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Sample records for hard photon production

  1. Hard thermal photon production in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, F. D.; Thoma, M. H.

    2001-06-01

    The recent status of hard thermal photon production in relativistic heavy ion collisions is reviewed and the current rates are presented with emphasis on corrected bremsstrahlung processes in the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) and quark-hadron duality. Employing Bjorken hydrodynamics with an EOS supporting the phase transition from QGP to hot hadron gas (HHG), thermal photon spectra are computed. For SPS 158 GeV Pb+Pb collisions, comparison with other theoretical results and the WA98 direct photon data indicates significant contributions due to prompt photons. Extrapolating the presented approach to RHIC and LHC experiments, predictions of the thermal photon spectrum show a QGP outshining the HHG in the high-pT-region.

  2. Strong impact parameter dependence of hard photon production in intermediate energy heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migneco, E.; Agodi, C.; Alba, R.; Bellia, G.; Coniglione, R.; Del Zoppo, A.; Finocchiaro, P.; Maiolino, C.; Piattelli, P.; Russo, G.; Sapienza, P.; Badalá, A.; Barbera, R.; Palmeri, A.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Riggi, F.; Russo, A. C.; Peghaire, A.; Bonasera, A.

    1993-01-01

    The dependence of the high energy photon production on the impact parameter has been investigated in the reaction 129Xe+ 197Au at 44 MeV/u using the multidetector array MEDEA. A strong dependence of the high energy photon production probability on the impact parameter has been observed, while the slope parameter of the photon spectrum is almost constant. The data support the interpretation of the hard photon production in terms of first chance n-p collisions.

  3. Electroweak corrections to top quark pair production in association with a hard photon at hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Peng-Fei; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Yong; Song, Mao; Li, Gang

    2017-03-01

    We present the next-to-leading order (NLO) electroweak (EW) corrections to the top quark pair production associated with a hard photon at the current and future hadron colliders. The dependence of the leading order (LO) and NLO EW corrected cross sections on the photon transverse momentum cut are investigated. We also provide the LO and NLO EW corrected distributions of the transverse momentum of final top quark and photon and the invariant mass of top quark pair and top-antitop-photon system. The results show that the NLO EW corrections are significant in high energy regions due to the EW Sudakov effect.

  4. Evidence for an anticorrelation effect in the production of hard photons and preequilibrium protons in heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapienza, P.; Coniglione, R.; Alba, R.; del Zoppo, A.; Migneco, E.; Agodi, C.; Bellia, G.; Finocchiaro, P.; Loukachine, K.; Maiolino, C.; Peghaire, A.; Piattelli, P.; Santonocito, D.

    1994-09-01

    An exclusive study of the hard photon production in the reaction 40Ar51V at 44 MeV/nucleon has been carried on with the 4π multidetector MEDEA. An anticorrelation effect in the emission of very energetic photons and protons has been observed for the first time. This is a strong indication for the first-chance n-p bremsstrahlung production mechanism.

  5. Heavy-Quark Associated Production with One Hard Photon at Hadron Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Hartanto, Heribertus Bayu

    2013-01-01

    We present the calculation of heavy-quark associated production with a hard photon at hadron colliders, namely $pp(p\\bar p) → Q\\bar Q +X$γ (for $Q=t,b$), at Next-to-Leading Order (NLO) in Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). We study the impact of NLO QCD corrections on the total cross section and several differential distributions at both the Tevatron and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). For $t\\bar t$γ production we observe a sizeable reduction of the renormalization and factorization scale dependence when the NLO QCD corrections are included, while for $b\\bar b$γ production a considerable scale dependence still persists at NLO in QCD. This is consistent with what emerges in similar processes involving $b$ quarks and vector bosons and we explain its origin in detail. For $b\\bar b$γ production we study both the case in which at least one $b$ jet and the case in which at least two $b$ jets are observed. We perform the $b\\bar b$γ calculation using the Four Flavor Number Scheme (4FNS) and compare the case where at least one $b$ jet is observed with the corresponding results from the Five Flavor Number Scheme (5FNS) calculation. Finally we compare our results for $p\\bar p →+b+X$γ with the Tevatron data.

  6. Photon bremsstrahlung and diffusive broadening of a hard jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumder, A.; Fries, R. J.; Müller, B.

    2008-06-01

    The photon bremsstrahlung rate from a quark jet produced in deep-inelastic scattering (DIS) off a large nucleus is studied in the collinear limit. The leading medium-enhanced higher twist corrections that describe the multiple scattering of the jet in the nucleus are re-summed to all orders of twist. The propagation of the jet in the absence of further radiative energy loss is shown to be governed by a transverse momentum diffusion equation. We compute the final photon spectrum in the limit of soft photons, taking into account the leading and next-to-leading terms in the photon momentum fraction y. In this limit, the photon spectrum in a physical gauge is shown to arise from two interfering sources: one where the initial hard scattering produces an off-shell quark, which immediately radiates the photon and then undergoes subsequent soft rescattering, and an alternative in which the quark is produced on-shell and propagates through the medium until it is driven off-shell by rescattering and radiates the photon. Our result has a simple formal structure as a product of the photon splitting function, the quark transverse momentum distribution coming from a diffusion equation, and a dimensionless factor that encodes the effect of the interferences encountered by the propagating quark over the length of the medium. The destructive nature of such interferences in the small-y limit is responsible for the origin of the Landau-Pomeranchuck-Migdal (LPM) effect. Along the way we also discuss possible implications for quark jets in hot nuclear matter.

  7. Single photon, photon-jet and diphoton production at DO

    SciTech Connect

    Abachi, S.; DO Collaboration

    1995-07-01

    Results are described on the observation of isolated single photons by the DO detector at the Fermilab {anti p}p collider. The inclusive cross section has been measured for photons in the central rapidity region ({vert_bar} {eta} {vert_bar}< 0.9) above 10 GeV E{sub T}. Studies of jets recoiling against the single photon permit the measurement of the fundamental hard scattering cos{theta}* distribution. An analysis of the {eta} correlations between high-E{sub T} photons and the leading jet probes the gluon x distribution. Diphoton production measurements are used both as a test of QCD processes and as a search for resonant structure, including bosonic Higgs production.

  8. Direct Photon Production in a Nuclear Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiaofeng

    The photon is a very good probe of short distance physics in strong interactions. It can be produced directly at short-distance or through fragmentation processes. Through one-loop order in perturbation theory of quantum chromodynamics (QCD), this thesis provides complete analytic expressions for both the inclusive and the isolated prompt photon production cross sections in hadronic final states of e^+e ^- annihilations. It is the first time that the full angular dependence of the cross sections is derived. Extraction of photon fragmentation functions from e^+e ^- annihilations is addressed. Using e ^+e^--->gamma+X as an example, this work demonstrates for the first time that conventional perturbative QCD factorization breaks down for isolated photon production in e^+e ^- annihilations in a specific region of phase space. The impact of this breakdown for computations of prompt photon production in hadron-hadron reactions is also discussed. In hadron-nucleus collisions, high energy photons can be produced through a single hard scattering as well as through multiple scattering. The contribution from the multiple scattering can be presented in terms of multi-parton correlation functions. Using information on the multi-parton correlation functions extracted from photon-nucleus experiments, for the first time, the nuclear dependence of direct photon production in hadron-nucleus collisions was predicted without any free parameter, and was tested at Fermi Lab experiment E706.

  9. Photon structure and the production of jets, hadrons, and prompt photons.

    SciTech Connect

    Klasen, M.

    1999-07-22

    We give a pedagogical introduction to hard photoproduction processes at HERA, including the production of jets, hadrons, and prompt photons. Recent theoretical developments in the three areas are reviewed. In summary, hard photoproduction processes can provide very useful information on the hadronic structure of the photon, in particular on the gluon density, which is complimentary to the information coming from deep inelastic photon-photon scattering at electron-positron colliders. Among the different hadronic final states, jets are most easily accessible experimentally and phenomenologically. On the other hand, inclusive hadron production offers the possibility to test the universality of hadron fragmentation functions and measure the photon structure down to very low values of p{sub T} and x{sub {gamma}}. Prompt photon production suffers from a reduced cross section and limited data, but allows for the additional testing of photon fragmentation functions.

  10. Delayed hard photons from gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, J. I.

    1994-01-01

    The delayed hard (up to 25 GeV) photons observed more than an hour following a gamma-ray burst on 1994 February 17 may result from the collisions of relativistic nucleons with a dense cloud, producing pi(0). The required cloud density is approx. 2 x 10(exp 11)/cu cm. This cloud may be the remains of the disrupted envelope of a neutron star, and may survive as an excretion disk of approx. 10(exp 14) - 10 (exp 15) cm radius around the coalescing binary.

  11. Delayed hard photons from gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, J. I.

    1994-01-01

    The delayed hard (up to 25 GeV) photons observed more than an hour following a gamma-ray burst on 1994 February 17 may result from the collisions of relativistic nucleons with a dense cloud, producing pi(0). The required cloud density is approx. 2 x 10(exp 11)/cu cm. This cloud may be the remains of the disrupted envelope of a neutron star, and may survive as an excretion disk of approx. 10(exp 14) - 10 (exp 15) cm radius around the coalescing binary.

  12. Hard photon and energetic proton emission in heavy ion collisions at intermediate energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapienza, P.; Coniglione, R.; Migneco, E.; Agodi, C.; Alba, R.; Bellia, G.; Del Zoppo, A.; Finocchiaro, P.; Loukachine, K.; Maiolino, C.; Piattelli, P.; Santonocito, D.; Blumenfeld, Y.; Le Faou, J. H.; Suomijarvi, T.; Frascaria, N.; Roynette, J. C.; Scarpaci, J. A.; Garron, J. P.; Gillibert, A.; Alamanos, N.; Auger, F.; Peghaire, A.; Chomaz, Ph.

    1998-02-01

    The emission of hard photons and pre-equilibrium protons has been investigated in exclusive clusive experiments performed with MEDEA detector. The observation of the γ-proton anticorrelation indicate that the dominant production mechanism is the first chance neutron-proton collisions. Very energetic protons, with energy more than twice the kinematical limit for nucleon-nucleon collisions, have been observed in several reactions.

  13. Experimental study of hard photon radiation processes at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, T.; Aid, S.; Andreev, V.; Andrieu, B.; Appuhn, R.-D.; Arpagaus, M.; Babaev, A.; Baehr, J.; Bán, J.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Barth, M.; Bassler, U.; Beck, H. P.; Behrend, H.-J.; Belousov, A.; Berger, Ch.; Bergstein, H.; Bernardi, G.; Bernet, R.; Bertrand-Coremans, G.; Besançon, M.; Beyer, R.; Biddulph, P.; Bizot, J. C.; Blobel, V.; Borras, K.; Botterweck, F.; Boudry, V.; Braemer, A.; Brasse, F.; Braunschweig, W.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Brune, C.; Buchholz, R.; Büngener, L.; Bürger, J.; Büsser, F. W.; Buniatian, A.; Burke, S.; Buschhorn, G.; Campbell, A. J.; Carli, T.; Charles, F.; Clarke, D.; Clegg, A. B.; Clerbaux, B.; Colombo, M.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormack, C.; Coughlan, J. A.; Courau, A.; Coutures, Ch.; Cozzika, G.; Criegee, L.; Cussans, D. G.; Cvach, J.; Dagoret, S.; Dainton, J. B.; Danilov, M.; Dau, W. D.; Daum, K.; David, M.; Deffur, E.; Delcourt, B.; Del Buono, L.; de Roeck, A.; de Wolf, E. A.; di Nezza, P.; Dollfus, C.; Dowell, J. D.; Dreis, H. B.; Droutskoi, A.; Duboc, J.; Düllmann, D.; Dünger, O.; Duhm, H.; Ebert, J.; Ebert, T. R.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Ehrlichmann, H.; Eichenberger, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ellison, R. J.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, M.; Erdmann, W.; Evrard, E.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Feeken, D.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Ferrarotto, F.; Flamm, K.; Fleischer, M.; Flieser, M.; Flügge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Fominykh, B.; Forbush, M.; Formánek, J.; Foster, J. M.; Franke, G.; Fretwurst, E.; Gabathuler, E.; Gabathuler, K.; Gamerdinger, K.; Garvey, J.; Gayler, J.; Gebauer, M.; Gellrich, A.; Genzel, H.; Gerhards, R.; Goerlach, U.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Goldberg, M.; Goldner, D.; Gonzalez-Pineiro, B.; Gorelov, I.; Goritchev, P.; Grab, C.; Grässler, H.; Grässler, R.; Greenshaw, T.; Grindhammer, G.; Gruber, A.; Gruber, C.; Haack, J.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Hamon, O.; Hampel, M.; Hanlon, E. M.; Hapke, M.; Haynes, W. J.; Heatherington, J.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Henschel, H.; Herma, R.; Herynek, I.; Hess, M. F.; Hildesheim, W.; Hill, P.; Hiller, K. H.; Hilton, C. D.; Hladký, J.; Hoeger, K. C.; Höppner, M.; Horisberger, R.; Hudgson, V. L.; Huet, Ph.; Hütte, M.; Hufnagel, H.; Ibbotson, M.; Itterbeck, H.; Jabiol, M.-A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jacobsson, C.; Jaffre, M.; Janoth, J.; Jansen, T.; Jönsson, L.; Johannsen, K.; Johnson, D. P.; Johnson, L.; Jung, H.; Kalmus, P. I. P.; Kant, D.; Kaschowitz, R.; Kasselmann, P.; Kathage, U.; Katzy, J.; Kaufmann, H. H.; Kazarian, S.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kermiche, S.; Keuker, C.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Knies, G.; Ko, W.; Köhler, T.; Köhne, J.; Kolanoski, H.; Kole, F.; Kolya, S. D.; Korbel, V.; Korn, M.; Kostka, P.; Kotelnikov, S. K.; Krämerkämper, T.; Krasny, M. W.; Krehbiel, H.; Krücker, D.; Krüger, U.; Krüner-Marquis, U.; Kubenka, J. P.; Küster, H.; Kuhlen, M.; Kurča, T.; Kurzhöfer, J.; Kuznik, B.; Lacour, D.; Lamarche, F.; Lander, R.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Lanius, P.; Laporte, J.-F.; Lebedev, A.; Leverenz, C.; Levonian, S.; Ley, Ch.; Lindner, A.; Lindström, G.; Linsel, F.; Lipinski, J.; List, B.; Loch, P.; Lohmander, H.; Lopez, G. C.; Lubimov, V.; Lüke, D.; Magnussen, N.; Malinovski, E.; Mani, S.; Maraček, R.; Marage, P.; Marks, J.; Marshall, R.; Martens, J.; Martin, R.; Martyn, H.-U.; Martyniak, J.; Masson, S.; Mavroidis, T.; Maxfield, S. J.; McMahon, S. J.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Mercer, D.; Merz, T.; Meyer, C. A.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Milstead, D.; Moreau, F.; Morris, J. V.; Mroczko, E.; Müller, G.; Müller, K.; Murín, P.; Nagovizin, V.; Nahnhauer, R.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P. R.; Newton, D.; Neyret, D.; Nguyen, H. K.; Nicholls, T. C.; Niebergall, F.; Niebuhr, C.; Nisius, R.; Nowak, G.; Noyes, G. W.; Nyberg-Werther, M.; Oakden, M.; Oberlack, H.; Obrock, U.; Olsson, J. E.; Ozerov, D.; Panaro, E.; Panitch, A.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Peppel, E.; Perez, E.; Phillips, J. P.; Pichler, Ch.; Pitzl, D.; Pope, G.; Prell, S.; Prosi, R.; Rädel, G.; Raupach, F.; Reimer, P.; Reinshagen, S.; Ribarics, P.; Rick, H.; Riech, V.; Riedlberger, J.; Riess, S.; Rietz, M.; Rizvi, E.; Robertson, S. M.; Robmann, P.; Roloff, H. E.; Roosen, R.; Rosenbauer, K.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rouse, F.; Royon, C.; Rüter, K.; Rusakov, S.; Rybicki, K.; Rylko, R.; Sahlmann, N.; Sanchez, E.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Savitsky, M.; Schacht, P.; Schiek, S.; Schleper, P.; von Schlippe, W.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, D.; Schmidt, G.; Schöning, A.; Schröder, V.; Schuhmann, E.; Schwab, B.; Schwind, A.; Seehausen, U.; Sefkow, F.; Seidel, M.; Sell, R.; Semenov, A.; Shekelyan, V.; Sheviakov, I.; Shooshtari, H.; Shtarkov, L. N.; Siegmon, G.; Siewert, U.; Sirois, Y.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Smirnov, P.; Smith, J. R.; Solochenko, V.; Soloviev, Y.; Spiekermann, J.; Spitzer, H.; Starosta, R.; Steenbock, M.; Steffen, P.; Steinberg, R.; Stella, B.; Stephens, K.; Stier, J.; Stiewe, J.; Stösslein, U.; Stolze, K.; Strachota, J.; Straumann, U.; Struczinski, W.; Sutton, J. P.; Tapprogge, S.; Taylor, R. E.; Tchernyshov, V.; Thiebaux, C.; Thompson, G.; Truöl, P.; Turnau, J.; Tutas, J.; Uelkes, P.; Usik, A.; Valkár, S.; Valkárová, A.; Vallée, C.; van Esch, P.; van Mechelen, P.; Vartapetian, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Vecko, M.; Verrecchia, P.; Villet, G.; Wacker, K.; Wagener, A.; Wagener, M.; Walker, I. W.; Walther, A.; Weber, G.; Weber, M.; Wegener, D.; Wegner, A.; Wellisch, H. P.; West, L. R.; Willard, S.; Winde, M.; Winter, G.-G.; Wright, A. E.; Wünsch, E.; Wulff, N.; Yiou, T. P.; Žáček, J.; Zarbock, D.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zimmer, M.; Zimmermann, W.; Zomer, F.; Zuber, K.

    1995-12-01

    We present an experimental study of the ep→ eγ+ p and ep→ eγ+ X processes using data recorded by the H1 detector in 1993 at the electron-proton collider HERA. These processes are employed to measure the luminosity with an accuracy of 4.5 %. A subsample of the ep→ eγ+ X events in which the hard photon is detected at angles θ{γ/'} ≤ 0.45 mrad with respect to the incident electron direction is used to verify experimentally the size of radiative corrections to the ep→ eX inclusive cross section and to investigate the structure of the proton in the Q 2 domain down to 2 GeV2, lower than previously attained at HERA.

  14. Jet production and high p/sub T/ phenomena in photon-photon reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wermes, N.

    1983-05-01

    The status of experimental investigations of high p/sub T/ phenomena and jet production in photon-photon collisions is reviewed. Taking the challenging questions on hard scattering processes in ..gamma gamma.. reactions as a guide, the experimental approach to these questions is summarized. Results from the PETRA experiments CELLO, JADE, PLUTO, and TASSO are presented including preliminary results on the Q/sup 2/-dependence of jet cross sections. Experimental limitations and background problems are discussed. 36 references.

  15. Green photonics: the role of photonics in sustainable product design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wessler, Berit; Tober, Ursula

    2011-05-01

    Photonic technologies will play an increasingly significant role in reducing our environmental impact. In addition to the direct eco-benefits derived from the products themselves, green photonics will also impact the product design and manufacturing processes employed. Examples are discussed covering laser manufacturing, solid-state lighting, solar cells and optical communications. The importance of considering the full lifetime environmental impact of products is discussed, including raw materials, manufacture, use, and end of life issues. Industrial and legislative strategies are reviewed, and a number of specific measures are presented for accelerating the development of green photonics technologies and promoting their adoption into society.

  16. Prompt photon production at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Ashish; /SUNY, Stony Brook

    2009-07-01

    Prompt photon production has been studied by the CDF and D0{sup -} experiments at the Fermilab Tevatron collider in p{bar p} collisions at the centre of mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Measurements of the inclusive photon, inclusive photon plus jet, photon plus heavy flavor jet, and diphoton production cross sections are discussed. The analyses use data sample corresponding to integrated luminosity between 0.2 fb{sup -1} and 1.02 fb{sup -1}. The results are compared to the next to leading order (NLO) perturbative QCD (pQCD) calculations.

  17. Holographic photon production in heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iatrakis, Ioannis; Kiritsis, Elias; Shen, Chun; Yang, Di-Lun

    2017-04-01

    The thermal-photon emission from strongly coupled gauge theories at finite temperature is calculated using holographic models for QCD in the Veneziano limit (V-QCD). The emission rates are then embedded in hydrodynamic simulations combined with prompt photons from hard scattering and the thermal photons from hadron gas to analyze the spectra and anisotropic flow of direct photons at RHIC and LHC. The results from different sources responsible for the thermal photons in QGP including the weakly coupled QGP (wQGP) from perturbative calculations, strongly coupled N = 4 super Yang-Mills (SYM) plasma (as a benchmark for reference), and Gubser's phenomenological holographic model are then compared. It is found that the direct-photon spectra are enhanced in the strongly coupled scenario compared with the ones in the wQGP, especially at high momenta. Moreover, both the elliptic flow and triangular flow of direct photons are amplified at high momenta for V-QCD and the SYM plasma. The results are further compared with experimental observations.

  18. Hard photons in heavy-ion collisions: Direct or statistical\\?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, N.; Bock, R.; Emling, H.; Freifelder, R.; Gobbi, A.; Grosse, E.; Hildenbrand, K. D.; Kulessa, R.; Matulewicz, T.; Rami, F.; Simon, R. S.; Stelzer, H.; Wessels, J.; Maurenzig, P. R.; Olmi, A.; Stefanini, A. A.; Kühn, W.; Metag, V.; Novotny, R.; Gnirs, M.; Pelte, D.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Moretto, L. G.

    1988-04-01

    Photons with energies from 2 to 60 MeV have been measured in coincidence with binary fragments in the reaction 92Mo+92Mo at an incident energy of 19.5A MeV. The rapid change of the γ-ray spectrum and multiplicity with the fragment total kinetic energy in the exit channel indicates that the γ rays are emitted statistically by the highly excited fragments. Temperatures as high as 6 MeV are inferred.

  19. Heavy flavor production from photons and hadrons

    SciTech Connect

    Heusch, C.A.

    1982-01-01

    The present state of the production and observation of hadrons containing heavy quarks or antiquarks as valence constituents, in reactions initiated by real and (space-like) virtual photon or by hadron beams is discussed. Heavy flavor production in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation, which is well covered in a number of recent review papers is not discussed, and similarly, neutrino production is omitted due to the different (flavor-changing) mechanisms that are involved in those reactions. Heavy flavors from spacelike photons, heavy flavors from real photons, and heavy flavors from hadron-hadron collisions are discussed. (WHK)

  20. Hard Exclusive Meson Production at COMPASS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ter Wolbeek, Johannes

    2016-02-01

    The concept of Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) combines two-dimensional spatial information given by form factors, with longitudinal momentum information from Parton Distribution Functions. GPDs provide comprehensive description of the nucleon structure involving a wealth of new information. For instance, according to Ji’s sum rule, the GPDs H and E enable access to the total angular momenta of quarks, antiquarks and gluons. While H can be approached using measurements of electroproduction cross sections, asymmetry measurements in hard exclusive meson production off transversely polarized targets can help to constrain the GPD E and chiral-odd GPDs. In 2007 and 2010 the COMPASS experiment at CERN collected data by scattering a 160GeV/c muon beam off a transversely polarized NH3 target. Exclusive vector-meson production μ + p → μ‧ + p + V with a ρ0 or ω meson in the final state is studied and five single-spin and three double-spin azimuthal asymmetries are measured.

  1. Photon-splitting limits to the hardness of emission in strongly magnetized soft gamma repeaters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baring, Matthew G.

    1995-01-01

    Soft gamma repeaters are characterized by recurrent activity consisting of short-duration outbursts of high-energy emission that is typically of temperature less than 40 keV. One recent model of repeaters is that they originate in the environs of neutron stars with superstrong magnetic fields, perhaps greater than 10(exp 14) G. In such fields, the exotic process of magnetic photon splitting gamma yields gamma gamma acts very effectively to reprocess gamma-ray radiation down to hard X-ray energies. In this Letter, the action of photon splitting is considered in some detail, via the solution of photon kinetic equations, determining how it limits the hardness of emission in strongly magnetized repeaters, and thereby obtaining observational constraints to the field in SGR 1806-20.

  2. Photon-splitting limits to the hardness of emission in strongly magnetized soft gamma repeaters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baring, Matthew G.

    1995-01-01

    Soft gamma repeaters are characterized by recurrent activity consisting of short-duration outbursts of high-energy emission that is typically of temperature less than 40 keV. One recent model of repeaters is that they originate in the environs of neutron stars with superstrong magnetic fields, perhaps greater than 10(exp 14) G. In such fields, the exotic process of magnetic photon splitting gamma yields gamma gamma acts very effectively to reprocess gamma-ray radiation down to hard X-ray energies. In this Letter, the action of photon splitting is considered in some detail, via the solution of photon kinetic equations, determining how it limits the hardness of emission in strongly magnetized repeaters, and thereby obtaining observational constraints to the field in SGR 1806-20.

  3. Subpicosecond hard x-ray streak camera using single-photon counting.

    PubMed

    Enquist, Henrik; Navirian, Hengameh; Nüske, Ralf; von Korff Schmising, Clemens; Jurgilaitis, Andrius; Herzog, Marc; Bargheer, Matias; Sondhauss, Peter; Larsson, Jörgen

    2010-10-01

    We have developed and characterized a hard x-ray accumulating streak camera that achieves subpicosecond time resolution by using single-photon counting. A high repetition rate of 2 kHz was achieved by use of a readout camera with built-in image processing capabilities. The effects of sweep jitter were removed by using a UV timing reference. The use of single-photon counting allows the camera to reach a high quantum efficiency by not limiting the divergence of the photoelectrons.

  4. rho/sup 0/. omega. production in photon photon interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Derby, K.A.

    1987-08-01

    The subject of this dissertation is the production of the rho/sup 0/..omega.. final state in photon photon interactions. The production of the rho/sup 0/..omega.. final state has been of interest primarily because of its similarity to the related process ..gamma gamma.. ..-->.. rho/sup 0/rho/sup 0/. The cross section for rho/sup 0/rho/sup 0/ production demonstrates a peaking near threshold, the mechanism of which has been the subject of considerable speculation. The data sample used for the analysis was obtained using the TPC detector facility at the PEP e/sup +/e/sup -/ storage ring, and corresponds to an integrated e/sup +/e/sup -/ luminosity of 64 pb/sup -1/ at 29 GeV center of mass energy. Our estimate of the rho/sup 0/..omega.. cross section is compared to the predictions of several models which have been used to account for the observed rho/sup 0/rho/sup 0/ cross section. The experimental results are consistent with the predictions of a threshold enhancement model, as well as those of a four quark (qq anti q anti q) resonance model. However, they disagree with the predictions of a t-channel factorization approach.

  5. Imaging the proton via hard exclusive production in diffractive pp scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Hyde; Leonid Frankfurt; Mark Strikman; Christian Weiss

    2007-05-21

    We discuss the prospects for probing Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) via exclusive production of a high-mass system (H = heavy quarkonium, di-photon, di-jet, Higgs boson) in diffractive pp scattering, pp -> p + H + p. In such processes the interplay of hard and soft interactions gives rise to a diffraction pattern in the final-state proton transverse momenta, which is sensitive to the transverse spatial distribution of partons in the colliding protons. We comment on the plans for diffractive pp measurements at RHIC and LHC. Such studies could complement future measurements of GPDs in hard exclusive ep scattering (JLab, COMPASS, EIC).

  6. Isolated prompt photon production at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Maas, P.A. )

    1992-11-01

    This note describes measurements of isolated prompt photon production at [radical]s = 1.8 TeV using the CDF experiment. The measurements are compared to recent NLO QCD calculations, including recently obtained parton distribution functions. Qualitatively, the QCD calculation with the new parton distribution functions agrees better with the data than the previous parton distribution functions.

  7. Isolated prompt photon production at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Maas, P.A.; CDF Collaboration

    1992-11-01

    This note describes measurements of isolated prompt photon production at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV using the CDF experiment. The measurements are compared to recent NLO QCD calculations, including recently obtained parton distribution functions. Qualitatively, the QCD calculation with the new parton distribution functions agrees better with the data than the previous parton distribution functions.

  8. Influence of Cosmological Expansion on the Threshold Effects in the Annihilation Reaction of Hard Photons with CMB Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grishkan, Yu. S.; Pershin, A. A.

    2005-01-01

    The redshift (z) dependence of the dispersion relations for free particles is analyzed by taking into account the Lorentz invariance violation. A nonlinear algebraic equation is derived for the momenta of the particles involved in the annihilation reaction of a hard photon from a γ-ray source with a soft cosmic microwave background (CMB) photon near the threshold of this reaction. The solutions of this threshold equation are constructed and analyzed as a function of the redshift. We show that the threshold of the reaction under consideration tends to decrease with increasing z; the energy spectra of γ-ray sources at energies of ˜10 TeV must be cut off in accordance with the calculated z dependence. We also calculate the time delay of the light signals from γ-ray sources that corresponds to the Lorentz invariance violation for photons. We discuss the possibility of improving the standard constraints on the Lorentz invariance violation parameters for fields of various physical natures.

  9. Reionization by Hard Photons. I. X-Rays from the First Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, S. Peng

    2001-06-01

    Observations of the Lyα forest at z~3 reveal an average metallicity Z~10-2 Zsolar. The high-redshift supernovae that polluted the intergalactic medium also accelerated relativistic electrons. Since the energy density of the cosmic microwave background is proportional to (1+z)4, at high redshift these electrons cool via inverse Compton scattering. Thus, the first star clusters emit X-rays. Unlike stellar UV ionizing photons, these X-rays can escape easily from their host galaxies. This has a number of important physical consequences:1. Owing to their large mean free path, these X-rays can quickly establish a universal ionizing background and partially reionize the universe in a gradual, homogeneous fashion. If X-rays formed the dominant ionizing background, the universe would have more closely resembled a single-phase medium rather than a two-phase medium.2. X-rays can reheat the universe to higher temperatures than possible with UV radiation.3. X-rays counter the tendency of UV radiation to photodissociate H2, an important coolant in the early universe, by promoting gas-phase H2 formation.The X-ray production efficiency is calibrated to local observations of starburst galaxies, which imply that ~10% of the supernova energy is converted to X-rays. While direct detection of sources in X-ray emission is difficult, the presence of relativistic electrons at high redshift and thus a minimal level of X-ray emission may be inferred by synchrotron emission observations with the Square Kilometer Array. These sources may constitute a significant fraction of the unresolved hard X-ray background and can account for both the shape and amplitude of the gamma-ray background. This paper discusses the existence and observability of high-redshift X-ray sources, while a companion paper models the detailed reionization physics and chemistry.

  10. Photon pair production in astrophysical transrelativistic plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoeger, W. R.

    1977-01-01

    Photon pair-production processes in marginally relativistic (transrelativistic) accretion plasmas are investigated in both Planckian and non-Planckian cases. Pair production in a plasma with an equilibrium (Planck) spectrum is reviewed, and pair-concentration calculations are performed for three general non-Planckian situations most relevant to black-hole accretion scenarios: steady-state transrelativistic plasmas of relatively high density characterized by a pure bremsstrahlung spectrum, a comptonized bremsstrahlung spectrum, and an unsaturated Compton scattering spectrum. The results obtained indicate that for transrelativistic temperatures (600 million to 6 billion K) photon pair production is not generally a dominant process for a plasma with a pure bremsstrahlung spectrum, but becomes dominant for plasmas where comptonization is important. It is also shown that photon pair-creation processes in a transrelativistic bremsstrahlung-radiating plasma that is more than marginally optically thick to Compton scattering significantly alter the plasma's spectrum by forcing it to become black-body before it reaches relativistic temperatures. Pair production and instabilities in unsteady-state plasmas are briefly considered

  11. Interspeaker Variability in Hard Palate Morphology and Vowel Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lammert, Adam; Proctor, Michael; Narayanan, Shrikanth

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Differences in vocal tract morphology have the potential to explain interspeaker variability in speech production. The potential acoustic impact of hard palate shape was examined in simulation, in addition to the interplay among morphology, articulation, and acoustics in real vowel production data. Method: High-front vowel production from…

  12. Interspeaker Variability in Hard Palate Morphology and Vowel Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lammert, Adam; Proctor, Michael; Narayanan, Shrikanth

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Differences in vocal tract morphology have the potential to explain interspeaker variability in speech production. The potential acoustic impact of hard palate shape was examined in simulation, in addition to the interplay among morphology, articulation, and acoustics in real vowel production data. Method: High-front vowel production from…

  13. Direct photon production from hadronic sources in high-energy heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Bratkovskaya, E. L.; Kiselev, S. M.; Sharkov, G. B.

    2008-09-15

    The low p{sub T} direct photon production from a variety of the hadronic sources is studied within the microscopic hadron-string dynamics transport approach for p+C, p+Pb, and Pb+Pb collisions at 160A GeV. The direct photon emission from elementary hadronic scatterings as well as meson-meson bremsstrahlung are incorporated. The influence of in-medium effects such as a collisional broadening of the vector-meson spectral functions on the photon emission rate is found to be hardly observable in the final spectra that are dominated by bremsstrahlung-type processes. The uncertainties in the subtraction of the 'background' from the photon decay of hadronic resonances inside the hot and dense fireball is investigated, additionally. Our findings are relevant for the interpretation and extraction of experimental data on direct photon production at low p{sub T}.

  14. Photon-in photon-out hard X-ray spectroscopy at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Zhu, Diling; Kroll, Thomas; Chollet, Mathieu; Feng, Yiping; Glownia, James M.; Kern, Jan; Lemke, Henrik T.; Nordlund, Dennis; Robert, Aymeric; Sikorski, Marcin; Song, Sanghoon; Weng, Tsu -Chien; Bergmann, Uwe

    2015-04-15

    X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) have opened unprecedented possibilities to study the structure and dynamics of matter at an atomic level and ultra-fast timescale. Many of the techniques routinely used at storage ring facilities are being adapted for experiments conducted at FELs. In order to take full advantage of these new sources several challenges have to be overcome. They are related to the very different source characteristics and its resulting impact on sample delivery, X-ray optics, X-ray detection and data acquisition. Here it is described how photon-in photon-out hard X-ray spectroscopy techniques can be applied to study the electronic structure and its dynamics of transition metal systems with ultra-bright and ultra-short FEL X-ray pulses. In particular, some of the experimental details that are different compared with synchrotron-based setups are discussed and illustrated by recent measurements performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source.

  15. Photon-in photon-out hard X-ray spectroscopy at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE PAGES

    Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Zhu, Diling; ...

    2015-04-15

    X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) have opened unprecedented possibilities to study the structure and dynamics of matter at an atomic level and ultra-fast timescale. Many of the techniques routinely used at storage ring facilities are being adapted for experiments conducted at FELs. In order to take full advantage of these new sources several challenges have to be overcome. They are related to the very different source characteristics and its resulting impact on sample delivery, X-ray optics, X-ray detection and data acquisition. Here it is described how photon-in photon-out hard X-ray spectroscopy techniques can be applied to study the electronic structure andmore » its dynamics of transition metal systems with ultra-bright and ultra-short FEL X-ray pulses. In particular, some of the experimental details that are different compared with synchrotron-based setups are discussed and illustrated by recent measurements performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source.« less

  16. Measurement of the space-time extent of the hard-photon emitting source in heavy-ion collisions at 100 MeV/nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Badala, A.; Barbera, R.; Palmeri, A.; Pappalardo, G.S.; Riggi, F.; Russo, A.C.; Turrisi, R.; Barbera, R.; Riggi, F.; Rizza, G.; Russo, G.; Turrisi, R.; Russo, G.

    1997-05-01

    The correlation between the couples of high-energy photons (E{sub {gamma}}{gt}30MeV) detected in the reactions induced by a {sup 36}Ar beam on {sup 27}Al, {sup 112}Sn, and {sup 197}Au targets at 95 MeV/nucleon has been analyzed with the intensity interferometry technique. Both the size and lifetime of the emitting source have been quantitatively evaluated. Results support the nucleon-nucleon picture as the dominant hard-photon production mechanism. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  17. Undulator-Based Production of Polarized Photons

    SciTech Connect

    Professor Kirk McDonald

    2008-05-29

    "Project Title: Undulator-Based Production of Polarized Photons" DOE Contract Number: FG02-04ER41355 Principal Investigator: Prof. Kirk McDonald Period of Performance: 09/10/2004 thru 08/31/2006 This award was to fund Princeton's activity on SLAC experiment E166, "Undulator-Based Production of Polarized Positrons" which was performed at SLAC during June and September 2005. Princeton U. fabricated a magnetic spectrometer for this experiment, and participated in the commissioning, operation, and analysis of the experiment, for which Prof. McDonald was a co-spokesperson. The experiment demonstrated that an intense positron beam with 80% longitudinal polarization could be generated by conversion of MeVenergy circularly polarized photons in a thin target, which photons were generated by passage of high-energy electrons through a helical undulator. This technique has since been adopted as the baseline for the polarized positron source of the proposed International Linear Collider. Results of the experiment have been published in Physical Review Letters, vol 100, p 210801 (2008) [see attached .pdf file], and a longer paper is in preparation.

  18. On the photon production in nucleus-nucleus collisions at high energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, Y. A.; Antonenko, V. G.

    1995-03-01

    A modified Landau hydrodynamical model is applied to study hard thermal photon production in central heavy-ion collisions at LHC, RHIC and SPS energies. It is shown that the phase transition from quark-gluon plasma into hadrons in consequence of the thermodynamical expansion is close to the second order phase transition if a resonance production is taken into account. Hard direct photon emission is also investigated with consideration of nuclear shadowing effect on structure function of quarks and gluons. Also ππ photon background is investigated. It is demonstrated that at the LHC energy photon yield from the quark-gluon plasma in the photon transversal momentum k ⊥ range from 5 to 25 GeV/c exceeds both the background and the direct photon yield. This conclusion may be important for the quark-gluon plasma diagnostic aims. It is also shown that for the LHC energy the thermal photon yield in the present model essentially exceeds this yield obtained in the Bjorken scaling model.

  19. Hard Two-Photon Contribution to Elastic Lepton-Proton Scattering Determined by the OLYMPUS Experiment.

    PubMed

    Henderson, B S; Ice, L D; Khaneft, D; O'Connor, C; Russell, R; Schmidt, A; Bernauer, J C; Kohl, M; Akopov, N; Alarcon, R; Ates, O; Avetisyan, A; Beck, R; Belostotski, S; Bessuille, J; Brinker, F; Calarco, J R; Carassiti, V; Cisbani, E; Ciullo, G; Contalbrigo, M; De Leo, R; Diefenbach, J; Donnelly, T W; Dow, K; Elbakian, G; Eversheim, P D; Frullani, S; Funke, Ch; Gavrilov, G; Gläser, B; Görrissen, N; Hasell, D K; Hauschildt, J; Hoffmeister, Ph; Holler, Y; Ihloff, E; Izotov, A; Kaiser, R; Karyan, G; Kelsey, J; Kiselev, A; Klassen, P; Krivshich, A; Lehmann, I; Lenisa, P; Lenz, D; Lumsden, S; Ma, Y; Maas, F; Marukyan, H; Miklukho, O; Milner, R G; Movsisyan, A; Murray, M; Naryshkin, Y; Perez Benito, R; Perrino, R; Redwine, R P; Rodríguez Piñeiro, D; Rosner, G; Schneekloth, U; Seitz, B; Statera, M; Thiel, A; Vardanyan, H; Veretennikov, D; Vidal, C; Winnebeck, A; Yeganov, V

    2017-03-03

    The OLYMPUS Collaboration reports on a precision measurement of the positron-proton to electron-proton elastic cross section ratio, R_{2γ}, a direct measure of the contribution of hard two-photon exchange to the elastic cross section. In the OLYMPUS measurement, 2.01 GeV electron and positron beams were directed through a hydrogen gas target internal to the DORIS storage ring at DESY. A toroidal magnetic spectrometer instrumented with drift chambers and time-of-flight scintillators detected elastically scattered leptons in coincidence with recoiling protons over a scattering angle range of ≈20° to 80°. The relative luminosity between the two beam species was monitored using tracking telescopes of interleaved gas electron multiplier and multiwire proportional chamber detectors at 12°, as well as symmetric Møller or Bhabha calorimeters at 1.29°. A total integrated luminosity of 4.5  fb^{-1} was collected. In the extraction of R_{2γ}, radiative effects were taken into account using a Monte Carlo generator to simulate the convolutions of internal bremsstrahlung with experiment-specific conditions such as detector acceptance and reconstruction efficiency. The resulting values of R_{2γ}, presented here for a wide range of virtual photon polarization 0.456<ε<0.978, are smaller than some hadronic two-photon exchange calculations predict, but are in reasonable agreement with a subtracted dispersion model and a phenomenological fit to the form factor data.

  20. Hard Two-Photon Contribution to Elastic Lepton-Proton Scattering Determined by the OLYMPUS Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, B. S.; Ice, L. D.; Khaneft, D.; O'Connor, C.; Russell, R.; Schmidt, A.; Bernauer, J. C.; Kohl, M.; Akopov, N.; Alarcon, R.; Ates, O.; Avetisyan, A.; Beck, R.; Belostotski, S.; Bessuille, J.; Brinker, F.; Calarco, J. R.; Carassiti, V.; Cisbani, E.; Ciullo, G.; Contalbrigo, M.; de Leo, R.; Diefenbach, J.; Donnelly, T. W.; Dow, K.; Elbakian, G.; Eversheim, P. D.; Frullani, S.; Funke, Ch.; Gavrilov, G.; Gläser, B.; Görrissen, N.; Hasell, D. K.; Hauschildt, J.; Hoffmeister, Ph.; Holler, Y.; Ihloff, E.; Izotov, A.; Kaiser, R.; Karyan, G.; Kelsey, J.; Kiselev, A.; Klassen, P.; Krivshich, A.; Lehmann, I.; Lenisa, P.; Lenz, D.; Lumsden, S.; Ma, Y.; Maas, F.; Marukyan, H.; Miklukho, O.; Milner, R. G.; Movsisyan, A.; Murray, M.; Naryshkin, Y.; Perez Benito, R.; Perrino, R.; Redwine, R. P.; Rodríguez Piñeiro, D.; Rosner, G.; Schneekloth, U.; Seitz, B.; Statera, M.; Thiel, A.; Vardanyan, H.; Veretennikov, D.; Vidal, C.; Winnebeck, A.; Yeganov, V.; Olympus Collaboration

    2017-03-01

    The OLYMPUS Collaboration reports on a precision measurement of the positron-proton to electron-proton elastic cross section ratio, R2 γ , a direct measure of the contribution of hard two-photon exchange to the elastic cross section. In the OLYMPUS measurement, 2.01 GeV electron and positron beams were directed through a hydrogen gas target internal to the DORIS storage ring at DESY. A toroidal magnetic spectrometer instrumented with drift chambers and time-of-flight scintillators detected elastically scattered leptons in coincidence with recoiling protons over a scattering angle range of ≈20 ° to 80°. The relative luminosity between the two beam species was monitored using tracking telescopes of interleaved gas electron multiplier and multiwire proportional chamber detectors at 12°, as well as symmetric Møller or Bhabha calorimeters at 1.29°. A total integrated luminosity of 4.5 fb-1 was collected. In the extraction of R2 γ, radiative effects were taken into account using a Monte Carlo generator to simulate the convolutions of internal bremsstrahlung with experiment-specific conditions such as detector acceptance and reconstruction efficiency. The resulting values of R2 γ, presented here for a wide range of virtual photon polarization 0.456 <ɛ <0.978 , are smaller than some hadronic two-photon exchange calculations predict, but are in reasonable agreement with a subtracted dispersion model and a phenomenological fit to the form factor data.

  1. Isolated double prompt photon production at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, R.M.

    1992-11-04

    We present a measurement of the cross section for production of two isolated prompt photons in p[bar p] collisions at [radical]s = 1.8 TeV. The cross section, measured as a function of transverse momentum (PT) of each photon, is roughly three times what full QCD calculations predict. Calculations that only include the Born and box diagrams, which are commonly used to estimate the prompt diphoton background to Higgs decay at future hadron colliders, are lower than our measurement by roughly ii factor of five. We also study variables sensitive to K[sub T]: the transverse momentum of initial state partons. The vector sum of the transverse momenta of both photons, K[sub T] = [vert bar][rvec P][sub T1] + [rvec P][sub T2][vert bar], is compared to previous measurements at lower collision energies, and we find a roughly logarithmic increase with [radical]s. The measured mean value is < K[sub T] >= 5.1 [plus minus] 1.1 GeV at [radical]s = 1.8 TeV.

  2. Interspeaker variability in hard palate morphology and vowel production.

    PubMed

    Lammert, Adam; Proctor, Michael; Narayanan, Shrikanth

    2013-12-01

    Differences in vocal tract morphology have the potential to explain interspeaker variability in speech production. The potential acoustic impact of hard palate shape was examined in simulation, in addition to the interplay among morphology, articulation, and acoustics in real vowel production data. High-front vowel production from 5 speakers of American English was examined using midsagittal real-time magnetic resonance imaging data with synchronized audio. Relationships among hard palate morphology, tongue shaping, and formant frequencies were analyzed. Simulations were performed to determine the acoustical properties of vocal tracts whose area functions are altered according to prominent hard palate variations. Simulations revealed that altering the height and position of the palatal dome alters formant frequencies. Examinations of real speech data showed that palatal morphology is not significantly correlated with any formant frequency but is correlated with major aspects of lingual articulation. Certain differences in hard palate morphology can substantially affect vowel acoustics, but those effects are not noticeable in real speech. Speakers adapt their lingual articulation to accommodate palate shape differences with the potential to substantially affect formant frequencies, while ignoring palate shape differences with relatively little acoustic impact, lending support for acoustic goals of vowel production.

  3. Hard photon processes in electron-positron annihilation at 29 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, M.S.

    1986-11-01

    The hard photon processes ..mu mu gamma.. and hadrons + ..gamma.. in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation at 29 GeV have been studied. The study is based on an integrated luminosity of 226 pb/sup -1/ taken at PEP with the Mark II detector. For the ..mu mu gamma.. process, a small fraction of non-planar events are observed with missing momentum along the beam direction. The resulting missing energy spectrum is consistent with that expected from higher order effects. The observed cross section is consistent with the predicted cross section for this process, sigma/sup exp/sigma/sup th/ = .90 +- .05 +- .06. The observed hard photon energy spectrum and mass distributions are found to be in agreement with O(..cap alpha../sup 3/) QED. The measured charge asymmetry is in good agreement with the predicted value, A/sub exp/A/sub th/ = .83 +- .25 +- .12. The ..mu gamma.. invariant mass distribution is used to place a limit on a possible excited muon coupling G..gamma../M* for excited muon masses in the range 1 < M* < 21 GeV of (G..gamma../M*)/sup 2/ < 10/sup -5/ GeV/sup -2/ at a 95% confidence level. In the hadrons + ..gamma.. process, evidence for final state radiation is found in an excess of events over that predicted from initial state radiation alone of 253 +- 54 +- 60 events. Further evidence for final state radiation is found in a large hadronic charge asymmetry A/sub Had+..gamma../= (-24.6 +- 5.5)%.

  4. Satellite project "CORONAS-PHOTON" for study of solar hard radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotov, Yu.; Cor-Phot Team

    "CORONAS-PHOTON" is the Russian mission for study of the solar hard electromagnetic radiation in the very wide energy range from Extreme UV up to high-energy gamma - radiation. GOAL OF PROJECT: The investigation of energy accumulation and its transformation into energy of accelerated particles processes during solar flares; the study of the acceleration mechanisms, propagation and interaction of fast particles in the solar atmosphere; the study of the solar activity correlation with physical-chemical processes in the Earth upper atmosphere. SCIENTIFIC PAYLOAD CAPABILITY Radiation / Energy region / Detector type: Full solar disk X- radiation / 2keV - 2000MeV / Prop. counter; NaI(Tl); Full solar disk X- and γ-radiation / NaI(Tl)/CsI(Na) phoswich; Full solar disk X- and γ-radiation and solar neutrons / 20 - 300MeV / YalO_3(Ce); CsI(Tl); Hard X-ray polarization in large flares / 20 - 150keV / p-terphenyl scatterer and CsI(Na) absorbers; Full solar disk EUV-radiation monitoring / 6 spectral windows in <10 - 130nm / Filtered photodiodes; Solar images in narrow spectral bands and monochromatic emission lines of hot plasma / Emission of HeII, SiXI, FeXXI, FeXXIII, MgXII ions / Multi-layer and Bregg spherical crystal quartz mirrors with CCDs; Additionally, the temporal and energy spectra of electrons (0.2-14MeV), protons (1-61MeV) and nuclei (Z<26, 2-50MeV/nuclon) at the satellite orbit will be registrated by several instruments. MAIN CHARACTERISTICS OF SPACECRAFT: Spacecraft weight: 1900 kg; Orbit type: Circular; Scientific payload weight: 540 kg; Height: 500 km; Orientation to the Sun [arc min]: better 5; Inclination: 82.5 degree; Instability of orientation [deg/s]: less 0.005; Solar - synchronous orbit is under study. Launching date of "CORONAS-PHOTON" spacecraft is 2006.

  5. Study of two-photon corrections in the pp{yields}e{sup +}e{sup -} process: Hard rescattering mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Guttmann, Julia; Vanderhaeghen, Marc; Kivel, Nikolai

    2011-05-01

    We investigate the two-photon corrections to the process pp{yields}e{sup +}e{sup -} at large momentum transfer, aimed to access the timelike nucleon form factors. We estimate the two-photon corrections using a hard rescattering mechanism, which has already been used to calculate the corresponding corrections to elastic electron-proton scattering. Using different nucleon distribution amplitudes, we find that the two-photon corrections to the pp{yields}e{sup +}e{sup -} cross sections in the momentum transfer range 5-30 GeV{sup 2} is below the 1% level.

  6. ST Rad-Hard Power Bipolar Transistors Product Portfolio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camonita, Giuseppe; Pintacuda, Francesco

    2011-10-01

    This article describes the STMicroelectronics Rad-Hard Bipolar Transistors product range addressed specifically for space applications. Available up to 100krad Total Ionized Dose radiation level at LDRS (Low Dose Rate Sensitivity) conditions, they are qualified according to the ESCC specifications. Here follows the main features, the characterization curves including static and dynamic behaviours, and the radiation performances for some products. Also some application examples are given.

  7. Photodiode radiation hardness, lyman-alpha emitting galaxies and photon detection in liquid argon neutrino detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baptista, Brian

    2013-12-01

    My dissertation is comprised of three projects: 1) studies of Lyman-alpha Emitting galaxies (LAEs), 2) radiation hardness studies of InGaAs photodiodes (PDs), and 3) scintillation photon detection in liquid argon (LAr) neutrino detectors. I began work on the project that has now become WFIRST, developing a science case that would use WFIRST after launch for the observation of LAEs. The radiation hardness of PDs was as an effort to support the WFIRST calibration team. When WFIRST was significantly delayed, I joined an R&D effort that applied my skills to work on photon detection in LAr neutrino detectors. I report results on a broadband selection method developed to detect high equivalent width (EW) LAEs. Using photometry from the CFHT-Legacy Survey Deep 2 and 3 fields, I have spectroscopically confirmed 63 z=2.5-3.5 LAEs using the WIYN/Hydra spectrograph. Using UV continuum-fitting techniques I computed properties such as EWs, internal reddening and star formation rates. 62 of my LAEs show evidence to be normal dust-free LAEs. Second, I present an investigation into the effects of ionizing proton radiation on commercial off-the-shelf InGaAs PDs. I developed a monochromator-based test apparatus that utilized NIST-calibrated reference PDs. I tested the PDs for changes to their dark current, relative responsivity as a function of wavelength, and absolute responsivity. I irradiated the test PDs using 30, 52, and 98 MeV protons at the IU Cyclotron Facility. I found the InGaAs PDs showed increased dark current as the fluence increased with no evidence of broadband response degradation at the fluences expected at an L2 orbit and a 10-year mission lifetime. Finally, I detail my efforts on technology development of both optical detector technologies and waveshifting light guide construction for LAr vacuum UV scintillation light. Cryogenic neutrino detectors use photon detection for both accelerator based science and for SNe neutrino detection and proton decay. I have

  8. Resonance production in two-photon interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Roe, N.A.

    1989-02-01

    Resonance production in two-photon interactions is studied using data collected with the ASP detector at the PEP e/sup +/e/sup /minus// storage ring located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The ASP detector is a non-magnetic lead-glass calorimeter constructed from 632 lead-glass bars. It covers 94% of 4..pi.. in solid angle, extending to within 20/degree/ of the beamline. Lead-scintillator calorimeters extend the coverage to within 21 mr of the beamline on both sides. Energy resolution of ..sqrt..E/10%, where E is the energy is GeV, is achieved for electrons and photons in the lead-glass calorimeter, and particle trajectories are reconstructed with high efficiency. A total luminosity of 108 pb/sup /minus/1/ was collected with the ASP detector at a center-of-mass energy of 29 GeV. The observed process is e/sup +/e/sup /minus// ..-->.. e/sup +/e/sup /minus//..gamma..*..gamma..* ..-->.. e/sup +/e/sup /minus//X, is a pseudoscalar resonance (J/sup PC/ = 0/sup /minus/+/) and ..gamma..* is a virtual (mass /ne/ 0) photon. The outgoing electrons scatter down the beampipe and are not detected. The observed resonances are the /eta/ and /eta/' mesons, with masses of 549 and 958 MeV, respectively. They are detected in the ..gamma gamma.. decay mode; a total of 2380 +- 49 /eta/ ..-->.. ..gamma gamma.. and 568 +- 26 /eta/' ..-->.. ..gamma gamma.. events are observed. From the number of events, the detection efficiency, and the calculated production cross sections the radiative widths, GAMMA/sub ..gamma gamma../, of the /eta/ and /eta/' were measured and found to be: GAMMA/sub ..gamma gamma../(/eta/) = .481 +- .010 +- .047keV and GAMMA/sub ..gamma gamma../(/eta/') = 4.71 +- .22 +- .70keV. These results are in good agreement with the world average values. 67 refs., 42 figs., 20 tabs.

  9. Experimental search for two-hard-photon exchange in elastic ep experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Perdrisat

    2012-09-01

    A remarkable change of paradigm was precipitated by the results, obtained in the last 12 years, of new measurements of the proton form factor ratio; the two form factors, G{sub Ep} and G{sub Mp}, are not in a constant ratio, as had been concluded from previous cross section experiments, and would be the case if charge and magnetization spatial distributions were the same. Rather, as the series of polarization measurements at JLab shows, the ratio {mu}{sub p}G{sub Ep}/G{sub Mp} decreases smoothly from 1 at Q{sup 2} = 0, to about 0.15 at Q{sup 2} = 8.5 GeV{sup 2}, with Q{sup 2} the negative of the four-momentum transfer squared. The interesting question is then: how can the results using two methods both related through the Born approximation, be found to lead to a different form factor ratio? The short answer is that cross sections require large radiative corrections, which tend to mask G{sub Ep} for increasing Q{sup 2}, whereas recoil polarization experiments measure the ratio of two components of the recoil polarization, which tends to cancel the effect of radiative corrections. Radiative corrections to the cross section of ep scattering have a long history. They may just not be accurate enough when the ratio G{sub Ep}/G{sub Mp} {approx} 0.05 and {tau} = Q{sup 2}/4m{sub p}{sup 2} {approx} 2.5, as is the case for the largest Q{sup 2} for which we have double-polarization data, 8.5 GeV{sup 2}. For this Q{sup 2} and with the Born cross section given by d{sigma} {approx} G{sub Ep}{sup 2} + ({tau}/{var_epsilon})G{sub Mp}{sup 2}, with {var_epsilon} the kinematic factor, the contribution to the cross section of G{sub Ep} becomes smaller than 0.1%, i.e. non-measurable in cross section experiments. The other hypothesis, is that the radiative corrections are incomplete, and that the exchange of two hard photons is the source of the discrepancy; the idea has been pursued in numerous works, but to this day there is no direct, experimental evidence that two-hard-photons

  10. Hard single diffractive jet production at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Abachi, S.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; D0 Collaboration

    1996-08-01

    Preliminary results from the D{null} experiment on jet production with forward rapidity gaps in {ital p{anti p}} collisions are presented. A class of dijet events with a forward rapidity gap is observed at center-of-mass energies {radical}s = 1800 GeV and 630 GeV. The number of events with rapidity gaps at both center-of-mass energies is significantly greater than the expectation from multiplicity fluctuations and is consistent with a hard single diffractive process. A small class of events with two forward gaps and central dijets is also observed at 1800 GeV. This topology is consistent with hard double pomeron exchange.

  11. Production and elliptic flow of dileptons and photons in a matrix model of the quark-gluon plasma.

    PubMed

    Gale, Charles; Hidaka, Yoshimasa; Jeon, Sangyong; Lin, Shu; Paquet, Jean-François; Pisarski, Robert D; Satow, Daisuke; Skokov, Vladimir V; Vujanovic, Gojko

    2015-02-20

    We consider a nonperturbative approach to the thermal production of dileptons and photons at temperatures near the critical temperature in QCD. The suppression of colored excitations at low temperature is modeled by including a small value of the Polyakov loop, in a "semi"-quark-gluon plasma (QGP). Comparing the semi-QGP to the perturbative QGP, we find a mild enhancement of thermal dileptons. In contrast, to leading logarithmic order in weak coupling there are far fewer hard photons from the semi-QGP than the usual QGP. To illustrate the possible effects on photon and dilepton production in heavy-ion collisions, we integrate the rate with a simulation using ideal hydrodynamics. Dileptons uniformly exhibit a small flow, but the strong suppression of photons in the semi-QGP tends to weight the elliptical flow of photons to that generated in the hadronic phase.

  12. 2-ps Hard X-Ray Streak Camera Measurements at Sector 7 Beamline of the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Chollet, M.; Ahr, B.; Walko, D.A.; Rose-Petruck, C.; Adams, B.

    2011-08-02

    A hard X-ray streak camera capable of 2-ps time resolution is in operation at the Sector 7 beamline of the Advanced Photon Source. It is used for laser-pump, X-ray probe experiments using the Ti:Sapphire femtosecond laser system installed on the beamline. This streak camera, combined with standardized and prealigned experimental setups, can perform time-resolved liquid-phase absorption spectroscopy, reflectivity, and diffraction experiments.

  13. Neutralino pair production at the photon-photon collider for the τ̃-coannihilation scenario

    SciTech Connect

    Sonmez, Nasuf

    2016-03-25

    Supersymmetry (SUSY) is a theory which gives an explanation for the strong and electroweak interactions from the grand unification scale down to the weak scale. The search for supersymmetric particles still continues at full speed at the LHC without success. The main task at the ILC is complementing the LHC result and also search for new physics. In this study, the neutralino pair production via photon-photon collision is studied for the t̃-coannihilation scenario in the context of MSSM at the ILC. In the calculation, all the possible one loop diagrams are taken into account for the photon-photon interaction. We present the production cross section and distribution of various observables for the lightest and next-to-lightest neutralino pairs for benchmark models which are specifically presented in the light of LHC8 data analysis, employing these benchmark models for neutralino pair production could show the potential of the ILC concerning the dark matter searches in supersymmetry.

  14. Toward two-dimensional nanometer resolution hard X-ray differential-interference-contrast imaging using modified photon sieves.

    PubMed

    Xie, Changqing; Zhu, Xiaoli; Li, Hailiang; Shi, Lina; Hua, Yilei; Liu, Ming

    2012-02-15

    In this Letter, we report a significant step forward in the design of single-optical-element optics for two-dimensional (2D) hard X-ray differential-interference-contrast (DIC) imaging based on modified photon sieves (MPSs). MPSs were obtained by a modified optic, i.e., combining two overlaid binary gratings and a photon sieve through two logical XOR operations. The superior performance of MPSs was demonstrated. Compared to Fresnel zone plates-based DIC diffractive optical elements (DOEs), which help to improve contrast only in one direction, MPSs can provide better resolution and 2D DIC imaging. Compared to normal photon sieves, MPSs are capable of imaging at a significantly higher image contrast. We anticipate that MPSs can provide a complementary and versatile high-resolution nondestructive imaging tool for ultra-large-scale integrated circuits at 45 nm node and below.

  15. Two-dimensional CdTe photon counting imager for hard x-ray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Toru; Morii, Hisashi; Ohashi, Gosuke; Tomita, Yasuhiro; Hatanaka, Yoshinori

    2006-08-01

    Two dimension real-time radiation imaging device for the hard ray with photon-counting type CdTe radiation detector was researched and developed. It is a device with the 35×35 arranged 1225 pixels including a virtual pixel in pixel pitch 1/10-inch pitch. All pixels are independently connected by original ASIC, and it has the energy distinction ability with five energy thresholds. The desecrated CdTe diodes were adopted in the photoelectric conversion elements by using eight ASIC of original development with maximum count rate 2Mcps / pixel and 5 energy distinction thresholds in this prototype. This prototype is a portable type device that can be the room temperature operation, it is possible to connect it with the laptop computer as a camera device of two dimension type to be able to take move of a real-time scene (an actual frame rate depends on signal conditioning PC) via USB2.0. The imaging area is about 3.5-inch corner. This time, it has been understood to be able to detect slight information that has tended to be overlooked up to now because it is possible to take picture of Am241, Co57, and Cs137 simultaneously, to try the animation taking picture that distinguishes three isotopes, and to set the best range of each at the same time as being able to distinguish these three kinds by the energy distinction clearly. It characterizes in corresponding to an incidence rate at the X-ray tube level, and it corresponds to taking picture of the animation of the penetration image that uses X rays.

  16. Coherent storage and phase modulation of single hard-x-ray photons using nuclear excitons.

    PubMed

    Liao, Wen-Te; Pálffy, Adriana; Keitel, Christoph H

    2012-11-09

    The coherent storage and phase modulation of x-ray single-photon wave packets in the resonant scattering of light off nuclei is theoretically investigated. We show that by switching off and on again the magnetic field in the nuclear sample, phase-sensitive storage of photons in the keV regime can be achieved. Corresponding π phase modulation of the stored photon can be accomplished if the retrieving magnetic field is rotated by 180°. The development of such x-ray single-photon control techniques is a first step towards forwarding quantum optics and quantum information to shorter wavelengths and more compact photonic devices.

  17. Universal Parametrization of Thermal Photon Production in Hadronic Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heffernan, Matthew; Hohler, Paul; Rapp, Ralf

    2014-09-01

    As the production of photons and dileptons from high-energy collisions is able to provide information on the high temperature and high density phases of nuclear matter, an improved and universal parametrization of the rather involved microscopic calculations is key to honing the theory behind this production. We focus on photon emission rates from hadronic many-body calculations of the in-medium rho spectral function, which includes the effects of baryons and antibaryons. Across a range of temperatures from 0.1 to 0.18 GeV and baryon chemical potentials from 0 to 0.4 GeV, a parametrization of thermal photon rates for energies from 0.2 to 5 GeV is numerically determined through the use of nested fitting methods. This provides a fully functional description of thermal photon production largely within an unprecedented 20% of the calculated values from the spectral function, a significant reduction in error from available parametrizations. The contribution of photons and dileptons from pion-pion bremsstrahlung is evaluated for the importance of its contribution. The functional form, coupled with the comparison to the bremsstrahlung production of thermal photons, will provide a baseline for guiding future studies. As the production of photons and dileptons from high-energy collisions is able to provide information on the high temperature and high density phases of nuclear matter, an improved and universal parametrization of the rather involved microscopic calculations is key to honing the theory behind this production. We focus on photon emission rates from hadronic many-body calculations of the in-medium rho spectral function, which includes the effects of baryons and antibaryons. Across a range of temperatures from 0.1 to 0.18 GeV and baryon chemical potentials from 0 to 0.4 GeV, a parametrization of thermal photon rates for energies from 0.2 to 5 GeV is numerically determined through the use of nested fitting methods. This provides a fully functional description of

  18. Hard four-jet production in pA collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blok, B.; Strikman, M.; Wiedemann, U. A.

    2013-06-01

    In a suitably chosen back-to-back kinematics, four-jet production in hadronic collisions is known to be dominated by contributions from two independent partonic scattering processes, thus giving experimental access to the structure of generalized two-parton distributions (2GPDs). Here, we show that a combined measurement of the double hard four-jet cross section in proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions will allow one to disentangle different sources of two-parton correlations in the proton that cannot be disentangled with 4-jet measurements in proton-proton collisions alone. To this end, we analyze in detail the structure of 2GPDs in the nucleus (A), we calculate in the independent nucleon approximation all contributions to the double hard four-jet cross section in pA, and we determine corrections arising from the nuclear dependence of single parton distribution functions. We then outline an experimental strategy for determining the longitudinal two-parton correlations in the proton.

  19. Time lag between hard and soft X-ray photons in QPO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stollman, G. M.; Van Paradijs, J.; Hasinger, G.; Lewin, W. H. G.; Van Der Klis, M.

    1987-01-01

    The millisec-order delay between quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) observed from Cyg X-2 and GX 5-1, in a high-energy and a low-energy bandpass, may be due to the Compton scattering of photons in a cloud of hot electron gas, depending on optical depth, electron temperature, and cloud radius, as well as input photon spectra. Monte Carlo simulations are used to demonstrate how the observed delay and X-ray spectrum can be used to constrain the size of the scattering cloud, for an assumed input spectrum of photons. Both QPO in emergent photons and a time lag between high and low energy photons can be generated not only by the scattering of an oscillating signal in a constant cloud, but also by the scattering of a constant source of input photons through a cloud with oscillating optical depth.

  20. Off-equilibrium photon production during the chiral phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Michler, Frank; Hees, Hendrik van; Dietrich, Dennis D.; Leupold, Stefan; Greiner, Carsten

    2013-09-15

    In the early stage of ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions chiral symmetry is restored temporarily. During this so-called chiral phase transition, the quark masses change from their constituent to their bare values. This mass shift leads to the spontaneous non-perturbative creation of quark–antiquark pairs, which effectively contributes to the formation of the quark–gluon plasma. We investigate the photon production induced by this creation process. We provide an approach that eliminates possible unphysical contributions from the vacuum polarization and renders the resulting photon spectra integrable in the ultraviolet domain. The off-equilibrium photon numbers are of quadratic order in the perturbative coupling constants while a thermal production is only of quartic order. Quantitatively, we find, however, that for the most physical mass-shift scenarios and for photon momenta larger than 1 GeV the off-equilibrium processes contribute less photons than the thermal processes. -- Highlights: •We investigate first-order photon emission arising from the chiral mass shift. •We provide an ansatz eliminating possible unphysical vacuum contributions. •Our ansatz leads to photon spectra being integrable in the ultraviolet domain.

  1. QCD corrections to top quark pair production in association with a photon at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Melnikov, Kirill; Schulze, Markus; Scharf, Andreas

    2011-04-01

    We compute QCD corrections to the production of a tt pair in association with a hard photon at the Tevatron and the LHC. This process allows a direct measurement of the top quark electromagnetic couplings that, at the moment, are only loosely constrained. We include top quark decays, treating them in the narrow width approximation, and retain spin correlations of final-state particles. Photon radiation off top quark decay products is included in our calculation and yields a significant contribution to the cross section. We study next-to-leading-order QCD corrections to the pp{yields}tt{gamma} process at the Tevatron for the selection criteria used in a recent measurement by the CDF collaboration. We also discuss the impact of QCD corrections to the pp{yields}tt{gamma} process on the measurement of the top quark electric charge at the 14 TeV LHC.

  2. Nanoporous hard data: optical encoding of information within nanoporous anodic alumina photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Santos, Abel; Law, Cheryl Suwen; Pereira, Taj; Losic, Dusan

    2016-04-21

    Herein, we present a method for storing binary data within the spectral signature of nanoporous anodic alumina photonic crystals. A rationally designed multi-sinusoidal anodisation approach makes it possible to engineer the photonic stop band of nanoporous anodic alumina with precision. As a result, the transmission spectrum of these photonic nanostructures can be engineered to feature well-resolved and selectively positioned characteristic peaks across the UV-visible spectrum. Using this property, we implement an 8-bit binary code and assess the versatility and capability of this system by a series of experiments aiming to encode different information within the nanoporous anodic alumina photonic crystals. The obtained results reveal that the proposed nanosized platform is robust, chemically stable, versatile and has a set of unique properties for data storage, opening new opportunities for developing advanced nanophotonic tools for a wide range of applications, including sensing, photonic tagging, self-reporting drug releasing systems and secure encoding of information.

  3. On the size of the secondary electron cloud in crystals irradiated by hard X-ray photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grum-Grzhimailo, Alexei N.; Pikuz, Tatiana; Faenov, Anatoly; Matsuoka, Takeshi; Ozaki, Norimasa; Albertazzi, Bruno; Pikuz, Sergei; Inubushi, Yuichi; Yabashi, Makina; Tono, Kensuke; Yumoto, Hirokatsu; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Kodama, Ryosuke

    2017-03-01

    A simple theoretical recipe is proposed to estimate the size of the secondary electron cloud, generated in matter by incoming hard X-ray photons. An exclusive response of the LiF crystal to deposited X-ray doses by proportional generation of secondary electrons, which cause creation of color centers density inside the crystal, provides a unique possibility to validate the theoretical predictions for the size of the electron cloud with submicron resolution. The radius of the electron cloud measured for 10.1 keV photons is in agreement with the theoretical predictions. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Many Particle Spectroscopy of Atoms, Molecules, Clusters and Surfaces", edited by A.N. Grum-Grzhimailo, E.V. Gryzlova, Yu V. Popov, and A.V. Solov'yov.

  4. Nanoporous hard data: optical encoding of information within nanoporous anodic alumina photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Abel; Law, Cheryl Suwen; Pereira, Taj; Losic, Dusan

    2016-04-01

    Herein, we present a method for storing binary data within the spectral signature of nanoporous anodic alumina photonic crystals. A rationally designed multi-sinusoidal anodisation approach makes it possible to engineer the photonic stop band of nanoporous anodic alumina with precision. As a result, the transmission spectrum of these photonic nanostructures can be engineered to feature well-resolved and selectively positioned characteristic peaks across the UV-visible spectrum. Using this property, we implement an 8-bit binary code and assess the versatility and capability of this system by a series of experiments aiming to encode different information within the nanoporous anodic alumina photonic crystals. The obtained results reveal that the proposed nanosized platform is robust, chemically stable, versatile and has a set of unique properties for data storage, opening new opportunities for developing advanced nanophotonic tools for a wide range of applications, including sensing, photonic tagging, self-reporting drug releasing systems and secure encoding of information.Herein, we present a method for storing binary data within the spectral signature of nanoporous anodic alumina photonic crystals. A rationally designed multi-sinusoidal anodisation approach makes it possible to engineer the photonic stop band of nanoporous anodic alumina with precision. As a result, the transmission spectrum of these photonic nanostructures can be engineered to feature well-resolved and selectively positioned characteristic peaks across the UV-visible spectrum. Using this property, we implement an 8-bit binary code and assess the versatility and capability of this system by a series of experiments aiming to encode different information within the nanoporous anodic alumina photonic crystals. The obtained results reveal that the proposed nanosized platform is robust, chemically stable, versatile and has a set of unique properties for data storage, opening new opportunities for

  5. Phenomenology of photon and dilepton production in relativistic nuclear collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bratkovskaya, Elena

    2014-11-01

    We discuss the latest theoretical results on direct photon and dilepton production from relativistic heavy-ion collisions. While the dilepton spectra at low invariant mass show in-medium effects like collisional broadening of the vector meson spectral functions, the dilepton yield at high invariant masses (above 1.1 GeV) is dominated by QGP contributions for central heavy-ion collisions at relativistic energies. The present status of the photon v2 "puzzle" - a large elliptic flow v2 of the direct photons experimentally observed at RHIC and LHC energies - is also addressed. The role of hadronic and partonic sources for the photon spectra and v2 is considered as well as the possibility to subtract the QGP signal from the experimental observables.

  6. Radiation hardness test of the Philips Digital Photon Counter with proton beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnyakov, M. Yu.; Frach, T.; Kononov, S. A.; Kuyanov, I. A.; Prisekin, V. G.

    2016-07-01

    The Philips Digital Photon Counter (DPC) is a silicon photomultiplier combining Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes (G-APD) and dedicated readout electronics in the same chip. The DPC is a promising photon sensor for future RICH detectors. A known issue of G-APD is its sensitivity to radiation damage. Two DPC sensors were tested using 800 MeV/c protons. An increase of dark counting rate with proton fluence up to 4 ·1011cm-2 has been measured.

  7. The hard X-ray Photon Single-Shot Spectrometer of SwissFEL—initial characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehanek, J.; Makita, M.; Wiegand, P.; Heimgartner, P.; Pradervand, C.; Seniutinas, G.; Flechsig, U.; Thominet, V.; Schneider, C. W.; Rodriguez Fernandez, A.; David, C.; Patthey, L.; Juranić, P.

    2017-05-01

    SwissFEL requires the monitoring of the photon spectral distribution at a repetition rate of 100 Hz for machine optimization and experiment online diagnostics. The Photon Single Shot Spectrometer has been designed for the photon energy range of 4 keV to 12 keV provided by the Aramis beamline. It is capable of measuring the spectrum in a non-destructive manner, with an energy resolution of Δ E/E = (2-5) × 10-5 over a bandwidth of 0.5% on a shot-to-shot basis. This article gives a detailed description about the technical challenges, structures, and considerations when building such a device, and to further enhance the performance of the spectrometer.

  8. Photon and hadron production of heavy flavors

    SciTech Connect

    DeJongh, F.

    1993-11-01

    Recent experiments have obtained large clean samples of charmed and bottom hadrons, and have measured both single-quark inclusive cross-sections and quark-antiquark correlations. Predictions for these production properties are available from next-to-leading order QCD. We review recent results from fixed target hadroproduction of charm and bottom, fixed target photoproduction of charm, and production of bottom at proton-antiproton colliders.

  9. A hard x-ray scanning microprobe for fluorescence imaging and microdiffraction at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, L.; Lai, B.; Yun, W.; Ilinski, P.; Legnini, D.; Maser, J.; Rodrigues, W.

    1999-11-02

    A hard x-ray scanning microprobe based on zone plate optics and undulator radiation, in the energy region from 6 to 20 keV, has reached a focal spot size (FWHM) of 0.15 {micro}m (v) x 0.6 {micro}m (h), and a photon flux of 4 x 10{sup 9} photons/sec/0.01%BW. Using a slit 44 meters upstream to create a virtual source, a circular beam spot of 0.15 {micro}m in diameter can be obtained with a photon flux of one order of magnitude less. During fluorescence mapping of trace elements in a single human ovarian cell, the microprobe exhibited an imaging sensitivity for Pt (L{sub a} line) of 80 attograms/{micro}m{sup 2} for a count rate of 10 counts per second. The x-ray microprobe has been used to map crystallographic strain and multiquantum well thickness in micro-optoelectronic devices produced with the selective area growth technique.

  10. Inclusive D*-meson production in two-photon collisions at LEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, A. A.

    2002-06-01

    The inclusive production of D*+ is measured by DELPHI in photon-photon collisions at LEP-II energies. The measured cross sections are compatible with the QCD calculations having the contributions from the resolved processes sensitive to the gluon density in photon. The total cross section of the charm quark production in two-photon collisions at LEP-II energies is estimated.

  11. Direct photon production in e+e- annihilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, E.; Ford, W. T.; Qi, N.; Read, A. L.; Smith, J. G.; Camporesi, T.; de Sangro, R.; Marini, A.; Peruzzi, I.; Piccolo, M.; Ronga, F.; Blume, H. T.; Hurst, R. B.; Sleeman, J. C.; Venuti, J. P.; Wald, H. B.; Weinstein, Roy; Band, H. R.; Gettner, M. W.; Goderre, G. P.; Meyer, O. A.; Moromisato, J. H.; Shambroom, W. D.; von Goeler, E.; Ash, W. W.; Chadwick, G. B.; Clearwater, S. H.; Coombes, R. W.; Kaye, H. S.; Lau, K. H.; Leedy, R. E.; Lynch, H. L.; Messner, R. L.; Moss, L. J.; Muller, F.; Nelson, H. N.; Ritson, D. M.; Rosenberg, L. J.; Wiser, D. E.; Zdarko, R. W.; Groom, D. E.; Lee, H. Y.; Delfino, M. C.; Heltsley, B. K.; Johnson, J. R.; Lavine, T. L.; Maruyama, T.; Prepost, R.

    1985-01-01

    Direct photon production in hadronic events from e+e- annihilation has been studied at √s =29 GeV with use of the MAC detector at the PEP storage ring. A charge asymmetry A=(-12.3+/-3.5)% is observed in the final-state jets. The cross section and the charge asymmetry are in good agreement with the predictions of the fractionally charged quark-parton model. Both the charge asymmetry and total yield have been used to determine values of quark charges. Limits have been established for anomalous sources of direct photons.

  12. Consistency of data on soft photon production in hadronic interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Lichard, P. )

    1994-12-01

    The glob model of Lichard and Van Hove and the modified soft annihilation model (MSAM) of Lichard and Thompson are used as a phenomenological tool for relating results from various experiments on soft photon production in high energy collisions. The total phenomenological expectation is composed of contributions from classical bremsstrahlung, the soft annihilation model, and the glob model. The empirical excess above the background from hadronic decays at very small longitudinal momenta of photons is well reproduced, as well as that for transverse momenta [ital p][sub [ital T

  13. Heavy Meson Production at a Low-Energy Photon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Asztalos, S

    2004-04-15

    A low-energy {gamma}{gamma} collider has been discussed in the context of a testbed for a {gamma}{gamma} interaction region at the Next Linear Collider(NLC). We consider the production of heavy mesons at such a testbed using Compton-backscattered photons and demonstrate that their production rivals or exceeds those by BELLE, BABAR or LEP where they are produced indirectly via virtual {gamma}{gamma} luminosities.

  14. Design of Si-photonic structures to evaluate their radiation hardness dependence on design parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeiler, M.; Detraz, S.; Olantera, L.; Pezzullo, G.; Seif El Nasr-Storey, S.; Sigaud, C.; Soos, C.; Troska, J.; Vasey, F.

    2016-01-01

    Particle detectors for future experiments at the HL-LHC will require new optical data transmitters that can provide high data rates and be resistant against high levels of radiation. Furthermore, new design paths for future optical readout systems for HL-LHC could be opened if there was a possibility to integrate the optical components with their driving electronics and possibly also the silicon particle sensors themselves. All these functionalities could potentially be combined in the silicon photonics technology which currently receives a lot of attention for conventional optical link systems. Silicon photonic test chips were designed in order to assess the suitability of this technology for deployment in high-energy physics experiments. The chips contain custom-designed Mach-Zehnder modulators, pre-designed ``building-block'' modulators, photodiodes and various other passive test structures. The simulation and design flow of the custom designed Mach-Zehnder modulators and some first measurement results of the chips are presented.

  15. Performance of hard X-ray zone plates at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Maser, J.; Lai, B.; Cai, Z.; Rodrigues, W.; Legnini, D.; Ilinski, P.; Yun, W.; Chen, Z.; Krasnoperova, A.A.; Vladimirsky, Y.; Cerrina, F.; Di, E.; Fabrizio, E.; Gentili, M.

    1999-12-20

    Fresnel zone plates have been highly successful as focusing and imaging optics for soft x-ray microscopes and microprobe. More recently, with the advent of third-generation high-energy storage rings, zone plates for the hard x-ray regime have been put to use as well. The performance of zone plates manufactured using a combination of electron-beam lithography and x-ray lithography is described.

  16. Generation of reactive oxygen species and photon emission from a browned product.

    PubMed

    Iida, Tetsuo; Yoshiki, Yumiko; Someya, Shinich; Okubo, Kazuyoshi

    2002-08-01

    The properties of photon emission arising from a browned product were investigated. The photon intensity of the browned product was proportional to the absorbancy at 420 nm, and was influenced by the amino acid structure. The fluorescence spectrum showed similar compounds in the browned product to be related with this photon emission. Superoxide and hydrogen peroxide contributed highly to this photon emission, and several redox compounds enhanced the photon intensity at appropriate concentrations. Our work suggests that the photon intensity was closely related to the reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated from the browned product, and this effect may be utilized to evaluate the function and quality of browned food.

  17. Multimodal hard x-ray nanoprobe facility by nested Montel mirrors aimed for 40nm resolution at Taiwan Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Gung-Chian Chang, Shi-Hung; Chen, Bo-Yi; Chen, Huang-Yeh; Lin, Bi-Hsuan; Tseng, Shao-Chin; Lee, Chian-Yao; Tang, Mau-Tsu; Wu, Shao-Yun

    2016-01-28

    The hard X-ray nanoprobe facility at Taiwan Photon Source (TPS) provides multimodal X-ray detections, including XRF, XAS, XEOL, projection microscope, CDI, etc. Resulting from the large numerical aperture obtained by utilizing nested Montel mirrors, the beamline with a moderate length 75 meters can conduct similar performance with those beamlines longer than 100 meters. The mirrors are symmetrically placed with a 45 degrees cut. The beamline optics is thus designed to take the advantage of the symmetry of mirrors such that a round focal spot is accomplished. The size and the divergence of the focus spot are simulated around 40 nm and 6.29 mrad, respectively. The whole facility including the beamline and the stations will be operated under vacuum to preserve the photon coherence as well as to prevent the system from unnecessary environmental interference. A SEM in close cooperation with laser interferometers is equipped to precisely locate the position of the sample. This endstation is scheduled to be commissioned in the fall of 2016.

  18. A bi-prism interferometer for hard x-ray photons

    SciTech Connect

    Isakovic, A.F.; Siddons, D.; Stein, A.; Warren, J.B.; Sandy, A.R.; Narayanan, M.S.; Ablett, J.M.; Metzler, M. and Evans-Lutterodt, K.

    2010-04-06

    Micro-fabricated bi-prisms have been used to create an interference pattern from an incident hard X-ray beam, and the intensity of the pattern probed with fluorescence from a 30 nm-thick metal film. Maximum fringe visibility exceeded 0.9 owing to the nano-sized probe and the choice of single-crystal prism material. A full near-field analysis is necessary to describe the fringe field intensities, and the transverse coherence lengths were extracted at APS beamline 8-ID-I. It is also shown that the maximum number of fringes is dependent only on the complex refractive index of the prism material.

  19. Higgs boson pair production at a photon-photon collision in the two Higgs doublet model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asakawa, Eri; Harada, Daisuke; Kanemura, Shinya; Okada, Yasuhiro; Tsumura, Koji

    2009-03-01

    We calculate the cross section of Higgs boson pair production at a photon collider in the two Higgs doublet model. We focus on the scenario in which the lightest CP even Higgs boson (h) has the Standard Model like couplings to the gauge bosons. We take into account the one-loop correction to the hhh coupling as well as additional one-loop diagrams due to charged Higgs bosons to the γγ → hh helicity amplitudes. It is found that the full cross section can be enhanced by both these effects to a considerable level. We discuss the impact of these corrections on the hhh coupling measurement at the photon collider.

  20. Born-approximation and radiative corrections to pair production in photon-photon collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, Robert J.

    1989-01-01

    Aspects of pair production in photon-photon collisions, which can be of great importance in a variety of astrophysical settings, are examined. In particular, the correction associated with the use of Coulomb rather than plane-wave functions to describe the outgoing e(+) e(-) is evaluated. This is important only in the energy domain near threshold where e(+) e(-) are nonrelativistic, and the effect is evaluated. Because of the extreme simplicity of the nonrelativistic Born limit, the corresponding derivation is briefly outlined using noncovariant perturbation theory. The relative magnitude of the Born correction is comparable to radiative-correction effects. These effects can be evaluated easily in the nonrelativistic limit, and an approximate calculation is outlined.

  1. Consistent simulation of direct-photon production in hadron collisions including associated two-jet production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odaka, Shigeru; Kurihara, Yoshimasa

    2016-05-01

    We have developed an event generator for direct-photon production in hadron collisions, including associated 2-jet production in the framework of the GR@PPA event generator. The event generator consistently combines γ + 2-jet production processes with the lowest-order γ + jet and photon-radiation (fragmentation) processes from quantum chromodynamics (QCD) 2-jet production using a subtraction method. The generated events can be fed to general-purpose event generators to facilitate the addition of hadronization and decay simulations. Using the obtained event information, we can simulate photon isolation and hadron-jet reconstruction at the particle (hadron) level. The simulation reasonably reproduces measurement data obtained at the large hadron collider (LHC) concerning not only the inclusive photon spectrum, but also the correlation between the photon and jet. The simulation implies that the contribution of the γ + 2-jet is very large, especially in low photon-pT ( ≲ 50 GeV) regions. Discrepancies observed at low pT, although marginal, may indicate the necessity for the consideration of further higher-order processes. Unambiguous particle-level definition of the photon-isolation condition for the signal events is desired to be given explicitly in future measurements.

  2. High-energy resummation in direct photon production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diana, Giovanni

    2010-01-01

    We present the computation of the direct photon production cross-section in perturbative QCD to all orders in the limit of high partonic center-of-mass energy. We show how the high-energy resummation can be performed consistently in the presence of a collinear singularity in the final state, we compare our results to the fixed order NLO cross-section in the MS¯ scheme, and we provide predictions at NNLO and beyond.

  3. Radiation hardness assessment of the charge-integrating hybrid pixel detector JUNGFRAU 1.0 for photon science

    SciTech Connect

    Jungmann-Smith, J. H. Bergamaschi, A.; Brückner, M.; Dinapoli, R.; Greiffenberg, D.; Jaggi, A.; Maliakal, D.; Mayilyan, D.; Mezza, D.; Mozzanica, A.; Ramilli, M.; Ruder, Ch.; Schädler, L.; Schmitt, B.; Shi, X.; Tinti, G.; Cartier, S.; Medjoubi, K.

    2015-12-15

    JUNGFRAU (adJUstiNg Gain detector FoR the Aramis User station) is a two-dimensional hybrid pixel detector for photon science applications in free electron lasers, particularly SwissFEL, and synchrotron light sources. JUNGFRAU is an automatic gain switching, charge-integrating detector which covers a dynamic range of more than 10{sup 4} photons of an energy of 12 keV with a good linearity, uniformity of response, and spatial resolving power. The JUNGFRAU 1.0 application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) features a 256 × 256 pixel matrix of 75 × 75 μm{sup 2} pixels and is bump-bonded to a 320 μm thick Si sensor. Modules of 2 × 4 chips cover an area of about 4 × 8 cm{sup 2}. Readout rates in excess of 2 kHz enable linear count rate capabilities of 20 MHz (at 12 keV) and 50 MHz (at 5 keV). The tolerance of JUNGFRAU to radiation is a key issue to guarantee several years of operation at free electron lasers and synchrotrons. The radiation hardness of JUNGFRAU 1.0 is tested with synchrotron radiation up to 10 MGy of delivered dose. The effect of radiation-induced changes on the noise, baseline, gain, and gain switching is evaluated post-irradiation for both the ASIC and the hybridized assembly. The bare JUNGFRAU 1.0 chip can withstand doses as high as 10 MGy with minor changes to its noise and a reduction in the preamplifier gain. The hybridized assembly, in particular the sensor, is affected by the photon irradiation which mainly shows as an increase in the leakage current. Self-healing of the system is investigated during a period of 11 weeks after the delivery of the radiation dose. Annealing radiation-induced changes by bake-out at 100 °C is investigated. It is concluded that the JUNGFRAU 1.0 pixel is sufficiently radiation-hard for its envisioned applications at SwissFEL and synchrotron beam lines.

  4. Radiation hardness assessment of the charge-integrating hybrid pixel detector JUNGFRAU 1.0 for photon science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jungmann-Smith, J. H.; Bergamaschi, A.; Brückner, M.; Cartier, S.; Dinapoli, R.; Greiffenberg, D.; Jaggi, A.; Maliakal, D.; Mayilyan, D.; Medjoubi, K.; Mezza, D.; Mozzanica, A.; Ramilli, M.; Ruder, Ch.; Schädler, L.; Schmitt, B.; Shi, X.; Tinti, G.

    2015-12-01

    JUNGFRAU (adJUstiNg Gain detector FoR the Aramis User station) is a two-dimensional hybrid pixel detector for photon science applications in free electron lasers, particularly SwissFEL, and synchrotron light sources. JUNGFRAU is an automatic gain switching, charge-integrating detector which covers a dynamic range of more than 104 photons of an energy of 12 keV with a good linearity, uniformity of response, and spatial resolving power. The JUNGFRAU 1.0 application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) features a 256 × 256 pixel matrix of 75 × 75 μm2 pixels and is bump-bonded to a 320 μm thick Si sensor. Modules of 2 × 4 chips cover an area of about 4 × 8 cm2. Readout rates in excess of 2 kHz enable linear count rate capabilities of 20 MHz (at 12 keV) and 50 MHz (at 5 keV). The tolerance of JUNGFRAU to radiation is a key issue to guarantee several years of operation at free electron lasers and synchrotrons. The radiation hardness of JUNGFRAU 1.0 is tested with synchrotron radiation up to 10 MGy of delivered dose. The effect of radiation-induced changes on the noise, baseline, gain, and gain switching is evaluated post-irradiation for both the ASIC and the hybridized assembly. The bare JUNGFRAU 1.0 chip can withstand doses as high as 10 MGy with minor changes to its noise and a reduction in the preamplifier gain. The hybridized assembly, in particular the sensor, is affected by the photon irradiation which mainly shows as an increase in the leakage current. Self-healing of the system is investigated during a period of 11 weeks after the delivery of the radiation dose. Annealing radiation-induced changes by bake-out at 100 °C is investigated. It is concluded that the JUNGFRAU 1.0 pixel is sufficiently radiation-hard for its envisioned applications at SwissFEL and synchrotron beam lines.

  5. Radiation hardness assessment of the charge-integrating hybrid pixel detector JUNGFRAU 1.0 for photon science.

    PubMed

    Jungmann-Smith, J H; Bergamaschi, A; Brückner, M; Cartier, S; Dinapoli, R; Greiffenberg, D; Jaggi, A; Maliakal, D; Mayilyan, D; Medjoubi, K; Mezza, D; Mozzanica, A; Ramilli, M; Ruder, Ch; Schädler, L; Schmitt, B; Shi, X; Tinti, G

    2015-12-01

    JUNGFRAU (adJUstiNg Gain detector FoR the Aramis User station) is a two-dimensional hybrid pixel detector for photon science applications in free electron lasers, particularly SwissFEL, and synchrotron light sources. JUNGFRAU is an automatic gain switching, charge-integrating detector which covers a dynamic range of more than 10(4) photons of an energy of 12 keV with a good linearity, uniformity of response, and spatial resolving power. The JUNGFRAU 1.0 application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) features a 256 × 256 pixel matrix of 75 × 75 μm(2) pixels and is bump-bonded to a 320 μm thick Si sensor. Modules of 2 × 4 chips cover an area of about 4 × 8 cm(2). Readout rates in excess of 2 kHz enable linear count rate capabilities of 20 MHz (at 12 keV) and 50 MHz (at 5 keV). The tolerance of JUNGFRAU to radiation is a key issue to guarantee several years of operation at free electron lasers and synchrotrons. The radiation hardness of JUNGFRAU 1.0 is tested with synchrotron radiation up to 10 MGy of delivered dose. The effect of radiation-induced changes on the noise, baseline, gain, and gain switching is evaluated post-irradiation for both the ASIC and the hybridized assembly. The bare JUNGFRAU 1.0 chip can withstand doses as high as 10 MGy with minor changes to its noise and a reduction in the preamplifier gain. The hybridized assembly, in particular the sensor, is affected by the photon irradiation which mainly shows as an increase in the leakage current. Self-healing of the system is investigated during a period of 11 weeks after the delivery of the radiation dose. Annealing radiation-induced changes by bake-out at 100 °C is investigated. It is concluded that the JUNGFRAU 1.0 pixel is sufficiently radiation-hard for its envisioned applications at SwissFEL and synchrotron beam lines.

  6. Method for Developing Descriptions of Hard-to-Price Products: Results of the Telecommunications Product Study

    SciTech Connect

    Conrad, F.; Tonn, B.

    1999-05-01

    This report presents the results of a study to test a new method for developing descriptions of hard-to-price products. The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) is responsible for collecting data to estimate price indices such as the Consumers Price Index (BLS) is responsible for collecting data to estimate price indices such as the Consumers Price Index (CPI). BLS accomplishes this task by sending field staff to places of business to price actual products. The field staff are given product checklists to help them determine whether products found today are comparable to products priced the previous month. Prices for non-comparable products are not included in the current month's price index calculations. A serious problem facing BLS is developing product checklists for dynamic product areas, new industries, and the service sector. It is difficult to keep checklists up-to-date and quite often simply to develop checklists for service industry products. Some people estimates that upwards of 50 % of US economic activity is not accounted for in the CPI

  7. Fission product yield measurements using monoenergetic photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishichayan; Bhike, M.; Tonchev, A. P.; Tornow, W.

    2017-09-01

    Measurements of fission products yields (FPYs) are an important source of information on the fission process. During the past couple of years, a TUNL-LANL-LLNL collaboration has provided data on the FPYs from quasi monoenergetic neutron-induced fission on 235U, 238U, and 239Pu and has revealed an unexpected energy dependence of both asymmetric fission fragments at energies below 4 MeV. This peculiar FPY energy dependence was more pronounced in neutron-induced fission of 239Pu. In an effort to understand and compare the effect of the incoming probe on the FPY distribution, we have carried out monoenergetic photon-induced fission experiments on the same 235U, 238U, and 239Pu targets. Monoenergetic photon beams of Eγ = 13.0 MeV were provided by the HIγS facility, the world's most intense γ-ray source. In order to determine the total number of fission events, a dual-fission chamber was used during the irradiation. These irradiated samples were counted at the TUNL's low-background γ-ray counting facility using high efficient HPGe detectors over a period of 10 weeks. Here we report on our first ever photofission product yield measurements obtained with monoenegetic photon beams. These results are compared with neutron-induced FPY data.

  8. Neutral Higgs boson pair production in photon-photon annihilation in the two Higgs doublet model

    SciTech Connect

    Arhrib, Abdesslam; Benbrik, Rachid; Chen, C.-H.; Santos, Rui

    2009-07-01

    We study double Higgs production in photon-photon collisions as a probe of the new dynamics of Higgs interactions in the framework of two Higgs doublet models. We analyze neutral Higgs bosons production and decay in the fusion processes, {gamma}{gamma}{yields}S{sub i}S{sub j}, S{sub i}=h{sup 0}, H{sup 0}, A{sup 0}, and show that both h{sup 0}h{sup 0} and A{sup 0}A{sup 0} production can be enhanced by threshold effects in the region E{sub {gamma}}{sub {gamma}}{approx_equal}2m{sub H{+-}}. Resonant effects due to the heavy Higgs H{sup 0} can also play a role in the cross section enhancement when it is allowed to decay to two light CP-even h{sup 0} or to two light CP-odd A{sup 0} scalars. We have scanned the allowed parameter space of the two Higgs doublet model and found a vast region of the parameter space where the cross section is 2 orders of magnitude above the standard model cross section. We further show that the standard model experimental analysis can be used to discover or to constrain the two Higgs doublet model parameter space.

  9. NLO QCD corrections for J /ψ +c +c ¯ production in photon-photon collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zi-Qiang; Chen, Long-Bin; Qiao, Cong-Feng

    2017-02-01

    The γ +γ →J /ψ +c +c ¯ inclusive process is an extremely important subprocess in J /ψ production via photon-photon scattering, like at LEPII or various types of future electron-positron colliders. In this work we perform the next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD corrections to this process in the framework of nonrelativistic QCD (NRQCD) factorization formalism, the first NLO calculation for two projectiles to the 3-body quarkonium inclusive production process. By setting the center-of-mass energy at LEPII, the √{s }=197 GeV , we conduct analyses of the pt2 distribution and total cross section of this process at the NLO accuracy. It turns out that the total cross section is moderately enhanced by the NLO correction with a K factor of about 1.46, and hence the predicted J /ψ inclusive productivity is increased while the DELPHI data still overshoot the theoretical prediction. At the future Circular Electron-Positron Collider, the NLO corrections are found to be more significant, with a K factor of about 1.76.

  10. Electroweak radiative corrections to triple photon production at the ILC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu; Li, Wei-Hua; Duan, Peng-Fei; Song, Mao; Li, Gang

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we present the precision predictions for three photon production in the standard model (SM) at the ILC including the full next-to-leading (NLO) electroweak (EW) corrections, high order initial state radiation (h.o.ISR) contributions and beamstrahlung effects. We present the LO and the NLO EW + h.o.ISR + beamstrahlung corrected total cross sections for various colliding energy when √{ s} ≥ 200 GeV and the kinematic distributions of final photons with √{ s} = 500 GeV at ILC, and find that the NLO EW corrections, the h.o.ISR contributions and the beamstrahlung effects are important in exploring the process e+e- → γγγ.

  11. Pi Zero and Direct Photon Production at High Transverse Moment

    SciTech Connect

    Zioulas, George

    1990-11-01

    The inclusive pizero and direct photon productions by 300 GeV/c $\\pi^-$ and $\\pi^+$ beams on a lithium target, were measured using the E705 spectrometer at Fermilab. The cross sections were determined by analyzing a fraction (20%) of the data recorded by the experiment during the 1987-1988 running period. The photons were measured by a high resolution electromagnetic calorimeter which consisted of scintillation and lead glass blocks. A fast trigger was designed and implemented to select events with high transverse energy depositions in the calorimeter. The invariant cross sections are presented as a function of the transverse momentum and the Feynman-x in the range between 4 to 7 GeV/c and -0.25 to 0.35 respectively. The results are compared to the measurements made by other experiments and to theoretical predictions within the framework of Quantum ChromoDynamics.

  12. Measurement of the inclusive isolated prompt photon production cross section at the Tevatron using the CDF detector

    SciTech Connect

    Deluca Silberberg, Carolina

    2009-04-01

    require a good understanding of the background, mainly dominated by light mesons (π0 and η) which decay into two very collinear photons. Since these photons are produced within a jet, they tend to be non-isolated in most of the cases, and can be suppressed by requiring the photon candidates to be isolated in the calorimeter. In the case the hard scattered parton hadronizes leaving most of its energy to the meson, the photon produced in the decay will not be surrounded by large energy depositions. To further reduce this remaining isolated background, we present a new technique based on the isolation distribution in the calorimeter. The measured cross section is compared to next-to-leading order (NLO) pQCD calculations, which have been corrected for non-perturbative contributions. This thesis is organized as follows: we start with a brief review of QCD theory and the formalism to calculate cross sections in Chapter 2, where we also introduce the physics of prompt photon production and summarize the current status of the prompt photon phenomenology. Chapter 3 contains a description of the Tevatron and the CDF detector. The experimental measurement is described in Chapter 4, where we provide details on the different datasets used in the measurement, the trigger, and the event selection requirements. Most of this Chapter is devoted to the explanation of the background subtraction method and the determination of the photon signal fraction. The systematic uncertainties on the measurement are evaluated in Chapter 5, while Chapter 6 discusses the final results and the comparison to the theoretical predictions. Finally, the conclusions are presented in Chapter 7.

  13. The Relationship Between Basal Area and Hard Mast Production in the Ouachita Mountains

    Treesearch

    Roger W. Perry; Ronald E. Thill; Philip A. Tappe; David G. Peitz

    2004-01-01

    Abstract - Because the relationship between stand density and hard mast production is not clear, we investigated the effects of varying total overstory basal area (BA) on acorn and hickory nut production in the Ouachita Mountains. We used Whitehead visual surveys to estimate mast production in oaks (Quercus spp.) and hickories (...

  14. Initial Effects of Reproduction Cutting Treatments on Residual Hard Mast Production in the Ouachita Mountains

    Treesearch

    Roger W. Perry; Ronald E. Thill

    2003-01-01

    We compared indices of total hard mast production (oak and hickory combined) in 20, second-growth, pine-hardwood stands under five treatments to determine the effects of different reproduction treatments on mast production in the Ouachita Mountains. We evaluated mast production in mature unharvested controls and stands under four reproduction cutting methods (single-...

  15. Ionizing Photon Production and Escape in Extreme Starbursts: the Case of the Green Peas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaskot, Anne; Oey, Sally

    2015-08-01

    With similarities to high-redshift galaxies and potential Lyman continuum (LyC) escape, the low-redshift "Green Pea" (GP) galaxies represent an important test of ionizing photon production and feedback in young massive clusters. Using optical spectra and HST ACS emission-line imaging, we evaluate the ionizing sources, optical depths, and spatial variation of ionization in these unusual starbursts. The GPs’ spectra imply young starburst ages and possible low LyC optical depths. However, CLOUDY photoionization and Starburst99 models have difficulty reproducing all of the observed line ratios and suggest a need for additional hard ionizing sources. New ACS observations of four GPs highlight the extreme, compact nature of these bursts and reveal regions of low optical depth that are the likely sites of LyC escape.

  16. Heavy quark production in photon-Pomeron interactions at high energies

    SciTech Connect

    Machado, M. M.; Goncalves, V. P.

    2013-03-25

    The diffractive heavy quark cross sections are estimated considering photon-Pomeron interactions in hadron - hadron at RHIC, Tevatron, and CERN LHC energies. We assume the validity of the hard diffractive factorization and calculate the charm and bottom total cross sections and rapidity distributions using the diffractive parton distribution functions of the Pomeron obtained by the H1 Collaboration at DESY-HERA. Such processes are sensitive to the gluon content of the Pomeron at high energies and are a good place to constrain the behavior of this distribution. We also compare our predictions with those obtained using the dipole model, and verify that these processes are a good test of the different mechanisms for heavy quarks diffractive production at hadron colliders.

  17. Two photons correlated production at the 25MWTh reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Abramowicz, H.; Doroba, K.; Walczak, R.; Gorski, M.; Jasin-acute-accentski, A.; Kozl-dash-barowski, T.; Ratyn-acute-accentski, W.; Szeptycka, M.; Szymczak, M.; Tucholski, A.; and others

    1985-01-15

    We have performed an extensive search for correlated production of two or more photons at the 25MWTh reactor at Swierk/Poland/. We were looking for a prompt signal originating from decays of axions. Our experimental set-up consisted of an arry of nine 3'' x 3'' NaI/Tl/detectors, surrounded by active/plastic scintillators/ and passive shieldings, thus ncreasing experimental sensitivity as compared to other experiments in which two detectors were used. Data were collected during 26 weeks, with four days of reactor ''ON'', and three days of reactor ''OFF'' each week. Preliminary results are presented.

  18. Entropy production in a lepton-photon universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husdal, Lars; Brevik, Iver

    2017-02-01

    We look at the entropy production during the lepton era in the early universe by using a model where we exclude all particles except the leptons and photons. We assume a temperature dependent viscosity as calculated recently by one of us (Husdal in Astrophys. Space Sci. 361(8):1, 2016b) with the use of relativistic kinetic theory. We consider only the bulk viscosity, the shear viscosity being omitted because of spatial isotropy. The rate of entropy production is highest just before the neutrinos decouple. Our results show that the increase in entropy during the lepton era is quite small, about 0.071 % at a decoupling temperature of T=10^{10} K. This result is slightly smaller than that obtained earlier by Caderni and Fabbri (Phys. Lett. B 69:508, 1977). After the neutrino decoupling, when the Universe has entered the photon era, kinetic theory arguments no longer support the appearance of a bulk viscosity. At high temperatures and a stable particle ratio, entropy production (d{σ }/d{T}) goes as T^{-8}, with the total entropy (Δ σ) increasing as T^{-7}. These rates go slightly down just before the neutrinos decouple, where Δσ∝ T^{-6.2}.

  19. White beam slits and pink beam slits for the hard x-ray nanoprobe beamline at the Advanced Photon Source.

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, C.; Jaski, Y.; Maser, J.; Powers, T.; Schmidt, O.; Rossi, E.

    2007-01-01

    A new type of slit has been designed for use in the hard x-ray nanoprobe beamline at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). The design incorporates monolithic GlidCop slit bodies mounted to commercially available x-y drive systems. Long, tapered apertures with adjacent water-cooling channels intercept the x-ray beam, removing the high heat load produced by two collinear APS undulators. The apertures are L-shaped and provide both horizontal and vertical slits. The beam-defining edges, positioned at the end of the tapered surfaces, consist of two sets of tungsten blades. These blades produce an exit beam with sharp corners and assure a clean cut-off for the white beam edges. The slit assembly is designed to allow overlap of the slit edges to stop the beam. The white beam slit design accommodates 3100 W of total power with a peak power density of 763 W/mm2. The pink beam slit design accommodates 400 W of total power with a peak power density of 180 W/mm2. Detailed thermal analyses were performed to verify the slits accuracy under full beam loading. The new concept allows beamline operations to 180 mA with a simplified design approach.

  20. White Beam Slits and Pink Beam Slits for the Hard X-ray Nanoprobe Beamline at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, C.; Jaski, Y.; Powers, T.; Schmidt, O.; Rossi, E.; Maser, J.

    2007-01-19

    A new type of slit has been designed for use in the hard x-ray nanoprobe beamline at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). The design incorporates monolithic GlidCop slit bodies mounted to commercially available x-y drive systems. Long, tapered apertures with adjacent water-cooling channels intercept the x-ray beam, removing the high heat load produced by two collinear APS undulators. The apertures are L-shaped and provide both horizontal and vertical slits. The beam-defining edges, positioned at the end of the tapered surfaces, consist of two sets of tungsten blades. These blades produce an exit beam with sharp corners and assure a clean cut-off for the white beam edges. The slit assembly is designed to allow overlap of the slit edges to stop the beam.The white beam slit design accommodates 3100 W of total power with a peak power density of 763 W/mm2. The pink beam slit design accommodates 400 W of total power with a peak power density of 180 W/mm2. Detailed thermal analyses were performed to verify the slits' accuracy under full beam loading. The new concept allows beamline operations to 180 mA with a simplified design approach.

  1. Single meson production in photon-photon collisions and infrared renormalons

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmadov, A. I.; Aydin, Coskun; Dadashov, E. A.; Nagiyev, Sh. M.

    2010-03-01

    In this article, we investigate the contribution of the higher-twist Feynman diagrams to the large-p{sub T} inclusive single meson production cross section in photon-photon collisions and present the general formulas for the higher-twist differential cross sections in case of the running coupling and frozen coupling approaches. The structure of infrared renormalon singularities of the higher-twist subprocess cross section and the resummed expression (the Borel sum) for it are found. We compared the resummed higher-twist cross sections with the ones obtained in the framework of the frozen coupling approach and leading-twist cross section. We obtain, that ratio R=({Sigma}{sub M}{sup +HT}){sup res}/({Sigma}{sub M}{sup +HT}){sup 0}, for all values of the transverse momentum p{sub T} of the meson identically equivalent to ratio r=({Delta}{sub M}{sup HT}){sup res}/({Delta}{sub M}{sup HT}){sup 0}. It is shown that the resummed result depends on the choice of the meson wave functions used in calculation. Phenomenological effects of the obtained results are discussed.

  2. THE PAIR BEAM PRODUCTION SPECTRUM FROM PHOTON-PHOTON ANNIHILATION IN COSMIC VOIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Schlickeiser, R.; Ibscher, D.; Elyiv, A.; Miniati, F. E-mail: ibscher@tp4.rub.de E-mail: fm@phys.ethz.ch

    2012-10-20

    Highly beamed relativistic e {sup {+-}}-pair energy distributions result in double photon collisions of the beamed gamma rays from TeV blazars at cosmological distances with the isotropically distributed extragalactic background light (EBL) in the intergalactic medium. The typical energies k {sub 0} {approx_equal} 10{sup -7} in units of m{sub e}c {sup 2} of the EBL are more than 10 orders of magnitude smaller than the observed gamma-ray energies k {sub 1} {>=} 10{sup 7}. Using the limit k {sub 0} << k {sub 1}, we demonstrate that the angular distribution of the generated pairs in the lab frame is highly beamed in the direction of the initial gamma-ray photons. For the astrophysically important case of power-law distributions of the emitted gamma-ray beam up to the maximum energy M interacting with Wien-type N(k {sub 0}){proportional_to}k{sup q} {sub 0}exp (- k {sub 0}/{Theta}) soft photon distributions with total number density N {sub 0}, we calculate analytical approximations for the electron production spectrum. For distant objects with luminosity distances d{sub L} >> r {sub 0} = ({sigma} {sub T} N {sub 0}){sup -1} = 0.49N {sup -1} {sub 0} Mpc (with Thomson cross section {sigma} {sub T}), the implied large values of the optical depth {tau}{sub 0} = d{sub L} /r {sub 0} indicate that the electron production spectra differ at energies inside and outside the interval [({Theta}ln {tau}{sub 0}){sup -1}, {tau}{sub 0}/{Theta}], given the maximum gamma-ray energy M >> {Theta}{sup -1}. In the case M >> {Theta}{sup -1}, the production spectrum is strongly peaked near E {approx_equal} {Theta}{sup -1}, being exponentially reduced at small energies and decreasing with the steep power law {proportional_to}E {sup -1-p} up to the maximum energy E = M - (1/2).

  3. Effect of water hardness on the production and microbicidal efficacy of slightly acidic electrolyzed water.

    PubMed

    Forghani, Fereidoun; Park, Joong-Hyun; Oh, Deog-Hwan

    2015-06-01

    Slightly acidic electrolyzed water (SAEW) has been proved as an effective sanitizer against microorganisms attached to foods. However, its physical properties and inactivation efficacy are affected by several factors such as water hardness. Therefore, in this study the effect of water hardness on SAEW properties were studied. Pure cultures of foodborne bacteria were used in vitro and in vivo to evaluate the inactivation efficacy of the SAEWs produced. Results obtained showed water hardness to be an important factor in the production of SAEW. Low water hardness may result in the necessity of further optimization of production process. In this study the addition of 5% HCl and 2 M NaCl at 1.5 mL/min flow rate was found to be the best electrolyte concentration for the optimization of SAEW production from low hardness water (34 ± 2 mg/L). Furthermore, the results showed that pre-heating was a better approach compared to post-production heating of SAEW, resulting in higher ACC values and therefor better sanitization efficacy.

  4. Direct virtual photon production in Au+Au collisions at √{sNN} = 200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Alekseev, I.; Anderson, D. M.; Aoyama, R.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Ashraf, M. U.; Attri, A.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, X.; Bairathi, V.; Behera, A.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandenburg, J. D.; Brandin, A. V.; Brown, D.; Bunzarov, I.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chankova-Bunzarova, N.; Chatterjee, A.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, X.; Chen, J. H.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Christie, W.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, S.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Elsey, N.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Esumi, S.; Evdokimov, O.; Ewigleben, J.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Federicova, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Z.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Fujita, J.; Fulek, L.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A. I.; Hamed, A.; Harlenderova, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, L.; Heppelmann, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, T.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, X.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, P.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jentsch, A.; Jia, J.; Jiang, K.; Jowzaee, S.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z.; Kikoła, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Kochenda, L.; Kocmanek, M.; Kollegger, T.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulathunga, N.; Kumar, L.; Kvapil, J.; Kwasizur, J. H.; Lacey, R.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, C.; Li, Y.; Lidrych, J.; Lin, T.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, Y.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, P.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Ma, L.; Ma, R.; Magdy, N.; Majka, R.; Mallick, D.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H. S.; Meehan, K.; Mei, J. C.; Miller, Z. W.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, D.; Mizuno, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nie, M.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Niida, T.; Nogach, L. V.; Nonaka, T.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V. A.; Olvitt, D.; Page, B. S.; Pak, R.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Pile, P.; Pluta, J.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Posik, M.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Ray, R. L.; Reed, R.; Rehbein, M. J.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Roth, J. D.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Saur, M.; Schambach, J.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Schweid, B. R.; Seger, J.; Sergeeva, M.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, M. K.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, Z.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Sikora, R.; Simko, M.; Singha, S.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Smirnov, D.; Solyst, W.; Song, L.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sugiura, T.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B.; Sun, Y.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, X.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Taranenko, A.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Todoroki, T.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbæk, F.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, G.; Wang, Y.; Wang, F.; Wang, Y.; Webb, J. C.; Webb, G.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y.; Xiao, Z. G.; Xie, W.; Xie, G.; Xu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y. F.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Q.; Yang, C.; Yang, S.; Ye, Z.; Ye, Z.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, S.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, C.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Z.; Zyzak, M.

    2017-07-01

    We report the direct virtual photon invariant yields in the transverse momentum ranges 1 6 GeV / c the production follows TAA scaling. Model calculations with contributions from thermal radiation and initial hard parton scattering are consistent within uncertainties with the direct virtual photon invariant yield.

  5. Direct photon production in high-energy nuclear collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Peitzmann, T.

    2016-01-22

    Direct photons have always been considered a promising probe for the very early phases of high-energy nuclear collisions. Prompt photons reveal information about the initial state and its possible modifications in nuclei. In this context they should be one of the best probes for effects of gluon saturation. Thermal photons emitted from the produced matter in nuclear collisions carry information on the temperature of the very early phase. In particular a simultaneous measurement of yield and elliptic flow of thermal photons can put strong constraints on the early time dynamics of the system. I review the status of results on direct photon measurements at RHIC and LHC and their interpretation. Prompt photons at high p{sub T} are consistent with expectations from NLO pQCD in pp and show no strong nuclear modifications in A–A collisions. Recent analysis at RHIC has shown very intriguing results for lower p{sub T}, with high thermal photon yield and strong elliptic flow of direct photons, which are not fully understood theoretically. Also the ALICE experiment at the LHC has measured a high yield of thermal photons. Furthermore I discuss prospects for future measurements of forward direct photons at the LHC.

  6. The Comprehension and Production of Wh-Questions in Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedmann, Naama; Szterman, Ronit

    2011-01-01

    Hearing loss during the critical period for language acquisition restricts spoken language input. This input limitation, in turn, may hamper syntactic development. This study examined the comprehension, production, and repetition of Wh-questions in deaf or hard-of-hearing (DHH) children. The participants were 11 orally trained Hebrew-speaking…

  7. Production of photons in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    DOE PAGES

    Jean -Francois Paquet; Denicol, Gabriel S.; Shen, Chun; ...

    2016-04-18

    In this work it is shown that the use of a hydrodynamical model of heavy-ion collisions which incorporates recent developments, together with updated photon emission rates, greatly improves agreement with both ALICE and PHENIX measurements of direct photons, supporting the idea that thermal photons are the dominant source of direct photon momentum anisotropy. The event-by-event hydrodynamical model uses the impact parameter dependent Glasma model (IP-Glasma) initial states and includes, for the first time, both shear and bulk viscosities, along with second-order couplings between the two viscosities. Furthermore, the effect of both shear and bulk viscosities on the photon rates ismore » studied, and those transport coefficients are shown to have measurable consequences on the photon momentum anisotropy.« less

  8. Production of photons in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Jean -Francois Paquet; Denicol, Gabriel S.; Shen, Chun; Luzum, Matthew; Schenke, Bjorn; Jeon, Sangyong; Gale, Charles

    2016-04-18

    In this work it is shown that the use of a hydrodynamical model of heavy-ion collisions which incorporates recent developments, together with updated photon emission rates, greatly improves agreement with both ALICE and PHENIX measurements of direct photons, supporting the idea that thermal photons are the dominant source of direct photon momentum anisotropy. The event-by-event hydrodynamical model uses the impact parameter dependent Glasma model (IP-Glasma) initial states and includes, for the first time, both shear and bulk viscosities, along with second-order couplings between the two viscosities. Furthermore, the effect of both shear and bulk viscosities on the photon rates is studied, and those transport coefficients are shown to have measurable consequences on the photon momentum anisotropy.

  9. Production of photons in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Jean -Francois Paquet; Denicol, Gabriel S.; Shen, Chun; Luzum, Matthew; Schenke, Bjorn; Jeon, Sangyong; Gale, Charles

    2016-04-18

    In this work it is shown that the use of a hydrodynamical model of heavy-ion collisions which incorporates recent developments, together with updated photon emission rates, greatly improves agreement with both ALICE and PHENIX measurements of direct photons, supporting the idea that thermal photons are the dominant source of direct photon momentum anisotropy. The event-by-event hydrodynamical model uses the impact parameter dependent Glasma model (IP-Glasma) initial states and includes, for the first time, both shear and bulk viscosities, along with second-order couplings between the two viscosities. Furthermore, the effect of both shear and bulk viscosities on the photon rates is studied, and those transport coefficients are shown to have measurable consequences on the photon momentum anisotropy.

  10. Process for casting hard-faced, lightweight camshafts and other cylindrical products

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Jeffrey S.; Turner, Paul C.; Argetsinger, Edward R.; Wilson, Rick D.

    1996-01-01

    A process for casting a hard-faced cylindrical product such as an automobile camshaft includes the steps of: (a) preparing a composition formed from a molten base metal and an additive in particle form and having a hardness value greater than the hardness value of the base metal; (b) introducing the composition into a flask containing a meltable pattern of a cylindrical product such as an automobile camshaft to be manufactured and encased in sand to allow the composition to melt the pattern and assume the shape of the pattern within the sand; and (c) rotating the flask containing the pattern about the longitudinal axes of both the flask and the pattern as the molten base metal containing the additive in particle form is introduced into the flask to cause particles of the additive entrained in the molten base metal to migrate by centrifugal action to the radial extremities of the pattern and thereby provide a cylindrical product having a hardness value greater at it's radial extremities than at its center when the molten base metal solidifies.

  11. Chemical Characterization of Beer Aging Products Derived from Hard Resin Components in Hops (Humulus lupulus L.).

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Yoshimasa; Yamada, Makiko; Taniguchi, Harumi; Matsukura, Yasuko; Shindo, Kazutoshi

    2015-11-25

    The bitter taste of beer originates from resins in hops (Humulus lupulus L.), which are classified into two subtypes (soft and hard). Whereas the nature and reactivity of soft-resin-derived compounds, such as α-, β-, and iso-α-acids, are well studied, there is only a little information on the compounds in hard resin. For this work, hard resin was prepared from stored hops and investigated for its compositional changes in an experimental model of beer aging. The hard resin contained a series of α-acid oxides. Among them, 4'-hydroxyallohumulinones were unstable under beer storage conditions, and their transformation induced primary compositional changes of the hard resin during beer aging. The chemical structures of the products, including novel polycyclic compounds scorpiohumulinols A and B and dicyclohumulinols A and B, were determined by HRMS and NMR analyses. These compounds were proposed to be produced via proton-catalyzed cyclization reactions of 4'-hydroxyallohumulinones. Furthermore, they were more stable than their precursor 4'-hydroxyallohumulinones during prolonged storage periods.

  12. Analytical Expressions for the Hard-Scattering Production of Massive Partons

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Cheuk-Yin

    2016-01-01

    We obtain explicit expressions for the two-particle differential cross section $E_c E_\\kappa d\\sigma (AB \\to c\\kappa X) /d\\bb c d \\bb \\kappa$ and the two-particle angular correlation function \\break $d\\sigma(AB$$ \\to$$ c\\kappa X)/d\\Delta \\phi \\, d\\Delta y$ in the hard-scattering production of massive partons in order to exhibit the ``ridge" structure on the away side in the hard-scattering process. The single-particle production cross section $d\\sigma(AB \\to cX) /dy_c c_T dc_T $ is also obtained and compared with the ALICE experimental data for charm production in $pp$ collisions at 7 TeV at LHC.

  13. Enhancing Photon Utilization Efficiency for Astaxanthin Production from Haematococcus lacustris Using a Split-Column Photobioreactor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Z-Hun; Park, Hanwool; Lee, Ho-Sang; Lee, Choul-Gyun

    2016-07-28

    A split-column photobioreactor (SC-PBR), consisting of two bubble columns with different sizes, was developed to enhance the photon utilization efficiency in an astaxanthin production process from Haematococcus lacustris. Among the two columns, only the smaller column of SC-PBR was illuminated. Astaxanthin productivities and photon efficiencies of the SC-PBRs were compared with a standard bubble-column PBR (BC-PBR). Astaxanthin productivity of SC-PBR was improved by 28%, and the photon utilization efficiencies were 28-366% higher than the original BC-PBR. The results clearly show that the effective light regime of SC-PBR could enhance the production of astaxanthin.

  14. Photon Production through Multi-step Processes Important in Nuclear Fluorescence Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hagmann, C; Pruet, J

    2006-10-26

    The authors present calculations describing the production of photons through multi-step processes occurring when a beam of gamma rays interacts with a macroscopic material. These processes involve the creation of energetic electrons through Compton scattering, photo-absorption and pair production, the subsequent scattering of these electrons, and the creation of energetic photons occurring as these electrons are slowed through Bremsstrahlung emission. Unlike single Compton collisions, during which an energetic photon that is scattered through a large angle loses most of its energy, these multi-step processes result in a sizable flux of energetic photons traveling at large angles relative to an incident photon beam. These multi-step processes are also a key background in experiments that measure nuclear resonance fluorescence by shining photons on a thin foil and observing the spectrum of back-scattered photons. Effective cross sections describing the production of backscattered photons are presented in a tabular form that allows simple estimates of backgrounds expected in a variety of experiments. Incident photons with energies between 0.5 MeV and 8 MeV are considered. These calculations of effective cross sections may be useful for those designing NRF experiments or systems that detect specific isotopes in well-shielded environments through observation of resonance fluorescence.

  15. Access to photon fragmentation functions in hadronic jet production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, Tom; Mukherjee, Asmita; Vogelsang, Werner

    2016-06-01

    We argue that the process p p →(jet γ )X , for which a photon is observed inside a fully reconstructed jet and is treated as part of the jet, offers new probes of the so far little-known fragmentation functions for photons. We present a next-to-leading-order QCD calculation of the cross section for this process in the limit that the jet is relatively narrow. We also investigate the background resulting from the two-photon decay of neutral pions. We present numerical results relevant for possible measurements at the LHC and at RHIC. These suggest that p p →(jet γ )X should provide clean access to the photon fragmentation functions, provided an efficient suppression of the background is available in experiment.

  16. Photon annd pion production in heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Blann, M.

    1989-05-01

    In this paper we describe different formulations for treating the nucleon-nucleon transport physics. These will all be semi-classical treatments; however considerable work has been done considering the relationship between quantal and semi-classical formulations. We discuss additional input specific to calculation of pion and photon yields, and present comparisons between calculated and experimental results, mostly for high energy photons. Conclusions and suggestions for future work are presented in the last section. 65 refs., 7 figs.

  17. The Lyman-continuum photon production efficiency in the high-redshift Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkins, Stephen M.; Feng, Yu; Di-Matteo, Tiziana; Croft, Rupert; Stanway, Elizabeth R.; Bouwens, Rychard J.; Thomas, Peter

    2016-05-01

    The Lyman-continuum photon production efficiency (ξion) is a critical ingredient for inferring the number of photons available to reionize the intergalactic medium. To estimate the theoretical production efficiency in the high-redshift Universe we couple the BlueTides cosmological hydrodynamical simulation with a range of stellar population synthesis models. We find Lyman-continuum photon production efficiencies of log10(ξion/erg-1 Hz) ≈ 25.1-25.5 depending on the choice of stellar population synthesis model. These results are broadly consistent with recent observational constraints at high-redshift though favour a model incorporating the effects of binary evolution.

  18. CLARO-CMOS: a fast, low power and radiation-hard front-end ASIC for single-photon counting in 0.35 micron CMOS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreotti, M.; Baldini, W.; Calabrese, R.; Carniti, P.; Cassina, L.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; Fiorini, M.; Giachero, A.; Gotti, C.; Luppi, E.; Maino, M.; Malaguti, R.; Pessina, G.; Tomassetti, L.

    2015-01-01

    The CLARO-CMOS is a prototype ASIC designed for fast photon counting with multi-anode photomultiplier tubes (MaPMT). The CLARO features a 5 ns peaking time, a recovery time to baseline smaller than 25 ns, and a power consumption of less than 1 mW per channel. The chip was designed in 0.35 μm CMOS technology, and was tested for radiation hardness with neutrons up to 1014 1 MeV neq/cm2, X-rays up to 40 kGy and protons up to 76 kGy. Its capability to read out single photons at high rate from a Hamamatsu R11265 MaPMT, the baseline photon detector for the LHCb RICH upgrade, was demonstrated both with test bench measurements and with actual signals from a R11265 MaPMT. The presented results allowed CLARO to be chosen as the front-end readout chip in the upgraded LHCb RICH detector.

  19. Growth and Saxitoxin Production by Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii (Cyanobacteria) Correlate with Water Hardness

    PubMed Central

    Carneiro, Ronaldo Leal; Pacheco, Ana Beatriz Furlanetto; Azevedo, Sandra Maria Feliciano de Oliveira e

    2013-01-01

    The cosmopolitan and increasing distribution of Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii can be attributed to its ecophysiological plasticity and tolerance to changing environmental factors in water bodies. In reservoirs in the semi-arid region of Brazil, the presence and common dominance of C. raciborskii have been described in waters that are considered hard. We investigated the response of a Brazilian C. raciborskii strain to water hardness by evaluating its growth and saxitoxin production. Based on environmental data, a concentration of 5 mM of different carbonate salts was tested. These conditions affected growth either positively (MgCO3) or negatively (CaCO3 and Na2CO3). As a control for the addition of cations, MgCl2, CaCl2 and NaCl were tested at 5 or 10 mM, and MgCl2 stimulated growth, NaCl slowed but sustained growth, and CaCl2 inhibited growth. Most of the tested treatments increased the saxitoxin (STX) cell quota after six days of exposure. After 12 days, STX production returned to concentrations similar to that of the control, indicating an adaptation to the altered water conditions. In the short term, cell exposure to most of the tested conditions favored STX production over neoSTX production. These results support the noted plasticity of C. raciborskii and highlight its potential to thrive in hard waters. Additionally, the observed relationship between saxitoxin production and water ion concentrations characteristic of the natural environments can be important for understanding toxin content variation in other harmful algae that produce STX. PMID:23955286

  20. Production of electron-positron pairs by a photon in the radiation-dominated universe

    SciTech Connect

    Tsaregorodtsev, L.I.

    1995-12-01

    The production of an arbitrary number of electron-positron pairs by a photon in a spatially flat Robertson-Walker universe with expansion law a(t) = a{sub o}{radical}t is considered. In Minkowski space, this process is forbidden by conservation laws. The total probability of the process and the mean number of Dirac particles produced as the result of photon decay are calculated and analyzed as functions of the primary-photon energy. The expressions obtained in this study are compared with the results of calculation of photon emission from the vacuum. The massless limit of the total probability of the process is considered. Numerical estimates are obtained for the mean number of particles produced in photon decays in the early universe. These estimates show that the production of Dirac particles in photon decays dominates over their production in photon emission from the vacuum and over their production from the vacuum of a free spinor field. 21 refs., 2 figs.

  1. Effects of the plasma profiles on photon and pair production in ultrahigh intensity laser solid interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Y. X.; Jin, X. L. Yan, W. Z.; Li, J. Q.; Li, B.; Yu, J. Q.

    2015-12-15

    The model of photon and pair production in strong field quantum electrodynamics is implemented into our 1D3V particle-in-cell code with Monte Carlo algorithm. Using this code, the evolution of the particles in ultrahigh intensity laser (∼10{sup 23} W/cm{sup 2}) interaction with aluminum foil target is observed. Four different initial plasma profiles are considered in the simulations. The effects of initial plasma profiles on photon and pair production, energy spectra, and energy evolution are analyzed. The results imply that one can set an optimal initial plasma profile to obtain the desired photon distributions.

  2. Photon and dilepton production in high energy heavy ion collisions

    DOE PAGES

    Sakaguchi, Takao

    2015-05-07

    The recent results on direct photons and dileptons in high energy heavy ion collisions, obtained particularly at RHIC and LHC are reviewed. The results are new not only in terms of the probes, but also in terms of the precision. We shall discuss the physics learned from the results.

  3. Photon and dilepton production in high energy heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Sakaguchi, Takao

    2015-05-07

    The recent results on direct photons and dileptons in high energy heavy ion collisions, obtained particularly at RHIC and LHC are reviewed. The results are new not only in terms of the probes, but also in terms of the precision. We shall discuss the physics learned from the results.

  4. Dual-array valence emission spectrometer (DAVES): A new approach for hard x-ray photon-in photon-out spectroscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Finkelstein, K. D. Lyndaker, A.; Krawcyk, T.; Conrad, J.; Pollock, C. J.

    2016-07-27

    CHESS has developed and successfully deployed a novel Dual Array Valence Emission Spectrometer (DAVES) for high energy resolution, hard x-ray spectroscopy. DAVES employs the simplest method for scanning multiple spherical crystals along a Rowland Circle. The new design achieves unique 2-color collection capability and is built to take special advantage of pixel array detectors. Our initial results show why these detectors greatly improve data quality. The presentation emphasizes flexibility of experimental design offered by DAVES. Prospects and benefits of 2-color spectroscopy are illustrated and discussed.

  5. Speech sound production in 2-year-olds who are hard of hearing.

    PubMed

    Ambrose, Sophie E; Unflat Berry, Lauren M; Walker, Elizabeth A; Harrison, Melody; Oleson, Jacob; Moeller, Mary Pat

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of the study was to (a) compare the speech sound production abilities of 2-year-old children who are hard of hearing (HH) to children with normal hearing (NH), (b) identify sources of risk for individual children who are HH, and (c) determine whether speech sound production skills at age 2 were predictive of speech sound production skills at age 3. Seventy children with bilateral, mild-to-severe hearing loss who use hearing aids and 37 age- and socioeconomic status-matched children with NH participated. Children's speech sound production abilities were assessed at 2 and 3 years of age. At age 2, the HH group demonstrated vowel production abilities on par with their NH peers but weaker consonant production abilities. Within the HH group, better outcomes were associated with hearing aid fittings by 6 months of age, hearing loss of less than 45 dB HL, stronger vocabulary scores, and being female. Positive relationships existed between children's speech sound production abilities at 2 and 3 years of age. Assessment of early speech sound production abilities in combination with demographic, audiologic, and linguistic variables may be useful in identifying HH children who are at risk for delays in speech sound production.

  6. Speech Sound Production in Two-Year-Olds who are Hard of Hearing

    PubMed Central

    Ambrose, Sophie E.; Unflat Berry, Lauren M.; Walker, Elizabeth A.; Harrison, Melody; Oleson, Jacob; Moeller, Mary Pat

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of the study was to 1) compare the speech sound production abilities of 2-year-old children who are hard of hearing (HH) to children with normal hearing (NH), 2) identify sources of risk for individual children who are HH, and 3) determine whether speech sound production skills at age two were predictive of speech sound production skills at age three. Method Seventy children with bilateral, mild-to-severe hearing loss who use hearing aids and 37 age- and SES-matched children with NH participated. Children’s speech sound production abilities were assessed at 2 and 3 years of age. Results At age two, the HH group demonstrated vowel production abilities on par with their NH peers, but weaker consonant production abilities. Within the HH group, better outcomes were associated with hearing aid fittings by 6 months of age, hearing loss of less than 45 dB HL, stronger vocabulary scores, and being female. Positive relationships existed between children’s speech sound production abilities at 2 and 3 years of age. Conclusions Assessment of early speech sound production abilities in combination with demographic, audiologic, and linguistic variables may be useful in identifying HH children who are at risk of delays in speech sound production. PMID:24686852

  7. Exclusive e+e-, di-photon and di-jet production at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Terashi, Koji; /Rockefeller U.

    2007-05-01

    Results from studies on exclusive production of electron-position pair, di-photon, and dijet production at CDF in proton-antiproton collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron are presented. THe first observation and cross section measurements of exclusive e{sup +}e{sup -} and di-jet production in hadron-hadron collisions are emphasized.

  8. Power-efficient production of photon pairs in a tapered chalcogenide microwire

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer-Scott, Evan Dot, Audrey; Ahmad, Raja; Li, Lizhu; Rochette, Martin; Jennewein, Thomas

    2015-02-23

    Using tapered fibers of As{sub 2}Se{sub 3} chalcogenide glass, we produce photon pairs at telecommunication wavelengths with low pump powers. We found maximum coincidences-to-accidentals ratios of 2.13 ± 0.07 for degenerate pumping with 3.2 μW average power, and 1.33 ± 0.03 for non-degenerate pumping with 1.0 μW and 1.5 μW average power of the two pumps. Our results show that the ultrahigh nonlinearity in these microwires could allow single-photon pumping to produce photon pairs, enabling the production of large entangled states, heralding of single photons after lossy transmission, and photonic quantum information processing with nonlinear optics.

  9. CT14QED parton distribution functions from isolated photon production in deep inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Carl; Pumplin, Jon; Stump, Daniel; Yuan, C.-P.

    2016-06-01

    We describe the implementation of quantum electrodynamic (QED) evolution at leading order (LO) along with quantum chromodynamic (QCD) evolution at next-to-leading order (NLO) in the CTEQ-TEA global analysis package. The inelastic contribution to the photon parton distribution function (PDF) is described by a two-parameter ansatz, coming from radiation off the valence quarks, and based on the CT14 NLO PDFs. Setting the two parameters to be equal allows us to completely specify the inelastic photon PDF in terms of the inelastic momentum fraction carried by the photon, p0γ, at the initial scale Q0=1.295 GeV . We obtain constraints on the photon PDF by comparing with ZEUS data [S. Chekanov et al. (ZEUS Collaboration), Phys. Lett. B 687, 16 (2010)] on the production of isolated photons in deep inelastic scattering, e p →e γ +X . For this comparison we present a new perturbative calculation of the process that consistently combines the photon-initiated contribution with the quark-initiated contribution. Comparison with the data allows us to put a constraint at the 90% confidence level of p0γ≲0.14 % for the inelastic photon PDF at the initial scale of Q0=1.295 GeV in the one-parameter radiative ansatz. The resulting inelastic CT14QED PDFs will be made available to the public. In addition, we also provide CT14QEDinc PDFs, in which the inclusive photon PDF at the scale Q0 is defined by the sum of the inelastic photon PDF and the elastic photon distribution obtained from the equivalent photon approximation.

  10. Dark photon relic dark matter production through the dark axion portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneta, Kunio; Lee, Hye-Sung; Yun, Seokhoon

    2017-06-01

    We present a new mechanism to produce the dark photon (γ') in the early Universe with the help of the axion (a ) using a recently proposed dark axion portal. The dark photon, a light gauge boson in the dark sector, can be relic dark matter if its lifetime is long enough. The main process we consider is a variant of the Primakoff process f a →f γ' mediated by a photon, which is possible with the axion-photon-dark photon coupling. The axion is thermalized in the early Universe because of the strong interaction and it can contribute to the nonthermal dark photon production through the dark axion portal coupling. It provides a two-component dark matter sector, and the relic density deficit issue of the axion dark matter can be addressed by the compensation with the dark photon. The dark photon dark matter can also address the reported 3.5 keV x-ray excess via the γ'→γ a decay.

  11. Deterministic Production of Photon Number States via Quantum Feedback Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geremia, J. M.

    2006-05-01

    It is well-known that measurements reduce the state of a quantum system, at least approximately, to an eigenstate of the operator associated with the physical property being measured. Here, we employ a continuous measurement of cavity photon number to achieve a robust, nondestructively verifiable procedure for preparing number states of an optical cavity mode. Such Fock states are highly sought after for the enabling role they play in quantum computing, networking and precision metrology. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the particular Fock state produced in each application of the continuous photon number measurement can be controlled using techniques from real-time quantum feedback control. The result of the feedback- stabilized measurement is a deterministic source of (nearly ideal) cavity Fock states. An analysis of feedback stability and the experimental viability of a quantum optical implementation currently underway at the University of New Mexico will be presented.

  12. Pion and photon production in heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Gabor,D.

    2008-03-16

    Measurement of neutral pions and direct photons are closely connected experimentally, on the other hand they probe quite different aspects of relativistic heavy ion collisions. In this short review of the {pi}{sup 0} results from the PHENIX experiment at RHIC our focus is on the {phi}-integrated nuclear modification factor, its energy and system size dependence, and the impact of these results on parton energy loss models. We also discuss the current status of high p{sub T} and thermal direct photon measurements both in p+p and Au+Au collisions. Recognizing the advantages of measuring not only the 'signal', but also all the 'references' needed for proper interpretation in the same experiments (with same or similar systematics) we argue that RHIC should regularly include d+A and even d+d collisions into its system size and energy scan.

  13. Prompt photon production in p-p collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Cleymans, J.; Quack, E.; Redlich, K.

    1995-07-01

    A systematic study of the inclusive photon cross-section in p-p collisions is presented. The dependence of the {gamma} rates on the renormalization and factorization scales is discussed. A comparison is made with experimental data for centre-of-mass energies ranging from 23 GeV to 1.8 TeV. Predictions of the cross-sections are given for two different sets of structure functions for RHIC and LHC energies.

  14. The condensation of the corona for the correlation between the hard X-ray photon index Γ and the reflection scaling factor ℜ in active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Erlin; Liu, B. F.

    2017-05-01

    Observationally, it is found that there is a strong correlation between the hard X-ray photon index Γ and the Compton reflection scaling factor ℜ in active galactic nuclei. In this paper, we propose that the Γ - ℜ correlation can be explained within the framework of the condensation of the hot corona on to the cold accretion disc around a supermassive black hole. In the model, it is presumed that, initially, a vertically extended hot gas (corona) is supplied to the central supermassive black hole by capturing the interstellar medium and stellar wind. In this scenario, when the initial mass accretion rate \\dot{M}/ \\dot{M}_Edd ≳ 0.01, at a critical radius rd, part of the hot gas begins to condense on to the equatorial disc plane of the black hole, forming an inner cold accretion disc. Then, the matter is accreted in the form of a disc-corona structure extending down to the innermost stable circular orbits of the black hole. The size of the inner disc is determined by the initial mass accretion rate. With the increase of the initial mass accretion rate, the size of the inner disc increases, which results in both the increase of the Compton reflection scaling factor ℜ and the increase of the hard X-ray photon index Γ. By comparing with a sample of Seyfert galaxies with well-fitted X-ray spectra, it is found that our model can roughly explain the observations. Finally, we discuss the possibility of applying our model to high-mass X-ray binaries, which are believed to be fuelled by hot winds from the companion stars.

  15. The condensation of the corona for the correlation between the hard X-ray photon index Γ and the reflection scaling factor ℜ in active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Erlin; Liu, B. F.

    2017-01-01

    Observationally, it is found that there is a strong correlation between the hard X-ray photon index Γ and the Compton reflection scaling factor ℜ in active galactic nuclei. In this paper, we propose that the Γ - ℜ correlation can be explained within the framework of the condensation of the hot corona onto the cold accretion disc around a supermassive black hole. In the model, it is presumed that, initially, a vertically extended hot gas (corona) is supplied to the central supermassive black hole by capturing the interstellar medium and stellar wind. In this scenario, when the initial mass accretion rate dot{M}/ dot{M}_Edd gtrsim 0.01, at a critical radius rd, part of the hot gas begins to condense onto the equatorial disc plane of the black hole, forming an inner cold accretion disc. Then the matter is accreted in the form of the disc-corona structure extending down to the innermost stable circular orbits of the black hole. The size of the inner disc is determined by the initial mass accretion rate. With the increase of the initial mass accretion rate, the size of the inner disc increases, which results in both the increase of the Compton reflection scaling factor ℜ and the increase of the hard X-ray photon index Γ. By comparing with a sample of Seyfert galaxies with well-fitted X-ray spectra, it is found that our model can roughly explain the observations. Finally, we discuss the possibility to apply our model to high mass X-ray binaries, which are believed to be fueled by the hot wind from the companion star.

  16. CdTe Timepix detectors for single-photon spectroscopy and linear polarimetry of high-flux hard x-ray radiation.

    PubMed

    Hahn, C; Weber, G; Märtin, R; Höfer, S; Kämpfer, T; Stöhlker, Th

    2016-04-01

    Single-photon spectroscopy of pulsed, high-intensity sources of hard X-rays - such as laser-generated plasmas - is often hampered by the pileup of several photons absorbed by the unsegmented, large-volume sensors routinely used for the detection of high-energy radiation. Detectors based on the Timepix chip, with a segmentation pitch of 55 μm and the possibility to be equipped with high-Z sensor chips, constitute an attractive alternative to commonly used passive solutions such as image plates. In this report, we present energy calibration and characterization measurements of such devices. The achievable energy resolution is comparable to that of scintillators for γ spectroscopy. Moreover, we also introduce a simple two-detector Compton polarimeter setup with a polarimeter quality of (98 ± 1)%. Finally, a proof-of-principle polarimetry experiment is discussed, where we studied the linear polarization of bremsstrahlung emitted by a laser-driven plasma and found an indication of the X-ray polarization direction depending on the polarization state of the incident laser pulse.

  17. CdTe Timepix detectors for single-photon spectroscopy and linear polarimetry of high-flux hard x-ray radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, C. Höfer, S.; Kämpfer, T.; Weber, G.; Märtin, R.; Stöhlker, Th.

    2016-04-15

    Single-photon spectroscopy of pulsed, high-intensity sources of hard X-rays — such as laser-generated plasmas — is often hampered by the pileup of several photons absorbed by the unsegmented, large-volume sensors routinely used for the detection of high-energy radiation. Detectors based on the Timepix chip, with a segmentation pitch of 55 μm and the possibility to be equipped with high-Z sensor chips, constitute an attractive alternative to commonly used passive solutions such as image plates. In this report, we present energy calibration and characterization measurements of such devices. The achievable energy resolution is comparable to that of scintillators for γ spectroscopy. Moreover, we also introduce a simple two-detector Compton polarimeter setup with a polarimeter quality of (98 ± 1)%. Finally, a proof-of-principle polarimetry experiment is discussed, where we studied the linear polarization of bremsstrahlung emitted by a laser-driven plasma and found an indication of the X-ray polarization direction depending on the polarization state of the incident laser pulse.

  18. Measurement of Prompt Photon Production in 1.8-TeV Proton - Antiproton Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Ino, Takashi

    1996-06-01

    The inclusive production cross section of prompt photons with transverse energies 27 < EtEt < 40 GeV and in pseudorapidity 1.32 < ηη < 2.22 has been measured in proton antiproton collisions at s√s = 1.8 TeV. Using the data recorded by the CDF detector during the 1988-1989 TEVATRON collider run, corresponding to an integrated lurminosity of 3.8 ± 0.1 pb-1 3995 prompt photon candidate events are selected in the endplug electromagnetic calorimeter. From differences in the longitudinal cascade shower profile between a single photon and multi-photons from π0π0 and ηη meson decays, the number of prompt photon events in the candidates is extracted to be 1972 ± 353.The differences in the shower shape are obtained by a GEANT3 based Monte Carlo detector simulation, which has been careful1y studied and found to wel1 reproduce the electromagnetic cascade of electrons at various energies as wel1 as incident angles. The inclusive production cross section has been obtained to be σσ = 1.44 ± 0.09(stat..) ± 0.27(syst.) nb. The measurement agrees with the next-to-leading order QCD calculation using recent parton distribution functions. The differential cross section with respect to pseudorapidity has also been measured and found to be in good agreement with the QCD calculation. The photon event fraction and its dependence on the photon isolation are studied. The isolation dependence of the photon event fraction shows a consistency with the QCD prediction. Future prospects of prompt photon measurernents in the endplug region for the new data, which has been col1ected during 1992 to 1995 correspondingto roughly 110 pb-1 are also discussed.

  19. A practical guide to event generation for prompt photon production with Sherpa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegert, Frank

    2017-04-01

    The production of prompt photons is one of the most relevant scattering processes studied at hadron–hadron colliders in recent years. This article will give an overview of the different approaches used to simulate prompt photon production in the Sherpa event generator framework. Special emphasis is placed on a complete simulation of this process including fragmentation configurations. As a novel application a merged simulation of γ γ and γ γ +jet production at NLO accuracy is presented and compared to measurements from the ATLAS experiment.

  20. Study of photon emission by electron capture during solar nuclei acceleration. 3: Photon production evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez-Peraza, J.; Alvarez, M.; Gallegos, A.

    1985-01-01

    Lower limits of photon fluxes were evaluated from electron capture during acceleration in solar flares, because the arbitrary q sub c asterisk assumed in this work evolves very slow with velocity, probably much more slowly than the physical actual situation: in fact, more emission is expected toward the IR region. Nevertheless the authors claim to show that the factibility of sounding acceleration processes, charge evolution processes and physical parameters of the source itself, by the observational analysis of this kind of emissions. For instance, it would be interesting to search observationally, for the predicted flux and energy drift of F sub e ions interacting with the atomic 0 and F sub e of the source matter, or, even more feasible for the X-ray lines at 4.2 keV and 2.624 + 0.003 KeV from Fe and S ions in ionized Fe at T = 10 to the 7th power K respectively, the 418 + or - 2 eV and 20 + or - 4 eV lines of Fe and S in ionized Fe at 5 x 10 to the 6th power K, which are predicted from Fermi acceleration.

  1. Impact of early stage non-equilibrium dynamics on photon production in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliva, L.; Ruggieri, M.; Plumari, S.; Scardina, F.; Greco, V.

    2017-04-01

    In this study we discuss our results on the spectrum of photons emitted from the quark-gluon plasma produced in heavy ion collisions at RHIC energies. Simulating the space-time evolution of the fireball by solving the relativistic Boltzmann transport equation and including two-particle scattering processes with photon emission allows us to make a first step in the description of thermal photons from the QGP as well as of those produced in the pre-equilibrium stage. Indeed, we consider not only a standard Glauber initial condition but also a model in which quarks and gluons are produced in the very early stage through the Schwinger mechanism by the decay of an initial color-electric field. In the latter approach relativistic kinetic equations are coupled in a self-consistent way to field equations. We aim at spotting the impact of early stage non-equilibrium dynamics on the photon production.

  2. Photon and Pomeron-induced Production of Dijets in pp, pA and AA Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basso, E.; Goncalves, V. P.; Kohara, A. K.; Rangel, M. S.

    2017-09-01

    In this paper we present a detailed comparison of the dijet production by photon-photon, photon-pomeron and pomeron-pomeron interactions in pp, pA and AA collisions at the LHC energy. The transverse momentum, pseudo-rapidity and angular dependencies of the cross sections are calculated at LHC energy using the Forward Physics Monte Carlo (FPMC), which allows one to obtain realistic predictions for the dijet production with two leading intact hadrons. We see that the γ {IP} channel is dominant at forward rapidities in pp collisions and in the full kinematical range in the nuclear collisions of heavy nuclei. Our results indicate that the analysis of dijet production at the LHC can be useful to test the resolved pomeron model as well as to constrain the magnitude of the absorption effects.

  3. Photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, D.L.

    1982-10-01

    Studies of photon-photon collisions are reviewed with particular emphasis on new results reported to this conference. These include results on light meson spectroscopy and deep inelastic e..gamma.. scattering. Considerable work has now been accumulated on resonance production by ..gamma gamma.. collisions. Preliminary high statistics studies of the photon structure function F/sub 2//sup ..gamma../(x,Q/sup 2/) are given and comments are made on the problems that remain to be solved.

  4. Charmonium production in ultra-peripheral heavy ion collisions with two-photon processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Gong-Ming; Yu, Yue-Chao; Li, Yun-De; Wang, Jian-Song

    2017-04-01

    We calculate the production of large-pT charmonium and narrow resonance state (exotic charmonium) in proton-proton, proton-nucleus, and nucleus-nucleus collisions with the semi-coherent two-photon interactions at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), Large Hadron Collider (LHC), and Future Circular Collider (FCC) energies. Using the large quasi-real photon fluxes, we present the γγ → H differential cross section for charmonium and narrow resonance state production at large transverse momentum in ultra-peripheral heavy ion collisions. The numerical results demonstrate that the experimental study of ultra-peripheral collisions is feasible at RHIC, LHC, and FCC energies.

  5. Chiral symmetry breaking and confinement effects on dilepton and photon production around Tc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satow, Daisuke; Weise, Wolfram

    2015-09-01

    Production rates of dileptons and photons from the quark-gluon (QGP) phase are calculated taking into account effects of confinement and spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking (χ SB ) not far from the transition temperature Tc. We find that the production rates of dileptons with large momenta and of photons originating from the QGP around Tc are suppressed by the χ SB effect. We also discuss to what extent information about details of the chiral transition, such as its characteristic temperature range and the steepness of the crossover, are reflected in these quantities.

  6. Production and calibration of the first HEFT hard x-ray optics module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koglin, Jason E.; Chen, C. M. H.; Chonko, James; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; Decker, Todd R.; Gunderson, Kurt S.; Hailey, Charles J.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Jensen, Carsten P.; Madsen, Kristin K.; Stern, Marcela; Windt, David L.; Yu, Haitao; Ziegler, Eric

    2004-02-01

    Complete hard X-ray optics modules are currently being produced for the High Energy Focusing Telescope (HEFT), a balloon born mission that will observe a wide range of objects including young supernova remnants, active galactic nuclei, and galaxy clusters at energies between 20 and 70 keV. Large collecting areas are achieved by tightly nesting layers of grazing incidence mirrors in a conic approximation Wolter-I design. The segmented layers are made of thermally-formed glass substrates coated with depth-graded multilayer films for enhanced reflectivity. Our novel mounting technique involves constraining these mirror segments to successive layers of precisely machined graphite spacers. We report the production and calibration of the first HEFT optics module.

  7. Singular Values of Products of Ginibre Random Matrices, Multiple Orthogonal Polynomials and Hard Edge Scaling Limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuijlaars, Arno B. J.; Zhang, Lun

    2014-12-01

    Akemann, Ipsen and Kieburg recently showed that the squared singular values of products of M rectangular random matrices with independent complex Gaussian entries are distributed according to a determinantal point process with a correlation kernel that can be expressed in terms of Meijer G-functions. We show that this point process can be interpreted as a multiple orthogonal polynomial ensemble. We give integral representations for the relevant multiple orthogonal polynomials and a new double contour integral for the correlation kernel, which allows us to find its scaling limits at the origin (hard edge). The limiting kernels generalize the classical Bessel kernels. For M = 2 they coincide with the scaling limits found by Bertola, Gekhtman, and Szmigielski in the Cauchy-Laguerre two-matrix model, which indicates that these kernels represent a new universality class in random matrix theory.

  8. Photon Production from Proton-Antiproton Collisions at SQRT.S = 1.8TEV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Thomas Gordon

    1990-01-01

    The first measurement of low energy photon production from pp collisions at sqrt{s} = 1.8TeV is presented. The transverse momentum spectrum for photons is measured between 260 and 1500MeV/c. The < P_{t}> between those limits is 511 +/- 11MeV/c. The absolute photon production rate in the range P_{t} = 0-1500MeV/c for -0.48 >=q eta >=q 0.97 is found to be {dN _gammaover deta} = 3.44 +/- 0.15 +/- 0.34. The photon to charged pi ratio is measured in this range and found to be 1.40 +/- 0.07 +/- 0.20. For values of average charged particle multiplicity between 20 and 123, the value of < P_ {t}> varies linearly between 487MeV/c and 560MeV/c, the absolute production rate varies linearly between 1.55 and 10.1 and the photon to charge pi ratio remains constant. The eta to pi^0 ratio for the data sample is determined to be 0.33 +/- 0.19.

  9. Photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1988-07-01

    Highlights of the VIIIth International Workshop on Photon-Photon Collisions are reviewed. New experimental and theoretical results were reported in virtually every area of ..gamma gamma.. physics, particularly in exotic resonance production and tests of quantum chromodynamics where asymptotic freedom and factorization theorems provide predictions for both inclusive and exclusive ..gamma gamma.. reactions at high momentum transfer. 73 refs., 12 figs.

  10. Observation of hard processes in rapidity gap events in γp interactions at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, T.; Aid, S.; Andreev, V.; Andrieu, B.; Appuhn, R.-D.; Arpagaus, M.; Babaev, A.; Baehr, J.; Bán, J.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Barth, M.; Bassler, U.; Beck, H. P.; Behrend, H.-J.; Belousov, A.; Berger, Ch.; Bergstein, H.; Bernardi, G.; Bernet, R.; Bertrand-Coremans, G.; Besançon, M.; Beyer, R.; Biddulph, P.; Bizot, J. C.; Blobel, V.; Borras, K.; Botterweck, F.; Boudry, V.; Braemer, A.; Brasse, F.; Braunschweig, W.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Brune, C.; Buchholz, R.; Büngener, L.; Bürger, J.; Büsser, F. W.; Buniatian, A.; Burke, S.; Buschhorn, G.; Campbell, A. J.; Carli, T.; Charles, F.; Clarke, D.; Clegg, A. B.; Clerbaux, B.; Colombo, M.; Contreras, J. G.; Coughlan, J. A.; Courau, A.; Coutures, Ch.; Cozzika, G.; Criegee, L.; Cussans, D. G.; Cvach, J.; Dagoret, S.; Dainton, J. B.; Danilov, M.; Dau, W. D.; Daum, K.; David, M.; Deffur, E.; Delcourt, B.; Del Buono, L.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E. A.; Di Nezza, P.; Dollfus, C.; Dowell, J. D.; Dreis, H. B.; Droutskoi, V.; Duboc, J.; Düllmann, D.; Dünger, O.; Duhm, H.; Ebert, J.; Ebert, T. R.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Ehrlichmann, H.; Eichenberger, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ellison, R. J.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, M.; Erdmann, W.; Evrard, E.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Feeken, D.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Ferrarotto, F.; Flamm, K.; Fleischer, M.; Flieser, M.; Flügge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Fominykh, B.; Forbush, M.; Formánek, J.; Foster, J. M.; Franke, G.; Fretwurst, E.; Gabathuler, E.; Gabathuler, K.; Gamerdinger, K.; Garvey, J.; Gayler, J.; Gebauer, M.; Gellrich, A.; Genzel, H.; Gerhards, R.; Goerlach, U.; Goerlach, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Goldberg, M.; Goldner, D.; Gonzalez-Pineiro, B.; Goodall, A. M.; Gorelov, I.; Goritchev, P.; Grab, C.; Grässler, H.; Grässler, R.; Greenshaw, T.; Grindhammer, G.; Gruber, A.; Gruber, C.; Haack, J.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Hamon, O.; Hampel, M.; Hanlon, E. M.; Hapke, M.; Haynes, W. J.; Heatherington, J.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Henschel, H.; Herma, R.; Herynek, I.; Hess, M. F.; Hildesheim, W.; Hill, P.; Hiller, K. H.; Hilton, C. D.; Hladký, J.; Hoeger, K. C.; Höppner, M.; Horisberger, R.; Huet, Ph.; Hufnagel, H.; Ibbotson, M.; Itterbeck, H.; Jabiol, M.-A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jacobsson, C.; Jaffre, M.; Janoth, J.; Jansen, T.; Jönsson, L.; Johannsen, K.; Johnson, D. P.; Johnson, L.; Jung, H.; Kalmus, P. I. P.; Kant, D.; Kaschowitz, R.; Kasselmann, P.; Kathage, U.; Kaufmann, H. H.; Kazarian, S.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kermiche, S.; Keuker, C.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Knies, G.; Ko, W.; Köhler, T.; Kolanoski, H.; Kole, F.; Kolya, S. D.; Korbel, V.; Korn, M.; Kostka, P.; Kotelnikov, S. K.; Krämerkämper, T.; Krasny, M. W.; Krehbiel, H.; Krücker, D.; Krüger, U.; Krüner-Marquis, U.; Kubenka, J. P.; Küster, H.; Kuhlen, M.; Kurča, T.; Kurzhöfer, J.; Kuznik, B.; Lacour, D.; Lamarche, F.; Lander, R.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Lanius, P.; Laporte, J.-F.; Lebedev, A.; Leverenz, C.; Levonian, S.; Ley, Ch.; Lindner, A.; Lindström, G.; Linsel, F.; Lipinski, J.; List, B.; Loch, P.; Lohmander, H.; Lopez, G. C.; Lubimov, V.; Lüke, D.; Magnussen, N.; Malinovski, E.; Mani, S.; Maraček, R.; Marage, P.; Marks, J.; Marshall, R.; Martens, J.; Martin, R.; Martyn, H.-U.; Martyniak, J.; Masson, S.; Mavroidis, T.; Maxfield, S. J.; McMahon, S. J.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Mercer, D.; Merz, T.; Meyer, C. A.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Milstead, D.; Moreau, F.; Morris, J. V.; Müller, G.; Müller, K.; Murín, P.; Nagovizin, V.; Nahnhauer, R.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P. R.; Newton, D.; Neyret, D.; Nguyen, H. K.; Niebergall, F.; Niebuhr, C.; Nisius, R.; Nowak, G.; Noyes, G. W.; Nyberg-Werther, M.; Oberlack, H.; Obrock, U.; Olsson, J. E.; Panaro, E.; Panitch, A.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Peppel, E.; Perez, E.; Phillips, J. P.; Pichler, Ch.; Pitzl, D.; Pope, G.; Prell, S.; Prosi, R.; Rädel, G.; Raupach, F.; Reimer, P.; Reinshagen, S.; Ribarics, P.; Rick, H.; Riech, V.; Riedlberger, J.; Riess, S.; Rietz, M.; Robertson, S. M.; Robmann, P.; Roloff, H. E.; Roosen, R.; Rosenbauer, K.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rouse, F.; Royon, C.; Rüter, K.; Rusakov, S.; Rybicki, K.; Rylko, R.; Sahlmann, N.; Sanchez, E.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Savitsky, M.; Schacht, P.; Schiek, S.; Schleper, P.; von Schlippe, W.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, D.; Schmidt, G.; Schöning, A.; Schröder, V.; Schuhmann, E.; Schwab, B.; Schwind, A.; Seehausen, U.; Sefkow, F.; Seidel, M.; Sell, R.; Semenov, A.; Shekelyan, V.; Sheviakov, I.; Shooshtari, H.; Shtarkov, L. N.; Siegmon, G.; Siewert, U.; Sirois, Y.; Skillicorni, I. O.; Smirnov, P.; Smith, J. R.; Soloviev, Y.; Spitzer, H.; Starosta, R.; Steenbock, M.; Steffen, P.; Steinberg, R.; Stella, B.; Stephens, K.; Stier, J.; Stiewe, J.; Stösslein, U.; Strachota, J.; Straumann, U.; Struczinski, W.; Sutton, J. P.; Tapprogge, S.; Taylor, R. E.; Tchernyshov, V.; Thiebaux, C.; Thompson, G.; Truöl, P.; Turnau, J.; Tutas, J.; Uelkes, P.; Usik, A.; Valkár, S.; Valkárová, A.; Vallée, C.; Van Esch, P.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vartapetian, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Vecko, M.; Verrecchia, P.; Villet, G.; Wacker, K.; Wagener, A.; Wagener, M.; Walker, I. W.; Walther, A.; Weber, G.; Weber, M.; Wegener, D.; Wegner, A.; Wellisch, H. P.; West, L. R.; Willard, S.; Winde, M.; Winter, G.-G.; Wright, A. E.; Wünsch, E.; Wulff, N.; Yiou, T. P.; Žáček, J.; Zarbock, D.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zimmer, M.; Zimmermann, W.; Zomer, F.; Zuber, K.

    1995-02-01

    Events with no hadronic energy flow in a large interval of pseudo-rapidity in the proton direction are observed in photon-proton interactions at an average centre of mass energy <√s γp> of 200 GeV These events are interpreted as photon diffractive dissociation. Evidence for hard scattering in photon diffractive dissociation is demonstrated using inclusive single particle spectra, thrust as a function of transverse energy, and the observation of jet production. The data can be described by a Monte Carlo calculation including hard photon-pomeron scattering.

  11. Di-photon and photon + b/c production cross sections at Ecm = 1.96- TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Gajjar, Anant; /Liverpool U.

    2005-05-01

    Measurements of the di-photon cross section have been made in the central region and are found to be in good agreement with NLO QCD predictions. The cross section of events containing a photon and additional heavy flavor jet have also been measured, as well as the ratio of photon + b to photon + c. The statistically limited sample shows good agreement with Leading Order predictions.

  12. Minimal NCSM Direct Photon Production in Proton-antiproton Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadou, I.; Mebarki, N.; Bekli, M. R.

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, we present the results of our calculations for the direct photons with proton-antiproton collision in Minimal Non-Commutative Standard Model at a center-of-mass energy √ s = 1.96 Tev. The analytical expression of the differential cross section of the two subprocesses is deduced after applying a series of rotation from the equatorial coordinates system to the laboratory frame. Subsequently, we have calculated the inclusive cross section in both space-space and space-time cases independently, by averaging over all unknown angles except the scattering angle and the colatitudes γ of electric-like vector ěc {θ }E and magnetic-like vector ěc {θ }B. Thus, comparison with the experimental CDF data of Tevatron allowed us to deduce two larges bounds on the non-commutativity parameter: {Λ}_{bound}^{space-space} =449.93± 29.20GeV and {Λ }_{bound}^{space-time} =459.83± 16.40 GeV. Moreover, the analysis between the difference experiment-theory and the purely non-commutative contribution, for γ varying between 0 ∘ to 90 ∘, allowed us to deduce a Pearson correlation coefficient: 0,58 ≤ ρ s p a c e-s p a c e ≤0,64 and 0,55 ≤ ρ s p a c e-t i m e ≤0,61. We deduce that the perpendicular to the earth rotation axis, given by γ = 90∘, is the preferred orientation of ěc {θ }E and ěc {θ }B.

  13. Minimal NCSM Direct Photon Production in Proton-antiproton Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadou, I.; Mebarki, N.; Bekli, M. R.

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we present the results of our calculations for the direct photons with proton-antiproton collision in Minimal Non-Commutative Standard Model at a center-of-mass energy √ s = 1.96 Tev. The analytical expression of the differential cross section of the two subprocesses is deduced after applying a series of rotation from the equatorial coordinates system to the laboratory frame. Subsequently, we have calculated the inclusive cross section in both space-space and space-time cases independently, by averaging over all unknown angles except the scattering angle and the colatitudes γ of electric-like vector ěc {θ }E and magnetic-like vector ěc {θ }B. Thus, comparison with the experimental CDF data of Tevatron allowed us to deduce two larges bounds on the non-commutativity parameter: {Λ}_{bound}^{space-space} =449.93± 29.20GeV and {Λ }_{bound}^{space-time} =459.83± 16.40 { GeV}. Moreover, the analysis between the difference experiment-theory and the purely non-commutative contribution, for γ varying between 0 ∘ to 90 ∘, allowed us to deduce a Pearson correlation coefficient: 0,58 ≤ ρ s p a c e- s p a c e ≤0,64 and 0,55 ≤ ρ s p a c e- t i m e ≤0,61. We deduce that the perpendicular to the earth rotation axis, given by γ = 90∘, is the preferred orientation of ěc {θ }E and ěc {θ }B.

  14. Direct photon production in NCG QCD at the tevatron and LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Bekli, M. R.; Mebarki, N.; Chadou, I.

    2012-06-27

    The minimal NCSM contribution of a direct photon production at the Tevatron and LHC is obtained and the phenomenological implications are discussed. Some behaviors are discussed. It is shown that the effect of the space-time noncommutativity becomes important at very high energies leading to a violation of unitarity.

  15. Abstracts of computer programs and data libraries pertaining to photon production data

    SciTech Connect

    White, J.E.; Manneschmidt, J.B.; Finch, S.Y.; Dickens, J.K.

    1998-06-01

    Abstracts, or descriptions, of computer programs and data libraries pertaining to Photon Production Data (Measurements, Evaluations and Calculations) maintained in the collections of the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee USA and at the OECD/NEA Data Bank, Paris, are collected in this document.

  16. Further Results on the Production of Neutral Mesons by Photons

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Panofsky, W. K. H.; Steinberger, J.; Steller, J.

    1951-10-01

    Further measurements have been made on the photoproduction of neutral mesons using the gamma-gamma coincidence technique. New data have been obtained on the gamma-gamma correlation curves in beryllium. The angular distribution of the photo mesons in Be has been determined and found to be strongly peaked forward. The dependence on the atomic number A of production has been found to obey an A{sup 2/3} law. Some data obtained for production in hydrogen show that the pi-zero and pi-plus production cross sections are comparable and that the pi-zero excitation curve starts more slowly from threshold than does the pi-plus photo excitation curve.

  17. Geolocating Individual Photons: Laying the Foundation for ICESat-2 Science Data Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, C. E.; Neumann, T.; Brenner, A. C.; Luthcke, S. B.; Robbins, J. W.; Saba, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    The Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite-2 (ICESat-2) is NASA's next generation spaceborne laser altimeter, currently scheduled for launch in October 2017. The sole instrument onboard is the Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS), which will use a photon-counting detection method to measure range from the satellite to the Earth's surface with green (532-nm wavelength) laser light. Combining these measurements with precise knowledge of the position and orientation of the ATLAS instrument in orbit will yield elevation measurements to ±88° latitude around the globe. In this presentation, we provide an overview of the ICESat-2 data products with a particular focus on the Global Geolocated Photon Cloud. With two redundant lasers, operated one at a time, ATLAS sends laser pulses toward the Earth 10,000 times per second, and the outgoing beam is split into three pairs of two beams, to increase spatial coverage and enable determination of local surface slopes. Geolocation algorithms in the ground-based science data processing system will produce a latitude, longitude and ellipsoidal elevation for each photon that is returned to ATLAS, yielding a photon point cloud. These data will incorporate a suite of geophysical corrections, and the product will also provide a coarse surface classification (land ice, sea ice, ocean, land, inland water), along with initial signal-vs-noise discrimination. While higher-level, surface-specific science data products will provide the most precise estimates of surface elevation by aggregating the geolocated photons to reduce noise, we expect that this lower-level data product - which provides most of the inputs to the higher-level products - will be of interest to the general community.

  18. Rapidity correlations and {Delta}G from prompt photon plus jet production in polarized pp collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Sanghyeon Chang; Claudio Coriano; L. E. Gordon

    1997-09-01

    A study of prompt photon plus associated jet production is performed at next-to-leading order (O({alpha}{alpha}{sub s}{sup 2})) in QCD at {radical}S=200--500 GeV, appropriate for the RHIC polarized {rvec p}{rvec p} collider experiment. Momentum correlations between the jet and photon are examined and the utility of the process as a method for constraining the size and shape of the polarized gluon density of the proton {Delta}G is examined.

  19. Growth of optical-quality anthracene crystals doped with dibenzoterrylene for controlled single photon production

    SciTech Connect

    Major, Kyle D. Lien, Yu-Hung; Polisseni, Claudio; Grandi, Samuele; Kho, Kiang Wei; Clark, Alex S.; Hwang, J.; Hinds, E. A.

    2015-08-15

    Dibenzoterrylene (DBT) molecules within a crystalline anthracene matrix show promise as quantum emitters for controlled, single photon production. We present the design and construction of a chamber in which we reproducibly grow doped anthracene crystals of optical quality that are several mm across and a few μm thick. We demonstrate control of the DBT concentration over the range 6–300 parts per trillion and show that these DBT molecules are stable single-photon emitters. We interpret our data with a simple model that provides some information on the vapour pressure of DBT.

  20. Measurement of direct-photon production at the Fermilab Tevatron fixed target energies

    SciTech Connect

    Apanasevich, L.; Bacigalupi, J.; Pellett, D.; Tripathi, S.M.; Baker, W.; Johnstone, C.; Lukens, P.; Skow, D.; Begel, M.; Barbaro, L. de; DeSoi, W.; Dunlea, J.; Fanourakis, G.; Ferbel, T.; Ftacnik, J.; Ginther, G.; Lobkowicz, F.; Mansour, J.; Osborne, G.; Prebys, E.

    2004-11-01

    Measurements of the production of high transverse momentum direct photons by a 515 GeV/c {pi}{sup -} beam and 530 and 800 GeV/c proton beams in interactions with beryllium and hydrogen targets are presented. The data span the kinematic ranges of 3.5photon cross sections are compared with next-to-leading-order perturbative QCD calculations and expectations based on a phenomenological parton-k{sub T} model.

  1. Spin-dependent Drell-Yan and double prompt photon production to NLO QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Sanghyeon; Coriano, C.; Field, R.D.; Gordon, L.E.

    1997-09-01

    We present the complete O({alpha}{sub s}{sup 2}) radiative corrections to the (non singlet) polarized Drell Yan cross section for the production of a lepton pair with a nonzero qT. The helicity of the incoming states is arbitrary. In the case of double photon, results for the longitudinal asymmetries and on the pT behavior of the cross section are also given (to O({alpha}{sub em}{sup 2}{alpha}{sub s})) in the central rapidity region of the tagged photon.

  2. Spin-dependent Drell-Yan and double prompt photon production to NLO QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.; Coriano, C.; Field, R.D.; Gordon, L.E

    1997-07-01

    The authors present the complete O({alpha}{sub s}{sup 2}) radiative corrections to the (non singlet) polarized Drell Yan cross section for the production of a lepton pair with a nonzero q{sub T}. The helicity of the incoming states is arbitrary. In the case of double photon, results for the longitudinal asymmetries and on the p{sub T} behavior of the cross section are also given (to O({alpha}{sub em}{sup 2}{alpha}{sub s})) in the central rapidity region of the tagged photon.

  3. Industrial-scale spray layer-by-layer assembly for production of biomimetic photonic systems.

    PubMed

    Krogman, K C; Cohen, R E; Hammond, P T; Rubner, M F; Wang, B N

    2013-12-01

    Layer-by-layer assembly is a powerful and flexible thin film process that has successfully reproduced biomimetic photonic systems such as structural colour. While most of the seminal work has been carried out using slow and ultimately unscalable immersion assembly, recent developments using spray layer-by-layer assembly provide a platform for addressing challenges to scale-up and manufacturability. A series of manufacturing systems has been developed to increase production throughput by orders of magnitude, making commercialized structural colour possible. Inspired by biomimetic photonic structures we developed and demonstrated a heat management system that relies on constructive reflection of near infrared radiation to bring about dramatic reductions in heat content.

  4. Two-photon production of leptons at hadron colliders in semielastic and elastic cases

    SciTech Connect

    Manko, A. Yu.; Shulyakovsky, R. G. E-mail: shulyakovsky@iaph.bas-net.by

    2016-03-15

    The mechanism of two-photon dilepton production is studied in the equivalent-photon (Weizsäcker–Williams) approximation. This approximation is shown to describe well experimental data from hadron accelerators. The respective total and differential cross sections were obtained for the LHC and for the Tevatron collider at various energies of colliding hadrons. The differential cross sections were studied versus the dilepton invariant mass, transverse momentum, and emission angle in the reference frame comoving with the center of mass of colliding hadrons. The cases of semielastic and inelastic collisions were examined.

  5. Development of a hard X-ray delay line for X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy and jitter-free pump-probe experiments at X-ray free-electron laser sources.

    PubMed

    Roseker, Wojciech; Franz, Hermann; Schulte-Schrepping, Horst; Ehnes, Anita; Leupold, Olaf; Zontone, Federico; Lee, Sooheyong; Robert, Aymeric; Grübel, Gerhard

    2011-05-01

    A hard X-ray delay line capable of splitting and delaying single X-ray pulses has been developed with the aim of performing X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) and X-ray pump-probe experiments at hard X-ray free-electron laser sources. The performance of the device was tested with 8.39 keV synchrotron radiation. Time delays up to 2.95 ns have been demonstrated. The feasibility of the device for performing XPCS studies was tested by recording static speckle patterns. The achieved speckle contrast of 56% indicates the possibility of performing ultra-fast XPCS studies with the delay line.

  6. Inclusive photon production at forward rapidities in pp collisions at LHC energies with the ALICE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudipan Dethe ALICE Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    Measurements of multiplicity and pseudorapidity distributions of particles produced in pp collisions are important for the study of particle production mechanisms and to obtain baseline distributions to be compared with those from heavy-ion collisions. The inclusive photon measurements (dominated by π0 decays) are complementary to the charged particle measurements. The present work focuses on the forward rapidity region with comparisons to different models such as PYTHIA and PHOJET. We report the measurements of multiplicity and pseudorapidity distributions of inclusive photons using the ALICE Photon Multiplicity Detector (PMD) at forward rapidities (2.3 < η < 3.9) in pp collisions at = 0.9, 2.76 and 7 TeV. It is observed that the photon multiplicity distributions are well described by negative binomial distributions (NBD). Multiplicity distributions are studied in terms of KNO variables for each energy. It is shown that the increase in the average photon multiplicity as a function of beam energy is compatible with both a logarithmic and power law dependence. The results are compared to different model predictions. These models reproduce experimental results at lower energy while they are not accurate at higher energies.

  7. Medium effect on the photon production in ultrarelativisitc heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Chung-Sik; Fai, George

    1998-04-01

    The effect of in-medium vector and axial vector meson masses on the photon production in heavy-ion collisions has been studied. We assume that the effective mass of a vector meson in hot nuclear matter decreases while that of an axial-vector meson is given by the Weinberg mass formula, m_a_1=√2m_ρ (Phys. Rev. Lett. 18, 507 (1967)). We find that the production rate increases with reduced vector and axial vector meson masses and is enhanced by an order of magnitude at T=160 MeV with m_ρ=330 MeV, compared to the result obtained with free mass. Assuming a hydrodynamic evolution of the system we estimate the effect of the reduced masses on the photon production in nucleus-nucleus collisions. The result has been compared with experimental data obtained from WA80/WA98 collaboration (Phys. Rev. Lett. 76, 3506 (1996).).

  8. Conversion of pesticides to biologically active products on urban hard surfaces.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Weiying; Gan, Jay

    2016-06-15

    Impervious pavements such as concrete are a dominant feature of urban landscapes, but their role in the fate of environmental contaminants is largely ignored. This study considered the case of urban-use pesticides, and demonstrated for the first time that surfaces such as concrete were capable of converting pesticides to other biologically active intermediates. Rapid transformation of pesticides was observed in both bench and field scale setups. Under outdoor conditions, permethrin, a heavily used pyrethroid insecticide, quickly formed 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3-PBA) that is a known endocrine disruptor, and the level of 3-PBA was >100μg/L in the runoff water even 3months after the treatment. Fipronil, a product used for termite and ant control, was quickly transformed to desulfinyl and sulfone derivatives, with the desulfinyl level exceeding that of parent in the runoff water only 1week after treatment. Fipronil derivatives have aquatic toxicity similar or even greater than the parent fipronil. Direct sampling of deposited particles from residential exterior pavements revealed widespread presence of fipronil sulfone and desulfinyl and demonstrated their in-situ formation and accumulation on concrete. The extensive transformations were likely caused by the alkalinity and metal oxides in concrete and conducive photolytic conditions at the hard surfaces. The study findings highlight the role of urban pavements and urbanization in the geochemical cycling of anthropogenic contaminants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Anomalous soft photon production from the induced currents in Dirac sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loshaj, Frasher; Kharzeev, Dmitri

    2013-10-01

    The propagation of a high energy quark distrurbs the confining vacuum inducing the currents in Dirac sea. Since quarks possess electric charge, these induced vacuum currents act as a source of soft photon radiation. This can lead to the enhancement of the soft photon production above the expectations based on the charged hadron yields and the Low theorem. We illustrate the phenomenon by using the exactly soluble 1 + 1 dimensional massless Abelian gauge model that shares with QCD all of the ingredients involved in this mechanism: confinement, chiral symmetry breaking, axial anomaly, and the periodic θ-vacuum. We show that the propagating quark throughout the process of hadronization induces in the vacuum charged transition currents that lead to a strong resonant enhancement of the soft photon yield; the Low theorem however remains accurate in the limit of very soft momenta. We then construct on the basis of our result a simple phenomenological model and apply it to the soft photon production in the fragmentation of jets produced in Z0 decays. We find a qualitative agreement with the recent result from the DELPHI Collaboration.

  10. Anomalous soft photon production from the induced currents in Dirac sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharzeev, Dmitri E.; Loshaj, Frashër

    2014-04-01

    The propagation of a high-energy quark disturbs the confining QCD vacuum inducing the currents in Dirac sea. Since quarks possess electric charge, these induced vacuum quark currents act as a source of soft photon radiation. This can lead to the enhancement of the soft photon production above the expectations based on the charged hadron yields and the Low theorem. We illustrate the phenomenon by using the exactly soluble 1+1 dimensional massless Abelian gauge model that shares with QCD all of the ingredients involved in this mechanism: confinement, chiral symmetry breaking, axial anomaly, and the periodic θ vacuum. We show that the propagating quark throughout the process of hadronization induces in the vacuum charged transition currents that lead to a strong resonant enhancement of the soft photon yield; the Low theorem, however, remains accurate in the limit of very soft momenta. We then construct on the basis of our result a simple phenomenological model and apply it to the soft photon production in the fragmentation of jets produced in Z0 decays. We find a qualitative agreement with the recent result from the DELPHI Collaboration.

  11. Measurement of K* K* production in two-photon interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ARGUS Collaboration; Albrecht, H.

    2000-09-01

    A measurement of gamma gamma production of the final states K^+ K^- π^+ π ^-, K^+ K^- π^0 π ^0, K^0_SK^0_Sπ^+π^-, K^0_S K^{±} π^{mp} π^0 and K^0_SK^0_Sπ^0π^0 was performed by the ARGUS collaboration at the e^+e^- storage ring DORIS II at DESY. Since the two intermediate states K^{*0} bar{K}^{*0} and K^{*+}K^{*-} are accessible by analysing different final states, the measurement provides several cross checks for cross-sections to these two states. The results for γγ to K^{*}bar{K}^* cross-sections obtained from different final states are found to be consistent with each other. The analysis of the partial wave structure of the K^{*0}bar{K}^{*0} state from the reaction γ γ to K^+ K^- π^+ π ^- revealed the dominance of the (J^P,J_z) = (2^+,± 2) wave.

  12. Preliminary effects of water hardness on triactinomyxon production and development from eastern tubifex worms infected with Myxobolus cerebralis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waldrop, Thomas B.; Densmore, Christine; Blazer, Vicki; Smith, Dave; Schill, Bane; Schill, B.; Waldrop, T.; Blazer, V.

    1999-01-01

    Whirling disease is caused by Myxobolus cerebralis and requires an intermediate oligochaete host identified as Tubifex tubifex (Wolf, Markiw, and Hiltunen, 1986). M. cerebralis spores ingested by the tubifex worms develop into triactinomyxons (tams) that are eventually released into the water column to infect salmonid fish. There may be many environmental parameters, biotic or abiotic, that may affect the development of waterborne tams in eastern tubifex worms. This study will focus on one of those environmental parameters, total water hardness. Total water hardness is defined as the concentration of calcium and magnesium in a water sample expressed in milligrams per liter of equivalent CACO3 (Boyd, 1990). This study will address whether different levels of water hardness affect the development and production of tams released by infected tubifex worms.

  13. Non-factorizable photonic corrections to resonant production and decay of many unstable particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittmaier, Stefan; Schwan, Christopher

    2016-03-01

    Electroweak radiative corrections to the production of high-multiplicity final states with several intermediate resonances in most cases can be sufficiently well described by the leading contribution of an expansion about the resonance poles. In this approach, also known as pole approximation, corrections are classified into separately gauge-invariant factorizable and non-factorizable corrections, where the former can be attributed to the production and decay of the unstable particles on their mass shell. The remaining non-factorizable corrections are induced by the exchange of soft photons between different production and decay subprocesses. We give explicit analytical results for the non-factorizable photonic virtual corrections to the production of an arbitrary number of unstable particles at the one-loop level and, thus, present an essential building block in the calculation of next-to-leading-order electroweak corrections in pole approximation. The remaining virtual factorizable corrections can be obtained with modern automated one-loop matrix-element generators, while the evaluation of the corresponding real photonic corrections can be evaluated with full matrix elements by multi-purpose Monte Carlo generators. Our results can be easily modified to non-factorizable QCD corrections, which are induced by soft-gluon exchange.

  14. Adaptive non-uniform photonic time stretch for blind RF signal detection with compressed time-bandwidth product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mididoddi, Chaitanya K.; Wang, Chao

    2017-08-01

    Photonic time stretch significantly extends the effective bandwidth of existing analog-to-digital convertors by slowing down the input high-speed RF signals. Non-uniform photonic time stretch further enables time bandwidth product reduction in RF signal detection by selectively stretching high-frequency features more. However, it requires the prior knowledge of spectral-temporal distribution of the input RF signal and has to reconfigure the time stretch filter for different RF input signals. Here we propose for the first time an adaptive non-uniform photonic time stretch method based on microwave photonics pre-stretching that achieves blind detection of high-speed RF signals with reduced time bandwidth product. Non-uniform photonic time stretch using both quadratic and cubic group delay response has been demonstrated and time bandwidth product compression ratios of 72% and 56% have been achieved respectively.

  15. Application of Origen2.1 in the decay photon spectrum calculation of spallation products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Shuang; Yang, Yong-Wei; Xu, Hu-Shan; Meng, Hai-Yan; Zhang, Lu; Liu, Zhao-Qing; Gao, Yu-Cui; Chen, Kang

    2016-11-01

    Origen2.1 is a widely used computer code for calculating the burnup, decay, and processing of radioactive materials. However, the nuclide library of Origen2.1 is used for existing reactors like pressurized water reactors. To calculate the photon spectrum released by the decay of spallation products, we have made specific libraries for the ADS tungsten spallation target, based on the results given by the FLUKA Monte Carlo code. All the data used to make the Origen2.1 libraries are obtained from Nuclear structure & decay Data (NuDat2.6). The accumulated activity of spallation products and the contribution of nuclides to photon emission are given in this paper. Supported by Strategic Priority Research Program of Chinese Academy of Sciences (XDA03030102)

  16. Calculation of energy deposition, photon and neutron production in proton therapy of thyroid gland using MCNPX.

    PubMed

    Mowlavi, Ali Asghar; Fornasie, Maria Rosa; de Denaro, Mario

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the MCNPX code has been used to simulate a proton therapy in thyroid gland, in order to calculate the proton energy deposition in the target region. As well as, we have calculated the photon and neutron production spectra due to proton interactions with the tissue. We have considered all the layers of tissue, from the skin to the thyroid gland, and an incident high energy pencil proton beam. The results of the simulation show that the best proton energy interval, to cover completely the thyroid tissue, is from 42 to 54 MeV, assuming that the thyroid gland has a 14 mm thickness and is located 11.2mm under the skin surface. The most percentage of deposited energy (78%) is related to the 54 MeV proton energy beam. Total photon and neutron production are linear and polynomial second order functions of the proton energy, respectively.

  17. Vacuum ultraviolet of hydrogenated amorphous carbons. II. Small hydrocarbons production in Photon Dominated Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alata, I.; Jallat, A.; Gavilan, L.; Chabot, M.; Cruz-Diaz, G. A.; Munoz Caro, G. M.; Béroff, K.; Dartois, E.

    2015-12-01

    Context. Hydrogenated amorphous carbons (a-C:H) are a major component of the carbonaceous solids present in the interstellar medium. The production and existence of these grains is connected in particular with the balance between their photolysis, radiolysis, and hydrogenation. During grain processing, H2 and other small organic molecules, radicals, and fragments are released into the gas phase. Aims: We perform photolytic experiments on laboratory produced interstellar a-C:H analogues to monitor and quantify the release of species and compare to relevant observations in the interstellar medium. Methods: Hydrogenated amorphous carbon analogues at low temperature are exposed to ultraviolet (UV) photons, under ultra-high vacuum conditions. The species produced are monitored using mass spectrometry and post irradiation temperature-programmed desorption. Additional experiments are performed using deuterated analogues and the species produced are unambiguously separated from background contributions. We implement the laboratory measured yields for the released species in a time dependent model to investigate the effect of the UV photon irradiation of hydrogenated amorphous carbons in a photon dominated region, and estimate the associated time scale. Results: The UV photolysis of hydrogenated amorphous carbons leads to the production of H2 molecules and small hydrocarbons. The model shows that the photolytic evolution of a-C:Hs in photon dominated regions, such as the Horsehead Nebula, can raise the abundance of carbonaceous molecules by several orders of magnitude at intermediate visual extinctions, i.e., after the C+ maximum and before the dense cloud conditions prevail where models generally show a minimum abundance for such carbonaceous species. The injection time peak ranges from a thousand to ten thousand years in the models, considering only the destruction of such grains and no re-hydrogenation. This time scale is consistent with the estimated advection front of

  18. Photon plus heavy-quark production in high-energy collisions within the target rest frame formalism

    SciTech Connect

    Betemps, M. A.; Machado, M. V. T.

    2010-11-01

    We apply the target rest frame formalism to photon+heavy quark production cross section in hadronic collisions at high energies. We investigate the dependence of the production cross section on the photon and quark rapidities and transverse momenta. It is shown that the photon transverse momentum spectrum is a sensitive probe of color dipole scattering amplitude. The theoretical results are compared to Tevatron measurements of the differential {gamma}+c+X and {gamma}+b+X production cross sections at {radical}(s)=1.96 TeV. An analysis for proton-proton and proton-lead collisions at the LHC regime is also performed.

  19. Nuclear effects in high-p{sub T} production of direct photons and neutral mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Apanasevich, L.; Bacigalupi, J.; Pellett, D.; Tripathi, S.M.; Baker, W.; Johnstone, C.; Lukens, P.; Skow, D.; Begel, M.; Barbaro, L. de; DeSoi, W.; Dunlea, J.; Fanourakis, G.; Ferbel, T.; Ftacnik, J.; Ginther, G.; Lobkowicz, F.; Mansour, J.; Osborne, G.; Prebys, E.

    2005-08-01

    We present results on the production of direct photons, {pi}{sup 0}, and {eta} mesons on nuclear targets at large transverse momenta (p{sub T}). The data are from 530 and 800 GeV/c proton beams and 515 GeV/c {pi}{sup -} beams incident upon copper and beryllium targets that span the kinematic range of 1.0

  20. Vector meson and associated strangeness production using a linearly polarized photon beam at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Philip L. Cole

    2004-09-01

    The set of experiments forming the g8a run took place in the summer of 2001 in Hall B of Jefferson Lab. The g8a run was the commissioning experiment for the linearly-polarized photon beam at CLAS. The aim of these experiments is to improve the understanding of the underlying symmetry of the quark degrees of freedom in the nucleon, the nature of the parity exchange between the incident photon and the target nucleon, and the mechanism of associated strangeness production in electromagnetic reactions. A beam of tagged and collimated linearly polarized photons (energy range 1.8-2.2 GeV) in conjunction with the large solid angle coverage of CLAS make possible the extraction of the differential cross-sections and polarization observables for the photoproduction of vector mesons and kaons. The reaction channels are under investigation to search for possibly missing nucleon resonances. An overview of the experiment and preliminary results on the measurement of the photon asymmetries of the aforementioned reactions will be presented in this paper.

  1. Measurement of the center-of-mass energy dependence of isolated direct photon production in proton-antiproton collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partos, Dana Sarah

    2001-08-01

    We present a measurement of the s dependence of isolated prompt photon production in hadronic collisions. Prompt photon samples from 1.8 TeV and 0.63 TeV pp¯ collisions were recorded with the Collider Detector at Fermilab. Two independent background subtraction methods, shower shape and conversion rates, were calibrated and used to calculate the photon cross sections. The shapes of the measured cross sections as a function of photon transverse momentum were not adequately predicted by current calculations of perturbative Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). One possible explanation for the disagreement between data and theory, an incorrect parameterization of the proton's parton distribution function, is excluded by a comparison of the cross sections as a function of photon xT, the fraction of the proton's momentum carried by the photon.

  2. Dark-photon searches via Z H production at e+e- colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Sanjoy; Gabrielli, Emidio; Heikinheimo, Matti; Mele, Barbara

    2017-09-01

    We study the Z H associated production followed by the Higgs H →γ γ ¯ decay into a photon plus an invisible and massless dark photon, at future high-energy e+e- facilities. Large H →γ γ ¯ decay rates (with branching ratios up to a few percent) are allowed, thanks to possible nondecoupling properties of the Higgs boson under specific conditions, and unsuppressed dark-photon couplings in the dark sector. Such large decay rates can be obtained in the framework of recent flavor models that aim to naturally explain the observed spread in the fermion mass spectrum. We analyze the experimental prospects for observing the e+e-→Z H process followed by the semi-invisible Higgs decay into a photon plus a massless invisible system. Search strategies for both the leptonic and the hadronic final states (arising from Z →μ+μ- and Z →q q ¯, respectively) are outlined. We find that a 5 σ sensitivity to a branching fraction B Rγ γ ¯˜3 ×10-4 can be achieved by combining the two channels with an integrated luminosity of 10 ab-1 at a c.m. energy of 240 GeV. This is considerably better than the corresponding sensitivity in alternative channels previously studied at lepton colliders. The analysis is model independent, and its results can be straightforwardly applied to the search for any Higgs two-body decay into a photon plus an undetected light particle.

  3. Photon-tagged and B-meson-tagged b-jet production at the LHC

    DOE PAGES

    Huang, Jinrui; Kang, Zhong -Bo; Vitev, Ivan; ...

    2015-09-18

    Tagged jet measurements in high energy hadronic and nuclear reactions provide constraints on the energy and parton flavor origin of the parton shower that recoils against the tagging particle. Such additional insight can be especially beneficial in illuminating the mechanisms of heavy flavor production in proton–proton collisions at the LHC and their modification in the heavy ion environment, which are not fully understood. With this motivation, we present theoretical results for isolated-photon-tagged and B-meson-tagged b-jet production at √sNN = 5.1 TeV for comparison to the upcoming lead–lead data. We find that photon-tagged b-jets exhibit smaller momentum imbalance shift in nuclearmore » matter, and correspondingly smaller energy loss, than photon-tagged light flavor jets. Our results show that B-meson tagging is most effective in ensuring that the dominant fraction of recoiling jets originate from prompt b-quarks. Furthermore, in this channel the large suppression of the cross section is not accompanied by a significant momentum imbalance shift.« less

  4. Study of isolated prompt photon production in p -Pb collisions for the ALICE kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goharipour, Muhammad; Mehraban, Hossein

    2017-03-01

    Prompt photon production is known as a powerful tool for testing perturbative QCD predictions and also the validity of parton densities in the nucleon and nuclei, especially of the gluon. In this work, we have performed a detailed study on this subject, focusing on the isolated prompt photon production in p -Pb collisions at forward rapidity at the LHC. The impact of input nuclear modifications obtained from different global analyses by various groups on several quantities has been investigated to estimate the order of magnitude of the difference between their predictions. We have also studied in detail the theoretical uncertainties in the results due to various sources. We found that there is a remarkable difference between the predictions from the nCTEQ15 and other groups in all ranges of photon transverse momentum pTγ. Their differences become more explicit in the calculation of the nuclear modification ratio and also the yield asymmetry between the forward and backward rapidities rather than single differential cross sections. We emphasize that future measurements with ALICE will be very useful, not only for decreasing the uncertainty of the gluon nuclear modification, but also to accurately determine its central values, especially in the shadowing region.

  5. Slow light with large group index - bandwidth product in lattice-shifted photonic crystal waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jian; Li, Wenhui; Wu, Jun; Xu, Zhonghui

    2016-10-01

    This study presents a systematic optimization procedure to generate slow light with large group index, wideband, and low dispersion in an lattice-shifted photonic crystal waveguide. The waveguide is based on triangular lattice photonic crystal imposed by selectively altering the locations of the holes adjacent to the line defect. Under a constant group index criterion of ± 10% variation, when group indices are nearly constants of 24, 33, 46, 57, and 66, their corresponding bandwidths of flat band reach 24.2, 17.6, 12.8, 10.1 and 8.6 nm around 1550 nm, respectively. A nearly constant large group index - bandwidth product (GBP) of 0.37 is achieved for all cases. Low dispersion slow light propagation is confirmed by studying the relative temporal pulse-width spreading with the 2-D finite-difference time-domain method.

  6. CONSTRAINTS ON IONIZING PHOTON PRODUCTION FROM THE LARGE-SCALE Lyα FOREST

    SciTech Connect

    Pontzen, Andrew; Peiris, Hiranya; Bird, Simeon; Verde, Licia

    2014-09-10

    Recent work has shown that the z ≅ 2.5 Lyα forest on large scales encodes information about the galaxy and quasar populations that keep the intergalactic medium photoionized. We present the first forecasts for constraining the populations with data from current and next-generation surveys. At a minimum, the forest should tell us whether galaxies or, conversely, quasars dominate the photon production. The number density and clustering strength of the ionizing sources might be estimated to sub-10% precision with a DESI-like survey if degeneracies (e.g., with the photon mean-free-path, small-scale clustering power normalization, and potentially other astrophysical effects) can be broken by prior information. We demonstrate that when inhomogeneous ionization is correctly handled, constraints on dark energy do not degrade.

  7. Momentum imbalance of isolated photon-tagged jet production at RHIC and LHC.

    PubMed

    Dai, Wei; Vitev, Ivan; Zhang, Ben-Wei

    2013-04-05

    In collisions of ultrarelativistic nuclei, photon-tagged jets provide a unique opportunity to compare jet production and modification due to parton shower formation and propagation in strongly interacting matter at vastly different center-of-mass energies. We present first results for the cross sections of jets tagged by an isolated photon to O(α(em)α(s)(2)) in central Au+Au reactions with sqrt[s(NN)] = 200 GeV at RHIC and central Pb + Pb reactions with sqrt[s(NN)] = 2.76 TeV at LHC. We evaluate the increase in the transverse momentum imbalance of the observed γ + jet state, induced by the dissipation of the parton shower energy due to strong final-state interactions. Theoretical predictions to help interpret recent and upcoming experimental data are presented.

  8. Production of Ac-225 for cancer therapy by photon-induced transmutation of Ra-226.

    PubMed

    Melville, G; Meriarty, H; Metcalfe, P; Knittel, T; Allen, B J

    2007-09-01

    The increasing application of Ac-225 for cancer therapy indicates the potential need for its increased production and availability. The production of Ac-225 has been achieved using bremsstrahlung photons from an 18 MV medical linear accelerator (linac) to bombard a Ra-226 target. A linac dose of 2800 Gy produced about 64 microCi of Ra-225, which decays to Ac-225. This result, while consistent with the theoretical calculations, is far too low to be of practical use. A more powerful linac is required that runs at a higher current, longer pulse length and higher frequency for practical production. This process could also lead to the reduction of the nuclear waste product Ra-226.

  9. Thermally-dried free and immobilized kefir cells as starter culture in hard-type cheese production.

    PubMed

    Katechaki, Eleftheria; Panas, Panayiotis; Kourkoutas, Yiannis; Koliopoulos, Dionisis; Koutinas, Athanasios A

    2009-07-01

    In an attempt to seek for suitable dried cultures, thermally-dried kefir was employed as starter in hard-type cheese production and tested in cheeses ripened at 5, 18 and 22 degrees C. Both free and immobilised on casein kefir cells were used and compared to cheese made without starter culture. Cheese products made with free cells of kefir culture were characterized by longer preservation time, improved aroma, taste, texture characteristics and increased degree of openness. Volatile profiles obtained by GC/MS analysis revealed a 216% increase in total concentration of esters, organic acids, alcohols and carbonyl compounds between cheeses prepared with and without kefir culture.

  10. Photon pair production from a hot atomic ensemble in the diamond configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, Richard Thomas

    This thesis discusses four-wave mixing (4WM) in a warm ensemble of rubidium using the diamond configuration level structure. Both classical 4WM and nonclassical photon-pair production are investigated. Quantum information science has spawned a great amount of experimental work on the interaction of light with collective modes of excitation in atomic ensembles. Plans to build quantum networks and quantum repeaters with atom ensembles take advantage of nonlinear interactions to produce and store non-classical states of light. These technologies will require photon sources that not only generate nonclassical light, but also resonant, narrow band light. Here we investigate a system which could be used as such a source. We take advantage of the 4WM interaction in a warm ensemble of Rubidium atoms. Our scheme utilizes the diamond energy level configuration which, in rubidium, allows for correlated pairs at telecommunications wavelengths. We start by examining the properties of classical 4WM in the system. We measure the resonance structure and see that it can be understood in terms of velocity class selective resonant enhancement and power splitting effects. The efficiency of the process is low and limited by linear absorption of the pumps. Our observations agree with a semi-classical Maxwell-Bloch theoretical treatment. Next we observe pair generation by spontaneous 4WM from the warm ensemble. The temporal profile of the cross-correlation function (CCF) for the photons depends on pump-laser power and detuning. This allows us to produce biphotons with controllable spectra. A simple quantum optical theoretical treatment based on linear filtering gives qualitative agreement with the data. We show that the photon pairs are polarization entangled, clearly violating Bell's Inequality. A perturbative quantum optical treatment predicts the polarization state of the pairs and agrees with our measurements. We analyze the photon statistics of the source and find the largest

  11. Production of hard-type cheese using free or immobilized freeze-dried kefir cells as a starter culture.

    PubMed

    Katechaki, Eleftheria; Panas, Panayiotis; Rapti, Katerina; Kandilogiannakis, Leonidas; Koutinas, Athanasios A

    2008-07-09

    This study provides a contribution to hard-type cheese starter culture production through the use of a freeze-dried culture in the ripening of hard-type cheeses. The effect of initial cell concentration, ripening temperature, and cell immobilization of kefir on the degree of openness, mold spoilage, microbial associations, physicochemical characteristics, and aroma-related compounds was studied. Use of kefir starter cultures resulted in cheese with an increased shelf life and resistance to spoilage as compared to control cheeses without kefir inoculants. Furthermore, the freeze-dried kefir culture improved aroma, taste, and texture characteristics while increasing the degree of openness in comparison to traditional hard-type cheese products. The kefir culture resulted in an increase in counts of total aerobic bacteria, yeasts and molds, lactococci, and lactobacilli until the 15th day of ripening. From then on, only lactobacilli counts increased, reaching levels up to 9.17 log CFU/g in cheeses ripened at 5 degrees C using freeze-dried kefir cells immobilized on casein. SPME-GC/MS analysis revealed major differences in volatile composition, especially with regard to alcohols (up to 75%), carbonyl compounds (up to 75%), and esters (up to 64%) between cheeses made with kefir cells and cheeses made without kefir inoculants.

  12. A potential photo-transmutation of fission products triggered by Compton backscattering photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J. G.; Xu, W.; Wang, H. W.; Guo, W.; Ma, Y. G.; Cai, X. Z.; Lu, G. C.; Xu, Y.; Pan, Q. Y.; Fan, G. T.; Shen, W. Q.

    2009-02-01

    We investigated the transmutation of some fission product nuclides I129, Cs135, Sn126, Zr93, Pd107, Cs137 and Sr90, induced by the Compton backscattering (CBS) photons generated from the future Shanghai Laser Electron Gamma Source (SLEGS) facility. The evaluated photo-transmutation rates for I129, Cs135, Sn126, Zr93, Pd107, Cs137 and Sr90 can achieve 2. 5×106, 1.3×106, 4.8×106, 2.7×106, 9.4×106, 1.3×106 and 1.6×106 per second, respectively, improving 4-5 orders of magnitude compared with those via the bremsstrahlung photons by a 1020 W/cm2 laser. The maximum transmutation coupling efficiencies of the CBS photons were estimated to be 1.36% for I129, 1.70% for Cs135, 2.02% for Sn126, 1.03% for Zr90, 1.52% for Pd107, 1.62% for Cs137 and 1.72% for Sr90, which are 2-6 times as those via the bremsstrahlung method by the 1020 W/cm2 laser. Moreover, we presented a possible experimental method for the future SLEGS facility to check the estimated results.

  13. Search for anomalous production of events with a high energy lepton and photon at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Loginov, Andrey Borisovich

    2006-01-01

    We present results of a search for the anomalous production of events containing a high-transverse momentum charged lepton (ℓ, either e or μ) and photon (γ), accompanied by missing transverse energy (ET), and/or additional leptons and photons, and jets (X). We use the same kinematic selection criteria as in a previous CDF search, but with a substantially larger data set, 305 pb-1, a p$\\bar{p}$ collision energy of 1.96 TeV, and the upgraded CDF II detector. We find 42 ℓγET events versus a standard model expectation of 37.3 ± 5.4 events. The level of excess observed in Run I, 16 events with an expectation of 7.6 ± 0.7 events (corresponding to a 2.7 σ effect), is not supported by the new data. In the signature of ℓℓγ + X we observe 31 events versus an expectation of 23.0 ± 2.7 events. In this sample we find no events with an extra photon or ET and so find no events like the one eeγγ ET event observed in Run I.

  14. A Polarized High-Energy Photon Beam for Production of Exotic Mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Senderovich, Igor

    2012-01-01

    This work describes design, prototyping and testing of various components of the Jefferson Lab Hall D photon beamline. These include coherent bremsstrahlung radiators to be used in this facility for generating the photon beam, a fine resolution hodoscope for the facility's tagging spectrometer, and a photon beam position sensor for stabilizing the beam on a collimator. The principal instrumentation project was the hodoscope: its design, implementation and beam testing will be thoroughly described. Studies of the coherent bremsstrahlung radiators involved X-ray characterization of diamond crystals to identify the appropriate line of manufactured radiators and the proper techniques for thinning them to the desired specification of the beamline. The photon beam position sensor project involved completion of a designed detector and its beam test. The results of these shorter studies will also be presented. The second part of this work discusses a Monte Carlo study of a possible photo-production and decay channel in the GlueX experiment that will be housed in the Hall D facility. Specifically, the γ p → Xp → b1 π → ω π+1 π-1 channel was studied including its Amplitude Analysis. This exercise attempted to generate a possible physics signal, complete with internal angular momentum states, and be able to reconstruct the signal in the detector and find the proper set of JPC quantum numbers through an amplitude fit. Derivation of the proper set of amplitudes in the helicity basis is described, followed by a discussion of the implementation, generation of the data sets, reconstruction techniques, the amplitude fit and results of this study.

  15. Search for new physics with photons and exclusive Z production at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Krop, Dan; /Chicago U., EFI

    2010-01-01

    We report the results of searches for non-standard model phenomena in photon final states and a search for exclusive Z boson production. These searches use data from p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV collected with the CDF and D0 detectors at the Fermilab Tevatron corresponding to 1.0-4.2 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. No disagreement of data with standard model predictions is observed. We report limits on the parameters of several models including anomalous triple gauge couplings, large extra dimensions, fermiophobic Higgs models, and supersymmety.

  16. Search for Anomalous Production of Events with Two Photons and Additional Energetic Objects at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2009-10-01

    The authors present results of a search for anomalous production of two photons together with an electron, muon, {tau} lepton, missing transverse energy, or jets using p{bar p} collision data from 1.1-2.0 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). The event yields and kinematic distributions are examined for signs for new physics without favoring a specific model of new physics. The results are consistent with the standard model expectations. The search employs several new analysis techniques that significantly reduce instrumental backgrounds in channels with an electron and missing transverse energy.

  17. A phenomenological study of photon production in low energy neutrino nucleon scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, James P; Goldman, Terry J

    2009-01-01

    Low energy photon production is an important background to many current and future precision neutrino experiments. We present a phenomenological study of t-channel radiative corrections to neutral current neutrino nucleus scattering. After introducing the relevant processes and phenomenological coupling constants, we will explore the derived energy and angular distributions as well as total cross-section predictions along with their estimated uncertainties. This is supplemented throughout with comments on possible experimental signatures and implications. We conclude with a general discussion of the analysis in the context of complimentary methodologies. This is based on a talk presented at the DPF 2009 meeting in Detroit MI.

  18. Dynamic control of photosynthetic photon flux for lettuce production in CELSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chun, C.; Mitchell, C. A.

    1996-01-01

    A new dynamic control of photosynthetic photon flux (PPF) was tested using lettuce canopies growing in the Minitron II plant-growth/canopy gas-exchange system. Canopy photosynthetic rates (Pn) were measured in real time and fedback for further environment control. Pn can be manipulated by changing PPF, which is a good environmental parameter for dynamic control of crop production in a Controlled Ecological Life-Support Systems CELSS. Decision making that combines empirical mathematical models with rule sets developed from recent experimental data was tested. With comparable yield indices and potential for energy savings, dynamic control strategies will contribute greatly to the sustainability of space-deployed CELSS.

  19. Exclusive production of pion and kaon meson pairs in two photon collisions at LEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ALEPH Collaboration; Heister, A.; Schael, S.; Barate, R.; Brunelière, R.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Goy, C.; Jezequel, S.; Lees, J.-P.; Martin, F.; Merle, E.; Minard, M.-N.; Pietrzyk, B.; Trocmé, B.; Bravo, S.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Martinez, M.; Pacheco, A.; Ruiz, H.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Filippis, N.; de Palma, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Barklow, T.; Buchmüller, O.; Cattaneo, M.; Clerbaux, B.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Gianotti, F.; Hansen, J. B.; Harvey, J.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kado, M.; Mato, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Sguazzoni, G.; Teubert, F.; Valassi, A.; Videau, I.; Badaud, F.; Dessagne, S.; Falvard, A.; Fayolle, D.; Gay, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Pallin, D.; Pascolo, J. M.; Perret, P.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Kraan, A. C.; Nilsson, B. S.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J.-C.; Machefert, F.; Rougé, A.; Videau, H.; Ciulli, V.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Bossi, F.; Capon, G.; Cerutti, F.; Chiarella, V.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Kennedy, J.; Lynch, J. G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Thompson, A. S.; Wasserbaech, S.; Cavanaugh, R.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Cameron, W.; Davies, G.; Dornan, P. J.; Girone, M.; Hill, R. D.; Marinelli, N.; Nowell, J.; Rutherford, S. A.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Thompson, J. C.; White, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bouhova-Thacker, E.; Bowdery, C. K.; Clarke, D. P.; Ellis, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Pearson, M. R.; Robertson, N. A.; Smizanska, M.; van der Aa, O.; Delaere, C.; Leibenguth, G.; Lemaitre, V.; Blumenschein, U.; Hölldorfer, F.; Jakobs, K.; Kayser, F.; Kleinknecht, K.; Müller, A.-S.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.-G.; Schmeling, S.; Wachsmuth, H.; Zeitnitz, C.; Ziegler, T.; Bonissent, A.; Coyle, P.; Curtil, C.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Payre, P.; Tilquin, A.; Ragusa, F.; David, A.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Hüttmann, K.; Lütjens, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Settles, R.; Villegas, M.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Jacholkowska, A.; Serin, L.; Veillet, J.-J.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Boccali, T.; Foà, L.; Giammanco, A.; Giassi, A.; Ligabue, F.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Tenchini, R.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Awunor, O.; Blair, G. A.; Cowan, G.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Green, M. G.; Jones, L. T.; Medcalf, T.; Misiejuk, A.; Strong, J. A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Norton, P. R.; Tomalin, I. R.; Ward, J. J.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Boumediene, D.; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M.-C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Tuchming, B.; Vallage, B.; Litke, A. M.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Hodgson, P. N.; Lehto, M.; Thompson, L. F.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Grupen, C.; Hess, J.; Ngac, A.; Prange, G.; Borean, C.; Giannini, G.; He, H.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Armstrong, S. R.; Berkelman, K.; Cranmer, K.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y.; González, S.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; Kile, J.; McNamara, P. A.; Nielsen, J.; Pan, Y. B.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wu, J.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.; Dissertori, G.

    2003-09-01

    Exclusive production of /π and K meson pairs in two photon collisions is measured with ALEPH data collected between 1992 and 2000. Cross-sections are presented as a function of cosθ* and invariant mass, for cosθ*<0.6 and invariant masses between 2.0 and 6.0 GeV/c2 (2.25 and 4.0 GeV/c2) for pions (kaons). The shape of the distributions are found to be well described by QCD predictions but the data have a significantly higher normalization.

  20. Search for anomalous production of events with two photons and additional energetic objects at CDF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Attal, A.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauer, G.; Beauchemin, P.-H.; Bedeschi, F.; Beecher, D.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Blair, R. E.; Blocker, C.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boisvert, V.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Bridgeman, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brubaker, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Byrum, K. L.; Cabrera, S.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chang, S. H.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Chung, K.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Chwalek, T.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clark, D.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Cully, J. C.; Dagenhart, D.; Datta, M.; Davies, T.; de Barbaro, P.; de Cecco, S.; Deisher, A.; de Lorenzo, G.; Dell'Orso, M.; Deluca, C.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; D'Errico, M.; di Canto, A.; di Giovanni, G. P.; di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, T.; Dube, S.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Fedorko, W. T.; Feild, R. G.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garberson, F.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerdes, D.; Gessler, A.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Gimmell, J. L.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gresele, A.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Grundler, U.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Han, B.-Y.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hartz, M.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Heuser, J.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hill, C. S.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hocker, A.; Hou, S.; Houlden, M.; Hsu, S.-C.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Incandela, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jha, M. K.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, J. E.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Kar, D.; Karchin, P. E.; Kato, Y.; Kephart, R.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, H. W.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirsch, L.; Klimenko, S.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kulkarni, N. P.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lecompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Lin, C.-J.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, T.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Lovas, L.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; MacQueen, D.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Maksimovic, P.; Malde, S.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Marino, C. P.; Martin, A.; Martin, V.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ballarín, R.; Mastrandrea, P.; Mathis, M.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzione, A.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Miladinovic, N.; Miller, R.; Mills, C.; Milnik, M.; Mitra, A.; Mitselmakher, G.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mülmenstädt, J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakamura, K.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Neubauer, S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norman, M.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Papaikonomou, A.; Paramanov, A. A.; Parks, B.; Pashapour, S.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Peiffer, T.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. I.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pinera, L.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Potamianos, K.; Poukhov, O.; Prokoshin, F.; Pronko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Pueschel, E.; Punzi, G.; Pursley, J.; Rademacker, J.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Renz, M.; Rescigno, M.; Richter, S.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Rossi, M.; Rossin, R.; Roy, P.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Rutherford, B.; Saarikko, H.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Santi, L.; Sartori, L.; Sato, K.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schmidt, M. A.; Schmidt, M. P.; Schmitt, M.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Sedov, A.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sexton-Kennedy, L.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shiraishi, S.; Shochet, M.; Shon, Y.; Shreyber, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sisakyan, A.; Slaughter, A. J.; Slaunwhite, J.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Snihur, R.; Soha, A.; Somalwar, S.; Sorin, V.; Squillacioti, P.; Stanitzki, M.; St. Denis, R.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Strycker, G. L.; Suh, J. S.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Taffard, A.; Takashima, R.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, R.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thome, J.; Thompson, G. A.; Thomson, E.; Tipton, P.; Ttito-Guzmán, P.; Tkaczyk, S.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Tourneur, S.; Trovato, M.; Tsai, S.-Y.; Tu, Y.; Turini, N.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; van Remortel, N.; Varganov, A.; Vataga, E.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vidal, M.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vogel, M.; Volobouev, I.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. G.; Wagner, R. L.; Wagner, W.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Weinberger, M.; Weinelt, J.; Wester, W. C., III; Whitehouse, B.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, G.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, C.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamaoka, J.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W. M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanetti, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, X.; Zheng, Y.; Zucchelli, S.; CDF Collaboration

    2010-09-01

    We present results of a search for anomalous production of two photons together with an electron, muon, τ lepton, missing transverse energy, or jets using pp¯ collision data from 1.1-2.0fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). The event yields and kinematic distributions are examined for signs of new physics without favoring a specific model of new physics. The results are consistent with the standard model expectations. The search employs several new analysis techniques that significantly reduce instrumental backgrounds in channels with an electron and missing transverse energy.

  1. Dynamic control of photosynthetic photon flux for lettuce production in CELSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chun, C.; Mitchell, C. A.

    1996-01-01

    A new dynamic control of photosynthetic photon flux (PPF) was tested using lettuce canopies growing in the Minitron II plant-growth/canopy gas-exchange system. Canopy photosynthetic rates (Pn) were measured in real time and fedback for further environment control. Pn can be manipulated by changing PPF, which is a good environmental parameter for dynamic control of crop production in a Controlled Ecological Life-Support Systems CELSS. Decision making that combines empirical mathematical models with rule sets developed from recent experimental data was tested. With comparable yield indices and potential for energy savings, dynamic control strategies will contribute greatly to the sustainability of space-deployed CELSS.

  2. ConnesFusionTensorProduct/Photon GluonFusion in Mitochondria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wh-Maksoed, Prodi Of Physics Ui, Depok 16415-Indonesia; Ssi, Wh-Maksoed

    2016-05-01

    As in AJ Wassermann distinguished of classical invariant theory & quantum invariant theory subfactor, in S. Palcoux:``From Neveu-Schwarz Subfactors & Connes Fusion'' described the subfactor theory & Witt-algebra whereas Andreas Thom's explanation about ConnesFusionTensorProduct/CFTP related Connes fusion to composition of homomorphism (i). classical tensor product O-X adds the changes,(ii). Relative tensor product H-X preserve the changes. For photonGluonFusion/PGF defined:''photon is the gauge boson of QED, the simplest of all boson'' devotes to CFT as ``quantum field theory which are invariant under conformal transformation & in 2D there are infinite dimensional algebra. Alain Connes states theirselves Connes fusion as ``associative tensor operation'' to be in coincidences with ``their dynamic behavior driven by the balance in mitochondrial fusion & fission (Carveney, 2007) from Peter Alexander Williams: ``Retinal neuronal remodeling in a model of Optic Atrophy'', Dec, 2011. Great acknowledged to the VicePresident of the R.I, HE.Mr. Drs. M. JUSUF KALLA.

  3. Center of mass energy and system-size dependence of photon production at forward rapidity at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    STAR Collaboration; Abelev, Betty

    2010-07-05

    We present the multiplicity and pseudorapidity distributions of photons produced in Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 62.4 and 200 GeV. The photons are measured in the region -3.7 < {eta} < -2.3 using the photon multiplicity detector in the STAR experiment at RHIC. The number of photons produced per average number of participating nucleon pairs increases with the beam energy and is independent of the collision centrality. For collisions with similar average numbers of participating nucleons the photon multiplicities are observed to be similar for Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at a given beam energy. The ratios of the number of charged particles to photons in the measured pseudorapidity range are found to be 1.4 {+-} 0.1 and 1.2 {+-} 0.1 for {radical}s{sub NN} = 62.4 GeV and 200 GeV, respectively. The energy dependence of this ratio could reflect varying contributions from baryons to charged particles, while mesons are the dominant contributors to photon production in the given kinematic region. The photon pseudorapidity distributions normalized by average number of participating nucleon pairs, when plotted as a function of {eta} - ybeam, are found to follow a longitudinal scaling independent of centrality and colliding ion species at both beam energies.

  4. Study of the dependence of direct soft photon production on the jet characteristics in hadronic Z 0 decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdallah, J.; Abreu, P.; Adam, W.; Adzic, P.; Albrecht, T.; Alemany-Fernandez, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Allport, P. P.; Amaldi, U.; Amapane, N.; Amato, S.; Anashkin, E.; Andreazza, A.; Andringa, S.; Anjos, N.; Antilogus, P.; Apel, W.-D.; Arnoud, Y.; Ask, S.; Asman, B.; Augustin, J. E.; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Ballestrero, A.; Bambade, P.; Barbier, R.; Bardin, D.; Barker, G. J.; Baroncelli, A.; Battaglia, M.; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K.-H.; Begalli, M.; Behrmann, A.; Ben-Haim, E.; Benekos, N.; Benvenuti, A.; Berat, C.; Berggren, M.; Bertrand, D.; Besancon, M.; Besson, N.; Bloch, D.; Blom, M.; Bluj, M.; Bonesini, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, P. S. L.; Borisov, G.; Botner, O.; Bouquet, B.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Boyko, I.; Bracko, M.; Brenner, R.; Brodet, E.; Bruckman, P.; Brunet, J. M.; Buschbeck, B.; Buschmann, P.; Calvi, M.; Camporesi, T.; Canale, V.; Carena, F.; Castro, N.; Cavallo, F.; Chapkin, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Checchia, P.; Chierici, R.; Chliapnikov, P.; Chudoba, J.; Chung, S. U.; Cieslik, K.; Collins, P.; Contri, R.; Cosme, G.; Cossutti, F.; Costa, M. J.; Crennell, D.; Cuevas, J.; D'Hondt, J.; da Silva, T.; da Silva, W.; Della Ricca, G.; de Angelis, A.; de Boer, W.; de Clercq, C.; de Lotto, B.; de Maria, N.; de Min, A.; de Paula, L.; di Ciaccio, L.; di Simone, A.; Doroba, K.; Drees, J.; Eigen, G.; Ekelof, T.; Ellert, M.; Elsing, M.; Espirito Santo, M. C.; Fanourakis, G.; Fassouliotis, D.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J.; Ferrer, A.; Ferro, F.; Flagmeyer, U.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Fuster, J.; Gandelman, M.; Garcia, C.; Gavillet, Ph.; Gazis, E.; Gokieli, R.; Golob, B.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncalves, P.; Graziani, E.; Grosdidier, G.; Grzelak, K.; Guy, J.; Haag, C.; Hallgren, A.; Hamacher, K.; Hamilton, K.; Haug, S.; Hauler, F.; Hedberg, V.; Hennecke, M.; Hoffman, J.; Holmgren, S.-O.; Holt, P. J.; Houlden, M. A.; Jackson, J. N.; Jarlskog, G.; Jarry, P.; Jeans, D.; Johansson, E. K.; Jonsson, P.; Joram, C.; Jungermann, L.; Kapusta, F.; Katsanevas, S.; Katsoufis, E.; Kernel, G.; Kersevan, B. P.; Kerzel, U.; King, B. T.; Kjaer, N. J.; Kluit, P.; Kokkinias, P.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krumstein, Z.; Kucharczyk, M.; Lamsa, J.; Leder, G.; Ledroit, F.; Leinonen, L.; Leitner, R.; Lemonne, J.; Lepeltier, V.; Lesiak, T.; Liebig, W.; Liko, D.; Lipniacka, A.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez, J. M.; Loukas, D.; Lutz, P.; Lyons, L.; MacNaughton, J.; Malek, A.; Maltezos, S.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Marechal, B.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J.-C.; Mariotti, C.; Markou, A.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Masik, J.; Mastroyiannopoulos, N.; Matorras, F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazzucato, F.; Mazzucato, M.; Mc Nulty, R.; Meroni, C.; Migliore, E.; Mitaroff, W.; Mjoernmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moch, M.; Moenig, K.; Monge, R.; Montenegro, J.; Moraes, D.; Moreno, S.; Morettini, P.; Mueller, U.; Muenich, K.; Mulders, M.; Mundim, L.; Murray, W.; Muryn, B.; Myatt, G.; Myklebust, T.; Nassiakou, M.; Navarria, F.; Nawrocki, K.; Nemecek, S.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nikolenko, M.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Olshevski, A.; Onofre, A.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Ouraou, A.; Oyanguren, A.; Paganoni, M.; Paiano, S.; Palacios, J. P.; Palka, H.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Pape, L.; Parkes, C.; Parodi, F.; Parzefall, U.; Passeri, A.; Passon, O.; Peralta, L.; Perepelitsa, V.; Perrotta, A.; Petrolini, A.; Piedra, J.; Pieri, L.; Pierre, F.; Pimenta, M.; Piotto, E.; Podobnik, T.; Poireau, V.; Pol, M. E.; Polok, G.; Pozdniakov, V.; Pukhaeva, N.; Pullia, A.; Radojicic, D.; Rebecchi, P.; Rehn, J.; Reid, D.; Reinhardt, R.; Renton, P.; Richard, F.; Ridky, J.; Rivero, M.; Rodriguez, D.; Romero, A.; Ronchese, P.; Roudeau, P.; Rovelli, T.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Ryabtchikov, D.; Sadovsky, A.; Salmi, L.; Salt, J.; Sander, C.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schwickerath, U.; Sekulin, R.; Siebel, M.; Sisakian, A.; Smadja, G.; Smirnova, O.; Sokolov, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sosnowski, R.; Spassov, T.; Stanitzki, M.; Stocchi, A.; Strauss, J.; Stugu, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Szumlak, T.; Tabarelli, T.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Timmermans, J.; Tkatchev, L.; Tobin, M.; Todorovova, S.; Tome, B.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortosa, P.; Travnicek, P.; Treille, D.; Tristram, G.; Trochimczuk, M.; Troncon, C.; Turluer, M.-L.; Tyapkin, I. A.; Tyapkin, P.; Tzamarias, S.; Uvarov, V.; Valenti, G.; van Dam, P.; van Eldik, J.; van Remortel, N.; van Vulpen, I.; Vegni, G.; Veloso, F.; Venus, W.; Verdier, P.; Verzi, V.; Vilanova, D.; Vitale, L.; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Washbrook, A. J.; Weiser, C.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Winter, M.; Witek, M.; Yushchenko, O.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zimin, N. I.; Zintchenko, A.; Zupan, M.; DELPHI Collaboration

    2010-06-01

    An analysis of the direct soft photon production rate as a function of the parent jet characteristics is presented, based on hadronic events collected by the DELPHI experiment at LEP1. The dependences of the photon rates on the jet kinematic characteristics (momentum, mass, etc.) and on the jet charged, neutral and total hadron multiplicities are reported. Up to a scale factor of about four, which characterizes the overall value of the soft photon excess, a similarity of the observed soft photon behavior to that of the inner hadronic bremsstrahlung predictions is found for the momentum, mass, and jet charged multiplicity dependences. However for the dependence of the soft photon rate on the jet neutral and total hadron multiplicities a prominent difference is found for the observed soft photon signal as compared to the expected bremsstrahlung from final state hadrons. The observed linear increase of the soft photon production rate with the jet total hadron multiplicity and its strong dependence on the jet neutral multiplicity suggest that the rate is proportional to the number of quark pairs produced in the fragmentation process, with the neutral pairs being more effectively radiating than the charged ones.

  5. Measurement of direct photon production in p+p collisions at sqrt[s] = 200 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adler, S S; Afanasiev, S; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Al-Jamel, A; Alexander, J; Aoki, K; Aphecetche, L; Armendariz, R; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Babintsev, V; Baldisseri, A; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Bauer, F; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Bjorndal, M T; Boissevain, J G; Borel, H; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bruner, N; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Camard, X; Chand, P; Chang, W C; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choudhury, R K; Chujo, T; Cianciolo, V; Cobigo, Y; Cole, B A; Comets, M P; Constantin, P; Csanád, M; Csörgo, T; Cussonneau, J P; d'Enterria, D; Das, K; David, G; Deák, F; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Devismes, A; Dietzsch, O; Drachenberg, J L; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Dzhordzhadze, V; Efremenko, Y V; En'yo, H; Espagnon, B; Esumi, S; Fields, D E; Finck, C; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fox, B D; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fukao, Y; Fung, S-Y; Gadrat, S; Germain, M; Glenn, A; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Perdekamp, M Grosse; Gustafsson, H-A; Hachiya, T; Haggerty, J S; Hamagaki, H; Hansen, A G; Hartouni, E P; Harvey, M; Hasuko, K; Hayano, R; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; Hidas, P; Hiejima, H; Hill, J C; Hobbs, R; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Hoover, A; Horaguchi, T; Ichihara, T; Ikonnikov, V V; Imai, K; Inaba, M; Inuzuka, M; Isenhower, D; Isenhower, L; Ishihara, M; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Jacak, B V; Jia, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Johnson, S C; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kaneta, M; Kang, J H; Katou, K; Kawabata, T; Kazantsev, A V; Kelly, S; Khachaturov, B; Khanzadeev, A; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D J; Kim, E; Kim, G-B; Kim, H J; Kinney, E; Kiss, A; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Klein-Boesing, C; Kobayashi, H; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Kohara, R; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kuberg, C H; Kunde, G J; Kurita, K; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lajoie, J G; Le Bornec, Y; Lebedev, A; Leckey, S; Lee, D M; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Li, X H; Lim, H; Litvinenko, A; Liu, M X; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Manko, V I; Mao, Y; Martinez, G; Masui, H; Matathias, F; Matsumoto, T; McCain, M C; McGaughey, P L; Miake, Y; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Mukhopadhyay, D; Muniruzzaman, M; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Nakamura, T; Newby, J; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Okada, H; Okada, K; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Oyama, K; Ozawa, K; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, J; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Pei, H; Penev, V; Peng, J-C; Pereira, H; Peresedov, V; Pierson, A; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Qualls, J M; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Roche, G; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosendahl, S S E; Rosnet, P; Rykov, V L; Ryu, S S; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, S; Samsonov, V; Sanfratello, L; Santo, R; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Schutz, Y; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Shea, T K; Shein, I; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shimomura, M; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Staley, F; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sullivan, J P; Takagi, S; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Taranenko, A; Tarján, P; Thomas, T L; Togawa, M; Tojo, J; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tram, V-N; Tserruya, I; Tsuchimoto, Y; Tydesjö, H; Tyurin, N; Uam, T J; Velkovska, J; Velkovsky, M; Veszprémi, V; Vinogradov, A A; Volkov, M A; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, X R; Watanabe, Y; White, S N; Willis, N; Wohn, F K; Woody, C L; Xie, W; Yanovich, A; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zaudtke, O; Zhang, C; Zhou, S; Zimányi, J; Zolin, L; Zong, X; Van Hecke, H W

    2007-01-05

    Cross sections for midrapidity production of direct photons in p+p collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are reported for transverse momenta of 3 < pT < 16 GeV/c. Next-to-leading order perturbative QCD (pQCD) describes the data well for pT >5 GeV/c, where the uncertainties of the measurement and theory are comparable. We also report on the effect of requiring the photons to be isolated from parton jet energy. The observed fraction of isolated photons is well described by pQCD for pT >7 GeV/c.

  6. Anomalous photon-gauge boson coupling contribution to the exclusive vector boson pair production from two photon exchange in pp collisions at 13 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, D. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Sá Borges, J.

    2015-04-01

    We study the W and Z pair production from two-photon exchange in proton-proton collisions at the LHC in order to evaluate the contributions of anomalous photon-gauge boson couplings, that simulates new particles and couplings predicted in many Standard Model (SM) extensions. The experimental results of W+ W- exclusive production (pp → pW+W- p) at 7 TeV from the CMS collaboration [1] updates the experimental limits on anomalous couplings obtained at the Large Electron-Positron Collider (LEP). This motivates our present analysis hopefully anticipating the expected results using the Precision Proton Spectrometer (PPS) to be installed as part of CMS. In this work, we consider the W+W- exclusive production to present the pT distribution of the lepton pair corresponding to the SM signal with pT (e, μ) > 10 GeV. Next, we consider the photon-gauge boson anomalous couplings by calculating, from the FPMC and MadGraph event generators, the process γγ → W+W- from a model with gauge boson quartic couplings, by considering a 1 TeV scale for new physical effects. We present our results for an integrated luminosity of 5 fb-1 at center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV and for an integrated luminosity of 100 fb-1 at 13 TeV. We present our preliminary results for Z pair exclusive production from two-photon exchange with anomalous couplings, where the ZZγγ quartic coupling is absent in the SM. We calculate the total cross section for the exclusive process and present the four lepton invariant mass distribution. Finally we present an outlook for the present analysis.

  7. Anomalous photon-gauge boson coupling contribution to the exclusive vector boson pair production from two photon exchange in pp collisions at 13 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Martins, D. E.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Sá Borges, J.; Rebello Teles, P.

    2015-04-10

    We study the W and Z pair production from two-photon exchange in proton-proton collisions at the LHC in order to evaluate the contributions of anomalous photon-gauge boson couplings, that simulates new particles and couplings predicted in many Standard Model (SM) extensions. The experimental results of W{sup +} W{sup −} exclusive production (pp → pW{sup +}W{sup −} p) at 7 TeV from the CMS collaboration [1] updates the experimental limits on anomalous couplings obtained at the Large Electron-Positron Collider (LEP). This motivates our present analysis hopefully anticipating the expected results using the Precision Proton Spectrometer (PPS) to be installed as part of CMS. In this work, we consider the W{sup +}W{sup −} exclusive production to present the p{sub T} distribution of the lepton pair corresponding to the SM signal with p{sub T} (e, μ) > 10 GeV. Next, we consider the photon-gauge boson anomalous couplings by calculating, from the FPMC and MadGraph event generators, the process γγ → W{sup +}W{sup −} from a model with gauge boson quartic couplings, by considering a 1 TeV scale for new physical effects. We present our results for an integrated luminosity of 5 fb{sup −1} at center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV and for an integrated luminosity of 100 fb{sup −1} at 13 TeV. We present our preliminary results for Z pair exclusive production from two-photon exchange with anomalous couplings, where the ZZγγ quartic coupling is absent in the SM. We calculate the total cross section for the exclusive process and present the four lepton invariant mass distribution. Finally we present an outlook for the present analysis.

  8. Higgs boson pair production in new physics models at hadron, lepton, and photon colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Asakawa, Eri; Harada, Daisuke; Okada, Yasuhiro; Kanemura, Shinya; Tsumura, Koji

    2010-12-01

    We study Higgs boson pair production processes at future hadron and lepton colliders including the photon collision option in several new physics models; i.e., the two-Higgs-doublet model, the scalar leptoquark model, the sequential fourth generation fermion model and the vectorlike quark model. Cross sections for these processes can deviate significantly from the standard model predictions due to the one-loop correction to the triple Higgs boson coupling constant. For the one-loop induced processes such as gg{yields}hh and {gamma}{gamma}{yields}hh, where h is the (lightest) Higgs boson and g and {gamma} respectively represent a gluon and a photon, the cross sections can also be affected by new physics particles via additional one-loop diagrams. In the two-Higgs-doublet model and scalar leptoquark models, cross sections of e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}hhZ and {gamma}{gamma}{yields}hh can be enhanced due to the nondecoupling effect in the one-loop corrections to the triple Higgs boson coupling constant. In the sequential fourth generation fermion model, the cross section for gg{yields}hh becomes very large because of the loop effect of the fermions. In the vectorlike quark model, effects are small because the theory has decoupling property. Measurements of the Higgs boson pair production processes can be useful to explore new physics through the determination of the Higgs potential.

  9. High-energy resummation of direct photon production at hadronic colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diana, Giovanni; Rojo, Juan; Ball, Richard D.

    2010-10-01

    Direct photon production is an important process at hadron colliders, being relevant both for precision measurement of the gluon density, and as background to Higgs and other new physics searches. Here we explore the implications of recently derived results for high-energy resummation of direct photon production for the interpretation of measurements at the Tevatron and the LHC. The effects of resummation are compared to various sources of theoretical uncertainties like PDFs and scale variations. We show how the high-energy resummation procedure stabilizes the logarithmic enhancement of the cross section at high energy which is present at any fixed order in the perturbative expansion starting at NNLO. The effects of high-energy resummation are found to be negligible at Tevatron, while they enhance the cross section by a few percent for pT≲10 GeV at the LHC. Our results imply that the discrepancy at small pT between fixed order NLO and Tevatron data cannot be explained by unresummed high-energy contributions.

  10. Probing gluon saturation with next-to-leading order photon production at central rapidities in proton-nucleus collisions

    DOE PAGES

    Benic, Sanjin; Fukushima, Kenji; Garcia-Montero, Oscar; ...

    2017-01-26

    Here, we compute the cross section for photons emitted from sea quarks in proton-nucleus collisions at collider energies. The computation is performed within the dilute-dense kinematics of the Color Glass Condensate (CGC) effective field theory. Albeit the result obtained is formally at next-to-leading order in the CGC power counting, it provides the dominant contribution for central rapidities. We observe that the inclusive photon cross section is proportional to all-twist Wilson line correlators in the nucleus. These correlators also appear in quark-pair production; unlike the latter, photon production is insensitive to hadronization uncertainties and therefore more sensitive to multi-parton correlations inmore » the gluon saturation regime of QCD. We demonstrate that k⊥ and collinear factorized expressions for inclusive photon production are obtained as leading twist approximations to our result. In particular, the collinearly factorized expression is directly sensitive to the nuclear gluon distribution at small x. Other results of interest include the realization of the Low-Burnett-Kroll soft photon theorem in the CGC framework and a comparative study of how the photon amplitude is obtained in Lorenz and light-cone gauges.« less

  11. Probing gluon saturation with next-to-leading order photon production at central rapidities in proton-nucleus collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benić, Sanjin; Fukushima, Kenji; Garcia-Montero, Oscar; Venugopalan, Raju

    2017-01-01

    We compute the cross section for photons emitted from sea quarks in proton-nucleus collisions at collider energies. The computation is performed within the dilute-dense kinematics of the Color Glass Condensate (CGC) effective field theory. Albeit the result obtained is formally at next-to-leading order in the CGC power counting, it provides the dominant contribution for central rapidities. We observe that the inclusive photon cross section is proportional to all-twist Wilson line correlators in the nucleus. These correlators also appear in quark-pair production; unlike the latter, photon production is insensitive to hadronization uncertainties and therefore more sensitive to multi-parton correlations in the gluon saturation regime of QCD. We demonstrate that k ⊥ and collinear factorized expressions for inclusive photon production are obtained as leading twist approximations to our result. In particular, the collinearly factorized expression is directly sensitive to the nuclear gluon distribution at small x. Other results of interest include the realization of the Low-Burnett-Kroll soft photon theorem in the CGC framework and a comparative study of how the photon amplitude is obtained in Lorenz and light-cone gauges.

  12. The efficiency of ionizing photon production and the radiation energy balance in compact star-forming galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izotov, Y. I.; Guseva, N. G.; Fricke, K. J.; Henkel, C.; Schaerer, D.

    2017-06-01

    We derive apparent and absolute ultraviolet (UV) magnitudes, and luminosities in the infrared (IR) range of a large sample of low-redshift (0 < z < 1) compact star-forming galaxies (CSFGs) selected from the Data Release 12 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. These data are used to constrain the extinction law in the UV for our galaxies and to compare the absorbed radiation in the UV range with the emission in the IR range. We find that the modelled far- and near-UV apparent magnitudes are in good agreement with the observed Galaxy Evolution Explorer magnitudes. It is found that galaxies with low and high equivalent widths EW(Hβ) of the Hβ emission line require different reddening laws with steeper slopes for galaxies with higher EW(Hβ). This implies that an important role of the hard ionizing radiation in shaping the dust grain size distribution. The IR emission in the range of 8-1000 μm is determined by using existing data obtained by various IR space telescopes. We find that the radiation energy absorbed in the UV range is nearly equal to the energy emitted in the IR range leaving very little room for hidden star formation in our galaxies. Using extinction-corrected Hβ luminosities and modelled SEDs in the UV range, we derive efficiencies of ionizing photon production ξ for the entire sample of CSFGs. It is found that ξ in CSFGs with high EW(Hβ) are among the highest known for low- and high-redshift galaxies. If galaxies with similar properties existed at redshifts z = 5-10, they could be considered as promising candidates for the reionization of the Universe.

  13. Reconsideration of the inclusive prompt photon production at the LHC with kT-factorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipatov, A. V.; Malyshev, M. A.

    2016-08-01

    We reconsider the inclusive production of isolated prompt photons in p p collisions at the LHC energies in the framework of kT-factorization approach. Our analysis is based on the O (α αs) off-shell (depending on the transverse momenta of initial quarks and gluons) production amplitudes of q*g*→γ q and q*q¯*→γ g partonic subprocesses and transverse momentum dependent (or unintegrated) quark and gluon densities in a proton, which are chosen in accordance with the Kimber-Martin-Ryskin prescription. We show that the subleading high-order O (α αs2) contributions, not covered by the noncollinear evolution of parton densities, are important to describe latest LHC data.

  14. Photon induced Λ(1520) production and the role of the K* exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toki, Hiroshi; García-Recio, Carmen; Nieves, Juan

    2008-02-01

    We study the photon induced Λ(1520) production in the effective Lagrangian method near threshold, EγLAB≤2GeV, and in the quark-gluon string model at higher energies 3GeV≤EγLAB≤5GeV. In particular, we study the role of the K* exchange for the production of Λ(1520) within the SU(6) Weinberg-Tomozowa chiral unitary model proposed by García-Recio, Nieves, and Salcedo [Phys. Rev. D 74, 034025 (2006)PRVDAQ0556-282110.1103/PhysRevD.74.034025]. The coupling of the Λ(1520) resonance to the NK¯* pair, which is dynamically generated, turns out to be relatively small and, thus, the K exchange mechanism dominates the reaction. In the higher energy region, where experimental data are available, the quark-gluon string mechanism with the K Regge trajectory reproduces both the energy and the angular distribution dependences of the Λ(1520) photoproduction reaction.

  15. Hard X-ray bremsstrahlung production in solar flares by high-energy proton beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emslie, A. G.; Brown, J. C.

    1985-01-01

    The possibility that solar hard X-ray bremsstrahlung is produced by acceleration of stationary electrons by fast-moving protons, rather than vice versa, as commonly assumed, was investigated. It was found that a beam of protons which involves 1836 times fewer particles, each having an energy 1836 times greater than that of the electrons in the equivalent electron beam model, has exactly the same bremsstrahlung yield for a given target, i.e., the mechanism has an energetic efficiency equal to that of conventional bremsstrahlung models. Allowance for the different degrees of target ionization appropriate to the two models (for conventional flare geometries) makes the proton beam model more efficient than the electron beam model, by a factor of order three. The model places less stringent constraints than a conventional electron beam model on the flare energy release mechanism. It is also consistent with observed X-ray burst spectra, intensities, and directivities. The altitude distribution of hard X-rays predicted by the model agrees with observations only if nonvertical injection of the protons is assumed. The model is inconsistent with gamma-ray data in terms of conventional modeling.

  16. Hardness testing

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    This technical manual is a handbook dealing with all aspects of hardness testing. Every hardness testing method is fully covered, from Rockwell to ultrasonic hardness testing. Specific hardness testing problems are also discussed, and methods are offered for many applications. One chapter examines how to select the correct hardness testing method. A directory of manufacturers, distributors and suppliers of hardness testing equipment and supplies in the United States and Canada is also included. The book consist of eight chapters and an appendix. It discusses common concepts of hardness, and the theories and methods of hardness testing. Coverage includes specific hardness testing methods - Brinell, Rockwell, Vickers, and microhardness testing; and other hardness testing methods, such as scleroscope, ultrasonic, scratch and file testing, and hardness evaluation by eddy current testing.

  17. Direct photon production in Pb–Pb collisions at sNN=2.76 TeV

    DOE PAGES

    Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; ...

    2016-01-19

    We studied the direct photon production at mid-rapidity in Pb-Pb collisions at √sNN = 2.76 TeV in the transverse momentum range 0.9 < pT < 14 GeV/c. Photons were detected with the highly segmented electromagnetic calorimeter PHOS and via conversions in the ALICE detector material with the e+e- pair reconstructed in the central tracking system. Our results of the two methods were combined and direct photon spectra were measured for the 0-20%, 20-40%, and 40-80% centrality classes. For all three classes, agreement was found with perturbative QCD calculations for pT greater than or similar to 5 GeV/c. Direct photon spectramore » down to pT approximate to 1 GeV/c could be extracted for the 20-40% and 0-20% centrality classes. Furthermore, the significance of the direct photon signal for 0.9 < pT < 2.1 GeV/c is 2.6 sigma for the 0-20% class. The spectrum in this pT range and centrality class can be described by an exponential with an inverse slope parameter of (297 ± 12stat ± 41syst) MeV. State-of-the-art models for photon production in heavy-ion collisions agree with the data within uncertainties.« less

  18. Direct photon production in Pb-Pb collisions at √{sNN} = 2.76 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahn, S. U.; Aiola, S.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alfaro Molina, R.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Almaraz, J. R. M.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Arnaldi, R.; Arnold, O. W.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Audurier, B.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmi, M. D.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baral, R. C.; Barbano, A. M.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartalini, P.; Barth, K.; Bartke, J.; Bartsch, E.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batista Camejo, A.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bello Martinez, H.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Belyaev, V.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Biswas, R.; Biswas, S.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blair, J. T.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Borri, M.; Bossú, F.; Botta, E.; Böttger, S.; Bourjau, C.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Brucken, E. J.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Butt, J. B.; Buxton, J. T.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calero Diaz, L.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Carnesecchi, F.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Castro, A. J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Cerkala, J.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Chartier, M.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chelnokov, V.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Cho, S.; Chochula, P.; Choi, K.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cortese, P.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dahms, T.; Dainese, A.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Conti, C.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; Deisting, A.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; Deplano, C.; Dhankher, P.; Di Bari, D.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Drozhzhova, T.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Engel, H.; Epple, E.; Erazmus, B.; Erdemir, I.; Erhardt, F.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Eum, J.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabbietti, L.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Feldkamp, L.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Feuillard, V. J. G.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Fleck, M. G.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Furs, A.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Gao, C.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Gasik, P.; Gauger, E. F.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Giubilato, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Goméz Coral, D. M.; Gomez Ramirez, A.; Gonzalez, V.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Grabski, V.; Grachov, O. A.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Graham, K. L.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Gronefeld, J. M.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Haake, R.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Harris, J. W.; Harton, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayashi, S.; Heckel, S. T.; Heide, M.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Herrera Corral, G.; Hess, B. A.; Hetland, K. F.; Hillemanns, H.; Hippolyte, B.; Hosokawa, R.; Hristov, P.; Huang, M.; Humanic, T. J.; Hussain, N.; Hussain, T.; Hutter, D.; Hwang, D. S.; Ilkaev, R.; Inaba, M.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, V.; Izucheev, V.; Jacobs, P. M.; Jadhav, M. B.; Jadlovska, S.; Jadlovsky, J.; Jahnke, C.; Jakubowska, M. J.; Jang, H. J.; Janik, M. A.; Jayarathna, P. H. S. Y.; Jena, C.; Jena, S.; Jimenez Bustamante, R. T.; Jones, P. G.; Jung, H.; Jusko, A.; Kalinak, P.; Kalweit, A.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. H.; Kaplin, V.; Kar, S.; Karasu Uysal, A.; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karayan, L.; Karpechev, E.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Keijdener, D. L. D.; Keil, M.; Mohisin Khan, M.; Khan, P.; Khan, S. A.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Kileng, B.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, D.; Kim, H.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, M.; Kim, M.; Kim, S.; Kim, T.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Kiss, G.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, C.; Klein, J.; Klein-Bösing, C.; Klewin, S.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Knospe, A. G.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobdaj, C.; Kofarago, M.; Kollegger, T.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Kondratyuk, E.; Konevskikh, A.; Kopcik, M.; Kour, M.; Kouzinopoulos, C.; Kovalenko, O.; Kovalenko, V.; Kowalski, M.; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, G.; Králik, I.; Kravčáková, A.; Kretz, M.; Krivda, M.; Krizek, F.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.; Kubera, A. M.; Kučera, V.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P. G.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, J.; Kumar, L.; Kumar, S.; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kuryakin, A.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; La Pointe, S. L.; La Rocca, P.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Lagana Fernandes, C.; Lakomov, I.; Langoy, R.; Lara, C.; Lardeux, A.; Lattuca, A.; Laudi, E.; Lea, R.; Leardini, L.; Lee, G. R.; Lee, S.; Lehas, F.; Lemmon, R. C.; Lenti, V.; Leogrande, E.; León Monzón, I.; León Vargas, H.; Leoncino, M.; Lévai, P.; Li, S.; Li, X.; Lien, J.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Ljunggren, H. M.; Lodato, D. F.; Loenne, P. I.; Loginov, V.; Loizides, C.; Lopez, X.; López Torres, E.; Lowe, A.; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Luparello, G.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahajan, S.; Mahmood, S. M.; Maire, A.; Majka, R. D.; Malaev, M.; Maldonado Cervantes, I.; Malinina, L.; Mal'Kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Marchisone, M.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Margutti, J.; Marín, A.; Markert, C.; Marquard, M.; Martin, N. A.; Martin Blanco, J.; Martinengo, P.; Martínez, M. I.; Martínez García, G.; Martinez Pedreira, M.; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Massacrier, L.; Mastroserio, A.; Matyja, A.; Mayer, C.; Mazer, J.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Mcdonald, D.; Meddi, F.; Melikyan, Y.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meninno, E.; Mercado Pérez, J.; Meres, M.; Miake, Y.; Mieskolainen, M. M.; Mikhaylov, K.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Minervini, L. M.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, A. N.; Miśkowiec, D.; Mitra, J.; Mitu, C. M.; Mohammadi, N.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Montaño Zetina, L.; Montes, E.; Moreira De Godoy, D. A.; Moreno, L. A. P.; Moretto, S.; Morreale, A.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Mühlheim, D.; Muhuri, S.; Mukherjee, M.; Mulligan, J. D.; Munhoz, M. G.; Munzer, R. H.; Murray, S.; Musa, L.; Musinsky, J.; Naik, B.; Nair, R.; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Naru, M. U.; Natal da Luz, H.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, K.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nedosekin, A.; Nellen, L.; Ng, F.; Nicassio, M.; Niculescu, M.; Niedziela, J.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Noris, J. C. C.; Norman, J.; Nyanin, A.; Nystrand, J.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S.; Oh, S. K.; Ohlson, A.; Okatan, A.; Okubo, T.; Olah, L.; Oleniacz, J.; Oliveira Da Silva, A. C.; Oliver, M. H.; Onderwaater, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Orava, R.; Ortiz Velasquez, A.; Oskarsson, A.; Otwinowski, J.; Oyama, K.; Ozdemir, M.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, J.; Pandey, A. K.; Papcun, P.; Papikyan, V.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Pareek, P.; Park, W. J.; Parmar, S.; Passfeld, A.; Paticchio, V.; Patra, R. N.; Paul, B.; Peitzmann, T.; Pereira Da Costa, H.; Pereira De Oliveira Filho, E.; Peresunko, D.; Pérez Lara, C. E.; Perez Lezama, E.; Peskov, V.; Pestov, Y.; Petráček, V.; Petrov, V.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Piano, S.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Piyarathna, D. B.; Płoskoń, M.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Poghosyan, M. G.; Polichtchouk, B.; Poljak, N.; Poonsawat, W.; Pop, A.; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.; Porter, J.; Pospisil, J.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puccio, M.; Puddu, G.; Pujahari, P.; Punin, V.; Putschke, J.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Raha, S.; Rajput, S.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Rami, F.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Räsänen, S. S.; Rascanu, B. T.; Rathee, D.; Read, K. F.; Redlich, K.; Reed, R. J.; Rehman, A.; Reichelt, P.; Reidt, F.; Ren, X.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Revol, J.-P.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Ricci, R. A.; Richert, T.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Ristea, C.; Rocco, E.; Rodríguez Cahuantzi, M.; Rodriguez Manso, A.; Røed, K.; Rogochaya, E.; Rohr, D.; Röhrich, D.; Romita, R.; Ronchetti, F.; Ronflette, L.; Rosnet, P.; Rossi, A.; Roukoutakis, F.; Roy, A.; Roy, C.; Roy, P.; Rubio Montero, A. J.; Rui, R.; Russo, R.; Ryabinkin, E.; Ryabov, Y.; Rybicki, A.; Sadovsky, S.; Šafařík, K.; Sahlmuller, B.; Sahoo, P.; Sahoo, R.; Sahoo, S.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Sakai, S.; Saleh, M. A.; Salzwedel, J.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Šándor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, M.; Sarkar, D.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schuchmann, S.; Schukraft, J.; Schulc, M.; Schuster, T.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, R.; Šefčík, M.; Seger, J. E.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Sekihata, D.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Senosi, K.; Senyukov, S.; Serradilla, E.; Sevcenco, A.; Shabanov, A.; Shabetai, A.; Shadura, O.; Shahoyan, R.; Shangaraev, A.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, M.; Sharma, M.; Sharma, N.; Shigaki, K.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siddhanta, S.; Sielewicz, K. M.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Simatovic, G.; Simonetti, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R.; Singha, S.; Singhal, V.; Sinha, B. C.; Sinha, T.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Slupecki, M.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R. J. M.; Snellman, T. W.; Søgaard, C.; Song, J.; Song, M.; Song, Z.; Soramel, F.; Sorensen, S.; Sozzi, F.; Spacek, M.; Spiriti, E.; Sputowska, I.; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stefanek, G.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stiller, J. H.; Stocco, D.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Suleymanov, M.; Suljic, M.; Sultanov, R.; Šumbera, M.; Szabo, A.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Szarka, I.; Szczepankiewicz, A.; Szymanski, M.; Tabassam, U.; Takahashi, J.; Tambave, G. J.; Tanaka, N.; Tangaro, M. A.; Tarhini, M.; Tariq, M.; Tarzila, M. G.; Tauro, A.; Tejeda Muñoz, G.; Telesca, A.; Terasaki, K.; Terrevoli, C.; Teyssier, B.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, D.; Tieulent, R.; Timmins, A. R.; Toia, A.; Trogolo, S.; Trombetta, G.; Trubnikov, V.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Tveter, T. S.; Ullaland, K.; Uras, A.; Usai, G. L.; Utrobicic, A.; Vajzer, M.; Vala, M.; Valencia Palomo, L.; Vallero, S.; Van Der Maarel, J.; Van Hoorne, J. W.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vanat, T.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Varga, D.; Vargas, A.; Vargyas, M.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vauthier, A.; Vechernin, V.; Veen, A. M.; Veldhoen, M.; Velure, A.; Venaruzzo, M.; Vercellin, E.; Vergara Limón, S.; Vernet, R.; Verweij, M.; Vickovic, L.; Viesti, G.; Viinikainen, J.; Vilakazi, Z.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Villatoro Tello, A.; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, L.; Vinogradov, Y.; Virgili, T.; Vislavicius, V.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vodopyanov, A.; Völkl, M. A.; Voloshin, K.; Voloshin, S. A.; Volpe, G.; von Haller, B.; Vorobyev, I.; Vranic, D.; Vrláková, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Vyushin, A.; Wagner, B.; Wagner, J.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, Y.; Weber, M.; Weber, S. G.; Weiser, D. F.; Wessels, J. P.; Westerhoff, U.; Whitehead, A. M.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilde, M.; Wilk, G.; Wilkinson, J.; Williams, M. C. S.; Windelband, B.; Winn, M.; Yaldo, C. G.; Yang, H.; Yang, P.; Yano, S.; Yasar, C.; Yin, Z.; Yokoyama, H.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yoon, J. H.; Yurchenko, V.; Yushmanov, I.; Zaborowska, A.; Zaccolo, V.; Zaman, A.; Zampolli, C.; Zanoli, H. J. C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zardoshti, N.; Zarochentsev, A.; Závada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zgura, I. S.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, C.; Zhigareva, N.; Zhou, D.; Zhou, Y.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, A.; Zimmermann, M. B.; Zinovjev, G.; Zyzak, M.

    2016-03-01

    Direct photon production at mid-rapidity in Pb-Pb collisions at √{sNN} = 2.76 TeV was studied in the transverse momentum range 0.9 Photons were detected with the highly segmented electromagnetic calorimeter PHOS and via conversions in the ALICE detector material with the e+e- pair reconstructed in the central tracking system. The results of the two methods were combined and direct photon spectra were measured for the 0-20%, 20-40%, and 40-80% centrality classes. For all three classes, agreement was found with perturbative QCD calculations for pT ≳ 5 GeV / c. Direct photon spectra down to pT ≈ 1 GeV / c could be extracted for the 20-40% and 0-20% centrality classes. The significance of the direct photon signal for 0.9 photon production in heavy-ion collisions agree with the data within uncertainties.

  19. Inclusive J/psi production in two-photon collisions at LEP II with the DELPHI detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapkine, Mikhail

    2002-06-01

    Inclusive J/psi production in photon-photon collisions has been observed by the DELPHI collaboration at LEP II beam energies. A clean signal from the reaction gamma][gamma [right arrow] J/psi + X is seen. Number of observed events, N(J/psi [right arrow] mu]+[mu-) = 36 plus-or-minus 7 for the integrated luminosity 617 pb-1, yielding a cross section of sigma](J/[psi [right arrow] mu]+[mu-) = 25.2 plus-or-minus 10.2 pb. Based on a study of the event shapes of different types of gamma][gamma processes in the PYTHIA program, we conclude that (74plus-or-minus22)% of the observed J/psi events are due to the 'resolved' photons, the dominant contribution of which is evidently a single color-octet gluon within the photon.

  20. Study of inclusive J/ψ production in two-photon collisions at LEP II with the DELPHI detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdallah, J.; Abreu, P.; Adam, W.; Adzic, P.; Albrecht, T.; Alderweireld, T.; Alemany-Fernandez, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Allport, P. P.; Almehed, S.; Amaldi, U.; Amapane, N.; Amato, S.; Anashkin, E.; Andreazza, A.; Andringa, S.; Anjos, N.; Antilogus, P.; Apel, W.-D.; Arnoud, Y.; Ask, S.; Asman, B.; Augustin, J. E.; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Ballestrero, A.; Bambade, P.; Barbier, R.; Bardin, D.; Barker, G.; Baroncelli, A.; Battaglia, M.; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K.-H.; Begalli, M.; Behrmann, A.; Bellunato, T.; Belous, K.; Benekos, N.; Benvenuti, A.; Berat, C.; Berggren, M.; Berntzon, L.; Bertrand, D.; Besancon, M.; Besson, N.; Bloch, D.; Blom, M.; Bonesini, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, P. S. L.; Borisov, G.; Botner, O.; Bouquet, B.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Boyko, I.; Bracko, M.; Brenner, R.; Brodet, E.; Bruckman, P.; Brunet, J. M.; Bugge, L.; Buschmann, P.; Calvi, M.; Camporesi, T.; Canale, V.; Carena, F.; Carimalo, C.; Castro, N.; Cavallo, F.; Chapkin, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Checchia, P.; Chierici, R.; Chliapnikov, P.; Chung, S. U.; Cieslik, K.; Collins, P.; Contri, R.; Cosme, G.; Cossutti, F.; Costa, M. J.; Crawley, B.; Crennell, D.; Cuevas, J.; D'Hondt, J.; Dalmau, J.; da Silva, T.; da Silva, W.; Della Ricca, G.; de Angelis, A.; de Boer, W.; de Clercq, C.; de Lotto, B.; de Maria, N.; de Min, A.; de Paula, L.; di Ciaccio, L.; di Simone, A.; Doroba, K.; Drees, J.; Dris, M.; Eigen, G.; Ekelof, T.; Ellert, M.; Elsing, M.; Espirito Santo, M. C.; Fanourakis, G.; Fassouliotis, D.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J.; Ferrer, A.; Ferro, F.; Flagmeyer, U.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Fuster, J.; Gandelman, M.; Garcia, C.; Gavillet, Ph.; Gazis, E.; Gele, D.; Geralis, T.; Gokieli, R.; Golob, B.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncalves, P.; Graziani, E.; Grosdidier, G.; Grzelak, K.; Guy, J.; Haag, C.; Hahn, F.; Hahn, S.; Hallgren, A.; Hamacher, K.; Hamilton, K.; Hansen, J.; Haug, S.; Hauler, F.; Hedberg, V.; Hennecke, M.; Herr, H.; Holmgren, S.-O.; Holt, P. J.; Houlden, M. A.; Hultqvist, K.; Jackson, J. N.; Jarlskog, Ch.; Jarlskog, G.; Jarry, P.; Jeans, D.; Johansson, E. K.; Johansson, P. D.; Jonsson, P.; Joram, C.; Jungermann, L.; Kapusta, F.; Katsanevas, S.; Katsoufis, E.; Keranen, R.; Kernel, G.; Kersevan, B. P.; Kiiskinen, A.; King, B. T.; Kjaer, N. J.; Kluit, P.; Kokkinias, P.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krumstein, Z.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kurowska, J.; Laforge, B.; Lamsa, J.; Leder, G.; Ledroit, F.; Leinonen, L.; Leitner, R.; Lemonne, J.; Lenzen, G.; Lepeltier, V.; Lesiak, T.; Liebig, W.; Liko, D.; Lipniacka, A.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez, J. M.; Loukas, D.; Lutz, P.; Lyons, L.; MacNaughton, J.; Malek, A.; Maltezos, S.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Marechal, B.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J.-C.; Mariotti, C.; Markou, A.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Masik, J.; Mastroyiannopoulos, N.; Matorras, F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazzucato, F.; Mazzucato, M.; Mc Nulty, R.; Meroni, C.; Meyer, W. T.; Migliore, E.; Mitaroff, W.; Mjoernmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moch, M.; Moenig, K.; Monge, R.; Montenegro, J.; Moraes, D.; Moreno, S.; Morettini, P.; Mueller, U.; Muenich, K.; Mulders, M.; Mundim, L.; Murray, W.; Muryn, B.; Myatt, G.; Myklebust, T.; Nassiakou, M.; Navarria, F.; Nawrocki, K.; Nemecek, S.; Nicolaidou, R.; Niezurawski, P.; Nikolenko, M.; Nygren, A.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Olshevski, A.; Onofre, A.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Ouraou, A.; Oyanguren, A.; Paganoni, M.; Paiano, S.; Palacios, J. P.; Palka, H.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Pape, L.; Parkes, C.; Parodi, F.; Parzefall, U.; Passeri, A.; Passon, O.; Peralta, L.; Perepelitsa, V.; Perrotta, A.; Petrolini, A.; Piedra, J.; Pieri, L.; Pierre, F.; Pimenta, M.; Piotto, E.; Podobnik, T.; Poireau, V.; Pol, M. E.; Polok, G.; Poropat, P.; Pozdniakov, V.; Privitera, P.; Pukhaeva, N.; Pullia, A.; Rames, J.; Ramler, L.; Read, A.; Rebecchi, P.; Rehn, J.; Reid, D.; Reinhardt, R.; Renton, P.; Richard, F.; Ridky, J.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rodriguez, D.; Romero, A.; Ronchese, P.; Rosenberg, E.; Roudeau, P.; Rovelli, T.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Ryabtchikov, D.; Sadovsky, A.; Salmi, L.; Salt, J.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schwanda, C.; Schwering, B.; Schwickerath, U.; Segar, A.; Sekulin, R.; Siebel, M.; Sisakian, A.; Smadja, G.; Smirnova, O.; Sokolov, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sosnowski, R.; Spassov, T.; Stanitzki, M.; Stocchi, A.; Strauss, J.; Stugu, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Szumlak, T.; Tabarelli, T.; Taffard, A. C.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Terranova, F.; Timmermans, J.; Tinti, N.; Tkatchev, L.; Tobin, M.; Todorovova, S.; Tome, B.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortosa, P.; Travnicek, P.; Treille, D.; Tristram, G.; Trochimczuk, M.; Troncon, C.; Tyapkin, I. A.; Tyapkin, P.; Tzamarias, S.; Ullaland, O.; Uvarov, V.; Valenti, G.; van Dam, P.; van Eldik, J.; van Lysebetten, A.; van Remortel, N.; van Vulpen, I.; Vegni, G.; Veloso, F.; Venus, W.; Verbeure, F.; Verdier, P.; Verzi, V.; Vilanova, D.; Vitale, L.; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Washbrook, A. J.; Weiser, C.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Winter, M.; Witek, M.; Yushchenko, O.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zimin, N. I.; Zintchenko, A.; Zoller, Ph.; Zupan, M.; Delphi Collaboration

    2003-07-01

    Inclusive J/ψ production in photon-photon collisions has been observed at LEP II beam energies. A clear signal from the reaction γγ→J/ψ+X is seen. The number of observed N(J/ψ→μ+μ-) events is 36±7 for an integrated luminosity of 617 pb-1, yielding a cross-section of σ(J/ψ+X)=45±9(stat)±17(syst) pb. Based on a study of the event shapes of different types of γγ processes in the PYTHIA program, we conclude that (74±22)% of the observed J/ψ events are due to 'resolved' photons, the dominant contribution of which is most probably due to the gluon content of the photon.

  1. Study of inclusive /J/ψ production in two-photon collisions at LEP II with the DELPHI detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DELPHI Collaboration; Abdallah, J.; Abreu, P.; Adam, W.; Adzic, P.; Albrecht, T.; Alderweireld, T.; Alemany-Fernandez, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Allport, P. P.; Almehed, S.; Amaldi, U.; Amapane, N.; Amato, S.; Anashkin, E.; Andreazza, A.; Andringa, S.; Anjos, N.; Antilogus, P.; Apel, W.-D.; Arnoud, Y.; Ask, S.; Asman, B.; Augustin, J. E.; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Ballestrero, A.; Bambade, P.; Barbier, R.; Bardin, D.; Barker, G.; Baroncelli, A.; Battaglia, M.; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K.-H.; Begalli, M.; Behrmann, A.; Bellunato, T.; Belous, K.; Benekos, N.; Benvenuti, A.; Berat, C.; Berggren, M.; Berntzon, L.; Bertrand, D.; Besancon, M.; Besson, N.; Bloch, D.; Blom, M.; Bonesini, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, P. S. L.; Borisov, G.; Botner, O.; Bouquet, B.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Boyko, I.; Bracko, M.; Brenner, R.; Brodet, E.; Bruckman, P.; Brunet, J. M.; Bugge, L.; Buschmann, P.; Calvi, M.; Camporesi, T.; Canale, V.; Carena, F.; Carimalo, C.; Castro, N.; Cavallo, F.; Chapkin, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Checchia, P.; Chierici, R.; Chliapnikov, P.; Chung, S. U.; Cieslik, K.; Collins, P.; Contri, R.; Cosme, G.; Cossutti, F.; Costa, M. J.; Crawley, B.; Crennell, D.; Cuevas, J.; D'Hondt, J.; Dalmau, J.; da Silva, T.; da Silva, W.; della Ricca, G.; de Angelis, A.; de Boer, W.; de Clercq, C.; de Lotto, B.; de Maria, N.; de Min, A.; de Paula, L.; di Ciaccio, L.; di Simone, A.; Doroba, K.; Drees, J.; Dris, M.; Eigen, G.; Ekelof, T.; Ellert, M.; Elsing, M.; Espirito Santo, M. C.; Fanourakis, G.; Fassouliotis, D.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J.; Ferrer, A.; Ferro, F.; Flagmeyer, U.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Fuster, J.; Gandelman, M.; Garcia, C.; Gavillet, Ph.; Gazis, E.; Gele, D.; Geralis, T.; Gokieli, R.; Golob, B.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncalves, P.; Graziani, E.; Grosdidier, G.; Grzelak, K.; Guy, J.; Haag, C.; Hahn, F.; Hahn, S.; Hallgren, A.; Hamacher, K.; Hamilton, K.; Hansen, J.; Haug, S.; Hauler, F.; Hedberg, V.; Hennecke, M.; Herr, H.; Holmgren, S.-O.; Holt, P. J.; Houlden, M. A.; Hultqvist, K.; Jackson, J. N.; Jarlskog, Ch.; Jarlskog, G.; Jarry, P.; Jeans, D.; Johansson, E. K.; Johansson, P. D.; Jonsson, P.; Joram, C.; Jungermann, L.; Kapusta, F.; Katsanevas, S.; Katsoufis, E.; Keranen, R.; Kernel, G.; Kersevan, B. P.; Kiiskinen, A.; King, B. T.; Kjaer, N. J.; Kluit, P.; Kokkinias, P.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krumstein, Z.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kurowska, J.; Laforge, B.; Lamsa, J.; Leder, G.; Ledroit, F.; Leinonen, L.; Leitner, R.; Lemonne, J.; Lenzen, G.; Lepeltier, V.; Lesiak, T.; Liebig, W.; Liko, D.; Lipniacka, A.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez, J. M.; Loukas, D.; Lutz, P.; Lyons, L.; MacNaughton, J.; Malek, A.; Maltezos, S.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Marechal, B.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J.-C.; Mariotti, C.; Markou, A.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Masik, J.; Mastroyiannopoulos, N.; Matorras, F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazzucato, F.; Mazzucato, M.; Mc Nulty, R.; Meroni, C.; Meyer, W. T.; Migliore, E.; Mitaroff, W.; Mjoernmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moch, M.; Moenig, K.; Monge, R.; Montenegro, J.; Moraes, D.; Moreno, S.; Morettini, P.; Mueller, U.; Muenich, K.; Mulders, M.; Mundim, L.; Murray, W.; Muryn, B.; Myatt, G.; Myklebust, T.; Nassiakou, M.; Navarria, F.; Nawrocki, K.; Nemecek, S.; Nicolaidou, R.; Niezurawski, P.; Nikolenko, M.; Nygren, A.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Olshevski, A.; Onofre, A.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Ouraou, A.; Oyanguren, A.; Paganoni, M.; Paiano, S.; Palacios, J. P.; Palka, H.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Pape, L.; Parkes, C.; Parodi, F.; Parzefall, U.; Passeri, A.; Passon, O.; Peralta, L.; Perepelitsa, V.; Perrotta, A.; Petrolini, A.; Piedra, J.; Pieri, L.; Pierre, F.; Pimenta, M.; Piotto, E.; Podobnik, T.; Poireau, V.; Pol, M. E.; Polok, G.; Poropat, P.; Pozdniakov, V.; Privitera, P.; Pukhaeva, N.; Pullia, A.; Rames, J.; Ramler, L.; Read, A.; Rebecchi, P.; Rehn, J.; Reid, D.; Reinhardt, R.; Renton, P.; Richard, F.; Ridky, J.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rodriguez, D.; Romero, A.; Ronchese, P.; Rosenberg, E.; Roudeau, P.; Rovelli, T.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Ryabtchikov, D.; Sadovsky, A.; Salmi, L.; Salt, J.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schwanda, C.; Schwering, B.; Schwickerath, U.; Segar, A.; Sekulin, R.; Siebel, M.; Sisakian, A.; Smadja, G.; Smirnova, O.; Sokolov, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sosnowski, R.; Spassov, T.; Stanitzki, M.; Stocchi, A.; Strauss, J.; Stugu, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Szumlak, T.; Tabarelli, T.; Taffard, A. C.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Terranova, F.; Timmermans, J.; Tinti, N.; Tkatchev, L.; Tobin, M.; Todorovova, S.; Tome, B.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortosa, P.; Travnicek, P.; Treille, D.; Tristram, G.; Trochimczuk, M.; Troncon, C.; Tyapkin, I. A.; Tyapkin, P.; Tzamarias, S.; Ullaland, O.; Uvarov, V.; Valenti, G.; van Dam, P.; van Eldik, J.; van Lysebetten, A.; van Remortel, N.; van Vulpen, I.; Vegni, G.; Veloso, F.; Venus, W.; Verbeure, F.; Verdier, P.; Verzi, V.; Vilanova, D.; Vitale, L.; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Washbrook, A. J.; Weiser, C.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Winter, M.; Witek, M.; Yushchenko, O.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zimin, N. I.; Zintchenko, A.; Zoller, Ph.; Zupan, M.

    2003-07-01

    Inclusive /J/ψ production in photon-photon collisions has been observed at LEP II beam energies. A clear signal from the reaction /γγ-->J/ψ+X is seen. The number of observed N(J/ψ-->μ+μ-) events is /36+/-7 for an integrated luminosity of 617 pb-1, yielding a cross-section of /σ(J/ψ+X)=45+/-9(stat)+/-17(syst) pb. Based on a study of the event shapes of different types of /γγ processes in the PYTHIA program, we conclude that /(74+/-22)% of the observed /J/ψ events are due to `resolved' photons, the dominant contribution of which is most probably due to the gluon content of the photon.

  2. Study of inclusive strange-baryon production and search for pentaquarks in two-photon collisions at LEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achard, P.; Adriani, O.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Alcaraz, J.; Alemanni, G.; Allaby, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alviggi, M. G.; Anderhub, H.; Andreev, V. P.; Anselmo, F.; Arefiev, A.; Azemoon, T.; Aziz, T.; Bagnaia, P.; Bajo, A.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldew, S. V.; Banerjee, S.; Banerjee, S.; Barczyk, A.; Barillère, R.; Bartalini, P.; Basile, M.; Batalova, N.; Battiston, R.; Bay, A.; Becattini, F.; Becker, U.; Behner, F.; Bellucci, L.; Berbeco, R.; Berdugo, J.; Berges, P.; Bertucci, B.; Betev, B. L.; Biasini, M.; Biglietti, M.; Biland, A.; Blaising, J. J.; Blyth, S. C.; Bobbink, G. J.; Böhm, A.; Boldizsar, L.; Borgia, B.; Bottai, S.; Bourilkov, D.; Bourquin, M.; Braccini, S.; Branson, J. G.; Brochu, F.; Burger, J. D.; Burger, W. J.; Cai, X. D.; Capell, M.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carlino, G.; Cartacci, A.; Casaus, J.; Cavallari, F.; Cavallo, N.; Cecchi, C.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo, M.; Chang, Y. H.; Chemarin, M.; Chen, A.; Chen, G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, H. S.; Chiefari, G.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Clare, I.; Clare, R.; Coignet, G.; Colino, N.; Costantini, S.; de La Cruz, B.; Cucciarelli, S.; de Asmundis, R.; Déglon, P.; Debreczeni, J.; Degré, A.; Dehmelt, K.; Deiters, K.; Della Volpe, D.; Delmeire, E.; Denes, P.; Denotaristefani, F.; de Salvo, A.; Diemoz, M.; Dierckxsens, M.; Dionisi, C.; Dittmar, M.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Duchesneau, D.; Duda, M.; Echenard, B.; Eline, A.; El Hage, A.; El Mamouni, H.; Engler, A.; Eppling, F. J.; Extermann, P.; Falagan, M. A.; Falciano, S.; Favara, A.; Fay, J.; Fedin, O.; Felcini, M.; Ferguson, T.; Fesefeldt, H.; Fiandrini, E.; Field, J. H.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, P. H.; Fisher, W.; Forconi, G.; Freudenreich, K.; Furetta, C.; Galaktionov, Y.; Ganguli, S. N.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gataullin, M.; Gentile, S.; Giagu, S.; Gong, Z. F.; Grenier, G.; Grimm, O.; Gruenewald, M. W.; Gupta, V. K.; Gurtu, A.; Gutay, L. J.; Haas, D.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hebbeker, T.; Hervé, A.; Hirschfelder, J.; Hofer, H.; Hohlmann, M.; Holzner, G.; Hou, S. R.; Jin, B. N.; Jindal, P.; Jones, L. W.; de Jong, P.; Josa-Mutuberría, I.; Kaur, M.; Kienzle-Focacci, M. N.; Kim, J. K.; Kirkby, J.; Kittel, W.; Klimentov, A.; König, A. C.; Kopal, M.; Koutsenko, V.; Kräber, M.; Kraemer, R. W.; Krüger, A.; Kunin, A.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Laktineh, I.; Landi, G.; Lebeau, M.; Lebedev, A.; Lebrun, P.; Lecomte, P.; Lecoq, P.; Le Coultre, P.; Le Goff, J. M.; Leiste, R.; Levtchenko, M.; Levtchenko, P.; Li, C.; Likhoded, S.; Lin, C. H.; Lin, W. T.; Linde, F. L.; Lista, L.; Liu, Z. A.; Lohmann, W.; Longo, E.; Lu, Y. S.; Luci, C.; Luminari, L.; Lustermann, W.; Ma, W. G.; Malgeri, L.; Malinin, A.; Maña, C.; Mans, J.; Martin, J. P.; Marzano, F.; Mazumdar, K.; McNeil, R. R.; Mele, S.; Merola, L.; Meschini, M.; Metzger, W. J.; Mihul, A.; Milcent, H.; Mirabelli, G.; Mnich, J.; Mohanty, G. B.; Muanza, G. S.; Muijs, A. J. M.; Musy, M.; Nagy, S.; Natale, S.; Napolitano, M.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Newman, H.; Nisati, A.; Novak, T.; Nowak, H.; Ofierzynski, R.; Organtini, G.; Pal, I.; Palomares, C.; Paolucci, P.; Paramatti, R.; Passaleva, G.; Patricelli, S.; Paul, T.; Pauluzzi, M.; Paus, C.; Pauss, F.; Pedace, M.; Pensotti, S.; Perret-Gallix, D.; Piccolo, D.; Pierella, F.; Pieri, M.; Pioppi, M.; Piroué, P. A.; Pistolesi, E.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Pojidaev, V.; Pothier, J.; Prokofiev, D.; Rahal-Callot, G.; Rahaman, M. A.; Raics, P.; Raja, N.; Ramelli, R.; Rancoita, P. G.; Ranieri, R.; Raspereza, A.; Razis, P.; Rembeczki, S.; Ren, D.; Rescigno, M.; Reucroft, S.; Riemann, S.; Riles, K.; Roe, B. P.; Romero, L.; Rosca, A.; Rosemann, C.; Rosenbleck, C.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Roth, S.; Rubio, J. A.; Ruggiero, G.; Rykaczewski, H.; Sakharov, A.; Saremi, S.; Sarkar, S.; Salicio, J.; Sanchez, E.; Schäfer, C.; Schegelsky, V.; Schopper, H.; Schotanus, D. J.; Sciacca, C.; Servoli, L.; Shevchenko, S.; Shivarov, N.; Shoutko, V.; Shumilov, E.; Shvorob, A.; Son, D.; Souga, C.; Spillantini, P.; Steuer, M.; Stickland, D. P.; Stoyanov, B.; Straessner, A.; Sudhakar, K.; Sultanov, G.; Sun, L. Z.; Sushkov, S.; Suter, H.; Swain, J. D.; Szillasi, Z.; Tang, X. W.; Tarjan, P.; Tauscher, L.; Taylor, L.; Tellili, B.; Teyssier, D.; Timmermans, C.; Ting, S. C. C.; Ting, S. M.; Tonwar, S. C.; Tóth, J.; Tully, C.; Tung, K. L.; Ulbricht, J.; Valente, E.; van de Walle, R. T.; Vasquez, R.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vetlitsky, I.; Viertel, G.; Vivargent, M.; Vlachos, S.; Vodopianov, I.; Vogel, H.; Vogt, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Vorobyov, A. A.; Wadhwa, M.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Z. M.; Weber, M.; Wynhoff, S.; Xia, L.; Xu, Z. Z.; Yamamoto, J.; Yang, B. Z.; Yang, C. G.; Yang, H. J.; Yang, M.; Yeh, S. C.; Zalite, A.; Zalite, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, J.; Zhu, G. Y.; Zhu, R. Y.; Zhuang, H. L.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, B.; Zöller, M.

    2007-01-01

    Measurements of inclusive production of the Λ, Ξ- and Ξ*(1530) baryons in two-photon collisions with the L3 detector at LEP are presented. The inclusive differential cross sections for Λ and Ξ- are measured as a function of the baryon transverse momentum, pt, and pseudo-rapidity, η. The mean number of Λ, Ξ- and Ξ*(1530) baryons per hadronic two-photon event is determined in the kinematic range 0.4 GeVproduction of the pentaquark θ+(1540) in two-photon collisions through the decay θ+→pK0 S is also presented. No evidence for production of this state is found.

  3. Study of π0 pair production in single-tag two-photon collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, M.; Uehara, S.; Watanabe, Y.; Nakazawa, H.; Abdesselam, A.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Al Said, S.; Asner, D. M.; Atmacan, H.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Babu, V.; Badhrees, I.; Bakich, A. M.; Barberio, E.; Behera, P.; Bhuyan, B.; Biswal, J.; Bobrov, A.; Bonvicini, G.; Bozek, A.; Bračko, M.; Browder, T. E.; Červenkov, D.; Chekelian, V.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Chistov, R.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, S.-K.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, D.; Dalseno, J.; Danilov, M.; Dash, N.; Dingfelder, J.; Doležal, Z.; Drásal, Z.; Dutta, D.; Eidelman, S.; Epifanov, D.; Farhat, H.; Fast, J. E.; Ferber, T.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gaur, V.; Gabyshev, N.; Garmash, A.; Gillard, R.; Giordano, F.; Glattauer, R.; Goh, Y. M.; Goldenzweig, P.; Golob, B.; Haba, J.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; He, X. H.; Hou, W.-S.; Iijima, T.; Inami, K.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jaegle, I.; Joffe, D.; Joo, K. K.; Julius, T.; Kang, K. H.; Kato, E.; Kawasaki, T.; Kim, D. Y.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Ko, B. R.; Korpar, S.; Križan, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kumita, T.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lange, J. S.; Lee, D. H.; Lee, I. S.; Li, C.; Li, L.; Li, Y.; Libby, J.; Liventsev, D.; Lukin, P.; Matvienko, D.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Mohanty, S.; Moll, A.; Moon, H. K.; Mori, T.; Mussa, R.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nanut, T.; Natkaniec, Z.; Nayak, M.; Nisar, N. K.; Nishida, S.; Ogawa, S.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Pal, B.; Park, C. W.; Park, H.; Pedlar, T. K.; Pestotnik, R.; Petrič, M.; Piilonen, L. E.; Rauch, J.; Ribežl, E.; Ritter, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Sandilya, S.; Santelj, L.; Sanuki, T.; Sato, Y.; Savinov, V.; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Seino, Y.; Senyo, K.; Seon, O.; Sevior, M. E.; Shebalin, V.; Shen, C. P.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shiu, J.-G.; Shwartz, B.; Simon, F.; Sohn, Y.-S.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Starič, M.; Sumihama, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tamponi, U.; Tanida, K.; Teramoto, Y.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Van Hulse, C.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, G.; Vinokurova, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Vossen, A.; Wagner, M. N.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M.-Z.; Wang, P.; Williams, K. M.; Won, E.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamashita, Y.; Yashchenko, S.; Ye, H.; Yusa, Y.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Zupanc, A.; Belle Collaboration

    2016-02-01

    We report a measurement of the differential cross section of π0 pair production in single-tag two-photon collisions, γ*γ →π0π0, in e+e- scattering. The cross section is measured for Q2 up to 30 GeV2, where Q2 is the negative of the invariant mass squared of the tagged photon, in the kinematic range 0.5 GeV

  4. Photon-induced Fission Product Yield Measurements on 235U, 238U, and 239Pu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishichayan, Fnu; Bhike, M.; Tonchev, A. P.; Tornow, W.

    2015-10-01

    During the past three years, a TUNL-LANL-LLNL collaboration has provided data on the fission product yields (FPYs) from quasi-monoenergetic neutron-induced fission of 235U, 238U, and 239Pu at TUNL in the 0.5 to 15 MeV energy range. Recently, we have extended these experiments to photo-fission. We measured the yields of fission fragments ranging from 85Kr to 147Nd from the photo-fission of 235U, 238U, and 239Pu using 13-MeV mono-energetic photon beams at the HIGS facility at TUNL. First of its kind, this measurement will provide a unique platform to explore the effect of the incoming probe on the FPYs, i.e., photons vs. neutrons. A dual-fission ionization chamber was used to determine the number of fissions in the targets and these samples (along with Au monitor foils) were gamma-ray counted in the low-background counting facility at TUNL. Details of the experimental set-up and results will be presented and compared to the FPYs obtained from neutron-induced fission at the same excitation energy of the compound nucleus. Work supported in part by the NNSA-SSAA Grant No. DE-NA0001838.

  5. Hard processes in hadronic interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Satz, H. |; Wang, X.N.

    1995-07-01

    Quantum chromodynamics is today accepted as the fundamental theory of strong interactions, even though most hadronic collisions lead to final states for which quantitative QCD predictions are still lacking. It therefore seems worthwhile to take stock of where we stand today and to what extent the presently available data on hard processes in hadronic collisions can be accounted for in terms of QCD. This is one reason for this work. The second reason - and in fact its original trigger - is the search for the quark-gluon plasma in high energy nuclear collisions. The hard processes to be considered here are the production of prompt photons, Drell-Yan dileptons, open charm, quarkonium states, and hard jets. For each of these, we discuss the present theoretical understanding, compare the resulting predictions to available data, and then show what behaviour it leads to at RHIC and LHC energies. All of these processes have the structure mentioned above: they contain a hard partonic interaction, calculable perturbatively, but also the non-perturbative parton distribution within a hadron. These parton distributions, however, can be studied theoretically in terms of counting rule arguments, and they can be checked independently by measurements of the parton structure functions in deep inelastic lepton-hadron scattering. The present volume is the work of Hard Probe Collaboration, a group of theorists who are interested in the problem and were willing to dedicate a considerable amount of their time and work on it. The necessary preparation, planning and coordination of the project were carried out in two workshops of two weeks` duration each, in February 1994 at CERn in Geneva andin July 1994 at LBL in Berkeley.

  6. Hard processes in hadronic interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Satz, H. |; Wang, X.N.

    1995-07-01

    Quantum chromodynamics is today accepted as the fundamental theory of strong interactions, even though most hadronic collisions lead to final states for which quantitative QCD predictions are still lacking. It therefore seems worthwhile to take stock of where we stand today and to what extent the presently available data on hard processes in hadronic collisions can be accounted for in terms of QCD. This is one reason for this work. The second reason--and in fact its original trigger--is the search for the quark-gluon plasma in high energy nuclear collisions. The hard processes to be considered here are the production of prompt photons, Drell-Yan dileptons, open charm, quarkonium states, and hard jets. For each of these, the authors discuss the present theoretical understanding, compare the resulting predictions to available data, and then show what behavior it leads to at RHIC and LHC energies. All of these processes have the structure mentioned above: they contain a hard partonic interaction, calculable perturbatively, but also the non-perturbative parton distribution within a hadron. These parton distributions, however, can be studied theoretically in terms of counting rule arguments, and they can be checked independently by measurements of the parton structure functions in deep inelastic lepton-hadron scattering. The present volume is the work of Hard Probe Collaboration, a group of theorists who are interested in the problem and were willing to dedicate a considerable amount of their time to work on it. The necessary preparation, planning and coordination of the project were carried out in two workshops of two weeks` duration each, in February 1994 at CERN in Geneva and in July 1994 at LBL in Berkeley. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  7. Photon initiated single top quark production via flavor-changing neutral currents at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldouzian, Reza; Clerbaux, Barbara

    2017-03-01

    Single top quark production is a powerful process to search for new physics signs. In this work we propose and investigate a search for top quark flavor-changing neutral currents (FCNCs) via a photon using direct single top quark production events in proton-proton collisions at the LHC at CERN. We show that the direct single top quark final state can provide constraints on the strengths of top-quark-γ and top-quark-gluon FCNC couplings simultaneously. Results of a search for direct single top quark production at the LHC at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV performed by the ATLAS Collaboration are used to set first experimental limits on the anomalous FCNC top decay branching fractions B (t →u γ )<0.05 % and B (t →c γ )<0.14 % via direct single top quark production. Finally, the sensitivity of the proposed channel for probing the top-quark-γ couplings at 13 TeV is presented.

  8. Two-photon polymerization as a structuring technology in production: future or fiction?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harnisch, Emely Marie; Schmitt, Robert

    2017-02-01

    Two-photon polymerization (TPP) has become an established generative fabrication technique for individual, up to three-dimensional micro- and nanostructures. Due to its high resolution beyond the diffraction limit, its writing speed is limited and in most cases, very special structures are fabricated in small quantities. With regard to the trends of the optical market towards higher efficiencies, miniaturization and higher functionalities, there is a high demand for so called intelligent light management systems, including also individual optical elements. Here, TPP could offer a fabrication technique, enabling higher complexities of structures than conventional cutting and lithographic technologies do. But how can TPP opened up for production? In the following, some approaches to establish TPP as a mastering technique for molding are presented against this background.

  9. Direct Photon Production at Next-to-Next-to-Leading Order

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, John M.; Ellis, R. Keith; Williams, Ciaran

    2016-12-13

    We present the first calculation of direct photon production at next-to-next-to leading order (NNLO) accuracy in QCD. For this process, although the final state cuts mandate only the presence of a single electroweak boson, the underlying kinematics resembles that of a generic vector boson plus jet topology. In order to regulate the infrared singularities present at this order we use the $N$-jettiness slicing procedure, applied for the first time to a final state that at Born level includes colored partons but no required jet. We compare our predictions to ATLAS 8 TeV data and find that the inclusion of the NNLO terms in the perturbative expansion, supplemented by electroweak corrections, provides an excellent description of the data with greatly reduced theoretical uncertainties.

  10. High Transverse Momentum Direct Photon Production at Fermilab Fixed-Target Energies

    SciTech Connect

    Apanasevich, Leonard

    2005-01-01

    This thesis describes a study of the production of high transverse momentum direct photons and π0 mesons by proton beams at 530 and 800 GeV/c and π- beams at 515 GeV/c incident on beryllium, copper, and liquid hydrogen targets. The data were collected by Fermilab experiment E706 during the 1990 and 1991-92 fixed target runs. The apparatus included a large, finely segmented lead and liquid argon electromagnetic calorimeter and a charged particle spectrometer featuring silicon strip detectors in the target region and proportional wire chambers and drift tubes downstream of a large aperture analysis magnet. The inclusive cross sections are presented as functions of transverse momentum and rapidity. The measurements are compared with next-to-leading order perturbative QCD calculations and to results from previous experiments.

  11. Direct Photon Production at Next-to-Next-to-Leading Order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, John M.; Ellis, R. Keith; Williams, Ciaran

    2017-06-01

    We present the first calculation of direct photon production at next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) accuracy in QCD. For this process, although the final-state cuts mandate only the presence of a single electroweak boson, the underlying kinematics resembles that of a generic vector boson plus jet topology. In order to regulate the infrared singularities present at this order, we use the N -jettiness slicing procedure, applied for the first time to a final state that at the Born level includes colored partons but no required jet. We compare our predictions to ATLAS 8 TeV data and find that the inclusion of the NNLO terms in the perturbative expansion, supplemented by electroweak corrections, provides an excellent description of the data with greatly reduced theoretical uncertainties.

  12. Prompt J /ψ production in association with a c c ¯ pair within the framework of nonrelativistic QCD via photon-photon collisions at the International Linear Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhan; Wu, Xing-Gang; Zhang, Hong-Fei

    2015-10-01

    We present a systematical study on the prompt J /ψ production in association with a c c ¯ pair via the process, γ γ →H (c c ¯)+c +c ¯, within the framework of nonrelativistic QCD at the future high-energy e+e- collider—International Linear Collider (ILC), including both direct and feed-down contributions. For direct J /ψ production, the states with color-octet channels, especially the P3 J[8] and S1 0[8] ones, provide a dominant contribution to the production cross section, which are about 52 times over that of the color-singlet one. This is clearly shown by the transverse momentum (pt) and rapidity distributions. The feed-down contribution from ψ' and χc J (J =0 , 1, 2) is sizable, which is about 20% to the total prompt cross section. Besides the yields, we also calculate the J /ψ polarization parameter λ . In the small pt region, the polarization of the prompt J /ψ is longitudinal due to large contributions through the P3 J[8] channel, and becomes transverse in the high pt region due to the S3 1[8] channel. Thus the J /ψ production via photon-photon collisions at the ILC shall provide a useful platform for testing the color-octet mechanism.

  13. In Situ Production of Hard Metal Matrix Composite Coating on Engineered Surfaces Using Laser Cladding Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raza, Mohammad Shahid; Hussain, Manowar; Kumar, Vikash; Das, Alok Kumar

    2016-11-01

    The growing need for high wear-resistant surface with enhanced physical properties has led to extensive researches in the field of surface engineering. Laser cladding emerged to be a promising method to achieve these objectives in a cost-effective way. The present paper studies the viability of cladding of tungsten disulfide (WS2) powder by using 400 W continuous-wave fiber laser. WS2 was used as a coating material, which was decomposed at higher temperature and underwent several chemical reactions. By this process, in situ formation of metal matrix composites and hard face coating on the substrate surface were attained. The characterization of laser cladded surface was done to study its morphological, microstructural, mechanical and tribological properties. It was observed that cladding of WS2 powder on 304 SS resulted in the formation of Cr-W-C-Fe metal matrix composite having improved mechanical and tribological properties. The value of microhardness of the coated surface was found to increase three to four times in comparison with the parent material surface. Wear test results indicated a decrease in wear by 1/9th (maximum) as compared to the parent 304 SS surface. The volume fractions of tungsten particles on the cladded surface were also investigated through EDS analysis.

  14. Cheese milk low homogenization enhanced early lipolysis and volatiles compounds production in hard cooked cheeses.

    PubMed

    Vélez, María A; Hynes, Erica R; Meinardi, Carlos A; Wolf, Verónica I; Perotti, María C

    2017-06-01

    Homogenization applied to cheese milk has shown to increase lipolysis but its use is not spread as it can induce detrimental effects. The aim of this work was to assess the effect of low-pressure homogenization of the cream followed by pre-incubation of cheese milk on the composition, ripening index, lipolysis and volatile profiles of hard cooked cheeses. For that, control and experimental miniature Reggianito cheeses were made and analyzed during ripening (3, 45 and 90days). Homogenization had no impact on composition and proteolysis. An acceleration of the lipolysis reaction was clearly noticed in cheeses made with homogenized milk at the beginning of ripening, while both type of cheeses reached similar levels at 90days. We found the level of several compounds derived from fatty acid catabolism were noticeably influenced by the treatment applied: straight-chain aldehydes such as hexanal, heptanal and nonanal and methylketones from C5 to C9 were preferentially formed in experimental cheeses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. In Situ Production of Hard Metal Matrix Composite Coating on Engineered Surfaces Using Laser Cladding Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raza, Mohammad Shahid; Hussain, Manowar; Kumar, Vikash; Das, Alok Kumar

    2017-01-01

    The growing need for high wear-resistant surface with enhanced physical properties has led to extensive researches in the field of surface engineering. Laser cladding emerged to be a promising method to achieve these objectives in a cost-effective way. The present paper studies the viability of cladding of tungsten disulfide (WS2) powder by using 400 W continuous-wave fiber laser. WS2 was used as a coating material, which was decomposed at higher temperature and underwent several chemical reactions. By this process, in situ formation of metal matrix composites and hard face coating on the substrate surface were attained. The characterization of laser cladded surface was done to study its morphological, microstructural, mechanical and tribological properties. It was observed that cladding of WS2 powder on 304 SS resulted in the formation of Cr-W-C-Fe metal matrix composite having improved mechanical and tribological properties. The value of microhardness of the coated surface was found to increase three to four times in comparison with the parent material surface. Wear test results indicated a decrease in wear by 1/9th (maximum) as compared to the parent 304 SS surface. The volume fractions of tungsten particles on the cladded surface were also investigated through EDS analysis.

  16. The effect of neutron skin on inclusive prompt photon production in Pb + Pb collisions at Large Hadron Collider energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De, Somnath

    2017-04-01

    Recent experiments on lead ({{{Pb}}}82208) nuclei have observed the celebrated phenomenon of the neutron skin thickness of low energy nuclear physics. Skin thickness provides a measure of the extension of the spatial distribution of neutrons inside the atomic nucleus than protons. We have studied the effect of neutron skin thickness on inclusive prompt photon production in Pb + Pb collisions at Large Hadron Collider energies. We have calculated the ‘central-to-peripheral ratio’ ({R}{cp}) of prompt photon production with and without accounting for the neutron skin effect. The neutron skin causes a characteristic enhancement of the ratio, in particular at forward rapidity, which is distinguishable in our calculation. However, a very precise direct photon measurement up to large transverse momenta would be necessary to constrain the feature in experiment.

  17. Double parton scattering in the color glass condensate: Hanbury-Brown-Twiss correlations in double inclusive photon production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovner, Alex; Rezaeian, Amir H.

    2017-06-01

    We introduce a technique to study double parton scattering (DPS) in the color-glass-condensate (CGC) approach. We show that the cross section of the DPS in the CGC approach is calculable in terms of new nonperturbative objects, generalized double transverse momentum-dependent parton distribution (2GTMD) functions. We investigate the production of pairs of prompt photons from two partons in the projectile hadron in high-energy proton-nucleus collisions. We show that even for independent partons in the projectile, the prompt photon correlation function exhibits Hanbury Brown and Twiss (HBT) correlations. The width of the HBT peak is controlled by the transverse distance between the partons of the pair, which is of the order of the proton size. Thus, the HBT measurements in two-particle production such as prompt photon pairs provide useful information about the nonperturbative 2GTMDs.

  18. Effect of five different dental products on surface hardness of enamel exposed to chlorinated water in vitro.

    PubMed

    Rirattanapong, Praphasri; Vongsavan, Kadkao; Tepvichaisillapakul, Mullika

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the effect of five different dental products on surface microhardness of enamel exposed to chlorinated water in vitro. Sixty human sound premolar teeth, extracted for orthodontic reasons, were used and randomly divided into 6 groups (10 specimens each group: artificial saliva, 1,000 ppm fluoride toothpaste, CPP-ACP paste, CPP-ACP with 900 ppm fluoride paste, CPP toothpaste and tricalcium phosphate with 950 ppm fluoride paste. All specimens were immersed in chlorinated water at pH 5 for 24 hours and then remineralized by coating with a dental product from each group for 5 minutes and kept in artificial saliva at 37 degrees C for 6 hours. The surface microhardness of the enamel was measured with a Vickers hardness tester at baseline, after erosion by chlorinated water and after remineralization. Comparisons of the mean microhardness within each group were made a one-way repeated measures ANOVA and between groups using a one-way ANOVA and an LSD test at p < 0.05. The mean surface microhardness in all groups decreased significantly after eroding with chlorinated water and increased after remineralization. After remineralization, the mean surface microhardness of the artificial saliva group was significantly less than the other groups. Five different dental products (1,000 ppm fluoride toothpaste, CPP-ACP paste, CPP-ACP with 900 ppm fluoride paste, CPP toothpaste and tricalcium phosphate with 950 ppm fluoride paste) increased the hardness in vitro of eroded enamel caused by chlorinated water.

  19. Measurement of Production Cross Section Times Branching Ratio for W Boson + Photon and Z Boson + Photon and Search for Anomalous W Boson-Photon and Z Boson-Photon Couplings at 1.8 Tev

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vondracek, Mark Frank

    Measurements of the production cross section times branching ratio for W + gamma and Z + gamma processes, where the W decays into a muon and neutrino and the Z decays into a muon pair, have been made from the analysis of 18.6 +/- 0.7 pb^{-1} of high-P_{T} muon data from proton-antiproton (pp) collisions. The data were collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) during the 1992-93 run. In a search for central photons (|eta| < 1.1) with transverse energy above 7 GeV and angular separation from the muon by at least Delta R = 0.7 we find 7 Wgamma and 4 Z gamma candidates. This translates into cross section times branching ratios of 9.0 +/- 6.4 pb for the Wgamma process and 6.6 +/- 3.4 pb for the Z gamma process. Separate measurements were made for photon E_{T} values above 11 GeV and 15 GeV. The cross section times branching ratio results were used to calculate a series of cross section ratios. An analysis designed to search for anomalous couplings between the gauge bosons was also carried out using these results. Assuming only one anomalous coupling to be non-zero at a time, the 95% CL limits on Wgamma anomalous couplings are, -3.7 < Deltakappa < 3.7, -1.2 < lambda < 1.2, -3.8 < ~kappa < 3.8 and -1.2 < ~lambda < 1.2. For ZZgamma anomalous couplings the experimental limits are measured to be, at the 95% CL, -4.6 < h_sp{30}{Z}(h _sp{10}{Z}) < 4.6 and -1.1 < h_sp{40}{Z}(h _sp{20}{Z}) < 1.1. For Zgammagamma anomalous couplings the experimental limits are measured to be, at, the 95% CL, -4.9 < h_sp{30}{gamma }(h_sp{10}{gamma}) < 4.9 and -1.2 < h_sp{40} {gamma}(h_sp{20}{ gamma}) < 1.2. Limits are placed on electromagnetic multipole moments for both the W and Z bosons using the measured limits of the anomalous couplings, and are presented in this thesis. All of the measurements presented in this thesis are consistent with Standard Model expectations.

  20. On the nature of the Fe-bearing particles influencing hard anodizing behavior of AA 7075 extrusion products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, A. K.

    1998-03-01

    The deleterious effects of Fe-bearing constituent particles on the fracture toughness of wrought A1 alloys have been known. Recent studies have shown that the presence of Fe-bearing, constituent particles is also determental to the nature and growth of the hard anodic oxide coating formed on such materials. The present study, using a combination of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), was made to examine the influence of the nature of the Fe-bearing particles on the hard anodizing behavior of AA 7075 extrusion products containing varying amounts of Si, Mn, and Fe impurities. It was found that, in the alloy containing 0.25 wt pct Si, 0.27 wt pct Mn, and 0.25 wt pct Fe, the Fe-bearing constituent particles are based on the Al12(FeMn)3Si phase (bcc with α=1.260 nm). These particles survive the hard anodizing treatment, add resistance to the electrical path, causing a rapid rise in the bath voltage with time, and cause a nonuniform growth of the anodic oxide film. In the materials containing 0.05 wt pct Si, 0.04 wt pct Mn, and 0.18 wt pct Fe, on the other hand, the formation of the Al12(FeMn)3Si-based phase is suppressed, and two different Fe-bearing phases, based on Al-Fe-Cu-Mn-based (simple cubic with a=1.265 nm) and Al7Cu2Fe, respectively form. Neither the Al-Fe-Cu-Mn-based phase nor the Al7Cu2Fe-based phase survive the hard anodizing treatment, and this results in a steady rise in the bath voltage with time and a relatively uniform growth of the anodic oxide film. Consideration of the size of the Fe-bearing, particles reveals that the smaller the particle, the more uniform the growth of the anodic oxide film.

  1. Tyramine production in Dutch-type semi-hard cheese from two different producers.

    PubMed

    Komprda, T; Burdychová, R; Dohnal, V; Cwiková, O; Sládková, P; Dvorácková, H

    2008-04-01

    Tyramine content and counts of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and enterococci were measured (including tyrosine-decarboxylase activity testing, and testing of the presence of the tyrosine-decarboxylase gene sequence, tyrdc, by PCR) during ripening (0, 26, 54, 88, 119, 146, and 176 days) in the core (C)- and edge (E)-samples of Dutch-type semi-hard cheese produced from pasteurized milk by two dairies (R, H) with two levels of fat content (30 and 45%) using two different starter cultures (Y, L), respectively. Tyramine content (y, mgkg(-1)) increased (P<0.001) with increasing time of ripening (x, days) in the cheeses of both producers (R: y=0.88x-31.4, R(2)=0.30; H: y=0.50x-6.3, R(2)=0.18), and its content was higher (P<0.01) in E-samples in comparison with C-samples. Time of ripening, part of the cheese and starter culture accounted for 67%, 28%, and 4% of explained variability of tyramine content in the cheese, respectively. After 26 days of ripening, using decarboxylase screening medium (DCM), tyrosine-decarboxylase positive LAB isolates constituted 7-27% and 6-32% of the square root of total countable colonies of LAB isolates of the producer R and H, respectively; tyrosine-decarboxylase positive enterococci were present only in R-cheeses (4-26% of the square root of total countable colonies). Tyrdc was confirmed only in 13% and 42% of the tyrosine-decarboxylase positive LAB and enterococci isolates, respectively (presumably due to the tendency of DCM to give false-positive results). Lactobacillus curvatus subsp. curvatus and Enterococcus durans, Enterococcus faecalis, and Enterococcus casseliflavus were identified as tyrdc-positive LAB and enterococci in the cheeses, respectively.

  2. Resonance formation in photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Gidal, G.

    1988-08-01

    Recent experimental progress on resonance formation in photon-photon collisions is reviewed with particular emphasis on the pseudoscalar and tensor nonents and on the ..gamma gamma..* production of spin-one resonances. 37 refs., 17 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. Scale-up of thermally dried kefir production as starter culture for hard-type cheese making: an economic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Koutinas, Athanasios A; Bekatorou, Argyro; Katechaki, Eleftheria; Dimitrellou, Dimitra; Kopsahelis, Nikolaos; Papapostolou, Harris; Panas, Panayiotis; Sideris, Kostas; Kallis, Mihalis; Bosnea, Loulouda A; Koliopoulos, Dionisis; Sotiropoulos, Panayiotis; Panteli, Ageliki; Kourkoutas, Yiannis; Kanellaki, Maria; Soupioni, Magdalini

    2010-03-01

    This paper concerns the effect of thermal-drying methodology on the investment cost for dried kefir cells production in order to be used as starter culture in cheese manufacturing. Kefir cells were produced at pilot plant scale using a 250-L bioreactor and whey as the main substrate. Kefir cells were subsequently dried in a thermal dryer at 38 degrees C and used as a starter culture in industrial-scale production of hard-type cheeses. The use of thermally dried kefir as starter culture accelerated ripening of cheeses by increasing both lipolysis and fermentation rate as indicated by the ethanol, lactic acid, and glycerol formation. Additionally, it reduced coliforms and enterobacteria as ripening proceeded. This constituted the basis of developing an economic study in which industrial-scale production of thermally dried kefir starter culture is discussed. The industrial design involved a three-step process using three bioreactors of 100, 3,000, and 30,000 L for a plant capacity of 300 kg of thermally dried kefir culture per day. The cost of investment was estimated at 238,000 euro, which is the 46% of the corresponding cost using freeze-drying methodology. Production cost was estimated at 4.9 euro/kg of kefir biomass for a 300-kg/day plant capacity, which is the same as with the corresponding cost of freeze-dried cells. However, the estimated added value is up to 10.8 x 10(9) euro within the European Union.

  4. High-statistics study of K0S pair production in two-photon collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uehara, S.; Watanabe, Y.; Nakazawa, H.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Asner, D. M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Bala, A.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bhuyan, B.; Bondar, A.; Bonvicini, G.; Bozek, A.; Bračko, M.; Chekelian, V.; Chen, A.; Chen, P.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Chistov, R.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, S.-K.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, D.; Dalseno, J.; Dingfelder, J.; Doležal, Z.; Dutta, D.; Eidelman, S.; Epifanov, D.; Farhat, H.; Fast, J. E.; Feindt, M.; Ferber, T.; Frey, A.; Gaur, V.; Gabyshev, N.; Ganguly, S.; Gillard, R.; Giordano, F.; Goh, Y. M.; Golob, B.; Haba, J.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; Hoshi, Y.; Hou, W.-S.; Hyun, H. J.; Iijima, T.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Julius, T.; Kah, D. H.; Kang, J. H.; Kato, E.; Kawai, H.; Kawasaki, T.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, D. Y.; Kim, H. O.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Klucar, J.; Ko, B. R.; Kodyš, P.; Korpar, S.; Križan, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kumita, T.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lee, S.-H.; Li, J.; Li, Y.; Liu, C.; Liu, Z. Q.; Liventsev, D.; Lukin, P.; Matvienko, D.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Moll, A.; Mori, T.; Muramatsu, N.; Mussa, R.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nakao, M.; Ng, C.; Nisar, K. N.; Nishida, S.; Nitoh, O.; Ogawa, S.; Okuno, S.; Pakhlova, G.; Park, C. W.; Park, H.; Park, H. K.; Pedlar, T. K.; Pestotnik, R.; Petrič, M.; Piilonen, L. E.; Ritter, M.; Röhrken, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Sahoo, H.; Saito, T.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, S.; Santelj, L.; Sanuki, T.; Savinov, V.; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Seidl, R.; Senyo, K.; Seon, O.; Shapkin, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shiu, J.-G.; Shwartz, B.; Sibidanov, A.; Simon, F.; Sohn, Y.-S.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Starič, M.; Steder, M.; Sumihama, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tamponi, U.; Tanida, K.; Tatishvili, G.; Teramoto, Y.; Uchida, M.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Urquijo, P.; Vahsen, S. E.; Van Hulse, C.; Varner, G.; Wagner, M. N.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M.-Z.; Wang, P.; Wang, X. L.; Williams, K. M.; Won, E.; Yamashita, Y.; Yashchenko, S.; Yook, Y.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yusa, Y.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Zupanc, A.

    2013-12-01

    We report a high-statistics measurement of the differential cross section of the process γ γ to K^0_S K^0_S in the range 1.05 {GeV} ≤ W ≤ 4.00 GeV, where W is the center-of-mass energy of the colliding photons, using 972 fb^{-1} of data collected with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e^+ e^- collider operated at and near the Upsilon -resonance region. The differential cross section is fitted by parameterized S-, D_0-, D_2-, G_0-, and G_2-wave amplitudes. In the D_2 wave, the f_2(1270), a_2(1320), and f_2'(1525) are dominant and a resonance, the f_2(2200), is also present. The f_0(1710) and possibly the f_0(2500) are seen in the S wave. The mass, total width, and product of the two-photon partial decay width and decay branching fraction to the K bar {K} state Γ _{γ γ }mathcal {B}(K bar {K}) are extracted for the f_2'(1525), f_0(1710), f_2(2200), and f_0(2500). The destructive interference between the f_2(1270) and a_2(1320) is confirmed by measuring their relative phase. The parameters of the charmonium states χ _{c0} and χ _{c2} are updated. Possible contributions from the χ _{c0}(2P) and χ _{c2}(2P) states are discussed. A new upper limit for the branching fraction of the P- and CP-violating decay channel η _c to K^0_S K^0_S is reported. The detailed behavior of the cross section is updated and compared with QCD-based calculations.

  5. Noninvasive multi–photon fluorescence microscopy resolves retinol and retinal–condensation products in mouse eyes

    PubMed Central

    Palczewska, Grazyna; Maeda, Tadao; Imanishi, Yoshikazu; Sun, Wenyu; Chen, Yu; Williams, David R.; Piston, David; Maeda, Akiko; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2010-01-01

    Multi–photon excitation fluorescence microscopy (MPM) can image certain molecular processes in vivo. In the eye, fluorescent retinyl esters in sub–cellular structures called retinosomes mediate regeneration of the visual chromophore, 11–cis–retinal, by the visual cycle. But harmful fluorescent condensation products were also identified previously. We report that in wild type mice, excitation with λ ~730 nm identified retinosomes in the retinal pigment epithelium, whereas excitation with λ ~910 nm revealed at least one additional retinal fluorophore. The latter fluorescence was absent in eyes of genetically modified mice lacking a functional visual cycle, but accentuated in eyes of older WT mice and mice with defective clearance of all–trans–retinal, an intermediate in the visual cycle. MPM, a noninvasive imaging modality that facilitates concurrent monitoring of retinosomes along with potentially harmful products in aging eyes, has the potential to detect early molecular changes due to age–related macular degeneration and other defects in retinoid metabolism. PMID:21076393

  6. Vacuum ultraviolet photon-mediated production of [(18) F]F2.

    PubMed

    Krzyczmonik, Anna; Keller, Thomas; Kirjavainen, Anna K; Forsback, Sarita; Solin, Olof

    2017-04-01

    The chemistry of F2 and its derivatives are amenable to facile aliphatic or aromatic substitution, as well as electrophilic addition. The main limitation in the use of [(18) F]F2 for radiopharmaceutical synthesis is the low specific activity achieved by the traditional methods of production. The highest specific activities, 55 GBq/μmol, for [(18) F]F2 have been achieved so far by using electrical discharge in the post-target production of [(18) F]F2 gas from [(18) F]CH3 F. We demonstrate that [(18) F]F2 is produced by illuminating a gas mixture of neon/F2 /[(18) F]CH3 F with vacuum ultraviolet photons generated by an excimer laser. We tested several illumination chambers and production conditions. The effects of the initial amount of [(18) F]F(-) , amount of carrier F2 , and number of 193-nm laser pulses at constant power were evaluated regarding radiochemical yield and specific activity. The specific activity attained for [(18) F]F2 -derived [(18) F]NFSi was 10.3 ± 0.9 GBq/μmol, and the average radiochemical yield over a wide range of conditions was 6.7% from [(18) F]F(-) . The production can be improved by optimization of the synthesis device and procedures. The use of a commercially available excimer laser and the simplicity of the process can make this method relatively easy for adaptation in radiochemistry laboratories.

  7. Dual topological unitarization of hard and soft hadronic cross sections: A new approach to multiparticle production at hadron colliders in the TeV energy range

    SciTech Connect

    Ranft, J.; Hahn, K. . SSC Central Design Group); Aurenche, P.; Maire, P. . Lab. de Physique des Particules Elementaires); Bopp, F. . Fachbereich Physik); Capella, A.; Tran Thanh Van, J. . Lab. de Physique Theorique et Particules Elementaires); Kwi

    1987-12-01

    The dual topological unitarization of hard and soft hadronic collisions is formulated as a Monte-Carlo event generator for events containing both the soft (low p{perpendicular}) and hard (jets, minijets) component of hadron production. The parameters of the model are determined from fits to the energy dependence of the total and inelastic hadron cross-sections and from the predictions of the QCD-parton model for the perturbative hard constituent scattering cross sections. The properties of the model are studied. Good agreement of the model predictions is found with data at present accelerator and collider energies. The predictions of the model for TeV colliders are presented. Interesting changes of the produced multiparticle system are formed when selecting classes of events with and without hard jets or minijets. 35 refs., 22 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Soft X-Ray Irradiation of Methanol Ice: Formation of Products as a Function of Photon Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.-J.; Ciaravella, A.; Muñoz Caro, G. M.; Cecchi-Pestellini, C.; Jiménez-Escobar, A.; Juang, K.-J.; Yih, T.-S.

    2013-12-01

    Pure methanol ices have been irradiated with monochromatic soft X-rays of 300 and 550 eV close to the 1s resonance edges of C and O, respectively, and with a broadband spectrum (250-1200 eV). The infrared (IR) spectra of the irradiated ices show several new products of astrophysical interest such as CH2OH, H2CO, CH4, HCOOH, HCOCH2OH, CH3COOH, CH3OCH3, HCOOCH3, and (CH2OH)2, as well as HCO, CO, and CO2. The effect of X-rays is the result of the combined interactions of photons and electrons with the ice. A significant contribution to the formation and growth of new species in the CH3OH ice irradiated with X-rays is given by secondary electrons, whose energy distribution depends on the energy of X-ray photons. Within a single experiment, the abundances of the new products increase with the absorbed energy. Monochromatic experiments show that product abundances also increase with the photon energy. However, the abundances per unit energy of newly formed species show a marked decrease in the broadband experiment as compared to irradiations with monochromatic photons, suggesting a possible regulatory role of the energy deposition rate. The number of new molecules produced per absorbed eV in the X-ray experiments has been compared to those obtained with electron and ultraviolet (UV) irradiation experiments.

  9. Probing the neutron-skin thickness by photon production from reactions induced by intermediate-energy protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Gao-Feng

    2015-07-01

    The photon from neutron-proton bremsstrahlung in p +Pb reactions is examined as a potential probe of the neutron-skin thickness in different centralities and at different proton incident energies. It is shown that the best choice of reaction environment is about 140 MeV for the incident proton and the 95%-100% centrality for the reaction system since the incident proton mainly interacts with neutrons inside the skin of the target and thus leads to different photon production to a maximal extent. Moreover, considering two main uncertainties from both photon production probability and nucleon-nucleon cross section in the reaction, I propose to use the ratio of photon production from two reactions to measure the neutron-skin thickness because of its cancellation effects on these uncertainties simultaneously, but preserved about 13%-15% sensitivities on the varied neutron-skin thickness from 0.1 to 0.3 fm within the current experimental uncertainty range of the neutron-skin size in 208Pb.

  10. Cross-linking of wheat gluten proteins during production of hard pretzels.

    PubMed

    Rombouts, Ine; Lagrain, Bert; Brijs, Kristof; Delcour, Jan A

    2012-06-01

    The impact of the hot alkaline dip, prior to pretzel-baking, on the types and levels of cross-links between wheat proteins was studied. Protein extractability of pretzel dough in sodium dodecyl sulfate containing buffer decreased during alkaline dipping [45 s, 1.0% (w/v) NaOH, 90°C], and even more during baking (3 min at 250°C) and drying (10 min at 135°C). Reducing agent increased the extractability partly, indicating that both reducible (disulfide, SS) and non-reducible (non-SS) protein cross-links had been formed. The decrease in cystine levels suggested β-elimination of cystine releasing Cys and dehydroalanine (DHA). Subsequent reaction of DHA with Lys and Cys, induced the unusual and potentially cross-linking amino acids lysinoalanine (LAL) and lanthionine (LAN), respectively, in alkaline dipped dough (7 μmol LAN/g protein) and in the end product (9 μmol LAL and 50 μmol LAN/g protein). The baking/drying step increased sample redness, decreased Lys levels more than expected based on LAL formation (57 μmol/g protein), and induced a loss of reducing sugars (99 μmol/g protein), which suggested the potential contribution of Maillard-derived cross-links to the observed extractability loss. However, levels of Maillard products which possibly cross-link proteins, are small compared to DHA-derived cross-links. Higher dipping temperatures, longer dipping times, and higher NaOH concentrations increased protein extractability losses and redness, as well as LAL and LAN levels in the end product. No indications for Maillard-derived cross-links or LAL in pretzel dough immediately after dipping were found, even when severe dipping conditions were used.

  11. Heavy ion precompound phenomena: A glance at hard gamma and subthreshold pion production

    SciTech Connect

    Blann, M.; Remington, B.A.

    1987-08-01

    We test a relaxation model based on two body nucleon-nucleon scattering processes to interpret phenomena observed in heavy ion reactions. We use the Boltzmann master equation to accomplish this. By assuming that the projectile nucleons share the total excitation with equal a-priori probability of all configurations, we are able to reproduce several sets of neutron spectra from /sup 20/Ne and /sup 12/C induced reactions on /sup 165/Ho. With no additional free parameters our model successfully reproduces subthreshold pion production cross sections, high energy ..gamma..-ray spectra, and angular distributions of high energy ..gamma..-rays. 40 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Modelling gamma-ray photon emission and pair production in high-intensity laser–matter interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ridgers, C.P.; Kirk, J.G.; Duclous, R.; Blackburn, T.G.; Brady, C.S.; Bennett, K.; Arber, T.D.; Bell, A.R.

    2014-03-01

    In high-intensity (>10{sup 21} Wcm{sup −2}) laser–matter interactions gamma-ray photon emission by the electrons can strongly affect the electron's dynamics and copious numbers of electron–positron pairs can be produced by the emitted photons. We show how these processes can be included in simulations by coupling a Monte Carlo algorithm describing the emission to a particle-in-cell code. The Monte Carlo algorithm includes quantum corrections to the photon emission, which we show must be included if the pair production rate is to be correctly determined. The accuracy, convergence and energy conservation properties of the Monte Carlo algorithm are analysed in simple test problems.

  13. Measurement of the Differential Cross Section for Isolated Prompt Photon Production in pp Collisions at 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, S.; et al.,

    2011-09-01

    A measurement of the differential cross section for the inclusive production of isolated prompt photons in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV is presented. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 36 inverse picobarns recorded by the CMS detector at the LHC. The measurement covers the pseudorapidity range |eta|<2.5 and the transverse energy range 25 < ET < 400 GeV, corresponding to the kinematic region 0.007 < xT < 0.114. Photon candidates are identified with two complementary methods, one based on photon conversions in the silicon tracker and the other on isolated energy deposits in the electromagnetic calorimeter. The measured cross section is presented as a function of ET in four pseudorapidity regions. The next-to-leading-order perturbative QCD calculations are consistent with the measured cross section.

  14. Measurement of the Isolated Prompt Photon Production Cross Section in pp Collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.

    2011-02-01

    The differential cross section for the inclusive production of isolated prompt photons has been measured as a function of the photon transverse energy E_T-gamma in pp collisions at sqrt(s)=7 TeV using data recorded by the CMS detector at the LHC. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 2.9 inverse picobarns. Photons are required to have a pseudorapidity |eta_gamma|<1.45 and E_T-gamma > 21 GeV, covering the kinematic region 0.006 < x_T < 0.086. The measured cross section is found to be in agreement with next-to-leading-order perturbative QCD calculations.

  15. Electro-magnetic physics studies at RHIC: Neutral pion production, direct photon HBT, photon elliptic flow in gold-gold collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV and the Muon Telescope Detector simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Guoji

    Electro-magnetic (E&M) probes such as direct photons and muons (mu) are important tools to study the properties of the extremely hot and dense matter created in heavy ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). In this thesis, several topics of E&M physics will be addressed, including neutral pion (pi0) production, direct photon HBT, and photon elliptic flow (v2) in Au+Au collisions at sNN = 200 GeV. A discussion on the simulation study of the new Muon Telescope Detector (MTD) will also be presented. The pi0 production is a fundamental measurement of hadron production and prerequisite for the background study of direct photons. Neutral pions are reconstructed using the photons detected by the STAR Barrel Electro-magnetic Calorimeter (BEMC) and the Time Projection Chamber (TPC). Spectra of pi 0 are measured at transverse momentum 1 < pT < 12 GeV/c near mid-rapidity (0 < eta < 0.8) in 200 GeV Au+Au collisions. The spectra and nuclear modification factors RCP and RAA are compared to earlier pi+/- and pi0 results. Direct photon Hanbury-Brown and Twiss (HBT) correlations can reveal information of the system size throughout the whole collision. A first attempt of direct photon HBT study at RHIC in 200 GeV Au+Au collisions is done using photons detected by the STAR BEMC and TPC. All unknown correlation at small Qinv is observed, whose magnitude is much larger than the expected HBT signal, and possible causes of the correlation will be discussed. Direct photon elliptic flow (v2) at intermediate to high pT is sensitive to the source of direct photon production. Results of inclusive photon v2 in 200 GeV Au+Au collisions are presented. The v2 of pi0 decay photons is calculated from the previously published pi results. The comparison between inclusive and decay photon v 2 indicates that direct photon v2 is small. A new large-area Muon Telescope Detector at mid-rapidity at RHIC is proposed and under investigation, using the Long-strip Multi-Gap Resistive Plate

  16. Quasi-simultaneous acquisition of hard electron ionization and soft single-photon ionization mass spectra during GC/MS analysis by rapid switching between both ionization methods: analytical concept, setup, and application on diesel fuel.

    PubMed

    Eschner, Markus S; Gröger, Thomas M; Horvath, Thomas; Gonin, Marc; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2011-05-15

    This work describes the realization of rapid switching between hard electron ionization (EI) and soft single-photon ionization (SPI) integrated in a compact orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) photons of 9.8 eV (126 nm) emitted from the innovative electron-beam-pumped rare-gas excimer light source (EBEL) filled with argon are focused into the ion chamber by an ellipsoidal mirror optic for accomplishing of SPI. This novel orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight mass spectrometer with switching capability was hyphenated to one-dimensional gas chromatography (GC) and comprehensive two-dimensional (2D) gas chromatography (GC × GC) for the first time. Within this demonstration study, a maximum switching frequency of 80 Hz was applied for investigation of a mineral-oil-type diesel sample. This approach allows the quasi-simultaneous acquisition of complementary information about the fragmentation pattern (EI) as well as the molecular mass (SPI) of compounds within a single analysis. Furthermore, by application of a polar GC column for separation, the SPI data can be displayed in a 2D contour plot, leading to a comprehensive 2D characterization (GC × MS), whereas the typical group-type assignment for diesel is also met.

  17. Ten years of photonics education at the college level in Ontario: results and by-products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nantel, Marc

    2010-08-01

    In 2000, there was no way for an Ontario student to obtain a credential in optics, laser or photonics without going through graduate school. This was in, arguably, the world-leading jurisdiction in photonics-enabled telecommunications industry. To alleviate this problem and supply the job market with highly-qualified people in the field of optics and photonics, the Ontario Centres of Excellence - then as Photonics Research Ontario - partnered with Algonquin College (Ottawa) and Niagara College (Welland) to establish over the past decade a suite of programs: a 1-year Certificate in Advanced Lasers, a 2-year Diploma for Photonics Engineering Technician, a 3-year Diploma for Photonics Engineering Technologists and a 4-year Bachelor of Applied Technology - Photonics. Much has been learnt along the way - the crucial need for industrial partner and government support, for example - and many course corrections had to be made (telecom bust, anyone?). The author will share the results of this 10-year journey so far, the lessons learnt, and a view to the next ten years for these programs and photonics education in Ontario in general.

  18. Direct photon production in d+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adare, A.; Adler, S. S.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Al-Jamel, A.; Alexander, J.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aphecetche, L.; Aramaki, Y.; Armendariz, R.; Aronson, S. H.; Asai, J.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldisseri, A.; Barish, K. N.; Barnes, P. D.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Batsouli, S.; Baublis, V.; Bauer, F.; Baumann, C.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bhom, J. H.; Bickley, A. A.; Bjorndal, M. T.; Blau, D. S.; Boissevain, J. G.; Bok, J. S.; Borel, H.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Brown, D. S.; Bruner, N.; Bucher, D.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Burward-Hoy, J. M.; Butsyk, S.; Camacho, C. M.; Camard, X.; Campbell, S.; Caringi, A.; Chand, P.; Chang, B. S.; Chang, W. C.; Charvet, J.-L.; Chen, C.-H.; Chernichenko, S.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiba, J.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Churyn, A.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cobigo, Y.; Cole, B. A.; Comets, M. P.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M.; Constantin, P.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Cussonneau, J. P.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; David, G.; Dayananda, M. K.; Deák, F.; Delagrange, H.; Denisov, A.; d'Enterria, D.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Devismes, A.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Dietzsch, O.; Dion, A.; Donadelli, M.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Dubey, A. K.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; Dzhordzhadze, V.; D'Orazio, L.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Ellinghaus, F.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Espagnon, B.; Esumi, S.; Eyser, K. O.; Fadem, B.; Fields, D. E.; Finck, C.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fox, B. D.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fung, S.-Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Gadrat, S.; Garishvili, I.; Germain, M.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gonin, M.; Gosset, J.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grim, G.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Gustafsson, H.-Å.; Hachiya, T.; Hadj Henni, A.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Han, R.; Hanks, J.; Hansen, A. G.; Hartouni, E. P.; Haruna, K.; Harvey, M.; Haslum, E.; Hasuko, K.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Heuser, J. M.; Hidas, P.; Hiejima, H.; Hill, J. C.; Hobbs, R.; Hohlmann, M.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Hoover, A.; Horaguchi, T.; Hornback, D.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Iinuma, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Ikonnikov, V. V.; Imai, K.; Imrek, J.; Inaba, M.; Inuzuka, M.; Isenhower, D.; Isenhower, L.; Ishihara, M.; Isobe, T.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Ivanischev, D.; Iwanaga, Y.; Jacak, B. V.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Jin, J.; Jinnouchi, O.; Johnson, B. M.; Johnson, S. C.; Jones, T.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kamin, J.; Kaneta, M.; Kang, J. H.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kasai, M.; Katou, K.; Kawabata, T.; Kawall, D.; Kawashima, M.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kelly, S.; Kempel, T.; Khachaturov, B.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, A.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.; Kim, E.-J.; Kim, E. J.; Kim, G.-B.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y.-J.; Kinney, E.; Kiriluk, K.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Kiyomichi, A.; Klay, J.; Klein-Boesing, C.; Kleinjan, D.; Kobayashi, H.; Kochenda, L.; Kochetkov, V.; Kohara, R.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Kroon, P. J.; Kuberg, C. H.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Layton, D.; Lebedev, A.; Le Bornec, Y.; Leckey, S.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, T.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Lenzi, B.; Li, X.; Li, X. H.; Lichtenwalner, P.; Liebing, P.; Lim, H.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Love, B.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Malakhov, A.; Malik, M. D.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Martinez, G.; Mašek, L.; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; Matsumoto, T.; McCain, M. C.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; Means, N.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Mignerey, A. C.; Mikeš, P.; Miki, K.; Miller, T. E.; Milov, A.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, G. C.; Mishra, M.; Mitchell, J. T.; Mohanty, A. K.; Moon, H. J.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Moss, J. M.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Mukhopadhyay, D.; Muniruzzaman, M.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nam, S.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Nihashi, M.; Niida, T.; Nouicer, R.; Nyanin, A. S.; Nystrand, J.; Oakley, C.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Ohnishi, H.; Ojha, I. D.; Oka, M.; Okada, K.; Onuki, Y.; Oskarsson, A.; Otterlund, I.; Ouchida, M.; Oyama, K.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pal, D.; Palounek, A. P. T.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, I. H.; Park, J.; Park, S. K.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Pei, H.; Penev, V.; Peng, J.-C.; Pereira, H.; Peresedov, V.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Petti, R.; Pierson, A.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Purwar, A. K.; Qu, H.; Qualls, J. M.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Rembeczki, S.; Reuter, M.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Romana, A.; Rosati, M.; Rosen, C. A.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Rosnet, P.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Ružička, P.; Rykov, V. L.; Ryu, S. S.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakai, S.; Sakashita, K.; Samsonov, V.; Sanfratello, L.; Sano, S.; Santo, R.; Sato, H. D.; Sato, S.; Sato, T.; Sawada, S.; Schutz, Y.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Semenov, A. Yu.; Semenov, V.; Seto, R.; Sharma, D.; Shea, T. K.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Slunečka, M.; Soldatov, A.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Staley, F.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.; Ster, A.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Sukhanov, A.; Sullivan, J. P.; Sziklai, J.; Takagi, S.; Takagui, E. M.; Taketani, A.; Tanabe, R.; Tanaka, K. H.; Tanaka, Y.; Taneja, S.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tarján, P.; Themann, H.; Thomas, D.; Thomas, T. L.; Togawa, M.; Toia, A.; Tojo, J.; Tomášek, L.; Tomita, Y.; Torii, H.; Towell, R. S.; Tram, V.-N.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Tydesjö, H.; Tyurin, N.; Uam, T. J.; Vale, C.; Valle, H.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Velkovsky, M.; Vértesi, R.; Veszprémi, V.; Vinogradov, A. A.; Virius, M.; Volkov, M. A.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Wei, F.; Wei, R.; Wessels, J.; White, S. N.; Willis, N.; Winter, D.; Wohn, F. K.; Woody, C. L.; Wright, R. M.; Wysocki, M.; Xie, W.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yamaura, K.; Yang, R.; Yanovich, A.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; You, Z.; Young, G. R.; Younus, I.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zaudtke, O.; Zhang, C.; Zhou, S.; Zimányi, J.; Zolin, L.; Zong, X.

    2013-05-01

    Direct photons have been measured in sNN=200 GeV d+Au collisions at midrapidity. A wide pT range is covered by measurements of nearly real virtual photons (1photons (5photons in d+Au collisions over the scaled p+p cross section is consistent with unity. Theoretical calculations assuming standard cold-nuclear-matter effects describe the data well for the entire pT range. This indicates that the large enhancement of direct photons observed in Au+Au collisions for 1.0

  19. Two-photon polymerization for production of human iPSC-derived retinal cell grafts.

    PubMed

    Worthington, Kristan S; Wiley, Luke A; Kaalberg, Emily E; Collins, Malia M; Mullins, Robert F; Stone, Edwin M; Tucker, Budd A

    2017-03-25

    Recent advances in induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology have paved the way for the production of patient-specific neurons that are ideal for autologous cell replacement for treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. In the case of retinal degeneration and associated photoreceptor cell therapy, polymer scaffolds are critical for cellular survival and integration; however, prior attempts to materialize this concept have been unsuccessful in part due to the materials' inability to guide cell alignment. In this work, we used two-photon polymerization to create 180 μm wide non-degradable prototype photoreceptor scaffolds with varying pore sizes, slicing distances, hatching distances and hatching types. Hatching distance and hatching type were significant factors for the error of vertical pore diameter, while slicing distance and hatching type most affected the integrity and geometry of horizontal pores. We optimized printing parameters in terms of structural integrity and printing time in order to create 1 mm wide scaffolds for cell loading studies. We fabricated these larger structures directly on a porous membrane with 3 µm diameter pores and seeded them with human iPSC-derived retinal progenitor cells. After two days in culture, cells nested in and extended neuronal processes parallel to the vertical pores of the scaffolds, with maximum cell loading occurring in 25 μm diameter pores. These results highlight the feasibility of using this technique as part of an autologous stem cell strategy for restoring vision to patients affected with retinal degenerative diseases.

  20. Indirect dark matter signatures in the cosmic dark ages. II. Ionization, heating, and photon production from arbitrary energy injections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slatyer, Tracy R.

    2016-01-01

    Any injection of electromagnetically interacting particles during the cosmic dark ages will lead to increased ionization, heating, production of Lyman-α photons and distortions to the energy spectrum of the cosmic microwave background, with potentially observable consequences. In this paper we describe numerical results for the low-energy electrons and photons produced by the cooling of particles injected at energies from keV to multi-TeV scales, at arbitrary injection redshifts (but focusing on the post-recombination epoch). We use these data, combined with existing calculations modeling the cooling of these low-energy particles, to estimate the resulting contributions to ionization, excitation and heating of the gas, and production of low-energy photons below the threshold for excitation and ionization. We compute corrected deposition-efficiency curves for annihilating dark matter, and demonstrate how to compute equivalent curves for arbitrary energy-injection histories. These calculations provide the necessary inputs for the limits on dark matter annihilation presented in the accompanying paper I, but also have potential applications in the context of dark matter decay or deexcitation, decay of other metastable species, or similar energy injections from new physics. We make our full results publicly available at http://nebel.rc.fas.harvard.edu/epsilon, to facilitate further independent studies. In particular, we provide the full low-energy electron and photon spectra, to allow matching onto more detailed codes that describe the cooling of such particles at low energies.

  1. Fate of Listeria innocua during production and ripening of smeared hard cheese made from raw milk.

    PubMed

    Hammer, P; Bockelmann, W; Hoffmann, W

    2017-10-01

    The fate of 2 different Listeria innocua strains was analyzed during the production and ripening of smeared raw milk Greyerzer cheese (Gruyère). These strains were used as surrogates for the pathogenic Listeria monocytogenes, as they are physiologically very similar. Bacterial cells were added to the cheese milk at levels of 10(5) cfu/mL. During the first 24 h of cheese making, the number of the test strains decreased to a level of below 10(2) cfu/g. Obviously, the cooking temperature of 56°C and the subsequent slight temperature decrease to 50°C within 70 min contributed to a distinct reduction of Listeria counts. The counts in the cheese cores did not exceed 10(3) cfu/g within 12 wk of cheese ripening and Listeria was not detectable after 24 wk. In contrast to the cores of the cheeses of the 4 batches in this study, their rinds always contained a high listerial load of approximately 10(6) to 10(8) cfu/g throughout the entire ripening period. The smeared surface showed an increase of pH to alkaline values, corresponding to smear microbiota development. Coryneforms and Staphylococcus counts were stable at >10(7) cfu/cm(2) over 175 d, whereas yeast counts decreased to about 10(5) cfu/cm(2) at the end of ripening. The study shows that the smear culture had no noticeable anti-listerial potential. When removing the rind or portioning such smeared cheese loaves with a cutting device, a postprocess contamination of the core might occur, thus presenting a major hygienic risk. Copyright © 2017 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. New results for a photon-photon collider

    SciTech Connect

    David Asner et al.

    2002-09-26

    We present new results from studies in progress on physics at a two-photon collider. We report on the sensitivity to top squark parameters of MSSM Higgs boson production in two-photon collisions; Higgs boson decay to two photons; radion production in models of warped extra dimensions; chargino pair production; sensitivity to the trilinear Higgs boson coupling; charged Higgs boson pair production; and we discuss the backgrounds produced by resolved photon-photon interactions.

  3. New Results for a Photon-Photon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Asner, D; Grzadkowski, B; Gunion, J F; Logan, H E; Martin, V; Schmitt, M; Velasco, M M

    2002-08-23

    We present new results from studies in progress on physics at a two-photon collider. We report on the sensitivity to top squark parameters of MSSM Higgs boson production in two-photon collisions; Higgs boson decay to two photons; radion production in models of warped extra dimensions; chargino pair production; sensitivity to the trilinear Higgs boson coupling; charged Higgs boson pair production; and we discuss the backgrounds produced by resolved photon-photon interactions.

  4. Long-term monitoring of fleshy fruit and hard mast production and seasonal bird distribution at the Savannah River Site, South Carolina.

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, Cathryn, H.; Levey, Douglas J.

    2009-06-15

    A final report of Fruit and hard mast production in five habitat types at SRS with a comparison of fruit consumption by fledgling versus adult birds at SRS and Relative importance of fruit, seeds, and insects in the diets of overwintering birds at SRS.

  5. Co-Production Dynamics and Time Dollar Programs in Community-Based Child Welfare Initiatives for Hard-to-Serve Youth and Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks, Michael B.; Lawson, Hal A.

    2005-01-01

    Hard-to-serve youth and families residing in high-poverty communities often have multiple, interlocking needs. These needs necessitate complex service models. The complex model described in this article combines a unique approach to wraparound services with a co-production framework and related theories. The model aims to improve outcomes for…

  6. Recent advances and open questions in neutrino-induced quasi-elastic scattering and single photon production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garvey, G. T.; Harris, D. A.; Tanaka, H. A.; Tayloe, R.; Zeller, G. P.

    2015-06-01

    The study of neutrino-nucleus interactions has recently seen rapid development with a new generation of accelerator-based neutrino experiments employing medium and heavy nuclear targets for the study of neutrino oscillations. A few unexpected results in the study of quasi-elastic scattering and single photon production have spurred a revisiting of the underlying nuclear physics and connections to electron-nucleus scattering. A thorough understanding and resolution of these issues is essential for future progress in the study of neutrino oscillations. A recent workshop hosted by the Institute of Nuclear Theory at the University of Washington (INT-13-54W) examined experimental and theoretical developments in neutrino-nucleus interactions and related measurements from electron and pion scattering. We summarize the discussions at the workshop pertaining to the aforementioned issues in quasi-elastic scattering and single photon production, particularly where there was consensus on the highest priority issues to be resolved and the path towards resolving them.

  7. Two-photon processes of electron-positron pair production and annihilation. I. Kinematics and cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagirner, D. I.

    1999-01-01

    The kinematics of electron-positron pair production and annihilation, i.e., the determination and transformation of the momenta and energies of particles and photons upon the transition from an arbitrary reference frame to the center-of-mass frame of the particles and back, is analyzed in detail. It is found that the magnitudes of the particle momenta in certain directions in pair production may be ambiguous. An interpretation of this ambiguity and a way of circumventing it are given. Invariant quantities and the most convenient variables for calculating various integrals are found. Then the differential and total cross sections are given and the mean frequencies and dispersions of the frequencies of photons produced during annihilation are calculated.

  8. Study of π0 pair production in single-tag two-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Masuda, M.; Uehara, S.; Watanabe, Y.; Nakazawa, H.; Abdesselam, A.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Al Said, S.; Asner, D. M.; Atmacan, H.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Babu, V.; Badhrees, I.; Bakich, A. M.; Barberio, E.; Behera, P.; Bhuyan, B.; Biswal, J.; Bobrov, A.; Bonvicini, G.; Bozek, A.; Bračko, M.; Browder, T. E.; Červenkov, D.; Chekelian, V.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Chistov, R.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, S. -K.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, D.; Dalseno, J.; Danilov, M.; Dash, N.; Dingfelder, J.; Doležal, Z.; Drásal, Z.; Dutta, D.; Eidelman, S.; Epifanov, D.; Farhat, H.; Fast, J. E.; Ferber, T.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gaur, V.; Gabyshev, N.; Garmash, A.; Gillard, R.; Giordano, F.; Glattauer, R.; Goh, Y. M.; Goldenzweig, P.; Golob, B.; Haba, J.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; He, X. H.; Hou, W. -S.; Iijima, T.; Inami, K.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jaegle, I.; Joffe, D.; Joo, K. K.; Julius, T.; Kang, K. H.; Kato, E.; Kawasaki, T.; Kim, D. Y.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Ko, B. R.; Korpar, S.; Križan, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kumita, T.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y. -J.; Lange, J. S.; Lee, D. H.; Lee, I. S.; Li, C.; Li, L.; Li, Y.; Libby, J.; Liventsev, D.; Lukin, P.; Matvienko, D.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Mohanty, S.; Moll, A.; Moon, H. K.; Mori, T.; Mussa, R.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nanut, T.; Natkaniec, Z.; Nayak, M.; Nisar, N. K.; Nishida, S.; Ogawa, S.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Pal, B.; Park, C. W.; Park, H.; Pedlar, T. K.; Pestotnik, R.; Petrič, M.; Piilonen, L. E.; Rauch, J.; Ribežl, E.; Ritter, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Sandilya, S.; Santelj, L.; Sanuki, T.; Sato, Y.; Savinov, V.; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Seino, Y.; Senyo, K.; Seon, O.; Sevior, M. E.; Shebalin, V.; Shen, C. P.; Shibata, T. -A.; Shiu, J. -G.; Shwartz, B.; Simon, F.; Sohn, Y. -S.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Starič, M.; Sumihama, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tamponi, U.; Tanida, K.; Teramoto, Y.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Van Hulse, C.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, G.; Vinokurova, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Vossen, A.; Wagner, M. N.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M. -Z.; Wang, P.; Williams, K. M.; Won, E.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamashita, Y.; Yashchenko, S.; Ye, H.; Yusa, Y.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Zupanc, A.

    2016-02-01

    We report a measurement of the differential cross section of π^0 pair production in single-tag two-photon collisions, y*y->π^0π^0, in e+e- scattering. The cross section is measured for Q^2up to 30 GeV^2 is the negative of the invariant mass squared of the tagged photon

  9. Measurement of identified and inclusive photon second-harmonic parameter and implications for direct photon production in [FORMULA: SEE TEXT] Au+Au.

    PubMed

    Adler, S S; Afanasiev, S; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Alexander, J; Amirikas, R; Aphecetche, L; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, R; Babintsev, V; Baldisseri, A; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Berdnikov, Y; Bhagavatula, S; Boissevain, J G; Borel, H; Borenstein, S; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bruner, N; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Camard, X; Chai, J-S; Chand, P; Chang, W C; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J; Choudhury, R K; Chujo, T; Cianciolo, V; Cobigo, Y; Cole, B A; Constantin, P; d'Enterria, D; David, G; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Devismes, A; Dietzsch, O; Drapier, O; Drees, A; du Rietz, R; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Efremenko, Y V; El Chenawi, K; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Ewell, L; Fields, D E; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fox, B D; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fung, S-Y; Garpman, S; Ghosh, T K; Glenn, A; Gogiberidze, G; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; de Cassagnac, R Granier; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Perdekamp, M Grosse; Guryn, W; Gustafsson, H-A; Hachiya, T; Haggerty, J S; Hamagaki, H; Hansen, A G; Hartouni, E P; Harvey, M; Hayano, R; Hayashi, N; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; Hibino, M; Hill, J C; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Hoover, A; Ichihara, T; Ikonnikov, V V; Imai, K; Isenhower, D; Ishihara, M; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Jacak, B V; Jang, W Y; Jeong, Y; Jia, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Johnson, S C; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kaneta, M; Kang, J H; Kapoor, S S; Katou, K; Kelly, S; Khachaturov, B; Khanzadeev, A; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, D W; Kim, E; Kim, G-B; Kim, H J; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Kiyoyama, K; Klein-Boesing, C; Kobayashi, H; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Koehler, D; Kohama, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kuberg, C H; Kurita, K; Kuroki, Y; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Ladygin, V; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Leckey, S; Lee, D M; Lee, S; Leitch, M J; Li, X H; Lim, H; Litvinenko, A; Liu, M X; Liu, Y; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Manko, V I; Mao, Y; Martinez, G; Marx, M D; Masui, H; Matathias, F; Matsumoto, T; McGaughey, P L; Melnikov, E; Messer, F; Miake, Y; Milan, J; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, R E; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Mühlbacher, F; Mukhopadhyay, D; Muniruzzaman, M; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Nakamura, T; Nandi, B K; Nara, M; Newby, J; Nilsson, P; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Okada, K; Ono, M; Onuchin, V; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Oyama, K; Ozawa, K; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, J; Parmar, A; Pate, S F; Peitzmann, T; Peng, J-C; Peresedov, V; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Plasil, F; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Roche, G; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosnet, P; Ryu, S S; Sadler, M E; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, M; Sakai, S; Samsonov, V; Sanfratello, L; Santo, R; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Schutz, Y; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Shaw, M R; Shea, T K; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shiina, T; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Sivertz, M; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Staley, F; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sullivan, J P; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tamai, M; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarján, P; Tepe, J D; Thomas, T L; Tojo, J; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuruoka, H; Tuli, S K; Tydesjö, H; Tyurin, N; van Hecke, H W; Velkovska, J; Velkovsky, M; Veszprémi, V; Villatte, L; Vinogradov, A A; Volkov, M A; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, X R; Watanabe, Y; White, S N; Wohn, F K; Woody, C L; Xie, W; Yang, Y; Yanovich, A; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhang, C; Zhou, S; Zhou, S J; Zolin, L

    2006-01-27

    The azimuthal distribution of identified pi0 and inclusive photons has been measured in [FORMULA: SEE TEXT] Au+Au collisions with the PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC). The second-harmonic parameter (nu2) was measured to describe the observed anisotropy of the azimuthal distribution. The measured inclusive photon is consistent with the value expected for the photons from hadron decay and is also consistent with the lack of direct photon signal over the measured pT range 1-6 GeV/c. An attempt is made to extract nu2 of direct photons.

  10. Next Generation Endstation for Concurrent Measurements of Charged Products and Photons in LCLS FEL Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osipov, T.; Rolles, D.; Bostedt, C.; Castagna, J.-C.; Hartmann, R.; Bozek, J. D.; Schlichting, I.; Strüder, L.; Ullrich, J.; Berrah, N.

    2012-11-01

    We are designing and building the next generation multi-purpose instrumentation especially adapted to accommodate unique large-area, single-photon counting pnCCD detectors together with advanced many-particle ion and electron imaging spectrometers (reaction microscope, REMI; velocity map imaging, VMI; magnetic bottle) for simultaneous detection of scattered and fluorescent photons and charged particles in experiments at the LCLS FEL.

  11. Photonic Reagents: The Production of Cyclic Ozone, With a Focus on Developing Equation Free Methods for Optimization Schemes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-31

    clustering and eigenfunctions of Fokker - Planck Operators, B. Nadler, S. Lafon, R. R. Coifman and I. G. Kevrekidis, Proceedings of the 2005 Neural...Diffusion maps, spectral clustering and eigenfunctions of Fokker - Planck Operators, B. Nadler, S. Lafon, R. R. Coifman and I. G. Kevrekidis, Proceedings...0039 5b. GRANT NUMBER 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Photonic Reagents: The Production of Cyclic Ozone, With a Focus on Developing Equation Free

  12. Estimate of massive-dimuon production via a Drell-Yan-type process in two-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Sajjad Zahir, M.

    1981-11-01

    This paper presents a theoretical analysis and numerical estimate of the production of massive ..mu../sup +/..mu../sup -/+hadrons in ..gamma gamma.. collision. Although, from the theoretical point of view, the process might have some interesting possibilities, the numerical estimates show that the cross section is too small to be measured with nearly on-shell high-energy photons from either doubly tagged or untagged electrons considering the luminosity of the new generation of machines.

  13. The hard metal diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Cugell, D.W. )

    1992-06-01

    Hard metal is a mixture of tungsten carbide and cobalt, to which small amounts of other metals may be added. It is widely used for industrial purposes whenever extreme hardness and high temperature resistance are needed, such as for cutting tools, oil well drilling bits, and jet engine exhaust ports. Cobalt is the component of hard metal that can be a health hazard. Respiratory diseases occur in workers exposed to cobalt--either in the production of hard metal, from machining hard metal parts, or from other sources. Adverse pulmonary reactions include asthma, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, and interstitial fibrosis. A peculiar, almost unique form of lung fibrosis, giant cell interstitial pneumonia, is closely linked with cobalt exposure.66 references.

  14. The hard metal diseases.

    PubMed

    Cugell, D W

    1992-06-01

    Hard metal is a mixture of tungsten carbide and cobalt, to which small amounts of other metals may be added. It is widely used for industrial purposes whenever extreme hardness and high temperature resistance are needed, such as for cutting tools, oil well drilling bits, and jet engine exhaust ports. Cobalt is the component of hard metal that can be a health hazard. Respiratory diseases occur in workers exposed to cobalt--either in the production of hard metal, from machining hard metal parts, or from other sources. Adverse pulmonary reactions include asthma, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, and interstitial fibrosis. A peculiar, almost unique form of lung fibrosis, giant cell interstitial pneumonia, is closely linked with cobalt exposure.

  15. Soft X-ray irradiation of methanol ice: Formation of products as a function of photon energy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.-J.; Juang, K.-J.; Yih, T.-S.; Ciaravella, A.; Cecchi-Pestellini, C.; Muñoz Caro, G. M.; Jiménez-Escobar, A.

    2013-12-01

    Pure methanol ices have been irradiated with monochromatic soft X-rays of 300 and 550 eV close to the 1s resonance edges of C and O, respectively, and with a broadband spectrum (250-1200 eV). The infrared (IR) spectra of the irradiated ices show several new products of astrophysical interest such as CH{sub 2}OH, H{sub 2}CO, CH{sub 4}, HCOOH, HCOCH{sub 2}OH, CH{sub 3}COOH, CH{sub 3}OCH{sub 3}, HCOOCH{sub 3}, and (CH{sub 2}OH){sub 2}, as well as HCO, CO, and CO{sub 2}. The effect of X-rays is the result of the combined interactions of photons and electrons with the ice. A significant contribution to the formation and growth of new species in the CH{sub 3}OH ice irradiated with X-rays is given by secondary electrons, whose energy distribution depends on the energy of X-ray photons. Within a single experiment, the abundances of the new products increase with the absorbed energy. Monochromatic experiments show that product abundances also increase with the photon energy. However, the abundances per unit energy of newly formed species show a marked decrease in the broadband experiment as compared to irradiations with monochromatic photons, suggesting a possible regulatory role of the energy deposition rate. The number of new molecules produced per absorbed eV in the X-ray experiments has been compared to those obtained with electron and ultraviolet (UV) irradiation experiments.

  16. Analysis of the components of hard resin in hops (Humulus lupulus L.) and structural elucidation of their transformation products formed during the brewing process.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Yoshimasa; Taniguchi, Harumi; Yamada, Makiko; Matsukura, Yasuko; Koizumi, Hideki; Furihata, Kazuo; Shindo, Kazutoshi

    2014-11-26

    The resins from hops (Humulus lupulus L.), which add the bitter taste to beer, are classified into two main sub-fractions, namely, soft and hard resins. α- and β-Acids in soft resin and their transformation during the wort boiling process are well-studied; however, other constituents in resins, especially hard resin, have been unidentified. In this study, we identified humulinones and hulupones as soft-resin components, in addition to 4'-hydroxyallohumulinones and tricyclooxyisohumulones A and B as hard-resin components. These compounds are all oxidation products derived from α- or β-acids. We also investigated compositional changes in the hard resin during the wort boiling process, which has a significant effect on the taste of the beer, by using model boiling experiments. The major changes were identified to be isomerization of 4'-hydroxyallohumulinones into 4'-hydroxyallo-cis-humulinones, followed by decomposition into cis-oxyhumulinic acids. These findings will be helpful in systematically evaluating and optimizing the effect of the hard resin on beer quality.

  17. Production of degenerate polarization entangled photon pairs in the telecom-band from a pump enhanced parametric downconversion process.

    PubMed

    Thomas, P J; Chunnilall, C J; Stothard, D J M; Walsh, D A; Dunn, M H

    2010-12-06

    The design and implementation of a novel source of degenerate polarization entangled photon pairs in the telecom band, based on a cavity enhanced parametric downconversion process, is presented. Two of the four maximally entangled Bell states are produced; the remaining two are obtainable by the addition of a half wave plate into the setup. The coincident photon detection rate in the A/D basis between two detectors at the output of the device revealed the production of highly entangled states, resulting in quantum interference visibilities of 0.971 ± 0.041 (ϕ = 0 state) and 0.932 ± 0.036 (ϕ = π state) respectively. The entangled states were found to break the Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt (CHSH) Bell inequality by around 6 standard deviations. From the measured coincidence counting rates and the optical system losses, an entangled photon pair production rate of 8.9 × 10(4) s(-1) mW(-1) pump was estimated.

  18. Production of photonic nanojets by using pupil-masked 3D dielectric cuboid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Liyang; Yan, Bing; Monks, James N.; Wang, Zengbo; Thanh Tung, Nguyen; Dinh Lam, Vu; Minin, Oleg; Minin, Igor

    2017-05-01

    Photonic nanojets can be created via plane wave irradiation of multi-shaped mesoscale dielectric particles, and a waist of full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) smaller than the diffraction limit can be achieved in this process. In this paper, photonic nanojet produced by a pupil-masked 3D dielectric cuboid lens is numerically investigated under the irradiation of 532 nm wavelength plane wave. It is found that a pupil-masked cuboid lens is not only able to produce photonic nanojets with shorter FWHMs, but also increase its maximal intensity at certain masking ratios on the receiving surface. This phenomenon is different from the result of the spherical-lens reported in previous publications, and is attributed to the convergence of power flow and near-field numerical aperture (NA) increase after analysis of simulated power flow diagrams.

  19. Exploratory study of fission product yield determination from photofission of Pu239 at 11 MeV with monoenergetic photons

    DOE PAGES

    Bhike, Megha; Tornow, W.; Krishichayan, -; ...

    2017-02-14

    Here, measurements of fission product yields play an important role for the understanding of fundamental aspects of the fission process. Recently, neutron-induced fission product-yield data of 239Pu at energies below 4 MeV revealed an unexpected energy dependence of certain fission fragments. In order to investigate whether this observation is prerogative to neutron-induced fission, a program has been initiated to measure fission product yields in photoinduced fission. Here we report on the first ever photofission product yield measurement with monoenergetic photons produced by Compton back-scattering of FEL photons. The experiment was performed at the High-Intensity Gamma-ray Source at Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory on 239Pu at Eγmore » = 11 MeV. In this exploratory study the yield of eight fission products ranging from 91Sr to 143Ce has been obtained.« less

  20. Simultaneous production of mixed electron--photon beam in a medical LINAC: A feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Khaledi, Navid; Arbabi, Azim; Sardari, Dariush; Mohammadi, Mohammad; Ameri, Ahmad

    2015-06-01

    The electron or photon beams might be used for treatment of tumors. Each beam has its own advantage and disadvantages. Combo beam can increase the advantages. No investigation has been performed for producing simultaneous mixed electron and photon beam. In current study a device has been added to the Medical Linac to produce a mixed photon-electron beam. Firstly a Varian 2300CD head was simulated by MCNP Monte Carlo Code. Two sets of perforated lead sheets with 1 and 2 mm thickness and 0.2, 0.3, and 0.5 cm punches then placed at the top of the applicator holder tray. This layer produces bremsstrahlung x-ray upon impinging fraction electrons on it. The remaining fraction of electrons passes through the holes. The simulation was performed for 10 × 10, 6 × 6, and 4 × 4 cm(2) field size. For 10 × 10 cm(2) field size, among the punched targets, the largest penumbra difference between the depth of 1 and 7 cm was 72%. This difference for photon and electron beams were 31% and 325% respectively. A maximum of 39% photon percentage was produced by 2 mm target with 0.2 cm holes diameter layer. The minimum surface dose value was 4% lesser than pure electron beam. For small fields, unlike the pure electron beam, the PDD, penumbra, and flatness variations were negligible. The advantages of mixing the electron and photon beam is reduction of pure electron's penumbra dependency with the depth, especially for small fields, also decreasing of dramatic changes of PDD curve with irradiation field size. Copyright © 2015 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Measurements of the Differential Cross Sections for the Inclusive Production of a Photon and Heavy Flavor Jet

    SciTech Connect

    Duggan, Daniel

    2009-04-01

    This thesis presents the first measurement of the differential production cross section of a heavy flavor (bottom or charm) jet and direct photon at the Fermilab Tevatron. These measurements were performed using data recorded with the D0 detector from proton-antiproton collisions at a center of mass energy of √s = 1.96 TeV. These results probe a kinematic range for the photon transverse momentum of 30 < pTγ < 150 GeV and rapidity of |yγ| < 1.0 and for jet transverse momentum pTjet > 15 GeV and rapidity of |yjet| < 0.8. These results are compared to next-to-leading-order theoretical calculations.

  2. Effects of Photon Absorption in High Energy Heavy Ion Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winchell, Joshua; Somanathan, Sidharth; Fries, Ranier

    2014-09-01

    Photons are an important probe of the hot and dense nuclear matter created in high-energy collisions of nuclei at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Since the mean free path of photons is larger than the size of the fireball of nuclear matter, final state interactions of photons are usually neglected. In light of recent tension between theoretical calculations and data from RHIC and LHC, we study the effect of reabsorption of photons on elliptic flow v2 and on the nuclear modification factor RAA. We consider photons emitted in primary hard collisions and thermal photons from quark-gluon plasma and hot hadron gas. We use the jet-quenching code PPM to simulate the propagation of those photons in a fireball of quark-gluon plasma and hot hadron gas created by collisions of heavy nuclei. For the absorption cross-sections we consider three different approaches: (a) Compton and pair production processes calculated by us in a static approximation, (b) the photon damping rates calculated by Thoma (1995), and (c) absorption rates derived from a recent photon calculation by van Hees et al.

  3. High-ET isolated-photon plus jets production in pp collisions at √{ s} = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaboud, M.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abraham, N. L.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adachi, S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Ali, B.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allen, B. W.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Alshehri, A. A.; Alstaty, M.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antel, C.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antrim, D. J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Armitage, L. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Artz, S.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Baines, J. T.; Bajic, M.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisits, M.-S.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska-Blenessy, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barranco Navarro, L.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bedognetti, M.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Bell, A. S.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Belyaev, N. L.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez, J.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Beringer, J.; Berlendis, S.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertram, I. A.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethani, A.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bielski, R.; Biesuz, N. V.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Billoud, T. R. V.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bisanz, T.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blue, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, S.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Boerner, D.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bokan, P.; Bold, T.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortoletto, D.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Bossio Sola, J. D.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Broughton, J. H.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruni, L. S.; Brunt, BH; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryant, P.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgard, C. D.; Burger, A. M.; Burghgrave, B.; Burka, K.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Burr, J. T. P.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calace, N.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Callea, G.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvente Lopez, S.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Calvet, T. P.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Camincher, C.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Camplani, A.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Carbone, R. M.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardillo, F.; Carli, I.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carlson, B. T.; Carminati, L.; Carney, R. M. D.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Casper, D. 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I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tu, Y.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tulbure, T. T.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turgeman, D.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turra, R.; Tuts, P. M.; Ucchielli, G.; Ueda, I.; Ughetto, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usui, J.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valdes Santurio, E.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Graaf, H.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vasquez, J. G.; Vasquez, G. A.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigani, L.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vittori, C.; Vivarelli, I.; Vlachos, S.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wallangen, V.; Wang, C.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, W.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Weber, S. A.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M. D.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Whallon, N. L.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilk, F.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winston, O. J.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wolf, T. M. H.; Wolff, R.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Worm, S. D.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xi, Z.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W.-M.; Yap, Y. C.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zacharis, G.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zakharchuk, N.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, J. C.; Zeng, Q.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zwalinski, L.

    2017-05-01

    The dynamics of isolated-photon plus one-, two- and three-jet production in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV are studied with the ATLAS detector at the LHC using a data set with an integrated luminosity of 20.2 fb-1. Measurements of isolated-photon plus jets cross sections are presented as functions of the photon and jet transverse momenta. The cross sections as functions of the azimuthal angle between the photon and the jets, the azimuthal angle between the jets, the photon-jet invariant mass and the scattering angle in the photon-jet centre-of-mass system are presented. The pattern of QCD radiation around the photon and the leading jet is investigated by measuring jet production in an annular region centred on each object; enhancements are observed around the leading jet with respect to the photon in the directions towards the beams. The experimental measurements are compared to several different theoretical calculations, and overall a good description of the data is found.

  4. Magnetic photon splitting and gamma ray burst spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baring, Matthew G.

    1992-01-01

    The splitting of photons into two photons becomes both possible and significant in magnetic fields in excess of 10(exp 12) Gauss. Below the threshold energy, 2m sub e c(exp 2) for single photon pair production, splitting can be an astronomically observable phenomenon evident in gamma ray burst spectra. In such circumstances, it was found that magnetic photon splitting reprocesses the gamma ray burst continuum by degrading the photon energy, with a net effect that is quite similar to pair cascade reprocessing of the spectrum. Results are presented for the spectral modifications due to splitting, taking into account the different probabilities for splitting for different polarization modes. Unpolarized and polarized pair cascade photon spectra form the input spectra for the model, which calculates the resulting splitting reprocessed spectra numerically by solving the photon kinetic equations for each polarization mode. This inclusion of photon polarizations is found to not alter previous predictions that splitting produce a significant flattening of the hard X ray continuum and a bump at MeV energies below a pair production turnover. The spectrum near the bump is always strongly polarized.

  5. Physical stability and resistance to peroxidation of a range of liquid-fill hard gelatin capsule products on extreme long-term storage.

    PubMed

    Bowtle, William; Kanyowa, Lionel; Mackenzie, Mark; Higgins, Paul

    2011-06-01

    The industrial take-up of liquid-fill hard capsule technology is limited in part by lack of published long-term physical and chemical stability data which demonstrate the robustness of the system. To assess the effects of extreme long-term storage on liquid-fill capsule product quality and integrity, with respect to both the capsules per se and a standard blister-pack type (foil-film blister). Fourteen sets of stored peroxidation-sensitive liquid-fill hard gelatin capsule product samples, originating ~20 years from the current study, were examined with respect to physical and selected chemical properties, together with microbiological evaluation. All sets retained physical integrity of capsules and blister-packs. Capsules were free of leaks, gelatin cross-linking, and microbiological growth. Eight samples met a limit (anisidine value, 20) commonly used as an index of peroxidation for lipid-based products with shelf lives of 2-3 years. Foil-film blister-packs using PVC or PVC-PVdC as the thermoforming film were well-suited packaging components for the liquid-fill capsule format. The study confirms the long-term physical robustness of the liquid-fill hard capsule format, together with its manufacturing and banding processes. It also indicates that various peroxidation-sensitive products using the capsule format may be maintained satisfactorily over very prolonged storage periods.

  6. Direct Photon Results from CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Tingjun

    2013-01-01

    Direct (prompt) photon production is a field of very high interest in hadron colliders. It provides probes to search for new phenomena and to test QCD predictions. In this article, two recent cross-section results for direct photon production using the full CDF Run II data set are presented: diphoton production and photon production in association with a heavy quark.

  7. Systematization of the yields of products of photonuclear reactions on enriched-tin targets at the bremsstrahlung-photon endpoint energy of 4.5 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balabekyan, A. R.

    2008-11-01

    Yields of photonuclear-reaction products formed in targets from separated tin isotopes under the effect of beams of bremsstrahlung photons whose endpoint energy is 4.5 GeV were investigated. The systematization performed on this basis revealed an isoscaling character of the behavior of the production yields for various regions of reaction-product masses.

  8. Hard X-ray total scattering study on the structure of Si-dopped ferric oxyhydroxides and products of their transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieczara, Gabriela; Borkiewicz, Olaf; Manecki, Maciej; Rzepa, Grzegorz

    2016-04-01

    Here we report the results of a detailed structural investigation, using synchrotron-based pair distribution function analyses (PDF) and high-resolution X-ray diffraction (HR-XRD), on a series of Si-bearing synthetic analogues of ferrihydrite with a range of Si/Fe ratio relevant to geological environments and on products of their thermal transformation. Hard X-ray total scattering data suitable for PDF analyses have been collected at the PDF-dedicated beamline 11-ID-B and the HR-XRD data at beamline 11-BM of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). Ferrihydrite is a poorly crystalline, nano-sized hydrous ferric oxyhydroxide with a nominal/ideal formula Fe5HO8•4H2O. Its chemical composition however, can vary significantly and the atomic structure is yet to be fully understood despite multitude of structural studies undertaken over the past two decades (Michel et al., 2007; Manceau, 2009). One of the most commonly discussed and still unsettled contention points regarding the structural arrangements of ferrihydrite is related to the presence or absence of tetraherdally coordinated iron(III) within its structure. The majority of experimental work carried out to date focused on pure, synthetic ferrihydrite analogues with chemical composition close to ideal/nominal. This approach is clearly a significant oversimplification of natural ferrihydrite which always contains substantial amounts of admixtures, with Si, C, P, As, Ca, S and Al being the most common. One of the most important and the most commonly encountered impurities is Si, in the form of silicate ion that has strong affinity for ferrihydrite. SiO2content in natural ferrihydrites can vary substantially but generally falls with the range of 2.6-31.5 wt% (Cismasu et al., 2011). In certain environments however, such as modern seafloor hydrothermal vents, higher Si/Fe ratios (up to ca. 3) have been reported (Sun et al., 2013). The results of previous reports indicate that silicate

  9. Exclusive photon-photon production of muon pairs in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; Khachatryan, Vardan; Sirunyan, Albert M.; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Fabjan, Christian; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; /Yerevan Phys. Inst. /Vienna, OAW /Minsk, High Energy Phys. Ctr. /Antwerp U., WISINF /Vrije U., Brussels /Brussels U. /Gent U. /Louvain U. /UMH, Mons /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Rio de Janeiro State U.

    2011-11-01

    A measurement of the exclusive two-photon production of muon pairs in proton-proton collisions at {radical}s = 7 TeV, pp {yields} p{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}p, is reported using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 40 pb{sup -1}. For muon pairs with invariant mass greater than 11.5 GeV, transverse momentum p{sub T}({mu}) > 4 GeV and pseudorapidity |{eta}({mu})| < 2.1, a fit to the dimuon p{sub T}({mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}) distribution results in a measured cross section of {sigma}(p {yields} p{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}) = 3.38{sub -0.55}{sup +0.58}(stat.) {+-} 0.16(syst.) {+-} 0.14(lumi.) pb, consistent with the theoretical prediction evaluated with the event generator LPAIR. The ratio to the predicted cross section is 0.83{sub -0.13}{sup +0.14}(stat.) {+-} 0.04(syst.) {+-} 0.03(lumi.). The characteristic distributions of the muon pairs produced via {gamma}{gamma} fusion, such as the muon acoplanarity, the muon pair invariant mass and transverse momentum agree with those from the theory.

  10. Enzymatic production of trans-free hard fat stock from fractionated rice bran oil, fully hydrogenated soybean oil, and conjugated linoleic Acid.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, P; Shin, J-A; Lee, J-H; Hu, J-N; Hwang, K T; Lee, K-T

    2009-03-01

    Rice bran oil (RBO) was fractionated into 2 phases, solid (S-RBO) and liquid (L-RBO), using acetone at -18 degrees C and the weight yield of each S-RBO and L-RBO was 45.5% and 54.5%, respectively. Then, trans-free hard fat was synthesized from trans-free substrate of S-RBO and fully hydrogenated soybean oil (FHSBO) at different molar ratios (S-RBO : FHSBO; 1 : 1, 1 : 1.5, 1 : 2, and 1 : 3) with Lipozyme TL IM lipase (10% of total substrate). Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA, 20% of total substrate) was used as functional fatty acids for the production of trans-free hard fat. After fatty acid analysis, CLA (12.2% to 14.2%) was found on the triacylglycerol (TAG) backbone of the interesterified products along with stearic (37.6% to 49%), palmitic (15% to 17.9%), and oleic acids (13.3% to 19.2%). The interesterified product contained higher level of saturated fatty acid (62.6% to 70.1%) at sn-2 position. Total tocopherols (alpha-, gamma-, and delta-; 1.4 to 2.6 mg/100 g) and phytosterols (campesterol, stigmasterol, and beta-sitosterol; 220.5 to 362.7 mg/100 g) were found in the interesterified products. From DSC results, solid fat contents of the interesterified products (S-RBO : FHSBO 1 : 1, 1 : 1.5, 1 : 2, and 1 : 3) at 25 degrees C were 23.1%, 27%, 30.1%, and 44.9%. The interesterified products consisted mostly of beta' form crystal with a small portion of beta form. The interesterified product (S-RBO : FHSBO 1 : 1.5) was softer than the physical blend but slightly harder than commercial shortenings as measured by texture analyzer. Thus, trans-free hard fat stock, which may have a potential functionality could be produced with various physical properties.

  11. Recent Advances and Open Questions in Neutrino-induced Quasi-elastic Scattering and Single Photon Production

    SciTech Connect

    Garvey, G. T.; Harris, D. A.; Tanaka, H. A.; Tayloe, R.; Zeller, G. P.

    2015-06-15

    The study of neutrino–nucleus interactions has recently seen rapid development with a new generation of accelerator-based neutrino experiments employing medium and heavy nuclear targets for the study of neutrino oscillations. A few unexpected results in the study of quasi-elastic scattering and single photon production have spurred a revisiting of the underlying nuclear physics and connections to electron–nucleus scattering. A thorough understanding and resolution of these issues is essential for future progress in the study of neutrino oscillations.

  12. Positronium energy levels at order m α7 : Product contributions in the two-photon-annihilation channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adkins, Gregory S.; Tran, Lam M.; Wang, Ruihan

    2016-05-01

    Ongoing improvements in the measurement of positronium transition intervals motivate the calculation of the O (m α7) corrections to these intervals. In this work we focus on corrections to the spin-singlet parapositronium energies involving virtual annihilation to two photons in an intermediate state. We have evaluated all contributions to the positronium S -state energy levels that can be written as the product of a one-loop correction on one side of the annihilation event and another one-loop correction on the other side. These effects contribute Δ E =-0.561971 (25 ) m α7/π3 to the parapositronium ground-state energy.

  13. On the production of the chargino and W boson at the interaction of neutralino with high-energy photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanchik, A. B.

    2014-04-01

    The process of the photoproduction of the chargino and W boson on nonrelativistic neutralinos has been considered within the supersymmetric Standard Model. It has been shown that the energy of the chargino in the limit of high energies of the initial photon approaches a constant limit and its decays are accompanied by the production of leptons with energies in a certain range whose width depends only on the masses of the chargino and neutralino. The importance of this process for the detection of dark matter in the observations of cosmic rays from nearest active galactic nuclei and in experiments at modern colliders has been discussed.

  14. Direct photon pair production at the LHC to O(α) in TeV scale gravity models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, M. C.; Mathews, Prakash; Ravindran, V.; Tripathi, Anurag

    2009-09-01

    The first results on next-to-leading order QCD corrections to production of direct photon pairs in hadronic collisions in the extra dimension models — ADD and RS are presented. Various kinematical distributions are obtained to order α in QCD by taking into account all the parton level subprocesses. Our Monte Carlo based code incorporates all the experimental cuts suitable for physics studies at the LHC. We estimate the impact of the QCD corrections on various observables and find that they are significant. We also show the reduction in factorization scale uncertainty when O(α) effects are included.

  15. Periodic dielectric structure for production of photonic band gap and method for fabricating the same

    DOEpatents

    Ozbay, E.; Tuttle, G.; Michel, E.; Ho, K.M.; Biswas, R.; Chan, C.T.; Soukoulis, C.

    1995-04-11

    A method is disclosed for fabricating a periodic dielectric structure which exhibits a photonic band gap. Alignment holes are formed in a wafer of dielectric material having a given crystal orientation. A planar layer of elongate rods is then formed in a section of the wafer. The formation of the rods includes the step of selectively removing the dielectric material of the wafer between the rods. The formation of alignment holes and layers of elongate rods and wafers is then repeated to form a plurality of patterned wafers. A stack of patterned wafers is then formed by rotating each successive wafer with respect to the next-previous wafer, and then placing the successive wafer on the stack. This stacking results in a stack of patterned wafers having a four-layer periodicity exhibiting a photonic band gap. 42 figures.

  16. Enhanced, high energy photon production from resonant Compton scattering in a strong external field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartin, A.

    2017-07-01

    A theoretical and phenomenological consideration is given to higher order, strong field effects in electron/laser interactions. A consistent strong field theory is the Furry interaction picture of intense field quantum field theory. In this theory, fermions are embedded in the strong laser field and the Volkov wavefunction solutions that result, are exact with respect to the strong field. When these Volkov fermions interact with individual photons from other sources, the transition probability is enhanced in a series of resonances when the kinematics allow the virtual fermion to go on-shell. An experiment is proposed in which, for the first time, resonances could be used to generate high energy photons from relativistic electrons at rates orders of magnitude in excess of usual mechanisms.

  17. Resonance--Continuum Interference in Light Higgs Boson Production at a Photon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, Lance J.; Sofianatos, Yorgos; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2009-01-06

    We study the effect of interference between the Standard Model Higgs boson resonance and the continuum background in the process {gamma}{gamma} {yields} H {yields} b{bar b} at a photon collider. Taking into account virtual gluon exchange between the final-state quarks, we calculate the leading corrections to the height of the resonance for the case of a light (m{sub H} < 160 GeV) Higgs boson. We find that the interference is destructive and around 0.1-0.2% of the peak height, depending on the mass of the Higgs and the scattering angle. This suppression is smaller by an order of magnitude than the anticipated experimental accuracy at a photon collider. However, the fractional suppression can be significantly larger if the Higgs coupling to b quarks is increased by physics beyond the Standard Model.

  18. Production and transfer of UV photons in non-homogeneous spherical clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aiello, Santi; Cecchi-Pestellini, C.; Mencaraglia, Francesco; Barsella, Bruno; Ferrini, F.

    1989-01-01

    Due to screening by dust particles, the UV radiation field of interstellar origin is practically inexistent within very dense interstellar clouds. However, it appears possible that the cosmic-ray excitation of the Lyman and Werner systems of the hydrogen molecule could originate a chemically-significant flux of UV photons even within such dense clouds. Computations of photon fluxes were carried out for two different models of radial density distribution inside the cloud (gas and dust densities were assumed to have the same density distribution). The result strongly support the suggestion that the low energy cosmic rays may generate inside dense interstellar clouds UV radiation fields that may significantly contribute to the gas and dust evolution.

  19. Single photon production induced by (anti)neutrino neutral current scattering on nucleons and nuclear targets

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez-Ruso, L.; Nieves, J.; Wang, E.

    2015-10-15

    We review our theoretical approach to neutral current photon emission on nucleons and nuclei in the few-GeV energy region, relevant for neutrino oscillation experiments. These reactions are dominated by the weak excitation of the Δ(1232) resonance but there are also important non-resonant contributions. We have also included terms mediated by nucleon excitations from the second resonance region. On nuclei, Pauli blocking, Fermi motion and the in-medium Δ resonance broadening have been taken into account for both incoherent and coherent reaction channels. With this model, the number and distributions of photon events at the MiniBooNE and T2K experiments have been obtained. We have also compared to the NOMAD upper limit at higher energies. The implications of our findings and future perspectives are discussed.

  20. Search for production of invisible final states in single-photon decays of Υ(1S).

    PubMed

    del Amo Sanchez, P; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prencipe, E; Tisserand, V; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Martinelli, M; Milanes, D A; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Brown, D N; Chistiakova, M V; Jensen, F; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Osipenkov, I L; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Asgeirsson, D J; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Randle-Conde, A; Blinov, V E; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Yushkov, A N; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Atmacan, H; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Vitug, G M; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; West, C; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Martinez, A J; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Winstrom, L O; Cheng, C H; Doll, D A; Echenard, B; Hitlin, D G; Ongmongkolkul, P; Porter, F C; Rakitin, A Y; Andreassen, R; Dubrovin, M S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Toki, W H; Jasper, H; Karbach, T M; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Kobel, M J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Bernard, D; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Playfer, S; Watson, J E; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Fioravanti, E; Franchini, P; Garzia, I; Luppi, E; Munerato, M; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Nicolaci, M; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Contri, R; Guido, E; Lo Vetere, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Tosi, S; Bhuyan, B; Prasad, V; Lee, C L; Morii, M; Adametz, A; Marks, J; Uwer, U; Bernlochner, F U; Ebert, M; Lacker, H M; Lueck, T; Volk, A; Dauncey, P D; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Mallik, U; Chen, C; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Derkach, D; Firmino da Costa, J; Grosdidier, G; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Malaescu, B; Perez, A; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wang, L; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Paramesvaran, S; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Hafner, A; Alwyn, K E; Bailey, D; Barlow, R J; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; Anderson, J; Cenci, R; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Dallapiccola, C; Salvati, E; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Sciolla, G; Zhao, M; Lindemann, D; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Schram, M; Biassoni, P; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Stracka, S; Cremaldi, L; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sonnek, P; Summers, D J; Nguyen, X; Simard, M; Taras, P; De Nardo, G; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; 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    2011-07-08

    We search for single-photon decays of the Υ(1S) resonance, Υ → γ + invisible, where the invisible state is either a particle of definite mass, such as a light Higgs boson A⁰, or a pair of dark matter particles, χχ. Both A⁰ and χ are assumed to have zero spin. We tag Υ(1S) decays with a dipion transition Υ(2S) → π⁺π⁻Υ(1S) and look for events with a single energetic photon and significant missing energy. We find no evidence for such processes in the mass range m(A⁰) ≤ 9.2 GeV and m(χ) ≤ 4.5 GeV in the sample of 98 × 10⁶ Υ(2S) decays collected with the BABAR detector and set stringent limits on new physics models that contain light dark matter states.

  1. Periodic dielectric structure for production of photonic band gap and method for fabricating the same

    DOEpatents

    Ozbay, Ekmel; Tuttle, Gary; Michel, Erick; Ho, Kai-Ming; Biswas, Rana; Chan, Che-Ting; Soukoulis, Costas

    1995-01-01

    A method for fabricating a periodic dielectric structure which exhibits a photonic band gap. Alignment holes are formed in a wafer of dielectric material having a given crystal orientation. A planar layer of elongate rods is then formed in a section of the wafer. The formation of the rods includes the step of selectively removing the dielectric material of the wafer between the rods. The formation of alignment holes and layers of elongate rods and wafers is then repeated to form a plurality of patterned wafers. A stack of patterned wafers is then formed by rotating each successive wafer with respect to the next-previous wafer, and then placing the successive wafer on the stack. This stacking results in a stack of patterned wafers having a four-layer periodicity exhibiting a photonic band gap.

  2. The initial data products from the EUVE software - A photon's journey through the End-to-End System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antia, Behram

    1993-01-01

    The End-to-End System (EES) is a unique collection of software modules created for use at the Center for EUV Astrophysics. The 'pipeline' is a shell script which executes selected EES modules and creates initial data products: skymaps, data sets for individual sources (called 'pigeonholes') and catalogs of sources. This article emphasizes the data from the all-sky survey, conducted between July 22, 1992 and January 21, 1993. A description of each of the major data products will be given and, as an example of how the pipeline works, the reader will follow a photon's path through the software pipeline into a pigeonhole. These data products are the primary goal of the EUVE all-sky survey mission, and so their relative importance for the follow-up science will also be discussed.

  3. Role of the furrow of the proximal colon in the production of soft and hard feces in nutrias, Myocastor coypus.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, T; Sakaguchi, E

    2000-11-01

    The bacterial level of soft feces is higher than that of hard feces in nutrias. This suggests the heterogeneity of bacterial density in the large intestine. To show the heterogeneity of bacteria in the contents of the large intestine in nutrias, we divided the contents of the large intestine into 12 regions, then measured the nitrogen (N), total amino acids (TAA) and diaminopimelic acid (DAP), a bacterial marker, of these regions. Levels of N, TAA and DAP varied along the cross section of the proximal colon. The greater curvature of the main lumen and furrow had higher N, TAA and DAP concentrations than the lesser curvature. We also examined the involvement of the furrow in producing two types of feces differing in bacterial nitrogen content by surgically preventing the flow of the furrow contents. We compared the concentrations of N, TAA and DAP between soft and hard feces among operated, sham-operated and intact animals. Surgical closure of the furrow abolished the difference in levels of N, TAA and DAP between soft and hard feces, suggesting that the furrow of the proximal colon is responsible for making the bacterial density higher in soft feces than in hard feces.

  4. Molecular markers linked to genes important for Hard Winter Wheat production and marketing in the U.S. Great Plains

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Biotic stresses including diseases [leaf, stem and stripe rusts, and wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV)] and insects [greenbug (GB), Hessian fly (Hf), Russian wheat aphid (RWA) and wheat curl mite (WCM)] significantly affect grain yield and end-use quality of hard winter wheat (HWW, Triticum aestivum ...

  5. Measurement of the cross section for inclusive isolated-photon production in pp collisions at s=13 TeV using the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGES

    Aaboud, M.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; ...

    2017-07-01

    Here, inclusive isolated-photon production in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 13TeV is studied with the ATLAS detector at the LHC using a data set with an integrated luminosity of 3.2fb-1. The cross section is measured as a function of the photon transverse energy above 125GeV in different regions of photon pseudorapidity. Next-to-leading-order perturbative QCD and Monte Carlo event-generator predictions are compared to the cross-section measurements and provide an adequate description of the data.

  6. Measurement of the cross section for inclusive isolated-photon production in pp collisions at √{ s} = 13 TeV using the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaboud, M.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Abidi, S. H.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abraham, N. L.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adachi, S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adersberger, M.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agheorghiesei, C.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akatsuka, S.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Ali, B.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allen, B. W.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Alshehri, A. A.; Alstaty, M.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antel, C.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antrim, D. J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Araujo Ferraz, V.; Arce, A. T. H.; Ardell, R. E.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Armitage, L. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Artz, S.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Baines, J. T.; Bajic, M.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisits, M.-S.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska-Blenessy, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barranco Navarro, L.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bedognetti, M.; Bee, C. P.; Beermann, T. A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Bell, A. S.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Belyaev, N. L.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez, J.; Benjamin, D. P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Beringer, J.; Berlendis, S.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernardi, G.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertram, I. A.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethani, A.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bielski, R.; Biesuz, N. V.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Billoud, T. R. V.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bisanz, T.; Bittrich, C.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blue, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, S.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Boerner, D.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bokan, P.; Bold, T.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortoletto, D.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Bossio Sola, J. D.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Briglin, D. L.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Broughton, J. H.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruni, L. S.; Brunt, BH; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryant, P.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgard, C. D.; Burger, A. M.; Burghgrave, B.; Burka, K.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Burr, J. T. P.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calace, N.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Callea, G.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvente Lopez, S.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Calvet, T. P.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Camincher, C.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Camplani, A.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Carbone, R. M.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardillo, F.; Carli, I.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carlson, B. T.; Carminati, L.; Carney, R. M. D.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Casper, D. W.; Castelijn, R.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavallaro, E.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Celebi, E.; Ceradini, F.; Cerda Alberich, L.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, S. K.; Chan, W. S.; Chan, Y. L.; Chang, P.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chatterjee, A.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Che, S.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, S.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, H. J.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiarelli, G.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chitan, A.; Chiu, Y. H.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chomont, A. R.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christodoulou, V.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M. C.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Cioara, I. A.; Ciocca, C.; Ciocio, A.; Cirotto, F.; Citron, Z. H.; Citterio, M.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, M. R.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Colasurdo, L.; Cole, B.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cormier, F.; Cormier, K. J. R.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Crawley, S. J.; Creager, R. A.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cueto, A.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cúth, J.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; D'amen, G.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dado, T.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dandoy, J. R.; Dang, N. P.; Daniells, A. C.; Dann, N. S.; Danninger, M.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Daubney, T.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, M.; Davison, P.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Benedetti, A.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Maria, A.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vasconcelos Corga, K.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. V.; Dehghanian, N.; Deigaard, I.; Del Gaudio, M.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delgove, D.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Dell'Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; DeMarco, D. A.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Denysiuk, D.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Dette, K.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Clemente, W. K.; Di Donato, C.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Petrillo, K. F.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Di Valentino, D.; Diaconu, C.; Diamond, M.; Dias, F. A.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Díez Cornell, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Djuvsland, J. I.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Dobos, D.; Dobre, M.; Doglioni, C.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Drechsler, E.; Dris, M.; Du, Y.; Duarte-Campderros, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Ducu, O. A.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Chr. Dudder, A.; Duffield, E. M.; Duflot, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dumancic, M.; Dumitriu, A. E.; Duncan, A. K.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Durglishvili, A.; Duschinger, D.; Dutta, B.; Dyndal, M.; Eckardt, C.; Ecker, K. M.; Edgar, R. 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F.; Olivares Pino, S. A.; Oliveira Damazio, D.; Olszewski, A.; Olszowska, J.; Onofre, A.; Onogi, K.; Onyisi, P. U. E.; Oreglia, M. J.; Oren, Y.; Orestano, D.; Orlando, N.; Orr, R. S.; Osculati, B.; Ospanov, R.; Otero y Garzon, G.; Otono, H.; Ouchrif, M.; Ould-Saada, F.; Ouraou, A.; Oussoren, K. P.; Ouyang, Q.; Owen, M.; Owen, R. E.; Ozcan, V. E.; Ozturk, N.; Pachal, K.; Pacheco Pages, A.; Pacheco Rodriguez, L.; Padilla Aranda, C.; Pagan Griso, S.; Paganini, M.; Paige, F.; Pais, P.; Palacino, G.; Palazzo, S.; Palestini, S.; Palka, M.; Pallin, D.; St. Panagiotopoulou, E.; Panagoulias, I.; Pandini, C. E.; Panduro Vazquez, J. G.; Pani, P.; Panitkin, S.; Pantea, D.; Paolozzi, L.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Papageorgiou, K.; Paramonov, A.; Paredes Hernandez, D.; Parker, A. J.; Parker, M. A.; Parker, K. A.; Parodi, F.; Parsons, J. A.; Parzefall, U.; Pascuzzi, V. R.; Pasner, J. M.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passaggio, S.; Pastore, Fr.; Pataraia, S.; Pater, J. R.; Pauly, T.; Pearce, J.; Pearson, B.; Pedersen, L. E.; Pedraza Lopez, S.; Pedro, R.; Peleganchuk, S. V.; Penc, O.; Peng, C.; Peng, H.; Penwell, J.; Peralva, B. S.; Perego, M. M.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perini, L.; Pernegger, H.; Perrella, S.; Peschke, R.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Peters, K.; Peters, R. F. Y.; Petersen, B. A.; Petersen, T. C.; Petit, E.; Petridis, A.; Petridou, C.; Petroff, P.; Petrolo, E.; Petrov, M.; Petrucci, F.; Pettersson, N. E.; Peyaud, A.; Pezoa, R.; Phillips, P. W.; Piacquadio, G.; Pianori, E.; Picazio, A.; Piccaro, E.; Pickering, M. A.; Piegaia, R.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pilkington, A. D.; Pin, A. W. J.; Pinamonti, M.; Pinfold, J. L.; Pirumov, H.; Pitt, M.; Plazak, L.; Pleier, M.-A.; Pleskot, V.; Plotnikova, E.; Pluth, D.; Podberezko, P.; Poettgen, R.; Poggioli, L.; Pohl, D.; Polesello, G.; Poley, A.; Policicchio, A.; Polifka, R.; Polini, A.; Pollard, C. S.; Polychronakos, V.; Pommès, K.; Pontecorvo, L.; Pope, B. G.; Popeneciu, G. A.; Poppleton, A.; Pospisil, S.; Potamianos, K.; Potrap, I. N.; Potter, C. J.; Potter, C. T.; Poulard, G.; Poveda, J.; Pozo Astigarraga, M. E.; Pralavorio, P.; Pranko, A.; Prell, S.; Price, D.; Price, L. E.; Primavera, M.; Prince, S.; Prokofiev, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Protopopescu, S.; Proudfoot, J.; Przybycien, M.; Puddu, D.; Puri, A.; Puzo, P.; Qian, J.; Qin, G.; Qin, Y.; Quadt, A.; Quayle, W. B.; Queitsch-Maitland, M.; Quilty, D.; Raddum, S.; Radeka, V.; Radescu, V.; Radhakrishnan, S. K.; Radloff, P.; Rados, P.; Ragusa, F.; Rahal, G.; Raine, J. A.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rangel-Smith, C.; Ratti, M. G.; Rauch, D. M.; Rauscher, F.; Rave, S.; Ravenscroft, T.; Ravinovich, I.; Raymond, M.; Read, A. L.; Readioff, N. P.; Reale, M.; Rebuzzi, D. M.; Redelbach, A.; Redlinger, G.; Reece, R.; Reed, R. G.; Reeves, K.; Rehnisch, L.; Reichert, J.; Reiss, A.; Rembser, C.; Ren, H.; Rescigno, M.; Resconi, S.; Resseguie, E. D.; Rettie, S.; Reynolds, E.; Rezanova, O. L.; Reznicek, P.; Rezvani, R.; Richter, R.; Richter, S.; Richter-Was, E.; Ricken, O.; Ridel, M.; Rieck, P.; Riegel, C. J.; Rieger, J.; Rifki, O.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rimoldi, M.; Rinaldi, L.; Ristić, B.; Ritsch, E.; Riu, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rizvi, E.; Rizzi, C.; Roberts, R. T.; Robertson, S. H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robinson, D.; Robinson, J. E. M.; Robson, A.; Roda, C.; Rodina, Y.; Rodriguez Perez, A.; Rodriguez Rodriguez, D.; Roe, S.; Rogan, C. S.; Røhne, O.; Roloff, J.; Romaniouk, A.; Romano, M.; Romano Saez, S. M.; Romero Adam, E.; Rompotis, N.; Ronzani, M.; Roos, L.; Rosati, S.; Rosbach, K.; Rose, P.; Rosien, N.-A.; Rossetti, V.; Rossi, E.; Rossi, L. P.; Rosten, J. H. N.; Rosten, R.; Rotaru, M.; Roth, I.; Rothberg, J.; Rousseau, D.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Rubbo, F.; Rühr, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Ruschke, A.; Russell, H. L.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruthmann, N.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Rybar, M.; Rybkin, G.; Ryu, S.; Ryzhov, A.; Rzehorz, G. F.; Saavedra, A. F.; Sabato, G.; Sacerdoti, S.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sadykov, R.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Saha, P.; Sahinsoy, M.; Saimpert, M.; Saito, T.; Sakamoto, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Salamanna, G.; Salazar Loyola, J. E.; Salek, D.; Sales De Bruin, P. H.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sammel, D.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sánchez, J.; Sanchez Martinez, V.; Sanchez Pineda, A.; Sandaker, H.; Sandbach, R. L.; Sander, C. O.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandoval, C.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sannino, M.; Sansoni, A.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, H.; Santoyo Castillo, I.; Sapp, K.; Sapronov, A.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarrazin, B.; Sasaki, O.; Sato, K.; Sauvan, E.; Savage, G.; Savard, P.; Savic, N.; Sawyer, C.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, J.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scanlon, T.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Scarcella, M.; Scarfone, V.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schachtner, B. M.; Schaefer, D.; Schaefer, L.; Schaefer, R.; Schaeffer, J.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Schiavi, C.; Schier, S.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmidt-Sommerfeld, K. R.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, S.; Schneider, B.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schoenrock, B. D.; Schopf, E.; Schott, M.; Schouwenberg, J. F. P.; Schovancova, J.; Schramm, S.; Schuh, N.; Schulte, A.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwarz, T. A.; Schweiger, H.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Sciolla, G.; Scuri, F.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Seema, P.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekhon, K.; Sekula, S. J.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Sessa, M.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfiligoj, T.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shaikh, N. W.; Shan, L. Y.; Shang, R.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shaw, S. M.; Shcherbakova, A.; Shehu, C. Y.; Shen, Y.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shirabe, S.; Shiyakova, M.; Shlomi, J.; Shmeleva, A.; Shoaleh Saadi, D.; Shochet, M. J.; Shojaii, S.; Shope, D. R.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Sicho, P.; Sickles, A. M.; Sidebo, P. E.; Sideras Haddad, E.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simon, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sioli, M.; Siragusa, G.; Siral, I.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Skinner, M. B.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Slovak, R.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smiesko, J.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, J. W.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smith, R. W.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snyder, I. M.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Sokhrannyi, G.; Solans Sanchez, C. A.; Solar, M.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Son, H.; Song, H. Y.; Sopczak, A.; Sorin, V.; Sosa, D.; Sotiropoulou, C. L.; Soualah, R.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Sowden, B. C.; Spagnolo, S.; Spalla, M.; Spangenberg, M.; Spanò, F.; Sperlich, D.; Spettel, F.; Spieker, T. M.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stabile, A.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, G. H.; Stark, J.; Stark, S. H.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Stärz, S.; Staszewski, R.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Suchek, S.; Sugaya, Y.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Suruliz, K.; Suster, C. J. E.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Svatos, M.; Swiatlowski, M.; Swift, S. P.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, M.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanioka, R.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tapia Araya, S.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, A. C.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, P. T. E.; Taylor, W.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temple, D.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todome, K.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tong, B.; Tornambe, P.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Treado, C. J.; Trefzger, T.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Trofymov, A.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsang, K. W.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsui, K. M.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tu, Y.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tulbure, T. T.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turgeman, D.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turra, R.; Tuts, P. M.; Ucchielli, G.; Ueda, I.; Ughetto, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usui, J.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valdes Santurio, E.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valéry, L.; Valkar, S.; Vallier, A.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; van der Graaf, H.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varni, C.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vasquez, J. G.; Vasquez, G. A.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viaux Maira, N.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigani, L.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vishwakarma, A.; Vittori, C.; Vivarelli, I.; Vlachos, S.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wallangen, V.; Wang, C.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, Q.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, W.; Wang, W.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, A. F.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Weber, S. A.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M. D.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Whalen, K.; Whallon, N. L.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilk, F.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winston, O. J.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wobisch, M.; Wolf, T. M. H.; Wolff, R.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Worm, S. D.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xi, Z.; Xia, L.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W.-M.; Yap, Y. C.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zacharis, G.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zakharchuk, N.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, J. C.; Zeng, Q.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; Zou, R.; zur Nedden, M.; Zwalinski, L.

    2017-07-01

    Inclusive isolated-photon production in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV is studied with the ATLAS detector at the LHC using a data set with an integrated luminosity of 3.2 fb-1. The cross section is measured as a function of the photon transverse energy above 125 GeV in different regions of photon pseudorapidity. Next-to-leading-order perturbative QCD and Monte Carlo event-generator predictions are compared to the cross-section measurements and provide an adequate description of the data.

  7. Improved biomass productivity in algal biofilms through synergistic interactions between photon flux density and carbon dioxide concentration.

    PubMed

    Schnurr, Peter J; Molenda, Olivia; Edwards, Elizabeth; Espie, George S; Allen, D Grant

    2016-11-01

    Algal biofilms were grown to investigate the interaction effects of bulk medium CO2 concentration and photon flux density (PFD) on biomass productivities. When increasing the CO2 concentration from 0.04% to 2%, while maintaining a PFD of 100μmol/m(2)/s, biomass productivities increased from ∼0.5 to 2.0g/m(2)/d; however, the productivities plateaued when CO2 concentrations were incrementally increased above 2-12%. Statistical analysis demonstrates that there is a significant interaction between PFD and CO2 concentrations on biomass productivities. By simultaneously increasing PFD and CO2 concentrations, biomass productivities were significantly increased to 4.0 and 4.1g/m(2)/d in the experimental and modeled data, respectively. The second order model predicted increases in biomass productivities as both PFD and CO2 simultaneously increased yielding an optimum at 440μmol/m(2)/s and 7.1%; however, when conditions were extended to the highest end of their respective ranges, the conditions were detrimental to growth and productivities decreased. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Search for Double Higgs Production in the Final State with Two Photons and Two Bottom Quarks at the CMS Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebda, Philip Robert

    A search for the production of Higgs pairs in the decay channel with two photons and two bottom quarks is reported for both resonant and nonresonant cases. The data corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 /fb of proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV collected by the CMS detector at the CERN Large Hardron Collider. The candidate events are selected by requiring two photons and two jets and are classified according to the number of jets tagged as coming from the hadronization of a bottom quark. The search for resonance production of two Higgs bosons through a new particle as hypothesized in extensions to the Standard Model involving a Radion or KK-graviton from models with warped extra dimensions or involving a heavy Higgs from models with supersymmetry, is performed on the resonant mass range from 260 GeV to 1100 GeV. The search for Standard Model nonresonant production of two Higgs bosons is performed; in addition a theoretical framework is explored for the analysis of anomalous values of the couplings tt¯H, HHH, and tt¯HH. The observations are consistent with background expectations. Upper limits at the 95% confidence level are extracted on the production cross section of resonant and SM nonresonant production. In particular, the Radion with a vacuum expectation of 1 TeV is observed (expected) to be excluded with masses below 0.97 TeV (0.88 TeV), while the analysis is not sensitive to the Radion with a vacuum expectation of 3 TeV. The nonresonant double Higgs cross section is observed (expected) to be excluded at 1.91 fb (1.59 fb) or 72.9 (60.7) times the NNLO Standard Model value.

  9. Production of a heavy quarkonium with a photon or via ISR at Z peak in e + e - collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chaohsi; Wang, Jianxiong; Wu, Xinggang

    2010-11-01

    Considering the possibility to build an e + e - collider at the energies around Z-boson resonance with a luminosity so high as L ∝ 1034 cm-2 s-1 (even higher) and the abilities of a modern synthesis detector, we systematically calculate the exclusive two body processes of the heavy quarkonium production: e + e - annihilates into a heavy quarkonium and a photon, involving the initial state radiation (i.e. ISR) cases, at the energies around the Z-boson resonance. Since the couplings of Z-boson to quarks contain an axial vector term as well as a vector one, a charmonium such as J/ψ or η c or h c or χ cJ …, or a bottomonium such as ϒ or η b or h b or χ bJ …, associating with a photon, may be produced respectively via Z-boson annihilation. If we call such a collider with so high luminosity and running around the Z-boson resonance as a Z-factory, then our results obtained here indicate that experimental studies of the various heavy quarkona (their ground and excited states) via the two-body processes at a Z-factory have outstanding advantages, especially, the production of the possible states with quantum numbers J PC = 1-- via ISR.

  10. Hadron and Photon Production of J Particles and the Origin of J Particles

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Ting, S. C. C.

    1975-01-01

    There have been many theoretical speculations on the existence of long lived neutral particles with a mass larger than 10 GeV/c{sup 2} which play the role of weak interactions that photons play in electromagnetic interactions. There is, however, no theoretical justification, and no predictions exist, for long lived particles in the mass region 1-10 GeV/{up 2}. Even though there is no strong theoretical justification for the existence of long lived particles at low masses, there is no experimental indication that they should not exist. Until last year no high sensitivity experiment had been done in this mass region.

  11. Production of a magnetic material with the ability to change from very soft to semi-hard magnetic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Sharma, Parmanand; Yodoshi, Noriharu; Makino, Akihiro

    2015-05-01

    Development and magnetic properties of an alloy that can change from very soft to semi-hard magnetic are reported. We found that as quenched ribbons of Fe75.3Pt8B12P4Cu0.7 alloy are amorphous by X-ray. Heat treatment in the temperature range of 400-450 °C causes formation of many α-Fe grains in the amorphous matrix. Hard magnetic L10 FePt grains appear at ˜520 °C. This alloy shows a high saturation magnetic flux density [Bs (≈ Ms) > 1.55 T] along with the ability to vary coercivity (Hc) from ˜25 A/m to 11 000 A/m. The Hc can be increased further to more than 21 000 A/m, but at the expense of a significant decrease in Bs. The ability to control magnetic properties lies in a precise control over the soft and hard magnetic phases, which are strongly exchange coupled.

  12. Upgrades to the GALEX photon tools for production of databases of GALEX UV photometry and variability at short timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Million, Chase

    This project will make use of gPhoton, a database and software suite of individual photons detected by the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) UV survey telescope mission that has recently become available at the Mikulski Archive at Space Telescope, making studies of astrophysical phenomena observed by this mission on short time scales (seconds to minutes) feasible for the first time since the end of the mission. This project will extend the capabilities of gPhoton to make it computationally feasible to conduct studies of this type across the whole mission. That new capability will then be leveraged to search for, analyze, and build a comprehensive of short time domain behavior for a particularly interesting class of object: dwarf flares. The frequency, energy, and nature of these energetic stellar events have important consequences for habitability of orbiting exoplants. Their dynamic origin is also not currently fully understood, and the catalog produced by this work will provide an important observational resource in wavelengths and energies not available in other surveys. The proposed work will create a new software tool, in the form of a source extraction stage of gPhoton, that makes it computationally feasible to systematically and comprehensively mine the entire GALEX data set on short time domains. The proposed work will also generate and archive a new high level database product derived from the legacy GALEX mission data set in the form of a catalog of short time domain UV lightcurves of flares, extending the value and utility of the GALEX data beyond what currently exists. The proposed work is therefore responsive to ``1.3.3 Astrophysical databases and development of new data products/analysis tools'' of this solicitation and falls under ADAP Research Area ``10. Astrophysical Databases.'' The proposed work also includes a scientific focus on the structure and evolution of main sequence stars with consequences for exoplanets and is therefore responsive to

  13. Search for Production of Invisible Final States in Single-Photon Decays of Upsilon(1S)

    SciTech Connect

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D.A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Brown, D.N.; Chistiakova, M.V.; Jensen, F.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2010-08-25

    We search for single-photon decays of the {Upsilon}(1S) resonance, {Upsilon} {yields} {gamma} + invisible, where the invisible state is either a particle of definite mass, such as a light Higgs boson A{sup 0}, or a pair of dark matter particles, {chi}{bar {chi}}. Both A{sup 0} and {chi} are assumed to have zero spin. We tag {Upsilon}(1S) decays with a dipion transition {Upsilon}(2S) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{Upsilon}(1S) and look for events with a single energetic photon and significant missing energy. We find no evidence for such processes in the mass range m{sub A{sup o}} {le} 9.2GeV and m{sub {chi}} {le} 4.5GeV in the sample of 98 x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(2S) decays collected with the BABAR detector and set stringent limits on new physics models that contain light dark matter states.

  14. Periodic dielectric structure for production of photonic band gap and devices incorporating the same

    DOEpatents

    Ho, Kai-Ming; Chan, Che-Ting; Soukoulis, Costas

    1994-08-02

    A periodic dielectric structure which is capable of producing a photonic band gap and which is capable of practical construction. The periodic structure is formed of a plurality of layers, each layer being formed of a plurality of rods separated by a given spacing. The material of the rods contrasts with the material between the rods to have a refractive index contrast of at least two. The rods in each layer are arranged with their axes parallel and at a given spacing. Adjacent layers are rotated by 90.degree., such that the axes of the rods in any given layer are perpendicular to the axes in its neighbor. Alternating layers (that is, successive layers of rods having their axes parallel such as the first and third layers) are offset such that the rods of one are about at the midpoint between the rods of the other. A four-layer periocity is thus produced, and successive layers are stacked to form a three-dimensional structure which exhibits a photonic band gap. By virtue of forming the device in layers of elongate members, it is found that the device is susceptible of practical construction.

  15. Temperature Insensitive and Radiation Hard Photonics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-19

    irradiation session and the results recorded . Temperature variation tests using the segmented contact method produced data used in predictive models. 3.1...measurements using the segmented contact method. The second device was a working laser that can be used to test the effect of irradiation on the...gain and loss curves of the diagnostic devices after the irradiation will provide us with the metrics that we can use to gauge the overall effect

  16. High- E T isolated-photon plus jets production in pp collisions at s=8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGES

    Aaboud, M.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; ...

    2017-03-11

    The dynamics of isolated-photon plus one-, two- and three-jet production in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV are studied with the ATLAS detector at the LHC using a data set with an integrated luminosity of 20.2 fb -1 . Measurements of isolated-photon plus jets cross sections are presented as functions of the photon and jet transverse momenta. The cross sections as functions of the azimuthal angle between the photon and the jets, the azimuthal angle between the jets, the photon–jet invariant mass and the scattering angle in the photon–jet centre-of-mass system are presented. The pattern of QCDmore » radiation around the photon and the leading jet is investigated by measuring jet production in an annular region centred on each object; enhancements are observed around the leading jet with respect to the photon in the directions towards the beams. The experimental measurements are compared to several different theoretical calculations, and overall a good description of the data is found.« less

  17. Calculation of Nuclear Particles Production at High-Energy Photon Beams from a Linac Operating at 6, 10 and 15 MV.

    PubMed

    Marchesini, Renato; Bettega, Daniela; Calzolari, Paola; Pignoli, Emanuele

    2016-08-13

    Production of photonuclear particles in a tissue-equivalent medium has been calculated for linacs at 6, 10 and 15 MV from Varian TrueBeam. Based on the knowledge of bremsstrahlung fluence spectra and linac photon beam parameters, numerical integration was performed on the cross sections for photoparticle production of the constituent elements of tissue ((2)H,(12)C,(13)C,(16)O,(17)O,(18)O,(14)N,(15)N). At 15 MV, at the depth of photon maximum dose, the total absorbed dose due to neutrons, protons, alphas and residual nuclei from photon reactions in tissue (5.5E-05 Gy per Gy of photons) is comparable to that due to neutrons from accelerator head. Results reasonably agree with data reported in the literature using Monte Carlo models simulating linac head components. This work suggests a simple method to estimate the dose contributed by the photon-induced nuclear particles for high-energy photon beams produced by linacs in use, as it might be relevant for late stochastic effects.

  18. Recoil and power corrections in high-xT direct photon production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterman, George; Vogelsang, Werner

    2005-01-01

    We study a class of nonperturbative corrections to single-inclusive photon cross sections at measured transverse momentum pT, in the large-xT limit. We develop an extension of the joint (threshold and transverse momentum) resummation formalism, appropriate for large xT, in which there are no kinematic singularities associated with recoil, and for which matching to fixed-order and to threshold resummation at next-to-leading logarithm (NLL) is straightforward. Beyond NLL, we find contributions that can be attributed to recoil from initial-state radiation. Associated power corrections occur as inverse powers of p2T and are identified from the infrared structure of integrals over the running coupling. They have significant energy-dependence and decrease from typical fixed-target to collider energies. Energy conservation, which is incorporated into joint resummation, moderates the effects of perturbative recoil and power corrections for large xT.

  19. Photon-initiated production of a dilepton final state at the LHC: Cross section versus forward-backward asymmetry studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accomando, Elena; Fiaschi, Juri; Hautmann, Francesco; Moretti, Stefano; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire H.

    2017-02-01

    We explore the effects of photon induced (PI) production of a dilepton final state in the Large Hadron Collider environment. Using QED parton distribution function (PDF) sets we can treat the photons as real partons inside the protons and compare their yield directly to that of the Drell-Yan (DY) process. In particular, we concentrate on an error analysis of the two mechanisms. In order to do so, we use the neural network parton distribution functions (NNPDF) set, which comes with a set of replicas to estimate the systematic PDF error, and the CT14 set. On the one hand, we find that the PI contribution becomes dominant over DY above a dilepton invariant mass of 3 TeV. On the other hand, the PI predictions are affected by a large uncertainty coming from the QED PDFs, well above the one affecting the DY mode. We assess the impact of these uncertainties in the context of resonant and nonresonant searches for a neutral massive vector boson (Z') through the differential cross section and forward-backward asymmetry (AFB) observables as a function of the dilepton invariant mass. While the former is subject to the aforementioned significant residual errors the latter shows the systematic error cancellation expected (recall that AFB is a ratio of cross sections) even in presence of PI contributions, so that the recently emphasized key role played by AFB as a valid tool for both Z' discovery and interpretation in both resonant and nonresonant mode is further consolidated.

  20. Search for anomalous production of events with a photon, jet, b-quark jet, and missing transverse energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; González, B. Álvarez; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Ashmanskas, W.; Attal, A.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Azzurri, P.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Bartsch, V.; Bauer, G.; Beauchemin, P.-H.; Bedeschi, F.; Beecher, D.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Beringer, J.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Blair, R. E.; Blocker, C.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boisvert, V.; Bolla, G.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Bridgeman, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brubaker, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burke, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Byrum, K. L.; Cabrera, S.; Calancha, C.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chang, S. H.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Choudalakis, G.; Chuang, S. H.; Chung, K.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Chwalek, T.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clark, D.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Cordelli, M.; Cortiana, G.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Almenar, C. Cuenca; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Cully, J. C.; Dagenhart, D.; Datta, M.; Davies, T.; de Barbaro, P.; de Cecco, S.; Deisher, A.; de Lorenzo, G.; Dell'Orso, M.; Deluca, C.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; Derwent, P. F.; di Giovanni, G. P.; Dionisi, C.; di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Donini, J.; Dorigo, T.; Dube, S.; Efron, J.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Fedorko, W. T.; Feild, R. G.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H. J.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garberson, F.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Genser, K.; Gerberich, H.; Gerdes, D.; Gessler, A.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Gimmell, J. L.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gresele, A.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Grundler, U.; da Costa, J. Guimaraes; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, K.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Han, B.-Y.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harper, S.; Harr, R. F.; Harris, R. M.; Hartz, M.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heijboer, A.; Heinrich, J.; Henderson, C.; Herndon, M.; Heuser, J.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hill, C. S.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hocker, A.; Hou, S.; Houlden, M.; Hsu, S.-C.; Huffman, B. T.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Incandela, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jha, M. K.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, J. E.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Kar, D.; Karchin, P. E.; Kato, Y.; Kephart, R.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, H. W.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirsch, L.; Klimenko, S.; Knuteson, B.; Ko, B. R.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kubo, T.; Kuhr, T.; Kulkarni, N. P.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lecompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Lin, C.-S.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, T.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Loreti, M.; Lovas, L.; Lucchesi, D.; Luci, C.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lyons, L.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; MacQueen, D.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Maki, T.; Maksimovic, P.; Malde, S.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Marino, C. P.; Martin, A.; Martin, V.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ballarín, R.; Maruyama, T.; Mastrandrea, P.; Masubuchi, T.; Mathis, M.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzione, A.; Merkel, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Miladinovic, N.; Miller, R.; Mills, C.; Milnik, M.; Mitra, A.; Mitselmakher, G.; Miyake, H.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Fernandez, P. Movilla; Mülmenstädt, J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Mumford, R.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Nagano, A.; Naganoma, J.; Nakamura, K.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Necula, V.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Neubauer, S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norman, M.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Griso, S. Pagan; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Papaikonomou, A.; Paramonov, A. A.; Parks, B.; Pashapour, S.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Peiffer, T.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pinera, L.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poukhov, O.; Pounder, N.; Prakoshyn, F.; Pronko, A.; Proudfoot, J.; Ptohos, F.; Pueschel, E.; Punzi, G.; Pursley, J.; Rademacker, J.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Renz, M.; Rescigno, M.; Richter, S.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Rossi, M.; Rossin, R.; Roy, P.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Saarikko, H.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Saltó, O.; Santi, L.; Sarkar, S.; Sartori, L.; Sato, K.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schmidt, M. A.; Schmidt, M. P.; Schmitt, M.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Sedov, A.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sexton-Kennedy, L.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shiraishi, S.; Shochet, M.; Shon, Y.; Shreyber, I.; Sidoti, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sisakyan, A.; Slaughter, A. J.; Slaunwhite, J.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Snihur, R.; Soha, A.; Somalwar, S.; Sorin, V.; Spalding, J.; Spreitzer, T.; Squillacioti, P.; Stanitzki, M.; Denis, R. St.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Strycker, G. L.; Stuart, D.; Suh, J. S.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Suzuki, T.; Taffard, A.; Takashima, R.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, R.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Terashi, K.; Thom, J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thompson, G. A.; Thomson, E.; Tipton, P.; Ttito-Guzmán, P.; Tkaczyk, S.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Tourneur, S.; Trovato, M.; Tsai, S.-Y.; Tu, Y.; Turini, N.; Ukegawa, F.; Vallecorsa, S.; van Remortel, N.; Varganov, A.; Vataga, E.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vidal, M.; Vidal, R.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vine, T.; Vogel, M.; Volobouev, I.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. G.; Wagner, R. L.; Wagner, W.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Weinberger, M.; Weinelt, J.; Wester, W. C., III; Whitehouse, B.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, G.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, C.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Würthwein, F.; Xie, S.; Yagil, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamaoka, J.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W. M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanello, L.; Zanetti, A.; Zhang, X.; Zheng, Y.; Zucchelli, S.

    2009-09-01

    We present a signature-based search for the anomalous production of events containing a photon, two jets, of which at least one is identified as originating from a b quark, and missing transverse energy (E̸T). The search uses data corresponding to 2.0fb-1 of integrated luminosity from pp¯ collisions at a center-of-mass energy of s=1.96TeV, collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. From 6.69747×106 events with a photon candidate with transverse energy ET>25GeV, we find 617 events with E̸T>25GeV and two or more jets with ET>15GeV, at least one identified as originating from a b quark, versus an expectation of 607±113 events. Increasing the requirement on E̸T to 50 GeV, we find 28 events versus an expectation of 30±11 events. We find no indications of non-standard-model phenomena.

  1. Search for Anomalous Production of Events with a Photon, Jet, b-quark Jet, and Missing Transverse Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Collaboration, The CDF

    2009-05-01

    We present a signature-based search for anomalous production of events containing a photon, two jets, of which at least one is identified as originating from a b quark, and missing transverse energy (/E{sub T}). The search uses data corresponding to 2.0 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity from p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. From 6,697,466 events with a photon candidate with transverse energy ET > 25 GeV, we find 617 events with /E{sub T} > 25 GeV and two or more jets with E{sub T} > 15 GeV, at least one identified as originating from a b quark, versus an expectation of 607 {+-} 113 events. Increasing the requirement on /E{sub T} to 50 GeV, we find 28 events versus an expectation of 30 {+-} 11 events. We find no indications of non-standard-model phenomena.

  2. Challenges of direct photon production at forward rapidities and large pT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krelina, Michal; Cepila, Jan; Nemchik, Jan

    2017-02-01

    Direct photons produced in interactions with nuclear targets represent a cleaner probe for investigation of nuclear effects than hadrons, since photons have no final state interaction and no energy loss or absorption is expected in the produced hot medium. Therefore, besides the Cronin enhancement at medium-high transverse momenta pT and isospin effects at larger pT , one should not expect any nuclear effects. However, this fact is in contrast to the PHENIX data providing an evidence for a significant large-pT suppression at mid rapidities in central d + Au and Au + Au collisions that cannot be induced by coherent phenomena (gluon shadowing, Color Glass Condensate). We demonstrate that such an unexpected results is subject to deficit of energy induced universally by multiple initial state interactions (ISI) towards the kinematic limits (large Feynman xF and/or large {x_T} = 2{p_T}/\\sqrt s ). For this reason, in order to enhance the effects of coherence, one should be cautious going to forward rapidities and higher energies. In the LHC kinematic region ISI corrections are irrelevant at mid rapidities but cause rather strong suppression at forward rapidities and large pT . Numerical calculations of invariant pT spectra and the nuclear modification factor were performed within two different models, the color dipole formalism and the model based on kT -factorization, which are successfully confronted with available data from the RHIC and LHC collider experiments. Finally, we perform also predictions for a strong onset of ISI corrections at forward rapidities and corresponding expected suppression can be verified by the future measurements at LHC.

  3. Probing the Small- x Gluon Tomography in Correlated Hard Diffractive Dijet Production in Deep Inelastic Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Hatta, Yoshitaka; Xiao, Bo-Wen; Yuan, Feng

    2016-05-20

    The close connection between the quantum phase space Wigner distribution of small-x gluons and the color dipole scattering amplitude is investigated, and studying it experimentally is proposed in the hard diffractive dijet production at the planned electron-ion collider. The angular correlation between the nucleon recoiled momentum and the dijet transverse momentum probes the nontrivial correlation in the phase space Wigner distribution. This experimental study not only provides three-dimensional tomographic pictures of gluons inside high energy protons - it gives a unique and interesting signal for the small-x dynamics with QCD evolution effects.

  4. Photons, photon jets, and dark photons at 750 GeV and beyond.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Basudeb; Kopp, Joachim; Schwaller, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    In new physics searches involving photons at the LHC, one challenge is to distinguish scenarios with isolated photons from models leading to "photon jets". For instance, in the context of the 750 GeV diphoton excess, it was pointed out that a true diphoton resonance [Formula: see text] can be mimicked by a process of the form [Formula: see text], where S is a new scalar with a mass of 750 GeV and a is a light pseudoscalar decaying to two collinear photons. Photon jets can be distinguished from isolated photons by exploiting the fact that a large fraction of photons convert to an [Formula: see text] pair inside the inner detector. In this note, we quantify this discrimination power, and we study how the sensitivity of future searches differs for photon jets compared to isolated photons. We also investigate how our results depend on the lifetime of the particle(s) decaying to the photon jet. Finally, we discuss the extension to [Formula: see text], where there are no photons at all but the dark photon [Formula: see text] decays to [Formula: see text] pairs. Our results will be useful in future studies of the putative 750 GeV signal, but also more generally in any new physics search involving hard photons.

  5. Photons, photon jets, and dark photons at 750 GeV and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, Basudeb; Kopp, Joachim; Schwaller, Pedro

    2016-05-01

    In new physics searches involving photons at the LHC, one challenge is to distinguish scenarios with isolated photons from models leading to "photon jets". For instance, in the context of the 750 GeV diphoton excess, it was pointed out that a true diphoton resonance S → γ γ can be mimicked by a process of the form p p → S → a a → 4γ , where S is a new scalar with a mass of 750 GeV and a is a light pseudoscalar decaying to two collinear photons. Photon jets can be distinguished from isolated photons by exploiting the fact that a large fraction of photons convert to an e^+e^- pair inside the inner detector. In this note, we quantify this discrimination power, and we study how the sensitivity of future searches differs for photon jets compared to isolated photons. We also investigate how our results depend on the lifetime of the particle(s) decaying to the photon jet. Finally, we discuss the extension to S→ A^' A^' → e^+e^-e^+e^-, where there are no photons at all but the dark photon A^' decays to e^+e^- pairs. Our results will be useful in future studies of the putative 750 GeV signal, but also more generally in any new physics search involving hard photons.

  6. Gas scintillation drift chambers with wave shifter read-out for hard X-ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadoulet, Bernard; Lin, Robert P.; Weiss, Steven C.

    1987-01-01

    A major improvement in hard X-ray and gamma ray astrophysics could be provided by high pressure xenon time projection chambers where gas scintillation is used both for the measurement of the time of interaction and for the detection of the extracted electrons. This allows three dimensional imaging of naturally complex events (photoelectric interaction with escape photon, Compton scatter, and pair production). A novel read-out system based on wave shifter fibers, which is well suited to the high pressures and large areas required of a hard X-ray telescope is proposed. Expected performances are computed, potential problems are outlined, and the experimental effort to solve these problems are described.

  7. Microalgae photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floume, Timmy; Coquil, Thomas; Sylvestre, Julien

    2011-05-01

    Due to their metabolic flexibility and fast growth rate, microscopic aquatic phototrophs like algae have a potential to become industrial photochemical converters. Algae photosynthesis could enable the large scale production of clean and renewable liquid fuels and chemicals with major environmental, economic and societal benefits. Capital and operational costs are the main issues to address through optical, process and biochemical engineering improvements. In this perspective, a variety of photonic approaches have been proposed - we introduce them here and describe their potential, limitations and compatibility with separate biotechnology and engineering progresses. We show that only sunlight-based approaches are economically realistic. One of photonics' main goals in the algae field is to dilute light to overcome photosaturation effects that impact upon cultures exposed to full sunlight. Among other approaches, we introduce a widely-compatible broadband spectral adaptation technique called AlgoSun® that uses luminescence to optimize sunlight spectrum in view of the bioconverter's requirements.

  8. Microjet formation and hard x-ray production from a liquid metal target irradiated by intense femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Lar'kin, A. Uryupina, D.; Ivanov, K.; Savel'ev, A.; Bonnet, T.; Gobet, F.; Hannachi, F.; Tarisien, M.; Versteegen, M.; Spohr, K.; Breil, J.; Chimier, B.; Dorchies, F.; Fourment, C.; Leguay, P.-M.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.

    2014-09-15

    By using a liquid metal as a target one may significantly enhance the yield of hard x-rays with a sequence of two intense femtosecond laser pulses. The influence of the time delay between the two pulses is studied experimentally and interpreted with numerical simulations. It was suggested that the first arbitrary weak pulse produces microjets from the target surface, while the second intense pulse provides an efficient electron heating and acceleration along the jet surface. These energetic electrons are the source of x-ray emission while striking the target surface. The microjet formation is explained based on the results given by both optical diagnostics and hydrodynamic modeling by a collision of shocks originated from two distinct zones of laser energy deposition.

  9. Molecular spectroscopy by stepwise two-photon ion-pair production at 71 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Kung, A.H.; Page, R.H.; Larkin, R.J.; Shen, Y.R.; Lee, Y.T.

    1985-06-01

    The Rydberg states of H/sub 2/ have been a continuing subject of intensive study by various research groups. However, understanding of the high lying electronic states of this molecule has been inhibited by the lack of spectroscopic data in the region <75 nm. Experimental studies have been difficult because spectroscopic features are generally buried under an intense absorption or photoionization continuum. Intense, high-resolution excitation sources are not easily available. Recent developments on tunable, narrowband, coherent xuv sources provide new means of studying the spectroscopy in this region with high resolution (+- .0005 nm). We have applied the technique of stepwise two-photon excitation to study photoionization of H/sub 2/ in a molecular beam using the two lowest excited states of H/sub 2/ as the intermediate level. This excitation, coupled with the detection of background-free H/sup -/ ions has enabled us to uncover, for the first time, spectroscopic features that are difficult to observe in positive ion detection. These features have been successfully assigned to new Rydberg series converging to the high vibrations of the H/sub 2//sup +/ ground electronic state.

  10. Production of TeV-class photons via Compton back-scattering on proton beams of a keV high brilliance FEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafini, L.; Broggi, F.; Curatolo, C.

    2017-07-01

    Present availability of high brilliance photon beams as those produced by X-ray Free Electron Lasers in combination with intense TeV proton beams like those available at SPS, LHC or in the future at FCC, makes possible to conceive the production of TeV-class photons by Compton back-scattering of keV photons carried by the FEL radiation pulse. We present here the study of spectra and fluxes of the TeV-class photons, which are collimated in the typical 1/ γ forward angle with respect to the propagation of the proton beam (γ is the proton beam relativistic factor). Using a room-temperature Linac based X-ray FEL delivering radiation pulses at 100 Hz up to 6 keV photon energy (implying a Linac electron beam energy in the 5-8 GeV range), fluxes of tens photons/s are achievable. It is also shown that a proper control of proton beam emittance and focusing at the interaction point is crucial to assure a reasonable energy spread of the photons emitted within an angle smaller than 1/ γ . Moreover, due to the reasonably small proton recoil, the back-scattering is actually in the Thomson regime, therefore the back-scattered photons retain the same polarization of the incident FEL beam (that is typically linear, but can be made circular too) even using unpolarized protons. The life-time of the proton beam circulating in the main ring is not affected at all by the interaction with the FEL beam due to the small number of Compton back-scattering events generated (maximum of 1 per bunch collision).

  11. Influence of milk pretreatment on production of free fatty acids and volatile compounds in hard cheeses: heat treatment and mechanical agitation.

    PubMed

    Vélez, M A; Perotti, M C; Wolf, I V; Hynes, E R; Zalazar, C A

    2010-10-01

    This work aimed to identify technological steps that can increase fat hydrolysis and volatile compounds production in hard cheeses; these biochemical events have been related with improved piquant taste and development of genuine flavor during cheese ripening. For that purpose, 2 different pretreatments of cheese milk were tested: heat treatment and mechanical agitation. Both factors were assayed at 2 levels: milk was either batch pasteurized or nonthermally treated, and mechanical agitation was either applied or not applied. For all combinations, hard cheeses (Reggianito type) were produced in a pilot plant and ripened for 90 d. In all cheeses the degree of lipolysis, assessed by gas chromatography, increased similarly during ripening. However, the proportion of short-chain fatty acids was higher in the cheeses made with unpasteurized milk, suggesting a higher activity of lipases with positional specificity toward the sn-3 position of the triglyceride, among which milk lipoprotein lipase is found. Similar results were found for most of the volatile compounds, determined by solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography flame-ionization detector/mass spectrometry, which constitute the groups of ketones, alcohols, esters, and the group of acids. On the contrary, no effect of mechanical agitation was observed, although some interactions between factors were found. In the conditions of the study, results suggest that heat treatment had a higher effect on cheese lipolysis and volatile compounds production than partial destabilization of the fat emulsion produced by the agitation method applied.

  12. Determining the chirality of Yukawa couplings via single charged Higgs boson production in polarized photon collisions.

    PubMed

    He, Hong-Jian; Kanemura, Shinya; Yuan, C-P

    2002-09-02

    When the charged Higgs boson is too heavy to be produced in pairs, the predominant production mechanism at linear colliders is via the single charged Higgs boson production processes, such as e(-)e(+)-->bcH+,taunuH+ and gammagamma-->bcH+,taunuH+. We show that the yield of a heavy charged Higgs boson at a gammagamma collider is typically 1 or 2 orders of magnitude larger than that at an e(-)e(+) collider. Furthermore, a polarized gammagamma collider can determine the chirality of the Yukawa couplings of fermions with charged Higgs boson via single charged Higgs boson production and, thus, discriminate models of new physics.

  13. Practice in photonics education and training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong-Lin; Di, Hong-Wei; Zhong, Jingang

    2002-05-01

    Photonics and photon technology play an important role in information technology and life science in the 21st Century. Jinan University always devotes itself to the training of the technicians in optics and photonics. We have founded the system of undergraduate and postgraduate courses and also built up the photonics technology major lab of Guang Dong Education Bureau. The research involves the optoelectronics detection, the image processing, laser biological effects, optical communications, and so on. Jinan University works hard to promote the industrial application of photonics technology. Jinan University is making its great contribution to the construction of Photon Valley of Guang Dong Province.

  14. Centrality dependence of direct photon production in (square root)S(NN) = 200 GeV Au + Au collisions.

    PubMed

    Adler, S S; Afanasiev, S; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Alexander, J; Amirikas, R; Aphecetche, L; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, R; Babintsev, V; Baldisseri, A; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Berdnikov, Y; Bhagavatula, S; Boissevain, J G; Borel, H; Borenstein, S; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bruner, N; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Camard, X; Chai, J-S; Chand, P; Chang, W C; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J; Choudhury, R K; Chujo, T; Cianciolo, V; Cobigo, Y; Cole, B A; Constantin, P; d'Enterria, D; David, G; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Devismes, A; Dietzsch, O; Drapier, O; Drees, A; du Rietz, R; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Efremenko, Y V; El Chenawi, K; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Ewell, L; Fields, D E; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fox, B D; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fung, S-Y; Garpman, S; Ghosh, T K; Glenn, A; Gogiberidze, G; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Perdekamp, M Grosse; Guryn, W; Gustafsson, H-A; Hachiya, T; Haggerty, J S; Hamagaki, H; Hansen, A G; Hartouni, E P; Harvey, M; Hayano, R; Hayashi, N; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; Hibino, M; Hill, J C; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Hoover, A; Ichihara, T; Ikonnikov, V V; Imai, K; Isenhower, D; Ishihara, M; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Jacak, B V; Jang, W Y; Jeong, Y; Jia, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Johnson, S C; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kang, J H; Kapoor, S S; Katou, K; Kelly, S; Khachaturov, B; Khanzadeev, A; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, D W; Kim, E; Kim, G-B; Kim, H J; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Kiyoyama, K; Klein-Boesing, C; Kobayashi, H; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Koehler, D; Kohama, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kuberg, C H; Kurita, K; Kuroki, Y; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Ladygin, V; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Leckey, S; Lee, D M; Lee, S; Leitch, M J; Li, X H; Lim, H; Litvinenko, A; Liu, M X; Liu, Y; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Manko, V I; Mao, Y; Martinez, G; Marx, M D; Masui, H; Matathias, F; Matsumoto, T; McGaughey, P L; Melnikov, E; Messer, F; Miake, Y; Milan, J; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, R E; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Mühlbacher, F; Mukhopadhyay, D; Muniruzzaman, M; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Nakamura, T; Nandi, B K; Nara, M; Newby, J; Nilsson, P; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Okada, K; Ono, M; Onuchin, V; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Oyama, K; Ozawa, K; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, J; Parmar, A; Pate, S F; Peitzmann, T; Peng, J-C; Peresedov, V; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Plasil, F; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Roche, G; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosnet, P; Ryu, S S; Sadler, M E; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, M; Sakai, S; Samsonov, V; Sanfratello, L; Santo, R; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Schutz, Y; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Shaw, M R; Shea, T K; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shiina, T; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Sivertz, M; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Staley, F; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sullivan, J P; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tamai, M; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarján, P; Tepe, J D; Thomas, T L; Tojo, J; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuruoka, H; Tuli, S K; Tydesjö, H; Tyurin, N; van Hecke, H W; Velkovska, J; Velkovsky, M; Veszprémi, V; Villatte, L; Vinogradov, A A; Volkov, M A; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, X R; Watanabe, Y; White, S N; Wohn, F K; Woody, C L; Xie, W; Yang, Y; Yanovich, A; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhang, C; Zhou, S; Zhou, S J; Zolin, L

    2005-06-17

    The first measurement of direct photons in Au + Au collisions at (square root)S(NN) = 200 GeV is presented. The direct photon signal is extracted as a function of the Au + Au collision centrality and compared to next-to-leading order perturbative quantum chromodynamics calculations. The direct photon yield is shown to scale with the number of nucleon-nucleon collisions for all centralities.

  15. Transverse single-spin asymmetries of weak boson, Drell-Yan and prompt photon production at STAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazio, Salvatore

    2017-03-01

    Accessing the Sivers TMD function in proton+proton collisions through the measurement of transverse single spin asymmetries (TSSAs) in Drell-Yan and weak boson production is an effective path to test the fundamental QCD prediction of the non-universality of the Sivers function. Furthermore, it provides data to study the spin-flavor structure of valence and sea quarks inside the proton and to test TMD evolution of parton distributions. The TSSA amplitude, AN, has been measured at STAR in proton+proton collisions at √{s }=500 GeV , with a recorded integrated luminosity of 25 pb-1. Within relatively large statistical uncertainties, the current data favor theoretical models that include a change of sign for the Sivers function relative to observations in SIDIS measurements, if TMD evolution effects on the AN are small. RHIC plans to run collisions of transversely polarized proton+proton beams at √{s }=500 GeV in 2017, delivering an integrated luminosity of 400 pb-1. This will allow STAR to perform a precise measurement of TSSAs in both Drell-Yan and weak boson production, as well as other observables sensitive to the non-universality of the Sivers function via the Twist-3 formalism, e.g. the TSSA of prompt photons.

  16. Measurement of the Production Cross Section for Pairs of Isolated Photons in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, S.; et al.,

    2012-01-01

    The integrated and differential cross sections for the production of pairs of isolated photons is measured in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC. A data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 36 inverse picobarns is analysed. A next-to-leading-order perturbative QCD calculation is compared to the measurements. A discrepancy is observed for regions of the phase space where the two photons have an azimuthal angle difference, $\\Delta(\\phi)$, less than approximately 2.8.

  17. Study of the associated production of photons and b-quark jets in pp¯ collisions at s=1.96TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Attal, A.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauer, G.; Beauchemin, P.-H.; Bedeschi, F.; Beecher, D.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Blair, R. E.; Blocker, C.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boisvert, V.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Bridgeman, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brubaker, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Byrum, K. L.; Cabrera, S.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chang, S. H.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Chung, K.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Chwalek, T.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clark, D.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Cully, J. C.; Dagenhart, D.; Datta, M.; Davies, T.; de Barbaro, P.; de Cecco, S.; Deisher, A.; de Lorenzo, G.; Dell'Orso, M.; Deluca, C.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; D'Errico, M.; di Canto, A.; di Giovanni, G. P.; di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, T.; Dube, S.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Fedorko, W. T.; Feild, R. G.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garberson, F.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerdes, D.; Gessler, A.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Gimmell, J. L.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gresele, A.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Grundler, U.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Han, B.-Y.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hartz, M.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Heuser, J.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hill, C. S.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hocker, A.; Hou, S.; Houlden, M.; Hsu, S.-C.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Incandela, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jha, M. K.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, J. E.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Kar, D.; Karchin, P. E.; Kato, Y.; Kephart, R.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, H. W.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirsch, L.; Klimenko, S.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kulkarni, N. P.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lecompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Lin, C.-J.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, T.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Lovas, L.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; MacQueen, D.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Maksimovic, P.; Malde, S.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Marino, C. P.; Martin, A.; Martin, V.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ballarín, R.; Mastrandrea, P.; Mathis, M.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzione, A.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Miladinovic, N.; Miller, R.; Mills, C.; Milnik, M.; Mitra, A.; Mitselmakher, G.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mülmenstädt, J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakamura, K.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Neubauer, S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norman, M.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Papaikonomou, A.; Paramanov, A. A.; Parks, B.; Pashapour, S.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Peiffer, T.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. 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J.; Slaunwhite, J.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Snihur, R.; Soha, A.; Somalwar, S.; Sorin, V.; Squillacioti, P.; Stanitzki, M.; St. Denis, R.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Strycker, G. L.; Suh, J. S.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Taffard, A.; Takashima, R.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, R.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thome, J.; Thompson, G. A.; Thomson, E.; Tipton, P.; Ttito-Guzmán, P.; Tkaczyk, S.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Tourneur, S.; Trovato, M.; Tsai, S.-Y.; Tu, Y.; Turini, N.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; van Remortel, N.; Varganov, A.; Vataga, E.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vidal, M.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vogel, M.; Volobouev, I.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. G.; Wagner, R. L.; Wagner, W.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Weinberger, M.; Weinelt, J.; Wester, W. C., III; Whitehouse, B.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, G.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, C.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamaoka, J.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W. M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanetti, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, X.; Zheng, Y.; Zucchelli, S.; CDF Collaboration

    2010-03-01

    The cross section for photon production in association with at least one jet containing a b quark has been measured in proton antiproton collisions at s=1.96TeV. The data sample used corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 340pb-1 collected with the CDF II detector. Both the differential cross section as a function of photon transverse energy ETγ and the total cross section are measured and compared to a next-to-leading order prediction for the process.

  18. Updated Draft Protocol for the Evaluation of Bactericidal Activity of Hard, Non-porous Copper Containing Surface Products

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document describes the updated draft testing protocol recommended by the EPA to support the registration of copper-containing surface products (such as door knobs, or other items that are not intended for food contact) that bear sanitizer claims.

  19. High energy photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.; Zerwas, P.M.

    1994-07-01

    The collisions of high energy photons produced at a electron-positron collider provide a comprehensive laboratory for testing QCD, electroweak interactions and extensions of the standard model. The luminosity and energy of the colliding photons produced by back-scattering laser beams is expected to be comparable to that of the primary e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collisions. In this overview, we shall focus on tests of electroweak theory in photon-photon annihilation, particularly {gamma}{gamma} {yields} W{sup +}W{sup {minus}}, {gamma}{gamma} {yields} Higgs bosons, and higher-order loop processes, such as {gamma}{gamma} {yields} {gamma}{gamma}, Z{gamma} and ZZ. Since each photon can be resolved into a W{sup +}W{sup minus} pair, high energy photon-photon collisions can also provide a remarkably background-free laboratory for studying WW collisions and annihilation. We also review high energy {gamma}{gamma} tests of quantum chromodynamics, such as the scaling of the photon structure function, t{bar t} production, mini-jet processes, and diffractive reactions.

  20. Comparison of photon and hadron induced production of ρ0 mesons in the energy range of 65 to 175 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apsimon, R. J.; Atkinson, M.; Baake, M.; Bagdasarian, L. S.; Barberis, D.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Brook, N.; Charity, T.; Clegg, A. B.; Coyle, P.; Danaher, S.; Danagulian, S.; Davenport, M.; Dickinson, B.; Diekmann, B.; Donnachie, A.; Doyle, A. T.; Eades, J.; Ellison, R. J.; Fiedler, F.; Flower, P. S.; Foster, J. M.; Galbraith, W.; Galumian, P. I.; Gapp, C.; Gebert, F.; Hallewell, G.; Heinloth, K.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Hickman, M. T.; Hoeger, K. C.; Hofmann, R. P.; Holzkamp, A.; Holzkamp, S.; Hughes-Jones, R. E.; Ibbotson, M.; Jakob, H. P.; Joseph, D.; Keemer, N. R.; Kingler, J.; Körsgen, G.; Kolya, S. D.; Lafferty, G. D.; McCann, H.; McClatchey, R.; McManus, C.; Mercer, D.; Morris, J. A. G.; Morris, J. V.; Newton, D.; O'Connor, A.; Oedingen, R.; Oganesian, A. G.; Ottewell, P. J.; Paterson, C. N.; Paul, E.; Raid, D.; Rotscheidt, H.; Sharp, P. H.; Soeldner-Rembold, S.; Thacker, N. A.; Thompson, L.; Thompson, R. J.; Waterhouse, J.; Weigend, A. S.; Wilson, G. W.

    1992-12-01

    The inclusive production of ρ0 mesons was measured in γ p and h ± p collisions at beam energies of 65 GeV≦ E γ≦175 GeV and E h =80, 140 GeV, respectively, where h is π or K. Cross sections were determined for all beams and energies as functions of x F (-0.1≦ x F≦1.0), p T (0≦ p T≦3.5 GeV/c) and the polar decay angle of the ρ0 by fitting the ρ0 signal in π+π- mass distributions. The ρ0 line shape is found to be distorted from a pure Breit-Wigner distribution throughout most of the x F- p T plane for both photon and hadron beams and a simple explanation is suggested. Throughout the paper emphasis is put on the comparison of photon and hadron beam data. The comparison of cross sections of γ p and hp data provides a measure of the Vector Meson Dominance factor throughout the x F- p T range of the ρ0. The ρ0 production at low p T can be described for both photon and hadron beams by a triple regge model at large x F. Similarly central production is well described by the quark-antiquark fusion model. At large p T there is an excess of ρ0 photoproduction which is consistent with the expected onset of pointlike photon interactions.

  1. Measurement of the isolated prompt photon production cross section in pp collisions at √s=7  TeV.

    PubMed

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Ozok, F; Sen, S; Wetzel, J; Yetkin, T; Yi, K; Barnett, B A; Blumenfeld, B; Bonato, A; Eskew, C; Fehling, D; Giurgiu, G; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Hu, G; Maksimovic, P; Rappoccio, S; Swartz, M; Tran, N V; Whitbeck, A; Baringer, P; Bean, A; Benelli, G; Grachov, O; Murray, M; Noonan, D; Radicci, V; Sanders, S; Wood, J S; Zhukova, V; Bolton, T; Chakaberia, I; Ivanov, A; Makouski, M; Maravin, Y; Shrestha, S; Svintradze, I; Wan, Z; Gronberg, J; Lange, D; Wright, D; Baden, A; Boutemeur, M; Eno, S C; Ferencek, D; Gomez, J A; Hadley, N J; Kellogg, R G; Kirn, M; Lu, Y; Mignerey, A C; Rossato, K; Rumerio, P; Santanastasio, F; Skuja, A; Temple, J; Tonjes, M B; Tonwar, S C; Twedt, E; Alver, B; Bauer, G; Bendavid, J; Busza, W; Butz, E; Cali, I A; Chan, M; Dutta, V; Everaerts, P; Gomez Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; Hahn, K A; Harris, P; Kim, Y; Klute, M; Lee, Y-J; Li, W; Loizides, C; Luckey, P D; Ma, T; Nahn, S; Paus, C; Ralph, D; Roland, C; Roland, G; Rudolph, M; Stephans, G S F; Sumorok, K; Sung, K; Wenger, E A; Xie, S; Yang, M; Yilmaz, Y; Yoon, A S; Zanetti, M; Cole, P; Cooper, S I; Cushman, P; Dahmes, B; De Benedetti, A; Dudero, P R; Franzoni, G; Haupt, J; Klapoetke, K; Kubota, Y; Mans, J; Rekovic, V; Rusack, R; Sasseville, M; Singovsky, A; Cremaldi, L M; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Perera, L; Rahmat, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D; Bloom, K; Bose, S; Butt, J; Claes, D R; Dominguez, A; Eads, M; Keller, J; Kelly, T; Kravchenko, I; Lazo-Flores, J; Lundstedt, C; Malbouisson, H; Malik, S; Snow, G R; Baur, U; Godshalk, A; Iashvili, I; Kharchilava, A; Kumar, A; Shipkowski, S P; Smith, K; Alverson, G; Barberis, E; Baumgartel, D; Boeriu, O; Chasco, M; Kaadze, K; Reucroft, S; Swain, J; Wood, D; Zhang, J; Anastassov, A; Kubik, A; Odell, N; Ofierzynski, R A; Pollack, B; Pozdnyakov, A; Schmitt, M; Stoynev, S; Velasco, M; Won, S; Antonelli, L; Berry, D; Hildreth, M; Jessop, C; Karmgard, D J; Kolb, J; Kolberg, T; Lannon, K; Luo, W; Lynch, S; Marinelli, N; Morse, D M; Pearson, T; Ruchti, R; Slaunwhite, J; Valls, N; Warchol, J; Wayne, M; Ziegler, J; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Gu, J; Hill, C; Killewald, P; Kotov, K; Ling, T Y; Rodenburg, M; Williams, G; Adam, N; Berry, E; Elmer, P; Gerbaudo, D; Halyo, V; Hebda, P; Hunt, A; Jones, J; Laird, E; Lopes Pegna, D; Marlow, D; Medvedeva, T; Mooney, M; Olsen, J; Piroué, P; Quan, X; Saka, H; Stickland, D; Tully, C; Werner, J S; Zuranski, A; Acosta, J G; Huang, X T; Lopez, A; Mendez, H; Oliveros, S; Ramirez Vargas, J E; Zatserklyaniy, A; Alagoz, E; Barnes, V E; Bolla, G; Borrello, L; Bortoletto, D; Everett, A; Garfinkel, A F; Gecse, Z; Gutay, L; Hu, Z; Jones, M; Koybasi, O; Laasanen, A T; Leonardo, N; Liu, C; Maroussov, V; Merkel, P; Miller, D H; Neumeister, N; Potamianos, K; Shipsey, I; Silvers, D; Svyatkovskiy, A; Yoo, H D; Zablocki, J; Zheng, Y; Jindal, P; Parashar, N; Boulahouache, C; Cuplov, V; Ecklund, K M; Geurts, F J M; Liu, J H; Morales, J; Padley, B P; Redjimi, R; Roberts, J; Zabel, J; Betchart, B; Bodek, A; Chung, Y S; Covarelli, R; de Barbaro, P; Demina, R; Eshaq, Y; Flacher, H; Garcia-Bellido, A; Goldenzweig, P; Gotra, Y; Han, J; Harel, A; Miner, D C; Orbaker, D; Petrillo, G; Vishnevskiy, D; Zielinski, M; Bhatti, A; Demortier, L; Goulianos, K; Lungu, G; Mesropian, C; Yan, M; Atramentov, O; Barker, A; Duggan, D; Gershtein, Y; Gray, R; Halkiadakis, E; Hidas, D; Hits, D; Lath, A; Panwalkar, S; Patel, R; Richards, A; Rose, K; Schnetzer, S; Somalwar, S; Stone, R; Thomas, S; Cerizza, G; Hollingsworth, M; Spanier, S; Yang, Z C; York, A; Asaadi, J; Eusebi, R; Gilmore, J; Gurrola, A; Kamon, T; Khotilovich, V; Montalvo, R; Nguyen, C N; Pivarski, J; Safonov, A; Sengupta, S; Tatarinov, A; Toback, D; Weinberger, M; Akchurin, N; Bardak, C; Damgov, J; Jeong, C; Kovitanggoon, K; Lee, S W; Mane, P; Roh, Y; Sill, A; Volobouev, I; Wigmans, R; Yazgan, E; Appelt, E; Brownson, E; Engh, D; Florez, C; Gabella, W; Johns, W; Kurt, P; Maguire, C; Melo, A; Sheldon, P; Velkovska, J; Arenton, M W; Balazs, M; Boutle, S; Buehler, M; Conetti, S; Cox, B; Francis, B; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Lin, C; Neu, C; Yohay, R; Gollapinni, S; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Lamichhane, P; Mattson, M; Milstène, C; Sakharov, A; Anderson, M; Bachtis, M; Bellinger, J N; Carlsmith, D; Dasu, S; Efron, J; Gray, L; Grogg, K S; Grothe, M; Hall-Wilton, R; Herndon, M; Klabbers, P; Klukas, J; Lanaro, A; Lazaridis, C; Leonard, J; Lomidze, D; Loveless, R; Mohapatra, A; Reeder, D; Ross, I; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Swanson, J; Weinberg, M

    2011-02-25

    The differential cross section for the inclusive production of isolated prompt photons has been measured as a function of the photon transverse energy E(T)(γ) in pp collisions at √s=7  TeV using data recorded by the CMS detector at the LHC. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 2.9  pb(-1). Photons are required to have a pseudorapidity |η(γ)|<1.45 and E(T)(γ)>21  GeV, covering the kinematic region 0.006

  2. Photo-production of a 750 GeV di-photon resonance mediated by Kaluza-Klein leptons in the loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abel, Steven; Khoze, Valentin V.

    2016-05-01

    We consider the phenomenology of a 750 GeV resonance X which can be produced at the LHC by only photon fusion and subsequently decay into di-photons. We propose that the spin-zero state X is coupled to a heavy lepton that lives in the bulk of a higher-dimensional theory and interacts only with the photons of the Standard Model. We compute the di-photon rate in these models with two and more compact extra dimensions and demonstrate that they allow for a compelling explanation of the di-photon excess recently observed by the ATLAS and CMS collaborations. The central role in our approach is played by the summation over the Kaluza-Klein modes of the new leptons, thus providing a significant enhancement of the X → γγ loops for the production and decay subprocesses. It is expected that the jet activity accompanying these purely electromagnetic (at the partonic level) processes is numerically suppressed by factors such as {α}_{em}^2{{C}}_{qoverline{q}}/{{C}}_{γ γ}˜ 1{0}^{-3}.

  3. Single-photon sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lounis, Brahim; Orrit, Michel

    2005-05-01

    The concept of the photon, central to Einstein's explanation of the photoelectric effect, is exactly 100 years old. Yet, while photons have been detected individually for more than 50 years, devices producing individual photons on demand have only appeared in the last few years. New concepts for single-photon sources, or 'photon guns', have originated from recent progress in the optical detection, characterization and manipulation of single quantum objects. Single emitters usually deliver photons one at a time. This so-called antibunching of emitted photons can arise from various mechanisms, but ensures that the probability of obtaining two or more photons at the same time remains negligible. We briefly recall basic concepts in quantum optics and discuss potential applications of single-photon states to optical processing of quantum information: cryptography, computing and communication. A photon gun's properties are significantly improved by coupling it to a resonant cavity mode, either in the Purcell or strong-coupling regimes. We briefly recall early production of single photons with atomic beams, and the operation principles of macroscopic parametric sources, which are used in an overwhelming majority of quantum-optical experiments. We then review the photophysical and spectroscopic properties and compare the advantages and weaknesses of various single nanometre-scale objects used as single-photon sources: atoms or ions in the gas phase and, in condensed matter, organic molecules, defect centres, semiconductor nanocrystals and heterostructures. As new generations of sources are developed, coupling to cavities and nano-fabrication techniques lead to improved characteristics, delivery rates and spectral ranges. Judging from the brisk pace of recent progress, we expect single photons to soon proceed from demonstrations to applications and to bring with them the first practical uses of quantum information.

  4. Omega Omega and Proton-Antiproton Production in Two Photon Interactions at ARGUS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsipolitis, George

    1990-01-01

    The reactions gammagamma to 2pi^+2pi ^-2pi^0 and gamma gammatopi^+pi^-pi ^0pi^0 have been studied by using the ARGUS detector at the e^+e^ - storage ring DORIS II at DESY. In the 2pi^+2pi^ -2pi^0 final state the production of omega-mesons is observed and in particular the reaction gammagamma to omegaomega is seen for the first time. The cross section for gammagamma to omegaomega is found to have an enhancement at ~1.9GeV/c ^2 of about 12 nb. The topological cross sections for the reactions gammagamma to 2pi^+2 pi^-2pi^0 and gammagamma to omegapi^+pi^-pi ^0 are also measured. The production of charged rho -mesons is observed in the pi^+pi ^-pi^0pi^0 final state. The cross section for the reaction gamma gamma to rho ^+rho^- is measured for the first time. The cross section did not show a threshold enhancement similar to that found in the reaction gammagamma to rho^0rho^0 and is about a factor of four smaller. A spin parity analysis of the rho^+rho^- system shows that the cross section is dominated by the two amplitudes J^{P} = 0^+ and J^{P } = 2^+ with helicity 2.

  5. Scintillation Detectors for Radiation-Hard Electromagnetic Calorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löhner, H.

    2005-02-01

    For the application in the compact and radiation hard electromagnetic (EM) calorimeter in the PANDA detection system at the new GSI facility, we have started to advance scintillation crystals and the light detection technique. PANDA is the universal internal-target detection system for charmonium spectroscopy and the search for glue-balls and hybrid states in antiproton annihilations. In particular, the large dynamic range from several GeV down to a detection threshold of some MeV for EM radiation and the expected high background rate of neutrons and ions will impose severe requirements on crystals and light sensors. In the magnetic environment of tracking devices the use of Avalanche Photodiodes (APD's) is preferred. In order to achieve suitable resolution for low energy hadrons and photons, the light output of crystals will have to be improved by special production techniques, activation and doping. These procedures might have implications for the radiation hardness. We report on measurements of signal response and radiation damage in crystals of PbWO4 and BGO both from the BTCP (Russia) and SICCAS (China) production sites. Beams of protons, electrons and photons have been applied while detectors with either phototube or APD readout were operated in the range from room temperature to -20°C. Results on light yield and energy resolution are presented. We report on the reduction of light transmission after proton irradiation and results from electron-spin resonance studies on irradiated crystals to analyse the cause of radiation damage.

  6. Study of non-thermal photon production under different scenarios in solar flares. 1: Scenarios and formulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez-Peraza, J.; Alvarez, M.; Gallegos, A.

    1985-01-01

    In order to study the overall phenomenology involved in solar flares, it is necessary to understand their individual manifestation before building a corresponding description of the global phenomenon. Here the concern is with the production of X and gamma rays in solar flares. Flares are initiated very often within the closed magnetic field configurations of active centers. According (2) when beta = kinetic energy density/magnetic energy density approximately 0.2, the magnetic trap configuration is destructed within the time scale of the impulsive phase of flares ( 100 s). A first particle acceleration stage occurs during this phase as indicated by impulsive microwave and hard X-rays bursts. In some flare events, when the field strength beta is very high, the broken field lines may close again, such that later, in the course of the flash and main phases more hot plasma of very high conductivity is created, and so, the field and frozen plasma expand outward, as the kinetic pressure inside the closed loops increases. The magnetically trapped particles excite strong Alfven wave turbulence of small transverse scale.

  7. Photonic Crystal Laser Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, Benjamin M

    2003-05-21

    Photonic crystals have great potential for use as laser-driven accelerator structures. A photonic crystal is a dielectric structure arranged in a periodic geometry. Like a crystalline solid with its electronic band structure, the modes of a photonic crystal lie in a set of allowed photonic bands. Similarly, it is possible for a photonic crystal to exhibit one or more photonic band gaps, with frequencies in the gap unable to propagate in the crystal. Thus photonic crystals can confine an optical mode in an all-dielectric structure, eliminating the need for metals and their characteristic losses at optical frequencies. We discuss several geometries of photonic crystal accelerator structures. Photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) are optical fibers which can confine a speed-of-light optical mode in vacuum. Planar structures, both two- and three-dimensional, can also confine such a mode, and have the additional advantage that they can be manufactured using common microfabrication techniques such as those used for integrated circuits. This allows for a variety of possible materials, so that dielectrics with desirable optical and radiation-hardness properties can be chosen. We discuss examples of simulated photonic crystal structures to demonstrate the scaling laws and trade-offs involved, and touch on potential fabrication processes.

  8. Probing nuclear symmetry energy at high densities using pion, kaon, eta and photon productions in heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Zhi-Gang; Yong, Gao-Chan; Chen, Lie-Wen; Li, Bao-An; Zhang, Ming; Xiao, Guo-Qing; Xu, Nu

    2014-02-01

    The high-density behavior of nuclear symmetry energy is among the most uncertain properties of dense neutron-rich matter. Its accurate determination has significant ramifications in understanding not only the reaction dynamics of heavy-ion reactions, especially those induced by radioactive beams, but also many interesting phenomena in astrophysics, such as the explosion mechanism of supernova and the properties of neutron stars. The heavy-ion physics community has devoted much effort during the last few years to constrain the high-density symmetry using various probes. In particular, the / ratio has been most extensively studied both theoretically and experimentally. All models have consistently predicted qualitatively that the / ratio is a sensitive probe of the high-density symmetry energy especially with beam energies near the pion production threshold. However, the predicted values of the / ratio are still quite model dependent mostly because of the complexity of modeling pion production and reabsorption dynamics in heavy-ion collisions, leading to currently still controversial conclusions regarding the high-density behavior of nuclear symmetry energy from comparing various model calculations with available experimental data. As more / data become available and a deeper understanding about the pion dynamics in heavy-ion reactions is obtained, more penetrating probes, such as the K +/ K 0 ratio, meson and high-energy photons are also being investigated or planned at several facilities. Here, we review some of our recent contributions to the community effort of constraining the high-density behavior of nuclear symmetry energy in heavy-ion collisions. In addition, the status of some worldwide experiments for studying the high-density symmetry energy, including the HIRFL-CSR external target experiment (CEE) are briefly introduced.

  9. Hard Hitters!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dupont, Stephen

    2000-01-01

    Presents a selection of computers and peripherals designed to enhance the classroom. They include personal digital assistants (the AlphaSmart 30001R, CalcuScribe Duo, and DreamWriter IT); new Apple products (the iBook laptop, improved iMac, and OS 9 operating system); PC options (new Gateway and Compaq computers); and gadgets (imagiLab, the QX3…

  10. Hard Hitters!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dupont, Stephen

    2000-01-01

    Presents a selection of computers and peripherals designed to enhance the classroom. They include personal digital assistants (the AlphaSmart 30001R, CalcuScribe Duo, and DreamWriter IT); new Apple products (the iBook laptop, improved iMac, and OS 9 operating system); PC options (new Gateway and Compaq computers); and gadgets (imagiLab, the QX3…

  11. Nuclear effects in high- pT production of direct photons and neutral mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Apanasevich, L.; Bacigalupi, J.; Baker, W.; Begel, M.; Blusk, S.; Bromberg, C.; Chang, P.; Choudhary, B.; Chung, W. H.; de Barbaro, L.; DeSoi, W.; Długosz, W.; Dunlea, J.; Engels, E.; Fanourakis, G.; Ferbel, T.; Ftacnik, J.; Garelick, D.; Ginther, G.; Glaubman, M.; Gutierrez, P.; Hartman, K.; Huston, J.; Johnstone, C.; Kapoor, V.; Kuehler, J.; Lirakis, C.; Lobkowicz, F.; Lukens, P.; Mansour, J.; Maul, A.; Miller, R.; Oh, B. Y.; Osborne, G.; Pellett, D.; Prebys, E.; Roser, R.; Shepard, P.; Shivpuri, R.; Skow, D.; Slattery, P.; Sorrell, L.; Striley, D.; Toothacker, W.; Tripathi, S. M.; Varelas, N.; Weerasundara, D.; Whitmore, J. J.; Yasuda, T.; Yosef, C.; Zieliński, M.; Zutshi, V.

    2005-08-01

    The authors present results on the production of direct photons, {pi}{sup 0}, {eta} mesons on nuclear targets at large transverse momenta (p{sub T}). The data are from 530 and 800 GeV/c proton beams and 515 GeV/c {pi}{sup -} beams incident upon copper and beryllium targets that span the kinematic range of 1.0 < p{sub T} {approx}< 10 GeV/c at central rapidities.

  12. Measurement of the photon plus b-jet production differential cross section in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ =1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Aoki, M; Askew, A; Atkins, S; Augsten, K; Avila, C; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bartosik, N; Bassler, U; Bazterra, V; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Bellantoni, L; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besancon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatia, S; Bhatnagar, V; Blazeay, G; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brandt, O; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Brown, J; Bu, X B; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Buszello, C P; Camacho-Perez, E; Casey, B C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H; Caughron, S; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chapon, E; Chen, G; Chevalier-Thery, S; Cho, D K; Cho, S W; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M -C; Croc, A; Cutts, D; Das, A; Davies, G; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; Deliot, F; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Deterre, C; DeVaughan, K; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Ding, P F; Dominguez, A; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Facini, G; Feng, L; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fuess, S; Garcia-Bellido, A; Garcia-Gonzalez, J A; Garcia-Guerra, G A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, R; Geng, W; Gerbaudo, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Ginther, G; Golovanov, G; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J -F; Grohsjean, A; Gruenendahl, S; Gruenewald, M W; Guillemin, T; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hays, J; Head, T; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegab, H; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Heredia-De La Cruz, I; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Howley, I; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Ilchenko, Y; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffre, M; Jayasinghe, A; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, E; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, R; Joshi, J; Jung, A W; Juste, A; Kaadze, K; Kajfasz, E; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y N; Kiselevich, I; Kohli, J M; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kulikov, S; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kuzmin, V A; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Lee, W M; Lellouch, J; Li, H; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lim, J K; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, H; Liu, Y; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; de Sa, R Lopes; Lubatti, H J; Luna-Garcia, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K. A.; Madar, R; Magana-Villalba, R; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Maravin, Y; Martinez-Ortega, J; McCarthy, R; McGivern, C L; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Menezes, D; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; et al.

    2012-07-24

    We present measurements of the differential cross section dσ/dργτ for the inclusive production of a photon in association with a b -quark jet for photons with rapidities |yγ| < 1.0 and 30 < ργτ < 300 GeV , as well as for photons with 1.5 <|yγ| < 2.5 and 30 < ργτ < 200 GeV, where ργτ is the photon transverse momentum. The b -quark jets are required to have pT > 15 GeV and rapidity |yjet| < 1.5. The results are based on data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 8.7 fb-1, recorded with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron $p\\bar{p}$ Collider at $\\sqrt{s}$ =1.96 TeV. The measured cross sections are compared with next-to-leading order perturbative QCD calculations using different sets of parton distribution functions as well as to predictions based on the kT-factorization QCD approach, and those from the SHERPA and PYTHIA Monte Carlo event generators.

  13. Search for anomalous single top quark production in association with a photon in pp collisions at √(s) = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2016-04-06

    We found the results of a search for flavor changing neutral currents (FCNC) through single top quark production in association with a photon is presented. The study is based on proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV using data collected with the CMS detector at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.8 fb-1. The search for tγ events where t → Wb andW → μn is conducted in final states with a muon, a photon, at least one hadronic jet with at most one being consistent with originating from a bottom quark, and missing transverse momentum. Furthermore, there was no evidence of single top quark production in association with a photon through a FCNC is observed. Upper limits at the 95% confidence level are set on the tug and tcg anomalous couplings and translated into upper limits on the branching fraction of the FCNC top quark decays: B(t → uγ) < 1.3 x 10-4 and B(t →cγ) < 1.7 x 10-3. Upper limits are also set on the cross section of associated tγ production in a restricted phase-space region. These are the most stringent limits currently available.

  14. Search for anomalous single top quark production in association with a photon in pp collisions at √(s) = 8 TeV

    DOE PAGES

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2016-04-06

    We found the results of a search for flavor changing neutral currents (FCNC) through single top quark production in association with a photon is presented. The study is based on proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV using data collected with the CMS detector at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.8 fb-1. The search for tγ events where t → Wb andW → μn is conducted in final states with a muon, a photon, at least one hadronic jet with at most one being consistent with originating from a bottom quark, and missing transverse momentum.more » Furthermore, there was no evidence of single top quark production in association with a photon through a FCNC is observed. Upper limits at the 95% confidence level are set on the tug and tcg anomalous couplings and translated into upper limits on the branching fraction of the FCNC top quark decays: B(t → uγ) < 1.3 x 10-4 and B(t →cγ) < 1.7 x 10-3. Upper limits are also set on the cross section of associated tγ production in a restricted phase-space region. These are the most stringent limits currently available.« less

  15. Radiation and Temperature Hard Multi-Pixel Avalanche Photodiodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bensaoula, Abdelhak (Inventor); Starikov, David (Inventor); Pillai, Rajeev (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    The structure and method of fabricating a radiation and temperature hard avalanche photodiode with integrated radiation and temperature hard readout circuit, comprising a substrate, an avalanche region, an absorption region, and a plurality of Ohmic contacts are presented. The present disclosure provides for tuning of spectral sensitivity and high device efficiency, resulting in photon counting capability with decreased crosstalk and reduced dark current.

  16. Pion-photon reactions and chiral dynamics in Primakoff processes at COMPASS

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, Jan Michael

    2016-01-22

    With the COMPASS experiment at CERN, pion-photon reactions are investigated via the Primakoff effect, implying that high-energetic pions react with the quasi-real photon field surrounding the target nuclei. The production of a single hard photon in such a pion scattering at lowest momentum transfer to the nucleus is related to pion Compton scattering. From the measured cross-section shape, the pion polarisability is determined. The COMPASS measurement is in contradiction to the earlier dedicated measurements, and rather in agreement with the theoretical expectation from chiral perturbation theory. In the same data taking, reactions with neutral and charged pions in the final state are measured and analyzed. At low energy in the pion-photon centre-of-momentum system, these reactions are governed by chiral dynamics and contain information relevant for chiral perturbation theory. At higher energies, resonances are produced and their radiative coupling is investigated.

  17. Photon final states at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Campanelli, Mario; /University Coll. London

    2008-04-01

    The authors present here several recent measurements involving associate production of photons and jets at the Tevatron. In particular, inclusive photon + met from D0, and photon + b-jets and photon + b-jet + leptons + MET from CDF are described in some detail. These measurements offer a good test of QCD predictions in rather complex final states.

  18. Hard Gamma Ray Emission from the Starburst Galaxy NGC 253

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, James M.; Marscher, Alan M.

    1996-01-01

    We have completed the study to search for hard gamma ray emission from the starburst galaxy NGC 253. Since supernovae are thought to provide the hard gamma ray emission from the Milky Way, starburst galaxies, with their extraordinarily high supernova rates, are prime targets to search for hard gamma ray emission. We conducted a careful search for hard gamma ray emission from NGC 253 using the archival data from the EGRET experiment aboard the CGRO. Because this starburst galaxy happens to lie near the South Galactic Pole, the Galactic gamma ray background is minimal. We found no significant hard gamma ray signal toward NGC 253, although a marginal signal of about 1.5 sigma was found. Because of the low Galactic background, we obtained a very sensitive upper limit to the emission of greater than 100 MeV gamma-rays of 8 x 10(exp -8) photons/sq cm s. Since we expected to detect hard gamma ray emission, we investigated the theory of gamma ray production in a dense molecular medium. We used a leaky-box model to simulate diffusive transport in a starburst region. Since starburst galaxies have high infrared radiation fields, we included the effects of self-Compton scattering, which are usually ignored. By modelling the expected gamma-ray and synchrotron spectra from NGC 253, we find that roughly 5 - 15% of the energy from supernovae is transferred to cosmic rays in the starburst. This result is consistent with supernova acceleration models, and is somewhat larger than the value derived for the Galaxy (3 - 10%). Our calculations match the EGRET and radio data very well with a supernova rate of 0.08/ yr, a magnetic field B approx. greater than 5 x 10(exp -5) G, a density n approx. less than 100/sq cm, a photon density U(sub ph) approx. 200 eV/sq cm, and an escape time scale tau(sub 0) approx. less than 10 Myr. The models also suggest that NGC 253 should be detectable with only a factor of 2 - 3 improvement in sensitivity. Our results are consistent with the standard picture

  19. 21 CFR 133.150 - Hard cheeses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hard cheeses. 133.150 Section 133.150 Food and... CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.150 Hard cheeses. (a) The cheeses for which definitions and standards of identity are...

  20. Production and dosimetry of simultaneous therapeutic photons and electrons beam by linear accelerator: A Monte Carlo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khledi, Navid; Arbabi, Azim; Sardari, Dariush; Mohammadi, Mohammad; Ameri, Ahmad

    2015-02-01

    Depending on the location and depth of tumor, the electron or photon beams might be used for treatment. Electron beam have some advantages over photon beam for treatment of shallow tumors to spare the normal tissues beyond of the tumor. In the other hand, the photon beam are used for deep targets treatment. Both of these beams have some limitations, for example the dependency of penumbra with depth, and the lack of lateral equilibrium for small electron beam fields. In first, we simulated the conventional head configuration of Varian 2300 for 16 MeV electron, and the results approved by benchmarking the Percent Depth Dose (PDD) and profile of the simulation and measurement. In the next step, a perforated Lead (Pb) sheet with 1mm thickness placed at the top of the applicator holder tray. This layer producing bremsstrahlung x-ray and a part of the electrons passing through the holes, in result, we have a simultaneous mixed electron and photon beam. For making the irradiation field uniform, a layer of steel placed after the Pb layer. The simulation was performed for 10×10, and 4×4 cm2 field size. This study was showed the advantages of mixing the electron and photon beam by reduction of pure electron's penumbra dependency with the depth, especially for small fields, also decreasing of dramatic changes of PDD curve with irradiation field size.

  1. Production and dosimetry of simultaneous therapeutic photons and electrons beam by linear accelerator: A Monte Carlo study

    SciTech Connect

    Khledi, Navid; Sardari, Dariush; Arbabi, Azim; Ameri, Ahmad; Mohammadi, Mohammad

    2015-02-24

    Depending on the location and depth of tumor, the electron or photon beams might be used for treatment. Electron beam have some advantages over photon beam for treatment of shallow tumors to spare the normal tissues beyond of the tumor. In the other hand, the photon beam are used for deep targets treatment. Both of these beams have some limitations, for example the dependency of penumbra with depth, and the lack of lateral equilibrium for small electron beam fields. In first, we simulated the conventional head configuration of Varian 2300 for 16 MeV electron, and the results approved by benchmarking the Percent Depth Dose (PDD) and profile of the simulation and measurement. In the next step, a perforated Lead (Pb) sheet with 1mm thickness placed at the top of the applicator holder tray. This layer producing bremsstrahlung x-ray and a part of the electrons passing through the holes, in result, we have a simultaneous mixed electron and photon beam. For making the irradiation field uniform, a layer of steel placed after the Pb layer. The simulation was performed for 10×10, and 4×4 cm2 field size. This study was showed the advantages of mixing the electron and photon beam by reduction of pure electron's penumbra dependency with the depth, especially for small fields, also decreasing of dramatic changes of PDD curve with irradiation field size.

  2. Photon and neutral pion production in Au+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 130 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, J.; Adler, C.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B.D.; Anderson, M.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Badyal, S.K.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, B.I.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhaskar, P.; Bhati, A.K.; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, C.O.; Bonner, B. E.; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.; Bravar, A.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai, X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Castro, M.; Cebra, D.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, Y.; Chernenko, S.P.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, B.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford, H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dubey, A.K.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Majumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Efimov, L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faine, V.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flierl, D.; Foley, K.J.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Ganti, M.S.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Gagunashvili, N.; Gans, J.; Gaudichet, L.; Germain, M.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.E.; Grachov, O.; Grigoriev, V.; Gronstal, S.; Grosnick, D.; Guedon, M.; Guertin, S.M.; Gupta, A.; Gushin, E.; Hallman, T.J.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J.W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Heppelmann, S.; Herston, T.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horsley, M.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Janik, M.; Johnson, I.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kaneta, M.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J.; Klein, S.R.; Klyachko, A.; Koetke, D.D.; Kollegger, T.; Konstantinov, A.S.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kovalenko, A.D.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A.I.; Kumar, A.; et al.

    2004-01-08

    We report the first inclusive photon measurements about mid-rapidity (|y| < 0.5) from {sup 197}Au + {sup 197}Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 130 GeV at RHIC. Photon pair conversions were reconstructed from electron and positron tracks measured with the Time Projection Chamber (TPC) of the STAR experiment. With this method, an energy resolution of {Delta}E/E {approx} 2% at 0.5 GeV has been achieved. Reconstructed photons have also been used to measure the transverse momentum (p{sub t}) spectra of {pi}{sup 0} mesons about mid-rapidity (|y| < 1) via the {pi}{sup 0} {yields} {gamma}{gamma} decay channel. The fractional contribution of the {pi}{sup 0} {yields} {gamma}{gamma} decay to the inclusive photon spectrum decreases by 20% {+-} 5% between p{sub t} = 1.65 GeV/c and p{sub t} = 2.4 GeV/c in the most central events, indicating that relative to {pi}{sup 0} {yields} {gamma}{gamma} decay the contribution of other photon sources is substantially increasing.

  3. Broadband photon-photon interactions mediated by cold atoms in a photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litinskaya, Marina; Tignone, Edoardo; Pupillo, Guido

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate theoretically that photon-photon attraction can be engineered in the continuum of scattering states for pairs of photons propagating in a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber filled with cold atoms. The atoms are regularly spaced in an optical lattice configuration and the photons are resonantly tuned to an internal atomic transition. We show that the hard-core repulsion resulting from saturation of the atomic transitions induces bunching in the photonic component of the collective atom-photon modes (polaritons). Bunching is obtained in a frequency range as large as tens of GHz, and can be controlled by the inter-atomic separation. We provide a fully analytical explanation for this phenomenon by proving that correlations result from a mismatch of the quantization volumes for atomic excitations and photons in the continuum. Even stronger correlations can be observed for in-gap two-polariton bound states. Our theoretical results use parameters relevant for current experiments and suggest a simple and feasible way to induce interactions between photons.

  4. Broadband photon-photon interactions mediated by cold atoms in a photonic crystal fiber

    PubMed Central

    Litinskaya, Marina; Tignone, Edoardo; Pupillo, Guido

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate theoretically that photon-photon attraction can be engineered in the continuum of scattering states for pairs of photons propagating in a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber filled with cold atoms. The atoms are regularly spaced in an optical lattice configuration and the photons are resonantly tuned to an internal atomic transition. We show that the hard-core repulsion resulting from saturation of the atomic transitions induces bunching in the photonic component of the collective atom-photon modes (polaritons). Bunching is obtained in a frequency range as large as tens of GHz, and can be controlled by the inter-atomic separation. We provide a fully analytical explanation for this phenomenon by proving that correlations result from a mismatch of the quantization volumes for atomic excitations and photons in the continuum. Even stronger correlations can be observed for in-gap two-polariton bound states. Our theoretical results use parameters relevant for current experiments and suggest a simple and feasible way to induce interactions between photons. PMID:27170160

  5. Search for supersymmetry in electroweak production with photons and large missing transverse energy in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}$$ = 8 TeV

    DOE PAGES

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2016-06-01

    Results are reported from a search for supersymmetry with gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking in electroweak production. Final states with photons and large missing transverse energy (more » $$E_{\\mathrm{T}}^{\\text{miss}}$$) were examined. The data sample was collected in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s} = $$ 8 TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC and corresponds to 7.4 fb$$^{-1}$$. The analysis focuses on scenarios in which the lightest neutralino has bino- or wino-like components, resulting in decays to photons and gravitinos, where the gravitinos escape undetected. The data were obtained using a specially designed trigger with dedicated low thresholds, providing good sensitivity to signatures with photons, $$E_{\\mathrm{T}}^{\\text{miss}}$$, and low hadronic energy. No excess of events over the standard model expectation is observed. The results are interpreted using the model of general gauge mediation. With the wino mass fixed at 10 GeV above that of the bino, wino masses below 710 GeV are excluded at 95% confidence level. Lastly, constraints are also set in the context of two simplified models, for which the analysis sets the lowest cross section limits on the electroweak production of supersymmetric particles.« less

  6. Search for supersymmetry in electroweak production with photons and large missing transverse energy in pp collisions at √{ s} = 8TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Knünz, V.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rad, N.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; De Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Van Parijs, I.; Barria, P.; Brun, H.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Goldouzian, R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-conde, A.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva, S.; Sigamani, M.; Tytgat, M.; Van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Delaere, C.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Mertens, A.; Musich, M.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Beliy, N.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, F. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Hamer, M.; Hensel, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mora Herrera, C.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; De Souza Santos, A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Leggat, D.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Spiezia, A.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Awad, A.; Mahrous, A.; Radi, A.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Peltola, T.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Davignon, O.; Filipovic, N.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Jo, M.; Lisniak, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Pigard, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Merlin, J. A.; Skovpen, K.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Bernet, C.; Boudoul, G.

    2016-08-01

    Results are reported from a search for supersymmetry with gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking in electroweak production. Final states with photons and large missing transverse energy (ETmiss) were examined. The data sample was collected in pp collisions at √{ s} = 8TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC and corresponds to 7.4fb-1. The analysis focuses on scenarios in which the lightest neutralino has bino- or wino-like components, resulting in decays to photons and gravitinos, where the gravitinos escape undetected. The data were obtained using a specially designed trigger with dedicated low thresholds, providing good sensitivity to signatures with photons, ETmiss , and low hadronic energy. No excess of events over the standard model expectation is observed. The results are interpreted using the model of general gauge mediation. With the wino mass fixed at 10GeV above that of the bino, wino masses below 710GeV are excluded at 95% confidence level. Constraints are also set in the context of two simplified models, for which the analysis sets the lowest cross section limits on the electroweak production of supersymmetric particles.

  7. Hybrid hard- and soft-modeling of spectrophotometric data for monitoring of ciprofloxacin and its main photodegradation products at different pH values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razuc, Mariela; Garrido, Mariano; Caro, Yamile S.; Teglia, Carla M.; Goicoechea, Héctor C.; Fernández Band, Beatriz S.

    2013-04-01

    A simple and fast on line spectrophotometric method combined with a hybrid hard-soft modeling multivariate curve resolution (HS-MCR) was proposed for the monitoring of photodegradation reaction of ciprofloxacin under UV radiation. The studied conditions attempt to emulate the effect of sunlight on these antibiotics that could be eventually present in the environment. The continuous flow system made it possible to study the ciprofloxacin degradation at different pH values almost at real time, avoiding errors that could arise from typical batch monitoring of the reaction. On the base of a concentration profiles obtained by previous pure soft-modeling approach, reaction pathways have been proposed for the parent compound and its photoproducts at different pH values. These kinetic models were used as a constraint in the HS-MCR analysis. The kinetic profiles and the corresponding pure response profile (UV-Vis spectra) of ciprofloxacin and its main degradation products were recovered after the application of HS-MCR analysis to the spectra recorded throughout the reaction. The observed behavior showed a good agreement with the photodegradation studies reported in the bibliography. Accordingly, the photodegradation reaction was studied by high performance liquid chromatography coupled with UV-Vis diode array detector (HPLC-DAD). The spectra recorded during the chromatographic analysis present a good correlation with the ones recovered by UV-Vis/HS-MCR method.

  8. Effects of super-hard rice bread blended with black rice bran on amyloid β peptide production and abrupt increase in postprandial blood glucose levels in mice.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Sumiko; Hara, Takashi; Joh, Toshio; Kobayashi, Atsushi; Yamazaki, Akira; Kasuga, Kensaku; Ikeuchi, Takeshi; Ohtsubo, Ken'ichi

    2017-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease and type 2 diabetes are very serious diseases with the latter having been suggested to cause the former. We prepared super-hard rice bread blended with black rice bran (SRBBB), which contained a high amount of resistant starch that showed strong inhibitory activities against β-secretase and acetylcholinesterase even after heating. Black rice bran showed greater β-secretase inhibitory activity (3.6-fold) than Koshihikari rice. The bran contained more oleic acid and anthocyanin, meaning that it is potentially a biofunctional food with a high antioxidant capacity. Furthermore, aged mice, which were fed a SRBBB diet for four weeks, showed lower amyloid β 40 peptide in the blood than mice fed a commercial diet (p < 0.01). Additionally, their initial blood glucose levels (BGLs) after 12 weeks of being fed SRBBB were significantly lower than those in the control group. Taken together, our results indicate SRBBB shows promise for inhibiting not only amyloid β production, but also abrupt increases in postprandial BGLs.

  9. Use of two varieties of hard-to-cook beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) and cowpeas (Vigna unguiculata) in the processing of koki (a steamed legume product).

    PubMed

    Mbofung, C M; Rigby, N; Waldron, K

    1999-01-01

    Koki is a nutritious cowpea-based food product usually processed by steam cooking whipped cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) paste mixed with spices and palm oil. A study was carried out to investigate the effect of the partial replacement of cowpeas (CP) with hard-to-cook (HTC) beans on the chemical, nutritional and sensory characteristics of koki. Towards this objective, two varieties of beans--Phaseolus vulgaris (red kidney beans--RKB and mottled brown beans--MBB), each with the HTC defect, were separately incorporated into cowpea paste in the following Bean:CP ratios 0:100, 20:80, 30:70, 40:60, 50:50, 60:40 and processed into koki. Incorporation of dry HTC beans into cowpeas in the making of koki affected the bulking properties of the uncooked paste, the nutrient composition, essential amino acid content, antinutritional factors, digestibility as well as the sensory attributes of cooked koki. Sensory tests showed that a highly acceptable, nutritious and digestible koki can be processed from cowpeas partially replaced with dry HTC bean paste up to levels of about 40-50% depending on the variety of dry bean used.

  10. Hybrid hard- and soft-modeling of spectrophotometric data for monitoring of ciprofloxacin and its main photodegradation products at different pH values.

    PubMed

    Razuc, Mariela; Garrido, Mariano; Caro, Yamile S; Teglia, Carla M; Goicoechea, Héctor C; Fernández Band, Beatriz S

    2013-04-01

    A simple and fast on line spectrophotometric method combined with a hybrid hard-soft modeling multivariate curve resolution (HS-MCR) was proposed for the monitoring of photodegradation reaction of ciprofloxacin under UV radiation. The studied conditions attempt to emulate the effect of sunlight on these antibiotics that could be eventually present in the environment. The continuous flow system made it possible to study the ciprofloxacin degradation at different pH values almost at real time, avoiding errors that could arise from typical batch monitoring of the reaction. On the base of a concentration profiles obtained by previous pure soft-modeling approach, reaction pathways have been proposed for the parent compound and its photoproducts at different pH values. These kinetic models were used as a constraint in the HS-MCR analysis. The kinetic profiles and the corresponding pure response profile (UV-Vis spectra) of ciprofloxacin and its main degradation products were recovered after the application of HS-MCR analysis to the spectra recorded throughout the reaction. The observed behavior showed a good agreement with the photodegradation studies reported in the bibliography. Accordingly, the photodegradation reaction was studied by high performance liquid chromatography coupled with UV-Vis diode array detector (HPLC-DAD). The spectra recorded during the chromatographic analysis present a good correlation with the ones recovered by UV-Vis/HS-MCR method. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Silicon photonics: optical modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, G. T.; Gardes, F. Y.; Hu, Youfang; Thomson, D.; Lever, L.; Kelsall, R.; Ikonic, Z.

    2010-01-01

    Silicon Photonics has the potential to revolutionise a whole raft of application areas. Currently, the main focus is on various forms of optical interconnects as this is a near term bottleneck for the computing industry, and hence a number of companies have also released products onto the market place. The adoption of silicon photonics for mass production will significantly benefit a range of other application areas. One of the key components that will enable silicon photonics to flourish in all of the potential application areas is a high performance optical modulator. An overview is given of the major Si photonics modulator research that has been pursued at the University of Surrey to date as well as a worldwide state of the art showing the trend and technology available. We will show the trend taken toward integration of optical and electronic components with the difficulties that are inherent in such a technology.

  12. Photonic Generation and Detection of Arbitrary MMW Waveform for High-Resolution MMW Radar Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-06

    photonics has long been considered an attractive methodology for generating wideband electrical waveforms in the microwave and millimeter wave...based approach are still hard to be competed with the existed electrical solution in microwave frequency regime. On the other hand, in order to...Bandwidth Products,” in Technical Digest of Conference on Lasers and Electro- Optics, paper SM1G.1, San Jose, CA, USA, June 2014. 3. Yihan Li, A

  13. Exploratory study of fission product yield determination from photofission of 239Pu at 11 MeV with monoenergetic photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhike, Megha; Tornow, W.; Krishichayan, Tonchev, A. P.

    2017-02-01

    Measurements of fission product yields play an important role for the understanding of fundamental aspects of the fission process. Recently, neutron-induced fission product-yield data of 239Pu at energies below 4 MeV revealed an unexpected energy dependence of certain fission fragments. In order to investigate whether this observation is prerogative to neutron-induced fission, a program has been initiated to measure fission product yields in photoinduced fission. Here we report on the first ever photofission product yield measurement with monoenergetic photons produced by Compton back-scattering of FEL photons. The experiment was performed at the High-Intensity Gamma-ray Source at Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory on 239Pu at Eγ=11 MeV. In this exploratory study the yield of eight fission products ranging from 91Sr to 143Ce has been obtained.

  14. Study of non-thermal photon production under different scenarios in solar flares. 2: The Compton inverse and Bremsstrahlung models and fittings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez-Peraza, J.; Alvarez, M.; Laville, A.; Gallegos, A.

    1985-01-01

    Energy spectra of photons emitted from Bremsstrahlung (BR) of energetic electrons with matter, is obtained from the deconvolution of the electron energy spectra. It can be inferred that the scenario for the production of X-rays and gamma rays in solar flares may vary from event to event. However, it is possible in many cases to associated low energy events to impulsive acceleration, and the high energy phase of some events to stochastic acceleration. In both cases, flare particles seem to be strongly modulated by local energy losses. Electric field acceleration, associated to neutral current sheets is a suitable candidate for impulsive acceleration. Finally, that the predominant radiation process of this radiation is the inverse Compton effect due to the local flare photon field.

  15. X-ray production cross sections at incident photon energies across the M{sub i} (i=1-5) edges of {sub 90}Th

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Rajnish; Shehla,; Kumar, Anil; Puri, Sanjiv

    2015-08-28

    The X-ray production cross sections for the M{sub k} (k= ξ, δ, α, β, ζ, γ, m{sub 1}, m{sub 2}) groups of X-rays have been evaluated at incident photon energies across the M{sub i} (i =1-5) edges of {sub 90}Th using the relativistic Hartree-Fock-Slater model based photoionisation cross sections and recently reported values of the M-shell X-ray emission rates, fluorescence and Coster Kronig yields. Further, the energies of the prominent (M{sub i}-S{sub j}) (S{sub j}=N{sub j}, O{sub j} and i =1-3, j =1-7) resonant Raman scattered (RRS) peaks at different incident photon energies have also been evaluated using the neutral-atom electron binding energies (E{sub sj}) based on the relaxed orbital relativistic Hartree-Fock-Slater model.

  16. Neutron-skin effect in direct-photon and charged-hadron production in Pb+Pb collisions at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helenius, Ilkka; Paukkunen, Hannu; Eskola, Kari J.

    2017-03-01

    A well-established observation in nuclear physics is that in neutron-rich spherical nuclei the distribution of neutrons extends farther than the distribution of protons. In this work, we scrutinize the influence of this so called neutron-skin effect on the centrality dependence of high-p_T direct-photon and charged-hadron production. We find that due to the estimated spatial dependence of the nuclear parton distribution functions, it will be demanding to unambiguously expose the neutron-skin effect with direct photons. However, when taking a ratio between the cross sections for negatively and positively charged high-p_T hadrons, even centrality-dependent nuclear-PDF effects cancel, making this observable a better handle on the neutron skin. Up to 10% effects can be expected for the most peripheral collisions in the measurable region.

  17. Study of non-thermal photon production under different scenarios in solar flares. 2: The Compton inverse and Bremsstrahlung models and fittings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Peraza, J.; Alvarez, M.; Laville, A.; Gallegos, A.

    1985-08-01

    Energy spectra of photons emitted from Bremsstrahlung (BR) of energetic electrons with matter, is obtained from the deconvolution of the electron energy spectra. It can be inferred that the scenario for the production of X-rays and gamma rays in solar flares may vary from event to event. However, it is possible in many cases to associated low energy events to impulsive acceleration, and the high energy phase of some events to stochastic acceleration. In both cases, flare particles seem to be strongly modulated by local energy losses. Electric field acceleration, associated to neutral current sheets is a suitable candidate for impulsive acceleration. Finally, that the predominant radiation process of this radiation is the inverse Compton effect due to the local flare photon field.

  18. Next-to-leading order QCD predictions for graviton and photon associated production in the large extra dimensions model at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Xiangdong; Li Chongsheng; Gao Jun; Wang Jian; Oakes, Robert J.

    2010-02-01

    We present the calculations of the complete next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD corrections to the inclusive total cross sections for the Kaluza-Klein (KK) graviton and photon associated production process pp{yields}{gamma}G{sub KK}+X in the large extra dimensions model at the LHC. We show that the NLO QCD corrections in general enhance the total cross sections and reduce the dependence of the total cross sections on the factorization and renormalization scales. When jet veto is considered, the NLO corrections reduce the total cross sections. We also calculate some important differential cross sections for this process at NLO: the missing transverse momentum distribution, the transverse momentum distribution, and the pseudorapidity distribution of photon.

  19. Imaging penetrating radiation through ion photon emission microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattar, Khalid; Branson, Janelle V.; Powell, Cody J.; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy; Rossi, Paolo; Doyle, Barney L.

    2010-08-01

    The ion photon emission microscope (IPEM), a new radiation effects microscope for the imaging of single event effects from penetrating radiation, is being developed at Sandia National Laboratories and implemented on the 88" cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories. The microscope is designed to permit the direct correlation between the locations of high-energy heavy-ion strikes and single event effects in microelectronic devices. The development of this microscope has required the production of a robust optical system that is compatible with the ion beam lines, design and assembly of a fast single photon sensitive measurement system to provide the necessary coincidence, and the development and testing of many scintillating films. A wide range of scintillating material for application to the ion photon emission microscope has been tested with few meeting the stringent radiation hardness, intensity, and photon lifetime requirements. The initial results of these luminescence studies and the current operation of the ion photon emission microscope will be presented. Finally, the planned development for future microscopes and ion luminescence testing chambers will be discussed.

  20. Roadmap on silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, David; Zilkie, Aaron; Bowers, John E.; Komljenovic, Tin; Reed, Graham T.; Vivien, Laurent; Marris-Morini, Delphine; Cassan, Eric; Virot, Léopold; Fédéli, Jean-Marc; Hartmann, Jean-Michel; Schmid, Jens H.; Xu, Dan-Xia; Boeuf, Frédéric; O'Brien, Peter; Mashanovich, Goran Z.; Nedeljkovic, M.

    2016-07-01

    Silicon photonics research can be dated back to the 1980s. However, the previous decade has witnessed an explosive growth in the field. Silicon photonics is a disruptive technology that is poised to revolutionize a number of application areas, for example, data centers, high-performance computing and sensing. The key driving force behind silicon photonics is the ability to use CMOS-like fabrication resulting in high-volume production at low cost. This is a key enabling factor for bringing photonics to a range of technology areas where the costs of implementation using traditional photonic elements such as those used for the telecommunications industry would be prohibitive. Silicon does however have a number of shortcomings as a photonic material. In its basic form it is not an ideal material in which to produce light sources, optical modulators or photodetectors for example. A wealth of research effort from both academia and industry in recent years has fueled the demonstration of multiple solutions to these and other problems, and as time progresses new approaches are increasingly being conceived. It is clear that silicon photonics has a bright future. However, with a growing number of approaches available, what will the silicon photonic integrated circuit of the future look like? This roadmap on silicon photonics delves into the different technology and application areas of the field giving an insight into the state-of-the-art as well as current and future challenges faced by researchers worldwide. Contributions authored by experts from both industry and academia provide an overview and outlook for the silicon waveguide platform, optical sources, optical modulators, photodetectors, integration approaches, packaging, applications of silicon photonics and approaches required to satisfy applications at mid-infrared wavelengths. Advances in science and technology required to meet challenges faced by the field in each of these areas are also addressed together with

  1. Production of f 2(1270) and f 0(975) mesons by photons and hadrons of energy 65 175 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apsimon, R. J.; Atkinson, M.; Baake, M.; Bagdasarian, L. S.; Barberis, D.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Brook, N.; Charity, T.; Clegg, A. B.; Coyle, P.; Danaher, S.; Danagulian, S.; Davenport, M.; Dickinson, B.; Diekmann, B.; Donnachie, A.; Doyle, A. T.; Eades, J.; Ellison, R. J.; Fiedler, F.; Flower, P. S.; Foster, J. M.; Galbraith, W.; Galumian, P. I.; Gapp, C.; Gebert, F.; Hallewell, G.; Heinloth, K.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Hickman, M. T.; Hoeger, K. C.; Hofmann, R. P.; Holzkamp, A.; Holzkamp, S.; Hughes-Jones, R. E.; Ibbotson, M.; Jacob, H. P.; Joseph, D.; Keemer, N. R.; Kingler, J.; Körsgen, G.; Kolya, S. D.; Lafferty, G. D.; McCann, H.; McClatchey, R.; McManus, C.; Mercer, D.; Morris, J. A. G.; Morris, J. V.; Newton, D.; O'Connor, A.; Oedingen, R.; Oganesian, A. G.; Ottewell, P. J.; Paterson, C. N.; Paul, E.; Reid, D.; Rotscheidt, H.; Sharp, P. H.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Thacker, N. A.; Thompson, L.; Thompson, R. J.; Waterhouse, J.; Weigend, A. S.; Wilson, G. W.

    1992-06-01

    Measurements are reported of inclusive f 2(1270) and f 0(975) production in γp, π± p and K ± p collisions at photon beam energies of 65 to 175 GeV and hadron beam energies of 80 and 140 GeV. The f 2 and f 0 mesons were found at masses of 1.250 GeV and 0.961 GeV respectively. Inclusive f 2 production at low x F was found to have a similar p T dependence for each beam type, whereas an additional pion-exchange contribution was found for production by pions at high x F. Cross sections are compared with those for ρ0 production and give no indication of a non-qbar q component in either f-meson state.

  2. [Real-time analysis of polyvinyl chloride thermal decomposition/combustion products with single photon ionization/photoelectron ionization online mass spectrometer].

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Dong; Hou, Ke-Yong; Chen, Ping; Li, Fang-Long; Zhao, Wu-Duo; Cui, Hua-Peng; Hua, Lei; Xie, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Hai-Yang

    2013-01-01

    With the features of a broad range of ionizable compounds, reduced fragments and simple mass spectrum, a homemade magnetic field enhanced photoelectron ionization (MEPEI) source combined with single photon ionization (SPI) for time-of-flight mass spectrometer was built and applied to analyze thermal decomposition/combustion products of polyvinyl chloride (PVC). The combined ion source can be switched very fast between SPI mode and SPI-MEPEI mode for detecting different targeted compounds, and only adjusting the voltage of the electrode in the ionization region to trigger the switch. Among the PVC thermal decomposition/combustion products, HCl and CO2, which ionization energies (12.74 eV, 13.77 eV respectively) were higher than the energy of photon (10.60 eV), were ionized by MEPEI, while alkenes, dichloroethylene, benzene and its homologs, monochlorobenzene, styrene, indane, naphthalene and its homologs were ionized by SPI and MEPEI simultaneously. Spectra of interested products as a function of temperatures indicated that products are formed via two main mechanisms: (1) dechlorination and intramolecular cyclization can lead to the formation of HCl, benzene and naphthalene at 250-370 degrees C; (2) intermolecular crosslinking leads to the formation of alkyl aromatics such as toluene and xylene/ethylbenzene at 380-510 degrees C. The experimental results show that the combined ion source of SPI/ SPI-MEPEI for TOF-MS has broad application prospects in the online analysis field.

  3. Methods and Guidance for Testing the Efficacy of Antimicrobial Products Against Spores of Clostridium difficile on Hard Non-Porous Surfaces (September 2017)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document provides an update to the Agency’s interim guidance for the efficacy evaluation of antimicrobial pesticides that are labeled for treating hard non-porous surfaces in healthcare settings contaminated with spores of Clostridium difficile.

  4. Photonic Hypercrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narimanov, Evgenii E.

    2014-10-01

    We introduce a new "universality class" of artificial optical media—photonic hypercrystals. These hyperbolic metamaterials, with periodic spatial variation of dielectric permittivity on subwavelength scale, combine the features of optical metamaterials and photonic crystals. In particular, surface waves supported by a hypercrystal possess the properties of both the optical Tamm states in photonic crystals and surface-plasmon polaritons at the metal-dielectric interface.

  5. Photon absorptiometry

    SciTech Connect

    Velchik, M.G.

    1987-01-01

    Recently, there has been a renewed interest in the detection and treatment of osteoporosis. This paper is a review of the merits and limitations of the various noninvasive modalities currently available for the measurement of bone mineral density with special emphasis placed upon the nuclear medicine techniques of single-photon and dual-photon absorptiometry. The clinicians should come away with an understanding of the relative advantages and disadvantages of photon absorptiometry and its optimal clinical application. 49 references.

  6. Progress in Ultrafast Photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiya, Takeshi; Tsuchiya, Masahiro

    2005-08-01

    Recent progress in ultrafast photonics is reviewed with special emphasis on the research and development activities in Japanese research institutions in the field of optical communication and related measurement technologies. After summarizing the physical natures of ultrashort optical pulses, selected topics are reviewed on such as (1) ultrahigh-bit-rate optical communication employing the combination of optical time division multiplexing (OTDM) and wavelength division multiplexing (WDM), (2) optical components for ultrafast photonics with emphasis on all optical switches including semiconductor optical amplifiers, cascaded second order frequency converters, semiconductor saturable absorber switches, organic dye saturable absorber switches and bistable semiconductor lasers, (3) microwave photonics, emphasizing millimeter-wave/photonic communication technologies, and (4) high-speed optical measurements featuring both compact femtosecond pulse source development and rf magnetic field imaging. Some comments on the future prospect of ultrafast photonics are also given. It is concluded that in order to bring the powerful and versatile capability of ultrafast photonics into the real world, further collaboration between photonics specialists and production engineers/information specialists is strongly desired.

  7. Direct Photons at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Gabor,D.

    2008-07-29

    Direct photons are ideal tools to investigate kinematical and thermodynamical conditions of heavy ion collisions since they are emitted from all stages of the collision and once produced they leave the interaction region without further modification by the medium. The PHENIX experiment at RHIC has measured direct photon production in p+p and Au+Au collisions at 200 GeV over a wide transverse momentum (p{sub T}) range. The p+p measurements allow a fundamental test of QCD, and serve as a baseline when we try to disentangle more complex mechanisms producing high p{sub T} direct photons in Au+Au. As for thermal photons in Au+Au we overcome the difficulties due to the large background from hadronic decays by measuring 'almost real' virtual photons which appear as low invariant mass e{sup +}e{sup -} pairs: a significant excess of direct photons is measured above the above next-to-leading order perturbative quantum chromodynamics calculations. Additional insights on the origin of direct photons can be gained with the study of the azimuthal anisotropy which benefits from the increased statistics and reaction plane resolution achieved in RHIC Year-7 data.

  8. Photonics21 and the perspectives from the European photonics industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertin, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Photonics provide indispensable technology buildings bricks that enable a wide range of products as well as driving the development of entirely new industries. The European Commission recognized the potential of photonics to strengthen Europe's industrial and innovation capacity and consequently declared photonics as a Key Enabling Technology. Photonics21 as partner of the European Commission developed a Multiannual Strategic Roadmap which aims at boosting European photonics along the whole innovation chain with special focus on the gap between generating knowledge and products. The roadmap will be realized in a Public Private Partnership between the European photonics industry and the European Commission until 2020. In this PPP it is intended that the industry commits to leverage the public funds by the factor of 4.

  9. Topological photon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, S. C.

    2008-03-01

    We associate intrinsic energy equal to hν /2 with the spin angular momentum of photon, and propose a topological model based on orbifold in space and tifold in time as topological obstructions. The model is substantiated using vector wavefield disclinations. The physical photon is suggested to be a particlelike topological photon and a propagating wave such that the energy hν of photon is equally divided between spin energy and translational energy, corresponding to linear momentum of hν /c. The enigma of wave-particle duality finds natural resolution, and the proposed model gives new insights into the phenomena of interference and emission of radiation.

  10. Search for Anomalous Production of Photon + Jets + Missing Transverse Energy in $p\\bar{p}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$~TeV Using the CDF II Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Hewamanage, Samantha Kaushalya

    2011-01-01

    A model-independent signature-based search for physics beyond the Standard Model is performed in the photon + jets + missing transverse energy channel in \\ppbar collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV using the CDF II detector. Events with a photon + jets are predicted by the Standard Model and also by many theoretical models beyond the Standard Model. In the Standard Model, the main mechanisms for photon + jets production include quark-antiquark annihilation and quark-gluon scattering. No intrinsic missing transverse energy is present in any of these Standard Model processes. In this search, photon + $\\geq$1 jet and photon + $\\geq$2 jet events are analyzed with and without a minimum requirement on the missing transverse energy. Numerous mass distributions and kinematic distributions are studied and no significant excess over the background prediction is found. All results indicate good agreement with expectations of the Standard Model.

  11. Measurement of differential cross sections for the production of a pair of isolated photons in pp collisions at √s=7TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-11-12

    A measurement of differential cross sections for the production of a pair of isolated photons in proton–proton collisions at √s=7TeV is presented. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 5.0fb-1 collected with the CMS detector. A data-driven isolation template method is used to extract the prompt diphoton yield. The measured cross section for two isolated photons, with transverse energy above 40 and 25GeV respectively, in the pseudorapidity range |η|<2.5, |η|ϵ[1.44,1.57] and with an angular separation ΔR>0.45, is 17.2±0.2(stat)±1.9(syst)±0.4(lumi) \\,pb. Differential cross sections are measured as a function of the diphoton invariant mass, the diphoton transverse momentum, the azimuthal angle difference between the two photons, and the cosine of the polar angle in the Collins–Soper reference frame of the diphoton system. The results are compared to theoretical predictions at leading, next-to-leading, and next-to-next-to-leading order in quantum chromodynamics.

  12. Measurement of differential cross sections for the production of a pair of isolated photons in pp collisions at √s=7TeV

    DOE PAGES

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-11-12

    A measurement of differential cross sections for the production of a pair of isolated photons in proton–proton collisions at √s=7TeV is presented. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 5.0fb-1 collected with the CMS detector. A data-driven isolation template method is used to extract the prompt diphoton yield. The measured cross section for two isolated photons, with transverse energy above 40 and 25GeV respectively, in the pseudorapidity range |η|<2.5, |η|ϵ[1.44,1.57] and with an angular separation ΔR>0.45, is 17.2±0.2(stat)±1.9(syst)±0.4(lumi) \\,pb. Differential cross sections are measured as a function of the diphoton invariant mass, the diphoton transverse momentum, the azimuthalmore » angle difference between the two photons, and the cosine of the polar angle in the Collins–Soper reference frame of the diphoton system. The results are compared to theoretical predictions at leading, next-to-leading, and next-to-next-to-leading order in quantum chromodynamics.« less

  13. Enhanced production of direct photons in Au + Au collisions at square root(S(NN)) = 200 GeV and implications for the initial temperature.

    PubMed

    Adare, A; Afanasiev, S; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Al-Bataineh, H; Alexander, J; Al-Jamel, A; Aoki, K; Aphecetche, L; Armendariz, R; Aronson, S H; Asai, J; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldisseri, A; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Bauer, F; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, Y; Bickley, A A; Bjorndal, M T; Boissevain, J G; Borel, H; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Campbell, S; Chai, J-S; Chang, B S; Charvet, J-L; Chernichenko, S; Chiba, J; Chi, C Y; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Churyn, A; Cianciolo, V; Cleven, C R; Cobigo, Y; Cole, B A; Comets, M P; Constantin, P; Csanád, M; Csörgo, T; Dahms, T; Das, K; David, G; Deaton, M B; Dehmelt, K; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; d'Enterria, D; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Donadelli, M; Drachenberg, J L; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Dubey, A K; Durum, A; Dzhordzhadze, V; Efremenko, Y V; Egdemir, J; Ellinghaus, F; Emam, W S; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Espagnon, B; Esumi, S; Eyser, K O; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Finger, M; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Forestier, B; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fung, S-Y; Fusayasu, T; Gadrat, S; Garishvili, I; Gastineau, F; Germain, M; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Gunji, T; Gustafsson, H-A; Hachiya, T; Hadj Henni, A; Haegemann, C; Haggerty, J S; Hagiwara, M N; Hamagaki, H; Han, R; Harada, H; Hartouni, E P; Haruna, K; Harvey, M; Haslum, E; Hasuko, K; Hayano, R; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; Heuser, J M; He, X; Hiejima, H; Hill, J C; Hobbs, R; Hohlmann, M; Holmes, M; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hornback, D; Hur, M G; Ichihara, T; Imai, K; Inaba, M; Inoue, Y; Isenhower, D; Isenhower, L; Ishihara, M; Isobe, T; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Jacak, B V; Jia, J; Jin, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kamin, J; Kaneta, M; Kang, J H; Kanou, H; Kawagishi, T; Kawall, D; Kazantsev, A V; Kelly, S; Khanzadeev, A; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, E; Kim, Y-S; Kinney, E; Kiss, A; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Klay, J; Klein-Boesing, C; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Král, A; Kravitz, A; Kroon, P J; Kubart, J; Kunde, G J; Kurihara, N; Kurita, K; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y-S; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Le Bornec, Y; Leckey, S; Lee, D M; Lee, M K; Lee, T; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Lenzi, B; Lim, H; Liska, T; Litvinenko, A; Liu, M X; Li, X; Li, X H; Love, B; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Malik, M D; Manko, V I; Mao, Y; Masek, L; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCain, M C; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; Miake, Y; Mikes, P; Miki, K; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mishra, G C; Mishra, M; Mitchell, J T; Mitrovski, M; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Moukhanova, T V; Mukhopadhyay, D; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagata, Y; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nakagawa, I; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Norman, B E; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Okada, H; Okada, K; Oka, M; Omiwade, O O; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Ouchida, M; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, J; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Pei, H; Peng, J-C; Pereira, H; Peresedov, V; Peressounko, D Yu; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Qu, H; Rak, J; Rakotozafindrabe, A; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Rembeczki, S; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Roche, G; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosendahl, S S E; Rosnet, P; Rukoyatkin, P; Rykov, V L; Ryu, S S; Sahlmueller, B; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, S; Sakata, H; Samsonov, V; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Sharma, D; Shea, T K; Shein, I; Shevel, A; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shimomura, M; Shohjoh, T; Shoji, K; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Silvestre, C; Sim, K S; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Skutnik, S; Slunecka, M; Smith, W C; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Staley, F; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Suire, C; Sullivan, J P; Sziklai, J; Tabaru, T; Takagi, S; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Taranenko, A; Tarján, P; Thomas, T L; Togawa, M; Toia, A; Tojo, J; Tomásek, L; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tram, V-N; Tserruya, I; Tsuchimoto, Y; Tuli, S K; Tydesjö, H; Tyurin, N; Vale, C; Valle, H; van Hecke, H W; Velkovska, J; Vertesi, R; Vinogradov, A A; Virius, M; Vrba, V; Vznuzdaev, E; Wagner, M; Walker, D; Wang, X R; Watanabe, Y; Wessels, J; White, S N; Willis, N; Winter, D; Woody, C L; Wysocki, M; Xie, W; Yamaguchi, Y L; Yanovich, A; Yasin, Z; Ying, J; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Younus, I; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zaudtke, O; Zhang, C; Zhou, S; Zimányi, J; Zolin, L

    2010-04-02

    The production of e+ e- pairs for m(e+ e-)<0.3 GeV/c2 and 1photon internal conversions, the invariant yield of direct photons is deduced. In central Au+Au collisions, the excess of the direct photon yield over p+p is exponential in transverse momentum, with an inverse slope T=221+/-19(stat)+/-19(syst) MeV. Hydrodynamical models with initial temperatures ranging from T(init) approximately 300-600 MeV at times of approximately 0.6-0.15 fm/c after the collision are in qualitative agreement with the data. Lattice QCD predicts a phase transition to quark gluon plasma at approximately 170 MeV.

  14. Measurements of integrated and differential cross sections for isolated photon pair production in p p collisions at √{s }=8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaboud, M.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Abidi, S. H.; Abouzeid, O. S.; Abraham, N. L.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adachi, S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adelman, J.; Adersberger, M.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agheorghiesei, C.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akatsuka, S.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albicocco, P.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Ali, B.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allen, B. W.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Alshehri, A. A.; Alstaty, M.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Angerami, A.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antel, C.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antrim, D. J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Araujo Ferraz, V.; Arce, A. T. H.; Ardell, R. E.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Armitage, L. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Artz, S.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagnaia, P.; Bahrasemani, H.; Baines, J. T.; Bajic, M.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisits, M.-S.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska-Blenessy, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barranco Navarro, L.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bedognetti, M.; Bee, C. P.; Beermann, T. A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Bell, A. S.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Belyaev, N. L.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez, J.; Benjamin, D. P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Beringer, J.; Berlendis, S.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernardi, G.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertram, I. A.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethani, A.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Beyer, J.; Bianchi, R. M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bielski, R.; Biesuz, N. V.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao de Mendizabal, J.; Billoud, T. R. V.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bisanz, T.; Bittrich, C.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blair, R. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blue, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, S.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Boerner, D.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bokan, P.; Bold, T.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bolz, A. E.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortoletto, D.; Bortolotto, V.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Bossio Sola, J. D.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Briglin, D. L.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Broughton, J. H.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruni, L. S.; Brunt, Bh; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryant, P.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burch, T. J.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgard, C. D.; Burger, A. M.; Burghgrave, B.; Burka, K.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Burr, J. T. P.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calace, N.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Callea, G.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvente Lopez, S.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Calvet, T. P.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Camincher, C.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Camplani, A.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Carbone, R. M.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardillo, F.; Carli, I.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carlson, B. T.; Carminati, L.; Carney, R. M. D.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrá, S.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Casper, D. W.; Castelijn, R.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavallaro, E.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Celebi, E.; Ceradini, F.; Cerda Alberich, L.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, S. K.; Chan, W. S.; Chan, Y. L.; Chang, P.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Che, S.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, S.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, H. J.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiarelli, G.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chitan, A.; Chiu, Y. H.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chomont, A. R.; Chouridou, S.; Christodoulou, V.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M. C.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Cioara, I. A.; Ciocca, C.; Ciocio, A.; Cirotto, F.; Citron, Z. H.; Citterio, M.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, M. R.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Colasurdo, L.; Cole, B.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Constantinescu, S.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cormier, F.; Cormier, K. J. R.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Crawley, S. J.; Creager, R. A.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cueto, A.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cukierman, A. R.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cúth, J.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; D'Amen, G.; D'Auria, S.; D'Eramo, L.; D'Onofrio, M.; da Cunha Sargedas de Sousa, M. J.; da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dado, T.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dandoy, J. R.; Daneri, M. F.; Dang, N. P.; Daniells, A. C.; Dann, N. S.; Danninger, M.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Daubney, T.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, M.; Davis, D. R.; Davison, P.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; de, K.; de Asmundis, R.; de Benedetti, A.; de Castro, S.; de Cecco, S.; de Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; de la Torre, H.; de Lorenzi, F.; de Maria, A.; de Pedis, D.; de Salvo, A.; de Sanctis, U.; de Santo, A.; de Vasconcelos Corga, K.; de Vivie de Regie, J. B.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. V.; Dehghanian, N.; Deigaard, I.; Del Gaudio, M.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delgove, D.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Dell'Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; Della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delporte, C.; Delsart, P. A.; Demarco, D. A.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Denysiuk, D.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Dette, K.; Devesa, M. R.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; di Bello, F. A.; di Ciaccio, A.; di Ciaccio, L.; di Clemente, W. K.; di Donato, C.; di Girolamo, A.; di Girolamo, B.; di Micco, B.; di Nardo, R.; di Petrillo, K. F.; di Simone, A.; di Sipio, R.; di Valentino, D.; Diaconu, C.; Diamond, M.; Dias, F. A.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Díez Cornell, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Djuvsland, J. I.; Do Vale, M. A. B.; Dobos, D.; Dobre, M.; Doglioni, C.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Drechsler, E.; Dris, M.; Du, Y.; Duarte-Campderros, J.; Dubreuil, A.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Ducourthial, A.; Ducu, O. A.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Dudder, A. Chr.; Duffield, E. M.; Duflot, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dumancic, M.; Dumitriu, A. E.; Duncan, A. K.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Durglishvili, A.; Duschinger, D.; Dutta, B.; Dyndal, M.; Eckardt, C.; Ecker, K. M.; Edgar, R. C.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; El Kosseifi, R.; Ellajosyula, V.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Elliot, A. A.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Ennis, J. S.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Ernis, G.; Ernst, M.; Errede, S.; Escalier, M.; Escobar, C.; Esposito, B.; Estrada Pastor, O.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Ezhilov, A.; Ezzi, M.; Fabbri, F.; Fabbri, L.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falla, R. J.; Faltova, J.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farina, C.; Farina, E. M.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Faucci Giannelli, M.; Favareto, A.; Fawcett, W. J.; Fayard, L.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Feigl, S.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Feng, H.; Fenton, M. J.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Feremenga, L.; Fernandez Martinez, P.; Fernandez Perez, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. E.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filipuzzi, M.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Finelli, K. D.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Fischer, A.; Fischer, C.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, W. C.; Flaschel, N.; Fleck, I.; Fleischmann, P.; Fletcher, R. R. M.; Flick, T.; Flierl, B. M.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Forcolin, G. T.; Formica, A.; Förster, F. A.; Forti, A.; Foster, A. G.; Fournier, D.; Fox, H.; Fracchia, S.; Francavilla, P.; Franchini, M.; Franchino, S.; Francis, D.; Franconi, L.; Franklin, M.; Frate, M.; Fraternali, M.; Freeborn, D.; Fressard-Batraneanu, S. M.; Freund, B.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fusayasu, T.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gabrielli, A.; Gabrielli, A.; Gach, G. P.; Gadatsch, S.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, L. G.; Galea, C.; Galhardo, B.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Galster, G.; Gan, K. K.; Ganguly, S.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Y. S.; Garay Walls, F. M.; García, C.; García Navarro, J. E.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garonne, V.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gasnikova, K.; Gatti, C.; Gaudiello, A.; Gaudio, G.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gazis, E. N.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geisen, J.; Geisen, M.; Geisler, M. P.; Gellerstedt, K.; Gemme, C.; Genest, M. H.; Geng, C.; Gentile, S.; Gentsos, C.; George, S.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gershon, A.; Geßner, G.; Ghasemi, S.; Ghneimat, M.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, S. M.; Gignac, M.; Gilchriese, M.; Gillberg, D.; Gilles, G.; Gingrich, D. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M. P.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giraud, P. F.; Giromini, P.; Giugni, D.; Giuli, F.; Giuliani, C.; Giulini, M.; Gjelsten, B. K.; Gkaitatzis, S.; Gkialas, I.; Gkougkousis, E. L.; Gkountoumis, P.; Gladilin, L. K.; Glasman, C.; Glatzer, J.; Glaysher, P. C. F.; Glazov, A.; Goblirsch-Kolb, M.; Godlewski, J.; Goldfarb, S.; Golling, T.; Golubkov, D.; Gomes, A.; Gonçalo, R.; Goncalves Gama, R.; Goncalves Pinto Firmino da Costa, J.; Gonella, G.; Gonella, L.; Gongadze, A.; González de La Hoz, S.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goossens, L.; Gorbounov, P. A.; Gordon, H. A.; Gorelov, I.; Gorini, B.; Gorini, E.; Gorišek, A.; Goshaw, A. T.; Gössling, C.; Gostkin, M. I.; Gottardo, C. A.; Goudet, C. R.; Goujdami, D.; Goussiou, A. G.; Govender, N.; Gozani, E.; Graber, L.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Gradin, P. O. J.; Gramling, J.; Gramstad, E.; Grancagnolo, S.; Gratchev, V.; Gravila, P. M.; Gray, C.; Gray, H. M.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Grefe, C.; Gregersen, K.; Gregor, I. M.; Grenier, P.; Grevtsov, K.; Griffiths, J.; Grillo, A. A.; Grimm, K.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Groh, S.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Grossi, G. C.; Grout, Z. J.; Grummer, A.; Guan, L.; Guan, W.; Guenther, J.; Guescini, F.; Guest, D.; Gueta, O.; Gui, B.; Guido, E.; Guillemin, T.; Guindon, S.; Gul, U.; Gumpert, C.; Guo, J.; Guo, W.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, R.; Gupta, S.; Gustavino, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Gutierrez Ortiz, N. G.; Gutschow, C.; Guyot, C.; Guzik, M. P.; Gwenlan, C.; Gwilliam, C. B.; Haas, A.; Haber, C.; Hadavand, H. K.; Haddad, N.; Hadef, A.; Hageböck, S.; Hagihara, M.; Hakobyan, H.; Haleem, M.; Haley, J.; Halladjian, G.; Hallewell, G. D.; Hamacher, K.; Hamal, P.; Hamano, K.; Hamilton, A.; Hamity, G. N.; Hamnett, P. G.; Han, L.; Han, S.; Hanagaki, K.; Hanawa, K.; Hance, M.; Haney, B.; Hanke, P.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, M. C.; Hansen, P. H.; Hara, K.; Hard, A. S.; Harenberg, T.; Hariri, F.; Harkusha, S.; Harrington, R. D.; Harrison, P. F.; Hartmann, N. M.; Hasegawa, M.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hasib, A.; Hassani, S.; Haug, S.; Hauser, R.; Hauswald, L.; Havener, L. B.; Havranek, M.; Hawkes, C. M.; Hawkings, R. J.; Hayakawa, D.; Hayden, D.; Hays, C. P.; Hays, J. M.; Hayward, H. S.; Haywood, S. J.; Head, S. J.; Heck, T.; Hedberg, V.; Heelan, L.; Heidegger, K. K.; Heim, S.; Heim, T.; Heinemann, B.; Heinrich, J. J.; Heinrich, L.; Heinz, C.; Hejbal, J.; Helary, L.; Held, A.; Hellman, S.; Helsens, C.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Heng, Y.; Henkelmann, S.; Henriques Correia, A. M.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Herbert, G. H.; Herde, H.; Herget, V.; Hernández Jiménez, Y.; Herten, G.; Hertenberger, R.; Hervas, L.; Herwig, T. C.; Hesketh, G. G.; Hessey, N. P.; Hetherly, J. W.; Higashino, S.; Higón-Rodriguez, E.; Hill, E.; Hill, J. C.; Hiller, K. H.; Hillier, S. J.; Hils, M.; Hinchliffe, I.; Hirose, M.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hiti, B.; Hladik, O.; Hoad, X.; Hobbs, J.; Hod, N.; Hodgkinson, M. C.; Hodgson, P.; Hoecker, A.; Hoeferkamp, M. R.; Hoenig, F.; Hohn, D.; Holmes, T. R.; Homann, M.; Honda, S.; Honda, T.; Hong, T. M.; Hooberman, B. H.; Hopkins, W. H.; Horii, Y.; Horton, A. J.; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Hou, S.; Hoummada, A.; Howarth, J.; Hoya, J.; Hrabovsky, M.; Hrdinka, J.; Hristova, I.; Hrivnac, J.; Hryn'ova, T.; Hrynevich, A.; Hsu, P. J.; Hsu, S.-C.; Hu, Q.; Hu, S.; Huang, Y.; Hubacek, Z.; Hubaut, F.; Huegging, F.; Huffman, T. B.; Hughes, E. W.; Hughes, G.; Huhtinen, M.; Huo, P.; Huseynov, N.; Huston, J.; Huth, J.; Iacobucci, G.; Iakovidis, G.; Ibragimov, I.; Iconomidou-Fayard, L.; Idrissi, Z.; Iengo, P.; Igonkina, O.; Iizawa, T.; Ikegami, Y.; Ikeno, M.; Ilchenko, Y.; Iliadis, D.; Ilic, N.; Introzzi, G.; Ioannou, P.; Iodice, M.; Iordanidou, K.; Ippolito, V.; Isacson, M. F.; Ishijima, N.; Ishino, M.; Ishitsuka, M.; Issever, C.; Istin, S.; Ito, F.; Iturbe Ponce, J. M.; Iuppa, R.; Iwasaki, H.; Izen, J. M.; Izzo, V.; Jabbar, S.; Jackson, P.; Jacobs, R. M.; Jain, V.; Jakobi, K. B.; Jakobs, K.; Jakobsen, S.; Jakoubek, T.; Jamin, D. O.; Jana, D. K.; Jansky, R.; Janssen, J.; Janus, M.; Janus, P. A.; Jarlskog, G.; Javadov, N.; Javůrek, T.; Javurkova, M.; Jeanneau, F.; Jeanty, L.; Jejelava, J.; Jelinskas, A.; Jenni, P.; Jeske, C.; Jézéquel, S.; Ji, H.; Jia, J.; Jiang, H.; Jiang, Y.; Jiang, Z.; Jiggins, S.; Jimenez Pena, J.; Jin, S.; Jinaru, A.; Jinnouchi, O.; Jivan, H.; Johansson, P.; Johns, K. A.; Johnson, C. A.; Johnson, W. J.; Jon-And, K.; Jones, R. W. L.; Jones, S. D.; Jones, S.; Jones, T. J.; Jongmanns, J.; Jorge, P. M.; Jovicevic, J.; Ju, X.; Juste Rozas, A.; Köhler, M. K.; Kaczmarska, A.; Kado, M.; Kagan, H.; Kagan, M.; Kahn, S. J.; Kaji, T.; Kajomovitz, E.; Kalderon, C. W.; Kaluza, A.; Kama, S.; Kamenshchikov, A.; Kanaya, N.; Kanjir, L.; Kantserov, V. A.; Kanzaki, J.; Kaplan, B.; Kaplan, L. S.; Kar, D.; Karakostas, K.; Karastathis, N.; Kareem, M. J.; Karentzos, E.; Karpov, S. N.; Karpova, Z. M.; Karthik, K.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Karyukhin, A. N.; Kasahara, K.; Kashif, L.; Kass, R. 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M.; Zakharchuk, N.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, J. C.; Zeng, Q.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, P.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; Zou, R.; Zur Nedden, M.; Zwalinski, L.; Atlas Collaboration

    2017-06-01

    A measurement of the production cross section for two isolated photons in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of √{s }=8 TeV is presented. The results are based on an integrated luminosity of 20.2 fb-1 recorded by the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. The measurement considers photons with pseudorapidities satisfying |ηγ|<1.37 or 1.56 <|ηγ|<2.37 and transverse energies of respectively ET,1 γ>40 GeV and ET,2 γ>30 GeV for the two leading photons ordered in transverse energy produced in the interaction. The background due to hadronic jets and electrons is subtracted using data-driven techniques. The fiducial cross sections are corrected for detector effects and measured differentially as a function of six kinematic observables. The measured cross section integrated within the fiducial volume is 16.8 ±0.8 pb . The data are compared to fixed-order QCD calculations at next-to-leading-order and next-to-next-to-leading-order accuracy as well as next-to-leading-order computations including resummation of initial-state gluon radiation at next-to-next-to-leading logarithm or matched to a parton shower, with relative uncertainties varying from 5% to 20%.

  15. Measurement of differential cross sections for the production of a pair of isolated photons in pp collisions at [Formula: see text].

    PubMed

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    A measurement of differential cross sections for the production of a pair of isolated photons in proton-proton collisions at [Formula: see text] is presented. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 5.0[Formula: see text] collected with the CMS detector. A data-driven isolation template method is used to extract the prompt diphoton yield. The measured cross section for two isolated photons, with transverse energy above 40 and 25[Formula: see text] respectively, in the pseudorapidity range [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] and with an angular separation [Formula: see text], is [Formula: see text][Formula: see text]. Differential cross sections are measured as a function of the diphoton invariant mass, the diphoton transverse momentum, the azimuthal angle difference between the two photons, and the cosine of the polar angle in the Collins-Soper reference frame of the diphoton system. The results are compared to theoretical predictions at leading, next-to-leading, and next-to-next-to-leading order in quantum chromodynamics.

  16. Measurements of integrated and differential cross sections for isolated photon pair production in pp collisions at s=8TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGES

    Aaboud, M.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; ...

    2017-06-27

    A measurement of the production cross section for two isolated photons in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy ofmore » $$\\sqrt{s}$$ = 8 TeV is presented. The results are based on an integrated luminosity of 20.2 fb-1 recorded by the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. The measurement considers photons with pseudorapidities satisfying |ηγ| < 1.37 or 1.56 < |ηγ| < 2.37 and transverse energies of respectively E$$γ\\atop{T,1}$$ > 40 GeV and E$$γ\\atop{T,2}$$ > 30 GeV for the two leading photons ordered in transverse energy produced in the interaction. The background due to hadronic jets and electrons is subtracted using data-driven techniques. The fiducial cross sections are corrected for detector effects and measured differentially as a function of six kinematic observables. The measured cross section integrated within the fiducial volume is 16.8 ± 0.8 pb . Lastly, the data are compared to fixed-order QCD calculations at next-to-leading-order and next-to-next-to-leading-order accuracy as well as next-to-leading-order computations including resummation of initial-state gluon radiation at next-to-next-to-leading logarithm or matched to a parton shower, with relative uncertainties varying from 5% to 20%.« less