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Sample records for hard scattering physics

  1. Fixed target electroweak and hard scattering physics

    SciTech Connect

    Brock, R. ); Brown, C.N.; Montgomery, H.E. ); Corcoran, M.D. )

    1990-02-01

    The possibilities for future physics and experiments involving weak and electromagnetic interactions, neutrino oscillations, general hard scattering and experiments involving nuclear targets were explored. The studies were limited to the physics accessible using fixed target experimentation. While some of the avenues explored turn out to be relatively unrewarding in the light of competition elsewhere in the world, there are a number of positive conclusions reached about experimentation in the energy range available to the Main Injector and Tevatron. Some of the experiments would benefit from the increased intensity available from the Tevatron utilizing the Main Injector, while some require this increase. Finally, some of the experiments would use the Main Injector low energy, high intensity extracted beams directly. A program of electroweak and hard scattering experiments at fixed target energies retains the potential for important contributions to physics. The key to major parts of this program would appear to be the existence of the Main Injector. 115 refs, 17 figs.

  2. Physics of Hard Sphere Experiment: Scattering, Rheology and Microscopy Study of Colloidal Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Z.-D.; Zhu, J.; Phan, S.-E.; Russel, W. B.; Chaikin, P. M.; Meyer, W. V.

    2002-01-01

    The Physics of Hard Sphere Experiment has two incarnations: the first as a scattering and rheology experiment on STS-83 and STS-94 and the second as a microscopy experiment to be performed in the future on LMM on the space station. Here we describe some of the quantitative and qualitative results from previous flights on the dynamics of crystallization in microgravity and especially the observed interaction of growing crystallites in the coexistance regime. To clarify rheological measurements we also present ground based experiments on the low shear rate viscosity and diffusion coefficient of several hard sphere experiments at high volume fraction. We also show how these experiments will be performed with confocal microscopy and laser tweezers in our lab and as preparation for the phAse II experiments on LMM. One of the main aims of the microscopy study will be the control of colloidal samples using an array of applied fields with an eye toward colloidal architectures. Temperature gradients, electric field gradients, laser tweezers and a variety of switchable imposed surface patterns are used toward this control.

  3. Physics of Hard Sphere Experiment: Scattering, Rheology and Microscopy Study of Colloidal Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Z.-D.; Zhu, J.; Phan, S.-E.; Russel, W. B.; Chaikin, P. M.; Meyer, W. V.

    2002-01-01

    The Physics of Hard Sphere Experiment has two incarnations: the first as a scattering and rheology experiment on STS-83 and STS-94 and the second as a microscopy experiment to be performed in the future on LMM on the space station. Here we describe some of the quantitative and qualitative results from previous flights on the dynamics of crystallization in microgravity and especially the observed interaction of growing crystallites in the coexistance regime. To clarify rheological measurements we also present ground based experiments on the low shear rate viscosity and diffusion coefficient of several hard sphere experiments at high volume fraction. We also show how these experiments will be performed with confocal microscopy and laser tweezers in our lab and as preparation for the phAse II experiments on LMM. One of the main aims of the microscopy study will be the control of colloidal samples using an array of applied fields with an eye toward colloidal architectures. Temperature gradients, electric field gradients, laser tweezers and a variety of switchable imposed surface patterns are used toward this control.

  4. Nonperturbative vacuum and hard scattering processes

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, N.

    1980-08-01

    A number of interesting suggestions for the QCD nonperturbative vacuum have been advocated in recent years by a group of people in Copenhagen. Some of the main ideas are briefly reviewed. An attempt to obtain the physical effects of the nonperturbative vacuum by studying hard scattering processes such as e/sup +/e/sup -/ ..-->.. hadrons is also described. 2 figures.

  5. Hard Scattering Studies at Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Harutyun Avagyan; Peter Bosted; Volker Burkert; Latifa Elouadrhiri

    2005-09-01

    We present current activities and future prospects for studies of hard scattering processes using the CLAS detector and the CEBAF polarized electron beam. Kinematic dependences of single and double spin asymmetries have been measured in a wide kinematic range at CLAS with a polarized NH{sub 3} and unpolarized liquid hydrogen targets. It has been shown that the data are consistent with factorization and observed target and beam asymmetries are in good agreement with measurements performed at higher energies, suggesting that the high energy-description of the semi-inclusive DIS process can be extended to the moderate energies of JLab measurements.

  6. The underlying event in hard scattering processes

    SciTech Connect

    R. Field

    2002-02-08

    The authors study the behavior of the underlying event in hard scattering proton-antiproton collisions at 1.8 TeV and compare with the QCD Monte-Carlo models. The underlying event is everything except the two outgoing hard scattered jets and receives contributions from the beam-beam remnants plus initial and final-state radiation. The data indicate that neither ISAJET or HERWIG produce enough charged particles (with p{sub T} > 0.5 GeV/c) from the beam-beam remnant component and that ISAJET produces too many charged particles from initial-state radiation. PYTHIA which uses multiple parton scattering to enhance the underlying event does the best job describing the data.

  7. The space-time structure of hard scattering processes

    SciTech Connect

    J.-M. Laget

    2004-09-01

    Recent studies of exclusive electroproduction of vector mesons at JLab make it possible for the first time to play with two independent hard scales: the virtuality Q{sup 2}2 of the photon, which sets the observation scale, and the momentum transfer t to the hadronic system, which sets the interaction scale. They reinforce the description of hard scattering processes in terms of few effective degrees of freedom relevant to the Jlab-Hermes energy range.

  8. Investigating hard sphere interactions through spin echo scattering angle measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washington, Adam

    Spin Echo Scattering Angle Measurement (SESAME) allows neutron scattering instruments to perform real space measurements on large micron scale samples by encoding the scattering angle into the neutron's spin state via Larmor precession. I have built a SESAME instrument at the Low Energy Neutron Source. I have also assisted in the construction of a modular SESAME instrument on the ASTERIX beamline at Los Alamos National lab. The ability to tune these instruments has been proved mathematically and optimized and automated experimentally. Practical limits of the SESAME technique with respect to polarization analyzers, neutron spectra, Larmor elements, and data analysis were investigated. The SESAME technique was used to examine the interaction of hard spheres under depletion. Poly(methyl methacrylate) spheres suspended in decalin had previously been studied as a hard sphere solution. The interparticle correlations between the spheres were found to match the Percus-Yevick closure, as had been previously seen in dynamical light scattering experiments. To expand beyond pure hard spheres, 900kDa polystyrene was added to the solution in concentrations of less than 1% by mass. The steric effects of the polystyrene were expected to produce a short-range, attractive, "sticky" potential. Experiment showed, however, that the "sticky" potential was not a stable state and that the spheres would eventually form long range aggregates.

  9. A hard X-ray polarimeter utilizing Compton scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakurai, H.; Noma, M.; Niizeki, H.

    1991-01-01

    The paper describes a 50-cm-diam prototype of a novel Compton-scattering-type polarimeter for hard X-rays in the energy range 30-100 keV. The characteristics of the prototype polarimeter were investigated for various conditions. It was found that, with polarized X-rays from a simple polarizer, the detection efficiency and the modulation factor of the polarimeter with a 40-mm thick scatterer were 3.2 percent and 0.57 percent, respectively, at about 60 keV.

  10. Azimuthal asymmetries in QCD hard scattering: infrared safe but divergent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catani, Stefano; Grazzini, Massimiliano; Sargsyan, Hayk

    2017-06-01

    We consider high-mass systems of two or more particles that are produced by QCD hard scattering in hadronic collisions. We examine the azimuthal correlations between the system and one of its particles. We point out that the perturbative QCD computation of such azimuthal correlations and asymmetries can lead to divergent results at fixed perturbative orders. The fixed-order divergences affect basic (and infrared safe) quantities such as the total cross section at fixed (and arbitrary) values of the azimuthal-correlation angle φ. Examples of processes with fixed-order divergences are heavy-quark pair production, associated production of vector bosons and jets, dijet and diboson production. A noticeable exception is the production of high-mass lepton pairs through the Drell-Yan mechanism of quark-antiquark annihilation. However, even in the Drell-Yan process, fixed-order divergences arise in the computation of QED radiative corrections. We specify general conditions that produce the divergences by discussing their physical origin in fixed-order computations. We show lowest-order illustrative results for cos( nφ) asymmetries (with n = 1 , 2 , 4 , 6) in top-quark pair production and associated production of a vector boson and a jet at the LHC. The divergences are removed by a proper all-order resummation procedure of the perturbative contributions. Resummation leads to azimuthal asymmetries that are finite and computable. We present first quantitative results of such a resummed computation for the cos(2 φ) asymmetry in top-quark pair production at the LHC.

  11. Scattering for mixtures of hard spheres: comparison of total scattering intensities with model.

    PubMed

    Anderson, B J; Gopalakrishnan, V; Ramakrishnan, S; Zukoski, C F

    2006-03-01

    The angular dependence of the intensity of x-rays scattered from binary and ternary hard sphere mixtures is investigated and compared to the predictions of two scattering models. Mixture ratio and total volume fraction dependent effects are investigated for size ratios equal to 0.51 and 0.22. Comparisons of model predictions with experimental results indicate the significant impact of the role of particle size distributions in interpreting the angular dependence of the scattering at wave vectors probing density fluctuations intermediate between the sizes of the particles in the mixture.

  12. Nonlinear scattering in hard tissue studied with ultrashort laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Eichler, Jürgen; Kim, Beop-Min

    2002-01-01

    The back-scattered spectrum of ultrashort laser pulses (800 nm, 0.2 ps) was studied in human dental and other hard tissues in vitro below the ablation threshold. Frequency doubled radiation (SHG), frequency tripled radiation and two-photon fluorescence were detected. The relative yield for these processes was measured for various pulse energies. The dependence of the SHG signal on probe thickness was determined in forward and back scattering geometry. SHG is sensitive to linear polarization of the incident laser radiation. SHG in human teeth was studied in vitro showing larger signals in dentin than in cementum and enamel. In carious areas no SHG signal could be detected. Possible applications of higher harmonic radiation for diagnostics and microscopy are discussed.

  13. Scattering of a Spherical Wave by a Thin Hard Strip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouis, D.

    1999-02-01

    This paper is concerned with a theoretical solution to the problem of scattering of a spherical wave by a strip. The strip is infinitely thin, infinite in length and of width 2a. The problem is first brought into the wave space through a spatial Fourier transform of the wave equation and of the boundary conditions on the strip. The Fourier transform is taken with respect to the co-ordinate axis parallel to the edges of the strip. Using the boundary conditions on the strip leads to an integral equation of the first kind, the unknown of which is the discontinuous potential jump across the strip. This latter is expanded into some suitable functions and the coefficients of the series expansion are thereafter determined from an infinite system of equations. The system's matrix is found to be mainly diagonal and tests on the stability of the numerical calculations suggest the significant number of equations in the system be limited to approximatelyka+5, withkbeing the wavenumber. Finally, after solving the system of equations and going back to the scattered field, the expression of this latter is made from an infinite series over some infinite double integrals whose approximate evaluation is made with the help of the two-dimensional stationary phase method. This treatment corresponds to the far field case. A further consideration of the right side of the system of equations leads to an improved value of the scattered field. Comparisons are made to an approximated prediction of the scattered field by using the Biot and Tolstoy exact theory of diffraction of a spherical wave by a hard wedge. The implementation of this approach to the strip requires the further consideration of the multiple diffraction between its edges for improving the calculated value of the scattered field. Some numerical examples are treated with discussions on their results.

  14. Statistical physics of hard optimization problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdeborová, Lenka

    2009-06-01

    Optimization is fundamental in many areas of science, from computer science and information theory to engineering and statistical physics, as well as to biology or social sciences. It typically involves a large number of variables and a cost function depending on these variables. Optimization problems in the non-deterministic polynomial (NP)-complete class are particularly difficult, it is believed that the number of operations required to minimize the cost function is in the most difficult cases exponential in the system size. However, even in an NP-complete problem the practically arising instances might, in fact, be easy to solve. The principal question we address in this article is: How to recognize if an NP-complete constraint satisfaction problem is typically hard and what are the main reasons for this? We adopt approaches from the statistical physics of disordered systems, in particular the cavity method developed originally to describe glassy systems. We describe new properties of the space of solutions in two of the most studied constraint satisfaction problems - random satisfiability and random graph coloring. We suggest a relation between the existence of the so-called frozen variables and the algorithmic hardness of a problem. Based on these insights, we introduce a new class of problems which we named "locked" constraint satisfaction, where the statistical description is easily solvable, but from the algorithmic point of view they are even more challenging than the canonical satisfiability.

  15. Statistical Physics of Hard Optimization Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdeborová, Lenka

    2008-06-01

    Optimization is fundamental in many areas of science, from computer science and information theory to engineering and statistical physics, as well as to biology or social sciences. It typically involves a large number of variables and a cost function depending on these variables. Optimization problems in the NP-complete class are particularly difficult, it is believed that the number of operations required to minimize the cost function is in the most difficult cases exponential in the system size. However, even in an NP-complete problem the practically arising instances might, in fact, be easy to solve. The principal question we address in this thesis is: How to recognize if an NP-complete constraint satisfaction problem is typically hard and what are the main reasons for this? We adopt approaches from the statistical physics of disordered systems, in particular the cavity method developed originally to describe glassy systems. We describe new properties of the space of solutions in two of the most studied constraint satisfaction problems - random satisfiability and random graph coloring. We suggest a relation between the existence of the so-called frozen variables and the algorithmic hardness of a problem. Based on these insights, we introduce a new class of problems which we named "locked" constraint satisfaction, where the statistical description is easily solvable, but from the algorithmic point of view they are even more challenging than the canonical satisfiability.

  16. Stable determination of sound-hard polyhedral scatterers by a minimal number of scattering measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongyu; Petrini, Michele; Rondi, Luca; Xiao, Jingni

    2017-02-01

    The aim of the paper is to establish optimal stability estimates for the determination of sound-hard polyhedral scatterers in RN, N ≥ 2, by a minimal number of far-field measurements. This work is a significant and highly nontrivial extension of the stability estimates for the determination of sound-soft polyhedral scatterers by far-field measurements, proved by one of the authors, to the much more challenging sound-hard case. The admissible polyhedral scatterers satisfy minimal a priori assumptions of Lipschitz type and may include at the same time solid obstacles and screen-type components. In this case we obtain a stability estimate with N far-field measurements. Important features of such an estimate are that we have an explicit dependence on the parameter h representing the minimal size of the cells forming the boundaries of the admissible polyhedral scatterers, and that the modulus of continuity, provided the error is small enough with respect to h, does not depend on h. If we restrict to N = 2 , 3 and to polyhedral obstacles, that is to polyhedra, then we obtain stability estimates with fewer measurements, namely first with N - 1 measurements and then with a single measurement. In this case the dependence on h is not explicit anymore and the modulus of continuity depends on h as well.

  17. Absence of Scaling for the Intermediate Scattering Function of a Hard-Sphere Suspension: Static and Dynamic X-Ray Scattering from Concentrated Polystyrene Latex Spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Lurio, L. B.; Lumma, D.; Sandy, A. R.; Borthwick, M. A.; Falus, P.; Mochrie, S. G. J.; Pelletier, J. F.; Sutton, M.; Regan, Lynne; Malik, A.

    2000-01-24

    X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy and small-angle scattering measurements are presented of the dynamics and structure of concentrated suspensions of charge-stabilized polystyrene latex spheres dispersed in glycerol, for volume fractions from 3% to 52% . The static structures of the suspensions show essentially hard-sphere behavior, and the short-time dynamics shows good agreement with predictions for the wave-vector-dependent collective diffusion coefficient. However, the intermediate scattering function is found to violate a scaling behavior found previously for a sterically stabilized hard-sphere suspension [P. N. Segre and P. N. Pusey, Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 771 (1996)]. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  18. Hard scattering of partons as a probe of collisions at RHIC using the STAR detector system

    SciTech Connect

    Christie, W.B.

    1995-07-15

    Presented here is the current state of the author`s investigations into the use of hard probes to study pp, pA, and AA collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) being built at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The overall goal of the RHIC program is the discovery and study of the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP), which is predicted to be formed at the high energy densities reached at RHIC in high energy AA collisions. The term {open_quotes}Hard probes{close_quotes} as used in this document includes those particles whose origin is the result of a direct hard parton scatter (i.e qq, qg, or gg). The final states of these hard parton scatters which the author proposes to study include dijets, gamma-jet coincidences, and inclusive high P{sub t} particle spectra. A brief discussion of the physics objectives is given in section 1. This is followed by an introduction to the STAR detector system in section 2, with particular details given for the proposed STAR Electromagnetic Calorimeter (EMC). The present simulation studies and results are given in section 3. The author concludes with a summary and a discussion of future plans in section 4.

  19. Extending synchrotron-based atomic physics experiments into the hard X-ray region

    SciTech Connect

    LeBrun, T.

    1996-12-31

    The high-brightness, hard x-ray beams available from third-generation synchrotron sources are opening new opportunities to study the deepest inner shells of atoms, an area where little work has been done and phenomena not observed in less tightly bound inner-shells are manifested. In addition scattering processes which are weak at lower energies become important, providing another tool to investigate atomic structure as well as an opportunity to study photon/atom interactions beyond photoabsorption. In this contribution the authors discuss some of the issues related to extending synchrotron-based atomic physics experiments into the hard x-ray region from the physical and the experimental point of view. They close with a discussion of a technique, resonant Raman scattering, that may prove invaluable in determining the spectra of the very highly-excited states resulting from the excitation of deep inner shells.

  20. Rapidity gaps and color evolution in QCD hard scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oderda, Gianluca

    1999-03-01

    We discuss rapidity-gap events between two jets produced at high momentum transfer in ρ ρ¯ scattering, from the point of view of the soft energy flow into the interjet region. We define a gap cross section and, in perturbative QCD (pQCD), resum all the leading logarithms in the soft intermediate energy. We show that the numerical result from our cross section reproduces the shape of the DO and CDF [1-3] experimental data.

  1. Imaging the proton via hard exclusive production in diffractive pp scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Hyde; Leonid Frankfurt; Mark Strikman; Christian Weiss

    2007-05-21

    We discuss the prospects for probing Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) via exclusive production of a high-mass system (H = heavy quarkonium, di-photon, di-jet, Higgs boson) in diffractive pp scattering, pp -> p + H + p. In such processes the interplay of hard and soft interactions gives rise to a diffraction pattern in the final-state proton transverse momenta, which is sensitive to the transverse spatial distribution of partons in the colliding protons. We comment on the plans for diffractive pp measurements at RHIC and LHC. Such studies could complement future measurements of GPDs in hard exclusive ep scattering (JLab, COMPASS, EIC).

  2. Medium-induced gluon radiation in hard forward parton scattering in the saturation formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munier, Stéphane; Peigné, Stéphane; Petreska, Elena

    2017-01-01

    We derive the medium-induced, fully coherent soft gluon radiation spectrum associated with the hard forward scattering of an energetic parton off a nucleus, in the saturation formalism within the Gaussian approximation for the relevant correlators of Wilson lines and for finite number of colors. The validity range of the result is rigorously specified by keeping track of the order of magnitude of subleading contributions to the spectrum. The connection between the saturation formalism and the opacity expansion used in previous studies of the same observable is made apparent. Our calculation sets the basis for further studies of the interplay between saturation and fully coherent energy loss in hard forward parton scattering.

  3. Physics of Cyclotron Resonance Scattering Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sschoenherr, Gabriele; Schwarm, Fritz-Walter; Falkner, Sebastian; Dauser, Thomas; Pottschmidt, Katja; Kretschmar, Peter; Klochkov, Dmitry; Ferrigno, Carlo; Britton Hemphill, Paul; Wilms, Joern

    2016-04-01

    Cyclotron resonant scattering features (short: cyclotron lines) are sensitive tracers of the physics of the accretion columns and mounds of X-ray pulsars. They form by interaction of X-ray photons with magnetically quantized electrons in the accreted plasma close to the neutron star. Such lines have been observed as absorption-like features for about 20 X-ray pulsars. Their energies provide a direct measure of the magnetic field strength in the line-forming region. By detailed modelling of the lines and of their parameter dependencies we can further decipher the physical conditions in the accretion column. For instance the fact that the complex scattering cross sections have a strong angle-dependence relates the phase-resolved cyclotron line shapes to parameters that constrain the systems’ still poorly understood geometry. Modelling the physics of cyclotron lines to a degree that allows for detailed and solid comparison to data therefore provides a unique access also to a better understanding of the overall picture of magnetically accreting neutron star systems.

  4. Portraying Physicists and Physics in Hard Science Fiction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cramer, John G.

    2001-03-01

    "Hard" science fiction is that sub-genre of SF in which a serious attempt is made to portray science and scientists as accurately as possible, often by using scientists and engineers as principal characters and by using scientific problem solving as a major plot element. The speaker, a Professor of Physics, writes a regular bimonthly science column (see http://www.npl.washington.edu/av) and has also written two hard SF novels, Twistor, which is about ``small" science in a university physics research laboratory, and Einstein's Bridge, which portrays ``big" science and in particular the 1993 cancellation of the Superconducting Super Collider Project, as played out against a fictional background of breakthrough discoveries, alien contact, wormholes, and time travel. The speaker will discuss his experiences in planning, writing, and publishing hard SF, and will consider how these activities address the general problem of public appreciation, perception, and mis-perception of science.

  5. The Physics of Hard Spheres Experiment on MSL-1: Required Measurements and Instrument Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doherty, Michael P.; Lant, Christian T.; Ling, Jerri S.

    1998-01-01

    The Physics of HArd Spheres Experiment (PHaSE), one of NASA Lewis Research Center's first major light scattering experiments for microgravity research on complex fluids, flew on board the Space Shuttle's Microgravity Science Laboratory (MSL-1) in 1997. Using colloidal systems of various concentrations of micron-sized plastic spheres in a refractive index-matching fluid as test samples, illuminated by laser light during and after crystallization, investigations were conducted to measure the nucleation and growth rate of colloidal crystals as well as the structure, rheology, and dynamics of the equilibrium crystal. Together, these measurements support an enhanced understanding of the nature of the liquid-to-solid transition. Achievement of the science objectives required an accurate experimental determination of eight fundamental properties for the hard sphere colloidal samples. The instrument design met almost all of the original measurement requirements, but with compromise on the number of samples on which data were taken. The instrument performs 2-D Bragg and low angle scattering from 0.4 deg. to 60 deg., dynamic and single-channel static scattering from 10 deg. to 170 deg., rheology using fiber optics, and white light imaging of the sample. As a result, PHaSE provided a timely microgravity demonstration of critical light scattering measurement techniques and hardware concepts, while generating data already showing promise of interesting new scientific findings in the field of condensed matter physics.

  6. A survey of the physical optics inverse scattering identity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojarski, N. N.

    1982-09-01

    An inverse scattering identity relating the characteristic function of a scatterer to the three-dimensional spatial Fourier transform of the augmented far field scattering amplitude is derived by applying the physical optics approximation to the acoustic and electromagnetic direct scattering integral representation. Because this identity requires full scattering data for all frequencies and aspect angles, an integral equation is developed for incomplete scattering data which solves for the unknown characteristic function of the scatterer in terms of the known incomplete scattering data. A regularized analytic closed form solution to this integral equation is obtained, and synthesized numerico-experimental results verifying the solution are presented.

  7. Physics of Hard Spheres Experiment: Significant and Quantitative Findings Made

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doherty, Michael P.

    2000-01-01

    Direct examination of atomic interactions is difficult. One powerful approach to visualizing atomic interactions is to study near-index-matched colloidal dispersions of microscopic plastic spheres, which can be probed by visible light. Such spheres interact through hydrodynamic and Brownian forces, but they feel no direct force before an infinite repulsion at contact. Through the microgravity flight of the Physics of Hard Spheres Experiment (PHaSE), researchers have sought a more complete understanding of the entropically driven disorder-order transition in hard-sphere colloidal dispersions. The experiment was conceived by Professors Paul M. Chaikin and William B. Russel of Princeton University. Microgravity was required because, on Earth, index-matched colloidal dispersions often cannot be density matched, resulting in significant settling over the crystallization period. This settling makes them a poor model of the equilibrium atomic system, where the effect of gravity is truly negligible. For this purpose, a customized light-scattering instrument was designed, built, and flown by the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field on the space shuttle (shuttle missions STS 83 and STS 94). This instrument performed both static and dynamic light scattering, with sample oscillation for determining rheological properties. Scattered light from a 532- nm laser was recorded either by a 10-bit charge-coupled discharge (CCD) camera from a concentric screen covering angles of 0 to 60 or by sensitive avalanche photodiode detectors, which convert the photons into binary data from which two correlators compute autocorrelation functions. The sample cell was driven by a direct-current servomotor to allow sinusoidal oscillation for the measurement of rheological properties. Significant microgravity research findings include the observation of beautiful dendritic crystals, the crystallization of a "glassy phase" sample in microgravity that did not crystallize for over 1 year in 1g

  8. Quark structure of the nucleon and angular asymmetry of proton-neutron hard elastic scattering.

    PubMed

    Granados, Carlos G; Sargsian, Misak M

    2009-11-20

    We investigate an asymmetry in the angular distribution of hard elastic proton-neutron scattering with respect to the 90 degrees center of mass scattering angle and demonstrate that it's magnitude is related to the helicity-isospin symmetry of the quark wave function of the nucleon. Our estimate of the asymmetry within the quark-interchange model of hard scattering demonstrates that the quark wave function of a nucleon based on the exact SU(6) symmetry predicts an angular asymmetry opposite to that of experimental observations. We found that the quark wave function based on the diquark picture of the nucleon produces a correct asymmetry. Comparison with the data allowed us to show that the vector diquarks contribute around 10% in the nucleon wave function and they are in negative phase relative to the scalar diquarks. These observations are essential in constraining QCD models of a nucleon.

  9. The underlying event in hard scattering collisions of proton and antiproton at 1.8 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, Richard Martin

    /ψ B as a function of J/ψ data potentially indicating a dependence of the underlying event on the particle created in the hard scattering collision. In order to obtain reliable predictions for physics backgrounds in Run II environments, the underlying event must be correctly modeled.

  10. THE HARD X-RAY SPECTRUM OF NGC 1365: SCATTERED LIGHT, NOT BLACK HOLE SPIN

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, L.; Turner, T. J.

    2013-08-10

    Active galactic nuclei (AGNs) show excess X-ray emission above 10 keV compared with extrapolation of spectra from lower energies. Risaliti et al. have recently attempted to model the hard X-ray excess in the type 1.8 AGN NGC 1365, concluding that the hard excess most likely arises from Compton-scattered reflection of X-rays from an inner accretion disk close to the black hole. Their analysis disfavored a model in which the hard excess arises from a high column density of circumnuclear gas partially covering a primary X-ray source, despite such components being required in the NGC 1365 data below 10 keV. Using a Monte Carlo radiative transfer approach, we demonstrate that this conclusion is invalidated by (1) use of slab absorption models, which have unrealistic transmission spectra for partial covering gas, (2) neglect of the effect of Compton scattering on transmitted spectra, and (3) inadequate modeling of the spectrum of scattered X-rays. The scattered spectrum is geometry-dependent and, for high global covering factors, may dominate above 10 keV. We further show that, in models of circumnuclear gas, the suppression of the observed hard X-ray flux by reprocessing may be no larger than required by the ''light bending'' model invoked for inner disk reflection, and the expected emission line strengths lie within the observed range. We conclude that the time-invariant ''red wing'' in AGN X-ray spectra is probably caused by continuum transmitted through and scattered from circumnuclear gas, not by highly redshifted line emission, and that measurement of black hole spin is not possible.

  11. Analytical Expressions for the Hard-Scattering Production of Massive Partons

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Cheuk-Yin

    2016-01-01

    We obtain explicit expressions for the two-particle differential cross section $E_c E_\\kappa d\\sigma (AB \\to c\\kappa X) /d\\bb c d \\bb \\kappa$ and the two-particle angular correlation function \\break $d\\sigma(AB$$ \\to$$ c\\kappa X)/d\\Delta \\phi \\, d\\Delta y$ in the hard-scattering production of massive partons in order to exhibit the ``ridge" structure on the away side in the hard-scattering process. The single-particle production cross section $d\\sigma(AB \\to cX) /dy_c c_T dc_T $ is also obtained and compared with the ALICE experimental data for charm production in $pp$ collisions at 7 TeV at LHC.

  12. Two-tone frequency modulation spectroscopy from laser light scattered off a hard target.

    PubMed

    Powers, P E; Taatjes, C A; Kulp, T J

    1996-08-20

    One can apply two-tone frequency modulation spectroscopy techniques to the detection of gas-phase species by using laser light scattered from hard targets. High sensitivities are demonstrated, with a minimum detectable absorption of 10(-4) possible with a simple apparatus. The effects of laser speckle on the FM signal are described, and we show that the detection signal-to-noise ratio can be improved by collecting an increased number of speckle cells.

  13. Physics and Hard Disk Drives-A Career in Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Steven

    2014-03-01

    I will participate in a panel discussion about ``Career Opportunities for Physicists.'' I enjoyed 27 years doing technology development and product support in the hard disk drive business. My PhD in low temperature physics was excellent training for this career since I learned how to work in a lab, analyze data, write and present technical information, and define experiments that got to the heart of a problem. An academic position did not appeal to me because I had no passion to pursue a particular topic in basic physics. My work in industry provided an unending stream of challenging problems to solve, and it was a rich and rewarding experience. I'm now employed by the APS to focus on our interactions with physicists in industry. I welcome the chance to share my industrial experience with students, post-docs, and others who are making decisions about their career path. Industrial Physics Fellow, APS Headquarters.

  14. Turbulent pitch-angle scattering and diffusive transport of hard X-ray-producing electrons in flaring coronal loops

    SciTech Connect

    Kontar, Eduard P.; Bian, Nicolas H.; Emslie, A. Gordon; Vilmer, Nicole E-mail: emslieg@wku.edu

    2014-01-10

    Recent observations from RHESSI have revealed that the number of non-thermal electrons in the coronal part of a flaring loop can exceed the number of electrons required to explain the hard X-ray-emitting footpoints of the same flaring loop. Such sources cannot, therefore, be interpreted on the basis of the standard collisional transport model, in which electrons stream along the loop while losing their energy through collisions with the ambient plasma; additional physical processes, to either trap or scatter the energetic electrons, are required. Motivated by this and other observations that suggest that high-energy electrons are confined to the coronal region of the source, we consider turbulent pitch-angle scattering of fast electrons off low-frequency magnetic fluctuations as a confinement mechanism, modeled as a spatial diffusion parallel to the mean magnetic field. In general, turbulent scattering leads to a reduction of the collisional stopping distance of non-thermal electrons along the loop, and hence to an enhancement of the coronal hard X-ray source relative to the footpoints. The variation of source size L with electron energy E becomes weaker than the quadratic behavior pertinent to collisional transport, with the slope of L(E) depending directly on the mean free path λ associated with the non-collisional scattering mechanism. Comparing the predictions of the model with observations, we find that λ ∼ (10{sup 8}-10{sup 9}) cm for ∼30 keV, less than the length of a typical flaring loop and smaller than, or comparable to, the size of the electron acceleration region.

  15. Stimulated Raman scattering: old physics, new applications

    PubMed Central

    Yakovlev, Vladislav V.; Petrov, Georgi I.; Zhang, Hao F.; Noojin, Gary D.; Denton, Michael L.; Thomas, Robert J.; Scully, Marlan O.

    2009-01-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering as a promising way of expanding the tunability of ultrafast lasers and as an exciting new biomedical imaging modality capable of selective excitation and chemically-specific diagnostics of molecular species. PMID:20354585

  16. Physics Of Image Formation By Microwave Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Theodore C.; Guo, Wendy W.

    1987-01-01

    The complex permittivities of three-dimensional inhomogeneous biological bodies can be extracted from microwave scattering data by inverse scattering approach. A water-immersed microwave system is used to contract the wavelength to millimeter range and to enhance impedance matching with the biological body. Contraction of the wavelength increases the image resolution, while impedance matching promotes the microwave penetration. Scattered fields are measured using an array of 127 dipole elements and a total size of approximately 15cm x 18cm with operating frequency at 3 GHz. Two inverse scattering approaches have been developed. One approach, which has been published earlier, utilizes an inverse scattering theorem which may be considered as a generalization of the Lorentz reciprocity theorem to dissipative media. The other approach, which is presented in this article, takes scattering measurement by an array with various directions of incident wave; the wave equation is converted to a matrix equation by dividing the dielectric body into a number of cells, the dielectric data is then obtained by inverting the matrix equation. In both approaches, uniqueness is assured owing to the dissipativity of the propagation medium.

  17. Soft and hard Pomerons in hadron elastic scattering at small t

    SciTech Connect

    Cudell, J.R.; Lengyel, A.; Martynov, E.

    2006-02-01

    We consider simple-pole descriptions of soft elastic scattering for pp, pp, {pi}{sup {+-}}p and K{sup {+-}}p. We work at t and s small enough for rescatterings to be effectively absorbed in a simple-pole parametrization, and allow for the presence of a hard Pomeron. After building and discussing an exhaustive dataset, we show that simple poles provide an excellent description of the data in the region -0.5 GeV{sup 2}{<=}t{<=}-0.1 GeV{sup 2}, 6 GeV{<=}{radical}(s){<=}63 GeV. We show that new form factors have to be used, and get information on the trajectories of the soft and hard Pomerons.

  18. Polarized electron scattering, new physics and dark parity violation

    SciTech Connect

    Marciano, William J.

    2013-11-07

    'New Physics' sensitivities of polarized electron scattering asymmetries, atomic parity violation, m{sub W} and sin{sup 2} θ{sub W} (Z pole measurements) are compared. The utility of low Q{sup 2} polarized electron scattering for probing parity violating 'dark boson' effects is discussed. A possible determination of the weak charge Q{sub w}({sup 12}C) to about ±0.3% via elastic e-Carbon scattering is advocated.

  19. Simple Laser Scattering Experiment for Biology-Oriented Physics Labs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orwig, L.; Schrank, G.

    1979-01-01

    Describes a physics exercise designed for biology and premed majors. The activity is a low intensity laser light scattering laboratory exercise to determine the diameter of micron-sized latex spheres (simulated microbes) in water suspension. (GA)

  20. Simple Laser Scattering Experiment for Biology-Oriented Physics Labs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orwig, L.; Schrank, G.

    1979-01-01

    Describes a physics exercise designed for biology and premed majors. The activity is a low intensity laser light scattering laboratory exercise to determine the diameter of micron-sized latex spheres (simulated microbes) in water suspension. (GA)

  1. A Study of Terrain Scattering Physics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-02-01

    by a Gaussian probabllity density Futnction. Section 4 extends the composite model to bistatic scattering from a lossy, dielectric, rough surface. The...fumction. Tn the case of a jointly Gauanian surface these integrals can be performed and a closed - form result is obtained for the shadowing function. For...for j the special case of a jointly Gaussian surface. V The form of (3.10) compared to Smith’s results, i.e. (23) of [4], suggests that the above

  2. Quantitative spectromicroscopy from inelastically scattered photoelectrons in the hard X-ray range

    SciTech Connect

    Renault, O. Zborowski, C.; Risterucci, P.; Wiemann, C.; Schneider, C. M.; Grenet, G.; Tougaard, S.

    2016-07-04

    We demonstrate quantitative, highly bulk-sensitive x-ray photoelectron emission microscopy by analysis of inelastically scattered photoelectrons in the hard X-ray range, enabling elemental depth distribution analysis in deeply buried layers. We show results on patterned structures used in electrical testing of high electron mobility power transistor devices with an epitaxial Al{sub 0.25}Ga{sub 0.75}N channel and a Ti/Al metal contact. From the image series taken over an energy range of up to 120 eV in the Ti 1s loss feature region and over a typical 100 μm field of view, one can accurately retrieve, using background analysis together with an optimized scattering cross-section, the Ti depth distribution from 14 nm up to 25 nm below the surface. The method paves the way to multi-elemental, bulk-sensitive 3D imaging and investigation of phenomena at deeply buried interfaces and microscopic scales by photoemission.

  3. Hard Two-Photon Contribution to Elastic Lepton-Proton Scattering Determined by the OLYMPUS Experiment.

    PubMed

    Henderson, B S; Ice, L D; Khaneft, D; O'Connor, C; Russell, R; Schmidt, A; Bernauer, J C; Kohl, M; Akopov, N; Alarcon, R; Ates, O; Avetisyan, A; Beck, R; Belostotski, S; Bessuille, J; Brinker, F; Calarco, J R; Carassiti, V; Cisbani, E; Ciullo, G; Contalbrigo, M; De Leo, R; Diefenbach, J; Donnelly, T W; Dow, K; Elbakian, G; Eversheim, P D; Frullani, S; Funke, Ch; Gavrilov, G; Gläser, B; Görrissen, N; Hasell, D K; Hauschildt, J; Hoffmeister, Ph; Holler, Y; Ihloff, E; Izotov, A; Kaiser, R; Karyan, G; Kelsey, J; Kiselev, A; Klassen, P; Krivshich, A; Lehmann, I; Lenisa, P; Lenz, D; Lumsden, S; Ma, Y; Maas, F; Marukyan, H; Miklukho, O; Milner, R G; Movsisyan, A; Murray, M; Naryshkin, Y; Perez Benito, R; Perrino, R; Redwine, R P; Rodríguez Piñeiro, D; Rosner, G; Schneekloth, U; Seitz, B; Statera, M; Thiel, A; Vardanyan, H; Veretennikov, D; Vidal, C; Winnebeck, A; Yeganov, V

    2017-03-03

    The OLYMPUS Collaboration reports on a precision measurement of the positron-proton to electron-proton elastic cross section ratio, R_{2γ}, a direct measure of the contribution of hard two-photon exchange to the elastic cross section. In the OLYMPUS measurement, 2.01 GeV electron and positron beams were directed through a hydrogen gas target internal to the DORIS storage ring at DESY. A toroidal magnetic spectrometer instrumented with drift chambers and time-of-flight scintillators detected elastically scattered leptons in coincidence with recoiling protons over a scattering angle range of ≈20° to 80°. The relative luminosity between the two beam species was monitored using tracking telescopes of interleaved gas electron multiplier and multiwire proportional chamber detectors at 12°, as well as symmetric Møller or Bhabha calorimeters at 1.29°. A total integrated luminosity of 4.5  fb^{-1} was collected. In the extraction of R_{2γ}, radiative effects were taken into account using a Monte Carlo generator to simulate the convolutions of internal bremsstrahlung with experiment-specific conditions such as detector acceptance and reconstruction efficiency. The resulting values of R_{2γ}, presented here for a wide range of virtual photon polarization 0.456<ε<0.978, are smaller than some hadronic two-photon exchange calculations predict, but are in reasonable agreement with a subtracted dispersion model and a phenomenological fit to the form factor data.

  4. Hard Two-Photon Contribution to Elastic Lepton-Proton Scattering Determined by the OLYMPUS Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, B. S.; Ice, L. D.; Khaneft, D.; O'Connor, C.; Russell, R.; Schmidt, A.; Bernauer, J. C.; Kohl, M.; Akopov, N.; Alarcon, R.; Ates, O.; Avetisyan, A.; Beck, R.; Belostotski, S.; Bessuille, J.; Brinker, F.; Calarco, J. R.; Carassiti, V.; Cisbani, E.; Ciullo, G.; Contalbrigo, M.; de Leo, R.; Diefenbach, J.; Donnelly, T. W.; Dow, K.; Elbakian, G.; Eversheim, P. D.; Frullani, S.; Funke, Ch.; Gavrilov, G.; Gläser, B.; Görrissen, N.; Hasell, D. K.; Hauschildt, J.; Hoffmeister, Ph.; Holler, Y.; Ihloff, E.; Izotov, A.; Kaiser, R.; Karyan, G.; Kelsey, J.; Kiselev, A.; Klassen, P.; Krivshich, A.; Lehmann, I.; Lenisa, P.; Lenz, D.; Lumsden, S.; Ma, Y.; Maas, F.; Marukyan, H.; Miklukho, O.; Milner, R. G.; Movsisyan, A.; Murray, M.; Naryshkin, Y.; Perez Benito, R.; Perrino, R.; Redwine, R. P.; Rodríguez Piñeiro, D.; Rosner, G.; Schneekloth, U.; Seitz, B.; Statera, M.; Thiel, A.; Vardanyan, H.; Veretennikov, D.; Vidal, C.; Winnebeck, A.; Yeganov, V.; Olympus Collaboration

    2017-03-01

    The OLYMPUS Collaboration reports on a precision measurement of the positron-proton to electron-proton elastic cross section ratio, R2 γ , a direct measure of the contribution of hard two-photon exchange to the elastic cross section. In the OLYMPUS measurement, 2.01 GeV electron and positron beams were directed through a hydrogen gas target internal to the DORIS storage ring at DESY. A toroidal magnetic spectrometer instrumented with drift chambers and time-of-flight scintillators detected elastically scattered leptons in coincidence with recoiling protons over a scattering angle range of ≈20 ° to 80°. The relative luminosity between the two beam species was monitored using tracking telescopes of interleaved gas electron multiplier and multiwire proportional chamber detectors at 12°, as well as symmetric Møller or Bhabha calorimeters at 1.29°. A total integrated luminosity of 4.5 fb-1 was collected. In the extraction of R2 γ, radiative effects were taken into account using a Monte Carlo generator to simulate the convolutions of internal bremsstrahlung with experiment-specific conditions such as detector acceptance and reconstruction efficiency. The resulting values of R2 γ, presented here for a wide range of virtual photon polarization 0.456 <ɛ <0.978 , are smaller than some hadronic two-photon exchange calculations predict, but are in reasonable agreement with a subtracted dispersion model and a phenomenological fit to the form factor data.

  5. Scaling, scattering, and blackbody radiation in classical physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyer, Timothy H.

    2017-07-01

    Here we discuss blackbody radiation within the context of classical theory. We note that nonrelativistic classical mechanics and relativistic classical electrodynamics have contrasting scaling symmetries which influence the scattering of radiation. Also, nonrelativistic mechanical systems can be accurately combined with relativistic electromagnetic radiation only provided the nonrelativistic mechanical systems are the low-velocity limits of fully relativistic systems. Application of the no-interaction theorem for relativistic systems limits the scattering mechanical systems for thermal radiation to relativistic classical electrodynamic systems, which involve the Coulomb potential. Whereas the naive use of nonrelativistic scatterers or nonrelativistic classical statistical mechanics leads to the Rayleigh-Jeans spectrum, the use of fully relativistic scatterers leads to the Planck spectrum for blackbody radiation within classical physics.

  6. THE ROLE OF INVERSE COMPTON SCATTERING IN SOLAR CORONAL HARD X-RAY AND {gamma}-RAY SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Bin; Bastian, T. S.

    2012-05-01

    Coronal hard X-ray (HXR) and continuum {gamma}-ray sources associated with the impulsive phase of solar flares have been the subject of renewed interest in recent years. They have been interpreted in terms of thin-target, non-thermal bremsstrahlung emission. This interpretation has led to rather extreme physical requirements in some cases. For example, in one case, essentially all of the electrons in the source must be accelerated to non-thermal energies to account for the coronal HXR source. In other cases, the extremely hard photon spectra of the coronal continuum {gamma}-ray emission suggest that the low-energy cutoff of the electron energy distribution lies in the MeV energy range. Here, we consider the role of inverse Compton scattering (ICS) as an alternate emission mechanism in both the ultra- and mildly relativistic regimes. It is known that relativistic electrons are produced during powerful flares; these are capable of upscattering soft photospheric photons to HXR and {gamma}-ray energies. Previously overlooked is the fact that mildly relativistic electrons, generally produced in much greater numbers in flares of all sizes, can upscatter extreme-ultraviolet/soft X-ray photons to HXR energies. We also explore ICS on anisotropic electron distributions and show that the resulting emission can be significantly enhanced over an isotropic electron distribution for favorable viewing geometries. We briefly review results from bremsstrahlung emission and reconsider circumstances under which non-thermal bremsstrahlung or ICS would be favored. Finally, we consider a selection of coronal HXR and {gamma}-ray events and find that in some cases the ICS is a viable alternative emission mechanism.

  7. Scattered hard X-ray and γ-ray generation from a chromatic electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, J. E.; Welch, D. R.; Miller, C. L.

    2015-11-01

    An array of photon diagnostics has been deployed on a high power relativistic electron beam diode. Electrons are extracted through a 17.8 cm diode from the surface discharge of a carbon fiber velvet cathode with a nominal diode voltage of 3.8 MV. <10% of the 100 ns electron pulse is composed of off energy electrons (1-3 MeV) accelerated during the rise and fall of the pulse that impact the stainless steel beam pipe and generate a Bremsstrahlung spectrum of 0.1-3 MeV photons with a total count of 1011. The principal objective of these experiments is to quantify the electron beam dynamics and spatial dynamics of the hard X-ray and γ-ray flux generated in the diode region. A qualitative comparison of experimental and calculated results are presented, including time and energy resolved electron beam propagation and scattered photon measurements with X-ray PIN diodes and a photomultiplier tube indicating a dose dependence on the diode voltage >V4 and detected photon counts of nearly 106 at a radial distance of 1 m which corresponds to dose ˜40 μrad at 1 m.

  8. Scattered hard X-ray and γ-ray generation from a chromatic electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, J. E.; Welch, D. R.; Miller, C. L.

    2015-11-14

    An array of photon diagnostics has been deployed on a high power relativistic electron beam diode. Electrons are extracted through a 17.8 cm diode from the surface discharge of a carbon fiber velvet cathode with a nominal diode voltage of 3.8 MV. <10% of the 100 ns electron pulse is composed of off energy electrons (1–3 MeV) accelerated during the rise and fall of the pulse that impact the stainless steel beam pipe and generate a Bremsstrahlung spectrum of 0.1–3 MeV photons with a total count of 10{sup 11}. The principal objective of these experiments is to quantify the electron beam dynamics and spatial dynamics of the hard X-ray and γ-ray flux generated in the diode region. A qualitative comparison of experimental and calculated results are presented, including time and energy resolved electron beam propagation and scattered photon measurements with X-ray PIN diodes and a photomultiplier tube indicating a dose dependence on the diode voltage >V{sup 4} and detected photon counts of nearly 10{sup 6} at a radial distance of 1 m which corresponds to dose ∼40 μrad at 1 m.

  9. Music algorithm for imaging of a sound-hard arc in limited-view inverse scattering problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Won-Kwang

    2017-07-01

    MUltiple SIgnal Classification (MUSIC) algorithm for a non-iterative imaging of sound-hard arc in limited-view inverse scattering problem is considered. In order to discover mathematical structure of MUSIC, we derive a relationship between MUSIC and an infinite series of Bessel functions of integer order. This structure enables us to examine some properties of MUSIC in limited-view problem. Numerical simulations are performed to support the identified structure of MUSIC.

  10. PHYSICS OF POLARIZED SCATTERING AT MULTI-LEVEL ATOMIC SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Stenflo, J. O.

    2015-03-01

    The symmetric peak observed in linear polarization in the core of the solar sodium D{sub 1} line at 5896 Å has remained enigmatic since its discovery nearly two decades ago. One reason is that the theory of polarized scattering has not been experimentally tested for multi-level atomic systems in the relevant parameter domains, although the theory is continually being used for the interpretation of astrophysical observations. A laboratory experiment that was set up a decade ago to find out whether the D{sub 1} enigma is a problem of solar physics or quantum physics revealed that the D{sub 1} system has a rich polarization structure in situations where standard scattering theory predicts zero polarization, even when optical pumping of the m state populations of the hyperfine-split ground state is accounted for. Here we show that the laboratory results can be modeled in great quantitative detail if the theory is extended to include the coherences in both the initial and final states of the scattering process. Radiative couplings between the allowed dipole transitions generate coherences in the initial state. Corresponding coherences in the final state are then demanded by a phase closure selection rule. The experimental results for the well understood D{sub 2} line are used to constrain the two free parameters of the experiment, collision rate and optical depth, to suppress the need for free parameters when fitting the D{sub 1} results.

  11. The material co-construction of hard science fiction and physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasse, Cathrine

    2015-12-01

    This article explores the relationship between hard science fiction and physics and a gendered culture of science. Empirical studies indicate that science fiction references might spur some students' interest in physics and help develop this interest throughout school, into a university education and even further later inspire the practice of doing science. There are many kinds of fiction within the science fiction genre. In the presented empirical exploration physics students seem particularly fond of what is called `hard science fiction': a particular type of science fiction dealing with technological developments (Hartwell and Cramer in The hard SF renaissance, Orb/TOR, New York, 2002). Especially hard science fiction as a motivating fantasy may, however, also come with a gender bias. The locally materialized techno-fantasies spurring dreams of the terraforming of planets like Mars and travels in time and space may not be shared by all physics students. Especially female students express a need for other concerns in science. The entanglement of physics with hard science fiction may thus help develop some students' interest in learning school physics and help create an interest for studying physics at university level. But research indicates that especially female students are not captured by the hard techno-fantasies to the same extent as some of their male colleagues. Other visions (e.g. inspired by soft science fiction) are not materialized as a resource in the local educational culture. It calls for an argument of how teaching science is also teaching cultural values, ethics and concerns, which may be gendered. Teaching materials, like the use of hard science fiction in education, may not just be (yet another) gender bias in science education but also carrier of particular visions for scientific endeavours.

  12. On physical optics for calculating scattering from coated bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldauf, J.; Lee, S. W.; Ling, H.; Chou, R.

    1989-01-01

    The familiar physical optics (PO) approximation is no longer valid when the perfectly conducting scatterer is coated with dielectric material. This paper reviews several possible PO formulations. By comparing the PO formulation with the moment method solution based on the impedance boundary condition for the case of the coated cone-sphere, a PO formulation using both electric and magnetic currents consistently gives the best numerical results. Comparisons of the exact moment method with the PO formulations using the impedance boundary condition and the PO formulation using the Fresnel reflection coefficient for the case of scattering from the cone-ellipsoid demonstrate that the Fresnel reflection coefficient gives the best numerical results in general.

  13. Characterization of scatter in digital mammography from physical measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Leon, Stephanie M. Wagner, Louis K.; Brateman, Libby F.

    2014-06-15

    .16, and the MRE ranged from about 3 to 13 mm. Without a grid, the SF ranged from a minimum of 0.25 to a maximum of 0.52, and the MRE ranged from about 20 to 45 mm. The SF with a grid demonstrated a mild dependence on target/filter combination and kV, whereas the SF without a grid was independent of these factors. The MRE demonstrated a complex relationship as a function of kV, with notable difference among target/filter combinations. The primary source of change in both the SF and MRE was phantom thickness. Conclusions: Because breast tissue varies spatially in physical density and elemental content, the effective thickness of breast tissue varies spatially across the imaging field, resulting in a spatially-variant scatter distribution in the imaging field. The data generated in this study can be used to characterize the scatter contribution on a point-by-point basis, for a variety of different techniques.

  14. The Material Co-Construction of Hard Science Fiction and Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hasse, Cathrine

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the relationship between hard science fiction and physics and a gendered culture of science. Empirical studies indicate that science fiction references might spur some students' interest in physics and help develop this interest throughout school, into a university education and even further later inspire the practice of…

  15. The Material Co-Construction of Hard Science Fiction and Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hasse, Cathrine

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the relationship between hard science fiction and physics and a gendered culture of science. Empirical studies indicate that science fiction references might spur some students' interest in physics and help develop this interest throughout school, into a university education and even further later inspire the practice of…

  16. Positron scattering measurements for application to medical physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, James

    2015-09-01

    While the use of positrons in medical imaging is now well established, there is still much to learn regarding the transport of positrons through the body, and the subsequent damage induced. Current models of dosimetry use only a crude approximation of the collision physics involved, and at low energies misrepresent the thermalisation process to a considerable degree. Recently, collaborative work has commenced to attempt to refine these models, incorporating a better representation of the underlying physics and trying to gain a better understanding of the damage done after the emission of a positron from a medical radioisotope. This problem is being attacked from several different angles, with new models being developed based upon established techniques in plasma and swarm physics. For all these models, a realistic representation of the collision processes of positrons with relevant molecular species is required. At the Australian National University, we have undertaken a program of measurements of positron scattering from a range of molecules that are important in biological systems, with a focus on analogs to DNA. This talk will present measurements of positron scattering from a range of these molecules, as well as describing the experimental techniques employed to make such measurements. Targets have been measured that are both liquid and solid at room temperature, and new approaches have been developed to get absolute cross section data. The application of the data to various models of positron thermalisation will also be described.

  17. Hard-sphere fluid adsorbed in an annular wedge: the depletion force of hard-body colloidal physics.

    PubMed

    Herring, A R; Henderson, J R

    2007-01-01

    Many important issues of colloidal physics can be expressed in the context of inhomogeneous fluid phenomena. When two large colloids approach one another in solvent, they interact at least partly by the response of the solvent to finding itself adsorbed in the annular wedge formed between the two colloids. At shortest range, this fluid mediated interaction is known as the depletion force/interaction because solvent is squeezed out of the wedge when the colloids approach closer than the diameter of a solvent molecule. An equivalent situation arises when a single colloid approaches a substrate/wall. Accurate treatment of this interaction is essential for any theory developed to model the phase diagrams of homogeneous and inhomogeneous colloidal systems. The aim of our paper is a test of whether or not we possess sufficient knowledge of statistical mechanics that can be trusted when applied to systems of large size asymmetry and the depletion force in particular. When the colloid particles are much larger than a solvent diameter, the depletion force is dominated by the effective two-body interaction experienced by a pair of solvated colloids. This low concentration limit of the depletion force has therefore received considerable attention. One route, which can be rigorously based on statistical mechanical sum rules, leads to an analytic result for the depletion force when evaluated by a key theoretical tool of colloidal science known as the Derjaguin approximation. A rival approach has been based on the assumption that modern density functional theories (DFT) can be trusted for systems of large size asymmetry. Unfortunately, these two theoretical predictions differ qualitatively for hard sphere models, as soon as the solvent density is higher than about 23 that at freezing. Recent theoretical attempts to understand this dramatic disagreement have led to the proposal that the Derjaguin and DFT routes represent opposite limiting behavior, for very large size asymmetry

  18. Hard-sphere fluid adsorbed in an annular wedge: The depletion force of hard-body colloidal physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herring, A. R.; Henderson, J. R.

    2007-01-01

    Many important issues of colloidal physics can be expressed in the context of inhomogeneous fluid phenomena. When two large colloids approach one another in solvent, they interact at least partly by the response of the solvent to finding itself adsorbed in the annular wedge formed between the two colloids. At shortest range, this fluid mediated interaction is known as the depletion force/interaction because solvent is squeezed out of the wedge when the colloids approach closer than the diameter of a solvent molecule. An equivalent situation arises when a single colloid approaches a substrate/wall. Accurate treatment of this interaction is essential for any theory developed to model the phase diagrams of homogeneous and inhomogeneous colloidal systems. The aim of our paper is a test of whether or not we possess sufficient knowledge of statistical mechanics that can be trusted when applied to systems of large size asymmetry and the depletion force in particular. When the colloid particles are much larger than a solvent diameter, the depletion force is dominated by the effective two-body interaction experienced by a pair of solvated colloids. This low concentration limit of the depletion force has therefore received considerable attention. One route, which can be rigorously based on statistical mechanical sum rules, leads to an analytic result for the depletion force when evaluated by a key theoretical tool of colloidal science known as the Derjaguin approximation. A rival approach has been based on the assumption that modern density functional theories (DFT) can be trusted for systems of large size asymmetry. Unfortunately, these two theoretical predictions differ qualitatively for hard sphere models, as soon as the solvent density is higher than about 2/3 that at freezing. Recent theoretical attempts to understand this dramatic disagreement have led to the proposal that the Derjaguin and DFT routes represent opposite limiting behavior, for very large size asymmetry

  19. Fits of weak annihilation and hard spectator scattering corrections in B u,d \\wideoverrightarrow VV decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Qin; Li, Xiao-Nan; Sun, Jun-Feng; Yang, Yue-Ling

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, the contributions of weak annihilation and hard spectator scattering in B\\to ρ {K}* , {K}* {\\bar{K}}* , φ {K}* , ρ ρ and φ φ decays are investigated within the framework of quantum chromodynamics factorization. Using the experimental data available, we perform {χ }2 analyses of end-point parameters in four cases based on the topology-dependent and polarization-dependent parameterization schemes. The fitted results indicate that: (i) in the topology-dependent scheme, the relation ({ρ }Ai,{φ }Ai)\

  20. Electron pitch angle scattering and the impulsive phase microwave and hard X-ray emission from solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, G. D.; Kundu, M. R.; Papadopoulos, K.

    1982-01-01

    Observations and theoretical considerations have led to a model for impulsive phase flare emission involving the heating and acceleration of thermal electrons in the coronal part of a magnetic loop. The bulk of the heated gas is confined between conduction fronts, but particles with velocities a few times greater than the thermal velocity can escape into the lower part of the loop. It is shown that, when the electron gyrofrequency exceeds the plasma frequency, the escaping electrons are unstable to the generation of electrostatic plasma waves which scatter the particles in pitch angle to a nearly isotropic distribution. It is also shown that this scattering can (1) enhance the microwave emission from the upper part of the loop, and (2) due to the Landau damping of both low and high phase velocity waves, can lead to one or two breaks in the impulsive-phase hard X-ray spectrum.

  1. Sound Scattering by a Hard Half-Plane Experimental Evidence of the Edge-Diffracted Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    OUIS, D.

    2002-05-01

    In this short note, some experimental results are presented on the diffraction of a spherical way by a hard half-plane. This study was conducted with the aim to give evidence to the existence of the edge-diffracted wave. The sound source used in this experimental study is a condenser microphone operating in a reverse way. The wave emitted by a sound source propagates in space and hits a thin aluminium sheet with a straight edge, considered as an idealization of the hard half-plane. The resulting impulse response includes among others a wave diffracted by the edge of the half-plane, which is compared to its theoretical prediction. This latter is calculated from the exact Biot and Tolstoy solution to the problem of diffraction of a spherical wave by a hard wedge. Relatively satisfactory agreement is found between theory and experiment.

  2. 2D-Omnidirectional Hard-X-Ray Scattering Sensitivity in a Single Shot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagias, Matias; Wang, Zhentian; Villanueva-Perez, Pablo; Jefimovs, Konstantins; Stampanoni, Marco

    2016-03-01

    X-ray scattering imaging can provide complementary information to conventional absorption based radiographic imaging about the unresolved microstructures of a sample. The scattering signal can be accessed with various methods based on coherent illumination, which span from self-imaging to speckle scanning. The directional sensitivity of the existing real space imaging methods is limited to a few directions on the imaging plane and requires scanning of the optical components, or the rotation of either the sample or the imaging setup, in order to cover the full range of possible scattering directions. In this Letter the authors propose a new method that allows the simultaneous acquisition of scattering images in all possible directions in a single shot. This is achieved by a specialized phase grating and a detector with sufficient spatial resolution to record the generated interference fringe. The structural length scale sensitivity of the system can be tuned by varying its geometry for a fixed grating design. Taking into account ongoing developments in the field of compact x-ray sources that allow high brightness and sufficient spatial coherence, the applicability of omnidirectional scattering imaging in industrial and medical settings is boosted significantly.

  3. Ultrashort hard x-ray pulses generated by 90 degrees Thomson scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, A.H.; Schoenlein, R.W.; Glover, T.E.

    1997-04-01

    Ultrashort x-ray pulses permit observation of fast structural dynamics in a variety of condensed matter systems. The authors have generated 300 femtosecond, 30 keV x-ray pulses by 90 degrees Thomson scattering between femtosecond laser pulses and relativistic electrons. The x-ray and laser pulses are synchronized on a femtosecond time scale, an important prerequisite for ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy. Analysis of the x-ray beam properties also allows for electron bunch characterization on a femtosecond time scale.

  4. Constraints on hard spectator scattering and annihilation corrections in Bu,d → PV decays within QCD factorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Junfeng; Chang, Qin; Hu, Xiaohui; Yang, Yueling

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we investigate the contributions of hard spectator scattering and annihilation in B → PV decays within the QCD factorization framework. With available experimental data on B → πK* , ρK , πρ and Kϕ decays, comprehensive χ2 analyses of the parameters XA,Hi,f (ρA,Hi,f, ϕA,Hi,f) are performed, where XAf (XAi) and XH are used to parameterize the endpoint divergences of the (non)factorizable annihilation and hard spectator scattering amplitudes, respectively. Based on χ2 analyses, it is observed that (1) The topology-dependent parameterization scheme is feasible for B → PV decays; (2) At the current accuracy of experimental measurements and theoretical evaluations, XH = XAi is allowed by B → PV decays, but XH ≠ XAf at 68% C.L.; (3) With the simplification XH = XAi, parameters XAf and XAi should be treated individually. The above-described findings are very similar to those obtained from B → PP decays. Numerically, for B → PV decays, we obtain (ρA,Hi ,ϕA,Hi [ ° ]) = (2.87-1.95+0.66 , -145-21+14) and (ρAf, ϕAf [ ° ]) = (0.91-0.13+0.12 , -37-9+10) at 68% C.L. With the best-fit values, most of the theoretical results are in good agreement with the experimental data within errors. However, significant corrections to the color-suppressed tree amplitude α2 related to a large ρH result in the wrong sign for ACPdir (B- →π0K*-) compared with the most recent BABAR data, which presents a new obstacle in solving "ππ" and "πK" puzzles through α2. A crosscheck with measurements at Belle (or Belle II) and LHCb, which offer higher precision, is urgently expected to confirm or refute such possible mismatch.

  5. Design and synthesis of polyphosphazenes: Hard tissue scaffolding biomaterials and physically crosslinked elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modzelewski, Tomasz

    The work in this thesis is divided into two main parts. The first part examines the synthesis and characterization of polyphosphazenes as potential scaffolding materials usable for hard tissue repair. The goal of this work was to design polymers containing acidic functional groups in an attempt to encourage the deposition of calcium hydroxyapatite when the polymer is exposed to simulated body fluids. The second part examines the development of a new polymeric architecture which generates elastomeric properties without the use of traditional covalent or physical crosslinks. The goal was to examine the effects of this new architecture on the physical and mechanical properties of the final polymers. Chapter 1 provides a general background for the two main focus areas mentioned above. More specifically: a brief explanation is provided of the necessary physical and chemical properties of a suitable hard tissue engineering scaffolding substrate, and the basis of those requirements; together with an examination of the traditional ways in which elastomeric properties are introduced into a polymeric sample. Chapter 2 details the design and synthesis of polyphosphazenes bearing phosphonic acid and phosphoester side groups using two different routes. The first route utilized a linker unit which was functionalized with phosphoesters prior to its attachment to the polyphosphazene backbone, while the second route involved attachment of the same linking group to the polyphosphazene backbone before the introduction of the phosphoester moieties. In both cases, the samples were treated with iodotrimethylsilane to cleave the ester bonds and afford the parent phosphonic acid. Both routes proved successful. However, varying difficulties were encountered for each route. In Chapter 3 we examine the ability of the phosphonic acid functionalized polyphosphazenes described in Chapter 2 to mineralize calcium hydroxyapatite when exposed to simulated body fluid, which has the same ion

  6. a Numerical Method for Scattering from Acoustically Soft and Hard Thin Bodies in Two Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    YANG, S. A.

    2002-03-01

    This paper presents a numerical method for predicting the acoustic scattering from two-dimensional (2-D) thin bodies. Both the Dirichlet and Neumann problems are considered. Applying the thin-body formulation leads to the boundary integral equations involving weakly singular and hypersingular kernels. Completely regularizing these kinds of singular kernels is thus the main concern of this paper. The basic subtraction-addition technique is adopted. The purpose of incorporating a parametric representation of the boundary surface with the integral equations is two-fold. The first is to facilitate the numerical implementation for arbitrarily shaped bodies. The second one is to facilitate the expansion of the unknown function into a series of Chebyshev polynomials. Some of the resultant integrals are evaluated by using the Gauss-Chebyshev integration rules after moving the series coefficients to the outside of the integral sign; others are evaluated exactly, including the modified hypersingular integral. The numerical implementation basically includes only two parts, one for evaluating the ordinary integrals and the other for solving a system of algebraic equations. Thus, the current method is highly efficient and accurate because these two solution procedures are easy and straightforward. Numerical calculations consist of the acoustic scattering by flat and curved plates. Comparisons with analytical solutions for flat plates are made.

  7. System-level physics of autonomous nanorobots for hard chemistry and wave packet engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoli, Salvatore

    1994-08-01

    The operation of the prospective autonomous molecular robots that would represent the most advanced achievement of the molecular manufacturing conception is examined at various levels of physical description: the thermodynamic, the hydrodynamic, and the kinetic (Boltzmann) level down to local nonequilibrium thermodynamical and/or mechanical conditions possibly arising in work in some circumstances. The concept of wave packet engineering is suggested as a special technique in the exploitation of molecular robots possibilities, which are generally characterized as 'hard chemistry'.

  8. Azimuthal anisotropy and correlations in the hard scattering regime at RHIC.

    PubMed

    Adler, C; Ahammed, Z; Allgower, C; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Averichev, G S; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bichsel, H; Billmeier, A; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Boucham, A; Brandin, A; Bravar, A; Cadman, R V; Caines, H; Calderón De La Barca Sánchez, M; Cardenas, A; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Castro, M; Cebra, D; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Deng, W S; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Draper, J E; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Fachini, P; Faine, V; Faivre, J; Filimonov, K; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Foley, K J; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Gaudichet, L; Germain, M; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Grachov, O; Grigoriev, V; Guedon, M; Gushin, E; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Ivanshin, Yu I; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Konstantinov, A S; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R Kh; Kuznetsov, A A; Lakehal-Ayat, L; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednický, R; Leontiev, V M; LeVine, M J; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Liu, Q J; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; LoCurto, G; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, J; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Messer, M; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mitchell, J; Moiseenko, V A; Moore, C F; Morozov, V; De Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potrebenikova, E; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rai, G; Rakness, G; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Renault, G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Rykov, V; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Saulys, A C; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schüttauf, A; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seliverstov, D; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskii, S S; Shvetcov, V S; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stephenson, E J; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Struck, C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; Szanto De Toledo, A; Szarwas, P; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thomas, J H; Thompson, M; Tikhomirov, V; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Buren, G Van; VanderMolen, A M; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vigdor, S E; Voloshin, S A; Wang, F; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Wells, R; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Yakutin, A E; Yamamoto, E; Yang, J; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Zanevski, Y V; Zborovský, I; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zoulkarneev, R; Zubarev, A N

    2003-01-24

    Azimuthal anisotropy (v(2)) and two-particle angular correlations of high p(T) charged hadrons have been measured in Au+Au collisions at sqrt[s(NN)]=130 GeV for transverse momenta up to 6 GeV/c, where hard processes are expected to contribute significantly. The two-particle angular correlations exhibit elliptic flow and a structure suggestive of fragmentation of high p(T) partons. The monotonic rise of v(2)(p(T)) for p(T)<2 GeV/c is consistent with collective hydrodynamical flow calculations. At p(T)>3 GeV/c, a saturation of v(2) is observed which persists up to p(T)=6 GeV/c.

  9. Frequent hard physical activity lowered serum beta-carotene level in a population study of a rural city of Japan.

    PubMed

    Takatsuka, N; Kawakami, N; Ohwaki, A; Ito, Y; Matsushita, Y; Ido, M; Shimizu, H

    1995-07-01

    To determine the effect of physical activity on serum beta-carotene, we analyzed data about life styles including 3-day food records and blood samples collected from 57 men and 74 women in a rural city of Japan. Physical activity was asked as mean frequency of hard physical activities per week last year. A declining trend in serum beta-carotene was observed with increasing frequency of hard physical activities in men. In multiple regression analyses, the frequency of hard physical activities showed a negative partial correlation coefficient (r = -0.38, p = 0.007) with serum beta-carotene in men when controlled by age, BMI (body mass index), dietary factors (carotene intake, alcohol consumption and vitamin supplements use), smoking status, serum total cholesterol and serum triglycerides. These results suggest that frequent hard physical activity decreases serum beta-carotene especially in men.

  10. Physics Model Based Scatter Correction in Multi-source Interior Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Gong, Hao; Li, Bin; Jia, Xun; Gao, Guohua

    2017-08-17

    Multi-source interior computed tomography (CT) has a great potential to provide ultra-fast and organ-oriented imaging at low radiation dose. However, X-ray cross scattering from multiple simultaneously activated X-ray imaging chains compromises imaging quality. Previously, we published two hardware based scatter correction methods for multi-source interior CT. Here, we propose a software based scatter correction method, with the benefit of no need for hardware modifications. The new method is based on a physics model and an iterative framework. The physics model was derived analytically, and was used to calculate X-ray scattering signals in both forward direction and cross directions in multi-source interior CT. The physics model was integrated to an iterative scatter correction framework to reduce scatter artifacts. The method was applied to phantom data from both Monte Carlo simulations and physical experimentation that were designed to emulate the image acquisition in a multi-source interior CT architecture recently proposed by our team. The proposed scatter correction method reduced scatter artifacts significantly, even with only one iteration. Within a few iterations, the reconstructed images fast converged toward the "scatter-free" reference images. After applying the scatter correction method, the maximum CT number error at the region-of-interests (ROIs) was reduced to 46 HU in numerical phantom dataset and 48 HU in physical phantom dataset respectively, and the contrast-noise-ratio (CNR) at those ROIs increased by up to 44.3% and up to 19.7% respectively. The proposed physics model based iterative scatter correction method could be useful for scatter correction in dual-source or multi-source CT.

  11. Cometary Spectra Induced by Scattering and Florescence of Hard Solar X-Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snios, B. T.; Lewkow, N.; Kharchenko, V. A.

    2013-12-01

    Accurate calculations of X-ray emissions from cometary atmospheres due to Scattering and Florescence (SF) of solar X-rays are carried out over the photon energy range 0.4-3.0 keV. Computations of the X-ray SF spectra are performed for different distributions of the cometary neutral gas, dust, and ice grains, including nano-size particles. The SF spectra of cometary X-rays above 1 keV are determined for different solar conditions, incorporating X-ray spectra induced by solar flares. Theoretical X-ray SF spectra are compared with the results of recent observations of several comets with the Chandra X-ray Observatory [1]. A correlation between the spectral shapes of the observed cometary and solar X-ray emissions above 1 keV has been found and analyzed. The strong similarity between the cometary SF spectra and the X-ray spectra observed from the Jupiter atmosphere with XMM-Newton [2] is analyzed in detail. Upper limits on the density of cometary nano-particles are determined through comparison of the theoretical and observational data. The X-ray SF spectra with photon energies above 1 keV are predicted for a model history of solar activity and compositions of cometary gas, dust, and ice particles, which could reflect evolutionary transformations of cometary environment. [1] Ewing, I., Christina, D. J., & Bodewits, D. et al. 2013, ApJ, 763, 66 [2] Branduardi-Raymont, G., Bhardwaj, A., & Elsner, R. F. et al. 2007, Planet. Space Sci., 55, 1126

  12. Study of hard double-parton scattering in four-jet events in pp collisions at $$ \\sqrt{s}=7 $$ TeV with the ATLAS experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Aaboud, M.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; ...

    2016-11-21

    Inclusive four-jet events produced in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of √s = 7 TeV are analysed for the presence of hard double-parton scattering using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 37.3 pb–1, collected with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The contribution of hard double-parton scattering to the production of four-jet events is extracted using an artificial neural network, assuming that hard double-parton scattering can be approximated by an uncorrelated overlaying of dijet events. For events containing at least four jets with transverse momentum pT ≥ 20 GeV and pseudorapidity |η| ≤ 4.4, and at least onemore » having pT ≥ 42.5 GeV, the contribution of hard double-parton scattering is estimated to be fDPS = 0.092–0.011+0.005(stat.)–0.037+0.033(syst.). After combining this measurement with those of the inclusive dijet and four-jet cross-sections in the appropriate phase space regions, the effective cross-section, σeff , was determined to be σeff = 14.9–1.0+1.2(stat.)– 3.8+5.1(syst.) mb. This result is consistent within the quoted uncertainties with previous measurements of σeff , performed at centre-of-mass energies between 63 GeV and 8 TeV using various final states, and it corresponds to 21–6+7% of the total inelastic cross-section measured at √s = 7 TeV. As a result, the distributions of the observables sensitive to the contribution of hard double-parton scattering, corrected for detector effects, are also provided.« less

  13. Study of hard double-parton scattering in four-jet events in pp collisions at √{s}=7 TeV with the ATLAS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaboud, M.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Aben, R.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abraham, N. L.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adachi, S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Ali, B.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allen, B. W.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Alshehri, A. A.; Alstaty, M.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antel, C.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Armitage, L. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Artz, S.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisits, M.-S.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska-Blenessy, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barranco Navarro, L.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bedognetti, M.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Belyaev, N. L.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez, J.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Beringer, J.; Berlendis, S.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertram, I. A.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethani, A.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bielski, R.; Biesuz, N. V.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Billoud, T. R. V.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bisanz, T.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blue, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, S.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Boerner, D.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bokan, P.; Bold, T.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortoletto, D.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Bossio Sola, J. D.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Broughton, J. H.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruni, L. S.; Brunt, BH; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryant, P.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgard, C. D.; Burghgrave, B.; Burka, K.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Burr, J. T. P.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calace, N.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Callea, G.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvente Lopez, S.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Calvet, T. P.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Camincher, C.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Camplani, A.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Carbone, R. 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F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Trofymov, A.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsui, K. M.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tu, Y.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turgeman, D.; Turra, R.; Tuts, P. M.; Tyndel, M.; Ucchielli, G.; Ueda, I.; Ughetto, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usui, J.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valdes Santurio, E.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Graaf, H.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vasquez, J. G.; Vasquez, G. A.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigani, L.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vittori, C.; Vivarelli, I.; Vlachos, S.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wallangen, V.; Wang, C.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, T.; Wang, W.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Weber, S. A.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, M. D.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Whallon, N. L.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilk, F.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winston, O. J.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wolf, T. M. H.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Worm, S. D.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W.-M.; Yap, Y. C.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zakharchuk, N.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, J. C.; Zeng, Q.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zwalinski, L.

    2016-11-01

    Inclusive four-jet events produced in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of √{s}=7 TeV are analysed for the presence of hard double-parton scattering using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 37 .3 pb-1, collected with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The contribution of hard double-parton scattering to the production of four-jet events is extracted using an artificial neural network, assuming that hard double-parton scattering can be approximated by an uncorrelated overlaying of dijet events. For events containing at least four jets with transverse momentum p T ≥ 20 GeV and pseudorapidity | η| ≤ 4 .4, and at least one having p T ≥ 42 .5 GeV, the contribution of hard double-parton scattering is estimated to be f DPS = 0.092 - 0.011 + 0.005 (stat.) - 0.037 + 0.033 (syst.). After combining this measurement with those of the inclusive dijet and four-jet cross-sections in the appropriate phase space regions, the effective cross-section, σ eff , was determined to be σ eff = 14. 9 - 1.0 + 1.2 (stat.) - 3.8 + 5.1 (syst.) mb. This result is consistent within the quoted uncertainties with previous measurements of σ eff , performed at centre-of-mass energies between 63 GeV and 8 TeV using various final states, and it corresponds to 21 - 6 + 7 % of the total inelastic cross-section measured at √{s}=7 TeV. The distributions of the observables sensitive to the contribution of hard double-parton scattering, corrected for detector effects, are also provided. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  14. Study of hard double-parton scattering in four-jet events in pp collisions at √s=7 TeV with the ATLAS experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Aaboud, M; Aad, G; Abbott, B; ...

    2016-11-01

    Inclusive four-jet events produced in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of s=7 TeV are analysed for the presence of hard double-parton scattering using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 37.3 pb -1 , collected with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The contribution of hard double-parton scattering to the production of four-jet events is extracted using an artificial neural network, assuming that hard double-parton scattering can be approximated by an uncorrelated overlaying of dijet events. For events containing at least four jets with transverse momentum p T ≥ 20 GeV and pseudorapidity |η| ≤ 4.4, and at leastmore » one having p T ≥ 42.5 GeV, the contribution of hard double-parton scattering is estimated to be f DPS = 0.092 - 0.011 + 0.005 (stat.) - 0.037 + 0.033 (syst.). After combining this measurement with those of the inclusive dijet and four-jet cross-sections in the appropriate phase space regions, the effective cross-section, σ eff , was determined to be σ eff = 14. 9 - 1.0 + 1.2 (stat.) - 3.8 + 5.1 (syst.) mb. This result is consistent within the quoted uncertainties with previous measurements of σ eff , performed at centre-of-mass energies between 63 GeV and 8 TeV using various final states, and it corresponds to 21 - 6 + 7 % of the total inelastic cross-section measured at s=7 TeV. The distributions of the observables sensitive to the contribution of hard double-parton scattering, corrected for detector effects, are also provided.« less

  15. Physics of Hard Spheres Experiment (PhaSE) or "Making Jello in Space"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ling, Jerri S.; Doherty, Michael P.

    1998-01-01

    The Physics of Hard Spheres Experiment (PHaSE) is a highly successful experiment that flew aboard two shuttle missions to study the transitions involved in the formation of jellolike colloidal crystals in a microgravity environment. A colloidal suspension, or colloid, consists of fine particles, often having complex interactions, suspended in a liquid. Paint, ink, and milk are examples of colloids found in everyday life. In low Earth orbit, the effective force of gravity is thousands of times less than at the Earth's surface. This provides researchers a way to conduct experiments that cannot be adequately performed in an Earth-gravity environment. In microgravity, colloidal particles freely interact without the complications of settling that occur in normal gravity on Earth. If the particle interactions within these colloidal suspensions could be predicted and accurately modeled, they could provide the key to understanding fundamental problems in condensed matter physics and could help make possible the development of wonderful new "designer" materials. Industries that make semiconductors, electro-optics, ceramics, and composites are just a few that may benefit from this knowledge. Atomic interactions determine the physical properties (e.g., weight, color, and hardness) of ordinary matter. PHaSE uses colloidal suspensions of microscopic solid plastic spheres to model the behavior of atomic interactions. When uniformly sized hard spheres suspended in a fluid reach a certain concentration (volume fraction), the particle-fluid mixture changes from a disordered fluid state, in which the spheres are randomly organized, to an ordered "crystalline" state, in which they are structured periodically. The thermal energy of the spheres causes them to form ordered arrays, analogous to crystals. Seven of the eight PHaSE samples ranged in volume fraction from 0.483 to 0.624 to cover the range of interest, while one sample, having a concentration of 0.019, was included for

  16. Low-energy shelf response in thin energy-dispersive X-ray detectors from Compton scattering of hard X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel-Hart, N.; Elam, W. T.

    2017-08-01

    Silicon drift detectors have been successfully employed in both soft and hard X-ray spectroscopy. The response function to incident radiation at soft X-ray levels has been well studied and modeled, but less research has been published on response functions for these detectors to hard X-ray input spectra above 20 keV. When used with hard X-ray sources a significant low energy, non-peak response exists which can adversely affect detection limits for lighter elements in, for example, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. We present a numerical model that explains the non-peak response function of silicon drift detectors to hard X-rays based on incoherent Compton scattering within the detector volume. Experimental results are presented and numerically compared to model results.

  17. The physical meaning of scattering matrix singularities in coupled-channel formalisms

    SciTech Connect

    S. Capstick; A. Svarc; L. Tiator; J. Gegelia; M.M. Giannini; E. Santopinto; C. Hanhart; S. Scherer; T.-S.H. Lee; T. Sato; N. Suzuki

    2007-09-04

    The physical meaning of bare and dressed scattering matrix singularities has been investigated. Special attention has been attributed to the role of well known invariance of scattering matrix with respect to the field transformation of the effective Lagrangian. Examples of evaluating bare and dressed quantities in various models are given.

  18. Hard-to-recover oils with anomalous physical and chemical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yashchenko, I. G.; Polishchuk, Y. M.

    2016-11-01

    Using the global database on physical and chemical properties of oils, the analysis of distribution of viscous, heavy, waxy and highly resinous oils in terms of volumes of their reserves was carried out. It is known that heavy and viscous oils account for slightly more than 33% of the total sample. Resinous and paraffin oils account for less than 30% of the total sample. The criteria necessary to classify oils as hard-to-recover oil reserves are determined. Features of physicochemical properties of these oils are studied under various conditions. The results obtained could be used to solve practical issues in the oil sector.

  19. Implications of stimulated resonant X-ray scattering for spectroscopy, imaging, and diffraction in the regime from soft to hard X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreck, Simon; Beye, Martin; Föhlisch, Alexander

    2015-12-01

    The ultrahigh peak brilliance available at X-ray free-electron lasers opens the possibility to transfer nonlinear spectroscopic techniques from the optical and infrared into the X-ray regime. Here, we present a conceptual treatment of nonlinear X-ray processes with an emphasis on stimulated resonant X-ray scattering as well as a quantitative estimate for the scaling of stimulated X-ray scattering cross sections. These considerations provide the order of magnitude for the required X-ray intensities to experimentally observe stimulated resonant X-ray scattering for photon energies ranging from the extreme ultraviolet to the soft and hard X-ray regimes. At the same time, the regime where stimulated processes can safely be ignored is identified. With this basis, we discuss prospects and implications for spectroscopy, scattering, and imaging experiments at X-ray free-electron lasers.

  20. Some Very Hard Problems in Nature (Biology-biochemistry) Solved Using Physical Algorithms that Reduce the Hardness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-18

    fumarase; MAN ) mandelate racemase; PEP ) carboxypeptidase B; CDA ) E . coli cytidine deaminase; KSI ) ketosteroid isomerase; CMU ) chorismate...resumption of respiration. A 3D model of E . coli Ndh according to Schmid and Gerloff (2004). Putative flavin-, NADH-, and membrane-binding domains are...DATE 18 SEP 2008 2. REPORT TYPE 3 . DATES COVERED 00-00-2008 to 00-00-2008 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Some Very Hard Problems in Nature (Biology

  1. A Comparison between 3D Model Results Using Two Different Collision Schemes: Forward Scattering vs. Hard Sphere Collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y.; Combi, M. R.; Tenishev, V.; Bougher, S. W.; Johnson, R. E.; Tully, C.

    2016-12-01

    The recent observations of the Martian geomorphology suggest that water has played a critical role in forming the present status of the Martian atmosphere and environment. The inventory of water has been depleted throughout the planet's geologic time via various mechanisms from the surface to the uppermost atmosphere where the Sun-Mars interaction occurs. During the current epoch, dissociative recombination of O2+ is suggested as the main nonthermal mechanism that regulates the escape of atomic O, forming the hot O corona. A nascent hot O atom produced deep in the thermosphere undergoes collisions with the background thermal species, where the particle can lose energy and become thermalized before it reaches the collisionless regime and escape. The major hot O collisions with the background species that contribute to the thermalization of hot O are Ohot-Ocold, Ohot-CO2,cold, Ohot-COcold, and Ohot-N2,cold. In order to describe these collisions, there have been different collisions schemes used by the previous models. One of the most realistic descriptions involves using angular differential cross sections, and the simplest approach is using isotropic collision cross sections. Here, we present a comparison between the 3D model results using two different collision schemes to find equivalent hard sphere collision cross sections that satisfy the effects from using forward scattering cross sections. We adapted the newly calculated angular differential cross sections to the major hot O collisions. The hot O corona is simulated by coupling our Mars application of the 3D Adaptive Mesh Particle Simulator (M-AMPS) [Tenishev et al., 2008, 2013] and the Mars Global Ionosphere-Thermosphere Model (M-GITM) [Bougher et al., 2015].

  2. From QCD-based hard-scattering to nonextensive statistical mechanical descriptions of transverse momentum spectra in high-energy pp and pp¯ collisions

    DOE PAGES

    Wong, Cheuk-Yin; Wilk, Grzegorz; Cirto, Leonardo J. L.; ...

    2015-06-22

    Transverse spectra of both jets and hadrons obtained in high-energymore » $pp$ and $$p\\bar p $$ collisions at central rapidity exhibit power-law behavior of $$1/p_T^n$$ at high $$p_T$$. The power index $n$ is 4-5 for jet production and is slightly greater for hadron production. Furthermore, the hadron spectra spanning over 14 orders of magnitude down to the lowest $$p_T$$ region in $pp$ collisions at LHC can be adequately described by a single nonextensive statistical mechanical distribution that is widely used in other branches of science. This suggests indirectly the dominance of the hard-scattering process over essentially the whole $$p_T$$ region at central rapidity in $pp$ collisions at LHC. We show here direct evidences of such a dominance of the hard-scattering process by investigating the power index of UA1 jet spectra over an extended $$p_T$$ region and the two-particle correlation data of the STAR and PHENIX Collaborations in high-energy $pp$ and $$p \\bar p$$ collisions at central rapidity. We then study how the showering of the hard-scattering product partons alters the power index of the hadron spectra and leads to a hadron distribution that can be cast into a single-particle non-extensive statistical mechanical distribution. Lastly, because of such a connection, the non-extensive statistical mechanical distribution can be considered as a lowest-order approximation of the hard-scattering of partons followed by the subsequent process of parton showering that turns the jets into hadrons, in high energy $pp$ and $$p\\bar p$$ collisions.« less

  3. Study of hard double-parton scattering in four-jet events in pp collisions at $ \\sqrt{s}=7 $ TeV with the ATLAS experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Aaboud, M.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Aben, R.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abraham, N. L.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adachi, S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Ali, B.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allen, B. W.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Alshehri, A. A.; Alstaty, M.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antel, C.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Armitage, L. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Artz, S.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisits, M-S; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska-Blenessy, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barranco Navarro, L.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bedognetti, M.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Belyaev, N. L.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez, J.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Beringer, J.; Berlendis, S.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertram, I. A.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethani, A.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bielski, R.; Biesuz, N. V.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Billoud, T. R. V.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bisanz, T.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J. -B.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blue, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, S.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Boerner, D.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bokan, P.; Bold, T.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortoletto, D.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Bossio Sola, J. D.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Broughton, J. H.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruni, L. S.; Brunt, BH; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryant, P.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgard, C. D.; Burghgrave, B.; Burka, K.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Burr, J. T. P.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calace, N.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Callea, G.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvente Lopez, S.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Calvet, T. P.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Camincher, C.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Camplani, A.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Carbone, R. M.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardillo, F.; Carli, I.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Carney, R. M. D.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Casper, D. W.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelijn, R.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavallaro, E.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerda Alberich, L.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, S. K.; Chan, Y. L.; Chang, P.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chatterjee, A.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Che, S.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, S.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, H. J.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiarelli, G.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. 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H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wallangen, V.; Wang, C.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, T.; Wang, W.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Weber, S. A.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, M. D.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Whallon, N. L.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilk, F.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winston, O. J.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wolf, T. M. H.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Worm, S. D.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W-M.; Yap, Y. C.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zakharchuk, N.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, J. C.; Zeng, Q.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zwalinski, L.

    2016-11-21

    Inclusive four-jet events produced in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of √s = 7 TeV are analysed for the presence of hard double-parton scattering using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 37.3 pb–1, collected with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The contribution of hard double-parton scattering to the production of four-jet events is extracted using an artificial neural network, assuming that hard double-parton scattering can be approximated by an uncorrelated overlaying of dijet events. For events containing at least four jets with transverse momentum pT ≥ 20 GeV and pseudorapidity |η| ≤ 4.4, and at least one having pT ≥ 42.5 GeV, the contribution of hard double-parton scattering is estimated to be fDPS = 0.092–0.011+0.005(stat.)–0.037+0.033(syst.). After combining this measurement with those of the inclusive dijet and four-jet cross-sections in the appropriate phase space regions, the effective cross-section, σeff , was determined to be σeff = 14.9–1.0+1.2(stat.)– 3.8+5.1(syst.) mb. This result is consistent within the quoted uncertainties with previous measurements of σeff , performed at centre-of-mass energies between 63 GeV and 8 TeV using various final states, and it corresponds to 21–6+7% of the total inelastic cross-section measured at √s = 7 TeV. As a result, the distributions of the observables sensitive to the contribution of hard double-parton scattering, corrected for detector effects, are also provided.

  4. Quantitative Measurements of Multilayer Physical Adsorption on Heterogeneous Surfaces from Nonlinear Light Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henson, B. F.; Wilson, K. R.; Robinson, J. M.

    1997-08-01

    We present measurements of equilibrium multilayer physical adsorption on porous, heterogeneous ice films using nonlinear light scattering. The dependence of scattering intensity on surface coverage is modeled using the adsorption theory of Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller, and an extension based on the Bragg-Williams formalism. We show that a complete equation of state for an adsorbed species can be experimentally determined within this simple framework.

  5. Bio-physical modeling of time-resolved forward scattering by Listeria colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Euiwon; Banada, Padmapriya P.; Bhunia, Arun K.; Hirleman, E. Daniel

    2006-10-01

    We have developed a detection system and associated protocol based on optical forward scattering where the bacterial colonies of various species and strains growing on solid nutrient surfaces produced unique scatter signatures. The aim of the present investigation was to develop a bio-physical model for the relevant phenomena. In particular, we considered time-varying macroscopic morphological properties of the growing colonies and modeled the scattering using scalar diffraction theory. For the present work we performed detailed studies with three species of Listeria; L. innocua, L. monocytogenes, and L. ivanovii. The baseline experiments involved cultures grown on brain heart infusion (BHI) agar and the scatter images were captured every six hours for an incubation period of 42 hours. The morphologies of the colonies were studied by phase contrast microscopy, including measurement of the diameter of the colony. Growth curves, represented by colony diameter as a function of time, were compared with the time-evolution of scattering signatures. Similar studies were carried out with L. monocytogenes grown on different substrates. Non-dimensionalizing incubation time in terms of the time to reach stationary phase was effective in reducing the dimensionality of the model. Bio-physical properties of the colony such as diameter, bacteria density variation, surface curvature/profile, and transmission coefficient are important parameters in predicting the features of the forward scattering signatures. These parameters are included in a baseline model that treats the colony as a concentric structure with radial variations in phase modulation. In some cases azimuthal variations and random phase inclusions were included as well. The end result is a protocol (growth media, incubation time and conditions) that produces reproducible and distinguishable scatter patterns for a variety of harmful food borne pathogens in a short period of time. Further, the bio-physical model we

  6. Falsifying models of new physics via WW scattering.

    PubMed

    Distler, Jacques; Grinstein, Benjamin; Porto, Rafael A; Rothstein, Ira Z

    2007-01-26

    We show that the coefficients of operators in the electroweak chiral Lagrangian can be bounded if the underlying theory obeys the usual assumptions of Lorentz invariance, analyticity, unitarity, and crossing to arbitrarily short distances. Violations of these bounds can be explained by either the existence of new physics below the naive cutoff of the effective theory, or by the breakdown of one of these assumptions in the short distance theory. As a corollary, if no light resonances are found, then a measured violation of the bound would falsify generic models of string theory.

  7. Applications of Robust, Radiation Hard AlGaN Optoelectronic Devices in Space Exploration and High Energy Density Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, K.

    2011-05-04

    This slide show presents: space exploration applications; high energy density physics applications; UV LED and photodiode radiation hardness; UV LED and photodiode space qualification; UV LED AC charge management; and UV LED satellite payload instruments. A UV LED satellite will be launched 2nd half 2012.

  8. Physical characterization and profiling of airway epithelial derived exosomes using light scattering.

    PubMed

    Kesimer, Mehmet; Gupta, Richa

    2015-10-01

    Exosomes and other extracellular vesicles have been gaining interest during the last decade due to their emerging role in biology and, disease pathogenesis and their biomarker potential. Almost all published research related to exosomes and other extracellular vesicles include some form of physical characterization. Therefore, these vesicles should be precisely profiled and characterized physically before studying their biological role as intercellular messengers, biomarkers or therapeutic tools. Using a combination of light scattering techniques, including dynamic light scattering (DLS) and multi-angle laser light scattering combined with size exclusion separation (SEC-MALLS), we physically characterized and compared distinct extracellular vesicles derived from the apical secretions of two different cultured airway epithelial cells. The results indicated that epithelial cells release vesicles with distinct physical properties and sizes. Human primary tracheobronchial cell culture (HTBE) derived vesicles have a hydrodynamic radius (Rh) of approximately 340 nm while their radius of gyration (Rg) is approximately 200 nm. Electron microscopy analysis, however, revealed that their spherical component is 40-100 nm in size, and they carry filamentous, entangled membrane mucins on their surface that increases their overall radius. The mucin decoration on the surface defines their size and charge as measured using light scattering techniques. Their surface properties mirror the properties of the cells from which they are derived. This may provide a unique tool for researchers to elucidate the unanswered questions in normal airway biology and innate and adaptive defense, including the remodeling of airways during inflammation, tumorigenesis and metastasis.

  9. Model-Based Detection of Radioactive Contraband for Harbor Defense Incorporating Compton Scattering Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J V; Chambers, D H; Breitfeller, E F; Guidry, B L; Verbeke, J M; Axelrod, M A; Sale, K E; Meyer, A M

    2010-03-02

    The detection of radioactive contraband is a critical problem is maintaining national security for any country. Photon emissions from threat materials challenge both detection and measurement technologies especially when concealed by various types of shielding complicating the transport physics significantly. This problem becomes especially important when ships are intercepted by U.S. Coast Guard harbor patrols searching for contraband. The development of a sequential model-based processor that captures both the underlying transport physics of gamma-ray emissions including Compton scattering and the measurement of photon energies offers a physics-based approach to attack this challenging problem. The inclusion of a basic radionuclide representation of absorbed/scattered photons at a given energy along with interarrival times is used to extract the physics information available from the noisy measurements portable radiation detection systems used to interdict contraband. It is shown that this physics representation can incorporated scattering physics leading to an 'extended' model-based structure that can be used to develop an effective sequential detection technique. The resulting model-based processor is shown to perform quite well based on data obtained from a controlled experiment.

  10. The GALAXIES beamline at the SOLEIL synchrotron: inelastic X-ray scattering and photoelectron spectroscopy in the hard X-ray range.

    PubMed

    Rueff, J P; Ablett, J M; Céolin, D; Prieur, D; Moreno, Th; Balédent, V; Lassalle-Kaiser, B; Rault, J E; Simon, M; Shukla, A

    2015-01-01

    The GALAXIES beamline at the SOLEIL synchrotron is dedicated to inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) and photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) in the 2.3-12 keV hard X-ray range. These two techniques offer powerful complementary methods of characterization of materials with bulk sensitivity, chemical and orbital selectivity, resonant enhancement and high resolving power. After a description of the beamline components and endstations, the beamline capabilities are demonstrated through a selection of recent works both in the solid and gas phases and using either IXS or HAXPES approaches. Prospects for studies on liquids are discussed.

  11. Probing the Small- x Gluon Tomography in Correlated Hard Diffractive Dijet Production in Deep Inelastic Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Hatta, Yoshitaka; Xiao, Bo-Wen; Yuan, Feng

    2016-05-20

    The close connection between the quantum phase space Wigner distribution of small-x gluons and the color dipole scattering amplitude is investigated, and studying it experimentally is proposed in the hard diffractive dijet production at the planned electron-ion collider. The angular correlation between the nucleon recoiled momentum and the dijet transverse momentum probes the nontrivial correlation in the phase space Wigner distribution. This experimental study not only provides three-dimensional tomographic pictures of gluons inside high energy protons - it gives a unique and interesting signal for the small-x dynamics with QCD evolution effects.

  12. Determination of the angular and energy dependence of hard constituent scattering from. pi. /sup 0/ pair events at the CERN intersecting storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Angelis, A.L.S.; Besch, H.J.; Blumenfeld, B.J.

    1982-08-23

    We present data on proton-proton collisions, obtained at the CERN Intersecting Storage Rings, in which two roughly back-to-back ..pi../sup 0/'s of high transverse momentum (p/sub T/) were produced. The angular distribution of the dipion axis relative to the collision axis is found to be independent of both the effective mass m of the dipion system and the centre-of-mass energy ..sqrt..s of the proton-proton collision. The cross-sections dsigma/dm at the two values of ..sqrt..s satisfy a scaling law of the form dsigma/dm = G(x)/m/sup n/, where x = m(..pi../sup 0/,..pi../sup 0/)/..sqrt..s and n = 6.5 +- 0.5. We show from our data that the leading ..pi../sup 0/ carries most of the momentum of the scattered parton. Given this fact, the axis of the dipion system follows closely the direction of the scattered constituents, and we exploit this to determine the angular dependence of the hard-scattering subprocess. We also compare our data with the lowest order QCD predictions using structure functions as determined in deep-inelastic scattering and fragmentation functions from electron-positron annihilation.

  13. Detection of charge scattering associated with stripe order in La1.775Sr0.225NiO4 by hard-x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigliante, A.; von Zimmermann, M.; Schneider, J. R.; Frello, T.; Andersen, N. H.; Madsen, J.; Buttrey, D. J.; Gibbs, Doon; Tranquada, J. M.

    1997-10-01

    In the past few years neutron-scattering experiments have shown very intriguing stripe correlations of spins and holes in hole-doped La2NiO4 and La2CuO4. As yet, no x-ray-diffraction experiment has confirmed the neutron results and the topic is still controversial. In this paper we report the observation of stripe correlations of holes by x-ray diffraction. The experiments were performed in Laue geometry at the hard-x-ray beamline BW5 at HASYLAB on a crystal of La1.775Sr0.225NiO4 which was previously studied by neutron diffraction. Temperature dependences of the intensities and wave vectors of the charge-density-modulation peaks were characterized and found to be in good agreement with the neutron-scattering results. Interestingly, weak, temperature-dependent scattering was also observed at positions consistent with nonresonant x-ray magnetic scattering from the spin correlations; however, a definitive determination of its origin remains lacking.

  14. Use of the sampling theorem to speed up near-field physical optics scattering calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cramer, P. W.; Imbriale, W. A.

    1994-01-01

    Physical optics scattering calculations performed on the DSN 34-m beam-waveguide antennas at Ka-band (32 GHz) require approximately 12 hr of central processing unit time on a Cray Y-MP2 computer. This is excessive in terms of resource utilization and turnaround time. Typically, the calculations involve five surfaces, and the calculations are done two surfaces at a time. The sampling theorem is used to reduce the number of current values that must be calculated over the second surface by performing a physical optics integration over the first surface. The additional number of current values required on the second surface by subsequent physical optics integrations is obtained by interpolation over the original current values. Time improvements on the order of a factor of 2 to 4 were obtained for typical scattering pairs.

  15. Scattering of light by large bubbles: Coupling of geometrical and physical optics approximations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sentis, Matthias P. L.; Onofri, Fabrice R. A.; Méès, Loic; Radev, Stefan

    2016-02-01

    This paper analyzes various phenomena in modeling the light-scattering properties of large spherical bubbles in the context of geometrical and physical optics approximations. Among these phenomena are interference occurring between higher-order rays, the Goos-Hänchen shift, the tunneling phase and the weak caustic associated with the critical angle. When the phenomena are appropriately taken into account, they allow retrieval of most features of the scattering diagrams predicted by the Lorenz-Mie theory, offering new possibilities for the optical characterization of bubbly flows.

  16. Radioactive Threat Detection with Scattering Physics: A Model-Based Application

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J V; Chambers, D H; Breitfeller, E F; Guidry, B L; Verbeke, J M; Axelrod, M A; Sale, K E; Meyer, A M

    2010-01-21

    The detection of radioactive contraband is a critical problem in maintaining national security for any country. Emissions from threat materials challenge both detection and measurement technologies especially when concealed by various types of shielding complicating the transport physics significantly. The development of a model-based sequential Bayesian processor that captures both the underlying transport physics including scattering offers a physics-based approach to attack this challenging problem. It is shown that this processor can be used to develop an effective detection technique.

  17. Some physical factors influencing the accuracy of convolution scatter correction in SPECT.

    PubMed

    Msaki, P; Axelsson, B; Larsson, S A

    1989-03-01

    Some important physical factors influencing the accuracy of convolution scatter correction techniques in SPECT are presented. In these techniques scatter correction in the projection relies on filter functions, QF, evaluated by Fourier transforms, from measured scatter functions, Qp, obtained from point spread functions. The spatial resolution has a marginal effect on Qp. Thus a single QF can be used in the scatter correction of SPECT measurements acquired with the low energy high resolution or the low energy general purpose collimators and over a wide range of patient-collimator distances. However, it is necessary to examine the details of the shape of point spread functions during evaluation of Qp. QF is completely described by scatter amplitude AF, slope BF and filter sum SF. SF is obtained by summation of the values of QF occupying a 31 x 31 pixels matrix. Regardless of differences in amplitude and slope, two filter functions are shown to be equivalent in terms of scatter correction ability, whenever their sums are equal. On the basis of filter sum, the observed small influence of ellipticity on QF implies that an average function can be used in scatter correcting SPECT measurements conducted with elliptic objects. SF is shown to increase with a decrease in photon energy and with an increase in window size. Thus, scatter correction by convolution may be severely hampered by photon statistics when SPECT imaging is done with low-energy photons. It is pointless to use unnecessarily large discriminator windows, in the hope of improving photon statistics, since most of the extra events acquired will eventually be subtracted during scatter correction. Regardless of the observed moderate reduction in SF when a lung-equivalent material replaces a portion of a water phantom, further studies are needed to develop a technique that is capable of handling attenuation and scatter corrections simultaneously. Whenever superficial and inner radioactive distributions coexist the

  18. Physically Realizable Space for the Purity-Depolarization Plane for Polarized Light Scattering Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tariq, Aziz; Li, Pengcheng; Chen, Dongsheng; Lv, Donghong; Ma, Hui

    2017-07-01

    We propose a physically realizable space for the polarized light scattering measurement using the Stokes-Mueller formalism by a purity-index-depolarization-index (PI -PΔ ) plane. The parameter PI is defined from indices of polarimetric purity (IPP), which exhibits the overall magnitude of the polarimetric randomness of a medium, while the depolarization index (PΔ ) delineates a proper global degree of polarimetric purity and may also refer to the average measure of depolarization power of the scattering medium. Subregions and curves connecting the edge points in the plane are obtained by imposing certain constraints on the IPP; consequently any point on the subregion indicates the information related to a decomposition of the Mueller matrix into its components as a convex sum. From the same set of constraints, complete information about the depolarization index versus the entropy [S (M ) -PΔ ] diagram is recovered. This work provides a simple geometric representation and a deeper perceptivity of the light scattering media comprising depolarization.

  19. Rayleigh Scattering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Andrew T.

    1982-01-01

    The correct usage of such terminology as "Rayleigh scattering,""Rayleigh lines,""Raman lines," and "Tyndall scattering" is resolved during an historical excursion through the physics of light-scattering by gas molecules. (Author/JN)

  20. Rayleigh Scattering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Andrew T.

    1982-01-01

    The correct usage of such terminology as "Rayleigh scattering,""Rayleigh lines,""Raman lines," and "Tyndall scattering" is resolved during an historical excursion through the physics of light-scattering by gas molecules. (Author/JN)

  1. Novel Aspects of Hard Diffraction in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC

    2005-12-14

    Initial- and final-state interactions from gluon-exchange, normally neglected in the parton model have a profound effect in QCD hard-scattering reactions, leading to leading-twist single-spin asymmetries, diffractive deep inelastic scattering, diffractive hard hadronic reactions, and nuclear shadowing and antishadowing--leading-twist physics not incorporated in the light-front wavefunctions of the target computed in isolation. I also discuss the use of diffraction to materialize the Fock states of a hadronic projectile and test QCD color transparency.

  2. Effects of scattering and absorbing medium in the fluorescence conversion efficiency of physical tissue models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, Suresh; Sujatha, N.

    2015-03-01

    Auto-fluorescence spectroscopy based on spectral line shape and intensity has been in use as a promising technique for detecting varying degrees of tissue malignancy. Tissue is a turbid medium with multi-layered structure constituting of different fluorophores, absorbers and scattering molecules. Tumor progression in tissues is ac- companied by varying degrees of biochemical and morphological changes. These include changes in nuclear size and density, epithelial thickness and increase in the hemoglobin (Hb) concentration associated with changes in metabolic activity. These variations in overall tissue scattering and absorption properties in turn modulate the fluorescence spectrum emitted and derived from tissues. Estimation of fluorescence conversion efficiency in the turbid tissue needs to take into account these effects of absorption and scattering in order to be evolved as a parameter for tissue discrimination. In this study, we set to investigate the factors affecting tissue fluorescence conversion efficiency by making use of physical models of the tissue. Liquid tissue models were prepared with different concentrations of absorbing and scattering media to simulate biological tissues of various degrees of malignancy. The results indicate that emitted fluorescence from the tissue model is subjected to variations by multiple scattering events and absorption. The fluorescence conversion efficiency of the models were derived and correlated to the experimental results with possible diagnostic significance.

  3. Design study for a hard X-ray source with a femto-second length by using Compton scattering at the Pohang Accelerator Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Eun-San; Kim, KyungRyul

    2016-02-01

    X-ray generation based on laser-electron Compton scattering is a method to generate a compact high-flux X-ray source. At the Pohang Accelerator Laboratory's (PAL's) fs-THz facility, 3-THz radiation has been achieved using an electron beam of 150 fs rms. To further enhance the radiation bandwidth, we present design results on X-ray generation by using Compton scattering at the facility. We show the design performance for the Compton source by using a 75-MeV electron linac with a 800-nm laser system. The Compton scattering X-ray source will be a compact facility that produces 3.1 × 107 photons in a single shot and a maximum photon energy of 130 keV. In this paper, we show the system layout and the design parameters that offers an ultra-short, high-flux hard X-ray source. We present the simulation studies to optimize the parameters of the electron beam and the X-ray pulse that was given by code CAIN.

  4. Application of an ePix100 detector for coherent scattering using a hard X-ray free-electron laser.

    PubMed

    Sikorski, Marcin; Feng, Yiping; Song, Sanghoon; Zhu, Diling; Carini, Gabriella; Herrmann, Sven; Nishimura, Kurtis; Hart, Philip; Robert, Aymeric

    2016-09-01

    A prototype ePix100 detector was used in small-angle scattering geometry to capture speckle patterns from a static sample using the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) hard X-ray free-electron laser at 8.34 keV. The average number of detected photons per pixel per pulse was varied over three orders of magnitude from about 23 down to 0.01 to test the detector performance. At high average photon count rates, the speckle contrast was evaluated by analyzing the probability distribution of the pixel counts at a constant scattering vector for single frames. For very low average photon counts of less than 0.2 per pixel, the `droplet algorithm' was first applied to the patterns for correcting the effect of charge sharing, and then the pixel count statistics of multiple frames were analyzed collectively to extract the speckle contrast. Results obtained using both methods agree within the uncertainty intervals, providing strong experimental evidence for the validity of the statistical analysis. More importantly it confirms the suitability of the ePix100 detector for X-ray coherent scattering experiments, especially at very low count rates with performances surpassing those of previously available LCLS detectors.

  5. Investigating surface and subsurface physical properties of small bodies from light scattering observations and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levasseur-Regourd, A. C.; Hadamcik, E.; Lasue, J.; Renard, J. B.

    Investigating surface and subsurface physical properties of small bodies from light scattering observations and simulations A.C. Levasseur-Regourd (1), E. Hadamcik (1), J. Lasue (1), J.B. Renard (2) (1) Université Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris6, UMR 7620, Aéronomie, BP-3, Verrières, 91371 France, (2) LPCE-CNRS, 3A av. Recherche Scientifique, Orléans, F-45071 France Investigating surface and subsurface physical properties of asteroids and comet nuclei is of major interest to i) assess future space missions and ii) constrain formation and evolution models. Our purpose is to infer such properties from the properties of solar light scattered by such media. We will first summarize recent remote polarimetric observations of small bodies, which confirm the main characteristics of the variation of the linear polarization of solar scattered light in the visible domain with the scattering geometry and the wavelength (1). To interpret such characteristics in terms of physical properties of the regoliths (e.g. albedo, size distribution, complex refractive index, porosity), experimental and numerical simulations on various types of particles and aggregates are mandatory, together with some comparisons between experimental and numerical simulations (2,3). We will thus present recent results of such simulations (for dust around bright comets, for core-mantle particles, for loose deposited transparent and dark materials), and point out the trends already suggested by this approach. Finally, we will mention future key observations and elaborate simulations, which could solve open questions about surface and subsurface properties of small bodies. References 1. Levasseur-Regourd et al., ASR 37, 161, 2006. 2. Hadamcik et al., JQSRT 100, 143, 2006. 3. Lasue et al., JQSRT 100, 220, 2006.

  6. Method and apparatus for determining the physical properties of materials using dynamic light scattering techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhadwal, Harbans S. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A system for determining the physical properties of materials through the use of dynamic light scattering is disclosed. The system includes a probe, a laser source for directing a laser beam into the probe, and a photodetector for converting scattered light detected by the probe into electrical signals. The probe includes at least one optical fiber connected to the laser source and a second optical fiber connected to the photodetector. Each of the fibers may adjoin a gradient index microlens which is capable of providing a collimated laser beam into a scattering medium. The position of the second optical fiber with respect to the optical axis of the probe determines whether homodyne or self-beating detection is provided. Self-beating detection may be provided without a gradient index microlens. This allows a very small probe to be constructed which is insertable through a hypodermic needle or the like into a droplet extending from such a needle. A method of detecting scattered light through the use of a collimated, Gaussian laser beam is also provided. A method for controlling the waist and divergence of the optical field emanating from the free end of an optical fiber is also provided.

  7. Physical Education and Sport Adaptations for Students Who Are Hard of Hearing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reich, Lori M.; Lavay, Barry

    2009-01-01

    Hearing loss is the number one disability in the United States. It cannot be assumed, however, that all people with hearing loss have similar needs. Most individuals with hearing loss do not use sign language, and people who are hard of hearing (HOH) are often grouped together with people who are Deaf and referred to as "deaf" or "hearing…

  8. Atomic physics with hard X-rays from high brilliance synchrotron light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Southworth, S.; Gemmell, D.

    1996-08-01

    A century after the discovery of x rays, the experimental capability for studying atomic structure and dynamics with hard, bright synchrotron radiation is increasing remarkably. Tempting opportunities arise for experiments on many-body effects, aspects of fundamental photon-atom interaction processes, and relativistic and quantum-electrodynamic phenomena. Some of these possibilities are surveyed in general terms.

  9. AlGaN UV LED and Photodiodes Radiation Hardness and Space Qualifications and Their Applications in Space Science and High Energy Density Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, K. X.

    2011-05-31

    This presentation provides an overview of robust, radiation hard AlGaN optoelectronic devices and their applications in space exploration & high energy density physics. Particularly, deep UV LED and deep UV photodiodes are discussed with regard to their applications, radiation hardness and space qualification. AC charge management of UV LED satellite payload instruments, which were to be launched in late 2012, is covered.

  10. A physical optics model for scattering by irregular terrain at HF

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, G.J.

    1994-03-08

    Physical optics models were developed for scattering of HF radiation by irregular terrain when an antenna is located on or near the scattering surface. The primary interest was in skywave radiation patterns for communication links using the ionosphere. Second-order reflections were included in the solution through an image approximation, and the UTD result for an impedance half-plane was used to reduce reflections due to truncating the current distribution on the surface. Arbitrary 2-D or 3-D terrain profiles can be entered into the codes, and the source can be an antenna with currents generated by the NEC method of-moments code or a point source. Results are validated by comparing with 2-D integral equation solutions for actual terrain contours.

  11. Scattering from a random layer of leaves in the physical optics limit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, R. H.; Seker, S. S.; Le Vine, D. M.

    1982-01-01

    Backscatter of electromagnetic radiation from a layer of vegetation over flat lossy ground has been studied in collaborative research at the George Washingnton University and the Goddard Space Flight Center. In this work the vegetation is composed of leaves which are modeled by a random collection of lossy dielectric disks. Backscattering coefficients for the vegetation layer have been calculated in the case of disks whose diameter is large compared to wavelength. These backscattering coefficients are obtained in terms of the scattering amplitude of an individual disk by employing the distorted Born procedure. The scattering amplitude for a disk which is large compared to wavelength is then found by physical optic techniques. Computed results are interpreted in terms of dominant reflected and transmitted contributions from the disks and ground.

  12. Application of physical optics to ocean surface radar scattering with CUDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling-Hu, Long-xiang; Wu, Zhen-sen; Guo, Xing

    2013-09-01

    The problem of electromagnetic waves scattering at rough boundaries is of practical interest and has been addressed many times in different papers. Theories for investigation of rough surface scattering primarily two kinds of methods: numerical method and approximate method. As the classic analytical methods cannot calculate the electromagnetic scattering characteristics at Low Grazing Angle (LGA) accurately, in this paper, a novel method is presented by utilizing the Radar Cross Section (RCS) of the low grazing two-dimensional sea surface based on the triangles-based Physical Optics (PO) method. Firstly, the Monte Carlo method is applied to simulate the two-dimension rough sea surface in different wind speeds based on the PM sea spectrum. Then, the sea surface is generally meshed by 1/8~1/10 length of the incident wave. Secondly, the complex permittivity of the sea surface is calculated by two-Debye method and compared with the experiment. The physical optical is used to calculate the backscattering coefficient of the random rough sea surface. Considering the problem of low grazing, it is especially sampled more densely between the scattering angles 70°~90°. Then the self-shadow and inter-shadow of the sea surface at low grazing angle is taken into account, the Z-BUFFER method is used to judgment of the shadow effect. The numerical result is compared with the FEKO and good agreement is obtained. As the frequency increasing, the sea surface will have more triangles to be calculated, it will take more time. Finally, we propose a novel graphic processing unit (GPU)-accelerated decoding system. The result is 68.96 faster than its CPU counterpart.

  13. Micromanufacturing Of Hard To Machine Materials By Physical And Chemical Ablation Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Schubert, A.; Edelmann, J.; Gross, S.; Meichsner, G.; Wolf, N.; Schneider, J.; Zeidler, H.; Hackert, M.

    2011-01-17

    Miniaturization leads to high requirements to the applied manufacturing processes especially in respect to the used hard to machine materials and the aims of structure size and geometrical accuracy. Traditional manufacturing processes reach their limits here. One alternative for these provide thermal and chemical ablation processes. These processes are applied for the production of different microstructures in different materials like hardened steel, carbides and ceramics especially for medical engineering and tribological applications.

  14. Liquid crystal physical gel formed by cholesteryl stearate for light scattering display material.

    PubMed

    Leaw, W L; Mamat, C R; Triwahyono, S; Jalil, A A; Bidin, N

    2016-12-01

    A liquid crystal physical gel was prepared by the self-assembly of cholesteryl stearate in a nematic liquid crystal, 4-cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl. The electro-optical properties were tuned by varying the gelator concentration and the gelation conditions. Polarized optical microscopy revealed that cholesteric cholesteryl stearate induced chiral nematic phase in 4-cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl during the gelation process. As a result, a plate-like gel structure consisting of spherical micropores was formed, as observed by scanning electron microscopy. Electron spin resonance spectroscopy showed that the liquid crystal director orientations in these macrophase-separated structures were massively randomised. For these reasons, the liquid crystal physical gel generated a strong light scattering effect. For 48.0wt% cholesteryl stearate gelled 4-cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl, the turbid appearance could be switched to a transparent state using a 5.0V alternating current. The response time was about 3.7μs. This liquid crystal physical gel has potential for use in light scattering electro-optical displays.

  15. Hybrid Analysis of Radar Cross Section of Open-Ended Cavity Scatterers by Using Modified Physical Optics and Iterative Physical Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasaba, Ryosuke; Ando, Makoto

    Electromagnetic scattering at high-frequencies is computationally heavy. Radar cross section (RCS) of electrically large concave and convex objects are solved by using the hybrid method. For convex and concave surfaces, Modified-Vector Physical Optics (MPO) with enhanced accuracy and Iterative Physical Optics (IPO) taking multiple-reflections into account, are selectively and independently applied for convex and concave parts of the scatterer. The accuracy of RCS by this hybrid method is tested with the MoM based simulator Wipl-D as the reference. The RCS from relatively small scatterers with the dimension of the order of a few wavelengths can be successfully predicted.

  16. Forward scattering in hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy: Structural investigation of buried Mn–Ga films

    SciTech Connect

    ViolBarbosa, Carlos E. Ouardi, Siham; Fecher, Gerhard H. Felser, Claudia; Kubota, Takahide; Mizukami, Shigemi; Miyazaki, Terunobu; Ikenaga, Eiji

    2015-02-02

    X-ray photoelectron diffraction (XPD) in combination with hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) has been used to study the structure of buried layers in thin multilayer films. A detailed layer-by-layer investigation was performed using the element-specific, local-probe character of XPD. In the present work, angular-resolved HAXPES at a photon energy of 7.94 keV photon energy was used to investigate a Cr/Mn{sub 62}Ga{sub 38}/Mg/MgO multilayer system. Differences in the angular distributions of electrons emitted from Mn and Ga atoms revealed that the structure of Mn{sub 62}Ga{sub 38} changes from L1{sub 0} towards D0{sub 22} for increasing annealing temperatures. A c/a ratio of 1.81 ± 0.06 was determined for the buried Mn{sub 62}Ga{sub 38} layer in a D0{sub 22} structure from the XPD experiment. The improvement of the structural order of the Mn{sub 62}Ga{sub 38} layer is accompanied by an improvement of the structure of the overlying MgO layer.

  17. Scattered and Reflected Light Polarimetry as a Diagnostic of Multibeam Hohlraum Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turnbull, David

    2015-11-01

    Scattered light provides a window into the complex laser-plasma interactions and hydrodynamics occurring within indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) hohlraums. Understanding hohlraum physics is an important part of developing improved targets and increasing the likelihood of ignition. Measurements of the scattered light power and spectrum are routinely made on each cone of beams at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) in order to correct for coupling losses due to laser-plasma instabilities. The additional ability to probe scattered light polarization on a 30° incidence beam was recently added, which has produced a number of discoveries regarding multibeam hohlraum physics. One particularly important insight is that the polarizations of an incident beam and its backscatter are affected by amplitude and phase modulations induced by crossing laser beams. The revised theory describing this optical wave mixing has recently been validated by conducting a two beam pump-probe experiment under carefully controlled conditions. This effect could be utilized more generally to produce ultrafast, damage-resistant, and tunable laser-plasma wave plates, polarizers, or other photonic devices. It also enables remote polarimetry-based probing of plasma conditions such as electron temperature. To extract more quantitative feedback about crossed-beam energy transfer (CBET) from the polarimetry data in ICF experiments at the NIF, the diagnostic has been upgraded to measure the complete Stokes vector with temporal resolution. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  18. Sensitivity of scattering and absorbing aerosol direct radiative forcing to physical climate factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocko, Ilissa B.; Ramaswamy, V.; Ginoux, Paul; Ming, Yi; Horowitz, Larry W.

    2012-10-01

    The direct radiative forcing of the climate system includes effects due to scattering and absorbing aerosols. This study explores how important physical climate characteristics contribute to the magnitudes of the direct radiative forcings (DRF) from anthropogenic sulfate, black carbon, and organic carbon. For this purpose, we employ the GFDL CM2.1 global climate model, which has reasonable aerosol concentrations and reconstruction of twentieth-century climate change. Sulfate and carbonaceous aerosols constitute the most important anthropogenic aerosol perturbations to the climate system and provide striking contrasts between primarily scattering (sulfate and organic carbon) and primarily absorbing (black carbon) species. The quantitative roles of cloud coverage, surface albedo, and relative humidity in governing the sign and magnitude of all-sky top-of-atmosphere (TOA) forcings are examined. Clouds reduce the global mean sulfate TOA DRF by almost 50%, reduce the global mean organic carbon TOA DRF by more than 30%, and increase the global mean black carbon TOA DRF by almost 80%. Sulfate forcing is increased by over 50% as a result of hygroscopic growth, while high-albedo surfaces are found to have only a minor (less than 10%) impact on all global mean forcings. Although the radiative forcing magnitudes are subject to uncertainties in the state of mixing of the aerosol species, it is clear that fundamental physical climate characteristics play a large role in governing aerosol direct radiative forcing magnitudes.

  19. Characterization of Athabasca Asphaltenes Separated Physically and Chemically Using Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amundarain Hurtado, Jesus Leonardo

    Athabasca asphaltenes were characterized using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) with synchrotron radiation. Two methods were used to separate asphaltenes from Athabasca bitumen. Conventional chemical separation by precipitation with n-pentane, and physical separation realized by passing bitumen through a zirconia membrane with a 20 nm average pore size. The Athabasca permeates and chemically separated samples were dispersed in 1-methylnaphtalene and n-dodecane, with temperature and asphaltene concentration ranges of 50-310 °C and 1-8 wt. %, respectively. Two approaches were also taken in the analysis of the SAXS emissions. A model-independent approach provided radii of gyration and scattering coefficients. A model-dependent fit provided size distributions for asphaltenes aggregates assuming that they are dense and spherical. Physically and chemically separated asphaltenes showed significant differences in nominal size and structure, and their structural properties exhibited different temperature dependencies. The results challenge the merits of using chemically separated asphaltene properties as a basis for asphaltene property prediction in crude oil/bitumen.

  20. Characterization of Physically and Chemically Separated Athabasca Asphaltenes Using Small-Angle X-ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Amundaraín Hurtado, Jesús Leonardo; Chodakowski, Martin; Long, Bingwen; Shaw, John M.

    2012-02-07

    Athabasca asphaltenes were characterized using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Two methods were used to separate asphaltenes from the Athabasca bitumen: namely, chemical separation by precipitation with n-pentane and physical separation by nanofiltration using a zirconia membrane with a 20 nm average pore size. The permeate and chemically separated samples were diluted in 1-methylnaphtalene and n-dodecane prior to SAXS measurements. The temperature and asphaltene concentration ranges were 50-310 C and 1-10.4 wt %, respectively. Model-independent analysis of SAXS data provided the radius of gyration and the scattering coefficients. Model-dependent fits provided size distributions for asphaltenes assuming that they are dense and spherical. Model-independent analysis for physically and chemically separated asphaltenes showed significant differences in nominal size and structure, and the temperature dependence of structural properties. The results challenge the merits of using chemically separated asphaltene properties as a basis for asphaltene property prediction in hydrocarbon resources. While the residuals for model-dependent fits are small, the results are inconsistent with the structural parameters obtained from model-independent analysis.

  1. HARD PARTON PHYSICS IN HIGH ENERGY NUCLEAR COLLISIONS. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP, VOLUME 17

    SciTech Connect

    CARROLL,J.

    1999-09-10

    The RIKEN-BNL center workshop on ''Hard parton physics in high energy nuclear collisions'' was held at BNL from March 1st-5th! 1999. The focus of the workshop was on hard probes of nucleus-nucleus collisions that will be measured at RHIC with the PHENIX and STAR detectors. There were about 45 speakers and over 70 registered participants at the workshop, with roughly a quarter of the speakers from overseas. About 60% of the talks were theory talks. A nice overview of theory for RHIC was provided by George Sterman. The theoretical talks were on a wide range of topics in QCD which can be classified under the following: (a) energy loss and the Landau-Pomeranchuk-Migdal effect; (b) minijet production and equilibration; (c) small x physics and initial conditions; (d) nuclear parton distributions and shadowing; (e) spin physics; (f) photon, di-lepton, and charm production; and (g) hadronization, and simulations of high pt physics in event generators. Several of the experimental talks discussed the capabilities of the PHENIX and STAR detectors at RHIC in measuring high pt particles in heavy ion collisions. In general, these talks were included in the relevant theory sessions. A session was set aside to discuss the spin program at RHIC with polarized proton beams. In addition, there were speakers from 08, HERA, the fixed target experiments at Fermilab, and the CERN fixed target Pb+Pb program, who provided additional perspective on a range of issues of relevance to RHIC; from jets at the Tevatron, to saturation of parton distributions at HERA, and recent puzzling data on direct photon production in fixed target experiments, among others.

  2. Study of hard double-parton scattering in four-jet events in pp collisions at s = 7 $$ \\sqrt{s}=7 $$ TeV with the ATLAS experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Aaboud, M.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Aben, R.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abraham, N. L.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adachi, S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Ali, B.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allen, B. W.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Alshehri, A. A.; Alstaty, M.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antel, C.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Armitage, L. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Artz, S.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisits, M-S; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska-Blenessy, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barranco Navarro, L.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bedognetti, M.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Belyaev, N. L.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez, J.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Beringer, J.; Berlendis, S.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertram, I. A.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethani, A.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bielski, R.; Biesuz, N. V.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Billoud, T. R. V.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bisanz, T.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J. -B.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blue, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, S.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Boerner, D.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bokan, P.; Bold, T.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortoletto, D.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Bossio Sola, J. D.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Broughton, J. H.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruni, L. S.; Brunt, BH; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryant, P.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgard, C. D.; Burghgrave, B.; Burka, K.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Burr, J. T. P.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calace, N.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Callea, G.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvente Lopez, S.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Calvet, T. P.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Camincher, C.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Camplani, A.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Carbone, R. M.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardillo, F.; Carli, I.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Carney, R. M. D.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Casper, D. W.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelijn, R.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavallaro, E.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerda Alberich, L.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, S. K.; Chan, Y. L.; Chang, P.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chatterjee, A.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Che, S.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, S.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, H. J.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiarelli, G.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chomont, A. R.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christodoulou, V.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Cioara, I. A.; Ciocca, C.; Ciocio, A.; Cirotto, F.; Citron, Z. H.; Citterio, M.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, M. R.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Colasurdo, L.; Cole, B.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cormier, K. J. R.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Crawley, S. J.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cueto, A.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cúth, J.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; D’amen, G.; D’Auria, S.; D’Onofrio, M.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dado, T.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dandoy, J. R.; Dang, N. P.; Daniells, A. C.; Dann, N. S.; Danninger, M.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, M.; Davison, P.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Benedetti, A.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Maria, A.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. V.; Dehghanian, N.; Deigaard, I.; Del Gaudio, M.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delgove, D.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Dell’Acqua, A.; Dell’Asta, L.; Dell’Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; DeMarco, D. A.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Denysiuk, D.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Dette, K.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Clemente, W. K.; Di Donato, C.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Di Valentino, D.; Diaconu, C.; Diamond, M.; Dias, F. A.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Díez Cornell, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Djuvsland, J. I.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Dobos, D.; Dobre, M.; Doglioni, C.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Drechsler, E.; Dris, M.; Du, Y.; Duarte-Campderros, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Ducu, O. A.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Dudder, A. Chr.; Duffield, E. M.; Duflot, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dumancic, M.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Durglishvili, A.; Duschinger, D.; Dutta, B.; Dyndal, M.; Eckardt, C.; Ecker, K. M.; Edgar, R. C.; Edwards, N. C.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellajosyula, V.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Elliot, A. A.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Ennis, J. S.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Ernis, G.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Ezhilov, A.; Ezzi, M.; Fabbri, F.; Fabbri, L.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falla, R. J.; Faltova, J.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farina, C.; Farina, E. M.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. 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C.; Mönig, K.; Monk, J.; Monnier, E.; Montalbano, A.; Montejo Berlingen, J.; Monticelli, F.; Monzani, S.; Moore, R. W.; Morange, N.; Moreno, D.; Moreno Llácer, M.; Morettini, P.; Morgenstern, S.; Mori, D.; Mori, T.; Morii, M.; Morinaga, M.; Morisbak, V.; Moritz, S.; Morley, A. K.; Mornacchi, G.; Morris, J. D.; Mortensen, S. S.; Morvaj, L.; Mosidze, M.; Moss, J.; Motohashi, K.; Mount, R.; Mountricha, E.; Moyse, E. J. W.; Muanza, S.; Mudd, R. D.; Mueller, F.; Mueller, J.; Mueller, R. S. P.; Mueller, T.; Muenstermann, D.; Mullen, P.; Mullier, G. A.; Munoz Sanchez, F. J.; Murillo Quijada, J. A.; Murray, W. J.; Musheghyan, H.; Muškinja, M.; Myagkov, A. G.; Myska, M.; Nachman, B. P.; Nackenhorst, O.; Nagai, K.; Nagai, R.; Nagano, K.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nagata, K.; Nagel, M.; Nagy, E.; Nairz, A. M.; Nakahama, Y.; Nakamura, K.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, I.; Naranjo Garcia, R. F.; Narayan, R.; Narrias Villar, D. I.; Naryshkin, I.; Naumann, T.; Navarro, G.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Nechaeva, P. Yu.; Neep, T. J.; Negri, A.; Negrini, M.; Nektarijevic, S.; Nellist, C.; Nelson, A.; Nemecek, S.; Nemethy, P.; Nepomuceno, A. A.; Nessi, M.; Neubauer, M. S.; Neumann, M.; Neves, R. M.; Nevski, P.; Newman, P. R.; Nguyen, D. H.; Nguyen Manh, T.; Nickerson, R. B.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nielsen, J.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikolaenko, V.; Nikolic-Audit, I.; Nikolopoulos, K.; Nilsen, J. K.; Nilsson, P.; Ninomiya, Y.; Nisati, A.; Nisius, R.; Nobe, T.; Nomachi, M.; Nomidis, I.; Nooney, T.; Norberg, S.; Nordberg, M.; Norjoharuddeen, N.; Novgorodova, O.; Nowak, S.; Nozaki, M.; Nozka, L.; Ntekas, K.; Nurse, E.; Nuti, F.; O’grady, F.; O’Neil, D. C.; O’Rourke, A. A.; O’Shea, V.; Oakham, F. G.; Oberlack, H.; Obermann, T.; Ocariz, J.; Ochi, A.; Ochoa, I.; Ochoa-Ricoux, J. P.; Oda, S.; Odaka, S.; Ogren, H.; Oh, A.; Oh, S. H.; Ohm, C. C.; Ohman, H.; Oide, H.; Okawa, H.; Okumura, Y.; Okuyama, T.; Olariu, A.; Oleiro Seabra, L. F.; Olivares Pino, S. A.; Oliveira Damazio, D.; Olszewski, A.; Olszowska, J.; Onofre, A.; Onogi, K.; Onyisi, P. U. E.; Oreglia, M. J.; Oren, Y.; Orestano, D.; Orlando, N.; Orr, R. S.; Osculati, B.; Ospanov, R.; Otero y Garzon, G.; Otono, H.; Ouchrif, M.; Ould-Saada, F.; Ouraou, A.; Oussoren, K. P.; Ouyang, Q.; Owen, M.; Owen, R. E.; Ozcan, V. E.; Ozturk, N.; Pachal, K.; Pacheco Pages, A.; Pacheco Rodriguez, L.; Padilla Aranda, C.; Pagáčová, M.; Pagan Griso, S.; Paganini, M.; Paige, F.; Pais, P.; Pajchel, K.; Palacino, G.; Palazzo, S.; Palestini, S.; Palka, M.; Pallin, D.; Panagiotopoulou, E. St.; Pandini, C. E.; Panduro Vazquez, J. G.; Pani, P.; Panitkin, S.; Pantea, D.; Paolozzi, L.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Papageorgiou, K.; Paramonov, A.; Paredes Hernandez, D.; Parker, A. J.; Parker, M. A.; Parker, K. A.; Parodi, F.; Parsons, J. A.; Parzefall, U.; Pascuzzi, V. R.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passaggio, S.; Pastore, Fr.; Pásztor, G.; Pataraia, S.; Pater, J. R.; Pauly, T.; Pearce, J.; Pearson, B.; Pedersen, L. E.; Pedersen, M.; Pedraza Lopez, S.; Pedro, R.; Peleganchuk, S. V.; Penc, O.; Peng, C.; Peng, H.; Penwell, J.; Peralva, B. S.; Perego, M. M.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perez Codina, E.; Perini, L.; Pernegger, H.; Perrella, S.; Peschke, R.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Peters, K.; Peters, R. F. Y.; Petersen, B. A.; Petersen, T. C.; Petit, E.; Petridis, A.; Petridou, C.; Petroff, P.; Petrolo, E.; Petrov, M.; Petrucci, F.; Pettersson, N. E.; Peyaud, A.; Pezoa, R.; Phillips, P. W.; Piacquadio, G.; Pianori, E.; Picazio, A.; Piccaro, E.; Piccinini, M.; Pickering, M. A.; Piegaia, R.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pilkington, A. D.; Pin, A. W. J.; Pinamonti, M.; Pinfold, J. L.; Pingel, A.; Pires, S.; Pirumov, H.; Pitt, M.; Plazak, L.; Pleier, M. -A.; Pleskot, V.; Plotnikova, E.; Plucinski, P.; Pluth, D.; Poettgen, R.; Poggioli, L.; Pohl, D.; Polesello, G.; Poley, A.; Policicchio, A.; Polifka, R.; Polini, A.; Pollard, C. S.; Polychronakos, V.; Pommès, K.; Pontecorvo, L.; Pope, B. G.; Popeneciu, G. A.; Poppleton, A.; Pospisil, S.; Potamianos, K.; Potrap, I. N.; Potter, C. J.; Potter, C. T.; Poulard, G.; Poveda, J.; Pozdnyakov, V.; Pozo Astigarraga, M. E.; Pralavorio, P.; Pranko, A.; Prell, S.; Price, D.; Price, L. E.; Primavera, M.; Prince, S.; Prokofiev, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Protopopescu, S.; Proudfoot, J.; Przybycien, M.; Puddu, D.; Purohit, M.; Puzo, P.; Qian, J.; Qin, G.; Qin, Y.; Quadt, A.; Quayle, W. B.; Queitsch-Maitland, M.; Quilty, D.; Raddum, S.; Radeka, V.; Radescu, V.; Radhakrishnan, S. K.; Radloff, P.; Rados, P.; Ragusa, F.; Rahal, G.; Raine, J. A.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rammensee, M.; Rangel-Smith, C.; Ratti, M. G.; Rauch, D. M.; Rauscher, F.; Rave, S.; Ravenscroft, T.; Ravinovich, I.; Raymond, M.; Read, A. L.; Readioff, N. P.; Reale, M.; Rebuzzi, D. M.; Redelbach, A.; Redlinger, G.; Reece, R.; Reed, R. G.; Reeves, K.; Rehnisch, L.; Reichert, J.; Reiss, A.; Rembser, C.; Ren, H.; Rescigno, M.; Resconi, S.; Rezanova, O. L.; Reznicek, P.; Rezvani, R.; Richter, R.; Richter, S.; Richter-Was, E.; Ricken, O.; Ridel, M.; Rieck, P.; Riegel, C. J.; Rieger, J.; Rifki, O.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rimoldi, M.; Rinaldi, L.; Ristić, B.; Ritsch, E.; Riu, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rizvi, E.; Rizzi, C.; Robertson, S. H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robinson, D.; Robinson, J. E. M.; Robson, A.; Roda, C.; Rodina, Y.; Rodriguez Perez, A.; Rodriguez Rodriguez, D.; Roe, S.; Rogan, C. S.; Røhne, O.; Roloff, J.; Romaniouk, A.; Romano, M.; Romano Saez, S. M.; Romero Adam, E.; Rompotis, N.; Ronzani, M.; Roos, L.; Ros, E.; Rosati, S.; Rosbach, K.; Rose, P.; Rosien, N. -A.; Rossetti, V.; Rossi, E.; Rossi, L. P.; Rosten, J. H. N.; Rosten, R.; Rotaru, M.; Roth, I.; Rothberg, J.; Rousseau, D.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Rubbo, F.; Rudolph, M. S.; Rühr, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Ruschke, A.; Russell, H. L.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruthmann, N.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Rybar, M.; Rybkin, G.; Ryu, S.; Ryzhov, A.; Rzehorz, G. F.; Saavedra, A. F.; Sabato, G.; Sacerdoti, S.; Sadrozinski, H. F-W.; Sadykov, R.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Saha, P.; Sahinsoy, M.; Saimpert, M.; Saito, T.; Sakamoto, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Salazar Loyola, J. E.; Salek, D.; Sales De Bruin, P. H.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sammel, D.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sanchez, A.; Sánchez, J.; Sanchez Martinez, V.; Sandaker, H.; Sandbach, R. L.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandoval, C.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sannino, M.; Sansoni, A.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, H.; Santoyo Castillo, I.; Sapp, K.; Sapronov, A.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarrazin, B.; Sasaki, O.; Sato, K.; Sauvan, E.; Savage, G.; Savard, P.; Savic, N.; Sawyer, C.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, J.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scanlon, T.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Scarcella, M.; Scarfone, V.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schachtner, B. M.; Schaefer, D.; Schaefer, L.; Schaefer, R.; Schaeffer, J.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Schiavi, C.; Schier, S.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmidt-Sommerfeld, K. R.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, S.; Schneider, B.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schoenrock, B. D.; Schopf, E.; Schott, M.; Schouwenberg, J. F. P.; Schovancova, J.; Schramm, S.; Schreyer, M.; Schuh, N.; Schulte, A.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H. -C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwarz, T. A.; Schweiger, H.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Sciolla, G.; Scuri, F.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Seema, P.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekhon, K.; Sekula, S. J.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Sessa, M.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfiligoj, T.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shaikh, N. W.; Shan, L. Y.; Shang, R.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shaw, S. M.; Shcherbakova, A.; Shehu, C. Y.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shirabe, S.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shoaleh Saadi, D.; Shochet, M. J.; Shojaii, S.; Shope, D. R.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Sicho, P.; Sickles, A. M.; Sidebo, P. E.; Sideras Haddad, E.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simon, D.; Simon, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sioli, M.; Siragusa, G.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Skinner, M. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Slovak, R.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smiesko, J.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smith, R. W.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snyder, I. M.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Sokhrannyi, G.; Solans Sanchez, C. A.; Solar, M.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Son, H.; Song, H. Y.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosa, D.; Sotiropoulou, C. L.; Soualah, R.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Sowden, B. C.; Spagnolo, S.; Spalla, M.; Spangenberg, M.; Spanò, F.; Sperlich, D.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; Denis, R. D. St.; Stabile, A.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, G. H.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Stärz, S.; Staszewski, R.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. 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F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, A. C.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, P. T. E.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Temple, D.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todome, K.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tong, B.; Tornambe, P.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Trofymov, A.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tseng, J. C-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsui, K. M.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tu, Y.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turgeman, D.; Turra, R.; Tuts, P. M.; Tyndel, M.; Ucchielli, G.; Ueda, I.; Ughetto, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usui, J.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valdes Santurio, E.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Graaf, H.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vasquez, J. G.; Vasquez, G. A.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigani, L.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vittori, C.; Vivarelli, I.; Vlachos, S.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wallangen, V.; Wang, C.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, T.; Wang, W.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Weber, S. A.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, M. D.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Whallon, N. L.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilk, F.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winston, O. J.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wolf, T. M. H.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Worm, S. D.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W-M.; Yap, Y. C.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. 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    2016-11-01

    Inclusive four-jet events produced in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of s=7 TeV are analysed for the presence of hard double-parton scattering using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 37.3 pb -1 , collected with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The contribution of hard double-parton scattering to the production of four-jet events is extracted using an artificial neural network, assuming that hard double-parton scattering can be approximated by an uncorrelated overlaying of dijet events. For events containing at least four jets with transverse momentum p T ≥ 20 GeV and pseudorapidity |η| ≤ 4.4, and at least one having p T ≥ 42.5 GeV, the contribution of hard double-parton scattering is estimated to be f DPS = 0.092 - 0.011 + 0.005 (stat.) - 0.037 + 0.033 (syst.). After combining this measurement with those of the inclusive dijet and four-jet cross-sections in the appropriate phase space regions, the effective cross-section, σ eff , was determined to be σ eff = 14. 9 - 1.0 + 1.2 (stat.) - 3.8 + 5.1 (syst.) mb. This result is consistent within the quoted uncertainties with previous measurements of σ eff , performed at centre-of-mass energies between 63 GeV and 8 TeV using various final states, and it corresponds to 21 - 6 + 7 % of the total inelastic cross-section measured at s=7 TeV. The distributions of the observables sensitive to the contribution of hard double-parton scattering, corrected for detector effects, are also provided.

  3. Study of hard double-parton scattering in four-jet events in pp collisions at s = 7 $$ \\sqrt{s}=7 $$ TeV with the ATLAS experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Aaboud, M.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; ...

    2016-11-01

    Inclusive four-jet events produced in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of s=7 TeV are analysed for the presence of hard double-parton scattering using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 37.3 pb -1 , collected with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The contribution of hard double-parton scattering to the production of four-jet events is extracted using an artificial neural network, assuming that hard double-parton scattering can be approximated by an uncorrelated overlaying of dijet events. For events containing at least four jets with transverse momentum p T ≥ 20 GeV and pseudorapidity |η| ≤ 4.4, and at leastmore » one having p T ≥ 42.5 GeV, the contribution of hard double-parton scattering is estimated to be f DPS = 0.092 - 0.011 + 0.005 (stat.) - 0.037 + 0.033 (syst.). After combining this measurement with those of the inclusive dijet and four-jet cross-sections in the appropriate phase space regions, the effective cross-section, σ eff , was determined to be σ eff = 14. 9 - 1.0 + 1.2 (stat.) - 3.8 + 5.1 (syst.) mb. This result is consistent within the quoted uncertainties with previous measurements of σ eff , performed at centre-of-mass energies between 63 GeV and 8 TeV using various final states, and it corresponds to 21 - 6 + 7 % of the total inelastic cross-section measured at s=7 TeV. The distributions of the observables sensitive to the contribution of hard double-parton scattering, corrected for detector effects, are also provided.« less

  4. Why is Ampère's law so hard? A look at middle-division physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manogue, Corinne A.; Browne, Kerry; Dray, Tevian; Edwards, Barbara

    2006-04-01

    Because mathematicians and physicists think differently about mathematics, they have different goals for their courses and teach different ways of thinking about the material. As a consequence, there are a number of capabilities that physics majors need in order to be successful that might not be addressed by any traditional course. The result is that the total cognitive load is too high for many students at the transition from the calculus and introductory physics sequences to upper-division courses for physics majors. We illustrate typical student difficulties in the context of an Ampère's law problem.

  5. Bio-physically plausible visualization of highly scattering fluorescent neocortical models for in silico experimentation.

    PubMed

    Abdellah, Marwan; Bilgili, Ahmet; Eilemann, Stefan; Shillcock, Julian; Markram, Henry; Schürmann, Felix

    2017-02-15

    We present a visualization pipeline capable of accurate rendering of highly scattering fluorescent neocortical neuronal models. The pipeline is mainly developed to serve the computational neurobiology community. It allows the scientists to visualize the results of their virtual experiments that are performed in computer simulations, or in silico. The impact of the presented pipeline opens novel avenues for assisting the neuroscientists to build biologically accurate models of the brain. These models result from computer simulations of physical experiments that use fluorescence imaging to understand the structural and functional aspects of the brain. Due to the limited capabilities of the current visualization workflows to handle fluorescent volumetric datasets, we propose a physically-based optical model that can accurately simulate light interaction with fluorescent-tagged scattering media based on the basic principles of geometric optics and Monte Carlo path tracing. We also develop an automated and efficient framework for generating dense fluorescent tissue blocks from a neocortical column model that is composed of approximately 31000 neurons. Our pipeline is used to visualize a virtual fluorescent tissue block of 50 μm(3) that is reconstructed from the somatosensory cortex of juvenile rat. The fluorescence optical model is qualitatively analyzed and validated against experimental emission spectra of different fluorescent dyes from the Alexa Fluor family. We discussed a scientific visualization pipeline for creating images of synthetic neocortical neuronal models that are tagged virtually with fluorescent labels on a physically-plausible basis. The pipeline is applied to analyze and validate simulation data generated from neuroscientific in silico experiments.

  6. Assessing Child Obesity and Physical Activity in a Hard-to-Reach Population in California's Central Valley, 2012-2013.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Sara E; Camacho-Gomez, Rosa; Sadeghi, Banefsheh; Kaiser, Lucia; German, J Bruce; de la Torre, Adela

    2015-07-23

    In California's agricultural Central Valley, the rate of childhood obesity is higher than the national average. Adequate physical activity contributes to obesity prevention and its assessment is useful to evaluate the impact of interventions. Niños Sanos, Familia Sana (Healthy Children, Healthy Family [NSFS]) uses community-based participatory research to implement an intervention program to reduce childhood obesity among people of Mexican origin in the Central Valley. Anthropometric measurements were conducted on more than 650 children enrolled in NSFS. Physical activity data from a subgroup of children aged 4 to 7 years (n = 134) were collected via a wearable accelerometer. Children were classified on the basis of age and sex-adjusted body mass index as healthy weight (57.7%); overweight (19.3%), or obese (23%). Logistic regression showed that moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) was associated with a child's likelihood of having a healthy BMI (odds ratio: 1.03; 95% CI, 1.01-1.05; P = .017). NSFS's community-based participatory approach resulted in successful use of a commercial electronic device to measure physical activity quantity and quality in this hard-to-reach population. Promotion of adequate daily MVPA is an appropriate and necessary component of NSFS's childhood obesity prevention strategy.

  7. A dialogue regarding "The material co-construction of hard science fiction and physics"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geelan, David; Prain, Vaughan; Hasse, Cathrine

    2015-12-01

    Science fiction and the `technofantasies' of the future that it provides may attract some students to study physics. The details and assumptions informing these `imaginaries' may, on the other hand, be unattractive to other students, or imply that there is not a place for them. This forum discussion complements Cathrine Hasse's paper discussing the ways in which gender and other interests interact in the `entanglement' of physics and science fiction. The conversation interrogates some of the issues in Cathrine's paper, and brings in complementary literatures and perspectives. It discusses the possibility of a `successor science' and new, more inclusive ways of imagining and constructing our possible futures.

  8. A Dialogue Regarding "The Material Co-Construction of Hard Science Fiction and Physics"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geelan, David; Prain, Vaughan; Hasse, Cathrine

    2015-01-01

    Science fiction and the "technofantasies" of the future that it provides may attract some students to study physics. The details and assumptions informing these "imaginaries" may, on the other hand, be unattractive to other students, or imply that there is not a place for them. This forum discussion complements Cathrine Hasse's…

  9. A Dialogue Regarding "The Material Co-Construction of Hard Science Fiction and Physics"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geelan, David; Prain, Vaughan; Hasse, Cathrine

    2015-01-01

    Science fiction and the "technofantasies" of the future that it provides may attract some students to study physics. The details and assumptions informing these "imaginaries" may, on the other hand, be unattractive to other students, or imply that there is not a place for them. This forum discussion complements Cathrine Hasse's…

  10. Determination and prediction of physical properties of cellulose nanocrystals from dynamic light scattering measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khouri, Salim; Shams, Mouhamed; Tam, Kam C.

    2014-07-01

    Cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) has attracted increasing interest due to their biocompatibility, rigidity, and potential applications in biomedicine and cosmetics. A parameter estimation technique was used to calculate the average dimension of CNC with different aspect ratios, and their dynamic physical parameters denoted by the translational ( D t) and rotational diffusion (Θ) coefficients. For CNC with L/ d ratio of 17, the experimental D t and Θ values produced calculated length ( L) and diameter ( d) values that deviated from the experimental results by 0.22 and 0.27 % after 1,000 iterations, respectively. The calculated translational and rotational coefficients converged to an asymptotic value of 5.048 × 10-12 m2 s-1 and 551.9 s-1, with the latter requiring a larger number of iterations to achieve convergence. Close agreement between experimentally obtained and calculated dimensions and dynamics ( L, d, D t, and Θ) for various types of CNCs was observed using this technique. By combining the theoretical model formulated by Broersma and the computational method utilizing a Nelder-Mead simplex direct search algorithm, reliable predictions of the average sizes determined from dynamic light scattering of a CNC sample was achieved; yielding an average L = 253.5 nm and d = 15.7 nm. The proposed approach provides a convenient, simple, and robust technique to determine the length and diameter of rod-like nanoparticles, such as CNC from light scattering measurements.

  11. A built-in SRAM for radiation hard CMOS pixel sensors dedicated to high energy physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xiaomin; Gao, Deyuan; Doziere, Guy; Hu, Yann

    2013-02-01

    CMOS pixel sensors (CPS) are attractive candidates for charged particle tracking in high energy physics experiments. However, CPS chips fabricated with standard CMOS processes, especially the built-in SRAM IP cores, are not radiation hard enough for this application. This paper presents a radiation hard SRAM for improving the CPS radiation tolerance. The SRAM cell is hardened by increasing the static noise margin (SNM) and adding P+ guard rings in layout. The peripheral circuitry is designed by building a radiation-hardened logic library. The SRAM internal timing control is hardened by a self-adaptive timing design. Finally, the SRAM design was implemented and tested in the Austriamicrosystems (AMS) 0.35 μm standard CMOS process. The prototype chips are adapted to work with frequencies up to 80 MHz, power supply voltages from 2.9 V to 3.3 V and temperatures from 0 °C to 60 °C. The single event latchup (SEL) tolerance is improved from 5.2 MeV cm2/mg to above 56 MeV cm2/mg. The total ionizing dose (TID) tolerance is enhanced by the P+ guard rings and the self-adaptive timing design. The single event upset (SEU) effects are also alleviated due to the high SNM SRAM cell and the P+ guard rings. In the near future, the presented SRAM will be integrated in the CPS chips for the STAR experiments.

  12. Light scattering by ice crystals of cirrus clouds: comparison of the physical optics methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konoshonkin, Alexander V.; Kustova, Natalia V.; Borovoi, Anatoli G.; Grynko, Yevgen; Förstner, Jens

    2016-10-01

    The physical optics approximations are derived from the Maxwell equations. The scattered field equations by Kirchhoff, Stratton-Chu, Kottler and Franz are compared and discussed. It is shown that in the case of faceted particles, these equations reduce to a sum of the diffraction integrals, where every diffraction integral is associated with one plane-parallel optical beam leaving a particle facet. In the far zone, these diffraction integrals correspond to the Fraunhofer diffraction patterns. The paper discusses the E-, M- and (E, M)-diffraction theories as applied to ice crystals of cirrus clouds. The comparison to the exact solution obtained by the discontinuous Galerkin time domain method shows that the Kirchhoff diffraction theory is preferable.

  13. Hard Physical Work Intensifies the Occupational Consequence of Physician-Diagnosed Back Disorder: Prospective Cohort Study with Register Follow-Up among 10,000 Workers

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    While musculoskeletal pain is common in the population, less is known about its labor market consequences in relation to physical activity at work. This study investigates whether hard physical work aggravates the consequences of back disorder. Using Cox regression analyses, we estimated the joint association of physical activity at work and physician-diagnosed back disorder in 2010 with the risk of register-based long-term sickness absence (LTSA) of at least 6 consecutive weeks during 2011-2012 among 9,544 employees from the general working population (Danish Work Environment Cohort Study). Control variables were age, gender, psychosocial work environment, smoking, leisure physical activity, BMI, depression, and mental health. At baseline, 19.4% experienced high low-back pain intensity (≥5, 0–9 scale) and 15.2% had diagnosed back disorder. While high pain intensity was a general predictor for LTSA, physician-diagnosed back disorder was a stronger predictor among those with hard physical work (HR 2.23; 95% CI 1.68–2.96) compared with light work (HR 1.40; 95% CI 1.09–1.80). Similarly, physician-diagnosed back disorder with simultaneous high pain intensity predicted LTSA to a greater extent among those with hard physical work. In conclusion, the occupational consequence of physician-diagnosed back disorder on LTSA is greater among employees with hard physical work. PMID:28255304

  14. The hard start phenomena in hypergolic engines. Volume 3: Physical and combustion characteristics of engine residuals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miron, Y.; Perlee, H. E.

    1974-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the cause of starting problems in the hypergolic rocket engines of the Apollo reaction control (RCS) engines. The scope of the investigation was as follows: (1) to establish that chemical reactions occurred during the preignition and post combustion periods, (2) to identify the chemical species of the products of preignition and post combustion reaction, and (3) to determine the explosive nature of the identified species. The methods used in identifying the chemical products are described species. The infrared spectra, X-ray spectra, and other signatures of the compounds are presented. The physical and explosion characteristics of various hypergolic agents are reported.

  15. American Conference on Neutron Scattering 2014

    SciTech Connect

    Dillen, J. Ardie

    2014-12-31

    Scientists from the around the world converged in Knoxville, TN to have share ideas, present technical information and contribute to the advancement of neutron scattering. Featuring over 400 oral/poster presentations, ACNS 2014 offered a strong program of plenary, invited and contributed talks and poster sessions covering topics in soft condensed matter, hard condensed matter, biology, chemistry, energy and engineering applications in neutron physics – confirming the great diversity of science that is enabled by neutron scattering.

  16. RADIATION HARDNESS / TOLERANCE OF SI SENSORS / DETECTORS FOR NUCLEAR AND HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS.

    SciTech Connect

    LI,Z.

    2002-09-09

    Silicon sensors, widely used in high energy and nuclear physics experiments, suffer severe radiation damage that leads to degradations in sensor performance. These degradations include significant increases in leakage current, bulk resistivity, and space charge concentration. The increase in space charge concentration is particularly damaging since it can significantly increase the sensor full depletion voltage, causing either breakdown if operated at high biases or charge collection loss if operated at lower biases than full depletion. Several strategies can be used to make Si detectors more radiation had tolerant to particle radiations. In this paper, the main radiation induced degradations in Si detectors will be reviewed. The details and specifics of the new engineering strategies: material/impurity/defect engineering (MIDE); device structure engineering (DSE); and device operational mode engineering (DOME) will be given.

  17. Brockhouse and others: Neutron Scattering and Condensed Matter Physics at Chalk River Labs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svensson, Eric

    2004-03-01

    Bertram Brockhouse, in brilliant, pioneering work carried out during the period 1950-1962 at Chalk River Laboratories, laid the foundation for the field of inelastic neutron scattering. Bert invented/developed an abundance of new instrumentation (most notably the Triple Axis Crystal Spectrometer) and techniques (most notably the Constant-Q Method) and he and his collaborators carried out a truly impressive number of ground breaking measurements. These included the first determination of phonon dispersion curves (in aluminum in 1955, with Alec Stewart), the first determination of a magnon dispersion curve (in magnetite in 1958), the first measurements of phonons in semiconductors, alkali halides and several other metals, the first measurements of magnons in a metal (cobalt), and the first observation of a Kohn anomaly. Bert Brockhouse was a great scientist with an amazing intuition, but, as he regularly emphasized, the terrific atmosphere for scientific research at Chalk River Labs as well as the outstanding technical support staff and facilities were essential ingredients of his success. He also had unlimited access to, in succession, the NRX and NRU reactors which were, when they were commissioned (in 1947 and 1957) and for several years thereafter, the best research reactors in the world. Bert's accomplishments were ultimately recognized by the 1994 Nobel Prize in Physics, which he shared with Clifford Shull of the United States, Cliff having laid the foundation for the field of elastic neutron scattering. My presentation will focus strongly on the work of Brockhouse, but I will also cover several highlights from the Chalk River program of neutron scattering studies on liquid helium, started in 1952 by Dave Henshaw and Don Hurst. (Don Hurst was the person who hired Bert Brockhouse and charged him with "finding something interesting to do with neutrons".) The helium program, now running almost continuously for half a century, has been a major focus of my own

  18. Influence of Polymer Type on the Physical Properties and Release Profile of Papaverine Hydrochloride From Hard Gelatin Capsules.

    PubMed

    Polski, Andrzej; Iwaniak, Karol; Kasperek, Regina; Modrzewska, Joanna; Sobótka-Polska, Karolina; Sławińska, Karolina; Poleszak, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    The capsule is one of the most important solid dosage forms in the pharmaceutical industry. It is easier and faster to produce than a tablet, because it requires fewer excipients. Generally, capsules are easy to swallow and mask any unpleasant taste of the substances used while their release profiles can be easily modified. Papaverine hydrochloride was used as a model substance to show different release profiles using different excipients. The main aim of the study was to analyze the impact of using different polymers on the release profile of papaverine hydrochloride from hard gelatin capsules. Six series of hard gelatin capsules containing papaverine hydrochloride as a model drug and different excipients were made. Then, the angle of repose, flow rate, mass flow rate and volume flow rate of the powders used for capsule production were analyzed. The uniform weight and disintegration time of the capsules were studied. The dissolution study was performed in a basket apparatus, while the amount of papaverine hydrochloride released was determined spectrophotometrically at 251 nm. Only one formula of powder had satisfactory flow properties, while all formulas had good Hausner ratios. The best properties were from powder containing polyvinylpyrrolidone 10k. The disintegration time of capsules varied from 1:30 min to 2:00 min. As required by Polish Pharmacopoeia X, 80% of the active substance in all cases was released within 15 minutes. The capsules with polyvinylpyrrolidone 10k were characterized by the longest release. On the other hand, capsules containing microcrystalline cellulose had the fastest release profile. Using 10% of different polymers, without changing the other excipients, had a significant impact on the physical properties of the powders and papaverine hydrochloride release profile. The two most preferred capsule formulations contained either polyvinylpyrrolidone 10k or microcrystalline cellulose.

  19. Measurement of the dependence of transverse energy production at large pseudorapidity on the hard-scattering kinematics of proton–proton collisions at √s = 2.76 TeV with ATLAS

    DOE PAGES

    Aad, G.

    2016-03-02

    The relationship between jet production in the central region and the underlying-event activity in a pseudorapidity-separated region is studied in 4.0 pb-1 of √s = 2.76 TeV pp collision data recorded with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The underlying event is characterised through measurements of the average value of the sum of the transverse energy at large pseudorapidity downstream of one of the protons, which are reported here as a function of hard-scattering kinematic variables. The hard scattering is characterised by the average transverse momentum and pseudorapidity of the two highest transverse momentum jets in the event. The dijetmore » kinematics are used to estimate, on an event-by-event basis, the scaled longitudinal momenta of the hard-scattered partons in the target and projectile beam-protons moving toward and away from the region measuring transverse energy, respectively. Transverse energy production at large pseudorapidity is observed to decrease with a linear dependence on the longitudinal momentum fraction in the target proton and to depend only weakly on that in the projectile proton. Lastly, the results are compared to the predictions of various Monte Carlo event generators, which qualitatively reproduce the trends observed in data but generally underpredict the overall level of transverse energy at forward pseudorapidity.« less

  20. Measurement of the dependence of transverse energy production at large pseudorapidity on the hard-scattering kinematics of proton-proton collisions at √{ s} = 2.76 TeV with ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bieniek, S. P.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Brown, J.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgard, C. D.; Burghgrave, B.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calace, N.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardillo, F.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerio, B. C.; Cerny, K.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chang, P.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, L.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiarelli, G.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christodoulou, V.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Cioara, I. A.; Ciocio, A.; Cirotto, F.; Citron, Z. H.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Cleland, W.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Cogan, J. G.; Colasurdo, L.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cúth, J.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. 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R.; Pauly, T.; Pearce, J.; Pearson, B.; Pedersen, L. E.; Pedersen, M.; Pedraza Lopez, S.; Pedro, R.; Peleganchuk, S. V.; Pelikan, D.; Penc, O.; Peng, C.; Peng, H.; Penning, B.; Penwell, J.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perez Codina, E.; Pérez García-Estañ, M. T.; Perini, L.; Pernegger, H.; Perrella, S.; Peschke, R.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Peters, K.; Peters, R. F. Y.; Petersen, B. A.; Petersen, T. C.; Petit, E.; Petridis, A.; Petridou, C.; Petroff, P.; Petrolo, E.; Petrucci, F.; Pettersson, N. E.; Pezoa, R.; Phillips, P. W.; Piacquadio, G.; Pianori, E.; Picazio, A.; Piccaro, E.; Piccinini, M.; Pickering, M. A.; Piegaia, R.; Pignotti, D. T.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pilkington, A. D.; Pin, A. W. J.; Pina, J.; Pinamonti, M.; Pinfold, J. L.; Pingel, A.; Pires, S.; Pirumov, H.; Pitt, M.; Pizio, C.; Plazak, L.; Pleier, M.-A.; Pleskot, V.; Plotnikova, E.; Plucinski, P.; Pluth, D.; Poettgen, R.; Poggioli, L.; Pohl, D.; Polesello, G.; Poley, A.; Policicchio, A.; Polifka, R.; Polini, A.; Pollard, C. S.; Polychronakos, V.; Pommès, K.; Pontecorvo, L.; Pope, B. G.; Popeneciu, G. A.; Popovic, D. S.; Poppleton, A.; Pospisil, S.; Potamianos, K.; Potrap, I. N.; Potter, C. J.; Potter, C. T.; Poulard, G.; Poveda, J.; Pozdnyakov, V.; Pralavorio, P.; Pranko, A.; Prasad, S.; Prell, S.; Price, D.; Price, L. E.; Primavera, M.; Prince, S.; Proissl, M.; Prokofiev, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Protopapadaki, E.; Protopopescu, S.; Proudfoot, J.; Przybycien, M.; Ptacek, E.; Puddu, D.; Pueschel, E.; Puldon, D.; Purohit, M.; Puzo, P.; Qian, J.; Qin, G.; Qin, Y.; Quadt, A.; Quarrie, D. R.; Quayle, W. B.; Queitsch-Maitland, M.; Quilty, D.; Raddum, S.; Radeka, V.; Radescu, V.; Radhakrishnan, S. K.; Radloff, P.; Rados, P.; Ragusa, F.; Rahal, G.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rammensee, M.; Rangel-Smith, C.; Rauscher, F.; Rave, S.; Ravenscroft, T.; Raymond, M.; Read, A. L.; Readioff, N. P.; Rebuzzi, D. M.; Redelbach, A.; Redlinger, G.; Reece, R.; Reeves, K.; Rehnisch, L.; Reichert, J.; Reisin, H.; Relich, M.; Rembser, C.; Ren, H.; Renaud, A.; Rescigno, M.; Resconi, S.; Rezanova, O. L.; Reznicek, P.; Rezvani, R.; Richter, R.; Richter, S.; Richter-Was, E.; Ricken, O.; Ridel, M.; Rieck, P.; Riegel, C. J.; Rieger, J.; Rifki, O.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rinaldi, L.; Ristić, B.; Ritsch, E.; Riu, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rizvi, E.; Robertson, S. H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robinson, D.; Robinson, J. E. M.; Robson, A.; Roda, C.; Roe, S.; Røhne, O.; Rolli, S.; Romaniouk, A.; Romano, M.; Romano Saez, S. M.; Romero Adam, E.; Rompotis, N.; Ronzani, M.; Roos, L.; Ros, E.; Rosati, S.; Rosbach, K.; Rose, P.; Rosendahl, P. L.; Rosenthal, O.; Rossetti, V.; Rossi, E.; Rossi, L. P.; Rosten, J. H. N.; Rosten, R.; Rotaru, M.; Roth, I.; Rothberg, J.; Rousseau, D.; Royon, C. R.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Rubbo, F.; Rubinskiy, I.; Rud, V. I.; Rudolph, C.; Rudolph, M. S.; Rühr, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Ruschke, A.; Russell, H. L.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruthmann, N.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Rybar, M.; Rybkin, G.; Ryder, N. C.; Saavedra, A. F.; Sabato, G.; Sacerdoti, S.; Saddique, A.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sadykov, R.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Saha, P.; Sahinsoy, M.; Saimpert, M.; Saito, T.; Sakamoto, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Salazar Loyola, J. E.; Saleem, M.; Salek, D.; Sales De Bruin, P. H.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sammel, D.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sanchez, A.; Sánchez, J.; Sanchez Martinez, V.; Sandaker, H.; Sandbach, R. L.; Sander, H. G.; Sanders, M. P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandoval, C.; Sandstroem, R.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sannino, M.; Sansoni, A.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, H.; Santoyo Castillo, I.; Sapp, K.; Sapronov, A.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarrazin, B.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, Y.; Sato, K.; Sauvage, G.; Sauvan, E.; Savage, G.; Savard, P.; Sawyer, C.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, J.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scanlon, T.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Scarcella, M.; Scarfone, V.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schaefer, D.; Schaefer, R.; Schaeffer, J.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Schiavi, C.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, B.; Schnellbach, Y. J.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schoenrock, B. D.; Schopf, E.; Schorlemmer, A. L. S.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schramm, S.; Schreyer, M.; Schroeder, C.; Schuh, N.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwarz, T. A.; Schwegler, Ph.; Schweiger, H.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Sciacca, F. G.; Scifo, E.; Sciolla, G.; Scuri, F.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Sedov, G.; Sedykh, E.; Seema, P.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekhon, K.; Sekula, S. J.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Serre, T.; Sessa, M.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfiligoj, T.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shang, R.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shaw, S. M.; Shcherbakova, A.; Shehu, C. Y.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shoaleh Saadi, D.; Shochet, M. J.; Shojaii, S.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Shushkevich, S.; Sicho, P.; Sidebo, P. E.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simon, D.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sioli, M.; Siragusa, G.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinner, M. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smith, R. W.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snidero, G.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Sokhrannyi, G.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Song, H. Y.; Soni, N.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, B.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosa, D.; Sosebee, M.; Sotiropoulou, C. L.; Soualah, R.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Sowden, B. C.; Spagnolo, S.; Spalla, M.; Spangenberg, M.; Spanò, F.; Spearman, W. R.; Sperlich, D.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stabile, A.; Staerz, S.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramaniam, R.; Succurro, A.; Suchek, S.; Sugaya, Y.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Svatos, M.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, P. T. E.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Temple, D.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thun, R. P.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todome, K.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; True, P.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Velz, T.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. 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G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2016-05-01

    The relationship between jet production in the central region and the underlying-event activity in a pseudorapidity-separated region is studied in 4.0 pb-1 of √{ s} = 2.76 TeVpp collision data recorded with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The underlying event is characterised through measurements of the average value of the sum of the transverse energy at large pseudorapidity downstream of one of the protons, which are reported here as a function of hard-scattering kinematic variables. The hard scattering is characterised by the average transverse momentum and pseudorapidity of the two highest transverse momentum jets in the event. The dijet kinematics are used to estimate, on an event-by-event basis, the scaled longitudinal momenta of the hard-scattered partons in the target and projectile beam-protons moving toward and away from the region measuring transverse energy, respectively. Transverse energy production at large pseudorapidity is observed to decrease with a linear dependence on the longitudinal momentum fraction in the target proton and to depend only weakly on that in the projectile proton. The results are compared to the predictions of various Monte Carlo event generators, which qualitatively reproduce the trends observed in data but generally underpredict the overall level of transverse energy at forward pseudorapidity.

  1. Characterization of scatter in digital mammography from use of Monte Carlo simulations and comparison to physical measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Leon, Stephanie M. Wagner, Louis K.; Brateman, Libby F.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Monte Carlo simulations were performed with the goal of verifying previously published physical measurements characterizing scatter as a function of apparent thickness. A secondary goal was to provide a way of determining what effect tissue glandularity might have on the scatter characteristics of breast tissue. The overall reason for characterizing mammography scatter in this research is the application of these data to an image processing-based scatter-correction program. Methods: MCNPX was used to simulate scatter from an infinitesimal pencil beam using typical mammography geometries and techniques. The spreading of the pencil beam was characterized by two parameters: mean radial extent (MRE) and scatter fraction (SF). The SF and MRE were found as functions of target, filter, tube potential, phantom thickness, and the presence or absence of a grid. The SF was determined by separating scatter and primary by the angle of incidence on the detector, then finding the ratio of the measured scatter to the total number of detected events. The accuracy of the MRE was determined by placing ring-shaped tallies around the impulse and fitting those data to the point-spread function (PSF) equation using the value for MRE derived from the physical measurements. The goodness-of-fit was determined for each data set as a means of assessing the accuracy of the physical MRE data. The effect of breast glandularity on the SF, MRE, and apparent tissue thickness was also considered for a limited number of techniques. Results: The agreement between the physical measurements and the results of the Monte Carlo simulations was assessed. With a grid, the SFs ranged from 0.065 to 0.089, with absolute differences between the measured and simulated SFs averaging 0.02. Without a grid, the range was 0.28–0.51, with absolute differences averaging −0.01. The goodness-of-fit values comparing the Monte Carlo data to the PSF from the physical measurements ranged from 0.96 to 1.00 with a

  2. SHUTTLE IMAGING RADAR: PHYSICAL CONTROLS ON SIGNAL PENETRATION AND SUBSURFACE SCATTERING IN THE EASTERN SAHARA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaber, Gerald G.; McCauley, John F.; Breed, Carol S.; Olhoeft, Gary R.

    1986-01-01

    It is found that the Shuttle Imaging Radar A (SIR-A) signal penetration and subsurface backscatter within the upper meter or so of the sediment blanket in the Eastern Sahara of southern Egypt and northern Sudan are enhanced both by radar sensor parameters and by the physical and chemical characteristics of eolian and alluvial materials. The near-surface stratigraphy, the electrical properties of materials, and the types of radar interfaces found to be responsible for different classes of SIR-A tonal response are summarized. The dominant factors related to efficient microwave signal penetration into the sediment blanket include 1) favorable distribution of particle sizes, 2) extremely low moisture content and 3) reduced geometric scattering at the SIR-A frequency (1. 3 GHz). The depth of signal penetration that results in a recorded backscatter, called radar imaging depth, was documented in the field to be a maximum of 1. 5 m, or 0. 25 times the calculated skin depth, for the sediment blanket. The radar imaging depth is estimated to be between 2 and 3 m for active sand dune materials.

  3. Physical optics polarization scattering matrix for a right-angle dihedral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verly, J. G.

    1995-02-01

    Using the geometrical optics (GO) and physical optics (PO) approximations, a correct, complete, ready-to-use formula is derived for the backscatter (monostatic) polarization scattering matrix (PSM) of the perfectly conducting right dihedral at arbitrary incidence angle. The absence of such a result from the literature is surprising given that the dihedral's PSM is needed in many applications, such as in the calibration of polarimetric radars, including synthetic aperture radars (SAR), in the generation of simulated polarimetric radar imagery, and in automatic target recognition (ATR). Because the new results provided are important to many researchers who may not be experts in electromagnetic theory (as is often the case for the computer-vision researchers working on ATR), the report is relatively self-contained and takes the reader from the definitions of PSMs and complex radar cross-sections, through the mathematical formulation of Huygen's Principle, the combined use of GO and PO, and changes of polarization bases, to the derivation, discussion, and simplification of the dihedral's PSM.

  4. Prize for Industrial Applications of Physics Talk: The Inverse Scattering Problem and the role of measurements in its solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyatt, Philip

    2009-03-01

    The electromagnetic inverse scattering problem suggests that if a homogeneous and non-absorbing object be illuminated with a monochromatic light source and if the far field scattered light intensity is known at sufficient scattering angles, then, in principle, one could derive the dielectric structure of the scattering object. In general, this is an ill-posed problem and methods must be developed to regularize the search for unique solutions. An iterative procedure often begins with a model of the scattering object, solves the forward scattering problem using this model, and then compares these calculated results with the measured values. Key to any such solution is instrumentation capable of providing adequate data. To this end, the development of the first laser based absolute light scattering photometers is described together with their continuing evolution and some of the remarkable discoveries made with them. For particles much smaller than the wavelength of the incident light (e.g. macromolecules), the inverse scattering problems are easily solved. Among the many solutions derived with this instrumentation are the in situ structure of bacterial cells, new drug delivery mechanisms, the development of new vaccines and other biologicals, characterization of wines, the possibility of custom chemotherapy, development of new polymeric materials, identification of protein crystallization conditions, and a variety discoveries concerning protein interactions. A new form of the problem is described to address bioterrorist threats. Over the many years of development and refinement, one element stands out as essential for the successes that followed: the R and D teams were always directed and executed by physics trained theorists and experimentalists. 14 Ph. D. physicists each made his/her unique contribution to the development of these evolving instruments and the interpretation of their results.

  5. Physical interpretation of the phase function related parameter γ studied with a fractal distribution of spherical scatterers.

    PubMed

    Chamot, Stéphane; Migacheva, Elena; Seydoux, Olivier; Marquet, Pierre; Depeursinge, Christian

    2010-11-08

    The optical properties within limited volumes of diffusive media can be probed by carrying spatially-resolved measurements of diffused light at short source-detector separation (typically one scattering mean free path). At such distance, analytical models only relying on the absorption and reduced scattering coefficients fail at correctly predicting reflectance and it was demonstrated that adding a third optical coefficient γ improves the description of light propagation conditions near the source. In an attempt to relate the γ coefficient to physical properties of turbid media, this paper uses a fractal distribution law for modeling scatterers' sizes distributions and investigates numerically and experimentally how γ is related to the fractal power α. The results indicate that within the range of γ typically encountered in biological samples, this coefficient is approximately linearly correlated with α.

  6. Physical bounds to the entropy-depolarization relation in random light scattering.

    PubMed

    Aiello, A; Woerdman, J P

    2005-03-11

    We present a theoretical study of multimode scattering of light by optically random media, using the Mueller-Stokes formalism which permits us to encode all the polarization properties of the scattering medium in a real 4 x 4 matrix. From this matrix two relevant parameters can be extracted: the depolarizing power D(M) and the polarization entropy E(M) of the scattering medium. By studying the relation between E(M) and D(M), we find that all scattering media must satisfy some universal constraints. These constraints apply to both classical and quantum scattering processes. The results obtained here may be especially relevant for quantum communication applications, where depolarization is synonymous with decoherence.

  7. Scattering theory and the Aharonov-Bohm effect in quasiclassical physics

    SciTech Connect

    Sitenko, Yurii A.; Vlasii, Nadiia D.

    2011-06-15

    Research Highlights: > Scattering Aharonov-Bohm effect. > Short-wavelength limit of scattered nonrelativistic particles. > Fraunhofer diffraction in the forward direction. > Fresnel diffraction in the forward region in conical space. > Enclosed magnetic flux is a gate for the propagation of quasiclassical particles. - Abstract: Scattering of a nonrelativistic quantum-mechanical particle by an impenetrable magnetic vortex is considered. The nonvanishing transverse size of the vortex is taken into account, and the limit of short, as compared to this size, wavelengths of the scattered particle is analyzed. We show that the scattering Aharonov-Bohm effect persists in the quasiclassical limit owing to the diffraction persisting in the short-wavelength limit. As a result, the vortex flux serves as a gate for the propagation of short-wavelength, almost classical, particles. This quasiclassical effect is more feasible to experimental detection in the case when space outside the vortex is conical.

  8. Physical stability and resistance to peroxidation of a range of liquid-fill hard gelatin capsule products on extreme long-term storage.

    PubMed

    Bowtle, William; Kanyowa, Lionel; Mackenzie, Mark; Higgins, Paul

    2011-06-01

    The industrial take-up of liquid-fill hard capsule technology is limited in part by lack of published long-term physical and chemical stability data which demonstrate the robustness of the system. To assess the effects of extreme long-term storage on liquid-fill capsule product quality and integrity, with respect to both the capsules per se and a standard blister-pack type (foil-film blister). Fourteen sets of stored peroxidation-sensitive liquid-fill hard gelatin capsule product samples, originating ~20 years from the current study, were examined with respect to physical and selected chemical properties, together with microbiological evaluation. All sets retained physical integrity of capsules and blister-packs. Capsules were free of leaks, gelatin cross-linking, and microbiological growth. Eight samples met a limit (anisidine value, 20) commonly used as an index of peroxidation for lipid-based products with shelf lives of 2-3 years. Foil-film blister-packs using PVC or PVC-PVdC as the thermoforming film were well-suited packaging components for the liquid-fill capsule format. The study confirms the long-term physical robustness of the liquid-fill hard capsule format, together with its manufacturing and banding processes. It also indicates that various peroxidation-sensitive products using the capsule format may be maintained satisfactorily over very prolonged storage periods.

  9. Hardness testing

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    This technical manual is a handbook dealing with all aspects of hardness testing. Every hardness testing method is fully covered, from Rockwell to ultrasonic hardness testing. Specific hardness testing problems are also discussed, and methods are offered for many applications. One chapter examines how to select the correct hardness testing method. A directory of manufacturers, distributors and suppliers of hardness testing equipment and supplies in the United States and Canada is also included. The book consist of eight chapters and an appendix. It discusses common concepts of hardness, and the theories and methods of hardness testing. Coverage includes specific hardness testing methods - Brinell, Rockwell, Vickers, and microhardness testing; and other hardness testing methods, such as scleroscope, ultrasonic, scratch and file testing, and hardness evaluation by eddy current testing.

  10. Physical explanation of the SLIPI technique by the large scatterer approximation of the RTE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristensson, Elias; Kristensson, Gerhard

    2017-03-01

    Visualizing the interior of a turbid scattering media by means light-based methods is not a straightforward task because of multiple light scattering, which generates image blur. To overcome this issue, a technique called Structured Laser Illumination Planar Imaging (SLIPI) was developed within the field of spray imaging. The method is based on a 'light coding' strategy to distinguish between directly and multiply scattered light, allowing the intensity from the latter to be suppressed by means of data post-processing. Recently, the performance of the SLIPI technique was investigated, during which deviations from theoretical predictions were discovered. In this paper, we aim to explain the origin of these deviations, and to achieve this end, we have performed several SLIPI measurements under well-controlled conditions. Our experimental results are compared with a theoretical model that is based on the large scatterer approximation of the Radiative Transfer Equation but modified according to certain constraints. Specifically, our model is designed to (1) ignore all off-axis intensity contributions, (2) to treat unperturbed- and forward-scattered light equally and (3) to accept light to scatter within a narrow forward-cone as we believe these are the rules governing the SLIPI technique. The comparison conclusively shows that optical measurements based on scattering and/or attenuation in turbid media can be subject to significant errors if not all aspects of light-matter interactions are considered. Our results indicate, as were expected, that forward-scattering can lead to deviations between experiments and theoretical predictions, especially when probing relatively large particles. Yet, the model also suggests that the spatial frequency of the superimposed 'light code' as well as the spreading of the light-probe are important factors one also needs to consider. The observed deviations from theoretical predictions could, however, potentially be exploited to assess

  11. The Physics of Sound Scattering From, and Attenuation Through, Compliant Bubbly Mixtures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-09-01

    of Xanthan gum . The advantage of the latter technique is the bubble distributions in both size and space are stationary in time and easy to...is utilized to increase the void fraction. Samples are tapped from the main processing system, pass through the scattering test section (not shown...a dramatic influence on sound production , scattering and transmission, many articles have appeared in the acoustics literature concerning the

  12. Hard X-ray total scattering study on the structure of Si-dopped ferric oxyhydroxides and products of their transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieczara, Gabriela; Borkiewicz, Olaf; Manecki, Maciej; Rzepa, Grzegorz

    2016-04-01

    Here we report the results of a detailed structural investigation, using synchrotron-based pair distribution function analyses (PDF) and high-resolution X-ray diffraction (HR-XRD), on a series of Si-bearing synthetic analogues of ferrihydrite with a range of Si/Fe ratio relevant to geological environments and on products of their thermal transformation. Hard X-ray total scattering data suitable for PDF analyses have been collected at the PDF-dedicated beamline 11-ID-B and the HR-XRD data at beamline 11-BM of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). Ferrihydrite is a poorly crystalline, nano-sized hydrous ferric oxyhydroxide with a nominal/ideal formula Fe5HO8•4H2O. Its chemical composition however, can vary significantly and the atomic structure is yet to be fully understood despite multitude of structural studies undertaken over the past two decades (Michel et al., 2007; Manceau, 2009). One of the most commonly discussed and still unsettled contention points regarding the structural arrangements of ferrihydrite is related to the presence or absence of tetraherdally coordinated iron(III) within its structure. The majority of experimental work carried out to date focused on pure, synthetic ferrihydrite analogues with chemical composition close to ideal/nominal. This approach is clearly a significant oversimplification of natural ferrihydrite which always contains substantial amounts of admixtures, with Si, C, P, As, Ca, S and Al being the most common. One of the most important and the most commonly encountered impurities is Si, in the form of silicate ion that has strong affinity for ferrihydrite. SiO2content in natural ferrihydrites can vary substantially but generally falls with the range of 2.6-31.5 wt% (Cismasu et al., 2011). In certain environments however, such as modern seafloor hydrothermal vents, higher Si/Fe ratios (up to ca. 3) have been reported (Sun et al., 2013). The results of previous reports indicate that silicate

  13. Inactivation of Vibrio parahaemolyticus in hard clams (Mercanaria mercanaria) by high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) and the effect of HHP on the physical characteristics of hard clam meat.

    PubMed

    Mootian, Gabriel K; Flimlin, George E; Karwe, Mukund V; Schaffner, Donald W

    2013-02-01

    Shellfish may internalize dangerous pathogens during filter feeding. Traditional methods of depuration have been found ineffective against certain pathogens. The objective was to explore high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) as an alternative to the traditional depuration process. The effect of HHP on the survival of Vibrio parahaemolyticus in live clams (Mercanaria mercanaria) and the impact of HHP on physical characteristics of clam meat were investigated. Clams were inoculated with up to 7 log CFU/g of a cocktail of V. parahaemolyticus strains via filter feeding. Clams were processed at pressures ranging from 250 to 552 MPa for hold times ranging between 2 and 6 min. Processing conditions of 450 MPa for 4 min and 350 MPa for 6 min reduced the initial concentration of V. parahaemolyticus to a nondetectable level (<10(1) CFU/g), achieving >5 log reductions. The volume of clam meat (processed in shell) increased with negligible change in mass after exposure to pressure at 552 MPa for 3 min, while the drip loss was reduced. Clams processed at 552 MPa were softer compared to those processed at 276 MPa. However, all HHP processed clams were found to be harder compared to unprocessed. The lightness (L*) of the meat increased although the redness (a*) decreased with increasing pressure. Although high pressure-processed clams may pose a significantly lower risk from V. parahaemolyticus, the effect of the accompanied physical changes on the consumer's decision to purchase HHP clams remains to be determined. Shellfish may contain dangerous foodborne pathogens. Traditional methods of removing those pathogen have been found ineffective against certain pathogens. The objective of this research was to determine the effect of high hydrostatic pressure on V. parahaemolyticus in clams. Processing conditions of 450 MPa for 4 min and 350 MPa for 6 min reduced the initial concentration of V. parahaemolyticus to a nondetectable level, achieving >5 log reductions. © 2013 Institute of Food

  14. Physical optics solution for the scattering of a partially-coherent wave from a statistically rough material surface.

    PubMed

    Hyde, Milo W; Basu, Santasri; Spencer, Mark F; Cusumano, Salvatore J; Fiorino, Steven T

    2013-03-25

    The scattering of a partially-coherent wave from a statistically rough material surface is investigated via derivation of the scattered field cross-spectral density function. Two forms of the cross-spectral density are derived using the physical optics approximation. The first is applicable to smooth-to-moderately rough surfaces and is a complicated expression of source and surface parameters. Physical insight is gleaned from its analytical form and presented in this work. The second form of the cross-spectral density function is applicable to very rough surfaces and is remarkably physical. Its form is discussed at length and closed-form expressions are derived for the angular spectral degree of coherence and spectral density radii. Furthermore, it is found that, under certain circumstances, the cross-spectral density function maintains a Gaussian Schell-model form. This is consistent with published results applicable only in the paraxial regime. Lastly, the closed-form cross-spectral density functions derived here are rigorously validated with scatterometer measurements and full-wave electromagnetic and physical optics simulations. Good agreement is noted between the analytical predictions and the measured and simulated results.

  15. The Physical Origin and Magnetic Sensitivity of the Scattering Polarization Observed in the O i IR Triplet at 777 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Pino Alemán, T.; Trujillo Bueno, J.

    2017-04-01

    The linearly polarized solar limb spectrum caused by the absorption and scattering of anisotropic radiation has a very rich diagnostic potential, given its sensitivity to the thermal, dynamic, and magnetic structure of the solar atmosphere. A crucial first step toward its scientific exploitation is understanding the physical origin of the observed spectral line polarization and its magnetic sensitivity via the Hanle and Zeeman effects. Here, we study the linear polarization signals observed in the IR triplet of O i at 777 nm, describing in detail the multilevel radiative transfer calculations that allowed us to decipher their physical origin. We investigate the sensitivity of the calculated scattering polarization signals to various modeling parameters, finding that the observed fractional linear polarization pattern originates mainly in the solar chromosphere, although the intensity profiles of the O i IR triplet come mainly from the lower photosphere. We find that the three lines are sensitive, via the Hanle effect, to magnetic fields with strengths between 0.01 and 30 G, in a extended region of the solar atmosphere. We show this through calculations of the response function to magnetic field perturbations in a semi-empirical model of the quiet Sun atmosphere. The dominant response of the linear polarization signals occurs at heights ∼ 1000 km above the visible model’s surface, which demonstrates that the scattering linear polarization signals of the oxygen IR triplet encode information on the magnetism of the solar chromosphere.

  16. Interaction physics for the stimulated Brillouin scattering of a laser in laser driven fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, Pinki; Gupta, D.N.; Avinash, K.

    2014-07-01

    Energy exchange between pump wave and ion-acoustic wave during the stimulated Brillouin Scattering process in relativistic laser-plasma interactions is studied, including the effect of damping coefficient of electron-ion collision by obeying the energy and momentum conservations. The variations of plasma density and damping coefficient of electron-ion collision change the amplitudes of the interacting wave. The relativistic mass effect modifies the dispersion relations of the interacting waves and consequently, the energy exchange during the stimulated Brillouin Scattering is affected. The collisional damping of electron-ion collision in the plasma is shown to have an important effect on the evolution of the interacting waves. (author)

  17. Hard X-ray Fourier Transform Holography Using a Reference Scatterer Fabricated by Electron-Beam-Assisted Chemical-Vapor Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, M.; Isogami, S.; Tsunoda, M.; Takahashi, S.; Ishio, S.

    2011-09-09

    We present a fabrication method for a reference source that is efficient when used for lensless Fourier transform holography. This method produces a reference source that yields high spatial resolution and enhanced signal-to-noise ratio in a Fourier-transformed real-space image, and is particularly useful for Fourier transform holography experiments in the hard x-ray region.

  18. Inferring dust physical properties through light scattering measurements with the ICAPS facility on board the International space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levasseur-Regourd, A. C.

    2003-04-01

    Numerous low-density clouds of dust particles and aggregates are formed in the solar system (e.g. cometary comae and tails, interplanetary dust cloud). The physical properties of the dust (i.e. morphology, size distribution, albedo, porosity), seldom revealed by in-situ measurements, may be obtained by remote observations. The phase angle dependence and the wavelength dependence of the scattered light brightness and polarization (which does not depend upon the distance nor upon the concentration) actually provide drastic constraints for these properties. Our present understanding of the properties of these irregular dust particles will first be presented, with emphasis on the need for laboratory measurements (avoiding sedimentation and multiple scattering on gravity packed layers) to interpret the observations. The feasibility of light scattering measurements on dust clouds and on the aggregates they form under micro-gravity conditions, as demonstrated by the PROGRA2 experiment during parabolic flight campaigns and by the CODAG-LSU experiment during a rocket flight, will be summarized. The opportunity offered by the ICAPS facility (now in phase B at ESA) to deduce without any ambiguity the physical properties of cosmic dust particles from their optical properties, as well as their evolution when they break-off or aggregate, will be presented. New possibilities will be discussed, including measurements on ices condensing on micron-sized dust particles/aggregates, and the significance of light scattering measurements on submicron-sized particles with the IMPF facility (to be integrated with ICAPS in a common rack facility on board the ISS). Finally the latest developments of the ICAPS-Sounding Rocket Experiment, to be flown in 2004 on board the ESA MASER 10 rocket, will be presented.

  19. Hierarchical cross-linking in physical alginate gels: a rheological and dynamic light scattering investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larobina, Domenico; Cipelletti, Luca

    We investigate the dynamics of alginate gels, an important class of biopolymer-based viscoelastic materials, by combining mechanical tests and non-conventional, time-resolved light scattering methods. Two relaxation modes are observed upon applying a compressive or shear stress. Dynamic light scattering and diffusive wave spectroscopy measurements reveal that these modes are associated with discontinuous rearrangement events that restructure the gel network via anomalous, non-diffusive microscopic dynamics. We show that these dynamics are due to both thermal activation and internal stress stored during gelation and propose a scenario where a hierarchy of cross-links with different life times is responsible for the observed complex behavior. Measurements at various temperatures and sample ages are presented to support this scenario.

  20. The contribution of small angle and quasi-elastic scattering to the physics of liquid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira, José

    2017-05-01

    Many properties of liquid water at low temperature show anomalous behaviour. For example, density, isothermal compressibility, heat capacity pass by maxima or minima and transport properties show a super-Arrhenius behaviour. Extrapolations performed beyond the homogeneous nucleation temperature are at the origin of models that predict critical points, liquid-liquid transitions or dynamic cross-overs in the large domain of temperature and pressure not accessible to experiments because of ice nucleation. A careful analysis of existing data can be used to test some of these models. Small angle X-ray or neutron scattering data are incompatible with models where two liquids or heterogeneities are present. Quasi-elastic neutron scattering, taking advantage and combining both coherent and incoherent scattering show that two relaxation times are present in liquid water and that one of them, related to hydrogen bond dynamics, has an Arrhenian behaviour, suggesting that the associated dynamics of the bonds, similar to the β relaxation of polymers, determines the glass transition temperature of water.

  1. Shuttle Imaging Radar - Physical controls on signal penetration and subsurface scattering in the Eastern Sahara

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaber, G. G.; Mccauley, J. F.; Breed, C. S.; Olhoeft, G. R.

    1986-01-01

    Interpretation of Shuttle Imaging Radar-A (SIR-A) images by McCauley et al. (1982) dramatically changed previous concepts of the role that fluvial processes have played over the past 10,000 to 30 million years in shaping this now extremely flat, featureless, and hyperarid landscape. In the present paper, the near-surface stratigraphy, the electrical properties of materials, and the types of radar interfaces found to be responsible for different classes of SIR-A tonal response are summarized. The dominant factors related to efficient microwave signal penetration into the sediment blanket include (1) favorable distribution of particle sizes, (2) extremely low moisture content and (3) reduced geometric scattering at the SIR-A frequency (1.3 GHz). The depth of signal penetration that results in a recorded backscatter, here called 'radar imaging depth', was documented in the field to be a maximum of 1.5 m, or 0.25 of the calculated 'skin depth', for the sediment blanket. Radar imaging depth is estimated to be between 2 and 3 m for active sand dune materials. Diverse permittivity interfaces and volume scatterers within the shallow subsurface are responsible for most of the observed backscatter not directly attributable to grazing outcrops. Calcium carbonate nodules and rhizoliths concentrated in sandy alluvium of Pleistocene age south of Safsaf oasis in south Egypt provide effective contrast in premittivity and thus act as volume scatterers that enhance SIR-A portrayal of younger inset stream channels.

  2. Gamma-ray, neutron, and hard X-ray studies and requirements for a high-energy solar physics facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Dennis, B. R.; Emslie, A. G.

    1988-01-01

    The requirements for future high-resolution spatial, spectral, and temporal observation of hard X-rays, gamma rays and neutrons from solar flares are discussed in the context of current high-energy flare observations. There is much promise from these observations for achieving a deep understanding of processes of energy release, particle acceleration and particle transport in a complicated environment such as the turbulent and highly magnetized atmosphere of the active sun.

  3. Gamma-ray, neutron, and hard X-ray studies and requirements for a high-energy solar physics facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Dennis, B. R.; Emslie, A. G.

    1988-01-01

    The requirements for future high-resolution spatial, spectral, and temporal observation of hard X-rays, gamma rays and neutrons from solar flares are discussed in the context of current high-energy flare observations. There is much promise from these observations for achieving a deep understanding of processes of energy release, particle acceleration and particle transport in a complicated environment such as the turbulent and highly magnetized atmosphere of the active sun.

  4. Polarized Nuclei: From Fundamental Nuclear Physics To Applications In Neutron Scattering and Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, B. van den; Hautle, P.; Konter, J. A.; Kurdzesau, F.; Piegsa, F. M.; Urrego-Blanco, J.-P.

    2008-02-06

    The methods of dynamically polarizing nuclei (DNP) have not only lead to the development of increasingly sophisticated polarized targets with which the role of spin in nuclear and particle interactions is investigated, but have also opened new possibilities in neutron science by exploiting the strong spin dependence of the neutron scattering. Very recently NMR and MRI have been a driving force behind a surge of interest in DNP methods, considering its tremendous potential for sensitivity enhancement. An overview of our current projects with dynamically polarized nuclei is given.

  5. Influence of the microstructure and composition on the thermal-physical properties of hard candy and cooling process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinheimer, M. Agustina; Mussati, Sergio; Scenna, Nicolás J.; Pérez, Gustavo A.

    2010-09-01

    In this paper, glass transition temperature ( Tg) and microstructure of hard candy honey flavored have been investigated using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) data and scanning electron microscopy images (SEM) respectively. Precisely, the glass transition temperature can be used as reference temperature to determine the operating mode of processing stages. In fact, the temperature at which hard candies may leave the cooling stage has to be equal or lower than 34 °C in order to ensure the glassy state and therefore improve product shelf life; due to the fact that the experimental results indicated a temperature range of glass transition of 35.36 ± 1.48-36.37 ± 1.63 °C. As regards to the microstructure, SEM images reveal overlapping of layers at samples edges which could be attributed to the water absorption from the environment leading to storage problems, like crystallization. In addition, micrographics also reveal the presence of air bubbles which may negatively affect the temperature profile inside the candy and consequently may change the operating mode of the cooling equipment. The influence of the air bubbles on the thermal conductivity of the candy is also investigated.

  6. The characteristics of healthy adults with hardly palpable vein--Relations between easy venous palpation and physical factors.

    PubMed

    Ichimura, Mika; Matsumura, Yuko; Sasaki, Shinsuke; Murakami, Naoki; Mori, Masaharu; Ogino, Tetsuya

    2015-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate relations between ease of venous palpation and various venous factors, and to elucidate characteristics of hardly palpable veins. Healthy adult volunteers (n = 110) were enrolled. The ease of venous palpation was scored from 0: impalpable to 3: well palpable. Venous factors, namely venous depth, elevation, area and minimal pressure that starts to collapse vein, were measured using an ultrasonography before and after tourniquet inflation at 60 mmHg for 60 s. Tourniquet inflation significantly increased the venous area and venous palpation score. The four venous factors correlated significantly with venous palpation score with the following correlation coefficient: Depth (r = -0.542), Elevation (0.486), area (0.258) and start-to-collapse pressure (-0.220). The characteristics of hardly palpable veins were small size, deep location and little elevation. Although vasodilatation facilitated venous palpation, venous depth and elevation were also important and should be included in future studies in which vasodilatation methods are evaluated.

  7. Hybrid theory and calculation of e-N2 scattering. [quantum mechanics - nuclei (nuclear physics)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandra, N.; Temkin, A.

    1975-01-01

    A theory of electron-molecule scattering was developed which was a synthesis of close coupling and adiabatic-nuclei theories. The theory is shown to be a close coupling theory with respect to vibrational degrees of freedom but is a adiabatic-nuclei theory with respect to rotation. It can be applied to any number of partial waves required, and the remaining ones can be calculated purely in one or the other approximation. A theoretical criterion based on fixed-nuclei calculations and not on experiment can be given as to which partial waves and energy domains require the various approximations. The theory allows all cross sections (i.e., pure rotational, vibrational, simultaneous vibration-rotation, differential and total) to be calculated. Explicit formulae for all the cross sections are presented.

  8. Applications of mesoscopic physics to novel correlations and fluctuations of speckle patterns: Imaging and tomography with multiply scattered classical waves. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Shechao Charles

    1995-02-01

    This is the final report on the grant, entitled `applications of mesoscopic physics to novel correlations and fluctuations of speckle patterns: imaging and tomography with multiply scattered classical waves`, which expired on September 14, 1994. The author summarizes the highlights of this research program, and lists the publications supported by this grant. The report is divided into sections, titled: application of mesoscopic fluctuations theory to correlations and fluctuations of multiply scattered light; quantum transport in localized electronic systems; electron-phonon inelastic scattering rate and the temperature scaling exponent in integer quantum Hall effect; high frequency quantum transport in quantum well devices.

  9. Has your work worked you too hard? Physically demanding work and disability in a sample of the older Irish population.

    PubMed

    Mc Carthy, V J C; Perry, I J; Greiner, B A

    2013-03-01

    There is a heightened need for the practitioner to be alert to the determinants of functional limitations and disabilities owing to the ageing workforce. This study investigated the association between work type and disability in older age in both the paid and the previously unexplored, unpaid worker (household labour). Data on demographic factors, physical measurements, work history and functional status were collected on three hundred and fifty seven 57-80-year-olds. Past or present work was identified as either physically demanding or not. Functional limitations and activities of daily living (ADL) disabilities were assessed using validated scales. Logistic regression was used to examine the relationship between the dependent variables and work type (physically demanding work or not physically demanding work). Over half of the sample reported doing physically demanding work. 20% had complete function (n = 67), 65% (n = 223) functional limitations and 15% (n = 53) ADL disability. Physically demanding work was associated with functional limitations [OR 2.52 (1.41, 4.51), p = 0.01] and ADL disability [OR 2.10 (1.06, 4.17), p = 0.03] after adjustment for a measure of obesity and gender. When gender stratified, looking only at females, physically demanding work was associated with ADL disability [OR 2.79 (1.10, 7.07), p = 0.03] adjusted for a measure of obesity and household labour. Physically demanding work was related to functional limitations and ADL disability in older age. This is valuable information to inform practitioners in the treatment of older people with functional limitations and disabilities and in guiding interventions in the prevention of work related disability.

  10. The Dynamics of Disorder-Order Transition in Hard Sphere Colloidal Dispersions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaikin, Paul M.; Zhu, Jixiang; Cheng, Zhengdong; Phan, See-Eng; Russel, William B.; Lant, Christian T.; Doherty, Michael P.; Meyer, William V.; Rogers, Richard; Cannell, D. S.; hide

    1998-01-01

    The Physics of Hard Spheres Experiment (PHaSE) seeks a complete understanding of the entropically driven disorder-order transition in hard sphere colloidal dispersions. The light scattering instrument designed for flight collects Bragg and low angle light scattering in the forward direction via a CCD camera and performs conventional static and dynamic light scattering at 10-160 deg. through fiber optic cables. Here we report on the kinetics of nucleation and growth extracted from time-resolved Bragg images and measurements of the elastic modulus of crystalline phases obtained by monitoring resonant responses to sinusoidal forcing through dynamic light scattering. Preliminary analysis of the former indicates a significant difference from measurements on the ground, while the latter confirms nicely laboratory experiments with the same instrument and predictions from computer simulations.

  11. Assessing Child Obesity and Physical Activity in a Hard-to-Reach Population in California’s Central Valley, 2012–2013

    PubMed Central

    Camacho-Gomez, Rosa; Sadeghi, Banefsheh; Kaiser, Lucia; German, J. Bruce; de la Torre, Adela

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In California’s agricultural Central Valley, the rate of childhood obesity is higher than the national average. Adequate physical activity contributes to obesity prevention and its assessment is useful to evaluate the impact of interventions. Methods Niños Sanos, Familia Sana (Healthy Children, Healthy Family [NSFS]) uses community-based participatory research to implement an intervention program to reduce childhood obesity among people of Mexican origin in the Central Valley. Anthropometric measurements were conducted on more than 650 children enrolled in NSFS. Physical activity data from a subgroup of children aged 4 to 7 years (n = 134) were collected via a wearable accelerometer. Results Children were classified on the basis of age and sex-adjusted body mass index as healthy weight (57.7%); overweight (19.3%), or obese (23%). Logistic regression showed that moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) was associated with a child’s likelihood of having a healthy BMI (odds ratio: 1.03; 95% CI, 1.01–1.05; P = .017). Conclusion NSFS’s community-based participatory approach resulted in successful use of a commercial electronic device to measure physical activity quantity and quality in this hard-to-reach population. Promotion of adequate daily MVPA is an appropriate and necessary component of NSFS’s childhood obesity prevention strategy. PMID:26203815

  12. Optics as Scattering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    di Francia, Giuliano Toraldo

    1973-01-01

    The art of deriving information about an object from the radiation it scatters was once limited to visible light. Now due to new techniques, much of the modern physical science research utilizes radiation scattering. (DF)

  13. Topics in chemical physics: I, Semiclassical reactive scattering theory: II, Corrected effective medium theory

    SciTech Connect

    Kress, J.D.

    1988-07-01

    Two distinct areas within theoretical chemical physics are investigated in this dissertation. First, the dynamics of collinear exchange reactions is treated within a semiclassical Gaussian wavepacket (GWP) description. Second, a corrected effective medium (CEM) theory is derived which yields: a one-active-body description of the binding energy between an atom and an inhomogeneous host; and an N-active-body description of the interaction energy for an N atom system. To properly treat the dynamics of collinear exchange reactions, two extensions to the previous methodology of GWP dynamics are presented: evaluation of the interaction picture wavefunction propagators directly via the GWP solution to the time-dependent Schrodinger equation; and use of an expansion of GWPs to represent the initial translational plane wave. This extended GWP dynamical approach is applied to the H + H/sub 2/ collinear exchange reaction using the Porter-Karplus II potential energy surface.

  14. New phase for one-component hard spheres.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guang-Wen; Sadus, Richard J

    2004-06-22

    A completely new phase for one-component hard spheres is reported in an unexpected region of the phase diagram. The new phase is observed at compressibility factors intermediate between the solid and the metastable branches. It can be obtained from either Monte Carlo simulations alone or a combination of Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics calculations. An analysis of the intermediate scattering function data shows that the new phase is in a stable equilibrium. Radial distribution function data, configurational snapshots, bond order parameters, and translational order parameters obtained from molecular simulations indicate that the new phase is significantly different from the isotropic liquid, metastable, or crystalline phases traditionally observed in hard sphere systems. This result significantly changes our previous understanding of the behavior of hard spheres. (c) 2004 American Institute of Physics.

  15. Rayleigh scattering. [molecular scattering terminology redefined

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, A. T.

    1981-01-01

    The physical phenomena of molecular scattering are examined with the objective of redefining the confusing terminology currently used. The following definitions are proposed: molecular scattering consists of Rayleigh and vibrational Raman scattering; the Rayleigh scattering consists of rotational Raman lines and the central Cabannes line; the Cabannes line is composed of the Brillouin doublet and the central Gross or Landau-Placzek line. The term 'Rayleigh line' should never be used.

  16. Estimating the Analytical and Surface Enhancement Factors in Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS): A Novel Physical Chemistry and Nanotechnology Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavel, Ioana E.; Alnajjar, Khadijeh S.; Monahan, Jennifer L.; Stahler, Adam; Hunter, Nora E.; Weaver, Kent M.; Baker, Joshua D.; Meyerhoefer, Allie J.; Dolson, David A.

    2012-01-01

    A novel laboratory experiment was successfully implemented for undergraduate and graduate students in physical chemistry and nanotechnology. The main goal of the experiment was to rigorously determine the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-based sensing capabilities of colloidal silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). These were quantified by…

  17. Estimating the Analytical and Surface Enhancement Factors in Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS): A Novel Physical Chemistry and Nanotechnology Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavel, Ioana E.; Alnajjar, Khadijeh S.; Monahan, Jennifer L.; Stahler, Adam; Hunter, Nora E.; Weaver, Kent M.; Baker, Joshua D.; Meyerhoefer, Allie J.; Dolson, David A.

    2012-01-01

    A novel laboratory experiment was successfully implemented for undergraduate and graduate students in physical chemistry and nanotechnology. The main goal of the experiment was to rigorously determine the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-based sensing capabilities of colloidal silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). These were quantified by…

  18. Discovery and physical characterization of a large scattered disk object at 92 au

    DOE PAGES

    Gerdes, D. W.; Sako, M.; Hamilton, S.; ...

    2017-04-10

    We report the observation and physical characterization of the possible dwarf planet 2014 UZmore » $$_{224}$$ ("DeeDee"), a dynamically detached trans-Neptunian object discovered at 92 AU. This object is currently the second-most distant known trans-Neptunian object with reported orbital elements, surpassed in distance only by the dwarf planet Eris. The object was discovered with an $r$-band magnitude of 23.0 in data collected by the Dark Energy Survey between 2014 and 2016. Its 1140-year orbit has $$(a,e,i) = (109~\\mathrm{AU},2 0.54, 26.8^{\\circ})$$. It will reach its perihelion distance of 38 AU in the year 2142. Integrations of its orbit show it to be dynamically stable on Gyr timescales, with only weak interactions with Neptune. We have performed followup observations with ALMA, using 3 hours of on-source integration time to measure the object's thermal emission in the Rayleigh-Jeans tail. As a result, the signal is detected at 7$$\\sigma$$ significance, from which we determine a $V$-band albedo of $$18.0^{+4.0}_{-2.9}\\mathrm{(stat)}^{+1.5}_{-1.2}\\mathrm{(sys)}$$ percent and a diameter of $$541^{+47}_{-51}\\mathrm{(stat)}^{+19}_{-20}\\mathrm{(sys)}$$~km, assuming a spherical body with uniform surface properties.« less

  19. Ultrabright x-ray laser scattering for dynamic warm dense matter physics

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, L. B.; Lee, H. J.; Doppner, T.; Galtier, E.; Nagler, B.; Heimann, P.; Fortmann, C.; Mao, T.; Millot, M.; Pak, A.; Turnbull, D.; Chapman, D. A.; Gericke, D. O.; Vorberger, J.; White, T.; Gregori, G.; Wei, M.; Barbrel, B.; Falcone, R. W.; Kao, C. -C.; Nuhn, H.; Welch, J.; Zastrau, U.; Neumayer, P.; Hastings, J. B.; Glenzer, S. H.

    2015-03-23

    In megabar shock waves, materials compress and undergo a phase transition to a dense charged-particle system that is dominated by strong correlations and quantum effects. This complex state, known as warm dense matter, exists in planetary interiors and many laboratory experiments (for example, during high-power laser interactions with solids or the compression phase of inertial confinement fusion implosions). Here, we apply record peak brightness X-rays at the Linac Coherent Light Source to resolve ionic interactions at atomic (ångström) scale lengths and to determine their physical properties. Our in situ measurements characterize the compressed lattice and resolve the transition to warm dense matter, demonstrating that short-range repulsion between ions must be accounted for to obtain accurate structure factor and equation of state data. Additionally, the unique properties of the X-ray laser provide plasmon spectra that yield the temperature and density with unprecedented precision at micrometre-scale resolution in dynamic compression experiments.

  20. Ultrabright X-ray laser scattering for dynamic warm dense matter physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, L. B.; Lee, H. J.; Döppner, T.; Galtier, E.; Nagler, B.; Heimann, P.; Fortmann, C.; Lepape, S.; Ma, T.; Millot, M.; Pak, A.; Turnbull, D.; Chapman, D. A.; Gericke, D. O.; Vorberger, J.; White, T.; Gregori, G.; Wei, M.; Barbrel, B.; Falcone, R. W.; Kao, C.-C.; Nuhn, H.; Welch, J.; Zastrau, U.; Neumayer, P.; Hastings, J. B.; Glenzer, S. H.

    2015-04-01

    In megabar shock waves, materials compress and undergo a phase transition to a dense charged-particle system that is dominated by strong correlations and quantum effects. This complex state, known as warm dense matter, exists in planetary interiors and many laboratory experiments (for example, during high-power laser interactions with solids or the compression phase of inertial confinement fusion implosions). Here, we apply record peak brightness X-rays at the Linac Coherent Light Source to resolve ionic interactions at atomic (ångström) scale lengths and to determine their physical properties. Our in situ measurements characterize the compressed lattice and resolve the transition to warm dense matter, demonstrating that short-range repulsion between ions must be accounted for to obtain accurate structure factor and equation of state data. In addition, the unique properties of the X-ray laser provide plasmon spectra that yield the temperature and density with unprecedented precision at micrometre-scale resolution in dynamic compression experiments.

  1. Discovery and Physical Characterization of a Large Scattered Disk Object at 92 au

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerdes, D. W.; Sako, M.; Hamilton, S.; Zhang, K.; Khain, T.; Becker, J. C.; Annis, J.; Wester, W.; Bernstein, G. M.; Scheibner, C.; Zullo, L.; Adams, F.; Bergin, E.; Walker, A. R.; Mueller, J. H.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Bechtol, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Burke, D. L.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Carretero, J.; Cunha, C. E.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Eifler, T. F.; Flaugher, B.; Frieman, J.; García-Bellido, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Goldstein, D. A.; Gruen, D.; Gschwend, J.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Kent, S.; Krause, E.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Li, T. S.; Maia, M. A. G.; March, M.; Marshall, J. L.; Martini, P.; Menanteau, F.; Miquel, R.; Nichol, R. C.; Plazas, A. A.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Sanchez, E.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, M.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Tucker, D. L.; Zhang, Y.; DES Collaboration

    2017-04-01

    We report the observation and physical characterization of the possible dwarf planet 2014 UZ224 (“DeeDee”), a dynamically detached trans-Neptunian object discovered at 92 au. This object is currently the second-most distant known trans-Neptunian object with reported orbital elements, surpassed in distance only by the dwarf planet Eris. The object was discovered with an r-band magnitude of 23.0 in data collected by the Dark Energy Survey between 2014 and 2016. Its 1140 year orbit has (a,e,i)=(109 {au},0.65,26\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} 8). It will reach its perihelion distance of 38 au in the year 2142. Integrations of its orbit show it to be dynamically stable on Gyr timescales, with only weak interactions with Neptune. We have performed follow-up observations with ALMA, using 3 hr of on-source integration time to measure the object’s thermal emission in the Rayleigh-Jeans tail. The signal is detected at 7σ significance, from which we determine a V-band albedo of {13.1}-2.4+3.3({stat}{)}-1.4+2.0({sys}) percent and a diameter of {635}-61+57({stat}{)}-39+32({sys}) {km}, assuming a spherical body with uniform surface properties.

  2. "How Hard Could it Be?" A Descriptive Analysis of Errors Made on a Validated Lifetime Physical Activity Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Anderton, Natalie; Newhouse, Megan E; Ainsworth, Barbara E; Nygaard, Ingrid E; Egger, Marlene J; Shaw, Janet M

    2015-03-01

    Measuring historical physical activity in epidemiologic research depends on self-report. We aimed to describe data reporting errors women made in completing 2 validated questionnaires: Lifetime Physical Activity Questionnaire (LPAQ) and Occupational Questionnaire (OQ). Participants--229 women aged 38 to 65 years--completed questionnaires on paper (n = 160) or by web interface (n = 69). One research assistant collected questionnaire data, identified potential errors and contacted participants to trouble-shoot errors. Women made mean 9.7 (SD 11.2) errors on paper and 7.1 (SD 6.2) errors on electronic versions of the LPAQ and 2.6 (SD 3.8) and 1.1 (SD 1.4) errors on paper and electronic versions of the OQ, respectively. Fewer mistakes were made on electronic versions of both questionnaires combined (8.5 ± 6.1) when compared with the paper versions (12.7 ± 13.1). Only ~2% of the sample completed all questionnaires without detectable errors. The most common errors were reporting activities or frequencies inconsistently between past year survey and the current age epoch, reporting more years than allowed by age epoch and missing information. Despite the implications of "self-report" questionnaires, we recommend researchers provide participants with additional instructions, either verbally or as written tip sheet or both, and follow-up after questionnaire completion to correct mistakes as needed.

  3. A Physical Basis for Ms-Yield Scaling in Hard Rock and Implications for Late-Time Damage of the Source Medium

    SciTech Connect

    Patton, Howard John

    2016-04-11

    Surface wave magnitude Ms for a compilation of 72 nuclear tests detonated in hard rock media for which yields and burial depths have been reported in the literature is shown to scale with yield W as a + b × log[W], where a = 2.50 ± 0.08 and b = 0.80 ± 0.05. While the exponent b is consistent with an Ms scaling model for fully coupled, normal containment-depth explosions, the intercept a is offset 0.45 magnitude units lower than the model. The cause of offset is important to understand in terms of the explosion source. Hard rock explosions conducted in extensional and compressional stress regimes show similar offsets, an indication that the tectonic setting in which an explosion occurs plays no role causing the offset. The scaling model accounts for the effects of source medium material properties on the generation of 20-s period Rayleigh wave amplitudes. Aided by thorough characterizations of the explosion and tectonic release sources, an extensive analysis of the 1963 October 26 Shoal nuclear test detonated in granite 27 miles southeast of Fallon NV shows that the offset is consistent with the predictions of a material damage source model related to non-linear stress wave interactions with the free surface. This source emits Rayleigh waves with polarity opposite to waves emitted by the explosion. The Shoal results were extended to analyse surface waves from the 1962 February 15 Hardhat nuclear test, the 1988 September 14 Soviet Joint Verification Experiment, and the anomalous 1979 August 18 northeast Balapan explosion which exhibits opposite polarity, azimuth-independent source component U1 compared to an explosion. Modelling these tests shows that Rayleigh wave amplitudes generated by the damage source are nearly as large as or larger than amplitudes from the explosion. As such, destructive interference can be drastic, introducing metastable conditions due to the sensitivity of reduced amplitudes to Rayleigh wave initial phase angles of

  4. A Physical Basis for Ms-Yield Scaling in Hard Rock and Implications for Late-Time Damage of the Source Medium

    DOE PAGES

    Patton, Howard John

    2016-04-11

    Surface wave magnitude Ms for a compilation of 72 nuclear tests detonated in hard rock media for which yields and burial depths have been reported in the literature is shown to scale with yield W as a + b × log[W], where a = 2.50 ± 0.08 and b = 0.80 ± 0.05. While the exponent b is consistent with an Ms scaling model for fully coupled, normal containment-depth explosions, the intercept a is offset 0.45 magnitude units lower than the model. The cause of offset is important to understand in terms of the explosion source. Hard rock explosions conductedmore » in extensional and compressional stress regimes show similar offsets, an indication that the tectonic setting in which an explosion occurs plays no role causing the offset. The scaling model accounts for the effects of source medium material properties on the generation of 20-s period Rayleigh wave amplitudes. Aided by thorough characterizations of the explosion and tectonic release sources, an extensive analysis of the 1963 October 26 Shoal nuclear test detonated in granite 27 miles southeast of Fallon NV shows that the offset is consistent with the predictions of a material damage source model related to non-linear stress wave interactions with the free surface. This source emits Rayleigh waves with polarity opposite to waves emitted by the explosion. The Shoal results were extended to analyse surface waves from the 1962 February 15 Hardhat nuclear test, the 1988 September 14 Soviet Joint Verification Experiment, and the anomalous 1979 August 18 northeast Balapan explosion which exhibits opposite polarity, azimuth-independent source component U1 compared to an explosion. Modelling these tests shows that Rayleigh wave amplitudes generated by the damage source are nearly as large as or larger than amplitudes from the explosion. As such, destructive interference can be drastic, introducing metastable conditions due to the sensitivity of reduced amplitudes to Rayleigh wave initial phase angles of the explosion

  5. A laser-Compton scattering prototype experiment at 100 MeV linac of Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics.

    PubMed

    Luo, W; Xu, W; Pan, Q Y; Cai, X Z; Chen, J G; Chen, Y Z; Fan, G T; Fan, G W; Guo, W; Li, Y J; Liu, W H; Lin, G Q; Ma, Y G; Shen, W Q; Shi, X C; Xu, B J; Xu, J Q; Xu, Y; Zhang, H O; Yan, Z; Yang, L F; Zhao, M H

    2010-01-01

    As a prototype of the Shanghai Laser Electron Gamma Source in the Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility, an x-ray source based on laser-Compton scattering (LCS) has been installed at the terminal of the 100 MeV linac of the Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics. LCS x-rays are generated by interactions between Q-switched Nd:yttrium aluminum garnet laser pulses [with wavelength of 1064 nm and pulse width of 21 ns (full width at half maximum)] and electron bunches [with energy of 108 MeV and pulse width of 0.95 ns (rms)] at an angle of 42 degrees between laser and electron beam. In order to measure the energy spectrum of LCS x-rays, a Si(Li) detector along the electron beam line axis is positioned at 9.8 m away from a LCS chamber. After background subtraction, the LCS x-ray spectrum with the peak energy of 29.1+/-4.4|(stat)+/-2.1|(syst) keV and the peak width (rms) of 7.8+/-2.8|(stat)+/-0.4|(syst) keV is observed. Normally the 100 MeV linac operates with the electron macropulse charge of 1.0 nC/pulse, and the electron and laser collision repetition rate of 20 Hz. Therefore, the total LCS x-ray flux of (5.2+/-2.0) x 10(2) Hz can be achieved.

  6. Temporal evolution of an energetic electron population in an inhomogeneous medium: Application to solar hard X-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilmer, N.; Mackinnon, A. L.; Trottet, G.

    1985-01-01

    Energetic electrons accelerated during solar flares can be studied through the hard X-ray emission they produce when interacting with the solar ambient atmosphere. In the case of the non thermal hard X-ray emission, the instanteous X-ray flux emitted at one point of the atmosphere is related to the instantaneous fast electron spectrum at that point. A hard X-ray source model then requires the understanding of the evolution in space and time of the fast particle distribution. The physical processes involved here are energy losses due to Coulomb collisions and pitch angle scattering due to both collisions and magnetic field gradients.

  7. DISCERNING THE PHYSICAL ORIGINS OF COSMOLOGICAL GAMMA-RAY BURSTS BASED ON MULTIPLE OBSERVATIONAL CRITERIA: THE CASES OF z = 6.7 GRB 080913, z = 8.2 GRB 090423, AND SOME SHORT/HARD GRBs

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Bing; Zhang Binbin; Virgili, Francisco J.; Proga, Daniel; Liang, E.-W.; Lv, H.-J.; Kann, D. Alexander; Wu Xuefeng; Toma, Kenji; Meszaros, Peter; Burrows, David N.; Roming, Peter W. A.; Gehrels, Neil

    2009-10-01

    The two high-redshift gamma-ray bursts, GRB 080913 at z = 6.7 and GRB 090423 at z = 8.2, recently detected by Swift appear as intrinsically short, hard GRBs. They could have been recognized by BATSE as short/hard GRBs should they have occurred at z <= 1. In order to address their physical origin, we perform a more thorough investigation on two physically distinct types (Type I/II) of cosmological GRBs and their observational characteristics. We reiterate the definitions of Type I/II GRBs and then review the following observational criteria and their physical motivations: supernova (SN) association, specific star-forming rate (SFR) of the host galaxy, location offset, duration, hardness, spectral lag, statistical correlations, energetics and collimation, afterglow properties, redshift distribution, luminosity function, and gravitational wave signature. Contrary to the traditional approach of assigning the physical category based on the gamma-ray properties (duration, hardness, and spectral lag), we take an alternative approach to define the Type I and Type II Gold Samples using several criteria that are more directly related to the GRB progenitors (SN association, host galaxy type, and specific SFR). We then study the properties of the two Gold Samples and compare them with the traditional long/soft and short/hard samples. We find that the Type II Gold Sample reasonably tracks the long/soft population, although it includes several intrinsically short (shorter than 1 s in the rest frame) GRBs. The Type I Gold Sample only has five GRBs, four of which are not strictly short but have extended emission. Other short/hard GRBs detected in the Swift era represent the BATSE short/hard sample well, but it is unclear whether all of them belong to Type I. We suggest that some (probably even most) high-luminosity short/hard GRBs instead belong to Type II. Based on multiple observational criteria, we suggest that GRB 080913 and GRB 090423 are more likely Type II events. In

  8. A simple but accurate ultraviolet limb-scan spherically-layered radiative-transfer-model based on single-scattering physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xia; Lü, Daren; Lü, Yao

    2007-07-01

    Here we present a study focusing on atmospheric limb-scattered radiative characteristics in the ultraviolet band by using a limb-scan spherically-layered radiative-transfer-model based on the single-scattering approximation, which was developed by the present authors. We have applied an accurate numerical integration technique involving an auto-adaptive modified-space step, which assured high accuracy and simplification. Comparisons were made to the newly released spherical radiative transfer model, SCIATRAN2.0, which was developed by Institute of Remote Sensing/Institute of Environmental Physics (IUP/IFE) at University of Bremen and to measurements collected via an ultraviolet spectrometer on the Solar Mesospheric Explorer (SME) satellite, which was launched in October, 1981. Preliminary results indicate that the present model provides a good interpretation of the earth-limb scattered ultraviolet radiance, and thus, is suitable for the study of the ultraviolet-limb radiative-transfer problem with high accuracy.

  9. Syntheses and physical characterization of new aliphatic triblock poly(L-lactide-b-butylene succinate-b-L-lactide)s bearing soft and hard biodegradable building blocks.

    PubMed

    Ba, Chaoyi; Yang, Jing; Hao, Qinghui; Liu, Xiaoyun; Cao, Amin

    2003-01-01

    This study presents chemical syntheses and physical characterization of a new aliphatic poly(L-lactide-b-butylene succinate-b-L-lactide) triblock copolyester with soft and hard biodegradable building blocks. First, poly(butylene succinate) (PBS) prepolymers terminated with hydroxyl functional groups were synthesized through melt polycondensation from succinic acid and 1,4-butanediol. Further, a series of new PLLA-b-PBS-b-PLLA triblock copolyesters bearing various average PLLA block lengths were prepared via ring opening polymerization of L-lactide with the synthesized hydroxyl capped PBS prepolymer (Mn = 4.9 KDa) and stannous octanoate as the macroinitiator and catalyst, respectively. By means of GPC, NMR, FTIR, DSC, TGA, and wide-angle X-ray diffractometer (WAXD), the macromolecular structures and physical properties were intensively studied for these synthesized PBS prepolymer and PLLA-b-PBS-b-PLLA triblock copolyesters. 13C NMR and GPC experimental results confirmed the formation of sequential block structures without any detectable transesterification under the present experimental conditions, and the molecular weights of triblock copolyesters could be readily regulated by adjusting the feeding molar ratio of L-lactide monomer to the PBS macroinitiator. DSC measurements showed all single glass transitions, and their glass transition temperatures were found to be between those of PLLA and PBS, depending on the lengths of PLLA blocks. It was noteworthy that the segmental flexibilities of the hard PLLA blocks were found to be remarkably enhanced by the more flexible PBS block partner, and the PBS and PLLA building blocks were well mixed in the amorphous regions. Results of TGA analyses indicated that thermal degradation and stabilities of the PLLA blocks strongly depended on the average PLLA block lengths of triblock copolyesters. In addition, FTIR and WAXD results showed the coexistence of the assembled PLLA and PBS crystal structures when the average PLLA block

  10. Dynamics of hard sphere colloidal dispersions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, J. X.; Chaikin, Paul M.; Phan, S.-E.; Russel, W. B.

    1994-01-01

    Our objective is to perform on homogeneous, fully equilibrated dispersions the full set of experiments characterizing the transition from fluid to solid and the properties of the crystalline and glassy solid. These include measurements quantifying the nucleation and growth of crystallites, the structure of the initial fluid and the fully crystalline solid, and Brownian motion of particles within the crystal, and the elasticity of the crystal and the glass. Experiments are being built and tested for ideal microgravity environment. Here we describe the ground based effort, which exploits a fluidized bed to create a homogeneous, steady dispersion for the studies. The differences between the microgravity environment and the fluidized bed is gauged by the Peclet number Pe, which measures the rate of convection/sedimentation relative to Brownian motion. We have designed our experiment to accomplish three types of measurements on hard sphere suspensions in a fluidized bed: the static scattering intensity as a function of angle to determine the structure factor, the temporal autocorrelation function at all scattering angles to probe the dynamics, and the amplitude of the response to an oscillatory forcing to deduce the low frequency viscoelasticity. Thus the scattering instrument and the colloidal dispersion were chosen such as that the important features of each physical property lie within the detectable range for each measurement.

  11. 'It was hard but you did it': the co-production of 'work' in a clinical setting among spinal cord injured adults and their physical therapists.

    PubMed

    Papadimitriou, Christina

    2008-01-01

    This paper focuses on what takes place during the rehabilitation of spinal cord injured (SCI) adults. It analyses the cardinal rehabilitation task of transforming the compromised, limited and injured corporeal style of newly injured adults (best described phenomenologically as an 'I cannot do' or 'I no longer can') into a new style of embodiment, one in which 'I am newly abled'. This transformation is not a passive, surrendering experience. Rather, as informants repeatedly noted, 'rehabilitation is hard work'. This paper examines that 'work'. This paper draws from observational and interview data collected over an 18-month period in a metropolitan rehabilitation centre in the Midwestern United States. It presents an exemplar case of a clinical setting, that between a physical therapist and her SCI client. The interactional and meaning-making nature of clinical encounters are explicated, revealing the collaborative and situational constitution of rehabilitation work. Experience-near, phenomenologically informed, research is shown to be a valuable way of understanding rehabilitation practices and how they might affect inpatients and staff.

  12. From QCD-based hard-scattering to nonextensive statistical mechanical descriptions of transverse momentum spectra in high-energy pp and pp¯ collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Cheuk-Yin; Wilk, Grzegorz; Cirto, Leonardo J. L.; Tsallis, Constantino

    2015-06-22

    Transverse spectra of both jets and hadrons obtained in high-energy $pp$ and $p\\bar p $ collisions at central rapidity exhibit power-law behavior of $1/p_T^n$ at high $p_T$. The power index $n$ is 4-5 for jet production and is slightly greater for hadron production. Furthermore, the hadron spectra spanning over 14 orders of magnitude down to the lowest $p_T$ region in $pp$ collisions at LHC can be adequately described by a single nonextensive statistical mechanical distribution that is widely used in other branches of science. This suggests indirectly the dominance of the hard-scattering process over essentially the whole $p_T$ region at central rapidity in $pp$ collisions at LHC. We show here direct evidences of such a dominance of the hard-scattering process by investigating the power index of UA1 jet spectra over an extended $p_T$ region and the two-particle correlation data of the STAR and PHENIX Collaborations in high-energy $pp$ and $p \\bar p$ collisions at central rapidity. We then study how the showering of the hard-scattering product partons alters the power index of the hadron spectra and leads to a hadron distribution that can be cast into a single-particle non-extensive statistical mechanical distribution. Lastly, because of such a connection, the non-extensive statistical mechanical distribution can be considered as a lowest-order approximation of the hard-scattering of partons followed by the subsequent process of parton showering that turns the jets into hadrons, in high energy $pp$ and $p\\bar p$ collisions.

  13. Seismic attenuation and scattering tomography of rock samples using stochastic wavefields: linking seismology, volcanology, and rock physics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazio, Marco; De Siena, Luca; Benson, Phillip

    2016-04-01

    Seismic attenuation and scattering are two attributes that can be linked with porosity and permeability in laboratory experiments. When measuring these two quantities using seismic waveforms recorder at lithospheric and volcanic scales the areas of highest heterogeneity, as batches of melt and zones of high deformation, produce anomalous values of the measured quantities, the seismic quality factor and scattering coefficient. When employed as indicators of heterogeneity and absorption in volcanic areas these anomalous effects become strong indicators of magma accumulation and tectonic boundaries, shaping magmatic chambers and conduit systems. We perform attenuation and scattering measurements and imaging using seismic waveforms produced in laboratory experiments, at frequencies ranging between the kHz and MHz. As attenuation and scattering are measured from the shape of the envelopes, disregarding phases, we are able to connect the observations with the micro fracturing and petrological quantities previously measured on the sample. Connecting the imaging of dry and saturated samples via these novel attributes with the burst of low-period events with increasing saturation and deformation is a challenge. Its solution could plant the seed for better relating attenuation and scattering tomography measurements to the presence of fluids and gas, therefore creating a novel path for reliable porosity and permeability tomography. In particular for volcanoes, being able to relate attenuation/scattering measurements with low-period micro seismicity could deliver new data to settle the debate about if both source and medium can produce seismic resonance.

  14. Molecular hardness and softness, local hardness and softness, hardness and softness kernels, and relations among these quantities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkowitz, Max; Parr, Robert G.

    1988-02-01

    Hardness and softness kernels η(r,r') and s(r,r') are defined for the ground state of an atomic or molecular electronic system, and the previously defined local hardness and softness η(r) and s(r) and global hardness and softness η and S are obtained from them. The physical meaning of s(r), as a charge capacitance, is discussed (following Huheey and Politzer), and two alternative ``hardness'' indices are identified and briefly discussed.

  15. GPU acceleration of the Locally Selfconsistent Multiple Scattering code for first principles calculation of the ground state and statistical physics of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenbach, Markus; Larkin, Jeff; Lutjens, Justin; Rennich, Steven; Rogers, James H.

    2016-07-12

    The Locally Self-consistent Multiple Scattering (LSMS) code solves the first principles Density Functional theory Kohn–Sham equation for a wide range of materials with a special focus on metals, alloys and metallic nano-structures. It has traditionally exhibited near perfect scalability on massively parallel high performance computer architectures. In this paper, we present our efforts to exploit GPUs to accelerate the LSMS code to enable first principles calculations of O(100,000) atoms and statistical physics sampling of finite temperature properties. We reimplement the scattering matrix calculation for GPUs with a block matrix inversion algorithm that only uses accelerator memory. Finally, using the Cray XK7 system Titan at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility we achieve a sustained performance of 14.5PFlop/s and a speedup of 8.6 compared to the CPU only code.

  16. GPU acceleration of the Locally Selfconsistent Multiple Scattering code for first principles calculation of the ground state and statistical physics of materials

    DOE PAGES

    Eisenbach, Markus; Larkin, Jeff; Lutjens, Justin; ...

    2016-07-12

    The Locally Self-consistent Multiple Scattering (LSMS) code solves the first principles Density Functional theory Kohn–Sham equation for a wide range of materials with a special focus on metals, alloys and metallic nano-structures. It has traditionally exhibited near perfect scalability on massively parallel high performance computer architectures. In this paper, we present our efforts to exploit GPUs to accelerate the LSMS code to enable first principles calculations of O(100,000) atoms and statistical physics sampling of finite temperature properties. We reimplement the scattering matrix calculation for GPUs with a block matrix inversion algorithm that only uses accelerator memory. Finally, using the Craymore » XK7 system Titan at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility we achieve a sustained performance of 14.5PFlop/s and a speedup of 8.6 compared to the CPU only code.« less

  17. GPU acceleration of the Locally Selfconsistent Multiple Scattering code for first principles calculation of the ground state and statistical physics of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenbach, Markus; Larkin, Jeff; Lutjens, Justin; Rennich, Steven; Rogers, James H.

    2016-07-12

    The Locally Self-consistent Multiple Scattering (LSMS) code solves the first principles Density Functional theory Kohn–Sham equation for a wide range of materials with a special focus on metals, alloys and metallic nano-structures. It has traditionally exhibited near perfect scalability on massively parallel high performance computer architectures. In this paper, we present our efforts to exploit GPUs to accelerate the LSMS code to enable first principles calculations of O(100,000) atoms and statistical physics sampling of finite temperature properties. We reimplement the scattering matrix calculation for GPUs with a block matrix inversion algorithm that only uses accelerator memory. Finally, using the Cray XK7 system Titan at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility we achieve a sustained performance of 14.5PFlop/s and a speedup of 8.6 compared to the CPU only code.

  18. Theoretical studies of multistep processes, isospin effects in nuclear scattering, and meson and baryon interactions in nuclear physics: Annual progess report, 1 May 1988--30 April 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Landau, R.H.; Madsen, V.A.

    1988-10-25

    A progress report is presented for DOE grant FG06-86ER40283 supporting theoretical studies in nuclear and particle physics at Oregon State University. The research was led by Professors Landau and Madsen, and carried out in collaboration with graduate students in Corvallis, and scientists at LLNL-Livermore, TRIUMF, KFA-Juelich, Purdue University, and Florida State University. The studies include meson-exchange-current effects, quark effects, and relativistic (Dirac) effects deduced from spin observables in p-/sup 3/He scattering, atomic and nuclear Gamow states in momentum space of kaons and antiprotons, and charge-symmetry violation in pion scattering. Additional studies include microscopic optical potential calculations, multiple step processes, and differences in neutron and proton multipole matrix elements and transition densities in low lying collective states and in giant resonances. 13 refs.

  19. Theoretical studies of multistep processes, isospin effects in nuclear scattering, and meson and baryon interactions in nuclear physics: Three year summary, 1 May 1986--30 April 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Landau, R.H.; Madsen, V.A.

    1988-10-25

    A three-year summary is presented for DOE grant FG06-86ER40283 supporting theoretical studies in nuclear and particle physics at Oregon State University. The research was led by Professors Landau and Madsen, and carried out in collaboration with graduate students in Corvallis, and scientists at LLNL-Livermore, LLNL, Los Alamos, TRIUMF, KFA-Juelich, Purdue University, and Florida State University. The studies include meson-exchange-current effects, quark effects, and relativistic (Dirac) effects deduced from spin observable in p-/sup 3/He scattering, atomic and nuclear Gamow states in momentum space of kaons and antiprotons, and charge-symmetry violation in pion scattering. Additional studies include microscopic optical potential calculations, multiple step processes, and differences in neutron and proton multipole matrix elements and transition densities in low lying collective states and in giant resonances.

  20. Light-scattering changes caused by RBC aggregation: physical basis for new approach to noninvasive blood count

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvartsman, Leonid D.; Fine, Ilya

    2001-06-01

    We develop theoretical models of light transmission through whole blood considering RBC aggregation. RBC aggregates are considered to be the main centers of scattering in red/near- infrared spectral region. In pulsatile blood flow the periodic changes of aggregate geometry cause oscillations of light scattering. Thus scattering-assisted mechanism has to be taken into account in pulse oximeter calibration. In case of over-systolic vessel occlusion the size of aggregates grows, and the light transmission rises. Light diffraction on a single scatterer makes the transmission growth non- monotonic for certain spectral range. For the most typical set of aggregate parameters this range corresponds to wavelengths below 760 nm, and this prediction fits well both in vivo and in vitro experimental results. This spectral range depends on the refraction index mismatch and the geometry of aggregates. Both of them may be affected by the chemistry of blood. For instance, changes of glucose and hemoglobin have different effect on light transmission time response. Consequently, their content may be determined from time evolution of optical transmission.

  1. Neutron scattering studies in thorium and uranium. Progress report, 1 September 1979-30 June 1980. [Dept. of Physics and Applied Physics, Univ. of Lowell, Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect

    Beghian, L. E.; Kegel, G. H.R.

    1980-01-01

    Analysis of (n,n'..gamma..) measurements is now essentially complete, and level cross sections inferred from these data have been extracted for twenty-seven levels up to E/sub x/ = 1516 keV in /sup 238/U, and for thirty-seven levels up to E/sub x/ = 1738 keV in /sup 232/Th. One goal of the present work is to compare the level cross sections obtained from (n,n'..gamma..) with those from (n,n') measurements, to determine whether the former values are generally lower due, for example, to E0 contributions. Inelastic neutron scattering from high-lying states near 1 MeV excitation was measured in both /sup 232/Th and /sup 238/U, over the range of incident energies corresponding to the (n,n'..gamma..) studies. So far the results show no significant discrepancies between the (n,n'..gamma..) and (n,n') cross sections for most levels near theshold. Considerable progress was made on the near-threshold measurements of inelastically scattered neutrons from the 45-keV first excited state in /sup 238/U. These measurements were conducted using both the standard disk scatterer geometry and a ring scatterer with forward-angle geometry. These two very different techniques give cross sections in excellent agreement with one another; the measurement at 81 keV is the lowest energy measurement of this type published to date. Improved time resolution was also demonstrated using thin, ring-shaped scatterers at back angles. Data reduction capabilities have been further enhanced by the acquisition of several new peripherals. 17 figures, 1 table. (RWR)

  2. Structure Functions in Deep Inelastic Lepton Scattering: Data from DOE laboratory experiments as compiled in data reviews by the Durham High Energy Physics Database Group

    DOE Data Explorer

    Gehrmann, T; Roberts, R. G.; Whalley, M. R.; Durham HEP Database Group

    Gehrmann, Roberts, and Whalley in their 1999 paper, A Compilation of Structure Functions in Deep Inelastic Scattering, published in volume 25 of Journal of Physics G (Nuclear and Particle Physics) note that these data will continue to be relevant to the next generation of hadron colliders. They present data on the unpolarized structure functions F2 and xF3, R D ._L=_T /, the virtual photon asymmetries A1 and A2 and the polarized structure functions g1 and g2, from deep inelastic lepton scattering off protons, deuterium and nuclei. Data are presented in both tabular and graphical format and include predictions based on the MRST98 and CTEQ4 parton distribution functionsö as well. The data gathered from the relevant collaborations at DOE's Fermilab, SLAC, and JLAB are available, and so are data from related collaborations based at CERN and DESY. The Durham High Energy Physics (HEP) Database Group makes these data, extracted from papers and data reviews, available in one place in an easy-to-access format. These data are also include in the Durham HEP Reaction Data Database which can be searched at http://hepdata.cedar.ac.uk/reaction

  3. Theoretical studies in elementary particle physics. Annual technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, J.

    1994-07-01

    This is a report on research conducted at Penn State University under grant number DE-FG02-90ER-40577, from November 1992 to present. The author is a member of the CTEQ collaboration (Coordinated Theoretical and Experimental Project on Quantitative QCD). Some of the work in CTEQ is described in this report. Topics which the authors work has touched include: polarized hard scattering; hard diffraction; small x and perturbative pomeron physics; gauge-invariant operators; fundamental QCD; heavy quarks; instantons and deep inelastic scattering; non-perturbative corrections to {tau} decay.

  4. Physical Retrievals of Over-Ocean Rain Rate from Multichannel Microwave Imagery. Part 1; Theoretical Characteristics of Normalized Polarization and Scattering Indices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petty, G. W.

    1994-01-01

    Microwave rain rate retrieval algorithms have most often been formulated in terms of the raw brightness temperatures observed by one or more channels of a satellite radiometer. Taken individually, single-channel brightness temperatures generally represent a near-arbitrary combination of positive contributions due to liquid water emission and negative contributions due to scattering by ice and/or visibility of the radiometrically cold ocean surface. Unfortunately, for a given rain rate, emission by liquid water below the freezing level and scattering by ice particles above the freezing level are rather loosely coupled in both a physical and statistical sense. Furthermore, microwave brightness temperatures may vary significantly (approx. 30-70 K) in response to geophysical parameters other than liquid water and precipitation. Because of these complications, physical algorithms which attempt to directly invert observed brightness temperatures have typically relied on the iterative adjustment of detailed micro-physical profiles or cloud models, guided by explicit forward microwave radiative transfer calculations. In support of an effort to develop a significantly simpler and more efficient inversion-type rain rate algorithm, the physical information content of two linear transformations of single-frequency, dual-polarization brightness temperatures is studied: the normalized polarization difference P of Petty and Katsaros (1990, 1992), which is intended as a measure of footprint-averaged rain cloud transmittance for a given frequency; and a scattering index S (similar to the polarization corrected temperature of Spencer et al.,1989) which is sensitive almost exclusively to ice. A reverse Monte Carlo radiative transfer model is used to elucidate the qualitative response of these physically distinct single-frequency indices to idealized 3-dimensional rain clouds and to demonstrate their advantages over raw brightness temperatures both as stand-alone indices of

  5. Hardnesses of metal parts and constructions measured for comparison by small hardness testers with different principles of operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matyunin, V. M.; Karimbekov, M. A.; Marchenkov, A. Yu.; Demidov, A. N.

    2016-12-01

    The existing handheld and portable hardness testers are classified depending on their operating principles. The advantages and disadvantages of the measurement procedures and the hardness testers are considered. The hardnesses of the metal parts with different masses and stiffness are measured by mechanical and physical-mechanical hardness testers and compared. The test errors are estimated. Recommendations for the calibration of the hardness testers of physical and mechanical operating principles are given.

  6. Confluent Heun functions and the physics of black holes: Resonant frequencies, Hawking radiation and scattering of scalar waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, H. S.; Bezerra, V. B.

    2016-10-01

    We apply the confluent Heun functions to study the resonant frequencies (quasispectrum), the Hawking radiation and the scattering process of scalar waves, in a class of spacetimes, namely, the ones generated by a Kerr-Newman-Kasuya spacetime (dyon black hole) and a Reissner-Nordström black hole surrounded by a magnetic field (Ernst spacetime). In both spacetimes, the solutions for the angular and radial parts of the corresponding Klein-Gordon equations are obtained exactly, for massive and massless fields, respectively. The special cases of Kerr and Schwarzschild black holes are analyzed and the solutions obtained, as well as in the case of a Schwarzschild black hole surrounded by a magnetic field. In all these special situations, the resonant frequencies, Hawking radiation and scattering are studied.

  7. Confluent Heun functions and the physics of black holes: Resonant frequencies, Hawking radiation and scattering of scalar waves

    SciTech Connect

    Vieira, H.S.; Bezerra, V.B.

    2016-10-15

    We apply the confluent Heun functions to study the resonant frequencies (quasispectrum), the Hawking radiation and the scattering process of scalar waves, in a class of spacetimes, namely, the ones generated by a Kerr–Newman–Kasuya spacetime (dyon black hole) and a Reissner–Nordström black hole surrounded by a magnetic field (Ernst spacetime). In both spacetimes, the solutions for the angular and radial parts of the corresponding Klein–Gordon equations are obtained exactly, for massive and massless fields, respectively. The special cases of Kerr and Schwarzschild black holes are analyzed and the solutions obtained, as well as in the case of a Schwarzschild black hole surrounded by a magnetic field. In all these special situations, the resonant frequencies, Hawking radiation and scattering are studied. - Highlights: • Charged massive scalar field in the dyon black hole and massless scalar field in the Ernst spacetime are analyzed. • The confluent Heun functions are applied to obtain the solution of the Klein–Gordon equation. • The resonant frequencies are obtained. • The Hawking radiation and the scattering process of scalar waves are examined.

  8. Application of laser light scattering for determination of the border aerosol-air in a specialized physical laboratory setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damov, K. S.; Iliev, M. T.

    2016-02-01

    The current article examines the application of laser light scattering in a specialized laboratory setup. It is used for determination of the kinematic viscosity and mass density of Aerodispersed Systems formed in Limited Volume (High Concentration Aerosols) by the method of free flow out. The measurement chamber is first filled with the investigated aerosol. After a predetermined delay time the aerosol is allowed to flow out through a calibrated pipe with fixed size located few centimetres above the chamber's bottom. The lowering of the upper border aerosol-air is continuously scanned using a laser beam directed along the axis of the cylindrical chamber. The kinematic viscosity and mass density of the investigated aerosol phase are calculated by formulas obtained by the authors. The suggested application of laser light scattering led to higher accuracy of the determination the position of aerosol-air border, thence the certainty of this method. This improvement allowed the use of computer controlled optoelectronic setting. The use of laser light scattering significantly improves the method for determination of the kinematic viscosity and mass density of Aerodispersed Systems formed in Limited Volume.

  9. Hard up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-06-01

    With CERN's new collider due to open next month, the UK's science-funding crisis could not have come at a worse time for the country's physics community "The events of the past few months have exposed serious deficiencies within the senior management [of the Science and Technology Facilities Council], whose misjudgements could still significantly damage Britain's research reputation in [physics], both at home and abroad." That was the damning verdict of a report published by MPs at the end of April into the crisis in UK science funding (see physicsworld.com/cws/article/news/34003). The MPs, who form the House of Commons select committee on innovation, universities, science and skills, called for "substantial and urgent changes" to the way in which the council is run and said that there were "serious questions about the role and performance of the chief executive [Keith Mason]".

  10. Tunneling effects in electromagnetic wave scattering by nonspherical particles: A comparison of the Debye series and physical-geometric optics approximations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Lei; Yang, Ping

    2016-07-01

    The accuracy of the physical-geometric optics (PG-O) approximation is examined for the simulation of electromagnetic scattering by nonspherical dielectric particles. This study seeks a better understanding of the tunneling effect on the phase matrix by employing the invariant imbedding method to rigorously compute the zeroth-order Debye series, from which the tunneling efficiency and the phase matrix corresponding to the diffraction and external reflection are obtained. The tunneling efficiency is shown to be a factor quantifying the relative importance of the tunneling effect over the Fraunhofer diffraction near the forward scattering direction. Due to the tunneling effect, different geometries with the same projected cross section might have different diffraction patterns, which are traditionally assumed to be identical according to the Babinet principle. For particles with a fixed orientation, the PG-O approximation yields the external reflection pattern with reasonable accuracy, but ordinarily fails to predict the locations of peaks and minima in the diffraction pattern. The larger the tunneling efficiency, the worse the PG-O accuracy is at scattering angles less than 90°. If the particles are assumed to be randomly oriented, the PG-O approximation yields the phase matrix close to the rigorous counterpart, primarily due to error cancellations in the orientation-average process. Furthermore, the PG-O approximation based on an electric field volume-integral equation is shown to usually be much more accurate than the Kirchhoff surface integral equation at side-scattering angles, particularly when the modulus of the complex refractive index is close to unity. Finally, tunneling efficiencies are tabulated for representative faceted particles.

  11. A Comparison between the Effects of Aerobic Dance Training on Mini-Trampoline and Hard Wooden Surface on Bone Resorption, Health-Related Physical Fitness, Balance, and Foot Plantar Pressure in Thai Working Women.

    PubMed

    Sukkeaw, Wittawat; Kritpet, Thanomwong; Bunyaratavej, Narong

    2015-09-01

    To compare the effects of aerobic dance training on mini-trampoline and hard wooden surface on bone resorption, health-related physical fitness, balance, and foot plantar pressure in Thai working women. Sixty-three volunteered females aged 35-45 years old participated in the study and were divided into 3 groups: A) aerobic dance on mini-trampoline (21 females), B) aerobic dance on hard wooden surface (21 females), and C) control group (21 females). All subjects in the aerobic dance groups wore heart rate monitors during exercise. Aerobic dance worked out 3 times a week, 40 minutes a day for 12 weeks. The intensity was set at 60-80% of the maximum heart rate. The control group engaged in routine physical activity. The collected data were bone formation (N-terminal propeptine of procollagen type I: P1NP) bone resorption (Telopeptide cross linked: β-CrossLaps) health-related physical fitness, balance, and foot plantar pressure. The obtained data from pre- and post trainings were compared and analyzed by paired samples t-test and one way analysis of covariance. The significant difference was at 0.05 level. After the 12-week training, the biochemical bone markers of both mini-trampoline and hard wooden surface aerobic dance training subjects decreased in bone resorption (β-CrossLaps) but increased in boneformation (P1NP). Health-related physical fitness, balance, and foot plantar pressure were not only better when comparing to the pre-test result but also significantly different when comparing to the control group (p < 0.05). The aerobic dance on mini-trampoline showed that leg muscular strength, balance and foot plantar pressure were significantly better than the aerobic dance on hard wooden surface (p < 0.05). The aerobic dance on mini-trampoline and hard wooden surface had positive effects on biochemical bone markers. However, the aerobic dance on mini-trampoline had more leg muscular strength and balance including less foot plantar pressure. It is considered to be

  12. Physical analysis of the shielding capacity for a lightweight apron designed for shielding low intensity scattering X-rays.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seon Chil; Choi, Jeong Ryeol; Jeon, Byeong Kyou

    2016-07-27

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a lightweight apron that will be used for shielding low intensity radiation in medical imaging radiography room and to apply it to a custom-made effective shielding. The quality of existing aprons made for protecting our bodies from direct radiation are improved so that they are suitable for scattered X-rays. Textiles that prevent bodies from radiation are made by combining barium sulfate and liquid silicon. These materials have the function of shielding radiation in a manner like lead. Three kinds of textiles are produced. The thicknesses of each textile are 0.15 mm, 0.21 mm, and 0.29 mm and the corresponding lead equivalents are 0.039 mmPb, 0.095 mmPb, 0.22 mmPb for each. The rate of shielding space scattering rays are 80% from the distance of 0.5 m, 86% from 1.0 m, and 97% from 1.5 m. If we intend to approach with the purpose of shielding scattering X-rays and low intensity radiations, it is possible to reduce the weight of the apron to be 1/5 compared to that of the existing lead aprons whose weight is typically more than 4 kg. We confirm, therefore, that it is possible to produce lightweight aprons that are used for the purpose of shielding low dose radiations.

  13. Physical analysis of the shielding capacity for a lightweight apron designed for shielding low intensity scattering X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seon Chil; Choi, Jeong Ryeol; Jeon, Byeong Kyou

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a lightweight apron that will be used for shielding low intensity radiation in medical imaging radiography room and to apply it to a custom-made effective shielding. The quality of existing aprons made for protecting our bodies from direct radiation are improved so that they are suitable for scattered X-rays. Textiles that prevent bodies from radiation are made by combining barium sulfate and liquid silicon. These materials have the function of shielding radiation in a manner like lead. Three kinds of textiles are produced. The thicknesses of each textile are 0.15 mm, 0.21 mm, and 0.29 mm and the corresponding lead equivalents are 0.039 mmPb, 0.095 mmPb, 0.22 mmPb for each. The rate of shielding space scattering rays are 80% from the distance of 0.5 m, 86% from 1.0 m, and 97% from 1.5 m. If we intend to approach with the purpose of shielding scattering X-rays and low intensity radiations, it is possible to reduce the weight of the apron to be 1/5 compared to that of the existing lead aprons whose weight is typically more than 4 kg. We confirm, therefore, that it is possible to produce lightweight aprons that are used for the purpose of shielding low dose radiations.

  14. Physical analysis of the shielding capacity for a lightweight apron designed for shielding low intensity scattering X-rays

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seon Chil; Choi, Jeong Ryeol; Jeon, Byeong Kyou

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a lightweight apron that will be used for shielding low intensity radiation in medical imaging radiography room and to apply it to a custom-made effective shielding. The quality of existing aprons made for protecting our bodies from direct radiation are improved so that they are suitable for scattered X-rays. Textiles that prevent bodies from radiation are made by combining barium sulfate and liquid silicon. These materials have the function of shielding radiation in a manner like lead. Three kinds of textiles are produced. The thicknesses of each textile are 0.15 mm, 0.21 mm, and 0.29 mm and the corresponding lead equivalents are 0.039 mmPb, 0.095 mmPb, 0.22 mmPb for each. The rate of shielding space scattering rays are 80% from the distance of 0.5 m, 86% from 1.0 m, and 97% from 1.5 m. If we intend to approach with the purpose of shielding scattering X-rays and low intensity radiations, it is possible to reduce the weight of the apron to be 1/5 compared to that of the existing lead aprons whose weight is typically more than 4 kg. We confirm, therefore, that it is possible to produce lightweight aprons that are used for the purpose of shielding low dose radiations. PMID:27461510

  15. Reduction of the scattering matrix array

    SciTech Connect

    Sadovskyy, I. A.

    2015-09-30

    The scattering matrix approach is widely applied in wave engineering and quantum physics. Usually, a combination of multiple scattering matrices is used. In this article, we consider arbitrary arrays of interconnected scattering matrices and present a formal result for the reduced scattering matrix. We demonstrate this approach in two well-known scattering problems.

  16. Nuclear physics aspects involved in studies of low-Q parity-violating electron scattering from nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, T. W.; Moreno, O.

    2013-11-07

    The parity-violating asymmetry in polarized electron scattering from nuclei can be used to extract information on nuclear and nucleon structure, as well as to determine the values of Standard Model electroweak couplings. To achieve the latter, high precision is needed both in the measured asymmetry and in the underlying nuclear structure theory. For the former a few tenths of a percent may be attainable; for the latter the present discussions have the dual goal of ascertaining both the sizes of various nuclear structure related effects and of providing estimates of their uncertainties.

  17. A ditopic O(4)S(2) macrocycle and its hard, soft, and hard/soft metal complexes exhibiting endo-, exo-, or endo/exocyclic coordination: synthesis, crystal structures, NMR titration, and physical properties.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Hyunsoo; Park, Ki-Min; Ikeda, Mari; Habata, Yoichi; Lee, Shim Sung

    2014-04-21

    A 20-membered O4S2 macrocycle (L(2)) was synthesized as a ditopic ligating system toward hard and soft metal ions simultaneously. Five complexes (3-7) of L(2) with different structures and coordination modes, including discrete to infinite forms, mono- to heteronuclear, and endo- to exo- and endo/exocoordination, were prepared and structurally characterized. First, the reaction of L(2) with Pb(ClO4)2·3H2O afforded a typical endocyclic mononuclear perchlorato complex [Pb(L(2))(ClO4)2] (3) in which one lead(II) is surrounded by the macrocycle adopting a "tight and bent" conformation. Meanwhile, the reaction with a softer metal salt AgNO3 resulted in the formation of the dinuclear bis(macrocycle) complex [Ag2(L(2))2(NO3)2] (4) in which two exocyclic silver(I) ions are doubly linked by two nitrate ions. The treatment of L(2) with CuI gave a mixture of the exocyclic monomer complex [Cu(L(2))I] (5) and the exocyclic dimer complex [(Cu2I2)(L(2))2] (6), which were separated manually because of their brick and rhomboid shapes of the crystals, respectively. Furthermore, the reaction of L(2) with a mixture of CuI and NaI afforded a photoluminescent heteronuclear complex [Na2(Cu6I8)(L(2))2(CH3CN)4]n (7) in the endo/exocyclic coordination mode. In this case, the endocyclic sodium(I) complex units are linked by the double-open cubanes-type cluster Cu6I8, yielding a two-dimensional network. The structural and binding properties of the complex of L(2) with silver(I) nitrate in solution were monitored by the NMR titration. Photophysical and thermal properties for complex 7 were also investigated and discussed.

  18. Scattering Theory of Mesoscopic Gilbert Damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brataas, Arne

    2010-03-01

    Magnetic damping determines the performance of magnetic devices including high-frequency oscillators, hard drives, magnetic random access memories, magnetic logic devices, and magnetic field sensors. The drive to improve these devices, to reduce the response time of sensors and the physical dimensions has led to a greater focus on studying the friction force a changing magnetization experiences. We study the magnetization dynamics of single domain ferromagnets and domain walls in contact with a thermal bath by scattering theory. We recover the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation and express the Gilbert damping tensor in terms of the scattering matrix [1,2]. Dissipation of magnetic energy equals energy current pumped out of the system by the time-dependent magnetization, with separable spin-relaxation induced bulk and spin-pumping generated interface contributions [3]. The scattering theory of Gilbert damping is suitable for first-principles calculations that include disorder and spin-orbit coupling on an equal footing [4]. In linear response, our scattering theory for the Gilbert damping tensor is equivalent with the Kubo formalism. [4pt] [1] A. Brataas, Y. Tserkovnyak, and G. E. W. Bauer, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 037207 (2008). [0pt] [2] K. M. D. Hals, A. K. Nguyen, and A. Brataas, Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 256601 (2009). [0pt] [3] Y. Tserkovnyak, A. Brataas, G. E. W. Bauer, and B. I. Halperin, Rev. Mod. Phys. 77, 1375 (2005). [0pt] [4] A. A. Starikov, P. J. Kelly, A. Brataas, Y. Tserkovnyak, and G. E. W. Bauer, unpublished.

  19. Construction of a scattering chamber for ion-beam analysis of environmental materials in undergraduate physics research

    SciTech Connect

    LaBrake, Scott M.; Vineyard, Michael F.; Turley, Colin F.; Moore, Robert D.; Johnson, Christopher

    2013-04-19

    We have developed a new scattering chamber for ion-beam analysis of environmental materials with the 1.1-MV Pelletron accelerator at the Union College Ion-Beam Analysis Laboratory. The chamber was constructed from a ten-inch, Conflat, multi-port cross and includes a three-axis target manipulator and target ladder assembly, an eight-inch turbo pump, an Amptek X-ray detector, and multiple charged particle detectors. Recent projects performed by our undergraduate research team include proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and Rutherford backscattering (RBS) analyses of atmospheric aerosols collected with a nine-stage cascade impactor in Upstate New York. We will describe the construction of the chamber and discuss the results of some commissioning experiments.

  20. David Adler Lectureship Award in the Field of Materials Physics: Electrically Tunable Nanoantennas for Control of Absorption, Emission and Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atwater, Harry

    Progress in understanding resonant subwavelength structures has fueled an explosion of interest in both fundamental processes and nanophotonic devices for imaging, sensing, solar energy conversion and thermal radiation control. Achieving electronic tunability of the optical properties is also an emerging opportunity to bring nanoscale resonators and antennas to life as dynamic objects. While the optical properties of photonic and plasmonic nanostructures are typically fixed at the time of fabrication, gated field effect tuning of the carrier density in conducting oxides and two-dimensional materials enables the optical dispersion of individual structures to be altered from dielectric to plasmonic, yielding active nano-antenna arrays with electrically tunable absorption, radiative emission and scattering properties. Supported by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science Basic Energy Sciences.

  1. Characterization of antibody-polyol interactions by static light scattering: implications for physical stability of protein formulations.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Shermeen A; Sharma, Vikas K; Patapoff, Thomas W; Kalonia, Devendra S

    2013-05-20

    In this study, the nature of interactions between monoclonal antibodies and polyols was studied using static light scattering. Solutions of mAb-U and mAb-P (4-12 mg/mL) were analyzed using static light scattering in buffer, 10% w/v trehalose and ethylene glycol solutions at pH 5.0, 7.0 and 9.0. Mechanical stress studies were conducted by shaking the mAb-U solutions (5mg/mL, pH 5.0, 7.0 and 9.0) and mAb-P solutions (5mg/mL, pH 7.0) at 200 rpm for 5 days at 25°C. Addition of trehalose and ethylene glycol resulted in a decrease in the attractive interactions between mAb-U molecules at pH 7.0 and 9.0, and at pH 9.0 between mAb-P molecules. At a higher ionic strength (300 mM, pH 5.0) trehalose and ethylene glycol decreased attractive interactions for both mAbs. Mechanical stress studies showed higher aggregation of mAb-U in trehalose solutions than ethylene glycol and buffer solutions at pH 7.0 and 9.0. A converse trend was seen for mAb-P at pH 7.0. This study showed that polyols, conformational stabilizers or destabilizers, decrease attractive interactions between protein molecules. The decrease is a result of masking of the hydrophobic sites on a protein as polyols can have favorable hydrophobic interactions with the surface exposed hydrophobic groups.

  2. The Classical Scattering of Waves: Some Analogies with Quantum Scattering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    Code . Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. 13. Abstract (Maximum 200 words). The scattering of waves in classical physics and quantum...both areas. 92-235222’ 14. Subject Terms. IS. Number of Page. Acoustic scattering , shallow water, waveguide propagation . 27 16. Price Code . 17. Security...Numbers. The Classical Scattering of Waves: Some Analogies with Quantum Scattering Contract ,~~ ~ -V ,~Pom Element NO- 0601153N 6. Author(s). t

  3. GPU Acceleration of the Locally Selfconsistent Multiple Scattering Code for First Principles Calculation of the Ground State and Statistical Physics of Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenbach, Markus; Larkin, Jeff; Lutjens, Justin; Rennich, Steven; Rogers, James H

    2016-01-01

    The Locally Self-consistent Multiple Scattering (LSMS) code solves the first principles Density Functional theory Kohn-Sham equation for a wide range of materials with a special focus on metals, alloys and metallic nano-structures. It has traditionally exhibited near perfect scalability on massively parallel high performance computer architectures. We present our efforts to exploit GPUs to accelerate the LSMS code to enable first principles calculations of O(100,000) atoms and statistical physics sampling of finite temperature properties. Using the Cray XK7 system Titan at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility we achieve a sustained performance of 14.5PFlop/s and a speedup of 8.6 compared to the CPU only code.

  4. A Search for New Physics at the TeV Scale Via a Precise Measurement of the Weak Mixing Angle in Moller Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Emam, W.

    2004-11-01

    This dissertation reports on a precise measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry in electron-electron (Moeller) scattering at a four-momentum transfer Q{sup 2} = 0.03 (GeV/c){sup 2}. The observed parity-violating asymmetry is A{sub PV} = -128 {+-} 14 (stat.) {+-} 12 (syst.) x 10{sup -9}. This is the most precise asymmetry ever measured in a parity-violating electron scattering. In the context of the Standard Model, the A{sub PV} result determines the weak mixing angle, which is one of the fundamental parameters of the model. The result is sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W}{sup eff} = 0.2403 {+-} 0.0014, which is consistent with the Standard Model expectation at the current level of precision. The comparison between this measurement of the weak mixing angle at low Q{sup 2} and at the Z{sup 0} pole establishes the running of sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W} with 6.5{sigma} significance. In addition, they report on the first observation of a transverse asymmetry in electron-electron scattering. The observed asymmetry is A{sub T}{sup Moeller} = 2.7 x 10{sup -6}, which is consistent with the theoretical predictions. They also provide a new measurement of the transverse asymmetry in ep scattering A{sub T}{sup ep} = 2 x 10{sup -6}. The consistency of the result with the theoretical prediction provides new limits on the TeV scale physics. A limit of 0.9 TeV was set on the mass of the extra Z' boson in the SO(10) Model. A limit of 14 TeV and 6 TeV was set on the compositeness scales {Lambda}{sub ee}{sup +} and {Lambda}{sub ee}{sup -}, respectively. Finally a limit of 0.2 TeV was set on ratio of the doubly-charged Higgs mass to the ee{Delta} coupling g{sub ee{Delta}}{sup 2}/m{sub {delta}}{sup 2}.

  5. Final results of bar nue — e scattering cross-section measurements and constraints on new physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deniz, Muhammed; Bilmis, Secluk; Wong, Henry T.; Texono Collaboration

    2012-07-01

    The bar nue - e elastic scattering cross-section was measured with a CsI(Tl) scintillating crystal detector array with a total mass of 187 kg at the Kuo-Sheng Nuclear Power Station. The detectors were exposed to a reactor bar nue flux of 6.4 × 1012 cm-2s-1 originated from a core with 2.9 GW thermal power. Using 29882/7369 kg-days of Reactor ON/OFF data, the Standard Model (SM) of electroweak interaction was probed at the 4-momentum transfer range of Q2 ~ 3 × 10-6 GeV2. A cross-section ratio of Rexpt = [1.08±0.21 (stat)±0.16 (sys)] × RSM was measured. Constraints on the electroweak parameters (gV,gA) were placed, corresponding to a weak mixing angle measurement of sin2θw = 0.251 ±0.031 (stat) ±0.024 (sys). Destructive interference in the SM bar nue-e processes was verified. Bounds on neutrino anomalous electromagnetic properties (neutrino magnetic moment and neutrino charge radius), as well as non-standard neutrino interactions were placed. We summarize the experimental details and results, and discuss projected sensitivities with realistic and feasible hardware upgrades.

  6. Magnetic levitation for hard superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Kordyuk, A.A.

    1998-01-01

    An approach for calculating the interaction between a hard superconductor and a permanent magnet in the field-cooled case is proposed. The exact solutions were obtained for the point magnetic dipole over a flat ideally hard superconductor. We have shown that such an approach is adaptable to a wide practical range of melt-textured high-temperature superconductors{close_quote} systems with magnetic levitation. In this case, the energy losses can be calculated from the alternating magnetic field distribution on the superconducting sample surface. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Hard processes in hadronic interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Satz, H. |; Wang, X.N.

    1995-07-01

    Quantum chromodynamics is today accepted as the fundamental theory of strong interactions, even though most hadronic collisions lead to final states for which quantitative QCD predictions are still lacking. It therefore seems worthwhile to take stock of where we stand today and to what extent the presently available data on hard processes in hadronic collisions can be accounted for in terms of QCD. This is one reason for this work. The second reason - and in fact its original trigger - is the search for the quark-gluon plasma in high energy nuclear collisions. The hard processes to be considered here are the production of prompt photons, Drell-Yan dileptons, open charm, quarkonium states, and hard jets. For each of these, we discuss the present theoretical understanding, compare the resulting predictions to available data, and then show what behaviour it leads to at RHIC and LHC energies. All of these processes have the structure mentioned above: they contain a hard partonic interaction, calculable perturbatively, but also the non-perturbative parton distribution within a hadron. These parton distributions, however, can be studied theoretically in terms of counting rule arguments, and they can be checked independently by measurements of the parton structure functions in deep inelastic lepton-hadron scattering. The present volume is the work of Hard Probe Collaboration, a group of theorists who are interested in the problem and were willing to dedicate a considerable amount of their time and work on it. The necessary preparation, planning and coordination of the project were carried out in two workshops of two weeks` duration each, in February 1994 at CERn in Geneva andin July 1994 at LBL in Berkeley.

  8. Hard processes in hadronic interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Satz, H. |; Wang, X.N.

    1995-07-01

    Quantum chromodynamics is today accepted as the fundamental theory of strong interactions, even though most hadronic collisions lead to final states for which quantitative QCD predictions are still lacking. It therefore seems worthwhile to take stock of where we stand today and to what extent the presently available data on hard processes in hadronic collisions can be accounted for in terms of QCD. This is one reason for this work. The second reason--and in fact its original trigger--is the search for the quark-gluon plasma in high energy nuclear collisions. The hard processes to be considered here are the production of prompt photons, Drell-Yan dileptons, open charm, quarkonium states, and hard jets. For each of these, the authors discuss the present theoretical understanding, compare the resulting predictions to available data, and then show what behavior it leads to at RHIC and LHC energies. All of these processes have the structure mentioned above: they contain a hard partonic interaction, calculable perturbatively, but also the non-perturbative parton distribution within a hadron. These parton distributions, however, can be studied theoretically in terms of counting rule arguments, and they can be checked independently by measurements of the parton structure functions in deep inelastic lepton-hadron scattering. The present volume is the work of Hard Probe Collaboration, a group of theorists who are interested in the problem and were willing to dedicate a considerable amount of their time to work on it. The necessary preparation, planning and coordination of the project were carried out in two workshops of two weeks` duration each, in February 1994 at CERN in Geneva and in July 1994 at LBL in Berkeley. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  9. Physical structure of the excitable membrane of unmyelinated axons: X-ray scattering study and electrophysiological properties of pike olfactory nerve.

    PubMed

    Luzzati, V; Mateu, L; Vachette, P; Benoit, E; Charpentier, G; Kado, R

    2000-11-17

    The aim of this work was to elicit correlations between physical structure and physiological functions in excitable membranes. Freshly dissected pike olfactory nerves were studied by synchrotron radiation X-ray scattering experiments and their physiological properties were tested by electrophysiological techniques. The scattering spectra contained a sharply oriented equatorial component (i.e. normal to the nerve axis), and an isotropic background. After background subtraction, the equatorial component displayed a weak and fairly sharp spectrum of oriented microtubules, and a strong and diffuse band of almost the same shape and position as the band computed for an isolated myelin membrane. We ascribed this spectrum to the axonal membranes. Under the action of temperature and of two local anesthetics, the spectrum underwent a contraction (or expansion) in the s-direction, equivalent to the structure undergoing an expansion (or contraction) in the direction perpendicular to the plane of the membrane. The main observations were: (i) with increasing temperature, membrane thickness decreased with a thermal expansion coefficient equal to -0.97(+/-0.19) 10(-3) degrees C(-1). The polarity and amplitude of this coefficient are typical of lipid-containing systems with the hydrocarbon chains in a disordered conformation. The amplitude and propagation velocity of the compound action potentials were drastically and reversibly reduced by lowering the temperature from 20 degrees C to 5 degrees C. (ii) Exposing the nerve to two local anesthetics (tetracaine and dibucaine) had the effect of decreasing membrane thickness. Action potentials were fully inhibited by these anesthetics. (iii) Upon depolarization, induced by replacing NaCl with KCl in the outer medium, approximately 25 % of the membranes were found to associate by apposing their outer faces. Electrophysiological activity was reversibly impaired by the KCl treatment. (iv) No detectable structural effect was observed upon

  10. Thermodynamic hardness and the maximum hardness principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco-Pérez, Marco; Gázquez, José L.; Ayers, Paul W.; Vela, Alberto

    2017-08-01

    An alternative definition of hardness (called the thermodynamic hardness) within the grand canonical ensemble formalism is proposed in terms of the partial derivative of the electronic chemical potential with respect to the thermodynamic chemical potential of the reservoir, keeping the temperature and the external potential constant. This temperature dependent definition may be interpreted as a measure of the propensity of a system to go through a charge transfer process when it interacts with other species, and thus it keeps the philosophy of the original definition. When the derivative is expressed in terms of the three-state ensemble model, in the regime of low temperatures and up to temperatures of chemical interest, one finds that for zero fractional charge, the thermodynamic hardness is proportional to T-1(I -A ) , where I is the first ionization potential, A is the electron affinity, and T is the temperature. However, the thermodynamic hardness is nearly zero when the fractional charge is different from zero. Thus, through the present definition, one avoids the presence of the Dirac delta function. We show that the chemical hardness defined in this way provides meaningful and discernible information about the hardness properties of a chemical species exhibiting integer or a fractional average number of electrons, and this analysis allowed us to establish a link between the maximum possible value of the hardness here defined, with the minimum softness principle, showing that both principles are related to minimum fractional charge and maximum stability conditions.

  11. Thermodynamic hardness and the maximum hardness principle.

    PubMed

    Franco-Pérez, Marco; Gázquez, José L; Ayers, Paul W; Vela, Alberto

    2017-08-21

    An alternative definition of hardness (called the thermodynamic hardness) within the grand canonical ensemble formalism is proposed in terms of the partial derivative of the electronic chemical potential with respect to the thermodynamic chemical potential of the reservoir, keeping the temperature and the external potential constant. This temperature dependent definition may be interpreted as a measure of the propensity of a system to go through a charge transfer process when it interacts with other species, and thus it keeps the philosophy of the original definition. When the derivative is expressed in terms of the three-state ensemble model, in the regime of low temperatures and up to temperatures of chemical interest, one finds that for zero fractional charge, the thermodynamic hardness is proportional to T(-1)(I-A), where I is the first ionization potential, A is the electron affinity, and T is the temperature. However, the thermodynamic hardness is nearly zero when the fractional charge is different from zero. Thus, through the present definition, one avoids the presence of the Dirac delta function. We show that the chemical hardness defined in this way provides meaningful and discernible information about the hardness properties of a chemical species exhibiting integer or a fractional average number of electrons, and this analysis allowed us to establish a link between the maximum possible value of the hardness here defined, with the minimum softness principle, showing that both principles are related to minimum fractional charge and maximum stability conditions.

  12. Segmented polyurethane elastomers with liquid crystalline hard segments. 1. Synthesis, characterization and rheology

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, W.; MacKnight, W.J.; Welder, W.

    1995-12-01

    Segmented liquid crystalline polyurethanes (LCPUE) have been studied with hard segments composed of the mesogen 4,4`-bis(6-hydroxyhexoxy)biphenyl, 2,4-tolylene diisocyanate, and 2,6-tolylene diisocyanate and soft segments composed of poly(tetramethylene oxides). Differential scanning calorimetry and wide-angle X-ray scattering experiments show the existence of an enantiotropic mesophase in the hard domains of the elastomer. Compared with nonsegmented polyurethane containing the same mesogen, the isotropization temperature of the mesophase in the elastomer is depressed. This is a result of the oligomeric structure of the hard domains. The endotherm corresponding to the isotropization transition is also broadened, reflecting a lack of uniformity of the hard domains. Furthermore, the mesophase can be oriented by elastic deformation, and it forms a more ordered chain packing during this process. The tensile properties of these segmented polyurethanes are determined by their morphologies and can be manipulated by controlling the hard- and soft-segment concentration ratio. The rheological study indicates a broad transition from a viscoelastic solid to a viscoelastic liquid at the isotropization temperature of the mesophase. Physical gelation studies identify a liquid/solid transition when cooled to 106{degrees}C or below, and show the characteristic, critical behavior at the gel point with a power law relaxation spectrum at low frequencies.

  13. Investigating the Physics of Hard X-ray Outbursts from the Galactic Center Supermassive Black Hole Sagittarius A* with NuSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuo; NuSTAR Galactic Plane Survey Working Group

    2016-01-01

    The Galactic center supermassive black hole (SMBH) Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*) is remarkably underluminous with a bolometric luminosity about 10-9 times its Eddington luminosity. It is the closest SMBH and thus an ideal target for investigation of galactic nuclei and their activity cycles. This goal can be fulfilled by studying its current, past and possible future outbursts. Its current X-ray quiescent state, with a luminosity of LX ~ 1033 erg s-1, is punctuated by X-ray flares up to a few times 1035 erg s-1, whose origin is poorly understood. With 638.6 ks NuSTAR observation of Sgr A*, I collected nine X-ray flares which are detected up to 79 keV, and studied their timing behavior using the Bayesian block analysis. The broadband (3-79 keV) spectroscopic studies show that the X-ray flares can have a range of photon indexes, which can be explained by the magnetic reconnection scenario. During the flares, Sgr A* is still orders of magnitudes lower than its Eddington luminosity. Whether it has ever experienced more substantial increases in activity as observed in low-luminosity Active Galactic Nuclei is still under discussion. Indication of such past activity of Sgr A* has come from the Galactic center molecular clouds (GCMCs). I use the hard X-ray emission from Sgr B2, the densest GCMC, to constrain the past Sgr A* X-ray outburst, resulting in LX~5×1038 erg s-1 with a photon index of Γ=2.2±0.4. I also discovered different timing variability from different cloud substructures, which can further constrain the past Sgr A* outburst and the cloud structure. Future giant outburst from Sgr A* could be triggered by dust/gas infall. Although the G2 infall event has not caused any increased X-ray activity from Sgr A*, there has been evidence that it caused flare behavior changes. Ongoing hard X-ray monitoring of Sgr A* will address this remaining puzzle.

  14. Rad-Hard Silicon Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giorgi, Marco

    2005-06-01

    For the next generation of High Energy Physics (HEP) Experiments silicon microstrip detectors working in harsh radiation environments with excellent performances are necessary. The irradiation causes bulk and surface damages that modify the electrical properties of the detector. Solutions like AC coupled strips, overhanging metal contact, <100> crystal lattice orientation, low resistivity n-bulk and Oxygenated substrate are studied for rad-hard detectors. The paper presents an outlook of these technologies.

  15. Research in the Hard Sciences, and in Very Hard "Softer" Domains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, D. C.

    2014-01-01

    The author of this commentary argues that physical scientists are attempting to advance knowledge in the so-called hard sciences, whereas education researchers are laboring to increase knowledge and understanding in an "extremely hard" but softer domain. Drawing on the work of Popper and Dewey, this commentary highlights the relative…

  16. Research in the Hard Sciences, and in Very Hard "Softer" Domains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, D. C.

    2014-01-01

    The author of this commentary argues that physical scientists are attempting to advance knowledge in the so-called hard sciences, whereas education researchers are laboring to increase knowledge and understanding in an "extremely hard" but softer domain. Drawing on the work of Popper and Dewey, this commentary highlights the relative…

  17. Investigation on the long-term radiation hardness of low resistivity starting silicon materials for RT silicon detectors in high energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Z.

    1994-02-01

    Relatively low resistivity (200 to 1000 {Omega}-cm) starting silicon materials have been studied in the search of room temperature neutron radiation-hard silicon detectors. It has been found that, moderate resistivity (300-700 {Omega}-cm) silicon detectors, after being irradiated to 5.0 {times} 10{sup 13} to 2.0 {times} 10{sup 14} n/cm{sup 2}, are extremely stable in terms of the detector full depletion voltage (V{sub d}) or the net effective concentration of ionized space charges (N{sub eff} ---- there is little ``reverse annealing`` of N{sub eff} at RT and elevated temperatures as compared with large reverse annealing observed for high resistivity silicon detectors. Detectors with starting resistivity of 300-700 {Omega}-cm have been found to be stable, during the equivalent of one year RT anneal that would reach the saturation of the first stage of reverse anneal, within then N{sub eff} window of {vert_bar}N{sub eff}{vert_bar}{le} 2.5 {times} 10{sup 12} cm{sup {minus}3} (V{sub d} = 180 V for d = 300 {mu}m) in a working range of 5.0 {times} 10{sup 13} to 1.5 {times} 10{sup 14} n/cm{sup 2}, or a net neutron radiation tolerance of 1.0 {times} 10{sup 14} n/cm{sup 2}. The observed effects are in very good agreement with an early proposed model, which predicted among others, that there might be an off set between the reverse annealing effect and the partial annealing of the P-V centers that leads to the partial recovery of the shallow impurity donors.

  18. Review of physics results from the Tevatron: QCD physics

    SciTech Connect

    Mesropian, Christina; Bandurin, Dmitry

    2015-02-17

    We present a summary of results from studies of quantum chromodynamics at the Fermilab Tevatron collider by the CDF and the D0 experiments. These include Run II results for the time period up to the end of Summer 2014. A brief description of Run I results is also given. This review covers a wide spectrum of topics, and includes measurements with jet and vector boson final states in the hard (perturbative) energy regime, as well as studies of soft physics such as diffractive and elastic scatterings, underlying and minimum bias events, hadron fragmentation, and multiple parton interactions.

  19. DSMC simulation of Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering in binary mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruno, Domenico; Frezzotti, Aldo; Ghiroldi, Gian Pietro

    2016-11-01

    Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering spectra (RBS) in dilute gas mixtures have been simulated by the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo method (DSMC). Different noble gas binary mixtures have been considered and the spectra have been simulated adopting the hard sphere collision model. It is suggested that DSMC simulations can be used in the interpretation of light scattering experiments in place of approximate kinetic models. Actually, the former have a firmer physical ground and can be readily extended to treat gas mixtures of arbitrary complexity. The results obtained confirm the capability of DSMC to predict experimental spectra and clears the way towards the simulation of polyatomic gas mixtures of interest for actual application (notably, air) where tractable kinetic model equations are still lacking.

  20. Deep Inelastic Scattering and Related Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Agostini, G.; Nigro, A.

    1997-03-01

    The Table of Contents for the book is as follows: * Organization * Foreword * Welcome Address * PLENARY SESSION: "From Paris to Rome" * Deep Inelastic Physics with H1 * Recent Results from ZEUS * Overview of the Status of Polarised Structure Functions * Quarks and Gluons at Hadron Colliders * Deep Inelastic Scattering - Theory and Phenomenology * WORKING GROUP 1: Structure Functions * Inclusive Jet Cross Section Measurement at CDF * Measurement of Direct Photons by the DØ Experiment * MRS Parton Distributions * Global QCD Analysis, the Gluon Distribution, and High Et Inclusive Jet Data * F2 Measurement and QCD Analysis on 94 H1 Data * The ZEUS 1994 F2 Measurement * Measurement of the Total γ*p Cross Section at very Low x and Q2 at HERA * New Results on F2 Structure Functions * Proton Structure Function and Gluon Distribution Functions from Fermilab Experiment E665 * The Transition from the Photoproduction to the DIS Region * The BFKL Pomeron: Can It Be Detected? * BFKL/CCFM Phenomenology * Physics and Mathematics of Dynamical Partons * k⊥-Factorization and Perturbative Invariants at Small x * Double Scaling Violations * On the Asymptotic Behaviour of F2(x, Q2) * Double Logarithmic Scaling of F2 * Differential Charged Current Cross-Sections at HERA * Neutral Current ep Deep Inelastic Scattering at High Q2 and Limits on New Physics * Charm Production in Charged-Current DIS and Extraction of the Strange Sea Density * Extraction of the Gluon Density * On Problems in Extracting the Gluon Density from the Nucleon Structure Function Measurements * Inclusive Measurement of the Strong Coupling at HERA * A Measurement of R = σL/σT in Deep Inelastic Neutrino-Nucleon Scattering at the Tevatron * A Measurement of R = σL/σT in Deep Inelastic μ - p and μ - d Scattering * A Determination of the Longitudinal Proton Structure Function FL(x, Q2) at Low x at HERA * Prospects for Measuring R = σL/σT at HERA in 1966 Low-Energy Running * A Leading Order, in ln(1/x) as well as

  1. Rayleigh, Raman and particulate scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, W. D.

    1982-01-01

    Analysis of the visible and near infrared spectra of planetary atmospheres and the multiple scattering of photons within the atmosphere are discussed. Photons detected within the spectral region are solar photons which were scattered by the gas and particles in the planetary atmosphere. An example is given for the incident and emitted fluxes for a hypothetical planet with an effective temperature of 100 K. The absorption spectrum of the planetary atmosphere is discussed in terms of the various scattering processes photons undergo within the atmosphere. Three different physical processes are considered. Rayleigh scattering and Raman scattering by the gas molecules, and scattering by any cloud or dust aerosol particles in the atmosphere. The physics of each of these processes is examined.

  2. Nano-metric Dust Particles as a Hardly Detectable Component of the Interplanetary Dust Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonia, I.; Nabiyev, Sh.

    2015-09-01

    The present work introduces the hypothesis of existence of a hardly detectable component of the interplanetary dust cloud and demonstrates that such a component is a dust formation consisting of the dust particles of nano-metric dimensions. This work describes the main physical properties of such a kind of nano-dust, and its possible chemical and mineralogical peculiarities proposes new explanations related to reddening of the dynamically cold transneptunian objects on account of scattering their light by nano-dust of the hardly detectable component of the interplanetary dust cloud. We propose the relation for the coefficient of absorption by the nano-dust and provide results of the statistical analysis of the TNO color index-orbital inclinations. We also present a critical assessment of the proposed hypothesis.

  3. “How hard could it be?” A descriptive analysis of errors made on a validated lifetime physical activity questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Anderton, Natalie; Newhouse, Megan E.; Ainsworth, Barbara E.; Nygaard, Ingrid E.; Egger, Marlene J.; Shaw, Janet M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Measuring historical physical activity in epidemiologic research depends on self-report. We aimed to describe data reporting errors women made in completing two validated questionnaires – Lifetime Physical Activity Questionnaire (LPAQ) and Occupational Questionnaire (OQ). Methods Participants, 229 women aged 38 – 65 years, completed questionnaires on paper (n=160) or by web interface (n=69). One research assistant collected questionnaire data, identified potential errors and contacted participants to trouble-shoot errors. Results Women made mean 9.7 (SD 11.2) errors on paper and 7.1 (SD 6.2) errors on electronic versions of the LPAQ and 2.6 (SD 3.8) and 1.1 (SD 1.4) errors on paper and electronic versions of the OQ, respectively. Fewer mistakes were made on electronic versions of both questionnaires combined (8.5±6.1) when compared to the paper versions (12.7±13.1). Only ~2% of the sample completed all questionnaires without detectable errors. The most common errors were reporting activities or frequencies inconsistently between past year survey and the current age epoch, reporting more years than allowed by age epoch and missing information. Conclusions Despite the implications of “self-report” questionnaires, we recommend researchers provide participants with additional instructions, either verbally or as written tip sheet or both, and follow-up after questionnaire completion to correct mistakes as needed. PMID:24809450

  4. Hyperon-nucleon scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rijken, Th. A.; Maessen, P. M. M.; de Swart, J. J.

    1991-04-01

    The YN-scattering low energy data are analyzed from the perspectives of the recently published Nijmegen soft-core Hyperon-Nucleon potential model. This model is derived from the soft-core Nucleon-Nucleon model using notably SU(3). Differences with the Nijmegen hard-core models D and F are indicated. The predictions of the differential cross section and the Λ-spin observables DNN, DSS, DSL, DLS, and DLL, which could be measured by PILAC, are given for pΛ(lab)=600 MeV/c.

  5. "Phonon" scattering beyond perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, WuJie; Ke, XueZhi; Xi, LiLi; Wu, LiHua; Yang, Jiong; Zhang, WenQing

    2016-02-01

    Searching and designing materials with intrinsically low lattice thermal conductivity (LTC) have attracted extensive consideration in thermoelectrics and thermal management community. The concept of part-crystalline part-liquid state, or even part-crystalline part-amorphous state, has recently been proposed to describe the exotic structure of materials with chemical- bond hierarchy, in which a set of atoms is weakly bonded to the rest species while the other sublattices retain relatively strong rigidity. The whole system inherently manifests the coexistence of rigid crystalline sublattices and fluctuating noncrystalline substructures. Representative materials in the unusual state can be classified into two categories, i.e., caged and non-caged ones. LTCs in both systems deviate from the traditional T -1 relationship ( T, the absolute temperature), which can hardly be described by small-parameter-based perturbation approaches. Beyond the classical perturbation theory, an extra rattling-like scattering should be considered to interpret the liquid-like and sublattice-amorphization-induced heat transport. Such a kind of compounds could be promising high-performance thermoelectric materials, due to the extremely low LTCs. Other physical properties for these part-crystalline substances should also exhibit certain novelty and deserve further exploration.

  6. Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bromley, D. Allan

    1980-01-01

    The author presents the argument that the past few years, in terms of new discoveries, insights, and questions raised, have been among the most productive in the history of physics. Selected for discussion are some of the most important new developments in physics research. (Author/SA)

  7. Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bromley, D. Allan

    1980-01-01

    The author presents the argument that the past few years, in terms of new discoveries, insights, and questions raised, have been among the most productive in the history of physics. Selected for discussion are some of the most important new developments in physics research. (Author/SA)

  8. Ordering of hard particles between hard walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrzanowska, A.; Teixeira, P. I. C.; Ehrentraut, H.; Cleaver, D. J.

    2001-05-01

    The structure of a fluid of hard Gaussian overlap particles of elongation κ = 5, confined between two hard walls, has been calculated from density-functional theory and Monte Carlo simulations. By using the exact expression for the excluded volume kernel (Velasco E and Mederos L 1998 J. Chem. Phys. 109 2361) and solving the appropriate Euler-Lagrange equation entirely numerically, we have been able to extend our theoretical predictions into the nematic phase, which had up till now remained relatively unexplored due to the high computational cost. Simulation reveals a rich adsorption behaviour with increasing bulk density, which is described semi-quantitatively by the theory without any adjustable parameters.

  9. Analysis of Hard Thin Film Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Dashen

    1998-01-01

    MSFC is interested in developing hard thin film coating for bearings. The wearing of the bearing is an important problem for space flight engine. Hard thin film coating can drastically improve the surface of the bearing and improve the wear-endurance of the bearing. However, many fundamental problems in surface physics, plasma deposition, etc, need further research. The approach is using electron cyclotron resonance chemical vapor deposition (ECRCVD) to deposit hard thin film an stainless steel bearing. The thin films in consideration include SiC, SiN and other materials. An ECRCVD deposition system is being assembled at MSFC.

  10. Analysis of Hard Thin Film Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Dashen

    1998-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is interested in developing hard thin film coating for bearings. The wearing of the bearing is an important problem for space flight engine. Hard thin film coating can drastically improve the surface of the bearing and improve the wear-endurance of the bearing. However, many fundamental problems in surface physics, plasma deposition, etc, need further research. The approach is using Electron Cyclotron Resonance Chemical Vapor Deposition (ECRCVD) to deposit hard thin film on stainless steel bearing. The thin films in consideration include SiC, SiN and other materials. An ECRCVD deposition system is being assembled at MSFC.

  11. Amino acid sequence homologies in the hard keratins of birds and reptiles, and their implications for molecular structure and physical properties.

    PubMed

    Fraser, R D Bruce; Parry, David A D

    2014-12-01

    Avian and reptilian epidermal appendages such as feathers, claws and scales exhibit a filament-matrix texture. Previous studies have established that both components reside within the same single-chain molecule. In the present study the homology in a wide range of aligned sequences is used to gain insights into the structure and function of the molecular segments associated with the filament and with the matrix. The notion that all molecules contain a β-rich 34-residue segment associated with the framework of the filament is reinforced by the present study. In addition, the residues involved in the polymerization of the molecules to form filaments are identified. In the Archosaurs (birds, crocodiles and turtles), and the Squamates (snakes and lizards) segments rich in glycine and tyrosine can be identified in the C-terminal domain. In Rhynocephalians (tuataras) and Squamates a similar segment is inserted at a specific point in the N-terminal domain. In some Archosaurian appendages (both avian and reptilian) segments rich in charged residues and cysteine are found in the N-terminal domain. The likely effect of these segments will be to soften the tissue without compromising its insolubility. The structure and role of the various molecular segments identified in this study and the way in which they might manifest themselves in terms of the physical properties of the particular epidermal appendage in which they appear are also discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Characterization of the physical properties and biocompatibility of polybenzoxazine-based aerogels for use as a novel hard-tissue scaffold.

    PubMed

    Rubenstein, David A; Lu, Hongbing; Mahadik, Shruti S; Leventis, Nicholas; Yin, Wei

    2012-01-01

    The process to successfully synthesize polybenzoxazine (PBO)-based aerogels has recently been optimized; however, the biocompatibility of these materials has never been investigated. PBO is synthesized from bisphenol A and aniline, which are both precursors to many commonly used biomaterials, including polyurethane. Surface-wise these new aerogels resemble the innate extracellular matrix of bone and if these new aerogels exhibit acceptable biocompatibility, they may be used as a scaffold for bone tissue engineering. Here, we aimed to characterize some of the physical properties of PBO aerogels, PBO aerogels co-polymerized with resorcinol and formaldehyde (RF) and their conversion to carbon aerogel, while determining the compatibility of all of these materials towards human osteoblasts. Biocompatibility was determined with a live/dead cell cytotoxicity assay, a metabolic activity assay, alkaline phosphatase activity and osteocalcin production, after incubation with PBO-based aerogels for up to 5 days. PBO aerogels co-polymerized with RF tended to have a low density, porosity and elastic modulus and provided the weakest substrate for bone cell growth. PBO-derived carbon aerogels tended to have a high density, a large porosity and improved mechanical properties and provided the best substrate for bone cell growth. These results suggest that PBO based carbon aerogels have a suitable biocompatibility towards osteoblasts and that they may be able to be used for bone tissue engineering scaffolds.

  13. Physics of High-Temperature Air. Part. 2. Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-01

    6-48 alia l/li I [ Hi (e.g., survivability, in particular X-ray hardness) to those cases where the understanding is poor (e.g., UV / VIS sensor...University of California, San Diego. f Mission Research Corp., Nashua, NH. g Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM. h Nicholls Research Corp., Vienna, VA...Scattering by Air Molecules in the Visible and Near- UV ............. 7-17 viii 7.4 Physics of Clouds

  14. Comparing natural and artificial carious lesions in human crowns by means of conventional hard x-ray micro-tomography and two-dimensional x-ray scattering with synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botta, Lea Maria; White, Shane N.; Deyhle, Hans; Dziadowiec, Iwona; Schulz, Georg; Thalmann, Peter; Müller, Bert

    2016-10-01

    Dental caries, one of the most prevalent infectious bacterial diseases in the world, is caused by specific types of acid-producing bacteria. Caries is a disease continuum resulting from the earliest loss of ions from apatite crystals through gross cavitation. Enamel dissolution starts when the pH-value drops below 5.5. Neutralizing the pH-value in the oral cavity opposes the process of demineralization, and so caries lesions occur in a dynamic cyclic de-mineralizing/remineralizing environment. Unfortunately, biomimetic regeneration of cavitated enamel is not yet possible, although remineralization of small carious lesions occurs under optimal conditions. Therefore, the development of methods that can regenerate carious lesions, and subsequently recover and retain teeth, is highly desirable. For the present proceedings we analyzed one naturally occurring sub-surface and one artificially produced lesion. For the characterization of artificial and natural lesions micro computed tomography is the method of choice when looking to determine three-dimensional mineral distribution and to quantify the degree of mineralization. In this pilot study we elucidate that the de-mineralized enamel in natural and artificially induced lesions shows comparable X-ray attenuation behavior, thereby implying that the study protocol employed herein seems to be appropriate. Once we know that the lesions are comparable, a series of well-reproducible in vitro experiments on enamel regeneration could be performed. In order to quantify further lesion morphology, the anisotropy of the enamel's nanostructure can be characterized by using spatially resolved, small-angle X-ray scattering. We wanted to demonstrate that the artificially induced defect fittingly resembles the natural carious lesion.

  15. Session: Hard Rock Penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Dunn, James C.; Drumheller, Douglas S.; Glowka, David A.; Lysne, Peter

    1992-01-01

    This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five presentations: ''Hard Rock Penetration - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''Overview - Hard Rock Penetration'' by James C. Dunn; ''An Overview of Acoustic Telemetry'' by Douglas S. Drumheller; ''Lost Circulation Technology Development Status'' by David A. Glowka; ''Downhole Memory-Logging Tools'' by Peter Lysne.

  16. Hardness Tester for Polyur

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauser, D. L.; Buras, D. F.; Corbin, J. M.

    1987-01-01

    Rubber-hardness tester modified for use on rigid polyurethane foam. Provides objective basis for evaluation of improvements in foam manufacturing and inspection. Typical acceptance criterion requires minimum hardness reading of 80 on modified tester. With adequate correlation tests, modified tester used to measure indirectly tensile and compressive strengths of foam.

  17. Hardness Tester for Polyur

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauser, D. L.; Buras, D. F.; Corbin, J. M.

    1987-01-01

    Rubber-hardness tester modified for use on rigid polyurethane foam. Provides objective basis for evaluation of improvements in foam manufacturing and inspection. Typical acceptance criterion requires minimum hardness reading of 80 on modified tester. With adequate correlation tests, modified tester used to measure indirectly tensile and compressive strengths of foam.

  18. The hard metal diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Cugell, D.W. )

    1992-06-01

    Hard metal is a mixture of tungsten carbide and cobalt, to which small amounts of other metals may be added. It is widely used for industrial purposes whenever extreme hardness and high temperature resistance are needed, such as for cutting tools, oil well drilling bits, and jet engine exhaust ports. Cobalt is the component of hard metal that can be a health hazard. Respiratory diseases occur in workers exposed to cobalt--either in the production of hard metal, from machining hard metal parts, or from other sources. Adverse pulmonary reactions include asthma, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, and interstitial fibrosis. A peculiar, almost unique form of lung fibrosis, giant cell interstitial pneumonia, is closely linked with cobalt exposure.66 references.

  19. The hard metal diseases.

    PubMed

    Cugell, D W

    1992-06-01

    Hard metal is a mixture of tungsten carbide and cobalt, to which small amounts of other metals may be added. It is widely used for industrial purposes whenever extreme hardness and high temperature resistance are needed, such as for cutting tools, oil well drilling bits, and jet engine exhaust ports. Cobalt is the component of hard metal that can be a health hazard. Respiratory diseases occur in workers exposed to cobalt--either in the production of hard metal, from machining hard metal parts, or from other sources. Adverse pulmonary reactions include asthma, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, and interstitial fibrosis. A peculiar, almost unique form of lung fibrosis, giant cell interstitial pneumonia, is closely linked with cobalt exposure.

  20. On the constituent counting rule for hard exclusive processes involving multi-quark states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Feng-Kun; Meißner, Ulf-G.; Wang, Wei

    2017-05-01

    At high energy, the cross section at finite scattering angle of a hard exclusive process falls off as a power of the Manderstam variable s. If all involved quark-gluon compositions undergo hard momentum transfers, the fall-off scaling is determined by the underlying valence structures of the initial and final hadrons, known as the constituent counting rule. In spite of the complication due to helicity conservation, it has been argued that when applied to exclusive process with exotic multiquark states, the counting rule is a powerful way to determine the valence degrees of freedom inside hadron exotics. In this work, we demonstrate that for hadrons with hidden flavors, the naive application of the constituent counting rule to exclusive process with hadron exotic multiquark states is problematic, since it is not mandatory for all components to participate in hard scattering at the scale . We illustrate the problems in the viewpoint based on effective field theory. We clarify the misleading results that may be obtained from the constituent counting rule in exclusive processes with exotic candidates such as , , X(3872), etc. Supported in part by DFG and NSFC through funds provided to the Sino-German CRC 110 “Symmetries and the Emergence of Structure in QCD” (NSFC Grant No. 11261130311), Thousand Talents Plan for Young Professionals, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) President’s International Fellowship Initiative (PIFI) (2015VMA076), National Natural Science Foundation of China (11575110, 11655002), Natural Science Foundation of Shanghai (15DZ2272100, 15ZR1423100), Open Project Program of State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China (Y5KF111CJ1), and by Key Laboratory for Particle Physics, Astrophysics and Cosmology, Ministry of Education.

  1. Spectral evolution of microwaves and hard X-rays in the 1989 March 18 flare and its interpretation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jeongwoo W.; Gary, Dale E.

    1994-01-01

    We analyze the time variation of microwave spectra and hard X-ray spectra of 1989 March 18, which are obtained from the Solar Array at the Owens Valley Radio Observatory (OVRO) and the Hard X-Ray Burst Spectrometer (HXRBS) on the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM), respectively. From this observation, it is noted that the hard X-ray spectra gradually soften over 50 - 200 keV on-and-after the maximum phase while the microwaves at 1 - 15 GHz show neither a change in spectral shape nor as rapid a decay as hard X-rays. This leads to decoupling of hard X-rays from the microwaves in the decay phase away from their good correlation seen in the initial rise phase. To interpret this observation, we adopt a view that microwave-emitting particles and hard X-ray particles are physically separated in an inhomogeneous magnetic loop, but linked via interactions with the Whistler waves generated during flares. From this viewpoint, it is argued that the observed decoupling of microwaves from hard X-rays may be due to the different ability of each source region to maintain high energy electrons in response to the Whistler waves passing through the entire loop. To demonstrate this possibility, we solve a Fokker-Planck equation that describes evolution of electrons interacting with the Whistler waves, taking into account the variation of Fokker-Planck coefficients with physical quantities of the background medium. The numerical Fokker-Planck solutions are then used to calculate microwave spectra and hard X-ray spectra for agreement with observations. Our model results are as follows: in a sronger field region, the energy loss by electron escape due to scattering by the waves is greatly enhanced resulting in steep particle distributions that reproduce the observed hard X-ray spectra. In a region with weaker fields and lower density, this loss term is reduced allowing high energy electrons to survive longer so that microwaves can be emitted there in excess of hard X-rays during the decay phase

  2. Spectral evolution of microwaves and hard X-rays in the 1989 March 18 flare and its interpretation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jeongwoo W.; Gary, Dale E.

    1994-01-01

    We analyze the time variation of microwave spectra and hard X-ray spectra of 1989 March 18, which are obtained from the Solar Array at the Owens Valley Radio Observatory (OVRO) and the Hard X-Ray Burst Spectrometer (HXRBS) on the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM), respectively. From this observation, it is noted that the hard X-ray spectra gradually soften over 50 - 200 keV on-and-after the maximum phase while the microwaves at 1 - 15 GHz show neither a change in spectral shape nor as rapid a decay as hard X-rays. This leads to decoupling of hard X-rays from the microwaves in the decay phase away from their good correlation seen in the initial rise phase. To interpret this observation, we adopt a view that microwave-emitting particles and hard X-ray particles are physically separated in an inhomogeneous magnetic loop, but linked via interactions with the Whistler waves generated during flares. From this viewpoint, it is argued that the observed decoupling of microwaves from hard X-rays may be due to the different ability of each source region to maintain high energy electrons in response to the Whistler waves passing through the entire loop. To demonstrate this possibility, we solve a Fokker-Planck equation that describes evolution of electrons interacting with the Whistler waves, taking into account the variation of Fokker-Planck coefficients with physical quantities of the background medium. The numerical Fokker-Planck solutions are then used to calculate microwave spectra and hard X-ray spectra for agreement with observations. Our model results are as follows: in a sronger field region, the energy loss by electron escape due to scattering by the waves is greatly enhanced resulting in steep particle distributions that reproduce the observed hard X-ray spectra. In a region with weaker fields and lower density, this loss term is reduced allowing high energy electrons to survive longer so that microwaves can be emitted there in excess of hard X-rays during the decay phase

  3. Stimulated Brillouin Scattering Microscopic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ballmann, Charles W.; Thompson, Jonathan V.; Traverso, Andrew J.; Meng, Zhaokai; Scully, Marlan O.; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.

    2015-01-01

    Two-dimensional stimulated Brillouin scattering microscopy is demonstrated for the first time using low power continuous-wave lasers tunable around 780 nm. Spontaneous Brillouin spectroscopy has much potential for probing viscoelastic properties remotely and non-invasively on a microscopic scale. Nonlinear Brillouin scattering spectroscopy and microscopy may provide a way to tremendously accelerate the data aquisition and improve spatial resolution. This general imaging setup can be easily adapted for specific applications in biology and material science. The low power and optical wavelengths in the water transparency window used in this setup provide a powerful bioimaging technique for probing the mechanical properties of hard and soft tissue. PMID:26691398

  4. Hardness of irradiated poly(methyl methacrylate) at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, K.-P.; Lee, Sanboh; Cheng, Cheu Pyeng

    2001-08-15

    The decrease in hardness induced by gamma irradiation in poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) has been investigated. The hardness is assumed to decrease linearly with the concentration of radiation-induced defects. Annealing at high temperatures induces defect annihilation as tracked by an increase in hardness. The annihilation follows first-order kinetics during isothermal annealing. The dependence of hardness on the reciprocal of the time constant satisfies the Arrhenius equation, and the corresponding activation energy of the kinetic process decreases with increasing dose. The hardness of postannealed PMMA decreases linearly with increasing dose. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  5. Dynamic hardness of metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xuecheng

    Dynamic hardness (Pd) of 22 different pure metals and alloys having a wide range of elastic modulus, static hardness, and crystal structure were measured in a gas pulse system. The indentation contact diameter with an indenting sphere and the radius (r2) of curvature of the indentation were determined by the curve fitting of the indentation profile data. r 2 measured by the profilometer was compared with that calculated from Hertz equation in both dynamic and static conditions. The results indicated that the curvature change due to elastic recovery after unloading is approximately proportional to the parameters predicted by Hertz equation. However, r 2 is less than the radius of indenting sphere in many cases which is contradictory to Hertz analysis. This discrepancy is believed due to the difference between Hertzian and actual stress distributions underneath the indentation. Factors which influence indentation elastic recovery were also discussed. It was found that Tabor dynamic hardness formula always gives a lower value than that directly from dynamic hardness definition DeltaE/V because of errors mainly from Tabor's rebound equation and the assumption that dynamic hardness at the beginning of rebound process (Pr) is equal to kinetic energy change of an impact sphere over the formed crater volume (Pd) in the derivation process for Tabor's dynamic hardness formula. Experimental results also suggested that dynamic to static hardness ratio of a material is primarily determined by its crystal structure and static hardness. The effects of strain rate and temperature rise on this ratio were discussed. A vacuum rotating arm apparatus was built to measure Pd at 70, 127, and 381 mum sphere sizes, these results exhibited that Pd is highly depended on the sphere size due to the strain rate effects. P d was also used to substitute for static hardness to correlate with abrasion and erosion resistance of metals and alloys. The particle size effects observed in erosion were

  6. Hard QCD rescattering in few nucleon systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maheswari, Dhiraj; Sargsian, Misak

    2017-01-01

    The theoretical framework of hard QCD rescattering mechanism (HRM) is extended to calculate the high energy γ3 He -> pd reaction at 900 center of mass angle. In HRM model , the incoming high energy photon strikes a quark from one of the nucleons in the target which subsequently undergoes hard rescattering with the quarks from the other nucleons generating hard two-body baryonic system in the final state of the reaction. Based on the HRM, a parameter free expression for the differential cross section for the reaction is derived, expressed through the 3 He -> pd transition spectral function, hard pd -> pd elastic scattering cross section and the effective charge of the quarks being interchanged in the hard rescattering process. The numerical estimates obtained from this expression for the differential cross section are in a good agreement with the data recently obtained at the Jefferson Lab experiment, showing the energy scaling of cross section with an exponent of s-17, also consistent with the quark counting rule. The angular and energy dependences of the cross section are also predicted within HRM which are in good agreement with the preliminary data of these distributions. Research is supported by the US Department of Energy.

  7. Scattering Of Light Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Quaglioni, S; Navratil, P; Roth, R

    2009-12-15

    The exact treatment of nuclei starting from the constituent nucleons and the fundamental interactions among them has been a long-standing goal in nuclear physics. Above all nuclear scattering and reactions, which require the solution of the many-body quantum-mechanical problem in the continuum, represent an extraordinary theoretical as well as computational challenge for ab initio approaches.We present a new ab initio many-body approach which derives from the combination of the ab initio no-core shell model with the resonating-group method [4]. By complementing a microscopic cluster technique with the use of realistic interactions, and a microscopic and consistent description of the nucleon clusters, this approach is capable of describing simultaneously both bound and scattering states in light nuclei. We will discuss applications to neutron and proton scattering on sand light p-shell nuclei using realistic nucleon-nucleon potentials, and outline the progress toward the treatment of more complex reactions.

  8. Hard and soft acids and bases: atoms and atomic ions.

    PubMed

    Reed, James L

    2008-07-07

    The structural origin of hard-soft behavior in atomic acids and bases has been explored using a simple orbital model. The Pearson principle of hard and soft acids and bases has been taken to be the defining statement about hard-soft behavior and as a definition of chemical hardness. There are a number of conditions that are imposed on any candidate structure and associated property by the Pearson principle, which have been exploited. The Pearson principle itself has been used to generate a thermodynamically based scale of relative hardness and softness for acids and bases (operational chemical hardness), and a modified Slater model has been used to discern the electronic origin of hard-soft behavior. Whereas chemical hardness is a chemical property of an acid or base and the operational chemical hardness is an experimental measure of it, the absolute hardness is a physical property of an atom or molecule. A critical examination of chemical hardness, which has been based on a more rigorous application of the Pearson principle and the availability of quantitative measures of chemical hardness, suggests that the origin of hard-soft behavior for both acids and bases resides in the relaxation of the electrons not undergoing transfer during the acid-base interaction. Furthermore, the results suggest that the absolute hardness should not be taken as synonymous with chemical hardness but that the relationship is somewhat more complex. Finally, this work provides additional groundwork for a better understanding of chemical hardness that will inform the understanding of hardness in molecules.

  9. Organizing Your Hard Disk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stocker, H. Robert; Hilton, Thomas S. E.

    1991-01-01

    Suggests strategies that make hard disk organization easy and efficient, such as making, changing, and removing directories; grouping files by subject; naming files effectively; backing up efficiently; and using PATH. (JOW)

  10. Organizing Your Hard Disk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stocker, H. Robert; Hilton, Thomas S. E.

    1991-01-01

    Suggests strategies that make hard disk organization easy and efficient, such as making, changing, and removing directories; grouping files by subject; naming files effectively; backing up efficiently; and using PATH. (JOW)

  11. Radiation from hard objects

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1997-02-01

    The inference of the diameter of hard objects is insensitive to radiation efficiency. Deductions of radiation efficiency from observations are very sensitive - possibly overly so. Inferences of the initial velocity and trajectory vary similarly, and hence are comparably sensitive.

  12. Photon bremsstrahlung and diffusive broadening of a hard jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumder, A.; Fries, R. J.; Müller, B.

    2008-06-01

    The photon bremsstrahlung rate from a quark jet produced in deep-inelastic scattering (DIS) off a large nucleus is studied in the collinear limit. The leading medium-enhanced higher twist corrections that describe the multiple scattering of the jet in the nucleus are re-summed to all orders of twist. The propagation of the jet in the absence of further radiative energy loss is shown to be governed by a transverse momentum diffusion equation. We compute the final photon spectrum in the limit of soft photons, taking into account the leading and next-to-leading terms in the photon momentum fraction y. In this limit, the photon spectrum in a physical gauge is shown to arise from two interfering sources: one where the initial hard scattering produces an off-shell quark, which immediately radiates the photon and then undergoes subsequent soft rescattering, and an alternative in which the quark is produced on-shell and propagates through the medium until it is driven off-shell by rescattering and radiates the photon. Our result has a simple formal structure as a product of the photon splitting function, the quark transverse momentum distribution coming from a diffusion equation, and a dimensionless factor that encodes the effect of the interferences encountered by the propagating quark over the length of the medium. The destructive nature of such interferences in the small-y limit is responsible for the origin of the Landau-Pomeranchuck-Migdal (LPM) effect. Along the way we also discuss possible implications for quark jets in hot nuclear matter.

  13. Communications through EM-wave scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ince, A. N.

    1982-05-01

    Various scatter systems are examined with reference to the underlying physical processes and communications capabilities. The systems reviewed include ionoscatter, meteor burst, field-aligned scatter, chaff and needles, troposcatter, and optical scattering by aerosols. The scatter channel characteristics discussed include transmission loss, long- and short-term fading, signal distortion, and antenna gain degradation. Although the capacities of the scatter systems are restricted, the ranges they cover put them in the same group as the conventional HF radio and modern satellite communications. Scatter systems can be designed to be more robust than HF and more economical than satellite communication systems.

  14. A breast-specific, negligible-dose scatter correction technique for dedicated cone-beam breast CT: a physics-based approach to improve Hounsfield Unit accuracy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kai; Burkett, George; Boone, John M

    2014-11-07

    The purpose of this research was to develop a method to correct the cupping artifact caused from x-ray scattering and to achieve consistent Hounsfield Unit (HU) values of breast tissues for a dedicated breast CT (bCT) system. The use of a beam passing array (BPA) composed of parallel-holes has been previously proposed for scatter correction in various imaging applications. In this study, we first verified the efficacy and accuracy using BPA to measure the scatter signal on a cone-beam bCT system. A systematic scatter correction approach was then developed by modeling the scatter-to-primary ratio (SPR) in projection images acquired with and without BPA. To quantitatively evaluate the improved accuracy of HU values, different breast tissue-equivalent phantoms were scanned and radially averaged HU profiles through reconstructed planes were evaluated. The dependency of the correction method on object size and number of projections was studied. A simplified application of the proposed method on five clinical patient scans was performed to demonstrate efficacy. For the typical 10-18 cm breast diameters seen in the bCT application, the proposed method can effectively correct for the cupping artifact and reduce the variation of HU values of breast equivalent material from 150 to 40 HU. The measured HU values of 100% glandular tissue, 50/50 glandular/adipose tissue, and 100% adipose tissue were approximately 46, -35, and -94, respectively. It was found that only six BPA projections were necessary to accurately implement this method, and the additional dose requirement is less than 1% of the exam dose. The proposed method can effectively correct for the cupping artifact caused from x-ray scattering and retain consistent HU values of breast tissues.

  15. A breast-specific, negligible-dose scatter correction technique for dedicated cone-beam breast CT: a physics-based approach to improve Hounsfield Unit accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kai; Burkett, George, Jr.; Boone, John M.

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this research was to develop a method to correct the cupping artifact caused from x-ray scattering and to achieve consistent Hounsfield Unit (HU) values of breast tissues for a dedicated breast CT (bCT) system. The use of a beam passing array (BPA) composed of parallel-holes has been previously proposed for scatter correction in various imaging applications. In this study, we first verified the efficacy and accuracy using BPA to measure the scatter signal on a cone-beam bCT system. A systematic scatter correction approach was then developed by modeling the scatter-to-primary ratio (SPR) in projection images acquired with and without BPA. To quantitatively evaluate the improved accuracy of HU values, different breast tissue-equivalent phantoms were scanned and radially averaged HU profiles through reconstructed planes were evaluated. The dependency of the correction method on object size and number of projections was studied. A simplified application of the proposed method on five clinical patient scans was performed to demonstrate efficacy. For the typical 10-18 cm breast diameters seen in the bCT application, the proposed method can effectively correct for the cupping artifact and reduce the variation of HU values of breast equivalent material from 150 to 40 HU. The measured HU values of 100% glandular tissue, 50/50 glandular/adipose tissue, and 100% adipose tissue were approximately 46, -35, and -94, respectively. It was found that only six BPA projections were necessary to accurately implement this method, and the additional dose requirement is less than 1% of the exam dose. The proposed method can effectively correct for the cupping artifact caused from x-ray scattering and retain consistent HU values of breast tissues.

  16. A New Polyethylene Scattering Law Determined Using Inelastic Neutron Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Lavelle, Christopher M; Liu, C; Stone, Matthew B

    2013-01-01

    Monte Carlo neutron transport codes such as MCNP rely on accurate data for nuclear physics cross-sections to produce accurate results. At low energy, this takes the form of scattering laws based on the dynamic structure factor, S (Q, E). High density polyethylene (HDPE) is frequently employed as a neutron moderator at both high and low temperatures, however the only cross-sections available are for T =300 K, and the evaluation has not been updated in quite some time. In this paper we describe inelastic neutron scattering measurements on HDPE at 5 and 300 K which are used to improve the scattering law for HDPE. We describe the experimental methods, review some of the past HDPE scattering laws, and compare computations using these models to the measured S (Q, E). The total cross-section is compared to available data, and the treatment of the carbon secondary scatterer as a free gas is assessed. We also discuss the use of the measurement itself as a scattering law via the 1 phonon approximation. We show that a scattering law computed using a more detailed model for the Generalized Density of States (GDOS) compares more favorably to this experiment, suggesting that inelastic neutron scattering can play an important role in both the development and validation of new scattering laws for Monte Carlo work.

  17. Virtual Nucleon Compton Scattering in Perturbative QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, Richard; Ji, Chueng-Ryong

    2004-10-01

    Results of perturbative calculation for nucleon Compton scattering are presented. The calculations consider both the case of the incoming photon being real and the case of the incoming photon being virtual. Hard scattering amplitudes are calculated using a software package developed at NC State University footnote[1]A. Pang and C.-R. Ji, Computers in Physics Vol 9 (No. 6), Nov/Dec 1995 p589-593footnote[2]A. Pang and C.-R. Ji, J. Comp. Phys. 115, 267 (1994). The integrations required to calculate total cross section are made following the approach of Kronfeld and Nizicfootnote[3]A. Kronfeld and B. Nizic, Phys. Rev. D 44, 3445 (1991). Poles are split into a real principal part plus an imaginary delta function. The delta functions are evaluated explicitly by hand; principal part integrations are evaluated numerically, after making a variable transformation to render the integrand finite over the range of integration. For the real photon case, there are five previous calculations to consider, each of which produced a different resultfootnote[3]A. Kronfeld and B. Nizic, Phys. Rev. D 44, 3445 (1991)footnote[4]E. Maina and G. Farrar, Phys. Lett. B 206, 120 (1988)footnote[5]G. Farrar and H. Zhang, Phys. Rev. D 41, 3348 (1990)footnote[6]M. Vanderhaeghen, P. Guichon, and J. Van de Wiele, presented at workshop on virtual Compton scattering, Clermont-Ferrand, France, 1996footnote[7]T. Brooks and L. Dixon, Phys. Rev. D 62, 114021 (2000). There is an agreement with the results of Brooks and Dixonfootnote[7]T. Brooks and L. Dixon, Phys. Rev. D 62, 114021 (2000). For the virtual photon case, the new result is compared with that of Farrar and Zhang footnote[5]G. Farrar and H. Zhang, Phys. Rev. D 41, 3348 (1990). Since there are differences, we discuss which result is more believable and why. For the deeply virtual case (DVCS), comparison is made with other non-pertubative methods using GPDs.

  18. The challenge and impact of engaging hard-to-reach populations in regular physical activity and health behaviours: an examination of an English Premier League 'Football in the Community' men's health programme.

    PubMed

    Curran, K; Drust, B; Murphy, R; Pringle, A; Richardson, D

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the challenges that men from hard-to-reach (HTR) populations encounter when attempting to commit to regular participation in physical activity and health behaviours, and to explore the psychological and social effects of participation in a twelve week football-led health improvement intervention. A twelve week football specific physical activity intervention targeting men from HTR populations was delivered by Everton Football Clubs' Football in the Community (FitC) scheme as part of a national programme of men's health delivered in/by English Premier League (EPL) football clubs. Men living in homeless shelters and/or recovering from substance misuse were recruited over a period of three months. The programme consisted of a two hour football session, twice weekly, alongside the dissemination of healthy living messages. Football sessions were conducted by a qualified FitC coach. This research was conducted during a twelve week period of immersed practitioner-research. Ethnographic and observational methodologies were adopted. Psychosocial issues were discussed with participants through informal client-researcher interactions and data were logged via field notes. Records of attendance were logged. Participants who failed to attend a session were contacted and their reason(s) for non-attendance were recorded. Data were analysed using deductive and inductive reasoning. Despite the apparent ambition of the participants to regularly participate in the FitC programme, adherence to the programme was poor. Economic, environmental and social barriers to engagement in the programme were apparent. Engagement in the programme resulted in positive psychosocial developments; the development of structure, social interaction and social capital. Community based football-led health improvement programmes endorsed by professional football clubs appear well positioned to connect with, and attract, men from HTR populations. The evidence suggests that such programmes can

  19. PREFACE: Atom-surface scattering Atom-surface scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miret-Artés, Salvador

    2010-08-01

    It has been a privilege and a real pleasure to organize this special issue or festschrift in the general field of atom-surface scattering (and its interaction) in honor of J R Manson. This is a good opportunity and an ideal place to express our deep gratitude to one of the leaders in this field for his fundamental and outstanding scientific contributions. J R Manson, or Dick to his friends and colleagues, is one of the founding fathers, together with N Cabrera and V Celli, of the 'Theory of surface scattering and detection of surface phonons'. This is the title of the very well-known first theoretical paper by Dick published in Physical Review Letters in 1969. My first meeting with Dick was around twenty years ago in Saclay. J Lapujoulade organized a small group seminar about selective adsorption resonances in metal vicinal surfaces. We discussed this important issue in surface physics and many other things as if we had always known each other. This familiarity and warm welcome struck me from the very beginning. During the coming years, I found this to be a very attractive aspect of his personality. During my stays in Göttingen, we had the opportunity to talk widely about science and life at lunch or dinner time, walking or cycling. During these nice meetings, he showed, with humility, an impressive cultural background. It is quite clear that his personal opinions about history, religion, politics, music, etc, come from considering and analyzing them as 'open dynamical systems'. In particular, with good food and better wine in a restaurant or at home, a happy cheerful soirée is guaranteed with him, or even with only a good beer or espresso, and an interesting conversation arises naturally. He likes to listen before speaking. Probably not many people know his interest in tractors. He has an incredible collection of very old tractors at home. In one of my visits to Clemson, he showed me the collection, explaining to me in great detail, their technical properties

  20. Scattering Law Analysis Based on Hapke and Lommel-Seeliger Models for Asteroidal Taxonomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiang-Jie; Lu, Xiao-Ping; Li, Jian-Yang; Mei, Bao; Hsia, Chih-Hao; Zhao, Hai-Bin

    2017-09-01

    In deriving the physical properties of asteroids from their photometric data, the scattering law plays an important role, although the shape variations of asteroids result in the main variations in lightcurves. By following the physical behaviors of light reflections, Hapke et al. deduced complex functions to represent the scattering process, however, it is very hard to accurately simulate the surface scattering law in reality. For simplicity, other numerical scattering models are presented for efficiently calculating the physical properties of asteroids, such as the Lommel-Seeliger (LS) model. In this article, these two models are compared numerically. It is found that in some numerical applications the LS model in simple form with four parameters can be exploited to replace the Hapke model in complex form with five parameters. Furthermore, the generated synthetic lightcurves by the Cellinoid shape model also show that the LS model can perform as well as the Hapke model in the inversion process. Finally, by applying the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) technique to the parameters of the LS model, we present an efficient method to classify C and S type asteroids, instead of the conventional method using the parameters of the Hapke model.

  1. Partial wave analysis of scattering with the nonlocal Aharonov-Bohm effect and the anomalous cross section induced by quantum interference

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, D.-H.

    2004-05-01

    Partial wave theory of a three dimensional scattering problem for an arbitrary short range potential and a nonlocal Aharonov-Bohm magnetic flux is established. The scattering process of a 'hard sphere'-like potential and the magnetic flux is examined. An anomalous total cross section is revealed at the specific quantized magnetic flux at low energy which helps explain the composite fermion and boson model in the fractional quantum Hall effect. Since the nonlocal quantum interference of magnetic flux on the charged particles is universal, the nonlocal effect is expected to appear in a quite general potential system and will be useful in understanding some other phenomena in mesoscopic physics.

  2. Radiation Hard AlGaN Detectors and Imager

    SciTech Connect

    2012-05-01

    Radiation hardness of AlGaN photodiodes was tested using a 65 MeV proton beam with a total proton fluence of 3x10{sup 12} protons/cm{sup 2}. AlGaN Deep UV Photodiode have extremely high radiation hardness. These new devices have mission critical applications in high energy density physics (HEDP) and space explorations. These new devices satisfy radiation hardness requirements by NIF. NSTec is developing next generation AlGaN optoelectronics and imagers.

  3. Moisture influence on near-infrared prediction of wheat hardness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windham, William R.; Gaines, Charles S.; Leffler, Richard G.

    1991-02-01

    Recently near infrared (NTR) reflectance instrumentation has been used to provide an empirical measure of wheat hardness. This hardness scale is based on the radiation scattering properties of meal particles at 1680 and 2230 nm. Hard wheats have a larger mean particles size (PS) after grinding than soft wheats. However wheat kernel moisture content can influence mean PS after grinding. The objective of this study was to determine the sensitivity of MR wheat hardness measurements to moisture content and to make the hardness score independent of moisture by correcting hardness measurements for the actual moisture content of measured samples. Forty wheat cultivars composed of hard red winter hard red spring soft red winter and soft white winter were used. Wheat kernel subsamples were stored at 20 40 60 and 80 relative humidity (RH). After equilibration samples were ground and the meal analyzed for hardness score (HS) and moisture. HS were 48 50 54 and 65 for 20 40 60 and 80 RH respectively. Differences in HS within each wheat class were the result of a moisture induced change in the PS of the meal. An algorithm was developed to correct HS to 11 moisture. This correction provides HS that are nearly independent of moisture content. 1.

  4. Physics.

    PubMed

    Bromley, D A

    1980-07-04

    From massive quarks deep in the hearts of atomic nuclei to the catastrophic collapse of giant stars in the farthest reaches of the universe, from the partial realization of Einstein's dream of a unified theory of the forces of nature to the most practical applications in technology, medicine, and throughout contemporary society, physics continues to have a profound impact on man's view of the universe and on the quality of life. The author argues that the past few years, in terms of new discoveries, new insight-and the new questions-have been among the most productive in the history of the field and puts into context his selection of some of the most important new developments in this fundamental science.

  5. MAGNETIC NEUTRON SCATTERING

    SciTech Connect

    ZALIZNYAK,I.A.; LEE,S.H.

    2004-07-30

    Much of our understanding of the atomic-scale magnetic structure and the dynamical properties of solids and liquids was gained from neutron-scattering studies. Elastic and inelastic neutron spectroscopy provided physicists with an unprecedented, detailed access to spin structures, magnetic-excitation spectra, soft-modes and critical dynamics at magnetic-phase transitions, which is unrivaled by other experimental techniques. Because the neutron has no electric charge, it is an ideal weakly interacting and highly penetrating probe of matter's inner structure and dynamics. Unlike techniques using photon electric fields or charged particles (e.g., electrons, muons) that significantly modify the local electronic environment, neutron spectroscopy allows determination of a material's intrinsic, unperturbed physical properties. The method is not sensitive to extraneous charges, electric fields, and the imperfection of surface layers. Because the neutron is a highly penetrating and non-destructive probe, neutron spectroscopy can probe the microscopic properties of bulk materials (not just their surface layers) and study samples embedded in complex environments, such as cryostats, magnets, and pressure cells, which are essential for understanding the physical origins of magnetic phenomena. Neutron scattering is arguably the most powerful and versatile experimental tool for studying the microscopic properties of the magnetic materials. The magnitude of the cross-section of the neutron magnetic scattering is similar to the cross-section of nuclear scattering by short-range nuclear forces, and is large enough to provide measurable scattering by the ordered magnetic structures and electron spin fluctuations. In the half-a-century or so that has passed since neutron beams with sufficient intensity for scattering applications became available with the advent of the nuclear reactors, they have became indispensable tools for studying a variety of important areas of modern science

  6. Softeners for hardness removal.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Rashma; Manjunath, N T; Babu, B T Suresh

    2005-10-01

    The depletion of water resources, both surface and subsurface and deterioration of water quality made researchers and policy makers to think of the possible remedies to make water sources potable / wholesome. There is a need to address the problems of hardness and fluoride in subsurface water on priority basis. In this direction, bench scale studies were conducted to evaluate the performance of water softeners. Indepth studies were carried out at University B.D.T College of Engineering, Davangere, Karnataka, to assess the performance of bench scale softeners of D to H ratio 1:2, 1:3, 1:4 in removing hardness of varied concentrations from both synthetic and natural water samples. Studies revealed that irrespective of D to H ratio of softeners, the waters having hardness concentration up to 1000 mg/l can be treated to the same degree (81.68% and above). The findings of regeneration studies and cost economics are also summarized in this paper.

  7. Scientific Applications of a Hard-X-Ray FEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arthur, John

    1998-04-01

    Free electron lasers are now being designed which will operate at wavelengths down to about 1 angstrom. Due to the physics of the high-gain, single pass FEL process that these sources will exploit, the radiation produced will have unique properties. In particular: -- The FEL peak intensity and peak brightness will be many orders of magnitude higher than can be produced by any other source. -- The pulse length will be less than 1 picosecond, orders of magnitude shorter than can be achieved with any other bright source such as a synchrotron. -- The FEL radiation will have full transverse coherence and a degeneracy parameter (photons/coherence volume) equal to 10^9 or more. No other source can produce hard x-radiation with a degeneracy parameter significantly greater than 1. These properties offer the chance to study chemical, biological, and condensed matter dynamical processes with sub-picosecond time resolution and angstrom spatial resolution. X-ray crystallography could be used to determine the structures of very-short-lived states of photosynthetic reaction centers. X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy could be used to study fluctuations in materials such as gels and glass-forming liquids, on a time scale complementary to that probed by neutron spin echo and dynamic light scattering techniques, but with better spatial resolution. Snap-shot x-ray scattering experiments could be performed on samples in extreme conditions such as ultra-high pulsed magnetic fields. Furthermore, the high peak power of the FEL radiation could be used to create precisely-controlled chemical and structural modifications inside samples. There is also the possibility that nonlinear x-ray interactions could be used to give increased resolution for spectroscopic studies, to greatly expand the parameter space for atomic physics studies, and to permit new fundamental tests of quantum mechanics. For example, the study of nonlinear photon interactions with core atomic electrons would test and

  8. Hyperon-nucleon scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Rijken, T.A.; Maessen, P.M.M.; de Swart, J.J. )

    1991-04-25

    The YN-scattering low energy data are analyzed from the perspectives of the recently published Nijmegen soft-core Hyperon-Nucleon potential model. This model is derived from the soft-core Nucleon-Nucleon model using notably SU(3). Differences with the Nijmegen hard-core models D and F are indicated. The predictions of the differential cross section and the {Lambda}-spin observables {ital D}{sub {ital NN}}, {ital D}{sub {ital SS}}, {ital D}{sub {ital SL}}, {ital D}{sub {ital LS}}, and {ital D}{sub {ital LL}}, which could be measured by PILAC, are given for {ital p}{sub {Lambda}}(lab)=600 MeV/c.

  9. Polarimetric scattering from layered media with multiple species of scatterers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nghiem, S. V.; Kwok, R.; Yueh, S. H.; Kong, J. A.; Hsu, C. C.; Tassoudji, M. A.; Shin, R. T.

    1995-01-01

    Geophysical media are usually heterogeneous and contain multiple species of scatterers. In this paper a model is presented to calculate effective permittivities and polarimetric backscattering coefficients of multispecies-layered media. The same physical description is consistently used in the derivation of both permittivities and scattering coefficients. The strong permittivity fluctuation theory is extended to account for the multiple species of scatterers with a general ellipsoidal shape whose orientations are randomly distributed. Under the distorted Born approximation, polarimetric scattering coefficients are obtained. These calculations are applicable to the special cases of spheroidal and spherical scatterers. The model is used to study effects of scatterer shapes and multispecies mixtures on polarimetric signatures of heterogeneous media. The multispecies model accounts for moisture content in scattering media such as snowpack in an ice sheet. The results indicate a high sensitivity of backscatter to moisture with a stronger dependence for drier snow and ice grain size is important to the backscatter. For frost-covered saline ice, model results for bare ice are compared with measured data at C band and then the frost flower formation is simulated with a layer of fanlike ice crystals including brine infiltration over a rough interface. The results with the frost cover suggest a significant increase in scattering coefficients and a polarimetric signature closer to isotropic characteristics compared to the thin saline ice case.

  10. Physically based radiative transfer framework for hyperspectral modelling of light interaction with volumetrically inhomogeneous scattering tissue-like media (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doronin, Alexander; Bykov, Alexander; Rushmeier, Holly E.; Meglinski, Igor

    2017-02-01

    In the current report we present further developments of a unified Monte Carlo-based computational model and explore hyperspectral modelling of light interaction with volumetrically inhomogeneous scattering tissue-like media. The developed framework utilizes voxelized representation of the medium and considers spatial/volumetric variations in both structural e.g. surface roughness and wavelength-dependant optical properties. We present the detailed description of algorithms for modelling of light-medium interactions and schemes used for voxel-to-voxel photon packet transitions. The results of calculation of diffuse reflectance and Bidirectional Scattering-Surface Reflectance Distribution Function (BSSRDF) are presented. The results of simulations are compared with exact analytical solutions, phantom studies and measurements obtained by a low-cost experimental system developed in house for acquiring shape and subsurface scattering properties of objects by means of projection of temporal sequences of binary patterns. The computational solution is accelerated by the graphics processing units (GPUs) and compatible with most standard graphics/ and computer tomography file formats.

  11. Investigation of optimum anti-scatter grid selection for digital radiography: physical imaging properties and detectability of low-contrast signals.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Nobukazu; Naka, Kentaro; Saito, Aya; Morishita, Junji; Toyofuku, Fukai; Ohki, Masafumi; Higashida, Yoshiharu

    2013-01-01

    Our aim in this study was to evaluate the effect of the grid variations on the imaging performance for a computed radiographic system under identical exposure condition. Digital radiographies using a 20-cm Lucite phantom were performed without grid and with grid ratios of 5:1, 8:1, 10:1, 12:1, and 14:1. The scatter fraction, the incident dose to the image receptor, the Wiener spectrum (WS), and the noise-equivalent quanta (NEQ) were measured. Visibility of low-contrast signals was evaluated using a contrast-detail phantom. The scatter fractions decreased considerably with an increase in the grid ratio. On the other hand, the WSs were increased (the noise property deteriorated) as the grid ratio increased due to a decreased incident dose to the image receptor under the identical exposure condition. The NEQs were improved as the grid ratio increased. The high grid ratios provided higher low-contrast detectability compared to the low grid ratios. Our results indicated that the removal of scattered radiation was very effective in improvement of the NEQ in the digital system under the identical exposure condition.

  12. Multiple scattering expansion with distortion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tandy, P. C.; Thaler, R. M.

    1980-12-01

    A multiple scattering description of elastic scattering is formulated in terms of impulsive scatterings from single target nucleons and pairs of target nucleons. In this description, distortion effects on the projectile from the residual medium are also described by multiple scattering in terms of the same single and pair amplitudes. At the level of single scattering, this procedure yields the first order optical potential result of Kerman, McManus, and Thaler. When scattering from both single nucleons and pairs of nucleons is included, the method leads to a one-body integral equation which requires the physical projectile-nucleon and projectile-pair transition amplitudes as input. This input is similar, but not exactly equivalent to that required by the spectator expansion for the optical potential truncated at second order. A principal advantage of the present formulation is that there need be no explicit dependence upon the projection operator Q which projects off the target ground state. This feature introduces a scaling which appears to be a direct extension of the first order Kerman, McManus, and Thaler type of scaling. We follow up suggestions arising in the foregoing to show that the exact optical potential to second order in the spectator expansion can also be cast into a form having no explicit dependence upon Q, and requiring physical projectile-nucleon and projectile-pair transition amplitudes as input. NUCLEAR REACTIONS Multiple scattering from single nucleons, pairs of nucleons in nucleus. Distortion from residual medium. Optical potential. spectator expansion.

  13. Microscopic Hydrodynamic Modes in a Binary Hard Sphere Mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichl, L. E.; Gust, Erich D.

    2017-07-01

    We derive analytic microscopic expressions for the shear viscosity, the speed of sound, and the decay rates of the hydrodynamic modes in a hard sphere binary gas mixture directly from the spectral properties of coupled Boltzmann equations. We show that the analytic expressions give good agreement with experimental viscosity data and to the results of light scattering experiments on noble gas binary mixtures.

  14. Budgeting in Hard Times.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrino, Frank M.

    2003-01-01

    Interviews with school board members and administrators produced a list of suggestions for balancing a budget in hard times. Among these are changing calendars and schedules to reduce heating and cooling costs; sharing personnel; rescheduling some extracurricular activities; and forming cooperative agreements with other districts. (MLF)

  15. Budgeting in Hard Times.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrino, Frank M.

    2003-01-01

    Interviews with school board members and administrators produced a list of suggestions for balancing a budget in hard times. Among these are changing calendars and schedules to reduce heating and cooling costs; sharing personnel; rescheduling some extracurricular activities; and forming cooperative agreements with other districts. (MLF)

  16. Running in Hard Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, John N., III

    2009-01-01

    Roberta Stevens and Kent Oliver are campaigning hard for the presidency of the American Library Association (ALA). Stevens is outreach projects and partnerships officer at the Library of Congress. Oliver is executive director of the Stark County District Library in Canton, Ohio. They have debated, discussed, and posted web sites, Facebook pages,…

  17. Running in Hard Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, John N., III

    2009-01-01

    Roberta Stevens and Kent Oliver are campaigning hard for the presidency of the American Library Association (ALA). Stevens is outreach projects and partnerships officer at the Library of Congress. Oliver is executive director of the Stark County District Library in Canton, Ohio. They have debated, discussed, and posted web sites, Facebook pages,…

  18. CSI: Hard Drive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sturgeon, Julie

    2008-01-01

    Acting on information from students who reported seeing a classmate looking at inappropriate material on a school computer, school officials used forensics software to plunge the depths of the PC's hard drive, searching for evidence of improper activity. Images were found in a deleted Internet Explorer cache as well as deleted file space.…

  19. Acoustic Inverse Scattering for Breast Cancer Microcalcification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    implemented a new data acquisition systen for water tank measurements, designed breast phantoms including appropriate hard scatterers of known shape...computation tools to more powerful computer clusters, has been delayed by the introduction of multicore computers. We find that much of our code for 2D

  20. Periodicity property of relativistic Thomson scattering with application to exact calculations of angular and spectral distributions of the scattered field

    SciTech Connect

    Popa, Alexandru

    2011-08-15

    We prove that the analytical expression of the intensity of the relativistic Thomson scattered field for a system composed of an electron interacting with a plane electromagnetic field can be written in the form of a composite periodic function of only one variable, that is, the phase of the incident field. This property is proved without using any approximation in the most general case in which the field is elliptically polarized, the initial phase of the incident field and the initial velocity of the electron are taken into consideration, and the direction in which the radiation is scattered is arbitrary. This property leads to an exact method for calculating the angular and spectral distributions of the scattered field, which reveals a series of physical details of these distributions, such as their dependence on the components of the initial electron velocity. Since the phase of the field is a relativistic invariant, it follows that the periodicity property is also valid when the analysis is made in the inertial system in which the initial velocity of the electron is zero in the case of interactions between very intense electromagnetic fields and relativistic electrons. Consequently, the calculation method can be used for the evaluation of properties of backscattered hard radiations generated by this type of interaction. The theoretical evaluations presented in this paper are in good agreement with the experimental data from literature.

  1. Hard X-ray astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothschild, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    Past hard X-ray and lower energy satellite instruments are reviewed and it is shown that observation above 20 keV and up to hundreds of keV can provide much valuable information on the astrophysics of cosmic sources. To calculate possible sensitivities of future arrays, the efficiencies of a one-atmosphere inch gas counter (the HEAO-1 A-2 xenon filled HED3) and a 3 mm phoswich scintillator (the HEAO-1 A-4 Na1 LED1) were compared. Above 15 keV, the scintillator was more efficient. In a similar comparison, the sensitivity of germanium detectors did not differ much from that of the scintillators, except at high energies where the sensitivity would remain flat and not rise with loss of efficiency. Questions to be addressed concerning the physics of active galaxies and the diffuse radiation background, black holes, radio pulsars, X-ray pulsars, and galactic clusters are examined.

  2. Resonant soft X-ray scattering on protein solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Dan; Le, Thinh; Wang, Cheng; Zwart, Peter; Gomez, Esther; Gomez, Enrique

    Protein structure is crucial for biological function, such that characterizing protein folding and packing is important for the design of therapeutics and enzymes. We propose resonant soft X-ray scattering (RSOXS) as an approach to study proteins and other biological assemblies in solution. Calculations of the scattering contrast suggest that soft X-ray scattering is more sensitive than hard X-ray scattering, because of contrast generated at the absorption edges of constituent elements such as carbon, nitrogen and oxygen. We have examined the structure of bovine serum albumin (BSA) in solution by RSOXS. We find that by varying incident X-ray energies, we are able to achieve higher scattering contrast near the absorption edge. From our RSOXS scattering result we are able to reconstruct the structure of BSA in 3D. These RSOXS results also agree with hard X-ray experiments, including crystallographic data. Our study demonstrates the potential of RSOXS for studying protein structure in solution.

  3. Erosion testing of hard materials and coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Hawk, Jeffrey A.

    2005-04-29

    Erosion is the process by which unconstrained particles, usually hard, impact a surface, creating damage that leads to material removal and component failure. These particles are usually very small and entrained in fluid of some type, typically air. The damage that occurs as a result of erosion depends on the size of the particles, their physical characteristics, the velocity of the particle/fluid stream, and their angle of impact on the surface of interest. This talk will discuss the basics of jet erosion testing of hard materials, composites and coatings. The standard test methods will be discussed as well as alternative approaches to determining the erosion rate of materials. The damage that occurs will be characterized in genera1 terms, and examples will be presented for the erosion behavior of hard materials and coatings (both thick and thin).

  4. Two Theoretical Studies in Particle Physics: I. Calculability in Quark Flavor Mixing. I. Forward Proton Proton and Proton Antiproton Scattering at High Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadjitheodoridis, Stilianos

    I. We consider the origin of the flavor mixings and calculability of mixing parameters in the quark sector of the standard model. The Fritzsch type quark mass matrices are analysed and the results are tested against experiments, predicting the mass of the t-quark as large as 80.8 GeV. II. In connection with the recent UA4 experiment on p| p scattering we reexamine the existence of the odderon and we speculate on the opening of a new threshold.

  5. Osmotic virial coefficients for model protein and colloidal solutions: importance of ensemble constraints in the analysis of light scattering data.

    PubMed

    Siderius, Daniel W; Krekelberg, William P; Roberts, Christopher J; Shen, Vincent K

    2012-05-07

    Protein-protein interactions in solution may be quantified by the osmotic second virial coefficient (OSVC), which can be measured by various experimental techniques including light scattering. Analysis of Rayleigh light scattering measurements from such experiments requires identification of a scattering volume and the thermodynamic constraints imposed on that volume, i.e., the statistical mechanical ensemble in which light scattering occurs. Depending on the set of constraints imposed on the scattering volume, one can obtain either an apparent OSVC, A(2,app), or the true thermodynamic OSVC, B(22)(osm), that is rigorously defined in solution theory [M. A. Blanco, E. Sahin, Y. Li, and C. J. Roberts, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 225103 (2011)]. However, it is unclear to what extent A(2,app) and B(22)(osm) differ, which may have implications on the physical interpretation of OSVC measurements from light scattering experiments. In this paper, we use the multicomponent hard-sphere model and a well-known equation of state to directly compare A(2,app) and B(22)(osm). Our results from the hard-sphere equation of state indicate that A(2,app) underestimates B(22)(osm), but in a systematic manner that may be explained using fundamental thermodynamic expressions for the two OSVCs. The difference between A(2,app) and B(22)(osm) may be quantitatively significant, but may also be obscured in experimental application by statistical uncertainty or non-steric interactions. Consequently, the two OSVCs that arise in the analysis of light scattering measurements do formally differ, but in a manner that may not be detectable in actual application.

  6. Osmotic virial coefficients for model protein and colloidal solutions: Importance of ensemble constraints in the analysis of light scattering data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siderius, Daniel W.; Krekelberg, William P.; Roberts, Christopher J.; Shen, Vincent K.

    2012-05-01

    Protein-protein interactions in solution may be quantified by the osmotic second virial coefficient (OSVC), which can be measured by various experimental techniques including light scattering. Analysis of Rayleigh light scattering measurements from such experiments requires identification of a scattering volume and the thermodynamic constraints imposed on that volume, i.e., the statistical mechanical ensemble in which light scattering occurs. Depending on the set of constraints imposed on the scattering volume, one can obtain either an apparent OSVC, A2,app, or the true thermodynamic OSVC, {B_{22}^{osm}}, that is rigorously defined in solution theory [M. A. Blanco, E. Sahin, Y. Li, and C. J. Roberts, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 225103 (2011), 10.1063/1.3596726]. However, it is unclear to what extent A2,app and {B_{22}^{osm}} differ, which may have implications on the physical interpretation of OSVC measurements from light scattering experiments. In this paper, we use the multicomponent hard-sphere model and a well-known equation of state to directly compare A2,app and {B_{22}^{osm}}. Our results from the hard-sphere equation of state indicate that A2,app underestimates {B_{22}^{osm}}, but in a systematic manner that may be explained using fundamental thermodynamic expressions for the two OSVCs. The difference between A2,app and {B_{22}^{osm}} may be quantitatively significant, but may also be obscured in experimental application by statistical uncertainty or non-steric interactions. Consequently, the two OSVCs that arise in the analysis of light scattering measurements do formally differ, but in a manner that may not be detectable in actual application.

  7. Unemployment: Hard-Core or Hard-Shell?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lauer, Robert H.

    1972-01-01

    The term hard-core'' makes the unemployed culpable; the term hard shell'' shifts the burden to the employer, and the evidence from the suburban plant indicates that a substantial part of the problem must lie there. (DM)

  8. Acoustic scattering from ellipses by the modal element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreider, Kevin L.; Baumeister, Kenneth J.

    1995-01-01

    The modal element method is used to study acoustic scattering from ellipses, which may be acoustically soft (absorbing) or hard (reflecting). Because exact solutions are available, the results provide a benchmark for algorithm performance for scattering from airfoils and similar shapes. Numerical results for scattering from rigid ellipses are presented for a wide variety of eccentricities at moderate frequencies. These results indicate that the method is practical.

  9. Super-Hard Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Philip; Prozorov, Ruslan

    2005-03-01

    We present the magnetic response of Type-II superconductivity in the extreme pinning limit, where screening currents within an order of magnitude of the Ginzburg-Landau depairing critical current density develop upon the application of a magnetic field. We show that this ``super-hard'' limit is well approximated in highly disordered, cold drawn, Nb wire whose magnetization response is characterized by a cascade of Meissner-like phases, each terminated by a catastrophic collapse of the magnetization. Direct magneto-optic measurements of the flux penetration depth in the virgin magnetization branch are in excellent agreement with the exponential model in which Jc(B)=Jco(-B/Bo), where Jco˜5x10^6 A/cm^2 for Nb. The implications for the fundamental limiting hardness of a superconductor will be discussed.

  10. Periodically kicked hard oscillators.

    PubMed

    Cecchi, G. A.; Gonzalez, D. L.; Magnasco, M. O.; Mindlin, G. B.; Piro, O.; Santillan, A. J.

    1993-01-01

    A model of a hard oscillator with analytic solution is presented. Its behavior under periodic kicking, for which a closed form stroboscopic map can be obtained, is studied. It is shown that the general structure of such an oscillator includes four distinct regions; the outer two regions correspond to very small or very large amplitude of the external force and match the corresponding regions in soft oscillators (invertible degree one and degree zero circle maps, respectively). There are two new regions for intermediate amplitude of the forcing. Region 3 corresponds to moderate high forcing, and is intrinsic to hard oscillators; it is characterized by discontinuous circle maps with a flat segment. Region 2 (low moderate forcing) has a certain resemblance to a similar region in soft oscillators (noninvertible degree one circle maps); however, the limit set of the dynamics in this region is not a circle, but a branched manifold, obtained as the tangent union of a circle and an interval; the topological structure of this object is generated by the finite size of the repelling set, and is therefore also intrinsic to hard oscillators.

  11. SUPER HARD SURFACED POLYMERS

    SciTech Connect

    Mansur, Louis K; Bhattacharya, R; Blau, Peter Julian; Clemons, Art; Eberle, Cliff; Evans, H B; Janke, Christopher James; Jolly, Brian C; Lee, E H; Leonard, Keith J; Trejo, Rosa M; Rivard, John D

    2010-01-01

    High energy ion beam surface treatments were applied to a selected group of polymers. Of the six materials in the present study, four were thermoplastics (polycarbonate, polyethylene, polyethylene terephthalate, and polystyrene) and two were thermosets (epoxy and polyimide). The particular epoxy evaluated in this work is one of the resins used in formulating fiber reinforced composites for military helicopter blades. Measures of mechanical properties of the near surface regions were obtained by nanoindentation hardness and pin on disk wear. Attempts were also made to measure erosion resistance by particle impact. All materials were hardness tested. Pristine materials were very soft, having values in the range of approximately 0.1 to 0.5 GPa. Ion beam treatment increased hardness by up to 50 times compared to untreated materials. For reference, all materials were hardened to values higher than those typical of stainless steels. Wear tests were carried out on three of the materials, PET, PI and epoxy. On the ion beam treated epoxy no wear could be detected, whereas the untreated material showed significant wear.

  12. PoGOLite - a circumpolar balloon-borne mission for hard X-ray polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, Mark

    Mark Pearce For the PoGOLite Collaboration. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Dept. of Physics, Stockholm, Sweden. pearce@kth.se Abstract Emission processes in astrophysical systems can yield polarised hard X-rays. The orientation of the polarisation plane is a powerful probe of the physical environment around compact astrophysical sources. Despite the wealth of sources accessible to polarisation measurements, and the importance of these measurements, it is 40 years since the last dedicated mission for X-ray polarimetry of point sources. PoGOLite is a balloon-borne hard X-ray polarimeter operating in the 25-100 keV energy band. Polarisation is determined using coincident Compton scattering and photo-absorption in a segmented array of plastic scintillators surrounded by a BGO anticoincidence system and a polyethylene neutron shield. PoGOLite was launched from the Esrange Space Center on July 12th 2013 with the Crab nebula and pulsar as primary observation targets. The mission was terminated on July 25th after an almost complete circumpolar flight. The PoGOLite mission was conducted as a collaboration between Swedish, Japanese, Russian and US scientific teams. The PoGOLite circumpolar mission will be reviewed and the outcome of the 2013 flight discussed.

  13. Dynamics in dense hard-sphere colloidal suspensions.

    PubMed

    Orsi, Davide; Fluerasu, Andrei; Moussaïd, Abdellatif; Zontone, Federico; Cristofolini, Luigi; Madsen, Anders

    2012-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of a hard-sphere colloidal suspension was studied by x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy and small-angle x-ray scattering over a wide range of particle volume fractions. The short-time mobility of the particles was found to be smaller than that of free particles even at relatively low concentrations, showing the importance of indirect hydrodynamic interactions. Hydrodynamic functions were derived from the data, and for moderate particle volume fractions (Φ≤ 0.40) there is good agreement with earlier many-body theory calculations by Beenakker and Mazur [Physica A 120, 349 (1984)]. Important discrepancies appear at higher concentrations, above Φ≈ 0.40, where the hydrodynamic effects are overestimated by the Beenakker-Mazur theory, but predicted accurately by an accelerated Stokesian dynamics algorithm developed by Banchio and Brady [J. Chem. Phys. 118, 10323 (2003)]. For the relaxation rates, good agreement was also found between the experimental data and a scaling form predicted by the mode coupling theory. In the high concentration range, with the fluid suspensions approaching the glass transition, the long-time diffusion coefficient was compared with the short-time collective diffusion coefficient to verify a scaling relation previously proposed by Segrè and Pusey [Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 771 (1996)]. We discuss our results in view of previous experimental attempts to validate this scaling law [L. Lurio et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 785 (2000)]. © 2012 American Physical Society

  14. Staking Tool for Hard Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    Simple tool stakes hard-steel parts--that is, forces one part into recess on another, deforming receiving part so that it restrains inserted one. Tool allows small machine shops to stake hard steel without massive presses. Can be used, for example, to insert ball and spring into hard steel snap-tool body such as that used to turn socket wrenches. Use is not limited to hard steel; can be used as well to assemble parts made of softer materials.

  15. Neutrino physics

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Deborah A.; /Fermilab

    2008-09-01

    The field of neutrino physics has expanded greatly in recent years with the discovery that neutrinos change flavor and therefore have mass. Although there are many neutrino physics results since the last DIS workshop, these proceedings concentrate on recent neutrino physics results that either add to or depend on the understanding of Deep Inelastic Scattering. They also describe the short and longer term future of neutrino DIS experiments.

  16. Scattering from Superquadric Surfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-01

    for any purpose other than in connection with a definitely related Government procurement operation, the United States Government thereby incurs no...Clomparative C’PU times in VPU (VAX 780 Processing Units ) 44 3 I I I I I I I I I I * Chapter 1 | INTRODUCTION I The electromagnetic scattering from a...in the Shadow region (2.4) where ft is the unit normal to the surface. Physical Optics is useful because the form of the assumed currents is 3 simple

  17. Microscopic distorted wave theory of inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picklesimer, A.; Tandy, P. C.; Thaler, R. M.

    1982-03-01

    An exact microscopic distorted wave theory of inelastic scattering is formulated which contains the physical picture usually associated with distorted wave approximations without the usual redundancy. This formulation encompasses the inelastic scattering of two fragments, elementary or composite (both with or without the full complexity of interfragment Pauli symmetries). The fact that these considerations need not be based upon elementary potential interactions is an indication of the generality of the approach and supports its applicability to inelastic meson scattering. The theory also maintains a description of inelastic scattering which is a natural extension of the description of elastic scattering and it provides a general basis for obtaining truncation models with an explicit distorted wave structure. The distorted wave impulse approximation is presented as an example of a particular truncation/approximation encompassed by this theory and the nature of the distorted waves is explicated. NUCLEAR REACTIONS Distorted wave theory, inelastic scattering, multiple scattering, spectator expansion, Pauli exclusion principle, composite particles, unitarity structure.

  18. Development of method for evaluating cell hardness and correlation between bacterial spore hardness and durability.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Koichi; Kogure, Akinori; Fujii, Takenao; Kokawa, Ryohei; Deuchi, Keiji

    2012-06-07

    Despite the availability of conventional devices for making single-cell manipulations, determining the hardness of a single cell remains difficult. Here, we consider the cell to be a linear elastic body and apply Young's modulus (modulus of elasticity), which is defined as the ratio of the repulsive force (stress) in response to the applied strain. In this new method, a scanning probe microscope (SPM) is operated with a cantilever in the "contact-and-push" mode, and the cantilever is applied to the cell surface over a set distance (applied strain). We determined the hardness of the following bacterial cells: Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and five Bacillus spp. In log phase, these strains had a similar Young's modulus, but Bacillus spp. spores were significantly harder than the corresponding vegetative cells. There was a positive, linear correlation between the hardness of bacterial spores and heat or ultraviolet (UV) resistance. Using this technique, the hardness of a single vegetative bacterial cell or spore could be determined based on Young's modulus. As an application of this technique, we demonstrated that the hardness of individual bacterial spores was directly proportional to heat and UV resistance, which are the conventional measures of physical durability. This technique allows the rapid and direct determination of spore durability and provides a valuable and innovative method for the evaluation of physical properties in the field of microbiology.

  19. Development of method for evaluating cell hardness and correlation between bacterial spore hardness and durability

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite the availability of conventional devices for making single-cell manipulations, determining the hardness of a single cell remains difficult. Here, we consider the cell to be a linear elastic body and apply Young’s modulus (modulus of elasticity), which is defined as the ratio of the repulsive force (stress) in response to the applied strain. In this new method, a scanning probe microscope (SPM) is operated with a cantilever in the “contact-and-push” mode, and the cantilever is applied to the cell surface over a set distance (applied strain). Results We determined the hardness of the following bacterial cells: Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and five Bacillus spp. In log phase, these strains had a similar Young’s modulus, but Bacillus spp. spores were significantly harder than the corresponding vegetative cells. There was a positive, linear correlation between the hardness of bacterial spores and heat or ultraviolet (UV) resistance. Conclusions Using this technique, the hardness of a single vegetative bacterial cell or spore could be determined based on Young’s modulus. As an application of this technique, we demonstrated that the hardness of individual bacterial spores was directly proportional to heat and UV resistance, which are the conventional measures of physical durability. This technique allows the rapid and direct determination of spore durability and provides a valuable and innovative method for the evaluation of physical properties in the field of microbiology. PMID:22676476

  20. Hard hadronic collisions: extrapolation of standard effects

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, A.; Aurenche, P.; Baier, R.; Berger, E.; Douiri, A.; Fontannaz, M.; Humpert, B.; Ingelman, G.; Kinnunen, R.; Pietarinen, E.

    1984-01-01

    We study hard hadronic collisions for the proton-proton (pp) and the proton-antiproton (p anti p) option in the CERN LEP tunnel. Based on our current knowledge of hard collisions at the present CERN p anti p Collider, and with the help of quantum chromodynamics (QCD), we extrapolate to the next generation of hadron colliders with a centre-of-mass energy E/sub cm/ = 10 to 20 TeV. We estimate various signatures, trigger rates, event topologies, and associated distributions for a variety of old and new physical processes, involving prompt photons, leptons, jets, W/sup + -/ and Z bosons in the final state. We also calculate the maximum fermion and boson masses accessible at the LEP Hadron Collider. The standard QCD and electroweak processes studied here, being the main body of standard hard collisions, quantify the challenge of extracting new physics with hadron colliders. We hope that our estimates will provide a useful profile of the final states, and that our experimental physics colleagues will find this of use in the design of their detectors. 84 references.

  1. Hard metal composition

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, Haskell

    1986-01-01

    A composition of matter having a Rockwell A hardness of at least 85 is formed from a precursor mixture comprising between 3 and 10 weight percent boron carbide and the remainder a metal mixture comprising from 70 to 90 percent tungsten or molybdenum, with the remainder of the metal mixture comprising nickel and iron or a mixture thereof. The composition has a relatively low density of between 7 to 14 g/cc. The precursor is preferably hot pressed to yield a composition having greater than 100% of theoretical density.

  2. Hard metal composition

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, H.

    1983-07-26

    A composition of matter having a Rockwell A hardness of at least 85 is formed from a precursor mixture comprising between 3 and 10 wt % boron carbide and the remainder a metal mixture comprising from 70 to 90% tungsten or molybdenum, with the remainder of the metal mixture comprising nickel and iron or a mixture thereof. The composition has a relatively low density of between 7 and 14 g/cc. The precursor is preferably hot pressed to yield a composition having greater than 100% of theoretical density.

  3. Neutrino Scattering from 12C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Neutrino scattering cross-sections from 12C, which have been measure for pion decay-at-rest and pion decay-in-flight neutrino energies, are difficult to reproduce theoretically. In this talk I discuss the physics issues involved and show the importance of a proper treatment of the conservation of the vector current.

  4. Blue Skies, Coffee Creamer, and Rayleigh Scattering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liebl, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The first physical explanation of Earths blue sky was fashioned in 1871 by Lord Rayleigh. Many discussions of Rayleigh scattering and approaches to studying it both in and out of the classroom are available. Rayleigh scattering accounts for the blue color of the sky and the orange/red color of the Sun near sunset and sunrise, and a number of…

  5. An Introductory Scattering Experiment by Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrill, John R.; Morrow, Richard A.

    1970-01-01

    Describes an introductory physics experiment concerned with scattering particles off various force centers. The experiment uses simulation techniques and a computer. The scattering is classical, and the student examines plots of computed particle trajectories. The results illustrate the concepts of differential corss-section, total cross-section,…

  6. Blue Skies, Coffee Creamer, and Rayleigh Scattering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liebl, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The first physical explanation of Earths blue sky was fashioned in 1871 by Lord Rayleigh. Many discussions of Rayleigh scattering and approaches to studying it both in and out of the classroom are available. Rayleigh scattering accounts for the blue color of the sky and the orange/red color of the Sun near sunset and sunrise, and a number of…

  7. Revisiting the definition of local hardness and hardness kernel.

    PubMed

    Polanco-Ramírez, Carlos A; Franco-Pérez, Marco; Carmona-Espíndola, Javier; Gázquez, José L; Ayers, Paul W

    2017-05-17

    An analysis of the hardness kernel and local hardness is performed to propose new definitions for these quantities that follow a similar pattern to the one that characterizes the quantities associated with softness, that is, we have derived new definitions for which the integral of the hardness kernel over the whole space of one of the variables leads to local hardness, and the integral of local hardness over the whole space leads to global hardness. A basic aspect of the present approach is that global hardness keeps its identity as the second derivative of energy with respect to the number of electrons. Local hardness thus obtained depends on the first and second derivatives of energy and electron density with respect to the number of electrons. When these derivatives are approximated by a smooth quadratic interpolation of energy, the expression for local hardness reduces to the one intuitively proposed by Meneses, Tiznado, Contreras and Fuentealba. However, when one combines the first directional derivatives with smooth second derivatives one finds additional terms that allow one to differentiate local hardness for electrophilic attack from the one for nucleophilic attack. Numerical results related to electrophilic attacks on substituted pyridines, substituted benzenes and substituted ethenes are presented to show the overall performance of the new definition.

  8. Hard Metal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bech, A. O.; Kipling, M. D.; Heather, J. C.

    1962-01-01

    In Great Britain there have been no published reports of respiratory disease occurring amongst workers in the hard metal (tungsten carbide) industry. In this paper the clinical and radiological findings in six cases and the pathological findings in one are described. In two cases physiological studies indicated mild alveolar diffusion defects. Histological examination in a fatal case revealed diffuse pulmonary interstitial fibrosis with marked peribronchial and perivascular fibrosis and bronchial epithelial hyperplasia and metaplasia. Radiological surveys revealed the sporadic occurrence and low incidence of the disease. The alterations in respiratory mechanics which occurred in two workers following a day's exposure to dust are described. Airborne dust concentrations are given. The industrial process is outlined and the literature is reviewed. The toxicity of the metals is discussed, and our findings are compared with those reported from Europe and the United States. We are of the opinion that the changes which we would describe as hard metal disease are caused by the inhalation of dust at work and that the component responsible may be cobalt. Images PMID:13970036

  9. Study of vector boson scattering and search for new physics in events with two same-sign leptons and two jets.

    PubMed

    Khachatryan, V; Sirunyan, A M; Tumasyan, A; Adam, W; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Erö, J; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hartl, C; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kiesenhofer, W; Knünz, V; Krammer, M; Krätschmer, I; Liko, D; Mikulec, I; Rabady, D; Rahbaran, B; Rohringer, H; Schöfbeck, R; Strauss, J; Treberer-Treberspurg, W; Waltenberger, W; Wulz, C-E; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Alderweireldt, S; Bansal, M; Bansal, S; Cornelis, T; De Wolf, E A; Janssen, X; Knutsson, A; Lauwers, J; Luyckx, S; Ochesanu, S; Rougny, R; Van De Klundert, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Van Spilbeeck, A; Blekman, F; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; Daci, N; Heracleous, N; Keaveney, J; Lowette, S; Maes, M; Olbrechts, A; Python, Q; Strom, D; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Van Onsem, G P; Villella, I; Caillol, C; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dobur, D; Favart, L; Gay, A P R; Grebenyuk, A; Léonard, A; Mohammadi, A; Perniè, L; Reis, T; Seva, T; Thomas, L; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wang, J; Zenoni, F; Adler, V; Beernaert, K; Benucci, L; Cimmino, A; Costantini, S; Crucy, S; Dildick, S; Fagot, A; Garcia, G; Mccartin, J; Ocampo Rios, A A; Ryckbosch, D; Salva Diblen, S; Sigamani, M; Strobbe, N; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Yazgan, E; Zaganidis, N; Basegmez, S; Beluffi, C; Bruno, G; Castello, R; Caudron, A; Ceard, L; Da Silveira, G G; Delaere, C; du Pree, T; Favart, D; Forthomme, L; Giammanco, A; Hollar, J; Jafari, A; Jez, P; Komm, M; Lemaitre, V; Nuttens, C; Pagano, D; Perrini, L; Pin, A; Piotrzkowski, K; Popov, A; Quertenmont, L; Selvaggi, M; Vidal Marono, M; Vizan Garcia, J M; Beliy, N; Caebergs, T; Daubie, E; Hammad, G H; Aldá Júnior, W L; Alves, G A; Brito, L; Correa Martins Junior, M; Dos Reis Martins, T; Mora Herrera, C; Pol, M E; Carvalho, W; Chinellato, J; Custódio, A; Da Costa, E M; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Malbouisson, H; Matos Figueiredo, D; Mundim, L; Nogima, H; Prado Da Silva, W L; Santaolalla, J; Santoro, A; Sznajder, A; Tonelli Manganote, E J; Vilela Pereira, A; Bernardes, C A; Dogra, S; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Gregores, E M; Mercadante, P G; Novaes, S F; Padula, Sandra S; Aleksandrov, A; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Marinov, A; Piperov, S; Rodozov, M; Sultanov, G; Vutova, M; Dimitrov, A; Glushkov, I; Hadjiiska, R; Litov, L; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Bian, J G; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Chen, M; Cheng, T; Du, R; Jiang, C H; Plestina, R; Romeo, F; Tao, J; Wang, Z; Asawatangtrakuldee, C; Ban, Y; Li, Q; Liu, S; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Wang, D; Zou, W; Avila, C; Cabrera, A; Chaparro Sierra, L F; Florez, C; Gomez, J P; Gomez Moreno, B; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, D; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Kovac, M; Brigljevic, V; Kadija, K; Luetic, J; Mekterovic, D; Sudic, L; Attikis, A; Mavromanolakis, G; Mousa, J; Nicolaou, C; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Bodlak, M; Finger, M; Finger, M; Assran, Y; Ellithi Kamel, A; Mahmoud, M A; Radi, A; Kadastik, M; Murumaa, M; Raidal, M; Tiko, A; Eerola, P; Fedi, G; Voutilainen, M; Härkönen, J; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Kortelainen, M J; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Mäenpää, T; Peltola, T; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Tuovinen, E; Wendland, L; Talvitie, J; Tuuva, T; Besancon, M; Couderc, F; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Favaro, C; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Locci, E; Malcles, J; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Titov, M; Baffioni, S; Beaudette, F; Busson, P; Charlot, C; Dahms, T; Dalchenko, M; Dobrzynski, L; Filipovic, N; Florent, A; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Mastrolorenzo, L; Miné, P; Mironov, C; Naranjo, I N; Nguyen, M; Ochando, C; Paganini, P; Regnard, S; Salerno, R; Sauvan, J B; Sirois, Y; Veelken, C; Yilmaz, Y; Zabi, A; Agram, J-L; Andrea, J; Aubin, A; Bloch, D; Brom, J-M; Chabert, E C; Collard, C; Conte, E; Fontaine, J-C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Goetzmann, C; Le Bihan, A-C; Van Hove, P; Gadrat, S; Beauceron, S; Beaupere, N; Boudoul, G; Bouvier, E; Brochet, S; Carrillo Montoya, C A; Chasserat, J; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Depasse, P; El Mamouni, H; Fan, J; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Gouzevitch, M; Ille, B; Kurca, T; Lethuillier, M; Mirabito, L; Perries, S; Ruiz Alvarez, J D; Sabes, D; Sgandurra, L; Sordini, V; Vander Donckt, M; Verdier, P; Viret, S; Xiao, H; Tsamalaidze, Z; Autermann, C; Beranek, S; Bontenackels, M; Edelhoff, M; Feld, L; Heister, A; Hindrichs, O; Klein, K; Ostapchuk, A; Raupach, F; Sammet, J; Schael, S; Weber, H; Wittmer, B; Zhukov, V; Ata, M; Brodski, M; Dietz-Laursonn, E; Duchardt, D; Erdmann, M; Fischer, R; Güth, A; Hebbeker, T; Heidemann, C; Hoepfner, K; Klingebiel, D; Knutzen, S; Kreuzer, P; Merschmeyer, M; Meyer, A; Millet, P; Olschewski, M; Padeken, K; Papacz, P; Reithler, H; Schmitz, S A; Sonnenschein, L; Teyssier, D; Thüer, S; Weber, M; Cherepanov, V; Erdogan, Y; Flügge, G; Geenen, H; Geisler, M; Haj Ahmad, W; Hoehle, F; Kargoll, B; Kress, T; Kuessel, Y; Künsken, A; Lingemann, J; Nowack, A; Nugent, I M; Perchalla, L; 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Turner, P; Varelas, N; Bilki, B; Clarida, W; Dilsiz, K; Duru, F; Haytmyradov, M; Merlo, J-P; Mermerkaya, H; Mestvirishvili, A; Moeller, A; Nachtman, J; Ogul, H; Onel, Y; Ozok, F; Penzo, A; Rahmat, R; Sen, S; Tan, P; Tiras, E; Wetzel, J; Yi, K; Barnett, B A; Blumenfeld, B; Bolognesi, S; Fehling, D; Gritsan, A V; Maksimovic, P; Martin, C; Swartz, M; Baringer, P; Bean, A; Benelli, G; Bruner, C; Kenny, R P; Malek, M; Murray, M; Noonan, D; Sanders, S; Sekaric, J; Stringer, R; Wang, Q; Wood, J S; Chakaberia, I; Ivanov, A; Khalil, S; Makouski, M; Maravin, Y; Saini, L K; Shrestha, S; Skhirtladze, N; Svintradze, I; Gronberg, J; Lange, D; Rebassoo, F; Wright, D; Baden, A; Belloni, A; Calvert, B; Eno, S C; Gomez, J A; Hadley, N J; Kellogg, R G; Kolberg, T; Lu, Y; Marionneau, M; Mignerey, A C; Pedro, K; Skuja, A; Tonjes, M B; Tonwar, S C; Apyan, A; Barbieri, R; Bauer, G; Busza, W; Cali, I A; Chan, M; Di Matteo, L; Gomez Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; Gulhan, D; Klute, M; Lai, Y S; Lee, Y-J; Levin, A; Luckey, P D; Ma, T; Paus, C; Ralph, D; Roland, C; Roland, G; Stephans, G S F; Stöckli, F; Sumorok, K; Velicanu, D; Veverka, J; Wyslouch, B; Yang, M; Zanetti, M; Zhukova, V; Dahmes, B; Gude, A; Kao, S C; Klapoetke, K; Kubota, Y; Mans, J; Pastika, N; Rusack, R; Singovsky, A; Tambe, N; Turkewitz, J; Acosta, J G; Oliveros, S; Avdeeva, E; Bloom, K; Bose, S; Claes, D R; Dominguez, A; Gonzalez Suarez, R; Keller, J; Knowlton, D; Kravchenko, I; Lazo-Flores, J; Malik, S; Meier, F; Ratnikov, F; Snow, G R; Zvada, M; Dolen, J; Godshalk, A; Iashvili, I; Kharchilava, A; Kumar, A; Rappoccio, S; Alverson, G; Barberis, E; Baumgartel, D; Chasco, M; Haley, J; Massironi, A; Morse, D M; Nash, D; Orimoto, T; Trocino, D; Wang, R-J; Wood, D; Zhang, J; Hahn, K A; Kubik, A; Mucia, N; Odell, N; Pollack, B; Pozdnyakov, A; Schmitt, M; Stoynev, S; Sung, K; Velasco, M; Won, S; Brinkerhoff, A; Chan, K M; Drozdetskiy, A; Hildreth, M; Jessop, C; Karmgard, D J; Kellams, N; Lannon, K; Lynch, S; Marinelli, N; Pearson, T; Planer, M; Ruchti, R; Valls, N; Wayne, M; Wolf, M; Woodard, A; Antonelli, L; Brinson, J; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Flowers, S; Hart, A; Hill, C; Hughes, R; Kotov, K; Ling, T Y; Luo, W; Puigh, D; Rodenburg, M; Smith, G; Winer, B L; Wolfe, H; Wulsin, H W; Driga, O; Elmer, P; Hardenbrook, J; Hebda, P; Hunt, A; Koay, S A; Lujan, P; Marlow, D; Medvedeva, T; Mooney, M; Olsen, J; Piroué, P; Quan, X; Saka, H; Stickland, D; Tully, C; Werner, J S; Zuranski, A; Brownson, E; Mendez, H; Ramirez Vargas, J E; Barnes, V E; Benedetti, D; Bortoletto, D; De Mattia, M; Gutay, L; Hu, Z; Jha, M K; Jones, M; Jung, K; Kress, M; Leonardo, N; Lopes Pegna, D; Maroussov, V; Miller, D H; Neumeister, N; Radburn-Smith, B C; Shi, X; Shipsey, I; Silvers, D; Svyatkovskiy, A; Wang, F; Xie, W; Xu, L; Yoo, H D; Zablocki, J; Zheng, Y; Parashar, N; Stupak, J; Adair, A; Akgun, B; Ecklund, K M; Geurts, F J M; Li, W; Michlin, B; Padley, B P; Redjimi, R; Roberts, J; Zabel, J; Betchart, B; Bodek, A; Covarelli, R; de Barbaro, P; Demina, R; Eshaq, Y; Ferbel, T; Garcia-Bellido, A; Goldenzweig, P; Han, J; Harel, A; Khukhunaishvili, A; Korjenevski, S; Petrillo, G; Vishnevskiy, D; Ciesielski, R; Demortier, L; Goulianos, K; Lungu, G; Mesropian, C; Arora, S; Barker, A; Chou, J P; Contreras-Campana, C; Contreras-Campana, E; Duggan, D; Ferencek, D; Gershtein, Y; Gray, R; Halkiadakis, E; Hidas, D; Kaplan, S; Lath, A; Panwalkar, S; Park, M; Patel, R; Salur, S; Schnetzer, S; Somalwar, S; Stone, R; Thomas, S; Thomassen, P; Walker, M; Rose, K; Spanier, S; York, A; Bouhali, O; Castaneda Hernandez, A; Eusebi, R; Flanagan, W; Gilmore, J; Kamon, T; Khotilovich, V; Krutelyov, V; Montalvo, R; Osipenkov, I; Pakhotin, Y; Perloff, A; Roe, J; Rose, A; Safonov, A; Suarez, I; Tatarinov, A; Akchurin, N; Cowden, C; Damgov, J; Dragoiu, C; Dudero, P R; Faulkner, J; Kovitanggoon, K; Kunori, S; Lee, S W; Libeiro, T; Volobouev, I; Appelt, E; Delannoy, A G; Greene, S; Gurrola, A; Johns, W; Maguire, C; Mao, Y; Melo, A; Sharma, M; Sheldon, P; Snook, B; Tuo, S; Velkovska, J; Arenton, M W; Boutle, S; Cox, B; Francis, B; Goodell, J; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Li, H; Lin, C; Neu, C; Wood, J; Clarke, C; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C; Lamichhane, P; Sturdy, J; Belknap, D A; Carlsmith, D; Cepeda, M; Dasu, S; Dodd, L; Duric, S; Friis, E; Hall-Wilton, R; Herndon, M; Hervé, A; Klabbers, P; Lanaro, A; Lazaridis, C; Levine, A; Loveless, R; Mohapatra, A; Ojalvo, I; Perry, T; Pierro, G A; Polese, G; Ross, I; Sarangi, T; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Taylor, D; Verwilligen, P; Vuosalo, C; Woods, N

    2015-02-06

    A study of vector boson scattering in pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV is presented. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 19.4  fb(-1) collected with the CMS detector. Candidate events are selected with exactly two leptons of the same charge, two jets with large rapidity separation and high dijet mass, and moderate missing transverse energy. The signal region is expected to be dominated by electroweak same-sign W-boson pair production. The observation agrees with the standard model prediction. The observed significance is 2.0 standard deviations, where a significance of 3.1 standard deviations is expected based on the standard model. Cross section measurements for W(±)W(±) and WZ processes in the fiducial region are reported. Bounds on the structure of quartic vector-boson interactions are given in the framework of dimension-eight effective field theory operators, as well as limits on the production of doubly charged Higgs bosons.

  10. Study of vector boson scattering and search for new physics in events with two same-sign leptons and two jets

    DOE PAGES

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-02-02

    Our study of vector boson scattering in pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV is presented. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 19.4 fb-1 collected with the CMS detector. Candidate events are selected with exactly two leptons of the same charge, two jets with large rapidity separation and high dijet mass, and moderate missing transverse energy. The signal region is expected to be dominated by electroweak same-sign W-boson pair production. The observation agrees with the standard model prediction. Furthermore, the observed significance is 2.0 standard deviations, where a significance of 3.1 standard deviations is expectedmore » based on the standard model. Cross section measurements for W±W± and WZ processes in the fiducial region are reported. Bounds on the structure of quartic vector-boson interactions are given in the framework of dimension-eight effective field theory operators, as well as limits on the production of doubly charged Higgs bosons.« less

  11. Medium induced transverse momentum broadening in hard processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, A. H.; Wu, Bin; Xiao, Bo-Wen; Yuan, Feng

    2017-02-01

    Using deep inelastic scattering on a large nucleus as an example, we consider the transverse momentum broadening of partons in hard processes in the presence of medium. We find that one can factorize the vacuum radiation contribution and medium related PT broadening effects into the Sudakov factor and medium dependent distributions, respectively. Our derivations can be generalized to other hard processes, such as dijet productions, which can be used as a probe to measure the medium PT broadening effects in heavy ion collisions when Sudakov effects are not overwhelming.

  12. Parity Violating Electron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Krishna S.

    2003-07-01

    We report on a mature experimental program to measure the parity violating asymmetry in the elastic scattering of longitudinally polarized electrons from unpolarized 1H, 2H, 4He and 208Pb targets. One focus is the measurement of the nucleon neutral weak form factors at intermediate four-momentum transfer (0.1 < Q2 < 1) (GeV/c)2 which provide information about the impact of virtual strange quarks on the charge and current distributions inside nucleons. Another focus is the neutral current elastic amplitude at very low Q2, which can provide stringent tests of the standard model and possess unique sensitivity to new physics at the TeV scale. Finally, the elastic neutral weak amplitude from scattering off a heavy spinless nucleus is very sensitive to the presence of a neutron skin. We report on recent technical progress in the design and scope of the experimental techniques. The physics implications of the published measurements are discussed and the current status and anticipated results experiments under construction are summarized.

  13. Ion mobilities in diatomic gases: measurement versus prediction with non-specular scattering models.

    PubMed

    Larriba, Carlos; Hogan, Christopher J

    2013-05-16

    Ion/electrical mobility measurements of nanoparticles and polyatomic ions are typically linked to particle/ion physical properties through either application of the Stokes-Millikan relationship or comparison to mobilities predicted from polyatomic models, which assume that gas molecules scatter specularly and elastically from rigid structural models. However, there is a discrepancy between these approaches; when specular, elastic scattering models (i.e., elastic-hard-sphere scattering, EHSS) are applied to polyatomic models of nanometer-scale ions with finite-sized impinging gas molecules, predictions are in substantial disagreement with the Stokes-Millikan equation. To rectify this discrepancy, we developed and tested a new approach for mobility calculations using polyatomic models in which non-specular (diffuse) and inelastic gas-molecule scattering is considered. Two distinct semiempirical models of gas-molecule scattering from particle surfaces were considered. In the first, which has been traditionally invoked in the study of aerosol nanoparticles, 91% of collisions are diffuse and thermally accommodating, and 9% are specular and elastic. In the second, all collisions are considered to be diffuse and accommodating, but the average speed of the gas molecules reemitted from a particle surface is 8% lower than the mean thermal speed at the particle temperature. Both scattering models attempt to mimic exchange between translational, vibrational, and rotational modes of energy during collision, as would be expected during collision between a nonmonoatomic gas molecule and a nonfrozen particle surface. The mobility calculation procedure was applied considering both hard-sphere potentials between gas molecules and the atoms within a particle and the long-range ion-induced dipole (polarization) potential. Predictions were compared to previous measurements in air near room temperature of multiply charged poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) ions, which range in morphology from

  14. Acoustic scattering on spheroidal shapes near boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miloh, Touvia

    2016-11-01

    A new expression for the Lamé product of prolate spheroidal wave functions is presented in terms of a distribution of multipoles along the axis of the spheroid between its foci (generalizing a corresponding theorem for spheroidal harmonics). Such an "ultimate" singularity system can be effectively used for solving various linear boundary-value problems governed by the Helmholtz equation involving prolate spheroidal bodies near planar or other boundaries. The general methodology is formally demonstrated for the axisymmetric acoustic scattering problem of a rigid (hard) spheroid placed near a hard/soft wall or inside a cylindrical duct under an axial incidence of a plane acoustic wave.

  15. Renormalization Scale-Fixing for Complex Scattering Amplitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Llanes-Estrada, Felipe J.; /Madrid U.

    2005-12-21

    We show how to fix the renormalization scale for hard-scattering exclusive processes such as deeply virtual meson electroproduction by applying the BLM prescription to the imaginary part of the scattering amplitude and employing a fixed-t dispersion relation to obtain the scale-fixed real part. In this way we resolve the ambiguity in BLM renormalization scale-setting for complex scattering amplitudes. We illustrate this by computing the H generalized parton distribution at leading twist in an analytic quark-diquark model for the parton-proton scattering amplitude which can incorporate Regge exchange contributions characteristic of the deep inelastic structure functions.

  16. RHIC spin physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunce, G.

    The physics potential of colliding beams of protons, polarized either longitudinally or transversely, at RHIC is remarkable. A luminosity of L = 2 x 10(exp 32) cm(exp -2) sec(exp -1) with 70 percent polarized beams will be available with up to 250 GeV energy in each beam. The proposal to collide polarized protons in RHIC was submitted in August 1992 and approved in October 1993, just after this workshop. The collaboration has been encouraged to complete research and development on Siberian Snakes, so that RHIC will be able to accelerate polarized protons early in its program. The expected date of the first heavy ion collisions is 1999. The spin physics program includes measurement of gluon and sea quark polarization in the longitudinally polarized proton, measurement and then application of parity violation in W and Z production, measurement of hard scattering parton-parton asymmetries, and quark polarization or transversity in transversely polarized protons. Single spin asymmetries allow sensitive searches for parity violation (longitudinal polarization) and correlations between quark spin and gluons (transverse). Probes include direct photons (to p(sub T) = 20 GeV/c), jets (to p(sub T) greater than 50 GeV/c), Drell-Yan pairs (to m(sub ll) = 9 GeV), W(sup +/-), and Z. Here, the collaboration emphasizes the new information included in the update, given to the Brookhaven PAC this September.

  17. Perspectives on stimulated Brillouin scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garmire, Elsa

    2017-01-01

    This collection of papers describes research that goes into detail on some of the more important issues in the physics of stimulated Brillouin scattering. This perspective describes the earliest years of the physics of stimulated Brillouin scattering, along with key developments that have led to this technically and physically rich field of today’s nonlinear optics. Stimulated Brillouin has a profound effect in optical fiber communications, initially discovered by its limit on the transmitted power. By controlling SBS in fibers and making use of its phase conjugation properties in both fibers and bulk media, a wide range of applications have been enabled. Today ring Brillouin lasers in fibers, whispering gallery modes and in photonic integrated circuits provide optical delay lines and switches, pulse shapers and components for increasingly complex and important optical systems.

  18. Incoherent Scatter Radar User Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richmond, A. D.

    1984-04-01

    The incoherent scatter radar technique has developed over the years into one of the most powerful tools for investigating physical processes in the upper atmosphere. The National Science Foundation (NSF) now supports a chain of four incoherent scatter facilities at Sondrestromfjord (Greenland), Millstone Hill (Massachusetts), Arecibo (Puerto Rico), and Jicamarca (PERU). Six European nations support the EISCAT facility in northern Scandinavia, and France also has a radar at St. Santin. Recently, the organizations reponsible for each of the six radars agreed to participate in a centralized data base being established at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) to make their data more readily accessible to the scientific community at large.

  19. Quantum Chromodynamics and Deep Inelastic Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, R. Keith

    2016-10-01

    This article first describes the parton model which was the precursor of the QCD description of hard scattering processes. After the discovery of QCD and asymptotic freedom, the first successful applications were to Deep Inelastic lepton-hadron scattering. The subsequent application of QCD to processes with two initial state hadrons required the understanding and proof of factorization. To take the fledgling theory and turn it into the robust calculational engine it has become today, required a number of technical and conceptual developments which will be described. Prospects for higher loop calculations are also reviewed.

  20. Janka hardness using nonstandard specimens

    Treesearch

    David W. Green; Marshall Begel; William Nelson

    2006-01-01

    Janka hardness determined on 1.5- by 3.5-in. specimens (2×4s) was found to be equivalent to that determined using the 2- by 2-in. specimen specified in ASTM D 143. Data are presented on the relationship between Janka hardness and the strength of clear wood. Analysis of historical data determined using standard specimens indicated no difference between side hardness...

  1. Acoustic Scattering from Compact Bubble Clouds.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindall, Jeffrey Alan

    In this study, a simple model describing the low -frequency scattering properties of high void fraction bubble clouds in both the free field and near the ocean surface is developed. This model, which is based on an effective medium approximation and acoustically compact scatters, successfully predicts the results of the bubble cloud scattering experiment carried out at Lake Seneca in New York state for frequencies consistent with the model assumptions (Roy et al., 1992). The introduction of the surface is facilitated by the method of images and is subject to the same constraint of low-acoustic frequency imposed by the compact scatterer assumption. This model is not intended to serve as an exact replicate of oceanic bubble cloud scattering. The model herein was kept simple by design, for only then can the complex physical behavior be expressed in a simple analytical form. Simple, analytic theories facilitate the exploration of parameter space, and more importantly serve to illuminate the underlying physics.

  2. Future Hard X-ray and Gamma-Ray Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczynski, Henric; Physics of the Cosmos (PCOS) Gamma Ray Science Interest Group (GammaSIG) Team

    2017-01-01

    With four major NASA and ESA hard X-ray and gamma-ray missions in orbit (Swift, NuSTAR, INTEGRAL, and Fermi) hard X-ray and gamma-ray astronomy is making major contributions to our understanding of the cosmos. In this talk, I will summarize the current and upcoming activities of the Physics of the Cosmos Gamma Ray Science Interest Group and highlight a few of the future hard X-ray and gamma-ray mission discussed by the community. HK thanks NASA for the support through the awards NNX14AD19G and NNX16AC42G and for PCOS travel support.

  3. Effect of photopolymerization variables on composite hardness.

    PubMed

    Abate, P F; Zahra, V N; Macchi, R L

    2001-12-01

    Variations in light-polymerizing parameters, such as light intensity and light-to-material distance, may affect the physical characteristics of polymerized resin. The purpose of this study was to characterize the relation between total light energy and the final hardness of 4 composites polymerized under varying conditions. Four commercial composite restorative resins (Z100, Filtek A110, Tetric Ceram, and Tetric Flow) were used to prepare 4 disk-shaped specimens (6 x 2 mm) for each experimental condition. Photoactivation was carried out with a light device and energy of 22.6, 15.7, 9.0, or 6.7 J/cm(2). Either the light-to-material distance (0, 5, 10, 15 mm) or activation time (40, 28, 16, 12 seconds) was varied. Immediately after polymerization, Barcol hardness was determined on the specimen surface that had been exposed to the light. Analysis of variance (P<.05) and regression analysis were used to examine the data. No significance (P>.05) was found for the overall effect of the experimental variables (polymerization time and distance), but significant differences (P<.01) were found among materials and energy levels. Regression equations for each product and polymerization condition were calculated for hardness as a function of energy. No significant differences were found for slopes within each material. Hardness values were 3.0 to 3.5 for Tetric Ceram, Tetric Flow, and Filtek A110 and approximately 4.9 for Z100. The hardness of the products analyzed was related to the total energy used for activation. The effect was independent of the manner in which the amount of energy was modified (light-to-material distance or activation time).

  4. SERS of Gold/C 60 (/C 70) nano-clusters deposited on floppy disk and hard disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Zhixun; Fang, Yan

    2006-01-01

    It is important to apply the surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra to study the interfacial properties of films and the adsorption behavior of molecules on substrates. In this paper, SERS spectra of good quality of gold/C 60 (/C 70) nano-clusters deposited on floppy disk and hard disk were reported with the pyridine as a kind of solvent intermediate. The floppy disk or hard disk, as a new and effective substrate for SERS, provides a plank for C 60/C 70 molecules to adsorb on the gold nano-particles. The number of vibrational modes was greatly increased, especially some modes that were forbidden in Raman spectrum, appeared and even split as prediction of group theory. The enhancement factor is estimated to over 10 6. It provides convenience for probing the C 60/C 70 vibrational structure and the physical properties with the high sensitivity, as well as the adsorption behavior, the interaction of fullerene with gold surface and the SERS mechanism of molecules adsorbed on substrates. What's more, the SERS sensitivity of the magnetism is demonstrated by comparing the SERS of gold/C 60 (/C 70) nano-clusters deposited on floppy disk and hard disk.

  5. Comparison of scatter correction methods for CBCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suri, Roland E.; Virshup, Gary; Zurkirchen, Luis; Kaissl, Wolfgang

    2006-03-01

    In contrast to the narrow fan of clinical Computed Tomography (CT) scanners, Cone Beam scanners irradiate a much larger proportion of the object, which causes additional X-ray scattering. The most obvious scatter artefact is that the middle area of the object becomes darker than the outer area, as the density in the middle of the object is underestimated (cupping). Methods for estimating scatter were investigated that can be applied to each single projection without requiring a preliminary reconstruction. Scatter reduction by the Uniform Scatter Fraction method was implemented in the Varian CBCT software version 2.0. This scatter correction method is recommended for full fan scans using air norm. However, this method did not sufficiently correct artefacts in half fan scans and was not sufficiently robust if used in combination with a Single Norm. Therefore, a physical scatter model was developed that estimates scatter for each projection using the attenuation profile of the object. This model relied on laboratory experiments in which scatter kernels were measured for Plexiglas plates of varying thicknesses. Preliminary results suggest that this kernel model may solve the shortcomings of the Uniform Scatter Fraction model.

  6. Multi-methodological investigation of the variability of the microstructure of HPMC hard capsules.

    PubMed

    Faulhammer, E; Kovalcik, A; Wahl, V; Markl, D; Stelzer, F; Lawrence, S; Khinast, J G; Paudel, A

    2016-09-25

    The objective of this study was to analyze differences in the subtle microstructure of three different grades of HMPC hard capsule shells using mechanical, spectroscopic, microscopic and tomographic approaches. Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), vibrational spectroscopic, X-Ray scattering techniques as well as environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) were used. Two HPMC capsules manufactured via chemical gelling, one capsule shell manufactured via thermal gelling and one thermally gelled transparent capsule were included. Characteristic micro-structural alterations (associated manufacturing processes) such as mechanical and physical properties relevant to capsule performance and processability were thoroughly elucidated with the integration of data obtained from multi-methodological investigations. The physico-chemical and physico-mechanical data obtained from a gamut of techniques implied that thermally gelled HPMC hard capsule shells could offer an advantage in terms of machinability during capsule filling, owing to their superior micro- and macroscopic structure as well as specifically the mechanical stability under dry or humid conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Hard x-ray imaging polarimeter for PolariS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Kim, Juyong; Sadamoto, Masaaki; Yoshinaga, Keigo; Gunji, Shuichi; Mihara, Tatehiro; Kishimoto, Yuji; Kubo, Hidetoshi; Mizuno, Tsunefumi; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Dotani, Tadayasu; Yonetoku, Daisuke; Nakamori, Takeshi; Yoneyama, Tomokage; Ikeyama, Yuki; Kamitsukasa, Fumiyoshi

    2016-07-01

    Hard X-ray imaging polarimeters are developed for the X-ray γ-ray polaeimtery satellite PolariS. The imaging polarimter is scattering type, in which anisotropy in the direction of Compton scattering is employed to measure the hard X-ray (10-80 keV) polarization, and is installed on the focal planes of hard X-ray telescopes. We have updated the design of the model so as to cover larger solid angles of scattering direction. We also examine the event selection algorithm to optimize the detection efficiency of recoiled electrons in plastic scintillators. We succeed in improving the efficiency by factor of about 3-4 from the previous algorithm and criteria for 18-30 keV incidence. For 23 keV X-ray incidence, the recoiled electron energy is about 1 keV. We measured the efficiency to detect recoiled electrons in this case, and found about half of the theoretical limit. The improvement in this efficiency directly leads to that in the detection efficiency. In other words, however, there is still a room for improvement. We examine various process in the detector, and estimate the major loss is primarily that of scintillation light in a plastic scintillator pillar with a very small cross section (2.68mm squared) and a long length (40mm). Nevertheless, the current model provides the MDP of 6% for 10mCrab sources, which are the targets of PolariS.

  8. Nuclear Scattering from Transition Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hira, Ajit; McKeough, James; Valerio, Mario; Cathey, Tommy

    2016-03-01

    In view of the continued interest in the scattering of light projectiles by metallic nuclei, we present a computational study of the interactions between different nuclear species of atoms such as H through F (Z <= 9) and the nuclei of Silver, Palladium and other metals. Recent work has shown that neutron scattering can be used to record holographic images of materials. We have developed a FORTRAN computer program to compute stopping cross sections and scattering angles in Ag and other metals for the small nuclear projectiles, using Monte Carlo calculation. This code allows for different angles of incidence. Next, simulations were done in the energy interval from 50 to 210 keV. The computational results thus obtained are compared with relevant experimental data. The data are further analyzed to identify periodic trends in terms of the atomic number of the projectile. Such studies also have potential applications in nuclear physics and in nuclear medicine. Funding from National Science Foundation.

  9. Time reversal for a single spherical scatterer.

    PubMed

    Chambers, D H; Gautesen, A K

    2001-06-01

    We show that the time reversal operator for a planar time reversal mirror (TRM) can have up to four distinct eigenvalues with a small spherical acoustic scatterer. Each eigenstate represents a resonance between the TRM and an induced scattering moment of the sphere. Their amplitude distributions on the TRM are orthogonal superpositions of the radiation patterns from a monopole and up to three orthogonal dipoles. The induced monopole moment is associated with the compressibility contrast between the sphere and the medium, while the dipole moments are associated with density contrast. The number of eigenstates is related to the number of orthogonal orientations of each induced multipole. For hard spheres (glass, metals) the contribution of the monopole moment to the eigenvalues is much greater than that of the dipole moments, leading to a single dominant eigenvalue. The other eigenvalues are much smaller, making it unlikely multiple eigenvalues could have been observed in previous experiments using hard materials. However, for soft materials such as wood, plastic, or air bubbles the eigenvalues are comparable in magnitude and should be observable. The presence of multiple eigenstates breaks the one-to-one correspondence between eigenstates and distinguishable scatterers discussed previously by Prada and Fink [Wave Motion 20, 151-163 (1994)]. However, eigenfunctions from separate scatterers would have different phases for their eigenfunctions, potentially restoring the ability to distinguish separate scatterers. Since relative magnitudes of the eigenvalues for a single scatterer are governed by the ratio of the compressibility contrast to the density contrast, measurement of the eigenvalue spectrum would provide information on the composition of the scatterer.

  10. Overview: Hard Rock Penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, J.C.

    1992-08-01

    The Hard Rock Penetration program is developing technology to reduce the costs of drilling and completing geothermal wells. Current projects include: lost circulation control, rock penetration mechanics, instrumentation, and industry/DOE cost shared projects of the Geothermal Drilling organization. Last year, a number of accomplishments were achieved in each of these areas. A new flow meter being developed to accurately measure drilling fluid outflow was tested extensively during Long Valley drilling. Results show that this meter is rugged, reliable, and can provide useful measurements of small differences in fluid inflow and outflow rates. By providing early indications of fluid gain or loss, improved control of blow-out and lost circulation problems during geothermal drilling can be expected. In the area of downhole tools for lost circulation control, the concept of a downhole injector for injecting a two-component, fast-setting cementitious mud was developed. DOE filed a patent application for this concept during FY 91. The design criteria for a high-temperature potassium, uranium, thorium logging tool featuring a downhole data storage computer were established, and a request for proposals was submitted to tool development companies. The fundamental theory of acoustic telemetry in drill strings was significantly advanced through field experimentation and analysis. A new understanding of energy loss mechanisms was developed.

  11. Overview - Hard Rock Penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, James C.

    1992-03-24

    The Hard Rock Penetration program is developing technology to reduce the costs of drilling and completing geothermal wells. Current projects include: lost circulation control, rock penetration mechanics, instrumentation, and industry/DOE cost shared projects of the Geothermal Drilling Organization. Last year, a number of accomplishments were achieved in each of these areas. A new flow meter being developed to accurately measure drilling fluid outflow was tested extensively during Long Valley drilling. Results show that this meter is rugged, reliable, and can provide useful measurements of small differences in fluid inflow and outflow rates. By providing early indications of fluid gain or loss, improved control of blow-out and lost circulation problems during geothermal drilling can be expected. In the area of downhole tools for lost circulation control, the concept of a downhole injector for injecting a two-component, fast-setting cementitious mud was developed. DOE filed a patent application for this concept during FY 91. The design criteria for a high-temperature potassium, uranium, thorium logging tool featuring a downhole data storage computer were established, and a request for proposals was submitted to tool development companies. The fundamental theory of acoustic telemetry in drill strings was significantly advanced through field experimentation and analysis. A new understanding of energy loss mechanisms was developed.

  12. Overview: Hard Rock Penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, J.C.

    1992-01-01

    The Hard Rock Penetration program is developing technology to reduce the costs of drilling and completing geothermal wells. Current projects include: lost circulation control, rock penetration mechanics, instrumentation, and industry/DOE cost shared projects of the Geothermal Drilling organization. Last year, a number of accomplishments were achieved in each of these areas. A new flow meter being developed to accurately measure drilling fluid outflow was tested extensively during Long Valley drilling. Results show that this meter is rugged, reliable, and can provide useful measurements of small differences in fluid inflow and outflow rates. By providing early indications of fluid gain or loss, improved control of blow-out and lost circulation problems during geothermal drilling can be expected. In the area of downhole tools for lost circulation control, the concept of a downhole injector for injecting a two-component, fast-setting cementitious mud was developed. DOE filed a patent application for this concept during FY 91. The design criteria for a high-temperature potassium, uranium, thorium logging tool featuring a downhole data storage computer were established, and a request for proposals was submitted to tool development companies. The fundamental theory of acoustic telemetry in drill strings was significantly advanced through field experimentation and analysis. A new understanding of energy loss mechanisms was developed.

  13. Measuring the Hardness of Minerals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bushby, Jessica

    2005-01-01

    The author discusses Moh's hardness scale, a comparative scale for minerals, whereby the softest mineral (talc) is placed at 1 and the hardest mineral (diamond) is placed at 10, with all other minerals ordered in between, according to their hardness. Development history of the scale is outlined, as well as a description of how the scale is used…

  14. Simplified Formulae System for Resonant Inverse Compton Scattering of a Fast Electron in an Intense Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    You, J. H.; Chen, W. P.; Zhang, S. N.; Chen, L.; Liu, D.; Chou, C. K.

    2003-01-01

    We present simple analytical formulae for the emission spectrum and total power of a special kind of resonant inverse Compton scattering (RICS) of a relativistic electron in an intense magnetic field. In contrast with the available formulae system, we obtain a markedly simplified one based on the semiclassical quantum theory, which is more understandable for people who are unfamiliar with quantum electrodynamics. We show that the RICS process, under an appropriate 'accommodation condition' derived in this paper, is predominantly much more efficient than the coexistent ordinary inverse Compton scattering, and produces highly beamed high-frequency radiation with moderately good monochromaticity. Our formulae are simple to use - thus offering a lucid physical intuition for the theory - and may find wide applications in hard X-ray and gamma-ray astrophysics.

  15. Resolving Ambiguities in the LF/HF Ratio: LF-HF Scatter Plots for the Categorization of Mental and Physical Stress from HRV.

    PubMed

    von Rosenberg, Wilhelm; Chanwimalueang, Theerasak; Adjei, Tricia; Jaffer, Usman; Goverdovsky, Valentin; Mandic, Danilo P

    2017-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the activities of the autonomic nervous system (ANS), which consists of the sympathetic (SNS) and parasympathetic nervous systems (PNS), are reflected in the low- (LF) and high-frequency (HF) bands in heart rate variability (HRV)-while, not without some controversy, the ratio of the powers in those frequency bands, the so called LF-HF ratio (LF/HF), has been used to quantify the degree of sympathovagal balance. Indeed, recent studies demonstrate that, in general: (i) sympathovagal balance cannot be accurately measured via the ratio of the LF- and HF- power bands; and (ii) the correspondence between the LF/HF ratio and the psychological and physiological state of a person is not unique. Since the standard LF/HF ratio provides only a single degree of freedom for the analysis of this 2D phenomenon, we propose a joint treatment of the LF and HF powers in HRV within a two-dimensional representation framework, thus providing the required degrees of freedom. By virtue of the proposed 2D representation, the restrictive assumption of the linear dependence between the activity of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) and the LF-HF frequency band powers is demonstrated to become unnecessary. The proposed analysis framework also opens up completely new possibilities for a more comprehensive and rigorous examination of HRV in relation to physical and mental states of an individual, and makes possible the categorization of different stress states based on HRV. In addition, based on instantaneous amplitudes of Hilbert-transformed LF- and HF-bands, a novel approach to estimate the markers of stress in HRV is proposed and is shown to improve the robustness to artifacts and irregularities, critical issues in real-world recordings. The proposed approach for resolving the ambiguities in the standard LF/HF-ratio analyses is verified over a number of real-world stress-invoking scenarios.

  16. Eikonal Scattering at Strong Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irizarry-Gelpi, Melvin Eloy

    The scattering of subatomic particles is a source of important physical phenomena. Decades of work have yielded many techniques for the computation of scattering amplitudes. Most of these techniques involve perturbative quantum field theory and thus apply only at weak coupling. Complementary to scattering is the formation of bound states, which are intrinsically nonperturbative. Regge theory arose in the late 1950s as an attempt to describe, with a single framework, both scattering and the formation of bound states. In Regge theory one obtains an amplitude with bound state poles after analytic continuation of a nonperturbative scattering amplitude, corresponding to a sum of an infinite number of Feynman diagrams at large energy and fixed momentum transfer (but with crossed kinematics). Thus, in order to obtain bound states at fixed energy, one computes an amplitude at large momentum transfer. In this dissertation we calculate amplitudes with bound states in the regime of fixed energy and small momentum transfer. We formulate the elastic scattering problem in terms of many-body path integrals, familiar from quantum mechanics. Then we invoke the semiclassical JWKB approximation, where the path integral is dominated by classical paths. The dynamics in the semiclassical regime are strongly coupled, as found by Halpern and Siegel. When the momentum transfer is small, the classical paths are simple straight lines and the resulting semiclassical amplitudes display a spectrum of bound states that agrees with the spectrum found by solving wave equations with potentials. In this work we study the bound states of matter particles with various types of interactions, including electromagnetic and gravitational interactions. Our work has many analogies with the work started by Alday and Maldacena, who computed scattering amplitudes of gluons at strong coupling with semiclassical quantum mechanics of strings in anti de-Sitter spacetime. We hope that in the future we can apply our

  17. Numerical prediction of microstructure and hardness in multicycle simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Oddy, A.S.; McDill, J.M.J.

    1996-06-01

    Thermal-microstructural predictions are made and compared to physical simulations of heat-affected zones in multipass and weaved welds. The microstructural prediction algorithm includes reaustenitization kinetics, grain growth, austenite decomposition kinetics, hardness, and tempering. Microstructural simulation of weaved welds requires that the algorithm include transient reaustenitization, austenite decomposition for arbitrary thermal cycles including during reheating, and tempering. Material properties for each of these phenomena are taken from the best available literature. The numerical predictions are compared with the results of physical simulations made at the Metals Technology Laboratory, CANMET, on a Gleeble 1500 simulator. Thermal histories used in the physical simulations included single-pass welds, isothermal tempering, two-cycle, and three-cycle welds. The two- and three-cycle welds include temper-bead and weaved-weld simulations. A recurring theme in the analysis is the significant variation found in the material properties for the same grade of steel. This affected all the material properties used including those governing reaustenitization, austenite grain growth, austenite decomposition, and hardness. Hardness measurements taken from the literature show a variation of {+-}5 to 30 HV on the same sample. Alloy differences within the allowable range also led to hardness variations of {+-}30 HV for the heat-affected zone of multipass welds. The predicted hardnesses agree extremely well with those taken from the physical simulations.

  18. Thomson scattering from laser plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, J D; Alley, W E; De Groot, J S; Estabrook, K G; Glenzer, S H; Hammer, J H; Jadaud, J P; MacGowan, B J; Rozmus, W; Suter, L J; Williams, E A

    1999-01-12

    Thomson scattering has recently been introduced as a fundamental diagnostic of plasma conditions and basic physical processes in dense, inertial confinement fusion plasmas. Experiments at the Nova laser facility [E. M. Campbell et al., Laser Part. Beams 9, 209 (1991)] have demonstrated accurate temporally and spatially resolved characterization of densities, electron temperatures, and average ionization levels by simultaneously observing Thomson scattered light from ion acoustic and electron plasma (Langmuir) fluctuations. In addition, observations of fast and slow ion acous- tic waves in two-ion species plasmas have also allowed an independent measurement of the ion temperature. These results have motivated the application of Thomson scattering in closed-geometry inertial confinement fusion hohlraums to benchmark integrated radiation-hydrodynamic modeling of fusion plasmas. For this purpose a high energy 4{omega} probe laser was implemented recently allowing ultraviolet Thomson scattering at various locations in high-density gas-filled hohlraum plasmas. In partic- ular, the observation of steep electron temperature gradients indicates that electron thermal transport is inhibited in these gas-filled hohlraums. Hydrodynamic calcula- tions which include an exact treatment of large-scale magnetic fields are in agreement with these findings. Moreover, the Thomson scattering data clearly indicate axial stagnation in these hohlraums by showing a fast rise of the ion temperature. Its timing is in good agreement with calculations indicating that the stagnating plasma will not deteriorate the implosion of the fusion capsules in ignition experiments.

  19. Time Dependent Nuclear Scattering Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weeks, David

    2005-04-01

    A new time dependent method for calculating scattering matrix elements of two and three body nuclear collisions below 50 Mev is being developed. The procedure closely follows the channel packet method (CPM) used to compute scattering matrix elements for non-adiabatic molecular reactions.ootnotetextT.A.Niday and D.E.Weeks, Chem. Phys. Letters 308 (1999) 106 Currently, one degree of freedom calculations using a simple square well have been completed and a two body scattering calculation using the Yukawa potential is anticipated. To perform nuclear scattering calculations with the CPM that will incorporate the nucleon-nucleon tensor force, we plan to position initial reactant and product channel packets in the asymptotic limit on single coupled potential energy surfaces labeled by the spin, isospin, and total angular momentum of the reactant nucleons. The wave packets will propagated numerically using the split operator method augmented by a coordinate dependant unitary transformation used to diagonalize the potential. Scattering matrix elements will be determined by the Fourier transform of the correlation function between the evolving reactant and product wave packets. A brief outline of the Argonne v18 nucleon-nucleon potentialootnotetextR.B.Wiringa, V.G.J.Stoks, and R.Schiavilla, Physical Review C 51(1995) 38 and the proposed wave packet calculations will be presented.

  20. Nonlinear scattering in plasmonic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Shi-Wei

    2016-09-01

    Nonlinear phenomena provide novel light manipulation capabilities and innovative applications. Recently, we discovered nonlinear saturation on single-particle scattering of gold nanospheres by continuous-wave laser excitation and innovatively applied to improve microscopic resolution down to λ/8. However, the nonlinearity was limited to the green-orange plasmonic band of gold nanosphere, and the underlying mechanism has not yet been fully understood. In this work, we demonstrated that nonlinear scattering exists for various material/geometry combinations, thus expanding the applicable wavelength range. For near-infrared, gold nanorod is used, while for blue-violet, silver nanospheres are adopted. In terms of mechanism, the nonlinearity may originate from interband/intraband absorption, hot electron, or hot lattice, which are spectrally mixed in the case of gold nanosphere. For gold nanorod and silver nanosphere, nonlinear scattering occurs at plasmonic resonances, which are spectrally far from interband/intraband absorptions, so they are excluded. We found that the nonlinear index is much larger than possible contributions from hot electrons in literature. Therefore, we conclude that hot lattice is the major mechanism. In addition, we propose that similar to z-scan, which is the standard method to characterize nonlinearity of a thin sample, laser scanning microscopy should be adopted as the standard method to characterize nonlinearity from a nanostructure. Our work not only provides the physical mechanism of the nonlinear scattering, but also paves the way toward multi-color superresolution imaging based on non-bleaching plasmonic scattering.

  1. Neutron Scattering Stiudies

    SciTech Connect

    Kegel, Gunter H.R.; Egan, James J

    2007-04-18

    This project covers four principal areas of research: Elastic and inelastic neutron scattering studies in odd-A terbium, thulium and other highly deformed nuclei near A=160 with special regard to interband transitions and to the investigation of the direct-interaction versus the compound-nucleus excitation process in these nuclei. Examination of new, fast photomultiplier tubes suitable for use in a miniaturized neutron-time-of-flight spectrometer. Measurement of certain inelastic cross sections of 238U. Determination of the multiplicity of prompt fission gamma rays in even-A fissile actinides. Energies and mean lives of fission isomers produced by fast fission of even-Z, even-A actinides. Study of the mean life of 7Be in different host matrices and its possible astro-physical significance.

  2. Interference in spectrum of radiation from doubly scattered charged particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondarenco, M. V.; Shul'ga, N. F.

    2017-03-01

    Existence of different types of interference in the spectrum of radiation emitted by a doubly hard scattered electron is demonstrated. The spectrum develops oscillations in two regions: the hard, where they depend on the electron Lorentz factor, and the soft, where the oscillations depend on the electron scattering angles. This interference pattern owes to the presence of jetlike radiation configurations, formed by a piecewise-rectilinearly moving electron and the accompanying photon. The corresponding nondipole decomposition relation is derived. Notions describing proper field formation and interference, and presumably being applicable more generally, are discussed in detail.

  3. Multiple parton scattering in nuclei: Parton energy loss

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xin-Nian; Guo, Xiao-feng

    2001-02-17

    Multiple parton scattering and induced parton energy loss are studied in deeply inelastic scattering (DIS) off nuclei. The effect of multiple scattering of a highly off-shell quark and the induced parton energy loss is expressed in terms of the modification to the quark fragmentation functions. The authors derive such modified quark fragmentation functions and their QCD evolution equations in DIS using the generalized factorization of higher twist parton distributions. They consider double-hard and hard-soft parton scattering as well as their interferences in the same framework. The final result, which depends on both the diagonal and off-diagonal twist-four parton distributions in nuclei, demonstrates clearly the Landau-Pomeranchuk-Migdal interference features and predicts a unique nuclear modification of the quark fragmentation functions.

  4. Lensless ghost imaging through the strongly scattering medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhe, Yang; Lianjie, Zhao; Xueliang, Zhao; Wei, Qin; Junlin, Li

    2016-02-01

    Lensless ghost imaging has attracted much interest in recent years due to its profound physics and potential applications. In this paper we report studies of the robust properties of the lensless ghost imaging system with a pseudo-thermal light source in a strongly scattering medium. The effects of the positions of the strong medium on the ghost imaging are investigated. In the lensless ghost imaging system, a pseudo-thermal light is split into two correlated beams by a beam splitter. One beam goes to a charge-coupled detector camera, labeled as CCD2. The other beam goes to an object and then is collected in another charge-coupled detector camera, labeled as CCD1, which serves as a bucket detector. When the strong medium, a pane of ground glass disk, is placed between the object and CCD1, the bucket detector, the quality of ghost imaging is barely affected and a good image could still be obtained. The quality of the ghost imaging can also be maintained, even when the ground glass is rotating, which is the strongest scattering medium so far. However, when the strongly scattering medium is present in the optical path from the light source to CCD2 or the object, the lensless ghost imaging system hardly retrieves the image of the object. A theoretical analysis in terms of the second-order correlation function is also provided. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11175094 and 91221205), the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2015CB921002), and partially supported by the Basic Research Fund of Beijing Institute of Technology (Grant No. 20141842005).

  5. Future of Electron Scattering and Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Ernest; Stemmer, Susanne; Zheng, Haimei; Zhu, Yimei; Maracas, George

    2014-02-25

    , momentum space, and energy space for visualizing dopants, interstitials, and light elements; for imaging localized vibrational modes and the motion of charged particles and vacancies; for correlating lattice, spin, orbital, and charge; and for determining the structure and molecular chemistry of organic and soft matter. The instrument will be uniquely suited to answer fundamental questions in condensed matter physics that require understanding the physical and electronic structure at the atomic scale. Key developments include stable cryogenic capabilities that will allow access to emergent electronic phases, as well as hard/soft interfaces and radiation- sensitive materials. B. Ultrafast Electron Diffraction and Microscopy Instrument: This instrument would be capable of nano-diffraction with 10 fs temporal resolution in stroboscopic mode, and better than 100 fs temporal resolution in single shot mode. The instrument would also achieve single- shot real-space imaging with a spatial/temporal resolution of 10 nm/10 ps, representing a thousand fold improvement over current microscopes. Such a capability would be complementary to x-ray free electron lasers due to the difference in the nature of electron and x-ray scattering, enabling space-time mapping of lattice vibrations and energy transport, facilitating the understanding of molecular dynamics of chemical reactions, the photonic control of emergence in quantum materials, and the dynamics of mesoscopic materials. C. Lab-In-Gap Dynamic Microscope: This instrument would enable quantitative measurements of materials structure, composition, and bonding evolution in technologically relevant environments, including liquids, gases and plasmas, thereby assuring the understanding of structure function relationship at the atomic scale with up to nanosecond temporal resolution. This instrument would employ a versatile, modular sample stage and holder geometry to allow the multi-modal (e.g., optical, thermal, mechanical, electrical, and

  6. Measurement, entanglement, and collapse, in atom-photon scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozeri, Roee; Glickman, Yinnon; Kotler, Shlomi; Akerman, Nitzan

    2013-05-01

    Photon scattering is a common tool in atomic physics experiments. We show how, entanglement, measurement and decoherence are intertwined in the process of photon scattering by a single trapped ion. We preform quantum process tomography on the spin of a single trapped 88Sr+ ion, undergoing resonant photon scattering. We observe that, following the scattering and detection of a single photon, a spin measurement basis emerges. The measurement basis is aligned with the scattered photon direction and its state are invariant under photon scattering. We also find that, while the measurement basis states themselves are classically correlated with the scattered photon polarization, superpositions of these basis state become entangled with the scattered photon. Quantum feedback, based on photon polarization measurement, can be used to reverse photon scattering decoherence.

  7. Luminosity-dependent changes of the cyclotron line energy and spectral hardness in Cepheus X-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vybornov, V.; Klochkov, D.; Gornostaev, M.; Postnov, K.; Sokolova-Lapa, E.; Staubert, R.; Pottschmidt, K.; Santangelo, A.

    2017-05-01

    Context. X-ray spectra of accreting pulsars are generally observed to vary with their X-ray luminosity. In particular, the hardness of the X-ray continuum is found to depend on luminosity. In a few sources, the correlation between the energy of the cyclotron resonance scattering feature (CRSF) and the luminosity is clear. Different types (signs) of the correlation are believed to reflect different accretion modes. Aims: We analyse two NuSTAR observations of the transient accreting pulsar Cep X-4 during its 2014 outburst. Our analysis is focused on a detailed investigation of the dependence of the CRSF energy and of the spectral hardness on X-ray luminosity, especially on short timescales. Methods: To investigate the spectral changes as a function of luminosity within each of the two observations, we used the intrinsic variability of the source on the timescale of individual pulse cycles (tens of seconds), the so-called pulse-to-pulse variability. Results: We find that the NuSTAR spectrum of Cep X-4 contains two CRSFs: the fundamental line at 30 keV and its harmonic at 55 keV. We find for the first time that the energy of the fundamental CRSF increases and the continuum becomes harder with increasing X-ray luminosity not only between the two observations, that is, on the long timescale, but also within an individual observation, on the timescale of a few tens of seconds. We investigate these dependencies in detail including their non-linearity. We discuss a possible physical interpretation of the observed behaviour in the frame of a simple one-dimensional model of the polar emitting region with a collisionless shock formed in the infalling plasma near the neutron star surface. With this model, we are able to reproduce the observed variations of the continuum hardness ratio and of the CRSF energy with luminosity.

  8. Extracting Dynamical Equations from Experimental Data is NP Hard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubitt, Toby S.; Eisert, Jens; Wolf, Michael M.

    2012-03-01

    The behavior of any physical system is governed by its underlying dynamical equations. Much of physics is concerned with discovering these dynamical equations and understanding their consequences. In this Letter, we show that, remarkably, identifying the underlying dynamical equation from any amount of experimental data, however precise, is a provably computationally hard problem (it is NP hard), both for classical and quantum mechanical systems. As a by-product of this work, we give complexity-theoretic answers to both the quantum and classical embedding problems, two long-standing open problems in mathematics (the classical problem, in particular, dating back over 70 years).

  9. Extracting dynamical equations from experimental data is NP hard.

    PubMed

    Cubitt, Toby S; Eisert, Jens; Wolf, Michael M

    2012-03-23

    The behavior of any physical system is governed by its underlying dynamical equations. Much of physics is concerned with discovering these dynamical equations and understanding their consequences. In this Letter, we show that, remarkably, identifying the underlying dynamical equation from any amount of experimental data, however precise, is a provably computationally hard problem (it is NP hard), both for classical and quantum mechanical systems. As a by-product of this work, we give complexity-theoretic answers to both the quantum and classical embedding problems, two long-standing open problems in mathematics (the classical problem, in particular, dating back over 70 years).

  10. Nonlinear Waves and Inverse Scattering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-09-18

    problems. Research is really two pronged. It is necessary for us to understand and effectively solve both classical and new direct and inverse scattering... descoveries employed IST in one spatial dimension, we have developed effective procedures to carry forth the method for multidimensional problems. In one...Employing IST we have been able to find new solutions to physically interesting multidimensional nonlinear wave equations. The method requires a

  11. Grassmannian origin of scattering amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trnka, Jaroslav

    Quantum field theory (QFT) is our central theoretical framework to describe the microscopic world, arising from the union of quantum mechanics and special relativity. Since QFTs play such a central role in our understanding of Nature, a deeper study of their physical properties is one of the most exciting directions of research in theoretical physics. This has led to the discovery of many important theoretical concepts, such as supersymmetry and string theory. One of the most prominent physical observable in any QFT is the scattering amplitude, which describes scattering processes of elementary particles. Theoretical progress in understanding and computing scattering amplitudes has accelerated in last few years with the discovery of amazing new mathematical structures in a close cousin of QCD, known as N=4 Super-Yang-Mills theory (SYM). In the first chapter we study integrands of loop amplitudes in planar N=4 SYM and show their astonishing simplicity when written in terms of special set of chiral integrals. In chapter two we show how to reconstruct the multi-loop integrand recursively starting from tree-level amplitudes. This approach makes the long-hidden Yangian symmetry of the theory completely manifest and provides a Lagrangian-independent approach for determining the integrand at any loop order. In chapter three we demonstrate that the problem of calculating of scattering amplitudes in planar N=4 SYM can be completely reformulated in a new framework in terms of on-shell diagrams and integrals over the positive Grassmannian G(k,n). Remarkably, the building blocks for amplitudes play a fundamental role in an active area of research in mathematics spanning algebraic geometry to combinatorics. In chapter four we sketch the argument that the amplitude itself is represented by a single geometrical object defined purely using a new striking property -- positivity -- and all physical concepts like unitarity and locality emerge as derived concepts, each having a sharp

  12. DEEPLY INELASTIC SCATTERING OFF NUCLEI AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    VENUGOPALAN, R.

    2001-09-14

    In this talk, we discussed the physics case for an eA collider. We emphasized the novel physics that might be studied at small x. The interesting physics at intermediate x's has been discussed elsewhere [3]. Plans for an electron-ion collider include, as a major part of the program, the possibility of doing polarized electron-polarized proton/light ion scattering. A discussion of the combined case for high energy electron nucleus and polarized electron-polarized proton scattering will be published separately [66].

  13. Beta Backscatter Measures the Hardness of Rubber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrissey, E. T.; Roje, F. N.

    1986-01-01

    Nondestructive testing method determines hardness, on Shore scale, of room-temperature-vulcanizing silicone rubber. Measures backscattered beta particles; backscattered radiation count directly proportional to Shore hardness. Test set calibrated with specimen, Shore hardness known from mechanical durometer test. Specimen of unknown hardness tested, and radiation count recorded. Count compared with known sample to find Shore hardness of unknown.

  14. Thin coatings and films hardness evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matyunin, V. M.; Marchenkov, A. Yu; Demidov, A. N.; Karimbekov, M. A.

    2016-10-01

    The existing thin coatings and films hardness evaluation methods based on indentation with pyramidal indenter on various scale levels are expounded. The impact of scale factor on hardness values is performed. The experimental verification of several existing hardness evaluation methods regarding the substrate hardness value and the “coating - substrate” composite hardness value is made.

  15. Beta Backscatter Measures the Hardness of Rubber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrissey, E. T.; Roje, F. N.

    1986-01-01

    Nondestructive testing method determines hardness, on Shore scale, of room-temperature-vulcanizing silicone rubber. Measures backscattered beta particles; backscattered radiation count directly proportional to Shore hardness. Test set calibrated with specimen, Shore hardness known from mechanical durometer test. Specimen of unknown hardness tested, and radiation count recorded. Count compared with known sample to find Shore hardness of unknown.

  16. Rayleigh scattering of a spherical sound wave.

    PubMed

    Godin, Oleg A

    2013-02-01

    Acoustic Green's functions for a homogeneous medium with an embedded spherical obstacle arise in analyses of scattering by objects on or near an interface, radiation by finite sources, sound attenuation in and scattering from clouds of suspended particles, etc. An exact solution of the problem of diffraction of a monochromatic spherical sound wave on a sphere is given by an infinite series involving products of Bessel functions and Legendre polynomials. In this paper, a simple, closed-form solution is obtained for scattering by a sphere with a radius that is small compared to the wavelength. Soft, hard, impedance, and fluid obstacles are considered. The solution is valid for arbitrary positions of the source and receiver relative to the scatterer. Low-frequency scattering is shown to be rather sensitive to boundary conditions on the surface of the obstacle. Low-frequency asymptotics of the scattered acoustic field are extended to transient incident waves. The asymptotic expansions admit an intuitive interpretation in terms of image sources and reduce to classical results in appropriate limiting cases.

  17. Efficient finite element modeling of elastodynamic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, Paul D.; Velichko, Alexander

    2009-03-01

    The scattering of elastic waves by defects is the physical basis of ultrasonic NDE. Although analytical models exist for some canonical problems, the general case of scattering from an arbitrarily-shaped defect requires numerical methods such as finite elements (FE). In this paper, a robust and efficient FE technique is presented that is based on the premise of meshing a relatively small domain sufficient to enclose the scatterer. Plane waves are then excited from a particular direction by a numerical implementation of the Helmholtz-Kirchhoff integral that uses an encircling array of uni-modal point sources. The scattered field displacements are recorded at the same points and the field decomposed into plane waves of different modes at different angles. By repeating this procedure for different incident angles it is possible to generate the scattering- or S-matrix for the scatterer. For a given size of scatterer, all the information in an S-matrix can be represented in the Fourier domain by a limited number of complex coefficients. Thus the complete scattering behavior of an arbitrary-shaped scatterer can be characterized by a finite number of complex coefficients, that can be obtained from a relatively small number of FE model executions.

  18. Compton scattering in strong magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daugherty, Joseph K.; Harding, Alice K.

    1986-01-01

    The relativistic cross section for Compton scattering by electrons in strong magnetic fields is derived. The results confirm and extend earlier work which has treated only transitions to the lowest or first excited Landau levels. For the teragauss field strengths expected in neutron star magnetospheres, the relative rates for excited state transitions are found to be significant, especially for incident photon energies several times the cyclotron frequency. Since these transitions must result in the rapid emission of one or more cyclotron photons as well as the Compton-scattered photon, the scattering process actually becomes a photon 'splitting' mechanism which acts to soften hard photon spectra, and also provides a specific mechanism for populating higher Landau levels in the electron distribution function. The results should be significant for models of gamma-ray bursters and pulsating X-ray sources.

  19. Reviews Book: Marie Curie and Her Daughters Resource: Cumulus Equipment: Alpha Particle Scattering Apparatus Equipment: 3D Magnetic Tube Equipment: National Grid Transmission Model Book: Einstein's Physics Equipment: Barton's Pendulums Equipment: Weather Station Web Watch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-09-01

    WE RECOMMEND Marie Curie and Her Daughters An insightful study of a resilient and ingenious family and their achievements Cumulus Simple to install and operate and with obvious teaching applications, this weather station 'donationware' is as easy to recommend as it is to use Alpha Particle Scattering Apparatus Good design and construction make for good results National Grid Transmission Model Despite its expense, this resource offers excellent value Einstein's Physics A vivid, accurate, compelling and rigorous treatment, but requiring an investment of time and thought WORTH A LOOK 3D Magnetic Tube Magnetic fields in three dimensions at a low cost Barton's Pendulums A neat, well-made and handy variant, but not a replacement for the more traditional version Weather Station Though not as robust or substantial as hoped for, this can be put to good use with the right software WEB WATCH An online experiment and worksheet are useful for teaching motor efficiency, a glance at CERN, and NASA's interesting information on the alpha-magnetic spectrometer and climate change

  20. Interfacial phenomena in hard-rod fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shundyak, K. Y.

    2004-05-01

    This thesis addresses questions of interfacial ordering in hard-rod fluids at coexistence of the isotropic and nematic phases and in their contact with simple model substrates. It is organized as follows. Chapter II provides some background information about the relation between the statistical mechanical and thermodynamical level of descriptions of bulk hard-rod fluids, as well as introduces the asymptotically exact Onsager model, and some basic facts of interfacial thermodynamics. Chapter III represents studies of the simplest free IN interface in a fluid of monodisperse Onsager hard rods. For the analysis of this system we develop an efficient perturbative method to determine the (biaxial) one-particle distribution function in inhomogeneous systems. Studies of the free planar isotropic-nematic interfaces are continued in Chapter IV, where they are considered in binary mixtures of hard rods. For sufficiently different particle shapes the bulk phase diagrams of these mixtures exhibit a triple point, where an isotropic (I) phase coexists with two nematic phases (N1 and N2) of different composition. For all explored mixtures we find that upon approach of the triple point the IN2 interface shows complete wetting by an intervening N1 film. We compute the surface tension of isotropic-nematic interfaces, and find a remarkable increase with fractionation. These studies are complemented by an analysis of bulk phase behavior and interfacial properties of nonadditive binary mixtures of thin and thick hard rods in Chapter V. The formulation of this model was motivated by recent experiments in the group of Fraden, who explored the phase behavior of a mixture of viruses with different effective diameters. In our model, species of the same types are considered as interacting with the hard-core repulsive potential, whereas the excluded volume for dissimilar rods is taken to be larger (smaller) then for the pure hard rods. Such a nonadditivity enhances (reduces) fractionation at

  1. 2010 American Conference on Neutron Scattering (ACNS 2010)

    SciTech Connect

    Billinge, Simon

    2011-06-17

    The ACNS provides a focal point for the national neutron user community to strengthen ties within this diverse group, while at the same time promoting neutron research among colleagues in related disciplines identified as “would-be” neutron users. The American Conference on Neutron Scattering thus serves a dual role as a national user meeting and a scientific meeting. As a venue for scientific exchange, the ACNS showcases recent results and provides forums for scientific discussion of neutron research in diverse fields such as hard and soft condensed matter, liquids, biology, magnetism, engineering materials, chemical spectroscopy, crystal structure, and elementary excitations, fundamental physics and development of neutron instrumentation through a combination of invited talks, contributed talks and poster sessions. As a “super-user” meeting, the ACNS fulfills the main objectives of users' meetings previously held periodically at individual national neutron facilities, with the advantage of a larger and more diverse audience. To this end, each of the major national neutron facilities (NIST, LANSCE, HFIR and SNS) have an opportunity to exchange information and update users, and potential users, of their facility. This is also an appropriate forum for users to raise issues that relate to the facilities. For many of the national facilities, this super-user meeting should obviate the need for separate user meetings that tax the time, energy and budgets of facility staff and the users alike, at least in years when the ACNS is held. We rely upon strong participation from the national facilities. The NSSA intends that the American Conference on Neutron Scattering (ACNS) will occur approximately every two years, but not in years that coincide with the International or European Conferences on Neutron Scattering. The ACNS is to be held in association with one of the national neutron centers in a rotating sequence, with the host facility providing local organization

  2. Hard Photodisintegration of a Proton Pair in 3He

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.

    2003-09-30

    Hard photodisintegration of the deuteron has been extensively studied in order to understand the dynamics of the transition from hadronic to quark-gluon descriptions of the strong interaction. In this work, we discuss the extension of this program to hard photodisintegration of a pp pair in the {sup 3}He nucleus. Experimental confirmation of new features predicted here for the suggested reaction would advance our understanding of hard nuclear reactions. A main prediction, in contrast with low-energy observations, is that the pp breakup cross section is not much smaller than the one for pn break up.In some models, the energy-dependent oscillations observed for pp scattering are predicted to appear in the {gamma}{sup 3}He to pp + n reaction. Such an observation would open up a completely new field in studies of color coherence phenomena in hard nuclear reactions. We also demonstrate that, in addition to the energy dependence, the measurement of the light-cone momentum distribution of the recoil neutron provides an independent test of the underlying dynamics of hard disintegration.

  3. Hard photodisintegration of 3He into a p d pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maheswari, Dhiraj; Sargsian, Misak M.

    2017-02-01

    The recent measurements of high energy photodisintegration of a 3He nucleus to a p d pair at 90∘ center of mass demonstrated an energy scaling consistent with the quark counting rule with an unprecedentedly large exponent of s-17. To understand the underlying mechanism of this process, we extended the theoretical formalism of the hard rescattering mechanism (HRM) to calculate the γ 3He→p d reaction. In HRM the incoming high energy photon strikes a quark from one of the nucleons in the target which subsequently undergoes hard rescattering with the quarks from the other nucleons, generating a hard two-body system in the final state of the reaction. Within the HRM we derived the parameter-free expression for the differential cross section of the reaction, which is expressed through the 3He→p d transition spectral function, the cross section of hard p d →p d scattering, and the effective charge of the quarks being interchanged during the hard rescattering process. The numerical estimates of all these factors resulted in the magnitude of the cross section, which is surprisingly in good agreement with the data.

  4. Segmented Liner to Control Mode Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.; Jones, Michael G.; Brown, Martha C.

    2013-01-01

    The acoustic performance of duct liners can be improved by segmenting the treatment. In a segmented liner treatment, one stage of liner reduces the target sound and scatters energy into other acoustic modes, which are attenuated by a subsequent stage. The Curved Duct Test Rig is an experimental facility in which sound incident on the liner can be generated in a specific mode and the scatter of energy into other modes can be quantified. A series of experiments is performed in which the baseline configuration is asymmetric, that is, a liner is on one side wall of the test duct and the wall opposite is acoustically hard. Segmented liner treatment is achieved by progressively replacing sections of the hard wall opposite with liner in the axial direction, from 25% of the wall surface to 100%. It is found that the energy scatter from the (0,0) to the (0,1) mode reduces as the percentage of opposite wall treatment increases, and the frequency of peak attenuation shifts toward higher frequency. Similar results are found when the incident mode is of order (0,1) and scatter is into the (0,0) mode. The propagation code CDUCT-LaRC is used to predict the effect of liner segmenting on liner performance. The computational results show energy scatter and the effect of liner segmentation that agrees with the experimental results. The experiments and computations both show that segmenting the liner treatment is effective to control the scatter of incident mode energy into other modes. CDUCT-LaRC is shown to be a valuable tool to predict trends of liner performance with liner configuration.

  5. Hard sphere-like glass transition in eye lens α-crystallin solutions

    PubMed Central

    Savin, Gabriela; Bucciarelli, Saskia; Dorsaz, Nicolas; Thurston, George M.; Stradner, Anna; Schurtenberger, Peter

    2014-01-01

    We study the equilibrium liquid structure and dynamics of dilute and concentrated bovine eye lens α-crystallin solutions, using small-angle X-ray scattering, static and dynamic light scattering, viscometry, molecular dynamics simulations, and mode-coupling theory. We find that a polydisperse Percus–Yevick hard-sphere liquid-structure model accurately reproduces both static light scattering data and small-angle X-ray scattering liquid structure data from α-crystallin solutions over an extended range of protein concentrations up to 290 mg/mL or 49% vol fraction and up to ca. 330 mg/mL for static light scattering. The measured dynamic light scattering and viscosity properties are also consistent with those of hard-sphere colloids and show power laws characteristic of an approach toward a glass transition at α-crystallin volume fractions near 58%. Dynamic light scattering at a volume fraction beyond the glass transition indicates formation of an arrested state. We further perform event-driven molecular dynamics simulations of polydisperse hard-sphere systems and use mode-coupling theory to compare the measured dynamic power laws with those of hard-sphere models. The static and dynamic data, simulations, and analysis show that aqueous eye lens α-crystallin solutions exhibit a glass transition at high concentrations that is similar to those found in hard-sphere colloidal systems. The α-crystallin glass transition could have implications for the molecular basis of presbyopia and the kinetics of molecular change during cataractogenesis. PMID:25385638

  6. Observation of hard processes in rapidity gap events in γp interactions at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, T.; Aid, S.; Andreev, V.; Andrieu, B.; Appuhn, R.-D.; Arpagaus, M.; Babaev, A.; Baehr, J.; Bán, J.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Barth, M.; Bassler, U.; Beck, H. P.; Behrend, H.-J.; Belousov, A.; Berger, Ch.; Bergstein, H.; Bernardi, G.; Bernet, R.; Bertrand-Coremans, G.; Besançon, M.; Beyer, R.; Biddulph, P.; Bizot, J. C.; Blobel, V.; Borras, K.; Botterweck, F.; Boudry, V.; Braemer, A.; Brasse, F.; Braunschweig, W.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Brune, C.; Buchholz, R.; Büngener, L.; Bürger, J.; Büsser, F. W.; Buniatian, A.; Burke, S.; Buschhorn, G.; Campbell, A. J.; Carli, T.; Charles, F.; Clarke, D.; Clegg, A. B.; Clerbaux, B.; Colombo, M.; Contreras, J. G.; Coughlan, J. A.; Courau, A.; Coutures, Ch.; Cozzika, G.; Criegee, L.; Cussans, D. G.; Cvach, J.; Dagoret, S.; Dainton, J. B.; Danilov, M.; Dau, W. D.; Daum, K.; David, M.; Deffur, E.; Delcourt, B.; Del Buono, L.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E. A.; Di Nezza, P.; Dollfus, C.; Dowell, J. D.; Dreis, H. B.; Droutskoi, V.; Duboc, J.; Düllmann, D.; Dünger, O.; Duhm, H.; Ebert, J.; Ebert, T. R.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Ehrlichmann, H.; Eichenberger, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ellison, R. J.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, M.; Erdmann, W.; Evrard, E.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Feeken, D.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Ferrarotto, F.; Flamm, K.; Fleischer, M.; Flieser, M.; Flügge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Fominykh, B.; Forbush, M.; Formánek, J.; Foster, J. M.; Franke, G.; Fretwurst, E.; Gabathuler, E.; Gabathuler, K.; Gamerdinger, K.; Garvey, J.; Gayler, J.; Gebauer, M.; Gellrich, A.; Genzel, H.; Gerhards, R.; Goerlach, U.; Goerlach, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Goldberg, M.; Goldner, D.; Gonzalez-Pineiro, B.; Goodall, A. M.; Gorelov, I.; Goritchev, P.; Grab, C.; Grässler, H.; Grässler, R.; Greenshaw, T.; Grindhammer, G.; Gruber, A.; Gruber, C.; Haack, J.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Hamon, O.; Hampel, M.; Hanlon, E. M.; Hapke, M.; Haynes, W. J.; Heatherington, J.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Henschel, H.; Herma, R.; Herynek, I.; Hess, M. F.; Hildesheim, W.; Hill, P.; Hiller, K. H.; Hilton, C. D.; Hladký, J.; Hoeger, K. C.; Höppner, M.; Horisberger, R.; Huet, Ph.; Hufnagel, H.; Ibbotson, M.; Itterbeck, H.; Jabiol, M.-A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jacobsson, C.; Jaffre, M.; Janoth, J.; Jansen, T.; Jönsson, L.; Johannsen, K.; Johnson, D. P.; Johnson, L.; Jung, H.; Kalmus, P. I. P.; Kant, D.; Kaschowitz, R.; Kasselmann, P.; Kathage, U.; Kaufmann, H. H.; Kazarian, S.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kermiche, S.; Keuker, C.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Knies, G.; Ko, W.; Köhler, T.; Kolanoski, H.; Kole, F.; Kolya, S. D.; Korbel, V.; Korn, M.; Kostka, P.; Kotelnikov, S. K.; Krämerkämper, T.; Krasny, M. W.; Krehbiel, H.; Krücker, D.; Krüger, U.; Krüner-Marquis, U.; Kubenka, J. P.; Küster, H.; Kuhlen, M.; Kurča, T.; Kurzhöfer, J.; Kuznik, B.; Lacour, D.; Lamarche, F.; Lander, R.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Lanius, P.; Laporte, J.-F.; Lebedev, A.; Leverenz, C.; Levonian, S.; Ley, Ch.; Lindner, A.; Lindström, G.; Linsel, F.; Lipinski, J.; List, B.; Loch, P.; Lohmander, H.; Lopez, G. C.; Lubimov, V.; Lüke, D.; Magnussen, N.; Malinovski, E.; Mani, S.; Maraček, R.; Marage, P.; Marks, J.; Marshall, R.; Martens, J.; Martin, R.; Martyn, H.-U.; Martyniak, J.; Masson, S.; Mavroidis, T.; Maxfield, S. J.; McMahon, S. J.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Mercer, D.; Merz, T.; Meyer, C. A.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Milstead, D.; Moreau, F.; Morris, J. V.; Müller, G.; Müller, K.; Murín, P.; Nagovizin, V.; Nahnhauer, R.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P. R.; Newton, D.; Neyret, D.; Nguyen, H. K.; Niebergall, F.; Niebuhr, C.; Nisius, R.; Nowak, G.; Noyes, G. W.; Nyberg-Werther, M.; Oberlack, H.; Obrock, U.; Olsson, J. E.; Panaro, E.; Panitch, A.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Peppel, E.; Perez, E.; Phillips, J. P.; Pichler, Ch.; Pitzl, D.; Pope, G.; Prell, S.; Prosi, R.; Rädel, G.; Raupach, F.; Reimer, P.; Reinshagen, S.; Ribarics, P.; Rick, H.; Riech, V.; Riedlberger, J.; Riess, S.; Rietz, M.; Robertson, S. M.; Robmann, P.; Roloff, H. E.; Roosen, R.; Rosenbauer, K.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rouse, F.; Royon, C.; Rüter, K.; Rusakov, S.; Rybicki, K.; Rylko, R.; Sahlmann, N.; Sanchez, E.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Savitsky, M.; Schacht, P.; Schiek, S.; Schleper, P.; von Schlippe, W.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, D.; Schmidt, G.; Schöning, A.; Schröder, V.; Schuhmann, E.; Schwab, B.; Schwind, A.; Seehausen, U.; Sefkow, F.; Seidel, M.; Sell, R.; Semenov, A.; Shekelyan, V.; Sheviakov, I.; Shooshtari, H.; Shtarkov, L. N.; Siegmon, G.; Siewert, U.; Sirois, Y.; Skillicorni, I. O.; Smirnov, P.; Smith, J. R.; Soloviev, Y.; Spitzer, H.; Starosta, R.; Steenbock, M.; Steffen, P.; Steinberg, R.; Stella, B.; Stephens, K.; Stier, J.; Stiewe, J.; Stösslein, U.; Strachota, J.; Straumann, U.; Struczinski, W.; Sutton, J. P.; Tapprogge, S.; Taylor, R. E.; Tchernyshov, V.; Thiebaux, C.; Thompson, G.; Truöl, P.; Turnau, J.; Tutas, J.; Uelkes, P.; Usik, A.; Valkár, S.; Valkárová, A.; Vallée, C.; Van Esch, P.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vartapetian, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Vecko, M.; Verrecchia, P.; Villet, G.; Wacker, K.; Wagener, A.; Wagener, M.; Walker, I. W.; Walther, A.; Weber, G.; Weber, M.; Wegener, D.; Wegner, A.; Wellisch, H. P.; West, L. R.; Willard, S.; Winde, M.; Winter, G.-G.; Wright, A. E.; Wünsch, E.; Wulff, N.; Yiou, T. P.; Žáček, J.; Zarbock, D.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zimmer, M.; Zimmermann, W.; Zomer, F.; Zuber, K.

    1995-02-01

    Events with no hadronic energy flow in a large interval of pseudo-rapidity in the proton direction are observed in photon-proton interactions at an average centre of mass energy <√s γp> of 200 GeV These events are interpreted as photon diffractive dissociation. Evidence for hard scattering in photon diffractive dissociation is demonstrated using inclusive single particle spectra, thrust as a function of transverse energy, and the observation of jet production. The data can be described by a Monte Carlo calculation including hard photon-pomeron scattering.

  7. Nanoindentation hardness of mineralized tissues.

    PubMed

    Oyen, Michelle L

    2006-01-01

    A series elastic and plastic deformation model [Sakai, M., 1999. The Meyer hardness: a measure for plasticity? Journal of Materials Research 14(9), 3630-3639] is used to deconvolute the resistance to plastic deformation from the plane strain modulus and contact hardness parameters obtained in a nanoindentation test. Different functional dependencies of contact hardness on the plane strain modulus are examined. Plastic deformation resistance values are computed from the modulus and contact hardness for engineering materials and mineralized tissues. Elastic modulus and plastic deformation resistance parameters are used to calculate elastic and plastic deformation components, and to examine the partitioning of indentation deformation between elastic and plastic. Both the numerical values of plastic deformation resistance and the direct computation of deformation partitioning reveal the intermediate mechanical responses of mineralized composites when compared with homogeneous engineering materials.

  8. Wave packet autocorrelation functions for quantum hard-disk and hard-sphere billiards in the high-energy, diffraction regime.

    PubMed

    Goussev, Arseni; Dorfman, J R

    2006-07-01

    We consider the time evolution of a wave packet representing a quantum particle moving in a geometrically open billiard that consists of a number of fixed hard-disk or hard-sphere scatterers. Using the technique of multiple collision expansions we provide a first-principle analytical calculation of the time-dependent autocorrelation function for the wave packet in the high-energy diffraction regime, in which the particle's de Broglie wavelength, while being small compared to the size of the scatterers, is large enough to prevent the formation of geometric shadow over distances of the order of the particle's free flight path. The hard-disk or hard-sphere scattering system must be sufficiently dilute in order for this high-energy diffraction regime to be achievable. Apart from the overall exponential decay, the autocorrelation function exhibits a generally complicated sequence of relatively strong peaks corresponding to partial revivals of the wave packet. Both the exponential decay (or escape) rate and the revival peak structure are predominantly determined by the underlying classical dynamics. A relation between the escape rate, and the Lyapunov exponents and Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy of the counterpart classical system, previously known for hard-disk billiards, is strengthened by generalization to three spatial dimensions. The results of the quantum mechanical calculation of the time-dependent autocorrelation function agree with predictions of the semiclassical periodic orbit theory.

  9. Improved Gaussian Beam-Scattering Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lock, James A.

    1995-01-01

    The localized model of the beam-shape coefficients for Gaussian beam-scattering theory by a spherical particle provides a great simplification in the numerical implementation of the theory. We derive an alternative form for the localized coefficients that is more convenient for computer computations and that provides physical insight into the details of the scattering process. We construct a FORTRAN program for Gaussian beam scattering with the localized model and compare its computer run time on a personal computer with that of a traditional Mie scattering program and with three other published methods for computing Gaussian beam scattering. We show that the analytical form of the beam-shape coefficients makes evident the fact that the excitation rate of morphology-dependent resonances is greatly enhanced for far off-axis incidence of the Gaussian beam.

  10. Rotational superradiant scattering in a vortex flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Theo; Patrick, Sam; Coutant, Antonin; Richartz, Maurício; Tedford, Edmund W.; Weinfurtner, Silke

    2017-09-01

    When an incident wave scatters off of an obstacle, it is partially reflected and partially transmitted. In theory, if the obstacle is rotating, waves can be amplified in the process, extracting energy from the scatterer. Here we describe in detail the first laboratory detection of this phenomenon, known as superradiance. We observed that waves propagating on the surface of water can be amplified after being scattered by a draining vortex. The maximum amplification measured was 14% +/- 8%, obtained for 3.70 Hz waves, in a 6.25-cm-deep fluid, consistent with the superradiant scattering caused by rapid rotation. We expect our experimental findings to be relevant to black-hole physics, since shallow water waves scattering on a draining fluid constitute an analogue of a black hole, as well as to hydrodynamics, due to the close relation to over-reflection instabilities.

  11. Measurements of Parity Violation in Electron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paschke, Kent

    2016-09-01

    The measurement of the violation of parity symmetry in electron scattering has proven to be a powerful technique for exploring nuclear matter and for the search for new fundamental forces. A successful history with the experimental technique has set the stage for a series of high precision measurements to be made over the next decade. Scattering from heavy, spinless targets will measure the neutron skin of heavy nuclei, providing a valuable calibration for the equation-of-state in neutron-rich nuclear systems. Searches for new neutral-current interactions will be performed in ultra-high precision measurements of scattering from protons and electrons at very low momentum transfer Q2 . In the DIS regime, scattering from deuterium will extend this search for new physics while also providing a unique window on nucleon partonic structure. The physics implications of recent results and development of the next generation of experiments will be reviewed.

  12. Neutron scattering: Technological achievements and illustrative results

    SciTech Connect

    Chiba, S. ); Takahashi, A. ); Klein, H. ); Smith, A. )

    1991-01-01

    Contemporary neutron scattering endeavors (energies {le} = 25 MeV), using monoenergetic sources and the time-of-flight technique, are reviewed. Facilities and techniques are described, with attention to the optimization of measurement systems. Discrete scattering results are illustrated in fundamental and applied contexts. Techniques for and results from continuum neutron emission studies are discussed, with the implications on physical models and on neutron applications in energy systems. 45 refs., 14 figs.

  13. Hierarchical optimization for neutron scattering problems

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, Feng; Archibald, Rick; Bansal, Dipanshu; Delaire, Olivier

    2016-06-15

    We present a scalable optimization method for neutron scattering problems that determines confidence regions of simulation parameters in lattice dynamics models used to fit neutron scattering data for crystalline solids. The method uses physics-based hierarchical dimension reduction in both the computational simulation domain and the parameter space. We demonstrate for silicon that after a few iterations the method converges to parameters values (interatomic force-constants) computed with density functional theory simulations.

  14. Hierarchical optimization for neutron scattering problems

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, Feng; Archibald, Rick; Bansal, Dipanshu; Delaire, Olivier

    2016-03-14

    In this study, we present a scalable optimization method for neutron scattering problems that determines confidence regions of simulation parameters in lattice dynamics models used to fit neutron scattering data for crystalline solids. The method uses physics-based hierarchical dimension reduction in both the computational simulation domain and the parameter space. We demonstrate for silicon that after a few iterations the method converges to parameters values (interatomic force-constants) computed with density functional theory simulations.

  15. Resonances in pi-K scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, David J.

    2014-06-23

    We have obtained clear signals of resonances in coupled-channel pi K - eta K scattering. Using distillation and a large basis of operators we are able to extract a precise spectrum of energy levels using the variational method. These energies are analysed using inelastic extensions of the Luescher method to obtain scattering amplitudes that clearly describe S, P and D wave resonances, corresponding to the physical K_0^*(1430), the K^*(892) and the K_2^*(1430).

  16. Hierarchical optimization for neutron scattering problems

    DOE PAGES

    Bao, Feng; Archibald, Rick; Bansal, Dipanshu; ...

    2016-03-14

    In this study, we present a scalable optimization method for neutron scattering problems that determines confidence regions of simulation parameters in lattice dynamics models used to fit neutron scattering data for crystalline solids. The method uses physics-based hierarchical dimension reduction in both the computational simulation domain and the parameter space. We demonstrate for silicon that after a few iterations the method converges to parameters values (interatomic force-constants) computed with density functional theory simulations.

  17. Recent progress in electron scattering at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, R.G.

    1984-09-01

    A new experiment on ep elastic scattering at large momentum transfer, Experiment E136, has recently completed data taking. A new measurement of deep inelastic electron scattering from nuclear targets, Experiment E139, has been completed and preliminary results are available. A new program of experiments has begun, called Nuclear Physics at SLAC (NPAS), that will use a new injector on the SLAC linac to provide high intensity beams in the energy range from 0.5 to 6 GeV.

  18. Scattering from binary optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricks, Douglas W.

    1993-01-01

    There are a number of sources of scattering in binary optics: etch depth errors, line edge errors, quantization errors, roughness, and the binary approximation to the ideal surface. These sources of scattering can be systematic (deterministic) or random. In this paper, scattering formulas for both systematic and random errors are derived using Fourier optics. These formulas can be used to explain the results of scattering measurements and computer simulations.

  19. Fundamental measure theory for hard-sphere mixtures: a review.

    PubMed

    Roth, Roland

    2010-02-17

    Hard-sphere systems are one of the fundamental model systems of statistical physics and represent an important reference system for molecular or colloidal systems with soft repulsive or attractive interactions in addition to hard-core repulsion at short distances. Density functional theory for classical systems, as one of the core theoretical approaches of statistical physics of fluids and solids, has to be able to treat such an important system successfully and accurately. Fundamental measure theory is up to date the most successful and most accurate density functional theory for hard-sphere mixtures. Since its introduction fundamental measure theory has been applied to many problems, tested against computer simulations, and further developed in many respects. The literature on fundamental measure theory is already large and is growing fast. This review aims to provide a starting point for readers new to fundamental measure theory and an overview of important developments.

  20. Peroxide interactions with hard tissues: effects on surface hardness and surface/subsurface ultrastructural properties.

    PubMed

    White, Donald J; Kozak, Kathy M; Zoladz, James R; Duschner, Heinz; Götz, Hermann

    2002-01-01

    Laboratory studies were performed to assess the impact of peroxide bleaching on enamel surface and subsurface physical and ultrastructural properties. Human enamel blocks were prepared, polished, and measured for native color. Cyclic bleaching treatments were carried out with soaks in whole stimulated saliva interspersed with bleaching treatments using bulk bleaching gels from commercial bleaching systems including Opalescence (20% and 10% carbamide peroxide systems) and Crest Whitestrips, a hydrogen peroxide gel formula, at doses of 5.3% and 6.5% hydrogen peroxide. Treatments ranged from conditions of normal use (14 hours as recommended for Crest Whitestrips) to excessive bleaching (70 hours). Controls included nontreated as well as treatments with placebo (not containing peroxide) gels. Surface hardness and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) techniques were used to characterize the effects of bleaching on the physical properties and ultrastructure of the teeth. Tooth color measurements revealed dose-response bleaching in vitro with the increases in L* and decreases in b* normally expected with effective bleaching. Placebo control treatments did not bleach. Surface hardness measurements showed no decreases associated with tooth bleaching. CLSM measurements also showed no effects from tooth bleaches on the surface or subsurface prism architecture of enamel. This was opposed to significant changes seen with even moderate levels of demineralization associated with the caries process. These studies support: (1) the safety of Crest Whitestrips formulas for enamel surfaces and tooth subsurfaces; and (2) the generic safety of peroxide bleaching of hard tissues associated with conditions of both recommended use and overuse.

  1. Graviton and Gluon Scattering from First Principles.

    PubMed

    Boels, Rutger H; Medina, Ricardo

    2017-02-10

    Graviton and gluon scattering are studied from minimal physical assumptions such as Poincare and gauge symmetry as well as unitarity. The assumptions lead to an interesting and surprisingly restrictive set of linear equations. This shows gluon and graviton scattering to be related in many field and string theories, explaining and extending several known results. By systematic analysis exceptional graviton scattering amplitudes are derived, which in general dimensions cannot be related to gluon amplitudes. The simplicity of the formalism guarantees wide further applicability to gauge and gravity theories.

  2. Setup for FIR scattering on plasma crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Raensch, Jens; Aschinger, Andreas; Winter, Joerg

    2008-09-07

    We propose a new method for the investigation of plasma crystals. It is equivalent to the X-ray scattering methods of solid state physics but using far infrared (FIR) laser beams with wavelengths comparable to the Debye length of the system. This method could provide information about structure and dynamics of large 3D plasma crystals. Such crystals with up to 1 million particles have been realised in CCP discharges using micron sized Melamin-Formaledhyd (MF) particles. We present the setup of the FIR laser system, scattering arrangement, and plasma chamber. Results are discussed including video analysis of plasma crystals and FIR scattering on test samples.

  3. Blue Skies, Coffee Creamer, and Rayleigh Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebl, Michael

    2010-05-01

    The first physical explanation of Earths blue sky was fashioned in 1871 by Lord Rayleigh. Many discussions of Rayleigh scattering and approaches to studying it both in and out of the classroom are available.2-5 Rayleigh scattering accounts for the blue color of the sky and the orange/red color of the Sun near sunset and sunrise, and a number of classroom demonstrations have been described for showing the effects.6-11 This paper describes how these demonstrations can be enhanced by using a spectrometer to measure the preferential scattering of the shorter wavelength light.

  4. Quantum scattering on a cone revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barroso, V. S.; Pitelli, J. P. M.

    2017-07-01

    We revisit the scattering of quantum test particles on the conical (2 +1 )-dimensional spacetime and find the scattering amplitude as a function of the boundary conditions imposed at the apex of the cone. We show that the boundary condition is responsible for a purely analytical term in the scattering amplitude, in addition to those coming from purely topological effects. Since it is possible to have nonequivalent physical evolutions for the wave packet (each one corresponding to a different boundary condition), it seems crucial to have an observable quantity specifying which evolution has been prescribed.

  5. Reprint of : Scattering approach to scanning gate microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalabert, Rodolfo A.; Weinmann, Dietmar

    2016-08-01

    We present a perturbative approach to the conductance change caused by a weakly invasive scattering potential in a two-dimensional electron gas. The resulting expressions are used to investigate the relationship between the conductance change measured in scanning gate microscopy as a function of the position of a scattering tip and local electronic quantities like the current density. We use a semiclassical approach to treat the case of a strong hard-wall scatterer in a half-plane facing a reflectionless channel. The resulting conductance change is consistent with the numerically calculated quantum conductance.

  6. How plants manipulate the scatter-hoarding behaviour of seed-dispersing animals

    PubMed Central

    Vander Wall, Stephen B.

    2010-01-01

    Some plants that are dispersed by scatter-hoarding animals appear to have evolved the ability to manipulate the behaviour of those animals to increase the likelihood that seeds and nuts will be stored and that a portion of those items will not be recovered. Plants have achieved this in at least four ways. First, by producing large, nutritious seeds and nuts that are attractive to animals and that stimulate hoarding behaviour. Second, by imposing handling costs that cause animals to hoard rather than to eat items immediately. These handling costs can take one of two forms: physical barriers (e.g. hard seed coats) that take time to remove and secondary chemicals (e.g. tannins) that impose metabolic costs. Third, by masting, where a population of plants synchronizes reproductive effort, producing large nut crops at intervals of several years. Mast crops not only satiate seed predators, but also increase the amount of seed dispersal because scatter-hoarding animals are not easily satiated during caching (causing animals to store more food than they can consume) but are satiated during cache recovery. And fourth, by producing seeds that do not emit strong odours so that buried seeds are less likely to be discovered. These, and perhaps other, traits have increased the relative success of plant species with seeds dispersed by scatter-hoarding animals. PMID:20156821

  7. Hard ellipses: Equation of state, structure, and self-diffusion.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wen-Sheng; Li, Yan-Wei; Sun, Zhao-Yan; An, Li-Jia

    2013-07-14

    Despite their fundamental and practical interest, the physical properties of hard ellipses remain largely unknown. In this paper, we present an event-driven molecular dynamics study for hard ellipses and assess the effects of aspect ratio and area fraction on their physical properties. For state points in the plane of aspect ratio (1 ≤ k ≤ 9) and area fraction (0.01 ≤ φ ≤ 0.8), we identify three different phases, including isotropic, plastic, and nematic states. We analyze in detail the thermodynamic, structural, and self-diffusive properties in the formed various phases of hard ellipses. The equation of state (EOS) is shown for a wide range of aspect ratios and is compared with the scaled particle theory (SPT) for the isotropic states. We find that SPT provides a good description of the EOS for the isotropic phase of hard ellipses. At large fixed φ, the reduced pressure p increases with k in both the isotropic and the plastic phases and, interestingly, its dependence on k is rather weak in the nematic phase. We rationalize the thermodynamics of hard ellipses in terms of particle motions. The static structures of hard ellipses are then investigated both positionally and orientationally in the different phases. The plastic crystal is shown to form for aspect ratios up to k = 1.4, while appearance of the stable nematic phase starts approximately at k = 3. We quantitatively determine the locations of the isotropic-plastic (I-P) transition and the isotropic-nematic (I-N) transition by analyzing the bond-orientation correlations and the angular correlations, respectively. As expected, the I-P transition point is found to increase with k, while a larger k leads to a smaller area fraction where the I-N transition takes place. Moreover, our simulations strongly support that the two-dimensional nematic phase in hard ellipses has only quasi-long-range orientational order. The self-diffusion of hard ellipses is further explored and connections are revealed between

  8. Atomic and Molecular Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, Anand K.

    2005-01-01

    A symposium on atomic and molecular physics was held on November 18, 2005 at Goddard Space Flight Center. There were a number of talks through the day on various topics such as threshold law of ionization, scattering of electrons from atoms and molecules, muonic physics, positron physics, Rydberg states etc. The conference was attended by a number of physicists from all over the world.

  9. Topics in Collider Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Petriello, Frank J

    2003-08-27

    the Drell-Yan process, an important discovery channel for new physics at hadron colliders. We introduce a powerful new method for calculating differential distributions in hard scattering processes. We apply our results to the analysis of fixed target experiments, which provide important constraints on the parton distribution functions of the proton.

  10. Multipole scattering amplitudes in the color glass condensate formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yu; Zhang, Cheng; Wang, Enke

    2017-06-01

    We evaluate the octupole in the large-Nc limit in the McLerran-Venugopalan model and derive a general expression of the 2n-point correlator, which can be applied in analytical studies of the multiparticle production in the scatterings between hard probes and dense targets.

  11. Leading twist nuclear shadowing phenomena in hard processes with nuclei

    DOE PAGES

    L. Franfurt; Guzey, V.; Strikman, M.

    2012-01-08

    We present and discuss the theory and phenomenology of the leading twist theory of nuclear shadowing which is based on the combination of the generalization of Gribov-Glauber theory, QCD factorization theorems, and HERA QCD analysis of diffraction in lepton-proton deep inelastic scattering (DIS). We apply this technique for the analysis of a wide range of hard processes with nuclei-inclusive DIS on deuterons, medium-range and heavy nuclei, coherent and incoherent diffractive DIS with nuclei, and hard diffraction in proton-nucleus scattering - and make predictions for the effect of nuclear shadowing in the corresponding sea quark and gluon parton distributions. We alsomore » analyze the role of the leading twist nuclear shadowing in generalized parton distributions in nuclei and certain characteristics of final states in nuclear DIS. We discuss the limits of applicability of the leading twist approximation for small x scattering off nuclei and the onset of the black disk regime and methods of detecting it. It will be possible to check many of our predictions in the near future in the studies of the ultraperipheral collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Further checks will be possible in pA collisions at the LHC and forward hadron production at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). As a result, detailed tests will be possible at an Electon-Ion Collider (EIC) in USA and at the Large Hadron-Electron Collider (LHeC) at CERN.« less

  12. Leading twist nuclear shadowing phenomena in hard processes with nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    L. Franfurt; Guzey, V.; Strikman, M.

    2012-01-08

    We present and discuss the theory and phenomenology of the leading twist theory of nuclear shadowing which is based on the combination of the generalization of Gribov-Glauber theory, QCD factorization theorems, and HERA QCD analysis of diffraction in lepton-proton deep inelastic scattering (DIS). We apply this technique for the analysis of a wide range of hard processes with nuclei-inclusive DIS on deuterons, medium-range and heavy nuclei, coherent and incoherent diffractive DIS with nuclei, and hard diffraction in proton-nucleus scattering - and make predictions for the effect of nuclear shadowing in the corresponding sea quark and gluon parton distributions. We also analyze the role of the leading twist nuclear shadowing in generalized parton distributions in nuclei and certain characteristics of final states in nuclear DIS. We discuss the limits of applicability of the leading twist approximation for small x scattering off nuclei and the onset of the black disk regime and methods of detecting it. It will be possible to check many of our predictions in the near future in the studies of the ultraperipheral collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Further checks will be possible in pA collisions at the LHC and forward hadron production at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). As a result, detailed tests will be possible at an Electon-Ion Collider (EIC) in USA and at the Large Hadron-Electron Collider (LHeC) at CERN.

  13. Multiple scattering technique lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bissonnette, Luc R.

    1992-01-01

    The Bernouilli-Ricatti equation is based on the single scattering description of the lidar backscatter return. In practice, especially in low visibility conditions, the effects of multiple scattering can be significant. Instead of considering these multiple scattering effects as a nuisance, we propose here to use them to help resolve the problems of having to assume a backscatter-to-extinction relation and specifying a boundary value for a position far remote from the lidar station. To this end, we have built a four-field-of-view lidar receiver to measure the multiple scattering contributions. The system has been described in a number of publications that also discuss preliminary results illustrating the multiple scattering effects for various environmental conditions. Reported here are recent advances made in the development of a method of inverting the multiple scattering data for the determination of the aerosol scattering coefficient.

  14. Scattering anisotropy and giant magnetoresistance in magnetic multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Binder, J.; Zahn, P.; Mertig, I.

    2001-06-01

    We present full ab initio calculations of giant magnetoresistance (GMR) in Co/Cu (001) multilayers including self-consistent impurity scattering potentials. Starting from density functional theory the electronic structure of the multilayer and the scattering at impurities are described by means of a new Green function method. It will be demonstrated that impurity scattering in magnetic multilayers is strongly anisotropic in comparison to impurity scattering in bulk systems. Concerning transport the anisotropy of scattering leads to a formation of highly conducting channels which give rise to short circuits and cause strong variation of GMR as a function of the impurity position in the multilayer. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  15. Scattering Models and Basic Experiments in the Microwave Regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, A. K.; Blanchard, A. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1985-01-01

    The objectives of research over the next three years are: (1) to develop a randomly rough surface scattering model which is applicable over the entire frequency band; (2) to develop a computer simulation method and algorithm to simulate scattering from known randomly rough surfaces, Z(x,y); (3) to design and perform laboratory experiments to study geometric and physical target parameters of an inhomogeneous layer; (4) to develop scattering models for an inhomogeneous layer which accounts for near field interaction and multiple scattering in both the coherent and the incoherent scattering components; and (5) a comparison between theoretical models and measurements or numerical simulation.

  16. Resonant soft X-ray scattering for polymer materials

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Feng; Brady, Michael A.; Wang, Cheng

    2016-04-16

    Resonant Soft X-ray Scattering (RSoXS) was developed within the last few years, and the first dedicated resonant soft X-ray scattering beamline for soft materials was constructed at the Advanced Light Source, LBNL. RSoXS combines soft X-ray spectroscopy with X-ray scattering and thus offers statistical information for 3D chemical morphology over a large length scale range from nanometers to micrometers. Using RSoXS to characterize multi-length scale soft materials with heterogeneous chemical structures, we have demonstrated that soft X-ray scattering is a unique complementary technique to conventional hard X-ray and neutron scattering. Its unique chemical sensitivity, large accessible size scale, molecular bondmore » orientation sensitivity with polarized X-rays, and high coherence have shown great potential for chemically specific structural characterization for many classes of materials.« less

  17. Resonant soft X-ray scattering for polymer materials

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Feng; Brady, Michael A.; Wang, Cheng

    2016-04-16

    Resonant Soft X-ray Scattering (RSoXS) was developed within the last few years, and the first dedicated resonant soft X-ray scattering beamline for soft materials was constructed at the Advanced Light Source, LBNL. RSoXS combines soft X-ray spectroscopy with X-ray scattering and thus offers statistical information for 3D chemical morphology over a large length scale range from nanometers to micrometers. Using RSoXS to characterize multi-length scale soft materials with heterogeneous chemical structures, we have demonstrated that soft X-ray scattering is a unique complementary technique to conventional hard X-ray and neutron scattering. Its unique chemical sensitivity, large accessible size scale, molecular bond orientation sensitivity with polarized X-rays, and high coherence have shown great potential for chemically specific structural characterization for many classes of materials.

  18. TOPOGRAPHIC SITE RESPONSE AT HARD ROCK SITES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, A. K.; Hough, S. E.

    2009-12-01

    Site (material impedance) and topographic (geometric form) effects are known to be key factors that influence seismic ground motions. To characterize site effects, Yong et al. (2009) developed a terrain-based Vs30 prediction model using an automated classification method (Iwahashi and Pike, 2007) that relied on taxonomic criteria (slope gradient, local convexity and surface texture) developed from geomorphometry to identify 16 terrain types from a 1-km spatial resolution (SRTM30 data) digital elevation model of California. On the basis that the underlying framework for this model contains parameters (esp., local convexity) which aptly describe the geometry (i.e., base to height ratio) of relief features that are known to also control the behavior of ground motions (Bouchon, 1973), we extend our investigation to study topographic effects. Focusing on sites that would generally be considered “hard rock,” the classification scheme distinguishes 7 separate terrain types ranging from “moderately eroded mountains” to “well dissected alpine summits.” Observed 1-Hz amplification factors at Southern California Seismographic Network sites reveal a weak but systematic correlation with these 7 terrain types. Significant scatter is also found within each terrain type; typical standard deviations of logarithmic amplification factors are 0.2-0.3. Considering stations that have high amplification factors, we find some that have apparently been misclassified due to data resolution limitations. Many of the remaining stations with higher than expected amplifications are located on or near topographic peaks or ridges. The unusually high amplification factors at hard-rock sites, typically factors of 1.5-2, can most plausibly be explained as a topographic effect.

  19. Brillouin scattering self-cancellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florez, O.; Jarschel, P. F.; Espinel, Y. A. V.; Cordeiro, C. M. B.; Mayer Alegre, T. P.; Wiederhecker, G. S.; Dainese, P.

    2016-06-01

    The interaction between light and acoustic phonons is strongly modified in sub-wavelength confinement, and has led to the demonstration and control of Brillouin scattering in photonic structures such as nano-scale optical waveguides and cavities. Besides the small optical mode volume, two physical mechanisms come into play simultaneously: a volume effect caused by the strain-induced refractive index perturbation (known as photo-elasticity), and a surface effect caused by the shift of the optical boundaries due to mechanical vibrations. As a result, proper material and structure engineering allows one to control each contribution individually. Here, we experimentally demonstrate the perfect cancellation of Brillouin scattering arising from Rayleigh acoustic waves by engineering a silica nanowire with exactly opposing photo-elastic and moving-boundary effects. This demonstration provides clear experimental evidence that the interplay between the two mechanisms is a promising tool to precisely control the photon-phonon interaction, enhancing or suppressing it.

  20. Brillouin scattering self-cancellation

    PubMed Central

    Florez, O.; Jarschel, P. F.; Espinel, Y. A. V.; Cordeiro, C. M. B.; Mayer Alegre, T. P.; Wiederhecker, G. S.; Dainese, P.

    2016-01-01

    The interaction between light and acoustic phonons is strongly modified in sub-wavelength confinement, and has led to the demonstration and control of Brillouin scattering in photonic structures such as nano-scale optical waveguides and cavities. Besides the small optical mode volume, two physical mechanisms come into play simultaneously: a volume effect caused by the strain-induced refractive index perturbation (known as photo-elasticity), and a surface effect caused by the shift of the optical boundaries due to mechanical vibrations. As a result, proper material and structure engineering allows one to control each contribution individually. Here, we experimentally demonstrate the perfect cancellation of Brillouin scattering arising from Rayleigh acoustic waves by engineering a silica nanowire with exactly opposing photo-elastic and moving-boundary effects. This demonstration provides clear experimental evidence that the interplay between the two mechanisms is a promising tool to precisely control the photon–phonon interaction, enhancing or suppressing it. PMID:27283092

  1. Design and Simulation of a Polarized Pure Photon Source for Compton Scattering from Solid Polarized Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, Donal; Keller, Dustin; Zhang, Jixie

    2016-09-01

    Wide angle compton scattering from polarized protons holds great promise: access to the generalized parton distribution functions H and E with different weighting and moments than in other hard exclusive processes, emphasizing the u-quarks and the valence region. Previously, experiments were proposed using bremsstrahlung from polarized electrons striking a radiator. Unfortunately the mixed electron- γ beam limits the polarized target performance due to radiation damage and restricted luminosity owing to the heat load. We have designed a pure photon beam line by placing a dipole magnet after the radiator which deflects the electrons away from the target and into a beam dump. This approach has many benefits which include an order of magnitude increase in the photon luminosity and unrestricted use of transversely polarized targets while preserving robust target performance. We will discuss the physics motivation, the design (of two different options) as well as the G4beamline simulation results of the source.

  2. Hard Work and Hard Data: Getting Our Message Out.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glau, Gregory R.

    Unless questions about student performance and student retention can be answered and unless educators are proactive in finding and publicizing such information, basic writing programs cannot determine if what they are doing is working. Hard data, especially from underrepresented groups, is needed to support these programs. At Arizona State…

  3. Future hard disk drive systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Roger

    2009-03-01

    This paper briefly reviews the evolution of today's hard disk drive with the additional intention of orienting the reader to the overall mechanical and electrical architecture. The modern hard disk drive is a miracle of storage capacity and function together with remarkable economy of design. This paper presents a personal view of future customer requirements and the anticipated design evolution of the components. There are critical decisions and great challenges ahead for the key technologies of heads, media, head-disk interface, mechanics, and electronics.

  4. Guidelines for the Adaptation of Preschool Environments to Integrate Deaf, Hard of Hearing, and Hearing Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bednarczyk, Angela M.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Focuses on expanding childhood programs to accommodate deaf, hard-of-hearing, and hearing children: in-service training; the addition of staff who can communicate with the deaf and hard-of-hearing children; and with physical changes. Modifications to aspects of the environment are discussed. (LZ)

  5. Interference by rain scatter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crane, Robert K.

    1988-01-01

    The data from Japan and the U.S. (the Virginia Precipitation Scatter Experiment) show excellent agreement between the two-component rain scatter model predictions and bistatic scatter measurements. In employing the model, all the scattering geometries should be classified as backscattering as defined by Crane (1974). The forward scatter model should only be used for great circle paths with both antennas pointed at the horizon and at each other in a typical troposcatter communication system geometry. The forward scatter model can also be used for main-lobe, side-lobe coupling when one antenna is pointed toward the other along the great circle path. The forward scatter observations made over the Prospect Hill - Mt Tug path show that the two-component model is incomplete. Much stronger signals were observed at Ku-band than expected based on simultaneous C-band measurements. The discrepancies may be due to: (1) scattering by ice/snow at height (posssible in April) at the 1 km height of the scattering volume), (2) the coherent effects of turbulent fluctuations in the hydrometeor number densities and (3) errors in the modeling of the statistical relationship between attenuation along the path and scattering in the common volume.

  6. Interference by rain scatter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, Robert K.

    1988-08-01

    The data from Japan and the U.S. (the Virginia Precipitation Scatter Experiment) show excellent agreement between the two-component rain scatter model predictions and bistatic scatter measurements. In employing the model, all the scattering geometries should be classified as backscattering as defined by Crane (1974). The forward scatter model should only be used for great circle paths with both antennas pointed at the horizon and at each other in a typical troposcatter communication system geometry. The forward scatter model can also be used for main-lobe, side-lobe coupling when one antenna is pointed toward the other along the great circle path. The forward scatter observations made over the Prospect Hill - Mt Tug path show that the two-component model is incomplete. Much stronger signals were observed at Ku-band than expected based on simultaneous C-band measurements. The discrepancies may be due to: (1) scattering by ice/snow at height (posssible in April) at the 1 km height of the scattering volume), (2) the coherent effects of turbulent fluctuations in the hydrometeor number densities and (3) errors in the modeling of the statistical relationship between attenuation along the path and scattering in the common volume.

  7. Toward a new polyethylene scattering law determined using inelastic neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavelle, C. M.; Liu, C.-Y.; Stone, M. B.

    2013-05-01

    Monte Carlo neutron transport codes such as MCNP rely on accurate data for nuclear physics cross-sections to produce accurate results. At low energy, this takes the form of scattering laws based on the dynamic structure factor, S(Q,E). High density polyethylene (HDPE) is frequently employed as a neutron moderator at both high and low temperatures, however the only cross-sections available are for ambient temperatures (˜300 K), and the evaluation has not been updated in quite some time. In this paper we describe inelastic neutron scattering measurements on HDPE at 5 and 294 K which are used to improve the scattering law for HDPE. We review some of the past HDPE scattering laws, describe the experimental methods, and compare computations using these models to the measured S(Q,E). The total cross-section is compared to available data, and the treatment of the carbon secondary scatterer as a free gas is assessed. We also discuss the use of the measurement itself as a scattering law via the one phonon approximation. We show that a scattering law computed using a more detailed model for the Generalized Density of States (GDOS) compares more favorably to this experiment, suggesting that inelastic neutron scattering can play an important role in both the development and validation of new scattering laws for Monte Carlo work.

  8. Improving Population-Level Maternal Health: A Hard Nut to Crack? Long Term Findings and Reflections on a 16-Community Randomised Trial in Australia to Improve Maternal Emotional and Physical Health after Birth [ISRCTN03464021

    PubMed Central

    Small, Rhonda; Watson, Lyndsey; Gunn, Jane; Mitchell, Creina; Brown, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    Background Community level interventions to improve maternal and child health have been supported and well evaluated in resource poor settings, but less so in developed countries. PRISM - Program of Resources, Information and Support for Mothers - was a primary care and community-based cluster-randomised trial in sixteen municipalities in Victoria, Australia, which aimed to reduce depression in mothers and improve their physical health. The aim of this paper is to report the longer term outcomes of PRISM and to reflect on lessons learned from this universal community intervention to improve maternal health. Methods Maternal health outcome data in PRISM were collected by postal questionnaire at six months and two years. At two years, the main outcome measures included the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) and the SF-36. Secondary outcome measures included the Experience of Motherhood Scale (EOM) and the Parenting Stress Index (PSI). A primary intention to treat analysis was conducted, adjusting for the randomisation by cluster. Results 7,169/18,424 (39%) women responded to the postal questionnaire at two years −3,894 (40%) in the intervention arm and 3,275 (38%) in the comparison arm. Respondents were mostly representative on available population data comparisons. There were no differences in depression prevalence (EPDS≥13) between the intervention and comparison arms (13.4% vs 13.1%; ORadj = 1.06, 95%CI 0.91–1.24). Nor did women's mental health (MCS: 48.6 vs 49.1) or physical health scores (PCS: 49.1 vs 49.0) on the SF-36 differ between the trial arms. Conclusion Improvement in maternal mental and physical health outcomes at the population level in the early years after childbirth remains a largely unmet challenge. Despite the lack of effectiveness of PRISM intervention strategies, important lessons about systems change, sustained investment and contextual understanding of the workability of intervention strategies can be drawn from the

  9. Dynamic indentation hardness of materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koeppel, Brian James

    Indentation hardness is one of the simplest and most commonly used measures for quickly characterizing material response under static loads. Hardness may mean resistance to cutting to a machinist, resistance to wear to a tribologist, or a measure of flow stress to a design engineer. In this simple technique, a predetermined force is applied to an indenter for 5-30 seconds causing it to penetrate a specimen. By measuring the load and the indentation size, a hardness value is determined. However, the rate of deformation during indenter penetration is of the order of 10sp{-4}\\ ssp{-1}. In most practical applications, such as high speed machining or impact, material deforms at strain rates in excess of 10sp3{-}10sp5\\ ssp{-1}. At such high rates, it is well established that the plastic behavior of materials is considerably different from their static counterpart. For example, materials exhibit an increase in their yield stress, flow stress, fracture stress, and fracture toughness at high strain rates. Hence, the use of static hardness as an indicator of material response under dynamic loads may not be appropriate. Accordingly, a simple dynamic indentation hardness tester is developed for characterizing materials at strain rates similar to those encountered in realistic situations. The experimental technique uses elastic stress wave propagation phenomena in a slender rod. The technique is designed to deliver a single indentation load of 100-200 mus duration. Similar to static measurements, the dynamic hardness is determined from the measured load and indentation size. Hardness measurements on a range of metals have revealed that the dynamic hardness is consistently greater than the static hardness. The increase in hardness is strongly dependent on the crystal structure of the material. The observed trends in hardness are also found to be consistent with the yield and flow stresses of these materials under uniaxial compression. Therefore, it is suggested that the

  10. Hard breakup of the deuteron into two {Delta} isobars

    SciTech Connect

    Granados, Carlos G.; Sargsian, Misak M.

    2011-05-15

    We study high-energy photodisintegration of the deuteron into two {Delta} isobars at large center of mass angles within the QCD hard rescattering model (HRM). According to the HRM, the process develops in three main steps: the photon knocks a quark from one of the nucleons in the deuteron; the struck quark rescatters off a quark from the other nucleon sharing the high energy of the photon; then the energetic quarks recombine into two outgoing baryons which have large transverse momenta. Within the HRM, the cross section is expressed through the amplitude of pn{yields}{Delta}{Delta} scattering which we evaluated based on the quark-interchange model of hard hadronic scattering. Calculations show that the angular distribution and the strength of the photodisintegration is mainly determined by the properties of the pn{yields}{Delta}{Delta} scattering. We predict that the cross section of the deuteron breakup to {Delta}{sup ++}{Delta}{sup -} is 4-5 times larger than that of the breakup to the {Delta}{sup +}{Delta}{sup 0} channel. Also, the angular distributions for these two channels are markedly different. These can be compared with the predictions based on the assumption that two hard {Delta} isobars are the result of the disintegration of the preexisting {Delta}{Delta} components of the deuteron wave function. In this case, one expects the angular distributions and cross sections of the breakup in both {Delta}{sup ++}{Delta}{sup -} and {Delta}{sup +}{Delta}{sup 0} channels to be similar.

  11. Exact sampling hardness of Ising spin models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fefferman, B.; Foss-Feig, M.; Gorshkov, A. V.

    2017-09-01

    We study the complexity of classically sampling from the output distribution of an Ising spin model, which can be implemented naturally in a variety of atomic, molecular, and optical systems. In particular, we construct a specific example of an Ising Hamiltonian that, after time evolution starting from a trivial initial state, produces a particular output configuration with probability very nearly proportional to the square of the permanent of a matrix with arbitrary integer entries. In a similar spirit to boson sampling, the ability to sample classically from the probability distribution induced by time evolution under this Hamiltonian would imply unlikely complexity theoretic consequences, suggesting that the dynamics of such a spin model cannot be efficiently simulated with a classical computer. Physical Ising spin systems capable of achieving problem-size instances (i.e., qubit numbers) large enough so that classical sampling of the output distribution is classically difficult in practice may be achievable in the near future. Unlike boson sampling, our current results only imply hardness of exact classical sampling, leaving open the important question of whether a much stronger approximate-sampling hardness result holds in this context. The latter is most likely necessary to enable a convincing experimental demonstration of quantum supremacy. As referenced in a recent paper [A. Bouland, L. Mancinska, and X. Zhang, in Proceedings of the 31st Conference on Computational Complexity (CCC 2016), Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics (Schloss Dagstuhl-Leibniz-Zentrum für Informatik, Dagstuhl, 2016)], our result completes the sampling hardness classification of two-qubit commuting Hamiltonians.

  12. New developments in classical chaotic scattering.

    PubMed

    Seoane, Jesús M; Sanjuán, Miguel A F

    2013-01-01

    Classical chaotic scattering is a topic of fundamental interest in nonlinear physics due to the numerous existing applications in fields such as celestial mechanics, atomic and nuclear physics and fluid mechanics, among others. Many new advances in chaotic scattering have been achieved in the last few decades. This work provides a current overview of the field, where our attention has been mainly focused on the most important contributions related to the theoretical framework of chaotic scattering, the fractal dimension, the basins boundaries and new applications, among others. Numerical techniques and algorithms, as well as an