purely organic layers or as an organic fibrous matrix reinforced by crystallites. Our results show that this particular fiber composite material is very efficient for the protection and the support of the soft animal tissue. It lowers the probability of crack formation and effectively impedes crack propagation perpendicular to the shell by crack-deviation mechanisms. The high degree of mechanical stability and toughness is achieved by two design features. First, there is the fiber composite material which overcomes some detrimental and enhances some advantageous properties of the single constituents, that is the softness and flexibility of chitin and the hardness and

  13. A theoretical CMS-X α treatment of CH 3I photoionization dynamics: outer valence shell and iodine 4d levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powis, Ivan

    1995-12-01

    Continuum multiple scattering (CMS-X α) calculations are used to investigate methyl iodide photoionization dynamics. The validity of atomic versus molecular models of behaviour for the localised iodine 4d and 5p (lone pair) electrons, where conflicting experimental interpretations have been offered, is examined. A good account of all the available experimental data is obtained. While the calculations provide some limited support for an atomic-like description of the iodine 4d -1 phenomenological cross-section, the atomic picture has little validity for the 5p -1 ionization. Variations in both cross-section and β parameter which were previously ascribed to the Cooper minimum are identified to be more likely a core-valence shell interaction, opening above the 4d -1 threshold. The other valence shell channels are similarly affected. Significant l-wave mixing, induced by the molecular anisotropy, is found to result in the creation of mixed parity final states, contrary to the atomic model. In these circumstances odd and even harmonic components can interfere to create orientation (odd harmonic terms) in the photoelectron angular distribution (PAD). Molecule frame PADs are calculated and compared to experimental data for the ionization of oriented molecules, confirming an intuitive expectation of asymmetric electron emission from an asymmetric molecule. The CH 3 group therefore acts as a non-negligible perturbation, even on quite localised iodine 5p electrons, and the molecular environment is a paramount factor.

  14. Material with core-shell structure

    DOEpatents

    Luhrs, Claudia [Rio Rancho, NM; Richard, Monique N [Ann Arbor, MI; Dehne, Aaron [Maumee, OH; Phillips, Jonathan [Rio Rancho, NM; Stamm, Kimber L [Ann Arbor, MI; Fanson, Paul T [Brighton, MI

    2011-11-15

    Disclosed is a material having a composite particle, the composite particle including an outer shell and a core. The core is made from a lithium alloying material and the outer shell has an inner volume that is greater in size than the core of the lithium alloying material. In some instances, the outer mean diameter of the outer shell is less than 500 nanometers and the core occupies between 5 and 99% of the inner volume. In addition, the outer shell can have an average wall thickness of less than 100 nanometers.

  15. Multi-Shell Hollow Nanogels with Responsive Shell Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Andreas J.; Dubbert, Janine; Rudov, Andrey A.; Pedersen, Jan Skov; Lindner, Peter; Karg, Matthias; Potemkin, Igor I.; Richtering, Walter

    2016-01-01

    We report on hollow shell-shell nanogels with two polymer shells that have different volume phase transition temperatures. By means of small angle neutron scattering (SANS) employing contrast variation and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations we show that hollow shell-shell nanocontainers are ideal systems for controlled drug delivery: The temperature responsive swelling of the inner shell controls the uptake and release, while the thermoresponsive swelling of the outer shell controls the size of the void and the colloidal stability. At temperatures between 32 °C < T < 42 °C, the hollow nanocontainers provide a significant void, which is even larger than the initial core size of the template, and they possess a high colloidal stability due to the steric stabilization of the swollen outer shell. Computer simulations showed, that temperature induced switching of the permeability of the inner shell allows for the encapsulation in and release of molecules from the cavity. PMID:26984478

  16. Outer-shell photodetachment of the metastable Be{sup -} 1s{sup 2}2s2p{sup 2} {sup 4}P{sup e} state

    SciTech Connect

    Sanz-Vicario, Jose Luis; Lindroth, Eva

    2003-07-01

    We report calculated photodetachment cross sections from the metastable Be{sup -} 1s{sup 2}2s2p{sup 2} {sup 4}P{sup e} state in the photon energy range 0-10 eV. Outer-shell photodetachment takes place in this energy range, which includes the double-ionization threshold Be{sup +}({sup 2}S{sup e}) at {approx}7 eV as well as doubly excited thresholds of the residual atom up to the Be(1s{sup 2}2p4f) threshold at {approx}10 eV. Therefore, triply excited states of Be{sup -} are reached within the selected photon energy. We have implemented the complex scaled configuration interaction method along with a model potential for the 1s{sup 2} core to uncover the first series of Be{sup -} {sup 4}L{sup o} resonant states. In this work, four {sup 4}P{sup o}, seven {sup 4}D{sup o}, and two {sup 4}S{sup o} resonances are reported and we compare our cross section with other previous theoretical calculations, that reported none or, at most, two resonances.

  17. The ultrastructure of shelled and unshelled cashew nuts.

    PubMed

    Muniz, Celli R; Freire, Francisco C O; Soares, Arlete Aparecida; Cooke, Peter H; Guedes, Maria I F

    2013-01-01

    Cashew nuts have many attributes, including sensory, nutritional and health appeal, which contribute to their worldwide acceptance. We demonstrate details of the microstructure of shelled and unshelled cashew kernels with regard to pericarp and cotyledon organization. This study also provides evidence of the colonization of these kernels by filamentous fungi. Nuts were examined by scanning electron and confocal scanning laser microscopy. Staining with acridine orange was performed. A tight lignified palisade layer adjacent to the exocarp surface explains the hardness of the shell's pericarp. The mesocarp contains large secretory cavities that confer a spongy property to this tissue. Papillose cells, which are responsible for secreting CNSL (cashew nutshell liquid), were observed to cover the inner wall of these cavities. Lipid components are readily released from the parenchyma and appear as oil droplets. The outer surface of the shelled samples exhibited a dense Aspergillus infestation.

  18. Inner shell radial pin geometry and mounting arrangement

    DOEpatents

    Leach, David; Bergendahl, Peter Allen

    2002-01-01

    Circumferentially spaced arrays of support pins are disposed through access openings in an outer turbine shell and have projections received in recesses in forward and aft sections of an inner turbine shell supported from the outer shell. The projections have arcuate sides in a circumferential direction affording line contacts with the side walls of the recesses and are spaced from end faces of the recesses, enabling radial and axial expansion and contraction of the inner shell relative to the outer shell. All loads are taken up in a tangential direction by the outer shell with the support pins taking no radial loadings.

  19. Shell forming apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Granett, Dan (Inventor); Akutagawa, Wesley M. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A nozzle assembly is described for use in a system that forms small gas-filled shells, which avoids the need for holding a miniature inner nozzle precisely concentric with a miniature outer nozzle. The outer nozzle has a diameter which is less than about 0.7 millimeter, which results in fluid passing through the nozzle having a progressively greater velocity at locations progressively further from the walls of the outer nozzle across most of the nozzle. This highly variable velocity profile automatically forces gas to the center of the outer nozzle. The end of the inner nozzle, which emits gas, is spaced upstream from the tip of the outer nozzle, to provide a distance along which to center the gas. This self-centering characteristic permits the inner nozzle to be positioned so its axis is not concentric with the axis of the outer nozzle.

  20. Multiple shell fusion targets

    DOEpatents

    Lindl, J.D.; Bangerter, R.O.

    1975-10-31

    Multiple shell fusion targets for use with electron beam and ion beam implosion systems are described. The multiple shell targets are of the low-power type and use a separate relatively low Z, low density ablator at large radius for the outer shell, which reduces the focusing and power requirements of the implosion system while maintaining reasonable aspect ratios. The targets use a high Z, high density pusher shell placed at a much smaller radius in order to obtain an aspect ratio small enough to protect against fluid instability. Velocity multiplication between these shells further lowers the power requirements. Careful tuning of the power profile and intershell density results in a low entropy implosion which allows breakeven at low powers. For example, with ion beams as a power source, breakeven at 10-20 Terrawatts with 10 MeV alpha particles for imploding a multiple shell target can be accomplished.

  1. 46 CFR 154.170 - Outer hull steel plating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Outer hull steel plating. 154.170 Section 154.170... Structure § 154.170 Outer hull steel plating. (a) Except as required in paragraph (b) of this section, the outer hull steel plating, including the shell and deck plating must meet the material standards of...

  2. 46 CFR 154.170 - Outer hull steel plating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Outer hull steel plating. 154.170 Section 154.170... Structure § 154.170 Outer hull steel plating. (a) Except as required in paragraph (b) of this section, the outer hull steel plating, including the shell and deck plating must meet the material standards of...

  3. 46 CFR 154.170 - Outer hull steel plating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Outer hull steel plating. 154.170 Section 154.170... Structure § 154.170 Outer hull steel plating. (a) Except as required in paragraph (b) of this section, the outer hull steel plating, including the shell and deck plating must meet the material standards of...

  4. 46 CFR 154.170 - Outer hull steel plating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Outer hull steel plating. 154.170 Section 154.170... Structure § 154.170 Outer hull steel plating. (a) Except as required in paragraph (b) of this section, the outer hull steel plating, including the shell and deck plating must meet the material standards of...

  5. 46 CFR 154.170 - Outer hull steel plating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Outer hull steel plating. 154.170 Section 154.170... Structure § 154.170 Outer hull steel plating. (a) Except as required in paragraph (b) of this section, the outer hull steel plating, including the shell and deck plating must meet the material standards of...

  6. Shell forming system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor); Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    Hollow shells of high uniformity are formed by emitting liquid through an outer nozzle and gas through an inner nozzle, to form a hollow extrusion, by flowing the gas at a velocity between about 1.3 and 10 times the liquid velocity. The natural breakup rate of the extrusion can be increased to decrease shell size by applying periodic perturbations to one of the materials prior to exiting the nozzles, to a nozzle, or to the extrusion.

  7. Thick-shell nanocrystal quantum dots

    DOEpatents

    Hollingsworth, Jennifer A.; Chen, Yongfen; Klimov, Victor I.; Htoon, Han; Vela, Javier

    2011-05-03

    Colloidal nanocrystal quantum dots comprising an inner core having an average diameter of at least 1.5 nm and an outer shell, where said outer shell comprises multiple monolayers, wherein at least 30% of the quantum dots have an on-time fraction of 0.80 or greater under continuous excitation conditions for a period of time of at least 10 minutes.

  8. Optimum rotationally symmetric shells for flywheel rotors

    DOEpatents

    Blake, Henry W.

    2000-01-01

    A flywheel rim support formed from two shell halves. Each of the shell halves has a disc connected to the central shaft. A first shell element connects to the disc at an interface. A second shell element connects to the first shell element. The second shell element has a plurality of meridional slits. A cylindrical shell element connects to the second shell element. The cylindrical shell element connects to the inner surface of the flywheel rim. A flywheel rim support having a disc connected an outer diameter of a shaft. Two optimally shaped shell elements connect to the optimally shaped disc at an interface. The interface defines a discontinuity in a meridional slope of said support. A cylindrical shell element connects to the two shell elements. The cylindrical shell element has an outer surface for connecting to the inner surface of the flywheel rim. A flywheel rim casing includes an annular shell connected to the central shaft. The annular shell connects to the flywheel rim. A composite shell surrounds the shaft, annular shell and flywheel rim.

  9. Removable inner turbine shell with bucket tip clearance control

    DOEpatents

    Sexton, Brendan F.; Knuijt, Hans M.; Eldrid, Sacheverel Q.; Myers, Albert; Coneybeer, Kyle E.; Johnson, David Martin; Kellock, Iain R.

    2000-01-01

    A turbine includes a plurality of inner shell sections mounting first and second stage nozzle and shroud portions. The inner shell sections are pinned to an outer containment shell formed of sections to preclude circumferential movement of the inner shell relative to the outer shell and enable thermal expansion and contraction of the inner shell relative to the outer shell. Positive bucket tip clearance control is afforded by passing a thermal medium about the inner shell in heat transfer relation with the shrouds about the first and second stage bucket tips, the thermal medium being provided from a source of heating/cooling fluid independent of the turbine. Access is provided to the rotor and turbine buckets by removing the outer and inner shell sections.

  10. Protein profiles of hatchery egg shell membrane

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Eggshells, which consist largely of calcareous outer shell and shell membranes, constitute a significant part of poultry hatchery waste. The shell membranes (ESM) not only contain proteins that originate from egg whites but also from the developing embryos and different contaminants of m...

  11. G359.97-0.038: A HARD X-RAY FILAMENT ASSOCIATED WITH A SUPERNOVA SHELL-MOLECULAR CLOUD INTERACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Nynka, Melania; Hailey, Charles J.; Zhang, Shuo; Gotthelf, Eric V.; Mori, Kaya; Perez, Kerstin M.; Morris, Mark M.; Zhao, Jun-Hui; Goss, Miller; Bauer, Franz E.; Boggs, Stephen E.; Craig, William W.; Christensen, Finn E.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Stern, Daniel; Zhang, William W.

    2015-02-20

    We present the first high-energy X-ray (>10 keV) observations of the non-thermal filament G359.97-0.038 using the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR). This filament is one of approximately 20 X-ray filaments of unknown origin located in the central 20 pc region in the Galactic Center near Sgr A*. Its NuSTAR and Chandra broadband spectrum is characterized by a single power law with Γ = 1.3 ± 0.3 that extends from 2 to 50 keV, with an unabsorbed luminosity of 1.3 × 10{sup 33} erg s{sup –1} (d/8 kpc){sup 2} in the 2-8 keV band. Despite possessing a cometary X-ray morphology that is typical of a pulsar wind nebula (PWN) in high-resolution Chandra imaging, our spatially resolved Chandra spectral analysis found no significant spectral softening along the filament as would be expected from particle synchrotron cooling. Coincident radio emission is detected using the Very Large Array at 5.5 and 8.3 GHz. We examine and subsequently discard a PWN or magnetic flux tube as the origin of G359.97-0.038. We use broadband spectral characteristics and a morphological analysis to show that G359.97-0.038 is likely an interaction site between the shell of Sgr A East and an adjacent molecular cloud. This is supported by CS molecular line spectroscopy and the presence of an OH maser.

  12. Method to produce large, uniform hollow spherical shells

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, Charles D.

    1985-01-01

    Large, uniform hollow spherical shells are produced by forming uniform size drops of heat decomposable or vaporizable material, evaporating the drops to form dried particles, coating the dried particles with a layer of shell forming material, and heating the composite particles to melt the outer layer and decompose or vaporize the inner particle to form an expanding inner gas bubble which expands the outer layer. By cycling the temperature and pressure on the hollow shells, spherical shells with uniform walls are produced.

  13. Sound Transmission through Two Concentric Cylindrical Sandwich Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Yvette Y.; Silcox, Richard J.; Robinson, Jay H.

    1996-01-01

    This paper solves the problem of sound transmission through a system of two infinite concentric cylindrical sandwich shells. The shells are surrounded by external and internal fluid media and there is fluid (air) in the annular space between them. An oblique plane sound wave is incident upon the surface of the outer shell. A uniform flow is moving with a constant velocity in the external fluid medium. Classical thin shell theory is applied to the inner shell and first-order shear deformation theory is applied to the outer shell. A closed form for transmission loss is derived based on modal analysis. Investigations have been made for the impedance of both shells and the transmission loss through the shells from the exterior into the interior. Results are compared for double sandwich shells and single sandwich shells. This study shows that: (1) the impedance of the inner shell is much smaller than that of the outer shell so that the transmission loss is almost the same in both the annular space and the interior cavity of the shells; (2) the two concentric sandwich shells can produce an appreciable increase of transmission loss over single sandwich shells especially in the high frequency range; and (3) design guidelines may be derived with respect to the noise reduction requirement and the pressure in the annular space at a mid-frequency range.

  14. Ocean worlds in the outer solar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimmo, F.; Pappalardo, R. T.

    2016-08-01

    Many outer solar system bodies are thought to harbor liquid water oceans beneath their ice shells. This article first reviews how such oceans are detected. We then discuss how they are maintained, when they formed, and what the oceans' likely characteristics are. We focus in particular on Europa, Ganymede, Callisto, Titan, and Enceladus, bodies for which there is direct evidence of subsurface oceans. We also consider candidate ocean worlds such as Pluto and Triton.

  15. Fabrication of diamond shells

    SciTech Connect

    Hamza, Alex V.; Biener, Juergen; Wild, Christoph; Woerner, Eckhard

    2016-11-01

    A novel method for fabricating diamond shells is introduced. The fabrication of such shells is a multi-step process, which involves diamond chemical vapor deposition on predetermined mandrels followed by polishing, microfabrication of holes, and removal of the mandrel by an etch process. The resultant shells of the present invention can be configured with a surface roughness at the nanometer level (e.g., on the order of down to about 10 nm RMS) on a mm length scale, and exhibit excellent hardness/strength, and good transparency in the both the infra-red and visible. Specifically, a novel process is disclosed herein, which allows coating of spherical substrates with optical-quality diamond films or nanocrystalline diamond films.

  16. Method of fabricating nested shells and resulting product

    DOEpatents

    Henderson, Timothy M.; Kool, Lawrence B.

    1982-01-01

    A multiple shell structure and a method of manufacturing such structure wherein a hollow glass microsphere is surface treated in an organosilane solution so as to render the shell outer surface hydrophobic. The surface treated glass shell is then suspended in the oil phase of an oil-aqueous phase dispersion. The oil phase includes an organic film-forming monomer, a polymerization initiator and a blowing agent. A polymeric film forms at each phase boundary of the dispersion and is then expanded in a blowing operation so as to form an outer homogeneously integral monocellular substantially spherical thermoplastic shell encapsulating an inner glass shell of lesser diameter.

  17. Large ultrathin shelled drops produced via non-confined microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Chaurasia, Ankur S; Josephides, Dimitris N; Sajjadi, Shahriar

    2015-02-02

    We present a facile approach for producing large and monodisperse core-shell drops with ultrathin shells using a single-step process. A biphasic compound jet is introduced into a quiescent third (outer) phase that ruptures to form core-shell drops. Ultrathin shelled drops could only be produced within a certain range of surfactant concentrations and flow rates, highlighting the effect of interfacial tension in engulfing the core in a thin shell. An increase in surfactant concentrations initially resulted in drops with thinner shells. However, the drops with thinnest shells were obtained at an optimum surfactant concentration, and a further increase in the surfactant concentrations increased the shell thickness. Highly monodisperse (coefficient of variation smaller than 3 %) core-shell drops with diameter of ∼200 μm-2 mm with shell thickness as small as ∼2 μm were produced. The resulting drops were stable enough to undergo polymerisation and produce ultrathin shelled capsules.

  18. Turbine blade with spar and shell

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, Daniel O; Peterson, Ross H

    2012-04-24

    A turbine blade with a spar and shell construction in which the spar and the shell are both secured within two platform halves. The spar and the shell each include outward extending ledges on the bottom ends that fit within grooves formed on the inner sides of the platform halves to secure the spar and the shell against radial movement when the two platform halves are joined. The shell is also secured to the spar by hooks extending from the shell that slide into grooves formed on the outer surface of the spar. The hooks form a serpentine flow cooling passage between the shell and the spar. The spar includes cooling holes on the lower end in the leading edge region to discharge cooling air supplied through the platform root and into the leading edge cooling channel.

  19. Hollow silica capsules with well-defined asymmetric windows in the shell.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bo; Collinson, Maryanne M

    2012-05-15

    A straightforward and effective approach to fabricate porous silica capsules with well-defined asymmetric windows in the shell using raspberry-like templates has been developed. This process begins with the formation of a hierarchical template by chemically coupling a large polystyrene sphere to an ensemble of small, polystyrene latex spheres. The hierarchical template in conjunction with a hard templating method and spin-coating leads to silica capsules with well-defined, asymmetric pores (windows) in the outer shell. Proof-of-principle of this approach has been demonstrated using a 1500/110 nm hierarchical template. The silica capsules thus produced were characterized with scanning electron microscopy and STEM. The diameter of the capsules was ~1400 nm, and the outer opening of the windows was ~100 nm in size, consistent with the diameters of the core and satellite spheres considering the shrinkage due to the calcination. The inner opening was ~30 nm, which gives rise to an asymmetry factor, defined as the diameter of the outer window to the diameter of the inner window, of ~3. In another example, surface-bound capsules with an asymmetry factor of ~1 were made. Collectively, these windows can provide efficient pathways to connect the inside of the capsule to the outside and have potential for asymmetric diffusion and rectification.

  20. Mass variation tests for coating tablets and hard capsules: rational application of mass variation tests.

    PubMed

    Katori, Noriko; Aoyagi, Nobuo; Kojima, Shigeo

    2002-09-01

    The mass variation test is a simplified alternative test version of the content uniformity test. In the case of coating tablets and capsules, the mass variation test is principally applied to test the inner cores or fillings containing the active ingredient. However, some exceptions exist in pharmacopoeias. The effects of tablet coating and capsule shell on the results of the mass variation test were studied. The mass variation of outer crusts (coatings, capsule shells) and inner cores (core tablets, fillings) was measured separately in several products. The effects of coating on weight variability were very large for sugar-coated tablets. Relative standard deviation (RSD) of the formulation weight (RSD(W)) of sugar-coated tablets (2.73%) was larger than that of plain tablets (0.77%). The cause of the large RSD(W) is the large variation the weight of sugar-coating accounting for 44% of formulation weight. In the case of film-coated tablets, the effect of coating weight on the mass variation test was very small because the rate of coating in comparison to the whole weight was small. In the case of hard capsules, the usage of whole formulation weight resulted in underestimation of variations of filling weight. The differences between dosage forms in the applicability of the mass variation test are caused by differing weight proportions and variability of the outer coatings or shells. To avoid the underestimation of mass variation for hard capsules, a corrected acceptance value is useful. For all the dosage units, the mass variation test can principally be applied to determine which mass is expected to be proportional to the content of the active ingredient. However, some modification of acceptance values enables application of the mass variation tests to inapplicable cases, such as when the RSD of drug concentration (RSD(C)) is larger than 2%.

  1. Outer planet satellites

    SciTech Connect

    Schenk, P.M. )

    1991-01-01

    Recent findings on the outer-planet satellites are presented, with special consideration given to data on the rheologic properties of ice on icy satellites, the satellite surfaces and exogenic processes, cratering on dead cratered satellites, volcanism, and the interiors of outer-planet satellites. Particular attention is given to the state of Titan's surface and the properties of Triton, Pluto, and Charon. 210 refs.

  2. Mechanical properties of modern calcite- (Mergerlia truncata) and phosphate-shelled brachiopods (Discradisca stella and Lingula anatina) determined by nanoindentation.

    PubMed

    Merkel, Casjen; Deuschle, Julia; Griesshaber, Erika; Enders, Susan; Steinhauser, Erwin; Hochleitner, Rupert; Brand, Uwe; Schmahl, Wolfgang W

    2009-12-01

    We measured distribution patterns of hardness and elastic modulus by nanoindentation on shells of the rhynchonelliform brachiopod Mergerlia truncata and the linguliform brachiopods Discradisca stella and Lingula anatina. The rhynchonelliformea produce calcitic shells while the linguliformea produce chitinophosphatic shells. Dorsal and ventral valves, commissure and hinge of the calcitic shell of M. truncata show different nanohardness values (from 2.3 to 4.6 GPa) and E-modulus (from 52 to 76 GPa). The hardness of the biocalcite is always increased compared to inorganic calcite. We attribute the effects to different amounts of inter- and intracrystalline organic matrix. Profiles parallel to the radius of curvature of the valves cutting through the different layers of shell material surprisingly show quite uniform values of nanohardness and modulus of elasticity. Nanoindentation tests on the chitinophosphatic brachiopods D. stella and L. anatina reflect the hierarchical structure composed of laminae with varying degree of mineralization. As a result of the two-phase composite of biopolymer nanofibrils reinforced with Ca-phosphate nanoparticles, nanohardness, and E-modulus correlate almost linearly from (H=0.25 GPa, E=2.5 GPa) to (H=2.5 GPa, E=50 GPa). The mineral provides stiffness and hardness, the biopolymer provides flexibility; and the composite provides fracture toughness. Gradients in the degree of mineralization reduce potential stress concentrations at the interface between stiff mineralized and soft non-mineralized laminae. For the epibenthic chitinophosphatic D. stella the lamination is also present but less pronounced than for the infaunal L. anatina, and the overall distribution of material strength in the cross-sectional profile shows a maximum in the center and a decrease towards the inner and outer shell margins (modulus of elasticity from 30 to 12 GPa, hardness from 1.7 to 0.5 GPa). Accordingly, the two epibenthic forms, calcitic M. truncata and

  3. Ionic bonding of lanthanides, as influenced by d- and f-atomic orbitals, by core-shells and by relativity.

    PubMed

    Ji, Wen-Xin; Xu, Wei; Schwarz, W H Eugen; Wang, Shu-Guang

    2015-03-15

    Lanthanide trihalide molecules LnX3 (X = F, Cl, Br, I) were quantum chemically investigated, in particular detail for Ln = Lu (lutetium). We applied density functional theory (DFT) at the nonrelativistic and scalar and SO-coupled relativistic levels, and also the ab initio coupled cluster approach. The chemically active electron shells of the lanthanide atoms comprise the 5d and 6s (and 6p) valence atomic orbitals (AO) and also the filled inner 4f semivalence and outer 5p semicore shells. Four different frozen-core approximations for Lu were compared: the (1s(2) -4d(10) ) [Pd] medium core, the [Pd+5s(2) 5p(6) = Xe] and [Pd+4f(14) ] large cores, and the [Pd+4f(14) +5s(2) 5p(6) ] very large core. The errors of LuX bonding are more serious on freezing the 5p(6) shell than the 4f(14) shell, more serious upon core-freezing than on the effective-core-potential approximation. The LnX distances correlate linearly with the AO radii of the ionic outer shells, Ln(3+) -5p(6) and X(-) -np(6) , characteristic for dominantly ionic Ln(3+) -X(-) binding. The heavier halogen atoms also bind covalently with the Ln-5d shell. Scalar relativistic effects contract and destabilize the LuX bonds, spin orbit coupling hardly affects the geometries but the bond energies, owing to SO effects in the free atoms. The relativistic changes of bond energy BE, bond length Re , bond force k, and bond stretching frequency vs do not follow the simple rules of Badger and Gordy (Re ∼BE∼k∼vs ). The so-called degeneracy-driven covalence, meaning strong mixing of accidentally near-degenerate, nearly nonoverlapping AOs without BE contribution is critically discussed.

  4. Saturn's outer magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schardt, A. W.; Behannon, K. W.; Carbary, J. F.; Eviatar, A.; Lepping, R. P.; Siscoe, G. L.

    1983-01-01

    Similarities between the Saturnian and terrestrial outer magnetosphere are examined. Saturn, like Earth, has a fully developed magnetic tail, 80 to 100 RS in diameter. One major difference between the two outer magnetospheres is the hydrogen and nitrogen torus produced by Titan. This plasma is, in general, convected in the corotation direction at nearly the rigid corotation speed. Energies of magnetospheric particles extend to above 500 keV. In contrast, interplanetary protons and ions above 2 MeV have free access to the outer magnetosphere to distances well below the Stormer cutoff. This access presumably occurs through the magnetotail. In addition to the H+, H2+, and H3+ ions primarily of local origin, energetic He, C, N, and O ions are found with solar composition. Their flux can be substantially enhanced over that of interplanetary ions at energies of 0.2 to 0.4 MeV/nuc.

  5. 75 FR 54369 - BOEMRE Information Collection Activity: 1010-NEW, Upcoming Projects Considering the Use of Outer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-07

    ...: 1010-NEW, Upcoming Projects Considering the Use of Outer Continental Shelf Sand, Gravel, and Shell... paperwork requirements that respondents will submit to BOEMRE to obtain OCS sand, gravel, and shell...-1275. Marine Minerals Program information and procedures for obtaining sand, gravel, and...

  6. 76 FR 3152 - Agency Information Collection Activity: 1010-NEW, Upcoming Projects Considering the Use of Outer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-19

    ...: 1010-NEW, Upcoming Projects Considering the Use of Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Sand, Gravel, and... respondents will submit to BOEMRE to obtain OCS sand, gravel, and shell resources for use in shore protection... obtaining sand, gravel, and shell resources can be found on the BOEMRE Web site...

  7. Law in Outer Space.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, William G.

    1997-01-01

    Provides an overview of the current practice and fascinating future of legal issues involved in outer space exploration and colonization. Current space law, by necessity, addresses broad principles rather than specific incidents. Nonetheless, it covers a variety of issues including commercial development, rescue agreements, object registration,…

  8. Acoustic radiation from single and double ribbed circular cylindrical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burroughs, C. B.; Hayek, S. I.; Hallander, J. E.; Bostian, D. A.

    1984-03-01

    Measurements of the acoustic radiation from single and double ribbed circular cylindrical shells were made on the NUSC Transducer Calibration Platform (TCP) in Lake Seneca, NY. Six different types of mechanical drives were used at each of three locations inside the inner shell. Measurements of the shell vibration and acoustic radiation were made with and without outer shells installed around the inner shell structure. For two types of drives, measurements were made with a pressure release layer installed between the inner and outer shell surfaces. Acoustic radiation measurements were made as a function of frequency from 20 to 5,000 Hz and as a function of observation direction at several frequencies for each shell and drive measurement configuration. Measured acoustic radiation data as a function of frequency have been processed. Analysis of the processed data is presented and discussed. It is shown that the location of the drive had a significant effect on the acoustic radiation. The outer shell reduced the acoustic radiation at shell resonant frequencies, but had little effect on other frequencies. The pressure release layer in the double shell had little effect on the acoustic radiation.

  9. The ultimate step towards a tailored engineering of core@shell and core@shell@shell nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Llamosa, D; Ruano, M; Martínez, L; Mayoral, A; Roman, E; García-Hernández, M; Huttel, Y

    2014-11-21

    Complex core@shell and core@shell@shell nanoparticles are systems that combine the functionalities of the inner core and outer shell materials together with new physico-chemical properties originated by their low (nano) dimensionality. Such nanoparticles are of prime importance in the fast growing field of nanotechnology as building blocks for more sophisticated systems and a plethora of applications. Here, it is shown that although conceptually simple a modified gas aggregation approach allows the one-step generation of well-controlled complex nanoparticles. In particular, it is demonstrated that the atoms of the core and the shell of the nanoparticles can be easily inverted, avoiding intrinsic constraints of chemical methods.

  10. Probabilistic Dynamic Buckling of Smart Composite Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Abumeri, Galib H.

    2007-01-01

    A computational simulation method is presented to evaluate the deterministic and nondeterministic dynamic buckling of smart composite shells. The combined use of intraply hybrid composite mechanics, finite element computer codes, and probabilistic analysis enable the effective assessment of the dynamic buckling load of smart composite shells. A universal plot is generated to estimate the dynamic buckling load of composite shells at various load rates and probabilities. The shell structure is also evaluated with smart fibers embedded in the plies right next to the outer plies. The results show that, on the average, the use of smart fibers improved the shell buckling resistance by about 10% at different probabilities and delayed the buckling occurrence time. The probabilistic sensitivities results indicate that uncertainties in the fiber volume ratio and ply thickness have major effects on the buckling load while uncertainties in the electric field strength and smart material volume fraction have moderate effects. For the specific shell considered in this evaluation, the use of smart composite material is not recommended because the shell buckling resistance can be improved by simply re-arranging the orientation of the outer plies, as shown in the dynamic buckling analysis results presented in this report.

  11. Probabilistic Dynamic Buckling of Smart Composite Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abumeri, Galib H.; Chamis, Christos C.

    2003-01-01

    A computational simulation method is presented to evaluate the deterministic and nondeterministic dynamic buckling of smart composite shells. The combined use of composite mechanics, finite element computer codes, and probabilistic analysis enable the effective assessment of the dynamic buckling load of smart composite shells. A universal plot is generated to estimate the dynamic buckling load of composite shells at various load rates and probabilities. The shell structure is also evaluated with smart fibers embedded in the plies right below the outer plies. The results show that, on the average, the use of smart fibers improved the shell buckling resistance by about 10 percent at different probabilities and delayed the buckling occurrence time. The probabilistic sensitivities results indicate that uncertainties in the fiber volume ratio and ply thickness have major effects on the buckling load while uncertainties in the electric field strength and smart material volume fraction have moderate effects. For the specific shell considered in this evaluation, the use of smart composite material is not recommended because the shell buckling resistance can be improved by simply re-arranging the orientation of the outer plies, as shown in the dynamic buckling analysis results presented in this report.

  12. Nuclear interlevel transfer driven by collective outer shell electron oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Rinker, G.A.; Solem, J.G.; Biedenharn, L.C.

    1986-10-20

    The general problem of dynamic electron-nucleus coupling is discussed, and the possibility of using this mechanism to initiate gamma-ray lasing. Single-particle and collective mechanisms are considered. The problems associated with accurate calculation of these processes are discussed, and some numerical results are given. Work in process in described. 10 refs., 7 figs.

  13. Shell Games.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkinson, Bill

    1982-01-01

    The author critiques the program design and educational aspects of the Shell Games, a program developed by Apple Computer, Inc., which can be used by the teacher to design objective tests for adaptation to specific assessment needs. (For related articles, see EC 142 959-962.) (Author)

  14. Supercooling Self-Assembly of Magnetic Shelled Core/Shell Supraparticles.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiaotong; Yan, Bingyun; Wu, Fengluan; Zhang, Jinlong; Qu, Shuxin; Zhou, Shaobing; Weng, Jie

    2016-09-14

    Molecular self-assembly has emerged as a powerful technique for controlling the structure and properties of core/shell structured supraparticles. However, drug-loading capacities and therapeutic effects of self-assembled magnetic core/shell nanocarriers with magnetic nanoparticles in the core are limited by the intervention of the outer organic or inorganic shell, the aggregation of superparamagnetic nanoparticles, the narrowed inner cavity, etc. Here, we present a self-assembly approach based on rebalancing hydrogen bonds between components under a supercooling process to form a new core/shell nanoscale supraparticle with magnetic nanoparticles as the shell and a polysaccharide as a core. Compared with conventional iron oxide nanoparticles, this magnetic shelled core/shell nanoparticle possesses an optimized inner cavity and a loss-free outer magnetic property. Furthermore, we find that the drug-loaded magnetic shelled nanocarriers showed interesting in vitro release behaviors at different pH conditions, including "swelling-broken", "dissociating-broken", and "bursting-broken" modes. Our experiments demonstrate the novel design of the multifunctional hybrid nanostructure and provide a considerable potential for the biomedical applications.

  15. Vibration of Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leissa, A. W.

    1973-01-01

    The vibrational characteristics and mechanical properties of shell structures are discussed. The subjects presented are: (1) fundamental equations of thin shell theory, (2) characteristics of thin circular cylindrical shells, (3) complicating effects in circular cylindrical shells, (4) noncircular cylindrical shell properties, (5) characteristics of spherical shells, and (6) solution of three-dimensional equations of motion for cylinders.

  16. Energetic particle drift motions in the outer dayside magnetosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, R.M.

    1987-12-01

    Models of the geomagnetic field predict that within a distance of approximately one earth radius inside the dayside magnetopause, magnetic fields produced by the Chapman-Ferraro magnetopause currents create high-latitude minimum-B ''pockets'' in the geomagnetic field. Drift-shell branching caused by the minimum-B pockets is analyzed and interpreted in terms of an adiabatic shell branching and rejoining process. We examine the shell-branching process for a static field in detail, using the Choe-Beard 1974 magnetospheric magnetic field model. We find that shell branching annd rejoining conserves the particle mirror field B/sub M/, the fieldline integral invariant I, and the directional electron flux j. We determine the spatial extent of the stable trapping regions for the Choe-Beard model. We develop an adiabatic branching map methodology which completely identifies and describes the location of shell-branching points and the adiabatic trajectories of particles on branched shells, for any model field. We employ the map to develop synthetic pitch angle distributions near the dayside magnetopause by adiabatically transforming observed midnight distributions to the dayside. We find that outer dayside lines contain particles moving on branched and unbranched shells, giving rise to distinctive pitch angle distribution features. We find a good correlation between the pitch angles which mark the transition from branched to unbranched shells in the model, and the distinctive features of the OGO-5 distributions. In the morning sector, we observe large flux changes at critical pitch angles which correspond to B-pocket edges in the model. Measurements on inbound passes in the afternoon sector show first the adiabatic particle shadow, then the arrival of fluxes on rejoined shells, then fluxes on unbranced shells - in accord with model predictions. 204 refs., 138 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Building Atoms Shell by Shell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sussman, Beverly

    1993-01-01

    Describes an atom-building activity where students construct three-dimensional models of atoms using a styrofoam ball as the nucleus and pom-poms, gum drops, minimarshmallows, or other small items of two different colors to represent protons and neutrons attached. Rings of various sizes with pom-poms attached represent electron shells and…

  18. Outer Solar System Nomenclature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, Tobias C.

    1998-01-01

    The Principal Investigator's responsibilities on this grant fell into two categories according to his participation. In the nomenclature work of the International Astronomical Union (IAU). Owen is chair of the Task Group for the Outer Solar System. He is also a member of the IAU's Working Group on Planetary and Satellite Nomenclature (WGPSN) which is composed of the chairs of the several Task Groups plus the presidents of two IAU Commissions and several outside consultants. The WGPSN is presided over by its President, Professor Kaare Aksnes from the Rosseland Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics in Oslo, Norway.

  19. Jupiter's outer atmosphere.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brice, N. M.

    1973-01-01

    The current state of the theory of Jupiter's outer atmosphere is briefly reviewed. The similarities and dissimilarities between the terrestrial and Jovian upper atmospheres are discussed, including the interaction of the solar wind with the planetary magnetic fields. Estimates of Jovian parameters are given, including magnetosphere and auroral zone sizes, ionospheric conductivity, energy inputs, and solar wind parameters at Jupiter. The influence of the large centrifugal force on the cold plasma distribution is considered. The Jovian Van Allen belt is attributed to solar wind particles diffused in toward the planet by dynamo electric fields from ionospheric neutral winds, and the consequences of this theory are indicated.

  20. Shell worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Kenneth I.; Kennedy, Robert G., III; Fields, David E.

    2013-02-01

    The traditional concept of terraforming assumes ready availability of candidate planets with acceptable qualities: orbiting a star in its "Goldilocks zone", liquid water, enough mass, years longer than days, magnetic field, etc. But even stipulating affordable interstellar travel, we still might never find a good candidate elsewhere. Whatever we found likely would require centuries of heavy terraforming, just as Mars or Venus would here. Our increasing appreciation of the ubiquity of life suggests that any terra nova would already possess it. We would then face the dilemma of introducing alien life forms (us, our microbes) into another living world. Instead, we propose a novel method to create habitable environments for humanity by enclosing airless, sterile, otherwise useless planets, moons, and even large asteroids within engineered shells, which avoids the conundrum. These shells are subject to two opposing internal stresses: compression due to the primary's gravity, and tension from atmospheric pressure contained inside. By careful design, these two cancel each other resulting in zero net shell stress. Beneath the shell an Earth-like environment could be created similar in almost all respects to that of Home, except for gravity, regardless of the distance to the sun or other star. Englobing a small planet, moon, or even a dwarf planet like Ceres, would require astronomical amounts of material (quadrillions of tons) and energy, plus a great deal of time. It would be a quantum leap in difficulty over building Dyson Dots or industrializing our solar system, perhaps comparable to a mission across interstellar space with a living crew within their lifetime. But when accomplished, these constructs would be complete (albeit small) worlds, not merely large habitats. They could be stable across historic timescales, possibly geologic. Each would contain a full, self-sustaining ecology, which might evolve in curious directions over time. This has interesting implications

  1. Physics Considerations for Double-Shell Capsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daughton, W.; Montgomery, D. S.; Wilson, D.; Simakov, A.; Dodd, E.; Merritt, L.; Cardenas, T.; Kline, J. L.; Batha, S.

    2016-10-01

    Double-shell capsules offer an alternative approach for achieving burn on the National Ignition Facility. These capsules consist of a low-Z ablatively driven outer shell that converges a factor of 3 before colliding with a high-Z inner shell filled with liquid DT. Such targets permit short simple laser pulses using near vacuum hohlraum conditions, which have been shown to eliminate laser plasma instabilities, resulting in good coupling efficiency. The adiabat of the fuel is set predominantly by a single strong shock, followed by the nearly adiabatic compression of the fuel volume by a convergence ratio of 9 . In this talk, we present some key physics consideration for double-shell targets, including design constraints for optimizing the kinetic energy transfer to the inner shell. These basics considerations are confirmed by a series of 1D simulations, resulting in several optimized point designs. Two-dimensional simulations are employed to evaluate the influence of low-mode asymmetries, as well as the stability of both the outer and inner shells as the implosion proceeds.

  2. Method to produce large, uniform hollow spherical shells

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, C.D.

    1983-09-26

    The invention is a method to produce large uniform hollow spherical shells by (1) forming uniform size drops of heat decomposable or vaporizable material, (2) evaporating the drops to form dried particles, (3) coating the dried particles with a layer of shell forming material and (4) heating the composite particles to melt the outer layer and to decompose or vaporize the inner particle to form an expanding inner gas bubble. The expanding gas bubble forms the molten outer layer into a shell of relatively large diameter. By cycling the temperature and pressure on the molten shell, nonuniformities in wall thickness can be reduced. The method of the invention is utilized to produce large uniform spherical shells, in the millimeter to centimeter diameter size range, from a variety of materials and of high quality, including sphericity, concentricity and surface smoothness, for use as laser fusion or other inertial confinement fusion targets as well as other applications.

  3. The development of the mammalian outer and middle ear.

    PubMed

    Anthwal, Neal; Thompson, Hannah

    2016-02-01

    The mammalian ear is a complex structure divided into three main parts: the outer; middle; and inner ear. These parts are formed from all three germ layers and neural crest cells, which have to integrate successfully in order to form a fully functioning organ of hearing. Any defect in development of the outer and middle ear leads to conductive hearing loss, while defects in the inner ear can lead to sensorineural hearing loss. This review focuses on the development of the parts of the ear involved with sound transduction into the inner ear, and the parts largely ignored in the world of hearing research: the outer and middle ear. The published data on the embryonic origin, signalling, genetic control, development and timing of the mammalian middle and outer ear are reviewed here along with new data showing the Eustachian tube cartilage is of dual embryonic origin. The embryonic origin of some of these structures has only recently been uncovered (Science, 339, 2013, 1453; Development, 140, 2013, 4386), while the molecular mechanisms controlling the growth, structure and integration of many outer and middle ear components are hardly known. The genetic analysis of outer and middle ear development is rather limited, with a small number of genes often affecting either more than one part of the ear or having only very small effects on development. This review therefore highlights the necessity for further research into the development of outer and middle ear structures, which will be important for the understanding and treatment of conductive hearing loss.

  4. CORNER OF SUBPILE ROOM: NORTH AND EAST SIDES. STEEL OUTER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CORNER OF SUBPILE ROOM: NORTH AND EAST SIDES. STEEL OUTER SHELL HAS BEEN AFFIXED. SIGN SAYS "HERRICK IRON WORKS STEEL, OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA." NOTE CONDUIT FOR FUTURE INSTRUMENTATION. TOP OF STEEL CASE WILL BE LEVEL WITH BASEMENT CEILING. CAMERA FACES SOUTHEAST. INL NEGATIVE NO. 734. Unknown Photographer, 10/6/1950 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  5. Saturn's outer satellite - Phoebe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Voyager 2 took these images of Saturn's outer satellite Phoebe, on Sept. 4, 1981, from 2.2 million kilometers (1.36 million miles)away. This pair shows two different hemispheres of the satellite. The left image shows a bright mountain on the upper right edge reflecting the light of the setting sun. This mountain is possibly the central peak of a large impact crater taking up most of the upper right quadrant of Phoebe in this view. The right images shows a hemisphere with an intrinsically bright spot in the top portion of the image as well as the ridges appearing bright in the sunset light of the lower right. These images were processed by the Multimission Image Processing Laboratory of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the Voyager Project for NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications.

  6. Strategy for outer planets exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    NASA's Planetary Programs Office formed a number of scientific working groups to study in depth the potential scientific return from the various candidate missions to the outer solar system. The results of these working group studies were brought together in a series of symposia to evaluate the potential outer planet missions and to discuss strategies for exploration of the outer solar system that were consistent with fiscal constraints and with anticipated spacecraft and launch vehicle capabilities. A logical, scientifically sound, and cost effective approach to exploration of the outer solar system is presented.

  7. Separating in shell pistachio nuts from kernels using impact vibration analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A sorting system has been developed for the separation of small in-shell pistachio nuts from kernels without shells on the basis of vibrations generated when moving samples strike a steel plate. Impacts between the steel plate and the hard shells, as measured using an accelerometer attached to the...

  8. Outer Solar System Nomenclature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, Tobias C.; Grant, John (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    This grant has supported work by T. Owen and B. A. Smith on planetary and satellite nomenclature, carried out under the general auspices of the International Astronomical Union (IAU). The IAU maintains a Working Group on Planetary and Satellite Nomenclature (WGPSN) whose current chair is Prof.Kaare Aksnes of the Rosseland Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics in Oslo, Norway. Both Owen and Smith are members of the WGPSN; Owen as chair of the Outer Solar System Task Group, and Smith as chair of the Mars Task Group. The major activity during the last grant period (2002) was the approval of several new names for features on Mars by Smith's group and features on Jovian satellites plus new names for satellites of Jupiter, Saturn and Uranus by Owen's group. Much of this work was accomplished by e-mail exchanges, but the new nomenclature was formally discussed and approved at a meeting of the WGPSN held in conjunction with the Division for Planetary Sciences meeting in Birmingham, Alabama in October 2002.

  9. Onset and Cessation of Thermal Convection within Titan's Ice Shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitri, G.; Tobie, G.; Choblet, G.

    2015-12-01

    The onset of thermal convection within the outer ice shell of Titan is believed to be at the origin of methane outgassing on Titan (Tobie et al., 2006), a possible factor in Titan's resurfacing processes (Mitri et al., 2008), and to have a major role in the evolution and tectonic activity of this Saturnian icy satellite (Tobie et al., 2005; Mitri and Showman, 2008; Mitri et al., 2010). Recent measurements of the gravity field (Iess et al., 2010, 2012) and the modeling of the shape and topography (Zebker et al., 2009; Mitri et al., 2014) have recently improved our knowledge of the thermal state and structure of Titan's outer ice shell. Mitri et al. (2014) found that Titan's surface topography is consistent with an isostatically compensated ice shell of variable thickness, likely at the present in a thermally conductive state (see also Nimmo and Bills, 2010; Hemingway et al., 2013), overlying a relatively dense (~1200-1350 kg m-3) subsurface ocean. As Titan's ice shell is not currently experiencing thermal convection it is likely that the ice shell could have experienced during its history both the onset and the cessation of thermal convection; thermal convection could be present within the ice shell for limited times or in fact be episodic. We investigate the evolution of Titan's outer ice shell from the crystallization of the underlying ocean with a focus on the onset and cessation of thermal convection. To simulate convection in a growing ice shell, we numerically solve the thermal convection equations for a Newtonian rheology in a two dimensional Cartesian domain using finite element method, with a moving bottom boundary to ocean crystallization. We discuss how the crystallization process affects the onset of convection and in which conditions the cessation of thermal convection may occur. The geological consequences of the changes of the thermal state and structure of the outer ice shell will also be discussed.

  10. The Role of the Icy Shell in the Thermal Evolution of Ceres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, S. D.

    2015-12-01

    Ceres shape and crater morphology are consistent with a layer of low-density material that appears to be more dense and viscous than pure water ice, over an even more dense and viscous core. In order to understand the evolution of Ceres, we conduct a series of numerical experiments designed to understand the evolution of temperature and flow within a spherical body with a soft outer shell over a nearly rigid core using 3D spherical code CitcomS. In these experiments the sphere is heated from within using chondritic abundances of radiogenic elements. We study the impact of surface temperature, outer shell thickness, as well as the density and rheology of the softer outer shell and stiffer core on the thermal and dynamical evolution of the interior of the body, including both the soft shell and stiff core. For the outer shells with a thickness less than 10% of the radius of the body and a surface temperature at or below 90 K, the entire body remains in a conductive state and the temperature of the soft outer shell never exceeds the melting temperature of pure water ice throughout the history of the solar system. However for a range of outer shell thickness and surface temperatures, we find that within the first Gyr of evolution a degree-1 (i.e. single hemisphere) mode of convection encompassing both the stiff core and soft outer shell overtakes shorter-wavelength convective flow occurring in the softer outer shell. When this happens the body dramatically cools over a time interval of less than 100 Myrs and the internal temperature remains asymmetric throughout the subsequent evolution of the body.

  11. Role of reactant transport in determining the properties of NIF shells made by interfacial polycondensation

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, K.E.; Letts, S.A.; Buckley, S.R.; Fearon, E.M.; Wilemski, G.; Cook, R.C.; Schroen-Carey, D.

    1997-03-01

    Polymer shells up to 2 mm in diameter were prepared using an interfacial polycondensation / cross-linking reaction occurring at the surface of an oil drop. The oil phase is comprised of a solution (20 wt% or less) of isophthaloyl dichloride (IPC) dissolved in an organic solvent. An interfacial reaction is initiated when the IPC-loaded oil drop is submerged in an aqueous solution of poly(p-vinylphenol) (PVP), a poly(electrolyte) at elevated pH. Composition, structure, and surface finish for fully-formed dry shells were assessed using a number of techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), pyrolysis-gas chromatography (GC) mass spectroscopy (MS), microhardness measurements, gas permeability, and solvent permeability measurements. From deposition rate data, a reaction mechanism and key reaction parameters were identified. The deposition rate of shell membrane material was found to be a diffusion limited reaction of IPC through the forming membrane to the exterior shell interface (which is believed to be the reaction front). The final thickness of the film deposited at the interface and the rate of deposition were found to be strong functions of the IPC concentration and oil phase solvent. Films made with diethyl phthalate (DEP) were thinner and harder than films made using 1,6-dichlorohexane (DCH) as a solvent. Differences in solubility of the forming membrane in DCH and DEP appear to be able to account for the differences in deposition rate and the hardness (related to cross-linking density). The deposition can be thought of as a phase separation which is affected by both the poly(electrolyte) / ionomer transition and the amount of cross-linking. Finally, it was found that the choice of oil phase solvent profoundly affects the evolution of the outer surface roughness.

  12. Shell thickness determination of polymer-shelled microbubbles using transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Härmark, Johan; Hebert, Hans; Koeck, Philip J B

    2016-06-01

    Intravenously injected microbubbles (MBs) can be utilized as ultrasound contrast agent (CA) resulting in enhanced image quality. A novel CA, consisting of air filled MBs stabilized with a shell of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) has been developed. These spherical MBs have been decorated with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) in order to serve as both ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) CA. In this study, a mathematical model was introduced that determined the shell thickness of two types of SPIONs decorated MBs (Type A and Type B). The shell thickness of MBs is important to determine, as it affects the acoustical properties. In order to investigate the shell thickness, thin sections of plastic embedded MBs were prepared and imaged using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). However, the sections were cut at random distances from the MB center, which affected the observed shell thickness. Hence, the model determined the average shell thickness of the MBs from corrected mean values of the outer and inner radii observed in the TEM sections. The model was validated using simulated slices of MBs with known shell thickness and radius. The average shell thickness of Type A and Type B MBs were 651nm and 637nm, respectively.

  13. Outer Planet Assessment Group (OPAG) Recommended Exploration Strategy for the Outer Planets 2013-2022

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinnon, William B.; Steering Committee, Opag; Planets Community, Outer

    2010-05-01

    The Outer Solar System provides critical clues to how solar systems form and evolve, how planetary systems become habitable, and how life has evolved in our solar system. NASA's Outer Planets Assessment Group (OPAG) was established to identify scientific priorities and pathways for Outer Solar System exploration. Fundamental new discoveries are best made with a mixture of mission sizes that includes large (flagship) missions, and medium-sized and smaller-sized (as practical) missions, along with vigorous support for basic research, data analysis, and technology development — a balanced strategy most efficiently implemented as an Outer Planets Exploration Program. Missions to the Outer Solar System are major undertakings, requiring large and expensive launch vehicles, long mission durations, highly reliable (frequently radiation hard) and autonomous spacecraft, and radioisotope power sources in most cases. OPAG has recommended to the US National Research Council Planetary Science Decadal Survey to explore the possibilities for ‘small flagship' class missions to be considered, providing a greater range of choice and capabilities in the mix to balance program size and science return. With the Galileo mission concluded, the Cassini equinox mission in progress, and Juno in development, OPAG has strongly endorsed the competitive selection by NASA of the Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO) as the next Outer Planets Flagship and as part of the Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) with ESA, a collaboration that includes a Ganymede orbiter and an increased focus on Jupiter science; OPAG has strongly recommended support of JEO and EJSM in the Decadal Survey. In addition, OPAG has strongly endorsed approval by NASA of the Cassini Solstice Mission, including the Juno-like end-of-mission scenario, given the likely phenomenal return on investment. OPAG also advocates the need for a focused technology program for the next Outer Planet Flagship Mission after EJSM, in order to be ready

  14. Shell-armored wood cobbles as a potential criterion for detrital coal deposits

    SciTech Connect

    DiMarco, M.J.; Nummedal, D.

    1986-01-01

    Shell-armored wood cobbles occur on detrital-peat beaches along the seaward edge of the Mississippi Delta. Shell material consists exclusively of Mulinia lateralis, a dwarf surf clam. Soft, heavy, waterlogged wood fragments are abraded and become armored by hard shells in response to wave activity on the beach. Although their preservation potential is suspect, fossilized shell-armored wood clasts would probably be recognized as a type of coal ball and might indicate an allochthonous origin for the host coal.

  15. Mussel Shell Evaluation as Bioindicator For Heavy Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrello, Avacir Casanova; Lopes, Fábio; Galvão, Tiago Dutra

    2010-05-01

    Recently, in Brazil, it has appeared a new and unusual "plague" in lazer and commercial fishing. It is caused by the parasitic larval phase of certain native bivalve mollusks of fresh water known as "Naiades" and its involves the presence of big bivalve of fresh water, mainly Anodontites trapesialis, in the tanks and dams of the fish creation. These bivalve mollusks belong to the Unionoida Order, Mycetopodidae Family. The objective of the present work was to analyze the shells of these mollusks to verify the possibility of use as bioindicators for heavy metals in freshwater. The mollusks shells were collected in a commercial fishing at Londrina-PR. A qualitative analysis was made to determine the chemical composition of the shells and verify a possible correlation with existent heavy metals in the aquatic environment. In the inner part of the shells were identified the elements Ca, P, Fe, Mn and Sr and in the outer part were identified Ca, P, Fe, Mn, Sr and Cu. The Ca ratio of the outer part by inner part of the analyzed shells is around of 1, as expected, because Ca is the main compound of mollusks shells. The ratio of P, Fe, Mn, and Sr to the Ca were constant in all analyzed shells, being close to 0.015. The ratio Cu/Ca varied among the shells, showing that this mollusk is sensitive to concentration of this element in the aquatic environment.

  16. Turbine airfoil with outer wall thickness indicators

    DOEpatents

    Marra, John J; James, Allister W; Merrill, Gary B

    2013-08-06

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine and including a depth indicator for determining outer wall blade thickness. The airfoil may include an outer wall having a plurality of grooves in the outer surface of the outer wall. The grooves may have a depth that represents a desired outer surface and wall thickness of the outer wall. The material forming an outer surface of the outer wall may be removed to be flush with an innermost point in each groove, thereby reducing the wall thickness and increasing efficiency. The plurality of grooves may be positioned in a radially outer region of the airfoil proximate to the tip.

  17. Distributed neural signals on parabolic cylindrical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, S. D.; Li, H.; Tzou, H. S.

    2013-06-01

    Parabolic cylindrical shells are commonly used as key components in communication antennas, space telescopes, solar collectors, etc. This study focuses on distributed modal neural sensing signals on a flexible simply-supported parabolic cylindrical shell panel. The parabolic cylindrical shell is fully laminated with a piezoelectric layer on its outer surface and the piezoelectric layer is segmented into infinitesimal elements (neurons) to investigate the microscopic distributed neural sensing signals. Since the dominant vibration component of the shell is usually the transverse oscillation, a new transverse mode shape function is defined. Two shell cases, i.e., the ratio of the meridian height to the half span distance of a parabola at 1:4 (shallow) and 1:1 (deep), are studied to reveal the curvature effect to the neural sensing signals. Studies suggest that the membrane signal component dominates for lower natural modes and the bending signal component dominates for higher natural modes. The meridional membrane and bending signal components are mostly concentrated on the high-curvature areas, while the longitudinal bending component is mostly concentrated on the relatively flat areas. The concentration behavior becomes more prominent as the parabolic cylindrical shell deepens, primarily resulting from the enhanced membrane effect due to the increased curvature.

  18. Thermoelectric Outer Planets Spacecraft (TOPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The research and advanced development work is reported on a ballistic-mode, outer planet spacecraft using radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) power. The Thermoelectric Outer Planet Spacecraft (TOPS) project was established to provide the advanced systems technology that would allow the realistic estimates of performance, cost, reliability, and scheduling that are required for an actual flight mission. A system design of the complete RTG-powered outer planet spacecraft was made; major technical innovations of certain hardware elements were designed, developed, and tested; and reliability and quality assurance concepts were developed for long-life requirements. At the conclusion of its active phase, the TOPS Project reached its principal objectives: a development and experience base was established for project definition, and for estimating cost, performance, and reliability; an understanding of system and subsystem capabilities for successful outer planets missions was achieved. The system design answered long-life requirements with massive redundancy, controlled by on-board analysis of spacecraft performance data.

  19. FIRST 100 T NON-DESTRUCTIVE MAGNET OUTER COIL SET

    SciTech Connect

    J. BACON; A. BACA; ET AL

    1999-09-01

    The controlled power outer coil set of the first 100 T non-destructive (100 T ND) magnet is described. This magnet will be installed as part of the user facility research equipment at the National High Magnetic Field laboratory (NHMFL) Pulsed Field Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The 100 T ND controlled power outer coil set consists of seven nested, mechanically independent externally reinforced coils. These coils, in combination, will produce a 47 T platform field in a 225-mm diameter bore. Using inertial energy storage a synchronous motor/generator provides ac power to a set of seven ac-dc converters rated at 64 MW/80 MVA each. These converters energize three independent coil circuits to create 170 MJ of field energy in the outer coil set at the platform field of 47 T. Each coil consists of a multi-layer winding of high strength conductor supported by an external high strength stainless steel shell. Coils with the highest magnetic loads will utilize a reinforcing shell fabricated from highly cold worked 301 stainless steel strip. The autofrettage conditioning method will be used to pre-stress the coils and thereby limit conductor and reinforcement strains to the elastic range. The purpose of pre-stressing the coils is to attain a design life of 10,000 full field pulses. The operation and conditioning of the coil set will be described along with special features of its design, magnetic and structural analyses and construction.

  20. Tailoring magnetic properties of core/shell nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Hao; Sun, Shouheng; Li, J.; Wang, Z. L.; Liu, J. P.

    2004-08-01

    Bimagnetic FePt /MFe2O4(M =Fe,Co) core/shell nanoparticles are synthesized via high-temperature solution phase coating of 3.5nm FePt core with MFe2O4 shell. The thickness of the shell is controlled from 0.5 to 3nm. An assembly of the core/shell nanoparticles shows a smooth magnetization transition under an external field, indicating effective exchange coupling between the FePt core and the oxide shell. The coercivity of the FePt /Fe3O4 particles depends on the volume ratio of the hard and soft phases, consistent with previous theoretical predictions. These bimagnetic core/shell nanoparticles represent a class of nanostructured magnetic materials with their properties tunable by varying the chemical composition and thickness of the coating materials.

  1. Multiple shells in IRC+10216: shell properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauron, N.; Huggins, P. J.

    2000-07-01

    We report on the properties of the multiple shells in the circumstellar envelope of IRC+10216, using deep optical imaging, including data from the Hubble Space Telescope. The intensity profiles confirm the presence of thin ( ~ 0farcs5 -3'' ec), limb-brightened shells in the envelope, seen in stellar and ambient Galactic light scattered by dust. The shells are spaced at irregular intervals of ~ 5'' ec-20'' ec, corresponding to time scales of 200-800 yr, although intervals as short as ~ 1'' ec (40 yr) are seen close to the star. The location of the main shells shows a good correlation with high-resolution, molecular line maps of the inner envelope, indicating that the dust and gas are well coupled. The shell/intershell density contrast is typically ~ 3, and we find that the shells form the dominant mass component of the circumstellar envelope. The shells exhibit important evolutionary effects: the thickness increases with increasing radius, with an effective dispersion velocity of 0.7 km s-1 and there is evidence for shell interactions. Despite the presence of bipolar structure close to the star, the global shell pattern favors a roughly isotropic, episodic mass loss mechanism, with a range of time scales. Based on observations made with the Canada-France-Hawaii telescope, operated by CNRS, NRCC and UH, and on dearchived observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, operated by AURA Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555

  2. 75 FR 3915 - Environmental Documents Prepared in Support of Sand and Gravel Activities on the Outer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-25

    ... Minerals Management Service Environmental Documents Prepared in Support of Sand and Gravel Activities on... for three sand and gravel activities proposed on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) and described in... noncompetitive basis, the rights to OCS sand, gravel, or shell resources for shore protection, beach or...

  3. Origin of Outer Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Matthew J.; Lindstrom, David (Technical Monitor)

    2005-01-01

    Our ongoing research program combines extensive deep and wide-field observations using a variety of observational platforms with numerical studies of the dynamics of small bodies in the outer solar system in order to advance the main scientific goals of the community studying the Kuiper belt and the outer solar system. These include: (1) determining the relative populations of the known classes of KBOs as well as other possible classes; ( 2 ) determining the size distributions or luminosity function of the individual populations or the Kuiper belt as a whole; (3) determining the inclinations distributions of these populations; (4) establishing the radial extent of the Kuiper belt; ( 5 ) measuring and relating the physical properties of different types of KBOs to those of other solar system bodies; and, (6) completing our systematic inventory of the satellites of the outer planets.

  4. Classification Shell Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Etzold, Carol

    1983-01-01

    Discusses shell classification exercises. Through keying students advanced from the "I know what a shell looks like" stage to become involved in the classification process: observing, labeling, making decisions about categories, and identifying marine animals. (Author/JN)

  5. Ordering of hard particles between hard walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrzanowska, A.; Teixeira, P. I. C.; Ehrentraut, H.; Cleaver, D. J.

    2001-05-01

    The structure of a fluid of hard Gaussian overlap particles of elongation κ = 5, confined between two hard walls, has been calculated from density-functional theory and Monte Carlo simulations. By using the exact expression for the excluded volume kernel (Velasco E and Mederos L 1998 J. Chem. Phys. 109 2361) and solving the appropriate Euler-Lagrange equation entirely numerically, we have been able to extend our theoretical predictions into the nematic phase, which had up till now remained relatively unexplored due to the high computational cost. Simulation reveals a rich adsorption behaviour with increasing bulk density, which is described semi-quantitatively by the theory without any adjustable parameters.

  6. The Double Chooz Outer Veto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toups, Matthew

    2009-05-01

    Measuring a non-zero value for the neutrino mixing angle θ13 sets the scale for future precision measurements in the lepton sector such as CP violation. The Double Chooz experiment will begin taking data later this year with a sensitivity to 2̂(2θ13) in the 0.02 - 0.03 range, improving on the CHOOZ bound by about an order of magnitude. Efficient rejection of backgrounds induced by cosmic muons is essential to achieving this sensitivity. The Double Chooz Outer Veto plays a crucial role in vetoing and tagging these muons. An update on the status of the Double Chooz Outer Veto will be presented.

  7. Hollow Pollen Shells to Enhance Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Diego-Taboada, Alberto; Beckett, Stephen T.; Atkin, Stephen L.; Mackenzie, Grahame

    2014-01-01

    Pollen grain and spore shells are natural microcapsules designed to protect the genetic material of the plant from external damage. The shell is made up of two layers, the inner layer (intine), made largely of cellulose, and the outer layer (exine), composed mainly of sporopollenin. The relative proportion of each varies according to the plant species. The structure of sporopollenin has not been fully characterised but different studies suggest the presence of conjugated phenols, which provide antioxidant properties to the microcapsule and UV (ultraviolet) protection to the material inside it. These microcapsule shells have many advantageous properties, such as homogeneity in size, resilience to both alkalis and acids, and the ability to withstand temperatures up to 250 °C. These hollow microcapsules have the ability to encapsulate and release actives in a controlled manner. Their mucoadhesion to intestinal tissues may contribute to the extended contact of the sporopollenin with the intestinal mucosa leading to an increased efficiency of delivery of nutraceuticals and drugs. The hollow microcapsules can be filled with a solution of the active or active in a liquid form by simply mixing both together, and in some cases operating a vacuum. The active payload can be released in the human body depending on pressure on the microcapsule, solubility and/or pH factors. Active release can be controlled by adding a coating on the shell, or co-encapsulation with the active inside the shell. PMID:24638098

  8. Advances in the Manufacture of Omega-scale Double-shell Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bono, M.

    2005-10-01

    The double-shell ignition target design consists of a low-Z outer shell that absorbs hohlraum-generated x-rays, implodes, and collides with a high-Z inner shell containing DT fuel. Efforts are continuing to field scaled ignition-like double shells on the Omega laser facility over a range of inner-shell Z. Previous ignition-like double-shell implosions on Omega used a low-Z CH inner shell [1]. The current target contains a higher-Z glass inner shell of diameter 216 microns, which is supported by SiO2 aerogel inside a Br-doped CH ablator shell of diameter 550 microns. Fielding double-shell targets has historically been limited by the ability to successfully fabricate them, but several technological advances have recently been made in the manufacturing process. The inner capsule will be cast in SiO2 aerogel of density 50 mg/cc, whose outer contour will be machined concentric to the inner capsule. This piece will then be assembled between two hemispherical ablator shells that mate at a step-joint with an adhesive-filled gap of thickness 100 nm. Three-dimensional tomographs made of each target using an x-ray micro-tomography system will allow precise characterization of the targets. [1] P. Amendt et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 065004 (2005).

  9. Proteomic characterization of oyster shell organic matrix proteins (OMP)

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Abhishek; Thiyagarajan, Vengatesen; Tong, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Oysters are economically and ecologically important bivalves, with its calcareous shell and delicious meat. The shell composition is a blend of inorganic crystals and shell proteins that form an organic matrix which protects the soft inner tissue of the oyster. The objective of the study was to compare the composition of organic matrix proteins (OMP) of two phylogenetically related species: the Hong Kong oyster (Crassostrea hongkongensis) and the Portuguese oyster (Crassostrea angulata) which differ in their shell hardness and mechanical properties. C. hongkongensis shells are comparatively stronger than C. angulata. Modern shotgun proteomics has been used to understand the nature of the OMP and the variations observed in the mechanical properties of these two species of oyster shells. After visualizing proteins on the one (1DE) and two-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE) gels, the protein spots and their intensities were compared using PDQuest software and 14 proteins of C. hongkongensis were found to be significantly different (student׳s t-test; p<0.05) when compared to the C. angulata. Furthermore, shell OMP separated on 1DE gels were processed using Triple TOF5600 mass spectrometry and 42 proteins of C. hongkongensis and 37 of C. angulata identified. A Circos based comparative analysis of the shell proteins of both oyster species were prepared against the shell proteome of other shell forming gastropods and molluscs to study the evolutionary conservation of OMP and their function. This comparative proteomics expanded our understating of the molecular mechanism behind the shells having different hardness and mechanical properties. PMID:28246460

  10. Magnetosphere of the outer planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennel, C. F.

    1972-01-01

    Scaling laws for possible outer planet magnetospheres are derived. These suggest that convection and its associated auroral effects will play a relatively smaller role than at earth, and that there is a possibility that they could have significant radiation belts of energetic trapped particles.

  11. Defects in liquid crystal nematic shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Nieves, A.; Utada, A. S.; Vitelli, V.; Link, D. R.; Nelson, D. R.; Weitz, D. A.

    2006-03-01

    We generate water/liquid crystal (LC)/water double emulsions via recent micro-capillary fluidic devices [A. S. Utada, et.al. Science 308, 537 (2005)]. The resultant objects are stabilized against coalescence by using surfactants or adequate polymers; these also fix the boundary conditions for the director field n. We use 4-pentyl-4-cyanobiphenyl (5CB) and impose tangential boundary conditions at both water/LC interfaces by having polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) dispersed in the inner and outer water phases. We confirm recent predictions [D. R. Nelson, NanoLetters 2, 1125 (2002)] and find that four strength s=+1/2 defects are present; this is in contrast to the two s=+1 defect bipolar configuration observed for bulk spheres [A. Fernandez-Nieves, et.al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 105503 (2004)]. However, these defects do not lie in the vertices of a tetrahedron but are pushed towards each other until certain equilibration distance is reached. In addition to the four defect shells, we observe shells with two s=+1 defects and even with three defects, a s=+1 and two s=+1/2. We argue these configurations arise from nematic bulk distortions that become important as the shell thickness increases. Finally, by adding a different surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS), to the outer phase, we can change the director boundary conditions at the outermost interface from parallel to homeotropic, to induce coalescing of the two pair of defects in the four defect shell configuration to yield two defect bipolar shells.

  12. Hardness Tester for Polyur

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauser, D. L.; Buras, D. F.; Corbin, J. M.

    1987-01-01

    Rubber-hardness tester modified for use on rigid polyurethane foam. Provides objective basis for evaluation of improvements in foam manufacturing and inspection. Typical acceptance criterion requires minimum hardness reading of 80 on modified tester. With adequate correlation tests, modified tester used to measure indirectly tensile and compressive strengths of foam.

  13. Session: Hard Rock Penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Dunn, James C.; Drumheller, Douglas S.; Glowka, David A.; Lysne, Peter

    1992-01-01

    This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five presentations: ''Hard Rock Penetration - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''Overview - Hard Rock Penetration'' by James C. Dunn; ''An Overview of Acoustic Telemetry'' by Douglas S. Drumheller; ''Lost Circulation Technology Development Status'' by David A. Glowka; ''Downhole Memory-Logging Tools'' by Peter Lysne.

  14. Shell Worlds: The Question of Shell Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, K. L.; Kennedy, R. G., III; Fields, D. E.

    The initial idea of shell worlds was first proposed in the January 2009 edition of JBIS. In that paper the stability of the shell around a central world was not discussed at any length except to say that it was stable due to forces induced by gravity. This paper demonstrates in a qualitative and quantitative manner that a material shell supported by atmospheric pressure around a moon or small planet is indeed stable and does not require active measures to remain centered, provided that the central body is large enough. The minimal size of the central body to provide this stability is discussed.

  15. Strategy for exploration of the outer planets: 1986-1996

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Over the past decade COMPLEX has published three strategy reports which, taken together, encompass the entire planetary system and recommend a coherent program of planetary exploration. The highest priority for outer planet exploration during the next decade is intensive study of Saturn (the planet, satellites, rings, and magnetosphere) as a system. The Committee additionally recommends that NASA engage in the following supporting activities: increased support of laboratory and theoretical studies; pursuit of earth-based and earth-orbital observations; commitment to continued operation of productive spacecraft; implementation of the instrument development plan as appropriate for the outer solar system; studies of deep atmospheric probes; development of penetrators or other hard landers; development of radiation-hardened spacecraft; and development of low-thrust propulsion systems. Longer-term objectives include exploration and intensive study of: the Uranus and Neptune systems; planetology of the Galilean satellites and Titan; and the inner Jovian system.

  16. Turbine airfoil with a compliant outer wall

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Christian X [Oviedo, FL; Morrison, Jay A [Oviedo, FL

    2012-04-03

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine with a cooling system and a compliant dual wall configuration configured to enable thermal expansion between inner and outer layers while eliminating stress formation in the outer layer is disclosed. The compliant dual wall configuration may be formed a dual wall formed from inner and outer layers separated by a support structure. The outer layer may be a compliant layer configured such that the outer layer may thermally expand and thereby reduce the stress within the outer layer. The outer layer may be formed from a nonplanar surface configured to thermally expand. In another embodiment, the outer layer may be planar and include a plurality of slots enabling unrestricted thermal expansion in a direction aligned with the outer layer.

  17. Manipulation of emission energy in GaAs/AlGaAs core-shell nanowires with radial heterostructure

    SciTech Connect

    Barbosa, B. G.; Arakaki, H.; Souza, C. A. de; Pusep, Yu. A.

    2014-03-21

    Photoluminescence was studied in GaAs/AlGaAs nanowires (NWs) with different radial heterostructures. We demonstrated that manipulation of the emission energy may be achieved by appropriate choice of the shell structure. The emission at highest energy is generated in the NWs with tunneling thin AlGaAs inner shell and thin GaAs outer shell due to recombination of the photoexcited electrons confined in the outer shell with the holes in the core. Lower energy emission was shown to occur in the NWs with thick outer shell grown in the form of a short-period GaAs/AlGaAs multiple quantum well structure. In this case, the tunneling probability through the multiple quantum wells controls the energy emitted by the NWs. The doping of core results in dominated low energy emission from the GaAs core.

  18. Dynamic hardness of metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xuecheng

    Dynamic hardness (Pd) of 22 different pure metals and alloys having a wide range of elastic modulus, static hardness, and crystal structure were measured in a gas pulse system. The indentation contact diameter with an indenting sphere and the radius (r2) of curvature of the indentation were determined by the curve fitting of the indentation profile data. r 2 measured by the profilometer was compared with that calculated from Hertz equation in both dynamic and static conditions. The results indicated that the curvature change due to elastic recovery after unloading is approximately proportional to the parameters predicted by Hertz equation. However, r 2 is less than the radius of indenting sphere in many cases which is contradictory to Hertz analysis. This discrepancy is believed due to the difference between Hertzian and actual stress distributions underneath the indentation. Factors which influence indentation elastic recovery were also discussed. It was found that Tabor dynamic hardness formula always gives a lower value than that directly from dynamic hardness definition DeltaE/V because of errors mainly from Tabor's rebound equation and the assumption that dynamic hardness at the beginning of rebound process (Pr) is equal to kinetic energy change of an impact sphere over the formed crater volume (Pd) in the derivation process for Tabor's dynamic hardness formula. Experimental results also suggested that dynamic to static hardness ratio of a material is primarily determined by its crystal structure and static hardness. The effects of strain rate and temperature rise on this ratio were discussed. A vacuum rotating arm apparatus was built to measure Pd at 70, 127, and 381 mum sphere sizes, these results exhibited that Pd is highly depended on the sphere size due to the strain rate effects. P d was also used to substitute for static hardness to correlate with abrasion and erosion resistance of metals and alloys. The particle size effects observed in erosion were

  19. 76 FR 2919 - Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagram and Supplemental Official Outer Continental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-18

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagram and Supplemental Official Outer Continental Shelf Block Diagrams AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean... American Datum of 1983 (NAD 83) Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagram and...

  20. 76 FR 54787 - Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagram, Lease Maps, and Supplemental Official Outer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-02

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagram, Lease Maps, and Supplemental Official Outer Continental Shelf Block Diagrams AGENCY... revised North American Datum of 1927 (NAD 27) Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagram,...

  1. Fluctuating shells under pressure

    PubMed Central

    Paulose, Jayson; Vliegenthart, Gerard A.; Gompper, Gerhard; Nelson, David R.

    2012-01-01

    Thermal fluctuations strongly modify the large length-scale elastic behavior of cross-linked membranes, giving rise to scale-dependent elastic moduli. Whereas thermal effects in flat membranes are well understood, many natural and artificial microstructures are modeled as thin elastic shells. Shells are distinguished from flat membranes by their nonzero curvature, which provides a size-dependent coupling between the in-plane stretching modes and the out-of-plane undulations. In addition, a shell can support a pressure difference between its interior and its exterior. Little is known about the effect of thermal fluctuations on the elastic properties of shells. Here, we study the statistical mechanics of shape fluctuations in a pressurized spherical shell, using perturbation theory and Monte Carlo computer simulations, explicitly including the effects of curvature and an inward pressure. We predict novel properties of fluctuating thin shells under point indentations and pressure-induced deformations. The contribution due to thermal fluctuations increases with increasing ratio of shell radius to thickness and dominates the response when the product of this ratio and the thermal energy becomes large compared with the bending rigidity of the shell. Thermal effects are enhanced when a large uniform inward pressure acts on the shell and diverge as this pressure approaches the classical buckling transition of the shell. Our results are relevant for the elasticity and osmotic collapse of microcapsules. PMID:23150558

  2. Origin of Outer Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Matthew J.; Boyce, J. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    We feel that at the present moment the available theoretical models of the Kuiper belt are still in advance of the data, and thus our main task has been to conduct observational work guided by theoretical motivations. Our efforts over the past year can be divided into four categories: A) Wide-field Searches for Kuiper Belt Objects; B) Pencil-beam Searches for Kuiper Belt Objects; C) Wide-field Searches for Moons of the Outer Planets; D) Pencil-beam Searches for Faint Uranian and Neptunian Moons; E) Recovery Observations. As of April 2002, we have conducted several searches for Kuiper belt objects using large-format mosaic CCD camera on 4-meter class telescopes. In May 1999, we used the Kitt Peak 4-meter with the NOAO Mosaic camera we attempted a search for KBOs at a range of ecliptic latitudes. In addition to our wide-field searches, we have conducted three 'pencil-beam' searches in the past year. In a pencil-beam search we take repeated integrations of the same field throughout a night. After preprocessing the resulting images we shift and recombine them along a range of rates and directions consistent with the motion of KBOs. Stationary objects then smear out, while objects moving at near the shift rate appear as point sources. In addition to our searches for Kuiper belt objects, we are completing the inventory of the outer solar system by search for faint satellites of the outer planets. In August 2001 we conducted pencil beam searches for faint Uranian and Neptunian satellites at CFHT and CTIO. These searches resulted in the discover of two Neptunian and four Uranian satellite candidates. The discovery of Kuiper belt objects and outer planet satellites is of little use if the discoveries are not followed by systematic, repeated astrometric observations that permit reliable estimates of their orbits.

  3. Physics of the outer heliosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Gazis, P.R. )

    1991-01-01

    Major advances in the physics of the outer heliosphere are reviewed for the 1987-1990 time frame. Emphasis is placed on five broad topics: the detailed structure of the solar wind at large heliocentric distances, the global structure of the interplanetary field, latidudinal variations and meridional flows, radial and temporal variations, and the interaction of the solar wind with the local interstellar medium. 122 refs.

  4. Outer Space Traffic Safety Standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Paul B.

    2013-09-01

    Management of traffic in outer space is a major safety problem. Traffic is increasing. Most satellites are navigable but they have to co-exist with space debris which is not navigable. We need minimum safety rules for outer space traffic. We have the possible beginnings of international safety standards in the form of national space object tracking; Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) standardization through ICAO and the International Committee on GNSS (ICG); the IADC space debris guidelines; and the proposed Code of Conduct. However, safety could be improved by standards for such activities as licensing launches of satellites into outer space; standards for accident investigation and search and rescue: operational safety zones around space objects such as the International Space Station. This paper describes legal authority for minimum safety standards. It considers safety standards established by private agreements among commercial operators. Finally it examines a number of options for an international forum to establish safety standards, including self-regulation, COPUOS, ICAO, ITU, a space code of conduct, and a new space organization.

  5. Organizing Your Hard Disk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stocker, H. Robert; Hilton, Thomas S. E.

    1991-01-01

    Suggests strategies that make hard disk organization easy and efficient, such as making, changing, and removing directories; grouping files by subject; naming files effectively; backing up efficiently; and using PATH. (JOW)

  6. Radiation from hard objects

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1997-02-01

    The inference of the diameter of hard objects is insensitive to radiation efficiency. Deductions of radiation efficiency from observations are very sensitive - possibly overly so. Inferences of the initial velocity and trajectory vary similarly, and hence are comparably sensitive.

  7. The Development of Hard-X-Ray Optics at MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, Brian D.; Elsner, R. F.; Engelhaupt, D. E.; Kolodziejczak, J. J.; ODell, S. L.; Speegle, C. O.; Weisskopf, M. C.; Six, Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We are fabricating optics for the hard-x-ray region using electroless nickel replication. The attraction of this process, which has been widely used elsewhere, is that the resulting full shell optics are inherently table and thus can have very good angular resolution. The challenge with this process is to develop lightweight optics (nickel has a relatively high density of 8.9 g / cu cm), and to keep down the costs of mandrel fabrication. We accomplished the former through the development of high-strength nickel alloys that permit very thin shells without fabrication- and handling-induced deformations. For the latter, we have utilized inexpensive grinding and diamond turning to figure the mandrels and then purpose-built polishing machines to finish the surface. In-house plating tanks and a simple water-bath separation system complete the process. To date we have built shells ranging in size from 5 cm diameter to 50 cm, and with thickness down to 100 micron. For our HERO (high energy replicated optics) balloon program, we are fabricating over 200 iridium-coated shells, 250 microns thick, for hard-x-ray imaging up to 75 keV. Early test results on these have indicated half-power-diameters of 15 arcsec. The status of these and other hard-x-ray optics will be reviewed.

  8. Geometrical interpretation for the outer SU(3) outer multiplicity label

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draayer, Jerry P.; Troltenier, D.

    1995-01-01

    A geometrical interpretation for the outer multiplicity rho that occurs in a reduction of the product of two SU(3) representations, (lambda(sub pi), mu(sub pi)) x (lambda(sub nu), mu(sub nu)) approaches sigma(sub rho)(lambda, mu)(sub rho), is introduced. This coupling of proton (pi) and neutron (nu) representations arises, for example, in both boson and fermion descriptions of heavy deformed nuclei. Attributing a geometry to the coupling raises the possibility of introducing a simple interaction that provides a physically meaningful way for distinguishing multiple occurrences of (lambda, mu) values that can arise in such products.

  9. A surface crack in shells under mixed-mode loading conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joseph, P. F.; Erdogan, F.

    1988-01-01

    The present consideration of a shallow shell's surface crack under general loading conditions notes that while the mode I state can be separated, modes II and III remain coupled. A line spring model is developed to formulate the part-through crack problem under mixed-mode conditions, and then to consider a shallow shell of arbitrary curvature having a part-through crack located on the outer or the inner surface of the shell; Reissner's transverse shear theory is used to formulate the problem under the assumption that the shell is subjected to all five moment and stress resultants.

  10. Can Shells be Biomonitor of Contaminants in the Environment: an Investigation Study of Perfluorinated Compounds in Bivalve Shells of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei

    2010-05-01

    To assess the feasibility of using biominerals to biomonitor the extent of persistent contaminants in the environment, concentrations of perfluorinated compounds (PFCs), including perfluorinated carboxylic acids (PFCAs) and perfluorinated alkylsulfonates (PFASs), in the bivalve shells of clams, razor clams, oysters and mussels sampled from 8 sampling sites along China coast were analyzed. Concentrations of these contaminants in the waters and sediments of the sampling sites, as well as in the soft tissues of clams were also determined. Results show that though the concentrations of most PFCs in shells were lower than in soft tissues, the amount of contaminants in shells and soft tissues of bivalves are comparable, due to the larger dry-weight of shells than soft tissues of these animals. Concentrations of some PFCs in shells primarily correlate to concentrations in sediments, while concentrations in the soft tissues seems to be more related to those in water samples. We suggested that shells uptake PFCs by adsorption or passive deposition of the target chemicals to the shell organic matrix followed by a biomineralisation process. Therefore, contaminants bound to the organic matrix in the shell microstructure are sequestrated and hard to release. Like soft tissues, biominerals, e.g. shells, might also be considered as biomonitoring matrix for some contaminants in environments, because (i) the individual differences of contaminants concentrations among shell samples were smaller than soft tissue samples; (ii) secondary pollution is less likely to affect shell samples during sampling and transportation; and (iii) the shells was hypothesized to "record" past exposure to contaminants according to their annual growth ring. (This study was supported by National Science Foundation for Natural Science, China (No. 20807024) & Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (No. 200800551051))

  11. Imperfection Insensitive Thin Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Xin

    The buckling of axially compressed cylindrical shells and externally pressurized spherical shells is extremely sensitive to even very small geometric imperfections. In practice this issue is addressed by either using overly conservative knockdown factors, while keeping perfect axial or spherical symmetry, or adding closely and equally spaced stiffeners on shell surface. The influence of imperfection-sensitivity is mitigated, but the shells designed from these approaches are either too heavy or very expensive and are still sensitive to imperfections. Despite their drawbacks, these approaches have been used for more than half a century. This thesis proposes a novel method to design imperfection-insensitive cylindrical shells subject to axial compression. Instead of following the classical paths, focused on axially symmetric or high-order rotationally symmetric cross-sections, the method in this thesis adopts optimal symmetry-breaking wavy cross-sections (wavy shells). The avoidance of imperfection sensitivity is achieved by searching with an evolutionary algorithm for smooth cross-sectional shapes that maximize the minimum among the buckling loads of geometrically perfect and imperfect wavy shells. It is found that the shells designed through this approach can achieve higher critical stresses and knockdown factors than any previously known monocoque cylindrical shells. It is also found that these shells have superior mass efficiency to almost all previously reported stiffened shells. Experimental studies on a design of composite wavy shell obtained through the proposed method are presented in this thesis. A method of making composite wavy shells and a photogrametry technique of measuring full-field geometric imperfections have been developed. Numerical predictions based on the measured geometric imperfections match remarkably well with the experiments. Experimental results confirm that the wavy shells are not sensitive to imperfections and can carry axial compression

  12. [A review on liquid-filled hard gelatin capsules].

    PubMed

    Ma, Jia-Hua; Yang, Ming; Zeng, Min; Chen, Xue-Mei; Lan, Jie

    2008-03-01

    Novel dosage forms emerges more and more in recent years. One of them is liquid-filled hard gelatin capsules, which adopt gelatin or the hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose (HPMC) as capsule shell. The liquid-filled hard gelatin capsule is increasingly getting attention because of its new-concept dosage form design, which deliver liquid drugs by solid form. The paper mainly introduces application, pharmaceutical manufacturing, quality assessment, prospect of liquid-filled hard gelatin capsules, and focuses on the application and pharmaceutical manufacturing (preparation) of liquid-filled capsule. It is suggested that the capsule is suitable for various liquid or semi-solid natural plant extract and achieve different release profiles. The preparation adopted liquid-filled hard capsules technology. The influence factors concluded property of shell and device of filling. The quality was often evaluated by moisture content of capsule shell, dissolution rate etc. At the same time, it was pointed out that the new dosage form has remarkable marketing prospect and bring profits for enterprises.

  13. OSEFT or how to go beyond hard thermal loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manuel, Cristina; Soto, Joan; Stetina, Stephan

    2017-03-01

    We show that effective field theory techniques can be applied in the high temperature T regime of plasmas to improve the accuracy of the physics of the hard scales (or scales of order T), and as a by-product, also that of the soft scales (or scales of order gT). At leading order in the coupling constant the hard scales of the plasma can be viewed as on-shell classical particles. Based on this observation, and without any reference to the state of the system, we derive an effective field theory describing the quantum fluctuations around an on-shell fermion with energy p, described as a set of high dimension operators over the on-shell energy p. When applied to systems close to thermal equilibrium, where for most on-shell particles p T, we show that the on-shell effective field theory (OSEFT) properly describes the HTL photon polarization tensor of QED, and its 1/T corrections. For the soft scales the first non-vanishing power correction turns out to be a perturbative correction to the HTL result.

  14. Replicated Nickel Optics for the Hard-X-Ray Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, Brian

    2005-01-01

    Replicated nickel optics has been used extensively in x-ray astronomy, most notable for the XMM/Newton mission. Thc combination of relative ease of fabrication and the inherent stability of full shell optics, make them FIJI attractive approach for medium-resolution, high-throughput applications. MSFC has been developing these optics for use in the hard-x-ray region. Efforts at improving the resolution of these, particularly the very-thin shells required to meet thc weight budget of future missions, will be described together with the prospects for significant improvements down to the 5-arcsec level.

  15. The CDF Central Outer Tracker

    SciTech Connect

    Pitts, K.T.; CDF Collaboration

    1997-01-01

    We describe the CDF Central Outer Tracker (COT), an open-cell drift chamber currently being constructed for the CDF detector to run at the upgraded Fermilab Tevatron collider. This detector will provide central tracking with excellent momentum resolution in the high- density environment of a hadron collider. It will be able to resolve 132 ns beam crossings and provide tracking trigger information to the Level 1 trigger. The design is based upon the existing and successful CDF Central Tracking Chamber. The preliminary mechanical and electrical designs are presented. 5 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Outer scale of atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukin, Vladimir P.

    2005-10-01

    In the early 70's, the scientists in Italy (A.Consortini, M.Bertolotti, L.Ronchi), USA (R.Buser, Ochs, S.Clifford) and USSR (V.Pokasov, V.Lukin) almost simultaneously discovered the phenomenon of deviation from the power law and the effect of saturation for the structure phase function. During a period of 35 years we have performed successively the investigations of the effect of low-frequency spectral range of atmospheric turbulence on the optical characteristics. The influence of the turbulence models as well as a outer scale of turbulence on the characteristics of telescopes and systems of laser beam formations has been determined too.

  17. Wall-Thickness Dependence of Cooling-Induced Deformation of Polystyrene Spherical Shells

    SciTech Connect

    Endo, T.; Kobayashi, N.; Goto, K.; Yasuda, M.; Fujima, Y.

    2003-05-15

    Experiments on the wall-thickness dependence of the cooling-induced deformation (CID) of polystyrene (PS) spherical shells were carried out. For the experiments, the PS shells were fabricated by the density-matched emulsion method using the hand-shaken microencapsulation technique. The number-averaged and weight-averaged molecular weights of the PS were M{sub n} 1.1 x 10{sup 5} and M{sub w} = 4.0 x 10{sup 5}, respectively. The diameter of the PS shells was {approx}400-550 {mu}m. To investigate the wall-thickness dependence of the CID, the wall thickness of the PS shells was varied between 5 and 60 {mu}m. In the experiments, the PS shells were cooled by using liquid nitrogen, and their images were captured at 0 and -190 deg. C. For the investigation of the CID, two shapes of each shell that were measured at 0 and -190 deg. C were compared. The thinner PS shells showed larger CID. The maximum deformation was almost 1% of the outer radius when the shell aspect ratio (outer radius)/(wall thickness) was higher than 20. The repeatability of the CID was studied, and the results implied that residual stress in the PS shells had an influence on the CID.

  18. Effect of milling time and CNT concentration on hardness of CNT/Al{sub 2024} composites produced by mechanical alloying

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Bustamante, R.; Perez-Bustamante, F.; Estrada-Guel, I.; Licea-Jimenez, L.; Miki-Yoshida, M.; Martinez-Sanchez, R.

    2013-01-15

    Carbon nanotube/2024 aluminum alloy (CNT/Al{sub 2024}) composites were fabricated with a combination of mechanical alloying (MA) and powder metallurgy routes. Composites were microstructurally and mechanically evaluated at sintering condition. A homogeneous dispersion of CNTs in the Al matrix was observed by a field emission scanning electron microscopy. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy confirmed not only the presence of well dispersed CNTs but also needle-like shape aluminum carbide (Al{sub 4}C{sub 3}) crystals in the Al matrix. The formation of Al{sub 4}C{sub 3} was suggested as the interaction between the outer shells of CNTs and the Al matrix during MA process in which crystallization took place after the sintering process. The mechanical behavior of composites was evaluated by Vickers microhardness measurements indicating a significant improvement in hardness as function of the CNT content. This improvement was associated to a homogeneous dispersion of CNTs and the presence of Al{sub 4}C{sub 3} in the aluminum alloy matrix. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The 2024 aluminum alloy was reinforced by CNTs by mechanical alloying process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Composites were microstructural and mechanically evaluated after sintering condition. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The greater the CNT concentration, the greater the hardness of the composites. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Higher hardness in composites is achieved at 20 h of milling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The formation of Al{sub 4}C{sub 3} does not present a direct relationship with the milling time.

  19. An effective theory on the light shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajjad, Aqil

    We describe work on the construction of an effective field theory on a spherical light shell. The motivation arises from classical electromagnetism: If a collision produces charged particles with zero net charge emerging simultaneously from a point and instantaneously accelerating to the speed of light, then the electromagnetic fields due to these charges lie entirely on a spherical shell expanding at the speed of light. We show that this also applies to classical color radiation from high-energy collisions that produce colored particles. Specifically, the color fields produced in such a process are associated with a non-linear sigma-model on the 2D light shell with specific symmetry-breaking terms. The quantum version of such a picture exhibits asymptotic freedom and should therefore be a useful starting point for a light-shell effective theory for QCD. We start in the simplified context of zero-flavor scalar quantum electrodynamics. Our effective theory has 3 major ingredients: breaking down the fields into soft and hard sectors with the large energy of the hard fields in the radial direction scaled out, a special gauge called light-shell gauge in which the picture simplifies, and a gauge-invariant source defined on a spherical light shell having infinitesimal radius. We match the fields between the effective theory and the full theory, meaning zero-flavor scalar QED. This allows us to compute the amplitude for the production of any number of scalars from the gauge-invariant source. We then find the tree-level amplitude for the emission of a photon using our effective theory and show that our result agrees with the full theory. To calculate loop effects in our effective theory, we need the photon propagator in light-shell gauge. We derive this propagator and use it to calculate the 1-loop correction to the amplitude for the production of a scalar and anti-scalar pair arising from virtual photon effects. This reduces to a pair of purely angular integrals in the

  20. Chemical Component and Proteomic Study of the Amphibalanus (= Balanus) amphitrite Shell

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Gen; He, Li-sheng; Wong, Yue-Him; Xu, Ying; Zhang, Yu; Qian, Pei-yuan

    2015-01-01

    As typical biofoulers, barnacles possess hard shells and cause serious biofouling problems. In this study, we analyzed the protein component of the barnacle Amphibalanus (= Balanus) amphitrite shell using gel-based proteomics. The results revealed 52 proteins in the A. Amphitrite shell. Among them, 40 proteins were categorized into 11 functional groups based on KOG database, and the remaining 12 proteins were unknown. Besides the known proteins in barnacle shell (SIPC, carbonic anhydrase and acidic acid matrix protein), we also identified chorion peroxidase, C-type lectin-like domains, serine proteases and proteinase inhibitor proteins in the A. Amphitrite shell. The sequences of these proteins were characterized and their potential functions were discussed. Histology and DAPI staining revealed living cells in the shell, which might secrete the shell proteins identified in this study. PMID:26222041

  1. Chemical Component and Proteomic Study of the Amphibalanus (= Balanus) amphitrite Shell.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gen; He, Li-Sheng; Wong, Yue-Him; Xu, Ying; Zhang, Yu; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    As typical biofoulers, barnacles possess hard shells and cause serious biofouling problems. In this study, we analyzed the protein component of the barnacle Amphibalanus (= Balanus) amphitrite shell using gel-based proteomics. The results revealed 52 proteins in the A. Amphitrite shell. Among them, 40 proteins were categorized into 11 functional groups based on KOG database, and the remaining 12 proteins were unknown. Besides the known proteins in barnacle shell (SIPC, carbonic anhydrase and acidic acid matrix protein), we also identified chorion peroxidase, C-type lectin-like domains, serine proteases and proteinase inhibitor proteins in the A. Amphitrite shell. The sequences of these proteins were characterized and their potential functions were discussed. Histology and DAPI staining revealed living cells in the shell, which might secrete the shell proteins identified in this study.

  2. Wurtzite (Ga,Mn)As nanowire shells with ferromagnetic properties.

    PubMed

    Sadowski, J; Kret, S; Šiušys, A; Wojciechowski, T; Gas, K; Islam, M F; Canali, C M; Sawicki, M

    2017-02-09

    (Ga,Mn)As having a wurtzite crystal structure was coherently grown by molecular beam epitaxy on the {1100} side facets of wurtzite (Ga,In)As nanowires and further encapsulated by (Ga,Al)As and low temperature GaAs. For the first time, a truly long-range ferromagnetic magnetic order is observed in non-planar (Ga,Mn)As, which is attributed to a more effective hole confinement in the shell containing Mn by the proper selection/choice of both the core and outer shell materials.

  3. Comparative Study Of Outer Halos Of Planetary Nebula NGC 246, NGC 1501, And NGC 2022

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arion, Douglas N.; Finnvik, S.; Troyer, Z.

    2012-01-01

    A number of planetary nebulae exhibit multiple shell structures, including concentric outer halos. Three such nebulae have been studied by obtaining deep images in [O III] to identify linkages between structures observed in the inner nebula and structures found in the outer halos. Three different planetaries were studied - NGC 246, 1501, and 2022, and all exhibit similar morphologies, suggesting similar evolutionary pathways. Of note are jet structures that appear to extend through all of the shell/halo layers, implying that the layers were ejected before the jets. Data were obtained on the 0.9m WIYN telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory and the 1.52m Kuiper Telescope of the University of Arizona Steward Observatory. This work was supported in part by the Wisconsin Space Grant Consortium and a private bequest from Ms. Linda Staubitz.

  4. Outer Appearances Can Be Deceiving

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This graph shows the chemical composition of the rock at Gusev Crater dubbed 'Mazatzal' after it was brushed and ground by the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's rock abrasion tool. The data, taken by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer over the last few sols, show that the amount of chlorine and sulfur tri-oxide in Mazatzal first increased after brushing, then diminished after grinding. The interior of the rock appears to have the same chemical make-up as other volcanic or basalt rocks studied in the Gusev Crater area ('Adirondack' and 'Humphrey'). Its outer coating or rind, on the other hand, appears to be of a different constitution. Scientists are still puzzling out the implications of these data.

    The larger symbols on the graph represent inferred rock compositions, while the smaller symbols are actual data points. Observations were made at the target dubbed 'New York' on Mazatzal.

  5. Aft outer rim seal arrangement

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ching-Pang; Tham, Kok-Mun; Schroeder, Eric; Meeroff, Jamie; Miller, Jr., Samuel R; Marra, John J; Campbell, Christian X

    2015-04-28

    An outer rim seal arrangement (10), including: an annular rim (70) centered about a longitudinal axis (30) of a rotor disc (31), extending fore and having a fore-end (72), an outward-facing surface (74), and an inward-facing surface (76); a lower angel wing (62) extending aft from a base of a turbine blade (22) and having an aft end (64) disposed radially inward of the rim inward-facing surface to define a lower angel wing seal gap (80); an upper angel wing (66) extending aft from the turbine blade base and having an aft end (68) disposed radially outward of the rim outward-facing surface to define a upper angel wing seal gap (80, 82); and guide vanes (100) disposed on the rim inward-facing surface in the lower angel wing seal gap. Pumping fins (102) may be disposed on the upper angel wing seal aft end in the upper angel wing seal gap.

  6. Budgeting in Hard Times.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrino, Frank M.

    2003-01-01

    Interviews with school board members and administrators produced a list of suggestions for balancing a budget in hard times. Among these are changing calendars and schedules to reduce heating and cooling costs; sharing personnel; rescheduling some extracurricular activities; and forming cooperative agreements with other districts. (MLF)

  7. Running in Hard Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, John N., III

    2009-01-01

    Roberta Stevens and Kent Oliver are campaigning hard for the presidency of the American Library Association (ALA). Stevens is outreach projects and partnerships officer at the Library of Congress. Oliver is executive director of the Stark County District Library in Canton, Ohio. They have debated, discussed, and posted web sites, Facebook pages,…

  8. CSI: Hard Drive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sturgeon, Julie

    2008-01-01

    Acting on information from students who reported seeing a classmate looking at inappropriate material on a school computer, school officials used forensics software to plunge the depths of the PC's hard drive, searching for evidence of improper activity. Images were found in a deleted Internet Explorer cache as well as deleted file space.…

  9. Chemistry of the outer planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scattergood, Thomas W.

    1992-01-01

    Various aspects were studied of past or present chemistry in the atmospheres of the outer planets and their satellites using lab simulations. Three areas were studied: (1) organic chemistry induced by kinetically hot hydrogen atoms in the region of Jupiter's atmosphere containing the ammonia cirrus clouds; (2) the conversion of NH3 into N2 by plasmas associated with entry of meteors and other objects into the atmosphere of early Titan; and (3) the synthesis of simple hydrocarbons and HCN by lightning in mixtures containing N2, CH4, and NH3 representing the atmospheres of Titan and the outer planets. The results showed that: (1) hot H2 atoms formed from the photodissociation of NH3 in Jupiter's atmosphere could account for some of the atmospheric chemistry in the ammonia cirrus cloud region; (2) the thermalization of hot H2 atoms in atmospheres predominated by molecular H is not as rapid as predicted by elastic collision theory; (3) the net quantum loss of NH3 in the presence of a 200 fold excess of H2 is 0.02, much higher than was expected from the amount of H2 present; (4) the conversion of NH3 into N2 in plasmas associated with infalling meteors is very efficient and rapid, and could account for most of the N2 present on Titan; (5) the yields of C2H2 and HCN from lightning induced chemistry in mixtures of CH4 and N2 is consistent with quenched thermodynamic models of the discharge core; and (6) photolysis induced by the UV light emitted by the gases in the hot plasmas may account for some, if not most, of the excess production of C2H6 and the more complex hydrocarbons.

  10. Shell microstructure of the late Carboniferous rostroconch mollusc Apotocardium lanterna (Branson, 1965)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rogalla, N.S.; Carter, J.G.; Pojeta, J.

    2003-01-01

    The Late Carboniferous bransoniid conocardioidean Apotocardium lanterna (Branson, 1965) had an entirely aragonitic shell with a finely prismatic outer shell layer, a predominantly crossed lamellar to complex crossed lamellar middle shell layer, and an "inner" shell layer of finely textured porcelaneous and/or matted structure. This "inner" layer is probably homologous with the inner part of the middle shell layer and the inner layer sensu stricto of bivalved molluscs. Shell morphological and microstructural convergences between conocardioids and living heart cockles suggest that at least some conocardioids may have farmed algal endosymbionts in their posterior mantle margins. This symbiosis may have helped conocardioids compete with the biomechanically more efficient bivalves during the latter part of the Paleozoic.

  11. Records of River Variation in the Shells of Freshwater Bivalves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, M.; Romanek, C.

    2005-12-01

    The skeletons of hard-shelled invertebrates such as corals and bivalves are commonly used in marine settings as archives of environmental information. They are less commonly used in freshwater settings where variability in water chemistry makes it more difficult to calibrate chemical proxies such as the Sr:Ca in a shell. Our objective is to evaluate whether trace element concentrations in freshwater bivalve shells contain information on environmental conditions. Multiple elements (Ba, Cu, Mn and Sr) were analyzed within the shells of modern bivalves from four streams on DOE's Savannah River Site in S.C. Laser Ablation ICP-MS was used to measure elemental concentrations across five aragonitic shells from each site. These elements were chosen because they are present in detectable concentrations (ppm) in the shell and they have been suggested as useful proxies for temperature, rainfall, productivity and pollution. Results were compared to historical monthly site records of water chemistry and chemical analyses of water samples collected from the streams where the clams were found. The average shell concentrations of Sr and Mn were significantly different between sites and increased proportionally to water concentration. This was not observed for Ba and Cu. For example, the Ba concentrations of shells collected at a site downstream of a lake were higher than those for shells from stream sites with significantly higher dissolved Ba concentrations. Copper was only detected at dark growth lines with the number of lines and shell material between them varying between shells within the same stream. Intrashell profiles of Ba, Sr and Mn concentrations exhibited cyclical variation. The magnitude of cyclical variation for Mn and Sr within a shell corresponds with the annual variation in monthly water sample concentrations. Again, this pattern was not observed for Ba, especially in shells from the site downstream of a lake. This supports suggestions that particulate organic

  12. The photochemistry of carbon-rich circumstellar shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huggins, P. J.; Glassgold, A. E.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of ambient ultraviolet photons on the chemical structure of carbon-rich, circumstellar envelopes is investigated with a simple formulation of the time-dependent, photochemical rate equations valid for optically thick shells. Molecules injected into the shielded inner envelope are broken down when they reach the outer regions where ambient ultraviolet photons can penetrate. A quantitative description of the abundance variations is obtained for the case of uniform expansion by detailed consideration of the shielding of the radiation by the dust and molecules of the envelope. Representative results are presented to illustrate the role of shielding in defining the extent of molecular envelopes, the formation of C I and C II shells by photodestruction of carbon-bearing molecules, and the development of layered chemical structures from the photobreakup of polyatomic molecules. Photochemistry makes the outer parts of thick, carbon-rich envelopes into complex regions containing radicals, ions, and atoms which are of considerable observational and theoretical interest.

  13. Elbow and knee joint for hard space suits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vykukal, H. C.

    1986-01-01

    An elbow or knee joint for a hard space suit or similar usage is formed of three serially connected rigid sections which have truncated spherical configurations. The ends of each section form solid geometric angles, and the sections are interconnected by hermetically sealed ball bearings. The outer two sections are fixed together for rotation in a direction opposite to rotation of the center section. A preferred means to make the outer sections track each other in rotation comprises a rotatable continuous bead chain which engages sockets circumferentially spaced on the facing sides of the outer races of the bearings. The joint has a single pivot point and the bearing axes are always contained in a single plane for any articulation of the joint. Thus flexure of the joint simulates the coplanar flexure of the knee or elbow and is not susceptible to lockup.

  14. Non-uniform thickness in Europa's icy shell: implications for astrobiology mission design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairén, A.; Amils, R.

    The exploration of Europa's subsurface ocean is hardly constrained by the presence of an outer ice shell of unknown thickness: a somewhat thin crust would allow easier access to the ocean below. Current estimates for the thickness of Europa's icy surface range from a few km [1] to a few tens of km [2], the shell overlying a liquid water ocean up to 150 km thick [3,4,5]. The surface is believed to be young (mean age of 30-80 Myr [6]) and geologically active [7,8,9], as it is sparsely cratered. Here we report geological evidence indicating that the thickness of Europa's ice crust is actually a complex combination of thicker and thinner areas, highlighting the implications of such structure in the future exploration of the inner ocean. Detailed geologic mapping of impact craters, palimpsests and chaotic terrains distribution on Europa's surface, offers an initial approach to a comprehensive description of the thickness variation in the ice shell. Our analysis is based in: (1) Crater distribution, morphology, diameter and depth. Seminal work by Schenk [2] of transitions in crater shape/diameter suggested enhanced structural collapse of craters with diameter >27-33 km, that will consequently form multiring basins, due to weaker ice or a global ocean at depths >19-25 km. This being true, strictly can only be interpreted regionally: multiring basins indicate regions where the ice shell is thick; in those regions where the icy surface is thin, a bolide impact will breach the ice and leave neither crater nor multiring basin behind, but probably Ganymede's type palimpsests. (2) Palimpsest-type features distribution, indicating regions where the ice shell is too thin to support crater formation after big bolide impacts. In Ganymede, palimpsests are circular, low albedo and relief features formerly formed by impacts [10,11]. (3) Chaotic terrain distribution, considering features tens to hundreds of km across, that may be the evidence for very thin ice areas (from ˜ 2 km to

  15. Magnetic nanohybrids loaded with bimetal core-shell-shell nanorods for bacteria capture, separation, and near-infrared photothermal treatment.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bo; Wang, Ning; Han, Lu; Chen, Ming-Li; Wang, Jian-Hua

    2015-04-20

    A novel antimicrobial nanohybrid based on near-infrared (NIR) photothermal conversion is designed for bacteria capture, separation, and sterilization (killing). Positively charged magnetic reduced graphene oxide with modification by polyethylenimine (rGO-Fe3 O4 -PEI) is prepared and then loaded with core-shell-shell Au-Ag-Au nanorods to construct the nanohybrid rGO-Fe3 O4 -Au-Ag-Au. NIR laser irradiation melts the outer Au shell and exposes the inner Ag shell, which facilitates controlled release of the silver shell. The nanohybrids combine physical photothermal sterilization as a result of the outer Au shell with the antibacterial effect of the inner Ag shell. In addition, the nanohybrid exhibits high heat conductivity because of the rGO and rapid magnetic-separation capability that is attributable to Fe3 O4 . The nanohybrid provides a significant improvement of bactericidal efficiency with respect to bare Au-Ag-Au nanorods and facilitates the isolation of bacteria from sample matrixes. A concentration of 25 μg mL(-1) of nanohybrid causes 100 % capture and separation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 (1×10(8) cfu mL(-1) ) from an aqueous medium in 10 min. In addition, it causes a 22 °C temperature rise for the surrounding solution under NIR irradiation (785 nm, 50 mW cm(-2) ) for 10 min. With magnetic separation, 30 μg mL(-1) of nanohybrid results in a 100 % killing rate for E. coli O157:H7 cells. The facile bacteria separation and photothermal sterilization is potentially feasible for environmental and/or clinical treatment.

  16. Inferring the State of Tidally-heated Satellite Ice Shells from Global Shape Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimmo, F.; Thomas, P. C.; Pappalardo, R. T.; Moore, W. B.

    2006-12-01

    Several icy satellites of the outer solar system, notably Europa and Enceladus, are sufficiently tidally heated that they likely possess ice shells overlying oceans. Because tidal heating varies spatially [1], variations in ice shell thickness are likely to occur [2]. Lateral variations in shell thickness will in turn give rise to global topographic variations. The amplitude of this long-wavelength topography is potentially comparable to shape variations due to tidal and rotational stresses [3]. Thus, careful measurement of satellite shapes from limb profiles may be used to infer the nature of shell thickness variations, and thus the state of the ice shell. We demonstrate that limb profiles of Europa give no evidence for lateral shell thickness variations, in contrast to theoretical predictions [2] for a conductive ice shell above liquid water. There are two possible explanations: 1) the ice shell is sufficiently thick (> ~10 km) that lateral shell flow has smoothed out any variations; 2) the shell is heated mainly from below, resulting in a uniform, thin (~3 km) shell. Based on local topography from limb profiles and stereo topography [4] we favour the former explanation: a constant shell thickness rules out isostatic support, and the thin shell model is unable to flexurally support topography with amplitudes of ~1 km. Given sufficiently good limb profiles, a similar analysis may be carried out for Enceladus. Lateral variations in ice shell thickness also affect the tendency of a satellite to reorient itself [5]; thus, reorientation of Enceladus [6] may provide another constraint on the nature of the ice shell there. [1] G. Tobie et al., Icarus 177, 534-549, 2005. [2] Ojakangas and Stevenson, Icarus 81, 220-241, 1989 [3] Murray and Dermott, Solar System Dynamics, 2000 [4] Prockter and Schenk, Icarus 177, 305-326, 2005. [5] Ojakangas and Stevenson, Icarus 81, 242-270, 1989 [6] Nimmo and Pappalardo, Nature 441, 614-616, 2006.

  17. Dynamics of a suspension of interacting yolk-shell particles

    DOE PAGES

    Sánchez Díaz, L. E.; Cortes-Morales, E. C.; Li, X.; ...

    2014-12-01

    In this work we study the self-diusion properties of a liquid of hollow spherical particles (shells) bearing a smaller solid sphere in their interior (yolks). We model this system using purely repulsive hard-body interactions between all (shell and yolk) particles, but assume the presence of a background ideal solvent such that all the particles execute free Brownian motion between collisions, characterized by short-time self-diusion coecients D0 s for the shells and D0 y for the yolks. Using a softened version of these interparticle potentials we perform Brownian dynamics simulations to determine the mean squared displacement and intermediate scattering function ofmore » the yolk-shell complex. These results can be understood in terms of a set of eective Langevin equations for the N interacting shell particles, pre-averaged over the yolks' degrees of freedom, from which an approximate self-consistent description of the simulated self-diusion properties can be derived. Here we compare the theoretical and simulated results between them, and with the results for the same system in the absence of yolks. We nd that the yolks, which have no eect on the shell-shell static structure, in uence the dynamic properties in a predictable manner, fully captured by the theory.« less

  18. Dynamics of a suspension of interacting yolk-shell particles

    SciTech Connect

    Sánchez Díaz, L. E.; Cortes-Morales, E. C.; Li, X.; Chen, Wei-Ren; Medina-Noyola, M.

    2014-12-01

    In this work we study the self-diusion properties of a liquid of hollow spherical particles (shells) bearing a smaller solid sphere in their interior (yolks). We model this system using purely repulsive hard-body interactions between all (shell and yolk) particles, but assume the presence of a background ideal solvent such that all the particles execute free Brownian motion between collisions, characterized by short-time self-diusion coecients D0 s for the shells and D0 y for the yolks. Using a softened version of these interparticle potentials we perform Brownian dynamics simulations to determine the mean squared displacement and intermediate scattering function of the yolk-shell complex. These results can be understood in terms of a set of eective Langevin equations for the N interacting shell particles, pre-averaged over the yolks' degrees of freedom, from which an approximate self-consistent description of the simulated self-diusion properties can be derived. Here we compare the theoretical and simulated results between them, and with the results for the same system in the absence of yolks. We nd that the yolks, which have no eect on the shell-shell static structure, in uence the dynamic properties in a predictable manner, fully captured by the theory.

  19. Hollow spherical shell manufacture

    DOEpatents

    O'Holleran, Thomas P.

    1991-01-01

    A process for making a hollow spherical shell of silicate glass composition in which an aqueous suspension of silicate glass particles and an immiscible liquid blowing agent is placed within the hollow spherical cavity of a porous mold. The mold is spun to reduce effective gravity to zero and to center the blowing agent, while being heated so as to vaporize the immiscible liquid and urge the water carrier of the aqueous suspension to migrate into the body of the mold, leaving a green shell compact deposited around the mold cavity. The green shell compact is then removed from the cavity, and is sintered for a time and a temperature sufficient to form a silicate glass shell of substantially homogeneous composition and uniform geometry.

  20. Hollow spherical shell manufacture

    DOEpatents

    O'Holleran, T.P.

    1991-11-26

    A process is disclosed for making a hollow spherical shell of silicate glass composition in which an aqueous suspension of silicate glass particles and an immiscible liquid blowing agent is placed within the hollow spherical cavity of a porous mold. The mold is spun to reduce effective gravity to zero and to center the blowing agent, while being heated so as to vaporize the immiscible liquid and urge the water carrier of the aqueous suspension to migrate into the body of the mold, leaving a green shell compact deposited around the mold cavity. The green shell compact is then removed from the cavity, and is sintered for a time and a temperature sufficient to form a silicate glass shell of substantially homogeneous composition and uniform geometry. 3 figures.

  1. Mitochondrial dysfunction underlying outer retinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Lefevere, Evy; Toft-Kehler, Anne Katrine; Vohra, Rupali; Kolko, Miriam; Moons, Lieve; Van Hove, Inge

    2017-03-29

    Dysfunction of photoreceptors, retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) or both contribute to the initiation and progression of several outer retinal disorders. Disrupted Müller glia function might additionally subsidize to these diseases. Mitochondrial malfunctioning is importantly associated with outer retina pathologies, which can be classified as primary and secondary mitochondrial disorders. This review highlights the importance of oxidative stress and mitochondrial DNA damage, underlying outer retinal disorders. Indeed, the metabolically active photoreceptors/RPE are highly prone to these hallmarks of mitochondrial dysfunction, indicating that mitochondria represent a weak link in the antioxidant defenses of outer retinal cells.

  2. [Scattering properties of core-shell structure of mist wrapped dust particles].

    PubMed

    Feng, Shi-qi; Song, Wei; Wang, Yan; Miao, Xin-hui; Xu, Li-jun; Liu, Yu; Li, Cheng; Li Wen-long; Wang, Yi-ran; Cai, Hong-xing

    2014-12-01

    The authors have investigated the optical properties of core-shell structure of mist wrapped dust particles based on the method of discrete dipole approximation (DDA). The influence on the thickness of the elliptical core-shell structure were calculated which the ratio of long axis and short axis is 2:1, and the change of scattering angle for scattering characteristics. The results shows that the thickness of outer layer increase from 1.2 to 4.8 μm with the scattering and extinction coefficient of double core-shell layers particles decrease from 3.4 and 3.43 to 2.543 and 2.545, when the size of inner core isn't change. And scattering relative strength also increased obviously. The thickness of inner core increase from 0.6 to 2.4 μm with the of scattering and extinction coefficient change from 2.59 and 2.88 to 2.6 and 2.76 when thickness of outer remain constant. Effect of the thickness of visible outer layer on the scattering characteristics of double core-shell layers particles is greater, because of the interaction between scattering light and outer materials. The scattering relative intensity decrease with wavelength increased, while increased with the scale of core-shell structure increase. The results make a promotion on the study of the transportation characteristics of laser and scattering characteristics when the atmospheric aerosol and water mist interact together.

  3. Corrasion of a remoulded cohesive bed by saltating littorinid shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amos, C. L.; Sutherland, T. F.; Cloutier, D.; Patterson, S.

    2000-07-01

    along the rounded outer lip of the aperture (measured to be 0.5% of the nominal cross-sectional area of the shell). T increased with shell mass ( Mg) and current speed ( Uy). Below 0.29 m s -1, T< τo; for 0.29< Uy<0.35 m s -1, T≈ τo; and for Uy>0.35 m s -1, T> τo where τo is the fluid-induced shear stress. The total erosion rate ( Etot= Es+ Eo) was compared to the excess total bed shear stress ( τtot- τcrit) and found to be linearly related in the form: E tot=0.010 [τ tot-τ crit] gm -2 s -1. Es appeared to be in linear continuity with Eo if the impact area was set to 0.05% of the estimated shell nominal cross-sectional area.

  4. Shells and Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutley, Jane

    2009-01-01

    "Shells and Patterns" was a project the author felt would easily put smiles on the faces of her fifth-graders, and teach them about unity and the use of watercolor pencils as well. It was thrilling to see the excitement in her students as they made their line drawings of shells come to life. For the most part, they quickly got the hang of…

  5. Off-shell CHY amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, C. S.; Yao, York-Peng

    2016-06-01

    The Cachazo-He-Yuan (CHY) formula for on-shell scattering amplitudes is extended off-shell. The off-shell amplitudes (amputated Green's functions) are Möbius invariant, and have the same momentum poles as the on-shell amplitudes. The working principles which drive the modifications to the scattering equations are mainly Möbius covariance and energy momentum conservation in off-shell kinematics. The same technique is also used to obtain off-shell massive scalars. A simple off-shell extension of the CHY gauge formula which is Möbius invariant is proposed, but its true nature awaits further study.

  6. Super-Hard Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Philip; Prozorov, Ruslan

    2005-03-01

    We present the magnetic response of Type-II superconductivity in the extreme pinning limit, where screening currents within an order of magnitude of the Ginzburg-Landau depairing critical current density develop upon the application of a magnetic field. We show that this ``super-hard'' limit is well approximated in highly disordered, cold drawn, Nb wire whose magnetization response is characterized by a cascade of Meissner-like phases, each terminated by a catastrophic collapse of the magnetization. Direct magneto-optic measurements of the flux penetration depth in the virgin magnetization branch are in excellent agreement with the exponential model in which Jc(B)=Jco(-B/Bo), where Jco˜5x10^6 A/cm^2 for Nb. The implications for the fundamental limiting hardness of a superconductor will be discussed.

  7. Large scale production of yolk-shell β-tricalcium phosphate powders, and their bioactivities as novel bone substitutes.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jung Sang; Lee, Jong-Heun; Kang, Yun Chan

    2014-08-28

    This paper proposes the production of yolk-shell structured β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) powders using a spray-drying method, suitable for commercial scale production. Spray-dried precursor powders, consisting of calcium-phosphate salts and each of the various carbon source materials, are combusted in an oxygen atmosphere to obtain a yolk-shell structure. Only dextrin among the carbon source materials investigated shows promise in the production of β-TCP yolk-shell powders. By evaluating their apatite-forming capacity in simulated body fluid, the outstanding bioactivity of β-TCP yolk-shell powders is confirmed: numerous acicular and newly formed hydroxyl carbonate apatite crystals cover the entire β-TCP surface after a single day of soaking. These crystals are observed on both the outer and inner surfaces of the shells, and on the outer surface of the core, which is encouraging for its potential use as a bone grafting material.

  8. Shape transformation of bimetallic Au–Pd core–shell nanocubes to multilayered Au–Pd–Au core–shell hexagonal platelets

    DOE PAGES

    Bhattarai, Nabraj; Prozorov, Tanya

    2015-11-05

    Transformation of metallic or bimetallic (BM) nanoparticles (NPs) from one shape to another desired shape is of importance to nanoscience and nanotechnology, where new morphologies of NPs lead to enhancement of their exploitable properties. In this report, we present the shape transformation of Au octahedral NPs to Au–Pd core–shell nanocubes, followed by their transformation to nanostars and finally to multilayered Au–Pd–Au core–shell hexagonal platelets in the presence of T30 DNA. The weaker binding affinity of T30 DNA directs the growth to favor the formation of lower energy {111} facets, changing the morphology from nanocubes to nanostar. The nanostars, exhibiting unusualmore » intermediate morphologies, are comprised two sets of shell layers and have Au core, Pd intermediate shell, and Au outer shell. Similarly, the hexagonal platelets, which also have Au core and inner Pd shell, are encased in an external gold shell. As a result, the formation of multilayered Au–Pd–Au core–shell hexagonal platelets from Au–Pd core–shell nanocubes via the multilayered nanostars is monitored using scanning/transmission electron microscopy analysis.« less

  9. Shape transformation of bimetallic Au–Pd core–shell nanocubes to multilayered Au–Pd–Au core–shell hexagonal platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattarai, Nabraj; Prozorov, Tanya

    2015-11-05

    Transformation of metallic or bimetallic (BM) nanoparticles (NPs) from one shape to another desired shape is of importance to nanoscience and nanotechnology, where new morphologies of NPs lead to enhancement of their exploitable properties. In this report, we present the shape transformation of Au octahedral NPs to Au–Pd core–shell nanocubes, followed by their transformation to nanostars and finally to multilayered Au–Pd–Au core–shell hexagonal platelets in the presence of T30 DNA. The weaker binding affinity of T30 DNA directs the growth to favor the formation of lower energy {111} facets, changing the morphology from nanocubes to nanostar. The nanostars, exhibiting unusual intermediate morphologies, are comprised two sets of shell layers and have Au core, Pd intermediate shell, and Au outer shell. Similarly, the hexagonal platelets, which also have Au core and inner Pd shell, are encased in an external gold shell. As a result, the formation of multilayered Au–Pd–Au core–shell hexagonal platelets from Au–Pd core–shell nanocubes via the multilayered nanostars is monitored using scanning/transmission electron microscopy analysis.

  10. Effects of alga polysaccharide capsule shells on in-vivo bioavailability and disintegration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ting; Guo, Shuju; Ma, Lin; Yuan, Yi; Han, Lijun

    2012-01-01

    Gelatin has been used in hard capsule shells for more than a century, and some shortcomings have appeared, such as high moisture content and risk of transmitting diseases of animal origin to people. Based on available studies regarding gelatin and vegetable shells, we developed a new type of algal polysaccharide capsule (APPC) shells. To test whether our products can replace commercial gelatin shells, we measured in-vivo plasma concentration of 12 selected volunteers with a model drug, ibuprofen, using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), by calculating the relative bioavailability of APPC and Qualicaps® referenced to gelatin capsules and assessing bioequivalence of the three types of shells, and calculated pharmacokinetic parameters with the software DAS 2.0 (China). The results show that APPC shells possess bioequivalence with Qualicaps® and gelatin shells. Moreover, the disintegration behavior of four types of shells (APPC, Vegcaps®, Qualicaps® and gelatin shells) with the content of lactose and radioactive element (99mTc) was observed via gamma-scintigraphic images. The bioavailability and gamma-scintigraphic studies showed that APPC was not statistically different from other vegetable and gelatin capsule shells with respect to in-vivo behavior. Hence, it can be concluded that APPCs are exchangeable with other vegetable and gelatin shells.

  11. Outer Sphere Adsorption of Pb(II)EDTA on Goethite

    SciTech Connect

    Bargar, John R

    1999-07-16

    FTIR and EXAFS spectroscopic measurements were performed on Pb(II)EDTA adsorbed on goethite as functions of pH (4-6), Pb(II)EDTA concentration (0.11 {micro}M - 72 {micro}M), and ionic strength (16 {micro}M - 0.5M). FTIR measurements show no evidence for carboxylate-Fe(III) bonding or protonation of EDTA at Pb:EDTA = 1:1. Both FTIR and EXAFS measurements suggest that EDTA acts as a hexadentate ligand, with all four of its carboxylate and both amine groups bonded to Pb(II). No evidence was observed for inner-sphere Pb(II)-goethite bonding at Pb:EDTA = 1:1. Hence, the adsorbed complexes should have composition Pb(II)EDTA{sup 2{minus}}. Since substantial uptake of PbEDTA(II){sup 2{minus}} occurred in the samples, we infer that Pb(II)EDTA{sup 2{minus}} adsorbed as outer-sphere complexes and/or as complexes that lose part of their solvation shells and hydrogen bond directly to goethite surface sites. We propose the term ''hydration-sphere'' for the latter type of complexes because they should occupy space in the primary hydration spheres of goethite surface functional groups, and to distinguish this mode of sorption from common structural definitions of inner- and outer-sphere complexes. The similarity of Pb(II) uptake isotherms to those of other divalent metal ions complexed by EDTA suggests that they too adsorb by these mechanisms. The lack of evidence for inner-sphere EDTA-Fe(III) bonding suggests that previously proposed metal-ligand - promoted dissolution mechanisms should be modified, specifically to account for the presence of outer-sphere precursor species.

  12. Outer organic layer and internal repair mechanism protects pteropod Limacina helicina from ocean acidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peck, Victoria L.; Tarling, Geraint A.; Manno, Clara; Harper, Elizabeth M.; Tynan, Eithne

    2016-05-01

    Scarred shells of polar pteropod Limacina helicina collected from the Greenland Sea in June 2012 reveal a history of damage, most likely failed predation, in earlier life stages. Evidence of shell fracture and subsequent re-growth is commonly observed in specimens recovered from the sub-Arctic and further afield. However, at one site within sea-ice on the Greenland shelf, shells that had been subject to mechanical damage were also found to exhibit considerable dissolution. It was evident that shell dissolution was localised to areas where the organic, periostracal sheet that covers the outer shell had been damaged at some earlier stage during the animal's life. Where the periostracum remained intact, the shell appeared pristine with no sign of dissolution. Specimens which appeared to be pristine following collection were incubated for four days. Scarring of shells that received periostracal damage during collection only became evident in specimens that were incubated in waters undersaturated with respect to aragonite, ΩAr≤1. While the waters from which the damaged specimens were collected at the Greenland Sea sea-ice margin were not ΩAr≤1, the water column did exhibit the lowest ΩAr values observed in the Greenland and Barents Seas, and was likely to have approached ΩAr≤1 during the winter months. We demonstrate that L. helicina shells are only susceptible to dissolution where both the periostracum has been breached and the aragonite beneath the breach is exposed to waters of ΩAr≤1. Exposure of multiple layers of aragonite in areas of deep dissolution indicate that, as with many molluscs, L. helicina is able to patch up dissolution damage to the shell by secreting additional aragonite internally and maintain their shell. We conclude that, unless breached, the periostracum provides an effective shield for pteropod shells against dissolution in waters ΩAr≤1, and when dissolution does occur the animal has an effective means of self-repair. We suggest

  13. Outer trapped surfaces in Vaidya spacetimes

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Dov, Ishai

    2007-03-15

    It is proven that in Vaidya spacetimes of bounded total mass, the outer boundary, in spacetime, of the region containing outer trapped surfaces, is the event horizon. Further, it is shown that the region containing trapped surfaces in these spacetimes does not always extend to the event horizon.

  14. 76 FR 63654 - Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagram, Lease Maps, and Supplemental Official Outer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-13

    ... Doc No: 2011-26503] DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagram, Lease Maps, and Supplemental Official Outer Continental Shelf Block... American Datum of 1927 (NAD 27) Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Official Protraction Diagram (OPD),...

  15. Bivalve shells as high resolution biomineral archives of early Pleistocene seasonality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crippa, Gaia; Angiolini, Lucia; Leng, Melanie

    2016-04-01

    Bivalves are among the best tools for palaeoclimatic and palaeoenvironmental reconstructions because they are known to precipitate their shells in isotopic equilibrium with the seawater in which they live. Also, the analysis of their shell microstructure shows that these organisms modify their shell fabric in response to environmental variations forming growth lines. However, diagenetic processes may alter fossil bivalve shell microstructure and shell isotopic composition; for this reason it is important to perform screening tests to check if the shell is pristine and thus confidently identify biogenic calcium carbonate as a reliable proxy of primary seawater chemistry. Here, we performed a detailed study of the microstructure of ten aragonite bivalves shells belonging to Glycymeris insubrica, Glycymeris inflata and Arctica islandica, collected from the lower Pleistocene Arda River marine succession (northern Italy), to check their preservation for subsequent sclerochemical stable isotope analyses (δ18O, δ13C). To assess shell preservation 4 different screening techniques were used: Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Catholuminescence (CL), X-Ray Powder Diffraction (XRD) and Feigl's solution. Shells of species of Glycymeris, under SEM, show an outer crossed lamellar layer, an inner irregular and cone complex crossed lamellar layer and an irregular simple prismatic pallial myostracum; all the layers are penetrated by cylindrical tubules. Arctica islandica has an outer homogenous/crossed lamellar/crossed acicular layer, an inner fine complex crossed lamellar layer and an irregular simple prismatic pallial myostracum. The comparative analysis with recent fabrics shows a consistent pattern for species of both Glycymeris and Arctica genera, the recent and fossils shell microstructures being almost identical. Analyses at CL, XRD and Feigl's solution support that these fossil species have a non luminescent shells composed of pure aragonite. The excellent preservation

  16. Astroparticles: Messengers from Outer Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desiati, Paolo

    2016-07-01

    Since Galileo pointed a spyglass toward the sky, 400 years ago, observations empowered by man-made instrumentation have provided us with an enormous leap in the knowledge of how the Universe functions. More and more powerful optical telescopes made it possible for us to reach the farthest corners of space. At the same time, the advances in microphysics and the discovery of the electromagnetic spectrum, made it possible to directly look at the Universe in a way that our eyes cannot see. The discoveries of the intimate structure of matter, of subatomic particles and of how they interact with each other, have led astronomers to use the smallest objects in Nature to observe the farthest reaches of the otherwise invisible Universe. Not unlike Galileo, today we observe Outer Space with visible light and beyond, across the entire electromagnetic spectrum, from long wavelength radio waves to short wavelength gamma rays. But also with instruments detecting cosmic rays (the atomic nuclei we know on Earth) neutrinos (neutral subatomic particles that interact very weakly with matter) and gravitational waves (perturbations of spacetime predicted by General Relativity). Each cosmic messenger provides us with a unique piece of information about their source and the history of their journey to us. Modern astrophysics has the challenging goal to collect as much information as possible from all those messengers, to reconstruct the story of the Universe and how it became what it is today. This journey started with the unsettling discovery that we are only one minuscule dot in the immensity of the Universe and yet we are able to observe objects that are far in space and time. This journey is yet to complete its course, and the more we advance our knowledge, the more we need to understand. This interdisciplinary talk provides an overview of this journey and the future perspectives.

  17. Energy-dependent dynamics of keV to MeV electrons in the inner zone, outer zone, and slot regions.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Geoffrey D; Friedel, Reiner H W; Larsen, Brian A; Skoug, Ruth M; Funsten, Herbert O; Claudepierre, Seth G; Fennell, Joseph F; Turner, Drew L; Denton, Mick H; Spence, Harlan E; Blake, J Bernard; Baker, Daniel N

    2016-01-01

    We present observations of the radiation belts from the Helium Oxygen Proton Electron and Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer particle detectors on the Van Allen Probes satellites that illustrate the energy dependence and L shell dependence of radiation belt enhancements and decays. We survey events in 2013 and analyze an event on 1 March in more detail. The observations show the following: (a) at all L shells, lower energy electrons are enhanced more often than higher energies; (b) events that fill the slot region are more common at lower energies; (c) enhancements of electrons in the inner zone are more common at lower energies; and (d) even when events do not fully fill the slot region, enhancements at lower energies tend to extend to lower L shells than higher energies. During enhancement events the outer zone extends to lower L shells at lower energies while being confined to higher L shells at higher energies. The inner zone shows the opposite with an outer boundary at higher L shells for lower energies. Both boundaries are nearly straight in log(energy) versus L shell space. At energies below a few 100 keV, radiation belt electron penetration through the slot region into the inner zone is commonplace, but the number and frequency of "slot filling" events decreases with increasing energy. The inner zone is enhanced only at energies that penetrate through the slot. Energy- and L shell-dependent losses (that are consistent with whistler hiss interactions) return the belts to more quiescent conditions.

  18. Energy-dependent dynamics of keV to MeV electrons in the inner zone, outer zone, and slot regions

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Friedel, Reiner H. W.; Larsen, Brian A.; Skoug, Ruth M.; Funsten, Herbert O.; Claudepierre, Seth G.; Fennell, Joseph F.; Turner, Drew L.; Denton, Mick H.; Spence, Harlan E.; Blake, J. Bernard; Baker, Daniel N.

    2016-01-28

    Here, we present observations of the radiation belts from the Helium Oxygen Proton Electron and Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer particle detectors on the Van Allen Probes satellites that illustrate the energy dependence and L shell dependence of radiation belt enhancements and decays. We survey events in 2013 and analyze an event on 1 March in more detail. The observations show the following: (a) at all L shells, lower energy electrons are enhanced more often than higher energies; (b) events that fill the slot region are more common at lower energies; (c) enhancements of electrons in the inner zone are more common at lower energies; and (d) even when events do not fully fill the slot region, enhancements at lower energies tend to extend to lower L shells than higher energies. During enhancement events the outer zone extends to lower L shells at lower energies while being confined to higher L shells at higher energies. The inner zone shows the opposite with an outer boundary at higher L shells for lower energies. Both boundaries are nearly straight in log(energy) versus L shell space. At energies below a few 100 keV, radiation belt electron penetration through the slot region into the inner zone is commonplace, but the number and frequency of “slot filling” events decreases with increasing energy. The inner zone is enhanced only at energies that penetrate through the slot. Energy- and L shell-dependent losses (that are consistent with whistler hiss interactions) return the belts to more quiescent conditions.

  19. Effects of magnetic drift shell splitting on electron diffusion in the radiation belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Liheng; Chan, A. A.; O'Brien, T. P.; Tu, W.; Cunningham, G. S.; Albert, J. M.; Elkington, S. R.

    2016-12-01

    Drift shell splitting in the presence of pitch angle scattering breaks all three adiabatic invariants of radiation belt electron motion and produces new diffusion terms that fully populate the diffusion tensor in the Fokker-Planck equation. The Radbelt Electron Model (REM) solves such a Fokker-Planck equation and is used to investigate the phase space density sources. Our simulation results and theoretical arguments suggest that drift shell splitting changes the phase space location of the source to smaller L shells, which typically reduces outer zone phase space density enhancements, and this reduction has a limit corresponding to two-dimensional local diffusion on a curved surface in the phase space.

  20. Active Control of Vibrations and Noise of Double Wall Cylindrical Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.-Y.; Vaicaitis, R.

    1998-10-01

    Active control of vibrations and noise transmissions of double wall composite cylindrical shells using pairs of spatially discrete piezoelectric actuators is investigated. The velocity feedback and sound pressure rate feedback control procedures are developed. The inner and outer shells which are separated by a soft core are modelled by Love's thin shell theory for laminate composite materials and the inputs are taken as stationary random pressures and/or random point forces. A galerkin-like procedure is used to obtain solutions of the governing structural-acoustic equations. Parametric studies are performed to demonstrate the effect of actuator placement, actuator size, control gains, spillover, structural and acoustic damping characteristics

  1. Hard metal composition

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, H.

    1983-07-26

    A composition of matter having a Rockwell A hardness of at least 85 is formed from a precursor mixture comprising between 3 and 10 wt % boron carbide and the remainder a metal mixture comprising from 70 to 90% tungsten or molybdenum, with the remainder of the metal mixture comprising nickel and iron or a mixture thereof. The composition has a relatively low density of between 7 and 14 g/cc. The precursor is preferably hot pressed to yield a composition having greater than 100% of theoretical density.

  2. Hard metal composition

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, Haskell

    1986-01-01

    A composition of matter having a Rockwell A hardness of at least 85 is formed from a precursor mixture comprising between 3 and 10 weight percent boron carbide and the remainder a metal mixture comprising from 70 to 90 percent tungsten or molybdenum, with the remainder of the metal mixture comprising nickel and iron or a mixture thereof. The composition has a relatively low density of between 7 to 14 g/cc. The precursor is preferably hot pressed to yield a composition having greater than 100% of theoretical density.

  3. Shell Biorefinery: Dream or Reality?

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Yang, Huiying; Yan, Ning

    2016-09-12

    Shell biorefinery, referring to the fractionation of crustacean shells into their major components and the transformation of each component into value-added chemicals and materials, has attracted growing attention in recent years. Since the large quantities of waste shells remain underexploited, their valorization can potentially bring both ecological and economic benefits. This Review provides an overview of the current status of shell biorefinery. It first describes the structural features of crustacean shells, including their composition and their interactions. Then, various fractionation methods for the shells are introduced. The last section is dedicated to the valorization of chitin and its derivatives for chemicals, porous carbon materials and functional polymers.

  4. Sensational spherical shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. C.; Kendall, J. M., Jr.; Bahrami, P. A.; Wang, T. G.

    1986-01-01

    Fluid-dynamic and capillary forces can be used to form nearly perfect, very small spherical shells when a liquid that can solidify is passed through an annular die to form an annular jet. Gravity and certain properties of even the most ideal materials, however, can cause slight asymmetries. The primary objective of the present work is the control of this shell formation process in earth laboratories rather than space microgravity, through the development of facilities and methods that minimize the deleterious effects of gravity, aerodynamic drag, and uncontrolled cooling. The spherical shells thus produced can be used in insulation, recyclable filter materials, fire retardants, explosives, heat transport slurries, shock-absorbing armor, and solid rocket motors.

  5. Outer planets and icy satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drobyshevski, E. M.

    1991-01-01

    The resources offered by the outer bodies in the Solar System, starting with the main belt asteroids and Jovian System, are not only larger and more diverse but may even be easier to reach than, say, those of Mars. The use of their material, including water and organic matter, depends exclusively on the general strategy of exploration of the Solar System. Of major interest in this respect are the large ice satellites - Titan, Ganymede, and Callisto. Motion through the planetary magnetospheres excites in their ice envelopes megampere currents which, in the presence of rocky, etc., inclusions with electronic conduction should lead to the bulk electrolysis of ice and accumulation in it of 2H2 + O2 in the form of a solid solution. With the concentration of 2H2 + O2 reaching about 15 wt. percent, the solution becomes capable of detonation by a strong meteoritic impact. An explosion of Ganymede's ice envelope about 0.5 By ago could account for the formation of the Trojans and irregular satellites, all known differences between Ganymede and Callisto, and many other things. The explosion of a small icy planet with M approx less than 0.5 Moon created the asteroid belt. Two to three explosions occurred on Io, and two on Europa. The specific features of the longperiod comets close to Saturn's orbit permit dating Titan's envelope explosion as 10,000 yr ago, which produced its thick atmosphere, young Saturn's rings, as well as a reservoir of ice fragments saturated by 2H2 + O2, i.e., cometary nuclei between the orbits of Jupiter and Saturn. Thus these nuclei should contain, besides organic matter, also 2H2 + O2, which could be used for their transportation as well as for fuel for spaceships. Ices of such composition can reside deep inside Deimos, the Trojans, C-asteroids, etc. The danger of a future explosion of Callisto's electrolyzed ices, which would result in a catastrophic bombardment of the Earth by comets, may be high enough to warrant a revision of the priorities and

  6. Outer planets and icy satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drobyshevski, E. M.

    The resources offered by the outer bodies in the Solar System, starting with the main belt asteroids and Jovian System, are not only larger and more diverse but may even be easier to reach than, say, those of Mars. The use of their material, including water and organic matter, depends exclusively on the general strategy of exploration of the Solar System. Of major interest in this respect are the large ice satellites - Titan, Ganymede, and Callisto. Motion through the planetary magnetospheres excites in their ice envelopes megampere currents which, in the presence of rocky, etc., inclusions with electronic conduction should lead to the bulk electrolysis of ice and accumulation in it of 2H2 + O2 in the form of a solid solution. With the concentration of 2H2 + O2 reaching about 15 wt. percent, the solution becomes capable of detonation by a strong meteoritic impact. An explosion of Ganymede's ice envelope about 0.5 By ago could account for the formation of the Trojans and irregular satellites, all known differences between Ganymede and Callisto, and many other things. The explosion of a small icy planet with M approx less than 0.5 Moon created the asteroid belt. Two to three explosions occurred on Io, and two on Europa. The specific features of the longperiod comets close to Saturn's orbit permit dating Titan's envelope explosion as 10,000 yr ago, which produced its thick atmosphere, young Saturn's rings, as well as a reservoir of ice fragments saturated by 2H2 + O2, i.e., cometary nuclei between the orbits of Jupiter and Saturn. Thus these nuclei should contain, besides organic matter, also 2H2 + O2, which could be used for their transportation as well as for fuel for spaceships. Ices of such composition can reside deep inside Deimos, the Trojans, C-asteroids, etc. The danger of a future explosion of Callisto's electrolyzed ices, which would result in a catastrophic bombardment of the Earth by comets, may be high enough to warrant a revision of the priorities and

  7. Oyster shell conveyor used to lift shells from the dock ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oyster shell conveyor used to lift shells from the dock into the receiving room housed in the 1965 concrete block addition. - J.C. Lore Oyster House, 14430 Solomons Island Road, Solomons, Calvert County, MD

  8. Uranyl peroxide oxalate cage and core-shell clusters containing 50 and 120 uranyl ions.

    PubMed

    Ling, Jie; Qiu, Jie; Burns, Peter C

    2012-02-20

    Cage clusters built from uranyl hexagonal bipyramids and oxalate ligands crystallize from slightly acidic aqueous solution under ambient conditions, facilitating structure analysis. Each cluster contains uranyl ions coordinated by peroxo ligands in a bidentate configuration. Uranyl ions are bridged by shared peroxo ligands, oxalate ligands, or through hydroxyl groups. U(50)Ox(20) contains 50 uranyl ions and 20 oxalate groups and is a topological derivative of the U(50) cage cluster that has a fullerene topology. U(120)Ox(90) contains 120 uranyl ions and 90 oxalate groups and is the largest and highest mass cluster containing uranyl ions that has been reported. It has a core-shell structure, in which the inner shell (core) consists of a cluster of 60 uranyl ions and 30 oxalate groups, identical to U(60)Ox(30), with a fullerene topology. The outer shell contains 12 identical units that each consist of five uranyl hexagonal bipyramids that are linked to form a ring (topological pentagon), with each uranyl ion also coordinated by a side-on nonbridging oxalate group. The five-membered rings of the inner and outer shells (the topological pentagons) are in correspondence and are linked through K cations. The inner shell topology has therefore templated the location of the outer shell rings, and the K counterions assume a structure-directing role. Small-angle X-ray scattering data demonstrated U(50)Ox(20) remains intact in aqueous solution upon dissolution. In the case of clusters of U(120)Ox(90), the scattering data for dissolved crystals indicates the U(60)Ox(30) core persists in solution, although the outer rings of uranyl bipyramids contained in the U(120)Ox(90) core-shell cluster appear to detach from the cluster when crystals are dissolved in water.

  9. Sound Transmission through Cylindrical Shell Structures Excited by Boundary Layer Pressure Fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Yvette Y.; Silcox, Richard J.; Robinson, Jay H.

    1996-01-01

    This paper examines sound transmission into two concentric cylindrical sandwich shells subject to turbulent flow on the exterior surface of the outer shell. The interior of the shells is filled with fluid medium and there is an airgap between the shells in the annular space. The description of the pressure field is based on the cross-spectral density formulation of Corcos, Maestrello, and Efimtsov models of the turbulent boundary layer. The classical thin shell theory and the first-order shear deformation theory are applied for the inner and outer shells, respectively. Modal expansion and the Galerkin approach are used to obtain closed-form solutions for the shell displacements and the radiation and transmission pressures in the cavities including both the annular space and the interior. The average spectral density of the structural responses and the transmitted interior pressures are expressed explicitly in terms of the summation of the cross-spectral density of generalized force induced by the boundary layer turbulence. The effects of acoustic and hydrodynamic coincidences on the spectral density are observed. Numerical examples are presented to illustrate the method for both subsonic and supersonic flows.

  10. Simulation on the aggregation process of spherical particle confined in a spherical shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Xu, J. J.; Zhang, L.

    2016-04-01

    The aggregation process of spherical particles confined in a spherical shell was studied by using a diffusion-limited cluster-cluster aggregation (DLCA) model. The influence of geometrical confinement and wetting-like properties of the spherical shell walls on the particle concentration profile, aggregate structure and aggregation kinetics had been explored. The results show that there will be either depletion or absorption particles near the shell walls depending on the wall properties. It is observed that there are four different types of density distribution which can be realized by modifying the property of the inner or outer spherical shell wall. In addition, the aggregate structure will become more compact in the confined spherical shell comparing to bulk system with the same particle volume fraction. The analysis on the aggregation kinetics indicates that geometrical confinement will promote the aggregation process by reducing the invalid movement of the small aggregates and by constraining the movement of those large aggregates. Due to the concave geometrical characteristic of the outer wall of the spherical shell, its effects on the aggregating kinetics and the structure of the formed aggregates are more evident than those of the inner wall. This study will provide some instructive information of controlling the density distribution of low-density porous polymer hollow spherical shells and helps to predict gel structures developed in confined geometries.

  11. Hard Metal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bech, A. O.; Kipling, M. D.; Heather, J. C.

    1962-01-01

    In Great Britain there have been no published reports of respiratory disease occurring amongst workers in the hard metal (tungsten carbide) industry. In this paper the clinical and radiological findings in six cases and the pathological findings in one are described. In two cases physiological studies indicated mild alveolar diffusion defects. Histological examination in a fatal case revealed diffuse pulmonary interstitial fibrosis with marked peribronchial and perivascular fibrosis and bronchial epithelial hyperplasia and metaplasia. Radiological surveys revealed the sporadic occurrence and low incidence of the disease. The alterations in respiratory mechanics which occurred in two workers following a day's exposure to dust are described. Airborne dust concentrations are given. The industrial process is outlined and the literature is reviewed. The toxicity of the metals is discussed, and our findings are compared with those reported from Europe and the United States. We are of the opinion that the changes which we would describe as hard metal disease are caused by the inhalation of dust at work and that the component responsible may be cobalt. Images PMID:13970036

  12. Interactive design of large end rings on stiffened conical shells using composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, R. C.; Cooper, P. A.

    1974-01-01

    Design study methods and results for a composite reinforced base ring for the conical aeroshell structure of the planetary lander vehicle for Project Viking, an unmanned mission to Mars, are presented. The aeroshell is a ring and stringer-stiffened conical shell structure having a half angle of 70 degrees with a large base ring mounted at the outer edge of the cone and a large pay-load ring in the interior with many smaller rings spaced along the inside shell surface. The purpose of the structure is to develop the aerodynamic drag required to decelerate the lander in the Mars atmosphere to facilitiate a soft landing. The design of a shell structure of this complexity requires the use of the latest technology available in a large general-purpose shell buckling program. The large general-purpose non-linear shell buckling program (BOSOR 2) which was used for this purpose is described.

  13. Physical Mechanisms and Scaling Laws of K-Shell Double Photoionization

    SciTech Connect

    Hoszowska, J.; Dousse, J.-Cl.; Berset, M.; Cao, W.; Fennane, K.; Kayser, Y.; Szlachetko, J.; Szlachetko, M.; Kheifets, A. K.; Bray, I.; Kavcic, M.

    2009-02-20

    We report on the photon energy dependence of the K-shell double photoionization (DPI) of Mg, Al, and Si. The DPI cross sections were derived from high-resolution measurements of x-ray spectra following the radiative decay of the K-shell double vacancy states. Our data evince the relative importance of the final-state electron-electron interaction to the DPI. By comparing the double-to-single K-shell photoionization cross-section ratios for neutral atoms with convergent close-coupling calculations for He-like ions, the effect of outer shell electrons on the K-shell DPI process is assessed. Universal scaling of the DPI cross sections with the effective nuclear charge for neutral atoms is revealed.

  14. Physical Mechanisms and Scaling Laws of K-Shell Double Photoionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoszowska, J.; Kheifets, A. K.; Dousse, J.-Cl.; Berset, M.; Bray, I.; Cao, W.; Fennane, K.; Kayser, Y.; Kavčič, M.; Szlachetko, J.; Szlachetko, M.

    2009-02-01

    We report on the photon energy dependence of the K-shell double photoionization (DPI) of Mg, Al, and Si. The DPI cross sections were derived from high-resolution measurements of x-ray spectra following the radiative decay of the K-shell double vacancy states. Our data evince the relative importance of the final-state electron-electron interaction to the DPI. By comparing the double-to-single K-shell photoionization cross-section ratios for neutral atoms with convergent close-coupling calculations for He-like ions, the effect of outer shell electrons on the K-shell DPI process is assessed. Universal scaling of the DPI cross sections with the effective nuclear charge for neutral atoms is revealed.

  15. Palaeoecology and evolution of marine hard substrate communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, P. D.; Wilson, M. A.

    2003-07-01

    Marine organisms have occupied hard substrates since the Archaean. Shells, rocks, wood and sedimentary hardgrounds offer relatively stable habitats compared to unconsolidated sediments, but the plants and animals which inhabit them must develop means to gain and defend this premium attachment space. Hard substrate communities are formed by organisms with a variety of strategies for adhering to and/or excavating the substrates they inhabit. While mobile grazers, organically attached and even soft-bodied organisms may leave evidence of their former presence in ancient hard substrate communities, a superior fossil record is left by sessile encrusters with mineralised skeletons and by borers which leave trace fossils. Furthermore, encrusters and borers are preserved in situ, retaining their spatial relationships to one another and to the substrate. Spatial competition, ecological succession, oriented growth, and differential utilisation of exposed vs. hidden substrate surfaces can all be observed or inferred. Hard substrate communities are thus excellent systems with which to study community evolution over hundreds of millions of years. Here we review the research on modern and ancient hard substrate communities, and point to some changes that have affected them over geological time scales. Such changes include a general increase in bioerosion of hard substrates, particularly carbonate surfaces, through the Phanerozoic. This is, at least in part, analogous to the infaunalisation trends seen in soft substrate communities. Encrusting forms show an increase in skeletalisation from the Palaeozoic into the Mesozoic and Cenozoic, which may be a response to increasing levels of predation. Hard substrate communities, considering borers and encrusters together, show a rough increase in tiering through the Phanerozoic which again parallels trends seen in soft substrate communities. This extensive review of the literature on living and fossil hard substrate organisms shows that

  16. Depletion of the Outer Asteroid Belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Jer-Chyi; Malhotra, Renu

    1997-01-01

    During the early history of the solar system, it is likely that the outer planets changed their distance from the sun, and hence, their influence on the asteroid belt evolved with time. The gravitational influence of Jupiter and Saturn on the orbital evolution of asteroids in the outer asteroid belt was calculated. The results show that the sweeping of mean motion resonances associated with planetary migration efficiently destabilizes orbits in the outer asteroid belt on a time scale of 10 million years. This mechanism provides an explanation for the observed depletion of asteroids in that region.

  17. Measurements of the Effect of Adiabat on Shell Decompression in Direct-Drive Implosions on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, D. T.; Hu, S. X.; Radha, P. B.; Davis, A. K.; Craxton, R. S.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Goncharov, V. N.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Stoeckl, C.; Froula, D. H.

    2016-10-01

    Measurements of the effect of adiabat (α) on the shell thickness were performed in direct-drive implosions. The maximum in-flight shell thickness was obtained using a novel technique where the outer and inner surfaces of the shell were simultaneously measured using self-emission images of the imploding target. When reducing the shell's adiabat from α = 6 to α = 4.5 , the shell thickness was measured to decrease from 75 μm to 60 μm, but when decreasing the adiabat further (α = 1.8), the shell thickness was measured to increase to 75 μm. The measured shell thickness, shell trajectories, neutron bang time, and neutron yield were reproduced by two-dimensional simulations that include laser imprint, nonlocal thermal transport, cross-beam energy transfer, and first-principles equation-of-state models. These results show that the decompression of the shell measured for low-adiabat implosions was a result of laser imprint. Additional information on the evolution of the density profile was obtained using x-ray radiography. The backlighter was created with six of the 60 OMEGA laser beams, with the pointings and energies of other beams adjusted to maintain a uniform implosion. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  18. Shell Higher Olefins Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lutz, E. F.

    1986-01-01

    Shows how olefin isomerization and the exotic olefin metathesis reaction can be harnessed in industrial processes. Indicates that the Shell Higher Olefins Process makes use of organometallic catalysts to manufacture alpha-olefins and internal carbon-11 through carbon-14 alkenes in a flexible fashion that can be adjusted to market needs. (JN)

  19. Shell Creek Summers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seier, Mark; Goedeken, Suzy

    2005-01-01

    In 2002 Shell Creek Watershed Improvement Group turned to the Newman Grove Public Schools' science department to help educate the public on water quality in the watershed and to establish a monitoring system that would be used to improve surface and groundwater quality in the creek's watershed. Nebraska Department of Environmental Quality provided…

  20. Snail Shell Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Catherine

    1992-01-01

    Presents three inquiry-based lessons to develop the science process skills of observation, identification, and classification. Activities use whelk eggs and snail shells as the focus of the students' inquiries. Provides a list of 19 facts about whelks and snails. (MDH)

  1. Outer planet probe engineering model structural tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smittkamp, J. A.; Gustin, W. H.; Griffin, M. W.

    1977-01-01

    A series of proof of concept structural tests was performed on an engineering model of the Outer Planets Atmospheric Entry Probe. The tests consisted of pyrotechnic shock, dynamic and static loadings. The tests partially verified the structural concept.

  2. HI shells in the Leiden/Argentina/Bonn HI survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehlerová, S.; Palouš, J.

    2013-02-01

    Aims: We analyse the all-sky Leiden/Argentina/Bonn HI survey, where we identify shells belonging to the Milky Way. Methods: We used an identification method based on the search of continuous regions of a low brightness temperature that are compatible with given properties of HI shells. Results: We found 333 shells in the whole Galaxy. The size distribution of shells in the outer Galaxy is fitted by a power law with the coefficient of 2.6 corresponding to the index 1.8 in the distribution of energy sources. Their surface density decreases exponentially with a scale length of 2.8 kpc. The surface density of shells with radii ≥100 pc in the solar neighbourhood is ~4 kpc-2 and the 2D porosity is ~0.7. Tables A.1 and A.2 are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/550/A23

  3. First Images from HERO: A Hard-X-Ray Focusing Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, Brian D.; Alexander, Cheryl D.; Apple, Jeff A.; Benson, Carl M.; Dietz, Kurtis L.; Elsner, Ronald F.; Engelhaupt, Darell E.; Ghosh, Kajal K.; Kolodziejczak, Jeffery J.; ODell, Stephen L.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We are developing a balloon-borne hard-x-ray telescope that utilizes grazing incidence optics. Termed HERO, for High-Energy Replicated Optics, the instrument will provide unprecented sensitivity in the hard-x-ray region and will achieve milliCrab-level sensitivity in a typical 3-hour balloon-flight observation and 50 microCrab sensitivity on ultra-long-duration flights. A recent proof-of-concept flight, featuring a small number of mirror shells captured the first focused hard-x-ray images of galactic x-ray sources. Full details of the payload, its expected future performance and its recent measurements are provided.

  4. Dissecting a supernova impostor's circumstellar medium: MUSEing about the SHAPE of η Carinae's outer ejecta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehner, A.; Steffen, W.; Groh, J. H.; Vogt, F. P. A.; Baade, D.; Boffin, H. M. J.; Davidson, K.; de Wit, W. J.; Humphreys, R. M.; Martayan, C.; Oudmaijer, R. D.; Rivinius, T.; Selman, F.

    2016-11-01

    Aims: The role of episodic mass loss is one of the outstanding questions in massive star evolution. The structural inhomogeneities and kinematics of their nebulae are tracers of their mass-loss history. We conduct a three-dimensional morpho-kinematic analysis of the ejecta of η Car outside its famous Homunculus nebula. Methods: We carried out the first large-scale integral field unit observations of η Car in the optical, covering a field of view of 1'× 1' centered on the star. Observations with the Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) at the Very Large Telescope (VLT) reveal the detailed three-dimensional structure of η Car's outer ejecta. Morpho-kinematic modeling of these ejecta is conducted with the code SHAPE. Results: The largest coherent structure in η Car's outer ejecta can be described as a bent cylinder with roughly the same symmetry axis as the Homunculus nebula. This large outer shell is interacting with the surrounding medium, creating soft X-ray emission. Doppler velocities of up to 3000 km s-1 are observed. We establish the shape and extent of the ghost shell in front of the southern Homunculus lobe and confirm that the NN condensation can best be modeled as a bowshock in the orbital/equatorial plane. Conclusions: The SHAPE modeling of the MUSE observations provides a significant gain in the study of the three-dimensional structure of η Car's outer ejecta. Our SHAPE modeling indicates that the kinematics of the outer ejecta measured with MUSE can be described by a spatially coherent structure, and that this structure also correlates with the extended soft X-ray emission associated with the outer debris field. The ghost shell immediately outside the southern Homunculus lobe hints at a sequence of eruptions within the time frame of the Great Eruption from 1837-1858 or possibly a later shock/reverse shock velocity separation. Our 3D morpho-kinematic modeling and the MUSE observations constitute an invaluable dataset to be confronted with future

  5. Multi-shell effective interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsunoda, Naofumi; Takayanagi, Kazuo; Hjorth-Jensen, Morten; Otsuka, Takaharu

    2014-02-01

    Background: Effective interactions, either derived from microscopic theories or based on fitting selected properties of nuclei in specific mass regions, are widely used inputs to shell-model studies of nuclei. The commonly used unperturbed basis functions are given by the harmonic oscillator. Until recently, most shell-model calculations have been confined to a single oscillator shell like the sd shell or the pf shell. Recent interest in nuclei away from the stability line requires, however, larger shell-model spaces. Because the derivation of microscopic effective interactions has been limited to degenerate models spaces, there are both conceptual and practical limits to present shell-model calculations that utilize such interactions. Purpose: The aim of this work is to present a novel microscopic method to calculate effective nucleon-nucleon interactions for the nuclear shell model. Its main difference from existing theories is that it can be applied not only to degenerate model spaces but also to nondegenerate model spaces. This has important consequences, in particular for intershell matrix elements of effective interactions. Methods: The formalism is presented in the form of a many-body perturbation theory based on the recently developed extended Kuo-Krenciglowa method. Our method enables us to microscopically construct effective interactions not only in one oscillator shell but also for several oscillator shells. Results: We present numerical results using effective interactions within (i) a single oscillator shell (a so-called degenerate model space) like the sd shell or the pf shell and (ii) two major shells (nondegenerate model space) like the sdf7p3 shell or the pfg9 shell. We also present energy levels of several nuclei that have two valence nucleons on top of a given closed-shell core. Conclusions: Our results show that the present method works excellently in shell-model spaces that comprise several oscillator shells, as well as in a single oscillator

  6. Structure and mechanical properties of Saxidomus purpuratus biological shells.

    PubMed

    Yang, W; Zhang, G P; Zhu, X F; Li, X W; Meyers, M A

    2011-10-01

    The strength and fracture behavior of Saxidomus purpuratus shells were investigated and correlated with the structure. The shells show a crossed lamellar structure in the inner and middle layers and a fibrous/blocky and porous structure composed of nanoscaled particulates (~100 nm diameter) in the outer layer. It was found that the flexure strength and fracture mode are a function of lamellar organization and orientation. The crossed lamellar structure of this shell is composed of domains of parallel lamellae with approximate thickness of 200-600 nm. These domains have approximate lateral dimensions of 10-70 μm with a minimum of two orientations of lamellae in the inner and middle layers. Neighboring domains are oriented at specific angles and thus the structure forms a crossed lamellar pattern. The microhardness across the thickness was lower in the outer layer because of the porosity and the absence of lamellae. The tensile (from flexure tests) and compressive strengths were analyzed by means of Weibull statistics. The mean tensile (flexure) strength at probability of 50%, 80-105 MPa, is on the same order as the compressive strength (~50-150 MPa) and the Weibull moduli vary from 3.0 to 7.6. These values are significantly lower than abalone nacre, in spite of having the same aragonite structure. The lower strength can be attributed to a smaller fraction of the organic interlayer. The fracture path in the specimens is dominated by the orientation of the domains and proceeds preferentially along lamella boundaries. It also correlates with the color changes in the cross section of the shell. The cracks tend to undergo a considerable change in orientation when the color changes abruptly. The distributions of strengths, cracking paths, and fracture surfaces indicate that the mechanical properties of the shell are anisotropic with a hierarchical nature.

  7. The heterogeneous ice shell thickness of Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucchetti, Alice; Pozzobon, Riccardo; Mazzarini, Francesco; Cremonese, Gabriele; Massironi, Matteo

    2016-10-01

    Saturn's moon Enceladus is the smallest Solar System body that presents an intense geologic activity on its surface. Plumes erupting from Enceladus' South Polar terrain (SPT) provide direct evidence of a reservoir of liquid below the surface. Previous analysis of gravity data determined that the ice shell above the liquid ocean must be 30-40 km thick from the South Pole up to 50° S latitude (Iess et al., 2014), however, understand the global or regional nature of the ocean beneath the ice crust is still challenging. To infer the thickness of the outer ice shell and prove the global extent of the ocean, we used the self-similar clustering method (Bonnet et al., 2001; Bour et al., 2002) to analyze the widespread fractures of the Enceladus's surface. The spatial distribution of fractures has been analyzed in terms of their self-similar clustering and a two-point correlation method was used to measure the fractal dimension of the fractures population (Mazzarini, 2004, 2010). A self-similar clustering of fractures is characterized by a correlation coefficient with a size range defined by a lower and upper cut-off, that represent a mechanical discontinuity and the thickness of the fractured icy crust, thus connected to the liquid reservoir. Hence, this method allowed us to estimate the icy shell thickness values in different regions of Enceladus from SPT up to northern regions.We mapped fractures in ESRI ArcGis environment in different regions of the satellite improving the recently published geological map (Crow-Willard and Pappalardo, 2015). On these regions we have taken into account the fractures, such as wide troughs and narrow troughs, located in well-defined geological units. Firstly, we analyzed the distribution of South Polar Region fracture patterns finding an ice shell thickness of ~ 31 km, in agreement with gravity measurements (Iess et al., 2014). Then, we applied the same approach to other four regions of the satellite inferring an increasing of the ice

  8. Extending synchrotron-based atomic physics experiments into the hard X-ray region

    SciTech Connect

    LeBrun, T.

    1996-12-31

    The high-brightness, hard x-ray beams available from third-generation synchrotron sources are opening new opportunities to study the deepest inner shells of atoms, an area where little work has been done and phenomena not observed in less tightly bound inner-shells are manifested. In addition scattering processes which are weak at lower energies become important, providing another tool to investigate atomic structure as well as an opportunity to study photon/atom interactions beyond photoabsorption. In this contribution the authors discuss some of the issues related to extending synchrotron-based atomic physics experiments into the hard x-ray region from the physical and the experimental point of view. They close with a discussion of a technique, resonant Raman scattering, that may prove invaluable in determining the spectra of the very highly-excited states resulting from the excitation of deep inner shells.

  9. Natural melting within a spherical shell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahrami, Parviz A.

    1990-01-01

    Fundamental heat transfer experiments were performed on the melting of a phase change medium in a spherical shell. Free expansion of the medium into a void space within the sphere was permitted. A step function temperature jump on the outer shell wall was imposed and the timewise evolution of the melting process and the position of the solid-liquid interface was photographically recorded. Numerical integration of the interface position data yielded information about the melted mass and the energy of melting. It was found that the rate of melting and the heat transfer were significantly affected by the movement of the solid medium to the base of the sphere due to gravity. The energy transfer associated with melting was substantially higher than that predicted by the conduction model. Furthermore, the radio of the measured values of sensible energy in the liquid melt to the energy of melting were nearly proportional to the Stefan number. The experimental results are in agreement with a theory set forth in an earlier paper.

  10. Tuning the bridging attraction between large hard particles by the softness of small microgels.

    PubMed

    Luo, Junhua; Yuan, Guangcui; Han, Charles C

    2016-09-20

    In this study, the attraction between large hard polystyrene (PS) spheres is studied by using three types of small microgels as bridging agents. One is a purely soft poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) microgel, the other two have a non-deformable PS hard core surrounded by a soft PNIPAM shell but are different in the core-shell ratio. The affinity for bridging the large PS spheres is provided and thus affected by the PNIPAM constituent in the microgels. The bridging effects caused by the microgels can be indirectly incorporated into their influence on the effective attraction interaction between the large hard spheres, since the size of the microgels is very small in comparison to the size of the PS hard spheres. At a given volume fraction of large PS spheres, they behave essentially as hard spheres in the absence of small microgels. By gradually adding the microgels, the large spheres are connected to each other through the bridging of small particles until the attraction strength reaches a maximum value, after which adding more small particles slowly decreases the effective attraction strength and eventually the large particles disperse individually when saturated adsorption is achieved. The aggregation and gelation behaviors triggered by these three types of small microgels are compared and discussed. A way to tune the strength and range of the short-range attractive potential via changing the softness of bridging microgels (which can be achieved either by using core-shell microgels or by changing the temperature) is proposed.

  11. Overview: Hard Rock Penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, J.C.

    1992-08-01

    The Hard Rock Penetration program is developing technology to reduce the costs of drilling and completing geothermal wells. Current projects include: lost circulation control, rock penetration mechanics, instrumentation, and industry/DOE cost shared projects of the Geothermal Drilling organization. Last year, a number of accomplishments were achieved in each of these areas. A new flow meter being developed to accurately measure drilling fluid outflow was tested extensively during Long Valley drilling. Results show that this meter is rugged, reliable, and can provide useful measurements of small differences in fluid inflow and outflow rates. By providing early indications of fluid gain or loss, improved control of blow-out and lost circulation problems during geothermal drilling can be expected. In the area of downhole tools for lost circulation control, the concept of a downhole injector for injecting a two-component, fast-setting cementitious mud was developed. DOE filed a patent application for this concept during FY 91. The design criteria for a high-temperature potassium, uranium, thorium logging tool featuring a downhole data storage computer were established, and a request for proposals was submitted to tool development companies. The fundamental theory of acoustic telemetry in drill strings was significantly advanced through field experimentation and analysis. A new understanding of energy loss mechanisms was developed.

  12. Overview - Hard Rock Penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, James C.

    1992-03-24

    The Hard Rock Penetration program is developing technology to reduce the costs of drilling and completing geothermal wells. Current projects include: lost circulation control, rock penetration mechanics, instrumentation, and industry/DOE cost shared projects of the Geothermal Drilling Organization. Last year, a number of accomplishments were achieved in each of these areas. A new flow meter being developed to accurately measure drilling fluid outflow was tested extensively during Long Valley drilling. Results show that this meter is rugged, reliable, and can provide useful measurements of small differences in fluid inflow and outflow rates. By providing early indications of fluid gain or loss, improved control of blow-out and lost circulation problems during geothermal drilling can be expected. In the area of downhole tools for lost circulation control, the concept of a downhole injector for injecting a two-component, fast-setting cementitious mud was developed. DOE filed a patent application for this concept during FY 91. The design criteria for a high-temperature potassium, uranium, thorium logging tool featuring a downhole data storage computer were established, and a request for proposals was submitted to tool development companies. The fundamental theory of acoustic telemetry in drill strings was significantly advanced through field experimentation and analysis. A new understanding of energy loss mechanisms was developed.

  13. Overview: Hard Rock Penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, J.C.

    1992-01-01

    The Hard Rock Penetration program is developing technology to reduce the costs of drilling and completing geothermal wells. Current projects include: lost circulation control, rock penetration mechanics, instrumentation, and industry/DOE cost shared projects of the Geothermal Drilling organization. Last year, a number of accomplishments were achieved in each of these areas. A new flow meter being developed to accurately measure drilling fluid outflow was tested extensively during Long Valley drilling. Results show that this meter is rugged, reliable, and can provide useful measurements of small differences in fluid inflow and outflow rates. By providing early indications of fluid gain or loss, improved control of blow-out and lost circulation problems during geothermal drilling can be expected. In the area of downhole tools for lost circulation control, the concept of a downhole injector for injecting a two-component, fast-setting cementitious mud was developed. DOE filed a patent application for this concept during FY 91. The design criteria for a high-temperature potassium, uranium, thorium logging tool featuring a downhole data storage computer were established, and a request for proposals was submitted to tool development companies. The fundamental theory of acoustic telemetry in drill strings was significantly advanced through field experimentation and analysis. A new understanding of energy loss mechanisms was developed.

  14. Biomechanics of turtle shells: how whole shells fail in compression.

    PubMed

    Magwene, Paul M; Socha, John J

    2013-02-01

    Turtle shells are a form of armor that provides varying degrees of protection against predation. Although this function of the shell as armor is widely appreciated, the mechanical limits of protection and the modes of failure when subjected to breaking stresses have not been well explored. We studied the mechanical properties of whole shells and of isolated bony tissues and sutures in four species of turtles (Trachemys scripta, Malaclemys terrapin, Chrysemys picta, and Terrapene carolina) using a combination of structural and mechanical tests. Structural properties were evaluated by subjecting whole shells to compressive and point loads in order to quantify maximum load, work to failure, and relative shell deformations. The mechanical properties of bone and sutures from the plastral region of the shell were evaluated using three-point bending experiments. Analysis of whole shell structural properties suggests that small shells undergo relatively greater deformations before failure than do large shells and similar amounts of energy are required to induce failure under both point and compressive loads. Location of failures occurred far more often at sulci than at sutures (representing the margins of the epidermal scutes and the underlying bones, respectively), suggesting that the small grooves in the bone created by the sulci introduce zones of weakness in the shell. Values for bending strength, ultimate bending strain, Young's modulus, and energy absorption, calculated from the three-point bending data, indicate that sutures are relatively weaker than the surrounding bone, but are able to absorb similar amounts of energy due to higher ultimate strain values.

  15. Shell funds chair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Shell Companies Foundation, Inc., of Houston, Tex., has given $750,000 to the University of Texas at Austin to establish the Shell Distinguished Chair in Geophysics. The 5-year, $150,000-per-year grant will support the studies of John G. Sclater. Sclater, currently a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, has accepted a joint position that begins July 1 in the geological sciences department and in the Institute for Geophysics at UT Austin.Sclater's research into the formation of ocean basins has applications for understanding the way petroleum deposits mature. He has studied the reconstruction of movements of the continents and the subsidence of ocean basins. He is considered an expert in the interpretation of geothermal and seismic data.

  16. Morphological diversity of microstructures occurring in selected recent bivalve shells and their ecological implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brom, Krzysztof Roman; Szopa, Krzysztof

    2016-12-01

    Environmental adaptation of molluscs during evolution has led to form biomineral exoskeleton - shell. The main compound of their shells is calcium carbonate, which is represented by calcite and/or aragonite. The mineral part, together with the biopolymer matrix, forms many types of microstructures, which are differ in texture. Different types of internal shell microstructures are characteristic for some bivalve groups. Studied bivalve species (freshwater species - duck mussel (Anodonta anatina Linnaeus, 1758) and marine species - common cockle (Cerastoderma edule Linnaeus, 1758), lyrate Asiatic hard clam (Meretrix lyrata Sowerby II, 1851) and blue mussel (Mytilus edulis Linnaeus, 1758)) from different locations and environmental conditions, show that the internal shell microstructure with the shell morphology and thickness have critical impact to the ability to survive in changing environment and also to the probability of surviving predator attack. Moreover, more detailed studies on molluscan structures might be responsible for create mechanically resistant nanomaterials.

  17. Fabrication of polyacrylate core-shell nanoparticles via spray drying method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Pengpeng; Cheng, Zenghui; Chu, Fuxiang; Xu, Yuzhi; Wang, Chunpeng

    2016-05-01

    Fine polyacrylate particles are thought to be environmental plastisols for car industry. However, these particles are mainly dried through demulsification of the latexes, which is not reproducible and hard to be scaled up. In this work, a spray drying method had been applied to the plastisols-used acrylate latex. By adjusting the core/shell ratio, spray drying process of the latex was fully studied. Scanning electronic microscopy observation of the nanoparticles before and after spray drying indicated that the core-shell structures could be well preserved and particles were well separated by spray drying if the shell was thick enough. Otherwise, the particles fused into each other and core-shell structures were destroyed. Polyacrylate plastisols were developed using diisononylphthalate as a plasticizer, and plastigels were obtained after heat treatment of the sols. Results showed that the shell thickness also had a great influence on the storage stability of the plastisols and mechanical properties of the plastigels.

  18. Bioluminescent signals spatially amplified by wavelength-specific diffusion through the shell of a marine snail

    PubMed Central

    Deheyn, Dimitri D.; Wilson, Nerida G.

    2011-01-01

    Some living organisms produce visible light (bioluminescence) for intra- or interspecific visual communication. Here, we describe a remarkable bioluminescent adaptation in the marine snail Hinea brasiliana. This species produces a luminous display in response to mechanical stimulation caused by encounters with other motile organisms. The light is produced from discrete areas on the snail's body beneath the snail's shell, and must thus overcome this structural barrier to be viewed by an external receiver. The diffusion and transmission efficiency of the shell is greater than a commercial diffuser reference material. Most strikingly, the shell, although opaque and pigmented, selectively diffuses the blue-green wavelength of the species bioluminescence. This diffusion generates a luminous display that is enlarged relative to the original light source. This unusual shell thus allows spatially amplified outward transmission of light communication signals from the snail, while allowing the animal to remain safely inside its hard protective shell. PMID:21159673

  19. Measuring the Hardness of Minerals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bushby, Jessica

    2005-01-01

    The author discusses Moh's hardness scale, a comparative scale for minerals, whereby the softest mineral (talc) is placed at 1 and the hardest mineral (diamond) is placed at 10, with all other minerals ordered in between, according to their hardness. Development history of the scale is outlined, as well as a description of how the scale is used…

  20. Thickness Constraints on the Icy Shells of the Galilean Satellites from a Comparison of Crater Shapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schenk, Paul M.

    2002-01-01

    A thin outer ice shell on Jupiter's large moon Europa would imply easy exchange between the surface and any organic or biotic material in its putative subsurface ocean. The thickness of the outer ice shell is poorly constrained, however, with model-dependent estimates ranging from a few kilometers of depths of impact craters on Europa, Ganymede and Callisto that reveal two anomalous transitions in crater shape with diameter. The first transition is probably related to temperature-dependent ductility of the crust at shallow depths (7-8 km on Europa). The second transition is attributed to the influence of subsurface oceans on all three satellites, which constrains Europa's icy shell to be at least 19 km thick. The icy lithospheres of Ganymede and Callisto are equally ice-rich, but Europa's icy shell has a thermal structure about 0.25-0.5 times the thickness of Ganymede's or Callisto's shells, depending on epoch. The appearances of the craters on Europa are inconsistent with thin-ice-shell models and indicate that exchange of oceanic and surface material could be difficult.

  1. Thickness constraints on the icy shells of the galilean satellites from a comparison of crater shapes.

    PubMed

    Schenk, Paul M

    2002-05-23

    A thin outer ice shell on Jupiter's large moon Europa would imply easy exchange between the surface and any organic or biotic material in its putative subsurface ocean. The thickness of the outer ice shell is poorly constrained, however, with model-dependent estimates ranging from a few kilometres to ten or more kilometres. Here I present measurements of depths of impact craters on Europa, Ganymede and Callisto that reveal two anomalous transitions in crater shape with diameter. The first transition is probably related to temperature-dependent ductility of the crust at shallow depths (7 8 km on Europa). The second transition is attributed to the influence of subsurface oceans on all three satellites, which constrains Europa's icy shell to be at least 19 km thick. The icy lithospheres of Ganymede and Callisto are equally ice-rich, but Europa's icy shell has a thermal structure about 0.25 0.5 times the thicknesses of Ganymede's or Callisto's shells, depending on epoch. The appearances of the craters on Europa are inconsistent with thin-ice-shell models and indicate that exchange of oceanic and surface material could be difficult.

  2. Energy dependent dynamics of keV to MeV electrons in the inner zone, outer zone, and slot regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, G. D.; Friedel, R. H.; Larsen, B.; Skoug, R. M.; Funsten, H. O.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Fennell, J. F.; Turner, D. L.; Denton, M.; Spence, H. E.; Blake, J. B.; Baker, D. N.

    2015-12-01

    We present observations that illustrate the energy-dependence and L-shell dependence of radiation belt dynamics. We survey events in 2013 and analyze individual events in more detail. The survey data show: (a) Lower-energy electrons are enhanced more often than higher energies. (b) Events that fill the slot region are more common at lower energies. (c) Enhancements of electrons in the inner zone are more common at lower energies. And (d) even when events do not fully fill the slot region, enhancements at lower-energies tend to extend to lower L-shells than higher energies. The outer zone, inner zone, and slot region all occupy regions of space that are strongly energy dependent. During enhancement events the outer zone extends to lower L-shells at lower energies and higher L-shells at higher energies. The inner zone shows the opposite with an outer boundary at higher L-shells for lower energies. Both boundaries are nearly straight in log(energy) vs. L-shell space. At energies below a few hundred keV radiation belt electron penetration through the slot region into the inner zone is commonplace but the number and frequency of "slot filling" events decreases with increasing energy. The inner zone is enhanced only at energies that penetrate through the slot. Analysis shows that at least three processes may determine which electrons penetrate into the slot and inner zone: (1) enhanced convective electric fields at low L-shells, (2) impulsive, substorm-associated injections at low L-shells, and (3) slower radial diffusion and interaction with plasmaspheric hiss. These new observations challenge some of our long-held pictures of what the radiation belts look like and how they behave.

  3. Grinding tool for making hemispherical bores in hard materials

    DOEpatents

    Duran, E.L.

    1985-04-03

    A grinding tool for forming hemispherical bores in hard materials such as boron carbide. The tool comprises a hemicircular grinding bit, formed of a metal bond diamond matrix, which is mounted transversely on one end of a tubular tool shaft. The bit includes a spherically curved outer edge surface which is the active grinding surface of the tool. Two coolant fluid ports on opposite sides of the bit enable introduction of coolant fluid through the bore of the tool shaft so as to be emitted adjacent the opposite sides of the grinding bit, thereby providing optimum cooling of both the workpiece and the bit.

  4. Dual-Functionalized Double Carbon Shells Coated Silicon Nanoparticles for High Performance Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuangqiang; Shen, Laifa; van Aken, Peter A; Maier, Joachim; Yu, Yan

    2017-03-15

    To address the challenge of huge volume change and unstable solid electrolyte interface (SEI) of silicon in cycles, causing severe pulverization, this paper proposes a "double-shell" concept. This concept is designed to perform dual functions on encapsulating volume change of silicon and stabilizing SEI layer in cycles using double carbon shells. Double carbon shells coated Si nanoparticles (DCS-Si) are prepared. Inner carbon shell provides finite inner voids to allow large volume changes of Si nanoparticles inside of inner carbon shell, while static outer shell facilitates the formation of stable SEI. Most importantly, intershell spaces are preserved to buffer volume changes and alleviate mechanical stress from inner carbon shell. DCS-Si electrodes display a high rechargeable specific capacity of 1802 mAh g(-1) at a current rate of 0.2 C, superior rate capability and good cycling performance up to 1000 cycles. A full cell of DCS-Si//LiNi0.45 Co0.1 Mn1.45 O4 exhibits an average discharge voltage of 4.2 V, a high energy density of 473.6 Wh kg(-1) , and good cycling performance. Such double-shell concept can be applied to synthesize other electrode materials with large volume changes in cycles by simultaneously enhancing electronic conductivity and controlling SEI growth.

  5. Drift shells and aurora computed using the O8 magnetic field model for Neptune

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paranicas, C.; Cheng, A. F.

    1994-01-01

    Charged particle drift shells are calculated using the O8 magnetic field model for Neptune. Inner drift shell morphologies differ significantly from dipolar drift shells for the parts of drift shells inward of r = 2 R(sub N). Outer drift shells (L approx. greater than 10), when traced down to Neptune's surface following magnetic field lines, are simple closed loops around magnetic poles. Inner drift shells (L approx. less than 4), on the other hand, when traced to the surface, are also single loops but stretched in a previously unknown way: sometimes with a cusp and sometimes into two joined loops. Inner drift shell footprints on R = 1 provide the basis for identifying precipitation L shells, interpreting observed aurora, and predicting additional emissions on that part of Neptune's surface unobserved by the Ultraviolet Spectrometer (UVS). Precipitation in a global magnetic anomaly, `ordinary' auroral precipitation near the south magnetic pole, and precipitation from field lines with no magnetic field minimum above Neptune's exobase collectively appear to account for all of the observed auroral emission regions at Neptune. To the extent that aurora can be understood in this model, it is suggested O8 may be reasonably accurate.

  6. Design and synthesis of highly luminescent near-infrared-emitting water-soluble CdTe/CdSe/ZnS core/shell/shell quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenjin; Chen, Guanjiao; Wang, Jian; Ye, Bang-Ce; Zhong, Xinhua

    2009-10-19

    Applications of water-dispersible near-infrared (NIR)-emitting quantum dots (QDs) have been hampered by their instability and low photoluminescence (PL) efficiencies. In this paper, water-soluble highly luminescent NIR-emitting QDs were developed through constructing CdTe/CdSe/ZnS core/shell/shell nanostructure. The CdTe/CdSe type-II structure yields the QDs with NIR emission. By varying the size of CdTe cores and the thickness of the CdSe shell, the emission wavelength of the obtained nanostructure can span from 540 to 825 nm. In addition, the passivation of the ZnS shell with a substantially wide bandgap confines the excitons within the CdTe/CdSe interface and isolates them from the solution environment and consequently improves the stability of the nanostructure, especially in aqueous media. An effective shell-coating route was developed for the preparation of CdTe/CdSe core/shell nanostructures by selecting capping reagents with a strong coordinating capacity and adopting a low temperature for shell deposition. An additional ZnS shell was deposited around the outer layer of CdTe/CdSe QDs to form the core/shell/shell nanostructure through the decomposition of single molecular precursor zinc diethyldithiocarbamate in the crude CdTe/CdSe reaction solution. The water solubilization of the initially oil-soluble CdTe/CdSe/ZnS QDs was achieved through ligand replacement by 3-mercaptopropionic acid. The as-prepared water-soluble CdTe/CdSe/ZnS QDs possess PL quantum yields as high as 84% in aqueous media, which is one of the best results for the luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals.

  7. Low-energy outer-shell photodetachment of the negative ion of boron.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kedong; Zatsarinny, Oleg; Bartschat, Klaus

    2016-05-01

    The photodetachment of the negative ion of boron, B-(2s2 2p2) 3 P , was investigated by employing the B-spline R-matrix method for photon energies ranging from threshold to 12 eV. A multi-configuration Hartree-Fock method with nonorthogonal, term-dependent orbitals was used to generate accurate initial bound-state and final continuum-state wavefunctions. The close-coupling expansion included all principal scattering channels for photodetachment from both the 2p and 2s orbitals. The resulting equation were solved using a parallelized version of the BSR computer code. The calculated photodetachment cross sections are in good agreement with the available experimental data. Several prominent resonance features are predicted, thereby providing new challenges in the study of this highly correlated process. To classify the resonance structure, both the partial cross sections and the main contributions of the individual scattering channels are discussed. Work supported by the China Scholarship Council and the United States National Science Foundation under Grants PHY-1403245 and PHY-1520970, and by the XSEDE allocation PHY-090031.

  8. Low-energy outer-shell photodetachment of the negative ion of boron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kedong; Zatsarinny, Oleg; Bartschat, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    The photodetachment of the negative ion of boron, B-(2s22p2)3P, is investigated by employing the B-spline R-matrixmethod for photon energies ranging from threshold to 12 eV. A multi-configuration Hartree-Fock method with nonorthogonal, term-dependent orbitals is employed to generate accurate initial bound-state and final continuum-state wavefunctions. The close-coupling expansion includes all principal scattering channels for photodetachment from both the 2p and 2s orbitals. The calculated photodetachment cross sections are in good agreement with the available experimental data. Several prominent resonance features are predicted, thereby providing new challenges in the study of this highly correlated process. To classify the resonance structure, both the partial cross sections and the main contributions of the individual scattering channels are discussed. The presented cross sections, along with the asymmetry parameter β for the angular distribution, are believed to be the most comprehensive and accurate dataset currently available for the B- photodetachment process at low energies. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Advances in Positron and Electron Scattering", edited by Paulo Limao-Vieira, Gustavo Garcia, E. Krishnakumar, James Sullivan, Hajime Tanuma and Zoran Petrovic.

  9. Origin of the Outer Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Matthew J. (Principal Investigator); Boyce, Joseph (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Our ongoing research program combines extensive deep and wide-field observations using a variety of observational platforms with numerical studies of the dynamics of small bodies in the outer solar system in order to advance the main scientific goals of the community studying the Kuiper belt and the outer solar system. These include: (1) determining the relative populations of the known classes of KBOs as well as other possible classes; (2) determining the size distributions or luminosity function of the individual populations or the Kuiper belt as a whole; (3) determining the inclinations distributions of these populations; (4) establishing the radial extent of the Kuiper belt; (5) measuring and relating the physical properties of different types of KBOs to those of other solar system bodies; and, (6) completing our systematic inventory of the satellites of the outer planets.

  10. Chasing shadows in the outer solar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianco, Federica

    The characteristics of the populations of objects that inhabit the outer solar system carry the fingerprint of the processes that governed the formation and evolution of the solar system. Occultation surveys push the limit of observation into the very small and distant outer solar system objects, allowing us to set constraints on the structure of the Kuiper belt, Scattered disk and Sedna populations. I collected, reduced, and analyzed vast datasets looking for occultations of stars by outer solar system objects, both working with the Taiwanese American Occultation Survey (TAOS) collaboration and leading the MMT/Megacam occultation effort. Having found no such events in my data, I was able to place upper limits on the Kuiper belt, scattered disk and Sedna population. These limits and their derivation are described here.

  11. MHD processes in the outer heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.

    1984-01-01

    The magnetic field measurements from Voyager and the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) processes in the outer heliosphere are reviewed. A bibliography of the experimental and theoretical work concerning magnetic fields and plasmas observed in the outer heliosphere is given. Emphasis in this review is on basic concepts and dynamical processes involving the magnetic field. The theory that serves to explain and unify the interplanetary magnetic field and plasma observations is magnetohydrodynamics. Basic physical processes and observations that relate directly to solutions of the MHD equations are emphasized, but obtaining solutions of this complex system of equations involves various assumptions and approximations. The spatial and temporal complexity of the outer heliosphere and some approaches for dealing with this complexity are discussed.

  12. Shell model calculations of 109Sb in the sdgh shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dikmen, E.; Novoselsky, A.; Vallieres, M.

    2001-12-01

    The energy spectra of the antimony isotope 109Sb in the sdgh shell are calculated in the nuclear shell model approach by using the CD-Bonn nucleon-nucleon interaction. The modified Drexel University parallel shell model code (DUPSM) was used for the calculations with maximum Hamiltonian dimension of 762 253 of 5.14% sparsity. The energy levels are compared to the recent experimental results. The calculations were done on the Cyborg Parallel Cluster System at Drexel University.

  13. Butterfly distribution of outer zone relativistic electrons and their potential connection to the solar wind dynamic pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, B.; Zou, Z.; Gu, X.; Zhou, C.; Thorne, R. M.; Bortnik, J.; Shi, R.; Zhao, Z.; Baker, D. N.; Li, X.; Kanekal, S.; Spence, H. E.; Reeves, G. D.

    2015-12-01

    Butterfly distributions, characterized by flux minima at pitch angles around 90º, are broadly observed in the Earth's magnetosphere. While butterfly distributions have been well recognized for radiation belt electrons below ~ 1 MeV, there is lack of investigation of butterfly distributions for relativistic (> MeV) electrons. We conduct a comprehensive analysis of outer zone (L >= 3) relativistic electron butterfly distribution based upon a survey of over-two-year Van Allen Probes REPT measurements. The global profile of butterfly distribution is investigated in detail for relativistic electrons at REPT energies, along with its dependence on L-shell, MLT, and the level of geomagnetic activity. Furthermore, the occurrence pattern of outer zone relativistic electron butterfly distribution is explored with respect to the solar wind dynamic pressure, which suggests that there exist a good correlation between these two phenomena especially at high L-shells (e.g., L ~ 6) and that some other mechanism(s), besides losses through the magnetopause, should play to contribute to the occurrence of outer zone relativistic electron butterfly distribution at lower L-shells.

  14. 38 CFR 38.629 - Outer Burial Receptacle Allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Outer Burial Receptacle... (CONTINUED) NATIONAL CEMETERIES OF THE DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS § 38.629 Outer Burial Receptacle Allowance. (a) Definitions—Outer burial receptacle. For purposes of this section, an outer burial...

  15. 38 CFR 38.629 - Outer Burial Receptacle Allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Outer Burial Receptacle... (CONTINUED) NATIONAL CEMETERIES OF THE DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS § 38.629 Outer Burial Receptacle Allowance. (a) Definitions—Outer burial receptacle. For purposes of this section, an outer burial...

  16. 38 CFR 38.629 - Outer Burial Receptacle Allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Outer Burial Receptacle... (CONTINUED) NATIONAL CEMETERIES OF THE DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS § 38.629 Outer Burial Receptacle Allowance. (a) Definitions—Outer burial receptacle. For purposes of this section, an outer burial...

  17. 38 CFR 38.629 - Outer Burial Receptacle Allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Outer Burial Receptacle... (CONTINUED) NATIONAL CEMETERIES OF THE DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS § 38.629 Outer Burial Receptacle Allowance. (a) Definitions—Outer burial receptacle. For purposes of this section, an outer burial...

  18. Energization of outer radiation belt electrons during storm recovery phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Asif; Waters, C. L.; Sciffer, M. D.; Menk, F. W.

    2016-11-01

    We use test particle simulations incorporating an MHD model of ULF wave propagation in the magnetosphere with realistic ionosphere boundary conditions to study electron energization in the dayside outer Van Allen radiation belt, referenced to in situ particle and wave observations. On 7 January 2011 the THEMIS spacecraft detected 3 and 4-5 mHz waves simultaneous with flux enhancement of >10 keV electrons during the early recovery phase of a moderate geomagnetic storm. We find that internal energization of equatorially mirroring electrons via nonresonant ULF wave-particle interactions can explain these observations. The wave poloidal components cause radial drift of electrons, increasing (decreasing) their kinetic energy as they move inward (outward). Electrons with initial kinetic energies of a few keV can be energized to double these values within an hour by interaction with the 3 mHz waves. The energization rate is somewhat less for the 4-5 mHz waves. An increase in the ionospheric conductance decreases the power of the fast mode wave, reducing radial drift velocities and hence decreasing the rate of energization. The fast mode poloidal field varies with radial distance and longitude, and this also affects energization. Electrons which drift outward encounter a region where the toroidal field due to the field line resonance becomes dominant and produces strong azimuthal drift. These electrons become trapped in an L-shell range just outward of the resonance region and are not energized.

  19. Continuum Mechanical Model of the Outer Hair Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleischer, Mario; Harasztosi, Csaba; Nowotny, Manuela; Zahnert, Thomas; Gummer, Anthony W.

    2011-11-01

    Knowledge of the mechanical properties of the outer hair cell (OHC) is essential for understanding its electromechanical action. To provide insight into underlying mechanics, we developed a finite-element-model of the OHC. The model contains both an intracellular viscous fluid and a homogeneous shell-like structure for the basolateral wall, including anisotropic viscoelastic material properties. We found that the viscosity of the intracellular fluid could not yield the frequency dependent behaviour of the measured impedance. Shear viscosity needed to be included in the basolateral wall to obtain an adequate representation. The required value of the dynamic viscosity is on the order of 103 mPaṡs and, therefore, 1000 fold higher than for water. Furthermore, changing the compressibility of the basolateral wall from 106 to 109 Pa suggests that the impedance is not significantly affected by this parameter. Finally, our calculations indicate that up to at least 10 kHz the measured impedances result from passive mechanical properties of the OHC.

  20. Synthesis of stiffened conical shells.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, W. A.

    1972-01-01

    The development of a method to effect the automated minimum weight design of ring and stringer stiffened shells is presented. Membrane theory is used for the shell prebuckling analysis. The buckling analysis is based upon an arbitrary shell of revolution computer program. The structural analysis includes both buckling and yielding modes of failure. The synthesis involves the coupling of an exterior penalty function with a method for the unconstrained minimization of a function comprised of a sum of squares. Results of the application of the method to the design of the Viking Aeroshell cone are presented. The least weight Viking Aeroshell appears to be an all magnesium shell with ring stiffeners of hollow circular cross section. Because the method incorporates a general shell of revolution buckling analysis, it can be readily modified and applied to the design of any axisymmetrically loaded uniformly stiffened shell of revolution for which a membrane prebuckling solution exists.

  1. Prevention of the Outer Space Weaponization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukov, Gennady P.

    2002-01-01

    9 states. The satellites of various functions (early warning, communication, data acquisition, reconnaissance and navigation) were actively used and continue to be used with the purposes of raising efficiency of ground armed forces, especially in fight against international terrorism. At the same time such satellites are not a weapon in the sense of that word since they do not create the threats of armed attack in outer space or from outer space. Moreover, they promote maintaining of stability in the international relations. For this reason the reconnaissance and data acquisition satellites used for the verification of observance by States of the arms limitation agreements are under international protection as national technical means of the control. Similar protection is enjoyed by the early warning satellites. With the help of space communication facilities the more reliable operative connection of the statesmen is organized in the strained situations. By this way the probability of making of the incorrect retaliatory decisions in critical political situations is reduced. At the same time it's necessary to take into consideration that the activities of such satellite systems are tightly connected with ground armed forces of the states. the earth, what from the point of view of international law may be qualified as establishing a partial demilitarization regime in outer space. After the prohibition of anti-satellite weapons (ASAT) and anti-satellite (ASAT) weapons it will be possible to speak about establishing of an international legal regime of complete demilitarization in outer space eliminating any kinds of weapon from outer space. in a peaceful time. weaponization.The main task of this paper is to analyze and to discuss the present binding regime of the outer space deweaponization and particular measures on consolidation and strengthening of this regime. agreements of the Russian Federation and the USA into multilateral Treaties. Such "immunity" would cover

  2. Beta Backscatter Measures the Hardness of Rubber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrissey, E. T.; Roje, F. N.

    1986-01-01

    Nondestructive testing method determines hardness, on Shore scale, of room-temperature-vulcanizing silicone rubber. Measures backscattered beta particles; backscattered radiation count directly proportional to Shore hardness. Test set calibrated with specimen, Shore hardness known from mechanical durometer test. Specimen of unknown hardness tested, and radiation count recorded. Count compared with known sample to find Shore hardness of unknown.

  3. Thin coatings and films hardness evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matyunin, V. M.; Marchenkov, A. Yu; Demidov, A. N.; Karimbekov, M. A.

    2016-10-01

    The existing thin coatings and films hardness evaluation methods based on indentation with pyramidal indenter on various scale levels are expounded. The impact of scale factor on hardness values is performed. The experimental verification of several existing hardness evaluation methods regarding the substrate hardness value and the “coating - substrate” composite hardness value is made.

  4. Oxygen Isotope Variability within Nautilus Shell Growth Bands

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Nautilus is often used as an analogue for the ecology and behavior of extinct externally shelled cephalopods. Nautilus shell grows quickly, has internal growth banding, and is widely believed to precipitate aragonite in oxygen isotope equilibrium with seawater. Pieces of shell from a wild-caught Nautilus macromphalus from New Caledonia and from a Nautilus belauensis reared in an aquarium were cast in epoxy, polished, and then imaged. Growth bands were visible in the outer prismatic layer of both shells. The thicknesses of the bands are consistent with previously reported daily growth rates measured in aquarium reared individuals. In situ analysis of oxygen isotope ratios using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) with 10 μm beam-spot size reveals inter- and intra-band δ18O variation. In the wild-caught sample, a traverse crosscutting 45 growth bands yielded δ18O values ranging 2.5‰, from +0.9 to -1.6 ‰ (VPDB), a range that is larger than that observed in many serial sampling of entire shells by conventional methods. The maximum range within a single band (~32 μm) was 1.5‰, and 27 out of 41 bands had a range larger than instrumental precision (±2 SD = 0.6‰). The results from the wild individual suggest depth migration is recorded by the shell, but are not consistent with a simple sinusoidal, diurnal depth change pattern. To create the observed range of δ18O, however, this Nautilus must have traversed a temperature gradient of at least ~12°C, corresponding to approximately 400 m depth change. Isotopic variation was also measured in the aquarium-reared sample, but the pattern within and between bands likely reflects evaporative enrichment arising from a weekly cycle of refill and replacement of the aquarium water. Overall, this work suggests that depth migration behavior in ancient nektonic mollusks could be elucidated by SIMS analysis across individual growth bands. PMID:27100183

  5. Oxygen Isotope Variability within Nautilus Shell Growth Bands.

    PubMed

    Linzmeier, Benjamin J; Kozdon, Reinhard; Peters, Shanan E; Valley, John W

    2016-01-01

    Nautilus is often used as an analogue for the ecology and behavior of extinct externally shelled cephalopods. Nautilus shell grows quickly, has internal growth banding, and is widely believed to precipitate aragonite in oxygen isotope equilibrium with seawater. Pieces of shell from a wild-caught Nautilus macromphalus from New Caledonia and from a Nautilus belauensis reared in an aquarium were cast in epoxy, polished, and then imaged. Growth bands were visible in the outer prismatic layer of both shells. The thicknesses of the bands are consistent with previously reported daily growth rates measured in aquarium reared individuals. In situ analysis of oxygen isotope ratios using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) with 10 μm beam-spot size reveals inter- and intra-band δ18O variation. In the wild-caught sample, a traverse crosscutting 45 growth bands yielded δ18O values ranging 2.5‰, from +0.9 to -1.6 ‰ (VPDB), a range that is larger than that observed in many serial sampling of entire shells by conventional methods. The maximum range within a single band (~32 μm) was 1.5‰, and 27 out of 41 bands had a range larger than instrumental precision (±2 SD = 0.6‰). The results from the wild individual suggest depth migration is recorded by the shell, but are not consistent with a simple sinusoidal, diurnal depth change pattern. To create the observed range of δ18O, however, this Nautilus must have traversed a temperature gradient of at least ~12°C, corresponding to approximately 400 m depth change. Isotopic variation was also measured in the aquarium-reared sample, but the pattern within and between bands likely reflects evaporative enrichment arising from a weekly cycle of refill and replacement of the aquarium water. Overall, this work suggests that depth migration behavior in ancient nektonic mollusks could be elucidated by SIMS analysis across individual growth bands.

  6. On-site implementation of characterization and sizing techniques for outer-wall defects in reactor pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Lasserre, F.; Chapuis, N.

    1994-12-31

    Pressurized reactor vessels in France have been examined from the inside with ultrasonic focused transducers since the very first inspection. The developments carried out to solve the problem of oversizing in the case of defects located near the outer surface in the welds or in the wall thickness and presented in the framework of the 10th and 11th conference of NDE in the nuclear and pressure vessels industries, now have applications through SPARTACUS software work. Indications detected during, the systematic inspection of welds and shells, corresponding to outer wall defects, trigger a digital acquisition of data, the scanning being limited to the area of interest. This acquisition is now followed by analysis through the new system CIVAMIS, which includes the main imaging tools of SPARTACUS, but which has been specifically developed to be implemented on site, for outer wall defects. Characteristics of CIVAMIS in relation with the initial structure of SPARTACUS are discussed on actual results.

  7. Post-mortem erosion of fine-scale spatial structure of epibenthic megafauna on the outer Grand Bank of Newfoundland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, D. C.; Haedrich, R. L.

    1991-08-01

    Marine organisms exhibit spatial variability at scales ranging from thousands of kilometres (biogeographic variability) to a few body lengths. Physical processes can increase spatial variability through selective sorting, or decrease it through mixing. We examine the effects of post-mortem processes on the spatial structure of empty shells and tests left by populations of molluscs and echinoderms on outer Grand Bank. Analysis of data from five photographic transects showed that spatial variability of shells and tests decreased relative to live organisms of the same species at scales greater than 140 m. Spatial variability did not increase relative to live specimens, with the exception of urchin tests at a scale of 20-30 m on two of five transects. We postulate that selective transport of shells does not occur in this environment at scales from 15 to 1500 m.

  8. Ultrasonic scattering from anisotropic shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittleman, John; Thompson, R. B.; Roberts, R.

    The exact differential equations for elastic wave scattering from spherical shells with spherically orthotropic properties are presently shown to be separable; the angular equations are satisfied by Legendre polynomials that are independent of material properties. The results thus obtained have been validated by exact solutions for the case with vanishing shell thickness, and that of isotropic elastic constants. Excellent agreement is thus obtained over a wide range of shell thicknesses and wave numbers.

  9. Controllable fabrication and magnetic properties of double-shell cobalt oxides hollow particles

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dan; Zhu, Jianyu; Zhang, Ning; Liu, Tao; Chen, Limiao; Liu, Xiaohe; Ma, Renzhi; Zhang, Haitao; Qiu, Guanzhou

    2015-01-01

    Double-shell cobalt monoxide (CoO) hollow particles were successfully synthesized by a facile and effective one-pot solution-based synthetic route. The inner architecture and outer structure of the double-shell CoO hollow particles could be readily created through controlling experimental parameters. A possible formation mechanism was proposed based on the experimental results. The current synthetic strategy has good prospects for the future production of other transition-metal oxides particles with hollow interior. Furthermore, double-shell cobalt oxide (Co3O4) hollow particles could also be obtained through calcinating corresponding CoO hollow particles. The magnetic measurements revealed double-shell CoO and Co3O4 hollow particles exhibit ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic behaviour, respectively. PMID:25736824

  10. Controllable fabrication and magnetic properties of double-shell cobalt oxides hollow particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dan; Zhu, Jianyu; Zhang, Ning; Liu, Tao; Chen, Limiao; Liu, Xiaohe; Ma, Renzhi; Zhang, Haitao; Qiu, Guanzhou

    2015-03-01

    Double-shell cobalt monoxide (CoO) hollow particles were successfully synthesized by a facile and effective one-pot solution-based synthetic route. The inner architecture and outer structure of the double-shell CoO hollow particles could be readily created through controlling experimental parameters. A possible formation mechanism was proposed based on the experimental results. The current synthetic strategy has good prospects for the future production of other transition-metal oxides particles with hollow interior. Furthermore, double-shell cobalt oxide (Co3O4) hollow particles could also be obtained through calcinating corresponding CoO hollow particles. The magnetic measurements revealed double-shell CoO and Co3O4 hollow particles exhibit ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic behaviour, respectively.

  11. Shear correction factors for layered plates and shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruttmann, F.; Wagner, W.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper layered composite shells subjected to static loading are considered. The theory is based on a multi-field functional, where the associated Euler-Lagrange equations include besides the global shell equations formulated in stress resultants, the local in-plane equilibrium in terms of stresses and a constraint which enforces the correct shape of warping through the thickness. Within representative volume elements warping displacements are interpolated with layerwise cubic functions in thickness direction and constant shape throughout the reference surface. Elimination of warping and Lagrange parameters by static condensation leads to a material matrix for the stress resultants and to shear correction factors for layered plates and shells. For linear elasticity the computation can be done once in advance. The condensed material matrix is used in displacement based elements along with the enhanced strain method or in mixed hybrid elements with the usual 5 or 6 nodal degrees of freedom. This allows standard geometrical boundary conditions and the elements are applicable also to shell intersection problems. The interlaminar shear stresses are evaluated via the constitutive law by back substitution of the eliminated parameters. The computed transverse shear stresses are automatically continuous at the layer boundaries and zero at the outer surfaces. Furthermore, the integrals of the shear stresses coincide exactly with the shear forces without introduction of further constraints.

  12. The structure of circumstellar shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fix, John D.

    1993-01-01

    This document provides a report on research activities carried out with the support of NASA grant NAG 5-1174, the Structure of Circumstellar Shells, funded under the Astrophysics Data Program. The research carried out with the support of this grant is a study of the properties of circumstellar dust shells for which spectra are available through IRAS low resolution spectrometry (LRS). This research consisted of the development and application of models of axisymmetric circumstellar shells and a preliminary survey of the applicability of neural nets for analysis of the IRAS LRS spectra of circumstellar dust shells.

  13. Shell Analysis Manual

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1968-04-01

    plane strains o 0 0 el, e 2 , el2 Components of nonlinear in-plane middle surface strains; also, strains corresponding to equilibrium configuration el...plates) in the treatment of shell problems. This theory, often referred to as Love’s first approximation, has since occupied a position of prominence...Materials such as wood and synthetic fiberboard possess this property. For this case, the generalized Hooke’s Law reduces to oII = El Fl + E 2 p 2 1

  14. Shoulder and hip joints for hard space suits and the like

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vykukal, H. C.

    1986-01-01

    For use in hard space suits and the like, a joint between the torso covering and the upper arm covering (i.e., shoulder) or between the torso covering and upper leg covering (i.e., hip) is disclosed. Each joint has an outer covering and a inner covering. The outer covering has plural perferably truncated toroidal sections decreasing in size proceeding outwardly. In one embodiment at each joint there are two bearings, the first larger than the second. The outer race of the larger bearing is attached to the outer edge of the smaller end of each section and the inner race of the larger bearing is attached to the end wall. The inner race of the smaller bearing is attached to the end wall. The outer race of the smaller bearing is attached to the larger end of the next section. Each bearing hask appropriate seals. Between each section is a rubber ring for the comfort of the wearer. Such rubber rings have radial flanges attached to the inner races of two adjacent bearings. Matching semicircular grooves are formed in the abutting overlapping surfaces. Bellows-like inner walls are also provided for each section fixed at one end to an inner cylindrical flange and, at the opposite end, to an end wall. Each outer section may rotate 360 deg relative to the next outer section, whereas the bellows sections do not rotate, but rather expand or contract locally as the rigid sections rotate relative to each other.

  15. BIOREACTOR DESIGN - OUTER LOOP LANDFILL, LOUISVILLE, KY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bioreactor field demonstration projects are underway at the Outer Loop Landfill in Louisville, KY, USA. The research effort is a cooperative research effort between US EPA and Waste Management Inc. Two primary kinds of municipal waste bioreactors are under study at this site. ...

  16. THE ORBITS OF THE OUTER URANIAN SATELLITES

    SciTech Connect

    Brozovic, M.; Jacobson, R. A.

    2009-04-15

    We report on the numerically integrated orbits for the nine outer Uranian satellites. The orbits are calculated based on fits to the astrometric observations for the period from 1984 to 2006. The results include the state vectors, post-fit residuals, and mean orbital elements. We also assess the accuracy of the orbital fits and discuss the need for future measurements.

  17. The magnetospheres of the outer planets

    SciTech Connect

    Mcnutt, R.L., Jr. )

    1991-01-01

    Research on the magnetospheres of all of the outer planets including Jupiter, Uranus, Neptune, and Pluto is reviewed for the 1987-1990 time period. Particular attention is given to magnetospheric structure, plasma transport, Jovian aurora, Io and the plasma torus, Titan and its magnetospheric interactions, rings and dusty plasmas, magnetospheric convection, and satellite interactions.

  18. Ground Based Studies of the Outer Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trafton, Laurence M.

    2005-01-01

    This report covers progress to date under this grant on our continuing program to conduct ground based studies of the outer solar system planets and satellites, with emphasis on spectroscopy and atmospheric phenomena. The research continues under our new PAST grant, NNG04G131G beginning 5/1/2004. The original period of performance of the subject grant was 3/1/2001 to 2/28/2004, but was extended one year at no cost. Although there is some overlap in the scientific projects conducted during the extended year with those of the new grant, this report is confined to the portion of the work funded under NAG5-10435. The primary goals for this grant period were a comparative study of outer planet thermospheres/ionospheres near solar maximum, extended to the mid-IR, and the investigation of molecular dimers in outer solar system atmospheres. This project supports NASA's planned space missions, Jupiter Polar Orbiter, outer Planet Microprobes, and the recent Cassini flyby of Jupiter. It also supports the OSS strategic plan themes, The Exploration of the Solar System and The Sun-Earth Connection/ Understanding comparative planetary space environments.

  19. [Chemistry in Outer Solar System and Beyond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    During the three years of the NASA Planetary Atmospheres grant NAG51 1032, we have developed photochemical models for Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, Io, and extrasolar giant planets. We have compared the Io and outer planet model predictions with various infrared and microwave observations.

  20. Automated shell theory for rotating structures (ASTROS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, B. J.; Thomas, J. M.

    1971-01-01

    A computer program for analyzing axisymmetric shells with inertial forces caused by rotation about the shell axis is developed by revising the STARS II shell program. The basic capabilities of the STARS II shell program, such as the treatment of the branched shells, stiffened wall construction, and thermal gradients, are retained.

  1. On the influence of a translating inner core in models of outer core convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, C. J.; Silva, L.; Mound, J.

    2013-01-01

    It has recently been proposed that the hemispheric seismic structure of the inner core can be explained by a self-sustained rigid-body translation of the inner core material, resulting in melting of the solid at the leading face and a compensating crystallisation at the trailing face. This process induces a hemispherical variation in the release of light elements and latent heat at the inner-core boundary, the two main sources of thermochemical buoyancy thought to drive convection in the outer core. However, the effect of a translating inner core on outer core convection is presently unknown. In this paper we model convection in the outer core with a nonmagnetic Boussinesq fluid in a rotating spherical shell driven by purely thermal buoyancy, incorporating the effect of a translating inner core by a time-independent spherical harmonic degree and order 1 (Y11) pattern of heat-flux imposed at the inner boundary. The analysis considers Rayleigh numbers up to 10 times the critical value for onset of nonmagnetic convection, a parameter regime where the effects of the inhomogeneous boundary condition are expected to be most pronounced, and focuses on varying q∗, the amplitude of the imposed boundary anomalies. The presence of inner boundary anomalies significantly affects the behaviour of the model system. Increasing q∗ leads to flow patterns dominated by azimuthal jets that span large regions of the shell where radial motion is significantly inhibited. Vigorous convection becomes increasingly confined to isolated regions as q∗ increases; these regions do not drift and always occur in the hemisphere subjected to a higher than average boundary heat-flux. Effects of the inner boundary anomalies are visible at the outer boundary in all inhomogeneous models considered. At low q∗ the expression of inner boundary effects at the core surface is a difference in the flow speed between the two hemispheres. As q∗ increases the spiralling azimuthal jets driven from the

  2. Rhodamine functionalized magnetic core-shell nanocomposite: An emission 'Off-On' sensing system for mercury ion detection and extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Lei; Wu, Yan; Ma, Wuze

    2015-03-01

    This paper reported a core-shell structured composite with superparamagnetic ferroferric oxide as the inner core and silica molecular sieve as the outer shell. A rhodamine based sensing dye was covalently grafted into the highly ordered tunnels of silica molecular sieve, so that mercury ion sensing and extraction could be achieved from this composite. This probe loaded core-shell structure was characterized by electron microscopy images, X-ray diffraction patterns, infrared spectra, thermogravimetry and N2 adsorption/desorption measurement. This composite showed increased emission with increasing mercury ion concentration, along with high sensitivity and good selectivity. Linear response and good regenerating performance were also observed from this composite.

  3. Nanoindentation hardness of mineralized tissues.

    PubMed

    Oyen, Michelle L

    2006-01-01

    A series elastic and plastic deformation model [Sakai, M., 1999. The Meyer hardness: a measure for plasticity? Journal of Materials Research 14(9), 3630-3639] is used to deconvolute the resistance to plastic deformation from the plane strain modulus and contact hardness parameters obtained in a nanoindentation test. Different functional dependencies of contact hardness on the plane strain modulus are examined. Plastic deformation resistance values are computed from the modulus and contact hardness for engineering materials and mineralized tissues. Elastic modulus and plastic deformation resistance parameters are used to calculate elastic and plastic deformation components, and to examine the partitioning of indentation deformation between elastic and plastic. Both the numerical values of plastic deformation resistance and the direct computation of deformation partitioning reveal the intermediate mechanical responses of mineralized composites when compared with homogeneous engineering materials.

  4. Phase separation in single In(x)Ga(1-x)N nanowires revealed through a hard X-ray synchrotron nanoprobe.

    PubMed

    Segura-Ruiz, J; Martínez-Criado, G; Denker, C; Malindretos, J; Rizzi, A

    2014-03-12

    In this work, we report on the composition, short- and long-range structural order of single molecular beam epitaxy grown In(x)Ga(1-x)N nanowires using a hard X-ray synchrotron nanoprobe. Nano-X-ray fluorescence mapping reveals an axial and radial heterogeneous elemental distribution in the single wires with Ga accumulation at their bottom and outer regions. Polarization-dependent nano-X-ray absorption near edge structure demonstrates that despite the elemental modulation, the tetrahedral order around the Ga atoms remains along the nanowires. Nano-X-ray diffraction mapping on single nanowires shows the existence of at least three different phases at their bottom: an In-poor shell and two In-rich phases. The alloy homogenizes toward the top of the wires, where a single In-rich phase is observed. No signatures of In-metallic precipitates are observed in the diffraction spectra. The In-content along the single nanowires estimated from X-ray fluorescence and diffraction data are in good agreement. A rough picture of these phenomena is briefly presented. We anticipate that this methodology will contribute to a greater understanding of the underlying growth concepts not only of nanowires but also of many nanostructures in materials science.

  5. Shell cracking strength in almond (Prunus dulcis [Mill.] D.A. Webb.) and its implication in uses as a value-added product.

    PubMed

    Ledbetter, C A

    2008-09-01

    Researchers are currently developing new value-added uses for almond shells, an abundant agricultural by-product. Almond varieties are distinguished by processors as being either hard or soft shelled, but these two broad classes of almond also exhibit varietal diversity in shell morphology and physical characters. By defining more precisely the physical and chemical characteristics of almond shells from different varieties, researchers will better understand which specific shell types are best suited for specific industrial processes. Eight diverse almond accessions were evaluated in two consecutive harvest seasons for nut and kernel weight, kernel percentage and shell cracking strength. Shell bulk density was evaluated in a separate year. Harvest year by almond accession interactions were highly significant (p0.01) for each of the analyzed variables. Significant (p0.01) correlations were noted for average nut weight with kernel weight, kernel percentage and shell cracking strength. A significant (p0.01) negative correlation for shell cracking strength with kernel percentage was noted. In some cases shell cracking strength was independent of the kernel percentage which suggests that either variety compositional differences or shell morphology affect the shell cracking strength. The varietal characterization of almond shell materials will assist in determining the best value-added uses for this abundant agricultural by-product.

  6. Hardness-based plasticity and fracture model for quench-hardenable boron steel (22MnB5)

    SciTech Connect

    Greve, L. Medricky, M. Andres, M.; Eller, T. K.

    2013-12-16

    A comprehensive strain hardening and fracture characterization of different grades of boron steel blanks has been performed, providing the foundation for the implementation into the modular material model (MMM) framework developed by Volkswagen Group Research for an explicit crash code. Due to the introduction of hardness-based interpolation rules for the characterized main grades, the hardening and fracture behavior is solely described by the underlying Vickers hardness. In other words, knowledge of the hardness distribution within a hot-formed component is enough to set up the newly developed computational model. The hardness distribution can be easily introduced via an experimentally measured hardness curve or via hardness mapping from a corresponding hot-forming simulation. For industrial application using rather coarse and computationally inexpensive shell element meshes, the user material model has been extended by a necking/post-necking model with reduced mesh-dependency as an additional failure mode. The present paper mainly addresses the necking/post-necking model.

  7. Hi shells, supershells, shell-like objects, and ''worms''

    SciTech Connect

    Heiles, C.

    1984-08-01

    We present photographic representations of the combination of two Hi surveys, so as to eliminate the survey boundaries at Vertical BarbVertical Bar = 10/sup 0/. We also present high-contrast photographs for particular velocities to exhibit weak Hi features. All of these photographs were used to prepare a new list of Hi shells, supershells, and shell-like objects. We discuss the structure of three shell-like objects that are associated with high-velocity gas, and with gas at all velocities that is associated with radio continuum loops I, II, and III. We use spatial filtering to find wiggly gas filaments: ''worms'': crawling away from the galactic plane in the inner Galaxy. The ''worms'' are probably parts of shells that are open at the top; such shells should be good sources of hot gas for the galactic halo.

  8. Microscopic Shell Model Calculations for sd-Shell Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Bruce R.; Dikmen, Erdal; Maris, Pieter; Shirokov, Andrey M.; Smirnova, Nadya A.; Vary, James P.

    Several techniques now exist for performing detailed and accurate calculations of the structure of light nuclei, i.e., A ≤ 16. Going to heavier nuclei requires new techniques or extensions of old ones. One of these is the so-called No Core Shell Model (NCSM) with a Core approach, which involves an Okubo-Lee-Suzuki (OLS) transformation of a converged NCSM result into a single major shell, such as the sd-shell. The obtained effective two-body matrix elements can be separated into core and single-particle (s.p.) energies plus residual two-body interactions, which can be used for performing standard shell-model (SSM) calculations. As an example, an application of this procedure will be given for nuclei at the beginning ofthe sd-shell.

  9. Ultrathin Interface Regime of Core-Shell Magnetic Nanoparticles for Effective Magnetism Tailoring.

    PubMed

    Moon, Seung Ho; Noh, Seung-Hyun; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Shin, Tae-Hyun; Lim, Yongjun; Cheon, Jinwoo

    2017-02-08

    The magnetic exchange coupling interaction between hard and soft magnetic phases has been important for tailoring nanoscale magnetism, but spin interactions at the core-shell interface have not been well studied. Here, we systematically investigated a new interface phenomenon termed enhanced spin canting (ESC), which is operative when the shell thickness becomes ultrathin, a few atomic layers, and exhibits a large enhancement of magnetic coercivity (HC). We found that ESC arises not from the typical hard-soft exchange coupling but rather from the large magnetic surface anisotropy (KS) of the ultrathin interface. Due to this large increase in magnetism, ultrathin core-shell nanoparticles overreach the theoretical limit of magnetic energy product ((BH)max) and exhibit one of the largest values of specific loss power (SLP), which testifies to their potential capability as an effective mediator of magnetic energy conversion.

  10. Current status of ASTRO-H Hard X-ray Telescopes (HXTs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awaki, Hisamitsu; Kunieda, Hideyo; Furuzawa, Akihiro; Haba, Yoshito; Hayashi, Takayuki; Iizuka, Ryo; Ishibashi, Kazunori; Ishida, Manabu; Itoh, Masayuki; Kosaka, Tatsuro; Maeda, Yoshitomo; Matsumoto, Hironori; Miyazawa, Takuya; Mori, Hideyuki; Nagano, Hosei; Namba, Yoshiharu; Ogasaka, Yasushi; Ogi, Keiji; Okajima, Takashi; Sugita, Satoshi; Suzuki, Yoshio; Tamura, Keisuke; Tawara, Yuzuru; Uesugi, Kentaro; Yamashita, Koujun; Yamauchi, Shigeo

    2012-09-01

    ASTRO-H is an international X-ray mission of ISAS/JAXA, which will be launched in 2014. One of the main characteristics of ASTRO-H is imaging spectroscopy in the hard X-ray band above 10 keV. ASTRO-H will carry two identical Hard X-ray telescopes (HXTs), whose mirror surfaces are coated with Pt/C depth-graded multilayers to enhance hard X-ray effective area up to 80 keV. HXT was designed based on the telescope on board the SUMIT balloon borne experiment. After feasibility study of the HXT design, the FM design has been deteremined. Mass production of the mirror shells at Nagoya University has been going on since August 2010, and production of mirror shells for HXT-1 was completed in March 2012. After the integation of X-ray mirrors for HXT-1, we measured hard X-ray performance of selected mirror shells for HXT-1 at a synchrotron radiation facility, SPring-8 beamline BL20B2. We will perform environment tests and ground calibarations at SPring-8 for HXT-1. In HXT-2, foil production is going on.

  11. Estimating Gaia's performance for O stars in the Outer Galactic plane using Herschel data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rygl, K. L. J.; Molinari, S.; Prusti, T.; Antoja, T.; Elia, D.; de Bruijne, J.

    2014-07-01

    It is in the less dense Outer Galaxy where Gaia can contribute much to stellar studies of the Galactic Plane. As O stars are by definition young objects, their positions and kinematics can still be related to their formation site and history. O star astrometry will not only be important for studies of high-mass star formation, such as triggered star-formation in shells, but also an interesting complement to the radio maser astrometry of star-forming regions and the structure of spiral arms. With the TLUSTY (Lanz & Hubeny 2013) model atmospheres and the nominal Gaia parallax uncertainty, we estimate the parallax uncertainty for all subtypes of main sequence O stars given a visual extinction. The expected extinction is an important limitation for Gaia's astrometric performance and we estimate the extinction from the column density maps calculated from the Herschel Infrared Galactic Plane survey (Molinari et al. 2010), a thermal cold dust emission survey of unprecedented angular resolution and sensitivity. In the 10∘ strip, taken to represent the first estimate of the average extinction in the Outer Galaxy, we find that most of the visual extinction is less than 10 mag. Only the most dense parts of the clouds have AV > 10 mag. Given these extinctions toward the Outer Galaxy, Gaia will provide accurate (5σ) astrometry for O stars in the Outer Galaxy up to distances of at least 4-6 kpc, which means that Gaia's O star astrometry will be able to transgress the Perseus arm and reach the less-known Outer Arm of the Milky Way (Rygl et al.https://gaia.ub.edu/Twiki/pub/GREATITNFC/ProgramFinalconference/Poster_Rygl%2cK.pdf).

  12. Foam shell cryogenic ICF target

    DOEpatents

    Darling, Dale H.

    1987-01-01

    A uniform cryogenic layer of DT fuel is maintained in a fusion target having a low density, small pore size, low Z rigid foam shell saturated with liquid DT fuel. Capillary action prevents gravitational slumping of the fuel layer. The saturated shell may be cooled to produce a solid fuel layer.

  13. Biomineralisation in Mollusc shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dauphin, Y.; Cuif, J. P.; Salomé, M.; Williams, C. T.

    2009-04-01

    The main components of Mollusc shells are carbonate minerals: calcite and aragonite. ACC is present in larval stages. Calcite and aragonite can be secreted simultaneously by the mantle. Despite the small number of varieties, the arrangement of the mineral components is diverse, and dependant upon the taxonomy. They are also associated with organic components much more diverse, the diversity of which reflects the large taxonomic diversity. From TGA analyses, the organic content (water included) is high (>5% in some layers). The biomineralisation process is not a passive precipitation process, but is strongly controlled by the organism. The biological-genetic control is shown by the constancy of the arrangement of the layers, the mineralogy and the microstructure in a given species. Microstructural units (i.e. tablets, prisms etc.) have shapes that do not occur in non-biogenic counterparts. Nacreous tablets, for example, are flattened on their crystallographic c axis, which is normally the axis of maximum growth rate for non-biogenic aragonite. Morever, their inner structure is species-specific: the arrangements of nacreous tablets in Gastropoda - Cephalopoda, and in Bivalvia differ, and the inner arrangement of the nacreous tablets is different in ectocochlear and endocochlear Cephalopoda. The organic-mineral ratios also differ in the various layers of a shell. Differences in chemical composition also demonstrates the biological-genetic control: for example, aragonite has a low Sr content unknown in non-biogenic samples; two aragonitic layers in a shell have different Sr and Mg contents, S is higher in calcitic layers. Decalcification releases soluble (SOM) and insoluble (IOM) organic components. Insoluble components form the main part of the intercrystalline membranes, and contain proteins, polysaccharides and lipids. Soluble phases are present within the crystals and the intercrystalline membranes. These phases are composed of more or less glycosylated proteins

  14. Vulnerability of the paper Nautilus (Argonauta nodosa) shell to a climate-change ocean: potential for extinction by dissolution.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Kennedy; Smith, Abigail M; Trimby, Patrick; Byrne, Maria

    2012-10-01

    Shell calcification in argonauts is unique. Only females of these cephalopods construct the paper nautilus shell, which is used as a brood chamber for developing embryos in the pelagic realm. As one of the thinnest (225 μm) known adult mollusc shells, and lacking an outer protective periostracum-like cover, this shell may be susceptible to dissolution as the ocean warms and decreases in pH. Vulnerability of the A. nodosa shell was investigated through immersion of shell fragments in multifactorial experiments of control (19 °C/pH 8.1; pCO(2) 419; Ω(Ca) = 4.23) and near-future conditions (24 °C/pH 7.8-7.6; pCO(2) 932-1525; Ω(Ca) = 2.72-1.55) for 14 days. More extreme pH treatments (pH 7.4-7.2; pCO(2) 2454-3882; Ω(Ca) = 1.20-0.67) were used to assess tipping points in shell dissolution. X-ray diffractometry revealed no change in mineralogy between untreated and treated shells. Reduced shell weight due to dissolution was evident in shells incubated at pH 7.8 (projected for 2070) after 14 days at control temperature, with increased dissolution in warmer and lower pH treatments. The greatest dissolution was recorded at 24 °C (projected for local waters by 2100) compared to control temperature across all low-pH treatments. Scanning electron microscopy revealed dissolution and etching of shell mineral in experimental treatments. In the absence of compensatory mineralization, the uncovered female brood chamber will be susceptible to dissolution as ocean pH decreases. Since the shell was a crucial adaptation for the evolution of the argonauts' holopelagic existence, persistence of A. nodosa may be compromised by shell dissolution in an ocean-change world.

  15. The jump-off velocity of an impulsively loaded spherical shell

    SciTech Connect

    Chabaud, Brandon M.; Brock, Jerry S.

    2012-04-13

    We consider a constant temperature spherical shell of isotropic, homogeneous, linearly elastic material with density {rho} and Lame coefficients {lambda} and {mu}. The inner and outer radii of the shell are r{sub i} and r{sub o}, respectively. We assume that the inside of the shell is a void. On the outside of the shell, we apply a uniform, time-varying pressure p(t). We also assume that the shell is initially at rest. We want to compute the jump-off time and velocity of the pressure wave, which are the first time after t = 0 at which the pressure wave from the outer surface reaches the inner surface. This analysis computes the jump-off velocity and time for both compressible and incompressible materials. This differs substantially from [3], where only incompressible materials are considered. We will consider the behavior of an impulsively loaded, exponentially decaying pressure wave p(t) = P{sub 0{sup e}}{sup -{alpha}t}, where {alpha} {ge} 0. We notice that a constant pressure wave P(t) = P{sub 0} is a special case ({alpha} = 0) of a decaying pressure wave. Both of these boundary conditions are considered in [3].

  16. Myxobacteria Produce Outer Membrane-Enclosed Tubes in Unstructured Environments

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xueming; Vassallo, Christopher N.; Pathak, Darshankumar T.

    2014-01-01

    Myxobacteria are social microbes that exhibit complex multicellular behaviors. By use of fluorescent reporters, we show that Myxococcus xanthus isolates produce long narrow filaments that are enclosed by the outer membrane (OM) and contain proteins. We show that these OM tube (OMT) structures are produced at surprisingly high levels when cells are placed in liquid medium or buffer without agitation. OMTs can be long and easily exceed multiple cell lengths. When viewed by transmission electron microscopy, their morphology varies between tubes and chain-like structures. Intermediate-like structures are also found, suggesting that OMTs may transition between these two morphotypes. In support of this, video epifluorescence microscopy found that OMTs in solution dynamically twist and jiggle. On hard surfaces, myxobacteria glide, and upon cell-cell contact, they can efficiently exchange their OM proteins and lipids by a TraAB-dependent mechanism. Although the structure of OMTs hints at a possible role as conduits for exchange, evidence is presented to the contrary. For example, abundant OMT production occurs in traA or traB mutants and when cells are grown in liquid medium, yet transfer cannot occur under these conditions. Thus, genetic and environmental conditions that promote OMT production are incongruent with OM exchange. PMID:24391054

  17. The structural, compositional and mechanical features of the calcite shell of the barnacle Tetraclita rufotincta.

    PubMed

    Astachov, Liliana; Nevo, Zvi; Brosh, Tamar; Vago, Razi

    2011-09-01

    The microstructure and chemical composition of the calcite shell of the sea barnacle Tetraclita rufotincta (Pilsbry, 1916) were investigated using microscopic and analytical methods. The barnacle shell was separated mechanically into its three substructural units: outer, interior, and inner layers. The organic matrices of these structural parts were further separated into soluble and insoluble constituents and their characteristic functional groups were studied by FTIR. Investigation of the mechanical properties of the interior mass of the shell reveals remarkable viscoelastic behavior. In general, the mechanical behavior of the shell is a function of its geometry as well as of the material, of which it is constructed. In the case of T. rufotincta, as calcite is a brittle material, the elastic behavior of the shell is apparently related to its micro- and macroarchitecture. The latter enables the shell to fulfill its primary function which is to protect the organism from a hostile environment and enables its survival. Our detailed identification of the similarities and differences between the various structural components of the shell in regard to the composition and properties of the organic component will hopefully throw light on the role of organic matrices in biomineralization processes.

  18. Site-specific carbon deposition for hierarchically ordered core/shell-structured graphitic carbon with remarkable electrochemical performance.

    PubMed

    Lv, Yingying; Wu, Zhangxiong; Qian, Xufang; Fang, Yin; Feng, Dan; Xia, Yongyao; Tu, Bo; Zhao, Dongyuan

    2013-10-01

    A fascinating core-shell-structured graphitic carbon material composed of ordered microporous core and uniform mesoporous shell is fabricated for the first time through a site-specific chemical vapor deposition process by using a nanozeolite@mesostructured silica composite molecular sieve as the template. The mesostructure-directing agent cetyltrimethylammonium bromide in the shell of the template can be either burned off or carbonized so that it is successfully utilized as a pore switch to turn the shell of the template "on" or "off" to allow selective carbon deposition. The preferred carbon deposition process can be performed only in the inner microporous zeolite cores or just within the outer mesoporous shells, resulting in a zeolite-like ordered microporous carbon or a hollow mesoporous carbon. Full carbon deposition in the template leads to the new core-shell-structured microporous@mesoporous carbon with a nanographene-constructed framework for fast electron transport, a microporous nanocore with large surface area for high-capacity storage of lithium ions, a mesoporous shell with highly opened mesopores as a transport layer for lithium ions and electron channels to access inner cores. The ordered micropores are protected by the mesoporous shell, avoiding pore blockage as the formation of solid electrolyte interphase layers. Such a unique core-shell-structured microporous@mesoporous carbon material represents a newly established lithium ion storage model, demonstrating high reversible energy storage, excellent rate capability, and long cyclic stability.

  19. Shell forming system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor); Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    An apparatus is provided for forming gas-filled spheres of metal, glass or other material, which produces spheres (12) of uniform size and wall thickness in a relatively simple system. The system includes concentric nozzles, including an inner nozzle (18) through which gas flows and and an outer nozzle (20), which jointly define an annular passageway (50) through which a liquid flows. The flow rates are adjusted so that the gas flows at greater velocity than does the liquid, out of their respective nozzles, e.g. three times as great, in order to produce an extrusion (30) which undergoes axisymmetric oscillations resulting in the pinch off into hollow spheres with very uniform spacing. The system is useful not only where gas-filled spheres are required, but also is useful to accurately control the dispensing of solid, liquid, or gaseous materials.

  20. The DarkSide-50 outer detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westerdale, S.; Agnes, P.; Agostino, L.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Alexander, T.; Alton, A. K.; Arisaka, K.; Back, H. O.; Baldin, B.; Biery, K.; Bonfini, G.; Bossa, M.; Bottino, B.; Brigatti, A.; Brodsky, J.; Budano, F.; Bussino, S.; Cadeddu, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cadoni, M.; Calaprice, F.; Canci, N.; Candela, A.; Cao, H.; Cariello, M.; Carlini, M.; Catalanotti, S.; Cavalcante, P.; Chepurnov, A.; Cocco, A. G.; Covone, G.; D'Angelo, D.; D'Incecco, M.; Davini, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Deo, M.; De Vincenzi, M.; Derbin, A.; Devoto, A.; Di Eusanio, F.; Di Pietro, G.; Edkins, E.; Empl, A.; Fan, A.; Fiorillo, G.; Fomenko, K.; Foster, G.; Franco, D.; Gabriele, F.; Galbiati, C.; Giganti, C.; Goretti, A. M.; Granato, F.; Grandi, L.; Gromov, M.; Guan, M.; Guardincerri, Y.; Hackett, B. R.; Herner, K. R.; Hungerford, E. V.; Aldo, Ianni; Andrea, Ianni; James, I.; Jollet, C.; Keeter, K.; Kendziora, C. L.; Kobychev, V.; Koh, G.; Korablev, D.; Korga, G.; Kubankin, A.; Li, X.; Lissia, M.; Lombardi, P.; Luitz, S.; Ma, Y.; Machulin, I. N.; Mandarano, A.; Mari, S. M.; Maricic, J.; Marini, L.; Martoff, C. J.; Meregaglia, A.; Meyers, P. D.; Miletic, T.; Milincic, R.; Montanari, D.; Monte, A.; Montuschi, M.; Monzani, M. E.; Mosteiro, P.; Mount, B. J.; Muratova, V. N.; Musico, P.; Napolitano, J.; Orsini, M.; Ortica, F.; Pagani, L.; Pallavicini, M.; Pantic, E.; Parmeggiano, S.; Pelczar, K.; Pelliccia, N.; Perasso, S.; Pocar, A.; Pordes, S.; Pugachev, D. A.; Qian, H.; Randle, K.; Ranucci, G.; Razeto, A.; Reinhold, B.; Renshaw, A. L.; Romani, A.; Rossi, B.; Rossi, N.; Rountree, S. D.; Sablone, D.; Saggese, P.; Saldanha, R.; Sands, W.; Sangiorgio, S.; Savarese, C.; Segreto, E.; Semenov, D. A.; Shields, E.; Singh, P. N.; DSkorokhvatov, M.; Smirnov, O.; Sotnikov, A.; Stanford, C.; Suvorov, Y.; Tartaglia, R.; Tatarowicz, J.; Testera, G.; Tonazzo, A.; Trinchese, P.; Unzhakov, E. V.; Vishneva, A.; Vogelaar, B.; Wada, M.; Walker, S.; Wang, H.; Wang, Y.; Watson, A. W.; Wilhelmi, J.; Wojcik, M. M.; Xiang, X.; Xu, J.; Yang, C.; Yoo, J.; Zavatarelli, S.; Zec, A.; Zhong, W.; Zhu, C.; Zuzel, G.; DarkSide Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    DarkSide-50 is a dark matter detection experiment searching for Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs), in Gran Sasso National Laboratory. For experiments like DarkSide-50, neutrons are one of the primary backgrounds that can mimic WIMP signals. The experiment consists of three nested detectors: a liquid argon time projection chamber surrounded by two outer detectors. The outermost detector is a 10 m by 11 m cylindrical water Cherenkov detector with 80 PMTs, designed to provide shielding and muon vetoing. Inside the water Cherenkov detector is the 4 m diameter spherical boron-loaded liquid scintillator veto, with a cocktail of pseudocumene, trimethyl borate, and PPO wavelength shifter, designed to provide shielding, neutron vetoing, and in situ measurements of the TPC backgrounds. We present design and performance details of the DarkSide-50 outer detectors.

  1. Cryovolcanism in the outer solar system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geissler, Paul E.

    2015-01-01

    Cryovolcanism is defined as the extrusion of liquids and vapors of materials that would be frozen solid at the planetary surface temperatures of the icy bodies of the outer solar system. Active cryovolcanism is now known to occur on Saturn's moon Enceladus and on Neptune's moon Triton and is suspected on Jupiter's moon Europa, while evidence for past cryovolcanic activity is widespread throughout the outer solar system. This chapter examines the mechanisms and manifestations of cryovolcanism, beginning with a review of the materials that make up these unusual ‘‘magmas’’ and the means by which they might erupt and concluding with a volcanologist's tour of the farthest reaches of the solar system.

  2. The outer mitochondrial membrane in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Owen; van der Merwe, Margaretha J; Daley, Daniel O; Whelan, James

    2013-04-01

    The acquisition and integration of intracellular organelles, such as mitochondria and plastids, were important steps in the emergence of complex multicellular life. Although the outer membranes of these organelles have lost many of the functions of their free-living bacterial ancestor, others were acquired during organellogenesis. To date, the biological roles of these proteins have not been systematically characterized. In this review, we discuss the evolutionary origins and functions of outer membrane mitochondrial (OMM) proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana. Our analysis, using phylogenetic inference, indicates that several OMM proteins either acquired novel functional roles or were recruited from other subcellular localizations during evolution in Arabidopsis. These observations suggest the existence of novel communication routes and functions between organelles within plant cells.

  3. Outer crust of nonaccreting cold neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rüster, Stefan B.; Hempel, Matthias; Schaffner-Bielich, Jürgen

    2006-03-01

    The properties of the outer crust of nonaccreting cold neutron stars are studied by using modern nuclear data and theoretical mass tables, updating in particular the classic work of Baym, Pethick, and Sutherland. Experimental data from the atomic mass table from Audi, Wapstra, and Thibault of 2003 are used and a thorough comparison of many modern theoretical nuclear models, both relativistic and nonrelativistic, is performed for the first time. In addition, the influences of pairing and deformation are investigated. State-of-the-art theoretical nuclear mass tables are compared to check their differences concerning the neutron drip line, magic neutron numbers, the equation of state, and the sequence of neutron-rich nuclei up to the drip line in the outer crust of nonaccreting cold neutron stars.

  4. Outer spiral structure in disk galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patsis, P. A.

    2017-03-01

    In several grand design barred-spiral galaxies it is observed a second, fainter, outer set of spiral arms. Typical examples of objects of this morphology can be considered NGC 1566 and NGC 5248. I suggest that such an overall structure can be the result of two dynamical mechanisms acting in the disc. The bar and both spiral systems rotate with the same pattern speed. The inner spiral is reinforced by regular orbits trapped around the stable, elliptical, periodic orbits of the central family, while the outer system of spiral arms is supported by chaotic orbits. Chaotic orbits are also responsible for a rhomboidal area surrounding the inner barred-spiral region. In general there is a discontinuity between the two spiral structures at the corotation region.

  5. The Outer Banks of North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dolan, Robert; Lins, Harry; Smith, Jodi Jones

    2016-12-27

    The Outer Banks of North Carolina are excellent examples of the nearly 300 barrier islands rimming the Atlantic and Gulf coasts of the United States. These low, sandy islands are among the most dynamic natural landscapes occupied by man. Beach sands move offshore, onshore, and along the shore in the direction of the prevailing longshore currents. In this way, sandy coasts continuously adjust to different tide, wave, and current conditions and to rising sea level that causes the islands to migrate landward.Despite such changes, barrier islands are of considerable environmental importance. The Outer Banks are home to diverse natural ecosystems that are adapted to the harsh coastal environment. Native species tend to be robust and many are specifically adapted to withstand salt spray, periodic saltwater flooding, and the islands’ well-drained sandy soil. The Outer Banks provide an important stopover for birds on the Atlantic flyway, and many species inhabit the islands year round. In addition, Outer Banks beaches provide an important nesting habitat for five endangered or threatened sea turtle species.European explorers discovered North Carolina’s barrier islands in the 16th century, although the islands were not permanently settled until the middle 17th century. By the early 19th century, shipbuilding and lumber industries were among the most successful, until forest resources were depleted. Commercial fishing eventually followed, and it expanded considerably after the Civil War. By the Great Depression, however, little industry existed on the Outer Banks. In response to the effects of a severe hurricane in 1933, the National Park Service and the Civilian Conservation Corps proposed a massive sand-fixation program to stabilize the moving sand and prevent storm waves from sweeping across the entire width of some sections of the islands. Between 1933 and 1940, this program constructed sand fencing on 185 kilometers (115 miles) of beach and planted grass seedlings

  6. Effects of long-range interactions on curvature energies of viral shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shojaei, Hamid R.; Božič, Anže Lošdorfer; Muthukumar, Murugappan; Podgornik, Rudolf

    2016-05-01

    We formulate a theory of the effects of long-range interactions on the surface tension and spontaneous curvature of proteinaceous shells based on the general Deryaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek mesoscale approach to colloid stability. We derive the full renormalization formulas for the elastic properties of the shell and consider in detail the renormalization of the spontaneous curvature as a function of the corresponding Hamaker coefficient, inner and outer capsid charges, and bathing solution properties. The renormalized spontaneous curvature is found to be a nonmonotonic function of several parameters describing the system.

  7. A model for high frequency guided wave inspection of curved shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, R.; Pardini, A.; Diaz, A.

    2002-05-01

    Modeling work is reported in support of the development of an ultrasonic measurement to detect stress corrosion cracking in the shell of a nuclear waste storage tank, where transducer access is restricted to distances of several feet from the suspected flaw location. The measurement uses a 3.5 MHz 70 degree shear wave that propagates from the transducer to flaw site through a series of multiple reflections between the outer and inner walls of the shell. Results are shown which explain experimentally observed complexities in the received signals.

  8. Composite shell spacecraft seat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barackman, Victor J. (Inventor); Pulley, John K. (Inventor); Simon, Xavier D. (Inventor); McKee, Sandra D. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A two-part seat (10) providing full body support that is specific for each crew member (30) on an individual basis. The two-part construction for the seat (10) can accommodate many sizes and shapes for crewmembers (30) because it is reconfigurable and therefore reusable for subsequent flights. The first component of the two-part seat construction is a composite shell (12) that surrounds the crewmember's entire body and is generically fitted to their general size in height and weight. The second component of the two-part seat (10) is a cushion (20) that conforms exactly to the specific crewmember's entire body and gives total body support in more complex environment.

  9. Soft vesicles in the synthesis of hard materials.

    PubMed

    Dong, Renhao; Liu, Weimin; Hao, Jingcheng

    2012-04-17

    Vesicles of surfactants in aqueous solution have received considerable attention because of their use as simple model systems for biological membranes and their applications in various fields including colloids, pharmaceuticals, and materials. Because of their architecture, vesicles could prove useful as "soft" templates for the synthesis of "hard materials". The vesicle phase, however, has been challenging and difficult to work with in the construction of hard materials. In the solution-phase synthesis of various inorganic or macromolecular materials, templating methods provide a powerful strategy to control the size, morphology, and composition of the resulting micro- and nanostructures. In comparison with hard templates, soft templates are generally constructed using amphiphilic molecules, especially surfactants and amphiphilic polymers. These types of compounds offer advantages including the wide variety of available templates, simple fabrication processes under mild conditions, and easy removal of the templates with less damage to the final structures. Researchers have used many ordered molecular aggregates such as vesicles, micelles, liquid crystals, emulsion droplets, and lipid nanotubes as templates or structure-directing agents to control the synthesis or assembly hard micro- and nanomaterials composed from inorganic compounds or polymers. In addition to their range of sizes and morphologies, vesicles present unique structures that can simultaneously supply different microenvironments for the growth and assembly of hard materials: the inner chamber of vesicles, the outer surface of the vesicles, and the space between bilayers. Two main approaches for applying vesicles in the field of hard materials have been explored: (i) in situ synthesis of micro- or nanomaterials within a specific microenvironment by vesicle templating and (ii) the assembly or incorporation of guest materials during the formation of vesicles. This Account provides an in-depth look at

  10. Differential Rotation within the Earth's Outer Core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hide, R.; Boggs, D. H.; Dickey, J. O.

    1998-01-01

    Non-steady differential rotation drive by bouyancy forces within the Earth's liquid outer core (OC) plays a key role not only in the generation of the main geomagnetic field by the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) dynamo process but also in the excitation of irregular fluctuations in the angular speed of rotation of the overlying solid mantle, as evidenced by changes in the length of the day (LOD) on decadal and longer timescales (1-8).

  11. Planetary magnetism in the outer solar system.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonett, C. P.

    1973-01-01

    A brief review of the salient considerations which apply to the existence of magnetic fields in connection with planetary and subplanetary objects in the outer solar system is given. Consideration is given to internal dynamo fields, fields which might originate from interaction with the solar wind or magnetospheres (externally driven dynamos) and lastly fossil magnetic fields such as have been discovered on the moon. Where possible, connection is made between magnetism, means of detection, and internal body properties.

  12. Photopolarimetry team outer planets mission definition phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The work is reported of the Photopolarimetry Team in identifying scientific objectives for photometer/polarimeter experiments for outer planet flyby missions. A discussion of the scientific objectives which can be attained with a photometer/polarimeter experiment, and summaries of the special studies which were performed for the Photopolarimetry Team are presented along with a description of the photometer/polarimeter design which was developed for the Meteoroid Detection Team.

  13. A model environment for outer zone electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singley, G. W.; Vette, J. I.

    1972-01-01

    A brief morphology of outer zone electrons is given to illustrate the nature of the phenomena that we are attempting to model. This is followed by a discussion of the data processing that was done with the various data received from the experimenters before incorporating it into the data base from which this model was ultimately derived. The details of the derivation are given, and several comparisons of the final model with the various experimental measurements are presented.

  14. A photometric survey of outer belt asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimartino, M.; Gonano-Beurer, M.; Mottola, Stefano; Neukum, G.

    1992-01-01

    Since 1989, we have been conducting a research program devoted to the study of the Trojans and outer belt asteroids (Hilda and Cybele groups), in order to characterize their rotational properties and shapes. As an outcome of several observational campaigns, we determined rotational periods and lightcurve amplitudes for 23 distant asteroids, using both CCD and photoelectric photometry. In this paper, we compare the rotational properties of main belt asteroids and Trojans, based on the preliminary results of this survey.

  15. Outer membrane proteins of pathogenic spirochetes

    PubMed Central

    Cullen, Paul A.; Haake, David A.; Adler, Ben

    2009-01-01

    Pathogenic spirochetes are the causative agents of several important diseases including syphilis, Lyme disease, leptospirosis, swine dysentery, periodontal disease and some forms of relapsing fever. Spirochetal bacteria possess two membranes and the proteins present in the outer membrane are at the site of interaction with host tissue and the immune system. This review describes the current knowledge in the field of spirochetal outer membrane protein (OMP) biology. What is known concerning biogenesis and structure of OMPs, with particular regard to the atypical signal peptide cleavage sites observed amongst the spirochetes, is discussed. We examine the functions that have been determined for several spirochetal OMPs including those that have been demonstrated to function as adhesins, porins or to have roles in complement resistance. A detailed description of the role of spirochetal OMPs in immunity, including those that stimulate protective immunity or that are involved in antigenic variation, is given. A final section is included which covers experimental considerations in spirochetal outer membrane biology. This section covers contentious issues concerning cellular localization of putative OMPs, including determination of surface exposure. A more detailed knowledge of spirochetal OMP biology will hopefully lead to the design of new vaccines and a better understanding of spirochetal pathogenesis. PMID:15449605

  16. CLOSURE WELD DEVELOPMENT FOR 3013 OUTER CONTAINERS

    SciTech Connect

    Daugherty, W.; Howard, S.; Peterson, K.; Stokes, M.

    2009-11-10

    Excess plutonium materials in the DOE complex are packaged and stored in accordance with DOE-STD-3013. This standard specifies requirements for the stabilization of such materials and subsequent packaging in dual nested seal-welded containers. Austenitic stainless steels have been selected for container fabrication. The inner 3013 container provides contamination control while the outer 3013 container is the primary containment vessel and is the focus of this paper. Each packaging site chose a process for seal welding the outer 3013 containers in accordance with its needs and expertise. The two processes chosen for weld closure were laser beam welding (LBW) and gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). Following development efforts, each system was qualified in accordance with DOE-STD-3013 prior to production use. The 3013 outer container closure weld joint was designed to accommodate the characteristics of a laser weld. This aspect of the joint design necessitated some innovative process and equipment considerations in the application of the GTAW process. Details of the weld requirements and the development processes are presented and several potential enhancements for the GTAW system are described.

  17. Imaging of the outer planets and satellites.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, B. C.

    1973-01-01

    Imaging is the most widely applicable single means of exploring the outer planets and their satellites and also complements other planet-oriented instruments. Photography of Jupiter from terrestrial telescopes has revealed features which were neither predictable or predicted. Close-up imaging from fly-bys and orbiters affords the opportunity for discovery of atmospheric phenomena on the outer planets forever beyond the reach of terrestrial laboratories and intuition. On the other hand, a large number of specific applications of close-up imaging to study the giant planets are suggested by experience in photography from Earth and Mars orbit, and by ground-based telescopic studies of Jupiter and Saturn. The satellites of the outer planets actually constitute three distinct classes: lunar-sized objects, asteroidal-sized objects, and particulate rings. Imaging promises to be the primary observational tool for each category with results that could impact scientific thinking in the late 70's and 80's as significantly as has close-up photography of Mars and the Moon in the last 10 yr.

  18. Development of a Prototype Nickel Optic for the Constellation-X Hard-X-Ray Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basso, S.; Bruni, R. J.; Citerio, O.; Engelhaupt, D.; Ghigo, M.; Gorenstien, P.; Mazzoleni, F.; ODell, S. L.; Pareschi, G.; Ramsey, B. D.

    2003-01-01

    The Constellation-X mission, planned for launch in 2011, will feature an array of hard-x ray telescopes with a total collecting area goal of 1500 square centimeters at 40 keV. Various technologies are currently being investigated for the optics of these telescopes including multilayer-coated Eletroformed-Nickel-Replicated (ENR) shells. The attraction of the ENR process is that the resulting full-shell optics are inherently stable and offer the promise of good angular resolution and enhanced instrument sensitivity. The challenge for this process is to meet a relatively tight weight budget with a relatively dense material (rho nickel = 9 grams per cubic centimeters.) To demonstrate the viability of the ENR process we are fabricating a prototype HXT mirror module to be tested against a competing segmented-glass-shell optic. The ENR prototype will consist of 5 shells of diameters from 150 mm to 280 mm and of 426 mm total length. To meet the stringent weight budget for Con-X, the shells will be only 150 micron thick. The innermost of these will be coated with Iridium, while the remainder will be coated with graded-density multilayers. Mandrels for these shells are currently under fabrication (Jan 03), with the first shells scheduled for production in February 03. A tentative date of late Summer has been set for prototype testing. Issues currently being addressed are the control of stresses in the multiplayer coating and ways of mitigating their effects on the figure of the necessarily thin shells. Also, the fabrication, handling and mounting of these shells without inducing permanent figure distortions. A full status report on the prototype optic will be presented along with test results as available.

  19. Theory of Moderately Large Deflections of Sandwich Shells Having a Transversely Soft Core and Reinforced Along Their Contour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paimushin, V. N.

    2017-03-01

    Variants of sandwich structural elements in the form of plates and shells with a transversely soft core are analyzed. Their outer, load-carrying layers are reinforced along their outer contour with elastic bars to ensure the transfer of loads to the layers during their interaction with other structural elements. For such structures, at small strains and moderate displacements, a refined geometrically nonlinear a theory is constructed that allows one to describe their subcritical deformation and reveal all possible buckling modes (cophasal, antiphasal, mixed flexural, mixed shear-flexural, and arbitrary modes including all the listed ones) of the load-carrying layers and the reinforcing elements (flexural, shear-flexural, and pure shear ones at various subcritical stressstrain states). This theory is based on considering the interaction forces of outer layers with the core and of the layers and core with the reinforcing bars as unknowns. To derive the basic equations of static equilibrium, boundary conditions for the shell and stiffening bars, the conditions of kinematic conjunction of outer layers with the core and of the outer layers and core with the reinforcing bars, and the generalized Lagrange variational principle proposed earlier are utilized. The theory suggested differs from all known variants by a high degree of accuracy and maningfulness at a minimum number of unknown two-dimensional functions for the shells, one-dimensional functions for the reinforcing bars, and one and two-dimensional contact forces of interaction between structural elements.

  20. Energy-dependent dynamics of keV to MeV electrons in the inner zone, outer zone, and slot regions

    DOE PAGES

    Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Friedel, Reiner H. W.; Larsen, Brian A.; ...

    2016-01-28

    Here, we present observations of the radiation belts from the Helium Oxygen Proton Electron and Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer particle detectors on the Van Allen Probes satellites that illustrate the energy dependence and L shell dependence of radiation belt enhancements and decays. We survey events in 2013 and analyze an event on 1 March in more detail. The observations show the following: (a) at all L shells, lower energy electrons are enhanced more often than higher energies; (b) events that fill the slot region are more common at lower energies; (c) enhancements of electrons in the inner zone are moremore » common at lower energies; and (d) even when events do not fully fill the slot region, enhancements at lower energies tend to extend to lower L shells than higher energies. During enhancement events the outer zone extends to lower L shells at lower energies while being confined to higher L shells at higher energies. The inner zone shows the opposite with an outer boundary at higher L shells for lower energies. Both boundaries are nearly straight in log(energy) versus L shell space. At energies below a few 100 keV, radiation belt electron penetration through the slot region into the inner zone is commonplace, but the number and frequency of “slot filling” events decreases with increasing energy. The inner zone is enhanced only at energies that penetrate through the slot. Energy- and L shell-dependent losses (that are consistent with whistler hiss interactions) return the belts to more quiescent conditions.« less

  1. Crack problems in cylindrical and spherical shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.

    1976-01-01

    Standard plate or shell theories were used as a starting point to study the fracture problems in thin-walled cylindrical and spherical shells, assuming that the plane of the crack is perpendicular to the surface of the sheet. Since recent studies have shown that local shell curvatures may have a rather considerable effect on the stress intensity factor, the crack problem was considered in conjunction with a shell rather than a plate theory. The material was assumed to be isotropic and homogeneous, so that approximate solutions may be obtained by approximating the local shell crack geometry with an ideal shell which has a solution, namely a spherical shell with a meridional crack, a cylindrical shell with a circumferential crack, or a cylindrical shell with an axial crack. A method of solution for the specially orthotropic shells containing a crack was described; symmetric and skew-symmetric problems are considered in cylindrical shells with an axial crack.

  2. Glass shell manufacturing in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downs, R. L.; Ebner, M. A.; Nolen, R. L., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Highly-uniform, hollow glass spheres (shells), which are used for inertial confinement fusion targets, were formed from metal-organic gel powder feedstock in a vertical furnace. As a result of the rapid pyrolysis caused by the furnace, the gel is transformed to a shell in five distinct stages: (a) surface closure of the porous gel; (b) generation of a closed-cell foam structure in the gel; (c) spheridization of the gel and further expansion of the foam; (d) coalescence of the closed-cell foam to a single-void shell; and (e) fining of the glass shell. The heat transfer from the furnace to the falling gel particle was modeled to determine the effective heating rate of the gel. The model predicts the temperature history for a particle as a function of mass, dimensions, specific heat, and absorptance as well as furnace temperature profile and thermal conductivity of the furnace gas. A model was developed that predicts the gravity-induced degradation of shell concentricity in falling molten shells as a function of shell characteristics and time.

  3. STELLAR POPULATIONS IN THE OUTER HALO OF THE MASSIVE ELLIPTICAL M49

    SciTech Connect

    Mihos, J. Christopher; Harding, Paul; Rudick, Craig S.; Feldmeier, John J. E-mail: paul.harding@case.edu E-mail: jjfeldmeier@ysu.edu

    2013-02-20

    We use deep surface photometry of the giant elliptical M49 (NGC 4472), obtained as part of our survey for diffuse light in the Virgo Cluster, to study the stellar populations in its outer halo. Our data trace M49's stellar halo out to {approx}100 kpc (7r{sub e}), where we find that the shallow color gradient seen in the inner regions becomes dramatically steeper. The outer regions of the galaxy are quite blue (B - V {approx} 0.7); if this is purely a metallicity effect, it argues for extremely metal-poor stellar populations with [Fe/H] < -1. We also find that the extended accretion shells around M49 are distinctly redder than the galaxy's surrounding halo, suggesting that we are likely witnessing the buildup of both the stellar mass and metallicity in M49's outer halo due to late time accretion. While such growth of galaxy halos is predicted by models of hierarchical accretion, this growth is thought to be driven by more massive accretion events which have correspondingly higher mean metallicity than inferred for M49's halo. Thus the extremely metal-poor nature of M49's extended halo provides some tension against current models for elliptical galaxy formation.

  4. Process Development and Micro-Machining of MARBLE Foam-Cored Rexolite Hemi-Shell Ablator Capsules

    SciTech Connect

    Randolph, Randall Blaine; Oertel, John A.; Schmidt, Derek William; Lee, Matthew Nicholson; Patterson, Brian M.; Henderson, Kevin C.; Hamilton, Christopher Eric

    2016-06-30

    For this study, machined CH hemi-shell ablator capsules have been successfully produced by the MST-7 Target Fabrication Team at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Process development and micro-machining techniques have been developed to produce capsules for both the Omega and National Ignition Facility (NIF) campaigns. These capsules are gas filled up to 10 atm and consist of a machined plastic hemi-shell outer layer that accommodates various specially engineered low-density polystyrene foam cores. Machining and assembly of the two-part, step-jointed plastic hemi-shell outer layer required development of new techniques, processes, and tooling while still meeting very aggressive shot schedules for both campaigns. Finally, problems encountered and process improvements will be discussed that describe this very unique, complex capsule design approach through the first Omega proof-of-concept version to the larger NIF version.

  5. Process Development and Micro-Machining of MARBLE Foam-Cored Rexolite Hemi-Shell Ablator Capsules

    DOE PAGES

    Randolph, Randall Blaine; Oertel, John A.; Schmidt, Derek William; ...

    2016-06-30

    For this study, machined CH hemi-shell ablator capsules have been successfully produced by the MST-7 Target Fabrication Team at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Process development and micro-machining techniques have been developed to produce capsules for both the Omega and National Ignition Facility (NIF) campaigns. These capsules are gas filled up to 10 atm and consist of a machined plastic hemi-shell outer layer that accommodates various specially engineered low-density polystyrene foam cores. Machining and assembly of the two-part, step-jointed plastic hemi-shell outer layer required development of new techniques, processes, and tooling while still meeting very aggressive shot schedules for both campaigns.more » Finally, problems encountered and process improvements will be discussed that describe this very unique, complex capsule design approach through the first Omega proof-of-concept version to the larger NIF version.« less

  6. Future hard disk drive systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Roger

    2009-03-01

    This paper briefly reviews the evolution of today's hard disk drive with the additional intention of orienting the reader to the overall mechanical and electrical architecture. The modern hard disk drive is a miracle of storage capacity and function together with remarkable economy of design. This paper presents a personal view of future customer requirements and the anticipated design evolution of the components. There are critical decisions and great challenges ahead for the key technologies of heads, media, head-disk interface, mechanics, and electronics.

  7. Magnetic levitation for hard superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Kordyuk, A.A.

    1998-01-01

    An approach for calculating the interaction between a hard superconductor and a permanent magnet in the field-cooled case is proposed. The exact solutions were obtained for the point magnetic dipole over a flat ideally hard superconductor. We have shown that such an approach is adaptable to a wide practical range of melt-textured high-temperature superconductors{close_quote} systems with magnetic levitation. In this case, the energy losses can be calculated from the alternating magnetic field distribution on the superconducting sample surface. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. 75 FR 61512 - Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagrams

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-05

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagrams AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement, Interior. ACTION... Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagrams (OPDs) located within Atlantic Ocean areas,...

  9. Oceans, Ice Shells, and Life on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schenk, Paul

    2002-01-01

    The four large satellites of Jupiter are famous for their planet-like diversity and complexity, but none more so than ice-covered Europa. Since the provocative Voyager images of Europa in 1979, evidence has been mounting that a vast liquid water ocean may lurk beneath the moon's icy surface. Europa has since been the target of increasing and sometimes reckless speculation regarding the possibility that giant squid and other creatures may be swimming its purported cold, dark ocean. No wonder Europa tops everyone's list for future exploration in the outer solar system (after the very first reconnaissance of Pluto and the Kuiper belt, of course). Europa may be the smallest of the Galilean moons (so-called because they were discovered by Galileo Galilei in the early 17th century) but more than makes up for its diminutive size with a crazed, alien landscape. The surface is covered with ridges hundreds of meters high, domes tens of kilometers across, and large areas of broken and disrupted crust called chaos. Some of the geologic features seen on Europa resemble ice rafts floating in polar seas here on Earth-reinforcing the idea that an ice shell is floating over an ocean on this Moon-size satellite. However, such features do not prove that an ocean exists or ever did. Warm ice is unusually soft and will flow under its own weight. If the ice shell is thick enough, the warm bottom of the shell will flow, as do terrestrial glaciers. This could produce all the observed surface features on Europa through a variety of processes, the most important of which is convection. (Convection is the vertical overturn of a layer due to heating or density differences-think of porridge or sauce boiling on the stove.) Rising blobs from the base of the crust would then create the oval domes dotting Europa's surface. The strongest evidence for a hidden ocean beneath Europa's surface comes from the Galileo spacecraft's onboard magnetometer, which detected fluctuations in Jupiter's magnetic

  10. MicroShell Minimalist Shell for Xilinx Microprocessors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werne, Thomas A.

    2011-01-01

    MicroShell is a lightweight shell environment for engineers and software developers working with embedded microprocessors in Xilinx FPGAs. (MicroShell has also been successfully ported to run on ARM Cortex-M1 microprocessors in Actel ProASIC3 FPGAs, but without project-integration support.) Micro Shell decreases the time spent performing initial tests of field-programmable gate array (FPGA) designs, simplifies running customizable one-time-only experiments, and provides a familiar-feeling command-line interface. The program comes with a collection of useful functions and enables the designer to add an unlimited number of custom commands, which are callable from the command-line. The commands are parameterizable (using the C-based command-line parameter idiom), so the designer can use one function to exercise hardware with different values. Also, since many hardware peripherals instantiated in FPGAs have reasonably simple register-mapped I/O interfaces, the engineer can edit and view hardware parameter settings at any time without stopping the processor. MicroShell comes with a set of support scripts that interface seamlessly with Xilinx's EDK tool. Adding an instance of MicroShell to a project is as simple as marking a check box in a library configuration dialog box and specifying a software project directory. The support scripts then examine the hardware design, build design-specific functions, conditionally include processor-specific functions, and complete the compilation process. For code-size constrained designs, most of the stock functionality can be excluded from the compiled library. When all of the configurable options are removed from the binary, MicroShell has an unoptimized memory footprint of about 4.8 kB and a size-optimized footprint of about 2.3 kB. Since MicroShell allows unfettered access to all processor-accessible memory locations, it is possible to perform live patching on a running system. This can be useful, for instance, if a bug is

  11. Comparative study of shell swab and shell crush methods for the recovery of Salmonella from shell eggs.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Swabbing (SW) is the standard methodology for the recovery of resident microorganisms from shell eggs in Japan. A comparative study of shell swab (SW) and a shell crush (CR) technique was performed to recover the laboratory-inoculated Salmonella from shell eggs. It was found that the recovery of ...

  12. Dynamic indentation hardness of materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koeppel, Brian James

    Indentation hardness is one of the simplest and most commonly used measures for quickly characterizing material response under static loads. Hardness may mean resistance to cutting to a machinist, resistance to wear to a tribologist, or a measure of flow stress to a design engineer. In this simple technique, a predetermined force is applied to an indenter for 5-30 seconds causing it to penetrate a specimen. By measuring the load and the indentation size, a hardness value is determined. However, the rate of deformation during indenter penetration is of the order of 10sp{-4}\\ ssp{-1}. In most practical applications, such as high speed machining or impact, material deforms at strain rates in excess of 10sp3{-}10sp5\\ ssp{-1}. At such high rates, it is well established that the plastic behavior of materials is considerably different from their static counterpart. For example, materials exhibit an increase in their yield stress, flow stress, fracture stress, and fracture toughness at high strain rates. Hence, the use of static hardness as an indicator of material response under dynamic loads may not be appropriate. Accordingly, a simple dynamic indentation hardness tester is developed for characterizing materials at strain rates similar to those encountered in realistic situations. The experimental technique uses elastic stress wave propagation phenomena in a slender rod. The technique is designed to deliver a single indentation load of 100-200 mus duration. Similar to static measurements, the dynamic hardness is determined from the measured load and indentation size. Hardness measurements on a range of metals have revealed that the dynamic hardness is consistently greater than the static hardness. The increase in hardness is strongly dependent on the crystal structure of the material. The observed trends in hardness are also found to be consistent with the yield and flow stresses of these materials under uniaxial compression. Therefore, it is suggested that the

  13. Mobile hard substrata - An additional biodiversity source in a high latitude shallow subtidal system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balazy, Piotr; Kuklinski, Piotr

    2013-03-01

    This study demonstrates the importance of a hard mobile substratum (hermit crab shells) for Arctic biodiversity. Based on previous observations from other geographic regions we hypothesized that this niche at high latitudes would support a higher biodiversity of epifauna than might be predicted from similar substrata. We test whether the hermit crab epifauna is specific to that substratum providing unique biodiversity components to the local community. From four study sites in Isfjorden (78°N), West Spitsbergen and two study sites in Northern Norway (69°N) we collected approximately 50 each of hermit crabs, gastropods and pebbles, of visually similar surface area using SCUBA diving. Hermit crab shells were colonized by a larger number of epifaunal species than either gastropods or pebbles, even when they were of a larger size. Among 87 taxa found on all the three substrata, 22 occurred only on hermit crab shells. Except for two study sites hermit crab shells also supported more individuals. This study shows that the contribution of shells carried by hermit crabs to high-latitude, shallow-subtidal diversity is higher than might be predicted by their surface area alone and that hermit crabs modify, maintain and create a unique habitat. This is the result of a number of factors interacting positively on the presence of epifauna including shell surface heterogeneity and the complex influence of the crab host.

  14. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV: Outer Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The session 'Outer Solar System" inlcuded:Monte Carlo Modeling of [O I] 630 nm Auroral Emission on Io; The Detection of Iron Sulfide on Io; Io and Loki in 2003 as Seen from the Infrared Telescope Facility Using Mutual Satellite and Jupiter Occultations; Mapping of the Zamama-Thor Region of Io; First Solar System Results of the Spitzer Space Telescope; Mapping the Surface of Pluto with the Hubble Space Telescope; Experimental Study on Fischer-Tropsch Catalysis in the Circum-Saturnian Subnebula; New High-Pressure Phases of Ammonia Dihydrate; Gas Hydrate Stability at Low Temperatures and High Pressures with Applications to Mars and Europa; Laboratory UV Photolysis of Planetary Ice Analogs Containing H2O + CO2 (1:1); The OH Stretch Infrared Band of Water Ice and Its Temperature and Radiation Dependence; Band Position Variations in Reflectance Spectra of the Jovian Satellite Ganymede; Comparison of Porosity and Radar Models for Europa s Near Surface; Combined Effects of Diurnal and Nonsynchronous Surface Stresses on Europa; Europa s Northern Trailing Hemisphere: Lineament Stratigraphic Framework; Europa at the Highest Resolution: Implications for Surface Processes and Landing Sites; Comparison of Methods to Determine Furrow System Centers on Ganymede and Callisto; Resurfacing of Ganymede by Liquid-Water Volcanism; Layered Ejecta Craters on Ganymede: Comparisons with Martian Analogs; Evaluation of the Possible Presence of CO2-Clathrates in Europa s Icy Shell or Seafloor; Geosciences at Jupiter s Icy Moons: The Midas Touch; Planetary Remote Sensing Science Enabled by MIDAS (Multiple Instrument Distributed Aperture Sensor); and In Situ Surveying of Saturn s Rings.

  15. Peaceful Use of Outer Space: principles of Japanese Policies on Utilization and Activities in Outer space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosuge, Toshio

    2002-01-01

    " P e aceful use of outer space of outer space.....Principles of exploitation of outer space was passed in the Japanese Diet. It clearly mentioned that any activity of launching space object into outer space and developing launching rocket should be exclusively for peaceful purpose. NASDA was also established based upon the same principles of the public law. Japanese interpretation of Space Treaty and other related international agreements has been more strict on peaceful use of outer space, like non-military use rather than non-aggressive, because of influence of Japanese Constitution. Treaty and other agreements is analyzed through rapid development of its space activities, technologies and international cooperation with other space powers. Through more than thirty years experiences in space activities in public and private sectors, Japanese domestic laws and policies have not been changed in relation with basic principles. and laws relating to space activities in order to develop new space law and more international cooperation for space utilization rather than military use in new century.

  16. Electrospinning of artemisinin-loaded core-shell fibers for inhibiting drug re-crystallization.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yongli; Zhang, Jianhua; Xu, Shuxin; Dong, Anjie

    2013-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to inhibit the re-crystallization of a potent antimalarial drug, artemisinin (ART), by encapsulating it in core-shell fibers via a coaxially electrospun method. The ART-infiltrated cellulose acetate (CA) solution as the core material and poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP) solution as the shell material were used to prepared ART-loaded core-shell fibers ([ART/CA]/PVP). Transmission electron microscopy images confirmed the core-shell structures of the coaxially electrospun fibers. The scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction, and differential scanning calorimetry were performed to characterize the physical states of ART in the fibers. It was observed that ART crystals were formed in the ART-loaded CA/PVP composite fibers (ART/CA/PVP) during the electrospinning process and increased during storage duration. While ART crystals hardly were observed in the fresh core-shell [ART/CA]/PVP fibers with high ART entrapped amount (20 wt.%) and a little was detected after 6-month storage. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) results illustrated the hydrogen bonding interaction between ART and CA in the core-shell [ART/CA]/PVP fibers mainly contributed to the amorphous state of ART. Importantly, combination of the hydrophilic PVP shell and the amorphous ART in CA core, the core-shell [ART/CA]/PVP fibers provided a continued and stable ART release manner. Ex vivo permeation studies suggested the amorphous ART in the medicated core-shell fibers could permeate through the stratum corneum smoothly. Hence, the core-shell [ART/CA]/PVP fiber matrix could provide a potential application in transdermal patches.

  17. 33 CFR 117.323 - Outer Clam Bay

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Outer Clam Bay 117.323 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.323 Outer Clam Bay The drawspan of the Outer Clam Bay Boardwalk Drawbridge shall open on signal if at least 30 minutes advance notice is given....

  18. 33 CFR 117.323 - Outer Clam Bay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Outer Clam Bay. 117.323 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.323 Outer Clam Bay. The drawspan of the Outer Clam Bay Boardwalk Drawbridge shall open on signal if at least 30 minutes advance notice is given....

  19. 33 CFR 117.323 - Outer Clam Bay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Outer Clam Bay. 117.323 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.323 Outer Clam Bay. The drawspan of the Outer Clam Bay Boardwalk Drawbridge shall open on signal if at least 30 minutes advance notice is given....

  20. 33 CFR 117.323 - Outer Clam Bay

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Outer Clam Bay 117.323 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.323 Outer Clam Bay The drawspan of the Outer Clam Bay Boardwalk Drawbridge shall open on signal if at least 30 minutes advance notice is given....

  1. 33 CFR 117.323 - Outer Clam Bay

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Outer Clam Bay 117.323 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.323 Outer Clam Bay The drawspan of the Outer Clam Bay Boardwalk Drawbridge shall open on signal if at least 30 minutes advance notice is given....

  2. 49 CFR 192.10 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 192.10 Section... shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf (as defined in the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act; 43 U.S.C. 1331) must identify on all their respective pipelines...

  3. 49 CFR 192.10 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 192.10 Section... shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf (as defined in the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act; 43 U.S.C. 1331) must identify on all their respective pipelines...

  4. 49 CFR 195.9 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 195.9 Section... HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE General § 195.9 Outer continental shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf must identify on all their respective pipelines the specific...

  5. 49 CFR 195.9 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 195.9 Section... HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE General § 195.9 Outer continental shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf must identify on all their respective pipelines the specific...

  6. 49 CFR 195.9 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 195.9 Section... HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE General § 195.9 Outer continental shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf must identify on all their respective pipelines the specific...

  7. 49 CFR 192.10 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 192.10 Section... shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf (as defined in the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act; 43 U.S.C. 1331) must identify on all their respective pipelines...

  8. 49 CFR 195.9 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 195.9 Section... HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE General § 195.9 Outer continental shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf must identify on all their respective pipelines the specific...

  9. 49 CFR 192.10 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 192.10 Section... shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf (as defined in the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act; 43 U.S.C. 1331) must identify on all their respective pipelines...

  10. 49 CFR 195.9 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 195.9 Section... HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE General § 195.9 Outer continental shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf must identify on all their respective pipelines the specific...

  11. 49 CFR 192.10 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 192.10 Section... shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf (as defined in the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act; 43 U.S.C. 1331) must identify on all their respective pipelines...

  12. Metrics for Hard Goods Merchandising.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Gloria S., Ed.; Magisos, Joel H., Ed.

    Designed to meet the job-related metric measurement needs of students interested in hard goods merchandising, this instructional package is one of five for the marketing and distribution cluster, part of a set of 55 packages for metric instruction in different occupations. The package is intended for students who already know the occupational…

  13. Playing the Numbers: Hard Choices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doyle, William R.

    2009-01-01

    Stateline.org recently called this recession the worst in 50 years for state budgets. As has been the case in past economic downturns, higher education looks to be particularly hard hit. Funds from the American Recovery and Relief Act may have postponed some of the difficulty for many colleges and universities, but the outlook for public higher…

  14. Hard Trying and These Recipes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atwell, Nancie

    2003-01-01

    Writers thrive when they are motivated to work hard, have regular opportunities to practice and reflect, and benefit from a knowledgeable teacher who knows writing. Student feedback to lessons during writing workshop helped guide Nancie Atwell in her quest to provide the richest and most efficient path to better writing.

  15. FATIGUE OF BIOMATERIALS: HARD TISSUES

    PubMed Central

    Arola, D.; Bajaj, D.; Ivancik, J.; Majd, H.; Zhang, D.

    2009-01-01

    The fatigue and fracture behavior of hard tissues are topics of considerable interest today. This special group of organic materials comprises the highly mineralized and load-bearing tissues of the human body, and includes bone, cementum, dentin and enamel. An understanding of their fatigue behavior and the influence of loading conditions and physiological factors (e.g. aging and disease) on the mechanisms of degradation are essential for achieving lifelong health. But there is much more to this topic than the immediate medical issues. There are many challenges to characterizing the fatigue behavior of hard tissues, much of which is attributed to size constraints and the complexity of their microstructure. The relative importance of the constituents on the type and distribution of defects, rate of coalescence, and their contributions to the initiation and growth of cracks, are formidable topics that have not reached maturity. Hard tissues also provide a medium for learning and a source of inspiration in the design of new microstructures for engineering materials. This article briefly reviews fatigue of hard tissues with shared emphasis on current understanding, the challenges and the unanswered questions. PMID:20563239

  16. Hypersonic vibrations of Ag@SiO2 (cubic core)-shell nanospheres.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jing Ya; Wang, Zhi Kui; Lim, Hock Siah; Ng, Ser Choon; Kuok, Meng Hau; Tran, Toan Trong; Lu, Xianmao

    2010-12-28

    The intriguing optical and catalytic properties of metal-silica core-shell nanoparticles, inherited from their plasmonic metallic cores together with the rich surface chemistry and increased stability offered by their silica shells, have enabled a wide variety of applications. In this work, we investigate the confined vibrational modes of a series of monodisperse Ag@SiO(2) (cubic core)-shell nanospheres synthesized using a modified Stöber sol-gel method. The particle-size dependence of their mode frequencies has been mapped by Brillouin light scattering, a powerful tool for probing hypersonic vibrations. Unlike the larger particles, the observed spheroidal-like mode frequencies of the smaller ones do not scale with inverse diameter. Interestingly, the onset of the deviation from this linearity occurs at a smaller particle size for higher-energy modes than for lower-energy ones. Finite element simulations show that the mode displacement profiles of the Ag@SiO(2) core-shells closely resemble those of a homogeneous SiO(2) sphere. Simulations have also been performed to ascertain the effects that the core shape and the relative hardness of the core and shell materials have on the vibrations of the core-shell as a whole. As the vibrational modes of a particle have a bearing on its thermal and mechanical properties, the findings would be of value in designing core-shell nanostructures with customized thermal and mechanical characteristics.

  17. Recovery of Salmonella from commercial shell eggs by shell rinse and shell crush methodologies.

    PubMed

    Musgrove, M T; Jones, D R; Northcutt, J K; Harrison, M A; Cox, N A; Ingram, K D; Hinton, A J

    2005-12-01

    Salmonella is the most important human pathogen associated with shell eggs. Salmonella Enteritidis is the serotype most often implicated in outbreaks, although other serotypes have been recovered from eggs and from the commercial shell egg washing environment. Many sample methods are used to recover microorganisms from eggshells and membranes. A shell rinse and modified shell-and-membrane crush method for recovery of Salmonella were compared. Eggs were collected from 3 commercial shell-washing facilities (X, Y, and Z) during 3 visits. Twelve eggs were collected from each of 10 to 12 locations along the egg processing chain. After being transported back to the laboratory, each egg was sampled first by a shell rinse method and then by a shell crush method. For each technique (rinse or crush), 2 pools of 5 eggs per location sampled were selectively enriched for the recovery of Salmonella. Presumptive samples positive for Salmonella were confirmed serologically. Overall, there were 10.1% (40/396) Salmonella-positive pooled samples. Salmonella were recovered by the shell rinse and shell crush techniques (4.8 vs. 5.3%, respectively). Plant X yielded 21.5% Salmonella positives, whereas less than 5% of samples from plants Y and Z were found to be contaminated with the organism (4.2 and 4.5%, respectively). Salmonella was recovered more often from unwashed eggs (15.8%) than from washed eggs (8.3%). For some eggs, Salmonella was only recovered by one of the methods. Use of both approaches in the same experiment increased sampling sensitivity, although in most cases, crushing provided more sensitive Salmonella recovery.

  18. Discovery of Molecular Gas Shells around the Unusual Galaxy Centaurus A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-03-01

    photometric and spectrographic studies of their light, it has been known since the early 1980's that such shells are made up of stars. It appears that they are quite common - about half of the nearby large elliptical galaxies have been found to be surrounded by stellar shells. More recently, in 1994, atomic hydrogen gas was discovered to be associated with some of the stellar shells. This discovery was a bit of a surprise, because the current theory predicts that when two galaxies merge, their gas and stars will behave very differently. While the individual stars hardly ever hit each other, the interstellar gas clouds collide violently. They will lose all their energy and the gas will fall towards the common centre where it is soon consumed in vigorous bursts of star formation. Why would there then be hydrogen gas in the outer shells of some elliptical galaxies? A possible origin of gaseous shells The astronomer team, headed by Vassilis Charmandaris [1] decided to look into this serious discrepancy between theory and observations. They believed that a possible explanation might be that this diffuse atomic gas is located, not in vast, very dilute clouds, but rather in smaller, much denser molecular clouds , such as these are known in our own galaxy, the Milky Way. Due to their relative compactness (more than 1000 molecules/cm 3 , i.e,. at least 100 times more than that of larger diffuse clouds), molecular clouds would behave more like the stars during the galaxy collision event. Indeed, realistic calculations showed that the dynamical behavior of such dense clouds would be intermediate between the stars and the diffuse hydrogen gas. Thus, while most of the gas would still end up in the centre of the remaining galaxy after a merger, a larger fraction of it would be able to survive at large distances from the nucleus. This would then be the origin of the observed hydrogen shells. During the merger, gas that originates from regions in the outskirts of the "cannibalized" galaxy

  19. Fluoreno[4,3-c]fluorene: a closed-shell, fully conjugated hydrocarbon.

    PubMed

    Rose, Bradley D; Vonnegut, Chris L; Zakharov, Lev N; Haley, Michael M

    2012-05-04

    The synthesis and optoelectronic properties of 24 π-electron, formally antiaromatic 4,11-di-t-butyl-1,8-dimesitylfluoreno[4,3-c]fluorene (FF) are presented. The solid-state structure shows that the outer rings are aromatic, while the central four rings possess a bond-localized 2,6-naphthoquinone dimethide motif (in red). The biradical character of FF is assessed experimentally and computationally; the results of which implicate a closed-shell ground state.

  20. 7 CFR 996.19 - Shelled peanuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Shelled peanuts. 996.19 Section 996.19 Agriculture... STANDARDS FOR DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED PEANUTS MARKETED IN THE UNITED STATES Definitions § 996.19 Shelled peanuts. Shelled peanuts means the kernels or portions of kernels of peanuts after the shells are removed....

  1. 7 CFR 996.19 - Shelled peanuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Shelled peanuts. 996.19 Section 996.19 Agriculture... STANDARDS FOR DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED PEANUTS MARKETED IN THE UNITED STATES Definitions § 996.19 Shelled peanuts. Shelled peanuts means the kernels or portions of kernels of peanuts after the shells are removed....

  2. 7 CFR 996.19 - Shelled peanuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Shelled peanuts. 996.19 Section 996.19 Agriculture... STANDARDS FOR DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED PEANUTS MARKETED IN THE UNITED STATES Definitions § 996.19 Shelled peanuts. Shelled peanuts means the kernels or portions of kernels of peanuts after the shells are removed....

  3. 7 CFR 996.19 - Shelled peanuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Shelled peanuts. 996.19 Section 996.19 Agriculture... STANDARDS FOR DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED PEANUTS MARKETED IN THE UNITED STATES Definitions § 996.19 Shelled peanuts. Shelled peanuts means the kernels or portions of kernels of peanuts after the shells are removed....

  4. 7 CFR 996.19 - Shelled peanuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Shelled peanuts. 996.19 Section 996.19 Agriculture... STANDARDS FOR DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED PEANUTS MARKETED IN THE UNITED STATES Definitions § 996.19 Shelled peanuts. Shelled peanuts means the kernels or portions of kernels of peanuts after the shells are removed....

  5. Gas hydrates of outer continental margins

    SciTech Connect

    Kvenvolden, K.A. )

    1990-05-01

    Gas hydrates are crystalline substances in which a rigid framework of water molecules traps molecules of gas, mainly methane. Gas-hydrate deposits are common in continental margin sediment in all major oceans at water depths greater than about 300 m. Thirty-three localities with evidence for gas-hydrate occurrence have been described worldwide. The presence of these gas hydrates has been inferred mainly from anomalous lacoustic reflectors seen on marine seismic records. Naturally occurring marine gas hydrates have been sampled and analyzed at about tensites in several regions including continental slope and rise sediment of the eastern Pacific Ocean and the Gulf of Mexico. Except for some Gulf of Mexico gas hydrate occurrences, the analyzed gas hydrates are composed almost exclusively of microbial methane. Evidence for the microbial origin of methane in gas hydrates includes (1) the inverse relation between methane occurence and sulfate concentration in the sediment, (2) the subparallel depth trends in carbon isotopic compositions of methane and bicarbonate in the interstitial water, and (3) the general range of {sup 13}C depletion ({delta}{sub PDB}{sup 13}C = {minus}90 to {minus}60 {per thousand}) in the methane. Analyses of gas hydrates from the Peruvian outer continental margin in particular illustrate this evidence for microbially generated methane. The total amount of methane in gas hydrates of continental margins is not known, but estimates of about 10{sup 16} m{sup 3} seem reasonable. Although this amount of methane is large, it is not yet clear whether methane hydrates of outer continental margins will ever be a significant energy resource; however, these gas hydrates will probably constitute a drilling hazard when outer continental margins are explored in the future.

  6. The Young Outer Disk of M83

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidge, T. J.

    2010-08-01

    Deep near-infrared images recorded with NICI on Gemini South are used to investigate the evolved stellar content in the outer southeast quadrant of the spiral galaxy M83. A diffuse population of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars is detected, indicating that there are stars outside of the previously identified young and intermediate age star clusters in the outer disk. The brightest AGB stars have M K >= -8, and the AGB luminosity function (LF) is well matched by model LFs that assume ages <=1 Gyr. The specific star formation rate (SFR) during the past few Gyr estimated from AGB star counts is consistent with that computed from mid-infrared observations of star clusters at similar radii, and it is concluded that the disruption timescale for star clusters in the outer disk is Lt1 Gyr. The LF and specific frequency of AGB stars vary with galactocentric radius, in a manner that is indicative of lower luminosity-weighted ages at larger radii. Modest numbers of red supergiants are also found, indicating that there has been star formation during the past 100 Myr, while the ratio of C stars to M giants is consistent with that expected for a solar metallicity system that has experienced a constant SFR for the past few Gyr. The results drawn from the properties of resolved AGB stars are broadly consistent with those deduced from integrated light observations in the UV. Based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a co-operative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the Science and Technology Facilities Council (United Kingdom), the National Research Council of Canada (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), the Ministerio da Ciencia e Technologia (Brazil), and the Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnologia e Innovacion Productiva (Argentina).

  7. Insulative laser shell coupler

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Phillip A.; Anderson, Andrew T.; Alger, Terry W.

    1994-01-01

    A segmented coaxial laser shell assembly having at least two water jacket sections, two pairs of interconnection half rings, a dialectric break ring, and a pair of threaded ring sections. Each water jacket section with an inner tubular section that defines an inner laser cavity with water paths adjacent to at least a portion of the exterior of the inner tubular section, and mating faces at the end of the water jacket section through which the inner laser cavity opens and which defines at least one water port therethrough in communication with the water jackets. The water paths also define in their external surface a circumferential notch set back from and in close proximity to the mating face. The dielectric break ring has selected thickness and is placed between, and in coaxial alignment with, the mating faces of two of the adjacent water jacket sections. The break ring also defines an inner laser cavity of the same size and shape as the inner laser cavity of the water jacket sections and at least one water passage through the break ring to communicate with at least one water port through the mating faces of the water jacket sections.

  8. Insulative laser shell coupler

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, P.A.; Anderson, A.T.; Alger, T.W.

    1994-09-20

    A segmented coaxial laser shell assembly having at least two water jacket sections, two pairs of interconnection half rings, a dielectric break ring, and a pair of threaded ring sections is disclosed. Each water jacket section with an inner tubular section that defines an inner laser cavity with water paths adjacent to at least a portion of the exterior of the inner tubular section, and mating faces at the end of the water jacket section through which the inner laser cavity opens and which defines at least one water port therethrough in communication with the water jackets. The water paths also define in their external surface a circumferential notch set back from and in close proximity to the mating face. The dielectric break ring has selected thickness and is placed between, and in coaxial alignment with, the mating faces of two of the adjacent water jacket sections. The break ring also defines an inner laser cavity of the same size and shape as the inner laser cavity of the water jacket sections and at least one water passage through the break ring to communicate with at least one water port through the mating faces of the water jacket sections. 4 figs.

  9. Core-shell-shell nanorods for controlled release of silver that can serve as a nanoheater for photothermal treatment on bacteria.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bo; Wang, Ning; Han, Lu; Chen, Ming-Li; Wang, Jian-Hua

    2015-01-01

    A novel bactericidal material comprising rod-shaped core-shell-shell Au-Ag-Au nanorods is constructed as a nanoheater in the near-infrared (NIR) region. The outer Au shell melts under laser irradiation and results in exposure of the inner Ag shell, facilitating the controlled release of the antibacterial Ag shell/layer or Ag(+). This results in the Au-Ag-Au nanorods having a favorable bactericidal ability as it combines the features of physical photothermal ablation sterilization of the outer Au shell and the antibacterial effect of the inner Ag shell or Ag(+) to the surrounding bacteria. The sterilizing ability of Au-Ag-Au nanorods is investigated with Escherichia coli O157:H7 as a model bacterial strain. Under low-power NIR laser irradiation (785 nm, 50 mW cm(-2)), the Au-Ag-Au nanoheater exhibits a higher photothermal conversion efficiency (with a solution temperature of 44°C) with respect to that for the Au-Ag nanorods (39°C). Meanwhile, a much improved stability with respect to Au-Ag nanorods is observed, i.e., 16 successive days of monitoring reveal virtually no change in the ultraviolet-visible spectrum of Au-Ag-Au nanorods, while a significant drop in absorption along with a 92 nm red shift of Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance is recorded for the Au-Ag nanorods. This brings an increasing bactericidal efficiency and long-term stability for the Au-Ag-Au nanorods. At a dosage of 10 μg ml(-1), a killing rate of 100% is reached for the E. coli O157:H7 cells under 20 min of irradiation. The use of Au-Ag-Au nanorods avoids the abuse of broad-spectrum antibiotics and reduces the damage of tissues by alleviating the toxicity of silver under controlled release and by the use of low-power laser irradiation. These features could make the bimetallic core-shell-shell nanorods a favorable nanoheater for in vivo biomedical applications.

  10. Dark matter in the outer solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, T.; Cruikshank, D.; De Bergh, C.; Geballe, T.

    1994-01-01

    There are now a large number of small bodies in the outer solar system that are known to be covered with dark material. Attempts to identify that material have been thwarted by the absence of discrete absorption features in the reflection spectra of these planetesimals. An absorption at 2.2 micrometers that appeared to be present in several objects has not been confirmed by new observations. Three absorptions in the spectrum of the unusually red planetesimal 5145 Pholus are well-established, but their identity remains a mystery.

  11. Overview of 2008 Outer Planet Flagship Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reh, Kim R.

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the process involved in the Phase-2 studies for the next Outer Planets Flagship (OPF). These studies will be a cooperative effort with ESA and JAXA in partnership with NASA. The annoucement of oppurtunity (AO) for the science instruments and the launch approval/planetary protection processes are reviewed. There is also discussion about capturing relevant lessons from the Cassini team, supporting international collaboration, and support for science definition teams. Some mission specific tasks are also reviewed, for the three missions being proposed: (1) Europa Explorer, (2) Jupiter System Observer and (3) Titan Explorer. A timeline for the studies is also included.

  12. Meridional plasma flow in the outer heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lazarus, A. J.; Yedidia, B.; Villanueva, L.; Mcnutt, R. L., Jr.; Belcher, J. W.; Villante, U.; Burlaga, L. F.

    1988-01-01

    Voyager 2 observations made in the outer heliosphere near 25 AU and within 2 deg of the heliographic equatorial plane show periodic variations in the meridional (North/South) flow velocities that are much more prominent than the East/West variations. An autocorrelation analysis shows that the flow variation has a period of about 25.5 days in the latter half of 1986, in approximate agreement with the solar rotation period. The results suggest that increased pressure in interaction regions remains the best candidate for the driver of the nonradial flows.

  13. Dishwasher For Earth Or Outer Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tromble, Jon D.

    1991-01-01

    Dishwashing machine cleans eating utensils in either Earth gravity or zero gravity of outer space. Cycle consists of three phases: filling, washing, and draining. Rotation of tub creates artificial gravity aiding recirculation of water during washing phase in absence of true gravity. Centrifugal air/water separator helps system function in zero gravity. Self-cleaning filter contains interdigitating blades catching solid debris when water flows between them. Later, blades moved back and forth in scissor-like manner to dislodge debris, removed by backflow of water.

  14. Outer atmospheres of giant and supergiant stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, A.

    1984-01-01

    The properties of the chromospheres, transition regions and coronas of cool evolved stars are reviewed based primarily on recent ultraviolet and X-ray studies. Determinations of mass loss rates using new observational techniques in the ultraviolet and radio spectral regions are discussed and observations indicating general atmospheric motions are considered. The techniques available for the quantitative modeling of these atmospheres are outlined and recent results discussed. Finally, the current rudimentary understanding of the evolution of these outer atmospheres and its causes are considered.

  15. Hard processes in hadronic interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Satz, H. |; Wang, X.N.

    1995-07-01

    Quantum chromodynamics is today accepted as the fundamental theory of strong interactions, even though most hadronic collisions lead to final states for which quantitative QCD predictions are still lacking. It therefore seems worthwhile to take stock of where we stand today and to what extent the presently available data on hard processes in hadronic collisions can be accounted for in terms of QCD. This is one reason for this work. The second reason - and in fact its original trigger - is the search for the quark-gluon plasma in high energy nuclear collisions. The hard processes to be considered here are the production of prompt photons, Drell-Yan dileptons, open charm, quarkonium states, and hard jets. For each of these, we discuss the present theoretical understanding, compare the resulting predictions to available data, and then show what behaviour it leads to at RHIC and LHC energies. All of these processes have the structure mentioned above: they contain a hard partonic interaction, calculable perturbatively, but also the non-perturbative parton distribution within a hadron. These parton distributions, however, can be studied theoretically in terms of counting rule arguments, and they can be checked independently by measurements of the parton structure functions in deep inelastic lepton-hadron scattering. The present volume is the work of Hard Probe Collaboration, a group of theorists who are interested in the problem and were willing to dedicate a considerable amount of their time and work on it. The necessary preparation, planning and coordination of the project were carried out in two workshops of two weeks` duration each, in February 1994 at CERn in Geneva andin July 1994 at LBL in Berkeley.

  16. HR Del REMNANT ANATOMY USING TWO-DIMENSIONAL SPECTRAL DATA AND THREE-DIMENSIONAL PHOTOIONIZATION SHELL MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Moraes, Manoel; Diaz, Marcos E-mail: marcos@astro.iag.usp.br

    2009-12-15

    The HR Del nova remnant was observed with the IFU-GMOS at Gemini North. The spatially resolved spectral data cube was used in the kinematic, morphological, and abundance analysis of the ejecta. The line maps show a very clumpy shell with two main symmetric structures. The first one is the outer part of the shell seen in H{alpha}, which forms two rings projected in the sky plane. These ring structures correspond to a closed hourglass shape, first proposed by Harman and O'Brien. The equatorial emission enhancement is caused by the superimposed hourglass structures in the line of sight. The second structure seen only in the [O III] and [N II] maps is located along the polar directions inside the hourglass structure. Abundance gradients between the polar caps and equatorial region were not found. However, the outer part of the shell seems to be less abundant in oxygen and nitrogen than the inner regions. Detailed 2.5-dimensional photoionization modeling of the three-dimensional shell was performed using the mass distribution inferred from the observations and the presence of mass clumps. The resulting model grids are used to constrain the physical properties of the shell as well as the central ionizing source. A sequence of three-dimensional clumpy models including a disk-shaped ionization source is able to reproduce the ionization gradients between polar and equatorial regions of the shell. Differences between shell axial ratios in different lines can also be explained by aspherical illumination. A total shell mass of 9 x 10{sup -4} M {sub sun} is derived from these models. We estimate that 50%-70% of the shell mass is contained in neutral clumps with density contrast up to a factor of 30.

  17. Computerized Buckling Analysis of Shells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-01

    bl block nurmber) Shells Composites Buckl ing Stiffened Numerical Methods Elastic-Plastic Nonlinear Survey 20 AES’RACT (Con’inue on re, ense Ride If...Contract F33615-76-C-3105. The work was completed under Task 2307NI, "Basic Research in Behavior of Metallic and Composite Components of Airframe Struc...and Internal Pressure ....... ................. ... 134 Stiffened Cylindrical Shells Under Combined Loading .... ........ 136 - Buckling of Composite

  18. Rotating thin-shell wormhole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovgun, A.

    2016-11-01

    We construct a rotating thin-shell wormhole using a Myers-Perry black hole in five dimensions, using the Darmois-Israel junction conditions. The stability of the wormhole is analyzed under perturbations. We find that exotic matter is required at the throat of the wormhole to keep it stable. Our analysis shows that stability of the rotating thin-shell wormhole is possible if suitable parameter values are chosen.

  19. Nematic textures in spherical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitelli, V.; Nelson, D. R.

    2006-08-01

    The equilibrium texture of nematic shells is studied as a function of their thickness. For ultrathin shells the ground state has four short (1)/(2) disclination lines but, as the thickness of the film increases, a three-dimensional escaped configuration composed of two pairs of half-hedgehogs becomes energetically favorable. We derive an exact solution for the nematic ground state in the one Frank constant approximation and study the stability of the corresponding texture against thermal fluctuations.

  20. Atmospheric entry probes for outer planet exploration. Outer planet entry probe technical summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The use of unmanned space probes for investigating the conditions existing on and around the outer planets of the solar system is discussed. The subjects included in the report are: (1) the design of a common entry probe for outer planet missions, (2) the significant trades related to the development of a common probe design, (3) the impact of bus selection on probe design, (4) the impact of probe requirements on bus modifications, and (5) the key technology elements recommended for advanced development. Drawings and illustrations of typical probes are included to show the components and systems used in the space probes.

  1. Triton shells of intact erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Sheetz, M P; Sawyer, D

    1978-01-01

    About 40% of human erythrocyte membrane protein is resistant to solubilization in 0.5% Triton X-114. These components comprise a structure called a Triton shell roughly similar in size and shape to the original erythrocyte and thus constitute a cytoskeleton. With increasing concentrations of Triton the lipid content of the Triton shell decreases dramatically, whereas the majority of the protein components remain constant. Exceptions to this rule include proteins contained in band 3, the presumed anion channel, and in band 4 which decrease with increasing Triton concentration. The Triton-insoluble complex includes spectrin (bands 1 and 2), actin (band 5), and bands 3' and 7. Component 3' has an apparent molecular weight of 88,000 daltons as does 3; but unlike 3, it is insensitive to protease treatment of the intact cell, has a low extinction coefficient at 280 nm, and is solubilized from the shells in alkaline water solutions. Component 7 also has a low extinction coefficient at 280 nm. Spectrin alone is solubilized from the Triton shells in isotonic media. The solubilized spectrin contains no bound Triton and coelectrophoreses with spectrin eluted in hypotonic solutions from ghosts. Electron micrographs of fixed Triton shells stained with uranyl acetate show the presence of numerous filaments which appear beaded and are 80--120 A in diameter. The filaments cannot be composed mainly af actin, but enough spectrin is present to form the filaments. Triton shells may provide an excellent source of material useful in the investigation of the erythrocyte cytoskeleton.

  2. Mechanisms of the outer radiation belt electron flux variation during magnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, M.; Obara, T.; Koshiishi, H.; Koga, K.; Matsumoto, H.; Goka, T.

    2003-12-01

    We have investigated variations of the energetic electron flux (> 0.4 MeV) and the magnetic field in the outer radiation belt obtained from the Standard DOse Monitor (SDOM) and the MAgnetoMeter (MAM) of the Space Environment Data Acquisition equipment (SEDA) onboard Tsubasa (Mission Demonstration Test Satellite (MDS)-1). Since Tsubasa operates in geostationary transfer orbit (GTO) with an orbital period of 10 hours and an inclination of 28.5 degrees, it has provided a rare opportunity for directly observing near-equatorial radiation belt plasma particles and the magnetic field during magnetic storms. The decreases of the energetic electron flux during the main phase of the magnetic storms, and the subsequent recoveries and enhancements during the recovery phase in the outer radiation belt are linked respectively to typical variations of the magnetic field. At the moment that the outer radiation belt flux sharply drops during the main phase of the 17 April 2002 magnetic storm, the butterfly distribution is observed at L=5 and the magnetic equator where the magnitude of magnetic field is much smaller than the IGRF model. Calculating the drift motions of the energetic electrons in the Tyganenko 2001 magnetospheric magnetic field model, shows that the drift-shell splitting mechanism could generate the butterfly distribution due to loss of the near-equatorially mirroring electrons through dayside magnetopause boundary. We evaluate roles and contributions of the other possible mechanisms to explain the flux decreases. We discuss the three-dimensional field configuration in the magnetopause to compare with the low earth orbital observation of the outer radiation belt flux.

  3. Shells in the C2 coma of Comet P/Halley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulz, Rita; A'Hearn, Michael F.

    1995-01-01

    We reanalyzed the CN images of Comet P/Halley, in which jets have been discovered for the first time, in search of shell structures. Shells were actually detected at the outer edges of the frames on those dates for which shells with radii small enough to be covered by the limited field of view of the CCD were predicted. The C2 images of the same data set were subjected to an analogous investigation which led to the discovery of shell structures in C2 as well. The morphology of the CN and the C2 shells is essentially equal on the same observational date. They have the same radii and show almost identical asymmetries which suggests that CN and C2 in the shells originate from the same general source. The comparison of the jets in both species before and after a two-dimensional continuum subtraction supports this supposition. The similar morphology of the jets indicates that both species are produced from the same bulk of precursor material which has been ejected in the form of jets from the same active area. However, similarly located and oriented jets in CN and C2 do not show similar relative intensities in most cases. These differences in the intensity distribution imply that the production rates of CN and C2 follow different laws.

  4. Linear thermoelastic buckling and free vibration behavior of functionally graded truncated conical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhangale, Rajesh K.; Ganesan, N.; Padmanabhan, Chandramouli

    2006-04-01

    In recent years, structures made up of functionally graded materials (FGMs) have received considerable attention for use in high-temperature applications. In this article, a finite element formulation based on First-Order Shear Deformation Theory (FSDT) is used to study the thermal buckling and vibration behavior of truncated FGM conical shells in a high-temperature environment. A Fourier series expansion for the displacement variable in the circumferential direction is used to model the FGM conical shell. The material properties of the truncated FGM conical shells are functionally graded in the thickness direction according to a volume fraction power law distribution. Temperature-dependent material properties are considered to carry out a linear thermal buckling and free vibration analysis. The conical shell is assumed to be clamped-clamped and has a high temperature specified on the inner surface while the outer surface is at ambient temperature. The one-dimensional heat conduction equation is used across the thickness of the conical shell to determine the temperature distribution and thereby the material properties. In addition, the influence of initial stresses on the frequency behavior of FGM shells has also been investigated. Numerical studies involving the understanding of the role of power law index, r/h ratios, and semi-vertex angle on the thermal buckling temperature as well as on vibration have been carried out.

  5. A yolk-shell design for stabilized and scalable li-ion battery alloy anodes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Nian; Wu, Hui; McDowell, Matthew T; Yao, Yan; Wang, Chongmin; Cui, Yi

    2012-06-13

    Silicon is regarded as one of the most promising anode materials for next generation lithium-ion batteries. For use in practical applications, a Si electrode must have high capacity, long cycle life, high efficiency, and the fabrication must be industrially scalable. Here, we design and fabricate a yolk-shell structure to meet all these needs. The fabrication is carried out without special equipment and mostly at room temperature. Commercially available Si nanoparticles are completely sealed inside conformal, thin, self-supporting carbon shells, with rationally designed void space in between the particles and the shell. The well-defined void space allows the Si particles to expand freely without breaking the outer carbon shell, therefore stabilizing the solid-electrolyte interphase on the shell surface. High capacity (∼2800 mAh/g at C/10), long cycle life (1000 cycles with 74% capacity retention), and high Coulombic efficiency (99.84%) have been realized in this yolk-shell structured Si electrode.

  6. Structural and magnetic properties of core-shell Au/Fe3O4 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    León Félix, L.; Coaquira, J. A. H.; Martínez, M. A. R.; Goya, G. F.; Mantilla, J.; Sousa, M. H.; Valladares, L. De Los Santos; Barnes, C. H. W.; Morais, P. C.

    2017-02-01

    We present a systematic study of core-shell Au/Fe3O4 nanoparticles produced by thermal decomposition under mild conditions. The morphology and crystal structure of the nanoparticles revealed the presence of Au core of d = (6.9 ± 1.0) nm surrounded by Fe3O4 shell with a thickness of ~3.5 nm, epitaxially grown onto the Au core surface. The Au/Fe3O4 core-shell structure was demonstrated by high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy analysis. The magnetite shell grown on top of the Au nanoparticle displayed a thermal blocking state at temperatures below TB = 59 K and a relaxed state well above TB. Remarkably, an exchange bias effect was observed when cooling down the samples below room temperature under an external magnetic field. Moreover, the exchange bias field (HEX) started to appear at T~40 K and its value increased by decreasing the temperature. This effect has been assigned to the interaction of spins located in the magnetically disordered regions (in the inner and outer surface of the Fe3O4 shell) and spins located in the ordered region of the Fe3O4 shell.

  7. Structural and magnetic properties of core-shell Au/Fe3O4 nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    León Félix, L.; Coaquira, J. A. H.; Martínez, M. A. R.; Goya, G. F.; Mantilla, J.; Sousa, M. H.; Valladares, L. de los Santos; Barnes, C. H. W.; Morais, P. C.

    2017-01-01

    We present a systematic study of core-shell Au/Fe3O4 nanoparticles produced by thermal decomposition under mild conditions. The morphology and crystal structure of the nanoparticles revealed the presence of Au core of d = (6.9 ± 1.0) nm surrounded by Fe3O4 shell with a thickness of ~3.5 nm, epitaxially grown onto the Au core surface. The Au/Fe3O4 core-shell structure was demonstrated by high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy analysis. The magnetite shell grown on top of the Au nanoparticle displayed a thermal blocking state at temperatures below TB = 59 K and a relaxed state well above TB. Remarkably, an exchange bias effect was observed when cooling down the samples below room temperature under an external magnetic field. Moreover, the exchange bias field (HEX) started to appear at T~40 K and its value increased by decreasing the temperature. This effect has been assigned to the interaction of spins located in the magnetically disordered regions (in the inner and outer surface of the Fe3O4 shell) and spins located in the ordered region of the Fe3O4 shell. PMID:28165012

  8. Environments in the Outer Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupp, N.; Khurana, K. K.; Iess, L.; Lainey, V.; Cassidy, T. A.; Burger, M.; Sotin, C.; Neubauer, F.

    2010-06-01

    The outer planets of our solar system Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune are fascinating objects on their own. Their intrinsic magnetic fields form magnetic environments (so called magnetospheres) in which charged and neutral particles and dust are produced, lost or being transported through the system. These magnetic environments of the gas giants can be envisaged as huge plasma laboratories in space in which electromagnetic waves, current systems, particle transport mechanisms, acceleration processes and other phenomena act and interact with the large number of moons in orbit around those massive planets. In general it is necessary to describe and study the global environments (magnetospheres) of the gas giants, its global configuration with its large-scale transport processes; and, in combination, to study the local environments of the moons as well, e.g. the interaction processes between the magnetospheric plasma and the exosphere/atmosphere/magnetosphere of the moon acting on time scales of seconds to days. These local exchange processes include also the gravity, shape, rotation, astrometric observations and orbital parameters of the icy moons in those huge systems. It is the purpose of this chapter of the book to describe the variety of the magnetic environments of the outer planets in a broad overview, globally and locally, and to show that those exchange processes can dramatically influence the surfaces and exospheres/atmospheres of the moons and they can also be used as a tool to study the overall physics of systems as a whole.

  9. OSSOS: The Outer Solar System Origins Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladman, Brett; Bannister, Michele; Kavelaars, Jj; Petit, Jean-Marc; Gwyn, Stephen; Chen, Ying-Tung

    2014-11-01

    We present the first detection set from the Outer Solar System Origins Survey (OSSOS) which is a mammoth 560-hour CFHT Large Program over 4 years (finishing January 2017). This is likely to be the largest Kuiper Belt survey before LSST comes on line (in terms of the number of precise transneptunian object (TNO) orbits it provides).OSSOS studies gradually-slewing 21-square degree blocks of sky that are repeatedly imaged in many dark runs over two semesters. This strategy is designed to detect and track TNOs in order to provide extremely high-quality orbits in a short amount of time; in 16-18 month arcs we are obtaining fractional semimajor axis uncertainties in the range 0.01-0.1% and accuracies in the libration amplitudes of resonant objects better than 10 degrees, due to mean astrometric residuals routinely being of order 50-100 milliarcseconds.This talk will present the survey design and full detection sample for objects observed in the first half of 2013 and 2014. We will report how adding these detections to those from the Canada-France Ecliptic Plane Survey (CFEPS) modifies conclusions about the orbital and size distribution of main classical Kuiper Belt, as well as other non-resonant sub-populations. In particular, because OSSOS is sensitive to, and has detected objects, from 8 AU to beyond 60 AU, we will report on how the combined distance and magnitude distribution impact dicsussions of the absolute magnitude distribution of outer Solar System objects.

  10. Stellar evolution in the outer Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczerba, Ryszard; Siódmiak, Natasza; Leśniewska, Aleksandra; Karska, Agata; Sewiło, Marta

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the distribution of different classes of spectroscopically identified sources and theoretical models in the color-color diagrams (CCDs) combining the near-infrared (NIR) and mid-infrared (MIR) data to develop a method to classify Outer Galaxy sources detected with the Spitzer Space Telescope (hereafter Spitzer) SMOG survey in the IRAC 3.68.0 µm and MIPS 24 µm bands. We supplement the Spitzer data with the data from other satellite and ground-based surveys. The main goal of our study is to discover and characterize the population of intermediate- and low-mass young stellar objects (YSOs) in the Outer Galaxy and use it to study star formation in a significantly different environment than the Galaxy inside the solar circle. Since the YSOs can be confused with evolved stars in the MIR, these classes of objects need to be carefully separated. Here we present the initial results of our analysis using the Ks-[8.0] vs. Ks-[24] CCD as an example. The evolved stars separated from YSOs in the YSO selection process will be investigated in detail in the follow-up study.

  11. SDC conceptual design: Scintillating fiber outer tracker

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, D.; Baumbaugh, A.; Bird, F.; SDC Collaboration

    1992-01-22

    The authors propose an all-scintillating fiber detector for the purpose of outer tracking for the SDC. The objectives of this tracking system are to: (1) provide a first level trigger for {vert_bar}{eta}{vert_bar} < 2.3 with sharp p{sub T} threshold with the ability to resolve individual beam crossings; (2) provide pattern recognition capability and momentum resolution which complements and extends the capabilities of the inner silicon tracking system; (3) provide three dimensional linkage with outer detection systems including the shower maximum detector, muon detectors, and calorimetry; (4) provide robust tracking and track-triggering at the highest luminosities expected at the SSC. The many attractive features of a fiber tracker include good position resolution, low occupancy, low mass in the active volume, and excellent resistance to radiation damage. An additional important feature, especially at the SSC, is the intrinsically prompt response time of a scintillating fiber. This property is exploited in the construction of a level 1 trigger sensitive to individual beam crossings.

  12. Radio Emissions from the Outer Heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Kurth, W. S.

    1996-01-01

    For nearly fifteen years the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft have been detecting an unusual radio emission in the outer heliosphere in the frequency range from about 2 to 3 kHz. Two major events have been observed, the first in 1983-84 and the second in 1992-93. In both cases the onset of the radio emission occurred about 400 days after a period of intense solar activity, the first in mid-July 1982, and the second in May-June 1991. These two periods of solar activity produced the two deepest cosmic ray Forbush decreases ever observed. Forbush decreases are indicative of a system of strong shocks and associated disturbances propagating outward through the heliosphere. The radio emission is believed to have been produced when this system of shocks and disturbances interacted with one of the outer boundaries of the heliosphere, most likely in the vicinity of the the heliopause. The emission is believed to be generated by the shock-driven Langmuir-wave mode conversion mechanism, which produces radiation at the plasma frequency (f(sub p)) and at twice the plasma frequency (2f(sub p)). From the 400-day travel time and the known speed of the shocks, the distance to the interaction region can be computed, and is estimated to be in the range from about 110 to 160 AU.

  13. Energy‐dependent dynamics of keV to MeV electrons in the inner zone, outer zone, and slot regions

    PubMed Central

    Friedel, Reiner H. W.; Larsen, Brian A.; Skoug, Ruth M.; Funsten, Herbert O.; Claudepierre, Seth G.; Fennell, Joseph F.; Turner, Drew L.; Denton, Mick H.; Spence, Harlan E.; Blake, J. Bernard; Baker, Daniel N.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We present observations of the radiation belts from the Helium Oxygen Proton Electron and Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer particle detectors on the Van Allen Probes satellites that illustrate the energy dependence and L shell dependence of radiation belt enhancements and decays. We survey events in 2013 and analyze an event on 1 March in more detail. The observations show the following: (a) at all L shells, lower energy electrons are enhanced more often than higher energies; (b) events that fill the slot region are more common at lower energies; (c) enhancements of electrons in the inner zone are more common at lower energies; and (d) even when events do not fully fill the slot region, enhancements at lower energies tend to extend to lower L shells than higher energies. During enhancement events the outer zone extends to lower L shells at lower energies while being confined to higher L shells at higher energies. The inner zone shows the opposite with an outer boundary at higher L shells for lower energies. Both boundaries are nearly straight in log(energy) versus L shell space. At energies below a few 100 keV, radiation belt electron penetration through the slot region into the inner zone is commonplace, but the number and frequency of “slot filling” events decreases with increasing energy. The inner zone is enhanced only at energies that penetrate through the slot. Energy‐ and L shell‐dependent losses (that are consistent with whistler hiss interactions) return the belts to more quiescent conditions. PMID:27818855

  14. Core-shell structured PEO-chitosan nanofibers by coaxial electrospinning.

    PubMed

    Pakravan, Mehdi; Heuzey, Marie-Claude; Ajji, Abdellah

    2012-02-13

    Core-shell structured PEO-chitosan nanofibers have been produced using a coaxial electrospinning setup. PEO and chitosan solutions, both in an aqueous acetic acid solvent, were used as the inner (core) and outer (shell) layer, respectively. Uniform-sized defect-free nanofibers of 150-190 nm diameter were produced. In addition, hollow nanofibers could be obtained subsequent to PEO washing of the membranes. The core-shell nanostructure and existence of chitosan on the shell layer were confirmed by TEM images obtained before and after washing the PEO content with water. The presence of chitosan on the surface of the composite nanofibers was further supported by XPS studies. The chitosan and PEO compositions in the nanofibrous mats were determined by TGA analysis, which were similar to their ratio in the feed solutions. The local compositional homogeneity of the membranes and the efficiency of the washing step to remove PEO were also verified by FTIR. In addition, DSC and XRD were used to characterize the crystalline structure and morphology of the co-electrospun nonwoven mats. The prepared coaxial nanofibers (hollow and solid) have several potential applications due to the presence of chitosan on their outer surfaces.

  15. Transpecific microsatellites for hard pines.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, M.; Cross, M.; Maguire, L.; Dieters, J.; Williams, G.; Henry, J.

    2002-04-01

    Microsatellites are difficult to recover from large plant genomes so cross-specific utilisation is an important source of markers. Fifty microsatellites were tested for cross-specific amplification and polymorphism to two New World hard pine species, slash pine ( Pinus elliottii var. elliottii) and Caribbean pine ( P. caribaea var. hondurensis). Twenty-nine (58%) markers amplified in both hard pine species, and 23 of these 29 were polymorphic. Soft pine (subgenus Strobus) microsatellite markers did amplify, but none were polymorphic. Pinus elliottii var. elliottii and P. caribaea var. hondurensis showed mutational changes in the flanking regions and the repeat motif that were informative for Pinus spp. phylogenetic relationships. Most allele length variation could be attributed to variability in repeat unit number. There was no evidence for ascertainment bias.

  16. Ultrasonic material hardness depth measurement

    DOEpatents

    Good, Morris S.; Schuster, George J.; Skorpik, James R.

    1997-01-01

    The invention is an ultrasonic surface hardness depth measurement apparatus and method permitting rapid determination of hardness depth of shafts, rods, tubes and other cylindrical parts. The apparatus of the invention has a part handler, sensor, ultrasonic electronics component, computer, computer instruction sets, and may include a display screen. The part handler has a vessel filled with a couplant, and a part rotator for rotating a cylindrical metal part with respect to the sensor. The part handler further has a surface follower upon which the sensor is mounted, thereby maintaining a constant distance between the sensor and the exterior surface of the cylindrical metal part. The sensor is mounted so that a front surface of the sensor is within the vessel with couplant between the front surface of the sensor and the part.

  17. Ultrasonic material hardness depth measurement

    DOEpatents

    Good, M.S.; Schuster, G.J.; Skorpik, J.R.

    1997-07-08

    The invention is an ultrasonic surface hardness depth measurement apparatus and method permitting rapid determination of hardness depth of shafts, rods, tubes and other cylindrical parts. The apparatus of the invention has a part handler, sensor, ultrasonic electronics component, computer, computer instruction sets, and may include a display screen. The part handler has a vessel filled with a couplant, and a part rotator for rotating a cylindrical metal part with respect to the sensor. The part handler further has a surface follower upon which the sensor is mounted, thereby maintaining a constant distance between the sensor and the exterior surface of the cylindrical metal part. The sensor is mounted so that a front surface of the sensor is within the vessel with couplant between the front surface of the sensor and the part. 12 figs.

  18. Schwannoma of the hard palate

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Pradyumna Kumar; Mandal, Palash Kumar; Ghosh, Saradindu

    2014-01-01

    Schwannomas are benign encapsulated perineural tumors. The head and neck region is the most common site. Intraoral origin is seen in only 1% of cases, tongue being the most common site; its location in the palate is rare. We report a case of hard-palate schwannoma with bony erosion which was immunohistochemically confirmed. The tumor was excised completely intraorally. After two months of follow-up, the defect was found to be completely covered with palatal mucosa. PMID:25298716

  19. Rad-Hard Silicon Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giorgi, Marco

    2005-06-01

    For the next generation of High Energy Physics (HEP) Experiments silicon microstrip detectors working in harsh radiation environments with excellent performances are necessary. The irradiation causes bulk and surface damages that modify the electrical properties of the detector. Solutions like AC coupled strips, overhanging metal contact, <100> crystal lattice orientation, low resistivity n-bulk and Oxygenated substrate are studied for rad-hard detectors. The paper presents an outlook of these technologies.

  20. Microwave assisted hard rock cutting

    DOEpatents

    Lindroth, David P.; Morrell, Roger J.; Blair, James R.

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus for the sequential fracturing and cutting of subsurface volume of hard rock (102) in the strata (101) of a mining environment (100) by subjecting the volume of rock to a beam (25) of microwave energy to fracture the subsurface volume of rock by differential expansion; and , then bringing the cutting edge (52) of a piece of conventional mining machinery (50) into contact with the fractured rock (102).

  1. Radio seismology of the outer solar corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaqarashvili, Teimuraz; Melnik, Valentin; Brazhenko, Anatoliy; Panchenko, Mykhaylo; Konovalenko, Alexander; Dorovskyy, Vladimir; Rucker, Helmut

    2014-05-01

    Observed oscillations of coronal loops in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lines have been successfully used to estimate plasma parameters in the inner corona (< 0.2R0, where R0 is the solar radius). However, coronal seismology in EUV lines fails for higher altitudes because of rapid decrease in line intensity. We aim to use radio observations to estimate the plasma parameters of the outer solar corona (> 0.2R0). We used the large Ukrainian radio telescope URAN-2 to observe type IV radio bursts at the frequency range of 8-32 MHz during the time interval of 09:50-12:30 UT on April 14, 2011. The burst was connected to C2.3 flare, which occurred in AR 11190 during 09:38-09:49 UT. The dynamic spectrum of radio emission shows clear quasi-periodic variations in the emission intensity at almost all frequencies. Wavelet analysis at four different frequencies (29 MHz, 25 MHz, 22 MHz, and 14 MHz) shows the quasi-periodic variation of emission intensity with periods of ~ 34 min and ~ 23 min. The periodic variations can be explained by the first and second harmonics of vertical kink oscillation of transequatorial coronal loops, which were excited by the same flare. The apex of transequatorial loops may reach up to 1.2 R0 altitude. We derive and solve the dispersion relation of trapped magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) oscillations in a longitudinally inhomogeneous magnetic slab. The analysis shows that a thin (with width to length ratio of 0.1), dense (with the ratio of internal and external densities of ≥ 20) magnetic slab with weak longitudinal inhomogeneity may trap the observed oscillations. Seismologically estimated Alfvén speed inside the loop at the height of ~ 1 R0 is ~ 1000 km s-1. The magnetic field strength at this height is estimated as ~ 0.9 G. Extrapolation of magnetic field strength to the inner corona gives ~ 10 G at the height of 0.1 R0. Radio observations can be successfully used for the sounding of the outer solar corona, where EUV observations of coronal loops fail

  2. Radio seismology of the outer solar corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaqarashvili, T. V.; Melnik, V. N.; Brazhenko, A. I.; Panchenko, M.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Franzuzenko, A. V.; Dorovskyy, V. V.; Rucker, H. O.

    2013-07-01

    Context. Observed oscillations of coronal loops in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lines have been successfully used to estimate plasma parameters in the inner corona (<0.2 R0, where R0 is the solar radius). However, coronal seismology in EUV lines fails for higher altitudes because of rapid decrease in line intensity. Aims: We aim to use radio observations to estimate the plasma parameters of the outer solar corona (>0.2 R0). Methods: We used the large Ukrainian radio telescope URAN-2 to observe type IV radio bursts at the frequency range of 8-32 MHz during the time interval of 09:50-12:30 UT on April 14, 2011. The burst was connected to C2.3 flare, which occurred in AR 11190 during 09:38-09:49 UT. The dynamic spectrum of radio emission shows clear quasi-periodic variations in the emission intensity at almost all frequencies. Results: Wavelet analysis at four different frequencies (29 MHz, 25 MHz, 22 MHz, and 14 MHz) shows the quasi-periodic variation of emission intensity with periods of ~34 min and ~23 min. The periodic variations can be explained by the first and second harmonics of vertical kink oscillation of transequatorial coronal loops, which were excited by the same flare. The apex of transequatorial loops may reach up to 1.2 R0 altitude. We derive and solve the dispersion relation of trapped magnetohydrodynamic oscillations in a longitudinally inhomogeneous magnetic slab. The analysis shows that a thin (with width to length ratio of 0.1), dense (with the ratio of internal and external densities of ≥20) magnetic slab with weak longitudinal inhomogeneity of the Alfvén speed may trap the observed oscillations. Seismologically estimated Alfvén speed inside the loop at the height of ~1 R0 is ~1000 km s-1. The magnetic field strength at this height is estimated as ~0.9 G. Extrapolation of magnetic field strength to the inner corona gives ~10 G at the height of 0.1 R0. Conclusions: Radio observations can be successfully used for the sounding of the outer solar

  3. THE OUTER DISKS OF DWARF IRREGULAR GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, Deidre A.; Massey, Philip; Wilsey, Nick; Riabokin, Malanka; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Oh, Se-Heon; Anderson, Ed; Nordgren, Tyler E. E-mail: phil.massey@lowell.edu E-mail: riabokin@msu.edu E-mail: seheon-oh@ast.uct.ac.za E-mail: tyler_nordgren@redlands.edu

    2011-10-15

    In order to explore the properties of extreme outer stellar disks, we obtained ultra-deep V and GALEX ultraviolet (UV) images of four dwarf irregular galaxies and one blue compact dwarf galaxy, and ultra-deep B images of three of these. Our V-band surface photometry extends to 29.5 mag arcsec{sup -2}. We convert the FUV and V-band photometry, along with H{alpha} photometry obtained in a larger survey, into radial star formation rate profiles that are sensitive to timescales from 10 Myr to the lifetime of the galaxy. We also obtained H I-line emission data and compare the stellar distributions, surface brightness profiles, and star formation rate profiles to H I-line emission maps, gas surface density profiles, and gas kinematics. Our data lead us to two general observations. First, the exponential disks in these irregular galaxies are extraordinarily regular. We observe that the stellar disks continue to decline exponentially as far as our measurements extend. In spite of lumpiness in the distribution of young stars and H I distributions and kinematics that have significant unordered motions, sporadic processes that have built the disks-star formation, radial movement of stars, and perhaps even perturbations from the outside-have, nevertheless, conspired to produce standard disk profiles. Second, there is a remarkable continuity of star formation throughout these disks over time. In four out of five of our galaxies the star formation rate in the outer disk measured from the FUV tracks that determined from the V-band, to within factors of five, requiring star formation at a fairly steady rate over the galaxy's lifetime. Yet, the H I surface density profiles generally decline with radius more shallowly than the stellar light, and the gas is marginally gravitationally stable against collapse into clouds. Outer stellar disks are challenging our concepts of star formation and disk growth and provide a critical environment in which to understand processes that mold

  4. Highly-resolved 2D HYDRA simulations of Double-Shell Ignition Designs

    SciTech Connect

    Milovich, J L; Amendt, P; Hamza, A; Marinak, M; Robey, H

    2006-06-30

    Double-shell (DS) targets (Amendt, P. A. et al., 2002) offer a complementary approach to the cryogenic baseline design (Lindl, J. et al., 2004) for achieving ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Among the expected benefits are the ease of room temperature preparation and fielding, the potential for lower laser backscatter and the reduced need for careful shock timing. These benefits are offset, however, by demanding fabrication tolerances, e.g., shell concentricity and shell surface smoothness. In particular, the latter is of paramount importance since DS targets are susceptible to the growth of interface perturbations from impulsive and time-dependent accelerations. Previous work (Milovich, J. L. et al., 2004) has indicated that the growth of perturbations on the outer surface of the inner shell is potentially disruptive. To control this instability new designs have been proposed requiring bimetallic inner shells and material-matching mid-Z nanoporous foam. The challenges in manufacturing such exotic foams have led to a further evaluation of the densities and pore sizes needed to reduce the seeding of perturbations on the outer surface of the inner shell, thereby guiding the ongoing material science research efforts. Highly-resolved 2D simulations of porous foams have been performed to establish an upper limit on the allowable pore sizes for instability growth. Simulations indicate that foams with higher densities than previously thought are now possible. Moreover, while at the present time we are only able to simulate foams with average pore sizes larger than 1 micron (due to computational limitations), we can conclude that these pore sizes are potentially problematic. Furthermore, the effect of low-order hohlraum radiation asymmetries on the growth of intrinsic surface perturbations is also addressed. Highly-resolved 2D simulations indicate that the transverse flows that are set up by these low-order mode features (which can excite Kelvin

  5. Cenosphere formation from heavy fuel oil: a numerical analysis accounting for the balance between porous shells and internal pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Vanteru M.; Rahman, Mustafa M.; Gandi, Appala N.; Elbaz, Ayman M.; Schrecengost, Robert A.; Roberts, William L.

    2016-01-01

    Heavy fuel oil (HFO) as a fuel in industrial and power generation plants ensures the availability of energy at economy. Coke and cenosphere emissions from HFO combustion need to be controlled by particulate control equipment such as electrostatic precipitators, and collection effectiveness is impacted by the properties of these particulates. The cenosphere formation is a function of HFO composition, which varies depending on the source of the HFO. Numerical modelling of the cenosphere formation mechanism presented in this paper is an economical method of characterising cenosphere formation potential for HFO in comparison to experimental analysis of individual HFO samples, leading to better control and collection. In the present work, a novel numerical model is developed for understanding the global cenosphere formation mechanism. The critical diameter of the cenosphere is modelled based on the balance between two pressures developed in an HFO droplet. First is the pressure (Prpf) developed at the interface of the liquid surface and the inner surface of the accumulated coke due to the flow restriction of volatile components from the interior of the droplet. Second is the pressure due to the outer shell strength (PrC) gained from van der Walls energy of the coke layers and surface energy. In this present study it is considered that when PrC ≥ Prpf the outer shell starts to harden. The internal motion in the shell layer ceases and the outer diameter (DSOut) of the shell is then fixed. The entire process of cenosphere formation in this study is analysed in three phases: regression, shell formation and hardening, and post shell hardening. Variations in pressures during shell formation are analysed. Shell (cenosphere) dimensions are evaluated at the completion of droplet evaporation. The rate of fuel evaporation, rate of coke formation and coke accumulation are analysed. The model predicts shell outer diameters of 650, 860 and 1040 µm, and inner diameters are 360, 410

  6. Ultra-strong surface plasmon amplification characteristic of a spaser based on gold-silver core-shell nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li; Zhou, Jun; Zhang, Haopeng; Jiang, Tao; Lou, Cibo

    2015-03-01

    We proposed an efficient spaser based on gold-silver core-shell nanorods (NRs) encapsulated by an outer silica shell doped with a gain medium. The optical characteristics of the spaser were numerically simulated based on the finite element method (FEM). The results showed that the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) amplification characteristics of the spaser strongly depend on the thickness of silver shell, the aspect ratio of the inner gold NRs, and the polarization direction of the incident light. And, the maximum absolute value of optical cross-section of the spaser can reach 21,824 μm2, which is about 1115, 523, and 18 times higher than that of spasers based on the gold NRs, the silver NRs, and the silver-gold core-shell NRs, respectively. The ultra-strong surface plasmon amplification characteristics of the spaser have potential applications in optical information storage, high sensitivity biochemical sensing, and medical engineering.

  7. Impact and hardness optimisation of composite materials inspired by the babassu nut (Orbignya speciosa).

    PubMed

    Staufenberg, Gerrit; Graupner, Nina; Müssig, Jörg

    2015-08-20

    The babassu nut is the fruit of the babassu palm Orbignya speciosa. The combination of hardness and impact strength is difficult to acquire for artificial materials, making the babassu nut a promising source for biomimetic inspiration. Unnotched Charpy impact tests, Shore D hardness tests and scanning electron microscopy were used for mechanical and microscopical analysis of the pericarp. Four major principles were found for a biomimetic approach: a hard core ((1); endocarp) is embedded in a soft outer layer of high impact strength ((2); epicarp) and is reinforced with fibres of variable fineness (3), some of which are oriented radial to the core (4). Biomimetic fibre-reinforced composites were produced using abstracted mechanisms of the babassu nut based on regenerated cellulose fibres (lyocell, L) with two different fineness values as reinforcement embedded in a polylactide (PLA) core matrix and polypropylene (PP) based outer layers. The biomimetic fibre composite reaches a significantly higher impact strength that is 1.6 times higher than the reference sample produced from a PLA/PP/L-blend. At the same time the hardness is slightly increased compared to PP/L.

  8. Semiclassical environment of collapsing shells

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Kinjal; Paranjape, Aseem

    2009-12-15

    We explore in detail the semiclassical environment of collapsing shells of matter, and determine the semiclassical flux measured by a variety of observers. This study is a preliminary step in a broader investigation of thermodynamic properties of the geometry of collapsing objects. Specifically, in this paper we consider spherically symmetric null and timelike collapsing shells which form an event horizon, and calculate the flux measured by observers both inside and outside the shell, and both inside and outside the event horizon, and find nontrivial results in most of the cases. Additionally, we also investigate the environment of a shell which collapses but does not form a horizon, halting at some radius larger than the Schwarzschild radius, and find that such an object generically gives rise to a pulse of radiation which is sharply peaked as it travels inwards and is reflected at the origin, and eventually emerges from the shell in a thermalized form. Our results have potential consequences in addressing questions pertaining, e.g. to black hole entropy and backreaction.

  9. Shell models of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plunian, Franck; Stepanov, Rodion; Frick, Peter

    2013-02-01

    Shell models of hydrodynamic turbulence originated in the seventies. Their main aim was to describe the statistics of homogeneous and isotropic turbulence in spectral space, using a simple set of ordinary differential equations. In the eighties, shell models of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence emerged based on the same principles as their hydrodynamic counter-part but also incorporating interactions between magnetic and velocity fields. In recent years, significant improvements have been made such as the inclusion of non-local interactions and appropriate definitions for helicities. Though shell models cannot account for the spatial complexity of MHD turbulence, their dynamics are not over simplified and do reflect those of real MHD turbulence including intermittency or chaotic reversals of large-scale modes. Furthermore, these models use realistic values for dimensionless parameters (high kinetic and magnetic Reynolds numbers, low or high magnetic Prandtl number) allowing extended inertial range and accurate dissipation rate. Using modern computers it is difficult to attain an inertial range of three decades with direct numerical simulations, whereas eight are possible using shell models. In this review we set up a general mathematical framework allowing the description of any MHD shell model. The variety of the latter, with their advantages and weaknesses, is introduced. Finally we consider a number of applications, dealing with free-decaying MHD turbulence, dynamo action, Alfvén waves and the Hall effect.

  10. Foam shell project: Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Overturf, G.; Reibold, B.; Cook, B.; Schroen-Carey, D.

    1994-03-25

    The authors report on their work to produce a foam shell target for two possible applications: (1) as liquid-layered cryogenic target on Omega Upgrade, and (2) as a back-up design for the NIF. This target consists of a roughly 1 mm diameter and 100 {mu}m thick spherical low-density foam shell surrounding a central void. The foam will be slightly overfilled with liquid D{sub 2} or DT, the overfilled excess being symmetrically distributed on the inside of the shell and supported by thermal gradient techniques. The outside of the foam is overcoated with full density polymer which must be topologically smooth. The technology for manufacturing this style of foam shell involves microencapsulation techniques and has been developed by the Japanese at ILE. Their goal is to determine whether this technology can be successfully adapted to meet US ICF objectives. To this end a program of foam shell development has been initiated at LLNL in collaboration with both the General Atomics DOE Target Fabrication Contract Corporation and the Target Fabrication Group at LLE.

  11. Why Are Drugs So Hard to Quit?

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Quitting drugs is hard because addiction is a brain disease. Your brain is like a control tower that sends out ... and choices. Addiction changes the signals in your brain and makes it hard to feel OK without ...

  12. More Older Women Hitting the Bottle Hard

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_164321.html More Older Women Hitting the Bottle Hard Study found dramatic jump ... March 28, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- More older American women than ever are drinking -- and drinking hard, a ...

  13. Variability in the outer planet aurorae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, John T.

    1992-01-01

    Multiwavelength observations of the aurorae of the outer planets are reviewed emphasizing the findings on physical processes derived from specific wavelengths. The review examines features of the auroral zones such as ionospheric currents, atmospheric heating, and compositional changes in the aurorae of Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and the earth for comparison. Jupiter's multiwavelength aurora receives special attention since recent observations shed light on the distribution of the UV auroral ovals, the spectroscopy of the UV auroral emissions, auroral dynamics and ion upwelling, and IR emission from auroral latitudes. The observational data on Jupiter facilitate the modeling of variability and detailed thermospheric and magnetospheric processes. Saturn can be studied by extending findings fron Jupiter's aurora, and deficiencies are found in the observational datasets for Neptune and Uranus.

  14. Formation of the outer planets and satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, A. G. W.

    1977-01-01

    A mechanism for the formation of the outer planets is proposed, the basis of which is the idea that the giant planets contain an excess of chemically condensable materials over solar composition. Planetary cores were formed by the clumping together of chemically condensed bodies forming a thin disk in the solar nebula. Gas surrounding a core becomes unstable against collapse onto the core. In the case of Jupiter and Saturn, much of the collapsing gas goes into orbit about the formed planet, forming a relatively thin circumplanetary disks with differential rotation in the prograde sense. For Uranus and Neptune, the dynamical collapse mechanism is unlikely. A disk of gas around Uranus may have been formed during a collision of the protoplanet with a large body. The circumplanetary disks then form the basis for formation of satellite systems, in which the Goldreich-Ward instability mechanism plays a role.

  15. Outer solar system for 200 million years

    SciTech Connect

    Applegate, J.H.; Douglas, M.R.; Gursel, Y.; Sussman, G.J.; Wisdom, J.

    1986-07-01

    A special-purpose computer is used to integrate the orbits of the outer five planets for more than 100 Myr into the future and more than 100 Myr into the past. The strongest features in the Fourier transforms of the orbital elements of the Jovian planets can be identified with the frequencies predicted by linear secular theory. Many of the weaker features in the Fourier spectra are identified as linear combinations of the basic frequencies. Serious differences are noted between the present measurements and the predictions of Bretagnon (1974). The amplitude of the 3.796 Myr period libration of Pluto's longitude of perihelion is modulated with a period of 34 Myr. Very long periods, on the order of 137 Myr, are also seen. The orbit of Pluto is stable for the duration of the integration; the maximum Liapunov characteristic exponent is less than 10 to the -6.8 power/yr. 21 references.

  16. Outer Hair Cell Electromotility in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramamoorthy, Sripriya; Nuttall, Alfred L.

    2011-11-01

    The effectiveness of outer hair cell (OHC) electro-motility in vivo has been challenged by the expected low-pass filtering of the transmembrane potential due to the cell's own capacitance. The OHC electromotility is characterized here by an electromechanical ratio defined as the ratio of the OHC contraction to the transmembrane potential. This ratio has been measured in isolated cells to be approximately 26 nm/mV. We estimate the OHC electromechanical ratio in vivo from the recently measured displacements of the reticular lamina and the basilar membrane near the 19 kHz characteristic frequency in the basal region of guinea pig cochlea. Our analysis strongly suggests OHC electromotility process is effective for cochlear amplification in vivo at least around the characteristic frequency of the basal location in spite of the low-pass filtering.

  17. Organic Matter in the Outer Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruiskshank, Dale P.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Many solid bodies in the outer Solar System are covered with ices of various compositions, including water, carbon dioxide, methane, nitrogen, and other molecules that are solid at the low temperatures that prevail there. These ices have all been detected by remote sensing observations made with telescopes on Earth, or more recently, spacecraft in orbit (notably Galileo at Jupiter). The data also reveal other solid materials that could be minerals or complex carbon-bearing organic molecules. A study in progress using large ground-based telescopes to acquire infrared spectroscopic data, and laboratory results on the optical properties of complex organic matter, seeks to identify the non-icy materials on several satellites of Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. The work on the satellites of Saturn is in part preparatory to the Cassini spacecraft investigation of the Saturn system, which will begin in 2004 and extend for four years.

  18. ONE-DIMENSIONAL ACCELERATOR IN PULSAR OUTER MAGNETOSPHERE REVISITED

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, G. F.; Zhang, L.

    2009-07-10

    We re-examine the one-dimensional (1D) vacuum and nonvacuum accelerators in the outer magnetosphere of rotation-powered pulsars by considering the limit of trans-field height through pair-production process. In the original 1D nonvacuum outer gap model, both the Poisson equation for electrical potential and the Boltzmann equations of particles and gamma-rays are solved self-consistently by assuming the trans-field height as a free parameter, usually resulting in a narrow outer gap (i.e., gap length along magnetic field lines is short). In the modified 1D nonvacuum outer gap model, two improvements have been made: the trans-field height is limited by photon-photon pair production process and the outer boundary of the outer gap can be extended outside the light cylinder. Under the above assumptions, we self-consistently solve the Poisson equation for electrical potential, and the Boltzmann equations of electrons/positrons and gamma-rays in both vacuum and nonvacuum outer gaps for the parameters of both Vela and Geminga pulsars. We obtain an approximate geometry of the outer gap, i.e., the trans-field height is limited by the pair-production process and increases with the radial distance to the star, and the width of the outer gap starts at the inner boundary (near the null charge surface in the vacuum case) and ends at the outer boundary which is located inside or outside the light cylinder depending on the inclination angle. Our calculated results also indicate that gamma-ray spectrum from a wide outer gap is flatter than the one from a narrow outer gap and the relation between the electric field and trans-field height has an important effect on the structure of the outer gap.

  19. Closed-shell and open-shell 2D nanographenes.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhe; Wu, Jishan

    2014-01-01

    This chapter describes a series of two-dimensional (2D) expanded arene networks, also known as nanographenes, with either closed-shell or open-shell electronic structure in the ground state. These systems are further categorized into three classes on a basis of different edge structures: those with zigzag edges only, those with armchair edges only, and those possessing both. Distinctive physical properties of these 2D aromatic systems are closely related to their structural characteristics and provide great potential for them as materials for different applications.

  20. The Outer Planetary Mission Design Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benfield, Michael; Turner, M. W.

    2010-10-01

    With the recent focus from the planetary science community on the outer planets of the solar system, The University of Alabama in Huntsville Integrated Product Team program is embarking on a new challenge to develop an outer planetary mission for the academic year 2010-2011. Currently four bodies are of interest for this mission: Titan, Europa, Triton, and Enceledus, with one body being chosen by the instructors by the beginning of the fall semester. This project will use the 2010 Discovery Announcement of Opportunity as its Request for Proposal (RFP). All of the teams competing in this project will use the AO to respond with a proposal to the instructors for their proposed mission and spacecraft concept. The project employs the two-semester design sequence of the IPT program to provide a framework for the development of this mission. This sequence is divided into four phases. Phase 1 - Requirements Development - focuses on the development of both the scientific and engineering requirements of the mission. During this phase the teams work very closely with the PI organization, represented by the College of Charleston. Phase 2 - Team Formation and Architecture Development - concentrates on the assessment of the overall mission architecture from the launch vehicle to the ground operations of the proposed spacecraft. Phase 3 - System Definition - provides for spacecraft subsystem trade studies and further refinement of the specific spacecraft to meet the scientific requirements and objectives developed in Phase 1. Phase 4 - Design - is the phase where the engineers provide the spacecraft design that is required for the mission of interest. At the conclusion of Phases 2 and 4, an external review board evaluates the proposed designs and chooses one winner of the competition.

  1. Is the Outer Solar System Really Chaotic?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Wayne B.

    2006-09-01

    The existence of chaos among the system of Jovian planets (Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune) is not yet firmly established. Although Laskar originally found no chaos in the outer Solar System, his "averaged" integrations did not account for the possibility of mean-motion resonances. Once full n-body integrations were performed, a dichotomy arose. On one hand, many investigators (Sussman, Wisdom, Murray, Holman, among many others) consistently measured a Lyapunov time of between 5 and 12 million years in the outer Solar System; the chaos can even be explained as the overlap of three-body resonances (Murray + Holman, Science 283, 1999). Furthermore, Murray + Holman's theory has been recently corroborated across a wide range of system parameters (Guzzo 2005), and the chaos does not disappear with decreasing timestep. On the other hand, some other investigators (Newman, Grazier, and Varadi, among several others) have compelling evidence against chaos. Namely, they have convincingly demonstrated that a sympletic integration using the famous Wisdom + Holman (1992) symplectic mapping with a 400-day timestep reproduces the chaos seen by others, but that the chaos disappears and the orbit converges to being regular as the timestep decreases. Their integration remains regular, showing beautiful convergence with decreasing timestep, down to a 2 day timestep. The resolution of this apparent paradox is simple. The orbital positions of the Jovian planets is known only to a few parts in 107, and it turns out that within that observational error ball, there exist both chaotic and regular solutions. I will demonstrate this fact using several initial conditions and several accurate integration algorithms. Thus, whether a particular investigator will see chaos or not depends (essentially randomly) upon the details of how that investigator draws their initial conditions. Thus, some investigators legitimately find chaos, while others legitimately find no chaos.

  2. FBL Outer Can Welder Acquisition Software

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Susan L.

    2004-01-16

    The Outer Can Welder Data Acquisition Software (OCWDAS) was originally developed by SRTC for use at Hanford to assist in the storage of their excess plutonium in the DOE standard 3013 containers until it can be properly dispositioned using one of the approved DOE methods. After Hanford OCWDAS software was the starting point for the new version developed for FB-Line. New graphical display formats and features were added to this software to make it more robust and operator friendly. Several hardware changes were also made at this time and the software was modified to accommodate these as well. During the welding process, critical weld parameters such as weld current and voltage, can give valuable information about the weld. In the past, weld data from the TIG welding process, such as the bagless transfer system in FB-Line, has been monitored using strip chart recorders. The data from the weld process, recorded on the strip chart recorder traces, are reviewed to analyze the weld. The OCWDAS improves this technology by digitizing the weld data which allows for automation of the analysis process. The OCWDAS performs the necessary functions to perform the data acquisition functions during the 3013 Outer Can Welding Process. It is important to monitor the critical weld parameters, current and voltage, during a weld as they can be used to set acceptance criteria for weld acceptance. The software monitors and records the weld current, voltage, and RPM data. It also records the absolute position of the weld head during the weld process from a quadrature encoder. Digital handshaking between the AMI Welding unit and the OCWDAS ensure that both systems are operational and ready prior to the weld initiation taking place.

  3. Lateral interactions in the outer retina.

    PubMed

    Thoreson, Wallace B; Mangel, Stuart C

    2012-09-01

    Lateral interactions in the outer retina, particularly negative feedback from horizontal cells to cones and direct feed-forward input from horizontal cells to bipolar cells, play a number of important roles in early visual processing, such as generating center-surround receptive fields that enhance spatial discrimination. These circuits may also contribute to post-receptoral light adaptation and the generation of color opponency. In this review, we examine the contributions of horizontal cell feedback and feed-forward pathways to early visual processing. We begin by reviewing the properties of bipolar cell receptive fields, especially with respect to modulation of the bipolar receptive field surround by the ambient light level and to the contribution of horizontal cells to the surround. We then review evidence for and against three proposed mechanisms for negative feedback from horizontal cells to cones: 1) GABA release by horizontal cells, 2) ephaptic modulation of the cone pedicle membrane potential generated by currents flowing through hemigap junctions in horizontal cell dendrites, and 3) modulation of cone calcium currents (I(Ca)) by changes in synaptic cleft proton levels. We also consider evidence for the presence of direct horizontal cell feed-forward input to bipolar cells and discuss a possible role for GABA at this synapse. We summarize proposed functions of horizontal cell feedback and feed-forward pathways. Finally, we examine the mechanisms and functions of two other forms of lateral interaction in the outer retina: negative feedback from horizontal cells to rods and positive feedback from horizontal cells to cones.

  4. Outer Planet Mission Studies Neptune Aerocapture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wercinski, Paul F.; Langhoff, Steven R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Current and previous studies of orbiter missions to the outer planets have clearly identified high-energy aerocapture as a critical and enabling technology. Aerocapture involves the use of aerodynamic lift to fly a trajectory through a planet's atmosphere to sufficiently decelerate an entry vehicle to capture into planetary orbit. In the past, numerous studies of different configurations of lifting entry vehicles were studied for various planetary orbiter missions which identified aerocapture as a feasible concept yet complex and technically challenging. In order to determine the feasibility of high-speed aerocapture at the outer planets, an accurate trajectory simulation of the flight vehicle is the critical first step in the proposed research. Vehicle response to aerodynamic loading must be predicted accurately in the trajectory simulations. For several Neptune orbiter missions currently under study at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), entry velocities relative to the rotating atmosphere ranging from 25 to 30 km/sec, are to be expected. Preliminary trajectory analysis has identified the various flow regimes the entry vehicle is expected to fly in the 8 1% H2 and 19% He atmosphere of Neptune. The size and mass of the vehicle are also determined by the launch vehicle constraints and orbiter spacecraft requirements. For a given baseline arrival conditions of an inertial entry velocity of 28 km/sec and an entry mass of 400 kg, a medium lift (L/D = 1), axisymmetric biconic shaped vehicle was selected in order to satisfy entry corridor width requirements expected for Neptune aerocapture. The analysis summarized in this study indicates that a biconic entry vehicle is a feasible concept for a Neptune aerocapture orbiter mission. The preliminary entry trajectory simulations has demonstrated adequate entry corridor control authority. Furthermore, estimates of the stagnation point heating environment has enabled the preliminary selection of candidate lightweight ceramic

  5. Nuclear Electric Propulsion for Outer Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barret, Chris

    2003-01-01

    Today we know of 66 moons in our very own Solar System, and many of these have atmospheres and oceans. In addition, the Hubble (optical) Space Telescope has helped us to discover a total of 100 extra-solar planets, i.e., planets going around other suns, including several solar systems. The Chandra (X-ray) Space Telescope has helped us to discover 33 Black Holes. There are some extremely fascinating things out there in our Universe to explore. In order to travel greater distances into our Universe, and to reach planetary bodies in our Solar System in much less time, new and innovative space propulsion systems must be developed. To this end NASA has created the Prometheus Program. When one considers space missions to the outer edges of our Solar System and far beyond, our Sun cannot be relied on to produce the required spacecraft (s/c) power. Solar energy diminishes as the square of the distance from the Sun. At Mars it is only 43% of that at Earth. At Jupiter, it falls off to only 3.6% of Earth's. By the time we get out to Pluto, solar energy is only .066% what it is on Earth. Therefore, beyond the orbit of Mars, it is not practical to depend on solar power for a s/c. However, the farther out we go the more power we need to heat the s/c and to transmit data back to Earth over the long distances. On Earth, knowledge is power. In the outer Solar System, power is knowledge. It is important that the public be made aware of the tremendous space benefits offered by Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) and the minimal risk it poses to our environment. This paper presents an overview of the reasons for NEP systems, along with their basic components including the reactor, power conversion units (both static and dynamic), electric thrusters, and the launch safety of the NEP system.

  6. Lateral interactions in the outer retina

    PubMed Central

    Thoreson, Wallace B.; Mangel, Stuart C.

    2012-01-01

    Lateral interactions in the outer retina, particularly negative feedback from horizontal cells to cones and direct feed-forward input from horizontal cells to bipolar cells, play a number of important roles in early visual processing, such as generating center-surround receptive fields that enhance spatial discrimination. These circuits may also contribute to post-receptoral light adaptation and the generation of color opponency. In this review, we examine the contributions of horizontal cell feedback and feed-forward pathways to early visual processing. We begin by reviewing the properties of bipolar cell receptive fields, especially with respect to modulation of the bipolar receptive field surround by the ambient light level and to the contribution of horizontal cells to the surround. We then review evidence for and against three proposed mechanisms for negative feedback from horizontal cells to cones: 1) GABA release by horizontal cells, 2) ephaptic modulation of the cone pedicle membrane potential generated by currents flowing through hemigap junctions in horizontal cell dendrites, and 3) modulation of cone calcium currents (ICa) by changes in synaptic cleft proton levels. We also consider evidence for the presence of direct horizontal cell feed-forward input to bipolar cells and discuss a possible role for GABA at this synapse. We summarize proposed functions of horizontal cell feedback and feed-forward pathways. Finally, we examine the mechanisms and functions of two other forms of lateral interaction in the outer retina: negative feedback from horizontal cells to rods and positive feedback from horizontal cells to cones. PMID:22580106

  7. How quickly, how deeply, and how strongly can dynamical outer boundary conditions impact Van Allen radiation belt morphology?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Ian R.; Ozeke, Louis G.

    2016-06-01

    Here we examine the speed, strength, and depth of the coupling between dynamical variations of ultrarelativistic electron flux at the outer boundary and that in the heart of the outer radiation belt. Using ULF wave radial diffusion as an exemplar, we show how changing boundary conditions can completely change belt morphology even under conditions of identical wave power. In the case of ULF wave radial diffusion, the temporal dynamics of a new source population or a sink of electron flux at the outer plasma sheet boundary can generate a completely opposite response which reaches deep into the belt under identical ULF wave conditions. Very significantly, here we show that such coupling can occur on timescales much faster than previously thought. We show that even on timescales ~1 h, changes in the outer boundary electron population can dramatically alter the radiation belt flux in the heart of the belt. Importantly, these flux changes can at times occur on timescales much faster than the L shell revisit time obtained from elliptically orbiting satellites such as the Van Allen Probes. We underline the importance of such boundary condition effects when seeking to identify the physical processes which explain the dominant behavior of the Van Allen belts. Overall, we argue in general that the importance of temporal changes in the boundary conditions is sometimes overlooked in comparison to the pursuit of (ever) increasingly accurate estimates of wave power and other wave properties used in empirical representations of wave transport and diffusion rates.

  8. Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera near-infrared features in the outer parts of S4G galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laine, Seppo; Knapen, Johan H.; Muñoz-Mateos, Juan-Carlos; Kim, Taehyun; Comerón, Sébastien; Martig, Marie; Holwerda, Benne W.; Athanassoula, E.; Bosma, Albert; Johansson, Peter H.; Erroz-Ferrer, Santiago; Gadotti, Dimitri A.; Gil de Paz, Armando; Hinz, Joannah; Laine, Jarkko; Laurikainen, Eija; Menéndez-Delmestre, Karín; Mizusawa, Trisha; Regan, Michael W.; Salo, Heikki; Sheth, Kartik; Seibert, Mark; Buta, Ronald J.; Cisternas, Mauricio; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Elmegreen, Debra M.; Ho, Luis C.; Madore, Barry F.; Zaritsky, Dennis

    2014-11-01

    We present a catalogue and images of visually detected features, such as asymmetries, extensions, warps, shells, tidal tails, polar rings, and obvious signs of mergers or interactions, in the faint outer regions (at and outside of R25) of nearby galaxies. This catalogue can be used in future quantitative studies that examine galaxy evolution due to internal and external factors. We are able to reliably detect outer region features down to a brightness level of 0.03 MJy sr-1 pixel-1 at 3.6 μm in the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S4G). We also tabulate companion galaxies. We find asymmetries in the outer isophotes in 22 ± 1 per cent of the sample. The asymmetry fraction does not correlate with galaxy classification as an interacting galaxy or merger remnant, or with the presence of companions. We also compare the detected features to similar features in galaxies taken from cosmological zoom re-simulations. The simulated images have a higher fraction (33 per cent) of outer disc asymmetries, which may be due to selection effects and an uncertain star formation threshold in the models. The asymmetries may have either an internal (e.g. lopsidedness due to dark halo asymmetry) or external origin.

  9. Suzaku Detection of Diffuse Hard X-Ray Emission Outside Vela X

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katsuda, Satoru; Mori, Koji; Petre, Robert; Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Bocchino, Fabrizio; Bamba, Aya; Miceli, Marco; Hewitt, John W.; Temim, Tea; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Yoshii, Rie

    2011-01-01

    Vela X is a large, 3 deg x 2 deg, radio-emitting pulsar wind nebula (PWN) powered by the Vela pulsar in the Vela supernova remnant. Using four Suzaku/XIS observations pointed just outside Vela X, we find hard X-ray emission extending throughout the fields of view. The hard X-ray spectra are well represented by a power-law. The photon index is measured to be constant at Gamma approximates 2.4, similar to that of the southern outer part of Vela X. The power-law flux decreases with increasing distance from the pulsar. These properties lead us to propose that the hard X-ray emission is associated with the Vela PWN. The larger X-ray extension found in this work strongly suggests that distinct populations relativistic electrons form the X-ray PWN and Vela X, as was recently inferred from multiwavelength spectral modeling of Vela X.

  10. Hard x-ray and hot electron environment in vacuum hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, J.W.; Suter, L.J.; Landen, O.L.; Foster, J.M.; Celeste, J.R.; Holder, J.P.; Dewald, E.L.; Schneider, M.B.; Hinkel, D.E.; Kauffman, R.L.; Atherton, L.J.; Bonanno, R.E.; Dixit, S.N.; Eder, D.C.; Haynam, C.A.; Kalantar, D.H.; Koniges, A.E.; Lee, F.D.; MacGowan, B.J.; Manes, K.R.

    2006-03-15

    Time resolved hard x-ray images (hv>9 keV) and time integrated hard x-ray spectra (hv=18-150 keV) from vacuum hohlraums irradiated with four 351 nm wavelength National Ignition Facility [J. A. Paisner, E. M. Campbell, and W. J. Hogan, Fusion Technol. 26, 755 (1994)] laser beams are presented as a function of hohlraum size, laser power, and duration. The hard x-ray images and spectra provide insight into the time evolution of the hohlraum plasma filling and the production of hot electrons. The fraction of laser energy detected as hot electrons (F{sub hot}) shows a correlation with laser intensity and with an empirical hohlraum plasma filling model. In addition, the significance of Au K-alpha emission and Au K-shell reabsorption observed in some of the bremsstrahlung dominated spectra is discussed.

  11. Low Temperature Processing of Core-Shell Baroplastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez Leon, Juan A.

    2005-03-01

    Baroplastics are nanophase materials that exhibit the ability to flow and be molded under pressure at reduced temperatures. Core-shell nanoparticle baroplastics comprised of one soft component, such as poly(butyl acrylate), and one glassy component, such as polystyrene, were synthesized by miniemulsion polymerization and processed at temperature as low as 25^oC by compression molding and extrusion. The resulting specimens are clear and well-defined solid objects with a diverse range of mechanical properties depending on composition, ranging from tough, rigid materials to rubbery materials comparable to commercial thermoplastic elastomers. SANS and DSC measurements on the core-shell materials before and after processing reveal pressure induced partial mixing of the hard and soft components, while TEM studies show that the core-shell morphology is substantially retained, even after 20 reprocessing cycles. Mechanical properties of the processed samples were measured to elucidate the effects of processing pressure and temperature and to isolate the role of the pressure-induced miscibility.

  12. Modified conventional hard gelatin capsules as fast disintegrating dosage form in the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Ciper, Mesut; Bodmeier, Roland

    2006-02-01

    Fast disintegrating capsules for administration in the oral cavity were prepared either by perforation or by vacuum-drying of conventional hard capsules. When compared to other fast disintegrating dosage forms (e.g. lyophilized sponges or tablets), these capsules have various advantages, in particular, a high drug loading capacity and no compression steps. The disintegration time of conventional hard gelatin capsules (HGC) was reduced from 91 to 39 s by introducing 6-10 small holes (diameter =25-50 microm) into the capsule shell. Vacuum-drying of conventional hard gelatin capsules resulted in brittle capsules, which broke rapidly in the oral cavity. The brittleness of the hard gelatin capsules correlated well with their moisture content. The critical moisture value for sufficient brittleness of hard gelatin capsules was <4% w/w. In contrast, HPMC capsules remained flexible, even at low moisture content. The moisture uptake of various capsule fillers was in the order of Avicel PH101 > lactose > Avicel PH112 > or = mannitol. Hard gelatin capsules filled with mannitol and packaged in bottles with silica gel kept their desired brittleness during 6 months storage at various relative humidities.

  13. Influence of the shell thickness and charge distribution on the effective interaction between two like-charged hollow spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelescu, Daniel G.; Caragheorgheopol, Dan

    2015-10-01

    The mean-force and the potential of the mean force between two like-charged spherical shells were investigated in the salt-free limit using the primitive model and Monte Carlo simulations. Apart from an angular homogeneous distribution, a discrete charge distribution where point charges localized on the shell outer surface followed an icosahedral arrangement was considered. The electrostatic coupling of the model system was altered by the presence of mono-, trivalent counterions or small dendrimers, each one bearing a net charge of 9 e. We analyzed in detail how the shell thickness and the radial and angular distribution of the shell charges influenced the effective interaction between the shells. We found a sequence of the potential of the mean force similar to the like-charged filled spheres, ranging from long-range purely repulsive to short-range purely attractive as the electrostatic coupling increased. Both types of potentials were attenuated and an attractive-to-repulsive transition occurred in the presence of trivalent counterions as a result of (i) thinning the shell or (ii) shifting the shell charge from the outer towards the inner surface. The potential of the mean force became more attractive with the icosahedrally symmetric charge model, and additionally, at least one shell tended to line up with 5-fold symmetry axis along the longest axis of the simulation box at the maximum attraction. The results provided a basic framework of understanding the non-specific electrostatic origin of the agglomeration and long-range assembly of the viral nanoparticles.

  14. Oxygen isotope variability within Nautilus shell growth bands

    DOE PAGES

    Linzmeier, Benjamin J.; Kozdon, Reinhard; Peters, Shanan E.; ...

    2016-04-21

    Nautilus is often used as an analogue for the ecology and behavior of extinct externally shelled cephalopods. Nautilus shell grows quickly, has internal growth banding, and is widely believed to precipitate aragonite in oxygen isotope equilibrium with seawater. Pieces of shell from a wild-caught Nautilus macromphalus from New Caledonia and from a Nautilus belauensis reared in an aquarium were cast in epoxy, polished, and then imaged. Growth bands were visible in the outer prismatic layer of both shells. The thicknesses of the bands are consistent with previously reported daily growth rates measured in aquarium reared individuals. In situ analysis ofmore » oxygen isotope ratios using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) with 10 μm beam-spot size reveals inter- and intra-band δ18O variation. In the wild-caught sample, a traverse crosscutting 45 growth bands yielded δ18O values ranging 2.5‰, from +0.9 to -1.6 ‰ (VPDB), a range that is larger than that observed in many serial sampling of entire shells by conventional methods. The maximum range within a single band (~32 μm) was 1.5‰, and 27 out of 41 bands had a range larger than instrumental precision (±2 SD = 0.6‰). The results from the wild individual suggest depth migration is recorded by the shell, but are not consistent with a simple sinusoidal, diurnal depth change pattern. In addition, to create the observed range of δ18O, however, this Nautilus must have traversed a temperature gradient of at least ~12°C, corresponding to approximately 400 m depth change. Isotopic variation was also measured in the aquarium-reared sample, but the pattern within and between bands likely reflects evaporative enrichment arising from a weekly cycle of refill and replacement of the aquarium water. Overall, this work suggests that depth migration behavior in ancient nektonic mollusks could be elucidated by SIMS analysis across individual growth bands.« less

  15. Warren G. Harding and the Press.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitaker, W. Richard

    There are many parallels between the Richard M. Nixon administration and Warren G. Harding's term: both Republicans, both touched by scandal, and both having a unique relationship with the press. But in Harding's case the relationship was a positive one. One of Harding's first official acts as president was to restore the regular White House news…

  16. 30 CFR 56.15002 - Hard hats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hard hats. 56.15002 Section 56.15002 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Personal Protection § 56.15002 Hard hats. All persons shall wear suitable hard hats when in or around a mine or plant where falling...

  17. 30 CFR 57.15002 - Hard hats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hard hats. 57.15002 Section 57.15002 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... Underground § 57.15002 Hard hats. All persons shall wear suitable hard hats when in or around a mine or...

  18. 7 CFR 201.21 - Hard seed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hard seed. 201.21 Section 201.21 Agriculture..., Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Labeling Agricultural Seeds § 201.21 Hard seed. The label shall show the percentage of hard...

  19. 7 CFR 201.30 - Hard seed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hard seed. 201.30 Section 201.30 Agriculture..., Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Labeling Vegetable Seeds § 201.30 Hard seed. The label shall show the percentage of hard seed,...

  20. 7 CFR 201.57 - Hard seeds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS Germination Tests in the Administration of the Act § 201.57 Hard seeds. Seeds which remain hard at..., are to be counted as “hard seed.” If at the end of the germination period provided for legumes, okra... percentage of germination. For flatpea, continue the swollen seed in test for 14 days when germinating at...

  1. 7 CFR 201.57 - Hard seeds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS Germination Tests in the Administration of the Act § 201.57 Hard seeds. Seeds which remain hard at..., are to be counted as “hard seed.” If at the end of the germination period provided for legumes, okra... percentage of germination. For flatpea, continue the swollen seed in test for 14 days when germinating at...

  2. 7 CFR 201.57 - Hard seeds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS Germination Tests in the Administration of the Act § 201.57 Hard seeds. Seeds which remain hard at..., are to be counted as “hard seed.” If at the end of the germination period provided for legumes, okra... percentage of germination. For flatpea, continue the swollen seed in test for 14 days when germinating at...

  3. 7 CFR 201.57 - Hard seeds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS Germination Tests in the Administration of the Act § 201.57 Hard seeds. Seeds which remain hard at..., are to be counted as “hard seed.” If at the end of the germination period provided for legumes, okra... percentage of germination. For flatpea, continue the swollen seed in test for 14 days when germinating at...

  4. 7 CFR 201.57 - Hard seeds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS Germination Tests in the Administration of the Act § 201.57 Hard seeds. Seeds which remain hard at..., are to be counted as “hard seed.” If at the end of the germination period provided for legumes, okra... percentage of germination. For flatpea, continue the swollen seed in test for 14 days when germinating at...

  5. Plastic buckling of cylindrical shells

    SciTech Connect

    Bandyopadhyay, K.; Xu, J.; Shteyngart, S.; Eckert, H.

    1994-05-01

    Cylindrical shells exhibit buckling under axial loads at stresses much less than the respective theoretical critical stresses. This is due primarily to the presence of geometrical imperfections even through such imperfections could be very small (e.g., comparable to thickness). Under internal pressure, the shell regains some of its buckling strength. For a relatively large radius-to-tickness ratio and low internal pressure, the effect can be reasonably estimated by an elastic analysis. However, for low radius-to-thickness ratios and greater pressures, the elastic-plastic collapse controls the failure load. In order to quantify the elastic-plastic buckling capacity of cylindrical shells, an analysis program was carried out by use of the computer code BOSOR5 developed by Bushnell of Lockheed Missiles and Space company. The analysis was performed for various radius-to- thickness ratios and imperfection amplitudes. The analysis results are presented in this paper.

  6. Asymptotic safety goes on shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedetti, Dario

    2012-01-01

    It is well known in quantum field theory that the off-shell effective action depends on the gauge choice and field parametrization used in calculating it. Nevertheless, the typical scheme in which the scenario of asymptotically safe gravity is investigated is an off-shell version of the functional renormalization group equation. Working with the Einstein-Hilbert truncation as a test bed, we develop a new scheme for the analysis of asymptotically safe gravity in which the on-shell part of the effective action is singled out and we show that the beta function for the essential coupling has no explicit gauge dependence. In order to reach our goal, we introduce several technical novelties, including a different decomposition of the metric fluctuations, a new implementation of the ghost sector and a new cut-off scheme. We find a nontrivial fixed point, with a value of the cosmological constant that is independent of the gauge-fixing parameters.

  7. Outer Radiation Belt Dropout Dynamics Following the Arrival of Two Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alves, L. R.; Da Silva, L. A.; Souza, V. M.; Sibeck, D. G.; Jauer, P. R.; Vieira, L. E. A.; Walsh, B. M.; Silveira, M. V. D.; Marchezi, J. P.; Rockenbach, M.; Del Lago, A.; Mendes, O.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Koga, D.; Kanekal, S. G.; Baker, D. N.; Wygant, J. R.; Kletzing, C. A.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetopause shadowing and wave-particle interactions are recognized as the two primary mechanisms for losses of electrons from the outer radiation belt. We investigate these mechanisms, sing satellite observations both in interplanetary space and within the magnetosphere and particle drift modeling. Two interplanetary shocks sheaths impinged upon the magnetopause causing a relativistic electron flux dropout. The magnetic cloud (C) and interplanetary structure sunward of the MC had primarily northward magnetic field, perhaps leading to a concomitant lack of substorm activity and a 10 day long quiescent period. The arrival of two shocks caused an unusual electron flux dropout. Test-particle simulations have shown 2 to 5 MeV energy, equatorially mirroring electrons with initial values of L 5.5can be lost to the magnetosheath via magnetopause shadowing alone. For electron losses at lower L-shells, coherent chorus wave-driven pitch angle scattering and ULF wave-driven radial transport have been shownto be viable mechanisms.

  8. Thermodynamic stability in elastic systems: Hard spheres embedded in a finite spherical elastic solid.

    PubMed

    Solano-Altamirano, J M; Goldman, Saul

    2015-12-01

    We determined the total system elastic Helmholtz free energy, under the constraints of constant temperature and volume, for systems comprised of one or more perfectly bonded hard spherical inclusions (i.e. "hard spheres") embedded in a finite spherical elastic solid. Dirichlet boundary conditions were applied both at the surface(s) of the hard spheres, and at the outer surface of the elastic solid. The boundary conditions at the surface of the spheres were used to describe the rigid displacements of the spheres, relative to their initial location(s) in the unstressed initial state. These displacements, together with the initial positions, provided the final shape of the strained elastic solid. The boundary conditions at the outer surface of the elastic medium were used to ensure constancy of the system volume. We determined the strain and stress tensors numerically, using a method that combines the Neuber-Papkovich spherical harmonic decomposition, the Schwartz alternating method, and Least-squares for determining the spherical harmonic expansion coefficients. The total system elastic Helmholtz free energy was determined by numerically integrating the elastic Helmholtz free energy density over the volume of the elastic solid, either by a quadrature, or a Monte Carlo method, or both. Depending on the initial position of the hard sphere(s) (or equivalently, the shape of the un-deformed stress-free elastic solid), and the displacements, either stationary or non-stationary Helmholtz free energy minima were found. The non-stationary minima, which involved the hard spheres nearly in contact with one another, corresponded to lower Helmholtz free energies, than did the stationary minima, for which the hard spheres were further away from one another.

  9. Fault tolerant, radiation hard, high performance digital signal processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmann, Edgar; Linscott, Ivan R.; Maurer, Michael J.; Tyler, G. L.; Libby, Vibeke

    1990-01-01

    An architecture has been developed for a high-performance VLSI digital signal processor that is highly reliable, fault-tolerant, and radiation-hard. The signal processor, part of a spacecraft receiver designed to support uplink radio science experiments at the outer planets, organizes the connections between redundant arithmetic resources, register files, and memory through a shuffle exchange communication network. The configuration of the network and the state of the processor resources are all under microprogram control, which both maps the resources according to algorithmic needs and reconfigures the processing should a failure occur. In addition, the microprogram is reloadable through the uplink to accommodate changes in the science objectives throughout the course of the mission. The processor will be implemented with silicon compiler tools, and its design will be verified through silicon compilation simulation at all levels from the resources to full functionality. By blending reconfiguration with redundancy the processor implementation is fault-tolerant and reliable, and possesses the long expected lifetime needed for a spacecraft mission to the outer planets.

  10. Shell disturbances and butyltins burden in commercial bivalves collected from the Bizerta lagoon (northern Tunisia).

    PubMed

    Kefi, Ferdaous Jaafar; Lahbib, Youssef; Abdallah, Lamia Gargouri Ben; El Menif, Najoua Trigui

    2012-11-01

    Shell disturbances and soft tissues butyltin burden were investigated in commercial bivalves Lithophaga lithophaga, Mytilus galloprovincialis, Solen marginatus and Crassostrea gigas from the Bizerta lagoon. Shell disturbances were found in all bivalves, being scarce in S. marginatus. In the internal valve of L. lithophaga, burrowing annelids and sipunculids living inside galleries were observed, while in the external valve, brown-blackish or white stains were found. In M. galloprovincialis, a yellowish mass located at the shell anterior side was found fixed firmly to the pearly layer by a hard brownish structure covering some annelid elliptic eggs. In the internal shell layer of some specimens collected in April, embryos belonging to tubiculous annelids at various developmental stages were observed. In C. gigas, shell thickening was revealed in some specimens corresponding to white doughy deposits at the internal valve and between shell layers. In S. marginatus, only one specimen showing a cavity at the posterior site was found. Total butyltin concentrations in the studied bivalves varied between 30 and 245 ng/g dry weight with tributyltin (TBT) being the predominant compound. The highest concentration was recorded in L. lithophaga collected from the Bizerta Bay and the lowest concentration in S. marginatus from Maghraoua. This study provided baseline data that could serve for long-term monitoring of TBT pollution in Tunisia, since legislation to reduce the use of TBT-based antifouling paints has not been introduced yet.

  11. Assessing the utility of elemental ratios as a paleotemperature proxy in shells of patelloid limpets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graniero, Lauren; Surge, Donna; Gillikin, David

    2015-04-01

    Archaeological shell and fish middens are rich sources of paleoenvironmental proxy data. Carbonate hard part remains contained in such deposits have been used as archives of coastal marine climate and human-climate interactions. Oxygen isotope records from fast-growing limpet shells potentially capture summer and winter seasons, and thus, approach the full seasonal range of sea surface temperature (SST). Fast-growing shells are often short-lived, providing "snap-shots" of multi-year seasonal cycles. Patelloid limpet shells are common constituents in archaeological middens found along European, African, and South American coastlines. Oxygen isotope ratios of archaeological limpet shells from the genus, Patella, have been used to reconstruct seasonal SST and ocean circulation patterns during the Late Quaternary. Such studies depend on the ability to constrain the oxygen isotope ratio of seawater; therefore, alternative proxies are necessary for coastal localities where this is not possible. Elemental ratios (e.g., Sr/Ca, Mg/Ca) have been used as paleotemperature proxies in corals and foraminifera with varying degrees of success and appear problematic in bivalves. Here, we test whether such elemental ratios are useful as an alternative SST proxy in patelloid limpet shells.

  12. Two-shell collisions in the gamma-ray burst afterglow phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasis, A.; van Eerten, H. J.; Meliani, Z.; Keppens, R.

    2011-07-01

    Strong optical and radio flares often appear in the afterglow phase of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). It has been proposed that colliding ultrarelativistic shells can produce these flares. Such consecutive shells can be formed due to the variability in the central source of a GRB. We perform high-resolution 1D numerical simulations of late collisions between two ultrarelativistic shells in order to explore these events. We examine the case where a cold uniform shell collides with a self-similar Blandford & McKee shell in a constant density environment and consider cases with different Lorentz factor and energy for the uniform shell. We produce the corresponding on-axis light curves and emission images for the afterglow phase and examine the occurrence of optical and radio flares, assuming a spherical explosion and a hard-edged jet scenario. For our simulations, we use the Adaptive Mesh Refinement version of the Versatile Advection Code coupled to a linear radiative transfer code to calculate synchrotron emission. We find steeply rising flares like the behaviour of small jet opening angles and more gradual rebrightenings for large opening angles. Synchrotron self-absorption is found to strongly influence the onset and shape of the radio flare.

  13. Process for overcoming drug retention in hard gelatin inhalation capsules.

    PubMed

    Saim, Said; Horhota, Stephen T

    2002-07-01

    The quantity and consistency of drug delivery from dry powder inhalation devices that incorporate a pre-measured dose in a hard shell capsule of gelatin or other compatible material can be negatively affected by mold release lubricants used in capsule manufacturing. This paper describes a novel process employing supercritical CO2 for selective extraction of the fraction of lubricant responsible for the observed high and inconsistent drug retention in capsules and the ensuing lack of reproducibility of drug delivery. The process allows for lubricant removal from seemingly inaccessible interior surfaces of assembled capsule shells without altering the structural or chemical properties of the capsules. Diffusion limitations are overcome through repeated pressure increase and decrease to generate significant convective flow of dissolved lubricant out of the capsule. Drug retention is alleviated only if nearly all the retentive fraction of the lubricant is removed. The effect of extraction with supercritical CO2 on the structure of the internal surfaces of the capsules is investigated using scanning electron microscopy. Key performance parameters such as drug and carrier retention and fine particle mass are investigated using simulated inhalation tests. Laboratory and pilot scale extractions yielded similar results.

  14. Glass shell manufacturing in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nolen, R. L., Jr.; Ebner, M. A.; Downs, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    A heat transfer model was developed that mathematically describes the heating and calculates the thermal history of a gel particle in free-fall through the furnace. The model parameters that greatly affect the calculations were found to be gel particle mass, geometry, specific heat, and furnace gas. Empirical testing of the model has commenced. The code calculations and the initial empirical testing results both indicate that the gel-to-shell transformation occurs early and rapidly in the thermal history of the gel particle, and that for current work the heat transfer rate is not a limitation in shell production.

  15. On Closed Shells in Nuclei

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Mayer, M. G.

    1948-02-01

    It has been suggested in the past that special numbers of neutrons or protons in the nucleus form a particularly stable configuration.{sup1} The complete evidence for this has never been summarized, nor is it generally recognized how convincing this evidence is. That 20 neutrons or protons (Ca{sup40}) form a closed shell is predicted by the Hartree model. A number of calculations support this fact.{sup2} These considerations will not be repeated here. In this paper, the experimental facts indicating a particular stability of shells of 50 and 82 protons and of 50, 82, and 126 neutrons will be listed.

  16. Shell may expand detergent alcohols

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-23

    Shell Chemical is studying plans to expand detergent alcohols capacity in the US, CW has learned. The company is considering adding capacity for about 80 million lbs/year. If the project is approved, it would be implemented at the company`s Geismar, LA site. Shell will make a final decision on whether to proceed with the project within six months. It has been rumored to be considering a capacity addition as a result of tightening supply of natural and synthetic detergent alcohols.

  17. Corrugated outer sheath gas-insulated transmission line

    DOEpatents

    Kemeny, George A.; Cookson, Alan H.

    1981-01-01

    A gas-insulated transmission line includes two transmission line sections each of which are formed of a corrugated outer housing enclosing an inner high-voltage conductor disposed therein, with insulating support means supporting the inner conductor within the outer housing and an insulating gas providing electrical insulation therebetween. The outer housings in each section have smooth end sections at the longitudinal ends thereof which are joined together by joining means which provide for a sealing fixed joint.

  18. The Hard Problem of Cooperation

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, Kimmo; Strimling, Pontus

    2012-01-01

    Based on individual variation in cooperative inclinations, we define the “hard problem of cooperation” as that of achieving high levels of cooperation in a group of non-cooperative types. Can the hard problem be solved by institutions with monitoring and sanctions? In a laboratory experiment we find that the answer is affirmative if the institution is imposed on the group but negative if development of the institution is left to the group to vote on. In the experiment, participants were divided into groups of either cooperative types or non-cooperative types depending on their behavior in a public goods game. In these homogeneous groups they repeatedly played a public goods game regulated by an institution that incorporated several of the key properties identified by Ostrom: operational rules, monitoring, rewards, punishments, and (in one condition) change of rules. When change of rules was not possible and punishments were set to be high, groups of both types generally abided by operational rules demanding high contributions to the common good, and thereby achieved high levels of payoffs. Under less severe rules, both types of groups did worse but non-cooperative types did worst. Thus, non-cooperative groups profited the most from being governed by an institution demanding high contributions and employing high punishments. Nevertheless, in a condition where change of rules through voting was made possible, development of the institution in this direction was more often voted down in groups of non-cooperative types. We discuss the relevance of the hard problem and fit our results into a bigger picture of institutional and individual determinants of cooperative behavior. PMID:22792282

  19. The hard problem of cooperation.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Kimmo; Strimling, Pontus

    2012-01-01

    Based on individual variation in cooperative inclinations, we define the "hard problem of cooperation" as that of achieving high levels of cooperation in a group of non-cooperative types. Can the hard problem be solved by institutions with monitoring and sanctions? In a laboratory experiment we find that the answer is affirmative if the institution is imposed on the group but negative if development of the institution is left to the group to vote on. In the experiment, participants were divided into groups of either cooperative types or non-cooperative types depending on their behavior in a public goods game. In these homogeneous groups they repeatedly played a public goods game regulated by an institution that incorporated several of the key properties identified by Ostrom: operational rules, monitoring, rewards, punishments, and (in one condition) change of rules. When change of rules was not possible and punishments were set to be high, groups of both types generally abided by operational rules demanding high contributions to the common good, and thereby achieved high levels of payoffs. Under less severe rules, both types of groups did worse but non-cooperative types did worst. Thus, non-cooperative groups profited the most from being governed by an institution demanding high contributions and employing high punishments. Nevertheless, in a condition where change of rules through voting was made possible, development of the institution in this direction was more often voted down in groups of non-cooperative types. We discuss the relevance of the hard problem and fit our results into a bigger picture of institutional and individual determinants of cooperative behavior.

  20. Magnetic dipole moment of a spherical shell with TRM acquired in a field of internal origin. [Thermoremanent Magnetization implications for lunar magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srnka, L. J.

    1976-01-01

    The acquisition of thermoremanent magnetization (TRM) by a cooling spherical shell is studied for internal magnetizing dipole fields, using Runcorn's (1975) theorems on magnetostatics. If the shell cools progressively inward, inner regions acquire TRM in a net field composed of the dipole source term plus a uniform field due to the outer magnetized layers. In this case, the global dipole moment and external remanent field are nonzero when the whole shell has cooled below the Curie point and the source dipole has disappeared. The remanent field outside the shell is found to depend on the thickness, radii, and cooling rate of the shell, as well as the coefficient of TRM and the intensity of the magnetizing field. Some implications for the moon's remanent dipole moment are discussed.

  1. Radiation Hardness Assurance (RHA) Guideline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campola, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Radiation Hardness Assurance (RHA) consists of all activities undertaken to ensure that the electronics and materials of a space system perform to their design specifications after exposure to the mission space environment. The subset of interests for NEPP and the REAG, are EEE parts. It is important to register that all of these undertakings are in a feedback loop and require constant iteration and updating throughout the mission life. More detail can be found in the reference materials on applicable test data for usage on parts.

  2. Radiation hard electronics for LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymond, M.; Millmore, M.; Hall, G.; Sachdeva, R.; French, M.; Nygård, E.; Yoshioka, K.

    1995-02-01

    A CMOS front end electronics chain is being developed by the RD20 collaboration for microstrip detector readout at LHC. It is based on a preamplifier and CR-RC filter, analogue pipeline and an analogue signal processor. Amplifiers and transistor test structures have been constructed and evaluated in detail using a Harris 1.2 μm radiation hardened CMOS process. Progress with larger scale elements, including 32 channel front end chips, is described. A radiation hard 128 channel chip, with a 40 MHz analogue multiplexer, is to be submitted for fabrication in July 1994 which will form the basis of the readout of the tracking system of the CMS experiment.

  3. Hard Scattering Studies at Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Harutyun Avagyan; Peter Bosted; Volker Burkert; Latifa Elouadrhiri

    2005-09-01

    We present current activities and future prospects for studies of hard scattering processes using the CLAS detector and the CEBAF polarized electron beam. Kinematic dependences of single and double spin asymmetries have been measured in a wide kinematic range at CLAS with a polarized NH{sub 3} and unpolarized liquid hydrogen targets. It has been shown that the data are consistent with factorization and observed target and beam asymmetries are in good agreement with measurements performed at higher energies, suggesting that the high energy-description of the semi-inclusive DIS process can be extended to the moderate energies of JLab measurements.

  4. Thermopile detector radiation hard readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaalema, Stephen; Van Duyne, Stephen; Gates, James L.; Foote, Marc C.

    2010-08-01

    The NASA Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO) conceptual payload contains a thermal instrument with six different spectral bands ranging from 8μm to 100μm. The thermal instrument is based on multiple linear arrays of thermopile detectors that are intrinsically radiation hard; however, the thermopile CMOS readout needs to be hardened to tolerate the radiation sources of the JEO mission. Black Forest Engineering is developing a thermopile readout to tolerate the JEO mission radiation sources. The thermal instrument and ROIC process/design techniques are described to meet the JEO mission requirements.

  5. Outer contour extraction of skull from CT scan images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulinuha, M. A.; Yuniarno, E. M.; Nugroho, S. M. S.; Hariadi, M.

    2017-03-01

    Extraction of the outer contour of the skull is an important step in craniofacial reconstruction. The outer contour is required for surface reconstruction of the skull. In this paper, we propose a method to extract the outer contour of the skull. The extraction process consists of four stages: defining the region of interest, segmentation of the bone, noise removal and extraction of the outer contour based on scanning from the four sides of the image. The proposed method successfully extracts the outermost contour of the skull and avoids redundant data.

  6. Tectonics of the Outer Planet Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKinnon, W. B.; Collins, G. C.; Moore, J. M.; Nimmo, F.; Pappalardo, R. T.; Prockter, L. M.; Schenk, P. M.

    2010-01-01

    Tectonic features on the satellites of the outer planets range from the familiar, such as clearly recognizable graben on many satellites, to the bizarre, such as the ubiquitous double ridges on Europa, the twisting sets of ridges on Triton, or the isolated giant mountains rising from Io's surface. All of the large and middle-sized outer planet satellites except Io are dominated by water ice near their surfaces. Though ice is a brittle material at the cold temperatures found in the outer solar system, the amount of energy it takes to bring it close to its melting point is lower than for a rocky body. Therefore, some unique features of icy satellite tectonics may be influenced by a near-surface ductile layer beneath the brittle surface material, and several of the icy satellites may possess subsurface oceans. Sources of stress to drive tectonism are commonly dominated by the tides that deform these satellites as they orbit their primary giant planets. On several satellites, the observed tectonic features may be the result of changes in their tidal figures, or motions of their solid surfaces with respect to their tidal figures. Other driving mechanisms for tectonics include volume changes due to ice or water phase changes in the interior, thermoelastic stress, deformation of the surface above rising diapirs of warm ice, and motion of subsurface material toward large impact basins as they fill in and relax. Most satellites exhibit evidence for extensional deformation, and some exhibit strike-slip faulting, whereas contractional tectonism appears to be rare. Io s surface is unique, exhibiting huge isolated mountains that may be blocks of crust tilting and foundering into the rapidly emptying interior as the surface is constantly buried by deposits from hyperactive volcanoes. Of the satellites, diminutive Enceladus is spectacularly active; its south polar terrain is a site of young tectonism, copious heat flow, and tall plumes venting into space. Europa's surface is

  7. Acinetobacter baumannii outer membrane protein A modulates the biogenesis of outer membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Moon, Dong Chan; Choi, Chul Hee; Lee, Jung Hwa; Choi, Chi-Won; Kim, Hye-Yeon; Park, Jeong Soon; Kim, Seung Il; Lee, Je Chul

    2012-02-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii secretes outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) during both in vitro and in vivo growth, but the biogenesis mechanism by which A. baumannii produces OMVs remains undefined. Outer membrane protein A of A. baumannii (AbOmpA) is a major protein in the outer membrane and the C-terminus of AbOmpA interacts with diaminopimelate of peptidoglycan. This study investigated the role of AbOmpA in the biogenesis of A. baumannii OMVs. Quantitative and qualitative approaches were used to analyze OMV biogenesis in A. baumannii ATCC 19606T and an isogenic ΔAbOmpA mutant. OMV production was significantly increased in the ΔAbOmpA mutant compared to wild-type bacteria as demonstrated by quantitation of proteins and lipopolysaccharides (LPS) packaged in OMVs. LPS profiles prepared from OMVs from wild-type bacteria and the ΔAbOmpA mutant had identical patterns, but proteomic analysis showed different protein constituents in OMVs from wild-type bacteria compared to the ΔAbOmpA mutant. In conclusion, AbOmpA influences OMV biogenesis by controlling OMV production and protein composition.

  8. A novel core-shell nanocomposite Ni-Ca@mSiO2 for benzophenone selective hydrogenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xue; Feng, Wenhui; Chu, Xiaoning; Chu, Hailong; Niu, Libo; Bai, Guoyi

    2017-02-01

    A novel core-shell nanocomposite Ni-Ca@mSiO2 was first prepared by a modified Stöber method in this paper. It has a core-shell structure with Ni (about 8 nm in diameter) and Ca as the cores and mesoporous silica as the outer shell, as proven by the transmission electron microscopy. This nanocomposite exhibited good catalytic performance in the selective hydrogenation of benzophenone, with 96.1% conversion and 94.9% selectivity for benzhydrol under relatively mild reaction conditions. It was demonstrated that addition of small amounts of alkaline Ca can not only markedly improve the dispersion of the active species but also tune the acid-base property of this nanocomposite, resulting in the efficient suppression of benzhydrol dehydration to achieve a high selectivity. Furthermore, the core-shell nanocomposite Ni-Ca@mSiO2 can be recycled four runs without appreciable loss of its initial activity, more stable than the traditional supported nanocatalyst Ni-Ca/mSiO2. It was suggested that the outer mesoporous silica shell of Ni-Ca@mSiO2 can prevent both the aggregation and the leaching of the active Ni species, accounting for its relatively good stability.

  9. Spherical-shell model for the van der Waals coefficients between fullerenes and/or nearly spherical nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Perdew, John P; Tao, Jianmin; Hao, Pan; Ruzsinszky, Adrienn; Csonka, Gábor I; Pitarke, J M

    2012-10-24

    Fullerene molecules such as C(60) are large nearly spherical shells of carbon atoms. Pairs of such molecules have a strong long-range van der Waals attraction that can produce scattering or binding into molecular crystals. A simplified classical-electrodynamics model for a fullerene is a spherical metal shell, with uniform electron density confined between outer and inner radii (just as a simplified model for a nearly spherical metallic nanocluster is a solid metal sphere or filled shell). For the spherical-shell model, the exact dynamic multipole polarizabilities are all known analytically. From them, we can derive exact analytic expressions for the van der Waals coefficients of all orders between two spherical metal shells. The shells can be identical or different, and hollow or filled. To connect the model to a real fullerene, we input the static dipole polarizability, valence electron number and estimated shell thickness t of the real molecule. Our prediction for the leading van der Waals coefficient C(6) between two C(60) molecules ((1.30 ± 0.22) × 10(5) hartree bohr(6)) agrees well with a prediction for the real molecule from time-dependent density functional theory. Our prediction is remarkably insensitive to t. Future work might include the prediction of higher-order (e.g. C(8) and C(10)) coefficients for C(60), applications to other fullerenes or nearly spherical metal clusters, etc. We also make general observations about the van der Waals coefficients.

  10. The Magnetic Field in the Outer Heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suess, S. T.

    2004-01-01

    One of the great achievements of Parker was the prediction that the solar magnetic field would be drawn into Archimedian spirals as it is carried away from the Sun by the solar wind. This prediction has been amply confirmed by many in situ measurements in the intervening four decades. But, Parker made his prediction for a solar wind that expands into infinite space while we now know that the local interstellar medium (LISM) is far from empty and, in fact, confines the solar wind to a finite volume, known as the heliosphere, that extends to approximately 100 AU in the upstream direction (the solar system is moving through the LISM). Voyagers 1/2, presently at -80 AU, are approaching the upstream boundaries of the heliosphere and returning data on the properties of the magnetic field. This is important for understanding how galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) reach the Earth. Voyagers show that the IMF at 10-80 AU behaves much as Parker predicted - with two important exceptions. This is not surprising since the field is essentially passively advected by the solar wind out to 80 AU. But, new models say that nearer the heliosphere boundaries the field plays a major role in the solar wind-LISM interaction. However, of the many physical ingredients that constitute the outer heliosphere, the magnetic field poses some of the most interesting and difficult numerical modeling problems. Presently, only a few results have been published and much remains to be done. Here I will summarize the expected and measured behavior of the magnetic field at 80 AU. Then I will describe modeling predictions beyond 80 AU: magnetic "tornadoes", polarity envelopes, the Axford-Cranfill effect, inner and outer magnetic walls and more. I will also list what I believe to be important new modeling objectives. Finally, I will speculate on what is happening with the magnetic field near the nose of the heliosphere. My conclusion is that models of GCR modulation rarely incorporate even crudely realistic

  11. Hardness correlation for uranium and its alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Humphreys, D L; Romig, Jr, A D

    1983-03-01

    The hardness of 16 different uranium-titanium (U-Ti) alloys was measured on six (6) different hardness scales (R/sub A/, R/sub B/, R/sub C/, R/sub D/, Knoop, and Vickers). The alloys contained between 0.75 and 2.0 wt % Ti. All of the alloys were solutionized (850/sup 0/C, 1 h) and ice-water quenched to produce a supersaturated martensitic phase. A range of hardnesses was obtained by aging the samples for various times and temperatures. The correlation of various hardness scales was shown to be virtually identical to the hardness-scale correlation for steels. For more-accurate conversion from one hardness scale to another, least-squares-curve fits were determined for the various hardness-scale correlations. 34 figures, 5 tables.

  12. Mineralogical characterization of pristine, bio-eroded and fossil bivalve shell material for the evaluation of a species-specific alteration potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hippler, Dorothee; Goetschl, Katja Elisabeth; Gerstmann, Brigitte Simone; Rafael Garcia-March, Jose; Dietzel, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Biogenic carbonates of marine calcifiers can provide a wealth of information for the reconstruction of modern and palaeo-environments. However, their composite carbonate shells are often prone to different alteration processes that might occur during their lifetime, post-mortem or during early diagenesis. In order to use these calcifiers as palaeo-archives or proxy carriers, it is thus of crucial importance to assess their alteration potential. Here, we present the mineral phase composition of four different Mediterranean bivalve species (Spondylus, Lithophaga, Arca, Glycymeris) using spatially selected, powder XRD analysis, as well as in-situ high-resolution Raman spectroscopy. The sample set thereby comprises pristine-modern, bioeroded-modern, Holocene and Pleistocene specimens of the same bivalve species in order to characterize and evaluate the species-specific susceptibility to bioerosion and diagenetic alteration. We reveal species-specific shell compositions that are validated by both analytical methods. Differences in shell mineralogy occur between the outermost (periostracum), the outer (ostracum) and inner (hypostracum) layer, with the outer layer mainly composed of calcite and the inner layers of aragonite with variable portions of calcite. Considerable species-specific changes in mineralogy of the respective shell layers with increasing geological age are not found. Our results indicate that the original shell mineralogy (calcite, aragonite and carbonate fluorapatite) as well as the composition, structure and thickness of the respective shell layers are important factors favouring or preventing alteration to occur. Moreover, our findings highlight the effect of bioerosion during the alteration process. The analysis of distinct areas of the shells hinting at microbial activity reveals slight changes in shell mineralogy. We thus postulate that processes related to shell taphonomy are crucial for the shell's alteration/preservational potential and thus

  13. Hard and Soft Safety Verifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wetherholt, Jon; Anderson, Brenda

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the differences between and the effects of hard and soft safety verifications. Initially, the terminology should be defined and clarified. A hard safety verification is datum which demonstrates how a safety control is enacted. An example of this is relief valve testing. A soft safety verification is something which is usually described as nice to have but it is not necessary to prove safe operation. An example of a soft verification is the loss of the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) casings from Shuttle flight, STS-4. When the main parachutes failed, the casings impacted the water and sank. In the nose cap of the SRBs, video cameras recorded the release of the parachutes to determine safe operation and to provide information for potential anomaly resolution. Generally, examination of the casings and nozzles contributed to understanding of the newly developed boosters and their operation. Safety verification of SRB operation was demonstrated by examination for erosion or wear of the casings and nozzle. Loss of the SRBs and associated data did not delay the launch of the next Shuttle flight.

  14. Dual shell pressure balanced vessel

    DOEpatents

    Fassbender, Alexander G.

    1992-01-01

    A dual-wall pressure balanced vessel for processing high viscosity slurries at high temperatures and pressures having an outer pressure vessel and an inner vessel with an annular space between the vessels pressurized at a pressure slightly less than or equivalent to the pressure within the inner vessel.

  15. Shell Games: Uncovering Periodic Properties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, William G.

    1983-01-01

    Describes activities (demonstrations/experiments) used to introduce history of periodic properties--without electrons, orbitals, filling shells, or any conception of atoms beyond Dalton's model. Activities supplement first chapter in a currently available chemistry text. Indicates potential danger of experiments if proper safety precautions are…

  16. Finite element shell instability analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Formulation procedures and the associated computer program for finite element thin shell instability analysis are discussed. Data cover: (1) formulation of basic element relationships, (2) construction of solution algorithms on both the conceptual and algorithmic levels, and (3) conduction of numerical analyses to verify the accuracy and efficiency of the theory and related programs therein are described.

  17. Recommended Exploration Strategy for the Outer Planets 2013-2022: Goals and Priorities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinnon, W. B.; Johnson, T. V.

    2009-12-01

    Important scientific discoveries continue to be made in the outer solar system through NASA missions and research programs (for example, via the ongoing Cassini mission at Saturn, the New Horizons encounter with Jupiter in 2007, and earth-based studies of Uranus and Neptune). The Outer Planets Assessment Group (OPAG) was established by NASA to identify scientific priorities and pathways for outer solar system exploration, because the outer solar system provides critical clues to unraveling the mysteries of how solar systems form and evolve, how planetary systems become habitable, and how life has evolved in our solar system. Addressing such scientific questions requires a balanced strategy of outer solar system exploration that includes steady support for vigorous programs of basic research, data analysis, and technology development. Fundamental new discoveries are best made with a mixture of mission sizes that includes large (flagship) missions, along with medium-sized and smaller-sized (as practical) missions. Such a strategy is most efficiently implemented as a coherent Outer Planets Exploration Program. Missions to the outer solar system are major undertakings, requiring large and expensive launch vehicles, long mission durations, highly reliable (frequently radiation hard) and autonomous spacecraft, and radioisotope power sources in most cases. OPAG recommends that the Decadal Survey explore the possibilities for a program structure/categorization that could allow ‘small flagship’ class missions to be considered, providing a greater range of choice and capabilities in the mix to balance program size and science return. With the Galileo mission concluded, the Cassini equinox mission in progress, and Juno in development, OPAG strongly endorses the competitive selection by NASA of the Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO) as the next Outer Planets Flagship and as part of the Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) with ESA, a collaboration that includes a Ganymede

  18. Electrocaloric effect in core-shell ferroelectric ceramics: Theoretical approach and practical conclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anoufa, M.; Kiat, J. M.; Bogicevic, C.

    2015-10-01

    Most of the theoretical and experimental studies on the electrocaloric effect (ECE) are devoted to thin films, but they can be hardly envisaged for cooling macroscopic systems; moreover, the results obtained cannot be easily transposed for larger systems like multilayered ceramics. Therefore, efforts should also be focused on predicting, synthesizing, and characterizing interesting bulk single crystal or ceramics. In ferroelectric nanoparticles and ceramics, the core-shell structure of grains is of uttermost importance to explain the experimental results at small sizes. Moreover, it can be used to tailor physical properties, such as energy storage, by experimenting with the composition, thickness, and permittivity of the shell. Here, we report the effect of such structures on the electrocaloric effects in a variety of ferroelectric materials. The magnitude of ECE as well as its field and temperature-dependence are obtained for different types of core-shells. The optimal configuration for a maximal ECE is deduced.

  19. Identification of Chlamydia trachomatis outer membrane complex proteins by differential proteomics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoyun; Afrane, Mary; Clemmer, David E; Zhong, Guangming; Nelson, David E

    2010-06-01

    The extracellular chlamydial infectious particle, or elementary body (EB), is enveloped by an intra- and intermolecular cysteine cross-linked protein shell called the chlamydial outer membrane complex (COMC). A few abundant proteins, including the major outer membrane protein and cysteine-rich proteins (OmcA and OmcB), constitute the overwhelming majority of COMC proteins. The identification of less-abundant COMC proteins has been complicated by limitations of proteomic methodologies and the contamination of COMC fractions with abundant EB proteins. Here, we used parallel liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analyses of Chlamydia trachomatis serovar L2 434/Bu EB, COMC, and Sarkosyl-soluble EB fractions to identify proteins enriched or depleted from COMC. All well-described COMC proteins were specifically enriched in the COMC fraction. In contrast, multiple COMC-associated proteins found in previous studies were strongly enriched in the Sarkosyl-soluble fraction, suggesting that these proteins are not COMC components or are not stably associated with COMC. Importantly, we also identified novel proteins enriched in COMC. The list of COMC proteins identified in this study has provided reliable information for further understanding chlamydial protein secretion systems and modeling COMC and EB structures.

  20. Recent advances in shell theory. [application of asymptotic approach to thin walled shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmonds, J. G.

    1976-01-01

    The results reviewed are divided into two categories: those that relate two-dimensional shell theory to three-dimensional elasticity theory and those concerned with shell theory per se. In the second category results for general elastic systems that carry over, by specialization or analogy, to shells and results that are unique to shell theory itself are considered.

  1. Proteomics of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Outer Membrane Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Kieselbach, Thomas; Zijnge, Vincent; Granström, Elisabeth; Oscarsson, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is an oral and systemic pathogen associated with aggressive forms of periodontitis and with endocarditis. Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) released by this species have been demonstrated to deliver effector proteins such as cytolethal distending toxin (CDT) and leukotoxin (LtxA) into human host cells and to act as triggers of innate immunity upon carriage of NOD1- and NOD2-active pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). To improve our understanding of the pathogenicity-associated functions that A. actinomycetemcomitans exports via OMVs, we studied the proteome of density gradient-purified OMVs from a rough-colony type clinical isolate, strain 173 (serotype e) using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). This analysis yielded the identification of 151 proteins, which were found in at least three out of four independent experiments. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002509. Through this study, we not only confirmed the vesicle-associated release of LtxA, and the presence of proteins, which are known to act as immunoreactive antigens in the human host, but we also identified numerous additional putative virulence-related proteins in the A. actinomycetemcomitans OMV proteome. The known and putative functions of these proteins include immune evasion, drug targeting, and iron/nutrient acquisition. In summary, our findings are consistent with an OMV-associated proteome that exhibits several offensive and defensive functions, and they provide a comprehensive basis to further disclose roles of A. actinomycetemcomitans OMVs in periodontal and systemic disease.

  2. THE OUTER MAGNETIC FIELD OF L183

    SciTech Connect

    Clemens, Dan P.

    2012-03-20

    The L183 (= L134N) dark molecular cloud has been probed using deep near-infrared imaging polarimetry of stars to beyond 14 mag in H band (1.6 {mu}m), using the Mimir instrument on the 1.83 m Perkins Telescope. Nearly 400 arcmin{sup 2} were surveyed, including the dense core in L183, as seen in WISE Band 3 (12 {mu}m) extinction, and the near surroundings, revealing 35 stars with either detected polarizations or significant upper limits. Stars with detected polarizations are reddened if closer than 8 arcmin (0.25 pc at the 110 pc cloud distance) and unreddened beyond. The polarimetric sample probes as close to the core as 3 arcmin (0.1 pc), where A{sub V} {approx} 14 mag. Compared to the relatively unextincted surrounding stars, the reddened stars show no increase in polarization with extinction, suggesting that all of the polarization is induced in the outer layers of the cloud. This 0.25 pc radius envelope magnetic field does show a strong interaction with the L183 dark cloud. The envelope field is also virtually perpendicular, on the plane of the sky, to the field seen at 850 {mu}m, though more closely aligned with the rotation axis of the dense gas core. The physical size scale at which the envelope and the core magnetic fields either decouple from each other or strongly modify their directions must be inside the 0.1 pc region probed here.

  3. Substructure of the outer dynein arm

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    The substructure of the outer dynein arm has been analyzed in quick- frozen deep-etch replicas of Tetrahymena and Chlamydomonas axonemes. Each arm is found to be composed of five morphologically discrete components: an elliptical head; two spherical feet; a slender stalk; and an interdynein linker. The feet make contact with the A microtubule of each doublet; the stalk contacts the B microtubule; the head lies between the feet and stalk; and the linker associates each arm with its neighbor. The spatial relationships between these five components are found to be distinctly different in rigor (ATP-depleted) versus relaxed (ATP- or vanadate plus ATP-treated) axonemes, and the stalk appears to alter its affinity for the B microtubule in the relaxed state. Images of living cilia attached to Tetrahymena cells show that the relaxed configuration is adopted in vivo. We relate our observations to morphological and experimental studies reported by others and propose several models that suggest how this newly described dynein morphology may relate to dynein function. PMID:6218174

  4. The Outer Heliosphere: The Next Frontiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherer, K.; Fichtner, Horst; Fahr, Hans Jörg; Marsch, Eckart

    The 11th COSPAR Colloquium "The Outer Heliosphere: The Next Frontiers" was held in Potsdam, Germany, from July 24 to 28, 2000, and is the second dedicated to this subject after the first one held in Warsaw, Poland in 1989. Roughly a century has passed after the first ideas by Oliver Lodge, George Francis Fitzgerald and Kristan Birkeland about particle clouds emanating from the Sun and interacting with the Earth environment. Only a few decades after the formulation of the concepts of a continuous solar corpuscular radiation by Ludwig Bierman and a solar wind by Eugene Parker, heliospheric physics has evolved into an important branch of astrophysical research. Numerous spacecraft missions have increased the knowledge about the heliosphere tremendously. Now, at the beginning of a new millenium it seems possible, by newly developed propulasion technologies to send a spacecraft beyond the boundaries of the heliosphere. Such an Interstellar Proce will start the in-situ exploration of interstellar space and, thus, can be considered as the first true astrophysical spacecraft. The year 2000 appeared to be a highly welcome occassion to review the achievements since the last COSPAR Colloquia 11 years ago, to summarize the present developments and to give new impulse for future activities in heliospheric research.

  5. Bacterial outer membrane vesicles and vaccine applications.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Reinaldo; Fernández, Sonsire; Zayas, Caridad; Acosta, Armando; Sarmiento, Maria Elena; Ferro, Valerie A; Rosenqvist, Einar; Campa, Concepcion; Cardoso, Daniel; Garcia, Luis; Perez, Jose Luis

    2014-01-01

    Vaccines based on outer membrane vesicles (OMV) were developed more than 20 years ago against Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B. These nano-sized structures exhibit remarkable potential for immunomodulation of immune responses and delivery of meningococcal antigens or unrelated antigens incorporated into the vesicle structure. This paper reviews different applications in OMV Research and Development (R&D) and provides examples of OMV developed and evaluated at the Finlay Institute in Cuba. A Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) process was developed at the Finlay Institute to produce OMV from N. meningitidis serogroup B (dOMVB) using detergent extraction. Subsequently, OMV from N. meningitidis, serogroup A (dOMVA), serogroup W (dOMVW), and serogroup X (dOMVX) were obtained using this process. More recently, the extraction process has also been applied effectively for obtaining OMV on a research scale from Vibrio cholerae (dOMVC), Bordetella pertussis (dOMVBP), Mycobacterium smegmatis (dOMVSM), and BCG (dOMVBCG). The immunogenicity of the OMV has been evaluated for specific antibody induction, and together with functional bactericidal and challenge assays in mice has shown their protective potential. dOMVB has been evaluated with non-neisserial antigens, including with a herpes virus type 2 glycoprotein, ovalbumin, and allergens. In conclusion, OMV are proving to be more versatile than first conceived and remain an important technology for development of vaccine candidates.

  6. Outer membrane vesicles as platform vaccine technology

    PubMed Central

    Stork, Michiel; van der Ley, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are released spontaneously during growth by many Gram‐negative bacteria. They present a range of surface antigens in a native conformation and have natural properties like immunogenicity, self‐adjuvation and uptake by immune cells which make them attractive for application as vaccines against pathogenic bacteria. In particular with Neisseria meningitidis, they have been investigated extensively and an OMV‐containing meningococcal vaccine has recently been approved by regulatory agencies. Genetic engineering of the OMV‐producing bacteria can be used to improve and expand their usefulness as vaccines. Recent work on meningitis B vaccines shows that OMVs can be modified, such as for lipopolysaccharide reactogenicity, to yield an OMV product that is safe and effective. The overexpression of crucial antigens or simultaneous expression of multiple antigenic variants as well as the expression of heterologous antigens enable expansion of their range of applications. In addition, modifications may increase the yield of OMV production and can be combined with specific production processes to obtain high amounts of well‐defined, stable and uniform OMV particle vaccine products. Further improvement can facilitate the development of OMVs as platform vaccine product for multiple applications. PMID:26912077

  7. Bacterial Outer Membrane Vesicles and Vaccine Applications

    PubMed Central

    Acevedo, Reinaldo; Fernández, Sonsire; Zayas, Caridad; Acosta, Armando; Sarmiento, Maria Elena; Ferro, Valerie A.; Rosenqvist, Einar; Campa, Concepcion; Cardoso, Daniel; Garcia, Luis; Perez, Jose Luis

    2014-01-01

    Vaccines based on outer membrane vesicles (OMV) were developed more than 20 years ago against Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B. These nano-sized structures exhibit remarkable potential for immunomodulation of immune responses and delivery of meningococcal antigens or unrelated antigens incorporated into the vesicle structure. This paper reviews different applications in OMV Research and Development (R&D) and provides examples of OMV developed and evaluated at the Finlay Institute in Cuba. A Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) process was developed at the Finlay Institute to produce OMV from N. meningitidis serogroup B (dOMVB) using detergent extraction. Subsequently, OMV from N. meningitidis, serogroup A (dOMVA), serogroup W (dOMVW), and serogroup X (dOMVX) were obtained using this process. More recently, the extraction process has also been applied effectively for obtaining OMV on a research scale from Vibrio cholerae (dOMVC), Bordetella pertussis (dOMVBP), Mycobacterium smegmatis (dOMVSM), and BCG (dOMVBCG). The immunogenicity of the OMV has been evaluated for specific antibody induction, and together with functional bactericidal and challenge assays in mice has shown their protective potential. dOMVB has been evaluated with non-neisserial antigens, including with a herpes virus type 2 glycoprotein, ovalbumin, and allergens. In conclusion, OMV are proving to be more versatile than first conceived and remain an important technology for development of vaccine candidates. PMID:24715891

  8. Inner and outer horizons of time experience.

    PubMed

    Wackermann, Jirí

    2007-05-01

    Human experience of temporal durations exhibits a multi-regional structure, with more or less distinct boundaries, or horizons, on the scale of physical duration. The inner horizons are imposed by perceptual thresholds for simultaneity (approximately equal to 3 ms) and temporal order (approximatly equal to 30 ms), and are determined by the dynamical properties of the neural substrate integrating sensory information. Related to the inner horizon of experienced time are perceptual or cognitive "moments." Comparative data on autokinetic times suggest that these moments may be relatively invariant (approximately equal to 10(2) ms) across a wide range of species. Extension of the "sensible present" (approximately equal to 3 s) defines an intermediate horizon, beyond which the generic experience of duration develops. The domain of immediate duration experience is delimited by the ultimate outer horizon at about = 10(2) s, as evidenced by analysis of duration reproduction experiments (reproducibility horizon), probably determined by relaxation times of "neural accumulators." Beyond these phenomenal horizons, time is merely cognitively (re)constructed, not actually experienced or "perceived," a fact that is frequently ignored by contemporary time perception research. The nyocentric organization of time experience shows an interesting analogy with the egocentric organization of space, suggesting that structures of subjective space and time are derived from active motion as a common experiential basis.

  9. Hard X-ray mirrors for Nuclear Security

    SciTech Connect

    Descalle, M. A.; Brejnholt, N.; Hill, R.; Decker, T.; Alameda, J.; Soufli, R.; Pivovaroff, M.; Pardini, T.

    2016-01-07

    Research performed under this LDRD aimed to demonstrate the ability to detect and measure hard X-ray emissions using multilayer X-ray reflective optics above 400 keV, to enable the development of inexpensive and high-accuracy mirror substrates, and to investigate applications of hard X-ray mirrors of interest to the nuclear security community. Experiments conducted at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility demonstrated hard X-ray mirror reflectivity up to 650 keV for the first time. Hard X-ray optics substrates must have surface roughness under 3 to 4 Angstrom rms, and three materials were evaluated as potential substrates: polycarbonates, thin Schott glass and a new type of flexible glass called Willow Glass®. Chemical smoothing and thermal heating of the surface of polycarbonate samples, which are inexpensive but have poor intrinsic surface characteristics, did not yield acceptable surface roughness. D263 Schott glass was used for the focusing optics of the NASA NuSTAR telescope. The required specialized hardware and process were costly and motivated experiments with a modified non-contact slumping technique. The surface roughness of the glass was preserved and the process yielded cylindrical shells with good net shape pointing to the potential advantage of this technique. Finally, measured surface roughness of 200 and 130 μm thick Willow Glass sheets was between 2 and 2.5 A rms. Additional results of flexibility tests and multilayer deposition campaigns indicated it is a promising substrate for hard X-ray optics. The detection of U and Pu characteristics X-ray lines and gamma emission lines in a high background environment was identified as an area for which X-ray mirrors could have an impact and where focusing optics could help reduce signal to noise ratio by focusing signal onto a smaller detector. Hence the first one twelvetant of a Wolter I focusing optics for the 90 to 140 keV energy range based on aperiodic multilayer coating was designed. Finally

  10. 7 CFR 981.6 - Shelled almonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Shelled almonds. 981.6 Section 981.6 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ALMONDS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 981.6 Shelled almonds. Shelled almonds mean raw or roasted almonds...

  11. 7 CFR 981.6 - Shelled almonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Shelled almonds. 981.6 Section 981.6 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ALMONDS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 981.6 Shelled almonds. Shelled almonds mean raw or roasted almonds...

  12. 7 CFR 981.6 - Shelled almonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Shelled almonds. 981.6 Section 981.6 Agriculture... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ALMONDS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 981.6 Shelled almonds. Shelled almonds mean raw or roasted almonds...

  13. 7 CFR 981.6 - Shelled almonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Shelled almonds. 981.6 Section 981.6 Agriculture... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ALMONDS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 981.6 Shelled almonds. Shelled almonds mean raw or roasted almonds...

  14. 7 CFR 981.6 - Shelled almonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Shelled almonds. 981.6 Section 981.6 Agriculture... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ALMONDS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 981.6 Shelled almonds. Shelled almonds mean raw or roasted almonds...

  15. 7 CFR 983.29 - Shelled pistachios.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Shelled pistachios. 983.29 Section 983.29 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PISTACHIOS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA, ARIZONA, AND NEW MEXICO Definitions § 983.29 Shelled pistachios. Shelled pistachios means...

  16. 7 CFR 983.29 - Shelled pistachios.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Shelled pistachios. 983.29 Section 983.29 Agriculture... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PISTACHIOS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA, ARIZONA, AND NEW MEXICO Definitions § 983.29 Shelled pistachios. Shelled pistachios means...

  17. 7 CFR 983.29 - Shelled pistachios.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Shelled pistachios. 983.29 Section 983.29 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PISTACHIOS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA, ARIZONA, AND NEW MEXICO Definitions § 983.29 Shelled pistachios. Shelled pistachios means...

  18. Thin-shell wormholes in dilaton gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Eiroa, Ernesto F.; Simeone, Claudio

    2005-06-15

    In this work we construct charged thin-shell Lorentzian wormholes in dilaton gravity. The exotic matter required for the construction is localized in the shell and the energy conditions are satisfied outside the shell. The total amount of exotic matter is calculated and its dependence with the parameters of the model is analyzed.

  19. Developments in Cylindrical Shell Stability Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    Today high-performance computing systems and new analytical and numerical techniques enable engineers to explore the use of advanced materials for shell design. This paper reviews some of the historical developments of shell buckling analysis and design. The paper concludes by identifying key research directions for reliable and robust methods development in shell stability analysis and design.

  20. 7 CFR 984.10 - Shelled walnuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Shelled walnuts. 984.10 Section 984.10 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WALNUTS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 984.10 Shelled walnuts. Shelled walnuts means walnut kernels after...